Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th May 1804.
Reference Number: 18040516
Reference Number: f18040516-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 16th of MAY, 1804, and following Days,

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1804.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir NASH GROSE, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir JAMES GRAHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; JOHN BOYDELL , Esq. Sir BROOK WATSON, Bart. Sir WILLIAM STAINES , Knt. Sir CHARLES PRICE , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; CHARLES FLOWER , Esq. and JOSHUA- JONATHAN SMITH , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Thomas Lane ,

William Sutton ,

Thomas North ,

William Tippett ,

Jeremiah Tasker ,

Stephen Osmond ,

John Lamb ,

James Paterson ,

Joseph Fredder ,

Richard May ,

John Higgins ,

John Musgrave .

First Middlesex Jury.

Richard Cook ,

Andrew Burges ,

William Smith ,

John Plowman ,

William Dole ,

William Row ,

Jonathan Hanston ,

Thomas Wilkinson ,

Samuel Hutchins ,

Robert Hamilton ,

Thomas-Andrew Howell ,

Richard Davies .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Richard Bradshaw ,

Ralph Webb ,

Roger Percy ,

Henry Sabine ,

John Warren ,

William Syre ,

John Gardner ,

Thomas Fisher ,

Thomas Wheatley ,

William Dolgleish ,

Duncan Dunbar ,

James Smith .

Reference Number: t18040516-1

311. ROBERT CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May, six silver spoons, value 6 l. the property of Charles Incledon .

CHARLES INCLEDON sworn. - I live at Brompton Crescent, Knightsbridge, in the parish of Kensington , I keep a house: Last Wednesday, between the hours of three and four, my servant laid the cloth for dinner, upon which were placed half a dozen silver spoons; I had Mr. Cooke, the actor, with me; I had been at the front of my house giving some orders to some painters that were painting the railing of the garden; I had left them for about three minutes, and was speaking to a neighbour, when I received information that my house had been robbed; the two men who were employed in painting my garden railing went and pursued them, their names are Taylor and Winter; after pursuing them some time, they took him, and brought him back; he had been searched prior to their bringing him back, and the property found on him.

MARY KING sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Incledon; I was in the kitchen, and saw from the window of the kitchen a man go down the garden; then I went up stairs, and missed the spoons from the table; I had laid the cloth in the parlour, and had put these spoons on the table; there were two men painting the rails next door, I went and informed them of it; they went after him, and brought him back.

Q. Did you observe enough to know that the man brought back was the man you saw go down the garden? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it after you had seen him that he was brought back again? - A. About a quarter of an hour; I am sure it is the same person.

JOHN TAYLOR sworn. - I am a painter, I was at work next door to Mr. Incledon's: On Wednesday, the 9th of May last, Mary King , servant to Mr. Incledon, came and said to us, painters, did you see a man come out of our yard? we replied, that we did; the servant answered, he has stole our spoons; we immediately pursued him, and not being out of sight, we took the prisoner; when I had got the prisoner in my custody, Winter searched him, and found on him a pot of currant jelly and two table-spoons; walking about twenty or thirty yards further, he delivered me two more, and then after that he gave me another two; we brought him back to Mr. Incledon's house; he was then put in a hackney-coach, and sent to Bow-street; we took this man about three quarters of a mile from Mr. Incledon's house, there were two more accomplices with him, one jumped over the hedge.

LAWRENCE WINTER sworn. - I went in pursuit of him with the last witness.

Q. Did you lose sight of him? - A. No, I apprehended him; I searched him, and I found two silver table-spoons and a pot of currant jelly; I gave the spoons to the Magistrate, and they were given me; I have had them in my custody ever since.

Q. Did you see him give the other spoons to Taylor? - A. No.

(The spoons produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I beg for mercy of the Court.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-2

312. THOMAS IVORY and SAMUEL TURNER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of May , a brown mare, value 4 l. the property of John Lilly .

JOHN LILLY sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. I live at Hampstead.

Q. What have you to say respecting this mare? - A. On Monday, the 30th of April, I turned the mare out of my possession upon Hampstead-heath .

Q. What colour was your mare? - A. A brown mare: On Wednesday morning, the 2d of May, I went and searched for her, and could not find her; I could not hear any thing of her till the Monday following, and then I found her in the possession of the officers of Hatton-garden.

Q. What are the officers' names? - A. Wood and Trott.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden: On Wednesday, the 2d of May, I heard that the two prisoners at the bar offered two horses for sale in John's Mews, Bedford-row.

Q. Did you know the two boys before? - A. Yes, I went to them, and took them into custody; one of the prisoners had hold of one of the horses by the bridle.

Q. Which of the prisoners? - A. Ivory; he had hold of the brown mare, I think it was the brown mare; I did not see Turner with the other horse, his father had locked him up.

Q. Then it is a mistake that you found the two prisoners with the horses, because you only found

one prisoner with the brown mare, and the other locked up? - A. Yes, I did not see Turner till his father unlocked the door; he was let out, and given into my custody and the other officers.

Q.Where was the other horse? - A. They were both in the Mews, the horse and the mare; Ivory had the mare, and the horse was tied up close by the stable-door close by the other; I took them to the Office with the other officers; Ivory said, going down to the Office -

Q. Did you promise any thing to him before he said this? - A. I did not; he said, he had been persuaded by Turner to go to Hendon to steal them, the horse and the mare; he said, he rode the horse up to town, they took the mare from off the Common near Hendon, and put the bridle on her in Golder's-green, and brought her up to town to sell.

Q. When he said this, was Turner near him? - A. No, he was not.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - I am an officer; I took the two horses, I have had them in my possession ever since.

JOHN TROTT sworn. - On the 2d instant, I was in company with White and Wood, from an information that we received that two boys were selling two horses in John's Mews, Bedford-row; when we arrived there, the prisoner, Ivory, stood at the head of one of the horses; I then enquired where the other boy was.

Q. Was it the horse or the mare that Ivory stood near? - A. I think that Ivory stood at the head of the mare, I am not quite positive, there was a number of people standing about; they said, that Turner's father had secured him, till some officers came, over the stable; I went up stairs, and took him into custody; I brought him down stairs, and took him to the Office, and White went away with Ivory, the other boy, and Wood led the horses down to the Office; then Turner told me there had been another boy riding one of the horses; I asked him what they were riding him for; he said, to sell; there were three horse-dealers looking at them; thinking he might be a witness, I asked him to shew me him, he could not find him; going to the Office, he told me that Ivory and he went to Hendon together with intent to steal lambs, fowls, ducks, geese, or horses, if they could see any; they broke a barn open at Hendon, they stole the horse from the barn, and returning back to town they stole the mare in question off the green from among some others that were there; they charged one another with the same thing backwards and forwards, one laid it to one, and the other laid it to the other.

Q. Did they ever offer any of these to sell? - A. From information that I received, they did; the person is not here.

Q. Did either of them say they had offered the mare to sell? - A. I did not hear that.

Q.(To Lilly.) Did you see the mare? - A. Yes, tied up in the stable; it is my mare.

Q.Was that the mare that you had stole? - A. The very same.

Q. What was the mare worth? - A. I gave four pounds for her.

JOHN TURNER , Sen. sworn. - Q. We understand you are the father of Samuel Turner , you are come to speak in his favour? - A. No further than it is the first crime he has been guilty of, and somebody must lead him into it first.

Q. Turner, you are the person that took and locked him up? - A. Yes, I took him on the poney.

Q. What colour was the poney? - A. A kind of a dun.

Lilly. It is a brown mare, she has lately lost her coat, that makes her appear so.

Turner. My son's master told me he was a good boy to him, and minded his business exceeding well; he told me if I could find him, he would take him back; on Wednesday, the 2d of May, about two o'clock, I catched him on this poney at the bottom of Horn's-alley, Liquorpond-street.

Q. Did he tell you where he got it? - A.He said he took the bridle from his master, and this bridle being on the poney, I asked him whose horse it was that he was upon; he made answer, that it belonged to his master; I made him dismount the poney, and hold her by the bridle; I drove him and the horse before me to the Mews; I then said, is there any body here that will run for an officer; immediately a person went, and the officers came in the course of ten minutes.

Ivory, GUILTY , Death , aged 12.

Turner, GUILTY , Death , aged 14.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

The Jury recommended them both to mercy, on account of their youth.

Reference Number: t18040516-3

313. HARRIET ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Wilkinson , on the 28th of April , about the hour of six in the forenoon, and stealing therein fourteen shirts, value 7 l. eight handkerchiefs, value 8 s. six neckcloths, value 6 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Isaac Burns and Clarissa Wigmore .

ISAAC BURNS sworn. - I live at No. 12, Great Shire-lane, Temple-bar, in the Liberty of the Rolls : On the 28th of April, in the morning, as me and my wife lay asleep in the bed, between five and six, I was awakened by a noise; I saw the back part of the prisoner go creeping out of the door of my room; I never saw the prisoner before; I immediately said, who is that? the prisoner immediately ran down stairs; with that I jumped out of bed, and

ran after her down one pair of stairs; I catched her on the one pair by the shoulder, and she fell down; she said, do not hold so hard, here is all your property, I am in distress; I said, you do not think how you are distressing of me; with that I laid hold of the one part of the things that was in her gown; I live in the two-pair of stairs, I am a lodger, Mrs. Wilkinson keeps the house, it is a public-house, the sign of the Bible; when I took her, I found fourteen shirts.

Q.What are they worth? - A. Four guineas; two of the shirts were delivered by me to the owner, they are not here; I can swear to the property, they were given to my wife to iron.

(The property produced, and identified by Burns.)

JOHN BLUNDLE sworn. - I am constable of the Liberty of the Rolls; I had the property, and have had it in my possession ever since.

Q.(To Burns.) How did she get into the house? - A. I look upon it she got into the house in the morning by the street-door being left upon the jar; my wife was ironing late that night, and she frequently leaves the key outside of the door; she came to bed that night, and left the key outside of the door; the door fastens on the inside, or outside, with putting too; with the key being left on the outside, she found the way to open the door, and came in while we were fast asleep; there were six of the shirts hung on the horse, there were eight that were folded up in a basket ready for ironing.

ELIZABETH BURNS sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I take in things to iron.

Q. You can speak to the property of their being the same things? - A. I can; they are shirts that belonged to different gentlemen that I am intrusted with to iron.

Q. Did you see the girl brought back? - A. Yes, when my husband brought her up.

Q. Did you see these things gone? - A. Yes, I missed them from the horse.

Q. Did you happen to know the prisoner at the bar? - A. No, I never saw her before.

Q. What did she say when she was brought back? - A. She said but very little, but very pert; she did not deny taking the things.

Q. Did she say how she came by them? - A. No, she gave no account at all.

Q. What is the value of these shirts? - A. I am sure they were never bought under a guinea a-piece.

MARY MERRITT sworn. - I lodge in the same house; I recollect the voice of Mr. Burns saying, I am robbed of all I have; I got up, and saw the prisoner on the stairs; I took hold of her arm, and Mr. Burns took part of the things away; she said, let me go; the man has all his property; she said, she was in distress, she had a husband and children.

Prisoner. (To Witness.) Q. Did you see me on the stairs? - A. Yes; I catched hold of your arm, and led you up stairs.

CLARISSA WIGMORE sworn. - I am a washerwoman: six of these shirts is my property, I know them by the marks, (looks at them); they are a gentleman's property that I wash for; I entrusted Mrs. Burns with them to iron.

Q. I suppose you can speak to the value of those things, as to their being worth a guinea a-piece? - A. Not so much as that, about two guineas the half dozen.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to work early in the morning, at my mother's; I met a young person that lodged with me some time back, in Fetter-lane, she desired me to go up stairs with her; after I went up, I heard the cry of stop thief; she ran down stairs and went away, and soon after, this gentleman caught me.

GUILTY,

Of stealing only, to the value of 39 s.

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-4

314. THOMAS WILLIAMS and JANE NUN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Eldridge , on the 7th of May , about the hour of eleven at night, with intent burglariously to steal the goods and chattels .

ANN ELDRIDGE sworn. - I live at the Bear and Ragged-staff, Whitecross-street, in the parish of St. Luke , my husband keeps that public-house : On the 7th of this month, about the hour of eleven at night, or half past, as near as I can recollect; my family were all in bed, my husband went to bed first, I had a light in the room, I was up some time after, and when I was undressed to get into bed, I put the candle on a little pair of drawers, the drawers stood under the window which the prisoner pushed open; I went to light a rush-light by this cotton candle, and as I was putting the rushlight down, I saw the prisoner Williams shove the window open, and put his head, arms, and shoulders, in the window.

Q. Was the window put to, or only hasped? - A. There was no hasp at all to it, it is a small sash, it draws with a slide, I saw my husband put the sash to, it was only closed; I saw the prisoner put his head and arms in, and the moment I saw him I screamed out; I had seen him the same morning in the house, I know it to be the same face, I looked very stedfast at him, but the fright seized me much; he took nothing away from me.

Q. Upon your screaming out, what did he do? - A. He went to roll off from the tiles; he got up the shed and on the tiling, to get into my window; my husband got out of bed, and saw him roll off the tiles.

Q. Good woman, had you the candle within the room at the window, or had you lit the rushlight? - A. I had not lighted the rush-light, I was going to light it.

Q. Then the man at the window must see you in the room? - A.He certainly did; I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS ELDRIDGE sworn. - I keep the Bear and Ragged-staff public-house, Whitecross-street: On the 7th of May, about half past eleven o'clock at night, I was in bed, my wife screamed out, Oh! Eldridge, here is a man coming in at the window; I immediately jumped out, and saw the prisoner go from the window, I knew his person before, I saw his body but not his face; I had suspicion before, and sat up on purpose on Saturday night to watch; a neighbour of mine told me, on Saturday the 5th, that he saw some persons of suspicious character about my house; I put my family to bed that night, there are two ways to my house, I shut up the house, and left the candle burning in the bar, and after shutting the front door, I went and walked in the street to see if any body went up; about half after one at night, I saw a man and a woman go up to the front of my house; I followed up, and saw the two prisoners close to the door; I said to them, what do you want here; I spoke to both of them; the man made answer, d - n it we only want a glass of gin; I said, you did not come after a glass of gin; the woman said, let us have a drop of gin; to have a better sight of them I went and unlocked the bar, and went into the bar, a misfortune happened, the candle went out; he said, governor, give me hold of the candle, I will get you a light; the prisoner Williams got me a light, and then I served them each with a glass of gin.

Q. Having seen these prisoners so satisfactorily that night, can you say it was the prisoner at the bar that rolled off the tiles? - A. I saw them again on Monday morning; when the man rolled from the tiles, I put on my breeches, and went out immediately, I pursued them in the street; I saw the woman stand close by the tiles, she said, make haste, come along; the tiles broke where he rolled off, and one of the rafters gave way, and he fell; she said, get up, come along, make haste; I sleep in the front room, the house is back from the street, there is a shed on the right-hand side going up, at the front of the house, and any person getting on the tiles of that shed may easily get in, the window is not above a foot, or a foot and a half, from the top of the tiles; it is a sliding sash window, without any hasp.

Q. When you came down, you saw the two prisoners at the bar run away? - A. I did; I saw the man go first, and the woman follow; a neighbour of mine was coming up the gateway, he said to me, it is a tallish man, and a shortish woman.

Q. When you saw this neighbour of your's, the prisoners then had got out of sight? - A. They got out of the gateway over to Gloucester-court, I was as quick as possible, I was not above two minutes; I then ran after them, I went over to them, and catched him by the collar; he resisted very much, made use of very bad language; he swore to me, and said, you b - y thief, what did I want; I said, what did you want, getting in at my window; he tried to get from me, and dragged me near twenty yards to a corner of an alley; the woman stuck close to him, I did not observe her assist him in any thing; there were some women standing at the end of the alley, they said, that is the thief; a neighbour was coming by, his name is Prince, and the watchman came up, and we secured them both that night.

Q. Do you recollect when you went to bed, whether there was any thing on this chest of drawers? - A. There was a gilt metal watch, and a parcel of halfpence in the room; near to the drawers there was a club-box containing twenty or thirty pounds, about three or four yards off; and on the drawers there were about ten or a dozen shillings, I had not counted them; he had opened the window far enough that I could easily get in or out, or any middling sized man; I gave charge of them both that night; the watchman was negligent, and did not search either; I positively swore to the woman; the officer was reprimanded, and fined forty shillings, by the Magistrate; I took her up again on the Saturday following of the Monday.

JOSEPH PRINCE sworn. - On the 7th of May, I was coming from my benefit-club about half past eleven at night, I saw Mr. Eldridge coming along with only his breeches and shirt on; we took the man up, and the woman followed us to the watch-house, the watchman took him to the watchhouse.

RICHARD PENRIN sworn. - I am a Police-officer: I apprehended the woman on the Saturday following.

Prisoner Williams's defence. I had been hard to work that day, I mended two pair of shoes, and was not done till nine at night, and I had to take them as far as Tooley-street before I sold them; coming along I met this woman, and was going over the way to an alley to get some drink; this man came to me, and said, were not you up at my window; he went away, and brought another man to me, he tore my jacket; I said, if you are a constable do not use me bad; he called two watchmen, I laid hold of each of their arms, and went with them.

Prince. He tried to make his escape before the watchmen came up; I did not tare his jacket, he tore my waistcoat.

Prisoner Nun's defence. Mr. Eldridge gave charge of me the same night; he told me, after my name was taken down in the book, I might go home, and come again in the morning; he said to me, what a d - d piece of nonsense this is, I cannot swear to

Williams; tell him from me that I cannot swear to him, nor my wife neither. He made it his business to follow me to Playhouse-yard, and told me the same, and last Saturday he took me up on the same suit; he said at the watch-house he could swear to me, but he could not swear to the man.

Prosecutor. I saw her in the street the next morning, and I said to her, tell me the truth, did you come after the club-box, or privately to rob me? she said she did not know what he was after, he was so drunk.

Q. Did you tell her you were not positive to Williams? - A. I never did.

Q.(To Prince.) When the prisoner at the bar tore your waistcoat, did he appear to be drunk? - A. He did not.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-5

315. HANNAH PATRICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , a pair of breeches, value 18 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 18 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. and a metal watch, value 10 s. the property of Edward-Joseph White .

JOSEPH- EDWARD WHITE sworn. - I live at Hoxton, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; I am a book-keeper : I went out on the 15th of April, in the morning, on Sunday, and I returned again in the evening about eleven o'clock with the person that keeps the house, a Mrs. Hoole; the door was double locked when she left the house, and single locked when we returned.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know that of your own knowledge? - A. I heard so; there was a very large dog that we left in the house; he was out of the house then; not seeing the dog, I immediately pulled the door to, and desired her to fetch the watchman; when the watchman came, I begged his lantern, and I found my bed-room had been entered by some person, and a pair of kerseymere breeches, a pair of pantaloons, a metal watch, and a toilenet waistcoat, had been taking from a large trunk in the room.

Q. Was the trunk locked? - A. No; I heard nothing of the things till about ten days; I was passing Golden-lane, and saw the kerseymere breeches in the shop of a salesman, his name is Parr; I gave him a deposit, and desired him to put them by; I went to a Magistrate, and traced them to the prisoner; on the same day she was apprehended; she denied having any knowledge of it; she said she never had them.

Q. You are sure this happened on the 15th day of April, on a Sunday? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any violence used in order to get into your room? - A. The bed-room door was never fastened.

Q. Was there any violence used to the house? - A. Yes, the door must have been opened by a pick-lock key.

Q. That was more likely to be used by a man than by a woman? - A. I should think so myself.

Q. You did not see any of these articles till about ten days after? - A. No.

Q. Where was the prisoner's house? - A. In Wentworth-street, Spitalfields.

Q. You do not know she is a married woman? - A. I think she said she was before the Magistrate, and that she lived with her husband.

Q. There is a person of the name of Abrahams, a witness, a Jew? - A. Yes.

Q. He was taken up for this? - A. He was, on the same day.

Q. Therefore it was through the intelligence of this Jew you apprehended the prisoner - he was taken up first? - A. No, Parr first, then Abrahams, and then the prisoner.

WILLIAM PARR sworn. - I live at No. 1, Golden-lane.

Q. Do you remember Mr. White coming to your house? - A. Yes.

Q. What was it that he fixed upon? - A. A pair of small clothes that hung in the window; it was about three or four days after I purchased them; I purchased them of a man of the name of Abrahams in Petticoat-lane, in the market.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am an officer: I produce a pair of breeches; there was nothing else found charged to Parr.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the officer that apprehended the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did she live? - A. In Wentworth-street, Spitalfields; I apprehended Abrahams first.

Q. He is a Jew? - A. Yes.

Q. Is she a married woman? - A. I have heard so; I understood that she lived with her husband, it is a private house; there appeared to be some lodgers in the house; there were four women and a man in the room; when I took her, I asked her whether that was her husband, and she said, no.

LAZARUS ABRAHAMS sworn. - Q. Look at these breeches, (the breeches handed to him,) did you at any time receive these breeches from any body? - A. Yes, from Mrs. Patrick, the prisoner at the bar; I have dealt with her about three months; I received them of her on a Monday, I cannot recollect the day of the month; I bought them of her in her house; she sent an old man to my house; I have bought things of her before I bought those of her; I gave her nine shillings for them.

Q. Is that what they are worth? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. You cannot tell - you shall tell? - A. They are worth ten shillings, or half a guinea.

Q. You will swear that? - A. Yes, it is all a fancy; they are second hand, and the linings are dirty; they have been wore once.

Q. Will you swear they are worth no more than

half a guinea? - A. I cannot swear it, it is all a fancy.

Q. Do you know what the stuff cost? - A. No; I bought them of her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Perhaps, on recollection, you may remember that this woman is a married woman? - A. I did not enquire for that.

Q. Do not you know that she lived with her husband? - A. I heard it up the court, I do not know it.

Q. How long had you got these breeches in your possession? - A. I bought them on Monday, and on Thursday I sold them.

Q. When you bought them, did you ask whose breeches they were? - A. I never enquired that.

Court. You would be much more like an honest man if you did.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you say any thing about these breeches till you were taken up - did you go to any Magistrate, or to any Police-officer, to give any information - you gave no information till you were taken up yourself? - A. I do not understand you.

Mr. Knapp. (To Vickery.) Q. Was there not something the matter with the woman when she was examined? - A. There was a scalded leg.

- LEVI sworn. - Q. What do you know of this matter: On Monday morning, the 16th of April, I was coming through Wentworth-street, and saw Lazarus Abrahams come out of Mrs. Patrick's house; I cannot prove any more than what he told you.

Court. I cannot hear that; I cannot believe him; a man that buys a new pair of breeches for nine shillings; I have a great scruple about believing him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-6

316. MARIA BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , twenty-five yards of printed cotton, value 35 s. the property of Alexander-Colville Johnson .

WILLIAM TOMKINS sworn. - I live with Mr. Johnson, No. 13, Norton Falgate ; he is a linen-draper : On the 5th of May, a woman came in, and informed me of a person that stole the print; she pointed to the prisoner at the bar; I followed the prisoner, and took the print from under her cloak; when I took her, she was about four doors off from my master's shop; I brought her back to my master's shop; she said in the shop she did it through necessity; I had put the printed cotton at the door about nine o'clock in the morning. (The cotton produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was walking by, and this piece of cotton was laying on the ground, and this woman said to me, take it; I was going to put it down; this woman went, and told this young man that I took this piece of cotton; I said, no, I had not, I picked it up; I gave it to the young man; he went into the shop, and took me up; it say a good way from the shop, I dare say it was half a yard from the shop-door, on the pavement.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined one month in the New-prison , and to be whipped during that time .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-7

317. MARY BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , a silver table-spoon, value 10 s. a silver tea-spoon, value 18 d. and two gowns, value 20 s. the property of Andrew Magill .

- MAGILL sworn. - Q. Mrs. Magill, do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. She was my servant not quite a fortnight; my husband is a tailor ; I did not miss any thing till she left me. On Thursday, the 26th of April, when she was gone, I missed the things mentioned in the indictment; I did not find any thing till the pawnbroker brought to my house two spoons, her name is Mr. Parr; my initials and my husband's are upon them.

- PARR sworn - I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 3, High-street, St. Giles's: I received these spoons, I produce, on Thursday, the 26th of April, from the prisoner, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; she required half a guinea on them, when she brought them to pledge; I asked her who they belonged to, and she said they were the property of her mother; I asked her where her mother lived, and she said, at No. 4, Long-acre; she told me that No. 4 was a chandler's shop; I told her I thought it was not; she then hesitated, and said she might make a mistake; I told her I did not like to take them in of her; I desired her to fetch her mother, she agreed to fetch her mother, but wished to take the spoons with her; I told her I should detain the spoons till her mother came; there was with her, when she came, a girl of about twelve years of age; I then laid an information before Mr. Bond; I produce the two spoons. (The spoons identified by the prosecutrix.)

- HARVEY sworn. - I produce two gowns pledged by Mrs. Peters.

ISABELLA PETERS sworn. - The prisoner came on Thursday the 26th of April; she came first in the morning and rapped at the door, and told me she had lost her place through the means of her former mistress; she asked me to let her wash herself; I thought it very hard to refuse, I let her; she went away with a bundle and a shoulder of veal; I asked her how she came to buy such a thing; she said she was hungry, she only gave three shillings and sixpence for it; I asked what she gave a pound for it, she said sixpence or sixpence halfpenny; she had two gowns, I pawned those two gowns by her order.

Q. Where did she say she got these gowns? - A. She said that Captain Holmes gave them her as a present; I pawned them at different times to Mr. Harvey; I am sure I received those gowns from her; Mr. Harvey advanced seven shillings and sixpence on one, and eight shillings on the other. - (The gowns identified by the prosecutrix.)

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am an officer, I took her in custody; I went to Mrs. Peters's apartments, and there I found the duplicates.

Prisoner's defence. I was opening the shop; a woman came by and asked me how I was, and told me there had been a woman at her house enquiring after me; I asked her the name, she told me; she said, in case I went down to her house I should see the person; I went to a public-house to get a light, I had told her to stop at the door; this woman was gone; I came up stairs to sweep the passage; this woman came back; I told her my mistress did not give me enough to eat, I wished to go; she said I might take my clothes and go along with her; I went down stairs and brought up my clothes, and went with her to her apartment and had my breakfast; she took me to the pawnbroker's to pledge these gowns; she said her sister had died and left them to her; I told them the same as she told me.

Q.(To Harvey.) What day was it on? - A. On Friday the twenty-seventh of April.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-8

318. PATRICK COOLING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of May , a shirt, value 1 s. 6 d. a shift, value 6 d. four handkerchiefs, value 8 d. two towels, value 4 d. and an apron, value 3 d. the goods of James Drewett .

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I live at No. 6, Artillery-lane, Bishopsgate-street .

Q. Do you know James Drewett ? - A. He is my landlord ; I rent the lower part of the house of him, he lives on the first floor: On the second of May last I saw the prisoner at the bar going out of my shop-door, at least going out of the entrance of the house; my wife observed him going out first (there is a passage by the side of the shop); she said, good God, there is somebody gone out; I followed the man down the lane, and at the bottom of the lane I touched him on the arm; friend, said I, have you been at Mrs. Drewett's (they were not at home at the time)? he said, yes; I turned myself round to come home again; a thought struck me from his having a bundle under his coat, under his left arm; I stopped, he crossed the road in Bishopsgate-street, and ran up Dunning's-alley; I followed him till he came to Christopher's-alley; before I got up to him he dropped one of the things; it was in the evening after eight o'clock' it was not dark; he returned and picked that one up, he went two or three steps and dropped two or three things more; he picked one of them up, and seemed careless about picking the rest up; there came some little boys that were at play about there, and they assisted him in picking them up; in the mean time I ran and seized him; you rascal, said I, you have been robbing of my house; he said, if the things are your's take them, I do not want them; I said I will take them and you too; he said I should not; a scuffle ensued, I wanted to bring him back but he would not come; he begged for mercy that I would let him go to his wife and family, but till I knew whose things they were I did not think it right to let him go; I delivered him to the officer, his name is Mason; the officer searched him.

- MASON sworn. - I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner at the bar on the second of May, in the evening; there are four handkerchiefs, an old shift, a shirt, an apron, and two towels; I was sent for, and Kennedy gave me charge of the prisoner. (The property produced, and identified by Mrs. Drewett.)

Prisoner's defence. I came up from Deptford from the regiment to see a mother that is in St. Luke's workhouse, to give her some small relief; in coming near the end of Finsbury-square I saw two towels, I picked them up, and there was a man and three boys with him; I asked him if they were his, he said they were; I said if they are your's take them.

Q.(To the prisoner.) Do you mean to say you never was in Drewett's house? - A. No, I had not been two hours in London; I never had nothing but the two towels.

Q.(To Kennedy.) You saw him pick up the two towels? - A. I saw him and the boys pick up all the things.

Q. You saw him drop several things? - A. Yes, they dropped from him as he was running; first one, two, and three.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that it was the same man that you followed out of Mr. Drewett's house? - A. I am as confident as of my own life.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-9

319. WALTER DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing a pewter quart-pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Dixey .

JOHN DIXEY sworn. - I am a publican ; on the fourteenth of April I lost a quart pot in the morning; it was at a customer's house where I serve.

- GREGORY sworn. - I am a constable; the prisoner at the bar was brought to me; I took this quart pot out of his right-hand coat-pocket, and this pint pot out of his left-hand waistcoat-pocket.

Q. What day was it? - A. On the fourteenth of April, near half past nine in the morning.

RICHARD JOSHUA sworn. - On the fourteenth of April I saw the prisoner at the bar pass my door; I went to the door and saw him turn into No. 40, at Mr. Keys; I passed the door, and saw him standing in the passage; I repassed and saw him remain, I saw a quart-pot in the stair-case window, and the third time I passed I saw the prisoner put it in his pocket. (The pots produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. What I have been guilty of was through extreme distress; I hope for mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined one week , and during that time whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-10

320. DAVID FITZGERALD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the fourteenth of May , a pair of pantaloons, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Sowerby .

- sworn. - I am servant to Thomas Sowerby : Last Monday, about half past one o'clock, he came in and pledged a handkerchief; I came out from dinner, and the other apprentice went in to dinner; I heard a sudden pull or crush; I immediately jumped over the counter, and missed the trowsers from the door; I collared him, and caught him with the trowsers under his jacket.

Prisoner's defence. I went in to buy a pair of trowsers, and I went in to pawn a handkerchief, I had not money enough; I looked at the trowsers, they were hanging up at the door; I heard them fall down, they were only tied with a string, I picked them up; he came out and collared me, he shook me so I let them fall.

Q.(To witness.) Was the prisoner going when you laid hold of him? - A. No, he was standing still at the threshold of the door; he pulled them down with a sudden jerk, here is the piece of string he broke.

Q. Did he ask any questions about the trowsers? - A. None.

Q. What did he pledge the handkerchief for? - A. Eight-pence.

Q. What was the price of the trowsers? - A. Five shillings.

GUILTY , aged 78.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-11

321. JAMES FLOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , a basket, value 8 s. five quartern loaves, value 3 s. 4 d. and two half-quartern loaves, value 8 d. the property of David Chapman .

DAVID CHAPMAN sworn. - I live at No. 383, in the Strand : I am a baker . This man took my basket from under my window; I had pitched it there when I went into the shop, with the loaves in it; my shop is rather small, I had no room to take it in; there were some customers there, I went in to serve them.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take it? - A. I did not see him take it away; I received information from a person that keeps a cellar next door, her name is Mary Fry ; I had not left it above ten minutes; I ran after the prisoner at the bar, and caught him going up Southampton-street with the basket on his shoulder.

Q. Were all the loaves in the basket when you caught him? - A. Yes. (The basket produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I met a man in the Strand, at the corner of Southampton-street; he asked me to carry that basket, he had one quartern loaf in his hand, and that gentleman came up; he asked me where I got it; I told him that a man told me to take care of it till he came back.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) What did the prisoner say to you? - A. He said he was going to carry it to Covent-garden; he likewise found two-pence halfpenny in his pocket when he was at Bow-street, that this man gave him to carry it he said.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-12

322. RICHARD LEE and JAMES LEE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , thirty-six boards, value 4 s. and a brick-mould, value 6 d. the property of William Hobson .

JAMES HEBERTON sworn. - Q. Do you remember seeing the two prisoners upon Hackney Downs? - A. Yes, about four o'clock on Sunday morning last, the thirteenth of May.

Q. Who was with you? - A. William Payne ; they were coming from Mr. Hobson's brick-fields; we walked after them and overtook them in Love-lane, going to the back of Clapton towards Stamford-hill; I asked them what they had got in the bag, they said working tools; I examined them, and asked them where they had got them.

Q. Which of them? - A. Old Lee; the young one had the bag; they were both together, the father and the son; they said they had been on the other side of the water, and were going to work at Tottenham; when I examined them I thought they were all stolen; Payne and I took them both to the watch-house; we went to Mr. Hobson's brick-field, where I thought they belonged, and there I found the staple drawn from the sand-house.

Q. How did it appear? - A. It appeared to have been forced open by a chissel which they had in their bag; we took the chissel down to the sand-house,

and it exactly fitted the mark on the door.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a gardener.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn. - I was in company with Heberton; they said they had working tools; we desired them to turn them out, we mistrusted them; we went to Hobson's sand-house, there we found the staple drawn; we tried the chissel, it fitted it.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Hobson.

Q. Do you remember your sand-house being broke open? - A. It was broke open on Sunday morning.

SAMUEL SYMONDS sworn. - I work for Mr. Hobson; I was called up on Sunday morning, about five minutes before five o'clock; I went down to the sand-house, I missed thirty-six pallet-boards and a brick-mould that had been in the sand-house; my partner locked it up before my face.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn. - I was officer of the night on Saturday, and a bag with the boards and the brick-mould, and another bag that he had under his arm with a chisel, were delivered to me; I have had them in my custody ever since.

Q. You are sure that the chisel was in the bag? - A. Yes.

(The property produced and identified by Samuel Symonds .)

Richard Lee 's defence. I worked for Mr. Lee, in the parish of Hackney; I had some shirts with me; my wife works with me in the field; so I got up on Sunday morning; I suppose it was between three and four o'clock, and I set off to go to Shoreditch with my little bag under my arm; I was going to one of my sons, and going over Hackney-downs I met my son; not my son I was going to; when he met me on the Downs, he said, where are you going; he had a bag on his shoulder; what was in it I did not know; I said, I am going to John's, with the things; he made answer to me that he was not at home; that he was gone to the Dock, to a sister he had there; I was going there with the things, and to buy some bacon; with that, I said, it is of no use for me to go there, if he is not at home; I turned back again, and came along with him, and he went all the way before me; these two gentlemen followed us, and at the same time I did not know what was in the bag.

James Lee 's defence. I worked in Mr. Rhodes's fields, with my brother, and my brother and I had some words; and as I was going down Dalston-lane, I saw this bag lay, and the misfortune was I picked up the bag, and threw it across my shoulder; and walking across Hackney-downs I met my father; my father said, he was going to my brother John's; I told him he was not at home; he was gone to the Dock; he turned round, and went back; I walked just before him, about ten yards, and crossing the stiles these gentlemen stopped us; they asked what we had in the bag; I told them; they said, let us see; I said, by all means; I turned them out of the bag.

Q.(To Heberton.) Was the young man walking before? - A. They were both together; the old man and the young man; and the old man answered me.

Richard Lee , GUILTY , aged 64.

James Lee , GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-13

323. ANN MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a gown, value 7 s. the property of Ann Tipko .

ANN TIPKO sworn. - I am a widow woman, I go to work in gentlemen's families, I live in Marshall-street, St. James's : I lost my gown on the 7th of April.

Q. Did you ever see this woman before? - A. Yes; the person that I lodged with employed her.

Q. How lately before had you seen it? - A. On the 6th of April; I was very positive with the person that I lodged with, and her, the prisoner, lodged in the kitchen; I went down stairs to the prisoner; I asked her what became of my gown; she said she knew nothing of the gown; I told her I was positive of her knowing about it; if she would give me the duplicate I might get it out; she took the duplicate out of her pocket, and gave it me; I told her I wanted the money to redeem it; she would not give me the money; then I went for the officer, he took her.

Q. Did you go to the pawnbroker's with that duplicate? - A. Mr. Lovitt, the officer, took the duplicate; the pawnbroker has the gown in Court.

WILLIAM NEAD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's apprentice, Mr. Stafford, No. I, Cambridge-street, Manchester-square; I produce a gown, the prisoner pawned it; I have known her for two or three years.

Q. Have you got the duplicate? - A. Yes, the officer has the counter part of it.

- LOVITT, sworn. - I am an officer.

Q. Have you any duplicate? - A. Yes, I went with it to the pawnbrokers.

Q.(To the prosecutrix). Is that the duplicate the prisoner gave to you? - A. Yes.

Q. You gave it to the officer? - A. No, Mrs. Tattersell gave it to the officer; I gave it to her.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, only for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040516-14

324. WILLIAM WILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , three quarters of a pound weight of tobacco , the property of Thomas Pearson .

Second Count. For the like offence, stating the property as belonging to the Officers of his Majesty's Customs .

And a Third Count, the property of persons unknown.

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ALEXANDER GRAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the gatesmen employed in the King's tobacco-warehouse, upon Tower-hill ? - A. I am gate-keeper.

Q. What parish is it in? - A. It is in the parish of St. Botolph, in the county of Middlesex.

Q. The prisoner was a labouring cooper in this warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. On the day when the labourers came from work did you stop him? - A. Yes; on Monday, the 30th of April, when I rubbed him down, and on the seam of his breeches, I found something hard; I searched him, and found some in his breeches and some in his waistcoat; I detained him, with the assistance of my partners; he begged we would let him go, and take no farther notice of it; we detained him at our lodge, and sent for an Officer; I produce the tobacco; I have had it ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Whereabouts is this tobacco-warehouse? - A. At Tower-hill.

Q. Are you sure it is not in the city? - A. I am sure of it.

Court. Q. Who is Mr. Pearson? - A. He is the King's tobacco-warehouse keeper.

THOMAS PEARSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the keeper of the King's tobacco-warehouse, on Tower-hill? - A. Yes.

Q. This warehouse was full of tobacco? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the sort of tobacco that was in the warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. You have the care of the warehouse, and of course you are answerable for it? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Is not some part of St. Botolph in the city? - A. I believe not.

Q. What is the value of this tobacco? - A. About 18 d.

Q. How long has the prisoner worked in that warehouse? - A. I believe about two years.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped 100 yards on Tower-hill .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-15

325. EDWARD KING and GEORGE MUSSARD , otherwise GEORGE MUSLIN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on Thursday, the 8th of March , one trunk, value 5 s. eighty rings, value 2 l. one hundred gold rings, value 50 l. four gold seals, value 4 l. four gold broaches, value 5 l. two hundred gold ear-rings, value 50 l. ninety seals, value 3 l. eight pair of spectacles, value 2 l. twenty-four silk purses, value 2 l. two hundred spoons, value 8 l. forty-eight watch-chains, value 2 l. sixty watch-keys, value 5 s. five knives, value 20 s. and five forks, value 20 s. the goods of John Alder ; four Bank-notes of 5 l. each, four Banknotes of 10 l. each, sixteen Bank-notes of 10 l. each, six promissory notes for the payment of ten guineas each, value 70 l. ten promissory notes for the payment of ten guineas each, value 110 l. six promissory notes of 10 l. each, five promissory notes, value 5 l. 5 s. a bill of exchange, value 30 l. a bill of exchange, value 15 l. a bill of exchange, value 12 l. 6 s. and one bill of exchange, value 6 l. the said Bank-notes and bills of exchange being the property of John Alder , then due and unsatisfied to him .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gleed.)

JOHN ALDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. What are you, Mr. Alder? - A. I live at Yarmouth; I am a goldsmith and cutler .

Q. Did you pack up the property that is mentioned in the indictment at Waltham-cross? - A. Yes.

Q. What day was it? - A. On the 8th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the trunk was put on the back of the chaise - it was a one-horse chaise; the trunk was fastened with two broad straps, about three inches broad, and stuck on iron pins, about an inch in length, as I have travelled for twelve years before. At the end of Long-lane , and twenty yards before I came to Long-lane, I observed the trunk was safe; I saw it safe after I was about twenty yards in Smithfield; I then whipped my horse, I was within forty yards of the King's Head inn, Smithfield , where I meant to put up.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. Between six and seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Immediately when you got to the inn, you looked and you observed the trunk was gone? - A. Yes, I immediately left the horse and chaise in care at the inn.

Q. In point of fact, you never saw the trunk since? - A. No; in about two minutes Oliver came to the King's Head, and gave me some information, and another man of the name of Woodland, he gave me some information.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a goldsmith at Yarmouth? - A. Yes.

Q. Carrying on trade there? - A. Yes.

Q. You have a partner? - A. I have no partner.

Q. This happened momentarily - it happened

almost instantaneously? - A. Yes, it was very quick done.

Q. You had no opportunity of observing any person in Smithfield in course, it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening? - A. There were very few people in Smithfield, it was in Long-lane I saw a number of people; I did not miss it till I got to the King's Head.

Q. Being in danger, whether any thing had struck your attention at Long-lane? - A. Nothing more than I was in Long-lane.

Court. Q. After you come into London at dusk, it strikes your attention, and makes you careful? - A. Yes.

Q. It was dusk? - A. It was; I saw it perfectly safe in Smithfield.

THOMAS OLIVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 7, Jacob's-court, Turnmill-street; I am a carman to Ann Withers .

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Have you known them before? - A. I have known King for three years, and Mussard for two years.

Q. What time was this? - A. About a quarter before seven o'clock at night, I saw the gentleman's chaise coming along Long-lane.

Q. Did you see the same gentleman come along Smithfield? - A. Yes; he drove to the King's Head, and there he stopped; I saw King take a knife out of his pocket and cut the strap; I do not know whether it was a strap or a rope; then he took it up on his arms and put it on his left shoulder, and went towards the end of Long-lane.

Q. At that time, when you observed King cut the straps, whereabouts was the other prisoner? did you see the other prisoner there? - A. He was standing a few yards from where Ryland was standing.

Q. Were they standing in Smithfield; Ryland and Mussard? - A. Just against the cross-way; it may be about a dozen yards from the chaise; Ryland was not half a yard from me, Muslin was standing two yards from me, and close to King.

Mr. Gleed. Q. After King had taken away the box from the chaise, what did King do with the box? - A. He went towards Long-lane with the box on his shoulder; as soon as they left me, I went to the King's Head, and informed the gentleman of it.

Q. Did you see any thing pass after at the end of Long-lane? - A. I saw them all three together, they were one on each side, and King in the middle.

Court. Q. Who had the box? - A. King; King was in the middle, and Muslin and Ryland were on each side, that was all I saw then; I went to the King's Head, and informed the gentleman, he was gone to Mr. Scott's, the toy-shop; he came to me afterwards; I did not tell him then that I knew the prisoners, I described the men.

Q. Are you sure these are the two men? - A. I am sure these are the two men, and Ryland was the third; and the next day I saw Ryland in Smithfield, he offered me a one-pound note, and I would not take it; King offered me a one-pound note, he was in company with three men, one of the men was of the name of Higgins; King put his hand in his pocket, and clapped me on the shoulder, and said, here, take this.

Q. What did he offer it for? - A. He did not say.

Q. Did they see you were on the watch? - A. Yes, they saw me standing there.

Q. I am talking of the day before - did they see you the day before? - A. I do not know whether they saw me or no, I saw them.

Q. It was light enough for them to see you, if they had a mind to see you? - A. One of them stood close by me, about a yard off, and the other two yards off.

Q. At the place where they were standing, could they see the chaise? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gleed. Q. Did any other thing pass? - A. On the Monday following, as I was going to my brother's in Golden-lane, I saw Ryland and Muslin standing together at a public-house door.

Court. Q. What time of the day? - A. It was in the evening, about eight o'clock; he asked me where I was going.

Q. Who asked you? - A. Ryland; I said, to my brother's; he then said he wanted to speak to me.

Q. Did you stop? - A. I did; he asked me what I meant to do in this business, those are the words he said to me; I said, to do that which was right; he said, if you do nothing in it, I will give you a couple of guineas.

Q. Which of them was it that said that? - A. I do not know which.

Q. Could the other man hear, whoever it might have been that said that? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. At the time that you saw King doing the act that you were talking of, Muslin and Ryland were as far off as you were? - A. I was within three yards.

Q. Muslin and Ryland were close to you? - A. Muslin was, and Ryland was about two yards off; I was standing at the cross way just where they cut the trunk from the back of the chaise.

Q. At the second time you met Ryland and Muslin, how far distant was Muslin from Ryland? - A. The second time we met was at a public-house door.

Q. Do you mean to swear, that, talking to one man, that another man must hear? - A. He might if he liked.

Q. Suppose he did not like, what then? - A. I think he must hear; I do not know which of them it was at the public-house door that said they would give me the two guineas.

Q. You knew both their persons? - A. Yes, they were both together; I do not know which was nearest.

Q. Nor you do not know who spoke to you? - A. No, they might both speak to me.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known King? - A. Near three or four years.

Q. When you went to Mr. Alder, you did not tell their names? - A. I was afraid to tell him who they were, least I should get ill used.

Q. So your courage enabled you to go and tell him that three men had been concerned in stealing his trunk, but your courage would not let you tell him who they were - did you tell him that you did not know who they were? - A. I do not know that I did, to my knowledge.

Q. That is an odd way of swearing - am I to understand you, that you did not tell Mr. Alder you did not know who they were? - A. Yes.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a carman, I work for Ann Withers .

Q. How long have you lived with Ann Withers ? - A. About a twelvemonth, on and off.

Q. Who did you live with before? - A. Mr. Sarcut, a year and a half.

Q. What on and off? -

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Did he tell you that he did not know the persons who took the trunk? - A. He did not tell me nothing about it.

Court. Q. Did he say he knew the persons, or that he did not? - A. I do not think he did.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Why, Mr. Alder, was not he taken in custody, and taken before the Lord-Mayor, in giving the information? - A. No.

Q. Was not he taken by an officer before the Lord-Mayor to be examined - he came and told you, soon after you lost the trunk, that he saw it taken away, did he tell you that he knew the persons? - A. He told me he knew their persons.

Q. Did he say he knew their names? - A. No, he did not say he knew their names; I advertised it.

Q. With a large reward? - A. Yes, of two hundred guineas; at the time I published the handbills, I did not know the names, that was on the same night.

Q. How soon did he tell you he knew their names? - A. It might be a few days after that he told me their names; he gave me a reason why he did not, he was afraid of being murdered.

Mr. Gleed. Q. The reward was for the recovery of the property? - A. Yes.

Q. And that property was never recovered? - A. No.

JOHN WOODLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am a brick maker: On the 8th of March last, I was in Smithfield with the last witness, about twenty minutes before seven o'clock; he asked me if I saw that; the first thing that I observed, was the young man with the box, I do not know what his name is, he is a stranger to me.

Court. Q.(To Prisoner, King.) Your name is King? - A. Yes.

Woodland. I saw the young man with a box.

Q. Where did he take it from? - A. I do not know, I did not see; King bore away towards the Bear and Ragged Staff, it takes you round by the Bell, and so down to Long-lane.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Muslin? - A. I do not know any of them; all that I saw, was the prisoner, King, with the box.

Q. Are you sure that is the man? - A. I am confident that is the man; I went with the gentleman to Bow-street that night.

Court. Q. Before you went to Bow-street, you went some where else? - A. I went to the King's Head, I saw the ostler with the horse and chaise, and a couple of young women, and afterwards I went to Bow-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am a brick maker; I work for Mr. Thomas Holloway , I have worked for him for the last three years.

Q. How do you account for working for Mr. Hale, of Kentish Town? - A. He lives in Sommers' Town.

Q. You did not say in Kentish Town? - A. No.

Q. How came you in Smithfield then? - A. I drove a hay cart all the winter for William Hale to the Bear and Ragged Staff.

Q. Is that your name, Woodland? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you never go by the name of Barber? - A. No.

Q. Did you never go by the name of Goodland? - A. I never went by those names in my life.

Q. How is that, are you called the Barber? - A. No.

Q. Were you acquainted with Oliver? - A. No further than seeing him in the market.

Q. Did you go along with him that night to Mr. Alder? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know King's name? - A. No.

Q. Did Oliver tell you whether he knew his name or no? - A. He told me he knew the man, I will not belie my conscience.

Q. Did you go and take any pains to catch the man afterwards when you saw these doings? - A. I was afraid.

Q. The next day was market-day - I am told you saw the prisoner, King, the next day in the market? - A. I said I thought I saw the three men in the market.

Q. You saw Thomas Oliver talking with two officers, and you saw the two prisoners, you went and told Oliver, and told the officers? - A. I never

went and told the officers; I never said a word, I did not go nigh them at all.

Q Pray how soon was it that you heard of a reward? - A. I cannot read, nor yet write.

Q. But you have ears? - A. Yes.

Q. You understand English, there is nothing plainer in English than reward? -

RICHARD LIMERICK sworn. - On the 22d of April, in consequence of some information, I apprehended King; I apprehended the other prisoner on the 30th of April at the Merry Carpenter , in Old-street, with my brother officer, Blackman.

The prisoner, King, said nothing in his defence.

Mussard's defence. I was at Stilton, at a place sixty miles off; I was on a journey for a fortnight.

King, GUILTY , aged 24.

Mussard, GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-16

326. FRANCES TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , a cloth cloak, value 5 s. the property of William Chamberlain .

MARY CHAMBERLAIN sworn. - My husband is a weaver : I live at the corner of Great Pelham-street, Spitalfields .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I never saw her till the day she came into my room with an acquaintance of mine to see me, on the 30th of April; she would have a pot of beer to drink, she fetched it herself and paid for it; I turned my back to stir up the fire; when I turned round again I missed the prisoner, my cloak, and the quart pot; I had asked my acquaintance to stay and take a cup of tea with me; my acquaintance said she might have gone into the yard, and might return again; I heard no more of her till the next day, I found her in Swan-yard watch-house; she had pawned my cloak.

Prisoner's defence. I never touched the cloak; there were more people in the room besides me; we were all drunk together.

Q.(To prosecutrix.) Were you drunk? - A. Upon my oath I never was out of my room that day, and I had not left work for above five minutes, and I only drank about a cupfull of beer.

JANE NEEZER sworn. - I saw her with the cloak on that afternoon, the 30th of April, about half past four in the afternoon, and after that I saw her without it; she said she had pawned it.

WILLIAM POPE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner at the bar pawned this cloak.

(The cloak produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-17

327. ANN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , two sheets; value 10 s. a petticoat, value 3 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a child's cloak, value 1 s. a child's shirt, value 1 s. and a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Crook .

THOMAS CROOK sworn. - On Friday the twentieth of April the servant went up stairs, and when she came down she said somebody had stole the sheets from off the bed; I went up stairs immediately and found nobody was there; I immediately sent off to the pawnbroker's, and at the first pawnbroker's we heard some of the things were pledged.

JOHN HAYWOOD sworn. - The prisoner is the young woman that pledged the sheets on Friday the twentieth of April; she came about twelve o'clock in the morning and pledged two sheets for ten shillings, in the name of Jones; about half an hour afterwards she came again, and pledged a cambric muslin petticoat and a dimity cloak, and a cambric pocket-handkerchief; Mr. Crook came in and identified them, and we were directed to stop her when she came again.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; her family has been in the habit of coming to our house till of late; we have known them for years, they are very respectable people.

- TREADWAY sworn. - I searched her lodgings on the 23d of April; I found this child's shirt, a muslin handkerchief, and two duplicates of the things that were pawned. (The articles produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-18

328. THOMAS BAYNHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , two shillings and a sixpence , the monies of Peter-Radley Jackson , and Robert Filmer .

ROBERT FILMER sworn. - I am a druggist , in Bishopsgate-street ; I am in partnership with Peter-Radley Jackson; the prisoner has lived with us about nine months; he was warehouseman : The prisoner took his turn of staying at home on a Sunday with the other young men; we observed on these Sundays it was his turn, that there were generally less money taken than on other Sundays; he likewise attended the shop, while our young men were at dinner, during that hour of the day; from circumstances, we had reason to suspect he was not so honest as he ought to be; in consequence of which, my partner marked some money on the 4th of May; he gave two shillings of it to a neighbour; I gave five shillings to another neighbour of this marked money, and desired them to go when he was there, to buy some articles.

Q. You have one partner? - A. No more.

Q. How long has this man lived with you? - A. Nine months.

Q. Where did he come from? - A.From Bristol.

Q. He is a married man - he has a wife and family? - A. Yes.

SAMUEL DANCE sworn. - I am a mercer; I live at No. 189, Bishopsgate-street Without: I received five shillings of Mr. Filmer; I gave it to my servant to fetch some drugs at Mr. Filmer's, her name is Sarah Hopkins.

Q. Was it the same money you received from Mr. Filmer? - A. Yes.

SARAH HOPKINS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dance; I took the five shillings of Mr. Dance, I went to Mr. Filmer's, and bought some drugs with it.

Q. From whom did you buy the drugs? - A. Of the prisoner; I paid him five shillings, the same five shillings I had from Mr. Dance.

Q. Have you been in the habit of going to the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it all shillings? - A. There was half-a-crown, a sixpence, and two shillings.

RICHARD GOOD sworn. - I am a stationer; I live in Bishopsgate-street: Mr. Jackson came to me on the 4th of May, and asked me to go to his shop, and buy some drugs; he gave me two shillings; I gave the same money to my servant, and sent her over, her name is Catherine Lee .

CATHERINE LEE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Good, he gave me two shillings; I went to Mr. Filmer and Jackson's, and bought some drugs with the same money.

Q. Was it the same money you gave the prisoner that you had from your master? - A. The same.

ROBERT SAPWELL sworn. - On Friday, the 4th of May, I searched the prisoner, and found five shillings, half-a-crown of which I returned to him; there were four shillings, and two sixpences; out of which there was one shilling and sixpence Mr. Jackson said was his property, which I have kept in my custody ever since. (Produces them.)

PETER RADLEY JACKSON sworn. - I marked some money, and gave half-a-crown and two shillings and sixpence to Mr. Filmer to give to Mr. Dance; I also gave two shillings to Mr. Good to give to his servant; to lay out; in the mean time I shewed the money to my young men; I asked them if they could swear to it again, and they said they could, (looked at the 1 s. 6 d. produced by Sapwell, and identified it). In the till was found five shillings and sixpence, out of which money there was one shilling that was not marked; what money was taken besides, I cannot tell; there was only a seven-shilling piece left in the till, there was no silver left in the till.

Q. You yourself did not see that the till was not empty - now what was the mark of that money? - A. A little scratch, in contact with the letters.

Q. Can you swear to the mark? - A. I can swear to the mark on the one shilling and sixpence.

WILLIAM HARTLEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Filmer and Jackson; I cleared the till when I went to dinner, at four o'clock; I left in the till a seven-shilling piece only; Mr. Jackson desired me to look what there was when I came down, and there were five shillings and sixpence.

Q. In what pieces? - A. In half-a-crown, and three shillings. (Produces the money.)

Q.(To Jackson.) Look at this - is that your money? (looks at the money) - A. There is one shilling and half-a-crown that I can swear to, and there is one shilling that I cannot; it was marked in the presence of that young man.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-19

329. ANN SANDELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , three pounds of candles, value 2 s. two pounds of tea, value 12 s. three pounds of sugar, value 2 s. 6 d. one pound of other sugar, value 8 d. two pounds of currants, value 1 s. 6 d. one pound of raspberry jam, value 1 s. 6 d. and one pound of sugar-candy, value 1 s. the goods of John-Hutchinson Browne , Neville Browne , and William Johnson .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN- HUTCHINSON BROWNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are your partners names? - A. Neville Browne and William Johnson ; I live at No. 10, Fish-street-hill; I am a grocer and confectioner .

Q. What was the prisoner at the bar? - A. A cook .

Q. How long previous to your discharging of her had she been in your service? - A. Near three months; I discharged her on Saturday, the 28th of last month.

Q. Before that time had you missed any of your property? - A. No, I had not; I discharged her in consequence of information that I received.

Q. Where was she when you searched her box? - A. She was brought into my parlour; the box was searched at the Mansion-house on the Tuesday following; my porter took the box, by order of the Lord-Mayor, in the presence of the beadle or constable.

Q. When was it you were before the Lord-Mayor? - A. On Monday, and the box was produced on Tuesday; there were two boxes produced in the presence of the prisoner before the Lord-Mayor.

Court. Q. How were they carried? - A. In a

cart; one of the boxes was too heavy for a man to carry; Beverley went with them.

Q. What did they contain of your property? - A. Articles of grocery; there were currants, raspberry-jam, tea, sugar, sugar-candy, and barley-sugar.

Court. Q. Did you know them to be your property? - A. I have every reason to suppose they were my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What the prisoner said at the Mansion-house was taken down by the clerk? - A. I do not know whether she said any thing or not.

Q. With respect to these boxes, did you ever see them before you saw them at the Mansion-house? - A. No.

Q. Therefore, of your own knowledge, you do not know whether they were the boxes of the prisoner? - A. No.

Court. Q. You do not know they were the prisoner's boxes? - A. No.

NEVILLE BROWNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a partner in this house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing about the candles? - A. I do not. In consequence of the suspicion that we had of her, I watched, and followed her, on the 28th of May, and the person that was with her, Robert Johnson ; I followed her with Robert Beverley, the beadle; I desired the man to stop, and Beverley stopped the woman.

Q. Was there any thing brought back that they took with them? - A. Yes, there were two bundles and a band-box; the man had the two bundles, and the woman had the band-box.

Q.Was it opened in your presence? - A. It was.

Q. What did the band-box contain? - A. There were several things in the band-box, which were the only things, except the white candy, which we supposed were ours.

Q Were you present before the Lord-Mayor when the boxes were produced there? - A. Yes; I saw several articles, which I supposed to be our property.

FRANCES-SELWOOD HARLING sworn. - I keep a tallow-chandler's shop.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I never saw her.

Q. Do you know of any candles that you received from a person of the name of Johnson? - A. I do; I received three pounds last Monday was three weeks.

Q. Was that just before the prisoner was taken up? - A. A few days.

Q. You received from a man of the name of Johnson three pounds of candles? - A. I did; that man was in the habit of bringing kitchen stuff from the house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What time did he come? - A. Between six and seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Were you in the shop? - A. I was in the parlour; they were intermixed with the kitchen-stuff, as much as three pounds of candles.

Q. Did you receive it yourself? - A. I did not; I came into the shop the moment the man was gone out, to send a servant to watch the man.

Q. Did you see the kitchen-stuff weighed while the man was there? - A. No.

JOHN HOBSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You remember the circumstance of some kitchen-stuff being brought by a man, of the name of Johnson, with three pounds of candles - did you weigh them? - A. No.

Q. Did you see them weighed? - A. No.

Q. What did you do with the kitchen-stuff? - A. The candles were picked out of the kitchen-stuff by Mrs. Harling.

THOMAS JOHNSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am in the Excise; my wife was in the habit of being employed at Mr. Brown's, she is a char-woman.

Q. Do you remember carrying some kitchen-stuff on the day Mrs. Harling has been speaking of? - A I carried some kitchen-stuff to Mrs. Harling's.

Q. Who did you receive that from, that you had tied up? - A. I got it out of Mrs. Browne's kitchen, from the cook, the prisoner; I carried it into the shop, Mrs. Harling was in the parlour, I think it was another man that took it, not Hobson.

Q. Did you see the candles taken out? - A. No; I saw no candles whatever, they untied it and threw it in a tub with other fat.

Q. You were taken up? - A. I was; from Saturday till Monday I was kept in custody; I well knew that she was allowed the kitchen-stuff.

Court. Q. You did not look at it at all to see if there were any candles in the kitchen-stuff? - A. No.

Q.(To Hobson.) Was that the man that brought the kitchen-stuff, on the day that you bought the candles? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Harling.) Is that the person that brought the kitchen-stuff in which you took out the candles? - A. Yes.

- BEVERLEY sworn. - I produce some candles, I received them from Mr. Browne.

Mr. Knapp. (To John Hutchinson Browne .) Q Are you able to speak to those candles? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. They are not whole pieces? - A. Me and my brother, and a third partner, keep the shop; me and my brother keep the house; they are the property of the firm, there is an allowance from the firm; we are allowed to take candles for our use.

Q. Then, when they are taken out of the shop for your use, the firm allows it? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. When the firm allows them to be taken from the firm, and they are taken from the firm, they are no longer the property of the firm, they are the property of those who have them for their use.

Court. (To Browne.) Q. Can you swear to those candles? - A. I cannot swear to them.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-20

330. ANN SANDELL was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , one sheet, value 10 s. two pillow-cases, value 2 s. one napkin, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and two books, value 2 s. the property of James Bolland .

JAMES BOLLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. The prisoner was my servant , she lived with me a year and three quarters, as cook.

Q. In consequence of your receiving some information you attended at the Mansion-house, some time last April? - A. Yes; there were several things produced, and I will speak to those that I am positive of; the things that I selected were taken from her box.

- BEVERLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. What are you? - A. I am an officer: On the 1st of May the boxes were brought to the Mansion-house, we sent to Mr. Bolland.

Q. Was it a box and a trunk? - A. It was.

Q. Whose box and trunk were they? - A. I believe, the prisoner's.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You do not know that of your own knowledge? - A. I received them from Mr. Browne's house; I received it of the same servant.

Mr. Gleed. Q. How was the box opened? - A. The prisoner gave me the key.

Q. With the key the prisoner gave you, you opened the box? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner present at the time you opened the box? - A. She was; these were the things that were taken out. (Produces them.)

Court. Q. You opened the box in her presence, and took these things out? - A. I did; there is all the things mentioned in the indictment, and they were all taken out of the box.

Court. (To Bolland.) Q. Do you know that sheet? - A.(Looks at it); There is my mark upon it, and on the pillow-case.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, they were missing? - A. I know from my daughter's information.

Q. Do you know your own articles? - A. I will speak to one of the articles, the map; having had it in my possession about thirty years.

Q What are the books? - A. They are school books, there is my daughter's name on them in her hand-writing.

Q. They are your daughter's books, not your's? - A. My money paid for them, and I suppose the right continues in me now.

Court. Q. You know the sheet and the pillowcase have your mark? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-21

331. FREDERIC BEYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on Saturday the 14th of April , nine pounds weight of raw sugar, value 4 s. 6 d. and one pound weight of prunes, value 6 d. the property of John Cousins , William Cousins , William Nash , Charles Sayer , and James Wilde .

JOHN COUSINS sworn. - I am a wholesale grocer , I live at No. 8, Broad-street , the prisoner was a porter : About the middle of April my head warehouseman found him going out of the shop, took him, and sent for me, he is not here; when I first went to him, I found some prunes in his pocket; I sent for the constable, and after the constable had searched him, we found a paper of raw sugar tied up, that weighed nine pounds three quarters, the constable then took him before the Lord-Mayor.

Q. What did he say before the Lord-Mayor? - A. The prunes he said he had a right to eat, the sugar was the first offence; when the officer went to his apartment they found six pounds and three quarters of raw sugar in paper.

WILLIAM NASH sworn. - On the 14th of April, while I was in the accompting-house I heard somebody send for a constable, I went out immediately, and the constable took from him nine pounds of raw sugar, and some prunes.

JAMES DAVIS sworn. - I am a constable: I searched him, I found some prunes in his pocket, in a pair of large trowsers; I took his apron off, and from a bag hanging before him under his apron, it hung so low as his knees, I found nine pounds of raw sugar; I took him before the Lord-Mayor, I was recommended to search his lodgings, there we found six pounds three quarters of raw sugar, and there was some rice, that he said was not his master's.

Mr. Cousens. We cannot swear to sugar. (The sugar produced).

Q. You had sugar of that quality? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-22

332. MARY SIMMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , twelve yards of muslin, value 40 s. the property of Eleanor Neale .

ELEANOR NEALE sworn. - I am a widow ; I keep a shop in the Minories , a ready-made linen warehouse : On the twenty-seventh of April the prisoner came with another to purchase a child's

blanket, and they looked at some infant's caps, and the one that was with her purchased a child's blanket, and as soon as they were gone we missed two pieces of muslin from the counter; I immediately sent my daughters after her, and the other came back of her own accord; the prisoner was the person that was brought back, I took those two pieces from her.

Q. Who had you in the shop besides? - A. Only my daughter and me all the whole time those women were there, there was not any other person in the shop besides; the moment they were gone out of the shop we missed the muslin; when she was brought back I took it from her.

Q. Is your shop a wide shop? - A. It is not particularly wide, I think it is not quite two yards in width, it is rather a narrow than a wide shop; when I took it from her I sent for the ward beadle; I never saw her before.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not take them off the floor between the other woman and me? - A. I took it from under your gown, on your left side.

Q. Look at it and see whether there are no marks of the ground on it? I have been in confinement ever since, and the other woman was let free.

FRANCES NEALE sworn. - Q. You are the daughter of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. You were in the shop the whole time? - A. Yes; only I went out for change.

Q. Did you observe any thing of it? - A. No; I went after her, I told her I thought she had something belonging to me.

Q. Did she come back with you? - A. She did.

Prisoner. I immediately came back.

Q. What did you take from her? - A. My mother took it from her from under her gown.

Q. It was not from off the ground? - A. No, it was not.

Prisoner. I only say God forgive you; that is all.

- sworn. - I am warehouseman to Mr. Thomas Meadows ; I saw the prisoner brought back to the shop, and after Miss Neale brought them into the shop Mrs. Neale took the things from her, and she tried to get out of the door; I immediately went over and stopped her from coming out, and another gentleman went for the beadle.

EDWARD DAVIES sworn. - I am beadle; I took charge of this woman; the muslin was given to me, I produce the muslin. (The muslin produced.)

Mrs. Neale. I can swear to it; there is my private mark on it.

Prisoner's defence. I hope you will unfold the muslin; you will see that there is a mark of dirt on it; the good woman took it from the ground; I am an unfortunate woman; my husband is on board a man of war; I have only a mother that is helpless; I have not a friend in the world.

GUILTY , Death .

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutrix.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-23

333. GEORGE BENTLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , a 7 lb. weight, value 1 s. 6 d. and one 4 lb. weight, value 1 s. the property of William Remnant .

WILLIAM REMNANT sworn. - I live at No. 168, Chancery-lane : I have been robbed divers times, particularly of weights; I had some weights made with my initials at the bottom, and at eleven o'clock these weights were there; I had given the servant every instruction to mind if any body came into the shop, and between the hours of eleven and twelve at night I came home; the next day I went with two officers and took the prisoner; we found where he sold the weights, in Field-lane, at an old iron-shop.

MARY HARRIS sworn. - The prisoner came in and went up stairs to his daughter; he had a daughter lodged in the house, in the three pair of stairs; I was in the shop when he came in, I was in the kitchen when he went out; he went to the street door and came back again; I heard no door open, I saw him stand before the weights; he had something in his apron that was very heavy, he went up stairs no higher than the one pair of stairs; I went into the shop when he came down; there was nobody came into the shop nor went out but him.

Q. What is he? - A. I do not know.

MARY ANN TAYLOR sworn. - I live in Field-lane; I keep a shop, my husband is a smith; I sell a little brokery, and a little in the new iron way; the prisoner came into the shop, I purchased them of him, I gave him sixteen-pence half-penny for them.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - A. I never saw him before, I know he is the man.

JOHN LACEY sworn. - I am an officer; from information I received we went into Field-lane; there we found this 7 lb. and this 4 lb. weight. (Produces the property, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Q What is the prisoner? - A. I understand he is a poor man, and has been out of the workhouse these two months.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-24

334. BENJAMIN WATERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on Tuesday the 17th of April , two pieces of marble, value 40 s. the property of Josiah Cook and Daniel Jones .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

JOSIAH COOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What is your partner's name? - A. Daniel Jones; we are manufacturers of chimney-ornaments ; the prisoner did not work regularly in our yard, he worked sometimes task-work for us.

Q. In consequence of any information did you go to his house, and when? - A. On Monday the 16th of April I went to his house opposite the Red-lion, Hampstead, I told him I was coming that way, as he had offered me a chimney-piece for sale I thought it was a good opportunity; he very readily shewed it me; when I saw it I knew it to be mine; I then asked him if he could let me have a wider shelf; he said if I liked the chimney-piece as it was I might make a wider shelf for it; I told him I wished to have it without any alteration, therefore if he could make me a shelf to suit my purpose I would call and treat with him; he said he had a shelf at Ship's that would do for me, and after a pause he said it would not, it was not so wide as that; on that same morning I called again, I saw a little slip of marble in Ship's presence that I knew to be mine; I caused the prisoner to be apprehended immediately; the slip was brought from Ship's the next day by the officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Whether that stone you swear to, and this chimney-shelf which he readily shewed you, was not at one time or other to be made up in a chimney-piece for you? - A. At no time; the shelf is mason's work; he had no mason's work from us in Portland-road; he had then a small pedestal to make for us.

Q. He was employed by other masters as well as you? - A. Certainly; the prisoner is a carver, he never was employed by us in doing any thing like a mason.

Q. What is Ship? - A. He is a polisher of stones.

Court. Q. You went to this man's house under the idea of buying a chimney-piece? - A. Yes, I thought it was an opportunity of seeing whether it was mine.

Q. Where does he get chimney-pieces from, he only being a carver? - A. I understood then from him he made chimney-pieces.

ISAAC SHIP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am a polisher of marble, I live in Holbrook-court, Swan-market: On the 11th of April I received a slip of marble at Hampstead from the prisoner to polish.

Q. Is that the flip of marble Mr. Cook saw at your house? - A. It is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is there any particular thing in this piece of marble that you should know it from any other person's? - A. I brought it from him, I had five or six pieces of marble to work for Mr. Waterman.

Court. Q. Suppose that piece of marble had been out of your possession eight or ten days, should you know it again? - A. Yes, we only polish it on one side.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer; I produce the slip of marble from the house of Ship.

Q.(To Ship.) Is that the piece of marble you brought from the prisoner? - A. It is.

- SHAFFIELD sworn. - I am an officer, I took the prisoner in custody; I produce a shelf brought from the prisoner's lodgings, I made the prisoner carry it himself, for fear he should run away; I have had it in my possession ever since; I produce another slab, brought from Mr. Cook's yard.

Prosecutor. I told Waterman, that, if I had this stone brought from my yard to compare with that stone found upon him, he would see that nothing but a saw parted it; there is a shake in each; he said, he could not help it, he bought it of a man in the Curtain-road; he took the child from his wife, and in a moment threw it into her lap, and then run away across the fields; we went after him, and took him; I have since compared it, I am positive it was sawed off the piece of marble in my yard, because of the shake, and the black veins answer one with the other, and these corners taken off there; its rough part is taken from the rock. (The prosecutor identified the pieces of marble, by comparing them both with other pieces of marble they had been sawed from, which corresponded.)

Prisoner's defence. I purchased the marble of Nevill Edmonds, he lived in the Curtain-road, since that he let his yard to go to Norfolk, I paid him twelve shillings a foot for it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-25

335. JAMES STAPLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , 40 lb. weight of bacon, value 20 s. the property of John Marr .

JOHN MARR sworn. - I live at No. 50, Brook-street, Holborn; I keep a chandler's shop : On Thursday, the 19th of April, an acquaintance of mine brought the prisoner to my house; he told the prisoner to order a pot of beer, and during the time the bacon was gone; he kept me in conversation in the parlour; no other person came into the shop, the bacon was on the counter close by the door; no other person came into the shop at the time, I saw it about five minutes before they came in, and in about a dozen minutes after that I missed it; I followed him, I catched him at his own place, and found no bacon; James Murray informed me he saw him take it, I have never seen the bacon since.

JAMES MURRAY sworn. - Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar being at the last witness's house on the 19th of April? - A. Yes; I saw him take the flitch of bacon out of the door, and Tracey kept talking to Marr; I told Marr he had got his bacon; Marr went after him, and Tracey called him back; it was near half an hour before he was brought back, I saw the prisoner go to the watch-house.

Q.(To Marr.) How long was it before you took the prisoner? - A. About a dozen minutes.

Q. Had he got home? - A. Yes, before I took him.

Q.(To Murray.) Did you think he had bought it or stole it? - A. That he had stole it.

Q. Did you say any thing to him? - A. No, my leg was unshifted. (The witness had a wooden leg.) I called out to Marr, and told him to go after him; when we went to his room, he knocked me and Marr down stairs; I saw the bacon afterwards in Tracey's house.

- MACARTY sworn. - I am a watchman; I took him in his own room, in company with two other watchmen; we searched his house, we found there was no bacon; he was quite stupidly drunk, I think he was not capable of bringing the bacon, he was quite drunk.

- WHITEHEAD sworn. - I was constable the night this happened, I took him into custody at the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. I know no more of it than a child unborn.

For the Prisoner.

EDWARD TRACEY sworn. - I was at Marr's on the 19th of April; I do not think he could carry a flitch of bacon if it was ever so; the prisoner was ordered to go for a pot of beer, he was rather intoxicated at the time.

Q. Did he take any bacon? - A. No, he did not; I stood by the prosecutor all the time, and he was in the shop all the time; I heard him perjure himself at Marlborough-street, first he swore that he saw the man carry the bacon out of the house, and then he said he did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-26

336. THOMAS PEAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , a saw, value 1 s. 6 d. and small saw, value 6 d. the property of John Thorney ; a plane, value 1 s. a pair of nippers, value 6 d. and a pair of compasses, value 3 d. the property of Robert Webster .

ROBERT WEBSTER sworn. - I am a carpenter , I work at the new houses, St. Mary-le-bone : On the 12th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come along, he is a sawyer ; he went up the building, he came back, and entered the premises, and went in at the gate; I went to a public-house to get some assistance to take him, there are two entrances into the yard; I ordered four men to stand at one gate to stop any body that came, while I went to the other gate with Hitchcock, the publican; I was informed the prisoner was at the other gate with some lead; I went to the prisoner, and saw him; there was nothing found on him but a leaden sash-weight, it was in his hand; we took him to the watch-house, he told us where the tools were.

- BETTS sworn. - I am lantern-bearer to the watch-house, I had the prisoner in my custody; I searched him; I went to his lodgings, by his own confession; I found these articles, mentioned in the indictment, in a bag at the prisoner's lodgings; I have had them ever since in my custody.

(The articles produced, and identified by the prosecutors.)

Prisoner's defence. It is the first thing I have done in my life, I hope you will have mercy on me.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-27

337. THOMAS PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , a gown, value 10 s. the property of Richard Dearlove .

RICHARD DEARLOVE sworn. - The prisoner came into Mrs. Dearlove's house on Wednesday, the 25th of April, and called for a glass of gin.

Q. Whose gown was that? - A. The gown belonged to Mary Mills , it was entrusted to me in my possession, she left it with me; she said, she was going further, and she would call for it when she came back; I did not see any body take it, I laid it upon a little shelf that was on the side of the counter.

RICHARD BROWNING sworn. - I was at Mrs. Dearlove's on the 25th of April, I saw the prisoner come there, I was in the parlour when the prisoner came in; directly he came into the shop, I saw him reach over the counter, and, drawing himself back, I saw something in his hand, which I observed he dropped down by the side of him; I, after that, went to the corner of the counter, and saw it lay between his feet; he then drank his liquor, and stooped and picked it up with his right hand; he doubled it up as well as he could, and was walking out, upon which I told Mr. Dearlove he had got something belonging to him; Mr. Dearlove called after him, he then dropped it in the passage; Mr. Dearlove went after him, and apprehended him.

(The gown produced by the officer, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. There were more people in

the gin-shop, there were two women and one man; they saw this gown laid on the floor, they said, there was something on the floor; I picked it up with my left hand, he did not say any thing of this kind when the people were there; I was not out of the place at all.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Did you follow the prisoner? - A. Mr. Browning told me he had got some of my property; I opened the door, and said, what have you got there? he threw the gown back on the threshold of the door, I took him about a stone's throw from the door.

The prisoner called two witnesses to prove that a guinea was paid to Mary Mills to prevent her coming forward, and one witness to prove he had had a paralytic stroke, and when he drank too freely, he did not know what he was about.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-28

338. LUCY RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , two sheets, value 10 s. and one pillow-case, value 6 d. the property of Richard Wright .

MARY WRIGHT sworn. - I live at No. 2, John's-row, St. Luke's .

Q. Did you let any apartment to the prisoner? - A. Yes, I let it to her; she had a young man with her of the name of William Maine , as her husband; I did not know her name was Lucy Russell then, she was to give me four shillings a week for it, I took her to be a married woman; while they were with me, the prisoner at the bar paid me the four shillings a week; they lodged with me a fortnight and three days.

Q. When did you find it out that she was not a married woman? - A. The day she was taken up; I missed a pair of sheets and a pillow-case out of the back room where they lodged.

Q. You are a married woman yourself? - A. Yes, my husband's name is Richard Wright ; I had a suspicion, I sent for an officer, he searched her, he found nothing only the duplicates; she gave me the key of the room, I went up stairs, and found the things were gone; it might be for distress, I hope you will have mercy.

JAMES GEARY sworn. - I am a headborough; I searched the prisoner on the 3d of May, I produce the duplicates.

GEORGE SHEPHERD sworn. - I live with Messrs. Salmon and Gadsworth, Whitecross-street; I produce one sheet pledged by the prisoner for four shillings, I am quite sure of her person.

JOHN BERRY sworn. - I live with Mr. Spinks, Barbican; I produce a sheet, pledged by the prisoner, for three shillings, and a pillow-case, pledged for four-pence; I am sure of her person.

(The articles identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. It was through distress; Mrs. Wright gave me leave to pledge them, if I redeemed them again.

Q.(To Mrs. Wright.) Did you ever give her leave? - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18040516-29

339. CHARLES HILL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Furneaux, in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a pair of shoes, value 2 s. a shirt, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. a waistcoat, value 1 s. and two neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of Edward Furneaux .

THOMAS FURNEAUX called. - Q. How old are you? - A. Eleven.

Q. Can you say your catechism? - A. Not quite.

Q. Do you know the three first commandments? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what will become of you in the other world if you swear falsely? - A. I shall go to a bad place. (He is sworn.)

Q. Where were you at the time the prisoner came up to you? - A. In Church-street , at Mr. Isaacs' door, my brother was with me; I was sitting down, waiting for my other brother till he came out; the prisoner came up, and said, what are you going to do with these things?

Q. How long ago? - A. I cannot tell the day, it was half past eight in the evening; I did not know what was in the bundle then, it was my brother's, Edward Furneaux's, that had been in the country with his master, Mr. Isaacs; he had come home, and was gone into his master's house; he sleeps at home with us; I was waiting with his bundle till he came out to go home with us, he is with his master all day, and sleeps at home at night; Mr. Isaacs is a dancing-master; the things were laying in my lap; the prisoner said, what are you going to do with these things? I did not answer him the first time, he asked the second time; my brother John, that was sitting with me, told him, nothing; he is thirteen years old; he kneeled down, and took the bundle out of my lap; I holloaed out stop thief; he collared us both; we holloaed patrol and watchman; I cried out murder; a gentleman came up, and asked him what he was going to do with us; he told him, he wanted to know what we had in the bundle.

Q. Did the prisoner call out watch? - A. Yes.

JOHN FURNEAUX sworn. - I am the brother of the last witness.

Q. Do you recollect sitting with your brother at Mr. Isaacs's door? - A. Yes; my brother had

a bundle, the prisoner came up, and said, what is going forward how; I said, nothing; he kneeled down and put his hand on my brother's knee; he snatched the bundle out of my brother's hands; he collared us; my brother halloaed out, murder; the prisoner halloaed patrol; a gentleman came up, and asked him what he wanted to do with these two children; he said he wanted to know what was in the bundle; the prisoner had the bundle, and the gentleman took him to the watch-house.

Q. Who called out first? - A. My brother; the prisoner appeared to be drunk.

DAVID PIKE sworn. - Q. Were you the person that came up at the time the boys were engaged with the prisoner? - A. I was; it was on the 16th of April, between eight and nine o'clock; as soon as I entered the street, I heard the cry of murder; with that I hastened to the spot, and when I was very near the prisoner he began to cry out watch; the boy was crying out murder for a long time; finding he had the bundle belonging to the two boys, I asked him what he wanted with these two boys; he said he wanted to know what they had in the bundle; I took him by the collar, and said he should go to the watch-house, and give an account of himself; I took him to the watch-house, and delivered him to the constable.

- sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner; I have had the bundle ever since.

EDWARD FURNEAUX sworn. - I live with Mr. Isaacs; my brother always comes to me when I come out of the country, to take my dirty linen; I had not been up stairs above ten minutes, before I heard the cry of murder; I was going home; he was waiting for me; my bundle was in his possession.

(The things produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. As I was returning from Mr. Showers, the Bull's Head, in Dean-street, where I had been drinking rather freely, coming up the street, I saw two boys; I asked them what they were about at that time of night; they made no answer for a long time; I suspected the boys had stole this bundle; I told them I would soon know; I immediately called out watchman; some persons came up to me, and asked me what I was about; I told them I suspected the boys had not come honestly by that bundle, and Mr. Pike and others, with me, went to the watch-house together; I was not collared; I believe the bundle was examined at the watch-house, and the watch-house keeper thought proper to detain me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-30

340. JOHN HOLLOWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , two copper saucepans, value 6 s. and a sheet, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Jones .

ELIZABETH JONES sworn. - I live at the Bricklayers' Arms, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square ; the prisoner came in for a pint of beer, on Monday, the 16th of April; he asked for a lodging; I told him I did not like to let strangers a lodging at night, but seeing he had come off a journey I let him; he got up between five and six in the morning, and he went along the passage to a scullery, were the saucepans were kept; from there he took two saucepans; he had taken one of the sheets off the bed where he slept, and put the sheet in the largest of them; my sons, who lay in the adjoining room, saw him, and cried out to him to put them down and go about his business.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not see any of the transaction yourself? - A. No.

PETER JONES sworn. - I am the son of the last witness; I was alarmed by a noise a quarter before six; he was walking about the house to see if any body was waking; I spoke to him through a door; I desired him to put the property back, and go about his business; he had two copper saucepans and something in one of them, which afterwards proved to be a sheet; I saw him come with these things from the back kitchen; he was walking out of the door; I told him to put the property back, otherwise he would be prosecuted; with that he began to abuse me, and said he had no property of mine, nor would he put it back; he had previously got the street-door open, upon which he ran out; I followed him with the cry of stop thief; I got near him, and took hold of his frock; he turned round, and threw the saucepan at me; a watchman going along attempted to stop him; he struck the watchman; he could not stop him, and there were two more people that tried to stop him, but they could not, he was so powerful a man; I saw him stoop to pick up something; I got up to him at the time he was stooping; there were four people came up to him, and then he was taken to Mount-street watch-house.

Q. Did you take up the saucepan? - A. Yes; and there was a sheet in it.

(The things produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-31

341. CHARLES HOLLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , from William Humphries, one paper bag, value one halfpenny; four cakes, value one half-penny; twelve penny-pieces, and twenty-four half-pence ,

the goods and monies of George Bindby , the elder.

WILLIAM HUMPHRIES sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. I am fifteen this month.

Q. Do you know what an oath is, and that you are bound to speak the truth; if you do not you go to a bad place? - A. Yes: I live with Mr. Bindby, he is a pastry-cook and ginger-bread baker ; on the 14th of April last I was going across London-field , with some cakes in a basket; the prisoner came up to me, with two other boys, and took some cakes and ran away.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take any? - A. He was one of them; when they took the cakes, they all ran away towards London; I then ran after them for my cakes; they threw some of the cakes on the ground, and while I was stooping to pick them up, this boy took 2 s. worth of copper out of my pocket.

Q. Are you sure of what you are saying? - A. This boy and another took 2 s. worth of penny-pieces and half-pence out of my right-hand coat pocket; there was one before me and one behind me; I could not resist; the prisoner was behind me.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say, whether the prisoner put his hand in your pocket? - A. No; I cannot say which it was of the two; when they took them out they again ran away towards London; it was about four o'clock on the 14th of April; a butcher's boy was near enough to see them; he went and told my master, and Mr. Bindby, the younger, pursued them; I did not know the boys before.

GEORGE LILLY sworn. - I saw the prisoner and two more boys come up to Humphries; the prisoner passed me about five minutes after it happened; the prisoner was walking towards London, and another boy; when they came up to the baker's boy, I was coming from Mr. Bindby's house; I saw the prisoner and another boy behind Humphries in the middle of the field; I went up to Humphries, and then immediately I went and told his master.

GEORGE BINDBY , jun. sworn. - The last witness came to me, and said my boy had been robbed, and the boys were just gone past our house towards London; and as soon as they had got from the new row of houses, they made off for Bethnal-green; I pursued them immediately; he described one of them as a shortish lad, and having a leather cap on: I pursued them from Lilly's description; I went about a hundred yards, and there I saw two boys in a field, walking towards Bethnal-green; there is a path in the field; before I overtook them, I run about four or five hundred yards; seeing a man on the left, I called out, stop thief; they both ran directly; I soon overtook this one; he made a stop, and walked before an elderly man, apparently to me a bricklayer's labourer; he seemed to shelter himself before this man; I took this one, and the other ran away; when I brought him back to my father's house, I took him to the constable, and there he was searched; the butcher's lad said he was one of them.

Q.(To Lilly.) You saw the prisoner at the bar when Bindby was taking him to the constable? - A. Yes; I know him to be one of the boys that was behind Humphries.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down Hackney-road, I came from Shoreditch church, so right down the road; I never went across London fields that day; I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-32

342. JOHN DAVENPORT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a pair of shoes, value 2 s. four papers of pins, value 3 d. forty-two penny-pieces, and ninety-six half-pence , the goods and monies of Mary Lucas .

MARY LUCAS sworn. - I am a single woman : I live at No. 5, Grafton-street, in the parish of St. Anne, Westminster ; I am a haberdasher ; on the 26th of April I was in my parlour at supper; I heard a noise in my shop and took the candle to go and see; I saw a person standing behind the counter, but was too much in a flurry to see whether it was a man or a boy; I saw his buttons glitter against the candle, and being frightened, I went into the street, and gave the alarm to the watchman; the watchman came in and a few gentlemen of the neighbourhood; in the mean time the prisoner came out of the shop and went up stairs.

Q. He is indicted for stealing a quantity of penny-pieces and half-pence, did they belong to you? - A. They belonged to me; it was not property that was taken in the trade; I have one partner; there was a pair of shoes that belonged to me, and and a paper of pins; the money was taken out of a caddy.

- DEWELL sworn. - I am a neighbour: I heard the noise about eleven o'clock at night, and went to Mrs. Lucas; she informed me there were some thieves; I took a candle and went into the shop, and could find no one; I went up stairs into the second floor, and found the prisoner under a half-press bedstead; I took him from under it, and put him under my arm and carried him to the watch-house; I saw him searched, and there was about 7 s. 6 d found upon him.

- HAWTHORN sworn. - I was constable of the night: I searched him in the presence of the last witness; I found 3 s. 6 d. in penny-pieces in his coat pocket, and 4 s. in half-pence; I found one shoe in his pocket, and a parcel of pins in papers; the watchman, when it came to be day-light,

brought the other shoe out of Grafton-street to the watch-house.

(The shoes produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of sixpence .

Whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-33

343. ANN BURKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , twenty-seven yards of printed cotton, value 35 s. the property of Thomas Middleditch .

THOMAS MIDDLEDITCH sworn. - I live at the corner of Great Newport-street, the corner of Long-Acre : I am a linen-draper ; the prisoner at the bar came into my shop last Saturday evening; she told me she wanted about seven yards of printed cotton, at about 2 s. a yard; I shewed her several pieces, and there was one piece which we measured was only six yards and a quarter; she said that was not enough for a gown; she would have a yard and a half of it for a child's frock; I told her I could not cut that; she then fixed on another piece; I cut her a yard and a half off, and then she wished to have a little bit cut off the six yards and a quarter for a pattern; I then rather suspected her from her behaviour; she came in about nine o'clock in the evening; I turned over the pieces on the counter I had shewn her; I missed one of the pieces; I was not willing to tax her with it without I was certain; I counted them over a second time; I still found there was one missing; she paid me the money for the yard and a half, and was going away; I stepped over the counter to where she was; I perceived a quarter of a yard hung below her petticoats; I took her by the arm and pulled this piece of print from under her clothes; I told my man to go for a constable; the man was engaged at the other end of the shop, in folding up goods; the beadle came and took her into custody. (The cotton produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I went into this gentleman's shop last Saturday evening; my husband is on board of a man of war, and his brother allows me a small sum, so far as his pocket will allow; I had pledged all my clothes; I went to that shop to buy a gown, and the piece that I pitched upon was only six yards and a quarter; I told him there was not enough; he told me there was; I told him I did not wish to have less than seven yards; he rather urged me on the business; I immediately said, there was not sufficient; I bought a yard and a half for the child, and paid 2 s. 7 d 1/2. I was coming out of the shop, and he said, come back, and have that print; I told him, whenever I bought a piece of print I liked to have half a yard over to mend it; he then said I had robbed him; I told him I had not; he sent his man to get a constable; I told him he had no right to detain me; I had left my children in the street; the beadle came and took me to St. Martin's watch-house; I had a one-pound bill in my pocket; I declare to you all that I never took that piece of cotton; I did not see it; he might as well say it was forty yards as what he has.

GUILTY,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-34

344. ROBERT HIBBERT was indicted for that he, on Friday the 13th of April , being employed in the capacity of a clerk by Philip Sansom , William Blake , and Thomas Postlethwaite , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession a certain banker's draft, value 45 l. 12 s. 7 d. on account of his said masters and employers, and did afterwards feloniously embezzle, secrete, and make away with the same; the said sum of money being then due and unsatisfied to them .

Second Count. For like offence, calling it a warrant, the property of the said persons.

Third Count. Calling it a Bill of Exchange instead of a warrant.

Fourth Count. For like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM BLAKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Will you state the names of your partners? - A. Philip Sansom and Thomas Postlethwaite ; the prisoner was an assistant to the regular clearing clerk.

Q. Was he in your service on the 13th of April? He was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He was not the regular clearing clerk? - A. He was only assistant to the clearing clerk, but not the clearing clerk.

Q. I believe, up to this time, he had lived with you a good while, and had bore a good character? - A. He had.

WILLIAM RAINES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are clerk to the house of Messrs. Down, Thornton, and Free? - A. I am the regular clearing clerk.

Q. On Friday the 13th of April had you any check in your possession on the house of Messrs. Sansom, Blake, and Postlethwaite? - A. I had; I put it in with others; I have the book that I made the note in.

Court. Q. On Friday you had a draft for 45 l. 12 s. 7 d. did you go to the clearing-house? - A. I did.

Q. Did you give the draft in the name of Sansom to any person to put in? - A. I did, to a person of the name of Pearkes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Was this the draft you gave him to put into the box? - A.(Looks at the draft.) It was.

Q. How soon afterwards did you discover any thing wrong? - A. Between three and four hours after; in the course of that evening I discovered the draft was missing, I discovered it in my book, by their not giving me the total credit of all the drafts; I believe it to be checked, because it corresponded with the sum.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How many other checks did you give to Pearkes at the time? - A. He had one more check of 200 l.

Q. Had you any other draft for Sansom to that amount? - A. I had not.

RICHARD PEARKES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you, on Friday the 13th of April, receive a number of drafts to put in the box at the clearing house? - A. Yes; I put all in I received.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you able to say what these drafts were composed of? - A. No; I do not know how many I received, but all I received for Sansom's house, I put in Sansom's box.

EDWARD TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are the regular clearing clerk to Sansom and Co. - were you so on the 13th of last month? - A. I was; the prisoner was an assistant clearing clerk.

Q. Did he attend at the clearing-house on Friday the 13th of April? - A. He did.

Q. Which of you had the key of the drawer? - A. We have no key to the drawer, the drawer pulls out with a slide; the drawers are pulled out by persons who are employed on purpose.

Q. Had the prisoner access to your drawer? - A. He had.

Q. Have you the book of the drafts to your house that you had from the clearing-house on that day? - A. Yes; I have no note of 45 l. 12 s. 7 d. I took account of every draft I took out of the drawer.

Q. Was it in the power of the prisoner to take any out without your observation? - A. It was; but then it was his duty to have given them to me, if he had, I should have put it down in my book; I am certain no such draft came to my hands.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand, any other person, besides you, might have access to it? - A. Yes, before I was there.

Q. You did not put this in your drawer? - A. No.

Q. Whether any body else did you cannot say? - A. That I cannot say.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am in the employ of Mr. Taddy, of Fenchurch-street.

Q. Did you meet the prisoner on the 13th of April last? - A. Yes, in the yard of the foreign post-office at three o'clock; I knew him by the name of Oliver; he told me to meet a gentleman on purpose to get me a situation at three o'clock, and when he came out he asked me to go to Lombard-street to get the draft exchanged of 45 l. 12 s. and 7 d. I took it to Messrs. Sansom's and Co. and got it exchanged; I got bank-notes for it, I brought it to Mr. Oliver in the foreign post-office yard, I gave him the whole I received; he gave me a shilling for my trouble.

Q. How soon afterwards did you give any information? - A. As soon as I saw the hand-bill stuck up: As I was going to the house I met the prisoner, I took him by the collar, and told Mr. Downes's clerk, that was Mr. Oliver; the prisoner said stop; I immediately took him in backwards, I saw him searched at the Mansion-house.

WILLIAM PEARKES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I paid that draft on the 13th of April; I gave him three bank-notes of 10 l. each; one was 6717, 10 l. 2172, 10 l. 4696, 10 l. and a 15 l. note, and 12 s. and 7 d. in money.

Q. You do not recollect the person of the man you paid these notes to? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was Smith.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were not acquainted with Smith before? - A. No, I think it was him.

JAMES COLLYER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the prisoner being apprehended, what did you find on him? - A. Three 10 l. notes; No. 4696, 2172, and 6717.

Mr. Gurney (To Smith.) Q. You met the prisoner at the foreign post-office, was it on purpose? - A. He sent me a letter (The letter shewn him); that is the letter; he went into the foreign post-office door, he came out and told me the gentleman had not come; he said he had got to go to Lombard-street; I told him then if the gentleman came I should not know him; he asked me to go to Lombard-street, and when I came back he said he had seen the gentleman, and the gentleman wanted to see a specimen of my hand-writing; he was to get me a place at a ship-broker's; he said it was a place to my advantage, about 69 l. a year.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, nor call any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-35

345 ELIZABETH ELLIS and JANE WOOTTAN were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Hill , on the King's highway, on the 16th of April , and taking from his person a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of the said James Hill, and JAMES LEETCH , for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

JAMES HILL sworn. - I am a carpenter: I live at No. 9, Berkley-street: on Monday, the 16th of April, as I was coming along Great Russel-street ,

the prisoner Ellis gave me a jerk with her elbow, and snatched the watch in the twinkling of an eye, and ran away; I followed her down Dyot-street; she was in company with Woottan; I overtook her and asked for the watch; she denied it; I told her she should go no farther, till I charged the watch with her; with that a fighting ensued; Ellis struck me; I kept the blows off with my left hand; I called the watch, and no watchman came up; then two men came, and one of them struck me on the arm; with that the girls ran away from me, and went into the Maidenhead, in Dyot-street; and who should come along but Mr. Blackman, the Officer; Leetch was taken the next day.

Q. You had never seen these prisoners before? - A. I had seen Elizabeth Ellis before, I saw her about the neighbourhood; I know her by sight.

Q. Had not you been drinking with her that night? - A. She came into the public-house where I was, and she asked me if I would give her any thing to drink; with that they both drank out of the pot; she went out, and I saw no more of her till she took the watch out of my pocket.

Q. How long were you with them at the public-house? - A. About ten minutes; I never found my watch; I think they were taken up on Tuesday evening; I gave information to Mr. Blackman, and he took all three.

Q. Whether the man is the same, you do not know? - A. I cannot say; to the best of my knowledge he is the man.

JOHN CONWAY sworn. - Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. I know the man by sight, I saw him in Dyot-street that night, between seven and eight o'clock, coming out of the Maidenhead public-house, in Dyot-street; Hill had hold of Ellis at the time; he said she had robbed him of his watch; she was making resistance, and striking Hill, when the prisoner Leetch and another came out; Leetch struck at Hill, and partly rescued Ellis; Ellis got away; Leetch took the watch out of Ellis's bosom when she was under Hill, in the street, she told him; he then went into the Maidenhead public-house, and both the girls ran up the street; Mr. Blackman, the officer, came along; he went into the Maidenhead, and I saw Leetch run out of the Maidenhead as fast as he could; I saw Leetch take the watch from his small clothes, and put it in his bosom, and run down to St. Giles's; we took another man that struck Hill, and he is in custody for the assault.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street; I was in Dyot-street: On Monday, the 16th of April, in the evening, I had information that there was a young man that had his watch taken out of his pocket by Elizabeth Ellis ; I went into the Maidenhead; Hill, the prosecutor was in there; he said he had been robbed of his watch; he had hold of one; he said he had rescued the prisoner that had robbed him of his watch; it is a very bad house; these girls are robbing every body that comes down the street; I went after her that night, but could not find her; I found her the next day at the cook's shop; I took Leetch at the Black Dog on the Tuesday evening, smoking his pipe; I have seen Leetch before, and have warned him, and told him he would come to no good, keeping company with these bad girls; I have put him out of this house when I have seen him with these had girls; I took the two girls into custody, and the prosecutor swore to them.

Ellis's defence. This man, and this young girl, and I, were in the Maidenhead in the morning; he called for a pot of ale, and I drank with him; he took us to some other house in Compton-street, he said that ale was not good; after that, he asked us to come with him to Russel-street, where we had a pot of beer; this young girl was tipsy; she wished me good night; he asked me to sleep with him; I told him I would not, and he said he did not wish to force me; he wished me good night, he very much abused me; he followed this young girl then, and pulled her handkerchief off her neck; she was very tipsy; with that I got from the man, and I saw no more of him.

Woottan's defence. I was in his company with Ellis; he took us from one public-house to another; I found myself getting very much in liquor, and I left him and the young woman in Russel-street.

Q.(To Hill) Do you hear what Ellis has said? - A. I can bring them to prove that I was at work in the forenoon.

Leetch's defence. I was never nigh the place at the time.

For the prisoner Leetch.

CATHERINE PHILLIPS sworn. - I saw the accident happen in Dyot-street; I was coming home between seven and eight o'clock, and saw Hill laying hold of one of the girls; he said he had been robbed of his watch; I will be upon my oath that James Leetch was not there at the time.

RICHARD WESTHEAD sworn. - I am induced to come here under the intreaties of Leetch's poor aged mother, merely to state a circumstance that I submit to your Lordship, whether it is admissible in this case: At Bow-street, the witness Conway swore that he was a clerk to me.

Q. Is he a man to be believed upon his oath? - A. I would not believe him; I have known him about three years off and on; he has been with me about five or six times; he is a depraved man, and has conducted himself very base.

Conway. Mr. Westhead has sworn that I am a man of bad character; here is Mr. Westhead's character that he has written for me. (Produces it.)

Q.(To Conway.) (The paper handed to him.) Look at that paper; is that your hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. That character is dated 1803 - so then, this man you recommended last year as an honest man, you now tell me he is not to be believed upon his oath? - A. He is as bad and as wild as possible; I do not think I could believe him upon oath.

MARY LEETCH sworn. - I think that man has swore false; my son was at home that night the robbery was committed; I live at No. 4, Blue-bell-court, Tottenham-court-road: On Monday, the 16th of April, I think it was rather before seven o'clock, my son came home; he was at supper about eight o'clock; I am sure he was in bed before nine o'clock. At Bow-street, Conway told me a trifle would get him off; he looked at my son, and he said, that is not the lad.

Conway. There was another man in custody, and I said that was not the man.

Mary Leetch . Conway took hold of my arm, and said, that is not the lad; here is another that heard it at the same time; her name is Catherine Philips .

CATHERINE PHILIPS sworn. - Q. Were you present at the time - did you hear Conway say any thing about that being the man, or not? - A. He said that was not the man, meaning Leetch.

Leetch called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Woottans called her sister, who said she never was in any trouble before.

Ellis, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Wottan, NOT GUILTY .

Leetch, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18040516-36

346. THOMAS RANNS and WILLIAM STONNELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , 102 pounds of lead, fixed to a certain building, called a house , the property of James Taddy .

Second Count. For like offence, not stating it to be a house.

JAMES TADDY sworn. - I am building a house near Mile-end , the house is partly finished: On the 7th of May, I missed the lead from both the wings.

WILLIAM SMITHERS sworn. - I am a plumber: I was employed by Mr. Taddy to roof his house with lead, the flap of one wing, and the hip of the other.

Q. When did you last see the building with the lead on? - A. On Friday, the 4th of May; and on the Monday following I went down by the order of Mr. Taddy, to see what was taken away, and the flap of one wing was cut, and some part torn away, and on the other wing the lead of that hip was very near gone.

Q. Have you ever seen the lead again that you supposed might be taken off these premises? - A. Going down the road the next morning by the side of the Globe, I was called by some bricklayers; they said there was some of the lead found; I went into the Globe, and there I saw the two prisoners at the bar in custody, and the lead lying on the table.

MARIA SUTTON sworn. - I live in Bethnal-Green: Last Tuesday week I was walking up Tottenham-fields, between six and seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. Were the fields near Mr. Taddy's new house? - A. Yes; I saw the two prisoners come along; they stopped right over where I was; one of them said to the other, this is the place; I was about five or six yards distance from them. They pulled down part of the bank, and took out one piece of lead, and tied it up in a piece of dirty cloth; the other replied, will you have my apron to put the other in; I cannot say which it was; he took the apron, and I saw him take another piece, and put it in that apron, and tied it up; I went immediately, and informed John Mills , he worked for Mr. Taddy; the bank where they took this lead from, is not a quarter of a mile from the new house.

JOHN MILLS sworn. - Q. You remember the young woman coming to you on the morning of the 8th of May? - A. Yes; she informed me that she saw two men take some lead from the bank; I ran after them, and took them, I was at work for Mr. Taddy at the same time; I found two bundles of lead on them in dirty cloths, and I apprehended them; there were several come to my assistance, and we took them to the Globe; Philips came into the Globe, and I shewed the lead to him; we took them before a Justice, and they were committed.

Q. What did you do with the lead? - A. I left it at the constable's house.

THOMAS PRIGMORE sworn. - I am a constable: I took the two prisoners into custody; Mills brought me the lead; the two pieces have been in my custody ever since.

(The lead produced and identified.)

Stonnal's defence. This man came to the house where I lodged on Monday night, to take a night's lodging there, at No. 11, Kingsland-road, and the next morning I got up to go to work, and I met him coming out of his room; I asked him what o'clock it was, and he told me; I worked at Leadenhall-market, in the leather market; I said it was far too late to go to work, I have lost a day's work; he said, if you want a job, I will give you a job, I will give you half-a-crown, and some

victuals and drink, to take some goods that belong to me, about two miles distance; I asked him what it was; he said, when you come there, you will know what it is; he took me to a field, and he went into the ditch on one side of this field; I asked him if this was the place, and he said it was; with that he went into the ditch, and uncovered some stuff, and we took these two pieces of lead out of the bank; I lent him my apron, and he wrapped it up; he took one piece, and I took the other, till we got into a foot-path; then we met about half a dozen men that stopped us, and asked him where he was going; he told them it was his property, and they insisted upon knowing how he came by it.

Rann's defence. Upon the 7th of May I went down to Blackwall to see an acquaintance of mine: on returning home, I was going past Bethnal-green, and this lead lay on one side, bare as it is now; I thought I had as much right to it as any other person, so I covered it up and went to Kingsland-road, where I lodged, and I employed him in the morning to take it away, about seven o'clock, and we were detected; I found the lead, and hired this man to assist me in taking it away.

Ranns, GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

Stonnal, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-37

347. JOSEPH STONEHAM was indicted for that he, on the 2d of December , being clerk to John Dunkin , did receive the sum of 2 l. of Evan Edwards , for his said master, and did, on the same day, feloniously embezzle, secrete, and make away with the same .

Second Count. For the like offence, only stating it to be the property of John Dunkin .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

EVAN EDWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am a publican, I live at the Cooper and Tub in Redcross-street; I knew the prisoner as clerk to Mr. Dunkin.

Q. On the 2d of December last did you pay him a 2 l. note on account of Mr. John Dunkin ? - A. Yes, I have got the receipt for it, he wrote it in my presence; I paid it in Redcross-street, Cripplegate.

JOHN DUNKIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you were a rectifier of spirits in December last? - A. Yes; I live in Redcross-street, Cripplegate; the prisoner was a clerk of mine in December last, that was before I had the misfortune to fail, and Mr. Edwards was a customer of mine.

Q. Did he ever account to you for a bank-note of 2 l. received of Mr. Edwards, on the 2d of December? - A. No.

Court. Q. Have you your books here? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Pray, Sir, how long has he lived in your service? - A. Ever since the year 1799; I found him in the house, and he has been there ever since I came into the business; he has been there twenty or thirty years.

Q. During the time he was in your service he served you with fidelity? - A. I cannot say I had a good opinion of him long before this.

Q. Do you mean to speak from your memory, or from your books, that he never accounted to you for so small a sum as 2 l.? - A. From my memory, and from my books, I am persuaded that if I had received a single 2 l. I should have remembered it.

Court. Q. What sum did you receive on the 2d of December last? - A. I do not recollect without I had the books; I have the prisoner's cash-book here, where he ought to enter all the sums he received; there is no entry of it in his cash-book.

Mr. Gurney. Q. In consequence of your having large failings to make up you were more pressing for money, the prisoner was going about in a more than ordinary way? - A. He ought to have kept a regular account, that was nothing to him.

Q. Have you your books here besides that of the prisoner's? - A. No, his book was posted by another person; I have my clerk here.

Q. Did that clerk you have here post it? - A. No, he was not there at the time; all the money the prisoner received, if I was not in the way he accounted to another clerk.

Q. Is that clerk here? - A. I do not know that he is.

Court. Q. Have you ever received money from the prisoner that he has not put down in his book? - A. Yes, then I entered it in my books; I know I have never received this 2 l.

Q. When were your affairs deranged? - A. On the 6th of March; I was distressed before, in December last my affairs were deranged.

EDWARD RICHARD ADAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Dunkin; what have you got there? - A. Mr. Stone's cash-book.

Q. Is that his hand-writing; turn to the 2d of December last, and tell me whether there is any entry of any money received from Mr. Edwards on that day? - A. There is no entry of any money received of Mr. Edwards on that day; it is his hand-writing.

Q. Did the prisoner ever account to you for this bank-note? - A. I was not clerk there on the 2d of December last, I was gone six months before that; since I have been in town I have posted the cash-book.

Mr. Gurney. There are two defects more; the clerk is not here, nor the books are not here.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-38

348. JOSEPH STONEHAM was again indicted, for that he being clerk to John Dunkin , did by virtue of such employment receive and take into his possession of Thomas Atkins , 7 l. of money, for and on account of the said John Dunkin , and afterwards did feloniously embezzle, secrete, and make away with the same .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS ATKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am a publican at the King's-Arms, Windmill-street, Finsbury-square; I know the prisoner, he was clerk to Mr. Dunkin: On the 22d of February last I paid him 7 l. on account of his master John Dunkin ; I have the receipt for it, which he gave me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you pay it in money, or in bank-notes? - A. I am not quite clear, I think it was in bank.

Mr. Gurney. Unless the word bank-notes are the indictment it will not do.

Court. The Act of Parliament has enumerated what a man has to receive - money, bill, bond, notes, goods, banker's drafts, or other valuable securities or effects; we cannot convict a man for stealing of money when it is notes; the witness says he believes it to be bank-notes.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-39

349. JOSEPH STONEHAM was again indicted for the like offence, having received 4 l. 10 s. and 4 d. of Claudius Smith , on the 3d of December , on account of his master John Dunkin .

It appeared to the Court that Mr. Smith had paid him in notes, and received 9 s. and 8 d. change of the prisoner, and the indictment stating it money, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-40

350. JAMES BATTERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a pair of sheets, value 12 s. the property of William Andrews .

WILLIAM ANDREWS sworn. - I live at No. 2, Tower-street, Seven-Dials : last Friday I lost a pair of sheets, between the hours of twelve and one; Mary Edmonds gave me the alarm; she saw him drop the sheets; he was at the middle door in the passage; the door is generally left open; it is a green-grocer's.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a shoemaker ; the linen was in the yard, drying; I took him myself; I only let him go while I put my coat on; I then took him to the Brown Bear, in Bow-street.

Q. What was the value of your sheets? - A. Twelve shillings.

Q. Where are they? - A. I left them at home; they were marked; I knew them to be mine; they were not out of my house; Mary Edmonds stopped him at the door; he was hardly clear of the door when I stopped him.

Q. What did he say when you stopped him? - A. He said I had no business to collar him like a thief; I was no constable.

MARY EDMONDS sworn. - I live at No. 2, Tower-street, Seven Dials; I rent the shop and parlour; I saw this man take the sheets off the line in the yard last Friday, between twelve and one o'clock; I called to Mr. Andrews, and told him there was a man taking the sheets off the line; he had not got the sheets quite off the line when I first saw him; I laid hold of him, and when Mr. Andrews came down, he dropped the sheets before the middle door of the passage; Mr. Andrews secured him.

Prisoner's defence. I was a little intoxicated with liquor; going through the street, I saw the door open; when I went into the privy there was a man ran out, and almost pushed me down; that woman caught hold of me by the collar, and held me fast till the gentleman came; I never had the sheets at all.

Prosecutor. He did not appear in liquor at all.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040516-41

351. JOHANNA MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a gown, value 18 s. a cloak, value 5 s. two caps, value 2 s. a pair of breeches, value 6 s. a hat, value 5 s. a child's frock, value 3 s. two children's petticoats, value 4 s. the goods of Cornelius Sulivan ; two petticoats, value 11 s. a shift, value 3 s. a hat, value 13 s. and two pair of shoes, value 5 s. the goods of Catherine Sulivan .

ANN SULIVAN sworn. - I live in French-alley, Rosemary-lane , in Patrick Dillon 's house, in the parish of Whitechapel; the prisoner lived, in August last, in Patrick Dillon 's house; I am the wife of Cornelius Sulivan; she stole from me all the things mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Who is Catherine Sulivan ? - A. She lodged in the same house; she is no relation; I took the prisoner up into the room and told her to mind the place; she had lived in the house three weeks.

Q. All these things were in the room at the time you desired her to take care of your apartment? - A. They were indeed.

Q. Did you leave her in possession of your apartment? - A. I did; she herself called me up at five o'clock, I told her it was too soon to go out; I went out at six, my husband was out at harvest work, I came back about eight o'clock in the morning and she was gone; I missed all the things mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Did she ever return? - A. Never, till the day she was taken.

Q. What part of the house did you occupy? - A. The front room in the two pair of stairs.

Q. When was she taken? - A. This day fortnight.

Q. Did you ever see the things again? - A. She had a gown belonging to me on her person, and a coat belonging to this woman.

Q. What was the value of your gown? - A. Eighteen shillings.

Q. Did you ever make search after the woman? - A. Yes, and could not find her.

CATHERINE SULIVAN sworn. - Q. Did you live in this house? - A. Yes, in the kitchen; I rented it of Mr. Dillon; I left my things in Mrs. Sulivan's room; I thought it was the safest part of the house; I am a single woman; I went out at six o'clock, selling milk; I did not come home till nine; when I came home I went into Mrs. Sulivan's room and found them gone; I saw them on the night before.

Q. Did you make search after the prisoner? - A. I did, but it was of no use; I never saw her till the day she was taken up; she lodged in the house with me; I do not know how she got her living; she had a petticoat of mine on when she was taken; I have never seen the other things.

Q. What was the value of the petticoat she had on? - A. Six shillings; the officer has got it.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am an Officer at Lambeth-street: I took the prisoner on the 4th of May, at Limehouse; she had a gown and petticoat on; Ann Sulivan was with me; she said it was her gown; the prisoner said it was. (The gown and petticoat produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought them at Rag-fair; I never took them.

GUILTY, aged 23,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040516-42

352. MARY CUMMINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , four yards and a half of printed cotton, value 9 s. the property of Christopher Dresser .

CHRISTOPHER DRESSER sworn. - I am a linen-draper : I live at No. 2, East-Smithfield : the prisoner came to my shop on the 5th of May; I had several customers in the shop; she asked to look at some printed cottons; I took her down this one and several others; she pulled them about a good deal, and bought none; I suspected her; I desired her to walk back; she said she had nothing; I followed her; she did go back, and when she got just by the door, she dropped that piece from her clothes. (The property produced and identified.) By the manner I saw her fumbling about her clothes, I suspected she was doing something wrong.

GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040516-43

353. MARY KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of William Harris .

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - I live at No. 15, Cow-cross: I lost my watch at No. 4, Church-lane, Dyot-street ; on Monday the 14th, I was with a young woman at her room there; Mary Kelly had access to the room while I was there; it was about twelve o'clock the next day when I lost my watch; I went there on Sunday night, between ten and eleven; I was drunk, and staid there till twelve o'clock the next day; I went to bed when I went there, and got up on Monday morning, and went over the way to get some beer to drink; I went to bed again, when Mary Kelly put her hand in my pocket and took five-pence halfpenny out; I told her not to be so meddling, but the object of halfpence I did not mind; she went out, and was gone two or three hours; she came back, and tumbled down on the bed; I told her I did not want her there; I said, I wish you to be off; I went to sleep, and when I awaked I saw her standing up by me; when she went out I put my hand in bed and found my watch was gone; with that I said to her who was with me, get up, and let me look whether the watch is under you; she got up; she was undressed, and so was I; I felt all about for the watch, and could not find it.

Q. So you get drunk, and go to a house in Church-lane, Dyot-street, and there you continue drunk till the next day at noon; you were half-drunk and asleep all the time; what are you? - A. I am a shagreen case maker; I am sure this is the woman.

Q. You were sleeping, drowsy, and drunk? - A. I was so.

Q. Was the watch ever found? - A. Yes.

- NORMAN sworn. - I am a publican: about 2 o'clock this woman came into my house; she offered this watch to a Jew; the Jew came to me, and said she had a watch to sell; he asked me what he had best do; I told him to send for a constable; I took her by the hand and asked her her name (she was very drunk); she told me in the best manner she could, that her name was Kelly; I gave her and the watch to a constable; she said it was her husband's; both her eyes were black.

- PERRY sworn. - I am an Officer: on the 14th of May Mr. Norman sent to me, and said a woman had offered a watch to sell; I took the

woman, and he gave me the watch; she was very much intoxicated with liquor; she said it was her husband's watch, he was on board a sloop of war, and was going off; I said I did not think it was so; I took her to the office; Mr. Kinnaird desired me to put her into the watch-house till she was sober. (The watch produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Q.(To the prosecutor.) You know the other young woman very well, as you had been there so many hours - what is her name? - A. I do not know.

Q. You did not give her the watch to pawn? - A. No; when I came away, I had about nine shillings in my pocket; I had had no supper, nor no breakfast.

Q. You had had a little porter in the morning - you do not call that a breakfast? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I went down to Billingsgate, and could buy nothing; I returned to the public-house facing of this bawdy-house, where he was; this gentleman and this woman were standing in this tap-room, where she was drinking; I asked her to give me some drink, and when I got a little tipsy, she told me to go home, and lay my head down till I was sober; this gentleman, after I went there, said, this is all the money I can afford at present, I will give it you if you can get any gin for it; I went out to get the gin, and broke the mug, I was so intoxicated with liquor; he got up on his elbow, and gave me the watch to pawn for a trifle of money; he bid me bring in half a pint of gin; I took the watch in one hand, and the bottle in the other, and as I was going down stairs, I broke the bottle.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-44

354. JOSEPH HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , one single horse-chaise harness, value 27 s. and one bucket, value 6 d. the property of John Simpson .

JOHN SIMPSON sworn. - I am a coachmaker ; I live in Little James-street, Bedford-row : On the 1st of May, I employed the prisoner as a labourer ; after which time I missed several things out of the shop; when the prisoner came to me, I asked him where he lived; he said, in the Horse and Groom yard, Holborn. After missing these things, I had a strong suspicion of him, and I went to enquire whether he lived there; I found it to be a false direction, and on Tuesday last I sent a man to watch him home at dinner-time; he watched him into a court in Turnmill-street. In the afternoon I sent for an officer, and had him taken up; he was examined the same evening, and the things were found between the two examinations; the harness was found at Mr. Smith's, a sadler, in Long-lane, West Smithfield, and the pail was found at his lodging.

- SMITH sworn. - I live in Long-lane, West Smithfield; I am a sadler: John Hodge , broker, of Mutton-hill, called on me, and told me he had a harness to sell; he asked me to come, and look at it; I went, and he asked me a guinea and a half; I told him I could not afford any more than twenty-five shillings; I went again, and then I saw his wife; she said, let us try if you and I can deal; I bought it of her at twenty-seven shillings.

MARY HODGE sworn. - My husband is a broker, and lives in Vine-street, Mutton-hill: This very day week the prisoner came to me about three o'clock in the afternoon; he asked me to buy a harness of him; he left it with me for my husband to see it, and I bought it the next morning by my husband's orders; he told me he was a groom to a gentleman, and had lived with him seven years, and that the gentleman had bought a new harness, and gave him the old one; I gave one pound for it, and my husband gave him something to drink, which made it up a guinea.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - On Tuesday, I took the prisoner into custody; he lodged with a girl of the town in a court in Turnmill-street; I searched his lodgings, and found a water-bucket belonging to the prosecutor.

(The articles produced and identified.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-45

355. MARY-ANN BLEW and CHRISTIANA GOOCH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , seven yards, of tambour-worked muslin, value 4 l. the property of Basil Francis and Abraham Francis .

BASIL FRANCIS sworn. - I live at No. 61, High Holborn ; I am in partnership with my brother, Abraham Francis : On Monday, the 26th of March last, the prisoners, Blew and Gooch, came to our shop, and asked to look at some calico; I shewed them several pieces, and they disputed about the quantity; one said they would take a whole piece of calico, and the other said only a yard and a half; Blew fixed upon one piece of calico, and agreed for the price of it, which was two guineas and a half; she said I was to send it home into Bedford-row, next door to Dr. Latham's house; they were going out of the shop, and the prisoner Gooch laid down three shillings, and said the remainder of the money should be paid when the goods were sent home. From their conduct, and from her saying she lived in Bedford-row, and she not appearing a person of that respectability, I suspected they had an intention of stealing; our porter was in the shop the whole time; he does not serve; I followed them to the door, and saw them turn the corner, into Featherstone-buildings; I called the porter, and sent him to watch where they went to.

In the mean time I went to the counter to see if I missed any thing, and I missed the piece of muslin in question.

Q. Which of the prisoners said they lived the next door to Dr. Latham's? - A. Blew; the other prisoner only gave me the three shillings, and called Mrs. Blew, mother, several times in the shop; I went after them to where I heard they were, at the Golden Lion, Warwick-steps, and found the prisoners there; I challenged the prisoner Blew with having the muslin, and she denied it; I sent for a constable, and ordered him to search her; she refused to be searched there by a man; she said she would be searched by a woman, and desired to be taken to the Office in Hatton-garden; I then left her, and he took her down, and delivered her to White, the officer, I went down to Hatton-garden, when she was examined in the evening.

- sworn. - I am porter to Messrs. Francis: By order of my master I followed the two prisoners to watch where they went to, and I saw them go into the Golden Lion, Warwick-steps; I then went, and told my master; I went back to watch; they did not go away; when my master came, he told me to fetch a constable; they would not let the constable search them; I went down to the Office with them.

ANN KEARY sworn. - I am a publican, at the Hat and Tun, Hatton-wall: Mr. White, the constable, brought these two ladies into my house, and took them up into the one pair of stairs dining room; then he called me up stairs, and asked me if I had any objection to search these ladies; I went into the room, and one of the prisoners bolted the door; I cannot say which; Mrs. Blew took some muslin from under her cloaths, and desired me to hide it under mine; I told her I would not; I took it out of her hands, and threw it into a cupboard that was open, and went down stairs, and told the constable.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - I am a constable of Hatton-garden; they were brought to me at the Office; they refused to be searched; I took them to Mrs. Keary's, in the dining-room, and Mrs. Keary came out, and told me there was a piece of muslin in the cupboard; I went in, and found it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What did you do with Mrs. Blew when you searched her - did not you beat her, and cut her head? - A She refused to go into the lock-up room; I took her in my arms, and she fell down; I believe she hurt her head; I will swear I never ill used her.

(The muslin produced and identified.)

Blew did not lay any thing in her defence, but called seven witnesses, who proved she was infant.

Gooch's defence. I know nothing at all about it; I was in company with her.

Gooch called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-46

356. HUMPHRY HOBART was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God, but being moved by the instigation of the devil, on the 18th day of May, in the 43d year of his present Majesty's reign , on Thomas O'Reilly feloniously and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain pistol loaded with gunpowder in his hand, feloniously did shoot off and discharge a leaden bullet; and that he with a leaden bullet the said Thomas O'Reilly aforesaid, feloniously, maliciously, and unlawfully, did strike, penetrate, and wound, one mortal wound on the right side of his body, of which wound, on the 19th of May, in the 43d year aforesaid, he languished and died, and the said Thomas O'Reilly the aforesaid Humphry Hobart did kill and murder, against the statute and against the King's peace .

RICHARD DIXON sworn. - I am in the East-India Company's service: On the 17th of May, 1809, I was present at a ball-room at Tottenham-court-road; it was between twelve and one when I went there; soon after I entered the room, Mr. Hobart came to me in the room, and informed me he had been very grossly insulted by Mr. O'Reilly; I had some conversation with him, he informed me of the substance of what Mr. O'Reilly had said to him; Mr. O'Reilly had used such language to him that no gentleman could put up with; I had some conversation with the friends of Mr. O'Reilly upon the subject.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar observe to you what was the cause of this quarrel? - A. I understood it was something that amounted to a challenge, I endeavoured to bring about a reconciliation of parties.

Q. From whom and to whom did you understand the challenge to pass? - A. I understood the challenge to have passed from Mr. O'Reilly to Mr. Hobart; I soon after that left the room; I had seen both the parties before; I had known Mr. Hobart some years; I always understood he was studying law at the Temple.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe, Mr. Dixon, you have known Mr. Hobart some time? - A. I have.

Q. He has always conducted himself extremely well? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe that Mr. Hobart wished there should have been a settlement of the business? - A. I have reason to believe both from Mr. Hobart's conduct and from what I know of him, that he could not have acted otherways.

Q. That he would have done every thing he could to avoid so serious a quarrel? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Do not go by conjecture, was not there something done on his part at the ball-room? - A. I believe there was, but the offence of Mr. O'Reilly was of such a gross nature, that he could not put up with it, it could not be compromised.

Q. Mr. Dixon, from what you know yourself, or from what you heard Mr. Hobart say; are you clear who it was that gave the challenge? - A. I always understood that it came from Mr. O'Reilly, from what passed before I came into the room; I learned it from Mr. O'Reilly's friends.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was it in Mr. O'Reilly's presence? - A. It must be in the presence of Mr. O'Reilly's friends.

Court. Unless you state facts, and was present when the challenge was given, I cannot hear that.

JOSEPH DIXON sworn. - I live in Camden Town: On the 18th of May last, I saw some hackney-coaches go up the lane to Chalk Farm, about six in the evening; when I came within half a mile of Chalk Farm , I saw a hackney-coach stand in the lane some distance from the house; as I drew nearer, I saw a second coach, and as I came nearer the farm, I saw some gentlemen standing, and as I drew nearer, I saw two parties, there might be five or six gentlemen in each party; I saw no coachman on the box, I thought there was a duel going forwards; I turned down the lane to the right hand to where the gentlemen were conversing; they seemed to look stedfast at me, whether they thought me an officer I know not; before I got to the end of the lane the third coach came very rapid indeed; I stopped, and saw two gentlemen come out; I went to the coachman, and asked him if he knew what was going forwards; then I observed the gentlemen go up to one of the parties in the lane, they were in three separate parties on the Hampstead side of the house; seeing them getting into the fields in two different directions, I hastened round the gate to get into the field, anxious to know what was going forwards; they got out of that field into the next, I observed them taking their ground, when I was at the hedge, then I got into the field where they were; I saw the two gentlemen placed in their situations, standing opposite to each other, back to back; they were fifteen or sixteen paces from each other, and a gentleman stood nearly in the centre between them; he gave the signal, I believe the signal was one, two; he stood wide of them, then they fired; I saw one of the gentlemen put his hand to the right hand side of his hip, then I saw them take him to the farm, he did not fall, his friends that were of the group supported him, or else he would have fallen, he seemed to totter, and the man that fired ran away; I did not take notice of their persons so as to know them again.

Q. Did you follow this unhappy man to the farm? - A. I did, and I saw him after the ball was extracted up stairs, he looked in a dying state as I thought.

JOHN RUTHERFORD sworn. - On the 18th of May I saw two gentlemen take a position, and then fire, they were about fifteen or sixteen paces distant; they stood in a field the north side of Chalk Farm; I did not see nor hear the signal given, I heard them fire, I was about thirty yards off.

Q. Did you see them fire? - A. No, I heard them fire it.

Q. How many pistols did you hear fire? - A. I only heard one; I am not confident, it might be two; I only heard one report; I saw one of the gentlemen put his hand to his hip, and run towards Chalk Farm, his friend ran after him to assist him; I observed the other man run away, I believe there were two or three with him; he ran towards Haverstock-hill as if he was going to Hampstead; I saw the whole of the transaction, my father keeps the house called Chalk Farm, I saw him after the ball was extracted, he appeared in a dying state; he died on Thursday, the day after, about three o'clock.

Q. Can you take upon you to say that the prisoner was one of the two that stood opposite to each other? - A. I cannot.

CHARLES MONTAGUE sworn. - I am a surgeon, I was dining at Chalk Farm on the 18th of May, when this accident happened; I was called from my dinner to attend him, about five or six in the evening; I had known Mr. O'Reilly some years before in the East Indies; they were bringing him to the farm, I saw the wound, I had him carried into the house, and extracted the ball.

Q. In what state did you find him? - A. I found a little wound upon the right hip, I discovered the hall upon the opposite side, and extracted it.

Q. Had it nearly perforated the other side so that you made no deeper incision for it? - A. It had.

Q. From the direction you have described, it must have passed through the lower extremities? - A. From circumstances afterwards it certainly must, at first I did not suspect it had; I saw him on the morning the next day, I dressed him, I saw him sinking, I had little hopes then; I left him about ten o'clock, I did not go to him again, they brought me word that he died about three o'clock.

Q. Were you of opinion that the shot you extracted was a pistol ball? - A. I was.

Q. Are you of opinion that that was the cause of his death? - A. I am clearly so.

TIMOTHY MILLINGTON sworn. - I am a surgeon and apothecary, I was at Chalk Farm, I was in the field about two or three hundred yards distance.

Q. You did not notice the persons that were engaged? - A. Not till I took hold of the deceased; I assisted in taking him to Chalk Farm, I

dressed his wound, I have no doubt it was the cause of his death; I saw him on the morning prior to his decease, he told me his antagonist had offered to compromise matters with him, but he had refused; he did not say his name.

Q.(To Mr. Dixon.) How long have you known him? - A. Five years before I went to the East Indies, we lodged in a house together for about two months.

Q. After that time you went to India, how long did you stay in India? - A. Till last year, January, 1803, since then I have met him once or twice a month at dinner, and within these last two months he has called on me, and I have called on him at his lodgings; I have seen him walking about the town, he lodged in South Moulton-street.

Q. I understand that you have at times used some endeavour to persuade him to come forward? - A. I cannot exactly say how to answer that question, I do not know the law; when he was before Sir Richard Ford , I said, he had better confess; when this matter was mentioned, it was very lately that I advised him to come forward.

Q. When you gave this advice, did the prisoner deny it? - A. He never directly denied it, nor indirectly told me any thing about it.

Q. In consequence of your advice, he appeared before Sir Richard Ford? - A. He did, but not entirely in consequence of my advice.

Q. Did you promote the prosecution? - A. No.

Q. Did any of your friends by your direction? - A. No.

Q. Who is the attorney of the prosecution? - A. I believe Mr. Humphries; Mr. Humphries did not prefer this prosecution, I was bound over by Sir Richard Ford to give evidence here.

Q. On the day before the prisoner was carried before Sir Richard Ford , did not Mr. Humphries say this, that it would be better for him if he would confess? - A. He did.

Q. Whether Mr. Hobart was the person that killed Mr. O'Reilly, you cannot tell? - A. He had never told me so, but from circumstances in the room, and from Mr. O'Reilly's friends, I had no doubt that he was the person.

Q. Did you not tell Mr. Hobart, before he was examined by Sir Richard Ford , that, in consequence of the advice you had received of Mr. Humphries? - A. I certainly did.

Court. It was the most disgraceful thing, and the most likely way to bring the life of the prisoner in danger, and the justice of the country has been attempted to be baffled by shameful shallow artifice, scandalous to the last. Now, I shall hear every word the prisoner said before Sir Richard Ford.

Q. Did he say that he was the person that killed Mr. O'Reilly? - A. He did confess that he was the gentleman.

Q.(To Joseph Dixon .) Did you hear one or two pistols fire? - A. It might be two, it was all at one time.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18040516-47

357. JOSEPH HEADS was indicted for feloniously being at large before the expiration of seven years for which he had been ordered to be transported .

JOHN HART sworn. - I am servant at Tothill-fields bridewell: On Sunday the 28th of April, I received information that the prisoner at the bar had got from one of the hulks at Woolwich.

THOMAS RANEY sworn. - I am an officer of Queen's-square: On the 28th of April I received information. - (Produces a certificate of the conviction, which was read; when it appeared, that the prisoner was tried in the county of Surry, on Tuesday the 10th of January, for an offence committed on the 21st of December last, and ordered to be transported for the term of seven years); I apprehended him on the 29th of April, about two o'clock in the morning.

JAMES GLANNING sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Union-hall, and I assist at the gaol in Horsemonger-lane; I took him to the Retribution-hulk lying at Woolwich, I took him there on the 26th of January last.

Q. Are you sure he is the same man? - A. Perfectly clear; I rid in the coach with him all the way. (Produces a receipt for the delivery of the prisoner, signed by Capt. Read of the Retribution.)

Q. Do you know how he made his escape from there? - A. I heard that he made his escape from there, and went down to Warwick.

Prisoner. Q. I think it is very hard that a man should swear to me when he never saw me before? - A. I saw you tried at Union-hall, and rode in the coach with you to Woolwich.

JOHN HART sworn. - On the 29th of April I apprehended the prisoner in company with Raney and Bly, in Pye-street, Westminster ; I received information that he had got from the hulk.

Prisoner's defence. All the time I was down there I found a good deal of ill usage and barbarity; the Captain was brought in debt to every prisoner in the ship, and he told them there should be no lenity shewed them; they had brought him in debt, and in so doing the contract was taken out of his hands; he told them they should not have the privilege of writing to the Secretary of State, and he said he would be a match for them all the while he was Captain on board the hulk; I had been on board a man of war all last war; we had a petition, and he said there should no petition go from there; there was a great deal of barbarity, and every man tried for his liberty, and I thought it was necessary to make away as fast as I could.

Court. As to your ill usage I do not believe.

GUILTY Death , aged 30.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-48

358. THOMAS SLATER was indicted for feloniously stealing on Friday, the 9th of March , a book, value 1 s. the property of James Middleton ; a pair of breeches, value 7 s. a coat, value 7 s. a telescope, value 5 s. a hautboy, value 4 s. and a book, value 1 s. the property of Robert Hudson ; a waistcoat, value 1 s. and a clarinet, value 3 s. the property of John State .

CHARLES RICHARDSON sworn. - I keep a public house, No. 15, Baldwin's-gardens, Leather-lane ; I believe it was about the 2d of last March the prisoner came to my house and enquired for a lodging; I took him in, and he went to bed: On the 11th Mr. Hudson called upon me; he had left his property with me; I went up stairs to fetch his box to him, and I found it had been broke open; he said there was some of the property gone; I told him I was very sorry, I would endeavour to find out the person if I could; on Sunday evening, the same day, a Mr. State was with me, who had left his property with me; I related the circumstance of Mr. Hudson's box being broke open (there were two other boxes in the room); he found his box had been broke, and a white waistcoat and a clarinet was gone: on Sunday evening the prisoner at the bar came, and I challenged him with the robbery; he denied it; I went on Monday morning to the pawnbrokers round the place; I found part of the property at different places; the book belonging to Mr. Middleton I got by his own direction; he had lent it to a young man to read in Rebecca-court, Well-street, Middlesex-hospital.

JOHN STATE sworn. - I am a baker; I left my waistcoat and clarinet in my trunk, at Mr. Richardson's.

Q.(To Richardson.) What time did the prisoner come to you? - A. He came to me on the 2d of March, and continued till the 11th of March; when he came to me he represented himself as a jeweller, since that I found him to be a shoemaker.

- ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Baldwin's-gardens; the clarinet was pledged on the 7th of March last; I have a little pocket dictionary also; I am sure the prisoner is the person that pledged them.

- EDWARDS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I live in Portpool-lane: the prisoner at the bar pawned a pair of breeches for 8 s. and a coat for 7 s. he came again on the 9th of March, and pawned a waistcoat for a shilling. (The waistcoat and clarinet produced and identified.)

- BERKENETT sworn. - I live in St. John's street: I am a pawnbroker: on the 5th of March the prisoner brought a telescope and a hautboy; he pledged it for 4 s I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's defence. On the 5th of March, being in a public house, a person came in with this property and asked me to pawn them for him; accordingly I went; I have not seen him since.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-49

359. JOHN NEADS and THOMAS DORSET were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Grange , at the parish of Hoxton , on the 4th of November , about the hour of twelve at night, with intent to steal a wooden clock, value 7 s. a feather bed, value 3 l. three blankets, value 13 s. a coat, value 40 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. and a hat, value 12 s. the property of William White ; five baskets, value 6 s. and a water-tub, value 10 s. the property of James Grange.

The indictment stating the offence committed in the parish of Hoxton, and there being no such parish in the county, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-50

360. JOSEPH FRENCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , one cheese, value 9 s. the property of Edward Parry , John Gadsden , and Edward Savage .

EDWARD SAVAGE sworn. - I am a cheesemonger : I only come to prove the property.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an Officer: On Monday, the 14th of May, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was going down Wentworth-street, from Brick-lane; a little before I got to the Cross Keys, coming out of Petticoat-lane, I saw the prisoner at the bar, with a basket upside down, and a cheese in it, under his arm; seeing the basket the wrong side down, I suspected him; I turned back; I told Oliver and Hughes to follow me, for I thought that man had something he should not have; I took hold of the prisoner in one hand, and the basket and cheese in the other; there was another man, about three yards before him; I asked him what he had got there; he said a cheese; I asked him who it belonged to; he said that man; the other man kept walking along; he would not tell me where he lodged; I told him it was an odd manner of carrying the basket; he refused telling me who he was; he said, if I would go to his master's, he would tell; I went with him to the Red Lion, Red-Lion street, Whitechapel; he requested his master to be sent for; accordingly, after some time, the gentleman came in, and then he said the property belonged to the other person, and he took it from the yard-gate of Mr. Savage; that is all I know; that is the cheese, and that is the man, I am sure.

CHARLES NICHOLLS sworn. - I am shopman

to Messrs. Parry and Co. On the 14th of May, at nine o'clock in the evening, I was sent for to the Red Lion, Red Lion-street, and there I saw the prisoner in custody with Brown, who produced this cheese, which I know to be the property of Messrs. Parry and Co. I know it by the mark.

Q. How long had he been in your service? - A. About six years.

Prisoner. I never had a cheese in my hand all the day; I was cutting chaff all the day, and never went out of my master's yard with a cheese.

Edward Savage . He has lived with me about five or six years; I always thought him a very honest man till this business, I have intrusted him with a deal of property; this man has been a carman ever since he has been with us, and so had the other man.

Prisoner's defence. After we had done our work, I asked Field to take a walk, and when I went out, he stood there with a parcel under his arm; going along, he asked me to lay hold of it while he was making water, which I did; Mr. Brown asked me what I had got; I told him I believed it was cheese; I said, it is not my property; directly the man made off; I told him if he would go with me to the Red Lion, I would send for my master, and I did so.

ELIZABETH KEY sworn. - My mother keeps a chandler's shop close by the yard; I saw the prisoner coming down; he had his hands in his pocket.

Q. What day was it? - A. On Monday, the 14th; I saw him go as far as the gate.

Q. Did you see any body with him? - A. I did not.

Q. How far distant is your house from Wentworth-street? - A. We can see down to the bottom of Wentworth-street; I said to him, how do you do; he was walking towards the gate.

Q. You did not see him go into the yard? - A. No.

MARY RUTHERFORD sworn. - This prisoner has lived with me five years off and on, and when he went out of the yard, he went out empty handed; we have the key of Messrs. Parry and Co's gate; I never knew any thing amiss of his character.

Q. You do not know that he robbed his master? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-51

361. CHARLOTTE WOOD and CHARLES ASTROPP were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , two Bank-notes, value 2 l. each , the property of William Drake .

The prosecutor not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated, and the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-52

362. ALEXANDER BADDEN was indicted for personating a person of the name of Edward Ball .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You assist Mr. Newport in the New Prison, Clerkenwell? - A. I am deputy keeper of the New Prison.

Q. Had you a person of the name of Thomas Carr in your custody? - A. Yes; I had him in my custody in the year 1802. (The warrant of Thomas Carr produced, and read in Court.)

Q. Did you attend Thomas Carr before Mr. Justice Le Blanc, at his chambers, Serjeant's Inn, London? - A. I did; there were two of my men with me.

Q. On the 19th of November, 1802, did you see the prisoner at the bar there? - A. I cannot say; it was at night; there were a vast many people there; Thomas Carr was bailed and discharged; I did not give attention to his person.

JOHN MAYER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You produce the Record of Michaelmas Term, in the 43d Year of his present Majesty? - A. Yes; I am agent to the Crown-office.

Q. Is there any indictment on that file against the person of Thomas Carr ? - A. There is, for seducing artificers to go out of the kingdom. (The indictment of Thomas Carr, and the original recognizance of Edward Ball, for the appearance of Thomas Carr in the Court of King's Bench, produced, and read in Court.)

Q. Does it appear that he ever appeared? - A. No; not by any thing here. (Looking at the recognizance.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Barry. Q. Can you take upon you to say, whether Carr has pleaded to that indictment or not? - A. I know that he was tried and convicted; and I know, of my own knowledge, that a record is made out of his conviction.

Q. Do not you think it is necessary, if a man enters into a recognizance, that he should enter his name to it? - A. It is not usual.

WILLIAM BEVEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are servant to Mr. Newport? - A. Yes; I took Carr to Serjeants' Inn, with Mr. Roberts, in company with my fellow-servant, James Peters .

Q. Do you know the defendant at the bar, Badden? - A. Yes, I have seen him before; I saw him when he became bail for Thomas Carr , in the name of Edward Ball , in Primrose-street; I do not recollect the number; I saw him acknowledge a recognizance in the sum of 500 l. before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Court. Q. You are sure this is the man? - A. I am positive of it; he and a man of the name of Read was bound in a bond of five hundred pounds each. I do not know Read.

Mr. Knapp. Your duty leading you to be near your prisoner whom you had the care of, you are quite sure the prisoner Badden was one of them? - A. Yes.

Q. And that the prisoner, Badden, is not Mr. Ball? - A. Certainly not.

JAMES PETERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are also a servant belonging to Mr. Newport; do you remember going with the last witness and Mr. Roberts

to Mr. Justice Le Blanc's chambers? - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner, Badden, there.

Q. Were you close to Carr and Badden? - A. They shook hands together, and Badden and Carr went afterwards to the desk.

Court. Q. Who shook hands together? - A. Carr and Badden; there was a good many people there.

Prisoner. As I am a sinner to God I never saw Carr.

Cross-examined by Mr. Barry. Q. In point of fact you did not see Badden acknowledge the bail? - A. I cannot take upon myself to say I did.

Mr. Knapp. Q. The last evidence had a better opportunity of seeing that than you? - A. Certainly; I saw the prisoner Badden, Read, and them all, go up together.

EDWARD BALL sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You live at No. 20, Primrose-street; how long have you lived there? - A. I have lived there two or three years; I lived there in 1802.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Thomas Carr ? - A. I have seen him.

Q. Did you ever become bail for him any where? - A. No.

Q. Did you go to Mr. Justice Le Blanc's chambers to become bail for him, for seducing artificers to leave the kingdom? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Barry. Q. I think the prisoner and you are old acquaintances, he has been often bail for you? - A. I never bailed him.

Q. Have you not been in the habit of bailing together in the Court of Westminster? - A. There were two friends of mine had a dispute, and one arrested the other, they were in the Lock-up-house; and there was a certain man in St. Giles's became bail for him, and asked me if I would become bail for him in the Lock-up-house; they brought Badden in with them, and made a third bail at the Lock-up-house, but I never bailed Badden any where, nor ever assisted to bail with him, ever since I was born but then.

Q. Were you never called upon for this bail of Mr. Carr? - A. I was called upon by Mr. White, Mr. White told me, when he wanted me he would send for me; the letter Mr. Humphries has got.

Q. Do you know Carr? - A. I have seen him.

Q. I ask you, in point of fact, whether you did not demand twenty pounds of Mr. Carr? - A. No such a man as me demanded twenty pounds of Mr. Carr, no such thing; I made several enquiries after Carr, I had notice from Mr. White, I found out where Carr lived after I received a letter from Mr. White, I told Mr. White where he did live, he ran away; I have seen him in the street many a time.

Q. Do not you know that you were liable to pay the five hundred pounds? - A. Mr. White told me I should be in a pretty situation if I did not find him out.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You received a letter from Mr. White, he is receiver of the treasury? - A. I did; and I did what I could to find out where Carr lived, and when I did, I told Mr. White; Carr was run away, I could not find him.

Court. Q. How long have you known Carr? - A.Twenty years; at the time I knew him first, he was a soldier, then he was a gardener, and after that he went to sea.

Prisoner. Q. Only ask Mr. Ball whether he and another person did not come to me, and ask me, if I would give twenty pounds he would surrender him up?

Court. It would be unnecessary to explain the unrighteous deed, it does not entirely depend upon his testimony.

GUILTY .

Confined two years in Newgate ,

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040516-53

363. JOHN COOPER and SAMUEL HOWARD were indicted for a misdemeanor .

(The indictment was read by Mr. Watson, and the case stated by Mr. Vaillant.)

PHILIP HOLDSWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am upper City-Marshal: Cooper and Howard were constables till dismissed by the Lord-Mayor; I administered the oath, and swore them in.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long have you known them? - A. I have known Cooper seven years; Cooper was sworn in about the 14th of November last, and Howard the month after.

Mr. Watson. Q. Were they both constables on the 4th of February last? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you know that Cooper came well recommended in the situation in which he was sworn to? - A. He did, his character was good.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known Howard? - A.For three years; he came likewise well recommended; there never was a man that I esteemed more as an officer before this, he has acted generally very well, and always gave me satisfaction till the present instance.

JOHN FRENCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Where did you live on the 4th of February last? - A. No. 21, New-street, Bishopsgate-street; on the 4th of February, the last day of the lottery, Cooper and Howard came into my apartment about a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning; they were both together; John Bailey , my son-in-law, was with me, and two or three women; they said they had got an information against me for insurances in the lottery; they found two papers on my table where I was; they searched the women, and found nothing on them; they searched my son-in-law, and found two or three papers in his pocket; they said that was enough for them, and they must take me and my son-in-law with them; they took my papers likewise that were laying on my table. I asked them whether this could not be settled without their taking us away; they said, no, they must do their duty; they took me and my son-in-law to a public-house, the side of the Poultry-Compter; then they asked if we had any body to come forward on our behalf. I answered I would send to a friend, this was about ten o'clock; they said I might, and I did send to a friend; they found a person to go for me to Mr. Wells; he did not come; Robert Shearman came for him, and Shearman was surprized to see me there; he asked Mr. Cooper what he wanted, and he told him twenty guineas.

Q. Did Mr. Cooper say what he wanted that twenty guineas for? - Q. Then he said he would return the papers, and keep the informer back; Mr. Shearman went away, and returned with sixteen pounds; he asked me if I had enough to make it twenty guineas; I told him I had none in my pocket; my son-in-law had three pounds, that made it nineteen pounds; Mr. Shearman rolled the nineteen pounds up, and tendered it down to Mr. Cooper.

Q. Did Mr. Cooper say any thing? - A. Mr. Cooper said he did not take it in that manner; it was rolled up,

and thrown over the settle; Mr. Cooper walked away, and took it up; Howard was walking backwards and forwards out of one room into the other; I cannot say whether he was present during this transaction.

Q. Did you hear Mr. Howard say any thing? - A. No further, than he was agreeable to what Cooper did; I was taken to the Lord-Mayor about twelve o'clock; Mr. Cooper had my numerical papers that lay on my table.

Q. What became of the paper that came from John Bailey 's pocket? - A. They were given back at the time of the payment of the nineteen pounds.

Q. But the papers upon the witnesses table, Mr. Cooper presented to the Lord-Mayor? - A. He did; there was nothing appeared against me, on account of that paper; my Lord was pleased to fine me five pounds, which I was to pay before I was released; I did not pay the five pounds then, I went back to the Compter; my son-in-law paid that.

Q. After that did you do any thing respecting this prosecution? - A. Yes, on the Friday following, I did, I was persuaded; I went to the Marshal; I saw the Lord-Mayor, and told him the same story as I have here, as near as I can recollect.

Q. In consequence of that, the Lord-Mayor directed this? - A. He did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am a tailor.

Q. And an insurer? - A. I do not deny I have insured.

Q. How many times have you been before a Justice? - A. Twice; it was by false swearers.

Q. Who was the friend that persuaded you to let us know that? - A. I can let you know, if I must - Mr. Crabb, a City constable.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You have been before a Justice only twice? - A. I suppose three times.

Q. I am told, that what is bred in the bone, is never out of the flesh? - A. I was before a Justice last week, that is the third time; that was a charge of a false woman, I never saw her before in my life from her birth; that was on the lottery business, by an informer.

Mr. Watson. Q. You had been before the Magistrate twice respecting lottery business before last Monday se'nnight - what time were you then taken? - A. At eleven o'clock at night.

Q. In consequence of that, you were discharged? - A. I was.

JOHN BAILEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. Q. Are you son in-law to Mr. French, the last witness? - A. I am; Cooper and Howard came right into my father's apartment; they saw my father with a paper on the table, and some women in the room; they said they had an information against him for taking illegal insurances, and that he must go with them; they searched the women in the room, and let them go; my father asked if it could not be made up without going out of his own place; they said, no. Howard said he would be agreeable to any thing that Cooper was agreeable to; they searched me, and took two or three papers from me; I had put them in my pocket. When they came in, they took my father's papers that were lying on the table, and they took us to a public-house inside of the Compter; they brought out a book, and took our names down; they asked my father if he had any friends to come forward; my father had sent for a friend, and Mr. Shearman came; Shearman spoke to Cooper, I cannot rightly say what he said; I heard Cooper say to Mr. Shearman, twenty guineas; Mr. Shearman went out, and returned in about a quarter of an hour; he brought sixteen pounds in notes with him. When he came in, he said, French, I cannot get any more than sixteen pounds; he said, you must make it up; my father said he had none; he said to me, John, what money have you; I said I had got three pounds; I laid it on the table, and Shearman put it up with the sixteen pounds; he rolled up the sixteen pounds and the three pounds together. Cooper said, chuck them down any where; he chucked them down in the next bench to where we were sitting; Cooper went, and picked them up; then he said, let us go into the next room, there is a good fire there; and when we had been there about five minutes, he said, do not look so chearful, look as you did when you first came in. They gave all the papers back to my father but two; we went to the Mansion-house before the Lord-Mayor, and there two papers were produced; my father was fined five pounds.

Q. Did you give the five pounds? - A. Yes, I gave it to Cooper; Cooper said, do not give it before any body; my father said, have I occasion to go before the Lord-Mayor again; with that, I walked down the yard, and gave him the five pounds; with that, he said you are cleared, by paying the jail fees.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You and your father were fined five pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were cleared after paying the fine of five pounds? - A. Yes.

ROBERT SHEARMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I live at No. 25, Belvidere-place, Borough-road: On the 4th of February last, I went, at the request of Mr. Wells, to the Poultry-Compter, there I saw Mr. French, Bailey, and Cooper, I never saw Howard before this day, they were the only persons that were in the room, to the best of my recollection, there was a girl that came in to light the fire; when I went in, I asked Mr. French what was the matter; he told me he had been taken up for insuring in the lottery; Cooper, or French, said, (I think it was French) it would be all settled for twenty guineas; I am not positive, I think it was French.

Q. Was it said in Cooper's hearing? - A. I was sitting between Cooper and French; Cooper said, nothing less than twenty guineas would do; upon which I said I had no twenty guineas, I would go back and inform Mr. Wells; I went out, and returned in about a quarter of an hour; I brought with me twenty pounds, but when I came in, I thought the sum so extravagant, I said, French, I have brought from your friend sixteen pounds, this is all he will give, and I am not authorised to give it, without you will pay it by instalments; upon which French asked his son-in-law (Bailey) if he had any money; Bailey took out three pounds, and said it was all that he had; I took the three pounds, and put it to the sixteen pounds. Previous to that, Cooper said, I will not take any thing, but you may throw it down in any corner, it will answer the same purpose; I took the sixteen pounds and the three pounds, and rolled them together, and threw the whole over the partition of the boxes; there was a curtain between us and the next box.

Q. Did you see any body pick it up? - A. Cooper

picked it up, and insisted on having two pounds more before I left the room, to make it up twenty guineas; I said to Cooper, if nothing else will do, I will give you the other two pounds at the Dolphin, on Ludgate-hill, if you will meet me there this evening; he met me there that evening at the public-house; I did not give him the other two pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What sort of life are you in; how do you live? - A. I live as you do.

Q. How many times have you been before a Magistrate; you had the impudence to say, you lived as I did; have you ever been in gaol? - A. I have for debt and for the lottery.

Q. For selling illegal policies? - A. I had the opinion of the first lawyers in the kingdom that they were legal; I have been before the Lord Mayor; I was before a Magistrate once before, and once at Hick's hall, a man took me in the street for the little-go.

Q. How do you live? - A. I have had a liberal education; I have in my present employ two guineas a week, and I earn a guinea now and then, when I can; I settle matters between people.

EDWARD ALDERMAN sworn. - I am one of the turnkeys in the Poultry Compter. (Produces a book with the entry of John French and John Bailey, lottery vagrants, taken by Cooper to the Poultry Compter.)

Mr. Gurney. Q. You made this entry? - A. Not that entry; that is exactly the same entry as the rough charge entry.

Q. Did you see them come in? - A. I did not.

Mr. Watson. Q. When they are brought in, then the entry is made? - A. Yes.

Both, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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