Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th July 1804.
Reference Number: 18040704
Reference Number: f18040704-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 4th of JULY, 1804, and following Days,

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1804.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir SOULDEN LAWRENCE , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; the Right Honourable THOMAS HARLEY , PAUL LE MESURIER , Esq. Sir JOHN WILLIAM ANDERSON , Bart. Sir JOHN EAMER , Knt. Alderman of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; GEORGE CLARK , Esq. RICHARD LEA , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Robert Meller ,

Joseph Fawcett ,

John Thistlewood ,

Thomas Brassnall ,

John Martin ,

John Jordaine ,

James Barryman ,

Joseph Betterton ,

John Lockwood ,

John Viner ,

James Field ,

Joseph Reynolds.

First Middlesex Jury.

John Jones ,

Ephraim Lee ,

Daniel Hayward ,

William Bigley ,

John Rowley ,

Peter Barlow ,

Joseph Williams ,

Thomas Griffin ,

John Merrington ,

William Acott ,

James Burdon ,

James Peirce .

Second Middlesex Jury.

George Young ,

John Wheeler ,

James Clarke ,

James Powell ,

Charles Cracklow ,

Robert Lloyd ,

John Barker ,

William Swan ,

John Style ,

Nathaniel Weeks ,

Richard Hale ,

James Holbrooke .

Reference Number: t18040704-1

364. ANN BOLTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , two muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. ten candles, value 6 d. and one pound weight of soap, value 6 d. the property of Richard Jones .

RICHARD JONES sworn - I live at Newington-green, in the county of Middlesex .

Q. What was the prisoner? - A. A servant of mine, of all work ; she had lived with me about five or six weeks; I had missed some things, and I suspected she had taken them, and when her boxes went away, I had them searched, and found two muslin neck handkerchiefs, and my name marked upon them, and some soap and candles; this was on the 7th of June.

Q. Had you given her warning, or she you? - A. She gave me warning.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer: On the 7th of June I had a warrant to execute on this gentleman; the prisoner at the bar took out a warrant for an assault on her person; I went to Newington-green, and I informed the gentleman I had a warrant against him; he then asked where the servant was; I told Mr. Jones I believed she was somewhere about the Green, I would go and see for her; I found her, and brought her to Mr. Jones's house; Mr. Jones insisted upon her taking her boxes away, and begged of me to assist her in getting her boxes out of the room, which I did; I moved her boxes out of her room into the study; Mr. Jones then said, he would wish to look into the box before it was taken out of the house.

Q. Was the box locked? - A. It was, and the prisoner had the key; we got the key from the prisoner, and unlocked the box, and there were two handkerchiefs, and a quantity of soap and candles; the prisoner seemed very much alarmed, and said somebody must have put them in when she left the house; as I was bringing the box down stairs, she seemed very desirous that her master might look into her box to see that every thing was right.

Q. What kind of a lock was it on this box? - A. It was one of the crooked wards, not a common lock, and it was a crooked key.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Have you any other servant in the house? - A. No.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. No.

Prisoner. I unlocked the box up stairs before it was brought down; I had been ironing, I put some of my things into my box.

Ray. You did look up some things that were about the room, but did not unlock the box.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Were the handkerchiefs marked? - A. They are marked in full length R. Jones, with ink, and there were some soap and candles in the middle of her box; they were exactly like what was in the house; I cannot swear to the candles and soap, the handkerchief had been rough-dried, and put by a month before in the wardrobe; I put them away myself, they are winter handkerchiefs; I put the key in the drawer underneath, and she must have got the key; I have exerted myself in enquiring her character, and never could find any thing to hurt her character.

Prisoner's defence. I quitted Mr. Jones's service by his ill-usage of throwing water over me, and he marked me in my arm with the pail; I left my things some ironed, and some not ironed; they were bundled up in a heap, and my box was not locked, I put some of my things in, in a hurry; I do not know that I have all my things, my double handkerchief I left on the chair, I folded it up, and put it in my box; I know nothing of the things coming into my box, without I put them in by mistake.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined one week in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-2

365. MARY ANKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , eleven Banknotes, value 11 l. the property of Thomas Collins , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS COLLINS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a timber dealer ; I live in Old-street-road , the prisoner was my servant , she had lived with me near three years.

Q. What do you accuse her of? - A. Of stealing eleven Bank-notes. On Thursday, the 17th of May, a little before one o'clock, as myself and family were sitting down to dinner, the prisoner came instantly down stairs, and entered the room where we were, and said there was a man in our chamber up stairs; I immediately got up, and secured the front and back door; I went up stairs, and when I entered the room, there was a sheet taken off the bed, and spread on the floor, upon which was all my wearing apparel taken out of the wardrobe, which were seven coats and seven waistcoats, and four pair of breeches, and a suit of clothes; besides on the table, which stood just against where the clothes were laid on the sheet, was laying my pocket-book, with a number of Bank-notes upon it, which were taken out of the book; I took the notes and book, and put them in my pocket; I

immediately sought the house all over to see if I could discover any person; I could not discover any person in the house but our own family; I concluded that if there was any person, as I then thought there had been, they might have slipped down stairs after the girl; I blamed the girl for not holding the door, and calling me; she said, she saw the person in the room in a light-coloured coat.

Q. Were it possible that any person might have followed the girl, and have gone out? - A. It was possible; after we had given up the search, I took the book, and counted the notes, and found there were eleven missing out of the thirty-eight that were in the book; some hours after, I conceived it an awkward circumstance, and, ruminating in my mind, a thought struck me whether the girl could have any concern in the business; the day past over, we did not make any discovery; but, on the following day, my wife told me the prisoner had been at her box, and if I would satisfy myself, she would have me examine it; I went down stairs, and got Hawkins to bring the box down stairs; the prisoner was in the room, and said, that is my box, Sir; I replied, I knew it was, I wished to see the inside of it; I asked her to give me the key; she gave the key to Hawkins, and we opened the box; in undoing her things, in a piece of muslin, a caul of a cap, was pinned up ten one-pound notes out of the eleven, and nearly a pound was found in her pocket that had been changed; I desired Hawkins to put the notes in the box, and lock it, and keep the key in his pocket.

Q. Do you know these notes to be your's? - A. I believe them to be mine; there is a witness or two present that can swear to them.

RICHARD HAWKINS sworn. - I am a carpenter; I was at Mr. Collins's on the 18th of May, the day after the alarm.

Q. You went up stairs, and fetched the box? - A. Yes, the girl had the key; I opened the box, we found ten one-pound notes wrapped up in a bit of muslin; Mr. Collins gave the notes to me to put into the box again, which I did; I locked the box, and kept the key till the officer came.

EDWARD COLE sworn. - I am a headborough of St. Luke's: On the 18th, Mr. Collins came to me; I went to his house, and the box was down in the kitchen; they desired me to unlock it; I unlocked it, and in the box I found ten one-pound notes in a bit of muslin or gauze. (Produces the notes.) These are the notes I found in her box.

NICOL STEVENS sworn. - On the 16th of May I paid the sum of thirty-eight pounds and odd money; I paid the prisoner at the bar for her master; thirty-seven were Bank of England notes, and one was a country Bank-note.

Q. Did you put your mark upon them? - A. No, here are persons here that can speak to them, I cannot; I received them of Mr. Wood on the same day, and the same notes I paid to the prisoner; I counted them over three times to satisfy her they were right.

THOMAS WOOD sworn. - On the 16th of May I gave thirty-eight pounds ten shillings and sixpence to Stevens; thirty-seven Bank and one country note, and half-a-guinea in gold.

Q. Do you know the notes again? - A. Some of them; (the notes handed to the witness.) There are four of them had the word Waggoner, which I noticed when I took them; I can swear to them, the others I believe to be the same.

RICHARD CANNON sworn. - I am a publican, I live at the corner of Wilderness-row, Goswell-street: On the 16th of May, I paid Mr. Wood thirty-eight pounds in Bank of England notes, all but one, which was a country one-pound note; I know them all again, (looks at them;) I endorse every note I take, I know them all to be mine.

Q. (To Collins.) From whom did you receive these notes? - A. From my wife, and she received them from the prisoner; and when I received them, I counted them over, and put them in my pocketbook; I had not another note in my possession at that time.

Prisoner's defence. I should have replaced the notes, but the book was taken away; there was nineteen shillings and sixpence in my pocket left out of the one pound I changed; with the other sixpence I bought a pencil and some cakes for my master's children; I have received several sums of money for my master, and never robbed him before.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Privately whipped , and discharged.

The prosecutor and Jury recommended her to mercy .

Reference Number: t18040704-3

366. EDWARD PRITCHARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , one yard and a half of linen, value 9 s. two yards and a quarter of other linen, value 2 s. 3 d. two yards of jean, value 2 s. 9 d. one yard of woollen cloth, value 2 s. five yards and a half of cotton, value 6 s. and five yards and a half of dyed linen, value 6 s. the property of Richard Dixon .

RICHARD DIXON sworn. - I live in Fenchurch-street , the prisoner was one of my cutter s: On the 19th of May, I had information that this man had been robbing me, and then I missed part of my property from what he had been using just before; I missed five yards and a half of dyed linen at one o'clock, I missed it when he was gone to dinner; I had information by a man from the public-house where the prisoner was; I sent a man, whose name was Coffey, and I followed Coffey to the public-house; Coffey went in immediately, and took the

linen from the prisoner, and held it up, and I went in and told him to take the prisoner, I knew the linen was mine at the time; immediately the prisoner came up to me, and begged for mercy; his wife was with him.

Q. Did you compare it with any linen in your shop? - A. I went and compared it with the linen in my warehouse, and I have no doubt at all it was mine.

Q. Had the prisoner the liberty to take any part of your linen on his own account? - A. By no means.

Q. What do you think is the value of this five yards and a half? - A. Six shillings; I went to the Office in Hatton-garden, and had a search-warrant; I attended the execution of that warrant to the prisoner's lodgings in Tash-street, where his children were, and there I found half a yard of linen, which was cut in what we call sleeve gussets, two yards and a quarter of brown Holland, two yards of jean, five yards and a half of coloured cotton, about a yard of mixed woollen cloth, and sundry remnants of cotton; I knew them to be mine, I have pieces to match in my house that were found in his lodgings.

Q. How long has this man been with you? - A. Some months, I cannot exactly say.

Q. What wages had he from you? - A. Twenty-nine shillings a week.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You have said he had a wife and two children? - A. He has.

Q. When he asked you to forgive him, did he say any thing more? - A. He only begged and prayed me to forgive him.

Q. Do you know whether he has only two children, perhaps he may have more? - A. I do not know.

Court. Q. How many children did you find in his lodgings? - A. There was a young child, and a girl, I suppose she might be eleven or twelve years old.

Mr. Gleed. Q. The only reason that induces you to believe that the property found at the prisoner's house is your's, is that it matches with the property at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. So it would if you had sold it? - A. Exactly so.

Q. When this man, Coffey, took this linen from the prisoner, you were outside? - A. The moment Coffey took it, he held it up, and I went in immediately.

Q. How many yards did this piece contain? - A. About twenty-five yards; I cannot say I measured it, it was linen I bought and had it dyed, and there is the man's stamp that dyed it.

JOHN COFFEY sworn. - I am an officer of Cheap ward: About two or three minutes after one o'clock, Mr. Dixon came to me, and gave information; I went to the Crown, in Leadenhall-market, I saw the prisoner at the bar and his wife there, with a plate of beef-steaks; I saw him take this out of his right-hand pocket, (shewing the five yards and a half of linen,) and put it across the table to his wife, with this wrapper; I then said to them, you are both my prisoners, and seized the property.

Q. Did you give him any signal? - A. Yes; nothing further passed, but the man said, I hope you will forgive me; I have had the property in my custody ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are perfectly sure that no conversation passed between you and the prisoner before Mr. Dixon came in? - A. I am.

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden; I had a warrant to search the prisoner's lodgings, Mr. Dixon accompanied me to No. 30, Tash-street, Gray's-Inn-lane; by the information of Mr. Dixon, I went up to the second floor, and there I found these articles that Mr. Dixon said was his property, (produces them;) I brought them away, there were two or three children there, the doors were all open.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You have no reason to know that it was the prisoner's lodgings, only from the information of Mr. Dixon? - A. That is all.

Court. Q. (To Mr. Dixon.) Are they your property? - A. They are; they are cut off from the pieces I have in my warehouse, the piece of brown linen he had to cut that same morning, it corresponds exactly.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-4

367. GEORGE MANN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , seven shirts, value 1 l. 8 s. 6 d. three yards of brown linen, value 3 s. 6 d. one pair of flannel drawers, value 2 s. 6 d. one yard and a half of flannel, value 3 s. and a yard of Russia duck, value 6 d. the property of Richard Dixon .

RICHARD DIXON sworn. - I am a slop-seller , in Fenchurch-street : On the 19th of May, after taking Pritchard, I got a search-warrant for Mann at the Mansion-house; he lived in Bevis Marks.

Q. How did you know the prisoner lived in Bevis Marks? - A. By the direction in my book; I did not go there myself, I gave the officer directions.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long has the prisoner lived with you? - A. Five or six months.

Q. How long had you taken stock before you missed this property? - A. I had taken stock two or three months before this happened.

Q. Do you deal in wholesale or retail? - A. In wholesale and retail.

Q. Were the articles made up? - A. Yes.

Q. Then they might have found their way into the world if any body went and bought them at your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any family? - A. I never heard he had.

Court. Q. What wages did you pay him? - A. Twenty-nine shillings a week; he was another of my cutters.

ELISHA CRABB sworn. - I am a constable: On Saturday, the 19th of May, I had a search-warrant to search the prisoner's lodgings; I went to No. 30, Bevis Marks, on the second floor, there was nobody in the rooms at all; I searched them both, John Turner went with me to the prisoner's lodgings; I found the articles mentioned in the indictment there, I brought the articles away, and locked them up in the Marshal's office; I produce the property.

JOHN TURNER sworn. - I am a constable; I went with the last witness to the prisoner's lodgings, we brought the property away.

MOSES ANDRADE sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. He and his wife lodged in my second floor for four or five years; I know nothing of this business.

Court. Q. (To Prosecutor.) Look at the things produced, and tell us whether you know any of these things are your's? - A. These seven shirts belong to me, six are striped cotton sea-faring shirts, and one white soldier's shirt, with a frill; there is no mark upon them; I employ a man in the country who makes the whole of this cotton.

Q. What is the value of these seven shirts? - A. They are valued at one pound eight shillings and sixpence; I had only a remnant, a yard and a half, of swansdown in the house, and the piece of swans-down found in the prisoner's lodgings is not quite a yard; I have the other piece here, and the piece found at the prisoner's lodgings make up a yard and a half; it is the same pattern, I value that at two shillings; the buttons I cannot speak to myself, they are in this paper with the word middling upon it; it is the writing of my young man, they are valued at four shillings and sixpence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. These shirts have no mark on them? - A. No, I know them by the pattern and quality.

Q. Could not any person find in shops of the same description, shirts of the same quality and pattern? - A. I do not think they could for width, length, pattern, and quality; I know so well the particular patterns, and the cotton the man makes by contract, I know I am perfectly right.

Q. Has he a patent to make that pattern? - A. No.

Q. How many different shirts have you sold? - A. A great many.

Q. And no mark on them at all? - A. No.

Q. Now, with respect to that piece of swans-down, you did not make that? - A. I did not; I only say that was in my possession.

Q. Do you mean to state, from your own knowledge, that it was in your possession before the 19th of May, or do you speak so because some of your servants knew that? -

Court. Q. Had you yourself observed that individual thing in your stock? - A. Yes, a little while before, on the 30th of April I took stock.

Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 30th of April you took stock, did you yourself notice that there was only a yard and a half of that swansdown? - A. Particularly so, and on the 19th of May I found but half the remnant.

Q. Now, with respect to the shirt-buttons, there is your servant's mark upon the paper, and that piece of paper was in your warehouse - do you swear to the buttons? - A. I can give you a fellow-parcel of buttons to it.

Q. You do not mean to say they are not common buttons? - A. They are not common buttons.

Mr. Gurney. (Shews the buttons to the Court.) They are common sugar-loaf buttons.

Q. Persons, who are not slop-sellers, do make use of them? - A. They do.

CHARLES WRIGHTEN sworn. - I am a servant of Mr. Dixon, (looks at the paper of buttons,) that is my mark, the word middling.

Q. Can you say that was in your shop before the 30th of April, or earlier? - A. I cannot say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. All that you can say is, that is your mark, you cannot say when it was in your warehouse? - A. No.

Q. You had many others marked in the same way, middling, and the same sort of buttons? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you tell me how many more persons, slop-sellers, might or might not have in their possession as many as there are persons dealing in the articles? - A. Yes, we do not sell them, we put them on shirts; in that paper is twelve gross.

Q. You do not sell buttons - now, supposing the paper in which buttons is bound up that are to be used, when the paper is empty, what becomes of it - it is waste paper, is it not? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of that which I am accused of.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-5

368. CHARLOTTE MILLER was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Dixon , on the King's highway, on the 5th of June , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 2 l. 2 s. his property .

JAMES DIXON sworn. - On Tuesday, the 5th of June, about half-past one in the morning, as I was going up St. Martin's lane, (I had been at my club on Monday, the 4th,) a girl took hold of my arm and asked me where I was going; I told her I was going home; she asked me, if I would go home with her; I told her no; I lodge at No. 16, Tottenham-street, Tottenham-court road.

Q. Was that the woman at the bar? - A. No; some other woman; I walked with the woman till I got to Drury-lane; I crossed Drury-lane into Charles-street, near Broad St. Giles's ; the girl that was with me went from my side, and there stood two men and another woman, the prisoner at the bar; the woman that had been walking with me said something to the men and the prisoner at the bar, but I do not know what; one of the men struck me back handed, and he gave me a touch with his foot, and tripped me up; he kept me down by the head, and stopped my mouth up with his hands.

Q. What did the other man do? - A. He held my feet, and the other woman that I walked with from St. Martin's lane, was on the right hand side of me, holding my feet too, and Charlotte Miller came on the left hand side of me, and put her hand in my waistcoat pocket, and from there she put her hand to my watch, and pulled my watch out; a stone-sawyer heard the noise, his name is John Curann ; he opened his window and saw all four of them; he came to my assistance, and while he was unlocking his door, they all made their escape but the prisoner; the watchman catched her; she was running as fast as she could; I gave charge to take her to the watch-house; John Curann went with me to Marlborough-street; he was bound to appear, but he would not come.

Q. Did you find your watch on the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Were you sober at this time, after being at your club? - A. Yes, I was not very well; I had been sleeping there for almost four hours; I had a little beer before I went to the club, and two glasses of gin; I did not drink any thing at the club; I was no more tipsey than I am now.

Q. How came you to go with this woman to Drury-lane; why did not you go to your own house; had you ever seen this woman before? - A. Never.

Q. This was the darkest part of the night, about an hour after midnight: was there any light in the street, that you could know a woman you never saw before in your life? - A. There was a lamp some distance from the place; the prisoner was never far enough from me to be out of my sight.

Q. Are you sure that you had your watch about you at this time of the morning? - A. Yes; the watchman found the ribbon the next morning after she had pulled it out of my pocket.

- CORBETT sworn. - I am a watchman: I was in Brownlow-street, nearly opposite Charles-street; I heard about half-past one a cry of watch and murder; I run as fast as I could with my stick and lantern; as I was coming out of Brownlow-street, two men and a woman ran down Drury-lane, and the prisoner ran against me; I saw Dixon rising; his mouth was a little cut; I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

Q. What state did Dixon appear to be in; was he in liquor? - A. He did not appear so at the time; his lips were a little cut; while I was in the watch-house there was another watchman went and searched, and found a ribbon; he is not here.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the man before in my life; as I was coming down Charles-street, I saw this man, with two or three more about him, and then they set off a running; I passed that watchman, and he asked me what was the matter; I told him there were two or three about him, and he was lying in the middle of the road when I was coming down the street; the reason I did not run as well as the rest did, is that I was only going home.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-6

369. CHARLES STABLES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary-Ann Cox , on the 10th of June , and taking from her person a gold locket, value 20 s. her property .

MARY-ANN COX sworn. - I lived at No. 21, Clare-street, Clare-market, at the time I lost my locket.

Q. Are you in any business? - A. I am not; I am a single woman: on Sunday, the 10th of June last, the watch was upon the cry of half-past ten, I was near the New Church, in the Strand , at a coffee-house door; I had been just in the entrance of the coffee-house, delivering a message to a gentleman; as I came out of the door three men came past me.

Q. Who were they? - A. The prisoner was one; they met me, and the prisoner accosted me; I had never seen him before; the prisoner tried to tear the locket from my neck; it was fastened by a ribbon; he tried to pull it off but he could not; then he struck me on the face and on the breast; he tore my handkerchief off my neck, knocked me down, and tore my locket from me; I called out watch, and kept hold of him; he said, if I insisted on holding him he would murder me; then the watch came up, and took him out of my hands.

Q. Did you perceive the locket go from you? - A. Yes, entirely, and he threw it away at the watch-house door; a gentleman came up and said he saw him do it.

Q. What was the value of this locket? - A. I

gave 25 s. for it; I bought it of a pawnbroker; it was a gold locket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You say you do not carry on any business, what have you done for a livelihood? - A. I have lived with a gentleman these three months.

Q. You describe the prisoner to be one of the men who came up to you without any assault? - A. They did, and then knocked me down.

Q. In the way you describe you never had said a word to him; nor ever took hold of his hand at all? - A. No.

Q. He did not kiss you, I dare say; nor you him? - A. No.

Q. Where do you live now? - A. No. 50, in Wardour-street, Soho; the other two men walked off; they both left me, and he was the only person that stopped.

Q. You never said a word to him? - A. Upon my oath I never spoke a word to him, nor he to me.

Q. Your name is Brown, is it not? - A. No; my name is Mary-Ann Cox .

Q. Do you know what you have charged this man with? - A. Yes, with robbing me, and striking me three or four times.

Q. Do you know there is 40 l. if you convict him? - A. No.

Q. Nor ever heard it? - A. I have heard, but do not know what it is.

WILLIAM BACON sworn. - I am collecting-clerk to Messrs. Hookham and Eamer's circulating-library, in Bond-street; I was going along the Strand, at twelve o'clock at night, as near as I can recollect; I heard a rattle spring, and as I went along, I met a young man and woman, which I believe to be the prisoner at the bar and the prosecutrix, along with two watchmen; they were taking them both to the watch-house; being very near the watch-house, curiosity led me to the door, seeing the woman; I observed something thrown at the door, at the time they were going in; I told the last watchman to bring a light, which he did, and I went out and picked up this locket; I produce it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. So, Bacon, they were both taken to the watch-house, both the young man and the woman? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know who this locket fell from, therefore, whether it fell from the woman or the man you do not know? - A. I do not.

Q. You do not know her? you had not seen her before? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Mr. Knapp. Not to your knowledge; there are a great many there to be sure.

DENNIS MACKEY sworn. - I am a watchman: I had this woman and the prisoner in custody.

Q. How came you to take the woman into custody? - A. The woman gave charge to me of the man, and likewise it was my duty to take them that gave the charge; I took them both together, at half-past eleven o'clock; I left my box, and went down the Strand from St. Clement's church; they were standing in Surry-street, and she was holding him by the neck; I asked her what was the matter, and she gave charge of this man to me.

Q. When she came to the watch-house, how were her clothes? - A. They seemed to be very well; I heard her complain a little of the bruises on her breast, while I was there; I was soon sent out on my duty.

Q. Was her handkerchief torn? - A. No; it was very well.

Prisoner's defence. About half-past eleven o'clock on Sunday night, as I was coming down the Strand, by Somerset-house, this woman came up to me, and asked me if I would give her something to drink; I said no and went on; there were three or four people coming on; I saw one cross the road, and run away; I came back; she told me she had lost her locket; I told her to call the watch, and she called the watch, and they found the locket in the road, and they took me to the watch-house.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040704-7

370. THOMAS RILEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Nicoll , on the King's highway, on the 30th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, against his will, a seven-shilling piece, two shillings, thirteen penny-pieces, and forty-eight halfpence, the property of the said Thomas .

THOMAS NICOLL sworn. - Q. Where were you on Saturday last? - A. I worked for Mr. Ives, at Hendon ; I was paid 12 s. last Saturday night, that I had earned.

Q. Was the prisoner with you at the same time? - A. Yes; he was paid at the same time; he asked me if I would go as far as the Bell, and have a pot of beer; I told him I did not care if I did; it was scarcely above a quarter of a mile; we had a pound of mutton and two pots of beer for our supper, at the Bell; I told him, when we had had the two pots of beer, I should go to my lodgings; I said to him, I will not have any more, I have had plenty; then we had about a quarter of a mile to go; we came very steady.

Q. Did you go out of the Bell together? - A. We did.

Q. How far did you go? - A. About a quarter of a mile; we lodged in a barn at Mr. Ives's; he was in one barn and I in another; he is an Irishman, and the Irishmen live in one barn and the English live in the other; there are two houses of Mr. Ives's, a dwelling-house, and a farm-house

besides, and between those two houses he knocked me down with his fist, and he flung his body on me; I asked him what he was going to do with me; he said, d - n your old blood, I'll have your life and your money both; he said, if you speak another word, I'll have your life this very moment; when he had abused me, and got my money, he ran away; I was five minutes before I could get up.

Q. What was it he took? - A. My purse, a seven-shilling bit, two shillings in silver, and three shillings and a penny in penny bits and halfpence, in all twelve shillings and one penny; the seven-shilling bit was wrapped up in a bit of white paper, with a red binding round it; there was some reading on it, but I am no scholar; I cannot read, but it was wrapped up in that.

Q. What sort of purse was it? - A. I do not know; it was not canvas; it was made of some sort of linen cloth.

Q. What became of him after he took the money? - A. He ran away from me before I got up; where he went to I do not know.

Q. Your purse and money were found the next day? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Instead of two pots we had five pots, and the publican denied drawing us any more.

Prosecutor. We had no more than two pots; I came home as sober as a judge; as sober as I went.

Court. (To Prosecutor.) Q. Are you certain that you were not in liquor? - A. I am very certain I was not.

Prisoner. (To Prosecutor.) I neither struck you nor took your money in Hendon; my prosecutor had so much liquor the publican refused to draw us any more; said he, as you and I are going to London, here is my money, take care of it for me; I did not want his money; I said take your money.

Court. Q. Did you desire him to take care of your money? - A. I never did.

Q. What became of you that night, after you were robbed? - A. I went to my lodgings in the barn, and this man was taken in the morning before I went to London; I staid at my lodgings till six o'clock; he was in custody at Hampstead before that time, and the gentleman that stands behind me took him into custody himself.

THOMAS HALMS sworn. - I live at Hampstead; I am beadle and constable.

Q. Did you meet with the prisoner at the bar there any time on Sunday? - A. About seven o'clock, as I was coming out of my own house.

Q. What time? - A. Just after seven o'clock on Sunday last, the prisoner at the bar passed me; I looked very hard at him, and when I went a little higher in town a countryman came and told me of a robbery; I went and stopped him at the King's Head, the corner of Church-lane, Hampstead; I searched him, and took all his money from him; I took from him 7 s. 6 d. in silver, and 2 s. and a penny farthing in penny-pieces and halfpence, and that purse.

Q. What was in that purse? - A. A seven-shilling piece, wrapped up in that piece of paper.

Q. Was it tied up with any thing - he said it was tied up with a piece of red binding? - A. No binding at all; the border on the paper he calls a binding; there were more half-pence in his pocket, but I gave him five-pence halfpenny to pay for the liquor he had drank. (The money and purse produced.)

Q. (To prosecutor.) Look at that purse? - A. (Looks at it.) I will take my oath to this purse; I have had it seven years.

Q. Look at that paper? - A. That is the paper I wrapped it up with.

Q. Where is the binding? - A. This piece of red I call the binding.

Court. That is the border.

Prisoner's defence. I had been working for Mr. Cloud for a month; on Tuesday last week this man was employed at hay-making (Mr. Cloud is foreman), and this man has done more hurt to his hay than he did good; he was continually drunk: on Saturday I was coming from the Bell public-house; he asked me if I would lend him a pint of beer; with that I lent him a pint; we went down to the pay-table, where we received our money; he said to me, if you are agreeable, we will have some mutton-chops and some beer, and if you are agreeable, to-morrow we will proceed to London; after we got our money separate for one another, we came up to a butcher's shop; I said to the butcher, will you cut us some mutton-chops; I came out, and shewed this mutton to the prosecutor; I said, are you agreeable to have this mutton for 10 d. he said, yes; we went to the Bell and there was no fire in the room; I said, here is no fire; the landlord said, you may make a fire; with that I cooked the mutton, and I said, what beer will you chuse to have, and we had a pot; and after that we had four pots more, and more company coming in he wished to have more, and the publican refused to draw more, he being in liquor; I was forced to lead him till we came to Cloud's house, and there was a five-barred gate; he said, I cannot go over this gate; he gave me his money, what quantity I cannot tell; I went to my barn and it was shut up, and I went towards London, thinking he was going to London; I thought to meet him as he was going on to London. I do not suppose this here gentleman is any acquaintance of my prosecutor's; I deny knocking him down or tumbling upon him; if I had threatened or

tumbled upon him he would have some marks upon him; I had nothing on me but an old smock frock; there was a Jew with this old man; he said to him, if we can condemn him it will be the best hay-harvest we ever had; I have sailed all the last war in his Majesty's service with Captain Rodney, and I have sailed with Sir Hyde Parker, and I never came to disgrace, so much as the lash of a cat; if you wish to send to Mr. Cloud, you will find I never had a miss word from him.

Halms. The old man never said any such thing.

GUILTY , Death , aged 36.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-8

371. SARAH MUNYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a cotton gown, value 6 s. the property of Amelia Carfree .

AMELIA CARFREE sworn. - I have known the prisoner about seven years: I said, let me take hold of your arm, to help me along; we had been together; she left me in Victualling-office square; I had tied the corners of my old apron that I had on behind me; I had in it a gown, a cap, and handkerchief.

Q. Did she use any violence to you? - A. No; she untied my apron, and the things fell down; she called to some woman, and the woman came and took the gown, and she and the prisoner ran away; I cannot tell what became of the other woman.

- sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Ireland, a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned the gown on the 7th of June, for 6 s. (The gown produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040704-9

372. JOSEPH JACKSON was indicted for that he, on the 16th of March, had in his custody and possession a certain bill of exchange, in the words and figures following: that is to say, -

"London, 13th March, 1804. Gentlemen, nine months after date, pay to me or my order the sum of thirteen hundred pounds, for value received, and place the same to the account of, gentlemen, your humble servant, John Brown." Addressed

"Messrs. Leerworth and Lindsey, merchant s, London. Accepted by procuration, John Leerworth ." And that he, afterwards, on the 17th of March feloniously did falsely make, forge, and conterfeit, upon the said bill of exchange, an endorsement upon the said bill of exchange , in the name of

"John Brown," with intention to defraud John Brown .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing as true a like endorsement, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

In Two other Counts, for the same offences, charging the intention to be to defraud John Evans and John Poole .

And in Two other Counts, for the same offences, charging the intention to be to defraud Alexander Leerworth and James Lindsey .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Curwood, and the case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

( Richard Shawe , Esq. produced the bill, which had been deposited in his hands for the purpose of being produced upon the trial.)

JAMES AKERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you live at the Adelphi-terrace? - A. I do.

Q. Are you intimately acquainted with Mr. John Brown? - A. I am.

Q. On Friday the 16th of March, did you accompany Mr. Brown to Baker's coffee-house? - A. I did, in Change-alley, Cornhill.

Q. Did you and Mr. Brown then meet with the prisoner at the bar, Mr. Jackson? - A. We did.

Q. Were any bills at that time deposited in the hands of Mr. Jackson? - A. We met at the hour of twelve, and Mr. Brown then had a bill for two thousand five hundred pounds, accepted by Leerworth and Lindsey, which Mr. Brown said was not so cashable, and therefore requested it to be split into two bills, one of one thousand two hundred pounds, and the other of one thousand three hundred pounds, this was about the hour of twelve; Mr. Brown observed, that he supposed Leerworth and Lindsey, who were the accepters, and who were to be the accepters of the one thousand two hundred pounds, and the one thousand three hundred pounds, could have no objection, but he would inquire of them, and return again in the course of an hour or two; we then appointed Mr. Jackson to meet Mr. Brown at Baker's coffee-house, about two o'clock; we met at two, and Mr. Brown had then received the acceptances of twelve and thirteen hundred pounds, which he gave to me, and I delivered them to Mr. Jackson; it was handed from my hands to Jackson.

Q. Look at that, was that one of the two bills which you handed to Jackson? - A. I am confident it is.

Q. Is that a receipt for the two bills? - A. Yes; I wrote it, and Jackson signed it. (The receipt read.)

"London, March 16, 1804.

"Received from John Brown, Esq . by the hands of James Akers , two bills drawn upon Leerworth and Lindsey, and accepted by them for twelve hundred and thirteen hundred pounds, at nine months after date, from the 13th instant; for which I engage to bring in the cash, and discount, &c. this day.

JOSEPH JACKSON ."

Q. At that time, was this bill endorsed or unendorsed? - A. Most positively not.

Q. Did any thing pass between Mr. Brown and Jackson respecting the endorsement? - A. Jackson

proposed that he should bring a person to Baker's coffee-house about the hour of five, with the money for these bills; I observed to him, that I could not be in the City at five, but that he had better bring the money to my house, with the person who was to give it, and then the bills should be endorsed, and Mr. Brown receive the money; I further observed not to bring banker's checks, but Bank-notes, or cash; Mr. Jackson then agreed to come to my house for that purpose, at a quarter after five o'clock; Mr. Brown, though engaged to dine, postponed that engagement, and dined with me at my house, for the purpose of meeting Jackson.

Q. At what time did Mr. Brown come to your house? - A. Mr. Brown came to my house a quarter before five.

Q. How soon after did any person come to inquire for Jackson? - A. About six o'clock, or five minutes after; a person brought a note, but I did not see the person.

Q. Was that the note which was brought? (shewing it to him) - A. Yes; Mr. Brown shewed me the note; I have no doubt that that was the note.

Q. Did Mr. Brown give a verbal answer to the messenger who brought that note? - A. He did.

Q. How soon after that did Mr. Brown quit your house? - A. As soon as his servant could call a coach; I don't think it was ten minutes.

Q. You saw no more of Mr. Brown that night? - A. No; nor till half after twelve, or a quarter after twelve the next day.

Q. After Mr. Brown had left you, did the prisoner, Jackson, come to your house? - A. He did, about half after seven o'clock.

Q. Have the goodness to state what then passed? - A. I was in my front parlour, with some West-India friends who were going to embark, and writing some letters to send with them; I went into the back room with Mr. Jackson, and he told me he was disappointeed in getting the bills done, but if Mr. Brown would let him have them by nine o'clock the next morning, he might be certain of having the money at twelve; I observed to him, as I had an appointment in Windmill-street, at ten o'clock, it was impossible I could deliver the bills to him at nine, and therefore he had better keep them; and he appointed Mr. Brown and myself to meet him at Baker's coffee-house, at twelve o'clock, on Saturday the 17th.

Q. Did you, the next day, meet Mr. Brown at Baker's coffee-house? - A. I did, about a quarter after twelve, I believe.

Q. Did you communicate to Mr. Brown, that night, the appointment you had made? - A. Yes; I sent my servant to inform him, that we were to meet there at twelve o'clock; we remained there about ten minutes; I was backward and forward between Baker's and Lloyd's coffee-houses several times; I was not there when Mr. Combe came in first.

Q. At what time did you see Mr. Combe with Mr. Brown? - A. I rather imagine it was near three o'clock; it might be from half after two to three o'clock.

Q. In consequence of any information which Combe gave you, what did Mr. Brown do? - A. Mr. Brown and myself went immediately from Baker's coffee-house to Messrs. Newnham, Everitt, and Co. bankers.

Q. Did you find Mr. Jackson? - A. No.

Q. Did Mr. Brown do any thing else? - A. We were a little confused; Mr. Brown, at the recommendation of Mr. Combe, traced the notes so as to stop them at the Bank.

Q. Did you endeavour to find Jackson? - A. No; we went to the Bank, and then we went to the City-Marshal, Mr. Nalder; we could not find Mr. Jackson, we went to the place he called his accompting-house, in Spread-eagle-court, with Mr. Nalder, but he was not there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. In what line of life are you? - A. A merchant.

Q. Residing where? - A. In the Adelphi-terrace.

Q. You are speaking of a transaction which took place as long ago as March last? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been long acquainted with Mr. Brown? - A. Upwards of twenty years.

Q. Have you ever been in the habit, with Mr. Brown, of assisting him in getting money for him? - A. Never at any other time, nor at this time.

Q. Did you ever hear of his applications to persons to borrow money? - A. Yes, from his own report.

Q. Then Mr. Brown had been obliged to raise money in this sort of way? - A. No; he had applied to Messrs. Manning and Bosanquet, one of the first West-India houses in town, but not in this way.

Q. There was nothing particular in this transaction more than any other transaction? - A. No; excepting from an advertising broker, and the exorbitant interest.

Q. Did you take any memorandum at the time of the transaction taking place, so that you could resort to them? - A. No.

Q. Then what you say depends upon your memory, at this distance of time? - A. Most undoubtedly.

Q. Mr. Jackson was to have come at the time appointed, and he sent some excuse by letter? - A. Yes, to my house.

Q. But in point of fact, he came very soon after Mr. Brown was gone? - A. About an hour and a half after.

Q. You say the bills were not to be endorsed till the money was paid? - A. That was understood, both by Mr. Brown and Mr. Jackson.

Q. What period of time was there from the first time Mr. Jackson had the bills, till you met at Baker's coffee-house, and saw Mr. Combe? - A.

The bills were delivered to him on the Friday, and we met about three o'clock on Saturday.

Q. Had you seen much of Mr. Brown during that interval? - A. No, I had not seen him.

Q. The prisoner had the possession of these bills from the Friday to the Saturday? - A. I don't know to the contrary.

Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, whether Mr. Brown and he met between the middle of the day on Friday and the Saturday? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Was it at your request, or the prisoner's, that the bills were permitted to remain in his hands? - A. Neither one nor the other; but I observed that as it was impossible for me to deliver him the bills at nine o'clock, he had better keep them.

Q. That you told him? - A. Undoubtedly.

Q. When the bills were delivered to him, there was no difficulty at all on his part to give a receipt for them? - A. Not the least.

Q. He made not the least hesitation? - A. None whatever.

Q. From the nature of the transaction, did it occur to you to make any particular remark, excepting the exorbitance of the interest? - A. I knew nothing of Jackson, and advised my friend to have nothing to do with an advertising broker.

Q. But excepting that, there was nothing extraordinary in the transaction? - A. No.

Q. Had you ever any occasion, I don't mean from any necessity of your own, but have you ever had occasion to apply to an advertising person for yourself, or any of your friends? - A. Never, upon my oath, neither; I am merely in acts of friendship with Mr. Brown, and not in acts of business.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Be so good as to state what passed between you and Mr. Jackson on the Tuesday preceding? - A. Mr. Brown gave me a bill for 2500 l. and in consequence of what Mr. Brown told me, I met Mr. Jackson at the City coffee-house, Cheapside; Jackson wanted me to give him the bill for 2500 l. that he might shew it to a gentleman to discount; I told him I could not deliver it without Mr. Brown's desire; I met him again, I think, on the Wednesday, but it was either the Wednesday or Thursday, I cannot be positive to the day, at the City coffee-house, and with Mr. Brown's concurrence, I gave him the bill for 2500 l.; that bill was afterwards returned to Mr. Brown.

GEORGE KNAPP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. You were clerk to the prisoner, were you not? - A. Yes.

Q. Of course you know his hand-writing? - A. I have seen his hand-writing.

Q. Look at those letters? - A. I believe them to be his hand-writing.

Q. Look at that (another letter), do you believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. I do.

(A letter read, addressed J. Brown, Esq. Buckingham-street, Strand, No. 10. Signed J. Jackson, Spread Eagle-court, 10th March, 1804.)

"Dear Sir, - I am sorry to inform you a slight accident has prevented me from coming to you as I wished and promised. I have however taken the liberty of writing you a note to inform you I have seen the gentleman with whom I am arranging your business; he has informed me it will be absolutely necessary for him to have your bills unendorsed at least three hours in his possession, previous to his giving the cash, and then you endorse them, without which the bills are useless. He has made his arrangements for Tuesday, and wishes that day to compleat them, for reasons which I will tell you when I see you. If Messrs. Leerworth and Lindsey mean to accept the bills, it is of small consequence whether they accept them on Tuesday, or any other day; and as the gentleman with whom I am engaged will accept them with myself, there can be no objection to their being trusted three or four hours in our hands."

(Another letter read, addressed J. Brown, Esq. Buckingham-street, Strand. Signed J. Jackson, dated 13 March, 1804.)

"Dear Sir, - Inclosed is a letter I have just received from W. Combe and Co. Queen-street, Cheapside, the house that was to discount your bill. You will perceive from it the unfortunate delay which my caution occasioned, has produced a delay still more unfortunate. However, I have seen Mr. Combe, who informs me it is a matter of small consequence whether the bill is made into five, or whether it remains in one, and begs me to say, if Friday will be more convenient, their house can do it. I have written to prevent Mr. Akers an unnecessary journey, particularly as I am engaged at that hour: I appointed to meet a gentleman at Westminster. I hope these delays will not be attended with any unpleasant consequences, and I trust this letter and its inclosure will convince you of my incapability of performing my engagement."

(Another letter read, addressed J. Brown, Esq. at Mr. Akers's, Adelphi Terrace. Signed J. Jackson, dated 16th March, 1804.)

"Dear Sir, - Your bills are in that situation that they will certainly be done, but owing to the lateness of my friend seeing Mr. Leerworth, they cannot be done to night. If you will leave them with me to night, they shall be done in the morning, or if you have them back of me, and I can again have them at nine, they shall be done by twelve. Do send word by the bearer, which you will do. I wait your answer."

Mr. Curwood. Q. Do you remember taking a note to Mr. Brown? - A. Yes, on Friday evening.

Q. Did you receive a message to carry back to your master? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was your master then? - A. At the City coffee-house.

Q. Did you carry that message to him? - A. I delivered the message to him.

Q. Where did you receive the message? - A. I received it from Mr. Brown.

Q. What was that message? - A. To tell Mr. Jackson to bring the bills up to him that night, and he would see him to-morrow at twelve at the City coffee-house.

Q. Your master was to bring the bills to Mr. Brown? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was with your master at the City coffee-house? - A. I did not go in; Mr. Jackson came out of a private room; a gentleman came out of the room after him.

Q. Do you know the gentleman? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was it? - A. Mr. Combe.

Q. Did Mr. Jackson ever return to his accompting-house after that time? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Court. Q. Where is his accompting-house? - A. In Spread Eagle-court, Finch-lane, Cornhill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Parry. Q. You say you went on Friday evening with a letter - what time was it? - A. About six o'clock.

Q. Did you see Mr. Akers? - A. I heard his voice, but did not see him.

Q. Was there a hackney-coach at that time at the door of Mr. Akers's house? - A. There was.

Q. Did you see Mr. Brown go into that coach? - A. No.

Q. Did you receive a written answer, or a verbal one? - A. I received no written note.

Q. You have sworn that, to the best of your belief, the letters shewn to you were the handwriting of the prisoner; did you ever see him write? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see him write his name? - A. Yes; but not to take particular notice.

Q. Then how are you able to swear to his handwriting? - A. I cannot swear to it; I believe it to be his hand-writing.

Q. But you cannot take upon you positively to swear that these letters are his hand-writing? - A. No. (Mr. Brown called into Court.)

Mr. Gurney. Q. Is that the gentleman you saw at Mr. Akers's? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM COMBE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. In the month of March last you carried on the business of a warehouseman, in Queen-street, Cheapside? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you for some time before that been acquainted with the prisoner Jackson? - A. About three weeks before the 13th of March.

Q. Did he make any application to you upon the subject of-bills? - A. In the course of conversation he mentioned a bill of 2500 l. that was about a week before the bills were dated; he told me Mr. Brown was a very respectable man from the West-Indies, and had lately purchased a large estate in this country; he said Mr. Brown had an instalment to make by a certain day upon this estate, and that he wanted to raise the money, for which he would allow 15 per cent.; and he said Mr. Brown was in the habit of consigning his goods to the house of Leerworth and Lindsey, upon whom he was going to draw bills; he told me they were to the amount of 2500 l. nine months after date, from the 1st of March; I told him at first I could not do any thing with the bills at so long a date, however respectable they might be; upon his suggestion that the house was of the first respectability, and that if that house was not liked, he could draw upon any other, I told him there were a certain description of goods for a long credit, that he might buy and sell them again at a very small loss.

Q. Did you mention to him what description of goods? - A. Irish linens.

Q. What did Jackson say to that? - A. I don't immediately recollect, but he told me the house upon which they were drawn, who was to accept, and where I might enquire Mr. Brown's character; upon which I made application to the house of Webster and Corbett; I saw Jackson, and told him Messrs. Webster and Corbett were perfectly satisfied with the acceptors, and would sell Irish linens to the amount of one half.

Q. One half of what? - A. Of the 2500 l.

Q. What did Jackson say to that? - A. He desired me to get it done as soon as possible, because Mr. Brown was a man who very much respected him, and if he could transact this to his satisfaction, he would accommodate him, Mr. Jackson, with acceptances to the amount of 2 or 3000 l. upon the same house, which, if I would give him a share in my concern, he would throw into it.

Q. Did you make any agreement? - A. Yes, on the Friday, for the linens; one bill was to be 1300 l. and the other 1200 l.

Q. Did you in the course of that Friday receive from Jackson two bills? - A. About two o'clock on Friday, the 16th of March, Jackson called upon me, and said, as Mr. Brown was a man of high honour, he did not wish them to be shewn about the market; he gave me two bills, and desired me to take them to Messrs. Webster and Corbett's, to enquire into the acceptance: one was for 1200 l. and the other for 1300 l.; I took them to Webster and Corbett's in Friday-street, and gave them to Mr. Corbett.

Q. At that time was this bill for 1300 l. indorsed, or not indorsed? - A. It was not indorsed.

Q. Did you give them both to him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, in the course of that afternoon, receive them back from Mr. Corbett? - A. Yes,

in about half an hour; about two o'clock young Mr. Corbett brought them back to me.

Q. How soon after Mr. Corbett brought them back to you, did you see Mr. Jackson? - A. In about an hour.

Q. What passed between you and Jackson then? - A. I gave him back the bills, informing him that Mr. Corbett had made enquiry, and was perfectly satisfied; I desired him also to get the bills indorsed, as they were to be paid over before the linens were delivered.

Q. When were the linens to be delivered? - A. As soon as the bills were paid that evening, if the bills were paid in time.

Q. Was there any appointment between Jackson and you to meet again? - A. Not particularly; he was in the habit of calling three or four times a day at my house.

Q. Did he take the bills with him at that time? - A. He did.

Q. How soon after did you see him? - A. About half past six, at my warehouse; I asked him if he had got the bills indorsed; he said he had sent them to the City coffee-house for that purpose.

Q. Did you go with him then to the City coffee-house? - A. No; in a short time after Jackson's lad returned, and called Mr. Jackson out; when Jackson came in to me, he said Mr. Brown had not indorsed the bills, and was rather angry at his having sent the lad up to him; I told him he must get the bills indorsed and paid before the goods would be delivered; he told me if I would go to the parties to see that the goods were getting ready, he would himself go to Mr. Brown and get them indorsed; he then left me; I went to Webster and Corbett's to see that the goods were getting ready.

Q. Did Jackson come to you again? - A. I afterwards went to the City coffee-house; Jackson was not then there, but his wife and a gentleman were in a private room.

Q. How soon did he come to you? - A. About eight o'clock in the evening; his wife and a gentleman were present; when he came in, he said,

"Oh, it is perfectly right; Mr. Brown was rather displeased at first at my having sent the lad, but he was pleased at my going up, and explaining the business; his friend said he dare say I was perfectly right, and indorsed the bills." I did not understand who Mr. Brown's friend was; in a short time after, I went with him to Webster and Corbett's.

Q. Did you there see him pay this bill of 1300 l. to Webster and Corbett? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you look at the bill? - A. Yes, I looked at it in Corbett's hand; it was then indorsed.

Q. Had you looked at it before unindorsed? - A. Yes, it was the same bill.

Q. And purported to be indorsed John Brown? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the linens amount to 1300 l. or something less? - A. 1338 l.

Q. The next morning were the linens delivered by Webster and Corbett to your warehouse in Queen-street? - A. Yes, they were, early in the morning.

Q. At about what time was that delivery ready? - A. From six to seven o'clock in the morning, or rather before; I am not certain to the hour.

Q. Had you made an agreement with any other house for the sale of these linens? - A. Yes; Jackson was with me.

Q. What house was it? - A. The house of Rickaby and Company in Gracechurch-street.

Q. How soon after they were delivered to you, did you deliver them over to Rickaby and Company? - A. Immediately.

Q. When had you been with Rickaby and Co.? - A. I don't recollect whether he went with me on the Friday or not, but on the Saturday, Jackson and I went together, the moment after the goods were delivered at my warehouse.

Q. Was any agreement made for these linens? - A. Yes, they were sold for money.

Q. What was the amount? - A. Those which were bought for 2500 l. were sold for about 2000 l.; there is a balance in their hands now; I went soon after to the warehouse, and saw them delivering them; Mr. Jackson went with the carts to Rickaby's, and I followed; Jackson went for the purpose of receiving the money.

Q. What time was it? - A. I believe about half past twelve.

Q. How long did Jackson wait there? - A. A very short time; a gentleman said, as the goods could not be examined very quickly, he would let Mr. Jackson have 1800 l. on account, which he did.

Q. Then Jackson did not wait the examination? - A. He did not; Jackson wanted me to receive the balance; I told him I had nothing to do with it.

Q. Did he receive 1800 l.? - A. Yes, he received a check upon the house of Newnham, Everett, and Co. at the Mansion-house.

Q. At what hour was that? - A. Between twelve and one o'clock; he had told me in the morning that Mr. Brown was waiting for him at Baker's coffee-house.

Q. What time in the morning did he tell you that? - A. As early as ten o'clock; when we came out of Rickaby and Co's. accompting-house, Jackson turned down towards London-bridge.

Q. Was that the way or the opposite way to Newnham and Everett's banking-house? - A. It was from Newnham's banking-house; I asked him where he was going then, that he was not going to Mr. Brown; he said he was going to see his little woman off to Maidstone, meaning his wife;

she was with him at the time; he said he would be with Mr. Brown very shortly; I told him, if he was only going into the Borough, I would walk with him; he did not seem to wish me to go, and I, thinking he might have something to say to his wife, did not press it; he wished me to wait for him in the neighbourhood, that he might inform me how Mr. Brown was pleased with his bargain; he appointed the Antigallican coffee-house, just by the 'Change; I then parted from him. I was not altogether pleased with his manner, and I turned and looked back to see which way he was going, and I observed, instead of going over London-bridge, he turned up Cannon-street; I did not like immediately to follow him, and I turned up Crooked-lane, which brought me into Cannon-street; I then lost sight of him, and did not see him again; I then went to the Antigallican coffee-house, but he did not come to me; I waited half an hour, or more; I then went to Baker's coffee-house to see if he was there, but he was not there; I saw Mr. Brown, but I did not then know him; he is a very remarkable gentleman; I was then going home, and in the Poultry I met Mr. Jackson's lad.

Q. In consequence of any thing that passed between you and him, what did you do? - A. I went back to Baker's coffee-house, and Mr. Brown was there.

Q. Did you inform Mr. Brown what had taken place? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you endeavour to find out Jackson? - A. I first of all endeavoured to stop the check; I went to Newnham's house, and then to the Bank; I endeavoured to find Jackson that day, but could not.

Q. I believe you were taken into custody for a day or two, and discharged upon giving your word to appear? - A. Yes, I was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. In March last you were a warehouseman? - A. Yes.

Q. Dealing in linen? - A. Manchester goods principally.

Q. Linen was not an article you dealt in? - A. No.

Q. What are you now? - A. I am in an unfortunate situation; in consequence of this I became insolvent, and am a bankrupt; I have dealt in linens.

Q. But it was not the particular article in which you dealt? - A. No.

Q. You have probably raised money in the same way before? - A. No, I have sold goods of my own for bills before.

Q. You were taken up for this yourself? - A. I was detained for two or three days.

Q. Charged with uttering this forgery? - A. I believe there was no charge given; it was at the instigation of Mr. Nalder, the City Marshal.

Q. You told my learned friend that the original cost of this was 2500 l.? - A. Yes.

Q. There was 500 l. sunk in the article sold? - A. Yes.

Q. That is quite an usual thing? - A. No; but under the circumstances of this case, Jackson told me Mr. Brown was willing to lose fifteen per cent. I told Jackson, as near as I could calculate, it was twenty per cent. lost; he said it was no matter, Mr. Brown must have the money.

Q. Did you see the goods examined? - A. Yes; I was present when they were looked at; they were not examined; there were two or three rounds taken out of each box, that is as much as any tradesman does.

Q. Upon looking at the articles, they would easily find out that they were worth more than Rickaby and Co. afterwards gave for them? - A. They could no doubt ascertain the value.

Q. And yet you being present agreed to this bargain, notwithstanding the loss? - A. Yes.

JAMES CORBETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. What is the firm of your house? - A. Robert Webster and James Corbett .

Q. Do you recollect that bill being brought to you? - A. On Friday, the 16th of March.

Q. Was the bill at that time endorsed or unendorsed? - A. I believe it was not endorsed.

Q. Who was it brought by? - A. Mr. Combe brought it between twelve and one o'clock; I sent my son with it to enquire into the acceptance again the same night. It was by Combe and Jackson; they were both present.

Q. Was it then endorsed or unendorsed? - A. It was then endorsed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Parry. Q. Do you know Mr. Brown? - A. I never saw him till I saw him at the Mansion-house.

Court. Q. Was it left with you by Jackson and Combe, and for what purpose? - A. In part of payment.

Q. Who was the purchaser of the linens? - A. Mr. Combe.

Mr. Parry. Q. What quantity of linen did you give for it? - A. Thirteen hundred and thirty-eight pounds odd shillings.

Q. Did you receive any difference? - A. I was to receive a difference from a gentleman who sold a similar quantity, which did not come to quite so much as this.

Q. Who was that gentleman? - A. John Evans and Co. - Evans and Poole.

Q. You do not know whether the endorsement is Mr. Brown's hand-writing or not? - A. No.

ARCHIBALD CORBETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Were you present when this bill for 1300 l. was brought in the middle of the day, by Combe, to your father's accompting-house? -

A. It was given to me in the warehouse; I received it from Combe.

Q. For what purpose? - A. He came for the express purpose of suggesting the propriety of enquiring whether this was the real acceptance of Leerworth and Co.

Q. At that time was it endorsed or unendorsed? - A. It was not.

Q. Did you take them both to the house of Leerworth and Lindsey? - A. I presented them to Mr. Lindsey, who said it was their acceptance; I then carried it to the warehouse of Combe.

Q. How soon that evening did you see them again? - A. About eight o'clock in the evening, Combe and Jackson came to our house, and gave this bill to my father.

Q. Was it then endorsed? - A. It was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You went to Leerworth and Lindsey's? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you give the bill to? - A. I presented it to Mr. Lindsey, in the accompting-house.

Q. You parted with it for some time, I suppose, for them to look at it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he retire out of the place where you gave it to him? - A. No, he did not.

JAMES LINDSEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. What is the firm of your house? - A. Alexander Leerworth and James Lindsey .

Q. Look at that bill; was that brought to you? - A. Yes; on the 16th of March, this bill was brought to me by Mr. Archibald Corbett .

Q. Was it at that time endorsed? - A. It was not.

Q. Is it your acceptance? - A. Yes, it is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Parry. Q. Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of Mr. Brown? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that his hand-writing, as the drawer of that bill? - A. I have no doubt about it.

Q. Now, be so good as to look at the endorsement, comparing it with the name of John Brown, as the drawer, can you take upon yourself to say that that is not his writing? - A. I should not think it was; it has not the freeness of his hand-writing; I do not believe it is.

Q. Will you swear it is not? - A. I cannot do that.

ISAAC CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a clerk in the Bank? - A. I am.

Q. Do you produce any power from the house of Leerworth and Lindsey to John Leerworth to accept bills? - A. Yes. (Produces it.)

JOHN SHEEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you see that power of attorney executed by Leerworth and Lindsey? - A. Yes, I did; my name is to it as a witness.

JOSEPH STARKEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are one of the partners in the firm of Rickaby and Co.? - A. I am.

Q. On the 16th or 17th of March, did you purchase any Irish linens of Jackson or Combe? - A. Of Jackson, in Combe's warehouse, on the morning of Saturday, the 17th of March.

Q. To what amount? - A. The amount was about 2000 l. I cannot say exactly.

Q. At what time in the forenoon were the linens delivered into your warehouse? - A. From twelve to one o'clock.

Q. Did you pay Jackson any thing on account of these linens? - A. Yes; 1800 l.

Q. In what manner did you pay it? - A. By a check upon Newnham and Co.

Q. Have you that check about you? - A. I have.

Q. From whom had you that check afterwards? - A. It was returned to us.

Q. Credit having been given you for it? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Newnham, Everett, and Co. are your bankers? - A. Yes, they are.

Q. You are in the habit of drawing a great number of checks in the course of the year? - A. Yes.

Q. Once a year the checks are returned? - A. There are no stated times.

Q. When this was returned, you do not know? - A. I do not. (It is read.)

JOSEPH BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. What are you? - A. A clerk to Messrs. Newnham, Everett, and Company.

Q. Did you pay that check? - A. I did, on the 17th of March.

Q. Who did you pay it to? - A. I believe to the prisoner.

Q. How did you pay it? - A. (Produces a book.) I paid it by a note of 1000 l. No. 333, dated 7th of March, and other notes to the amount of 800 l.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You say you believe you paid it to the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. You pay a great many checks in the course of the day? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean that you can fully and positively swear you paid that to the prisoner? - A. I think I paid it to him; I cannot positively swear to his person, but I believe him to be the man.

FRANCIS NALDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are one of the City Marshal's? - A. I am.

Q. Did you go over to Ireland for the purpose of bringing the prisoner into this country? - A. I did.

Q. Where did you find him? - A. At the time of my arrival in Dublin he was in custody in the Newgate of Dublin.

Q. On what day? - A. It was in the month of April, I cannot say the day, I brought him in custody to London.

Q. At the time he was put into your custody,

was any pocket-book or memorandum put into your custody? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you see that found upon the prisoner? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you put any question to him respecting these books? - A. Yes; these books were given me by Mr. Galbraith, the Solicitor for the Crown in Dublin; the prisoner asked me if I had got the memorandum books that were taken from him at Inniskillen; I told him I had.

Q. Did any thing pass respecting any memorandum? - A. There was a conversation concerning a memorandum of his journey to France; he asked me if I had got a book containing a memorandum respecting his journey to Ireland; I told him I had. (Produces them.)

Q. Did you converse with him at all respecting the contents of it? - A. I did not.

Court. Q. Did you shew it him? - A. No, I did not; they have never been out of my custody, nor has he seen them at all.

Q. Had you any conversation with him respecting his leaving this country? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you say any thing to induce him to confess? - A. No; he was aware of my coming for him, and he frankly admitted to me that he was not guilty of the forgery, but from poverty he had been foolish enough to run away with the money; if he was in England he had an instrument to prove his innocence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Parry. Q. Did the prisoner explain to you what the instrument was? - A. He did in a conversation afterwards.

Q. When was it? - A. After his coming to England.

John Knapp called again. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Look at that, and tell me if you believe that to be Mr. Jackson's hand-writing? - A. I believe it is. (It is read.)

"Saturday, 1st of March, 1804, with a heart almost sinking under the weight of my miseries, I left London; the motive which led me to this conduct I may explain at another time, if I live; the present is a rough sketch of my wanderings; I took a hackney-coach to Kensington about five o'clock, then proceeded in a post-chaise to Bristol. Sunday, I got to Bristol about six o'clock. Poor F. was tired, and went to a cupboard to get some supper. Accidentally crossing a square, I believe Queen-square, I met an Irish gentleman who was going to Ireland; that very morning I hastened back to the inn, got away, and by eleven o'clock we set sail on board the Graces for Dublin; the sea sickness affected both dreadfully, however a good passage brought us to Dublin on Tuesday night; I never can forget the strange behaviour of the waiter at the hotel in Dawson-street, who would give me nothing to eat, but very kindly sent me to the Leinster hotel, Frederick-street, where we were well off; the waiter gave me a bottle of wine, and made me laugh. Theatre. Saturday left Dublin for Inniskillin. Rode lame. Horses provisions. Monday Inniskillin."

JOHN STEVENSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. What are you? - A. I am servant to Mr. Brown.

Q. Do you recollect on Friday, the 16th of March, what time your master came home? - A. Between two and three o'clock.

Q. Do you know where he was engaged to dine that day? - A. Yes.

Q. Where? - A. At Mr. Webb's, in Thayer-street, Manchester-square.

Q. Did he, in fact, dine there? - A. No.

Q. Where did he dine? - A. At Mr. Akers's.

Q. Where does Mr. Akers live? - A. At No. 2, Adelphi Terrace.

Q. Did you go with your master to Mr. Akers's? - A. No; I went to him at six o'clock with a coach.

Q. While you were there, do you recollect a lad bringing him a letter? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did your master stay with Mr. Akers after he received that letter? - A. Not five minutes; he went away in a coach that I had brought.

Q. Where did he then go? - A. To Mr. Webb's, in Thayer-street.

Q. How long did your master stay at Mr. Webb's? - A. Till about ten.

Q. Were you at Mr. Webb's all the time your master staid? - A. Not all the time.

Q. Do you know whether any body came from your master while you were there? - A. I don't think there was.

Q. Did you come away with your master that night? - A. Yes, a little after ten o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not stay all the time? - A. No.

Q. How long might you be by yourself? - A. About three quarters of an hour.

Q. What happened during that three quarters of an hour, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. (To Mr. Nalder.) Q. Are you in possession of the 1000 l. Bank-note? - A. Yes. (Produces it.)

Q. Of whom did you receive that note? - A. I took it out of the pocket of Mrs. Jackson this day fortnight in Newgate. (The Bank-note read.)

"No. 333, 7th March, 1804, 1000 l. Bank of England."

Mr. Parry. Q. Who was present when you found that note? - A. A woman, whose name I believe is Seal.

Q. Was the prisoner present? - A. No.

Q. How do you know she was his wife? - A.

She came over with me from Ireland, and was treated by him as his wife the whole of the way.

Court. Q. He treated her as his wife? - A. Yes; she came over in the packet with him and me.

Mrs. FANNY ROSS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you live in Thayer-street, Manchester-square? - A. I do.

Q. You are the sister of Mr. Webb? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you reside there in March last? - A. Yes.

Q. On Friday, the 16th of March, did Mrs. Brown and Miss Brown dine with you? - A. They did.

Q. Did Mr. Brown come after dinner? - A. Before the cloth was removed.

Q. How long that evening did Mr. Brown remain? - A. Till about ten o'clock.

Q. During that time did any person come to him? - A. Not while I was with him; I went up stairs with Mrs. Brown into the drawing-room, leaving Mr. Brown with a gentleman.

Q. How long were you absent from him? - A. About an hour.

Q. Excepting that hour, was he in your company the whole of the evening? - A. He was.

Q. Did any person come to him while you were in his company, for the purpose of endorsing any bill, or any other business? - A. Certainly not.

Q. About what time in the evening did you leave Mr. Brown in the dining parlour to go up stairs? - A. I should suppose about eight.

Q. How many persons were there? - A. Major Allen, Dr. Ludiman, and Mr. Brown.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. There was an hour in which he was out of your company? - A. Yes, or towards an hour.

Q. What passed while you were not there, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Major ALLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. Do you recollect dining at Mr. Webb's, in Thayer-street, when Mr. Brown was there, on the 16th of March? - A. I dined with Dr. Ludiman.

Q. Did you ever dine with that party before? - A. No; Mr. Brown came in about a quarter before seven.

Q. When the ladies left the room, did Mr. Brown continue in the room? - A. He did.

Q. Was he absent any part of the time? - A. No.

Q. Did any person come into the room to him? - A. None.

Q. Was there any message delivered to him? - A. None.

Q. Did you afterwards go with him into the drawing-room? - A. I did.

Q. How late did you remain in the drawing-room? - A. Till after Mr. Brown left it.

Q. What time did he leave the room? - A. A little after ten o'clock.

Q. Do you mean to say, that during the whole time he was there, no person came to him? - A. No person came to him, nor was any message brought.

Cross-examined by Mr. Parry. Q. Can you take upon you to say there was no person waiting in the hall when he first came? - A. Certainly not.

Mr. Gurney. (To Akers.) Q. Have the goodness to look at that - have you seen Mr. Brown write? - A. I have been in the habit of corresponding with Mr. Brown.

Q. Did you ever see Mr. Brown write? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever have any communication with him on the subject of the letters you have received from him? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that endorsement, and tell me whether you do or not believe that to be Mr. Brown's hand-writing? - A. I do not believe it is, but I cannot swear it is not.

Q. At the time Jackson came to your house that evening, did you inform him where Mr. Brown was gone to? - A. I don't know that I did.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You never saw Mr. Brown write his name? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. You did not say so before? - A. Then I did not understand you.

PHILIP CHARITY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Brown's character of hand-writing? - A. Very well.

Q. How long have you known Mr. Brown? - A. Fifteen or sixteen years.

Q. Have you seen him write frequently? - A. Often.

Q. Look at that endorsement, and say if you believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. I do not.

Q. Have the goodness to take that in your hand, and tell me if that is Mr. Brown's hand-writing? - A. I think it looks like it.

Q. Should you, if you had seen it any where else but in this Court, have had any difficulty in believing that that was Mr. Brown's hand-writing? - A. None.

Q. Have you looked at the endorsement and the signature upon the note itself - now look at the one and the other - do you or not believe they are both the same hand-writing? - A. No; there is a stiff-ness in the endorsement.

Q. Persons do not always sign with the same freedom? - A. I don't know.

Q. Looking at both, looking at the endorsement, looking at the signature, and looking at what I now shewed you, do they not bear a strong resemblance? - A. Certainly they do.

Mr. MORETON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Brown? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know his hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen him write? - A. I have.

Q. Look at the endorsement upon that bill - do

you believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. I do not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Parry. Q. Look at the name

"John Brown" - is that Mr. Brown's handwriting? - A. I certainly think it is.

Mr. ANDREW HAMILTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Brown? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen him write frequently? - A. Yes.

Q. Be so good as tell me whether you believe that endorsement to be Mr. Brown's hand-writing, or not? - A. I should think not.

Q. Do you believe not? - A. I believe not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you been used to Mr. Brown's hand-writing? - A. I was for five years of his Majesty's Council, where Mr. Brown was President; I had an opportunity of frequently seeing him write.

Q. It is not at all like it perhaps? - A. I cannot say that; I think the John very unlike it.

Q. What do you think of the name of Brown? - A. It is by no means I think like his.

Q. Altogether it seems very unlike? - A. Yes.

Q. Now take that into your hand? - A. This is a great deal more like it.

Q. Will you venture to swear that that is his hand-writing? - A. No, I cannot swear it.

Q. Mr. Brown, like other men, don't always write with the same freedom? - A. Generally; I have had his correspondence six or seven years. (The bill read.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not know till this moment that the defence would have devolved upon me: I did not know that my Counsel could not speak for me: I had every reason to believe they could, and I had furnished my Solicitor with documents to substantiate my innocence; but though a great number of witnesses have been subpoenaed, no one is here. Under these circumstances it is impossible for me to make any defence. With regard to the thing itself, I have simply to say this: that I never did commit a forgery; that I took the money I confess, and in doing so, that I acted very wrong, I confess also; and if Mr. Brown had charged me with defrauding him of the money, I should have submitted to my fate, but I never dreamed of committing a forgery. I met Mr. Brown at the place of appointment; he there endorsed the bills. As I hope to see Heaven, that is the truth, Gentlemen. It is not a trifling thing for a person in my situation to appeal to the Almighty: I know not how soon your verdict may bring me into the presence of that Being to whom I am appealing; but as I hope for future felicity, I never did commit the forgery. I am confident, if the evidence had been gone into which might have been gone into, you would have been convinced of my innocence. Whether you pronounce me guilty or innocent, as far as regards myself, is a matter of very little consideration; my character is already ruined; no absolution whatever can wash me from the stain now thrown upon my character. But I have a thousand things on account of which I wish to continue in existence: I have an infant, who will be left an orphan; I have a wife who is very young, who will be a widow without support; I have a parent who will be miserable, and two houses will be defrauded of their property. It is impossible for me to make more than an asseveration, and though my Solicitor actually subpoenaed a number of witnesses, not one single one has come, or a single effort made to save me from destruction. Under these circumstances I submit myself to your decision; I have no kind of hesitation in believing you will act as your consciences dictate; but whether your verdict is for me, or against me, there is a higher tribunal to which I look with pleasure, where I am certain I shall receive my acquittal. You will observe from the evidence, that I did not wish to obtain possession of the bills in a clandestine manner. I offered to return them to Mr. Akers that very night, if I had committed a forgery, and wished that forgery to pass unnoticed. I should not have been thus open in my conduct, if Mr. Brown had been examined: he would have told you that he said to me, I have no doubt of your integrity, and would willingly trust them with you endorsed. Under these circumstances I submit to whatever decision you may please to come to, satisfied with my own innocence; and I again appeal to that Supreme Being, who knows I am innocent of the crime with which I am charged.

Court. It must not be understood that there is any blame in Mr. Brown not being called by the prosecutor, because he has no power of giving evidence; the Counsel for the prosecution could not call Mr. Brown; it was not in their power to call him.

For the Prisoner.

Mrs. Charity called again.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Look at that which I gave into your hands before - look at the signature, and tell me whether you believe that to be Mr. Brown's hand-writing? - A. I believe it is; it is more like it than the other.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Read it all through, and see if you think the whole of it is Mr. Brown's? - A. I don't know whose writing the body is. (It is read. Signed John Brown.)

"Received this 17th of March, 1804, of Mr. Joseph Jackson , 500 l. on account of two bills drawn, endorsed by me, and accepted by Messrs. Leerworth and Lindsey, Abchurch-lane."

DAVID POOLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Parry. Q. I believe you are an attorney? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on the 16th of March? - A. I saw him at four o'clock in the afternoon, at the City coffee-house; on Friday the 16th of March, I went there by his appointment, to receive twenty-five pounds.

Q. Did he shew you two bills of exchange? - A. Not at that time.

Q. When? - A. Not at all that day; I never saw the bills of exchange at all.

Q. (To Combes.) On the morning of the 17th, the linens were delivered? - A. Yes; between six and seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. How soon after that did Jackson come to your house? - A. Jackson was at the house at the time the linens were delivered; he was at the house before they were delivered, he left me several times; the first time he left me, he said he was going to put on a clean shirt.

Q. How long was it between the time the linens were delivered, and your going to Rickaby and Co.? - A. About four or five hours; the linens were sold for money, and the goods were not sent to Rickaby and Co. till twelve o'clock; Jackson was with me all the while Starkey was looking at the linens.

Q. Did Starkey come to your house? - A. Yes, he did; I cannot exactly say the time, I believe it was between eight and nine.

Q. How long were you looking over the linens? - A. He looked at the first goods some time, I cannot say how long, it might be an hour; he looked at each sort.

Q. Did he go away after looking at the first goods? - A. Yes; he was absent about an hour.

Q. What became of Jackson? - A. He was at my warehouse most of the time looking at the linens, they were in large deal boxes; they were then repacking them.

Q. How long was Starkey there the second time? - A. It might be an hour; nearly as long as the first time.

Q. Was Jackson there while Starkey looked at the second parcel? - A. Yes; after that, they were sent to Rickaby and Co. Jackson and two ticket-porters, and my two porters, took them up.

Q. Did Jackson go away with the goods? - A. He went away with the carts.

Q. What length of time was he absent from your house? - A. It might be a quarter of an hour, or half and hour; I was very busy with Mr. Starkey.

Q. To the best of your judgement, was it half an hour? - A. It might be; he went several times out.

- NICOLL sworn. - Where does Mr. Brown live? - A. At No. 10, Buckingham-street, York-buildings, in the Strand.

DANIEL-SIMON MERCER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am clerk to Atkinson and Robinson, Notaries-public, Royal-Exchange.

Q. Was any application ever made to you by Mr. Jackson, to witness any paper at Baker's coffee-house? - A. I did witness a paper.

Court. Q. When was that done? - A. On Saturday the 17th of March.

Q. Is that your hand-writing? (A paper shewn him.) - A. It is.

Q. What is become of that paper that you witnessed? - A. Mr. Jackson took it, I have not seen it since.

Mr. Brown called.

Mr. Gurney. (To Witness.) Q. Do you know that gentleman, Mr. Brown? - A. I saw Mr. Brown at the Mansion-house.

Q. Is that the gentleman that did any thing with respect to any instrument, that you saw at Baker's coffee-house? - A. No.

Court. Q. Did you see any body do any thing with any instrument, at Baker's coffee-house? - A. I did.

Q. At what time? - A. It might be about ten o'clock in the morning.

Q. Is that the instrument that you witnessed? (A paper handed to the witness.) - A. It is hard to tell; it is about the shape, and about the size.

Q. Mr. Brown, whom you now see, was not the person? - A. No.

Q. By what name was that person introduced to you? - A. By no name particular; I saw him sign, I think it was, John Brown.

Q. For what purpose did you go to the Mansion-house? - A. To see Mr. Brown.

Q. Was the prisoner present at the time you saw Mr. Brown at the Mansion-house? - A. He was.

Q. That was in the month of April? - A. It was either April or May.

Court. Q. Did the person you saw witness the receipt; did he write it in your presence? - A. He wrote it in my presence.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did he write the whole body of the paper, or only the signature? - A. Only the signature; I was not at the table the whole time, I was near enough to see him write the signature.

Q. You are sure that that person is not Mr. Brown you now see? - A. I am.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner Jackson, with respect to the paper you witnessed? - A. Yes, at the Poultry Compter; he told me he should call me up to prove the signature of a receipt I had signed, or witnessed, at Baker's coffee-house.

Court. Q. When did he say he would call you up? - A. He said, upon his trial.

Q. Had you at that time seen Mr. Brown at the Mansion-house? - Q. I had.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you say any thing to Jackson upon that subject? - A. I told him, I was sure the person that I saw at Baker's coffee-house was not the John Brown I saw at the Mansion-House;

he told me at the Poultry Compter, that the prosecutor was the person who had signed the receipt; I told him the person I had seen at the Mansion-house, who was said to be Mr. Brown, was not the person that had signed the receipt at Baker's coffee-house; he said it was; I told him I could not swear to the person of Mr. Brown that I saw at the Mansion-house as being the person that signed it, I refused to swear to that person; upon which, he threatened me with my life if I would not come forward and swear that was the man.

Q. Have you seen him since? - A. Yes, frequently.

Q. Where did you see him the next time? - A. At the Poultry Compter, again.

Q. Did any thing more pass? - A. Nothing, except my refusing, as he asserted, that Mr. Brown was the man.

Q. Did he ever tell you any thing about the receipt afterwards? - A. No; I always endeavoured to obtain the receipt from him, and destroy it.

Court. Q. Did you ever see it in his hands at any time? - A. No; he would not let me ever see it.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Has any thing ever passed, with respect to any other paper, between you and him? - A. No.

Q. Just look at that; is it your hand-writing? (a paper handed to the witness.) - A. Yes; I got the receipt last Monday morning, from his wife.

Q. Was that receipt, that his wife gave you, the same receipt that you witnessed? - A. It was; it had my name upon it; I then took and tore it in several pieces, and threw it into the fire, and quite destroyed it.

Q. After you had so done, did you ever see the prisoner again? - A. He sent for me; he wanted me to sign another receipt, and threatened me if I did not.

Q. Now look at that, and see whether that is like the receipt? - A. (Looking at a paper.) This is it; he wanted me to sign that on Monday, this week, and likewise on Tuesday; he wanted me to witness it, and I refused it, at Newgate.

Q. Did he tell you how he procured it, or how long it had been written? - A. He did not; I then went away, and would have nothing to do with it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You have told my Lord, and the Jury, that he had threatened you, frequently? - A. Yes.

Q. I understood you to say, that you believed it to be the same receipt, and that it was signed by the name of John Brown? - A. I think it was.

Q. How many times have you been backwards and forwards to this man? - A. Several times, and frequently been threatened by him.

Q. Did you come here by any subpoena from the prosecutor? - A. No, by the defendant.

Q. Have you never refused to attend, and give evidence in this case on the part of the prisoner? - A. No, never; I always said I would come and say the truth.

Q. I understood you, that you were not at the same table that the man wrote at? - A. Not during the time of conversation, I was at another table.

Q. You never saw the person who signed the name of John Brown before? - A. No.

Q. Nor that man that was at the Mansion-house before? - A. No.

Q. Is it not possible that you might be mistaken with respect to the person you saw? - A. No, because Mr. Brown is so particular.

Q. Yes now, but he might not be then? - A. This one that I saw at the Mansion-house was not the person that signed it.

Q. Should you know the same person that signed the name of John Brown? - A. I think I should; I am sure of it.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (To Dickson.) What time was it your master went out on that day? - A. I think on that day it was about eleven o'clock; I do not remember positively.

JOHN HARRISON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am waiter at Baker's coffee-house.

Q. Do you remember seeing Mr. Brown there? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did Mr. Brown come? - A. About twelve o'clock, I believe.

JANE-HENRIETTA BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the daughter of Mr. Brown? - A. Yes.

Q. At what time did your father leave his house? - A. At twelve o'clock precisely.

Q. Had he been out before? - A. He had not.

Court. Q. What makes you say precisely upon that day? - A. He was to meet Mr. Jackson at Baker's coffee-house, and he is a particular man to his engagements; he went out precisely at twelve, and returned about six o'clock in the evening.

Q. Did you see him go out? - A. I did; I helped him on with his great coat.

GUILTY Death , aged 23,

Of uttering the bill knowing it to be forged, but not of forging it.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-10

373. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , a pocketbook, value 1 s. a pencil, value 6 d. and one Bank note, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - On the 31st of May last, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I came from the Chapter-house, in St. Paul's church-yard ; when I got near Cannon-alley, which is nearly opposite the North door of St. Paul's; there was a great concourse of people, occasioned by the

children coming out of St. Paul's; the peace-officers were attempting to keep the people from the children; the prisoner was very much on me; I felt my watch and purse were safe; while I was so doing, I felt a pressure on my left-hand coat pocket; I immediately put my left hand in there, and missed my pocket-book; I then looked on my left hand, to see who was near me, and from the very decent appearance of the prisoner, I could not suspect his person; I fixed my eye very attentively on him, and I saw him turn a little away, at the same time I perceived his hand upon his breast; seeing that, I immediately put my right hand on his left breast; I felt something like a book, I immediately asked him if he had not taken my pocket-book out of my pocket; he denied it, and while he was speaking, I put my hand to his breast, and took the pocket-book out; he then said, he wished to speak to me; I took him by the collar, I saw some of the Marshal-men; I called out, I have got a pickpocket, and an officer, of the name of Cartwright, turned round, and came to me; I delivered to him the prisoner with my left hand, and my pocketbook with my right hand; my pocket-book contained a one-pound Bank-note and a small pencil; I cannot say there was any struggle, nor any bustle of any kind.

Q. Had he any body with him? - A. He seemed to be alone.

SAMUEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I am an officer; I was seeing the children out after service was over, to Cannon-alley.

Q. Did you see this transaction? - A. No, I received the prisoner and the book of Mr. Smith. (Produces the book.) This is the book, and that is the young man I received of the prosecutor.

(The book and note identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say particularly; I rely upon the mercy of the Court; I hope Mr. Smith will recommend me.

Prosecutor. If there was no other circumstance against him, I should be very willing to recommend him; I have come forward only for the sake of public justice; I understand he is well known.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-11

374. ANN TEWSBERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , privately, in the dwelling-house of John Walter and John-Fanner Gresham , four yards of black silk lace, value 20 s. four yards of thread lace, value 12 s. five yards of linen, called cambric, value 10 s. and two remnants of printed cotton, value 3 s. the property of William Sheppard and Elizabeth Sheppard .

ELIZABETH SHEPPARD sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At Dartford, in Kent; I am in partner ship with my brother.

Q. Where did you lose your things? - A. At Mr. Walter's, in Nicholas-lane, Lombard-street ; he is a shoe-maker, and keeps a leather warehouse; I was at a visit there, I came to town in May, on the Tuesday before; I missed these articles on the 27th, the prisoner was servant to Mr. Walter; I missed the articles named in the indictment, I suspected her, and went to her lodgings in Moor-square, and there I found the articles I missed in her box; she left Mr. Walter the Saturday before.

Q. How long were you at Mr. Walter's? - A. I was there ten days; I have the patterns of the thread lace in my pocket.

JOHN WALTER sworn. - I live in Nicholas-lane, Lombard-street, I am a shoe-maker and leather-seller, the prisoner lived with me as servant, she has lived with us twice: On Sunday, the 27th of May, Miss Sheppard informed me that she had missed some lace and other articles from her box; the prisoner left our service on the Saturday preceding, about eight o'clock in the evening. On the Tuesday following, I obtained a warrant to search her lodgings, and in her box, concealed in some pieces of linen, we found the lace; the five yards of printed linen was in a room below in a closet.

Q. What did she quit your service for? - A. Mrs. Walter was dissatisfied with her conduct, we did not know she was dishonest before; she informed us she was going to a place on the Saturday evening she left us; we applied to that place, and, finding she was not there, I discovered that she was at her brother's in Moor-square, Moor-lane.

Q. Have you any partner? - A. I have, his name is John-Fanner Gresham; Miss Sheppard was on a visit to Mrs. Walter, she is a general shop-keeper in linen drapery, and came to London to buy goods.

Q. Is your partner in the house with you? - A. He does not sleep in the house, he pays half the rent, and taxes, he takes his breakfast there; at present the house is under repair.

(The articles produced by John Clark , the officer, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-12

375. ANN TEWSBERRY was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , twenty pair of women's leather shoes, value 3 l. three pair of women's jeans shoes, value 10 s. six pair of children's shoes, value 10 s. one pair of men's leather

shoes, value 3 s. three other pair of children's shoes, value 3 s. one pair of women's clogs, value 1 s. 6 d. another pair of clogs, value 2 s. two other pair of women's shoes, value 5 s. nine other pair of women's shoes, value 20 s. three other pair of children's shoes, value 20 s. and one other pair of women's shoes, value 2 s. the property of John Walter and John-Fanner Gresham .

JOHN WALTER sworn. - Q. Mr. Walter, are you in partner ship with John-Fanner Gresham? - A. He pays the rent and taxes with me where I live.

Q. It must be the dwelling-house of both, I cannot conceive it his dwelling-house? - A. In consequence of a search-warrant, on opening the box, we discovered several pair of shoes, and in two places of the house we found shoes, and in her pocket we found several duplicates.

Prisoner. I know nothing at all of pawning the shoes.

JOHN CLARK sworn. - Q. What did you find in the house? - A. These shoes, (produces them;) part were taken out of the box, and the others in the same room.

Q. Have you got your mark on the shoes? - A. Yes, on most of them.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) What is her brother? - A. He is a shoe-maker.

Q. Had he any access to your house? - A. He has been there.

Q. The brother having had access to the house, might have stole them? -

Q. Who are the shoes pawned by? - A. They were not pawned by her, they were pawned by her brother and her brother's wife, in the name of Dale.

Q. Which of the articles can you fix upon her? - A. I should not wish to fix upon any article whatever.

Court. The Jury must be satisfied about the articles stolen by her.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-13

376. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , a coat, value 1 l. a waistcoat, value 18 s. and one habit shirt, value 6 d. the property of John Weston .

JOHN WESTON sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , I live at No. 47, Cloth-fair ; the prisoner at the bar was my bed-fellow, I left him in bed on Monday, the 11th of June; I was going to work, and between five and six in the evening I wanted to put my things on, I found they were all gone.

Q. How had you left your box? - A. My box was left open, and the prisoner did not return to his lodgings; I went in pursuit of him to the Borough, but could not find him there; I found him on the Saturday following at Covent-garden theatre with the clothes on.

Q. Your coat, waistcoat, and shirt? - A. Yes; the shirt did not belong to me, it was left in my care.

Q. What do you call it? - A. A habit shirt; it is a half shirt, what the ladies wear.

Q. Where did you find that? - A. On his back.

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. He came in the character of a gentleman's servant ; he only lodged there two nights.

- RAWLINSON sworn. - On Saturday, the 16th of June, I took the prisoner out of the theatre with the clothes on him mentioned in the indictment, in company with some women.

(The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner delivered a paper, which was read in Court.

"My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, Permit an unfortunate young man, who, never deviated from the paths of honour till this time, to relate the circumstance in which he is involved. I lodged at the prosecutor's house on Monday in June last; being very intimate with the prosecutor, we having frequently conversed together, I requested him to accomodate me with the clothes, my own being out of repair, and they were livery; and being in company with the women above stated to you, I was apprehended in the one shilling gallery; the reason I had them, was only to appear gay in the eyes of these incorrect women, nothing but that induced me to behave so imprudently, and I hope you will believe me, that, though I acted as with the intention to rob the prosecutor of the property, I would not have kept the clothes so long, nor would I have took them, had I not the prosecutor's consent; I beg leave to state, that my box was at the lodgings at the time; I trust I am an object that will experience the lenity of your Lordship and the Gentlemen of the Jury. Be pleased to bestow mercy, for which I shall be bound in duty ever to pray,

WILLIAM SMITH ."

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Had you lent him these clothes? - A. I only saw him of a morning when I was going to work, and of an evening; I never lent them.

Q. Did he leave his box there? - A. I believe he left an old pair of breeches and a red waistcoat in his box.

Jury. Q. How long were you acquainted with the prisoner before this circumstance happened? - A. I never knew him before he came to these lodgings.

Q. Were your clothes in a box? - A. No, I folded them up in the morning, and put them safe on a table.

Court. Q. (To Prisoner.) Have you any witnesses? - A. No, I lived in the last place in Charterhouse-square, with Mr. Swainston, a coal-merchant,

It was not my intention to steal the clothes; upon my life I meant to bring them back.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-14

377. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , from the person of Elizabeth, the wife of Frederick Anderson , privily and without her knowledge, a pocket-book, value 1 d. three seven-shilling pieces, one Bank note, value 2 l. and one other Bank note, value 1 l. the property of the said Frederick .

ELIZABETH ANDERSON sworn. - I am a married woman, my husband's name is Frederick Anderson ; he is a contract dealer : on Monday, the 18th of June, about half-past ten o'clock at night, this John Lewis walked by my side; I live at Deptford.

Q. Did you know him before? - A No; he did not walk a great way with me; he directed his discourse to me, saying it was a fine night; I answered him, yes, I thought it was; he then told me I was walking very fast; I told him I had need, I had a long way to go; he asked me if he should accompany me home; I told him, no, I was going to my husband and family; with that I perceived a piece of paper kick against my foot; I picked it up, and saw it was a song I had had in my pocket; I then put my hand in my pocket to see if any thing else was taken out; I missed a pocket-book and a little snuff-box; I turned round to look for the man, and he was gone; I ran as far as the corner of Water-lane, and could see nothing of him; I returned back to my mother's.

Q. Where is your mother's? - A. She keeps house for Mr. Bilson, in the Strand; the next morning I went to the corner of Bedford-street, in the Strand, to stop eight yards of silk lace I had pledged for 8 s. the duplicates were in my pocket-book; I lost a great many duplicates in my pocket-book; some of gowns and other things; when I went for the silk lace it was taken out; then, on Tuesday, I went to Mr. Burn's, in East-Smithfield, a pawnbroker, and told him of my misfortune, and if any person came to take them out, to be so good as to stop them; I had pawned there a great many things of different descriptions.

Q. What money was in your pocket-book? - A. A 2 l. note, a 1 l. note, and three 7 s. pieces; I went home to Deptford, and on Wednesday, the prisoner came to Mr. Burn's.

Q. All that you know is, that you had your pocket-book taken from you in Fleet-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure to the person who took it? - A. Yes; I took particular notice of him.

Q. How far did he walk with you? - A. Not past twenty doors.

Q. What time of night was it? - A. About half-past ten at night; it was rather dark.

Q. What made you take notice of him? - A. I thought he was a very decent man, and I had no occasion to be afraid of him.

Q. Did you observe his countenance or his clothes? - A. His countenance and his clothes both.

Q. Now look at the prisoner; is that the man? - A. (Looks at the man.) Yes, that is the man.

Jury. Q. Had he the same clothes on then? - A. No; he had a kind of plaided waistcoat on then.

Court. Q. How soon after did you see him? - A. On Wednesday Mr. Burn sent for me, and then I went and saw him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. On Wednesday were you sure he was the person? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Had you any conversation with him then? - A. Yes, at Lambeth-street office; I am positive he is the man.

Q. Has any of your property been found since? - A. Yes, on the prisoner; the duplicates and the pocket-book.

Mr. Alley. Q. You were coming to town that night? - A. No; going to Deptford.

Q. You are really a married woman? - A. Yes.

Q. You made no difficulty of speaking to him? - A. I looked at him first.

Q. You looked at his face, to see if you liked him? - A. No.

Q. You never saw him before that night? - A. No.

Q. What kind of hat was it he wore? - A. A round hat.

Q. You said it was very dark? - A. Yes.

Q. You never saw the man before, and yet you mean to say the prisoner at the bar is the man? - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw the prisoner after that time, you saw him in the street; he was then in custody? - A. Yes; the pawnbroker sent a man to Deptford for me to come up.

Q. He gave you directions to come to the Police-office? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you came up to the Police-office with that impression on your mind that you might see the man that had robbed you? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever discovered any of your notes since? - A. No, nor the money.

Q. You say you pawned eight yards of silk lace for 8 s.? - A. That was in September last.

Q. This was a good deal of money for you to have about you? - A. It was money we had saved up to pay our rent.

Q. You mean to swear that was the man? - A. I can, with a clear conscience.

Q. And yet you never saw the man before? - A. No.

WILLIAM BURN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I live in East Smithfield: on the 18th of June, at night, the prosecutrix left word to request that I would stop any body that came for her things; I was out; on the 19th, about two o'clock, the prisoner accompanied by another man, came and presented two tickets.

Q. Who presented two tickets? - A. The prisoner; which were mine; I asked him many questions, to which he gave me such evasive answers that I had no doubt he was the person; he walked out of the shop with the other man; I followed and collared him; he begged me not to collar him; he said he would come back, which he did; I sent for a parish-officer; he had many doubts whether I had any right to keep him; I took him to the Police-office; there was no Magistrate sitting; I caused him to be locked up in the parish watch-house; I sent a man to Deptford for the woman, and she appeared; Griffiths has the duplicates; the other man was a Jew dealer; he had brought him to buy the things; I had a young lad that ran after him, and he gave him a blow.

Court. You behaved very well indeed.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Q. What do you know of this? - A. On the 20th, this man was brought up to our office, about five o'clock in the evening; our office shuts up at six; he was taken before the Magistrate by the Headborough, and the Magistrate asked if he had been searched; the Headborough said, no; I took him out and searched him, by order of the Magistrate, and out of his pocket I took this pocket-book, with a large quantity of duplicates in it, which were shewed to the prosecutrix; she said it was her's, and the pocket-book likewise; I asked him how he came by it; he said he picked it up. (Produces them.)

Q. (To prosecutrix.) Look at that pocket-book - is that your pocket-book? - A. It is.

Q. Are these duplicates your's? - A. If you will have the goodness to look, you will find them all in my own name.

Griffiths. They are all in her own name.

Q. (To prosecutrix.) Did you not feel any thing taken out of your pocket? - A. No.

Q. Was that the first alarm, when you saw the song at your foot? - A. It was the appearance of paper kicked against my foot; when I took it up, I saw it was a song I had had in my pocket.

Q. Had not he laid hold of you at all? - A. No, he did not.

Q. By the arm or by the side? - A. He did not.

Prisoner's defence. I was walking down Fleet-street, on the 18th of last month, and just by Water-lane I kicked the old pocket-book before my feet; I looked at it, and saw the contents of it; I called at that gentleman's house to see the articles were these duplicates were; as for money, there was none; there was not a penny in it; I tendered two of these tickets, to see what these goods were; I made no resistance; I told him I found them; I was taken into custody, and confined in the watch-house, and at the time when the lady came in she said a tall man accosted her in Fleet-street; she did not know me at first; she said afterwards that I was the man that did rob her; she said she lost three articles out of her pocket, a snuff-box, a screw box, and the book; I think it is not likely any person could take these three things at once; if there had been money in the book, I should have advertised it, and consequently I knew I had come fairly by it; I did not think it wrong; now farther, she never felt her pocket from the time she came from home till she saw the song, and picked it up.

Court. Duplicates are as valuable as money to the owners of them.

Q. (To prosecutrix.) Did any person accost you besides? - A. No.

Jury. Was the duplicate of the silk lace in that pocket-book? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 35.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-15

378. JAMES SHACKLEFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , a bay mare, value 21 l. the property of Charles Brown .

CHARLES BROWN sworn. - I am a surgeon and apothecary ; I live at Hornsey .

Q. Did you loose a mare at any time, and when? - A. In February, 1803, between the 21st and 26th, I lost her out of the yard of Mr. Thompson, a farmer.

Q. What kind of a mare was it? - A. A bright bay mare, about fifteen hands high; there was an accidental blemish on the near hind foot (she had got her foot in the halter), by which means the hair rather grew upwards; I was informed when I bought her of the accident; I bought her at a sale of Mr. Crane's; she had four black legs, and a small common star on her forehead; I was informed the next morning after she was taken out of the straw-yard, that she was taken with another; I had had her about a year and a half; she might be about eight years old; she had a black mane.

Q. This was in February, 1803; when did you see her afterwards? - A. The latter end of April or the beginning of May, in this year; then I saw

her in Mr. Preston's stables, near Battle-bridge; I did not tell him I knew her the first time; I called a second time, then she was not there; I called again, and while I was there the mare came into the yard; she had been out on hire; he called her his blood mare; I will swear to her at any time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You took up Preston, and brought him to Hatton-Garden; Preston came to Hatton-Garden, and stated that he bought it of Mr. Shackleford.

Court. Q. The horse was found in Preston's possession; you took Preston up, and the prisoner came, and said he was the man that sold it to Preston? - A. Yes.

JAMES PRESTON sworn. - I am a stable-keeper.

Q. What do you know of this mare? - A. I never saw her before I saw her at Mr. Marsden's livery-stables; Mr. Shackleford was upon her back.

Q. The mare was found in your possession, which you had in April last, and which Mr. Brown claimed as his mare, and for which you were taken up to Hatton-garden - how long had you had that mare? - A. Near a twelvemonth, to the best of my knowledge; I bought her of Mr. Shackleford at Mr. Marsden's livery-stables, Tottenham-court-road, at the gateway.

Q. Had she any particular marks on her? - A. Blind on the near eye, with a broken knee, the off knee.

Q. Had she the least shew that she had been hurt with a halter? - A. Not the least; her legs are as clean as any mare's in the world.

Q. A horse may have a clean leg, and yet she may be hurt with the halter? - A. There is not the least appearance in the world of her leg being hurt with it.

Q. Had she hurt herself with a halter while in your possession? - A. Never.

Q. Is there any marks about that one you bought of Shackleford? - A. There are many particular marks about that mare; in the first place, near the hip, there is a kind of a hole you may put your finger in it when she walks forward; she has four black legs, and on the off side of the body there are three or four white marks; a small white mark on her forehead, and one foot less than the other before, and was always a little tender-footed; I bought her as such.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you take any receipt of Mr. Shackleford? - A. No.

Q. Then you cannot speak to the time? - A. No.

Q. When Shackleford came to the office, he went and surrendered himself, that was on Tuesday last Sessions? - A. I believe it was.

Q. He then went down to Leiceistershire with an officer to bring the person whom he had bought the mare of - did he not return as fast as a mail-coach could take him with the person? - A. To the best of my knowledge, he did.

Mr. Gurney. He was in Court on Friday last Sessions.

JAMES THOMPSON sworn. - I live at Hornsey, I am a farmer, I know when she was lost from my premises.

Q. You have heard two descriptions of this mare, which is the right? - A. I very well remember the star was on one side of her forehead, she was between fourteen and fifteen hands high; her eyes were perfectly good.

Q. When you took her in the straw-yard, did you observe whether she had hurt herself with the halter? - A. No.

Q. Did you observe any thing about her feet, or whether she had any white spots on her side? - A. No, neither.

Q. Are you able to say, whether that is the same mare you had in your straw-yard? - A. Yes.

Q. By what? - A. By her gift of going, and by her size it is.

Q. Did you pace her? - A. I used to see Mr. Brown ride her three or four times a day before I had her.

Q. Did you observe her only to have one eye? - A. No, I cannot say I looked over her particularly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You seem to be a man of some courage to swear that this mare was lost out of your straw-yard - you had not noticed these spots? - A. No.

Q. Is she not here? - A. No, the parties on both sides saw her yesterday.

Q. Do you know whether this mare has one eye or two? - A. No.

Q. Can you swear to her having four legs, you seem not to have looked over her? -

- CRANE sworn. - Q. This was your mare once? - A. Yes, I saw her on the 8th of May.

Q. How long had you had her before you sold her? - A. Between four and five years, I sold her to Mr. Brown; I saw her when she was brought to the Office, I believe her to be the same mare.

Q. Did you see the white marks on her then? - A. Only the star on her forehead.

Q. None of the side? - A. I did not take particular notice.

Q. When you went to identify, one would have thought that you would have took particular notice of every hair in her body almost - how old is she? - A. She is eleven years old; I bought her at a year old, and kept her five years.

Q. Had she hurt herself with the halter? - A. A servant of mine informed me she had three years before I sold her; I have seen the mark, it continued when I parted with her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You do not know that she has any marks on the side? - A. No.

Q. Therefore, for what you know, it may not be the same mare? -

- LEWIS sworn. - I bought the horse of Preston, she has four or five marks on the side under the saddle, they are very visible.

JOHN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer: On the 9th of May, I had a search-warrant to go to Preston's to look for this mare.

Q. Has she any marks? - A. She certainly has, from being lent out, and being made a common hack of by Mr. Preston; those marks might have come from the saddle, and fifty people might go to-day, and think she has both good eyes; she is blind of one eye.

Prisoner's defence. Hearing that Mr. Preston was taken into custody, I went to Hatton-garden; I informed the Magistrate, I had bought it of a gentleman in Leicestershire; I requested bail, and went down into Leicestershire, and brought the gentleman up, who is now outside of the Court.

(For the Prisoner.)

FRANCIS CHRICHLEY sworn. - I am a draper, in Leicestershire: On the 19th of May, on Holy Thursday, last year, I sold the mare to Mr. Shackleford for eighteen pounds; I had her in my possession about a month, or six weeks; I bought her of John Williams , he is a dealer in cattle in Leicestershire, and is well known in this place.

Q. Shackleford came down to you last Sessions, and brought you into Court? - A. Yes, I am perfectly clear it is the same mare, she is blind in one eye.

Q. Had she any marks on her side? - A. Not that I know of, she is about fourteen hands and a half high.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Had you rode her yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you the least doubt that she is the same mare? - A. No, James Swan was with me when I sold her; I am positively clear it is the mare I sold Mr. Shackleford.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-16

379. ANN SMITH was indicted for not having the fear of God before her eyes, but being moved by the instigation of the devil, on the 16th of June , on a certain female child, then lately born of her body, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously, did make an assault, and that she, on the said certain female child, with both her hands, did take into a privy, belonging to Saunders Turner , wherein was a great quantity of human filth and excrement, feloniously did cast and throw the said child, and by means of the filth and excrement aforesaid, the said child was choaked and smothered, of which the said child instantly died, and so she, the said Ann Smith , the said child did kill and murder , against the statute and against his Majesty's peace.

ANTHONY LONGHEAD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner at the bar has been some time past in your service? - A. Yes, she left me on the latter end of May.

Q. Did she, at the time she left you, appear to be pregnant? - A. She did.

Q. After that time, the officers came to search her box at your house, did they find any child-bed linen? - A. Yes, there was some; that was Sunday, June the 17th.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner behaved very well in your service? - A. Yes, she was not so keen and witty as some.

ESTHER MONTFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know the nature of an oath - what will be the consequence if you swear falsely? - A. I shall go to the naughty man.

Q. How old are you? - A. I am twelve years old.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar, in the course of this last month, lodge with your mother? - A. Yes, she lodged with my mother about three weeks.

Q. Where does your mother live? - A. In Bethnal-green-road .

Q. With whom did she sleep? - A. She slept with my mother and me, in the same bed.

Q. On the night of Saturday, the 16th of June, was your mother at home - did your mother sleep with you the night this happened? - A. No, only the prisoner, and she was taken very bad.

Q. What time of the night? - A. It was in the morning, between four and five.

Q. What did you observe upon her being taken ill? - A. I did not know what to think; she got out of bed, and sat on the bed; I heard a noise, like the cry of a child; I asked her what was that? she said, it did not concern me, I was in bed; immediately she asked me for a light, I got out of bed, and struck a light; then she asked me for a towel, I gave her a towel.

Q. When you had given her a towel, what then? - A. I saw it was full of blood; then she went down stairs, and when I thought she had got down stairs, I went slyly down, and walked after her, to see where she went to; I saw her take a stick, and go into the vault.

Q. How long did she stay there? - A. I believe it was about ten minutes; when I thought she was coming up stairs, I came up slyly, and went into bed.

Q. How soon did she come to you? - A. In about ten minutes from going down; she came to me immediately after I got into bed again.

Q. What did she say to you when she came to you then? - A. She asked me whether her belly had sunk down; I told her I did not know, and when it was about ten o'clock, she went out to her sister's, she said.

Q. How did she seem, well or ill, when she

came to bed? - A. She seemed better than she was before.

Q. What time did she get up? - A. I believe about nine o'clock.

Q. How soon after she went did you see her again? - A. About eight or nine o'clock that night; she was then a great deal better; she was taken in Mr. Gibbons's house that night.

Q. You told me this happened between four and five in the morning - how do you know that? - A. I thought it was by the day-light.

Q. Did she get up more than once that night? - A. No, only once.

Q. Then she went to bed, and went to sleep, and slept some time? - A. She did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You know you are bound to tell the truth, and nothing else? - A. Yes,

Q. You say you are twelve years old - is your father and mother alive? - A. No.

Q. How long have you been in the parish-school? - A. Almost a year.

Q. Were you bound apprentice when you left the parish-school? - A. No.

Q. They generally bind the children apprentice when they leave the school? - A. I do not know; I was turned out of the school, and I got in again.

Q. What were you turned out of school for? - A. I do not know I am sure.

Q. Has it ever happened that you had the misfortune of tumbling in the water any where? - A. Yes, in Hare-street.

Q. How did that happen? - A. I do not know.

Q. Was the water deep or shallow? - A. It was deep enough to drown me.

Q. How did it happen - tell the truth and nothing else? - A. I took a few shillings from my mother.

Q. Who did you accuse of doing that? - A. Mary Reeson , the servant in the house.

Q. Where was the money - in a box, or how? - A. In a chest.

Court. The girl is not bound to answer that question without she chooses.

Q. Have you ever been in a Court of Justice before this occasion? - A. I do not know.

Q. You know what a Justice of Peace is? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you remember going before a Justice against a man, for having something to do with you against your will? - A. Yes.

Q. What was his name? - A. I do not know the man's name.

Q. What was the charge you made against him? - A. I have forgot.

Q. Was he ever prosecuted? - A. He was not.

Q. How long ago was that? - A. I do not know I am sure.

Q. What time did she come to bed on the night before the morning you heard the crying of a child? - A. I do not know I am sure.

Q. Was it eight o'clock at night? - A. I believe it was after; it was dark when she came to bed.

Q. Was the door locked on the inside? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she call to you to let her in? - A. I did not hear her.

Q. Was the door broke open? - A. I found it was opened; I was fast asleep.

Q. You locked it when you went to bed? - A. Yes, my mother told me.

Q. Do you remember quarreling with her about the door being broke open? - A. I forget that.

Q. Do you remember giving her two or three blows on the belly? - A. That I never did.

Q. You did not tell your mother of what passed till next day? - A. No.

Q. You saw your mother in the course of that day at breakfast, and other times? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you neither told your mother, nor your aunt, nor any body else? - A. I never told any body till the evening, and on the next day I told it to Mrs. Longhead and Mary Reeson .

Q. Recollect, do you mean in persisting to say that you did not strike the girl in the course of the night? - A. I only touched her with my elbow.

Q. You nudged her? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you nudge her for? - A. She kept talking to me, and I wanted to go to sleep; I nudged her with the end of my elbow.

Q. That was a nudge in the belly? - A. No, on her back; I only nudged her twice.

JOSEPH LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you lodge in the same house? - A. Yes: On Saturday morning, the 16th of June, I saw the prisoner at the bottom of the stairs; I saw her go up stairs; I did not see where she had been; I went to the privy; I saw the privy all over with blood, and at the front part of the privy there was a parcel of blood about the size of my hand.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know any thing of that girl? - A. Yes; she has been a very bad girl, I believe.

Mrs. LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Were you present when any thing was taken out of the privy in the course of Saturday, the 16th of June? - A. Yes; as nigh as I can recollect, between three and four in the afternoon, a young child was taken out dead; it was a female child.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you a married woman? - A. I am; I have no children of my own; I have seen children at their birth.

JOHN GIBBONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You live next door to where the prisoner lodged? - A. Yes.

Q. On Saturday, the 16th of June, did you

take the dead body out of the privy that died the night before? - A. I did; I looked down the privy, and first took up two large pieces of bread that were laying on the soil; I did not discover the dead body till I had stirred the soil, then I saw either the leg or the foot; I took the child up, and washed it; it was in a narrow passage where the child went down; I found it rather difficult to get it out; she was taken to my house in the course of the evening; I said several words to her; she said, what shall I be done to; I think, to the best of my recollection, she asked whether she should be hung; Mr. Ray, the officer, asked her if she had done any thing; she did not seem to speak; there were no marks of violence on the child.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer: On Saturday the 16th, in the evening, I was sent for at Mr. Gibbons's house, and when I first saw the prisoner at the bar, she was in a fainting state; she came to herself, and said, Oh! I shall be hanged; she immediately fainted again; we got some harts-horn, and she recovered herself; she then said she should be hung; I then said, I do not know that you have done any thing that you deserve to be hanged for; O yes, she said, I have, and then fainted again. When she came to, she said, it was dead before I threw it down; she then fainted away, and was in a very bad state; we searched her box at Mr. Longhead's, and found some saffron; there was a bit of a child's blanket; I believe there were one or two children's caps in the box; there might be two.

MARY REESON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. In Bethnal-green-road.

Q. On Saturday morning did that little girl come to you? - A. Yes; Esther Montford came to me at four o'clock, and said Ann Smith was fainting; I did not see her then; I saw Esther Montford at dinner time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You live in this house with this little girl - is she a girl that you would believe one word she said upon her oath? - A. I cannot say I could.

Mr. Alley. (To Mrs. Lewis.) Q. Whether you have seen any children recently after birth? - A. I have.

Q. Have you ever attended any ladies, so as to know what is called by a surgeon a caul? - A. I have seen such things.

Q. What children have on their heads - a thing of that sort prevents the child from crying? - A. I have heard so; I did not examine the child; I saw a caul afterwards.

Mr. Gurney. (To Mrs. Gibbons.) Q. You are the wife of that gentleman who has been examined before - you have had children? - A. I have been the mother of ten children.

Q. Did you see this infant after your husband took it out of the privy - had it any caul? - A. It had not then; the caul was left in the prisoner's shift; I examined the child, and from the child's head to its feet there were no marks of violence on it; she had not gone above seven months; there were no toe-nails, and the lower parts were not perfect.

Prisoner's defence. I put it down there to hide my shame; I knew it was born before its time; I thought it was a miscarriage.

Q. (To Mr. Gibbons.) Is the privy dark? - A. It is under the stairs.

Q. Must she have a light to go there? - A. It is very dark.

GUILTY

Of endeavouring to conceal the birth, but not of the murder .

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-17

380. THOMAS BUCKNELL was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on Monday the 21st of May , a Bank-note, value 1 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. Stands charged with feloniously uttering, disposing of, and putting away, a like forged note, with like intentions.

Third and Fourth Counts. For like offence, only stating it a promissory note for the payment of one pound, with like intentions.

And Four other Counts. The same as the former, only alledging the intention to defraud Samuel Peckham .

(The indictment read by Mr. Giles, and the case stated by Mr. Fielding.)

JOSEPH KIMBELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. I am a servant of Mr. Peckham, I live at the Brill-house, Somer's-town.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at the bar there? - A. Yes, on Whit-Monday; there were two women and three men that came with him, I only took particular notice of the prisoner; they came there to spend their afternoon.

Q. Had they any thing to drink? - A. The men had some ale, and the two women had some tea; the prisoner at the bar offered to pay the reckoning; he paid me the reckoning, he gave me a note; I looked at the note strictly, and took it up to the mistress at the bar.

Q. Did you, in consequence of any thing that passed, go back to the prisoner - what passed between you and the prisoner? - A. I asked him to put his name to it.

Q. Did you tell him why? - A. I did not; I took a pen and ink, and he wrote it on the bench which he sat on; he wrote on it William Humphrys , Charlton-street; I only made mention to

him, that he was a near neighbour; and he said, yes, meaning that it was the same street that we lived in; he gave me his address, No. 14, or 17, in that street.

Q. There is a Charlton-street, in Somers-town? - A. Yes.

Q. You took the note upon that? - A. Yes; upon his signifying it, and gave him change for it.

Q. And the prisoner and the party went away? - A. Yes, soon after that.

Q. Have you made any inquiry in Charlton-street? - A. I went to No. 14, 15, and 17, and they never heard that a man of the name of Humphrys lived there.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - A. Not till I saw him at Bow-street.

Q. Did you know him again? - A. Yes; I knew him to be the same man.

Court. Q. The next time you saw him he was in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was that? - A. At Bow-street.

WILLIAM HUGHES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 14, Charlton-street, Somers-town.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Humphrys at your house? - A. No; I never knew a person of that name in Somers-town.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at the bar? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Have you lived there long? - A. Three years.

RICHARD ALDRIDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 17, Charlton-street, Somers-town; I have lived there about six years.

Q. Do you know any person of the name of Humphries living there? - A. No, never; none of that name.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner there? - A. To the best of my knowledge I never saw him before in my life.

THOMAS BLISS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You are inspector of Bank notes; you will be so good as to state whether that is a Bank of England note? - A. It is a counterfeit note.

Q. Is that the signature of the Cashier of the Bank? - A. It is not the signature of any person in the Bank; the whole of it is counterfeit.

Court. Q. What is the name of the signature? - A. It is in imitation of William Colleer .

Q. Did you ever see him write? - A. Many times; I know his hand writing; I am certain it is not his hand writing; the whole of it is counterfeit. (The note read.)

Q. (To Joseph Kimbell .) Is that the note you received from the prisoner? - A. (Looks at the note.) It is.

Q. How do you know it to be the note that you received from the prisoner? - A. By his hand writing, and by the name that he wrote upon it.

Q. (To Mr. Bliss.) Were you present when the prisoner was apprehended? - A. I was.

Q. Where did you find him? - A. No. 14, Queen-street, Drury-lane.

Q. When was it you apprehended him? - A. On Sunday morning, the 24th of June.

Q. (To Kimbell.) What was the day of the month when you saw him at your master's? - A. I cannot say; it was in Whitsun week; Monday or Tuesday.

JACOB-THOMAS WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. What are you? - A. I am a publican, living at Brentford.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at Brentford? - A. On the 17th of May I saw him at Mr. Nunn's shop.

Q. Were you in Mr. Nunn's shop before the prisoner? - A. No; he was in there before I was; the prisoner was in the shop buying some dressed ham; Mrs. Nunn put the ham in some paper; the prisoner tossed a 1 l. note on the counter, to pay for the ham.

Q. Did you observe the note? - A. I observed the note particularly; I made an observation to Mr. Nunn that it was a bad note in the prisoner's presence; the prisoner immediately stepped to the counter, close to me, and asked me how I knew it was a bad one; and I asked him (and looked at him very sternly), how he knew it was a good one; I meant to take him by the collar; I took the note nearer to the candle, and examined it more minutely, and found it was a bad one.

Q. You did not take hold of him? - A. No.

Q. What time of the evening was it? - A. Between nine and ten in the evening, on the 17th of May; the candles were lit, and the prisoner said he had it of a man at the door, and he would call him in.

Q. Did you make any answer to him? - A. Not at that time; on my looking at the note more particularly (I was behind the counter). I immediately said I would take the prisoner; the prisoner was making to the door, as I then supposed, in order to bring the man; I followed him, and could not find him; I did not go outside of the door at that time.

Q. Did he come in, and bring in any body with him? - A. No.

Court. Q. How long were you in the house? - A. As much as ten minutes.

Mr. Fielding. Q. What did you do with the note? - A. I came back and marked the note in two places, sealed it up in a paper directed to Mr. Nunn, and ordered him, if any one called, to detain them.

Q. Is that the note? (A note shewn him.) - A. That is the same note.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have not the least doubt he is the man.

Q. Had you ever seen the man before? - A. No, nor since, till I saw him at the prison in Coldbath-fields.

Q. Were there any other persons when you saw him in Coldbath-fields? - A. There were four or five others brought up; I immediately selected him.

Q. You have no hesitation? - A. None whatever of his person.

Prisoner. I never saw Mr. White at all with my eyes.

JOHN NUNN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Where do you live? - A. At Brentford; I keep a shop there, the corner of the Market-place; I am a grocer and cheesemonger.

Q. Look at the prisoner; do you remember seeing him at any time in May last? - A. Yes, on the first day of Brentford fair, in the evening.

Q. Was that on the 17th of May? - A. I do not recollect the day, it was the first fair-day.

Q. You remember his coming into the shop? - A. Yes; he asked for half a pound of ham; it came to tenpence.

Q. How did he offer to pay for it? - A. With a 1 l. note, which he threw on the counter.

Q. Did you ever see that note? (A note shewn to him.) - A. Yes; that is the note the prisoner brought; I know it by Mr. White's mark; I saw him make the mark; Mr. White was in the shop at the time the note was paid; I took the note and looked at it, and shewed it to Mrs. Nunn; she said it was very greasy; I said, never mind, if it is greasy, if it is a good one; Mr. White said it was a bad one; the prisoner asked Mr. White how he knew it was a bad one; Mr. White said, how do you know it is a good one; Mr. White was behind the counter, and said he would take him; I do not know the words exactly; the prisoner said the man was at the door he received it of; he would bring him in.

Court. Q. Did he say he would take him so loud as the prisoner could hear? - A. I do not know; I think he could.

Q. Did the prisoner ever return? - A. No.

Mr. Bosanquet. (To Mr. Bliss.) Q. Is that a counterfeit note? - A. (Looks at the note.) I am convinced it is a counterfeit note; the same plate as the last.

WILLIAM STONE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are a biscuit-baker in Long-lane, Smithfield? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at Brentford fair with your articles? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 17th, the first day of the fair? - A. Yes.

Q. Look steadfastly at the prisoner; did you see him at the fair on that day? - A. Yes; towards the evening; it was duskish; he asked me the price of the best nuts, what they were a pound; I said fourteen pence; he said, weigh me a pound; I weighed him a pound, and he gave me a 1 l. note.

Q. Are you able from what took place at that time, to know the note again? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the note? (The note shewn him.) - A. It is; it is the first note that I took; I had the misfortune to take two at that fair.

Q. Are you sure that is the note you received from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. By what mark is it that you know that is the note that you took of him? - A. I observed these two flaws, and particularly this tear is a crooked tear.

Q. Did it differ by that tear from the other note you took? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any other mark by which you know it? - A. Yes, by the names of Jenks and Green at the bottom.

Q. What did you do with the notes after you received them? - A. I put them in my fob.

Q. Whom did you deliver that note to? - A. To the solicitor or inspector.

Q. To Mr. Bliss? - A. That is the gentleman.

Court. Q. When did you deliver it to Mr. Bliss? - A. The second day of the fair in the morning, at Brentford; the gentleman came up to my stall the day after I received it.

Mr. Fielding. Q. When did you write your name on it? - A. Last week, at Bow-street.

Q. Have you got in your possession any other note that you had took on that day? - A. No; I parted with that on the same day, to the same gentleman.

Q. Is that the other note, that you received on the same day at the fair? (The note shewn him.) - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How do you know that? - A. By the long name; I took notice at the time it was a long name; I cannot pronounce it perfectly.

Q. Did you deliver these two notes to Mr. Bliss, and did you receive these two notes on the 17th, at the fair at Brentford? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You had no notes but what you delivered to Mr. Bliss? - A. No, I only took two.

Mr. Fielding. Q. (To Mr. Bliss.) Look at that note? (A note shewn him.) - A. This is one of the notes I received of Stone, it is a counterfeit, like the other note he has got in his hand.

Court. Q. When did you receive it from Stone? - A. On the 18th of May, at the fair, both the notes.

Q. You had been at Brentford? - A. Yes; on hearing there were some counterfeit notes there, I went down.

Q. Was that you received on the 18th of May from Stone a counterfeit note? - A. Yes, they are both counterfeits, and from the same plate with those I have received before; they are all from the same plate with that I saw of Kimbell and Nunn.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty of what is

Alledged against me; I was never at Brentford fair in my life, I am in the plated way by trade, the lady is here where I work at; we were short of work at our shop, and I bought things of my mistress to get a shilling or two, because I had not employment, and a young man, of the name of Booth, had got his watch in pledge; he gave me the ticket of it, and in the course of three or four days, I pawned some of my things to release the watch, because he told me it was worth four pounds, and I thought to get something by it; it was not worth fifteen shillings, I kept it for two or three days, the case was very much bruised and broke; I mended the case, then it was much better than it was before; I wore it for three or four days, then I saw a man that gave an order for three or four plated spoons and cups, and when I had taken them to the man that had ordered them, they were too small and too light, I had them returned on my hands, I kept them for three or four days; I then thought I had better get a fresh place of work; I went down to Hoxton, to a friend, at the Royal Oak, he was not at home, then I went to the White Horse in Pitfield-street; I called for a pint of beer, and there was a gentleman there whom I had never seen before, I supposed he was a countryman; seeing him play at skittles, I went up to him, and I said to him, I beg your pardon, an't you a traveller? Why, says he; by your appearance and your dress, said I. I then said to him, I have an article to dispose of in my pocket; he asked me what they were, I told him; he says, come and go into the parlour, we will agree if we can; we went into the parlour, and there were three or four gentlemen there; I shewed him the articles, he liked them very much; I asked him fifteen shillings for the two cups, and seven shillings for the spoons, or seven shillings and sixpence, I will not be sure which; he bated me down to twelve shillings for the cups, and six shillings for the spoons, that was eighteen shillings; I told him there was another article to sell, and that was the watch that I had fetched out of pledge; I gave it into his hands, and he set the price, and I took it, that was twenty-eight shillings, I was to spend a shilling out of it, which I agreed to do; in the mean time, I asked him if he dealt in such goods as them; he said, he generally dealt in a smaller way, in knives, &c. I said, if you do, I will give you my master's residence, I knew the manufactory of such goods, I could get them cheaper of my master and mistress than he could get them himself, and get something myself by them; in the mean time, he did not want the residence of my master and mistress, he said he would sooner deal with me; I then required of him where he lodged, when in town, which he gave me; he could not write himself, nor read in his life; he said, he always kept his accounts by his head, and a gentleman in company wrote his residence, that was in Charlton-street; he gave me the direction to the Brill-house, which I have lost; he travelled to Norfolk he said, and to Newmarket; he authorised me to sign it in his name. I was never in the house above three times, in the White Horse, Pitfield-street, and I saw him there twice.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

Of uttering it, knowing it to be forged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-18

381. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for that he, on the 23d of June , feloniously, knowingly, and wittingly, and without lawful excuse, having in his custody divers forged and counterfeited Bank notes, setting forth five different forged and counterfeited Bank notes, for the payment of 1 l. each, he then and there knowing the said Bank notes to be forged and counterfeited. And another charge, for the like offence, only stating it one forged and counterfeited Bank note, for the payment of 1 l. he then knowing the said Bank note to be forged and counterfeited .

Second Count. For having in his possession, without lawful excuse, a certain other forged and counterfeited Bank note.

And other Counts, setting forth other forged and counterfeited Bank notes.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Bosanquet, and the case stated by Mr. Fielding.)

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Were you stationed at the house of the prisoner, No. 14, Cumberland-street, Tottenham-court road , on the 23d of June? - A. I waited there till about five o'clock in the afternoon; I went on Friday, and staid there all night; he had a lodging in the two pair of stairs front room; I staid there in the room; there was one of the Officers with me at night; about five o'clock on Saturday afternoon, Mr. Jones and three more men and a woman came up stairs to me.

Q. Were you acquainted with their persons? - A. I had never seen them before; as soon as Jones came up, I asked him if his name was Jones; he said, yes; he said, where is my wife; I told him she had not been gone long, she was at a public-house near by, and I would shew him where she was.

Q. At the same time where was his wife? - A. At Mr. Carpmeal's, an Officer of Bow-street; they were very agreeable to go with me; I gave them the key of the room, and they locked the door; they all went down stairs, and I followed them, and when they got into the street they seemed rather shy; I said you had better all go together, it is but just round the corner; there was one of them with a saddle-bag; he said, I cannot

go, it will be too late for me, I must go by the coach; then Jones made answer and said, he would be d - d if he would go, and I said, I would be d - d if he should not go; I took hold of his collar with my left hand; the other men all went off but one; one stopped; the woman went away first; Jones then put his right hand in his pocket, and threw this parcel (shews the parcel) and said to the man, take care of that; he threw it in the street, and the man that waited picked it up, and Jones begged him to run away with it; I immediately swore, that if he ran away with it I would shoot him; I then swore, if he did not bring or throw the parcel to me, I would shoot him; he threw the parcel, and it hit me on the leg; I stooped to pick it up, and Jones tried to throw me down, and he kicked the parcel about a yard from me; then I threw Jones; we had three or four ups and downs in the street, and we had three or four overs at the same time; and then there came by a young girl; I desired her to pick the parcel up; she threw it at me; there was a man standing by; I understand his name is Thomas Jones ; I charged him to aid and assist, and just when the girl threw the parcel I was on top of the prisoner; Thomas Jones took the parcel, and kept it till such time as I had tied the prisoner's hands; when I tied his hands, I got a coach and took him to Bow-street; I took the parcel and put it in my pocket; Mr. Bliss examined it; I found a large piece of cotton in it, which is here now, and inside of the cotton there is a brown paper parcel, and when the parcel was opened there were five parcels, and each parcel contained twenty 1 l. notes; in all there were one hundred pounds.

Q. I believe you marked them? - A. (Looks at them.) Yes, they are the same.

MARY WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. Look at the prisoner; do you remember seeing the prisoner any time with the last witness? - A. Yes, on Saturday afternoon, at five o'clock, on the 23d of June.

Q. Did you see any struggle between them? - A. No.

Q. Did you see a paper parcel? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you pick up that parcel? - A. I throwed it to the Officer; he desired me to pick it up; I held it a bit, and he did not take it, and then I threw it down.

Q. Did you open the parcel while it was in your possession? - A. I did not.

THOMAS JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Were you present at the struggle between the officer and the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; I was in my shop, on Saturday, the 23d of June, and saw two men in the road, contending or struggling together; the prisoner at the bar and the officer; I went out to see what was the matter, and just as I got out of the door the prisoner was on his back, and the officer had got his legs over him; I then asked what was the matter; he told me he was a Bow-street officer, and charged me to assist him; I took the parcel and stood by; he tied his hands together; there was a paper parcel which the officer desired the girl to throw towards him; I took the parcel; I kept the parcel while he tied his hands; the parcel was the same parcel the girl threw to him.

Prisoner. Q. Is that the same parcel that I had in my hands? - A. To the best of my knowledge it is; there was writing on it, and according to the writing I now see, it is; it was directed in the same way; I did not see it opened.

Prisoner. Nor I.

THOMAS BLISS sworn. Court. Q. What are you? - A. I am one of the inspectors of the Bank of England.

Mr. Giles. Q. Were you at Bow-street when this parcel was brought? - A. I was at Bow-street half an hour after the man was there (looks at the notes), and these are five of the notes; there were five parcels of twenty each, and these five are like the others; they are all forged notes; the five separate parcels of twenty each; I have looked at them all, and marked them all; every one of these notes are forged, and all from the same plate. - (The notes read.)

Prisoner's defence. Saturday week I came to town, as stated, in company with three men and a woman; when we came into London, they told me they were strangers to London; I told them I lived very near there; they had a portmanteau and several bundles; among the bundles there was this parcel that I had; I asked them to go to my lodging to get a cup of tea; upon entering the room there was Mr. Smith there; I asked for my wife; he told me he would take me there; after going down stairs, and going along, I recollected I had a parcel that belonged to them; I threw the parcel to the man that belonged to it; he picked up the parcel, and after the man went a little way he threw the parcel down; he says he pulled his pistol out to the man; he had no pistol; in the mean time I was thrown down on my back; he tied my hands; how was it possible that it could not be out of his sight, when he was shifting from one side to the other and tying my hands; I asked him where I was going to; he said, you must go along with me; he said, come along immediately; a scuffle ensued, it did not last above a minute, there were no blows, nor any harm.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040704-19

382. HANNAH CALLAGNAN and ELEANOR HOLLAND were indicted for feloniously stealing a gown, value 7 s. two aprons, value 3 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of John Jones .

HANNAH JONES sworn. - Q. Are you a married woman? - A. Yes, my husband's name is John Jones ; I went out of an errand on Whit-Monday, I was coming home, between one and two, I met these two women in Vere-street, Clare-market; I knew the old woman, Mrs. Holland, the other I never saw in my life; she asked me how I did, and I asked her the same; I said, Mrs. Holland, I cannot stop; they followed me, and I said to Mrs. Holland, when she came up into the room, you are welcome; I made as much of these two women as I could afford, I gave them victuals and drink.

Q. Were you sober yourself? - A. We were all sober together; the gown and aprons hung over my head while they were in the room, this was on Monday, I wore them on Sunday, and the two handkerchiefs hung over a chair in the room; they staid with me about an hour, Holland went out with the gown and apron; I called to my husband for assistance, he was at work at the back part of the house underneath, he did not hear, nor did he come; this young woman, when I was going to run out of the room-door, gave me a very hard blow, and I lay all in agore of blood on the floor.

Q. What was taken away? - A. The gown and handkerchief; I cannot say they took them, there was nobody else in the place to take them.

Prisoner Holland. I know nothing about this, I have no right to be here for this.

ANN FRANCIS sworn. - I went with Mrs. Jones to the lodgings of Holland on the 22d; we saw Mrs. Holland, her husband, and another man, eating their breakfast; Mrs. Jones asked them for her property that they had stole last night; Mrs. Holland said, she was not the person that stole it, it was Callagnan; and that if they could find Callagnan, they would bring the property, it was pawned in the street; Mrs. Jones said, she would not be put off any longer, if they did not choose to get it, she would fetch a constable; I immediately fetched Mr. Wygate, he came with me to the house; with that, Mrs. Holland said that Mrs. Callagnan was up stairs; Mrs. Holland, Mrs. Jones, and myself, went up stairs, and Mrs. Jones knocked at the door; Callagnan opened the door, and came forward, and Mrs. Jones said, that is the woman that laid me on the floor all of a gore of blood; down stairs we came, and Callagnan with us, into Holland's apartment again; with that, Callagnan said she would take her oath that she never saw any property of Mrs. Jones's in her life; when she saw the constable was going to take her into custody, she stood with her feet asunder, and dropped the ticket; she kicked it with her feet, and said to Mrs. Jones see what that is; Mrs. Jones picked it up, and gave it to Mrs. Holland's husband, as she could not read, and he said, here the clothes are pledged for fifteen shillings; he immediately gave the duplicate to the constable, Mr. Wygate.

- WYGATE sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to apprehend these two people by Mrs. Francis; after they had dropped the duplicates down, I saw where the things were pledged; I took them immediately to the watch-house, and went to the pawnbroker's, that he might bring the things the next day to Marlborough-street.

- HOW sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I produce a gown, two aprons, and a handkerchief, the younger prisoner pledged them, I think they were both together.

(The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Holland, GUILTY .

Callagnan, GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040704-20

383. WILLIAM WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , two iron bars, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Sir James Mansfield and Thomas-Burly Bransom , Esq . then and there fixed to a certain building .

Second Count. For the like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

WILLIAM DAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you a watchman on the 11th of June at the Temple? - A. Yes; I stopped him on the 11th of June, at half past five o'clock in the morning, in Temple-lane; he had the bars on his shoulders, I had some suspicions that he had stole them from the Temple ; I put both hands to him, and soon got his master, and then took the bars from him, and put them on the ground, and dragged him to Mr. Smith's, and the bars were delivered to Mr. Smith on the same morning; I took the bars to a cellar in Essex-court, No. 3, and they fitted, and there was a piece of wood that fitted as well as the bars.

Q. You have no doubt that these bars were taken from that cellar? - A. I am sure of that.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the head porters of the Temple; they came and called me out of bed, and brought the prisoner down to me, a little before six; I came immediately to the door, and as soon as I saw the prisoner I knew him again; I told them to keep him till I put my clothes on, and before I took him to the watch-house, I took the bars to No. 3, Essex-court, and this piece of wood, and it fitted the place.

Q. Essex-court is in the Middle Temple? - A. Yes.

Q. In the county of Middlesex? - A. Yes.

GEORGE NORMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am porter and watchman of the Middle Temple.

Q. Had you lately observed No. 3, Essex-court? - A. On the 11th of June, at five o'clock in the morning, I saw them all safe. (Produces the bars.)

Q. Are those the bars you had delivered to you? - A. Yes, I have had them in my custody ever since; they fitted the place exactly.

Q. How early do you open the gates of a morning? - A. At five o'clock.

JOHN BARBER sworn. - (Produces a deed, and the names of the gentlemen inserted therein, which was read in Court.)

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from my own home, there is an old building at Blackfriars-bridge, one end goes down from the bridge, I saw them lay there, I took them up, and put them across my shoulder.

Q. (To Norman.) Did you ever see the prisoner at the Temple before? - A. Yes, and at Bow-street too.

GUILTY , aged 67.

Whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-21

384. THOMAS PADGETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , one copper, value 15 s. the property of Bannister Flight .

BANNISTER FLIGHT sworn. - On Tuesday morning, the 22d of May, when I came down, the servant told me the house had been robbed, on which I went down, and saw the copper was gone; the wash-house is a little distance from the house.

Q. Was the copper the only property the house had been robbed of? - A. There was a handkerchief, but the copper was the chief of the property stolen; it was fixed in the wash-house.

JOHN WEBB sworn. - I am patrol of Hackney : On the 22d of May, me and my partners were standing at Mr. Flight's gates, and at a quarter past one in the morning we saw a man; he went by us as we stood at the door of Mr. Manning's house; he got up the back premises, up the pallisading; my partners and I went and surrounded the place; they had not been gone no long time before they returned to me, and said, there was a man with the copper; we all three of us went after him, he run away when he saw us, and left the copper; the copper appeared to be fresh taken from the brick-work; one of the patrols stopped him, I joined in the pursuit; we asked him where he got that copper? he said, he was walking along the road, and saw nothing of it; I am sure he is the man that had the copper; we had never lost sight of him, I was up to him in less than a minute.

Q. How came you not to take him before he got in? - A. We have an order from the Committee to take them if they come out.

Q. If you had raised the alarm, you know he could not have broke into the house; very bad conduct! nobody ordered you to wait till a man breaks into the house, it is your duty to take them before they go in - did you know the man before? - A. I saw him one morning before, he came past me and my partners.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn. - I am a patrol: I saw the man when they were pursuing of him; I went after him, and the rest of our comrades; we surrounded, that is all I know, I helped to take him.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am a constable; the prisoner was brought to me with the copper, I have had the copper ever since.

(The copper produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

JOHN COX sworn. - I was one of the patrols stationed at the back of Mr. Flight's premises; I laid down when I saw the prisoner, and after I laid down, I heard the rattling of copper; I then rose up, and I saw him cutting the copper with a pair of shears.

JOHN GARDNER sworn. - I am a gardener; I saw him with the copper, but not cutting it; they called me up to help take him.

Prisoner. Q. (To Webb.) Whether that I was the man that went over the fence? - A. I cannot swear that you were the man that went over, but I have no doubt at all; there was only the footmark of one man, I saw him with the copper afterwards.

Prisoner's defence. I am a navigator , I never saw the copper, I was travelling to my work.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-22

385. NATHAN ASHER was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Hutchinson on the King's highway, on the 26th of May , putting him in fear, and forcibly taking from his person and against his will a pocket-book, value 6 d. and several Bank of England notes and drafts, value 85 l. 10 s. the property of the said John Hutchinson .

Second Count. For the like offence, only charging the pocket-book and notes the property of Henry Cherrington .

JOHN HUTCHINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. I am clerk to Cherrington and Co. brewer s.

Q. On the night of the 26th of May last, were you coming down Mile-End-road ? - A. Yes, about eleven o'clock.

Q. Had you any thing in your pocket-book? - A. I had Bank-notes and drafts to the amount of 85 l. 10 s.

Q. Did any thing happen to you as you were walking along? - A. I was knocked down.

Q. Had you any opportunity of observing the persons who knocked you down? - A. No.

Q. Did you observe more than two persons near you? - A. I did not; since then I have got the pocket-book, but none of the notes or drafts; the payment of the notes were stopped.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I believe it is customary for clerks to drink at every house they go to; you were perfectly sober? - A. I was not perfectly sober; I was a little merry; I perfectly recollect every thing that passed. I was going down Whitechapel-road, I received a blow on my head; I clapped my hands to my pocket, and my pocketbook was gone.

Q. You do not know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do not.

EDWARD BEWLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. Did you happen to be in the Whitechapel-road? - A. Yes; on the 26th of May, about eleven o'clock at night; I saw the prosecutor fall; I saw the prisoner take his foot in his hand, and he said, he has broke my foot, or toe; and while he was hopping off, another man sat him against the wall.

Q. When the man fell, are you sure the prisoner at the bar is one of the men? - A. Yes; it was not very light then, but it was light enough for me to see the man; I took notice of his features; he was very well dressed, but the colour of his coat I cannot tell; when he hopped round me he looked me full in the face, and went off towards Bow: my wife was with me, we had been at Bow Fair, she looked more at the man on the ground that she did at this man; there was another man taken up on suspicion, and they were both together in the lock-up house, and when she saw this man, this, said she, is him; and when she looked at the other, she said, that is not him.

HENRY KENDAR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. What are you? - A. I am a groom to Mr. Agars, in Field-gate-street.

Q. Do you know where it was that this gentle- was knocked down? - A. Yes; my master's house is situated between that and Bow, about two hundred yards off; I found a pocket-book in my master's yard, the dog had it, and carried it about the yard; I gave it to the clerk about an hour after I took it from the dog; I saw it at Lambeth-street office.

Q. (To Mr. Hutchinson. The pocket-book shewn him.) Is that the book that you had the notes in? - A. Yes.

- GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am a Police-officer, I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th, in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel: I was in Whitechapel-road on Saturday morning, about two o'clock; I saw the prisoner at the Golden-eagle, in a back room, I think he had a bottle of wine before him, he asked me and some of my fellow officers to take a glass of wine; that is about half a mile from where the robbery was committed.

Mr. Clifton. Q. You had not seen him at Bow-fair on that day? - A. No; I had not seen him till the evening I saw him at the Eagle, when I apprehended him. I searched him and his house, and found nothing whatever; there were two men in custody, and Bewley pointed out the other man as well as this, he said, that was very much like the tall man, his name is William Irish .

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Griffiths said he did not see me at Bow-fair; he saw me three or four times, and I asked him if he would have any thing to drink; he said no, he was busy; I was never in any bad company in my life; I am apprehended in this case as innocent as a baby from its mother's womb; I was drinking at the time at a public-house near three quarters of a mile distant from where the robbery happened.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS HUTCHER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I am a waterman and lighterman.

Q. Where you at Bow-fair on Saturday the 26th of May? - A. Yes; I was there about half after nine at night.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there? - A. No; I was coming home about eleven o'clock from Bow-fair, with three young women, and I called in at the Eagle for a shillingsworth of brandy and water, and the prisoner at the bar came in, with two or three more, into our company.

Q. What time did he come in? - A. A little after eleven o'clock.

Court. Q. The prisoner and who came in? - A. Two or three more men.

Q. Then the prisoner was not in the house when you came in? - A. He might be in the house, I cannot say that he came in; there were a great many people in the house at that time, they might be in before.

Q. What makes you say that they came in? - A. They came into my company; and we staid there till three o'clock in the morning, and the officers came in and told us to disperse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Who were in company with him? - A. Two or three more young men; I saw a shortish young man in his company, I don't know his name.

Q. Had you a party of your own at the public-house - A. Yes, three women; and that was the instigation of their coming into my company, as I had three to one.

Q. Pray did it happen to you, that any misfortune befel you? - A. About six or seven years ago, I had my head fractured.

Q. Have you been at Clerkenwell lately? - A. I was there for an assault upon people that used me ill, they gave an assault upon me first.

WILLIAM POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. Where do you live? - A. In Spitalfields; I am a painter and glazier: On Saturday the 26th of May I went to the Eagle public-house, about half past ten o'clock, I went by myself; there were a good many people drinking there, they asked me to sit down and drink, I sat down and drank in the house.

Q. Was the prisoner there? - A. He was; we were all in one room, I have seen him often before.

WILLIAM ENGLISH sworn. - I am a broker, I live in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel: I was at Bow-fair on Saturday, the last day of the fair, I went with the prisoner to the fair with another man, of the name of Stone.

Q. Were you with him during the whole time he was at the fair? - A. I left him about seven o'clock to go home, to see if my house was safe; I went home, and found my wife was at home; I went out again, and met him about nine o'clock, coming towards town, about half a mile from the Eagle; I returned with him to the Eagle, the other man he left at the fair; I then staid with him at the Eagle till two o'clock in the morning, I did not miss him at all, to the best of my knowledge; I will swear, if he did go out once or twice, it was not long; I am a broker by trade, and lately have been employed to get men for the army of reserve, I go to sales now, and they know me at Lambeth-street office.

Court. Q. Am I to understand from you, that during the time this man was with you he never went out of your company? - A. I cannot say positively that he was not, if he did go out he was not above five minutes out.

Q. Can you swear that he was not out above a quarter of an hour? - A. I can positively swear that.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040704-23

386. CHARLES WITHOLME was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , a pair of velveteen pantaloons, value 10 s. the property of Susannah Nevill , and James Hall .

It appearing to the Court that the prisoner was an ideot, and subject to fits, he was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-24

387. JOSEPH PITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , two pair of breeches, value 5 s. two waistcoats, value 5 s. five shirts, value 10 s. three neck-handkerchiefs, value 3 s. and four pair of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Benjamin Calloy .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of John Taylor .

FLORA CALLOY sworn. - I live at No. 4, Seven Dials , the prisoner lodged at my house in the garret.

Q. Where did you lose these clothes from? - A. From a chest; I put them in a chest, and locked it, and put the key in my drawers.

Q. When had you seen these clothes last? - A. On Wednesday the 16th of May, to the best of my recollection.

Q. What were the clothes? - A. Five shirts, three neck-handkerchiefs, four pair of stockings, two waistcoats, and two pair of small clothes; there was a hat also, they belonged to John Taylor , he is at the West Indies. I suspected the prisoner had taken them by his absconding; he had taken the sheets, I did not think he had gone to the chest.

Q. When you went to the chest, how did you find the chest? - A. It was locked the same as I left it; I left it locked, and when I unlocked it Taylor's things were all gone.

Q. How soon after did you see the prisoner? - A. On Saturday evening; he was taken at a public-house in the neighbourhood, to the best of my knowledge; the small clothes and stockings he had on were Taylor's property.

Q. What sort of breeches were these? - A. Velveteen, of an olive colour.

Q. What reason had you to think they were Taylor's? - A. I had them so long in my care, I was positive they were his.

Q. Were there any marks about them; you know olive velveteens are very common? - A. The pockets were flung back the same as when Taylor wore them, and they had pearl buttons at the knees; the stockings, to the best of my knowledge, are his.

Q. Did any body else sleep in the room? - A. No; we had no other lodgers in the house, not at that time; the prisoner had only one dress.

- DEYKIN sworn. - Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner? - A. Yes, at the Maidenhead, in Dyot-street, St. Giles's; he had a pair of velveteen breeches, and a pair of white ribbed stockings on, and a bundle in his hand; we took him to Mr. Calloy's house, and Mrs. Calloy said they were Taylor's breeches and stockings; we opened his bundle, and there were an old pair of black velveteen breeches, which were his own, and a dark pair of stockings; when the watch set, Mr. Calloy sent for the watchman, and we took him to the watch-house; the constable of the night took care of the breeches, and the next day he was taken to Marlborough-street office. (The breeches and stockings produced and identified by Mrs. Calloy.)

Prisoner's defence. They are my own property, I brought them from Birmingham; I was in the Staffordshire Militia, I never was before a Magistrate for any misdemeanour in my life; what I am brought here for now I am innocent of; one of the witnesses has kept my mother-in-law away.

Q. (To Mrs. Calloy.) You say he absconded from his lodgings? - A. Yes; he came generally home

to his meals; he is a locksmith; he had picklocks and keys found upon him when he was at the watch-house; they were found in his breeches pocket. (The picklock keys produced.)

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-25

388. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , one silver watch, value 40 s. the property of Robert Hawthorntwaite .

ROBERT HAWTHORNTWAITE sworn. - The prisoner at the bar took my watch from me on the 30th of June, the watchman was going eleven o'clock; I was going up Dyot-street ; she accosted me, and asked me if I would go home with her; I told her I had no time, nor no money; she walked up the street a little way with me, and said that I might have some money, if it was only sixpence; I told her I had no small change, I had a pound note; she told me I could get it changed at the public-house; all the time she had hold of me, and in not more than one minute she took hold of the watch, and drew it out of my pocket, it was a silver watch; I followed her directly, and took hold of her; I had a box under my right arm; the moment I took hold of her, she gave the watch to another woman; the other woman ran off with the watch.

Q. What did you do down Dyot-street at that time of the night? - A. It was my nearest way to Bond-street; I always used to go up Plumbtree-street, but being night I took the wrong street.

SARAH COOPER sworn. - I had been of an errand; I met with this man coming down Dyot-street; the prisoner and the man were tustling together; as I came close up, she said, loose me; no, said he, you are the girl that robbed me, you have got my watch, and I will not let you go till I have got my watch; she called a girl by the name of Nancy; she came, and she gave the watch to her out of her hand; she ran away as hard as she could.

CHARLOTTE NUNN sworn. - I was coming down the same street; the prisoner ran to me with the watch, and strove to put it in my bosom; when she found my handkerchief was pinned, that she could not put it down my bosom, she hid herself behind my back; she was quite a stranger to me; I had a bundle in my arm, and a child; the man took her from behind me; I can swear to her; we were under a lamp, and I saw her by the watchman's lantern.

- sworn. - I am a watchman; she gave the watch away before she was given into my charge.

Prisoner's defence. The man said he was going; he was under the gateway along with two girls; he laid hold of me, and said, would I go down a little way with him; he went down with me; he laid hold of me again, and said I had got his watch; I did not run away from him.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-26

389. MARY DALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a gown, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 2 s. a cloth coat, value 15 s. a pair of breeches, value 9 s. a waistcoat, value 4 s. five yards of Irish linen, value 2 s. 6 d. and a petticoat, value 5 s. the property of Abraham Benziken .

REBECCA HEILY sworn. - I live in Crown-street with my son-in-law, Abraham Benziken : On Thursday, the 21st of June, the prisoner came to my daughter's house, (I have seen her once before); she came there in the forenoon about eleven o'clock, and went away, and came back about two o'clock; then she asked me to go round the corner, and bring a quartern of liquor, to see whether her husband was there; she said he had a blue coat on; I was gone about five minutes.

Q. Did you know her husband before? - A. No; it was only four doors from my place; I brought the liquor, and looked for her husband, and when I came to my door, I found it a-jar, and she was gone; I left her sitting; she was to stop till I came back; then I missed the best of the cloaths out of the drawer belonging to my son-in-law; I missed a gown, a coat and waistcoat, a piece of linen, a pair of breeches, a handkerchief, and a muslin petticoat; I should know them again.

JOHN ALGER sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Thomas Dobson , No. 35, Chiswell-street: On the 21st of June, the prisoner pawned a coat, a waistcoat, a pair of breeches, and a remnant of linen, for thirteen shillings; a gown, petticoat, and handkerchief, for twelve shillings. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I went to Mrs. Benziken's house; she was not at home, only her mother; she had promised to lend me some money; I took the things, and I was going to return every thing to her on Saturday night, only she would not wait for it; I told her I would return every thing again.

Prosecutrix. I never offered to lend her any thing.

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of 38 s.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-27

390. ANN MOLINEUX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , a canvas bag, value 1 d. a seven-shilling piece, three shillings, two Bank-notes, value 4 l. and a Bank-note, value 1 l. the property of Absalom Jerrard .

ABSALOM JERRARD sworn. - On Sunday evening I had been in Westminster, and near eleven o'clock at night I was returning from there to my lodgings, in King-street, Golden-square; coming through Whitcomb-street , I saw the prisoner in the street: she asked me to give her a glass of liquor to drink, and I consented; we went into a public-house; we turned out of the public-house, and went about six doors further, and staid about five minutes talking there; at that time she put her hand in my pocket, and drew my purse out; I accused her of robbing me; I took her fast by the hand, and told her to deliver up the money she had taken from me; she stood for a time, and did not deliver it up; I put my hand in her pocket, but I could not find the money; the purse laid in a corner on the steps close by the door; I stooped down to take the purse, and she attempted to take the purse out of my hand; there was one of the notes coming out of the purse at the time, and I continued to have the purse in my possession; then I charged the watchman with her; there were two two-pound notes, a one-pound note, a seven-shilling piece, and three shillings in silver; I went from there into a public-house to examine what I had lost; I knew the contents of the purse before; I found there was a two-pound note missing; the watchman and I went back, and examined the place where the girl and me had been standing, after we had taken her to St. Martin's watch-house, and we found it about five yards off; I went back to the constable of the watch-house, he signed it, and I was obliged to prosecute the girl.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had drank at many public-houses in the course of that day - were you sober? - A. I was perfectly sober.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. I am not.

Q. Had you seen her before? - A. I had.

Q. Were you in company with any other girl before? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. Will you undertake to swear that you were not in company with any other girl? - A. The girls will come in company of men, whether they like it or no.

Q. You are a stout fellow, you are able to put a girl away if you like - did you drink with her? - A. I don't know that I did.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you were sober? - A. I had drank two pints of beer in the course of the afternoon.

Q. When you stopped in the street, do you mean to say that you were only talking to her? - A. Nothing further passed than conversation.

- DONALDSON sworn. - I was constable of the night; the prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house.

Q. How was the man - did he seem intoxicated? - A. He seemed as if he had been drinking, but was quite sensible of what he was about; the note was not found upon the girl, it was found in the street, as I understood.

Prisoner's defence. I am an unfortunate girl; I happened to go into a public-house, the corner of Panton-street, and that gentleman was drinking a pint of ale with a young woman; I know nothing of it.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) What sort of a purse was it? - A. (Shews the purse.) This is the purse, and the note was dropped in the scuffle.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-28

391. JOHN FITZWATER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , one oak plank, value 30 s. the property of John Dove .

JOHN DOVE sworn. - I am a carpenter : I missed an oak plank on the 17th of June; I had no intelligence of it till the 23d; it was laying opposite my yard by the water-side; it was timber I had for the repair of the church; I live at Sunbury.

Q. When had you seen it last? - A. I do not know that I had seen it for a week before; it was laying there with five more; the prisoner lives at Walton on Thames, about a mile and a half off; I got a search-warrant on the 25th of June; the constable went to the prisoner's house, and in less than five minutes it was taken out of his shop; I saw the plank, and knew it was mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where you live is in Middlesex? - A. Yes; and Walton is in Surry.

Q. You did not attend the search-warrant yourself? - A. I attended it myself, but I was a little distance off.

Q. It very often happens that planks are carried away by the tide - the tide very often overflows the banks entirely? - A. They were all fastened together; I had ten more.

Court. If there had been any flood, it must have carried away the other planks.

JAMES HARLEY sworn. - I am a constable; I went to the prisoner's premises on the 25th of June with a search-warrant; I found the plank in his work-shop; he was not at home; it had been cut since it had been taken from the water-side.

Q. Was there much more plank in the workshop? - A. None at all, only pieces of chips; soon after I took the prisoner before the Justice.

Q. Did you tell him what was the cause of your apprehending him? - A. Yes; he said he wished me to read the warrant; he acknowledged that he had used some of it where he had been at work.

Q. Did he give any account how he got it? - A. He said he had been hauling some grigs in still water, between three and four o'clock in the morning, and two men followed him in the Thames, and asked him if he would buy the plank; he went and looked at it; they asked him two guineas for

the whole plank, upon which he gave them two pounds in Bank-notes, and two shillings; to the best of my remembrance that is the account he gave the Magistrate; he said they called him by name, but he did not know them, and did not ask where they lived; it was taken down in writing, and it was read over to him before the Magistrate, and he said it was right.

Prisoner's defence. The account which I gave before the Magistrate is true.

(The prisoner's deposition before the Magistrate read in Court, which is the same as stated by the witness.)

Mr. Alley. (To Harley.) Q. You say you found this timber in his work-shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any other pieces of timber in the shop? - A. What do you call timber.

Q. I am no carpenter, you are not to expect technical words from me - was there any other wood in the place? - A. There might be chips and shavings; it had the appearance of a work-shop.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) You have no mark upon it? - A. No.

Court. Q. You have no doubt of it's being your property? - A. No.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. I have valued it at thirty shillings.

Q. What could you buy a plank of that size for? - A. Five pounds.

Jury. Q. Are you aware of the value of that sort of timber - you surely could buy it at four or five shillings a foot? - A. The value of it is about forty shillings.

Court. Q. Do you think it could be got for forty shillings? - A. Yes, it might.

Q. How came you to say it could not be got for less than five pounds? - A. It is stuff that I do not understand so much.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-29

392. MARY BEARD and SARAH SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , twenty yards of printed cotton, the property of Lydell Thirlwall , privately in his shop .

RICHARD HORNBUCKLE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Thirlwall, linen-draper , No. 106, St. John's-street, West-Smithfield : The prisoners came into our shop on the 30th of June, between the hours of twelve and one; they wanted to look at a gown, and I reached them down several prints. During the time they were looking at these prints, I had reason to suspect that Mary Beard was doing something she ought not; I never said a word to her till after she went out; they came in together; they seemed to be acquaintances.

Q. Were there any other customers in the shop during the time that they were there? - A. Yes, about five minutes; they staid in the shop about a quarter of an hour before they fixed on what they chose; Sarah Smith bought a gown, and paid for it; I had reason to suspect that Mary Beard was drawing the print towards her, and likewise pulling it out of the fold; I followed them when they left the shop, they had got about ten or a dozen yards before I overtook them; I had great reason to suspect they had got a piece of print, by the manner of Mary Beard 's walking; when I first came out of the shop, I run after them immediately; I saw the print between them when I came up to them; before I came up to them, I saw Sarah Smith go close to Mary Beard , and put her apron on one side, on purpose to take the print from the girl that I supposed had taken it; I immediately brought them back, and went for an officer, and they were secured.

Q. What was the value of this piece of print? - A. Four shillings; after I brought them both back, Mary Beard fell down on her knees, and begged I would forgive her.

JOSEPH-WAYFORD sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoners, the print was delivered to me, I have kept it ever since.

(The print produced, and intentified by Richard Hornbuckle .)

Beard, GUILTY , aged 18.

Smith, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-30

393. ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , four pair of stockings, value 10 s. the property of Charles Holmes .

WILLIAM COGHLAND sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Charles Holmes , linen draper and haberdasher , Tothill-street, Westminster ; the prisoner came into the shop about a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening, and asked for half an ounce of thread; she staid about five minutes in the shop, there were other customers in the shop, and a young woman was serving them; there came on a shower of rain; I went outside of the door to bring in a piece of print, fearing it might be damaged by the rain, and when I went out these four pair of stockings laid on the counter, on an opposite counter to where the prisoner stood; when I went in, I missed the stockings, and the prisoner was gone without being served; I went after her, and took her about one hundred and fifty yards off; on coming up to her, I observed the stockings in her apron; I laid hold of her, and asked her if these stockings were her's; she said, no; I brought her back to the shop, she begged forgiveness; we sent for a constable, and had her secured.

Q. What is the value of these stockings? - A. Ten shillings; they are women's cotton stockings.

JOHN HOBBS sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I have not a friend in the world.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-31

394. BENJAMIN WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , seven dozen of wooden hoops, value 28 s. the property of Samuel Chandler .

SAMUEL CHANDLER sworn. - I am a brush-maker, and keep a turner's shop , High Holborn .

Q. Did you lose any wooden hoops on the 9th of June? - A. Yes, I was in the habit of serving Mr. Blakit, in the Borough: On the 9th of June I received an order, in the name of Mr. Blakit, for seven dozen of hoops; I have the order here, signed by William Richards , his foreman.

Q. Do you know Richards's hand-writing? - A. I have seen his hand-writing, it is very similar to his; the prisoner did not bring the order himself, it was brought by a porter, whose name is William Holegate .

Q. Did you deliver to the porter these hoops? - A. Yes, I delivered these hoops to the porter as for Mr. Blakit; I had the porter taken into custody on suspicion, the officer went with the porter and the hoops; this West employed the porter to bring the order to me; I took the porter into custody; he said, he was an innocent man, he would give up the principal; he took the hoops to the prisoner, and then we took Benjamin West .

Q. At the time you delivered these seven dozen of hoops, you believed he was not the man that came from Mr. Blakit's? - A. Yes, but we could not get at him by any other means.

Q. You believed they were not to be delivered to Mr. Blakit, but to this man who signed this order? - A. Most certainly.

NOT GUILTY .

[The prisoner was ordered to be detained for the fraud.]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-32

395. RICHARD WOOLINGS, otherwise GEORGE FOWLER , was indicted for that he, on the 11th of June, in the 39th year of his present Majesty's reign, at the parish of St. Pancras, did take to wife one Eleanor Evans , spinster, and that he did then and there marry her; and that he afterwards, on the 13th of January last, at the parish of Waltham Holy Cross, in the county of Essex , by the name of George Fowler , did take to wife one Louisa Surry , his former wife Eleanor being then alive; and that he afterwards, on the 29th of May, was taken for the felony .

No evidence appearing in Court that Eleanor, the first wife of the prisoner, was alive, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-33

396. RICHARD WOOLINGS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , two horse-cloths, value 10 s. and two rollers, value 5 s. the property of John Scott .

JOHN SCOTT sworn. - The prisoner lived with me in the City, and also in Surry; he came to live with me in the month of December, 1802, as coachman ; he left my service in June following; I suspected him, while living with me, of stealing hay, corn, and other things, therefore I discharged him; I told the coachman to go and see whether the things were all right; he came and told me there was hardly any thing there; the only thing that I know of is two horse-cloths and two rollers; I saw Woolings some time afterwards, he came for a quarter's wages that I owed him; I told him that he had robbed me, and that there were two horse-cloths and two rollers found of mine, and that I had ordered them to be stopped; I told him that I insisted upon having them; he said, he would return them to me, he never did return them.

Q. Had you ever given him these things? - A. I never did; I meant to keep these spare cloths in case any friend came to my house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. He lived with you in the City and in Surry? - A. Yes, my carriage was kept at Mr. Bevans's, in Old-street.

Q. Were they the cloths that were used in Surry? - A. No, they were used in town.

Q. You say that he called upon you for a quarter's wages, and you told him that he had taken the cloths - what did he say? - A. He admitted of it very reluctantly; I never saw him after that, I received an attorney's letter from him, but I never paid him; I never took him up at all.

Q. In point of fact, did not you know where he lived? - A. I thought I knew where he lived, but my coachman told me he saw him in the Strand driving a hackney-coach; it was no use going to where I thought he lodged, I heard he was in custody.

THOMAS BANNISTER sworn. - I am a coachman; I succeeded the prisoner in June, 1803; I went to the Two Brewers, London-wall, and there I found the two horse-cloths and the two rollers, in a sack; I left them there.

MARY WALTER sworn. - I live at the Two Brewers, London-wall; he left the cloths with me; I have not got the cloths, the prisoner had them away.

Prosecutor. He has got the cloths, and fold them.

Court. Q. You told me that you stopped them?

- A. I did; the woman imprudently let him have them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-34

397. SUSANNAH GARMENT was indicted upon the Coroner's inquisition, stating, that upon the 19th day of May , and continually afterwards, until the 11th of June, at the parish of St. Luke's , she, the prisoner, was nurse, and had the care, custody, and charge, of one William Lee , an infant of tender years , and that from the time aforesaid she was to find and provide the said William Lee with sufficient drink and food for the maintenance and support of his body, but that she neglected her duty in that behalf, feloniously and wilfully did contrive to kill and murder the said William Lee , from the said 19th of May till the 11th of June, and that the said William Lee , for want of sufficient support of food for the maintenance of his body from the 19th of May, and continually from that day until the 11th of June, became and was mortally sick and diseased in his body, and on the 11th of June aforesaid did languish and die; and that she, the said Susannah Garment , the Jury say the said William Lee , with malice aforethought, did kill and murder , against the statute and against the King's peace.

There not being the least evidence whatever against the prisoner, and it appearing from the evidence of the surgeon, who opened the child, that it died of a mortification in the stomach, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-35

398. CHARLES JARVIS stood charged upon the Coroner's inquisition for that he, on the 2d of July, at the parish of St. Luke's , on Edmund Bray , feloniously did make an assault, and that he, with both his hands, on and upon his head did then and there give him a mortal wound and bruise, and that he, the said Charles Jarvis , by striking, did give to him, the said Edmund Bray , a mortal wound and bruise, of which mortal wound and bruise the said Edmund Bray did then and there instantly die; and that he, the said Charles Jarvis , the said Edmund Bray did kill and slay , against the statute and against the King's peace.

(The case stated by Mr. Alley.)

NICHOLAS KEDAR sworn - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What business are you? - A. I am in the East-India warehouse.

Q. Do you recollect, on the 2d of July, seeing a fight? - A. Yes, on last Monday in a field opposite the City-road , between the prisoner and the deceased.

Q. What sort of a boy was the deceased? - A. He was rather taller, and not so stout as the prisoner.

Q. Had the fight commenced when you came up? - A. Yes, I did not see the beginning of it; it had been about five minutes.

Q. Was there any fair fighting? - A. Yes, there were no foul blows as I observed; they continued to fight for about five minutes after I came up, the deceased then gave up, in consequence of the blow he had received.

Court. Q. Did you see where the blow was? - A. No; after the fight, they went to the public-house, the City Arms, in the City-road; I went there with them.

Q. Did you observe whether he was knocked down? - A. No, there was a crowd, I saw him after the fight was over.

Mr. Alley. Q. Was he able to walk? - A. Yes.

Q. How far is it from the field to the public-house? - A. About a hundred yards; the deceased walked to that public-house, and went into the skittle-ground; I was in the further part of the skittle-ground; in about a quarter of an hour, I observed he was dead; the prisoner was there, I do not recollect what he said.

ARCHIBALD YOUNGER sworn. - I am a brewer; I was at the City Arms, and saw the prisoner and the deceased there, he was in about three minutes and a half, and then died; a surgeon was sent for, and he bled him; I saw the surgeon there, and I went to him; I saw the boy was dead; I asked who was the person that did it; the prisoner replied, I am the person that did it, I am sorry for it; I said, we will take him into the front parlour, and there we secured him; we got a constable; he said, he would relate the whole story as it happened concerning the fight; he said, he was going on Monday morning down Golden-lane, he went into the Black Horse to have a pint of beer, he observed Teddy, the deceased, sitting in a box; he asked the deceased about a pair of breeches that he was to buy of him for four shillings and sixpence; he had paid the deceased a shilling, and he was to pay the rest when he could; the deceased had sold the breeches; the prisoner said, if he had not tore his coat, and cheated him out of a shilling, he should not have fought.

- PALMER sworn. - I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I took him to Worship-street, and he related the conversation that the last witness mentioned.

CHARLES HAYWARD sworn. - I am a surgeon; I was called in to see the deceased at the City Arms; when I went in, I saw the deceased on a table; I made an incision in both arms, and in opening the veins, I found only two tea-spoons full of blood from both arms; I found then all my efforts were in vain; I then used friction, and pursued the plan recommended by the Humane Society; I observed there was a blow on the nose, and one on the chin.

Court. Q. The blow on the nose and on the chin could not have done this - was there not a

blow on the temple? - A. The next morning I perceived a contusion on the side of the head; when the scull was removed, there was a pound of extravasated blood on the brain; I was told he had been fighting; I believe he did not live half a minute after I got in.

Q. Whether it was done by a blow or by a fall, you cannot say? - A. No, there were several blows on the back part of his head.

Mr. EVANS sworn. - I am a surgeon; I attended the next morning, there was a violent contusion behind the right ear, and by removing the scull there was a quantity of extravasated blood from blows or falls, I cannot ascertain which; there were several blows on the back part of his head.

Prisoner's defence. On Saturday morning I went to Mr. Bray's house to get my breakfast, he behaved very civil to me, I used to go there and have a pint of porter; I have no father and mother; Teddy Bray , the deceased, used to use that house; he said to me, that he had a pair of breeches to sell for four shillings and sixpence; he said, you give me a shilling, and you shall have them, and pay me the rest when you can; I paid him a shilling, he did not bring them on Saturday night, nor on Monday morning; I asked Teddy for the breeches, there was a man in the public-house with two crutches; he said to Teddy, will you take three shillings for them, I will give it you? I said, I had bought them, I did not like to be cheated of the shilling; Teddy said, you b - r, what makes you make these words with this man, I will knock your head off; I said, I will not be knocked about, I will stand in my own defence; we then came out of the public-house, and went to Playhouse-yard, he began to square at me; he said, will you fight? I said, I will not fight here at all, we shall have all the jack-ass people about us; we went to the top of Brick-lane along those gardens that takes you up to the City-road, and there he said to me, I shall knock your bl - y head off; I said, I should leave off when I had got enough, and there Teddy pulled off his clothes; I did not pull off my clothes, and this pork butcher, that lives in Grub-street, said to me, I will second you, and then the seconds laid hold of one another's hands, and we fought; he struck at me, and I closed him and I fell down, and he upon me; he throwed himself over me, and said, I will fight no more; we got up, and when we came to the turnpike, d - n me, he said, we will not go further without some drink; I said, I will put two-pence towards a pot of porter, and this butcher said, we will go backwards in the left box of the skittle-ground; Teddy took his hand, and reached the pot, and drank some porter, and laid his head on the table, and presently one of the men lifted him up, and said, I think he is dying; one of the men said to me, you had better bolt; I said, no, I will not run away, if I have done it, I am sorry for it; when the landlord came, he took me into custody; I lived with Mr. Butcher, in Red-Lion-market, but a young lad put me in getting a piece of bread much better, in selling scouring-paper and black lead to the coffee-houses; I can earn three or four shillings a day, so I left Mr. Butcher, I thought I could better myself.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Of Manslaughter.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-36

399. JOHN NEEDS and THOMAS DORSET were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Grange and George Gregory , about the hour of twelve in the night, on the 4th of November , with intent to steal, and feloniously stealing a feather bed, value 3 l. two blankets, value 12 s. a coat, value 2 l. two waistcoats, value 3 s. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. a hat, value 14 s. and a Dutch clock, value 7 s. the property of William White ; and a pair of sheets, value 12 s. the property of the said James Grange and George Gregory .

JAMES GRANGE sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 178, Piccadilly , opposite the Duke of Portland's.

Q. What are you? - A. A fruiterer and confectioner .

Q. Was your house broke open? - A. A small house in a garden, on the 5th of November last.

Q. Who left the place last? - A. My market-man left the place at four o'clock in the morning, to go to market.

Q. Where is that? - A. My market-man slept there; it is situated at Hoxton, in the parish of Shoreditch; it stands in the middle of the garden.

Q. How many rooms does it consist of? - A. A sleeping-room above and an accompting-house below.

Q. What is the name of your market-man? - A. William White; the whole of the articles in the room belonged to him, excepting the sheets.

Q. Did you make any use of your accompting-house? - A. Yes, every day in the week, except the Sabbath day.

Q. Does the market-man pay any thing to you for sleeping there? - A. No, he does not; I slept that night at Hoxton, in another house; I went out with my market-man at four o'clock in the morning of the 5th.

Q. Did you see your market-man lock the house up? - A. No, I did not.

Q. When did you know the house had been broke open? - A. I went that evening from town, to pay my men, and then I discovered it.

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. On the Saturday I was informed by my brother that the

back garden gate had been broke open, and the summer-house had been broke open likewise, but nothing missed; I then desired William White to go up and see if his door was fast; he found the door a-jar; he then went for a light, and I went with him, and found the articles gone.

Q. Did you miss your sheets? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever seen them again? - A. No, never.

WILLIAM WHITE sworn. - Q. You are a market-man to Mr. Grange? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. How did you leave the house at Hoxton when you went away? - A. I locked the door and had the key in my pocket; the stairs go up into my room outside of the accompting-house; I went out with my master a little past four; when I returned I found the door open, and missed a feather bed, a pair of blankets, and a pair of sheets; I then went to examine the drawers, and missed a coat, two waistcoats, one pair of small clothes, and a Dutch clock.

Q. What was the worth of the clock? - A. Seven shillings.

Q. What do you reckon your bed worth? - A. Three pounds.

Q. The blankets? - A. Fourteen shillings.

Q. The coat? - A. Two guineas.

Q. The two waistcoats? - A. Twelve shillings.

Q. The breeches? - A. Fifteen shillings.

Q. Have you ever seen any of those things again? - A. Only the clock; I saw it at Hatton-garden office.

JOHN GRANGE sworn. - I am brother to the prosecutor: I am a gardener, and live at Hoxton; on the 5th of November, a little before five in the morning, I came down to see the horses baited that were going out in the cart; I then went home to breakfast.

Q. Were you at this house in the garden? - A. I was in the stables adjoining.

Q. Did you observe any thing? - A. No, I did not; it was so dark.

Prosecutor. The place was not known to have been broke open till the evening.

John Grange . The first that I saw, I discovered that the garden-gate had been broke open, and then the summer-house broke open, which I was surprised at, knowing I had the keys; my brother had discovered that the room was broke open before I did; I was on the premises from five in the morning till I went home to breakfast, about nine o'clock; the stables adjoin the house; I was in the stables till near seven; there were a number of men on the premises at work, and women too; we found a rug tucked in at one corner of the window, which looks to where my brother slept.

Prosecutor. The two prisoners worked for me a week before the robbery was committed; they had worked for me, I cannot say how long; it might be two or three months; Needs came to me at Hackney, on the Saturday night, about an hour or two hours before the robbery was discovered, to ask if I would take him into my employ again on Monday; they had left me on the Saturday night before, under pretence of going into the country for two or three days; I told Needs I would give him an answer at my accompting-house, at Hoxton, that evening.

Q. Was Dorset with him? - A. No.

Q. Did he come? - A. He did.

Q. Had you found out the robbery then? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you say any thing to him about it? - A. Not more than to the rest of the men.

Q. He knew that you were aware of the robbery then? - A. Yes.

Q. What answer did you give him? - A. I was in want of hands, but he being, as I then thought, a worthless character, I wished to consult my foreman, whether I should take him on or not; and after I found out the robbery, I forbid him to come.

Q. Did he say any thing then? - A. No.

Q. What is your partner's name? - A. George Gregory; we found some baskets belonging to us at the Magistrates, and a tub.

ALEXANDER SMITH sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 50, Portpool-lane.

Q. What are you by business? - A. A smith.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Both of them? - A. Yes; They both lodged at my house; they came upon the 17th of November; I had a shop and parlour to let; Dorset took the lodgings; he asked me what I charged a week for the shop and parlour; I said 4 s. 6 d. a week; Needs told me he was a poor man, and was just married; could not I take 4 s. I said if I did, I must have my money every week, and I agreed to take 4 s. Dorset paid me 1 s. I think it was earnest; Needs also took a lodging of me; he came on the Friday, and gave me 6 d. earnest, and he came in on the Saturday; he paid me 20 d. a week.

Q. They seemed to be well acquainted together? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any conversation with Dorset respecting him? - A. Dorset set up in the green-grocery line, in a day or two after he had been there.

Q. Dorset only, or both of them? - A. Dorset only; the shop did not very well answer; after he had been there a month or two, he told me he did not like to go to gardening again, for the wages were very low, and if they lost an hour, through rain or any thing of that sort, it was stopped; I recommended him to a Mr. Kinman, where I worked; he worked there some time, I cannot say how long, and one day coming home, as we lived

near together, we got into a conversation about servitude, and one thing or other, and he said he wished I had not let Mr. Needs lodge in the house; I asked him why, and he told me that the last place where they worked in they committed a robbery.

Q. Did he say where they worked? - A. I asked him where it was, and he told me it was at Mr. Grange's, at Hoxton; he then said, he had taken a pair of sheets and blankets, and some clothes; he said they took every thing there was, and he wished to get rid of Needs.

Q. Did he say what became of the things? - A. No; he said he let Needs have the water-tub that was in the yard, and the sheets, and he had not paid him for them, but he did not say that they were the sheets that they took.

Q. What did you do upon this? - A. One day I thought it was not right such people should lodge in my place; I thought my other lodgers were not safe, and I went to Mr. Grange and informed him of it; I saw William White , and he came down to my place, where Needs lodged; I went with the officers to Needs's sister-in-law, where they found a tub belonging to Mr. Grange.

Q. Where was that? - A. At Mr. Lowe's, in Tash-court.

Q. What was the sister-in-law's name? - A. Finney; I went with the officer to Needs's apartments, along with old Mr. Grange, to see if there was any property; there were several baskets found, but I do not know whether there were any of them their's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoners altogether? - A. Ever since the 17th of November last.

Q. You have been extremely intimate? - A. No; only walking backwards and forwards; I do not think I ever drank with him above five or six times in my life.

Q. You happened to be walking one day by chance, and he made this open confession? - A. Yes.

Q. At this time you had no intimacy at all with him, and he told you he had committed a robbery? - A. Yes.

Q. You say that one day after that you thought it was right they should leave your house? - A. Sometime after.

Q. Your principles of honesty and notions of it, were always the same? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore, though he told you he had committed a robbery, it did not strike you till some time after that he was a man unfit to remain in your house; how long was it after? - A. After Dorset had left the house.

Q. Dorset left the house voluntarily? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not desire him to go? - A. Yes, one day when he was taken up for an affray in Lincoln's inn fields; he said he did not think my lodgings would suit him, and I said I did not think they would.

Q. You were always upon good terms with Dorset? - A. I never had a quarrel with either of them.

Q. Has not Dorset told you he thought you a very bad man, and he did not think it fit to stay in your house? - A. No.

Q. He never said you had done things for which you ought to be hanged? - A. No.

Q. How long after this confession was it that you saw Mr. Grange? - A. I saw Mr. Grange at the office.

Q. How long after was it that you saw White? - A. It might be five weeks.

Q. I suppose you went the next day to Bow-street, and gave information? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You did not think it right that they should be punished? - A. Yes, but Needs's wife lay very dangerously ill in the house.

Q. Dorset has left your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know there is such a thing as a reward of 40 l. upon conviction of a burglary? - A. I did not know it till lately.

Q. Did you never learn it till you came to give evidence here? - A. No.

Q. You did not hear it from the officers? - A. No.

Q. Did it ever happen to you to have any misfortune yourself? - A. No.

Q. Have you always been a smith? - A. Nine years and four months in the army.

Q. Were you abroad during those nine years? - A. No, at home.

JOHN GRANGE , Senior, sworn. - Q. You knew nothing, I believe, till you went to get the warrant? - A. Yes, on the 5th of November, in the morning, White went out with the cart, and the next morning I took down a rug from the window, it was pinned up with a fork.

Q. That window looked towards you? - A. Yes.

Q. Now go to the time when you got the warrant? - A. It was on the 3d of May I went with some officers to Needs's house; I found Needs at his work at a coachmaker's in Portpool-lane; we took him into custody? Chapman, the officer, locked him up in the office, and we went to his room at Smith's house; we did not find any thing there; while we were there, Mr. Lowe, hearing that Needs was taken up, came and told us that his sister-in-law lived in his house, and that there were some baskets there; I went with him; I went into the cellar, and found five baskets which belonged to my son; I know the marks well; there was also a wooden clock found in Mr.

Lowe's house, which was taken away at the time that the house was broke open.

Q. Who did that belong to? - A. It belonged to White, the pendulum was left in the room.

ANN FINNEY sworn. - I am sister-in-law to Needs; my sister was wife to him for any thing I know; she died the very day he was taken up.

Q. In what way of life are you? - A. My husband is a millwright; I lodged at Mr. Lowe's at the time these things were found.

Q. Do you remember Needs bringing any clock to your house? - A. Yes; I think it was on the 7th of November, Dorset came with him; Needs brought it in an apron, and asked me to let him leave it there, because it was so far to take it to Hoxton that night; he lived at that time in Hoxton market-place; the clock had weights but no pendulum; it was broke, the face of it was broke in two.

Q. When did the baskets come? - A. Dorset brought the baskets about a week after; he said they were going to remove, and wished them to be put in Mr. Lowe's yard; they were taken away, and Needs afterwards brought them again; Needs said they were his.

Q. Who brought the water-tub? - A. Needs brought it in the morning that he was taken up, before I was up, and he came again afterwards and asked me if I would ask Mr. Lowe to buy it; he told me himself that he had brought it that morning; he said, as my sister was dead, it was of no use to him; Mr. Chapman came with Mr. Grange, and asked me if I had any thing belonging to Needs; I told him there was a water-tub he had brought in that morning, and I gave the clock up to old Mr. Grange; I told him Needs had brought it to me.

- LOWE sworn. - I heard that the officers were making a search, and they found a water-tub which I did not know was on the premises; Mrs. Finney explained how it came there; I then gave the officer information of the baskets; Mrs. Finney was coming up stairs, and heard them say they had taken every thing away, even the wooden clock, upon which she said she had got the clock, and delivered it up immediately.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am one of the officers of Hatton-garden: on the 3d of May I went with the elder Mr. Grange, and took Needs into custody; we then went to Mr. Lowe's house and found the water-tub, Mr. Lowe told us of the baskets, and Mrs. Finney produced the clock; it is here. (Produces the clock.)

Q. (To White.) Look at that clock? - A. This is my clock, it was in the room when I went out that morning.

Q. What do you know it by - was the face broke when you lost it? - A. No, it was not; I know it by the mark here, a castle and a ship; and here is a place where I strained it when I cleaned it.

Mr. Alley. Q. You do not mean to swear to the ship and the castle, I suppose? - A. And the strain.

Jury. Q. Is this writing on the back your's? - A. No; I observed the writing upon it before my master gave it me.

Q. How long ago? - A. I cannot say; it was bought about three years ago.

John Grange . I know the clock by a mark upon the weight; it is a cap at the bottom of it; I can swear to it.

Grange, senior. Here is the pendulum, which I picked up in the room after I discovered the robbery.

Q. Were not these two men acquitted the last session? - A. They were not tried; there were no witnesses examined.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - On the 3d of May, after Needs was taken, I got into discourse with him; he said he was taken innocently for a thing he had not done.

Q. Did you make him any promise? - A. No.

Q. Nor threaten him? - A. No; he said he was accused of stealing some things that were found; he said he did not steal them, but he knew the man that did; I asked him who it was, and he mentioned the prisoner Dorset; I asked him where he was to be found; I think he said the name was Lane, at Blackwall, and if I did not make haste he would be gone to sea; I left him with another person, and consulted Chapman; who said there were some things at a pawnbroker's; the pawnbroker came, but we were not able to trace any of this property; a young woman, who was there, told us where Dorset was, in Catherine-wheel-alley; I went and found him, and took him into custody, I told him I took him into custody on suspicion of a burglary; there was a chest of his there, but I found nothing belonging to Mr. Grange; I found in the chest a pair of pincers; I afterwards went to the premises, and gave the pincers into the hands of John Grange , I saw him try them, this end fitted the marks upon the door and the drawers.

Mr. Alley. Q. These are shoemaker's pincers? - A. Yes.

Q. There are thousands of the same shape? - A. Yes; I dare say there are.

Needs's defence. I am as innocent as my children are, I never was guilty of a robbery in my life; I never was before a Magistrate before.

Dorset's defence. I worked with Smith; one day as we were coming home we were talking together, and he was telling me what a life he led when he was a soldier, going and robbing upon the highway; he several times wanted me to take copper belonging to Mr. Kinman, and one time when we were going along, he saw a leather apron, he desired me to take it, and I would not; he snatched it up, and ran away with it.

Court. (To Smith.) Q. Did you tell Dorset of

your having been a soldier? - A. No; he knew I had been a soldier.

Q. Did you tell him what soldiers are apt to do, taking things belonging to other people? - A. No.

The prisoner Dorset called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Needs, GUILTY , Death , aged 41.

Dorset, GUILTY , Death , aged 24.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, to the value of 40 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040704-37

400. CHARLOTTE WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of June , in the dwelling-house of John Bligh , a piece of foreign coin, called a franc, value 4 s. 2 d. and a Bank-note, value 5 l. the property of the said John Bligh .

JOHN BLIGH sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At Knightsbridge.

Q. In what parish? - A. The parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster .

Q. Are you a housekeeper there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner live in your family as a servant ? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had she been with you? - A. Eighteen weeks on Friday the 22d of June; I observed that the lock had been broke off from the bureau, and part of the bureau with it.

Q. Was it open? - A. It was open.

Q. Did you examine to see if any thing was missing? - A. No, I did not; there was a five pound note missing, and a French coin, but I had never seen them there; I went out with my wife, and when I came home I found the prisoner in custody; I went about half past eleven in the morning, and came home at half past twelve at night; the prisoner had been stopped by the next door neighbour, going out with these things; she was in custody at my next door neighbour's house.

Q. Who searched her? - A. The next witness, the constable.

JAMES PAGAN sworn. - Q. Are you a constable? - A. Yes, I am; I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody on Friday night, the 22d of last month.

Q. Who sent for you? - A. Some of Mr. Bligh's neighbours.

Q. Where did you find the prisoner? - A. In Mr. Bligh's house.

Q. Was she searched? - A. Yes; I found this red-morocco purse upon her, and the contents.

Q. (To Bligh.) Look at this coin, and this note? - A. I know them both to be mine.

Q. Do you know any thing about that purse? - A. No.

Q. How do you know the note? - A. By the name of Arnold, Rotherhithe, the name of the person I took it of; I wrote the name upon it.

Q. How do you know the coin? - A. I know it by a cut across the cheek; it was done with a knife.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, Death , aged 11.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy, on account of her youth, and by the prosecutor also .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-38

401. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Crook , the said Thomas, and others of his family, being therein, about the hour of three, in the afternoon of the 26th of May , and feloniously stealing a hat, value 21 s. a black silk cloak, value 2 l. 2 s. and three handkerchiefs, value 6 s. the property of the said Thomas .

THOMAS CROOK sworn. - I live in Little Queen-street .

Q. Are you a lodger, or a housekeeper? - A. A housekeeper.

Q. In what parish is it? - A. St. Giles's: On Saturday the 26th of May, about three o'clock in the afternoon, in consequence of a lodger coming to me, and saying she saw a man go up stairs; I went up with the key of the servant's room, and the key of our bed-room; I saw a key in the door of the two pair of stairs bed-room.

Q. Was that the room you slept in? - A. Yes.

Q. How had that room been left? - A. Locked.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes; we are always very particular in locking the door.

Q. Did you lock it yourself? - A. No; but the key was down stairs, I took it up with me.

Q. Where had you taken that key from? - A. Out of the kitchen; I opened the bed-room door, and saw the prisoner, the cupboard-door was open, which he was standing by; I took him by the collar.

Q. Had he any hat on? - A. Yes, this hat.

Q. Whose hat is that? - A. My own.

Q. Where had you left it? - A. In a hat-box, in the cupboard; I took him by the collar, he asked me what I did that for; and I said he was come to rob the house; he said he was come to some person, whose name I forget; I told him he should go along with me; he told me not to tear his clothes; he stooped down in the cupboard, and got shuffling about with the hat-boxes, I thought he might be feeling for something, I took him by the back part of his coat, and pulled him out of the cupboard; I told him he had no business there; upon which he took off my hat and put on his own, which was lying upon the floor, upon that I said, you have got my hat have you; I then brought him down to the bottom of the stairs, in the passage, I was giving the keys to the servant with my other hand; he gave himself a sudden twist, and ran off, upon which I immediately ran after him, and cried stop

thief; he ran up Princes-court, up Turnstile, into Holborn, into Kingsgate-street, and Eagle-street; he fell down in Dean-street, he got up, and was laid hold of by another person; I took him myself into Holborn, he twisted to get out of my hands again, he ran about as far as two yards, I caught hold of his coat, and pulled him over; a man came over and offered his assistance, and as we were going along he offered me any thing to let him go; I told him I would have no satisfaction, but he should have justice; I took him into the kitchen, where I met with the beadle, he searched him, and found upon him some keys, and some Bank-notes; upon seeing the notes, I went up stairs to see if he had been at the drawers, and when I got up stairs I found this cloak, and these handkerchiefs, upon the landing outside the room-door.

Q. How high was this? - A. Two pair of stairs.

Q. Where had the cloak and handkerchiefs been before? - A. On the drawers in the room.

Q. Did you see them there? - A. No; I only knew from what Mrs. Crook said; I took the key out of the door.

Q. Was that your key? - A. No, it is not; it is a key of his, which he owned and asked for.

Q. How long had you been at home? - A. I suppose I had been at home about an hour, I had just done my dinner.

Q. Was your wife at home? - A. She was.

Q. What does your family consist of besides? - A. Two children, and a servant.

Q. Were they at home? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. How many lodgers have you? - A. Two.

Q. Were they both at home? - A. Yes.

Q. What are their names? - A. Welchman and Lewin.

Q. Are they neither of them here? - A. No.

Q. Before you saw any body, one of your lodgers had seen the prisoner, or somebody else, before you saw him? - A. Yes.

Q. This was broad day-light? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before that you had seen this room? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Had you been there after you got up? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Therefore it is impossible for you to say that it was locked? - A. No.

Q. Did he ask for one of your lodgers? - A. No.

Q. He knocked at the door of one of your lodgers? - A. She saw him.

Court. Q. Did that key open your door? - A. Yes; and he had two other keys.

JOHN BLYTHE sworn. - I was standing in Holborn, near Kingsgate-street, I heard the alarm of stop thief; I went after the prisoner, but I did not come up till he got into Dean-street, I then took charge of him; I found upon him two pounds thirteen shillings, and these keys, (Producing them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. They are common keys? - A. One of them the Magistrate desired me to shew in Court; I have been told by several people it will open almost any lock. As I was going along the top of Long-acre, he offered me five guineas to let him go; I told him if he offered an hundred I should not.

Prisoner's defence. One of these keys belong to my own room, and the other to my mother's; I went to this house for my master, for an extra man of my master's, of the name of Wilson; I knocked at the door up one pair of stairs, and the woman told me there was no such name there, I might go up stairs; I went up, and this gentleman came up, and said I wanted to rob the house; I told him I wanted Mr. Wilson, and then he pushed me about, and used me very ill; I did not run away.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing the hat, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-39

402. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , two pair of cotton drawers, value 10 s. a pair of silk gloves, value 5 s. two caps, value 4 s. a pair of braces, value 3 s. and thirty-six pair of stockings, value 7 l. 5 s. the property of Joseph Mather , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH MATHER sworn. - Q. What are you, and where do you live? - A. I live in New-street, Covent-garden ; I am a hosier .

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; he lived with me six months as a shopman ; during the time he has been with me, I have missed several things; in consequence of suspicion, I apprehended him on the 31st of May, about ten o'clock in the evening; in the course of the day I had observed his coat pocket bulky, and putting the cover of his pocket on to prevent any thing from being seen; and when he was going home at night, I called him back, and told him I missed several things, and requested, for my satisfaction and his innocence, that he would turn out his pockets; and another young man that I had in the shop I desired to do the same; he faultered for some time, and at last brought out some keys, and then a pocket handkerchief, and then he brought out these things, which I have had sealed up ever since; he first pulled out a pair of black worsted stockings, which had been open in the course of the day, and then he pulled out this pair of cotton stockings, which are made of three different cottons, and have my initials made in them, which I can swear to; in consequence of that, I told him I would see what he had at his lodgings; he said, that I might do, but, says he, you will understand, that all I have got there is not your's; I told him I should send for an officer; he said he hoped I would not do so,

he hoped I would behave kind to him; when the officer came, I asked him how many pair he had of mine at his lodgings; he said there might be seven or eight; I went to his lodgings, and found a great number of articles.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. How many pair of stockings had the prisoner at the bar purchased of you? - A. Eight pair at one time, and one at another.

Q. Did he purchase any black ones? - A. He purchased black ones for a family, which he paid me for the next day, and one pair of brown cotton, which he had on the next day.

Court. Q. When did he buy the black ones? - A. In January.

Mr. Watson. Q. And he bought mottled ones? - A. No, he did not.

Q. He had not purchased any that day? - A. No.

Q. He had been out, had not he? - A. No, he had not been out in the course of the day.

Q. You found three pair of his stockings at his lodgings? - A. A great many more.

Q. He had kept a shop, and sold stockings himself? - A. Yes; but I understood he had given them up to his creditors.

Q. You don't know that of your own knowledge? - A. No.

Q. How many pair can you swear to? - A. Here are two pair of drawers that I can positively swear to; one pair has not only my private mark, but is my own manufacture, and here is another pair of stockings with my private mark.

Q. Those stockings which you sold to the prisoner had your private mark? - A. No, they had not.

Q. When did you put your mark upon that pair of stockings? - A. At the time I bought them.

- NIBLOCK sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Mather; I was present when the prisoner was desired to open his pocket; I was desired to open mine at the same time, which I did; he first pulled out a handkerchief, and then a pair of black stockings; the prisoner said, these are mine; Mr. Mather said, no, they are mine; I said they were a pair that had been opened that day, and the paper tied up again; one pair had been sold in the day; I had done them up again slightly, and put them upon the counter; then he pulled out this pair of mottled stockings; my master said, these are mine; to which King did not answer a word.

Q. What number did that parcel contain? - A. I do not know.

Prisoner's defence. That pair of black stockings, and the pair of grey stockings, I brought from my house in the morning, to meet a friend at Hungerford-market, where I was going, when I was stopped by Mr. Mather; the others I had had some months before.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 44.

Of stealing, to the value of 7 s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040704-40

403. SARAH HILLIARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , six guineas, the property of John Hall , in the dwelling-house of William Hilliard .

JOHN HALL sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A rigger .

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Shadwell ; I lodged in the house of William Hilliard , the father of the prisoner.

Q. Had you a room to yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you lose any thing at any time? - A. On Whit-Tuesday, at night, I missed six guineas.

Q. Where had you left those six guineas? - A. They were in a small box that was in a large one.

Q. Was it locked? - A. No; the other box was locked.

Q. When had you seen them? - A. About the middle of the week before.

Q. Who kept the key of the box? - A. Myself.

Q. When did you see your box locked? - A. I had been out for four or five days; I never suffered any body in the room but myself.

Q. When you came home did you find your room locked? - A. Yes.

Q. How was your box? - A. Locked the same as I left it.

Q. What did you do upon missing your money? - A. I called in an officer of the parish, and had the prisoner apprehended; she was locked up all night; I told her I had missed my money, and she said she had never had it.

Q. Had you seen any alteration in her dress? - A. Yes, that was what I went by; she had a very mean dress before.

Q. How did you find her dressed when you came back? - A. She was in bed.

Q. Then you don't know any thing about it? - A. No.

JAMES WENDY sworn. - I am an officer of Shadwell.

Q. Look at that; do you know Mr. Clarke's hand-writing? - A. Yes; that is his writing.

Q. Did you see the prisoner sign it? - A. No.

Q. Were any promises made to her? - A. No; in order to liberate her mother she confessed it.

Q. To whom did she confess it? - A. She confessed it to me.

Q. Her mother lived in the house with her? - A. Yes; she said she had taken the money to Greenwich Fair, to buy herself things, to make herself decent.

Q. Did you find any clothes? - A. Yes; a new gown, and a bonnet.

Q. Did she own them to be her's? - A. She said she had bought them with the money she had taken.

Prisoner's defence. That man was not at the Justices when I was examined; the things were mine, a gentleman gave me some money to buy them with, before he went to sea.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040704-41

404. ANN COCKRAN alias COCKERELL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , twenty-one yards of printed cotton, value 85 s. the property of Robert Haynes and Thomas Bell , privately in their shop .

JAMES ASHTON sworn. - I am shopman to Robert Haynes and Thomas Bell , drapers , No. 1, Clare-street, Clare-market .

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner in your shop? - A. Not before Saturday, the 26th of May, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon; she came into the shop, and requested me to shew her some light printed cottons for a gown; in consequence of which, I took some printed cottons down, and the second that I took down was the piece I now hold in my hand; I shewed her four others afterwards, making in the whole six pieces; she offered me two shillings and nine-pence for one of them, which I could not take; having occasion to turn my back, she had an opportunity of secreting one of them under her cloak, she had a large red cloak on which hung down to her heels.

Q. Did you see her do it? - A. No; she had a singular manner, which created a suspicion in my mind that she had some evil intention; she told me she should not take the gown away with her if she had bought it, but should leave sixpence in part till the evening; I told her I could not put a gown by for her, or any one else, upon such terms, that it was not customary for us so to do; she turned upon her heels, and, in a kind of shuffling ran towards the door, said there were plenty of people that would do it; I then looked among the pieces upon the counter, and missed this piece; she turned round the corner of Stanhope-street, I followed her into White-horse-yard; I desired her to come back with me, and she came back very willingly to the shop; she immediately put her arm under her cloak, and threw the piece of print on the counter before my face, I was close to her, and therefore there could be no mistake; she then went upon her knees, and said, for God Almighty's sake, or for the love of God, pray forgive me, I will never do so again; for the sake of my two children, for I am fatherless and motherless, and have nothing to depend upon but my labour.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. Thirty-five shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I went in with intent to buy a gown, I never looked at more than one print, we did not agree, and I went away, and the gentleman came after me; I went back with him immediately, I am perfectly innocent.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040704-42

405. THOMAS RADFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Augustine Sherry .

AUGUSTINE SHERRY sworn. - I live at No. 16, Broad-street; I am a cutler ; I went on Blackfriars-bridge on Friday, the 29th of June, to see the sailing-match; about half-past five o'clock, while I was standing on the bridge, looking towards the boat, Mr. Lewis, who was behind me, tapped me on the shoulder, and said, this fellow, or this man, behind me, has taken your handkerchief; I turned round, put my hand down to my pocket, and found my handkerchief was gone, and at the same minute I saw the handkerchief drop from under the prisoner's coat, on his left hand side; Mr. Lewis, a tallow-chandler, collared him, and took him farther on the bridge, and gave him in charge of two Police-officers; he was taken to a public-house and searched, and some more handkerchiefs found in his hat; I appeared afterwards, on the Monday following, before the Lord Mayor, and he would have sent him on board a King's ship, but it appeared he was ruptured.

- LEWIS sworn. - I went to see the failing-match; my coat was buttoned; I felt a hand against my pocket; I turned round, and saw some suspicious persons near me; I saw the last witness near, and the prisoner was wanting to push in between me and the stone work; I watched him; he found he could not get before me, and he went behind him, put his hand in his pocket gently, and drew out the handkerchief and put it under his coat; some Police-officers were on the bridge, and I gave him in charge.

(- Hart, a city officer, produced the handkerchief, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was standing reading a paper against the watch-box; I know nothing of the handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-43

406. WILLIAM DORRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , a handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Richard Dyde , the younger.

RICHARD DYDE , junior, sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Sixteen, the 7th of last April: I live in the Minories, and go of errands for Mr. Dimes, haberdasher, in the Minories; on Saturday, the 9th of June, I was sent up to Hyde-park, about six o'clock in the evening; coming back, about half-past nine, in Smithfield , I got up behind a hackney coach; the prisoner was behind the coach, and when I got up I was hardly seated before my handkerchief was gone; I missed it immediately that he took his seat; he got down from the coach, and I followed him up Cloth-fair; I called out stop thief, till I came to Aldersgate-street; I called out stop thief again, and he knocked me down, and gave me two black eyes; I then saw him take my handkerchief from his left hand pocket and put it into his breeches; when he got to Jewin-street, a young man stopped him, he was detained till the constable came; he was taken to the ward watch-house in Little Britain.

Q. Was the handkerchief found upon him? - A. Yes, it was found upon him in his breeches, where he put it.

WILLIAM STAPLING sworn. - I live at No. 51, Jewin-street: on Saturday night, about half-past nine, I was sitting at my own door; I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw a person coming towards me; I stopped him; the prisoner is the man; he struck me a violent blow, but I detained him till the constable came; I went down to the watch-house, and saw the handkerchief found in his breeches; it was owned by the young man, Richard Dyde .

THOMAS GOODACRE sworn. - I took the prisoner to the watch-house; he denied having the handkerchief at first, but going to the watch-house he owned that he had it about him; when I got to the watch-house, he put his hand down, and I helped him to take it out of his breeches. (The handkerchief produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I belong to the 16th light dragoons: I was going to the Two Brewers, in Holborn, to receive my pay; I got up behind a coach, and this boy got up; there were a sailor and a baker running after the coach, and the sailor put this handkerchief upon my knee, and I put it in my pocket; the witness Stapling is not fit to take an oath; he took the oath of allegiance once, and afterwards deserted.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who knew very little of him, but who deposed they knew no harm of him.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-44

407. CATHARINE KENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , five shrouds, value 5 s. five pillows, value 2 s. two sets of ruffles, value 3 s. and five caps, value 1 s. the property of James Storer .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040704-45

408. WILLIAM POUCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , 4 pounds weight of opium, value 39 s. the property of George Prior .

Second Count, charging it to be the property of Alexander Andrews .

Third Count, charging it to be the property of certain persons, to the jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a merchant's agent: the Queen Charlotte was lying at Fresh wharf ; the prisoner was a lumper on board; I saw him coming from on board the vessel.

Q. Who is the commander of that vessel ? - A. Alexander Andrews .

Q. Did you suspect him? - A. I did, by seeing him put his head up the hold two or three times, to look; he had staid behind the rest of the men; he then came up the ladder; I laid hold of him, and asked him what he had about him, and he said he had got some victuals in his coat pocket, which was for his dinner.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. About one o'clock, the time they go to their dinner; upon that I told him I should see into his pocket and put my hand into his pocket and pulled out a piece of opium; I put my hand into his pocket again and found another piece; I then called Corry, who searched him in my presence; he found between his shirt and his flesh another piece of opium; he then said, pray let me go, it is my first offence, and I will do so no more; the captain was then called from on board.

Q. Was that vessel laden with opium among other things? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you examine the hold? - A. The case appeared to have been broke open; it was hollow.

ALEXANDER ANDREWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were the master of the Queen Charlotte? - A. Yes; she was lying at Fresh wharf.

Q. Your vessel was partly laden with opium? - A. Yes; I employed the prisoner as a labourer, and I employed him a quarter of a day on Monday, all day on Tuesday, and half a day on Wednesday, when this happened; in consequence of information, that I received from Mr. Nichols, I went down and discovered that one of the cases, out of five near the hatchway, had been broke open by

some iron instrument, a chisel, or a small iron crow.

(- Harding, a constable, produced the opium.)

Chapman. These two pieces were taken out of the prisoner's pocket, and the other from between his shirt and his flesh.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publickly whipped near Fresh-wharf .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-46

409. WILLIAM COX was indicted for feloniously embezzling and secreting, on the 15th of December , a bill for the payment of 38 l. 9 s. he being employed in the capacity of a clerk to Thomas Rowcroft and Henry Blackburn , for whose use he had taken it into his possession .

No evidence being offered, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-47

410. JOHN OLIVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, privily from the person of John Worton , on the 26th of May , a pocket-book, value 1 d. a Bank note, value 20 l. and another Bank note, value 10 l. his property .

JOHN WORTON sworn. - I live at Portsea; I am a wheelwright : on the 26th of May I was walking over London-bridge , as near as I can recollect between twelve and one o'clock, in the middle of the day; my wife was with me; she told me a man had picked my pocket; I turned round, and she had hold of the prisoner; I took hold of him from her, and searched him for the pocket-book, but he had it not; a gentleman immediately handed the book to me, and asked me if it was my property; I do not know who the gentleman was; after I had recovered my property I secured the prisoner.

Q. Was it your pocket-book? - A. It was my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There were a great many people walking over the bridge at this time? - A. Yes.

Q. You had your eye upon the prisoner? - A. Yes, when my wife alarmed me.

Q. You did not see him in possession of your pocket-book? - A. No.

Jury. Q. In what pocket was your book? - A. In my right hand coat pocket, outside, and my wife had hold of my right arm.

Q. You did not feel any body take it out of your pocket? - A. No.

ANN WORTON sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: I was walking over London-bridge, with my husband; I had hold of his right arm; I saw the prisoner put his hand in his right-hand pocket, and take out his pocket-book; I caught hold of the prisoner and alarmed my husband immediately; I told him he had taken my husband's pocket-book; he said he had not; I said he had, for I saw him take it; then a gentleman produced my husband's pocket-book, and asked him if it was his property; he said it was.

Q. Where was that gentleman? - A. Close to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There were a great many people about at this time? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was quite a stranger to you? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not mean to say you saw him take the pocket-book, only that he rushed up close to your husband? - A. I saw him take it out of his pocket.

( Isaac Rolfe , a constable, who had the possession of the property, was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.)

Prosecutor. He told me yesterday that he was offered money by the prisoner's friends not to appear.

Q. When had you any conversation with him? - A. I saw him yesterday, and desired him to attend at five o'clock to-day, in case the trial should come on, but I have not seen him.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, the prisoner at the bar stands indicted for a capital offence, in stealing privily from the person of John Worton , a pocket-book, containing two notes, one of 20 l. and the other of 10 l. the pocket-book unfortunately has been given to the constable, who is not here, and it is necessary, as the pocket-book is in existence, and can be produced, that it should be produced before you. There are certain rules of law which we can never deviate from, one of which is, that the best evidence which the case can admit of must be given to a Court and Jury, and therefore we must not indulge in fanciful ideas; the best evidence of the pocket book being the property of this gentleman is the production of it, and then he would say, that is the identical pocket-book which he lost, and that it is his property. Now, as it can be produced, it ought to be produced, and it is much better a guilty man should escape than either you or I deviate from the rules of law; for if we deviate from them, neither you or I can be safe, and though there can be little doubt of the guilt of the prisoner, yet, as the case is not made out, by the regular and best evidence, he must have the benefit of it. Whether it has happened from the negligence of the constable, or from any wicked design, or from having received a bribe, we have no evidence before us, and the only thing I can do at present is to estreat his recognizance, and you may be assured that that recognizance shall not be taken off; he is bound in a recognizance of 40 l. which shall be forfeited; but the prisoner, I am afraid, must, for this time, escape

justice; the prosecutor will have his remedy against the constable for the money, he will therefore get back the money he has lost; and I say, thus publicly, that the recognizance shall be forfeited, unless it appears that it was occasioned by some act of the Almighty, or by something that will satisfy every one, that it was not the fault of the witness. Therefore, let the prisoner be acquitted, and I trust the hazard of his life which he has run this day, will be such a warning to him, that we shall never see his face again; I would have him recollect this circumstance will not be forgotten.

(The Jury deliberated a considerable time, when the learned Recorder again called up the Prosecutor.)

Q. You had the pocket-book returned by a gentleman? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you keep it? - A. Two or three minutes, and then I gave it my wife.

Q. Are you sure that was your pocket-book? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you open it before you gave it your wife? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the contents of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you examine it before you delivered it? - A. Yes, and saw the notes in it; they were both in the pocket-book.

Q. When did your wife deliver it to you to the constable? - A. As near as I can recollect it was a quarter of an hour afterwards, at a public-house on this side of London-bridge; we could not at first find a constable, except a poor old man, who was not able to take him into custody; my wife gave the constable the book to look at, and he kept it; he attended before the Lord Mayor, and was bound over.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you know the number of the notes before you lost them? - A. No, I did not.

Q. And, as between the prisoner and the constable, you had not observed any intimacy, or any communication, at the time you delivered your pocket-book to the constable? - A. No.

Mrs. Worton called again. Q. Did you know the pocket-book? - A. Yes, it was my husband's; I saw him look to see if the notes were safe, it contained a twenty-pound note and a ten pound note.

Q. How long did you keep the pocket-book? - A. As well as I can recollect, pretty near a quarter of an hour; the constable asked to look at it, I gave it him, and he said, he should put it in his pocket, he was going to take the prisoner before the Lord-Mayor; we went, but the Lord-Mayor was not there; then he said he should keep the book till Monday; we went before the Lord-Mayor on the Monday, and he produced the same book.

Q. Are you sure it was the same? - A. Yes.

Q. Were the contents the same? - A. Yes; the Lord-Mayor allowed me to take the notes, and the constable kept the book.

Mr. Alley. Q. Then your husband has paid the notes away? - A. Yes; the Lord-Mayor said he might.

Prosecutor. I changed them at the Bank at Portsmouth, to the best of my recollection.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, I will tell you how I will put this case. The prisoner is accused of having stolen this pocket-book, the contents of which were two Bank notes; now the regular and the strict evidence would be, either to produce the book itself, in which the Bank notes were contained, or to produce one of the Bank notes, to prove that that was the property lost, for if a man loses a box of things, he is not bound to preserve the whole contents of that box; if the box itself is produced, and proved to have been stolen, that is proving the whole contents of the box, but the deficiency here is, that we have neither the notes or the pocket-book. The Chief Magistrate, before whom this came, could have no idea but that the constable, whom he took care to bind over, would appear, and produce to the Court and Jury the book in which the notes were contained, and that was sufficient; therefore the Magistrate says, you keep the book, and you take the notes and dispose of them; but it now unfortunately becomes somewhat material, because you have neither of them here, but if you are satisfied upon the evidence you have heard, that the prisoner was the person who stole this book, you will pronounce him guilty by your verdict, acquitting him of the capital part of the charge, for that is quite out of your consideration, and I will reserve the case so far as to have some conversation with the Judges upon it; on the other hand, if you have a doubt as to the facts, you will let him have the benefit of that doubt, by an acquittal. If the evidence satisfies you, that the prisoner's was the hand who stole the book, with the contents or without the contents is a matter of very little consequence, I shall certainly state the case to the Judges for their opinion, whether you are warranted on giving your verdict upon such evidence; if they should be of opinion that the evidence, in point of law, is not strictly such as to authorise the verdict, the prisoner will have the benefit of it; if, on the other hand, they are satisfied that the facts will warrant your verdict in point of law, it will then stand.

GUILTY,

Of stealing, but not privily from the person.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-48

411. MICHAEL FOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , in the dwelling-house of William Watson , one Bank note, value 200 l. one other Bank note, value 100 l. four other notes, value 200 l. another note, value

50 l. another note, value 20 l. four others, value 40 l. and three other Bank notes, value 3 l. the property of Mary Larking .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

MARY LARKING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a widow , and live in Sloane-street , at the house of Mr. William Watson ? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. About seven months.

Q. What is the defendant? - A. I do not believe he is any thing; he told me he was a captain in full pay.

Q. Did he ever apply to you to lend him a sum of money? - A. Yes, for the payment of twenty-five men he was recruiting for; he had got twenty-one of Captain Reynolds, and he had only four to raise; for this purpose, he wanted to borrow a little money.

Q. How much did he want to borrow of you? - A. We had not agreed on the sum; he told me he was to pay thirteen guineas a man, and I never intended to lend him more than to pay for these men; I sold out stock, and received 600 l. of Mr. Thompson, the stock-broker.

Q. In what manner did you receive it of Mr. Thompson? - A. Part in cash and part in checks; he sent the checks to Messrs. Fullers, and got cash for the same; I received altogether 613 l. after I received it, I went home; it was dinner time; the prisoner came between five and six o'clock; when he came I had my sister with me; when my sister went we walked part of the way with her and returned; when I got up stairs, it was beginning to be dusk; I then took the Bank notes from my pocket, and sat down at the table, and put them on the table, and holding my hand on them at the same time, I was beginning to discourse with him what I meant to do; I told him I expected I had lost money by selling out stock; he said he must be answerable for that, but as part was only for him, I meant to distinguish that part that was left for myself, and the part for him; I concluded that he was prepared with security, but I did not tell him so; we sat down at the table for the purpose of discussing this point, and then there came a knock at the door; he just cast his eye on them; they were laying before him; he started up and opened the sash; we were up one pair of stairs, and Mr. Meene, who was on the outside of the door, said, here is Reynolds and some other person, waiting for you, whose name I do not recollect; he said he must come down directly; Foley said, I will be with you in five minutes; the prisoner seemed agitated, and took up one of the notes and surveyed it, and I believe did not see what it was, for he held it wrong end upwards; he was about to speak; he stopped short, and hustled them all up together, and went out of the room, and down stairs; he ran out very fast, and shut the street-door after him, and joined Meene, the man that knocked, and they walked off arm in arm together.

Q. Did you call out? - A. No; my consternation was so great, I did not know how to act.

Q. Did you consent to his taking away all these Bank notes? - A. I did not.

Q. Had you ever promised to lend him so large a sum as 613 l.? - A. Never.

Q. Is that one of the letters you received from him - (a paper shewn to the witness) - after you had received that letter, had you any conversation with him, so as to know that it came from him? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know his hand writing - have you ever seen him write? - A. I have seen him write; I have heard people say that it is not.

Q. You say that it is? - A. No.

Q. Did he ever acknowledge to you that this letter was sent from him to you? - A. Oh yes. - (The letter read.)

Q. I believe he made an offer to you; how long has your husband been dead? - A. Twenty years; I have known Mr. Foley about seven months; I had a very good opinion of him; I knew where he lodged.

Q. You had a great regard for him? - A. I never professed any regard to him; you may be able to prove it, but I do not recollect it.

Q. Do you know your own hand-writing? - A. I do; I acknowledge that I had friendship for him, and would serve him in this affair.

Q. You wrote to him very frequently? - A. No; it occurs to me that I wrote to him once to refuse him the money; and I wrote a note to him once or twice, but I cannot even recollect the purport of it.

Q. Where was it your intimacy first began? - A. At Mr. Gardner's, at Chelsea; I boarded there.

Q. The prisoner has been there with you? - A. Yes.

Q. You have said before that you did not know what he was? - A. I have heard that he was an ensign; I never heard it disputed but that he was an officer in the army.

Q. How long might you have known him at the lodging-house before he visited you at your apartments? - A. Sometimes he spent his hours with the family, and sometimes with me alone.

Q. Have you not made a promise to him; and that you should wish to alter your condition? - A. No; quite the reverse.

Q. You know Miss Dance and Mrs. Moiney? - A. She is one of the conspiracy.

Q. She is a wife of one of the captains in the army? - A. It is said so, but I do not know it; I dined once at his house with them; he told me,

and they confirmed him, that his father is a man of 700 l. a year, and that he could not leave it from him.

Q. Have you never conversed on the subject of intimacy and attachment to the person of the prisoner at the bar? - A. Never.

Q. My question is this; have you never talked with Miss Dance and Mrs. Moiney upon the subject of your attachment to the person of the prisoner? - A. What made me say never, I never spoke to them together; I never spoke to Mrs. Dance, only as a person that he lodged with; he always considered them as good kind of people, but I never considered them as acquaintances.

Q. He went away quite in a hurry? - A. Yes.

Q. Somebody knocked at the door, and he went away in a hurry; you begged him to sit down; and did you not say, my dear Foley, I have done so and so for you, and I hope to make you a happy man? - A. I did not expect to be treated so.

Q. Did you not, on the same evening, or on the next day, tell Mrs. Moiney in these words, I have made my dear Foley happy; I have lent him this 600 l. - A. By heavens, I never said so in my life; you alarm me.

Q. You know the Miss Dalsiers? - A. These are people he lives with.

Court. Q. Did you, either on the evening of that day, or the next day, or any time, in which the defendant got your money, and was taken up, say that you had lent him that money? - A. I told the transaction.

Q. The question is not whether you told the transaction, but whether you told any person that you had lent him the 600 l.? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know Captain Fitzgerald ? - A. I am sorry I do; I have heard a bad character of him.

Q. Mr. Meene was before the Magistrate, and was examined as a witness? - A. He was; his name was on the warrant.

Q. You know Mr. Meene was discharged, and was at liberty; and has been at liberty ever since? - A. He has.

Q. Did you not hear it said, and do you not believe it, that that man was to be a principal witness on behalf of that gentleman to-day? - A. I supposed he would if he could, because I knew there was a conspiracy.

Q. I ask you this question solemnly upon the oath you have taken, was he or was he not indicted in order to be kept from giving his testimony today; I desire a plain answer? - A. I cannot tell; I am not a lawyer; I represented him as a person that was an accomplice in carrying on a swindling scheme to defraud me of my money.

Court. You do not represent him to us as a swindler; you represent him to us as a thief.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did not you swear before the Grand Jury so as to induce them to find the bill? - A. I did; I am not used to be examined, therefore I may be too quick.

Q. Did you not direct your attorney or the clerk of the indictments to put Mr. Meene in the indictment? - A. I consented.

Court. Q. Whether you did not desire the attorney or the clerk of the indictments to insert Mr. Meene in the indictment? - A. I did.

Mr. Alley. Q. Upon your oath, did not you know by so doing I could not have him as a witness to-day? - A. I did know it.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, did not you desire him to be indicted for the express purpose of preventing him? - A. I did, because I knew he was a dangerous person and an enemy.

Q. Who was the principal adviser to take this gentleman up? - A. The attorney I employed, considering my loss was so great.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you were not directed by another person? - A. It was my own inclination, it was my own act.

Q. Do you know Captain Kenner? - A. Yes; I never heard him called Captain Kenner, but Mr. Kenner; I saw him and several other people, and Mr. Fitzgerald, at the Sessions-house yesterday; Mr. Kenner gave me information that the money was lodged in Gooch's Bank; I went early on Monday, this transaction was on Friday, and I did not hear before Sunday of its being lodged there.

Q. You did not give him permission to take the money away; that you are positive of? - A. Yes.

Q. And that you were to advance 13 guineas for 25 men? - A. Yes.

Q. That is just 325 guineas; you had a good deal of other property, and though you had many annuities you were only to lend the gentleman at the bar the sum I have stated that was necessary? - A. I wanted to change my stock.

Court. Q. To fell off all the money you had in that stock? - A. Yes; there were 150 l. in the 3 per cent. I wanted to put it in the 4 per cent. when I got my money in four days.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did not you say before the Magistrate that you wanted some of it for your own private use? - A. So I did; I did not say I should keep every shilling.

Q. You have now said; that you wished to transfer it to another stock; how do you reconcile that? - A. I had a quantity of stock to sell, and if I wanted pocket-money, should I not be a great fool not to keep it out of so large a sum as 600 l.

Q. Had you made any agreement with Mr. Foley, before you sold out any stock, that he should return it at any given time? - A. He told me he would return it in four days.

Q. Do you recollect the day after the money was taken seeing Mr. Meene at your lodgings with excuses for Mr. Foley, that he was gone to London?

- A. Mr. Meene called the next day, and the day after, on Sunday.

Q. Do you know that Mr. Meene called to know whether you wished to have a bond or a note for your money, and you refused having a bond or a note; and that you would rely on the honour of Mr. Foley? - A. He did mention the note or bond, but I did not want to make a debt of it; what could I think when I heard the money was in Gooch's Bank, and he had told me it was to raise 25 men, but that it was in the hands of swindlers?

Q. It was late on Friday when this happened; had you taken any steps before they offered a bond or a note? - A. None at all; I certainly should have given him a day's time for security.

Court. Q. You were afraid, if you made a debt of it, you would lose your money? - A. Yes, because I knew he had been false; he got the money fraudulently to give the men, and there were no men.

- BROUGHTON sworn. - The prisoner brought notes to the amount of 610 l. he had 10 l. and in consequence left 600 l.

Q. Have you any of the notes here? - A. No; Bankers generally, when they receive notes, pay them away.

Mr. Alley. We admit the notes belong to herself.

Court. It is a very dishonourable thing; it is not a felony; it may be a trick; they are her notes, and it is right she should have them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-49

412. MARY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , a canvas bag, value 1 d. two seven-shilling pieces, a half-crown piece of silver, also five shillings in silver and three sixpences in silver, and one Bank of England note, value 1 l. the property of William Pocock .

WILLIAM POCOCK sworn. - I am a labouring man ; I live at Harley, in Kent; I was going up Drury-lane , near eleven o'clock at night; Mary Brown picked me up, and afterwards there were two more women came; I turned angry with them, and asked them what they wanted; the last two went away and left me with the first; we went on a little farther, and there was a man that used me ill; he wanted to fight me; the prisoner had some conversation with him, what I cannot tell; the prisoner came to me again, and, as I was going along the street to St. Martin's lane, I missed the canvas bag.

Q. Where did you keep your canvas bag? - A. In my breeches pocket; going along I heard something fall; it happened to be my own canvas purse, I took it up, and missed a note out of it; I told her, if she would give it me honourably I would give her 5 s.

Q. Did you ever get your note again? - A. No.

Q. When you found your purse, what did you find in it? - A. All the money was left in it, and nothing gone but the note; I had felt her hand about that pocket.

Q. Not directly in it? - A. No, only about the pocket; I immediately put my hand there, and found the purse was gone.

Q. You know there were two other girls with you before? - A. Yes; but it was after they were gone I missed it; Mary Brown was with me then, I picked it up myself.

Q. You were not going any where at all with her? - A. No; I did not want any of that sort.

JOHN WHITE sworn. - I was constable of the night; she was brought in about eleven o'clock, the purse was delivered to me by Pocock; it contained two seven-shilling-pieces, five shillings, half-a-crown, and three sixpences, in silver; it was agreed by the Magistrate, at Marlborough-street, for the man to have some of the money, and three of the pieces of silver were marked. (The bag, and the three shillings marked, were produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was in Long-acre, that man picked me up, and asked me to go and drink something; there were two or three more girls, they ill-used me, I went away from them; this man came up to me, and said he had been robbed; the girls knocked me down.

Jury. Q. Did you see the bag drop from her? - A. I heard it.

Court. Q. Were you sure that your purse was in your possession when the two women went away? - A. I cannot particularly say; when I missed it, the man wanted to fight me; I searched my pocket, and found the bag was gone.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-50

413. JOHN WYNAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , two pounds of horse-hair, value 2 s.

WILLIAM DIRDEN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Thomas Willan , at Mary-le-bonne Park .

Q. On the morning of the 30th of May, were you at the stables where the artillery horses are kept? - A. Yes; at about twenty minutes past six in the morning.

Q. Had any of them lost their tails, or manes? - A. A lad called to me to look at the horses' tails, there was one horse with the blood running from his tail, that gave me suspicion; and on looking further, I found thirty or forty of their tails maimed and shaved.

Q. How lately had you seen these horses' tails before; were they perfect, had they lost their tails

the over night? - A. No; I saw them safe about six o'clock the night before.

Q. Was the prisoner at that time in Mr. Willan's service? - A. Yes.

- FISHER sworn. - I am one of the drivers.

Q. On the morning of the 30th of May, what time did you go to the stables where these horses are kept? - A. About a quarter before six o'clock; I found this man cutting the tail of a black horse with his knife.

Q. Did he cut the tail as well as the hair off? - A. He cut the tail and it bled; he had the hair in his left-hand, and his knife in his right-hand; and when I came up he put the horse's hair in his hat, and put his hat on his head, and said, I am so ill I must go home.

Q. Was there any body else in the stables besides? - A. Not that I saw.

Q. Had these horses long tails? - A. Very long tails; in about two or three days after we found a little bunch of grey horse hair, when we were cleaning.

Q. (To Dirden.) When you found the horses' tails were cut, did you search the stables? - A. No; I do not know what became of the hair, we could not find out any body but this man, we had no suspicions before of any man.

Prisoner's defence. It was half past five when I went into the stable, I was very ill and shut up the stable; I came out of the Infirmary three or four days before; I went home to my lodgings, and when I came up again I was stopped at the accompting-house, I know nothing about it; I have been with Mr. Willan these two years, and never was charged with any thing in my life.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped near Mary-le-bonne Park .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-51

414. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , a gown, value 10 s. an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. a flannel petticoat, value 3 s. and a cloak, value 5 s. the property of David Lewis .

SARAH LEWIS sworn. - I am a married woman, my husband's name is David Lewis , he is at sea; I live in Poplar , the prisoner was a lodger of mine: On the 18th of May last, she got up a little after six o'clock, she did not return again; and about half an hour after she was gone, I found missing a gown, an apron, a flannel petticoat, and a cloak; on Saturday morning I went to Shadwell office, and got a warrant for her, and she was taken up; she had pawned the things, and the duplicates were found upon her; she came to our house as a married woman, but since, the man denied being married to her when this happened.

JAMES WEBB sworn. - I searched the prisoner, and found on her four duplicates. (The articles produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. She gave me these things to wash, and she said she would lend them me to pledge, as I was in distress; she told me to get them out on Saturday night, I would have returned them when I had got the money, but she sent the runners after me.

Q. (To Prosecutrix.) Did you ever suffer her to pawn any thing for you? - A. No; the petticoat was pawned a fortnight before she left the house.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-52

415. JOHN O'SHAUGHNESSY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , a saw, value 3 s. three planes, value 3 s. 6 d. one oilstone, value 9 d. three squares, value 2 s. 3 d. one screw-driver, value 6 d. one hammer, value 6 d. a gouge, value 3 d. an auger, value 3 d. and one axe, value 2 s. the property of William Fudge .

Second Count. For like offence, only charging it the property of Charles Hellenden .

CHARLES HELLENDEN sworn. - I live at No. 38, Duke-street, St. James's, my shop is at No. 2, Eden-street, Swallow-street ; the prisoner at the bar, and William Fudge, both worked for me as journeymen : On the 2d of June last, I discharged William Fudge , he not being a good workman enough; when I discharged him, he asked me to leave his tools in my possession, till he got another job, which I consented to; they were there from June the 4th to the 7th, and on the 8th I missed them; then I asked the prisoner at the bar what had become of the tools; he told me that Fudge had fetched them away, he had got another job; I heard no more about it till the 23d of June, when I received a letter from Fudge, asking me to send his tools, and to direct them on board his Majesty's ship, he was pressed, and he desired me to send them to him; the tools were gone, I had suspicion that the prisoner had taken them away; I had him apprehended on Sunday, and some of the tools I saw in his possession, at his house when it was searched; I told him he had better collect them together, and let me see them; on Monday, at the watch-house, the tools were there.

Counsel for the Prisoner. Q. The prisoner worked for you at the time Fudge worked for you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know his hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you believe that to be Fudge's hand-writing? (Shewing a letter from Fudge to the prisoner.)

- A. I have seen him write, I think it is his handwriting; I only wish him to have his property.

(The letter read in Court.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-53

416. RUTH ALLEN and ANN EDY were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , a cloth coat, value 5 s. and a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of Daniel Carrier ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

DANIEL CARRIER sworn. - I am a journeyman carpenter ; I live at Clapton: on the 27th of May I stopped at the end of a court in Kingsland-road , to make water; I met the prisoner, and she asked me to go home with her; I went with her, up one pair of stairs in the same court; I continued there some time, and sent her for some porter; it was about seven o'clock on a Sunday evening; I was not quite sober.

Q. How long did you stay there? - A. About twenty minutes or half an hour; I sent her out for a pot of porter, when she returned, she brought another woman with her; I pulled off my coat and waistcoat, and laid it on a chair on the side of the bed in her absence; I was laid down on the bed, and this other woman laid down at the side of me.

Q. Not the prisoner? - A. No; the prisoner walked to and fro in the room, for about five minutes, and then she absconded with the coat and waistcoat; I got up, and found the waistcoat and coat were gone; she went out of the room without my perceiving she had took the coat and waistcoat; I got off the bed, and went and searched for her and could not find her, nor the coat and waistcoat, for an hour afterwards; after I had been searching, I went and continued in the room, and in about an hour I heard the prisoner going up the other pair of stairs higher; I asked her for my coat and waistcoat, and she ran down stairs; I continued in the room, it was near dusk, I was thinking to go home; I met the Headborough, Mr. Lilly-white, and the prisoner.

Q. Did you ever find your coat and waistcoat? - A. Yes, in Whitecross-street; she confessed when she came before the Magistrate.

Q. Were you sober enough to know what passed? - A. Yes; I was sober enough to recollect it, as well as if it was only an hour ago.

Q. Ruth Allen was the woman you want with? - A. Yes.

SARAH BISHOP sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Kingsland-road: Ruth Allen gave me the things, and told me to take them to Ann Edy ; I took the coat and waistcoat to Ann Edy , and stopped there all night; I was to leave them there, and to pledge them in the morning for what I could get.

Q. What is Ann Edy ? - A. She makes children's pumps; Ann Edy went and pawned them for three shillings and sixpence, I went with her, and sat at the door while she pawned them; she came out and gave me the money.

GEORGE SHEPPARD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 104, Whitecross-street, I produce a coat and waistcoat; I cannot swear to the prisoners.

- LILLYWHITE sworn. - A. I am a headborough: On the 27th of May, I was sent for to Cox's-court, by Mr. Carrier, he gave me charge of Ruth Allen, he said she had stole a coat and waistcoat of his; I took her to the watch-house, and on Wednesday she confessed it; I went to Sarah Bishop , and then apprehended Ann Edy .

(The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Ruth Allen 's defence. This man came up stairs, and asked me to fetch something to drink; he had no money, he said, but if it was a working-day he would pledge his coat; he said to me, you can pawn them on Monday morning, and he would leave his coat and waistcoat; when I came back with the pot of beer they were both sitting on the bed; the young woman told me to give the clothes to that girl, which I did; they took me to the watch-house, and this old woman, and asked me if I would tell where his things were; I told them I could not; in the mean time they had been and pledged the things, and were intoxicated.

Q. Was there any thing in your pockets? - A. There was a knife, a pair of gloves, and some loose halfpence.

Q. Did you desire them to pawn them? - A. I went home, I never said a word about pawning them.

Allen, GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Edy, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-54

417. CHARLES HARPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , one shirt, value 5 s. the property of Philip Horby .

Second Count. For like offence, charging it to be the property of Sarah Christmas , widow . And a

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of Joyce Dale , widow .

SARAH CHRISTMAS sworn - Q. Are you a widow? - A. Yes; I live in Britannia-gardens, Hoxton; I go out an ironing, I had five shirts of Mrs. Horby, belonging to Philip Horby , to wash and iron against Saturday; I had not an opportunity of doing them, being engaged to go out to three days work; I took them to my aunt to do them for me on Thursday, the 7th of June; on Saturday, my aunt came to me, and said there was one lost.

JOYCE DALE sworn. - I live at the Green-gate, Hackney-road ; I received these five shirts of

Sarah Christmas on Thursday night; I washed them, and hung them up in the garden, they were almost dry; the prisoner at the bar went down our place, there is no thoroughfare at all there; when he walked up and down, I thought he was sick; I saw him take the shirt from off the lines, and before I could open the gate he was gone out of the street; I went to the public-house just by, and said I had lost a shirt; he said, never mind, poor woman, mind your work, you will hear something of it by and by, and at ten o'clock it was brought back.

Q. Are you sure the young man is the person that took it? - A. I know him to be the same man, I could swear to him.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer: On Friday, the 8th of June, I had some business to call at the Green-gate, the landlord informed me of a poor woman that had lost a shirt from a line; the prisoner was described to me, and his name was mentioned; I spoke to several that saw him in that neighbourhood if they saw him to detain him; he was detained at the Nag's Head the same afternoon; I took him into custody, and took him to the Office; the shirt has been taken to the gentleman it belonged to, somebody had been to the prosecutrix's house, and threw it over the garden that night, while he was in custody.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-55

418. ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , six yards of cambric muslin, value 21 s. one yard of muslin, value 7 s. five gown pieces, value 5 l. ten pair of stockings, value 2 l. six pieces, of muslin, value 2 l. four shawls, value 8 s. six muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 12 s. and twelve pocket handkerchiefs, value 12 s. the property of Joseph Stevens .

JOSEPH STEVENS sworn. - I am a linen draper , I live at No. 9, Vauxhall-road: On the 18th of May I went over to Chelsea, I had a little business to do there, I met with a West countryman there, and we enjoyed ourselves a little together, and going down Pye-street, No. 52 , about half past four in the afternoon, there was a girl pulled hold of me, and pulled me into a room, the prisoner followed in.

Court. Q. The girl laid hold of you, and you went into her house? - A. I did not go with the prisoner, I went with the other girl; it was in Old Pye-street, they wanted something to eat; I sent for some ham and some porter, and after that I sat down on a chair, and laid my arm on the table, and dropped into a bit of a dose, and the while I was in a dose, they undid the wrapper where the goods were in, and took all the goods out; when I awakened, I found all these goods gone, and they had left the wrapper behind; I had bought a pound of sugar and a quarter of a pound of tea for my wife; I had in my pocket twelve shillings and sixpence and a pocket handkerchief; they took that, and afterwards they locked me in the room.

Q. Did you ever find your property? - A. Some of it.

Q. You were pretty much in liquor? - A. I had been drinking, I found myself locked in; I pulled the door open, I was very much fatigued; loosing all my property, I went to Queen's-square, and got two officers to see after them; the officers proceeded after them, but they did not get them that night.

Q. Why do you accuse this woman more than the other? - A. I do not, they were both together.

THOMAS KENNAR sworn. - I am an officer of Queen-square; the prosecutor came to the Office on the 18th of May, and said he had been robbed of a quantity of articles; I found, on enquiry, it was the prisoner at the bar and another woman, who had been with the man; we did not succeed that night, but in the morning we found the prisoner at her lodgings, No. 3, Pear-street, Westminster; the prisoner was then in a state of intoxication, it was about eight o'clock the next morning; we found a piece of cambric muslin and a piece of pearl muslin, they were laying on the floor at the foot of the bed.

(The pieces of muslin produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the muslin, how it came in the room I know not, certainly it was found there.

GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-56

419. LAURENCE BARROW was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Nicholas Taylor , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 17th of January , and burglariously stealing therein one Bank-note, value 20 l. three other Bank-notes, value 15 l. seven Bank-notes, value 70 l. six Bank-notes, value 60 l. three other Bank-notes, value 6 l. one hundred and six Bank-notes, value 106 l. a Cambridge note. value 10 l. a bill of exchange, value 10 l. 12 s. the said several Bank-notes, Cambridge note, and bill of exchange, being the property of John Nicholas Taylor .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

SAMUEL JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Taylor? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Taylor is proprietor of Mr. Harford's brewhouse, Limehouse ? - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of the 17th of January last, did you receive any quantity of Bank-notes from your collecting clerk? - A. Upwards of two hundred and ninety pounds; I put them in an iron chest in the accompting-house, and locked the iron chest; I did not lock the accompting-house, I left another clerk there; on the next morning, when I came, the iron chest was unlocked, and the notes were all gone; it was between ten and eleven o'clock the next morning when I came there.

Court. Q. What time did you leave the accompting-house on the evening? - A. About eight o'clock.

JAMES ROBINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the collecting clerk to Mr. Harford's brewhouse? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 17th of January last, had you, in the course of business, received a large number of Bank-notes? - A. I did, and I delivered them to the last witness, Jones; I wrote the names of the persons I received them from, except one parcel, and Mr. Sanderson wrote the name on them in my presence, and that name was Austin; the other person's names were Yates, Upchurch, and Glutton; on the 18th, when I came, it was about twenty minutes past ten o'clock; I came after Jones.

Q. Who is the proprietor of that brewhouse? - A. John Nicholas Taylor ; Mr. Taylor is the sole proprietor, Mr. Harford died last July.

JAMES BLAKEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are one of the clerks of this brewhouse? - A. I am store-house clerk; I came about five in the morning.

Court. Q. Who was the last person that left the accompting-house? - A. Mr. Robinson was.

Q. (To Robinson.) You were the last person that left the accompting-house? - A. I was; I am sure it was past eight.

Q. Are you sure you did not leave somebody in the accompting-house? - A. Yes, I was reading the newspaper; I locked the accompting-house door when I went out, and tried it to see if it was fast as I always do.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (To Blakey.) In what state did you find the accompting-house? - A. I found it locked; I found no marks of violence, I knew nothing of the robbery till Mr. Jones came.

Q. Who lives in the house? - A. Richard Rider above stairs, the house is over the accompting-house, there is no communication from the dwelling-house to the accompting-house, the door is fastened up.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. The brewer cannot go to the accompting-house without going to the outward door? - A. No.

Q. You did not know of this property being stole till ten o'clock? - A. I stopped there till six o'clock, then I went away, I cannot say what time I returned, nor whether the accompting-house was left or not that morning.

Court. Q. Is this accompting-house surrounded by any gates? - A. There is a gate to it both ways, no person can come to the accompting-house unless they come through the gates, or climb the wall; the gates are opened about eight o'clock in the morning, the watchman continues on the premises till six or seven o'clock; the gates had been opened by a key, there was no appearance of force on the premises; no person could come in or out without picking the lock of the gate; the watchman might let a person in; the clerks have not a key of the gate.

Q. Supposing the servants doing their duty, no person could come in there without climbing the wall, or forcing the gates, or picking the lock? - A. Not that I know off; it was not discovered it was broken open till past ten o'clock in the morning.

JOHN GRIFFITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an officer of Lambeth-street; I produce the notes I received from Hillingsworth and Parsley.

Q. Hillingsworth and Parsley were employed by you to go to Moore's to see whether they could discover any thing of these notes? - A. From Hillingsworth I received six one-pound Bank-notes, and four from Parsley.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you know Moore very well? - A. Yes.

Q. From information, you had no difficulty in resorting to Moore to find out these notes, and get the notes back again? - A. Yes.

Q. You remember Mr. Moore was committed for this burglary, and afterwards acquitted partly upon the ground my learned friend has admitted - Mrs. Moore was not here? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Nor the maid servant? - A. I do not recollect that.

Q. How soon was it that the prisoner at the bar was taken up for this charge, or was he taken up? - A. He was taken up about a fortnight after Moore had been committed; I met him at the Flying Horse door, his brother and him.

Q. Did he make any difficulty in coming? - A. Surely not: he lived in Somerset-street, Whitechapel, No. 19.

Q. The present prisoner was charged before the Magistrate at that time? - A. Yes, and after a long examination set at liberty; it was not till after Moore was acquitted, that the prisoner was indicted.

Q. Moore was tried in April Sessions, and Barrow was indicted the same Sessions - did you do all that was in your power to apprehend him? - A. Certainly; I went to his house, and could not find

him; I received information from the brewhouse, and went to different places in town, and could not find him.

THOMAS THOMAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are clerk to Cooper and Co. tea-brokers - did you receive these four Bank-notes from a person of the name of William Moore ? - A. I did, on or about the 1st of February; they came from Moore to us, and went into the East-India Company's hands, and then went to the Bank; they have been cancelled, (looks at them,) I am sure these are the notes.

JOHN HILLINGSWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you receive these six one-pound notes from Mr. Moore? - A. I received them from Mrs. Moore on the 3d of February; I went by the desire of Griffiths; I live in Whitechapel-road; I asked Mrs. Moore if she could give me change for a ten-pound note; I endorsed them, and put them in my pocket.

JOSEPH PARSLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Look at these four notes, (the notes handed to him,) - from whom did you receive these four notes? - A. From Moore himself; I live in Whitechapel.

WILLIAM MOORE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a grocer in Whitechapel.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Laurence Barrow ? - A. I do.

Q. Did you see him in the month of January? - A. I did, I think on the 24th, on Tuesday, he said he had got some small Bank-notes to the amount of one hundred pounds, or upwards; he said he had got them, or should have, I am not certain which; he said he would call again; I did not make any particular answer to him.

Court. Q. Then you did not tell him whether you would, or not? - A. I did not; he called again in the evening, and handed me a roll of paper, and said, there was a hundred and twenty-nine pounds; he described the notes, and said, there were eleven fives, a small bundle of twos, and the others all ones; I asked him respecting the notes, and he said they were notes that had been found; he said he would allow me eight pounds, if I would take them; he said he would leave them, and call in the morning for me to consider of it, and he did leave them; I looked over the notes, and found there was not the number; he said there were eleven fives, six or seven twos, and the rest ones; he called the next morning, I think, about nine o'clock; he asked me if I had considered about the notes; I asked him if there was any danger; he said none, they had been found; I asked him if they had been advertised; he said, not that he knew of; he said he would allow me the odd nine pounds; he had said the over night there were a hundred and twenty-nine pounds, and I said no; he took them in his hand, and counted them in my back warehouse, and he came forward, and said there were only a hundred and twenty-seven; he agreed that I should have them for a hundred and twenty pounds; I then asked him if he could give me change for a two hundred pound note; he said, yes; he gave me two fiftys, and I gave him eighteen pounds in small notes, and gave him the two hundred pounds.

Q. It was nine pounds he was to give you? - A. Give me leave to correct that error; it was a hundred and eighteen pounds I was to have them for.

Court. Q. Then, in point of fact, you took nine pounds instead of seven? - A. I did; that was all that passed. In the course of three days afterwards I saw an advertisement or bill stuck up, I cannot say which; the names were erased on the notes I had, which gave me suspicions that they were some of the notes; I did not observe the erasure on the notes till after I saw the advertisement; he called on me the next day, after I had seen this hand-bill, or advertisement; I mentioned to him what I had seen; I told him I had seen an advertisement about a robbery that had been committed at Limehouse, and I was doubtful that these notes were part of them; he said he did not believe they were; before he left me, he said that they might be part of them, but there was no danger; there were no numbers, and the names were all altered, and therefore they might be paid away.

Q. Did you see him any more before you were taken up? - A. I did not.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Parsley coming to your house for change of a ten-pound note? - A. Yes.

Q. Were the notes that you gave Mr. Parsley part of the notes you had received from him - look at these four, and see whether these four were part of the notes you had received from the prisoner? - A. I cannot tell. (Looks at them.)

Q. Look at these six one-pound notes that Mr. Lillywhite had from your wife, whether they are any part of the notes that you had from the prisoner? - A. I cannot swear that they are.

Q. See whether these four, which are cancelled by the Bank, are the same that you paid Mr. Thomas? - A. I cannot speak to any of them.

Q. Have you any of the notes that you had received from the prisoner? - A. No, they are paid away.

Q. When did you pay the last of them away? - A. Near two months ago.

Q. In whose possession, when you were tried in April, was the remainder of the notes? - A. I cannot say; I believe they were not all paid away.

Q. At the time you were taken up, how many were in your possession? - A. To the best of my recollection about fifty pounds; they were paid away with other notes.

ELIZABETH MOORE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Were you present at any time your husband received any Bank-notes of Mr. Barrow? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember giving change for a ten-pound Bank-note to Mr. Hillingsworth? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any of these notes your husband had from Mr. Barrow? - A. I cannot swear to any of these notes; there were all the other notes in the drawer.

Court. (To Moore.) I think you have said, that at the time you were tried here, you had fifty pounds of these notes that had not been discovered, and which you have paid away since; I am really very much surprised your countenance did not change, when you told us that; there is much more cogent proof of your being concerned in that burglary as receiver of stolen property; against the prisoner there is no proof but what depends upon the man in whose possession the stolen property was found.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-57

420. WILLIAM BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , a shirt, value 3 s. a neck handkerchief, value 3 s. 6 d. and one pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of William Dirden .

WILLIAM DIRDEN sworn. - I live in the parish of St. Marylebone, at the Buffalo's Head, New-road, Paddington : On Sunday, June the 10th, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, about one or two o'clock; I had pulled them off to clean myself, and after I cleaned myself, I went up to the stable; I am servant to Mr. Willan; the prisoner had been in the employ of Mr. Willan as a driver . On Monday morning when I arose, I looked for my things, and they were gone; the prisoner lodged in the house, but not in my room; I had a room to myself, but I had not locked my door when I went out; I went up to the stable on Monday morning, and between nine and ten o'clock I went to Somers Town, where I heard the prisoner had such things to sell, and witnesses which I have here bought the things of him, which I know to be mine.

Prisoner. He now says the things were dirty, and at the Magistrate's he swore they were clean linen, and that he put them there to put on.

Witness. No such thing.

Prisoner. I came after I heard of it, and surrendered myself up to the house when I came from Mr. Field's.

Court. Q. Is it true that he surrendered himself? - A. The landlord of the house charged him with it; his servant boy lost a pair of breeches, and he heard that he had the boy's breeches.

EDWARD LONG sworn. - I am one of the drivers of the artillery horses; the prisoner worked in the same stable where I did.

Q. Did you buy any thing of him? - A. He had a pair of stockings; he shewed them to me; I told him I did not want any stockings, that was on Sunday between five and six o'clock; I bought them of him, and he was to return the money to me at night; I lent him ninepence on them; he was discharged at night; I was informed they were stolen; I sent for the man that owned them, and I gave them to him.

THOMAS MILLER sworn. - I bought a white neck handkerchief of the prisoner; I gave him sixpence for it; he worked in the same stable with me; I gave it over to Dirden; I bought it of him on Sunday evening between five and six o'clock.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have been in Mr. Willan's employ these last three years; as soon as I heard of it, I came up to the Buffalo's Head, and surrendered myself up.

Court. (To the prisoner.) Q. These people charge you with having possession of these things, and selling of them? - A. I did not take them; they were given me by another man; as soon as I was taken up, he was gone.

Prosecutor. He acknowledged at Marlborough-street that he had took the things, and that he had sold these, and the other part were in pledge.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-58

421. JOHN DOBEY and THOMAS BARNSLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , a great coat, value 8 s. the property of George Clark .

GEORGE CLARK sworn. - I live at the Angel inn: On the 30th of April I lost a great coat from off the coach-box, after it came in at night; I saw the coat between eight and nine that night, and I missed it the next morning; the gates are not shut till eleven o'clock, or after; the prisoners both worked in the yard, one is horse-keeper, and the other is employed in washing and cleaning the coaches.

Q. When did you see your great coat again? - A. On the 9th of June; the prisoners were taken up to Bow-street on that day.

Q. You do not know that they ever had it in their possession of your own knowledge? - A. No.

JOHN HARPER sworn. - I drive a chaise for Mr. Woodland.

Q. Does he keep the Angel? - A. No; I was out of place at that time; they brought the coat to me, and wanted me to go with them to pawn it, and I did; it was night when we went to pawn it; it was pawned in Drury-lane, just before you

come to Long-acre; I do not know the pawnbroker's name.

Q. Did both of the prisoners go? - A. No, only Dobey; they both of them asked me if I would go along with them to pawn it; that is all I know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This was only meant as a joke; they had agreed to take it out as soon as he came to town? - A. Yes, they were drunk, and we got drunk the next morning too.

Q. Were you drunk at the time? - A. I was not very drunk at the time.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Did not the prisoners say, as soon as they had got the money, they would take it out? - A. They denied it; I went to Barnsley afterwards, and he owned that they had took the coat from the coach-office; he told me I should have the coat after a while; this was five weeks afterwards; I had offered five shillings the next morning to drink, if any body would come forward, and I think I offered very fair.

THOMAS-WINDSOR ALLEN sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Lane, No. 135, Drury-lane: On the 1st of May, I took in a great coat, and lent 8 s. on it; I believe that was the day I took it in; I am not certain.

Dobey's defence. We did it merely as a joke.

Barnsley's defence. We did it merely as a joke.

The prisoners called three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

The prosecutor said he could by no means give them a bad character, only in that instance.

Dobey, GUILTY .

Barnsley, GUILTY .

Both ordered to be discharged, having suffered in jail since the 10th of June .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-59

422. WILLIAM BAILEY was indicted for that he, on the 26th of May , being servant to Ann Hardy and William Hodge , took thirteen shillings on account of his mistress and master, the said widow , Ann Hardy , and William Hodge , and having so received the said sum of money on their account, fraudulently did embezzle and secrete the same, then and there in manner aforesaid did carry away the same .

Another Count in like manner, only varying the manner of charging.

JOHN THELWALL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Coxwell, Fleet-street, near Temple-bar.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner at the bar carrying a load for you on the 26th of May? - A. Yes, a load of lemon juice, from Thames-street to Kentish-town; it was a City cart; it came to 13 s. it was paid to Hawkins, a fellow-servant of his; there were three loads, and he carried one.

GEORGE HAWKINS sworn. - I am a carter to Mrs. Elizabeth Morley .

Q. Did you ever receive any money from Mr. Thelwall to pay the prisoner for any load he had carried for him? - A. Yes; I received from Mr. Thelwall 1 l. 19 s.; I received 13 s. for the prisoner; he had carried one load, and that 13 s. I paid him; the gentleman could not pay without taking the money together; I got change in Fleet-street, and paid him in Fleet-street .

Q. Was the money for himself, or his master? - A. His master.

Q. You did not give him 13 s.? - A. No; there was 2 d. paid for toll and watering the horses, and allowing for that, the money I gave him made it amount to 13 s.

Prisoner. My master received 6 s. 4 d. out of the 13 s.

WILLIAM HODGE sworn. - I am a carman ; I have a partner, Ann Hardy ; the prisoner was employed by me to drive a cart: On the 26th of May, he gave me an account of three loads - a load of rags 6 s. 1 d. a load of linen 7 s. and 6 s. 4 d. for a load to Fleet-street; he went to Kentish-town, which he gave no account of; he stopped 3 s. for his day's work; I challenged him at the time; I saw the horse looked sadly; I gave 35 guineas for the horse; he has not been fit to be seen since.

Prisoner. I gave him 6 s. 4 d. part of the money I received for the load to Kentish-town; I am indebted 6 s. 8 d.

Q. (To Thelwall.) Did he come to Fleet-street? - A. Yes; they were not to come to Fleet-street, but they did come there; then they went to Kentish-town; I paid them 13 s. each, and each man a shilling for himself.

Prosecutor. It was impossible for him to ascend Holborn-hill with one horse; they might go that way on that account.

Mr. Alley. (To Thelwall.) Q. Did you then agree for another journey? - A. We considered it the same.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-60

423. NICHOLAS BURKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , twelve pounds weight of sheet copper, value 15 s. the property of George Oliver and Joseph Oliver .

JOSEPH OLIVER sworn. - I am in partnership with George Oliver , braziers and ironmongers , Wapping New Docks : Being informed that some copper was concealed behind some sheet iron, it was handed to me, and I marked it; it was put down in the same place with that; I went over the way, and watched for the prisoner coming out, supposing he was the man that had concealed it; I was on the opposite side of the way, in the brazier's shop; I saw the prisoner come out to see if any body was looking about to watch him; he went in again, and took the sheet copper; we let him go out of the premises about three doors off,

and then called him back; we began to complain of his work at first, while my brother went over the way to see if the copper was gone; my brother came and took hold of him by the arm, and said you have been taking some copper; you have robbed us; with that I searched him and found the sheet copper rolled up in his leather apron; it was new sheet copper; he said he had no such thing about him, and put it down on the floor; I saw him put one parcel in a basket of straw, with a glass lantern; the other parcel he was going to put down, and I got it into my hands; I then opened the copper, and found my mark on it; I sent for an officer, and took him into custody. (The copper produced and identified.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence; but called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-61

424. JOHN WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , five silk handkerchiefs, value 25 s. the property of William Bray .

WILLIAM BRAY sworn. - I keep a hosier's and haberdasher's shop , in High Holborn : on the 30th of June, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop; he asked me to let him look at a silk handkerchief; I took down several, and gave him one piece to look at; he said he did not like that pattern, he wanted a darker pattern; I shewed him another pattern that was a deal darker, and he looked at it, by way of examination, to see if it was a good handkerchief, and while he was looking at it he went out with it in his hand as quick as possible to the door; my daughter was at the other end of the counter; I desired her to run after him and call stop thief; she did, and in about five minutes he was taken and brought back; the property was lost; he acknowledged taking the property, but he cast it away opposite Red-lion street, in Holborn.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. I am sure of it; after he was brought back and searched, he had not the goods about him; he acknowledged he had taken them, and before the Magistrate he acknowledged the same.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I am told there was another person in the shop at that time; did not you make a mistake, and suppose it was another man? - A. No; I am sure he is the man.

JANE BRAY sworn. - I am the daughter of the last witness.

Q. Did you see any man come into the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. That is the man; I am sure of it; he took five silk handkerchiefs and ran out, and I pursued; and at the top of Red-lion street he was taken, and brought back; he acknowledged at the same time, after he was taken into our parlour, that he had taken them, and that he had thrown them away opposite Red-lion street.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-62

425. DANIEL MILLER and JOHN SWAIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , two men's hats, value 5 s and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Richard Martin .

SARAH MARTIN sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Martin , we live at Isleworth , my husband is master of a coasting vessel : He took these two boy s, as men are scarce at sea; my husband desired me to give them a belly-full of victuals, and make a bed for them, which we did; they came on Saturday, and staid till Wednesday morning; then they got up about four o'clock in the morning, and robbed the house of a great many things of wearing apparel.

Q. You did not expect they were going away? - A. No, my husband got up about six o'clock in the morning; when he came down stairs, he saw all the drawers open, and his hat gone; I came and saw it as he described, and found they had robbed us of a great many things; there was a deal of clothes that had been washed and dried they had taken, not included in this indictment.

Q. Was there a handkerchief missing? - A. Yes, and two hats; one hat was my husband's, and the other my son's; the constable took the boys the same day in the afternoon, and all the things; there were three bundles.

CHARLES COLLINGS sworn. - I am a constable of Isleworth: On the 23d of May they were in our town; I apprehended them between twelve and one at noon, I found them in the parish of Isleworth; I apprehended them selling a jack-ass; at eleven o'clock I heard that some lads had stole some linen, the description was given to me of the lads; they stand now as when I apprehended them, in their smock-frocks; I went after them, they turned up a lane, and there I took them; the two hats were on their heads, and this handkerchief was on one of their necks; the clothes are in the hands of the people that bought them. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Miller, GUILTY , aged 11.

Swain, GUILTY , aged 12.

Ordered to remain for the Marine Society .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-63

426. MARY MAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , four yards of cloth, value 8 s. a great coat. value 18 s. a shift, value 3 s. and an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Kennard .

MARY LARKING sworn. - I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane; my husband's name is Michael Larking .

Q. Who is John Kennard ? - A. My father-in-law; the prisoner lodged with my mother, and she said she wanted some employment, and I work at making military pantaloons. On Monday night she brought my mother with her, and I gave her the cloth to make a pair of pantaloons, and the trimmings of another pair, and on the next day I gave her another pair; the cloth was Russia duck.

Q. Did you ever get the cloth? - A. No.

ELIZABETH KENNARD sworn. - My husband's name is John Kennard ; the prisoner came to lodge with me on the 12th of March, and on the Friday, the 16th of March, I lost my husband's great coat, my shift, and apron; I had seen all these things on the Friday.

Q. Had you any pantaloons? - A. Yes, they were my daughter's; she had them to make, she took all with her on the Friday.

Q. When was she taken up for this? - A. On the 23d of May.

Q. What is the value of the great coat? - A. It cost my husband thirty shillings; the shift and apron I value at four shillings and sixpence.

Q. Did you ever see the pantaloons again? - A. No, my husband paid for the pantaloons before she was taken; I never saw any of the things again, she said she came from Sheerness.

Q. What name did she go by when she lived with you? - A. Elizabeth Astley .

Prisoner's defence. I knew nothing of the person till she met me in the street; I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-64

427. GADALIAH PHILIPS was indicted for that he, on the 30th of June , one false counterfeited piece of money, made to the likeness of a good seven-shilling piece; two false counterfeited pieces of money, made to the likeness of a good half-crown; and seven pieces of false counterfeited milled money, made to the likeness of good shillings, feloniously did put off to William Hyde , at a lower rate than they were counterfeited for, that is to say, for 8 s.

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM HYDE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am a tailor .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; he is a Jew, a dealer in bad money . On Saturday, the 30th of June, I went by the directions of Armfield, and James and Richard Limerick , with James Harris ; he went with me, as a friend; we went to a public-house in Petticoat-lane ; I think it was the Blue Anchor; we went there to take the prisoner up for selling bad money.

Q. Had you any money given you before you went there? - A. Yes, Smith, a Bow-street officer, gave me 8 s. there were two half-crowns and three shillings he gave me; they were all marked in my presence; James Harris and me went into the Blue Anchor, the officers waited on the outside.

Q. Had you any other money with you than that they had given you? - A. No; when I first went in I asked for the prisoner; I found him not in the public-house; he told me they expected him in; I went into the parlour by the desire of the landlord; he came in in the space of ten minutes; when he came in, Harris was sitting with me.

Court. Q. How long had you known him before? - A. Only by a person that was with me once before who purchased; he came in, in about ten minutes, and beckoned me out of the parlour, and asked me whether that was a friend of mine that was sitting with me; I told him he need not be afraid; I said he wanted readers; he then asked me whether I wanted a watch; I told him, no; he then asked me, whether I wanted any such as had been passed in my company before.

Q. Is that the expression he made use of? - A. He asked me whether I wanted any spangles, half-beans, or whites; I told him I wanted some whites; he then told me he would fetch me some down; he fetched me some; I then went into the parlour.

Q. He came into the parlour with you from his lodgings? - A. Yes; he fetched me some, from where I do not know; we went into the parlour; James Harris was there; he called me on one side, and I went with him on one side; he then presented me the coin in blue paper, telling me they were capital good; he asked how many I wanted of them; I did not notice how many there were; there were a good many; I then told him I had only 8 s. in my pocket, and he was to give me to the amount of that; he then asked me if I had any more; I told him, no, and to give me the most he could to the amount of that; he then asked me if I would have all whites; I said I did not care; he then gave me two half-crowns, 7 s. in silver, and one 7-shilling piece.

Court. Q. All that for your 8 s.? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You had a good lot of it? - A. Yes; after he had given it me in blue paper, I put it in my right-hand breeches pocket; I had no other money about me; after I had put it into my pocket, he said he could not stop any longer; he then drank and went out of the parlour door; it was rum and water we had on the table; directly after that he went out, and I gave a signal to James Harris that he should give intimation to the officers; James Harris went out of the parlour immediately after him, upon which I followed, and saw the prisoner in James Harris 's custody.

Q. (To Harris.) You secured him? - A. Yes.

Hyde. I immediately went down to the officers, and Mr. Limerick and the other officers came up, and then we were all taken together to a public-house, the next but one, and there we were searched, and Limerick took out of my pocket the metal I had bought of the prisoner; and after they had searched me they searched the prisoner in my presence, and on him they found a vast quantity of silver and gold and Bank notes, and amongst the silver they found one of the shillings I had given him for the metal; we were taken from there and brought to Bow-street.

Q. First of all are you quite sure you had no more money when you went to the public-house than that they gave you? - A. I am sure of it.

Q. And after you had given the prisoner that money, you had only that metal? - A. I am sure of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have been some time acquainted with the prisoner? - A. Not some time, I have seen him once before.

Q. With your friend? - A. Yes.

Q. So you were searched by the officer before you

went into the public-house? - A. Yes; and one of the officers gave me the 8 s. which I gave the prisoner.

Q. How were you searched, by rubbing down your small clothes? - A. Yes; they searched the pockets, and that was all.

Q. Had you the same hat that you have now, it has a draw-in lining? - A. Mr. Limerick searched that.

Q. Did not you tell me this moment they only searched your pockets, they did not search the sleeve of your coat; there are strange things done in the sleeve of a coat; where was it you went for the officers? - A. Close by.

Q. What, were they within sight; what distance might they be; were there many people in the street? - A. Not far, I did not meet many people.

Q. It was noon day? - A. It was; I met the officers directly I got out of the door.

Q. How many persons were there in the public-house; it was a busy day there I am told? - A. There were a good many people there, as far as I know of.

Q. You were drinking rum and water there; the landlord and other people came in occasionally? - A. Nobody came in but the landlord.

Q. Did you leave the door open? - A. No.

Q. It is a glass door; is it not? - A. I did not take particular notice of it.

Q. The door came into the tap-room? - A. No, the door is out from the tap; it is a private parlour; it joins the bar in which the wife of the landlord sits.

Q. So then the officers searched you before you went into the public-house - do you know the reason why they searched you? - A. To find the coin I had bought of the Jew.

Q. For what purpose, before you went into the house, did they search you - they searched you at Bow-street -

Court. I will give you the reason why they searched him: because they supposed it necessary for your examination.

Q. Had not you a slight character? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. Had not you a misfortune befall you in the country? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us what that misfortune was? - A. I suppose you know as well as I do; I would wish you to tell the gentlemen.

Q. Were you taken up for passing bad money? - A. I gave information of a person who passed bad money there.

Q. Were they so uncivil as to take you up for giving information of a person passing bad money - you were taken into custody yourself - do you mean to say that you were taken into custody for giving information of another person? - A. I do.

Q. Am I to understand you that you were not taken up for passing bad money? - A. No.

Q. How came the officer to take you up? - A. I came forward to the Magistrate at High Wickham; he was an acquaintance of mine.

Q. So then one of your acquaintances had the misfortune to fall in a bad thing of this kind - after you came from High Wickham, you came to Bow-street? - A. I was taken to Bow-street; they kept me in custody, perhaps, because I could not give security.

Q. What became of your friend at High Wickham? - A. He was sent on board a man of war.

Q. This Harris, where did he sit, he was in the parlour all the time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not he go to the window? - A. Not all the time; the prisoner, when he came, asked me if my friend wanted to buy a watch.

Q. Do you mean to say that your acquaintance was looking on all the time? - A. He was looking on some of the time, when the prisoner was in the parlour.

Q. You say the prisoner was searched afterwards, and no bad money found on him? - A. I do not know whether it was good or bad.

Q. You deal in these articles, you ought to know? - A. One of the officers had it.

Q. He gave you nineteen shillings of what you call capital good? - A. I do not call it capital good.

Q. What became of the nineteen shillings? - A. The officers have got it.

Q. You never examined the silver you got from him? - A. I counted it over in the room before my friend.

Q. This was transacted all before his face, and he quite a stranger? - A. Yes.

Q. You say one of the marked shillings was found in the prisoner's possession - what became of the others? - A. I do not know; he was not immediately taken into custody, because he pulled the door after him; he then was out of my sight.

Q. You never told him you were going to inform? - A. I have reason to believe that he had suspicions, by seeing James Harris looking out of the window several times.

Q. When did James Harris look out of the window - before the prisoner gave the bad money? - A. Yes.

Q. It is extraordinary that if that should give him suspicion, that he should go and get the bad money -

Court. It was not before he went for the money, it was after.

Q. Did the officer say he had discovered one of the marked shillings on the first examination - do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes, and I think he said so when he searched the prisoner.

JAMES HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have been a servant; I am out of place at present.

Q. Were you directed by the officers to go with the last witness to a public-house? - A. I was, on Saturday, the 30th of June.

Q. Did you see the officers give Hyde any money? - A. I did, I saw it marked; I believe there were two half-crowns and three shillings.

Q. Where you acquainted with Hyde before? - A. No acquaintance at all of Hyde's; I went by the desire of the officers, we got out of a coach before we went there; Hyde and me went into the public-house, the officers were on the outside waiting; we went into a back room behind the bar, we did not go through the bar; after we got into the room, the prisoner came in about ten minutes, and Hyde told him he wanted to speak to him; the prisoner took him out, and what they said I cannot say; Hyde came in again, and he said, he is gone to fetch it; the prisoner went out of the house, he returned, and went the opposite side of the room, the prisoner's back was towards me, I heard the money pass; the prisoner seemed rather shy.

Q. On his appearing rather shy, do you recollect Hyde saying any thing to him? - A. He said, you

need not be afraid of him, he is a friend of mine, he wants readers.

Court. Q. Did you know what was the meaning of readers? - A. No, I did not then; I was informed afterwards.

Q. Then you said the prisoner's back was towards you? - A. Yes; and I heard some money pass; I turned round, and saw Hyde have some blue paper in his hand, the prisoner was going out immediately.

Q. Did you hear any conversation that took place between the prisoner and Hyde? - A. I did not hear the words that passed; I then asked him to stay and drink.

Q. What was it? - A. Rum and water; he drank, and went out, and pulled the door after him; and Hyde looked at me, I took the notice, I followed after him immediately; and just as he got out of the door, I laid hold of the prisoner with my left-hand, and I said, stay; I called to Richard Limerick , one of the Bow-street officers, and he, and the other officers, came up, and we took him to another public-house, and they were searched; I do not know what was taken out of their pockets.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adey. Q. You have been a gentleman's servant? - A. I have been a gentleman's servant; I once lived with Mr. Garrow.

Q. I am glad of that; the witness, Hyde, is quite a stranger to you? - A. I saw him before, in the morning, at the office.

Q. When you went to the public-house the prisoner was not there? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure the witness, Hyde, did not go out of the room, and call him out to speak to him? - A. The prisoner called him out to the door.

Q. The prisoner seemed rather shy? - A. He was shy.

Q Did you never know that a reader was a pocketbook; you are not acquainted with pick pockets, you thought by readers Bank-notes were meant? - A. I did not know then, I was told afterwards.

Q I suppose your common good manners would not let you stay in the room; did any body desire you to go out of the room? - A. Nobody desired me to go out of the room, I was looking at a geranium that was in the window.

Q. And what passed in the room you could not hear? - A. Not all; I saw the paper in Hyde's hand, and I heard the money pass.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer of Bow-street? - A. I am one of the patrols of Bow-street.

Q. Did you, with Limerick, and other officers of Bow-street, employ Hyde to go to this public-house? - A. I did.

Q. Before he went did you search him, to see whether he had any money about him? - A. James Limerick searched him in my presence; I gave him two half-crowns, and three shillings, I marked them; I waited in Petticoat-lane while Hyde and Harris went into the public-house, when I came up Richard Limerick had him in custody; we took him to the Blue-Lion, and he was searched by Armfield; there was found upon him two pounds nine shillings and sixpence in good silver, five guineas in gold, four one pound notes, and two watches.

Q. Was there found there part of that money that you had given him.? - A. There was one shilling I had marked, (looking at the shilling); that is the shilling I had marked, and this is the punch I had marked it with; afterwards I saw three seven-shilling-pieces taken out of a quart pot by Richard Limerick , he had drank once before out of the pot of porter; he spoke in a language I could not understand, nor could I see the person; then he drank some more beer, and Richard Limerick took the pot, and found three seven-shilling-pieces in it.

RICHARD LIMERICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the officers of Bow-street, you were with the last witness, did you search the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. What have you got to produce? - A. He asked for something to drink as he was being searched; after he had done drinking, he spoke in a foreign language to another Jew, and handed the pot to the Jew; the Jew went out of the room, and returned again; the prisoner said he was rather dry, and asked to drink again; they handed the pot again, and as he was putting it to his mouth, I heard something jingle to the bottom of the pot; he was going to hand the pot over to the Jew again, I put my hand over, and took the pot, and found these three seven-shilling pieces in it. (Produces them.)

THOMAS ARMFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the officers of Bow-street, did you search Hyde? - A. No, I searched the prisoner, and I found five guineas in gold, and the silver I put down, and Smith took it in his possession; the other Limerick had.

JAMES LIMERICK sworn. - Q. Did you see Hyde before he was searched? - A. Yes, I searched him at the Black Lion; I found in his breeches pocket this money. (The bad coin he had purchased of the prisoner.)

WILLIAM PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the person that is usually called upon these occasions, look at this money, and tell us what it is? (The money handed to the witness.) - A. The whole of it is counterfeit; two half-crowns, a seven-shilling piece, and seven shillings, they are all bad.

Q. Now look at these three seven-shilling pieces that were found in the pot? (Looks at them.) - A. They are all three counterfeits.

Q. Compare that parcel with the other, these three seven-shilling pieces found in the pot, and the seven-shilling piece found on Hyde? - A. They are all four like one another, I believe they are all struck with the same dye; these four seven-shilling pieces are all counterfeits.

Prisoner's defence. I never knew Hyde at all; he asked me to sell him a watch, I fetched him one, and told him the price; he said, it was too dear, he had not money enough about him; if I had done any thing that was evil, I should have made my escape, and run away; the only dealings that I had with him was the watch.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 5 l.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040704-65

428. ROBERT HOWES , JOHN THODY , and JAMES RONALDS , were indicted for a conspiracy .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Gurney, and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

JANE-ANN WALTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What is your husband? - A. He is a tallow-chandler,

in Little Britain: On the 30th of January last, the prisoner Ronalds came to my shop to desire I would send some one to take an order at No. 08, Duke-street, West-Smithfield; I sent my apprentice, Charles-William Taylor ; he went, and returned with this piece of paper, (producing it,) in consequence of which, I packed up twelve dozen of candles and half a hundred of mottled soap, according to order; I sent them by William Richardson , another apprentice; while Richardson was gone, the prisoner Howes called, and asked me the amount of the bill for the soap and candles; I had sent a bill of parcels and a receipt; he said, he was going to send into the country, that he should have a remittance the latter end of the week, and he would call and settle; I gave him the amount, he produced a small book out of his pocket, in which he wrote the amount of the bill. On the 6th of February I received this letter, (producing it,) containing a bill of exchange for 25 l. 10 s. 1 d.

CHARLES-WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am apprentice to Mr. Walton, tallow chandler; I went with the prisoner Ronalds to No. 28, Duke-street, West Smithfield; I went up one pair of stairs, and saw Mr. Howes; Mr. Howes wrote an order for some soap and candles.

Q. Look at that, is that the order that Howes wrote in your presence? - A. Yes, that is the very order that he wrote; I asked him how they were to be packed, and he said they were to be put in two boxes to send into the country. I delivered the order to my mistress.

(The order read:)

"Six dozen middle six, six dozen middle eight, and half a hundred weight of mottled, for Mr. Howes, No. 28, Duke-street. Dated 30th January, 1804."

WILLIAM RICHARDSON sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Walton: On the 30th of January, I took a box of candles and a box of soap, by my mistress's direction, to No. 28, Duke-street, West-Smithfield; I delivered them to Esther Moody .

ESTHER MOODY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant at No. 28, Duke-street, to Mrs. Vigurs, who keeps the house; the prisoner Howes lodged there, he came on the 20th of January, and staid till the 11th of February.

Q. Do you know Ronalds, the other prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Thody? - A. Yes, I have seen them both at our house; Ronalds was there every day, Thody I have only seen twice.

Q. Do you remember Richardson bringing two boxes? - A. Yes, on the 30th of January; he delivered them to me, and I took them in for Mr. Howes; I put them in the shop till Howes came in, my mistress keeps a haberdasher's shop; Howes and Ronalds both came in immediately afterwards; Howes asked me if the boxes were come, and I shewed him that they were; Howes told Ronalds to go out, and get a porter to take the biggest box away; Ronalds went out directly, and brought a porter with him; the porter took the biggest box first, and then came back for the other with Ronalds; Howes went up stairs to get some dinner, and Ronalds dined with him, and then went out together; they said, they should not return till the next evening, they returned together the next day.

Q. Have you any doubt of their persons? - A. No.

Q. Nor have you any doubt of Thody being the person you have seen twice? - A. No, he was up stairs once when Howes was not at home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Ronalds had not been at the house till after the goods were delivered? - A. No.

Q. Did not Howes, after he had been in the country, return to the lodging, and remain for a fortnight? - A. He went out of town very often.

JOHN HANSON sworn - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you have ever seen the defendant Howes write? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that letter, do you or not believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. I never saw him write but twice, and I then received letters from him professionally since he has been in custody.

Q. Do you believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. I believe it not to be his hand-writing from what I have seen, neither the signature nor the body.

Q. What do you believe as to that bill of exchange? - A. I don't believe the body is his hand-writing.

Q. What do you think of the signature? - A. It is like it, but I don't believe it to be his; there are one or two letters like his, but it is not the general character of his writing.

Q. Look at that? (The order for the soap and candles produced.) - A. I cannot speak to that at all.

HENRY CHESTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are an attorney? - A. Yes.

Q. Be so good as look at that letter and that bill, did you ever see Howes write? - A. Never, I have had letters from him.

Q. Did you ever converse with him afterwards upon the subject of those letters? - A. Never.

WILLIAM PHIPPS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you ever seen the defendant Howes write? - A. Never.

Q. Have you ever corresponded with him? - A. Never.

ELIZABETH WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you live in Wych-street, in the Strand? - A. Yes; in the latter end of November last, the prisoner Howes came to my shop, and brought an order from Portsmouth for goods to the amount of twenty-five or twenty-six pounds.

Q. Was it a written order? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got it? - A. No, they were to be sent off in the course of two days; he hurried me, because the ship was going off; I was to have ready money, and I sent the goods to No. 3, Isabel-place, Westminster-road.

Q. Did he afterwards call to pay you? - A He came according to promise that same evening that I sent the goods, and brought me a draft at three months, which I returned to him the next day; I said to him, Mr. Howes, the agreement was cash, or I would not have hurried the goods; he said, he should have plenty of cash in a fortnight, and he would bring it me; I gave him four pounds one shilling change out of thirty pounds ten shillings; he promised to bring me the cash in a fortnight. When he was gone, I looked at the bill, and found it was not accepted; I went and shewed the draft to Mr. Bird; in consequence of a conversation with him, I went to Westminster-road the next morning, and got the goods again; I saw Mr. Howes,

and he promised to call upon me in the afternoon with the four pounds one shilling. A woman, of the name of Williams, called about eleven o'clock, and brought me this bill, (producing it.) After she was gone, the prisoner Thody came, and said he was the person to accept that bill which Mrs. Williams had brought.

Q. Did he accept it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he write this acceptance in your presence? - A. He did; I asked him if he knew Howes; he said, yes, he thought very highly of him as a professional gentleman, he had got a cause for him twelve years ago; I asked him how I was to get my four pounds one shilling. While we were talking, Howes came in, and wrote upon the back of this bill a memorandum, to which Thody put his name.

"Memorandum. - Mr. Thody is to pay 30 l. 10 s. besides 25 l.

JOHN THODY ."

I was to take that bill, and the box was put into the coach; that bill was to pay for the goods and the four pounds one shilling. I sent for Mr. Bird, my neighbour, and then Howes got out of the wrong side of the coach; Mr. Bird came directly, and asked to see the bill; I shewed it him; Howes had run away, Thody was in the house; I was confused, and Mr. Bird can tell you more of it than I can.

Q. Did either Howes or Thody tell you any thing about No. 4, Temple-lane, London? - A. No, that was in the bill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. All that you have been speaking of took place at Wych-street? - A. Yes.

Q. In the county of Middlesex? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not Howes afterwards come back again with Thody? - A. Yes; Thody went and fetched him back again.

Q. Did not Thody tell you he lived in Whitechapel? - A. Yes; either No. 2 or 32, I cannot tell which.

Q. Howes had conducted a law-suit for you? - A. He was to get me some money from Portsmouth; I did not know he was a lawyer; he did not look like one.

Q. Did not you make an affidavit, and employed him and give him 2 l. as a part of the expence to be incurred in a law-suit? - A. I gave him 2 l. to go a journey to Portsmouth, and he employed somebody else.

THOMAS DALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a perfumer, No. 10, New Round-court, Strand.

Q. I believe you have seen the defendant Howes write? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that letter, and tell me if you believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. It resembles a writing that has been in my possession before; I rather think it is his hand writing.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, do you believe it to be his hand writing or not? - A. I rather believe it; not but it is larger than his usual hand writing.

Q. Now look at that endorsement; do you believe that to be his hand writing? - A. I believe it is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say you could not swear to his hand writing because it is larger than his usual writing? - A. I go by the H. I have seen him write very often.

Q. Where did you see him write? - A. I am not obliged to answer that.

Q. Yes, you are; upon your oath tell me one single thing you ever saw him write? - A. If my Lord requires me I will.

Q. I ask you where you have seen him write? - A. I saw him write a letter to-day.

Q. How long have you been a perfumer? - A. Twenty years.

Q. Have you never been a waiter? - A. Yes, at the watering-places, of course.

Q. Then I suppose you are an itinerant perfumer? - A. I have the run of the house.

Q. What house? - A. At Thurpark's, in Yorkshire.

Q. You have been getting a livelihood for twenty years past in the trade of a perfumer; have you never been an informer? - A. To be sure I have, for the good of the Crown.

Q. And for the good of your own pocket too? - A. I do not say that; I never was but once in my life in a Court, and that was in the Court of Exchequer.

Q. I know that is the Court in which informations are brought; where do you keep a shop? - A. I do not keep a shop at all; I sell my goods by wholesale; my warehouse is at Pentonville.

Q. How often do you go into Yorkshire? - A. I have not been there these eleven years.

Q. I ask you again do you mean to swear from the comparison of some writing you may have seen, or from the knowledge of having seen him write, that this is the defendant's hand-writing, or from both? - A. From what I have seen, and from having seen writing that I believe to be his, I think this is his hand-writing.

Q. When you talk of the run of the house, have you ever been in the capacity of an officer of any sort; I do not mean a military or naval officer? - A. Mr. Phillips, the Sheriff, employed me as a hair-dresser.

Q. How often have you been over the way lately? - A. Many times.

Q. How often have you been bail? - A. I am bail for the sheriff.

(A bill of exchange read, dated February 4, 1804, for 25 l. addressed James Ronalds , Esq. Board of Ordnance, Woolwich, payable when due. Signed J. Gaimes, No. 10, Hoxton-Town.)

RICHARD HUMPHREYS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Charles-Humphreys, Bernard's Inn? - A. I am.

Q. Did you go to enquire if there was an Ordnance-Office at Woolwich? - A. Yes, and I found none.

Q. Did you enquire for James Ronalds , Esq. of the Ordnance-Office? - A. I did.

Q. Did you find such a person? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. You are not an inhabitant of Woolwich? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. I suppose you can find a man, if he is to be found? - A. Yes.

RICHARD CLAXTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at No. 10, Hoxton-town; the prisoner Ronalds lodged with me about eight months, till he was taken up on the 12th of February.

Q. What is the size of your house? - A. It is a small house, two rooms on the first floor, and two rooms over.

Q. What rent do you pay for it? - A. Fifteen guineas; Ronalds occupied two rooms on the first floor and one on the second; he paid me 12 guineas a year; I understood him that he had been in the ca

Q. Have you ever learned that he was a merchant? - A. No.

Q. How did he spell his name? - A. That I cannot say; I was not present when he was taken up; my wife sent for me from the manufactory.

Q. Is there any such firm at your house as Thody and Company, merchants? - A. No.

Q. Did you know Howes and Thody at all? - A. Not till I saw them at Bow-street.

Court. Q. Did you understand from Ronalds what he was? - A. I thought at one time he used to work at Woolwich; but I afterwards thought he did not; I understood he was a gunsmith.

Q. From himself? - A. No, from his wife.

Mr. Alley to Mr. Humphreys. Q. Did you learn that a person of the name of Ronalds was employed at Woolwich, in the smithery? - A. I heard there was a person of the name of Ronalds, employed as a labouring gunsmith.

WILLIAM SWENDALL sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Humphreys; I went to Maidenhead to enquire if there was such a person as J. Gaimes, but I found no such person; I made diligent enquiry, and did all I could to find such a person, but could not.

Mr. Alley. Q. Had you ever been there before? - A. No; I was walking about nearly two hours and a half.

Mr. Gurney to Mrs. Walton. Q. In consequence of the directions to send the same quantity of soap to Mrs. Howe's, at Duke-street, did you send? - A. No; Mrs. Howe came for the change, to know whether I would send the goods or not.

Q. Did you part with any more goods or not? - A. I did not.

Mr. Alley. Q. Then nothing was procured in consequence of that letter? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ever receive any thing for the 9 l. worth of goods that were purchased, except this draft? - A. No.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street: I went to No. 10, Hoxton-Town, to apprehend Ronalds, on Sunday morning, the 12th of February, about eight o'clock; I asked if Mr. Ronalds was at home, a woman came to the door, and said, she believed he was; Smith, another officer, and I, waited five minutes, then I went up stairs, and found him concealed in a closet in a back room; I brought him before a Magistrate, and then searched him; I found upon him this pocket-book containing this note. (Producing them.)

Mr. Alley. Q. Did not Ronalds say the reason of his concealing himself was, that he owed some money, and was afraid of being arrested for debt? - A. He did.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you go to Slough? - A. Yes; I inquired if they knew any persons of the name of Ronalds, Thody, or Howes; I heard that two strange gentlemen had been there, who answered the description of Ronalds and Howes, at the Running-deer public-house.

Q. Did you find any such persons residing there? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Here is a paper found in the pocketbook of Ronalds, an engagement of a lodging, at a weekly rent of six shillings.

STEPHEN BIRD sworn. - I live at the corner of last I went to Mrs. White's shop, and found Thody on the right-hand side of the shop, as I went in at the door.

Q. Did you find Howes? - A. No; I asked Mrs. White, in Thody's presence, if she had got the bill; she said she had.

Q. Did she shew you that bill? - A. That is the bill she produced to me; and I asked Thody if he had accepted that bill; he said he had; I asked him if he lived at No. 4, Temple-lane; he said he did; I said you may be a respectable gentleman for any thing I know, but it is very proper I should go and see if you live there, Mrs. White being a widow woman; but I should be more satisfied if I could see Mr. Howes, as he represented him to be a respectable gentleman; I said, I shall not suffer these goods to go till I see Mr. Howes, to know who he is, the goods were in a coach at the door; says he I can fetch Howes; he went out of the shop to fetch Howes, down Wych-street, and the coachman ran after him; in about three or four minutes he came back, and brought Howes with him; I asked him if his name was Howes, he said it was; I asked who drew this bill, and he pointed to Thody; I said, that cannot be, for Thody has accepted it. I said to Mrs. White's porter, get the goods out of the coach, it is an infernal piece of business, they are a set of swindlers.

Q. Were not you afraid of these merchants bringing an action against you for destroying their credit? - A. I was threatened by Howes with a prosecution, Howes said he was an attorney; I said his actions were not like one, and I shut the door with intention to secure him; after many threats from Howes, I thought it best to let them out, for fear of a prosecution, not knowing the length that such gentlemen might go; the goods were delivered back safe into Mrs. White's shop, I kept the bill; I went to No. 4, Temple-lane, with the bill; I found it a respectable house in the profession of the law, the name of Lloyd was on the door, but I found no person of the name of Thody; there was another No. 4. I went there, but no such person was to be found there; I then got information of another Temple-lane, I went there, to No. 4, but no such person was to be found there, one Mr. Masters lived there. Some time afterwards, eight or nine days, I was coming through Scotland-yard, and saw Howes and Thody, I had a gentleman with me; I went up to them, and asked them for the balance that was due to Mrs. White; and Howes said, he had done business, to arrest one Wallis, for Mrs. White, and she owed him that money.

CHARLES MASTERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you live at No. 4, Temple-lane, Whitefriars? - A. I do.

Q. I believe, some time past, a person of the name of Williams lodged at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Thody, the prisoner? - A. I do not.

Q. Did you never see him there? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Howes? - A. Yes; I saw him at my house after that bill was drawn, three or four different times; he visited Mrs. Williams.

Q. Did you ever see Ronalds there? - A. Never.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you know, that Mrs. Williams's husband ever went to Portsmouth? - A. I believe he was at Portsmouth at that time.

PHILIP HERBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are servant to Mrs. Bacon, of Little-street, Leicester-fields? - A. Yes; she is the wife of

Thomas Bacon , and keeps a masquerade warehouse: On the 9th of February, the defendant Ronalds came to our house; he ordered four hats, four dominos, four masks, and four tickets, for the masquerade, to be sent to No. 28, Duke-street, West-Smithfield; he desired I would take change for a 10 l. note or bill; it was about eight o'clock, and about nine I went with the things; I went up into the first floor, and saw Mr. Ronalds and a lady; I unpacked the things, and then he asked me for the change; I told him to give me the note; he said he had not a 10 l. note, and gave me a bill for 25 l. 10 s. 6 d (Produces it. The note read, dated Slough, 26 January, 1804, at two months after date.) I looked at the bill, and suspected it not to be a good one; Hoxton was spelt wrong; I put the bill in my pocket, and told him I would bring him the change in an hour; he said he had come from Slough that day, and wanted cash to go to the masquerade; I went home, and mentioned my suspicions; I did not leave the masquerade tickets, I brought them back; my mistress desired me to go back, and leave the tickets; I went back, and Esther Moody came to the door; I told her to tell the people up stairs I could not bring the masquerade tickets, but as it was in their way to the masquerade, they might call for the tickets.

Q. Did you ever get the dominos and hats again? - A. Never.

ELIZABETH YATES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the sister of Mrs. Bacon? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that bill - did you take it to No. 10, Hoxton town? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any person there of the name of Ronalds? - A. Yes, a woman; I afterwards went to No. 28, Duke-street, I think it was the 11th of February; I went up stairs, and saw Mr. Howes; Mrs. Howes told him I had called concerning the masquerade tickets; he said, oh, he had not seen Mr. Ronalds, he supposed he had been in bad company, and lost the things; I said the things were brought here, and I should expect them returned from here; he then asked if I had got the note, and I said, no; he said, if I would give it him, he would try and get it changed for me; I did not deliver it to him; he then said he would get the things if possible for me, if I would call the next day; I called the next morning, and saw him at breakfast with Mrs. Howes; he asked me whether I had not been to Hoxton, and seen a lady there; I told him, yes, I had; I told him I would call again; he said, very well, if I would call again, he would do the utmost of his endeavours to get the things for me; he said first, he believed Mr. Ronalds a very good sort of a man, and there was no fear of my having them again; in about five minutes after he said Mr. Ronalds was a very indifferent sort of a man, and he thought he should never see either the things or the note again; I then went to Bow-street, and he was taken into custody about two o'clock that day.

Mr. Alley. Q. He was taken at his own lodgings? - A. Yes.

(Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant Howes.)

All Three GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and stand in the pillory .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040704-66

429. SAMUEL BRADFORD was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

There appearing to the Court no evidence of perjury whatever against the defendant, the Court informed him he was honourably

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: o18040704-1

Mr. Justice ROOKE delivered the Opinions of the Judges, in the Case of John Palmer, as follows:

JOHN PALMER , you were tried and convicted at a former Sessions of the crime of forgery; you were tried with another person of the name of Sarah Hudson , and your case was reserved for the opinions of the Judges. The indictment stated in one Count that you did feloniously utter and publish as true a false, forged, and counterfeit promissory note of the Bank of England, for the payment of 2 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England; and another Count charged that you feloniously disposed of and put away a certain counterfeit Bank-note, with intention to defraud John Shaw . Mr. Justice Le Blanc reported to the Judges that it was satisfactorily proved that you were in the habit of putting off bad notes, and that you employed Sarah Hudson in putting them off; that on Saturday, the 21st of January, you had so employed her, you being in or about the Old-Bailey while you so employed her; that on that day she went to the shop of John Shaw , in Newgate-street, and purchased some muslin handkerchiefs, for which she offered in payment a forty shilling Bank-note; he suspected it was a forged one; he stopped the note, and sent it to the Bank; it turned out to be a forged note. The same evening Sarah Hudson returned to the shop in company with you. You said,

"this woman has been here today, and offered a 2 l. note, which you have stopped." You asked the reason why it was stopped, and said,

"it is my note, and I must have either the note or the change." You were told it was sent to the Bank, and in consequence of that it could not be returned; you repeatedly insisted upon having the note or the change; the Jury found you guilty, and the judgment was respited for the opinion of the Judges to decide whether the evidence supported the conviction of yourself upon either of the Counts. In this case two questions have been proposed for the consideration of the Judges: one was whether the evidence supported the conviction upon the Count for uttering and publishing as true, knowing it to be forged; and the other was whether the evidence supported the conviction upon the second Count, for disposing of and putting away. As to the first Count, it seemed to be the general opinion of the Judges, that if the woman, Sarah Hudson , had been innocent, and had not known the note to be forged, you would have been rightly convicted upon the first Count, for uttering and publishing it as true, knowing it to be forged, according to the doctrine laid down by Mr. Justice Foster, chap. 1. sect. 3. that where an innocent person is employed for a criminal purpose, the employer must be answerable; but Mr. Justice Le Blanc stated to us, that it appeared at the trial that Sarah Hudson knew the note to be a forged one. Upon that being reported, the

Judges have formed no opinion upon the evidence, as applying to the first Count, for uttering and publishing as true knowing it to be forged, thinking it sufficient to consider the case upon the second Count. The question with respect to which is, whether the facts here stated amount to a disposing or a putting away within the meaning of the 15th Geo. II. chap. 13. sect. 11. Upon this point there has been a difference of opinion among the Judges. Some have held that this is not an offence within the statute, because, till she had uttered the note, it ought to be considered as in your possession; and when she did utter it, you were only an accessary before the fact, and should have been so indicted; but the majority of the Judges, of whom I am one, are of opinion that the conviction is right. As to the constructive possession, it is by fiction of law only, that, when the actual possession is in one person, the constructive possession shall be considered in another, and these fictions are for the purpose of obtaining the ends of justice, and ought not to be defeated when that is their object. In this case you delivered the note to Sarah Hudson for a fraudulent purpose; you could not have recovered it back by any action at law, it was out of your legal power; and when it was actually uttered by her, she had effected the purpose for which it was delivered to her, and the note was disposed of and put away. The question then was, which offence did the Legislature intend to prevent by the 11th sect. of the 13th chap. of 15th Geo. II. if their intention is clear the consideration of a constructive possession in you does not appear, if sufficient weight to restrain the ordinary construction of the words of the statute. The words of the statute are,

"if any person shall offer, or dispose of, or put away, any forged, counterfeit, or uttered note." Now, uttering was a capital offence by a former statute, and as delivering an instrument to another, is a step towards uttering it, seems most consonant to the intention of the Legislature, to hold that a delivery to another with a fraudulent purpose, is an offence within the words, dispose of or put away. For these reasons the majority of the Judges, and a very considerable majority, are of opinion that the conviction is right upon the Count for disposing of and putting away.


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