Old Bailey Proceedings, 25th May 1803.
Reference Number: 18030525
Reference Number: f18030525-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 25th of MAY, 1803, and following Days, BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , ESQUIRE, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street,

Doctors' Commons.

1803.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE, LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. RICHARD PEPPER LORD ALVANLEY, Chief Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir NASH GROSE, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's-Bench; Sir ROBERT GRAHAM, Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; JOHN BOYDELL, Esq. BROOK WATSON, Esq. Sir WILLIAM STAINES, Knight, Sir JOHN EAMER, Knt. Aldermen of the said City; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; PETER PERCHARD, Esq. JOHN ANSLEY, Esq. and THOMAS SMITH, Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

John Fisher ,

Jonathan Jones ,

David Vernon ,

Gilbert Laird ,

Thomas Kebby ,

William Mortlock ,

Richard Baker ,

Samuel Strong ,

William Stevens ,

Charles Brown ,

James Large ,

John Poole .

Second Middlesex Jury.

George Parvin ,

John Bruckner ,

Matthew Wilson ,

Charles King ,

Joseph Keene ,

Musgrove Blacklock ,

James Pulteney ,

John Stevens ,

James Goode ,

Henry Thompson ,

Thomas Gower ,

George Parke .

London Jury.

James Fenn ,

William Pugh ,

Thomas Kebble ,

William Pearson ,

James Barker ,

James Wainwright ,

William Snoxall ,

Joseph Bonser ,

William Wilson ,

James Dowson ,

William Humphrys ,

Henry Mawe .

Reference Number: t18030525-1

445. JONATHAN FAULKNER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 28th of February , 126 pair of shoes, value 33l. 4s. the property of Duncan Sinclair , the same being charged to have been stolen by William Owen and David Jenk .

The principals having been acquitted, the accessary was of course ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-2

446. ANN RANDALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , a child's pocket-handkerchief, value 1d. a shirt, value 5s. a sheet, value 4s. a table-cloth, value 1s. a flatiron, value 6d. a child's pin-a-fore, value 1d. three saucepans, value 3s. and three candlesticks, value 2s. the property of Christopher Cordy .

The prosecutor not being able to swear to the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-3

447. THOMAS BEAMS , JAMES SLOROW , and CATHERINE ROSS , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , two printed valvets, value 15s. fourteen yards of print, value 28s. one hundred and fifty-six yards of calico, value 15l. 12s. two diaper clouts, value 2s. fifteen handkerchiefs, value 18s. eight shirts, value 2l. two neckcloths, value 1s. three yards of huckerback, value 3s. three yards of nankeen, value 3s. seven yards of lawn, value 7s. four yards of dimity, value 5s. two yards and a half of lawn, value 2s. seven remnants of lawn, value 7s. eight handkerchiefs, value 10s. two muslin aprons, value 4s. sixteen yards of muslin, value 18s. a muslin shawl, value 2s. ten yards of gingham, value 10s. a muslin gown, value 21s. seven yards of muslin, value 14s. a remnant of diaper, value 1s. a suit of bed-furniture, value 18. twenty-two yards of printed calico, value 1l. 8s. two remnants of sheeting, value 1s. three tablecloths, value 2s. a gown, value 5s. a pair of trowsers, value 1s. a pair of trowers unmade, value 1s. and a napkin, value 1s. the property of Richard Ovey , in his dwelling-house ; and the other two for receiving part of the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

GEORGE OVEY sworn. - I keep a house in Tavistock-street, Covent-garden : On Saturday evening, I think, the 16th of April, about half past eight o'clock, I went round to see that all was safe in the shop, and in the inside of the first shop I found the bottom pannel of one of the shutters broke, and in the cavity I saw a remnant of print, which I knew to be out of its proper situation; I took it out, looked at it, and put it in the same place again, intending to observe if it was there on Monday morning. On Sunday, about three o'clock, I was going out, and missed the piece of print from the place; I took no further notice till Monday morning, ten o'clock, when all my young men were collected in the shop, I enquired who had taken it from the place, and no one would own it; I went up into the accompting-house, and they were searching to see if they could find it; I described the pattern to them, and in the course of an hour one of them, of the name of Lattey, brought me a piece of print; he is not here; he found it behind some white calico; I enquired who had put it there, and nobody would own it; it was the same piece that I had missed; I gave it to a young man of the name of Bliss, to take it into the accompting-house; I told them I was intimate with Mr. Bond, and they should all be examined the next morning at nine o'clock. I wrote a memorandum, which I asked them to sign, and they all signed it, the prisoner signed it among the rest; I was up stairs at the time he signed; the paper is not here; the prisoner came up stairs, and Bliss with him, and he acknowledged he had taken this remnant of print from behind the shutter on the Saturday evening, and put it where it was found. I went up stairs with Bliss, and searched the prisoner's box; I found a number of articles, which Bliss will give an account of; then we came down into the shop; after that Bliss brought me up a till from the shop, in which was a pocket-book belonging to Beams, containing entries of various articles, five yards, two yards, and so on; I asked the prisoner what this meant.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you and all your servants had made an agreement? - A. Yes.

Q. You meant by that agreement to get a confession from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not give them to understand, that if they would sign the paper, and be the means of discovering it, it would be better for them? - A. I said, they had better confess it. I found a paper in the pocket-book, in consequence of which I got a search-warrant, and went to Mrs. Ross's, in Carnaby-street, Carnaby-market, up three-pair-of-stairs, in company with Jones and Treadway; she lodges in the front room; I found several articles there in a drawer, which she called Tho. Beams 's drawer; Treadway has got them; I don't know any thing against Slorow.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Beams was in the habit of selling in your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. All your servants sold in that shop? - A. Yes.

Q.And accounted over to you? - A. Yes.

Q. And had each a separate till? - A. Yes.

Q. It is impossible for you to say how many things you sell in a day? - A.Impossible.

Q.If he wanted any articles for his own wear, he had the opportunity of taking them, and accounting to you? - A. Yes.

Q.Then he had as good an opportunity of selling articles to Mrs. Ross as well as any body else? - A. Yes.

ISAAC BLISS sworn. - I am a shopman to Mr. Ovey: After the piece of print was found that Mr. Ovey had been making enquiry about, he begged of me to find out the person who had taken it, if possible. I took the prisoner up stairs to Mr. Ovey, and he demanded the key of his box; we found some Holland shirts, pocket-handkerchiefs, and neckcloths belonging to Mr. Ovey; he came down stairs into the dining-room again; I went up again, and in a corner of the bed-room I found a hat-box belonging to the prisoner; he himself desired me to bring it down; it contained two painted velvets, some small diaper table-cloths, and some printed calico; I have had them ever since (produces them.) Mr. Ovey asked him for the key of his till, which he gave him, and in the till I found a remnant of lawn, a remnant of nankeen, some Bank-notes, and this pocket-book, containing some entries which led to the discovery of Mrs. Ross; there are a great variety of articles put down with the prices.

Q. Has it the name of Mrs. Ross in it? - A. No.

Q. Did you examine the articles with the book? - A. No, I did not go to Mrs. Ross's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. How many young men are there in Mr. Ovey's shop? - A. Five or six.

Q. You had all distinct tills? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you distinct rooms? - A. No.

Q. Did any body else sleep in the room where this hat-box was found? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you miss any of these articles before they were found? - A. No.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - I am a constable: On Tuesday the 19th of April, I went to the apartments of Mrs. Ross, in Carnaby-street; I told her, I had a search-warrant; I saw some bed-furniture; Mr. Ovey said, it was his property; I asked her if she had any more property belonging to Mr. Ovey; she then opened a drawer, and pulled out his bundle of things, saying, she had bought them of the prisoner, Beams, (produces them); there was a drawer under a bureau bedstead, locked; I desired her to open it; she said, she could not find the key; at last I found the key, and opened it; I found in that drawer these articles(producing a large bundle); she begged I would wait till her husband came home; I was then desired by Mr. Jones to go and fetch the husband; I asked for Mr. Ross, and they did not know him by that name; it turned out to be the prisoner, Slorow; he said, he had been married two years to her. I went back, and searched under the bed, where I found this bundle (producing it.)(The property was produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.When you came to the house of Mrs. Ross, you found she was a married woman, and her husband not at home? - A. Yes.

Q. She said she bought the things of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. You asked for the keys, and she could not find them, and luckily you found a key that opened them? - A. Yes.

Q. When you found him, he acknowledged he was her husband? - A. Yes.

Q. You brought him in a coach to the house? - A. Yes; when I found these pantaloons, he said he had them of the prisoner.

JOHN JONES sworn. - I am an attorney: On Monday the 18th of April, about nine o'clock at night, I was informed by my clerk that Mr. Ovey wanted to see me; I went to Mr. Ovey's house: Mr. Ovey was in his shop; the prisoner, Thomas Beams , was above stairs; I immediately went up stairs with Mr. Ovey, where I saw a large quantity of linen goods and silk handkerchiefs in the drawing-room; the prisoner was then present. Having understood the nature of the business from Mr. Ovey below, I put questions to Thomas Beams respecting the silk handkerchiefs.

Q. Mr. Ovey promised him favour if he confessed, was that while you were there? - A. No; there was a quantity of linen-drapery goods; I said to Mr. Ovey, you had better take the prisoner to the watch-house; as we were going to the watch-house, Mr. Ovey asked him if he had any thing further to say; he said he had, if Mr. Ovey would pardon him; I replied, Mr. Ovey shall enter into no promise whatever. The next day a search-warrant was obtained, and I went with Mr. Ovey, and Treadway, the constable, to Broad-street, Carnaby-market.

Q. Do you know any more than Treadway? - A. No, only one circumstance; I sent Treadway for the husband; Mrs. Ross desired I would wait while she put on a bed-gown; by her manner I thought we had not found all the property that was in her apartment. I had no opportunity of communicating my suspicion to Mr. Ovey, but I was determined to watch her. After considerable difficulty she came out of a room on the two-pair of stairs floor, and another woman with her, and locked the door. I went down a few stairs; I did

not hear the foot of Mrs. Ross following me, but I turned round, and discovered her very busy with a bunch of keys, selecting one, and giving directions to the woman, whispering to her; I then made her understand that I had observed her, and desired her to give me the keys; she refused to deliver them, and on my coming up to her, intending to take the keys, she put her hand behind her; I took the keys from her, after a small resistance, and also the keys of the doors, and went down stairs with her, where Treadway was waiting with a coach and Slorow; I told Treadway what had passed; Ross and Treadway were present; I desired him to make a second search, as I believed the whole of the things were not found.

Q.(To Treadway.) Did you discover any thing in consequence of the direction of the last witness? - A. Yes, in the middle of the room under the bed.

Jones Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. All this happened while the woman knew that her husband was sent for? - A. Yes, he was actually arrived in a coach.

Q.Did not this going up stairs and coming down stairs happen after she knew her husband was sent for? - A. Yes.(The prosecutor identified the property, but could not swear to any single article worth more than forty shillings.)

Mr. Knapp. Q.(To Ovey.) Have you any partner? - A.No.

Q. Several persons have the liberty of selling in your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you, when you sell things in the shop, cut the name off? - A. No.

Q. Will you swear these articles might not have been sold in the shop? - A. It is impossible to know that.

Q. How long has this man lived with you? - A.Four years; I always had a good opinion of him to this time; I believe this is his first offence.

Beams. I leave my defence to my Couniel.

Slorow did not say any thing in his defence.

Ross's defence. I bought the bed-furniture, and the aprons I gave one shilling and sixpence a yard for.

For Ross.

Mrs. SANDERSON sworn. - I live in George-street, Hanover-square; I have known Mrs. Ross twenty years; I always found her honest.

Court. Q. What name have you known her by? - A.I don't know her former husband's name; she has been married to two husbands since I knew her; her second husband's name was Ross; she was five pounds in my debt when her first husband died, and had the honestly to wash it out.

ELIZABETH WATKINS sworn. - I live in Broad-street, Carnaby-market; I keep a broker's shop; Mrs. Ross lived next door to me; she is a hard-working industrious woman.

Q.You don't know any thing of the man? - A. No, I never saw him there.

Q. Do you know whether Mrs. Ross is a married or single woman? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you call her Mrs. or Miss Ross? - A. Mrs. Ross.

JOHN ROSS sworn. - I have known Mrs. Ross between thirteen and fourteen years; I have never heard any thing amiss of her character after Ross's death.

Q. Are you a relation? - A. No, I was a friend of Ross's; he desired me to do what I could for the widow; I always believed her honest; he has been dead nine or ten years, I believe.

Q.(To Sanderson.) When did you last see Ross the husband? - A. I believe about three years ago; he was then very ill, and the doctor advised him to go to Scotland.

Q. You never knew her go by any other name than Ross within these two years? - A. No.

Q. When did she last call herself Ross to your knowledge? - A.About six weeks ago.

Q. You never knew that she was married to Slorow? - A.She never told me so.

Beams, GUILTY,

Of stealing under 40s.

Transported for seven years .

Slorow, NOT GUILTY .

Ross, GUILTY , aged 59.

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-4

448. ROBERT BEAMS and THOMAS BEAMS were indicted, the first for stealing, on the 18th of April , fifty-six handkerchiefs, value 8l. 8s. the property of William Philpot , in his dwelling-house ; and the other for receiving forty-five silk handkerchiefs, a parcel of the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM PHILPOT sworn. - I am a linendraper , and live at No. 283, Holborn, in the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields . The prisoner, Robert Beams, was recommended to me as a shopman ; he lived with me about four months. Mr. Jones came to me on the 19th of April; in consequence of what he said, the prisoner was called up stairs, when he was asked by Mr. Jones whether he had stolen any silk handkerchiefs from me.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you or Mr. Jones make him any promise of favour if he would discover any thing? - A. No, neither of us; he was asked if he had stolen any silk handkerchiefs from me; he said, no, he believed he was mistaken; Mr. Jones replied, he believed he would find he was not mistaken; that he should soon be able to produce to me what would surprize me; when he found that

Mr. Jones spoke positively, he began to confess that he might have taken a dozen, or a dozen and an half, he did not say whether he had taken them at one time, or at different times; Mr. Jones said, he believed there was more than a dozen and an half a great many; Treadway, the officer, and Mr. Ovey, who were in waiting, were then called in, and it was deemed proper to go up stairs and examine his box; he went up with us, and the officer asked him for the key of his box, and he gave it him, and the box was opened in his presence; we examined it, and found one silk handkerchief, which he acknowledged to the officer, and before us all, that he had stolen it from me, and it was mine; we then took him to Bow-street, the officer has the handkerchief; I then went with Mr. Jones and Mr. Ovey, to Mr. Ovey's house, in Tavistock-street, Covent-garden; we then went into a house in Southampton-street, which, I believe, belongs to Mr. Ovey, when Mr. Bliss, one of Mr. Ovey's shopmen, produced a bundle of silk handkerchiefs to me, which I examined; I deal very largely in the article; the marks were taken out in general, but one or two I found, which I can swear to:

Q.You don't know any circumstance to prove the prisoner, Robert Beams, carried these handkerchiefs to the place where you found them? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. From the prisoner's situation, he had the opportunity of taking these handkerchiefs by small parcels? - A. Yes.

Q. You told me, when I asked you, that you did not make him any promise then; he denied it; after that, did you hear Mr. Jones say, that it would be better for him to confess? - A.Not in the least.

ISAAC BLISS sworn. - I found these handkerchiefs in the trunk of Thomas Beams , on the evening of the 18th of April, up stairs in his bed-room, at Mr. Ovey's, No. 23, Tavistock-street, Covent-garden; Thomas Beams said, they belonged to his brother.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Was any promise made to Thomas Beams to say any thing about them? - A. None.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - On Tuesday, the 19th of April, I went to the house of Mr. Philpot, in Holborn; Mr. Philpot gave me charge of his servant; Robert Beams. On searching his box, he gave me this silk handkerchief; he said it was his master's property, and that he had had it about a month, or six weeks; that is all I know about it.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you make him any promise to induce him to tell you that? - A. No.

Philpot. I know the pattern, there is no mark upon it.

Q.You don't know that this property belongs to you, but from what the prisoner said? - A. No.

Q. You had such handkerchiefs? - A. Yes, a great many, while he lived with me.

JOHN JONES sworn. - I saw the handkerchiefs in Mr. Ovey's drawing-room, the prisoner, Thomas Beams, was then present; I questioned him as to the time these handkerchiefs had been in his possession; he replied, two years; I asked him of whom did he receive them; he said, of a Mr. Cook; that he became acquainted with Mr. Cook by accidentally meeting him in the Park - that about a month after such acquaintance commenced, he told him he had a quantity of silk handkerchiefs in pawn for five pounds - that he bought them of Cook for the identical sum for which they were pawned, namely, five pounds; I put the question, how came Mr. Cook to sell you the handkerchiefs in pawn for five pounds, for which he must have paid five pounds and some interest; to that he gave no immediate answer. About one o'clock in the morning, I went with Mr. Ovey to take him to the watch-house; in his way to the watch-house, Thomas Beams requested to go back to Mr. Ovey's house - that he had something further to say respecting the handkerchiefs; on returning to Mr. Ovey's house, he admitted that all that he had before stated was false - that he had the handkerchiefs from his brother, who lived with Mr. Philpot, the corner of Turnstile, Holborn; I went to Mr. Philpot to inform him of the circumstance next morning.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner Robert was searched? - A.I went up stairs after the box had been searched, and heard him admit that the handkerchief was Mr. Philpot's.

Q.Whether, or no, before you heard him admit any thing, any promise was made to him by you, or any one in your presence? - A. No, on the contrary; the moment he said he had something further to state, provided Mr. Ovey would forgive him, I prevented a reply.

Q. This applies to Thomas; I was asking you what you heard that applied to Robert? - A. I heard nothing that applies to him.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You saw Robert in the shop before he went up stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you then say, it would be better for him to confess? - A. I did not.(The handkerchiefs were produced by Treadway, and two of them, which had the marks on them, were identified by Philpot.)

Robert Beams's defence. Mr. Philpot and Jones say, that they never held out any promise to me; when I came into the parlour, Mr. Jones said, it was a serious case - that a number of things were found - that it did not signify any thing to deny it- if I expected any favour, the best way was to confess; he said that several times; and when they took me to Bow-street, Mr. Philpot and Jones pressed me very much to confess, and said, it would

be best, if I expected any mercy, for many things were very clear against me; when I would confess nothing, he went again in a rage into the Office. After the examination, when my brother and I were committed, we went into the Brown Bear; Jones came and sat down by me, and said, it was a very bad business, if I could make any discoveries, it would be the better for me; I told him I had nothing further to confess; Mr. Philpot came to me, and said, there were two silk handkerchiefs my brother sent into the country; I said, I knew nothing of it, I knew nothing of the concerns of my brother; then Jones and Philpot left us, they pressed us very hard to confess. On the Sunday following, I think it was, Mr. Philpot came to me alone at the New-Prison, Clerkenwell, and said, if you have robbed me to any considerable amount, if you confess it, it shall not operate against you; this he repeated several times then, and at other times.

Thomas Beams's defence. I have nothing to say in my defence.

Q.(To Jones.) Is what the prisoner says, true? - A. No.

Q.(To Philpot.) Is what the prisoner says, true? - A. No, it is not.

Robert Beams. I used frequently to want goods for friends; Mr. Philpot said I might take any thing I wanted.

Q.(To Philpot.) Did you suffer him to take goods? - A.The shopmen sometimes want goods for friends, but they are always entered in the accounts.

Robert Beams called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Robert Beams, GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing to the value of 5s.

Transported for Seven years .

Thomas Beams, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-5

449. JOHN FRANKLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , a mare, value 10l. the property of William Tomlins .(It was proved in the evidence that the prisoner bought the mare of a man of the name of Boswell, who is confined in Hertford jail for a like offence.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18030525-6

450. JOHN FRANKLIN was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , a mare, value 10l. the property of Samuel Dumbleton . NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18030525-7

451. HYAM PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , a pocketbook; value 4d. a handkerchief, value 2d. and seven pawnbroker's duplicates, value 7d. the property of Jane Smith , privily from her person .

JANE SMITH sworn. - On the 23d of April, between nine and ten in the evening, coming down Aldersgate-street , the prisoner overtook me, and said, young woman, are you going a walking; I replied, yes; he said, is it agreeable for me to walk with you; I said, it was not, for I was going home about my business; he asked me whether he might walk home with me; I told him, no; he said, young woman, do you wear ear-rings; I asked him why he asked that question, and he took a pair of ear-rings out of his pocket, and put them into my hands to look at, and asked me if I would accept of them; I told him I never accepted of any thing from any stranger in the street; I crossed the way to get rid of him, and he kept on the side of me till we came near a passage, and he asked me to walk up the passage with him; I told him I did not go to any strange places with any one, and wished him a good night, and he went away; directly after he went away, I observed my left side pocket turned inside out.

Q. Did you feel any thing? - A.No, I did not; I perceived it by its appearing white outside my gown; I had a small red morocco pocket-book, a white cotton handkerchief, seven duplicates, and a register in my pocket; I put them in my pocket when I set out, at nine o'clock, to go to my mother; I went to a pawnbroker's in Whitecross-street, where I had a gown in pawn, to mention it, but it being Saturday night, the shop was very full, and I did not go in; I asked my mother to go on Monday morning, and stop it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You walked a good distance that evening? - A. Yes.

Q. You must have met a great number of people besides the prisoner? - A. Yes; the duplicates were in my pocket-book; I felt my pocket-book in my pocket at different times, when I put my hand in my pocket to take my handkerchief out; I felt it not above a minute before he overtook me.

SARAH BOWLER sworn. - I am the mother of the last witness: My daughter was absent from my house but twenty-five minutes, till she returned; she had the duplicates in her pocket-book, I saw her put them in her pocket when she came home on Saturday night, and I went with her to the pawnbroker's, and the shop was so full, we could not get in; I went on Monday morning to stop the gown.

GEORGE SHEPHERD sworn. - On Saturday, the 23d of April, about ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop to redeem a gown for six shillings; knowing that he was not the person that pledged it, I asked him where he got the duplicate; he said he bought it; the gown was brought down to him, he looked at it, and asked me if I would purchase it of him; I told him I

could not; there were several women in the shop, he wanted some of them so buy it, and none of them would; he paid me the interest, and had a new ticket in his own name; I gave him a fresh ticker, and he went away; Mrs. Bowler came on Monday morning to stop it, and I told her who had got the duplicate of it; I knew the prisoner before, I believe he deals in ear-rings; his father and mother keep a cloaths shop; I sent Mrs. Bowler to his house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You knew where he lived very well? - A. Yes.

Q. The duplicate was in the name of a different person - he transferred it into his own name? - A. Yes.

Q. He told you he had purchased it? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Mrs. Bowler.) What did you do on receiving the information that the prisoner had the duplicate? - A. I went to his house, he was not at home; I did not see him till he was taken up, and was at Worship-street Office; we gave Ray, the officer, charge to seek after him. When he was in custody of the officer, he asked me whether I would make it up, and make my daughter speak soft to what she had said the night before, and he would take her cloaths out of pledge, and pay us for our trouble, and give us any satisfaction we desired, if we did not bring him before the Justice, for if my daughter said that which she said when he was taken, he should be transported; I told him we would take no brlbes, we would speak the truth, and nothing but the truth.

Q. Who was by at the time? - A.Ray, and my daughter.

JOHN RAY sworn. - On the 29th of April, I was at the public-house adjoining the Office, in Worship-street, and the headborough of St. Luke's brought the prisoner there; he begged to speak to me; he went into the back parlour, and asked me if the business could not be settled; he said, the young woman should have all the duplicates, and something besides.

Q. Did you make him any promise? - A. I did not.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the duplicate of a person on Sunday, and went to the pawnbroker's on Monday morning; I never saw Ray at the Office; I never spoke a word to him; I saw the gown, it was not worth the money; I left it in my own name, intending to fell it.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the value of 6d.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

Reference Number: t18030525-8

452. ABRAHAM PROTHERO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , a silver watch, value 40s. the property of John Tuson , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN TUSON sworn. - I am a builder , and live in Newcastle-street, Whitechapel ; the prisoner had been with me about a fortnight; Last Sunday week I went out about eight o'clock in the morning, and left my watch on the table; I returned in the evening. On Thursday last, at tea, I missed my watch; the prisoner, who drove my cart, having left me in a clandestine way, I went and gave information at Lambeth-street Office, and Trott, the officer, went after him, and took him.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday, the 19th of this month; I searched his pockets, and found a duplicate of a watch, pawned for 1l. 1s.; he said it was a duplicate of a watch of his own; I told him he must go with me to the Office, and I would satisfy myself of that going along; the pawnbroker living in the way, I said, don't deceive me, I mean to call as we go along; he then said, he found the watch in his master's hay-lost, among some hay; I took him to the Office, and he was committed.

JOSEPH BURTON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: This is our duplicate, we have the fellow of it; I took it of one George Nichols.

GEORGE NICHOLS sworn. - I received the duplicate of the pawnbroker on Monday night, and gave it to the prisoner; I received the watch of him to pawn.(The watch was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I went up in the afternoon to rack the horses up, and saw this watch lying by the door; I took it up, and put it in my pocket; I racked my horses up, and went away.

Prosecutor. I gave two guineas for the watch.

GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing to the value of 30s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-9

453. ESTHER TYSICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , a silver watch, value 3l. the property of John Shaw , in his dwelling-house .

MARY SHAW sworn. - I am the wife of John Shaw, and live at No. 27, Pelham-street, Spitalfields ; the prisoner was employed by me in winding silk: On the 7th of May, I saw my husband's watch hang over the mantle-piece at two o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner had done her work, and went away between three and four; I did not miss the watch till between six and seven in the evening; I went after her immediately, and met with her in a house in Wentworth-street; I stopped her when she came out, and asked her where her master's watch was; she told me she did not know any thing about it; I told her there had been nobody in the house, she well knew, except herself; she said, indeed she knew nothing at all of it, so

help her God; I pressed her very much to tell me what had become of it, and told her, if she had got it about her, I would not trouble her any more about it.

RICHARD PERKINS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 55, Tooley-street, in the Borough: The prisoner came to my shop on Saturday, the 7th of May, I believe, between four and five in the evening, and offered a watch to pledge to my young man; he would not lend so much upon it as she wanted; she went out, and returned in a little while; I then asked her who it belonged to; she desired I would lend as much as I could upon it, for it belonged to Mrs. Christian, a person I knew very well; I lent her twenty-seven shillings on it; I asked her what her name was; she said, Esther Christian, and that she was niece to Mrs. Christian, she brought it from; I am sure it was the prisoner, for she has been at my shop for Mrs. Christian.(The watch was produced by the pawnbroker, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18030525-10

454. WILLIAM ALDRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , 17 lb. of was candles, value 3l. the property of Edward Timberlake , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY TIMBERLAKE sworn. - I live in Oxford-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square : On the 26th of April, about half after nine in the evening, as I was sitting at supper in the parlour, I turned my head towards the door, and saw a person come from the side of the counter.

Q. Was the door shut? - A. I cannot say; I left a little boy in the shop, who was gone for some beer; I saw a man in the shop, and saw him go out; I flew out into the street instantly, and this young man of mine followed him, and never lost fight of him; I cried, stop thief, and he was taken; my young man and I followed him to Sheppard-street, and then I returned; I saw the prisoner after he was taken.

EDWARD FREEMAN sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. Timberlake: I was sitting in the parlour with my back to the door, when Mr. Timberlake said, somebody had gone out of the shop; I ran out with Mr. Timberlake, and followed this man to the corner of Sheppard-street; he ran to the corner of Union-street, and threw down the candles, and said, d - n your eyes, take them.

Q. Did you call out as you pursued him? - A. Yes, stop thief; I followed him into Blenheim-street.

Q. Did you keep your eyes upon him all the time? - A. Yes; I took hold of him by the collar of his coat, and held him till the watchman came and took him to the watch-house.

Q.What o'clock was this? - A.Half past nine.

Q. Did he say or do any thing? - A. No.

Q. Did you see the candles fall from his hand? - A. Yes; I did not stop to pick them up, but pursued him.

THOMAS COSS sworn. - I am a watchman of St. George's, Hanover-square: On the 26th of April, between nine and ten o'clock, there was a cry of stop thief, just by Union-street; I was close to the prisoner; he threw down the candles, and said, d - n your eyes, there take them; he was running, and they were pursuing him; he ran across Bond-street into Blenheim-street, we pursued him into Blenheim-street; the candles were picked up by the watchman; we took him, and brought him to the watch-house.

Q. Did he say any thing about these things? - A. No. (The candles were produced.)

Timberlake. These are my candles; the papers they are in are marked by my shopman with his mark.

Q.(To Freeman.) Were the candles delivered to you that night? - A. Yes.

Q. These are the candles he threw away? - A. Yes, I have had them ever since; I have kept them under lock and key; there are 17 lb. the present wholesale price is 3s. 5d. a pound.

Q.(To Timberlake.) Do you know that they were in your house that night? - A. Yes; I missed them the moment I went into the shop.

Q. Would you take no less, if a person took a large quantity? - A.Taking a great quantity, and paying ready money, might make a penny in the pound difference.

Q. Can you take upon you to say, they were in the shop before the prisoner was in the shop? - A. I cannot say I saw them before, but I missed them immediately as I came into the shop; there were 6lb. in a paper, 1 lb. had been sold out of one of them just before.

Q.(To Freeman.) How many pounds were there in the papers you took up? - A.Two 6 lb. and a 5 lb.

Prisoner's defence. On the 26th of April, a little before ten o'clock, coming up Oxford-street, I went down Blenheim-street; there was a great uproar, and just as I was going home, a watchman laid hold of me, and said I was a thief.

GUILTY , Death . aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

Reference Number: t18030525-11

455. THOMAS BOYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , eighteen yards of printed dimity, value 3l. 18s. twenty-two

yards and a half of toilinet, value 9l. 5s. and eighty yards of quilting, value 26l. the property of Thomas Merrick and John Buckley .

THOMAS MERRICK sworn. - I am a warehouseman in Lawrence-lane, in partnership with John Buckley : On the 5th of May, we delivered to a man in our employment, William Postance , six pieces of waistcoatings, quiltings, and toilinets; one parcel was to go over Blackfriars-bridge, and the remainder were to go to different persons at the west-end of the town.

WILLIAM POSTANCE sworn. - I am a porter belonging to Messrs. Merrick and Buckley: Some goods were delivered to me, I cannot exactly tell the day; one parcel was to go over Blackfriars-bridge, the bills were in the parcels.

Q. Do you know who it was to go to? - A. I don't know exactly.

Q.What day of the week? - A. I cannot tell; I came to the end of Fleet-market to a pitchingblock; I took the parcel out that was to go over Blackfriars-bridge, and lapped it up again; a man came up with a hamper, and I asked him how long he was going to stop there.

Q. Was that the prisoner? - A. I cannot say positively; when I asked him how long he was going to stop, he said, for why; I said, I was going with this piece, two or three yards, I would not be long, if he would take care of it till I came back; I told him I would not be above five minutes; he said, I had better tie it to the block, and it would be sure to be safe, and I went with the piece over the bridge, and when I came back, it was gone, and he was gone.

Q. Who was that? - A. The man that came with the hamper.

Q. You can't say that was the prisoner? - A. No.

JOSEPH DOBREE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I took in this property (producing some muslin, toilinet, and jean) of a witness who is here, Mary Brown , on the 5th of May; the next day, a handbill came, describing, as I thought, the property, directing to apply to Mr. Rendington, Charles-street, Covent-garden; I took it there, it proved to be part of the property lost; we went to Bow-street; I was ordered to attend at seven in the evening; I did attend, and on stating the case to the Magistrate, it was agreed to let it remain in my hands, as I knew the person that pledged it; I made search, and found several parts of the property pledged at other pawnbrokers; the next day, we took the woman, and found the remaining part of the property the corner of Little White Lyon-street, Seven Dials, that was her lodging; the prisoner lodged with her, he was on the bed when we went in; we went to Bow-street, and took him with us, and he was committed.

JOHN WOOD sworn. - I received eight yards of quilting of Mary Brown on the 6th of May; I lent eighteen shillings on it; the same evening Mr. Dobree came round, and informed me, that it was part of the property that had been stolen; upon which we took it to Bow-street the next day.

HENRY BROWN sworn. - On the 5th of May I received eighteen yards of Marseilles quilting of Mary Brown; I lent her a guinea and a half upon it.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - I am an officer: On the 7th of May I went with Mr. Dobree to find Mrs. Brown; we went and enquired at a house the corner of White Lion-street, Castle-street, St. Giles's. Mr. Dobree went in to enquire; they told him no such person lived there; not being satisfied with his enquiry, I went to a house close by to enquire myself; by the description I gave of her, they told me if I went up into the garret I should find her; the passage door being open, I went up directly to the garret door; I knocked at the door, and presently Mrs. Brown opened the door; I turned round to Mr. Dobree, who was behind me, and said, is this the woman; he said, yes; the prisoner was then on the bed, and at the head of the bed I found this wrapper(producing it); the prisoner said, that he found them, that he took them off a pitching-block; I said, he must go with me, and then she said, it was by his desire she pawned them; I asked her for the duplicates, and she gave them me, except one, which she said she had lost; she told me where that was pawned.

MARY BROWN sworn. - Treadway came to my lodgings, and found some things; I was out, and when I came home I found the things in the room; I don't know who brought them; when the prisoner came home, he told me he found them somewhere near Fleet-market; I pawned some of the things by his orders.(The things were produced and identified by Mr. Merrick.)

Prisoner's defence. As I was returning from the City, I came and stood by the pitching-block talking to a porter, and three porters came up with a load, and knocked this parcel off the block, and abused me for not taking them away, and I took them to my lodgings. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-12

456. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 3s. the property of James Davis .

JAMES DAVIS sworn. - I am a woollen-draper and man's-mercer : On the 28th of April, about six in the evening, passing round the corner of the Old Swan passage with a friend, who had his hand

underneath mine, I felt something touch my pocket; I immediately saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand; he passed my friend to the left, and ran over the bridge, with the handkerchief in his hand; he might be past the second or third arch, on the right-hand side going over the bridge, when seeing me pursuing him closely, and crying stop thief! he attempted to throw it over the bullustrades of the bridge, and it fell on the pavement; it was taken up by a person, and my friend took it out of his hand, and I pursued the prisoner; I never lost sight of him from the time I saw the handkerchief in his hand till I took him, and my friend came up with the handkerchief; I delivered him to a constable at the Poultry Compter; my friend delivered the handkerchief to the constable in my presence; it was a silk handkerchief.(The handkerchief was produced by the constable, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going over the bridge, this gentleman laid hold of me, and said I had robbed him. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-13

457. JAMES STEDMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , a pocketbook, value 1s. the property of Thomas Taylor , and two Bank-notes, value 1l. each , the property of the said Thomas Taylor .

THOMAS TAYLOR Sworn. - I am a mariner : On the 23d of April, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was going along Gracechurch-street, towards the 'Change, from Rotherhithe, I felt a hand in my pocket; I looked over my shoulder, and saw the prisoner; I told him that he had taken my pocket-book; there was no other man behind me that I saw; with that he took across the street, and I pursued him, and called stop thief! I never lost sight of him; he took into Whitehart-court; I sung out stop thief, and a gentleman in the court stopped him, and he dropped the pocket-book, and the gentleman took it up, and gave it me; an officer had hold of him before I got up to him; he is here, I went before a Magistrate with him; the pocket-book the gentleman picked up and gave me was mine; it was a black one; it contained two Bank of England notes of one-pound each; they were in it when it was found; the pocket-book was delivered to the officer as soon as it was picked up.

SAMUEL ELLIOT Sworn . - I am a painter; I was waiting in Whitehart-court for a friend; I saw the prisoner run from Gracechurch-street; as he ran I saw him drop a black pocket-book in Whitehart-court as he passed me; there was a cry of stop thief! by that time he had got as far as Lombard-street; I pursued him, and collared him; I never lost sight of him; the prosecutor by that time came forward, and recognized him; a gentleman took up the pocket-book; it was delivered to the constable, and we took the prisoner before the Lord Mayor; before the Lord Mayor the prosecutor said, there were two one-pound notes in it.

WILLIAM WOOD Sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the pocket-book) I have had it ever since; it was delivered to me in Whitehart-court by the prosecutor.(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. Coming up Fith-street-hill I picked this pocket-book up; the prosecutor followed me, and cried stop thief! and I threw the book away. GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-14

458. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lawrence Doran , on the 8th of May , about four o'clock in the forenoon, Mary his wife and John Farrow being therein, and stealing a child's frock, value 2s. a gown, value 21s. a petticoat, value 10s. 6d. five shirts, value 20s. three child's shifts, value 6s. and three yards of lace, value 9s. the property of Lawrence Doran .

MARY DORAN Sworn. - I am the wife of Lawrence Doran , and live at No. 2, Charles-court, Cow-lane : Last Sunday week, between four and five in the morning, our house was broke open; I was in the one-pair-of-stairs; I had been washing all night; I heard a noise, and came down stairs, and saw the prisoner with a basket and my things in it, and he ran into the court with it (repeating the articles); they were all my property; I left them between four and five hanging on the line.

Q.Was the basket your's? - A. No, the prisoner's.

Q. Was it light at the time? - A. Yes; I saw him with the basket and things in it under the gateway; I saw him go out with it; he hid himself under the gateway; he was gone with the things before I had power to follow him.

Q. How do you know it was the prisoner did this? - A. I am very sure; I have known him for years.

Q.When did you see him next? - A. Ten minutes after under the gateway; I suppose he thought I watched him; I went back to call my husband, who was in bed with another man.

Q.What did you do after this? - A.Came in doors, and went after my business; two days after I found one of his children, and went to his place in Glass-court, Mutton-hill; it was about three o'clock; I found him at home, and desired he would let me have my things, or I would get a constable; he said, his wife bought the frock on the Monday; I had him taken up that afternoon; I saw the lace hanging on the line of the chimney-

piece in the prisoner's house when I went in; his child wore the frock on the Sunday afternoon.

Q.Who was in the house when this happened? - A.Only my husband and John Farrow .

Q.Was the house fastened up that night? - A. Yes. I fastened the doors about eight o'clock.

Q.How did you find the house in the morning? - A.One door was shut, and the other open.

Q.Had you fastened that door over night? - A. Yes, it was bolted; I think he came in at the window, and unbolted the door to let himself out.

Q.Was the window fastened? - A. Yes.

Q.How could he get in at the window - was it broke? - A.No, it was up when I came down stairs; it was down over night, but not fastened.

Q.How far was it up when you came down? - A.Half up; there was room for a person to get in.

Q.Was there any window shutter? - A. No; there were marks of dirt of feet inside the window, and at the door.

Prisoner. Q. You told the Justice the house was undergoing a repair? - A. Yes, but it was all fastened up at the time.

Q.And that there was no fastening to the door at all? - A. I said no such thing.

MARY TOMLINS Sworn. - I live in the two pair of stairs, where the prisoner lives; I am a lodger there; I saw the prisoner's child with the frock on, on the Sunday.

Q.Shall you know the frock again? - A. Yes, the body is one colour, and the tail another; the prisoner said he bought it on Monday.

ANN GREATRIX Sworn. - I lodge in the house with the prisoner, in the two pair of stairs; I saw the prisoner's child wear the frock on Sunday morning.

Q.Did you hear the prisoner say any thing about it? - A.No.

Q.(To Tomlins.) Did you know the frock to be Doran's? - A.No, I heard her claim it; it was a sigured pattern.

Q.Did you hear Doran claim the frock? - A. Yes.

GEORGE WOOD Sworn. - I am an officer; the prosecutrix came to me, and told me she was robbed; I asked her by whom; she told me the prisoner's name, and described him; I took him into custody; the prosecutrix told me her frock was on the child of the prisoner; I asked the prisoner where that child was; he told me at work at the factory; I told her to go with the mother to the factory, and bring the child, and take care the frock was not changed; she brought the child to the Magistrate, and he ordered the child to be stripped; I have kept the frock ever since.

Q.(To Doran.) Look at that frock? - A.This is the frock.

Q.What is the value of it? - A.Two shillings.

Prisoner. It is needless for me to say any thing in my defence; I leave it to your Lordship, and the Gentlemen of the Jury.

GUILTY, aged 39.

Of stealing, to the value of 2s.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-15

459. JOSEPH FENSER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , five pounds of cheese, value 5s. the property of John Morgan , the elder, John Morgan , the younger, and Christopher-William Morgan .

JOHN MORGAN, Jun. Sworn. - My partners' names are John Morgan , sen. and Christopher-William Morgan; we keep a shop in Bishopsgate-street , the prisoner was our servant , and had been with us nine months: On the 4th instant, I had some wine come to me about five in the afternoon; I went into the warehouse where the saw-dust-binn is, to get some saw-dust; taking it out, I found two half cheeses, which proved to be one cheese cut in half; I placed the cheeses in as I found them; about half after eight at night, the prisoner came in, and went backwards, and in a few minutes returned, and went into the cellar; when he went into the cellar, I went backwards to see whether the cheese was where I left it; I found it was gone; I proposed to search the men, and desired all the men to go into the warehouse; I saw the prisoner whip back into the shop; I turned after him, and saw him take half the cheese from his bosom, and put behind a butter-flat; I went back, and said they need not search farther, I had found the cheese and the thief; on returning to the warehouse, he threw something from his person, and I heard it fall into the dog-kennel, where we found the other half cheese.

Q.Did the prisoner pass the dog-kennel? - A. Yes; the officer has the cheese, they weigh about five pounds.

Q.Are you sure the cheese you saw in the binn was the cheese he threw down? - A. Yes.

Q.Are you sure it was your property? - A.It had never been off the premises; it was the same sort we had on the premises.(Mr. Morgan produced the cheese.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the cheese; it was not light enough to see any body throw it away.

Mr. Morgan. There was a lamp in the shop, I am not certain that it was alight, but there were candles in the shop; it was light enough to see him take it from his bosom.

Q.What is the character of the prisoner? - A.For some months back I have had great suspicions that he has robbed me. GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-16

460. JEREMIAH COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a deal plank, value 5s. 6d. the property of James Payne and George Payne .

GEORGE PAYNE Sworn. - I am a carpenter , in partnership with James Payne : On Sunday, the 1st of May, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the plank was taken out of the front kitchen of a house we were finishing in Bedford-place, Bloomshury-square , I saw it there the afternoon before; the prisoner was found taking it out; he was followed, and caught in Bloomsbury-square.

JAMES SMITH Sworn. - I saw the prisoner carrying the plank on his shoulder on Sunday, the 1st of May, between three and four in the afternoon; I was going across Bloomsbury-square, towards King-street; I asked him where he was carrying it; he said, home; he pitched it to rest himself, and I overtook him, and asked him where he brought it from; he said it was his own, and he was going home with it; I said, I was a fraid he had stole it, and I would go home with him, and he told me I might go to hell; so he took up the deal, and I went along with him; he went to Holborn; he crossed Holborn, and went throught a great many streets and lanes; I did not know them; he came back to Holborn; I got a lad to assist; the lad went for an officer, and he was taken in Shoe-lane, and carried to the watch-house, and the deal taken from him; I went home, an searched after the owner of the deal, and found it to belong to George and James Payne ; I informed them, and they went with me, and saw it in the watch-house; the officer, Fletcher, has the deal.

- FLETCHER Sworn . - I am a constable; I produce the deal; I took it from the prisoner in Shoe-lane; I have kept it from that time to this.

EDWARD EDMONDSON Sworn. - I removed the deal on Saturday out of the area into the front kit chen; it was an unfinished house; it was open so as that any body might get in; I know the deal by a kemshot end it had; it is veiny on one edge; I saw it at the watch-house, and knew it immediately.

Q.You think you can safely swear to it? - A. Yes, (looks at it;) that is the same.

Prisoner. Q. Is there not many planks like that? - A.No.

Q.(To Payne.) Did you see the plank? - A.I had it in my hand on Saturday afternoon; I can swear to it.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up in the street; a parcel of boys were playing upon it, and jumping; they ran away, and I took it up; a gentleman said if I did not take it, somebody else would.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined three months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-17

461. JOHN FRY and GEORGE WHITE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , fifty-four black lead pencils, value 9s. a wooden ink-stand, value 8s. a pewter ink-stand, value 6d. three silver folders, value 1s. 6d. two pair of silver buttons, value 10d. and nine pencil tops, value 6d. the property of Elizabeth Barrett , widow .

ELIZABETH BARRETT Sworn. - I am a widow, and keep a shop in Portugal-street, Lincoln's-Innfields : On Wednesday, the 23d of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in the parlour behind the shop, opposite the shop-door, I heard the letch lift up, and not seeing any one there, I did not go into the shop; I thought I heard something again; I went into the shop, and my neighbour, Mr. Clarke, came to the door, and enquired if I had lost any thing; I immediately missed the ink-stands and pencils from the counter, near the door; I saw them again at Bow-street the next morning; I know them to be mine.

RICHARD LIMBRICK Sworn. - I am one of the patrol belonging to Bow-street: On the 23d of February, as I was going through the passage of Lincoln's Inn, the two prisoners ran across from Portugal-street towards Lincoln's Inn; the prisoner, Fry, had this ink-stand, (producing it,) which struck against the upright iron bar going into the passage.

Q.How far might they be from Mrs. Barrett's house? - A.Not more than thirty or forty yards; some of the things fell off the ink-stand, and they both stooped to pick them up; I laid hold of the ink-stand, and asked Fry what he had got; he said nothing, and immediately let go, and ran away; then White got up, and I laid hold of him, and searched him; I found under his coat these pencils,(producing them;) from there I took him to the watch-house; about half past twelve o'clock, in company with Christopher Jones and Michael Lee, I went to Fry's lodgings, and took him out of bed.

MICHAEL LEE Sworn. - I was with Limbrick and Jones at the apprehending of Fry.(The property was identified by Mrs. Barrent.)

Fry's defence. I had had a drop too much; this young man dropped the pencils; I picked them up, and before I could give them to him, Mr. Limbrick laid hold of me.

The prisoner, White, did not say any thing in his defence.

Fry called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Fry, GUILTY , aged 18.

White, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-18

462. ANN WILLIAMS, otherwise MIL

LAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , a gown, value 10s. three petticoats, value 9s. four pair of stockings, value 10s. a half shawl, value 1s. 6d. an apron, value 6d. another gown, value 15s. three other petticoats, value 4s. two caps, value 1s. 6d. three aprons, value 10s. two shifts, value 4s. 6d. a bonnet and feather, value 5s. another bonnet, value 1s. a pair of gloves, value 1s. a box, value 2s. and ten handkerchiefs, value 10s. the property of Elizabeth Legg , spinster , in the dwelling-house of William Stockway .

ELIZABETH LEGG Sworn. - I live at Mr. Stockway's, No. 4, Buckingham-street, Charing-cross ; I lodged with the prisoner; she was the landlady of the room; I paid her one shilling and nine-pence a week; I slept with her; I left the room on the 13th of April, about half past seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was in the room; I left my box locked; I returned about half past seven o'clock in the evening; I found the prisoner gone, and the lock off the box, and other articles, part of them are here; she was taken up on the 23d at Wapping, with some of my things upon her, a gown, a petticoat, a pair of stockings, and a handkerchief.

JOHN GUEST Sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Mathiter, a pawnbroker, in Ratcliff-highway; I have no recollection of the prisoner at all; I took in a petticoat and a handkerchief on the 14th of April; I lent four shillings upon them, in the name of Elizabeth Murray ; I cannot recollect the person.(Produces them.)

WILLIAM ELBY Sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office; I apprehended the prisoner on the 23d of April, about the middle of the day; I searched her at a public-house, in Wapping, and found some duplicates upon her; I found a gown and petticoat upon her, which the prosecutrix claimed, and a pair of stockings. (Produces them.)

Guest. This is our duplicate.

Mrs. Legg. This petticoat and handkerchief are mine; they were in the box that was locked; the petticoat is worth three shillings, the handkerchief one shilling.

CHARLES PRESTON Sworn . - I produce a gown and handkerchief; I took them in of a person of the name of Jane Smith .

Constable. I found that duplicate on the prisoner.

Mrs. Legg. This gown and handkerchief are mine; they are worth seven shillings.

ROBERT CLAYNEY Sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I produce a white apron; it was pawned for sixpence, in the name of Ann Vidian , of Cockhill.

JOHN WARD Sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I produce a pair of cotton stockings, pledged for two shillings.

Mrs. Legg. They are mine; they are worth two shillings and sixpence; they were in the box.

CHARLES WILLIAMSON Sworn . - I am a pawnbroker; I produce a half shawl, pawned in the name of Ann Robertson , for one shilling and sixpence.

Mrs. Legg. That is mine; it is worth two shillings.

SEPTIMUS SADLER Sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I have a petticoat, stockings, and shawl, pledged on the 18th of April, for seven shillings.

Q.What is the worth of them? - A.About ten shillings.

Mrs. Legg. They are mine, they are worth ten shillings; I saw the prisoner with a gown, petticoat, shift, and handkerchief, of mine upon her; the gown is worth seven shillings, the petticoat five shillings, the stockings two shillings, and sixpence, the shift three shillings, and the handkerchief one shilling.

Prisoner. I throw myself on your Lordship's mercy. GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, value 39s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-19

463. JOHN GRANT was indicted for that he, on the 15th of April , with a certain pistol, unlawfully and feloniously did shoot at Spencer-George Townsend .

Second Count. Varying the manner of Charging it.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

SPENCER- GEORGE TOWNSEND Sworn. - I am a solicitor , and live in Cleveland-court, St. James's Place: On Friday, the 15th of April, at about half after four o'clock, I was going up to my own house in Cleveland-court, St. James's Place , I heard a noise, a person called to me; I turned round, and observed the prisoner at the bar coming up to me in great haste, and holding these two pistols in his hands in this way, (describing him as holding the butt-end of one, and the mouth of the other to him,) and he called to me, and said, here! here!

Q.Was it in an apparently agitated manner? - A. Yes; I had a stick in my hand, I lifted up my stick, and was going to strike him over the wrist, that he might drop his pistols; seeing me going to strike him, he put his hands in this way, (down by his sides;) I saw two persons in St. James's Place, standing by the end of Cleveland-court; I called, help, upon which he lifted up his right-hand, cocked the pistol, and I turned my back to him.

Q.Did he present it at you? - A. Yes.

Q.How near was he to you then? - A.About the distance of a yard; I turned my back, and he fired; I felt a shock on my back as if I was struck; I endeavoured to get out of Cleveland-court to run

into St. James's Place, I fell down; when I was on the ground, he came up to me, and stooped to me, and swore at me, and cocked the pistol, and fired again.

Q.The other pistol was it? - A. Yes.

Q.When he fired the second time, your face was fronting to him? - A. Yes, I was on my right side, and looked at him; I received the shot here in my ham; they went through my breeches, through my drawers, and through the upper part of my stocking; and made several marks in my thigh, I believe three or four; upon that a number of people came, hearing the report of the pistols, and secured him, and took the pistols from him; these are the pistols. (Producing them.)

Q.Were you acquainted with the prisoner before? - A. I had known him four years.

Q.Had the prisoner, at any time, expressed any displeasure against you? - A. Yes, he had threatened to shoot me twenty times.

Q.Do you know where he was taken to? - A. He was taken to Bow-street immediately.

Q.You had known this gentleman four years before - what is his situation in life? - A.I was agent for a Miss Ward, who is since married to Colonel-Major St. Paul, and I knew him from the day after she came of age; he had been a long time troublesome to her, insisting that he was in love with her, and because I would not introduce him -

Q. Had he applied to you to introduce him? - A. Yes.

Q.More than once? - A. Yes, repeatedly, and because I refused to introduce him, and to sign certain papers which he sent to me to sign, he expressed his resentment against me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q.You have known the prisoner four years? - A. Yes.

Q.His attachment, I believe, had been long before? - A. Yes.

Q.So he had opportunities of seeing the young lady before you knew him? - A. I believe not; only in this way; she lived at her father-in-law's, in Sloane-street; the prisoner had a mother who lived in Sloane-street, with Sir William Bunbury, and Miss Ward visited there.

Q.You would not introduce him upon his desire? - A. I refused him.

Q.He wanted you to sign something, and you refused? - A. Yes.

Q.Upon this evening he made his approach to you very much agitated, and came close to you, and presented the pistol, as you have stated? - A. Yes.

Q.How close must you have been to him when he fired? - A.About a yard from him.

Q.What was in the pistol you felt? - A. Yes.

Q.But received no wound? - A. No.

Q.The second time he fired, you were probably nearer? - A.Not so near.

Q.You received what was in that pistol? - A. Yes.

Q.But there was no wound? - A. Nothing to signify.

Q.Through the whole of this time this young man has been under the insluence of this attachment to the young woman? - A. Yes.

Q. He never threatened to destroy you upon any score of jealousy? - A.No.

Court. Q.What was the nature of the papers that he wanted you to sign? - A. That he was a respectable man, and a proper person to marry Miss Ward; and if I did not sign them, he threatened to destroy me; and he sent me copies of duels, and said that should be my fate. On the 25th of last March, in consequence of a pretended duel he produced to me, I had him up at Bow-street before Mr. Bond, and I informed him I thought I could prosecute him criminally for the threats he had used to me, but did not think it worth while; I told him I thought he was a foolish fellow, and bid him go about his business.

JOHN HAWKINS Sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Macartney, in St. James's Place.

Q.Did you see the gentleman at the bar on the day that Mr. Townsend was shot at? - A. I saw him in custody.

Q.What time of the day did you see him first? - A. I believe about half past two, or three o'clock.

Q.Where was he when you saw him? - A.He was standing at the post at Lord Carrington's door, in St. James's Place.

Q.Can you, at that place, see who goes in and out of Cleveland-court? - A.No.

Q.How far is it from Cleveland-court? - A.About twenty yards; I saw him staying there above an hour and a half.

Q.Did you hear the report of any pistol? - A. I heard the report of a pistol, and ran into Cleveland-court; Mr. Townsend was on the ground then, the prisoner was standing just by him.

Q.Did you see him do any thing? - A. I was just turned the corner when he fired the last pistol off.

Q.Who did he fire the pistol at? - A. Mr. Townsend; he was lying on the ground.

Q.After he fired, what happened? - A.My fellow-servant came up, and he was taken into custody.

Q.Did you pick up any thing? - A. Yes, two shots, just by the scraper, about two yards from Mr. Townsend's door.

Q.How near to where Mr. Townsend lay? - A.About a yard and a half; I have one shot, the other I gave to Miss Townsend, Mr. Townsend's sister.

Q.Were they loose on the ground, or fixed in the wall? - A.They were fixed in a circle of the ground.

Q. As if shot into it? - A. Yes.

SUSANNAH RODERICK Sworn . - I live at No. 8, Hopkins-street, Carnaby-market; I am a milkwoman; I was serving milk the same day I saw the prisoner; the first place I saw him was turning up to Lord Carrington's house.

Q.At what time? - A.About four or five o'clock in the afternoon; I went up, and served some cream and milk, and he was there; I went down Pall-Mall; when I came back, he was there still.

Q.How long was it before you came back? -- A.About half an hour, as near as I can guess.

Q.When you last saw him, what did he do? - A. I was coming past him a second time, and before he moved, I saw Mr. Townsend come up St. James's Place; with that, he rushed by me, and shoved me off the curb stone.

Q.Where did he go? - A.He went into Cleveland-court as hard as ever he could run; with that, I heard the report of the first shot, and as I came into the court, the second I saw him fire at Mr. Townsend.

ROBERT EVANS Sworn. - I am a clergyman, a fellow of Trinity Collage, Cambridge.

Q. On this day you resided next door to Mr. Townsend? - A. Yes, I did; on hearing the report of the pistol, I came out of the house.

Q.Immediately did you go out? - A. Yes; I merely saw the prisoner, Grant, standing in the custody of the people who came to the assistance of Mr. Townsend; I walked with Mr. Townsend to Pall-Mall, but being in a bad state of health, and unable to assist him, I returned, and there were shots put into my hand by various people; I did not see them picked up.

WILLIAM NUNNERY Sworn. - I heard the report of two pistols in Cleveland-court; I was standing at my master's door; on hearing the report of the pistols, I stept up; the prisoner was taken; there were a great number of people; I looked round, and saw a smoke on the ground; I touched it with my foot, and took a shot out of it; it was wadding; I delivered that shot to Miss Townsend.

JAMES FROST Sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Townsend; when I opened the door, the smoke was over my master, he was lying on the ground; when I came to the door, I heard the report of two pistols; not thinking but he had fell from the wound he had received, I did not stay to assist him, but pursued the prisoner, and took him, and wrenched the two pistols out of his hand.

Q.What did he say to you, or did you say any thing to him? - A.He did not say any thing in particular; my master got up, and said, take him to Bow-street; and he said, take me to Bow-street, oh, take me to Bow-street.

Q.Did you hear him say any thing to any body else? - A.Not in particular.

Q.Do you recollect his making use of any expression to a man of the name of Garrat? - A. No, I do not.

WILLIAM WILBURROW Sworn. - I am a surgeon; I was sent for to Mr. Townsend on the afternoon of the 15th of April; he informed me of the circumstance that had happened to him, and requested me to examine the posterior part of his thigh, to see if any thing had happened to him; I examined, and found three superficial wounds, and the muscles of the thigh in that part a little enlarged; this was in the ham; near the ham, on the external part of the thigh, nearer the ham-string, I found three distinct red marks, as if somebody had struck him.

Q.As if made by different agents to those that made the wounds? - A. I cannot say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Was there any quantity of blood? - A. A trisling quantity.

Q.There was no danger? - A. No.

Q.This was the only possible mischief that could have arisen from the circumstance? - A. Yes.

Q. How did the shot appear to affect him? - A.Like a grazing of a gun-shot in an oblique direction.

JOHN MOSS Sworn. - I am a Bow-street patrol; I took the prisoner into custody; I searched him at the Office, and found upon him a picker, a turnscrew, and a little loose gunpowder, in his waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I did intend to enter into circumstances particularly between myself and Mr. Townsend, but I have been advised to say but little upon it; it is an affair so the heart, and nothing that can be alledged against me, no, not the verdict of a Jury can affect me so much as the expression of Spencer Townsend as to a declaration of malice; I would wish your Lordship's attention to the circumstances; one of the pistols having struck Mr. Townsend on the back, and not harmed him in the least, and the other pistol that was fired from which he received no harm, I would ask whether the pistols were not presented with the handles to him, and the mouths to myself; whatever I could have thought of Mr. Townsend, I could not wish to take any advantage of him; when I loaded the pistols, I declare before God I did not apprehend any harm could come to either of us; I knew the effect of pistols loaded with swan-shot and powder.

For the prisoner.

PHILIP BOND Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a gun-smith, in Cornhill.

Q.Are you acquainted with the effect of a pistol loaded with powder and shot? - A. Yes.

Q.At a yard distance would it be likely to effect death? - A.If properly loaded it would.

DAVID DUVAL Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a merchant of the City of London; I have known the prisoner many years.

Q.What sort of a behaved man is he? - A. A well behaved man; he has been seven or eight years in my accompting-house.

Q.Do you know any thing of this attachment to this young woman? - A. Yes.

Q.From your observations of the impression made on his mind, what was your opinion of him? - A.My opinion was, that his mind was not quite right upon the very point which brings him to this unfortunate situation.

Q.What is that point? - A.The attachment.

Q.Love? - A.Love upon this subject; though he has discovered a sanity on other pointsd, on that point he has always shewn some degree of insanity; that has been uniformly my opinion.

Q. Was that the account on which you parted with him? - A.That unfitted him for business entirely.

Q.How long before this moment has this sort of thing struck upon your attention? - A.Four or five years.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. He has traded largely on his own account? - A.Afterwards.

Q.How long has he left you? - A.About three years.

Q.During which time he has traded as a merchant? - A. Yes.

Q.You never heard of his being confined as a lunatic? - A.Never.

Q.Do you mean to say that he did not know the distinction between good and evil? - A.On other points he knew it.

Q. Do you mean to say that he did not know that it was a criminal act to fire at a person? - A. No.

WILLIAM BARNES , Esq. Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Water-street; I have known the prisoner from an insant in petticoats.

Q.Have you known of the unfortunate attachment? - A. Not till within a twelvemonth past, which was since his bankruptcy.

Q.Whether, prior to that twelvemonths, he was a peaceable, quiet, and harmless man? - A. He was of good conduct, as to his morals and behaviour.

Q.The last twelve months was his conduct at all altered? - A.After that time, it appeared to be perfectly inconprehensible.

Q.Upon any particular score that you were made acquainted with? - A. Upon general circumstances, particularly with regard to his bankruptcy, he persevered to the last moment in an opinion contrary to the opinion of all his creditors.

Q.Have you ever had any conversation with him, or heard any thing from him, respecting this unfortunate attachment? - A.Very lately he has hinted at it; there appeared to me some cause of mental derangement, but from what cause I cannot say.

Q. Did not his conduct appear compleatly contrary-to what it used to be? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. He differed from his creditors about his bankruptcy, and wanted to go on longer? - A.He wanted to go on a deed of trust, and not to be a bankrupt.

Q.Did you not hear that he wanted to go on, in expectation of marrying a woman of fortune? - A. I did not hear that.

Q.Did you consider his wanting to go on under a deed of trust, in oppostion to his creditors, as a mark of insanity? - A.I did.

Q.Do you think he was incapable of knowing good and evil? - A.His conduct was so extraordinary that I slighted him, and have known but little of him this last twelvemonth.

Q.How often have you seen him this last twelvemonth - have you seen him half a dozen times? - A. I may have seen him half a dozen times, but I have not conversed much with him.

Q.Will you venture to say, that a man you have not seen above half a dozen times in a twelvemonth, is incapable of knowing good from evil? - A.Certainly not.

JOHN GARDINER Sworn. - I have known the prisoner three or four years.

Q.Had you an opportunity of knowing that he was pursuing an hopeless attachment to a young lady? - A. Not till within this twelvemonth.

Q.Had you occasion to speak to him on the subject since you knew of the attachment? - A.His conduct has been such as consirmed my opinion, which I all along entertained, that he is deranged, that his mind is not right.

Q.You are of opinion that he has been deranged down to what time? - A. I have thought his conduct, previous to the information he gave me of this affair, extremely strange and incoherent; he has for some time previous to this affair visited at my house, and as well as I can recollect, about a twelvemonth ago, he called upon me one evening very late, I believe about twelve o'clock; on that evening, to the best of my recollection, he related to me this affair, previously pulling out some papers from his pocket.

Q.Was your observation of his conduct from that time such as convinced you he was deranged? - A.Those papers were a gross attack, a gross libel, on Mr. Townsend, which he meant to publish in all the papers.

Q.Do you think, upon your oath, that he has been for some time deranged? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. He shewed you some papers that were a libel on Mr. Townsend? - A. Yes.

Q. You advised him not to publish them? - A. Yes, as it would subject him to punishment.

Q.You were a creditor of his? - A. Yes.

Q. He had dealings with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen him lately? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you think he is incapable of knowing good and evil? - A.From the circumstances I must think so; I have refused to trust him any more, not thinking him right in his mind.

Q. He wished to have a deed of trust instead of being a bankrupt, on the expectation of marrying a lady of fortune? - A. I don't know that.

WILLIAM PEARCE Sworn . - I have known the prisoner three or four years, and a more harmless, more inoffensive man, and more unlikely to commit the outrang that has brought him here, is not within the circle of my acquaintance.

Q.Had you ever any conversation with him on the subject of the attachment we have been speaking of? - A.Frequently.

Q. Did he appear to you, in those conversations you had with him, to be in his found mind? - A. In every conversation I had with him on that subject, I thought him bewildered.

Q.Did you take him to have a rational mind on that subject? - A.Perfectly irrational.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Do you believe him to know the difference between good and evil? - A.Perhaps he may, except in the question of this unfortunate attachment; certainly it is not the same in any topic not connected with that circumstance.

SAMUEL TOMKINS Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I have known the prisoner from his infancy.

Q.Within these last four years? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you know of this unfortunate attachment? - A. I spoke to him of it about two years ago.

Q. What was his conduct in respect to that attachment? - A. It was extremely absurd and irrational in every degree.

Q.Did his conduct lead you to conceive he was deranged? - A. On that subject I believe he was.

Mr. Simmons. Q.You don't remember his telling you that this woman was a person of a great fortune? - A. No, I think the affair rather an affair of love than fortune.

SAMUEL MILLER Sworn. - I know the prisoner; I think I became acquainted with him in the end of the year 1799.

Q. Have you had conversations with the prisoner, or has he told you of this unfortunate attachment? - A. He gave me information of it after his affairs became deranged.

Q.Upon your observation of his conduct, was it the conduct of a man having the possession of his mind? - A. I am a principal creditor; he wished to have a trust deed; I was strongly for a commission of bankruptcy.

Q.Whether as applied to this subject of the attachment, did you believe him to be an irrational agent? - A.He was not rational upon that subject.

Q.Have you had many conversations with him upon that subject? - A. A good many.

Q.Did you form your opinion from those conversations? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.You were his principal creditor? - A. Yes.

Q.What did he owe you? - A.Six hundred pounds.

Q.Is it very frequent for persons to with to act under a deed of trust? - A. I suppose it is.

Q.Did he want this in expectation of marrying a lady of fortune? - A.He never stated that.

Q.Did he ever describe the person to you? - A. Yes, as the daughter of the late Lord Ward.

Q.Did he state her to be a young woman of fortune? - A. I understood her to be a person of fortune.

Q.You have not seen him much since his bankruptcy? - A. I have seen him more since than before.

Q.Did you conceive him conscious of moral good and evil? - A. I think he was, except when this subject came across his mind, he was quite wild.

JESSE GREGSON Sworn. - Q.I believe you were solicitor to this gentleman upon his affairs being deranged? - A. Yes, I was called in to settle his affairs; the first interview I ever had with him in my life, he mentioned this young lady; I had conversed with him before on his general concerns, upon which he talked as rationally as any othere man could do; but when he touched on the subject in question, he was wholly unmanned, quite irrational, and cried like a child, and talked in so incoherent, so inconsistent a style, that it excited the observation of a gentleman with me, that he was not right in his mind, that he was certainly a madman; I had occasion to converse with him a number of times on his general affairs and his attachment to this lady; he talked quite consistent on his general affairs, but on that subject he was invariably incoherent.

Cross-examination. - Q.Do you mean to say, that such was the deranged state of his mind, that he was incapable of knowing good or evil? - A.Upon my oath, I should doubt very much whether at times he was capable of it.

Q. Do you think he was so deraged, as not to feel that it was a dreadful crime to fire at a fellowcreature? - A.I think his mind was so distracted, as not to know what he was doing, and that he might fire at Mr. Townsend without knowing whether he was doing right or wrong, or even fire at myself, or any body else, when his mind was on that sub

ject; I conceive he was entirely incapable of knowing what he did.

Court. Q.How long is it since you made that observation? - A.The first time I ever saw him; that is about a twelvemonth ago, and it has been invariably so.

Q.How many times have you seen him since? - A. A great number of times.

WILLIAM STOCK Sworn. - Q. Do you know the unfortunate gentleman at the bar? - A. Yes, I have known him two years, and probably more than that.

Q.The last two years? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you been intimately acquainted with him during that time? - A. Only at Lloyd's Coffee-house, where he has shewn me policies.

Q.What is his character? - A. A plain dealing, well-meaning man.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Mr. Townsend.) Q.In all the different interviews you have had with this gentleman, did you ever conceive he was deranged in his intellect, and not a rational creature? - A.No, never.

Q.Mr. Knowlys. (To Mr. Moss.) Q. You took this man into custody? - A. Yes.

Q.You were with him when he passed his examination before the Magistrate? - A. Yes, he was in my custody all night.

Q.Did it appear to you that he was deranged in his intellect? - A.No, I did not observe any thing like derangement.

GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18030525-20

464. JOHN BRYAN and ANN BRYAN were indicted for that they, on the 13th of April , a piece of base coin resembling a shilling, feloniously and traiterously did colour with materials producing the colour of silver .

Second Count. A round blank of base metal of the size of a shilling, feloniously and traiterously did colour.(The case was opened by Mr. Fielding.)

JAMES TRAKLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know the man at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q.How long have you known him? - A. About two months before he was taken up.

Q.Where did you first become acquainted with him? - A.At a public-house in Long-lane.

Q. In the course of your acquaintance, did he apply to you for any loan of money? - A. Yes, about a fortnight before he was taken up, he came with another man.

Q. Did he state for what that loan of money was wanted? - A. Yes, they told me they were going to Cox's, the resiner's, in Little Britain, to buy gold and silver.

Q.Did they tell you for what purpose they wanted that gold and silver? - A. To make half guineas and guineas of; I went with them to Cox's to the door; Bryan told me, I had better give the other man the money, and he would go in and buy it.

Q.Did he give you a reason why the other man was to go in? - A.He said, he did not like to go in, because he was so well known there for having bought so much silver; the man went in, and stopped about a quarter of an hour, and then came out again with some stuff in a paper, some silver and gold as he called it.

Q.While the other man was gone in, had Bryan and you any conversation? - A.He said, he would be answerable for the money, as there was nothing but gold and silver sold there; he came out again, and we went to a public-house, and he gave me this stuff, which he told me cost more money than what he had of me a great deal.

Q.Had you any further conversation about money? - A.Bryan and the other man told me they would come the next night to my house; Bryan came, but the other did not; Bryan's wife came with him.

Q.Is the prisoner, the woman at the bar, that wife? - A. Yes: they said the other man would come another night to make the money up.

Q.Did you ever see the other man again? - A.No.

Q.Did you learn from either of the prisoners where they lived? - A.They said they lived in St. John's-street.

Q.Did you afterwards go to the apartments where they directed you? - A. I did call there a day or two after.

Q.On what business did you call there? - A. To know why they did not come.

Q.In consequence of what passed at the lodgings, did you give any information? - A.He, Bryan, told me he finished the silver; I called at Bryan's on Sunday; he was not at home; I saw the wife.

Q.What did you call for? - A. I called to know why the other man did not come; she told me her husband was not at home.

Q.In consequence of what Bryan said, that he finished the silver, did you give your information at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you direct the officers to the lodgings at which you had been? - A.I did.

Q.In consequence of your information, they went and apprehended these two prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q.Bryan told you he finished the silver? - A. Yes.

Q.Did he tell you any thing else? - A. Yes; he told me where he had the mixed metal rolled out, another place where he took it to be cut, and then he finished it himself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The only times

you saw the wife was one time with her husband, and another time you called, and she said her husband was not at home? - A. Yes.

Q.Another man came with Bryan to your house? - A. Yes.

Q.Had you any acquaintance with the other man? - A. No.

Q.You had seen the prisoner, John Bryan, but three times? - A. No.

Q.Having seen him but three times, he unbosomed himself to you, and told you this business? - A. Yes.

Q.You advanced him some money? - A. Yes.

Q.How much? - A.Ten pounds, he being recommended by Bryan.

Q.You trusted him with the money, and took what he gave you? - A.He said it was sure to be gold.

Q.You were a witness in Surrey? - A. Yes.

Q.On this kind of business? - A.No, selling.

Q.Were you taken up for shooting at an Excise officer? - A. No.

Q. You know there are forty pounds reward? - A. I have not been told so.

Q.Have you never heard on the occasion of this trial, or any other, that there is a reward of forty pounds if a man is convicted of high treason? - A. I have heard so.

Q.Did not you say you had never been told that there would be a reward for it? - A.I was told I should have my expences.

Q. Do you not now believe there is a reward? - A. I never understood there was any particular reward.

Court. Q. Is there a reward in this case?

Mr. Alley. A.No, my Lord.

Q.Did not you come into this Court with a belief, and go before the Magistrate with a belief, that there was a reward of forty pounds? - A. I was not certain of it; I did not firmly believe it.

Q. You have never got the ten guineas again? - A. No.

Q.Have you not, upon your oath, said, that if you did not get, your ten guineas, you would prosecute this man, and make it up by your share of the reward? - A.No, I never said so.

Q.Have you ever been a witness on any other occasion but that in the Borough? - A.No.

Q.What way of life are you in? - A. In the pork trade.

Q. Do you mean to tell me, that by following the pork business you get a livelihood? - A.No, not that alone; I belong to the India House, and have for some years.

Q.Are you at present in the India House? - A. Yes.

Q.You have no acquaintance at all with the man you gave the ten guineas to? - A.None.

Q.Did you ever say to the prisoner, that you passed a good deal of money in the country, because you kept a little go? - A. I told him so to get it out of him.

JOSEPH BENNETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.You are clerk to Messrs. Cox, refiners, in Little Britain? - A. Yes.

Q.Look at the man at the bar - do you know him? - A. I know him by sight; I have seen him several times at our house purchasing sterling silver.

ELIZABETH KETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at No. 132, St. John-street; the prisoners lived at my house; they had the two-pair-of-stairs front room.

Q.Did the man prisoner ever tell you what business he was? - A. He said he was a plumber by trade.

Q.Were they taken up in that room you let to them? - A. Yes, they were.

Mr. Alley. Q. Is that in the county of Middlesex? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am one of the officers of Bow-street: In consequence of an information I received on the 13th of April, I went with a search-warrant to No. 132, St. John-street, Smithfield; I went up two-pair-of-stairs; I knocked at the door.

Q.The front room? - A.The front room; the prisoner, Bryan, came to the door in his shirt.

Q.What time of the morning was it? - A.Between seven and eight; he opened the door, and let me in; I and my brother officers, Passmore and Lewis, went in; I told him I had come with an aukward circumstance; that I had a search warrant against his apartment; he said, I was very welcome to search; when I went into the room I saw a great quantity of half crowns, some shillings and sixpences, and some gold on the table; the gold and silver were all on the table mixed together.

Q.Was that good money you found on the table? - A. It was all good but one shilling and two sixpences; on searching about we found some implements, some stamps that answer the marks upon these shillings I have got, and some vitriol, and other ingredients for coining. On searching the prisoner I found six had shillings in his right-hand breeches pocket; Mrs. Bryan taking up her pockets from the head of the bed, I caught hold of the pockets, and took them out of her hand, and found five bad shillings in her pocket; there was a half crown and a sixpence very good; I secured them; this is the money I found on the man, and this on the woman. (The things were all produced.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. She was found in bed? - A. Yes.

Q.The husband was found in bed? -

Mr. Alley. Q.You made a mistake I believe; you said you searched the man, he was naked? - A. He had put his small clothes on before I searched him.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you find any aqua fortis? - A. I found some vitriol.

Q. Vitriol is a distinct thing from aqua fortis? - A. Yes.

Q. You found no aqua fortis? - A. No.

Q. Did you find any files? - A. No.

Q. You have often searched such places? - A. Yes.

Q. You always found files? - A. Yes.

Q. Are not files necessary in this business? - A. Yes.

Q. Is not aqua fortis necessary? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you find any press? - A. No; there was a little hand vyse.

Q. You found no crucible? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Whether vitriol or aqua fortis, that was the thing you found? - A. Yes.

EVAN LEWIS sworn. - I went to this house; I found this liquid, a pair of plyers, three stamps, with letters upon them, A D, a P, and an A; I found some papers, containing something, I imagine to be gold dust; another paper with some other metal in it not of the same colour; I found some clippings of some kind of metal, and something like filings of metal; some scowering-paper, some part of which seems to have been used; a piece of cork that appears to have been used, and these two bottles, and some blacking I found.

Q.Did you find all the things that are there? - A. Passmore and I found them, and put them in. Here is a piece of paper I found in his pocketbook (the paper read), eight ounces of silver, at 5s. 8d. per ounce, 2l. 5s. 4d. eight blank copper at 3l. 2s. mill seventeen ounces at 11/2d. 2s. 11/2d. cuttings at 2s. 3d.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What is that you call blacking? - A. Yes.

Q.Shew it me - is it not liquorice? - A. Yes, for ought I know; here is a piece that is not liquorice.

Q.Have you any doubt that this is a piece of liquorice? - A. I have not tried it; here is a little bit of blacking that is not liquorice.

Q.Have you ever been at the apprehension of a person for colouring silver before? - A. No.

Q.Scowering-paper is used in cleaning irons? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you been in the army? - A. Yes; I gave evidence on Governor Wall's trial.

- POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. - I am clerk to the Solicitor for the Mint.

Q.Have you seen the things that are produced? - A. Yes, they are such as are used by persons who counterfeit the coin.

Q.Will that liquid, if there is a particle of silver in the metal to which it is applied, produce the silver on the outside of the metal? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that by actual experiment which you yourself have made? - A. Yes, out of this very liquid I made the experiment; the officer, Blackman, delivered to me one of the counterfeit shillings, which was then finished fit for circulation, and found on John Bryan. In order to satisfy myself that the aqua fortis would produce the effect on this particular blank, I took all the silver from it entirely, and reduced it to the same state it had originally been in as a base metal blank; I had some of the liquid out of the bottle delivered to me by the same officer; I then applied such materials as are found, by robbing it with the sand-paper and the cork; I then made use of the aqua fortis; I put the aqua fortis into a cup, but knowing it would be too strong of itself, I lowered it by adding a little water, which is always done when it is used; I then put the blank in, and it produced the colour of silver.

Q. I thought you had taken all the silver from it? - A. Yes, all the silver on the outside.

Q. It produced what? - A. The colour of silver again.

Q. You had only taken the silver from the surface, but there was silver in it? - A.Certainly; it was a composition of base metal and silver.

Q. How did you destroy the colour of silver? - A. By taking it off compleatly with the sandpaper.

Q.Rubbing with sand-paper made it rub off? - A. Yes.

Q. How did you make it smooth again? - A. By rubbing it with cork.

Q.Then putting it into the liquor produced the colour of silver again? - A. Yes; at first when I took it out it was black, and it was necessary to clean it with salt; there is salt among the things found coming out of the pickle; it has a blackish appearance, and rubbing it with salt cleans it.

Q. That was found on John Bryan? - A. Yes.

Q. When cleaned with salt it appears very clean indeed, and glaringly white? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any thing there that reduces that glaring white? - A. No; here is a pair of plyers; these may be used in holding the blank while the operation is performed of rubbing it with the sandpaper and cork, which is preparative to its being coloured; here is sand-paper, which is of a peculiar sort used by those who counterfeit the coin; part appears to have been used, the other not.

Q. There is a piece of blacking, what is the use of that? - A. I don't think that is used in that case; it is very dry, it has been kept a long while, I cannot form an opinion of it; here is a piece of cork that appears to have been used a long while; here is the salt I mentioned; here is the liquid that produced the colour; here are some stamps used by persons in coining; there are the letters D P A upon them; these sort of marks are often

put by persons on good money, which gives a kind of credit to it.

Q. Look at the money found on the man, is any of that money marked with either of those stamps? - A. Here is one with D and P (compares them); the D corresponds and the P corresponds. I am now looking at what was found on the woman; here is one piece with a P, which corresponds with the stamp; here is another with an A and a D, found upon the woman.

Q.The pieces of coin found upon the man and the woman, do they all appear to be coloured blanks? - A. Those found on the woman are coloured blanks.

Q.Do they appear ever to have been in circulation? - A.They do not appear to have been in circulation; here are four in particular I think have not been in circulation; they are coloured blanks.

Q. Do you see among the things found sufficient for a person possessing blanks, to produce the colour of silver, and make them appear good shillings? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. Aqua fortis is obliged to be lowered with water? - A. Yes.

Q. There was nothing found in the room capable of producing the effect without alteration? - A. No.

Q. Is there a single shilling that was found on the man fit for circulation? - A.These four in my opinion have not been in circulation, and they looked much better when I first saw them.

Q. Were they found on the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Whether you mean to swear, that there is one shilling among those found on the prisoner, which would deceive a cautious person? - A. I conceive those four I have produced I could pass very well.

Court. Mr. Knowlys, I think you should select one shilling.

Mr. Knowlys. Shew any one to the Jury compleat, and fit for circulation.

Court. In a case of this sort it cannot be necessary for the prosecutor to say which shilling is coloured.

SAMUEL MENSELLING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the Moniers of his Majesty's Mint.

Q.Look at that shilling, is it a good shilling or not? - A. It is not; it is base metal coloured.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean to say, that that appears like a shilling by any outward application, or is it internally white? - A. I cannot say; it is base metal coloured.

John Bryan 's defence. I know nothing at all of this transaction; Mr. Powell has produced this colour, but I don't know how to produce it; I never had a bad shilling to my knowledge in my life.

Ann Bryan was not put on her defence.

For the prisoner, John Bryan.

THOMAS RYAN sworn. - I am a boot-maker; have known John Bryan for seven years very intimately; he had always a good character; I have received money of him; I never received any bad money of him.

Cross-examined. Q.Where do you live? - A. In Goswell-street.

Q. Have you known him intimately for seven years? - A. Yes.

Q.Has he never been in jail upon any charge but this upon which he is now tried? - A. No, I believe not.

Q.Don't you know that he has been in jail before he was committed for this offence? - A. I know nothing of it.

Q. Don't you know that he was in Newgate for one year? - A. I don't know it; I never had ocular evidence of it; I never saw him there.

For the prosecution.

EDWARD KIRBY sworn. - I am nephew of the present keeper of Newgate.

Q.How long has the prisoner, John Bryan, been out of jail before he was committed for this offence? - A. I believe about a year.

Q. How long was he with you? - A.About three months; he did not serve out his time with us; he was committed by the Court of King's Bench for a conspiracy, and ordered to be imprisoned six months in the House of Correction.

The prisoner called another witness, who gave him a good character.

John Bryan , GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

Ann Bryan , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-21

465. JAMES PAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a set of chaise-harness, value 30s. two bridles, value 3s. and a saddle, value 10s. the property of James Ogle , Esq.

BENJAMIN BENTLEY sworn. - I am servant to James Ogle , Esq. he lives at Bury-hall, Edmonton; the chaise-harness was in my care; they were in the stable; my master went into Sussex to visit his brother: On the night of the 24th of April they were taken away from the stable between Sunday night and Monday morning; I went in the morning, and found the things gone; the stable was locked over night; I suppose they got in at the lost, and went out at the window; I found the window open; I saw the prisoner on the Saturday, between four and five; he was talking with me at the stable-door; it was my master's brother's stable, at Worthing, in Sussex , they were in; the prisoner told me he had the care of some horses in that stable last summer, as groom of the Duke of Northumberland; while he was there he

pulled out two back staves to get in and out the lost, and he remarked to me their not being mended. About a week after I saw the harness at a broker's, in Perbeck-street, Soho; I went and swore to the property at Marlborough-street that day; the bridle had been altered, and the kickingstrap put on just before; the harness was quite plain; we had had it about eight months.

Q.You can swear to it? - A. Yes; the bridlereins are quite new, and had never been used before; the maker's name, Rees, is on the saddle; I saw the prisoner at Marlborough-street.

Q. Did you see the things at the Office? - A. Yes.

Q. How did you know the prisoner was at the Office? - A. They were advertised by Mr. Luppino; in consequence of that advertisement, I went to Marlborough-street.

CHARLES LUPPINO sworn. - I am an appraiser and auctioneer; in consequence of my having a sale for the Friday following, James Page applied to me to know if I would sell an harness; he informed me that a friend of his near Brighton had an harness to sell, and that he thought by sending it to London, he should get a better price for it; he then told me that he would bring the harness about three o'clock in the afternoon; between three and four he brought the harness in a sack into the rooms; it was a one-horse chaise harness, two bridles, and a saddle, with white cloth and girths; he then asked me if I would advance him a guinea on them till they were sold; having a suspicion that he had not come properly by them, I made an excuse that I had no money at the time; I told him if he would call about seven or eight in the evening, I should then have change; during which time I enquired at the coach-office; the clerk not being in the way, they could not tell me whether there had been a parcel of that description; when I came home, the prisoner was standing at my door; he again pressed me hard for a guinea, for he said he could not do without it; that he had not paid the coach-office for bringing it up; I told him positively I would advance no money till he could give me a further account whose property it was; he then seemed very much agitated, and told me he could produce me a letter from the parties that sent it up; I being fearful he should escape me, with the assistance of the watch, I seized him, and carried him to the watch-house; the next morning he was carried to Marlborough-street Office, and not being able to give a satisfactory account of himself, he was committed for re-examination; he was reexamined on the Thursday following, and fully committed; I have kept the things from that time to this; after the first examination, I advertised them three times, and Bentley came at the second examination.(They were produced, and identified by Bentley.)

Prisoner's defence. They were sent to me out of the country by a young man to sell for him.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-22

466. RICHARD FREAKE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Askew , on the 3d of May , about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing a gun, value 3l. the property of the said James.

JAMES ASKEW sworn. - I am a gun-maker , and live at No. 8, Dean-street, Red Lion-square ; I was out when the gun was lost.

ANN ASKEW sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; between nine and ten o'clock on Tuesday the 3d of May, I was going down-stairs for coals; I went out at the shop-door into the passage, and drew the door after me; I heard my sister scream aloud; I immediately ran back, and missed the gun out of the shop-window; I saw it about twenty minutes before; my husband came home about half an hour after, and I related to him how we had been alarmed.

Q.Was the door broke at all? - A.No, the door was shut and fastened with a slip-lock, which could be opened on the outside; there is a door out of the shop into the passage; I drew that slightly after me.

ELIZABETH-BOXLEY HUGHES sworn. - I live at No. 2, New-street, St. Giles's: On the 4th of May, about twenty minutes before eight in the morning, a person knocked at my door; I asked who was there; the prisoner answered, his name was Freake; I had seen him before; he came in, and said he wanted to see Thomas.

Q. Is that your husband? - A.It is a man I live with; he said, he had an article might suit him; I told him, he would be in in a quarter of an hour; he said, he could not stop, and desired me to tell him to come to a Mrs. Powell's, in Sutton-street, and if he did not find him there, he would find him at his own apartments; when Thomas Appleton came in, I told him of it; upon that Appleton went, and returned in half an hour, and said, he did not see him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You live with Appleton? - A. Yes.

Q. He was taken up, and sent to prison? - A. Yes.

Q. After that, he said he had the gun of the prisoner? - A. I cannot say that; I saw the gun in the room in the afternoon.

Q. Do you recollect being at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you offer the prisoner a duplicate of a gun? - A. No; he asked me where the duplicate of the gun was; I told him it was at home, and he said, you had better go, and make away with

it; upon which, not knowing the consequence, I went and tore it to pieces, and threw it away; it was in my drawer; I never saw the prisoner afterwards.

Q.Do you know who pawned the gun? - A. Yes, Appleton.

Q.How do you know that? - A. Only by his own words.

Q. Did Appleton give you the duplicate? - A. No.

Did he put it in the drawer? - A. I don't know.

Q. He was admitted a witness for the Crown, and so were you? - A. Yes.

THOMAS APPLETON sworn. - On the 4th of May, I came home about eight o'clock in the morning, and Mrs. Hughes informed me that Mr. Freake had been up to my lodging; in consequence of her information, I went to Mrs. Powell's, the Falcon; I did not find the prisoner; I went to his apartment, and he was not at home; I then returned home, and mentioned that I had not seen him; I waited sometime, and then went back again with Edward Deacon ; I found him at home, and Deacon waited for me in the street; the prisoner Freake shewed me this gun (producing it), and asked me the value of it; I told him, in the state it was in, it was of very little value; he asked me to take it and repair it, and make the best of it I could.

Q. What trade are you? - A. A gun-maker; I repaired it, and offered it for sale to more than one or two, and could get no more than a guinea and an half offered for it; wanting some money, I afterwards pledged it; I went and informed him, I could get but a guinea and an half for it; he said, that would do very well; I was to be paid for the repairs, which was full the half of it, and we were to divide the money; I paid him 12s. in part of 15s. 9d. I went home, and took the gun to the pawnbroker's, and pawned it for two pounds; I did not see Freake for two days after; he then asked me when I would pay him the overplus money.

Q.Did you tell him you pawned it for two pounds? - A.No; I told him I would give it him in a few days; I saw him two days after, and he asked me for it; I told him I had not it about me.

Q. Did you ever pay him the remainder? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. He offered to sell you the gun, and you told him it was worth but a guinea and an half? - A. Yes; I had repaired it.

Q.You knew the value of the gun? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw him two days after, and was honest enough to tell him you had received two pounds for it? - A. I did not.

Q. What repairs did you do? - A.There was a new lock.

Q. Did not you scratch the maker's name off? - A. No.

Q.Upon your oath, did not you say you scratched a name off the gun? - A.Off the barrel.

Q. Did not you put another name on? - A. The name of Oakes.

- PICKERING sworn. - I apprehended the last witness and Freake on Friday the 13th; I was sent by Mr. Bond to look after Appleton, a complaint having been made of Appleton pawning a gun that had been stolen; I knew him before; I went to his lodgings, and told him he must go with me; he asked, for what; I told him it was concerning a gun which he had pawned, which proved to be a stolen one; I brought him to the Office; he told me he had the gun of Freake; upon which, I told the Magistrate, and was sent, and apprehended Freake, and brought him to the Office, and they were both committed; the gun was stopped before at the pawnbroker's.

GEORGE HARDY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 9th of May, I took this gun in pledge of Thomas Appleton , and lent him two pounds upon it; there is Oakes on the gun, and Oakes on the lock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. To be sure the gun was worth more, or you would not have lent forty shillings on it? - A.Certainly.

EDWARD DEACON sworn. - I called on Appleton on the 4th of May; he said he was going to Crown-street; I went with him, he turned into a court or yard on the left hand in Crown-street; I did not see him go into the house; I waited in the street for him, at the end of the yard; in about ten minutes, he came out with a gun upon his shoulder; I don't know the name of the yard; we went down Crown-street together, there we parted, and he went home with the gun.

Q.(To Hughes.). Where does Freake live? - A. Somewhere by Crown-street; I don't know the house.

WILLIAM RADCLIFF sworn. - On Friday, the 13th, I was at Bow-street; Mr. Bond ordered the pawnbroker to give the gun into my possession; Pickering went, and apprehended Appleton, and brought him to the Brown Bear .(The gun produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Q.(To Askew.) Has your name been taken out? - A. Wood's name is taken out, and another name put in; it had no lock.

THOMAS ARMSLEY sworn. - I went with Pickering to apprehend Freake.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the gun till I saw it at the Office; what Appleton has been saying, is all a fable and falsity.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose

467. JOSEPH WILLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , six silver tea-spoons, value 18s. a silver seal, value 2s. a pair of breeches, value 26s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 10s. a neck handkerchief, value 1s. a waistcoat, value 8s. a shirt, value 3s. and a knife, value 1s. the property of Thomas Uppington , in the dwelling-house of John Ashley .

THOMAS UPPINGTON sworn. - I live with John Ashley, in Great Portland-street , he is a butcher; I am servant to him: On the 25th of April, about five in the morning, my master and I went to Smithfield; on our return, Jane Smith , my fellow-servant, said, she had seen a man in the house; we did not miss any thing then. On Wednesday morning I went to my box for something, and found my box broke open; it was in the garret where I slept; out of the box I lost the different articles mentioned in the indictment; in the afternoon, I went round to several pawnbrokers, and found most of the property at Mr. Dobree's, the corner of Charlotte-street, Rathbone-place; behind the box I found a chopper, which I suppose it was broke open with; it has my master's name on it, it was taken from the area where we kill the sheep.

EDWARD- WILLIAM TURNER sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. Dobree, in Charlotte-street; I have some articles the prisoner pledged with me, on the 25th, 26th, and 27th of April; the first time I saw him was on the 25th.

JANE SMITH sworn. - I live with Mr. Ashley: On the 25th of April, as I was standing in the kitchen, I saw the prisoner coming down stairs about half past seven o'clock, he was dressed as he is now; I am sure it was the prisoner; I did not see any thing he had with him.(The things were produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-23

468. THOMAS WADE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , a tableclock, value 5l. the property of William Rothwell , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Rothwell .

WILLIAM ROTHWELL sworn. - I am a plasterer , and live at No. 2, Farm-street, Berkeley-square : On the 17th of April, between five and six in the morning, I heard a noise in the room over where I was; I immediately went to the room, and found the door open; I immediately proceeded to the street-door, and saw two men in the act of turning the corner into South-street; as they were turning the corner, they looked back; I returned to the accompting-house door, and called my man out of the yard, and informed him, the accompting-house door was open, and I perceived the clock missing from a bracket on which it stood; the door was left on the latch; I heard that clock strike five; conceiving one, or both of them, had been in the room, I sent my man after them, his name is Hugh Stockman .

HUGH STOCKMAN sworn. - On the 17th of April, between five and six in the morning, my master called me, and sent me after two men; I did not see them till I turned into South-street; I saw them turn the corner of Chapel-street; I cried, stop thief, and when I turned the corner of the street, I saw one of them drop the clock; I left the clock where it was, and followed him; I don't know whether I lost sight of him, or not, but if I did, it was not for above a moment; I took him near Mount-street, and I took him to the watch-house; I am sure the prisoner is the man that dropped the clock, and that I pursued and took.

Prisoner's defence. I was walking early in the morning, and saw a man; he asked me to stop a little, and he went in, and brought out this clock; he desired me to take hold of it, and I at first declined it; he then desired me to hold it, while he put his apron on; he put it into my hands, and went on; I heard the cry of stop thief, and dropped the clock.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 37,

Of stealing, to the value of 20s.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18030525-24

469. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for privately stealing from the person of William Stebbing , on the 28th of April , a pocket-book, value 2s. three Bank-notes, value 50l. each, three Bank-notes, value 10l. each, two Bank-notes, value 5l. each, two promissory notes, value 75l. each, a bill of exchange for 13l. another bill of exchange for 37l. 10s. another bill of exchange for 9l. 17s. 6d. and a promissory note for 10l.

WILLIAM STEBBING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. On Thursday, the 28th of April, I was just seated with Mrs. Stebbing at tea; I was rung down; there were three ladies, with whom I went to the passage of Covent-garden Theatre , leading to the pit door; they were going to the play; I went to see them to the door; when we arrived in the passage, one of the ladies remarked, they should get in easily, there was no crowd; we had not been long in the passage, before a great confusion took place, and I was very much pressed, and before I got to the door, I perceived something like picking my breeches-pocket; I immediately applied my hand to button it up; not perceiving any body taking any thing out of my side-pocket, I

accompanied the ladies to the place, and returned home; not till then did I perceive that I had lost my pocket-book; I felt in my pocket as I went up Bow-street, before I entered the passage, it was in the inside pocket of my coat; I missed it, and went to Bow-street, and gave information; there were in my pocket-book, three 50l. Bank-notes, three 10l. Bank-notes, two 5l. Bank-notes, and a great many small notes, a note of hand of J, Harman, 10l. two notes of hand, 75l. each, of J. Willoughby, a draft on S. Lewis, for 37l. 10s. another bill of exchange, 9l. 17s. 6d. another draft of 13l. drawn on John Harris . The day fortnight after I missed them, I had notice from Mr. Harris, the acceptor of one of the drafts, that it had been presented to him, to know if it was his acceptance; I called on Mr. Harris, who referred me to a Mr. Strangways, of Islington, who had presented the bill to Mr. Harris; Mr. Strangway was not at home that afternoon; I met with him the next morning, who produced this bill, it had been in my possession ever since; it is one of the bills that was in my pocketbook when it was stolen; Mr. Strangway told me he would take me to the person he received it of; he took me to the place where he expected to find him, in Duke-street, but could not find him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How much property did you take to the playhouse with you? - A. I believe the amount was about 400l.

Q.You have no doubt you lost your property going into the passage? - A. No.

Q.You have no doubt it went at the time you felt it go? - A. I did not feel the pocket-book go; I felt a person at my breeches-pocket, not at my coat-pocket.

Court. Q. Was the breeches-pocket the same side as the coat-pocket? - A. It was.

Q.Did not the prisoner voluntarily come with Mr. Strangway? - A. Yes, to my house.

Q.The bill on the back appears to be indorsed by John Davis ? - A.No, not this bill.

Q.This was above a fortnight after? - A. That day fortnight.

Q.How many hands it had gone through, you cannot say? - A.No.

Q.There is the name of Jolly upon it? - A. Yes.

Q.As regularly indorsed? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any more notes? - A. I saw some at Bow-street.

Q. Were they indorsed with the name of Davis? - A. I believe they were.

Mr. Clifton. Jolly is the other person in the indictment? - A. Yes. (The note read.)

WILLIAM STRANGWAY sworn. - I live at Islington, I follow no profession at present; I received that bill from the prisoner on Tuesday, the 10th of May; the prisoner asked me to discount it.

Q. What is the amount of it? - A. Thirteen pounds; I told him I would give him an answer on Thursday morning; I came to the Britannia, in Little-Britain, to meet him, I had seen him there a number of times before. On the Thursday evening, I told him I had enquired of Mr. Harris, whether it was his acceptance; I told him, Mr. Harris knew me very well, and said, it was his acceptance, but that the gentleman that had it, had been robbed of it, with much more property, and I told him it would be necessary for him to go with me to Mr. Stebbing, to have the matter explained; he said, to be sure, but that he was particularly engaged that morning, but I might depend upon his going with me the next morning; he came the next morning, and waited half an hour for me, and left word he would come again in a quarter of an hour; he came, and went with me to Mr. Stebbing's; I told Mr. Stebbing I had brought Mr. Davis to answer for himself, and we walked immediately to Bow-street; there he was committed for further examination; he lived in West-street, West Smithfield, with his father, a leather-seller.

Q. Do you know whether he had any other place of residence? - A. Yes, over the water.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This bill has C. Jolly indorsed upon it? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Jolly? - A.I have heard of such a man.

Q. You would hardly discount a bill for a man without you had a good opinion of him? - A. Certainly not.

Q. I understand a mode of getting a livelihood, is getting bills discounted? - A. Yes.

Q.You would not discount it without his indorsing it? - A.No, I should not.

Q. Would you discount a bill for any man without his putting his name upon it? - A.No, I certainly would not.

Q. You did not personally know Jolly? - A. No.

Q. You have known Davis a long time? - A. Yes.

Q. Two days after, he came to you to explain the business? - A. Yes.

Mr. Clifton. Q. You don't know whether he would have indorsed this bill? - A. No.

Court. (To Stebbing.) Q. You told us, when you were in this passage, you found something press on your breeches-pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you look at the persons round about you? - A. No.

Q. You did not see the prisoner? - A. No; the pressure was so great, I could not take notice of any body.

WILLIAM ANTHONY sworn. - The papers I am going to produce, were delivered to me in the Office at Bow-street, by a man of the name of Tine; I have kept them ever since.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You know Jolly has absconded? - A. Yes; we have never been able to take him.

JOSEPH TINE sworn. - (Looks at the papers.) I received these papers of the prisoner, to the best of my recollection, the beginning of May, I believe about the 2d or 3d, at the Britannia Coffee-house.

Stebbing. These papers were in my pocket-book when I went into the passage; one is a promissory note for 75l. John Willoughby , another of the same value, John Willoughby , one draft for 9l. 17s. 6d. another draft, 37l. 10s. they are all indorsed with Jolly, except one; they are part of the property I lost.

Q. Do you recollect what indorsements were on them when you lost them? - A. The two notes of Willoughby's were indorsed by George Nichols .

Q.(To Tine.) What were these notes delivered to you for? - A. For the purpose of discounting, or getting them discounted.

Q.We are told, Davis carried on the business of discounting - how came he to apply to you? - A. I don't know; I have got bills discounted for him before.

Q.Did he tell you where he got them? - A. No.

Q.Did he inform you of any body else having any interest in them? - A. No.

Q. Were there any others delivered to you by the prisoner at that time? - A.One other 10l. that I paid away.

Q. Who did you pay it to? - A.Messrs. Mossat and Armstrong, Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Innfields.

Q. Have you ever settled with Davis for that bill you got discounted? - A. I have not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know the prisoner? - A. Yes, I have known him these three years.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Jolly? - A. I have been in his company eight or ten times, or a dozen times; I had no other acquaintance with him.

Q. You know the prisoner was in the business of discounting bills? - A. Yes.

Q. When he had not the cash, he applied to his friends? - A. Yes.

Q.You have advanced money for him? - A. Yes.

Q. Had the bills in question, when presented to you, the name of Jolly upon them? - A. Yes, all of them.

Q. Do you know the hand-writing of Jolly? - A. I think I do.

Q. Look at that - do you believe that to be the hand-writing of Jolly? - A. Yes, I do; I have seen him write, and received a letter from him; I have no doubt that it is his hand-writing.

Q. Did you know that they were acquainted together, and employing each other to get bills discounted? - A. I don't know that they employed each other.

Q.Both got bills discounted? - A. I don't know that, as to Jolly.

Q. You look to the last indorser? - A. Yes.

Q. You have known Davis three years - did you entertain a good opinion of his honesty? - A. I did.

Q. Did you ever entertain a doubt with respect to any transaction with him before? - A. No, never any demur upon any bills before.

Mr. Clifton. Q.How many times have you seen Jolly? - A. Perhaps ten or a dozen times.

Q. How many times have you seen him write? - A. I suppose three times.

LYDIA ENGLAND sworn. - I live in New Brunswick-street, Blackstiars Road; the prisoner took a lodging of me three weeks ago last Saturday; Jolly had lodged there two months.

Q. Did they lodge in one apartment? - A. No.

Q. Very intimate together? - A. I don't know what business they did together.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-25

470. RICHARD JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a napkin, value 2s. a shirt, value 3s. a pair of shoes, value 6d. a pair of stockings, value 5s. two razors and case, value 6s. a prayer-book, value 1s. a pocket-book, value 3s. and a pen-knife, value 1d. the property of William Williams .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a serjeant in the 66th: On Friday, the 29th of April, I was at the Mermaid at Chelsea ; the prisoner was a recruit . I did not know of my knapsack having been taken, till I had been in bed sometime; I had put it in a box in the room that I lie in; the prisoner was taken with my knapsack upon him; I saw my knapsack the next morning before the Justice, and knew it to be mine; the shirt has my name upon it.

THOMAS GEARING sworn. - I keep the King's Arms, Five Field Row: On the 29th of April, about ten o'clock at night, a person came into my house, and told me, there was a stout man getting into my garden; I immediately took a candle, and found the prisoner there, attempting to get over into the next yard, where there was wet linen hanging; when he saw the candle, he drew back, and squatted down; I asked him what he did there; he said he was going to do his business; I detained him, and brought him in; he then said he had a knapsack, which was lying at the bottom of my garden; I went there, and found it; I gave it him, and he put it upon his shoulder; I sent for a watchman, and gave charge of him.

- FOWLER sworn. - I am a watchman: I was sent for to Mr. Gearing's house; I took the

prisoner; the constable and I took the knapsack from him by force; he said it was his own, and resisted very much. (The constable produced the property, which was indentified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the knapsack of a servant, who said he had been a soldier, and it contained things that would be useful to me.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-26

471. MARY NORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , two sheets, value 3s. three pillow-cases, value 6s. and a tablecloth, value 6d. the property of James Goor .

JAMES GOOR sworn. - I am a shoemaker : On Wednesday, the 27th of April, I had occasion to go out upon business; when I returned, I missed the things; the prisoner lodged in the next room to me; I asked her if she had been in my room, and she denied knowing any thing about it; I had her taken up, and the constable found the things.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street; I found the property at a pawnbroker's on the 4th of May; the key of the prisoner's room-door opened the prosecutor's room-door.

(A pawnbroker's servant produced two sheets, three pillow-cases, and a table-cloth, and deposed that be took them in pledge of the prisoner on the 27th of April.)(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. He brought them into my apartment to repair; I had been under great distress, and pledged them.

Q.(To Goor.) Did you ever carry any of your things into the prisoner's apartment? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever deliver her these articles to mend? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-27

472. SAMUEL JOSEPH was indicted for that he, on the 3d of May , ten pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, each and every of them counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, the same not being cut in pieces, did put off to one James Ellis at a lower rate and value than the same, by their denomination, did import, and were counterfeited for, that is to say, for 5s. in monies numbered .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JAMES ELLIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where do you live? - A. In Dartmouth-street, Westminster, I belong to the Twopenny Post-office; I have known the prisoner since the 5th or 6th of April. In consequence of a suspicion I entertained, I gave information at Bow-street, and on the 3d of May I went with Pasmore and Lewis, two officers, to the Red Lion public-house, in Davies-street, Berkeley-square ; I had received six marked shillings from pasmore, for which I expected to get from the prisoner twelve counterfeit shillings; I then went into the taproom at the Red Lion, the officers followed me in; Pasmore sat at one corner of the tap-room, and I at the other; Lewis went into the parlour. In consequence of some information, we went to another public-house, the George, close by; I went first into the parlour; in the course of a little time, the prisoner came in, followed by Lewis; Pasmore, I believe, was in the tap-room; the prisoner sat down in the same box with me, and in the course of a little time, he asked me how many I wanted.

Q. Had you told him you wanted any thing? - A. Yes; his appointment was to meet him that day at another public-house; the price was fixed before; I was to have twelve bad shillings for six good ones; he told me he had but ten; he put them down on the table, and I gave him five marked shillings; I put the ten into my left hand waistcoat-pocket, he put the five marked shillings in his pocket; he had his hand in his pocket for a minute or two; as soon as he pulled his hand from his pocket, I gave the signal to the officer, and Lewis came up and seized the prisoner; Lewis rung the bell, and Pasmore came in, and he was secured.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you been in the Twopenny Post-office? - A. About a fortnight.

Q. Then you were not in the Twopenny Postoffice at the time of this transaction? - A. No; I kept a chandler's shop in East-lane, Lambeth, till the 25th of March, and then I tried to get into the Post-office.

Q. Had you any other business between the 25th of March, and your getting into the Post-office? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to say you had no other sort of dealing with the prisoner at this time, but for bad money? - A. No other.

Q. Do you mean to say you did not pay money to the prisoner in advance towards the purchase of a pair of breeches? - A. No, nothing of the kind.

Q. The prisoner is a person dealing in cloaths? - A. He had a bag with some cloaths in it.

Q. Do you mean to say positively, you had no dealing with him but for base coin? - A. I had not.

Q. You had an anxiety to bring a man to justice who was dealing in this manner? - A. Yes, I had indeed.

Q. And that anxiety led you into Newgate to visit him? - A. Yes.

Q. You went there from that anxiety to bring this man to justice? - A. A person called upon me, and said, he wished to hear his proposals, and I said, I had no objection.

Q. You did not at all go of your own motion? - A.I was sent for.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Do you know the name of the man who called upon you? - A. I understand his name is Howell.

Q. Were you first desired by the officer to lay the information? - A. No; I wrote a letter myself to Justice Bond, in consequence of conversation with the prisoner.

Court. Q. What communication had you with the prisoner before this? - A. I had purchased some bad shillings of him before.

ANDREW PASMORE sworn. - On the 3d of May, I went with Lewis and Ellis to Davies-street, for the purpose of apprehending the prisoner at the bar; I gave Ellis six shillings, which I marked in his presence; I went to the George, in Davies-street; I saw the prisoner go in, I was on the opposite side of the street; I went into the tap-room, and remained there till Lewis sent for me into the parlour; I went in, and found the prisoner in custody; Lewis searched him, and among a quantity of other silver that was taken from the prisoner, I found the five shillings that I had marked, (produces them); as we were taking him to Bow-street; he said, I am done at last, or, I am had at last, I cannot say which.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Had not the prisoner a bag of cloaths? - A. Yes.

Q. There were a pair of leather breeches in that bag, were there not? - A. Yes.

EVAN LEWIS sworn. - I was with the last witness at the George; Ellis and I went into the parlour, the prisoner came in, and I heard a conversation about a watch; after that, I saw the prisoner put down something like shillings; he was reckoning it; I then saw Ellis picking them up; then Ellis gave the prisoner some money, and he seemed to be examining it; then another person came in, and a signal was given me by Ellis, and I went up, and laid hold of the prisoner; he was very much agitated, and wanted to get his hands to his pockets; I prevented him; I rang the bell for the waiter, and sent for Pasmore; Pasmore came in, and I searched the prisoner; I found in his right hand waistcoat-pocket three bad shillings, not fit for circulation, but such as you may buy in the streets, and in his left waistcoat-pocket, I found two shillings and eight bad of the same sort, and a bad sixpence among some halfpence; I found no bad money upon him in a state fit for circulation; in his right hand pocket, I found a guinea, and a seven-shilling piece, and twenty-three shillings in silver, from among which Pasmore picked out five marked shillings, (produces the ten shillings); Ellis gave them to me the same day, at Mr. Powell's office.

Ellis. The shillings I delivered to Lewis, were the same that I received from the prisoner.(Mr. William Parker proved the ten shillings to be counterfeit.)

Prisoner's defence. I sold that man a pair of leather breeches; he told me I should go home with the breeches to my house, and he would fetch them; he was to give me twenty shillings for them; he paid me five shillings earnest for them.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18030525-28

473. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , two sheets, value 4s. a counterpane, value 8s. and a tablecloth, value 2s. the property of Thomas Lewis , in a lodging-room in his dwelling-house, let by contract by him to the prisoner .

THOMAS LEWIS sworn. - The prisoner at the bar came to lodge with me on the 2d of April; I live in Tabernacle-square ; he lodged with me about six weeks, till he was taken up; on the 20th of this month, I apprehended him upon missing a pair of sheets, a white cotton counterpane, and a table-cloth; he had them in his apartment for his use.

JOSEPH WOOD sworn. - I live at No. 35, Chiswell-street, I am a pawnbroker: On the 14th of April, I took in from the prisoner a sheet and petticoat. (Produces the sheet.)

Lewis. This is my sheet; I know it by the letter L upon it.

OBADIAH - sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 7th of April, I took in from the prisoner a table-cloth and petticoat. (Produces the table-cloth.)

Lewis. This has the same mark.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was a private in the East London Militia, - that he intended to redeem the property, - and that the prosecutor agreed, if he brought the articles home on the Saturday, he would take no notice of it.

Q.(To Lewis.) Is that true? - A. I cannot say any thing against it.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character as a soldier .

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one month in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-29

474. JOHN WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a cloth coat, value 13s. the property of Simon Solomons .

SIMON SOLOMONS sworn. - I live at No. 3, Edward-street, Wardour-street, Soho ; I keep a

clothes-shop : On the 11th of May, between one and two o'clock, I lost a coat from my shop-door; I saw the prisoner at the bar take it down, and run away it; I pursued him to the corner of the street; I laid hold of him, and told him he must come back; I brought him to my shop-door, and let one hand of his go, and then he threw the coat from under his left arm into my passage; my son picked it up; I have had it ever since (produces it); it has my mark upon it.

THOMAS BRAND sworn. - I was going home to dinner; I stopped at the corner of Edward-street, and saw the prosecutor stop the prisoner close by the side of me; he told him he had got his coat; he grappled hold of him, and the prisoner tried to get away; I assisted Mr. Solomons in taking him back, and when he got to the door, he took the coat from his left side, and threw it into the passage.

Prisoner's defence. I took the coat down to buy it, and I went to call a young man that had been drinking with me, and this gentleman came out, and said, I had stole it.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-30

475. WILLIAM BILLINGHURST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a half guinea, two seven-shilling-pieces, and 3s. the monies of John Whitney .

ELIZABETH WHITNEY sworn. - I am the wife of John Whitney ; I lodge at Mrs. Blackwell's, No. 4, Prince's-court, Duke-street, St. James's ; the prisoner lodged in the same house, in an apartment that he rented of me on the first floor. My husband is a wine-porter . On Thursday the 28th of April, about two minutes past four o'clock, I went to a chest of drawers to take out some money; I took out a halfpenny, and left in the drawer a half guinea, two seven-shilling pieces, and three shillings in silver; I locked the drawer, and went up two-pair-of-stairs; I left the prisoner in the room; I was not gone five minutes; when I came down again the prisoner was gone; I looked at the drawer, and found it burst open, and the money all gone; the prisoner never returned; he was taken up on the Saturday, and brought to my room; as he was going to Marlborough-street, he said, he was sorry I should be at the loss of the money, and he would make it up to me in the evening.( Sarah Bolter was called, but not appearing to know the nature of an oath, she was not sworn.)

JOHN BOLTER sworn. - I am the father of the child; I apprehended the prisoner; I met him in Leicester-square; I delivered him to the constable.

JOSEPH GREGORY sworn. - I received the prisoner from Bolter; I took him to the Office, in Swallow-street; he said to me, I have got a friend in Swallow-street (Dr. Young's coachman) he wished to speak to; I said, why? he said, I should like to settle with Mrs. Whitney if I can, for I have got plenty of money down at Croydon; we went into the yard, but he was not come in; I afterwards went to Dr. Young's coachman at the request of the prisoner. I asked the prisoner, in Mrs. Whitney's room, how he could think of committing such a depredation, a respectable young man like him, and he said, he did not do it.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of it; she wanted three guineas of me to make it up.

Q.(To Mrs. Whitney.) Did you offer to make it up? - A. No; his friends have been to me, and offered me any money to make it up.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-31

476. JOSEPH EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , a brass candlestick, value 2s. the property of Mary Burcher .

MARY BURCHER sworn. - I live at No. 13, in Monmouth-street, Seven Dials ; I keep a broker's shop : On Tuesday the 3d of May, the prisoner came in, and asked me to buy a plane; I told him, no, I never bought any thing in the shop; he immediately took up a brass candlestick under his arm, and walked away.

Q. In your presence? - A. Before my face, close to me; there were seven pair standing upon a chest of drawer.

Q. What time of day was it? - A.Five o'clock in the afternoon; he walked deliberately out of the shop; my servant was coming in as he went out; he crossed the street; I ran after him, and stopped him about twenty yards from my own door. A great many neighbours came to my assistance, and not being able to get a constable, we took him to St. Giles's watch-house; he was then taken to Marlborough-street, and committed; he used me extremely ill in the street; he threatened my life several times if I did not let him go.

Q.Did he appear to you to be in liquor? - A. Not in the least.

GILES HEMMINGS sworn. - I am a constable(produces the candlestick); I took the prisoner from the watch-house to Marlborough-street; it was rather dusk; after we had got a little way from the watch-house, I perceived this plane in his hand; I thought it adviseable to take it from him; while I was thinking how to get it from him, he swore bitterly, struck me violently with the plane, and stunned me; the blows were visible five days after; the plane dropped; I recovered myself, called stop thief! and ran after him (he had run away), a man stopped him; I came up almost im

mediately, and, with the assistance of the mob, took him to Marlborough-street.

Mrs. Burcher. This is the same candlestick that I lost; it has my private mark upon it.

Prisoner's defence. I belong to Portland Barracks; I was so much in liquor, I don't recollect any thing of it.

Q.(To Hemmings.) Did he appear to be in liquor? - A. By no means.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18030525-32

477. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , 17lb. of sugar, value 14s. 7d. the property of Edward Murrils .

EDWARD MURRILS sworn. - I live at Highgate: On the 27th of April I had been to London, between four and five o'clock, and when I came up to the pitch of the hill, going home, I met the prisoner with a sugar-loaf upon his shoulder; he had the little end in his right-hand; I did not then know it was mine; I am sure the prisoner is the same man; when I got to my own door, my wife told me all the money was gone out of the till, and a sugar-loaf was gone; I went after the prisoner, and he was stopped by Robert Coulson .

ROBERT COULSON sworn. - I was standing at the corner of Maiden-lane, I saw Mr. Murrils running down Highgate; he described to me the person he was looking for; I went one way, and he the other; I went down Maiden-lane, and saw three young men a-breast, going up the next field; the prisoner had the sugar-loaf on his shoulder; William Dymock was in the lane on horseback, and I desired him to ride forward, which he did; when I came up they were inside the field, and I was in the lane; two of them had got over a stile, and the prisoner came from behind a bush; I went on a little further, and got over a gate; as soon as they saw me get over the gate, they all three ran away; they took different ways; I followed the prisoner two miles and a quarter, or two miles and a half; I never lost sight of him; when I was within one hundred yards of him, he dropped down in a ditch, and I took him; he had left the sugar behind the bush; I am sure the prisoner is the man that had the sugar.

WILLIAM DYMOCK sworn. - On Wednesday the 27th of April, I saw the prisoner and two others in a field; Mr. Murrils told me he had lost his property, and I rode after them; I got off my horse, and went over the gate within a few yards of the prisoner, and then they all ran away; I did not see the sugar upon him; I took the loaf of sugar out of the bush.(James Hancock, an officer, produced the sugar, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

ANDREW- JAMES CUMMING sworn. - Mr. Murrils bought a loaf of sugar at our house, but whether this is the loaf of sugar or not, I don't know.

Murrils. Here is the bill of it.

Cumming. It corresponds with the book.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that Dymock was a man of bad character, and refused to attend at the Office, on account of his being known there.

Q.(To Dymock.) Did you refuse to attend at the Office? - A. Yes, because I was very busy that day.

Q. Were you ever at the Office before? - A. No.

Hancock. I don't know Dymock; I do not believe he is known at the Office.

Murrils. I have known him twelve years; he likes a drop of beer; I don't know any thing else against him. GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-33

478. JAMES PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , two shirts, value 2s. the property of James Ratcliffe .

JAMES RATCLIFFE sworn. - On the 12th of May, about half past seven in the evening, I lost two shirts; I had put them by to he washed, at a public-house; I met the prisoner coming out of the public-house with them; I went after him, and stopped him; I found the shirts under his coat; I know them to be mine; they have the Colonel's name upon them.

JAMES GARROW sworn. - I am a cabinet-maker; I was at the public-house when a man was brought in; I am not sure it was the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the shirts of a man for three shillings.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 49.

Publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-34

479. WILLIAM THORNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , a tool-basket, value 2s. two saws, value 10s. three planes, value 11s. four chissels, value 3s. an oilstone, value 3s. two squares and chalk-line, value 6s. a punch, value 6d. a gimlet, value 1d. a bradawl, value 1d. a hand-maller, value 1d. a jacket, value 6d. a gauge, value 1d. and 5lb. of nails, value 3s. the property of Richard Carter; a saw, value 3s. an axe, value 2s. two chissels, value 15d. two brad-awls, value 2d. a punch, value 1d. a gimlet, value 1d. and a pair of compasses, value 2d. the property of John Moll .

RICHARD CARTER sworn. - On Friday the 13th of this month, I was at work in the new buildings at Sommers-Town ; I left my tools there

a little after seven in the evening; John Moll and myself had been at work the whole of that day; I know nothing of the transaction.

THOMAS UNDERWOOD sworn. - I am a watchman, in Southampton-place: On Saturday the 14th, about half past three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the bar upon a ladder; I asked him what he did there; he said, he was a carpenter, and was looking after the building; I told him to come down, and, after a little bit, he came down, and I took him to the watch-house with the tools; the tools were at the bottom of the ladder; he said, he did not know any thing about the tools; they were not there at three o'clock.(The tools were produced and identified by Carter and Moll.)

Prisoner's defence. I had come from Portsmouth; I was very much fatigued, and I went into this building to sleep.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-35

480. ELEANOR CALLAGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a silver watch, value 25s. the property of Thomas Norton .

THOMAS NORTON sworn. - On the 10th of April, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was going home to my lodgings; I met the prisoner; I walked down the court that I lodge in with her; she lodges in the same court, and she took hold of the ribbon that was tied to my watch, and gave me a push with her left-hand; I recovered myself, and turned back; she ran away; I saw a woman go into a house opposite me, and I thought it might be her; I went to the house, and told her I had lost my watch; I found she was not the woman; I am quite sure it was the prisoner that took my watch; I had seen her before.

The pawnbroker was called, but did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18030525-36

481. MARY ANN ESTERSPORT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , a gown, value 4s. the property of James Pendergrass .

JAMES PENDERGRASS sworn. - On the 14th of April I lost a gown; the prisoner nursed my wife; she was taken up on the 5th of May.

ELIZABETH PENDERGRASS sworn. - I was lying-in; the prisoner nursed me; I did not miss my gown till I saw it upon her back.

- DALY sworn. - I am a watchman; Mr. Pendergrass gave me charge of the prisoner; she had this gown on - (producing it.)

Mrs. Pendergrass. This is my gown; it hung up by the bed-side to darken the room.

Prisoner's defence. Mrs. Pendergrass lent me the gown to go with her to her mother's.

Mrs. Pendergrass. I never lent her the gown.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined three months in the House of Correction , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-37

482. RICHARD EVELYN and ELIZABETH GODDARD were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing a silver table-spoon, value 10s. the property of Joseph Littler ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

ANN MORRIS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Joseph Littler : On the 14th of May, I put two silver spoons on the side table; Mr. Ments lodged in the house; he went to the door to buy some cat's meat; he went into the parlour to get some paper to put it in, and in about two minutes after I missed the spoon; I know nothing of the prisoners.

GEORGE ALLEN sworn. - I am a constable; I went by the direction of the Magistrate to the prisoner, Evelyn's, father's lodgings, on Saffron-hill; I asked the prisoner what he had done with the silver spoon; he fell a crying, and told me he would tell me where he had sold it; he said he had sold it to a woman, who keeps an old iron shop, in Woodbridge-street, Clerkenwell; I took the boy with me; the prisoner, Goddard, opened the door; I asked her what she had done with the spoon she had bought of that boy; she took it out of a drawer in the back room, and gave it me; I took them both into custody.(The spoon was identified by Ann Morris.)

The prisoner, Evelyn, did not say any thing in his defence.

Goddard's defence. I did not buy the spoon; this young man left it upon my table till he called again.

The prisoner, Goddard, called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Evelyn, GUILTY , aged 12.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Goddard, GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18030525-38

483. JAMES RUDD and JOHN WILLIS were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , four bushels and a half of grains, value 3s. 6d. the property of William Clement ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM CLEMENT sworn. - On the 20th of May, I sent James Rudd and another man to Mr.

Charrington's brewhouse, at Mile End, for grains; they returned about five minutes before ten o'clock at night; when they came in, I saw that they had been removed; they denied it strongly; they said they had sold none, and had given none away; the next morning I got up, and walked the same way the waggon came, and when I got to the end of the lane leading to our house, I found a quantity of grains in the road-way, close to Mr. Willis's gateway, where he takes his horse and chaise in; I got an officer, and asked permission to go into the stables, and in a little place by the side of the stable, I saw a tub full of grains, and some in a basket; they answered the description of the grains I had the night before; they were the same colour, pale malt.

JOHN BAILEY sworn. - On the 20th of May, about three o'clock, I went with Rudd for some grains; we were both carters to Mr. Cloment, a cow-farmer; we got the grains from Mr. Charrington's brewhouse, at Mile End; we stopped at the bottom of the lane; Mr. Willis's house is at the corner of the lane; I was going up the lane, and Mr. Willis's gates were open; it was then past nine o'clock; Rudd was behind me, and as I was going past Mr. Willis's gates, they threw a basket up; I cannot say who it was; there was Mr. Willis and another man.

Q.Look at the prisoner? - A. I cannot say whether he is the man or not, I was in liquor, but I am almost certain he is the man.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. I had seen him once before with Rudd, behind the cart; they called to me to stop, and they asked me for a few grains, and I gave them two or three shovels full, and Mr. Willis gave us sixpence a-piece.

Q. Was it dark at that time? - A. No, it was day-light; that is the gentleman, (pointing to the prisoner, Willis.)

Q. Did you see any money pass? - A. Yes, there was some money passed; as I was getting out of the cart, Mr. Willis holloaed out there were two shillings, and Rudd took the money from Mr. Willis's hands; Rudd gave me one shilling; I asked him what it was for, he gave me no answer, but laughed at me; he afterwards said it was for some grains.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were not quite sober? - A. No.

Q. What ale-house had you been at? - A. None; we had some beer at the brewhouse.

Q.When your master asked you if you had sold any grains, you told him, no? - A. Yes.

Q. Your master thought you ought to have given it him, instead of putting it in your own pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. You thought it was better, when you were taken up, to be a witness than a prisoner? - A. The whole was laid upon me at first, till Mr. Willis told the right of it; he said it was not me that had the money.

Mr. Clement. Mr. Willis came to my house on the Saturday, the day after we had seen the grains on his premises, and said he was very sorry for what he had done, in buying the grains of the man; I asked him what quantity he had, and he said six baskets that night, and some one or two nights before; he asked me if I could settle the difference between the officers and him, and I told him I could not, the law must take its course; I was very short upon the business; I was not in his company above five minutes.

Q. What is Willis? - A. He has some birth in the Bank, and lets out horses and chaises; Mr. Willis went to the Magistrates, and they would not grant a warrant; the Magistrate said, Mr. Willis had been there, and settled the business.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe he came and told you of the transaction between him and your men? - A. He told me part of it.

Q. He told you he thought he was doing right? - A. Yes, he said he thought the man belonged to the waggon.

Q.When was that? - A. At the time he came to my house, the next day.

Court. Q. How many horses were there to the waggon? - A. Four, I think; I told him they did not look like masters of waggons or carts either.

Q. Was your name upon the waggon? - A. Yes.

Q.What did he say then? - A. He said he had done wrong; he was very sorry for it.

Q. At what time did he say that? - A. After I had told him I should punish him.

PETER MASON sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I went to Mr. Willis's with the prosecutor; he was not at home; I saw the grains in a little room parted off from the stable; we told Mrs. Willis we would call again; there was no refusal of a warrant, only he came late at night; he had a warrant to apprehend his person on Monday.

The prisoner, Rudd, did not say any thing in his defence.

The prisoner, Willis, put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

Gentlemen of the Jury, I have for some time past, for amusement when at home, kept a few rabbits, and some pigs, and have been in the habit of purchasing grains for them of Mr. Lee, a cow-keeper in my neighbourhood, till a week previous to this transaction, when Mr. Lee was without grains; I made enquiries to get them elsewhere, and I therefore acknowledge, without hesitation, that upon the prosecutor's men calling at my house to know if I wanted any grains, I bought those in question, under an idea that they had power to sell them; I

gave them the same price I had always paid Mr. Lee, and which I thought was the full value.

Gentlemen, The moment I was informed that some of the officers belonging to Worship-street had been searching my house, I went and informed the Magistrate who I was, and every particular respecting the transaction; and that, if there was any charge against me, I was anxious to meet it, and explain my conduct, that not the slightest suspicion might attach upon my character; but the Magistrate said there was nothing against me, and I went home perfectly satisfied that I should hear no more of it; a few days after I was, to my great astonishment, taken from my own house by a warrant, and in a few hours afterwards examined, and committed as a felon.

Gentlemen, Till this unfortunate occurrence, I have not had the smallest imputation; on the contrary, I have been nearly eight years in a confidential situation in the Bank, and, as I shall prove by gentlemen of the greatest respectability, have always borne the character of an honest man; independent of the heavy punishment which the law has provided to deter from the commission of this crime, my situation in life puts me far above the imputation of so mean and contemptible, as well as guilty an act, as that with which I am charged.(For the prisoner, Willis.)

JOSEPH LEE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. A cow-keeper, in Hackney-road; my premises join Mr. Willis's; he used to buy his grains of me for his rabbits; the day before this happened, he applied to me for grains, and I was without any; I had not any for my own use; I used to charge him four-pence for a basket of grains; he had grains of me all the winter; he is a very upright honest man.

HANNAH STAPLES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the servant of Mr. Willis? - A. Yes, I was present when my master purchased the grains; a man knocked at the door; I opened it, and he asked me if my master wanted any grains; it was dark; I went in, and told my master; he had a gentleman with him, Mr. Littler; my master came out, and had some grains of him; my master keeps pigs and rabbits.

Q. Is he a livery-stable keeper? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Clement.) What are the grains worth? - A. I pay three shillings a quarter for them.

The prisoner, Willis, called twenty other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

JOHN LEDGER sworn. - The prisoner, Rudd, has worked for me about three months; I saw him on the Friday night with the grains; he was very much intoxicated, so much so, that the next morning he did not recollect he had seen me.

Rudd, GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

Willis, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gross.

Reference Number: t18030525-39

484. THOMAS HATTERSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , five smelling-bottles, value 10s. the property of Thomas Price .

THOMAS PRICE sworn. - The prisoner was a servant in my house, I am a glassman : On Saturday, the 23d of April, he was cleaning a pair of glass lustres; I found there were two drops missing; I asked him if he had broke them; I told him I thought he had put them in his pocket; I made him turn out his pockets, and found five smelling-bottles; he said, he was very sorry, he would pay me for them, or do any thing; then I sent for an officer.(Robert Boone, an officer, produced the property, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18030525-40

485. JOHN BARNARD M'MULLEN was indicted for that he, on the 5th of May , being a clerk to George Ellis , did receive and take into his possession a banker's draft for 4l. 8s. 2d. and did fraudulently and feloniously embezzle and steal the same .

Second Count. Varying the manner of laying the charge.

The note in question not having a date, would not have been paid by the banker if it had been presented, the prisoner was therefore found

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-41

486. HENRY THOMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , a pair of sheets, value 10s. the property of James Garrett , the same being in a lodging-room let by him to the prisoner .

The sheets were laid to have been stolen in June, 1802, and the prosecutor's wife was proved to have said she had other lodgers in the house she had as much suspicion of as of the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18030525-42

487. JOHN BETTS was indicted for that he, being servant to George M'Kerrell , did receive 9d. his property, and having received it, did embezzle the same .

Second Count. Laying it to have been received of Richard Aubery.

The money was received for a leaf, which the prisoner had accounted for in his master's book, but not paid the money, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-43

488. ELEANOR FRAME was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , a gown, value 10s. the property of John Botler .

The prosecutor was called on his recognizance, but did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18030525-44

489. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , a pair of tongs, value 4s. a pewter quart pot, value 14d. and a pewter pint pot, value 6d. the property of Joseph Ivison .

JOSEPH IVISON sworn. - I keep a public-house , the Three Compasses, Drury-lane : On the 23d of April, I lost a quart pewter pot, a pint pot, and a pair of tongs, which were found upon the prisoner.

JOHN WYGATE sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for on the 23d of April to Mr. Ivison's, to take charge of the prisoner; I found a pint pot in each of her pockets; the others were taken from her before I came; one has Mr. Ivison's name on it, the other belongs to a Mr. Anderson, in Mary-bone-lane.

THOMAS GARDENER sworn. - I am beadle of Drury-lane division; I was sent for to Mr. Ivison's, on Saturday, the 23d of April, between six and seven o'clock; the prisoner had gone out of the house, and was fetched back by the landlord, who desired me to search her, which I did, and found these tongs tied round her waist, under her petticoat; she said she was big with child, and would not be touched; I took hold of her, and shook her, and the tongs and pots rattled; I said, it was a live child, and I would soon deliver her, and bid her take up her petticoats; she would not; I took her petticoats up, and found the tongs, and a quart and two pint pots.(They were produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of what I am accused of; a man came into the house, and saw me in liquor, and put them into my pocket unknown to me; he was taken up, and put in New Prison. GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-45

490. JOHN DA COSTA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May , a saw, value 10s. the property of Richard Cook .(The prisoner, being a foreigner, was tried by a Jury of half foreigners, and an Interpreter was sworn.)

RICHARD COOK sworn. - I am a sawyer : On Monday, the 9th of May, I was sent for to the Cauliflower, in Wapping; there I saw the saw, but could not swear to it, it being out of the frame; there was a saw missing out of Mr. Stanley's yard, a carpenter, in Hermitage-street ; my men were at work there.

JOHN TAVENOR sworn. - I am servant to the last witness; I missed the saw out of Mr. Stanley's yard on Monday, the 9th, between two and three in the afternoon; I had seen it before on the 6th; I went on Monday night to Mr. Stanley's yard for my saw, to go to another job, and missed the saw; returning to the dock, I was informed a saw had been offered for sale in the dock; I then went to the Police-Office, and saw the saw; I mentioned the marks on it before I saw it; it was in a frame when I lost it, but not when I saw it at the Police-Office; there is a tooth out, and a piece split off near the top; I saw the prisoner in custody at the Office; I asked him about the frame, but he made no answer.

RICHARD ARCHER sworn. - I am a sawyer in the London Docks; between one and two o'clock the prisoner came into the yard with this saw, and offered it for sale; he wanted five shillings for it; I thought from the price he could not have come by it honestly; I stopped him, and he was taken to the Police-Office with the saw; it was delivered there to the prosecutor.(The saw was produced, and identified by Tavernor.)( John Comber , another sawyer, who worked in Stanley's yard, confirmed the evidence of Tavernor, and also identified the saw as the property of Mr. Cook.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say in my justification, but that I am quite starved.

Q.(To Cook.) What is the value of the saw - is it worth ten shillings? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-46

491. EPHRAIM HOULTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , four silver tea-spoons, value 2s. a pair of silver tongs, value 4s. two silver table-spoons, value 10s. a silver gravy-spoon, value 10s. a pair of silk stockings, value 2s. three quires of paper, value 1s. five books, value 2s. two blank books, value 1d. a manuscript book, value 6d. a bottle label, value 6d. two cutglass bottles, value 6d. a smelling-bottle, value 6d. a silver hook, value 6d. and six towels, value 6s. the property of Hickman Young .

HICKMAN YOUNG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an attorney ; my chambers are in Barnard's Inn ; the prisoner had been my clerk for several years; I was informed the articles mentioned in the indictment were taken from my chambers; I then looked, and missed them; they were more in the care of my laundress: On the 5th of April, I came to my chambers about two o'clock, and the prisoner was gone; I never saw him after till the day he was taken up.

Q. Had he intimated an intention to leave your service? - A. He had not; on the 25th I got a search-warrant to search his lodgings; I attended Macmanus to Gray's-Inn-lane; the prisoner was at home; Macmanus entered first, and told him his business, and asked him if he had any property of mine; he said, he had none; upon the execution of the warrant there was found, in my presence, these six towels, a second volume of the Age of Louis XV. the Art of Swimming, a blank book, another book, which was blank till he wrote in it, a manuscript book, an account of costs, two cut glass bottles, a silver hook, they call it an Alderman's hook, and a bottle label; I cannot swear to any of them positively, except the manuscript, the towels, the silver hook, the second volume of the Age of Louis XV. and the Art of Swimming; I believe the rest to be my property; the prisoner admitted the towels were mine, but not the rest of the things.

Q. What is the value of the towels? - A. A shilling a-piece.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. With respect to the manuscript book, was he not permitted to glean from your Office all the information he could? - A. He was not.

Q. Do you not know that it is customary, on all occasions, for a clerk to take copies of the precedents of his master? - A. Regular clerks, not an hired clerk.

Q. Is not that a manuscript of costs? - A. Yes, it was in the state it is now when I lost it.

Q. As to any individual in the world out of the profession, is it worth two-pence to any man in the world? - A. It is an account of costs for fifty or sixty years back.

Q.Except for your own information, it is of no value? - A. I should suppose there are people would be glad to have it.

Q. That might be taken for the purpose of copying only without your consent - the towels have no mark upon them? - A. I can swear to them from their complexion, make, and his confession.

Q. He had the care of your towels after his marriage? - A. Not generally after his marriage.

Q. He had the care of them, and used to give them out to wash? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not tell you that he took them home to his wife to wash? - A. No, he did not.

Q.There is a book, an odd volume of Louis XV. an amusing story he might take away for his amusement, it is worth nothing as an odd volume? - A. No, I suppose not.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. He could not improve in his profession by the towels? - A. No.

Q. He could not improve his knowledge by the hook? - A. No.

Court. Q. Were the things loose? - A. The towels were found in a paper, the books in his book-case, the other articles in his drawer.

MARY POPE sworn. - I am the porter's wife at Barnard's Inn, and laundress to Mr. Young.

Q. When did you see the prisoner last at chambers? - A. The 5th of April.

Q. Did you expect him to leave the chambers? - A. No, he left the door wide open; I, seeing the door open, went in; I saw him the night after; he called at the lodge-room, and said, dame, how are you? I said, when you went away, you left the door wide open, and the things were gone; he said, I did not know I left the door open; that was funny indeed; that was all that passed between us.

Q. Do you know what part of the chambers the towels were kept in? - A. No, I don't, I believe they were kept in the middle of the room; there are some such now in the chambers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not recollect where the towels were - you had never seen them before? - A. No.

Q. You don't mean to swear to them? - A. No.

Q. When you say you are a laundress, you mean you take care of the chambers? - A. Yes.

Q. You don't wash the linen? - A. No, he always gave that out to wash.

Court. Q. Do you know his lodgings? - A. Yes.

Q.During his absence from chambers, did he always live in the same lodgings? - A. Yes.

Q.Did he live in those lodgings when he went away? - A. Yes.

Q. And when the things were found? - A. Yes.

Q. You all knew where his lodgings were? - A. Yes, I knew he lodged there a good while.

Mr. Alley. (To Mr. Young.) Q. Is that a silver hook? - A. I believe it is; it is silver.

Q.Though it was silver, and worth something, he had not disposed of it? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, as to the articles of plate and bottles, I know nothing of them; the manuscript books were taken home to copy for my instruction, with intention to return them; the towels were taken home by me for no other purpose than to be marked; it not being convenient for my wife to do it just then, I placed them in the book-case.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-47

492. ANN M'GUIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , a table-cloth, value 7s. the property of Joseph Stevenson .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Stephen Tapster .

STEPHEN TAPSTER sworn. - I am waiter to Mr. Joseph Stevenson, who keeps the Craven Coffee-house, Craven-street, Strand ; the prisoner was a servant in the house, laundry maid: On the 14th,

looking over the stock, we missed a table-cloth; I had a suspicion of the prisoner, and searching the pawnbroker's, I found it at Mr. Gordon's, St. Martin's-lane, on the 22d of May.

Q. Did you find any duplicate on the prisoner? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Mr. Stevenson is not here? - A. No.

Q. You are a waiter, and therefore had the care of the table-cloths? - A. Yes.

Q. There were other waiters besides you? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Stevenson did not know the property, and therefore did not come? - A. No.

DAVID GORDON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in St. Martin's-lane; I have a table-cloth, pledged by Elizabeth Wooton, on the 4th of May; I gave her a duplicate.

ELIZABETH WOOTON sworn. - My husband is a tailor; I pawned a table-cloth with the last witness on the 4th of May; the prisoner gave it me; she said it was her own property; I gave her the money, three shillings; the duplicate was unfortunately lost; (the table-cloth produced.) That is it, to the best of my knowledge; there is no mark to it.

Q. Do you ever pawn more than one table-cloth with him? - A. Yes, one more; I received that from the prisoner.

Q. When did you pawn that? - A. I cannot say; it was before this.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you ever been in Stevenson's house? - A. No, never.

Q. You pawned another table-cloth? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever redeem that? - A. No.

Q. You believe that to be the table-cloth; you say there is no mark on it? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that is the tablecloth? - A. No.

Court. Q. You pawned two? - A. Yes.

Q. You never pawned more than two, and had them both of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Tapster.) Can you swear that to be your master's property? - A. No, only by losing three.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-48

493. WILLIAM MORGAN , JAMES SMITH , and JOHN GILL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , six pieces of wainscot boarding, value 10s. a doorcase, value 5s. three window-frames and three sashes glazed, value 30s. the property of Luke Lyons .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of John Hammet .

Third Count. Charging them to be the property of persons unknown.

LUKE LYONS sworn. - I am a brewer , and live at Shadwell ; I employed a Mr. Fellows to make repairs in this house for myself and family; he was to make two houses into one; Fellows employed a Mr. Hammet, a master carpenter ; these men were employed to pull down part of this house; I was present; the pulling down commenced on the 24th of April.

JOHN HAMMET sworn. - I am a carpenter; the prisoners were the workmen employed in pulling down this house; the articles mentioned in the indictment were pulled down, and lay loose; I saw them on the Saturday; they lay in the house; I saw part of them pulled down, particularly the door-case; I sent my men to bring them home in a cart; I did not return home till nine in the evening; Mr. Lyons had sent up, and desired to see me; I went to see Mr. Lyons, and on some information I received, I went into the cellar of a public-house, the sign of the King of Prussia, next door to the houses; Smith and Morgan were in the public-house, and the pieces of timber now in Court I found in the cellar; I went and got two constables, and took them to the public-house, and by that time Gill was come in.

Q. Were the prisoners all at work at this house? - A. Yes; the officers took them into custody, and on the Monday they were taken before the Magistrate, and committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had employed these men to pull down the articles? - A. Yes.

Q. You left them in the house, and went about your business? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not miss them till you saw them at the public-house? - A. No.

Q.They might be pulled down, and carried away by the men that pulled them down? - A. Yes.

Q. Whether they had been separated from the building before these men left the house, you don't know? - A. No.

Q. The pulling down and carrying away might be all one act for aught you know? - A. Yes.

Q. Several other men were employed as well as these three men? - A. Yes.

Q. The others absconded, these did not? - A. They had not the opportunity.

Court. Q. You told me that you saw the doorcase lying in the house, and the wainscot that had been pulled down standing up; that was on Saturday morning, and you went and sent your boy to fetch them - is this fact or not, as you have stated it? - A. I did see them.

Q. You saw them before they were taken out of the house, separate from the house? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to tell the Counsel it might be one act? - A. I don't believe that.

Q. You swore it? - A. Then I did not understand it.

Mr. Alley. Q. This is what you call a doorcase - you don't call it a door-case when it is broke to pieces? - A. It is possible to put it together.

Q. Then it would be a door-case? - A. Yes.

RACHAEL BARNES sworn. - I keep the King of Prussia public-house; part of the things here came out of my cellar.

Q. Did you see them in the cellar? - A. I only saw them down the area.(Hammet produced the two sides of the door-case.)

Q. If it was put together, would it make a doorcase? - A. No, the cill is not here; the wainscot boarding is broke in a hundred pieces I suppose.

Q.(To Barnes.) Can you tell who brought them into the cellar? - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect whether the prisoners were in your house on Saturday? - A. Yes.

- MASCALL sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Cook, the bricklayer.

Q. Did you see who took these pieces into the cellar? - A. No.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am a constable.

Q. Did you see who took these pieces into the cellar? - A. No.

The prisoners were not put on their defence.

All three NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-49

494. WILLIAM WELLS , otherwise HARVEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , five sheep, value 10l. the property of Thomas Field .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a drover, in the employ of Mr. Thomas Field , who is a sheep salesman .

Q. On the night of Sunday the 24th of April, had you any number of sheep at Mile-End for the next day's market? - A. Yes.

Q. To whose care were they committed to be drove to Smithfield ? - A. To the care of Chubby and another boy; they came to Smithfield that night; between twelve and one I found five of them missing when I came to draw them, that is, to separate every man's sheep by themselves; they belonged to three different people.

Q. In consequence of this, did you make any enquiry of persons of the names of Boyle and Butler? - A. Yes, and they took to the house of the prisoner; I went to the prisoner's house between ten and eleven on Monday morning, with two officers of the Police; we found five sheep dead.

Q. The carcases of five sheep? - A. Yes.

Q.What part of the house were they in? - A.Just as you go in on the right hand; he is a butcher.

Q. Did they bear the appearance of having been recently killed? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find the skins? - A. No.

Q. Were the heads on or taken off? - A.Taken off; we found the heads underneath an armedchair in the same shop, facing the carcases.

Q.Are you able to say from the appearance of the carcases, or the heads, whether they correspond with the five you lost? - A. They were like the five I lost.

Q. What do you speak from? - A. The heads.

Q.Had the heads any marks upon them? - A. No.

Q. Were the heads the heads of sheep of different sorts? - A. Yes, two or three different sorts.

Q. Were the appearances such as to induce you to believe they were the same sheep? - A. Yes; I cannot undertake to say they were.

Court. Q. The skins were not off the heads? No, not all off.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You cannot positively swear they were the sheep? - A. No.

Q.If you had seen other heads of sheep with marks on them, you might have thought them the sheep? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did not you see the heads immediately on entering the room under the chair? - A. No, the patrol pulled them out.

Q. You have been in custody yourself for this? - A. Yes, a week.

Q. We have heard of a boy of the name of Chubby, where is he? - A. He is gone off.

Q. He and the other person are run away? - A. Yes.

Q. You have taken pains to find them, but cannot? - A. Yes.

JOHN BOYLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a patrol; my walk is in the out parts of St. Sepulchre's parish.

Q. Where were you on Sunday night, the 24th of April? - A. Opposite White Horse-alley, in Cow-cross; the prisoner lives in Turnmill-street, No. 11, near Cow-cross.

Q. Did you that night see any drove of sheep opposite his house? - A. Yes, they stood there for some time.

Q. In whose care were they? - A. I cannot say; there were one or two; I did not know them; they might remain there twenty minutes, to speak within compass.

Q. How many were there? - A. I cannot say; the street being narrow, they reached a considerable way.

Q. Did the circumstance excite your suspicion? - A. Yes.

Q. When the drove went away, did you look into the prisoner's house? - A. Yes, throught the holes in the window-shutter, I saw the prisoner at work killing sheep; he had a jacket and blue apron on.

Q.How many did you see him kill? - A. I cannot say; I was at his house from half past one to

three in the morning, repeatedly resting, first upon one leg, and then on the other; I saw him put them in a private place on one side of the shop, one at one time, and one another.

Q. Did the watchman, Butler, watch with you? - A. No; he looked in at the side of the passage. I saw the prisoner go out rather before five in the morning; he had a bundle under his right arm, covered with a blue apron; he went up Cow-cross with it, towards Smithfield.

Q. Were you with the officers when they searched his house? - A. Yes; the prisoner was not at home then.

Q. Did the prisoner, to your knowledge, ever return after that? - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. Do you know when he was apprehended? - A. Yes, on the 25th, about twelve o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner is a butcher? - A. Yes.

Q. You don't know how many this drove consisted of? - A. No.

Q. You made no observation on the sheep? - A. No.

Q. You made no observation on the persons driving them? - A. No.

Q. All you know is, you saw this man killing sheep? - A. Yes.

JAMES BUTLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a watchman, near Cow-cross, Turnmill-street.

Q. On Sunday the 24th of April, did you observe any sheep opposite the prisoner's house? - A. Yes, a great stock, the street was full of them.

Q. In whose care were they? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How long did they stand there? - A.Near, or quite half an hour.

Q. After they were gone, did you go and look into the prisoner's house? - A. No, I did not; Boyle did.

Q. Were you standing by Boyle while he was looking in? - A. No.

Q. Did you see the prisoner go out that morning? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. A great many droves of sheep go through Turnmill-street and the other streets on the market day? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not observe the sheep, it was so dark- they were in a dark place? - A. No, I did not.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am a Police officer belonging to Hatton-garden: On the morning of the 25th of April, I searched the prisoner's house; I found, in a dark part of the shop, parted off from the front of the house, (one side is parted off, and kept dark, and the other is open,) five carcasses and five heads, under a chair; the liver, hearts, and plucks, were hung behind the door of the partitioned room.

Q. Did you, on the same day, apprehend the prisoner? - A. I did; the sat was in a pan.

Q. What time did you apprehend the prisoner? - A. About twelve; I went to him in the City, where he was at work.

Court. Q. Is he a master butcher? - A. No, he is journeyman to a calf-dresser, in Warwick-lane; they call him a leg-dresser.

Q. This shop was parted off - was it a shop he only hired, or a part of his dwelling-house? - A. Part of the dwelling-house, where he lived.

Q. He was not a regular butcher, killing meat at this shop? - A. No, there might be a few joints of meat sometimes.

Q. Did the shop appear to be such as would lead you to suppose you should find five carcasses there? - A.No.

Q. Were the carcasses where they might easily be seen? - A. No, you could not see them at all without a light.

Q. When you went to the prisoner where he was at work, did you make any enquiry about this shop? - A. I said to him, Harvey, there is a person in possession of five sheep at your house, and without you come and prove which way you came by them, they will be taken away; he said, he bought them of a man in the Hackney-road, who was driving them along the Saturday before; he washed himself, and came along with me; I told him he must go to the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where is this shop? - A. In Turnmill-street.

Q. When this is for sale, it is usually hung up in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. You have seen joints of meat in this shop? - A. Yes.

Q. In butcher's shops there is a place to kill sheep? - A. There were pullies behind the door; they were temporary things; they appeared to be a make-shift.

Q. If a butcher wanted to kill sheep, he would have this kind of make-shift? - A. He must have pullies to pull them up.

Q. This man was a journeyman butcher? - A. Yes.

Q. But, though a journeyman, he carried on the trade of a butcher in this shop? - A. Yes.

Q. After they have killed the sheep, don't they hang them up sometimes till they are cold, before the carcasses are cut up? - A.Exactly so; I never searched a butcher's shop before where there was such a private part as this.

Q. There were five heads, and hearts, livers, and plucks? - A. Yes.

Q. The heads were under a chair? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there a bottom to the chair? - A. I cannot say; it was an old chair.

Q.There was no difficulty in discovering the heads? - A. No.

Court. Q. Did you see them immediately as you got in? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. When sheep are killed, they don't use to hang them up in a dark place, but without the door in the cold? - A. That is at the discretion of the person.

JOHN DURANT sworn. - I am in the employ of Mr. Field.

Q. Did you go with the officers to search the prisoner's house? - A. No.

Q. Did you see the carcasses? - A. No.

THOMAS FIELD sworn. - I am a sheep salesman.

Q. In consequence of being informed by your servants of the loss of the sheep, did you go to the prisoner's house? - A. I went after I had been to the Magistrates.

Q. Before the prisoner was taken? - A. I believe after.

Q. What time? - A. Between twelve and one o'clock on Monday, the 25th of April; I saw the carcasses, and the heads, and the sat, and the plucks.

Q. Are you enabled to say whether or no those sheep resembled those you lost? - A. I believe they did resemble them, from the heads, and carcasses, and plucks.

Q. With respect to the heads first, had they any marks upon them? - A. No farther than the teeth, and being born sheep; the borns were chopt off.

Q. Were they the same sort of sheep as those you lost? - A.They were.

Q. How many different sorts were there? - A. Two single ones, and three of one sort.

Q. Did they correspond with the sorts you had lost? - A.Every one with the sorts I had lost.

Q. Was the weight such as would correspond with what you had lost? - A. Yes, and the price corresponded; provided they had had the skins, they would have corresponded in weight and price within five shillings of the money; they were worth forty-five shillings each.

Q. Do you believe those to be the sheep you lost? - A. As far as a person can be sure without the skins, I am sure they were my sheep.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.First you say they resemble the sheep? - A. Yes.PQ. They resemble the sheep in two circumstances, the teeth and the horns? - A. I said the carcasses resembled them.

Q. Do you mean to swear positively these to be your property, or that you believe them to be your property? - A. I mean to say that I believe them to be my property.

Q. If you had had the good fortune to find the skins, you would have found no difficulty in knowing them? - A. No.

Q.Without the skins, you mean to swear to the best of your belief? - A. I do.

Q. The teeth of sheep is one of the circumstances by which you know the age of sheep? - A. Yes.

Q. In Smithfield market there would be many sheep of the same age? - A. Yes.

Q. There would be born sheep there? - A. Yes, there is a great difference of horns.

Q. Do you mean to swear no others are chopt off in the way these were? - A. No.

Court. Q. The horns were chopped off by the man that killed them? - A. Yes, or I should have known them.

Q.Has not every exertion been made to take up Chubby? - A. I believe there has.

Q. Have you any partner? - A. I have not.

Prisoner's defence. I bought these sheep on the Saturday as I was taken up on the Monday.

GUILTY Death , aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18030525-50

495. JOHN THORN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a saw, value 4s. 9d. the property of Richard Knight and George Knight .

JAMES BLIGH sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Richard and George Knight, ironmongers , Foster-lane : On Monday last, about the middle of the day, the prisoner came and asked for a drawing-knife; after looking at them some time, he said, there were none to suit him; he then asked for some turning tools; a drawer was produced with the kind he asked for; he said, they would not do; then he asked for a Turkey stone; he said, they were not the kind he wanted; he took a rag stone, for which he paid two-pence, and left the shop, and came again between five and six; he asked the boy in the shop for a back-saw; the boy directed him to me to be served, not knowing where they were; I brought him down a parcel, containing five; I handed him one; he laid it down, and asked for another; he also asked for a third; I told him they were all alike, but I gave him the five; the prisoner had an apron on; I then observed he had one in his hand, he put it on the ground, and when he thought he was not observed, drew it up under his apron; I observed he had one under his apron when he brought his hands forward from concealing it; I asked him if he had chosen one; he said, he had not, made some excuse, said he would call again, and was going out of the shop; he said, he hoped there was no harm done; then I went round to him, and told him all the harm he had done, I believed was, he had stole one; I took up his apron, and observed the saw in his breeches down his thigh; the handle stuck up above his apron, whether I took it out, or the prisoner, I cannot say; the constable has had it ever since; I shall know it again; he had only a few halfpence in his pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I take out the saw myself, and told you I intended to pay for it? - A. That I cannot pretend to say.

Q.What is the saw worth? - A. Four shillings and nine-pence.(The saw was produced by the constable.)

Bligh. That is the saw I took from the prisoner; I gave it to the constable.

Prisoner's defence. I went to buy a saw; I put one on the ground; I meant to have that saw, I had no intention of taking it away without paying for it. GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-51

496. JOHN STONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a gelding, value 25l. the property of William Cobb .

WILLIAM COBB sworn. - I live at Winfern, in Norfolk , near Diss; I am a farmer ; I lost two geldings between nine o'clock on Monday, the 16th of May, and five o'clock on the Tuesday morning; the gate belonging to the stable was locked; the lock was taken off the chain, and put on again; my man came and told me there were two of the horses gone on the Tuesday morning; I thought the horses were stolen, and I went to Diss to know what to do; the gentlemen told me to get some bills printed, which I did; I left some of them at home, and brought the others to London; I arrived there between eleven and twelve on the Wednesday; a man took me from the coach to the repository stables; I am quite a stranger in London; he shewed me several repository stables; I went to Mr. Langhorn's, and at last, in the last stable, I found my horse; Mr. Langhorn lives in Barbican; I saw the horse, and told him it was my horse; he brought in a bill of sale of the horse, which was delivered to him with the horse; I knew the horse by a white mark in the face, two white legs behind, and of a bright chesnut colour; I bred him; there are many marks about him, I will swear to him; I do not know who brought him to Mr. Langhorn's; I missed him on the Tuesday; I saw him on the Friday at Mr. Langhorn's, at four o'clock in the afternoon.

HENRY LANGHORN sworn. - I received a chesnut horse with this note on Friday, with authority to sell it by private contract; I received the note from a person I don't know, he looked like a person in the situation of an ostler; I received it between ten and eleven o'clock; I made sale of it at twenty-two guineas, the price limited by his note; soon after I received the note and the horse; I sold it in about a quarter of an hour after, (produces the note.) Previous to the horse being delivered, he was claimed by Cobb, therefore I could not deliver him at all; the horse remains with me still; the prisoner came to me on the Monday to demand his money, and to know what became of his horse; Cobb had taken hold of him before I came; he was in custody when I saw him, Cobb and an officer having laid by in wait; I keep these stables in Barbican; nothing particular passed between me and the prisoner; he begged of me to let him go, as a friend of his wanted him, but I would not let him go; I did not hear Cobb claim the horse to be his in the prisoner's presence. (Produces one of the hand-bills.)

WILLIAM COBB, Jun. sworn. - I am a serjeant in the second regiment of Foot Guards; Cobb is my father; I went with him to Langhorn's; I do not know the gelding.

THOMAS ROSE sworn. - I was sent for as an officer to take the prisoner into custody; Mr. Langhorn sent for me; as I went up Mr. Langhorn's yard, the prisoner jumped through the window in the yard, and I caught him in my arms; I took him to the Compter, that is all I know.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-52

497. WILLIAM ONSLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , fifty pounds, and seven shillings, in monies numbered, the property of Henry Pray , in the dwelling-house of John Leach and Thomas Dallimore .

HENRY PRAY sworn - I am a porter at the London Coffee-house ; Mr. Leach and Mr. Dallimore are in partnership; they both live and sleep in the house; I kept my money in my box in the garret; the last time I saw it there was the 15th or 16th of April; I kept it in a bag in the box locked up; on the 20th of April I missed it; I went to fetch some money on the Wednesday, and I found the money gone; the box was locked as usual; I have not seen any of my money since.

Q.How came you to charge the prisoner? - A. He was an apprentice in the house, as cellar-man ; he ran away the same day I lost my money, about one o'clock in the day I missed it; I know nothing about the robbery having been committed; he was brought to the London Coffee-house on the 8th of May; he was taken on the 6th of May, he ran away on the 20th of April; he told my master he had found the key of the box.

JOHN LEACH sworn. - I and my partner, Mr. Dallimore, live in the house, and pay rent for it; the prisoner is our apprentice; the prosecutor is a porter, a sort of in-doors watchman; he goes to bed at six in the evening, and rises at one in the morning, in order to watch the fires, &c. he said on the 21st, Wednesday, in the morning, that he had lost his money; after this, I sent a man to Hertford, and I went to the prisoner's mother to find him; I had reason to suspect him; I saw him in about a fortnight; he was brought to my house; I took him to the accompting-house, and taxed him with the robbery of the porter; I did not tell him to confess; the conversation began on my part, I challenged him with the robbery; he denied it; he

said, he had not taken the money, and knew nothing of the fifty pounds which I challenged him with taking; he said, he did not take it; I asked him where he had been; he said, he had been in London; I asked him where; he could not tell me, he gave me no answer; I told him to tell me the truth; he said, he had been to Bristol; I asked him how he went to Bristol; he said, he went in the stage; I asked him where he got the money to go, I knew he had none; he was puzzled, and gave me no answer; he burst out crying, and said he bought new clothes, seventeen pounds worth.

WILLIAM KIMBER sworn. - I am an officer; I took the prisoner on the 6th of May; I went, at the request of the prisoner and Mr. Leach, to a house in Field-lane, an old clothes shop; the prisoner told me he went from the Saracen's Head, on Snow-hill; I asked the man what clothes the prisoner had purchased there; he said, fifteen pounds and a crown; the prisoner answered, Sir, you mistake, I laid out seventeen pounds and a crown; I gave you seventeen guineas, and you gave me no change; the gentleman in the shop said, he would come forward if wanted; the prisoner told me he went to Bristol, and paid a guinea down; I asked him how he could think of going there; he said, he wished to get a ship; he said, he went to the White Lion, at Bristol, and found a woman of the town; that he laid out a great deal of money on her, and finding his money grew short, he sold his watch, and returned to town on the 4th of May; I asked him how he could rob such a poor man as the porter, and he said he was sorry for it.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-53

498. JOHN PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , four shirts, value 20s. four pair of stockings, value 6s. two waistcoats, value 5s. a jacket, value 2s. two pair of breeches, value 5s. a pair of shoes, value 1s. and three handkerchiefs, value 3s. the property of Joseph Driver , in the dwelling-house of Mary Potter .

JOSEPH DRIVER sworn. - I belong to the Westminster Militia ; I was quartered at the house of Mary Potter ; I lost the articles stated in the indictment five weeks ago, they were kept in my bed-room, tied up in two handkerchiefs; I missed them when I went to bed, about nine o'clock in the evening; I saw some of them afterwards at Brentford in the hands of this woman, (pointing to a witness;) that was about a month after I lost them; I shall know them again; I never saw them in the prisoner's possession; he is a soldier, and slept in a room close to mine when I lost my property; he went away, and deserted the night I missed them; he came back in two days time of his own accord; I did not have him taken up.

RACHAEL NEWTON sworn. - Q. Do you know Mary Potter ? - A. Yes; I know nothing of the property; there were two rooms taken by the Westminster regiment, at Brentford, as an hospital; the prisoner was in that hospital; I have an apartment in the same house; he came down to me, and asked for a few halfpence to get him a little nourishment, for he was quite low, till his serjeant came back; I let him have nine-pence, and he left a bundle with me for it; the serjeant gave me the money in a week, Serjeant Howell; it might be about a month ago.

JOHN PERKINS sworn. - I bought a jacket of the prisoner five weeks ago last Saturday, as I was going to work in the morning; I overtook the prisoner in Blandford-street, Marybone, about ten minutes before six in the morning; he asked if I knew any one that wanted a jacket; I told him I wanted such a thing; I bought the jacket, and paid for it, and a pair of breeches; I agreed to give him a guinea for them, but I never had the breeches; he said, he lived in Baker-street, No. 8; I went there, but could not find him.

OWEN HOWELL sworn. - I am a serjeant in the Westminster Militia; the prisoner was a soldier in that regiment, and the prosecutor also; I never attend the regiment, I am always in London; on the 6th of May, I was at Brentford; on Saturday, the 7th of May, the Colonel ordered me to find the property, if possible; the prisoner was in the guard-room; Colonel Cluthero ordered me to take Price, and he would make an example of him for robbing his comrade; he told me where to find the property; I went by his direction to Mrs. Newton's house, and found it left for eight-pence or nine-pence; I paid it, and shewed the handkerchief and waistcoat to Driver; he claimed it; the jacket I found with Mr. Perkins, in Grosvenor-square, on his back; I have kept them ever since. (Produces them.)(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-54

499. ANN HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , a petticoat, value 5s. a handkerchief, value 1s. a shift, value 3s. and a towel, value 6d. the property of Mary-Ann Thompson , widow .

MARY-ANN THOMPSON sworn. - I am a widow; I live at No. 43, Manchester-street ; the prisoner was my servant , she came to me on the 20th of March. On Sunday, the 18th of May, I looked in my drawer, and missed a piece of muslin; that was in the two pair of stairs back room; on Monday I thought best to look about, and see if there

was any thing else gone; I went into the kitchen, and saw a piece of muslin which I thought I knew; I enquired whose it was, and I heard it was the prisoner's; I examined it, and found it to be the quantity and quality which I lost; I had only two servants; I am in no way of business; I fought further, and found a jar in the wash-house with two duplicates, which I sent to the pawnbroker's, to see if those things were mine, and found they were; the house-maid fetched me a petticoat; the prisoner was out, and when she came in I told her that I had missed some things, and produced the petticoat; I said, do you know that? she said, yes, she did, she was in distress, and had pawned it; I asked her where the remainder of my things were; she said, she supposed that Mary, the house-maid, had got them, as she had the petticoat; she said, she was sure I had them, as I had found the duplicates; she went down, and found the duplicates; I told her she had better confess, and she should go about her business.

JAMES HODGSON sworn. - I carry on business for my mother at No. 13, Little Marybone-street; on the 17th of April, a shift, a towel, and a handkerchief, were pawned for four shillings with me, by a woman of the name of Mary Hill, Great Chesterfield-street; I gave the person a duplicate.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Great Marlborough-street; I was sent for on the 16th to apprehend the prisoner; I did so, at her mistress's house, Mrs. Thompson's; she gave her mistress the duplicate.(The articles were produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.) GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-55

500. WILLIAM PERKS was indicted for that he, on the 1st of January , wilfully, maliciously, and feloniously, did hire one Samuel Eastaugh, to steal a piece of cotton cloth, value 4l. the property of James-Stubington Penny and William West , calicoprinters , being then and there placed in a certain printing-house made use of by them for printing calicoes .

No evidence being offered on the part of the prosecution, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-56

501. CHARLES CLARKE and JOSEPH CHINNERY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , fifty-eight yards of stuff, value 5l. two pieces of silk handkerchiefs, value 4l. two hundred and seventy-six handkerchiefs, value 70l. seven yards of quilting, value 2l. six yards of canvas, value 10s. twelve yards of Scotch gauze, value 9s. two silk veils, value 1l. 10s. and six cards of lace, value 6l. the property of Francis Drake and John Kay .

FRANCIS DRAKE sworn. - I am a warehouseman , in Wood-street , in partnership with John Kay : On Saturday, the 7th of May, in consequence of some information I had received, I went into the warehouse about half past eight in the morning; I immediately missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment, (enumerating them,) except the handkerchiefs, which I missed soon after.

Q.Whereabouts is the value of all that property? - A. The whole of it very near one hundred pounds; I saw it on the Friday evening, the night before; on Thursday, the 12th, I went to John Lench's house, in Horseshoe-alley, Moorfields, in company with Armstrong; Lench was not at home; we found two hundred and seventy handkerchiefs in a bed-room, up one pair of stairs; I immediately knew them all to be my property; the officer took the property; we found nothing else then; I saw Lench afterwards at the Office in Worship-street.

PETER JEFFERY sworn. - I am a warehouseman belonging to Drake and Kay; I got up about half past seven the morning the property was lost; I went out for a walk; I left the porter in the warehouse; when Mr. Drake came, the property was missed; I saw the property found at Lench's house.

LOUTHER JONES sworn. - I am porter to the prosecutors; I got up the morning of the robbery about a quarter past seven; I went out about five minutes to fetch water to sprinkle the warehouse; I shut the door after me, and locked it, and put the key in my pocket; I returned in less than five minutes, and found the lock shot out, but not into the ketch as it ought to be; I am sure it was in the ketch when I went out, for I pushed the door.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; in consequence of a search-warrant, I went to the house of Mr. Lench, in Horseshoe-alley, on Thursday, the 12th of May, about seven o'clock, or a little after, at night, in company with Mr. Drake, Jeffery, and Mason, another officer; I informed Mrs. Lench I had a warrant, and had these goods immediately produced to me out of a drawer by Mrs. Lench; it was a chest of drawers; there was nothing in the drawer but these handkerchiefs; Mr. Lench was not at home; I took the goods and Mrs. Lench to the Office that night, and she was committed; on Friday night, Mr. Lench surrendered at the Office, which was the first time I saw him; he is a master weaver, carries on a manufactory, and has a number of people working for him; I knew him before; he has lived there many years; Lench attended the Magistrate on Friday, and the two prisoners' names were given in by him; I knew the prisoners, and went in company with Ray, about eleven o'clock on Friday night, to a house, No. 10, in Leonard-street, pointed out by Lench as the house where Clarke lived, a little chandler's shop; we did not

go in that night; in the morning I, Mason, and Ray, went to this house, and went in, and found a woman and child, but Clarke was not at home; I left Mason there, and went, in company with Ray, and apprehended the other prisoner in his bed-room, No. 3, Fox-court, Worship-street; we then went to a bookseller's, Postern-row, Tower-hill, and found Clarke at work there; I took him, and brought him to the house where we left Mason, No. 10, Leonard-street; I asked him if that was his house; he said, yes; I asked him if he had any lodgers; he said, no, none but him and his family, and that every thing there was his; I desired Mason to search, and in a cupboard I saw Mason pull out a handkerchief, which I desired him to take care of, for I believed it was some of the goods we were searching for; I found this bag at Clarke's, on the pillow of a bed, at the foot.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You knew Lench very well? - A. Yes.

Q. You went with a search-warrant, and though you knew him to be a master weaver, you detained his wife in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not appear till Friday night, and she was still detained in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. You found Clarke at work at his usual employ? - A. Yes, at a bookbinder's.

Q. How long have you known Lench? - A. A number of years.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you ever know any harm of him? - A. No, I always thought him a man of independant property.

PETER MASON sworn. - I am an officer of Worship-street; I was with Armstrong at Lench's house; I saw the things found that he has been mentioning; I was also at Clarke's house, and found the handkerchief.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Mrs. Clarke told you that she bought it? - A. No.

Q.Are you a married man? - A. Yes.

Q. Your wife has such a handkerchief, perhaps? - A. No.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I went with Mr. Lench to his house on Monday, the 16th of May, and Mr. Lench delivered this bag to me; he took it out of a drawer.

JOHN LENCH sworn. - I live in Horseshoe-alley, Moorfields; I have known Chinnery many years, and the other prisoner about two years: On Saturday, the 7th of May, between twelve and one, I was reading the newspaper at a public-house, the Blue Bell, the bottom of Horseshoe-alley, there is a skittle-ground at the back of the house, which the back window looks to; Chinnery came out of the skittle-ground, and asked me how I did; I asked him the same; he said, he wanted to speak to me; I went about the space of a yard from where I was sitting; Chinnery said, his friend standing by, that was Clarke, had got something he thought might suit me; I asked him what it was.

Q. Was Clarke near enough to hear what he said? - A. Yes, he told me it was women's shawls; I told him I did not deal in those kind of things, I was no judge of them; Mr. Clarke then asked me if I would see them; I told him I had no objection, but they were articles I did not deal in; Clarke said, should he bring them to my house; I told him he might, if he pleased; he asked me what time; I told him I should be at home in half an hour, or a little more it might be; Clarke then went away.

Q. Before Clarke went away, was there any conversation to whom the goods belonged? - A. I seemed to hesitate; Clarke said, I need not be afraid, they were honestly come by; I think he said he had them to sell for a friend; Chinnery went away, I believe, at the same time; I staid there about half an hour, and then went home; in about an hour from the time they left me, Clarke came to my house with some silk handkerchiefs, in a black linen bag.

Q.Look at those handkerchiefs that lie by you? - A. I cannot swear to any of them; they are handkerchiefs of the same description.

Q.Look at that bag, was it that sort of bag? - A. It was a bag of this sort; the bag that Clarke brought them in I delivered to Ray when he went to my house on the Monday; when Clarke brought the handkerchiefs, I told him he might leave them, I was going to dinner, and that when I had dined, I would look over them; after dinner I looked over them, and put them up in the best manner I could, being so much tumbled; I told Clarke I should be some time looking over them, and if he would come to my house in two hours I should be ready; Clarke appointed me to meet him at the Green Dragon, Half Moon-alley, Bishopsgate-street Without, near about four o'clock in the afternoon; I went to the Green Dragon, and found both the prisoners there; Clarke asked me whether I had looked over them, and how many I made; I told him I made two hundred and fifty handkerchiefs; he said, he thought there might be more; Clarke talked first of selling them by the piece, then by the lump, at last I agreed to give him forty-five pounds for the whole; I paid Clarke the money in the presence of Chinnery.

Q. What were they about when you came to the Green Dragon? - A.They appeared to have been eating, there were radish-tops on the table; I left the handkerchiefs at home; I put them in the bag again; when I returned home, I put them in a drawer in my bed-chamber, up one pair of stairs; on the Thursday following, I took out two or three parcels, and went to a master weaver, a Mr. Stevens, in the neighbourhood where I live; I shewed them to Mr. Stevens, and asked him if he would buy them.

Q.Where was this? - A. At Ruddock's-buildings, near Skinner-street, Shoreditch; I believe I went with them about half after two; he looked at them, and asked me what I asked for them.

Q.You had some conversation about them? - A. Yes.

Q.After the officers had been at your house in your absence, did you go to Worship-street? - A. Yes, I sent my compliments to the Magistrate, and I would wait upon him in the evening.

Q. You were not taken up at all, but went to the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell the story there you have been telling to day? - A. Yes, as near as could be; I was sent to New Prison that night, and was bailed on the Monday following.

Q. Bailed to appear here, and give your evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. Your wife was discharged? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. We have heard that you are a man of independant fortune - that you could have no temptation to mix in a dishonest business? - A. No.

Q. You believed you were dealing in a perfectly honest transaction? - A. Yes.

Q. When you went to Stevens, you told him how you came by these things? - A. Yes, he said he could give no such money as I asked; then I said I had made a bad bargain, for I had given more than I should have done; he said, they would be a dead stock, they were going out of fashion.

Q.Whether you told Stevens the truth how you came by them? - A. I told Stevens I bought them.

Q. You did not tell Stevens you took them for a bad debt? - A. No, I did not; I said, I had had a bad deal.

Q. You enquired of this person, Clarke, what business he was, I suppose? - A.No, I did not.

Q. You knew what Chinnery was? - A. I heard he was a kind of a smith, that made small instruments for cases.

Q. That is not a dealer in handkerchiefs? - A. No, that is very clear.

Q. You had no curiosity to ask Chinnery what trade his friend was? - A. No.

Q. You are a manufacturer - you know large quantities of goods don't commonly come into person's hands? - A. I cannot account for that.

Q. The bag was found in your house? - A. I produced it.

Q. You made no enquiry what trade the man was, nor went to his house to see what trade he was, nor asked Chinnery what trade he was? - A. No, I did not; I did suppose he was a bookbinder.

Q. You supposed he was a bookbinder, and therefore bought of him forty-five pounds worth of handkerchiefs? - A. Yes.

Q. You don't deal in this sort of articles? - A. I deal in a variety of articles, and manufacture a great many articles.

Q.Not handkerchiefs? - A. No.

Q.Did you talk of this in the neighbourhood? - A. To no person but Stevens, whom I went to.

Q.Before you went to the Magistrate, your wife was in custody? - A. I was not at home that night till half after eleven; then I heard of this matter of Mrs. Lench; the next day I sent to the Magistrate to tell him I would wait upon him; I have lived in the house thirty-six years, my character was never impeached before in any criminal way whatever during my natural life.

Q. Did you never say that this matter was brought home to you, if you did not get rid of it? - A. I never did; I never made use of any such expression.

Q.Nothing at all to that purpose? - A. No.

Q.What do you deal in? - A. I cannot tell you all I deal in; I manufacture all in the fancy way, tassels and fringes for garments.

Q. The Magistrates committed you? - A. I was committed on Friday night.

Mr. Knapp. Q. This bag you found in your house, was it sent for by the Magistrate? - A.There was a bag produced at the Office, and I was desired to look at it; I looked at it, and could not take upon me to say it was the same bag; I thought it was not.

Q. Was the prisoner there at the time? - A. I believe he was.

Q. Did you afterwards go back to the house, and find this bag you now produce? - A. I did, and gave it to Mr. Ray.

JOHN WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Lench; I saw the prisoner, Clarke, come up my master's yard, about half after one, on Saturday, the 7th of May; he had a black bag on his right shoulder, with something of a bulky contents in it; he went into the warehouse, and stopped about a minute.

Q.Was your master at home at that time? - A. Yes, then I saw him return again without the bag, and went down the yard.

Q. Is that the sort of bag? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of Chinnery? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You never saw him before? - A. No.

Q. Did you always know him? - A. Yes, when I was brought into the Office at Worship-street, I was pointed instantly to the man; and, without thinking, I said, Chinnery was the man; Chinnery had a blue coat, and I said it was he; Clarke had a blue coat on on Saturday.

Court. Q. You hastily said Chinnery was the man? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. First the Magistrate desired

you to view the man, and you said Chinnery was the man; then you were desired to correct yourself, and you pitched upon Clarke? - A. Exactly so.

Q.There were but two? - A. No.

Q.Did your master give you a hint? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Clarke had a blue coat on on Saturday? - A. Yes.

Q.Chinnery had a blue coat on then? - A. Yes.

ANN WILLIAMS sworn. - I am the landlady of the Green Dragon, Bishopsgate Without; I think I have seen the prisoners before at my house, but I cannot say.

Q. When did you see them in your house before? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Do you recollect whether they had any thing to eat? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Don't you know they had some radishes? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you know what month they were at your house? - A. I do not; I was sent for to Worship-street.

Q. How long was it before you went to Worship-street, that they were at your house? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was it a month? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was it in the summer or winter? - A. I have kept the house but four months the 19th of this month.

Q. Do you think it was in the month of January? - A. I cannot recollect; not so late as that.

Q.What do you think of February? - A. It might be as late as that.

Q. Was it about a month ago? - A. I cannot say.

Q.What day of the week was it? - A. I cannot say.

Q.(To Drake.) Look at that single handkerchief? - A. I cannot swear positively to it; it is like what I lost.

Clarke's defence. I am conscious I never robbed any man; they bid the man bring the bag, and swear to it; when they came to enquire for me, my wife told them where I was at work; this man wants to throw the guilt off himself.

Chimnery's defence. I never recommended Clarke to Lench to buy this property.

HUGH STEVENS sworn. - I am a silk handkerchief manufacturer; I have known Lench by sight for years.

Q. Do you remember his coming to you with any handkerchiefs? - A. Yes, on Thursday, the 12th of this month; he brought four dozen of silk handkerchiefs, I asked the price; he said, four shillings and sixpence, or six shillings; I told him they were not saleable, and would not suit me, they were going out of fashion; he said, he took them of a person he was glad to get any thing of; I said, I supposed for a bad debt, and he said, yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. He has sworn that he said no such thing? - A. He told me first he took them of a man he was glad to get any thing of; and I said, I supposed for a bad debt; he said, yes, which we are all liable to in trade.

The prisoner, Clarke, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18030525-57

502. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , a handkerchief, value 5s. the property of John Heaps .

JOHN HEAPS sworn. - I am a hat-presser , in Wood-street, Cheapside: On Saturday the 30th of April, about twelve o'clock, I was walking on the Quay next to the Custom-house ; I felt a hand in my pocket, and turning quick, I saw the prisoner next the wall with my handkerchief in his hand; I immediately seized him by the collar, took the handkerchief from him, and gave him into the custody of a constable; he made no resistance; the constable has the handkerchief.

JOSEPH JONES sworn. - I am a hat-warehouseman, in Wood-street; Mr. Heaps and I were coming down the Quay, he called out; I turned round, and saw the handkerchief in the prisoner's hand; it was a silk handkerchief; Mr. Heaps took it out of the prisoner's hand; I went for a constable, while Mr. Heaps kept the prisoner; when I returned, Mr. Heaps delivered him and the handkerchief into the charge of the constable.(The constable produced the handkerchief, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going by the Custom-house; this gentleman pulled his hand out of his pocket, and this handkerchief fell out; I took it up, and was going to give it him, and he collared me. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-58

503. GEORGE FLAMSTEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , six fowls, value 6s. and 44lb. of leaden pipe, value 8s. the property of Edward Lilly .

EDWARD LILLY sworn. - I live at the Coach and Horses, Walthamstow ; I have several tenements there, and one pump that supplies them all: On Sunday the 8th of this month, I lost the fowls and lead; the lead was a part of the pump, fixed to the freehold; the fowls were in a little field I have behind my house; I saw them there on Saturday night; I missed them between five and six o'clock on Sunday evening; I heard of their being stopped at Hackney, and went over to Hackney about eight o'clock on Monday morning, and saw the fowls and lead in the possession of the patrol, Griffiths; the fowls were dead; they had been properly killed; they were in the guard-house

lying on a form; I had had them a twelvemonth, I suppose; they were very fine fowls; five hens, and a famous red cock, there was just the number I lost; they were delivered to me; I have no doubt of their being my property; the prisoner was in the lock-up-house adjoining the guard-house; I just looked through to see if I knew him; I had never seen him before; I asked him if he knew Walthamstow; he said, no.

WILLIAM SWANSDOWN sworn. - On Sunday morning the 8th of May, about a quarter after four, I stopped the prisoner at the end of Clapton field, Hackney, about three miles from the prosecutor's house, he was coming towards London; I asked him what he had in the bag; he said, he was a carpenter, and had got his working tools; I asked him to let me look at his tools; he threw the bag on the ground, and off he set as hard as he could run; I desired Thomas Baker , another patrol, to follow him, and not leave him, and I brought the bag to the watch-house; Baker met his brother patrols, and called to them, and they stopped him; the bag contained six fowls and a piece of leaden pipe; there were five hens and a cock; the bag and lead has been lodged in the watch-house ever since; I can swear this is the bag I took from the prisoner, and the contents of it.

Q. You saw him after he was taken? - A. Yes, I am sure it was the same man.

THOMAS BAKER sworn. - I am a patrol; I pursued the prisoner, and was very near him when he was taken; I never lost sight of him at all; he was stopped by Samuel Everton .

SAMUEL EVERTON sworn. - I am a patrol; I stopped the prisoner; I took him to the watch-house, and resigned him to Mr. Griffiths, the constable.

GEORGE GILES sworn. - I work with Mr. Benjamin Travers, at Clapton; I was stopping up the bank, and with my shovel I struck a piece of lead up; in about an hour or two, I heard a man was in the cage for stealing lead, and I carried the lead down.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS sworn. - I was constable of the night; I saw the prisoner brought in; Swansdown brought the bag, it contained six fowls; the bag has been in my possession ever since. (The bag produced.)

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Woodford, at Lee-bridge I overtook a man with a bag; he said he was going to London; I asked him what he had in his bag; he said, tools; he asked me to carry it for him, and he would give me a shilling; being distressed, I was glad to earn a trifle, and took them.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-59

504. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , a silk handkerchief, value 3s. a pair of gloves, value 1s. a pair of braces, value 5s. a pocket handkerchief, value 1s. a silk purse, value 2s. six half-guineas, nine seven-shilling-pieces, and three shillings and sixpence , the property of Thomas-Dixon Butler .

THOMAS- DIXON BUTLER sworn. - I have been formerly in the Light Horse; I keep a house in the City of Westminster; On Tuesday, the 10th of May, I went to Mile-end New-town, and from thence to Whitechapel, to the sign of the Sugar Loaf, in Church-street, to get a favourite sword given me by his Grace, the Duke of Northumberland; I stopped there to spend the evening, and got a little intoxicated; returning about half past nine, in Whitechapel I was accosted by the prisoner, and another girl, informing me they could get me a lodging where I could lie down with a pretty girl; the prisoner took me to Angel-court, in Wentworth-street, near Brick-lane , to a house; I was shewn up into a room by the prisoner, and another woman came in in black; the woman in black, and the prisoner, desired me to sit down on a bed, which I did; I perceived the woman in black took up the candle, and went to the door, and stood with the door in her hand half shut, and left the prisoner with me on the side of the bed; a little while after; she went away with the light, and left me and this girl in the dark; I found the prisoner's hand in my pocket, and told her, she was robbing me; immediately the prisoner got up, and ran away, I found my money all gone, and being in the dark, I was sometime before I could find the door. At last, I found the door, and found it fast against me; by making a noise at the door, the woman in black came and opened the door; I told her I was robbed of my money, handkerchief, and gloves, and I would call for an officer; she told me she knew nothing of the prisoner, she was gone away from the house; I went across the way, and made application for an officer; a man, who keeps an eating-house, went with me for an officer; he said it was well I escaped with my life, for it was a very bad house; we could not get an officer; he took me then to the Flying Horse, where we found an officer, and he desired me to leave it till the morning, and come about half after eight, which I accordingly did; the officer came to me, and took me to a house in Wentworth-street, where we found the prisoner and a good many more eating hot rolls; the officer, when we got into the room, asked me if any of those girls was the girl that robbed me; I immediately said, the prisoner was the girl; he searched her immediately, and found upon her six half guineas in gold, and seven seven-shilling pieces, two slides belonging to my purse, and a silk pocket handkerchief; I asked her what

she had done with the remainder of the things; she said, that was all she had got.

Q.Had you told her it would be better for her to give an account of the things? - A. No; I told her I would punish her; she said, that was my money, and hoped I would forgive her; I asked what she had done with my purse; she did not give me any answer; the officer took the money; I did not find my gloves, my braces, nor the purse; there was some silver found upon her; I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment; the silk handkerchief was a striped one, I wore it on my neck in the morning instead of a white one; it was in my pocket.

Q. Was there any thing remarkable about the half-guineas or seven-shilling-pieces? - A. No.

Q.Were you sober enough to swear you did not give her these things? - A. Yes, I was sober enough to know I did not give her any thing; she did not ask me.

Q. You were not sober when you went there? - A. I got more sober afterwards.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am one of the officers belonging to the Police Office, Whitechapel; I took up the prisoner; I found upon her six half-guineas, seven seven-shilling-pieces, two little brass rings, he calls them sliders to his purse, and a silk handkerchief; the prosecutor applied to me about eight o'clock in the morning, and stated to me that he was picked up by two little girls; I went to George-street, Spital-fields, to a Mr. Jenkins's, where these match-girls lodge; I apprehended her, and took her to the Office.

Q. Did the prosecutor know her immediately? - A. No, he did not, he hesitated some time; when I searched her, and found the handkerchief, he said, that was the girl; she said, it was not her, it was the other little girl; I asked her what she had done with the other two seven-shilling-pieces; she said, she had no more, that was all the other girl, who was with her when they picked him up, gave her.

Q.She never admitted it was her? - A. No.

Q. He has stated that he immediately pointed out the prisoner? - A. No, he did not; there were two or three other little girls; he did not know which to pitch upon; she begged to be forgiven, he was in a violent passion, and said he would hang her; I asked her if that was the gentleman's money; she said, the other girl gave it her; there is nothing remarkable about the money.(The handkerchief was produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. The other girl and I were going up the Minories; this gentleman met us, and he says, come along, I will give you five shillings; the other little girl was but eight years old; we came back, and went with him, and when we came to the house, he gave us three shillings and sixpence; he went with the other girl, he did not go with me at all; I stopped at the door, and she came out; we came into Whitechapel; she gave me the money; she said, the gentleman gave it her, and desired me to keep it till next morning for her.

Jury. (To the Prosecutor.) Q.You spoke of a pair of braces - where were those braces? - A. I had them in my pocket.

Smith. The prosecutor expressed a surprize bow they could get his gallows's off from under his waistcoat. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-60

505. ANN GREENLAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , a japan chair, value 2s. the property of Charles Marshall .

CHARLES MARSHALL sworn. - I am a broker , in Crown-street, Moorfields : On Saturday the 7th of May, between one and two o'clock, a young man came to me, and asked me if I had lost a chair; I looked at the door, and said, I had; he said, a woman was with it; I went to Worship-street Office, and saw it in the hands of Mr. Lisle, a broker, who lives just by; it was a black japan chair, and several marks by which I knew it; there is a split on the top of one of the back feet.

JOHN LISLE sworn. - I am a broker, in Prince's-street: On the 7th of May, between half after one and half after two, the prisoner brought a chair to me, and asked me to buy it; I looked at it, and said, it is a new chair, have not you got the half dozen; she said, no; I asked her where she brought it from; she said, St. Giles's; I said, she should shew me who she got it of, or go to Worship-street; a person present knew the chair, and we took her to Worship-street; I have kept it from that time to this.(The chair was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been to my sister's, in Globe-street; coming home I met a woman in Finsbury-square; she told me she had a chair to fell, and asked me if I knew a broker's, and said, if I would go in with it, she would satisfy me for my trouble; that she sold these chairs for a man that made them. GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-61

506. MARY BRIGGS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Beasley , the said George, Elizabeth his wife, John Smith, Cornelius Callan, and Mary Callan being therein, on the 16th of May , about four o'clock in the afternoon, and stealing a gown, value 2s. a bonnet, value 4s. the property of John Wright ; two sheets, value 8s. a blanket, value

2s. two pillows, value 2s. and two pillow-cases, value 1s. the property of the said George Beasley .

Second Count. Laying it to be the dwelling-house of John Wright , no person being therein.

ELIZABETH BEASLEY sworn. - I am the wife of George Beasley; I live at No. 16, Dorset-street, Spitalfields ; John Wright and Ann Wright, Cornelius Callan and Mary Callan , lodged in our house; Ann Wright lodged in a back room adjoining the garden: On the 16th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I called out, Mrs. Wright, are you at home? and nobody answered; I looked at the window, and saw the two garden-pots had been removed from the window; they were upon the ground; I then saw a washing-tub that had been removed from the bottom of the garden under the window.

Q. How could any body get into the garden? - A. By going through the passage from the street; the door was upon the latch.

Q. Who were in the house at this time? - A.Myself, Mary Callan, and Cornelius Callan; I got upon the tub, and saw a half tester bed turned down, and missed a blanket, a pair of sheets, a pair of pillows and pillow cases.

Q.They were your furniture? - A. Yes.

ANN WRIGHT sworn. - I lodge with Mrs. Beasley; I had the lower room backwards: On the 16th of May, I went out about half past six o'clock in the morning; I go out to daily labour, to whiten the rods that they make baskets with: I came home again about half past six at night, and found the window open; there is a fastening to it, but I did not fasten it, it was only shut close; when I came home I missed a gown and bonnet belonging to myself, and a pair of sheets, a blanket, and a pair of pillows and pillow-cases; I found my gown at Lazarus Jacobs's.

LAZARUS JACOBS sworn. - I keep a clothes-shop: On Monday the 16th of May, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner brought me a gown and blanket; I bought them of her for 4s.(Vickery produced the gown.)

Jacobs. I sold the blanket from my door for sixteen-pence.

Mrs. Wright. I am sure this is my gown.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - In consequence of a search-warrant, I went to the house of Lazarus Jacobs, in Raven-row, Spital-fields; I found this gown hanging in the window; I did not find any other property; the prisoner was brought to the Office on the Saturday following by Jacobs; I asked her where she got this gown from.

Q. Did you promise her any thing? - A. I did not; she then said, she had bought it of a woman; I took her to the house of Beasley, to see if she could produce the woman she bought it of; and in returning, she said, I will not lay this blame upon any body else, for I am guilty of it myself; I then asked her how she did it, that the window I thought was so high that she could not get into it; she said, she did not get into it herself, but that she got a little boy, and put him in at the window, and he had given her the things out at the window; and when he came out, she gave him sixpence for what he had done, and that she had taken the things to Jacobs, and sold them.

Prisoner. I am very sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-62

507. WILLIAM BOLTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , a copper, value 15s. belonging to James Black , fixed to a certain building of his, called a house .

Second Count. Fixed to a certain building.

WILLIAM RUTHERFORD sworn. - Q. Do you know the house of Mr. James Black , Charlotte-street, Rathbone-place ? - A. Yes: On Saturday the 30th of April, I saw the house; there were two coppers in the back kitchen fixed in the building; I saw them safe about half after six on Saturday evening; it is a house undergoing repairs; nobody lives in it; I left the house at half after six, and double-locked the door, and took the key with me; I returned about eight in the evening, and found the door on the single lock; going into the passage, I saw the back door open; I looked into the yard, and saw the shutters of the back kitchen window put back

Q.At this time it was dark? - A. Not quite; I immediately went down into the kitchen, and found one copper taken out of the place in which it was set on the floor, immediately after I heard some noise at the foot of the stairs, and turning about I saw two men going up the kitchen stairs, the prisoner and another man.

Q. Are you quite sure one was the prisoner? - A.Quite sure.

Q.Had he been employed as a workman in the house? - A. He had not; I went up, and caught them on the kitchen stairs; I caught the prisoner as he ran up stairs, and conveyed him to the door till assistance came; the other got away.

Q.When you unlocked the single lock, did you shut the door after you, or leave it open? - A. It was left open.

Q.When you first saw them, they were coming up from the kitchen? - A. Yes.

Q.Then they could not have come in after you? - A. No, they must have come in before me.

Q. You did not see any instruments in their hands? - A. No.

Q.Nor in the kitchen? - A. No; the prisoner was taken to St. Pancras watch-house; he was searched, and two parlour-door keys found upon him, and a knife; I believe that was all.

Q.No key large enough to open the street-door? - A.No; there was a key picked up in the street.

Q. You are sure the men that ran up from the kitchen must have been in the house before you came in? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The house was under repair? - A. Yes.

Q.There were workmen employed? - A. Yes.

Q. Had not they received orders to remove the coppers? - A.They had not.

JAMES BLACK sworn. - I am owner of the house where these coppers were.

Q.When did you last see this copper? - A.About six o'clock; it was fixed. I and the last witness left the house together; I saw him doublelock the door; I am certain we left nobody in the house; I did not return till about nine o'clock in the evening; then I saw the copper on the kitchen-floor. (The copper was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prosecutor. We fitted it into the place; it corresponded with all the marks.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; he took only two shillings and a knife out of my pocket; there were no keys taken out of my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18030525-63

508. THOMAS COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , a box-coat, value 10s. the property of Edmund Henry , Earl of Limerick .

ANDREW CHAPLIN sworn. - On the 10th of this month, about twenty minutes after nine o'clock, I was in Dutchess-mews ; I put my horses too into the coach, and drew them up into the Mews, and returned from the coach to fasten my doors; putting the bar up, I saw the prisoner pass the near side of my carriage; I stooped down, and saw him draw the coat off the box.

Q.Whose servant are you? - A. Lord Limerick's.

Q.What is his Christian name? - A.Edmund-Henry; he took the coat over his arm, and ran down the Mews; I pursued him, and attacked him in Dutchess-street; I said, you rascal, where are you going with my coat; a hackney-coach was coming past; he threw the coat at me, and attacked me, and hit me on the breast; on that, I made up to him, and collared him; with that, up came another man, and struck me over the breast, and knocked me from the prisoner; with that, a witness, I have here, caught hold of the prisoner; I called out for help, and he seized him; with that, the other man made off, and we took the prisoner and the coat to a public-house, and left him there till the watch was set. (The coat was produced and identified by Chaplin.)

THOMAS HUGHES sworn. - On the 10th of this month, I was going through Dutchess-street, about twenty minutes after nine at night; I saw the prisoner crossing the road with the coat under his right arm, and a man after him, calling, stop him; I pursued him immediately; before I came up to the prisoner, he threw the coat at the coachman, and the coachman seized him by the collar; somebody came up, and struck him, and made him leave his hold; I immediately seized him by the arms and body, and held him till the man took up the coat; we conveyed him to a public-house.

Prisoner's defence. I am sorry for it; I have been guilty of it; I have served his Majesty till last Christmas. GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-64

509. WILLIAM CLEUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a frock, value 6s. and four caps, value 4s. the property of James Gibson .

SARAH GIBSON sworn. - I live at the White-Lion, St. Catherine's-lane , near the Tower: On Thursday, the 28th of April, the prisoner was drinking at our house; he asked for a bed; he did not get up the next day till near one o'clock; I missed a striped muslin frock, and four caps; they were in a room adjoining to where he was drinking, I saw them the evening before; I missed them about twelve o'clock on Friday, the 29th, the prisoner was then in bed; when I missed them, I sent the servant up stairs to see if he was gone; he was not; when he came down, I mentioned to him that I had lost such things; he said, he hoped I did not think it was him; my husband was not at home; when he came home, I sent for an officer, and had him searched, and the frock and four caps were taken out of his small clothes; he begged my pardon, he said he was in liquor, and did not know what he was doing.

Q. Was he much in liquor that night? - A. I thought he seemed to pretend to be more in liquor than he was.

Q. Did he go through the room, where the things were, to-bed? - A. No; he went out backwards, about ten o'clock, through that room; the things were on a dresser; there was no light in the room.

Q. You don't remember his going into that room but that once? - A. No, only once.

THOMAS BLACKALL sworn. - I was sent for by Mrs. Gibson on the 29th of April, between one and two o'clock; I took the prisoner into custody; I was desired to search him, which I did; I found

a frock and four caps loose in his breeches, in the back part; he said, he was very sorry, he did not know what he was doing, and hoped he should be forgiven - that he was rather in liquor when he did it. (The things were produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner. Q.Whether I did not ask her whether the suspected me? - A. I did suspect him, but did not say so, because there was nobody at home but myself.

Prisoner's defence. I am a plumber; the circumstances of my case demands pity: I was going to sail in a few days, I met two persons at the prosecutor's house, and, in the course of the evening, I drank immoderately of mixed liquors; I knew nothing where I was, till I waked in a strange room; I did not know how the things came into my possession; I found them in the morning, and came down to the sitting room, and intended to find an opportunity of dispossessing myself of them; if you should find me guilty, I hope you will permit me to serve his Majesty by sea, which I will do thankfully and faithfully.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Jury. We recommend, that his request to serve his Majesty, may be granted.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18030525-65

510. JOHN CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , a cloth coat, value 5s. and a hat, value 1s. the property of Edward Mentor .

EDWARD MENTOR sworn. - On the 9th of May, I was unfortunately locked out of my lodging, and I went and got a lodging in Dyot-street ; a person went out of the lodging about seven in the morning, and left the door open; the prisoner came in a little time after, and stopped a minute or two, and went out again; seeing him go out, I jumped out of bed, and missed my coat and hat; it was on the lower floor; I dressed myself, all but my coat and hat, and went out, but could see nothing of him; I went in again, and in ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, the prisoner came, and stood opposite the door; I went out, and laid hold of him; he immediately drew a knife upon me; there were a parcel of people there rescued him from me; I ran into the house, and he followed me, and I took up the poker in my own defence; he then shut up the knife, and sat down in a chair; I went to the door, and locked it, and then he owned he had got my coat and hat, and said, he would give it me up, if I would go out with him; the woman of the house and me went out with him; then he drew the knife again, a parcel of people came up, and took his part, and I was obliged to leave him; I told them the case, but nobody would take my part, till Tierney, a witness, came up, and helped me to take him; he said then, he would give them up; we went to his lodging, he gave up the coat; he said he could not find the hat; I never got the hat again. (The coat was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

ANDREW TIERNEY sworn. - I am a labourer in St. Giles's.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; I don't know how he gets his bread: On the 9th of May, coming by Dyot-street, I saw a man standing in the street without a hat or coat; I asked what was amiss; they told me, young Connor had robbed the man; I saw him across the way, and went and took him; the prosecutor was by, relating the case to me; the prosecutor desired his coat again; he said, you b-r, what coat; the neighbours said, we must get somebody to take him to the watch-house; he then said, he would give up the hat and coat; I went with him to his lodgings, and got the coat; he had a drawn knife in his hand; I took it from him. (Producing it.)

Q.(To the Prosecutor.) Whose house was it you slept at? - A. I don't know; it was kept by a woman.

Q. Did she appear to be a woman of good repute? - A. Yes; it is a lodging-house.

Q. Did she know the prisoner? - A. She called him by his name.

Q. Did any body else sleep in the same room? - A. Yes, two women in another bed.

Q. Were they in bed when the prisoner came in? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. Coming up Dyot-street, I was in liquor, a girl that knew me called me into a house; I had this coat of my own over my arm; a man followed me, and said, I had got his coat; I said, if I had his coat, I would give it him; Tierney came up, and knocked me down.

Q.(To Tierney.) Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, some years; he has been employed by Mr. Wellings to drive the military bread waggons.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-66

511. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , a gold ring, value 2s. two silver tea-spoons, value 2s. a pair of silver buckles, value 10s. two brass cocks, value 6d. a pair of stockings, value 1s. an apron, value 2s. a table-cloth, value 1s. 6d. three yards of lace, value 1s. a housewife, value 1d. and a seven-shilling piece , the property of William Mobbs .

WILLIAM MOBBS sworn. - I live near the French hospital, St. Luke's ; the prisoner was employed in my family as a nurse to my wife.

Q. When the prisoner left your family, did you miss any thing? - A. Yes, a great many things.

Q. When did she come, and when did she go? - A. I don't know.

Q.Was it about the middle of April she came? - A. I believe before that.

SUSANNAH PORTER sworn. - On the 25th of April I was sent for to Mr. Mobbs's, on the death of my aunt; the prisoner was in the family as nurse to Mrs. Mobbs; we were sitting at tea, and the second dish I poured out I missed the teaspoon the prisoner was using with her tea; I asked where the spoon was; it could not be found; I called to my husband, who was outside the door; I told him I had missed a tea-spoon from the table, and he immediately went and fetched a constable, James Geary; when I missed the spoon, she went out of my uncle's house to the next door; the constable went after her to the next door.

WILLIAM GEARY sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for on the 25th of April, about five in the afternoon, to take up the prisoner; I found her at the next door to Mr. Mobbs's; I searched her, and found the things upon her mentioned in the indictment. - (They were produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was employed to look after this woman; I was desired by Mrs. Mobbs's nephew to take care of what things I could when her breath was out of her body; this man and woman came in, and brought a constable; the ring and other things I should have given to the parties, Mrs. Mobbs's relations, who desired me to take care of them; there were three 5l. Bank-notes I gave up.

Q.(To Porter.) Did she give you the three 5l. notes? - A. No, she gave them to the constable.

Q.(To the Constable.) Did she give you the three 5l. notes? - A. She threw them at me with the pocket half an hour before I took her into custody; I was sent for again to take her into custody.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined 12 months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18030525-67

512. ROBERT JINGLE , JOHN LIGO , and WILLIAM ROBERTSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of May , a framed saw, value 10s. the property of William East .

WILLIAM EAST sworn. - I am a sawyer ; I was at Mr. Williams's, the Duke of York's Head, on the 2d of May; the saw was on the outside of the door, it was in a frame; I staid drinking there three hours or more; when I came out I missed my saw, and returned into the house, and stopped there while the evening.

Q. Did you think any more of your saw? - A. No, I did not; I went home at night, and was very uneasy about the saw; a man came in the morning, and gave some information of the prisoners. - (The saw produced.)

Q. Is that the form in which it stood at the door? - A. No, the frame is knocked to pieces, and the name planed out.

MARY THOMPSON sworn. - I was at the Duke of York on the 2d of May; I saw all the three prisoners there.

Q. What time was it? - A. I cannot say; Ligo went out and came in again, and asked Jingle if that was his saw; he made no answer as I heard; Jingle went out.

Q. Was East in the house at that time? - A. Yes; Jingle came in, and called the other young man out.

Q. What is his name? - A. I don't know; it was the other prisoner.

MARY DAVIS sworn. - Q. Do you remember East coming into the Duke of York with a saw? - A. Yes, the 2d of May, he left the saw at the door; I was doing my work at the door, and saw two soldiers take the saw away.

Q. Look at the prisoners, and see if it was either of them that took it? - A. I cannot say.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH sworn. - On the 3d of May the prosecutor came and informed me he had been robbed at the Duke of York of a framed saw; I asked him if he knew any of the parties; he said, yes; I apprehended the prisoner Jingle, and afterwards Robertson; the serjeant went to fetch Ligo; one of the serjeants said to me, you take care of Robertson, and I will go and fetch the saw; the saw was brought to me at the Office by the serjeant and William Calvert ; it has been in my possession ever since.

WILLIAM CALVERT sworn. - On the 3d of May, when I went home to breakfast, I saw the saw stand in my room, No. 8, Dartmouth-row; I don't know who brought it there, nor how it came there.

ANN CALVERT sworn. - On the 3d of May, I was in bed, somebody knocked at the door, and Ligo came in, and asked me if I would let him leave the saw there till he came off guard the next day; he put it under the bed, and went away.

East. That is my saw, and altogether are worth fourteen or fifteen shillings at least.

Jingle's defence. I never saw the saw till I was taken up.

Ligo's defence. I saw the saw lying in Prince's-street as I was coming from duty at seven in the morning; I carried it to Calvert's, and desired if they found the right owner to let him have it.

Robertson's defence. I never saw the saw till I saw it at Queen's-square Office.

Jingle, NOT GUILTY .

Ligo, NOT GUILTY .

Robertson, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18030525-68

513. ANN HUGHES , otherwise FENTON ,

was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , an apron, value 1s. two shifts, value 2s. five caps, value 1s. five handkerchiefs, value 2s. three pair of stockings, value 3s. a pair of pockets, value 6d. and a sheet, value 6d. the property of Arabella Roberts .

ARABELLA ROBERTS sworn. - I live at Mr. Twaite's, at the Hoop and Anchor: On the 18th of May, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them.) from the kitchen table; the prisoner came in just before for half a pint of beer; she was in the kitchen about five minutes; I saw them there about five minutes before she came in, and missed them as soon as the went out; I went to look after her, but could not find her directly; she was stopped about four in the afternoon by Mr. Butler, a pawnbroker.

JOHN BUTLER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I know the prisoner; I took her as I was accidentally taking a walk in the afternoon; I had had a description of her from the prosecutrix; I saw the bundle under her arm, and she answering the description, I took her to Mr. Twaite's, in West-street, near Chick-lane; this was between four and five in the afternoon; I gave her in charge to Joseph Wentworth , the constable.

JOSEPH WENTWORTH sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody; the bundle was given to me, and has been in my custody ever since. (They were produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I went into this house to have half a pint of beer, and while the man was giving me the change, a woman gave me a wink to come out with her; I went with her, and going along she gave me this bundle to take care of; and walking, along I missed the woman, and was looking for her, and this man came up and asked me where I got the bundle; she went to pawn a check apron, and left the bundle with me; I went about the street two hours seeking her.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18030525-69

514. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May , a copper, value 30s. the property of Richard Hobdell , the same being fixed to a certain building, called a house .

Second Count. Laying it to be a certain building of his.

RICHARD HOBDELL sworn. - I live in Addle-street; this copper was taken from an unfinished house I have at Holloway : On the 9th of this month, I went down with a stone-mason to do some work; when I came into the kitchen, I missed the copper, that was between twelve and one o'clock on the Monday; I had seen it on the Sunday evening; I saw it afterwards at a public-house, in Hatton-garden, near the Office; I knew it to be mine by some marks, and the measurement over, and by the manner in which it was let, because I gave directions to the bricklayer how to set it; it was safe in the brick-work on Sunday evening.

PETER CULLEY sworn. - On Monday, the 9th of May, about four o'clock in the morning, I was informed by a drover that the prisoner was turned out of the Holloway road, with a copper upon his back; I immediately pursued after him, and in a bye lane I found him among some thick bushes, and the copper by his side.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor's house, at Holloway? - A. Yes.

Q. How far from his house was the place where you stopped the prisoner? - A. About half a mile; when the prisoner saw me advance towards him, he got up, and took the copper upon his back; I asked him where he was going with that copper; he said, to a coppersmith's, in Smithfield; I asked him where he brought it from; he said, from Whetstone; I asked if it was his own; he said, no, that it belonged to one Sanders, a bricklayer, that he had it of; I asked him the coppersmith's name that he was going to take it to, and he said he did not know the coppersmith's name; I told him he must go along with me for further examination, and I took him into custody; I took him to the Islington watch-house; the Magistrates of Islington ordered him to be taken to Hatton-garden at half after eleven that day; it has been in my possession ever since; I put two marks on it before the Magistrate.

Q.Did it appear to be recently taken out of the brick work? - A. Yes, the mortar was all about it.(The copper was produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I am veryinnocent of taking the copper away; I brought it from Whetstone.

Q.(To the Prosecutor.) Was the house broke open? - A. There was some brick work down behind the place where the copper was, and some wood work put up at the windows to keep the weather out; he must have got in by removing the wood work, or where the bricks were down.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-70

515. ROBERT LYONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , three shillings and thirteen halfpence , the monies of Mary Jones .

MARY JONES sworn. - I live in George-court, Fleet-market; I get my living by needle-work: Last Sunday night was week, I was coming from Clapham, very late in the evening, the prisoner

followed me, and asked me if I would take a walk with him; I told him it was very late, and I wanted to go home; he said, only across the way to Gardener's-lane; I went across the way, and stood talking with him, and he said he would give me a shilling; I said, I wished to go home; when we came to Gardener's-lane , he put his hand in my pocket, and took the three shillings and six penny worth of halfpence; there were, I believe, two penny pieces; after we came back, he wished me a good night, and I put my hand in my pocket, and missed my money; I had seen it just before he met me; I went across the way after him, and accused him with it, and he ran up a stable yard; I waited there till the watchman came to me; the watchman took him to the watch-house, and asked me if I had any money in my pocket I could swear to; I said, yes, I had a Queen's Ann's shilling; he gave me two sixpences, they were both had.

Q. Did you see him searched at the watch-house? - A. Yes, there were three shillings and half-a-crown in silver, and some halfpence found upon him; the Queen Ann's shilling I lost was among them.

Q. Where is Gardener's-lane? - A. In King-street, Westminster.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH sworn. - On the 15th instant, I was constable of the night; about half past twelve o'clock, between the 15th and 16th, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house by the prosecutrix, and a watchman, and Lord Macdonald's servant; Mary Jones charged him with robbing her of three shillings in silver, and sixpence halfpenny in copper; I asked her if there was any of the money she could swear to; she said, there was a Queen Ann's shillings, with a small scratch on the head, and the head was rather plain; and instead of giving her a shilling, he had given her two tin sixpences; the prisoner denied the charge; he said, he neither had shillings, nor had he any tin about him, he never made use of tin; I searched him, and found three shillings in silver, a half-crown, and eight-pence halfpenny in copper; I also found three pieces of tin, and a bad sixpence, and a pair of new shoes; one of the shilling is a Queen Ann's shilling.

Q.(To the Prosecutrix.) What was he to give you a shilling for - had he any connection with you? - A. No; he said he would give it me to get me something to drink as I was going home.

Q. When did he give you the two sixpences? - A.Under the arch way of Gardener's-lane.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, to-morrow will be a fortnight, between eleven and twelve o'clock, coming home to my lodging, I met this woman coming over Westminster-bridge; I was very drunk, I made a stumble; she said, she would take care of me; I did not know she was a woman of the town; I said, I would give her something to drink; we went to a house, it was not open; I said, I would give her a glass at my lodging; she took me to an obscure place, and began sumbling my pocket, and my face, and wanted me to do what is common to man and woman, and I would not; I had a shilling in my hand, she took it from me, and then I bid her good night; we had not been parted long before she came back, and charged me with taking her money; I was stupidly drunk; she afterwards came to Tothill-fields, and wanted to extort money from me to keep out of the way, and not appear at my second examination.

Q.(To the Prosecutrix.) What time was it you met this man? - A. Near twelve o'clock.

Q. Had you been drinking? - A. No, not at all, I was perfectly sober.

Q. He says you snatched some money out of his hand, is that true? - A. No, he had none in his hand but the two pieces of tin he gave me.

Q. Did you go to the prison? - A. Yes, he sent for me.

Q. Did you offer to make it up with him? - A. Yes, for my own money, I wanted nothing more.

Q. Where did you first meet with this man? - A. Just as I came down the steps out of Bridge-court.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-71

516. DANIEL MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , a screw plate, value 2s. two iron stakes, value 5s. and a burnisher, value 1s. the property of Jeremiah Sinderby .

JEREMIAH SINDERBY sworn. - I am a whitesmith : On Tuesday, the 17th of this month, I went out about two o'clock in the afternoon; about half past five, when I returned, my man informed me that a man had broke open my desk, and they had him in custody; I went to the Office in Hatton-garden the next morning, where I saw the property I had lost in the hands of the officer, Chapman, a screw plate, two iron stakes, and a burnisher; the prisoner, I understand, is of the same trade; I saw the things in the morning, and locked my desk when I went out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This poor fellow is a smith? - A. Yes, I believe so, I never saw the man work; he said he was a smith.

Q. Did not he say he came to your shop to look for a brother workman? - A. I was out.

JOHN BELL sworn. - I am journeyman to the last witness; I was working in the cellar; my mistress called me to go after this man; I found the prisoner in Leather-lane, just by Hatton-wall; Mr. Sinderby lives in Brook's-market ; I stopped the prisoner, and told him he must come back to the shop he came out of; he had a basket on his back;

when he had come back ten or fifteen yards, he tumbled down, and these tools tumbled out of the basket; there was a screw plates, two iron stakes, and a burnisher; we helped him up with them, and brought him back to the shop again; my mistress sent for a constable, and the prisoner and the tools were sent to Hatton-garden.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a smith? - A. Yes.

Q. My friend says you a whitesmith, you look like a blacksmith? - A. I am black enough now, to be sure, working at the fire.

Q. Is the prisoner a whitesmith or blacksmith? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did he not come to see an acquaintance at your shop? - A. I don't know, I was not in the shop.

Q. Whose tools were they that he took away? - A. My master's tools, so far as I know.

Q. Did you or not say he was intoxicated when you saw him? - A. He seemed to be in liquor, he said he came for Bill Byers ; when I took him, he fell down twice.

Q. Did Bill Byers work at your shop? - A. Yes, but he had not worked there for a twelvemonth.

JOHN CROPPER sworn. - I was at work in the cellar; my master was out; I accidentally came up into the shop, and saw the man at the desk; I asked him what he wanted at the desk.

Q.Where was the desk? - A. In the top shop? he said, he wanted Tom Price ; I told him he had no business at the desk, and bid him take his basket, and go about his business; I went in and told my mistress, and my mistress sent me after him; the desk was open, and the prisoner looking in it when I saw him; Mr. Bell, my shopmate, and I, went after him, and overtook him in Leather-lane, close by Hatton-wall; he had the things in his basket, and carried them on his hammer, across his shoulder; Bell tapped him on the shoulder, and told him he must come back to the smith's shop, and an officer was sent for.

Q.Did you see any thing happen to the basket? - A. Yes, he fell down in Leather-lane, and the basket fell off his shoulder; he seemed to be in liquor.

Mr. Alley. Q. He was in liquor, and tumbled about? - A. Yes.( William Chapman , the constable, produced the things, and they were identified by the prosecutor.)

Q.(To the Prosecutor.) Were these things in the desk? - A. No, on the vice-board.

Sinderby, Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a master? - A. Yes.

Q. You don't work much yourself? - A. I work sometimes myself.

Q. They are your journeymen's tools? - A. No, they are mine.

Q. If they loose the tools, they must pay for them? - A. No, I often loose tools, they are in the shop for any man to work with.

Prisoner's defence. I was so much in liquor, I don't know a single thing that passed.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-72

517. JOHN GREEN and ANN MORRO , otherwise ANN GREEN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , a frock, value 1s. two pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d. four pair of trowsers, value 5s. four jackets, value 10s. a quilt, value 5s. a pair of boots, value 2s. a pair of breeches, value 2s. three waistcoats, value 4s. 6d. three handkerchiefs, value 3s. two shirts, value 3s. a wooden chest, value 5s. a basket, value 2s. and a wooden cage, value 3d. the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a seaman : Last Sunday fortnight, I left my chest of things on board the Walthamstow East-Indiaman, lying at Blackwall ; I left it in the mid-ship; it was locked, the chest and things were taken away; I found some of the things afterwards at some pawnbrokers', and some at the prisoner's lodgings, where I went with an officer; they were in the prisoner's chest; there was a jacket, trowsers, two pair of stockings, and several more articles I cannot mention now; I have kept them from that time to this; my chest was found at the Coach and Horses, at Bow.(The things found in the prisoner's lodgings were produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Q. How soon after you missed them did you find these articles in his house? - A. Last Monday.

Q. You never saw either of the prisoners on board your ship? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say you left the ship at Blackwall? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not I go down to Gravesend to the ship? - A. Not that I know.

JEREMIAH SMITH sworn. - I am the father of the last witness; he has been to India, and came home on the 1st of this month: On Tuesday, the 11th of this month, my son and I went down to Blackwall, and my son went on board the Walthamstow to fetch his chest and bedding, and the chest and bed was gone; some of the people told him John Green had taken it away.

Q. What did you do? - A. I endeavoured to find out the man; I heard of him at several public-houses where he had been, but could not get the sight of him till last Sunday, when my son and I walking through Bow-lane, between Bromley and Bow, met him; I said, is that John Green; he re

plied, and said his name was John Green; I said, you are the very man I am looking for; I asked him then if he knew the youth standing there, which was my son; he told me he did not; I asked him what he did with his chest and bedding that he took out of the ship Walthamstow, at Blackwall; he told me he had bought a bit of a chest of a soldier on board that ship, and gave half a guinea for it; and what of that, says he; my son said directly, father, those are my clothes he has got on, he has got on my trowsers, my waistcoat, and my handkerchief; he asked him then whether he would swear to that; he told him he would; I took hold of him immediately, and said he should go with me; he up with his fist, and knocked me down upon the road immediately; I had a stick in my hand, and to prevent his running, I knocked him over the shins, and he kept knocking me about, and I kept knocking his shins till I brought him from Bow-lane to Poplar watch-house, then I furrendered him to an officer; I could not get one before; the officer took those three articles from him; on Monday, I went with the officer to the prisoner's house, and saw the things found there; he lives opposite the White Horse, Bow, he rents three rooms on a floor there.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police Office, Shadwell; the prisoner was brought to me on Monday morning; the prosecutor's father said he had a part of the property on him; a waistcoat, trowsers, and an handkerchief round his neck; I took them from him; I then took the woman; she came to the Office, I searched her, and found three duplicates on her.

Q.She is the wife of the other prisoner? - A. She said she was, and afterwards she said she was not; she said before the Magistrate that she was not married, that her name was Morro; she came with the man to the Office, she was not brought in custody; I took the woman, and went to Mr. Farmer's, a pawnbroker, at Bow, and found two shirts and one handkerchief, in three different pledges; I went afterwards to the Coach and Horses, where the woman told me the chest was, and likewise the man told me before I went away; there I found the chest; she said, the other bits of rags were in it; I asked the woman of the house if she knew John Green; she said, yes, very well; I asked if he left a chest there; she said, yes; I searched the chest, but found nothing in it; I then went with her to her lodging, about ten or twelve doors from the Coach and Horses.

Q.Did the man and woman lodge together? - A. Yes, I was told they did; the woman went with me; I searched two rooms, and found nothing; I then asked if they had any other room, and a person told me they had the whole floor; there was a room, with a padlock on the door; I desired her to open it, or I would; she pulled a key out of her pocket, and opened it; I found this quilt on the bed; I searched a chest, and found various articles the lad said were his; in that chest I found a pocket-book, with three duplicates in it; one for a pair of boots, another for a pair of breeches, pawned at Mrs. Harvey's, Mile End, another for two jackets and a waistcoat, seven shillings, at Mr. Dexter's, Whitechapel; I told the pawnbrokers to attend at the Office; they attended, and brought the property.

Ann Green. He took the duplicates belonging to my property.

Brown. I returned the duplicates that did not belong to this business.

JOHN HIGHLEY sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Dexter, Whitechapel-road; I have two jackets and a waistcoat pawned by Ann Green.

MARY HARVEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I have a pair of boots and a pair of small clothes, pawned the 11th of May, by Ann Green, I am sure the prisoner is the person; both the prisoners were present.

WILLIAM FARMER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I have two cotton shirts and a handkerchief pawned by Ann Green.

HANNAH HINCHLEY sworn. - I keep the Coach and Horses, at Bow: On Friday week, in the morning, the chest was brought into the passage; on enquiry, I found it belonged to John Green, the prisoner, he owned it himself in my hearing.(The things were all produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

John Green's defence. The one half of the things there are my property that he has robbed me of; the quilt is my property, he took it off my bed; I went down to the Walthamstow to work the ship from Gravesend, the men were all pressed; we worked there for nine days; there was a woman there, and the chest was upon the table she had her grog on; she said her husband was pressed, and I said I would buy the chest of her; I bought the handkerchief and white jacket of a soldier there; I paid fifteen shillings for the chest and the old rags in it, there was nothing but old rags in it; they put my property in the chest when they found it, and this woman was taken into custody for nothing at all; she asked me, when I came home, how it was I was so short of money; I said, I had bought the chest, and if she wanted money, she might pawn some of me things, and she went to pawn them; he wants to hang me before my face; when Brown took the things off my back, the young fellow said they were not his property.

Ann Green's defence. I have nothing to say; I pawned the things by his direction, because I wanted money.

Smith. The quilt is an East-India article; I

bought it in the East-Indies, and brought it home with me.

John Green, GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Ann Green, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030525-73

518. MICHAEL TOOL was indicted for that he, on the 7th of May , did obtain, by false pretences, a watch, value 4l. a watch-chain, value 2d. two watch-keys, value 2d. and a seal, value 2d. the property of George Jones , from the person of Thomas Roberts.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Thomas Hawley, a watch-maker, No. 120, Fleet-street: On Thursday, the 5th of May, Michael Tool, and George Jones, the prosecutor, came to our shop, and Jones delivered me the watch specified in the indictment, to be repaired; on Friday, the 6th, Tool came for the watch, but it was not ready for him; he said, he was come for Jones's watch; on Saturday, the 7th, he came again; I informed him the watch was done, and told him it came to six shillings and sixpence; he said, he would go and fetch the money; he went and fetched five shillings; on the receipt of the five shillings, I delivered him the watch; there was a metal chain, two keys, and one seal; I rather objected to taking five shillings instead of six shillings and sixpence, and he said, on condition of my taking it, he would bring a customer on Monday to purchase a watch.

Q.When he came the second time, how did he demand the watch? - A. He said he came for Jones's watch, which was left to repair; and from his coming with Jones, I could not think but he had sent him.

GEORGE JONES sworn. - I am a sailor: On the 5th of May, I was coming down Fleet-street with Michael Tool and John Owens; I had let my watch fall on board the frigate Cibber; says Tool, I will shew you a watch-maker's, and he shewed me Mr. Hawley's, No. 120; we went in, and I gave the watch to the watch-maker to repair; we came out, and went into a public-house, and had two pots of beer, and then I went home.

Q. After this, did you ever give the prisoner any orders or directions to get the watch when it was done? - A. No, he came to me on the 6th, and told me the watch was not done; I told him to go about his business, that the watch-maker would not deliver the watch to any person but me, George Jones; on the 7th, he came to me again, and told me the watch was done, and the price was five shillings; I told him again to go about his business, that he could not get the watch till I went myself; I went to the watch-maker's half an hour after for my watch, and was told the prisoner had got it; on the 11th, I went to his house, he was sitting by the fire up stairs; he asked me what I was come for; I told him for my watch, and he offered me his pension-ticket for a security; I told him I did not want it, it was of no service to me; I then took him to Mr. Hawley's, and Mr. Hawley sent for a watchman; he offered me his pension-ticket in Mr. Hawley's shop.

Q. Did you give him any authority, at any time, to get this watch? - A. No, nothing of the kind; I saw it afterwards in the hands of the pawnbroker.

JOSEPH PAUL sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker: On the 7th of May, the prisoner's wife brought this watch to our house, and pledged it for thirty-five shillings, in the name of Mary Tool; I gave her a duplicate; I had seen the prisoner and his wife several times, I understood them to be man and wife; on the 11th, a constable came and told us to appear at Guildhall with the watch. (The watch produced.)

- JOHNSON sworn. - I am a watchman belonging to St. Bride's, Fleet-street: On Wednesday, the 11th, I was at Mr. Smith's; the constable's; Hawley came, and said he had a thief in his shop; I went and got a constable; the prisoner delivered the duplicate to Mr. Hawley, he gave it me, and I gave it to the constable, Hope; the prisoner produced his pension-ticket, and wanted Jones to take it to get the money and get his watch; the constable would not allow it.(- Hope, the constable, produced the duplicate, and Jones identified the watch.)

Jones. I have had the watch three weeks; I had not had it in my pocket but once before I went to the watch-maker's, and then I was half stupified; I had come from Woolwich, I gave five pounds for it.

Prisoner's defence. On the 5th of May, this man and a shipmate of mine were together; he asked me to go down to a watch maker's with him, to get his watch repaired; I went to the watch-maker's, and gave him the watch, and desired him to repair it as soon as possible; the next day he desired me to go and see if it was done, and said he would satisfy me for my trouble; I went to the watch-maker's; he said it would not be done till Saturday, the mainspring was broke, and it wanted to be cleaned; I went on Saturday, about two o'clock to Jones, and he was not within; I went to the watch-maker's, and got the watch, and went again to Jones's lodging, and they told me he was gone; I met a person I owed some money to, and I pawned the watch for thirty-five shillings; he came to me, and said he wanted the watch; I went to the watch-maker's,

and gave him the duplicate, and offered him my pension-ticket for the use, of the money for three hours; he had a man with him, who told the watchmaker to send for a constable.

Q.(To Jones.) You have heard, what he has said - is it true? - A. No, none of it; I never saw him before we went together to the watch-maker's.

Q. Were you in liquor? - A. Not much, I knew what I said and what I did.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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