Old Bailey Proceedings, 11th January 1804.
Reference Number: 18040111
Reference Number: f18040111-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 11th of JANUARY, 1804, and following Days,

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1804.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir ARCHIBALD MACDONALD , Knight, Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir SOULDEN LAWRENCE , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; the Right Honourable THOMAS HARLEY , PAUL LE MESURIER , Esq. Sir JOHN WILLIAM ANDERSON , Bart. Sir JOHN EAMER , Knt. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; GEORGE CLARK , Esq. RICHARD LEA , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Richard Groom ,

David Price ,

Edward White ,

David Phillips ,

David Ramsay ,

William Wells ,

John-Goodridge Gossling ,

Peter Perry ,

William Gascoigne ,

Henry-Gundy Renshaw ,

Thomas Scarborough ,

Griffith Thomas .

First Middlesex Jury.

Richard Francis ,

James Herbert ,

Thomas Driver ,

Edward Kent ,

Peter Bacon ,

Thomas Wilson ,

William Talbot ,

Richard Welch ,

George Harrison ,

James Fraser ,

Henry-Robson Robley ,

William Armstrong .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Hugh Wright ,

Robert Salter ,

John M'Corn ,

John Whitehead ,

Henry Bourne ,

Walter Thwaites ,

John Browning ,

Joseph Green ,

James Stewart ,

James Chard ,

Robert Gledhill ,

John Forrest .

Reference Number: t18040111-1

61. CORNELIUS DELTENON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , thirty lemons, value 1 s. 5 d. a basket, value 1 d. a copper pocket-piece, value one farthing, and a piece of copper money, called a farthing , the property of Samuel Tilley .

SAMUEL TILLEY sworn. - I am a green-grocer : On the 20th of December, I lost a basket of lemons about six o'clock, and about a quarter past six, a person brought the prisoner back with a basket containing part of the lemons; they were inside the shop; I know nothing of the prisoner; there was an imitation of a farthing, which I had dropped into the basket that evening, and there was a pocket-piece in it.

- sworn. - I am an officer: I was going to the Office, when I met the prisoner, and four other boys, whom I knew; one of them had been convicted before; they all ran up Church-street, out of Shoreditch; I then saw the prisoner crawl into Mr. Tilley's shop upon his hands and knees; he came out again, and ran up Church-street; I thought he had only taken a few apples, and I was going to the Office, when I saw him and another boy come back, go into the shop, and take a basket of lemons; I immediately took hold of him, and carried him back with the lemons.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 11.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-2

62. ELIZABETH EDWARDS, alias KNIGHT , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , a feather bed, value 30 s. two pillows and cases, value 10 s. a bolster, value 2 s. a pair of sheets, value 8 s. two blankets, value 10 s. two curtains, value 5 s. a dressing-glass, value 5 s. a washing-tub, value 6 d. a saucepan, value 6 d. a stone pitcher, value 6 d. and a bason, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Mitchell , in a lodging-room .

JOSEPH MITCHELL sworn. - I live at No. 28, Tower-street, Seven Dials : I keep a lodging-house ; the prisoner lodged in the back-room, on the third floor; she hired the room of me furnished, on the 29th of October, at four shillings and sixpence a week; she came with a young woman, about twenty, whom, she said, was her daughter; she informed me, she and her daughter worked at child-bed linen , at a warehouse in Holborn. About a fortnight after, she borrowed a cloak of my wife, to go to Hammersmith to see her aunt, who was ill; the daughter remained in the house eight or nine days afterwards; the prisoner did not return; the daughter said, she had heard from her mother, and her aunt was dead. On the 29th of November, the daughter disappeared; after three or four days, I had the door broken open on the 2d of December; I was not present at that time, my daughter was.

Prisoner. I was going home at the time Mr. Mitchell met me; I had the key in my pocket, and after he took me up, he came to me several times, and offered me two or three guineas, if I would tell him where the things were, and I told him I did not know any thing of them.

Q. (To Mitchell.) Is that true? - A. No; I found her coming out of Newgate; she has a husband there for two years; I told her she had served me a very pretty trick, and said, I should be thankful if she would tell me where the things were; she said she knew nothing of them, she had the key in her possession; she acknowledged to nothing but the cloak, which never was returned.

ELIZABETH MITCHELL sworn. - I am the daughter of the last witness; I was present when Mr. Matthews broke open the door; he lodges in the next room; I had delivered the things to the prisoner myself; I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment. (Repeats them.)

Q. You have not been able to trace them? - A. No.

Q. (To Mitchell.) Had you any opportunity, between the mother going away and the daughter, of seeing whether any thing was missing? - A. No; there was always a rag hanging in the way, that we could not see whether she was at home or not; she paid the lodging for the first fortnight.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS sworn. - I broke open the door at the request of Elizabeth Mitchell , and the things were missing; I was with Mr. Mitchell when he found the prisoner coming out at the felon's door; I asked her what she had done with the property; she asked me how I knew there was any missing, for she had got the key of the premises; I took her to the public-house, and endeavoured to persuade her to confess what she had done with the things, but she would not own to them.

Prisoner. This man lodged in the next room to me, and things of this bulk could not have been carried out without his knowing it; I can hear every thing that he, and his wife, and child say.

Matthews. Mr. Mitchell allows his lodgers to

have a latch-key, so that she could come in at the dead of night, and go out again.

Mitchell. These things might have been made very portable, by taking out the feathers a few at a time; she came home one night without the key, and I was obliged to get up to let her in at eleven o'clock at night, and I then saw a man with her.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-3

63. WILLIAM LATHAM , THOMAS PRUDEN , and JACOB VANDOME , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , a metal watch, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of Hugh Jones .

HUGH JONES sworn. - I keep the Fountain, in Virginia-row, Bethnal-green : On the 26th of December, about four o'clock, the three prisoners came into my house; they drank a pot of porter together; they paid me for that, and when they went away, they asked whether, if they came again, they should get some steaks dressed; I told them they might; they came back about seven o'clock with some beef-steaks; they delivered them to my wife, and wished them to be ready by eight o'clock; they were cooked in the tap-room, and while they were cooking, one of them, I cannot say which, asked me if they could not have another place to eat it in than the tap-room, because there were four others there; I told them, yes, if they would put up with the back kitchen; they all supped there, and after supper, Pruden came into the bar-door, and said, they must have a drop of something to drink after supper, and they had four or five glasses of liquor among his acquaintances, while they were at supper; they found out where they were, and went to them; I do not know how many of them were there; Pruden served those people with the liquor over the bar-door, which is facing the tap-room; I asked Pruden to pay for the liquor; he desired me to go into the tap-room for the money from those that had it; I went into the tap-room, but did not know who to ask for it, and I came back, and told him he was the proper person to pay for it, and they might settle among one another afterwards, he was still in the bar, and then he paid me for it, and wished me a good night; I then looked into the tap-room, and saw Vandome sitting behind the tap-room door; I asked him why he did not sit by the fire; I then went to the bar to look what the time was, and missed my watch from over the fire-place; I then went after Pruden, and found him in Turk-street; I brought him back, he came back very quiet; he denied having it; I sent for Mr. Jones, a constable, and gave charge of him; I saw my watch the same night in the watch-house, in the hands of the officer; the other two prisoners were there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Symonds. Q. The bar did not open into the tap-room? - A. No.

WILLIAM BLESSIT sworn. - I am a headborough: On the 26th of December, I was sent for by the prosecutor to take charge of these three lads at the bar, for taking a watch; I found them in a back room in his house; I searched them, but did not find the watch; I took them to the cage, and locked them up; I had not locked them up two minutes, before I thought I would search them again; I had one of them out, I think it was Latham, and while I was searching him, one of my watchmen brought in the watch, it has no case to it, and the glass is broke; I asked them several questions; Vandome did not appear to know any thing about it, the other two seemed to accuse each other.

JOHN HASSENT sworn. - I am a watchman: Mr. Blessit had got Latham out, examining him in the watch-house, Pruden and Vandome were in the cage; I was standing by the door, and saw a watch thrown through the bars of the cage upon the pathway; I picked it up, and took it into the watch-house, there was no outside case upon it; we went out with lights, but could not find it.

(The watch was produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Pruden's defence. I never saw the watch till I saw it here.

The prisoner Pruden called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The other two prisoners were not put upon their defence.

Pruden, GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Latham, NOT GUILTY .

Vandome, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040111-4

64. WILLIAM BAKER and WILLIAM DEVISE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , three pair of bellows, value 5 s . the property of Joseph Adshead .

JOSEPH ADSHEAD sworn. - I am a tin-plate worker , No. 74, Whitechapel High-street : On the 7th of this month, I lost three pair of bellows, between five and six o'clock in the evening; I lighted my candles, and went into the back room to get my tea; I had scarcely sat down, when I perceived a person coming to the door; I got up, and the person immediately went away again; I went in again, and a person came in again; I got up again, and then lit up another candle, that I might have a better view of the shop; I sat down again to tea, and a third time a person came to the

door; I got up again, and they went away the third time; I had scarce sat down again, before I heard a noise; I went out, and missed three pair of bellows off the counter; I ran out, and heard the cry of stop thief, and about three hundred yards from my own house I saw Devise collared by a gentleman who saw him take them out of the shop; that is all I know of it.

HENRY COOKE sworn. - About six o'clock on Saturday night, I saw the prisoners lurking about different shops, and looking in, till they came to the prosecutor's shop; they were watching the shop I suppose for half an hour; I saw the short man, Baker, try five or six times to go into the shop, by getting hold of part of the door, and peeping in, while the other prisoner was watching the door; I saw Devise running towards Aldgate church; I pursued him, took hold of his collar, and he threw the bellows down; he had a short struggle; we both fell; he got up first, and ran away; he ran about forty yards; I had my eye upon him the whole time, and then he was taken; I took him back, and he asked me to let him go; by that time a mob had collected; taking him along the prisoner, Baker, came up, and made enquiry what was the matter; I expected he came to make some resistance, and immediately seized him by the collar, and told the mob he was the confederate of the other; we then got him into an ironmonger's shop; the person who picked up the bellows is not here.

Baker's defence. I saw a great number of people collected; I went to see what was the matter, and that gentleman laid hold of me

Devise's defence. I heard the cry of, stop thief! I went to see what it was about, and this gentleman took me into custody.

Adshead. When they were brought back, Devise offered to pay me for the bellows.

Baker, GUILTY , aged 26.

Devise, GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-5

65. JOHN NORMAN and WALTER DAVIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , 51 lb. of solder, value 1 l. 16 s. the property of John Liptrap and Samuel Liptrap .

WILLIAM TOWNSEND sworn. - I am servant to Mess. John and Samuel Liptrap , distiller s, in Whitechapel-road ; the prisoners were servant s to Mess. Oakes and Brown, coppersmiths, Houndsdith; they were fixing a new copper in the spirit warehouse: On the 4th of December we received one hundred and a quarter and one pound of solder, which was regularly entered in the book; I did not make the entry myself, it was made by James Fisk ; Mess. Liptraps were then accountable for the solder.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. I believe this solder was to be used in fixing a new pump? - A. Yes.

Q. That pump was sent from Oakes and Brown's? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the pump fixed in a workman like way? - A. Yes.

Q. All the solder that was necessary was used? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Then for the solder that was not used Mess. Liptraps were accountable? - A. Yes.

BENJAMIN MIST sworn. - I am cooper to Mess. Liptraps; the prisoners were at work in the warehouse on Monday the 5th of December; I was with them two or three times that day; I asked Norman if the work was finished, and he said; yes; I saw a little solder left, but what quantity I cannot say; they brought the solder on the Sunday.

WILLIAM OAKES sworn. - We had a job to do on the Sunday, and we sent the two prisoners with the solder to Mess. Liptraps.

Q. Whose property is the solder when it arrives there? - A. Mess. Liptraps.

Court. Q. If you did a job for me, you would not make me the owner of all the solder you sent? - A. I should give credit for what was returned.

Q. How long had these men worked for you? - A. As long as I have been in business, near three years; they have always bore a good character, and been very industrious.

JAMES FISK sworn. - I am clerk to Mess. Liptraps: We have frequently had solder from Mess. Oakes and Brown: On the 4th of December I saw the solder weighed, and made an entry in the book; there was one hundred and a quarter and one pound; when the job is done, it is the duty of the workmen to come that we may take an account of the solder that remains; I do not know how much was used; I don't think there is any body here who does know.

Q. Do you consider yourselves as answerable for what remains after the job is done? - A. Yes, it is ours.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. This solder came in pigs I apprehend? - A. Yes.

Q. So that they were to use as much as was necessary for fixing this pump? - A. Yes.

Q. When they have used all that was necessary, the remainder is usually weighed off, and entered in your book? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew nothing of the prisoners before? - A. No.

Q. So that if any solder was taken back to Mess. Oakes and Brown's, the only omission was their not being acquainted with your course? - A. They ought to have called us to see it weighed.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I belong to the Police

Office, Worship-street: On Monday the 5th of December, about a quarter before six in the evening, I was standing at the bottom of Baker's-row; the two prisoners passed me; they were coming as from Mess. Liptraps, and might have gone that way to Houndsditch; they went on a few yards, and were knocking at a little brazier's shop, kept by one Newberry I think the name is; I observed each of them had something heavy wrapped up under their arms; I asked them what they had got there; they said, what was that to me; I told them I was an officer, and insisted upon seeing what they had; I immediately laid hold of them both; there is a public-house next door, I endeavoured to get them to the public-house, when the tall one, Davis, rescued himself from me, and got away, throwing down this solder, which weighs 26 lb. (produces it); I called out, stop thief! and he was brought back in a minute or two; I kept the other in custody in the public-house; he had this piece of solder wrapped up in his working jacket; this weighs 25 lb. (produces it); the largest piece, when I picked it up, was warm; they said they had been at work for Mr. Liptrap; Norman was very much frightened; I went the next day to Mr. Liptrap's, and found two ladles that correspond with the solder. (Produces them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. They both told you where they had been at work? - A. Yes.

Q. And told you who their masters were? - A. Yes, at the Office.

Q. (To Mr. Oakes.) If these men had brought home the solder to your house, you would have weighed it, and accounted for it to Mess. Liptrap's? - A. Yes.

Davis's defence. I had not worked at Mr. Liptrap's for six years before, and I did not know the custom; I have taken it home to my master from other places.

The prisoner Norman called four, and Davis five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-6

66. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a chair, value 6 s. 6 d. the property of Luke Brinckworth .

LUKE BRINCKWORTH sworn. - I live at No. 1, Church-row, St. Luke's : On the 4th of January I lost a japan chair from a set of half a dozen; I know nothing of the loss.

SAMUEL MARR sworn. - I am a chair-maker: Yesterday was a week the prisoner brought me a chair to sell; she asked me 5 s. 6 d. I asked her if she had any more of them; she said, she had half a dozen, and she would sell them one at a time, she was in distress; being a new chair, I suspected it was stolen; I went to several chair-makers, and at last found Mr. Brinckworth had lost a chair; he came with me to look at the chair, and he owned it. - (Produces it.)

Brinckworth. This is my chair.

PETER MASON sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner; she said the chair was her own, that her husband had bought it, and brought it home; she would not tell me her name nor where she lived; I told her she must go to the Magistrate's, and as we went along, she gave the name of Mary Brown ; before the Magistrate, she gave the name of Mary Smith .

Prisoner's defence. I never said I had a husband at all.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined 12 months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-7

67. MARY WARREN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , a seven-shilling piece, six shillings, and a sixpence , the property of John Gallie .

JOHN GALLIE sworn. - On the 27th of last month, I met with the prisoner in Fleet-street, after two o'clock in the morning; she asked me what I would give her to drink; I said, I did not know where to get any thing myself; she took me to the White Horse, in Clare-market ; I spoke to the landlord for some purl, and while I was speaking to him, I found her picking my pocket; I put my hand to my pocket, and missed a seven-shilling piece and six shillings and sixpence; I had been drinking, but knew what I was about; I had been locked out from my lodging, and was very cold; I had counted it about ten minutes before by a lamp near a watchman.

Q. What are you? - A. A journeyman shoemaker ; she then came a second time to my watch; I twisted the chain round my hand, and said, I shall give charge of you; a watchman immediately came in, and I gave charge of her.

WILLIAM RICKMAN sworn. - I am a beadle; the prisoner was brought to me; I searched her, and found a seven-shilling piece and six shillings and sixpence, and an old housewife; there were a great many people in the watch-house; I endeavoured to quell the riot, and she took the money, and put it in her pocket again.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street; I searched the prisoner between eleven and twelve o'clock on Tuesday the 27th of December; I found a seven-shilling piece, two shillings in silver, and a sixpence.

Rickman. I left the prisoner in the watch-house, at six o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner's defence. This man was very much intoxicated, and had not two-pence to pay for a pint of purl.

Q. (To Rickman.) How was Gallie when you saw him? - A. Half drunk.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040111-8

68. WILLIAM BLIGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , ten sacks of foot, value 30 s. the property of William Woodward .

JAMES FOXLEY sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Sixteen; I am apprentice to William Woodward , Marybone-passage, Wells-street ; he is a sweep , the prisoner was his journeyman : On Wednesday morning, I do not know rightly how long ago, a month I dare say, he took away ten sacks of soot; it was taken from the house where we live, my master lives at the next house; he had two men to help him; they took them away about three o'clock in the morning, they were not above an hour and a half; Bligh took them out of the cellar to the top of our passage, and there the men took them of him; I did not know the men before; I told my master of it the Sunday following.

Q. Why did not you tell him next day? - A. I did not see him next day, he was at our other house in Swallow-street.

DANIEL DAVIS called. - I am eight years old.

Q. Do you go to church? - A. Yes, I go to St. Giles's church every Sunday.

Q. Do you know what will happen to you after you are dead if you don't tell the truth? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you never hear what will become of persons who don't tell the truth when they have taken an oath to tell the truth? - A. Yes, they never go to Heaven, they always go to Hell. (Sworn.) I am an apprentice to Mr. Woodward; I live in the same house with Foxley: On a Wednesday morning, about a month ago or better, I saw Bligh take ten sacks of soot away; I counted them; I followed the man with the last sack as far as St. Giles's church; there were three or four men in it; it was all in one morning; the soot was loose in the cellar, and he and another man put it into the sacks; the other man came with a whistle, and then Bligh let him in; I was in the passage, I saw the man go down into the cellar; he looked like a chimney-sweeper, but I did not know any of the men; Foxley was in the back room; Bligh used to send me out in a morning, saying, it was six o'clock, and I saw the man come and go down into the cellar; Bligh brought up the soot in sacks, and then another man came and met him, and took it of him.

- BERRY sworn. - I am twelve years old; I am apprentice to Mr. Woodward, I live in the same house with Foxley and Davis: On a Wednesday morning, about a month ago, Bligh took ten sacks away; a whistle came to the door, and he let the people in; it was three o'clock in the morning; Bligh called us up; I was in the room, I heard the whistle at the door, and Bligh let them in; he called us up to send us out, and I stood in the passage; he sent us to work in Berners-street, and it was too soon; I staid in the passage, and saw the man and Bligh fill the sacks; I could see into the cellar, because the room was broke in; Bligh held the sack, and the man filled it in; then Bligh carried the sack up to the passage, and we ran out, and then he gave the sack to another man, and he took it away; Bligh could not see us.

WILLIAM WOODWARD sworn. - I am the master of these boys; I have several times missed soot: About a month ago, on a Saturday, I missed a quantity of soot from the front cellar; I apprehended the prisoner the Monday following; the cellar was filled up with soot as full as it could hold; I asked him what had become of the soot; he said, he did not know, but it was gone; he had been with me three months all but a week; he said, I had been robbed before he came to me; after he was taken up, he said he would sooner be hanged than tell me who it was that helped him; I had seen it about three weeks before; I had filled the cellar up from Swallow-street several times.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it, I never saw any body near the place; another man, of the name of Tucker, was taken up, and was acquitted before the Magistrate; my master wanted me to swear to him.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040111-9

69. ROBERT REARDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , three pounds six ounces weight of galls, value 5 s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

HENRY MATTHEWS sworn. - I am an assistant elder in the East-India Company's warehouses at Horslydown ; the prisoner was employed as a labourer : On Friday, the 16th of December, about two o'clock, I informed the prisoner I suspected he had some of the Company's property about him; I told him I must insist upon his stripping, and searching him particularly; he saved me that trouble, by confessing that he had them; he said, it is true I have, and gave me some galls out of his waistcoat, I suppose about three pounds, they were in a small canvas bag; I took him to the accompting-house,

in Billiter-lane; Rigge, a constable, was sent for, who searched him again; another bag of galls, very similar to the one I had taken from him, was found; I saw it about a minute after it was found, they were of the same quality with those in the warehouses.

JOHN RIGGE sworn. - I am a constable of Aldgate ward: I was sent for to Billiter-lane on the 16th of December last, about half past two o'clock, to take charge of the prisoner at the bar; I went, and searched him; I found in the after-part of his small clothes this bag of galls, weighing three pounds six ounces, (produces it.) I then went to the prisoner's lodgings in a lane in Horslydown-court, where I found pepper, indigo, borax, loose galls, and a number of other things.

Q. (To Mr. Matthews.) Those are the sort of articles that would be in the India Company's warehouses? - A. We have articles of that description; these are blue galls, and correspond exactly with the galls in the warehouse; he was at work close by this heap of galls; I took him to be a very honest man till this time.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped before the India Company's warehouses in the parish of St. Catherine Cree .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-10

70. ALEXANDER YOUNG , WILLIAM FISHER , and MARY WRIGHT , were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , 96 lb. weight of flax, value 4 l. the property of Isabella, the wife of John Francis ; and the other two, for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of John Francis .

There not being sufficient evidence to make out the charge as stated in the indictment, the prisoners were

All Three ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-11

71. ARTHUR M'GINNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , three pounds two ounces of indigo, value 5 s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

- SHILLETO sworn. - I am an assistant elder in the East-India Company's warehouses in Seething-lane ; the prisoner was a labourer in the warehouses: On the 13th of December, at the usual time of discharging the labourers, I found in the prisoner's pocket about three pounds weight of indigo; I asked him what he had there; I took him into the accompting-house, and took indigo out of his coat pockets on each side; he said, he hoped I would not hurt him; we took him to Billiter-lane, and there he said he had lost half-a-guinea, and wanted to make up his loss by the sale of that indigo; it is of the same quality with that in the warehouses.

( John Rigge , the constable, produced the indigo.)

Shilleto. This is the same sort of indigo; it is worth ten shillings a pound.

Prisoner. It is the first time I was ever guilty of such a thing; I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped before the India Company's warehouse in the parish of Allhallows Barking .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-12

72. SARAH CHESHIRE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Harding , about the hour of five in the night of the 14th of December , and burglariously stealing three silver tea-spoons, value 7 s. and an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of the said John .

JOHN HARDING sworn. - I live in Half-Moon-alley, Bishopsgate-street ; I am a carpenter ; the house is let out in tenements, I rent the second floor; the landlord does not live in the house; it is in the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate: On the 14th of December, a little before five in the evening, the things were lost; I was not at home; I left my children in the room, one about eleven years old, another six years and three quarters, and another about fifteen months; I apprehended the prisoner the next day, and took her to the Police-Office, where she confessed it.

ELIZABETH HARDING sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: On the 14th of December, the prisoner knocked at my door, about five o'clock at night, one of my children opened the door; she asked me how I did; I told her I did not recollect her; she then made herself known to me, by mentioning some friends, and I recollected her; she wanted to know where my mother lived; she wanted her as a chair-woman to go to a place of two days work, where she could not go; she said, she was engaged at Dr. Taylor's; I asked her where she was wanted; she said, the Three Tuns, in Hog-lane, just by where she lived; I told her I should see my mother that night, I was going there directly I cleared the table; I had two bundles of clothes to carry, and she took one for me to the top of Half-Moon-alley into Bishopsgate-street; she then gave me the bundle, I went to my mother's, and asked her if she knew of any chairwoman; she told me, no; I then met the prisoner in Shoreditch; she told me she had been back to Dr. Taylor's, and had her tea; she said, she was going to find where my mother lived; I told her she need not, for my mother knew of no chairwoman;

she turned back, and walked to Hog-lane with me; I then went home, and missed all the spoons I had, there were three of them; I found a spoon and apron that night at a pawnbroker's in Bishopsgate-street, Mr. Davidson's.

ELIZABETH HARDING , Jun. sworn. - I am eleven years old; bad people, who swear false, go to Hell: My father is a carpenter, at No. 12, Half-Moon-alley, Bishopsgate-street; I never saw the prisoner before she came to my father's house on the 14th of last month, when she knocked at the door after five o'clock, and asked my mother how she did. After some discourse, they both went out, and about ten minutes after the prisoner came and knocked at the door, which my little brother opened; she said, she came to stay till my mother came in, and asked how long she would be; I said, not long; she went towards the drawers, and took off her bonnet, and said she would put her cap on; she came towards the fire-place, and scraped her feet on the stove; I was reading, and heard her jingling the glass that stood on the mantle-piece, with one spoon in it; she asked what my mother drank; said, nothing particular; she told me to get a bottle, and she would fetch something against she came in; I gave her a bottle, with which she went out, and never returned; the other two spoons were on the drawers; I was frightened, and did not observe they were gone.

THOMAS MITFORD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 14th of December, about six o'clock, the prisoner pledged an apron and teaspoon; on the same evening, a person came to enquire if I had taken in any tea-spoons; I produced the tea-spoon and apron, which were owned, (produces them.) When the prisoner pledged them, I asked her name, seeing it did not correspond with the letter on the spoon; she said, it was her own, and she had two more.

MARY WILLIS sworn. - On the 14th of December, the prisoner brought two spoons to my shop, which is a silversmith's; I have one, the other was sold the evening after; I cannot swear to her, but I believe it to be her.

(The spoons and apron produced, and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutor's wife has known me for twelve years; I was going past, and stopped ten minutes; she said, she was going to see her mother; we went out, I left her, and did not go back that night.

GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-13

73. ROBERT HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , a chest, value 6 d. six pounds four ounces of tea, value 2 l. 11 s. two pounds weight of coffee, value 16 s. one pound and a half of cocoa, value 7 s. eighty-nine pounds weight of sugar, value 3 l. 19 s. a pint of mustard, value 15 d. four pounds twelve ounces of starch, value 3 s. fourteen pounds of soap, value 11 s. a pound of blue, value 20 d. four ounces of pepper, value 9 d. eight ounces of orange peppermint, value 1 s. four ounces of lemon lozenges, value 1 s. 6 d. six pounds weight of currants, value 5 s. and thirty lemons, value 1 s. the property of James Smith .

JOHN WILCOX sworn. - I am porter to Mr. James Smith , a grocer , No. 79, Tower-street; I was sent with the chest on my knot to Craven-street, about five o'clock in the evening; I saw a waggon in Watling-street, and asked the waggoner to give me a lift; he agreed for me to do so; I went behind it past the Bolt-in-Tun, Fleet-street ; I stepped forward from the tail of the waggon to the waggoner, and asked him where about Craven-street was; I turned round, and saw the chest was gone; I stepped back, and enquired for it; I run after it, and in the third court, named Crown-court, I found two men sitting on it; I pushed his legs on one side, and put my hand on the chest, and said it was my property; I called out stop thief, and the prisoner was stopped in the court.

JAMES SHERRING sworn. - I went up Fisher's-alley with Wilcox, and saw the prisoner sitting on the chest, I did not hear the prisoner say any thing.

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn. - I am a porter to Mr. Abbott, in Fleet-street; I saw two men lugging a chest down a court; Wilcox came running, and enquired about it; we followed them, and found the chest and prisoner.

RICHARD TEMPLEMAN sworn. - I live in Crown-court; I heard a lump against my door, and saw the chest and the prisoner; I took charge of the chest.

(The chest and articles produced, and identified.)

- LAWRENCE sworn. - I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's defence. I am a waterman, and was plying at Blackfriars-stairs; a man came and asked me to carry a chest for him to Pepper-alley, and to help him down with it; I went, and found it too heavy; he asked me to mind it while he went for a porter; I said I would, and while I was watching, four or five men came, and being frightened, I certainly did attempt to escape.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-14

74. WILLIAM HASELDINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , 80 lb. weight of tea, value 24 l. and a chest, value 1 s. the property of William-Storrs Fry , William Fry , and Joseph Fry .

JOHN HALL sworn. - I am a carman in the employ of William-Storrs Fry , William Fry , and Joseph Fry ; I stopped with my cart in Wood-street, at the Castle Inn , between four and five; I left my cart with the chest in it, and went up the yard to get the book signed; I was gone about a quarter of an hour; when I got back, I got up and found the prisoner on the copse of the cart trying to get the chest off, but the cord catching one of the irons, he could not; he had removed it from one side to the other; I saw another standing close to the cart to receive it; the prisoner run away, I followed, and took him.

JOHN LINGALL sworn. - On the 4th of January I was going by Wood-street, I saw the prisoner and another standing under the cart close by the copse; the prisoner jumped up, and moved the chest; the carter took him, and I took the other, who was discharged by the Lord-Mayor, and sent on board a ship.

Prisoner's defence. The copse was full of chests, therefore I could not move one from the other.

Hall. There was only one more chest.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-15

75. MATTHEW MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , eight quarts of wine, value 40 s. and twelve bottles, value 3 s. the property of John Wild and Thomas Wild .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-16

76. ROBERT WOODBOURNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , a block hammer, value 2 s. a tea-pot head-stake, value 3 s. 6 d. a punch, value 2 s. two flat punches, value 2 s. and a pound weight of solder, value 9 d. the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I live at No. 17, Wilderness-row, Goswell-street ; I am a tin-plate worker , the prisoner worked for me: On the 15th of December, I missed a tool, called a tea-pot head-stake; I got a warrant to search the prisoner's lodgings; I found that and a quantity of other things in our line of business; I found a block hammer, three punches, a pound of solder, with my name upon it, and other things; he had left me on the 14th; I took him up at another master's; he made his escape from the officers, but was taken again after a long run, and taken to Worship-street.

JAMES HALL sworn. - I am a Marshalman: I went with a search-warrant with Mr. Smith to No. 8, Silk-street, Grub-street, where the prisoner lodged; the prisoner was not at home; Mr. Smith, went into his room, and in a box in that room, which the landlord said was the prisoner's, I found these tools, (producing them.) I then went to Old-street-square, where the prisoner worked; I went into the work-shop where he was at work, and informed him I wanted him to come to see his master that he had just left; he asked me what it was about; I told him his master was below, and would inform him; when we came out of the house, Mr. Smith was in the square, and he said let me go and speak to my master; I told him it was a charge of felony, and he must go before the Magistrate; he placed his back against the wall, and swore he would not, and forced himself from us, but we caught him again.

JOHN JONES sworn. - I live at No. 8, Silk-street, Cripplegate; the prisoner lodged in my house, he slept with another young man, he had part of a bed; I shewed the officer the room and the box belonging to the prisoner; it was my box, which my wife lent him; the other young man was a shopman in the jewellery line; I had known him some years, he had lodged with me near a twelve-month, and a very respectable character he is; the prisoner had lodged with me five weeks, he kept very regular hours, but I can swear to his bringing this hammer into my house.

Smith. This is my hammer, and the other articles are mine.

Jones. I never saw any thing but what was very honest in him.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Smith was very badly off for tools, and I took my own tools, and his apprentices worked with them as well as myself; Mr. Smith and I had a dispute about the sort of work he gave me to do, and I left him.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-17

77. ANN ROUND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , twenty yards of cotton, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of John Whitehead and William Perkins , privately in their shop .

Mrs. WHITEHEAD sworn. - I am the wife of John Whitehead , a linen-draper , No. 3, Houndsditch , in partnership with William Perkins , he has no other partner: On Wednesday last, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to purchase a gown with another person; they looked at a number, and at last pitched upon one; they said they would not pay for it then, but leave two shillings, and call again, and as they were going out, I saw something projecting under the prisoner's cloak; I came round the counter, and said, I think you have got some of my property; she then dropped a piece of cotton, I laid hold of her at the door, and she dragged me down the street a good way; I

kept my hold of her, and brought her back again, and then she dropped another piece of printed cotton; I then sent for a constable; myself and two sons were in the shop, one of them is here; she struck me several times; there was a woman-servant in the shop at the time, who was a customer; I never saw the prisoner before.

JOHN WHITEHEAD , jun. sworn. - I am the son of the last witness; I am sixteen years old, and my brother about fifteen: I was serving along with my mother, my brother was in the back shop, and I called him into the front shop; he was there during part of the transaction, and another customer was in the shop; I saw the prisoner going out at the door with a bulk under her cloak; my mother stepped round the counter, laid hold of her, and said she had got more she thought than her own; she dragged her down the street a little way, almost two doors; a gentleman laid hold of her, and brought her in; the other woman ran away.

JOHN TOFT sworn. - I am a salesman in Houndsditch, two doors from the prosecutors: On Wednesday, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Whitehead's shop, and Mrs. Whitehead following her; I saw her wrenching something from under the prisoner's cloak; I saw the prisoner strike Mrs. Whitehead, and she was obliged to let her go; Mrs. Whitehead called for assistance, and I went up and took hold of the prisoner; she made some resistance, in the course of which I tore her cloak in the neck; some abusive language came from her, but I insisted upon taking her back; I took her into Mr. Whitehead's shop, and by her manner of twisting about, I was sure she had more property about her; and while an officer was sent for, she wanted to go backwards to be searched; I told her she should not go from where she was, till the officer came; she begged I would let her cloak go, and not use her ill; I then saw a piece of cotton drop from her cloak.

(The property was produced by Edward Davis , the officer, and identified by Mrs. Whitehead, as having a private mark upon it.)

Prisoner's defence. I work at the gun work; I was going to buy a file for my work, and met a young woman, who asked me to go with her to buy a gown-piece; I went with her, she looked at several, and when I was going away, the lady laid hold of me; I am as innocent as the child unborn.

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-18

78. THOMAS TOWNSEND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , four pounds of cocoa, value 10 s. the property of John St. Barbe , John Green , and William Bignell .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of William Hunter .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM HUNTER sworn. - I am a watchman upon Ralph's-quay , the prisoner is a labourer upon the quay: On the 13th of December, I saw him at work between twelve and one o'clock in the day; I saw him again between three and four under the fore-sheet of a lighter; I asked him what he was doing there; he said, mending some bags; I asked him who employed him, and he told me, no one; I called him up three times before he came up; I then took him by the collar, and gave charge of him; I then went into the lighter, and found a coat under the fore-sheet, with cocoa in the pockets; there were two bags over the coat, I had seen the prisoner with the same coat on in the morning; I asked the prisoner what he was going to do with it; he said, the coat did not belong to him; the lighter was loaded with cocoa and coffee, it was in my charge; the prisoner had a fustian jacket on, which he wore under his coat; he had no business on board the lighter at all; we have a regular bag-mender.

- HARDING sworn. - I am a constable: I took charge of the prisoner and some cocoa, (produces the coat and cocoa), I took the prisoner to the Compter; in going along, he told me I had better go with him, we could make it up other ways; he said, it was a bad job, and I took him to the Compter.

WILLIAM BIGNELL sworn. - Messrs. John St. Barbe , John Green , and myself, were the broker s employed upon this occasion: the lighter was laden with cocoa in part.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-19

79. JOSEPH BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , two seven-shilling pieces; a half-crown, twenty-two shillings, and a sixpence , the monies of Robert Chadwick .

ROBERT CHADWICK sworn. - I keep a public-house , No. 47, Great St. Andrew's-street, Seven Dials : The prisoner lived servant with me about ten weeks, I had a good character with him; I had a suspicion of him, I did not like to accuse him with an unjust thing: On Saturday, the 24th of December, I had a party of friends to dine; between six and seven o'clock, I left them, and attended to my business; a customer gave me a seven-shilling piece, with the letter A on the crown side; I laid it on the top of the beer machine, and

went on the other side of the bar to take some change out of another till, gave the gentleman the remainder of the change that was coming to him, and wished him a good evening; I recollected I did not take the seven-shilling piece off the beer machine; no one had been inside the bar but the prisoner; I went into the room, and said, Joseph, did you take a seven-shilling piece off the beer machine; he said, no, I did not, sir; I said, no one else has been in the bar but you; the maid was standing by him, and I desired her to be very particular in sweeping out the bar in the morning: On Thursday, the 29th, I had been to Lambeth; when I came back, I had the prisoner searched; he said he was very sorry for what he had done, he should not have done it, but for the advice of a man, whose company I had often advised him to shun; the seven-shilling piece, and the other money, was found upon him.

WILLIAM ATKINS sworn. - I saw the prisoner produce a purse, containing a seven-shilling piece, with the letter A marked upon it, and the other money.

(The constable produced the money, and the seven shilling piece was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up in the passage.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-20

80. JOHN GIBSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , 3 lb. and a half of pounded sugar, value 4 s. and 3 lb. of Barbary comfits, value 6 s. the property of Henry Barnes .

(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

HENRY BARNES sworn. - I am a grocer and confectioner in Princes-street, Leicester-fields ; the prisoner was my servant : On the 9th of January I gave my servants a supper; after the rest were gone, I observed the prisoner go twice into the confectionary; the second time I heard a rustling of paper among the confectionary goods; he came up stairs, and I opened the door myself, and let him out; I watched him about fifty yards, left the door on the jar, and went down into the confectionary, and found a parcel at the top of the area; I immediately ran up stairs, and found him in the act of taking the parcel from the area; I called the watchman, and he was taken; it was sometime before we could find them, but at last found them upon him. - The property produced.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 24,

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-21

81. JOHN-WILSON HATFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , ninety-seven files, value 1 l. the property of Richard Knight and George Knight .

JAMES BLIGH sworn. - I am shopman to Richard and George Knight , ironmongers , in Foster-lane, Cheapside : On Wednesday last, about one o'clock, the prisoner came to our shop, threw a lock upon the counter, and asked me for a key; I gave him out a drawer with keys to fit a key; he looked at them sometime, and said, there were none that would do, and walked towards the fire; I ordered the boy to get him some more keys, and after the prisoner was gone, the boy informed me he had taken some parcels; I went after him, and in order to induce him to come back, I told him we had got other keys; I then laid hold of his coat, and took a parcel of files out of his pocket; I sent for a constable, and took him up stairs, when we found he had another bundle of files in his breeches; I delivered them to the constable.

SAMUEL DAVIS sworn. - I live with Mr. Knight; Mr. Bligh told me to reach the drawer of keys out, and while I was reaching the keys, I saw him take a parcel, and put it in his pocket; I gave him the drawer of keys, and went to the accompting-house to tell Mr. Richard Knight , and while I was telling him the man went out at the door; I immediately ran after him, telling Mr. Bligh he had taken something out of the shop; Mr. Bligh ran with me, and telling him we had more keys, he came back, and the files were found upon him.

( William Sheppard , an officer, produced three parcels of files, which were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-22

82. JOHN PUGH and MATTHEW MILLER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , eight gallons of wine, value 40 s. the property of John Garcias .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney, and stated by Mr. Knapp.)

Mr. JOHN GARCIAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you live in Finsbury-square ? - A. Yes, and in April last I employed Mess. Wild to bottle off three pipes of port for me; the prisoners came to do it; they had been at my house before; I saw them at work bottling the wine in my cellar; I asked them to be careful in taking away all the ullage, or thick part, into bottles; they said they had, and in order to draw off the wine clearer, they turned the pipe edgeways; they pointed out thirteen bottles, in which they said they had put the ullage of the three pipes; I saw Miller particularly officious, and thought it was occasioned by drinking too much wine; the

pipes were taken out of the cellar before me, and Miller locked the door, and brought me the keys.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You gave no particular directions as to the manner the wine was to be drawn off? - A. No.

Q. When the men went away, did they give you the quantity of wine in the binns? - A. They marked it with chalk on the binns.

Q. Have you since that time had an opportunity of examining those binns? - A. I have.

Q. Have you found the quantity correspond with the numbers? - A. With twenty-two broken bottles found in the middle of the binns, it corresponds with the number; the twenty-two broken bottles might be accident.

Court. Q. How much did you find in the binns? - A. One hundred and fifty-one dozen and nine bottles, including the twenty-two broken ones.

JOHN WILD sworn. - I and my brother are wine-merchants and wine-coopers; the prisoners were our servant s; Pugh has been so nearly twelve years, Miller upwards of six: On Saturday the 30th of April I was with them at Mr. Garcias's, and saw the pipes were full; I thought they would yield fifty-two dozen for each pipe, which would be one hundred and fifty-six dozen, without the grounds, and I should have expected to have found three times thirteen bottles of ullage or grounds at least; I speak within compass when I say thirteen bottles a pipe.

THOMAS SELLWOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you carman to Mr. Wild? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed by them in April last? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sent to Mr. Garcias's house in Finsbury-square in April last? - A. Yes, on a Saturday, to fetch the empty pipes, baskets, and tools home to my masters.

Q. Who did you see there? - A. John Pugh and Matthew Miller , who were servants of my masters, one foreman, the other porter; they were employed to bottle the wine, and had not finished when I went, I helped them; they put one pipe out first, and told me that was the pipe that was to go into my cart first before Mr. Garcias came down, and we got that pipe up stairs first before Mr. Garcias came.

Q. Did you discover there was any thing in it? - A. Yes, I heard the wine shake in it.

Q. Were you to be paid any thing? - A. Yes, they gave me two half crowns for taking it home to Miller's house.

Q. Who desired you to take it home to Miller's house? - A. John Pugh and Mattew Miller.

Q. After you got one pipe up, did you put it into the cart? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you put the others into the cart? - A. After Mr. Garcias came down; he seemed surprised there was no more than thirteen bottles of ullage out of three pipes; but he left the cellar, and we got the other pipes up, and put them into the cart.

Q. Did you discover whether there was any thing in them? - A. No, there was nothing in them.

Q. Where is Miller's house? - A. In Halfmoon-street, Bishopsgate-street; Miller went with me, and Pugh came just afterwards; I saw them both there as soon as the cart stopped; they then got up in the cart, and drew as much wine as they could out of the first pipe with a crane into a wooden can.

Q. Was it wine? - A. Yes, I saw it drawn.

Q. How many times did they fill the can? - A. Three or four times, and carried it into Miller's house.

Q. What did the can contain? - A. I believe the can held four gallons; I saw miller's wife standing at the door at the same time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you employed by Mess. Wild? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you their carman now? - A. No.

Q. You came from prison to-day? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you lived with them? - A. Ten months.

Q. How long have you known the prisoners? - A. When I went to live there.

Q. When you went home, you told your masters what passed? - A. No.

Q. You did not think you had been doing any thing wrong? - A. No.

Q. When you thought they had, you gave an account of it I suppose? - A. I confessed all I knew about it.

Q. You thought there was no harm in carrying away thirteen or fourteen gallons of wine? - A. I knew it was wrong.

Q. Did you not say this moment you did not think you had done any thing wrong? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you then consider it was right or wrong at the time it was done? - A. I knew it was wrong.

Q. Why did you not tell your master? - A. I did not tell him.

Q. Did you discover it as soon as you understood it was wrong? - A. No.

Q. Were you examined before the Lord Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. How often before you discovered the whole of the transaction? - A. Once I believe.

Q. Not more? - A. No.

Q. Did you not at first say you knew nothing about the transaction? - A. Yes.

Q. You were then delivered into custody, and kept in a private room by yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. And after you had undergone private confinement,

you thought fit to accuse the men, and not before? - A. I confessed the truth.

Q. Did you disclose a single tittle of what you have said to day, till you had undergone the discipline of private confinement? - A. No.

Q. What part of the country did you come from? - A. From Wootton Basset.

Q. In what line of life? - A. I lived with a publican.

Q. How came you to leave him? - A. To better myself.

Q. Did you not leave him in consequence of an accusation of your having made free with something? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you never make free with a leg of mutton or so? - A. No.

Q. Did you leave his service in consequence of that, or any other theft? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You come here in custody, being admitted an evidence for the Crown? - A. Yes.

Q. The first time you were examined you did not disclose the circumstances, but the second time you did? - A. Yes.

ANN PARISH sworn. - I live in Halfmoon-street, Bishopsgate-street, opposite Miller's: On Saturday the 30th of April, I was cleaning my windows, and saw Sellwood bring a cart to Miller's house, with two or three pipes in it; I saw the name of Wild on the cart; the cart came in a hurry to the door, and at a single knock the door was opened in a moment; they were all in confusion; one of the pipes was removed a little way by the cops of the cart, and a thing with a cock was put into the bung-hole; two pails lined with copper were then brought; Miller filled the first; they were all assisting as fast as they could; Pugh took in the second in a hurry, and Miller scolded his wife, upon which a pan was brought to the door in the passage, and a pail emptied into it, while Pugh was drawing another; a knock was made at my door, and I was obliged to go down, but I think I saw four pails drawn full, but I will not speak to more than I know; as soon as it was over the things were hurried into the cart, and it drove off as fast as possible. Sometime after my husband sent information to Mr. Wild, as I had seen the cart there several times.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. How long have you lived opposite Miller? - A. About four years.

Q. Did you always go by the name of Parish? - A. No; our real name is Parish; my husband's mother sent to him to inform him that he was by a former husband, and his name was Parish.

Q. You went before the Lord Mayor in December? - A. Yes.

Q. And this took place in April? - A. Yes.

Q. How do you know that? - A. For a particular reason, which I suppose I am not obliged to state.

Q. Can you write? - A. No.

Q. Can you read? - A. Yes.

Q. How far might the cart stand from the door? - A. There is a corner, and our house is in a nook; but the horses heads were towards Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Were there two or three pipes in the cart? - A. There were three no doubt, but I will not be positive.

Q. Have you not, in giving an account of some former transaction, stated there were only two? - A. Not to the best of my recollection.

Q. Have you not said there were only two? - A. I was not positive to be on my oath that there were three, but I think there were.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Pugh called five witnesses and Miller two, who gave them good characters.

Pugh, GUILTY , aged 33.

Miller, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-23

83. MARGARET CARROL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , in the dwelling-house of Robert Orford , a pocketbook, value 6 d. a key, value 1 d. a seven-shilling piece; a Bank-note, value 10 l. two other Banknotes, value 5 l. each; three 2 l. Bank-notes, and five 1 l. Bank-notes, the property of William Davis .

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn. - Q. Were you in the employment of Mr. Robert Orford ? - A. Yes.

Q. What is he? - A. A silversmith.

Q. Where does he live? - A. At No. 71, Oxford-street.

Q. Is he a housekeeper there? - A. Yes.

Q. What parish is it in? - A. St. Mary-le-bone .

Q. In what way were you employed? - A. As shopman .

Q. Do you live in the house now? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been with him? - A. Near eight years.

Q. In December last did you live in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time miss any of your property? - A. Yes.

Q. When was that? - A. The 17th of December.

Q. What time of the day? - A. About six o'clock in the evening.

Q. What did you miss? - A. A pocket-book.

Q. From whence? - A. From my box.

Q. Where was that standing? - A. At the bottom of the kitchen-stairs, near the kitchen-door.

Q. How had you left the box? - A. Locked.

Q. How was it when you missed the pocketbook? - A. It was locked then; I was obliged to get a blacksmith to pick it.

Q. What had become of the key? - A. I had

lost the key as I thought out of a hole in my pocket, but I have since found it.

Q. What was there in the pocket-book? - A. One ten-pound note, two five-pound notes, three two-pound notes, and five or six one-pound notes, which, I cannot be positive, all Bank of England notes, a seven-shilling piece, and a new sixpence.

Q. How near the time of your missing them had you seen them in this box? - A. I had seen them the Friday before the Tuesday she went away.

Q. You mean the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. How long after she went away was it you missed them? - A. She went away on the Tuesday, and I did not miss them till the Saturday; I missed the key the morning she went away.

Q. Was she a servant in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had she been so? - A. Near six months.

Q. Did you ever see your pocket-book or key again? - A. I saw them the night she was taken, which was the 22d of December.

Q. In whose possession? - A. She took the pocket-book out of her pocket, and gave it to me; I gave it to Smith, the officer.

Q. Where was that? - A. At the Hole-in-the-Wall, King-street, Westminster.

Q. Were you there when she was apprehended? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you see the key? - A. The key was found in her pocket by Smith; I saw him find it.

Q. Were there any notes in it? - A. Eleven pounds; he opened it, and told what was in it; she was then taken to St. Martin's watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This young woman lived in the house with you? - A. Yes.

Q. You were in the habit of making her presents? - A. Never.

Q. Did you never give her possession of your key? - A. Never; there were two boxes, one at the top of the stairs with my clothes in it; the lock of that box was broke, and I have asked her to bring so and so out of my box of clothes; I slept below, and she up stairs; the other box below contained my books, and was never left unlocked; but I carelessly left the key in my great coat pocket, and I never saw it till it was produced from her.

Q. Have you never happened to make her a present of a watch? - A. Never.

Q. You never gave her permission to use your key? - A. Never; the Sunday preceding there was no one in the house but herself; the family were all out.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am one of the conductors of the patrol at Bow-street.

Q. Did you go with the last witness to the Hole-in-the-Wall, in King-street, Westminster? - A. Yes, on the 22d of December.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there? - A. She was sitting in the tap-room.

Q. Did she produce any thing from her pocket? - A. Yes, this pocket-book. - (Produces it.)

Q. Was any thing in it? - A. Three two-pound notes, and five one-pound notes.

Q. Did you search her pockets? - A. Yes, I found three keys. - (Produces them.)

Q. (To Davis.) Look at that pocket-book? - A. It is mine.

Q. Is that the book you missed from the box? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the key of the box? - A. This is the key of my box.

Q. Is that the key you left in your great coat? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you speak to the notes? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. Does any body live in the house with your master as partner? - A. No.

RICHARD BENNETT sworn. - Q. What do you know of this? - A. I was present when she was apprehended and searched.

Q. Did you see a key and pocket-book delivered to Davis? - A. Yes; we went into a back room, and she went down upon her knees, and begged several times for me to intercede for forgiveness, and said, she was sorry for what she had done, and she would get a gentleman to make up the money.

GUILTY, Death , aged 19.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, on the presumption of it being her first offence .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040111-24

84. SARAH BLAKE and THOMAS BARRY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a loaf, value 9 d. two pounds of veal, value 1 s. six pounds of soap, value 4 s. a bag, value 2 d. and a towel, value 2 d. the property of George Roberts .

GEORGE ROBERTS sworn. - I am a grocer In Fore-street, the corner of Coleman-street ; Blake lived cook with me about five weeks; I missed several articles: In consequence of my suspicions, she was watched on Sunday evening, the 1st of January; I set out to go to chapel; my apprentice gave me some information, I went home, and waited sometime, and saw Thomas Barry come to the door, and without knocking or ringing, the door was opened; he went in, and returned into the street with a bundle; he waited about three or four minutes in the street, when Blake came out, and they went off together; my apprentice and I followed them to Old Bedlam; she made a stop, I went up to the man, and asked him what he had got; he said he could not tell; I asked him where he brought it from; he said, he could not tell; I

said, I could tell him, but where was he going to carry it; he said, he could not tell, he had it from that young woman. During our conversation, she walked off; we took him into a public-house, and sent for a constable; I opened the bundle, there was a quartern loaf, and about two pounds of fillet of veal, which we had had for dinner, and two cakes of mottled soap; the man and woman were taken to the Compter; we went to where the man said he lodged, but could not find it, but found it to be in Vine-court, not at the place he stated.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Whether he had taken those things into the house, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. Have the things any mark by which you know them? - A. No, I cannot swear to any of them.

HENRY GILBERT sworn. - I am the apprentice, and coming down stairs, I saw the cook talking to Barry at the private door; at my appearance, the man went away confused, as I thought, and I informed Mr. Roberts; we saw him go in, and come out with a bundle; he had none when he went in.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long he had been at the door, you cannot say? - A. About two minutes.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he could not carry the bundle in with him? - A. I am sure of it, because I came down stairs at the time she did, and I am sure no bundle came in with the man.

- SUMNER sworn. - I am a constable, and searched the prisoner's boxes, and found a large quantity of soap and tea.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Barry called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-25

85. JOHN NICHOLSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , one hair front for the forehead, value 5 s. the property of Alexander Ross .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

ALEXANDER ROSS , jun. sworn. - My father lives in Bishopsgate-street : The prisoner was his servant , and he was at work on a front of hair in a work-shop; I took notice of it, it was a light brown. Next day, I saw it hung up in the hair-room, on the bell-pull; the day after, it was gone, and a dark one put in its place; I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and saw the same front which I had seen in the hair-room.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Your's is a considerable manufactory? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner, I believe, got 200 l. a year?

A. Yes, wages and perquisites.

Q. This hair is valued at five shillings? - A. Yes.

Q. You have a great number of fronts in your warehouse of the same colour? - A. Yes, but not of the same make; this is of a peculiar make, and I should be able to distinguish it from any other; we never made one in that way before.

Q. Had the prisoner a power of selling any articles? - A. He had.

Mr. Gurney. Q. When he sold any thing, was he not expected to render an account of it? - A. Yes, to bring the money, and enter it in a book.

JOHN MORGAN sworn. - I saw the prisoner making up the front which was found in his lodgings, and asked him who it was for; he said, for a lady, who was to call, of the name of Thomas, or Thompson; I asked him what the price was, in case she should call; he said, seven shillings; I thought it too little; he said he had agreed for it, and could not charge higher; I paid particular attention to it, and am quite sure this is the same; he never accounted for the sale of it, but told me he had pinned it up to the bell-rope in the hair-room.

Mr. Knapp. Q Did you ever call upon him to account for it? - A. No, I frequently asked whether the lady had called; he said, no.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am an officer, and searched the prisoner's lodgings, No. 13, Peter-street, Half Moon-alley, where I found a quantity of hair, and this front in a cupboard.

(The front was produced, and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. If a lady comes into the shop for an article, and chooses that which is made for a customer, we sell that, and make another for the person who bespoke it, rather than lose the sale; so it was in this case; I had the hair myself, and made the one which is produced for a friend of mine; I made it up on a Sunday, and I believe a person is here who called upon me at the time, and saw me making it.

(The person was called, but did not appear.)

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-26

86. SARAH BLAKE was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , a tippet, value 2 s. the property of Eliza Prim .

ELIZA PRIM sworn. - I live with Mr. Freake, son-in-law to Mr. Roberts: On the 29th of November, I lost a tippet; I left it at Mr. Roberts's, in Fore-street ; when I came to town again, I asked the prisoner for it; she said she had never seen it, or had it, but it was found in her box.

CHARITY BLYTHE sworn. - I was servant to Mr. Roberts; the prisoner said I might put my things in her box, and shewed me a tippet, which she said she gave half-a-crown for.

RICHARD SUMNER sworn. - I searched their boxes, and found the tippet in Barry's box. (The tippet was produced and identified.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-27

87. JEREMIAH SLOP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , nine pounds weight of pewter, value 5 s. the property of Robert-Percy Hodge .

ROBERT-PERCY HODGE sworn. - I am a pewterer , at No. 61, Whitecross-street ; the prisoner was a labourer to me for upwards of seven years: On the 7th of December, he was detected with the pewter.

GEORGE OLIVER sworn. - I am a journeyman to Mr. Hodge, and had a suspicion of the prisoner; I marked a pewter plate, and put it on the drawers in the shop at watering time; I staid to watch, but it remained till next day; I did not stay to watch that day, but when I came back to work, I missed it; one of my shop-mates came to me, and we informed my master, and after work we hustled the prisoner as he went out, and felt the pewter; he fell down on his knees, and said, O Lord, O Lord, what shall I do? The plate was found between his waistcoat and shirt, and a quantity of small pieces in his breeches, above nine pounds; we found at his lodgings a piece of metal in a closet, melted in a frying-pan.

( John Mills , the constable, produced the pewter, which was identified.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor .

Whipped in the jail , confined one month in Newgate , and whipped again.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-28

88. SAMUEL FULMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , a bushel of coals, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of our Sovereign Lord the King .

MARY THORPE sworn. - I am house-keeper at the Treasury, Whitehall : On the 23d of November last, I had a quantity of coals belonging to his Majesty; I have known the prisoner a great many years, and never had cause to suspect him; he was employed to carry coals from the cellar to the different apartments; he had no order to send out coals for me; he has been continued as lamplighter up to this day.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH sworn. - I am an officer: On the 23d of November, about half past six o'clock in the morning, I met John Jones with a bag; I asked him what he had there, he was confused; I took him to the watch-house, and examined the bag, and found coals; I then apprehended the prisoner, and told him I had taken Jones, who said he had the coals of him; he said he had given him a few coals, as the man had a large family, and was very sorry for it.

JOHN JONES sworn. - In November, the officer met me with a sack of coals, which were given me by Mr. Fulmer at the Treasury.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You asked him to let you have a few coals, and he gave you a few out of compassion? - A. Yes.

Q. He had no advantage by them - you did not pay him any thing? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-29

89. JUDITH DOWNES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James-Sebastian Willimot ; about the hour of eight in the night, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing twenty yards of printed-cotton, value 30 s. and eight yards of Scotch plaid, value 8 s. his property .

The Court being of opinion there was no evidence to fix the prisoner with the burglary, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-30

90. JOHN HEATH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , fifty pounds weight of hay, value 20 s. the property of Abraham Vickery .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

- HUMPHREYS sworn. - I am a gardener to Mr. Vickery at Edgeware : I know the prisoner; we missed some hay from Mr. Vickery's, we set up to watch. About three o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the rick, and cut some hay, and took it away; we took him with the hay upon him; he said he took it for his horses, but he had a sufficient quantity cut for him.

Prisoner's defence. I took it for my master's horses, for I had not sufficient.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-31

91. MARY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a blanket, value 3 s. a pillowcase, value 6 d. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of James Hill , in a lodging-room .

ANN HILL sworn. - On the 10th of December the prisoner took an apartment furnished of me, at No. 4, Eagle-street, Red-Lion-street , and was to pay weekly for it four shillings; I gave her the

sheets and the keys. On Monday morning, about half past ten, she came home in liquor; I went up stairs, and asked her to let me look if the blankets were clean, when I found a pair of sheets, one pillow-case, one flat iron, and one blanket, were gone; she said her husband was a watchman upon the water; and asked for a pen and ink to write to him; she was taken up, and the Justice committed her; she owned to having taken the things, and pulled the duplicate out of her bosom of a sheet.

Prisoner's defence. I told Mrs. Hill she should have her things in twenty-four hours if she would not hurt me; she said that was all she wanted, and would not hurt me.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-32

92. FRANCES CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , ten yards of calico, value 15 s. the property of Joseph Birch .

JOSEPH BIRCH sworn. - I live at Upper Clapton , and am a calico printer , the prisoner worked for me about two years: On the 12th of December, I had a parcel of pieces to print; I gave them to her to look over, and see they were not damaged; she came and told me one piece ran short, that there was only half a piece; I said, it must have been cut on my premises; I took the piece with me to the person I had it from, and he said it must have been cut at my place; the thread was rent; that passed on till the next Tuesday; the prisoner did not come to work that week; in consequence of information, I found the calico at a mantua-maker's in Sandford-lane, Stoke Newington; I saw a gown made up laying on the table, and the end of the cotton, which matched with mine, laying by it; I had the prisoner taken up to Worship-street. (Produces the piece found at the mantua-maker's.)

ELIZABETH JOHNSON sworn. - I am a mantua-maker, in Sandford-lane: On Tuesday evening, the 12th of December, about eight o'clock, the prisoner brought me ten yards of cotton, and asked me if I could make a gown and coat that week; I said I was busy, but if she particularly wanted it, I would do it; she said, it was not for her, but a young woman, and if I fitted her, it would fit the young woman, who was the same size; she came on Saturday, and asked if it was done; I said, yes; she said, she would take the petticoat, and leave the gown till Monday, and I did not see her again; the piece found there was part of the ten yards she brought. (Produces the gown.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-33

93. MARY ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , two pieces of cotton, containing together nine yards, value 1 l. 12 s. the property of William Woollatt , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM WOOLLATT sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in Holborn; I know nothing of the robbery.

JOHN OLD sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Woollatt, No. 53, Holborn-hill : On Monday, the 26th of December, the prisoner, in company with another woman, came to ask to look at some gown pieces; I shewed them a number, and the other woman purchased six yards, for which she paid two shillings in part payment; they went out, and I went to the door; the woman who purchased the gown turned and looked behind her; I thought her countenance was much confused; I got my hat, and went after them, and when I got to Bartlett's-buildings, I saw the prisoner running very fast; I ran after her, she stopped, and said, if you will forgive me, Sir, I will give you up the property; I took hold of her hand, and desired her to walk back with me, which she did, and put her hand to her pocket-hole, and pulled out two gown pieces of four yards and a half each.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You dealt with the other woman? - A. Yes.

Q. That occasioned you to follow them? - A. Yes, I had hardly left them a moment.

Q. During the time you got your hat, might not the woman who you served have given the prisoner the cotton? - A. I am sure the other woman did not take any thing.

Q. Were there other people in the shop? - A. Yes, Mr. Woollatt, and his brother, who is not here; and there might be others.

(The pieces produced, and identified.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-34

94. THOMAS MOPPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , four shirts, value 12 s. a table-cloth, value 6 d. two waistcoats, value 2 s. 6 d. seven stockings, value 1 s. a night-cap, value 2 d. and a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John Young .

JOHN YOUNG sworn. - I live at No. 70, New Compton-street , and belong to Covent-Garden theatre: On the 7th of last December, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was brought to my door with the things in a bundle; the linen was wet.

- RIMINGTON sworn. - I am a watchman of St. James's parish, and saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Young's house, between seven and eight

o'clock in the morning, with the things; I asked him what he had there; he said, they were his own property; a boy was with him, who ran away, and I caught hold of the prisoner; he did not know I was behind him; I took him to Mr. Young's house; he wanted to give me the things to let him go, but I would not; I knocked at the door, and informed Mr. Young.

- BAKER sworn. - I am a Police-officer; I searched him, and found nothing material.

(The property produced, and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down Compton-street, and saw that witness with a stick and watch-coat on, and saw the things laying at the door; I spoke to him twice, and he passed me, and let me go two streets off before he took me.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-35

95. JOHN THILTHORPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , twelve Bank of England notes for ten pounds each, value 120 l. ninety-eight Bank of England notes for one pound each, fourteen Portsmouth Bank-notes, value 10 l. each, and one Bridport Bank-note, value 10 l. the property of William Burrage , the elder , and William Burrage , the younger .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Samuel Heaven and John Cross .

Third Count. Charging them to be the property of Samuel Heaven only. And

Fourth Count. Charging them to be the property of persons unknown.

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

Mr. WILLIAM BURRAGE , Jun. sworn. - I live at Portsmouth; my father, William Burrage , is a timber-merchant , we are in partnership: On the 26th of October last, I transmitted by the Portsmouth mail-coach some notes to my father in London at the Angel Inn; there were forty-nine ten-pound notes of the Portsmouth and Hampshire Bank, and one ten-pound which I received in the morning by post from a clerk of our's at Lime, a Bridport note; I sent them in a parcel by the mail, that was the only parcel that went that evening in a brown paper, stringed and sealed, directed to Mr. William Burrage , Angel Inn, St. Clement's, London ; Walford, our clerk, was present; the amount of the whole sent was five hundred pounds; I delivered it to Walford to take it to the mail-coach office; I have seen the Bridport note since in the possession of Smith, the officer; to the best of my knowledge it is the same note I sent; there was only one Bridport Bank-note.

RICHARD WALFORD sworn. - I am a clerk of Messrs. Burrages, and was present at the time Mr. Burrage put up the notes on the 26th of October; there was a Bridport note; I took them to the coach-office at Portsmouth, and saw it booked, and paid two-pence; it was No. 20; I delivered it into the hands of one of the proprietors, named Bonamy.

JOHN DRAYTON sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Burrages: On the 24th of October I was at Lime on their business, and transmitted to them a Bridport note for ten pounds, dated 7th September, 1802, No. 1163, with the letter E before the number; I have seen it since I put it into the letter at Clerkenwell Sessions-house, and am sure it is the same note, but I observed the date has been altered, for I copied the date at the time I sent it.

WILLIAM HOARE sworn. - I am book-keeper at the Angel Inn; Samuel Heaven is the proprietor of the coach business ; the business of the prisoner was coach-washer and lamp-lighter in the yard, he was discharged on the 12th of November; he had been with us about three years; he was in our service on the 26th of October; I have a copy of the way-bill; no paper parcel came on that day to the name of Burrage, though it was entered in the way-bill; after that time the prisoner neglected his business, and after his discharge I saw him, but saw no difference in his appearance.

Mr. Alley. Q. Was it not the prisoner's duty to assist about the Portsmouth mail-coach? - A. It was his place to push the coach out after it was unloaded; he had no concern in unloading the coach.

- BROWN sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Mastermans, bankers, in White-Hart-court, Lombard-street; I believe the prisoner is the person I changed ten Portsmouth notes for on the 24th of November, they were payable at our house; nobody was with him; I paid him ten ten-pound Bank of England notes, No. 2706, dated 4th of October; No. 7923, 11th of July; No. 3882, 17th of September; No. 8285, 12th of October; No. 5657, 5th of October; No. 3149, 9th of November; No. 6907, 15th of November; No. 9131, 20th of July; No. 5089, 11th of July; and No. 8485, 11th of November; for ten Portsmouth notes; I saw the prisoner afterwards at Bow-street, and believe him to be the man; I took notice of him, because on the same day a woman came with ten Portsmouth notes, and was asked what others she would have in exchange; she said, it was a matter of indifference; the clerk gave her one hundred notes, of one pound each, and desired her to count them, which she declined, although he pressed her to do it; she said, she dared to say they were all right; she went out, and no other person came in till the prisoner, about five minutes after, and tendered me ten of the Portsmouth Banknotes of ten pounds each; I thought it extraordinary that two persons should come to close together, having the same quantity of Portsmouth Banknotes; I asked him what notes he would have; he said, it was immaterial; I gave him ten ten-pounds.

From the vast number of notes we pay, we do not take person's names; it frequently occurs that sailors have a quantity of those notes, and I thought it possible the prisoner might be one, and I did not ask him his name. About half an hour afterwards, a gentleman came in, and asked me if I knew that a parcel containing Portsmouth Bank-notes had been lost; I said, no. In the course of the morning, Mr. Burrage came to stop them, and I told him I had paid ten of them.

Court. Q. The man coming with ten notes so immediately after the woman excited your attention? - A. Yes, it did very particularly.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a Bow-street officer, and produce some notes which I took in the house of the father of the prisoner at Great Ellenborough, in Norfolk, on the 9th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock; I apprehended the prisoner in his father's bake-house; I searched him, and told him I had come about a robbery of the Portsmouth mail-coach; he said, he knew nothing of it; I searched his wife and him, but found nothing; I then went up stairs with them, and searched a box which she opened, and attempted to take this book, but I prevented her; it contained ninety-eight one-pound notes, fourteen Portsmouth Banknotes of ten pounds, a ten-pound Bridport Banknote, and twelve ten-pound Bank of England notes; I put them into the book again, and brought them and the prisoner to town. Coming to town, he said he found the notes in the Angel yard among some straw, and that the pigs had been routing them about.

(Seven of the ten-pound Bank of England notes and the Bridport note produced, and identified.)

WILLIAM BURRAGE , Sen. sworn. - I never received the parcel sent by the coach.

Prisoner's defence. I found the parcel in the coach-house amongst the straw that comes out of the different mail-coaches, on the 24th of October.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-36

96. JAMES HUGHES and MARY HOWSTER were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , a quart pewter pot, value 20 d. the property of Joseph Kiddy ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

JOSEPH KIDDY sworn. - I keep the Two Sugar Loaves, Queen-street, Drury-lane : On the 4th of December, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner, Hughes, was drinking in my house; he went away in about half an hour, and in about twenty minutes, or half an hour after, the pot was missing; my wife went out after him, and the servant with her; they brought the prisoner into the house, I accused him of stealing the pot; he stood sometime, but did not say any thing; the first he said was, on conditions, on conditions. I then sent him to the watch-house, and very soon after, the watchman came in; he pulled sixpence out of his mouth, and said, he had sold the pot for that; I asked him where he had sold it; he said, in Lewkner's-lane, which is now called Charles-street ; he said, he would shew the watchman where the place was; we went with him, and he kept us walking backwards and forwards, and would not inform us of the place; we took him to the watch-house, and the constable of the night asked him what kind of woman it was he had sold the pot to, and he said, he thought he could find her; I went with the constable of the night, and the prisoner went likewise, and he then took us to the house; we knocked at the door, it was not fast, and we shoved it open; it was then about twenty minutes past ten o'clock; the constable and the watchman went up stairs with a lantern, and knocked at the door; the prisoner, Howster, came down stairs; the constable said to Hughes, is this the woman you sold the pot to, and he said, yes, that is the woman I sold the pot to for sixpence; she declared to God she had never seen the man in her life; then the constable asked her where the pot was; she seemed quite confused, and at last asked for the keys of the shop; the constable went in with her, and found my quart pot amongst others; we then took them both to the watch-house.

WILLIAM COMBES sworn. - I was in Mr. Kiddy's house when the pot was missing: I saw Hughes in the tap-room, and he said he had sold it for sixpence; I went with him to the watch-house; he said he had sold it in Charles-street, at an iron-shop; we went to find it out; we went up and down Charles-street three times, and he pretended he could not find it out; then we took him to the watch-house; he then described her as a short thick woman; the constable knew something of her, and we all went to Lewkner's-lane together, the sixpence was deposited in my hands; when we went to the house, we knocked at the door, Mrs. Howster came down; at first, she made an excuse, and then she opened the shop-door, and we found the pot in the shop.

WILLIAM BENTLEY sworn. - I was constable of the night: On Sunday evening, the 4th of December, about half past ten o'clock, the prisoner, Hughes, was brought into the watch-house by the watchman, Mr. Kiddy, and William Combes , charged with stealing a quart pot; I asked Kiddy if he saw the prisoner take the pot; he said he had not, but that he had confessed he had sold the pot to a woman in Lewkner's-lane; I asked him what he had sold it for; he told me he had sold it for sixpence, and he was distressed, or he would not have done so; I asked him if he should know the

person, if he saw her; he said he should, it was down at the lower end of the street; I suspected then where the pot was; I immediately went with the prosecutor, the watchman, Combes, and the prisoner; the door was just put too; I pushed it open, it was not latched; I then called, hoy; some woman answered from the top of the stairs; I heard a little bustle, I desired the watchman to put his lantern behind him, and follow me up; Howster and another woman were in the room, they seemed to be in the act of undressing; she had her gown and shawl off, the other woman had her stays off; the prisoner, Howster, keeps the shop, as I have always understood; I told her I wanted her down stairs, she seemed surprized, and asked if any thing was amiss; I told her to come down stairs, she came down into the passage with me; I asked Hughes if that was the woman who had bought the pot, and given him sixpence for it, and he said it was, three or four times over, and he would swear it; she replied, I don't know any thing of you, I never saw you in my life; I told her I must be under the necessity of looking for the pot; she called for the keys, took me into a room backwards, and then into another room; she stooped down by the side of the door, and said, is this the pot; I said, yes, that is the pot, (Produces it); the prosecutor immediately claimed it.

(The pot was identified by the prosecutor.)

Hughes's defence. I did not steal the pot.

Howster's defence. I never saw the man, nor the pot.

For the prisoner.

ANN SMITH sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A chairwoman.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At Mr. Cooke's, a broker, in Charles-street, I live in one of his back rooms: On the Sunday night, about six weeks ago, I was nursing a lodger in the house; I went into the yard for a pitcher of water, and found a quart pot lying in the yard, the water-tub is sunk in the ground; it was about half past nine o'clock at night; I picked it up, and said, here is one of Mr. Lee's pots; I thought it belonged to the publican over the way, and I put it down in the passage.

Q. You did not look to see whose pot it was? - A: No; I supposed some of the lodgers had taken it to get water in it.

Q. Were you in the prisoner's room when the constable came? - A. No.

Q. Had it a spout? - A. I don't recollect.

JOHN FERGUSON sworn. - I came down between eight and nine o'clock at night, and saw Ann Smith coming out of the yard with a quart pot in her hand; she said, somebody had left a pot of Mr. Lee's in the yard, and she put it into the passage in Mrs. Howster's back place.

Prosecutor. There was a pot of Mr. Lee's there, and he had it.

Hughes, GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Howster, GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-37

97. THOMAS KINMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , a deal box, value 5 s. twenty-four pounds weight of powder, value 18 s. twenty-four pounds weight of violet powder, value 22 s. twenty-four pounds weight of pomatum, value 8 s. twenty-four powder puffs, value 25 s. 6 d. lavender water, value 19 s. 6 d. one pound weight of senna, value 6 s. 6 d. four pounds weight of Windsor soap, value 5 s. 4 d. friars balsam, value 8 s. six pounds weight of brown candy, value 8 s. two pounds weight of peppermint lozenges, value 6 s. one pound weight of candied lemons, value 16 d. one pound weight of candied orange, value 16 d. and fourteen pounds weight of bay salt, value 10 s. the property of Ann Frood .

And in five other Counts, charging them to be the property of other persons.

JAMES CLARK sworn. - I am a waggoner: On Monday, the 19th of December, the waggon was loaded in the evening at the White Hart, St. John's-street; I loaded the waggon, and the porters brought the goods to me in the waggon; I loaded this box, about six o'clock, on the off side of the waggon between the wheels, about half way under the hoops; the tilt was on, but not all hooped. On Tuesday morning, the 20th. I set off about a quarter before four o'clock; I followed the tail of the waggon, till I got off the stones, with a candle in my hand; I then got into the waggon, with the candle alight open in my hand; I rode on to the Peacock, I believe the sign is, between the Angel and the weigh-bridge. I am sure the box was there then; being very dark, I wished the man that goes with me, to stand at the door while I had my purl; then we went on till we came to the weigh-bridge, I did not get into the waggon again; when I got there, the candle blew out; I went in where the man stands at the gate, and lit it again, the waggon might stop there about a minute; when I got over the stones at Islington, I missed the box; I went back, and met the patrols, who told me, they had got the box, and the man; I am sure the box was there when the waggon stopped at the weigh-bridge; I found the box at the watch-house, and the prisoner in custody; they asked me if I knew the box; I told them, yes; the sheet of the waggon was cut about half a yard in length, and three or four strings that tied it down were cut.

Q. Was it cut sufficiently to let the box out? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It was very dark when the waggon went out? - A. Yes.

Q. How lately had you seen the box before you missed it? - A. It might be a quarter of an hour.

Q. You are the waggoner? - A. Yes.

Q. You are not answerable for this property? - No; it is put under my care whilst I get home.

JAMES READ sworn. - I am a patrol: On the 20th of December, I was stationed at Islington-green , behind the back part of the houses. About three o'clock, I heard there were some loose chaps about the town, and I kept on the watch; we came to the front of the town, in consequence of that. I heard the waggon come by about a quarter past three; we concealed ourselves in a lane, and about half past four, I was standing at the very corner, opposite the watch-house, and saw a man, who has been discharged, and then the prisoner came up to me, laid his hand upon my shoulder, and said, where are they; says he, I have just turned it out in the middle of the road; I did not know the prisoner at the time he spoke, as I took him to be my partner patrol; I was not convinced till my brother patrol immediately ran up from the other corner of the lane, and laid hold of him, and then he said directly, he wanted to ease himself; I was convinced then of his being the man, and secured him; I then ran to take the other, who was in waiting; he was discharged through a good character, and this prisoner declaring he was innocent; my fellow patrol took the prisoner to the watch-house; I went down the town to see if I could find any more of them, but could not; and coming back, my partner called out, I have got the swag; that was the box.

CHARLES LACK sworn. - I am a patrol: I heard there were three idle fellows about, and about half past four, we came out by the Wheatsheaf, between the weigh-bridge and the church; I heard some persons talking, and saw three talking together, I am sure the prisoner was one of them; I don't know that I ever saw him; I heard some person move a box on the road at the same time; after that, the prisoner drew from the place, I looked at him all the while, and went up to my partner; he tapped him on the shoulder, and said, where are they? I have turned it out in the middle of the road. I then took him to the watch-house; I went back to the place, and found the box on one side of the road; I took it to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You never saw the prisoner before? - A. Never, that I know of.

Q. It was very dark? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you an opportunity, from the light of the night, to observe the person of any man? - A. Yes, I saw three persons.

(The box was identified by Clarke.)

JOHN TALBOT sworn. - I am a porter at the inn; I took this box out of the warehouse, and gave to James Clarke in the waggon; I am sure it is the same box.

Q. Who is the proprietor of the waggon ? - A. Ann Frood .

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Highgate; the patrol laid hold of me; I told him I was going to ease myself, my breeches were unbuttoned at the time; I was taken to the watch-house.

Read. Immediately after he found we were not his palls, he endeavoured to unbutton his breeches.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-38

98. CORNELIUS MAHONEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , 2 lb. of copper, value 2 s. the property of William Edridge .

JAMES HURN sworn. - I am clerk to William Edridge , a copper and brass-founder , and has a manufactory at Goswell-place , where the prisoner worked; I know nothing of the loss.

JAMES FROST sworn. - I work for Mr. Edridge. On the 1st of December, in consequence of having missed some copper, I marked three pieces, and gave them to Harrison and Ritchie, and they put an additional mark to them; the next day they suspected the prisoner, and I went after him; he had got about forty or fifty yards from the premises; I called to him to come back; he asked what I wanted; I told him, from the appearance of his coat, I thought he had something that was not his own; he turned his left pocket to me, and took out this copper, which I can swear to be my master's property.

- HARRISON sworn. - This is the same piece of copper that I marked; it is my master's property.

- RITCHIE sworn. - This is the same that I marked.

Prisoner's defence. I found it on a heap of dust outside the gate.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-39

99. JOHN PORTER , ELIZABETH PORTER , and SARAH CARTER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , two drakes, value 3 s. three ducks, value 3 s. a cock, value 2 s. and three hens, value 6 s. the property of John Baddeley .

JOHN BADDELEY sworn. - I live in Basket-alley, Golden-lane , I am an oilman ; the poultry were in a yard adjoining almost to the dwelling-house; I locked them up on the 14th, between the hours

of five and seven; about half past eight the next morning I unlocked the door, and found they were all taken out; I then spoke to one of the constables of the parish, and between eleven and twelve o'clock the same day, I saw them again in a room where all the prisoners were; the constable sent for me; they were dead and picked, excepting the heads and pinions; they were marked exactly as mine were, I believe them to be mine, but I cannot swear positively to them; the number and the marks are exactly the same as mine; others might be like mine.

- JAQUES sworn. - I am an officer of the parish of St. Luke's: On Thursday the 15th of December I was informed of Mr. Baddeley's loss; I went to Porter's apartment in Green-arbour-court, Golden-lane; I knocked at the door about a minute, and saw John Porter sitting on the right-hand side of the fire-place, with his coat off, picking some fowls, and a great quantity of feathers near the fire-place; I asked him how he came by them; he made no reply; he said, if I would settle it, he would give me any money I required; he repeated that four or five times more; I searched the place, and found two drakes, three ducks, a cock fowl, and three hens; I then sent for Mr. Baddeley; Carter was close to Porter, and said to me, can't you settle it; Mr. Baddeley said they were his.

JOHN LEWIS sworn. - I went with the last witness to Porter's house; he was picking a duck; he wanted us to settle it; I sent for Mr. Baddeley, and he claimed them.

FRANCIS BIRD sworn. - I am a watchman; I went with the last witness to the prisoners' apartment; I went to fetch Mr. Baddeley.

John Porter 's defence. The property was left while I was out.

The prisoner Porter called four witness, who gave him a good character.

All three NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-40

100. THOMAS PROCTOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , two quarts of oil, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Couldrey .

WILLIAM COULDREY sworn. - The prisoner worked for me four days; I know nothing of it myself.

THOMAS-SIMS COULDREY sworn. - I am the son of the last witness, who is a lamp-contractor ; the prisoner was one of our lamp-lighter s; he commenced working for my father on the 3d. Having a suspicion, I went on the 6th to look after him on the Stamford-hill Road ; I found him lighting his work between five and six o'clock, with a stone bottle strapped to the side of his ladder; he seemed confused, and I asked him to let me have some of his burners, to see if the oil was chilled; I looked at half a dozen, which I made him bring down to me, and there was not one that had one-third of the oil that was allowed; I asked him what he was going to do with the stone bottle; he said, he was going to take it to his father; I asked him where he got it from; he said, some landlord down the road had given it him; I asked him what his father was going to do with it; he said, he did not know; I asked him if there was any thing in it; he said there was nothing in it that he knew of; while he was up the ladder I felt the weight of the bottle, and found it nearly full of oil (produces it); it is Greenland whale oil, and answers to the sample that he took out; I then left him, and watched him; I suddenly missed the bottle from the ladder; I then looked about the spot, but could not see any thing of it; I watched him till he had done his work; I saw him come out of a public-house, and go towards home; I did not see him go into the public-house; I got up early the next morning as soon as it was light, and found the bottle of oil upon the path-way in a parallel line with two lamp-posts; I procured a constable, and took him up while he was at work; he said, he was very sorry for what he had done; it was the first time he had taken any; he said, the first time he went out he had a pint and a half left, and his fellow-servant told him he might have it if he got a bottle to put it in.

Prisoner's defence. I did not take it with a view of making a property of it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-41

101. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , a box, value 6 d. and a wig, value 3 l. the property of Stephen Lightburne , Esq .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Thomas Bowman .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of Richard Bunn .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS BOWMAN sworn. - I am a patent wig-maker , in Bond-street: On the 1st of December I packed up a wig for Colonel Lightburne in a box, and directed it for Col. Lightburne, 53 d regiment, Sunderland, Durham, 1st December, 1803; it was written on the box.

THOMAS GUARD sworn. - I carried a wig-box, directed to Col. Lightburne, to the George and Blue Boar, Holborn, and had a receipt for it.

WILLIAM COLE sworn. - I am book-keeper at the Bull and Mouth Inn; I received a box on the 3d of December, directed for Colonel Lightburne;

Sunderland; I had it from the George and Blue Boar, and gave it to Short and Sutton, who were loading the coach.

JAMES SHORT sworn. - I am porter at the Bull and Mouth; all the boxes I received I put in the coach and upon the coach, and in the rumble-tumble, and I put this particular box in at the top of all, and buckled the strop over it.

JOHN SUTTON sworn. - I am guard to the Newcastle coach; we left town at seven o'clock at night exactly; I sat upon the back part of the coach with my feet upon the rumble-tumble; as we were going up Highgate-hill , one of the traces broke of one of the wheel horses; I got down and assisted the coachman; the coach stopped, it was very heavy loaded; the coach went on, and I walked after it; a waggon with ten horses went up at the same time, and I went on one side and the coach on the other; when I got clear of the waggon, I saw the coach again, and I saw a man upon the rumble-tumble; I saw him get off, he then walked across me; I asked him if he belonged to the coach, or was a passenger: he said, no; I said, then you belong to me; I made him get upon the box with the coachman, and we took him to Highgate; I found the flap unbuckled, and the boxes exposed to the air, and a vacancy for this box; when we got to the Red Lion, I gave charge of him to a constable till I came back; we went on to Grantham, where we changed coaches, and there the box was missing; it has never been found since (produces the way-bill); when I came back to Highgate, I brought him to town.

ELIZABETH KNOWLE sworn. - On Sunday morning, the 3d of December, I found a piece of board upon Highgate-hill, not so far up as Hornsey-lane; there was some writing upon it; I gave it to my mother.

ANN KNOWLE sworn. - I am the mother of the last witness; she brought me a board, which I burnt, not thinking it of any consequence; it looked like a piece of a direction; part of it was broke off; there was wrote upon it, Sunderland, Durham, and December 31, 1803, in the corner.

RICHARD HARGRAVE sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner; he said he was innocent.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down Highgate-hill, on the path-way, when the guard came up to me with a pistol in his hand, and said, I was his prisoner; I was not near the coach.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-42

102. MARY BARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of January , a cloak, value 5 s. the property of John Downey .

MARY DOWNEY sworn. - I am a labouring woman; I live in Whitechapel ; the prisoner lodged in the same room, and worked at slop-work; I lost my cloak on the 2d of January; she lodged with me from Saturday till Monday; I found it at the pawnbroker's.

( Charles Stanstead , a pawnbroker, produced a cloak, which he took in of the prisoner - it was identified by Downey.)

Prisoner's defence. She lent me the cloak to pledge it, and had half the money.

Q. (To Downey.) Did you lend her the cloak? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-43

103. GEORGE CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of December , three shillings and eighteen halfpence , the property of Evan Evans .

ELIZABETH EVANS sworn. - I am the wife of Evan Evans ; my husband is a labourer , and works for Mr. Booth, in Cow-cross: On the 19th of December, I was sitting in my back room, with my back to the shop; I heard a noise, I turned round, and saw the prisoner standing close to the counter; I keep a chandler's-shop in Portpool-lane ; I went out and shut the shop door, and he asked me for a halfpennyworth of Spanish liquorice; I put my hand into the drawer in the counter, and missed my money directly; I asked him what he had done with my money; you villain, says I, you have got my money in your pocket; he put his hand in his pocket, and took out two shillings and a penny; I said, you have got one shilling more in your pocket; he said, he had not a farthing in the world more; he put his hand in his pocket, and pulled out a shilling among some halfpence; I called one of the lodgers down stairs, and the woman came down; he dropped on his knees, and said, pray let me go, and don't take me up; there were about three shillings worth of halfpence in the drawer, I cannot tell how much he had taken; he pulled out eight pence or a shilling's worth; the shop door was ajar; it was about half past two o'clock in the afternoon.

- sworn. - I was called down, and found the prisoner in the shop; he said he had got the money for driving cattle into Smithfield; I fetched a constable, and when I came back, he went down upon his knees, and said, take your money, don't send me to Newgate.

Prisoner's defence. It was my own money.

Mrs. Evans. One of the shillings I can swear to; I had cut a piece out of it before the prisoner came in.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-44

104. WILLIAM HOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , a washing-tub, value 6 s. the property of George Francis .

GEORGE FRANCIS sworn. - I am a cooper , in Whitechapel : On the 11th of January, I lost a tub from under my window; in consequence of information, I went into Fieldgate-street, and saw the prisoner with the tub resting upon his hip; he was walking very fast with it; I stopped him, and brought him back; he said, it was his first offence; he was taken before a Magistrate, and committed.

- GREEN sworn. - I saw the prisoner take the tub away, and I informed Mr. Francis of it.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-45

105. JEREMIAH CORNEILLY , JAMES DRAPER , EDWARD TAYLOR , and JOHN NEWMAN , were indicted, the first three, for that they, on the 3d of November , upon Thomas Coltman , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, maliciously, wilfully, and unlawfully, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument feloniously did strike the said Thomas Coltman in and upon his back, with intention feloniously and wilfully of their malice aforethought, him, the said Thomas, to kill and murder; and the other, for that he feloniously did counsel, aid, and abet, the other three the felony aforesaid to do and commit .

Second Count. They stood charged with making a like assault upon the same person, with intention to disable him.

Third Count. With feloniously and wilfully stabbing at and cutting the same person, with intention to do him some grievous bodily harm.

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Alley, and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

SAMUEL BRIDGMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. The high-constable of the Finsbury division.

Q. Is the parish of St. Luke in that division? - A. Yes.

Q. What have you got in your hand? - A. A search-warrant.

Q. Who does it purport to be signed by? - A. John Turton , Esq. and Thomas Leach , Esq. two of the Magistrates of Hatton-garden.

RICHARD BRAILSFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are clerk at the Police-office in Hatton-garden, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Are the names of Mr. Turton and Mr. Leach to that warrant the hand-writing of those two Magistrates? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know whether that warrant was executed by Mr. Turton and Mr. Leach jointly or apart? - A. That I cannot say; I can only speak to the handwriting.

Q. Were you at the Office on the day on which that warrant was executed? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What is the date of it? - A. The 3d of November.

Q. Are you not there every day? - A. It may happen that I may not be there.

Q. Are there any other clerks? - A. Yes, two other clerks.

Q. One or more of the three clerks is always attending the Magistrates? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore some one of the clerks, if it was signed by the Magistrates jointly, must have been present? - A. It might, or might not be.

Q. But whether it was signed by them jointly you cannot say? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. (To Bridgman.) Did you, in obedience to that warrant, go to Whitecross-street, in the parish of St. Luke's ? - A. In obedience to this warrant, I issued a precept to call several of my constable s to meet me.

Q. Was Thomas Coltman one of those constables? - A. Yes, he was.

Q. Did you go to any public-house there? - A. Yes, I first went to the Cock and Bell public-house with Coltman and a number of other constables; when I went in, I saw Corneilly taking a pint of beer from the bar; though I knew him, I thought it was not proper to take him when he was only in the act of taking a pint of beer; there were several loose idle characters, some of whom I took into custody, and others I took the neighbours' bail, and the publican's bail, for their appearance; I sent Coltman and four other officers to the watch-house in Old-street with five prisoners.

Q. Were those five persons of the description of idle and disorderly? - A. Yes, they were so deemed at the Mansion-house the next morning; with the remainder of the officers I then proceeded to the Oxford Arms.

Q. How far is that from the Cock and Bell? - A. It is in the same street.

Q. Did you see the prisoner, Corneilly, after you saw him at the Cock and Bell? - A. Not till he was taken, to the best of my knowledge, at the Oxford Arms; I saw Newman and several other characters that I knew to be reputed thieves, in a box in the tap-room; I saw Draper there, but I am not positive that I saw Taylor there; I am positive I saw Draper there, I had conversation with him. As I went by Newman, I heard him say d - n Bridgman, d - n the high-constable, which I took no notice of at that time.

Q. At that time had there been any disturbance? - A. No, not a word said; I passed on, and examined who and what the company were till I came up to Draper; the whole of the people in the house were very quiet, and Draper and I had some quiet conversation together; he told me I

knew his father, and many other expressions, it was quite a peaceable conversation; I told him as I was come to execute a warrant, I could not be partial at this time; I heard Newman crying aloud with bitter oaths against me by name and by office, repeatedly, very loud, and I turned round, and said, Jack, hold your tongue, or I will order you in custody.

Court. Q. Give us the expression he used? - A. Words to this effect: d - n Bridgman, bl - st Bridgman, d - n the high-constable, d - n all his bl - y traps, and several such like expressions, repeatedly, and d - n his bl - y liver was used several times indeed, that seemed to be the principal word among them; upon saying I would order him in custody, Newman rushed out of the box with great fury, as if he was going to commit some violence upon me, putting himself in a posture as if he was going to strike me, and used the same words again, d - ning and bl - sting in the same manner; he then turned round to the box where Draper was and several more of the same description, and said, you are all a set of bl - y fools to suffer yourselves to be taken; he then said, I would die first, or you ought to die first, I cannot positively say which; a confusion immediately took place; the house was upon that all up in a riot, some upon boxes, some one way, and some another; they began immediately to push about the officers, and broke away; I seized hold of Draper; his coat tore, and he got away from me at that time; he then ran up the side of a table in one of the public-house boxes; he then pulled something out of his pocket, which I have no doubt was a knife.

Court. Q. Did you see it? - A. He said, I will cut your bl - y liver out, and turned it over and over again, like a confused man; another officer struck him over the arm, and whether it was from being numbed or confused I cannot say, but he seemed so confused he could not get the knife open; I never saw the knife open; he rushed out of the box at me with the knife shut, and seized my stick; I seized hold of him again, and delivered him, as I thought, into the safe custody of two officers, but I saw one of the officers knocked down; he did not fall quite down, the seat prevented his falling quite down; then Draper made his escape; I then ordered Newman into custody, and took him down to Old-street watch-house. As we went along, he still exalted his voice very high with the same sort of abuse that he abused me with before, so loud that he might be heard half way down the street; when I got to the watch-house, I had but just turned myself round, when one of the officers informed me Coltman was cut; at the same time Corneilly was brought up by two officers with his hands very bloody.

Q. Tell us what Corneilly said? - A. His words were just the same as the others, bl - st their bl - y liver, and repeatedly said, I wish had cut their bl - y liver out; though I have been fourteen years an officer, I hardly ever heard such horrid expressions as they used before.

Q. Was any thing said by Corneilly how his hands became bloody? - A. He said some of the bl - y traps had cut him; I replied, I did not think that could be true, for I did not think one of them had a cutting instrument about them; I knew he meant by the word traps, my officers; one of them had a cutlass, but he was with me.

Q. Did Corneilly give you any other account of it? - A. Not at that time, he did afterwards; he said, he had cut it with a bit of glass; I then ordered Newman and Corneilly to be handcuffed together, one for stirring up, and the other for making a confusion; the other five were in the watch-house before the affray happened; I was not positive that Taylor was there, from my own recollection; when Taylor was apprehended, I was sent for to the Public Office, and in the back room I said, Well, Master Taylor, you know me; no, says he, Sir, I don't know who you are; I asked him where he worked; he said, he worked for a person in Castle-street; knowing that street was near my house, says I, you work for a person in Castle-street, and don't know me; he said, no, he did not; says I, don't you know the Oxford Arms, in Whitecross-street; he said, no, he did not; I said, do you mean to tell me you do not know Hopwood and Draper, (Hopwood is a person who is not taken;) he said, no, I do not; says I, do you know Sadler; yes, says he, I know Jem Sadler ; Draper being a sadler , went by the name of Jem Sadler among them; two of the officers did not know him by the name of Draper, but by the name of Sadler; says I, how can you tell me you were not there that night; yes, says he, Mr. Bridgman, I was there, but I was gone before the affray happened; no person had told him my name before that, but he called me by my name, and said he was gone before the affray happened.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I take it for granted, as you have described it, you saw Corneilly at the Cock and Bell, and did not see him afterwards till he was brought to the watch-house? - A. No.

Q. You did not see him at the Oxford Arms, or with the the persons at the Oxford Arms? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. How far is the Oxford Arms from the Cock and Bell? - A. It may be a furlong.

Q. Was not Newman extremely drunk? - A. I really don't think he was, for he neither staggered, nor any thing of the kind; he might be a little fresh, but he was not deranged in his walk at all.

Q. Have you known him for some years? - A. Yes.

Q. He was part of his life a fish-monger, and part a publican? - A. Yes.

Q. He had just before ceased to be a publican? - A. Just before the licencing day he had kept that very house.

Q. You did not apprehend him to be one of the persons described in your warrant, as disorderly? - A. I should not have taken him up, but on account of his behaviour.

Q. Do you remember his wife coming in at the time he and you were talking, and saying, you fool, hold your tongue; Mr. Bridgman, don't mind him, you see he is drunk? - A. There was something said, and then he said, d - n Bridgman, who cares for him.

Q. Did not his wife desire him not to speak to you in that manner? - A. I believe he knocked her down in his fury; he pushed her against the table, she did not fall.

Q. He certainly had been drinking? - A. He was not stupid, he was able to walk very well.

Q. How far is the watch-house from the place where Coltman was hurt? - A. About fifty yards; I cannot say justly.

Q. You had not seen Coltman, and the party that were with Coltman, from the time you had sent them with persons in custody from the Cock and Bell? - A. No, I had not.

Q. You had kept the warrant yourself, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen that warrant signed yourself? - A. No, it was brought to me by one Dixon, an officer, sealed up in a blank cover, and a gentleman of my acquaintance was in the house, to whom I shewed it.

Q. Did you at all see Corneilly in company with Draper or Newman that night, or with the other prisoners? - A. No, I don't remember that I did.

Q. Draper went in just before you? - A. He must have gone in before me, because the landlord brought him a pint of beer; it must have been just at the moment.

Prisoner Corneilly. Q. Did you find any knife about me? - A. No, I did not take him; he was brought to me at the watch-house.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you consider Draper as a person that would come within the idea of your warrant? - A. No, he was more properly a fence.

THOMAS LEACH , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a Magistrate for the county of Middlesex? - A. I am.

Q. Be so good as take that warrant in your hand, and tell me if you were one of the Magistrates that signed that? - A. I am.

Q. Is that your hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. And is that Mr. Turton's hand-writing? - A I believe that is Mr. Turton's writing.

Q. Have you any recollection if Mr. Turton was present when you signed it? - A. I cannot recollect.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. It is a common case, I believe, when a warrant is signed by one Magistrate, to put it by in a drawer to be signed by the other? - A. That is the only warrant of the kind I have signed since I have been at the Office.

Q. Have you no sort of recollection whether Mr. Turton was present when you signed it? - A. I have no recollection whatever of any consultation on the occasion, or of the circumstances.

Q. I believe the persons taken up were examined at your Office? - A. Yes, they were, I took the examination myself; I don't know that the circumstance of their examination can bring to my mind any thing respecting the warrant.

Q. Is it the inclination of your mind that it was signed by you and Mr. Turton separately? - A. It is; the warrant is put into the drawer after being signed by one Magistrate.

Q. And is not signed in the presence of the first Magistrate? - A. It most frequently is.

Q. And frequently not? - A. Not frequently.

(The warrant read.)

Mr. Gurney. Q. This is dated the 3d of November; I believe, upon looking at the almanack, that is on a Thursday? - A. Yes.

Q. That is a day on which the Office was not open? - A. No, I did not attend the Office; I was attending the County Court.

Q. Therefore it might have been signed by you at a different place? - A. I cannot say.

THOMAS MILES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a constable of the parish of St. John's, Clerkenwell? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect having been applied to by the last witness upon any occasion to assist him to execute a search-warrant? - A. Yes, on the 3d of November.

Q. Did you accompany him to execute it? - A. I did.

Q. Where did you first go to? - A. We walked to several houses, and we went to the Cock and Bell, and afterwards to the Oxford Arms.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Draper? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him at the Oxford Arms? - A. I did.

Q. Did you see him do any thing there? - A. Yes, I saw him draw his knife out of his waistcoat pocket; Mr. Bridgman said, he should go with him, and he said, bl - st his eyes, if he would; they had been talking some time before that; I then went to the table where he was, and immediately struck at him, and hit him over the arm; he then made a lunge at me over the table with the hand that the knife was in; I don't know that the knife was open, I don't think it was; I drew back, and received a blow from somebody on my shoulder,

which knocked me into the box on the other side, and then they all rushed out and escaped, except Newman, and he was taken into custody.

Q. Look at the prisoners, and tell me if you recollect having seen either of the others? - A. No, I cannot swear to Taylor; there was a man standing there with a pipe in his hand, very much like Taylor.

Q. You went away with Newman, and saw no more of it? - A. I went to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. If you don't know whether the knife was open or not, how do you know he had a knife? - A. I saw him take a knife out of his pocket.

Q. How near were you to him? - A. Close by him.

Q. Was there any confusion or noise at that time? - A. Newman was making a noise.

THOMAS COLTMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a constable? - A. I am.

Q. Did you accompany Bridgman on the 3d of November to the Cock and Bell? - A. Yes, in Whitecross-street.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners at the Cock and Bell? - A. I did not notice any body there.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Corneilly? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you see him? - A. I did not see him till he knocked me down.

Q. What did you do at the Cock and Bell? - A. We took five prisoners to St. Luke's watch-house.

Q. Was it agreed between Bridgman and you where you should meet afterwards? - A. Yes, at the Oxford Arms.

Q. Was that said in the room? - A. Yes, Mr. Bridgman said it at the door, coming out at the door of the tap-room; we lodged the prisoners safe in the watch-house, me, Juniper, Wentworth, and another officer; we returned back down Whitecross-street, in the way to the Oxford Arms; instead of going to the Oxford Arms, we made a mistake, and went to the Three Jolly Butchers, in Whitecross-street; we found our mistake, and came out of the house again; and coming up Whitecross-street, near St. Luke's church, three men, Corneilly, Draper, and Hopwood, formed themselves in a line across the street.

Q. Tell us more particularly how they were standing? - A. Hopwood had a velveteen jacket and velveteen breeches on; he was on one side of the street, Corneilly in the middle, and Draper on the other side, with a rough light-coloured great coat on; upon our coming towards them, Corneilly swore he would have some one's bl - y life.

Q. Before Corneilly had made use of that expression, had you made towards them, or used any endeavour to take them? - A. No, I did not see them till the very instant I heard him express the words; I then went towards Corneilly to seize him by the collar, but before I could lay hold of him, he knocked me down.

Q. Did you receive any blow while you were down? - A. Yes, several.

Q. From whom? - A. I cannot say from which of them; I had one severe blow upon the hip, which I believe I received from Hopwood; the blow that knocked me down, was a very severe blow on the head; I believe it was with his fist; Draper struck me several times, I saw him strike me over Corneilly's shoulder.

Court. Q. Still with fists? - A. Yes, I did not see any weapon at all; when I was about half bent, I felt something prick my back; I thought it was like a pin in my linen; one of them said at that time, d - n his eyes, cut the b - r down, which I believe was Draper, but I cannot be certain, but it was one of them; Draper was upon my left hand almost the whole of the time; after that I got up, and collared Corneilly, and tore his coat; soon after that, Juniper, one of my brother-officers, came up, and knocked Corneilly down; I then found myself released, and I ran away down Banner-street; Hopwood ran down on the right hand side of Banner-street; and Draper, I believe, on the left; there was a gentleman and lady at a green-shop door; I asked them to let me come in, and sit down; I found myself very faint and sick; I went into the house, and said I was cut, and the gentleman said he would go with me to a surgeon; I put my hand to my back, and got my two fingers of my right hand into the wound, and then I found I was cut.

Q. When did you first find yourself cut? - A. Not till I was faint and sick, I felt myself wet in my breeches; I went over to Mr. Smith, the surgeon, the corner of Banner-street, and had my wound dressed.

Court. Q. What time of night was this? - A. Between a quarter after ten and a quarter before eleven.

Q. From thence, I believe, you were sent to the hospital? - A. Yes.

Q. How long were you in the hospital? - A. I believe a month; I am now an out-patient.

Q. Can you tell at all from whom you received that wound? - A. No, I cannot; but I believe it was from Draper; though, from the appearance of the wound, there must have been more than one man cut me; I have the coat here, (produces a coat and shirt.) Here is the shirt cut, and a mark with the point of a knife; just above the great gash where I received a wound in the waistcoat there is the same.

Q. How many cuts are there? - A. Six in the coat, two in the left arm.

Q. Were you wounded in the left arm? - A. Yes, under the left arm.

Q. Did you see Corneilly afterwards? - A. Before the Magistrate.

Q. Did you, at any time, take notice whether Corneilly had cut his finger or not? - A. No, I did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. At the time you saw Draper, Hopwood, and Corneilly, you were in the middle of the street? - A. Yes.

Q. Corneilly was in the middle, and therefore supposing the others to be Hopwood and Draper, they were at some distance from you, one on your right hand, and the other on your left? - A. Yes.

Q. You first of all snatched at the person you supposed to be Corneilly? - A. Yes, after he had expressed these words, and then he knocked me down.

Q. From the moment of his knocking you down, to the end of the scuffle, you must have been in very great agitation? - A. I did not know that I was cut.

Q. But from being beat? - A. I was in great agitation undoubtedly; I expected the officers to come up and assist me, which they did not.

Q. You had not an opportunity of paying much attention to their faces? - A. Draper's face I was perfectly acquainted with.

Q. Have you not said, you believed it was Hopwood that gave the wound? - A. I thought so, but I cannot tell.

Q. Now you say, you think it was Draper? - A. I say, I believe he was one.

Q. Whitecross-street is not a very light street, I believe? - A. No; but the houses were not all shut up.

Q. Do you mean that there were any shops open where you had the contest? - A. Yes.

Q. You had no warrant with you? - A. Mr. Bridgman had the warrant.

SAMUEL JUNIPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you recollect the night this search-warrant was executed, accompanying the last witness to the Jolly Butchers? - A. Yes.

Q. When you were coming out, did you hear any thing said? - A. Yes, I heard a voice say, a d - d set of bl - y thieves, we will cut their bl - y livers out.

Q. Have you heard that voice before, or since? - A. Since; I believe it to be the same voice at Hatton-garden.

Q. Whose voice was it you heard at Hatton-garden? - A. I verily believe it to be Corneilly's.

Q. Had you known him before that night? - A. Not at all.

Q. When you heard the voice, did you see any person? - A. I did not; after I heard that voice, I walked on a little further along the street, facing Banner-street; Coltman was a little distance behind me.

Q. When you came opposite Banner-street, did you then see any person? - A. I did, I saw three.

Q. Were they standing, or were they walking? - A. I saw them at the end of Banner-street upon Coltman; they were all three upon him in a very active manner; they seemed to be striking him.

Q. Was Coltman on the ground at that time? - A. No, he was rather on the stoop.

Q. Did you do any thing, upon observing that? - A. I did; I knocked Corneilly down upon the spot, and as he rose, I caught him by the collar with the left hand.

Q. Did you afterwards let him go? - A. I did not; I kept him in custody till I took him to the watch-house.

Q. Did Corneilly's hat happen to drop off? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he pick it up himself? - A. He did, with my leave, and when he put his hat on, he said, now I will surrender, and go with you, you bl - y set of thieves.

Q. At this time were there any other officers with you, besides Coltman? - A. There were two at a little distance off.

Q. Had either you or Coltman any sharp instrument with you? - A. Neither of us; I had a stick in my hand.

Q. When you took Corneilly to the watch-house, did you examine his hand? - A. I did; his hand was cut just in the thick of his hand; it was quite a fresh cut, and bleeding.

Q. As you were taking him to the watch-house, did you observe him make any particular motion? - A. He did, towards his breeches-pocket, but whether he dropped any thing, or not, I cannot tell; I saw nothing.

JOSEPH WENTWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable of the parish of St. Sepulchre's: I went with Coltman to the watch-house with five persons who were taken into custody.

Q. In coming back from the watch-house, did you see the prisoners, or any of them, and where? - A. Not coming back from the watch-house; we went into the Three Jolly Butchers, and upon coming out, I saw three men, but I cannot speak to their persons; one was a shortish man, another a middle-sized man, and the other a tall man; I saw them come from over the way, with horrid imprecations; I then saw them engaged with Coltman, they had got him down, and he was surrounded by the three men; I went up towards them, and when I got up, Juniper had knocked Corneilly down; then I found it to be Corneilly, and not before.

Q. Are you sure he was one of the three you first saw? - A. I am.

Q. Look round, and point out which is Corneilly?

- A. (Points to him.) That is him. Upon that, I went with Juniper and Corneilly to the watch-house, and I saw no more.

Q. Did you ever discover who the other two persons were? - A. I did not.

Q. Did Corneilly say any thing, or do any thing, as he was going to the watch-house? - A. No, nothing particular, only when we took a prisoner, they always swore; I observed his hand cut, and I said, how was your hand cut, we have not cut it, for we have no sharp instrument with us.

Q. Had you no sharp instrument? - A. No, none of us; he said he had fell upon a glass bottle, or something of that sort.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am an apothecary in Banner-street.

Q. Do you recollect, on the evening this unfortunate affair took place, seeing Coltman? - A. Yes, he came to my shop.

Q. Be so good as describe the state in which you found him? - A. When he was brought in, I observed a very considerable cut in his back, the length from eight to ten inches, from the right shoulder slanting downwards; the breadth took place from the gaping of the wound, it might be a quarter of an inch, or more.

Q. What was the depth? - A. About a quarter of an inch.

Q. What did you suppose it to have been done with? - A. A sharp instrument; I should suppose, a knife.

Q. Did you observe any other wound upon his back? - A. No; there were some bruises about his head; I dressed his wound that night, and he afterwards went to the hospital.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a Police officer belonging to Worship-street? - A. I am.

Q. Did you apprehend Draper? - A. Yes, on Friday, the 25th of November, at the Weavers Arms, in Angel-alley.

Q. Did you search him? - A. He had this knife in his hand; he appeared to have been eating something; he said, I will go any where with you, Mr. Armstrong.

Q. Did you take any coat from him? - A. A coat was taken from him, which Mason has.

Q. Did you know Draper before? - A. Yes, I have seen him many a time.

Q. He behaved extremely well at the time of his apprehension? - A. Yes, and at all other times, when I have been in a house where he has been.

PETER MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you got a coat taken off the prisoner Draper? - A. Yes, it is the same he had on when he was apprehended. (Produces it.)

Q. Does it appear to be torn any where? - A. Yes, the lappel on the left side.

Bridgman. I have no doubt this is the coat that I tore, when I first seized him.

Prisoner Corneilly's defence. As to the cutting, I know nothing about it, any more than the child unborn.

Prisoner Draper's defence. When I came out of the Oxford Arms, I made my way straight home, and did not hear any thing of the cutting till the next morning; I never absconded, knowing myself perfectly innocent of the affair.

Prisoner Taylor's defence. I never was near the place at the time.

Prisoner Newman's defence. I was in the house, and had been drinking; I never was out of the house, till Mr. Bridgman took me out; I was taken to the watch-house a quarter of an hour before this man was cut.

Corneilly, GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

Draper, GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

Taylor, NOT GUILTY .

Newman, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-46

106. JOHN LINDSAY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Remington , about the hour of three in the night of the 30th of November , with intent the goods and chattels therein being, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

There being no evidence of an entry of the dwelling-house, the window only having been lifted up, and no property stolen, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-47

107. REBECCA STANFORTH, alias BROAD , and MARY SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a silk purse, value 6 d. and 89 l. 5 s. in monies numbered, the goods and monies of William Hauxwell , privily from his person .

WILLIAM HAUXWELL sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At Boston, in North America.

Q. Where do you reside in London? - A. At the Butchers Arms, in Clare-street, Clare-market: On the 30th of December, I was coming down the Strand, about half past eight o'clock, and met the prisoner in the blue gown, Mary Smith ; she asked me to go home with her; accordingly I went home with her to a house, No. 5, Vine-street , up two heights of stairs; when we got up stairs, she called Beck, or Rebecca, I cannot say which; the other prisoner then came, and they wanted some gin; I gave her half-a-crown to fetch some gin, Mary Smith went to fetch it; when she returned, we each had a glass of gin; then Mary Smith went out, and left Rebecca and me alone; after we had been alone a few minutes, Rebecca went out, and Smith came in.

Q. Had you any connection with Rebecca, while Smith left the room? - A. Yes.

Q. How long were the two women together with you, when you drank the gin? - A. Ten minutes, probably.

Q. During that time, had you any connection with either of the women? - A. No; when Smith came in, I missed my purse; I said, I had lost a purse, containing one hundred guineas; Smith seemed very much astonished; I asked her where Rebecca was gone to; she would not tell me; I told her I would make an example of her, and accordingly took her to the apartment of the mistress of the house; I had felt the money about half an hour before I met Smith; there were eighty-five guineas in guineas, half guineas, and seven-shilling pieces; I did not, at any time, perceive the hand of either of them near my pocket.

MARTHA WILSON sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Vine-street.

Q. Who keeps the house? - A. Elizabeth Lang ; I don't live in the house, I live at No. 6; I met Rebecca Stanforth , in Chandos-street, on Friday night, I think the last day of the old year, between ten and eleven o'clock at night.

Q. What did she say to you? - A. She asked me if I would have a glass of something to drink, that is all she said to me; I was going in with her to drink something, and the watchman laid hold of her, and took her up; she went away with the watchman.

Q. Did she drop any thing? - A. There was a purse dropped, and I picked it up.

Q. Who dropped it? - A. I cannot say; it might be she dropped it, or it might be any body else.

Q. Did you look at the purse? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take any thing out of it? - A. I took out a guinea, and asked for change; I was very much flurried in picking it up; I knew it did not belong to me.

Q. Did you get it changed? - A. No, it was returned, I believe; the constable had it.

Q. What became of the purse? - A. I delivered it to Elizabeth Phillips the next morning.

Q. What makes you think the constable had the guinea? - A. The landlord of the public-house said he gave it to the constable.

Q. Who is the landlord? - A. I don't know his name; he keeps the Reeking, in Cross-court.

Q. You left the guinea with the landlord? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you give the purse to? - A. Elizabeth Phillips, desiring her to take care of it; I told her I thought it might belong to the gentleman that had been robbed, and desired her to return it, if it was enquired after, for I was going out that day.

Q. Did you mention the name of the woman? A. I mentioned Rebecca Broad 's name to Phillips, and desired her to be so good as return it to whoever asked for it.

ELIZABETH PHILLIPS sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 5, in Vine-street.

Q. Are you servant there? - A. No.

Q. Are you a lodger there? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Martha Wilson ? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember receiving a purse from her? - A. Yes, I did, on Saturday morning, about seven o'clock; she told me to keep it for Rebecca Broad .

Q. What did you do with the purse? - A. I went out to work at a public-house that morning; I took it with me.

Q. Who did you deliver it to? - A. To the constable, Mr. Donaldson.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am a constable of St. Martin's-in-the Fields: On Friday, the 30th of December, I was sent for to Vine-street, and took Mary Smith in custody, about half past ten o'clock at night; I then went in search of the other prisoner, Broad, but could not find her; at last, the watchman found her, and brought her to the watch-house; I went then; and took Wilson into custody, understanding she had got the money; I searched her, but did not find it; at last, she told me where it was; she referred me to Phillips, I went, and found the purse hid among a parcel of boards in the cellar; I asked Phillips for the purse; she at first hesitated, and then said, she would show me, (produces the purse); I counted over the money, and found seven guineas, six half guineas, and two seven-shilling pieces.

Q. (To Hauxwell.) Look at that purse? - A. There is no particular mark upon the purse, but I will swear to it; there is one particular guinea that I can swear to. (Points it out.)

Q. What mark is there upon it? - A. It has an old-fashioned head, similar to a farthing head.

ELIZABETH LANG sworn. - Q. You keep this house, No. 5, Vine-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prosecutor being at your house? - A. He spoke to me when he came, on Friday night, the 30th of December; he came down, and told me he was robbed.

Q. Did he describe who had robbed him? - A. He brought Mary Smith ; I asked her if she had robbed him, and he said, no, it was not her.

Q. Was he sober, or in liquor? - A. Perfectly sober.

Q. Did you know, from his description, what girl he meant? - A. No; he ran out immediately into the street, and called the watchman, and by the description he gave the watchman, he knew who it was.

Q. At once, from the description, who it was? - A. I thought it was her, because there was no other person in the house.

Q. Did you see her go out? - A. No; somebody ran down stairs, I thought it was her foot, but I did not see her.

- KIRBY sworn. - Q. You are the watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. You heard of the robbery? - A. Yes, it was about thirty yards from my box; I went to the house; and from the description, I knew it was the prisoner Broad; she went by the name of Birmingham Beck; I found her going into a gin-shop along with this little black Pat, as they call her; we could not find any thing upon her; I did not hear the purse drop.

Prisoner Stanforth's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

The prisoner Smith was not put upon her defence.

Donaldson. The guinea was changed; I had the publican up to Bow-street.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-48

108. REBECCA BOULTON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Sturt , Esq . no person being therein, about the hour of eight in the forenoon of the 4th of December , and stealing eleven window curtains, value 40 l. seven chair-covers, value 30 s. and a set of bed-furniture, value 10 l. the property of the said Charles .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of Thomas Obee .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, except that of an accomplice uncorroborated, she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040111-49

109. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 13th of April, in the 32d year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of Little Bookham, in Surry, was married to Elizabeth Lawrence , and that afterwards, on the 31st of September, in the 41st year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish of Tottenham , feloniously was married to Deborah Hare , his former wife being then alive .

There being no evidence of the first marriage, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040111-50

110. JANE TICK was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Richards , Hannah Richards , spinster, being therein, about the hour of four in the afternoon of the 10th of December , and stealing a pair of sheets, value 6 s. an apron, value 3 s. a shift, value 2 s. and two shirts, value 12 s. the property of the said Joseph Richards .

JOSEPH RICHARDS sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Short's-gardens, at No. 8 .

Q. What are you? - A. A smith ; I was at work at the time the robbery was done, at Mr. Godsal's, in Long-acre.

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. On the Saturday; Mrs. Sullivan rents the house; I have one room in it.

Q. How long have you been in it? - A. Better than eighteen months.

ISABELLA RICHARDS sworn. - Q. Who is Hannah Richards ? - A. This child. (A child the witness had in her arms.)

Q. Is that the child that was in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you know about this business? - A. The prisoner came to my place a month ago last Saturday, and enquired for Mrs. Graham.

Q. Did she see you in your room? - A. Yes; I told her, Mrs. Graham was gone to live at the Coach and Horses, in the one pair back room.

Q. Did you go out? - A. Yes; I only just latched the door, and left the child in the cradle; I went up stairs for an iron, and staid about ten minutes; when I returned again, the things were missing; I missed a pair of sheets, two shirts, a shift, and an apron.

Q. Did you ever see the things afterwards? - A. I went to all the pawnbrokers about, that I could; I happened to go to a pawnbroker's, in Turnpin-alley, Leicester-square; I saw my apron and shift upon the counter, I told the pawnbroker they were mine; the pawnbroker asked me who stole them; I told him I did not know, I was afraid my husband would lick me, and the pawnbroker gave me a description of the person; I know it was the prisoner that had been in my room.

RICHARD LIMBRICK sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street: The last witness came to me, and told me, she knew where the prisoner lived; I apprehended her in a back room; I took her up, she begged for mercy; I asked her where the remainder of the things were; she told me, they were all at one place.

Q. And they were all at one place? - A. Yes, they were.

(- Wheatley, servant to a pawnbroker, produced a pair of sheets, three shirts, one shift, and one apron.)

Q. (To Mrs. Richards.) Look at these things? - A. I have no mark upon them.

Q. Are they the same sort? - A. They are like them.

Q. The pawnbroker produces three shirts, you missed but two? - A. No; two of them are coloured, and one white; they were coloured ones that I lost.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Look at these things, and see if you know them? - A. I have no mark upon them, but here is one of the shirts that the sleeves are not like the body.

Q. To Mrs. Richards.) Did you lose such an apron as that? - A. Yes, I lost a check apron.

Q. Were the sheets of that sort? - A. Yes; they were dirty.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Q. (To Wheatley.) Do you know who pawned these things? - A. Yes, the prisoner at the bar, on the 10th of December last, between six and seven o'clock in the evening.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-51

111. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 31st of October , a bill of exchange, for the payment of 10 l. 9 s. 4 d. with intention to defraud Thomas Ker .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing as true a like forged bill of exchange, knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

Two other Counts. Charging it to be with intention to defraud Charles Greenwood , and Richard-Henry Cox .

And in Four other Counts. Charging the forging and uttering an acceptance to a bill of exchange, with the like intentions.

THOMAS KER sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A boot-maker : On the 31st of October, the prisoner bought a pair of boots of me, and gave me a bill upon Cox and Greenwood; I had the bill of exchange in my pocket-book all day; yesterday I went out to get some refreshment; while I was out, I lost my pocket-book, with the bill of exchange in it, and in the evening the pocketbook was left at my house by a gentleman, whom I knew, but without the bill of exchange in it.

Q. Then the bill of exchange is not forthcoming? - A. No.

Q. When had you seen this bill of exchange, before you lost it? - A. I had it in the Court all day, till I went out to look for Mr. Rickerby, clerk to Cox and Greenwood; I found afterwards he was in Court; I went to get some refreshment, and I missed it.

Q. What time of day was it? - A. I presume, it might be three o'clock in the day.

Q. Had you your great coat on? - A. Yes, I had; I was sitting with two or three friends of mine over the way when I lost it; when I went home, my wife informed me that the pocket-book was left.

Q. Was any enquiry made of the person that returned it? - A. No.

Q. Who was the person who returned it? - A. A person that had been in the coffee-house with me.

Q. Did not you go to him? - A. I did not.

Q. Who was it? - A. It was an Irish gentleman, a friend of mine; I thought it was a fortunate event, I thought the young man might be reclaimed.

Lord Chief Baron. Q. You thought it right that a forger should escape in a country like this, and set with your hands before you without making any enquiry, or doing any thing to get the bill back; you have done a great injury to public justice? - A. If I have acted wrong in consulting my own feelings, I do not regret it.

Lord Chief Baron. Estreat his recognizance.

NOT GUILTY .

William Rickerby , clerk to Cox and Greenwood, was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was also estreated.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Lord Chief Baron. Mr. Ker, I cannot help saying this has very much the appearance of a foul collusion.

Reference Number: t18040111-52

112. GEORGE SMITH was again indicted for feloniously forging, on the 8th of November , a bill of exchange for the payment of 11 l. 4 s. with intention to defraud Jonathan Wimbury .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing as true a like forged bill of exchange, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Two other Counts. For forging and uttering as true a like bill of exchange, with intention to defraud Alexander Ross and John Ogilvy .

And in four other Counts. For forging and uttering as true an acceptance upon a like bill of exchange, with the same intention.

The witnesses being called, but not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-53

113. GEORGE SMITH was again indicted for that he, on the 28th of October , had in his custody and possession a certain bill of exchange to the tenor following, that is to say,

"London, October 28, 1803. - Twenty-one days after date, please to pay to my order 8 l. 15 s. and place it to my account, value received, F. N. Smith, 3d regiment Lincoln militia." Addressed to Mess. Cox and Greenwood, army agents, Craig's-court, Charing-cross. And that he afterwards, to wit, on the same day, did feloniously make, forge, and counterfeit an acceptance of the said bill of exchange as follows,

"Accepted, Cox and Greenwood," with intention to defraud John Pike .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the

same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

There being no evidence to prove the acceptance to be a forgery, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

William Rickerby , clerk to Mess. Cox and Greenwood was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

The prisoner was ordered to be detained, to take his trial at the next Sessions for returning from transportation.

Reference Number: t18040111-54

114. JOHN BLUNDELL was indicted for that he, on the 24th of December , one ewe sheep, value 50 s. the property of Michael and - Phillips , wilfully and feloniously did kill and steal the two hind quarters of the said sheep , against the statute.

MATTHEW RIDGWAY sworn. - I am servant to Mess. Phillips, farmer s, at Tottenham : On the morning of the 24th of December I went into the fields, and found a sheep with its throat cut, and the hind quarters skinned and taken away; I knew the sheep, because the skin was marked P on the off lip, and had some other small marks; I missed one also from the lot which I counted that morning; on the Tuesday following I saw the prisoner talking with my master, but did not hear what was said, but I understood he had found some mutton; I then asked him where he had found it; he said, he had found it in a bag in the road, behind a little bramble bush, not much concealed; we then went to Mr. Angle's, where he works, and he shewed it me in the hay-loft, behind a truss of hay; he told me my master had given it to him; there was a leg and part of a loin, and a good deal of fat in the bag; I told him, if my master had given him the mutton to take care of the bag, which I then thought to be my master's, but it is not.

EDWARD BROWN sworn. - I am carter to Mr. Angle, and found the mutton in the loft when I went for hay to feed my horses about four o'clock in the morning, behind a truss of hay; my mate, who was with me, pulled the leg of mutton out of the bag, and also a part of a loin of mutton; I put it in the same place; going by a public-house with my cart, I saw the prisoner; I went up and laid hold of his collar, and said, I wonder, Blundell, you should bring that into our loft - you must be the man, for nobody else goes there; yes, says he, I be; I bought it, and paid for it, and don't care who knows it, of one Jonathan, a butcher, at Highgate; I said, very well, that is all I want to know; I went and told my master; next morning the prisoner came to work, and my master asked him if the meat was his; he said, yes, and I found it in Mr. Phillips's hog park; my master said, that is a very different story from what you told Ned last night; we said no more, but sent to Mr. Phillips that there was some mutton in our loft.

JOHN THOMAS sworn. - I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner, and found him boiling part of a loin of mutton; I looked into the closet, and there was part of a leg and piece of a loin of mutton baked in a dish; he said, he had found it in a bag in a lane by Mr. Phillips's grounds.

Prisoner's defence. On Saturday morning, about half past seven o'clock, I was going to work, and in a lane I saw a bag laying behind a little bit of a bush, about a yard from the road, with meat in it; I took it into the hay-loft, and said nothing about it; I did not go to work till Tuesday, when my master asked me how I came by the meat; I told him I found it; he said, he heard Mr. Phillips had lost some, and I had better go to him, and clear it up; I went to Mr. Phillips, and told him what part I found; he said, take it home and boil it, or do as you like with it; I told my master, and said, I did not like to eat it; he said, if you don't, give it to the dogs, and they had a great part of it, and the carter had a leg; I had about three quarters of a pound, which I was boiling when they took me.

Court. Q. (To Brown.) Had you any part of it? - A. Yes; they gave a great part to the dogs, and I said, it was a pity it should be so wasted; I had a leg, but I first told Mr. Phillips of it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-55

115. ROBERT SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a brass washer, value 10 s. and three pieces of copper, value 2 s. the property of Henry Goodwin , William Skinner , Thomas Thornton , and George-Matthew Hoare .

(The case was opened by Mr. Watson.)

CHARLES HODSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Where do you work? - A. In East Smithfield: On the 5th of January I was employed to watch in a store-room belonging to Mess. Goodwin and Co. brewer s, in Lower East Smithfield ; I stationed myself in the store room, where there was a great deal of lead, brass, iron, and several other things; I went in about five o'clock, and in about half an hour afterwards two persons entered and looked into several boxes; the man had a candle in his hand; I saw them rummaging over a number of things, and put several into their pockets, but I was not near enough to observe what they were; when they had got as much as they wanted, I pursued them; I took the boy about six yards from the door; his name is Henry Brown ; the prisoner made his escape down a ladder out of the brewhouse through the gates, where there was

a watchman, whose name is James Selgood ; I continued pursuing, but he got away from me.

JAMES SELGOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. I am a watchman at Mess. Goodwin's brewhouse.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A. Yes: On Thursday last, the 5th of January, I saw him come in with a bar of iron on his shoulder, about four o'clock in the afternoon, and Henry Brown with him; I saw him again about half past five; he came to the gate from the brew-house to go out of the premises; he was then alone; he asked me to let him out; I asked him if he had finished his jobs; he said, no, he was going home for more tools, he was a smith; I opened the gate to let him out; I locked it again, and went back into the yard, it was dark; Hodsell called out, stop that man; the prisoner had nothing in his hand when I let him out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Symonds. Q. He went the usual way? - A. Yes.

Q. He was not running away? - A. No, he did not run away.

WILLIAM FOREMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a constable; I was taking the boy before the Magistrate, and going along in Nightingale-lane we saw the prisoner, and Mr. Scriven gave me charge of him.

Q. Did you search the boy? - A. Yes, in Mess. Goodwin's accompting-house; I found four articles upon him. - (Produces a brass washer and three copper rivets.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Symonds. Q. When was this? - A. The same evening, the 5th of January.

HENRY BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. An apprentice to Mr. Bryant, a smith; he does the smith's work for Mess Goodwin's brewhouse: On the 5th of January the prisoner and I left Mr. Bryant's shop in Wapping, about ten minutes before four o'clock on Thursday last with some work; we went to Mr. Goodwin's brewhouse; the prisoner had a bar of iron on his shoulder, and I had a hammer in my hand; we were going to fit some work on some brass cocks at the brewhouse; when we got there, there was a screw which prevented his trying the work; he had a candle alight in his hand, and we went up some stairs, and he called me after him; I went up to the top of the stairs to a little warehouse door, and he called me again by my name; then I went inside the place, and he told me to pick up those articles that lay there, and put them in my pocket, which I did.

Q. Were they articles like either of these? - A. I cannot say whether they were like these or not; as soon as I had put them in my pocket I came out, and Mr. Hodsell caught me about five or six yards from the door; the prisoner made his escape, and ran down some stairs; he ran towards the gate where the watchman was; Mr. Hodsell came down the same stairs; when he got to the yard he called out to the watchman not to let that man go out, but he was gone out; Mr. Hodsell took me to the gate; Mr. Scriven came, and ordered Mr. Hodsell to keep me there; then as I was going to the Office, going through Nightingale-lane, there was the prisoner; he had been stopped by a press-gang.

Cross-examined by Mr. Symonds. Q. He found a screw in the way, so that he could not fit the work on? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not go up stairs to get something to fit his work on with? - A. No.

Q. What conversation passed in the room? - A. He told me to pick these things up.

Q. If any body was in the room, must they not have heard this conversation? - A. He did not speak very loud to me.

Q. When did you first mention any thing about the prisoner? - A. As soon as I was taken.

Q. Before he found the things upon your person? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you lived with your master? - A. I have served four years of my time.

Q. (To Hodsell.) Did you hear the prisoner tell the lad to pick up the things? - A. I heard something said, but I could not tell what it was.

Court. Q. (To Brown.) Where did you pick these things up from? - A. From the ground; there was no part in a basket.

Q. Were there any boxes? - A. The prisoner was at the boxes, and what he took was out of the boxes.

JAMES SCRIVEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You are clerk to Goodwin and Company? - A. Yes. (Proves the firm.)

Q. Had you such articles as these in the storeroom? - A. Yes, there were two brass washers, and I suppose fifty of those large copper nails; there were only two brass washers of this description in the store-room, I had seen them that day.

Q. Do you believe these articles to be the property of Goodwin and Company? - A. This washer I can swear to, by a small dent in the top of it, and a roughness in the inside, which we do not expect in these sort of things.

Cross-examined by Mr. Symonds. Q. When did you first observe that dent? - A. On the 24th of December; I took it into the store-room from the accompting-house.

Prisoner's defence. My master is here, who knows that boy is an infamous thief.

For the prisoner.

- BRYANT sworn. - The prisoner was in my employ upwards of three years; I never found any thing dishonest in him.

Q. What do you think of the character of the boy? - A. I cannot say much for him.

Q. From what you have known, do you think he is fit to be believed upon his oath? - A. He is very subject to lie.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040111-56

116. MARY BROWN and SARAH LAMB were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Price , David Keen and others being therein, about the hour of eight in the forenoon of the 10th of January, and stealing three gowns, value 3 l. three shawls, value 15 s. a petticoat, value 7 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of the said Elizabeth Price .

ELIZABETH PRICE sworn. - I live at No. 9, Hemlock-court : On the 10th of January, I lost three gowns, six petticoats, four shifts, two silk handkerchiefs, one muslin handkerchief, a pair of stockings, and one pair of sheets; they were left in the front parlour in the drawers; the drawers were open; I had seen them the night before.

Q. What have you to say with respect to the prisoners at the bar? - A. Patterns of the gowns were carried round to the pawnbrokers, and the prisoners were stopped by the pawnbrokers; I saw the gowns again the same day, at ten o'clock.

Q. How came you to miss them? - A. I went out between eight and nine in the morning; I left the lodgers in bed, there was a family in the first floor, and a family in the second; I came back again in the space of ten minutes.

Q. How did you miss your things? - A. When I came in again, a little boy came down to light a candle, and then I missed the things.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you the landlady of the house yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. You are not a married woman? - A. No.

Q. You never saw the prisoners about the house at all? - A. No.

Q. Did not you see a man coming from towards your house with a bundle under his arm? - A. No, I did not.

JOHN WINGFIELD sworn. - Q. What are you by business? - A. A pawnbroker, at No. 178, Drury-lane: On the 10th of January, some people came round with some patterns of gowns; I was not in the shop at the time; I believe it was the constable and Mrs. Price's son, and about eleven o'clock the two prisoners came into the boxes, and the stoutest of the two, Mary Brown , offered two cottons gowns and a quilted petticoat; she asked thirty shillings on them; in consequence of having the patterns, we recollected the gowns; I locked the outside door, and secured them; I sent our young man to where the prosecutrix lived; Mr. Read, the constable, and Mrs. Price's son came, and the other prisoner had a bundle containing the other articles mentioned in the indictment; we took them into the parlour; Mr. Read searched them, and then we took them to Bow-street; I asked Mary Brown how she came by these things; she said a young woman, or two young women. I don't know which, gave them the things to pledge, and said if they would pledge them, they would give them a new shawl apiece, and one new shawl was found in the pocket of one of them, I think Sarah Lamb .

JAMES READ sworn. - Q. What do you know of this matter? - A. On the 10th of January, between the hours of eight and nine, Mrs. Price's son came to me, and told me her house was broke open, and that she was robbed of her apparel; she gave me an account of what was lost, and I advised her going about with patterns of the gowns; I was afterwards sent for to Mr. Wingfield's; the two prisoners were in the boxes, and he shewed me two gowns and a petticoat that Mary Brown had offered to pledge; I took this bundle from Sarah Lamb , (producing it;) I asked her what she had got there, and she said it did not signify to me how she came by them; I said, I must see what they were, and then she gave them into my hands.

Brown's defence. Two young men had desired us to pledge the things, and they would give us a shawl apiece; and, being unfortunate girls, they said they would go home with us afterwards.

Lamb's defence. I can say no more than this young woman says.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-57

117. JOHN BREWSTER and JOHN BROWN were indicted for making an assault, in the King's highway, on the 26th of December , upon Thomas Barry , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 50 s. his property .

THOMAS BARRY sworn. - Q. Do you remember, on the 26th of December, meeting with either of the prisoners any where? - A. Yes, between twelve and one o'clock at night, in Parker's-lane, Drury-lane ; I was going home, and the prisoner, Brown, came up to me.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. No, I did not know either of them before; Brown came up to me, and put his handkerchief into my face, and Brewster came up directly in the front of me; Brown pretended to wipe my face, because the night was wet, it rained; Brewster then snatched the watch out of my pocket, and ran away; I pursued him till the watchman caught him; one went one way, and the other the other; I cried out stop thief, all the way into Drury-lane, till the watchman stopped him.

Q. Did you find your watch? - A. No, he was searched at the watch-house, but the watch was not found upon him.

Q. While the handkerchief was over your face, how did you know it was Brewster that took

the watch, you could not see him? - A. Yes, I could.

Q. What sort of a night was it? - A. Moonlight.

Q. When was the other man taken? - A. He followed us to the watch-house, and I knew him, and he was taken into custody.

Q. Then are you sure it was Brown? - A. I saw two men come up to me, they spoke to me about the weather.

Q. How long were they with you before they put the handkerchief to your face? - A. Two minutes.

Q. What were you doing for those two minutes? - A. Sitting still.

Q. Why did not you go on, you said you were going home? - A. They came before me, and I stared and looked at them; I did not mind that they were thieves.

Q. Did it rain at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Then it could not be moon-light? - A. It was not dark.

- BUCKLEY sworn. - On the night of the 26th of December, a little after twelve o'clock, I heard a hue and cry out of Parker's-lane into Drury-lane; I turned round, and saw the prisoner, Brewster, running, but not very fast, however it was fast enough to make me think it was after him the hue and cry was, and I went after him, and stopped him; the prosecutor came up directly, and told me he had robbed him of his watch; I took him to the watch-house, and he was searched, but no watch found upon him; the prisoner, Brown, followed us, as it were, to prove an alibi for the prisoner, Brewster, to clear him of the charge; but Barry made one against him, and charged him as an accomplice, and he was taken into custody also.

Q. (To Barry.) What was this watch? - A. An old-fashioned silver watch.

Q. Did you see it thrown away or dropped? - A. No, only by all accounts, Brown made away with it before he came after Brewster; they seemed so close against one another, one made off one way, and the other the other.

Brewster's defence. I was going home to my sister's, and the watchman laid hold of me.

Brown's defence. I went to the watch-house to see what was the matter, and the prosecutor said I was concerned; if I had been guilty of the robbery, I should not have been so foolish as to go to the watch-house.

Q. (To Buckley.) What sort of a night was it? - A. Rather a rainy night.

Q. Parker's-lane is not much lit up with lamps? - A. Sometimes they were lit, and sometimes not.

Q. Was it light enough to see a man's face to know him? - A. I think it was; it appeared to me that the prosecutor was in liquor, and since he has been enquiring of me about it, as much as if he did not recollect.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040111-58

118. WILLIAM WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , a silver desert-spoon, value 3 s. a silver tea-spoon, value 1 s. a silver fork, value 10 s. and a silver pencil-case, value 1 s. the property of Ann Robley , widow .

ANN ROBLEY sworn. - I am a widow, and live at Stoke Newington : I had missed the desert-spoon about a month, and the fork about five or six weeks before I saw them at Worship-street, which was about the 24th or 26th of December; the prisoner was my gardener , he lived in a cottage on the premises; he was in my service when he was taken up; I had no suspicion of him till I was sent for to identify him.

JAMES HALL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, at No. 8, Old-street-road: On the 21st of December, the prisoner came to our shop, and offered a silver fork, a silver desert-spoon, and a silver pencil-case; I asked him how he came by them; he told me his fellow-servant gave it to him to sell for him, and that he lived with a lady, of the name of Agar, at Walthamstow; the fork was broke, and it appeared to have been done wilfully, and not by accident; I had a suspicion he had not come honestly by them, and I detained him.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - On the 21st of December, I was sent for to Mr. Hall's shop to take the prisoner into custody; the articles were then on the counter; I said to the prisoner, where did you have these things from? the tea-spoon, he said, he found in the garden; the fork, he said, he had from one John, that lived with Mrs. Agar, at Walthamstow, a fellow-servant of his; the prisoner was committed, and I found out Mrs. Robley's house, and she came and identified the prisoner and the fork.

Mrs. Robley. The fork has the letter R upon it, I have no doubt of its being mine.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

Mrs. Robley. He has been with me three years, and I never suspected him of any thing of that kind.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-59

119. SUSANNAH HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , a cloak, value 5 l. a table-cloth, value 5 s. two gowns, value 1 l. a shift, value 5 s. three silver table-spoons, value 2 l. three silver tea-spoons, value 7 s. and a salt-spoon, value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Spencer , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Ann Hopkins .

ELIZABETH SPENCER sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital .

Q. Are you married or single? - A. Single.

Q. Do you live in a house of your own, or do you lodge there? - I lodge in the house of Mary Hopkins .

Q. Are you sure her name is Mary? - A. Yes: the prisoner lived servant with me, she had only been with me two days: On the 2d of December, in the morning, she absconded between four and five o'clock; when I got up, I missed a black velvet cloak, a table-cloth, three table-spoons, two cotton gowns, a silver salt-spoon, and a shift; I have seen them since at Bow-street.

JOHN BANNISTER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. George Lane, pawnbroker, No. 185, Holborn, (produces a cloak and two gowns;) I received them in pledge from the prisoner on the 2d of December, in the morning, about eight or nine o'clock.

WILLIAM ATKINS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; I apprehended the prisoner in an apartment in King-street, where I found this gown, (produces it,) and a duplicate of three silver table-spoons, three tea-spoons, and one salt-spoon, pledged with Mr. Lane, in Holborn.

(The property was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. The night before my mistress called me into her bed-room, and said, she was to have a gentleman to sleep with her that night; she said, she had a bill to make up in the morning, and the gentleman would not give her any more than two guineas, and desired me to pledge these things, which I did accordingly; and I went to see a fire in my way back, lost part of the money, and I was afraid to go home.

Q. (To Spencer.) Did you give the prisoner any authority to pawn these things? - A. I did not; all that she says is false.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-60

120. ANN HURLE was indicted for feloniously, falsely, making, forging, and counterfeiting, on the 12th of December , a certain instrument, or letter of attorney, with the name Benjamin Allin thereunto subscribed, purporting to have been signed, sealed, and delivered, by one Benjamin Allin , of Greenwich, in the county of Kent, gentleman , a proprietor of certain annuities and stock transferable at the Bank of England, called Three per Cent. Reduced Annuities, to sell, assign, transfer, and convey, the sum of five hundred pounds of the said transferable annuities, the property of the said Benjamin Allin , to her, the said Ann Hurle , with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing as true a like forged deed, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Two other Counts. For the like offence, charging it to be with intention to defraud Benjamin Allin .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Bosanquet, and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

GEORGE FRANCILLON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You are a stock-broker? - A. I am.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect her applying to you on or about the 10th of December about any stock? - A. On the 10th of December last, she waited upon me at the Bank Coffee-house, requesting me I would take out a power of attorney for the sale of five hundred pounds Reduced.

Q. You were acquainted with her before, I believe? - A. I had known her five or six months; she told me it was to come out of the name of a Mr. Benjamin Allin , of Greenwich.

Q. That is a technical expression, which means that it was to be transferred from his stock? - A. Yes; she told me Mr. Benjamin Allin was an elderly gentleman residing at Greenwich, that she had been brought up in his family, her aunt had been for many years house-keeper and nurse to Mr. Allin, and that the five hundred pounds stock was a gift to her as a reward or recompence for her services to him for some years; according to that instruction, I took out a power of attorney, and delivered it to her.

Q. On the same day? - A. On the same day, for the purpose of taking back to Greenwich to be executed.

Q. There is an office in the Bank for the purpose of taking out the powers of attorney? - A. Yes; she told me she wanted it executed that afternoon, and return with it on the Monday morning, for the purpose of either selling the stock, or transferring it into her own name; on the Monday morning, at eleven o'clock, she brought back the power of attorney, executed, in the name of Benjamin Allin .

Q. Look at that, is that the instrument she brought back? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. You see the description of the attesting witnesses,

"of Greenwich?" - A. The residence was signed afterwards by me; I desired her to wait a few minutes while I went into the office to have the power passed, and in the mean time, as she said she would sell the stock, I would enquire the price of the stock; she said, she would sell the stock, and not have it transferred into her own name; in about twenty minutes I returned to the Reduced Office to know if they had passed the power; she

was at that time at the Bank Coffee-house; the power is left in the Office for the Bank clerk to examine it, and see whether it is a correct power; in about twenty minutes I went back to enquire if it was ready; I then found Mr. Bateman, the clerk who passes the powers, desired to see me; I went to him with Ann Hurle , the prisoner; when we got to his Office, he said that the signature of Benjamin Allin differed from the hand-writing they had at the Bank; he asked me if I knew Mr. Benjamin Allin .

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was the prisoner near enough to hear all this? - A. She was close to me; I told him no, I only knew Ann Hurle , who was made the attorney under the power; he asked her if she knew him; she said, yes; that she had been brought up and acquainted in the family from a child; that he was a very old man, near ninety, in an infirm state of health, and if the hand-writing differed, she accounted for it from his not being much in the habit of writing; on that account there might be some difference in the signature, but if it was necessary, she would take out a fresh power of attorney, if there were any doubts about this; Mr. Bateman replied, it would be a pity to put her to the additional expence of a fresh power; he said, he had some slight knowledge of one of the witnesses, Mr. Peter Verney ; Mr. Bateman wrote a memorandum at the bottom, which he wished her to get him to sign, that

"the within-mentioned Benjamin Allin has been many years personally known to me," and to return with it in the morning, that the stock should then be sold. While we were in Mr. Bateman's office together, in giving some little account of herself and Mr. Allin's family at Greenwich, she said, a few days before she had been married. On leaving Mr. Bateman's office before she left the Bank, I told her if she was married, which I was surprised to hear, that the power of attorney should have been taken out in her married name, and not in her maiden name, and that we must have a fresh power, or it would be of no use. She then told me she was very sorry she dropped any thing about her being married, for she had every reason to believe her marriage was not a good one. She then gave me the particulars of going to Bristol with a young man of the name of James Innis , whom she described as a person of bad character, that she had got acquainted with but a few days before, who persuaded her to go down to Bristol, and he would marry her. I then asked her what church she was married at, at Bristol; she said, not at a church, but at a private house in the afternoon; that within two hours after her being married, the man took what money she had, part of her clothes, and then left her; she heard that he entered on board a ship, and likewise that he was a married man; that either she or one of her friends had seen the certificate of his former marriage; that on her return to town, and then to Greenwich, she acquainted her friends in what manner she had been used by him, and that all her friends, as well as Mr. Benjamin Allin , requested her to go by her own name of Ann Hurle , as she certainly was not lawfully married to Innes; she then took the power of attorney back with her to have the memorandum at the back signed, and said she would be with me on the Tuesday morning. After she was gone, not being quite satisfied in my own mind whether she was married or not, and not wishing to run the risk of identifying a married woman as a single woman, or a single woman as a married woman, in my way home I called on Messrs. Owen and Hicks, of Bartlett's-buildings, attornies to the family; they recommended her to me last spring.

Q. What passed there is not material? - A. On the Tuesday morning, at eleven o'clock, she returned with the power of attorney, signed at the back of it Peter Verney , cheesemonger, of Greenwich; being then pretty certain, but not quite, that it was a forgery, I again put her off to be with me again on the Wednesday morning, intending in the mean time to make enquiry respecting the power, whether it was a good one or not; in the afternoon of Tuesday, myself and her father went to Greenwich; I went to Mr. Allin's house by myself, having the power of attorney with me.

Q. When did you see her again? - A. On the Wednesday morning; I got to the Bank pretty early, and went to Mr. Newcomb, the principal clerk in the Reduced Office, about ten o'clock; in going through the rotunda at the Bank, I saw the prisoner and a man with her standing just by the door going in; I said, Miss Hurle, you are come very early this morning, I will be with you in a minute, and immediately left her; from that time I did not see her till she was apprehended.

Q. Had you delivered up the power of attorney before that? - A. Not before that; after mentioning the circumstance to Mr. Newcomb, he took me to the accomptant-general; the accomptant-general took me before the Directors of the Bank, and they requested me to give the power of attorney up.

Q. Did you see it afterwards delivered over to Mr. Kay, the solicitor? - A. I gave it up in the morning, I should suppose between eleven and twelve, and I was again sent for in the afternoon.

Q. Do you know that to be the same power of attorney? - A. Yes, by this P being blotted a little, and wrote again, and also by my own hand-writing upon it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The description of the witnesses were wrote by yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not understand, from the whole tenor of her conversation, that there was a connection

between her and a man of the name of Innes? - A. Yes, I found there was an acquaintance, and a pretended marriage.

Q. You left the power of attorney the first time in the office for some time? - A. For about twenty minutes.

Q. It then passed into different hands, did it not? - A. It did.

Q. And you did not see it again for the space of twenty minutes? - A. Thereabouts.

Q. Did you know the person that was with her afterwards when you saw her early on the Wednesday morning? - A. I did not.

Q. Have you ever understood whether that person was Innes? - A. He was not.

Mr. Giles. Q. Had you written the words

"of Greenwich" upon it before it was left in the Office? - A. Yes, I had.

Jury. Q. Were you present during the conversation with her and Mr. Bateman? - A. Yes, I was.

THOMAS BATEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. I believe you are inspector of letters of attorney? - A. Yes, I am appointed to examine the letters of attorney; that is one part of my department.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner and the last witness coming to the Office? - A. To my Office, in the Four per Cents.

Q. Did they bring any paper with them? - A. Yes, this power of attorney; there is a memorandum of mine at the corner.

Q. Do you know, from any thing upon the paper, that that is the paper they brought with them? - A. Yes, it has my writing upon it; it is the same paper that Mr. Francillon and the prisoner brought.

Q. Did you examine that paper? - A. I did.

Q. Did any conversation pass respecting that paper in the prisoner's presence? - A. Certainly, between me and the prisoner, and the last witness.

Q. Be so good as state what that conversation was? - A. The prisoner, with the last witness, came to my Office to ask the objections I had to passing or admitting this power of attorney; I told her, I had compared the signature with the former signature of Mr. Allin, that there was a difference in the present signature and the former signature of Mr. Allin; in answer to which, she said, she expected it would be so; that Mr. Allin had been long out of the habit of writing, so much so, that her aunt signed all his drafts upon his banker; in answer to this, I said to her, perhaps your aunt has signed this for him; no, she said, I might depend upon it that Mr. Allin had signed that himself; I believe I put this question to her a second time, suspecting that her aunt might have signed it; to which she answered, I might depend upon it, it was not so; I then said, Pray, Ma'am, if I may ask you the question, what is this old gentleman going to do with this 500 l. she answered me, that he was going to make her a present of it for the great care and attention that she had many years paid him, and that her aunt was willing he should so do. I then asked her how this power came in this mutilated state; to which she answered, just as it was going to be executed, the dog had got hold of it and tore it; if that was any objection to the power she would take out a fresh one. I did not think any part of it torn to affect the validity of it; I therefore told her the Bank of England would never wish to put any constituent to any expence that might be fairly and properly avoided. To the best of my recollection, seeing the name of Peter Verney , a cheesemonger, of Greenwich, being a name I had well known and a respectable man, I asked her if she knew Mr. Verney; to which she answered, that she did; that he had been many years the cheesemonger of the family.

Q. Meaning Mr. Allen's family? - A. Yes; I observed to her, that he was a considerable proprietor of stock, and if he would certify what I should write upon the back of the paper as to his personal knowledge of Mr. Allen, I then would take the matter into further consideration when she brought it back again, and from that till the present time I have not seen the power of attorney.

Q. After that you saw nothing of the prisoner? - A. I saw her the morning after in the Rotunda, along with a man, but I had no conversation with her.

BENJAMIN ALLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Do you reside at Greenwich? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you a person in your service of the name of Hurle? - A. Yes, Jane Hurle .

Q. Do you know a young woman of the name of Ann Hurle , who is her niece? - A. Yes.

Q. Has she been much in your family? - A. I have seen her, but I have not been much in her company, nor much in any company.

Q. What was the latest time that you recollect her to have been at your house? - A. Upon my word I cannot really tell.

Q. Be so good as look at this paper, and inform the Court whether this is your signature, the words Benjamin Allin ? - A. It was the 1st of December I am told, but I never sign any thing but for the money I was to receive at the Bank.

Q. Be so good as look at it? - A. I know I never did sign it, and this is not my hand.

Q. Are you positively sure that is not your writing? - A. Yes, I am sure of it, that is not my hand-writing; I write nothing else but only receipts, and when I have received money from my banker, Mr. Powell, in Lombard-street.

Q. Do you usually write your name at full length? - A. I have not written it at full length for sometime.

Q. Do you mean for years or months? - A. For years for what I know; I cannot recollect how long.

Q. Did you in December, or any time lately, authorize any person to sell any of your stock? - A. God bless me, no, I don't know of any I am sure.

Q. Do you know Peter Verney, a cheesemonger? - A. I don't know any person of that name to my knowledge; I may know such a person by sight, but I don't know him.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Thomas Noulden , a carpenter? - A. No; Mr. Nowland I have seen I believe.

Q. Did you ever put your name to a paper in the presence of Peter Verney and Thomas Noulden ? - A. I don't know that ever I did.

Q. This paper is dated the 10th of December, are you able to say whether you did or not? - A. I don't know indeed; I think not, and if I did, could not those persons say I did.

Q. When you had occasion to sign papers, who was the person that used to present them to you? - A. One Miss Hurle, Miss Jane Hurle , she is the person who receives for me my dividends.

Q. By Mrs. Jane Hurle , do you mean your housekeeper, the aunt of the prisoner, or do you mean the prisoner? - A. The person that lives with me, I call it keeping the house; she lives in the house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Then we are to understand the aunt was the person who brought all the papers to you to sign? - A. God bless me, a gentleman of the Bank, Mr. Winter, I believe shewed me some papers to sign.

Mr. Garrow. Q. You are speaking of an examination before the Magistrate at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. The question you are asked is, whether when papers were presented to you to sign respecting your money transactions, Mrs. Jane Hurle was the person who presented those papers to you? - A. Yes; I used to sign them by her presentation.

PETER VERNEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Are you a cheesemonger at Greenwich? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have known her by coming backwards and forwards to my house for her grandmother.

Q. Do you know Mr. Benjamin Allin ? - A. I never saw him in my life till this morning.

Q. Look at this paper, is the name Peter Verney your hand-writing? - A. No.

Q. Look at the indorsement at the back of it, is the name Peter Verney to that indorsement your hand-writing? - A. It is not.

Q. Did you ever see it before it was shewn to you at the Mansion-house? - A. I did not.

Q. Was that after the apprehension of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

THOMAS NOULDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. You reside at Greenwich? - A. Yes.

Q. What is your business? - A. A carpenter.

Q. Look at that paper, do you see your own name written there? - A. Yes, but it is not my writing.

Q. Did you see that instrument executed? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Mr. Allin? - A. I never saw him but once before to-day.

Q. You never saw him execute that instrument? - A. No.

Q. When was the only time you ever saw him before? - A. I suppose twelve or thirteen years ago, when he removed from one house to the other.

Q. I believe you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, to my great mortification.

Q. You are related to her I believe? - A. Yes, I am her godfather.

JANE HURLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. I understand you reside in the family of Mr. Allin, and have done for some years? - A. Twelve years.

Q. I believe you have the principal management of his concerns? - A. I live with Mr. Allin as his housekeeper, and attend upon him.

Q. The young woman at the bar is your niece I understand? - A. Yes.

Q. When Mr. Allin has occasion to execute any paper, or put his name to any paper, who presents them to him? - A. I do, and I have two in my pocket now.

Q. What is the latest period at which you have seen the young woman at the bar at Mr. Allin's house? - A. Before Michaelmas.

Q. She has not been there since that you know of? - A. No.

Q. Could she have access to Mr. Allin without your knowledge? - A. Not since Michaelmas.

Q. Look at that paper - from your intimate acquaintance with Mr. Allin's manner of writing, do you think that is his? - A. I can't say it is, but it is like his hand-writing.

Q. Did you ever see him write the word Benjamin to any signature of his at full length? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Mr. Verney and Mr. Noulden? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see either of them in company with Mr. Allin? - A. Never.

Q. Could they at any time since Michaelmas last have had access to Mr. Allin, and attested any deed in his presence without your knowledge? - A. No.

Q. Was it impossible? - A. It was impossible.

Q. Did you ever present the paper now shewn to you to Mr. Allin? - A. No.

Q. When did you first know that such a paper was in existence? - A. Mr. Francillon brought it down to me.

Q. Until that time you had no knowledge that any such paper was in existence? - A. No.

Q. How many years has Mr. Allin kept within doors? - A. Above forty or fifty for any thing I know.

Q. How long within your own knowledge? - A. As long as I can remember.

Q. And no person has access to him without your knowledge? - A. Only myself and the person that shaves him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you to say you cannot say positively whether it is Mr. Allin's hand-writing or not? - A. It is so much like it, that I should have said it was his hand-writing.

Q. You have been in the habit, as you have lived with him so many years, of taking a variety of papers to him to sign during that long course of time, have you not? - A. Yes.

(The power of attorney read.)

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel.

GUILTY , Death , aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-61

121. THOMAS HOLMES was indicted for that he, on the 26th of October , being employed in certain business relating to the Post-office, that is, in receiving and carrying divers letters and packets, to be sent by the post from the General Post-office in London to divers places, a certain letter, intended to be sent by the post, from the said General Post-office, to one Jane Griffin , at Oakingham, in the county of Berks, containing therein two Bank-notes for the payment of the sum of 1 l. each, came to his hands and possession, being such person so employed; and that he afterwards did feloniously secrete the said letter containing the said Bank-notes, the said Bank-notes being the property of one Richard Maxon .

Second Count. Charging it to be a packet, instead of a letter.

In Two other Counts. For feloniously secreting like Bank-notes, one stating them to be contained in a letter, the other, in a packet, and charging them to be the property of Jane Griffin , instead of Richard Maxon .

And in Four other Counts. For feloniously stealing from and out of a certain letter, and from and out of a certain packet, like Bank-notes; in two Counts, charging them to be the property of Richard Maxon , and in the other two, of Jane Griffin .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Myers, and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

LUCY MAXON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodfall. I am the wife of Richard Maxon .

Q. Where do you reside? - A. At No. 6, Spring-street, Portman-square.

Q. Do you remember, about the 25th of October last, having written a letter into the country? - A. On the 25th, or 26th of October last, I am not certain which, I went into Gloucester-place.

Q. Did you send a letter into the country on one of those days? - A. Yes.

Q. What did it contain? - A. It contained two one-pound Bank-notes; it was directed to Mrs. Jane Griffin , Broad-street, Oakingham, Berks.

Q. When did you make that memorandum you are about to look at? - A. The instant before I enclosed them in the letter. (Produces the memorandum.) (Reads.)

"No. 13858, 13th August, 1803. No. 1057, 24th May, 1803."

Q. What did you do with the letter? - A. I met the bellman in Gloucester-place; I gave him the letter, telling him it contained property, and he refused it.

Q. Was any other bellman within hearing at that time? - A. Not that I recollect; I then went on to the top of Gloucester-street , on the border of Portman-square.

Q. How far from the other bellman? - A. I cannot exactly say; it was all in one straight line.

Q. Have you shewn the place, where you delivered the letter, to any one? - A. Yes, Mr. Fergusson, the inspector.

Q. Was that other bellman walking, or standing still? - A. I could scarcely distinguish whether he was or not, it was very foggy; I heard his bell ring, and called to him; he took my letter in one hand, and pressed it in the other, and then, apparently to me, dropped it in the bag.

Q. Had you any conversation with that postman? - A. None, that I recollect, further than giving him a shilling to pay the penny.

Q. You were some minutes with him then, of course? - A. Yes, waiting for change.

Q. Did you notice his person at all? - A. Yes, he was a tall man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is your husband alive? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Was the other bellman a tall man? - A. Not so tall as this.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you able to say with which hand the person took the letter? - A. I believe he took it in his right hand, and pressed it in his left.

JOHN MOSS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. Q. You are an officer of the Bank, I believe? - A. I am a clerk in the Bank.

Q. Look at that Bank-note - what is the number of it? -

Mr. Knapp. Q. Where did you get it from? - A. From Mr. Parkin; it has been in my possession before.

Q. Did you put any mark upon it? - A. No; it has been in my possession several times, backwards

and forwards to and from Mr. Parkin; I know the note perfectly well, No. 13858, 13th August, 1803, one pound.

Q. When was that note brought into the Bank of England? - A. On the 18th of November.

Q. By whom was it brought into the Bank of England? - A. It was brought from Esdaile and Company, with some other notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. With some other one-pound notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you the person that received them? - A. No, I only know it from the Bank-books.

Q. Are the Bank-books here? - A. No.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Look at that - has that been paid into the Bank? - A. Yes, on the 12th of December.

Q. How do you know that? - A. Only by reference to the Bank-books.

Mr. Garrow. We will send for the Bank-books.

Q. (To Mrs. Maxon.) Cast your eye upon that note - is that one of those that you inclosed in the letter to your mother? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you put any mark upon it? - A. It is the same number and date.

JANE GRIFFIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Where do you reside when you are at home? - A. At Oakingham, in Berkshire.

Q. Is Mrs. Maxon your daughter? - A. My daughter-in-law.

Q. Did you receive any letter from her in the month of November last, inclosing two Bank-notes of one pound each? - A. No.

Q. Did you expect some remittances from her? - A. Yes.

Q. It never arrived? - A. No.

HUGH FERGUSSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodfall. Q. You are inspector of letter-carriers? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect accompanying Mrs. Maxon to any part of Portman-square? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. How long since may that have been? - A. It may be about a week, I cannot exactly say the day.

Q. Did she point out to you the spot where she delivered the letter? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 26th of October, within whose collection would that place have been? - A. Thomas Holmes 's.

Q. Are the letter-carriers confined to particular districts? - A. Yes.

Q. Can they receive letters in any other districts? - A. Not in any other.

Q. On the 25th and 26th, was it the duty of Holmes to have been there? - A. It was.

Q. Upon letters being delivered to him, what was he to do? - A. To put them into the bag, of course.

Q. Have you got that bag here? - A. Yes. (Produces it.)

Court. Q. Do you mean that that is the very bag the prisoner had that night? - A. Yes.

Mr. Woodfall. Q. To whom is the bag afterwards delivered? - A. To a clerk at the Post-office.

Q. Is the bag hung over the shoulder? - A. I believe it is usually carried on the arm; some carry it across the shoulder, and some on the arm.

Court. (To Maxon.) Q. Is that the sort of bag that the man had, to whom you gave the letter? - A. I am quite ignorant of that, it was dark.

Q. How did he hold it? - A. I think, under his arm.

Q. And did he hold it under his arm, when he gave you the change? - A. Yes.

Mr. Woodfall. (To Mr. Fergusson.) Q. Is it possible to extract a letter from that bag, notwithstanding it is locked? - A. Yes, I have seen that done; they may shake out all the letters, but not any particular letter.

Q. I understand it is the duty of the carrier to convey this bag to Stratford-place? - A. To the end of Bond-street, where a man is stationed with a cart to receive the bags; that is the rendezvous for all of them at that end of the town to go to Bond-street, that they may assist one another not to come so far.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you to say, the prisoner was on that beat that night? - A. No.

Q. You did not see him upon the beat? - A. No; it was his duty to be upon the beat that night.

Q. But whether he was, or not, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. One postman will very often assist another in his duty? - A. If a man is taken ill, or has leave of absence, we have people to do that duty; it is never done without acquainting me; we have proper officers for that duty.

Q. The corner of Bond-street is the end of his district? - A. No, his district is Portman-square, and he brings his letters to Bond-street, which is a general place of rendezvous.

Q. Sometimes they do not go to the full extent of their beat? - A. No, they are saved by one another.

Q. Then, supposing a man with that bag did not go to the extent of his beat, and another person taking the letters on that part of the beat that he did not go to, would have the letters? - A. He would have the whole bag; sometimes another man carries the bag, but the letters of that district are all in one bag.

Q. Look at your book, and see if he was on duty that night? - A. Yes, and on the 25th; he came upon duty after his illness; he came to the office on the 25th.

Q. And upon the 26th, was he there? - A. He was.

WILLIAM CHAPLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Myers. Q. You are the post-master at Oakingham? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Did the bag arrive as usual, on the 26th and 27th of October last, with the mail from London? - A. Yes.

Q. And the letters were duly delivered? - A. They were delivered by the letter-carrier within half an hour after they came in.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Delivered by your letter-carrier? - A. Yes.

Q. Is your letter-carrier here? - A. No.

WILLIAM FOLKARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Are you a letter-carrier at the Post-office? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time receive that Banknote, (shewing him one), and from whom? - A. I received this note from the prisoner.

Q. Is there a regulation at the Post-office, that the Bank-notes passing through the hands of the carriers, shall have their names written upon them? - A. Yes.

Q. Had that the prisoner's name upon it? - A. Yes, and I wrote my name under it.

Q. Are you quite sure you received it from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. For what purpose? - A. He said he could not make his money even for the Receiver-General's office, without change for a pound-note, and I gave him change for it.

Q. You are not able to ascertain the actual day, I understand? - A. No; I paid it into the Receiver-General's office that same morning.

Q. Do you remember sometime afterwards, an enquiry being made respecting this note? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of that, had you any conversation with the prisoner? - A. Not till after he had been at Mr. Parkins's; he then said to me that he had taken them of Mr. Jennings, at the Three Compasses, by carrying him silver.

Q. What did he say he had taken from Jennings at the Three Compasses? - A. He said he had carried six pounds worth of small change, and had taken six one-pound notes; he said this was one of the six one-pound notes he took at that time.

Q. Did he give any account of what he had done at the time, as to writing, or any thing of that sort? - A. No.

Q. Did he say how long before he had taken them? - A. No; he said he always signed the name of the persons he took them from, and as he took that of Mrs. Jennings, he had signed her name to it.

Q. Does the name of Mrs. Jennings appear upon it? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When this conversation took place between you and the prisoner, you don't know? - A. No; this was the day he had been to Mr. Parkins.

Q. But when that was, you don't know? - A. No.

Q. Are you a letter-carrier? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it an uncommon thing for you to find publicans in change, where you stop to get refreshment? - A. No, by no means.

Q. Then there was nothing particular in the account the prisoner gave, that made you think that uncommon at all? - A. Not at all.

Q. How long have you been in the Post-office yourself? - A. Fourteen or fifteen years.

Q. Is it your custom to put upon a note the person's name from whom you receive it? - A. I generally get the person I take it of to sign it themselves, and then I put my name upon it.

Q. Do you know how long the prisoner has been in the office? A. Many years, I cannot say how long; he was there before me.

Q. Was there any person in the Post-office entitled to a better character than he was? - A. I never heard a better character given to any man in my life, in the office, or out.

Q. Do you know Mr. Jennings's house? - A. I have been there.

Q. Have you been in the habit of getting notes changed there? - A. I have, in the course of last summer, been with the prisoner to Jennings's house, when I have seen the prisoner give him some change, and he has given him ones and twos for it.

THOMAS COLEBACK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodfall. Q. You belong to the General Post-office? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect early in December last to have seen the prisoner upon the subject of any Bank-notes? - A. Yes; upon the Bank-notes being put into my hand, I saw the names of Folkard and Holmes, whom I recollected to be letter-carriers.

Court. Q. When was it - do you know? - A. On the 10th of December, I requested Folkard might be sent for into the inspector of letter-carrier's room; I sent for both, but I sent for Folkard first; I asked Holmes if he had paid that note to Folkard; he said, if I did, it has my name upon it, and when I shewed it him, he, without the least embarrassment, acknowledged the name of Holmes to be his hand-writing, and appeared perfectly unembarrassed; I asked him if he had any recollection from whom he had taken it; he begged to look at the note again, and said, yes, I have written the name of Jennings upon it, from whom I took it; he keeps the sign of the Compasses, in Portman-mews.

Q. Did any thing more pass? - A. He went out of the room, and I made out the usual statement for the information of Mr. Parkin, and there I left it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Then he appeared

not to have the least suspicion, and made no secret of any thing? - A. Perfectly unembarrassed.

Q. How long have you been in the Post-office? - A. Twenty-two years.

Q. How long has he been in the Post-office? - A. I am not much in the habit of seeing letter-carriers; I have known him by sight five or six years.

Q. What sort of a character did he bear? - A. I never heard any thing against him.

JAMES COCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. Q. You are clerk to the Receiver-General of the Post-office? - A. Yes; I paid to the house of Esdaile and Co. 1342 l. in Bank-notes, and the remainder was in two checks; upwards of one thousand of them were small notes, in ones and twos.

THOMAS PRICE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are a clerk in the house of Esdaile and Company? - A. Yes.

Q. Did your house, on the 7th of November, receive from the office of the Receiver-General, 1342 l. in Bank-notes? - A. Yes, (refers to his book), 512 notes of one pound each.

Q. You are not able to give us the dates or numbers? - A. No.

Q. Did you afterwards tie them in a bundle, to be carried to the Bank the next day? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you put them in the usual place for depositing those things? - A. Yes.

JAMES TARLING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodfall. Q. You are a clerk to Messrs. Esdaile and Co.? - A. I am.

Q. Do you recollect, on the 8th of November, that you took any notes to the Bank? - A. Yes, I recollect it perfectly well.

Q. To what amount? - A. I cannot recollect the amount; my signature is to the paper.

Q. Did you take the bundle that Mr. Price made up? - A. Yes, I took it to the Bank.

WILLIAM JENNINGS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. Q. You keep the public-house, the sign of the Three Compasses, in South Portman-mews, Portman-square? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, very well.

Q. What do you know him to be? - A. I know him to be a postman; he used to deliver letters in Orchard-street and Portman-square, and that district.

Q. I believe you have been in the habit occasionally of receiving cash of him? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Did you ever receive any thing besides cash? - A. Yes, small notes, from one pound up to ten pounds, for which I gave him notes of five pounds and ten pounds value.

Q. You don't mean to say you never gave him any small notes? - A. I cannot say I never did; I don't remember the time when I did give him any; I have given him two-pound notes.

Q. Did you ever give him a one-pound? - A. I never did, if I had two's.

Q. Will you swear you never did give him a one-pound note? - A. No.

Q. Did you use to write your name upon notes? - A. Hardly ever, without it was a five pound, or ten pound, and then I used to write the name of whoever I took them of.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner write his name upon any notes? - A. Yes, I have, upon large notes that he received from me; I have asked him whether I should write my name upon them, or he, and he said, it did not signify which, it made no difference.

Q. Do you recollect seeing him write his name upon six one-pound notes in one day? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever give him six one-pound notes in one day? - A. Never, to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were sent for to be examined upon this subject? - A. Yes.

Q. At that time you knew there was some question as to what had become of a Bank-note which should have gone in a letter? - A. I had the letter sent me; Mr. Parkin told me so.

Q. And you know probably, that with whomsoever that Bank-note might be found, they might get into some trouble? - A. Yes.

Q. You will not swear you never gave him six one-pound notes at a time? - A. No.

ANTHONY PARKIN sworn. - Q. You are solicitor to the Post-office? - A. I am.

Q. Did you at any time, in consequence of this letter, and Bank-notes being missed, see the prisoner, and receive any account of the transaction from him? - A. On the 12th of December, Mr. Jennings, Mrs. Maxon, Mr. Fergusson, the inspector of letter-carriers, and Mr. Coleback, came to my house; a Bank-note at that time was produced to the prisoner; he looked at it, and saw his own name upon it in his own hand-writing; he saw also upon it the name of Jennings; he said he had it either from Mr. or Mrs. Jennings; it was pointed out to him that the name upon it was Mr. and not Mrs. Jennings; upon which he said, then he must have had it from Mr. Jennings; Mrs. Maxon stated the circumstance of delivering the letter to the postman , and described the place; she also said, the postman, who received the letter from her hand, apparently to her put it into his bag; the prisoner observed upon it, that if it was put into the bag, he could not get it out, or at least could not without great difficulty. Mr. Jennings suggested to the prisoner, that he had been ill, and probably he might not have been upon duty on that day; the prisoner said he had been ill, but did not

know whether he was then recovered, or not; I asked the inspector if there was any means of knowing whether he was upon duty, or not; he said, there was; I then sent to the Post-office to ascertain that fact. Nothing more passed at that time, the parties separated, and I believe he went to the Post-office. On the 18th, I sent to him to come again, he came, and I desired he would particularly state the circumstances respecting his having taken a note of Mr. Jennings. Upon that occasion, I took down in writing what he said, that on the morning of the day on which he received the note from Mr. Jennings, Mr. Jennings spoke to him, and said, he wanted a good deal of silver and small change against the evening, and that about half past four in the afternoon, he called upon Mr. Jennings with six pounds worth of small gold and silver; that Mr. Jennings was not at home; that he saw Mrs. Jennings, to whom he gave the six pounds in small gold and silver, and she gave him six one-pound Bank of England notes for it; he took a pen and ink, which stood upon the mantle-piece, and wrote Mrs. Jennings's name and his own under it, in her presence; he did not see where she took the notes from; this was done in the same room where he gave her the gold and silver; on Saturday he received the Bank-notes from Mrs. Jennings, and on Monday, having five pounds fourteen shillings to pay into the Receiver-General's office, he requested change of one of the letter-carriers, that he might give even money; Folkard gave him change, and he paid the other five notes into the Receiver-General's office; he does not know the number of any of the said notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long had the prisoner been in the Post-office? - A. I understand, about sixteen years.

Q. I believe he would in a few months, or a short time, have been entitled to an annuity of fifty pounds a year for his life? - A. Of that, the inspector can inform you best.

Q. Do you know the character he has maintained in the Post-office? - A. I understand he has maintained one of the best of characters.

Q. From the 12th of December to the 18th, when he came again to you upon the second summons, he was going about his business? - A. He was suspended upon this enquiry, but he was at perfect liberty.

ELIZABETH JENNINGS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are the wife of William Jennings , of the Three Compasses? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner Holmes? - A. Some months.

Q. Was he in the habit of furnishing you with any accommodation with respect to small change? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you lived in your house? - A. Eight years.

Q. Have you known him all the time? - A. No, only a short time.

Q. Your husband used to take small change of him, in change for what? - A. Five pound and ten pound notes.

Q. What sort of change had you from him? - A. Sometimes cash and small notes.

Q. Did you personally transact this business, and how often? - A. Not above three times, I believe; three or four times.

Q. Can you fix when about those times were? - A. The first time was in the summer, in very hot weather; the next time was the latter end of the summer, when he gave me change for a five-pound note.

Q. When was the next? - A. The next was, when I gave him a five-pound note, and a one-pound note.

Q. When was that? - A. On the 10th of December.

Q. And you got six pounds worth of change? - - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time about the 25th of October, or after that time, give him six Bank-notes of one pound each, which he changed? - A. No, I don't recollect doing any such thing.

Q. Are you certain he never did? - A. To the best of my recollection I never gave six single one-pound notes.

Q. From October to December you never did? - A. I believe I did not.

Q. Did he at any time receive from you six Bank-notes at any time at once, and write your name upon each of them? - A. No.

Q. Did you never see him write your name upon any notes? - A. Never, to my recollection.

Q. Did he ever write any thing upon them? - A. I cannot recollect that I saw him write any thing upon them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You don't mean to swear positively you did not give him six one-pound notes? - A. I cannot recollect it; to the best of my recollection I did not.

Q. Your husband was had up to be examined at Mr. Parkins's, before you were examined? - A. Yes.

Q. How long? - A. I really don't know; he was there some days before.

Q. You understood from him, when he came back, what he was examined about? - A. No, I don't know justly what it was about.

Q. But you knew it was about a note? - A. Yes.

Q. You say he did not put, at your desire, your name upon any note in your sight? - A. No.

Q. Nor you never desired him to put your name upon any note out of your sight? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Folkard? - A. Yes, I have seen him.

Q. Did you ever see him come with the prisoner to your house? - A. I really cannot say.

Q. Did not he use your house? - A. Very seldom; I cannot say I ever noticed him coming in.

Q. Did he ever give you change? - A. No.

Q. Did you never give him change? - A. No.

Q. Will you swear that Folkard neither took change from, nor gave change to you? - A. No.

Court. Q. You spoke to your recollection only of three other times; you don't think he gave you change at any other time? - A. No.

Q. If you had at any time given him six one-pound notes, is it likely you should forget it? - A. No.

Q. Do you remember Holmes taking a pen and ink from the mantle-piece, and writing upon the notes? - A. I cannot say I do.

Mr. Gurney. (To Fergusson.) Q. Can you say whether, according to the course of the Post-office, the prisoner would, in the course of a few months, have been entitled to an annuity? - A. Not a few months.

Q. How long? - A. A few years; twenty years is the allotted time, if a man is not capable of doing his duty, and then by the approbation of the post-master.

Q. That annuity is fifty pounds? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I received six one-pound notes of Mrs. Jennings, and this is one of them; I signed my name upon them, and her own, in her bar, all at the same time.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character, when the Jury declared they were satisfied as to character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-62

122. THOMAS SIMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , a chaise, value 35 l. the property of Thomas Harris .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS HARRIS sworn. - The prisoner at the bar came to my house, in company with Mr. Menou, on the 27th of October last.

Q. Who is Mr. Menou? - A. He told me he was a gentleman in the army; I have been told he is now in Tothill-fields; the prisoner came in, and asked me if I had a chaise I could let him for a month; I told him I had one; I shewed it him, it was a two-wheeled chaise; he approved of it; he said, what will you charge me for a month? I said, four guineas; he agreed to pay it me. Now, says he, if I should buy this chaise within a month, you will not charge me for the hire of it? I told him, no; he looked about the shop, and saw another two-wheeled chaise; he asked me the price of it; I asked him sixty-five guineas; he said he thought he should purchase it of me; he told me he would send a Mr. Purvis the next day for the chaise that he had hired with a note from me; he said, Mr. Purvis was a stable-keeper, where his horses stood. Accordingly, the next day, Mr. Purvis came; I asked him for the note the prisoner was to send; he told me he had lost it out of his pocket.

Q. Where is Mr. Purvis now, do you know? - A. In Newgate, I believe; I was not inclinable to let him have it without a note from Sims, and he came again the next day with a note from Sims, and I sent the chaise by Purvis.

Q. Is that the note that Purvis brought you? (shewing him a paper) - A. Yes, it is; I let Purvis have the chaise, in consequence of Purvis's recommendation of Sims; I was to call upon Sims the next day, saying he should probably buy one chaise or the other; I went and found him at No. 40, Brompton-row, Knightsbridge, it was a very elegant house apparently; he wanted to purchase that chaise, for which I asked sixty-five guineas; I told him the very lowest was sixty guineas, ready money. Nothing more particular passed at that time; he told me he was an officer in the army, that he belonged to a German regiment that lay in Hampshire; we did not agree, and then he sent me another letter.

Q. How soon after this did you find out who he was, and where your chaise was? - A. I heard that Mr. Gibbons, in Tottenham Court-road, had my chaise; it was about six weeks after he had it.

Q. When did you go to Gibbons? - A. I applied for a warrant, and found the chaise at Gibbons's on the 8th of December.

- BARNETT sworn. - I am an auctioneer: I had the chaise sent to me, I think, about the beginning of December last, from the stable to my auction-room, to be sold; it was a two-wheeled chaise, with furniture; it was the same chaise that Mr. Harris afterwards saw. An advance upon it was required by a man of the name of Sowerby, but I refused it; I said I would advertise it, and put it up in the first sale I had; the prisoner came the next day, and claimed it as his property; he seemed to say he should not sell it, and wished to have it away.

Q. Was any thing said to you about fifteen pounds? - A. He said it would not bring money enough at the approaching sale, and wanted to have it away; Sowerby said he had advanced money upon it, and claimed it as his, and Sims claimed it as his; I believe fifteen pounds was mentioned as the price of it by Sims; the chaise was sent for away while I was away, and half-a-guinea paid for the standing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The chaise

was brought to you by a person of the name of Sowerby, and when Sims came to you, he desired you not to sell it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever put it in any catalogue, or offer it for sale? - A. No.

Q. The half-guinea was paid for the mere standing? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM GIBBONS sworn. - I am a stable-keeper in Tottenham Court-road; the prisoner came to me, and told me he had a chaise, if I could find room for it to stand; that was somewhere about the 17th of November; he gave me directions where to go for it, to Mr. Barnett's, in King-street, an auctioneer, and I went to Mr. Barnett's; he was not at home, and I went the next day, and had the chaise; I paid ten shillings for the standing of it, I took it home about two days after; the prisoner asked me if I could lend him a little money upon the chaise; I lent him six pounds upon it; I took the chaise first to stand at eighteen-pence a week.

Q. Do you know Sims? - A. Yes, I know him by seeing him at different places, but I cannot tell what he is.

Q. Is he an officer in the army? - A. Not that I know of; I have known him these two years.

Q. And you have seen him backwards and forwards in town? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did not Mr. Harris tell you he had sold the chaise to the prisoner for twenty-five guineas, and did you not reply to him that he had made a hard bargain with the prisoner? - A. No, I do not recollect that.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I apprehended the prisoner at a lock-up house in White Hart-court, at Mr. Wilson's, under the sheriff's process.

Q. (To Gibbons.) Are you sure as to the time you went to Barnett's to get this chaise? - A. I think it was somewhere about the 17th of November.

Court. Mr. Barnett says it was sent to him the beginning of December.

Q. (To Barnett.) Are you accurate as to the time of the chaise being brought to your house? - A. I have a paper which Sims wrote two days after it came, and left in my accompting-house, and if that is dated, it will tell, (refers to it); it is dated the 16th; then it must have come to me about the 14th.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the chaise of him a fortnight after it was delivered to me; it is very unfortunate that I cannot get my witnesses here; he would not take my bill at a short date, but would give me credit for three weeks; after the expiration of the month, I called upon Mr. Harris, a few days before the chaise was returned, and told him I had been under the necessity of borrowing some money upon it, but he should have it again in a few days; Purvis is unfortunately a debtor on the other side of Newgate.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040111-63

123. THOMAS GRIGGS and CHARLES EADY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , twenty-five sheets of cork, value 8 l. the property of Thomas Chattam .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS CHATTAM sworn. - I am a cork-manufacturer in Holborn; I burn my cork in St. John's-street, near the Skin-market ; the prisoners were employed by one of the foremen to sweep the cork after it was burnt.

JOHN MARTIN sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Chattam: On the 1st of December I burnt to the amount of ten bundles of Cork; the prisoners came there after I had began burning it; after I had burned five bundles, both the prisoners were at work sweeping; the next five bundles were then burnt and swept; the two prisoners took a part of these five bundles from the burning-ground to a warehouse of Mr. Donothy's; I cannot say which of them did it, it was at night.

Q. Were they both together? - A. Yes; it was heaved out of the ground into the warehouse.

Q. Did the workmen ever put it out of the yard to tie it up in bundles? - A. Frequently; it is sometimes bound up in the burning-ground, and it is sometimes carried out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is Mr. Donothy's warehouse adjoining the burning-ground? - A. Yes.

Q. This burning-ground is common to several warehouses? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever known cork after it has been swept carried by mistake into wrong warehouses? - A. Not that I know of.

Court. Q. What enables you to say it was one of these two prisons? - A. Because I saw the warehouse door open, and my master's property going in; I cannot swear to either of them, but there was nobody else about there.

- DONOTHY sworn. - I live at No. 30, Cow-lane, West Smithfield; my burning-ground is in Northampton-street, Clerkenwell, near the Skin-market; I know the prisoners very well; I never saw the boy many times; they never brought me any cork.

Q. Did you lend any key to them? - A. Yes, I lent a key to Griggs.

Q. Did he apply to you for it? - A. No, I gave it him, and Mr. Walker called upon me the day before, and asked me to let him have a sack of shavings, and he said he would send Griggs for

them; he did not send him, but I saw Griggs in the morning, and I told him to take them.

Q. Did you see any cork in your warehouse? - A. Yes, I have cork of my own there.

Q. Did you ever see any of Mr. Chattam's cork there? - A. No, not to my knowledge; I was not at home from nine in the morning till ten at night.

Q. (To Martin.) Did you find any cork in Mr. Donothy's warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. Whose cork was it? - A. My master's; it had not gone through my hand above an hour, it was quite warm; there was one very remarkable sheet of cork, you would not find such a one in twenty tons, that I took particular notice of; there were twenty-five sheets.

Q. Did you miss so many sheets? - A. Not till I saw it carried away; I examined that piece after it came out of Mr. Donothy's warehouse, and knew it again immediately.

Mr. Knapp. Q. (To Chattam.) Q. Did you see the cork that was produced from Mr. Donothy's premises? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know it to be your cork? - A. I cannot swear to it.

Q. Was it customary for cork to get by mistake out of your premises into Mr. Donothy's? - A. By no means.

Griggs's defence. It was an uncommon dark night; I was putting baskets of dust into Mr. Donothy's warehouse, and Mr. Chattam's foreman might suppose I was taking in cork, but I was obliged to have one hand to feel my way with the dust; I never took any cork in at all, and the cork that Mr. Martin made me take away from Mr. Donothy's warehouse was Mr. Donothy's own.

Eady's defence. I took in two baskets of dust belonging to my master, I took no cork in.

The prisoner Griggs called three, and Eady one witness, who gave them a good character.

Donothy. I went the next morning to Mr. Chattam's, and told him the cork in that warehouse was mine; I left from twelve to fourteen sheets in my warehouse.

Q. Were your's warm? - A. No.

Q. Had you any mark upon your cork? - A. No.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-64

124. JOHN SPEIL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Gibson , George-John Gibson , and John-Christopher Alterieth , about the hour of one in the night of the 26th of December , and stealing 1 cwt. of sugar, value 5 l. and a piece of cord, value 1 d. their property; also various articles of wearing apparel belonging to the workmen .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of Thomas Gibson and George-John Gibson only.

The prisoner being a foreigner, a Jury of half foreigners were sworn.

Names of the Jury.

Richard Groom ,

Christopher Quelles ,

David Price ,

Frederick Petersdorff ,

Edward White ,

Michael Wagner ,

David Phillips ,

John Schneider ,

David Ramsay ,

John-David Sprott ,

William Wells ,

Charles Giessner .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE-JOHN GIBSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partner ship with my father, Thomas Gibson , and John- Christopher Alterieth , No. 42, Lime-street .

Q. How is your house situated with respect to the street? - A. The whole of the premises stand back from the street.

Q. How do you get out of the premises from the street? - A. The entrance is by means of a passage from Lime-street, the gates of which are shut at night; at the end of the passage part of the dwelling-house front you; the sugar-house is behind the house; it joins by means of a warehouse; the warehouse is in the middle, between the sugar-house and the dwelling-house.

Q. Is there any communication internally between the one and the other? - A. None.

Q. How do you get from the dwelling-house to the sugar-house? - A. By crossing the yard, no other way, and then into the sugar-house.

Q. Then the entrance to the sugar-house is in the yard? - A. Yes.

Q. And the sugar-house, warehouse, and dwelling-house are all surrounded by a fence are they? - A. Yes.

Q. Which way do your carts come to the sugar-house? - A. By a gateway from Lime-street.

Q. What is the back part of the sugar-house? - A. Contiguous to a church-yard, near Fen-court; there is no entrance to the sugar-house from Lime-street.

Q. Who was last up on the 26th of December last? - A. The gates are locked regularly at ten o'clock; I fastened the private door of the dwelling-house that night, but not the gates; I came home about twelve o'clock that night, the dwelling-house was then in a perfect state of security.

Court. Q. Can you get to the private door without going through the great gates? - A. We have besides the great gates a private door in the street, and from the private door in the street we have to pass through a passage to the dwelling-house.

Q. There are two doors, the one for a cart, and the other a private door? - A. Yes; I can take upon me to say that both of them were perfectly secure at that time.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Is there any other passage that leads to the sugar-house? - A. There is a passage from Lime-street by Mr. Alterieth's house, but that is never used.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge whether the door of that passage was secure that night? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You have known the prisoner some time? - A. He was in our employ about two months previous to this affair.

Q. How long had he left you before this time? - A. I believe about three days; he left us on the 22d, and on the day following he applied for his wages; we paid him his wages, deducting a week, because he left us without warning, it is the rule of our house so to do; he withdrew himself, I did not discharge him.

Q. Did you happen, after you had discovered in the morning that the sugar-house was broke open, to make any observations? - A. Yes, I saw a ladder on the side next our premises, between the church-yard and our sugar-house, by which a person might easily ascend the wall, and get over into the church-yard.

Q. You suppose that is the way the man got out? - A. Yes, we observed some foot-steps; we at first imagined the door in Fen-court had always been locked, but upon enquiry we found it had not; we then imagined he had made his entry that way.

HANS JOUBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Mess. Gibsons.

Q. On the 26th of December were you the last up? - A. No, some of the servants.

Q. What servant? - A. The footman, he is not here.

EVAN MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I apprehended the prisoner on the 27th of December last; I was on the watch in Fenchurch-street, about two o'clock in the morning; the prisoner came past me facing Rood-lane.

Q. How far from Lime-street? - A. Not far; I observed a bag, as I thought, across his shoulder, and I asked him what he had there; he replied, his clothes; I put my hand to them, and found it a hard substance; I said, these are not clothes, I must detain you, you must go along with me to the watch-house; upon taking him to the watch-house and searching him, I found twelve loaves of sugar wrapped up in some shirts; I found also a pair of breeches and a shirt under his waistcoat in the watch-house; he said, he had bought them; he was taken to the Compter that night; the next day I attended before the Lord Mayor.

Q. Was what he said there taken down by the Clerk? - A. As far as I know.

Mr. HOBLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were present when the prisoner was examined? - A. Yes.

Q. Was what the prisoner said taken down in writing? - A. No.

Mason. He said the first day he bought them of a man, but he did not know who; the next day he said Mr. Gibson had stopped him of his wages, and that he went and stole them; he said, he had got them over the wall; the officer has got the things.

JOSEPH GREGORY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I searched the prisoner in the Compter, and found upon him a shirt; in the watch-house I found upon him a knife, a pair of scissars, and a duplicate, (produces them and the whole of the property); when this watchman brought him into the watch-house, he said he had bought them of Mr. Dedman, of Virginia-street.

(The sugar was identified by one of the prosecutors' workmen; the shirts and other things were also identified by the different proprietors.)

Q. (To Mr. Gibson.) Had any part of that sugar been sold? - A. No part of it.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house, nor of burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-65

125. ELEANOR NICHOLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , three gowns, value 30 s. two shifts, value 6 s. four petticoats, value 20 s. four neck-handkerchiefs, value 9 s. two habit shirts, value 5 s. two muslin caps, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 4 s. and a bonnet, value 7 s. the property of Sarah Green , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Jarvis Wild .

SARAH GREEN sworn. - On the 24th of October I lived with my sister, Mrs. Lane, in the dwelling-house of Mr. Jarvis Wild ; I was out of place; my sister was keeping his house in Davies-street ; I lost three gowns, two shifts, four petticoats, four handkerchiefs, and two habit shirts; they were all in a box together unlocked, the room was locked.

Q. Was it your sister's room? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. Yes, her sister was a servant to Capt. Wild; she came to stay with her sister; I missed them on the 24th of October.

Q. When had you seen them before? - A. In the morning between eight and nine o'clock; I missed them between seven and eight in the evening.

Q. Did you make your loss known? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner? - A. Not till she gave herself up; I went to Queen-square.

Q. How soon did you hear that she had given herself up? - A. About a month afterwards; she

came into the house on the 20th, and went away that day.

Q. Was she at all in the house after you had told of the loss of your goods? - A. No; I gave information at Queen-square the next day.

Q. Did her sister remain in the place? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever find any of your things again? - A. Never.

Q. What was the value of these articles? - A. Ten pounds.

MARY LANE sworn. - I was taking care of Mr. Jarvis Wild 's house; I went into the house on the 8th of June.

Q. How do you know his name is Jarvis? - A. Letters have come to him directed, Jarvis Wild , Esq.

Q. Did you ever see him write his own name? - A. No; my sister came to be with me while she was out of place; she was with me about two months; the prisoner came to the house on the Thursday evening; her sister, Sarah Whitehorn , was servant to Mrs. Wild, and came to town with Mrs. Wild; the room door was locked, and the key was in the kitchen closet; my sister kept her things in my room; the first I heard of my sister's loss was, I came home, and Sarah Whitehorn told me the house had been robbed, and her sister was missing; I went up stairs, and found the key in the door; I am sure I had left it in the kitchen closet; I had seen all the property in the morning; I left the house about two o'clock at noon; my sister was gone out before; I heard nothing of the prisoner till she gave herself up; the property has never been found.

Q. Had the prisoner told you she was going that night? - A. No; she left her own clothes behind her.

MARY-ANN GRISSELL sworn. - I am a soldier's wife, I live in Strutton-Ground, Westminster; I was in prison when the prisoner was brought there for unlawfully pawning; she told me there were three more concerned with her.

Q. How long after she had been in prison, did she make this declaration? - A. The next day after she came in; I had been in a fortnight.

Q. Did you know her before? - A. No; she slept with me.

Q. How came she to tell you? - A. I told her it would be better for her to tell who were concerned with her.

THOMAS REDHEAD sworn. - I am an officer of Queen-square; I was at the Office the last day of November, and the prisoner resigned herself up; that was all that she said; the second time I was taking her down, she said it was very hard she should suffer, when there were three more concerned with her.

Q. (To Mrs. Lane.) At the time you left the house, who did you leave in the house? - A. Nobody but the prisoner.

Q. What time did you return home? - A. Not till her sister came to inform me of the robbery, between seven and eight o'clock.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY.

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040111-66

126. CECIL PITT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Page , about the hour of six in the night of the 9th of January , and burglariously stealing nine watches, value 12 l. four pair of spectacles, value 2 l. and a pair of shoe-buckles, value 15 s. the property of the said William .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker and silversmith , in Liquorpond-street, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn .

Q. Last Monday evening were you in your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. At what time was it that any thing happened? - A. About a quarter after six; I was standing very near to the inside of the glass case in my shop-window, when three squares of glass were thrust in at once; I perceived several hands in the window with gloves on, scrambling at the property in the window.

Q. What articles were exposed there? - A. Watches, jewellery, and other articles.

Q. Were there any spectacles or silver buckles? - A. Yes; I observed the sleeve of a lightish coat in the window.

Q. Did you go out? - A. I ran out immediately, and three or four men ran from the window in different directions; I followed two of them up Leather-lane, four or five doors; I was nearly in the act of laying hold of them, when they took their hands out of their waistcoat-pockets, which alarmed me, and I drew back; I still kept crying stop thief, and returned to my shop.

Q. How soon afterwards was any person brought to your shop? - A. In the course of two or three minutes.

Q. When you went back to the shop and examined the window, what did you miss? - A. The next morning I missed nine watches, I only missed two that night; the things were all knocked about, and in the confused state in which I was, I could not tell.

Q. What was the value of these watches? - A. Twenty pounds.

Q. Did you lose any spectacles? - A. Yes, four pair; a part of the things were taken out of the area afterwards.

Q. Did you miss any thing else? - A. A pair of

silver shoe-buckles; in about two or three minutes the prisoner at the bar was brought into my shop.

Q. Was any thing said to him when he was brought in? - A. The person that brought him in desired him to pull his hands out of his breeches-pocket, his right-hand was in his pocket; he took his hand out.

Q. What appearance did it exhibit? - A. It was bloody.

Q. Did you examine to see whether it was cut or not? - A. I did not examine it myself, I did not look so close as to see the cut.

Q. Did you afterwards see his glove? - A. Yes, the glove of the right-hand was bloody.

Q. Did you see whether it was or was not cut? - A. It was cut.

Q. What part of it was cut? - A. About the first finger.

Q. What part of his hand was bloody? - A. All that part of his hand.

Q. Was it light or dark at this time? - A. It was dark.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a pawnbroker? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any partner? - A. No.

Q. Has any other person an interest in the business? - A. No.

WILLIAM FILP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. With Mr. Simmons, No. 1, Field-court, Gray's Inn.

Q. What is he? - A. He studies the law.

Q. You are his servant? - A. Yes.

Q. Last Monday evening were you in Chancery-lane? - A. Yes, I was going past Chancery-lane with a letter to the General Post-office.

Q. Did you see any persons? - A. Yes, I saw six young men.

Q. Were they in company? - A. They were all together; there was a little boy with a pair of leather breeches.

Q. In consequence of any thing that passed at that time, did you take notice of them? - A. Yes, I followed them; they went down Gray's-Inn-lane, then they came back again into Holborn, and went down Leather-lane.

Q. Did they keep company all the time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you follow them all the way? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you see them stop? - A. One stopped on each side of the way in Leather-lane, just by Mr. Page's; four of them went up to the window, and pushed their hands directly through the window, and they all ran away; two of them ran away across Leather-lane.

Q. Did the two that stood still run away too? - A. Yes; when the smash was in the window, Mr. Page ran out, and the two that were in Leather-lane Mr. Page ran after, and I ran after them too; the prisoner at the bar, when he got a little up Leather-lane, holloaed out stop thief.

Q. Was the prisoner one of the six? - A. He was one of the six that I saw in Chancery-lane, and one of the four that smashed their hands through the window.

Q. Did you follow him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any body stop him? - A. Yes, there was a man coming up Back-hill.

Q. Did you see the prisoner stopped, or had you lost sight of him? - A. No, I saw him till he was taken.

Q. How near were you to him when he was taken? - A. I was pretty close to him, as close as I am to you.

Q. When he was taken, what was done with him? - A. They took him to Mr. Page's shop.

Q. Do you remember what kind of a coat he had on? - A. A kind of white with black spots, what they call pepper and salt.

Q. Are you quite sure you never lost sight of him from the time he left Mr. Page's window till he was stopped? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing of any gloves? - A. Yes, all the four who put their hands in the window, had gloves on.

Q. Did you see whether he had gloves on when he was taken? - A. No, I was pushed so at the door, I was not able to get into the shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How old are you? - A. Fourteen, the 3d of next April.

Q. You were going to take a letter to the General Post-office? - A. Yes, it had just struck six o'clock.

Q. Where is the General Post situated? - A. In Lombard-street; I saw at the corner of Gray's-Inn gate the postman who always comes into the Inn, and I gave him a penny, and the letter.

Q. Where did you see him? - A. At the corner of Gray's-Inn gate; he knew me, and took the letter.

Q. Then you went back into Gray's-Inn, did not you? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You were always behind these persons? - A. I was sometimes behind, and sometimes at the side of them; I was on the contrary side of the way in Holborn; they were upon the side next Gray's-Inn gate, and I was on the contrary side.

Q. Very near Mr. Flight's shop? - A. Yes, the corner of Southampton-buildings.

Q. That is a pretty wide part? - A. Yes.

Q. There it was you saw them in Holborn? - A. Yes.

Q. A great many carriages were passing? - A. Yes, but I kept my eye upon them all the way.

Q. There were foot-passengers on both sides the way? - A. Yes.

Q. You never had an opportunity of seeing the prisoner's face till he was taken back to Mr. Page's? - A. Yes, I had, by Chancery-lane.

Q. Was it dark or light at this time? - A. It was a moon-light night.

Q. That you are quite sure of? - A. It was not very dark.

Q. Are you quite sure it was a moon-light night? - A. I will not be certain, but I think it was.

Q. Now was it moon-light or not? - A. It was not dark.

Q. Was it moon-light or not? - A. I will not say positively whether it was or not.

Q. Then it was dark? - A. It was not very dark.

Q. The evening was shut in? - A. Yes.

Q. All you could observe were from the lamps? - A. Yes, and from the shop-windows.

Q. Did it rain? - A. It did not just at that time.

Q. Not at what time? - A. Not at a little after six.

Q. How soon did it rain? - A. It rained about half past six.

Q. It was not the lighter for that you know - now you say you saw six persons; some were very short persons, I suppose? - A. No, they were all pretty well of a size.

Q. Had you ever seen this prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. Do you know how any of the others were dressed? - A. Yes, I do; one had a light-coloured coat on; there was another had a blue coat on; another had a great coat on, I think of a brownish colour, but I cannot be sure.

Q. They were all differently dressed, but two had light coats on? - A. No, only one had a pepper and salt coloured coat.

Q. Did you ever see the face of the person you supposed to be the prisoner till you got into Mr. Page's shop? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Full face? - A. Yes.

Q. As plain as you see mine? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was that? - A. By Chancery-lane.

Q. Did you say so before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever heard there is a reward of forty pounds upon conviction of a person for burglary? - A. I was told so.

Q. When were you told so - before you saw this man or since? - A. Since.

Q. Who told you since? - A. Different people.

Q. Any body at Hatton-garden belonging to the Office? - A. No.

Q. Who then told you so? - A. Different people.

Q. You were told you would get a part of the forty pounds, were not you? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it, at the time these persons put their hands in the windows, their backs were towards you? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell the Jury how you could see that they had gloves on at that time - how near to them were you standing? - A. I was standing right facing them in Liquorpond-street.

Q. Their backs were towards you? - A. Yes.

Q. Now how can you tell that they had gloves on? - A. I saw some of them put on their gloves just before they went up to the window.

Q. Did you actually see them put their hands in the window with gloves on? - A. I cannot say I did.

Q. This shop is near Meux's brewhouse, and very dark? - A. No, there were a great many lights in the window; it was very light just there.

Q. And you never saw either of these persons in your life before? - A. No.

Q. Every one of them were nearly of the same size? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been in custody yourself? - A. No, never.

Q. Never? - A. No, never.

Q. But you have heard of the forty pounds reward? - A. Yes, I have.

JOHN RAYMENT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. A labourer.

Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 2, Tash-street, Gray's-Inn-lane.

Q. On Monday evening last, tell us what you observed? - A. On Monday evening last, I was going home up Back-hill from my labour, about a quarter past six o'clock, I heard a great crash of glass windows break.

Q. Where was that? - A. At Mr. Page's shop.

Q. How far were you from his shop at that time? - A. I suppose it might be a dozen or fifteen yards.

Q. What did you see? - A. I saw the prisoner at the bar, and two or three more, run away from the window; the prisoner was eight or ten yards from the shop; he went some little way across Leather-lane, and then made a cross double towards Back-hill, where I was crossing, about the middle of the street, he called out stop thief, stop thief, running as hard as he could.

Q. Did you pursue him? - A. He was close to where I was; he was coming right to me, and I laid fast hold of him.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him from the time of his quitting the window till you seized him? - A. No, it was not much further than from my Lord to the window that I took him.

Q. How long after the crash at the window was it that you saw him leave the window? - A. Directly.

Q. Did you take him to Mr. Page's shop? - A. Me, with another gentleman; he at first said, when I laid hold of him, don't stop me, I know nothing of the affair, I am a respectable tradesman in the Old Jewry; then came up another gentleman, whom I have not seen since, a Mr. Rusby, a corn-chandler, who took him into Mr. Page's shop.

Q. Did you observe any thing with respect to either of his hands? - A. Both his hands were in his breeches-pocket when he came into the shop.

Q. Did he take either of them out? - A. He seemed very much confused and frightened; he begged not to be exposed, but to be taken into a back room, that he might not be seen by so many people.

Q. Was he taken into a back room? - A. No.

Q. When his hands were taken out of his pockets, did you observe any thing? - A. When he was desired to pull them out, he was very loth to pull his right-hand out of his breeches-pocket; in pulling it out, it was very bloody.

Q. Did you see whether it was cut? - A. I did not see whether it was cut then.

Q. Did you afterwards? - A. I cannot say exactly; it was somewhere about the finger and thumb.

Q. Did you see the right-hand glove? - A. Yes, I asked him the reason of his hand being bloody; he said, it was owing to his putting his hand in his pocket against a piece of silver solder, which they used in their line of business; he said, he was a working jeweller; he then pulled out eighteen pence, a pen-knife, a comb, and two or three halfpence.

Q. He did not pull out any solder? - A. Yes, he pulled out a piece of solder.

Q. Were they in his waistcoat or breeches pocket? - A. In his breeches pocket.

Q. Did you ask to see his glove? - A. Out of his left-hand pocket he pulled a small neat hook, such as are used for buck-skin breeches, but it has been lost since; he took his right-hand glove out of his right-hand coat-pocket; his right-hand glove appeared very bloody; I asked him the reason of its being bloody; he said, by putting his hand in his pocket upon it, his hand being bloody; I then turned the glove inside out, and the inside was bloody as well.

Q. Did you examine the glove besides? - A. No further than there was a cut in the glove corresponding with the place in his hand; two officers were sent for to take him to Hatton-garden, and I saw no more of him that night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When you came up, there was a considerable noise in the street? - A. The breaking of glass, nothing more.

Q. Did it not occasion a great alarm, and a cry of stop thief? - A. It created an alarm about Mr. Page's door.

Q. Mr. Page's is quite the corner, is it not? - A. The corner of Eyre-street-hill and Liquorpond-street.

Q. The prisoner desired not to be exposed, for he was a respectable tradesman? - A. Yes; he said, pray don't stop me, I am a respectable tradesman in the Old Jewry; he said, he would give me his address; I told him I should certainly stop him.

Q. Did he give you his direction? - A. No.

Q. Have you not since heard that he does live in the Old Jewry, and is a jeweller? - A. I have heard so from other people; in Mr. Page's shop, he said he lived four doors from the Poultry Compter.

Q. In point of fact, there was a piece of solder found in his breeches-pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it sharp? - A. Not very sharp; not sharp enough to cut any body's hand.

Q. Did he pull his hand out himself, or did Rice Jones take it out? - A. Himself; he was very loth to pull it out.

Q. Did not Rice Jones pull it out, and did he not, upon that, complain that his finger was cut? - A. No.

Q. Is Rice Jones here? - A. I don't know.

JANE RAMSAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are niece to the prosecutor? - A. Yes; the morning after the robbery I found a silver watch in the area.

(Mr. Page produces it.)

Q. From whom did you receive it? - A. My neice gave it to her aunt in my presence, and I received it from her.

Miss Ramsay. This is the same watch that I picked up, and gave to my aunt.

Q. Did you find any thing else? - A. No.

Q. (To the Prosecutor.) Look at that watch? - A. It is mine.

Q. Is that one of the watches that was hanging in the window? - A. Yes, it is.

Court. Q. How lately had you seen it before you heard the crash of the window? - A. A few days.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Are your shew-glasses outside the window? - A. No, it is an upright sash with inside sashes.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. An officer belonging to Hatton-garden; I was sent for to Mr. Page's to take charge of the prisoner; I searched him, and took out of his coat-pocket a glove, (producing it;) it has been in my possession ever since; I found this piece of solder lying upon the counter. (Produces it.)

Q. (To Rayment.) Was the piece of solder that laid upon the counter the same that was taken out of the prisoner's pocket? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. I am just informed, and I wish it to be understood, that the prisoner did give a true account of his residence.

Prisoner's defence. I live in Dove-court, in the Old Jewry; I left home between three and four o'clock in the afternoon to meet my father, who was gone to Hampstead; when I got to North End, I found he was gone; I came to town again down Gray's-Inn-lane and down Liquorpond-street; I crossed over at the end of Liquorpond-street, when I saw three fellows running away; there was a cry

of stop thief, and that man immediately laid hold of me, and took me to Mr. Page's; it was a wet afternoon, and one of my gloves were wet; I have a habit of walking with one hand in my breeches-pocket; I put my hand into my pocket with my glove on, and my glove being wet, and the breeches having leather linings, it stuck; and, when I got my hand out, it was bleeding.

The prisoner called eleven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 20.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth and good character. The Prosecutor also joined in the recommendation, on the same grounds .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040111-67

127. CHARLES HARPER and ANN HARPER were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , two coats, value 27 s. five waistcoats, value 30 s. a waistcoat-piece, value 2 s. four shirts, value 28 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. two pair of breeches, value 18 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 18 s. a hat, value 4 s. six handkerchiefs, value 15 s. and a pair of gloves, value 1 s. the property of John Millett , in the dwelling-house of Sarah Smith , spinster , and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, they were

Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040111-68

128. SAMUEL JENKINS was indicted, and the indictment stated that he, at the General Quarter Session of the Peace holden for the county of Middlesex, on the 27th of April, in the 42d year of his Majesty's reign, was convicted of being a common utterer of counterfeit money, and was sentenced to be confined in New-prison, Clerkenwell, for the space of one year, and to find sureties for his good behaviour for the space of two years. The indictment further stated that he, on the 10th of October last, at the parish of Christ-church, a piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a good half-crown, as and for a good half-crown, falsely, deceitfully, and feloniously did utter to one Richard Bangy , knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

Mr. CALEB-EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you assist Mr. Vernon, the solicitor for the Mint, in carrying on this prosecution? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you produce a copy of the record of the prisoner's conviction? - A. I produce a copy of the record of the prisoner's conviction, for uttering counterfeit money, at the Sessions holden for Middlesex, on the 26th of April, 1802.

Q. Have you examined it with the record? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you read it both ways? - A. Yes. (The copy of the record of conviction read.)

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You assist at the New-prison, Clerkenwell? - A. I am deputy-keeper.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do.

Q. Were you in Court at any time, and when he was tried? - A. I was present in April Session, 1802, when he was tried and convicted.

Q. You saw and heard him tried and convicted? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt of his person? - A. None at all.

Q. Are you well acquainted with him? - A. Yes, I have had him several times before.

Q. Was he taken in execution of that judgment to the New-prison, Clerkenwell? - A. He was taken to the House of Correction, Cold-bath-fields.

RICHARD BANGY sworn. - I keep the Castle, in Quaker-street, Spital-fields, in the parish of Christ-church : On Monday, the 10th of October last, the prisoner came in about four o'clock in the afternoon alone, and called for a pint of beer.

Q. Did you see Bayes then? - A. No; he sat sometime with his pint of beer, and drank part of it out, and then John Bayes came in, and joined his company; he called for another pint, and paid for it in halfpence; the prisoner gave me a half-crown, to pay for the other; I gave him change, and put the half-crown in my waistcoat-pocket; from the appearance, I took it to be a very good one; some little time after the prisoner was gone, Richard Barnes , the dyer, came in, and asked me to lend him four shillings; I told him I did not think I had small silver; I put my hand in my pocket, gave him the half-crown and a sixpence, and called to my wife for another shilling, I had no other silver; I did not see the half-crown again till the next morning, nor the prisoner; Barnes brought it back to me in the morning.

Q. Did you see the prisoner again before Barnes came? - A. Yes, he came in, and had a glass of gin, and paid me for it in halfpence; he then went away for some time, it might be a quarter of an hour; he came again, and called for a glass of gin, and gave me another half-crown, which proved to be a bad one; Barnes brought me back the other half-crown, and said that was a bad one.

Q. Have you any doubt that the half-crown Barnes brought back to you, was the same that you received from the prisoner, and gave to Barnes? - A. I have no doubt of it, I know it by the brightness of the head; I took particular notice of it.

Q. Is there any mark upon it? - A. No.

Q. Then you mean to swear positively that the

half-crown you gave to Barnes, was the one you received from the prisoner, you having no other? - A. I am positive of it, I gave it to Armstrong.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you took no half-crown of any other person on the 11th day of the month? - A. No, I did not; I was not asked that question; I took another half-crown, with the letter F on it.

Q. Did you not say before that solicitor (pointing to Mr. Powell), that you took it of me? - A. No. On the 11th, he offered me two half-crowns, one I did take, and the other I should have taken, if it had not by accident fell out of my hand, and I did not like the sound of it; he said he would change it, and then he gave me a good half-crown for it.

Court. Q. What did you do with the second half-crown you took of him? - A. I gave it to Armstrong.

Q. Are you sure it was the same you received from the prisoner? - A. Yes, I know it by the head upon it; I had two other half-crowns that were good ones, which I took of another man; one of them had an F upon it.

Prisoner. Q. At what time did you give the half-crown to Barnes? - A. About six o'clock.

RICHARD BARNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a dyer? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember going to Mr. Bangy's house? - A. Yes, on Monday, the 10th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, just as we had done work; I asked Mr. Bangy to lend me four shillings; he let me have half-a-crown and a sixpence, and his wife gave me a shilling; I put it in my pocket, and took it home.

Q. Had you any other half-crown about you? - A. I had not a farthing of silver besides; I did not want to use the half-crown till the next morning; I pulled the half-crown out of my pocket, and put it on the table, and immediately observed it was a bad half-crown; I took it back about nine o'clock that morning, and returned it to Mr. Bangy, telling him it was bad.

Q. Are you quite sure that was the same half-crown you had received of Mr. Bangy the day before? - A. Yes, I am.

Jury. Q. You did not offer it to any body, did you? - A. No; I took it out of my pocket, founded it on the table, and found it was a bad one.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street, (produces two half-crowns); I received them from Mr. Bangy, on Tuesday, the 11th of October, I have had them ever since. Mr. Bangy gave me a description of the prisoner, in consequence of which, Vickery apprehended him; I said I thought it was Samuel Jenkins .

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at the Office, that you had not got the half-crowns, but you believed you could find them? - A. No, I did not know he was at the Office; I said I had them locked up at home in my bureau; and I would fetch them, which I did.

Bangy. This half-crown is the one that I took of the prisoner, and gave to Barnes.

Q. Barnes brought you a half-crown on the 11th? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure the half-crown you gave Armstrong, was the same you received from Barnes on the 11th? - A. Yes, I kept it by itself.

Q. Is that second half-crown the same that you took of the prisoner? - A. I am sure it is.

Barnes. This is the half-crown I received from Bangy, on Monday, the 10th, in part of four shillings, and I returned it on Tuesday, the 11th.

Q. How do you know it is the same you returned? - A. I know it by the edge, and Mr. Bangy marked it in my presence, when I took it back to him.

Mr. SAMUEL MENCELIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's Mint? - A. I am.

Q. Is that half-crown (the first) a good or a bad one? - A. It is a counterfeit.

Q. Now look at the other? - A. This is a counterfeit.

Q. Do they appear to be from the same die, or coined at different times? - A. At different times.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner? - A. Yes, on the 12th of December, in Holborn, I think it was between twelve and one o'clock at noon; there was a woman with him.

Q. Did you know her? - A. Yes, I knew her very well.

Q. It was Sarah Defontaine , was it? - A. Yes, I knew them both very well; I had heard of the charge being lodged against him, I caught hold of him and her both; I had him in my right hand, and her in my left; he made a resistance, and I had like to have gone through a shop-window with them both; I had a struggle with them, he pulling one way, and she the other; I found I must let one of them go, and as there was a charge against him, I thought I would let her go, and secure him, which I did; a mob collected, and he wanted to send for a constable to me; he said he had charged many such a fellow as me with a constable. I put him into a coach, and then he told me he had left off this kind of business, and lived honest; I took him to the Office, and sent for Mr. Bangy.

Prisoner's defence. I went into Mr. Bangy's, and sometime after I had been there, a little man came in, and drank with me; I changed a shilling with him to pay for the beer, it was a remarkable shilling, marked with an S; I never changed a half-crown with him at all; the next morning I went

into Mr. Bangy's house, and had a pennyworth of gin; there was a man there who had change for half-a-crown, who is, I believe, out of doors; I went again in about half an hour, and had a glass of gin, and gave him a half-crown, which I had taken from my master.

Court. (To Bangy.) Q. He says, the first time he gave you a shilling? - A. I never saw a shilling of his.

For the prisoner.

JOHN DEFONTAINE sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Whitechapel, close to the Blue Anchor.

Q. In what street? - A. It is no street, it belongs to the Blue Anchor public-house.

Q. In what part of Whitechapel? - A. It is on the road, a little on this side the turnpike.

Q. On the right or left? - A. The left from here.

Q. What business are you? - A. A cabinet and chair maker.

Q. Do you keep a shop? - A. No, I do not, I work for myself in a room.

Q. Up one pair of stairs? - A. One room, up one pair of stairs.

Q. You don't work for any master? - A. Not particular, our trade is very dead.

Q. You are a master, and work for yourself? - - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you shew your goods? - A. Sometimes in Moorfields, and any where, wherever I can.

Q. You cannot carry cabinet goods upon your back to Moorfields? - A. Yes, I do, I take them to the shops; I take them to any brokers that chuse to buy them.

Q. You don't work for any particular broker? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Are you married or single? - A. My wife has been dead some years.

Q. You are a widower then? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you a sister? - A. No.

Q. No relation of the name of Defontaine? - A. No, I have not.

Q. No relation? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Not to your knowledge? - A. I have not.

Q. What do you come here to prove? - A. On the 10th of October, I think it was on a Monday, I went to Mr. Heathcote's, in Featherstone-street, for some wood; I have a rupture, and was taken very ill in my bowels; I went into the Castle, in Quaker-street, and asked for half a quartern of gin.

Q. This was on the Monday? - A. I will not be sure, I believe it was; the landlord served me; I gave him a half-crown piece to change.

Q. What time of day was this? - A. Between nine and ten o'clock, I believe very little after nine; he founded it two or three times upon the bar; he said it sounded dull; he had not change sufficient to give me, and he called to a child or servant in the back room, and sent her up to his wife for a shilling; the shilling was sent down; he tendered me two sixpences, a shilling, four-pennyworth of halfpence, and a bad farthing; I did not take the bad farthing, I refused it; he gave me another, and then I went away about my business.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. I cannot say I know any thing about him.

Q. Then, I am to understand, you don't know any thing about the prisoner? - A. No, I don't know any thing at all about the prisoner.

Q. You don't know the prisoner at all - am I to take that down? - A. I do not know him, not to say know him.

Q. Do you, or do you not, know the prisoner? - A. Not to have any correspondence with him.

Q. What do you mean by correspondence? - A. I do not know him.

Q. You don't know where he lives? - A. No, I do not.

Q. You don't know what he is, nor where he lives? - A. No.

Q. How came you here to-day? - A. I know his mother.

Q. Where does his mother live? - A. In Angel-alley, I believe.

Q. What Angel-alley? - A. Bishopsgate-street.

Q. He lived with his mother, did he? - A. I do not know.

Q. What did his mother come to you about? - A. She came to me, and said, her son was to be tried for passing bad money - two half-crowns.

Q. She said, my son is to be tried for passing bad money, and I want you to swear what - what fact were you to prove? - A. She said I had been at this public-house.

Q. How did she find that out? - A. That I cannot tell.

Q. What were you to prove? - A. She said, the publican had swore he never changed a half-crown piece for any body but her son.

Q. And therefore you were to come to swear that he did change a half-crown for you? - A. Yes, he did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have no female relation of your name? - A. No.

Q. No sister? - A. No.

Q. No mother? - A. No.

Q. No daughter? - A. Yes, I have three daughters.

Q. How came you just now to answer both my Lord and me, that you had no female relation of your name? - A. Relations, you know, are not children.

Q. You meant that, when you answered in that way? - A. Yes.

Q. Are either of your daughters here? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. You have not seen one of your daughters here? - A. No.

Q. You have not seen one of your daughters here to-day? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Upon your oath, did not she come for the purpose of attending the trial with you? - A. I look upon it she did.

Q. Don't you know she did? - A. Yes.

Q. Then what did you mean by saying, in the presence of the Jury and his Lordship, that you had no female relation of that name? - A. No sisters, nor brothers, I have not got.

Q. You say you went to the Castle? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the landlord there? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know him? - A. I think I should, if I was to see him.

(Mr. Bangy was desired to stand forward.)

Q. Do you see him now? - A. Yes, this is the gentleman.

Q. You went between nine and ten o'clock in the morning? - A. Yes, a little after nine, or between nine and ten.

Q. You saw the landlord there? - A. Yes.

Q. You mean to swear positively you saw the landlord? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure it was before ten? - A. Yes. it was between nine and ten.

Q. Was it before ten? - A. It was between the hours of nine and ten.

Q. You are sure it was between nine and ten then? - A. Yes.

Q. And you are sure Mr. Bangy gave you change for the half-crown? - A. Yes.

Q. And that he sent up stairs to his wife, who sent down a shilling? - A. Yes.

Q. He sent the little girl up stairs? - A. Some girl, or servant, or other.

Q. And the servant, or the girl, brought back a shilling? - A. Yes, to her master, that was in the bar.

Q. And her master gave you what? - A. Two sixpences, the shilling that was sent down, four-pennyworth of halfpence, and a bad farthing that I would not take, and he gave me another farthing.

Q. That was what he gave you, you are quite sure? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever been in that house before? - A. No never, not to my knowledge.

Q. I would advise you to take care, you are pretty near chin-deep in perjury already, take care how you answer the questions I am about to put to you - you say you did not know the prisoner before? - A. I may have seen him before, but not to know him.

Q. Nor you did not know where he lived? - A. No.

Q. Nor who lived with him? - A. Yes, and I would not see my daughter on the account.

Q. Who did live with him? - A. My daughter, and I would not speak to her on the account of it, nor him either.

Q. Where does your daughter live - she left your house, you know? - A. Yes.

Q. Where does she live? - A. Upon my word I don't know.

Q. You don't know where she lived? - A. No, nor him neither, I would not speak to her.

Q. You never saw her after she lived with him? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. How long has she lived with the prisoner? - A. She eloped from me last Whitsun-Monday.

Q. What age is your daughter? - A. She is twenty-three.

Q. She eloped with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. How often have you seen your daughter since? - A. Frequently.

Q. At your own house? - A. No, I have no house, at my room.

Q. You have seen her frequently at your room? - A. Yes.

Q. You never knew where she was living with the prisoner? - A. No, I never asked her, nor would not.

Q. Then from Whitsun-Monday, you never saw her any where but at your room? - A. Yes, I have seen her.

Q. Where? - A. In the street.

Q. Any where else? - A. No; she came to see me when she wanted a trifle.

Q. You never learned from your daughter where she lived? - A. No.

Q. You know she is here? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Then I tell you she is; you never heard from her where she and the prisoner lived together? - A. No.

Q. Nor you don't know now? - A. No.

Q. And you know nothing of the prisoner, except his coming after your daughter? - A. No further than that.

Q. You never knew him in custody before? - A. Never, to my knowledge.

Q. You never knew him in custody? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Nor ever heard that he was in custody? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. For what? - A. That I don't know.

Q. You hear things by halves - you heard he was in custody, and did not enquire for what? - A. No.

Court. Q. What is your daughter's name? - A. Sarah.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was she ever in custody? - A. Yes, I believe she was.

Q. What was she in custody for? - A. Upon my word I don't know; I look upon it for cohabiting with this man; she was never in custody before; I always brought her up in the paths of virtue.

Q. Upon what charge was she in custody? - A. That I cannot tell.

Q. Did you never go to see her in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. How many times have you been to see the present prisoner since he has been in custody? - A. Me.

Q. Who do you think I am speaking to? - A. Once.

Q. You went to see the prisoner in custody - a man you had never seen before? - A. His mother sent me to him.

Q. How many times were you in New-prison with him? - A. I never was in New-prison.

Q. How often have you been to New-prison to see both the prisoner and your daughter, charged with passing bad money? - A. Only once.

Q. Upon your oath, do you not know she was charged with uttering bad money? - A. Yes, they said so.

Q. Don't you know she was tried for it? - A. No, I do not.

Q. You did not enquire about it? - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner. She never was tried for it.

Q. How often has she been in custody? - A. I do not know.

Q. When about was it she was in custody - about what time of the year? - A. Upon my word I cannot tell.

Q. When she was in custody, was the prisoner in custody? - A. Yes, I believe they were.

Q. How long ago is it since they were in custody, and in custody together? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was it a year ago? - A. I cannot say how long.

Q. Was it last summer? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Upon your oath, was not Jenkins in custody in the New-prison at the same time your daughter was, and did you not see them both? - A. I saw none but my daughter.

Q. You know Mr. Roberts, don't you? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Do you know that gentleman, (pointing to Mr. Roberts)? - A. No, I do not.

Q. You did not see Jenkins in custody in New-prison? -

Prisoner. It will do me no harm, say you did see me.

Mr. Knapp. Q. After that hint, upon your oath, did you, or did you not, see Jenkins in New-prison? - A. No, I did not see any but my daughter.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. I do.

Q. (To Roberts.) Did you ever see this man in New-prison? - A. I have seen him in with Jenkins, and with his daughter.

Q. More than once? - A. More than once, but he did not see them together; he saw Jenkins at one gate, and the daughter at the other gate.

Q. More than once or twice? - A. I cannot say how many times.

Mr. Knapp. (To Bangy.) Q. You have heard what this man has been saying - do you remember his coming to you? - A. I never saw him, to my knowledge.

Q. Do you remember the circumstance of changing a half-crown with him, and sending your daughter up stairs to your wife for a shilling? - A. I do not.

Q. Do you remember any thing about a bad farthing? - A. No; I don't think I ever saw that man in my life.

GUILTY , Death , aged 32.

Upon the motion of Mr. Knapp, the witness, Defontaine, was committed for perjury.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-69

129. CHARLES LANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , a plated roller-bit, value 2 s. and two plated snaffles, value 4 s. the property of John Middlemore .

JOHN MIDDLEMORE sworn. - On Saturday night I brought the bits down, and put them in a closet, and on Monday morning they were gone.

SARAH CARTWRIGHT sworn. - On the Monday there were six bits and six snaffles brought to me, and I told the man there should be seven of each.

JOHN WIGAN sworn. - I am a constable; the prisoner told me if Mr. Middlemore would let him go into the Army of Reserve, he would acknowledge the whole. (Produces a snaffle-bit.)

THOMAS DRESS sworn. - On the 29th of November the prisoner offered this bit for sale in Bond-street; he said he found it in Holborn; we would not buy it, because it had the owner's name upon it; we gave him one shilling for finding it, and would not part with the bit.

Middlemore. The prisoner was a townsman of mine, and being in distress I used to relieve him; he was at my house on Sunday the 27th of November.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Middlemore has been in the habit of sending me round with things for sale.

Q. (To the Prosecutor.) Did you send him round with this bit? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-70

130. JAMES LATHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , 30 lb. of beef, value 20 s. the property of Eleazar Chaplin .

ELEAZAR CHAPLIN sworn. - I am a butcher in Hatton-wall ; I know nothing of the loss.

- RAGSDELL sworn. - I am a baker in Portpool-lane: Last Friday was a week I was going home, within twenty yards of the prosecutor's house, I saw the prisoner with the left hand under his coat take a piece of beef off, and walk away with it; I called to the prosecutor immediately, and informed him of it; it was about one o'clock in the day; the prisoner turned the corner of a short street, and the prosecutor went after him, and brought him back; I was going after him, and found the beef lying upon the stones in the street; it was the rump and chump.

JOHN EVANS sworn. - I am a music-master; I saw the prisoner last Friday week lay his coat over a piece of beef, and walk away with it, in Hatton-wall; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publickly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-71

131. THOMAS MAY, alias MATTHEWS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a tub, value 6 d. and a peck of oysters, value 5 s. the property of John Noble .

JOHN NOBLE sworn. - I live at No. 71, Paul-street, Finsbury-square ; I keep an oyster-shop : On the 9th of January, about half past five o'clock, two officers brought the prisoner into my shop, and a tub of oysters; they told me they saw him take the tub of oysters, and walk out with them; I went to Worship-street at seven o'clock the same evening, and claimed my property; the prisoner was committed.

BERNARD CLEAVE sworn. - I am an officer: On Monday evening last, about half past five o'clock, me and Ferris were going up Paul-street, I observed the prisoner pass Mr. Noble's shop several times; he reached into the shop, and took off a tub of oysters which stood on a stool in the shop; he then poured the water off before the man's door into the street; he then went round the corner a few yards into Leonard-square; I came up to him, and he was then pouring the remainder of the water from the oysters: Ferris caught hold of him, and then he threw the tub and the oysters down in the street; I picked up the oysters, and put them into the tub, and took them back to Mr. Noble.

- FERRIS sworn. - I was with Cleave, I saw the prisoner and another man walking past Mr. Noble's house several times; they parted, and then the prisoner went and brought out a tub of oysters; he poured the water off facing the gentleman's door; he then walked a few doors further into Leonard-square; I crossed the way, and apprehended him; he dropped the oysters, and Cleave picked them up; we took him and the oysters back to Mr. Noble's, and desired him to come to the Office at seven o'clock.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-72

132. MOSES JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , a pocket-book, value 1 s. a half guinea, and two Bank-notes, each of the value of 2 l. the property of Joseph Caton .

JOSEPH CATON sworn. - I am a seafaring man : I lost my pocket-book last Thursday fourteen days; I was at a dance at the Ship and Ocean, in East Smithfield , and after the dance I went to get something to drink; the prisoner was in the room where we were dancing; he stood looking on; I was quite sober; I had my pocket-book and notes in my right-hand pocket when I went to the dance; it was between seven and eight o'clock; when I went to the bar to get something to drink, the prisoner came to me at the bar, and took my pocketbook out of my waistcoat pocket; he came behind me, put his hand round, took it out, and went out at the door directly.

Q. Did you see him do it? - A. Yes; it contained two two-pound Bank-notes, half a gold guinea, and a Spanish protection, I am a Spaniard; I did not go out after him, but I called to the people, the man has robbed me; nobody went after him; he came back in two minutes, and I told him he had got my property, and he said, it was no such thing; I told him to stop, and I would send for an officer, and then he ran out at the back door, jumped over the wall, and ran away; I did not see him again till I saw him before the Magistrate; the next night I gave information at Lambeth-street; I have not seen my property since.

Q. Were you perfectly sober? - A. Yes, I had drank only a pot of brandy hot among three of us, I was quite sober; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you not dance yourself? - A. Yes, I danced with the women.

Q. Did you not say before the Justice, that you did not see the prisoner take it, but that another man told you so? - A. I said I saw him take it.

Q. You have always said you saw him take it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give the women any thing? - A. I know I paid the organ.

Q. What did you pay? - A. One shilling.

Q. How many persons were there? - A. A great many, plenty of women and men.

Q. You did not tumble down in your dancing? - A. No.

Q. You never charged any of the women with it? - A. No.

Q. You have never seen it since? - A. No.

Q. You never saw the prisoner before? - A. No.

LAWRENCE CROW sworn. - I am a seafaring man; I was dancing at the Ship and Ocean with Caton; he is a shipmate of mine; the prisoner was there, and I saw him take the pocket-book out of his right-hand waistcoat pocket; we had been dancing about an hour, and then we went to the bar to have something to drink; the prisoner put his hand in his right-hand pocket, he took out a pocket-book, went out at the door, and came in again; I told my shipmate of it; I did not go after him; I only told my shipmate of it, and then the prisoner came in again.

Q. In how long? - A. About half an hour; I am sure he is the man; I had never seen him before; a constable was sent for, and then he made a bolt out at the back door, jumped over the wall, and got away; we went to Lambeth-street, and gave information the next morning, and he was taken at night; the property has not been found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were the first that informed the prosecutor what had happened? - A. Yes, he had opened the pocket-book in the room to pay for the music, and the prisoner was looking over it then.

Q. Was Caton sober? - A. Yes, he was.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. He first said a girl had taken it, and the girl was searched, and nothing found upon her, and then he said it was me that had taken it.

Q. (To Crow.) Was there any girl searched? - A. No.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040111-73

133. MARY WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a bed, value 10 s. the property of John Francis .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

MARY FRANCIS sworn. - I am the wife of John Francis , No. 12, Wapping Dock-street , the prisoner was my servant ; my husband had the misfortune to be arrested, and the whole of our furniture was removed to No. 1, Dock-street, the prisoner had the care of that property about the middle of May; I did not miss any property till the prisoner told me the house was robbed of every thing; she met me in the street, and told me so; that was on the 29th of June; Mary Wood and I went about to see if we could find the things, but did not find any thing; the prisoner and I then went to Lambeth-street, and gave information; I heard nothing of it again for six months; one Mrs. Davis gave me information of a bed, which I saw at her house; we had had it eight years; I was sure it was my bed; I went for the prisoner, but she did not come for an hour and a half; she came to my door, and asked what I wanted her for; I told her there was something at Mrs. Davis's, and she knew what it was; she went away, and I had her taken up the same day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What business is your husband? - A. A victualler, and boards seamen .

Q. When was it your husband was arrested? - A. I cannot be particular, I have no business with that, I am not come here concerning that.

Q. What month was it in? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Just before your husband went to prison, he made over his furniture to Mr. Lethunder, did he not? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did you never hear whether he had or not? - A. I do not know whether he did or did not; the furniture went in, in March, the rent was paid in June.

Q. You had an execution in the house in February? - A. No.

Q. In March? - A. No.

Q. Nor January? - A. No; there was one last Christmas was a twelvemonth; I removed the furniture to a smaller house; I stopped to sell the fixtures on the premises; I entrusted Mary Wood to take care of the furniture.

Q. Where were your sons at the time you were informed of the robbery? - A. In the King's service.

Court. Q. Are you sure this bed was in the house after the execution was executed? - A. Yes, and went from No. 12 to No. 1; the prisoner used to sleep there of a night, and after she told me the house was robbed, I went to see, and every thing was gone, even to the tiles out of the fireplace. Mrs. Glover had the care of the house before her.

JANE SPENCE sworn. - I was employed by the prisoner to carry a bed from No. 1, Dock-street, to Mrs Davis's house in Pennington-street, about the middle of June last; she went in with me, and saw me deliver it; I saw it at the Justice's, packed up in the same manner that I delivered it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I go out washing and chairing, and do any thing for my living that I can get to do.

Q. How lately had you the misfortune to be in prison? - A. I never was in prison.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Drewser? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you not charged with robbing your lodgings? - A. No, Never.

Q. You never were in Clerkenwell prison? - A. No.

Q. Nor any other? - A. No.

Q. Did you lodge with her? - A. I lodged three years in her house; she took me up upon a false thing.

Q. No doubt about that - but you were taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. How long were you in prison? - A. Three days.

Q. What prison? - A. Cold-bath-fields.

Q. How came you to swear you had not been in prison? - A. I did not give my oath to that.

Q. Don't you know you have been sworn? - A. Yes; I was sworn to speak the truth upon this business.

Court. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. I have seen her several times.

MARGARET DAVIS sworn. - About the latter end of May, or beginning of June last, the last witness brought me a bed; the prisoner was with her; she had before asked my leave to put a few things into my house; she said she was going to decline servitude, and wished to put these things in my place till she got a room; it was packed up in the coverlid that it is now in; I put it up in the garret, packed as it was, till Mrs Francis came and claimed it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. When did the prisoner come to lodge with you? - A. Not till a long while after that; she slept upon a bed of mine; it is about three months ago I believe that she came to lodge with me when she left Mrs. Francis.

Q. You gave information to Mrs. Francis? - A. Yes.

Q. You have had no quarrel with her? - A. No; I knew her to be a bad woman, and turned her out of the house.

Q. Did she not leave the house, saying you were a bad woman? - A. No, I turned her out.

Q. Did any body else see the bed come in? - A. Yes, a lodger of mine, who is here.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street (produces a bed); I got it at one Mrs. Davis's, in Pennington-street, on the 9th of December; I have had it ever since: On Thursday the 10th of December, I took Mrs. Wood into custody, and brought her to Lambeth-street; coming along I asked her how she came by that bed; she said she had bought it of David Polack , a Jew, two years before, and begged I would let her send for him to the Flying Horse; I have known him many years; I sent for him, and he came; I called him into the passage, and she asked him if he did not remember her buying a bed of him about two years before; he answered, no; I bought a quantity of goods of you some years ago, but I never sold you any thing.

(The bed was identified by Mrs. Francis.)

JOHN FRANCIS sworn. - I know this bed to be mine by patches that I put on it myself five years ago, and the wool that is inside came from the Black Sea.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you not make over all your furniture in February or March last? - A. No, never; I had no occasion.

Prisoner's defence. Mrs. Davis has got a bed of mine now, a feather and flock bed, and other articles; Mrs. Francis owes me between five and six pounds, and she has no other means but swearing my life away in this rascally manner.

Davis. I have no other bed belonging to the prisoner; when she sent the bed to me, she begged I would not let Mr. Francis see the patches upon it, for her life was in his hands.

The prisoner called four witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040111-74

134. MARY MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, privily, from the person of George Wallis , seven half-guineas, a seven-shilling piece, six shillings, four Bank-notes, each of the value of 1 l. and two other Bank-notes, each of the value of 2 l. his property .

GEORGE WALLIS sworn. - I am a soldier in the Royal West-India Dock Volunteers, and a labourer in the warehouses : On Saturday, the 7th of this month, I was at the Waterman's Arms, between three and four o'clock in the morning; we had a merry meeting and a dance at the house where I lodge, in Fox-lane, Shadwell, a private house; between two and three in the morning the dance was over, and I wanted something to drink; I went to this house with a watchman, it is not more than a quarter of a mile from my house; I had been drinking, but was sensible of what I was doing.

Q. Only just sensible? - A. I was not the worse for liquor; I asked the watchman to shew me where to get something to drink; I had never been at the house before; I sat down, and called for some purl and gin between the watchman and myself; I dare say there were half a dozen drank out of it.

Q. Did you stand treat? - A. Yes. I paid one shilling for the liquor; the prisoner drank of it, she was very officious, and made very free with me, and I asked her to drink; I fell down before I got there, and cut my forehead; it was freezing very hard, and any body might have fallen down; she came over to wipe the blood off my face; in pulling

out the bag that I had my money in, I laid it on the table, and I found in about a minute it was gone; the landlord observed it, and said, what are you doing with the man's bag? and she said, if it was not for you, he would not have known any thing about it; I took it out of her hand, and found it all safe; after that, she told me she would get me a comfortable bed.

Q. After she had attempted to rob you? - A. Yes.

Q. And you pretend you were sober? - A. I was stupid with the cold.

Q. After having had gin and purl? - A. Yes; she took me to a place that she said was her lodging, but she did not go in; that was in New Gravel-lane , as I understood it after to be; I turned round to make water, and she was off; I missed my money immediately; this was near six o'clock; I was at the public-house two hours. On the Monday night following I saw her again, and took her up, at the Black Bull; she said, she had never seen me before; I gave charge of her to the watchman; there was five shillings and sixpence in silver found upon her; I had described the marks of the silver before she was searched; I never found the notes again; when I saw her first, she had not three pennyworth of clothes, and when I took her, she was dressed very smooth.

JOSEPH WOODROFFE sworn. - I am night-beadle of Shadwell; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, I searched her, and found some silver and halfpence upon her; the man said there were marks upon the silver, but he could not describe them. (Produces it.)

DAVID PETRIE sworn. - I keep the Waterman's Arms; Wallis came into my house about four o'clock in the morning, I always open at four o'clock, I was opening the house when he came in; he was not any way intoxicated, but was a little the worse for liquor; I did not see any watchman with him, there might be; he had two pints of purl and gin, one after the other, and there were five or six drank of it; he was sitting by himself, and the prisoner came in with a sailor; he went to sleep, and then she came to Wallis; she drank with him, and the watchman drank with him; he paid for the purl and gin out of a bag, it came to nine-pence; he gave me a shilling, and I changed it, and in a few minutes after I discovered the bag in the prisoner's hand; I asked her what she was doing with the man's bag; and she said, if you had not told him of it, he would not have known, but it was an old rag; she then gave it him back again, and he put it in his right-hand breeches-pocket; I went into the cellar to draw some beer, and when I came up again, they were both gone.

Prisoner's defence. I never had the property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040111-75

135. THOMAS LADD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , three bushels of coals, value 4 s. the property of Robert Gammon .

There being no evidence to charge the prisoner with the fact, he was.

- ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-76

136. MARY EDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , a sheet, value 1 s. five dusters, value 2 s. a bag, value 1 s. a pin-afore, value 1 s. and an apron, value 4 d. the property of Charles Noyes .

MARY NOYES sworn. - I am the wife of Charles Noyes , he is a silversmith , No. 8, Little Warner-street, Coldbath-fields : On the 9th of December, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner came down the steps which communicates with my wash-house, which goes to a small house in the yard, which made me not suspect any thing. In a few minutes, I saw her return with my linen on her arm; I went into the wash-house, and missed the linen out of the clothes-basket; I followed her, and stopped her on Saffron-hill; I asked her where she was going; she said, she was going home; I told her that was not the way home; I knew her immediately, I mangle for people in the house where she lived, I had known her by sight some months; I told her they were my property, and she said she would shew me where she took them from; she came back with me. I wanted to take her into the Coach and Horses, but she refused; a person in Court then took her to the Hat and Tun, and gave her up to an officer; she said, she had fetched them from the mangle, that she had sent them in the morning by a boy, and not being done, she fetched them away.

Q. Had she sent them to you? - A. No, I never had any thing from her, to my knowledge; part of these things were my own, and part belonging to other other people, that I had to wash.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - The property was given into my charge. (Produces it.)

(The property was identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she was innocent of the crime.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-77

137. JOSEPH POCOCK was indicted for making an assault upon Edward Gedge , the younger , on the 7th of January , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person a pair of boots, value 10 s. the property of Edward Gedge , the elder .

EDWARD GEDGE , Sen. sworn. - I am a stationer , No. 775 Bethnal-green-road; I sent my little boy

for the boots, and know nothing of the robbery but what he told me; he is eight years old.

EDWARD GEDGE , the younger, called. - Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Telling lies.

Q. Suppose you should tell what is false, what would become of you? - A. No, Sir, I have not told a story.

Q. What would become of you if you did? - A. I should go to the naughty place. (Sworn.)

Q. Did your father send you last Saturday for a pair of boots? - A. Yes, to Paternoster-row; I saw the prisoner by the place where the porters rest in Finsbury-square .

Q. What did he say to you? - A. Nothing, but he took the basket away with the boots in it, and left the basket in Finsbury-square; a gentleman caught him with one of the boots.

Q. Did you try to keep the basket? - A. Yes, I carried it before me.

Q. Did you say any thing to him? - A. No, because I did not think he would snatch it.

Q. He did not threaten you, did he? - A. No; a gentleman called out stop thief.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you first see the prisoner? - A. In Cheapside; there were two of them.

Q. What became of the other man? - A. I don't know, I did not see him run away.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was the person who took the basket? - A. Yes, he is the man.

Q. Did he not ask you to let him carry it for you? - A. Yes, as he came by Cheapside.

Q. And you gave it him? - A. No, he snatched it from me, and run away.

PAUL GRIFFITHS sworn. - I was going through Finsbury-square, and passed the boy and two men together; I had not gone half a dozen yards before I heard the little boy call out he had lost his father's boots; I ran after the prisoner, and caught him; he attempted to throw one of the boots over the rail, but I caught it; the man with him ran the other way; I gave the boot and the prisoner into the hands of a constable.

(The boot produced, and identified.)

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18040111-78

138. WILLIAM HARTLEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Smith , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 26th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing seven gowns, value 21 s. a sheet, value 5 s. a counterpane, value 10 s. two cloaks, value 5 s. three petticoats, value 5 s. a snuffbox, value 6 d. a pair of sugar-tongs, value 1 d. a silver stay-hook, value 6 d. two neck-handkerchiefs, value 8 d. a silk half handkerchief, value 6 d. and a Bank-note, value 2 l. the property of the said Benjamin .

BENJAMIN SMITH sworn. - I live at No. 1, Bedford-place, Bloomsbury-square , which is a new street leading to Russell-square; I had the laundry belonging to the house, which is Mr. Hall's, a plaisterer; he lives in the house, and lets me have the laundry till he could sell or let the house; the laundry is about fifteen yards from the house, and there is a back way to it through a mews and a stable.

Q. Under what agreement with Mr. Hall did you occupy this laundry? - A. He offered to let me live there rent free till the house was let or sold: On the 26th of December, I left the laundry about half past five, to spend the evening with my master at his house; my wife had gone before me; I locked the door at the bottom of the stairs, which comes into a wash-house; about two or three minutes after twelve, an alarm was given of thieves; I went back, and the door had been violently burst open; the wood work was forced away; I went up stairs, and observed the drawers had been opened, and the articles stated in the indictment taken out; I saw them next morning at Marlborough-street.

- HOBSON sworn. - On the 26th of December, between twelve and one in the morning, I observed the prisoner near the top of Southampton-street, Bloomsbury, run from a bundle, which I saw in the act of falling on the pavement; nobody was near the bundle but the prisoner; I ran after him, and called stop thief; he went across Holborn into Lewkner's-street; when he came to Cross-lane, I lost sight of him, but found him in the hands of a neighbour, who ran faster than I could.

Q. Do you know what became of the bundle, and what should induce him to run away from it? - A. Going across the street, I said to my neighbours who were with me, halloa, here is something, what is it? and he immediately run away from the bundle, we took him and the bundle to the watch-house.

( John Hewitt and - Dunstan corroborated Mr. Hobson's testimony.)

- WYGATE sworn. - I am a constable, and took charge of the bundle and prisoner.

JOHN RUPPER sworn. - On the 26th of December, I saw the prisoner at the corner of Southampton-street, with a bundle on his back, about twenty minutes after twelve, and I saw him drop it in the street, in consequence of seeing Mr. Hobson, as I suppose; I staid by the bundle till the prisoner was brought back, and they were both taken to the watch-house.

(The property produced, and identified.)

- RUMLEY sworn. - I produce a tobacco-box, which I took out of the prisoner's pocket, which contains a steel, tinder, and matches.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through Bloomsbury, and saw the things lay against a door, and I took them up.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing, but not of the breaking and entering .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18040111-79

139. FRANCIS SMITH was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Millwood .

JOHN LOCKE sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At Hammersmith.

Q. What is your profession? - A. A wine-merchant.

Q. Do you know any thing of the manner in which the deceased came by his death? - A. On the 3d of this month, at half past ten at night, I met Francis Smith ; he informed me he had shot a man, who he believed to be the pretended ghost of Hammersmith .

Q. There had been such a rumour, had there? - A. For a considerable time; I went with him, and the watchman.

Q. Did the watchman come up to you? - A. The watchman was in company with me; we went up Cross-lane.

Q. All three of you? - A. Yes, and Mr. George Stowe with us; it is a cross lane that crosses Black Lion-lane and Beaver-lane; we saw the deceased lying apparently dead; Mr. Stowe consulted what was to be done with the deceased; we sent for the high-constable, and ordered him to come down to see what was to be done.

Q. What appearance had the body of the deceased? - A. No appearance of life.

Q. Did you observe the head, or any part of the body? - A. I observed the head; it appeared to be shot on the lower part of the jaw on the left side.

Q. What did the prisoner say? - A. He seemed very much agitated; I told him what I thought of the consequence of firing; he said, he had fired, and did not know it was that person; it was an extreme dark night; the prisoner appeared very much agitated, and I advised him to go to his lodgings.

Q. Did he say any thing had passed between him and the deceased? - A. He said he had spoke to him twice, and received no answer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You have said there had been some talk about a ghost? - A. Yes, for some time, I suppose for five weeks previous to that.

Q. Had you, among others, ever seen the figure? - A. No, I had not.

Q. You know, I believe, however unfortunate it has turned out, that almost all the young men had gone out? - A. Yes, several parties had gone out.

Q. Which was publicly known and talked of? - A. Yes.

Q. The dress of the phantom had also been described? - A. Yes, and corresponding very much with the dress of the deceased.

Q. What was that dress? - A. Linen twowsers entirely white, washed very clean, a waistcoat of flannel, apparently new, very white, and an apron, which he wore round him; his trowsers came down almost to the edge of his shoes.

Q. What was he? - A. A bricklayer , I am informed, I did not know him.

Court. Q. What was reputed to be the appearance of the mischievous person? - A. In white sometimes, and sometimes in the skin of a beast; a calf skin, or something of that sort.

Mr. Const. Q. From the communication of the prisoner, you knew of the unfortunate accident? - A. Yes.

Q. You observed he was in great trepidation? - A. Yes, wonderfully so; so much so, that he could hardly speak.

Q. Do you recollect whether, in the disclosure, he told you of the conduct of the deceased, and what he did? - A. He said he advanced to him, and irritated his fears, or something of that sort.

Q. That he called twice, and the figure advanced to him, and raised his fears more? - A. Yes, and which was the case certainly.

Q. This lane is described as a very dark lane? - A. Yes, very dark.

Q. And it was a very dark night? - A. Yes.

Q. I understand the lane is inclosed between two hedges? - A. Yes, and if it was a light night, it would be dark in the lane, though it is not wider than from me to you, (about four yards,) you could not perceive any body on the other side of it.

Q. The prisoner, I understand, is in the Excise? - A. He is.

Q. You have known him some time? - A. I have; he lives just by me.

Q. Did he surrender himself afterwards? - A. Directly; I advised him to go to his lodgings; he went, and afterwards when they called to him, he came down directly, but he wished to surrender himself in the first instance; he said first, I wish you would take me into custody, or send for somebody.

Q. What is his disposition? - A. A very mild one.

Q. And a man of humanity? - A. Yes.

Q. Generally esteemed? - A. I don't know any one that has any reason to say any thing against him; he is generally liked.

- GIRDLER sworn. - Q. You are a watchman at Hammersmith? - A. Yes.

Q. You went with Mr. Locke on the 3d of this month? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell me what you observed with respect to the deceased? - A. I saw him laying upon his back in the lane.

Q. In what condition was he? - A. Laying on his back quite straight.

Q. What did you observe with regard to his person - did he appear to be alive or dead? - A. He was quite dead.

Q. Did you observe any wound about him? - A. No farther than in the jaw.

Q. What sort of wound? - A. Just on the left side; it appeared as if it was done by the shot.

Q. Tell me every thing you heard and saw? - A. I was called by Mrs. Honor at the White Hart, and Mr. Smith came up there, after he had shot the man.

Q. Was that the occasion of your going to the place where the man was shot? - A. Yes.

Q. What did he say or do? - A. We met Mr. Locke and Mr. Stowe at the corner of Black Lion-lane; I went down with Mr. Smith.

Q. What did Smith say to you when he came there? - A. He said he had hurt the man; I said, I hope you have not hurt him much; says he, I have, and I fear very bad.

Q. You, and Mr. Locke, and Mr. Stowe, went to the deceased? - A. Mr. Smith and I went first, and Mr. Locke and Mr. Stowe came up immediately after.

Q. Did Smith desire you to go? - A. Yes.

Q. What passed when you came to the place where the deceased lay? - A. Nothing passed then.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing? - A. I don't remember his saying any thing farther about it.

Q. What did you do when you got there? - A. Carried him to the Black Lion.

Q. Had you any meeting with the prisoner in Beaver-lane that night, or any night before? - A. I met him at the corner of Beaver-lane that night, and he said he was going to search after the ghost.

Q. What time was it you met him there? - A. About half past ten; I said, I would come round after I had cried the hour, and search the lanes, and we would take him if possible; we agreed, if we met in the lane, to say who comes there? Friend. Advance, friend.

Q. What did you do? - A. I went upon my own business.

Q. Did you hear the gun fired? - A. Yes, just before I came to Black Lion-lane.

Q. What did you do on hearing the report? - A. I did not take any notice of it, because I hear them every quarter of an hour, almost all night.

Q. Do you mean you hear guns fire frequently in the night-time? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do then? - A. We took the body to the Black Lion.

Q. Did you meet any young woman as you were going to the White Hart? - A. No.

Q. You said before the Justice that you did? - A. Mrs. Honor's maid came with a candle, and called me, and said, I was wanted to go along with Mr. Smith.

Q. Did you see the prisoner with a gun in his hand any time that evening? - A. He had a gun in his hand when I met him at the corner of Beaver-lane.

Q. When you came to the body of the deceased, did you see a gun there? - A. No.

Q. Did he say any thing about delivering himself up? - A. He told Mr. Locke and Mr. Stowe he would deliver himself up immediately.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. When he told you he was going to look after the ghost, were you armed? - A. I had a pistol with me, as I always have.

Q. Was it dark? - A. It was very dark.

Q. Had you heard the rumour of the appearance of a ghost? - A. Yes, I had seen it myself the Thursday before.

Q. What day did this accident happen? - A. On Tuesday.

Q. What appearance had it when you saw it? - A. It had a white sheet or table-cloth, I cannot say which.

Q. How near to Beaver-lane? - A. It was the other side of the lane.

Q. Near Beaver-lane? - A. Yes, just opposite the four-mile stone.

Q. Did you pursue it? - A. Yes.

Q. When you pursued it, how did it escape? - A. Slipped the sheet or table-cloth off, and then got it over his head; it was just as if his head was in a bag.

Q. How long had the neighbourhood been alarmed with its appearance? - A. About six weeks or two months.

Q. Was the alarm great and general? - A. Yes, very great.

Q. Had considerable mischief happened from it? A. Many people were very much frightened.

Q. Do you know of any mischief that happened to any woman by it? - A. I have heard tell of it, but I don't know it.

Q. There was a rumour of mischief having occurred from it? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you known the prisoner for sometime? - A. Yes.

Q. What character has he borne? - A. Always a very good-tempered young man.

Q. Nothing like a man of a cruel disposition? - A. No.

ANN MILLWOOD sworn. - Q. With whom do you live? - A. With my father and mother, in Black Lion-lane.

Q. The deceased was your brother, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Be so good as tell the Jury what you know relating to this melancholy affair? - A. Between ten

and eleven o'clock, my brother came to my father's house; he had been to see for his wife, who was at Mr. Smith's, the Out-riders; my mother and I were just going to bed when he came in; he said, mother, are you going to bed? I made answer, yes, Thomas, is your wife come home? he said, no, she will not be at home for half an hour; I said, will you come in, and I will sit with you? he came in, and I sat with him; we talked a considerable time, till my mother fell asleep; while my brother was sitting, I heard the watchman crying past eleven o'clock, as I thought; I told my brother, your time is expired, you had better go; he did not attend to me, but set for a considerable time; I said, you had better go, it is dangerous for your wife to come home by herself; he jumped up, and said, I will go; he bid my mother and me good night, and went out of the door, and shut it. As soon as he was gone, I jumped up, and went to the door; as soon as I got to the door, I heard a voice say, d - n you, who are you, and what are you, d - n you, I will shoot you? and whilst they were speaking, the gun went off, and I saw the flash of fire from the gun; I went from the door, and called Thomas, as loud as I could, three or four times, but nobody answered. I went into my mother, and said, I do think my brother is shot; I did not stay for an answer, but went up to my father, who was in bed, and said, do get up, for my brother is shot; he would not believe me, and then I went into a room adjoining, and awakened a young man; he would not believe me neither; I went to the window, and called Thomas, as loud as I could call. At last I said, well, if nobody will believe me, I will go myself; I ran out of the door, and when I had got half way from my father's house to my brother's, I saw my brother laying dead at the gate; I took hold of his right hand, and said, speak to me, but he could not, for he was quite dead; his head was laying towards me, as I went up to him.

Q. Who was there at the time? - A. Nobody, I was by myself, I saw nobody; when I saw my brother, I don't know whether I went home directly, or not, but I run to Mrs. Wells afterwards, if I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You saw the prisoner afterwards with Mr. Locke? - A. Yes; when I came back from Mrs. Wells, I saw Mr. Locke, Mr. Gilbert, Mr. Stowe, and Mr. Smith, with my brother; that was as I was coming back from Mr. Wells's, where I went.

Q. Had they a lantern? - A. I don't know, I believe they had.

Q. You say your brother shut the door after him? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not go out exactly at the same time? - A. I got up directly out of my chair, and got upon some bricks adjoining the door; I heard the words spoke.

Q. When you were out of the door? - A. Yes, and when I was upon the bricks before the door.

Q. The dress he had on, was a bricklayer's dress? - A. Yes, his working dress.

Q. You must have heard of this ghost? - A. Yes, I heard great talk of it, that sometimes it appeared in a white sheet, and sometimes in a calf-skin dress, with horns on its head, and glass eyes.

Q. Did it ever occur to you to mention any thing to your brother about his dress? - A. I often spoke to my brother, and asked him, if he saw it, should he be afraid, and he said, yes.

Q. As he was dressed in white, did it happen that you cautioned him about going in that dress? - A. No, I never did, because I never had any such thought of him.

Q. I only mean, as to his being in danger? - A. No.

Q. I don't mean to have it supposed your brother was guilty of it, but as every body was out to take the ghost, did you mention his being in white to him? - A. I did not know it.

Q. You never had any conversation about it? - A. I heard that some people had seen it, but I don't know any thing of it.

Q. Had Smith and your brother any animosity against each other? - A. I don't know, it is impossible for me to know.

- FLOWER sworn. - Q. Did you examine the body of the deceased? - A. Yes; I saw the body the day after the accident, and examined it on the 6th, by order of Mr. Hodgson; it had a gunshot wound on the left side of the lower jaw with small shot, about the size No. 4, one of which had penetrated the virtebre of the neck, and injured the spinal marrow, which has a communication to the brain; I examined the brain, but there was no injury whatever to the brain itself.

Q. What is your opinion with regard to this wound having been the cause of his death? - A. I have no doubt that it was the cause of it; it is what we call necessarily, a mortal wound.

Q. What appearance was there of this having been given by a gun-shot, besides the spinal marrow being touched? - A. It had broke the jaw, and the face was black.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you know any thing of Smith before? - A. I did not; but the character I have heard of him is very good, far from being a vindictive man; on the contrary, a very mild man.

- BROOKS sworn. - On Tuesday, the 3d of January, just before ten o'clock, I took the body of the deceased to the Black Lion; Mr. Stone told me, I must go along with him, and Millwood,

the father; going up a lane, they said, we are going to take the man that shot the other; we went up to the door, and knocked; upon which, Smith looked out of the window, and came down immediately, and surrendered himself; I had him two days and nights in my custody.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I went out with a good intention, and when this unhappy affair took place, I did not know what I did; speaking to the deceased twice, and he not answering, I was so much agitated, I did not know what I did; I solemnly declare my innocence, and that I had no intention to take away the life of the unfortunate deceased, or any other man whatever.

Evidence for the Prisoner.

Mrs. FULBROOKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Are you related by marriage to the deceased? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you heard any conversation at Hammersmith about the ghost? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of what you heard about it, did you ever say any thing to the deceased about the dress he wore? - A. On Saturday evening, he and I were at home, for he lived with me; he said he had frightened two ladies and a gentleman who were coming along the terrace in a carriage, for that the man said, he dared to say there goes the ghost; that he said he was no more a ghost than he was, and asked him, using a bad word, did he want a punch of the head; I begged of him to change his dress; Thomas, says I, as there is a piece of work about the ghost, and your cloaths look white, pray do put on your great coat, that you may not run any danger; I don't know what answer he made; he said he wished the ghost was catched, or something of that sort.

THOMAS GROOM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you servant to Mr. Burgess, a brewer, at Hammersmith? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you heard any thing of this appearance of a ghost? - A. Yes, I heard great talk of it.

Q. Was it your misfortune to be hurt by it? - A. Yes; I was going through the church yard between eight and nine o'clock, with my jacket under my arm, and my hands in my pocket, when some person came from behind a tomb-stone, which there are four square in the yard, behind me, and caught me fast by the throat with both hands, and held me fast; my fellow-servant, who was going on before, hearing me scuffling, asked what was the matter; then, whatever it was, gave me a twist round, and I saw nothing; I gave a bit of a push out with my fist, and felt something soft, like a great coat.

The prisoner called twelve witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The Jury retired for about three quarters of an hour, when they returned a verdict of Manslaughter. The Lord Chief Baron informed them, that according to law, he could not take that verdict, as they were not at liberty to find it; that they must either find the prisoner guilty, or not guilty, generally, there being no circumstance in the case that could reduce it to manslaughter. If they could say, upon their oaths, they did not give credit to the witnesses for the prosecution, then they might find the prisoner not guilty; if they could not say so, then they must convict him, and the prerogative of shewing mercy lay in the Crown.

The Jury immediately pronounced the prisoner

GUILTY , Death , aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18040111-80

140. WILLIAM NAYLOR and WILLIAM ANKLES were indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences ; but no false pretence being proved, they were

Both ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-81

141. WILLIAM NAYLOR was again indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences.

JANE PRIDMORE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Jamieson: On Tuesday, between one and two o'clock, Naylor came to our house, and said he came from Mr. Dunbar for the remainder of the bottles; he had away five dozen; I am sure he is the person; he came three days following.

THOMAS JAMIESON sworn. - Mr. Dunbar was to send to me for some empty bottles; there were forty or fifty dozen altogether.

DUNCAN DUNBAR sworn. - I live at No. 7, Fore-street, Limehouse; I had agreed with Mr. Jamieson for some empty bottles; I sent my servant for them; the prisoner is not my servant; I never ordered him to fetch them; I never saw him till I saw him at Guildhall.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040111-82

142. ELIZABETH BRIAN was indicted for uttering to one Benjamin Sheppard a counterfeit shilling, knowing it to be so, and also for having at the same time in her possession another counterfeit shilling .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

BENJAMIN SHEPPARD sworn. - I live at the Gun and Star, Petticoat-lane ; I know the prisoner; she came to me for a pint of beer; she gave me a shilling; I gave it to my master; he said it was a bad one, and I returned it to her; there was a man of the name of Callaghan with her; she gave me another; my master said that was a bad one; he went into the tap-room, and asked the prisoner if she had any more; I said, I saw her with more; my master sent for a constable, Mr. Gassen; he did not know how to search her, and sent for Elisha Crabb , and he searched her; I gave both the shillings to my master.

PETER - sworn. - I keep the Gun and Star; I went into the tap-room, and asked the prisoner if she had any more of the same sort; I heard some rattle; I took two from her hand, and I found one of them was the first that the boy brought to me; I had rubbed it; I found the other was a bad one, and I sent for a constable; he did not know how to search her, and then I set for Crabb.

ELISHA CRABB sworn. - I searched the prisoner; I received three shillings from the landlord, and found four more between her shift and her flesh; we took the man before the Lord Mayor, and he was discharged.

(Mr. William Parker proved all the shillings to be counterfeit.)

Prisoner's defence. My husband lives with another woman; I have three children, and my husband gave me this money to buy shoes for them.

GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and find security for good behaviour for two years longer .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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