Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th September 1803.
Reference Number: 18030914
Reference Number: f18030914-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 14th of SEPTEMBER, 1803, and following Days, BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , ESQUIRE, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1803.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. Sir SIMON LE BLANC , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's-Court of King's-Bench; the Hon. Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir ALAN CHAMBRE , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir WATKIN LEWES , THOMAS SKINNER , Esq. Sir RICHARD CARR GLYN , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN PERRING , Esq. JAMES SHAW , Esq. and GEORGE CLARK , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Shingler ,

James Rowe ,

Jonathan Samson ,

Charles Lackington ,

William Southey ,

James Fisher ,

Thomas Willement ,

John Cooke ,

Henry Cooper ,

Henry Slack ,

Thomas Williams ,

Samuel Cliff .

Second Middlesex Jury.

James Mylne ,

Thomas Chappel ,

Thomas Poole ,

Thomas Hodgson ,

John King ,

Richard Gupter ,

Samuel Cooper ,

Robert Watkins ,

Edward Barnes ,

- Senior,

John Rowe ,

James Gibbs .

London Jury.

Thomas-William Dickinson ,

John Lightly ,

William Archer ,

William Todd ,

Joseph Dempsey ,

John Perkins ,

Thomas Ross ,

George Duffield ,

George Gordon ,

Edward Walker ,

John Wynne ,

William Williams.

Reference Number: t18030914-1

592. WILLIAM IRELAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , fifty-two yards of linen cloth, value 2l. 2s. the property of Edward Sage , William Rawdon , and Richard Jennings , in the dwelling-house of the said Richard Jennings .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of Edward Sage , William Rawdon, and Richard Jennings .

JOHN ROBERTS sworn. - I am clerk to Sage, Rawdon, and Jennings; Irish factor s: On Monday the 29th of August, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was coming down stairs, and observed the prisoner and another man cutting open a pack of goods, and taking out of it one piece, it was placed in our passage; I immediately pursued him down Foster-lane , the prisoner threw down the goods within six or eight yards of the door, and with the assistance of two men, I secured him in Foster-lane, the other man got away; the good were picked up by a witness now in Court; Mr. Jennings lives in the house.

Q. Is the passage a part of the house? - A. It leads to the warehouse; there are two doors, one leads to the private door, the other is a glass door, through which I saw him.

JAMES LLOYD sworn. - I heard the cry of stop thief; I followed the prisoner, and overtook him at the bottom of Foster-lane, he had a large knife in his hand, and cut at a gentleman that attempted to stop him; he was stopped and thrown down before I came up to him.

BENJAMIN SIMS sworn. - I was coming up Foster-lane, I heard a cry of stop thief; I met the prisoner, he drew a knife from under his coat, and threatened to stab me if I attempted to stop him; he made a stab at me, but did not cut me; he was stopped by a man throwing him down, I went back with him to the house.

RICHARD CRISP sworn. - I was coming up Foster-lane, about nine o'clock in the morning, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running, he drew a knife upon me, and swore he would run it into me if I attempted to stop him; I turned upon my heel and threw him down, and he was secured.

DAVID GILSON sworn. - I was passing by when the prisoner threw down the goods against me, upon the pavement; I saw him run from Mr. Jennings's; I picked up the goods, and gave them to the servant; I am sure the prisoner is the sam man, he had a knife in his hand at the same time.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD sworn. - I am a constable, I received the knife from James Lloyd, (producing it;) I found two other knives in his pocket(Producing them.)(Mr. Jennings produced the property.)

Gilson. These are the goods I picked up and carried to Mr. Jennings.

Q. (To Mr. Jennings.) What are your partners names? - A. Edward Sage , and William Rawdon.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence. GUILTY.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-2

593. THOMAS ALLAMBY and JANE PROSSER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , a silver tongue scraper, value 2s. a paste pin, set in gold, value 3s. a table cloth, value 3s. a silver tooth-pick, value 6d. a pair of silk stockings, value 2s a necklace, value 1s. and two neckcloths, value 3s. the property of John Doratt ; a shift value 2s. four napkins, value 2s. and two table cloths, value 10s. the property of Mary Doratt , widow .

JOHN DORATT sworn. - I live at No. 35, Bruton-street, Berkeley-square ; I know the prisoners, one was my man servant , the other my cook ; I missed at various times, numberless articles, which created in me suspicion; on Saturday the 3d of this month, I took my man servant in the chaise with me, about ten o'clock in the morning, defiring an officer to be sent for, during my absence; I did not return till near two o'clock, when I found the officer in the house, and I charged him with the prisoner, Allamby, I cannot speak to the loss of the property.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn. - I am an officer, I was sent for to Mr. Doratt's; I searched the prisoner Prosser's box in her presence, it was in an upper room, she shewed me the box at my request, and unlocked it herself, I found in it the articles mentioned in the indictment, (produces them;) the other prisoner came in with his master; I searched his boxes, of which he produced the keys and unlocked them; I told him there was reason to believe there was property in his boxes, belonging to his master; he hesitated a moment, and then acknowledged there was a table cloth, and some property of his master's; I found in his boxes a silver tongue scraper, and a table cloth, which Mr. Doratt claimed; I told him a pin had been lost in the family, and he went to his bed's head and gave me

this pin, (producing it;) I found in his box, a duplicate of a table cloth, which will be produced by the pawnbroker.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q. Did not the man prisoner say, the pin was given to him; by some body in the house? - A. Yes, he said it was given to him by the other prisoner.

Q. Did he not say he had been using the table cloth, and had forgot to bring it down stairs? - A. I do not recollect that.

Q. From the duplicate, it appears to have been pawned by a woman? - A. Yes.

JAMES DEARE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Mulcaster, pawnbroker, in Chandler's-street, (produces a table cloth;) I took it in on the 23d of August, of a woman, whom I believe to be the prisoner at the har; she said, she pledged it for her mother or sister, I cannot say which, I did not know her before, it was a shortish young person.

Q. Is that your only reason for believing it to be the prisoner? - A. Yes, I cannot swear positively to her person; I lent her seven shillings and sixpence upon it.

Q. Look at that duplicate? - A. This is the duplicate that was given upon the pledging of the table cloth.(The property was identified by Mr. Doratt, and his mother.)

Mr. Doratt. The man prisoner has lived with me since Christmas; the other prisoner, from respect to my father, with whom she had lived, and from charity to her, I took her into my service upon his death.

Allamby's defence. The pin was given me two months ago by this young woman, and the table cloth was left in my box by mistake; the duplicate I don't know any thing of, my box has been left open many times.

Prosser's defence. Mrs. Doratt told me, in removing from one house to the other, if there was any thing in the litter worth my acceptance, I might take it.

The prisoner Allamby called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Allamby, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Prosser, GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction . fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-3

594. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , twelve silk handkerchiefs, value 4l. twenty-one yards of sarcenet, value 4l. two yards of silk, value 4s. twenty-two yards of other sarcenet, value 4l. twelve other silk handkerchiefs, value 2l. and six other silk handkerchiefs, value 3l. the property of William Clay and Richard Smith .

WILLIAM CLAY sworn. - I live in Crown-court, Cheapside , I am a silk manufacturer : On Monday the 18th of July, the prisoner was stopped by a pawnbroker, he was a clerk in our accompting-house .

ALEXANDER PURSE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, at London Wall; on the 18th of July, in the evening, the prisoner offered me twelve silk handkerchiefs to pledge, and from his manner, I suspected they were improperly come by; I asked him where he lived, he told me, in St. Mary-axe; I told him, I should send and see whether he did or not, upon that he ran away out of the shop, I followed him and he was taken; I took him to the Compter, and learnt that he lived with Mr. Clay.(Produces the handkerchiefs.)( Thomas Gabell proved the handkerchiefs to be the property of William Clay and Richard Smith.)

(- Leadbeater, an officer, produced the remainder of the property, which he found at the prisoner's lodgings, and which were also identified by Gabell.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

Mr. Clay gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-4

595. ELIZA BARRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , twenty-two yards of sarcenet, value 3l. 15s. the property of Walter Rose , in his dwelling-house .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of Shem Batho .

The prosecutor not being able to prove a loss but from his books, which he had left at home, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-5

596. HANNAH THEW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a gown, value 10s. the property of John Maudsley .

MARGARET MAUDSLEY sworn. - I am the wife of John Maudsley , I live in Panyer-alley, Newgate-street , my husband is a silk-dyer : On Monday, the 1st of August, I lost a gown, the prisoner lodged with me about four years ago; about three or four days after, I missed the gown, I went to the prisoner, and asked her if she had seen the gown, and she said, she did not know any thing of it; on the 11th of August, she was taken up for another offence, and when she was searched, the duplicate of my gown was found upon her, I saw it at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES WOODMAN sworn. - I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday the 11th

of August, in Newgate-street; I searched her, and found thirty-four or thirty-five duplicates upon her, one of them relates to this gown, (produces it;) Mrs. Maudsley was with me at the time, we found the gown at the pawnbroker's.

Thomas Newton , the pawnbroker, was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Prosecutrix. I went to the pawnbroker's, in Aldersgate-street, and saw the gown, which I knew to be mine, it is darned in the tail.

Q. Was the gown shewn you upon the production of that duplicate? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. A man desired me to pledge the gown for him, for eleven shillings, which I did, in the name of Jones, and he presented me with the ticket and sixpence.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-6

597. HANNAH THEW was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , two silver spoons, value 15s. the property of Lewis Williams .

LEWIS WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a glazier , No. 24, Bishopsgate-without ; I lost two silver spoons on the 11th of August; the prisoner came to my house about one o'clock, to offer herself as a servant , my wife not being at home, I desired her to wait, as I expected her in in a sew minutes; the prisoner waited in the passage, leading to the parlour about ten minutes, and my wife not coming in, I desired her to call again; she said, she would rather wait; I said, she had better go down into the kitchen, and sit with the servant; my wife came home soon after, and I told her a person was in the kitchen, waiting to speak with her; they had some short conversation together, and the prisoner left the house; as soon as she was gone, my wife went into the parlour for a table-spoon, and missed one; the girl said, she saw the prisoner come out of the parlour; I then suspected the prisoner; there was a tea-spoon then missed from the kitchen; my wife went after the prisoner to where she said she lodged, but she did not lodge there; then my wife and the officer found the prisoner offering the spoons to pledge, and likewise a duplicate of the tea-spoon, which I have seen and knew to be mine.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I came home and found the prisoner in the kitchen, she wanted a place, and I wanted a servant, but finding she would not suit me, very few words passed; she told me where she lived in case I altered my mind; when I missed the spoon, I went to where she told me she lived, which was Mrs. Maudsley's house; I found she had lodged there, but did not then; Mrs. Maudsley went with me to different pawnbrokers; I went to the house of Woodman, the officer, and took him with us; upon our return from the search, we found the prisoner at Mr. Fleming's, with the table-spoons; I asked her where the tea-spoon was, and she said, she would answer no question till she was obliged; I found the tea-spoon at a pawnbroker's at London-wall; Woodman found the duplicate upon her.

MARY MORRIS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Williams; the prisoner came to my master's-house, I think, on a Saturday, about one o'clock; my mistress was out and my master, but my master came in before my mistress; the prisoner and I were talking in the passage; I went down into the kitchen, and as I came up the kitchen stairs, I saw her coming out of the parlour.

Q. Where did you first see her? - A. In the shop; I was in the shop; she was in the shop-passage when my master came in by the accompting-house; after my master came in she went into the kitchen; my mistress went down into the kitchen to her; the prisoner went into the parlour before she went down into the kitchen; after she was gone I missed a tea-spoon out of the kitchen; I had seen the table-spoon in the parlour-window just before she came in.

JAMES WOODMAN sworn. - I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner on the 11th of August; Mrs. Williams came to me; I went with her to several pawnbrokers; she had given a description of the spoons at Mr. Fleming's, and when I got back I found Mr. Fleming had stopped the prisoner; I went with Mrs. Williams to Mr. Fleming's, and took charge of the prisoner; I found a great many duplicates upon her, and among them one of this tea-spoon, pledged at Mr. Purse's, London-wall; I went with Mrs. Williams, and saw the tea-spoon.

PETER BERRY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fleming: On Thursday the 11th of August, Mrs. Williams left a description of the table-spoon; about five minutes after the prisoner brought it to pledge, and I gave her in charge to the constable. - (Produces the spoon.)

WILLIAM GILL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Alexander Purse , London-wall, (produces a teaspoon); I took it in pledge from the prisoner on the 11th of August.(The spoons were identified by Mrs. Williams.)

Prisoner's defence. I never was in the parlour at all. GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-7

598. RAPHAEL MARTINI was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , a

pair of stockings, value 5s. 6d. the property of Edward Griffin , privately in his shop .

(The prisoner being a foreigner, an interpreter was sworn.)

EDWARD GRIFFIN sworn. - I keep a shop , No. 117, Oxford-street : On the 13th of August, at three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in, and offered me some artificial flowers to sell; having some suspicion of him, I asked him what his pleasure was, and he put his box down upon the counter beyond me; I told him not to put his trash there, but go about his business; he did not attend to me, I told him repeatedly to go away; I was alone in the shop, and no other person came in while he was there; my back was towards him between the counters, when I saw him pass me, and as he did not go out in the direction I expected, I had a suspecion of him; he had his right hand under his box, which confirmed me, being alone, I could not immediately follow him, but I watched him, I saw him turn down Prince's-street; being satisfied I could soon overtake him, I examined the counter, and immediately missed the stockings mentioned in the indictment, a pair of cotton stockings, they cost me 5s. 10d. the day before; I called my maid-servant up stairs, and went after him, but could not find him; I went after him a second time, and saw him come out of a public-house in Princes-street; by dint of persuasion I got him back to my house, and sent for a constable, who took the stockings from him; Princes-street is three doors from my house; I know the stockings to be mine by the marks.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. Q. Why did you not stop me before I went out of the shop? - A. I did not suspect him till he had got out at the door.

Q. Why did you not call, stop thief! when I was in the street? - A. I thought I had better take him quietly back, and get a constable.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer; I was sent for to Mr. Griffin's to take charge of the prisoner; I took him into the parlour, and searched him; I found in his pocket this pair of stockings - (producing them.)

Griffin. There is no private mark upon them; I know them by the manufacturer's marks.(The prisoner in his defence said, he was in liquor, and did not know any thing about it.

Q. (To Griffin.) Was the prisoner in liquor? - A. I believe he was a little in liquor, but seemed to know perfectly well what he was about; he struck the officer when he searched him.

GUILTY, aged 52,

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-8

599. THOMAS RICKERBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a pound and a half of shag tobacco, value 2s. the property of Robert Foulds and Thomas Imeson .

ROBERT FOULDS sworn. - I am a tobacconist , in Holywell-street, Shoreditch , in partnership with Thomas Imeson : On the 12th of July I sent for an officer to search the prisoner, who had been our servant about three or four months, in consequence of information I had received the night before; I was present when he was searched, and a quantity of shag tobacco found in his breeches, there was about a pound and a half of it; I could not miss it, it is impossible for me to identify it; he had been at work upon such tobacco that morning; he did not give any explanation of it.

JAMES MESSENGER sworn. - I am an officer, I was sent for by Mr. Foulds to take charge of the prisoner; I told him I must search him for tobacco; he said, he had none about him; I then told him I must search him; I pulled off his cap and his waistcoat, but found nothing; he still persisted he had none about him; I then unbuttoned his breeches, and found the tobacco, which I have here; it weighed exactly one pound three quarters; as he was going to the watch-house, he said in tears, he had robbed the best and dearest of masters; had I kept myself honest, I should not have been in this trouble; those were the only words exchanged between us.

Mr. Foulds. This is the same sort of tobacco that he was at work upon.

Prisoner's defence. I had been in the habit where I have been at work of taking a little tobacco for my own use, and I took this; I acknowledged it when I was apprehended.

Mr. Foulds. Till this time I had the highest opinion of the prisoner. It has been the custom of the trade, instead of giving them tobacco, to give them an equivalent in money, and sell them tobacco at the wholesale price.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030914-9

600. SAMUEL RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , three ounces of tea, value 6d. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ROBERT BACKHOUSE sworn. - I am an assistant-elder in the East India Company's warehouses, in Fenchurch-street the prisoner was a labourer ; I superintend the top floor; I had missed some teas; the floor was full of tea laid out to shew; I set William Brandon to watch, and the prisoner was detected.

WILLIAM BRANDON sworn. - I am a labourer in the warehouses; I was set to watch in the adjoining room on the top floor; I saw the prisoner go up to a chest of tea, pull off his shoes one at a time, put his hand into the chest, and take some tea, and put it into his shoes; when he had tied his shoes I came upon him, and took him down to the accompting-house; I saw him searched by an Excise officer, and the tea taken out of his shoes; he said he was very sorry for what he had done.(The tea was produced by Matthew White , the Excise officer.)

Prisoner's defence. In walking among such a quantity of tea, some of it got into my shoes.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Publickly whipped one hundred yards opposite the warehouse in Fenchurch-street .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-10

601. JAMES COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , a shoulder of mutton, value 3s. the property of Benjamin Brignall .

BENJAMIN BRIGNALL sworn. - I am a butcher in Aldersgate-street : On Wednesday the 13th of August, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I lost a shoulder of mutton; I was in a little room backwards at breakfast; the prisoner was brought back to me with the shoulder of mutton; I knew it to be mine; I had just before weighed it for a customer.

CHARLES HANSON sworn. - I am a butcher; I saw the prisoner take the shoulder of mutton from Mr. Brignall's door, and go away with it; he then turned round, and went past the shop with the shoulder of mutton in his hand; I then went into Mr. Brignall's shop, and asked him if he had sold it; one of his servants went with me after the prisoner; I saw him turn into Bell-court; he had it then by the knuckle; we laid hold of him, and brought him back; I am sure the prisoner is the same man; he said he had bought it in Fleet-market.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was he drunk or sober? - A. He appeared to be in a state of intoxication, he seemed to have been up all night, he appeared quite stupid.

Q. It appeared to you to be a frolic, did it not, rather than a felony? - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 31.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-11

602. SARAH-ANN BELL and ANN BOND were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a card, value 1d. and fourteen yards of black lace, value 3l. the property of John Carver .

JOHN CARVER sworn. - I keep a mercer's shop , No. 33, Oxford-street : On the 18th of July, in the afternoon, I lost a card of lace; I was informed of it by Charles Webb , my young man; I came out of the back shop, and saw the two prisoners there; they did not come in together; I saw the prisoner, Bond, come in; I did not see the other come in.

CHARLES WEBB sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Brown, in Oxford-street; I was shopman to Mr. Carver; On the 18th of July, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner Bell, and a woman who has been discharged, came into the shop, and asked to look at some lace; when they came in Mr. Carver and myself were engaged with customers; I was at leisure first, I shewed them some black lace; they said they did not mean black lace, they meant white; I told them we did not keep white French lace, they would get it eight or nine doors higher; the woman that is discharged said she wanted a remnant of black lace, about two yards; I shewed them some; I observed the prisoner, Bell, draw a card of lace off the counter with her right hand, and drop it on the ground; the prisoner, Bond, was at a distance when the card of lace was on the ground; she came and sat down in a chair by the prisoner, Bell; I continued to shew them all three lace; when I found none would suit them, I put the lace by; I went round the counter to look for the card that was dropped, and it was gone; I said I had lost a card of lace; I then observed that the prisoner, Bond, was gone; I went into the back shop to tell my master of it; I then went out after the prisoner, Bond; when I came to Newman-street, I observed the prisoner, Bond, walking slowly up; I went up to her, and asked her to come back; she said, yes, is there any thing the matter; she turned herself, and came close to me; I drew away from her, and desired her to come along; we walked on together about three yards; I then looked back, and saw the card lying without the lace about three yards behind us; I pointed to the card and said, that betrays you; she then drew the lace out of her right-hand pocket-hole; I then picked up the card, and she gave me the lace, and I brought her back to the shop, where the prisoner, Bell, was; my master then desired me to go for a constable; a constable came, and they were all three taken into custody. The prisoner, Bell, came in about three minutes after the others, she had a child in her arms (produces the lace); I know the lace by my master's private mark upon the card C. C. A. C. and I know it by the pattern; I had shewn them that card, it is worth 3l.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Your master has a partner, has not he? - A. No.

Q. The woman who was discharged was the spokeswoman upon this occasion, and asked for the lace? - A. Yes.

Q. She had a child? - A. Yes, and Mrs. Bell had a child.

Q. Both the children were playing upon the counter? - A. I cannot say that.

Q. You never saw the lace in the possession of Mrs. Bell? - A. Yes, I saw her draw it off the counter.

Q. You never saw her pick up the lace? - A. No.

Q. Mrs. Bond did not come in in company with Mrs. Bell? - A. No; she sat about three yards from her.(The lace was identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Bell, GUILTY , aged 28.

Bond, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-12

603. STEPHEN GARDENER and THO-MAS DIXON were indicted for an unnatural crime .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were

ACQUITTED .

But detained to take their trials for a misdemeanor.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-13

604. HANNAH BARTON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Gordon , the said Robert, Mary his wife, and others of his family being therein, about the hour of four in the forenoon of the 11th of August , and stealing two silver salts, value 20s. two tablespoons, value 18s. two salt-spoons, value 4s. a tea-spoon, value 1s. four brass candlesticks, value 6s. a glass decanter, value 1s. three glass salt-cellers, value 3s. twenty-four silver-handled knives, value 24s. twenty-three silver-handled forks, value 23s. two pots, value 1s. a tumbler, value 6d. two glass rummers, value 5s. a tea-caddee, value 4s. an apron, value 1s. two four cruets, value 4s. a cruet frame, value 1s. two dishes, value 6d. four plates, value 2s. a pair of iron longs, value 2s. an iron poker, value 1s. and an iron shovel, value 1s. the property of the said Robert .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

ROBERT GORDON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. At the Orchard-house, Blackwall, in the parish of Stepney : On the night of the 10th of August, I went to bed between eleven and twelve; the house was secured before I went to bed.

Q. About what time in the morning were you awaked? - A. I heard my name called a little before four.

Q. Did you come down stairs? - A. I came down stairs directly; as I was coming down stairs, I saw one of the parlour windows open.

Q. Had that window any shutters? - A. Yes, outside, and on the table I saw the knife case empty.

Q. At what window did the person get in? - A. The kitchen window.

Q. How was that window fastened? - A. The shutter was bolted with a bolt at bottom.

Q. Was that shutter forced? - A. It did not seem to me to be forced; there was a vacancy, owing to the sun having drawn it, by which an instrument might be put in, and it might have been opened.

Q. Are you quite sure that shutter had been bolted? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go in search of the person? - A. Yes; as soon as I had dressed myself I went in pursuit of her; I saw her in an alley about half a mile from my house; she saw me, and ran away; I pursued her, and called out, stop thief! I pursued her down the lane, and when she had got into the middle of the lane, she threw a brass candlestick at me; I still pursued her, and caught her; she asked me to let her go, and she would tell me where every thing was; she told me they were in a garden; I asked her if it was my garden, and she would not give me an answer.

Q. Did you take her back to your house? - A. She took me to the place where the bundles were.

Q. Where was that place? - A. In the alley where I first saw her; I found two bundles there; there was a low sence over the garden, where she had put them; I took her back to the house; there was a round table standing in the kitchen, and she took from her pocket three brass candlesticks, a decanter, two silver table-spoons, two silver salt-cellers, three glass salt-cellers, a silver tea-spoon, and two silver salt-spoons.

Q. Did you bring the bundle away which she had shewn you? - A. Yes; I led her down the lane to my house, and sent the bundles.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner as to the manner in which she got into your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Before she said any thing, did you tell her it would be better for her to confess? - A. No, I don't remember any promise.

Q. Did you make use of any threat to induce her to confess? - A. No; she said she had no accomplices; there were a great many people about, who said, why did not she go to place, and earn an honest living; and she said, if Mrs. Gordon had given her a character, she could have got a place; I did not then know that she had lived

in my service; she told me she came in at the kitchen window.

Q. Did you see any poker found? - A. There was a small old poker found just by the window; I did not see it found.

Q. Did you see it fitted to the window-shutter? - A. Yes, I saw the officer fit it.

Q. Did it appear to have been an instrument by which the shutter might have been opened? - A. Yes.

MARK MILGAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a headborough? - A. Yes.

Q. Were the things put into your charge? - A. Yes. (Produces them.)

Q. Did you find any poker near the back kit chen-window? - A. No, I did not; Mrs. Gordon found it some time after.

Q. Is she here? - A. No.

Q. (To Gordon.) What is the value of the two silver salt-cellers? - A. They are worth fifteen shillings.

Q. What is the value of the two table-spoon? - A. Fourteen or fifteen shillings.

Q. What is the value of the salt-spoons? - A. Four shillings.

Q. What is the value of the knives and forks? - A. Thirty shillings.

Court. Q. Was it day-light? - A. Perfectly light.

Q. Was your family all at home? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; but if Mrs. Gordon had given me a character, I could have got a place.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY Death , aged 16.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of her youth and good character .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18030914-14

605. JAMES AYRES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Lewis Owen , privily from his person .

LEWIS OWEN sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. An ironmonger .

Q. Where do you live? - A. At Messrs. Downer and Sandys, in Fleet-street: On the 27th of August, Saturday afternoon, about five o'clock, I was going from our house towards the Strand ; I saw a mob collected near Mr. Birkett's, the chymist; I ran up to see what was the master, and found a man in fits; I remained there a few minutes only, during which time an alarm was given,"your pocket is picked," or, "there is a pickpocket," I cannot say which; I turned round immediately, put my hand to my pocket, and found I had lost a pocket handkerchief, which lay about two yards behind me; Mr. March collared the prisoner, and secured him immediately, with my assistance.

Q. I suppose there was a press upon you? - A. Yes, there was a crowd upon me.

WILLIAM MARCH , jun. sworn. - I am a fishing-tackle maker: I was going up Fleet-street about five o'clock, and saw the prisoner at the bar take a yellow handkerchief out of Mr. Owen's pocket; I called to Mr. Owen, laid hold of the prisoner, and he dropped the handkerchief.

WILLIAM MARCH , fen. sworn. - I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner. (Produces the handkerchief.)

Owen. There is no mark upon the handkerchief; I cannot say that it is mine.

Q. (To March.) The handkerchief that the prisoner threw down, who picked it up? - A. Mr. Owen.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 40,

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-15

606. DANIEL HARRIS and ELEANOR HARRIS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Pring , spinster , no person being therein, about the hour of three in-the afternoon of the 29th of July , and stealing a tin canister, value 6d. a pound and a half of tea, value 9s. four loaves of bread, value 3s. eight lb. of bacon, value 8s. five 1b. of butter, value 2s. 11d. four lb. of sugar, value 4s. two lb. of cheese, value 20d. two lb. of soap, value 20d. two ounces of snuff, value 6d. two ounces of tobacco, value 5d. and ninety-six halfpence, the property of the said Elizabeth Pring .

ELIZABETH PRING sworn. - I live at Kenton Green, in the parish of Harrow : On the 25th of July, I went out between one and two o'clock at noon.

Q. Are you a single woman? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you leave any body in the house? - A. No.

Q. Did you lock the door of your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Were the windows shut? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you come back again to your house? - A. I returned again between four and five.

Q. How did you find the house when you returned? - A. It was broke open; the door was unlocked, and the bolt of the lock pushed out.

Q. Was the door then open? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you miss? - A. I have got it down upon paper.

Q. When did you write it? - A. At the time, as soon as I missed them; four loaves of bread, eight pounds of bacon, five pounds of butter, four pounds of sugar, a pound and a half of tea, two pounds of cheese, two pounds of soap, two ounces of shuff, 2 ounces of tobacco, and four shillings in halfpence.

Q. How was the tea that you lost? - A. In a tin canister.

Q. Was that gone? - A. Yes.

Q. You kept a little shop, did you? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you suppose all these things were worth? - A. The bread was ninepence halfpenny a loaf, the bacon one shilling a pound.

Q. Have you seen any of the things again? - A. Only the tea and the tin canister.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do not you keep a servant? - A. No.

Q. Was there any body in the house that evening belonging to you? - A. No.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Q. Do you live in the neighbourhood of Kenton Green? - A. Not now; I was there on the 25th of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon; I was putting up a scaffold about one hundred yards from Mrs. Pring's house.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, I saw them both.

Q. Are you sure they are the two persons? - A. Yes, I am sure of it; I saw them go into the yard of Mrs. Pring's house; I saw them open the door.

Q. How did they open the door? - A. They lifted up the latch, and both of them went in; the woman lifted up the latch, and went in first, and her husband followed her; the prisoner, Daniel, said the woman was his wife.

Q. Were you near enough to see whether they did more than lift up the latch? - A. I did not see them do any thing else.

Q. Did you know them before? - A. No.

Q. Was the door shut when they went in? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did they stop? - A. They might be in about five minutes.

Q. Did you see them come out again? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe when they came out, whether they had any thing with them? - A. Yes; the woman had the tea-canister under her arm.

Q. Did you see that under her arm when she went in? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any thing else? - A. No.

Q. You did not see any bundle? - A. No, I did not; when she came out, she dropped the canister upon the stones in the yard; she took it up again, put it under her arm, and went over to the public-house, and the man with her.

Q. Was the public-house near? - A. Yes; about an hour after I went to the public-house.

Q. You did not suspect any thing then? - A. No, I did not know but the young woman was at home; when I went to the public-house, they were both sitting against the door drinking beer; while I was there, the young woman came to the door into the yard, crying, and making an alarm; I then asked the man if he had been in the house, and he said, no, he had not; then I asked the woman, and she said, no, she had not been in the house; then I contradicted them, and said, they had, and sent for a constable, and took them into custody.

Q. Were they searched in your presence? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any thing found upon them? - A. No, nothing belonging to the young woman; and after they were taken into custody, they offered to give the young woman something to make it up, and said, they were guilty of it, - that they had taken the tea-canister out.

Q. Did you see the canister after they were in custody? - A. Yes, Lost brought it to me.

Q. None of the other things were found upon them? - A. No.

Q. And you saw no other person near the spot at the time? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had made the man some promise of forgiveness, had not you? - A. No.

Q. Did any body else hear him say that? - A. Yes; the young woman was with me; I don't know whether she heard it or not.

JAMES LOFT sworn. - I was at work at Kenton Green; I was going after the stone-mason's horse; I saw the two prisoners put the tea-canister among a bunch of nettles.

Q. Are you sure the prisoners are the two persons? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see it was a canister? - A. Yes; as soon as they had put the canister in the bunch of nettles, they both went into the public-house together.

Q. How near were you to them at the time? - A. About one hundred yards.

Q. How soon after did you go to the bunch of nettles? - A. It was between six and seven o'clock, after they were taken up; this is the canister.(Produces it.)

Q. Did you find nothing else? - A. No.

Q. Have you had it ever since? - A. It has been taken care of at Mrs. Pring's shop.

Q. When did she give it to you? - A. When I came up to Hicks's Hall.

Q. Did you hear any thing said by either of the prisoners after you found the canister? - A. Not a word.

Q. (To Pring.) Was that canister delivered to you the same day your house was robbed? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you receive it from? - A. Smith, the bricklayer.

Q. Did you see Lost bring it in? - A. Yes; this is the same canister.

Q. Do you know that canister? - A. Yes; I I have had it twelve months.

Q. How do you know it? - A. I bruised it by salling off the shelf, where it used to be kept.

Q. How much tea was in it? - A. A pound and a half.

Q. What was the value of it? - A. Nine shillings.

Q. Are you sure the other things were in your shop when you went out? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when the canister was brought in where the prisoners were? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear any thing said by the prisoners? - A. No.

Q. How had you fastened the door - was there a latch? - A. Yes.

Q. And a lock too? - A. Yes.

Q. You say you locked it as well as latched it? - A. Yes.

Q. And you found the bolt of the lock pushed out? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at all? - A. No, I never saw them before.

Daniel Harris 's defence. My prosecutor was an hour and a half drinking in my company before he took me, and brought the canister after I was in the watch-house.

Daniel Harris , GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of 4s. 10d.

Transported for seven years .

Eleanor Harris , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-16

607. JOHN PUNCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a cloth coat, value 10d. a waistcoat, value 5s. a pair of breeches, value 6s. a shirt, value 3s. a neckcloth, value 6d. two pair of stockings, value 2s. a looking-glass, value 1s. a brush, value 2d. a hone, value 2d. a pair of gloves, value 6d. a prayer-book, value 6d. a hat, value 6s. and a stick, value 1d. the property of Michael Hinchley .

MICHAEL HINCHLEY sworn. - I am a labouring man , as well as the prisoner; we lodged and slept together: Last Monday week, in the afternoon, I missed the articles which I had seen in the morning; I saw them again in Ruffell-street, when the prisoner was taken the same evening; I never lent them to the prisoner, or did I owe him any thing.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lend me a stick the Saturday before? - A. Yes.

THOMAS HATCH sworn. - I am a journeyman carpenter: I was going home to Stoke Newington; I saw the prisoner on the road with the cloaths in a bundle, on a stick over his shoulder, coming from Stoke Newington to London, between seven and eight in the evening; his master rode after him, and gave charge; I stopped him, and he threw the bundle into a ditch; the prisoner rather denied it when his master charged him with the robbery; he said, no, sir, they are not his things, and dropped them; I picked them up, and the watchman and I took him to the Office; he had the prosecutor's hat on.(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I went out and got drunk; he owed me money, and I took the things for it.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-17

608. WILLIAM BOLTON and JAMES SHARPE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Davenport , about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 31st of July , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing two bushels of wheat-flour, value 15s. the property of the said Charles .

FREDERICK-CHARLES DAVENPORT sworn. - Q. What is your father's name? - A. Charles.

Q. Is he a miller ? - A. Yes.

Q. Where does he live? - A. At Staines .

Q. Is the building in which the mill is, a dwelling-house? - A. No, it joins to the dwelling-house.

Q. In what way? - A. You cannot get out of the house into the mill, without going into the street - it is all joined together.

Q. Is it all under one roof? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any fence surrounding the whole? - A. No.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q. Does your brother and yourself live with your father? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the prisoner, Bolton? - A. Yes, on the 31st of July; I have seen him before, but did not know his name before.

Q. What time was it? - A. Just after the clock struck one, in the morning.

Q. Are you sure it was before day-break? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you see him? - A. I saw him go into the mill.

Q. Did you observe him before he went into the mill? - A. I heard him walk, and heard him stop.

Q. When had you been in the mill yourself? - A. I fastened the door at eleven o'clock at night with a bar.

Q. Did you leave any body in the mill? - A. Yes; James Sharpe was at work in the mill; I went into an opposite house about twelve o'clock.

Q. Were you in the opposite house when you first saw Bolton? - A. Yes.

Q. At what distance? - A. Not above ten yards.

Q. What sort of night was it? - A. Star-light.

Q. You say you heard him stop? - A. Yes, twice before he came to the door; when he came to the door, he pulled the latch up; he did not pull it up the first time, but the second time he pulled it up, and went in.

Q. Did he attempt the first time? - A. I saw him pull the latch up the first time.

Q. Did he do any thing else but pull the latch up the first time? - A. No; the second time he pulled it up, and went in.

Q. How long might that be after the first? - A. Not above two minutes.

Q. You did not see whether he passed the door the first time or not? - A. No.

Q. Had he any thing about him at that time? - A. He had a great coat on.

Q. You did not see a bag, or any thing of that sort? - A. No.

Q. Who was with you at this time? - A. My brother.

Q. Did you wait where you were? - A. Yes; there were two doors to the place where we were; I went to one door, and my brother to the other.

Q. Was the door of which you saw the latch lifted up, one of the doors you had fastened? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the next thing? - A. We perceived a light go up stairs to the mill.

Q. You did not perceive any light before? - A. Not up stairs; there was a light down stairs, where the man was at work.

Q. Could you see who was going up? - A. No; we waited till the light came down stairs, and as soon as it came down, Bolton came out with the flour on his back; it might be near a quarter of an hour after he had entered.

Q. Did you see what became of the light? - A. It was left down stairs, where the man was at work.

Q. You did not see Bolton with any light? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any body come with him to the door? - A. Somebody shut the door after he came out.

Q. Immediately after? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure he did not shut the door? - A. Yes, I am; I then went out of the bottom door, took him by the collar, called my father, got a constable, and put him in the cage, and left my brother to mind the sack and flour.

Q. You did not go into the mill, at all, at that time? - A. No, not till we came back, in about half an hour after, and took Sharpe, and put him in the cage with. Bolton.

Q. What was Sharpe at work upon? - A. Grinding wheat.

Q. You could not judge, from what you observed before in the mill, whether any thing had been taken from the flour? - A. No; we had upwards of seventy sacks.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are in partnership with your father? - A. No.

Q. The mill is opposite the house across the street? - A. No, it is all in a straight line.

Q. Is it connected? - A. Yes.

Q. You have no internal communication? - A. No, it is either from the street, or a little yard that is behind.

THOMAS DAVENPORT sworn. - Q. Were you with your brother when you saw the prisoner Bolton? - A. Yes.

Q. At what time of night? - A. About one o'clock.

Q. Had you heard it strike one? - A. Yes, while Bolton was in the mill.

Q. Tell us what you saw? - A. I saw Bolton come and pull the latch of the mill door.

Q. Had you seen him before he got to the mill door? - A. No.

Q. Had you known him before? - A. No.

Q. Did it open the first time he pulled? - A. No, he pulled it again directly afterwards, and then it opened and he went in.

Q. Did you wait till he came out again? - A. Yes, and continued watching the door all that time.

Q. Did you observe any light? - A. I observed a light going up stairs, in the mill.

Q. Did you see whether the light was brought down again? - A. Yes, it was, and then Bolton came out of the mill with the flour on his back.

Q. Where had he the flour? - A. On his shoulder, in a bag.

Q. You did not see Sharpe at all? - A. No, some one shut the door after he came out.

Q. Are you sure he had not the bag with him, when he went in? - A. I did not see it.

Q. Did you go along with those who apprehended him? - A. I was with my brother when he first took him; I then staid behind with the bag; Bolton threw it down when I laid hold of him.

Q. Who picked it up? - A. Nobody, till the constable came down; I remained with it in the street, and he took it up to his house, we examined it, and it contained wheat flour.

Q. Did you know any thing of the bag? - A. No.

Q. Had you seen any thing of Sharpe during this time? - A. Yes; when they were gone up with Bolton, I tried the mill door, and I found it fast; I tried it several times, at last he came and opened it; I went in, and asked him who the man was that had just come out of the mill, he said, he knew nothing of it.

Q. How near was the place where Sharpe was employed, to the door where Bolton entered? - A. About half a dozen yards within view of the door.

Q. Was any other person left in the mill? - A. No, none but Sharpe.

Q. And when the mill door was opened, you saw nobody there but Sharpe? - A. No.

Q. Of how many does your father's family consist? - A. Four sons, three daughters, and two maid-servants.

Q. Were you present when the mill was fastened? - A. No.

Q. There is a door communicating with the back yard? - A. Yes.

Q. And that yard communicates with the house? - A. Yes.

Q. What quantity of flour was in the sack? - A. A bushell and three pecks.

Q. (To Frederick- Charles Davenport .) Did you fasten the back door? - A. I locked it, and had the key in my pocket.

Q. Did you find it locked when you went into the mill afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. How long has Sharpe worked with you? - A. Two years, he has behaved very well in our service till this time.

Bolton. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

Sharpe. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

Bolton, GUILTY , Death , aged 42.

Sharpe, GUILTY , Death , aged 52.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-18

609. JOHN JONES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Sewell , widow , no person being therein, about the hour of six in the forenoon, of the 6th of August, and stealing a gown, value 11. a shift, value 2s. seven handkerchiefs, value 4s. an apron, value 2s. two towels, value 1s. a table cloth, value 5s. three caps, value 2s. two guineas, an half-guinea and a sixpence, the property of the said Ann; a hat, value 15s. a great-coat, value 15s. three shirts, value 11. and three Bank-notes, value 11. each, the property of John Sewell .

ANN SEWELL sworn. - I am a widow, and lodge at No. 32, St. Andrew's-hill , the landlord does not reside in the house, other persons lodge in the house; between six, and half-past six, on Saturday the 6th of August, my room was broke open while I was gone to market; I returned about half past six, I had double looked my door, and left nobody in the room; when I returned, I found my door open, and my things all about the room my boxes were broke open, which I had left locked, one was split across the top, and had the lock broke; I missed the things named in the indictment; John Sewell is my son, his things were all in the room; the prisoner was brought in as soon as I returned, by Whitehead, a carpenter, and a bag with my things in it; I never recovered the notes or money.

MARGARET M'KAY sworn. - Mrs. Sewell hired me to bring home some greens for her; I got to the door, and was lifting the things off, when the prisoner stepped out of the passage with a bag in his hand; I asked him who was in; he said there were some people in, and went away with the bag; soon after he was brought back.

JOHN WHITEHEAD sworn. - I am a carpenter: I saw the last witness contending with the prisoner, she seemed to be in great trouble; as soon as she turned from him, he ran away; I ran after him down Addle-hill; he had his coat and waistcoat on when he set off, and a bag under his arm; I missed sight of him, and when I saw him again, he was without his coat and waistcoat, and bag; I am certain he is the same man; he ran up Labourin-vain-hill into a public-house, and set himself down in a dark box; I took him into custody; the things were found over some rails.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask a boy if I was the man? - A. No.

AARON HALE sworn. - I am a smith: I heard the cry of stop thief, coming up the church passage; I saw the prisoner running with a bag in his hand; he passed some buildings, and threw the bag over some fencing adjoining my house; I went round, and fetched the bag, and brought it down to Mr. Russel; we carried it to Mrs. Sewell's, the prisoner was there; she claimed the goods, and the prisoner was taken into custody.

JOSEPH BEBB sworn. - I am messenger to the Phoenix Company: I met the prisoner and Whitehead, and saw the prisoner take these keys from his pocket, and lay on a window. (Produces some picklock keys.)

JOSEPH ROBINSON sworn. - I am a constable, and took charge of the prisoner: I searched him, and in his breeches pocket I found sixpence, and three halfpence; and in his right-hand pocket, these picklock keys, (produces them); three picklock keys were also found in Mrs. Sewell's room.(Produces the property, which was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I ply at the markets; I was returning from Billingsgate, and met an acquaintance; we went to a public-house, and that man came and charged me with a robbery, which I know nothing of.

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-19

610. ANN LEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , a coat, value 18s. the property of Joseph Roberts .

JOSEPH ROBERTS sworn. - I lodge in Sweden's passage, Moor-lane, and drive a hackney-coach : I was standing at Moorgate on the ranks, the prisoner asked me to give her some drink, on

the 15th of August, about half past ten at night; I did so; I left my coach, and went into a public-house, after drinking the liquor, and she offered to take care of my horses; in the mean time my coat was gone, and she too; I ran after her, and the watchman said she was up a court.

DENNIS LACEY sworn. - I am a watchman: I met the prisoner with the coat over her arm at half past ten; she said the coachman gave it her to mend, and I let her go; next morning I saw her in Grub-street; she had pawned it; I gave her in charge of a constable.

ELIZABETH ROBERTS sworn. - I am wife of Joseph Roberts: On Monday evening, as I was going on an errand, I met the prisoner with a large bundle in her apron at the corner of Moor-lane; I met my husband looking for his coat.

ROBERT EDDINBORO sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 1, Crown-street, Finsbury-square: On the 16th of August, this great coat was pledged with me by the prisoner, about nine o'clock in the morning; the prosecutor's wife brought the ticket, and said the coat was stolen. (Produces the coat.)

JOHN MILLS sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner; she said the pledged, and gave me the duplicate.

Prisoner's defence. I lived with the prosecutor between three and four years as his wife; I met him, and asked him to give me a trifle, and he gave me the coat to pawn, which I did for seven shillings and sixpence, and gave him the duplicate.

Prosecutor. I did not give it her.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-20

611. ELIZABETH FINES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , a cotton frock, value 1s. and a pillow-case, value 1s. the property of Thomas Lloyd .

ELIZABETH DARBY sworn. - On Thursday, the 9th of August, the things were stolen; Mrs. Lloyd lodges with me; the prisoner was chairing for Mrs. Lloyd.

ANN NEEDHAM sworn. - On the 7th of August, the prisoner pledged the things with me.

JAMES GEARY sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody, and saw her give a duplicate to a girl, which I took from her.(The things produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. Mrs. Lloyd owed me one shilling and sixpence; and said, I might take something to pledge for it. GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-21

612. ROBERT LEADER was indicted for that he, being a servant to Samuel Dean , on the 22d of August , did receive and take the sum of 5s. 3 1/4d. for and on his account, and did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

SAMUEL DEAN sworn. - I am a baker at Bow; the prisoner was my servant; I sent him out with a barrow of bread on the 22d of August, value 30s. he never returned, or brought any money; the barrow, with two loaves, was brought back by a stranger.

ANN BROWN sworn. - I live at Old Ford , and deal with Mr. Dean: On Monday, the 22d of August, I received a half quartern loaf from the prisoner, and paid him five shillings and threepence farthing, which I owed for bread; he had been with bread before, and I paid it on account of Mr. Dean.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-22

613. JOHN PAUL was indicted for that he, at the General Sessions for the county of Middlesex, held on Monday, the 15th of February, in the 42d year of the reign of his Majesty, George III. was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false and counterfeit money, and was sentenced by the Court to be imprisoned one year, and to find sureties for two years more; and that he afterwards, to wit, on the 10th day of August , one piece of false and counterfeit money made to the likeness of a good shilling, did unlawfully utter to Richard Soane , he knowing it to be false and counterfeit .(The case was stated by Mr. Knowlys.)

Mr. CALEB-EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you the copy of the record of conviction of a person of the name of John Paul? - A. I have.

Q. Where did you get it? - A. From the Office of the clerk of the peace for Middlesex.

Q. Did you compare it with the original? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a correct copy? - A. Yes.(Copy of record of conviction read.)

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you the deputy-keeper of the New-prison? - A. I am.

Q. Look at the prisoner - was he ever in your custody? - A. He was.

Q. Were you present at the time of the trial? - A. I was, in February sessions, 1802.

Q. Did you receive him into your custody after the trial? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did he remain in prison after the trial? - A. One year.

Q. Can you possibly be mistaken as to the person of the man? - A. No; I saw him almost every day.

RICHARD SOANE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you keep the Castle public-house, in Portugal-street, Lincoln's-Inn-fields ? -- A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I have seen him come backwards and forwards to my house.

Q. Did you see him at your house on the 10th of August? - A. Yes.

Q. The day before he was taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. What business did he come upon? - A. He came to the bar, and asked for a glass of gin, and offered a shilling; I drew him the gin, and he gave me a shilling; I gave him the change, and he went away.

Q. What was the amount of the glass of gin? - A. Seven farthings.

Q. After he was gone, did you turn your attention to the shilling? - A. I took the shilling from the bar, it being dark, to a window, and found it a bad one; I followed him towards Clare-market, but missed him; I returned, and put the shilling in a peace of paper, and have kept it separate from all others from that time to this; I crossed it at the same time.

Q. When did you see him again? - A. Next day, in the afternoon, on the 11th; he came for a glass of gin, which he was furnished with.

Q. How did he make payment for that? - A. He offered me another shilling; I looked at it, and saw it was a bad one; I took him by the collar, and said, my friend, I shall stop you as a smasher, or passer of bad money; he had asked to look at the shilling, and then had it in his possession; I took him into a little room behind the bar, and set him down in a chair, while I sent for a constable; I sat in a chair next to him, in order to take care he should not throw any thing away; all on a sudden he put his hand to his pocket, took out the shilling, and put his hand quickly to his mouth; I took him by the gullet, but he swallowed it, in spite of all I could do; I felt it pass between my fingers.

Q. When he was searched, what was found upon him? - A. Only six or seven pennyworth of halfpence; no silver whatever.

Q. Had he halfpence enough to pay for the gin, without offering the shilling? - A. Yes, and five-pence or sixpence to spare; he was then taken into custody, and sent to Bow-street. (Produced the counterfeit shilling.)

Mrs. SOANE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him the day before he was taken up? - A. I was up stairs at the time, but Mr. Soane called me down; I saw the prisoner next day.

Q. Did you see him come in the next day? - A. No; Mr. Soane called me to mind the bar, while he set with the man till the constable came.

Q. Did you see what became of the shilling? - A. No.

SAMUEL MENCELIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are one of the Moniers of his Majesty's Mint? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Look at that shilling? - A. It is a counterfeit, and a very bad one indeed.

Q. Is there any silver in it, except the colouring on the outside? - A. I think not.

Prisoner's defence. I took two shillings in change of a half crown piece; I supposed them to be good; I had no intention to defraud any one.

GUILTY , Death , aged 55.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030914-23

614. ANN GREENHILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , twenty-five yards of cotton, value 21. 2s. the property of William Gillman , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM GILLMAN sworn. - I am a linendraper , in Barbican : On the 26th of July I was robbed, but was not present.

JOHN GREENWOOD sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Gillman: On Tuesday the 26th of July, about seven or eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop; there were two other shopmen, who are not here; she asked for a piece of print for a frock, and was desired to walk to the further end of the shop, as we were busy; the article I wanted, lay just by on the shelf where she stood; as I went by I looked at her; she seemed confused; I went down the shop again; she had a little boy fitting in the middle of the shop; she took him up to the top; I thought I saw her stoop, and that she had taken something, but could not be sure; she fixed on the first or second print that was shewn her by one of the shopmen; as she was going out I stepped round the counter, and told her I wished to speak to her; I led her into the private passage, and from under her cloaths she dropped the two pieces of printed cotton, about twenty-four or twenty-five yards; I would give two guineas for them.

JOHN MILLS sworn. - I produce two pieces of cotton, and took charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I went to buy some cotton for a frock; I chose one, and paid four shillings for it; I was coming away; he said he would detain me, for I had stolen something; I said I had not, nor did I; I saw no prints but some bedfurniture.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined one year in Newgate , and whipped in, jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-24

615. JOHN DREW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , a shirt, value 14s. two jackets, value 20s. a pair of silk trowsers, value 5s. a waistcoat, value 9s. another waistcoat, value 5s. two frocks, value 6s. two Guernsey frocks, value 8s. two nankeen shirts, value 9s. a pair of valveteen breeches, value 14s. three handkerchiefs, value 3s. a neck-handkerchief, value 3s. a nankeen jacket, value 10s. a cloth jacket, value 10s. a pair of silk stockings, value 10s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 6s. two pair of trowsers, value 8s. a pair of kneebuckles, value 8s. a silk jacket, value 12s. a marsella waistcoat, value 12s, a satin waistcoat, value 9s. a pair of satin breeches, value 10s. a pair of nankeen breeches, value 10s. and two shirts, value 20s. the property of Emanuel Rotheridge , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Bardley .

EMANUEL ROTHERIDGE sworn. - I am a Portugueze sailor ; the prisoner is a Spaniard; I lodge in New Gravel-lane , No. 64, at the house of Samuel Bardley; my chests were broke open on the 29th of August; I saw them safe at nine o'clock in the morning of the 28th; I locked them up; nobody had the key but the prisoner and myself; every thing was taken out; I have seen some of them since at the pawnbroker's; the prisoner told us where they were when he was taken; he went to shew us the house, and went in with us; he said he got drunk, and lost the duplicate; he asked for the things, and part of my things were produced; a silk jacket, a pair of satin breeches, and several others; the prisoner slept in the same room; I staid out the night before I missed the things.

SAMUEL BARDLEY sworn. - The prisoner and prosecutor lodged at my house, in New Gravel-lane: On the 29th of August the prosecutor took me up to see his box; it was empty; it had been opened by a chissel or nail; I had never seen it full; I went with them to the pawnbroker, and found the prisoner at a public-house at Wapping-wall two days after. The prisoner slept at home the night before the robbery, and said he was going out very early in the morning on board his ship; he went out about five o'clock, and did not return; he went with us to the pawnbroker's, and demanded the things, part of which were produced; he said he got drunk, and lost the rest, and that he brought them on a particular day, upon which the pawnbroker produced them.

SEPTIMUS SADLER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, and live at No. 124, in Old Gravel-lane; I cannot swear to the prisoner, as I do not recollect him at all: On the 30th of August two persons brought two waisicoats, a jacket, two pair of breeches, and two shirts; one of them was a soreigner; I believe the other came with him to shew him the place; they were pawned in the name of the prosecutor; an officer, the prisoner, and the prosecutor afterwards claimed them, but I was not at home; the things I produce are not worth more than twenty shillings.(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-25

616. GEORGE ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , a wrapper, value 2s. the property of William Debrawer and William M'Alpine .

There being a mistake in the name of the prosecutors, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18030914-26

617. CHARLES ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , twenty-five yards of linen cloth, value 61. the property of Edward Sage , William Rawdon , and Richard Jennings , in the dwelling-house of Richard Jennings .

Second Count. Charging it to have been in the dwelling-house of Edward Sage , William Rawdon , and Richard Jennings .

RICHARD JENNINGS sworn. - I live at No. 19, Cheapside , and keep a house; I pay the rent myself; the goods were taken from the warehouse under the private house; the prisoner left my service, and I gave him a character.

WILLIAM HAYWARD sworn. - I have been in the Excise; I slept in the room where the boxes were found; I cannot say when it was, as I was there but five weeks; I have frequently seen the prisoner and Adams open the boxes in my lodging at the Red Lion, in Whitecross-street; the prisoner was in the hospital, but came out, and stopped a few days, and went into the country; he stopped there about ten days or a fortnight; he slept in the house where the box was, but not in the room; a young man and I were frequently disturbed by their coming into the room after we were in bed; the first part of the time there was no lock on the door; we had one put on; they frequently wished to be let in before we were up; I have sometimes let them in; the last time I did so, Roberts opened the box, and put some goods in it; one parcel appeared to be like a roll of linen, and the other was tied up in a handkerchief, which he took out of a flag basket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. When you first knew the prisoner he was in the hospital? - A. Yes; the box I understand belonged to him.

Q. Did you ever go by the name of Isaac? - A. No.

Q. Were you taken into custody for the these? - A. Yes, I was, being in the room where the things were found.

JOHN REED sworn. - I am a City officer, and executed a warrant at the Red Lion, Whitecross-street; in the two-pair-of-stairs front room there were three boxes, and Hayward in it; Spicer, the landlord, came up with me; I asked him who the boxes belonged to, he said two belonged to Roberts, and Hayward said one belonged to him; we opened the boxes, and found several articles, and among them the cloth.

Mr. Gleed. Q. Spicer is in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. It was Hayward's room? - A. Yes, as he told me.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner at his master's, in Houndsditch, on the 2d of July.

Mr. Gleed. Q. He was then in a respectable employ? - A. He was, and had been there two or three days.

- sworn. - I am warehouseman to Sage, Rawdon, and Jennings; I went to the Mansion-house, and saw the cloth there; the prisoner left us about the 21st of February last. On the goods being produced about the latter end of June, a piece of Irish linen was shewn, about eight or ten yards, which was sealed with the name of a correspondent of our's, marked 37 with a pencil, and J. G. No. 207, with an F. which has a stain upon it; the piece of cloth produced has those marks upon it; we have taken stock since, and that piece is missed.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-27

618. WILLIAM ODDRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , 43l. of lead, value 20s. the property of John Duncan and Charles Aldridge , fixed to a certain dwelling-house .

PETER LANGDALE sworn. - I am a coal-merchant and lighterman: On the 12th of July, about eight o'clock in the evening, there was an alarm of a man robbing the premises of some lead in Nettleton-court, Aldersgate-street ; I went up the staircase, and on the landing-place, I saw the prisoner with a piece of lead covered with a cloth; I sent for an officer, and informed the churchwardens; we examined the lead, and it corresponded with the place where it was cut from; the house belongs to the parish; I tenant it of them, and pay two shillings a week; the lead was on a gutter; I searched the prisoner, but found no knife, or any thing of that kind; we afterwards found a mallet on the premises.

MARGARET WILDMAN sworn. - I go out a washing; my room faces the place, and I saw the prisoner at the top of the house, between seven and eight in the evening, on a Tuesday, stooping in the gutter, but I could not see what he was doing; I called one of the neighbours.( Catharine Brown confirmed the testimony of the last witness.)(The lead produced by the constable, and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. Wildman was sitting upon a piece of timber by my door, very much in liquor; my little boy threw his ball upon the house; I went to fetch it, and went up to the two-pair-of-stairs for my wife; as I returned from the room I saw the lead on the landing-place. I lodged at the bottom of the house.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped one hundred yards in Aldersgate-street .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-28

619. HUMPHREY CRAWLEY was indicted for that he feloniously, on the 23d of July , did maliciously and advisedly endeavour to seduce John Hall from his duty and allegiance to his Majesty, he, the said John Hall , being a person serving in his Majesty's land forces .

Second Count, varying the manner of charging it.

(The case was stated by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you a corporal in the second regiment of Tower Hamlets militia ? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see him, and where? - A. In Spital-fields, on Saturday night, the 23d of July.

Q. Where were the Towler Hamlets militia quartered? - A. In and about Bethnal-green-road; I met the prisoner in Fort-street, Spital-fields .

Q. What time of night was it? - A. Half past eleven at night.

Q. Where were you going? - A. Home.

Q. At the time you met him, did he appear to be in liquor? - A. No, he appeared to be sober.

Q. Did he address you? - A. Yes; he said, where are you going, soldier; I told him I was going home; he asked me whether I would go and drink with him; I said, I had no objection.

Q. Where did you go to? - A. To the Northumberland Head in the same street, where we had two pints of beer.

Q. Was any body else present? - A. Nobody out him and I in the same box.

Q. Could any body hear what passed between you? - A. He whispered to me; he caught hold of my hand, and said, he believed I was one after his own heart; I asked him what he meant by it; he said, he was sure I was, and asked me whether he could trust me; I told him he might; he asked me whether I would join a society he belonged to; I asked him what the society consisted of; he caught hold of my hand again, and said, you will not hurt me I hope; I told him I would not; I

asked him what the society consisted of, and he said, to join Bonaparte when he should land; I asked him how strong the society was which he belonged to; he said, one hundred and fifty, and he knew a great many more societies; then he said, if you will join me, all your expences will be paid.

Q. Did you understand where you were to join him? - A. No; he told me a private house, but he did not tell me where; he told me he would shew me the house in about four or five minutes; I asked him when I was to meet him to go to join them; he told me on Monday, at seven o'clock, at the same house where we were drinking; I laid my cap and cane down in the box we were sitting in, and went over to the watch-house; I told him I had occasion to go out; I went to the watch-house, and the constable went over with me; I told him to take that man into custody; we took him to the watch-house, and I told the constable the same as I have told you now.

Q. When you met the prisoner, and during all the time you have been speaking of, were you sober? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you dressed as a soldier at the time? - A. Yes, the same as I am now.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing more? - A. The constable asked the prisoner whether he could deny what I had said; he said, no, he could not, and told him he could shew him the house in four or five minutes.

Q. What house did you understand he meant? - A. A private house.

Court. Q. Did he shew you any particular house? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What time in the evening was this? - A. Half past eleven.

Q. You are an old acquaintance of the prisoner's? - A. I never saw him before.

Q. So he placed this confidence in you, though you were a total stranger to him? - A. Yes.

Q. How many people were in the tap-room? - A. I cannot say, I did not take notice.

Q. Give a guess? - A. I don't suppose there were above four, five, or six.

Q. What size is the tap-room? - A. Not a very large one.

Q. Is it as large as this table? - A. Yes, something bigger.

Q. Then there were five or six persons beside the landlord? - A. The boy brought the beer; I did not see the landlord.

Q. Is there any bar in the room? - A. No; there is a passage between the tap-room and the bar.

Q. Did you see the landlord at all that night? - A. Yes, I saw him, but not in the tap-room.

Q. There was nobody with you and the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. How far were you from the public-house when you met him? - A. About fifty yards.

Q. Had you been on guard that day? - A. No, I had been on parade that day.

Q. You say he invited you, and not you him? - A. He invited me; I was going home.

Q. You had to go back a part of the road? - A. I returned back.

Q. Is the publican here? - A. No.

Q. Or the boy? - A. No.

Q. Did you not pay for one pint of the beer yourself? - A. I did not.

Q. Do you mean to swear he paid for both himself? - A. Yes, I will swear it.

Q. Had he paid for both before you went for a constable, or after? - A. He paid for them as they came in.

Q. There was nothing due when you went out of the house? - A. No; there was about half a pint left of the last pint.

Q. Why did you not go to the landlord, and inform him? - A. I did not know there was any occasion, the watch-house was so very handy.

Q. How are the boxes formed in the room - are they all on one side, or opposite? - A. One opposite to another.

Q. How many people were in the box opposite to you? - A. None.

Q. How many boxes are there? - A. Four.

Q. And how many people were in them? - A. Five or six; they were in the further corner box.

Q. Do you mean to say the six people were all in one box? - A. I cannot say how many there were; there might be more or less than six.

Q. Do you mean to say there was not company in any box but one? - A. I did not see there was; I know there was one box empty; I will not swear there were people in any other box.

Q. You say he told you he would take you shortly to a private house? - A. Yes, and I told him I would meet him.

Q. Did he tell you where it was situated? - A. No; he told me he would shew me the house in four or five minutes.

Q. Had you not the curiosity to go with him? - A. No, I thought it was a dangerous piece of business at that time of night.

Q. Why did you not get some one to go with you? - A. I did not know were the house was.

Q. You might have gone back without the constable, but have had him in waiting, and have got the prisoner to accompany you to the place? - A. He told the constable he could shew him the house in four or five minutes, as well as he did me.

Q. Why did you not communicate what had passed to some of the people? - A. I did not.

Q. Why? - A. I cannot state any particular reason.

Q. The means of detecting the persons belonging to the society, would have been to have gone with him, and to have discovered the house? - A. I did not do that.

Q. You say the constable asked him whether what you had said was true, and he said he could not deny it - did he not say he could not disprove it? - A. No; he told him he could not deny any thing.

Q. Did he not say he could not disprove it? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that the word was deny? - A. He said he could not deny it, that was the word.

Q. Do you mean to swear that was the word? - A. I will.

Q. How long have you been in the regiment? - A. From the 18th of last March; I have been in the army thirteen years, and was in Ireland the last rebellion; I volunteered my services.

Q. Did you not think it very extraordinary, that he, who was a stranger, should take hold of your hand in the way you describe - did you shudder, and draw back? - A. He called for a pint of beer, and asked me to drink with him.

Q. Before he told you there were so many people belonging to the society, he asked you if you would hurt him, when, in fact, he had said nothing for which you could hurt him? - A. He asked me to join him before; then he said, I hope you won't hurt me; I told him I would not; if I had told him I would, I should not have got out what I did.

Q. Who was in the watch-house with the constable? - A. Nobody.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you sober? - A. I was, as I am now.

Q. Was your only reason for not telling the people in the house, the better to discover the intention of the prisoner? - A. I thought it better to do it; and any man, I think, would do it, or he is no Englishman.

THOMAS EKLESO sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In the Old Artillery Ground, near Spital-fields.

Q. What are you? - A. An ale and cyder-merchant.

Q. Do you know the soldier who has been examined? - A. No.

Q. Had you any knowledge of him before the evening of the 23d of July? - A. No.

Q. Did you happen to be constable on the night of the 23d of July? - A. I am every Saturday night, and this was Saturday night; he came over to the watch-house about ten minutes before twelve.

Q. What business did he speak to you about? - A. He asked one of the watchmen for the officer of the night; upon which I arose from my chair.

Q. Was it in your hearing? - A. Yes.

Q. What did he desire you to do? - A. To go to a public-house over the way, to take charge of an Irishman.

Q. Did he tell you the business for which you were to take charge of him? - A. No.

Q. Did you go to the public-house with him? - A. Immediately.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any body in the same box with the man? - A. No; the soldier's cap and cane were laying on the table.

Q. He came to the watch-house without his cap and cane? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he give charge of him there? - A. Yes, and would have given me the particulars there, but I desired him to step over to the watch-house; we went over, and he gave me the particulars.

Q. What did he state the man to have said to him? - A. He said the Irishman had met him in the street, and asked him where he was going; he asked him if he would go to the public-house, and take part of a pint of beer, which he accordingly did; and while they were drinking the first pint, the Irishman squeezed the soldier's hand, and said, he believed him to be one after his own heart, and begged he would not hurt him if he told him; he told him he would not, and asked him what it was; he said, that it was to join a club which he belonged to, and it should not be a farthing expence to him, if he would go; he asked him what the consistency of the club was; he told him, there were about one hundred and fifty of them to assist Bonaparte when he landed, and that he knew of several other societies besides that.

Q. After he had said this, did you speak to the prisoner? - A. I asked the prisoner, as the soldier repeated the words, did you say that; he said, yes, I did; I desired the soldier to repeat it over again; he repeated it over three times, and the prisoner said it was right.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar appear to be sober? - A. I saw no difference in him between him then and the next day, or any other time.

Q. Did the soldier appear to be sober? - A. Yes.

Q. After the soldier had related this, did you put any questions to the prisoner? - A. No, nothing more than to know whether he knew it to be true.

Q. Was he taken before the Magistrate on the Monday? - A. Yes; and he told me, that when he came there, he would tell the truth.

Q. Did he tell you any thing explanatory of the business? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What distance is your watch-house from the public-house? - A. It may be thirty yards.

Q. It was about half past eleven? - A. It wanted about ten minutes to twelve.

Q. So that the watchmen did not go out of the watch-house to their round till after twelve? - A. They go every half hour.

Q. How many watchmen were there in the house at that time? - A. Two.

Q. They did not go out? - A. They went out almost immediately, while they were telling the story, after the man came back.

Q. After the man came back, and while he was telling the story, they went out? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. You are also positive there were only two there? - A. Only two.

Q. You understand my question - they continued there till part of the story had been related? - A. Most likely, part of it.

Q. If it has been sworn there was nobody there but you, and the witness, Hall, that cannot be true? - A. That never can have been sworn.

Q. If it has been sworn, it cannot be true? - A. No.

Q. When you asked the man whether what was stated was true, what did he say? - A. He said, yes, it was true.

Q. Do you recollect the expression accurately? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Then his words were not - I cannot deny it? - A. No, no such thing.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you sure the watchmen were not present during the whole time? - A. They could not be; they might be present during part of it.

Mr. Alley. Q. It has been said this man is an Irishman - is he or not? - A. He says he is.

Court. Q. Did you learn where the society was held? - A. I did not, I learned where he lodged; I asked him repeatedly where the house was, and he would not give me any answer; the night he was taken, he said it was the other end of the town, in St. Giles's, as I understood.

GUILTY , Death .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-29

620. MARY LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a pair of sheets, value 10s. a table-cloth, value 2s. and a gown, value 10s. the property of George Rice .

JOHN DELANEY sworn. - I am a watchman in Great Russel-street, St. Giles's: I was crying two o'clock in the morning, when I met the prisoner with a bundle; I asked her what was there; she said, her own things; I took her to the watch-house, but going along, she offered me things to let her go.

- MURPHY sworn. - I keep the watch-house in St. Giles's; this bundle was in her apron.(Produces the articles, which were identified by the prosecutor)

GEORGE RICE sworn. - I am a cheesemonger : A fire broke out, and in endeavouring to get my things away, they were taken away.

Prisoner's defence. I was at the fire, and a woman with a child asked me to hold the bundle; I could not find her afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-30

621. ELIZA LOCKTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , two shirts, value 5s. the property of John Nash .

Mrs. NASH sworn. - I live at No. 17, Baker-street, Westminster : The things were in my box on the 4th of August; the prisoner lodged up stairs over me; they were found on the prisoner.

JOHN STOCKS sworn. - I produce a shirt and pocket handkerchief, pledged by the prisoner on the 4th of August.

JOHN HOBBS sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, and found a shirt in her cupboard.(The shirts produced and identified.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-31

622. JOHN LEARY and EDWARD LAWRENCE were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , a feather bed, value 2l. two pillows, value 30s. two sheets, value 10s. two blankets, value 10s. two petticoats, value 5s. and two frocks, value 5s. the property of William Livermore ; two pair of stocking, value 2s. a shift, value 4s. a cap, value 1s. and a pair of black stockings, value 1s. the property of Sarah Lewis , in the dwelling-house of the said William Livermore ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen.

ANN LIVERMORE sworn. - My husband's name is William, and keeps the George, in Crown-street, Soho ; Sarah Lewis is a widow , and lodges with us: On the Wednesday, Leary was in our house drinking; on Friday evening, I saw him dodging backwards and forwards before the window; he was there from eight to nine in the passage, between the bar and tap-room; an acquaintance of mine treated him with a glass of gin, knowing something of him; I missed him, and sent my little girl to see if he was gone; she said, he was; at eleven o'clock I sent her to bed, she sleeps with Mrs. Lewis; she came down, and said, there was no bed or bedding; I sent for the officer in the morning, as I mistrusted the prisoner, and a woman who was with him; I sent the officer to her apartments, and on the 30th of July, went to the Magistrate's.

SARAH LEWIS sworn. - I lodge with Mrs. Livermore: I missed the things about eleven o'clock

out of my bed-room; I had washed them the day before; an officer was sent for, and we found the things in Lawrence's room; Leary was in the room; I saw a bundle, and knew the handkerchief it was tied in to be mine; I told the constable it was mine; he took it, and brought away all the things that were lost; we asked Lawrence who brought them there; Lawrence said, Leary did; Leary said, Mr. Lawrence, you are an innocent man in this affair, - you let me put them here out of good nature, to befriend me.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You and the constable found Leary and Lawrence in a room? - A. Yes.

Q. Lawrence said, it was his room? - A. Yes; and Lawrence bears an excellent character, as I have heard; he is a picture-frame maker; he was at work at the time we went in; I asked him who brought the things; he said that Leary came to him at a public-house, and asked him to lend him his key, to put some things into his room, - that he was afraid of being seized upon, and had got them away.

Q. Was Leary present? - A. Yes, and said, you are an innocent man.

JAMES MEELING sworn. - I am a constable: I went with Mrs. Lewis, on the 30th of July, to Lawrence's lodging; he said, it was his own; Leary was standing by the side of the bench, and Lawrence was at work; these two bundles (producing them) were laying on the tool-chest belonging to Lawrence; Lewis said, that is my handkerchief and property; I said to Lawrence, have you any thing more here, and who brought these; he said, that man, meaning Leary; I said, have you nothing more; no, said Lawrence, nothing more that I know of; I went into the bed-room, and found the bed, two blankets, two pillows, and a pair of sheets; I said to Leary, you must go along with me; he began to be a little rumbustical, but I tied his hands together, and searched him, and found a pair of black stockings in his pocket, and a pocket-book; this handkerchief was taken off his neck before the Magistrate, and was sworn to.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What time was it? - A. About nine o'clock; Lawrence was at work.

Q. The account of Mrs. Lewis is correct? - Yes.(The property produced, and identified by Mrs. Livermore and Mrs. Lewis.)

Leary's defence was read as follows: - My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, Having an impediment in my speech, and no Counsel or friend to assist me, but what I can adduce to give me a good character, I beg leave to state, that as I was going along, I met two persons, one of whom I knew; I said, I was going to Lawrence's; he said, it would be handy, and would be glad to leave some goods there, as he was going to be seized upon for rent; I went to Lawrence at a public-house, and, got the key of his room; the things were put in, and were to be called for next day, but were not.

Lawrence called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Leary, GUILTY, aged 44,

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Lawrence, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-32

623. HENRY JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a quarter of a pound of tea, value 16d. two 1b. of sugar, value 1s. 5d. a loaf of bread, value 4 1/2d. and a pound and a half of bacon, value 1s. the property of James Radford ; and four 1b. of bacon, value 2s. 6d. the property of John Hornblow .

PRISCILLA RADFORD sworn. - I am the wife of James Radford , at Highwood-hill, Barnet; we lodge at a public-house, the Three Crowns : I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment on a Monday morning, I don't know what day of the month; it was in August; I had seen them at nine o'clock in the morning in my master's barn, Mr. Boucher's; I missed them about eleven; I then went to the field where my husband was at work; the prisoner was brought back by Mr. Coxhead, my master's servant, with the property upon him; the articles that were found were of the same sort and quantity that I lost; the bacon belonging to John Hornblow was left in my care; I knew it again, when it was found; I never saw the prisoner before.

JAMES COXHEAD sworn. - I am bailiff to Mr. Boucher: On the 18th of July, the prisoner came to me to enquire for work, we were hay-making; I refused him work; I came out of the park gate, when I observed a person pop down behind a bedge; I called to him, to know what business he had there, for there was no foot-path on that side; I told him to go about his business, and I went into the park; soon after, this woman came, and said, she was robbed; I saddled my horse, and went in pursuit of the prisoner, and found him at the King's Head, about a mile from the barn; he had a bundle upon the table; I insisted upon seeing what was in it, and found the property mentioned in the indictment; he said he had bought them; he went back with me as far as Captain Williams's gates, and shut them; I got in, and he drew a knife; I called for help twice, and some people came and helped to take him; he had the property with him when he was taken.

THOMAS - sworn. - I assisted in taking the prisoner; he had the property upon him; he was knocked down by an Irishman with the handle of a hay fork.

Coxhead. Here is the knife, (producing it); a man took it out of his hand, and gave it to me.

Prisoner's defence. I told him I would shew him the house where I bought it at Barnet, and he would not go with me.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-33

624. EDWARD BOSFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , a gown, value 3s. the property of Joseph Price , and another gown, value 2s. the property of Frances Frost .

HANNAH PRICE sworn. - I live at No. 4, Crown-street, Finsbury-square ; my husband is a bedstead-maker : On the 26th of July last, I lost two gowns I had been washing that day, and they were hanging to dry; about two o'clock in the afternoon, I observed the prisoner at the bar standing at my gate, with an handkerchief tied across his head all over blood; I thought he wanted charity, he seemed much in distress; I went in to get him something; upon my return, he was gone, and two gowns; I immediately went to the gate, and heard he was gone down Long-alley; he was brought back by a witness of the name of Morris; the gowns were upon him.

- MORRIS sworn. - I was desired by Mrs. Price to go after the prisoner; I went down Long-alley to the Broker-row, and found him at the bottom of Broker-row; I laid hold of him, and asked him what he did with those things under his arm; he muttered something, and I brought him back with the gowns.(The constable produced the gowns.)

Mrs. Price. This is my gown; the other is Frances Frost's, my servant; I had washed them both.

Prisoner's defence. I picked them up in the street.

GUILTY , aged 67.

Confined two months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-34

625. JASPER BENFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , two pair of stocking, value 4s. three shirts, value 12s. two shifts, value 1s. and a child's frock, value 6d. the property of James Gurney .

JAMES GURNEY , jun. called. - My father is a bricklayer ; I am ten years old.

Q. Do you know if it is a good or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. If I tell a lie, I shall go to the devil.

Q. You are now going to call God to witness the truth of what you shall say, and you will be punished in this world as well as the next if you say that which is false? - A. Yes. - (Sworn.)

Q. Where does your father live? - A. No. 8, Willow-court ; the prisoner came to our house, I do not recollect the day, and said he came from Mrs. Meyrick for the cloaths to be washed; I am sure it was him, I had known him before a good while; I gave him two pair of stockings, three shirts, two shifts, and a frock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you been always sure that the prisoner was the person? - A. Yes; I did not know where he lived, but I knew the street he lived at.

Q. The prisoner was not taken up, but went to an officer, and surrendered himself upon hearing this accusation? - A. Yes.

Q. The things have never been found since? - A. No.

Q. Have you never said somebody gave you a halfpenny to let him have the things? - A. No; I followed the prisoner, and he gave me a halfpenny to go back again.

JAMES GURNEY, sen. sworn. - I am the father of the boy; I know no more than what he told me; he told me he knew the boy very well; that his brother had been playing with him, and I found him out.

JANE MEYRICK sworn. - I did not send the prisoner for the things; I do not know him.

Prisoner's defence. God, the searcher of all hearts, can testify that I am innocent.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-35

626. WILLIAM EMMETT and WILLIAM COLVILLE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a gown, value 10s. the property of Mary Adams .

MARY ADAMS sworn. - I live at No. 5, Hemming's-court, Haymarket ; my mistress, Mrs. Langford, keeps an eating-house; the two prisoners and two others came in to dine about a quarter before twelve; my gown was hanging up when they came in, and when they went away my gown was gone; nobody else had been there; they were all together; I have never seen the gown since.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I went to apprehend the prisoners and Humphreys; Wood was discharged, and Humphreys is a witness.

WILLIAM HUMPHREYS sworn. - I have worked in the brick-fields since I came from Gloucester: On the 10th of August, I met Emmett, Colville, and Wood; they asked me to go with them; we went to this house to dine; there was a gown hanging up, and Colville put it under his great coat; then we went to a wine-vaults, and had some raspberry; then we went to Mr. Capp's, a wheel wright, and Emmett sold the gown for seven shillings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How often

have you been taken up? - A. I never was before a Justice before.

Q. How long have you known the prisoners? - A. Not till that morning.

Q. And you would have us understand that they picked you up a ragged boy in the street, a stranger, and asked you to dine with them? - A. No.

Q. Wood was discharged? - A. No, he was never taken; it was a blue gown with a yellow flower, like the lillies of the valley.

Adams. Here is the pattern of it. (Produces a piece.)

Humphreys. That is the same pattern.

Emmett's defence. What he has stated, is entirely false.

Colville's defence. What he has said is false.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-36

627. MARY HUTCHINS, alias GRAY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , a silver watch, value 2l. a steel chain, value 1d. and a metal key, value 1d. the property of Thomas Lee .

THOMAS LEE sworn. - I live at No. 13. Brick-lane, Old-street : On Friday, the 9th of this month, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, I left my watch in the privy, about three quarters of an hour, as near as I can guess; I went back to look for it, and it was not there; I then went to the prisoner's door, she was not at home; I then went to all the lodgers in the house; I keep the house; I could not find it; I came down stairs and sent my wife for the prisoner; I found my watch at the pawnbroker's, the same morning, I knew it to be mine; the prisoner lodged in the house adjoining.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner in your house? - A. Yes, too often; I had not seen her that day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. Does this privy belong to both houses, or only to your house? - A. To both.

Q. It is quite open, and people can come out of the street into it? - A. Yes.

SARAH LEE sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; in consequence of information, I went to look for the prisoner; I found her, and asked her if she could tell me who left the privy when she went in; she said, a brewer's servant had been there; I asked her if she had seen the watch, I she had, I would make her any recompense she required; she positively told me she had not, she said, she wished she had, she would have given it me again.

ROBERT STILES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Spinks: On Friday the 9th of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, a woman brought this watch, (producing it;) I cannot speak positively to the woman, having never seen her before; the prisoner resembles the woman, but I cannot swear to her, we were very busy that morning; the prosecutor, accompanied by another person, came to our shop and enquired if I had taken in a watch, giving a description of the watch, and of the maker's name; I immediately turned round, and shewed them the watch, the prosecutor immediately owned it.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: On the 9th of September, the prosecutor came to me, stating, that he had lost a watch; I went to a public-house in Old-street-square, and apprehended the prisoner; she was sitting between two men in the tap-room; I told her the prosecutor had given charge of her for taking his watch from the privy; she said she had seen no watch at all; I then produced my staff, and told her I must take her into custody; she then said, she had taken it from the privy, and pledged at Mr. Spinks's, the corner of Golden-lane, in Barbican; she delivered me the ticket, (produces it;) it was pledged in the name of Ann Gray; she said, she had paid a little debt that she owed with the money.(The watch was identified by the prosecutor .)

Prisoner's defence. I found the watch.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-37

628. ROSE KITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , twenty-four yards of printed cotton, value 30s. the property of Edward Rogers , and William Jackson .

JOHN GATHERCOLE sworn. - I live with Edward Rogers, and William Jackson , No. 49, Oxford-street : On Monday the 11th of July, between twelve and one o'clock, I received information that the prisoner had taken a piece of print from the door; I pursued, and saw the prisoner stopped about 200 yards from the door, in Wells-street, she had the print under her arm, I took it from her, she snatched the ticket from it, and I picked it up by her side.

Q. Where was it before she took it away? - A. It laid outside the window, on a board.

Q. Had she a cloak on? - A. No; I delivered her and the property to an officer, it had our ticket upon it.( William Jackson , an officer, produced the property, which was identified by Gathercole.)

WILLIAM LEAVER sworn. - I wrote the ticket, and put it on, this is the same.

Prisoner's defence. A woman asked me to carry

it for her, and she would give me sixpence, and when there was an outcry, she ran away.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-38

629. WILLIAM WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , twenty iron bars, value 10s. the property of John Page , in his dwelling-house .

It appearing from the evidence that the property was not fixed to the dwelling-house, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-39

630. GEORGE LINNEKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , a silver watch, value 30s. a steel chain, value 1d. a silver seal, value 1s. a metal seal, value 1d. and two gold keys, value 1d. the property of Godfrey Bromhead .

GODFREY BROMHEAD sworn. - I live at No. 1, Flower-de-luce court, Spital-square : On Wednesday, the 20th of July, about one o'clock, I went to the privy, and laid my watch upon the ledge of a window, and went in doors again to dinner; I soon after missed it; I went to the privy, and it was gone; a woman in the yard said she had seen the prisoner go to the privy immediately after me, and came back directly; I then went up to his room, he lodged in the same house; he was not at home; I went back, and found him; I told him he was the man I wanted; he asked what I wanted with him; I said, did not you find something in the privy this afternoon, and he said, no, what should he find; I told him my watch; he said he had not seen it, and did not know any thing at all about it; I said, if you have, I will make you any satisfaction, if you will return it, or tell me where it is; he said he knew nothing of it, or he should he very happy to restore it to me, or any body else who might have left it; an officer then came in, and he still persisted he knew nothing of it; the officer then searched him, and found in his pocket two new handkerchiefs, and a pair of shoes; a little while after, he found in his coat some cherries, and a duplicate of the watch amongst them; it was pledged in Tooley-street; I saw it on the Friday following at the Office.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: On the 20th of July, I was sent for; I went to the prosecutor's house, I searched the prisoner, and found a duplicate of a watch upon him; the pawnbroker attended at the Office with the watch; the prisoner denied any knowledge of the watch till I found the duplicate, and then he said he had found it in the privy.

JAMES MESSENGER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Tooley-street: I took in this watch from the prisoner on the 20th of July. (Produces it.)(The watch was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I found this watch; I had a wife, and a child sucking at her breast, in great distress, and almost famishing for want, and I pledged it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 32.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-40

631. JOSEPH KITCHEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , a waistcoat, value 4s. the property of Samuel Morris .

SAMUEL MORRIS sworn. - I live in the parish of Hendon ; I am a sugar-ware potter : On Saturday, the 30th of July, I lost a waistcoat; I know nothing of it myself.

JOSEPH MORRIS sworn. - I am brother to the prosecutor: I took the prisoner about a mile from our house, with the waistcoat under his jacket; there were three others walking with him; I took it from him, and secured him; I had seen the waistcoat hanging upon the hedge to dry that day.

WILLIAM MEYRICK sworn. - I work for Mr. Morris: I saw the waistcoat under the prisoner's jacket as I was going from dinner; I immediately went to the house, and saw Mr. Joseph Morris , and he and I followed him, and took him.(The officer produced the waistcoat, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence. GUILTY , aged 38.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-41

632. JOHN WELLS was indicted for that he, on the 19th of July , being employed in the capacity of a servant to John Allam and Thomas Caithness , did take into his possession a watch, value 8l. 8s. for and on account of his said master, and afterwards did embezzle and secrete the same .

THOMAS CAITHNESS sworn. - I am a watchmaker , No. 119, New Bond-street , in partnership with John Allam : the prisoner was our shopman about ten months; he was entrusted with a metal time-keeper to set clocks by; I saw it in his possession on the 18th of July, and on the 21st; I told him I should not want him any longer than Saturday night, in consequence of suspicions that I entertained; this was on Thursday, and he did not return any more; I went in search of him, and apprehended him on the Saturday following at a public-house, the end of Rosoman's-street, Clerkenwell; he came about a quarter of a mile with me, and refused to go any further; he then turned back, and I followed him till I found an opportunity of getting assistance, and then he ran

away; I cried stop thief, and he cried stop thief till we got into Coppice-row, and then I secured him, and took him to Bow-street; the pawnbroker is here with the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have another watch in your possession belonging to the prisoner? - A. I do not know that it is belonging to him.

Q. There is a little account between you - a balance of wages, is there not? - A. He is considerably in my debt; the duplicate of the watch was sent to my house by the post, in a letter, after the prisoner was apprehended; it was pledged in his own name.

GEORGE HARVEY sworn. - I am servant to Moore and Grimwood, pawnbrokers, in Bird-street, Manchester-square: On the 19th of July, the prisoner pledged a metal watch at our house for three guineas; I was present. (Produces it.)

Prisoner's defence. When my master gave me this watch, I considered it as my own property.

Mr. Caithness. I never gave it to him for any other purpose than to regulate clocks; it was made for that purpose.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-42

633. CHARLES MACDONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a pewter bason, value 2s. the property of Job Waldon .

ANN WALDON sworn. - I am the wife of Job Waldon, he is a tailor , and keeps a house, No. 52, Bolsover-street, Cavendish-square : On Wednesday, the 7th of this month, I lost a pewter bason I saw the prisoner come up stairs, and go into the street; I followed him, and asked him what business he had in my house, and he said he wanted a tailor; I went back, and missed a pewter bason out of the cellar; I went after him again, and found it upon him; the witness here brought him back with the bason, and two pieces of leaden pipe that he had taken from the same place; I am sure it was my bason, I had had it eleven years; it was very dirty; it had been in the cellar about three quarters of a year; the prisoner seemed rather in liquor, but he walked very well; he said he would make me any allowance if I would let him off.

WILLIAM HITCHCOCK sworn. - I assisted in stopping the prisoner; he had a pewter bason, and some leaden pipe. (Produces them.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-43

634. EDWARD WITNELL and RICHARD DUPIER were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , two saws, value 12s. three planes, value 5s. and an adze, value 1s. the property of Waters Poney , the elder, and Waters Poney , the younger; and the other for receiving part of the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

WATERS PONEY, jun. sworn. - On the 12th of July, I lost three planes, two saws, and an adze, from the sixth house on the east side of Gloucester-place, Portman-square ; I had left them there in the evening of the 11th, and on the morning of the 12th, the chest was broke open, and the tools gone; I saw the two saws the next morning at a public-house, the corner of High-street, in the possession of the prisoner, Witnell; I then went to Compton-street, and found the three planes and the adze in the prisoner Dupier's shop; the adze was out at the door, and the planes in-doors, on a shelf; I asked him who he bought them of, and he said he bought them of the prisoner Witnell; then we went to the Office in Hatton-garden; the prisoner Dupier keeps a shop for the sale of old and new tools ; I am in partner ship with my father.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Dupier told you the man he bought them of? - A. Yes; he came to the coach, and said, that was the man; I had Witnell in custody in a coach.

Q. Did he not say, and was it not confirmed by Witnell, that the man he bought them of was in great distress, had a bad leg, and wanted a few shillings to go into the hospital? - A. Yes; he said he gave him four shillings.

Q. What are they worth? - A. About six shillings.

WILLIAM REEVES sworn. - I am an officer: I met the prisoner Witnell at Hampstead, and in consequence of information from Oliver, I apprehended him about one o'clock on Tuesday, the 12th of July; I found these two saws upon him,(produces them); I afterwards went to Dupier's, and found the other things. (Produces them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Nothing could be more open and ingenuous than the conduct of Dupier? - A. Certainly not; the prisoner Witnell said the saws were given to him by a man at Hampstead, and that he had got the other things from Mr. Poney's, in Gloucester-place; I then sent for Mr. Poney.

BENJAMIN OLIVER sworn. - I am a carpenter at Hampstead: On the 12th of July, I saw the prisoner asleep in the road, and two saws lying by him; I took the two saws, and left him asleep; I went to an officer with the saws, and gave them to the officer, and he took the prisoner in custody.

Poney. The prisoner did work for me in April and May last; all the tools are marked, I know them to be mine.

Witnell's defence. I did not break the house open.

The prisoner Witnell called four, and Dupier six witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Witnell, GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 12 months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Dupler, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-44

635. JOHN NICHOLAS was indicted for that he, on the 25th of August , being employed in the capacity of a servant to John Roberts , and William Roberts , did take into his possession a pair of spurs, value 2s. for and on account of his said masters, and afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

JOHN ROBERTS sworn. - I am a sadler in the Strand , the prisoner was my foreman ; Mr. Vincent, a spur-maker, bought some spurs of a man of the name of Solomons; Mr. Vincent brought me a pair of spurs, which I knew to be ours, they had our name on them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you in partnership with your brother William? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner has been in your service sixteen years? - A. I have known him fourteen years; he had been in our service six years.

Q. Upon the information of Vincent, you took up Solomon? - A. Yes.

Q. And then he said he could shew you the person? - A. He said, he bought them of a spurmaker, of whom he had bought spurs for years; Macmanus brought him to my shop, and he fixed upon the prisoner.

Q. I believe you continue to employ the prisoner's wife at this moment? - A. Yes.

JOHN VINCENT sworn. - On the 23d of August, as I was passing Solomon's house, in Vinegaryard, I saw a pair of spurs in his window; I asked his wife the price, and she told me four shillings and sixpence, I gave her four shillings and three-pence for them; upon taking them home, I found they were of a better quality than the price I gave for them, and upon finding Mr. Roberts's name, I took them to him, the real worth is about eight and sixpence from the manufacturer.

MOSES SOLOMON sworn. - I live in Vinegaryard, I keep a sale-shop.

Q. Look at those spurs? - A. I think I bought them.

Q. Are you sure of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Of whom? - A. The prisoner at the bar; I gave him three shillings for them; I knew him, he said he was a spur-maker, he did not tell me where he lived; I am sure he is the man, I have seen him, and had dealings with him for four years past for spurs; I have kept shop myself, twelve months, and I knew him before, where I was shopman.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were taken up for this yourself? - A. No, I was not.

Q. Do you know Macmanus? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not take you out of your house? - A. Not against my will.

Q. Macmanus asked you to go out with him, and you did? - A. Yes, I went with him to Mr. Roberts's.

Q. I dare say, if Macmanus had not come to your house, you meant to take a walk precisely that way? - A. No.

Q. Did not Macmanus say, if you did not find the person of whom you bought them, he must take you to prison? - A. No, he said he would give me time for a little while; Mr. Roberts said, go to my shop, perhaps it is one of my men.

Q. And then you fixed upon the prisoner in Mr. Roberts's shop? - A. Yes.

Mr. Roberts. These are my spurs.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You do not mean to swear you had never sold them? - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-45

636. RALPH LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , a gown, value 5s. two petticoats, value 12s. and three pair of stockings, value 3s. the property of Elizabeth Scudder , widow .

ELIZABETH SCUDDER sworn. - I am a widow, and live at No. 28, Dartmouth-street : On the 28th of July, I lost a black silk gown, two petticoats, and three pair of stockings out of my room, about nine o'clock in the evening, from the garret.

SARAH BOTHWICK sworn. - I was standing at my window, at nine o'clock, I saw a man slide down the tiles, and go in at the window, it was not light enough to see who it was.

PHILIP CASTLE sworn. - I am a watchman; on the 28th of July, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I heard an alarm, but found nobody; the next morning, about five o'clock, in consequence of information, I went to a public-house, where I found the prisoner in bed; I found these two petticoats and a gown upon the parapet, close to the window of the room; after I had taken him to the office, I went back and found this jacket in his bed, with the stockings in the pocket.

Q. How far from the house that was robbed? - A. Seven or eight houses.

JAMES JONES sworn. - I am a Police officer, I was sent for; I was present when the jacket was found in the bed he should have slept in, he was in bed with two other soldiers.

Q. How do you know that that is his jacket? - A. I have seen him in it very often.(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. When I was waked, these things were in the room, I don't know how they came there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18030914-46

637. EDWARD THOMPSON was indicted for that he, on the 26th of March , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Thomas Ekins , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession, a Banker's draft for the payment of 33l. 12s. and afterwards feloniously did embezzle, and secrete the same .

THOMAS EKINS sworn. - I am a stable-keeper , in Tottenham-court-road, at the Bull's-head-inn ; the prisoner was my servant, and had been about seven weeks: On the 26th of March, I entrusted him with a check to go to the Banking-house of Robarts, Curtis and Co. to get the money; I wished him to take a horse, but he said he had rather walk; I never saw him again till the 14th of August, at the Green-dragon, at Barnet; he told me, he was coming to town to settle with me, he said, he had got drunk and lost it; I said, why did not he come back to tell me; I got a constable, and he was committed, (produces the check;) I had it from Mr. Marshall, of Islington, from whom I first received it.

- WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a clerk to Robarts, Curtis and Co. I paid this check on the 26th of March, I don't recollect who I paid it to.

Ekins. This is the same draft I delivered to the prisoner.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-47

638. THOMAS WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , twenty pounds weight of white-lead, value 9s. the property of Mary Barry .

JAMES CAMPION sworn. - I am a butcher, No. 21, Fullwood's-rents, Holborn : I employed Mrs. Barry to paint my house; the prisoner was employed by her as a painter ; while sitting in my kitchen after dinner, I saw the prisoner go up into the first-floor, I saw him come down with a paintpot, and heard him pour something off upon the leads, he then took the pot and went out of the house; the apprentice came in just after, and complained of its being lost; the prisoner said, he knew nothing of it, and I immediately taxed him with it.

JAMES KELLY sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mrs. Barry; on the 9th of August, I delivered about three parts of a pot full of white-lead to the prisoner, to go to Mr. Campion's; I followed him a short time after, and he went away to dinner, and came back no more that day; I worked there the remainder of the day, and put the things away at night; I poured some water upon the white-lead; the next morning I sent him to another job, in Lamb's-conduit-street, he was to call at Mr. Campion's; I went with him to the other job, I was to work there till breakfast-time; I left him as much work as I thought would take him till about dinner-time; after dinner, I went to Mr. Campion's, and the lead was gone.

ANN HILL sworn. - I am servant at the Blueposts, Fullwood's-rents; on Wednesday, I think, the 10th of August, the prisoner dined at the house, and after he had dined, a man came in, and they talked about painting, and the man said, he must buy some paint, to paint a house that he was doing of a night; the prisoner said, I will fetch you some, which he did; he asked him what he should give him for it, and he said, they should not fall out about that; then he said, he should want some oil, and he said, he would go and fetch some; the apprentice came in and asked the prisoner where the colour was, and he said it was up in the room; he went away and came back, and said, there was none there.

Prisoner's defence. I went to have a pint of beer, and put the pint pot down in the passage, I don't know what became of it.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-48

639. SARAH STOUT and MARY GREENWELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , three guineas, and two half-guineas , the property of Jane Drummond .

The property being charged to have been stolen in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate, and there being no such parish in the County of Middlesex, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-49

640. REBECCA BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , a gown, value 10s. a petticoat, value 7s. and two shawls, value 4s. the property of Abraham Shuttleworth .

ELIZABETH SHUTTLEWORTH sworn. - I was the wife of Abraham Shuttleworth, he has died since I lost these things; I was in service, I came out of place and went to lodge with the prisoner, I knew her before: On the 7th of July, I went home about half-past eight in the evening, and found the door locked; I had left these things hanging in the room, at five o'clock; the prisoner went by the name of Scales there, she never re

turned afterwards; I broke open the door in the presence of the landlord, and missed my things; I went in search of her, but did not find her till the Sunday week following; I took her at her mother's place in Swallow-street; she directed me to three different pawnbrokers, where I found the things.

MORGAN JONES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Sheddon, (produces a petticoat); I took it in of the prisoner on the 9th of July for four shillings, in the name of Mary Brown ; I knew her before.

WILLIAM LEMAINE sworn. - I am an apprentice to Alexander Tait ; I took in these two shawls on the 7th of July for three shillings, from the prisoner, in the name of Mary Brown ; I knew her before.

GEORGE STOCKS sworn. - (Produces a gown); I took it in of the prisoner for seven shillings; I knew her before.(The property was identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined seven days in Newgate , fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-50

641. THOMAS BYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , a hair trunk, value 14s. the property of Thomas Playfair and John James .

RICHARD GUY sworn. - I am servant to Playfair and James, trunk-maker s, No. 14, the corner of Clifford-street, New Bond-street : On the 10th of May the trunk was stolen from the shop door; on the 16th of May I saw the trunk at Mr. Stevens's, a broker's door, in Mary-le-Bone-lane; I told my master.

JOHN STEVENS sworn. - I am a broker in Mary-le-Bone-lane; the prisoner brought the trunk to me the beginning of May, about nine days before it was owned; I paid for it; I gave nine shillings for it; he said he was out of employ.

- BARLOW sworn. - I saw a man take a trunk from Mr. Playfair's door, but cannot swear to the prisoner.(The trunk produced and identified by Guy.)

Prisoner's defence. I deny stealing the trunk; I sold a trunk to Mr. Stevens, which I bought of a fellow-servant; I have been in his Majesty's service, and bought it of my fellow-servant, who told me he was going to sell it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-51

642. ELIZABETH CURTIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , three silk handkerchiefs, value 18s, and five yards of muslin, value 15s. the property of Alexander-Colvill Johnson .

ALEXANDER COLVILL JOHNSON sworn. - I live at No. 13, Norton Falgate ; I am a linen-draper .

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house on the 31st of August? - A. Perfectly well, between four and five in the afternoon; she came to purchase some mourning; she said her husband's mother was dead; she was very difficult in her purchase.

Q. How long did she stay in the shop? - A. An hour and a half to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did she buy any thing at last? - A. She purchased as many goods as came to the value of 12l. and upwards.

Q. Did she pay you for them? - A. She did not; in the course of conversation, she said her husband kept a wine-vaults in Lime-street; that they had recently purchased the lease, and they had given 370l. for it; she went on to ask me for my custom, and I told her, I had no objection to give her a turn; as soon as the goods were looked out, I went to make out the bill of parcels, and I asked her what name I should make it out in; she told me Mrs. Allen; after that she entered into conversation where she was born, at Newbury, in Berkshire, and mentioned several people that I knew at Newbury; she then said, you may either send the goods home to my house, and I will pay for them, or I am going to Shoreditch to receive 15l. and I will call and pay for them when I come back; she said her mother had been dead about three months; she went away; I told her I should send the goods; I had not the smallest suspicion; I was behind the counter the whole time.

Q. When was it you missed any property? - A. I did not miss it; but as soon as she went out, my nephew, who is an assistant to me, said, uncle, I think that woman has robbed you.

Q. He is not a partner with you? - A. No; I made answer, that it was impossible she could have robbed me, as I had never been from the counter, and there had been no person in the shop during the time she was there; I did not quit the counter, but my people reached me what I asked for; upon that he went out of doors after her, and in about two or three minutes after I got information from a neighbour's boy that she was stopped by my nephew; she was brought back in about ten minutes; my nephew had hold of her arm; he had the handkerchiefs and muslin in his hand.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - On the 31st of August, about a quarter before eleven at night, I was sent for to Mr. Johnson's house, and received charge of the prisoner and these goods from Mr. Johnson. - (Produces them.)

Q. (To Johnson.) Do you know these things to be your's? - A. Yes, they have my own private mark bot upon the ticket and upon the handkerchiefs.

Q. Were those things in your shop that day? - A. I believe they were; but where there are a hundred or a hundred and fifty handkerchiefs in a bundle, it is impossible for me to say.

Q. Do you know if you saw them that day? - A. I had not shewn them to any body that day; but to swear I had those handkerchiefs in my shop that day I could not.

Q. Had you such handkerchiefs? - A. Yes.

Q. When had you seen the muslin? - A. The muslin I can swear to, as having shewn her at the time.

Mr. Hart. Q. How many persons were there in your shop? - A. My nephew, myself, and another young man.

Q. Is that young man here? - A. No.

Q. She was brought back about seven o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you not to put her in custody till eleven o'clock? - A. She requested that I would send to the butcher whom she said she was going to receive 15l from; she kept crying and taking on very much, and I was very much flurried; my customers came in very fast, and I desired her to walk into a back room, where I knew she would be safe.

WILLIAM TOMKINS sworn. - I am nephew to Mr. Johnson.

Q. Were you in the shop during the time the prisoner was there? - A. Yes.

Q. All the time? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you see? - A. I saw her put her hand under her cloak, but I did not see any thing.

Q. Had you seen the handkerchiefs that day? - A. Yes, I had seen them in the morning, and took particular notice of them; Mr. Johnson had been shewing them afterwards to the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you notice the muslin? - A. No.

Q. You did not see any thing in her hand when she put it under her cloak? - A. No.

Q. From that it was that you suspected her? - A. Yes; when she went away I followed her out.

Q. Did you keep sight of her from the time of her leaving the shop? - A. Yes; I watched her into a pawnbroker's shop in Shoreditch.

Q. How long did she stay there? - A. I don't think she was there above two minutes, if so much; directly that she came out I ran into the pawnbroker's; I came out again, and she was then running.

Q. Did she see you? - A. No; directly that I came up to her, I told her Mr. Johnson would be glad to speak to her; it was hardly a moment after I came out of the pawnbroker's before I laid hold of her, and as I was bringing her back she dropped the black cotton, but I did not see her drop it.

Q. Had she been looking at black cotton? - A. Yes, she had; soon after I saw her drop the silk handkerchiefs; a gentleman who was behind me picked up the black cotton and the silk handkerchiefs, and gave them to me; I brought her back to our shop, and gave her to Mr. Johnson; I don't know what passed; I had to attend to a customer.

Q. Look at these handkerchiefs? - A. They are ours, and so is the black muslin.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. By the cotton that you speak of, you don't mean that muslin? - A. Yes, it is cotton muslin.

WILLIAM BARKER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 219, Shoreditch: On the 31st of August the prisoner at the bar came into my shop, and laid down a piece of black cotton.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure it is the same woman? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did she come into your shop? - A. About six o'clock in the evening.

Q. Should you know the cotton again? - A. I never had it in my hand; it appears to be the same cotton; I told her I never took in any black cotton, and then she offered three silk handkerchiefs, and asked me ten shillings upon them; I just gave them a slight look, and said three half crowns; she said that would not do; she took them up very quick, and was out of the shop immediately; Mr. Johnson's nephew came in to know what that lady had offered; I told him, and he went out immediately, and followed her; I went round to the door, and he had overtaken her just before; he brought her back to my door; I saw the black cotton drop from under her cloak upon the pavement; I then called to the young man, and I saw the three silk handkerchiefs in her hand, but did not see her drop them.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I was with Armstrong when he was sent for to apprehend the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Johnson told me, if I would pay for the goods I should go home, and he sent to several places to get security for the money that I might go home.

Q. (To Johnson.) What is the value of these handkerchiefs? - A. The silk handkerchiefs cost me six shillings a piece, and the cotton, five yards or better, at three shillings a yard.

GUILTY, aged 23,

Of stealing goods, but not privately in the shop .

Confined 12 months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030914-52

643. MARY, the wife of JEREMIAH TOWNEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing

in the dwelling-house of Lawrence Keeley , on the 1st of July , two muslin handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d. a pair of pockets, value 3d. two caps, value 3d. a pair of brass candlesticks, value 5d. a tea-caddee, value 6d. a Bank-note, value 15l. two other Banknotes, value 4l. and two other Bank-notes, value 2l. the property of John Wright .

MARY WRIGHT sworn. - I live in Buckeridge-street, St. Giles's .

Q. What is your husband's name? - A. John Wright ; I lived with the prisoner two years in one house; her husband was on board a man of war , and my husband along with him.

Q. Where did the prisoner live at the time this happened? - A. At No. 9, Buckeridge-street; I lodged in the same room with her.

Q. Were both your husbands absent at that time? - A. No, she had her husband with her, and my husband was absent from me; I left the lodgings to go on board a King's ship to see my son; I left all I had in the world with the prisoner, locked up in a trunk, except what I stood upright in.

Q. Who did the house belong to where she lodged? - A. I don't recollect.

Q. How long ago is it since you went away, and left this trunk in her possession? - A. Four months ago; I locked up what I had in the trunk before her eyes.

Q. What did the trunk contain? - A. There was a tin-box in it in the shape of a nutmeggraser; it had a 15l. note in it, a 10l. note, two twos, and two ones.

Q. All Bank-notes? - A. Yes; there was a silver milk-pot that my son bought for me, a pair of silver buckles, and all my clothes; I put the tin-box into a tea-chest, and put it into my trunk.

Q. When did you return from the place where you went to see your son? - A. I think it is ten weeks next Sunday.

Q. How long were you absent? - A. A month and a week; I found my trunk broke open, and my little trunk tore to pieces; I found three or four gowns in it, and two or three tea-spoons.

Q. Had the prisoner quitted the lodging? - A. Yes, she had run away to her sister's, and she was taken there.

Q. Had her husband left the lodging too? - A. Her husband had run away; I afterwards saw my tin-box at Box-street; she was apprehended before I came.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. You lodged with this woman and her husband? - A. Yes.

Q. Her husband was at home as well as herself? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take the husband up? - A. No, he ran away.

Q. Have you not received the sum of 16l. 10s.? - A. It is in hand; the constable has it I dare say.

JAMES-CADWALLADER PARKER sworn. - I live in Whitcomb-street, Leicester-square.

Q. What is your business? - A. A painter and glazier.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I saw her at Bow-street; her husband worked with me as a bricklayer's labourer: On the 30th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening, he came to me when the men had left work, to a building I was repairing in Holborn; he had absented himself from me two or three days; I was standing in the passage to look at the building, and this man came down the passage very much in liquor; I asked him what brought him in that situation at such an hour; he said, he was come to take leave of me, he was going to Ireland: that he had taken his place to go the next day, as he was a freeman of the city of Cork, and could earn a guinea a week in Cork; he earned but fifteen or sixteen shillings a week with me; he said he had got money enough, and produced a tin-box that I suppose would hold an ounce of snuff.

Q. Was it in the form of a nutmeg-grater? - A. I understand there are some made in that form; he pulled out of the box a one-pound note, and afterwards a 15l. note; I told him I was very sorry to see him with it in the condition he was then in, and recommended his leaving the money with me till the next day, which he did; after exhorting him very much to go home immediately, he promised me he would, and I gave him the notes back again in the box; on his quitting the building he turned the contrary way from home; he turned to go to Snow-hill instead of St. Giles's, where he said he lived; I was sorry I had given him the money when I saw him go the wrong way, and I sent another labourer after him, to tell him I wanted him; after an absence of a few minutes he returned, and to induce him to give it me back, I told him I had a bill to pay that night, if he would lend me the money I would be obliged to him, and he should have it in the morning when he came to work; the man very willingly gave me the money, and on the day following I brought the notes and the box with me to the building, expecting to see him there, and in the yard of the building I found Mr. Wildman, a next door neighbour, who said he had been robbed of a sum of money, which one of my labourers had found; I desired him to go to the Police-office, Hatton-Garden, and make his complaint, and I would attend, and shew the money; an officer of the Police came to me with Mr. Wildman, at the request of the Magistrate, for me to shew him the notes; I shewed the notes and the box to Mr. Wildman, and they proved to be of a much later date than the loss of Mr. Wildman's property; after that a Mr. Keeley, a publican, came the same day.

Q. Where does Keeley live? - A. In Buckeridge-street, St. Giles's.

Q. Do you know his name? - A. I believe it is Lawrence; he complained of the robbery that the woman has been describing to you, and requested to have the property, as he had other property of the woman's in his care; I refused to part with the notes out of my hand, but by a course of law; I produced them before Mr. Bond, and by his order I gave them to the officer.

Q. Are you sure the notes you gave the officer were the same? - A. I marked them the day after I received them; I have kept them always in the tin-box.

Q. The prisoner's husband has never returned? - A. I have never seen him since.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street.

Q. Were you employed to make any search? - A. Lawrence Keeley , at the Hare and Hounds, came to me on the 1st of July, and said a woman of the name of Wright was gone to Portsmouth, and left her boxes in possession of the prisoner at the bar and her husband, and they were all broke open; I went with him to her lodgings, No.9, Buckeridge-street.

Q. Keeley's own house? - A. I believe it is; Michael Lahey and I searched the house; she was absconded from there; I found upon her bed a white muslin apron, and in a box I found two brass candlesticks, some caps and handkerchiefs; soon after that I heard she was at her sister's lodgings, at No. 6, Buckeridge-street; I went there immediately, and she was in bed; I came out of the room till she had dressed herself, and I took her into custody immediately; I took her to Mr. Keeley's, and she confessed there was a pair of pockets and an apron under the bed where she was in bed.

Q. Before you had that conversation, what was said to her? - A. Nothing at all.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her to confess? - A. No.

Q. Did you tell her she would be severely punished if she did not? - A. No; when I took her to Bow-street, she said she did not do it; her husband broke it open; Lahey has got the pockets and the apron; the prisoner was examined at Bow-street; Mr. Parker appeared, and I received from him this tin-box, with a fifteen-pound Bank-note and a one-pound note; I think that was at the second examination. - (Produces them.)

Parker. These are the notes I received from the prisoner's husband.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. Did you pursue the husband at all? - A. I never saw him.

Q. Do not you know that in point of fact be was taken? - A. I heard that he was.

MICHAEL LAHEY sworn. - I belong to Bow-street Office; I went with Blackman to the prisoner's lodgings, No. 6, Buckeridge-street; I found this pair of stockings and an apron, which the pointed out to me between the bed and the sacking. - (Produces them.)

Q. Does Keeley keep a lodging-house? - A. Yes.(The property was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. My husband was drunk all that week, and beat me and used me very ill; he knocked two of my teeth out of my head; I did not see him take these things, nor did not know when he did it, or any thing about it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-53

644. SAMUEL BASHAM was indicted for that he, being in the dwelling-house of William Vernon , about the hour of ten in the night of the 30th of July , feloniously did steal, three coats, value 3l. four jackets, value 20s. three pieces of cloth, value 20s. seven waistcoat pieces, value 30s. four waistcoats, value 30s. a piece of printed cotton, value 2s. a jacket, unmade, value 3s. two pieces of brown linen, value 3s. two yards of corderoy, value 5s. a pair of braces, value 2s. three pair of pantaloons, value 50s. three pair of breeches, value 20s. and two yards of camblet, value 2s. the property of the said William; and afterwards, about the hour of eleven in the night, the said dwelling-house burglariously did break to get out of the same .

WILLIAM VERNON sworn. - The prisoner was a servant in my house, he slept in a detached adjoining back part of the premises, he had only been in my service from the Friday preceding, (I can swear to the property.)

JOHN STEVENS sworn. - I am an officer of Bishopsgate-ward-without, on Sunday the 31st of January, about half-past eleven, I went to the Compter with a prisoner, when I came back to the watch-house, the prisoner at the bar was in custody, that was about half-past twelve, at night; I took the prisoner to the Compter, and before I got to Bartholomew-lane, I heard something gingle in his pocket, I enquired what it was, and he said, two keys; I told him, I must have these keys, he said, he would give them to me at the Compter; when we got to the corner of the Bank, he gave us the slip and ran; we pursued him into Coleman-street, and he was taken by the assistance of the watchmen; I took him to the Compter, with the keys; Mr. Vernon has got the keys, he could not get into the premises without them.

FRANCIS BAYLEY sworn. - Q. What do you know? - A. About half after twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner was coming by the watch-house, and dropped a bundle; the watchman laid hold of

him, and I took up the bundle; I opened it, and found two or three coats, a gown-piece, and different articles, made and unmade; I asked him, if he was a tailor, he said, he was; he told me, one great-coat was for the coachman, at the Swan, Bishopsgate-street; I said, is it possible your master could trust you with so much property at once, it will take you, I am sure, a month to make them; he dropped them at the door of the watch-house.(The property was identified by Mr. Vernon.)

Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you had entrusted the prisoner to go to your banker's, and found him faithful so far? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM DOWNS sworn. - I am a watchman of Bishopsgate-within; I saw the prisoner coming past the end of Wormwood-street, at half-past twelve o'clock at night, near the watch-house, he had a green bag upon his shoulder; I asked him where he brought it from; he said, from his master's, that he was a journeyman-tailor; I said, it was very odd he should have such a bundle at so late an hour, and took him into the watch-house; I examined the bag, these are the same articles.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030914-54

645. CATHERINE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a silk cloak, value 2s. a gown, value 10s. a petticoat, value 5s. two aprons, value 1s. a cap, value 6d. and six penny-pieces , the property of Rebecca Stevens .

REBECCA STEVENS sworn. - I am a widow , I live in Charles-street, Long-acre ; On the 4th of August, I lost the articles; I saw the prisoner go out of the room, I was not very well, and had laid down; the prisoner brought some work to me, and worked two days with me for company, and when she was packing up my things, I thought she was taking her work; the bundle she took out was bigger than that she brought in, and I had a suspicion; I called my landlord down; I had information where the prisoner was on the Friday, and I went and took her, she had on my cloak, aprons and handkerchief, she would not give any account of the other things; I gave charge of her, and the officer took the things from her which I produce,(produces and identifies them;) the gown, petticoat and apron, she will not tell where they are.

WILLIAM SCOTT sworn. - I am a shoe-maker, Mrs. Stevens lodges with me; on the 4th of August, between eight and nine o'clock, I was with her, when she missed the articles, and on the 6th, I saw the cloak, handkerchief, and apron taken from the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. Mrs. Stevens and I lived in the same house, she goes out at night, she was intoxicated, and had pledged my apron; I said, never mind, she lent me a handkerchief and apron; she had a man with her, and I acknowledge I put on her cloak to take home a pair of gaiters, and was going home with them when I met her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-55

646. EVAN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , 180lb. weight of wool, value 45l. three bags, value 3s. and twelve pieces of bag, value 2s. the property of Emanuel De la Torre .

JOHN EDWARD HALLIDAY sworn. - I am clerk to the prosecutor, who lives at No. 22, Finsbury-square , a Spanish merchant , and dealer in wool, his warehouse is behind the house, the prisoner was his servant ; we lost wool for a considerable time, particularly Leonisa, which is the finest, and Segoria, which is rather inferior; I went with the officer to the prisoner's house, and found some Spanish wool packed up in two bundles, being eight, ten, or twelve pounds weight; the finest sold at six shillings and sixpence per pound; the coarsest at two-pence or three-pence under; we also found some pieces of bags.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you mean to swear positively to the wool found there? - A. I can only say it is the same sort of wool, and we had missed quantities by the weight; when we fell, a sample is drawn from a bag; many bags have been opened in the warehouse, and sometimes they will come in a torn state, and loose wool will remain in the vessel.

NICHOLAS DE TELLETRE sworn. - I am the nephew of Mr. De la Torre, and am employed by him; before the prisoner was discharged, a warehouse-keeper received it, I took care of the weight when a bag was weighed to the seller.

ANN TWIDDY sworn. - I live at No. 25, Union-buildings; the prisoner lives opposite, at No. 30, but I did not know where he worked; he had no shop; I have observed him come home about eight or nine in the morning, one in the afternoon, and seven in the evening; he used to bring bundles continually, sometimes in bags and handkerchiefs: On the 5th of August I saw him come out, and saw a cart, horse, and man at the door, between one and two in the afternoon; I knew the man with the cart; afterwards I saw a large course bag put into the cart by Williams and another man; I went over to Mr. Williams, and told him the property he had was stolen; he said, it was no such thing, and wished I had told him before; he then turned to a man in the room, and said, this is the man who bought it; the man said, I have bought and

paid for it; I said, then you have bought stolen property; the cart drove away, and the man went with it; I gave information.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Mr. De la Torre lives about half a mile from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw nothing that was in the bag? - A. No.

Q. This was in the day-time? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did he explain what he meant, when he said, I wish you had told me before? - A. No.

- STEVENS sworn. - I went to fetch a bag of wool rom the prisoner's house, and believe he was there; it is hard swearing to a man, having seen him but once, but I believe it is him, three men loaded the cart; I took it to Cloth-fair, and afterwards went to the Red-cow, in Long-lane, somebody said they were going there; I went to the Red-cow, and saw three men, the prisoner was one; had I seen him in the street, I should not have known him.

GEORGE STANTON sworn. - I was clerk to Mr. Hughes, of Cloth-fair; in August, I remember Stevens bringing a bag of wool; I afterwards went to a public-house, in Long-lane, Smithfield; by direction of him, I found two or three others there, the prisoner was one; I asked him if it was his job, or on commission, as I had not seen him for a long time; he said, it was; I asked him, if he wanted the money to day, he said, he did, particularly; I said Mr. Hughes was out, but I would endeavour to get a check for it, when he came in; I went home and back again, and paid him seventeen pounds odd, and a check for the next day, for twenty-eight pounds, the wool was five shillings a pound; I asked him why he did not come to Mr. Hughes, he said, he was dirty, he would call the next day; I sold it to Mr. Hughes by commission; the prisoner gave me a pound for my commission, I was to have had a guinea; I had had a sample from a person of the name of Jackson; I expected the wool on the 5th of August.

HENRY HUGHES sworn. - I live at No. 30, Cloth-fair, and am a woollen-draper, Stanton used to keep our books; On the 3d of August, he brought us a sample of wool, if I could sell it by the sample; I said, I would buy it; on the 5th of August, I saw a bag of wool, there was an X. No. 29, and R. on the bag, I gave Stanton a check for seventeen pounds twelve shillings, and a check for the following day for twenty-eight pounds; I sold the wool to Mr. Bartlett, and knew the bag, the wool was superior to the sample.

JAMES BARTLETT sworn. - I live at No. 84, London-wall, and am a dealer in wool; on the 6th of August, I purchased a sack of wool of Mr. Hughes, and sent it to Gerrard's-hall to a waggon; I don't know the mark, I conceive the value to be five shillings and three pence a pound, it is re-packed wool of different sorts, I gave five and three pence.

JOHN ARMSTONG sworn. - I am a Police-officer: On Friday the 5th of August, at ten o'clock at night, I went to the prisoner's house, he and his wife were at supper; I asked him, if his name was Williams, and if he had any Spanish wool in the house; he said, no, and the woman said, no; I said, I should search, he said, I was welcome; I went into the back-room, and saw the bundles; I turned them up, and said, here is some, he said, he thought it was cloaths; I took them and the prisoner into custody; I went to Stevens and to Hughes, and found the bag of wool; I heard of a check for twenty-eight pounds, and asked the prisoner for it, he said I might ask his wife for it, for it had been sold.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am a Police-officer, and went with Armstrong, and found some bags, some up stairs, and some in the room where the prisoner was sitting; the prisoner said, they were given him by Mr. Jones, Mr. De la Torre's foreman.

MR. DE LA TORRE sworn. - I went with the officers to the prisoner, and saw the bags, and believe them to be mine.

JAMES BROOKE sworn. - I am a wool-broker, and have compared the wool in these bundles, with the wool in the bags, at the prisoner's; it corresponds perfectly, and is part of the same growth; the wool, in August, was sold for six shillings and sixpence per pound, wholesale.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you compared that with any wool you have purchased? - A. No; one pile makes between three and four hundred bags; I cannot say it is a part of that pile, but I have sold many bags for Mr. De la Torre; there are other importers of Leonisa wool, beside Mr. De la Torre.

The prisoner called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-56

646. ROGER otherwise DARBY BRYANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a silver watch, value 1l. 1s. the property of James Belott .

JAMES BELOTT sworn. - I am a weaver and watchman ; On the 16th of August, I was coming home between six and seven in the morning, and met the prisoner and two women, I had a little knowledge of him, they went home with me, the women went away; my watch was on the back-

room shelf, I went out for half an hour, and when I returned, I missed the watch.

ELIZABETH BELOTT sworn. - I found the watch at a pawnbroker's, in East-Smithfield.

ELIZABETH BOWRING sworn. - The prisoner brought the watch and pawned it for fifteen shillings, in the name of Darby Bryant.(The watch produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I know no more of the watch than the child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-57

647. JONATHAN BLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , a hammercloth, value 20l. and a leather chaise apron, value 1l. the property of Lord Rokeby .

Second Count. Charging them to belong to Thomas Arkell.

THOMAS ARKELL sworn. - I am master of a livery stable, in Davis-street , where the chariot was put up: On the 3d of August, the hammercloth was on the box at twelve o'clock at night; at six o'clock in the morning, it was gone; between six and seven o'clock it was found on the prisoner.

- sworn. - I keep the Union public-house, Princes-street, Westminster; early on the 3d of August, the prisoner came to hire a room; I said, he did not appear to be a person I should choose to let a room to, and asked him who and what he was; he said, he had been a gentleman's servant, but was reduced, that he was come to town to get a situation, and wished to have a night's lodging; I said, he should have a lodging, if possible, he paid down sixpence and went to fetch his cloaths; he brought a large bundle, which did not appear to be wearing apparel, and carried it into the passage; I suspected him and called the watchman, who was in the house, and he found a black velvet embroidered hammercloth.

WILLIAM FITZWALTER sworn. - I was sent by the landlord, and saw the prisoner ripping something to pieces, I saw it was a hammer-cloth, he said, his brother gave him leave to do it, he had ripped about a yard of lace.( John Mone produced the bammer-cloth, which was identified.)

Prisoner. I found the hammercloth in the morning. GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-58

648. ELIZABETH DOYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , a shawl, value 3s. 6d. the property of Thomas Sowerby .

JAMES BODMAN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker , in Davis'-street, Welclose-square, Whitechapel , on the 27th of July, the prisoner came to pledge something.

HANNAH POTTER sworn. - I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner take the shawl down, and put it into her pocket; when there was a piece of work about it, she dropped it from under her cloaths.(The shawl produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was in the shop which was full of people, they accused me with it, but I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-59

649. MATTHEW DELL and NICHOLAS MACNAMARA were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , two saws, value 2l. 2s. the property of Henry Latham .

HENRY LATHAM sworn. - I deal in mahogany, and am a Surveyor , in Princes-square, Ratcliff-highway , the saws are mine.

HENRY EDLIN sworn. - I am a butcher, in Ratcliff-highway, and saw two men lurking about Mr. Latham's premises; Mr. Walker and I took Dell, who was standing by the saws against the wall; we went to Mr. Latham's yard, and saw Macnamara on the gates.

- WALKER sworn. - I saw Dell with a saw, and asked him whose it was, he said nothing; I saw Macnamara in the yard, looking over, and heard him drop a saw, we found him concealed on some deals.

Macnamara's defence. Dell knows nothing of the saws; I went to take them to work, as is usual for the master to take a penny out of a shilling.

Dell's defence. I am entirely innocent.(The saws produced and identified.

Dell called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Dell, GUILTY , aged 39.

Macnamara, GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-60

650. JAMES HIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , a silk handkerchief, value 2s. the property of John Morse .

JOHN MORSE sworn. - I am a farrier : On the the 22d of July I was going down Whitechapel , and felt a pull; I turned about, and saw the prisoner; I caught hold of him, and found the handkerchief in his bosom.

Prisoner's defence. The handkerchief was dropped, and I picked it up, and gave it him.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-61

651. GEORGE JENKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a shift, value 2s. the property of Frances Child .

FRANCES CHILD sworn. - I hung the shift up, and in about five minutes after the prisoner came in, and took it wet as it was.

PHILIP LEE sworn. - I saw him take it; I followed him, and took him.

Prisoner's defence. It was laying on the ground.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-62

652. MARY KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , a metal watch, value 30s. the property of Lawrence Hollister .

LAWRENCE HOLLISTER sworn. - I am a broker , No. 6, Orange-street, Golden-square : On the 9th of August, between two and three o'clock, I lost my watch from the parlour; the prisoner was a lodger; she absconded, and I never saw her till the 13th, when she was taken; the watch was found at a watch-maker's.

JANE ROBERTSON sworn. - The prisoner came to me on the 12th of August, and asked me to buy a duplicate of a watch pawned for ten shillings, which she would sell for two shillings; I bought it, and she went with me to take it out.

RICHARD LOVATT sworn. - I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner; she said she had pawned the watch, and sold the ticket.(The watch produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was much distressed, and took the watch and pawned it.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-63

653. MILES DUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of John Lewis .

JOHN LEWIS sworn. - I am a carpenter ; On Tuesday the 6th of September, I was at No. 42, Grosvenor-place ; my chest was in the building; the prisoner was a labourer ; I gave my watch to John Hill to put into his chest; he told me where the key was before the prisoner; I went to the fair, and went home to the building, and slept there; in the morning John Hill said somebody had been at the chest; I said, no! we examined the chest, and my watch was gone.

JOHN HILL sworn. - He confirmed the last witness.

THOMAS ASTREE sworn. - I was sentry, and saw a man come out of the building about two o'clock, who I believe to be the prisoner; the moon as shining bright; he was taken into custody, d the duplicate found on him.

JOHN CRIDLAND sworn. - I searched the priner, and found a duplicate, and half a guinea in his mouth.(The pawnbroker produced the watch pawned by Hannah Gilbert .)

HANNAH GILBERT sworn. - The prisoner gave me the watch to pawn, and I gave him the money.

Prisoner. I found the watch.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publickly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-64

654. HANNAH DEDMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a yard and a half of cotton, value 1s. 6d. and a flat-iron, value 8d. the property of John Stedston .

MARY STEDSTON sworn. - My husband keeps the Swan, at Hungerford-stairs ; the prisoner lodged with me; I missed a flat-iron, and sent to the prisoner to ask her if she had it; she said, no; I sent for a constable, and she delivered up the tickets to him.

RICHARD LEWIS sworn. - I am a constable, and searched the prisoner, and found the tickets for the iron and cotton.(The articles produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I pledged the things, not meaning to cheat, but to get them out again.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-65

655. ELIZABETH PENNINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , two shifts, value 4s. three aprons, value 4s. 6d. two petticoats, value 6s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d. a frock, value 2s. a half handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. and five towels, value 6d. the property of Peter Lilley .

Mrs. LILLEY sworn. - I lodge in Globe-lane, Bethnal-green : On the 25th of July I lost the things stated in the indictment; the prisoner lodged in the next room; I missed the things out of a trunk, on the 27th I saw them again at a pawnbroker's, and at Mrs. Jackson's, where they were sold.

ROBERT COOKE sworn. - I am an officer, and produce the petticoats, shift, and other things, which I got from Mrs. Jackson on Wednesday the 27th; when I apprehended the prisoner, she told me she had pawned them, and sold some to Mrs. Jackson.

Mrs. JACKSON sworn. - I live at Mile-end, and

know the prisoner: On the 27th of July she sold me these things, which I delivered to the officer.

THOMAS BAXTER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Whitechapel-road; the prisoner pawned a shift, a white apron, a frock, and an half handkerchief.(The things produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. The door is open all night; my husband is a prisoner in the guard-house, being a soldier in the Tower Hamlets militia; I went home late at night, and found the bundle on the stairs, which I pledged.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 12 months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-66

656. EDWARD PARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , two shirts, value 1l. 8s. a cravat, value 5s. a pair of stockings, value 4s. 6d. and a handkerchief, value 3s. 6d. the property of Samuel Warr .

MARIA WARR sworn. - I am a washer-woman , and sent the things home by my little boy on Saturday the 23d of July: On the Tuesday following the prisoner brought them to me to wash; I washed for him at the same time; the marks are picked out, but I knew them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long had you washed for the prisoner? - A. Five months.

Q. He knew your boy? - A. No, he was always at school when he came.

Q. The prisoner brought the things to you? - A. Yes.

Q. You were answerable for the property? - A. Yes.

Q. Your son is not answerable? - A. No.

THOMAS WARR sworn. - On the 13th of July, between seven and eight o'clock, my mother sent me with a bundle of linen to Mr. Martin's, No. 10, Leicester-square ; I knocked at the door, and the prisoner came up, and asked me whose linen it was; I told him Mr. Martin's; he asked me if there was any message to leave; I said, no; I gave the bundle into his hands; he said, he would take care of it; he did not ask for it, but I thought he lived in the house; I then went home.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you know the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. How long were you with him? - A. About three minutes.

Q. Can you swear to him? - A. Yes; I was shewn the prisoner before the Justice, there were two or three with him.

Q. You have had a great number of conversations with your mother about it since? - A. Yes.

- LOVATT sworn. - I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody; he did not account for it, but said he was innocent.(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the things at a sale in Brewer-street.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn. - I live in Fetter-lane, and am a haberdasher; I have seen the prisoner once or twice; I was at the King's Arms, Brewer-street, with a friend on or about the 25th of July, when a young man came in, and offered some things for sale, shirts and other things, and the prisoner gave 19s. for them; I did not examine them.

ALEXANDER BADDEN sworn. - I live in Great Shire-lane, Temple-bar, and know the prisoner; Williams and I went to the King's Arms on Monday the 25th of July, and saw the prisoner buy some things of a young man about twenty-four or twenty-five years old, who was in a light-brown coat; I think there were two shirts, three neck-handkerchiefs, two pair of white stockings, and a pocket-handkerchief with a red border; he asked twenty-four shillings, and took nineteen shillings; he was not at all like the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-67

657. MARK STONE , WILLIAM BROWN , and JONH HERMITAGE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , four cups and four saucers, value 2s. five cups and five saucers, value 1s. 6. and five other cups, value 1s. the property of John Roper and others.

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Richard Weston .

Third Count. Charging them to be the property of Henry Jones . And,

Fourth Count. Charging them to be the property of persons unknown.

RICHARD WESTON sworn. - I am captain of the Heart of Oak barge , and am answerable for the property on board; I had a crate of Staffordshire ware on board, but cannot say what was in it; I went on board the barge, and found it was robbed; I had left every thing secure; I went in search after the property on board Stone's barge, where I found some of the property, but I cannot swear it is the same; the barges lay at Brentford, within about fifty yards of each other.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18030914-68

658. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , a pair of sheets, value 8s. the property of George Murdock , from a lodging-room in his dwelling-house, let by contract by him to her .

There being a mistake in the indictment the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18030914-69

659. ANN SMITH was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of September , a pair of sheets, value 10s. two pillow cases, value 2s. a

bolster, value 10s. a counterpane, value 10s. two towels, value 1s. a table-cloth, value 1s. and a teacup, value 2d. the property of John Darwell , from a lodging room in his dwelling-house, let by contract by him to her .

JOHN DARWELL sworn. - I keep a house, No. 25, Angel-court, Princes-street, Westminster : I let the prisoner a lodging, furnished, on Monday the 5th of September, at four shillings and sixpence a week, she slept one night in the house; on Wednesday I went and knocked hard at the door, no person answered, I opened a closet next the door, and saw the key, and opened the door; when I missed the things, I went round to the pawnbrokers, where I found them. I found her at Mr. Murdock's the next Sunday; a great many duplicates were taken from her.(The things produced by the pawnbrokers pledged by the prisoner, were identified by the prosecutor.)

MARY DELL sworn. - I keep a broker's shop; On the 8th and 9th, the prisoner sold me a bolster, a quilt, and a pair of sheets; I gave seven shillings for the bolster, six shillings and sixpence for the quilt, and six shillings and sixpence for the sheets; she said they were her own.

JOHN HOBBS sworn. - I am an officer: I took the prisoner into custody; she shewed me the shop where she sold the things.

Prisoner's defence. I took them from distress, and leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-70

660. JOSEPH ERRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a shilling, and four halfpence , the property of Charles Goldsmith .

CHARLES GOLDSMITH sworn. - I am a chair-maker , and keep a house No. 12, Worship-street : I left the money in my pocket when I went out to dinner, and did not miss it till Tuesday, when my lodger asked me if I had left fourteen-pence in my pocket; I cannot swear to the money; the prisoner is an articled apprentice to me. I cannot say I lost any.

CATHARINE TOVEY sworn. - I lodge with Mr. Goldsmith: There was a difference between the apprentices about the money in their master's small clothes; the prisoner said there was a shilling and two-pence, and would have the other to have part of it; I did not hear any more.

WILLIAM CUNDELL sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Goldsmith: On Sunday the 7th of August, the prisoner came in after my master was gone out, and he took fourteen-pence out of my master's breeches pocket, which were laying on the ground, and asked me whether I would have part of it. I cannot say what he did with it, I refused it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-71

661. THOMAS HUSSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a hammer head, value 2d. a piece of iron chain, value one halfpenny; the bottom of a fire pot, value 2d. two pieces of old iron, value 1d. and several other articles , the property of Thomas Compton and Townsend Compton .

Not being able to prove the partnership, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-72

662. ELIZABETH HOGG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , a gown, value 5s. the property of Rachael Leicester .

RACHAEL LEICESTER sworn. - I live at No. 1, Gresse-street, Rathbone-place , and am a single woman ; On the 2d of July, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, my landlady, came into my room, and asked me if I had any money; I said, no; I owed her money for rent; she saw a gown laying on the bed, and said, that is the gown you bought of me, and I'll have it; she took it under her arm into her own room, and locked it up in the cupboard; I tried to pull it from her, but could not, I did not say any thing to her; I asked her for it repeatedly, but she would not give it me. On the 11th of July, I went to the Magistrates, and she was taken up. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-73

663. CATHARINE BOYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a handkerchief, value 5s. a shirt, value 7s. a waistcoat, value 4s. a petticoat, value 10d. and half-a-crown , the property of Thomas Dawson .

ELEANOR DAWSON sworn. - I am wife of Thomas Dawson , a labouring man : The prisoner lodged with us; I missed the articles while she lodged with us, she left us the 7th of August without paying her rent, and took a petticoat with her which I saw upon her on the 18th; about seven or eight o'clock, the same night, she was apprehended; nothing else was found upon her.

ANN LIGHTFOOT sworn. - I lodge with Mrs. Dawson, I saw the prisoner take the petticoat off the line, but thought it was her own; I have seen it since upon her; it was found at the foot of her bed. (The petticoat produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I borrowed it of her while I mended my own; I carried it home twice, but she was not at home, and I took it home again for safety.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-74

664. JOHN WESTBROOK and DANIEL MURPHY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , six pair of glove mitts, value 10s. the property of Robert Thompson .

THOMAS INGLE sworn. - I am servant to Robert Thompson, a hosier ; No. 27, Middle-row, Holborn : On the 29th of August last, about nine o'clock in the morning, John Westbrook, and another who has made his escape, came into the shop and asked me to shew them a pair of worsted stockings; I did so; Westbrook said he wanted ribbed ones; I fetched them; he said they were too large; I suspected them, and made believe to look the parcel, but kept my eye on Westbrook and his companion; I saw him put his hand on a pile of goods, and give a parcel to his companion, who put it under his coat, and said, where's Jack; Westbrook said, I don't know; that person then ran out halloaing, Jack, Jack; a person came in, and said, have you lost a parcel; Westbrook was in the shop, I took him into custody.

JOHN PIPER sworn. I am journeyman to Mr. Bennett, auctioneer, High-Holborn, opposite to Mr. Thompson's; I observed a person come out of Mr. Thompson's shop, and call Jack, twice, with a parcel; Murphy came up, and they walked together for twenty yards talking; I saw the person who made his escape give a parcel to Murphy; they crossed, one on each side, and walked up Holborn; I went over and gave information.

Murphy's defence. I had no bundle.

Westbrook's defence. I went to buy a pair of stockings, and while I was looking at them a person came in, and said something had been taken from the shop, and charged me with it; I am totally innocent, as I never saw the person before.

Westbrook, GUILTY , aged 14.

Murphy, GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-75

665. MARY ELY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a quilt, value 10s. 6d. two sheets, value 9s. 6d. a looking-glass, value 2s. and a candlestick, value 1s. the property of John Beale , in a lodging-room .

JOHN BEALE sworn. - I live at No. 9, East-Smithfield ; I keep a house, and let lodgings: The prisoner came to lodge with me the 1st of July, she lived there till the 15th, when I missed her and the things; she was to pay four shillings a week.

MARY BEALE sworn. - I missed her, and when I went into the room the things were gone.

JAMES GEARY sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody on the 30th of August; I searched her, and found forty-seven duplicates on her, among which was the duplicate of the sheets.

- TATE sworn. - I live with Mr. Bourne, No. 55, East-Smithfield; I have one sheet which I took in, the other sheet is at Mr. Bourne's; I took this sheet of the prisoner, on the 8th of July; she pledged it for three shillings.(The sheet produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-76

666. ELIZABETH KEIL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , two petticoats, value 10s. six pair of stockings, value 12s. a shift, value 3s. and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Edward Bates .

ELIZABETH BATES sworn. - I live near the Turnpike, Oxford-road , my husband is a stocking weaver : The prisoner said she was a servant-maid out of place ; she came to lodge with us in the month of June; my husband sent me a parcel in the name of Martin; she said, as you are a poor woman I will go and fetch it; she did, but never brought it to me. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-77

667. JOHN RUSSELL otherwise RYAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a hand-saw, value 5s. the property of William Williams .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn. - I work with Mr. Thomas, a back-maker : I put my saw in a cupboard in Mr. Thomas's shop on Saturday the 9th of July, and missed it on the 11th.

WILLIAM PICKERING sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday the 10th of July, I saw him in the fields lousing himself, with two saws by him; I asked him how he came by them; he said they were his.

Prisoner's defence. I went to lay down on the grass, and the saws were there.

GUILTY , aged 83.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-78

668. JOHN MATTENEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , a jacket, value 10s. the property of Charles Slater .

CHARLES SLATER sworn. - I am a coach-maker , and work with Mr. Godsall: I went into the country for about three weeks, when I returned I missed my jacket; the prisoner is errand boy in the shop: On Saturday the 27th of August, I was going along Great Earl-street, and saw it hang up for sale; I asked the price of it, the man said seven shillings and sixpence. I left two shillings earnest to secure the jacket while I got an officer, which I did.

- BALER sworn. - I keep a sale-shop in Great Earl-street; I exchanged the jacket for a coat to the prisoner; I asked him how he came by it; he

said, it was his master's but misfitted, and he had given it to him to exchange for what he liked.(The jacket produced and identified.)

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-79

669. JANE HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , an iron bar, value 1s. 6d. the property of Isaac Emden .

ISSAC EMDEN sworn. - I live at No. 8, Mansell-street : The bar that fastened the shutters, about six feet long, lay in the passage; I had been out on the 26th of July, and met my servant, Mary East, who told me a woman had run away with it to Rosemary-lane; I went there, and saw the prisoner offering it for sale; my servant is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-80

670. THOMAS WILLIAMS , JOHN CARROLL , JOHN DALY , and SAMUEL TRIPP , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , a box, value 6d. a pair of brass money-scales and weights, value 2s. a half-crown, and four shillings and sixpence in monies , the property of James Elsegood .

The prosecutor not appearing the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-81

671. JOHN RIMES was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 23d of July , a Bank-note for the payment of 5l.

Second Count. For feloniously disposing of, and putting away, the said 5l. forged Bank-note, he knowing it to be forged.

Third and Fourth Counts. For feloniously forging and uttering as true, a promissory note for the payment of money, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

And four other Counts, charging it to be with intent to defraud Reuben Dear.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys, and stated by Mr. Fielding.)

REUBEN DEAR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you a butcher ? - A. Yes; at No. 175, High-Holborn .

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell us whether you saw him, and when? - A. Yes, that is the man; I never saw him before the 23d of July, on a Saturday night.

Q. About what time did you see him, and where? - A. Near upon twelve o'clock at night, in my shop.

Q. Was he alone? - A. He came alone.

Q. What did he come for, and what passed between you? - A. He asked me whether I had any thing left; I said I had a little but not much; I pointed to a piece of beef, and asked him if that would do, that it should be sixpence halfpenny a pound, but I would take sixpence, it weighed eight pounds two ounces, I abated the two ounces, and said he should have it for four shillings; he asked me whether I could give him change for a note; I asked him what; he said it was a five pound note; I gave him change in three one pound notes, five seven-shilling-pieces, and a shilling.

Q. Before you gave him change did you make any enquiries of him? - A. Yes; I asked him his name, and he said it was William Biddles, and he lived at No. 23, Drury-lane, and was a button-maker; he gave me the note, and I wrote his name on it; I asked him if it was a good one; and he said, yes.

Q. Did you make any request of him respecting the notes you gave him? - A. I asked him to write my name on the notes I gave him, as I had written his name on that note; he made answer, it did not signify, for he dared to say they were all good ones; he said, it was between two or three of them, and he dared to say they were all good ones.

Q. When he left your shop, did you see which way he turned? - A. I asked him if he would have the meat chopped, because he was going without it being chopped; he said, yes, and I chopped it; he went away, and turned down Holborn-hill way instead of towards Drury-lane, it was directly the contrary way.

Q. Did that raise your suspicion? - A. Yes; I followed him a few yards, when he picked up some sort of lady; I followed him to Turnstile, with the lady and the meat in his hand; my shop is near St. Giles's; he crossed over from Turnstile, and kept on to Brownlow street. I heard him say, the poor fellow will rue this to-morrow, and d - n us, that made me more anxious to give charge of him; I went rather past Gray's-Inn-lane, and saw a watchman almost asleep; I said, I wish you would take charge of this man, I suppose he has given me a bad five pound note; he said he should not go off his beat, and would not take him; the prisoner went on and turned up Brook-street; the woman being with him he did not hear what I said to the watchman. I went on, and saw a watch-box; I asked the watchman to take him into custody; I suppose the lantern made a noise, or something, but they turned into a public-house; we waited for them coming out for some time, but they did not, as the man had gone out at another door.

Q. You wrote the name the prisoner gave you on the note? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that, (shewing a paper) and say whether it is the note he passed to you? - A. Yes; this is my hand-writing, and there is William Biddles, No. 23, Drury-lane.

Q. Had you written that address on any othe

note - A. No; I have not had a five pound note lately but that.

Q. When were you first questioned about this? - A. I paid it away on Monday to Mr. Nott, who is a banker, and takes money for goods; it was returned to me on the Saturday following.

Q. Were you applied to by Croker? - A. We went to No. 23; that is, the gentleman and I, who brought the note to me; we could not find such a person; and then we gave information to Croker.

Q. How long after that was it you next saw the prisoner? - A. Three or four days; I saw him again in a public-house in King-street, Holborn.

Q. He was not in custody at that time? - A. No; I was sent for, and went there, and sat down by him.

Q. Did you know him again? - A. I knew him again; he went out, and I went after him; he returned in again, and I with him; I then told Croker, and the prisoner was secured.

Q. At the time he passed the note, was Thomas Holstock in the shop? - A. He was in a little accompting-house with a window that sides up, and stood full facing the prisoner as he was standing in the shop, and saw him take the change.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was the boy before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. When you received the note, you wrote the name of the person who uttered it to you? - A. Yes.

Q. This was the 23d of July? - A. Yes, I believe it was.

Q. If I can read, this is the 26th of July? - A. That is the same note I will swear; those words,"received Gibbs," are not my writing.

Q. After the man left you, and you heard the conversation, it necessarily excited your suspicion? - A. Yes.

Q. The man, whoever he was, absconded? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore, he had intimation of the fact that you were in pursuit of him? - A. I imagine so.

Q. After this you went to Smithfield, though you suspected the note to be a bad one, and offered it? - A. I shewed it to several people, and they said it was a good one.

Q. Did you tell the man to whom you offered it that you suspected it to be a bad one? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you go to the Bank, and communicate any thing there? - A. No.

Q. When they came to enquire after you, then you told this story? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the watchman here you spoke to that night? - A. No.

Q. We have heard it said, by my learned Friend, in his address, that the man bought a very small piece of meat - eight pounds is a good allowance for a poor man, is it not? - A. I have often sold twenty pounds; but oftener less than more.

Q. How long was it from the time the note was offered to you till you saw Croker? - A. Eight or ten days; they sent Croker to me.

Q. How long after that was it when you saw the prisoner at the bar, was it a day or two? - A. Three or four days.

Q. Croker told you he had apprehended the man who paid you the note? - A. He sent to me to come and look at a man.

Q. Did he not add, that he believed he was the man who had uttered the note? - A. I said it was the man.

Q. I ask you again - Did he not add, that he believed he was the man who uttered the note? - A. He said, he thought he had got the man I gave information of; and I said it was the man.

Q. At this time the man was in some public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. He saw you, did not he, when you spoke to Croker? - A. I did not speak to him at all, I said that was the man. I sat down by the man, and he went out and I followed him; we both returned in together, and I spoke to Croker.

Q. Have you always been as positive to the person of the prisoner as you are to day? - A. I said all along it was the same man.

Q. Have you always said it as positively as you do to day? - A. It is the man.

Q. Have you always said so? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you never spoke in doubt of it? - A. I knew it was the same man.

Q. Have you never spoke with doubt, as to the identity of the person? - A. No; I knew it was the same man always.

Q. And have you always said positively it was the same man? - A. Yes, I always did.

Q. Remember, you are upon your oath, did you or not, when you were examined before the Magistrate, say, you did not know that the prisoner was the man positively - but if he was not the man, he was extremely like him? - A. Do you mean to say positively you have never said that? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did not the prisoner say, he was surprised you could say so; and did not you make that answer? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Mr. Isaac Baxter? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he here? - A. Yes.

Q. I ask you upon the oath you have taken, whether you have never told Baxter that you did not recollect the person of the man? - A. No.

Q. Have you never said any thing to that effect? - A. No.

Q. Did you never say to him, that if the prisoner was not the person, he was very like him? - A. No.

Q. Have you not said to Baxter, that you entertained a doubt, and if it was not for the boy, you could not have sworn to him? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are asked when you put

this note off yourself, whether or not you knew it to be bad - to whom did you pay it? - A. To Mr. Nott.

Q. Were you known to Mr. Nott? - A. Yes; I do business with him every Monday almost, and have for years.

Q. Was the prisoner at all in custody at the time you saw him in King-street? - A. No, perfectly to himself, not in custody at all.

Q. You followed him upon his leaving the house? - A. Yes, he went to the door just to the step, and came back again.

Q. If he had attempted to run away, you would have followed him? - A. Yes.

Q. Who is Isaac Baxter? - A. He is an acquaintance of mine, and I was telling him about the man; I said it was the same man, but I had not sworn to him.

THOMAS HOLSTOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. How old are you? - A. Going of 17.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes,

Q. Look at the prisoner - did you ever see him before? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in your master's shop on the evening of Saturday the 23d of July? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you his apprentice? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come into your master's shop on the 23d of July, in the evening? - A. Yes,

Q. Are you sure of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes, he is the man I am sure.

Q. What made you take notice of him that night? - A. He held down his head, and looked very downy, and went the wrong way.

Q. How long do you think he staid in your master's shop? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Give a guess how many minutes? - A. He staid about ten minutes very likely, or a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you see him give your master a note for change? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see your master give him the change? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe him before and at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he dressed at that time as he is now? - A. No.

Q. Look again at the prisoner, and tell me, from the observation you made at the time, whether you can say, before God, that is the man? - A. I am sure that is the man.

Q. Did you hear him give your master any direction as to the place where he lived? - A. Yes, No. 23, Drury-lane.

Q. Did you see him when he went out of the shop? - A. Yes, he turned on the right hand instead of the left.

Q. Did your master follow him? - A. Yes.

Q. What made him follow him? - A. Because he went the wrong way, and my master had suspicion of him.

Q. I ask you again, whether you are sure or have any doubt about the prisoner being the man? - A. No, I have no doubt; I am positively sure he is the man.

Q. When did you see him again? - A. A week after.

Q. Where? - A. Coming along Holborn; he walked past our house with the officer.

Q. Were you sure at that time he was the same person? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You saw him a week afterwards with the officer passing by? - A. Yes.

Q. It could not be a fortnight after - you are sure it was a week? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to recollect it was on the 23d of July? - A. I do not know.

Q. Can you read or write? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to say it was on the 23d, or on any other day? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Your master has told you so since? - A. No.

Q. That you positively swear? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear, that from the time the man was in the shop, and bought a piece of meat, until the present time, your master has not spoken to you on the subject - do you mean solemnly to swear that? - A. He has spoke to me.

Q. I ask you when he spoke to you, did he not tell you it was on the 23d of July, and desire you to say so? - A. No, he never said anything about that.

Q. What did he say to you? - A. He asked whether I was sure that was the man.

Q. When was that? - A. When the officer took him by the house, and he said; I am sure, that is the man.

Q. Do you mean to say that is all he said to you? - A. Yes; all he said to me was, mind and be perfect in the man; that is all he said to me; and he said, he was sure to the man.

Q. And desired you to be sure to him? - A. He did not desire me to be sure too.

Q. Did he not desire you to be perfect to the man? - A. No; he said that was the man, and asked me if I did not think it was the man; I said, yes, I am sure it was the man; when he came by, he asked me to look at him.

Q. Did not your master say, he thought it was the man, and asked you? - A. No.

Q. How came you to recollect it was the 23d if your master did not tell you? - A. I cannot tell the day of the month.

Q. Was it not at the public-house you saw him? - A. No.

Q. Was he, taken by your master's house? - A. Yes; he was walking by the house with the officer.

Q. You knew he was in custody, and charged with the offence? - A. Yes.

Q. You said the reason you were sure of the man was because he held his head down, and went the wrong way? - A. Yes.

Q. For both those reasons you took notice of the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Where were you when he left the shop? - A. In the shop.

Q. What part of it? - A. In the shop.

Q. There is an accompting-house? - A. I was in the accompting-house while my master gave him change.

Q. You were in the shop when he went away? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw him going the wrong way? - A. Yes.

Q. How could his going the wrong way induce you to take notice of his person? - A. I took particular notice of him, because he would not sign his name to the notes my master gave him; I looked at him two or three times before he went the wrong way.

Mr. Fielding. Q. You began yourself to have suspicions when he would not sign his name to the notes your master wanted him? - A. Yes.

Q. You don't know what day of the month it was, but you are sure you saw that man some time or other in your master's shop? - A. I am sure I saw that man in the shop on Saturday night.

Q. You do not know the day of the month? - A. I do not know.

EDWARD CROKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are an officer belonging to Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you call upon Mr. Dear on the 1st of August, in consequence of what you heard from the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive from him any description of the man from whom the Bank-note was received? - A. I did.

Q. How long after that did you see the prisoner at the bar? - A. In the afternoon of the same day.

Q. In consequence of information you received, did you go to any place to enquire for the lodging of the prisoner? - A. No, not at that time.

Q. What place did you go to? - A. To several places in Gray's-inn-lane, and about it.

Q. Did you go to Drury-lane? - A. Yes, to No. 28.

Q. Did you go with Dear? - A. No.

Q. What took place between you and the prisoner at the time you saw him, and where did you see him? - A. I went into a public-house opposite Gray's-inn-lane, at the corner of Middle-row, where I saw the prisoner; he asked me to drink, I declined it; as I was coming out he followed me, and asked me if I did not want a man, describing a man they call Ugly, but whose name is Smith.

Q. Did he ask you what you wanted him for? - A. No, I did not let him know I knew the man; he said, he thought he could find him: I asked him if he thought he could, and if I should call upon him where he lodged: he declined telling me where he lodged; I asked him where I should see him, and appointed him to meet me where I live; I asked him when he would come, and whether he would come in the morning following; he said it would not suit him, but he would come on Thursday morning; in the evening I went to Mr. Dear, and told him what had happened, and desired him to meet me on Thursday morning, at ten o'clock, at my place.

Q. Did you see the prisoner that day? - A. Not at the time appointed; it was five or six o'clock in the evening on Thursday; I had been out with Mr. Dear, and after I left him, I met the prisoner; said I, I thought you were to have called upon me this morning; he said, I could not, but I have just been to your house now; I went with him to the Turk's Head, in King-street, Holborn, and took an opportunity of sending for Mr. Dear to come down; when he came in the prisoner walked out of the door; Dear followed him out, and the prisoner came in again.

Q. Had you at this time acquainted the prisoner with your suspicions of him? - A. No; when the prisoner came in Mr. Dear came in, and called me aside, and said, that was the man; in a little time after the prisoner wanted to go; I told him what was alledged against him, and he denied it.

Q. Did you ask him where he lodged? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he tell you? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did he not tell you where he lodged, and did you not go afterwards and search them? - A. He told about a week afterwards.

Q. Did you not search him in the public-house? - A. Yes, and found nothing but a dollar upon him.

Q. Which he told you where he had bought, I believe? - A. Yes; he said he had bought it at a silversmith's, which, upon enquiry, I found to be true.

Q. When you were at the public-house, and the prosecutor came there, he set down by the prisoner? - A. He did.

Q. He went out a second time, and returned, I believe? - A. No, I don't think he did when he first went out the prosecutor followed him.

Q. Who came in first? - A. The prisoner did.

Q. He did not attempt to abscond, or any thing of that sort? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you find his lodging to be at No. 23, Drury-lane? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. You went away, and left the prisoner in the house some time, did you not? - A. I only went outside the door.

Q. You did not go out of sight? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where was the place he lodged? - A. At the Bell, in Newkener's-street, Holborn.

Q. Did you find his lodging to be in Drury-lane? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever know him by the name of Biddles? - A. No.

Q. Newkener's-street is about a hundred yards from the prosecutor's? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How many people were there in the public-house when you went in with him? - A. There might be six or seven playing at bumblepuppy in the back-ground; I took him there to engage his attention, while I sent for the prosecutor.

Mr. THOMAS BLISS sworn. - Q. You are an inspector of Bank-notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that note? - A. It is a counterseit, the whole is a counterseit.

Q. How is the name of the cashier? - A. It is not our cashier's writing.

Mr. Alley. Q. (To Croker.) When you went to examine whether he purchased the dollar or not, did you not discover he paid by a Bank-not, which turned-out to be a good one? - A. I don't know.

Mr. Bliss. We could not ascertain that; we wished to see the note, because Mr. Dear always puts his name on the one-pound notes, and we were in hopes we could trace it.(The note read - No. 2269, dated Bank, 16th of February, 1803.)

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I am entirely innocent of the charge. Croker has made the man and boy come round, and swear my life away; he has been with them every day, and told them I was the man. I never was in the man's shop in my life. He wanted me to swear against my wife; he would not swear against me at all when I was before the Magistrate; all he said was, that if I was not the man, I was very much like him.

Evidence for the Prisoner.

ISAAC BAXTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. A cheesemonger, No. 6, Drury-lane.

Q. Have you lived there any time? - A. Yes, two years.

Q. Are you a housekeeper? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor? - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Have you known him any length of time? - A. Three quarters of a year.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I never saw him before last Wednesday.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with Dear about the prisoner? - A. Yes, about six or seven weeks before in my own house.

Q. Were you in the habits of visiting each other? - A. Sometimes.

Q. What did he say? - A. He came into my house about the Monday or Tuesday after he took the note; said he, a person came into my shop late on Saturday evening, and bought a piece of meat.

Q. Do you know whether it was the Monday or Tuesday after the note was paid him? - A. I think it was the Tuesday following; he said the person gave him a five-pound note to change; that he changed it, and gave him his address, No. 25, Drury-lane, a button-maker; accordingly I gave him the difference in change in some small notes, and asked him whether he chose to back them; he said, oh! no, it was no consequence, he should soon distribute them amongst his shop-mates; that the man went out, and instead of going to Drury-lane, he turned down Holborn, which led him to suspect the note was a bad one; then he said to his boy, d - n me, Tom, we are done, it is a bad note; accordingly he ordered the boy to take in the meat, and he went after the man. He told me the man crossed over the way, and went down a little below Gray's-inn-lane; that there was a watchman in his box, and he would have given charge of him, but the watchman would not take charge of him, as it was not done in his beat; that he followed the man down Brook-street, when he went into a gin-shop or public-house, where he lost him.

Q. Did he say any thing, whether he should be sure of the person, or not, after he lost him - did you ask him whether he should know the man again? - A. He said he saw no more of him; it may be five or six days after; I saw him again, and he said, the note that man gave me is a bad one; I did not hear any thing particular then, but two or three days after, he came into my shop one evening, and said, I have been down to Bow-street, and a person of the name of Croker had apprehended a person on suspicion of being the person who gave him the note; says he, my boy swore to him hard and fast, he knows him to be the same; says I, what do you think of him; says he, if he is not the same, he is very much like him, but he has altered his dress; that is all I heard.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. How came you to make your appearance here as a witness for the prisoner? - A. On Wednesday last, two or three friends of the prisoner came past my shop, and said, such a trial was going to take place that day; accordingly I said, I never was at any trial in my life, I should like to go.

Q. Did you know them? - A. One of them, by dealing at my shop.

Q. What is the name of that friend? - A. I cannot say; he lives at No. 26, Short's-gardens; it was a woman who asked me to go.

Q. What sort of a woman was it? - A. A stout woman.

Q. One of the friends? - A. Yes; and asked

me if I would go down to hear it; I said I should like to hear it; I came down with them on Wednesday, and understood it was not to come on that day; upon which, they asked me to go in, and see the prisoner, and I said I had no objection; I went in, and he asked me what I heard pass, and I stated what I have now stated.

Q. You had before been an acquaintance of Dear's, and knew it was his prosecution - did you state to the prisoner what you heard Dear say? - A. Yes, he asked me what I heard; I told him I knew Dear, and stated what I had heard.

Q. In consequence of this application you have made your appearance here to-day? - A. Yes; I was asked if I would come forward, and say the same.

Q. All that you could report to him was, that Dear said if he is not the man, he is very much like him, and the boy has no doubt? - A. No.

Q. And he told you all the circumstances of the case, as you have stated? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Dear.) You have heard what Baxter has said, that you told him, if he is not the man, he is very like him - did you, or not? - A. I said I was sure it was the man - that he was dressed in a brown great coat, and if I liked, I could swear to the coat.

Q. Did you ever express a doubt? - A. I told Baxter all along I was sure it was the man, if I liked to swear to him, but I did not then, for he had not then been before the Justice.

GUILTY , Death , aged 42.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-82

672. DANIEL BENNETT was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Luden , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 4l. and a silver watch-chain, value 2s. 6d. the property of the said John .

JOHN LUDEN sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A sugar-baker , and live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields.

Q. Were you robbed on the 29th of July ? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day? - A. About nine o'clock in the evening.

Q. Where were you going? - A. To Austin-street, Whitechapel .

Q. Were you alone? - A. Yes.

Q. What happened to you? - A. The prisoner gave me a violent blow.

Q. Are you sure of the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. No.

Q. Was he alone? - A. No, there were several with him.

Q. How many? - A. I cannot tell; perhaps four or five.

Q. Were they running or walking? - A. Walking.

Q. Did he or they speak to you? - A. No; he gave me a violent blow.

Q. Was it a push or a blow? - A. A blow.

Q. Did he knock you down? - A. No.

Q. Did he say any thing to you then? - A. No.

Q. What did he do? - A. He snatched the watch out of my pocket, and run away.

Q. What sort of watch was it? - A. A silver watch.

Q. Did you see him ran away? - A. Yes; and I followed him immediately; they all run the same way.

Q. Was it dark then? - A. It was near nine o'clock, but it was not dark.

Q. Did you lose sight of him? - A. I holloaed out stop thief, and he threw the watch to another man.

Q. Did you see him do that? - A. Yes.

Q. Which did you pursue? - A. The person who snatched the watch out of my pocket, and gave me the blow.

Q. Did you come up with him? - A. Yes, in Engine-alley, Whitechapel.

Q. How soon after? - A. Immediately; we run all the way down Whitechapel.

Q. How long might it be? - A. Not five minutes.

Q. Had he ever been out of your sight? - A. Never.

Q. Did you recover your watch? - A. No.

Q. Did he take the chain and seal? - A. Yes, all.

Q. Are you positively sure of the man? - A. Yes, I am sure he is the man.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Q. What do you know of the robbery? - A. On the 29th of July, about half past nine in the evening, the prosecutor brought the prisoner to me at the Flying Horse, near the Police-office, Lambert-street; I asked him if he had robbed him; he said, yes, of his watch; I asked him if he had lost sight of him; he said, no, and that he was certain he was the man; upon which I took him into custody, and put him into the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You examined the prisoner, and there was nothing found on him? - A. No.

Q. How far was he taken from where the robbery was committed? - A. It would take about a minute and a half to run.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

GUILTY , Death , aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030914-83

673. SAMUEL BEACH was indicted for feloniously returning from transportation before the time for which he was sentenced, without any lawful excuse for the same .

Mr. EDWARD KIRBY sworn. - Q. What do

you produce? - A. This is the certificate of the conviction of Samuel Beach, the prisoner, in the hand-writing of Mr. Shelton.(Certificate read to the following effect.)

"Samuel Beach was indicted for that he, on the 19th of July, in the 42d year of the reign of his Majesty George III. about the hour of twelve in the night, with force and arms the dwelling-house of George Skillicorn did break and enter, with intent the goods and chattels of the said George to steal and carry away, and did carry away several articles, to wit, 720 pieces of copper, called halfpence, the goods, chattels, and monies of the said George Skillicorn, and that he was tried and convicted of taking and carrying away the said monies from the said dwelling-house, but was acquitted of breaking and entering the same in the night, and was ordered and adjudged to be hanged by the neck till he was dead."

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when he took his trial? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he the same person mentioned in the certificate? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of him after his conviction, and how long did he remain in your custody? - A. He remained till the 14th of last February, and then he was delivered on board the hulks at Woolwich by me.

THOMAS MOSS sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I never saw him before we apprehended him, on the 6th of July last, in Piccadilly , opposite Bond-street.

Q. Who was with you? - A. Marsden.

Q. Was the prisoner going about at large? - A. Yes; he was going towards Hyde Park corner.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; a man in my situation would do any thing to get away; I had not done any thing amiss when they took me, but was going to work till I could get a few things, and then I was going on board a man of war.

GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-84

674. SUSANNAH DOUTFIRE , JOSEPH ROBINSON , and FANNY ROBINSON , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a silver watch, value 30s. three linen shirts, value 3l. a steel watch chain, value 1d. a silver seal, value 2s. two napkins, value 2s. a box, value 6d. an iron lock, value 2d. four Bank-notes, value 5l. each, seventeen Bank-notes, value 2l. each, and one Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Richard Chapman , in the dwelling-house of Robert Harris , and the other two for receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

RICHARD CHAPMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 49, Gloucester-street, Hoxton ; I have an apartment of Mr. Robert Harris, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch.

Q. Do you know Susannah Doutfire? - A. Yes.

Q. What was she? - A. She was servant in the house, and did little odd things for me by her mistresses permission; I used to satisfy her now and then with a guinea or two for her trouble; I gave her no wages.

Q. On the 13th of September, was she servant in the house? - A. Yes; there was only her and me at home in the morning; Mr. Harris is employed on board ship.

Q. Did you lose on that day three linen shirts? - A. Yes.

Q. A silver watch? - A. Yes.

Q. A steel chain? - A. Yes.

Q. And silver seal? - A. Yes.

Q. Two napkins, a linen sheet, four five-pound Bank-notes, seventeen two-pound notes, and a one-pound note, making altogether 55l.? - A. Yes, in a deal box, which contained them all, about a foot square; it contained a few memorandums, my will, and the notes.

Q. Were the shirts in the box? - A. No; they were in the drawers along with my other apparel; the watch lay on the top of the drawers, and the chain and seal to it; I kept it there sometimes the whole day.

Q. What time did you go into the garden in the morning? - A. I went down about a quarter after eleven, and returned back about a quarter before twelve.

Q. Were your things all safe before? - A. Yes, every thing.

Q. Was the box locked? - A. To the best of my knowledge; it was a small deal box, about a foot square; I locked it the last time I was at it, and placed it at the top of my bed-tester for safety.

Q. When you returned, what did you observe? - A. The first thing was all my apparel strewed about the rooms I paid rent for; I found the drawers open.

Q. Did you find your box? - A. I did not think of my box directly; about a quarter of an hour afterwards, I went into the bed-room, and missed all the things I have described; one corner of the box hung over the bedstead the day before.

Q. Did you see any person to whom you communicated it? - A. To Mr. Spraggs; he came about five or ten minutes after I returned from the garden.

Q. Have you ever seen any of your property since? - A. Yes, my watch, and seventeen pounds worth of notes were brought to the Police-office.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. With regard to Joseph Robinson , I will only ask, whether he did not hear a very excellent character? - A. Yes, I have heard he is a very honest industrious hard-working man; they are not married, I understand.

MATTHEW SPRAGGS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you come to the house after the prosecutor discovered he had been robbed? - A. Yes, in about half an hour.

Q. Did you see the prisoner, Susannah Doutsire? - A. Yes, she opened the door to me.

Q. Had you any conversation with her? - A. I had; when I first went, she seemed very much terrified; I asked for her master; she said he was not at home; in an instant, out came Mr. Chapman very much terrified, and said, he was just robbed; the girl looked agitated too; I asked her if she knew who had been there; she said, nobody; I said, what neither butcher or baker; she said, no; I spoke to Mr. Chapman, and after some conversation, she said there had been a girl there for a sheet; I enquired who the girl was; she said it was a little girl that came from where Mrs. Harrls's child was, meaning in Old-street, at Mrs. Robinson's, who had formerly been her servant; I advised the old gentleman to send for some friend, or relation; a neighbour was sent for, and afterwards an officer.

MARY CHURCHILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How old are you? - A. Going into thirteen.

Q. Are you niece to Mrs. Robinson? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember going to Mrs. Harris's? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it? - A. On this day week.

Q. Who sent for you? - A. My aunt, Mrs Robinson.

Q. What were you to go for? - A. For a sheet to turn; I went and saw Susannah Doutfire there.

Q. Did you see the old man, the prosecutor, there? - A. I saw him down at the bottom of the garden.

Q. What passed between you and Mrs. Doutfire? - A. She told me to go down to the kitchen, and she would setch the sheet; she went up stairs, and pinned something up in the sheet.

Q. Did you see her? - A. No.

Q. What that was, at that time, you did not know? - A. No.

Q. Was it something in the sheet that was put, or folded up? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it weighty and bulky? - A. Yes.

Q. What were you to do with it? - A. She told me to carry it home to my aunt.

Q. In going along, did you observe any thing? - A. I saw a bit of a box that was not pinned over with the sheet; I carried it home to my aunt, and put it on the bed.

Q. Did your aunt see you put it there? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Mrs. Robinson at home then? - A. No; my aunt then sent me down stairs into the kitchen.

Q. You did not see the box undone? - A. No; when I came up again, my aunt went out.

Q. Where did the bundle remain all this time? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did your aunt say where she was going? - A. No.

Q. When did you see your aunt again? - A. My aunt was gone about a quarter of an hour, and came in again, and said, I might go out with the child for half an hour; I staid out about an hour, and then she desired me to go for my uncle; I went for him, and he returned.

Q. Where was he? - A. At work at Mr. Knight's, in Curtain-road, Shoreditch.

Q. What became of him? - A. He went up stairs into the room where my aunt lives.

Q. Is that the same room in which the bundle had been put on the bed? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you see your aunt or uncle again? - A. I went down stairs for about five minutes, and as I was going up again, my uncle was coming down; my aunt went out again, and bought some things, as she told me, and shewed me some new handkerchiefs, some new muslins, new flannel and calico, and new stockings.

Q. Have you seen the box since? - A. No, it was chopped up.

Q. When? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did you see any pieces of the box produced? - A. No, not before the gentleman brought it to our house.

Q. When did they bring it? - A. Last Tuesday; Mr. Armstrong brought it.

Q. When you saw the bits of the box, did you know them? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to know them? - A. I knew it was the same colour that I saw under the corner of the sheet.

Q. Were you sent to any pawnbroker's that morning? - A. Not that morning, but a fortnight before I was.

Q. Do you know of your aunt having got any things out of pawn after the robbery? - A. No.

Court. Q. You say, your aunt sent you to this house for a sheet? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Susannah Doutfire before? - A. Yes, I had seen her at my aunt's.

Q. Had you often seen her there before? - A. Yes, several times.

Q. When was it you had last seen her, before your aunt sent you to her? - A. The Monday afternoon.

Q. What was the day she sent you to her? - A. The Tuesday; on Monday she had been there to tea.

Q. Did you drink tea with them? - A. Yes.

Q. You heard nothing pass? - A. No.

Q. Did you see her when she went away? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any thing said then? - A. No.

Q. Did they go out together? - A. Yes, for about an hour.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. At the time Doutfire was drinking tea with your aunt, your uncle was not present? - A. No.

Q. Was any agreement made between your aunt and Doutfire to see one another the next day? - A. No.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Q. You are an officer belonging to Worship-street? - A. Yes: On Tuesday the 13th, between twelve and one o'clock, I was sent for to Mr. Chapman's; I went with Mr. Cundy, and found Mr. Spraggs, Mr. Chapman, and Susanaah Doutfire; I was informed by Mr. Chapman, in the presence of the prisoner, of the nature of the robbery; I searched her box, and a number of places, but could find nothing; I then took her into custody, and we all went to the office; I repeatedly asked her, if she knew any thing of the robbery, and if any of the property might be mislaid by Mr. Chapman; she said, no, she knew nothing of it; I took Doutfire. Spraggs, and Chapman, to Robinson's house, No. 5, Old-street-road, and there I found Churchill; I told the aunt I should take the little girl to the office; Doutfire immediately said, Mr. Armstrong is come to enquire what I did with the sheet, what I sent the sheet here for; I said, Mr. Chapman has been robbed, and I shall try to find the things; Mrs. Robinson said, I was exceeding welcome to search her place, I said, no, I would take the girl to the office; I took her, and going along the Curtain-road, I by chance met the prisoner, Joseph Robinson , the girl said, "this is my uncle, sir;" I said to him, sir, I am going to take her to the Magistrate, you may step with us, and hear what it is about; he said, by all means, only let me go into the shop first; he went in, and returned to me, and we went to the office.

Q. Did he stay long in the shop? - A. No, not above a minute or two, no longer than to put a jacket on; I took Doutfire and the girl to the Magistrate, and Robinson was there and heard the charge exhibited by Mr. Chapman, before the Magistrate; I had dispatched Vickery and Mason to the house of Mrs. Robinson, to be in waiting, and I begged of the Magistrate to let me have a search-warrant, which he did; I went and found Mrs. Robinson and Vickery below stairs, and Mason up stairs; I read my warrant to her, and said, now, madam, I shall ask you a question, pray what was in the sheet when you opened it? Lord, sir, says she, a box, some Bank-notes, and a watch; where are they, said I, I have given them to my husband; said she, I have done it, don't hurt him; I put her into a coach, and took her to the office, where I found her husband detained; I said, Mr. Robinson, what have you done with the notes and watch your wife gave you? he said, they are in the shop; Vickery and I went to Mr. Knight's, a brass-caster, Robinson went with us instantly, we followed him into the shop, where there was some mould in a nasting-trough, he pulled the mould aside, and the first thing that appeared was the notes and watch, two 5l. three 2l. and a 1l. also a silver watch, that was all I found there; we took him back to the office and left him; we returned, and Vickery and Mason have the other things found at his room.

Q. Did you shew the watch to Chapman? - A. Yes, and he claimed it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The wife said, I have done it all, don't hurt my husband? - A. Yes.

Q. You found the notes in a paper? - A. Yes, in a little bit of paper, but the watch was not.

Q. You took Robinson to hear the examination, not as a prisoner? - A. No, I did not mention a word to him, he staid all the examination, but when I went with the search warrant, he was detained.

Q. You knew his master, Mr. Knight? - A. Yes.

Q. Does not Robinson, the prisoner, bear an excellent character? - A. I knew Mr. Knight, but I knew nothing of Mr. Robinson, till that day.

Q. Did hevnot bear that character? - A. Mr. Knight represented him as the best workman he had.

PETER MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer belonging to Worship-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to the house of Robinson? - A. Yes, this day week; I was present when Mr. Armstrong read the warrant, and when she owned it, he asked her what things were brought in the sheet, which was folded up, she said, there was a box, some Bank-notes and a watch; he asked her where the watch and Bank-notes were, she said, her husband had them; she owned she broke the box open with a poker before she sent for her husband, that he knew nothing of it, and hoped he would not be hurt, for it was her fault; on searching, I saw the pleces of the box pulled from under the bed, between the two beds; we found a parcel of new things, with a two pound note, which she owned she had taken out of the box.

Court. Q. Was any thing said to induce her to own it? - A. No.

Q. What are the sort of things found? - A. Some new flanuel, a pair of new stockings and muslin shawls, there were several other new things; she told me they belonged to General Gascoigne's servant at first; I took them to the

office, and told Doutfire what she had said, and asked her if the things were her's, she said, yes, and she had bought them with a five pound note, which she had taken out of Mr. Chapman's box, sometime before; here is the certificate of her marriage, and some duplicates.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What have you there? - A. A broken box, and three shirts, a silver watch and silver spoons; I went with Armstrong to the house of Robinson, and found part of a box between two beds in the same room, and three shirts in the same room, between the two beds; they would have been taken out by Mrs. Robinson; but we prevented her, and desired her to sit still; I found the sheet which she acknowledged the box to have been packed up in, the sheet that came from Doutfire; she said, she had broken the box open with a poker, and taken the things out; she acknowledged it to be part of the box; she said, there were some notes and a watch, and that she had given the notes and watch to her husband, whom she hoped would not be hurt as she had done it; we returned back a second time for some other things; I brought a watch away which was in the room with T. R. on it; I took it merely to prove it to be his apartments; the spoons and buckles are also his own.

Q. (To Chapman.) Is that part of the box? - A. Yes, it contained the Bank-notes.

Q. Are those your shirts? - A. Yes, marked R. C.

Q. What is the value of them now? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Are they worth more than five shillings a shirt? - A. I suppose not, I gave seven guineas and a half for the watch, twenty years ago, I think it is worth more than forty shillings now.

Q. How many five pound notes had you? - A. Four; seventeen two pound notes and a one pound note.

Susannah Doutfire. I leave my case to the mercy of the Jury.

Fanny Robinson. I leave my case to the mercy of your Lordship and the Jury.

Joseph Robinson. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

Joseph Robinson called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Susannah Doutfire, GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

Fanny Robinson, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for fourteen years .

Joseph Robinson, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-85

675. SARAH KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , in the dwelling-house of the Mayor and Commonalty, and Citizens of the City of London, Governors of the house of the poor, called St. Bartholomew's Hospital, West-Smithfield , of the foundation of King Henry VIII. three Bank-notes, each of the value of one pound, the property of Elizabeth Taylor , widow.

(The case opened by Mr. Gurney.)

ELIZABETH TAYLOR sworn. - I am a widow ; I went as a patient in St. Bartholomew's-hospital , five weeks ago last Thursday; I received three 1l. notes for my wages, when I left my place in Oxford-street, from Mr. Kingsbury, clerk to Mr. Phillips, he put his name upon them; when I went into the hospital, I put them in my left-hand pocket, under my pillow; I went in on the Thursday, and I missed them on the Monday morning following; the prisoner was one of the nurses in the ward; I acquainted Mrs. Pratley, the sister, of it.

ELIZABETH LATTIMORE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How old are you? - A. Going of thirteen.

Q. Were you a patient in St. Bartholomew's-hospital? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in the same ward with the last witness? - A. Yes; about seven o'clock in the morning, I heard Mrs. Taylor call nurse, for assistance to make her head up, nurse went to her, and I saw her put her hand under the pillow, and take out the pockets; she put them on a shelf behind the curtain, and put a bit of flannel over them; in a short time afterwards, I saw her go and take the pockets again, fling her apron over them, and take them to the privy; she staid there a short time; when she came back, she brought the pockets with her, and put them under the pillow again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Mrs. Taylor was awake, and could have observed every thing that was done as well as you? - A. She was in bed at the time, I was facing her.

Q. Of course, you told Mrs. Taylor of it? - A. No, I kept my bed, and was at a distance from Mrs. Taylor.

MARY-ANN-LLOYD sworn. - I was a patient in the hospital; I did not see the prisoner take the pockets, I saw her return them; I afterwards saw her in Mrs. Pratley's room, chewing something; I asked her what it was, she said, what was it to me; in chewing it very hard, I observed some paper upon her lip, she got it into her mouth again so eagerly, that she bit her lip, and blood appeared upon it, a piece of it flew out of her mouth, Mrs. Pratley picked it up, and delivered it to me, I delivered it to Turner.( - Turner produced two pieces of a one pound Bank note.)

Lloyd. Mrs. Pratley gave it to me, the little piece was damp, the other piece had not been in her mouth.

Mrs. PRATLEY sworn. - I am the sister of the ward, the nurse was put as a prisoner into my room, I locked the door; I saw her put a piece of paper under the carpet, she struggled to pick it up, but I was too quick for her, I ran out and gave it to Mrs. Lloyd; there were two pieces.

AARON HEPWORTH sworn. - I live in the same employ with Mr. Kingsbury, he is very ill: The initials, W K, upon this piece of a note, is his handwriting.

Taylor. These are Mr. Kingsbury's initials.

Prisoner's defence. I never took the pockets away at all; the patient was quite insane all that night and day.

GUILTY, aged 46.

Of stealing the notes, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-86

675. ROBERT ASLETT was indicted for that he, on the 26th of February , being an officer and servant of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , as such officer, was entrusted by the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England with certain effects belonging to the said Governor and Company, that is to say: a certain paper, partly printed and partly written, purporting to be a Bill called an Exchequer Bill, No. 835, for 500l. which said paper, partly printed and partly written, was then and there belonging to the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and of the value of 500l. and which was unpaid and unsatisfied to the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England the holders thereof; and one other paper, partly printed and partly written, purporting to be a Bill called an Exchequer Bill, No. 2694, for 1000l. which said last mentioned paper, partly printed and partly written, was then and there belonging to the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and of the value of 1000l. and which was unpaid and unsatisfied to the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England the holders thereof; and one other paper, partly printed and partly written, purporting to be a Bill called an Exchequer Bill, No. 106l. for 1000l. which said last mentioned paper, partly printed and partly written, was then and there belonging to the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and of the value of 1000l. and which was unpaid and unsatisfied to the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England the holders thereof; and that he being such officer, and servant of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, did feloniously secrete, embezzle, and run away with the said effects so belonging to the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and of the value of 2500l. against the form of the statute, and against the King's peace .

Second Count. For that he, being an officer, and servant of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, was entrusted with certain effects belonging to the said Governor and Company, that is to say: a certain paper, partly printed and partly written, upon the credit where of, the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England had advanced a large sum of money, to wit: 500l. which remained unpaid and unsatisfied to the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England the holders thereof. The indictment then set forth the Bill, as also the two other Bills, mentioned in the first Count, and charged that he feloniously did secrete, embezzle, and run away with the same.

Third Count. The same as the two former Counts, only describing the effects, setting each of them forth as a certain paper, partly printed and partly written, purporting to be a Bill commonly called an Exchequer Bill.

Fourth Count. The same as the former Counts, only describing the effects, setting each of them forth as a certain paper, partly printed and partly written, upon the credit and security whereof the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England had advanced a large sum of money, to wit: 2500l. which remained unpaid and unsatisfied to the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

Fifth Count. For that he, being such officer as aforesaid, was entrusted with certain effects belonging to the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England, setting forth a Bill, No. 2686, and charging that he feloniously did secrete, embezzle, and run away with the same.

6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th Counts. The same as the first five Counts, only calling the instruments embezzled securities instead of effects.

11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th Counts. The same as the first four Counts, but for feloniously secreting and embezzling two of the instruments, namely, those numbered 106l and 2686, and calling them effects.

15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th Counts. The same as the first four, only calling the two instruments securities instead of effects, against the form of the statute, and against the King's peace.

Names of the Jury.

John Hurle ,

Daniel Lane ,

Thomas Atkin

John Wynne ,

George Gordon ,

William Puckeridge ,

William Burton ,

Thomas Landells ,

George Duffield ,

William Williams ,

John Dolphin ,

John Hewson .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Giles.)

Mr. Garrow stated the circumstances of the case as upon the former trial. - (See Page 419.)

The Hon. Thomas Erskine. My Lords, in point of form I ought to postpone what I am about to state to your Lordships a few moments later, when the instruments which have been so distinctly stated by my learned friend would have been produced in evidence, and then have taken my objection; but I anticipate that; what I am about to say in this stage of the cause will not be considered premature, or at least will not be considered offensive to the Court, because it was not so considered upon a former occasion. I then had the opportunity of making my stand at the same period of the cause that I now make it, upon the same honourable, manly, and candid statement of the Learned Counsel on the part of the Bank that your Lordships have now heard. I agree with my learned friend, Mr. Garrow, that in presenting myself to a Court of Criminal Jurisdiction, in a case of such mighty moment as I admit this to be in point of magnitude, from the evidence that is proposed to be laid before your Lordships, that if we were in a case perfectly new, attended with considerations that required great difficulty in the examination and in the decision, I admit your Lordships might, however hard it may be upon the prisoner in his present anxious situation, in such a case think sit to reserve an opinion, which you could not form upon the argument you have heard to-day, until I have closed every thing I have to offer to your Lordships; and if, when you have heard, as I take it for granted you will hear an answer from my learned friend to what I am about to urge, your Lordships should find yourselves, with all the learning you bring into this place, (and there can be none greater) in no condition to give such a judgment as the public expect, unquestionably then would be the season for your Lordships reserving for further consideration the law belonging to the case; but if I find myself in a case altogether the same with that in which I stood before; if I find that, without perverting every idea I have entertained of criminal justice, the unhappy gentleman at the bar is arraigned for the same offence from which he has already been delivered, and that this indictment only gives the goby to the last in point of mere words, and remains the same upon all the substance of the transaction, I should think the prisoner had a right to complain of us, if we did not, upon this occasion, state why we consider ourselves as precisely in the same condition.

My Lords, I wish in the first instance, and that is matter of private feeling, to explain what I mean when I say we are precisely in the same case, because it might seem that this kind of preface to what I am about to deliver to your Lordships, looked as if I meant to consider this as a vexatious proceeding, as if I wished to arraign either the want of learning or discrimination in the Learned Counsel, in not having in an earlier period proceeded in this form, or as if I meant to arraign persons whom I greatly honour and respect, who have conducted themselves in a manner perfectly honourable and correct, as it regards the public, who have been guilty of no negligence in their trust, and who have been sufferers by an act from which no human foresight could have delivered them: I consider, therefore, and I am not speaking altogether as a lawyer when I say so, but I take upon me as a man to say,(after the acquittal which is so much in all our memories, and after the facts of the case which are now before us) this is an indictment for the same offence; but the Directors of the Bank of England were determined rather to appear to act with severity towards the prisoner, than with injustice and negligence towards the public; it was decent and fit that there should be none heard to say, if the indictment had been preferred in another form, public justice would have been satisfied; and therefore I do admit that the proceeding is not severe, but proper in every possible respect.

My Lords, it stands as a fact (and it stood exactly in the same manner before) that the Exchequer-bills, which the defendant is charged with having embezzled, were not Exchequer-bills.

Mr. Justice Le Blanc. Not valid Exchequer-bills.

Mr. Erskine. Not Exchequer-bills. When I had the good fortune upon the former occasion to address the Court, I held in my hand an Act of Parliament, in which these are declared not to be Exchequer-bills; that to have made them Exchequer-bills certain forms were to be observed; that those forms had not been observed, as it has been stated by Mr. Garrow, and therefore Parliament, in its justice, declares they shall be considered valid to all civil purposes, but with this proviso, which is deserving of your Lordships consideration and attention, "Provided always that nothing herein contained shall extend, or be construed to extend, to prejudice or affect in any manner whatsoever any prosecution now depending, or which may be hereafter commenced for, or relating to any act done previous to the passing of this Act, touching, or concerning, or relating to the said Exchequers-bills, or any of them, so as aforesaid signed by the said Robert Jennings , of his Majesty's Exchequer."

My Lords, the first distinction I would take between these papers, which are described as purporting to be Exchequer-bills, and which are considered as effects, and which are also considered as securities, is between their being securities of the public upon which the Bank had advanced money, and the securities of private individuals, although I think that will make very little difference.

Mr. Garrow. It is not merely money advanced, but both; it is sit that should be understood.

Mr. Erskine. I put the distinction between the security of a private individual, in which there is any fraud of which that individual might avail himself, and securities to the public. In the case of an individual, if a promissory note was embezzled, the party might wave the objection which the law gave him from its having been altered; for instance, without the leave of the party subsequent to its being executed, from its being without a stamp, or any other informalities that might belong to it, which would enable the party to make a stand against the recovery, though he might wave the objection, and pay the money, it might be argued (though then the argument would come to nothing) that it might be considered as effects, as something valuable, as some benefit of which he had been deprived by its being embezzled or stolen; but, as my learned friend truly expressed himself upon the former trial in his reply, he says, "I must shew that this is an Exchequer-bill, and if it is not an Exchequerbill, for this purpose to make it the subject of a charge

upon an indictment, it is nothing," This is not the case of a private individual, for the moment this Exchequer-bill became no Exchequer-bill, in consequence of the necessary ceremonies not having been performed, from that moment the generosity of Government could have no operation, the justice of Government could have no operation, nor could the Lords of the Treasury make any payment upon it. No man would suppose the Lords of the Treasury would pay it out of their own private pockets, and they could not have charged it to Government. The executive Government of the country could not have been called upon to make the payment, nor could they be justified in making it. There was but one way, therefore, by which these instruments could be made valuable, there was but one way in which they could be made to differ from what my learned friend stated, that they are Exchequer-bills, or nothing - they are waste paper, or they are valuable to the extent they purport to be. It could only be done by Act of Parliament; as it has been done by Act of Parliament, it was Parliament alone that could give existence, not validity, (for validity is something that by making an addition to it may render it effectual) but it was Parliament alone that could give existence to the instruments now proposed to be put in evidence before your Lordships; and to deprive my learned friend of the argument that, Parliament might be expected to do it, or that Parliament would do it, or the anticipation that Parliament must do it, that that could make them be considered by retrospect as valuable ab origine in the hands of the Bank. This humane proviso is introduced, this Act of Parliament in making these papers any thing else but waste paper that I have described them, and which they were described to be by my learned friend upon the former occasion, in order to extinguish the argument in its birth, and to destroy every appearance of an ex post facto law, has declared, that they shall be for all civil purposes Exchequer-bills, and not only have Parliament cautiously put it for civil purposes, but they have introduced this proviso, "that nothing herein contained shall extend, or be construed to extend, to prejudice in any manner whatsoever any prosecution now depending, or which may be hereafter commenced:" that is to say, the whole would have been waste paper before the passing of this Act; but which, by the passing of this Act, becomes a security ab origine, but for the purposes of prosecution, it is a piece of waste paper, upon which you could not count in petty iarceny, which does not come up to the extent of any denomination which can constitute value, and therefore your Lordships will consider it, as far as relates to my client, as if this Act had never passed; that they are not Exchequer-bills as they relate to the unhappy gentleman at the bar. It may be said that Mr. Aslett received money upon them, and that when he disposed of them to his own advantage, he treated them as things that were valuable. The answer I give to that is, that but for this Act, which is still not in my way, it would have been money had and received by Mr. Aslett, to the use of those persons who advanced the money. I will endeavour to make your Lordships understand in a very few words the light in which I consider it: The prisoner is indicted upon the statute of the 15th year of his late Majesty's reign, and it was intended, in consequence of the momentous concerns of the Bank, (as it was correctly stated by Mr. Garrow) to give them a protection, which the law gave to no private individual till the 39th of the present King, chap. 85, in consequence of Beasley's case; so that your Lordships observe between the 15th of George II. and the 39th of his present Majesty's reign, that in all that long interval Parliament never thought of giving to private men the security it had given to the Bank; and at last did it only upon the spur of the particular occasion, urged and goaded on by the escape of a notorious offender, who could not be brought within the reach of the law. Then can it be doubted for a moment what the construction of this Act was? The Legislature said this, the Bank is charged with mighty concerns; it has in its care and its custody vast revenues; it is obliged to place that considence in their servants, which my learned friend with so much humanity was pleased to say (and I honour him for it) had been faithfully administered by the unhappy prisoner at the bar for five-and-twenty years; who had been entrusted with hundreds of millions floating before his eyes, without even the wish to appropriate a farthing of it to his own use. The words used in this Act of Parliament therefore are, any dividend-warrant, bond, deed, or any security, money, or other effects. In order to fortify the construction, I take the liberty of putting to your Lordships, not for the purpose of this indictment, but because I can put no other, Parliament, looking at the great securities which the Bank are possessed of, the deeds they have, the dividend-warrants they have, the bullion they have, the bonds, securities, and money they have, add the words, "other effects," by which can only be meant other valuable effects, other chattels, other things, which, if they were stolen, at the common law would have been a larceny, not something, which, if it be no security, is nothing, not that which I say could not be worth a farthing. I say it could not be the intention of this Act of Parliament, that while a servant of your Lordships, entrusted with your plate, with your jewels, with all that is valuable, and the loss and embezzlement of which might have reduced your Lordships to considerable difficulties in your families, he shall be only guilty of a misdemeanour; while a servant of the Bank, who has secreted a pen worn down to the stump, or half a sheet of paper loose in the office, would be within this law; or that Parliament, in using the words" other effects," could mean any thing else than those kind of effects to which the law gives the sanction of criminal justice to protect the property of private individuals; and, therefore, unless it can be made out that this is the meaning of the Act of Parliament, this prosecution must fail. In the first place, is this a security? It is a security for civil purposes. Would it have been a security for civil purposes without an Act of Parliament? Certainly it was not only no security, but it could not be recovered against a private individual, and the purse of the people could only be open to Parliament. Are we then in a penal statute, in a statute which creates a capital offence in the servants of this great Corporation, but which did not extend for many years afterwards to the servants of other persons?Would your Lordships put so partial a construction upon it as to say, it had any other acceptation than that I have submitted to your Lordships? I would refer to what has been decided before the passing of the statute, 2 Geo. II . In Mr. East's late valuable book, which he has given to the profession, page 597, compiled from Hawkins's Pleas of the Crown, your Lordships will find this laid down as the reason of that statute having been passed, "In order to make the stealing of goods felony, they ought to have some worth in themselves, and not merely from their relation to some other thing, and therefore bonds, bills, notes, and other securities, which concern mere choses in action, were not the subjects of larceny at common law." Why were they not the subjects of larceny at common law? Because you could not count upon their value, but by connecting them with their value as securities. Suppose a man had stolen 50,000l. in Bank-notes which were cancelled, I do not believe there ever was an indictment for stealing them as paper.

Mr. Justice Le Blanc. You are likening it to a case which was brought before the Judges, and never decided.

Mr. Erskine. My Lord, I do not mean to build upon a case which was considered of sufficient magnitude to be brought before the Judges, and which going off upon another point did not call for any decision; but in the case of Sutton v. Johnstone, in the House of Lords, it was held a strong reason why an action for a malicious prosecution could not be maintained against a superior officer, because there was no instance in which such a doctrine had been held, My Lord, here the statute law, supplying the defects of the common law, makes it for the first time a felony to steal a security, which could not have been considered as a chattel, though it might be of some imaginary value; but it may be said, that by getting a number of them together, it might become a petty larceny. But give me leave to ask, if your Lordships can conceive it to be the construction of this Act of Parliament, that if a person takes a thing as a security, which turns out to be no security at all, that that is "effects" in the contemplation of the Legislature at the time this highly penal statute passed? Can it be supposed that Parliament, when they passed this Act on account of the magnitude of the concerns of the Bank, meant to put your Lordship in this situation to say, that the stealing of a pen or a sheet of paper might be considered as effects within this statute? My Lord, there is one great stay to the human mind in this argument, and it is this, suppose this was a loose sheet of paper, suppose it had been no security at all, suppose it to have been distinctly what I have stated it to be, and what it only is, except by the authority of this Act, would my learned friends call it effects? No, and therefore they are obliged to mix it in your Lordship's mind, as being connected with value, as being considered by the prisoner as value, as having been made use of by him as value, and as having received that for it which was a valuable consideration, then your Lordships can only look at it in that aspect, by considering it as a security, and your Lordships will say whether it is a security upon which any action could have been brought, or for which any demand could have been made by any living being; and in a penal case like this, when your Lordships are to put the true construction upon this Act of Parliament, it will be necessary to come to a decision that will cover other cases; and, therefore, I say, this is not a case worthy of your Lordships wisdom to reserve: I say it is either a case in which your Lordships will decide against me and against the prisoner, and execute the law upon him; or else it is a case in which I have a right humbly to ask your Lordships to deliver him from the charge, as the other Learned Judges delivered him from the former. Surely, my Lords, it is very little consonant with the wife principles of British justice, where, if the bills of indictment had been the same, he could have pleaded autrefois acquit; that the law should be different, though the act is the same; and I sit down with repeating, that in my opinion and belief this prosecution is a determination on the part of the Bank not to suffer any man living to whisper away their reputation, by saying they fell one iota short of that which the law of the land entitled them to carry into effect against the prisoner; and there is another reason for thinking so; the moment Mr. Aslett was acquitted, he was detained for debt, though the Grand Jury were at that time fitting, and they could have preferred another Bill.

Mr. Justice Le Blanc. That can have no effect as to the point of law.

Mr. Erskine. Certainly not, my Lord, but it shews that this did not at that time occur to the great learning with which the Bank are assisted, and there is none greater, at least that I am acquainted with, except as it exists with your Lordships on the Bench. I trust, therefore, this prosecution will take the same course it did at the former Session, and that your Lordships will be of opinion this indictment cannot be maintained.

Mr. Serjeant Best followed Mr. Erskine on the same side.

Mr. Garrow rose to reply, but was interrupted by

Mr. Justice Le Blanc. As it strikes me and my Brother, both as it respects the public and the prisoner, I should think it quite sufficient that either party should wish it to be submitted to the Jury. I was desirous of hearing every thing which ingenuity could alledge on the other side, in order to see whether any doubt that existed in my mind could be removed; but I confess it does not appear to me the clear case that it has been represented to be. The question turns upon this, whether, in the construction of this Act of Parliament, in which this general term "effects" is used, we can give that limited construction to the word "effects," as to say it shall not extend to any thing but that which is in itself of intrinsic value. The word securities as well as effects is used; but it will turn more upon the word effects, because that is the largest and most extended word. When it is compared with cases of larceny, it deserves a very different consideration; here it is not made a larceny, but the person is made guilty of felony, and therefore perhaps there is not so much analogy between the cases. At present, sitting here, I do not profess to be of opinion that every thing which is not in itself of value, or which cannot be called a security, does not come within the protection of the Act. I am, therefore, of opinion the trial should proceed.

Evidence for the Crown.

JOHN BEST sworn - Examined by Mr. Fielding.

Q. I believe you are the Secretary of the Bank? - A. I am.

Q. Be so good as cast your eyes on that unfortunate gentleman - do you know him? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he an officer, or servant in the Bank of England? - A. He was elected a clerk in the Bank, on the 19th of March, 1778.

Q. You have known him, I take it for granted, ever since that time? - A. I have.

Q. Do you know at what time any difference of situation was appointed him? - A. He was appointed assistant cashier under Mr. Newland, 19th September, 1793; he was appointed a cashier on the 17th of January, 1799, which appointment was advertised in the London Gazette of the 19th and 22d of January, 1799.

Q. And he has continued to act in those capacities all the time you have known him in the Bank? - A. He has.

ABRAHAM NEWLAND , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you are the principal cashier of the Bank of England? - A. Yes.

Q. For how many years has the prisoner at the bar been in your office as a cashier? - A. Between four and five years.

Q. Was the money business of the Bank intrusted to his care? - A. A good deal of it.

Q. When the Bank has occasion to purchase Exchequer-bills, who was in the habit of giving the orders for the payment of those bills? - A. Either Mr. Aslett or myself.

Q. When the Bank purchase Exchequer-bills in the market, who is the person that makes out the orders for the payment of those bills? - A. Mr. Aslett, or myself, signs an order for the payment of it.

Q. Are these purchases kept in any book for that purpose? - A. Yes, there are three or four books, the bought book is one.

Q. Who was the person that principally kept the bought book? - A. It is sometimes entered into by one clerk, and sometimes by another, which ever happened to be at leisure, but I believe Mr. Kiddell, principally.

Q. After the Bank has purchased any Exchequer-bills, can they, without fraud, in some person or other, in the employment of the Bank, come again into the market? - A. Impossible.

Q. Are they always kept in the custody of the Bank, till the Government redeem them? - A. Always.

Q. When Exchequer-bills are purchased, are they kept in the Cashier's office, or are they taken immediately to the Directors? - A. They very often are kept under the care of the Cashier for some weeks before they are deposited in the care of the Directors.

Q. When there are sufficient in the Cashier's-office to take to the Directors to put under their care, who was the servant who conveyed them from the custody of the Cashier's-office to the Directors? - A. Sometimes I have done it, and very often Mr. Aslett.

Q. Can you tell who conveyed the Exchequer-bills on the 26th of February last from the Cashier's-office to the Directors? - A. Mr. Aslett.

Cross-examined by Mr. Erskine. Q. The prisoner at the bar has been in a confidential situation in the Bank, for a great number of years? - A. He has.

Q. Has he not had opportunities, by which I mean, daily and hourly opportunities of defrauding the Bank, I won't say to the extent of this indictment, but to thousands of millions of money? - A. Undoubtedly, if you take the whole period.

Q. Was there any suspicion, or have you any more doubt, than that you are now a witness under examination, that his whole conduct was faithful? - A. I believe, entirely so.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. If such frauds had been committed, they must necessarily soon have come to detection? - A. Undoubtedly.

Mr. Erskine. Q. From whence you are unable to say, upon your oath, there have been none committed? - A. Undoubtedly there have been many thousands of millions of money passed through his hands.

ABRAHAM GOLDSMID , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. I believe your house deals very largely in Exchequer-bills? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect, in the month of December, in the last year, having sent any quantity of Exchequer-bills to the Bank, to the amount of 85,000l.? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at this - is this the bill of parcels you delivered, with the bills you sold to the Bank? - A. Yes, this was written by the clerk.

Q. Did you, in point of fact, on the 3d of December, 1802, sell Exchequer-bills to the Bank? - A. I did.

Q. Look at the order pinned to that bill of parcels, and say whether you received the money for those Exchequer-bills? - A. It is impossible for me to say, whether it was myself or Mr. Moxon, but the money was paid.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of the prisoner at the bar? - A. Certainly.

Q. Is the name of Aslett upon that order for the money, his hand-writing? - A. It is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, whether the

85,000l. has been paid? - A. Most assuredly, we received it.

Q. Your knowledge of the receipt of it, must have come either from Mr. Moxon or your books? - A. I am sure it was paid, because otherwise I must have been indebted to Government 85,000l.

Q. Do you know, except from the information of some other person, or your books, that it has been paid? - A. Yes, because we paid away the same money again.

Q. Mr. Moxon did not receive it in your presence? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Giles. Q. Are the Bank indebted to you one single farthing on account of these Exchequer-bills? - A. Certainly not.

BENJAMIN KIDDELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You are a clerk in the Cashier's-office, in the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. You were so in December 1802? - A. I was.

Q. Did you make out any order for the payment of 85,000l. Exchequer-bills? - A. I did.

Q. Is that order signed by the prisoner at the bar, Mr. Aslett? - A. Yes.

Q. Before Mr. Aslett signs these orders, he examines the bills of parcels? - A. He generally fees that the bill of parcels correspond with the order.

Q. How does he make the comparison? - A. He compares the total amount of the bill of parcels, with the order it is cast up.

Q. Was it your course to take the bill of parcels, and the Exchequer-bills, and the order to Mr. Aslett for signature? - A. Generally, not always.

Q. Did you mean that you did it when you wrote out the order? - A. Yes, I generally counted over the bill of parcels to see that it corresponded.

Q. And did you take it to Mr. Aslett with the order for signature? - A. Generally.

Q. Did you enter the particulars of those bills so brought in a book, which is called the bought book? - A. I did.

Court. Q. Whenever you wrote the order for the payment of the money, did you examine the bill of parcels? - A. Generally, but sometimes another person counted the bills while I wrote the order, when we have had a great many. (The bought book shewn to the witness.)

Q. Is that your hand-writing? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Does that contain a list of the bills in that bill of parcels for which that order was given? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you make that entry from a comparison with the bills? - A. It is a copy of the bill of parcels.

Q. After the order is given for the payment of the money, what do you do with the bills? - A. They are then given up to Mr. Aslett, or Mr. Newland.

Q. What is done with the bills then? - A. They were generally counted up afterwards by Mr. Aslett, or Mr. Newland, and deposited in the chest kept for that purpose.

Q. Is that chest in the Cashier's-office? - A. Yes, in an interior room.

Q. That bought book is also kept in the Cashier's-office, I believe? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. When those bills accomulate to a large amount, are they taken from the chest? - A. Yes, they are taken from the chest and delivered to the gentlemen in the parlour; they have sometimes been deposited as they have been bought, but of late they have been made up in large parcels, and delivered in very large parcels indeed.

Q. What is the mode of making up that parcel? - A. We used to deposit them according to the number of bills for the day, but since the bills have increased, they have been done up in sums of 1000l. or so on, they are wrapped in a cover with the amount generally endorsed upon it, and the date when deposited.

Q. Is there any description of the class of the bills upon the invelope? - A. Yes, always, whatever is the heading of the Exchequer-bill, for whatever services it may be.

Q. Whose duty was it to take it from the chest to the parlour? - A. Either Mr. Newland or Mr. Aslett.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand that the order was generally taken by you, but in the case of the present business, it might be done by another person? - A. It might.

Q. And you are quite sure your account of them is taken from the bills of parcels every time? - A. Yes.

Q. You merely copy the bills of parcels? - A. Yes.

PETER TEMPLEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You are a stock-broker? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that bill of parcels, and tell me if you purchased those Exchequer-bills for the Bank? - A. Yes, on the 11th of December, 1802, either by my partner, or myself, I cannot say which.

Q. Who is your partner? - A. Mr. Cole.

Q. Is that the bill of parcels which was delivered to the Bank with the bills? - A. I cannot speak of m yown knowledge, it was delivered by one of the firm most likely, they are all here.

Q. Who signed the bill of parcels? - A. Mr. Eade.

- EADE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles.

Q. Is that your signature? - A. Yes.

Q. Were the bills mentioned in those bills of parcels purchased for the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. Were they delivered with those bills of parcels to the Bank? - A. I should suppose they were.

Q. Have you any means of knowing whether the money was paid? - A. (Refers to his book.)

Q. Can you say from that, whether these Exchequer-bills were paid for by the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. Whose entry is that? - A. Mr. Cole, junr. - COLE, junr. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Is that entry your hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you enabled to say from that, that the Bank paid you for those Exchequer-bills? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. This is an entry of the 11th of December., 1802? - A. Yes; the entry is, "Nutt, Governor, 31985l. 2s. 2d."

Q. Was the entry made by you on that very day? - A. Yes, I made the entry from Banknotes and cash, which I myself received from the Bank.

Q. Did you receive it yourself? - A. I cannot recollect whether I received it, or Mr. Eade, or Mr. Templeman.

Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, for what specific subject matter this 31,000l. was received? - A. I believe for Exchequer-bills.

Q. I asked you, whether you knew it of your own knowledge? - A. I did not receive the money that I know of.

Q. Then all you know is, that from something which somebody told you you made an entry in your book, that you had received from the Bank, 31,000 and odd pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any recollection of the transaction? - A. No, I have not.

Q. Then, but for finding this entry in your own hand-writing, you know nothing about it? - A. Yes, I do, because I see an entry in the daybook.

Q. Who made that entry in the day-book? - A. Mr. Eade.

Q. In consequence of which you made this entry in the cash-book? - A. No, the entry in the cash-book is made before the entry in the daybook, I do not recollect at present what I entered that for.

Q. Whether the money was received, if it ever was received from the Bank by you or any other person, you do not know? - A. I do not.

Mr. Gurney. (To Mr. Eade.) Q. You have been speaking of a bill of parcels, whose writing is it? - A. It is the writing of Mr. Scott, or his clerk, it is the original bill of parcels that we received from the house of Scott, the signature"Cole, Templeman and Eade," is my hand-writing, I remember receiving it either from Mr. Scott, or some person in his house.

Q. Have you any recollection of the Exchequerbills, accompanying this bill of parcels? - A. No farther than the day-book entry shews it.

Q. Is that day-book entry made by yourself? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. From the bill of parcels? - A. Yes.

Mr. Giles. (To Mr. Cole, junr.) Q. Though you cannot at present recollect whether you or some other person received this money, should you have made this entry in the book, if you had not known it had been received? - A. No.

Q. (To Mr. Eade.) Look at the back of this bill of parcels - whose hand-writing is that? - A. The hand-writing of one of the clerks in the Bank.

Q. Look at the other; do you know whose handwriting that is? - A. No.

Q. (To Mr. Templeman.) Have you any demand upon the Bank now for these Bills? - A. No; the money has been received by one of the house, but which I do not know.

Mr. THOMAS MOXON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Look at those bills of parcels - is that your hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of those bills having been sold to the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. And that is a correct description of the bills? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that order, and tell me if you know of those bills having been paid for by the Bank? - A. I have no doubt but they were.

Cross-examined by Mr. Erskine. Q. You don't know it of your own knowledge? - A. I have no reason to doubt it, on account of our cash agreeing at that time.

Q. Did you receive the money? - A. I cannot say; either Mr. Goldsmid or myself received it.

Q. Did you yourself deliver those bills to the Bank? - A. I cannot say that I myself delivered them.

Q. Nor do you know, of your own knowledge, that they were delivered? - A. I made up the bill of parcels.

Mr. Giles. Q. Look at that order - was that the order given for the bills contained in that bill of parcels? - A. It is the same amount.

Q. That is signed by Mr. Aslett? - A. Yes.

Q. Does Mr. Aslett ever give you orders like that but upon the delivery of the bills? - A. Never.

Mr. Erskine. Q. There is no enumeration in the order, is there? - A. No.

Mr. Garrow. (To Mr. Kiddell.) Q. Look at that order, (the order of Cole an Templeman of the 11th of December,) did you make out that order? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Is that signed by the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that order made out on account of these bills of parcels? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whose figuring that is upon the back? - A. Mine; it is a collection of the two totals of the two bills of parcels.

Q. Have you entered the bills delivered with this bill of parcels in the bought book? - A. (Refers to it.) They are my entry in the book; it is a copy of the bills of parcels.

Q. Were those compared with the bills? - A. I can say I compared one of them, because it has my initials.

Q. Which is that? - A. 15,000l. I am sure we received of Messrs. Cole and Templeman 15,000l. of the description in this bill of parcels.

Q. And were they paid for by that order? - A. They were paid for by this order.

Q. When you made out an order of that sort, and took it to Mr. Aslett for signature, what did you do with it after he had signed it? - A. It was generally given to Mr. Cole, to apply at another office to receive the money.

Q. Is there any mark made upon the order at that office to denote the payment of it after it is paid? - A. There is no mark upon this order; we always answer the draft as soon as we pay it, by crossing the name.

Q. Is that so crossed? - A. It is.

Q. Now look at that, (the other order), and see if it is so cancelled? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Upon looking at these documents, and your bought book, have you any doubt that all these bills were brought into the Bank and paid for? - A. I have no doubt.

Q. By the order of Mr. Aslett? - A. By the order of Mr. Aslett.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. The bought book is a mere copy of the bill of parcels, and not copied from the Exchequer-bills? - A. It is a copy.

Q. You did not compare that with the bills themselves? - A. Certainly, the numbers and amounts.

Q. Did you, compare the numbers and amounts with the bills themselves? - A. They are compared, but not at all times, by the person who makes the entry.

Q. You said, just now, from the press of business another person might do it? - A. Yes.

Q. Does that frequently happen? - A. It has happened several times.

Q. It might have happened in this instance? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to swear you saw these specific bills with the numbers upon them? - A. The 15,000l. I can positively.

Court. Q. Is that one of the bills of parcels of Cole and Templeman? - A. Yes.

Mr. Giles. Q. Was it the duty of Mr. Aslett, before he gave these orders, to examine the bills, and to see that they were right? - A. It was his duty.

Q. And was that done? - A. I cannot say he generally counted the bills after I had given him the order to sign.

Court. Q. Do you mean that he counted over the amount of the bill of parcels, or examined the bills themselves? - A. The bills themselves generally, but I believe not always.

Mr. COLE, sen. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Look at that bill of parcels, (shewing him, another), have you signed that? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Do you know of those Exchequer-bills having been sold at the Bank? - A. I certainly know that.

Q. Look at that order annexed to it - are you acquainted with the hand-writing of Mr. Aslett? - A. Very well.

Q. Is that order signed by him? - A. Yes.

Q. Were these Exchequer-bills paid for by that order? - A. Yes.

Q. And you have no demand upon the Bank for these Exchequer-bills? - A. I cannot say that I received it myself, but some of the firm did; I generally received the orders from the Governor himself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You don't mean that you delivered the bills with your own hand? - A. No; I cannot say that.

Mr. Giles. Q. You signed the bill of parcels? - A. Yes.

Mr. Giles. (To Mr. Kiddell.) Q. Refer to the bought book, and see if you have entered that bill of parcels bought of Cole and Templeman on the 14th of December? - A. Yes, I have entered them.

Q. That bought book was kept in the Cashier's office? - A. It was.

Q. Did you write out the order for the payment of those bills? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that signed by Mr. Aslett? - A. It is.

Q. Does that appear to have been paid? - A. Yes.

Q. From the course of the Cashier's office, could a description of those bills have found their way into your bought book, unless they had been brought into the office? - A. I am well convinced these bills were brought into the Bank, because I examined them.

Q. What is the amount? - A. 10,055l.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you mean that you compared, in that instance, the bill of parcels with the bills themselves? - A. Yes.

Q. As to numbers as well as sums? - A. Yes.

Q. How do you know? - A. By my checking the bills of parcels.

Q. You are sure that bills to these amounts came into the Bank that day? - A. Yes.

Q. But do you mean to state positively, that the bill No. 562, for instance, or any other number, came into the Bank that day? - A. No, I did not look at the number; it is the general practice to read the numbers of the bills to the bill of parcels, but I cannot positively swear it was done in that instance.

Mr. Giles. Q. In the order that was signed by Mr. Aslett, and written by you, you gave a general description of the bills? - A. Yes, always.

Mr. JOHN PUGETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are one of the Directors of the Bank of England? - A. Yes.

Q. And was so on the 26th of February last? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it the course of transacting the business of the Bank, for certain Directors to be in daily attendance? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present on the 26th of February, assisted by Mr. Smith, another Director, - I will refresh your memory by giving you the book (hands it to him)? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it the duty of the Directors of the day, to receive, in that parlour, any Exchequer-bills that may be brought there for deposit from the Cashier's office? - A. Yes.

Q. By whom were they generally brought? - A. Generally by Mr. Aslett.

Q. Upon looking at that book, which is signed by yourself and Mr. Smith, are you able to say whether Mr. Aslett was the person who brought in Exchequer-bills upon that day? - A. The entry is his hand-writing: and I could almost positively say it was him, for I do not recollect for some time any one else coming into the parlour; certainly not when I was in waiting.

Q. Was any person in the course of bringing them, except Mr. Newland and Mr. Aslett? - A. No.

Q. In what way are Exchequer-bills brought, for the purpose of being deposited in the strong closet? - A. In bundles, inclosed in a case, a paper enveloped containing the number and amount.

Q. When they are brought in, is that book produced to the Directors, to compare the parcels with the entry? - A. Yes.

Q. When that is done, what becomes of the Exchequer-bills? - A. They are put by in the iron closet in their covers.

Q. That closet has three separate locks? - A. Yes.

Q. Can that be resorted to for the purpose of taking out its contents, but in the presence of two Directors? - A. Certainly not.

Q. As you signed the entry of that day, you can state to us whether all the parcels of Exchequer-bills, that were brought in and examined by you that day, were safely put into the strong closet? - A. I believe they were examined by me and Mr. Smith.

Q. When they are so deposited, these bought bills remain there till they are redeemed by the Government? - A. They do.

Q. Turn to your entry - it will appear, I believe, as if four separate parcels had been brought in that day? - A. It does so appear.

Q. Does the first parcel import to be a parcel of 200,000l.? - A. The first appears to be a parcel of 200,000l.

Q. For what service? - A. The supply of 1802.

Q. Supposing that parcel to have been brought in upon that day, and with the others, to have been deposited in the strong closet, must it have remained there till the month of April following? - A. I apprehend it must, unless it was stolen out.

Mr. HENRY SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Be so good as look at that book, and tell us if you were a Director in attendance with Mr. Pugett upon that day? - A. Yes, I signed the book.

Q. Do you recollect who brought the Exchequer-bills to be signed that day? - A. Mr. Aslett did; I never received any Exchequer-bills, from any other person at that period.

Mr. THOMAS BISH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are a stock-broker? - A. I am.

Q. You are largely concerned in the purchase and sale of Government securities? - A. Frequently.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Mr. Aslett? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he make any application to you in the month of March last? - A. On the 14th of March, Mr. Aslett came to me to know if I would make a purchase in the Stocks, as he and some friends intended to have a speculation; I told him it was a time when I thought there would be a very great variation in the Stocks, which might make it rather a matter of hazard; he told me I should be perfectly safe if he gave me security; he accordingly the next day gave me an order to buy 50,000l. Consols. for the approaching account, that was to be in a few days afterwards.

Q. A purchase for time? - A. A purchase for time; he asked me what difference I thought there would be in the Stocks; I told him I thought there might be from five to six per cent. fluctuation; he then said, he would give me 3000l. Exchequer-bills for the whole, which would cover the loss of six per cent.

Q. Did he in consequence of that make any deposit of Exchequer-bills? - A. He deposited three Exchequer-bills with me of 1000l. each.

Q. Look at these, and tell me if they are the three Exchequer-bills he deposited with you? - A. These are the three.

Mr. Garrow. There is only one of them charged in this indictment, the one No. 2694.

Q. In consequence, of this transaction, did you at any time go to the Bank? - A. I sold that stock again to Mr. Aslett, and in fact bought and sold it three times over.

Q. In consequence of the transactions growing out of this deposit, did you go to the Bank? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Have you marked those bills so that you can swear positively to them? - A. Yes, I can swear to their being the same bills.

BENJAMIN WINTHROP , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are the Deputy Governor of the Bank? - A. I am.

Q. Did Mr. Bish at any time make any communication to you of any circumstances which induced you to see Mr. Aslett? - A. He did.

Q. Be so good as state what passed between you and Mr. Aslett upon that occasion? - A. On the 9th of April, about twelve or one o'clock, I sent for Mr. Aslett and Mr. Newland; I began by asking Mr. Aslett what was the mode of taking the account of Exchequer-bills; I asked him whether it was possible, after the Exchequer-bills that we had purchased were either traced to Mr. Newland's iron chest, or removed from the iron chest to our parlour, that any of those bills could get out of the Bank again; he said, he believed it was not; I then told him, that nevertheless it appeared to me in proof, that there were bills out of the Bank that had been purchased by the Bank, and that were the property of the Bank; I told him I must go one step farther, and say, and I was very sorry to say it, that he, Mr. Aslett, was suspected of being the cause of their being so out of the Bank. I asked him then if he knew Mr. Bish; he said he did; I asked him whether he had placed any Exchequer-bills in the hands of Mr. Bish; he said he had, but that they were not the property of the Bank; he was then asked whose property they were; whether that question was asked him by myself or Mr. Watson, I am not sure; he said he had rather be excused mentioning names, but shortly after he did mention the name, and said, they were the property of Mr. Hosier.

Q. Did he give any description of Mr. Hosier? - A. I do not recollect that he did; I think we then sent for Mr. Bish, and I think it was about that period of our conversation that Mr. Watson said, Mr. Aslett, I think it my duty as a Magistrate to tell you that you are not obliged to answer any questions, the answers to which you may think will tend to criminate yourself. Mr. Bish then came into the room, and stated to us what he has just now stated, that he was applied to by Mr. Aslett to engage in a speculation of about 50,000l. that he declined it, because there might be a fall in the Stocks, and that Mr. Aslett proposed securing him by a deposit of 3000l. When we had heard this, Mr. Watson told Mr. Aslett he was under the necessity of committing him.

Q. Do you recollect in the course of that conversation any reference to the bought-book? - A. We had the bought-book in, in order to find out whether those Exchequer-bills at Mr. Bish's were really our property.

Q. Who was directed to turn to the boughtbook to obtain that information? - A. We had the bought-book there, and were looking over the bought-book to find the numbers; we had two books in, and could not find them; then we had a third book in.

Q. Who brought in that book? - A. I believe Mr. Aslett.

Q. Who was it that turned to the first and second bought-book? - A. I think Mr. Watson; Mr. Newland-said, there is another book, Mr. Aslett, you had better go and bring it; Mr. Aslett went from the room where we were, and returned a little while after with the third book, and when he brought that third book, Mr. Watson opened it, and discovered the numbers, and then we saw that they were the same; Mr. Aslett said, he had no doubt if he could be permitted to go to his own house instead of being sent to the Compter, he should be able to clear up every thing.

Q. Were you present on the Monday when Mr. Aslett's desk was broke open? - A. I was not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Erskine. Q. How long have you known Mr. Aslett? - A. Ever since I have been one of the Directors of the Bank.

Q. Was not his conduct perfectly correct up to this time? - A. I think no clerk could be more so; he was very much esteemed, very civil and complaisant to every one; we all regarded him very much.

Q. In this confidential situation, I need hardly ask whether he had not daily opportunities of embezzling the property of the Bank to a very great amount? - A. He had great opportunities certainly.

Q. And before this time no suspicion fell upon him? - A. I believe none, I am sure none with me; his knowledge was very extensive; he knew more of the business of the Bank than any other clerk in the Bank.

BROOK WATSON, Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Were you in waiting at the Bank in the month of April last? - A. I was.

Q. According to your recollection, has the conversation been correctly stated by the Deputy Governor? - A. The Deputy Governor has correctly stated it, with the exception of Mr. Aslett being sent out for the third book; to the best of my recollection the books were all there; that is, they were all brought in.

Q. Do you happen to recollect whether, in speaking of Mr. Hosier, Mr. Aslett gave any description from which you knew what Mr. Hosier he was speaking of? - A. Mr. Aslett, speaking of Mr. Hosier, said, he was a partner in the house of Mr. Morland, the banker.

Mr. Winthrop. When Mr. Aslett went out for the third book, the Governors said, we shall never see him any more; I expected he would go to his own office, take his hat, and go off; that was the impression upon my mind at the time.

THOMAS BODINGTON, Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are one of the Directors of the Bank? - A. I am.

Q. Did you attend on Monday the 11th of December upon the breaking open of Mr. Aslett's desk? - A. Yes; I found the desk locked, it was broke open in my presence by a smith; Mr. Hess, one of the clerks in the Cashier's office, was present at the time.

Q. Does that paper contain any Exchequer-bills found in that desk? - A. Yes; I gave it to Mr. Hess immediately, and desired him to make a list, which he did in my presence; he returned the list and its contents to me, No. 109; it contained Exchequer-bills to the value of 16,000l.

Q. Were they in your presence compared with the list Mr. Hess made? - A. No; I carried them into the parlour, and delivered them to Mr. Watson.

- HESS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Were you present when Mr. Aslett's desk was broke open? - A. Yes; I saw Mr. Bodington take the cover out which contained the Exchequer-bills; it was handed to me to make the enumeration of its contents; it was delivered to me almost instantly.

Q. Did you make a faithful list of the envelope? - A. I gave it to a clerk in the office; I saw him turn the bills over, and read them to me while I made the list.

- SMART sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Did you dictate to Mr. Hess the bundle of Exchequer-bills? - A. Yes.

Q. You dictated them faithfully? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Had any other person access to Mr. Aslett's desk? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Were there not papers belonging to the Bank that did not belong to Mr. Aslett in that desk? - A. Yes.

Q. Had not other persons access to it? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Garrow. Q. In that desk was there any other large bundle of Exchequer-bills? - A. Yes; they were delivered to me on the Saturday after he was taken into custody.

Q. In the afternoon after he had been before Mr. Watson? - A. Yes.

Q. What did Mr. Aslett deliver to you after his examination upon that very afternoon? - A. He gave me a bundle of Exchequer-bills, written on the back 200,000l.

Q. Was this a desk to which any body else had access, or had Mr. Aslett a private key of it? - A. He had the private key.

Q. Do you not know that no other person had access to it? - A. I know of none; I am not quite sure whether Mr. Aslett might not trust Mr. Hess to go to it.

Q. Was that bundle in the form and manner in which Exchequer-bills were made up to be carried into the Directors parlour? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that private desk a proper and usual place for bundles so made up for the parlour? - A. No; whether he put them in to take care of till the gentlemen were ready, I cannot tell.

Q. That was not the usual place to keep them in? - A. No.

Q. After he had given you out the bundle on the Saturday, did he lock the desk, and did you find it locked on the Monday? - A. It was locked when I saw Mr. Bodington come to it on the Monday.

Mr. Garrow. (To Hess.) Q. Whose desk was it out of which the 16,000l. Exchequer-bills were taken? - A. Mr. Aslett's; it was the inner seat of two in the Office.

Q. Had any other person access to that desk but himself? - A. I never knew of any body.

Q. From whom did you receive that bundle of 16,000l.? - A. I saw Mr. Bodington put his hand upon the envelope, and I then lost fight of them; but in the course of two minutes they were put into my hand by Mr. Bodington.

Mr. Garrow. (To Mr. Bodington.) Q. Did you deliver them in the same unopened state to Mr. Hess, in which you found them in the desk? - A. I did exactly.

Mr. Garrow. (To Mr. Winthrop.) Q. Have you, since Mr. Aslett was committed, examined in your strong depository in the parlour, and have you found there any bundle of Exchequer-bills corresponding with the first entry of 200,000l.? - A. I do not recollect that I have examined it since.

Mr. Garrow. (To Mr. Hess.) Q. After this matter was discovered, did you examine the different parcels of Exchequer-bills deposited in the parlour, to see whether you could find this entry of 200,000l.? - A. It was done in my presence by the Directors some days afterwards.

Q. Upon that examination, did you find that there was a deficiency of that 200,000l.? - A. The iron chest was deficient of 200,000l. of the description of the supply, 1802.

Q. And does the envelope of the 16,000l. agree with the entry made on the 16th of February? - A. It does.

Court. Q. They were missing, according to the Directors book? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you had occasion to attend the Directors in the parlour? - A. Very seldom; at that time I was not in a situation that required my attendance in general upon them.

Q. Had you ever, in their presence, access to the strong closet? - A. Never, till this circumstance.

Mr. Gurney. (To Mr. Winthrop.) Q. From

what you have said of Mr. Aslett's situation, I presume he had frequent occasion to attend you, and the other Directors, in the parlour? - A. Very often.

Q. Had Mr. Aslett ever access to that strong closet, in the presence of you, or any other Directors? - A. When he has brought in Exchequer-bills, he has deposited them in the closet, I believe, very often.

Q. Exchequer-bills, to the amount of some millions, were kept in that closet? - A. Yes.

Q. Were any other things, beside Exchequer-bills, deposited in that closet? - A. Yes.

Q. Of what description? - A. Of various descriptions - small packages of bonds, and other things; there are two drawers in that closet; in one is contained Exchequer-bills, and in the other the Accomptant-General's bills.

Q. In the interval of some months, Mr. Aslett must have frequent access to that closet? - A. Yes, in the presence of the Directors.

Q. Had any other person, besides Mr. Aslett and the Directors, access to that closet? - A. When the Accomptant-General had occasion to deposit, or take out bills, he had access to it in the presence of the Directors.

Q. Had any person ever access to that closet, without two or three Directors being present? - A. I think not; such a thing never did occur, I believe, and never ought to occur.

Q. It has never been left open? - A. No.

Mr. STEWART sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Were you a clerk in the Cashier's office, on the 26th of February? - A. I was.

Q. Look if that indorsement, with the exception of 16,000l. is your hand-writing? - A. It is.

Q. What does it import to be? - A. Exchequer-bills, to the amount of 200,000l.

Q. Upon what occasion was that indorsement made? - A. When the bills are told out, they are made up in bundles, and so indorsed.

Q. Do you happen to know by whose direction you made that indorsement? - A. I don't know particularly; sometimes Mr. Hess, and sometimes Mr. Smart.

Q. Somebody in the Cashier's office? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM HORTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You, I believe, live in Newgate-street, and are a hosier? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Aslett? - A. I have very little acquaintance with him.

Q. Did he make any application to you on the 22d of March last? - A. A friend of his did.

Q. In consequence of any thing that was said, did you see him? - A. I did, on Monday the 21st, and on Tuesday the 22d.

Q. What was his business to you? - A. To transfer to his direction 11,000l. Consols. and he proposed delivering into my hands nine Exchequer-bills, in consequence of an agreement.

Q. Did he deliver you any Exchequer-bills? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you a memorandum of those Exchequer-bills? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that? - A. This is the memorandum that he gave me; one of them is No. 1061.

RICHARD CHAMBERS -sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a merchant, in Dove-court, Swithin's-lane? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know Mr. Aslett? - A. I do.

Q. Did he make any deposit of Exchequer-bills with you at any time? - A. He did; the first was on the 16th of March last.

Q. To what amount of Exchequer-bills did he deposit with you on that day? - A. 10,000l.

Q. When was the next deposit made? - A. On the 17th, the next day.

Q. For what amount? - A. 16,000l.

Q. Was there any subsequent deposit? - A. On the 9th of April, I think, 17,000l. in all to the amount of 43,000l.

Q. Look at that paper? - A. This is a memorandum of the bills, their numbers, and dates.

Q. For what purpose did he make this large deposit with you? - A. To secure a loan of 3 per Cent. Consolidated Stock.

Q. Did you procure a loan for him? - A. I did, through the means of a broker.

Mr. JAMES VANSOMMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Had you any deposit of Exchequer-bills from Mr. Aslett, the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it? - A. In the beginning of the month of April last.

Q. What number of Exchequer-bills were placed in your hands by him? - A. 30,000l.

Q. For what purpose did he deposit those bills with you? - A. To borrow money.

Q. Were you to borrow money for him, or advance money of your own? - A. To borrow the money for him.

Q. You are a broker? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you borrow money on the whole 30,000l. or only upon a part of it? - A. Upon 15,000l.

Q. Had you 15,000l. remaining? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you an account of this 15,000l.? - A. Yes. (Produces it.)

Q. Have you any account of those you parted with? - A. No; this is the list of the bills I returned to the Bank, and which I received from Mr. Aslett.

Q. How did you dispose of the other 15,000l.? - A. To the parties who lent the money for them; there were 8000l. with Down's house, and 7000l. to Birch and Chambers in Bond-street, I think, but I cannot exactly say now which of them had the 7000l. and which the 8000l.

HENRY CHAMBERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Did you receive a deposit of Exchequer-bills from Mr. Vanlommes? - A. Yes, 7000l.

Q. Did you deliver them to Mr. Kay? - A. I cannot say; they were the same bills I took home to Bond-street, and put them in a drawer; I left them there, and saw no more of them; they were entered by my clerk, Mr. Wildon.

Q. You deposited them in the usual drawer for such things? - A. Yes.

- WILDON sworn. Q. Did you make any entry of the bills that were deposited in the drawer by Mr. Chambers? - A. I have the entries of the bills, and the sums, to the amount of 7000l.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you make that from the bills themselves? - A. I copied it from the book.

Court. Q. Did you enter the bills in the book? - A. Yes, and I copied it from the book.

Q. Is the book here? - A. No.

- DOWNES sworn. - Q. Did you receive any deposit of Exchequer-bills? - A. Yes, 8000l.

Q. Did you deliver those bills to Mr. Kay? - A. Yes,

Mr. Gurney. Q. From whom did you receive those bills? - A. From Mr. Vansomer's hands; I gave them to my clerk, and they were put into a drawer among other Exchequer-bills, after having been entered.

Q. Did you enter them? - A. No.

Q. How many persons had access to them beside yourself? - A. Two or three clerks; but I believe the bills I took from Mr. Vansomer were put separate.

Q. Did you put them there yourself? - A. No.

Q. Are your clerks here? - A. No.

Mr. JOHN HOSIER sworn. - Q. Are you a partner in the house of Morland and Co.? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Aslett engage in any transaction on the part of Mr. Bish with you? - A. In the latter end of March, or the beginning of April, I delivered to Mr. Aslett 8000l. part of the property of the house, but not for the purpose you mention.

Q. Do you know what he did with them? - A. I believe he carried them to Mr. Goldsmid's; he told me to afterwards.

Q. Have you a list of those 8000l.? - A. I have not, but my partner has, who is here.

Q. For what purpose did you deliver them to him? - A. For the purpose of raising some money upon a credit of ours that wanted an advance.

Q. Was that the only transaction you had with him of Exchequer-bills? - A. Yes.

Mr. WILLIAM BOEAS sworn. - Q. Have you a list of the Exchequer-bills for 8000l. delivered by your partner to Mr. Aslett? - A. I took a copy from the book into my pocket-book.

Q. Is the original book here? - A. No.

Q. Then you must go and setch it immediately.

Q. (To Mr. Kiddell.) Turn to your book and see whether you find entered on the 3d of December, an Exchequer-bill, No. 2692? - A. Yes, dated 25th Nov. 1802, for 1000l.

Q. Have you Nos. 2693, and 2694 of the same date for the same sum? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Mr Lord, I shall now take the 16000l. found in the desk.

Q. Look at No. 141, what is the date of the entry? - A. The 10th of December, 1802.

Q. What is the date of the bill? - A. The 3d of August, for 1000l.

Q. (To Mr. Hess.) Have you compared the 16000l. worth of Exchequer-bills found in the desk with the bought book? - A. I compared them with the Exchequer-bill ledger, but not with the bought book.

Q. Then we must go through them - do you find No. 867, 2804, 2916, 862 and 2919, for 500l. each? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you find Nos. 2351, 2352, 2353, 2354, 2355, 2356, 2357, 2358, 2359, 2360 and 2361, and from No. 2406 to No. 2494 inclusive, of 100l. each? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Now take Mr. Horton's list, and put in an agreement signed by Mr. Aslett, dated the 22d of March, 1803.

Q. Do you find an entry of No. 1060, 1061, 1062, 1063, 1064, 1071, 1072, 1073, and 1074, for 1000l. each, on 14th December? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Richard Chambers .) Is that the original list you made? - A. I made it from the bills themselves.

Q. Do you find No. 2078, dated 16th of February, for 1000l. Nos. 2080, 2081, 2082, 2824, 517, 518, 519, 1558, 1559, 1560, 1561, 1562, 1563, 1564, 1565, 1566, 1567, 1569, 1570, 1571, 1572, 1573, for 1000l. each, and No. 2925, dated 31 December; Nos. 2926, 2927, 2928, 2935, 2936, 2937, 2939, 2940, 2951, 2930, 2931, 2932, 2933, 2934, 2952, 2953, 2954, 2955, 2956, 2957 and 2959, for 500l. each? - A. Yes.

Mr. Erskine. (To Mr. Kiddell. Q. Turn to the bought book, on the 3d of December, 1802, where you find the bill 2694, which is one of the bills in the indictment? - A. Yes, here it is.

Q. You have told the Jury, that in making the entries in the bought-book, when it came to you to make them, you did not always look at the bills themselves, but at the bills of parcels? - A. Yes.

Q. I desire to know whether you can swear positively that you saw the bill No. 2694, when you made the entry, or that you did not make the entry from the bills of parcels, and which, if the entries are correct, ought to correspond? - A. I cannot swear to it.

Q. Turn to the 11th of December, 1802, there you find No. 835? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you swear, that in making that entry, you made it from your own occular inspection of the bill, or whether you did no more than make the entry from the bill of parcels, which ought to correspond with the contents? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Look to the 14th of December, 1802, you will find NO. 1061; I ask you the same question as to that? - A. I wish to see the bill of parcels,(looks at it;) yes, I examined the bills with this myself, I cannot swear whether I did the others or not.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Of the last you are certain? - A. Yes, I am positive.

Q. With regard to the others, have you any doubt they were the property of the Bank? - A. I have not the least doubt they were.

Mr. Erskine. Q. When you counted the bills, did you examine them? - A. No, we took care that the amount corresponded.

Q. Will you swear you had occular inspection of the bill, and saw No. 1061? - A. I have not the least doubt but I counted the bills, and they amounted to the sum.

Court. Q. Did you examine that bill as to the amount, or only the numbers of them? - A. That I cannot say.

Mr. Garrow. Q. You have said, that with regard to the bill of parcels, you had no doubt you examined it with the entry? - A. Yes.

Q. In what respect? - A. As to the amount.

Q. Do you find the amount in the invoice correctly entered in the bought-book? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you make it up without? - A. No.

Q. Have you any doubt they were entered as being the property of the Bank? - A. I have no doubt in the least.

Mr. Garrow. My Lord, I propose now to read the bills uttered by the prisoner to Mr. Bish.(Bills, No. 2694 and 1061, for 1000l. each, and No. 835, for 500l. read.)

Henry Boeas . I have now got my book.

Q. Are those the original entries you made? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Is that the list of the 8000l. Exchequer-bills your partner lent to Mr. Aslett? - A. The 8000l. are included here, but there are others.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Do you find No. 2692? - A. No.

Q. Nos. 2693 and 2694? - A. No.

Q. Then you are enabled to say those three numbers do not constitute any part of those lent by your partner to the prisoner? - A. No, positively.

Mr. Garrow. That is the case on the part of the prosecution.

Mr. Erskine. I understand it is admitted otherwise, I shall call Mr. Jennings to prove they are not bills legally signed by him.

Mr. Garrow. I take it, as admitted, that he was not legally authorized to sign those bills at the time they were issued; that he had no legal authority to sign them.

Court. That ought to stand upon the evidence - I will take it upon the admission.

GUILTY , Death .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-87

676. THOMAS WRIGHT and LANCELOT HOGGART , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , two pieces of muslin shawls, value 3l. 18s. six pieces of cambric, value 14l. 2s. two pieces of - handkerchiefs, value 1l. 1s. 4d. three pieces of gingham, value 5l. 8s. 9d. twenty-four yards of cambric, value 5l. 18s. four waistcoats, value 2l. 8s. three waistcoat pieces, value 13s. and five yards of gauze, value 1l. 10s. the property of Moses-Leport Merac , and Theophilus Merac , in their dwelling-house .

It appearing in evidence that a third person had an interest in the goods, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-88

677. CATHERINE BRYAN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Donovan , no person being therein, about the hour of one, in the afternoon of the 6th of September , and feloniously stealing an apron, value 2s. 6d. and a shawl, value 3s. 6d. the property of the said Mary .

It appearing in evidence that the prosecutrix was a married woman, and her husband living, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-89

678. WILLIAM IVEY was indicted for making an assault upon Frances Bebee , in a certain field and open place, pear the King's highway, on the 20th of August , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a half-crown, a shilling, and a sixpence, her property .

FRANCES BEBEE sworn. - Q. Were you robbed at any time? - A. Yes; on Saturday the 20th of August.

Q. Where were you going? - A. I was going to Kingsland .

Q. Was it in the foot-path in the road, or across the fields? - A. Across the fields; a good distance from any road.

Q. Was it a field through which there was a foot-path, or not? - A. There was a foot-path.

Q. A common footpath for Kingsland? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of day was it? - A. Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner met me, and asked me for my money.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was the man? - A. Yes.

Q. What did he do, or say? - A. He said, give me your money; I told him I had got no money; he said, he knew I had got money; I said, no, I had got none; he then took a knife out of his pocket.

Q. He had not taken it out before? - A. No.

Q. Was it open? - A. I did not see the blade.

Q. Are you sure it was a knife? - A. Yes; I saw the handle of it.

Q. Was it a large or a small one? - A. It was a smallish handle; I put my hand in my pocket to feel for my money.

Q. How came you to put your hand in your pocket then for your money, when you had not done it before? - A. I suppose I was afraid.

Q. What money did you take out? - A. A half-crown, a shilling, and a sixpence.

Q. Did you give it him? - A. No; I threw it down upon the ground, he stooped to pick it up, and I made off for Kingsland; I thought he was coming after me, I looked round, and saw him running away; I turned back, and cried stop thief, murder.

Q. Was any thing more said by him before you left him? - A. Yes; he asked me for more, when I threw the money down; I said I had no more; he asked me for a seven-shilling-piece; I said, I have got no seven-shilling-piece, you villain; that was all that passed till I called stop thief.

Q. Had you a seven-shilling-piece? - A. No.

Q. Did you know the man before? - A. No.

Q. How long might this transaction take up? - A. Not much more than a couple of minutes, I suppose.

Q. Have you any doubt whether the prisoner is the person or not? - A. No, I have not.

Q. Did you run after him? - A. I did.

Q. Did you see any body stop him? - A. No, I did not; he got over the hedge, and the people pursued him.

Q. How soon after was he taken? - A. I believe, about five minutes afterwards.

Q. Did you see him about five minutes afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any mark upon your money by which you could know it? - A. NO.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were a great deal alarmed, I take it for granted? - A. Yes.

Q. When you threw your money upon the ground, are you able to say whether he had taken out his knife? - A. I am positive he had taken a knife out of his pocket before I put my hand in my pocket.

JAMES ROWLEY sworn. - Q. What do you know about this? - A. I was at the ground adjoining, at work.

Q. Did you see or hear any thing that attracted your attention? - A. Yes; I heard a loud cry of stop thief, murder; I saw the prisoner and the lady, she was running after him, and he was running away from her; I came up to the lady, and asked her if that was the man that had robbed her; she said, yes, it was a man in a smock srock, and sore eyes; I then ran towards the prisoner, there were people nearer then I was; I cut across another field, and met him just as he was taken, he had got over the bank; I returned to meet the lady, and asked her what she was robbed of; she told me four shillings; I saw something in his pocket, and took it from him; it was an oyster-knife and a sheath.

Q. It was not a clasped knife? - A. No; the knife was in his right-hand breeches-pocket, and the sheath in his left; he put his hand to his left-hand pocket, and gave me the sheath, and said, you may as well take that with you.

WILLIAM ATWELL sworn. - I was in my own house, about a furlong from this field, and heard a cry of stop thief; I immediately ran out of the house, and saw the prisoner.

Q. Did you see any woman? - A. No, I did not; Mr. Elliot and I pursued him, and took him.

Q. When you took him, did you observe him do any thing? - A. In the scussle we tumbled both together; he had got one of his hands shut, we were going to lay hold of his hand, when he drew his hand back, and threw some money against the pales; I immediately picked up a sixpence, a young man got over the pales and gave me a half-crown over, I saw him pick it up.

Q. How near was that to the pales? - A. It might be a yard off.

- ELLIOTT sworn. - I was busy in my hay employ: I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner running, and I pursued him.

Q. Were you one of those who took him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any thing happen in the taking of him? - A. He had not an opportunity; I collared him, and Atwell pushed out of his own house immediately and assisted me; I saw his hand closed, I said to Atwell, he has got something in his hand; I endeavoured to open his hand, and he threw himself upon the ground in the struggle; Atwell then left me and picked up some money, while I held the prisoner upon the ground.

Q. Did you see any thing else picked up? - A. No, I did not; I heard of a half-crown being picked up, but I did not see it; I did not see the knife taken from him, but I saw the sheath; he said, you may as well take this with it; that was while I held him by the collar.

WILLIAM GRIFFIN sworn. - I know nothing of it any more than the prisoner was delivered to me by these people.

Q. How was he dressed? - A. In a smock frock.(Produces the knife and the sheath, a half-crown, and a sixpence.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, Death , aged 27.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his former good character .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-90

679. MICHAEL CARNEY was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann his wife .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ANN MYERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 1, Hull's-place, Brick-lane, Old-street , next door to the deceased: I heard the prisoner, her husband, come home, about half past eleven o'clock, in the morning of the 31st of July.

Q. Relate what you heard? - A. she was washing some small things for her family; you are d-d busy you bl-d b-h, were the first words I heard; she said, there are two nice cauliflowers, my dear, shall I boil them for dinner; he made answer, what do you think, you bl-d whore; upon which a violent noise ensued of blows, I heard no one scream out but the eldest daughter, who cried out you have killed her, you have killed her; I thought she meant the second daughter, because he has vowed he would take her life; I was frightened, went down stairs, and found it was his wife, when I saw the blood on her face, and that it had flew as far as the step outside the door; the prisoner was in the house, and said he would have dinner dressed by twelve o'clock, he repeated it I don't know how many times; and she said I will.

Q. Was this after the blow? - A. Yes; he then went away, and came back exactly at twelve o'clock; I durst not go in while he was gone fearing he should come, but I talked to her through the window; when he returned, he swore he would cut her bl-y liver and tongue out, and would not rest till he had murdered her and the children. I met her father, and told him not to go in, for that the prisoner would kill him, as he had often threatened. I saw the deceased afterwards brought out like a dead woman, immediately as her father and others went in; she could not speak or do any thing, her face was so dreadfully cut; she was held up in a chair, and some time after she came to herself, and said she had got her death blow from her husband: her nose was driven on one side upon her face by a blow.

Q. From all that you had an opportunity of observing, and from what she said, did she consider herself in a dying state? - A. Yes; from the 31st of July, she always said she should die, for that she had received her death blow.

Q. Did you see her often? - A. Every day, and many times in the day: this was the way she stood,(putting her hands on the left side and stomach), she said, I am so hurt, and crushed inside, that I cannot live, he kicked me for with his shoe; that he stamped on her stomach in the passage, on the 31st of July, and knocked her down on this candlestick,(producing a flat japanned candlestick), which broke under her body in the fall, and run up her private parts.

Q. Do you recollect whether she said any thing else? - A. No; she always said she should not live; that is all I particularly recollect.

WILLIAM BELK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are the father of this unfortunate woman? - A. I am.

Q. Did you see her on the 2d of August? - A. Yes; I had been to market, and was going to call on my daughter to leave her what little portion I could afford, and when I got within ten yards of the door, somebody said, run, run, for the villain is murdering your daughter; I went in, in a great hurry, and saw her on the floor, and he laying down on her.

Q. Was any body in the house beside? - A. There was one of the children, the other run out for a constable; Mary-Ann was in the room, who is near twelve years of age. I cannot tell whether the prisoner knelt on the floor or on his wife, but I pulled him up with all my strength.

Q. Was she able to stir, or call out? - A. I cannot tell for my confusion; I pulled her up in a hurry into the passage, some men pulled him from her; I took her in my arms, and she dropped down on the floor like a log of wood.

Q. After you got him from her, did you see him do any thing to her? - A. He punched at her with his foot and knee, as they dragged him from her.

Q. Could you see what part of her body he punched? - A. No, I was in too much confusion; in about ten or fifteen minutes she came to herself.

Q. Did you say any thing to him about it? - A. I said he had finished the job he had often promised to do; and he said, I'll finish your job too; I have heard him say many times, he never would rest satisfied till he had murdered her and me too.

Q. Was that what you meant, when you said, now you have finished the job you have often promised to do? - A. Yes; and he said he would finish me too.

Q. Was it in the fight of your daughter that he said it? - A. Yes; but she was insensible. They had him out at the door, and it was all confusion.

Q. Did you see your daughter from time to time after this? - A. Yes; every day till the day she died.

Q. Do you believe she thought herself a dying woman? - A. Most certainly she did; when they took her out of the room into the street, there was a mob of about fifty people; she was like a corpse for some time. The prisoner came back again (for they had let him go), he came back again in half an hour; and when the alarm was made that he was coming, I was ready to lay hold of him; he came

in, and said, he would have my heart's blood, in the hearing of Mrs. Myers, upon which I collared him, and threw him down.

Q. Did your daughter say any thing respecting what she imagined would be the consequence of the blows she had received? - A. She said all along she was killed; but she wished me to get him liberated to save my life, which I did. She died on the 17th of August; on the 15th I went to see her, when she said - Oh father, why did you not come yesterday, for I have got my death blow, the villain has been and executed his work; I have prayed for death many times under my calamities, and should have died in peace then, but I can never die in peace now, since I have prevailed on you to liberate that villain. - She then put her hand on her stomach, and said, he had been on Saturday night, and finished the job. The night before he was liberated he swore he would not go near her, but he went on the Saturday night.

Prisoner. Q. After I was liberated, did I not send home a pound note, and some oysters, to my wife? - A. You promised, if you were liberated, to send a two pound note; you wrote her a letter, saying, if she would endeavour to liberate you, you would send her a two pound note, and would not come near her; and if she did not chuse to consent to that, you had plenty of people to bail you.

Prisoner. I sent my daughter back to know if my wife would have a glass of wine, she said she should like a glass of Lisbon; I sent for a bottle, and went home and kissed my wife, and took leave of her, as I was going away.

Court. Q. Did he send her wine, and call upon her afterwards and kiss her? - A. He sent a twenty shilling note, and promised not to come there at all.

ANN GRAHAM sworn. - I live at the corner of Hull's-place: On the 2d of August I heard a great noise, between one and two o'clock; I went down the place, and saw the deceased sitting in a chair opposite her house, and a vast number of people round about; she was leaning on her eldest daughter's shoulder, not being able to support herself; her daughter said to her, here is Mrs. Graham; upon which she looked upon me with a very deadly look, took me by the hand, and said, - Oh Mrs. Graham, Mrs. Graham, fourteen years, more or less, I have borne this usage, but he has now given me my death blow; could you see from my anklebone to my private parts, your heart would bleed for me. - I bid her cheer up, and said she would get better; she said, no, never.

Q. Did she say any thing about her nose? - A. I saw the bridge of her nose flatted to her face, and a woeful black eye on the right-side. I asked her if she would take any kind of refreshment; she said, her inside was so bad with his kicks and bruises that she could not; she said, he had kicked her so much about the kidnies, that she rather thought they had departed from their places, by the feel she had; she said he had many times threatened, but now he had finished the job, and given her a death blow.

Q. Did you see her from day to day afterwards? - A. No, not till the day she died; about half an hour after.

Q. Did you examine her body? - A. Yes; I was the only person who proposed it.

Q. Was the surgeon there? - A. No; I went to see her, and seeing the black eye still remain it hurt me; I returned home, and after weeping a little, I went back, and pulled the sheet down that covered the body: the first thing I saw was the black eye, and the nose in the same fituation I saw it the first day; and her body was just as she described it, for from her ankle-bone to her privates, was as black as my cloak; and the right-side of her privates was very much swelled, just as she had described.

Q. Were you able to judge from whence it arose? - A. Apparently by a kick; On the right-side of her bottom was the mark of another kick apparently; there were little marks about her stomach, chest, and sides, but they were small marks.

Court. Q. How long had you know her? - A. Ever since she had lived in the neighbourhood; about twelve months.

Q. Had you been in the habit of seeing them together? - A. No, never; she was a very close woman, and very careful of being at home with her family.

JOHN YOUNG sworn. - Q. Do you live near the prisoner's house? - A. I did, within about thirty yards; I heard the cry of murder, very loud; in consequence of which, I run; the door was half open, I pushed it back, and saw the prisoner seize the woman in a very savage manner; she was leaning and supporting herself against the wall, and he grasped her as though he would murder her. I took hold of him, and the old gentleman and others assisting, we forced him out of the place.

Q. Did you see him do any thing else? - A. I did not.

MARY- ANN CARNEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What age you? - A. I shall be twelve the 5th of October.

Q. Do you go to church? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether it is a good or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. It is a very bad thing.

Q. What would happen to you if you should swear that which is false? - A. I should be pillored in this life, and go to the devil in the next world.

Q. Were you at home when your father came home with the meat? - A. Yes; I ran out of the house into the garden when he came in, because he had threatened to murder me if I was in the house; I stood at the window, and heard my mother ask him if she should dress the dinner; he swore, and

got up and knocked her down by a violent blow, which broke her nose; when he saw me he came out, and I run down to a neighbour's house; I heard a scream presently, and I ran for a constable; when I came back, my mother was laying on the floor, and my father was kneeling upon her; he had got hold of an iron pot, that was on the fire, with one hand, and held her by the throat with the other, and had his knee upon her right breast, he holding her so tight by the throat as to throw her into convulsions; my eldest sister had run to the top of the street screaming out, and my grand-father was coming down, the people desiring him to run as fast as he could, for my father was murdering my mother; he run in and pulled my father off; several more followed, and my grand-father pulled my mother up, and she fell out of his arms; she came a little to herself some time after. My father went away but returned again, and took hold of my grand-father, saying, I'll have your heart's blood before I sleep; when the neighbours came in a second time, and took him off, as my grand-father had collared him to prevent his getting a knife; and the neighbours went to get a warrant for him.

Prisoner. Q. Mary-Ann, my dear, did you see me strike your mother when I came home with a neck of mutton? - A. Yes; I saw you knock her down.

Q. No, you did not? - A. The wound was on her face; you did do it, certainly, and its no use to deny it.

EMMA CARNEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you at home when your father returned on the 2d of August? - A. Yes; he brought a part of a neck of mutton, and gave my mother half-a-guinea; she stood by the side of the table, and he knocked her down, and broke her nose.

Q. Before he knocked her down, did he say any thing? - A. He ordered his dinner ready by twelve o'clock; she said there was not time to do it, but she would do her endeavours.

Q. Had she said any thing more to him than that? - A. No; then he knocked her down with his fist, and broke her nose; I raised her from the ground, and then he knocked her down by a blow in the stomach; I ran out, and when I came back my grandfather was coming in, and I went with him.

Prisoner. Q. Emma, did you see me knock your mother down? - A. Yes; I saw you knock her down twice.

PHILIP DYNE sworn. - I live next door to the prisoner: I have heard him beat his wife, and threaten to murder her, several times. He was taken up on the 2d of August, and afterwards liberated.

Q. Did you see him near his wife the day he was discharged? - A. Yes; I saw him go by about five o'clock; he stopped some little time in the house, and then went away to the country. He came again on the Saturday before the Wednesday when she died, about six o'clock, when he returned from the country, and brought somebody with him. I heard some high words, and him threatening her, but I cannot say he struck her; I heard him use very abusive words and d-g and swearing.

WILLIAM EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What age are you? - A. Twenty.

Q. Are you a pupil of Mr. Cline? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sent for to examine the body of the deceased? - A. Yes; on the Friday after the Wednesday on which she died.

Q. What was the external appearance of the body? - A. It was in some part bruised, particularly in the face, and a slight bruise under the arm.

Q. Was it a violent bruise on the face? - A. It appeared to be very violent.

Q. Did you examine the bridge of the nose? - A. No, not particularly.

Q. Did it appear to be broke? - A. It appeared to be bruised, but I did not examine it, I did not take it to be broke; there was flight bruise under the left-arm, which appeared to have been there some time, and was dying away.

Q. Did you see how the state of the body was from the ankle to the groin? - A. I did not examine the lower extremities at all.

Q. Did you open and examine the chest? - A. Yes; the intestines appeared to be perfectly found.

Q. Did you examine the kidnies? - A. No.

Q. Or the spleen? - A. The spleen was found.

Q. How did you find the inside of the chest? - A. In a very diseased state.

Q. How was the membrane that lines the inside of the chest? - A. In a very inflamed state, and the lungs adhering to it.

Q. To what might the inflammation of the membrane of the chest be attributed? - A. It might be attributed to external violence, or cold will bring it on.

Q. Were the lungs diseased? - A. They were very much ulcerated.

Q. That was a disorder, perhaps, independent of violence? - A. Yes; and had existed for some time.

Q. What was the state of the heart? - A. Very diseased, both in its external appearance, and internal structure.

Q. Was it enlarged? - A. Yes, very much.

Q. Would external violence produce that effect? - A. The appearance might, but the size would not be encreased to the extent that was.

Q. Might it have been aggravated by external violence and alarm, in consequence of that violance? - A. Yes.

Q. Would the alarm a person might undergo, on being attacked by a person stronger than themselves, occasion an aggravation of those symptoms? - A. Yes.

Q. To what do you attribute the death of the de

ceased? - A. The immediate cause of her death, I attribute to the disease of the lungs; but I think it was accelerated by the ill usage, I hear, her husband had given her.

Q. Do you believe the deceased would have met her death so early, were it not from the violence used, attributed to her husband? - A. No.

Court. Q. Did you know the deceased? - A. I saw her once before, as I was accidentally passing.

Q. Do you know whether she had any ailment of any kind? - A. Only from what I heard, that she had an asthma, and I could see that was the immediate cause of her death.

Q. Would an asthma give that appearance to the lungs in the state you found them? - A. Yes.

Q. Would an asthma have any effect on the enlargement of the heart? - A. No, I don't apprehend it would.

Q. Did you see, from your inspection of the body, any particular blow that you suppose accelerated the death? - A. No; what bruises there were, appeared to be dying away.

Q. You cannot six on any particular blow, or bruise, that you apprehend was the cause of her death? - A. No, I cannot.

JOHN UNDERWOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you practice physic and surgery on your own account? - A. Yes, and have for near eight years.

Q. You have heard the description of the appearance of the unfortunate woman's lungs, and the injuries she received? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you think the appearance of the lungs, which has been described, might be produced by external violence? - A. Yes; the time the blows stated to be given, being the 2d of August, and the death of the woman happening fifteen days afterwards, is about the period that the termination of inflammation would happen, arising from external bruises, and would be supposed to produce death. When a person does not die during the inflammatory state, there happens, what is called, suppuration, which, by producing so great an injury to the lungs incompatible with life, of course terminates fatally. When inflammation does not produce death during the inflammatory state, the disease will go on to suppuration, and the state of the lungs then can hardly be distinguished from the state of the lunges of a person who died of an asthma; with regard to the enlargement of the heart, I have opened the bodies of persons who have died of other diseases, and have found some very much enlarged, and some diminished, where persons have never complained of desection in the part.

Q. Supposing the lungs had been in a reduced state previous to external violence, would not that external violence expedite the death? - A. Most assuredly; but admitting the person to labour under an asthma, the very alarm would accelerate the death; and I don't know whether without any external violence at all, it might not accelerate the death.

Court. Q. From what you have heard, can it be distinctly said, the state of the lungs did not proceed from the symptoms of the disease, or that it necessarily proceeded from the violence? - A. I cannot say that; I can only say, whatever might be the state of the lungs, death must have been accelerated.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Q. Are you an apothecary? - A. I am.

Q. Did you see the deceased? - A. Yes; I don't remember the day, but I think it was the day after she received the ill-usage; my house is about a quarter of a mile from her's; she came in with her father, and desired to be let blood; she complained of a pain in the chest.

Q. Did you examine her person at all? - A. I did not; I felt her pulse, and told her she seemed low and week, and desired my man to take away a small quantity of blood; I saw her once after, and my man saw her twice, but he is not here; when I saw her the second time, she was sitting upon a sofa, or chair, and appeared weak; she said her husband had ill-treated her, and that he had frequently done the same.

Q. Did any medical man attend her? - A. Her father came down to us the day before she died, and my young man went to her; he said that she was very bad, and frequently expectorated that day, but next day it stopped, and she died.

A written defence was put in by the prisoner, and read as follows:

"To the Right Honourable the Lord-Mayor, and the Honourable Judges of the Sessions.

"The petition of Micheal Carney, the prisoner at the bar.

"Most humbly sheweth - That your petitioner standing indicted for the wilful murder of his wife, and being deprived of the means of seeing Counsel, by the prosecutor (petitioner's father-in-law) having purloined and embezzled his property fince his confinement, has thus ventured to submit his case for your Lordship's consideration, with a full hope of justice being done him. That petitioner is a journeyman soap-maker, and upon his return home from employment in the country in August last, to pay his rent, a trifling dispute had arisen between him and his wife, respecting her not having his dinner ready in due time, to meet his master by appointment, which had brought on some blows on both sides; and the affray having come to the prosecutor's knowledge, he, with three or four men, came to petitioner's house, and demanded entrance, which being granted, petitioner was struck down, his cloaths rent, and he was carried to prison for an assault on his wife, where, after remaining sometime, the prosecutor and petitioner's

daughter came to him, and caused the warrant to be discharged, on giving them seven shillings, whereupon the petitioner went to his family, and reconciled all differences, after giving them some pecumary assistance. That soon after petitioner set off for his employment in the country, in friendship with them. That soon after he arrived there, the Excise caused a feizure to be made on his master's effects; and least the offence attached to petitioner, he abandoned the premises, and retired to a public-house in the neighbourhood, and was apprehended soon after, and brought to the public-office, Worship street, for the offence with which he is now charged. That a body of witnesses appeared against him: Mary Myers deposed that petitioner knocked his wife down; she heard the fall, but did not see the blow; she saw a flat candlestick in or near the deceased's body. On her second examination said, she deceased told her she had fallen on it. Mrs. Turnbull heard a noise only. The prosecutor (deceased's father) saw the abuse, but said, she had a consumption for twenty years. Dr. Smith's assistant, who attended the deceased, said, she spit no blood, but spit phlegm and corruption; heard nothing said of the candlestick, or disrespectful of petitioner by his wife. A number of low prejudiced witnesses will appear. Surgeon Evans , who opened the body, saw no marks of violence to cause death; her lungs were quite decayed and ulcerated, and appeared to have been of long standing. Dr. Smith deposed, that no violence caused her immediate death; it might perhaps, in some manner, hasten her death; her heart was a little drawn, occasioned by a disturbed mind; blows could not have caused ulcers on the lungs, without a force on her lungs; a small black spot, skin deep, appeared on her side; she died of a natural consumption, of many years standing.

"Such were the examinations before the Magistrate. Your petitioner further states to your Lordships, that the prosecutor gave out that petitioner absconded from justice in the country, and abused his wife after the warrant had been discharged: petitioner had no opportunity to abuse her, and his elopement was from a fear of being taken by the Excise, and he heard nothing of his wife's death till he was apprehended. That he was married to his wife fourteen years, by whom he had several children, five of whom are now living under the age of twelve years, whose dependence for support and maintenance rests on your petitioner, who always paid due attention to his family, and whose utter destruction he could not premeditate. The unhappy affair originated in a mere trisle, without any wicked intent, whatever may be given in evidence, before your Lordships, against their

"Most humble supplicant,

" MICHAEL CARNEY ."

The prisoner called William Bentley , an Excife-officer, who stated, he had known the prisoner a number of years, and was in the habit of seeing his wife about once a year, and who never stated to him her husband's ill-treatment at either of those times.

Court. (To Belk.) Q. Did you see your daughter frequently before this happened? - A. Yes.

Q. Had she been at any time ill, or did she complain of any disorder? - A. No.

Q. Had she any thing asthmatical about her? - A. When she had a cold - may be once or twice a year she might have a cold, but she was quite a hearty chearful woman.

Q. (To Mrs. Myers.) Were you in the habit of knowing the deceased? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether she was complaining, or not, before this happened? - A. No, I never heard her; and, in short, she could work faster than I could, and she was obliged to wash every day, or every other day, for her children and herself, to keep neat and clean; she was a very bustling woman; in short, I never heard her cough till after the blows.

GUILTY , Death .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030914-91

680. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for forging, on the 21st of July , a certain receipt for money, to wit, the sum of 3l. 12s. 5 1/4d. with intent to defraud Joseph Smith , Esq . agent for the out-pensioners of Chelsea-hospital .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing as true a like forged receipt, knowing it to be forged with the like intention.

And in several other Counts for the like offences, varying the manner of charging them.(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

WILLIAM PLASTED sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are pay-clerk in the office of Mr. Smith? - A. I am; he is agent to pay the out-pensioners of Chelsea-hospital.

Q. Had you upon your books a pensioner of the name of Thomas Heasty ? - A. Yes, of the 78th regiment.

Q. At what time would he have been entitled to the payment of any money from the hospital? - A. On the 25th of June; they are paid a half-yearly advance to the 25th of December, but his regiment would not have been paid till the 21st of July.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your Office upon any occasion? - A. Yes, perfectly; but before that, a woman, saying she was Mrs. Heasty, had come for a blank receipt; it is a custom to grant blank receipts when a man is incapable of coming himself: On the 16th of July, I received a letter, signed by Mr. Morgan, saying that this man had been dead a month; I therefore

provided an officer in case the woman should come to receive the money on the 21st of July, but she did not come, the prisoner at the bar came; I said to him, I don't think this is Heasty's writing; he said, yes, it is; I said, how do you know; he said, I saw him write it; I asked him how long since, and he said about a week or ten days; I then had him taken into custody. The receipt was filled up by one of my clerks before it was given to the woman; he is not here, but I can swear to his hand-writing; no person but myself or my clerks can get possession of them.

Q. Is that the receipt that was brought to you by the prisoner? - (Shewing it to him.) - A. Yes; I put my initials upon it; the name has evidently been penciled, and written over afterwards; this is not like his hand-writing; I never saw him write, but I have seen his writing; when a man is able to come himself the receipt is in a receipt book.

THOMAS MORGAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You were one of the overseers of St. Bride's in July last? - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember a man of the name of Thomas Heasty being in your workhouse? - A. Yes, very well; I understood he was an outpensioner, and received his pension half-yearly; I have seen him write; this is not like his handwriting; this is Hasty, and he spelt his name Heasty.

SAMUEL KING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const.

Q. What are you? - A. Master of St. Bride's workhouse; Thomas Heasty died in our workhouse on the 15th of June; he told me himself that he was an out-pensioner of Chelsea Hospital - (The receipt read.)

Prisoner's defence. The night before I went to that gentleman's office, I met Mrs. Heasty in Shoe-lane, and she asked me to fetch the money for her; she told me she would give me a new shirt for my trouble.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-92

681. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , a silver watch, value 3l. a seven-shilling piece, three shillings, and a farthing, the property of Thomas Smith , privily from his person .

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - On the 21st of August, about ten o'clock at night, I was going home to my lodgings in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square; I was quite sober; the prisoner came up to me, and walked up the Haymarket with me; she asked me to give her something to drink; I told her I would not, I did not want any thing with her; she followed me very close, and put her arm round my body, and when I got to the top of the Haymarket, I felt my watch drawing out of my pocket; I immediately caught hold of her hand with my watch in it; I then found my breeches-pocket unbuttoned, and my money gone; I missed a seven-shilling piece, three shillings, and a bad farthing, which I can swear to; it is a very particular one; the constable found it upon her; I never found the seven-shilling piece or the silver.

( George Donaldson , a constable, produced a bad farthing, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I never saw his money; he used me very ill because I told him I could not take him home with me; it was me that called the watchman.

Q. (To Smith.) Did you offer to go home with her? - A. No, I am not a man of that description.

GUILTY, aged 37,

Of stealing the goods, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blane.

Reference Number: t18030914-93

682. GEORGE CLARKE , THOMAS-WILLIAM STOPER , JAMES COOK , - WILLIAM JAMES WHITE , and MARY BRENNARD , were indicted, the first three for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Powell , about the hour of twelve o'clock in the night of the 23d of July , and stealing a silver watch, value 2l. a great coat, value 10s. a cloth coat, value 10s. a pair of breeches, value 10s. and a waistcoat, value 5s. the property of Charles Cathcart ; a shirt, value 1s. two shifts, value 2s. 6d. two aprons, value 1s. 6d. and a gown, value 1s. the property of the said Thomas Powell ; and the other prisoner for receiving the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

CHARLES CATHCART sworn. - I live in Lambeth-walk : On the 24th of July last I lost a silver watch, a great coat, a close-bodied coat, a waistcoat, and a pair of breeches, from the room where I slept.

Q. Whose house do you live in? - A. Mr. Thomas Powell's, I am his servant; I saw them on Saturday night the 23d when I went to bed, about a quarter before twelve o'clock; I got up in the morning about seven.

Q. In what parish is your master's house? - A. St. Mary , Lambeth.

Q. Are you sure of it? - A. No, I am not; when I rose in the morning, I missed all my things.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. James Cook slept with me, and he was in bed when I awoke.

Q. Do you know any thing of the other prisoners? - A. Yes, Stoper; I never saw the other two

before; Stoper and Cook worked in my master's shop.

Q. How far is that from the house? - A. The shop is underneath the floor that I slept in.

Q. Did Stoper lodge there? - A. No, he had slept with me two or three nights before.

Q. When did Cook get up? - A. He got up when I did, and said he had lost his wages out of his pocket; I and Mr. Powell and Cook went down Lambeth-walk; I left them at the public-house, and went to my brother's, and when I came back, Cook had left Mr. Powell; I came back in about a quarter of an hour; Mr. Powell desired me to go with him over the water; he suspected Cook; we went as far as Fleet-market, and saw Stoper, White, and Clark.

Q. What time in the morning was it? - A. About eleven o'clock I take it.

Q. Did you shew yourself to them? - A. No, we kept behind them at some distance, and by following them we found the property; I did not see Cook till I got to a public-house in Golden-lane.

Q. You did not see them go into the public-house in Golden-lane? - A. No, my master saw them go in; I followed him; I was at some distance behind; I followed my master into the Angel and Porter, and found Cook and White there.

Q. You did not find Clark and Stoper there? - A. No; Clark then came in, and while the constable was searching him, Stoper came in.

Q. Had they any thing with them? - A. Not that I saw; the constable found my watch upon Stoper.

Q. Did you see that? - A. Yes; they were then taken to Clerkenwell Bridewell; I saw all the things after; they were found at Mrs. Munday's, in Golden-lane.

Q. At a public-house or private house? - A. It is a chandler's-shop; they were in a cradle.

Q. Did any of the prisoners lodge at that place? - A. No; it seemed to be a lodging-house.

Q. Look at the female prisoner? - A. She was in the room; she asked Stoper for the money that the things were sold for; I heard Stoper say, she was not in the room at the time the things were bought.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat, Counsel for Stoper Q. This transaction was in Surrey, was it not? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. The place in which the goods were found is in Middlesex? - A. Yes.

THOMAS POWELL sworn. - I am the master of the last witness; in the morning of the 24th of June, I went up stairs, and saw Cook and Cathcart asleep in bed; my wife missed a gown, and then I waked the apprentice, and he immediately missed his watch; then he awaked the others, and upon looking about he missed the other things; Cook then said, I hope they have not taken my wages; I said, your coat is lying on the stairs, there was no money in it at all; I had paid him his wages the evening before; I told him I was sorry for it, and lent him a shilling; I told him I would give him a glass of gin, and I went up to the public-house; we parted there; I told him, if he heard any thing of it to let me know; it struck me that he must know something about it, and I went in pursuit after him, with Cathcart, the apprentice; I went to his lodgings in Blackfriars-road, but he was not there; then I went to Fleet-market, and when I got upon Snow-hill I saw Stoper going on first, and Clark and White going on behind him about twenty yards distance; then I followed them all three to Golden-lane; they had no bundle with them till then; I saw the bundle pass into two of their hands, Stoper and Clark; they went on, I could not go along with them, because one of them knew me; I went into the public-house, and found the other two, White and Clark; I had seen them go in; I asked them where the property was; they said, they knew nothing at all about it; I told them they must go and look after it; then the constable came in; I gave them in charge, while I went out to look after the others by myself; I met Clark coming along, and he said he had been to carry a bundle for a boy, but he thought no harm; I then took hold of him, carried him to the public-house, and told him he had better tell me where the things were, it would be a deal the best for him; he was going to shew me the house, when I met Stoper coming along with the watch in his pocket; he told me it was a corner house; I took Stoper into the public house, searched him, and found a silver watch and some money upon him; the constable has the money; I don't know how much it is; I asked Stoper where he had sold the things; he said he did not know; I told him I would pardon him if he would shew me; I went into the room, and found the things in the cradle; the woman that bought them ran away; he shewed me the cradle; I believe the woman is innocent.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. You made ample promises to Stoper? - A. Yes; I told him I would do all in my power to forgive him, if he would shew me where the things were.

JOHN DOWNES sworn. - I am a constable: On the 24th of July I was sent for to a public-house in Golden-lane, where I found Powell and Paint-house sitting in a box, with Cook, White, and Garlett, who has escaped; I searched Cook and Garlett, but found nothing; Powell said there were two more who had a bundle between them, and he could find them if they were near at hand; he went out, and brought Clarke in first; then he went out again, and brought in Stoper; Clarke had two shillings and a pocket-book: I searched Stoper, and found the watch and 1l. 14s. 6d. in

three seven shilling pieces, ten shillings, two sixpences, and half a crown; Stoper went with us to shew us where the things were in Ball-yard, Golden-lane.(Edward Tring confirmed the testimony of the last witness.)(The property produced and identified.)

Stoper. I have nothing to say for myself.

Clarke's defence. I know nothing of it; I met with this lad and White as I was going to Shoreditch.

Cook's defence. After I had left the prosecutor's on Sunday morning, I came home to my lodgings; I met with Garland, who asked me if I would go over the water with him; we went up Long-lane, and these overtook us just by Golden-lane, where we went into a public-house, and had some beer.

White's defence. We met Garland and this young man, and went to have a pot of beer, when that man gave charge of us; I am innocent of it.

Brennard's defence. I know nothing of it, or whether they were bought or stole.

Catbcart. Stoper said, she was not in the room when the things were bought.

Stoper called one, Cook one, and Brennard three witnesses, who gave them good characters.

Stoper, GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing goods, value 39s .

Transported for seven years .

Clarke, NOT GUILTY .

White, NOT GUILTY .

Cook, NOT GUILTY .

Brennard, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-94

683. EDWARD-BELLINGHAM KENNER and CHARLES M'GORE were indicted for making an assault on the King's highway, on the 1st of July , upon Thomas Scott , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a Bank-note, value 10l. the property of the said Thomas .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-95

684. ROBERT HUMMERSTON and THOMAS HUMMERSTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July, a brown gelding, value 40l. the property of Joseph Weston .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOSEPH WESTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. At Biggleswade, in Bedfordshire.

Q. On the 17th of July were you in possession of a gelding? - A. Yes, I kept him in a paddock in the town of Biggleswade ; I missed him on the 18th in the morning; the gate was thrown off the hooks, and the horse gone; it has been since shewn to me by some Police officers; it is my horse; it was worth 40l. or more.

PHILIP LAY sworn. - I am a farrier, in Sun-Tavern-fields: On the 23d of August, I saw the prisoner, Robert Hummerstone , on a bay mare, and another man behind him; I cannot say who he was; the prisoner, Robert, came up to me, and asked me how I did; I knew him before, he had lived servant with Mr. Ashfield, the attorney, for two or three years; I said, I thought you had been gone to sea; he said, I have been along with my brother ever since I left Mr. Ashfield; I understood it was a brother who kept the King's Arms at Colnbrooke, whom I had frequently called upon; he said, what your old mare has got killed; what have you got now; I said, I have got a poney; he said, I have got a famous one that will suit you: I said, whereabout will the figure be; he said, under twenty; I asked him when I could see him, and he told me the next morning at seven o'clock; the next morning the two prisoners came to me, between eight and nine o'clock; the prisoner, Robert, came upon the horse, and Thomas upon the mare that I had seen the day before; Robert said, here is a horse that will suit you, worth 50l. I said, not him up; he trotted him, and I observed there was something the matter with his loins; I then rode him myself about a hundred yards, and coming back, he said, go along, let him go; I rode him further on till I saw Mr. Camphor and another gentleman standing talking together; I did not bid for it at all; I had no other conversation with them; I was not present when they were taken up; Mr. Camphor rode the brown gelding about two hundred yards or more, and said, he was very heavy in hand; in consequence of suspicion, the two prisoners were immediately taken into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This was in the middle of the day? - A. Between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. How near to the Office? - A. A hundred and fifty or two hundred yards.

WILLIAM CAMPHOR sworn. - I saw the two prisoners with Mr. Lay on the 24th of August; I rode the brown gelding to give my opinion of it to Mr. Lay; I asked the prisoner, Robert, how he came by it, for the price he asked for it gave me a suspicion that he did not come honestly by it; he first said, he bought it of a Parson in Berkshire; that he had swapped a poney for it, and given a considerable sum of money besides, but he could afford to sell it cheap; I asked him where he was to be found if the horse should be owned; upon which he rode away, and declined answering; he came back again in the space of four or five minutes; we had got the officers, and took them into custody. The prisoner, Robert, was upon

the mare, and Thomas was in the act of mounting the horse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. After you communicated your suspicion that it was not honestly come by, the prisoner returned to the very spot? - A. Yes.

JOHN MILES Sworn . - I am a timber-merchant in Sun Tavern-fields; I saw the prisoner, Robert, come up on the mare; he said he had swapped it with a clergyman, or parson, in Berkshire, for a poney, and given a great deal of money to boot; I did not hear him ask any thing for it.

JOHN RILEY Sworn . - I am an officer; I took the prisoners in custody; the horse has been shewn to Mr. Weston; it is here.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

For the prisoners.

JAMES BYFIELD Sworn. - I am clerk of the market, (produces the toll-book, from which the following entry was read:) - " John Mott , of Old-street, Brompton, sells William Dunn , of Chelsea, carver and gilder, - voucher, Thomas Hummerston of Oakingham, Berks, - buyer, a brown horse, fifteen hands, off fore-leg white, bald face, aged seven years, warranted found, 281." I recollect writing the entry, but I have no recollection of the persons; I did not see the horse.

WILLIAM CURTIS Sworn . - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoners? - A. Yes: On the 5th of last month I was going through Smithfield into St. John's-street, and saw Thomas Hummerston with a horse; he agreed for it; he went into a public-house, and I saw him pay a man 28l. for it; I did not know the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. A labouring man; I live at Colnbrooke; I have worked for Mr. Batt, a farmer at Drayton, about two miles from Colnbrooke, about five weeks; I worked at the time this happened for Mr. Spedding, in Budge-row, who keeps the Mines Royal Copper Warehouse.

Q. How long have you known Thomas Hummerlton? - A. Ever since I was a little boy.

Q. Where has he lived lately? - A. I do not know; he has lived at Colnbrooke, but I cannot say how long; I had not seen him before I saw him in Smithfield for pretty near a twelvemonth; he kept the King's Arms at Colnbrooke; he has left it better than two years; I do not know where he has lived since.

Q. You did not know the parties dealing for this horse? - A. No.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. About three o'clock; I was going from Budge-row with a letter to St. John's-street.

Q. How long did you stop with your old friend in the market? - A. Not more than ten minutes; I left my place in Budge-row that day week; I wanted to go into the country, and I was going to send a letter to my friends.

Q. How do you know it was the 5th of August? - A. It was on a Friday, and the date was upon the letter.

Q. When was it you were desired to come here? - A. One day last week; Mr. Hummerston's brother sent me a letter; it came to my father at Colnbrooke.

Q. Have you ever given evidence here before for any body charged with horse-stealing? - A. No, never.

Q. Were you not in this Court when Snowden was tried for horse-stealing? - A. No, I never was here before in my life.

Q. How many persons were dealing about this horse? - A. Mr. Hummerston and the man.

Q. There was no third person with them? - A. No.

Q. Did he ask you to go into the public-house with him? - A. Yes; he asked me to go in, and have something to drink, and I saw the book signed.

Q. Did any other person go in, besides you, Hummerston, and the seller of the horse? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Who told the clerk to make the entry? - A. Mr. Hummerston.

Q. Who described to the clerk the marks of the horse and the price? - A. Mr. Hummerston.

Q. Did he tell the clerk where he lived? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did the person who sold the horse say any thing to the clerk? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you hear the name of the seller? - A. No; he was a man about my size, a youngish man, and looked like a horse-dealer; we drank a pot of beer, and then we all parted together.

Q. Do you remember where you were the day before? - A. At work at my master's.

Q. Do you remember where you were the Friday afterwards? - A. I was in the country.

Q. What day did you go into the country? - A. On Saturday, in the very next week.

Q. Were you ever in Smithfield before? - A. Yes, thousands of times; I used to go to Mr. Cave's, in Smithfield, with goods.

Q. Did you not use to be frequently in Smithfield of a Friday? - A. No, not particularly.

Q. Are you not very fond of horses? - A. I know no more of a horse than a horse knows of me.

JOSEPH WALKER Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. I keep a public-house, the Cross Keys, Great Peter-street, Westminster; I know the prisoner, Thomas Hummerston, and I know his brother, William; he keeps a chandler's shop in St. Ann's-lane: On Monday, the 18th of July, Mr. Thomas Hummerston , along with a party, came to my house to spend the evening, between eight and nine o'clock

to the best of my knowledge; he stopped with them till twelve o'clock; there was a gentleman out of the country, his brother William, and a neighbour, Samuel Burman ; I had seen Thomas Hummerston about eleven o'clock on the forenoon of the same day, the 18th, at Mr. William Barker 's house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known Thomas Hummerston? - A. I suppose about a month before that, not longer.

Q. Where does he live? - A. I do not rightly know; I have heard him say he lived in the country, but I forget where; he is a smith and a farrier.

Q. How lately were you subpoenaed to come here? - A. On Saturday last, I think; I went to the attorney's, and was examined on Sunday morning.

Q. What makes you remember it was the 18th of July? - A. Because William Hummerston said to his friends, "Gentlemen, I have bought a nice goose; I shall have you to sup with me to-morrow, the 19th, it is my wedding evening.( Samuel Burman confirmed the evidence of the last witness.)

SARAH HACKSHAM Sworn. - I lodge in St. Ann's-lane, Westminster, at William Hummerston 's; I assisted in cooking the wedding supper, on Tuesday, the 19th of July; the prisoner, Thomas Hummerston , was there: On the Sunday before, I went down stairs between nine and ten o'clock at night for a candle, and saw Thomas Hummerston going up to-bed; he wished me a good night; I saw him there on the Monday and Tuesday several times in the day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known Thomas Hummerston ? - A. About a twelvemonth; I have known William from a child; I have lived in the same house with him two years.

Q. Is Thomas Hummerston frequently in town? - A. Yes, backwards and forwards; he slept there every time he was in town.

Q. He was a good deal in town? - A. Yes.

Q. What was his business? - A. I cannot pretend to say; he was no acquaintance of mine, only as a lodger.

Q. Did you ever hear where he lived? - A. No.

Q. Nor his business? - A. No.

Q. How long ago did he first lodge with his brother? - A. I do not know, it might be nine or ten months; he slept there almost every night, and I generally saw him when he was going to-bed.

Q. From the month of March last? - A. It might be thereabout.

Q. It is only the wedding-day that impresses the time upon your memory? - A. Yes, I know from another reason: my son's birth-day was on the 18th, and Mr. Hummerston's wedding-day on the 19th.

WILLIAM HUMMERSTON Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the prisoner's brother? - A. Yes; I live at No.3, St. Ann's-street, Westminster, it used to go by the name of St. Ann's-lane: On the 18th of July, in the evening, I was in company with my brother at Mr. Walker's; I had breakfasted with him in the morning, and had seen him in the afternoon, and he was in my company the greater part of the Sunday evening, and slept in my house that night; my weddingday was the 19th, and he supped with me that evening.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did your brother lodge with you at that time? - A. He has lodged at my house a great number of times; he was at my house a long while; it might be two months, or three months, I cannot say exactly, till he was taken up; he would sleep three or four nights, or a week together, at my house, and then he would sleep at my brother John's for one night.

Q. What is his business? - A. A farrier.

Q. Did he carry on his business at your house, or his brother John's? - A. No; his wife died at or near Oakingham, and soon after he buried her, he sold the lease of his house.

Q. That was in March or April, was it not? - A. It is impossible for me to say.

Q. How long had he sold the lease of the house before your wedding-day? - A. I cannot say; it might be about two months.

Q. Had he any other residence than your house, and your brother's? - A. No.

Q.(To Mr. Weston.) At what time in the evening of Sunday had you seen your horse in the paddock? - A. About seven o'clock; I missed it in the morning between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. How far is Biggleswade from London? - A. The forty-five mile stone stands against the gate.

Q. Was this a good horse? - A. Yes.

Q. In how many hours might a person come to town upon this horse? - A. If they rode it hard, I should think, about five hours.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-96

685. ROBERT HUMMERSTON and THOMAS HUMMERSTON were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , a bay mare, value 20l. the property of Henry Franklin .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

HENRY FRANKLIN Sworn . - I am a riding officer of the Customs , at Folkstone, in Kent : On the 16th of August, in the evening, I turned out my mare into a meadow, and missed her the next morning between seven and eight o'clock; she has been shewn to me since by Mr. Riley, the Police-officer; she was worth twenty pounds.

PHILIP LAY Sworn. - I am a farrier, in Sun-Ta

vern-fields, Ratcliff highway: On the 23d of August, the prisoner, Robert, came to my house, with another person behind him, upon a hay mare, I do not know who that person was; the prisoner said, I hear your old mare has got killed, and told me he could suit me under twenty pounds, and from that to seven guineas; the next day he came again, upon a horse, and the prisoner, Thomas, upon a mare, the same mare I had seen the day-before; the horse being offered under price gave suspicion, and they were both taken into custody. I delivered the mare to Riley, the officer.

JOHN RILEY Sworn . - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell-office: I shewed the mare to Mr. Franklin, and he claimed it.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

For the prisoner.

JOHN STEVENSON Sworn. - I live at No.7, Gray's-Inn-lane, I am a carver and gilder: I was in Smithfield Market on the 19th of August, and saw the prisoner, Robert, whom I knew perfectly well, buying a mare of a man who said his name was John Smith , and lived at Brentford; he bought her with saddle and bridle, it was a hay mare, her knees had been broke, there was a lump of flesh upon the knee but it was well; he gave seventeen guineas for it, they asked me to witness the receipt, and I put my mark to it.

Q. Look at that receipt? - A. That is the mark I put to it; the room was full of people at the time.

(The witness was desired to go into the Sessions-house yard and look at the mare - upon his return, he said it was the same.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known the prisoner, Robert? - A. Nearly five years; he has got his living by horse-dealing for the last two years.

Q. What was he before that? - A. I do not rightly know; he was a servant, and lived with me; he was recommended to me by one Barnard.

Q. Do you know where he lives? - A. No.

Q. Has he had any fixed residence lately? - A. I do not know.

Q. How do you know it was the 19th of August? - A. By the orders I had to execute that day: I was then going to Bartholomew-close, to Mr. Robinson's a joiner.

Q. When were you subpoenaed? - A. Last Monday week.

Q. You were told what you were subpoenaed for? No; it was sent to me.

Q. How came you to find out what you were subpoenaed for? - A. Because they called upon me afterwards.

Q. How long have you lived in Gray's-Inn-lane? - A. About a year and a half.

JOHN HUMMERSTON Sworn. - I am the brother of the prisoners; I live at No.3, Market-street, Westminster: On the 15th of August, the day before the Duke of York's birth-day, my brother, Thomas, came to my house between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, supped and slept at my house; he breakfasted with us the next morning, went away about nine o'clock, and returned between three and four in the afternoon. I came home from my work earlier than usual, and went with him that evening to Astley's, and when it was over he came home with me, and slept at my house; we had agreed to go on the Duke of York's birth-night, because Bonaparte's invasion was to be acted that night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. A carpenter and joiner.

Q. Where was your brother Robert at the time you are speaking of? - A. I do not know.

Q. What is he? - A. He has followed horsedealing; Thomas is a farrier.

Q. Where does your brother Thomas carry on business? - A. He has not carried on business any where since he left his house.

Q. Does he carry on horse-dealing too? - A. Yes.

Q. Where has he lived lately? - Q. At my house, and my brother's.

Q. Can you tell me where he was on any one day besides the day you come to speak to? - A. I cannot positively say. Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030914-97

686. JOHN WRAGG was indicted for feloniously shooting at Sarah Box , on the 23d of May , with intent to kill her, the said Sarah .

SARAH FOX Sworn. - I am servant to Sir Ralph Woodford , No. 42, Upper Seymour-street ; the prisoner was butler : On the 23d of May I went home, and my mother with me, about ten o'clock; we were in the kitchen, with two maids and Mrs. Earl, about twelve o'clock, when the prisoner came in with three pistols in his hand; he told us to stand fair and clear; then he pointed one of them at me, which flashed in the pan; he put it down, and took up another, which he fired, and the bullet went through my shoulder; I tried to get away before that, but could not, because he kept turning to me, and pointed the pistol at me, let me go which way I would; when he shot me, I sell down directly, and don't recollect any thing more.

Q. Had you had any quarrel with him? - A. No; we had lived together two years and an half.

Q. Was he sober? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any reason to think he would treat you so? - A. No; he threatened to do it once, about a fortnight before, and brought two pistols in a pair of boots.

Q. Had you reason to suppose he was at all out of his mind? - A. No, he was not out of his mind.

Q. Had any thing passed between you, to in

duce you to suppose he meant to do youany harm? - A. No; he had behaved rude several times to me.

Q. Is he a singleman? - A. He had a wife, but she is dead.

Q. Had he ever paid his addresses to you? - A. No.

Q. By behaving rude, do you mean pulling you about? - A. Yes; he behaved very indecent several times.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had he never asked you to marry him? - A. No.

Q. Was it not the subject of conversation among all your fellow-servants? - A. No.

Q. Is Mary Roberts the name of one of the servants? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you no conversation with Mary Roberts about the attachment he had for you? - A. No.

Q. Did she never speak to you about marrying him? - A. No.

Q. Did she not tell you she had a conversation in the pantry with him, from which it appeared he was out of his mind? - A. No.

ELIZABETH EARL Sworn. - Q. Are you related to Sarah Fox ? - A. No; her mother lodged with me; the girl came to her, to complain of the prisoner having threatened to shoot her, and behaved improperly to her, and of what he had attempted; I said, it was proper she should come away; her mother asked me to go with them to her place, which I did; when we went it was ten o'clock at night; I asked the cook and house-maid how it was; they said, they could not tell, but he behaved very indifferent; I asked, did he court her; they said, they did not know, but he was a very comical fellow, and had attempted her life, and wished her mother and I to talk to him; the prisoner was not at home when we went, but came home about half an hour after; her mother and I went into the pantry to him with the girl; I asked him what he meant by using the girl ill, and whether he wished to have her for his wife; he said, no, he did not; I said, how could you use her so, as to conceal two pistols in a pair of boots, and say, if she did not put her hand to a paper, you would blow her brains out, and locked her in till she did put her hand to it from fear; he said, he did take the two pistols, and that there was one for her and one for him; I asked him, how he could use any body in such a barbarous manner; he said, he would not talk to me, but to her mother, upon which I came out.

Q. Was he sober? - A. He was sober to all appearance; I told the cook, I did not like his behaviour, and should be glad if she would let the girl go home with us, as Sir Ralph was not at home, and there were only two women servants in the house; she at last consented, and I had hardly said, come, let us go, because it is late, when the prisoner came in with three pistols; he stopped, and said, now I'll let you see what a man dare do who is destitute in his mind; the girl's mother got up and ran away; he advanced to the girl, and the house-maid ran away; the girl ran behind the cook and me, and screamed and begged of him not to kill her; the cook covered her head, and then he pointed a pistol at her, which flashed in the pan; the cook then ran away, and none but the prisoner, the girl, and me were left. I took up one of the wooden-bottom chairs, and told him I would not run away, for then he would surely murder her; I begged for God Almighty's take he would not kill her, for we would settle it any way; he bid me take care of myself; I told him there was no fear, and as I came to defend the girl, I would stand by her; he shuffled about till he got the pistol between the spokes of the chair and my arm, when he shot her, and she fell down behind me; she was no sooner down but she jumped up again, and ran up stairs; I being a stranger to the house, did not know which way to run; he discharged the third pistol, and I thought he pointed it at his own head, but it did not take place, nor do I know where the ball went to. I never saw the prisoner before that time, therefore do not know the state of his mind.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know what became of the prisoner, and whether he did not attempt to cut his own throat? - A. He did, but I did not see him.

SARAH ADAMS Sworn. - (Consirmed the testimony of the last witness as to the prisoner coming into the kitchen with the pistols, upon which she ran away.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner appeared quite insensible, did he not? - A. Yes, he seemed very much distressed.

Q. Did he not make some attempt to cut his throat? - A. Yes, and he must have cut it, for the blood was running down him; I did not see him do it.

Q. Had it not been before observed that his conduct seemed very strange? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you observed in former times that he was a man very humane and kind in his conduct? - A. Yes, he was.

Q. Did he not appear latterly to be beside himself? - A. Yes; he went very dirty, and seemed very distressed for about a fortnight; nor did he do his business as he used to do.

WILLIAM CHESTERMAN Sworn. - I am a milkman: On the 23d of May I was coming from Kensington Gravel-pits, when I heard a rattle spring, and murder called; I went to the door of Sir Ralph Woodford 's house, which was open, and heard a piece of work; nobody offered to go in, and I said to the watchman, d-n it, follow me; I met Mrs. Earl at the parlour door, who said, for God's take come in, here is murder; I ran a few steps down the kitchen stairs, and saw

the prisoner coming out of the kitchen with a pistol in his hand; I then jumped down upon him, and caught the pistol; three more pistols were picked up, which were found in different places; in the bustle they were all brought together, but I found one of them was loaded with powder and ball; we had three terrible falls, and we dropped the pistol; my toe was in between the door and door-post, to prevent his shutting it, which, when he found he could not do, he said, you don't want to hurt me, I'll let you in; some other people came down, and pushed me into the kitchen; upon which I seized him, and found he had cut his throat; when we took him, he said, he had told them something satal would happen.( Nicholas Porter consirmed the testimony of the last witness.)

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I am entirely ignorant of the affair I am indicted for.

Sir RALPH WOODFORD Sworn. - The prisoner lived in my service twelve years, and had conducted himself perfectly well; within the last two or three years he has appeared at times very confused, and for about a month before I observed several times that he seemed to be deranged in his mind, but did not know what to attribute it to.

RALPH-JAMES WOODFORD , Esq Sworn. - I am son to Sir Ralph; I returned from abroad about twelve months ago, and observed a considerable change in the prisoner's conduct; he was extremely negligent of himself and his business, and did not attend with that assiduity he was accustomed to, and for which he had been particularly remarked by every body who knew him; his mind certainly was impaired; he has been remiss in his behaviour also to his three children, which I have spoke to him about, but he seemed to be quite lost to it, though the former part of his life was humane and attentive.

JOHN EMMETT Sworn. - I was fellow-servant with the prisoner at Sir Ralph's for ten years, and I observed that for the last two or three months before this happened, his mind seemed much impaired and bewildered; before that time he was perfectly steady and humane in his behaviour.

JAMES DIXON Sworn. - I am a poulterer, and have known the prisoner five years; I observed a change for the worse latterly, and that he appeared to be deranged; I made the observation to other people, who have agreed with me.

WILLIAM HANSON Sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Kirby: On the 6th of June last, which was the first day of the Sessions, we were obliged to handcuff the prisoner, to prevent his beating himself to pieces; he beat his head against the floor that we thought he would kill himself; he has been so at different times since; sometimes he is very well to talk to, and at other times quite slighty.

THOMAS RAWLINS Sworn. - I have had the care of lunatics for a number of years, and have known the prisoner five or six years; I used to say to Mr. Dixon, there was an alteration in the prisoner a month or six weeks before the accident; I said he was mad, for he had every appearance of it.

NOT GUILTY.

Being insane at the time . Detained under the Act of Parliament .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham

Reference Number: t18030914-98

687. LEONARD WHITE , WILLIAM KITCHEN , EDWARD KAY EDWARDS , and WILLIAM CORTY alias SCHOFIELD , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of the honourable Richard Hussey , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 21st of July , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a silver tea-pot and stand, value 11l. 11s. a silver fish-trowel, value 3l. four silver spoons, value 3l. 13s. 6d. seventeen silver meat spoons, value 15l. twenty-three silver desert-spoons, value 11l. twelve silver tea-spoons, value 3l. 13s. 6d. two pair of silver tea-tongs, value 30s. a silver sugar-dish, value 6l. 6s. four silver salts, value 8l. 8s. six silver salt-spoons, value 21s. twenty-four silver forks, value 24l. a silver wine-funnel, value 2l. a silver milkpot, value 3l. 10s. a silver mustard-pot and spoon, value 2l. 17s. a silver pepper-box, value 13s. a silver skewer, value 35s. a pair of silver candlesticks, value 10l. 10s. and a pair of plated candlesticks, value 21s. the property of the said Richard Hussey . A gold ring, value 10s. six silver tea-spoons, value 29s. a silver tea caddy-spoon, value 4s. three two pound notes, two five pound notes, and 9l. 19s. 6d. in money, the property of Roger Langdale .

(The case was opened by Mr. Walson.

The Hon. RICHARD HUSSEY Sworn. - I live at Kensington Gravel-pits, in Kensington parish : On the 21st of July my house was robbed, my family were all in bed before twelve o'clock; the carpenters coming to work on the 22d discovered the house broke open. One of the back bow-windows in the back area was broken open; a ditch runs behind the garden which they got over, and broke through a door in a subterraneous passage, which goes into the area behind the house.

ROGER LANGDALE Sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hussey: On the 22d of July, about five o'clock, the carpenters alarmed us; I went down and saw the window was broke open, and all the doors left open at the back part of the house, the iron bar of the window was forced out; I had sastened the doors and windows myself, and can swear they were all secured safely. I went to the pantry and missed the things which I had seen the night before: I had lost three two pound notes, two five pound notes, nine guineas and a half in gold, a plain gold ring, half-a-dozen silver tea-spoons, a tea caddy-spoon, and a pair of plated tea-tongs, of my own; I alarm

ed the family, and immediately went to Bow-street. I learnt four men were taken up at Marlborough-street; I went there, and saw the four prisoners.

Q. Did you observe on the morning of the 22d any thing particular outside the house? - A. I observed foot marks without shoes, which I traced on the border of the garden going backwards and forwards towards the ditch.

JOHN HILLHAM Sworn. - I am a private watchman in Carnaby-market; I was on duty on the night of the 21st of July, and called a man up at three o'clock in Brown's-court to go to Smithfield-market; going back to my box I thought I saw three of the prisoners pass me, one of them had a bundle; the first was Corty, the next White, and the other Kitchen; when they saw me they seemed to start a little, and then walked very quick into the house to one Skully, in Munday's-court, adjoining Brown's-court, and shut the door after them; I went to the market to tell the watchman belonging to the parish; I looked back, and saw Skully looking after me in his shirt, with his body about half way out of the street-door they went in at; he then withdrew inside, and shut the door, and I informed the watchman; while he was gone for the patrol I concealed myself, so that I could see Skully's door. About half past four, Lovatt, Warren, and I, saw Corty and Edwards come out, and go up Marshall-street, as if they were going towards Broad-street; upon which Lovatt and his nephew took them into custody; I continued on the watch till six o'clock, when I observed White and Kitchen come out, and Lovatt and his nephew took them also into custody, in Broad-street, and they were taken before the Magistrate. I will swear the prisoners are the four men.

Mr. Knowlys. (Counsel for Edwards.) Q. Edwards was not one of the three you saw go in? - A. No.

Q. How long he had been in the house you cannot tell? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. It was quite light? - A. Yes; it had been light a good while.

Q. Can you say how long it had been day light before you saw four men go into Skully's house? - A. About half an hour; it might be about half past two o'clock when it was day-light, so that I could discern any thing.

RICE EVANS Sworn. - I am a patrol: On the night of the 21st of July, the last witness sent for me to watch, about twenty minutes before four; I went for Lovatt, who belongs to Marlborough-street, he came, and we all placed ourselves in such a situation, that we could see who went in or came out of Skully's house, and not be seen ourselves; in about half an hour we saw Schofield and Edwards come from Skully's, and they were taken to the watch-house, going along Schofield made his escape in Brewer-street, and holloaed out to the people not to stop him, for we were only after him for a bastard child; however, he was taken to the watch-house, and I saw no more.

RICHARD LOVATT Sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: On the night of the 21st of July, I was called up about half past three o'clock in the morning, and about a quarter past four, we saw Edwards and Corty come out of Skully's house; my nephew and I apprehended them, and took them to St. James's watch-house; and afterwards apprehended White and Kitchen. I searched Corty and Edwards as soon as I got them to the watch-house, and found a great number of Banknotes, and seven guineas, upon Corty; and about fourteen pounds in Bank small notes on Edwards; I was desired to take care of three of the brightest of the guineas. I searched the others, and found ten pounds on White, in two two-pound, and six one pound notes; and a twenty pound note on Kitchen, and a pair of wet dirty stockings in his pocket; I desired Hillham to take particular care of the house while I got a warrant to search it. About half past six o'clock I went and executed it, and found a lump of what I conceive to be silver, rather warm, on the top of a bureau in the parlour, and a great number of things in the jewellery and goldsmith line, which I took to the Magistrates, and a crucible. Skully is a jeweller, and keeps four or five men at work; he was not at home then, nor have I seen him since, though I searched diligently after him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. It is nothing uncommon to find melted silver in a jeweller's shop? - A. I should think not.

Q. As to the trinkets that were found, none were owned? - A. No.

Q. You found a twenty pound note on Kitchen, which was returned to him? - A. Yes; it was not owned, and I was ordered to return it.

Mr. Watson. (To Langdale.) Q. Look at those three bright guineas, - among the nine you lost, were there three such as those? - A. Yes; I had seven new, and two old guineas; three exactly corresponded with these.

Mr. Alley. Q. They are three common guineas, without any particular mark on them? - A. Yes.

The prisoners said they were innocent, and left their defence to their Counsel.

All NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-99

688. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , a silver watch, value 50s. a steal chain, value 6d. and a metal key, value 2d. the property of Thomas Crawley , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS CRAWLEY Sworn. - I am a baker , No. 11, Mansfield-street, Goodman's-fields : On

the 18th of August, about a quarter before six o'clock in the afternoon, I had seen my watch; about six o'clock I was coming out of the bake-house, and saw the prisoner run out of the parlour round the counter; I had left my wife in the parlour, which goes out of the shop, but she had stepped into the kitchen close by; I called out, but he never turned to make any answer; I pursued him up Swan-street into a court, which is no thoroughfare, and collared him; I opened his hand, and took out a seven-shilling piece, and twopence, which I cannot say was mine; the watch was found in about five minutes. (Produces the watch, and identifies it.)

WILLIAM EWER Sworn. - I was going past the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner go through the shop into the parlour, the parlour windows were open next the street, and I saw into the room; I saw him take something off the mantle-piece, and return instantly through the shop into the street; Mr. Crawley followed him, and I run with him.

CATHARINE MACKWAY Sworn. - I live in Chapman's-court; my little boy, not six years old, picked the watch up in the court, in a corner where the prisoner was taken.

Prisoner's defence. At the first hearing, before the Magistrate, she said she never saw me in the court; I saw some people running up the court, and I run with them; I am innocent of the robbery.

GUILTY, aged 20, Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030914-100

689. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a Banknote, value 10l. the property of John Marshall , in the dwelling-house of David Baillie .

There being nothing to affect the prisoner but her confession, extorted from her under promises of forgiveness, she was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-101

690. CHARLES BARTLETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a silver watch, value 3l. the property of Thomas Lee , in the dwelling-house of Stephen Cave .

THOMAS LEE Sworn. - I am a soldier belonging to the 2d battalion of the 3d regiment of Footguards , and lodge in Gloucester-place, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn , with Stephen Cave , a publican: On the 24th of August, I went out on duty about six o'clock, and left the watch in the cupboard near the bed-side, and my wife in bed; I returned home again between four and five o'clock, and missed my watch, which was afterwards found upon Finch, a fireman.

STEPHEN CAVE Sworn. - The prisoner and prosecutor lodged with me; On the 24th of August, the prosecutor's wife went out for a roll for her breakfast; and when she came back she missed the watch; we enquire who had been in the room, and found the prisoner had absconded without giving notice; we went down to Ship-yard, in Great Shire-lane, and enquired for him at his mother's; he was not there, but we watched for him, and apprehended him.

JOHN FINCH Sworn. - I live at No.3, Crown-court, Fleet-street, and am a fireman and waterman; I bought the watch of the prisoner at the Plough public-house, in Black Horse-court, Fleet-street; he said he had a watch to sell, - that he was going to sea, and wanted money; he asked a guinea and a half for it; I gave him thirty shillings; I had it in wear five or six days; the prosecutor and his landlord came to my house, and gave me a description of it, upon which I thewed it him, and the prisoner was apprechended.(The watch produced and identified.)

Prisoner. Finch says he gave me thirty shillings for it; he only gave me twenty-six; he knew it to be stolen, and asked me if I had stolen it; I said, I had; William Hollis , of Shoemaker-row, took me down to him to sell it, and he wanted me to get him two gold seals.

GUILTY, aged 23,

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-102

691. ISAAC JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , a gold seal, value 5s. and two silver watch keys, value 1s. the property of persons unknown .

JOHN SHRIMPTON Sworn. - On the 8th of August, about half past eleven in the morning, I was standing talking with a young woman in Oxford-road; she told me to look about, and see a Jew picking the countryman's pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner attempting to pull the countryman's watch out, he tried three times; several people were standing round, there having been a fire over night; the prisoner drew back about a quarter of a yard, put his hand in his left pocket, and pulled out a small pair of scissars; he went up to the countryman again, and cut the string that held the seals; the gold seal dropped on the ground, and the prisoner picked it up, and went off; I crossed the road, and took him by the collar; he said, if he had got any thing of the gentleman's, he would give it him, but he had nothing; I saw the seal up his sleeve, but he held his hand down, and dropped it in the mud; he was then taken into custody.( Charles Lewis , and John Underwood , confirmed the testimony of the last witness, and produced the ribbon.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it; I am a stranger here, and have no friends; I work hard for my living, and never did such a thing as I am charged with.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-103

692. JOHN WHITE and JOSEPH BYGRAVE were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Dallas , Esq . about the hour of five in the afternoon, on the 25th of August , John Smith and others being therein, and feloniously stealing one silver sugar-basket, value 20s. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 7s. a china bason, value 1s. twelve silver tea-spoons, value 20s. and a silver cream-pot, value 10s. the property of the said Robert .

WILLIAM MEADOWS Sworn. - I am a stonemason; I was at work next door to Mr. Dallas's: On the 25th of August, between ten and eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoners, and Whalley, loitering about backwards and forwards, and looking down the area of Mr. Dallas; I saw them again about five o'clock, and saw White go down the steps, the other two were against the railing that forms the square; White brought something up, but I cannot say what, and gave it to Bygrave; I made an alarm, and they ran away; I pursued them, and saw Bygrave throw his hand out, but whether he threw any thing from it, I could not tell; the servant got over the rails afterwards, and I saw him pick up a china bason, and a boy take up the silver basket, and give it to the servant; the boys escaped them, but I saw them the same evening come round to look for what they had thrown over the rails; I went to call one of the servants, and when we came up again, they were gone; they were taken the following Monday, and I know them to be the same lads.

JOHN SMITH Sworn. - I am butler to Mr. Robert Dallas : On the 25th of August I missed the things stated in the indictment; I had taken them out of the plate-chest at twelve o'clock.(The articles produced and identified.)

WILLIAM GRIGWELL Sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dallas, and took the bason cut of the Square, after it was thrown over; I found it on the border.

JOHN WHALLEY Sworn. - I am fifteen years of age, and knew the prisoners about a fortnight before the robbery: On the day the robbery was committed, White and Bygrave came to me, in Broad-street, Bloomsbury, and asked me if I would take a walk; I said, no; they asked me again, and I agreed to go; we went down Russel-street, and White went down a great many areas, but brought up nothing; we went along till we came to Mr. Dallas's, when White went down, and hoisted up the window; I saw him, for I set upon the steps at the same door, and Bygrave set upon the stones that goes round the rails; White came up to me, and bid me go down, and fetch, up the property; I did, and brought up the bason, with some spoons and a silver basket in it; Bygrave said, d-n you, give it to me, which I did; when we got to the corner of the square, somebody halloaed out, and he threw the bason over the rails; I got over into the garden, and they ran off towards Dyot-street; I met them again, in about five minutes, at a place called Rag-cattle, in Dyot-street; Bygrave put the spoons under his arm, in his coat, and took them to Mrs. Sherwood, in Bowl-yard, St. Giles's, who buys stolen property, as I have heard; she said she would not buy any thing before me; I went into the passage, leaving Bygrave with her; presently she called me in, and said, she had agreed to give Bygrave twenty-eight shillings for the spoons; he said to me he had not received all the money for them, and when she paid him the rest, he would give me the whole of my share, and gave me half-a-crown; on the Sunday night following, I was apprehended; we went by again in the evening, thinking to find the bason, but did not.

EDWARD CROCKER Sworn. - In consequence of information, I took the prisoners in Dyot-street, St. Giles's.(The basket, ladle, spoon, and bason, produced and identified.)

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence. White, GUILTY, aged 19,

Bygrave, GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing to the value of 20s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030914-104

693. FRANCIS THOMPSON was indicted for that he, on the 15th of August , did make an assault upon Melisa Willis , and her the said Melisa did ravish and carnally know against her will , against the form of the stature, &c.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-105

694. ROBERT PENN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , a gun, value 15l. the property of Joseph Sabine , Esq . in the dwelling-house of Henry Brown , Esq .

WILLIAM PARKER Sworn . - I am a gunmaker, in Holborn: On the 29th of August last, I sent two guns, by Thomas Fleming , to Mr. Brown's, No 20, Portland-place , belonging to Joseph Sabine, Esq. about four o'clock in the afternoon; in the evening of the same day, Mr. Brown's house-keeper called to ask me if I had sent a double-barrel gun; I said, I had.

THOMAS FLEMING Sworn. - I carried the guns from Mr. Parker's, to Mr. Brown's, No. 2, Port

land-place, and delivered them in the hall to the woman who took care of the house.

JANETT WESTBROOK Sworn. - I had the care of the house, and received two guns from the last witnes, about two hours afterwards, the prisoner came, and told my little boy, who opened the door to him, he came about two guns, one of which was left in mistake; I went into the hall myself, and he said he came from Mr. Parker, a gunsmith in Holborn, about a gun that belonged to Mr. Dorrington, in Devonshire-place, as that the man, who carried out the guns, had made a mistake, and placed Mr. Dorrington's gun with ours, and carried ours to Devonshire-place; he had untied the guns by the time I got into the hall; he then looked at one, and said, that was not the gun; he then looked at the other, and said, this is it, and took it away; I begged him to make haste with the other, for I should be uneasy till it came, as a cart was coming early in the morning to take them with other things into the country; I also asked him, why he had not brought our gun with him; he said, because our house was in his way, and he would call as he came back with it; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You thought the person to whom you gave the gun, was the person who brought it? - A. No, I did not; I delivered it in consequence of the pretence.

Q. Was it dusk? - A. No, quite day-light.

Q. Did you not say, you could not undertake to swear to the prisoner, and that you did not believe he was the man, but your boy should be sent for? - A. No, I did not; I was in hopes I should get the gun without.

Q. Did not the Magistrate say, that unless your son could say something more than you did, he must discharge him? - A. No, not in my presence; I did not like to swear to him, because his cloathes were different.

Q. Why were you desired to bring your son, of ten years old, to swear to him, if you had no doubt? - A. I was told it was necessary.

- WESTBROOK Sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Ten years old.

Q. Do you go to school? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a good or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. A bad thing; it is a public scandal in this world, and whoever swears false goes to the devil in the next.

Q. Are you the son of the last witness? - A. Yes; I was at home when the man came for the guns; I let him in, and saw him afterwards at Bow-street, and am sure the prisoner is the man; he asked me if there were not two guns left; I said, yes; he said, the man who brought them, had made a mistake, - that one was for Mr. Dorrington, of Devonshire-place; I stood sometime before I let him have it, and then my mother came up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were not sworn at Bow-street? - A. No.

Q. You then said, you did not know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you not asked whether you knew the prisoner, and did you not say, no? - A. I said I was not sure, because I was afraid he would be hanged.

Q. Your mother expected a good deal of anger for having lost the gun? - A. Yes.

Q. She often told you so? - A. Yes.

Q. When you left Bow-street, your mother told you that was the man who took the gun? - A. No.

Q. She has often told you so - has she not? - A. No.

Q. Though you knew it was a bad thing to tell a lie, you told a lie at Bow-street before the Justice - had you ever been before a Justice before? - A. No.

Q. When your mother spoke to you about this business, did she not tell you, if you should be asked here the reason you did not speak to the man when you were at Bow-street, to say, it was because you were afraid he would be hanged? - A. Yes.

Q. Then the fact is, you did not know the man when there, and only know him now in consequence of what your mother told you? - A. Yes.

Q. You know it is the man, in consequence of your mother telling you to say he is the man? - A. Yes.

Q. She has since told you he was the man, and you believe it? - A. Yes; I saw nothing but his face when he came in.

Q. Since you were at Bow-street, your mother told you it was the man? - A. Yes.

Q. And she told you the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You observed the face of the man who came for the guns? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner - are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever any doubt of it? - A. Yes.

Q. When? - A. I don't think I ever saw him before he came for the guns.

Q. How came you to say you were not sure he was the man at Bow-street? - A. I was afraid to say it, for fear he should be hanged.

Q. Had your mother told you any thing before you went to Bow-street? - A. No.

Q. What did you say at Bow-street? - A. The gentleman asked me whether I remembered the man who came to our house; I said, yes; he said, look round, and point him out; I looked round, and pointed out the prisoner; he asked me if I was sure, and I said, no, for fear the should be hanged.

Q. You have called God to witness you will speak the truth, and if you swear what is false, you will not only be severely punished in this

world, but the next; having called God to witness what you say, are you sure the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes.

- COPE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 2, Panton-street, Haymarket: On the 30th of August, I took this gun in pledge of Mary Penn; in the afternoon of that day, I received a hand-bill of the loss of a gun; in consequence of which, I gave information at Bow-street, and went with the officer to No. 29, Duke-street, St. James's, where we found her, but not the prisoner.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am an officer, and went with the pawnbroker to the prisoner's wife; I waited there, and about eleven o'clock at night a woman came to enquire whether she was at home; I suspected she came from the prisoner, and stopped her, and by that means found out where the prisoner was; I went and took him at No. 5, Wild-court, Wild-street, Lincoln's-innfields, standing in a corner behind the door in the garret.(The gun produced and identified.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

Evidence for the prisoner.

WILLIAM DUNNAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. I live with Mr. Marsham, a wine-merchant, as clerk, in America-square, and have known the prisoner some years, he was a gentleman's servant; I remember hearing of his being taken into custody, and was in his company on the 29th of August, for I called upon him about two o'clock in Duke-street, St. James's, and he asked me to walk with him to Colchester-street, Whitechapel, which I did, and returned with him to the Strand about half past three, where I left him, and called upon him again at half past four at his lodgings, where I found him with his wife and her niece, and I staid with them all till near ten o'clock.

Court. Q. Do you still live with Mr. Marsham? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you lived with him? - A. About a year and an half.

Q. What makes you recollect the day? - A. Because I had not seen him for a long time before; I recollect it no further than calling upon him.

Q. When you heard he was in trouble, you went directly to Bow-street? - A. No.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. Four or five years.

Q. Have you never heard of his being in trouble before? - A. No.

Q. Then you went directly to the prosecutor, and said, you were in the prisoner's company? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he send for you? - A. No.

Q. Did it not appear odd he did not? - A. I don't know; I heard of it from a friend; I don't know why he did not.

Q. Had you no business to do for your master that day? - A. No.

Q. How came you not to dine with him? - A. I dined at home at my mother's, at my lodgings that are now.

Q. Who did the prisoner live with? - A. With Mr. Pelham, in Hill-street, Berkeley-square, about two years ago.

Q. What has he been doing during the last two years? - A. I don't know; it was very seldom I called upon him; his wife is a mantua-maker, and does a deal of business.

Q. Where were you on the 28th of August? - A. I dont't recollect.

ANN BLY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. What are you? - A. I came from Norwich to Mrs. Penn, to learn the business of a mantua-maker, at No. 39, Duke-street, St. James's.

Q. Do you remember the day that she and her, husband were taken up? - A. Last Tuesday three weeks.

Q. Do you remember on the Monday meeting the last witness at your master's? - A. Yes; he went away into the City.

Q. Do you know Ann Dent? - A. Yes.

Q. Is she any relation to the prisoner? - A. No; Mr. Penn returned about four o'clock, and about half past four Mr. Dunnage came back, and spent the evening till almost ten.

Q. Do you know a Mr. Sancroft? - A. Yes, I saw him at my master's on the Tuesday morning, the day he was taken up, about ten o'clock; he was going out of town, and was in my mistress's debt for washing and mangling, and for shirts and handkerchiefs, and things of that sort made for him, 5l. 1s. 4d. he said he was short of money, but if she would pledge something for him, he would pay her before he went out of town; he went down, he might be gone a quarter of an hour, when he returned with a gun for her to pledge; she said, she did not know whether they would take in such a thing; he said they would, and he would carry it as far as the shop, if she would go in with it; he told her to ask seven or eight guineas for it; he took it down stairs, and they went away together; they both returned, and she gave him 7l. and the duplicate, and he paid her, 5l. 1s.

Court. Q. Were you there when the Police officers came in? - A. No, I came in in the mean time; I saw Smith and the pawnbroker there; they said they came about a gun.

Q. And you told them you could explain all this? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did not you say Mr. Sancroft brought it

there? - A. No, I did not know that I should tell them of it.

Q. Where did Mr. Sancroft live? - A. I do not know; he used to come himself, and sometimes he had a black boy with him; I have heard them say he is a Captain.

Q. How near does he live to your mistress? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you mean to say there is any such person in existence? - A. I have seen the man, and should know him again if I was to see him; he sometimes used to breakfast and drink tea there.

Q. Did you tell this story at Bow-street? - A. No, they did not ask me any questions.

Q. Did not your mistress say, here is a witness can prove I had it from Mr. Sancroft? - A. No.

Q. Did you go for your master when your mistress was in custody? - A. No.

Q. Nor for his friend, Mr. Dunnage? - A. No.

Q. Then you kept this story of Mr. Sancroft a secret from the officer and the Justice? - A. They did not ask me any questions about it.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-106

695. WILLIAM DOUGLAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , a metal watch, value 3l. and a gold seal, value 5s. the property of David Price , in the dwelling-house of William Green .

DAVID PRICE sworn. - I am an officer in the 6th battalion of Reserve, attached to the 81st regiment : On the 1st of August I slept at the Cannon coffee-house, Cockspur-street ; I saw my watch at six o'clock the next morning by my bed-side upon the dressing-table; I got up and unbolted my room door to let the man come in for my boots, as I had been used to do; I went to bed again, and got up between seven and eight o'clock, my watch was then gone.

DAVID JONES sworn. - On the 2d of August the prisoner brought a watch to my master's shop, in St. Martin's-lane, about six o'clock in the afternoon; he wanted three guineas and a half upon it; I had previous to that received a hand-bill from Bow-street, describing the watch; I asked him his name; he said, Duncan Piggott, Chatham Barracks; I requested he would walk in, as I had something to say to him; his answer was, yes, and immediately turned himself towards the door; I went after him; he wanted to go to a friend three or four doors lower down; I told him I could not permit that; I had received some information respecting that watch, which I would communicate to him if he would come in, and upon being pressed he did come in; he said he found the watch in the necessary; I told him I must be under the necessity of sending for the gentleman; I immediately sent for an officer, and he was taken to Bow-street.(The watch was produced, and identified by Mr. Price.)

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am an officer; I took the prisoner into custody.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. - I keep the Cannon coffee-house: On the 2d of August, Mr. Price lodged in my house, and had done for some time before; the prisoner slept in my house on the night of the 1st of August, on the floor over Mr. Price.

Mr. Price. When I missed my watch the boots had not been taken out of the room.

Prisoner's defence. I found this watch in the privy; I have been nine or ten years in the service of my King and country; I am a lieutenant in the navy; I am unprepared for trial, or I could have had witnesses here. GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030914-107

696. JOHN SIMPSON, alias GATEHOUSE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Harrison and Robert Joy , a watch, value 2l. 10s. an eye-glass in a silver frame, value 5s. seven shillings in money, and two Bank-notes, value 2l. the property of the said Thomas Harrison and Robert Joy .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of Robert Joy .

Third Count. For stealing in the dwelling-house of Thomas Harrison and Robert Joy the like goods, charging them to be the property of Thomas Glover .

Fourth Count. For stealing like goods the property of Thomas Glover , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Harrison and Robert Joy .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS GLOVER sworn. - I am an underwriter : On the 12th of August, the Prince of Wales's birth-day, I went to Vauxhall; when I returned I slept at the New Hummums, in Covent-garden ; I got there between two and three o'clock in the morning, and slept in the top story; I awoke about half past eight in the morning, and missed my watch; my eye-glass, and two Banknotes of one pound each; I afterwards saw the watch and the eye-glass at the Mansion-house; I have no doubt of their being mine, particularly the watch; I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM DALBY sworn. - I was chamberlain at the Hummums: On the 12th of August I shewed a person to bed, in No. 17, whom from his manner and the height of his person I believe to be the prisoner, but I cannot swear to his face; Mr. Glover came about two hours afterwards; I shew

ed him to bed in No. 23, opposite the prisoner's room; I have no doubt of his being the person; he was the first that went out in the morning.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. Q. You say you cannot swear to my face? - A. No.

Q. Did you see me after I went to bed? - A. No, when you came in I shewed you up stairs, and you gave me three shillings, saying there was sixpence for myself.

Q. How do you know that the person who slept in No. 17 was the first that went out in the morning? - A. I carried in your shoes, and left you to call a gentleman who was going away by the stage, and while I was calling him you ran down stairs; I described the prisoner before the Lord Mayor, and I have no doubt of his being the person.

THOMAS FEATHER sworn. - I keep the Guildhall coffee-house; I am well acquainted with the person of the prisoner; he came to my house on the 18th of August; I was in bed; I was awoke by the waiter of the City coffee-house, informing me that the prisoner was in bed in my house; I immediately got up, and sent for a constable; I went to him, and desired him to put on his cloaths; I told him I was astonished at his coming to me again so soon; he asked me what I meant; I told him he had slept there on the 6th of May, and had robbed a gentleman; he said he had slept there on the 6th of May, but had not robbed any body; I was well convinced he was a desperate character, and desired the officer to handcuff him; he was then searched, and in one of his pockets, which he objected to have searched, the officer found an instrument similar to a chissel at one end; it was sunk below the level of his pocket, in a place appropriated for it; a person might have put his hand to the bottom of the pocket, and not have felt it; he also found upon him a bunch of keys and a watch; at the Compter he was searched further, and on his person were found two one-pound notes, a seven-shilling piece, and five shillings and sixpence in silver, and I think two half guineas; he then had on white shag breeches and boots; the next morning he had nankeen pantaloons.( John Coffee , a constable, repeated the circumstances of the prisoner's apprehension, as they had been stated by the last witness.)

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - I am a constable; I was ordered by the Lord Mayor to go to the Compter, and examine the place where the prisoner had been; I was informed he had been left at the necessary; I went there, and on the righthand fronting the necessary was a bulk seven or eight feet high; I got up there, and in the further corner I found these white shag breeches, with an eye-glass in the pocket - (Produces them.)

Mr. Glover. I have no private mark upon the eye-glass, but I have no doubt of its being mine from its appearance, and from the focus of the fight; I have had it about six or eight months; the watch I am sure is mine, William Lee , No. 1825.

ROBERT JOY sworn. - I am in partnership with Thomas Harrison; I sleep in the house; the rent and taxes are paid by us jointly; Mr. Harrison never sleeps there.

Prisoner's defence. If my trial had been put off till next Sessions, I could have brought evidence to shew how I came in possession of the watch.

GUILTY, Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-108

697. GEORGE BAYLISS was indicted for that he, on the 7th of August , being employed in the capacity of a servant to John Hatchett , Robert Green , and John White , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession, for and on account of his said masters and employers, 31l. 10s. 4d. and afterwards feloniously did embezzle and secrete part thereof, to wit, 2l. 3d. against the form of the statute .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM APPLEBY sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Hatchett and Co. coach-maker s, in Long-acre ; the prisoner was the foreman of the smiths , and as such it was his duty to pay them their wages; he received the money from me; here is; an account of the names of the different men who had a claim upon Messrs. Hatchett and Co. for work supposed to be done in the week preceding the 26th of August, upon which the prisoner calculates their wages.

Q. Is that his writing? - A. I suppose it is; it is the account he furnished to me; these are his figures, except the total; I paid him upon this account 31l. 10s. 4d.

Q. In that account is there included wages due to two men of the names of Kendall and Dearing? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You know the number of men employed as well as he does? - A. Yes.

Q. When you see the names put down upon paper, do you not enquire whether those men were there or not? - A. No.

Q. He enquires of the men what work they have done? - A. Yes.

Q. And whether there is any blunder or not, he puts it down as they inform him? - A. Yes, and if it was any thing that appeared improbable, I should discover it; but if it was a thing probable, I should not.

Mr. Alley. Q. Look at this, is that the account he rendered to you of the next week to the 2d of September? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM KENDALL sworn. - I am a smith:

I work for Messrs. Hatchett and Co. the prisoner was our foreman.

Q. Were you at work from the 19th of August to the 26th? - A. No, I was not at work at all in August.

Q. Did he ever pay you for work done in that week? - A. I never received any money after the 29th of July; he sent my money by my partner; I was ill in bed at that time; I did not go to work again till the 5th of September; there was nothing due to me in August.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner was the foreman of the smiths? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there such a thing among you as being upon the box? - A. Yes, every man pays four-pence of a Monday, but that has nothing to do with the masters.

Q. There would be box-money due to you being a sick member? - A. I had received box-money.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. If you were not at work he must know it? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Supposing you were not sick, but capable of doing your work, and you had stepped out for beer, or any thing else, and the foreman came round for the account, would not your partner give the account of your day work or your piece work? - A. My partner kept an account of the time for me.

Court. Q. What did you receive from the box? - A. I received 2l. 10s. all together; I received the last the 6th of September; I was ill for six weeks.

JOSEPH DEARING sworn. - I am a smith.

Q. Did you work at Messrs. Hatchett's from Friday the 19th to Friday the 26th of August? - A. I was at work on the 24th, and received twelve shillings and three pence from James Willis , which was all that I was entitled to.

Mr. JOHN WHITE sworn. - (Proves the firm.) - Q. Had the prisoner any allowance for rendering the accounts of the men and their wages? - A. We paid him two guineas a week as foreman, for which he was entrusted with the receipt of the money to pay the men; we placed great confidence in him. - (The account read.)

Prisoner's defence. I have worked for Messrs Hatchett and Co. twenty-one years; I paid Kendall ten shillings and sixpence a week out of the money I charged for him; I had received no money from the club for nine weeks before; and as for Deering, I charged the time for him, and I have frequently allowed them for three or four days before hand on account.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030914-109

698. JOHN SIMMONS , JOHN CUEPPER , HARME TILLMAN , and JAN KUHLMAN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , twenty-three pounds of nutmegs, value 10l. and thirty-six pounds of indigo, value 20l. the property of John-Henry Rougemont , and Philip-Fretreck Behrends , being in a certain vessel called The Hoop , upon the navigable River of Thames .

Second Count. Charging the goods to be the property of Peter Hosman , Gideon De Bie , and Jan I'Ansen .

Third Count. Charging them to be the property of Swithert I'Ansen .

Fourth Count. Charging them to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

DOMINICUS BEHRENDS sworn. - I am clerk to to John-Henry Rougemont, and Philip-Fretrek Behrends.

Q. Do you recollect shipping any indigo and nutmegs on board the Hoop? - A. To the best of my recollection, there was a chest of nutmegs, and many chests of indigo.

Q. Do you recollect when? - A. About the middle or latter end of June.

Q. Were there any marks upon the chests containing the nutmegs? - A. Yes; it was marked grapes 424; there were six or seven of the chests of indigo marked double O, and two marks across it, and the number 297.

Q. Where was the Hoop lying? - A. In the river Thames; I don't know exactly where.

Q. These goods were packed up in the East-India warehouses? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not see them delivered? - A. No, I did not.

PETER CONTENSIN sworn. - Q. Do you attend from the tea and drug warehouses belonging to the East-India Company in Jewry-street? - A. I do.

Q. Did you weigh any nutmegs and indigo? - A. No indigo, but nutmegs, in April last.

Q. How many chests did you weigh? - A. I cannot exactly say how many.

Q. Did you weigh a chest marked Lot 1069? - A. I did; the landing number was 11, it was marked 6, 11.

Q. Do you recollect what the weight was? - A. Yes; two hundred, three quarters, and two pounds, gross weight; the tare was a quarter, and twenty-three pounds, leaving the nett weight two hundred, one quarter, and seven pounds.

Q. Who did you deliver it over to? - A. To William Bedbury.

WILLIAM BEDBURY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You attend the India Company's warehouses? - A. I attend the spice warehouse.

Q. Had you any order from Rougemont and Behrends? - A. Yes; an order to case a chest of nutmegs; I ordered it to be done, and it was done.

Q. Do you recollect how the chest of nutmegs was numbered? - A. Yes; 1069, it had the lot marked upon that; and when it was cased, it was marked bunch of grapes 424; it was then delivered to a carman's cart, in the usual routine of business, to be carried to some quay for exportation.

WILLIAM EASY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You attend the India Company's warehouses? - A. Yes; the private trade warehouse, in Billeter-lane.

Q. Did you weigh any indigo? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. When? - A. In March sale, 1803; I weighed three or four thousand chests of indigo.

Q. Was there any one that you weighed at that time which had upon it No. 62? - A. Yes, there was; the gross was two hundred weight and twenty pounds; the tare was half a hundred and thirteen pounds; the nett weight was one hundred and seventy-five pounds; after it was weighed, it was shipped for Rougemont and Company.

Q. Do you know that of your own knowledge? - A. Yes; I know it went from our warehouse.

FRANCIS HOLMES sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am waterman to the searchers of his Majesty's Revenue.

Q. Do you remember taking a chest of nutmegs marked in any particular way? - A. Yes; on the 8th of July, I received an order from Mr. Lock, one of my superior officers, to go on board the Hoop, captain I'Ansen; it expressed in the order that I should go for a chest of nutmegs, marked a bunch of grapes, No. 424; I went to the ship, and Mr. Gotty was on board, and the captain came; we had to remove an hogshead of tobaco to get at this chest.

Q. When you got at the chest, how was it marked? - A. A bunch of grapes, No. 424; when we got it upon deck, there was one end of it broke, and we nailed some canvas over the broken end.

Q. Did it appear to have lost any thing from it? - A. It appeared to have lost a considerable deal, I suppose there might be about a foot deficient from the top of the chest.

Q. It appeared to you to have been plundered? - A. Yes; it was then delivered to me in my boat, and I brought it up to the searcher's warehouse; it was delivered to Mr. Bolton, the warehouse-keeper.

Mr. Knapp. (To Behrends.) Q. What is the name of Mr. Johnson, the commander of the Hoop? - A. Swithert I'Ansen.

EDWARD BOLTON sworn. - Q. You attend from the searcher's warehouse at the Custom-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see a cask of nutmegs that Soames has been speaking of? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it? - A. On the 8th of July.

Q. Did you examine the case of nutmegs? - A. Yes.

Q. How was that case marked? - A. A bunch of grapes, No. 424.

Q. Did you examine what deficiency there was? - A. We took them out of the case, and weighed them: the weight was two hundred, twenty-one pounds, four ounces.

Q. Did it appear to be full? - A. It did not; there was a vacancy as it lay down; there was a chest of indigo, the nett weight of which, was one hundred and thirty-eight pounds.

Q. Did there appear to be a vacancy in that? - A. I think there did.

Q. (To Mr. Behrends.) Do you know the house of Hosman and Company? - A. Yes; but I don't know their christian names: Hosman, De Bie, and I'Ansen.

Q. They were the brokers upon this occasion? -- A. Yes.

THOMAS WALKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a Thames-Police Surveyor? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Simmons? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the others? - A. I know Cuepper.

Q. Where were you on the seventh of July, in the evening? - A. About six o'clock I was in a boat belonging to our office, near Wapping Old-stairs; I observed three men coming towards me, from the ship Hoop; I did not then know what ship it was.

Q. Who were they? - A. Simmons and Cuepper, and Henry Cuepper the accomplice.

Q. Where was that ship lying? - A. Between Wapping Old-stairs and Wapping New-stairs.

Q. Was she lying in the County of Middlesex? - A. Yes, as far as I understand; I went alongside the boat, Simmons held out his protection-box, and said he was a Prussian; I observed he had something under his jacket; I told him I did not want to see his protection, I wanted to see what he had under his jacket; he said he had nothing; I then got into the boat, and searched his pocket, and in each pocket he had nutmegs, and between his shirt and his body he had a number more concealed; upon Cuepper, I found nutmegs between his shirt and his body, and likewise in the same manner upon the accomplice; then I took them to the office; I asked them where they had got them; they said they got them out of a prize from Cape Francois, and that they were going to buy stock with it.

Q. That is, victuals, is it not? - A. Yes; the watermen pointed out that that was the ship; I took them into my boat; they did not say whether that was the ship or not; when I came past the Hoop, I asked them again if that was the ship, and they would not give me any answer; I then took them before the Magistrate.

Q. Does Cuepper understand English? - A. Just

as well as I do; he would not talk at all at first, till I brought him to it by degrees.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There are a great many smugglers on the River? - A. Yes.

Q. And they generally conceal their goods as much as they possibly can when they bring them on shore? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. There are as many thieves as smugglers on the River, I believe? - A. More thieves than smugglers.

JOHN GOTTY sworn. - I am one of the surveyors of the Thames-Police: In consequence of information I received, I went, on the 7th of July last, on board the Hoop, she was lying between Wapping Old and Wapping New-stairs, in the parish of St. John, Wapping, in the county of Middlesex; I went on board the Hoop, I went into the cabin, and requested the captain to call the cook down.

Q. The cook is one of the prisoners? - A. Yes, Tillman.

Q. The captain, I believe, is not here? - A. No; the vessel has failed, and the captain with it; the prisoner, Tillman, immediately came down into the cabin, and I desired him to let me have the bag of nutmegs that he had stowed away in the fore peak; and I requested the captain to give him the same direction in his own language, for fear he should not understand me; he went up the ladder first, upon the ship's deck, and brought me a bag containing 14lbs. of nutmegs; I then took him and the nutmegs together to the Office. The next morning I went on board the Hoop again, to see if I could discover any bag, or plunder; as soon as the captain came on board we opened the hatches, and hoisted a cask of tobacco up, and on the larboard side, close to the foremast, was a case of nutmegs standing upon its end, covered with some coarse bagging-cloth, and the case broke; between the bagging and the case some loose nutmegs had got down, and some were scattered; we got it upon deck, we found a deficiency of about eight inches, they were nutmegs of the same quality with those that had been produced by Mr. Walker; I saw that case delivered into the charge of the searcher's waterman, he took it away.

Q. Did you observe the mark? - A. Yes; a bunch of grapes, No. 424; I then went to the fore peak, to search if any more were secreted, and on the larboard side, between a hogshead of tobacco and the lining of the ship, I found a pair of trowsers full of indigo; I then proceeded to look further among the cargo, and see if any indigo was missing; I found a case marked with two round O's and a stroke across, No. 297; I got that up upon deck, and found nine inches deficient.

Q. (To Behrends.) Whereabouts was the whole of the deficiency of nutmegs? - A. They were worth about ten shillings a pound; the deficiency I cannot speak to.

THOMAS HOLLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are one of the Thames-Police watermen? - A. I am.

Q. Were you on board this ship on the 8th of July? - A. I was.

Q. Did you see the prisoner, Simmons? - A. I did.

Q. What was he? - A. He was one of the persons belonging to the vessel; I took him into custody about half past eleven o'clock, and brought him on shore.

Mr. Knapp. (To Bolton.) Q. Did you take the weight of the nutmegs, and also of the indigo? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know who brought the indigo? - A. Mr. Little, I believe, but he is not here.

HENRY-JOHN CUEPPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What countryman are you? - A. I am a Prussian.

Q. In the month of July last, were you on board a ship called the Hoop, in the river Thames? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the name of the captain? - A. I don't really know.

Q. Were the four men at the bar on board with you? - A. Simmons was mate I understood.

Q. Did he act as mate? - A. Yes; John Cuepper was foremast man, Tillman was cook, and Kuhlman was foremast man.

Q. Do you remember being taken in a boat by the Police-officers? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Were you present, before that, when any thing was done respecting nutmegs? - A. Yes; after dinner on Thursday, the day we were taken, the mate called us on deck, and ordered us to hoist out a cask of tobacco.

Q. Was any body else on board? - A. Yes; there was a Custom-house officer on board.

Q. But were there any other persons employed in shipping the cargo besides you five? - A. No; we all helped to hoist up a cask of tobacco, and then the mate ordered us to unstow the cargo, and cry if we could not put any more small things in between the goods that were in the vessel to make more room; Simmons, the mate, asked Tillman what kind of cargo there had been in the ship; Tillman told him, nutmegs, indigo, pepper, and other goods; in unstowing the cargo, Kuhlman said, I believe that is a chest of nutmegs; going on further with unstowing the things, Kuhlman said, the chest is open; then Simmons said, if it is not open enough we must break it open, and get some out; then we told him that it would not do.

Q. Who told him so? - A. In general; at least me, and the man that stood next me, said so; he

said, never mind, there has been two or three steersmen before me, and I will make it good; then some of the nutmegs were handed up, I handed some up to John Cuepper .

Q. Who opened the chest? - A. I cannot say; I saw Kuhlman with a crow-bar in his hand; I was standing in the hatchway.

Q. Was it opened by one of those four? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was there any other person there who could have opened it? - A. Not at that time.

Q. Who took out the nutmegs? - A. They rolled out; Kuhlman put his hand to them, and they rolled out, and I handed them up in a hat to John Cuepper, and he handed them upon deck to Tillman, the cook; Simmons was standing by the hatchway upon deck, on the starboard side, and Tillman was on the larboard side.

Q. Could he see what was going forward? - A. Yes, he was present all the time.

Q. When you had taken out all you wanted, what was done then? - A. Simmons ordered us to load the things again, and come upon deck; after we had stowed the things, we came upon deck again; Simmons then sent on shore for some gin, and he sent me up alost, but before I had my things ready to go up alost with, I heard Simmons order Kuhlman to break open a chest of indigo; I don't know whether he did or not, till I came down again upon the bowsprit; then Simmons called me, and ordered me to go down in the hold, and to empty a bowl of indigo, that was standing there, into a pair of trowsers, which I did; while we were hoisting up some other things that came on board, Simmons sent Kuhlman on shore; after we had laid the hatches on, Simmons told us we might dress ourselves, and go on shore; Cuepper and I came away; we left Tillman on board; Simmons ordered us to take some nutmegs and indigo, and bring them to his lodgings, which we did; Simmons had some in his pockets; I had no pocket about me, and so he told me to put them in my bosom, which I did, and Cuepper had some in his bosom; as we were going ashore, we were stopped by the officers, and the nutmegs found upon Simmons, me, and Cuepper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not think you were doing any thing wrong, as you were ordered by Simmons? - A. No; we thought, as he was commander of the vessel, we were to obey his orders.

Court. Q. How long had you been on board? - A. I shipped myself with the captain on Wednesday evening; we all four did, in short, the mate and all.

Simmons's defence. I know nothing of it; I ordered that man, Cuepper, to go up alost, and that is all the order I gave him.

The other prisoners, in their defence, said, they only obeyed the orders of the mate, Simmons.

Simmons, GUILTY , Death , aged 36.

Cuepper, GUILTY , Death , aged 33.

Tillman, NOT GUILTY .

Kuhlman, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030914-110

699. EVAN LEWIS was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, on the 12th of August , upon John Haley , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a pocket-book, value 6d. and a Bank-note, value 2l. the property of the said John .

JOHN HALEY sworn. - Q. What business do you follow? - A. Not any; I have been in business; I live in Marylebone-street, Golden-square: On the 12th of August, about three o'clock in the morning, I had been out to spend the evening, in Rose-street, Covent-garden, with my friends; I staid rather later than usual.

Q. At that time in the morning, perhaps you were not quite sober? - A. I was not.

Q. Were you sober enough to swear to the person of a man? - A. Yes, I was sober enough to identify the person; I was going home from Rose-street alone; the prisoner came up to me, and asked me how I did, and asked me to sit down at the door to rest ourselves; my coat was open, and my pocket-book inside; I sat down, and leaned my head back against the door, and felt the prisoner's hand in my pocket, taking my pocket-book out of my pocket.

Q. What had you in your pocket-book? - A. A two-pound note, some memorandums and a silver pencil-case.

Q. You were not sober enough to resist him, I suppose? - A. No; I said, you have got my pocket-book; he made no reply, but knocked me down, and ran off; I halloaed out, watch, stop thief; I called, watch, stop thief, a second time, and the watchman called out, I have got him.

Q. Then he was taken immediately? - A. Yes: the watchman asked me what I was robbed of; I said, he had robbed me of my pocket-book; the prisoner said, he had no pocket-book, nor he did not know me; the watchman searched him, and found none upon him; the watchman said, he thought he saw him drop something, before he crossed the way to lay hold of him; we all three went over to look, and on the iron railing of a window in King-street, we found the pocketbook; I said it was mine, and he was taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Your pocket was picked first, and you was knocked down afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. There was no force used to you till after the pocket-book was taken? - A. None.

Q. Your name is Haley, and you live where? - A. In Marybone-street, Golden-square.

Q. What time in the morning was it? - A. About three in the morning.

Q. Where was it you had spent the evening? - A. I cannot exactly tell you myself.

Q. And yet you can identify the man? - A. I won't swear positively to his person; the only thing I can swear by, is his dropping the book at the place.

Q. And that you did not see? - A. No.

Q. Were you ever robbed before? - A. Yes; I was robbed the same evening of my watch.

Q. Do you know where you were robbed of your watch? - A. No.

WILLIAM ASHMAN sworn. - I am a watchman: About three o'clock in the morning, I heard that person cry out, stop thief; I then looked, and saw nobody in the street but the prisoner, coming down the contrary side of the street that I was going up; I called out, stop, and then he dropped his hand down from his breast, as if he dropped something, but I could not discern what it was; he was crossing the street when I grasped hold of him; I brought him over to the same side of the street that I was walking on, and kept him there till the prosecutor came up; he desired me to search him; accordingly, I put my hand into his pocket, but only found some halfpence; I then said to the prosecutor, if he has taken your pocket-book, we will go up the other side of the way, and perhaps we may find it; I took the prisoner on the other side of the way, and at the same place where I desired him to stop I picked up the pocket-book upon the iron railing; I then took him to the watch-house; I produced the pocket-book to the constable of the night; it contained a two-pound note, and other papers. (Produces it.)

(The note and pocket-book were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was coming home from spending the evening; I heard a cry of stop thief; I walked up, seeing the watchman in the middle of the street, and asked him if he knew what was the matter; he desired me to stop, and I did immediately; a man then approached, and addressed himself to me, saying he had been robbed; he did not say I robbed him; I asked him by who; the watchman said, there was no other person in the street but me, and then he said, it must be me, and I was taken to the watch-house.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030914-111

700. MARY JONES was indicted for uttering to one Ann Booth, a counterfeit shilling, knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ANN BOOTH sworn. - I am the wife of Robert Booth , No. 2, Smithfield-bars ; I keep a haberdasher's shop : I have frequently seen the prisoner, particularly on the 22d of April; she came in about seven o'clock in the evening, and asked for a skein of black silk, it came to fivepence; she put her hand in her pocket, and drew from thence four or five shillings; she put them back, and drew another shilling up, which she gave me; I gave it into the hands of my little daughter, and desired her to learn if it was a good one, and if it was not, to call Mr. Whales; I suspected her before; she then desired to go, and said, she would call again for the change and the black silk, and she was sorry she had troubled me; I would not let her go; my daughter returned in a minute, or a minute and an half, with Mr. Whales; my daughter told me it was a bad shilling; I sent for a constable, he came and searched her; I was not present: the constable called me into the parlour, and told me, in the hearing of the prisoner, there was nothing but good money found upon her - a guinea and an half in gold, six crown pieces, two half-crowns, and three sixpences, all good; I said, I was positive I could not have mistaken crown pieces for shillings, and therefore she must have more bad money about her; she begged my pardon, and said, it would bring her family in disgrace; my daughter and another person then brought in a bag containing six shillings; the prisoner had been sitting on a chair in the shop; I then gave charge of her, and she begged to be let go.

ANN BOOTH , the younger, sworn. - On the 22d of April, the prisoner came in for a skein of black silk; the prisoner sat down on a chair in the shop; my mother gave me a shilling, and desired me to go to the cheesemonger's, and ask if it was a good one, and if it was not, to bring Mr. Whales over; I brought Mr. Whales over, and the shilling; the prisoner was sitting in the shop, as I left her; I told my mother, in her hearing, that the shilling was a bad one; Mr. Whales went to speak with my mother in the parlour, and the prisoner remained in the shop.

Q. Can you see into the shop from the parlour? - A. Yes; then Mr. Whales fetched Mr. Worrall, a constable; the prisoner continued sitting till he came; Mr. Whales and Mr. Worrall took her into the parlour to search her; I staid in the shop; Elizabeth Gibbs was up stairs; she came down in three or four minutes; when she came down by the side of the chair where the prisoner sat, on the ground there laid this bag of money; Miss Gibbs picked it up, and carried it into the parlour; I remained in the shop.

- WHALES sworn. - I live at Smithfieldbars, I am a hair-dresser: On the 22d of April, the little girl came to me; I went with her to her mother's; Mrs. Booth told me the prisoner gave her a bad shilling; the child gave me the shilling; Mrs. Booth said, she had given her a bad one ten days or a fornight before; the prisoner said, she did not know it; Mr. Worrall, the constable came, he took her into the parlour, and examined her; I found upon her a guinea and an half in gold, several crown pieces and half-crowns; then a purse was brought into the parlour, with six bad shillings, and three bad sixpences; she said it was not her's; I gave the bad shilling that I received from the child to Worrall.( Elizabeth Gibbs corroborated the evidence of Ann Booth .)( George Worrall , a constable, produced the shilling, and the six shillings in the purse, which were all proved to be counterfeit by Mr. William Parker .)

Mr. Knapp addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant. GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for six months more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-112

701. BRIDGET SMITH was indicted for uttering, on the 7th of September , to one William Gulley , a counterfeit shilling, knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM GULLEY sworn. - I was at Bartholomew fair on the 6th of September; I saw the prisoner there, selling fruit at a barrow ; I went up to her barrow between ten and eleven in the evening, Matthew Hanson was with me; I asked for twopenny-worth of apples, and gave her a shilling,

marked with the letter W; she put it into her she was going to give me change for it; she then put her hand to the corner of her barrow, and took up another shilling; she then put it to the side of the barrow, under pretence of rubbing it; she then gave it to me, and said, young man, you gave me a bad shilling.

Q. Was that the shilling you had given her? - No, it was not; I said, it was not the shilling I gave her; she said, it was; I put it down again along with her apples, and I was directed to get an officer; I went for an officer, and left the shilling on the barrow; I found a constable, and he would not do any thing in it; I had left Hanson with her; I then got another constable, of the name of Smith; I was present when she was searched, and the shilling found upon her that I had given her, and the bad one, with some other silver in a box; I cannot swear to the bad shilling. I can only be positive to my own; I was absent from the prisoner about a quarter of an hour; I had had my own shilling for a week, and observed it many times, W being the initial of my Christian name.

MATTHEW HANSON sworn. - I went with the last witness to the prisoner's barrow, for two-penny-worth of apples; he gave her one shilling, which I saw her put in her pocket with her right hand; she then put her left hand to the corner of the barrow, and took out another shilling; she had put the other in her pocket; she put it down to the side of the barrow, under pretence to rub it; she then gave it to Gulley, and told him it was a bad one; he told her it was not the shilling he gave her; I then told her, I had seen her put Gulley's shilling into her pocket; he desired her to return him the shilling, or the change for the apples; she said she would not, because he had given her a bad shilling; then we both went away, and tried to get a constable; when we came back, she had put the money into her pocket.

Q. Did you take sufficient notice of the bad shilling to know it again? - A. No; we got a constable, and he took charge of her; she was delivered to Mr. Clark, the marshalman, and searched; there was found upon her the shilling Gulley described, a bad shilling, and three more shillings; they were in a little box.

JOHN CLARK sworn. - I am one of the marshalmen: I was present when the prisoner was searched; this box was taken from her, containing these two shillings, besides a half-crown, two shillings, and two sixpences, (produces them), one of them is a bad shilling, and another that was described by Gulley to have a W upon it; she persisted that the bad shilling was the one he gave her, and he said, the one marked W was the one he gave her.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner; I found her where the young men had left her; she was searched in my presence by Elijah Crabb, he is not here; he found a box upon her, which was delivered to Clark; Gulley said, his shilling was marked with a W, and turned up a little on the edge; a shilling of that description, and a bad shilling, were found in the box; the prisoner insisted that the bad shilling was the one he had given her, and he insisted that the shilling marked W was the shilling he had given her.(Mr. William Parker proved the shilling to be counterfeit.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the shilling she received from the prosecutor, was the bad one, and called one witness, who gave her a good character. GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for six months more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-113

702. FRANCIS PINNEY was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, but not appearing, the defendant was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-114

703. THOMAS EDWARDS , ELIZABETH EDWARDS alias KNIGHT , and MARY BROMFIELD , were indicted for a conspiracy .

(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

SAMUEL YARDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am chief clerk at Worship-street Police-office; I know the prisoner Edwards.

Q. Do you recollect the man-prisoner calling at your Office, to lodge an information with respect to a Little Go? - A. Yes, on the 3d of February last. (Produces the original information.)

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was that information given upon oath? - A. Yes, I administered the oath myself.

Q. Who was the Magistrate? - A. Mr. Moser.(The information read.)

Q. Do you know if any warrant issued in consequence of that information? - A. The warrant was granted upon that information.

Q. Have you the warrant here? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. Were either of the other prisoners present when he applied for it? - A. I don't recollect.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Q. You are one of the Police officers of Worship-street? - A. Yes.

Q. What have you in your hand? - A. A warrant, upon the complaint of Thomas Edwards , against Mrs. Booker, No. 11, Short's-buildings, for keeping a Little Go; I went with Edwards and

Mrs. Edwards to execute the warrant; I did not execute it; Mrs. Booker was not to be found.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner, Edwards, concerning the subject of the warrant? - A. I said to him a few days afterwards, why do not you have the warrant executed and he said, as soon as the person was to be found he would let me know.

HANNAH LYNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a widow, and live in Paul's-alley, Aldersgate-street; I know all the three defendants: On Monday the 31st of January, Mrs. Edwards came to my house for eight shillings to release Edwards out of prison from an execution.

Q. Did she state any reason why she had a claim upon you for eight shillings? - A. No; she told me if I did not give it to her, it would be worse for me or other people that I should be sorry for before the week was out; she did not mention the name of any body; I told her I had not eight shillings to spare; I knew of no right that she had to ask for it; nothing farther passed; I saw Mrs. Bromfield, the defendant, on the Sunday after; she came to my house at ten o'clock in the morning, and asked for Mrs. Lyne's; I told her I was the person; she told me then she came to relate that there was a warrant against my sister for a little-go; I told her it was impossible, for I knew she was not guilty of any such action; I asked Mrs. Bromfield her name, and she told me her name was White; she said she lived in Short's-buildings; she had only been three weeks in town, she should be in London a few days; if I did not come forward with a handsome sum of money for Mr. Edwards, he would pull me out of my house and my sister too in the morning; I asked her where I was to go to see Mr. and Mrs. Edwards, to carry them the money; she said, to a chandler's-shop in the Broad-way, St. Giles's, turning up by the Black Dog; then she went away, and in the afternoon I went there, and saw a young person who passed for Mrs. Edwards's daughter; I was directed to go to a public-house opposite, and there I saw Mrs. Bromfield and Mrs. Edwards sitting together in a box, but nothing particular passed; Mrs. Bromfield said to Mrs. Edwards, she had had the pleasure of seeing me once before; Mrs. Edwards then asked for a private room, and I saw no more of Mrs. Bromfield; when we came into the room, I asked Mrs. Edwards what she wanted; she said, she had got a warrant against Mrs. Booker, my sister, for a little-go; I said it was impossible; she said it might be settled for a sum of money when Edwards came; some little time after Edwards came in, and said he would settle it for five quids; I asked him what that meant; he said five guineas; he said he acted under Mr. Wood, and the next day he said Mr. Wood protected him on the Sunday; I told him I had not so much money, or any thing like it; he then said he would call upon me the next day, and appointed his own time in the morning at ten o'clock; nothing more passed that night; the next morning Edwards and his wife both came to my house; I asked them if they would not drop it without that sum of money; he said, what could I give him; I told him it would be the destruction of my brother and sister if such a thing should occur.

Q. In what situation of life is Mr. Booker? - A. A very genteel one; he is an enameller, and has got many houses at the back of his own; Mrs. Edwards said to her husband, come along, if it cannot be settled, we will go to Worship-street, and follow them up; I then gave him a twenty-shilling note for fear of his going to do that against my sister which was wrong; he told me it was not enough; unless I promised him some more on Friday, he would not be satisfied; I told him I could not give him any more on the Friday, but I would give him another note on the Monday; he then said he would go and get Armstrong to file the warrant, and then both went away, and I saw no more of them till that day week; I met Edwards in Chiswell-street, and they said they were going to my house for the remainder of the money; Mr. Edwards said so in the hearing of his wife; I told him I should not be at home for two hours; they said they would not wait above an hour; I returned in an hour and a half, and they were at my house; I then gave them another twenty-shilling note; Mr. Edwards then said the warrant was done with.

Q. What was it induced you to give first one note, and then the other? - A. For fear they were taking my sister on a false accusation.

Q. Had they threatened to take her on a false accusation? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You never saw Mrs. Bromfield after the Sunday? - A. No.

Q. At the time you had the conversation with Mrs. Bromfield, was any body with you? - A. Nobody but my own children.

ANN JOHNSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Bromfield, the defendant? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect about the beginning of February having any conversation with her upon the subject of a little-go, or about Mrs. Booker? - A. On Friday the 4th of February, I had some conversation with her about Mrs. Booker; she came into my house, No. 6, Steward-court, Clerkenwell-green; she said, who do you think is taken up; I said, I don't know; she said, mother Booker; I asked her what she had done; she said, oh, she had done nothing; she said, she was sworn

against, and that was enough for her; she must pay 100l. or go to prison.

Q. Did she say at whose instance she was to go to prison? - A. I asked her what was the matter, and she said, it mattered not to me; she said, she would go, and seek about it; she came back in about an hour, and said it was all settled, they were to pay 100l. she said, the poor wretches, without mentioning any names, were in a starving condition, and she would go and see what she could do for them.

Q. Had you mentioned the names of Edwards or his wife to her? - A. No; she said the informers, but did not mention any names; she said, they had a hundred a year from Government, and she called them informers; she came again in the morning, and said, they had settled it; she said, we have settled it, and got ten guineas; we asked her who had got it, and whether it was settled before a Magistrate, and she said, no, it was settled among themselves; Mrs. Bromfield said, she had got interest at Hatton-garden; her word would go further than half the parish; she said she had been at Hatton-garden.

Q. Did she mention the name of either of the Edwards's? - A. No.

HENRY FRENCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live in Old-street; I know Edwards and his wife; I don't know Mrs. Bromfield; I have known them upwards of two years.

Q. Do you remember having any conversation with them about a Mrs. Booker? - A. Yes, at my own house sometime after Christmas, but I cannot say how long after; I asked Edwards with what view he took out the warrant against Mrs. Booker; he said, he took it out for the purpose of drawing five guineas from Mrs. Lynes, the sister of Mrs. Booker; I said, I was sure that Mrs. Booker lived in too much credit to do any thing of the kind; he made answer immediately, no, I never did any thing with her; I did it on purpose to draw her sister in for five guineas, and he told me Mrs. Lynes promised him five, but he said he had got two out of the five, two one-pound notes; if he had not got that he should have got nothing; I said, if she had not given you any thing, what would you have done then; he said, I would have wrote it down, and his pal, Mrs. Knight, would swear it.

SARAH BOOKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. My husband is a watch-enameller, No. 11, Short's-buildings, Clerkenwell; he has been a house-keeper there seventeen or eighteen years.

Q. Upon your oath did you ever keep a littlego? - A. Never; I don't know the meaning of it.

Q. Has your husband? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendant, Bromfield.

Thomas Edwards , GUILTY .

Confined a year in Newgate .

Elizabeth Edwards , NOT GUILTY .

Mary Bromfield , GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030914-115

704. WILLIAM CHALFONT was indicted for that he, being a person employed as a sorter and stamper of letters in the Post-office , fraudulently did secrete one of the said letters .

WILLIAM ANDREWS sworn. - I am an officer in the General Post-office , and know the defendant; he is a sorter of letters, and had been so before I was clerk of the Sunday duty; the town letters were charged with postage, except ship letters, and having sorted them, he had the duty of telling up the amount of the country letters on Sundays; he might have taken many without being discovered; he did not stamp the letters; he never had any thing to do with the stamping.

HUGH FERGERSON sworn. - I am inspector of the letter-carriers, and know the defendant and his employment as a sorter on Sundays for the delivery on the Monday; he had nothing to do with them on Mondays to my knowledge; I know Webster, who was an officer in the Post-office, but had no Sunday duty there; the letters came to him on the Monday that were in his district to be delivered.

THOMAS WEBSTER sworn. - I know William Chalfont , and was employed as a letter carrier in January, February, March, and beginning of April, 1802; I had no Sunday duty, Chalfont had; he delivered letters to me many times on Sundays, which he brought from the Post-office, as he told me, and I knew it by the post marks; he put them into his pocket when he was sorting them on Sundays, as he told me; I was to cause them to be delivered on Monday in the regular course of other letters; they were not all in my district, and I delivered those that were in my district to whom they were directed; those that were not in my district I transferred to the carriers of the districts to which they belonged, and they accounted to the charge taker of the division, and he paid me the money; letters are frequently missorted, and these were treated as such; the money received for them, Chalfont had half and I half. I at that time kept a tallow-chandler's-shop; Chalfont bought soap and candles of me, and I have a book of the sums of the moiety of each in my own writing at the time - (produces his day-book.) On the 13th of January, 1802, I find a dozen of candles charged 10s. to him; on the 17th W. C. cash 1l. 7s. 6d. being half of the postage money of letters Chalfont brought on that Sunday; on the 1st of February

17s. 4d. is placed to his credit as a moiety of the postage he brought from the Office on Sunday; on the 8th, 19s. 6d. also a moiety; on the 16th, 19s. 10d.; on the 22d, 15s. 9d.; on the 8th of March, 14s. and 15s. 6d.; on the 22d, 18s. 4d.; on the 30th, 12s. 4d.; on the 5th of April, in my ledger 2l. 14s. all moieties; I paid him five guineas at one time, and 4l. at another, and he had goods from my shop, which are entered in my day-book; I paid him the money towards settling the account of the letters; Chalfont's account is drawn out from the day-book to the ledger by my order by one Berridge; I gave an account of these transactions in May last to the Post-office, near a year after it took place.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What district was your's? - A. Wood-street, Cheapside.

Q. How long had you been a deliverer of letters? - A. Eight years.

Q. Are you in the Post-office now? - A. No.

Q. How long had the defendant been in the Postoffice? - A. Near twenty years.

Q. How long have you been out of it? - A. About fifteen months.

Q. How long has the prisoner? - A. In the month of May last.

Q. In consequence of your information? - A. Yes.

Q. And several months after you had been turned out of your place? - A. Yes.

Q. You were turned out for bad practices? - A. Yes.

Q. What situation of life have you been in for the last fifteen months? - A. None at all; twelve of the months. I lay in bed ill; since that I have had no employ.

Q. You began to get very poor, and wanted some assistance - did you not apply to the Post-office for assistance for making a discovery? - A. I have not asked for any pecuniary assistance yet.

Q. Have you not an idea they will afford you some? - A. I think they will do so, but not on account of coming here.

Q. What do you expect to be recompenced for? - A. That is for them to consider; I am sure I have made a saving to the Office.

Q. Did you happen to fall sick during the time you were in the Office, and be absent at all? - A. I have been sick and absent.

Q. Were you ever dismissed from the Office before this? - A. I was once suspended.

Q. Was that for saving money to the Office? - A. That is a matter I am not obliged to answer.

Q. You are not restored? - A. No, nor do I expect it.

Q. How long have you known Chalfont? - A. Seven years.

Q. Were you always at home to serve him? - A. No.

Q. How long is it since you kept a shop? - A. Two years.

Q. Had you a name-sake in the Post-office? - A. Yes.

Q. What is become of him? - A. I don't know.

Q. Don't you know whether he has been hanged or not? - A. No.

Q. Were you intimately acquainted with him? - A. Yes.

Q. What situation was he in? - A. A checkclerk.

Q. Of course he had access to the different offices occasionally? - A. Yes.

Q. How long has he absconded? - A. I don't exactly know.

Q. How often have you corresponded with him since he has been abroad? - A. Never; he wrote to me, but I never wrote to him.

Q. You had access to the different offices when you were a letter-carrier? - A. Yes.

Q. If a letter came in your way, and you had a mind to pick it up, you might do it? - A. I don't understand you.

Q. In plain English, you might steal it if you were so inclined! - A. I certainly might, but I defy any one to bring such a charge against me.

Q. Have you been travelling on the Continent lately? - A. I was never there in my life.

Q. You have never been abroad, whatever you may be entitled to? - A. No.

Q. Some of the Post-office men, who carried the letters for you, are here to-day? - A. They may be; I have not seen them.

Q. They were present when you accounted to Chalfont I suppose? - A. No.

Q. It was all secret? - A. Yes.

Q. He gave you some receipts? - A. No.

Q. What! although he was such a bad man, did you take no receipt from him? - A. No.

Q. Then it all rests upon the day book for what you paid him? - A. No.

Q. You have no particular entries of t e letters to any of the inhabitants of the district? - A. No.

Q. Therefore you cannot tell whether a letter was directed to Mr. Thomas in Aldgate Ward, was delivered in another Ward? - A. No.

Q. All you mean to say is, the letters were delivered by other men, but whether they were delivered to the direction, you cannot say? - A. No; I delivered some of them myself.

Q. Will you swear that on any given day you delivered any letter to any particular individual of those letters which were embezzled? - A. I know letters have been delivered at Mr. Adair Jackson 's house, and I have received the money, but I cannot name any particular day.

Mr. Abbott. Q. In what way did you make up the amount? - A. We told the charges over toge

ther, and Chalfont took an account in his way, and I in my book, to prevent mistakes; it was not with a view to bring it against him.

Court. Q. Did you undertake to pay him for those charges? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath have you in one way or other paid him half the charges? - A. Yes.

Mr. Abbott. Q. Was your name-sake any relation of your's? - A. No.

WILLIAM BERRIDGE sworn. - I live in Maiden-lane, and know Webster; I was employed by him to post his book from the day-book; part of this ledger is my hand-writing, and part Webster's; January 17th is mine, 1l. 7s. 6d.

Mr. Gleed. Q. You took the day-book, and made the entries from it? - A. Yes.

DANIEL STONE sworn. - I am Superintending-president of the Inland Office; the defendant was employed in January, February, March, and April, 1802, on Sundays, to sort letters brought by the mails that arrived on that day, to be delivered the Monday following. The letters ought to have remained in the Inland Office locked up. Thomas Webster , the witness, was employed, but had no Sunday duty. Buxton Webster was not in the Office in January, 1802; but previous to that he had Sunday duty; he was discharged the 5th of April, 1801. Any person employed on Sundays could take letters. The letters are sorted in twelve letter-carriers divisions, and are then sorted in to walks; mistakes are frequently made, and they hand them over to the charge-taker, and he gives them over to the others. Webster in January last made a disclosure after he was dismissed from his office; in consequence of his disclosure, Chalfont was sent for; Mr. Freeling, Mr. Parkin, and myself were present. Webster produced his daybook, and accused Chalfont of fraud in the course of his Sunday duty, saying, that he had taken letters for London delivery to Webster's-house, where they cast up the amount, and divided it on the Monday; such letters as were not in Webster's own delivery, he passed to the charge-taker, and such as wore he delivered himself, or by the persons under him. Items were read from the ledger and day-book, as sums Chalfont had credit for in respect of the amount of these letters, and was explained to be one half of the amount of the postage of letters taken away on the Sunday. Chalfont being confronted without any promise being made him, and being asked what he said to the charge, acknowledged he had participated in postage in the manner stated, but said the amount was not so great.

Mr. Gleed. Q. Is there any situation of subsorter? - A. Yes, the defendant was a sub-sorter, which is perfectly distinct from a sorter; sorters are often employed in charging the number of letters that come on Sundays, which are told, and we know the amount of postage, and any deficiency would be discovered on the Monday upon the retelling the letters; we have no account of the number sent from the different places; they are first told, and then sorted. Webster was a discharged servant when he made the disclosure, and I have a recollection of his being suspended before.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendant.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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