Old Bailey Proceedings, 11th April 1804.
Reference Number: 18040411
Reference Number: f18040411-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 11th of APRIL, 1804, and following Days,

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-street, Doctors' Commons.

1804.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. Edward LORD ELLENBOROUGH , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; JOHN HEATH , Esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; NATHANIEL NEWNHAM , Esq. Sir WILLIAM CURTIS , Bart. HARVEY-CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; JOHN ANSLEY , Esq. and - ROWCROFT, Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Joseph Hoppey ,

John Nottingham ,

John Sockett ,

James Hoppey ,

John Jones ,

Benjamin Firmley ,

Michael Bayley ,

George Goodwin ,

James Jones ,

John Sanders ,

William Silver ,

John Donaldson .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Hill ,

William Nash ,

William-Augustus Mitchell ,

James Ward ,

Henry Young ,

Thomas Brown ,

John Dell ,

Matthew Long ,

John Morgan ,

Richard Smith ,

Jeremiah Plume ,

John Barton .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Henry Freeman ,

Joseph Combes ,

John Walpole ,

Daniel Beck ,

George Smith ,

John Crawley ,

William Saunders ,

Lawrence Patman ,

Richard Powell ,

Joseph Radden ,

William Riley ,

Thomas Foster .

Reference Number: t18040411-1

224. EDWARD HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a sack, value 2 s. and four bushels of wheat, value 25 s. the property of Thomas Osborne , the elder , Thomas Osborne , the younger , and George Osborne .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Thomas Edmunds .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS OSBORNE (the younger) sworn. - Q. What are the names of your partners? - A. Thomas Osborne , the elder, and George Osborne ; we are wharfinger s on the Grand Junction Canal, near Uxbridge ; we had fifty quarters of wheat, which were all delivered excepting twelve: On the 14th of March, there were twenty-four sacks put in the waggon, they were there on the night of the 14th; on the 15th, I missed one from the waggon, it had been landed from the barge into the waggon; in consequence of that, suspicion fell upon two boats which had access to my wharf; I then went to Marlborough-street, and got a warrant, I apprehended the prisoner at Paddington, at the head of the Canal; I charged him, upon the evidence of the boy in the boat, that saw him take it; I did not hear the prisoner say any thing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You knew nothing of the prisoner before? - A. I might have seen him once or twice; he worked a barge belonging to Mr. Pickford.

WILLIAM RADLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How old are you? - A. Fourteen.

Q. What business do you follow? - A. No business.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner take a sack of wheat on board the boat, off Mr. Osborne's wharf.

Q. Where did he get it from? - A. I don't know; the waggon was on the wharf; I don't know whether he took it from the waggon or not; the waggon was loaded with wheat upon the wharf.

Court. Q. How do you know it was not barley? - A. I don't know; he put the sack out at Ganford-green, near Harrow.

Q. What time was it? - A. Between three and four o'clock in the morning; he went on with the boat, and left the sack there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You saw the prisoner take a sack from off the wharf? - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot tell what was in it? - A. No.

Q. Nor could you tell whose sack it was? - A. No.

Q. What time was it when he took it? - A. About half past ten at night.

Q. Were you ever taken into custody yourself? - A. No.

Court. Q. What time did he put it out at Ganford-green? - A. Between three and four o'clock in the morning.

Mr. Alley. Q. You knew it did not belong to the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose you told your master the next morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Before your master had said any thing to you about it? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you never been in prison since the property was supposed to be taken? - A. Yes, ever since.

Q. You were accused with taking this, and then you charged the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Where were you taken? - A. At Paddington, the day after.

Q. Before you were taken into custody, had you any conversation with your master? - A. No.

Court. Q. When did you tell your master? - A. Not at all.

Mr. Alley. Q. You never told any body of it till you were taken a prisoner? - A. No.

Q. And then you said the man at the bar did it? - A. Yes.

Q. There were three other men in the boat, were there not? - A. Yes.

Q. They must have seen him take it as well as you? - A. No, they were along with the horses.

Q. You don't mean to say they were all with the horses? - A. No, there were two with the horses.

Q. If a man came out of the barge the boat could not be going on? - A. No.

Q. Then the horses must have been standing still? - A. Yes.

Q. Then the man must have known that the barge was stopped? - A. Yes.

Q. And there was a man at the helm? - A, Yes.

For the Prisoner.

BENJAMIN NEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. A boat-man.

Q. A master boat-man? - A. Yes, employed by Mr. Pickford.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; he was a boat-man employed under me.

Q. Do you recollect coming down the canal? - Yes.

Q. Look at that little boy, do you recollect his being on board the barge with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you accompany the barge the whole way to town? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner bring any sack on board? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see him take any out at Ganford-green? - A. No.

Q. If he had had such a thing, must you or not have observed it? - A. I must have seen it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of Pickford's man? - A. Yes.

Q. And so is the prisoner? - A. Yes, I employ the prisoner.

Q. Did you see the waggon loaded with wheat? - A. No.

Q. Did you go on shore? - A. No, only to fetch the horses out at Uxbridge.

Q. How long were you gone for the horses? - A. About half an hour.

Q. It was quite time enough to have brought a sack on board if they had been so disposed? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you sleep on board? - A. Yes.

Q. This was about four o'clock in the morning; what were you doing on board at four o'clock in the morning - was not you a bed and asleep? - A. No, I was not on board the boat at four o'clock in the morning.

Q. Then what was done on board at four in the morning you do not know? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. What time did you go on board the boat at Uxbridge? - A. We got there about seven o'clock in the evening, and staid in the boat till about ten o'clock.

Q. Did you stay in the boat till you left Uxbridge? - A. No, I went to fetch the horses out.

Q. What time was it when you came on board again? - A. I did not go on board after I fetched the horses out of my stable; I was with the horses.

Q. Did the boat stop at Ganford-green? - A. No, he could not have got out of the boat without my seeing him.

Q. Had he an opportunity of getting out of the boat with a sack of wheat without your knowing it? - A. No.

THOMAS MARLBOROUGH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you on board this boat? - A. I was in the boat with the prisoner from the time the boat left Uxbridge till she got to London.

Q. Did you see him go on shore with the sack of wheat? - A. No, he was in bed, and could not get out of the bed without my knowing it; he got up before ten o'clock, and steered the boat to Bull's green, about six miles.

Q. Before you left Uxbridge, did you observe what was in the boat; was there a sack of wheat in the barge from the time you left Uxbridge, till you came to town? - A. No, there was not; he never was out of the barge but at the lock to pull the gates back.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He was on shore at Uxbridge? - A. Yes, about ten minutes; he went out for a loaf.

Q. What time did he return again to the boat? - A. I do'nt know justly when he returned; it was about half-past seven in the evening.

Q. He did not go to bed till ten? - A. Yes, he came to bed to me before dark.

Q. You slept pretty sound? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Were you awake at Ganford-green? - A. Yes; he steered to Ganford-green, and I drove the horses.

Mr. Alley. Q. When he returned he brought some bread, and did not bring a sack? - A. He did not; he only brought some bread, and some tea and sugar.

JOSEPH CATLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you on board this boat? - A. Yes; we left Uxbridge about ten o'clock; the prisoner was on board the boat.

Q. Do you recollect his going on board before the boat left Uxbridge? - A. Yes, he went for some bread, and some tea and sugar.

Q. Did he bring a sack of wheat on board? - A. No; he did not.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes, there was no sack at all on board.

Q. Were there any other barges there? - A. Yes; two.

Q. Do you recollect the boat stopping at Ganford-green. - A. They did not stop at all.

Q. Did the prisoner come on shore and carry a sack on shore? - A. No, he did not; I drove the horses from Ganford-green to town.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you on shore at Uxbridge? - A. Yes, about five minutes.

Q. Did you see the waggon load of wheat upon the wharf? - A. No, I did not.

Q. There was no waggon of wheat there? - A. I did not see any waggon.

Q. How long is the wharf, a pretty considerable one? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Mr. Osborne.) How far was the waggon from the barge? - A. About eight yards.

Q. Was the boy in custody at all? - A. No, in consequence of the boy's information, I took him to Marlborough-street; the Magistrates asked me if I would take care of him; I said no; and then he was committed to give evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-2

225. JAMES MANCHESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a sack, value 1 s. and eight bushels of pollard, value 4 s. the property of Stephen Briggs .

STEPHEN BRIGGS sworn. - I live at Acton ; I am a farmer ; the prisoner was my carter : On Tuesday, the 28th of February, I sent the prisoner to Mr. Martin's mill, at Moulsey; he was to bring six quarters of pollard; twelve sacks my man helped to unload, and the sacks were Mr. Martin's.

GEORGE HOGSFLESH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Briggs; on Tuesday, the 28th of February, the prisoner was sent for pollard, and brought it home between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; there were six quarters, which is twelve sacks; one was shot in the bin, and two set in the sacks, at the end of the bin, in the stable; and the other nine carried into the granary, just across the yard; I saw them unloaded about four o'clock; I cannot say to half an hour; the next morning, when my master and I looked the pollard over, we missed one sack out of the stable; my master was very particular, and made me measure that out of the bin; he had given a strike and a half, or two strikes, to the horses, and the rest was there; then we looked in the granary, to be sure it was not there; and there were nine and no more; about half an hour afterwards, I went to Mr. Howard's, just opposite, across the road, and he shewed me a sack of pollard standing in his house; the sack was marked G. and M. Martin; there are two brothers partners; the sacks were very much marked, and this was marked like them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You knew Mr. Martin? - A. Yes, one of them.

Q. They supply a great number of farmers in your neighbourhood with pollard? - A. Several farmers deal with them.

Q. Is Mr. Howard here? - A. Yes.

Q. You don't mean to swear to the pollard? - A. No.

THOMAS HOWARD sworn. - I know the prisoner; he was carter to Mr. Briggs.

Q. Did you ever employ him to bring any pollard from Mr. Martin's? - A. Yes; on the 27th of February he came to me, and told me he was going the next day to the mill, for pollard, and asked me if I wanted any; I told him he might bring me one sack of a bettermost sort of pollard, and I gave him 8 s. on the tap-room table, to pay for it; I used to pay 8 s. for it; on the 28th, between five and six in the evening, he brought it; I was at home, but I did not see him bring it; he came to me from the bar, and told me pollard was fell, and returned me one shilling; I gave him sixpence and a pint of beer for his trouble in bringing it.

Q. Did Mr. Briggs know that you were employing his carter? - A. I don't know that he did; I had employed him before, and several neighbours round he had brought pollard for besides me; my wife is here, she saw him bring the sack of pollard; Mr. Briggs and Hogsflesh came the next morning, and saw it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It is not at all unusual for the servant of a neighbour's team, when he goes to the mill, to bring some pollard for the neighbours? - A. Yes, it is a general way.

Q. And he had brought many times for you from the same mill? - A. Several times; I cannot say how many.

Q. He made no secret of this? - A. No.

SARAH HOWARD sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: On the 28th of February, the prisoner brought the sack of pollard on his back; he did not come into the house, but took it to the stable.

Q. Was that the pollard and the sack that Mr. Briggs and Hogsflesh saw? - A. Yes, my husband gave him eight shillings the over night to bring it, and he returned one shilling the next night; we always paid ready money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What time was it when he brought it? - A. It was day-light.

Q. And you live directly opposite Mr. Briggs? - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

Q. (To Briggs.) Do you understand the marks of Martin's sacks? - A. They are generally very full of marks with his name, and the sack that was found at Howard's was marked in the same way.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-3

226. ROBERT HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , a wrapper, value 2 s. and two hundred and twenty pounds weight of paper, value 9 l. the property of William Fulton , the elder , William Fulton , the younger , Henry Fulton , and John Pollock , in the dwelling-house of the said Henry Fulton .

HENRY FULTON sworn. - I live in Watling-street , I am a warehouseman ; I can only speak to the property.

THOMAS MORRIS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fulton, I am generally up first in the morning: On the 31st of March, I was about my business, about half past seven in the morning; I thought I heard a noise in the passage, and on looking over the banisters, I found a bale which laid in the passage missing; I immediately ran out of doors, the door was open, I had opened it myself; I saw the bale upon the prisoner Robert Harris 's back, about the distance of two houses from our's; I pursued, and a neighbour being by, I called for his assistance; in the mean time, the prisoner threw the bale down on the pavement; then I called out stop thief, and my neighbour pursued with me; he ran into the second street from where I lived; he then threw himself against a new building, and my neighbour and I brought him back to where the bale laid; a constable going by at the time, a man that I knew, I gave him charge of him, and took him to the Poultry Compter; I am sure the prisoner is the same man that I saw with the bale upon his back; the bale was

brought back by me and assistants; it contained two hundred and twenty pounds weight of paper.

Q. What might be the value of it? - A. About nine pounds.

Q. What kind of paper was it? - A. It is called calendar paper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ask him how he came by it? - A. No.

Q. Did he tell you? - A. No.

Q. After you had brought him back, you asked him how he came by it? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did the constable? - A. I cannot say.

JOHN ELLIOTT sworn - I am servant to Duncan and Hopkins, Manchester warehousemen, opposite Mr. Fulton's: On Saturday, the 31st of March, about half past seven in the morning, I was going to the warehouse, and saw Mr. Fulton's servant running; he asked me to run back with him, and stop the thief; he immediately called out stop thief; upon that, I saw the prisoner at the bar throw the bale from his shoulder, then I supposed he must be the person Morris was in pursuit of; I followed him to Bread-street, where we took him; we brought him back immediately to the bale.

Q. Was there any body else in the street at that time? - A. Yes, a great many people.

Q. Are you sure this is the man that had the bale upon his shoulder? - A. The same man.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am a constable: Going along Watling-street, Thomas Morris gave me charge of the prisoner; I turned round, and saw the bale lying upon the pavement; I took a piece of black lead, and marked the bale; I then took the prisoner to the Poultry Compter. (The bale produced.)

Morris. This is the same bale, I am sure it is my master's property; it is the same that stood in the passage.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (To Mr. Fulton.) Have you any partner? - A. Yes; William Fulton , the elder, William Fulton , the younger, and John Pollock .

Q. Have you no other partner who has any interest in it? - A. No.

Q. Do all your partners live in this house? - A. Only myself.

Q. The other partners pay the rent and taxes? - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-4

227. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , one pound twelve ounces of silk, value 2 l. the property of William Hunt .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of John Willan .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES DOWKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a porter belonging to Mr. John Willan ? - A. Yes.

Q. Has Mr. Willan any partner? - A. No: he keeps the Bull and Mouth, in Bull and Mouth-street ; the prisoner was our carman , it was his duty to attend the waggon to see the delivery of the goods.

Q. Did he drive the horses, or did he look to the delivery of his goods? - A. He attended the delivery of the goods: On Monday last, the 9th of April, the prisoner went with the waggon to Bishopsgate-street, he was in the waggon; I was coming from the Excise-Office towards Cornhill, I saw the waggon standing against the church in Threadneedle-street ; I observed the prisoner at the bar with a great-coat over a bag, and, as I supposed, lying on one side of it, with the coat a little in; I made a stop, and saw him draw the silk out of the bag, and put it under his coat, and button it up; I stepped on one side in Bishopsgate-street to let him get down from the waggon; he got down, and went to the Helmet public-house opposite where the waggon was; I followed him in immediately; I asked him if he was going home; he told me, yes; I then asked him to go home with me to load some other bales of goods for shipping; he came home with me; I then went into the waggon-office, and communicated what I had seen to Mr. Jefferies, and he came out with me into the yard; Mr. Jefferies opened the prisoner's coat, and found the silk buttoned up; there was a pound and a half of it, or a pound and three quarters, I did not see it weighed; I then left him in charge with Jefferies and the rest of the men, and went about my business.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. This was raw silk, was not it? - A. Yes.

Q. It was the prisoner's duty to attend the waggon? - A. Yes.

Q. Suppose any of these bales of silk were loose, what would have been his duty then? - A. There was no bale in the waggon but that.

Q. Supposing that it had been loose, what would have been his duty? - A. To have put it in again, and secured it.

Q. What is your employ with Mr. Willan? - A. My employment is as carman.

Q. Then it would not have been his duty to have told you any thing about it? - A. He did not tell me any thing about it.

Q. You gave him no opportunity of saying why he had taken this property to secure it for his master? - A. He did not make any mention at all about it.

Q. Did he ever attempt to make his escape at all? - A. No, he could not, because I was with him.

Q. Did he ever shew an inclination to do so? - A. Yes, he did attempt to go away to the corner of Basinghall-street, under pretence of going to see one of Mr. Pickford's waggoners.

Q. Do you mean to swear he attempted to make his escape? - A. Yes, he did, and I was obliged to lay hold of him.

Q. How long had you been carman? - A. Six years.

Q. How long has he been carman? - A. Four or five months, or not so long.

JOHN JEFFERIES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a book-keeper at the Bull and Mouth? - A. Yes; Dowker gave me information, in consequence of which I searched the prisoner, and found, under his top coat, a quantity of silk under his left arm; there was one pound twelve ounces of it; the prisoner did not say a word, I have had the silk ever since, (produces it;) it is part of the contents of a leather bag containing silk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing the contents of this bag? - A. No, I saw a part of the bag opened.

Q. That was afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you first see it before it was put into the waggon? - A. I did not see the bag till it was brought to the Bull and Mouth Inn; the bag had the appearance of having been broke, the end of the bag was drawn as under.

WILLIAM HUNT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know that silk? - A. Yes, perfectly well; the prisoner came from the Bull and Mouth Inn with a four-wheeled cart, or waggon, to take a pack of silk from my house, which is situated near the church, at the corner of Leadenhall-street; it was put into his charge for the purpose of taking it to the Bull and Mouth.

Q. Is that a part of the silk that was in that pack? - A. I am sure of it; there was a larger deficiency than this, and the next day, upon my writing to Mr. Jefferies, he sent me the remainder, which was found in the privy.

Prisoner's defence. This hank came out at one corner, and I put it under my coat to take it home, that it might be put into the bale again; and before I had time, when I got to the warehouse, they took it from me.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-5

228. MARY PRICE, alias SANDERS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , a bed quilt, value 2 s. an iron, value 6 d. a pail, value 9 d. a frying pan, value 1 s. and a sheet, value 2 s. the property of Richard Berwick , in a lodging-room .

RICHARD BERWICK sworn. - I live in Hackney road: I let lodgings in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street ; Mary Price had a room of me there, and the things mentioned in the indictment were missing; I did not let her the room, nor my wife; it was let to her by a woman who is in Court; she came to lodge there about six months ago; she had one room; I have seen the things there when I have gone for the rent; she paid me 3 s. a week; she paid me up to the last three weeks or so; she left the lodgings on the 21st of February; I missed the things on the 18th; I took her before she left the lodging; I suspected the things were gone, and I went, and she acknowledged it; she said she was distressed, and would take them out of pawn again: she said she did not mean to leave the room: I had not enquired her character; she told me she had a husband; there was one other lodger in the house, a man and his wife, I cannot tell who they are.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Cotton in Shoreditch (produces a quilt); it was pledged on the 15th of February for 1 s. 6 d. I cannot say that the prisoner is the person.

JOHN GIBBS sworn. - I am servant to Tyler and Laycock, pawnbrokers, in Shoreditch (produces a sheet); I took it in for 1 s. on the 21st of January; I do not know who pledged it.

RICHARD LILLYWHITE sworn. - I am an officer (produces two duplicates); I had one from the prisoner of a quilt, and the other of a sheet I had from Berwick.

Green. This is our duplicate of the quilt.

FRANCES PERKINS sworn. - I live in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street: I let the room for Mr. Berwick to Mary Price ; I do not live in the same house; I let her the lodging about seven months ago; she told me her husband was a box-maker; I cannot say what furniture she had; Mr. Berwick sent the things down, and I did not open them.

Berwick. This is my sheet; there is no particular mark on it; my wife is ill, I think it is mine. This is my quilt to the best of my knowledge.

Q. How many lodging houses have you? - A. Nine.

Q. And they have all sheets and all quilts? - A. Yes; here is a flat iron that I bought myself, it is broke in the front; the duplicate I gave the officer I received from the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I never had any of those things in the room; I never saw that gentleman when I took it; I had my room broke open at Christmas, and robbed of five pounds worth of articles.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-6

229. ROBERT DANIELS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , ten

wine-glasses, value 4 s. the property of Andrew-John Nash and George-Augustus Nash .

(The case was opened by Mr. Watson.)

ANDREW-JOHN NASH sworn. - I am in partner ship with my brother George- Augustus Nash , in Cornhill ; the prisoner was our packer , and had been four or five years. In consequence of information that goods were secreted in the cellar, I directed one of our clerks, Mr. Brown, to go down and mark them; I then directed a warehouseman, of the name of Jordan, to go into the cellar when the people went way, to see if any of the glasses so marked were gone: Jordan went down, and shortly after he brought the prisoner back; I took him into a private room.

Q. Before you put any question to the prisoner, had you told him it would be better for him? - A. I made use of neither promise nor threat; I desired him to produce what property of mine he had in his possession, which, after some hesitation, he did; he took three wine-glasses from each of his coat pockets; I then sent for a constable to take him into custody, and to search him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you not a sleeping partner? - A. No.

DANIEL BROWN sworn. - I am a glassman, I was in the employ of Mr. Nash. In February last, in consequence of direction from Mr. Nash, I marked a number of wine-glasses concealed among some way in the cellar; it was on Wednesday, the 15th of February; I marked thirteen glasses with a diamond, and two tumblers; I shall know them again; I left them where I marked them.

CHRISTOPHER JORDAN sworn. - I am in the employ of Messrs. Nash: In February last, I went down into the cellar, and observed thirteen wineglasses and two tumblers concealed under some hay; I informed Mr. Nash of it; I went down into the cellar with Mr. Brown, and saw him mark them; at one o'clock, when the men went out to dinner, I was sent to fetch the prisoner back; he came back with me; we went into a back room with Mr. Nash, and he pulled out six wine-glasses; a constable was then sent for, and he found four more in his breeches.

- TRENCHARD sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for to Mr. Nash's, I searched the prisoner, and found four wine-glasses in his breeches. (Produces them.)

Brown. These are the same glasses that I marked, on the 15th of February, in Mr. Nash's cellar.

Jordan. These are the same glasses that I saw Mr. Brown mark.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-7

230. WILLIAM BEVINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , two ounces of hops, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Davey and Joseph Talbot .

THOMAS DAVEY sworn. - I live in Gould-square, Crutched-friars , I am a druggist ; at the time of this occurrence I was in partnership with Joseph Talbot : Having missed a great many articles, I went to the prisoner's apartments, I think on the 28th of February, in a court in the Minories, and in one of the drawers found a paper parcel; when I asked him the contents of the paper, he informed me it was hops which his wife had bought in the Borough; but knowing it to be a sample of hops of my own, having no warrant, I asked his leave to take it home with me to compare; they were samples sent to me from Bristol; I found the marks corresponded with those I had; after that, I sent for the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You keep fourteen or fifteen servants? - A. Yes.

Q. You went there to know whether you had been robbed or not? - A. Yes.

Q. This man was confined to his bed? - A. Yes.

Q. He had his ribs broke in your service? - A. Yes.

THOMAS ARTHUR sworn. - I am a druggist, servant to Mr. Davey; I went to the prisoner's lodgings with Mr. Davey, where I found this sample of hops; I immediately said they belonged to us, the prisoner was present; Mr. Davey asked leave to take them home to examine them; he said, with all his heart.

THOMAS SKINNER sworn. - I am a constable. (Produces the hops.)

Q. (To Mr. Davey.) Look at that sample of hops, how do you know it to be your property? - A. By the mark and number, which answers to the original invoice which I have in my pocket; it is one of a set of samples sent to me from Bristol, marked from No. 1 to 9, and this is one of the nine.

Q. What is the value of hops? - A. I believe about sixteen pence a pound.

Q. And these are two ounces? - A. Yes.

Q. That would be of the value of two-pence? - A. Or perhaps not so much.

Q. You did not know you had lost any hops? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you seen the inside of this parcel? - A. No, I have not opened it at all.

Q. And yet you swear it contains hops? - A. From the appearance of it I conceive it to be hops; I have never opened it.

Court. Q. Is that sample of hops of any value at all? - A. I cannot say.

Jury. Q. Are samples ever charged for? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-8

231. JOHN ARNOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , two quart pewter pots, value 3 s. the property of James White .

JAMES WHITE sworn. - I keep the Swan, in Bury-street, St. James's : On the 2d of March, I met the prisoner coming out of the yard, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I asked him what he wanted; he said, he wanted a glass of brandy; I told him, if he came in, he should have it; I went into the yard to see if I missed any thing, and I missed two quart pots, I had seen them in the window just before; when I came back, the prisoner was gone; I went out in pursuit of him, and met him in King's-place; I brought him back into the house, and Thomas Moss took the two pots out of his pocket.

THOMAS MOSS sworn. - I am a Bow-street patrol, I was in the house when the prisoner came in, about half past eight o'clock, on the 2d of March; he asked for the name of John Wicks ; I told him I knew one John Wicks , at Richmond, an old poacher, if he meant him; upon that, he went out again directly: Mr. White then came in, and said, that man had stolen two of his pots; we then went after him, we took different directions; we found him, and brought him back; I searched him, and found these two pots upon him, one in each pocket. (Produces them.)

White. These are my pots.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that it was his first offence; that he had a wife and five small children; that he had fell from a scaffold, and was in great distress.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-9

232. RICHARD RADLEY was indicted for that he, on the 3d of March , sixty pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of the Hon. William-Booth Grey , and fixed to his dwelling-house, feloniously did break, with intent to steal .

SARAH RICKARDS sworn. - At the time this happened, I was living in Lower Brook-street ; I had the care of Mr. William-Booth Grey's house: On Saturday, the 3d of March, we were alarmed by bricks falling in the area, a little before nine o'clock in the evening; the family were out of town; Hannah Pollard , who was with me, went out at the front door, I was in the back parlour; Mr. Franks, who keeps the hotel across the way, brought the prisoner back about five or six minutes afterwards; I gave charge of him to the watchman; as I went out at the front door, I saw the lead broke off, and hanging over the front area-rails; it was the pipe that conveyed the water from the top of the house; it was broke off at the joint at the top, and held by an hold-fast at the bottom; an acquaintance of mine separated it after the prisoner was gone to the watch-house, and brought it in; the prisoner wished not to be sent to the watch-house, and asked what he had done.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are quite sure it was not quite separated? - A. No; it was confined by an iron hold-fast to keep it close to the wall; it was confined by bricks on each side.

Q. The lead does not go into the bricks? - A. Yes, it does, two or three inches.

- FRANKS sworn. - On the 3d of March, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I went out at my door, which is almost opposite where Mr. Grey lives: I saw two of Mr. Grey's servants with a lighted candle at the door, looking at a leaden pipe; I went over, and observed the pipe pulled out of one of the joints, with a good many of the hold-fasts pulled out, and likewise from the front door into the area, about seven or eight feet down, and there were a great many of the bricks torn away with it; it was fast at the lower end; it was almost twisted off within an inch. In coming back, I saw the prisoner looking past the end of my house; I went back, and told them to go in with the candle; they did so; I went back again, and saw the man come back in about five minutes; he ran over very quick indeed to the pipe; he took hold of it, and twisted it about half a dozen times; some bricks fell out of the wall, he ran away, and I took him; I was not above three yards off, and he ran towards me; it was as dark as pitch; I knew him to be the same man, because I had at my own door two very large lamps, which made it as light as day; he was very quick for a minute or two; some bricklayers labourers came up before the watchman came up, and then he was threatening to strike them; I delivered him to the watchman.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-10

233. ELIZABETH WILSON, otherwise GRIFFITHS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , six cups and saucers, value 1 s. two glass tumblers, value 4 d. a salt-cellar, value 1 d. nine forks, value 1 s. four knives, value 8 d. three looking-glasses, value 6 d. a tin canister, value 6 d. and a great variety of other articles , the property of Mary Buckle .

MARY BUCKLE sworn. - I gave the prisoner a night's lodging, and she staid with me from Thursday till the Monday, the 13th of February; I missed among other things the articles mentioned

in the indictment, (repeats them); I missed them the same day she went away; I found them afterwards in Buckridge-street, St. Giles's, on the 23d of February; I went first to Mr. Edwards's, in Portpool-lane, and described the prisoner, and by that means found where she was; I found all the articles in the indictment in her lodging; I could not get an officer, and the watchman came up; she desired me not to make a noise, and then the watchman came, and I gave charge of her.

- CONNOR sworn. - I am a watchman; I took charge of the prisoner. (Produces the property.)

Mrs. Buckle. These things are all my property.

ANN SCALES sworn. - I know nothing more than seeing the property found.

Prisoner's defence. She lent me these things to put in my lodging; she has known me these seven years.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18040411-11

234. RICHARD RADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , sixty pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. the property of the Hon. William-Booth Grey , fixed to his dwelling-house .

It appearing in evidence that the lead had not been removed, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-12

235. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John-Vickriss Taylor , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 17th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two pocketbooks, value 2 s. a Bank-note, value 20 l. another Bank-note, value 15 l. seven other Bank-notes, value 60 l. sixteen other Bank-notes, value 80 l. three other Bank-notes, value 6 l. one hundred and six other Bank-notes, value 106 l. a Cambridge Bank-note, value 10 l. a bill of exchange, value 106 l. 7 s. another bill of exchange, value 37 l. 10 s. and another bill of exchange, value 112 l. 10 s. the property of the said John .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, except the possession of part of the notes sixteen days after the robbery, and being a respectable tradesman in Whitechapel, he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-13

236. EPHRAIM FERMITEGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a bottle, value 2 d. a pint of varnish, value 4 s. six maps, value 3 s. six sheets of globe paper, value 1 s. and six sheets of other paper, value 6 d. the property of John Cary .

JOHN CARY sworn. - I live at No. 181, in the Strand ; I am an engraver of maps , the prisoner was my servant employed in the globe making business ; I had reason to suspect he had committed depredations upon me at various times; I missed a quantity of varnish, and, on the 24th of February last, I took the precaution to mark some bottles of varnish; they were on the premises where I carry on my globe making business in Angel-court, I have a manufactory there; I found in a cupboard, of which the prisoner had the key, some bottles of varnish, which I marked; the next day I sent the prisoner for a quantity of varnish to Mr. Swinsin's, in Fore-street; one of the bottles which I found on the premises the night before, was a quart bottle; the prisoner brought me back one of the bottles which we had marked on the premises the night before; he told me he had brought it from Fore-street, that he had purchased it there; I then gave charge of him to a peace-officer, Limerick; we then went back with the prisoner to the manufactory, to observe if the bottles which I had marked were still remaining; I found the whole of them were removed; I asked the prisoner what he had done with them; he denied that there had been any such bottles in the cupboard; he was then told, that, on the preceding night, we had searched the cupboard, and found three bottles, which we marked, one of which he had now brought as having purchased it of Mr. Swinsin; he was then pressed to discover what he had done with the other two bottles; he said, when very much pressed, that he had thrown them into the Thames; upon questioning a lad, who worked in the same room, we found them, from his information, concealed in the dust-hole; that lad has run away, and I cannot find him; we found them concealed in some soot; the prisoner then made a full confession of the theft, he acknowledged that he had taken and concealed these bottles; we afterwards went with the prisoner to his lodgings; we there found paper of various descriptions, brown paper and globe paper; the papers that I can swear to are these, (producing them;) they are papers for mounting small pocket globes. (Produces the varnish.)

( John Hoskins corroborated the evidence of Mr. Cary, as to finding the property.)

JOHN LIMERICK sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner; he confessed he had only bought a pint of varnish instead of a quart; I was present when the bottles were found in the foot.

Mr. Cary. I have no doubt these are my bottles.

Prisoner's defence. I have lived with my master six years, I know nothing of the property.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-14

237. WILLIAM GILL, alias HEWITT , was indicted for that he, on the 19th of February , in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, upon Samuel Brown , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a metal watch, value 50 s. a steel chain, value 1 s. two gold seals, value 42 s. a leather purse, value 6 d. a silver Indian coin, value 1 s. and 5 s. in monies, numbered, the property of the said Samuel .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

SAMUEL BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are one of the Common-council of the City of London ? - A. I am.

Q. Do you reside at Hackney? - A. I own a house at Hackney: On Sunday, the 19th of February, about half after twelve at noon, I was walking in the fields, over what they call the Hide, behind Clapton . I saw the prisoner.

Q. Look at him? - A. I am very sure he is the man; he passed me upon what is called the Hide, and afterwards came back again; he passed me twice.

Q. And therefore you had an opportunity of observing his person? - A. Certainly; when he passed me I was in what they call Love-lane; the prisoner went down Love-lane; I went very gently along down there; it is a long narrow walk, but about the middle of it there is a sort of elbow that you can neither see the top nor the bottom; when I got to that elbow he popped out upon me, and collared me; he got me fast hold, and asked me for my money.

Q. At the time he laid hold of you by the collar had he any thing in the other hand? - A. He pulled out a long knife, a long carving knife, which he held at my breast; he asked me for my money, and I gave it him in a little leather purse; there was only five shillings and sixpence, and an Indian piece; then he asked me for my watch; I pulled my watch out and gave it him; he then desired I would go: now, says he, you go that way; I did; I could not help looking back, and he said go on; I went on a little farther and looked back again; I found he was gone, and I run after him as fast as I could; I saw at a distance a person coming along, and I called out I am robbed.

Q. That person turned out to be Philip Read ? - A. Yes; he must have passed him at that minute almost; he went after him; I could not myself tell which way they were gone, and I happened to take the wrong way; I enquired at the turnpike.

Q. When you see the watch again shall you be able to know it? - A. Yes; there is a seal with S. B. and another seal with three heads upon it.

Q. Have you any doubt the prisoner at the bar was the person who robbed you? - A. Not the least.

PHILIP READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. A shoemaker.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Cold-bath lane, Church-street, Hackney: I heard the prosecutor call out, either I am robbed, or he has robbed me, pointing with his stick, but I could not see to whom he was pointing it; I instantly turned round, and met the prisoner running.

Court. Q. Did he point his stick in a direction which led to the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. And in consequence of that you saw the prisoner running? - A. Yes, I ran after him, and he was out of my sight about a minute, or a minute and a half.

Q. Are you sure it was the same man who got into your sight again afterwards? - A. Yes, I pursued him; the prisoner turned round and looked at me; I still kept running after him, and he was out of my sight again; when I got into Clapton I got information of the prisoner, and ran into Pound-lane; I saw him run across the field to the right, and I pursued him; he then wheeled to the left, and ran into Clapton again; then he took a tack to the left as if he was coming to Hackney; I called out stop thief, and he jumped over some low paling to the left.

Q. Before he jumped over, did you observe him do any thing? - A. No, he then ran across the field to some high paling, and then I saw him stoop.

Q. Did you observe him do any thing? - A. I cannot say I did; he stooped as if he was laying something upon the ground.

Q. Did he stoop at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he been running all the time you have been describing? - A. Yes; he then rose up again and got over the high paling; I got over the paling, and saw a young man of the name of Thurling had got hold of the prisoner; he heard me call out stop thief; he was then taken to Hackney-cage, and searched; there was none of the property found upon him.

Q. Were you afterwards present when any of the property was found? - A. Yes; I went up to the high paling where I saw the prisoner stoop, I looked down and saw the watch lying there; I took the watch up, and found a little leather bag underneath where the watch laid; I took the property to Mr. Brown, in Hackney-grove, and he identified it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. (To Brown). Was that watch and the leather bag which the witness brought to your house, the same that the prisoner had robbed you of? - A. Yes.

Q. After you had shown it to Brown what did you do with it? - A. I carried it home; I took it to Worship-street the next day; it was sealed up and delivered to me. (Produces the property).

Q. (To Mr. Brown). Is that your watch? - A. Yes, I am sure it is.

Q. Look at that bag? - A. This is what I gave him; the seals are my seals.

JOHN THURLING sworn. - Q. Did you see the watch found. - A. Yes, under the paling.

Q. Did you see the prisoner stoop there? - A. Yes.

Q. As if dropping something? - A. Yes; I took him after he came over the paling.

Prisoner's defence. I have not any thing to say; I did expect a few friends, but they are not come.

GUILTY, Death , aged 40.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, upon the ground of his not having hurt him .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18040411-15

238. THOMAS BRANHAM was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Frazer , about the hour of eight in the night of the 29th of March , and stealing two saucepans, value 5 s. the property of the said James .

JAMES FRAZER sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Whitcomb-street .

Q. What happened to your house? - A. On the 29th of March, between seven and eight o'clock, I was going out to a neighbour's house; I was in Whitcomb-court; I observed the prisoner in a corner that leads to my kitchen; there is a window in the court that lets light into the kitchen; there are wooden bars outside the window, and glass inside; I went up to the prisoner, and asked him what he was doing there; he said he was doing nothing; I said you must be doing something there, and then he struck me, I then laid hold of him, and another jumped out of the window at the same time, and I took hold of him, and then they both struck me; I had hold of them both at the same time; the man that came out of the window ran away, I then took the prisoner to the watch-house.

Q. What have you to say about the saucepan? - A. When I first came up to the prisoner, I asked him what he was doing, and he dropped the saucepan; he had one, and was in the act of taking out the second; he dropped them both; they are here.

Q. Do you know yourself what part of the house they were in? - A. They were upon the dresser in the kitchen after being cleaned; I had seen them there at five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. It was pretty light then? - A. No, it was growing dusk; I could see him very distinctly.

Q. You never saw the other man again? - A. No.

Q. What sort of a window is it, does it shove up? - A. No.

Q. Is it a slider? - A. No.

Q. Is it made to open? - A. There is a bolt inside; they broke the glass to push back the bolt; the wooden bars were broke and taken away.

Prisoner. I never had the property; he struck me first.

Prosecutor. I did not strike him, he struck me.

- GARDINER sworn. - Q. You are an officer? - A. Yes; I was coming up St. Martin's-lane, I saw a mob, and knowing the prisoner, I searched him, and found nothing upon him; I then went to the house, and found that a window had been broke; it was a casement window, one of the small squares had been broke to push back the bolt.

Q. Have you the saucepans? - A. Yes, the prosecutor delivered them to me. (Produces them).

Court. (To the prosecutor). Q. Look at the saucepans? - A. They are both mine.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing about the saucepans. I was coming through Whitcomb-court: I heard a piece of work about some kettles, and I was curious enough to stop and look, and the prosecutor struck me, and I struck him again, and then he gave charge of me; I never was in his house, nor did not know any thing of the property.

GUILTY, aged 46,

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-16

239. JAMES JONES, otherwise BURROWES , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Crozier , about the hour of eight in the night of the 19th of March , with intent the goods therein being burglariously to steal .

It appearing that neither the prosecutor or any servant of his slept in the house, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-17

240. THOMAS WHITWORTH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Burnell , about the hour of seven in the night of the 10th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two umbrellas, value 34 s. the property of the said John .

JOHN BURNELL sworn. - Q. What do you know about this? - A. On the 10th of March, I was sitting in a little room level with the shop, I heard a noise similar to a window being broke, I immediately ran into the shop to see if it was my window that was broke, and found it was my shop window, and two umbrellas taken out; I missed one immediately, because I had sold it, and was to have taken it home that night; I went out, and a person of the name of Spearing delivered the prisoner to me.

Q. Was it light or dark at this time? - A. Nearly dark.

Q. You could see the face of the boy when he was delivered to you? - A. Yes, I remember him very well.

Q. Could you see the face of the boy distinctly? - A. Yes; he had one of the umbrellas in his hand.

- SPEARING sworn. - I saw the prisoner at the corner of May's-buildings , where Mr. Burnell lives; I saw him looking all manner of ways; I went to my own house, to see if the cellar-window was fast; I came back, and heard a window crack; the prisoner ran by with something in his hand, I pursued him to the bottom of Bedfordbury, where I stopped him; I picked up one umbrella close by him when I stopped him; I took him back to Mr. Burnell's; I then directed a person whereabout I took the boy, and he went down and brought the other; he is not here, the prisoner's hand was bleeding when I took him.

Prisoner's defence. I was going down Bedfordbury, and this gentleman came and touched me on the shoulder, and brought me to that gentleman's house, and said I had taken two umbrellas; I am quite innocent of it.

GUILTY, aged 15,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18040411-18

241. CAROLINE MATTHEWS and ELIZABETH FISHER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , forty yards of ribbon, value 20 s. the property of Joseph Kay , privately in his shop .

SUSANNAH KAY sworn. - I am the wife of Joseph Kay .

Q. Where is his shop? - A. No. 28, Ratcliff-highway , a milliner and haberdasher 's.

Q. Do you attend the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. What day was it this happened? - A. On Saturday, the 10th of March; about half after one o'clock, the prisoner, Fisher, came into the shop, with another woman, to look at some ribbons; the prisoner, Matthews, I never saw till I saw her before the Magistrate; the other woman made her escape; Fisher asked to look at some ribbons; I took out the drawer, and placed it upon the counter; she turned over the ribbons several times in the drawer; there were none there that would please her, and I took some out of the window; she made choice of one, it was scarlet, with chocolate in the middle; the other person was difficult, and did not make choice of any; Fisher asked for a yard and a half of the one that she made choice of, and the person that was with her paid for it; they each offered me a seven-shilling piece for change; I took the seven-shilling piece from the other woman, whom she called Nance; I gave her six good shillings in change; she hesitated about the change being good, and I told her I had looked at it before I gave it her, and was sure it was all good, and I would not change them; a Mrs. Kemp then came in, whom I knew, for half an ounce of pins; she said to Fisher, that she believed the silver to be better than them; I asked her her reason for saying so; she said, they were shop-lifters.

Q. Were they present? - A. Yes, they were; they went away immediately as quick as possible.

Q. What did the ribbon come to? - A. A shilling; the woman that was called Nance sat upon a low seat in the shop; she pretended to have a very bad cough, and hid all her face entirely; she had a large cloak on, and she had either her gown or her cloak over her face at times; Fisher stood close by her; I did not see her drop any thing, but she certainly had the means of dropping them into her lap out of the drawer.

Q. Who was in the shop at the time? - A. My servant, Mary Wilson .

Q. Is she here? - A. No.

Q. You did not see any thing go yourself? - A. No; I immediately missed a piece of plain white ribbon from the drawer.

Q. Are you sure that was in the drawer when you produced it? - A. Yes, I saw it afterwards at the Magistrates, between seven and eight in the evening; the prisoner, Fisher, was then in custody; I missed a piece of figured ribbon at the same time, from the same drawer, which I saw again at the Magistrates the same evening with some others; I lost five pieces in all, I saw four of them at the Magistrates; I knew them to be mine, two of them had my shop mark upon them.

Q. Was Matthews in custody at the same time with Fisher? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see Fisher before? - A. I don't think I ever did.

Q. Are you sure she is one of the two women that was in your shop? - A. Yes, they might be in the shop altogether about twenty minutes; I went in search of her with an officer, and found her in custody; I was not at the apprehension of either of the women.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. A great many persons were in the shop during the time they were there? - A. There was my servant and Miss Bromet.

Q. Is Miss Bromet here? - A. No.

Q. You yourself did not see any thing taken? - A. No.

Q. Is Mrs. Kemp here? - A. No.

THOMAS FENWICK sworn. - I belong to the East-India Company's employ; at the time this happened I lodged at No. 175, Ratcliff-highway, about one hundred yards from Mrs. Kay's shop: On the 10th of March, I saw the prisoner, Matthews, between one and two o'clock, standing opposite Mr. Kemp's shop, near a public-house door; the prisoner, Fisher, and another person, whom I

do not know, came up to her; Fisher and the other went into Mrs. Kay's, Matthews went about twenty yards distance, and waited at the corner of John's-hill; I sent Mrs. Kemp in, I thought they were after no good; I saw them come out of the shop in about half an hour, I was waiting at Mrs. Kemp's door all the while; after they came out of Mrs. Kay's, I went in, and staid about five minutes.

Q. How came you to follow them? - A. I had business at Ratcliff-cross, and I went in for the parcels I had to carry there; I told Mrs. Kay I would follow them, and if I saw an officer, I would give charge of them; I afterwards saw Matthews standing by Old Gravel-lane, and then they all three came together again; they proceeded towards Ratcliff-cross; Fisher and the other woman then went into another shop, and I came back and acquainted the officer of it, Robert Brown ; I shewed him Matthews first, she was standing by herself, the other two were in the shop; while I was shewing Matthews to Brown, the other two came out of the shop, then they went into company together again; the two then went into a linen-draper's shop again, and Matthews staid at some distance off from the shop; Brown went into the linen-draper's shop where Fisher and the other had gone in; Brown then came and took Matthews; he took her to a public-house and searched her, and found several pieces of ribbon upon her; we then went in pursuit of the other two; I came up with the other two in Whitechapel road, they had gone across the fields; I told them they must go back; I brought the prisoner, Fisher, back to Shadwell-office, the other woman ran away the contrary way; there was about a yard and a half of ribbon found upon Fisher.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the public office, Shadwell: in consequence of an information, I went in pursuit of the two prisoners, and another woman; I went to a shop near Cock-hill, Ratcliff; I first found Fisher, and another woman of the name of Nance; I saw Matthews standing opposite the shop, this was about half a mile from Mrs. Kays; I laid hold of Fisher in the shop, and searched her; she had nothing but this piece of ribbon about her (produced); I found nothing upon the other woman; I then let them go; they followed me out immediately; I then went after Matthews, I overtook her in about twenty yards, and took her into a public-house; I searched her, and found eleven pieces of ribbon upon her; I then brought her back, and locked her up at the lock-up room in our office; I went in search of Fisher, and the other woman; Mr. Fenwick took one street, and I the other; I returned back to the public-house, where I secured Matthews; Mr. Fenwick brought Fisher to me at the public-house, and I searched her a second time, and found the same piece of ribbon upon her, and nothing else; Matthews told me she had come from Fisher; Fisher was in the room, but I cannot say whether she heard it or not. (The ribbons were produced).

Mrs. Kay. These pieces have my shop-mark upon them; I have sold some small quantity: I had a pattern of one of the others before the Magistrate, but I have not brought it here; the other piece I cut in a hurry, and put a blanket pin into it by accident, which is a very uncommon thing; it has a blanket pin in it now; this is the ribbon that I sold them for a shilling. (The yard and half of ribbon produced).

Matthews's defence. I was coming along, and a woman stopped me and asked me to hold that bundle for her; I thought she was a long while coming back; I stopped for her, and then Mr. Brown came and took me.

Q. (To Brown.) Were those things in a bundle when you took them from her? - A. No; they were loose in her pocket.

The prisoner, Fisher, left her defence to her Counsel, and called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Matthews, GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

Fisher, GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-19

242. SUSANNAH NETTLEFORD, alias BRADFORD , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of February , four window-curtains, value 40 s. the property of Elias Fletcher , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH GARRETT sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Fifteen; I am servant to Elias Fletcher : On Thursday, the 23d of February, I saw the prisoner on the kitchen-stairs, she was a stranger; I asked her what she did there, she said she was going to the privy; I called my mistress; she went down, and when she came up again, I saw the strings of the curtains hanging down her petticoat.

SARAH FLETCHER sworn. - I am the wife of Elias Fletcher , I was called by the last witness; I saw the prisoner, I met her in the passage, I had a set of curtains in the kitchen which had been washed the day before; I made her go down with me to see if the curtains were right; when I went down I missed them, I caught hold of the bundle which she had dropped, I did not see her drop it; when I got her into the kitchen I saw one of the curtains drop from her; I had seen them that very morning.

( John Armstrong produced the curtains, which were identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the curtains.

GUILTY, aged 33,

Of stealing goods, value 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-20

243. EDWARD TAYLOR and MARY-ANN TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling-house of Thomas Holderness , on the 24th of February , a pair of sheets, value 1 s. a table-cloth, value 7 s. an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. and ten Bank-notes, value 10 l. the property of the said Thomas .

(The case was opened by Mr. Watson.)

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. A leather-dresser by trade.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoners? - A. I never saw them till the day the robbery was committed, I saw the woman first at Mr. Holderness's, in her own dwelling-room; Treadway was with me, and Mr. Holderness.

Q. For what purpose did they go to her room? - A. They went with a search-warrant.

Q. Did you hear the woman prisoner say any thing at the time you made the search? -

Mr. Gurney. Q. Before she said any thing, was there any thing said to induce her to confess; was she told it would be better for her? - A. I cannot say whether there was or not; she was told the best thing she could do would be to confess.

THOMAS HOLDERNESS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 47, Drury-lane; I keep a public-house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, perfectly well; they came to take an apartment of me about Christmas last: on the 18th of February I took about twenty one-pound notes and put them in a drawer; I had indorsed the persons names that I had taken them of, I put them in a one pair back room where I sleep.

Q. How soon after you had deposited them in that drawer had you occasion to go to the drawer? - A. On the 24th of February they were all safe.

Q. Did you afterwards miss any part of them? - A. Yes; the next morning, at nine o'clock, I found the drawer had been broke open, and I missed ten notes.

Q. Did you afterwards see any of those Banknotes that had been taken from the drawer? - A. Yes; I found two in a tea-pot among some leaves in the room where the prisoners occupied, and two at Mr. Lane's the pawnbroker.

Q. Did you search in those two places in consequence of information you had received? - A. Yes, from the woman prisoner herself.

Q. Did you afterwards see any other property you had lost at the same time that the notes were lost? - A. Yes, at the prisoner, Edward Taylor 's mother, in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden.

Q. What became of that property? - A. The officer has got it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you mean to say you lost this table-cloth and the sheets on the 24th of February? - A. I suppose so, I had not seen them for some time.

Q. When had you first missed them? - A. I did not know of their being missed till my wife missed them.

Q. Had you ever marked the same names at the back of Bank-notes before? - A. Not to my knowledge; I marked these on suspicion.

Court Q. When was the last time you had seen these notes yourself? - A. In the morning of the 24th of February.

SARAH HOLDERNESS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - A. I am; I saw my husband write upon the notes; the last time I saw the notes in the drawer was on the 24th of February, near five o'clock; they were then safe in the drawer, and I left them under lock and key; my husband missed them on the 25th in the morning.

Q. Did you miss any thing else? - A. I did not miss them till I saw them, and knew them to be my own; the officer brought me a table-cloth, a pair of sheets, and a white apron,

Q. How long before that time did you see them in your house? - A. I cannot exactly say, because they were in a drawer in my own bed room; I saw two of the notes which had been lost in the parlour, when I saw the linen.

THOMAS ALLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. I am servant to Mr. Lane, pawnbroker, No. 135, Drury-lane.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. I know the woman's face particularly well; I have two notes that I took from her; I took them on Friday, the 24th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; she came to redeem five or six pledges, which amounted to 40 s. together, and she gave me these two one-pound notes; the articles pledged were her own things. (Produces them).

Mr. Gurney. Q. (To Prosecutor). How many other one-pound notes were there in your drawer? - A. I suppose forty others.

Mr. Watson. Q. Look at these two one-pound notes, were they in your possession? - A. Yes, these two notes were in my drawer the 24th of February.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You are a constable? - A. Yes; on the 25th of February, I went with a search-warrant to the prisoner's room, and found nothing; then I went to the mother-in-law's, and there I found the property I now produce, lying under the table.

Q. After you had so done, did you go back again to the prisoner's room and search the tea-pot? - A. Yes, in the tea-pot on the table of the prisoner's room, I found there two one-pound notes.

(The notes produced and identified by Mr. Holderness).

(The linen produced and identified by Mrs. Holderness.)

MARY TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Are these the articles found at your house? - A. I believe they are; she brought them to me in the forenoon, between nine and ten on the 25th; she said that a housekeeper had given them to her; she wished me to keep them for her till she returned.

Q. (To Holderness). Did this man live with his wife in that apartment? - A. Yes, he had been there at dinner-time, about half past one or two o'clock.

Q. What is the value of the linen? - A. It is worth 4 s. or 5 s.

Mary-Ann Taylor , GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

Edward Taylor , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18040411-21

244. PROVIDENCE HANSARD was indicted for forging, on the 7th of February , a certain order for the payment of 741 l. with intention to defraud Abraham Robarts , Sir William Curtis , Bart. Charles Horneyhold , Abraham-Wildey Robarts , and William Curtis , Junior .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing, as true, a like forged order for the payment of money, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

And in two other Counts. For similar offences, with intention to defraud John-Richard Ripley .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Bolland; and the case stated by Mr. Serjeant Shepherd.)

MARSHALL WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a clerk in the house of Robarts, Curtis, and Company? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the firm of that house? - A. Abraham Robarts , Sir William Curtis , Bart. Charles Horneyhold , Abraham-Wildey Robarts, and William Curtis , Junior.

Q. Did Mr. John-Richard Ripley keep cash at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Ripley is a merchant ? - A. Yes.

Q. He had a partner - what is his name? - A. Matthew Wiss .

Q. Had Mr. Ripley a separate account in your house, as well as a joint account with Mr. Wiss? - A. He had.

Q. Take that check in your hand, look at it, and tell me if you remember whether you paid that check to any body, and when? - A. I recollect paying this check on the 7th of February.

Q. Look round at the prisoner, and tell me whether you know his person? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Was it a man you paid it to? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell my Lord and the Jury how you paid it, and in what manner? - A. I will refer to the original entry.

Court. Q. Have you any recollection of the person to whom you paid it, so as to be able to say negatively that the prisoner was not the person? - A. No; I cannot take upon me to say whether he is the person or not; I paid him one Bank-note, 300 l. No. 26; another Bank-note, 300 l. No. 79; another Bank-note, 100 l. No. 6574; another, 20 l. No. 9921; another, 20 l. note, No. 1030; and a one-pound note, No. 23,465.

Q. That is the entry you made at the time you paid these notes? - A. Yes.

Q. When you part with your notes in the house, do you desire any name to be put upon the back of the check? - A. No.

Court. Q. You made no enquiry who the bearer of the check was? - A. None.

Q. Is it not usual to put upon the back of the check the name of the person to whom you pay the money? - A. No, it is not.

Mr. JOHN SCOTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is that your hand-writing as the subscribing witness to that release? - A. Yes; I saw the parties seal and deliver it.

CHARLES PIKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a clerk to Mr. Scott, a solicitor? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you the other subscribing witness to that release? - A. Yes; I saw Mr. Abraham Robarts execute it.

Mr. JOHN RICHARD RIPLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. I believe you keep cash at Messrs. Robarts and Company? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that draft, and see if the superscription to it is your hand-writing? - A. It is not. (The draft read.) -

"No. 5, Lombard-street, London, 6th February, 1804, Messrs. Robarts, Curtis, Horneyhold, Robarts and Curtis, pay Mr. John Chapman , or bearer, 741 pounds, John Richard Ripley . 741."

JOHN HEWLING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Serjeant Shepherd. Q. You are a clerk in the Bank of England? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you so in February, 1804? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any persons coming for change for Bank-notes for 300 l. - A. I do not remember any particular person.

Q. Do you remember a person coming? - A. Yes; I remember a person coming for change for two 300 l. notes.

Q. Look at these notes; were those the notes that were brought to be exchanged? - A. According to the name and residence they are.

Q. Were those the notes brought for change? - A. Yes, they are entered in the book (produces the book); I gave fifteen notes of 20 l. and thirty of 10 l.

Q. Give us the numbers of the 20 l. notes? - A. The 20 l. notes are from 2684 to 2698, inclusive; the number of the 10 l. notes were from 6590 to

6600, eleven of them, and 8851 to 8869 were nineteen more.

Q. When notes are brought to the Bank for change, is it usual for the person who brings them to put his name upon the back? - A. Yes, always.

Q. Do you ever change notes without that being done? - A. No, it is a regulation of the directors of the Bank; the person who brought these notes for change wrote upon them John Chapman , No. 30, Russel-square.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How many clerks are there in that office in which you are? - A. Eight.

Q. Do you mean to state positively that you received these two notes of the person that brought them with your own hands? - A. Yes; I enter them, and my partner pays.

Q. Do not you sometimes enter for each other? - A. At times; if a person is out of the way, and has a long list in hand, he may.

Q. Have you any recollection of this fact? - A. No, I have not.

Q. Therefore do you mean to state positively your's was the hand by whom these 300 l. notes were received? - A. Yes, because it is my own hand-writing.

Q. Are you sure they were not received by somebody else, and given you by another clerk? - A. That I am sure of.

Q. Are you sure you gave the person the notes in change? - A. No, my partner gave him the notes.

Q. Did you see him give them? - A. No.

Q. Then, whether these notes, the numbers of which you took, were given in exchange for these two notes, you do not know? - A. They must be.

Q. Did you see it done? - A. No.

Mr. Serjeant Shepherd. Q. Was the other clerk with you on that day, a man of the name of Seabrook? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM SEABROOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a clerk in the Bank? - A. I am.

Q. Were you present at the time that two 300 l. notes were brought to be cashed? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at these two 300 l. notes, and tell me if they were the notes that were offered to the last witness to be cashed? - A. They are; I paid them, and delivered the notes to the person who brought them.

Q. Did you see the name of Chapman written upon it? - A. Yes, because being more than one note, I put the name of the party myself,

"Chapman, two notes, 600 l."

JOHN HAWLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, and say whether you know him? - A. I do.

Q. Did the prisoner come to you at any time in the month of February last? - A. Three times, I believe; the first time was on the seventh of February.

Q. What was his business? - A. He called as he was passing by to look at a watch which he saw in the window; I was not at home myself; the next morning he called when I was at home, and exchanged the watch he had bought the day before for another.

Q. After he had so exchanged the watch, did any thing else pass between you? - A. He purchased a seal.

Q. Did he take the watch and seals away with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner after? - A. The day following that; I saw him on the ninth.

Q. What was his business that morning? - A. He called respecting some coins that he said he should want.

Q. What kind of coins? - A. He particularly wished Portugal pieces.

Q. Did you procure him these coins; or what passed between you and the prisoner upon the subject of them? - A. I told him I could procure them for him, but I had not any of them in the house; I had other sorts of coins, but he objected to them.

Q. What else passed between you and him? - A. I asked him how many he should want, and he said a considerable quantity; I then told him it would be necessary he should leave me some money, which he said he had no objection to; he would take all I could procure him; he left me 420 l. in Bank-notes.

Q. Look at that 100 l. note; was that one of the notes he left? - A. Yes, it has my signature at the back of it.

Q. Look at the name of John Chapman , No. 30, Russell-square, upon that note; was that upon the note at the time the prisoner left it with you? - A. I am not quite certain of that.

Q. Have you any belief about it? - A. I did not examine it so as as to be certain about it.

Q. Now look at the others? - A. These are the notes that the prisoner left with me.

Q. With the 100 l. the rest made up 320 l.? - A. Yes.

Q. Is your name upon the whole of them? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that note (shewing him another)? - A. That has my name upon it also.

Q. Did the prisoner ever return for the Portugal pieces? - A. No.

Q. Did he return for the notes? - A. No, I never saw him afterwards.

(The numbers read as follows:) 100 l. No. 6574; the 20 l. notes, No. 9921, 2691, 2689, 2684, 2693, 1030, 2695, 2696, 2685, 2694, and 2690;

the 10 l. notes, No. 6594, 6599, 6598, 6597, 6596, 6592, 6590, 6591, 6595, and 6593.

Q. Was the seal you sold to the prisoner, an engraved, or a blank seal? - A. A blank seal.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. All this transaction between you and the prisoner was public and open? - A. Yes.

Q. No secrecy at all? - None.

Q. Your shop, I believe, is in the county of Middlesex? - A. Yes.

JOHN STRONGITHARM sworn. - Q. Are you an engraver in Pall-mall? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar ever come to your shop for any purpose? - A. I think he did.

Q. When was it? - A. On the 10th of February.

Q. For what purpose did he come to your shop? - A. I did not take the order in; I saw him when it was finished; Mrs. Strongitharm took it in; when I saw him, he came to fetch the seal key away.

Q. What was to be done with it? - A. It was left to have engraved a cypher H in a medallion.

Q. Was it a black cornelian when left at your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the setting? - A. A gold seal, with a white cornelian.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner? - A. Yes; he was to come in the course of the day, and he did not come till the evening; when he came Mrs. Strongitharm was gone out; he said he wanted it because he was going out of town; I could not find it; after some looking we found it, but before that he said he was going into Lincolnshire.

Q. He took the seal with him, did he? - A. Yes, and paid for it.

- BURROWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a ticket-porter. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed by Mr. Scott to watch the motions of the prisoner? - A. Yes, on the 10th of February.

Q. Where did you see him? - A. In Great Suffolk-street, in the Borough.

Q. Where did you trace him? - A. I traced him to Blackfriars road; he took a coach there, and from thence he went to the corner of St. Alban's-street, Pall-mall, a seal-engraver to the Prince of Wales.

Q. That gentleman who has been examined? - A. Yes; from thence he went to Hyde-Park Corner in the same coach; he got out of the coach, and walked from thence to Hammersmith, I kept in sight of him all the time; he stopped a few minutes at Hammersmith, and hailed the Bath and Bristol coach; he got into the stage, and I parted with him.

Q. Was the Bath and Bristol stage going downwards? - A. Yes.

DANIEL ELIESON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Serjeant Shepherd. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he ever a clerk in your house? - A. He was.

Q. Had you an opportunity of being acquainted with his hand-writing? - A. I had.

Q. Be so good as look at these notes; do you see the name of John Chapman at the back of these notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Whose hand-writing do you believe that to be? - A. It resembles very much the prisoner's writing.

Q. Can you, from looking at the notes, form a belief whether it is his writing or not? - A. It is very much like it.

Q. Do you believe that is his hand writing? - A. It is very much like his hand.

Q. Such as to enable you to form a judgment? - A. It is very much like it.

Court. Q. Do you believe it to be his handwriting from your knowledge of the character of his hand-writing? - A. I believe it to be his handwriting.

Q. Look at that (shewing him another)? - A. I believe that to be his writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you mean that you have such a belief of its being the prisoner's hand-writing that if they had been shown you in another place, and you had been asked whose handwriting they were, without being called upon to see the prisoner at the bar, or he had not been accused of any offence, should you then have believed it to be his hand-writing? - A. I believe I should.

ABRAHAM GOLDSMID , the younger, sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe he lived with you? - A. He was in the accompting-house with my partner and myself nearly two years.

Q. During that time you had frequent opportunities of seeing his hand-writing? - A. Almost every day.

Q. Be so good as to look at the back of these notes, and see if it is his hand-writing. - A. It is very like it.

Q. Have you a doubt about it? - A. Yes, I have, because I received a letter from Liverpool, from a clerk in the house of Earle, so much like this, that I observed to a clerk at the time that it was so very much like his writing that I should not know the difference.

Q. Upon looking at it had you any doubt? - A. It is as much like one as it is like the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Then you would as soon think it was the hand-writing of the person at Liverpool as the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you ever see the gentleman at Liverpool write? - No.

Q. You do not know but they were both written by the same person? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. You have received more letters than one of that hand-writing? - A. One or two.

Q. In the couse of business? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you transact business in consequence of that hand-writing? - A. No, it was not of consequence; it was a postscript to a letter, or something of that sort.

Q. Before or since this transaction? - A. About the same time; it might be a little before.

PETER BROADLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been acquainted with his handwriting? - A. I have.

Q. Look at the back of these notes, and tell me if you believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. His hand-writing and my own are exactly the same.

Q. Will you swear you believe it to be his handwriting? - A. It resembles it.

Court. Q. Is it your hand-writing? - A. No, it is not.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Then whose do you believe it to be? - A. I conclude it to be his according to the best of my belief.

Court. Q. If you had met with it any where else, should you have concluded it to be his writing? - A. I should.

Q. And have transacted business upon it? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. If you had received a letter in that hand-writing, with that signature, J. Chapman, should you have concluded it to be his hand-writing? - A. I should.

Q. Looking at that name, J. Chapman, as it is, do you or not believe it to be his hand-writing? - A. I believe it is.

JUDAH COHEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with him? - A. Two years.

Q. Are you acquainted with his hand-writing? - Yes.

Q. Look at the name, John Chapman , Russell-square, and say whether it is his hand-writing? - A. It is very much like his hand-writing.

Q. Do you believe it to be his hand-writing? - A. It looks very much like it.

Q. Do you believe it or not to be his handwriting? - A. I believe it is.

ABRAHAM WILDEY ROBERTS sworn. Examined by Mr. Serjeant Shepherd. Q. Did you receive that letter which you have in your hand through the medium of the Twopenny Post? - A. I did, I received it at the banking-house.

Q. When did you receive it? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Was it after the circumstance of this forged draft? - A. Certainly.

Q. Did it contain at the time that you received it the same notes that you have in your hand? - A. Most undoubtedly, certainly, to the amount of 200 l. (the numbers read), all 10 l.; we recovered altogether the amount of 620 l.; 420 l. were left with Mr. Hawley, and 2001. sent by the Post to our house, No. 8851 to 8869, inclusive.

WILLIAM ANTHONY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a Bow-street officer? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you applied to by the prosecutors for the purpose of apprehending the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it? - A. On the 10th or 11th of February last.

Q. Tell us what you did in pursuit of the prisoner? - A. I first went to Bristol, by the direction of Messrs. Robarts's house; I made enquiry there, but I did not find the prisoner; I then went to the Post-office, and in consequence of the information I obtained, I went from there to Andover; I got some information, and from thence I went to Basingstoke.

Q. Did you get any information of the prisoner there? - A. Yes, I went back to Whitchurch, and from thence to Market Hilsley, between Newbury and Oxford.

Q. At Market Hilsley, did you come up with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you find him? - A. In the Oxford coach, going to Oxford; I addressed him by his name, Hansard; he said his name was Hansard; I told him I wanted him, he must come out of the coach; he seemed very much surprised, but got out of the coach.

Q. What day was this? - A. On Wednesday, the 15th of February; I took him into the public-house where the coach was standing; I asked him for his money; he asked me at what suit I apprehended him, I told him it was for forgery; I asked him for his money, he pulled out a purse with upwards of 40 l. in gold; I asked him for the remainder. After some hesitation he told me he had left 420 l. with a friend in Coventry-street.

Q. Did he mention that friend's name? - A. Not at that time; I believe he did afterwards.

Q. Do you recollect whether he did or not? - A. I believe he did, and 2001. he had sent in his saddle bags from Whitchurch the night before, directed to a friend in Eastcheap, and a letter at the same time, desiring that friend might send it to Messrs. Robarts the bankers.

Q. Did he at all say what the money was composed of that he sent, whether notes or money, or what? - A. I cannot charge my memory; he said he had no doubt they had received it before the time of my apprehending him.

Q. Did you take any thing from him? - A. I took upwards of 40 guineas in gold from him, and a pocket-book, in which there was some writing.

Q. Have you looked at the writing at all (produces

it); Does it contain any thing relative to this? - A. I believe it does. (It is read).

January 28th, Left Goldsmids, engaged a passage to Jamaica. February 2d, Paid J. Bennett 7 l. a loan. 9th, A very narrow escape for my life; slept at Brentford. 11th, Slept at Andover. 12th and 13th, Slept at Salisbury. 14th, Slept at Whitchurch, Hants. 15th, Hilsley Fair, 26th August.

Court. Q. Did you look into the pocket-book immediately after you had apprehended him? - A. No; it was two or three days afterwards; it has never been out of my possession.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Is it exactly in the same state in which you took it from him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he say any thing else to you? - A. I do not recollect any thing more.

Q. Did he express any astonishment at being found? - A. He was very much surprised; he said, from what had happened, his friend having sent back the 420 l. and the 200 l. having been sent to the bankers; he did not suppose they would have troubled their heads in sending after him.

Mr. WILLIAM CURTIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Did you go, according to the direction upon that note to Russel-square? - A. I went to see if there was such a Number, and found the house not built up to the first story.

Q. Where is your banking-house? - A. In Lombard-street.

Q. Is that in the City of London? - Yes.

(Mr. William called again).

Mr. Serjeant Shephard. Q. Where was this draft brought to you for payment? - A. No. 15, Lombard-street, in the City.

(Mr. Robarts called again).

Examined by Mr. Serjeant Shephard. Q. Did you receive the notes from Mr. Hawley? - A. Yes, I did, 420 l.

Q. Was the name John Chapman upon the back of that note at the time you received it from Mr. Hawley? - A. Most Certainly, undoubtedly.

(Mr. Ripley called again).

Mr. Gurney. Q. You say the signature of the note is not your hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you able to say that from the want of resemblance to your hand-writing? - A. No, from finding my account was overdrawn; it resembles my hand-writing very much, but I can swear I never signed it, because I did not know any person of the name of Chapman; I applied to the bankers to know why they placed it to my account.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , Death , aged 24.

London Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18040411-22

245. EDWARD TIDEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a pocketbook, value 1 s. and a 5 l. Bank of England note , the property of James Dunn .

JAMES DUNN sworn. - I am a chimney-sweeper , and live in North-street, Chelsea. On Wednesday, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the 14th of March last, I went to a friend at the Prince of Wales's Feathers, in Exeter-street; his name is Winter, and was to purchase a horse and a cart for me; I went to pay one Dunn, a baker, for the horse and cart; he was there, and the prisoner at the bar; we all drank and eat together; I have known the prisoner for some time, but not by name.

Q. Had you occasion to pay for the horse and cart? - A. I pulled out of my pocket-book, and gave to the said Thomas Winter a 10 l. note to give to Mr. Dunn, the baker; I do not understand notes, being no scholar: I see Winter give Dunn the 10 l. note for the horse and cart as part of payment; the prisoner was in the tap-room at the time Dunn, the baker, and Winter went away as soon as the victuals were gone.

Q. What time of the day was this? - A. I found it was between the hours of eleven and twelve. After Dunn and Winter were gone, the prisoner continued in my company.

Q. Were you drinking together? - A. I cannot recollect that; we drank after they were gone, if we did, it was only a pint or two; I had drank gin in the morning, I think three glasses; I did not drink beer till after I had my victuals, and then I drank very near a pot to my own share.

Q. Can you say how long you had continued in company with the prisoner after Dunn and Winter were gone? - A. Very near three quarters of an hour; we sat talking; he says to me, if I was in your place, Mr. Dunn, I would go and look after my property, the horse and cart I had bought; I said, where is the use of my going, when I have given the man liberty to work the horse and cart till Saturday, that was part of the bargain; he said I would have you go, for fear the horse and cart should be sold again; with great persuasion I went, and he went with me.

Q. What time of the day was it when you left this public-house? - A. Near one o'clock.

Q. How did you feel yourself at that time with respect to your sobriety? - A. Quite sober.

Q. How came you to tell the Justice that you felt yourself in liquor? - A. I did not, I had been drinking a little gin in the morning, and after that I had some victuals, and the porter does not hurt me.

Q. Do you mean to say the Justice mistook you; after you went from the public-house, what state were you in? - A. I was quite sober; I and the prisoner went down to the King's Arms, in Soho-square; as we went along we called upon one Dunn, a Police-officer; the prisoner asked him if it was not right that I should go and get a receipt for the 10 l.; then we all three went together to the King's Arms to get a receipt from Dunn, the

baker, for the 10 l.; he lived opposite: I had to pay 1 l. 6 d. the remainder of the money; I took out my pocket-book, on purpose to give Dunn, the Police-officer, a 1 l. note to pay Dunn, the baker, I had another 1 l. note besides in the corner of the pocket-book; I did not know what money I had when I went out; I had a 5 l. note; I afterwards found, when Dunn returned the pocket-book to me, a 5 l. note and a 1 l. note too; I did not know it was a 5 l. note; I am no scholar.

Q. You are sure that you gave it to Dunn? - A. Yes, the 5 l. note and the 1 l. note too; I put them in my pocket-book, and put it in my coat-pocket; the prisoner was with me all the time; we staid at the King's Arms the best part of an hour.

Q. I suppose you had some more liquor there? - A. Yes, because we joined the company of Dunn, the baker.

Q. Will you say you were perfectly sober when you left the King's Arms? - A. Not quite, but as sensible as I am now,

Q. When you left that house, who was with you? - A. The prisoner, and Dunn the officer; we walked together from Soho-square till we came to the Cadogan Arms; Dunn, the officer, parted from me just by York-street; and the prisoner promised Dunn to see me home.

Q. What occasion had he to see you home? - A. On account of my limbs being so bad; I am very feeble.

Q. No other cause? - A. No, I was supported by the prisoner, till I desired to lean against a wall.

Q. How long might you be resting that way? - A. About two minutes; he stood at the right-hand side of me, and I felt his hand in my pocket; then I said to him halloa, what are you doing; as soon as I had spoke that, he took to his heels, and run round the corner of York-street.

Q. You are sure that you felt with your hand his hands at your pocket? - A. Yes, my pocket was turned inside out.

Q. Did you immediately miss your pocketbook? - A. Yes; I immediately called out stop thief; there came several neighbours round me, and asked me what was the matter, I told them I had been robbed; they asked me if I knew him; I said I knew him very well, but I did not know his name.

Q. Did you ever see your pocket-book again? - A. Yes, it might be about two or three minutes after, that a man that lives in York-street, picked it up close by me, and gave it me; he is a newsmonger.

Q. Did you see him open your pocket-book? - A. I did not.

Q. How came you not to examine it then? - A. I did not then; when I came to Winter's house I examined it directly.

Q. Can you undertake to say, that what you call a 5 l. note was taken out of the pocket-book? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it that you had the prisoner taken up? - A. On the Saturday following; I left that to Mr. Dunn, the patrol, who understood the business better than I did; I informed Mr. Dunn of it on Friday.

Q. How came you not to inform him of it sooner? - A. I went to the Prince of Wales's Feathers, there I saw the prisoner; I did not go nigh him, but sat at the other side of the tap-room, I said nothing to him about it then; he owned to other people on Thursday in the tap-room.

Q. You have none of these people here? - A. No.

Q. When did you take him up? - A. On Saturday.

Q. Were you present, and what did he say? - A. He said he was willing to go.

Q. Did you see any thing found upon him? - A. No.

Q. What do you mean about your pocket-book laying by where you were standing? - A. Very likely he might have dropped it there.

Q. How could he possibly open your pocketbook and take your note out; you told us he was running away? - A. I cannot say whether he might have took it out before; I am not clear in that, and was trying to put it in.

Q. Of course you do not know your note again? - A. No.

JAMES DUNN sworn. - I am a Police patrol; I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner together at my own door; I heard the prisoner say, that it was better for him to go and pay the remainder of the money, for fear they should swindle him out of the money.

Q. In what state was the prosecutor in at that time with respect to sobriety? - A. In appearance he was fit for any sort of work; I thought he was sober; I went with him and the prisoner to the King's Arms, there I saw Dunn, the baker; I said to him, I am authorised by this man to say to you, if you will be good enough to take the remainder of the money, and let the man have the horse and cart; he said the difference between him and Dunn was, that he was to work the horse and cart till Saturday.

Q. In the course of the conversation, did Dunn take out his pocket-book? - A. Yes, he gave me two notes, one a 5 l. note, and the other a 1 l. note: As Dunn, the baker, would not take the remainder of the money, I gave it him again; I said, take notice what money you gave me; I saw him put it in his pocket-book, and I saw him put his pocket-book in his right-hand pocket; we staid at the King's Arms about half an

hour, or a little more; Dunn, the baker, went away, the prisoner and I went with him; he is quite a cripple; he cannot walk above forty yards without sitting down; he was supported by me and the prisoner.

Q. Did he appear to be sober when he quitted the King's Arms? - A. As sober as he is now; I walked with him about half a mile; I left them together; I said, Mr. Dunn, I must leave you because of my duty; the prisoner said he would take care of him and see him home.

Q. When was it you saw Dunn the prosecutor again? - A. Not till Thursday night; I saw the prisoner again on Friday.

Q. Had Dunn, the prosecutor, made his complaints to you? - A. Not to me, it was to my wife; I happened to be on duty on board the Tender with some men; on Friday I saw the prisoner, I had not a warrant then; I had instructions from Sir Richard Ford , and had a warrant on Saturday; I took him out of his own bed, and told him I had a warrant against him for robbing Dunn; he said, he did not care a farthing about Dunn, or any body else; he denied having any money of any description; I read the warrant to him, the warrant mentioned the five-pound note; I searched him at the watch-house, there I found fifteen shillings in silver, seven-pence in copper, and a five-pound note; the silver I found in his waistcoat, the five-pound note was concealed in his breeches-pocket; it was so placed, that I thought it was concealed, it was a little pocket quite within the breeches-pocket; I had the watchman with me; I said, I'll search him again, I think he has it concealed; I thought I felt a lump, (I had searched him, but could not then find it;) I took him back to the black hole again, there I found it; this is the note, I have had it ever since, (the note produced;) we went to the Star and Garter before we went to the King's Arms, Dunn stopped there to pay for a pane of glass he had broke; they had two pots of beer the whole time I was with them.

Prisoner's defence. On Wednesday, the 14th of March last, I went to the Prince of Wales's Feathers tavern, Sloane-street, there I was told by Thomas Winter that he had bought a horse and cart for James Dunn ; Winter then left me; I afterwards told Dunn he had acted improperly in paying the ten pounds, he being at the same time much intoxicated; we then took coach, he being in liquor so as not to be able to walk, on stepping into the coach, we met one Dunn, a patrol; he went with us to the King's Arms, Soho-square, there we saw Dunn, the baker, who refused to give a receipt, and to give up the horse and cart; in leaving the King's Arms, James Dunn insisted to go to the Star and Garter to have some more drink, at the same time he sat there he fell against the windows, and broke them, and paid for them; then he wanted to go to the Prince of Wales's Feathers, and have more liquor; Dunn, the patrol, said he could go no further, he recommended him to go with me; I begged him to make haste, he being very troublesome, and from his character of being a very dangerous and wicked man, I thought it proper to leave him. On Friday following, my wife told me I had a bad character with being with Dunn, the chimney-sweeper; I went to Dunn, the patrol; his wife told me he was gone to Covent-garden; I went there, and saw him; I frequently called upon Dunn, the patrol, at his house, and could not find him at home. On Saturday, Dunn, the patrol, came to me, and said he had a warrant, and I said I would go with him, being confident that I had not robbed him, nor any one else; what money I had then was my own property; the five pound note I had given me for my Christmas-box, and I bought some left-off cloaths, and sold them to a Jew, and gave him ten shillings in exchange for that five-pound note that was taken from me; the Christmas-box was given me in shillings and half-crowns; I bought some cloaths that one of the witnesses knows; I sold them to the Jew, and gave him the balance for the five pound note.

Court. (To Dunn the patrol). Q. Did the prisoner come to you as you were going to Covent-Garden? - A. Yes, I saw him as I was coming back.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-23

246. JAMES NIXON and WILLIAM BARNETT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Hargrave , on the 21st of February , about the hour of two o'clock at night, and burglariously stealing therein two smelling-bottles in Morocco cases, value 10 s. two snuff-boxes, value 20 s. two pair of snuffers, value 2 s. two half-guineas, three crown pieces, one shilling, two sixpences, eight pieces of base metal, value 4 d. the property of John Rider .

THOMAS HARGRAVE sworn. I keep the Ipswich Arms Inn, Cullum-street : About two o'clock, on the 21st of February last, the watchman rapped at my window; he has a key to let my customers in at night; he said there were some thieves in my lower warehouse; I asked him if he was certain of it; he said he was; I bid him go round my galleries and call my men up, he did; I put on my cloaths, and got up as soon as I could, and my men likewise; I met the men at the top of the stairs; I keep the keys of the warehouse in my own room; I took them up to bed with me; I took the keys, likewise a gun and bayonet, which stood at my bed's-head, and gave it to one of my men, and said, hold this while I unlock the door of the warehouse; I immediately unlocked the door,

and my men rushed in immediately; one had the gun; I did not see any person when they first rushed in till the watchman came with his light, then I saw the two prisoners standing at the top of the window-case endeavouring to make their escape out, they had got the sash up; one of my men that had the gun struck the prisoner with the bayonet; he desired him not to hurt him, and they would surrender; we tied their hands behind them in the warehouse, and took them to the watch-house; they were searched at the watch-house, and taken to the Compter.

Q. What did you find on them when they were searched? - A. There were some little boxes of different coins, the constable took notice of them; what was found in my possession belonged to Mr. Rider, they were in my possession till they were delivered to Mr. Rider.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You keep an inn? - A. Yes.

Q. Whereabouts was that warehouse situated in the inn yard? - A. At the right-hand side.

Court. Q. They are all in the same gateway? - A. Yes, they are all enclosed in one gateway.

Mr. Alley. Q. The warehouse is quite a separate concern? - A. No, it all belongs to me, I do not let any part of the yard to any one at all; over the warehouse I let out to a private family.

Q. Do you yourself use the warehouse? - A. Yes, to put the goods of different carriers in.

JOHN RIDER sworn. - I am a carpenter ; I sent some things to the Ipswich Arms, I cannot tell rightly what day, to Mr. Hargrave's warehouse, I think the box was left on the 19th of February; on the 21st of February, my son went to the warehouse, he informed me the box was broke open at Mr. Hargrave's warehouse; I went to Mr. Hargrave's, and saw the box; here is a picklock-key that was left in one of the boxes in Mr. Hargrave's warehouse, there were two mahogany boxes that were broke open that were taken out of a large chest; they are here; the property is mine to the best of my knowledge. (The property produced.)

Q. Have you any doubt about it? - A. I have seen the property, they are mine, I have not the least doubt of it; there are some few things that I can positively swear to, the smelling-bottles, the tortoiseshell snuff-box with a silver bottom, that I can swear to; I have not the least doubt about the coin and the two new half-guineas, but I cannot so well swear to them; I put two new half-guineas and some pieces of coin in the snuff-box.

RICHARD-JOSEPH BARTLETT sworn. - I am a confectioner, and live in Fenchurch-street, I was officer of the night; in consequence of the watchman suspecting something was wrong, I and the patrol went to Mr. Hargrave's with the watchman about twenty-five minutes before three; we alarmed the family, they opened the door of the warehouse, and we entered, where we found the two prisoners; we secured them, and tied their hands behind them, and took them to the watch-house; I have several things in my possession which I found upon them; I searched Nixon first, on him I found two glass smelling-bottles in Morocco cases, there was a tortoiseshell snuff-box with two new half-guineas in it and some foreign coin, and two or three sixpences; there was another box with an eye-glass and a silver thimble, and two pair of snuffers, a brass pin, a dark lantern, and several things not mentioned in the indictment; I found them on Nixon.

Q. What did you find about Barnett? - A. Twenty-three picklock-keys, an iron crow, and a pair of scissars.

Q. When you had secured them in the warehouse, what did they say for themselves? - A. They said they were our prisoners, and they did not mean to act with any violence.

THOMAS CHESLING sworn. - I am a watchman, and was going my round at half past two o'clock, I saw a light through the shutters of Thomas Hargrave's warehouse; I immediately went to the gate to unlock it, and found this pick-lock-key in the key-hole, (produces it;) it was in the inside of the lock; so that I could not put my key in: I immediately called to my brother watchman to come and assist me; I knew there was somebody in the warehouse; the lock being very much damaged, we got in very easy.

Q. Where was this? - A. At the great gate that leads into the yard; I went up immediately to Mr. Hargrave's, and told him there was certainly somebody in the warehouse; he told me to call his men up; I went, and called the men up; they got up, and they all came down stairs together; Mr. Hargrave came down stairs, and unlocked the warehouse-door; we went into the warehouse, there were the two prisoners standing by the window; they had the sash up, if possible to make their escape out, but they could not; then the ostler secured one of them, and the other man belonging to Mr. Hargrave pricked the tall one, his name is Barnett, on the left shoulder; he begged for his life; he said, behave like gentlemen to us, and we will surrender as prisoners; accordingly they did; we bound their arms behind them, and brought them to the watch-house.

Q. Which way had they got into this warehouse? A. They got in at the great gate; they forced the spring-lock at the great gate with an iron crow; the warehouse door is under the gateway; they unlocked the warehouse door.

Q. I thought you said you found the picklock-key in the yard-door lock? - A. It was found broken inside of the lock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. They behaved very quietly? - A. Yes.

Q. What you call pricking them on the shoulder was running them through the shoulder? - A. No, he only just pricked him; he did not like it.

HUGH REDDEN sworn. - I am an ostler to Mr. Hargrave: About half past two o'clock, the watchman called me up; he told us there were some thieves in the warehouse; our master got up, and brought his gun and bayonet; master unlocked the warehouse, and we saw these two men, the prisoners, standing at the window inside of the warehouse; they had got the sash of the window up, and was trying to get the window-shutter open to go out of the window into the street; I ran up to the window, and got hold of Nixon; I took hold of him by the collar, and pulled him down; my fellow-servant had the gun in his hand, his name is Smith, he could not get hold of the other, there were some boxes in the way; he pricked him with the bayonet, they directly surrendered themselves up as prisoners, and desired us not to hurt them; at the time I had got Nixon down on the floor, I heard something jingle; I thought he was taking out a knife; when I came back, I found eight or nine picklock-keys laying on the floor; we tied their hands behind them, and took them to the watch-house.

Q. Had they taken any thing out of the warehouse? - A. They had broke open the large chest, and the constable of the night found some of the property on them at the watch-house.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am a porter at the inn; I got up about half past two, and found these two men in the warehouse; they were at the window trying to get out; I just pricked the tall man, his name is Barnett, with the bayonet, I could not get at him; they then surrendered, we tied their hands behind them; they did not make any resistance.

WILLIAM MUNRO sworn. - I am a constable and patrol of Langbourn Ward, one of the watchmen brought the alarm to the watch-house; the constable and I went, we found these two men; I advised them to tie their hands behind them, and as they were brought to the watch-house, the constable searched them, and I took an inventory of the things found upon them; we found upon Barnett twenty-three picklock-keys, one pocket handkerchief, and a pair of scissars; upon Nixon one dark lantern, one waistcoat piece, two bottles imitating eggs, two half-guineas, six pieces of foreign coin, eighteen-pence in silver, four one-pound notes, two two-pound notes, and in another pocket half a guinea, a seven-shilling piece, eighteen-pence in silver, a silver watch, a piece of black lace, a silver thimble, and two pieces of candle.

(Mr. Hargrave produced the crow.)

Q. (To Mr. Hargrave.) Where was that found? - A. In the warehouse.

Q. How did they get into the warehouse? - A. By these picklock keys.

Mr. Alley. Q. You never saw these smelling bottles before? - A. No.

Q. (To Mr. Rider.) Look at the smelling bottles? - A. I can swear to them perfectly; the snuff-box I well know; this portable desk was inclosed in a large chest.

Mr. Hargrave (To Court.) Here is a mark of an iron chissel; they were so particularly fastened that they were forced with an iron chissel.

Neither of the prisoners said any thing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

Nixon, GUILTY , Death , aged 29.

Barnett, GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-24

247. JAMES MILLARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 lb. weight, value 10 d. two half-pound weights, value 10 d. and three quarters of a pound weight of metal, value 4 d. the property of John Thompson , and Robert and John Warner .

THOMAS THOMPSON sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Warners, No. 8, Crescent, Jewin-street : On the 24th of March I was ordered by my master to go into the warehouse, and take particular notice who came in and who went out, and the only person I saw was James Millard , the prisoner; he worked for the same masters, and when I saw him there, I saw him put some metal in his pocket; then I went down to acquaint my master what I had seen, and when I went to tell the master he went out to breakfast; it was about nine o'clock in the morning; as soon as he got off from the premises both my masters came out, and as soon as they got up to him, they caught him by the collar, and a scuffle ensued; I got him down; being nine o'clock, our men came to our assistance; a constable came up and assisted, and searched him, and pulled off his apron, and found a good deal of property in his small cloaths; there were ten tea-kettle nobs, there were three flat-weights, one pound and two half-pounds; when he had pulled it out of his pocket, and out of his small cloaths, and put it on the boards of the shop, the constable took charge of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. These are large works, there is a great deal of business carried on? - A. Yes.

Q. There are a good many partners? - A. There are three; I do not know any more.

Q. But there may be a good many more for what you know? - A. Too many.

- LOCKYER sworn. - I am a workman of Mr. Warner: On Saturday the 24th of March I heard the alarm of a thief being taken; I went and looked, and saw it was James Millard; I went

to breakfast, and when I returned (the constable and Millard were gone) I went into the warehouse; my master desired me to look this property over; they were all the property of Messrs. Thompson, John and Robert Warner .

- CLARK sworn. - I am a constable.

Q. Where did you find these things? - A. In his breeches; there was a one pound weight, and two half-pound weights, a piece of copper bale; the rest are tea-kettle nobs. (The property produced and identified.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Do you mean to say all these things are cast in your house? - A. Some of them I can prove are cast in the house.

Q. You cast a great many? - A. Yes.

Q. About how many in the course of a year? - A. I cannot pretend to calculate, about a hundred weight in the course of a week; they are finished up in the house.

Q. How long have you lived at these premises? - A. About fifteen years.

Q. The prisoner at the bar was employed in this warehouse; - he was particularly employed in packing up goods in the rough room, and to look over the rough room? - A. Never to pack up; he had to take care of the ware-rooms when the clerks were out of the way.

Q. How long has the prisoner lived on the premises? - A. About two years.

Prisoner's defence. I have a wife and five children; I was persuaded by a friend that I should not be called till Friday; there are many that would come forward then; I leave it entirely to your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-25

248. SOPHIA HANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of February , a coat, value 2 l. a waistcoat, value 2 s. a table-cloth, value 12 s. a shirt, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and five tea-spoons, value 15 s. the property of Charles Cowling .

CHARLES COWLING sworn. - I live in Old-Bethlem, Bishopsgate , and am a tin-plate worker ; the prisoner was a servant ; she was recommended to me to take care of my wife, and had been with me about six weeks when I discovered this; about the 18th of January she came to me, and soon after she came to attend my wife, who is almost blind and lame; soon afterwards I was informed that some of my property was missing, and found my coat was at a pawnbroker's in Houndsditch; his name is Barker; I found these spoons; three of them belonged to me, and two belonged to a gentleman who had an apartment in my house; I had lost a great many things; she had pawned them all in her own name; I had a constable, and took her up and sent her to the Compter.

Q. Had she left your service? - A. No, I took care she should not.

GEORGE YOUNG sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Barker, pawnbroker, No. 91, Houndsditch: The prosecutor came to enquire about a coat; he described a person to me; I recollected that person coming to our shop.

Court. Q. Is the prisoner that person? - A. Yes; the prisoner is that person (the articles produced and shewn); here is a coat, waistcoat, shirt, a pair of stockings, five tea-spoons, and a tablecloth.

Q. Did she pawn them all in one day? - A. No; they were pawned on different days.

Q. Were you present at the pawning of the whole? - A. No; I was present when she pawned the waistcoat, the hose and spoons; I am positive the prisoner is the person.

Q. Are they all pledged in the same name? - A. They are all in the same name.

WILLIAM SUMNER sworn. - I am a constable, and was sent for, and I took charge of her, and found two duplicates upon her; they appeared to belong to these articles (the officer produced the duplicates); the duplicates shewn to George Young .

Q. (To Young.) Are these your duplicates? - A. Yes; the counter-part of this ticket is not produced; there were several articles taken that proved to be her own. (The property produced and identified.)

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you say you would forgive her if she would confess the truth? - A. I said, that if she would tell me where the things were I would lay things as easy as possible, she told me she would not; she said they were all mine when she was before my Lord-Mayor.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-26

249. JOHN M'CURE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , one ounce eighteen penny-weights of silver, value 8 s. the property of Crispin Fuller .

CRISPIN FULLER sworn. - I am a silversmith , and live in Windsor-court, Monkwell-street , the prisoner was a journeyman to me: On the 17th of March last, he had two tea-pot spouts to cut, after they were stamped; after he had cut them, he left the place where he cut them; I examined the place where he had cut them, he had a skin to let the cuttings fall in, I had a suspicion that he had got some of the cuttings in his pocket; I left the shop, and went and got an officer; I told him I believed he had been robbing me that morning, he denied it;

I told him to turn his pocket inside out, which he refused to do; I told him it was of no use to refuse, I insisted upon it being done, or else it should be done for him, I would have him searched; upon which, he at last took out of his waistcoat-pocket one ounce eighteen penny weights of silver cuttings, he acknowledged they were mine; he hoped, as it was the first time he had robbed me, I would have mercy on him.

Q. How did he behave himself? - A. He behaved himself very well; I had suspicions he was not an honest man.

- SEARLE sworn. - I am a constable.

Q. What did he say? - A. He begged that his master would not discharge him, and that he would forgive him.

Q. (To Mr. Fuller.) What is the value of those cuttings? - A. Eight shillings.

Prisoner's defence. These tea-pot spouts I had to strike, he would not suffer them to be cut up stairs for fear of knocking the cieling down, because it was very heavy work: I had to take them down stairs, with four dies, and a crooked pair of shears, in all it was three quarters of an hundred-weight; after I had cut them, I had to enter them in the accompting-house; it was my practise to put the cuttings in my waistcoat-pocket, the dies and shears in my arms, to go up stairs; then my master said I had something about me that was his property; had he given me two minutes longer they would have been out of my pocket; I never took a penny-weight of silver out of his house, nor did I mean it at that time; I have a wife pregnant, and two children.

Prosecutor. He said he took these two tea-pot spouts down to strike; he did not, they were struck by another man.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-27

250. ROBERT MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , thirteen yards of cambric, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Abraham Alford .

ABRAHAM ALFORD sworn. - I am a linen-draper , and live at No. 6, Bishopsgate-street Without : On the 2d of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I lost thirteen yards of cambric from the shop-door, they were just within the shop-door.

CORNELIUS WEST sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Alford, and was shewing some Salisbury flannels; I cast my eye towards the door, and observed this cambric going from off the horse at the door; I immediately ran out and saw Robert Mills , he dropped it, and stooped to pick it up; I immediately laid hold of him, and he flung the print away, and asked me what I wanted with him; I told him he had stole that print from the door; he denied it, and struck me twice, and the third time he struck me I fell on one hand and one knee; he immediately ran away; the young man that was shutting up the shop saw him strike me; I got up and ran after him, and this young man, who ran faster than me, struck Robert Mills on the neck as he was running, and knocked him down, and brought him to Mr. Alford.

Q. Had you lost sight of him? - A. No, I had not; I had not run above ten yards before the young man had got him.

JAMES WALLIS sworn. - I was passing Bishopsgate Church-yard about half past seven o'clock on the 2d of April, and saw the prisoner throw something away from him; I observed a scuffle between them both, and the prisoner gave the young man here, a blow upon the face; I immediately ran, and about Cammomile-street, we took the prisoner, and brought him back to the shop.

BENJAMIN PAIN sworn. - I was shutting up the shop, and saw the scuffle; the prisoner knocked the young man down, and he cried out stop thief, I ran and brought him back.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for about half past seven o'clock, and received the property of Mr. Alford; it has been in my custody ever since. (The property produced, and identified by Mr. Alford and Cornelius West.)

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-28

251. ROBERT WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , three leather skins, value 24 s. a saddle-cloth, value 2 s. and six-pieces of leather, value 1 s. the property of Robert Gibson .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-29

252. JOHN FLIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. the property of Edward Kent .

EDWARD KENT sworn. - I live at No. 32, on the Colonade, Russell-square .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I never saw him till he was taken: On the 22d of February, I lost two pots, they were taken from No. 6, Colonade; I pursued him, and took the pots from him; I followed him about four hundred yards, he was running when I first saw him; I called out stop thief, and Mr. Randell overtook him; there were two pint pots taken out of his apron, they are mine.

JOHN RANDELL sworn. - We had information

of a person that saw him take them; I saw that Mr. Kent was not sufficient to catch him, I run, and took the pots from him, and have kept them ever since; the prisoner said not a word.

ANN CALLIS sworn. - I am a lodger, at No. 16, Colonade, and was down stairs in the kitchen, when I heard the pots knock one against the other, and I gave the alarm; these pots were in the passage, the door of the house is generally open in the day time. (The pots produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Somers Town after nine shillings that was owing me, and coming back, I met a person; he asked me if I would give him something to drink; he turned back, and gave me these pots; I did not know what to do with them; on my coming back, I was pursued and taken.

Q. (To Kent.) How far was he from your door when you first saw him? - A. He was next door but one.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-30

253. ESTHER LOVELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , two silk handkerchiefs, value 10 s. the property of John Heath .

RICHARD APPLEGARTH sworn. - On Saturday, the 25th of February, Esther Lovell came into Mr. Heath's shop, No. 27, Norton Falgate ; she asked for John, a boy, his name is John Lovell ; I called John down stairs; they went to the fire, and talked about five minutes; she asked for three handkerchiefs, I shewed her some in three or four parcels; she picked out two, and laid them on the counter; she asked me to shew her some red silk handkerchiefs that were then on the shelves, and as I was taking them from the shelves, I saw her put these two silk handkerchiefs in her pocket; she told me to cut off a yellow handkerchief, which was six shillings, I did not charge her with it then, and she gave me a seven-shilling piece; she said I need not fold it up, as she wanted to tie it round her neck. I went with the seven-shilling piece to get a shilling to give the prisoner; then I told Mr. Jones. Mr. Jones followed her, I went after him, and lifted up her great coat, and saw something under her gown; we took her back, and sent for an officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. This young woman desired to have some handkerchiefs shewn her? - A. Yes.

Q. The handkerchiefs she took was perfectly in your view? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw her put them on the counter? - A. Yes, and I saw her put them quite plainly into her right-hand pocket.

Q. It was done quite open? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What distance were you at the time? - A. I was on the other side of the counter; when we shew any of these articles, we always take particular notice of what is doing.

Mr. Watson. Q. This woman was a relation of one John, that she asked for? - A. Yes; he has been at our house about a week.

Q. Was that John standing by her? - A. He was standing at the left hand side of her.

Q. Had you told her what was the price of these things? - A. No; they are marked G S F, that was seven shillings and sixpence; she had not asked the price.

EDWARD JONES sworn. - Richard Applegarth had cut off the yellow handkerchief, and brought me the seven-shilling piece to take for the yellow handkerchief that she had purchased; he told me something; I followed the woman; there was another woman with her in the shop, she stood on the left-hand side of her; I followed her and the other woman, and stopped them just as they had got out of the shop; I brought them both back into the shop, and sent Applegarth for an officer; the officer came, and he searched her up stairs. As we went up stairs, I saw the handkerchief laying in a roll at the entrance of the shop, by the door; I picked them up, and gave them to Mason, the officer; he is here.

Q. What account did she give of it? - A. She said nothing, she seemed to be confused; there is a witness here that saw her drop it.

- MASON sworn. - I was the officer sent for, and saw the handkerchief laying at the door when I went into the shop; Mr. Jones picked them up.

Q. They were not wrapped up in any thing? - A. No. (The handkerchiefs produced and identified by Richard Applegarth .)

JOHN FARROW sworn. - I was coming by promiscuously, and saw Jones lay hold of the prisoner's arm, just before I came to him; she let them drop as they were taking her to go up stairs to be searched.

Q. You did not pick them up, nor mention the circumstance at the time? - A. No.

Prisoner. Q. I wish to ask the last witness if he can look me in the face, and swear that he saw me drop it? - A. That I can, and I am sorry to say it.

Prisoner. He has swore falsely.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18040411-31

254. JOSEPH MAGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , a steel watch-chain, value 6 d. a metal key, value 6 d. and

a metal seal, value 6 d. the property of Michael Quin .

MICHAEL QUIN sworn. - I am a labouring man , and lost my watch-chain on Monday, the 5th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I took some victuals with me to the Eight Bells at Hackney in my hand, and called for a pint of beer; the prisoner desired me to make a pot of it. After that I called for another pot; I fell asleep, and when I awoke, I was asked by Stephen Bishop if I had lost my watch; he said, is this your chain? the chain was broke, and part of it left on the watch; I can swear to it; I had seen it to my watch between eight and nine at night.

Q. What time was it when it was shewn you? - A. Between ten and eleven; the prisoner was present when Bishop shewed it me, and charged him with doing it.

STEPHEN BISHOP sworn. - I was at the Eight Bells, and saw the last witness and the prisoner there; I saw the prisoner pulling of somewhat; I saw him break the watch-chain from the watch; I said, you villain, you have robbed the man now he is asleep; he said, d - n your eyes I have not; then he threw it on the floor, and put his foot on it, and I told him to take his foot off.

Prisoner's defence. We were drinking together, and I never meddled with any thing; this Bishop owed me a grudge, and said he would do me if possible.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-32

255. REBECCA CORDEROY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a tin saucepan, value 6 d. three pint basons, value 6 d. two butter-boats, value 6 d. and a cup and saucer, value 4 d. the property of Robert Williams .

SARAH WILLIAMS sworn. - My husband's name is Robert Williams ; I live at No. 24, Paternoster-row, Spitalfields ; I have a house there, and keep a shop: On the 23d of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, I thought I heard somebody in the yard; I got up, took the candle, and opened the door in the passage that leads to the yard; I saw the prisoner in the passage coming out of the yard.

Q. Whereabouts is your kitchen? - A. In a stone yard, a door opens in the yard to it; she threw the saucepan to the door when she saw me; I opened her apron, and took out three pint basons, two butter boats, and a cup and saucer; I asked her what she did there; she said, a lodger in the house had given her these things; she said, the lodger had put her in the yard to stop till she came down stairs, and they were the lodgers things; I said they were mine; I called the lodgers down stairs; she then denied knowing any of them; I went for a constable, and left her in the charge of the lodgers; I had detected her once before; I was in the kitchen half an hour before; I am sure they were there at that time.

- DAVIS sworn. - I am headborough, and was sent for by Mrs. Williams; I took charge of the prisoner; Mr. Williams had the things.

(The articles produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I had bought a sheep's head for my supper, and was going to Spitalfields-market for a pound of potatos; this woman met me at the door; she kept me so long that I thought my poor sheep's head would be cold; she said this was her saucepan; I said some of your lodgers has given it me.

Q. (To Mrs. Williams.) Had she a sheep's head? - A. Yes, in her apron.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-33

256. SARAH KINNARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a metal quart-pot, value 2 s. the property of William Goff .

WILLIAM GOFF sworn. - On Sunday morning, the 25th of March last, she came to my bar-window to request a quartern and a half of gin; after I gave her the gin, she asked me to warm her half a pint of amber; a person gave me some information; the pot is worth two shillings, they are three shillings new.

THOMAS TODDS sworn. - I saw the prisoner at the bar take something from the shelf, and I went and informed Mr. Goff; she did not go out then; as she went out, we went after her, and stopped her, and found the pot wrapped up in her gown; it is a metal pot, called a bar pot.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the house to have half a pint of purl, and thought I saw a young man go by that I knew; I took the pot in my hand, but I did not mean to take it away.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

The prosecutor recommended her to mercy, on account of her bearing a general good character, and her father being a very honest man .

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-34

257. JOHN RICHARDSON and JOHN CLEMENTS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wheeler , on the 28th of February , about the hour of seven at night, and stealing therein two pair of shoes, value 14 s. and two odd shoes, value 7 s. the property of John Wheeler .

JOHN WHEELER sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , and lived then in St. Martin's-lane ; I went out a

little before seven o'clock, and returned a little before eight, on the 28th of February, in the evening; my shop was shut up; when I returned, the property was gone; I saw them before I went out.

Q. Have you seen them since? - A. No.

WILLIAM HEARN sworn. - I am a shoemaker, and observed the prisoner, Richardson, between seven and eight o'clock, as I was coming down St. Martin's-lane, as near the prosecutor's window as he could, with his left arm trying to lift up the sash, as I suppose; I went to the end of Moore's-yard, and saw them both at the window afterwards, and then I gave the alarm.

Q. Did you give the alarm immediately? - A. Not immediately; I went to the top of Chandos-street, then I returned up St. Martin's-lane; I always suspected the character of Richardson.

Q. How far did you stand from them when you saw them trying to lift up the sash? - A. About four doors from them; they were first one and then the other endeavouring to lift up the sash; I shifted my ground, and went facing the shop, and there I saw two of them trying; I am not certain of Clements, but I am certain of Richardson; I went into Mr. Allen's, the last and patten-maker, and gave the alarm; Mr. Allen went to Mr. Wheeler's, and Mr. Wheeler's wife told him the window was broke open, and the property was gone.

THOMAS ARMSTEAD sworn. - On Tuesday, the 28th of February, I was coming down St. Martin's-lane, and saw the two prisoners at the bar at Mr. Wheeler's window; they separated immediately as I came up.

Q. Had you any knowledge of them at the time? - A. Yes, of Richardson; Clements followed me as far as St. Martin's church; I returned back in the course of twenty minutes, and heard of the robbery; I went to the prisoners, knowing Richardson to be a suspicious character; I took both of them.

Q. Did you find any thing upon them? - A. No.

Richardson's defence. I was not in St. Martin's-lane that night, till he took me to St. Martin's watch-house.

Clements's defence. I observed I met this young man as I went into a house in Swallow-street to drink, where Mr. Armstead took me; I was not in St. Martin's-lane that evening.

The prisoners called no witnesses to character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-35

258. DANIEL INCH was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully making an assault, with a certain sharp instrument, on the 10th of March , and that he feloniously and maliciously did strike and cut Francis Geeves in the left side of his body, with intent to kill and murder him .

Second Count. Striking in like manner to disable him.

And Three other Counts. With intention to do him some bodily harm.

The Court being of opinion there was no proof of an intention on the part of the prisoner to commit a felony, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-36

259. EDWARD KING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Paterson , on the 6th of March , about the hour of seven at night, and burglariously stealing therein a waistcoat, value 3 s. a pair of sheets, value 14 s. a gown value 10 s. a shirt, value 5 s. a cloak, value 5 s. a sword, value 5 s. a crown-piece, a half crown-piece, a medal of the late King of France, value 1 s. and three pieces of silver coin, value 1 s. the property of John Paterson .

SARAH PATERSON sworn. - I am the wife of John Paterson , and live at No. 28, Chapel-street, Pentonville .

Q. What does your family consist of? - A. Only my husband, myself, and one child; I have no other person living with me in my house; my husband was not at home at the time this happened, he has been out for three months, and on Saturday, the 3d of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I took my child, and went in the City, with intention of staying two or three days; I fastened my shutters and my doors, and took the key with me; the house has three outer doors, I left all safe.

Q. Did you take more than one key; or only one? - A. Only one, the key of the front door; I left my house on the 3d of March, and did not return till Wednesday, the 7th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, in consequence of some information of my house being robbed on Tuesday.

Q. Did you find your door locked when you returned? - A. Yes, and I could not unlock it with my key; the constable, Goodall, opened the door for me.

Q. In going into your house, what state did you find it? - A. The locks of the drawers and the boxes were all broken; I missed a few pieces of coin that I had since I was about ten or eleven years of age, a crown-piece, a half crown, that was a medal of the late King of France; the money was taken from a drawer in this purse, (shews the purse;) up stairs some of it, and the other in a little box.

Q. Are you sure you left this money behind you? - A. Yes.

Q. What was taken away? - A. One pair of sheets, a dark cotton gown, a child's dimity cloak,

and a waistcoat; I am sure I left them behind me; there were the appearance of other things, packed up in bundles, ready to be taken away, containing stockings, sheets, and table-linen; I had not been at my house from Saturday till Wednesday.

JASPER HERBERT sworn. - I keep a public-house, nearly opposite Mrs. Paterson.

Q. Did you observe her house locked up on Saturday, the 3d of March? - A. I observed it close shut up from Saturday till Wednesday, the 7th of March: On the 6th of March, I received an alarm from a lady that lives opposite Mr. Paterson's house; I went out of my own door, and stood a minute, and I perceived the door of No. 28 open, as I thought, I was not certain; I then stepped back to my house again, opened the tap-room door, and called to the men that were in it.

Q. Did any of them go over with you? - A. Yes, Samuel Lane and John Swan ; when we went over, the door was standing wide open.

Q. Was it dark when you went over? - A. Yes, very dark; before I got to the house, I saw one man jump over the wicket, or the little garden gate, at the front of the house; I called out, and said, that is one of them, catch hold of him.

Q. Did any of them lay hold of him? - A. Yes, Samuel Lane; then I advanced a little farther, and saw the prisoner at the bar come out of the house-door.

Q. Did you see him come out of the house? - A. I saw him come from the door.

Q. How was he coming quietly on in a hurry? - A. In a hustle, he seemed very much confused; he jumped over the paling into the garden of the next house; I called out, and said, here is another, lay hold of him; I saw John Swan lay hold of him, he was taken to my house; I saw a bundle tied up in a handkerchief laying in Mrs. Paterson's garden, with a drawn sword lying across it; after we had secured the prisoner, we went into the house, and went first into the parlour; on the left-hand there was a candle burning on the carpet, it was a little wax-taper, about the length of one's finger-nail, burning on the carpet.

Q. Was the carpet on fire? - A. No; in the same was another bundle lying on the carpet in the middle of the room, and another large sword drawn lying across it; amongst the clothes in the bundle, was a blue coat.

Q. What state did you find the house above stairs? - A. In all appearance the locks were broke open, and the things strewed over the room, some in one place and some in another.

SAMUEL LANE sworn. - I was in the tap-room of Jasper Herbert on Saturday, the 3d of March, Mr. Herbert came into the tap-room, and said there was something in Mrs. Paterson's house he did not much like, they went out before me; when I went out, I saw a man running from the street-door; I stopped him in the street, as Mr. Herbert hallooed out; he said to me, let me go, I am not the man; by that I let him go, and made my way to the door; after that I saw Swan, he had fast hold of the prisoner, who was taken over to the public-house.

Q. Did you see where he was taken from? - A. No.

Q. Did you go into Mr. Paterson's house with Mr. Herbert? - A. Yes, when I saw the door open, and the bundle laying in the garden; I said to Swan, hold him fast, it is a robbery; I saw the wax-light lying on the carpet, Mr. Herbert took it up; I saw a cutlass and a blue coat on the side of it; I went up stairs, and found the things all in confusion, and all the locks broke open.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner was searched? - A. I was; Mr. Goodall searched him at the watch-house.

Q. How far is the watch-house from Herbert's? - A. About a minute's walk.

Q. Can you speak more particularly to what was found on him? - A. I saw a piece of money taken from his breeches, and a piece of money taken out of the knee of his stocking.

Q. What was done with the bundle found in the house? - A. Goodall took one bundle, the other was left in the house; there was a patrol put in the house for that night.

JOHN SWAN sworn. - Q. Were you at Herbert's public-house at this time? - A. I was lodger there; when I went out with Mr. Herbert and Samuel Lane, I saw the door open nearly opposite, and by such time as we got in the middle of the road, I saw two men come from the house-door; one of them jumped over the pales on the right-hand side, and the other the left; Mr. Herbert said, lay hold of them; I went up the right-hand side where the man was, and took hold of him in the next yard.

Q. Who was that man? - A. Edward King , the prisoner at the bar; I told him he was my prisoner; he said, he was not the person; I told him if he was not the person, it would be so much the better for him, but he must go with me over the way.

Q. When you had him over the way, did any thing happen? - A. No, only he wanted to go out into the yard, I went with him; from his appearance, he looked very ill; when he got into the yard, he desired to go in the privy; he went in, I stood within half a yard of him inside the door way; I heard the chink of money, and I heard the cry of a bird, afterwards I heard it fall on the floor; I told him he had stopped there long enough, and that it was time for us to go in the house; he came out then, and I delivered him into the hands of Samuel Lane.

Q. Did you go back to examine the place? - A. Yes, a man that sat in the house went back with me, and saw some money lie on the side of the

necessary, and on the floor of the necessary; there was a canary bird lying dead, quite warm, and the blood running from his mouth.

Q. Did you take up the money? - A. Not then; Mr. Goodall came in about ten minutes, and took him to the watch-house; I was present when he was searched; there was found on him a medal of the King of France, and a crown-piece, and other little pieces.

JOHN HAMPSTEAD sworn. - I am a lodger in the public-house, I went over with the others; when I went in at the front gate of the garden, I saw a bundle lie in the garden, with a hanger across it and an iron crow; I took up the sword and the crow, Tozzier took up three keys, and gave them to Mr. Herbert, he lodges in the public-house; they were tied with three strings, they are called skeleton-keys; I went into the house, and found it just in the same state as the other witnesses.

THOMAS WILSON sworn. - I was present at the search of the prisoner; after Mr. Goodall had searched him, on putting on his clothes I searched his pocket, and in his great-coat pocket I found a branch of a myrtle-tree, it was quite fresh, as though it was on the pot; I said to Goodall, I have no doubt that this come off the premises; I went back to match it with the myrtle in the pot; it exactly fitted the place where it was stripped off, the myrtle-tree was in the back-room up stairs.

Q. WILLIAM GOODALL sworn. - I am the officer that was sent for.

Q. You did not search the prisoner before he was taken to the watch-house? - A. No, I took him to the watch-house, and there I searched him; I found in his bosom a half Belcher silk handkerchief; out of the ham of his breeches a crown-piece of King Charles the Second; I pulled off his boots, in the ancle of his stocking I found a medal of the King of France; a little bit of foreign coin of Mrs. Paterson's, in his breeches-pocket. (The articles produced.)

Q. The sprig of myrtle escaped you? - A. Yes, we went back and searched the privy; we took up there a half-crown piece, and two smaller pieces of silver coin. (Produces them.)

Q. (To Mrs. Paterson.) You said this money was given you when you were a child? - A. Yes, it had a mark on it; I had often took notice of it.

Q. Had you took notice whose coin it was? - A. No.

Q. Can you, from that circumstance, take upon you to say that crown-piece is your's, and was in your house? - A. Yes, it was in my purse; the medal of the late King of France I had one exactly like it, but cannot positively swear to that; I have had that medal about five years.

Q. (To Goodall.) Was this one that was found upon his person? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Mrs. Paterson.) Look at the small pieces of coin, do you know that? - A. I cannot exactly say whether it is a threepenny piece or a twopenny piece; I have had it about nine or ten years.

Q. Is there any mark on it? - A. There is a little hole.

Q. Your's had a drill in it? - A. Yes; I am sure this is the same coin.

Q. The half-crown is King William and Queen Mary, that is all you can say upon that? - A. Yes, and there is a German sixpence. (The bundle produced.)

(Mrs. Paterson looks at them separately.)

Q. What are those - a pair of sheets? - A. Yes, I have examined them; they have my mark upon them, they were in my house when I left it.

Q. What is the value of those sheets? - A. I cannot tell exactly what I gave for them, I have had them about ten or twelve months.

Q. They must be worth more than fourteen shillings? - A. I believe they are.

Q. The next article is your gown, do you know that? - A. Yes, it is a new one almost, it cost me twenty-three shillings, I have had it about eleven months.

Q. It must be worth more than ten shillings? - A. Yes.

Q. There is a shirt, is that worth five shillings? - Yes.

Q. There is child's cloak, do you know it? - A. Yes, I value that at five shillings, and the waistcoat is an old one, I have valued that at three shillings.

Q. (To Goodall.) These are all the articles found in the bundle? - A. Yes.

Q. Where are the keys? - A. (Goodall produces the keys and an iron crow.) They are all skeleton-keys; I let Mrs. Paterson in the next day with one of these keys. The crow fitted the mark on the drawers, and it looked as if they had been forced by that.

Q. Where is the sword? - (The sword produced by Goodall, and shewn to Mrs. Paterson.)

Q. Do you know any thing of such a sword? - A. Yes, it is Mr. Paterson's.

Q. When you went away, did you leave a canary bird? - A. Yes, it was missing when I went there.

Q. Was the cage gone, or only the bird? - A. Only the bird.

Q. You had a myrtle in the house, where was that? - A. On the first pair of stairs in a little room backwards.

Q. Did you yourself observe whether any thing had been stripped off? - A. Yes. (The myrtle produced.)

Q. Did you see any sprig that had been stripped off? - A. Yes.

Q. Did it appear to correspond with what had been stripped off? - A. Yes.

Court. You may compare it, but I suppose it is too dry now.

(The sprig of myrtle was placed where it had been stripped off.)

Wilson. It exactly fitted the joint on placing it to the myrtle, I am confident, when it was fresh; it was kept in water till on the second examination, it fitted then, and was in appearance quite fresh.

Q. To Mrs. Paterson.) Is that your half handkerchief? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-37

260. THOMAS KNOWLES and MARGARET KNOWLES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , two dozen of silk purses, value 2 l. fourteen pair of garters, value 2 s. a silk sash, value 12 s. and four cards of lace, value 20 s. the property of William Dawson and Joseph Beardmore .

WILLIAM DAWSON sworn. - I am a lace manufacturer , in Owen's-row, Clerkenwell , and have a partner, whose name is Joseph Beardmore .

- MACKWORTH sworn. - I am a warehouse-clerk to Messrs. Dawson and Beardmore.

Q. What was the prisoner, Thomas Knowles ? - A. He was porter to the house: On the 23d of February, I sent the prisoner to clean out the little store-room; I had previously taken account of the goods lying in that apartment, and when he had cleaned the room, he sent the key to me; I went immediately and counted the goods over that laid in that room, and when I came to a lot of goods that consisted of thirty-six papers, in each paper I had counted a dozen of purses; when I came to count this lot of purses, instead of thirty-six papers, there were only thirty-two, there were two missing; they were lying on a shelf, marked No. 13; I communicated the circumstance to the accompting-clerk, Walter Dawson , and to Francis Bristow , the warehouse-clerk; at half past five, the prisoner went to his tea; I saw the accompting-house clerk, Walter Dawson , go after him, and in about five minutes after I saw the prisoner in the parlour with Walter Dawson and Mr. William Dawson ; I heard the prisoner deny having any goods alledged that he had stolen from the premises; and the charge being put close by Walter Dawson , who said to him, we know that you have some of our property about you, he then said, that he had got one, and that was all he had about him; he then pulled them out of his pocket, and delivered them to Walter Dawson ; I looked at it, it had my mark.

Q. Do you mean that you had put your mark on it that day? - A. Yes; then I went for a constable; the paper containing the purses was committed to the care of Walter Dawson , the accompting-house clerk.

Q. Did Mr. Bristow take account of the papers as well as yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. Then he did not deliver up more than one paper? - A. No; not to me.

Q. What were the contents of that room? - A. Purses, stay-laces, and some garters.

Q. Had you marked them? - A. Yes, some of them, as well as some of the purses.

Q. Had you marked all the things in the room? - A. No.

- BRISTOW sworn. - I am a warehouse-clerk.

Q. Did you take account of these thirty-six papers? - A. Yes; there are thirty-six, which I believe contained purses, in each paper one dozen.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. About half-past one o'clock: I went up after the last witness had informed me there were two papers missing, and I found there were two papers missing; after we got him into the parlour, Walter Dawson challenged him with having some goods out of the warehouse; he said I have got nothing at all about me, but I know who has told you this, and the woman that has I will commence an action against her; I then told him it was a folly to deny it; we were certain that he had such and such goods about him; I told him we must have a constable and search him; Mr. Mackworth came to the door; then he gave up one dozen to Walter Dawson ; after Mr. Mackworth came in, he gave another dozen and some worsted garters; after he had given up these goods, I told him we should search his mother's house; he said, he hoped we would not do any thing to his mother, for there was not any thing of consequence there; only some trifling things that were in a basket.

Q. Where did the prisoner live? - A. In Islington-Road, with his mother, in one room.

- HANCOCK sworn. - I am a constable of the Public-Office, Hatton-Garden: the prisoner lived with his mother: on the 23d of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I found these articles I now produce tied up in a handkerchief, as they are now, excepting two articles that I found in a chest. (The articles produced.)

Q. What are these things? - A. A night-cap, a pair of cotton mitts, one silk sash, two cards of black trimming, two cards of white, sixteen pair of garters, cotton and worsted, fourteen dozen of cotton laces, and three pair of cotton gloves, these were in her room; I met her coming out of the house; she said she was going to buy a penny candle; I went into the butcher's shop and borrowed a candle, and when we came up stairs there was a candle burning in the room at the same time.

Q. Who knows any thing of these things that the prisoner delivered up himself?

Mackworth. A. These papers were delivered in

my presence, which now contains my mark, and the other paper of purse contains a ticket, the hand-writing of which I am well acquainted with; it was a warehouseman that lived with us, but has left the warehouse for some time.

Q. Can Mr. Dawson speak to the purse? - (Mr. Dawson looks at them.) A. I believe them to be of my manufactory, and as to the garters and laces I know them by passing through my hands at several times, and these articles, and what was delivered up by the prisoner in the parlour, I believe to be of my manufactory.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows: Being totally unable to have Counsel, we most humbly beg leave to state our unhappy case before this Honourable Court, not doubting but we shall have every mercy shewn us; I am in the 57th year of my age, have lost the use of my right arm, am in bad health, and very poor. My poor son is in the 24th year of his age, and very often troubled with deranged senses; he has had articles from his master to take out, and has had different articles to those he had to deliver, supposed to have been put up by mistake of his master or Mr. Mackworth, which articles have always been faithfully brought back. Now, with respect to the present business, it happened on the 23d of February, when I, Thomas Knowles , was sent into a damaged ware-room, to clean it, he, Mackworth, came up, and gave me two dozen of purses and one dozen of stay-laces, which he told me to take to one Mr. Marley; in Long-Lane, West-Smithfield; it being tea time, he ordered me to go home and take the articles with me; however, I had not proceeded for, when I was informed my master wanted me; I was taken into the parlour; nobody was there but two clerks, excepting Mr. Dawson, and he told me I had robbed him; I said I had not robbed him; I know not what further I said to them; I have always been a faithful servant to my master, but for my character in general I refer you to my master; we, therefore, implore this most Honourable Court for mercy.

Q. (To Mackworth.) Had you delivered them to him to carry any where? - A. I never delivered to him on that day any thing of the sort.

Q. (To Dawson.) I suppose, by your continuing him in your employment, he behaved very well? - A. I knew nothing of him before, he came only from a neighbour's; where he lived I heard a good account of him.

The prisoner, Margaret Knowles , called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Thomas Knowles , GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

Margaret Knowles , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-38

261. RICHARD BLADON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , fourteen dresses, value 10 l. twelve handkerchiefs, value 6 s. seven pair of stockings, value 7 s. sixteen neck-handkerchiefs, value 16 s. five habit-shirts, value 10 s. four dressing-gowns, value 20 s. two tippets, value 16 s. two laced caps, value 10 s. a cloak, value 10 s. four towels, value 2 s. a veil, value 5 s. and other articles , the property of Sarah Williams .

SARAH WILLIAMS sworn. - I came with the Canterbury coach to the George and Blue Boar, on the 3d of April: I got into a Hackney coach with two trunks and a band-box, to go to No. 5, Baker-street North ; I was set down there, and ordered the servant to take out the things, but they were neglected; the coach drove away immediately after I had paid the fare; the prisoner at the bar was the coachman ; the trunks contained the articles in the indictment.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where did you take the coach? - A. Opposite the George and Blue Boar, at about half-past six in the evening.

Q. Was it dark then? - A. No, it was not.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. Never.

Q. You had very little opportunity of seeing his person? - A. No farther than contending with him at the George and Blue Boar, for putting me into such a bad coach; it was dirty, and there was no handle to the door; it was fastened by a peg.

Q. What time might be occupied after you got out of the coach, before you paid him? - A. I dare say ten minutes.

Q. What was the fare? - A. Three shillings; I gave my servant half-a-crown and a shilling, and she was to have change.

Q. Whether the coachman went to a public-house to get change or not, you do not know? - A. No.

WILLIAM ATKINS sworn. - I am an Officer of Bow-street. (The property produced.) I found them at a Mr. Howell's, a coachmaster; I apprehended the prisoner about two hours afterwards, on the 4th of this month; the cord was taken off the large trunk, and the nails drawn from the hasp; after I found the property I went in pursuit of the prisoner; I saw the coach with the wooden peg in the door; he set down a fare in the Haymarket; I told him what I wanted him for; he said he had received his fare of the lady, and the door was shut before he went away; I rode with him on the box, to go to his master's, and he told me going along that the lady lived at No. 5, Baker-street North; I then took him to the Office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. The place he took the boxes to was his master's - A. Yes.

Court. (To Mr. Williams.) Q. Was there

any thing missing out of the trunks? - A. Not any thing.

CHARLES HOWELL sworn. - I am a coach-master: the prisoner drove for me: on Tuesday night, April the third, I was coming down my Mews with a light; and the coachman was coming out of the Mews and another man with him; he had a little red trunk in his hand, and the strange man had got the other trunk and hat-box covered with paper; I asked him where he had got those boxes; he told me they were left in the coach; the prisoner at the bar said that; I asked him where; he said in Baker-street; I made him bring them up stairs; he never refused to bring them up stairs; I dressed his eye; he said his horses had run away with him; he had been with me about nine months; I never doubted his character while he was with me.

(To Sarah Williams .) Q. Do you know whether there was any rope about the large trunk? - A. There was not when I saw it last.

Q. When it was in the possession of the Officer was there any cord about it? - A. There was.

Q. Did the prisoner help to put these things in the coach? - A. He did not.

Q. Do you know about any nails missing from the hasp? - A. At Bow-street I did, I cannot say before. (The trunks produced.)

Q. Can you swear to these trunks? - A. Yes; there are two trunks and a box; they are my property.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-39

262. ANN DIXON was indicted for that she, being a servant to Samuel Moore , did receive and take into her possession the sum of 1 l. 14 s. 7 d. from Mrs. Elizabeth Neave , for her master, and did fraudulently embezzle, secrete, and make away with the same .

SAMUEL MOORE sworn. - I am a publican in Newport-street, the Crown and Punchbowl ; the prisoner was a servant that carried out beer and brought in pots; she had lived with me about ten or twelve months; she quitted my service about February the 19th, or rather sooner; Mrs. Neave had two pints of beer regular every day; every Monday I sent her a bill of it by the prisoner at the bar; she brought me an excuse every time that she was ill or gone into the city; I was satisfied with that excuse; she always made some excuse that Mrs. Neave had not paid her.

Q. Did you never speak to Mrs. Neave about it? - A. Not till after she was gone.

Q. Did you, when you sent your bill, expecting this not to be paid; did you always put the former bills at the top of the bills you sent? - A. I did till it came to this amount.

Q. Did you, in the mean time, see Mrs. Neave? - A. I did not know her if I had.

Q. When did the prisoner leave you? - A. On the 19th of February.

Q. How came you to make application to Mrs. Neave? - A. After the prisoner was gone, Mrs. Neave paid the boy every time; Mrs. Neave came in for the paper, and my mistress gave her the bill.

- NEAVE sworn. - I live at No. 7, Whitcomb-street.

Q. Where used you to be served with beer? - A. From the Crown and Punchbowl, Mr. Moore's.

Q. Who used to bring you the beer? - A. The prisoner used to come twice a day, at one o'clock at noon, and half after nine at night; I had a pint each time.

Q. Did you pay when it was brought? - A. If I did not pay for the pint. I always paid for the pot.

Q. Did she ever deliver to you any bill? - A. No, I never had any bill; the first time I knew any thing of it was on the 20th of February, that was after the prisoner ceased to bring me the beer; I paid her for all the beer I had from her master.

(Prisoner to Mrs. Neave). Q. You have forgot the last pint of beer that I carried; there were three pints left? - A. I have no recollection of it.

Prisoner's defence. I lived with Mrs. Moore ten or eleven months, and continually asked for my wages; I did not take the money to defraud Mr. Moore; I had my washing to put out; I made use of it, and when I had received my wages, I meant to pay it again.

Q. (To Moore). What wages did you give this girl? - A. Six pounds a year; I gave her five or six shillings, or a guinea at a time; she had her wages just as she wanted it; she was paid every halfpenny, and thirty shillings more than was due to her when she went away; I told her at Marlborough-street, if she would acknowledge it I would forgive her, but she was impertinent, and the gentleman forced me to prosecute.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-40

263. ELEANOR FLAHERTY and MARY LANGFORD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , four gowns, value 3 l. one bag, value 6 d. one child's frock, value 6 d. and forty pieces of patch-work, value 1 s. the property of John Brosnell .

ANN LINSEY sworn. - I came to call on Mrs. Brosnell, who was not within; I staid till she came; I saw both the prisoners at the door of Mrs. Brosnell, and saw the prisoner Flaherty come and take the handkerchief from off Langford's head;

she had it tied about her head, then she went backwards into the parlour; she had a great bundle in her lap; the parlour door was broke open; she went away with the bundle, and Langford staid till she came back, and then Flaherty took Langford by the shoulders, and pushed her off, and said run, she is coming.

CATHERINE BROSNELL sworn. - On the 28th, I left Eleanor Flaherty and Mary Langford at the door; they both had black eyes; Flaherty said to to me, how far are you going, Mrs. Brosnell, I said only for some butter; it was between three and four; I staid about half an hour, and while I was gone my door was broke open; when I returned they were running; I missed four gowns, a bag of pieces, and a child's frock.

ANN LAMBERT sworn. - The prisoner Flaherty brought me some pieces of calico to sell; she asked eighteen-pence for them; she dropped this piece of sleeve of a child's frock on the floor.

Q. (To Brosnell). Is that the sleeve of your child's frock? - A. It is.

Q. Do you know any thing of the other prisoner? - A. No, only finding her in bed with Flaherty, when I had her taken up.

Q. You have not heard any thing of your gowns? - No.

- I am a constable; I took the two women; Eleanor Flaherty owned to the bag.

Prisoner Flaherty's defence. I was coming home from my hard day's labour, I met with Ms. Langford; she asked me if my landlady bought things; she said she had lost a bed and a bolster; I had bought a rump bone, I went for a peck of coals; when I came back again, my landlady said where is the woman that was speaking to you; I told her she was gone home for what I knew; with that she told me I should not light the fire till I told her where the woman was gone; she took me to Bow-street, the Magistrate said, he wondered she had the impudence of coming there, as she had been convicted of buying stolen goods, and was six months in prison for it; my landlady came in the morning and caught us both in bed; she then said I will take a book-oath, I will not hurt you if you will satisfy me for what money I have spent; she went to all the linen-drapers to see if the calico belonged to any of them; I bought it at Rag-fair; you can buy pieces of calico in Rag-fair, of three yards for sixpence; she charged me with the calico belonging to a Gentleman in Holborn; I insisted on letting the Gentleman see the calico; they said she was a wicked woman, and fairly forced her out of the shop.

Prisoner Langford's defence. As I was going down Drury-lane, I met Mrs. Flaherty, I told her I had been robbed of my bed and bolster; she told me to go to the pawnbrokers, and her landlady bought such things; you can enquire if she has such things to sell; she told me to stop at the door till she carried the rump-bone up stairs; when she came down, she said, I will not go in now; I do not think any body is at home; we went into a public-house and had a pint of beer, and I never saw Mrs. Flaherty till past eleven o'clock at night; I was in bed, and when she came to me she said, my landlady says she will put me in the watch-house; in the morning, this woman came to me, and seized us both in bed; she said, I am very glad I have found you here; very well, said I, if you think I have got any thing, you are very welcome to search; she found nothing; no gowns, nor patchwork, nor pieces, I ever saw.

Eleanor Flaherty , GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Mary Langford , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18040411-41

264. ANN COTTERELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , fifty-five handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 15 s. nine shirts, value 2 l. 5 s. two petticoats, value 12 s. a muslin dress, value 15 s. three habit-shirts, value 3 s. and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. the property of William Kerrison , in the dwelling-house of Esther Fox .

SUSANNAH KERRISON sworn. - I live at Mrs. Fox's, and am the wife of William Kerrison , a soldier .

Q. Were you in possession of this property? - A. Yes; I take in washing.

Q. Did you lodge in the house where this was lost? - A. I have lodged there above twelve years.

Q. Were these things taken out of your lodging? - A. They were taken out of my garret; I have a garret on purpose to dry in.

Q. Had you left this property in your garret? - A. Yes; some were hung up, and some were not; I saw them about two hours before; that was on the 29th of March; the garret door was not locked.

Q. Was it shut? - A. No, it was left open.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before that time? - A. No; I never saw her before; my niece heard somebody go down the stairs.

Q. Is she here? - A. No; I was alarmed by my niece; at the loss of my things, I went down stairs.

Q. Was the prisoner taken? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon after? - A. Not a quarter of an hour.

Q. Were you present? - A. No.

Q. Was she brought to you with the property? - A. Yes; by the next witness.

EDWARD FOX sworn. - I am a glass-cutter: On the 29th of March, about half past ten o'clock, I was coming home in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another woman come out of the house;

the prisoner came out with a large bundle in her gown and apron together.

Q. Did you stop her? - A. Yes, I brought her back, and the bundle too.

Q. Did she give any account how she came by the bundle? - A. She gave no account at all how she came by the bundle.

GILL BLENNING sworn. - I am a tailor, and live in the house; I saw the prisoner go out with a bundle in the skirt of her gown; Mrs. Kerrison made the alarm, and then she was taken, and brought back with the property.

Q. (To Susannah Kerrison .) Is all the property that was lost your's? - A. There is one handkerchief mine; the others were mine while in my care; I had them to wash.

Q. What is the value of all the things that you have lost - do you think they are worth forty shillings? - A. Yes, they are worth more than that; I suppose they are not worth less than ten or a dozen pounds.

Prisoner's defence. I was going up to my aunt in Long-acre; as I was going past this woman's house, I met a woman with a bundle, and she asked me if I would help her to carry it; I said, yes; I found they were wet, and asked her what she was going to do with them; she said she was going to take them to dry and iron; then I was stopped, and asked what I had got; I told them it was no business of theirs; they took hold of each of my arms; the woman walked on, and they brought me back; I heard that gentlewoman say that she had transported one man, and she would hang me if she could; then she took me to Bow-street.

Kerrison. When she brought this property back, she threw it down at my landlady's door, and said, I know you will hang me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-42

265. JOHN ASHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a pair of pantaloons, value 15 s. the property of David Macdonald .

DAVID MACDONALD , sen. sworn. - I am a tailor , and live at No. 6, Bateman's-buildings Soho: On the evening of Shrove-Tuesday, I lost a pair of pantaloons between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; I sent my son out with them to a customer in Ironmonger-lane.

Q. What age is your son? - A. Between eleven and twelve; I never saw them after; they were kerseymere pantaloons.

DAVID MACDONALD , jun. sworn. - I am the son of the other witness: On Shrove-Tuesday, my father sent me with a pair of pantaloons to Ironmonger-lane; I set out from Bateman's-buildings with them between two and three o'clock; the prisoner at the bar met me just beyond Clare-market; I had them in a silk handkerchief; he asked me what trade I was; I told him, a tailor; he said, so was he, I did not know him before. He asked me where I was going; I told him, to Ironmonger-lane; he told me he was going to Mr. Payne's a tailor, in Bream's-buildings, Chancery-lane; he told me that he lived with Mr. Payne, as an apprentice, and he had run away, because he had not used him well, and he had left his things there, and when I got to Bream's-buildings, he shewed me the house, and Payne was on a brass plate on the door.

Q. How came you to Bream's-buildings - was it in your way to Ironmonger-lane? - A. It was the nearest way; he said he would not mind giving any body a shilling to knock at the door, because he wanted to see the maid, but did not want to see his master, as they had had a fall out; he asked me to knock at the door, and told me to put my bundle under my coat, for fear they should think it was something coming to Mr. Payne, because he was a tailor.

Q. Did you put your bundle under your coat? - A. Yes: then he said, you had better give it to this boy; I had met a boy at the top of Bream's-buildings , just by Mr. Payne's; the prisoner spoke to that boy just before he got to Mr. Payne's. He said to the boy, Jack, how is your mistress? there was a woman just gone into Mr. Payne's, the door was not shut; the prisoner took hold of the bundle; I saw the door going to shut, I run up, and knocked at the door, and told the maid; he run off immediately.

Q. What became of the boy? - A. He was almost a man; he ran with him up Bream's-buildings.

Q. Did you pursue them? - A. Yes, I gave an alarm, but I never saw him again that day: On Saturday three weeks, as I was going to Mr. Mills's, the scowerer, he crossed the way, and went into Crown-court; I then went up to him, and caught him by the coat, and asked him where my bundle was; he told me that he would put me in the watch-house if I said so again.

Q. He did not say what bundle, did he? - A. No; he said, you come there to my uncle's, there it is; he pointed to some house in the court, and said, there it is, and when I came there, he said it was only a little further. He got me on so till he came to Leicester-fields; I said, where does your uncle live; he said, in Sloane-street, down here; I caught hold of his coat, and said he should go no farther; then he knocked me down; a gentleman came up, and he ran down there by Orange-street; I got up, and ran after him, and he was caught just by the King's Mews.

Q. Had you given any alarm? - A. Yes; and

the gentleman that saw him knock me down, ran after him, and caught him.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner is the person who knocked you down? - A. I am sure he is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you ever seen this lad before? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Do you mean to swear positively to his person? - A. Yes, I am sure the prisoner is the person.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw that boy before in my life till this day he happened to meet me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-43

266. JAMES POBJOY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a 1 l. Bank-note, and one piece of gold coin, called a guinea , the money of Henry Fulcher .

HENRY FULCHER sworn. - I am a victualler , and live in Shoe-lane ; I keep the White Swan.

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. A tailor .

Q. What do you know of this transaction? - A. Upon the 16th, the day before the transaction, I lent Pobjoy two pounds; he was a customer of mine for two months before that, he lives in the same street; I told him, when I lent it to him, I should want it the next day: On the 17th he brought it back - the two pounds; I believe it was between ten and eleven o'clock of the day; I had given him an order for a suit of cloaths; he brought them home the same day - the coat and waistcoat. He brought me the two pounds an hour before he brought the clothes - it was a one-pound note and a guinea he brought me; I wrapped up the one-pound note, and put it in my right-hand waistcoat pocket. When he brought the clothes home, I was going to try them on in the bar; he said, as they were acquaintances of mine and his in the parlour, he thought I had better put them on in the parlour, as they might see how they fitted. I went into the parlour, and pulled my coat off, and laid it on one chair, and my waistcoat on another; one was about a yard and a half distance from the other, as near as possible. I observed the one-pound note and the guinea was in my pocket when I laid it down; when I was fitting them on, I turned, and said to him, do not be a thief, not suspecting any thing of that kind, I went on putting my clothes on.

Q. After you had said do not be a thief, had you any suspicion? - A. No, I spoke it as a joke; I have seen him take an handkerchief out of my pocket, and he has given it to me again; I do not know why I made use of that expression, only from seeing his hand at my waistcoat; I said it as a joke, I did not suspect being robbed at that time. After I had fitted the clothes on, I took off the new ones, and put on the old ones again; I did not feel in the pockets immediately. Soon after, I had to go out of the room to give Mr. Chartery ten pounds; he wanted me to lend him that sum; he was in the room at that time; I went to my wife, and said, if you have eight pounds, I have two pounds; I went to feel for it, and it was gone; I then felt in every pocket I had. Chartery called me on one side, then I suspected Pobjoy, and I directly went to his house.

Q. Did you see the prisoner near the waistcoat? - A. I saw his hand at the waistcoat, I had no suspicion at the time; I only suspected that he had took something out of my pocket.

Q. How came you not to look immediately? - A. I could not suspect a tradesman in the neighbourhood; I know that I had that money in my pocket.

Q. You never looked nor searched while he was present? - A. No.

Q. Strange conduct - did you find it afterwards? - A. No, I never found it afterwards; I accused Pobjoy of it afterwards, and he appeared to be a little agitated, as if some guilt was on him; that might be imagination; he said he knew nothing at all about it after some little agitation; it might be a minute or two.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You never were charged with any felony? - A. No.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. About three or four months.

Q. He uses your house? - A. Yes, he has a club in the house.

Q. I suppose there was nobody there but Mr. Chartery? - A. Yes, there was a Mr. Curtis and a Mr. Harris.

Q. And they had the same opportunity of seeing, as you had? - A. I do not know that they had; one was reading the newspaper, and the other was looking over his shoulder.

Q. You said, do not be a thief? - A. I did.

Q. It is no joke in your license in your house, to say, do not be a thief? - A. There is no such thing in the license.

Q. Mr. Chartery did not shake the coat, and take it up? - A. He did take hold of the coat, and shake it.

Q. He never touched the waistcoat? - A. He never did; nobody touched the waistcoat but Mr. Pobjoy.

Q. How came you to separate the waistcoat and coat? - A. I laid the coat down on one chair, and the waistcoat on another.

Q. You say he seemed to be very much agitated? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you take him up? - A. I did not take him up at all; I was at Guildhall; I believe Alderman Boydell was the sitting Magistrate that

day, and while the warrant was making out, Pobjoy came and surrendered himself, and said, there was no occasion for taking out a warrant.

Q. Then Pobjoy, at the Justice-room in the City, came and said, he would surrender where he expected to find you? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of it then? - A. The Alderman said that the evidence did not go to commit him, but he must find two bails sufficient.

Q. Did you tell the story before the Alderman, the same as you have to-day? - A. Yes, word for word.

Court. Q. What did the Alderman say? - A. He said there was no evidence for him to commit; he recommended me to advertise the note.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long did he stay in the house after you had said, do not be a thief? - A. About three quarters of an hour.

Q. Did you drink together? - A. We did.

Q. What did you drink, for God's sake, together? - A. We had, I believe, a bottle and a pint of mulled wine between four of us.

Q. After you had called that man a thief? - A. No, before.

Q. Did you not drink together after that? - A. We finished the remainder of the bottle; we had nothing more in; Mr. Curtis and Mr. Harrison was not there all the time.

Q. You sat down together check by joul, and drank together very comfortable? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner after that? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you say, if you could get the notes, you would say no more about it? - A. I do not know that I did.

Q. Upon your oath did you never say that if you could get the notes, you would say no more about it? - A. Upon my oath I did not.

Q. He desired you to go into the parlour, did you ever accuse him of having robbed you? - A. I accused him of having robbed me in the warrant.

Q. Upon your oath, in the room where Curtis and Harrison were, in that room did you ever charge him of having robbed you? - A. No, not in that room.

Court. Q. There were persons present - you were staying three quarters of an hour together; the question is in the presence of those persons there - did you ever say that? - A. No.

Q. When you were before the Magistrate, the Magistrate said there was no evidence to commit him? - A. He did not commit him.

Q. Do not shuffle with me? - A. Mr. Smith gave him a good character, and he said he would not commit him; he advised me to advertise the note.

- CHARTERY sworn. - I am a victualler: I live in Water-street, in the Strand; I was present when Mr. Pobjoy came to Mr. Fulcher's house; I saw him take a piece of paper out of his pocket.

Q. Did Mr. Fulcher see that? - A. I do not know whether he saw that, or no; Mr. Fulcher saw his hand at his waistcoat pocket, and turned round, and said, do not be a thief; Mr. Pobjoy put his hand behind him, and put the paper in his great coat pocket, and when Mr. Fulcher missed the money, Mr. Pobjoy was gone.

Q. How long was that? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What did you say to Mr. Fulcher? - A. I did not say any thing then, I did not think it was money; Mr. Pobjoy went away then.

Q. Immediately? - A. Very soon afterwards.

Q. How soon? - A. He stopped a few minutes, and then he went away out of the house.

Q. How long did you remain in the house? - A. About an hour, or an hour and a half, after that.

Q. Then if Pobjoy staid an hour and a half you must have known it? - A. Yes.

Q. If he had staid an hour you must have known it? - A. I was not out of the house the whole time.

Q. If he had staid half an hour you must have known it? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that he did not stop half an hour after that? - A. He went away a very few minutes afterwards, that I am sure of.

Q. How long was it before the loss was found out? - A. Very little time after Mr. Pobjoy was gone, it might be half an hour.

Q. Do not you think it very strange, that a tradesman and a neighbour should commit a felony of this kind? - A. I did not know it was a felony.

Q. You were all upon good terms? - A. I never heard them quarrel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It was a mere accidental visit of your's? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not go there for the purpose of borrowing ten pounds? - A. Yes, I did; there was ten pounds between us, and I went for it.

Q. How was that? - A. There was a difference between us of ten pounds.

Court. Q. Upon your oath, what purpose did you go there, to get ten pounds - did you go there to borrow ten pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any account between you? - A. There was; I cannot exactly tell what it was, some little scores.

Q. What do you mean by telling me that there were ten pounds between you? - A. I cannot say that there were ten pounds between us then.

Q. Is he in your debt? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Upon your oath, is there any thing between you? - A. Yes; I owe him, it may be, near two pounds.

Q. And yet you go to borrow ten pounds - what did you borrow that day? - A. Ten pounds.

Q. What did you owe him at that time? - A. I had some liquor of him, and what it was I cannot

say; it was ten pounds at that time, I went to borrow it, and he lent it me.

Q. Were you near the waistcoat at all? - A. No, I was not.

Q. When were you examined first as a witness? - A. I cannot tell well the day of the month I went before the Magistrate.

Q. How long afterwards? - A. How long afterwards?

Q. What is the occasion of your repeating what is said to you - it is only to think of what you shall answer - was it the 18th.? - A. Yes; the next day.

Q. Who was the Alderman? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You never heard? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. The Counsellor has done every thing that I could wish; there has been a great combination against me; I beg you will grant me a copy of my indictment; I have a great many witnesses here.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him the best of characters.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-44

267. THOMAS HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , a quart pewter pot, value 2 s. the property of James Cummings .

JAMES CUMMINGS sworn. - I am a publican , I live at the Three Tuns, Great New-street, Fetter-lane : On the 21st of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, accompanied by a man and a boy, came into my house and called for a pint of porter, I was in the tap-room when he came in, sitting by the fire in conversation with two of my neighbours; the prisoner sat down at a table nearly opposite me, the person that accompanied him drew near the fire to cover my view of him; after he had sat two or three minutes I perceived, through a vacancy of a person moving, the prisoner take this pot, and putting it off the table, I could perceive he was putting it somewhere about his person; after that, the prisoner, accompanied by this man and a boy, got up; I immediately rose up, and desired a person to follow him that was present, for I had not the least doubt that that man had a pot of mine about him, and in about two or three yards from my own door, I took him by the collar, and charged him with it, he denied it; he wore at that time a large blue apron, I turned up his apron, and in the front of his breeches I found this pot. (The pot produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

JAMES - sworn. - I am a barber: On the 21st of March, I went to Mr. Cummings's house to drink a pint of beer, which I usually do, and while I was there, the prisoner at the bar, accompanied with a man and a boy, called for a pint of beer; one man placed himself by the fire, and warmed the beer, I did not perceive him pay for it; in a few minutes they went out of the house; Cummings said to me, I suspect that that man has a pot of mine; he took it from him in the street.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-45

268. BENJAMIN BEAL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , ten yards of rope, value 8 s. and and an iron hook, value 2 s. the property of our Sovereign Lord the King .

And two other Counts, the same as the former, only varying the manner of charging.

JOHN FORRESTER sworn. - I am a patrol of Portsoken Ward: I know the prisoner, he is a merchant's watchman on the Quays ; I stopped him on the 13th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, in the Minories.

Q. How came you to stop him? - A. By the property being concealed, and he walking in a suspicious manner; I asked him what he had got under his coat, he told me slings for weighing; I asked what he was going to do with them, he told me he was going to get one of the same pattern, he told me Gravel-lane, Ratcliff-highway; I asked him the person's name that made them, he could not tell the person's name; I asked him how he should know the house, he said he should know it if he was by it; then I asked him what house he brought them from, he told me he brought them from no house, a man gave them him on this side of London-bridge; I asked him what the man's name was, he said he did not know his name, he should know the man if he saw him; I asked him to walk with me, and I took the slings from off his neck; I then saw the broad R on the head hook; I asked him if he could find the man any where; no, he said, he did not know where the man lived.

Q. Did you know the King's mark? - A. Yes, I know the broad R.

Q. Have you got them here? - A. Yes; (produces them); the head hook has the broad R, and the others have not.

Prisoner's defence. I told him it was scale-rope; the hooks catched hold of three different people passing along the street, it catched hold of one gentleman and made his clothes crack, and he was angry; the witness asked me where I got these things from, I said they were given me by one of the King's warehouse-men, at the corner of Tooley-street: he calls to me, Beal, how far are you going over the bridge, he asked me to carry them; I put them across my shoulder, and coming over the bridge the first person I met the hooks catched hold of; he was to pay me one shilling for taking them; I know him as well as I know any body, I have known him between these three and four years; I never

could get out, or else I could have found him directly; I would not have stooped in the street if I had seen them lay down to pick them up; I never was in any hobble before, I am as innocent as a child unborn.

- SANDLAND sworn. - Q. Do you know them; - A. I do know them, they belong to the Commissioners of the Customs; I am scale maker to the Custom-House, we put the King's mark on the strong arm.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-46

269. GEORGE SHEPHERD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , eight pounds weight of Spanish juice, value 12 s. twelve ounces of cassia, value 6 s. six bottles of British oil, value 5 s. half a pound weight of sealing-wax, value 2 s. half a pound weight of thread, value 2 s. seven pounds weight of soap, value 7 s. eight ounces of lavender, value 6 s. six ounces of Turkey rheubarb, value 12 s. one quart of tincture of cardamom, value 3 s. one pound of tapioca, value 9 d. fourteen ounces of mustard, value 1 s. one pound of Russia salts, value 2 s. three plaister skins, value 2 s. a knife, value 1 s. two pounds and eight ounces of ginger, value 3 s. a bottle containing essence of anchovy, value 2 s. six ounces of the essence of peppermint, value 5 s. seven bottles of Steers's opodeldoc, value 7 s. two bottles of Daffy's elixir, value 2 s. and one pound of Gascoign's balls, value 2 s. the property of Richard Bush and Lathiam Howard .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS PAYNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are warehouse clerk to Bush and Company? - A. Yes; they are druggist s in Cannon-street .

Q. Has the prisoner been in their service? - A. He has, as porter , from the 1st of February.

Q. In consequence of any thing occurring, was he taken into custody on the 31st of March? - A. He was.

Q. Did you go with the Officer to search his lodgings? - A. I did.

Q. Did the prisoner go with you? - A. He did.

Q. Were there a number of articles that you could identify, the property of Messrs. Bush and Howard? - A. There were; I took them away in a coach, and left them in the Compter; the prisoner said, some of the articles were sent him as presents from the country, and some were given him by some of the young men in the prosecutor's warehouse; he said in the coach, as we were going along, he hoped I would say what I could in his favour.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know the partnership very well? - A. Yes.

Q. Nobody else in partnership than Bush and Howard? - A. It goes under the firm of Steed, Bush, and Howard, but I do not believe that Mr. Steed has any thing to do with it now, I believe he lives at Brompton.

Q. You will not take upon you to swear whether he has or has not? - A. No.

Q. Now, with respect to what he said on the articles, that he had some out of the country, and some of the young men of the house gave him - he had been in the house before? - A. Yes; he had been in the house about six years.

Q. Were they a part of the old stock, or a part of the new stock, since the 31st of January? - A. I am sure that they were of the new stock. (The articles produced.)

JAMES HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are these the articles that you found upon the prisoner? - A. They are; they were not left in my care, but I left them at the house all sealed up.

Payne. I can speak to the opodeldoc, it is of my own making, and my own putting up. (Looks at the articles.)

Mr. Gurney. (To Payne.) Q. Is that the label of Messrs. Bush and Howard? - A. It is; and we have not sold any out since we have been on these premises, they are part of the old stock from Baldwin's gardens.

Q. Now, respecting the soap, how was this damaged? - A. I am not able to say how this was damaged; here is some British oil, I believe, of my own manufactory; here is some Spanish juice, it is cut off at the ends, which is not generally the case; this appears to be rolled out in a long roll, and cut off from the length.

Court Q. Do not others do the same? - A. I never saw any.

Q. How long have you been in this business? - A. About fourteen years.

Q. Have the prosecutors lost any of these articles? - A. They have.

Q. Had the prisoner access to these articles? - A. He had access to every part of the warehouse.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had every young man, employed in the warehouse, access to where these articles were? - A. They had.

Q. You said they were brought from Baldwin's-gardens? - A. The opodeldoc, essence of lemons, and British oil, were brought from Baldwin's-gardens: they were Steed's and Howard's.

Q. Did they sell by retail? - A. No.

Q. I suppose they had many of their friends retail dealers? - A. They had.

Court. Q. Will undertake to say, that Steed and Howard might not have sold any of the opodeldoc? - A. I did not sell any; I was there, and saw every order that went out of the house, and never saw any of that order go out of the house.

Q. It is not sold only at your shop, it may be sold at Newberry's, the bookseller, in St. Paul's-Church-yard?

- A. It is sold at Newberry's; the patent is expired, and any one may make it.

Q. I suppose any one may make it according to their own receipt; it is not Steers's but Bush's opodeldoc - do you mean to swear by the composition or by the bill? - A. I mean to swear by the settling that is at the bottom of the bottle.

Q. Whether Newberry, the bookseller, makes the same kind you do not know? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Will you take upon you to say, that you never saw any other opodeldoc with that settlement at the bottom? - A. I do not know that I did.

- NASH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You know respecting the soap? - A. The soap came from Baldwin's-gardens; there is something on it that I spilled upon it; compound tincture of peppermint.

Q. Do you believe that that is part of the soap you injured with the rest? - A. Yes.

Q. How much is there of that soap? - A. Seven or eight pounds; the soap was in an unsaleable state, we meant to exchange it to the man who made it; the prisoner denied taking the soap, he said he found it at the corner of Whitecross-street; the opodeldoc he acknowledged having taken it, saying he was very much subject to the rheumatism; the British oil, the essence of anchovy, the Spanish juice, the court plaister, the mustard, the tincture of cardamom, he acknowledged of having taken these, and the essence of peppermint, he also acknowledged to have took it, his wife was subject to wind, for which purpose he took it; and the Turkey rheubarb also, he acknowledged he had taken.

Q. What is the value of all these things? - A. I suppose five pounds.

Court. Q. You are certain he acknowledged taking all these things? - A. I am certain.

Mr. Knapp. Q. This was in the Compter, after he had been committed for examination, before he had been to the Mansion-house - how came you there? - A. I went in with Mr. Bush and Mr. Howard, on purpose to get an account.

Q. Did you mention all this at the Mansion-house afterwards - was it taken down in writing? - A. I am not positive.

Q. So you went to the Compter to pump him before you went to the Magistrate, and then you went after to the Magistrate, and told - did not you give him to expect some favour if he told? - A. No.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-47

270. MARY MATTHEWS, otherwise the wife of JOHN PEIRCE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , two sheets, value 12 s. a tea-kettle, value 1 s. a trivet, value 1 s. four pounds weight of feathers, value 2 s. the goods of James Venables , let by him to John Peirce .

And two others Counts, varying the manner of charging.

JAMES VENABLES sworn. - I live at No. 2, Cock-court, Snow-hill ; I am a watchman on Blackfriars-bridge ; I let out three rooms, two furnished and one unfurnished; I let the one pair of stairs to the prisoner at the bar, and her husband; they were both together when she took it.

Q. Who paid you the earnest? - A. My wife took the earnest; they were in my house about seven months; they behaved very well while he was there; he was a genteel man, a tailor by trade; he lived with her five weeks before she left my house, exactly; she said she had correspondence with him, and had money from him; he was only gone to see his brother at Portsmouth.

JANE VENABLES sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I let the lodgings on Friday in August last; they had been in our house about seven months; he came in and looked at the room; on Friday she came with him, and on the Monday night they brought some things; he said, my dear, do you like the room, and she said very much; the prisoner paid me the first week's rent, and she paid me the last that was ever paid; she went away on Monday, and locked the door, and took the key with her; she said she was going into the country, and when she came back she would settle with us; we sent for a smith, he unlocked the door, and we got the people that were up stairs to go in with us; we missed the sheets, the tea-kettle, and trivet; the bed was made as nice as could be; she took all the feathers from the bed and bolster, nineteen pounds of feathers I put in my bed; I found my tea-kettle in pawn at a broker's in Field-lane.

- BLACK sworn. - I am a dealer in shoes: This woman bought a pair of stockings for nine-pence; she put her hand in her pockt, and said I have only got six-pence in my pocket; here, said she, take this kettle, and I will come and pay you in the morning.

NICHOLAS TEMPLE sworn. - I am an officer; Venables sent for me to take her to the Compter; the prisoner gave me the duplicates of the sheets, at two different times.

HENRY WHEATLAND sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Bettesworth: I produce two sheets, one pledged on the ninth, and the other on the thirteenth of February.

Q. Who were they pledged by? - A. By the prisoner at the bar. (The sheets produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I pawned these sheets for the

landlady; I have pawned sheets for the landlady before, and she has given me the money to take them out.

Prosecutrix. I never did in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-48

271. MARY HAYNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of James Holt .

JAMES HOLT sworn. - I am a cloth-worker ; I live at No. 8, Nag's-head court, Clement's-lane, Lombard-street.

Q. When did you loose your watch? - A. I was discharged from the guards the seventh of last month; my friends got two substitutes for me; I had been making a little merry with my friends; we were going home; I was rather intoxicated in liquor; going home about nine at night to my lodgings in Westminster, the Three Tuns, I happened to call at a public-house, the sign of the Blue Bell; it was in my road home I met with the prisoner at the bar there; she seeing me rather in liquor, inticed me to go home with her to her lodgings; she asked me, and I went there.

Q. Where was her lodgings? - A. I do not know property; I am rather a stranger to that part of Westminster.

Q. What countryman are you? - A. I am a Yorkshire-man.

Q. How long have you been in London? - A. About five months since I came up; I went to her lodgings and stopped about an hour, and during that time I fell fast asleep; they waked me, and wished me to go home to the barracks; they did not know that I was discharged; I set off to my lodgings; it might be between ten and eleven; as I was going along I missed my watch, and being rather unacquainted with the place, I could not find the way to get back; I run about the streets till morning; nothing occurred, and in the morning I went to my lodgings.

Q. Has this watch since been found? - A. Yes.

Q. You were getting quite drunk; are you sure that is the woman? - A. I am sure that is the woman.

Q. How far is it from your lodgings to where she lived? - A. About half a mile; I do not know property the distance.

Q. What is the name of the place where she lived? - A. I do not know the name of the street properly.

Q. You are a Yorkshire-man you say? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you acquainted with her before? - A. I never saw her before that night.

Q. I suppose you laid down on the bed, and took asleep? - A. I was not in the house above in hour.

Q. When you were in the room with her, of course you laid down in bed with her? - A. Yes, and fell fast asleep.

Q. Never missed your watch? - A. No; it was taken one of my pocket, and the watch-glass was broke, and one of the pieces of glass was left in my pocket.

RICHARD EDWARDS sworn. - I am a soldier; the prisoner had the watch at my quarters, and they were laying a wager what this watch would pawn for; she asked me to pawn the watch; I went directly and pawned it.

- sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Merrick, in York-street: The prisoner was standing at the window when I took it in pawn of the last witness; he asked a guinea and a half; I told him I could not give above a guinea; he went out and asked the prisoner; I took it in pawn for a guinea. (The watch produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

- FREEMAN sworn. - I am an officer, I took the prisoner; she lived in Old Pye-street, Westminster .

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-49

272. THOMAS HICKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , a piece of Portland-stone, value 10 s. the property of William Mennoll .

WILLIAM MENNOLL sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing of this transaction? - A. It is my property.

THOMAS ROWTRY sworn. - I am a stonemason: On the 13th of March I was going to work; I was near Mr. Mennoll's yard in Carburton-street ; when I was passing by I met the prisoner coming out of the yard with a piece of Portland-stone under his arm; I passed him, and looked down the yard.

Q. Did you know him? - A. Yes; he is a stone-mason ; I passed him and looked down the yard, and seeing no workmen there, I turned round and asked him by his name, do you work for Mr. Mennoll? he replied, he had bought that stone; he did not say whether he worked for Mr. Mennoll or not; he turned up Glanville-street; I went the same way, and followed him; when he had got a little way up Buckingham-street; he set it down by the rails, and I stood near him; we could see one another; I had a partner; I went to call him to go to Mr. Mennoll's; when my back was turned, he took the stone and took it back to Mr. Mennoll's yard; I had fetched Mr. Prior the constable, I had apprised my partner; Prior said, I see the nature of the business, I will take him into custody.

Q. Did he take him into custody? - A. Yes; he

had got back with the stone; he took him coming out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know whether Mr. Hobbs had stones there as well as Mr. Mennell? - A. I cannot say.

Q. This was at noon-day? - A. Yes, between twelve and one o'clock.

Q. Were you present when he was apprehended? - A. I was.

Q. Did you, or did you not hear him say, that this stone belonged to Hobbs? - A. He told me he had bought stones of Hobbs.

Q. Do you know the stone again? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go back for the stone? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you able to point out the stone? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM PRIOR sworn. I am a constable; when I first saw the prisoner, I saw him turn from Buckingham-place with this stone under his arm; I thought, by his carrying the stone, he had not come honestly by it; I followed him, and before I came up, he turned out of the street into the yard; I there lost sight of him for one minute in Mr. Mennolls's yard; as he turned out of the yard into the street, I took him in custody; I now produce the stone; I have had it in my custody ever since.

Q. (To Rowtry.) Is that the stone you saw him with? - A. It is.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you produce the stone before the Magistrate? - A. No.

Q. Did not you say before the Magistrate you should not know the stone again? - A. No.

Q. (To Mennoll). Is that your stone? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, he is a stone-mason; he worked for me about twelve months ago, for the best part of a week.

Court. Q. Are there any other persons having stones in your yard? - A. There are one or two more; Cole has stones on the north-side of the yard, and Hobbs has stones on the south-side.

Prisoner's defence. This Hobbs and I had a dealing to the amount of 11 shillings, and we shook hands as we parted; he said there is another piece of stone, come and take it; I had told him I wanted another small bit to finish my job; Accordingly I went over, and looked out a piece of stone; I was there half an hour before I looked it out, and I enquired of a man whether Hobbs owned all the stones.

Q. Is he here? - A. I do not know, this Rowtry met me, and asked me whether I worked for Mr. Hobbs; I told him I had bought it, and if I was going to steal a stone, I would not go at noonday.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25,

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-50

273. SARAH WHILEY and ANN HAYNES, otherwise FOSS , were indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 12th of March , a certain Bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged note, knowing it to be forged with the like intention.

Third and fourth Counts. For forging and uttering and publishing the same as true, a promissory note for the payment of money, in the form of a Bank note, with the same intention.

And four other Counts for like offences, charging them to be with intention to defraud John Hind .

The indictment was opened by Mr. Bosanquet, and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

HENRY HIND sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are shopman to Mr. Hind, your brother? - A. Yes, he lives at No. 134, Whitechapel.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar, did you see them there on the 12th of March? - A. At half after one they both came into the shop to buy a brass footman; it had iron legs.

Q. Was that what they asked for at first? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you shew them the articles? - A. I did, the price was four shillings.

Q. Which of the women was it that particularly spoke for the article? - A. The person that called herself Evans; the one that goes by the name of Whiley.

Q. That is the woman that has the child in her arms? - A. Yes, they bought the footman, and offered a one-pound note; I had not sufficient change for it; I went to get change, when I returned I suspected the note; I sent for Mr. Tare.

Q. Did he come into the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you communicate any thing to him? - A. Yes.

Q. What happened after that when Tare was with you? - A. He thought it was a bad one; they said they did not know it, and offered another, a good one, I believe.

Q. What became of the first note? - A. Mr. Tare had it his possession.

Court. Q. Did both of them say they did not know it was a bad note, or only one of them? - A. I believe both of them expressed their surprise; but one of them I know said they did not know it.

Q. Did you look at the other note? - A. Yes, that was a good one; Mr. Tare had the possession of the other; I delivered the bad note to him.

Q. You received the other note; did you give change for that? - A. I did.

Q. What did Mr. Tare do with the women. - A. He told them they must go with him to the Bank; I asked Evans for her address; she at first refused to give her address; she said she would call the next day.

Q. Did she afterwards give you any address? - A. Yes, Mrs. Evans, No. 7, Essex-street.

Q. Then Tare had possession of the note, and went to the Bank? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. These two women came together? - A. Yes.

Q. They asked for a brass footman? - A. Yes.

Q. And Mrs. Whiley is the person who gave the note? - A. Yes.

Q. At this moment you are quite sure she is the person that gave you the note? - A. Yes.

Q. You are not quite sure of the person that said they did not know it was a bad one? - A. No, I am not, but both expressed their surprise.

Q. You said it was a bad one? - A. I did.

Q. Before you asked them any thing about their address? - A. Yes.

Q. Then intimating it was a bad one, she gave her name, her description that you have stated? - A. Yes.

Q. But at first both expressed their surprise of its being a bad one? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. I understood you to have said that Evans, who is proved to be the name of Whiley, expressed her surprise? - A. They both expressed their surprise.

Q. Was this footman at the door or in the shop, so as passengers could see it? - A. I do not know.

Q. Therefore it was a thing that a stranger might observe passing? - A. I believe it was behind a stove; they asked at first whether we sold footmen.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Was it or was it not exposed out of the shop? - A. It was not.

ROBERT TARE sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. I believe you are foreman to Mr. Hind? - A. I am.

Q. On the 12th of March did you go into the shop and see the two prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell me what passed within their hearing when you came into the shop? - A. I was sent for by Mr. Hind; I went to the prisoners and told them it was a bad note; I told them they must positively go with me to the Bank; they told me they would rather not go that day but they would call and go with me the next day.

Q. Were you present when they tendered the other note, which was a good one? - A. I was not.

Q. What did you do with it? - A. I took it to the Bank, and shewed it Mr. Needham.

THOMAS NEEDHAM sworn. Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are inspector of Bank notes? - A. I am.

Q. Look at that (The note handed to him), had you that note from the last witness? - A. I had, accompanied with the women; it is all forged, the signature, paper, ink, and every thing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I am afraid there are a great many forged two-pound and one-pound notes in circulation? - A. There are.

Q. There are many of us may have two-pound and one-pound notes in our possession? - A. There may.

Mr. Alley. Q. You are not a signer of notes yourself? - A. No.

Q. Are there persons of this name in the Bank? - A. There are persons of that name in the Bank.

Q. Do you know the hand-writing? - A. I am very certain that is not the hand-writing of Mr. Collier.

Mr. Garrow. Q. What passed between the two women and you? - A. I enquired where she took it; she said that she took it of a man that sold pork in Swallow-street.

Q. Who was that? - A. Whiley; I asked her if he was a shopkeeper; she said no, he sold it about the street.

Court. Q. Did she say what his name was? - A. No; I asked her if she could find that person; she said very probably she might, she took it in exchange of a two-pound note; I asked her her name, she said her name was Evans.

Q. Did she tell her place of abode? - A. Yes; I think it was in Change-court, Exeter-street.

Q. Did you ask the other woman? - A. Yes; she said she was only an acquaintance of the other's.

Court. Q. Did Haynes call her by the name of Whiley? - A. I did not hear her call her any name.

(The note read in Court.)

(Mr. Garrow handed a paper to Mr. Needham.)

Q. Look at that; do not answer in a hurry, and tell us where she described she lived? - A. In Change court.

- COLLINGS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 7, Essex-street, Whitechapel; there is no regular numbers all down the street.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. No.

Q. Did either of the prisoners at the bar live with you? - A. No.

Q. (To Hind.) Is Essex-street, Whitechapel, the nearest Essex-street to you? - A. Yes, it is not above twenty or thirty doors from our house.

Mr. Knapp. Q. There is another Essex-street, Temple-bar? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Q. How far is that Essex-street? - A. Some distance; about a mile and a half.

THOMAS BAXTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am one of the inspectors of Bank notes.

Q. Were you present at any time when the woman with the child gave you her name? - A. Yes.

Q. What name did she give you? - A. The name of Welch.

Q. That was when you asked her her name? - A. Yes; she gave me the name of Welch.

Q. What name did the other woman give? - A. I do not know that I asked that woman her name.

Q. Did Mrs. Whiley give her name Welch in the presence of the other? - A. She did.

Q. Did the other give her name? - A. No, not at that time; at one time she did give her name; I have forgot it upon my word, not being so particularly engaged in this case; but I made an enquiry, I went into Archer-street; whatever her name was, I enquired after her name.

Q. Where did she say she lived? - A. No. 7, Archer-street, west end of the town.

Q. Did you make an enquiry? - A. I did.

Court. Q. You should make memorandums? - A. I did not expect to be called upon.

- BLISS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. In consequence of this forged note did you see the prisoner at the bar? - A. The moment I heard they were in the Poultry-compter I went to them immediately; they were both in one room of the prison; I desired they might be kept separate, I asked them both their names; Mrs. Whiley then said her name was Whiley, and the other woman said her name was Ann Haynes ; Haynes first said, that she had given her account to the solicitor where she lived, at No. 7, Archer-street, Windmill-street, by Brewer-street; I then asked her how long she had lived there; she told me two years she believed; I then asked her what employment she had; she said that she went out to needlework for a woman in the name of Williams; I asked her if she was a married woman; she said she was not; I told her I thought she was, and she might as well tell me where she lived, and her real name, for I thought her name was Ann Foss ; I went to Archer-street with Baxter, and found it a respectable lodging-house; the woman told me her name was Mary Bennett .

Q. Could you find any account of Mrs. Foss? - A. No.

Q. Did you there find any account of Mrs. Haynes? - A. No, positively none.

Q. Did Whiley say any thing more in the course of her conversation? - A. Nothing more particular than she did not like to be searched.

Q. Do you look at that paper (the note handed to the witness); is the paper any thing corresponding with the Bank paper? - A. It is not the Bank paper; nor is it in the hand-writing of any person there; it is all forged.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Whiley gave an exact account? - A. Yes, she said she lived in Change-court.

Mr. Alley. Q. You are an inspector of Banknotes? - A. Yes.

Q. There had been an examination before? - A. Yes, about an hour or half an hour.

Q. Did you go like the good Samaritan? - A. I went to be convinced as to their persons.

Q. You had no occasion to go into conversation with them? - A. I thought I had, because they had given a false address before.

Q. You went for a double purpose, for conversation as well as to their persons; did you say any thing that you would befriend them? - A. Nothing of the kind; I believed they had got some forged notes about them, and my object was to see them searched; they had been very loosely taken care of before.

Q. How do you know that? - A. I understood they were to be kept separate.

Q. When you were in company with them they were in prison? - A. Yes, they were both standing together.

Q. Will you take upon you to swear they were kept loose? - A. They were standing together; I desired them to be kept separate.

Q. Did you or did you not go and put these questions, in order that you might be enabled to give the result upon this prosecution? - A. If I was called upon I meant to state the facts no doubt, I went strictly to see the parties.

Q. Did not you expect to be called upon? - A. I did.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Did you not expect they were ordered to be kept separate? - A. I did, and when I came there they were both standing together.

MARY BENNETT sworn. - I live at No. 7, Archer-street, Great Windmill-street.

Q. Does any person of the name of Ann Haynes live at your house? - A. No, nor has since I lived there.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know that some of the houses are misnumbered? - A. Not that I know of; it is a small street.

Mrs. SIMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Cast your eyes round, and see if you know either of the persons at the bar? - A. I know Mrs. Foss, I have known her some years.

Q. Did you always know her by the name of Mrs. Foss? - A. Yes; when I first knew her it was the other side of the water; in the month of March last she lived in Whitehorse-court, Cow-cross; she only lived there about five weeks; she left her house on Thursday, and was apprehended on the Monday; before that she lived in a court on Ludgate-hill.

Q. Had she, during the time you knew her, lived in Archer-street? - A. She never lived in Archer-street.

JOHN FOWLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are shopman to Mr. Jones? - A. Yes, No. 7, Cow-lane.

Q. Do you recollect seeing in your master's shop the prisoners? - A. They were both together there about the middle of the day; on the thirteenth of February they both came into my master's shop.

Q. What did they ask for? - A. Two lumps of fresh butter.

Q. Did you serve them with it? - A. No; I told them I had none.

Q. What said they? - A. They asked me to let them taste the best Cambridge salt butter.

Q. Did they offer to purchase any of that? - A. I let them taste that, and they asked for three pounds first, and then afterwards they asked for six pounds, at sixteen pence a pound.

Q. How much did that amount to, at sixteen pence a pound? - A. The butter they had amounted to eight shillings.

Q. Did they purchase any thing else then? - A. Yes, two shillings worth of eggs, they had ten shillings to pay me.

Q. What did they do towards paying you? - A. They gave me a two-pound note.

Q. Who gave you that two-pound note? - A. That lady with a child in her arms, Whiley.

Q. Did you look at that note? - A. Yes, I told them it was a bad one.

Q. What did they say? - A. They seemed rather alarmed.

Q. They did not own to it? - A. I presented it back to them; they neither of them took it up; I took it up from the counter; I asked them where they lived; I agreed to take the note upon these terms, if they would tell me where they lived.

Q Did they, either of them, tell you their names? - A. Yes, that lady with the child in her arms, Whiley. (The note handed to the witness.)

Q. Now look at that note - what address did Whiley give you? - A. She gave me the name of Evans, and said she lived at No. 19, Charterhouse-street.

Q. Is that street near you? - A. It is not far off.

Q. At the time Whiley gave you her address, and the name of Evans, what did the other person say? - A. The other person said, what use is that direction to you; if she wished to give you a bad note, do you think she would give you a right direction? I said, suppose she does not, if I should meet you in the street, how foolish you would look in the street with a false direction; I took the note, and gave them their change, and they took the butter and eggs.

Q. You are quite sure these are the women? - A. Yes, I am.

Mr. Knapp. Q. This is a long while ago - when was it? - A. On the 13th of February.

Mr. Alley. Q. How long was it before you found it was a bad note? - A. On the Friday following.

Q. You put them altogether, did not you? - A. I had marked it on the back.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Had you written Evans on all the other notes? - A. No.

(The note handed to Mr. Bliss.)

Mr. Garrow. (To Mr. Bliss.) Q. Is that a forged note? - A. It is a forged note, the whole of it is forged; the paper is not Bank paper, nor is the writing any person's writing at the Bank; the engraving is not like the Bank engraving.

JOHN PIERCE sworn. - I live at No. 19, Charterhouse-street.

Q. Did either of the prisoners live at No. 19, Charterhouse-street? - A. No.

GEORGE LOVE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. I am shopman to Frederick Findle; he lives in Brewer-street, Golden-square; he is a cheesemonger.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at your shop on Saturday, the 25th of February? - A. Yes; they were both together there between eleven and twelve o'clock, to the best of my recollection; they asked me to let them taste some butter, and I let them taste it.

Q. Which of them? - A. The right-hand one, Whiley.

Q. Did they buy any? - A. They bought twelve pounds, at fifteen pence a pound; it came to fifteen shillings; they gave me a note.

Q. Who gave you the note? - A. I cannot say; they were both together.

Q. Did you ask any questions respecting the note - did you believe it to be a good one? - A. I took it to my master.

Q. Did you make any mark upon it? - A. My fellow servant, an apprentice, signed it; I asked them their names; they gave me the name of Evans, No. 15, Great Windmill-street.

Court Q. Which of the two prisoners gave you the name? - A The right-hand one, Whiley, gave me the name of Evans.

Q. Whereabouts is Great Windmill street? - A. It is near Golden-square, the street faces the shop.

Q. Did you ask them any thing else? - A I offered to send the butter home; they said no, they would take it home themselves.

Q. Was there any thing written on the note in your presence? - A. Yes; Thomas Doyle wrote Evans, 15, Great Windmill-street.

Q. Which of the prisoners gave you the note? - A. I cannot say.

Q. I take it for granted, the person that gave you the address gave you the note? - A. I believe so.

THOMAS DOYLE sworn. - Q. Is there any hand-writing of your's upon that note? - A. Yes, the name of Evans; I received it from the last witness, and wrote upon it according to the directions that the prisoner gave.

Court. Q. You did not take it of that woman? - A. No, I took it from the shopman.

GILES MEMS sworn. - I live at No. 15, Great Windmill-street; neither of the prisoners lived at my house; I have lived there a year and a quarter.

Q. Is there a person that lived there of the name of Evans? - A. I am perfectly clear that I saw neither of them before that I saw them at the bar. (The note banded to Mr. Bliss.)

Mr. Bliss. It is forged in every particular, and it is printed from the same plate as the last two-pound note was; I am certain of it; I have made the same observations as with respect to Jones's of Cow-lane.

MARGARET CORDER sworn. - I am the wife of William Corder , by profession a Quaker, of Broad-street, Bloomsbury, a grocer.

Q. Do you remember these two persons? - A. I remember on the 28th of February I was called by my husband to come and assist in the shop; he had a note in his hand.

Q. Were these two persons in the shop at the same time? - A. They were; my husband said he was afraid it was a bad note, and he would step into Mr. Rider's, his next door neighbour, and ask him.

Q. Did he go into Mr. Rider's? - A. He did.

Q. How soon did he return? - A. Almost immediately.

Q. What passed between your husband and the prisoners? - A. When he came in, he addressed himself to the prisoners, and said it was a bad one, and Mr. Rider came in with him, and he said he would swear it was a bad one; Mr. Corder said he could not think of giving up the note without they would bring any body to satisfy him how they came by it, and then they should have it.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Rider making any observation about that? - A. Mr. Rider said, he ought to detain them also; my husband asked them where they got it; Mrs. Whiley, (I do not recollect the other said any thing,) said, she took it in exchange for a ten-pound note in Swallow-street; she said, of a man that sold pork in the street; I do not recollect any thing further; they gave a good two-pound note, and took the change; they took the articles they had purchased, and went away.

Q. Did they mention where they lived? - A. Mr. Corder asked where they lived when they were going out; they said No. 3, Charlton-place, Charlton-street, Sommer's Town, and that their names were Evans.

Q. Was that answer given by Whiley? - A. I think it was; I do not recollect the other saying any thing.

Q. Did they ever come again? - A. I never saw them any more till I saw them in the Poultry Compter.

Q. When you saw them, then you knew them? - A. I knew them directly.

Q. Do you remember what accident happened at your house that day? - A. I believe my husband cut his finger, I did not see it, but I observed it bleeding, and I observed some blood upon the note; I had it in my possession till the next day; (the note shewn the witness.) That is the same note that I had; I wrote my name upon the back, February 29, Margaret Corder , to know what time I had it in my own possession.

Q. Was the other woman in hearing when it was proposed by Rider that they should both be taken into custody? - A. They were both in the shop at the time.

(The note shewn to Mr. Bliss.)

Q. (To Mr. Bliss.) Is that in all respects forged the same as the last? - A. It is from the same plate, I am convinced of it.

JOHN RIDER sworn. - Q. Do you remember your next door neighbour coming in, and asking your opinion of a note? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you accompany him to the shop? - A. I did.

Q. Did you find the two prisoners there? - A. I did.

Q. Did he carry with him the note upon which he asked your opinion? - A. He did; he told them that he had every reason to believe it was a forged note, and he had that note in his hand; he told them that he could not give that note up, that his neighbour told him it was a bad one; he asked them if they had any money to pay for the goods.

Q. Did you make any observation upon his saying he could not give the note up? - A. I told them I thought he ought to detain the persons; I have no doubt but they heard it; they gave him a good two-pound note, and he gave them the change.

Q. Did Corder make any proposal about calling the next day to bring some reputable person to say where they had the note from, and then he would give it to them again? - A. He did.

Q. I believe this is the good one that was given in the place of the other? (The note shewn the witness.) A. It is.

Q. Did you see Corder make that memorandum? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the address? - A. Yes, it was by my desire; Evans, No. 3, Charlton-place, Charlton-street, Sommer's Town.

Q. That was Mrs. Whiley? - A. Yes, he wrote it down on the counter upon a slip of paper; I took it, and have had in my possession ever since.

Q. (To Mrs. Corder.) When your husband went to Mr. Rider's, did he take any more notes than the bad one? - A. I do not recollect that he took any other.

Q. When he came back, he had the same one? - A. He had.

WILLIAM MITCHELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I live at No. 3, Charlton-place, it

is sometimes called Charlton-garden, and sometimes Charlton-place, it is in Sommer's Town; I have lived there from the 27th of last August, I and my family occupy the whole house, we have no lodgers at all, no person has slept in my residence since I have had the house.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. I never saw either of the prisoners before since I have kept the house, none have ever slept under my roof but my own family.

DANIEL LEADBEATER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. I believe you are one of the officers that took charge of the prisoners, did you search the prisoners when they were committed? - A. I did.

Q. Upon the 12th of March, what did you find upon the person that nows calls herself Whiley? - A. I found in her pocket-book a five-pound Banknote and one shilling.

Q. A good one? - A. I believe so; I found two seven-shilling pieces, two shillings, and a sixpence, in her pocket; from Ann Haynes I took two two-pound notes in paper, in her pocket were four seven-shilling pieces, one half-crown, fourteen shillings, and one sixpence; in her purse there were two two-pound notes and seven one-pound notes, one guinea, and twenty-seven shillings.

Q. (To Mr. Bliss.) You saw these notes that were found upon the prisoners? - A. They were all good ones.

Prisoner Whiley's defence. I leave it to my Counsel, and the mercy of the Gentlemen; I had the notes from Haynes.

The prisoner, Haynes, said nothing in her defence.

Sarah Whiley , GUILTY , Death , aged 34.

Ann Haynes , GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

Reference Number: t18040411-51

274. HENRY FOSS was indicted for that he, on the 12th of March , feloniously and without lawful excuse, had in his possession a forged Banknote for the payment of 1 l. knowing it to be forged .

Second Count. For that he feloniously, and without lawful excuse, had in his dwelling-house a certain other forged Bank-note for the payment of 1 l. knowing that also to be forged and counterfeit.

(The case stated by Mr. Garrow.)

- BLISS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are an inspector of Bank-notes, did you go on the 12th of March last, and search the prisoner's house? - A. I did.

Q. On the 12th of March, what particular place did you go to? - A. After I had seen the prisoners, we went to Foss's house, White Horse-alley, Cow-cross ; we went there to search his house, and take him; he was not at home, he came home soon after.

Q. When you therefore discovered he was not at home, what did you do? - A. We searched the house, I had two officers, Edward Croker and Samuel Taunton ; the officers found a great quantity of money, and they searched his wearing-apparel that was in his bed-room; I took a waistcoat that had been laid over a chair in the bedroom at the bed-side. I found a piece of paper in one of the pockets; I took it out, and on opening, before it was quite unfolded, I said here is a Banknote; it turned out to be a forged one-pound note.

Q. Where is that note? - A. (The note produced.) This is the note that I took out of this piece of paper out of a waistcoat-pocket.

Q. Did you see him afterwards? - A. Foss came in soon afterwards, and was taken; he wished to stop, I was not there when he came in; when he was at Carpmeal's, he requested to have the number of notes that were found; the notes were produced, and he was asked if that was his waistcoat; he said, it was; then the number of notes were given him that were found.

Q. What other notes? - A. The notes amounted to thirty-three pounds, they were good notes; they were found in a purse with about one hundred and forty-three guineas, besides cash that was found upon the prisoner; he requested to have the number of notes that were taken from his lodging, which were give him.

Q. You did not say any thing to him then about the one-pound note? - A. No, we had other things to attend to.

Q. Is that the note? - A. It is, it is a counterfeit note, the whole of it.

EDWARD CROKER sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street; I searched Foss's house in company with Mr. Bliss; I chucked the waistcoat out of the chair on the ground by the side of the bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the fact, that that man kept a public-shop? - A. It is a public shop.

- FRESHFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Did you see the prisoner at Bow-street? - A. Yes, on the 21st of March.

Q. What account did he give of the note at Bow-street, was there any Magistrate present? - A. There was no Magistrate present when he was examined; I took written minutes, and afterwards read them over to him, and he said they were correct.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you intimate to him, that you took these minutes under the direction of the Magistrate? - A. I did not; I asked him if he chose to give any account of the note that was in his pocket; I asked him where he got that note, and he went on to give the account; I did not tell him whether I took it in one character, or in another.

Q. Did the Magistrate come in or out at the time? - A. He did not.

Q. Did you hold out any inducement to him? -

A. No, I begged he would tell me as few lies as possible.

(The written minutes read in Court.)

"The note found in my waistcoat-pocket was brought to me by a little boy that lived at a glass-cutters; I gave the boy two seven-shilling pieces, and two shillings in silver, and the old woman was present when I gave change for it, she had looked after my shop ever since I have been in custody; my wife had been in the habit of giving the same lad change; I do not know the number where the lad lived, I have seen his mistress, she dealt with us for what she wanted, but what she is, or how she gets her livelihood, I do not know; I do not know whether the lad lives with her or not, I know he is in the glass way, he used to bring glass to weigh, he used to say his master thought he wronged him, so he brought it to weigh; I did not ask the lad who the change was for; I do not know whether he owed any thing, if he did, I never stopped what was owing from the change; I do not know the lad's master, I could not think the note belonged to the lad, except I had thought he had stole it; he frequently came for change, I did not ask him, neither did my wife; he is about fourteen years old, a stout boy, about four foot high; he sometimes paid, and sometimes not; when he did not pay, I did not ask who it was for; I never heard the lad was in the glass way, nor never heard he had a master; I carried the note up stairs, and put it in my pocket on Monday, and I offered it to a countryman in Leadenhall-market; he said, he did not like it, I gave him another one-pound note; this note had not been lying on my table, I kept the note wrapt up in my waistcoat pocket by itself, the lad did not come after it was refused, I did not tell Betty the note had been refused; my wife's sister was with me; on Monday, about four o'clock, we drank tea, and went to a friend's house at six o'clock, I think it was Mr. Farmer's, somewhere about Goswell-street; I went to Holborn-bridge, and then I came home, and was apprehended; I know Mrs. Bowles, my wife was missing, I do not know where she slept; I do not know any body in Fetter-lane, I was never in any person's house in Fetter-lane; I never gave any parcel to any body before I was apprehended; on Monday morning I went to market, and came back as soon as I had bought my eggs, and staid at home till I went out with my wife's sister; says positively he did not ask any person on Sunday or Monday for a parcel; I know Skinner, I am quite sure I never called on any woman that looked after my wife's shop; I do not know where she lived when this woman came; my wife was at home, my wife went out when she was there; the woman staid till the shop was shut up; she came accordingly on Saturday, and staid till night, and she came on Sunday, and staid till night; she came again on Monday morning; I let my brother's wife know that I was taken; I did not know that my wife was missing, I had no suspicions that my wife was in custody, I thought she wanted to get a separation."

Q. Did you read that over to the prisoner after it was taken? - A. I did, and he said it was correct.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You had a private room? - A. I had.

Q. Did the prisoner know that you had refused Simpson to his admittance? - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH SIMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am a widow woman; I live at No. 84, Fetter-lane.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. Ever since he has been married, about a year; I have lived in Fetter-lane five years the 25th of March.

Q. Did the prisoner well know that you lived there, used he to call upon you there? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you the person that they called Betty? - A. They called me Aunt Betty, the prisoner and his wife did.

Q Was there any relationship between you? - A. No, none at all; he lodged at Mr. Seawood's, and as my niece called me Aunt Betty, they called me Aunt Betty; I do not think he was in my room above three times.

Q. Did he, at any time, leave any thing with you? - A. Yes, a small parcel that he said was lace; it was a small parcel.

Q. About such a parcel as this? - (Shews the parcel.) A. Yes.

Q. What were you to do with it? - A. I was to keep it for him, I put it in the top little drawer just as you enter the door.

Q. Did you leave the parcel in the same state as the prisoner gave it you? - A. Yes.

Q. When you went home, you found that the inspector had been there with another person? - A. Yes, Mr. Bliss and some other gentleman.

Q. Used you, when you went out, to leave the key? - A. Yes, just over the ledge of the door, I left it for his wife; I did not come home for above a week, not till after the officers had been there.

Q. Were you at Foss's house when in his bedroom a one-pound note was found in his waistcoat-pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. He was not at home? - A. No, he was gone a little way with his brother's wife.

Q. Had you any conversation with him after that? - A. I did not speak to him, the gentlemen took him away directly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You supposed it was a parcel of lace? - A. I did.

Q. Can you read or write? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Because as you were a shopkeeper it might be required? - A. I was only there for that time.

Q. You should know paper from lace? - A. Certainly.

Q. This parcel is open at both ends, therefore, without having the common curiosity of your sex, you must have seen what was in it? - A. I never opened it.

Q. Without much curiosity, certainly, you must have seen what was in the parcel? - A. I did not.

Q. You knew there was an accusation against this man for forgery? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew you were liable to a prosecution for having these notes in your possession? - A. I did not know.

Q. By saying you had it from the prisoner you are excused yourself? - A. I could not see it was open at both ends.

Court. Q. Do you remember any little boy coming into the shop with glass? - A. I do not remember any boy coming in with glass, or any thing of the kind at that time.

Q. How long has he kept this shop? - A. Only five weeks.

Q. Did he keep the whole house? - A. Yes.

(The notes found at Elizabeth Simpson 's room shewn to Mr. Bliss.)

Q. (To Mr. Bliss.) Is that the parcel of Bank notes that you found at the last witness's house? - A. It is; they were in a little top drawer, at the right hand going into the room; there are fifteen 1 l. notes, one 2 l. note, and two 5 l. notes; they are all forged; the 1 l. notes appear to be all from one plate, and same manufactory; and the 2 l. is the same as some others we have just seen.

GARNETT TERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am engraver to the Bank.

Q. Are there any of them from your plates? - A. None of them.

Q. Do all the ones appear to be from the same plate? - A. These ones are all from one plate.

Q. Do they appear to be from the same plate with the one I have shewn you; the one in the indictment? - A. They are from the same plate, all the ones.

- ROLLS sworn. - I lodge in the same house with Mrs. Simpson; I know the prisoner by his coming to ask for Mrs. Simpson this day five weeks; he came to the one pair of stairs room and asked for Mrs. Simpson; I asked him who he wanted; he said, Mrs. Simpson's room.

Q. Was Mrs. Simpson at home? - A. Yes; he went in and sat down.

Q. Are you sure you have seen him on other occasions? - A. Yes; one or twice.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, nor call any witness to his character.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-52

275. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 28th of February , a certain Bank note for the payment of 2 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For falsely disposing of and putting away a like forged note, knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

Third and Fourth Count. For forging and uttering, and publishing the same as true, a promissory note for the payment of 2 l. in the form of a Bank note, with the same intention.

And Four other Counts, for like offences, charging them to be with intention to defraud Marshall Spink .

(The case was stated by Mr. Garrow.)

THOMAS STILES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am shopman to Mr. Marshall Spinks, a pawnbroker , in Barbican: On the 24th or 25th of February, the prisoner at the bar came to our shop to look at a gold seal that was in the window; it was marked a guinea; I shewed it him; he put his hand into his pocket, and gave me three shillings earnest; he said he would call another time for it; I took his name down.

Q. What name did he give you? - A. Edwards; he came on the 25th, I think, again; I am not certain; it was on Saturday, and the next time it was on the 28th, the Tuesday following; when he came into the shop I was in at tea; I saw what he wanted; I got the seal, and gave him the seal and the three shillings he had left for the earnest; upon his receiving it, he gave me a 2 l. note; I took the 2 l. note and looked at it; it was quite dusk, and there was a lantern alight at the farther end of the shop; I went and fetched the lantern, and looked at the note; I said, I do not like this note, where do you live; he said, No. 4, Charterhouse-lane, West-Smithfield; I looked again at the note; more particularly; I was fully persuaded in my own mind that it was a forged one; I immediately said to him, I would advise you to be careful what you are about; I had not a single doubt but it was a forged note; I said to him, where and from whom did you take it; he told me he had it from one Mr. Hallam; I understood him so; he pointed with his finger to an indorsement at the back of the note; pointing to a name that he said was Hallam, that he took it of; he then took hold of the note, as if he meant to look at it.

Q. When you say he took hold of the note, as if he meant to look at it, did you part with the note? - A. No.

Q. He took hold with his hand, while you had it in your hand? - A. Yes, and pulled it, by which the note tore; then he immediately let go; he put the seal and the three shillings out of his pocket on the counter; I continued looking at the note, pondering in my mind what I had best do;

the prisoner then said that he took the note fairly; it was hard for him to be at the loss of it; that was nearly the words that he made use of; then he drew back from the counter; I continued looking at the note, and during that time he went out of the shop; the next morning I told Mr. Spinks what had happened with this note; I gave the note to him; I put my own initials upon it; he went to the Bank; I took the particulars of the note on paper. (The note produced by Mr. Fielding.)

Q. Look at this note? - A. This is the note.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you ever, in the course of your life, in the course of your conversation with any person, find one more ready to give an answer to what you asked? - A. I never did.

Q. Was it in the course of business fair and open? - A. It appeared so.

Q. He gave you his address, which address turned out to be a true one? - A. He did.

Mr. Fielding. Q. You did not go to the door to look after him, to see if he was in your reach? - A. No; there was no one in the shop besides.

THOMAS BAXTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are an inspector of Bank notes; look at that note? (The note handed to Mr. Baxter.) - A. It is altogether a forgery; it is neither Bank paper, nor Bank engraving, nor Bank printing.

Q. When did you first see the prisoner? - A. I saw him first in company with Mr. Stiles, in Charterhouse-lane; when Mr. Spinks brought the note to the Bank it was the 29th of February.

Q. Did you find the prisoner at home? - A. We did, at No. 4, Charterhouse-lane; Mr. Stiles went in first of all, and informed me he was at home; I went in; I told the prisoner he must go with me; he said, where; I then mentioned where; he went with me to our Solicitors; he said, he thought he was going to Mr. Spinks; I took him to our Solicitors, Messrs. Winter and Kaye, in Swithin's lane; Mr. Freshfield took some minutes in writing, in the presence of the prisoner.

JAMES-WILLIAM FRESHFIELD sworn. - Q. Were these minutes taken by yourself? - A. They were, on the 29th of February. (The minutes read as follows:) I saw a man in Clerkenwell, with a box of trinkets upon his neck; I looked at some pencils, and bought a couple; he told me he dealt in a great many things; and seeing some boxes I told him I made silver ones, and gave him my card; he called upon me about a week afterwards, and bought silver boxes to the amount of ten pounds twelve shillings, and said his name was Hallowes; he paid me in all two-pound notes, except the twelve shillings; I paid one to a pork-shop, in Fleet-market; I paid one at Jenkins's, a pawnbroker, in Redcross-street, where I redeemed some silver boxes; last week, at the beginning, I paid one to redeem six silver tea-spoons, in Shoreditch; two ladies keep the shop, left hand side, near the bottom of Old-street; about three weeks ago today, I paid another in Holborn, Middle-row, near Brook-street; bought a pair of shoes and gaiters; I went to Mr. Spinks, in Barbican; when I was told it was a bad one, I went away; was much surprized it was a bad one; I asked Mr. Spinks's young man if he should take it to the Bank today; he said he should; I said I would call to know if it was a bad one; I wrote the name of Hallowes upon the back of that note, and some of the others, as soon as the man was gone; I am a bright engraver by trade, but can make boxes; I work for Eames, in Paternoster-row; I am employed by my brother and Hallowes, in Hunt's court; also Merrit, Foster-lane; the boxes made for Hallowes laid by me some time.

Court. Q. The same name as he worked for? - A. Yes, but not the same person; upon the first of March I asked him at Bow-street (there was no Magistrate sitting then) about a note not included in this paper; he said he had that of the man also; I told him of a 2 l. note, that had been traced to Mr. Thorn; I asked him to give an account of that note; he said he received it from the same man he received the others.

THOMAS WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Are you in the employ of Mr. Hall? - A. I was at that time.

Q. Look at that note, and tell me whether that note was brought to your master on the 14th of February. (The note shewn him.) - A. Yes, it was; it was brought to redeem a pledge.

(The duplicate shewn him.) Q. Is that the duplicate? - A. It is the duplicate that was brought by a person who came to redeem a pledge.

Q. How long does it appear by that duplicate the spoons had been pledged? - A. They were pledged the 6th of June and redeemed on the 14th of February; they were pledged for 1 l.

Q. What is the address on the ticket? - A. Thomas Edwards , No. 3, City-road.

Q. Did you ask the person that came to redeem his name and address? - A. I did; I wrote Edwards, No. 4, Charterhouse-street.

Q. Look at the prisoner; do you believe that to be the person? - A. I cannot say; I have no belief about it; I have not the least recollection, there is so long time elapsed.

Q. About two weeks; that is too long for a pawnbroker's memory; where did you live then? - A. No. 8, Old-street road, near Shoreditch church; at Mr. Hall's.

Q. There were some ladies engaged in the business? - A. Yes; their names are Nevill.

Q. How many tea-spoons were pledged? - A. Six tea-spoons.

BENJAMIN CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Fielding. Q. You are a shoemaker, No. 8, Lower Holborn; on Saturday, the 28th of February, did you sell any shoes; look at the prisoner at the bar; see if you know him? - A. I cannot say I do; he is something like a young man that bought a pair of shoes and a pair of gaiters on Saturday, the 28th.

Q. What is your belief with respect to the prisoner? - A. He is something like, but I cannot say.

Q. How much did the shoes and gaiters come to? - A. I think it was about twelve shillings or twelve shillings and sixpence.

Q. How were you paid for this? - A. With a 2 l. note.

Q. Had you any conversation with the person? - A. No; I took the 2 l. note, and left him in the shop while I went up stairs for the rest of the change; there was another person in the room; I took a very little account of the note; I told my wife the paper was a very bad dark colour; I gave him the change; I put it in my pocket-book up stairs afterwards; on the 29th of February my wife borrowed a 1 l. note of my neighbour; I gave this 2 l. note to my apprentice boy, for to go and pay this 1 l. note she had borrowed; then I found it was a bad one; I saw a pair of gaiters at Bow-street; I cannot swear they are mine; they were bound round like mine; I cannot say they were mine; I have not seen the shoes.

Mrs. CLARK sworn. - I believe that to be the person to whom my husband sold the shoes and the gaiters.

Q. How long might the young man be in the shop? - A. From the time he came into the shop to the time he went out, twenty minutes or half an hour; I was in the shop with him at the side of the counter; I took a great deal of notice of him.

THOMAS BOWDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Do you remember your master giving you a two-pound note? - A. Yes.

Q. You are an apprentice to Mr. Clark? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he give you that note to get change? - A. To pay one that was owing.

Q. Did you get the two-pound note changed? - A. Mr. Cross was not at home.

Court. Q. Mr. Cross was the person to whom it was owing? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you get it changed? - A. Yes, Mr. Neale changed it.

Q. Neale is the porter at the Golden Cross? - A. Yes, he gave me two ones.

Q. Where did you meet Neale? - A. At the Blue Posts, the next door.

Q. Did you give Neale the same note your master had given to you? - A. Yes, I did.

THOMAS NEALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You are porter at the Golden Cross? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember receiving from him a two-pound note, for which he gave you change? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at it - is that the note? - A. Yes; Mr. Clark's name is at the back of it.

Q. Is Mr. Clark's name your hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Q. You are able to say then with certainty, that the note you gave your boy to pay Cross, was the same you received from the stranger? - A. I went up stairs, and put it in my pocketbook.

Q. Had you any other two-pound note in your pocket? - A. I had neither a two or a one, to my knowledge; I am certain it is the same, I had no other; I observed, when I took it, the paper looked rather dingy.

Q. Did you make the same observation when you took it out of your pocket-book? - A. I did not take particular notice.

Mr. Garrow. (To Baxter.) Q. Look at that note, (Hall's note), is that the forgery? - A. It is.

Q. Is it in all respects, both paper, and engraving, and signature? - A. I have not the least doubt it is the same manufacture as the first.

Q. Now look at that, (Clark's note), is that a forgery? - A. This is just the same as the other two, I have not the least doubt.

Mr. Garrow. (To Mr. Terry.) Q. Be so good as tell us whether these notes are from the same plate? - A. These are from one plate, all three; they are altogether forged. (The notes read.)

Mr. Gurney. (To Mr. Freshfield.) Q. You were led to go to the pawnbroker's from the information the prisoner gave you? - A. We knew the notes were uttered at these places.

Q. Therefore he was the person who gave you the information? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but that I have stated the truth how I came in possession of the notes; I am a young man, and have not been taught that caution which the Counsel against me seems to think I ought to be in the possession of.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-53

276. LOUIS DARNEY was indicted for an unnatural crime .

GUILTY , Death , aged 35.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-54

277. WILLIAM-GEORGE COLEMAN was indicted for that he, on the 14th day of February , being book-keeper to John Boville the

elder , Edward Cole , and John Boville the younger , did, by virtue of such employment, receive 2 s. 6 d. in money, one Bank of England note, value 10 l. one promissory note for five guineas, and another promissory note for one guinea, for the said John Boville the elder, Edward Cole , and John Boville the younger, did feloniously secrete, embezzle, and carry away the said monies and promissory notes, the notes and monies of the said John Boville the elder, Edward Cole , and John Boville the younger.

And in another Count for the like offence, charging him with carrying it away as the property of George Haynes .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Bolland; and the case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE HAYNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. I live in Aldersgate-street , and am a wholesale tobacconist .

Q. How much was the money? - A. Sixteen pounds nine shillings.

Q. In the course of that month, did any body call for that money? - A. William Coleman called.

Q. Did you give him that money? - A. I did; here is the receipt for the money, (shews the receipt), signed W. G. Coleman.

Q. You paid that money? - A. I did, and he gave me that receipt.

JOHN BOVILLE , jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Will you tell the name of your partner s? - A. John Boville my father, Edward Cole , and myself.

Q. The prisoner was a clerk of your's? - A. He was.

Q. How long had he been a clerk of your's? - Upwards of two years.

Q. Had he, in his station, your ledger? - A. That was his department.

Q. Did he ever receive any money for you? - A. He has received small sums of money when he was ordered.

Q. Did you give him any authority to receive this money from Mr. Haynes? - A. I did not.

Q. When you found you were defrauded, did you take the prisoner up? - A. He was taken up.

Q. Had you any conversation with him? - A. I had; when it was first discovered by Mr. Blakey, I called him into the room where I was, and asked him where he got a certain sum, not this sixteen pounds nine shillings; he fell upon his knees, and instantly said, for what he had done, his life was in our hands.

Q. You gave him no authority to receive it at all? - A. No, it was not his place to receive it; we have a collecting clerk, Mr. Blakey.

- BLAKEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. In what capacity were you employed by Mr. Boville? - A. As an accomptant.

Q. Have you your ledger here? - A. Yes. (The ledger produced.)

Q. Turn to your ledger, to the account - do you find an item of sixteen pounds nine shillings? - A. There is a reference of selling on the 3d of February.

Q. Is there any reference in the cash-book? - A. No, there is not.

Q. Were these books kept by the prisoner? - A. They were.

Q. Are they all in his hand-writing? - A. The ledger is.

Mr. Gurney. (To Mr. Haynes.) Q. When the prisoner came to you, what did he say to you? - A. He told me he called from the house of Boville.

Q. Did he say from whose order he came? - A. No; he said he only called for the money, and presented that account; he had called a day or two before, I was going out the first time; I told him I was going out, and he must call another time.

JOHN BOVILLE , sen. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Mr. Boville, you are the senior partner in this house - did you ever give the prisoner any authority to receive this money? - A. No.

EDWARD COLE sworn. - Q. You are the other partner in this house - did you ever give the prisoner any authority to get this money of Mr. Haynes? - A. No.

Court. (To Mr. Haynes.) Q. How was it paid? - A. A ten-pound Bank-note, a country Banknote of five pounds five shillings, and a Tunbridge Bank-note of one pound one shilling, and two shillings and sixpence in silver.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18040411-55

278. CATHERINE KIRBY was indicted for the wilful murder of her female bastard child .

There being no evidence to prove that the child was born alive, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18040411-56

279. SARAH PILCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , five pewter quart pots, value 5 s. the property of Francis Matthison .

FRANCIS MATTHISON sworn. - I am a publican at the George and Crown, Broad-street, Bloomsbury : On the 1st of March, the prisoner at the bar came into my house about seven o'clock in the evening, and took five quart pots out of the sink, where the girl had them to wash; she took them out of the house, and went over the way with them; the girl saw her take them, she called out, and a gentleman took her.

Q. Did you yourself see the prisoner there? - A. Not till after she was taken.

CHARLOTTE ELLIOTT sworn. - I live with Mr. Matthison; the prisoner worked at the army work for a person that lived in the house: On the 1st of March I was washing the pots in the yard, she came into the yard at the time; I heard the pots rattle, it was in the evening on Taffy's night, and I cried out; she run as far as the Black Dog in St. Giles's; she was never out of my sight till a gentleman stopped her; my master and mistress knew not a word of it till she was brought back; she dropped three of the pots just by the Black Dog, and two I took out of her lap when she was brought back; she insisted they were not my property; I told her they were my master's.

SAMPSON JONES sworn. - I am a waiter at the Cock Tavern, Royal Exchange: I was going to my cousin's to supper at Tottenham Court-road; I saw the prisoner coming out of the house, and the girl making a noise; I followed the prisoner, and took her, and brought her back.

Q. What had she upon her? - A. These five pots.

Q. What did she say for herself? - A. She said but very little.

(The pots produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I worked for a person in Mr. Matthison's house, up two pair of stairs; I was going there in the evening, and I met a woman at the door that lives in Leather-lane, Holborn; she met me in the passage, and she told me to take those pots; I was going away with them, and that young man stopped me; I did not know whose they were; that girl did not call after me, it was her fellow-servant.

Charlotte Elliott . My fellow-servant knew nothing about it, it was me; do not tell a lie about it.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-57

280. JOHN TATE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , a jacket, value 12 s. the property of Richard Mount .

JOSEPH BLANEY sworn. - I live with Mr. Mount, a pawnbroker , Gravel-lane, St. George's in the East : On the 5th of March, the prisoner came into the shop about nine o'clock in the morning, while we were busy, and he cut a jacket down from off the nails where it was hanging; a person that was in the shop said, there is a man has stole a jacket; I immediately followed him, and took the prisoner with the jacket in his possession. As I was taking him towards the Police-office, I met one of the Police-officers, and I gave him in charge.

Q. What did he say? - A. I believe the expression that he made use of was, that he wanted to borrow it of me.

WILLIAM SHAFFSTOW sworn. - I am an officer in the Thames Police: On Monday, the 5th of March, in the forenoon, I had charge of the prisoner by the prosecutor at the top of Anchor and Hope-alley, in St. George's in the East; he was charged with stealing this pea-jacket; I have had it in my custody ever since.

Q. Where did you find the jacket when you took him? - A. On the prosecutor's arms. (The jacket produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. When he took me, he asked me where I was going with the jacket; I told him I was going to No. 101, Wapping, to get one made like it; I was going along Wapping-wall, and met this crimp and another man; I was going up to the India-house to go on board the Lady Burgess; the man gave me the jacket to carry, so I was going along, and this man came running after me, and said it was his jacket; I said, how can it be your jacket, when a man gave it me to carry? I said, come along, and I will prove it to you. So he took me along, and we met this man, and he carried me to the Police-office.

Blaney. Before I took him to the Office, I took him back to the shop.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months in the House of Correction and publickly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-58

281. SARAH NEAL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , two silver table-spoons, value 1 l. the property of James Brewer .

SUSANNAH JOHNSON sworn. - Mr. Brewer keeps the Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane : On the 17th of March, the prisoner came and offered herself as a kitchen maid; we did not want a servant at that time; she said she wanted something to eat; in the mean time, the cook was going to give her something to eat, she stole these two spoons.

Q. Were you present at the time? - A. No; I am a relation to Mr. Brewer, I am come to prove the property; I saw her go into the kitchen to the cook.

- GOSS sworn. - I live with Mr. Pattmore on Ludgate-hill: On the 17th of March, the prisoner came and offered two spoons, and from their being engraved the Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane, it gave me a suspicion that she did not come honestly by them. When I interrogated her whose property they were, she said she was sent by Miss Bolton, who lived at the Swan and Two Necks; I detained her until I sent there; they immediately came and said that she stole them.

WILLIAM KIMBER sworn. - I am a constable: On the 17th of March, I was sent for to the house of Mr. Pattmore; I took the prisoner into custody; the pawnbroker gave me these spoons, I have kept them ever since. (The spoons produced and identified by Miss Johnson.)

Prisoner's defence. The only reason made me do this, I was very much distressed for want of bread, I had been out of place these five months.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-59

282. SAMUEL BRAMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , a cask, value 11 s. twenty-seven gallons of table beer, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Smith , Capel Hanbury , and Daniel Bell , executor s of the late John Hanbury .

(The case was opened by Mr Knapp.)

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have the management of the brewery in Whitecross-street ; I am the surviving partner; my partners are the executors of the late firm; John Hanbury was my partner, now the executors are connected with me; the executors are Capel Hanbury and Daniel Bell ; I have the management of the concern; the prisoner was a drayman , and had the charge of the beer, and delivered it to the different customers; he was what we call foreman of the dray; he had another man to assist him; when he comes home in the evening, the names of the persons to whom he has delivered beer, is entered in a book by the clerk; he mentions the names, and afterwards he signs it with his initials; that is the usual way.

Q. Was Mrs. Sexton a customer of yours? - A. Mrs. Sexton was some years ago, very near four years ago, but not since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where Mrs. Sexton lives is in Essex; the beer you charge to have stole was delivered in Essex? - A. Certainly.

MARGARET SEXTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe some years ago you were a customer of Messrs. Hanbury and Co.? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to your house, and when? - A. In the beginning of December last; I had some beer of him, and paid him when he delivered the cask; whether he asked me if I wanted the beer, or would I take the beer, I cannot say which of the words.

Q. Was he a servant of Messrs. Hanbury and Co. at the time you were a customer? - A. I knew him before, by coming with other men to serve me with beer.

Q. At the time he came to you in December, you were not a customer at all? - A. No.

Q. Did he say from whom he came? - A. I knew the dray, and from whom he came; I took a cask of beer.

Q. What did you pay for the cask? - A. Ten shillings and sixpence.

Court. Q. What cask was it, a large one? - A. I think they hold twenty-seven gallons.

Q. What price was it? - A. Mr. Smith told me it came to fifteen shillings; I gave him ten shillings and sixpence.

Q. Did you buy it of him as from the house of Hanbury and Co.? A. - Yes, being so inferior, I thought I gave the value of it.

Q. Did he say where he brought it from? - A. No, he did not; I knew the dray to be Mr. Smith's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You reside in Essex? - A. Yes, at Walthamstow; when the dray came round, they always spoke as they passed; I had a brother lived there.

Q. The prisoner brought you a cask of beer; you bought it, and gave ten shillings and sixpence for it? - A. Yes; it was not fit for the pigs; I gave it to the pigs at last.

Q. It was represented to you as good beer when you bought it? - A. It was.

Q. When you tasted it, it was sour and griping? - A. It was.

Q. The beer you formerly had of Hanbury was good; do you think the last beer was theirs? - A. It may; all beer does not run alike.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You said you had a relation in this house of Hanbury and Smith? - A. I had; he was a cooper.

Q. Was he acquainted with this man? - A. I do not know.

Q. You live at Walthamstow; what are you? - A. I am nothing but a washerwoman.

Q. What part of Walthamstow is your house near? - A. North-green; just before you come to the forest.

Q. How long is it since you have left off dealing with Messrs. Hanbury and Smith? - A. Near four years; if not quite.

Q. You have lived upon the spot ever since? - A. I have lived on the same spot thirty-six years.

Court. Q. Do you keep a house there? - A. Yes.

Q. A wooden tenement? - A. No; a brick one.

Q. Did you taste the beer before it was left? - A. No.

Q. Then you did not know it was bad when you bought it? - A. No.

Q. What did you pay? - A. Ten shillings and sixpence; that was the money he said it came to.

Q. Why did it not strike you that you could not have twenty-seven gallons of beer for ten shillings and sixpence. What does your family consist of? - A. People that I employ, sometimes five or six.

Q. How many casks of beer do you consume in a month? - A. Not many in a month.

Q. Who do you have your beer from? - A. From Mr. Aslam, at Stratford.

Q. Do you ever get twenty-seven gallons of beer from him for the same money? - A. I never had such a large cask of him.

Q. What do you pay him? - A. Ten shillings for eighteen gallons.

Q. Did it not strike you, when you paid ten shillings and sixpence for twenty-seven gallons of beer; did you think the man came by it honest? The fact is, that you had a cask of twenty-seven gallons of beer, and that you paid only ten shillings and sixpence for it, do not come by this way any more. -

THOMAS DALTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a servant to Mr. Smith? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember going with the prisoner with any beer from your masters, and going to Mrs. Sexton's house? - A. I did not know the house when I was there; I cannot tell when it was.

Q. You do not know whether it was before Christmas or since? - A. I cannot tell upon my word; I went along with him.

Q. Did you go to Walthamstow - Did you leave a cask there at Mrs. Sexton's? - A. Yes, we left a cask there, I do not know what was in it.

Q. You never gave Mr. Smith any information about it? - A. No, I did not know any thing about it.

Mr. Alley. You are a very honest fellow, and know nothing about it.

THOMAS SMITH , jun. sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the son of the Gentleman examined here before; I understand that the man who delivers beer, has it entered in a book when he comes home by the clerk, and he signs it; have you the book of the 2d of December last? - A. I have the book here, there is no delivery of that kind (the books produced), this is the book they sign, and this is the book they post it.

Q. Is there any account in the other book of any money having been received of a cask of beer to Mrs. Sexton in December last? - A. There is no name of Mrs. Sexton in it; there is one Gentleman, Mr. Allen, that suspected that he had not so many as we booked to him.

Court. The fraud this fellow commits is this; he charges Mr. Allen for three casks, and he has had but two; they are accounted for to the master, therefore the only evidence to prove against the prisoner would be, that he has charged to Mr. Allen three casks, and he has only had two.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-60

283. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for that he, on the 21st of March , did unlawfully utter to Samuel Barnard , a piece of false and counterfeit coin, made in the likeness of a good shilling, he knowing the same to be false and counterfeited .

JOHN WHITE sworn. - I am a plaisterer by trade: On the 21st of March, I was at the Sun on Addle-hill , I was at dinner, about the hour of one, I saw the prisoner come in; Mr. Hicks said, be careful of that man, your sister will take some bad money of him, my sister keaps the house; I stepped forward, and the man asked for a glass of gin and he offered me a shilling that was bad, I generally do serve when I am there; I saw in his hand another bad one, and two good ones; I then asked him how many more he had.

Q. Did he tend you the second one? - A. No, I saw another in his hand, he seemed to tremble; I told him I rather supposed he had more, and that I thought it was necessary to send for a constable, and search him; we found upon him two good shillings and two bad ones, a seven-shilling-piece, and two pence in halfpence.

Q. What did you do with the bad shilling he tended you? - A. I kept it in my hand till the constable came.

- PEDDER sworn. - Q. You are the constable, and searched the prisoner? - A. I did; I have got the two bad shillings here. (Produces them).

Q. (To White.) From whom did you receive that shilling at Mr. Barnard's? - A. From the prisoner.

Q. Which of those two shillings was tendered to you? - A. That is the shilling I took of the prisoner, (shewing them); and that is the one I took out of his hand; he had two good ones in his hand to pay if he chused.

- HICKS sworn. - Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. About two or three years; I only know that he was in the habit of passing it, he has been in confinement for the same.

- PARKER sworn. - Q. Look at these two shillings? - A. They are both counterfeited: they appear to be new coloured, they have not been in circulation since they have been coloured.

Prisoner's defence. When I went into this man's house I pulled out the silver, and a seven-shilling-piece, I called for a glass of pepper-mint; his wife that served at the bar, I gave her the shilling; she handed that over to the publican, and said, this here is a bad one; I would have given them the money I had in my hand to have changed, I had a seven-shilling-piece in my hand; that is the truth.

White. My sister was not in the bar.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for six months more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-61

284. WILLIAM BERESFORD was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

There being no evidence at all to affect the prisoner, and it appeared to the Court, that the prosecution was instituted for the purpose of seeking revenge, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-62

285. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for that he, on the 23d of October, in the 11th year of his Majesty's reign, did marry Margaret Coghlan ; and

that he, on the 19th of January, 1803 , did marry Ann Ramsay , his former wife being living, against his Majesty's peace, and against the statute .

SAMUEL KENELLY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a shoe-maker, I live at the Cove of Cork, in Ireland.

Q. Do you know a person whose maiden name was Margaret Coghlan ? - A. Yes, she was a neighbour; I saw her on the 17th of February last.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar - do you know him? - A. I know him very well.

Q. What age is Margaret Coghlan ? - A. About fifty-five or fifty-six.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. I knew the prisoner in the years 1770, 71, and 72, he was steward in his Majesty's ship the Solebay , she was lying at Cork.

Q. At that time did you know a person of the name of Margaret Coghlan ? - A. I did, very well.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar pass as a married man? - A. After he was married to Margaret Coghlan he did.

Court. Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, that he was married? - A. I do not.

Mr. Watson. Q. Do you know any thing of that paper, (a paper handed to the witness); did you compare that paper with any thing, and what? - A. I compared it with the register-book of the church of Cork; I saw it signed by the curate, I read it at the time; it was on or about the 19th of February last, (the certificate read in Court); after the certificate was wrote and signed by the curate, I went to the church-wardens at their own houses, and they signed it; my name is on the back of it, I wrote it at the time.

Q. When did you leave Cork? - A. In the month of February.

Q. Was this Margaret, whose maiden name was Coghlan, alive then? - A. She was on the 17th of February, I saw her, and conversed with her.

Q. Was she the same person you had seen living with the prisoner at the bar as man and wife? - A. Positively so.

Q. Do you know whether they had any children? - A. They had one child.

Q. After you left Cork, did you ever see the prisoner, when and where? - A. I saw him in the King's Bench prison.

Q. Did you recognize his person as the husband of Margaret Coghlan in the Cove of Cork, in Ireland? - A. Yes.

Q. And the same person that you described as steward of the gun-room in his Majesty's ship the Solebay? - A. Yes; and he talked of different matters to me respecting of the Cove of Cork, in Ireland, of people that we knew; he acknowledged himself to be the husband of Margaret Coghlan ; he said he did marry such a person, he liked her very well, and said, hang such marriages, he would marry again.

Court. Q. How came he to talk to you about that? - A. Mrs. Ramsay challenged him with respect to the marriage, she said, she did not like it; she told him she had been to Ireland, and had seen his first wife, Margaret Coghlan ; he said he had been married to her; she again said, I have seen your wife in Ireland; he said, then I am done.

Court. Q. Were you any relation, or friend of the first wife? - A. No; a neighbour of the first wife.

Q. How came the second wife to find you out? - A. Accidentally, enquiring about the first wife, she found me out when I was working at Mr. Leish's, in Cork; I knew the prisoner in the years 1770, 71, 72, I saw him go backwards and forwards on shore, when he seemed to pay his addresses to Margaret Coghlan ; I was intimate with her, and often spoke to her; I saw the prisoner go with Margaret Coghlan to church, and I saw them come back, I was not present at the ceremony; she was servant to Robert Newnham , Esq. they went from there to the church, and about ten weeks after I saw them live together in a room of their own, on the Cove of Cork.

Q. When did he quit the Cove of Cork? - A. I suppose in the year 1774.

Q. Did he leave Margaret Coghlan behind him? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time you had the conversation with him at the King's Bench, had you any reason to know whether he knew his wife to be living? - A. I cannot properly say.

Prisoner. Q. In the first place, what age are you? - A. Forty-nine.

Q. When you came to me, you were introduced by my wife, who is here, as a friend of her's; she said, she had been to Ireland; this man I never saw in my life, nor he me; did not you say you came for the sole purpose to take your son back to Ireland? - A. I said that, and I partly came for that, and other things.

Q. Whether, at the time this conversation passed, I told you, with respect to that wife, that I knew of no such person living? - A. I told you she was positively alive.

Court. Q. Did he say that he knew of no such person living? - A. I do not remember any such thing; he said, he had married Margaret Coghlan , but he thought she was dead.

ANN RAMSAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are the widow of a man whose name was Ramsay? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do.

Q. Have you known him before the decease of your husband? - A. Yes.

Q. How long is it since your husband died? - A. About a year and a half.

Q. Was he acquainted with your husband? - A. He was.

Q. Had he an opportunity of knowing your circumstances? - A. He had.

Q. After your husband was dead, did he make a proposition of marriage to you? - A. He did.

Q. Did you go to church with him? - A. I did.

Q. Were you married by banns, or by licence? - A. By licence.

Q. What church were you maried at? - A. At St. Paul's, Shadwell , on the 19th of January, 1803.

Q. Do you remember being with the last witness at the Cove of Cork, in Ireland, and seeing a woman of the name of Coghlan? - A. I went to Ireland the beginning of last February, in consequence of hearing this man had been married before, I would not believe it, I went there myself; when I arrived at the Cove of Cork, I went to a friend that knew her very well.

Q. Did you go to the house with the last witness? - A. I did; I went to the house with him, but I did not go in with him, I found her out by his directions.

Q. When you came back from Cork, did you go to the King's Bench prison? - A. Yes, and took Mr. Kenelly with me.

Q. Did the prisoner, in the King's Bench prison, say she was dead? - A. He did; he always said she was dead.

Court. Q. Have you any reason to know whether he has been in Ireland since you have known him? - A. I am sure he has not; I have been acquainted with him about two years in England.

JANE DONALD sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At present, in the Court of the King's Bench, I am a married woman; I was at Mr. Needle's, in the King's Bench, when Mrs. Ramsay and Kenelly were there; I heard Mr. Needle ask him if he had known Mr. Kenelly before; he said, no, he had never seen him before that day; he said, he came for the sole purpose of taking his son home to Ireland, and he immediately meant to return home.

Mr. Alley. Q. You live in the King's Bench? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been in the gallery during this trial, you have got the expression that he came for the sole purpose of getting his son - In what part of the prison was he during the time you heard this? - A. In Mr. Needle's room, No. 77.

Q. Is Mr. Needle here? - A. No.

Q. He was in the room at that time? - A. He asked the question.

Prisoner's defence. I never heard of my former wife for thirty-two years; I was not married in church, I was married in the parson's parlour; I belonged to his Majesty's ship the Solebay at that time, and two years after I was married I was ordered to Plymouth, the crew were discharged, and the ship was condemned, I was never in Ireland since; after that, I went to America for eleven years, and continued in his Majesty's service all the war, and was not home here till the year 1784, then I was informed by some relations of her's that she was dead; my wife, who is here, introduced herself in the name of Mrs. Goods, and said, she had been married again; she brought this Kenelly with her; says she to me, are not you glad to see me; I said, I have heard a bad thing of you, that you had cut your throat; she said, here is a young man come from Ireland with me; I did not like the appearance of the man, he could not stare me in the face at the time; I said, I do not believe you have been there; yes, said she, I have been there, in the Sturdy-Beggar.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-63

286. JOSEPH KING , THOMAS WALKER , and JOHN FITCH , were indicted, the two first, for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , forty-seven feet of oak-scantlings, value 9 s. twenty-two feet of oak slabs, value 4 s. nineteen feet six inches of fir, value 8 s. 3 d. five feet of fir batten, value 15 d. two oak-ends, value 2 s. and one piece of old oak, value 6 d. the property of John Restall ; and the latter, for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

Second Count. The same as the former, only charging the property to John Restall and Ann Bachelor .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN RESTALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a carpenter and builder , I live in Mansfield-street, Goodman's-fields ; the prisoners King and Walker were employed by me: I had reason to suppose I had been robbed, and in consequence of information that I received, I ordered Oliver to direct one of the men to mark some materials; his name is Davis, he occupies a cottage near the premises.

Q. In consequence of some information, did you go with the officer to Fitch's house? - A. Yes, on the thirteenth of March, I think it was on Tuesday; when I went into the house I was asked if I could swear to them; Fitch was present at the time; I could not, nor can I swear to it.

JAMES DAVIS sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a servant belonging to Mr. Restall: I was ordered by Mr. Oliver, on Thursday the 8th of March, to watch the sawyers; the next morning I marked four pieces, and three of them were found in Mr. Fitch's dwelling-house; on Tuesday morning following, about half past eight o'clock, I saw King go and take three or four pieces of scantling, and put them in the saw-pit to his partner Walker; Walker was in the saw-pit; the bottom part of the saw-pit against Mr. Fitch's premises is

level with the ground, and an open pale-fence, and to one of the boards there was a nail out at the bottom, so that the board could be put of either side; it was only fastened at the top, and when it was shoved on one side, any thing might be put in.

Q. Did you afterwards go to Fitch's premises with the officer? - A. Yes; I saw some scantlings in his outhouse where the coals were, belonging to Mr. Fitch, I saw seven or eight; I knew three, I had marked them before; Fitch is a publican, he keeps the Cherry-tree.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. I am a carpenter.

Q. I suppose if it is necessary for a carpenter or a sawyer to make his work higher or lower when he is at work, at any given piece of wood, he may remove any piece of wood honestly and fairly to make his work more easy? - A. Justly so.

Q. The man who is at work on the wood can see every body that is in the yard? - A. He might, perhaps, if he had known where I had been watching.

Court. Q. Here is a saw-pit six feet deep; the situation of the man who stood on the top of the wood, could not he see over six feet; he could see you if he had looked round? - A. He could not see me in the yard, because I was not in the yard; I was in a house that looked into the yard.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Where is this outhouse of Mr. Fitch's, that you saw these scantlings taken from? - A. An outhouse very near the yard of Mr. Restall.

Q. And there you found three pieces of oak-scantling? - A. There were seven in all, three I had marked.

Q. How are these premises of Mr. Restall guarded? - A. With high paling; some part is ten feet high, and other parts are not above seven feet, and some part with a brick manufactory at the bottom.

Q. Now the outhouse of Mr. Fitch, is that very well secured? - A. Yes, for what I know.

Q. The skittle ground is behind that? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there not a yard that any body may have access to? - A. If they do they have no right.

Court. Q. Tell us how Mr. Fitch's yard is situated: in the first place there is a paling belonging to Mr. Restall, that you have told us is seven feet high; what is Fitch's fence of the other side? - A. I cannot say.

WILLIAM OLIVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Restall? - A. I am: On Thursday, previous to the thirteenth of March, I marked as many pieces as the sawyers had been collecting together, for some unknown purpose.

Q. Were they pieces to be sawed up? - A. They were not; they are called oak-scantlings.

Court. Q. By no means to be sawed up? - A. They had been sawed up a year before.

Q. After you had marked them on Thursday morning did you go there, and did you miss any? - A. I went there every morning after I marked them, but I found more added to them; I had missed some for some time previous to that; but on the Tuesday following, as soon as I went into the yard, I found every piece that I had marked was gone excepting one; I immediately applied to Davis, whom I had put in a situation to watch their conduct.

Q. In consequence of some information he gave you, you got a warrant? - A. I did, and we, with some officers, went to Fitch's premises on the thirteenth of March; when we went to Fitch's house, we found him at work with a carpenter, making a skittle-frame in the yard; I immediately recognised a piece of fir-scantling, and a piece of fir-batten; it was a piece of fir that I had missed out of the yard; we immediately, in company with the officers, told Fitch that we had come in search after some stolen timber; he said he had got none: Smith then called him on one side; I heard what Smith said; Smith told him that he had a warrant to search his premises, and if he knew of any he had better tell him and the others where it was; he then said, that a man had left some pieces of scantlings for some gentleman over the way; he then pointed to his coal-cellar; the coal-cellar is level with the yard under his dwelling-house; as soon as we approached the coal-cellar, there I found the pieces I had marked; there were seven pieces to the best of my knowledge; in the whole there were four pieces that I had marked, and three Davis had marked; Smith asked him if he had any more, he said not to his knowledge; I then requested him to open the door adjoining his coal-cellar; I believed he called it his wine-cellar, and there I found two oak-ends I had missed out of the yard; I had no private mark on them, but they were such as I am positive that they were my master's property; Mr. Fitch told me these oak-ends were appraised to him when he came into the house.

Q. How long since had you seen the oak-ends? - A. I am positive they were in the yard after the twenty-seventh of May, last year.

Q. How long has Fitch kept the house? - A. I do not know; I have very little knowledge of the man; I had marked a piece of fir that was in the skittle-ground; he assured me they were appraised to him; the principal part of the frame I had not missed out of the yard till I saw the fir; they were then framing it and nailing it together, and closing it to some batten that it was confined to.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Was it that part that you had not missed before; was it marked before you saw it? - A. There was a bad end; it was marked with an axe mark.

Mr. Alley. Q. There is a great many more men

about this place? - A. Not at that time; there are at times.

Q. Were you always upon the spot? - A. No.

Q. How can you tell? - A. They are not suffered in the yard without my leave; I had a person watching at this time; he can speak.

- SMITH sworn. - I went to Fitch's premises with a warrant; I found in the coal-cellar what the last witnesses described, and that which made the skittle-frame was taken away by Mr. Oliver's servant; it is all here; the moment I went into the yard I saw Fitch with the carpenter; I told him I had a warrant to search for some stolen timber; he said, I have none here; a man has left some timber; it is in the coal-cellar; I have not purchased it, nor have I stolen it; he said he had no more than what was in the coal-cellar; I said, are you sure; he said, yes; and when we found more, he said they were appraised to him when he came into the house, about ten months ago; Mr. Oliver identified the piece of frame; he was very ready to let us search; there were two oak ends, that were in the wine-cellar, and two pieces of fir that were in the skittle-ground.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You say he was very ready to let you search? - A. He was.

(The timber produced and identified by Oliver and Davis.)

King's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

Walker's defence. I am innocent.

Fitch's defence. I cannot say any more than what I have said.

The prisoner King called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

The prisoner Fitch called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

All Three, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-64

287. JOHN ELLISON and WILLIAM JACKSON were indicted for feloniously assaulting of James Mansfield , on the King's highway, on the 12th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 3 l. his property .

JAMES MANSFIELD sworn. - I am a coal-merchant ; I live at No. 10, Charlotte-street, Field-gate-street, Whitechapel: On the 12th of March I was going down Whitechapel-road , about seven o'clock in the evening; opposite the bell-foundry I was surrounded by four or five men who pushed me and enclosed me about very much; I felt my watch go out of my pocket; I said, I was robbed; I had lost my watch; they were all round me.

Q. Had they got you against the wall? - A. No; they were all round me; I was in the middle of the pavement at the time.

Q. Did they use a great deal of force to you? - A. Yes; a good deal.

Q. Were you aware of your situation, when they came round you? - A. I was aware that I was going to be robbed.

Q. How many were there? - A. There were four or five; I cannot exactly say; I immediately laid hold of one of the men; the prisoner at the bar, the oldest of the two, John Ellison ; he stands facing of me; I told him that I had been robbed, and that he was one that had robbed me; he said that he had not got my watch; I told him I would take him to the Public-Office; he said he would go with me.

Q. Did you secure him? - A. Yes; he was with me till he came near the Office; we went to the Public-Office, Lambeth-street, Whitechapel, and when we came near the Office, he turned round and gave me a violent blow on the temple, and knocked me down, and ran off; there was a cry of stop thief, and he was soon brought back, and I took him to the Office.

Q. Are you sure it is the same man? - A. Very certain.

Q. When you laid hold of him, what became of the other four of them? - A. There was one taken by a man coming up, and the rest, I fancy, ran away.

Q. Did you apprehend the other man? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever find your watch? - A. No.

Q. You are sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

Prisoner Ellison. Q. Which way was I walking when you were stopped? - A. You went round me, shuffling me about.

Q. How far were you from the bell-founder's? - A. About as far as from me to his Lordship.

Q. What is the reason you did not give the same evidence on Tuesday evening after? - A. I did give the same evidence.

Q. Did not a person come up and ask you if you had been robbed of any thing? - A. I do not remember any such thing.

Q. Whether the Magistrate did not tell him he could only commit me for the assault; he could not charge me with the robbery? - A. He never said so.

Q. Can you remember what you said on the second examination, when no one was there but yourself; you said that you took me near the spot, as I was walking along? - A. I said, that as I was taking him near the Office, he turned round and gave me a violent blow and knocked me down.

Q. Whether he was not drunk at that time? - A. I was not.

WILLIAM SANDFORD sworn. - I am a labourer in the India warehouse: I am steward of a club held at the Bull's Head, Whitechapel: I had been visiting two sick members, and coming back, near the bell-founder's, Whitechapel-road, about five

minutes after seven, on Monday, the 12th of March, I saw three men hustling this Mr. Mansfield; his breath was almost out of his body; he was panting for breath; he said, in a low tone of voice, he had lost his watch; I immediately saw two men start from him, and they made for the opposite side of the way; the one I apprehended was William Jackson ; I took him into the butcher's shop, the corner of Fieldgate-street; I told the people that a man had been robbed of his watch; I begged them to keep him while I went out and looked for the other in a flannel jacket; I could not see the other in a flannel jacket; he made his escape.

Q. Are you sure this is one of the men? - A. Yes; I never took my eyes off him; I never lost sight of him; I took and put him in the butcher's shop.

Q. Are you sure he is one that hustled Mr. Mansfield? - A. Yes; and immediately I heard Mr. Mansfield say he had lost his watch I ran across the road and took him.

Q. In what manner were they hustling him? - A. They were shoving round him.

Q. Using violence against him? - A. Yes; he was quite out of wind when I came up, and he said in a low tone of voice that he had lost his watch.

Q. When you took him to the butcher's shop, what was done with him? - A. When we came back he was gone; there was a mob assembled about the door; they said they had no right to keep him, so they let him go; he was found about ten or eleven days after.

Q. Are you sure that he is the man? - A. That is the man; the butcher's sister is here; she will swear to him, as well as myself; and I will swear he is the man.

Q. Did you observe Ellison? - A. I had not time to recognize that man; Mr. Mansfield took him; I saw this man and Mr. Mansfield at the Office; Mr. Mansfield had his eye cut; it was bleeding; that man, if he was there, he must be in the front of him; this Jackson and the man in the flannel jacket were behind Mr. Mansfield at the time of the robbery.

Q. At the time of the robbery, could you observe who was in the front? - A. I could not; I did not turn my head that way; I run across the way when he said he was robbed, after Jackson, and while I took the prisoner, Jackson, I lost sight of the prosecutor and Ellison, and never saw him till I saw him at the Office.

Q. You were not walking along with Mr. Mansfield? - A. No, I was passing by; a stranger at the time.

FRANCES LUTTEN sworn. - Q. Your brother is a butcher, and lives in Whitechapel-road? - A. Yes; Jackson was brought into our shop.

Q. What day? - A. The 12th of March, about twenty minutes past seven in the evening.

Q. Who brought him in? - A. William Sandford .

Q. What was said in the presence of the prisoner, when he brought him in? - A. To let him remain while he went and catched the other for stealing the watch.

Q. Who took charge of him? - A. No one at all.

Q. Who was to prevent him from going out? - A. There were some neighbours.

Q. How long did you detain him? - A. About twenty minutes.

Q. How came you to let him go? - A. The mob around the shop, and the people in the shop, said we dare not detain him, as there were no Officers with him; so we let him go, and he went; him and the men that were in the shop.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. I am positive.

Q. How soon after the 12th did you see him again? - A. Two days after; I think it was on the 14th.

Q. I thought it was on the 17th; are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. What Office did you see him in? - A. In Lambeth-street; I am confident he is the man.

Q. (To Sandford.) When was he apprehended? - A. It was the 23d before I saw him in the Office; the Officer can tell when they apprehended him; I never set eyes on him after he got out of the shop, till he was apprehended, and at the Office.

THOMAS NOWLAND sworn. - I am an Officer: I know no more than apprehending Jackson, on Wednesday the 14th of March.

Ellison's defence. On Monday, as I had been down to Wilburn, and coming back as any Gentleman of the Jury might do, coming up the road, this gentleman walks after me, and said have you seen any thing of my watch; have you got it, for I have been robbed; a gentleman comes past; he said have you lost it; I do not think this man was there; I saw some man start, and run across the road; the prosecutor came up to me, and we walked together, and when we came to Church-street, he wanted to shove me into a public-house; he told me that was the Office; I told him it was not; with that he shoved me again; I went to the Office with him and was searched; the next day, before the Justice, he said he took me near the place; the Justice ordered the Clerk to commit me for the assault; the Clerk turned round and said you had better commit him for another hearing; then on Monday they brought this young

man for a hearing, and we staid at the Office the whole day; and then we were remanded back till Friday; then he swore that he took me on the spot, and that I was walking up the road by myself, careless.

Jackson's defence. As I was coming off the hill, walking along, that gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and said a gentleman over the way wanted me; I went with him; there was no gentleman there; I asked him who he was making a fool of, and what he meant by it; he insisted that I should go into the butcher's shop; I stopped in the butcher's shop; nobody came, and the gentleman said go along about your business; I made answer I will not go about my business till the gentleman comes; I turned round, and said I will tell you where I live; I told them where my father and mother lived, and with the same description that I gave, the Officer came and took me.

Q. (To Frances Lutten .) Did he say where he lived? - A. No, he did not; if he had said it to any person in the shop, I must have heard it, because I was by.

John Ellison , GUILTY , Death , aged 44.

William Jackson , GUILTY , Death , aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-65

288. HENRY JACKSON and WILLIAM SYKES were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , two wooden casks, value 20 s. and thirty gallons of beer, value 15 s. the property of William-Marmaduke Sellon ; and the latter for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am inspector of casks for the Committee of Brewers.

Q. In consequence of any information, did you go to Mr. Sykes's house, in Gray's Inn lane? - A. On the 12th of March, Mr. Sellon applied for a warrant to enquire of Mr. Sykes; Mr. Sykes keeps the Sun, in Gray's Inn lane ; I went there with some Officers from Hatton-garden; we found Mr. Sykes at home; we told him we were informed that he had some beer belonging to Mr. Sellon on his premises; he said he had a barrel of beer that a man left there until he called for it; it was in the cellar, at the bottom of the stairs; I found the barrel full of beer; I asked him if there was any thing else; he said, no; I went further into the cellar with the warrant, and there we found a half-hogshead, empty, of Mr. Sellon's; we went over the premises, and found nothing more belonging to Mr. Sellon; I left the Officer with Sykes till I got a dray to take the two casks away.

Q. Are you sure the casks are Mr. Sellon's? - A. Yes; they have the mark of Mr. Sellon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Does it not frequently occur that casks belonging to one brewer get mixed with another brewer's casks? - A. No doubt.

Q. With a publican who deals with four or five different brewers, it frequently occurs that mistakes happen, in a fair regular course of trade? - A. It certainly does.

Q. Mr. Meux's casks may get along with Mr. Sellon's, and vice versa. -

Court. Q. Does it happen, in course of business, that these casks get exchanged, suppose Mr. Meux takes the cask, and sends it out with beer? - A. A man may get one cask by way of another, by way of mistake.

Q. Suppose Mr. Meux takes Mr. Sellon's cask, and fills it again, does it happen they fill it again? - A. It does happen so.

Q. What were these casks, a small beer cask or what? - A. They may be used either for strong or small.

JAMES HERBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a servant of Mr. Sellon's? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you a servant in March last? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was a drayman ? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Which of them? - A. Jackson.

Q. Which of them is Jackson? -

Mr. Alley. Q. The gentleman with the red nose? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you carry any beer to Mr. Sykes's? - A. No, we did not carry it; we rolled it down to the bottom of the stairs.

Q. How came it from Mr. Sellon's to Mr. Sykes's? - A. From the dray.

Q. What day was it? - A. It was some time within a fortnight after I was there; I had been there a few days, I have forgot the day of the month.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Sykes was a customer of Mr. Sellon's or not? - A. I do not know any customer.

Court. Q. When you came to Sykes's house, there was one left there - who did you see when you left it? - A. I do not remember seeing any body when I left it.

Q. Did you see the man in the house, or any of his family? - A. No, there was a door that goes out of the street into a stable-yard.

Q. Did you know the house before? - A. I cannot say I did, I never was in that quarter before.

Q. Did you or he roll it down? - A. I helped him; he said, we will leave this here till another time, or day, I cannot say which.

Q. Was there any thing in it? - A. I cannot say whether it was full or not; there was something in it, but I cannot tell what was in it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you sure that was the house? - A. Yes, now I am sure; I was a stranger in that quarter.

Q. How soon did you tell this? - A. The inspector of the casks spoke of it first, then I told of it.

Q. How long after was it that you told of it? - A. I cannot say that; I cannot say whether it was a week or a few days.

Mr. Watson. Q. The house was in Gray's-Inn-lane? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not see any body there? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know now who keeps the house? - A. He had a fustian jacket when I saw him.

Q. Look round, and tell me whether that is the man? - A. I believe it is.

- HANCOCK sworn. - I am one of the Police officers of Hatton-garden; I went with a warrant to Sykes's house; I went with Mr. Evans, and in Mr. Sykes's cellar I found a cask of beer, and an empty cask, said by Mr. Evans to be the property of Mr. Sellon; and after Mr. Evans went to fetch the dray to take the beer away, Mr. Sykes was left in my custody; during the time he went, Mr. Sykes behaved very well; when Mr. Evans returned to take the beer away, during the time they were loading the dray, Mr. Sykes being then in my custody, withdrew into the back kitchen; at that time I did not know there was a door that leads into the yard from the back kitchen, I knew there was a window that came into the yard; Mr. Sykes went out of the door into the back kitchen, and got over the water-but and over the wall; I said nothing at the time, but rushed out of the door, and turned to the left up a stable-yard, and caught Mr. Sykes by the jacket; Mr. Sykes told me, when I laid hold of him, it was not his intention to escape, and desired that I would not hold him; I told him I was obliged to secure him, in order that he might not escape; I told him he was very much to blame, and we went into the kitchen again, nothing more passed; then I took him to the Police-office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Mr. Sykes told you he did not mean to escape - did not the Magistrate take his word for his appearance? - A. I believe he did.

Q. He was admitted to bail, and he came here and surrendered himself? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was not that at the request of Meux's house that he was admitted to bail? - A. I believe it was.

(The casks produced, and identified to be the property of Mr. Sellon by Mr. Evans.)

WILLIAM-MARMADUKE SELLON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Mr. Sellon, have you any partner? - A. No.

Q. Is Mr. Sykes any customer of your's? - A. No, he never was.

Q. The other prisoner, Jackson, was a servant of your's - how long has he been so? - A. About ten months.

Q. There are no orders for beer without your knowledge? - A. Whatever directions are sent to my brewhouse cannot be sent to the customers till I have set my initials on the margin; they cannot send from my brewhouse till I have set my regular mark.

Q. What beer is that? - A. It is small beer.

Q. Publicans cannot have small beer in their cellars? - A. They are liable to an information if they have.

- ROADS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you apprehend Jackson the same day? - A. Yes, I was sent for to take him into custody.

Q. Did any thing pass at the time? - A. He said that the man that had turned against him ought to have something said against him, because he was to have part.

Q. Are you sure that was the expression? - A. He ought to have suffered with him, or instead of him; he ought to have suffered, because he was to have part.

Jackson's defence. That beer, your Lordship, was my property, I will prove it, which all dray-men have; it is the bottom of the casks that all draymen have.

For the prisoner, Jackson.

HENRY CHUBB sworn. - I am a cooper, I live in Foster's-buildings, Whitecross-street, I work on my own account; I have known Jackson above ten years, he was a fellow-servant of mine at Mr. Bond's brewhouse; I always found him an honest man, and I always understood that the drains belonged to the drayman.

Court. Q. Did you ever know instances of their taking beer home, the drains from different barrels from different customers, to the master's house, and then fill it into the master's barrels, and take it out and sell it; I will take it down in writing, if you will swear so? - A. No, not sell it, but they take it home; I always understood it was their perquisites.

Court. You do not understand any such thing; you only come here to perjure yourself.

The prisoner, Jackson, called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner, Sykes, said nothing in his defence, but called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Jackson, GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for seven years .

Sykes, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-66

289. JAMES RANOLDS and ROBERT HOWES were indicted for feloniously forging, counterfeiting, and uttering, on the 6th of February , a certain false, forged, and counterfeit acceptance of a bill of exchange for the sum of

25 l. 10 s. 1 d. with intention to defraud William Walton , they and each of them knowing the said acceptance to be false, forged, and counterfeited .

And other Counts with like intentions, only varying the manner of charging.

JANE-ANN WALTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the wife of Mr. Walton? - A. I am.

Q. He is a tallow-chandler in Little Britain, in the City of London? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 30th of January, did you see either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes, Ranolds called at our shop; he desired that I would send somebody to take an order to No. 28, Duke-street, West-Smithfield ; I sent our apprentice, Charles Taylor went with him.

Q. How long was he gone at that time? - A. A short time.

Q. On his return, were any articles packed up? - A. Twelve dozen of candles and half a hundred weight of soap, in two boxes. (Produces the order.) That is the order the apprentice brought when he returned.

Q. By whose hands did you send these goods? - A. William Richardson , another apprentice, the same day.

Q. While Richardson was gone, did any other person call upon you? - A. Mr. Howes called upon me to know the amount of the bill.

Q. Did you tell him the amount? - A. I did, nine pounds two shillings; he wrote it in some book, or made a memorandum, and said he would call the latter end of the week; he said he was going into the country, he should have a remittance the latter end of the week.

Q. Upon the 6th of February, did you receive any letter? - A. I did, it came by the Post.

Q. At the time you received a letter from the Post, did it contain this bill of exchange you have given me? - A. It did; a letter wrote by Robert Howes , and enclosing a bill of exchange, signed J. J. I shewed this letter to my husband directly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoners did not come together? - A. No, one came at one time, and the other at another.

Court. Q. What time of the day did Ranolds come? - A. At one o'clock; Howes came, I believe, at four.

CHARLES-WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Erabraim. Q. You are an apprentice to Mr. Walton? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Ranolds? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him on the 30th of January last at your master's house? - A. I did.

Q. Did you go with him, and where? - A. I went with him to No. 28, Duke-street, West-Smithfield; when I came there, Mr. Ranolds told me to walk up stairs; I walked up one pair of stairs, and in the front room, up one pair of stairs, I saw Mr. Howes; he took the pen and ink, and wrote an order for six dozen of middling eighths.

Q. Look at that order, and tell me whether that is the order that the prisoner, Howes, gave you in the presence of Ranolds? - A. Yes, that is the order.

Q. Did you, after that, give it to your mistress? - A. I took it home, and gave it into my mistress's hands.

Q. Are you quite sure with respect to the persons of the prisoners? - A. I am sure of both of them.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Erabraim. Q. You are an apprentice to William Walton ? - A. I am.

Q. Do you recollect taking any goods, and where? - A. I took it the same day, it was ordered on the 30th of January.

Q. To whom did you deliver it? - A. To a young woman, of the name of Moody, that was in the shop, at No. 28, Duke-street, West-Smithfield.

ESTHER MOODY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. On the 30th of January last, did you live at the house, No. 28, Duke-street, West-Smithfield? - A. I did.

Q. Who kept the house? - A. Mrs. Elizabeth Wygus .

Q. Did either of the prisoners at the bar lodge there? - A. Howes did; he had the first floor, he came on the 20th of January.

Q. Do you know the other prisoner, Ranolds? - A. Yes, he was in the constant habit of visiting Howes.

Q. Had the prisoner, Ranolds, been there that day? - A. I believe the whole of the day.

Q. Before these boxes came, had any thing been said to you by Howes or Ranolds? - A. Howes told me there would be two boxes come, and desired me to take care of them till he came.

Q. At the time the boxes were brought, were either of them in the house? - A. No, neither of them.

Q. How soon after the boxes were brought did they come in? - A. In about five minutes, they came in together; Howes asked me if the boxes were come.

Q. Was Ranolds by? - A. Yes; I told him they were, and I pointed out where I had put them.

Q. What did either of them do upon that? - A. Howes told Ranolds to get a porter to take them to an inn, first one and then the other.

Q. Where were they to go to? - A. They were to go to Colnbrook, and they said they were going to Colnbrook; after they had taken them out to a porter, they both returned together; they went out, and they both returned the next evening.

RICHARD CLAXTON sworn. - Examined by

Mr. Knapp. I live at No. 16, Hoxton; I am a cotton manufacturer.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Ranolds? - A Yes, he has lodged at my house about eight months; he was taken out of my house, he had the first floor and the room over it.

Q. What business did he follow? - A. I do not know; I understood that he had been in the capacity of a rider , when he took the lodgings of me.

Q. Did you ever understand that he was a gunsmith? - A. I had reason to believe that he had been in some office in Woolwich one part of the time that he lodged with me.

Q. Do you know how he spelt his name? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What did you call him? - A. Reynolds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say he lodged at your house, what did he pay you? - A. Twelve guineas a year.

Mr. Knapp. Q. He kept no servant, did he? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. I approve of his economy - he continued to reside there with you till the time he was taken? - A. Yes.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a Police officer of Bow-street: On the 12th of February I apprehended the prisoner, Ranolds; when I went to Claxton's house, I enquired for Mr. Ranolds; his wife did not deny that he lived there, she said he lived there, but he was not at home; I asked her if I might go up stairs, and wait till he came home; she put her back to the door, and said I should not go in; I went in, and there I found him in a closet; I brought him to Mr. Kinnaird, in Holborn, there I searched him; I asked him if he had not got a pocket-book; he pulled out his pocket-book, there was a paper purporting to be a bill of exchange, signed J. Jones.

Mr. Alley. Q. His wife at first told you he was not in the house, and afterwards you found him? - A. Yes.

Q. That is what many a man's wife will do? - A. Yes.

MICHAEL HENRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know the prisoner, Howes? - A. I have known him nine years; I have known him as an attorney at the bar.

Q. Look at that letter, (a letter handed to the witness,) and tell me whether you believe that letter is Howes's hand-writing? - A. I have a great doubt; it is a great similitude, I think it is wrote too loose for it; I was in Mr. Humphries's chambers, I then thought, at the first flush, it was his handwriting, it has a great similitude; upon my oath, I think he did not write it.

Q. Look at this bill, (another paper handed him,) what do you say to that? - A. Formerly, in my days, he did not write full Robert, only R; I cannot believe it, I never saw it done; it is not his mode, he wrote quite a different hand in my days.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Condescend to look at it for one minute, and do not look at the blank side? - A. He wrote quite a different hand in my days; he wrote in a stiff technical way, he could not write this loose hand in my days; it is a strong resemblance.

Both NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-67

290. NATHAN SOLOMON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of March , a cloth great coat, value 20 s. the property of John Lindsay .

JOHN LINDSAY sworn. - I am a watch-case maker ; I live at No. 9, Union-street, Kingsland-road: On the 22d of March, I lost my coat at Mr. Arnett's, the sign of the Hope, in Banner-street , about four o'clock; I took my coat off, I came for it the next morning it was gone.

ANN ARNETT sworn. - I live at the Hope, in Banner-street, my father keeps the house.

Q. What became of the great coat? - A. Mr. Lindsay took it off, and I put it in the back-room; I never saw it afterwards.

THOMAS ARNETT sworn. - I keep the Hope, in Banner-street; I did not see the coat, it was given to my daughter, she put it in the back parlour; I do not know what became of it afterwards. Nathan Solomon asked leave to go back into the skittle ground to divide his bundle; he said it was too much for him to carry, whether he took the great coat I do not know.

Q. Had any body else been in that room? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. You do not know that he took it? - A. No.

SARAH HALL sworn. - I saw a Jew man take the great coat that was in that room, and he went away with it; he put it in his bag.

Q. Do you live with Arnett? - A. Yes, I live in the house; it was a white coat, and white velvet collar.

Q. Did you see where he took it from? - A. No.

Q. Where was he when he put it in his bag? - A. In the yard.

Mr. Knapp. (To Arnett.) Q. You say he put his bundle down and separated his clothes? - A. He separated his clothes in the yard, and put some of the clothes in that room.

Q. Whether he put it in by mistake, if he took it away, you cannot say? - A. No.

Q. He used the house, and came the next day? - A. Yes, just as he had done before.

Q. There might be a mistake? - A. I really cannot say.

Q. How long had he used the house? - A. About a month.

Q. Pretty constant? - A. Not above a dozen times.

Court. (To Lindsay). Q. Did you never find your coat? - A. No.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner there? - A. I have seen the prisoner there before; I never saw any thing amiss in him; he had a spencer like my coat; he offered it to Miss Arnett the next morning.

Q. Had it a velvet collar? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-68

291. CUTHBERT PARKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , seven yards of blue cloth, value 30 s. a coat, value 20 s. five shirts, value 12 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. and a waistcoat, value 2 s. the property of James Stewart , in the dwelling-house of Stephen Powell .

JAMES STEWART sworn. - I am a musician , I live at Mr. Powell's, Palm-street, Berkeley-square ; I lost my things on the 26th of February; I missed them about nine in the evening; when I came home I heard the prisoner was missing; he was a waiter ; I asked the landlady for a light, and when I went up stairs the room-door was locked as I had left it. On the 10th of March I saw him at Bow-street, where I saw seven yards of blue cloth, the blue coat, and two shirts, that I knew to be my property.

Q. Whether they were found with him you cannot say of your own knowledge? - No.

THOMAS NELSON sworn. - I am servant of Mr. Benjamin Wilson , pawnbroker, No. 17, Drury-lane: On the 27th of February, the fore-part of the day, the prisoner brought seven yards of blue cloth, and offered it to pledge; I advanced him the sum of thirteen shillings upon it; I am positive he is the man; he received a duplicate of me; he lost the duplicate; he came and begged an affidavit; I was present, and granted him one, that was before he was taken up.

JOHN BARNWELL sworn. - I am a tailor, I keep a clothes-shop, No. 93, Drury-lane: On Monday, the 27th of February, the prisoner brought me a coat, and told me it was his own property, and two old shirts; I gave him seventeen shillings for them; I am certain he is the man; I delivered them up to the officer.

SAMUEL CHANDLER sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; the prisoner at the bar came to the Public-Office, Bow-street, on the 9th of March last; to make an affidavit respecting six yards of blue cloth; having received information, I suspected the prisoner to be the man, I took him into custody; I asked him how he came by it, he told me his mother sent it him out of Yorkshire; I went to Barnwell the tailor, and he delivered up the things; I produce a coat and two shirts from him.

THOMAS WILSON sworn. I produce the cloth, it has never been out of my possession; the articles identified by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. On Sunday night my mistress and I had some words; I told her I would not stop; I went into the room; I slept in the same room Mr. Stewart did; a man that slept there gave me a duplicate of a piece of cloth; I told him I would release it; I went down to Deptford, and coming up to London, I lost the duplicate.

Court. (To Prisoner.) Q. At Bow-street, they charged you with a coat and shirts? - A. By all account the property was lost before I went away; my mistresses house was a lodging-house.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-69

292. JANE MARSH was indicted for burglariously stealing, on the 5th of April , about the hour of eleven at night, in the dwelling house of James Hubbard , a silver watch, value 30 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Daniel Hubbard ; a silver table-spoon, value 10 s. eight children's frocks, value 20 s. two shifts, value 5 s. two shirts, value 5 s. two shawls, value 5 s. four petticoats, value 10 s. two caps, value 2 s. the property of James Hubbard ; and that she, being in the said dwelling-house, burglariously did break out of the same .

JAMES HUBBARD sworn. - My house is No. 176, Drury-lane , I keep a baker's shop , the prisoner was my servant , she came to me on the 27th of March last; I had a written character with her, and some recommendations from where she went out some days.

Q. Did you lose any of your property on the 5th of April? - A. There was a silver watch of my nephew's lost from the premises, and all the articles mentioned in the indictment; I saw all the linen, I believe, about twenty minutes before hanging up on the line in the kitchen; she absconded about half past ten at night.

Q. When had you seen your table-spoon? - A. I saw it at one o'clock, when at dinner.

Q. About what time do you shut up your house? - A. About ten o'clock.

Q. When did you miss this woman out of your house? - A. At eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Do you know whether your house was shut up safe? - A. The way that I came to discover it, was this; it was the usual practice of the servant to set up to let the man in for his nightly labour, he

came, and knocked at the door two or three times; the man begins his work at eleven at night, and myself about two; she was not there to answer the door when the man knocked; he rung the bell, and not hearing the servant attend the door, I went down to let the man in, or rather, the door was open to let the man in, but he did not discover it; I called to the prisoner by name, and told the man the door was upon the jar.

Q. Did you find the door upon the jar at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure? - A. I am positive.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. Yes, I have four children, my wife, and a nephew.

Q. Had your wife gone to bed? - A. Yes; I secured the door, as I usually do.

Q. Did the man and you look over the house? - A. I went into the kitchen, and perceived the things were gone.

Q. When did you see the woman again? - A. On Monday, the 9th of April, I saw her in Lambeth-street Office, Whitechapel, in custody.

Q. Did you ever find your things again? - A. One petticoat only.

Q. Who has got that? - A. The person who took it into pledge.

Q. Was that produced at the Office? - A. Not at the Office she was first taken to; she was sent to Bow-street, and there I attended, and saw it.

Q. Had she given you any intimation that she meant to leave you? - A. No; we were quite happy to think that we had got a woman that suited us so well; she was a very handy woman in the house.

DANIEL HUBBARD sworn. - I am nephew to the last witness.

Q. Did you lose a silver watch at your uncle's? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it? - A. On Thursday night, the 5th of April.

Q. How soon in the day had you seen it before? - A. About seven o'clock in the evening; she then took notice of my watch when I was winding it up.

Q. Where did you leave it after you wound it up? - A. At the head of my bed.

Q. I suppose you got up early? - A. I got up at eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Did you perceive any body take your watch away? - A. No, I was fast asleep at the time; I missed it when I got up, about eleven o'clock.

Q. Have you seen it since? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever hear the prisoner say she was about leaving the place? - A. No.

CHRISTOPHER LAND sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 48, Stanhope-street, Clare-market: I produce a petticoat pledged on the 6th of April, I took it in myself.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. No, the petticoat was brought by Mary Slater ; I gave her three shillings for it.

MARY SLATER sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a woman that follows the market, I do any thing for my living.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I never saw the woman before the watchman brought her in, where a woman was in labour.

Q. Was it the same day you pawned these things? - A. The very same day; she took this petticoat out of a bundle; she said, I have no money; she offered the petticoat to a little girl that was there; I said, they will not take things of little children; she said, will you take it; I went and pawned it, and gave her the money; I live at No. 4, Nag's-head-court, Drury-lane.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Look at that petticoat, is it a child's or a woman's? - A. A woman's petticoat, it is my property; here is a drop of wine has been spilt upon it; I heard my wife give directions to get that stain out.

Q. Did she give charge to the prisoner to get that stain of wine out? - A. No, I do not know that she gave charge to the prisoner of it.

Q. How came you not to bring your wife? - A. I did not see it was necessary.

Q. Was there any thing found upon her? - A. Yes, a duplicate of this petticoat.

Q. Did you see it found upon her? - A. No.

Q. Who took it from her? - A. The officer, his name is Griffith.

Q. Have you got it? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the things; my mistress had some words with me, and I left her, and as for the things I never meddled with; I have no friends.

GUILTY , Death , aged 33.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-70

293. HARRIOT CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , three pieces of printed cotton, value 4 l. the property of Thomas Blowers and William Toadhunter .

THOMAS BLOWERS sworn. - I am a linen-draper , No. 36, Tottenham Court-road ; I have a partner, William Toadhunter : On the 3d of March, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop with two others; one of the women came to the counter where I was, not the prisoner, and asked to look at a piece of cotton for a child's frock; I took down two pieces; the second piece they told me would do.

Q. Do you mean they - I thought you only said one person, not the prisoner? - A. One person said one of the pieces would do.

Q. The prisoner was not one of the two women? - A. I think she was not. When they said it would do, I cut off a yard and a half; they gave me a seven-shilling piece to pay for it, the yard and

a half came to two shillings and ninepence; I gave them four shillings and threepence change, and they went away.

Q. Can you say they all three came in together? - A. I am not certain; I saw the prisoner warm herself at the fire.

Q. Did you observe, as they all three went out of the shop, that at the same time, they all went the same direction from your shop? - A. I cannot say, I had more customers in the shop.

Q. Did she, while these women were bargaining for this yard and a half, interfere in the matter? - A. She did not.

Q. Did you miss any thing after these people were gone? - A. No, not immediately; in the space of two minutes after, some person said the shop was robbed; a servant of mine ran out; I immediately left the shop, and went out myself; I turned to Piercy-street, which is two doors from my shop, and I saw the prisoner and another person running up Piercy-street.

Q. Did you pursue them? - A. I saw another person running after them; they were secured, and brought back to the shop. In the pursuit of them, I saw the prisoner drop one or more of the pieces of cotton; I did not stop to pick them up, but I pursued the prisoner; as soon as they were dropped, the servant stooped, and picked them up; I pursued the prisoner; they turned down a place at the top of Piercy-street, the first turning is Gresse-street; the prisoner turned down the left hand turning, and the person that was with her kept strait into Rathbone-street; I catched the prisoner in Gresse-street, and brought her directly back to the shop, and the servant followed me with these goods; they had been put upon a bale of goods for shew; I know them to be mine.

Q. How long had you seen them before? - A. Half an hour before these people came in, that was the extent.

Q. Had you any other customers in the shop at the time while these women were in? - A. I had two or three, I cannot say exactly the number; I brought the prisoner back myself; an officer was following me back from Piercy-street, and he took charge of her.

Q. Did you search her? - A. The officer did; nothing was found on her concerning me; she said she came on purpose to buy a gown.

Q. Did she herself make any purchase? - A. No.

Q. While these people were talking, she was about the fire warming herself? - A. She was.

Q. Where were these goods? - A. They were on a bale of goods about two yards from the fireplace, fronting the door-way; they were not on the counter at all.

Q. Who were serving in the shop at that time? - A. Two lads, whom I have here; my partner went out in the morning.

Q. What was the value of that that was dropped by her, and picked up by your servant? - A. I have not directly ascertained.

Q. Put the lowest value you can? - A. Upwards of four pounds, upon the most moderate calculation; Mr. Kelly, the officer, has the pieces of cotton.

Prisoner. I never dropped any thing of the kind.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Are you quite sure you saw her drop the things in Piercy-street? - A. Yes, she acknowledged the same in Marlborough-street.

THOMAS STONE sworn. - Q. Did you serve in Mr. Toadhunter's and Mr. Blowers's shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming into the shop? - A. I was the first person that she spoke to; she told me that she wanted some prints.

Q. Did you see whether she came in alone? - A. She came in with another person; the other had a little child with her.

Q. Did you look out any prints for her? - A. No, I was walking about the shop.

Q. At the time she was warming herself at the fire, and the other was being served, did the prisoner call for any thing? - A. I was called away.

Q. Did you see her do any thing while you were in the shop? - A. She did not look at any articles, she stood at the fire while I was there.

Q. Do you know what part of the shop these prints were in? - A. Just opposite the door, upon a bale of blankets.

JOHN SHEPHARD sworn. - Q. Did you serve in this shop? - A. I did; I saw the prisoner in the shop; she appeared to be in company with the woman that had the child.

Q. Did they speak together as if they were acquainted? - A. The woman with the child desired the prisoner to take her cloak, which is here, and the prisoner put it on the bale of goods, and this piece of print was on the bale of goods where the cloak was put.

Q. Did the prisoner desire to look at any thing? - A. No, she was by the fire.

Q. Did you perceive any thing missing while they were in the shop? - A. No.

Q. How long after they left the shop was it, that you perceived an alarm? - A. Not two minutes.

Q. Did you pursue upon the alarm? - A. I did.

Q. Before you left the shop, did you perceive that any thing was gone? - A. No; I immediately ran down Piercy-street, which is about two doors from the house; I saw the prisoner, and pursued her; I saw her drop the things, I picked them up, and I cried out stop thief.

Q. Did she drop the things before you cried out stop thief? - A. Yes, and I brought them back to my master's shop.

Q. Who was the person that dropped the cloak and the things? - A. The prisoner.

Q. Are you quite sure that it fell from her person? - A. I am.

Prisoner. I am sure that I never dropped the cloak, nor any of the things.

- KELLY sworn. - I am a constable belonging to the parish of St. Pancras; I prove nothing but the apprehending this woman; I searched her, and found a guinea and some things; I have had them in my custody ever since.

(The pieces of cotton produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I went into this shop with the person that had got the child; she said she was going to buy a frock, and I went in with intention to buy a gown; she bought a frock, and I took the child from her; I stood by the fire sometime, and the child began to cry; then I went out of doors, and walked about the door with the child till she came out with these things under her cloak; I went after her to give her the child; she chucked the cloak, and these things down; I gave her the child, and ran away.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Did the prisoner leave the shop before the other? - A. No; she did not take the child; the child was troublesome.

GUILTY , Death , aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-71

294. BARNARD WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , one hundred and eighty shawls, value 33 l. nine pounds of silk twist, value 11 l. and four pieces of Irish linen, value 10 l. the property of Joseph Pratt , in a certain boat on the navigable River Thames .

And Three other Counts, in like manner, only varying the manner of charging.

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Erabraim, and the case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

ISAAC PRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Erabraim. I am a resident of Boston, in America; I live at No. 104, Wood-street; Mr. Joseph Pratt occupies a part of that warehouse.

Q. Has he any partners? - A. None: On the 20th of March, a merchant bought fifteen dozen of shawls, and nine pounds of silk twist; I packed them up myself in a wooden chest; they were both in the same chest, with other articles.

Q. What sort of a package were they in? - A. They were in an iron-bound package, and the iron was screwed down on the package.

Q. What were the dimensions of the package? - A. About eight feet wide.

Q. Did you yourself see this package perfect? - A. I did, it was quite perfect.

Q. What became of this package on the morning of the 21st - was it taken by itself, or with others? - A. With four others.

Q. How was this package marked? - A. I marked it myself P. A. B. I saw them all put in the cart, and safe down to the Guillotine; I saw that with the other packages, one was marked N, with a diamond, No. 91.

Q. You accompanied the cart yourself? - A. I did, I went with it to the Guillotine.

Q. What became of it there? - A. I then saw it taken out of the cart; the Guillotine is near the Custom-house.

Q. What became of them then? - A. They were taken out of the cart, and put under the care of Mr. Mackenzie, the lighterman.

Q. What time was this? - A. A little before ten o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you see them put on board the boat? - A. I did not; I saw them after they were on board the boat.

Q. What boat was it? - A. A lug-boat of Mackenzie and Gray.

Q. What time was it when you last saw this boat? - A. Near eleven in the morning.

Q. How did the packages appear then? - A. Quite perfect; in the same condition as I left them.

Court. Q. That boat was close to the Custom-house? - A. Close by in the water.

Q. Were there any other packages in the boat? - A. There were about ten more.

Q. Were they put on last? - A. Yes; they were to be put on board the ship Kingston, bound to Boston, laying at Wapping Old-stairs; the tide had then run down about half an hour; the tide served about six hours good tide.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you, Sir? - A. I am an importer of British goods to Boston, in America.

Q. You are not a navigable man? - A. I have crossed the Atlantic twice.

Q. Some tides you go very expeditiously - do you know how the winds were on the river? - A. Very adverse winds.

Q. You do not know what time the lug-boat set sail? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Was it so late as two o'clock when it set off? - A. No, it was not; I saw the packages safe; they were uppermost in the boat.

Q. I do not know whether you have been up and down the river? - A. I have in a boat, as far as Blackwall.

Court. Q. Your packages were large? - A. Yes, and the others were small, in proportion to ours.

Q. You did not see the prisoner at that time? - A. No.

Q. Therefore whether he had any charge of that, you do not know? - A. No; upon the day the goods were re-landed, I saw him.

Q. He came forward voluntarily? - A. No; he said he had not done it, he had never left the boat, and was not concerned in the plunder.

Q. Who are the wharfingers? - A. John Alexander-Mackenzie and Henry Gray .

GEORGE PALMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are foreman and inspector to Mackenzie and Gray - is it your business to attend the quays to receive them on board the craft? - A. It is.

Q. On the 21st of March, did you receive these five packages that came from Mr. Pratt's? - A. Yes.

Q. Were they put on board the lug-boat? - A. They were, I saw them on board; as near as I can recollect, it was about eleven o'clock.

Q. How long did they continue in your care on board the lug-boat? - A. About two hours.

Q. Who came and took charge of them then? - A. The prisoner; that was near one, or thereabout.

Q. How soon did he go off from the quay? - A. As soon as he received the order from me; he left the quay about one o'clock.

Q. At that time were these five packages safe in the boat? - A. In all appearance to me they were, at the top; I saw them, they appeared safe; I have no doubt about it.

Q. Did any other person go with the prisoner? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Court. Q. Did you see the boat go off? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it to go with sails, or with oars? - A. With paddles.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are foreman to Mr. Mackenzie? - A. Yes.

Q. If the wind happened to be a little east, whether it was most condusive to the service he was employed in, to go down to Blackwall first, and work up, or whether to have gone first to the Kingston? - A. He stopped as he went down, and delivered at New Crane.

Court. Q. You did not see him do that - which would have been the best to have delivered, the packages at Wapping, or to have gone to Black-wall first, and then work up? - A. If he had found no difficulty of stopping, it would certainly have been his duty to have stopped there, could he have got the goods into the Kingston without stopping.

Mr. Alley. Q. Was the wind north or east? - A. It blew east.

Q. Do you think, if he had gone to the Kingston first, he could have got back? - A. I am confident he could not.

Q. Of course it would have been best to have gone to Blackwall first, and then to have worked up? - A. Certainly.

Q. What time did you come on board the boat? - A. I was not on board all the whole time after it left the quay, after I had put them on board.

Q. Then between eleven and one o'clock there was not any body on board the boat? - A. There are always people belonging to Mr. Mackenzie and Gray about; there are two watchmen and myself.

Court. Q. Was it possible, that when you had put it on board the craft, for any person to take it out and pack it up again? - A. I believe it possible, I cannot say it is likely.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did the prisoner tell you when he came back, whether he stopped at the New-Crane going or coming back? - A. Going down.

Q. Could not he have stopped and left these packages in the Kingston at Wapping Old-stairs, as well as to have stopped at New-Crane? - A. You may have one single box in a boat, or skiff; sometimes people are engaged in stowing away the holds, they may be so engaged as not to be able to deliver their cargo; it depends upon circumstances.

Q. What length of time would it have delayed him, to have stopped at the Kingston without impediment? - A. It would have detained him half an hour.

Q. Do you mean to say, that the delay of half an hour was such, that he could not get to Black-wall? - A. No.

Q. You packed these things on board the lug-boat; is it your usual custom to pack things that come last at the top? - A. Yes, it is; when I put those goods in I did not know of these goods.

THOMAS TURNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am porter to Mr. Smith, a merchant.

Q. Do you remember being on the Guillotine the 21st of March? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember these packages in charge? - A. Yes, I shipped them myself, between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. Who did you ship them for? - A. Mr. Smith.

Q. Who did you deliver them to? - A. To George Palms , the last witness.

Q. How did they appear? - A. In good order, quite tight.

Q. When did you last see them after that? - A. I saw them while they were on the quay, I do not know whether I was on the quay when they went away; I am often sent out with loads to different parts of the town.

Q. Do you remember whether any person unpacked them; could they have unpacked them and packed them up again while on the quay? - A. That could not be; they were not on the quay half an hour after they were taken out of the cart.

WILLIAM CHEAP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a Custom-house officer: On the 21st of March last, I was stationed on board the Kingston, lying at Wapping Old-stairs .

Q. Did you receive any parcel from the prisoner between six and seven o'clock on the evening of that day? - A. Near seven o'clock, the prisoner

came in a lug-boat, there was another person in the lug-boat.

Q. Did the prisoner deliver any packages on board the Kingston? - A. Yes, five.

Q. Did you observe any thing remarkable respecting these packages? - A. It appeared to me to have been broken very much; there were three appeared to have been broken.

Q. Were they such that induced you to think that two or three of them had been opened? - A. They appeared to be in a suspicious state, one was an iron bound case, it was the smallest of the three, marked P. A. B. one of the iron hoops was loose, and the ends had been rivetted on; it appeared loose by losing its rivet, and losing some screws; there was another marked N, and a diamond, the battens were some of them broken, that was corded; to all appearance they had been opened; there was some discourse with the mate and the prisoner concerning the state of these chests; the prisoner said, they had struck against the windlass; something about coming at the end of the windlass.

Q. Did you hear any thing of their coming at the end of the windlass? - A. No.

Q. Where were they put that night? - A. Down in the hold, they were locked up, and the mate had the key; I staid on board all the night, I cannot say whether the hold was open in the night or not; the next morning I saw the hold open, I waited for that purpose; they did not come out of the hold till the day after, during that time they were under my care.

Q. Were they brought up on deck the day after? - A. They were; and they were in the same state as they were when delivered on board the ship by the prisoner. In the morning, as soon as the hatch was open, I went down to inspect them; I found there had been formerly screws, and in the room of the screws that were taken out, there were put old nails which would not fit the holes; the smallest case that was iron bound, which is marked P. A. B. some part of it seemed to be very much broke indeed.

Q. You did not open them at that time? - A. No; the next morning I made a report, after they were put on board.

Q. The morning of the 22d of March, you made a report? - A. Yes; and on the 23d, I put them on deck, and sent them on shore.

Q. When you had parted with them, were they in the same state as when delivered by the prisoner? - A. There was some little difference made by Mr. Raines's men, who had been opening them, after Plumrage had been on board; Plumrage was present at their opening.

Q. When the prisoner came with the chests, did you hear any thing done when he came along-side of the vessel? - A. I heard him hammer.

Q. Are you sure that the hammering that you heard was in the boat? - A. I suspected that it was at first, but I afterwards found it was upon the deck, as they came over the bows.

Q. Was it as he was delivering you the package as he came over the bows? - A. It was.

Q. When you were on board the ship, how many seamen were there? - A. Several, and two mates.

Q. The head mate has the controul of every thing on board the ship? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the mate give a receipt to the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Did he assign any reason to the prisoner for not giving the receipt? - A. I do not believe he did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was the chief mate on board when the things were delivered? - A. No.

Q. Was there no answer made by the second mate to the prisoner, that he would not give him a receipt, that no one but the first mate should give a receipt? - A. I did not hear that.

Q. Was Evans on board at the time these things were delivered? - A. He was.

Q. He might hear it? - A. I did not hear it.

Q. I do not mean to ask you whether any of you had not access to it, the property was under lock and key; now the second mate shipped the packages, and kept the key; had you no access to the property? - A. No.

Q. Do you know that you had not? - A. Certainly not.

Q. Where did you sleep? - A. Aft.

Q. Aft is a long way, that is one half of the ship; Whereabouts did you sleep? - A. Near the cabin.

Q. Did not you sleep in the cabin? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to say that you slept on the deck? - A. I slept in the fore hold.

Q. That is below stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. They might get from the cabin to the half deck, and from the half deck to the hold; if there was any secret they might get there without a key? - A. Certainly.

Q. Therefore this place, locked up, if a man got into the cabin, he might get there? - A. Certainly.

Q. Did not the chief mate come on board that night? - A. He did.

Q. What day of the month was it? - A. The 21st of March.

Q. Quite dark at seven o'clock at night? - A. Yes, it was; I should not have been able to have seen then without the assistance of the moon.

Q. Is it darker on the Thames than in London, were there are many houses? - A. I could not see to take the marks without the light of the moon.

Q. Yet you could see they were broke when they came into the ship? - A. Yes, apparently.

Q. Is it not your duty, not to have received

things that appeared to have been broke? - A. I did not see it till they were upon deck.

Q. That is no answer - I ask you whether it is or not the duty of the chief mate, or the person who is superintendant of the ship? Is it not the duty of a Custom-house officer to refuse taking in goods that appear to have been plundered, aye or no? - A. I do not know how far that may go.

Q. How long have you been a Custom-house officer? - A. Five years.

Q. And not know your duty yet - you keep accounts on board a ship? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got that book here to-night? - A. No.

Q. Was it not your duty to have entered in your book, that night, that these things appeared to have been plundered? - A. We are not so particular; if the captain and the mate receive it, we do not so much mind; when I had examined them more particularly the next morning I made a report.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What part of the entrance to where the things were put was it that the mate locked up? - A. The hatch.

Q. After the hatch is locked down, is there any access from the cabin to there? - A. There is a door that leads to it opposite the cabin-door.

Q. Who were in possession of the cabin? - A. The chief mate, and the second mate.

JOHN PLUMRAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Erabraim. I am a Custom-house officer, a searcher: When I got on board the Kingston, on the 22d of March, I went down into the hold, I saw one package marked P. A. B. with an iron hoop round it; they appeared to have been screwed, but the screws were drawn, it appeared to me to have been plundered.

Court. Q. Did it appear to you that it had occurred by accident or by design? - A. By design: I opened it, and there was a little box with a hat, some red cotton, red and blue thread, that was all that I found in this case; the one marked N and a diamond, it appeared to have been broke, it appeared to have Irish linens, I did not take the lid off quite; I saw there was a cavity in which were some birch broom stuffed in it; there was another package, it did not appear that there was any thing taken out; I left them in charge of the officer.

Q. How long would it have took them to have opened the case in a regular manner, without doing the case any damage? - A. I cannot say, they were broke in such a manner; they might have compleated it, as it was done, in the space of twenty minutes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you saw them they appeared to have been broke; where they were broke you cannot tell; on board the ship, or elsewhere? - A. I cannot.

GEORGE PALMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You went on board the Kingston on the twenty-third, and brought them on shore to the Guillotine? - A. Yes; and both the Mr. Pratts were on the quays at the same time.

Mr. Alley. Q. In going, if he kept on the windward side, that part of the river is in Surry? - A. In Kent.

Mr. Gurney. Q. He had to go to Blackwall, that is in Middlesex? -

Court. All the places he had to go to were in Middlesex.

ISAAC PRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were at the Guillotine when these things were brought on shore - did you find any of the shawls there? - A. All the shawls were gone; and the package filled up with rubbish; the other articles were very much tumbled about.

Q. Can you speak to the other package? - A. I cannot.

JOSEPH PRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a merchant - you are proprietor of all these packages? - A. I am.

Q. Had you superintended the package marked N and a diamond? - A. I did.

Q. When it was brought on shore did you examine it? - A. I did; I found a deficiency of four pieces of Irish linen; likewise a deficiency of silk twist, nine pounds, value 11 l.

Q. What is the value of the Irish linen? - A. Ten pounds; and the shawls, thirty-three pounds fifteen shillings.

RICHARD PERRIN sworn. - I am a Police-officer, I took the prisoner: I told him my story, he jumped out of bed and let me in; he said it was what he expected, he was an innocent man.

Prisoner's defence. As I received the goods so I delivered them on board that ship in the same state.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY Death , aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-72

295. ROBERT HOWES and JOHN THODEY were indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 30th of November , a certain bill of exchange, for the payment of 25 l. in the name of W Williams, with intent to defraud Elizabeth White .

Second Count, for uttering and publishing as true a bill of exchange for the payment of money, knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

Third Count, for like offence, having signed an endorsement with like intention.

Fourth Count, for like offence, having signed an acceptance with like intention.

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Erabraim, and the case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ELIZABETH WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a widow ? - A. Yes.

Q. You keep a glass and Staffordshire warehouse

in the Strand; do you remember seeing the prisoner Howes in the month of November? - A. It was the last week in November; he came to buy some goods he said for a friend of his at Portsmouth that was going to the West-Indies; he desired me to be quick, for the ship was going off.

Q. What direction did he give you? - A. He gave me this kind of a card. (Shews the card.)

Q. Did you send the things? - A. I did in the course of three days.

Q. When he called upon you what then passed? - A. He gave me a draft of thirty guineas; I gave him four pounds one shilling; the goods came to more when they were packed up.

Q. Did you endeavour to get your goods back in consequence of an information? - A. Yes, a porter brought them back the morning after, and in half an hour after that a person brought another bill, in the name of W. Williams: in about an hour and an half the prisoner Thodey came; that was the first time I saw him; he said he was come to accept a bill; I said, what bill; he said, Mr. Howes.

Q. Did you shew him this bill? - A. I did, and I asked him about Mr. Howes; he spoke very highly of Mr. Howes as a professional man; he said that he had got him a cause a twelvemonth ago; he accepted this bill in my presence, in my house; I saw him write it, and he promised to give me the four pounds one shilling that I had given to Howes; Mr. Howes wrote upon the back of it, and Mr. Thodey signed it.

Q. When was this indorsement signed? - A. At the same time; it might be a quarter of an hour.

Q. Was Howes present when Thodey accepted it? - A. He was; I told him I wanted my four pounds one shilling; upon this Mr. Howes wrote this memorandum at the back of the bill, and Thodey: signed it; and Thodey told me he would call in the evening, and give me the balance; and while Howes and Thodey were present, my neighbour, Mr. Bird, came in; I shewed him the bill; he asked them several questions; I began to be alarmed, I was very ill; Mr. Bird began to question them who drew it; they were agitated and confused, and I began to suspect.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had been for some time acquainted with the prisoner Howes? - A. No, never before.

Q. Did you never employ Howes as a lawyer? - A. Only a week before; I believe he was employed to recover eighteen pounds; Mr. Simpson brought him to me, and Howes said he had got a good order for me.

Court. Q. Did he recover that money for you? - A. No, I had no money; he deceived me very much.

Q. Who was Simpson? - A. He belonged to one of the play-houses; the eighteen pounds I never had; I had been plundered very much; he was a Jew that accepted that bill.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You gave this Howes an order to get your debt, and in about a week after they were taken up? - A. I never expected to get it.

Q. You knew where Simpson lived, therefore you had an opportunity of enquiring about Howes? - A. I knew at that time, then he lived at No. 12, London Road.

Q. After you had some conversation with Howes concerning an order for a person at Portsmouth, Mrs. Williams called upon you; previous to that you had sent the goods; they were in the possession of Howes, at his lodgings? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not approve of the security he had given you; he returned the goods? - A. He did.

Q. After a whole night he had them in his possession? - A. Yes.

Q. When Mrs. Williams after tendered you the bill, neither of them came at that time? - A. No.

Q. The bill was then unaccepted; where does Mrs. Williams live? - A. No. 4, Temple-lane.

Q. How long after Mrs. Williams called did the prisoner Thodey call; the bill was drawn upon Mrs. Williams and directed to John Thodey ; when she called again you shewed her the bill, and after some conversation with Howes, you said he should have the goods? - A. I said I have a friend, I shall consult my friend; I wanted to keep them; they were in my possession, the cut glass was, when Thodey came to accept the bill.

Court. Q. The goods that Howes had were returned again? - A. Yes, all but some plate-frames.

Q. Did Thodey write that acceptance of the bill before Howes made his appearance at your house? - A. He did.

Mr. Alley. Q. I believe you were somewhat uneasy about the four pounds, and you sent for Mr. Howes by Thodey? - A. No, I sent for Mr. Bird; he came before Mr. Bird was there; I am certain that he came without being sent for: Thodey said, when he came, he had called to accept the bill drawn by W. Williams; he wrote John Thodey .

Q. Did any thing pass between you and Thodey about Temple-lane? - A. He said his own address was Whitechapel.

Mr. Watson. Q. You knew Mrs. Williams lived at No. 4, Temple-lane? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any means of knowing that her husband was dead at Portsmouth, at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. After Mr. Howes came in, he went up stairs with you? - A. Yes.

Q. There was some balance between you and him, and this memorandum was written; by whose

order? - A By Howes; that he would call and pay me the balance, and signed Thodey; I told him I would call upon him, and would not give him the trouble.

Mr. Gurney. Q. At about what time of the day was it that Thodey called upon you? - A. At about one o'clock.

Q. He first told you he came to accept a bill drawn by Williams; did you ask him what business he was? - A. I do not remember: one of them said he was a carpenter, I cannot say which; he told me he lived in Whitechapel.

Both, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-73

296. WILLIAM JAVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , a drake, value 2 s . the property of William Blackman .

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I lost a drake on Sunday, the 26th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon; I kept it in the fields at the back of the house; a neighbour of mine came to inform me that he had a man in custody in the watch-house, that had stolen a drake; I went to the watch-house, and there he was searched, and this piece of bread was found upon him, what he enticed the drake with.

Q. Did you know the man before? - A. No; I never saw the man before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know who this man is now; you found him to be a man employed in a decent line of life? - A. I heard so.

Q. You are a Bow-street Officer; are not you? - A. I am one of them.

JOHN MARSHALL sworn. - I live in Somer's town : On Sunday, the 26th of February, I saw Javes looking over a garden paling; I saw him stoop and put something in his pocket; I supposed it to be a duck or a fowl; I said, what have you got there; I put his coat on one side, and saw the duck.

Q. Whose garden was this? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Knapp. Q. This was on Sunday? - A. Yes; between two and three o'clock.

Q. A great number of people about then? - A. Not many.

Q. He was bailed by the Magistrate, and surrendered; have you heard who this young man was? - A. I have heard that he bore an excellent character.

Blackman. This man was taken before the Magistrate on Monday; he was in prison for about three or four days or a week, and then admitted to bail by Sir Richard Ford .

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-74

297. JOHN LOWRIE and THOMAS LEWIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , one pair of sheets, value 20 s. seven table-cloths, value 30 s. three napkins, value 3 s. four books, value 5 s. a child's satin mantle, value 7 s. four blankets, value 15 s. four yards of thread lace, value 3 s. and a lace handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Chloe Gambire , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Morrison .

ANN JONES sworn. - I live in Exeter-street, Sloane-street, Hans-place, Chelsea ; I was employed by Mrs. Gambire to let her house; I let it to Mrs. Morrison, at ten guineas a month, and for six months certain; I let it on the 5th of December.

Q. When did you see Mrs. Morrison? - A. On the 3d; I made the bargain with a man, on the account of Mrs. Morrison, and on the 4th a Mr. Francis came with Mrs. Morrison to take the lodgings; she said she liked the house very well; they were to come on the 5th; on the 5th of December, they came and took possession of the house; it was late in the evening when they came in, and about eleven o'clock in the evening John Lowrie came into the house.

Q. Did he come there as a servant? - A. They did not say what he came for; he came to live there; they told me I might go out of the house that night; I did not chuse; I stopped in the house all that night; I got up on the 6th of December; I left the house for that day; I left them in possession.

Q. When did you see Thomas Lewis ? - A. Not till the 22d of January.

Q. You do not know whether he resided in the house at all? - A. No.

Q. Were these things mentioned in the indictment let with the house? - A. They were left in the house, but not for her use; they were in trunks in the front garret, locked up safe, but not let to Mrs. Morrison; they are the property of Mrs. Gambire.

Q. When were these articles missing? - A. On Sunday, the 22d of January, I had a suspicion; they promised me rent and paid me nothing; on Sunday evening I went up stairs, and found the bed-rooms were both locked; I came down and went into the kitchen; I saw a little boy and girl there; this was about seven in the evening; they came home at half-past ten o'clock, and went away directly, when they heard I was in the house; I staid in the house all night; I went up stairs, and the bed-rooms were open; I missed a pier-glass; I went into the garrets; I tried to open the trunks; the keys would not unlock them; when I had them in my possession they would unlock them; the night came and I sent for a smith; I found every thing gone that was of any consequence, our of the two trunks and a box; he was forced to break all the locks of them open.

Q. Were the locks in a proper state before these people came into the house? - A. Yes, they were, and all the things were safe.

Q. Did you keep in possession of the house after that time? - A. No.

Q. Did you cause any body to be taken up? - A. Yes, Mrs. Morrison, on Monday night, and took her to Bow-street; on Tuesday she was committed to Tothill-fields; Sir Richard Ford discharged her; I took up Lowrie on Wednesday; he was committed to Coldbath-fields.

Q. Where did you find him? - A. Opposite the debtor's door of Newgate; I saw him taken up; I had the Officer with me.

Q. Did you tell him what you took him up for? - A. Yes; he said nothing.

Q. When did you take up Lewis? - A. On the Wednesday.

Q. You say that you never saw Lewis before the 22d of January? - A. No.

Q. Where did you find Lewis? - A. On the the debtors' side of Newgate.

Q. How came you to charge Lewis? - A. There were duplicates found upon him, and he was in the house.

Q. Did Lewis say that he lived there, or only came there occasionally? - A. I cannot say; he slept there that night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were present when Lewis was searched? - A. Yes.

Q. Mrs. Morrison was taken up on Monday, the 23d of January, and on Wednesday you took Lowrie and Lewis; they were examined before Sir Richard Ford ; Mrs. Morrison agreed to pay for all she had taken; that promise was not fulfilled? - A. No.

Q. And then the two lads were committed and Mrs. Morrison discharged? - A. Yes.

Q. Between the 4th or 5th of December to the 22d, Mrs. Morrison was completely mistress of the house? - A. She was.

Q. What had passed between you and her, respecting these trunks, was not in the presence of either of these lads? - A. It was not.

Court. Q. Did Mrs. Morrison agree to pay you for the things taken out of the trunks, as well as the furniture taken out of the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you suppose that she had a controuling power over the things in the trunk? - A. No; I did not let her the use of these things.

WILLIAM WILKINSON sworn. - I am a plumber and glazier: On the 23d of January, as I was going to my work, I was desired to call upon Mrs. Jones; I went to the house where Mrs. Morrison lived: I saw Mrs. Jones was very much alarmed; the prisoner Lowrie came in; he went down into the kitchen and spoke to Mrs. Morrison, and a short time after that he went into the privy; I suspected that he had thrown the duplicates of the property there; and at ten o'clock that morning I lowered a candle down into the privy; I saw some duplicates, which I have in my pocket, and three keys and a shawl; I delivered them to the Officer; he gave them to me to produce; soon after he had been in the privy, he said he was a servant to a gentleman in the country; when I had told him I thought he was concerned in the robbery, he wanted to go out of the house.

Q. Did you prevent him? - A. I did; he opened the door and I shut it, and put my back against the door.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You found the duplicates? - A. Yes; and the key of the street door, the key of the from room up one pair of stairs, and the key of the garret where the boxes were.

Q. Did you find the key that would open those boxes where the things were kept? - A. No.

Q. You had no candle down in the privy before he was there? - A. No.

Q. It was open for the use of any person in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. You were about leaving the house? - A. Yes.

Q. You told my Lord that when he wanted to quit the house, you prevented him? - A. Yes; I went back the same day.

Q. Did you find Lowrie when you came back? - A. No, he was gone.

THOMAS STOREY sworn. - I am a grocer and cheesemonger in Hans-place: On Monday, the 23d of January, I was sent for to No. 56, Hans-place; when I came there, Mrs. Jones said she was robbed; she wished me to go up stairs with her; the two prisoners were not there when I went; Lowrie came in about eleven o'clock; Wilkinson had been there previous to Lowrie coming in, and the smith's man; Mrs. Jones went up stairs and missed a number of things out of the trunks in the garret; we first examined the hinges, and then we found the locks of the trunks had been violently stained; they were nearly empty; we came down stairs, and at eleven o'clock Lowrie came in; I told him in the kitchen that he was suspected of being concerned in robbing the house; he wished to go out of the door, and said he would not be detained by me, or Mr. Wilkinson, or any body else.

Q. Before you let him go out of the house, had he been backwards? - A. Yes; soon after I had told him I thought he was a confederate, he went backward; he slipped out of the house unknown to me; I staid in the house after Mr. Wilkinson went.

Q. For what purpose did you stay after Wilkinson was gone? - A. On purpose to keep him in; he slipped out unobserved by me; he said he was a servant of Mrs. Morrison's; he was innocent of all that could be brought against him; after the privy was searched, we took up the seat, and took

up the shawl and these duplicates; there are seventeen of them now; there was a key of the street door, the key of the front room up one pair of stairs, and the key of the garret.

- MULKESTER sworn. - I am a servant of Messrs. Rochford, in Jermyn-street; they are pawnbrokers; here are eleven duplicates of our shop; one is a table-cloth; I do not know whether I took it in or one of the lads; a pair of sheets and four napkins; two table-cloths and two books; I took in these at different times, of the prisoner Lowrie; he pawned them in the name of Lee; a pair of sheets and two books; I lent upon the pair of sheets 18 s. they were pawned the 30th of December, 1803; two table-cloths I lent 13 s. on; they were pledged together; I lent 18 d. on the books; I am sure he is the man that pledged these articles.

JOSEPH CLIFTON sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Cameron, in the Strand: On the 9th of January I took in a sheet for 10 s. of Lowrie, in the name of John Cole ; on the 13th of January, four handkerchiefs, three towels, and a remnant of silk, for 7 s. of Lowrie; on the 18th of January, four napkins and a child's satin mantle; I took it in of Lowrie, in the name of Cole.

JAMES ROBINSON sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker, Charing-cross: I produce four yards of lace, pawned by Lewis, in the name of Thomas Smith ; he said he was the son of Ann Smith ; I am sure he is the lad; I lent him 4 s. on it.

RICHARD WHEATLEY sworn. - I produce a duplicate for a blanket: I am a servant to a pawnbroker in Cranbourn-street: I took the blanket of Lewis; he pledged it in the name of Charles Smith , for his mother, Sarah Smith .

(The articles identified by Mrs. Jones to be the property of Mrs. Gambire.)

Lowrie's defence. Whatever I pledged was given me by Mrs. Morrison, and for what I pledged I gave her the money and the duplicates; I always understood them to be her property.

Lewis's defence. I pledged these things for Mrs. Morrison; Lowrie staid in the house after I went out.

Lowrie, GUILTY, aged 20,

Of larceny only .

Transported for seven years .

Lewis, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-75

298. BARTHOLOMEW SCULLY was indicted for that he, and a certain evil-disposed person, whose name to the Jurors is unknown, did, on the 13th of February , at the hour of twelve at night, burglariously break and enter the dwelling-house of John Woosnam , and burglariously did steal therein thirty-four silver watches, value 50 l. seventy-two silver table-spoons, value 27 l. three silver mugs, value 7 l. 10 s. two silver milk-pots, value 5 l. ten silver bottle-labels, value 2 l. 10 s. seventy silver pencil-cases, value 8 l. a miniature picture, set in gold, value 4 l. 10 s. ten silver hairpins, value 10 s. eight silver boxes, value 4 l. twenty pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 6 l. twelve pair of silver knives and forks, value 9 l. five silver snuff-boxes, value 10 l. twelve silver caddie-handles, value 1 l. ninety gold rings, value 40 l. ten gold seals, value 10 l. ten gold keys, value 3 l. 10 s. eighteen silver salt-spoons, value 3 l. fourteen silver fruit-knives, value 4 l. ten gold rings, set in garnet, value 12 l. and seven silver watch-pendants, value 10 s. the property of John Woosnam ; and that he, on the 14th of February, feloniously received the said property, he then and there knowing the said property to be stolen .

Again indicted for receiving the said articles on the 14th day of February .

Second Count. Stands charged with the like burglary, and receiving the said goods with the like offence, and eight pair of spectacles, value 3 l. a waistcoat-piece, value 6 s. a pearl handled knife, value 10 s. a pearl handled fork, value 10 s. and two metal table-spoons, value 4 s. the property of the said John Woosnam .

The prisoner pleaded guilty of receiving the property .

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-76

299. THOMAS DAMAN was indicted for that he, on the 3d of March , he being in the service of Thomas Tuck , took into his possession 7 s. on account of his master; he afterwards did feloniously embezzle and secrete the same .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS TUCK sworn. - Q. Mr. Tuck, I believe you are a farmer , living at Edmonton; the prisoner was a servant of your's? - A. He was a week or two.

Q. Did you send him to London with any hay? - A. I sent him to Smithfield market on the 3d of March; he had no commission to sell it at all, he was to take it to the salesman; when he returned, he said he sold the hay at Tottenham; he did not know the man's name he sold it to; I asked him where he unloaded, he said the Ship at Tottenham ; I suspected him.

Court. Q. Did he tell you what he sold it for? - A. He gave me four pounds twelve shillings, and said I would not cheat you for the world, master; I found he had sold the hay to Mr. Needham, at Tottenham, for five pounds; I went and took him up the next day; he confessed the whole of it.

Q. Did you promise him any thing? - A. I told him I would punish him; he said he would work it out.

Q. Did he say any thing about the other money? - A. He lacked that.

Court. Q. You allow him the market shilling? - A. He took care to deduct that; I gave him sixpence to spend besides what they make, and his day's work.

Q. What was the price of hay at that time? - A. It depends upon the quality; I was not at market on that day.

RICHARD NEEDHAM sworn. - I am a brewer; I cannot say I know the prisoner; I do not recollect his features; I bought some hay of a person the beginning of March; I agreed to give him four pounds nineteen shillings; I was out of the way when my brother paid him.

JOSEPH NEEDHAM sworn. - I cannot recognize the prisoner; I gave him a five pound note; he gave my man a shilling.

Court. Q. It is not an uncommon thing to stop carts and buy hay of them; do you recollect what day it was? - A. The 3d of March.

Q. (To Tuck). Did he say who he sold it to? - A. He said he did not know the person's name, though he knew as well as I; I saw him standing at Mr. Needham's that morning; I thought one of the Needhams bought the hay.

Prisoner's defence. That gentleman that gave me the money, paid me five pounds; I gave his man a shilling; I told my master I would work it out, or I would borrow the money; I have a large family; I bought the children victuals with the money.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped at Edmonton .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-77

300. ALEXANDER BADDEN and EDWARD STACK were indicted, the first, for feloniously acknowledging bail, on the 13th of November , in the name of Edward Ball , he not being privy or consenting thereto; and the latter, for feloniously procuring the said Alexander Badden to do and commit the said felony .

The bail-piece not being produced, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-78

301. THOMAS BRIGGS and JAMES TAYLOR were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Dunant , on the 23d of March , about the hour of eight at night, and burglariously stealing therein a wooden till, value 6 d. three hundred and forty-seven penny-pieces, nine hundred and fifty-two halfpence, and thirty-five farthings, the goods and monies of the said Thomas Dunant .

THOMAS DUNANT sworn - I live at No. 2, Brook-street, Ratcliffe, in the parish of Stepney ; I came home as soon as I heard the alarm, about half past eight o'clock at night, on the 23d of March.

SARAH DUNANT sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness, at half past eight o'clock at night, I went to put my little girl to bed before I went up stairs; I opened the kitchen-door, my sister was in the kitchen; I told her to mind that nobody came into the shop; when I went up stairs I left my street-door shut.

Q. Is your's an open shop? - A. My shop has a large glass bow window.

Q. How does your door shut? - A. With a latch; I was not up stairs five minutes; when I returned again, I found my street-door open; I asked my sister who had been in the shop, she said nobody.

Q. Is your sister here? - A. No.

Q. I suppose you staid up stairs long enough to put your child to bed? - A. Yes; I had sent my sister up before.

Q. How old is she? - A. My little girl is seven years old; I went to my fore-door immediately; I saw a little boy, I received some information; I run over the way to the sign of the Blue Anchor.

Q. Was your husband there? - A. Yes, he was spending the evening; he had just gone; I opened the parlour-door, and said, Dunant, the till; I could say no more my fright was so great.

Q. When you came home you looked for the till? - A. I went into the shop and looked for the till, it was gone; I did not know what the amount of the money was then exactly; I knew it was near three or four pounds in copper.

Q. Did you know the persons of these two men? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Your sister is not here? - A. No.

Q. When you went up stairs to put the child to bed, did you leave any one there? - A. None but my sister.

Q. Was there any light below? - A. There was a candle on the counter, and my sister had a candle by the fire in the kitchen.

Q. Did you take the candle away when you went up stairs? - A. I took the candle away where I sat, my shop is first, and my parlour is second, and the kitchen is behind all, on a floor.

Court. Q. Can they see from the kitchen into the shop? A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the door was latched? - A. Yes, I am sure the door was latched; I had a customer in the shop; I went after them and latched the door, as I always do; I am positive I latched the door.

ANN POWELL sworn. - I am used to go out to service; I have been very ill, and now I go out a

cleaning; I had been over to Stepney, and returning home, on Friday, the 23d of March, between eight and nine o'clock, I met Briggs; he had at his right side something like a till.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. I never saw him before that I know of; I met him in Brook-street, just by Shakespeare's Rope-walk; he had a till by his right side, and with the flap of his coat over it; I perceived both penny-pieces and half-pence in the till; the moon was very bright; I said to him I wished they were mine as I passed him; he made no answer; he had another with him; but as to say I should know the other, I should not.

Q. Which is Briggs? - A. That man in the yellow waistcoat.

Q. Are you sure? - A. I am positive they went towards the Commercial Road, and I saw them no more till after they were brought back into custody.

Q. How soon were they brought back? - A. I believe it might be half an hour, not more; Briggs was brought back first, to the sign of the King's-head, in Brook-street.

Q. When he was brought back, were you sure he was the man you saw with the till? - A. I am sure.

Q. Had he the till when he was brought back? - A. No, he had nothing then; I knew him by his person.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You had never seen Briggs before? - A. No.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a servant.

Q. You are out of place? - A. No, I go out to cleaning and washing sometimes.

Q. You know there is a forty pounds reward if you convict this man? - A. No.

Q. Don't you know; has not Turnbull the officer talked about it? - A. No.

Q. You never had any conversation with him about it? - A. None at all.

Q. It was a moon-light night? - A. Yes, I am sure of that.

Q. I observed that at first you said it was something like a till? - A. Yes, and about the breadth of my hand was uncovered.

Q. Upon your oath, as it was under his coat, how could you see they were penny-pieces? - A. They were just enough uncovered to see that.

Q. Did Briggs tell you, that if you did not come forward, he would take you to the House of Correction? - A. No, he did not say a word about that.

Q. You have always sworn to the tallest of the two? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you read or write? - A. I can read a little, but not write.

Q. Who told you it was the 23d of March? - A. It was my birth-day on the 7th.

Q. Do you mean to state it to the Jury that you knew it by your birth-day, that it was the 23d of March? - A. No, I heard it when he was brought back; I did not know he was taken till he was brought back into custody.

Q. How came you take notice of the tallest? - A. I did not notice the little one.

Q. You liked the tallest best? - A. I did not like either of them; I took notice of him, because he had the money.

Q. It is the money only? Do you mean to swear positively to his person? - A. Yes.

THOMAS BROMAGE sworn. - I am a carpenter; I live in Brook-street, Ratcliff.

Q. What do you know of this transaction? - A. Going along the Commercial-road on the 23d of March, between the half-way house at Stepney-Causeway, these two prisoners and a boy along with them, seeing me come along, they turned out of the road directly, they seemed to have something under their coat, and they carried it along-side of them, with the flap of the coat over it; I think it was on the right side, I was about ten yards off.

Q. Could you see what it was? - A. I could not see particularly what it was, because he had it under his coat; I had suspicions, by their turning out of the road, they had been doing something they should not; I turned back, and looked which way they went, they stopped about forty yards from me; I went on about twenty or thirty yards further, and Richard Parsons came up to me, and asked me if I had met any body; I said, yes, very near at hand; he asked me how far they were got; I told him they were about a hundred yards off; he asked me if I would go along back with him; I went back with him, he crossed the road, and we found the watchman, and asked him to come after us; we could go faster than the watchman, we went on about one hundred and fifty yards, we crossed the road, we got before him; then he had something on his left shoulder, then we turned to the watchman, and told him to come on, we supposed he was the person that had the till; we let him go on about thirty yards further; when Edward Passey first met me, he told me they had been at a butcher's shop, and rung the changes of a seven-shilling piece; they kept going on, we stopped to see where the watchman was; about a hundred yards further, Briggs passed us, and went on before; Briggs took the money down a passage.

Q. Was any thing found in that passage? - A. Yes.

Q. Who found it? - A. Edward Passey ; Briggs had it when he went down there, when he came out he had not; Edward Passey was walking with the short one, and he said, here he comes without the parcel on his shoulder; we went up to him, and stopped him.

Q. Was any thing found upon him? - A. No.

Q. Was any thing found upon the other? - A. No.

Q. All the time you were following him, had you a doubt of what he had under his coat? - A. He had it on his shoulder; the till was emptied into his apron, and he carried it then on his left shoulder, and held it with his right hand.

Q. Had he that apron when he went up the passage? - A. Yes, before he went up the passage we saw him with it; then Edward Passey and I took him; he seemed obstreperous, and said we should not take him; we told him we would take him, and we took him near the half-way house; we had only one then, Briggs.

Q. When did you take the other? - A. Passey thought Briggs would be too many for him, so we got hold of him, each on one side; when we got him nearer the half way house, he seemed stronger than we thought he was; then Turnbull came up, he took him into custody.

Q. What became of the other one? - A. Dunant took him.

Q. Are you sure that Taylor was the other person that was walking on the other side? - A. I am sure of that.

Q. Was it a moon-light night? - A. Yes; they were taken to Turnbull's office, and from there to the Thames Police; we found the till in a gravel-pit, I was the first that saw it in a gravel-pit in the Commercial-road, nearly opposite where I saw them first.

Q. When you first saw it, was it like a till or like a bundle? - A. I cannot say; I was ten yards off.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were ten yards off, you fairly said you did not know what it was? - A. I only know it was something very heavy under his coat.

Q. Afterwards you said you saw a sack? - A. No, an apron; the till we found some time after they were taken into custody.

Q. How long? - A. About an hour and a half.

EDWARD PASSEY sworn. - I am a cornchandler: On Friday night, the 23d of March, I went as usual to spend my evening at the Blue Anchor; Mrs. Dunant came over, and said she had lost her till, upon which I and several others pursued the prisoners; I overtook them about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's house; I met the witness Bromage, he said he met two men; I went after them with him, he went on a few paces, and crossed the road, and called to the watchman, and desired him to follow us as fast as he could; I went up to the prisoners, and asked them if they had seen two men go along the road; they made answer they had not; I told them there had been two men ringing the changes with a butcher of a seven-shilling piece; they then said, they had seen two men in the fields, pointing towards Stepney church; I then perceived Briggs to have something across his shoulder; I left them then, and went to the witness Bromage; I told him I suspected they were the thieves, we crossed the road, then we met John Turnbull , an officer; I told him of the person who had been robbed, he is a near neighbour of his; he told me he would follow me in a few minutes; I then crossed the road again, and looked at the prisoners both full in the face, to see if they were the people I first met; when I came into the road again, I looked to see if the watchman was coming, or near at hand.

Q. When you saw them again, were you sure they were the men? - A. I was; they were the persons I first saw, I had lost sight of them only when the moon was in the clouds, that was only a short time; I then went across the road, and saw the prisoner Taylor standing by himself; I collared him, I did not see the other at that time; after I collared Taylor, I saw Briggs come out of an alley; he had not the bundle on his shoulder then which I at first saw him with; I then collared Briggs, I asked him what he had done with the bundle he had on his shoulder; I told him I thought he was the person I was looking after; he said, he had no bundle; I told him that Mr. Dunant had been robbed of his till, and I thought that was the bundle he had on his back when I saw him first; I told him he must go along with me; he said, he would not go along with me; in the mean time the witness, Bromage, had Taylor; he found that Briggs could not be managed by me alone; I had given up Taylor to Bromage at the first taking of Briggs; he let him go, and took hold of Briggs; I then called the watchman, and I found the money in the lane.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The moon did not shine all the night? - A. No, it shone at those times I took the opportunity of seeing what they had, and seeing their persons.

Q. Who found the till? - A. The witness, Bromage.

JOHN TURNBULL sworn. - I am an officer; I took the two prisoners into custody for robbing Mr. Dunant, I have had the property in my custody ever since; there are three articles that were sworn to by Mr. Dunant at our Office, they are curious ones, there is a counterfeit halfpenny, a marble, and a nail that is crooked at the point.

Q. (To Thomas Dunant .) Q. Look at those three articles? - A. Those three articles were in the till when it was brought back.

Q. Were they in the till before? - A. They were.

Q. Which of these two men did you stop? - A. Taylor; when my wife came into the room where I was, I went with several others; when I got near the half-way house, I heard them whistle across the field towards Spice Island; I followed the whistle, and among the new houses that are built upon Spice Island, I saw the prisoner Taylor; I

went up to him, and asked him if he had seen any body that looked like thieves; he told me there was one taken as he passed the Commercial-road; I told him if he could give so good an account of that one taken in so short a time in the Commercial-road, he was the next; I gave him in charge of a gentleman that came up, and we took him to Mr. Turnbull's, the King's Head.

Q. Did you find any thing upon him? - A. No.

Q. Is that your till? - A. It is.

Q. What quantity of money was there? - A. Three pounds, nine shillings, and three-pence three farthings.

Q. Did you ever know the amount before you lost it? - A. No, I knew there were between three and four pounds.

Q. You knew that before? - A. I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You do not mean to swear to that money? - A. I do not mean to swear to the money, but I do mean to swear to these three pieces that were in it.

Q. Now the nail, there is a crook at one end, you do not mean to swear to that? - A. I do.

Q. The marble? - A. There is a chip on that.

Q. Do you not see a chip on other marbles? - A. Yes; I am not in the habit of playing at marbles now.

Q. The pocket-piece, did you never see such a pocket-piece as that? - A. I do not know that ever I did.

Briggs's defence. I had been down to Blackwall about business, I was stopped on suspicion of a robbery; I know nothing at all about it.

Taylor's defence. I had been out about some work; coming into New-street, a gentleman stopped me, he asked me where I was going; I said, home; he asked me if I saw a man taken in the Commercial-road; I said, I did; with that I was taken.

The prisoner, Briggs, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Briggs, GUILTY, Death , aged 18.

Taylor, GUILTY, Death , aged 17.

The prosecutor recommended them both to mercy, on account of their youth .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-79

302. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , a shirt, value 6 s. the property of William Prentice .

WILLIAM PRENTICE sworn. - I am a publican , in Castle-street, Bethnal-green : On the 18th of March, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, Thomas Williams came in, with another man, and called for a pot of porter; and before I drew the porter, Thomas Williams went out, the other man stopped, and drank his porter; and after he had drank his porter, I shewed him the way out, because it was sermon time; about ten minutes after that, I went to look after my shirt, and found it was missing from the parlour table; I then went out after the last man that went out, and found him; I insisted upon his going with me to find the prisoner, it was almost dark before I could find out where he lived; I then got an officer to take him, the officer was afraid to go in; the officer desired him to come out, and he came out; the officer took him to the Crown, in Bunhill-row.

Q. Did you search the lodgings? - A. No, we did not search the lodgings at all.

Q. What did you say to him? - A. I accused him of taking my shirt out of the parlour; he said, he was not guilty; he offered me three shillings and sixpence and a duplicate of another shirt that was in pawn, in lieu of my shirt.

Q. What did you say to him? - A. I insisted upon his going to the watch-house.

Q. Did not you tell him if he would tell you, you would not prosecute him? - A. No.

EDWARD STEPHENS sworn. - I am a constable; the prisoner lodged in Goat-yard, Whitecross-street; I went to the door, he was in bed; I knocked at the door, it was near seven o'clock.

Q. How do you know he was in bed? - A. The prisoner said he was in bed himself; the room he sleeps in is on the ground-floor.

Q. Why did not you go into the house? - A. I knew his character before, he was a very bad one; the prosecutor did not tell me his name, or else I should have got some assistance; I staid at the door for fear he should abscond; he got up, and I took him in charge; I did not search him, he had nothing to be searched of; the ticket that he would give to Mr. Prentice was of another shirt; I told him, I would not let any thing of that kind be done; he said, that he had not got the shirt, nor did he take the shirt.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-80

303. WILLIAM COSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , two odd boots , the property of Peter Mergus .

JAMES KEEL sworn. - I live with Mr. Mergus, at No. 4, Coventry-street : On the 12th of April, between the hours of twelve and one, I heard a young man say, that a pair of boots had been taken out of our window; immediately I enquired which way he had taken, the young man went with me, he pointed to the prisoner at the corner of Rupert-street; I pursued him, and took the boots from under his arm; he seemed very much agitated, he did not run, he walked fast; I took him back to the shop, an officer came by while he was in the shop, and took him into custody.

(The boots produced, and identified by James Keel .)

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was not he drunk? - A. He rather-expressed himself in distress, and that it was

the first offence, and hoped I would permit him to walk quietly on.

GUILTY .

The prisoner expressed a wish to be sent abroad .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-81

304. WILLIAM BARRETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a metal watch, value 30 s. the property of George Tanfield .

GEORGE TANFIELD sworn. - I keep a public-house , the Spotted Dog, in the Strand , the prisoner was my servant ; the prisoner took one of my watches, I had laid it by, it hung up with another; his mother lived at Hampstead.

Q. Did you ever find your watch? - A. He had pledged it in St. John's-street.

Q. What age is he? - A. Between twelve and thirteen; he went from me on Monday, he had pledged the watch on Saturday.

Q. Had you any character with the boy? - A. We had not; the person that left the house neglected telling me, and I neglected asking him.

JOHN JOHNSTON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Griggs, pawnbroker, No. 92, St. John's-street.

Q. What day was it when you took it in pawn? - A. The 24th of March.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, I am certain of the boy.

Q. How came you to take a watch of a little boy? - A. He described it as belonging to his mother.

Q. You could not expect him to have said he had stole it? - A. He gave me a very good account of his mother; he told me she lived at Hampstead.

Q. How much did he borrow upon it? - A. Twelve shillings; he asked for twelve shillings.

(The watch produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 12.

To be sent to sea .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-82

305. MARY STACK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , a bed gown, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Hill .

THOMAS HILL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker , No. 64, Turnmill-street ; the prisoner at the bar came to my shop, I believe it was on Thursday, with a large picture, she wanted five shillings upon it; I enquired whose it was, she said it was her daughter's; she said, her daughter had given seventeen shillings and sixpence for it; after making every enquiry, I lent her the five shillings upon it; it was a large frame, with a print enclosed; after I had given her the money, I went backwards to some friends that were there to wish them good morning, and when I came back again, I missed a bed gown that was hanging up in my shop; suspecting the prisoner, I sent to the next shop to know if any such thing had been offered, the person describing her; they said, there had been such a person there; I sent to the Office in Hatton-garden, the officer came; I told him the person that brought that picture had stole a bed gown; the officer then went and took the prisoner; I then told him that was the person that had brought the picture, and had stole the bed gown; the officer searched her, and found two duplicates, one that was pinned on the gown, and one where she had pledged it.

(The duplicate produced.)

- FITCH sworn. - Q. Is that your duplicate? - A. Yes; she asked four shillings, and I offered her two shillings and sixpence; she would not take it, I then gave her three shillings; the prisoner at the bar is the woman. (The bed gown produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. It is all spite of this man; he told me he would hang any Irish man, or any Irish woman, for a shilling; I have got two dozen people for a character if I were to bring them in: I have lodged sixteen years in one house, I have got a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-83

306. CATHHRINE HARLEY, otherwise GODDARD , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a pair of ear-rings, value 6 s. 6 d. and a paste pin , the property of John Farmer .

JOHN FARMER sworn. - I am a publican , No. 2, Oxford-street ; the prisoner had been employed by Mrs. Farmer and me as a chair-woman ; Mrs. Farmer was taken particularly ill in January last, she desired that I would send for the prisoner as we had done before; I missed several articles on the premises at that time, and she was paid by me and discharged, but was never detected in taking any thing; some time in March last, I do not recollect the day, a person, who is one of the witnesses, brought a duplicate that she gave this woman a shilling upon; I went down to Mr. Dobree's, in Holborn, and there I saw the gold ear-rings; I have had the ear-rings in my hands since Mrs. Farmer's death; the ear-rings and paste pin is in Court.

Prisoner. (To the Prosecutor.) Q. Whether he ever missed any thing while I was with them, being employed frequently by him, sometimes I have been employed there for three weeks? - A. I never detected her in any thing, but at the time she was employed I had no servant and no lodger in my house; I lost my shirts and waistcoats; she told me, when she was in custody, she had taken three pair of stockings, a waistcoat, and other things she had robbed my house of, and had pawned them at Mr. Dobree's, and that the duplicates were all burnt, except this one.

Prisoner. I never confessed any thing of the kind.

- VINCENT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dobree, a pawnbroker, in Holborn.

Q. Who did you take the ring of? - A. I do not know; they were pledged the 15th of February.

JANE METCALF sworn. - My husband is a bricklayer; about the middle of March, the prisoner came to me, and asked me to lend her a shilling, and she would leave me that duplicate till Monday; a woman that I met at the door, Mrs. Crane, told me it was stole, and desired me to take it to Mr. Farmer's.

Q. Did you take it to Mr. Farmer's? - A. I did.

(The duplicate produced.)

Q. (To Vincent.) Is that the duplicate that was given for these ear-rings? - A. It exactly corresponds.

Q. (To the Prosecutor.) Look at the ear-rings? - A. I know them to be mine; I bought them at the corner of St. Swithin's alley; they were under lock and key at the time they were stole; my house was in a deal of confusion; I had two physicians attending, and an apothecary three or four times a day; I believe I left the key somewhere careless; I have had them in my hand since Mrs. Farmer's death.

ELIZABETH CRANE sworn. - I saw the prisoner have a pair of ear-rings; they had red stones set in gold; I have not seen them since I saw them in her hand (the ear-rings shewn her); they are the same.

Prisoner's defence. When I saw you, Mr. Farmer, did I not say that Mrs. Farmer gave them me; the reason was, you once broke a pair of earrings in her ears, and therefore she would not wear any more, you were so passionate; they were given me by the deceased upon my word; I have been backwards and forwards for a twelvemonth; I am not saying but he paid me honest and just, but his treatment to his wife was bad.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040411-84

307. JOSEPH BARRET was indicted for that he, having in his possession, on the 7th of April , four seven shilling-pieces of gold coin, and six halfpence, the monies of John Littlewood , he feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and carry away the same .

JOHN LITTLEWOOD sworn. - I live in Oxford-Market, I am a butcher : The prisoner was an occasional servant ; I sent him to Mr. Vaughan's, in Bedford-street, Covent-garden ; Mr. Vaughan's bill was 1 l. 17 s. 9 d. he paid every week; I gave him four seven-shilling-pieces, and three-pence, to give Mr. Vaughan change for three pounds; I apprehended him on the 9th of April, I heard that he was at Smithfield-market; as soon as he saw me he ran down St. John's-street; I pursued him, and gave the alarm of stop thief, he was stopped.

Q. I suppose you never got your money again? - A. No, nor my tray.

- VAUGHAN sworn. - Mr. Littlewood has furnished my family with meat every week for some time, I was very particular in having my bill; he sent the week's bill, 1 l. 11 s. 9 d. and the prisoner said, I have brought four seven-shilling-pieces, and some halfpence; I said, I have nearly done paying my men, therefore you may take the change back; he took the change out of my house, I threw the bill in the dust-hole; I told him I would call and pay his master.

Prisoner's defence. I have worked for the shop about a year and a half, they never found any thing more against me; I have carried out a deal of meat and brought the money to him; I had lost all the money out of my pocket.

(To the Prosecutor.) Q. Had he behaved well? - A. He always brought the money before this time.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Publickly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-85

308. JOSEPH RAFFLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a bushel of turnip-tops, value 1 s. and ten cabbage-plants, value 1 s. the property of James Brian .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-86

309. JOHN HILL and MARY GREEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , seven yards and a half of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Watson .

THOMAS WATSON sworn. - Q. Are you partner with your father? - A. No; I am a linen-draper , I live at No. 6, Great Chapel-street, Westminster : We lost, on the 22d of February, between four and five o'clock, seven yards and a half of printed cotton; I was looking through the shop window, I saw the prisoner Hill unpinning this piece of print, that was there for sale, and the woman pulling it, it was outside of the door, it hung up on two pins; on seeing that, I went out, and laid hold of the man by the collar, and the woman by the hand, they had got it completely down; on laying hold of the woman the man got rather out of my reach.

Q. Did he get out of your sight? - A. No.

Q. What is the value of this printed cotton? - A. Ten shillings.

Q. Did they say any thing? - A. No; I went for an officer, there was nobody there; the publican opposite desired them to be brought there, he kept them till the officer came.

JANE HOLT sworn. - I live in Pye-street, Westminster:

I was passing by the door, I made a bit of a stop, I saw the man unpin it, he put it in the girl's apron; I was but about a yard behind them when the gentleman came out of the shop.

- sworn. - I am the officer: They were in the public-house before I came, (the linen produced, which was identified by the prosecutor); both the prisoners said they were not guilty.

Hill, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction . and publickly whipped .

Green, GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040411-87

310. JOHN FREEMAN and THOMAS LILLY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , nine hundred pounds weight of glue, value 40 l. the property of Joseph Prior .

JOSEPH PRIOR sworn. - I am a dry salter ; I was out at the time; the prisoners were in the service of the volunteer corps which I let the warehouse to.

JOHN MAY sworn. - I am a dyer, I live in Brown's-lane; I went into a warehouse belonging to Mr. Prior, I looked through a hole in the door, I observed the prisoner Freeman (he was there by himself) with his arms in the hogshead of glue; I looked again, and then I saw Freeman and Lilly; one of them had some glue in his hands, I cannot tell which; I went round to the back gate in Corbett's-court ; there was a vacancy under the gate: I looked under the gate, and saw Freeman stand about five yards from the cask; I then went to Mr. Prior's warehouse and informed them, and one of Mr. Prior's men came with me to the warehouse; he put a key in the lock, and he found there was a key inside; I went to my house in Brown's-lane, there is an entrance there; I found the two prisoners were then in the warehouse.

Q. Was there no other person in the warehouse at that time? - A. No: Lilly was trying to get over the paling; I told him it was of no use; Mr. Prior's men came in, and then we secured them both; the constable came in, and then I went to the gate and took the key out of the lock which was inside.

Q. Did the prisoners say any thing? - A. They said they only came there to hide themselves; they thought the drum-major was coming.

Q. What were the prisoners? - A. One was a drummer in St. George's, and the other was a drummer in Spitalfields corps.

Q. Did you see any glue about the warehouse? - A. There was some glue in a bag, about thirty pounds weight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. When you got into the warehouse you saw the two boys, and they said they were running away from the drum-major? - A. Yes.

Q. They were in the habit of exercising in that warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. There was nothing found upon them? - A. No.

Q. This was about three or four o'clock? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What time did they come to exercise? - A. About twelve or one o'clock; they generally go away about two o'clock.

Q. The drummers were there exercising themselves at different hours? - A. They had no drums with them.

WILLIAM PYKE sworn. Q. Mr. May gave you some information, and when you received that information, you went down to the warehouse? - A. I did.

Q. You could not get in? - A. No; this key was in it, that was our key before; we went round Brown's-lane, and got in that way.

Q. What was deposited in that warehouse? - A. All glue entirely; Mr. May went to the other warehouse; I kept them in that warehouse till the constable came; I asked them what they came there for; they said to practise; I said I never knew drummers to practise without their drums; I told them they should not pass me till the constable came.

Q. Did you find any thing missing? - A. There were two hogsheads entirely empty.

Q. How lately had you been there? - A. Not for a week or a fortnight before.

Q. How do you know that there was any thing missing from that warehouse? - A. One of my mates had been there.

Q. You found a bag in the warehouse; what did that bag contain? - A. Better than a quarter of a hundred weight of glue.

Q. Did your master keep glue in a bag? - A. No; the prisoners denied knowing any thing about the glue; we delivered the bag with the glue in it to the constable.

JOSEPH PRIOR sworn. - Q. You were out of town; how long before was it that you had seen your warehouse? - A. I was not in the habit of going to that warehouse; it is a warehouse that we have nothing in but these two hogsheads of glue in it.

Q. How many servants have you? - A. Six or seven.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. In what way did they become possessed of the key? - A. They had the key; and when we wanted the key, they said it was lost; I was obliged to have another.

Q. Do not you know that one of them has been impressed in his Majesty's service? - A. I do not know.

Court. Q. Before there was any idea of the

boy being pressed, did they make any intimation of its being lost? - A. I believe it was before.

Mrs. MAY sworn. - I live in Brown's-lane: I went down to the first warehouse of Mr. Prior; I heard a noise in the second warehouse, where the glue was; I looked through the key-hole; I saw Lilly and Freeman, one of them was leaning in the tub with his arms in it; I told my husband.

THOMAS HART sworn. - I am a constable; I only accompanied the constable at the watch-house; after they were there, I asked them how they thought they should get through; Lilly said, he did not think he should get through it at all; he told me he should be very glad if they would let him pay for it at seven shillings a week till it was all paid for.

Freeman, GUILTY, aged 16.

Lilly, GUILTY, aged 15.

The prosecutor recommended them to mercy on account of their youth .

The prisoners called four witnesses who gave them a good character.

Both the prisoners to be whipped in Newgate .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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