Old Bailey Proceedings, 20th April 1803.
Reference Number: 18030420
Reference Number: f18030420-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, ON WEDNESDAY, the 20th of APRIL, 1803, and following Days, BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MARORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , ESQUIRE, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1803.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; JOHN HEATH , Esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; NATHANIEL NEWNHAM , Esq. WILLIAM CURTIS, Esq. HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir JOHN- WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; - ROWCROFT, Esq. Sir WILLIAM LEIGH-TON, Knt. and JOSHUA-JONATHAN SMITH, Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the faid City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

James Needham ,

James Meyrick ,

Richard Hale ,

Edward Wheeler ,

George Usher ,

John Sumner ,

Thomas Chance ,

Samuel Richards ,

Richard Glover ,

Joseph Heath ,

Thomas Harding ,

Charles Saunders .

Second Middlesex Jury.

James Brown ,

John Williams ,

Thomas Coshes ,

John Archer ,

Thomas Saunders , senior,

Robert Miller ,

Robert Lloyd ,

Robert Houghton ,

Thomas Nowler ,

William Boer ,

John Brooks ,

Francis Oliver .

London jury.

Henry Dobson ,

George Cooper ,

James Dervil ,

James Bethel ,

Joshua Ogier ,

Richard Jackson ,

Benjamin Plummer ,

Abraham Seward ,

Hawley Clutterbuck ,

Thomas-Dickinson Harriett ,

John Smith ,

Benjamin Denham .

Reference Number: t18030420-1

315. WILLIAM PIERS and MARY JOHNSTONE were indicted, the first for that he, on the 5th of January , with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did shoot at one William Cobb , against the form of the statute; and the other for feloniously being present, aiding, abetting, comforting, assisting, and maintaining the said William Piers, the felony aforesaid to do and commit .(The case was opened by Mr. Conft.)

WILLIAM COBB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q.What are you? - A. A journeyman butcher , servant to Mr. Sharp, in High-street, Marybone, the corner of Paddington-street .

Q. On the 5th of January were you at your master's house? - A. Yes.

Q.Who was with you? - A. I was standing at the door with the watchman.

Q.What time was it? - A.About half past nine at night; I was standing with my back against the waistcoat and the board where the shutters are put up; while the watchman and I were talking, a woman passed by the door several times, but I did not notice her at all; she came by again, and the watchman and I were talking about what fare he had met with in Harley-street; that he had had a dollop of turkey; my master's apprentice was standing at the door at the same time; his name is Lawrence Mawbey; the woman came by again, and said something to the boy, but what the words were, I did not hear; I then went into the road to make water; before I shut up the shop, and while I was there, I saw two persons go into the shop, whom I did not then know; one was Capt. Piers, and the other was the woman that I had seen pass the door before.

Q.Look at the two prisoners? - A. I know that gentleman, but the lady I do not know; that is the gentleman that went in with the lady; when I went into the shop, he was knocking with a stick against the boards.

Q.Who was in the shop? - A.Nobody, till the boy came out of the yard, and met them; the boy had gone back into the yard; as Capt. Piers met him in the shop he collared him; I came up, and asked what was the matter; he intimated that the lady had been infulted, but I don't remember the words he used; the turned about, looked at me, and said to Capt. Piers, that is the man that insulted me, pointing to me; upon which he laid hold of me by the collar, and said he would charge the watch with me; he took me from the shop to the door, he pulled me by the collar, and then a man of the name of Hales came up, and said, William, you charge the watch with him; I said, what for, there is no insult at all given; at that instant he insisted upon the watch being charged with me, and then I charged the watch with him; the watchman came up, and put his arm round my shoulder, and got me and Capt. Piers both hold together.

Q. What was that watchman's name? - A. Buckley, I think; and while we were in custody of the watchman, Capt, Piers withdrew back from the watchman, got out of the watchman's hands, and when he had got away, I said, it is a sad thing I am charged wrongfully, and tried to get away from the watchman.

Q. What became of the woman? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. How far did Capt. Piers go? - A. I cannot tell; he drew himself back from the watchman, and upon that instant he came up again.

Q. How long had he been absent? - A. Not half a moment; he withdrew himself behind me; he came up, and at that instant I was shot; I did not see him, nor I did not know I was shot; I do not know who shot me.

Q.Whereabouts were you shot? - A.Under the right ear; at that instant the watchman let me go, and I was taken to a surgeon's.

Q.Are you sure that you have told all that passed, as far as you are concerned? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you said any thing to the lady whatever? A.Not a word, if I was to die this moment.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.What was the name of the watchman you were conversing with at the time the lady was passing backwards and forwards? - A.His name is Corbett.

Q. Do you mean to represent that the Captain shot you as from behind? - A.From behind; I did not see him shoot me.

Q.You never saw him, or spoke to him? - A. No.

Q.Nor attempted to lay hold of him? - A. No, I never attempted to lay hold of him.

Q.There are some very respectable witnesses here, whom I shall examine upon that head; now do you mean to persist in it? - A. I do.

Q.You did not see him at the time, did not attempt to lay hold of him, nor did not speak to him? - A.Not at that time, not after I had charged the watch with him.

Q.Then of course you did not attempt to strike at any body? - A. No.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. I am sensible of it.

LAWRENCE MAWBEY Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q.You are an apprentice to Mr. Sharp? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you remember being at your master's door on the 5th of January? - A. Yes.

Q.About what time? - A.About half past nine.

Q.Were you there when the watchman came up? - A.No; I came up before he went to cry half past nine.

Q. Did you see any body in the street at that time? - A.No, I did not.

Q.Do you know either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, I know them both.

Q.Did you see them both that night? - A. Yes.

Q.When did you first see either of them? - It was about half past nine when I saw Miss Johnstone walking, first into Paddington-street, and then into High-street, round the corner.

Q.Was the there any time? - A. I cannot say the different times the was there.

Q.Did the say any thing to you, or you to her? - A. I did not say a word to her.

Q.Did any thing happen after the watchman cried half past nine? - A. Yes, Corbett was telling him about some turkey that was given him in Harley-street; he could not stop to finish the story, but went to cry half past nine; I said to him, old man, what a dollop of turkey you had; then Mary Johnstone came up, and said, young man, you shall suffer for that, and I laughed at her, and went into the shop, thinking no more of it.

Q.Had you said any thing to her? - A. I had not said a word to her; I went into the shop, and before I had been in the shop a minute, William Piers and Mary Johnstone came into the shop, and William Piers immediately collared me, and shook me; and then Miss Johnstone said, this is the boy, I am sure that is him that insulted me.

Q.At that time was any body else in the shop? - A. No; then Cobb came out of the street into the shop, and asked me what was the matter, while he had hold of my collar; when Cobb came in, Miss Johnstone said, oh, oh, that is not the boy, that is the man that insulted me; then he collared William Cobb , and pulled him on the step of the door, and called out, watch, several times.

Q.Was your mistress in the shop any part of the time? - A. Yes, she was in the shop when William Cobb came in, and asked what was the matter; my mistress came out of the parlour, and enquired what was the matter, and Capt. Piers said I had insulted this lady; my mistress said, she was very sorry for it, and asked what insult I had given.

Q. Was that before Cobb came in? - A. Yes; then Cobb came in, and that passed which I have stated; then Buckley, a watchman, came from over the way, and he gave charge of Cobb; he laid his hand on his shoulder, and then William Cobb said, he would give charge for charge, and then the watchman took hold of them both, and was going to take them to the watch-house; then William Piers broke loose from the watchman, and drew back from the watchman two or three paces, and then he came forward again, and presented a pistol at him.

Q.At what distance was he at that time? - A. He stretched out his leg, and let off the pistol within a foot or eight inches from his face.

Q.How did he stand? - A.He stood like by the side of him.

Q.Did he say any thing? - A. Yes; after he had shot the pistol, he said, there, you b - r, take that; then William Piers took Miss Johnstone under his arm, and ran down Paddington-street.

Q.Miss Johnstone was present then? - A. Yes, she was present the whole time; I took hold of Cobb, and led him to the surgeon's.

Q.Did you hear Cobb say any thing to Miss Johnstone? - A.Not at the time I was there.

Q.Did you hear the watchman say any thing to her? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You are an apprentice to Mr. Sharp? - A. Yes.

Q. The lady, I suppose, was a stranger to you, that you saw walking up and down? - A. Yes, she was.

Q.Had you never seen her before? - A. Not to my recollection.

Q.Do you know if there happens to be a lobstershop in your neighbourhood? - A.There is Mr. Dare's, a fishmonger, next door.

Q.Did not you see the lady waiting for some person that was purchasing a lobster? - A. I did not see that.

Q.How long were you waiting there? - A. About ten minutes.

Q.Remember you are upon your oath; do you mean to swear you never touched her? - A. I never touched her.

Q.Did any body touch her petticoats while you were there? - A. No.

Q.Do you mean to swear that? - A. I do.

Q.Were you inside or outside the shop? - A.Outside.

Q.Was the walking on the footway, or in the street? - A.She was walking on the pavement.

Q.Close by you? - A. No.

Q.She was on the pavement, and you were on the pavement? - A. Yes.

Q.Upon your oath, did you not put your hands upon her petticoats? - A. I did not, I did not touch her.

Q.Did you happen to put your foot between her legs, and kick her petticoats up? - A. I did not.

Q.That you mean to swear? - A. Yes.

Q.Was Cobb with you at the time the girl passed you? - A. Yes.

Q. Had Cobb and the watchman parted before the lady passed you? - A. No.

Q. Then Cobb could have observed what you were doing? - A. Yes, I stood by him at the same time.

Q.Do you mean to say you said nothing uncivil, either to Cobb, in the hearing of the lady, or to herself? - A. No.

Q.Nor attempted to touch her? - A. No, nobody said a word to her.

Q.You were examined before the Magistrate? - A. Yes, at Marlborough-street.

Q.Did you not say, at Marlborough-street, you only laid your hand upon her? - A.No, I did not say that I touched her.

Q. You say, you were there when the watchman came up, after Captain Piers had called the watchman? - A. Yes.

Q.Before the shot was fired, did you see Cobb attempt to strike the prisoner? - A.No, I did not.

Q.Had you an opportunity of observing what was doing? - A. Yes.

Q. You mean to persist in saying, you neither did or said any thing that was uncivil? - A. Yes, I do.

TIMOTHY CORBETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q.You are a watchman? - A. Yes, in Marybone parish.

Q.Do you remember seeing Cobb and Mawbey, at their master's door; on the 5th of January, at night? - A. Yes, at half-past nine o'clock.

Q. Do you remember seeing a lady in the street at that time? - A. Yes, that is the lady, (Pointing to the prisoner.)

Q.How was the employed? - A.She was walking along; she was rather intoxicated in liquor, and we were laughing at our solly, drinking with some gentlemen's servants, and then we laughed at her, seeing her intoxicated with liquor, and then the laughed at us again.

Q.She laughed at you again? - A. No, the did not laugh; I could not see her laugh by candlelight; she turned round and said, you vagabonds, what do you laugh at; upon that the walked on, and said, the would get a pill for one of us presently; I went to call my hour, and I saw no more of it.

Q.Did you hear Cobb say any thing to her? - A.Not a word.

Q. Or do any thing; did they touch her? - A. No; the man that was shot had his back against the window, he knocked his elbow against the window, and I told him not to break the glass, but neither of them ever touched her before I went away, nobody insulted her at all, only we laughed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.You are quite sure you did laugh at her? - A. We were first of all laughing at our own folly.

Q.And then you laughed at her? - A. Yes, we laughed at her for being drunk, I did not see any body touch her.

Q.You laughed at her for being intoxicated? - A. Yes.

Q.She was very drunk indeed, was not the? - A. No, she was intoxicated a little, the was waiting for him in the shop.

Q.But the was drunk enough to engage you all to laugh at her? - A.We did all laugh at her.

Q.How near were you to enjoy this joke? - A. Very near.

Q.And you were laughing at her being drunk? - A.No, we did not laugh at her being drunk, we were laughing at our own folly, and then we laughed at seeing her drunk.

Q.Then the said, you vagabonds, what do you laugh at; I will fetch somebody to give a pill to some of you? - A. Yes.

Q. Cobb had as good an opportunity of hearing that as you? - A. Yes.

Q.And Mawbey? - A. Yes; I don't know but he might hear it.

Q.Was it not your own low construction upon the words the used? - A. No.

Q. Did you see where the came from? - A. They both came from the other side of the street, and he went into a fishmonger's-shop.

Q.And the was walking up and down by the fishmonger's-shop? - A. No, she was walking up and down by the butcher's-shop.

Q. Is not that the next door to the fishmonger's? - A.No, there is a cobler's-stall between.

Q.And you chose to amuse yourself with laughing at her, being intoxicated? - A. No, we were laughing at our own folly first.

Q.What did you say among yourselves, about her being intoxicated? - A. Not any thing, only we saw she was rather intoxicated, and began laughing.

Q.You were talking to each other about her being intoxicated? - A. No, we did not; but when we saw her pass by intoxicated, we laughed.

Q.What did you say to each other about it? - A. Not a word, only laughing.

MARY SHARP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q.You keep this butcher's shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember two persons coming into your shop, on the night of the 5th of January? - A. Yes, between the hours of nine and ten; as I was sitting in my parlour, I heard a noise; I went out, and saw my apprentice standing in the passage; then I saw the prisoner, Piers, walking forwards towards the parlour door, and immediately asked, what was the matter? the prisoner, Piers, gave me

no answer; the prisoner, Mary Johnstone , immediately said, that is the boy that has insulted me,(pointing to Mawbey;) I immediately said; I was extremely sorry, if either had given any offence, but I wished to know what insult was given; they gave me no answer, but insisted upon charging the watch with him, he had hold of the boy at the time, and dragged him out of the passage; I immediately begged him to leave the boy alone, as his master was not in the way to take his part, that I would make any recompence in my power to the lady; upon that, William Cobb came in to the assistance of the boy, and begged the prisoner, Piers, to let go the boy, in a remarkable civil manner; immediately, Mary Johnstone turned round, and said, it is not the boy that has insulted me, it was the man; she said, she could swear, three times, it was the man that had insulted her, and not the boy; she first said, she could swear it was the boy, and then she said, it was the man, she said it three times to the best of my knowledge; the prisoner Piers immediately insisted upon taking Cobb out to the door, and charging the watchman with him, and the watch was charged; I said to Cobb, the gentleman has insulted you, and you have not insulted him; I desire you will give charge for charge, which he did, for I really thought the gentleman had insulted me as well as the man.

Q.Was a person of the name of Hales there at that time? - A. I did not see him at the time; the watchman said, what am I to take charge of this man for? Captain Piers immediately said, for insulting this lady; I then saw the watchman take hold of both of them, and I saw no more till I heard the report of the pistol, I saw the flash, but did not see what passed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fmowlys. Q.You made no particular remark about the lady at all? - A. No.

WILLIAM SERJEANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q.What are you? - A. A coachman.

Q.Were you at the corner of Marybone-street, on the 5th of January last? - A. Yes, I was coming by the door about half-past nine, at night.

Q.Do you know either of the parties? - A. No.

Q.What did you observe? - A. The first thing I observed, was Mr. Piers shaking the boy by the collar in the shop; Mrs. Sharp came out of the parlour, and asked what was the matter, Mr. Piers said, the boy had insulted the lady; Mrs. Sharp said, it is my boy, I am very sorry for what he has done, if he has insulted the lady; he shook the boy, and they both came out again; as they were coming out, Cobb came in, and then she said, it was not the boy, that is the man that infulted me; then Mr. Piers called the watch, the watchman came up, and he charged the watch with him; the watchman put his right-hand round the shoulder of the man; somebody said, why do not you give charge for charge, and then Cobb charged Mr. Piers; the watchman put out his hand and laid hold of Mr. Piers, and they all came off the flight of steps together, and after he had got off the flight, Mr. Piers made a step or two back; I thought he was shifting his money, there being a good many people about, to take care of it, it was his breeches pocket; he stepped forward again, and I heard the pistol go off, within six or eight inches of the man's head, it was very near; he then turned about, and said, there, take that; he then took the lady under his arm, and they went away; feeing the hole in the man's head, I sung out, do not let him go, he has murdered the man, then he was pursued, that is all I know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. As soon as the pistol was heard, he said, there, take that? - A. Yes.

Q.You heard perfectly plain what he said? - A. Yes.

Q.You were close by him, and therefore must have heard the expression exactly? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you see any body lay hold of Cobb, before the shot was fired, except the watchman? - A. No.

Q.Did you see Cobb make any effort to lay hold of Captain Piers? - A. No.

Q.Do you mean to say, you did not observe Cobb attempt to take hold of Captain Piers? - A. No, I did not.

Q.Were you examined at the Police-office? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you or not, say there, that you saw somebody, Cobb, I believe, attempt to take hold of Captain Piers, before he attempted to fire the pistol? - A. No.

PATRICK BUCKLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q.You are a watchman of Marybone parish? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you remember being called upon at Mr. Sharp's door, to take charge of any body? - A. Yes, on the 5th of January.

Q.What passed? - A.When I came up, the prisoner at the bar, William Piers , gave me charge of William Cobb.

Q.Did you take charge of him? - A. Yes.

Q.What else happended? - A.After I had him in custody, Cobb gave me charge of Captain Piers; I laid hold of both of them; then Mr. Piers withdrew himself from me to my left-hand, and turned from over the kirb-stone to the kennel; he declared, when he turned round from me, by heaven, I will blow his brains out.

Q.When did he say that? - A.Immediately, when he turned off from me; at the same time, William Cobb said to me, how dared he charge me wrongfully, he made a resistance to get from me.

Q. Did you let him go? - A. No, he was my first charge, and I kept him in possession; Mr.

Piers turned round very quick, and when we got to the post at the corner of Paddington-street and High-street, Capt. Piers stepped back, and then stepped forwards again, and said, take that, and fired a pistol.

Q.How near to his head? - A. As nigh as I can tell from nine to ten inches; as soon as the pistol was discharged, I let loose my hold of Cobb, and went across after Capt. Piers; I sprung my rattle, I overtook him, and he came quietly to the watch-house with me and the rest of the watchmen.

Q.Had you any conversation with Captain Piers when you took him? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.There was a good deal of struggling; first Capt. Piers got away from you, and then Cobb tried to get away from you? - A. Yes.

Q.The Captain declared he would blow his brains out? - A. Yes.

Q. That he cried out quite loud? - A. Yes.

Q.Any body might have heard it? - A. If he did not say it loud, you know I could not hear it.

Q.Every body might hear it who was near? - A. I suppose so; I cannot say whether they did or not.

Q.Was there not a man who laid hold of Cobb round the body to keep him from Capt. Piers? - A. I do not know that there was.

Q.You attended before the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q.Did not you hear some man declare that? - A. Yes.

Q.Who was that? - A. William Hales .

Q.Did you see Hales lay hold of him? - A. No.

Q.Did you lay hold of Miss Johnson? - A. I did not.

Q.You made no observation on Miss Johnstone at all? - A. No farther than when the first watchman came up to my assistance the struck at him.

Q.What is his name? - A.William Seymour.

Q. Is he here? - A.No, I don't think he is.

Q.She charged Cobb with insulting her? - A. I don't know; I was not there then.

RICHARD HALES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q.What are you? - A.A cordwainer.

Q.You live next door to Mr. Sharp? - A. I have a stall that I work in between the butcher's and the fishmonger's.

Q. Do you remember any thing happening on the 5th of January? - A. Yes; as I was sitting at works between nine and ten o'clock, I heard a noise; I saw some people round Mr. Sharp's door; I went out to see what was the matter; I saw the two prisoners giving charge to the watchman of William Cobb; upon that I said to William Cobb, give charge for charge; and Mrs. Sharp said in the shop, charge for charge; upon that Buckley took them both into custody; the watchman said, when they were both in custody, now make it up; Mr. Piers wrested himself from the watchman, and stepped back.

Q.Did he say any thing? - A. Not at that time as I heard; Cobb finding Capt. Piers loose from the watchman, rather put himself in a bustle, and said, he would not go the watch-house any more than Capt. Piers; upon that I said, stop, William, the watch shall take him into custody too; then the watchman went behind Cobb, and laid hold of him by the skirt of his coat, and Mr. Piers instantly stepped forward, and fired a pistol, saying, take that; I saw the first of the pistol, and I thought there might be another, and I let go, and drew back.

Q.Did you see Cobb attempt to take hold of the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Did you go to take Capt. Piers into custody? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Have you never said, you saw Cobb take hold of that man round the waist? - A. No.

Q.Who was it had hold of the prisoner? - A. The watchman.

Q. Did you neither yourself take hold of the prisoner, nor observe Cobb take hold of him? - A. I did not.

JOHN ANDREWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are one of the acting overseers of Marybone parish? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you near the corner of Marybone-street on the night of the 5th of January? - A. I was at the house directly opposite Mr. Sharp's shop; between nine and ten o'clock, I heard the report of a pistol, and a rattle spring; I went up, and enquired the cause, and, in the presence of Capt. Piers, I was informed a man was shot; I went and desired the watchman to be sure and take care of him, for he had shot the man through the head; the prisoner, Piers, replied, d - n him, I am glad of it; I with I had shot him through the heart; I then went down, and saw him lodged in the watch-house; I saw him searched, and the pistol found upon him, which he said he was not ashamed of, for he had authority to carry it, or words to that effect.

RICHARD MOAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q.You are keeper of Marybone watch-house? - A. I am.

Q.Were you upon duty when the prisoner, Piers, was brought to you? - A. Yes; when he was brought in, I went to search him; putting my hand down his sides, he said, you have no occasion to do that, the pistol in my breeches pocket; he was putting his hand in, and I stopped his hand, for fear of its being loaded; I put my hand in, and took it out; one of the gentlemen spoke to him; he said, I with the ball had been through his brains, or through his heart.

Q. Who said that? - A.Mr. Piers.

Q.After he was at the watch-house? - A. Yes.

Mr. MORRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const.

Q.You are a surgeon? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you state the situation of this poor man on the 5th of January? - A.On the 5th of January, between nine and ten, this man was brought to me, and, upon examination, I found the ball had entered the back side of the right cheek, had struck the upper jaw-bone, and was repelled backward into the muscles of the cheek on that side, it did not penetrate further than the check-bone.

Q.Did you extract the ball? - A. Yes, I did; I have it here.

JOHN MACKINTOSH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q.What are you? - A. I belong to the Stamp-office.

Q. Do you know any thing of this transaction? A. On the 5th of January, about half past nine in the evening, I was passing by; within about forty yards from the corner of Paddington-street, I heard some people hooting, and saw the lady passing; when I came to the corner of Paddington-street, I observed Mr. Sharp's man and boy standing at the door; they were hooting a lady who was passing by; when she had got about twenty yards down High-street, she returned, and went into Paddington-street, and then they began hooting at her again, and called after her, rag, tag, and bob-tail, those were the expressions they made use of; when she got into Paddington-street, she went to the fishmonger's, and then a gentleman came out of the fishmonger's with her; at the time the gentleman came out of the shop with her, I observed the man go across High-street, and the boy seemed to go back, as if it was to the yard; the person who came out of the fishmonger's-shop went into the butcher's-shop.

Q. Was Capt. Piers that person? - A. Yes; he asked who it was that insulted the lady under his protection; there was nobody in the shop at the time he went in; Mrs. Sharp came out from the parlour; he knocked with a stick on the floor, and Mrs. Sharp came out.

Q.Where were you standing at that time? - A. I was standing just at the door; Mrs. Sharp said, she could not tell who it was that insulted her, and then the boy came in from the yard.

Q.Did she day no more than that? - A. I did not hear her say any more; when the boy came into the shop, Miss Johnstone said, that is the person who insulted me; when Capt. Piers immediately caught him by the coat, began to shake him, and asked him how he dared insult any body in the street.

Q.What part of the coat did he take him by? - A.By the lappel; at the time he was shaking him, Cobb returned from the street, caught Mr. Piers by the arm, and asked him what he was doing; called him a stupid fool, and said, if he did not go out of the shop, he would turn him out.

Q.Was Mrs. Sharp there at this time? - A. Yes.

Q. And the boy? - A. Yes; he immediately turned round, and desired him to take his arm off; he immediately returned, and went into the street from the shop.

Q. He did not touch Cobb? - A. I did not see him touch Cobb; when he got into the street, he called the watch; when the watchman came up, he desired him to take into his charge Mr. Cobb; immediately Mr. Cobb gave charge for charge, and they both went together; at that time Mr. Piers turned round, and began to speak to the watchman.

Q. You saw him speak to the watchman? - A. I imagined him speaking to the watchman; I did not hear what he said.

Q.Were you as near to him as when you heard what passed between him and Mrs. Sharp? - A. No; when he appeared to speak to the watchman, Cobb jumped down the steps of the door, and began to swear very much indeed.

Q. At this time there were a great number of people there? - A.There might be about half a dozen.

Q.Then all those half dozen heard and saw what passed as well as you? - A.They might for what I know.

Q.Were they in the same situation that you were? - A. It they chose, I should think they might; he jumped down the steps, began to swear very much, and said, let me at him, I will give him his gruel; and it appeared to me as if several people attempted to stop Cobb; there appeared to be a bustle, as if they wished to stop-him from getting to Capt. Piers.

Q.What did they do? - A.One before me laid hold of him, but he broke from him, and I laid hold of him myself, but he got from me; then he went towards Capt. Piers, and made two or three blows at him; at the time that he aimed at him, Miss Johnstone happened to step between Captain Piers and Cobb; at that moment I wished to get away; I turned my head round, and saw Cobb making another attempt to strike at him; I heard the report of a pistol, and saw that Cobb was shot in the face.

Q.Did you happen to know either of the prisoners before? - A. No; I have often seen Cobb before, and I have seen Cobb sneer at me frequently as I have gone past.

Q.You were offended at him? - A. I thought it was very unmannerly.

Q.Did you ever make any complaint to the master or mistress? - A. No, I thought it the best way to take no notice of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe

your father lives within a very few doors of this shop? - A. Yes.

Q.You were not at all a friend or acquaintance of Capt. Piers or Miss Johnstone? - A. I don't know that I ever saw either of them before.

Q.As you are a neighbour of there butcher lads, and have passed the door frequently, are they civil lads, or the reverse? - A. I have heard that they are not, and I have observed them behave very unmannerly to me.

Q.Without your giving any cause? - A. Yes.

Q.You have the honour of having a place in the Stamp-Office? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you had it? - A.About a twelvemonth.

Q.Was there any thing in the dress or manner of Miss Johnstone to provoke the derision of any person? - A. No; I thought her dress was very becoming.

Q. Is it true or false that the had the least appearance of being disguised in liquor? - A. No, I did not imagine any thing of the kind; I thought her quite the contrary.

Q.Was the decent in her dress and appearance? - A.She was.

Q.You yourself saw several blows aimed by Cobb at Capt. Piers, before the pistol was fired? - A. Yes.

Q.Was the manner of Cobb violent at the time? - A.He appeared to be very much so, he swore very much.

Q. I believe you attended before the Magistrate, without being sent for by any body, to tell the truth of the transaction? - A.No, Miss Johnstone called upon me to request that I would.

Q. In consequence of which you attended before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q.You were bound over to appear before the Grand Jury? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you attend at the Grand Jury door? - A. I attended two days, but I was not called in.

Q. How long have you known there butcher lads? - A.Some time, from seeing them in the neighbourhood.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

For the Prisoners.

JAMES MIFFLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Where do you live? - A.At Mr. Lowe's, the corner of Great Marybone-street, a pawnbroker.

Q. Had you any business which took you on the evening this happened into this neighbourhood? - A. Yes; I was going of an errand for my master to the fishmonger's that joins Mr. Sharp's shop.

Q.Tell us what you observed? - A.Before I came to Mr. Sharp's, I saw Miss Johnstone walking; the turned back, and went past Mr. Sharp's; I passed her, and heard a boy hooting after her, the same as if they were driving a bullock or a sheep; upon looking round, I observed it was the butcher's boy.

Q.Did you know him before? - A. No.

Q. Where was he when you first saw him? - A.Standing upon the steps of Mr. Sharp's shopdoor; I went on to the fishmonger's, and Mr. Piers was there cheapening a lobster, which was not boiled; the lady came in, and said, I with you would step out, for here are some boys that have very much insulted me; then the gentleman laid hold of her arm, and went to Mr. Sharp's.

Q.Was that all the said to him? - A. Yes, that was all I heard; I saw the gentleman go into the shop, and knock hard with a stick; Mrs. Sharp came out, and asked what was the matter; he said, the boy had insulted a lady; Mrs. Sharp said, the boy had not, for he had just come out of the yard; then the person that was shot said, no, she had not been insulted there.

Q.Are you sure it was Cobb said so? - A. Yes. I am sure it was him; then there was a quarrel between Mr. Piers and Cobb; I saw Mr. Piers come down the steps of the butcher's door, and he called the watch three or four times; the watchman came, and Mr. Piers gave charge of Cobb.

Q.Did that draw any people round? - A. There was a vast concourse of people; upon that somebody called, give charge for charge, and there was charge for charge given.

Q.After Cobb had given charge of Capt. Piers, what followed then? - A.Mr. Piers seemed to decline it, and was going up Paddington-street; Cobb finding that, seemed very much enraged; he broke away from the watchman, and tried to strike at him.

Q.Tell us how he tried to strike at him? - A. Several people had hold of him, and he broke away from them, and tried to strike at him.

Q.Shew us in what manner he did it? - A.He squared at him with his fist. - (Describing it.)

Q.What happened upon that? - A.Upon that I saw Miss Johnstone get between them, and try to shove Cobb away, to keep him from striking.

Q.What happened upon that? - A. A vast concourse of people assembled; I had a large dish under my arm, and I got out of the mob, and in two or three seconds after that I heard the report.

Q.Was there any thing either in the dress, or conduct, or manner of Miss Johnstone, to induce these people to hoot after her? - A. Not the least.

Q. Did she appear to be a woman disguised by intoxication? - A.Not at all.

Q.Was there any thing indecent in her dress or manner? - A.Not at all.

Q.Were you acquainted with either of the prisoners? - A.No, I was a stranger to them.

Q.How came you to be subpoenaed? - A. After

I had seen what I did, I went home, and told it to my master.

Q.In consequence of which, I believe he gave information? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q.You say, you remember his coming out of the fishmonger's shop, and going into the butcher's shop? - A. Yes.

Q.Relate what passed at that time? - A. Mrs. Sharp came out of the parlour.

Q.How is the parlour situated with respect to the shop? - A.The parlour is on the left-hand.

Q.Could you see the parlour at all? - A. No, but I should suppose, by the door, it was the parlour; there are some windows in the shop, which I took to be the parlour.

Q.Who spoke first? - A.Captain Piers said, some boys had very much insulted the lady.

Q.Where were you when he said that? - A. I was by the door.

Q.What answer was made to that? - A. She said, her boy was just come out of the yard, and the man came up, and said, nobody had been infulted there.

Q.Was the boy in the shop when Cobb came in? - A. Yes.

Q.Who was in the shop when Mrs. Sharp came in? - A.Nobody.

Q. Mr. Piers did not take hold of the boy first? - A.Not that I saw.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, whether he took hold of the boy or not? - A. I did not see him.

Q.Must you have seen him, if he had? - A. Yes, I think I must.

Q. Did you hear Miss Johnstone accusing the boy of having insulted her? - A. Yes, the said, that was the boy that had infulted her. (Pointing to the apprentice.)

Q.And then Captain Piers did not lay hold of him? - A. No.

Q.Was Cobb in the shop at that time? - A. He came into the shop.

Q.Cobb was there, when the said, that was the boy that infulted her? - A. He came in at that time.

Q.Did she not, after having said the boy infulted her, tell Captain Piers to let go the boy, for that it was Cobb that had infulted her; I heard her say, that they had both infulted her.

Q.Did he take both into custody afterwards? - A. No, he gave charge of Cobb, and the boy said, he would go to the watch-house likewise, but charge was not given of him.

Q.Did they all go to the door together? - A. Yes, they all came out to the door together.

Q.You said Captain Piers went out to the door and called watch, did he not drag Cobb with him by the collar? - A.No, I did not see him.

Q.Then you mean to say, you did not see him touch Cobb at all? - A. No, I did not see him touch either of them.

Q.Did you see the watchman take hold of Captain Piers? - A. Yes, there were two or three watchmen got hold of him, after the pistol was fired.

Q.Did you see any watchman take hold of Captain Piers, before the siring of the pistol? - A. I cannot say I did.

Q.You saw all that passed? - A. Yes.

Q.Then, perhaps, you will swear he was not taken hold of by the watchman? - A.Not that I saw.

Q.And you are as sure of that as you are of any thing else you have told us? - A. Yes.

Q.Then Captain Piers, being in custody, could not get out of custody, by shifting his arm? - A. No, he was walking away.

Q.Therefore, though he was charged, the watchman went away without offering to detain him? - A. Yes, he was going up Paddington-street.

Q.And the watchman did not attempt to detain him, do you mean that? - A. Yes.

Q.The watchman never touched him at all? - A.Not that I saw.

Q.And you saw all? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a shoemaker, of the name of Hall, being there? - A. No, I did not know any one in the place.

Q.You saw Cobb running after the prisoner to attempt to strike at him? - A. Yes.

Q. And that repeatedly? - A. He did it two or three times.

Q.Did he strike him at all? - A. No.

Q.Were the watchmen near him at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw all the people there that have been examined this morning? - A. Not to take any notice of them.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are perfectly sure, that before the report of the pistol, this man had made two or three attempts to strike at Mr. Piers? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q.When you found Mr. Piers and the lady attempt to get away, was that before you heard the report of the pistol, or after? - A. It was before the report of the pistol.

CHRISTOPHER READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q.What business are you? - A. A carpenter.

Q.Do you live in Marybone? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember passing through Paddington-street on the night this happened? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the two prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you recollect any thing particular happening? - A. Yes; I came up to Mr. Sharp's door

just as the gentleman came down the steps with the lady, and he was calling for the watch; the watchman took Cobb into custody, and then some person persuaded Cobb to charge the prisoner; after that, Mr. Piers took hold of the lady, and seemed to be going away down Paddington-street; Cobb extricated himself frem the watchman, and followed him, he had put himself in a posture, as I suppose, to strike him.

Q. Did you see him attempt to strike? - A. I did not, I was not near enough.

Q. At that time, no mischief had been done? - A. No, some bad language had passed between both parties; after that, I saw Miss Johnstone drive Cobb back again, and in a few seconds after that, I heard the report of the pistol, but I did not see it fired.

Q. Are you sure, that when Cobb broke away, the prisoners were apparently going away? - A. They were.

Q. Did you ever see either of the prisoners before? - A.Never.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You saw the time when the prisoner charged Cobb with the watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. And Cobb charged the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. And the watchman took hold of both? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Which of them first got out of the watchman's hands? - A. Captain Piers.

Q.Are you sure the watchman had hold of him? - A. So far as to clap his hands upon him.

Q. After that, Cobb broke away? - A. Yes.

Q.Where were you? - A. I was standing at the post opposite the door.

Q.Could you see Cobb quite free from the watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. You are quite sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q.Did he run after Captain Piers? - A. Yes, he made all the haste he could.

Q.How far might he have got? - A.Nearly to the extremity of Mr. Sharp's premises.

Q. You could not see very well, I suppose, by that light? - A. No.

Q. You did not see him strike Mr. Piers? - A. No, I only saw him put himself in an attitude to strike.

Q. When Miss Johnstone drove him back, did he turn towards Mr. Piers? - A. He immediately received the wound.

Q. At the time he received the wound, had not the watchman hold of Cobb? - A. I cannot say, there were a number of people between me and Captain Piers, I did not see him fire the pistol.

Q.Then, for any thing you know, they might have hold of him? - A. I cannot say.

JOHN DUNKIN sworn. - I am a Captain in the Royal-artillery: I have known Captain Piers ever since the year 1798.

Q. What has been his disposition and character for humanity? - A. I never knew him act unlike a gentleman or rashly in my life.

Q. Did you account him a good tempered man always? - A.Always.

Q. What is he? - A. He was Captain in the 22d, and is now, I think, upon half-pay, in the 113th.

The prisoner also called Capt. De Young, and five other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

The prisoner, Johnstone, called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

The Jury retired at twenty minutes before two o'clock, and at four returned with a verdict of

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-2

316. JAMES MACNAMARA , Esq. stood charged upon the Coroner's Inquisition with killing and slaying Robert Montgomery , Esq. on the 6th of April .

Mr. Knapp. Gentlemen of the Jury, you have been informed by the Officer of the Court what is the nature of the offence which upon the inquisition you are now charged to try, and you find, that that inquisition imputes to the gentleman at the Bar the charge of killing and slaying with a pistol a gentleman of the name of Montgomery. Gentlemen, in the course of the few observations, accompanying the facts of this case, which I shall have the honour to address to you upon the present occasion, I shall carefully abstain from making any observations that may be thought by any body to create any prejudice against the gentleman at the bar. Gentlemen, I feel that all cases when they come into a Court of Justice to be tried, are to be tried by a Jury of the country upon the evidence that is given before them, and upon that evidence only. Gentlemen, I feel in this case that which we all in our turn often feel upon others, that much prejudice has been excited by the daily public prints with respect to the case which is now brought before you for enquiry. You can but feel with me the impropriety of making observations upon a case which is afterwards to be enquired of by a Jury of the country, both as they may tend on the part of the prosecution to detail evidence that shall be given against the party accused, and as they may tend, perhaps, more materially for the interest of the prisoner, to prejudice the minds of those who are to pass upon him in judgment afterwards. Gentlemen, in the course of this Session, I have the good fortune to state, that I am sure no such observations, through the medium of public prints, or in any other way that may have come to your knowledge, can possibly work upon your minds in the consideration of this case, because I have seen, in the course of this Sessions, that you will attend to the oath you have taken, and decide according to the circumstances as they are stated before you in evidence.

Gentlemen, the charge before you upon this inqui

sition is that of Manslaughter only, and you full well know (which must give every body satisfaction) that that charge does not affect the life of the prisoner at the bar; but it is a charge of a very great, of a very important nature, as it respects the interests of society, and the peace of the public; and in proportion as the charge is of importance, in proportion as it creates anxiety in those who hear, and those who are to judge of it, so in proportion does it deserve, and I am sure it will have, your serious attention.

Gentlemen, I am not aware, and if I was aware of any law that could be stated upon the subject, I should not feel it necessary, in a Court constituted as this is, to venture any ideas of the law upon the subject, as it respects manslaughter, because in such a Court you will have it better stated to you. I might probably make some mistake, which might affect the prisoner in a way in which it ought not; but I am not aware of any question of law. The only question is, whether the gentleman who is charged to have been killed, lost his life by the hands of the prisoner at the bar, in a rencontre which took place between them at Primrose-hill; and if you are of opinion he was the cause of the death of that gentleman by a pistol, having previously agreed to go out to determine a dispute, there can be no question in any body's mind with respect to the law upon the subject, but that it is properly described upon this inquisition to be Manslaughter.

Gentlemen, the prisoner at the bar, Captain Macnamara , is a gentleman very respectably connected; a gentleman who is highly praised for his magnanimity, and every thing that a gentleman in any situation could desire to have spoken of him. The deceased was also a gentleman of a character equally deserving attention from every body with whom he was connected, deserving the affection and regard of every body equally with the gentleman at the bar.

Gentlemen, the facts of this case lie in a very narrow compass, and I am the only feeble instrument, on the part of the family of the deceased, in conveying to you the facts of the evidence which I shall have the honour of laying before you, neither wishing nor being instructed to say any thing that should work a prejudice against the gentleman at the bar, at the same time taking care to discharge my duty to the public, by laying before you the whole of the evidence.

Gentlemen, Colonel Montgomery was in Hyde. Park, riding up and down between the bridge and the bar, where the horsemen come in. There were two large Newsoundland dogs, one belonging to Colonel Montgomery, the other belonging to the prisoner at the bar. The dogs attacked each other; they fought a battle. Col. Montgomery, seeing his dog had the worst of it, got off his horse, and asked "whose dog it was?" The prisoner, Capt. Macnamara, said, "it was his." Col. Montgomery said, "if you do not call your dog off, I shall knock him down." The defendant said, "have you the arrogance to say you will knock my dog down? How is it possible to prevent the fighting of dogs in an open field?" This word Arrogance, I understand, was made use of several times by the defendant. The defendant said, "he was a Captain (as was true, and a most respectable one) in the Royal Navy." After this nothing more passed that I am aware of, excepting that they pursued their different courses, and went towards Piccadilly; when they arrived in Piccadilly, some circumstances transpired, which I shall not state, because it is not evidence; but in consequence of that, I believe you will find that an appointment was made to meet within two hours at Primrose-hill. The persons who met at Primrose-hill you will find beyond all question to be Colonel Montgomery, the unfortunate gentleman at the bar, a Major Keir, or some such name, a Capt. Barry, and a gentleman very respectable in his line, Mr. Heaviside. When they are there, the ground is taken, a duel takes place, pistols are presented both by Col. Montgomery, who is dead, and the prisoner at the bar. Col. Montgomery fell. The prisoner received a desperate wound, under which he now labours. Col. Montgomery very speedily after died, and I shall be able to prove, beyond all doubt, that he died in consequence of the wound he received from the pistol; I shall be able to prove it by a gentleman who happened to be upon the spot, who knew nothing of the parties, who saw the pistols fired, and who stood about fifty yards off; he will be able to identify the persons of both the Gentlemen; he will prove to you that both of them were wounded in consequence of the firing; that Col. Montgomery was taken off the field, and died very soon after, and that Captain Macnamara was immediately taken.

Gentlemen, from a fear of stating more than I ought to do, or with more strength of observation than the circumstances seem to call for, I have abstained from any comment, leaving it to you to draw your conclusions from the evidence, when you shall have heard it.

Gentlemen, I believe I have now performed my duty in stating the outline of the case before you. Gentlemen, the prosecutor (and God forbid he should) entertains no with, he feels no anxiety at all about the fate of this trial; he only wishes, through me, to lay this case before you, that you may give that verdict which justice and the peace of society require you to give; and if, through the medium of this trial, such circumstances again taking place should be prevented, it will be, perhaps, one of the most important and one of the most advantageous trials that ever came before a Jury of the country, because it will have the effect of preventing those fatal consequences to which I have been calling your attention.

Evidence for the prosecution.

WILLIAM SLOANE , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you in Hyde-park on Wednesday the 6th of April? - A. Yes, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q.Were you on horseback? - A. Yes, in company with my brother and the deceased, Colonel Montgomery.

Q.Had you any dogs with you? - A. There was a dog following Col. Montgomery.

Q. A dog of what nature? - A. A Newfoundland dog, and there was another Newfoundland dog belonging to Capt. Macnamara.

Q. Did you know that gentleman at that time? - A. No; there were several gentlemen with him.

Q.Whereabouts was it? - A.Between the bridge and the barrier.

Q.Did any thing happen between the dogs? - A.They began fighting, they were both Newfoundland dogs. I observed Col. Montgomery turn round, and jump from his horse, in order to separate the dogs; they did separate. I heard Col. Montgomery call out, "whose dog is this?" Capt. Macnamara answered, "that is my dog." Col. Montgomery said, "if you don't call your dog off, I shall knock him down." I do not exactly use his words. Captain Macnamara said,"Have you the arrogance to say, Sir, that you will knock my dog down?" Col. Montgomery said, "I certainly shall knock the dog down if it falls upon mine again." About this time Lord Burghersh joined Col. Montgomery, my brother, and myself; a conversation ensued, and I think I heard the word Arrogance again from Captain Macnamara. Lord Burghersh joined us again about that time, and we proceeded on to Piccadilly.

Q.All of you? - A. All of us; I heard Col. Montgomery say, "Col. Montgomery," and I heard Capt. Macnamara say, "Captain Macnamara, of the Royal Navy." Col. Montgomery expressed a disinclination to quarrel; he said,"Sir, it is not my intention to quarrel with you, Capt. Macnamara; but if your dog falls upon mine, I shall knock him down," or something of that sort. We had some conversation in Piccadilly; I took leave of Col. Montgomery at the top of St. James's-street, with an intention of going home; I turned round, and saw Capt. Macnamara's party turning back from St. James's church; they had gone forward; I saw them turning back to go to St. James's-street; I had at that time got a little way up Bond-street.

Q. At that time, where was Col. Montgomery going? - A. I had taken leave of him, and he went down St. James's-street with my brother and Lord Burghersh. I then returned to my friends, and when I got into Jermyn-street, I saw Col. Montgomery going towards St. James's church; I rode after him, and then I saw the prisoner and Colonel Montgomery, and other persons; they were about thirty yards separate, in Jermyn-street, and then some gentleman rode up to Col. Montgomery.

Q.Whatever was then said, I suppose it was impossible for Capt. Macnamara to hear it? - A. Yes; a gentleman rode up by my side from Capt. Macnamara to Col. Montgomery, whom I have since understood was Capt. Barry.

Q.Did the same person who went from Capt. Macnamara to Col. Montgomery return to Capt. Macnamara again? - A. I do not know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Erskine. Q. You saw the dogs begin to fight? - A. Yes.

Q. They met each other of their own accord? - A. Yes.

Q.There was no reason for supposing the dogs were set on by either of their owners? - A. No.

Q. Col. Montgomery said, whose dog is this? - A. To the best of my recollection he did.

Q. Capt. Macnamara said, he is mine? - A. Yes.

Q. Capt. Macnamara was dressed as a gentleman, and had the appearance of a gentleman? - A. Yes.

Q. And there was no reason to suppose that that gentleman, who was a stranger, had been at all concerned in setting his dog on? - A.No.

Q. Upon which Col. Montgomery said, "if you do not call your dog off, I will knock him down? - A. Yes, to that effect.

Q. Be so good as let us know in what way he said that - did he pull off his hat, and say, Sir, be so good as call your dog off? - A. No, he did not.

Q.Instead of that, he said, if your do not call your dog off, I will knock him down? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not say it in a very gentle manner? - A.No, I do not think he did.

Q. Not in a very conciliating manner? - A. No.

Q. In consequence of that, Capt. Macnamara said, "have you the arrogance to say you will knock my dog down?" - A. Yes.

Q. Upon which Col. Montgomery again said, he would knock the dog down if he attacked his dog again? - A. Yes.

Q. I will remind you of only one expression more- Did he not say to Capt. Macnamara, if he was offended with those expressions, he knew where to find him? - A. Yes.

Q. Was this subsequent to telling him he was a Captain in the Royal Navy? - A. I cannot say whether it was before or after.

STEPHEN SLOANE , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Were you in Hyde-park on the 6th of April, in the afternoon? - A. Yes, I was.

Q.With your brother and Col. Montgomery? - A. Col. Montgomery joined us.

Q. Did you know Col. Montgomery before? - A. I knew his person, but I did not know him to speak to him.

Q. Do you remember coming to the barrier in Rotten-row? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Col. Montgomery having a Newfoundland dog with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any other person coming up who had also a Newfoundland dog? - A. That was before we came to the barrier; the first I heard was seeing the dogs fighting, and Col. Montgomery seeing his dog undermost, turned round and jumped off his horse to separate the dogs.

Q. At the time he was endeavouring to separate the dogs, did you see the other gentlemen? - A.

While he was separating the dogs, the other gentlemen rode up.

Q. Who were the other gentlemen? - A.Capt. Macnamara was one of them.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes; when Col. Montgomery jumped off his horse, he made this observation upon going up to the dogs, I will knock that dog down if he commits a violence upon my dog, or words to that effect; Capt. Macnamara then rode up, and said, if you knock my dog down, Sir, you must knock me down afterwards; Col. Montgomery made some observation, which I do not exactly recollect.

Q.Try to recollect? - A. He said to Captain Macnamara , this public place is not a proper place for the adjustment of the dispute; my name is Col. Montgomery, you may know where to find me. Capt. Macnamara then said, my name is Capt. Macnamara, of the Royal Navy. Colonel Montgomery then observed, that Capt. Macnamara could not suppose he intended any offence, either by desiring him to call off his dog, or by saying he would knock the dog down. Captain Macnamara then observed, very nearly in words to this effect, that he did not feel himself offended by what had passed; but if Col. Montgomery did say any thing that was intended to offend him, he would have taken it up with the greatest eagerness, or words very much to that effect, words that tended exactly to that effect; I cannot recollect the exact words, because a number of persons came up, and asked me what had happened, which took off my attention.

Q.Do you recollect any thing else that passed? A. I recollect Capt. Macnamara used the word Arrogance several times.

Q. Do you recollect any thing else? - A. I recollect nothing else; they separated; the parties went along Piccadilly; Col. Montgomery and his party, consisting, I think, of three persons; they were pretty nearly together till they got into Piccadilly; they separated in Piccadilly.

Q. Did you go into Piccadilly with them? - A. I went into Piccadilly with them.

Q. Where did the parties divide? - A.Almost immediately after they got through the gate.

Q. Did you see them together at any time afterwards? - A. We went on, Capt. Macnamara and his friends keeping about fifty yards before us; Capt. Macnamara was first; we went in this way till we got to St. James's-street, at pretty nearly the same distance; when we got into St. James's-street, my brother left us; Lord Burghersh and myself went into Jermyn-street; when we got down Jermyn-street, as far as the church, my brother rode up.

Q. Do not state any thing that passed in the absence of Capt. Macnamara; did you see any thing of Capt. Macnamara afterwards? - A.My brother rode up, and another person, whom I have understood since to have been Capt. Barry; it was one of the persons who rode with him up Piccadilly.

Q.You are quite sure he was one of those persons? - A. Yes.

Q. After some conversation, did the same gentleman return to Capt. Macnamara? - A. He did return to Capt. Macnamara, who was about fifteen yards behind.

Q. Then I believe you know nothing more about it? - A. I know nothing more about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You told us very truly persons asked you questions, which took off your attention; your recollection does not appear to be very accurate; do you recollect his desiring Capt. Macnamara to call his dog off? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the terms in which a gentleman, having the appearance of a gentleman, in the Park, was desired to call off his dog? - A.He said in a hurry, whose dog is it, not appearing to me to know who the dog belonged to.

Q. Upon asking what dog it was, Captain Macnamara said, it was his dog? - A. I did not hear that.

Q. Do you remember this expression, "that must depend upon circumstances, if you knock my dog down, you must knock me down?" - A. No; I think that must have been at the time Mr. Duff rode up to me.

Q. He said, I am Col. Montgomery, you may know where to find me? - A. Yes.

Lord BURGHERSH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Did you join Col. Montgomery and a Mr. Sloane in the Park on Wednesday the 6th of April? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present at any dispute that happened between any Newsoundland dogs? - A. No.

Q. You came up afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. At what time did you come up? - A.When Col. Montgomery, Capt. Macnamara, and other persons were about twenty yards from the upper bar, I was coming from St. James's-park, and met them; the first thing I heard was, Colonel Montgomery said, "very well, Sir, I shall knock your dog down if he attacks mine;" Capt. Macnamara's answer was, "but your desiring me to call off my dog was arrogant language, not language fit to be used by a gentleman, or to a gentleman," I don't recollect which;" Col. Montgomery said, "if you feel yourself injured, you know where to apply;" after that Colonel Montgomery said, "do you feel yourself injured;" Capt. Macnamara, said, "no, Sir, not by any thing which has yet happened; but if you say any thing that shall affront me, I will take it up as soon as any man in England;" Col. Montgomery said, "No, it is not my intention to quarrel with

you, but I shall adhere to what I originally said, if your dog attacks mine, I shall knock him down." They then separated, and were passing through the Park-gate. Capt. Macnamara said, that he would as soon fight him as any other person; that he would revenge an insult, and would as soon fight with Col. Montgomery as any other person. Capt. Macnamara was at some distance at that time; he was shaking a stick which he had in his hand, but I did not conceive it was any thing more than an involuntary thing, I think it was the act of the moment from the agitation he was in.

Q. Not intended to insult? - A.Certainly not.

Q.Did you go on with the parties? - A. Yes; they had been separated about twenty yards, and we rode on to St. James's-street, having been at a variable distance from twenty to thirty yards; there was some conversation whether the thing was over or not.

Q. It was not in the hearing of Captain Macnamara? - A. No.

Q. Your Lordship saw no more of it? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Erskine. Q.Did your Lordship hear Capt. Macnamara ask whose dog it was? - A.No, I was not there at that time.

CHARLES SMITH , Esq. sworn. - Q.Were you in Hyde-park on the 6th of April? - A. I was.

Q. Were you in the ride? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you see Captain Macnamara there? - A. Yes.

Q.Was he with any body else? - A.With three or four other gentlemen, riding towards the bar.

Q. At that time did you observe any dogs? - A. Two dogs began fighting immediately behind my horse; Col. Montgomery, whom I had never seen before, turned back, passed me, got off his horse, and standing over the dog said, I will knock the dog down; he did not strike either of the dogs, they separated themselves. Captain Macnamara then rode up, and said to Col. Montgomery, if you do knock the dog down, you must take the consequences, or knock me down too; Colonel Montgomery then said, why do not you call your dog off; Capt. Macnamara then replied, no, Sir, I do not chuse to call my dog off, and I will not be dictated to by you or any man.

Q.At this time then, Colonel Montgomery got upon his horse again? - A. He got upon his horse immediately, and then said, well, Sir, if your dog fights mine, I repeat to you, I will knock him down, and you shall be very welcome to know where to find me; as a gentleman you should have called your dog off. Capt. Macnamara then said, no, Sir, I did not chuse to call my dog off, I chose to let him fight; and I tell you again, I will not be dictated to by you or any man; I ought to know now, Sir, where to find you for what you have already said. At this time different gentlemen closed in upon them, that I had not an opportunity of hearing what further passed.

Q.Had you known Colonel Montgomery before? - A. No.

Q.Had you ever seen Captain Macnamara before? - A. Never to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q.Were you riding with either of these parties? - A.No.

Q.Were you riding or walking? - A. I was riding.

Q. Do you know now the person of Lord Burgersh? - A. Yes.

Q.And the Mr. Sloanes? - A. Yes.

Q.Were the Mr. Sloanes there? - A. I don't know.

Q. You did not hear Captain Macnamara say,"nothing that has been said has given me offence, but if any thing is said purposely to offend me, I would take it up?" - A. No, I did not hear that.

Q. You were not examined before the Coroner? - A. No.

Q.This is the first time your memory has been brought to it, the other gentlemen were examined the next day? - A. I was examined before Sir Richard Ford.

THOMAS LETCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are servant to Mr. Dean, a stable-keeper, in Bond-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you desired to go with a chaise to Dover-street, on Wednesday afternoon, the 6th of April? - A. In the first place, I was ordered to go to St. James's-street, which I did, Captain Barry came there in a hackney-coach, and ordered me to follow him; I followed him from there to Bennet-street, St. James's; as soon as I turned the corner, he stopped; I stopped just beyond the hackney-coach, he pulled a case out of the hackneycoach, and put it into my chaise.

Q. What was in that case? - A. I don't know; he then told me to drive down Dover-street, as fast as I could drive, I did so; he ordered me to drive to No. 8, I stopped there, and delivered the case out to Captain Barry, and he took it into the house.

Q.How long after did Captain Barry come out of the house again? - A.About four or five minutes.

Q. Did he come out alone? - A.He came out alone; and then afterwards he brought the case out in his hand.

Q. Was there anybody else with him? - A. No, I offered to put the case in the chaise, and he would not let me, he put it in himself; then Mr. Heaviside, and the gentleman that fought the duel.

Q. Do you know who that gentleman was? - A. I cannot swear that I know him.

Q. Look round? - (The witness looked round, but did not see the prisoner.)

Q.That gentleman and Captain Barry got into the chaise? - A. Yes, they ordered me to drive to Chalk-farm, I told them I did not know where that was.

Q.However, you found out where it was, and drove there? - A. Yes; there was a gentleman with one arm stopped us before we got there, and some conversation took place, but what it was, I do not know; a short time after, Captain Barry got out of the chaise, and walked up the field with the gentleman with one arm; in a short time afterwards, Mr. Heaviside and the gentleman got out of the chaise, and walked into the field with the others.

Q. Did you see anybody else? - A.Directly after, came up a hackney-coach, the gentleman with one arm went to the hackney-coachman.

Q. Did you see anybody in the hackney-coach? I did not, nor did not then see anybody get out of it; the gentleman asked the coachman where the company were in the coach, and then a gentleman got out.

Q. Do you know who that gentleman was? - A. No.

Q. Did you go up Primrose-hill yourself? - A. I did not; I went into a public-house and had a pint of beer to drink.

Q. Did the persons who got out of the hackneycoach, and those who got out of the chaise, go in the same direction up the field? - A. Yes, they did so, altogether.

Q. How soon did you see anybody return? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did the persons return that you had taken to Chalk-farm? - A. There was one gentleman returned first, and the other was brought afterwards with assistance; the person I helped to put on the bed, was Colonel Montgomery.

Q. How long a space was there, from the time you all went, and the time you helped to put this person upon the bed? - A. It might be a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you see the gentleman that you had taken in your chaise again that day? - A. I did so, I saw him come up to the chaise, and instead of getting into my chaise, he got into the Three-King's chaise.

Q. Was there any thing particular about his person at the time he got into the chaise? - A. They wanted him to have assistance in the chaise, and he wanted to get into the chaise himself, and he did; he was the second that went in, and Mr. Heaviside was the third.

DANIEL FARRER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are post-boy, at the Three-kings, Piccadilly? - A. Yes.

Q. On Wednesday, the 6th of April, did anybody come for you? - A. Yes, a gentleman's servant came for me to go with a chaise to Chalk-farm.

Q.Did you go? - A. He ordered a chaise and four, but we had but one pair of horses; I went with a chaise, and the servant in it to Chalk-farm.

Q.When you got to Chalk-farm, did you see Mr. Dean's chaise there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see a hackney-coach there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any gentlemen there? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you see the gentlemen? - A. Right opposite.

Q. Where? - A. At Chalk-farm, just by the window, there were three or four standing together.

Q. How were they standing? - A. I cannot say, they were talking together for any thing I know, I did not hear any discourse.

Q. What did you hear, did you hear the report of any thing? - A. Not from any gentleman.

Q.Did you hear any piece fired? - A.After I got into the field.

Q.More than once? - A. No more than once.

Q.Did it appear to be more than one, or was it two? - A. No more than one report that I heard.

Q. At the time you heard the report, did you see how the persons were standing together? - A. I cannot say to an inch.

Q. Were any persons standing opposite to each other? - A. There were two gentlemen that had the pistols in their hands, and Mr. Heaviside, and a gentleman with one arm, and Colonel Montgomery, which might stand three or four yards from each other, and another gentleman the same, from Mr. Macnamara.

Q. After you had heard the report, did you see either of them fall? - A. I saw Colonel Montgomery fall, I was down with them in a moment, I may say.

Q. When you came up to Colonel Montgomery, who did you see? - A. Mr. Heaviside was there, putting a bit of lint to the wound, and one of the gentlemen said, Captain Macnamara is wounded.

Q. Did you see Captain Macnamara at that time? - A. Yes, both of them.

Q.Did he appear to be wounded too? - A. Yes; I was with Colonel Montgomery, and a gentleman said to Mr. Heaviside, that Macnamara was wounded; he ordered another gentleman to clap his hand on the lint for him to put on the wound, and then he went to Captain Macnamara , and put a bit of lint on him.

Q. At that time, when both these gentlemen had this lint, where were the pistols, did you see them? - A. No.

Q. Did they both fall? - A. No, only Colonel Montgomery.

Q.How long did you stay in the field? - A. I cannot say; I dare say it was twenty minutes; I stopped there while Colonel Montgomery was led by two, while I was ordered to fetch the chaise up, which I did, and I lifted Captain Macnamara into

the chaise, and brought him down to Chalk-farm, and then a hackney-coach was sent up for Colonel Montgomery.

Q.Before you parted with Colonel Montgomery, had he died? - A. He was not dead; I helped to carry him up stairs afterwards, he was not dead then.

Q. Did you see Colonel Montgomery after he was dead at any time? - A. No, I was going up stairs after the gentlemen -

Q.Where did you take Captain Macnamara to? - A.Blake's Hotel, in Jermyn-street.

Q. What time was it when you went away? - A. I cannot say, but it was almost getting dusk.

JAMES HARDING sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A vintner, in St. James's-street.

Q. Were you at Chalk-farm, on Wednesday the 6th of April in the afternoon? - A. I was.

Q.What did you observe? - A. I observed the parties, Colonel Montgomery, and Captain Macnamara , and other gentlemen ascend Primrose-hill; I did not understand at first, that there was a duel; I followed them, one of them, Captain Barry, I think, desired the servant to bring the case out of the post-chaise, which opened my eyes to the business.

Q. What o'clock was it? - A. I think, about half-past six; I went up and stood upon the hill, at about fifty yards distance from them, I saw them conversing together.

Q. You saw who conversing together? - A. Sir William Keir , and I think Mr. Heaviside, then I saw them preparing pistols.

Q. Who preparing pistols? - A. I don't positively know; one pistol was discharged, as it struck me, to ascertain whether it was in good condition.

Q. By whom, do you recollect? - A. I don't know, the parties then separated and fired.

Q.Who fired? - A. Colonel Montgomery, and Captain Macnamara.

Q.How far were they distant, think you? - A. I fancy, about fifteen or sixteen yards.

Q. How were they standing at the time they fired, as respecting each other? - A.Face to face.

Q. Did each of the parties fire? - A. Yes.

Q.After they had fired, did you see either of them fall? - A.Colonel Montgomery.

Q. Captain Macnamara did not fall? - A. No.

Q. Did you go up to the party? - A. Yes.

Q. When you came up, tell us what you observed? - A.Colonel Montgomery was extended on the ground, and very shortly Mr. Heaviside opened his waistcoat, and looked at the wound.

Q. Where did the wound appear to be? - A. On the right breast.

Q. Mr. Heaviside, of course, administered relief? - A. He dressed the wound, and then went to Captain Macnamara.

Q. Did you observe whether Captain Macnamara had received any wound? - A. I did not observe any, I understood so, I think he expressed so; I think I recollect his observing to Mr. Heaviside, that he was wounded, that he was bleeding.

Q. Did you observe whether, after the pistols were fired, Captain Macnamara said any thing about it? - A. No.

Q. Or the Colonel? - A. No, I did not hear him speak.

Q. Do you recollect, at the time Captain Macnamara was bleeding, any desire on his part for Mr. Heaviside to go from him to assist the Colonel? - A. No, I don't recollect; I assisted in carrying Colonel Montgomery to the hackneycoach.

Q. How did he appear to be? - A. He was groaning, and his eyes fixed.

Q. He had the appearance of a dying man? - Yes.

Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, that he died? - A. I saw the corpse afterwards, on a bed in the house.

Q. In chalk farm? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Lord Burgbersh.) What was the Colonel's christian name? - A.Robert.

Q.Was it the person you saw in the park, that died? - A. Yes, I saw the corpse afterwards, at Chalk-farm.

Mr. Knapp. My Lord, that is the case on the part of the prosecution.

The prisoner, on being asked if he had any thing to say in his defence, rose up, and begged permission to read to the Gentlemen of the Jury, and the Court, a written defence, which he had prepared. This he was allowed to do, and to keep his seat, on account of his being still very weak, from his wound. It was as follows:

Gentlemen of the Jury.

I appear before you, with the consolation that my character has already been delivered, by the verdict of a Grand Jury, from the shocking Imputation of murder; and that although the evidence against me was laid before them, without any explanation or evidence of the sensations which brought me into my present unhappy situation, they made their own impression; and no charge of criminal homicide was found against me. I was delivered at once from the whole effect of the indictment. I therefore now stand before you, upon the inquisition only, taken before the Coronor, upon the view of the body, under circumstances extremely affecting to the mind of those who were to deliberate on the transaction, and without the opportunity; which the benignity of the law affords me at this moment, of repelling that inference of even sudden resentment against the deceased, which is the foundation of this inquest of manslaughter.

The origin of the difference, as you see it in the evidence, was insignisicant: - The heat of two persons, each desending an animal under his protection; was natural, and could not have led to any serious consequences. It was not the deceased's defending his own dog, or his threatening to destroy mine, that led to the fatal catastrophe: It was the defiance alone, which most unhappily accompanied what was said; words receive their interpretation from the avowed intention of the speaker. The offence was forced upon me by the declaration, that he invited me to be offended, and challenged me to vindicate the offence by calling upon him for satisfaction."If you are offended with what is past, you know where to find me." These words, unfortunately repeated and reiterated, have over and over again been considered by Criminal Courts of Justice as sufficient to support an indictment for a challenge. These Judgments of Courts are founded upon the universal understandings and feelings of mankind, and common candour must admit that an Officer, however desirous to avoid a quarrel, cannot refuse to understand what even the grave Judges of the Law must interpret as a provocation and a desiance. I declare, therefore, most solemnly, that I went into the field from no resentment against the deceased, nothing, indeed, but infanity could have led me to expose my own life to such imminent peril, under the impulse of passion, from so inadequate a cause as the evidence before you exhibits, when separated from the desiance which was the fatal source of mischief, and I could well have overlooked that too, if the world, in its present state, could have overlooked it also. I went into the field, therefore, with no determination or desire to take the life of my opponent, or to expose my own. I went there in hopes of receiving some soothing satisfaction, for what would otherwise have exposed me, in the general feelings and opinions of the world. The deceased was a man of popular manners, as I have heard, and with a very general acquaintance. I, on the other hand, was in a manner, a stranger in this great town, having been devoted, from my infancy, to the duties of my prosession in distant seas. If, under these circumstances, words which the deceased intended so offensive, and which he repeatedly invited to be resented, had been passed by and submitted to, they would have passed from mouth to mouth, have been even exaggerated at every repetition, and my honour must have been lost.

Gentlemen, I am a Captain of the British Navy. My character you can only hear from others; but to maintain any character, in that station, I must be respected. When called upon to lead others into honourable danger, I must not be supposed to be a man who had sought safety by submitting to what custom has taught others to consider as a disgrace. I am not presuming to urge any thing against the laws of God, or of this land. I know that, in the eye of religion and reason, obedience to the law, though against the general feelings of the world, is the first duty, and ought to be the rule of action: but, in putting a construction upon my motives, so as to ascertain the quality of my actions, you will make allowances for my situation. It is impossible to desine in terms, the proper feelings of a gentleman; but their existence have supported this happy country for many ages, and she might perish if they were lost, Gentlemen, I will detain you no longer: I will bring before you many honourable persons, who will speak what they know of me in my profession, and in private life, which will the better enable you to judge whether what I have offered in my defence may safely be received by you as truth. Gentlemen, I submit myself entirely to your judgments. I hope to obtain my liberty, through your verdict; and to employ it with honour in the defence of the liberties of my country.

Evidence for the prisoner.

Lieutenant HINDE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Erskine. Q. You are an officer? - A. Yes.

Q.In what regiment? - A. The first life guards.

Q. Were you present at the time these dogs began to fight? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you continue to be present while Capt. Macnamara and Col. Montgomery were in the Park? - A. When they came out of the Park.

Q. Were you near enough to hear all that passed to the time of their separating? - A. No; they went through the gate together, and I returned into the Park.

Q. Were you near enough to hear what passed? - A. Yes.

Q. And do you recollect it well? - A. I recollect some of the circumstances.

Q.Be so good as tell us how it began? - A. The dogs met and sought; Col. Montgomery got off his horse, and said, if that dog fights mine, I will knock him down.

Q. Was Capt. Macnamara present at this time? - A.He was near enough to hear it; he was going the other way down the Park; I believe Col. Montgomery repeated, if that dog fights mine, I will knock him down; to which Capt. Macuamara replied, if you knock him down, you must knock me down first; they rode up the Park a little way together, and I believe they exchanged their addresses, but that I cannot speak positively to; I heard Col. Montgomery say to Capt. Macnamara, why do not you take your dog off.

Q. Did he say that as you would speak to a gentleman, whose dog was attacking your's, or did he say it in a rude manner? - A.He was evidently heated; Capt. Macnamara said, you are not to dictate to me, Sir, and then I left them; I heard Col. Montgomery say, it is very well, Sir, if you have any thing to say to me, you know where to find me.

Lord HOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Erskine.

Q. Is your Lordship acquainted with the prisoner at the bar, Capt. Macnamara? - A.Certainly.

Q. How long has your Lordship known him? - A. I have known him eight or ten years; I had the good fortune to promote him in the year 1794.)

Q. I need hardly ask your Lordship, after having used the expression you had the good fortune

to promote him in the year 1794, whether he was an officer of merit? -

Court. That is not the question; I will not have that question answered.

Mr. Erskine. Q.Will your Lordship tell us what has been his general demeanour; has he always conducted himself properly? - A. I never heard any thing to the contrary.

Q. Was he a man of good temper? - A.He was a man of great moderation; he served under my command, when I had an opportunity of knowing him; it was on account of the high situation that he held in my opinion that I promoted him as an officer and a gentleman.

Lord NELSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q.Be so good as inform the Court how long you have known Captain Macnamara ? - A. I have known Capt. Macnamara about nine years; he has been at various times under my command; during my long acquaintance with him, I have not only had the highest respect for him as an officer, but although I have always believed Capt. Macnamara a gentleman that would not take an affront from any man, yet, as I stand here before God and my country, I must add, that I never knew or heard that he ever gave an offence to man, woman, or child, during the nine years I have had the pleasure of knowing him.

Lord HOTHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long have you known Capt. Macnamara? - A.Ever since the year 1764.

Q. That is the greatest part of his life? - A. Yes.

Q.During all that time, what has been the Captain's character for good temper? - A. I had an opportunity of seeing a great deal of him; I always found him a gentleman in every respect, always behaved properly and civilly in company; he is a very good-tempered man.

Lord MINTO sworn. - I have had the honour of knowing Capt. Macnamara ever since 1783, and from that time to the beginning of the year 1797, I had occasion to be very frequently on board the fleet; I had the honour of seeing him on board the ship he commanded; I have had occasion to see him at my own house several times.

Q. What character does this gentleman bear as to temper and behaviour? - A. In private life, with the opportunity I had of knowing his manners, I always thought him a lively, chearful, good-humoured companion, and never heard that he had occasion to be in any disputation or quarrel in my life; I believe his disposition is exactly the reverse.

Sir HYDE PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. How long have you known Captain Macnamara? - A.Ever since the year 1790.

Q. Be so good as state to the Jury what his estimation has been, as far as it has come to your knowledge, from your observation, and the opinions of others, as to his temper and disposition? - A. I am more able to speak to that than any body; his temper was moderate, and far from being quarrelsome; I have frequently heard, that he was that sort of man who would not receive an insult from another, but I never heard of his being quarrelsome; nor do I know, among all the little things that happen on board ship, any quarrel on his part; his character is that of a very honours able and respectable man in every point of view.

Sir THOMAS TROWBRIDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are one of the Lords of the Admiralty? - A. I am.

Q.How long have you known Captain Macnamara ? - A.Eight or ten years.

Q.Have you been in habits of intimacy with him? - A. Yes.

Q. What have you observed of his character for good nature and humanity? - A. I never saw him quarrel; I have been in habits of intimacy with him a long time; he is a good tempered man, I never saw in him a disposition to quarrel.

General CHURCHILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Erskine. Q.How long have you known Captain Macnamara? - A.Two years; I knew him first in the West Indies; I was introduced to him by a friend, and I thought myself indebted to that friend for his introducing to my acquaintance a gentleman of such known good character. I failed, with him from Jamaica, and lived in his cabin; I considered him a man of the strictest honour, and a good-humoured, lively companion; I know from a particular circumstance that occurred during our acquaintance, that he is far from being a quarrelsome man.

The prisoner also called Capt. George Martin, Mr. Phillips, Capt. Towley, Dr. Bain, Mr. Charles Wright, Capt. Liddiard, Capt. Waller, Capt. Graham Moore, and Capt. Fellows, who gave him a similar character.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, James Macnamara, the prisoner at the bar, stands charged with the crime of manslaughter, in feloniously discharging a pistol loaded with ball, and giving a mortal wound to Robert Montgomery, of which he died. Your province, Gentlemen, will be very limited indeed on this occasion, because that fact has not only been proved by witnesses, but acknowledged by the prisoner himself in the defence he has made. The crime of manslaughter consists in slaying a man under sudden provocation. Fortunately for the prisoner in this case - very fortunately for the prisoner, we are not to examine the extent of that provocation. Though true it is there was a sudden quarrel between the parties, yet a very considerable time intervened between that quarrel and the time of fighting the duel; and if the inquisition had found the prisoner guilty of murder, then you would have had the most painful

task to enquire whether there was time for the passions to cool (for the law is a stranger to all those nice sentiments of honour) and if there was, it would have amounted to murder. Gentlemen, a great deal of evidence has been gone into; it is not necessary for me to state to you particularly what that evidence is; it is fresh in your memory; and it appears, that afterwards, in consequence of this sudden quarrel, they parted from each other; they afterwards met - how they met, and by what appointment they met, does not appear; but it does appear they met at Chalk-farm, which is a considerable distance from the place of quarrel (a considerable space of time having elapsed) and decided their quarrel in the manner you have heard; and, as it now appears in evidence, the deceased died in consequence of a shot discharged from a pistol by the prisoner. The prisoner has acknowledged the fact, which appears also upon the evidence, and, therefore, however high his character may stand upon the evidence he has called, that ought not to influence your verdict. The only question for you to try is, whether, in a quarrel under a sudden provocation like this, and as this must now be taken to be, the deceased did not fall in the manner I have stated, by the hand and act of the prisoner. That appears to me most clear, both upon the evidence given, and upon the prisoner's own acknowledgement. Consider of your verdict, Gentlemen.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-3

317. WILLIAM FLETCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , nine fowls, value 20s. the property of John Freeman .

JOHN FREEMAN sworn. - I live at Newington-green ; I lost nine fowls, eight hens and a cock; on Saturday evening, the 19th of March, my man put them up, and on Sunday morning they were missing; I heard of them the same afternoon, a man had been stopped with them; I saw them on Monday morning, about nine or ten o'clock, hanging up in Islington watch-house; they were exactly the same number, eight hens and a cock; I knew them by their wings being all cut by my gardener; I can swear to the cock, he was a very large white cock, and the feathers under his neck were off; I had had him three years; the hens were different colours; I bred them; I have no doubt of their being mine; I found the prisoner in the watch-house in custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Your fowls used to fly away over the garden-wall? - A.No, they did not; a great many other people round the country had lost fowls also.

Q. Of the same sort? - A. Yes, for a year and a half, or two years.

Q. Do you mean, notwithstanding that, to swear to these fowls? - A. I can positively swear to the cock particularly.

GEORGE HOWARD sworn. - I am gardener to Mr. Freeman: On Saturday the 19th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I put up the fowls in a hen-house in the yard; there was a padlock on the door, but it was not locked; there were eight hens and a cock. I heard the dog in the yard make a terrible noise between three and four o'clock in the morning; I sleep in a room adjoining the yard; I did not get up till about six o'clock; I went to the hen-house, and they were all gone; I saw them again in Islington watch-house on the Sunday evening; they were then dead; the cock had no feathers on his breast, and I cut all their wings, because they used to get over into the garden; I had the training of them; some of them were speckled; there was one white one; they had smooth feathers; I can swear they were my master's fowls; I did not see the prisoner till Monday morning, about ten o'clock; he was stopped by the watchman; I never saw him near the house that I know of.

CHARLES DIXON sworn. - I am a patrol of the parish of Islington: On Sunday morning the 20th of March, about half past five o'clock, I was on duty; I saw the prisoner come across the fields with two bags hung across his shoulder; I stopped him, and asked him what he had got there; he said, he had nothing; I put my hand upon the bags, and found there was a fowl, or something of that sort, in it; I asked him where he came from; he told me he came from Southgate, and was going to Mr. Ball's, at Snow-hill; I told him he must go with me to the watch-house, and I took him to the watch-house, with the bags; they contained nine dead fowls; they were quite warm. I saw Mr. Freeman's servant at the watch-house on the Monday morning; he claimed them as Mr. Freeman's fowls.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the two bags in a ditch; I had not gone above two hundred yards before I was stopped by the patrol.

The prisoner called one witness, who had known him three years, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-4

318. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a tongue, value 5s. the property of Thomas Butt .

THOMAS BUTT sworn. - On Monday the 14th of March, about half past eight o'clock in the evening, as I was going to my house, I observed the prisoner close by the shop-door; he looked round, and saw there was no person in the shop,

he immediately put his hand in at the window, and took a tongue, which he concealed under his coat; I went up to him, and took him by the collar; I asked him what he had got there; he replied, he would pay me for it; I then took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. I did not take it away; I saw a man standing at the end of the shop-board, and I was going to ask him the price.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-5

319. EDWARD DAVIS and JOHN HODGES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , a great coat, value 7s. the property of Robert Read , the younger.

ROBERT READ , jun. sworn. - I am a clothworker , in Hosier-lane, Smithfield: On Tuesday the 12th of April, in the evening, I lost a great coat from Mr. Bennett's, where I had hired a chaise, in Worship-street, Shoreditch ; I received information of it the next morning, between nine and ten, and saw it at Worship-street Office on the Wednesday evening, in the possession of Mr. Jupp; I knew it to be my coat by a particular mark; it had been cut with a knife across the thighs; it was a brown coat, with a black velvet collar; I had had it about two years; I am sure it is mine.

JOHN JUPP sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Davison, a pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate-street, (produces a coat); I do not know the prisoners; I took the coat in pledge from a woman of the name of Hodges, on Wednesday the 13th of April; I sent her 7s. upon it.

James Bennett and John Vickery were called upon their recognizances, but did not appear.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-6

320. SAMUEL DYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of Joseph Kittier .

JOSEPH KITTIER sworn. - I am a seafaring man ; I lost my watch on Wednesday morning the 6th of April, alongside Carpenter Smith's wharf, in Tooley-street ; between the hours of two and six, some person came down into the cabin, and took my coat, waistcoat, breeches, and watch from my bed-side; I went to bed at ten o'clock, I got up at two, to see that all was safe, my cloaths were there then, and I went to bed again, and got up at six o'clock, when I missed my property; I saw my watch again on the Friday, in the hands of Mr. Griffiths, at the Public Office, in Lambeth-street; I knew it by my name, and the Freemasons arms; I had had it nine or ten years; the chain and key had been taken off.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am one of the officers of Lambeth-street: On Wednesday the 6th of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of a receiving-house in Goodman's-yard, Whitechapel; it is a broker's-shop; I took hold of him, and took him to the George public-house; I searched him, and in his fob pocket I found a silver watch; he said, it was his own, and had had it for sometime; seeing the Free-masons arms upon it, I suspected it was stolen, and I took him to the Office; I have had the watch ever since, (produces it); I went to different Free-masons Lodges till I found the prosecutor, who claimed the watch.(The watch was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. The watch was given me to sell. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-7

321. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , a watch, value 5l. another watch, value 30s. a gold key; value 5s. a metal watch-chain, value 2d. two gold seals, value 21s. two gold lockets, value 30s. three china dishes, value 5s. a tea-chest, value 10s. a china tureen, value 12s. a pair of breeches, value 10s. eight silver table-spoons, value 4l. 11s. a silver gravy-spoon, value 30s. fifteen silver tea-spoons, value 35s. and a pair of silver tea-tongs, value 12s. the property of John Sanders , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN SANDERS sworn. - I live in the London-road, St. George's-fields ; I keep a fruit-shop ; I left the prisoner a furnished room in my house in October last; he lodged with me about six weeks; he told me he was a cabinet-maker; he went away without my knowing it; he left my house on Thursday the 25th of November; the next morning after he was gone my wife missed a watch, the outside case gold, and the inside silver gilt, from my bed-room; it laid on the fire-place; it was a watch belonging to my wife. The other watch was lying near it, in a tortoishell case, and metal inside case; I had broke the glass two or three days before. My wife informed me the had missed the watches, I examined his room, and found duplicates of two table-spoons and two tea-spoons, we had lent them him a few days before; the other things were left to him with the lodgings. In my bed-room I found a trunk broke open.

Q. What things were found in the county of Middlesex? - A. The watches: On the 31st of March I saw the watches before the Magistrate, the gravy-spoon, thirteen tea-spoons, and the teatongs. On the 24th of March I met the prisoner in Nightingale-lane; I said, what, Davis, how

are you, how came you to leave me so? he said, he did not know; I asked him if he would take any thing to drink; we went to a public-house, and had a glass of gin a piece, and then I sent for an officer from Lambeth-street; Mr. Griffiths came, and took him; he found some duplicates upon him, which led to the property.

ESTHER SANDERS sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; the prisoner went away on Thursday the 25th of November, and on the Friday morning I missed the watches; I afterwards missed the spoons and other articles.

CHARLES WILLIAMS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker, the corner of Cable-street, (produces a pair of tongs, and a caddy spoon, a gravy-spoon, a metal watch, thirteen teaspoons, and six table-spoons); I took all these in pledge on the 25th of November, in the afternoon, from the prisoner, Thomas Davis; I knew him before; I am sure he is the man; his mother is a very creditable person, and has pledged articles at our shop; I had not the least suspicion of the prisoner; I lent him 6l. 5s. on them.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn - I am a pawnbroker, in Cable-street, (produces a watch, outside case gold, and inside case silver gilt); I took it in of the prisoner on the 25th of November; it has a chain, two gold seals, and two gold lockets attached to it.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer: On the 24th of March, about half past one, I was sent for to the Black Horse in Nightingale-lane, where I found the prisoner sitting with the prosecutor in a box in the tap-room; I took the prisoner backwards into a club-room, and asked him what he had done with the property he had taken from that person; he said, he had pledged them, and had the duplicates about him; he unbuttoned the waistband of his breeches, took out a pin, and pulled out these duplicates. - (Produces them)(The various articles were identified by Mr. and Mrs. Sanders.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-8

322. ELEANOR NELSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a silver watch, value 3l. the property of Robert Drinkwater .

ROBERT DRINKWATER sworn. - On Saturday the 19th of February, I was walking in Whitechapel, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner, I had seen her once before; I asked her if she would take a glass of liquor; I asked her if she would go into a house; I went with her to a room in Catherine-wheel-alley ; I went up in the room, and we had a glass of liquor together; I took out my watch to see what time it was; it wanted twenty minutes to twelve; she looked at the watch in my hand as well as me; I put it into my fob again directly; we sat down a while together, and I not being used to liquor, fell asleep.

Q. In a chair, or where? - A. I had laid down on a bed; I had only one glass of liquor, and part of another; I am sure I had my watch when I laid down; when I awoke the prisoner was gone; I had been asleep an hour, or an hour and a half; I put my hand to my fob, and missed my watch; I staid in the room, and she came back in about a quarter of an hour; I told her I had missed my watch; she said, she had not seen any watch of any kind; I had her apprehended in about half an hour afterwards; I saw my watch the same night in possession of the pawnbroker.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You knew where the prisoner lived before? - A. Yes.

Q. She took you to her own room? - A. Yes.

Q. You went in about twelve o'clock in the day? - A. Yes.

Q. It was about five in the evening when you missed your watch? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you alarm the people of the house? - A. No.

Q. Was there not a man at work in the room? - A. Not that I recollect.

Q. You said so in your examination before the Magistrate? - A. There was a man fixing up a grate I believe.

THOMAS LILBURN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate-street, and received this watch (producing it) from the prisoner on the 19th of February; I lent her one guinea on it; she asked a guinea and a half.

JOHN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer; the prosecutor's brother called on me, and we went to the prisoner's room, where we found her and the prosecutor; I asked her if she knew any thing of a watch; she said, no; I searched her pockets, she said it was no use; we got a light, and I observed her mouth going, as if she was eating; I said she was eating the ticket; I took hold of her hand, and gave her a tap on the cheek, and as she was resolute with the other hand, I took hold of it, and found part of the duplicate in her hand, and part on the ground, wet.

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutor took the watch out of a handkerchief, and told me to sell it; I said, I would pledge it, which I did, at Mr. Davison's; I returned with the money; he took the shilling, and gave me the one-pound note to do as I pleased with; I bought some things with

it which the officers took. (The watch produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-9

323. RICHARD CHANCELLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a waistcoat, value 2s. the property of Richard Compton .

RICHARD COMPTON sworn. - I am a leatherdresser , I lodge at No. 10, Haberdasher's-square, near Grub-street , the prisoner lodged in the same room: I put my waistcoat in the drawer on the Sunday, and I missed it on the Tuesday following, the 6th of April, he came home on the Tuesday evening, I asked him for it, and he said, he did not know any thing of it; he went to bed, and I sent for a constable, and had him taken up on suspicion; the next morning, at Guildhall, the prisoner gave me the ticket of it, the constable went to the pawnbroker's, and got the waistcoat.

JOHN BARRETT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Bridgewater gardens; I took in a waistcoat from the prisoner on the 30th of March; he fetched it out on the 2d of April, and on the 4th, he pledged it again; I never saw him before; I am sure he is the same man; I delivered it to the constable.( John Chandler , a constable, produced the waistcoat, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I pledged it, and intended to replace it the next morning.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-10

324. JOHN DECOSTA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a half-hundred iron weight, value 3s. the property of our Sovereign Lord the King .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of the Customs .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The prisoner being a foreigner, a Jury of half foreigners were sworn.)

Charles Tuck ,

John Maigre ,

James Brown ,

John-George Braun ,

John Williams ,

John Beeker ,

Thomas Coshes ,

George Duppa ,

John Archer ,

George Holbach ,

Thomas Saunders ,

George Erst .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN HARWOOD sworn. - I am an extra weigher, in the employment of the Customs: On Friday the 11th of March, I met the prisoner about half-past nine in the morning, on Little Tower-hill, he had a half hundred weight on his shoulder, it had the broad arrow upon it; I asked him where he had got it, and he gave me no answer; I told him, he must go back with me, he turned back very orderly, and when he came to Postern-row, he put it on the rail to rest himself, it was such a weight as we use on the quays, it had the city mark upon it; I never saw the prisoner before; the weights used at the water-side, are found by Government.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer; I saw the prisoner and the last witness against a rail, on Tower-hill; I enquired what was the matter, and upon being told, I took him to Lambeth-street; I saw the broad arrow upon the weight, and I told him I suspected it belonged to his Majesty, and then he said, he had stole it from the water-side; I asked him what he was going to do with it, and he said, a man, who keeps an iron-shop, in East-Smithfield, told him he would give him half-a-crown a-piece for as many weights as he could get of that kind.

RICHARD VANDORN sworn. - I am scale-maker to the Customs; this weight is the property of the Commissioners of the Customs, it is one of the weights that I made for them, it has the broad arrow upon it.

Q. From the appearance of it, was it in use or not? - A. It was in use; these weights are used all along his Majesty's quays.

CHARLES HUNTER sworn - I am a constable; I went to Custom-house quay, there are nearly forty tons of weights on the quay, it is impossible to miss one.

Vandom. I know this weight was made by me, for the Customs, because no other weights but these made for the Custom-house have the City mark, it is done on purpose to prevent disputes between the Custom-house and the merchant.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-11

325. PATRICK CRAIG , otherwise JOHN LOFTUS was indicted for that he, on the 22d of February , twenty-three pounds weight of lead, value 5s. belonging to Waters Poney , the elder, and Waters Poney the younger, fixed to a building of theirs, called a house; feloniously did rip and cut, with intent to steal .

And in three other counts, for a like offence, varying the manner of charging it.

WATERS PONEY, junr. sworn. - I am the son of Waters Poney: We lost some lead from a house in Gloucester-place, Marybone , belonging to my father, and myself, we are building three houses there on our own account; this happened on the Tuesday, and on the Sunday preceding, we missed three hundred weight: On Tuesday, the 22d of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the top of the last house, on the

east-side, cutting lead; I saw him cutting it, and rolling it up, he had a knife in his hand; I called him down, he came down, and I took him to the watch-house, I found the area door broke.

Q. Was this house covered in? - A. Yes, it has been covered in about six weeks; the doors and windows were fast at one o'clock that day; when I had secured the prisoner, I went up stairs and found the lead cut from the gutter, and rolled up, it was removed about eighteen inches, it weighed about twenty-three pounds.

Q.Was the prisoner employed about the building? - A. No, I don't recollect ever to have seen him before; I shall know it again when it is produced.

WILLIAM COOPER sworn. - I am a carpenter; I saw the prisoner cutting the lead, and rolling it up; my master was coming by, and ordered him to come down; I went up, and found the knife stuck in the cut of the lead, (produces it;) we found some nails in his pocket, which correspond with the lead. (Produces the nails and the lead.)

Prisoner's defence. A man employed me the day before to come there to a job, and I went accordingly, and not finding the man, I went to the top of the house to look for him, and while I was there, this gentleman came by.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-12

326. JUDITH READ and SARAH READ were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , a damask table-cloth, value 15s. two tea-spoons, value 2s. a cotton gown, value 5s. a shawl, value 2s. an apron value 1s. a pair of shoes, value 6d. a pair of stockings, value 4s. and a pillow-case, value 6d. the property of Ann Bailey , widow .

ANN BALLEY sworn. - I am a widow, No. 21, Tabernacle-walk ; the prisoner, Sarah Read was my apprentice , the other prisoner is her mother: On Saturday, the 12th of March, I went out and left Sarah Read in my apartment, telling her to iron her cloaths, and should be back by the time she had done; I went out between two and three, and returned about five o'clock, the fire was out, and the prisoner gone; I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment; I have found nothing since but the table-cloth, which was pawned, and a coloured apron, which I found upon the mother, when I took her; I took them both; on the 23d of March, I met the mother in Old Street-road, and knew her from the description her daughter had given of her; the constable has had the apron ever since; I found the girl the same day, coming out of a chandler's shop in White-cross-street, with a two penny loaf.

ROBERT RATTENBURY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in George-street, Finsbury-square: I took in a table-cloth, on Saturday, the 12th of March, it was pledged in the name of Mary Ward, I have not the least recollection of either of the prisoners; I recollect I took it in in the afternoon.

EVAN EVANS sworn. - I am a pork-butcher; I bought a duplicate of a table-cloth of the prisoner, Judith Read , she appeared in great distress, and I thought she wanted something to eat, it was on a Friday, but I cannot tell what day of the month.

Q.Where do you live? - A. In Golden-lane.

MARY STONARD sworn. - I am mistress of St. Luke's workhouse; the prisoner, Judith Read, left the house, on the 12th of March, she had been there about twelve months, she was a poor wandering creature in the house, she has been for days together without speaking five words.

Q. Was she in her perfect senses or not? - A. I think she was not; she was crying, and in a deranged state; she was brought back to the house by one of the officers, about a fortnight after she went away, she appeared to be just the same then.

Q. Did she ever do any mischief, or commit any violence? - A.Never, but was a poor wandering soul.( William Palmer , a headborough, produced an apron which he took from the prisoner Judith.)

THOMAL WICKINGTON sworn. - I am an officer; I took charge of the prisoner, Sarah Read , she told me her mother had sold the ticket of a table-cloth to Mr. Evans, in Golden-lane; I went to Evans, and got it. (Produces it.)

Judith Read's defence. I never stole any thing.

Sarah Read's defence. Mrs. Bailey beat me over the head with a stick, and I went away, but took nothing with me.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-13

327. WILLIAM SULLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , two remnants of stuff, value 30s. the property of Ann Cope , privately in her shop .

ANN COPE sworn. - I keep a mercer's shop , No. 117, High Holborn : On Tuesday, the 8th of March, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing in the back shop, and saw a man in a blue coat go off the steps, and put something on his shoulder; I ran into the street, and looked both up and down, but could not see any body; I turned round the corner, and looked up Kingsgate-street; I saw a man in a blue coat with a parcel on his shoulder; I called to the other witness, and told him what I had seen; he was turning the corner of Eagle-street; the witness went after him, and brought him back with the goods; they have my shop-mark upon them; they were lying upon the counter, near the door; I had shewn them to

a customer that afternoon; he must have come into the shop to have reached them.

Q. Did you observe his face? - A. No, his back was to me.

GEORGE TUCKER sworn. - I am shopman to Mrs. Cope: I had just come in, and was fitting with my back to the door, entering some goods, that I had sold, in the books; Mrs. Cope desired me to go out after a man she saw go out with some stuffs; I overtook the prisoner in Eagle-street with two pieces of stuff under his arm; I saw that they had my private mark upon them; I asked him how he came by them; he told me a gentleman in the street asked him to carry them for him; I have had them ever since. (Produces them.)

Q. What is the value of them? - A.Thirty shillings; they cost more.

Q. Was there any body else in the shop? - A. No, only Mrs. Cope and myself.

Q.(To Mrs. Cope.) You did not see him till he had got upon the steps? - A. No.(The property was identified by Mrs. Cope.)

Prisoner's defence. I was desired by a young man, in a blue coat, to carry these things up Eagle-street, and he would follow me.

Q.(To Tucker.) How was the prisoner dressed? - A. In a blue coat.

GUILTY Death , aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-14

328. SARAH GIBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , six shirts, value 40s. four pair of stockings, value 6s. and a silk handkerchief, value 2s. the property of James Taylor , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH TAYLOR sworn. - I am the wife of James Taylor; I am a laundress; the prisoner washed in my house at 2s. 6d. a day for a year and a half; in the course of that time I have met with great losses; I cannot ascertain the days when the things were taken; I have since seen the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Does your husband keep the house? - A. Yes.

Q. All this property was given to her in your house? - A. It was property that she and other people had to wash in my house.

ELIZABETH CORDERY sworn. - I worked for Mrs. Gibbs on the Friday and Saturday in every week in general, to scour pots for public-houses; I carried these things to pawn for her, but I cannot tell when it was; I took them to Mr. Bennet's, a pawnbroker; I gave the duplicate to Mrs. Gibbs; it was put down upon the duplicates Elizabeth Cordery for Sarah-Gibbs; I cannot swear to the property or duplicates.

THOMAS BENNET sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, (produces six shirts and four pair of stockings;) four shirts were pawned by Cordery, and two shirts and four pair of stockings by Gibbs, at ten different times, from the 29th of May to the 22d of January; I have had them ever since; the prisoner at the bar, and Cordery, the last witness, were the persons who pledged them; I know them both well.

Q.(To Cordery.) All the articles that are pledged in both names you received from the prisoner? - A. Yes.(The property was identified by Mrs. Taylor.)

The prisoner threw herself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house ;

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-15

329. SARAH GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , two gowns, value 30s. a petticoat, value 10s. and an apron, value 3s. the property of Richard Richmond ; in the dwelling-house of Jacob Ruff .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Ann Wilson .

MARY- ANN RICHMOND sworn. - I live in the parish of St. Giles's; my husband is a taylor ; his name is Richard Richmond : On Wednesday, the 6th of April, I gave some clothes to Ann Wilson to mangle; I know nothing of it myself.

ANN WILSON sworn. - On the 6th of April Mrs Richmond gave me some things to mangle; I took them home, and had them mangled; I sent Sarah Griffiths home with them; she mangled for me, and I saw no more of her till the 10th; she used to come to turn the mangle for me.

JOHN WINGFIELD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 178, Drury-lane: On the 6th and 7th of April the prisoner pledged two gowns, a petticoat, and an apron, with me; I remember the two gowns perfectly well; I am positive the prisoner pledged them. (Produces them.)

JAMES MORGAN sworn. - I am round-house keeper of St. Giles's; the prisoner was brought to me on the 10th; I searched her, and found the duplicates of the property now produced upon her.(Produces them.)

Wingfield. These are the counterparts of the duplicates on the things.(The property was identified by Mrs. Richmond.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-16

330. BRYAN CALLAGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a flock-bed, value 20s. a bolster, value 2s. a pillow, value 1s. a pair of sheets, value 4s. a blanket, value 2s. and a great coat, value 40s. the property of Samuel Copps , in his dwelling-house .

ANN COPPS sworn. - I am the wife of Samuel Copps, a butcher , in Graham's-buildings, Blue Anchor-alley : On the 3d of March I sold the prisoner at the bar a large deal box; I told him to take it away; he said, no, he would come again for it; I went with my husband's tea, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and he came while I was gone; I left a little boy in care of my little girl of five years old; I returned about half past five, I am not certain to a minute; when I came back, I found my bed gone and bedding, and my child very much intoxicated, and beating itself about the floor; it is since dead; I missed all the articles stated in the indictment.

WILLIAM GREEN called. - Q.How old are you? - A.Going of twelve.

Q. Do you go to school? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever learn your catechism? - A. No.

Q. Is it a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. A bad thing.

Q. What becomes of people that tell lies? - A. They go to the naughty man. (Sworn.)

Q. You have now called God to witness that you will tell me nothing but what is true - now tell me all that happened? - A. Yes, I do not know what day it was; that man, (pointing to the prisoner,) came in, and sent me for a quartern of gin; he gave me a cup full of gin, and Betsy half a cup of gin.

Q. What did he say he came for? - A. He did not say he came for any thing; then he sent me for another quartern of gin; the bed and the drawers were there when I went for the second quartern of gin; the bed was on the drawers up in the corner; when I came back with the second quartern, the man was gone, and bed and all.

Q. Are you sure that is the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he give you money to fetch the gin? - A. Yes.

EDWARD TRING sworn. - I am a constable: On the 3d of March, between five and six o'clock, I was sent for to a public-house to take charge of a man for stealing a bed; I was not at home; I went in the evening about nine o'clock, when I was sent for a second time; that was not the prisoner, but in consequence of his information I went to Golden-lane, and searched the prisoner's apartment, and found the box; I took that to the watchhouse.

JOHN ELLIS sworn. - I am a patrol: On the 3d of March, about half past seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner go into Black Swan-court, with a bed on his back; I don't know whether he lodged there, but he was in the habit of going there; I knew his person well; I received information about ten o'clock, and apprehended him coming out of Black Swan-court; I took him to the watch-house, and went back again with the prosecutor; we searched several houses in the court; there are but six-houses; we did not find any thing in the houses, but at the top of the court there is a privy, and there we found the bed and bedding, and every thing but the great coat,

- FITZGERALD sworn. - I am a watchman; I assisted Ellis in apprehending the prisoner.(The property was produced, and identified by Samuel Copps and his wife.

Prisoner's defence. The gin that she speaks of was fetched before she went out; the boy fetched it, and she and I drank it together.

Q.(To Mrs. Copps.) Had you any gin with him? - A. No. GUILTY.

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-17

331. ANN DIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , seventeen ounces of silk, value 3l. 3s. a cap, value 1d. a piece of bed-tick, value 1d. and a handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Henry Hewitt , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT AVERY sworn. - I live in Drury-lane; I am a silk-manufacturer: On the 21st of March I delivered to Elizabeth Hewitt , who winds for me, one pound, two ounces and a half of Italian tram silk; that is all I know of it.

ELIZABETH HEWITT sworn. - I am a windster; I work for Mr. Avery; I live in Oakley's-row, Bethnal-green ; I hired the prisoner on the 21st of March to wind silk; I was obliged to go out of an errand; about ten minutes before eleven o'clock, I left the prisoner at her work in my place; on my return back, rather before twelve, the prisoner was gone, and seventeen ounces of Italian silk were gone that I had had of Mr. Avery, and an old cap, a piece of bed-tick, and a handkerchief; she also took what little money I had, in halfpence and penny-pieces, but whether it was a penny under or a penny over a shilling I cannot tell; when she was taken before the Magistrate the same night she had the cap on, and the bed-tick; she told the Magistrates, it was mine.

Prisoner. She lent me the cap and the bed-tick.

Hewitt. I did not lend them her, upon my oath.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-18

332. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , a pair of sheets, value 5s. a gown, value 4s. an apron, value 6d. a frock, value 1s. a pin-cloth, value 6d. and a muslin handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Samuel Welcher .

MARTHA WELCHER sworn. - I am the wife of Samuel Welcher ; I live at No. 12, Villiers-street,

in the Strand ; On Tuesday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, my servant was washing the door; she went down to fetch a pail of water; I was looking out of the first floor window, and saw the prisoner go in at the door; he stopped there about two minutes, and returned with a bundle under his arm; I came down stairs, and followed him into Charles-court; I called stop thief; when he had nearly reached the top of the court, he dropped the things; I took them up, and one of the witnesses pursued him; he was brought back in the course of three or four minutes; I am sure the prisoner is the man; the constable has the bundle.

Q. Do you lett lodgings? - A. I left one room; these things were taken out of my bed-room on the ground floor, adjoining the back parlour.

- CHAMBERS sworn. - I am a locksmith and bell-hanger: On the 5th of April, between nine and ten o'clock, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running with a bundle under his great coat; Mrs. Welcher was pursuing him very close; I ran out of my shop, and when he saw me, he dropped the bundle; I pursued him across the Strand into Hewitt's-court, crying stop thief; he was stopped within a few yards of me; I never lost fight of him; Mrs. Welcher picked up the things.

- PURSER sworn. - I stopped the prisoner; I stood behind my counter; I saw the prisoner running up the court facing me, and I stopped him.( - Filby, a constable, produced the property, which was identified by Mrs. Welcher.)

The prisoner, when called upon for his defence, admitted the fact. GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-19

333. JOHN FRANKLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing three pair of shoes, value 20s. the property of Aaron Bennett .

JOHN FOSTER sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. James, a haberdasher, in Rathbone-place; Mr. Bennett lives in New-street, Covent-garden : On the 18th of March, between five and six o'clock, I was going with two bundles of bombazeens, and saw two men at Mr. Bennett's door; I saw one of them take three pair of shoes; I cannot tell whether the prisoner was one of them, or not; they pushed against me, and I ran on the other side of the way; I called out, stop thief, and several men came round me directly; there were seven or eight of them; one of them swore he would cut my liver out if I spoke; after I had been surrounded a little while, they ran off; I went directly to Mr. Bennett's, and told him; he came out directly, and ran up the street; I went home.

- OLDHAM sworn. - I live facing the prosecutor, No. 4, New-street, Covent-garden: On Friday, the 18th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a noise at my window; I went to look, and saw a man have the last witness by the collar, and said, he would cut his b-y liver out if he spoke; I thought the boy had shoved him off the pavement, and I did not interfere, but immediately the man let him go, and Foster said to me, that man, pointing to the prisoner, has stole three pair of shoes from Bennett's; he was pursued, and in about an hour after an officer took the prisoner, and I went to Bow-street, and identified his person; I am certain the prisoner is the person I saw running on the opposite side of the way; I saw him run from within six or eight yards of Bennett's door.

- ARMFIELD sworn. - I am one of the patrol at Bow-street: On the 18th of March, about a quarter before six, I was coming up Green-street, Leicester-fields; I met the prisoner about the middle of the street; I stopped him, knowing him before, and asked him where he was going; I saw a companion of his on the opposite side of the way with something concealed under his coat; I crossed over to him, and the prisoner followed me; I went to lay hold of him, and he dropped three pair of shoes; the prisoner popped between us, which made me break my hold of him, and he ran away; I secured the prisoner and the shoes. (Produces them).

Bennett. These are my shoes; I know them by the nails in the heels, and the strength of them.

Prisoner's defence. I never crossed over at all; the man dropped the shoes, and immediately ran round me. GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-20

334. ABRAHAM NEWLAN and WILLIAM CRISP were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , six gallons of brandy, value 5l. the property of George Bridges and John Reay .(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

THOMAS CHRISTOPHER sworn. - I am clerk to George Bridges and John Reay; The prisoner Newlan was employed on the 28th of March to cart a puncheon of brandy, and a puncheon of rum, to Mr. Harriott, in Oxford-road: there were 121 gallons of brandy, and 104 gallons of rum; the cask of brandy was filled close up to the bung; I delivered the permit to Newlan.

EDWARD ALDRIDGE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Swanson, who keeps the Bull public-house, in Dunning's-alley, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Look at the prisoners - did you see them on the 18th of March? - A. Yes, I saw Newlan come to Dunning's-alley, with a whip in his hand; the cart was in the alley; it was about six o'clock in the evening; Newlan, I am certain, was the man; the

cart stopped on the right-hand side of the way; there were two other men with him; one was Thomas Dolphin, and the other Bill Ivatt.

Q. Did you know Billy Bung? - A. Yes, but it was not him; I think it was Bill Ivatt .

Q. Did you see William Crisp ? - A.No, I rather think it was Bill Ivatt; they were drawing something off from a cask in a cart.

Q. Who was driving that cart? - A. Abraham Newlan .

Q. How were they drawing it off? - A.With a little brass cock and bullock's bladder; when they had drawn it off, they put it under some dung in the alley, by the side of the cart; they moved the dung, and covered it over again; then they fixed another bladder to the cock.

JOHN AYRES sworn. - I am a tallow blanchard: On the 18th of March I was going down Bishopsgate-street, and within about twenty yards of the horses, in a cart in Dunning's-alley, I smelt a particularly strong smell of brandy; there were two casks in the cart; when I came even with the cart, I saw three men.

Q.Look at the bar? - A. Newlan is the man that drove the cart, the other I cannot speak to; when I was even with the cart, I endeavoured to get a sight of their faces, but on account of the casks I could not; as I moved, they moved the contrary way, till I got round the tail of the cart, and then they all three ran away; when I came up, I observed a brass cock annexed to the brandy puncheon, with a bladder; I examined the bladder, and found it contained brandy; I then took charge of the horses and cart, and stopped for about ten minutes; I sent for two constables, but could not find them; Newlan then came up, and asked me what business I had with the cart; he began to drive the horses and cart away, and used some abusive language; I told him, I would take him in custody as well as the cart; he endeavoured to drive the horses over me to drive away; I told him, he should not go on till I had got a peaceofficer; upon that, Mr. Matthews came up, a publican, and said, I had better let the man go, because the liquor would be seized, and he agreed to go with me; I asked Newlan for the permit, which he reluctantly produced, but it was so badly written we could not read it; Newlan said, he was going to Holborn-bridge with the liquor, and then to Bridge-street; when we came to Snow-hill, we called at the Vintner's porters, and from them we learned that the goods were going to Oxford-street, to one Mr. Harriott, and they did not choose to go with it, as they always racked it off.

Q.Was that in the hearing of the prisoner? -- A. Yes; then I asked the porters where Mr. Harriott lived, and one of them told me the corner of Hanway-yard, in Oxford-street; Mr. Matthews accompanied me as far as the George and Blue Boar, in Holborn.

Q. In passing through Smithfield, did you meet a person of the name of Adams? - A. I did; he is a fellow-servant with the prisoner Newlan; he offered to take care of the cart till he got to Oxford-road, but the prisoner refused; Adams notwithstanding did join, and accompanied the cart; then I went on to Oxford-road, and left Mr. Matthews and Adams in care of the cart, as close to the George and Blue Boar as could be; I found Mr. Harriott's house, but not till after the cart had arrived there; I found the cart in the same state in which I left it; in consequence of what passed between the prisoner and Mr. Harriott, a coach was sent for to convey Mr. Harriott, myself, Mr. Matthews, and another person, into the City, to Messrs. Bridges and Reay's; the prisoner Newlan voluntarily offered to go behind the coach; we left Adams in care of the cart, and drove to Messrs. Bridges and Reay's; when we arrived there, Newlan was not to be found; I did not see him again that evening; I communicated all I had observed to the prosecutors.

JAMES ADAMS sworn. - On Friday, the 18th of March, I met Newlan with the cart in Smithfield; I am fellow-servant with the prisoner; I went on with the prisoner and the cart to Mr. Harriott's, in Oxford-road; the prisoner left the cart in Oxford-road, and jumped behind the coach; I took the cart back to Messrs. Bridges and Reay; there were some drippings from the cask, to the amount of about a quart, ran out upon Snow-hill; I then took the cart back to Water-lane, and Mr. Austin took possession of it.

JOHN AUSTIN sworn. - I am a custom-house officer: On the evening of the 18th of March, the quay-surveyors directed me to take charge of this liquor; the last witness was with the cart; it was then between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; the prosecutors house is close by Water-lane, at the water-side; my partner, John Craner, relieved me at six o'clock in the morning; I had it in my possession till that time; I delivered it to Craner in the same state that I received it.

JOHN CRANER sworn. - I am a Customhouse officer: On the morning of the 19th of March, at six o'clock, I took possession of this property from Austin, and did not quit the possession till I delivered it into the King's warehouse.

JAMES MOORE sworn. - I am cellarman to Messrs. Bridges and Reay: I received a puncheon of rum, and a puncheon of brandy, from the King's warehouse, on the 31st of March; they were seized on the 18th, housed on the 19th, and restored on the 31st. The puncheon of brandy I found deficient six gallons.

Q.Was there a brass cock in it? - A. No, I saw no brass cock.

Q.(To Ayres.) What became of the brass cock? - A.Green took it out on Snow-hill, and stopped up the hole again.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, Newlan, on the 19th of March; I am a fellow-servant of his; I apprehended him at the Hampshire Hog, in Rosemary-lane.

Prisoner Newlan's defence. I lost my horse and cart for a considerable time, an hour and a half, or thereabours, and at last I found them in this alley; I had not seen them for an hour and a half, when I came up to Mr. Ayres; and afterwards when I got behind the coach, the coachman cut me twice.

The prisoner, Crisp, was not put upon his defence.

Newlan, GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

Crisp, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-21

335. JOHN CHAMBERS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Williams , about the hour of seven in the night of the 10th of March , and burglariously stealing thirty-one pair of cotton stockings, value 5l. five pair of worsted stockings, value 12s. and six pair of other stockings, value 12s. the property of the said William Williams .

SARAH WILLIAMS sworn. - I am the wife of William Williams, who keeps a house in Finsbury-place : On Thursday, the 10th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, we were at tea in the parlour; the shop was open, and the door shut; it was not bolted, but it was upon the latch; I came into the shop, and found the prisoner with the stockings in his hand; he ran out with them under his arm, and I could not catch him; I had seen them about five o'clock in the afternoon behind the counter; I left the door latched just before I went into tea; I cried out stop that man, and he ran behind a coach; he was not taken till Saturday morning; I saw the stockings afterwards in the possession of Armstrong.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - A. I am perfectly sure.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was it dark at this time? - A. We had just lit the candles.

Q. Was there not light enough to see a man's face out of doors? - A. No, the lamps were lighted.

Q. Have you always been as certain as to the person of the prisoner? - A. At that time he had a scar upon his face, which has got a little well now, but I never had any doubt.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - On Saturday, the 12th of March, I was coming down Crown-street, I saw the prisoner turn up a gateway with these black stockings under his coat, and the white ones under his arm, (produces them.) I took him into custody: he said, he had them from his sister, whose name was Hill, and lived in Leather-lane; I took him to the office, and sent for Mrs. Williams, she claimed the stockings, and I have kept them ever since.(The stockings were identified by Mrs. Williams.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN MORRIS sworn. - I am a taylor, in Grub-street: On Thursday, the 10th of March last, the prisoner came to me between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day; I did not know him before; he staid with me about an hour, and I saw him again about two o'clock.

MARGARET LEARY sworn. - On Thursday evening, the 10th of March, the prisoner drank tea in my company, in Grub-street, Cripplegate; I was in his company from five o'clock in the afternoon till nine in the evening; I was never out of his company during that time; I have known him about four months.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. What business is the prisoner? - A. He is a turner .

Q. What are you? - A. A servant.

Q. At whose house were you? - A. At Daniel Sullivan's, a public-house; they are very particular friends of mine.

Q. How were you employed those four hours? - A. In drinking tea; I cannot say what time he came; I saw him there about five o'clock.

Q. Are you sure he did not leave your company for half an hour? - A. I am sure of it.

Q. Who first applied to you to come here? - A. The young man's friends.

Q. When? - A. The day before yesterday.

Q. Who was present besides you and the prisoner? - A. The woman of the house, her mother, the maid servant, and myself.

Q. Had you any thing besides tea? - A. No, nothing else.

Q. Is Sullivan or his wife here? - A. No.

Q. What is the sign of the house? - A. The Crispin, I think.(Mrs. Sullivan, her mother, and the servant, were sent for by the Court.)

Mrs. SULLIVAN sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Margaret Leary? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being at your house in the beginning of March? - A. I remember his being at my house one evening, and he said his coat was at the taylor's; he was there about two hours and a half, to the best of my recollection; it was about seven o'clock when we drank tea; my

mother called in, (she lives at Hackney,) and Peggy Leary, and this young man; he drank tea with us, and was there all the afternoon.

Q. You said he was there two hours and a half? - A. He was there two hours and a half without his coat, he went away shortly after drinking tea; he said his coat was at the taylor's being mended; I don't recollect how long it is ago.

Q. Do you remember the day of the week? - A. No.

JUDITH SULLIVAN sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his being at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. How long ago? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was Peggy Leary in company? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did he come? - A.Between seven and eight o'clock, I believe.

Q. What did he do there? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How long was it before he was taken up? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did you hear of his being taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before you heard he was taken up? - A. I don't know.

Q. Do you remember the day of the week? - A. No.

Q.(To Morris.) Did he come to you after two o'clock that day? - A. No, not till the next day at one o'clock, and then he had his coat.

GUILTY,

Of stealing goods, value 39s. but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-22

336. CHARLES BARTON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Crouchman , no person being therein, about the hour of three in the afternoon, of the 13th of April , and stealing a silk cloak, value 2s. the property of Margaret May ; a silk cloak, value 2s. three petticoats, value 1s. 6d. a night gown, value 1s. 6d. and a bed quilt, value 1s. 6d. the property of the said Richard.

ANN CROUCHMAN sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Crouchman ; I live in the first house in Essex-street, Whitechapel ; I have a room there; it is Mr. Welsted's house; he does not live in the house, he lives next door; I had lodged there about twelve months; my husband is at sea: On the 13th of April, I went out about ten minutes before three o'clock in the afternoon; I went out leaving no one in the room; I have a child, but I took that with me; I locked the room-door, and put the key in my pocket; I am sure it was locked; I only went to the next house, and was absent hardly ten minutes; I heard an alarm that my place was being robbed; I directly ran into my own passage, and saw the prisoner with my petticoats in his hand.

Q. Where was he? - A. On the bottom stair of the stairs leading from my room; as soon as he saw me, he dropped them; I told him to go up stairs, and let somebody search him; there was a great mob round the door; after a great deal of persuasion, he went up.

Q. What became of the petticoats that he dropped? - A. I made him pick them up; I found the room-door unlocked, and the padlock taken off; I went into the room with him, and desired him to let me call some man or other to search him; he would not have any body to search him; he pulled a bed-gown from under his coat, and said, now you have got your property, let me go; I told him, I would send for an officer if he would not let somebody or other search him; I called out at the window, and somebody fetched an officer, Mr. Trott; the prisoner was not searched till he got to the office; Mr. Trott took fourteen keys out of his pocket, and Mr. Osman took a cloak and a key out of his other pocket; then Mr. Osman took a black silk cloak and a black silk petticoat out of his hat; one of the cloaks belonged to my sister; she had lent it me; her name is Margaret May.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer: On Wednesday, the 13th instant, about three o'clock in the afternoon. I was sent for; the office is about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutrix's; I went up into Mrs. Crouchman's room, and saw the prisoner; I knew him; I asked him what he had been about; he said, he had done nothing; I found two petticoats, a bed-quilt, and a night-gown, lying close by him; I took him to the office; I met one of my brother-officers, Osman, he walked behind, endeavouring to keep the people back; the prisoner said, cannot you try and compromise this matter for me? I told him, I could not, he must go to the office; he seemed very uneasy, and shuffled his left-hand about; Osman laid hold of his hand, and he immediately pulled out a silk cloak; at the office we found in his hat a silk cloak and a silk petticoat; I searched him in the office-yard, and found some keys in his right-hand coatpocket, I cannot exactly say how many there were; I found some others in his right-hand coatpocket, I cannot exactly say how many there were; I found some others in his right-hand breeches-pocket, I believe altogether thirteen or fourteen; there are two of them that will open Mrs. Crouchman's padlock.( - Osman, another officer, produced the keys and the property found upon the prisoner, which was identified by Mrs. Crouchman.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that he went to the house of the prosecutrix to enquire for Mary Scott , who had lived there two years ago, and washed for him, and that he found the property in the passage; that he was an ar

mourer on-board an East-Indiaman, and had purchased the keys for the use of the ship.

GUILTY, aged 39.

Of stealing goods, value 4s. 10d.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-23

337. JOHN HOLT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Dowager Duchess of Chandos , about the hour of three in the night, of the 2d of April , with intent the goods therein being feloniously and burglariously to steal .

There not being sufficient evidence to shew the intention of the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-24

338. WILLIAM FITZGERALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , five silk handkerchiefs, value 20s. the property of Elizabeth Bowen , privately in her shop .

ELIZABETH BOWEN sworn. - I keep a hosier and haberdasher's shop : On the 10th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in with another boy to buy a waistcoat and a handkerchief; one tried on a waistcoat, while I shewed the other a handkerchief; I suppose they stopped about ten minutes; they did not buy any thing; another person came in, which took off my attention; I observed the prisoner taking his hand from the box where the handkerchiefs were; I accused him of taking something out; he told me he had not; I asked him if he had any objection to my looking, and he said, no; I then opened his coat, and I saw the handkerchiefs; the other was a taller lad than him.

GUILTY, aged 12,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-25

339. JEREMIAH HAWKINS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jonas Hall , about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 3d of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing nine stone weight of pork, value 42s. three pecks of flour, value 9s. and a sack, value 1s. the property of the said Jonas.

JONAS HALL sworn. - I keep a house at Fulham for the reception of lunatics: On the 3rd of April, I went to-bed about ten o'clock; I was the last up; I saw the doors and windows fast; I got up about half past five o'clock, it was then light; I came down, and found a hole made in the roof of the larder, which is across the court-yard; I missed nine stone weight of pork, three pecks of flour, and a sack; I do not know any thing of the prisoner.

ANN HALL sworn. - I am the wife of Jonas Hall; I can identify the pork; the constable has it.

- GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am a constable; I had a warrant to search the prisoner's house, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's; I went on the 4th of April, about two o'clock in the afternoon; he was not at home; I found a quantity of pork, and a bag of flour, in the bed-room: when we came away, we met the prisoner; upon seeing me, he ran away; I ran after him, and took him; I told him what for, and he said he did not know any thing of it; he said, he bought the property of a man in Westminster.(Produces the pork.)

JOHN WRIGHT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hall; I killed the pork for him; I can swear to it; it is my own cutting up.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the pork of a man of the name of Luggett; I have had the flour ever since last harvest; I had a bushel.

For the Prisoner.

SUSAN HALSEY sworn. - I live at Kensington: Last Saturday fortnight I was coming through York-street, Westminster, and this young man at the bar stood by the side of a cart talking to another man; he had a pot of beer; he asked me to drink with him, which I did; the man said to the prisoner, will you have the pork? the prisoner said, yes, I will, if you will let me have it at the money I offered for it; he said, then you shall treat me with some gin; and he paid down a guinea and a half for it; I cannot tell what quantity there was; I saw him give out several joints, but I did not take particular notice; I saw him give a leg out, that I am positive.(The pork was identified by Mr. and Mrs. Hall, and by Wright.)

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-26

340. MATTHEW CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , seven quartern loaves of bread, value 5s. 3d. and three half-quartern loaves of bread, value 14d. the property of Henry Hall .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of James George .

HENRY HALL sworn. - I am a baker , in Portman-street, Portman-square: On Tuesday, the 15th of March, I sent James George out with a basket of bread, between ten and eleven o'clock; about half an hour afterwards, he came back with the prisoner, with a basket of the prisoner's, with seven quartern loaves and three half-quartern loaves in it; I know it to be my bread by the making and baking of it.

Q. Is there any thing particular in the form or size of the W upon the bread? - A. No.

JAMES GEORGE sworn. - I am journeyman to

Mr. Hall: On the 15th of March, about ten minutes after ten, I went out with my bread in a large basket upon a barrow; I left my basket at the corner of Baker-street , and when I returned, I found the prisoner in the custody of James Lamb ; the prisoner had a baker's basket with him; Mr. Lamb told me he had taken all the bread out of my basket, and put into his own; the prisoner asked me to let him go, but I took him to my master's; there was no other bread in his basket but mine; I can swear to the bread, I can swear to my own setting.

JAMES LAMB sworn. - I am a journeyman baker: On the 15th of March, I was going up Lower Berkeley-street, I cast my eye to the corner of Baker-street, and saw the prisoner go up to Mr. Hall's basket, and look very stedfastly into it; I had worked for Mr. Hall; he then left the basket and went up Baker-street; he looked up the street as if he was looking for something particular; he came a second time to the basket, and went up Baker-street a little way again, and returned a third time; he put his own basket that he had upon his shoulder upon the handles of the barrow; he then took the bread out of Mr. Hall's basket, and put it into his own; he threw it upon his shoulder, and came in a direction to where I stood; when he came up to me, he said, Mr. Lamb, how do you do? I knew him as a journeyman baker, but had not seen him for three or four years; I told him he had been doing a very wrong thing, for he had been taking all the bread out of Mr. Hall's basket, and put it into his own; then he said, good God, Mr. Lamb, let me put the bread into the basket again; I told him, no; he should stop till James George came, and he might do as he pleased with him; he came, and took him with the basket of bread to Mr. Hall's, and from thence to Marybone watch-house.

Prisoner. I leave it to you, my Lord, and the Jury. GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-27

341. JOHN, alias ARCHIBALD DEW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , a trunk, value 10d. six shirts, value 16s. eleven pair of stockings, value 12s. a nightcap and fillet, value 6d. two neck-handkerchiefs, value 1s. two cotton handkerchiefs, value 4d. a guinea, a crown-piece, and 3s. 6d. the property of John Turpin , in the dwelling-house of the Hon. Margaret Gage .

JOHN TURPIN sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Gage, No.44, Dover-street . On Wednesday the 30th of March I lost the property from a trunk in the servants hall; I saw it there about half past three o'clock; I left it locked; I put my shirts in that had just come from the wash; about a quarter past three I went out with the carriage, and returned about half past five; I found the prisoner in custody; I missed the trunk, and when it was produced, I knew it to be mine.

PETER BANKS sworn. - I am servant to the Hon. Mrs. Gage; I was left at home when the prosecutor went out. About five o'clock I was setting my tray for dinner in the pantry; I thought I heard a foot in the passage below, which occasioned me to open the pantry-door; I opened the door, and saw the prisoner with a trunk in his hand; he was coming out of the hall into the passage leading to the area; as soon as he saw me, he set the trunk down, and asked me if the house was Lady Middleton's? (she lives in the same street, the name on the door;) I told him it was not; I asked him who he wanted, or what he wanted if it was Lady Middleton's, or who told him that it was; he said, some person in the street; I asked him again, and he said, dear me, I thought it was Lady Middleton's; then he went out, put the trunk down, and went up the area-steps; I followed him, and overtook him about ten yards from the gate, in the street; I caught him by the collar, and charged him with robbing our house; he said, my dear Sir, you must be mistaken, it could not be me; do you think a person like me would come down your area-steps to rob your house; I told him I was certain he was the man, and I insisted upon his going down stairs with me; he made no resistance, but went with me; I shewed him the trunk, and told him that was the trunk he had taken out of the servant's hall; he begged very much for me to let him go; I told him he might depend upon it I should not till my mistress came home; he said, he had a wife at the end of the street, who was waiting for him, and I was keeping him out of his business; he begged to go out to speak to his wife; I said, if he had any thing particular to say to her, he should, but he might depend upon it he should not go out of my hands; I went into the street with him; a woman came up who said she was his wife, and he said she was; she asked me if I thought a man of his appearance would come down to rob a servant's hall; I told her it mattered not what his appearance was, he was the man; she tried to loose him from me; a soldier was going by, and I charged him to assist me, which he did, and we took him down stairs again; I set the trunk before him, and desired the soldier not to let him go out of the house, and when my mistress came home, he was secured.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was the prisoner a stranger to you? - A. Yes.

Q. The trunk was never removed out of the house? - A. No.

Q. He asked you how you could suppose he was the person? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to suspect him? - A. I never lost sight of him till he was taken.

Q. Is your mistress a married lady? - A. No, she is a widow lady.

URIAH COSTER sworn. - I was desired by the last witness to assist him in apprehending the prisoner; I took charge of him in the house; I saw the trunk there.(The trunk was produced, and the property indentified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , Death , aged 33.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-28

342. JAMES LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , privily from the person of Matthew Jenkinson , two pocket-books, value 1s. and two Bank-notes, each of the value of 5l. his property.

MATTHEW JENKINSON sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A mason .

Q. Had you your pocket picked? - A. Yes: On Saturday, the 2d of April, between ten and eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I was going along the Strand , just by that place which used to be called Durham-yard, and of a sudden I felt my pocket lighter.

Q. What had you in your pocket? - A. Two pocket-books; in one of them were two 5l. notes.

Q. Did you perceive any person's hand? - A. No; I turned round, and the witness pointed to the prisoner, who was crossing the way, and I immediately called out, stop thief, he ran up Bedford-street; I went into Bedford-street, and I was informed the property was thrown into an area; I stopped there, and saw them handed up out of an area; they were my pocket-books.

Q. How long before had you seen the notes in the pocket-book? - A.I put them in when I came from home, which might be about an hour, or an hour and a half before.

Q. Was the prisoner taken? - A. He was taken in about two minutes.

Q. Had you such a view of the prisoner as to know him to be the man? - A. Yes, I am sure he is the man.

Q.Did you examine the pocket-books? - A. Yes, when I got to the public-house at Bow-street; when the prisoner was brought back to me, I was standing at the area; he said to me, you have got your property, you may as well let me go.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Did you feel your pocket-book go? - A. I felt my pocket lighter.

Q. Do you swear to me by my person or dress? - A. By person and dress.

Q. Was I in the same dress I am now? - A. You had a blue coat on.

THOMAS ZEMENES sworn. - I saw the prisoner throw a pocket-book down the area; I saw but one.

Q. Did you see it taken up? - A. I did not, but I saw it afterwards; I pursued with Mr. Jenkinson.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - A. Yes; I did not see him take the book, but I saw him run from the prosecutor; I pursued, and went with him to Bow-street.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect challenging me with robbing the gentleman of his watch? - A.Nothing of the kind.

Q. Do you swear to me by my person or dress? - A. By your person, and having a blue coat on.

JANE EVANS sworn. - Q. What do you know of this? - A. I saw a little girl pick up the pocketbook; she gave it to me, and I gave it to a man with a cart in the street; I saw him give it to Mr. Jenkinson. (The prosecutor produced the pocketbooks.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read, as follows:

"Gentlemen of the Jury - As the chief witness for the prosecution, I have every reason to expect, comes forward not to do public justice, but for pecuniary emolument, I hope the Court will grant me the indulgence of enquiring into his private character as to the mode of his subsistence, being credibly informed he is one of those who obtain a living by informations upon lottery transactions, and other things; I cannot learn where his residence is, and he himself refuses to say where he lives, and therefore there is no opportunity of investigating; I implore the Court that they will satisfy themselves that he is an honest man, before they admit his evidence to affect the life of a fellowcreature. I hope this will induce the Jury to consider it their duty to attend to his evidence; he left no address at the office from which I was committed, and gave no account of himself previous to the finding the bill of indictment."

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-29

343. ABRAHAM NICHOLAS was indicted for that he, on the 22d of January , being employed in the Post-office , did secrete a letter, directed to Mr. Joseph Goldsmith , carpenter , Lewes, Sussex, containing a Bank-note of 10l. and two other Bank-notes, of 1l. each .

There were seven other Counts for a like offence, varying the manner of charging it.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Myers, and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

JAMES SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodsall. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Richard-Stevens Taylor, an attorney, in Gray's-inn? - A. I am: On the 22d of January, I received a check from Mr. Richard-Stevens Taylor for the sum of 14l. 5s.

which I took to Messrs. Goslings, the bankers, the number of the notes I received for the check.

Q. You received it the same day? - A. Yes; I received in payment for that check a 10l. note; No. 1392; that 10l. note I inclosed in a letter, together with two 2l. notes and 5s. which, together with a bond, I inclosed in a letter, directed to Mr. Joseph Goldsmith , carpenter, Lewes, Sussex; that letter I delivered, sealed up, to Mr. James-Davenport Mearer, clerk to Mr. Taylor, to put into the Post-office.

Q. This letter, with the bond and the money, must have formed a considerable packet? - A. Yes; there was a letter in it too.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.With this Bank-note there were two other Bank-notes of 2l.? - A. Yes.

Q.The Bank-note for 10l. is the only one you have since heard of? - A. The only one.

JAMES DAVENPORT MEARER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodsall. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Taylor? - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember to have received a letter from the last witness? - A. I received a letter on the 22d of January from Mr. Smith, directed to Mr. Goldsmith, Lewes, Sussex; I put it into the receiving-house, in Hart-street, Bloomsbury.

Q. At what time? - A. A little after four; it was the nearest receiving-house in my way home, where I usually put my letters in.

SARAH WESTCUTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Do you keep a receiving-house for General Post letters, in Hart-street, Bloomsbury? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you dispatch the letters from the receiving-house on the 22d of January last? - A. I did.

Q. At what time in the afternoon? - A. About ten minutes after five.

Q. What was the name of the messenger who took them that day? - A. I forget his name.

Q. You dispatched the letters that day in their usual course? - A. The same on that day as on every other day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Is there any person that has any thing to do with the letters besides yourself? - A. No; I always make up the bag myself.

Q. There is no one who has the care of the boxes? - A. No one but myself.

FRANCIS MEAD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Did you take the letters from Mrs. Westcutt's receiving-house on the 22d of January last? - A. I did.

Q. In what manner did you take them? - A. They were secured in a bag, and sealed by Mrs. Westcutt.

Q.Where did you take them to? - A. To the General Post-office of the inland department.

Q.And deposited them there in the usual way? - A. I deposited them there in the usual way.

ISAAC HANSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. What is your situation in the Post-office? - A. A clerk.

Q.Did you attend on the 22d of January last? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. In what department? - A. The inland department.

Q. In what division? - A. The eighth division.

Q. Is that eighth division a division to which the letters for Lewes, in Sussex, should regularly come? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar on duty in that division that evening? - A. Yes, he was.

Q. What was his duty there? - A.Collecting up for the division, and bringing them to me to charge.

Q. Do you know whether he had any duty previous to that of collecting for you? - A.He faced the letters.

Q. What do you mean by facing? - A. The letters are all mixed promiscuously when they come to the Post-office, and the facing is, putting the face upwards, that the direction may be seen.

Q. Your duty was to tax them? - A. Yes.

Q. If you receive a letter to be taxed that contains money, is any thing particular done with respect to that letter or packet? - A. Yes; when we receive a letter that contains money or bills, we either take it, or send it to the clerk of the moneybook.

Q. Is a money-book kept for the purpose of entering letters containing money? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Is that kept by you? - A. No.

Q.Having collected the letters, and brought them to you in this manner, had he any thing further to do with it? - A.After the charge is made upon them, it was his duty to tie them up in bundles.

Q. Is there any memorandum made of the money letters on that day? - A. I don't know.

Q. If there was a letter containing money, would that be entered upon the bill sent to the postmaster, at Lewes? - A. Yes, it would.

Q. Was the prisoner on that evening in such a situation in the office, in which he had an opportunity to secrete a letter intended for Lewes? - A. Yes, he was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The letters, when they first come to the office, do not come to the eighth division immediately? - A. No; they go through several other hands.

Q.Before they come to the eighth division, where the prisoner was? - A. They come to him in the first instance; when they come to the Post-office, in the first instance, he has to do with them.

Q. Did they go through other hands? - A. There are so many hands employed, that they may come through other hands.

Q. Do you not know that they do? - A.They certainly do.

Q.Through how many different hands do they come, before they reach the eighth division? - A.Perhaps eight or ten.

Q. I believe, besides the prisoner, there are other clerks employed in the eighth division? - A. Yes.

Q.Can you tell how many? - A. Two.

Q. So that twelve other persons had access to those letters on that evening, as well as the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Do you, in fact, forward money with letters in them? - A. Yes; they are forwarded under a particular cover to the post-master of the town.

Q. To any amount? - A. Yes.

Q. If a letter had such a sum as five shillings in it, is it likely to be discovered at the Post-office? - A. Yes, very likely.

SAMUEL DUNSTAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Are you the post-master at Lewes? - A. I am.

Q. Did you receive the London letters in the usual course on Sunday morning, the 23d of January? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did the bag come sealed, as usual? - A. Yes, it did.

Q. Look at that bill; did that bill accompany them? - A. Yes.

Q. That bill contains the amount of the charges of the letters? - A. It does.

Q. Did the letters you received correspond with the amount of charges? - A.Exactly so.

Q. I observed there is a blank left in the column for money letters? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any money letters come that day? - A. No.

Q. Is it your duty, when there is a money letter, to add to the charge? - A. Yes.

Q. I see, here is a column of additional postage charged by the post-master? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH GOLDSMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. Q. Did you receive a letter from Mr. Richard-Stevens Taylor, on the 23d of January, or any other day? - A. I did not.

Q. You live at Lewes? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you expect a letter from Mr. Taylor? - A. I did.

Q. Which you never received? - A.Never.

JOHN MOSS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers.

Q. I believe you have in your possession a Banknote of the value of 10l.? - A. I have.

Q. What is the number? - A.1392, dated 11th of June.

Q. What are you? - A. A clerk in the Bank.

Q. Do you know on what day that note was paid into the Bank? - A. On the 2d of February.

WILLIAM ELLIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. I am clerk to Messrs. Gosling and Sharp.

Q. You have in your possession, I beleive, a draft for 14l. 5s.? - A. I have. (Produce it.)

Q. In what manner did you pay that draft? - A. I paid it, on the 22d of January, in a 10l. Bank of England note, No. 1392.

Q. Look at that note? - A. I believe this is the note which I paid; the number of the note is upon the back of the draft; 4l. 5s. was paid besides; it is dated 11th of June, 1802.

WILLIAM CARTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. I believe you keep a lottery-office at Charing-cross? - A. I do.

Q. Look at that Bank-note of 10l.; has that Bank-note at any time been in your possession? - A. It has; there are my own figures upon it.

Q. Are you enabled to say how it came into your possession? - A. I am not; I can tell that a person bought three sixteenth shares of lotterytickets at my office.

Q. Does it appear from any thing upon that Bank-note, that you had a knowledge that that Bank-note was paid for those shares? - A. I am certain of it; there are the check numbers of the shares upon the back of it.

Q. What were the description of those shares that you sold, for which you received that 10l. note? - A.The lottery number; 51; check, 202: 2046, the lottery number; check, 204: 40465, the lottery number; check, 257.

Q.Whereabout was it you sold these shares? - A. I think, from the 25th to the 31st of January.

Q. Have you a memory at all of the person who bought the shares? - A. I have not.

Q. To whom did you afterwards pay this Bank-note? - A. To the Equitable Assurance-office.

Q. When was it afterwards that you heard any more of it? - A. On the 2nd or 3rd of February I received some directions from Mr. Parkin; I had informed him of my having sold these three shares.

Q. Now, look at the prisoner at the bar; do you know him? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it he made his appearance at your office? - A. On the 28th or 29th of March; the prisoner desired I would stop No. 51, having lost his pocket-book near Whitehall; he told me it was the only sixteenth there was in it; upon which I told him I was very glad he had called, having been placed in a very disagreeable situation concerning No. 51; I told him I must insist upon his going to Mr. Parkin, I took his direction before I mentioned any thing to him, and then I told him I was glad he had called, for I had been placed in a very disagreeable situation, and I must insist upon his going to Mr. Parkin with me.

Q. Did you say any thing to him about a Bank-note that had been paid to you? - A. I told him I

had received a Bank-note for the share, No. 51, that had been stole; upon which he desired I would give him time to recollect himself.

Q.About what? - A.About the Bank-note; he told me, when he purchased No. 51, he had received that week three 10l. Bank-notes; he did not object to go to Mr. Parkin, but begged I would give him time to recollect himself where he had received these Bank-notes; upon which I told him I by all means wished him to have time, this was either Monday or Tuesday morning, I don't know which; on Wednesday he called, and I went to Mr. Parkin with him; Mr. Parkin not being at home, I appointed the next morning at ten o'clock; he came at the time appointed very exact, but it so happened that my business was such, I could not go with him, and he went by himself.

Q.When he first came, had he the usual dress of a letter-carrier? - A.When he came to stop the share he was.

Q. Did he say any thing about his purchasing the other numbers? - A. No; I told him I was afraid he had purchased some more shares.

Q.Was that the first time he came to you? - A. Yes; I told him Mr. Parkin was the proper person to explain it to, and I did not enter into any further particulars with him.

Q. Do you recollect whether the person who bought the shares was dressed in a letter-carrier's dress? - A. I think not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The first time he came was on the Monday? - A.It was on the Monday or Tuesday.

Q.You told him there was an enquiry on foot? - A. Yes.

Q.And that Mr. Parkin was the person to whom it was to be explained? - A. Yes.

Q. He told you that he had that very week he had purchased these shares received three 10l. notes? - A. He did.

Q. And therefore wished for time to recollect where he had got them? - A. Yes.

Q. You gave him time? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. He had full warning, and an opportunity of making his escape? - A. Yes; I think it was Monday that he came first; it was on Thursday morning that he called upon me the last time.

Q.He went with you on the Wednesday, and Mr. Parkin was not at home? - A. Yes.

Q. And the next morning he came to you, and you could not go? - A. Yes.

Q.Between each time having an opportunity of making his escape? - A. Yes; he said he was as innocent as a child unborn.

Q. You have frequently occasion, in your office, to want change to give your customers? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you not know it is very frequent to ask of the collectors of the letters to change notes for people in whole district they live? - A.Certainly; I have asked out postman for change, but not very often.

Q. Do you not know that it is a common thing? - A. I dare say it is.

Q.Could any thing be more open or explicit than this man's conduct? - A.Certainly not.

ANTHONY PARKIN sworn. - On the 31st of March last, the prisoner came to my house.

Q.What day of the week was it? - A. I think it was on the Thursday; he said, he came from Mr. Carter, at Charing-cross, respecting a 10l. Bank-note that had been put off there for a lottery ticket; he said, that about a month or six weeks before, as near as he could recollect as to the time, he bought a sixteenth share of a ticket, for which he paid 1l. 3s. 6d. I told him it was very important, that he should recollect where he got the 10l. Bank-note.

Q.Had he admitted that he had paid the 10l. note? - A. Yes; he said he could not tell where he got the 10l. Bank-note; I asked him if he did not know it was a regulation in the Office, that the letter-carriers should be able to say of whom they took Bank-notes, by writing something upon them; he said, he did, and he took a Bank-note of one pound out of his pocket that he had wrote upon that note his own name, and that that was the mode in which he wrote upon all Bank-notes that he received; he said, that was his usual mode; he said, the share was not for himself, but for one Henry Carden , of Chelmsford; that Henry Carden was a servant of Mrs. Lewis there; I asked him if he had sent the share to Carden, he said he had not; I asked him if he had registered the share, he said he had not; I asked him if he had advised the man of the purchase he had made, he said he had not; I asked him if he had bought it by Carden's direction, he said, no, he had bought it of his own accord for him; I asked him where the share was, he said he had lost his pocket-book on the 21st of March, between Parliament-street and the Post-office; that the pocket-book contained some redirected letters, a share of a lottery-ticket, a twopound Bank-note, a one-pound Bank-note, and two pawnbroker's duplicates. He again repeated that he had negociated the note at Mr. Carter's office for the sixteenth, still speaking of one sixteenth only. At this time I had not heard what had passed between Mr. Carter and the prisoner, except what the prisoner had himself said; but some time before that I had had communication with Mr. Carter, and from Mr. Carter I had learned there were three sixteenths sold at the time the 10l. note was negociated. I told the prisoner I understood there were three sixteenths bought; he said, he had only bought one sixteenth. Upon which I turned to some papers that I had upon the subject, and then I stated to him with

more certainly than I had done before, that three sixteenths were bought at Mr. Carter's office. He then, for the first time, said, he had bought three sixteenths; that he paid 1l. 3s. 6d. for each share; he said, he thought he had said so to me at the first. I then thought it was necessary he should be taken before a Magistrate.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.This man came unattended to you? - A.There was no one with him.

Q. Was there any body to controul him at all? - A. No.

Q. I believe the main subject of your enquiry was, whether this man had paid for the lottery tranfaction with a 10l. note? - A. Yes.

Q. That he had paid a 10l. note at that office, he did not attempt to deny; it might have been thought extravagant his buying three at once, and he concealed it? - A. He did conceal it.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Is there not an order at the Post-office, that a letter-carrier shall not have any thing to do with shares in the lottery? - A. Yes.

HENRY CARDEN sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Lewis, of Chelmsford.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner? - A. I have not seen him for some years; I know him from having lived with a gentleman that married Mrs. Lewis's fister.

Q. Have you had any connection with him in any shares of a lottery-ticket? - A. Not since the year 1791, and I am not quite sure then: he bought a share for a servant, and we had a sixteenth between us; we have had no lottery transactions together since.

- JORDAN sworn - Examined by Mr. Woodfall. Q. Do you recollect about March last to have found a pocket-book? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that pocket-book in your possession? - A. Yes(produces it); I found it against the bannisters of a staircase, in Elm-court, in the Temple.

Q.When? - A. About the 21st or 22d of March.

Q. Is it in the same condition now as when you found it? - A. I suppose so; it said about the chambers some time.

Q. Did you examine the contents of that pocketbook? - A. There were some open letters in French and Italian, and two pawnbrokers' duplicates.

RICHARD TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. What is your situation in the Postoffice? - A.Inspector of the Foreign Department.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know his pocket-book? - A. I don't know; he told me he lost his pocket-book.

Q. Look at that pocket-book, and tell the Court if that is the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. I cannot take upon myself to swear that; these are foreign letters, and have the Foreign-office stamp at the back.

Q. Does that memorandum (shewing him one) contain an account of any foreign letters? - A. It does.

Q. Do the letters in that pocket-book agree with the memorandums? - A. I will look.

Court. Q. Who gave you that memorandum? - A. The prisoner.

Q. Is that memorandum in his writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Do they correspond? - A. Two of them do.

Q. What did he give you that memorandum for? - A. As a memorandum of his losing his pocket-book and these letters.

Mr. Abbott. Q. You are an Inspector of foreign letters? - A. Yes.

Q. Those letters that were lost were foreign letters? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it his duty to account to you for them? - A. He accounted to the Comptroller, and then gave me this memorandum.

Q. Did he say any thing of having lost a lottery share? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. We have heard there is some regulation in the Post-office, in order to enable letter-carriers to know from whom they receive Bank-notes? - A. I always put upon them the name of the person from whom I receive them.

Q. Is that the general rule at the Post-office? - A. I have been given to understand that they are to do so.

Q. Do you happen to know whether the prisoner has received that direction, or has conformed to it? - A. He has conformed to it for any thing I know; I have seen his name endorsed upon many Bank-notes.

Court. Q.Only his name? - A. Only his name.

Mr. Abbott. Q. Do you know if the prisoner was in the habit of indorsing upon Bank-notes the name of the person from whom he received them, as well as his own? - A. I do not know that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Then he had acknowledged to his superior that he had lost his pocket-book? - A. Yes, with a two-pound note and a one-pound note.

Q. Do you know that it is very frequently done by very honest servants in the Post-office to give change for Bank-notes? - A. It is; they will oblige merchants and tradesmen with cash for notes.

Mr. Abbott. Q. When they do that, if they conform to the regulation of the Office, they will write upon it the name of the person from whom they receive it? - A. Certainly.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. And they might omit such a thing? - A. They might.

Q.(To Moss.) You are a clerk in the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. Does the Bank ever issue two notes of the same date, same number, and same sum? - A. It must be a very great mistake indeed if they do.

Q. Is it their practice to do it, or not to do it? - A. Not to do it; I dare say it does not happen one time in a million.

Q. Has this Bank-note the prisoner's name upon it? - A. No, nor any thing like it.

Court. (To Carter.) Q. Was No. 51 ever brought into you? - A. No, it is a blank.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called eleven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 50.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-30

344. THOMAS SMITH and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Fontaine , about the hour of eight in the night of the 17th of March , and burglariously stealing a metal candlestick, value 2s. the property of the said James.

BARNARD GLEED sworn. - Q. What are you? A. One of the patrols belonging to Bow-street: On Thursday evening, March 17, we had been seeing his Majesty into the Play-house; after that we went down Holborn; that was about half past seven o'clock.

Q. Who was with you? - A. Samuel Ferris , another patrol.

Q. Where is Mr. Fontaine's shop? - A. Just about Middle-row, Holborn ; it is a corner shop; we saw the two prisoners at the bar; Jones broke the window of Mr. Fontaine's shop.

Q. Were they both together when you saw them? - A. Yes.

Q. How did he break the window? - A.With his hand; I should suppose he had something in his hand, but that I did not see.

Q. How far were you from him? - A. I was opposite to him, on the other side of the way: then they both walked away together; then they came past backwards and forwards several times.

Q. Where were you? - A. I stood where I was watching them; they came backwards and forwards by the shop-window several times, and looked in; afterwards they both returned, and Jones put his hand into the window, and took something out.

Q. You did not see at that time what it was? - A. No; he put it under his coat, on the lefthand side, and then gave it to Smith.

Q. How near was you to him at that time? - A. About the same distance that I am now; I continued in the same situation.

Q. What did Smith do with it? - A. I don't know; I desired Ferris to apprehend Smith; I apprehended Jones, the little one, and took him into a public-house, and Ferris brought Smith in about the same time.

Q. Was any thing produced in the public-house? - A. No; after they were secured, Ferris went out, and brought in a candlestick.

Q. Had you lost sight of the prisoners at all before you apprehended them? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure they are the same men? - A. Yes.

Q. What light was it at this time? - A. It was dark, we could only see by the light of the shop; it was about half past seven when we first saw them, and about eight when we apprehended them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have no doubt at all respecting the persons of the prisoners? - A. No.

Q. It was quite light enough to observe their persons? - A. Yes, by the light of the shop and the lamps.

Q. Do you mean to swear it was dark? - A. Yes.

Q. You have indicted these men you know for burglary? - A. Yes.

Q.There are two 40l. rewards? - A. Yes, if the Court please to give it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Which is the man you call Jones? - A. The little one.

Q. Nothing was found upon him? - A. No.

Q. There were a great number of persons passing by? - A.Not one person, most people go down Middle-row, and this is the house that just out in the corner.

SAMUEL FERRIS sworn. - Q. You are a patrol? - A. Yes; on Thursday the 17th of March, I had been with his Majesty to Covent-garden Theatre, with Gleed; we afterwards walked down Holborn, and observed the prisoners at the bar looking in at the shop of Mr. Fontaine, we crossed facing Mr. Fontaine's, to see whether they were going to do any thing, or what they were, and a little while afterwards, I saw the little one, Jones, break the window with his hand, or something in his hand; they passed on for a little bit, and then returned again; they walked backwards and forwards two or three times; I saw Jones take something out of the window that he had broke, and put it under his coat, he afterwards gave it to Smith; Gleed desired me to apprehend Smith, and he would take Jones; I then went very near him, and saw the candlestick in his left-hand, it looked like brass, or copper; I was then within about two or three yards of him, he saw that I was coming towards him, he stepped aside into the road-way, and shyed the candlestick at me.

Q. Did it hit you? - A. No; he then ran away, I pursued him; he ran up against some gentlemen that were walking very fast, and I then apprehended him; I took him into a public-house directly, I was at the door before Jones and Gleed, we came up just at the same time; I handcuffed them together, and then went again to find the candlestick, and found it within ten yards of Mr. Fontaine's shop.

Q.Near where he threw it? - A. Yes; there is a public-house, with some shutters under the window, he threw it against those shutters, and it rebounded into the road, where I found it; I heard it strike against the shutters.

Q. Did you pick it up yourself? - A. No, a young man said, here it is, and picked it up and gave it me.

Q. Was it in the direction in which the prisoner was going? - A. Yes.

Q.What time was it, from his throwing the candlestick at you, till it was found? - A. About five or six minutes; I went out directly that way, and handcuffed them; it has been in my possession ever since. (Produces it.)

Q. You are very sure, what he threw towards you, was a candlestick? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q.Whereabout was Gleed at the time? - A.When Jones gave Smith the candlestick, they parted, and Jones went back towards Mr. Fontaine's shop.

JAMES FONTAINE sworn. - Q. What is your business? - A. A tin-plate-worker, the corner of Middle-row, Holborn.

Q. Not the passage, but the corner? - A. No, the north-west corner.

Q. Were you at home on the evening of the 17th of March? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you light candles in the shop? - A. As early as seven o'clock, I am sure, lamps however.

Q. Do you sell candlesticks? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any candlesticks in your window that night? - A. Yes, several.

Q. Was your window whole or broke when the lamps were lighted? - A. To the best of my knowledge, there was not a broken pane in that window, I broke one pane myself that evening, but it was subsequent to the prisoner being apprehended.

Q. About what time did you receive an alarm from any body? - A.About half-past seven, or it might be eight, I am not quite certain, I was called down stairs by Ferris.

Q. Who serves in your shop besides yourself? - A. The shopman and porter.

Q. You had not heard any alarm, or missed any thing till Ferris came? - A. No.

Q. In what state was the window? - A. The window was broke and the candlestick missing, that I had placed there a few days before.

Q. Is your's a sash-window? - A. Yes.

Q. You don't remember having seen it that day? - A. No, I do not; but had it not been there, I should have missed it, because the vacancy was obvious.

Q. Did you miss the candlestick before he produced it to you? - A. I am not clear whether it was before or after.

Q. Was the place, where you had placed it, within the reach of a man's arm? - A. Yes.

Q. When he produced that candlestick did you know it? - A.On examining it, I did.

Q. Look at that candlestick? - A. This is the candlestick, I have no doubt of it, it has my handwriting on it with ink, on the metal, both the cost and selling price.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is this the only window that you observed broke? - A. In that part of the shop.

Q. Had you any window broke in the shop, in any part of it? - A.Cracked, I dare say.

Q. You have told us, you know the candlesticks by the cost and selling price? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you put your cost and selling price upon all your candlesticks? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you sell them with the cost and the selling price upon them? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you sold a great many of the same sort of candlesticks? - A. Yes, but not since I placed them in that place I missed it from.

Q.Should you be able to swear to this from any other mark than the cost and selling price? - A. And the circumstance of my having placed it in a particular place, there had been a vacancy, and I found an odd one in paper, which I put in the vacancy.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. How lately had you seen your shop-window before this alarm? A. I cannot say precisely, before I went up to tea.

Q. How long do you suppose? - A. It might be a couple of hours, I cannot say at all.

The prisoner, Smith, did not say any thing in his defence.

Prisoner Jones's defence. On the 17th of March, I was going from my father's house, in Liquor-pond-street, to Mr. Townsend's, just as I got to Mr. Townsend's door, about ten or fifteen yards from the prosecutor's house, the witness, Gleed, came up and seized me by the collar, he took me to the public-house, I underwent strict search, but he found nothing upon me; I did not know what I was taken up for, till I was fully committed.

The prisoner Jones called William Garret , who had known him three years, and gave him a good character.

Smith, GUILTY , Death , aged 25.

Jones, GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-31

345. LAURENCE EGLIN was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 13th of March , a certain order for payment of 38l. 9s. with intent to defraud William Guy .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the same, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

And in two other Counts. Charging it to be with intent to defraud Robert Harrison , John Harrison , Robert Prickett , and John Newman .

WILLIAM GUY sworn. - I keep the Bell and Crown-inn, Holborn : On Saturday, the 12th of March, the prisoner came to my house, and enquired of my servant, if he could have a bed; I went to the prisoner, I had some scruple about letting him have a bed, as he appeared very shabby, and he referred me to his brother, his brother had lodged with me about four years ago, and I told him he could have a bed; I knew his brother very well; he took supper and went to-bed; the next morning, when I came down, he was gone; on Sunday evening the 13th, between eight and ten o'clock, the prisoner came in again, he told me, he had been to Deptford to get some money, and produced me a check, the sum was 38l. 9s. as well as I can recollect; I looked at it, and observed it was dated forward to be due on the 15th; I told him I had no money, but I would give him a memorandum for the check, and I would give him something to eat and drink till the Tuesday, when it would become due.

Q.Did you take the check of him? - A. Yes, he then had his supper and went to-bed; the next morning, he had his breakfast, and borrowed a seven-shilling-piece of me, he told me he should stop that night; on the Tuesday, after breakfast, the day it became due, I sent my servant to the bankers for the money, it appeared to be drawn by a man of the name of John Smith ; when my servant returned, I told the prisoner there was some mistake; I cast up what he had of me, to the amount of twenty-five shillings and five-pence, the bill was eighteen shillings and five-pence, and the seven-shilling-piece; he seemed surprised the money was not paid; I requested him to pay me, and I would give him the memorandum back; he said, he had no money, but he would go out and get some; I told him he could not go, he should have my servant to send, that he did not consent to; I insisted upon his going to the banker's to clear up the check, and I went with him and my servant; I saw, I think, Mr. Prickett, I told him that was the man I had taken the check of, which he had thought proper to stop; the prisoner said, he took it of a man of the name of John Smith , a coachmaster, at Deptford, and that he had sold him oats; the banker told me, in the prisoner's presence, that some years ago the prisoner had opened an account with them, about four years ago, and had checks of them; he confessed he had put the name of John Smith to the check in question.

Q. Had he any offer of favour made him? - A. No; they told me to do as I pleased, that John Smith had no money there; I then requested him to pay me, which he had no money to do; I then sent for a constable; the banker's clerk has the check, I shall know it when I see it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner's brother had been at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. And, during the time he used your house, had paid you honestly and fairly? - A. Yes.

Q. It was only from the prisoner's appearance, that you entertained any doubts? - A. Yes.

Q. But when you found him to be the brother of a man who had used you well, you entertained no doubts? - A. None, he used frequently to come with his brother.

Q. He placed this check, as a sort of security, in your hands? - A. Not that I know of, I should have given him back the check, if he had paid me the money.

Q. He spoke of a Mr. John Smith , of Deptford? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever taken the trouble to find him? - A.Here is a Mr. John Smith here, who lives near Deptford.

Q. You have made no enquiry for a Mr. John Smith , coach-master, at Deptford, who is since dead? - A. No.

Q. You say, he confessed he wrote the name of John Smith ? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not add, that John Smith could not write? - A. Yes, he did; he said, he filled up the check at John Smith's request, because he could not write.

Q. Who are your partners? - A. I have none, only my wife.

GEORGE BELL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Guy, at the Bell and Crown: On the 12th of March, the prisoner came in and asked me for a bed, I referred him to my master; he mentioned his brother's name, and my master told him he should have a bed; the next day, he gave the check to my master, I saw my master write the memorandum for the check; he slept at my master's house that night; the next morning, he asked my master for some money, I saw my master give him a sevenshilling-piece; on the Tuesday morning, my master gave me the check between 11 and 12 o'clock, I took it to the bankers, and gave it to the clerk; the clerk looked at it several times, and then it was sent to one of the partners in another room, and they called me in, and asked me where I got the check, and I told them; they stopped the check, and told me to bring the man forward; I went home as fast as I could, the prisoner came in in a few minutes after me; I told my master the note was stopped; then my master, and the prisoner, and I, went to the banking-house; I saw the clerk that I had delivered the check to, and said, this is Mr. Eglin, this is the man that gave the check to my master; then he was shewn into the accompting-house, and they asked him, if he knew that check,

and if he knew Mr. John Smith ; he said, he did, he was a coach-proprietor, at Deptford; they asked him what Mr. Smith paid him that check for, he said, for oats which he had sold him; they said, they knew the prisoner, and took down a book, where they found his name, Eglin, he had opened an account with them some few years ago; they asked him if he had had any checks at that time, and he said, he had; they asked him, if he saw Mr. John Smith write, it, and he said, no, Mr. John Smith could not write, and he wrote it himself; then a constable was sent for, and he was secured; the bankers have the check.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You understood that he wrote Smith's name, in Smith's presence, and at his desire? - A. Yes.

- SMITH sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Harrisons, Prickett, and Newman: On the 15th of March, this check was brought to me, ( produces it;) this is one of our checks, but the firm has been altered since, it was Harrison, Prickett, and Newman.

Q. Do you pay checks now, in the names of Harrison, Pricket, and Newman? - A. Yes; on the 15th of March, the last witness presented a check to me, for 38l. 9s. drawn by John Smith ; I sent it into the accompting-house, to one of the partners, and that is all I know about it, I am sure it is the same. (The draft read.)

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a coach-master, at Greenwich; I do not know any coach-master, in Deptford, of the name of John Smith ; I am well acquainted with Deptford, and have been in that line of business twenty-four years, I never heard of any coach-master of that name, I know several John Smiths there, in the public line, but not as coach-master.

JOSEPH WRINGHAM sworn. - I am a currier, and have known Greenwich 16 years, but little of Deptford; I know John Smith, coach-master of Greenwich, (books at the check;) this is not his hand-writing, I never heard of any John Smith, as coach-master, in Deptford.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. As you know but little about Deptford, will you swear there is no coach-master of the name of John Smith there? - A. I never heard of any.

ELIJAH CRABB sworn. - I am an officer of the Police: On the 15th of March, I took charge of the prisoner, and found this pocket-book in his pocket, (produces a pocket-book,) containing the receipt Mr. Guy gave him.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.(Evidence for the Prisoner.)

- RYE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.What are you? - A. I am a coach-harnetsmaker, and live at No. 1, Castle-street, Long-acre; I knew a person of the name of John Smith, at Deptford, who was a coach and stage-master, and have known him for some years; I have seen his coaches twice, with his name on them, he is now dead, he died on the Saturday before Easter, which I believe was the 2d of April.

Q. How do you know he is dead? - A.Because I helped to put him into his cossin, his wife and one daughter lives now at Deptford, and his son lives at Rochester, and drives one of the Rochester coaches; his youngest son is in the undertaking line, and could get no body to go with him, till he asked me, when I agreed to go and assist him; the youngest son would have been have to-day, but he set off yesterday morning, into Warwickshire, with a suneral.

Court. Q.Had you any transactions with the man who is dead? - A. No.

Q. You being a coach-harness-maker, had you any thing to do with him in his business? - A. No.

Q.Do you know whether he wrote a good hand? - a. No, I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-32

346. THOMAS COPELAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , three silk handkerchiefs, value 9s. the property of Jonathan Watson , privately in his shop .

JAMES WATSON sworn. - I am the son of Jonathan Watson, a linen-draper , in Oxford-street; I am an apprentice to my father; I attend a shop of my father's at Uxbridge : On Monday, the 28th of February, the prisoner came into the shop about eight o'clock in the evening, and desired to look at some cotton handkerchiefs, there was another boy with him; I shewed him some, but he said he did not like them; he then desired to look at some silk ones; I took down a bundle of silk handkerchiefs, and shewed them to him; while I was shewing them to him, a person knocked at the door; I went, and opened the door, and when I returned, I missed one parcel of silk handkerchiefs from the counter; I enquired if they had seen any handkerchief; they said they had not seen any; I said, I was very sure there was a parcel gone; Copeland then bid me three shillings for a handkerchief I had just before asked him three shillings and four-pence for, and upon my refusal to take three shillings, he went out of the shop, the other lad was following him; I told him to stop, saying, that I knew him; I then desired him to go to Copeland, and desire him to come back, which he did; the lad returned, but the prisoner did not; I then ordered a constable to go in search of Copeland; he found him about an hour, or an hour and a half afterwards; he brought him to the shop, and examined him, and out of his bosom pulled three silk handkerchiefs; they were not in one piece.

Q.What is the value of them - what would you give for them? - A.Nine Shillings.

Q.What was the colour of them? - A. Chocolate; there was one of them marked R S; they were the same that I had shewn to him, and left on the counter.

Q.Has your father any partner? - A. No.

Q.Had you no suspicion at all at the time that he was taking them? - A. No.

Q.Did you see his hand move towards them, at all? - A.No, I did not.

Q.Did they converse together respecting the goods? - A. Yes, they did.

Q.Who else was in the shop? - A. Nobody.

Q.Nobody within sight? - A.Probably there might be somebody in sight in the parlour; I believe it was my mother.

CHARLES MURRAY sworn. - I am a constable: I apprehended the prisoner on the 28th of February, about thirty or forty yards from the prosecutor's house; I found upon him three silk handkerchiefs in his bosom, between his shirt and his skin; I have had them ever since. (Produces them.)

Watson. I know these handkerchiefs to be my father's.

Prisoner's defence. I went in to look at some handkerchiefs with another lad; when he came out, he said he had done a wrong thing - he had taken some handkerchiefs; and asked me to take them back, and I was taking them back when the constable stopped me.

Q.(To Murray.) When you took the prisoner, was he going in a direction towards the shop, or from the shop? - A.From the shop.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-33

347. MARY STIFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , two chairs, value 10s. the property of John House .

JOHN HOUSE sworn. - I live at the corner of Hoxton-square , I am a broker and undertaker : On the 22d of February I lost a chair, I had four chairs at the door as patterns, under the eaves of my house; I went to the door about half past three o'clock, and found one chair missing, I had seen it about twelve o'clock; I went out, and enquired among the shops; I found it at Mr. Bradley's, about a stone's throw from my own shop, in Old-street-road; I paid Bradley three shillings, which he had given for it; I know it to be mine by a splice in the hind foot; there is no other particular mark.

WILLIAM BRADLEY sworn. - I am a broker: On Tuesday, the 22d of February, I bought a chair of the prisoner; she brought it about two o'clock; she said she was in distress, and wanted to fell it; I gave her three shillings for it; I asked her if she had more, and she said she had a half dozen; I told her, if she would let me go and see them, I would give her more money for them than I could for a single chair, and she said I should have them all; I heard of my neighbour losing a chair, and I sent down to him; the next day she brought another chair, and I stopped her.(The chair produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. A woman desired me to go and fell it for her.

GUILTY . aged 50,

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-34

348. ALEXANDER PHILLIPS and ELIZABETH PHILLIPS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a silver watch, value 6l. 6s. an ivory tooth-pick, value 1d. an ivory box, value 2d. and a knife, value 6d. the property of Charles Fairbone .

CHARLES FAIRBONE sworn. - I am a mathematical instrument-maker , and live in New-street, Fetter-lane: On Wednesday, the 16th of March, about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, I met with the woman at the bar; I went with her to her lodgings, in One Tun-court , in the Strand; I remained there till nine or ten o'clock in the evening.

Q.Are you a single or a married man? - A. A single man; I was very much in liquor. About nine or ten o'clock, to the best of my recollection, Alexander Phillips came into the room, and knocked me down.

Q.Did you undress yourself, or get into bed? - A. No; when he first came in, I was sitting; I got up, having some suspicion of him, and he knocked me down; when I got up, he was gone; I missed my watch; I then ran down stairs to call the watchman; I did not miss any thing else at that time, it was a silver watch; the watchman came up, and took the woman to the watch-house; the watchman went in search of the man, and brought him to the watch-house within an hour afterwards, I knew him to be the man; his hat was drawn over his face more than people generally have; I am sure the prisoner is the same man, I have no doubt of it; I did not miss the other things till they were produced before the Magistrate.

Q.Had you your watch while you was in the room? - A. Yes, sometimes in my hand, sometimes in my fob, and sometimes in my waistcoat pocket, and I observed it once in the woman's hand.

Q. You gave it her to look at? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you sober enough to know whether she gave it you back again, or not? - A. No.

Q.Where were the other things? - A. In my breeches pocket; they were produced the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You admit very fairly that you was drunk? - A.Very.

Q. So drunk, that you hardly recollected what you were about? - A. Yes.

Q.The woman and you had been sometime together before you saw the man? - A. Yes.

Q.Was there a bed in the room? - A. Yes.

Q.You put the watch into the girl's hand to look at? - A. Yes.

Q.How long do you think you might have been amusing yourself with the woman before the man came in? - A.Four hours, perhaps.

Q.Did you give her any money? - A. Not that I know of.

Q.You did not give her the watch, I dare say? - A.Hardly.

Q.But you don't know what you did give her? - A. No.

Q.Did you drink with her? - A. Yes.

Q.What did you drink? - A.Rum.

Q.How many glasses do you think you and your inamorata drank together? - A. I cannot say.

Q.Five or six? - A. Yes.

Q.Had you drank any rum before you came there? - A. Yes.

Q.How much? - A. It is impossible for a man to say what he drinks.

Q.Do you mean to swear to the person of the man, drunk as you were? - A. Yes, I am certain of it.

Q.Have you ever seen your watch since? - A. No.

Q. The man's hat was pulled over his face? - A. Yes.

Q. That gave you a better opportunity of observing him? - A.He had a down look, and I looked the more at him for that, because I had a suspicion of him.

THOMAS PATMORE sworn. - I am a coalporter, I live in One Tun-court, in the two pair of stairs room, over the prisoners; Elizabeth Phillips asked me to come down, and have something to drink, which I did; Mr. Fairbone was there; he and the woman were making very free with each other; I saw a watch in her hand.

Q.Did he give her the watch? - A. I don't know.

Q.She had it openly in the presence of Mr. Fairbone? - A. Yes, and there were two other women there; the prisoner, Alexander Phillips , came in; Elizabeth Phillips and another woman were having words; Mr. Fairbone was sitting in the room; Alexander Phillips came in, and wanted to know what was the matter; he asked Mr. Fairbone what business he had there, and he struck him, and went off.

Q.Did the blow knock him down? - A. I cannot say, because there was an uproar in the room; I saw no more of the prisoner till I saw him at the watch-house.

Q. Did you see the man's hands about Mr. Fairbone's pocket? - A. No.

MARK LEADMAN sworn. - I am a watchman; On the 16th of March, between nine and ten in the evening, I saw the man prisoner coming down stairs; then I saw Mr. Fairbone, he desired me to come up stairs; I got a light, and went up, he was very drunk; I found Elizabeth Phillips and two more women fighting; I asked her for the gentleman's watch; she said she had not got it; one of the women said she had given it to Ellick; I searched the prisoner and the bed, but found no watch, I took her to the watch-house; I locked the room door, and took the key with me; I searched her in the watch-house, and found twenty-one shillings, and one shillings in halfpence and penny pieces; among the money there was a toothpick and an ivory box.

JOHN YOUNG sworn. - I am one of the beadles of St. Martin's in the Fields: On the 16th of March, the prisoner, Elizabeth Phillips , was brought in; Mr. Fairbone charged her on suspicion of taking his watch, she was searched, and twenty one shillings found upon her, one shilling in copper, a toothpick, and an ivory box; I searched her apartments, but found nothing; I found the other prisoner at the Black Lion, in Charles-court, I searched him, but found nothing upon him; the next day I went to search the apartments with Mr. Fairbone and an officer; Mr. Fairbone found this knife on the mantle shelf.(The knife, toothpick, and ivory box, were produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Q.(To Fairbone.) Will you swear you did not give the prisoner these things? - A. No.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-35

349. ELIZABETH-ANN HUNT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Salmon Handfield , about the hour of five in the afternoon of the 4th of April , Ann Handfield and Charlotte Handfield being therein, and stealing a linen bag, value 1d. three guineas, four half guineas, ten seven-shilling pieces, three half-crowns, sixty shillings, and a sixpence, a Bank-note, value 5l. and six other Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of the said Salmon.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

SALMON HANDFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You keep a public-house in Shoreditch ? - A.- Yes.

Q. On Saturday the 2d of April, did you give

any property to your daughter to lock up? - A.Twenty pounds; five one-pound notes, three guineas, four half guineas, six seven shilling pieces, twenty-five shillings, three half-crowns, and one sixpence.

Q. To which of your daughters did you give it? - A.Ann.

Q.About what time? - A. About twelve o'clock at night; I desired her to lock it up.

Q.Where did you usually keep it? - A. In a room up one-pair-of-stairs.

Q. On the Monday did you receive any information? - A. On Sunday I went up to my bureau, and found the twenty pounds safe; I went again on Monday at three o'clock in the afternoon, and it was all safe then, and about five o'clock I gave my daughter 3l. 1os. more to put in the bureau, five seven-shilling pieces, and thirty-five shillings in silver, all shillings.

Q.Did you see them after your daughter had put them in the bureau? - A. No.

Q.How soon was it discovered that there was any missing? - A.About ten minutes afterwards I went up stairs, and found the room door wide open.

Q.Had it been usually kept locked? - A. Yes, the two doors were open.

Q. What other door? - A.The door of the room where the key of the bureau was kept, and the bureau was wide open.

Q.Did you lose any bag? - A. Yes, a yellow bag.

Q. Was your money always kept in a bag? - A. Yes, it was in a bag on Monday at three o'clock, I took it out and counted it.

Q.After you had found the doors open, did you miss your money? - A. Yes, and 30l. besides.

Q.Has the bag been found since? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you go up to the prisoner's room? - A. Yes, she had been at home almost all the afternoon; I challenged her with it; I said, Mrs. Hunt, you have been robbing me; she laughed, and said, she had no money at all, and began to sing about the room.

Q. Had she lodged with you any time? - A. Seven or eight months; I saw my daughter Ann pick up the bag in the room where the prisoner lived, close by her feet.

Q. Was there any thing in the bag? - A.Twenty-three pounds three shillings; she was sitting upon a stood close to the fire.

Q.What was it composed of? - A.Gold and silver, and Bank-notes; a 5l. Bank-note, and six notes of one-pound each; all the seven-shilling pieces were in it but one.

Q.Did you know the bag to be the same you had put your money in? - A. Yes.

Q.Had you any doubt about it? - A. None.

Q.Was there any mark upon the notes? - A.There was a mark upon one of the ones, the name of Jones; my daughter Ann had put the name of Jones on it; she had taken it from a man of the name of Jones.

Q.Who has had the possession of all these things? - A.Armstrong; there was a bunch of keys found in her room, two of them opened the bureau; I saw them tried.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q.How long did this woman lodge in your house? - A.Seven or eight months.

Q. I dare say you would not have let her lodge there if you had not thought her a very honest woman? - A. I don't know any thing of her character.

ANN HANDFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Are you the daughter of Salmon Handfield? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you receive any money from your father on the 2d of April? - A. Yes, I received twenty pounds from my father; he took an account of it, but I did not; I put it in a bag, carried it up stairs, and locked it in a little drawer inside the bureau in the one-pair-of-stairs room.

Q.What did you do with the keys? - A. The keys are on a bunch; I put the bunch in the top drawer in the bureau.

Q.When you had so done, what did you do with the room door? - A. I locked the room door, and put the key of that room door upon my bedroom table, which joins the other room; they are both backwards.

Q.How near to where the prisoner's room is? - A.She lodged in the two-pair-of-stairs.

Q.Did you see her about the time you went into that room? - A.No, I did not.

Q.When did you see the key of the room door again? - A. I came down stairs again.

Q.Did you receive any more money from your father on the Monday? - A. Yes, about five in the afternoon, 3l. 10s. five seven-shilling pieces, and thirty five shillings, all in shillings: I took them up stairs, and put them in the same bag with the others; I locked the bureau, locked the door, and put the key upon the other room table.

Q.How soon afterwards did you discover any thing respecting this property being missing? - A. About a quarter of an hour; my sister called me up stairs; I went up, and observed both bed-room doors open, and the bureau open, and the drawers in which the money was open.

Q.Having been all locked when you left them? - A. Yes.

Q.And the money gone? - A. Yes, and the bag.

Q. What did you do then? - A. I desired my sister to stay there, and I setched my father up; I then went up into Mrs. Hunt's room, and I asked her for the money; she said, what money, she knew nothing of it, I was joking; I told her I

was not joking; it might be a very good joke for her, but it was a very bad one for me. My father then went up, and asked her, and said, you had better give it me, for if you do not, I will send for, Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Armstrong was sent for, and came almost immediately; he came up into the two-pair-of-stairs; we were searching about the room in different places, and saw the money lie upon the hearth in the bag, and Mrs. Hunt was sitting close by it upon a stool; the bag had been untied; she was sitting on a stool blowing the fire, and she sat as it might be by the side of it.

Q.Was it in the ashes? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any thing else there? - A. Yes; I found the three keys belonging to the double chest of drawers which were in my bed-room.

Q.Where did you find them? - A. Lying by the side of the bag.

Q.Should you know the notes again? - A. Yes; there is my hand-writing upon one of them, of the name of Jones; I put it on when I changed it for a person of that name. Two of the three keys that I found will unlock the bureau; Mr. Armstrong tried them in my presence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q.You had other lodgers in the house? - A.There are single men lodgers in the house.

Q.How many? - A. I cannot exactly say how many there were then; I believe two or three.

Q.Had not the prisoner and you been out together just before? - A. No, we had been out at nine o'clock in the morning, and this was five in the afternoon.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Who are the men that lodge in your house? - A.Working men.

Q.What time do they go out? - A.Four or five o'clock in the morning, and come home at nine at night; they went out in the morning, and had never been home till after this happened.

CHARLOTTE HANDFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the one-pair-ofstairs room in which this money was? - A. Yes.

Q.At what time of day did you discover that this money was gone? - A. I discovered the door to be open about a quarter of an hour after the last money was put in; I was with my sister when it was found.

Q.Did you leave the room door locked? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you give information to your father and sister of what you had seen? - A. Yes; I saw Mrs. Hunt come out of the one-pair-of-stairs front room, about a quarter of an hour after the money was put in.

Q. That is not where the key was kept? - A. No, it was the room opposite; she went up stairs, and I asked her, who is there, twice; she made no answer; I turned round, and found both the room doors open, and then I called my father.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You are one of the officers belonging to Worship-street? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you go to the house of the prosecutor? - A. I did, on Monday the 4th of April, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon; I went up with the two girls and Mr. Handfield into the prisoner's apartments; Mr. Handfield told me what he had lost; I asked the prisoner if she knew any thing of it, and she said, no; I then went down stairs to look at the bureau; the prisoner was sitting upon a stool by the fire-side, and the child cried out, oh, Mr. Armstrong, here is my father's money; I immediately saw the bag lying close by the prisoner's side; the girl said, I know two of the notes, one has got Fry and the other Jones upon it; the girl then said, here is a bunch of keys; she picked them up in my presence; there were three of them, and two of them opened the bureau, I tried them. The bag contains sixty shillings in silver, three half-crowns, a sixpence, a five-pound note, six ones, three guineas, four half guineas, and ten seven-shilling pieces, which I have had ever since (produces them); the prisoner was exceedingly confused and flurried.

Ann Handfield . This one-pound note I know by the name of Fry upon it, which was put upon it in my presence, and this with the name of Jones upon it is my own hand-writing.

Q.Have you any doubt that these notes were part of the notes that you put in the drawer? - A. No.

Q.Look at the bag? - A.The bag has got a hole at the bottom, and I tied the two ends together to prevent the money falling out; I am sure it is the same.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel, and called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-36

350. STEPHEN BEAVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , a silver watch, value 30s. two seals, value 3d. two pair of silver-mounted spectacles, value 20s. a pair of pockets, value 1s. a nutmeg-grater, value 1d. a pocket-book, value 6d. five guineas, three seven-shilling pieces, and two half crowns, the property of Prudence Pearson , widow , in her dwelling-house .

PRUDENCE PEARSON sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. In Portpool-lane ; I buy rags, and sell cloaths ; a little in the brokery way, and buy a little old iron.

Q.What is the prisoner? - A. I believe he is a carpenter : On the 25th of March, between four and five o'clock, I was standing at the street-

door, and my pockets broke off; I picked them up, and threw them on the bed on which I slept, in the shop; a woman, who is here, Ann Green, was in the yard washing; she came in, and the prisoner came in; he pulled out a bit of old iron, about a pound; I saw nothing of the pockets afterwards.

Q.Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes; the property was found upon him.

ANN GREEN sworn. - I was washing at Mrs. Pearson's house on the 25th of March; I had a lodging backwards; I came into the shop, and the prisoner was there; they were talking together something about leaving a jacket. Knowing she had not been well, I asked her if I should make her bed for her; she said, I might if I would; upon that I took a little table and chair that stood by the bed-side away, and the first thing I found was a pair of white pockets on the bed; they seemed very heavy; I took them up, and twisted the strings round, and put them upon the head of the bed; it was a small bureau bedstead, and pulled the clean clothes over the pockets; I had washed them the day before; I put the table and the chair in their places again by the bed-side; I stood a little, but as they were talking, I said, Mrs. Pearson, I will take the things that I have been washing, and carry in doors; she said very well; she asked me how long I should stop; I told her I should be back in the space of five minutes; I carried them in, and then I came into the shop again; I said, is the man gone; yes, said she; I said, Mrs. Pearson, are your pockets gone; she said, oh, d - n it, no. I threw them on the bed; I told her they were safe at the top of the bed; I went to look for them, and they were gone; she threatened to send me to jail, for I must have them.

JOHN DIXON sworn. - Q.You are an officer? - A. Yes, belonging to Hatton-garden; in consequence of information, Chapman and I found all the property, except about four guineas, the next day after the robbery, at a house in Turnmill-street, No. 30, up two-pair-of-stairs, where the prisoner lodged; I found a silver watch, a pocketbook with the prosecutrix's name on it, two pair of silver-mounted spectacles, two guineas in gold, a watch and one seal to it, and here is the nutmeggrater (produces them); the pockets are not found; we found the property concealed under the mantleshelf; it was hollow, and the mantle-shelf was taken off, and then put over them again.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I was with Dixon; I found two knives and some pocketpieces, which were lost with Mrs. Pearson's pocket.

Q.(To Mrs. Pearson.) Is that watch your's? - A. Yes.

Q. The seals? - A. Yes, and the nutmeggrater is mine; all these things are mine, except this piece of nankeen.

Prisoner's defence. She asked me to put her shutters up for her, and she would give me a quartern of gin; she sent for a quartern of gin, and she gave me these things with her own hand to take care of them for her.

Q.(To Mrs. Pearson.) Whose house is this? - A. I have rented it almost four years.

Q. Are you a married woman? - A. I am a widow.

GUILTY Death , aged 49.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-37

351. EDMUND SMITH , otherwise JOHN THOMPSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a gelding, value 30l. the property of Frederick Choppin , and a mare, value 30l. the property of Charles Lawrence Dundas , Esq.

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of John Hall .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES CRANFORD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. John Hall.

Q.He has a farm and lands at Kensington ? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of a horse and mare belonging to Mr. Choppin and Mr. Dundas, that were put to winter with your master? - A. Yes.

Q.What colour were they? - A. A grey horse and a grey mare: On Saturday, the 19th of March, I racked them up in the stable, about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. And left them safe in the stalls? - A. Yes; the lock was rather out of repair, but by a sharp force the lock had effect; I saw them again about half past five.

Q.When did you go to the stable again? - A. Not till the next morning about six o'clock.

Q.Were you the first person there? - A. No, my master had been there; I found the horse and the mare gone.

Q.What was the state of the door? - A. I did not look at the door.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Your master takes in a great many horses? - A. Yes.

Q.You cannot tell who is the proprietor or owner of any given horse? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q.You know they were in the custody of Mr. Hall? - A. Yes.

JAMES LOVELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You are the bailiff to Mr. Hall? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the mare and the horse that belonged to Mr. Dundas and Mr. Chopping? - A. Yes, they were brought to me in those names.

Q.Do you remember seeing them on the 19th

of March? - A. Yes, about twelve o'clock, I saw them in the field.

Q. What happened to them on Sunday the 20th of March? - A. I went to the stable about six o'clock in the morning, and observed the door upon the jar, within about four inches of the post.

Q.Did it appear to you to have been forced? - A. No; I went into the stable, and missed the grey horse and the grey mare; there were eight horses in the stable.

Q. In consequence of missing them, did you pursue them on the Oxford-road? - A. I did.

Q.What time did you set off? - A. About seven o'clock, I came up with them between Wheatley and Tetsworth, in Oxfordshire.

Q.In whose custody did you find them? - A. The gentleman's at the bar, he was riding the grey mare, and leading the grey gelding.

Q.Did you know them to be the same? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt about it? - A. No.

Q.What time was it? - A.About twelve o'clock.

Q.Did the horses seem to have been rode hard? - A. I think the gelding had been rode very hard, for I saw the saddle mark, and the mark of the spur; I asked him what he was going to do with those horses, he asked what odds it was to me; I told him it was odds, they were horses that were placed in my care, and I must take care of him and the horses, till I could get a better answer; then I took hold of him by the collar, he got down off the mare, and asked what I was going at with him, and I told him, I wanted to know if he had any fire-arms, and he said, I was very welcome to feel; I felt down the side of his pocket, and found it was nothing but fancy, and I told him, he might get up upon the mare again, if he chose; he got up upon the mare again; there was a gentleman upon the road that assisted me, he put a stick through the prisoner's bridle; and between that and Wheatley, he told me he had bought them both of one Ward, a horse-dealer.

Q.Did he say where? - A. At Wycomb.

Q.Did he say which Wycomb? - A. High-Wycomb; he said, he gave thirty guineas, and a gelding; I asked him, if any person saw him pay for them; he said, there was no person up at the public-houses; then we went on to Wheatley, and ordered a post-chaise, but no chaise being to be got, I sent back to Tetsworth; then we came on to Oxford, which is six miles, and I enquired for a constable, and he was taken into custody; he said, he had made an appointment with Mr. Ward; at Abingdon-fair, and he was to meet him on the 20th of March.

Q.Are you quite sure they were the two horses that were lost from your master's stable? - A. I am quite sure.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your master has a great many horses? - A. Yes.

Q. You don't know what Mr. Dundas's christian name is? - A.No; the servant said it was Mr. Charles Dundas's, he sold two the same day; the grey gelding was Mr. Frederick Choppin 's, it was sold on the 8th of March.

Q.You got the name from your books this morning, before you came out, did not you? - A. No, I knew the name very well.

Q.How far were you from Wycomb, at the time you overtook him? - A. I cannot say.

Q.Did he not say, if you would go back to Wycomb, he had no doubt you would find Ward there? - A. Yes, he did.

Q.And you did not think proper to do so, but went to Oxford? - A. Yes.

Q.Does not your master, always, when he takes any horse, refuse to be answerable for it? - A. I believe not.

JOHN HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Do you know the name of Mr. Dundas, and Mr. Choppin? - A. Yes, Charles-Lawrence Dundas, and Frederick Choppin ; I received these two horses from them.

Q.Whereabout is the value of these two horses? - A.About thirty pounds a-piece.

Prisoner's defence. I purchased the horses on the 20th of March, at High Wycomb, of Thomas Ward, a horse-dealer, he has been well known for nine or ten months; I gave him in change, a black gelding, two ten pound notes, a one pound and ten guineas in cash, for the horse, mare, bridle, and saddle.

GUILTY , Death , aged 45.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-38

352. SARAH FRANKLIN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin West , about the hour of eleven in the night of the 13th of April , and burglariously stealing a shift, value 1s. a body of a shift, value 2s. a pair of sheets, value 4s. and a half-handkerchief, value 3s. the property of the said Benjamin; two gowns, value 15s. an apron, value 1s. a pair of pockets, value 1s. three petticoats, value 8s. two handkerchiefs, value 1s. and a shift, value 1s. 6d. the property of Sarah Hartwell , widow ; four gowns, value 21s. a lace handkerchief, value 2s. two petticoats, value 5s. eight yards of lace, value 5s. and a pair of pockets, value 6d. the property of Hannah Lynn .

SARAH HARTWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Peat. Q.What are you? - A.Servant to Mr. Benjamin West , No. 14, Newman-street .

Q. Was the house broke open? - A. Yes, on Tuesday, the 19th of April; I went to-bed between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q.Did you examine the door, yourself? - A.

Yes, I saw the chain up at the door, I was the first that went up to-bed; I found our room door up three pair of stairs backwards, locked; I came down, and enquired of my fellow-servant, why she had locked it, and she said, she had not locked it; then the footman went up stairs with the other fellow-servant, and I sat down in the hall; I went up about ten minutes afterwards, and found the bed stripped, and the things taken.

Q.How lately before that, had you been in the room? - A. I had not been up from two o'clock, the things were all safe then; I left the key in the door, we seldom locked the door; the sheets were gone off the bed, and several articles of mine, and some belonging to my master; the locks were broke off the drawers, and the things taken out.

Q. Do you know any thing else? - A. No.

Q.Who has got the property? - A. The constable.

Q.What is your fellow-servant's name? - A. Hannah Lynn.

Q.When you went up to bed, you found the door locked? - A. Yes.

Q. And the key inside the room? - A. Yes, in the middle of the room.

Q.Which way had the things been taken out? - A.Through the garret window; they came in at the window, and went out the same way.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.You had the misfortune to have an empty house within seven doors of you? - A. Yes.

Q. And whoever did it, must have come from the top of the house? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you think it possible for that old woman, who is more than seventy, to have done this? - A. I cannot say.

HANNAH LYNN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Peat. Q.You are servant to Mr. West? - A. Yes.

Q.When were you in this room last on the evening of the robbery? - A. I was in the room about seven o'clock.

Q.Did you sleep in the room yourself? - A. Yes; every thing then was perfectly safe.

Q.Did you see the things that are charged in the indictment at seven o'clock? - A.Most of them I did.

Q.You do not know by what means, or by whom, the room was entered? - A.They must have come in by the window.

Q.Did you lock the door when you left it? - A. No, I did not; I was the first person that went into the room afterwards; my fellow-servant opened the door, and I went in first; I found the drawers rifled, and every thing that was valuable taken out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.When you saw the room at seven o'clock, it was light? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.At seven o'clock was the window shut? - A.It was.

Q.Did you observe how they got in? - A. The window was wide open.

Q.How was it wide open? - A. The sash was shut, it was not fastened; the sash had been thrown up, it is not a casement.

Q.And you are sure at seven o'clock it was shut? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge whether any body belonging to the house had gone up stairs after seven o'clock? - A. No one.

HENRY LAST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Peat.

Q. You are servant to Mr. West? - A. I am.

Q.Did you at any part of the day see this room? - A. No.

Q.You were told by the servants that the door was locked, and they could not get in? - A. Yes; I went up stairs immediately, I got out at the adjoining room window - the next garret; I got into their room, I found the window open.

Q.Did you make any observations upon the roof of the building? - A.There was a looking-glass and a handkerchief outside the leads, in the gutter; I went into the room, and found all the cloaths stripped off the bed, and thrown on the floor, and the drawers partly open; I found the key lying in the middle of the room, and the door locked; I opened it with a key.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.When you got in, you found the persons who had been in had locked the door inside? - A. Yes.

Q.Whoever had been in had got in at the window? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you were able to trace a foot to about six doors off? - A.Seven doors.

Q. Do you think it possible for that old woman to have scrambled over these houses? - A. I cannot take upon me to say that.

JAMES DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Peat.

Q.You are a watchman? - A. Yes: On Thursday morning, about twenty minutes after five o'clock, the prisoner passed me with a bag on her shoulder, at Seven Dials, coming out of Lumbercourt. My good woman, said I, what have you got in this bag? What is that to you, she says. I laid my hand upon the bag, and I thought it was wet linen, being so well packed. Where are you going with this bag, says I; What is that to you, says she, I am going home. Where is your home, says I, where do you live? I shall not tell you, says she. If you don't, says I, you must go to the watch-house directly. When I spoke about the watch-house, she dropped the bag, and ran across the street to get away from me, I suppose; I called my partner; we took her to the watch-house, and gave her up to the constable of the night to search her; I was by when the bag was opened.

Q.Was any thing found upon her? - A. She dropped a dark lantern, and a key, a wrench, and

some combustibles, to get a light with. (Produces the bag.)

Q. Is that the bag she had across her shoulders? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see her drop those things you have mentioned? - A. Yes, I saw her drop them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Lumbercourt is not a thoroughfare, is it? - A. Yes, it is, going from one street to another.

JOHN TURNER sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner when she first came in; she complained her stomach ached, and she wished to go below; I told her I must search her before she did go; she resisted very much, and these things fell from her. (Produces a dark lantern, an iron crow, a phosphorous bottle, and a skeleton key.)

Q.These things dropped from her person? - A. Yes, from under her clothes; she also dropped this lock, and these two keys; this bag has been in my possession ever since. (Produces them.)

Q.(To Hartwell.) Have you examined these things? - A. Yes. (Repeats the articles mentioned in the indictment.) I know these to be mine.

Lynn. These are mine. (Picking out that part of the property which belonged to her.) Three of the gowns were hanging up in the room.

Q.(To Hartwell.) Look at that lock? - A. It is taken off my box; there is one gown that is not found, and a two-pound note of mine.

Prisoner's defence. My husband went out of town on Tuesday, and on Tuesday night I sat down to do some needle-work; a man, of the name of Smith, came to me, and said your husband has sent his things, and you must take them to-morrow morning, at five o'clock, to Monmouth-street, and he will fetch them; I know no more about any unjawful thing than I know about what is in the sky.

GUILTY , Death , aged 70.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-39

353. WILLIAM BOULTON was indicted for that he, on the 23d of March , feloniously, willingly, and knowingly, did personate and falsely assume the name and character of one Patrick Coffee , late a serjeant of marines , serving on board a ship of our Sovereign Lord the King, called the Hector, the said Patrick Coffee being entitled to certain prize-money as a serjeant of marines aforesaid, on board the said ship, in order to receive the said prize-money due and payable to the said Patrick, for his services on board the said ship .

Second Count. For that he, on the same day, feloniously, willingly, and knowingly, did personate and falsely assume the name and character of the same person, he, the said Patrick, being supposed to be entitled to prize-money, for services done by him on board the said ship.(The indictment was opened by Mr. Pooley, and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN CROSSDALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q.You are clerk to Messrs. Cooke and Hobday? - A. Yes.

Q.Had you the payment of the prize-money of the ship Hector? - A. Yes.

Was there prize-money due from the Hector to a person of the name of Patrick Coffee ? - A. The name of Patrick Coffee is on the list.

Q.Look at that (shewing him a book)? - A. It is the last name but one, "Coffee Patrick, serjeant of marines."

Q.On board what ship? - A.On board his Majesty's ship Hector.

Q.Would all persons in that list be entitled to prize-money? - A. Yes.

Q.Did the prisoner at any time make any application to you? - A. Yes, on the 23d of March.

Q.What was Coffee's share? - A. I don't know; there were three payments; one payment had been made into Greenwich Hospital; after three years, if shares are not claimed, they are paid into Greenwich Hospital. On the 23d of March, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to Beaufort-buildings, and asked for his prizemoney; I said, what ship; he said, the Hector; I said, your name; Patrick Coffee , serjeant of marines; I looked at the list of the Hector, and said, your prize-money has been paid, you have received it; the mode of receiving it I pointed out to him; I looked at the prize-list, and said, here is an abstract marked upon the prize-list - "Capt. Irvin, 15th December, 1800, Joseph Swathen ." - I shewed him that it had been paid by the agent at Portsmouth, at the instance of Capt. Irvin.

Q.Who was the person that did pay it? - A. Mr. William Henry Maul, clerk in the Pay-office at Plymouth, and who corresponds with Mr. Cooke. He said he had not received it. I then called to the clerk in the outer office, who had made this abstract upon the prize-list, and asked him if he knew any thing of the particulars relative to it. He would not acknowledge receiving it. He was asked for his certificate from an officer on board the Hector; he produced one.

Q.Have you got it? - A. Yes, (produces it); he immediately produced it, and put it in the hands of a young clerk in the office.

Q.Is that the same paper? - A. It has been in various hands; I cannot say whether it is or not.

Q.Did he produce more than one paper? - A. No.

Q.Was it given into your hands? - A. It was delivered into the hands of a young clerk in my presence. - (The certificate read.)

Q.Do you know Lieutenant Rice ? - A. I do.

Q.Do you know his hand-writing? - A. I do.

Q. Is that his hand-writing? - A. No, it is not; it is a certificate that he was on board the Hector, and entitled to prize-money; the Rebecca and the Roberspierre were the two ships that he applied for prize-money for.

Q. After you had discovered that this was not Mr. Rice's name, what did you do? - A. I carried it to Mr. Cooke; he came, and told him he was a rascal, and that it was a forgery; he was taken into custody immediately.

Q.How soon after did you hear him describe himself by a different name? - A. At the third examination he called himself William Boulton.

jury. Q.You say this prize-money was paid? - A. Yes, there was none due.

Q.You never pay prize-money without a certificate? - A.Sometimes we do.

Q.But generally you do not? - A. No.

HENRY RICE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Were you a Lieutenant on board his Majesty's ship Hector? - A. I was.

Q.Did you know a person on board that ship, a serjeant of marines, of the name of Patrick Coffee ? - A.There was such a man on board.

Q. Do you know what is become of him? - A. No.

Q.Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. There was a man of the name of Boulton on board, but I cannot recollect his person.

Q. Do you recollect the person of Coffee? - A. I cannot remember.

Q. Is the prisoner at the bar Patrick Coffee, a serjeant of marines? - A. I don't recollect.

Q.Did you ever give the prisoner at the bar that certificate? - (Shewing it to him.) - A. That is not my hand-writing, or any thing like it.

Q. Was there any other Lieutenant Henry Rice on board the Hector? - A. No.

Q. Is that certificate your hand-writing? - A. It is not.

Q. Is it customary on board his Majestey's ships for one gentleman to give a certificate in another gentleman's name? - A.Certainly not; the Captain always gives a certificate; but Admiral Montague being out of the way, I have given certificates.

Q.During the whole time you were on board the Hector, was there any other Lieutenant Rice? - A.No; I was on board some years, as first, second, and third lieutenant.

Q. I understand the Hector took two prizes, the Roberspierre and the Rebecca? - A. Yes.

JAMES HAMILTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. You are a serjeant of marines? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Patrick Coffee, a serjeant of marines, on board the Hector? - A. Yes, I knew him before he was on board the Hector; I was not on board the Hector with him.

Q. Did you know him after he returned home? - A. Yes, I saw him after he returned home.

Q. Is he living or dead? - A.He is dead.

Q.Where did he die? - A.He was drowned last March two years.

Q.Where was he drowned? - A.Coming round from Plymouth in a passage-boat.

Q.Do you know that of your own knowledge? - A.From the return in the books.

Q.Look at the prisoner, is that Patrick Coffee? - A. No.

Q. That is not the man who served as serjeant on board the Hector? - A. It is not.

Q. You are sure of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at all? - A. No, I do not.

JEREMIAH SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Polley. Q.You are a serjeant of marines? - A. I am.

Q.Did you know a person of the name of Patrick Coffee, who served as serjeant of marines on board the Hector? - A. I did.

Q.Did you know him well? - A. Yes; he first came is a volunteer from the 118th, in the year 1795.

Q. Is the prisoner the same man? - A. He is not. Admiral MONTAGUE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You commanded the Hector at the time of the capture of the Roberspierre and the Rebecca? - A. I did.

Q.Did you know a serjeant of the marines, of the name of Coffee? - A. I did.

Q.Was he engaged in the capture of these two French vessels? - A. I think he was, but I really cannot remember.

Q. Do you know the person of Patrick Coffee? I do.

Q.Look at the prisoner - is that the man? - A. That is not Patrick Coffee.

SAMUEL INMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a clerk in the Navy-Office? - A. I am.

Q.Have you got the muster-roll belonging to the Portsmouth division of marines? - A. I have.(Producer it.) - Reads." Patrick Coffee , serjeant of marines, on board the Hector, died in the third division, on the 24th of March, 1801."

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-40

354. THOMAS MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , an iron tongue, value 6s. and an iron chain and plate, value 3s. the property of the London Dock Company .

Two other Counts. Varying the manner of charging it.

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN HOOL sworn. - I am engineer at the engine-house, Wapping-Dock, and am employed by the London Dock Company; I know the prisoner: On the 17th of January, I saw him between eight and nine o'clock, in Back-lane, leading to the London Dock Company's works, about half a mile from Whitechapel, with an iron tongue under his right arm, and a chain and plates hanging on his left side; I looked at him, and went behind him to see if the Company's mark was on it; I saw it was, and followed him to the top of the lane, when I saw John Wilson , whom I called to assist me; we went to the prisoner, and asked him what he had got; he said, it was his own; we told him it was the Company's; then he said, he found it at the top of Old Gravel-lane; I think I have seen the prisoner employed about the works, that is all I know of him. The tongue is employed in the iron-rail-way, and the chain is used for the waggons; we had great numbers of them, and I only know this by the marks; they are generally kept in the store-house.

JOHN WILSON sworn. - I am a labouring man belonging to the Company: On the 17th of January last, at the end of Church-lane, Hool called me over, and we went and took the prisoner, with a tongue and chain, into custody, and I delivered the tongue and chain to Rogers, the officer.(The tongue and chain produced by the officer, and identified by the store-keeper.)

Prisoner's defence. I found them on the side of the road; I never stole any thing in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-41

355. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a handkerchief, value 10d. the property of John Clough .

JOHN CLOUGH sworn. - I am a merchant : On Saturday last, about three o'clock, in Gracechurch-street , I lost my handkerchief; I was crossing from Fenchurch-street, but was stopped by the carriages; I felt a hand in my pocket, turned round, and missed my silk handkerchief; the prisoner was taken into custody, and the handkerchief found in his bosom.

Prisoner's defence. I was going home, and there was a mob, and the gentleman laid hold of me with the handkerchief in his hand, which I had never seen before. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-42

356. SARAH HARCOURT , FRANCES JACKSON , and MARY CAYHILL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of March , twenty-three yards and three quarters of cotton, value 2l. 17s. 8d. the property of Bartholomew Coombe , privately in his shop .

BARTHOLOMEW COOMBE sworn. - I am a linen-draper , No. 74, Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street : On the 22d of March, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came in to look at some print for a child's frock; they conversed together while they were in the shop, and Harcourt looked at the print; I don't know which asked for it, but one of them asked to look at some printed cotton for a child's frock; they fixed on the pattern, and Harcourt paid four shillings for two yards of it; I delivered the print to her, and they left the shop together; about four or five minutes after a neighbour came into my shop, and asked if I had been robbed; I could not tell, but on his information I went into my parlour adjoining the shop, to see whether I could see the prisoners, I could not; I took my hat, and ran towards Finsbury-square; about fourteen or fifteen doors off there is an alley, where I saw the three prisoners in close conversation; I went to them, and desired them to return to my shop; they seemed in confusion, but as soon as they separated I picked up my property, being seventeen yards and three quarters of printed cotton in one piece, and six yards in another; Harcourt went into the Ship public-house, where I took her; in about two minutes Cayhill went into Sun-street, I stopped her just by the passage; and Jackson went towards Bishopsgate-street, a neighbour took her, and they were all brought to my house; I have no doubt they are the women who took the print, which cost me about 2l. 17s. I had no suspicion of their robbing me.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you a partner? - A. No; my wife sometimes serves in the shop when I am out, and was in the shop at the time, but is not here to day. I have no shopman.

- OWEN sworn. - I am a butcher, and saw the prisoners turn down a gateway opposite my door, No. 6, Sun-street, in great confusion; I suspected them, and went to Coombe's, and told him which way they went; he followed them, and took them; I did not see them drop any thing.

SARAH OWEN sworn. - I was in my husband's shop, and saw three women come out of Mr. Coombe's in a great hurry, go down a gateway, and stop, but I saw no further; I cannot say whether the prisoners are the women.

ROBERT SAPWELL sworn. - I am an officer, and took charge of the prisoners, and produce the cotton, which was delivered to me by Mr. Coombe.(The cotton produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner Harcourt's defence. I went into the shop to buy a piece of cotton to make a frock for Jackson's child; the prosecutor's wife served us, and I never saw the property till he came up, and took us with it under his arm.

Jackson's defence. I went with Mrs. Harcourt

to buy the frock, never thinking of any thing happening, and never saw the cotton till I saw it under the prosecutor's arm.

Caybill said the same.

Harcourt, GUILTY, aged 19.

Jackson, GUILTY, aged 28,

Cayhill, GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-43

357. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , eighteen yards of cotton, value 2l. the property of Edward Twell , privately in his shop .

EDWARD TWELL sworn. - I keep a linendraper's shop in Bishopsgate-street : On Wednesday the 2d of March, about half past four o'clock, the prisoner came in to purchase a small piece of cambrick; she had not sufficient money, but requested me to keep it a short time. There were a great many goods on the counter, and from her conduct, I suspected she had taken something; I followed her out up a court, and stopped her, and took from under her cloak a piece of print; I sent for an officer, who took her and the print into his possession; I gave about 2l. 8s. or 9s. for it; there were three young men in the shop at the time, who are not here.

ANN BAYLEY sworn. - I was in the shop buying some things, and saw the prisoner there; I bought some print off the piece which was lost, and it was put on one side while I looked at some other things; I marked my name on it, and shall know it; she went out, and Mr. Twell jumped over the counter, and said, she had got something.(Shephard, an officer, produced the print, which was identified by the prosecutor and Mrs. Bayley.)

Prisoner's defence. I went out of his shop into Long-alley, and the gentleman came after me, and said, I had robbed him; he left me then, and run after another woman, whom he stopped; he afterwards came back to me, and took me to a public-house, while he went after another woman. I know nothing of the robbery.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-44

358. WILLIAM STEEDMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , two half crowns, thirteen shillings, and two sixpences , the property of William Salhouse .

WILLIAM SALHOUSE sworn. - I am a baker ; the prisoner was my journeyman ; the money was taken out of the till on the 19th of April, between four and seven on Tuesday morning; I saw it in the till about a quarter past four, having counted it; and marked it; I marked fifty-four shillings, sixteen sixpences, and seven half-crowns; I missed two half-crowns, thirteen shillings, and two sixpences, at seven o'clock; I got two officers, who searched the prisoner, and found the property on him; the officers told him to take it out of his pocket, and he took it out of his fob himself, wrapped up in a piece of paper. I had stamped the money with a stamp, the half-crowns in two places, and the shillings and sixpences in one. The officer kept the money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How many servants have you? - A. None, but the prisoner; my wife serves in the shop, and has access to the till; it is not the prisoner's business to serve in the shop, or give change.

JOHN WHEELER sworn. - I am an officer, and was sent for to search the prisoner about eight o'clock yesterday morning; his master called him up, and he pulled out two half-crowns, thirteen shillings, and two sixpences, all marked, in a bit of paper.(The money produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. A boy came into the shop when my master was up stairs, and wanted a twopenny loaf; the key was in the till, and I gave him change, as I saw there was a great quantity of silver in the till; I took out nineteen shillings in silver, and two shillingsworth of penny-pieces, and put three seven-shilling-piece in for it.

Prosecutor. There was not any seven-shillingpiece. GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-45

359. JOHN OVERINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , six pounds weight of raw coffee, value 6s. the property of Andrew Cornish .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Andrew Cornish and others.

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of persons unknown.(The case stated by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS GREER sworn. - I am Custom-house locker at the warehouse of Mr. Cornish, for raw coffee, in Dowgate ; the prisoner came as a labouring cooper : On the 5th of April, about twelve o'clock, I saw him before he went out of the warehouse; it is the custom to search the men; as he was going out, I stopped him to rub him down, and in the back part of the thigh of his breeches I found nine pounds of raw coffee, loose; he begged me to let him go, as he had a wife and family; the coffee dropped loose on the floor when he unbuttoned his knees.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You have no property in the coffee? - A.No.

Q.This is a large warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q.Is there any thing called sweepings? - A. Yes.

Q.Is there a perquisite of the sweepings of coffee spilt on the floor? - A. No.

JEFFERY BARKER sworn. - I am the Custom-house locker, and took charge of the coffee in a bag.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Have you ever heard of a perquisite of sweepings of coffee? - A. No.( John Wainewright , the constable, produced the coffee.)

ANDREW CORNISH sworn. - I am proprietor of the warehouse, and am answerable for all loss to the owners of the property.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Publickly whipped 100 yards on Dowgate-hill .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-46

360. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , fifty-three yards of dimity, value 2l. 10s. the property of James Smith , and others.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am a warehouseman ; my partners' names are, John Lindsey , William Smith , John Dunlop, and William Linsay ; our warehouses are in Watling-street : On the 17th of February, the dimity was taken out of a bale of goods which lay in the yard; the bale was cut about four o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner was seen to take the goods, and was seized.

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - I was going down Watling-street, on the 17th of February, about four o'clock, and observed the prisoner and two other men at the corner of the Old-change, in Watling-street, the two men were assisting the prisoner on with a great coat; upon which, the prisoner ran across the way, and turned up the prosecutors' gateway, where the bales were; I saw him stoop, and pick up something; whether it was out of the bale, I don't know, but he put it under his coat, and turned round, and I seized him with the piece; a lad came down the yard, and we took the prisoner up the yard; the bale appeared to be cut; we asked the prisoner if he had a knife; he said, no, and soon after dropped one from his pocket; while I was with the prisoner, the other two men ran away.

THOMAS M'GEORGE sworn. - I am clerk to the prosecutors; I saw the prisoner drop the piece of goods; Mr. Clarke had not laid hold of him then, but did just afterwards.(The piece of dimity produced and identified.)

JOHN PEARS sworn. - I am clerk to the prosecutors; I asked the prisoner if he had a knife; he said, no; and soon after he dropped one, which I picked up.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer, and took the prisoner and property into custody.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-47

361. SAMUEL BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , ten pounds weight of coffee, value 15s. the property of Andrew Cornish .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of James Harris .

Third Count. Of persons unknown.(The case stated by Mr. Knowlys.)

ROBERT FAWCETT sworn. - I am an excise locker, employed in Mr. Cornish's warehouse, under the excise, for the reception of coffee; the prisoner was employed as a labouring cooper : About twelve o'clock, on the 5th of April, he was going out, I rubbed him down, and found the coffee in his breeches; when his breeches knees were opened, it sell out; a constable was sent for, and he was taken in charge; the prisoner begged for mercy.

JOHN WAINEWRIGHT sworn. - I am a constable, and produce the coffee.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Where did you get the cloth in which the coffee is? - A. At the warehouse, on the 5th of April.

Q. You don't know that the cloth or coffee were ever in his possession? - A. No.

JOHN BROWN sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Andrew Cornish , at Dowgate; the warehouse is his property, and he is accountable to the owners for any loss.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Cornish? - A.Eleven years.

Q.Has he any partners? - A. No.

Prisoner. I leave my case to the mercy of the Court, and to my Counsel.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one week in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-48

362. JAMES CAVENAGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , a carcase of a sheep, value 20s. the property of Robert Hull .

RICHARD FRIEND sworn. - I am a butcher, and servant to Mr. Hull, of Leadenhall-market : On Saturday, the 9th of April, I missed a sheep from off one of the rails; Jordan told me he could tell where it was, for he saw it taken; I went with

him to George-yard, Shoreditch, and waited a few minutes, when I saw the prisoner with a tray containing the whole carcase of mutton, cut in joints, on his shoulder; I stopped him, and said, Piky, which he is called, I shall own this sheep; he said, it did not belong to me; I said, it belonged to my master, and was in my charge, and I should take him; he said, don't hurt me, let me go, and you take the mutton; I persuaded him to go with me, which he did, till we got to Gregory's, the lamb butcher's, when he swore he would not go any further, and run away; I followed him; he fell, and I laid hold of him, and took him into the accompting-house; he said he never did such a thing before, and hoped we would forgive him; that he would sell the sheep, and pay for it, if we would let him go; the constable then took him in custody.

ROBERT JORDAN sworn. - I am a porter in Leadenhall-market, and saw the prisoner take the sheep off the hook, and run across the market.

JAMES HICKS sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's defence. I saw the sheep lay on a bulk in the market; I took it up, and went home with it, after asking who had lost it, but could not find an owner for it. GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-49

363. JOHN HODGSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , an ounce and an half weight of gold cuttings, value 3l. two ounces and an half weight of gold filings, value 4l. an ounce weight of gold wire, value 2l. and thirty-two diamonds, value 8l. the property of Richard Hobdell , in his dwelling-house .(The case stated by Mr. Knowlys.)

RICHARD HOBDELL sworn. - I am a jeweller , and live at No. 24, Addle-street; I have no partner; the prisoner was my servant : On the 6th of April I missed a tool we work with, and which the prisoner was entrusted with; I made an enquiry after it, and found the prisoner and lent it; I went to look at his tools, intending to send him away, and missed the thirty-two diamonds, which were in his possession, to set; he had had them about twelve months; on missing them, I sent for a constable to take him when he came to work; he did not return, and the constable and I went to his lodgings in Short-street, Little Moorfields; I knocked at the door, and he came down stairs; I asked him what he meant by taking the liberty of lending the tool, and what he had done with the diamonds; he said, they were very safe; I asked him where; he said, he would go and fetch them; I gave charge of him, and he begged, for God's sake, I would not expose him; that he had pawned them; that there were thirty-two diamonds pawned at Mr. Harris's, in Fleet-street, for one guinea and a half; I had missed, at various times, for two years past, great quantities of gold, and I supposed every man and apprentice to be thieves; I told him to come home with me, to see if any thing was missing; as we went along to my house, he begged to go back to his lodgings to get the duplicate of the diamonds; I took him to my house, and sent him to the Compter till the Magistrate sat; and in consequence of what passed, I went to his lodgings, without making any promise or threat, but begged of him to say whether any one was concerned with him, as I thought nothing else would save him; on searching, we found the duplicate of the thirty-two diamonds in a pair of breeches in a box; my apprentice, on looking farther, took out a parcel of gold cuttings, wire and filings, in my presence; the prisoner never had been entrusted with gold; he was a jeweller only. We went to the pawnbroker's, Mr. Harris, in Fleet-street, and found the thirtytwo diamonds in a box, taken from my shop; we use melting-pots in our trade, and I found the gold in one of them in his box.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you any partner? - A. No.

Court. Q. Don't you weigh your brilliants before you deliver them out? - A. No, I thought him honest.

Mr. Alley. Q. What form was the thirty-two brilliants to be worked into? - A. A crescent; he asked me if I should like that shape, which you will see the impression of in that box. (Produces a box.)

Q. You cannot speak to a brilliant without knowing the exact weight? - A. No.

Q. You usually buy them by weight? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at those - (shewing a box with a brilliant crescent) are those or not the brilliants you gave the prisoner? - A. I don't believe them to be, but I cannot swear they are not.

Q. What is the utmost value of one of those brilliants? - A.Perhaps eight or ten shillings.

Q. It is near twelve months ago that you gave the prisoner the brilliants to work? - A. Yes, it might be.

Q. You never gave him the gold? - A. No, he took that out of the skins.

Q. Is it possible to remember the precise value of the diamonds you gave him twelve months ago? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner worked for himself, and sometimes for Mr. Gibson - did not he? - A. I did not know it till I made this discovery.

Q. You ordered him to work the diamonds up at his leisure, and when you first accused him, he said he had some diamonds in pawn? - A. He acknowledged there were thirty-two diamonds of mine in pawn, and begged I would not expose him.

Q. Are there not thirty-two diamonds in the box I shew you? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Did he not say, being employed by Gibson, as you had given him unlimited time, they should be forthcoming when you wanted them? - A. No.

Court. Q. What is the utmost value of any one single piece of the gold? - A. There may be a piece worth twenty or thirty shillings; I have not weighted them separately.

JOHN THOMAS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Harris, the pawnbroker: On the 25th of February, the prisoner brought thirty-two diamonds, which I lent him one pound eleven shillings and sixpence upon. (Produces them.) He said his name was John Watson , and lived at No. 40, Brook's-market; that they were his own, and should have them out in a day or two.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. The prisoner gave the name of John Watson? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been in the pawnbroker's business? - A. Many years; it is seldom persons give their real name when they pledge things.(The diamonds produced.)

Mr. Hobdell. They are brilliants, and of a similar quality to those I delivered to the prisoner; every working jeweller has such; I cannot swear to them; no man can swear to diamonds, unless he marks them; I had told him he might work them at his leisure.

WILLARD PAUL sworn. - I am a constable, and went with Hobdell to the prisoner's; Mr. Hobdell asked him what he had done with his diamonds; the prisoner said, he had them; the prosecutor said, then deliver them to me; he said, I cannot do it directly; I said, very likely you have sold them, or pawned them; he said, he had pawned them for a guinea and a half, at Mr. Harris's, in Fleet-street; I took him into custody; we searched his lodgings afterwards, and found the duplicate in his breechespocket, in his box; we went to the pawnbroker's, and saw the diamonds.(Thomas Reynolds, a constable, confirmed the testimoney of the last witness.)(The duplicates produced.)

Prisoner's defence. The diamonds I am accused of stealing are my own, and those which my Counsel presented to the Court are Mr. Hobdell's; I pledged my diamonds, as I wanted money to make up a bill; it is customary for every one who works at home, to buy a few diamonds, as they are in the habit of working for a number of people, and are called upon to furnish a diamond or two now and then.

Evidence for the Prisoner.

SAMUEL PERKINS sworn. - I was journeyman to the prosecutor, and remember the prisoner working there; about six or eight weeks ago I remember the prisoner shewing some diamonds in a box, but I cannot swear to them.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-50

364. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , an handkerchief, value 1s. the property of John Royle .

JOHN ROYLE sworn. - On the 4th of April, my pocket was picked in Fleet-street , near Serjeant's Inn; I felt my coat move; I put my hand to my pocket and found my handkerchief gone; I turned round, and saw the prisoner with the handkerchief, I seized him, and he asked me what I wanted with him; I endeavoured to take the handkerchief from him; the watchman was crying ten o'clock, and I gave charge of him; he then dropped it at my feet, and begged I would forgive him; he was then taken to the watch-house.(John Harcourt, the watchman, corroborated Mr. Royle's testimony as to apprehending the prisoner, and his dropping the handkerchief.)(The handkerchief produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going along Fleet-street, and somebody threw the handkerchief in my face; I looked and saw it was not my own, and dropped it directly. I was rather in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-51

365. SAMUEL FORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , three muslin handkerchiefs, value 4s. 6d. the property of Joseph Bicknell .

JOSEPH BICKNELL sworn. - I keep a lodging-house , in Conduit-street, Hanover-square , and lost some handkerchiefs, but don't know when; the prisoner was servant to a gentleman who lodged in my house; I first missed them on Monday, the 11th of April; I called at Bow-street to hear the examination of the prisoner, who was taken up for another offence, and saw my handkerchiefs produced by an officer belonging to Marlborough-street; I had left them in a trunk in the prisoner's room; I went home, and examined the trunk, and missed them from two separate bundles; the prisoner had left my house, with his master, on the 31st of March.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: On Saturday, the 9th of April, I was sent for to No. 2, George-street, Hanover-square; I went up stairs to Major Philpot; the prisoner was in the room with him; I went up stairs to the prisoner's bed-room; in searching for what the Major charged him with, we found these handkerchiefs; he said, he brought them from India; I kept them, and we took him

to Marlborough-street; after which he was examined at Bow-street.(The handkerchiefs produced, and identified by the prosecutor.) GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-52

366. JOHN WILLIAMS , alias AMBROSE , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Johnson , Ann his wife and Sarah Freeman being therein, about the hour of nine in the forenoon of the 24th of March , and stealing one great coat, value 10s. and a pair of gloves, value 6d. the property of the said John Johnson .

JOHN JOHNSON sworn. - I live at Palmer's village, Tothill-fields ; my house was broke open on the 24th of March, while I was at breakfast; I went into my accompting-house and missed my great coat and a pair of gloves; I never saw it again till I saw it at the Police Office on Saturday the 26th; my wife and servant were in the house as well as myself at the time it was stolen; the door was not locked; he must have come in at the large gates, and gone into the accompting-house; I am sure the door was shut, but not locked.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Queen's-square. On Thursday the 24th March last, at nine o'clock, I met the prisoner with this coat under Mr. Johnson's house, going from Mr. Johnson's towards his own in Duck-lane; I suspected him, and asked him how he came by the coat; he said he bought it the day before of a Jew, and had given eight shillings for it; I felt the pockets, and asked him if there was any thing in them; he said no; I then took the gloves out, and put him into Tothill-fields bridewell; next day I heard that Mr. Johnson had lost the coat; I went to him, and he came and swore to the coat.(The coat produced and identified by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I was going home, and bought the coat of a Jew, and gave eight shillings for it; going along the officer stopped me, and took me into custody, though I told him I had bought it.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing, but not breaking and entering .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-53

367. JOHN SNOWDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of March , a mare, value 25l. the property of Charles Emmett .(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

CHARLES EMMETT sworn. - I live at Downend, in Gloucestershire, near Bristol . On Saturday morning the 5th of March, I had my stable door broke open; I put my mare in the stable between ten and eleven o'clock on Friday night, and left her; she had a blemish on the hoof of the off foot behind, and a white fetlock on the off foot behind; I valued her at twenty-five guineas; I locked the door and left her secure in the stable: On Saturday morning about half past six, I went to the stable and found the door broke open, and the mare gone; I heard of her about three weeks after in James Knapp 's stable at Downend.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You live near Bristol? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the boy who takes care of your stable here? - A. No.

Q. You never saw the prisoner near your house at all? - A. No.

Q. Was not the off hoof cracked? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not seen many black mares with cracked hoofs? - A. I have seen many with cracked hoofs; I had had the mare about two years.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you never see any other black mare with such a remarkable hoof as your own mare has? - A. I never did; I have been used to horses a great many years, but never saw one with such a blemish.

ROBERT HENLEY sworn. - I live at Wormley, in Gloucestershire, a mile and half from Downend, and saw the prisoner on the 1st and 2d of March, at the Maypole, at Wormley, and again, going towards Bristol on the 2d of March, he was on horseback, and another man with him, with three horses.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You are sure it was the 1st and 2d of March? - A. Yes.

Q.Where? - A. Between Wormley and Bristol.

JAMES KNAPP sworn. - I live at Downend, in Gloucestershire; by desire of Mr. Emmet, I went on the 5th of March to look after his mare; I went round the country till I came to Henley-on-Thames, on the 7th, where there was a fair, I looked all over the fair stables, and every place where I thought horses were to be seen; I dined at a house called the Broad Gate; I could not find the mare; I went away about five or six o'clock on the 7th; I then went to many other places in my way to London; I was going over Blackfriars-bridge to look for the mare, the 16th of March, when I saw the prisoner riding the black mare with a halter, talking with a man who was walking by his side; I did not know the prisoner, but I knew the mare; I did not tell him so, but said are you going to sell this mare? he said yes sir, I am. What do you want for it? he said twenty guineas; I said it is too much; he said it is worth something; I said it is, which way are you going? he said this way; I said I will go back with you, for I have no objection to buy the mare of you; we came by Fleet-market, and he said we'll have something to drink; he wanted to stop; I said, if you come on further, there is a better place; we rode along together, and he wanted to stop on Snowhill; I said you had better go a little further;

we rode together, and at the corner of Smithfield, he said, if you mean to buy the mare, buy her, for I will not go any further with you; I said, will you not give me leave to ride the mare; yes, says he, I will; I got off my horse, and got on his mare; I said, I would just ride round here, and be back in a few minutes, and I left my horse in his care; he said, he would call for six penny worth of gin and water; I rode across Smithfield, and round to the Ram Inn door; the gate happened to be shut; the ostler came with me to the public-house where I left the prisoner; I found a little boy holding my horse, but the prisoner was gone; I searched for him, but could not find him: I put the mare up at the Ram; about four o'clock next day, the 17th, Smith came to me, and in consequence of what passed, I went with him to the Red Lion, in Clothfair, Smithfield; Smith brought the prisoner from another house, through a passage, into the Red Lion; I said, how came you to run away, and trust me with the mare in that kind of way; says he, I was a little in liquor; says I, it did not appear so to me, I am glad to see you, I was afraid I should never see you again; says he, what's the matter? said I, you know what the matter is, it is a stolen mare; says he, I bought it at Henley fair; I said, I will not believe you, if you had been there, I must have seen you, where did you buy it there; he said, he bought it at Broad-gates; I said, if you had been there, I must have seen you, for I was looking for you, (the fair lasts only one day;) Smith was an officer, and I charged him with the prisoner, and I took the mare home to Down-end; I knew the mare well, having seen her every day; the next day I went before the Magistrate, and the prisoner was committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you always been equally accurate in your story? - A. Yes.

Q.Before the Magistrate you never said a word about any conversation having passed between you and the prisoner about his having bought the horse at Broad-gates? - A. He told me so when we took him.

Q. How long after the mare was lost was it that you saw the prisoner with her? - A. Eleven days.

Q. Which was of most value - your horse or the mare? - A.The mare.

Q.Which would go fastest? - A. The mare, I should think.

Q.What time of day was it? - A. Near seven o'clock.

Q. He had no difficulty in riding away from you, he being on the black mare? - A. He might; but I should have tried my horse.

Q. He gave you leave to ride the mare? - A. Yes.

Q. Was not he groggy? - A. He did not appear so.

Q.You went to one public-house, and he went to another? - A. I don't know where he went to.

Q.How long had you been away from where you left him? - A. I was not out of his fight.

Q.Was it market-day? - A. It was Wednesday.

Q.When you were at Henley, was it the fairday or before? - A. It was the same day.

Q.Don't you know that the best horses are generally sold the night before the fair-day? - A. Two or three days sometimes.

Q.Then the mare might have been fairly bought? - A. The prisoner said he had bought her on Monday evening at the fair, which was fair-day: I was there all day, and staid till it was night, about six o'clock; there were but few people there.

Q.Have you never said you did not believe the prisoner was the man who stole the mare? - A. I cannot say who stole her.

Q.Don't you know you have said so? - A. I cannot say who stole her.

Q.Don't you know you have said so? - A. I cannot say I have not said so.

HENRY SMITH sworn. - I am an officer of the Marshalsea Court; I was employed by a man; named Gerrard, in company with the prisoner, at the Red Lion, in Cloth-fair, to go to the Ram, and make a demand of a mare; Gerrard gave me the directions, and I went to the Ram Inn; a little man went with me; I saw Mr. Knapp, and the landlord; they detained me, and the little man went away; the mare was described to have a white foot behind; I made a claim, and they detained me; I told them if they would go along with me, I would shew them the person who sent me; they went with me to the Red Lion, Cloth-fair, and the prisoner was moved; we found Gerrard; the prisoner was brought in by Mr. Burridge in about a minute and a half; he was the man that sent me, and Mr. Knapp said he was the man he saw on the mare; I have seen Gerrard, and have seen the prisoner three or four times before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Did the prisoner go with you to the Ram? - A. No, Gerrard gave me the orders; I have never seen the little, man since; Gerrard was taken in custody afterwards; the prisoner was at the next public-house; I was to demand the mare as Gerrard's property; going across the market, the little man said, you go in and ask who rode the mare in; and if we find the man, we will arrest him.

SAMUEL BURRIDGE sworn. - I was at the Red Lion on the 17th of March; I heard some conversation respecting a mare a man had rode away with, between the prisoner, Gerrard, a little man, and Smith; I did not attend to it, but heard Gerrard say a countryman had rode away a mare that was on the partnership account between the prisoner and the little man; Gerrard told Smith if he would go and demand it, and get it, he should be well paid for it; Smith, Gerrard, and the little man, went

together, and the prisoner staid in the parlour; I asked the prisoner where Smith was gone; he said, he was gone to Smithfield; before I saw any of them again it might be three-quarters of an hour, when I saw a person come in who seemed in great confusion, who I did not know; the prisoner immediately jumped up, and went out of the parlour; Knapp, and five others, all came in; I went out into the yard in search of the prisoner, and into the tap-room and kitchen, but could not find him; I went into another public-house, about twenty yards off, and there I found him; I said, you have been stealing some horses; he made no answer; I asked him what he meant by sending Smith to get him into an awkward situation, and why he did not go himself; he denied it; I told him he must go with me to the other house; he went very quiet, and was taken to the Compter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You apprehended him on the spot? - A. Yes, about twenty yards off.

Q. He had time enough to run away? - A.Certainly.

Prisoner's defence. I have a receipt to prove I bought the mare; I have not had time to get my witnesses here; I sent for them on Wednesday, and to find the man I bought her of, but have not had time; when I purchased the mare it was about seven o'clock, nearly at the close of the fair.

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-54

368. ELIZABETH TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , seven silver tea-spoons, value 7s. a silver table-spoon, value 10s. two gold rings, value 10s. a pair of silver buckles, value 5s. a cloth shoe, value 6d. and six guineas, the property of James Burke , in the dwelling-house of Evan Griffiths .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

MARY BURKE sworn. - Q.Are you the wife of James Burke ? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you and your husband lodge on the 7th of March? - A. It is my misfortune that my husband and I do not live together; I live at No. 9, in Clement's-lane , just facing Clare-market; Mr. Griffiths, a plumber and glazier, keeps the house.

Q. What part of the house did you live in? - A. The two-pair-of-stairs.

Q. Do you know the Christian name of your landlord? - A. No.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 11th of March? - A. On Friday the 11th of March, the prisoner came to my room; she pushed the door, and came in, while I was sitting by the fire, with a box.

Q. Did you know her before that time? - A. She lived in St. Clement's work-house; she came to my room without my leave, liberty, or knowledge; I asked her what brought her and her box there; she told me there were twenty of them discharged out of the house; she was one, and she came to me to get a lodging; I told her I had no bed for her; but she begged so hard for me to grant her the liberty, that I gave her leave to sleep upon the boards that night.

Q.How long did she stay, with you the next day before you quitted it? - A. Till about eight o'clock in the evening of Saturday the 12th of March.

Q.Did you leave the room while she was there? - A. Yes, about four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q.Leaving her in the room? - A. Yes.

Q.When you left your apartment, do you know if you had seven silver tea-spoons in your apartment? - A. I am positive of that.

Q.Had you a silver table-spoon? - A. Yes, they were in the box.

Q. Two gold rings? - A. Yes.

Q. A pair of silver shoe-buckles? - A. Yes.

Q. Any money? - A. Yes, six guineas.

Q. Any cloth shoe? - A. Yes.

Q.How lately before you left the room had you seen these things in your box? - A. Between two and three o'clock that afternoon.

Q. How did you leave your box? - A. I locked it, and tried whether the hasp was safe, for fear of mistake.

Q. What time did you return to your room, after having left it at four? - A. Just close upon eight o'clock.

Q. When you returned, did you find that woman there, or was she gone? - A. I found her in the room, in the dark; when I came in, she was in a posture to come out of the room; I said to her, what! in the dark; she made a saint answer that I did not hear, and then she asked, me if I had any objection to let her go and make water; I told her to go; she whipped by me as quick as she could, and I never saw her again till she was taken the next day, Sunday, the 13th of March.

Q. When you got a light, did you perceive in what state your box was? - A. I lit a candle, and I found the box emptied, except one cap and one shoe.

Q. Did you make any enquiries after your things at the next door? - A. Yes, Mrs. Gould's.

Q. How soon after she was gone? - A.About an hour after I saw Mrs. Gould.

Q. Did you find any thing at Mrs. Gould's that had been taken out of your box? - A. Yes, I found the fellow to this shoe in Mrs. Gould's room; this is the shoe that was left behind in my box.

Q.When did you see any of the rest of the things? - A. The next day, Sunday, I saw the rest of them.

Q. In whose possession were they? - A.Newman's.

Q.Though your husband is not living with you, is he alive? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Q.Was the lock picked or broke? - A.The lock was so strained, that I cannot lock it, or unlock it.

SARAH GOULD sworn. - Q.Did you lodge next door to Mrs. Burke? - A.Next door but one.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the day Mrs. Burke was robbed? - A. Yes, on Saturday the 12th of March, about half past eight o'clock in the evening, she came to me.

Q.How long before Mrs. Burke complained of being robbed? - A. It was about half past nine, or better; she said, she did not like her lodging, and if I would let her leave her things, she would come in the morning.

Q. Did you give her leave? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see these things afterwards in the constable's possession? - A. Yes.

Q. Were the things you saw in the constable's possession the same that she left in your room by permission? - A. Yes, they were.

Q. Was there a shoe amongst them? - A. Yes, there was a shoe in particular.

Q. When was it you saw them in the constable's possession? - A. The same night; I did not see the prisoner again till she was taken.

Q. Why was she to leave these things? - A. She said she did not like her lodgings, and she would come in the morning to clean herself.

SUSANNAH NUNNERY sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. In Dyot-street, St. Giles's.

Q. Did the prisoner come to you on Saturday the 12th of March? - A. Yes, about eleven o'clock at night; she lodged at my house that night; I asked her where she came from (I had never seen her before to my knowledge) she said she came from Enfield; she said her husband and she had had some words, and she had left him; she said she hoped to make it up again in a few days, and she wished to have a room to herself; she asked me what my demand was; I told her one shilling; I did not see her again till Sunday, at four o'clock in the afternoon; she sent for me into a room in my house, where another person lodged; she told me she was going out, and wished to leave some property with me.

Q. What did she give you to take care of for her? - A.Three guineas, a gold ring, and some duplicates in a housewife; then I went out of the room, and went into the shop; as she turned out of the door in the passage, she gave me seven small spoons and a large one, and a pair of silver buckles; I said, good gracious! will not your husband be angry with you for bringing these things away; she said, no, they were not his property; I told her what was her's was her husband's; she said, no, they belonged to a former husband, and she had them to take care of for her children.

Q. Did she say whether she had any thing else? - A. No; she engaged the room for the night following, and then she said she would go and make it up with her husband; she went out with a lodger of mine, and the same evening she was brought back to me, and I delivered the things and the money to Mr. Newman.

BENJAMIN NEWMAN sworn. - Q. You are constable of St. Clement Danes ? - A. I am the beadle.

Q. Do you know Griffiths? - A. Yes.

Q. What is his Christian name? - A. I think it is Evan, but I am not sure; I took the prisoner into custody; she had been a pauper in the workhouse.

Q. You took her on the Sunday? - A. Yes; she said she knew nothing at all about the business; I afterwards went to Mrs. Nunnery's.(The property was produced and identified by Mrs. Burke.)

Prisoner's defence. I went to lodge at this woman's house on the Friday; I slept on the floor; on Saturday night I did not like to sleep there, and as I was coming away, I kicked against this bundle on the stairs.

GUILTY, aged 46,

Of stealing goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-55

369. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Cotton , a purse, value 6d. two Bank-notes, each of the value of 10l. another Bank-note, value 2l. and four other Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of Thomas-William Tattersall , Esq.

MATTHEW BACKHOUSE sworn. - Q.Were you servant to Mr. Tattersall? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time this happened, he lived in Chandos-street, Cavendish-square ? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe he is in an extremely ill state of health, unable to help himself? - A. He is; I attended him, and helped him in and out of bed.

Q. Had you before this got any money for Mr. Tattersall from the bankers? - A. Yes, I got change for a check of 30l. the week before the prisoner was taken up, but I cannot say what day: I gave the change to my master, and afterwards put it into my master's purse; two 10l. notes, a 2l. note, and four ones.

Q. What sort of a purse was it? - A. It was a red Morocco purse, with the head of Buonaparte upon it.

Q. Were you taken ill, so as to leave the care of your master? - A. No, but the prisoner assisted

in taking care of my master, and pulled off his clothes of a night.

Q.How soon after did you entertain any suspicion of him? - A. On Friday the 4th of March.

Q. In consequence of that, did any of the servants say any thing to him? - A. Yes; when I came down on Friday, the prisoner shewed me his watch-chain, and said, Matthew, don't I cut a swell here.

Q.Had he a watch and chain before he came into the service of your master? - A. He had none; he told me he had put in half a crown at a raffle, and had won this watch; I asked him where it was, and he said in the Haymarket; he afterwards said it was in a street at the back of the Haymarket; I asked the landlord's name, and he said he did not know. As soon as I had taken my breakfast, I enquired after my master's purse, and my master missed it in the evening; I got some constables, and took up the prisoner on suspicion.

Q.When the constables came, did you hear him say any thing respecting the purse? - A. No.

Q.Were you present when any search was made? - A.The purse was found in the privy.

Q. Do you know whether it was your master's purse or not? - A. Yes, I can swear it was my master's.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner give any directions where to find it? - A. I did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.The prisoner is quite a lad? - A. Yes.

Q. And he made use of this expression - Do not I cut a swell? - A. Yes.

THOMAS- WILLIAM TATTERSALL , Esq sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. In consequence of suspicion, I searched for my purse, and missed it.

Q. Was it shewn to you after it was found? - A.No, it was not.

Q. Did the prisoner now at the bar assist you in getting off your clothes? - A. Yes.

Q. By which means he had an opportunity of getting at your purse? - A. Yes.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you one of the Marlborough-street officers? - A. I am.

Q.Were you sent for to take charge of the prisoner? - A. I was; on Friday, the 4th of March, in the forenoon, I took him in custody on suspicion of robbing Mr. Tattersall of notes to the amount of twenty-six pounds.

Q.Before you took him before the Magistrate, did he say any thing respecting it? - A. Yes, he did.

Q.Before you tell us any thing he said, had any body said any thing to induce him to confess, or threatened him? - A. No; when I apprehended him, I told him my business, and I searched his box, and found a great quantity of things; he did the box; I asked him how he came by such a quantity of things; he said, he had picked up a ten-pound note in Oxford-street; I said, the things must have come to more than ten pounds, and asked him how he came by his watch, and he said, he had won it at a raffle in the Haymarket; I asked him where, but he could not, or would not tell me; I then took him to Marybone watch-house; just before I got him to the lock-up house, he said, Oh dear, gentlemen, I will tell you how I came by it, I certainly did rob Mr. Tattersall.

Q.Did you make any search for any thing, in consequence of what he told you? - A. Yes; he told me he had thrown the red purse down the privy; after I had put him in the watch-house, I got a candle and lanthorn, and found the pocketbook.

Q. Did you shew it to Mr. Tattersall's servant? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.Have you kept it? - A. No, it was too bad to produce.

Q.You found a great number of things in his box - did he say how he got them? - A. Yes; he gave me an account of things to the amount of the money within about three shillings.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are one of the Marlborough-street officers? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to apprehend this young man? - A. I did.

Q. When you got there, did you acquaint him with the nature of the charge? - A. Yes, I did, and I asked him what money he had got in his pocket; he pulled out a five pound note, a guinea, and some silver - nineteen shillings, three six pences, and a half-guinea; he denied the charge then, and going along Cavendish-square, he turns his head to me, and says, Oh dear, oh dear, what shall I do. I told him it was not our duty to advise him what to do; I told him he must make that up in his own mind, and he said, "I did rob Mr. Tattersall;" I searched for the pocket-book with Lovett, and we found it in the necessary.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-56

370. THOMAS JONES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Gover , Sarah Burney, widow, James Townsend and Sarah his wife being therein, about the hour of three in the afternoon of the 2d of April , and stealing a gown, value 20s. the property of the said Thomas.

THOMAS GOVER sworn. - I am a cellarman to a wine-merchant in St. James's-street: On the 2d

of April, I was at my work, and was sent for by my wife; I went home, and found the prisoner at the bar with his hands tied; he was in the custody of an officer.

SARAH GOVER sworn. - Q. You are the wife of Thomas Gover ? - A. Yes: On Saturday, the 2d of April, I locked my door, and went to St. James's-market, about half past two o'clock in the afternoon; I returned about three, and finding my door unlocked, I opened the door, and entered the room; I saw the prisoner in the room; he flew from the drawers, making a very frightful noise; upon that, he rushed out of the room, I followed him, and made an alarm of stop thief; he was stopped.

Q.Did you lose sight of him? - A.While he turned the corner of the street, he ran into a baker's shop; a gentleman stopped him, and brought him back to me, to know if I knew the man; I told him I would take my oath to him.

Q. Now look at him, are you sure he is the person? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure the person that was brought back to you, was the same person you had seen in your room? - A.The very same; this gown was in one of the drawers when I went out, and when I came home, it was at the other end of the room in a clothes basket; one of the drawers was broke very much.

Q. Did he take any thing away with him? - A. No, I lost nothing.

Q. Are you sure that gown when you went out was in your drawer? - A. Very sure.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is there any body else lives in this house besides you? - A. Yes, we have lodgers.

Q. The outer door is always open for the lodgers to come in? - A. It is on the latch.

Q. The lodgers might have left the outside door open? - A. I cannot say.

Q.This gown was in a clothes-bag? - A. No, in a clothes-basket with clean linen.

Q. How many lodgers did you leave in the house? - A. Sarah Burney, a very old woman, and Townsend, a shoe-maker, and his wife.

Q. You visit each other, don't you? - A. I keep them at a proper distance, I give them the time of the day or so; when people are in the house, you cannot help speaking.

Q. Are Townsend and his wife here? - A. No.

Q. This clean linen in a basket had been lately washed? - A. It had been ironed that morning.

Q.Was the gown clean? - A. It had not been put on since it was washed.

Court. Q. Was the street-door open? - A. I shut it after me when I went out.

Q.Any body might open it on the outside? - A. Yes.

SUSANNAH LOVETT sworn. - I was sitting at the window facing Mrs. Gover's house; I saw the prisoner come out.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.Are you the servant? - A. No, I live with my father and mother.

THOMAS DENIGHT sworn. - I am an officer: On Saturday, the 2d of April, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody for breaking open the house of Gover; I proceeded to search him, when he pulled out this book, which I took out of his hand, containing these keys, (producing five skeletonkeys;) this key the prisoner dropped out of his lefthand; I picked it up, and tried it in the room-door, and it locked and unlocked it as easy as the key of the door; this large pair of scissars belongs to Mrs. Gover; I looked at the drawers, and found they had been attempted to be opened; I picked up these scissars, and found that the scissars, in this shut situation, corresponded with the bruise in the bottom drawer which had been attempted to be broke open, and the top drawer, where the cloak was taken from, appeared to have been opened by the scissars in an open situation.

Prisoner's defence. That property is my own, and I cannot do without them; I was going to open an iron-chest in Tottenham-court-road, which I made for a Mr. Owen, who had lost the key; I was in the baker's shop when the robbery was committed.

Denight. He told me he was a copper-smith.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-57

371. MARY JONES and ELIZABETH MANDEVILLE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , eighteen yards of printed cotton, value 2l. the property of Richard Footner , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD FOOTNER sworn. - I am a linendraper , in Cranbourn-street, Leicester-square .

Q. Have you any partner? - A. No; I was in the country at the time of the transaction.

SARAH HANNEGAN called. - Q. How old are you? - A.Going of twelve years.

Q. Have you learned you catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what it is to tell a lie? - A. I know it is very wicked to tell a lie.

Q. When you are sworn here, you call God to witness the truth of what you say, which is what we call taking an oath, and if you tell a lie when you call God to witness, you will be punished both here and hereafter - do you know that? - A. Yes.

JOHN STOKES sworn. - I am shopman to Mr.

Charins, pawnbroker, No. 11, Great Sanctuary, Westminster: On the 5th of March last, I received from this girl, the witness, a piece of cotton, and lent her twelve shillings upon it. (Produces it.)

Q. How came you to take it in of such a child? - A. I thought she seemed quite old enough to take it in of; I know nothing of the prisoners.

JOSEPH PLIMPTON sworn. - I am shopman to David Cameron , pawnbroker, No. 318, in the Strand: On the 5th of March, I took in of Mary Jones a piece of printed cotton, four yards and three quarters, upon which I lent her ten shillings.

EDWARD CHARLTON sworn. - I am shopman to Nicholas Morritt , pawnbroker, York-street, Westminster: On the 5th of March, I took in of Mary Jones seven yards and a half of cotton; I lent her fifteen shillings upon it; the little girl, Sarah Hannegan , was with her.

Footner. I cannot swear to this cotton; the fag ends are torn off; I recollect having such patterns, but I cannot swear to them.

SARAH HANNEGAN called again and sworn. - I was with the prisoners when they stole this cotton.

Q. How often had you been with them stealing things? - A. I cannot say exactly.

Q. Have you a father and mother? - A. I have a mother, she goes out a washing; my mother was the first that found it out; I run away from my mother, and she came and had the house searched; I have been in this connection six weeks.

Q.Were you taken up? - A. Yes.

Q.What did you get for it? - A.They gave me what they liked.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-58

372. THOMAS MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , two halfcrown pieces, four shillings, and a sixpence, the property of Thomas Huggins , privily from his person .

THOMAS HUGGINS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a porter at Mr. Perrott's hotel, but I was out of place at the time I had my pocket picked: On the 2d of March, as the Lord-Mayor was going into St. James's palace , I found my breeches-pocket unbuttoned, and I buttoned it up again, and I found my money was safe; then I was looking over the people's shoulders, and James Bly, the officer, caught hold of the prisoner by the arm; I turned round, and found my pocket turned inside out; the prisoner was taken to Queen-square, and there was a particular half-crown, which I had taken the night before, found upon the prisoner, together with the rest of the money I lost, except a sixpence; I lost two half-crowns, four shillings, and sixpence.

Q.One half-crown you can swear to? - A. Yes.

Q.You did not feel him or see him pick your pocket? - A. No, I felt myself very much crowded.

JAMES BLY sworn. - Q. You were attending at St. James's? - A. I attended the procession; I saw the prisoner; I saw that he saw me, and immediately said hold of him; he asked me what I wanted with him; he said, I was always trobling him; Huggins immediately came up, and said he had had his pocket picked; I took the prisoner, and desired Huggins to follow me to the Office.

Q. Had you not seen him do any thing? - A. No; I searched him at the Office, and found two half-crowns upon him, and four shillings. (Produces them.)

THOMAS SKINNER sworn. - I am an officer; I was in company with Bly; I did not observe any thing more than Bly has said; Bly seized him, and desired me to assist him.

Bly. When I searched him, I laid the money down in the Office; I turned my head, and he endeavoured to secrete the marked half-crown; I took it out of his hand; when I searched him, I found, concealed under his coat, this silk handkerchief. (Producing it.)

Q.(To Huggins.) Look at that money? - A. I am perfectly sure this is the half-crown that I lost; it has the letter G upon it; the other I believe to be mine; it has a head on one side, and is plain on the other.

Prisoner's defence. It is my own money; I took it at market either the night before, or that day, I am not sure which; I buy fowls, and retail them out; Huggins said before the Magistrate he could not positively swear to that half-crown.

GUILTY, aged 39.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-59

373. MARY MANNING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , privily from the person of George Gannell , a half crown piece and two shillings , his property.

GEORGE GANNELL sworn. - Q.What are you? - A. A coach-maker , No. 10, Queen-street, Seven. Dials; I met the prisoner at the bar in Broad-street, St. Giles's; I went with her to a lodging-house in St. Giles's ; I had a one-pound note, a half crown, and two shillings, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. You are not sure? - A. I am not sure for the silver; I had some silver and a one-pound note; I am not certain as to the amount of the silver; I was with her about a quarter of an hour.

Q. Were you sober? - A.Almost; I was a little in liquor, but very little.

Q. You were not dead drunk, you could walk? - A. Yes, quite sensible; I immediately missed the money, and challenged her with having it; she denied having it, and I told her she must go

to the watch-house; she was searched, and the money found upon her, concealed in a stocking.

Q.Where did you keep this note? - A.In my waistcoat pocket.

Q.Could it not have dropped out of your waistcoat pocket? - A. No; I searched every where, and could not find it.

Q.But it might have dropped out of your pocket? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You were not quite sober? - A. No.

Q. Did you tumble about the bed? - A. Very little.

Q. How much had you been drinking? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How much beer? - A. I cannot say; I had been with my shop-mates; it was Saturday night.

Q. How many glasses of gin had you drank? - I cannot say.

Q. Had you drank any gin? - A. Yes, a little.

Prisoner. The four shillings and sixpence is my own; he gave me the one-pound note, and was to sleep with me all night, and when he had gratified his desires with me, he would not stay any longer, and wanted his money back.

JOHN TURNEY sworn. - I was officer of the night; the last witness brought the prisoner into the watch-house, about half past eleven o'clock at night; he said he had been robbed of a one-pound note, two shillings, and a half crown piece; I searched her, and found the money in her stocking, all wrapped up together. (Produces it.)

Q.(To Gannell.) Look at that one-pound note, when you had it in your pocket, was the silver wrapped up in it? - A. No; it was in the same pocket, but was not wrapped up together.

Q. Should you know the note again? - A. I do not know the number, but I know it by its being a new note, not signed at the back; there is no mark upon the money, that I know of.

Q. Did you give her any thing at all? - A. I gave her sixpence and some halfpence.

Turney. When she was at the watch-house, she said she had no more than nine-pence about her, and when the money was found, she said it was not his. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-60

374. EDWARDS REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a bullock, value 15l. the property of Joseph Belling .

JOSEPH BELLING sworn. - Q.What are you? - A. A drover ; on the 14th of March, I was driving seven bullocks to Hendon, and as I was going along the road by the Spa-fields turnpike , about three o'clock in the afternoon, a number of people came after me, I suppose as many as twenty or thirty, and they run amongst the drove, and drove one of my bullocks away from me; I desired my man to stop it, and help me, and they struck at me, and said they would knock me down.

Q. Do you know any of them? - A. No, I cannot say particularly that I do.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You found the bullock afterwards, did not you? - A. Yes, in White-conduit-fields, about an hour afterwards.

Q. Do you not believe these people meant merely to hunt the bullock? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you think they had any other intention? - A. I do not know that they had any other intention.

JAMES SHEARING sworn. - I am an errandboy at a china-painter's; I was coming by, and saw the prisoner take the bullock out of the drove, and hit the drover on the neck.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was the person? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. No.

Q. What did he do when he took the bullock out? - A. They went up the hill with the bullock, and the drover went after him, and he said he would cut his b - y liver out if he came after him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you near Bagnigge-Wells? - A. Yes.

Q. And White-counduit-fields is a very small distance? - A. Yes.

Q. It was a plan for hunting a bullock, was it not? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you join in the hunt after the bullock was separated from the drove? - A. No.

STEPHEN BROWNE sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I live with my father, in George-street; he makes India floor-mats; I saw the prisoner strike the drover, and I saw him take a stick, and drive the bullock along as hard as he could.

Q. Do you know what became of the bullock? - A. They drove it away; some runners came up, and they all ran away.

THOMAS MAYHEW sworn. - Q.What are you? - A. One of the conductors of the patrol belonging to Bow-street: On the 14th of March, I received an information that a drover had been struck, and a beast forcibly taken from him: I took Shearing, one of the witnesses, to a house, where I knew these sort of men frequent, and he pointed out the man that struck the drover, and I took him into custody; that was about eight o'clock in the evening; I never saw the bullock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Which way the bullock run, you do not know? - A. No.

THOMAS AVERY sworn. - I am an officer: On the 14th of March, I saw the bullock run up Penton-place, with the drover some distance behind: he informed me it was his bullock; the bullock ran up to White-conduit-house, and when I got in sight of the bullock, I saw a great many of them leave it, eight or nine; I ran to

wards them, the drover could not keep up with me; he called out, that is him, but he being behind, I did not know which was the man; I let him go; Shearing came up, and said he should know the man.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there? - A. I cannot say; there were several of them that I had seen before following bullocks.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Persons that you have seen in the pastime of bullock-hunting? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. What is alledged against me, I am quite innocent of; I did not leave my master's shop till half past three o'clock.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUITLY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-61

375. THOMAS GALLOWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , a piece of printed cotton, value 40s. the property of Robert Cottle , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT COTTLE sworn. - I am a linen-draper , No. 302, Holborn ; I can only identify the property.

- READ sworn. - I am a journeyman tailor: On Friday the 4th of March, about a quarter past six in the evening, I passed Mr. Cottle's house, in Holborn; I observed the prisoner handing about the door in a very suspicious manner; I turned back again, and passed him; he went off from the door, and went to No. 306; he placed himself inside the shop-door for the space of two minutes; he then came out, and returned to Mr. Cottle's again; I crossed over, and stood at the door of a Mr. Harris opposite, after he had walked to and fro' several times; then I saw him go upon the step of Mr. Cottle's door, and instantly pulled a piece of cotton from the window, and ran off with it; he ran across towards Warwick-court, and I stopped him; just as I came close to him he let it fall close to my feet; I secured him immediately.

Q. You never let him go? - A. No; I am sure he is the man.(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going home, and seeing a scuffle I stopped, and they laid hold of me.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing to the value of 39s. [ No sentence passed .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-62

376. JOHN READING and DENNIS DOUBT were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Nathan , with intent to steal, about the hour of nine in the night of the 19th of February , and burglariously stealing two great coats, value 18s. the property of the said Henry.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

MARY NATHAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the wife of Henry Nathan.

Q. Where is your house? - A. No. 7, Rosemary-lane .

Q. What day of the month was it you charged these men with having had any thing? - A. On the 19th of February, between the hours of nine and ten at night.

Q. Was your husband at home at that time? - A. No, he was not.

Q. Who was at home? - A. A servant-boy, Isaac Levy, and a servant-girl, who was in the parlour.

Q.Look at the prisoners - do you recollect them? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Did you know them before? - A. No, I cannot say that I did.

Q. Tell us what passed? - A. I was standing at the door with the boy; the boy asked the tall man if he would buy any clothes; he said, no, he could buy them of his master; the boy asked him who was his master; he told him he was over the way; he immediately knocked him down; I told the man he had better desist, and not do it again, or else he would get into trouble; I endeavoured to pull the boy in, when the other prisoner came up, I shut to the half door, and bolted it; I had not time to put to the top door; they both rushed in, and knocked me down on the counter; there was a candle on the counter, which was likewise knocked down; they both came in, and the short man drew a knife upon me, and swore a very wicked oath; we had been serving clothes, and I saw the tall man take two garments off the counter.

Q. What sort of garments were they? - A.Two great coats.

Q. What is the name of the tall man? - A.Reading.

Q. What became of the coats? - A. I saw Reading take the coats with him; I called out, murder! that I was robbed.

Q. Were you much alarmed? - A. I sainted away, and saw no more.

Q. How long after was it that they were taken? - A. The same evening.

Q. Who was the person that apprehended them? - A. Lee was one of them.

Q. Was the property found? - A. No.

Q. You say you shut to the half hatch? - A. Yes, it had three bolts to it.

Q. Did they get over the hatch, or force it? - A.They broke the hatch.

Q. Were the bolts broke? - A. Yes; there was a kind of hasp, and that was broke in two; I shewed it to the officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long was

it after this man had been in the shop that they were taken? - A. I believe, about half an hour.

Q. They were taken at a public-house at a very short distance? - A. No; the constables took them as they were coming out.

Q. What time in the evening was it? - A. Between nine and ten.

Q. And you had just before been serving some customers? - A. Mr. Nathan had.

Q. What time do you shut up? - A.Eleven o'clock on a Saturday night.

Q. Do you do business of a Saturday? - A. Yes, after Sabbath.

Q. What sort of coats were these? - A. One was a dark brown coat, and the other a mixture.

Q. What sort of a mixture? - A. A pepper and salt, or not quite so light.

Q. Were they single breasted or double breasted coats? - A. Both double breasted.

Q. What sort of cloth were they made of? - A.Beaver.

Q. Do you know whether they had buttons at the sleeves? - A. No, I cannot say.

Q. Can you tell what sort of collars they had? - A.No, I cannot remember.

Q. I take it for granted, you always charge more for a coat with a velvet collar than for a coat without? - A. No, we don't make any difference in old garments.

Q.One of the men drew a knife upon you? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that knife forth coming? - A. No.

Q. Did not you say before the Magistrate that you found that knife in your shop? - A. No; I said there had been a knife found, but I did not find it; the constable found it.

Q.Was not that knife which has been shewn to you, upon your oath, the knife that your husband had been himself continually in the habit of using? - A. I did not see the knife.

Q.Had you not a conversation with Trott about the knife? - A. No.

Q.Did you not admit to them that it was your husband's knife? - A. No, I never did.

Q. This was on Saturday night? - A. Yes.

Q. The men were in custody all day on Sunday, and were examined on Monday? - A. Yes.

Q.Upon the oath you have taken, did you not expressly state to the officers that they had not stolen any thing from you - that they only made a riot at the door? - A. I never said any thing of the kind.

Q.Have you not exprssly stated, that these men were never in your shop at all? - A. I could never have said that.

Q. Have you not said it? - A. No, I never did, or any thing of the kind.

Q. Did you say to the officers at the time the men were taken, that they had taken the great coats? - A. I said, I was robbed; but I was in too much confusion to recollect exactly what I said; both the officers were disguised in liquor; Mr. Nowlan got a reprimand from the Magistrate; I told them I was robbed.

Q. Had you been selling any other garment that evening in your shop? - A. Yes; Mr. Nathan had been selling some pantaloons.

Q. Did you miss any pantaloons? - A. No.

Q. You missed a great coat, did not you? - A. I saw him take them out of the house.

Court. Q. Who were the officers? - A. Trott and Nowlan, belonging to Lambeth-street; when Mr. Nathan came home, I went immediately for an officer.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you not tell me, that you did not tell the officers what you were robbed of, because they were disguised in liquor? - A. No.

Q. Did you or not tell me, that the officers were intoxicated? - A. I told you I was confused, and did not know hardly what I said to the officers.

Q.Did you or not know, at the time the officers came, what you had been robbed of? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Then you cannot undertake to say, whether you told them what you had been robbed of? - A. I cannot; I told them I was robbed.

Q. They were taken to the watch-house, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you or the officers go to the watch-house? - A. I could not get at it, there was such a riot.

Q. Did you see the constable of the night that night? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you tell the constable of the night you had been robbed of two great coats? - A. I told him I had been robbed.

Q. You were not confused then? - A. I was very ill.

Q. This was a long time after it happened? - A. No, it was not long.

Q.Surely you could not have been so much agitated at that time? - A. I don't know that I told him.

Q. Did you not go to Lambeth-street on the Monday? - A. Yes.

Q. Again I ask you, did you not tell both Trott and Nowlan that this man had not robbed you of any thing? - A. I never said any thing of the kind.

Q.Again I ask you, did you not say they had never been in the shop? - A. I did not.

Q. Your servant's name was Mary Cotterell, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether she is here, or not? - A. I have seen her in Court; she was knocked down at the same time in the shop.

Q. The first of this transaction took place when

the men were passing by, and the boy accosted them as usual? - A. Yes; I saw the tall man, I dare say, twenty minutes before, on the opposite side of the way.

Q. Did not the man say he did not want to buy any thing, and upon his opening his mouth, being an Irishman, did you not call him a Vinegar-hill rebel? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, was no such expression used by your servant? - A. Not that I heard of.

Q. I ask you again, was no such expression made use of? - A. I did not hear it.

Q.And you were standing by him all the time? A. I am very sure he did not.

Q. You would have us to understand, he knocked the boy down without any provocation whatever? - A. He did.

Q. You have never said, you were robbed of a waistcoat and two coats? - A.Never.

ISAAC LEVY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Were you a servant to Henry Nathan? - A. I was at that time.

Q. Do you recollect either of the two men at the bar? - A. Yes, both very well.

Q.About what time was it you first saw them? - A.Between nine and ten, as near as I can tell.

Q.Where were you at that time? - A. At the door.

Q.Who was with you? - A. My master was in the shop.

Q.Was your master at home at that time? - A. No, he was not.

Q.What happened as you were standing at the door? - A.The tall man was coming by, and I asked him if he wanted to buy any clothes; he immediately said, if I wanted to buy any clothes, I could buy them of your master.

Q.What evening was this? - A.Saturday evening.

Q. Did you say any thing to that? - A. I said, who is my master; upon that, he up with his fist, and knocked me down; then my mistress tried to save me, when the shortest man came up to my mistress, and knocked her down; then we shut the door, as well as we could, but we had not power to shut the top hatch; they forced the hatch, and broke the bolts off; they broke two or three of the windows, and knocked down the candle on the counter; we had a customer, who wanted to buy a pair of pantaloons and a waistcoat.

Q. Did they do any thing to your mistress after they got in? - A. The little one drew a knife upon her.

Q. What did they say? - A.There were two coats on the counter; my mistress called out, murder and fire, I am robbed; and I immediately saw the tall man run out with two great coats, the tall man run out first, and the little one after him; the little one drew the knife, and I took up the bar to save myself.

Q. Did you see which way they went? - A. They ran right over the way into a court; I don't recollect the name of the court, I believe it is White-horse-court.

Q.Directly opposite your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a thoroughfare? - A. No; with the fright my mistress fainted away; I said, mistress, don't be uneasy, for I know the men who robbed you.

Q.Did she call out before the men went out of the shop? - A. She called out, when the men went out with the two coats, murder! fire! I am robbed.

Q.Did you see what became of them afterwards? - A. No; I shut the door, and ran after my master, and after the officers; I could not find my master, he came home while I was out.

Q.Did you find a constable? - A. I could not find one on the beat; I went up to the watch-house, and brought two with me.

Q.How long was it before they were taken? - A.About a quarter of an hour, as near as I can guess.

Q.After the robbery had been committed? - A. Yes.

Q.You never found your coats again? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure these are the two men? - A. Yes, I am certain sure of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You don't live at Mr. Nathan's now? - A. No.

Q.How long had you lived with him at that time? - A. About three months.

Q.Had you lived with Mr. Davis, a grocer, before that? - A. Yes.

Q.How long is it since you left Mr. Davis, the grocer? - A. I believe about four years.

Q. What was the reason of your leaving Mr. Davis? - A.Because he did not give me money enough; he gave me seven shillings a week, and I had to board myself.

Q.Who did you live with before? - A. Mr. Phillips.

Q. How long had you lived with him at that time? - A.About a twelvemonth; it may be four or five years ago.

Q. You left his service, because your wages were not sufficient? - A. Yes.

Q.Then he had not made any complaint against you about the loss of any sugar? - A. No, he had not.

Q. I suppose you know something about rewards that are given in cases of burglary? - A. No, I do not; I can neither read nor write.

Q.But you have ears to hear? - A. I never knew or heard any thing of it.

Q. You was standing at the shop-door? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew the prisoners before? - A. I have known the tall one by passing.

Q.You knew he was an Irishman, did not you? - A. I believed he was.

Q.Did you know his name? - A. No, I never knew him only by passing backwards and forwards.

Q. You know there was a rebellion in Ireland some time ago? - A. I don't know any thing about it.

Q. You have heard of the late rebellion in Ireland? - A. I know nothing about it, I am sure.

Q.Did you ever hear of a place called Vinegarhill? - A. Yes.

Q. You know that is in Ireland? - A. No, I don't.

Q. Did you never hear of the rebels at Vinegarhill? - A. No.

Q. How came you to hear any thing about Vinegar-hill? - A. I have heard people talk about Vinegar-hill; it is a customary thing in Rosemary-lane to say Vinegar-hill.

Q.It is a bye-word in Rosemary-lane, is it? - A. Yes.

Q.Was it you or Mrs. Nathan who told the prisoners that they might go to Vinegar-hill? - A. I did not say any such thing.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Nathan has been examined? - A. I never heard any body mention any thing about it that night.

Q. Do you mean to say you did not hear any body use the term Vinegar-hill to the prisoner that night? - A. No.

Q.Nor the word rebel? - A. No.

Q. Mrs. Nathan was knocked down? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you see a knife? - A. Yes.

Q. That was your master's knife - was it not? - A. No.

Q.Did not you tell us the candle was blown out? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you saw the knife in the dark? - A. No, there was another candle in the shop; that was the candle that stood on the counter.

Q. Your master was not at home? - A. No.

Q. Your Sabbath had been just over? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he been spending his Sabbath abroad? - A. No.

Q.How long was it since you had seen him? - A. I had not been at home all that day.

Q. Do you recollect what hour it was when your Sabbath terminated? - A. I cannot say; I had not been at home above an hour.

Q. You was at home when the man looked at the pantaloons? - A. Yes.

Q.How long before that was it you master went out? - A. I cannot rightly tell.

Q.Cannot you tell whether it was an hour, or a quarter of an hour, before these men came in? - A. No, I cannot recollect any time at all.

Q. You are sure it was some time before the men came in? - A. It was a little time, but how long I cannot tell.

Q. If it has been sworn it was your master that sold these pantaloons and these waistcoats to the men, that is not true? - A. He was in the shop, and shewed them.

Q.Did not you tell me your master went out? - A. Yes, after he had sold the pantaloons; he sold them, and took the money.

Q.Did the same men buy a great coat? - A. No, he wanted a waistcoat.

Q.You told me over and over again, that your master was out before the men came in to look at the pantaloons? - A. I did not take you right then; he was at home, but I could not recollect how long after it was that he went out.

Q.What did he get for the pantaloons? - A.Seven shillings.

Q.What sort of pantaloons were they? - A. Blue pantaloons.

Q.Then there were no pantaloons lying on the counter at the time the prisoners came in? - A. No, nothing but two coats and a waistcoat.

Q.Have you never said they took two coats and a waistcoat? - A. I said, they took two coats; there was a waistcoat lost.

Q. Mrs. Nathan knew the waistcoat was lost? - A. Yes.

Q.And neither you nor she charged these men with stealing the waistcoat? - A. No.

Q. They were lost at the same time? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of great coats? - A. One was a dark brown, and the other a pepper-and-falt mixture.

Q. What distance is it from your house to the watch-house? - A.Hardly a minute's walk.

Q. Your neighbours shops were not shut at this time? - A. No, the shops were all open.

Q.When you saw these men go right across into the court, why did not you get some of your neighbours to assist in taking them? - A. I asked them, but they were frightened to go with me.

Q. Do you recollect the name of any one that you asked to go along with you? - A. The next door neighbour, I believe, Mr. Levy.

Q. Did you ask any body else? - A. No.

Q. And the reason was that they were all frightened? - A.They were all frightened.

Q.Did you say, when you came out of the shop, that these men had stole two great coats? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes.

Q. When the men were taken into custody by the watchmen, did you tell them that they had done any thing more than made a riot, and knocked you down? - A. Yes; I told them they had stole two coats.

Q.Then the moment the men came up, they knocked you down? - A. Yes; I told them they had stole two coats.

Q. Then the moment the men came up, they knocked you down? - A. Yes.

Q. As soon as you had asked one of them if he would buy any thing? - A. No, he said he could buy them of my master.

Q.Then he did not say to you that your master was over the way? - A. Not that I could hear; I did not hear it.

Q. Your mistress fainted? - A. Yes.

Q. She was not knocked down upon the counter? - A. She was knocked down outside the door into the shop.

Q.She was knocked down in the door-way, I suppose? - A. We both got up as well as we could to fasten the door, and I found the half-hatch shut.

Q. Do you know Trott, the officer, and Nowlan? - A. I know them by coming backwards and forwards to our house.

Q.Have you not said, both to Nowlan and Trott, that these men never took any thing out of the shop, and that your only complaint against them was having assaulted you? - A. I never saw them that night.

Q.Did not you see them at Lambeth-street? - A. Yes, I have seen them.

Q.Did not you tell them, at Lambeth-street, that they had knocked you down, and had not stolen any thing? - A. No.

Q. Do you remember whether the lady, who was here just now, has been in the House of Correction lately? - A. I never heard that.

Q. You never heard it in the neighbourhood? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where does Mr. Davis, the grocer, live? - A. The corner of the Minories.

Q. Have you seen him here to-day? - A. No.

Q. The only difference between you was as to wages? - A. Yes.

Q.Where does Mr. Phillips live? - A. A little higher up.

Q.And you went from Phillips's to Davis's? - A. Yes.

Q. You had no reason to believe they have left their place of abode, have you? - A. No.

JOHN LEE sworn - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Are you a watchman in the neighbourhood of Rosemary-lane? - A. I am the houseman of Aldgate watch-house: On the 19th of February, between nine and ten o'clock, I apprehended the prisoners, with the assistance of the watchmen and patrol.

Q. Where did you take them? - A.Just by Mr. Nathan's house.

Q.How near the Fourteen Stars - one hundred yards? - A. It is not one hundred yards from Mr. Nathan's house to the Fourteen Stars.

Q.Did you see whether they came out of the Fourteen Stars, or not? - A. I did not.

Q. Who gave you charge of them? - A. Mr. Nathan himself.

Q. Not the woman? - A. No.

Q. Did you tell the prisoners what you took them up for? - A. Mr. Nathan gave charge for breaking open his door, and robbing the shop; when I got to the watch-house, I took down the charge in these words -

Q.Have you got your watch-book here? - A.No.

Q.Did you put it down at the time the charge was given? - A. No, I did not put it down till I got to the watch-house; he gave me charge of them for breaking his door, and robbing the shop; as soon as they were taken, Doubt made a great deal of resistance, and another man endeavoured to rescue him.

Q. Did you take any thing from either of the prisoners? - A. I did not find any thing upon them.

Q.Were you by when any thing was found? - A. I was not; the street was quiet when I took them; there was no riot or confusion, but immediately as I took them, there was a mob arose.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have said this public-house is about one hundred yards from Nathan's? - A. Yes.

Q. It was not the witness, Levy, that made the complaint to you, but Nathan? - A. It was.

Q. I suppose your watch-house had been open sometime? - A. I set the patrol at six, and the watch at ten; the watch were not set at the time.

Q. If you had been told that any coats had been stolen by the men, you would have gone into the public-house to look for them? - A.Certainly; I did not hear a word that coats were stolen.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.All they told you was, that they had robbed the shop, but did not tell you what they had robbed it of? - A.No.

Prisoner Reading's defence. This man, Levy, came by me, caught me by the elbow, and wanted me to buy clothes; I told him, I wanted no clothes; his mistress was at the door, and she called me a Vinegar-hill rebel, and said, let him go about his business; then she gave me in charge of an officer, and got me confined; I have been there eleven weeks; I am as innonent of it as you are now, my Lord; I was never inside the door.

Prisoner Doubt's defence. I was along with him at the same time, when this man's mistress called him a Vinegar-hill rebel; they charged the constable with me, and in the scuffle I lost my hat.

For the prisoner.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I believe you are the head officer of Lambeth-street? - A. I am one of the officers.

Q. Do you remember seeing Mrs. Nathan at your Office? - A. I saw Nathan himself; he applied to us at the Flying Horse for some officers to take up some men for a riot, and breaking his windows; and I made answer, if we did not see the peace broke, we could not take them up.

Q.Did he at that time make any charge of a felony? - A. He did not.

Q. I need not ask you, if he had, if you would immediately have gone and taken them? - A.Certainly.

Q.Had you any conversation with Mrs. Nathan? - A. Mrs. Nathan asked me, if what passed before the Magistrate would be before the Grand Jury, and I told her, no, but it would be before the Judge at the Old Bailey.

Q.Did you know Mrs. Nathan before? - A. I took her up for a lottery transaction, as a vagrant.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know Mrs. Nathan? - A.Perfectly well.

Q.And her husband? - A. Yes.

Q.Had you any conversation with Mrs. Nathan upon this business? - A. Yes; on Saturday night, the 15th of February, I saw Mr. Nathan in conversation with the last witness, Griffiths, about a disturbance at his house; Nowlan and I went with Nathan.

Q. Had you any conversation with Mrs. Nathan - did she make any charge of a robbery? - A.She did not; when I went to enquire, I asked where the people were, for every thing was clear; she said, they were gone; she wanted two men taken into custody for breaking the windows, and making a riot; I said, I could not take them for that; then she said, they had broke the bolt of the door; I said, she might get a piece of iron from an old iron-shop for a penny, and it would be as fast as ever; she said, if I would not take them into custody, she was determined to be revenged of them; she said she could go and point out the men to us in their own lodgings.

Court. Q. Where were the two men then? - A. She said at their lodgings; Nowlan asked her who they were, and she mentioned the names of the prisoners.

Q.What did she say? - A.She said John Reading , and I think she said Dennis Doughty, had broke two panes of glass, and forced the door open; it is a kind of half hatch; I then asked her where the bolt was.

Q. You are sure the bolt was off? - A. Yes, the bolt was given into my hands by a servantmaid; one staple seemed to have been forced out by some means or other.

Q. Where did she tell you the men were? - A. Up a court just opposite; she persisted in it that we should take the charge; I explained to her why we could not take it; I then asked her if she had lost any thing; she said, no, she had not; Nowlan then made answer, let us go about our business; we were going about another felony in East-Smithfield.

Court. Q.She lives in Rosemary-lane? - A. Yes.

Q.What public-house were you at? - A. The Flying Horse, a public-house we use, just by the Office.

Q. How far from Rosemary-lane? - A.Rather better than a quarter of a mile.

Q. Mr. Nathan had been to you to give information? - A. Yes, he gave information to Griffiths of a riot.

Q. As it was only a riot, you did not hurry yourselves? - A. We walked pretty fast; we went on purpose to oblige Mr. Nathan.

Q. How far is the watch-house from Rosemary-lane? - A.About five hundred yards from their house.

Q.You did not by chance see Lee that night? - A. That is a watch-house we seldom go to.

Q.Then you did not go there that night? - A. No; and on the Monday at the examination I was not there.

Q. Nor Griffiths nor Nowlan? - A. I believe Nowlan was there.

Mr. Alley. Q. If she had told you any thing was stolen, you would have gone over and taken them into custody? - A. Yes; there is one thing I forgot, she gave as a reason for it, that there was a person, of the name of Leary, living opposite, who was frequently quarrelling with her, and she said she dare say that he had sent these Irishmen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.How came you to make such haste to go down? - A.Because Mr. Nathan said there was a disturbance.

Q.Did you find any body about the house? - A. No, every thing quite quiet.

Q. So Mrs. Nathan told you the place where they lodged? - A. She said she could shew me.

Q. And you objected to going? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell us why you went down? - A. Because he represented there was a great riot.

Q.Upon your oath, did not Griffiths ask him if there was any breach of the peace? - A. No, I did not hear much said; Griffiths said, be careful, if you don't see any thing amiss, don't take the charge; I think I recollect Griffiths asking him if he was robbed, and he said, no.

Q. You don't take persons to this watch-house? - A. No.

Q. You thought it was not quite right in Lee to take them to his watch-house? - A. I did not know they were in custody.

Q.You did not tell the Magistrate what had passed between Mr. Nathan and you? - A. No, the Magistrate had fully committed them before I came back.

Mr. Alley. Q. These poor fellows were strangers to you, and hearing this pass, you came forward as an honest man to give this account of it? - A. Yes, I should have come if I had not been subpoenaed.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am an officer of Lambeth-street.

Q. Do you know the two men at the bar? - A. Not to my knowledge; I saw them at the Office; I did not know them before.

Q.Had you ever any conversation with Mrs. Nathan upon the subject of the charge? - A. Yes, on Saturday night, the 19th of February, at her house; Trott was with me.

Q. Her husband had been to the Office for somebody? - A. Yes; as soon as we went into the house, she said she was very glad we came; I asked her what was the matter; she said, there were a parcel of Irish people had bred a riot about her house, and broke her windows; I asked her what was the cause of it, and she said there was one Leary, that lived right opposite, who always took an advantage when her husband was out of the way, to send these Irish people to breed a riot, and to ill treat her; I asked her what they had done; she desired I would lay hold of the candle, and see the window broke; there were two squares of glass, and likewise the bolt of the hatch; the staple that held the bolt was broke; I asked her whether they had stole any thing, and she said, no, I cannot say that they have; I asked her if they came into the house, and she said no, they had not come beyond the threshold; I asked her if she knew their names, or where they lived; she said, they lived in Whitehorse-court, of just opposite; she knew their names, and where they lived; she said, I insist upon your going and taking charge of them immediately; I told her no, I did not think I was justified, as I saw no peace broke; I told her to come up on Monday night to get a warrant, and I would apprehend them for her, and get them punished.

Q. If she had told you a felony had been committed, you would immediately have apprehended them? - A.Immediately; Mr. Nowlan said, if you will not take charge of them, the patrols will; I replied, if the patrols do wrong, that is no reason I should; that is all I know till I saw them on the Monday morning at the Office.

Q. Did she tell you they had knocked her down upon the counter? - A. No, she did not; we asked her several times if she had been robbed of any thing, and she said, no; I was called in before the Magistrate, and asked why I did not take charge of them for the felony; I was sworn, I declared, upon oath, she did not charge them with felony; and then she said it was Trott.

Court. Q.Do you know whether these men did really live in the court? - A. No, I never saw them, to my knowledge, till I saw them at the Office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were called in before the Magistrate? - A. I was sworn.

Q. Had she her recollection about her at the time you was at her house? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you quite sure you had? - A. Yes, as well as ever I had.

Q. Did you tell the Magistrate the woman had told you she had lost nothing? - A. Yes, I told him she never mentioned that she had been robbed at all.

Q.Upon your oath, do you mean to swear you told the Magistrate you had asked her the question, and she had told you she had lost nothing? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. How came you not to tell me so at first? - A. I did not rightly understand the question.

Q.You told the Magistrate she expressly told you she had lost nothing at the time? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes.

Q.And the Magistrate committed them? - A. Yes.

Q. She told you she knew their names? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon you oath, did she tell you their names? - A. No, I did not ask her; I told her if she knew their names, I would look for them.

Q.Trott and you were close together? - A. We were both in the shop with her.

Q.And do you mean to say you did not ask the names, and that she did not tell you the names? - A. I did not ask her the names.

Q. Nor Trott? - A.Not in my hearing.

Q. If she had said the name of one was Reading, and the other Doughty, you must have heard it? - A. No, I might not, because she made high words.

Q.If Trott had put that question to her, must you not have heard it? - A. I might not.

Q.Upon your oath, before the Magistrate did she call them by their right names? - A. I was not in at the beginning of the examination; I did not know that they were there till the Magistrate called me in.

Q. Did the Magistrate only take one examination of them? - A. No.

Q. He committed them, notwithstanding what you said? - A. Yes.

Q.Did the Magistrate say any thing to you at all? - A. No.

Q.Recollect yourself upon the subject of sobriety, did he say any thing to you? - A.Never.

Q.Nor drunkenness? - A. No, he did not; I was as sober as ever I was.

Q.However the Magistrate committed them, notwithstanding what you said, upon the first examination? - A. Yes.

Q.Do not you know they were not named by their right names before the Magistrate? - A. I do not.

Q. Do not you know they were not named by the names they are now indicted by? - A.No.

Griffiths. I positively say, upon my oath, we were both sober.

MARY COTTERELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You lived servant with Mrs. Nathan? - A. Yes, my mistress told me to come here as a witness, and she would make me a present of a gown and a petticoat.

Q. For what purpose? - A. To come and swear

against these men; she told me, as I was an Irish person, and a Christian, a word from me would go farther than ten from her.

Q. She is a Jewess? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you promise her you would come? - A. No, I refused to come.

Q. In consequence of your refusing to come, did she do any thing? - A. When I found the purpose for which she gave it me, I threw the gown at her, and the petticoat she tore off my side.

Q. Did she keep you in her service, or did she dismiss you? - A. I left her place.

Q. In consequence of not appearing against these men? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did you see the men in the shop, or see them attempt to take any thing? - A. No.

Q. And yet this woman asked you to swear against them? - A. Yes; I said, they had never been in doors, and she said, Oh, you fool, there is no harm in taking an English oath, any more than kissing a thumb.

Q. In consequence of this, you left her service? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. She told you it would be a special recommendation, not only that you were a Christian, but an Irish woman, you are sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Of what religion are you? - A. I am a Roman Catholic; there was one of the panes of glass broke when I first came there, and the other she broke herself.

Q. Were you there when this riot took place? - A. Yes, on Saturday night; these two men passed by the door, and her barker and herself stood by the door plying customers, and they wanted to bring these men in by force as customers, and the men refused to come in; they were rather in liquor to be sure.

Q. Who was in liquor? - A.These two men; then they said, they would come in to no d-d Jew's house; then she said, d-n them, let them go, for they are Irish rebels, they are Vinegar-hill rebels; then the barker went and struck the men, and the men struck the barker; upon that, my mistress and I got the barker in doors; then the barker broke the bolt off the door to get out to sight them, and my mistress broke one pane of glass.

Q. What did she break the pane of glass for? - A. She was trying to get out.

Q. Who prevented her getting out? - A.The door was locked, and the barker broke the lock off the door to get out, and she broke the square of glass trying to keep the men in doors; she and I endeavoured to keep the barker in, and after she had broke the glass, she fell in a faint.

Q. What was that for; nobody touched her? -- A. No; but she was frightened; there was nobody in doors but the barker, and I, and my mistress.

Q. So this little fellow, the barker, had a great desire to go out and fight these two great men? - A. Yes.

Q. You told the officer when he came, that it was the barker that broke off the bolt, and not the man? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. You told Trott and Nathan it was the barker that broke off the bolt, and not the men? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are quite sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. When he had broke off the bolt, and got out, what did he do then? - A. We kept him in, we would not let him go out, and the men returned again.

Q. How near were you? - A. I was inside the shop door.

Q. Did you see which way the men went? - A. No.

Q. What prevented the man getting out, when the bolt was off? - A. My mistress and I prevented him.

Q. But your mistress fainted away? - A. She came to again, she was not long in a saint; he only tore off one bolt; the door was not opened.

Q. Where were you when you went out of Court, was not you in the gallery? - A. No.

Q. So you told all this to the officers, Nowlan, and to the others? - A. No, I did not tell them nothing.

Q. Did not you tell them the barker broke off the bolt? - A. Yes, that was the night the men were taken up; my mistress said they had not stole any thing.

Q. But you told them, the barker pulled off the bolt? - A. My mistress herself told them so.

Q. You heard her? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Nowlan.) Did this woman tell you the barker had torn off the bolt? - A. Yes.

Q.And did her mistress tell you so? - A. No; my mistress told me the men burst it open; my master said, he could not confine the men, if he did not say they stole the coats.

Examined by the Court. Q.Did you ever hear where these men lived? - A. No, I never saw the men till I saw them the day before yesterday; I saw one of them at the Old-bailey, and the other at Clerkenwell.

Lee. One of them lives in Blue Anchor-yard, and the other in White Horse-court.

MARY COOKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. I work for Rosemary-lane; I make children's dresses; I live opposite Mrs. Nathan.

Q. Look at the bar and tell me if you saw either of those persons? - A. I think I saw them once before at Mrs. Nathan's door.

Q. Was there any riot there? - A. Yes, with the

salesman stopping them as they passed by, asking them to buy cloths; they positively told them they wanted none; then Mrs. Nathan walked forward, and said they were Irish rebels; upon that the barker said, if they were, he would cut their heads off; they went past, and then one of them returned and asked who there was that would cut their heads off? upon that the shortest of the two prisoners pulled the other, and told him to come away, and with pulling him, the tall one fell down; then the barker came out and said he was not afraid of them, he had licked four or five, and was not afraid of any of the b-y Irish set.

Q. Did you ever see the men go into Mrs. Nathan's shop? - A. No; they were not nigh the door to go into the shop at all.

Q. Are you an Irish or an English woman? - A. I was born in Cloth-fair.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowls. Q. So there was not a blow struck on either side? - A. No.

Q. Neither the barker struck or the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. But one pulled the other and he tumbled into the mud? - A. Yes.

Q. Any body at Mrs. Nathan's door might have seen that? - A. Yes; I was looking out at my window at the same time.

JOHN POWIS sworn - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. I was the master of a collier at the time this happened.

Q. Do you live in the neighbourhood of Rosemary-lane when you are in London? - A. I live opposite the prosecutrix's door; the two men at the bar were passing; Levy plied them in the usual way, do you want any clothes? they said they did not want any; he heard their tongues were Irish, and said you b - y Vinegar-hill rebels; his mistress came out, and said we will give the Irish crew their due, or something to that purpose; the men enraged at the expression returned, and asked for what reason they called them rebels; the man very properly could make no reply, and they asked him again why he called them Vinegar-hill rebels, and they could like to have satisfaction for what he had said; a scuffle of course (the men being enraged) ensued, and they struck the man; he told them he had licked half a dozen Irishmen before, and he was sure he could lick half a dozen now; the tallest of the men made a blow at him, and he ran in doors.

Q. The barker did not strike him? - A. Yes; the barker returned the blow, and ran in directly.

Q. From the observation you had, and upon the oath you have taken, were they ever in the shop? - A. No, they never were.

Court. Q. What became of them afterwards? - A. They left the house, and went into a public-house, called the Fourteen Stars; I saw them go in myself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You did not go in after them? - A. No, I saw them go in.

Q. This brave young chap ran away at the first blow being aimed at him? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not attempt to get out after them? - A. Yes, after he heard they were gone away he grew bold, and endeavoured to get out; I heard the servant say he had wrenched off the staple.

Q. You talked of being master of a collier? - A. I was.

Q. Do you continue in the same trade? - A. No.

Q. I hope you have not got into the barking trade yourself? - A. My constitution would not permit it.

Q. Have you got into the barking trade? - A. I don't understand that term; I am a salesman.

Q. You never heard the word barker then? - A. I do not understand the meaning of it; I am a salesman at Sparrow-corner.

Q. Where is that? - A. In the city of London.

Q. How far from Rosemary-lane? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Upon your oath is it not at the top of Rosemary-lane? - A. It is adjacent; I cannot say the positive distance; it is not a mile.

Q. Is it not the very corner of Rosemary-lane? - A. It is not more than a mile, I believe, from it.

Q. Is it ten yards from Rosemary-lane? - A. I never measured the distance.

Q. You keep a shop there? - A. No, I am only employed.

Q. Then you are the very thing they call a barker; this very respectable master of a collier carries clothes in a bag? - A. I stand in my master's shop.

Q. What shop does he keep? - A. A clothes shop, at Sparrow-corner.

Q. I rather think you are brother-in-law to a person of the name of Leary? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Leary, and the prosecutor of this indictment, are upon very bad terms? - A. I believe they are.

Q. Have you any doubt of it? - A. I believe they are.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. Sparrow-corner is at the end of Rosemary-lane, is it nor? - A. It joins it.

Q. It is a contlnuation of the same street from the Minories? - A. Yes.

Q. Then how could you say it was a mile off? - A. I said it is within a mile.

MARY LEVY sworn - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What way of life are you in? - A. My husband is a salesman.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Nathan? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoners, did you ever see them before? - A. I saw them once before; I am Mr. Nathan's next door neighbour; the prisoners were coming along, and Nathan's man plied them, and

asked them if they wanted to buy any clothes; they said no, they had no money to buy any; Nathan's man wished them to come in and look at some clothes, and took hold of their arms, and wanted to pull them in doors; they told him they would not go in, for they positively did not want to buy any; they went away, and came back again a little way, and then Nathan's man put up his hands and blew most horrid expressions through his fist.

Q. Did they ever go into the shop? - A.They never went into the door at all: Mrs. Nathan came out, and said let them go, they are Vinegar-hill rebels; they might have been gone ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, when they came back again; Nathan's man put up his hand to his mouth, and abused the men again; the mob gathered, and Mrs. Nathan got a rattle from somewhere; when Mr. Nathan came home, she gave him the rattle into his hand to spring.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.There was no scuffle ensued before Mr. Nathan came home? - A. Yes, there was, because Nathan's man blew after them, and made use of horrid expressions.

Q. Was there any battle at the door at all before Mr. Nathan came home? - A. Not that I know of.

Court. Q. When you were close to Nathan's house, did the woman desire you to go into the court to look after the clothes? - A. No, they did not; Mrs. Nathan said, she had been robbed; I asked her of what, and she said, she could not tell till the articles were looked over.

Q. Did she tell you where they lived? - A. No, she did not.

Q. You did not go to the Fourteen Stars? - A. No.

Q. Nor the watchman? - A. No.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-63

377. CHARLES DENNIS STRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April ' a pair of boots, value 30s. a pair of boot leg vamps and counters, value 12s. a pair of upper leathers for Hessian boots, value 9s. and a pair of slippers, value 1s. the property of Thomas Hacker , in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS HACKER sworn. - I am a shoe-maker in Oxford-street ; the prisoner has been in my service ten months as a clicker : On the 27th of April, in consequence of some information, I counted my boot legs; I went out between three and four, and left in the shop the prisoner at the bar, and a boy of the name of Roach; when I came home, instead of finding ten pair of one sort, there were only nine; very early the next morning, a pair of boot legs were shewn me by Meller, who is my boot closer; I can swear that that is the pair I missed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were those boot legs for sale? - A. No.

Q. How long have you employed Meller? - A. Eight years.

Q. Do you not know that servants take home work of their own, and get it done? - A. I have heard of such things being done, but I dont know this man did.

- ROACH sworn. - I am in the service of Mr. Hacker; last Friday I saw the prisoner take three pair of boot legs away while my master was out; he was not gone ten minutes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This he did in your presence? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MELLER sworn. - I am boot closer to Mr. Hacker. On the afternoon of Friday last, the prisoner brought me three pair of boot legs; two of them were to be done for his master, and one on his own account; I marked the pair that were to be done for himself in his presence; next morning Mr. Hacker came to me, and I shewed them to him. (Produces them).

Mr. Knapp. Q. You knew the prisoner before as servant to Mr. Hacker. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of such a practice as servants asking boot closers to do business on their own account? - A. Yes. (The boot legs were identified by Mr. Hacker.)

Prisoner's defence. On Monday before the Friday, I took a pair of boot legs to cut out for myself; I had not an opportunity of cutting them out till the Friday, and because my master should not find it out (as he does not like to see his men cut out work for themselves) I put them upon my masters own boot legs; I have been in business for myself, and these are part of my old stock.

Hacker. From the appearance of the leather it has not been curried above six months.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-64

378. SARAH EALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , 44 muslin handkerchiefs, value 40s. 56 cotton handkerchiefs, value 3l. and a cloth wrapper, value 3s. the goods of Joseph Lee .

JOSEPH LEE sworn. - I am a linen-draper , I live at No. 65, Chiswell-street; I was in the act of moving from No. 15, Fore-street, to a house in Chiswell-street, on the 25th of March; I lost the handkerchiefs stated in the indictment on the same day, the Friday evening; I am not quite certain whether they were lost in Fore-street or Chiswell-street. On Monday the 28th, I had information that a woman was stopped with a parcel of goods under her arm; on the Tuesday morning, about eleven o'clock, I saw

them at Worship-street; I knew them to be my property; I never saw the woman near my premises; the woman prior to this happening, had been a customer at my house several times, about a week or ten days before I lost the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were removing your goods at this time into another house? - A. I was.

Q. Were you present when the girl was taken? - A. I was not.

Q. I ask you whether, at the time she was taken, she did not say she was desired to carry these things for two men who ran away? - A. I cannot say.

- FITZGERALD sworn. - I am a watchman, in the parish of St. Luke's: On the 25th of March, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, I was standing at the corner of Play-house-yard; on the Friday evening, I saw two men come up, one after the other, there might be about two yards difference one from the other; they seemed rather alarmed when they came out of the yard; I did not see any thing upon them; at the same distance came the prisoner at the bar, and perceiving a bundle under her left arm, I caught hold of her, and asked her what she had got there, she told me that she had nothing; I felt on the outside of her cloak, and I found there was a bundle of some kind; I said she must have stolen it, or somebody else; I did not take it from her; one of the men immediately turned back, I thought his meaning was to liberate the prisoner, and therefore I sprung my rattle for assistance, and the man made his escape through Play-house-yard; I took the woman to the watch-house; she said, on going along, and at the watch-house, she was employed by three men to carry that bundle; I saw but two of them; that she was offered a shilling to carry it to some house in Golden-lane. I know no further about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The two men got away? - A. Yes, they did.

Q. Did she not give you to understand, that the men of whom she said she had the bundle, were the men that had ran away? - A. No, she never said a word about it.

Court. Q. Did these three people follow one another, had they any conversation together, and did you hear them talking together? - A. I did, very familiarly, and laugh together; I never saw the bundle in any persons hands but the prisoner's; I left the bundle at the watch-house, in the charge of the officer; I should know it again.

WILLIAM FRENCH sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 25th of March, about a quarter before eleven in the evening, I heard a rattle spring, and I went to give assistance, and there I saw my brother watchman and the prisoner together, and we took her up to the watch-house; I saw a bundle under her left arm; there was in that bundle some muslin handkerchiefs, and some cotton and linen handkerchiefs; we took her from the watch-house to the New-prison; the goods were left at the watch-house in the hands of William Palmer .

WILLIAM PALMER sworn. - I was officer of the night on the 25th of March; the prisoner and this bundle were brought in by the two watchmen, and I have had it ever since.

Prosecutor. I know these handkerchiefs to be my property, there are 101 in all, there is my private mark upon them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-65

379. MARY BUNN was indicted for the wilful murder of her female bastard child .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ANN KING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I do; I lived servant in the same house where the prisoner lived.

Q. Did she pass as a married woman? - A. No, a single woman .

Q. When did you leave that service? - A. A little while after her father died.

Court. Q.Was it before or after the child was born? - A.Before - not long before.

Mr. Watson. Q. Did you make any observation upon the appearance of the prisoner at the bar, did she appear to be with child, or not? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see her working at her needle at all? - A. Yes; she was making some little clothes for young children.

Court. Q.It was known that she was with child? - A. Yes.

Q. Every body could see she was with child? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH CLARKE sworn. - I am a surgeon, at Enfield; I was sent for to examine a child, upon the 24th of March, at the Greyhound; I cannot positively say whether the child was born alive.

Court. Had the child any marks of violence upon it? - A.None, that I could detect.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-66

380. JOHN WARREN was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 26th of March , a bank note, for the payment of 1l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. Putting away the same knowing it to be forged.

Stands charged in four other Counts, in like manner with intention to defraud various other persons.(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

EDWARD CROKER sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Fielding. Q. You are an officer of the Police-Office, Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.Had you occasion to know his person on the 26th of March and before? - A. Yes, I know he lodged at No. 14, Newton-street, Holborn.

Q.Do you know the person of Caroline Gregory? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner on the evening of the 26th of March coming from his lodging? - A. I did, on a Saturday evening, it might be about seven o'clock; it was not quite light; it was just getting dusk.

Q. Who was in company with him? - A. Mrs. Gregory; I observed them, and followed them to a Mrs. Groffnell's, the corner of Wellclose-square, a glass and china shop.

Q. What did you observe? - A. I was on the opposite side of the way.

Q.Were you employed for the express purpose of watching them? - A. I was; Mrs. Gregory went into this shop, Warren waited on the outside.

Q. How near to the shop door did Warren go with her before Mrs. Gregory went into the shop? - A.Close to it.

Q.Having been in company all the way from his lodgings? - A. Yes, Mrs. Gregory was in the shop about ten minutes, when she came out.

Q. What became of Warren, and what did you observe of him? - A. Warren walked back wards and forwards by the shop, while Mrs. Gregory was in the shop.

Court. Q. Do you mean before the shop door? - A.He walked backwards and forwards; when she came out he was close to the door, she immediately gave him something in a handkerchief; he took the handkerchief from her, and they went away together; I immediately went into the shop, and gave the woman in the shop directions to take care of the Bank-note.

Q. Did you see any Bank-note? - A. I did.

Q.And that Bank-note which you saw, you directed her to take care of? - A. I did.

Q. Where was the note when you saw it? - A. Mrs. Groffnell had it in her hand when I went into the shop; Mr. Bliss and I went on the Monday morning to the Bank.

Q. Was it not produced by her before Mr. Bliss? - A. It was.

Q. Was you the officer who afterwards apprehended the prisoner? - A. I was one; we apprehended him on the Tuesday following, at No. 14, Newton-street, at the house from whence I saw him come out; it was about eight o'clock in the morning when I apprehended him, he was in bed.

Q.Had you occasion to apprehend any other person in the house at that time? - A. Yes, Peter Gregory , and Mrs. Gregory.

Q. Mrs. Gregory was the woman you saw go into the glass-shop on the Saturday evening? - A. She was.

Q.Is Peter Gregory her husband, or brother, or what? - A. The husband.

Q. In what situation was Gregory, when you apprehended him? - A. In bed with his wife.

ELIZABETH GROFFNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are the wife of John Groffnell? - A. Yes.

Q. What shop do you keep? - A. A china-shop, No. 28, Well-street, corner of Wellclose-square.

Q. Do you recollect selling any articles in your business to a woman, on Saturday night, the 26th of March? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you sell to her, and how did she pay you? - A. I sold her six cups and saucers; she gave me a one pound Bank-note of England, as she said it was, I gave her change for it, half a guinea and three shillings.

Q. Did any body come into the shop after she had made this purchase of the cups and saucers? - A. A young man came in directly, who said his name was Croker.

Q. Where was the note when he came in? - A. I had just then put it into my pocket.

Q. In consequence of any thing that he said to you, did you produce the note? - A. I took it out of my pocket into my hand.

Q. Did you do any thing to the note, in consequence of any directions from him? - A. Only put it in paper.

Q.Did you keep it safe and apart from every other note? - A. I did.

Jury. Q. You had no other notes in your pocket at the time? - A. I had a two pound, but no other one pound note.

Q. Before you parted with it, did you put any mark upon it? - A. I did, Elizabeth Groffnell .

Q. That was on Monday morning, the next day but one after you had received it? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that note, and tell me whether that is the note you received from the woman, (produces the note)? - A. That I am certain is the note, my name is on it.

Q. When did you see the woman again from whom you received it? - A. Not till I came to Bow-street, the Friday or Saturday following, I will not be certain which.

Q. Was the woman, whom you saw at Bow-street, the same woman who passed the note to you? - A. I am certain of it.

Q. Did that woman turn out to be Caroline Gregory ? - A. So she said.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You keep a china-shop? - A. Yes.

Q.At the time this woman came into your shop, it was late in the evening? - A. It was, it

was duskish; I don't know any one person was in the shop in the course of the time.

Q. You had some purchase of goods during the course of the day? - A.Not one.

Q. When you receive Bank-notes, do you always put your name upon them? - A. No, not always, very seldom.

Q. You put the one pound note into your pocket? - A. Yes, in a little red leather purse.

Q. Had you put your name upon the two pound note as well? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you take care of it in consequence of what the officer told you? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You can swear that that was the very note that you received from the woman? - A. I can.

CAROLINE GREGORY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. I live at No. 14, Newton-street, Holborn.

Q. Did your husband live there? - A. Yes; I know the prisoner at the bar, he did live there to; he slept in the front parlour of the house, and he worked up stairs in the front garret.

Q. Did you go out on the evening of Saturday, the 26th of March, with the prisoner? - A. I don't know the day of the month, but it was on a Saturday evening; the prisoner was in my company, I went from my own house.

Q. For what purpose? - A. I had no particular purpose, it was a fine afternoon, and I went out.

Q. Where did you go to? - A. We went straight to Wellclose-square.

Q.Had you called at any glover's shop? - A. Yes, I did call at a glover's shop.

Q. Did you purchase any thing there? - A. We purchased a couple of pair of gloves.

Q.How did you pay for them? - A. By a note I had received of Mr. Isael, a Jew, in Russellcourt, Drury-lane.

Court. Q. You remember the situation in which you stand here, it behoves you to tell the whole of the truth? - A. I will tell the truth, it was the Thursday I received the note from Mr. Isael.

Q. What change did you receive at the glover's? - A. I paid three shillings and eight-pence for the gloves.

Q. Did the prisoner go with you into the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he go into the shop with you? - A. To the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did you go to any shop in Wellclose-square? - A. I bought some cups and saucers before I went to the glove shop.

Q. When you went to Wellclose-square, did you go into the shop of Mrs. Groffnell? - A. I think it was, I did not know their names.

Q. Did the prisoner go into the shop with you? - A. No.

Q.What did you buy in that shop? - A. Half a dozen cups and saucers.

Q. Did the prisoner wait for you till you came out? - A.I believe he did, he waited outside, he did not come into the shop, I found him at the door when I came out.

Q. From whom did you receive the note that you paid to Mrs. Groffnell? - A. I changed for the cups and saucers before I went for the gloves; I had two notes in my possession, I cannot say exactly which.

Q. I ask you from whom you received the note which you paid to Mrs. Groffnell? - A. I cannot exactly say, I had two notes at the time.

Q.From whom did you receive the other note? - A. I received one from Mr. Warren, and the other I received from Mr. Isael.

Q. How happened it, that Warren did not go into the shop with you? - A. I don't know.

Q.You say that Warren gave you a note - when did he give you that note? - A. On the Saturday, after we were out.

Q.For what purpose did he give it you? - A. He gave it me to huy half a dozen cups and saucers, which I bought.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I don't know whether you were acquainted with the fact, of some cups and saucers being broke? - A. Yes, and they were to replace those that were broke.

Q.Isael, the Jew, you say, gave you a one pound note, and Warren the other? - A. Yes, and it is impossible for me to say which of the notes I gave to Mrs. Groffnell.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Look to those gentlemen, and recollect what my Lord has said to you, respecting your own situation - how soon after you left Newton-street, did the prisoner give you a one pound note to purchase some cups and saucers? - A. I cannot exactly say how long.

Q. How longbefore you went into Groffnell's shop? - A.Just before.

Q. How near were you to Groffnell's door, when he delivered to you the one pound note? - A. I cannot exactly say, I was near it, I dare say I was in sight of it.

Q. Did he direct you to go to that shop to buy his cups and saucers? - A. Not directly to that shop.

Q. How many paces? - A. I cannot say how many.

Q. Were you further than you now stand from me? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Further than the Gentlemen of the Jury? - A. I cannot exactly say.

Q. Did you keep the note which you received, in your hand, till you delivered it to Mrs. Groffnell? - A. No, I did not.

Q. What did you do with it then, if you did

not keep it in your hand? - A. I put it into my pocket-book which had the other note.

Q. Was Isael's an older note than the other? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Where did you deliver the cups and saucers first to Warren? - A. I fancy it was at the door, the fatigue was not a great deal; then I proceeded with him to the glover's.

Q. And there you changed Isael's note? - A. Yes, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Upon your oath, have you any doubt the one that you passed at the glover's, was Isael's? - A. I cannot say, I speak to the best of my knowledge; I passed two as I have already informed you, Mr. Warren's was one, and Mr. Isael's was the other; I had only two notes in my posession, I am telling the exact truth.

Court. It is impossible to go on any further, a great suspicion hangs about this woman, as to the manner of giving her testimony, but the first step in the cause is to identify the note, she will not undertake to say that that is the note she gave to the china woman. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thomson.

Reference Number: t18030420-67

381. PETER GREGORY was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting a certain Bank-note to the tenor following:

Bank, No. 40,033, 29th Dec. 1801 .

I promise to pay to Mr. Abraham Newland, or bearer, the sum of one pound. London, the 29th day of December, 1801. For the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

Signed, J. Longman.

Entered T. Bilby.

With intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. Putting away the same, he knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud Miles Williamson .(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

JOHN GALLAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Miles Williamson ? - A. Not acquainted with him, I have known him within these few days.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do.

Q.When did you receive any money from him, to deliver over to Mr. Williamson? - A. It is better than twelve months ago, I don't believe it is eighteen months.

Q. What was the transaction? - A. He gave me some notes to pay, the amount I cannot say.

Q. To whom did you deliver them? - A. I put them in my pocket-book, and I delivered them to some officer, at Clifford's-inn, what officer I cannot say.

Q. Did you deliver the same notes to that officer which the prisoner gave you? - A. That I cannot say; I was always in the habit of collecting money for people.

Q. What did you do with the notes? - A. I put them into my pocket-book; I cannot say how many notes there were; I thought the bill was about 9l. or something of that way.

Q. Can you say whether or not the very identical parcel of notes that you received from the prisoner at the bar, you paid to this officer at Clifford's-inn? - A. I cannot exactly say that; it is impossible for me to recollect; I am in the habit of collecting money; I cannot positively say whether I had the money, or had it not.

Court. Here is a similar defect in the evidence as in the other case.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-68

382. PETER GREGORY was again indicted for that he, on the 27th of March , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain Bank-note , to the tenor and following effect:

No. 40,029. 29th Dec. 1801.

I promise to pay to Mr. Abm. Newland, or bearer, on demand, the sum of one pound. London, the 29th day of Dec. 1801. For the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .(Signed) J. LONGMAN.

Entd. T. BILBY.

Second Count. Putting off the same, he knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud Michael Goodall .(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

ANN GOODALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. I believe your husband's name is Michael Goodall? - A. Yes.

Q. You keep the Hampshire Hog public-house, in Exeter-street, Strand ? - A. I do.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have seen the gentleman.

Q. Was he at your house in March or April last? - A. I think it was the latter end of March, or beginning of April, I saw him at the Boar's Head, in Exeter-street; he had something to drink, but I cannot say what it was.

Q.Did he pay for what he had? - A. Yes; he asked me for change of a pound note; I had not the note in my hand; I said, be so good as to put your name upon it.

Q. Did he produce a note? - A. He had the note, as far as I recollect, in his hand; he threw the note on the table.

Q.Did he put his name upon it? - A. I did not see him; I told my sister, who was in the bar, to be so good as put down a pen and ink for Mr. Gregory.

Q. Did you know his name then? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.He was no stranger? - A. He used the house as other customers did, backwards and forwards; I think my sister picked up the note, and put it in the till.

Q. Did your sister bring the pen and ink? - A. I turned my back.

Q. Did you or your sister take up the note to put it into the till? - A. I think it was my sister.

Q.Did you or your sister take that note, or any other note, with the name of Gregory upon it? - A.Really I cannot say.

Q. I ask you whether it was you or your sister? - A. I don't know that either of us did; it was a good while after before I heard of it.

Q. When was it that any thing happened about this note? - A. The note came in for payment to the Bank in May; I heard of it about the month of May.

Q. Did you afterwards see Mr. Gregory, and had you any conversation with him about this note? - A. When I heard there was a note at the Bank with his name upon it, I asked him about it; I told him there was a note of his at the Bank stopped, with his name on it, and asked him if he would pay it.

Q. Did you or not threaten to summons him for it? - A. I said it was very hard that I should lose the note.

Q. How did you settle it? - A. I dealt with Mr. Gregory; he sold linen; I took about thirty shillings worth of linen, and I paid the difference.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I apprehend this was above a twelvemonth ago? - A. I hardly recollect the circumstance at all, it is so long ago.

Q. The prisoner at the bar was a person using your house at different times? - A. Yes.

Q. And continued to use it afterwards, did not he? - A. Yes.

Q. You took no account of the note, or put any name upon it? - A. No.

Q. It was put into the till, by whom you don't know? - A. I believe it was my sister.

Q. Perhaps taken out of the till, and put among a hundred notes? - A. I cannot say particularly a hundred notes.

Q. Whatever notes he gave you might be put among hundreds? - A. Yes.

CECELIA WHITBEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you the sister of Mrs. Goodall? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you know Gregory? - A. I have seen him at my sister's, no otherwise.

Q.What did he come there for? - A. He came as another customer, to take a glass of something.

Q. How did he pay for it? - A. The time I saw him there, he gave my sister a note for it, a onepound note.

Q. Did your sister desire him to do any thing with the note? - A. She told him to put his name on it.

Q. Had you a pen and ink in the house? - A. Yes, I got it, I was using of it at the time.

Q. Did you give the prisoner the pen and ink? - A. I laid it upon the bar for him to put his name upon the note.

Court. Q. He did put his name on it? - A. I did not see him.

Q. Did you see him writing? - A. No, I did not; I only left the pen and ink before him.

Q.After he was gone away, what did you do with the note? - A. I took it off the table, and put it into the till.

THOMAS GLOVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. I am inspector of Bank-notes in the Bank.

Q. Do you recollect speaking to the prisoner at the bar respecting his having uttered that note at Mrs. Goodall's, in Exeter-street? - A. Mr. Gregory, the prisoner at the bar, came down to the Bank to look at the note; I was present.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was any Magistate present at the time? - A.There was not. The prisoner at the bar, Gregory, looked at the note, and said, that this was not his hand-writing; he brought a bit of paper down with his hand-writing upon it, and address; he said, that he had not passed a onepound note at Goodall's; if it was a Bank-note, it was a two-pound, it could not be a one; but he could not recollect changing any.

Q.When was this? - A. I really don't know; I have made a memorandum in June last.

Q. Not long after the note had been stopped payment? - A. No great while after; he denied then having uttered a one-pound note at Goodall's, if he had it must have been a two-pound; he said, that the writing upon it was not his writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It is frequently the habit of persons who receive notes from others, to write the names of the persons from whom they receive them? - A.Frequently.

WILLIAM O'LOUGHLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Were you groom to Mr. Trent? - A. Yes.

Q.When did you first become acquainted with the prisoner at the bar, Gregory? - A.Sometime before July last.

Q. Had you any transactions with him, at what time, and of what nature? - A. Yes, I had; I was first introduced to him by another servant, Henry Nelland; Gregory bought a coat and a pair of boots of me, and paid two pounds for them. Upon the 12th of July I went off to Ireland with my master, and did not return till the 13th or 14th of November. My master took Lodgings in New Bond-street, No. 157.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the prisoner? - A. I suppose about the 17th to that of the

20th of November; he called upon me, and gave me a card of his linen drapery; he was what you call a duffer.

Q. Where did he call upon you? - A.In Bond-street, at the house; he told me he was very sorry he did not know me before I went to Ireland as he did then; he said, if he had, he would have given me something else than the two pounds which he had given me for the clothes, and that I might have had some pounds in my pocket on the road by it. I asked what it was; he told me he would call next morning, and let me know, between ten and eleven o'clock; accordingly he did, with Warren in company with him.

Q. Had you known Warren before? - A. I had seen him with Gregory, but did not know him by name.

Q. What passed then? - A. He wrapped at the door, the maid came up stairs, and I desired her to send them down; Gregory and I went into the cellar of my master's house, and Warren stood at the corner of the area, looking down; he put his hand in his waistcoat pocket, and pulled out a onepound note, and asked me if I would like that and another in the place of the two-pound note he had given me for the clothes before I went to Ireland; he said, if he had known me as well then as now, he would have given me the two one-pounds notes in the place of that.

Q. What answer did you make to that? - A. I said, I was perfectly satisfied with it; he told me he could let me have twenty of them for ten pounds, so I kept the pound note; I asked him if it was safe to pass it; he said it was perfectly so; he said, he would call upon me in a short time; they then left me.

Q. How soon after did you see the prisoner again? - A.About two or three nights afterwards, he called at my stables in North Portland Mews, in Baker-street, in company with Warren; my wife was up stairs; Gregory went up stairs to my wife.

Q. Warren and you had some transaction below? - A. Yes; I had notes in my hand when Gregory came down.

Q.What sort of notes, and how many? - A.Nineteen one-pound notes, and the one he gave me made twenty.

Court. Q. In his first conversation he left the one-pound note with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Then in the stable Warren gave you nineteen one-pound notes, together with the one-pound note that Gregory had given you, made up the twenty-pounds? - A. Yes; Gregory came down; we did not settle about the price of them; he asked me eight pounds for the twenty notes, so I agreed to give him between five pounds and eight pounds, and I gave him six pounds.

Q.Did you pay for them at that time? - A. Yes, I did; I paid it to Warren, in the presence of Gregory.

Q. In what way did you pay that six pounds? - A. It was in pound notes. I asked Warren who it was that made them (Gregory was by) he said, that he made every halfpenny worth of the things belonging to them except the plate, and that Gregory filled them up; Gregory then said, "when I am sober and free from drink, I can forge any man's hand in England;" at the same time I observed to him, that the numbers on one of the notes were very badly done; he put his hand into his pocket, and took out about twenty good Banknotes, and he shewed me one as badly written as the one he had given me, and he said, when they did them badly, he should do the same. Nothing more passed at the time; then they went away.

Q. When did you next see Gregory? - A. Warren then brought me a bedstead, for which I paid him eight and thirty shillings. My master was going to Bath after Christmas, and Gregory called on me to borrow 15l. of me; I told him that I had it not by me at the time. My master and I went off to Bath the day after Christmasday, and returned in a fortnight from that day to London; Gregory applied to me a very short time afterwards, about the 15th of January, for the 15l. again, and told me that he would give me a respectable tradesman's promissory note for 15l. and I told him, I would give it him, and I gave him a bill of exchange upon Mess. Cowan and Son for 15l. 6s. and he returned me the six shillings; he gave me a promissory note of a person of the name of Phillips, Hungerford-market; I lost the note in two days after.

Q. When did you next see Gregory? - A. Not till about five or six nights after that.

Q. How long was it after that you saw him again? - A. I suppose about a month after; he called at my stables first.

Q. Did you let him in? - A No, my helper, a person of the name of Hart.

Q. Did he come alone, or Warren with him? - A.They were both together; they came to the Worcester-Arms public-house, the corner of the Mews.

Q. You found from the conversation with them that they had been at your stables? - A. Yes.

Q.What passed between you and Warren there? - A. The conversation was about this 15l. note; I said, I was sorry I had lent Gregory the money, for I wanted it; then Warren told me, in the presence of Gregory, he would let me have plenty of money. I asked him why he did not give it to Gregory; he said, that he would as soon give it me, and asked me then to take 147 of these notes for 30l. and that he would deduct the 15l. which I had lent to Gregory; I told him, that I did not

pass any of them, and he said I should be very safe in passing them.

Court. Q. Who said that? - A.Gregory and Warren both, that I should be perfectly safe in passing them, as one night he and Gregory went to Vauxhall, and passed near twenty forged notes in the Gardens; on another night, at a dinner at Highgate, they changed a five-pound note for a farmer; Warren gave him three and Gregory two bad notes; and that Warren said, at the same time, he had been six years at it, and never met with a disappointment. Then the next time we met again, I went from Bond-street to Gregory's house; it was about a week after that.

Q. What month was it? - A. It was in the latter end of January, or the beginning of February, I think.

Q. What led you to Newton-street? - A. I called on Warren and Gregory both, to let them know I had lost the note.

Q.Did you find them both there? - A. I only found Warren.

Q.Did you see any thing in the house? - A. Yes, I did, in the workshop of Warren (it was a front garret) I saw a machine fixed there.

Q.Whose name was on the door? - A.Gregory's name. The first thing I saw were these irons fixed on a table; they were high irons fixed on a table with screws.

Q. Did you see the machine there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the trough? - A. Yes, and there was a wheel in it, and something at the bottom white, like thick milk; there was a wooden press, and I saw a copper-plate lay beside it upon the bench.

Q.Did you see what was upon it? - A. Yes; it was; "promise to pay."

Q. That was to impress these one-pound Bank-notes you saw? - A. Yes; I asked him where he got it. I saw some notes ready, all but the manuscript part; he shewed me one of those notes.

Q. How soon after did you see him again? - A. A short time after I saw Warren and the prisoner together at the Worcester-Arms; there was some company in the parlour (the very place where they always sat); we had two pints of ale, and, after some conversation, (I was in a hurry to go to my master,) Gregory and Warren told me that they could not at that time let me have what I wanted, and the next day he called upon me, and left a message with the helper, as usual.

Q. In consequence of that, what did you do? - I went to the Worcester-Arms.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there? - A. Yes, sitting in the same place; after sometime every body went away but we three, when Gregory got up, and put his back to the door, and said, he had the notes fastened with a pin between the frame of the table and the leaf; he said he did not care a d-n for all the Bow-street officers in London; the notes were fastened at another table where the company had been sitting; we then turned down the Mews, and he gave me the notes, and desired me to count them when I got into the stable. These were the fifty notes which I should have told you of before.

Q. Had you made any agreement with Warren for the fifty notes? - A. No; the agreement was made for 147, and the fifty were in part of the 147. Warren and Gregory both said, that whenever they went out to pass notes of this description it was at night; that they took the pricker they marked the wood with, and they rolled up their notes in a lump of brown paper, and went into the necessary of the public-house, and fastened there backwards under the seat of the necessary, the back part where it was clean, with this pricker, and that they would come in every now and then from time to time as they wanted a note, as they could not be hurt if one only was found at a time upon them. Then Gregory called on me shortly after.

Q. They gave you fifty notes in the yard to count them? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make any payment upon them at the time? - A. No, we parted; Gregory came to me at the stable about four days after, I think, and told me that he had passed a forged note to a publican, and to take care to destroy any papers in my room with his name upon them for fear of a discovery, for he had been brought to the Bank, and examined before an Inspector; that the Inspector put out his hand, and asked him whether that was his name, and that he had said it was not. We parted then.

Q. What happened upon denying his name at the Bank? - A.Nothing; he was set at liberty.(Note produced and read.)

Q. When did you next see Gregory? - A. Shortly after that I saw Gregory again.

Q. What then passed? - A. Nothing at all.

Q. Did any thing pass between you and Gregory about what had passed with Warren? - A. No, nothing, that I can recollect at the present.

Q. Nothing with respect to that subject? - A. Yes, there was about the ninety-seven notes that remained; Gregory told me, that he would send Warren with the remaining ninety-seven; accordingly he did.

Q. How soon afterwards? - A. I think it was about three weeks; but he said he had broke the handle of his machine, or that I should have had them before; I would not take the notes at all.

Q. In consequence of what Gregory had told you about the publican's story? - A. Yes; I told him I had not passed any of the others; but I told him of a person who had passed some, and I would bring them together if he chose it; he said, he would

not see him - that bringing too many into a thing of the kind, always made it turn out very bad; then he went away in a passion, because I would not take the remainder.

Q.Did you afterwards, and when, see Gregory? - A.This man and I went in company to Gregory's house, but they were all out.

Q.Did you afterwards see Gregory? - A. No, not till after he was taken into custody.

Q.Did you ever make any payment to Warren with the Bank-notes you received from your master? - A.All that I paid Warren was in money I had received from my master, Mr. Trent.

Q.Now state what these payments were? - A. The first payment was four guineas in gold, and a one-pound note; the second payment was a twopound note, with my master's name upon it, and a one-pound note, which in all made eight pounds four shillings, and I owes the remainder.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.How long have you been in custody-yourself upon this charge? - A. A month to day.

Q.When was it that you first became acquainted with Gregory? - A.Before I went to Ireland, the 12th of July.

Q.How long before last July - was it a month or two? - A. It was not a month, I am sure it was not a month.

Q.You are quite sure, when you saw this press we have heard of, Gregory was not present? - A. No; Warren was.

Q.How many conversations at different times had you about forged notes? - A. That I cannot tell; it was a great many times.

Q.Though you did not pass any yourself, you gave them to others to pass? - A. Yes, another person did pass them.

Q.You told him to do it? - A.No; he told me he was out of place, and he should be glad to get them.

Q.Did you tell him they were forged notes? - A. I told him what they told me.

Q. How many notes did you ever get delivered to you? - A. I got first 20, and then 147 after, in three different times.

Q.How soon, you knowing them to be forged, did you give any intelligence to any Justice about it? - A.Not at all till I was taken up.

Q.So you had been receiving 20 and 147 notes, which you knew to be forged? - A. I did not know them at the time.

Q.How long did you know them to be forged? - A. I cannot tell how long; at the first conversation I was told that they were forged.

Q.Did you tell any Justice or constable about it the first time you were taken up? - A. I will tell you the reason of that; Warren told me, in the presence of Gregory, that if this man was taken, and I came forward, I was sure to be hanged - that I certainly would be hanged if I was to own to it.

Q.How many examinations did you attend, before you were good enough to give that account to the public what you have been telling to-day? - A. I suppose three. He told me, at Liverpool a person was taken up for passing forged Bank-notes, Warren and Gregory both - that he had too guineas in gold in his pocket, and 200l. in forged notes, and he suffered to go through his trial rather than make a discovery, and that he was transported for fourteen years; and this very man wrote me a note in the prison in cold Bath-fields; I destroyed the note that the prisoner wrote.

Q. Do you know Gregory's hand-writing? - A. It is very hard to know it; I know the note was Gregory's hand-writing, because he wrote it with a pencil, and sent it up stairs to me; he requested of me, whatever I might say of the other man, to say nothing about him.

Q.Had you seen him write often? - A. Yes.

Q.You thought it was a better thing, when you were likely to be hanged yourself, to turn King's evidence? - A. No; Sir Richard Ford, in a very feeling manner, told me, that Warren and Gregory were in the habit of doing those things for a great while back, - that a great many knew of it, - that it was a pity to let such people escape, and that it was in my power to give evidence against them, which I did; I thought I was in duty bound to do it.

Q.You know, by giving that account, you would be saved yourself? - A. No, I have no purpose at all.

Q.You think you shall be hanged now? - A. I don't know it.

Q.Upon your oath, don't you believe, in conlequence of the evidence you have given to-day, you shall be saved from prosecution? - A. I don't know whether I shall be saved, or hanged, myself.

Mr. Garrow. Q. You have been asked how long you have been in custody; had you ever been in custody for the Bank-note passed to Mrs. Goodall? - A.No; Sir Richard took me over, and swore me to my own confession.

Q.Was that what you said, or meant to say, to this gentleman? - A.Certainly it was.

Q. The whole account you have given here of the connection with those persons, is the truth? - A. Yes. (The press and trough produced.)

- CROKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q.Were you the officer that searched the lodgings at No. 14, Newton-street? - A. Yes.

Q.Whose name was upon the door of that house? - A. Mr. Gregory's.

Q.Did you find those things, now produced, in the house? - A. Yes.

Q.Tell us what part of the house you found the articles in? - A. In the front garret.

Q.How were they placed when you first saw them? - A.This wheel was found in pieces.

Q.How was the press and the table? - A.These two were found in one corner, but all the materials were found in the room, excepting these three things; one was found in the cellar window, halfmoons they are called; the other two were found under ground in the cellar.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I should have supposed, but for what you have explained now, that all these things were ready in the state in which they are now? - A.They were all in one room, excepting these things.

Court. Q. Was the press in the condition it is now? - A.Not as it is now; it was not put together upon the table.

Mr. Fielding. Q. It was on the Tuesday morning, the 29th, when you took these things? - A. Yes, it was.

Q.O'Loughlin was taken up upon the 28th? - A. Yes.

GARNETT TERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am engraver to the Bank of England.

Q.Look at that Bank-note; is that Bank-note engraved from the plates of the Bank of England? - A. It is not.

Q.Are you suffciently acquainted with the signatures? - A. I am not.

Q. Do you employ any other engraver? - A. I am the principal; it is not from any of these plates.

Q.Are you conversant with the mode of making paper? - A. I am.

Q.Will you look at that through and the wheel; is that an instrument that might be used in the making of paper? - A. It might.

Q. The materials of which paper are made, are first reduced to a pulp? - A. Yes; I found the pulp sticking about the corners of the trough.

Q.What is the use of the wheel? - A. It appears to me to have been used as the hog for separating the pulp, and keeping it from floating.

Q.Will you look at these instruments; would they be useful in impressing an impression on a plate? - A.They might, these two irons might; these two half-moons are for a printing-press.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You are not a paper-maker, but an engraver belonging to the Bank of England, and you are capable of knowing that these things might be employed in papermaking? - A. Yes.

Q. In all papers? - A.Just so.

Q.Might not they be used for any other purpose as well as making paper? - A. They might.

Q. That may be just as well used for copypaper and demy paper? - A.Not demy; it must be small paper.

HENRY NELLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. In whose service were you last summer? - A. Richard Cheneway 's.

Q.Are you acquainted with the prisoner? - A. I have seen him by felling some old clothes to him.

Q.Are you acquainted with William O'Loughlin? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you ever seen him in company with Gregory? - A. I did once.

Q.How came he to be in company with Gregory that once? - A. I called on him myself, whilst I was making a bargain.

Q.What did you call on him for? - A.Merely to take a glass of ale at the time he was paying me for the cloths.

Q.Do you know whether he did any thing with Gregory at the time? - A. Not in my presence.

Q.Do you recollect what part of the year it was in? - A.Somewhere about the latter end of June, or beginning of July; I cannot say exactly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Had you been acquainted with Gregory for sometime? - A. No.

Q. He never did make any such offer to you? - A.No.

JAMES LIMIRICK sworn - I am one of the patrols belonging to Bow-street Office; I was in the room when Warren was apprehended; this note was found in his breeches pocket. (Note produced.)

- TRENT, Efq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are enabled to say, that that note was once in your possession, and that you gave it to your fervant? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I understand, it is your general custom to indorse your Banknotes? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM HART sworn. - Q.Were you a helper in the stable to William O'Loughlin ? - A. Yes.

Q.Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know his person? - A. Yes.

Q.What is his name? A.His name is Gregory.

Q.Did you ever fee him come to the stable where William O'Loughlin was? - A. Yes; he frequently came to ask for the groom.

Q. Do you know Warren's person? - A. Yes.

Q.Did they ever come together? - A. Yes; Gregory and Warren came together.

Q.Both of them came frequently? - A. Not frequently, but they used to come together.

Q.Tell me, as near as you can guess, whereabouts the month it was when you first saw them? - A. The first time - I cannot recollect the time; it was in the winter.

Q.Were you ever present, and heard the conversation that passed between O'Loughlin and the prisoner? - A.They used to talk together; he used to leave word for the groom to follow him to the public-house.

Q.What was the sign of the public-house? -

A. I don't know the sign, it is the corner of George-street.

Q.Did they use to leave word for O'Loughlin to come up to them there? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you recollect whether they had any thing to drink at this stable? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you get any liquor for them at any time when Gregory was there? - A. Yes.

Q.Was any thing given to you for your trouble? - A. Yes, Mr. Warren gave me a shilling to get two pots of porter, and Mr. Warren gave me the three-pence out of it.

MARY MILLER sworn. - Q.Do you live at the Worcester-Arms? - A. Yes.

Q.Where is that? - A. The corner of George-street.

Q.Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you recollect that person? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Warren? - A. Yes.

Q.And O'Loughlin? - A. Yes.

Q.Were they ever together? - A. Yes, in our parlour, four or five times.

JOHN-SPICER FISHER sworn - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Gregory? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you receive a bill from the prisoner at the bar? - A. I did. (Bill produced.)

Q. That is the bill drawn on Cowan and Sons, which O'Loughlin describes having given Gregory for 15l. 6s? - A. Yes.

Q.Can you fix the time? - A.Upon the 24th of January last, I received it from the prisoner.

Q.(To O'Loughlin.) Look at that bill, and fee whether that is the bill you gave the prisoner? - A.This is the bill I gave to Gregory.

THOMAS BLISS sworn. - Q.Tell us your department in the Bank? - A. I am one of the Inspectors of the Bank of England.

Q.Look at that bill? - A. The whole of this is a forgery.

Q.Look at the signatures? - A. It is not the paper of the Bank of England, nor the engraving, nor any of the clerk's writing employed to sign notes.

Mr. Knapp. I submit to your Lordship that the evidence given does not support the indictment.

Prisoner's defence. I never did pay that note away to Mrs. Goodall.

The prisoner's called thirteen witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 39.

First Middlefex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-69

383. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Bryers , about the hour of one in the night of the 24th of February , and burglariously stealing a pair of shoes, value 9d. two odd shoes, value 3d. seven pieces of leather, value 15d. a book, value 3d. and a sponge, value 3d. the property of Francis Collins .

FRANCIS COLLINS sworn. - I am a shoe-maker ; I live in Monmouth-street; I lost my property from a stall, at the White-Bear, Little Newport-street , in the front of the house; I pay half-a-crown a week for it; I have rented it a year and a half.

Q.When was it you missed any thing? - A. On the night of the 24th of February, I left the stall about half-past nine at night; I locked it up, and went home; I missed two pair of old shoes, and an odd one; some pieces of leather, a memorandum-book, and a sponge; I had left them safe locked up with a padlock.

SAMUEL HEBERDEN sworn. - I am a watchman; on the night of the 24th of February, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out of the stall; I did not see him go in; I followed him to the corner of Gerrard-street, and then I saw him throw something away into the open street; I followed him, and laid hold of him; I sprung my rattle for assitance, and took him into custody; I saw him drop this iron into an area.

Q.Was that before he had dropped the things, or after? - A.Afterwards.

Q.Did you see what it was at the time? - A. I did not; I knocked at the door, and the people of the house told us to come in the morning; I went between six and seven o'clock.

Q.What did you call that piece of iron? - A. It is what they call a center-bit.

JOHN NARBORN sworn. - I went to the assistance of Heberden; I saw the prisoner drop the property, and I saw him throw something into the area; I picked up some old shoes, some leather, and a memorandum-book (produces them.)

Prisoner. Did you see me throw any thing into the area? - A. Yes, I head it drop.

(To Collins.) Q.Are those your shoes and leather? - A. Yes, they were my own; I always take my customer's work home with me of a night; the memorandum-book is a book I keep against my landlord, when I pay my rent.

Q.How did your stall appear to be broke open? - A. The watchman came to me, and told me my stall was broke open; about half past seven o'clock I went and found the pastlock was taken off, and carried away.

Q.Was it forced off? - A. No, I think it was taken off by a picklock-key, for there is nothing wrenched.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. On the 7th of February, I came from a village in Northumberland, where I had been to see my mother,

who is ninety-two years old; I continued there eighteen months, and practised my profession, which is that of a hair-dresser; it did not answer my expectations; I arrived in London on the 7th of February, at near twelve o'clock at night; I called at an Alamode-beef shop, to refresh myself, where I staid about fifteen minutes; I went with intent to procure a bed, in Green-street, Leicester-fields, where I had lodged before; as I got to the corner of Gerrard-street, a man walked very fast by me, and dropped something; I called to him, but he made me no answer; the watchman came up, and laid hold of me; I told him which way the man was gone; he said he had got me, and that was sufficient for him, observing with a great oath, that he should lose his place if he had not somebody, for he was already upon his good behaviour.

Q.(To Heberden.) Are you sure you saw him come out of the stall? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you say you was upon your good behaviour, and must take up somebody? - A. I did not.

Q.You never lost sight of him after you got out of the stall? - A.Not at all.

Jury. It was not a moon-light night, was it? - A.No, it was not.

Q.How far were you from him? - A.About fourteen yards.

Q.Did you fee any body else near him? - A.There were several people passing.

Q.You saw him come out of the stall, you saw him throw the things away, and you never lost sight of him? - A.Never.

GUILTY, aged 54, of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baran Thompson.

Reference Number: t18030420-70

384. THOMAS WIESSNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , a metal watch, value 40s. the property of Mary Wheeler , in her dwelling-house .

MARY WHEELER sworn. - Q.Are you a married woman? - A.No, I am a single woman .

Q.Where do you live? - A. In Wells-street, Marybone . On the 12th of March, I lost my watch; I had seen it about five minutes before; I found the prisoner in the room, it was about eight o'clock in the evening; it is a metal watch, with a tortoiseshell case; the prisoner was a stranger; I asked him, what business he had there; he made me no answer; he took towards the shop door; I followed him, when he got to the shop door I laid hold of him by the coat; there were two men in the shop that my mother was serving; I desired them to assist me, and one of them turned round and gave me a violent blow in the face; they pulled open the door, and all three ran out; I followed them to the door, and called stop thief; the prisoner was taken within six or seven yards from the window.

ANDREW KING sworn. - I am a constable of Marybone parish; I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody (Produces the watch.) I received it from Mary Wheeler .

Prosecutrix. I received it from Priscilla Parker.

PRISCILLA PARKER sworn. - I picked it up in the street; the prisoner was in custody of a man, who was about three or four yards from the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. After the prisoner was in custody, I went into the parlour and missed the watch. This is my watch.

ANN CALVERT sworn. - On the 12th of March, I saw a man using Mrs. Wheeler very ill, beating her, and knocking out the candles; then she cried stop thief; I saw the man run towards Margaret-street, and the prisoner ran the contrary way; the prisoner was stopped by a man with a bag of coals upon his back, and I saw him throw the watch away.

Prisoner's defence. I was not in the shop, nor near it; I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-71

385. ROBERT WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , two yards of mixed cloth, value 20s. a remnant of drab cloth, value 1s. 6d. a remnant of blue cloth, value is. a remnant of Florentine silk, value 14s. five yards and a half of cotton, value 5s. 6d. and a nail of velvet, value 6s. the property of Robert King and John Thompson , in their dwelling-house .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED . First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-72

386. JOSEPH ELLIS and WILLIAM AMOS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , 139lb. of coffee, value 6l. the property of Anthony Schick , esq. in a certain boat, upon the navigable river Thames .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of John Burkitt Winholt .

Third Count. The property of James Beckett .

Fourth Count. The property of persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Watson, and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE COWEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.You are a Thames-Police surveyor? - A. I am.

Q.On the night of the 24th of February, were you on the river? - A. Yes.

Q.About what time were you off the Hamburgh tier? - A.About seven o'clock in the morning.

Q.Did you see any wherry? - A. Yes, I saw the two prisoners in a wherry, rowed by a boy, coming from the bows of the Henrietta, lying in the Hamburgh tier, St. Catherine's.

Q.Did you see a lug-boat lying against the Henrietta? - A. Yes.

Q.How far was the wherry from the lug-boat when you first saw her? - A.About half a boat's length.

Q.Did you pursue the wherry? - A.My boat shot past her; I did not see any thing in the boat at first; we pursued her; just as we came up, I saw a handkerchief under the thwart, where Amos was fitting, and he took the handkerchief and shoved it down under the water.

Q.Did he put his arm in the water? - A. Yes, he did.

Q.Did the handkerchief appear to be full or empty? - A.It was full of something.

Was it a common pocket handkerchief? - A. Yes; I called out to him not to put it overboard, but he took no notice of it; I said, do not throw it over-board, perhaps it is something I may not seize; people are foolish enough to throw biscuits and bees over-board sometimes; Ellis was on the starboard side; I saw him hand a bag over the boat's gunwhale, what they call a jemmy bag, they hold from fourteen pounds to half a hundred weight of coffee or sugar; this bag I suppose would hold about thirty pounds; he shoved it over-board; I went up along side, and desired them to come into my boat.

Q.Did you search Ellis? - A. Yes.

Q.What did you find upon him? - A. I found in his right-hand breast pocket, a small bag of raw coffee (produces it.) There is better than two pounds of it; when I had taken that from him, he put his hand over the boat's gunwhale, and I thought he was going to put something else overboard, and I wrenched a gimlet out of his hand; I found the head of a hammer in his waistcoat pocket.

Q.Was his hand over-board? - A. Yes.

Q.Then he had only to open his hand, and it must have gone? - A. I clenched his hand; I searched Amos, but found nothing upon him; I examined the lug-boat, in consequence of a boy, in their hearing, telling me he had brought them from that lug-boat; I went to the lug-boat, and found fifteen casks of coffee, marked from one to fifteen, with an hour-glass, and a flag, B.C. the cask No. 9, appeared to have lost a great deal of coffee; the cantling-piece of the head appeared to to have been taken out; the plug of the samplehole was taken out.

Q. That is usually covered with a hoop? - A. Yes, I found the hoop at the bottom of the boat, it had been wrenched off; there appeared to be a great deficiency in the cask, and I compared the cofee that I found upon the prisoner Ellis with that in the cask, and it appeared to be of the same quality; I then gave the coffee to the mate of the Henrietta, and took the prisoners to the office; I was present when it was weighed, it weighed six hundred, three quarters, and sixteen pounds, tare one hundred and six pounds, marked upon it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.This lug-boat in which the coffee was, had been in dock, had not she? - A. I don't know.

Q. She was a-ground, was not she? - A.No, it is a deep place there.

Q. I am told, after she was loaded, she had been sent into a dock? - A.No.

Q.Where you saw the boat, is in the City of London? - A.No, in the precinct of St. Catherine's.

ROBERT WORTHY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a waterman, belonging to the Thames-Police; I was with Mr. Cowen on the 24th of February.

Q.You have heard his evidence? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you agree in the story he has told? - A. Yes.

Q.After these two persons were taken into custody, did you hear either of them say any thing? - A. I heard Amos say d-n it, they can only take 40s. conviction on it!

Q.You have a great deal of smuggling on the river? - A. Yes.

And if you take any of them it is a 40s. penalty? - A. Yes.

CHARLES DERBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an apprentice to my father, a waterman; on the 24th of February I was upon the river, in my father's wherry.

Q.Was you hailed by any person in the Hamburgh tier? - A. Yes, by the two prisoners; they were in a lug-boat; I rowed off to them, and took them into my boat; I asked them where they were going, and they said towards St. Catharine's; I did not see them bring any thing into the boat.

Q.Before they got into the boat, had you any bag or handkerchief in your boat? - A.No.

Q.After you put off, did you see the Police boat? - A. Yes, the Police boat came down as I was shooting in shore; Amos threw over a handkerchief, and Ellis threw over a bag of something.

Q.Did you take Cowen to the same lug-boat, from which you had brought them? - A. Yes.

JAMES BECKETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a lighterman; I do business for Mr. Winholt; I know the prisoner, Ellis, he was in my

service, and this lug-boat was to have fifteen casks of coffee from the West-India Docks, on the morning of the 22d of February.

Q.Did you direct Ellis to do any thing with that coffee? - A. I ordered my servant to direct Ellis to put them on board the Henrietta, bound for Hamburgh.

Q.Did you yourself see fifteen casks? - A. I did not.

Q.How came they to lie in the lug-boat the whole of the 23d? - A.There were other goods before us; sometimes we lay for a week or ten days. - JUDSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a clerk to Mr. Winholt. Q.Did you put these fifteen casks of coffee on board the lug-boat, to be carried to the ship? - A. I entered them at the Custom-house, and gave directions.

Q.(To Mr. Beckett.) Did you see them weighed before they left the West-India Docks? - A.No.

EDWARD BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am foreman at the coffee warehouse, at the West-India Docks.

Q.Did you weigh these casks of coffee? - A. Yes, I weighed them in the month of November.

Q.What did No. 9 contain? - A.(refers to his book.) Seven hundred weight, one quarter, and twenty-two pounds; the entry is in my own writing, tare one hundred and six pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Have you ever seen the casks of coffee since the time of the coffee being lost? - A.No.

Anthony Schick, Esq. I am proprietor of the coffee.

The prisoner, Ellis, put in a written defence, stating that he was innocent of the crime laid to his charge.

The prisoner, Amos, called ten, and Ellis five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Ellis, GUILTY , aged 21.

Amos, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-73

387. MARY CHAMBERS and ELIZABETH PRICE were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Taylor , about the hour of four in the night of the 21st of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing twenty loaves of sugar, value 7l. forty pounds weight of tea, value 10l. one hundred pounds weight of moist sugar, value 3l. five silver teaspoons, value 5s. a silver table-spoon, value 5s. and two shirts, value 7s. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. - I am a grocer and cheesemonger , No. 18, Great Saffron-hill .

Q.Do you keep a house? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you any partner? - A.No.

Q.Were you the last person up on the 21st of March? - A. I was; I went to bed between twelve and one o'clock.

Q.Did you make fast your doors and windows? - A. Yes, I did: On Tuesday, the 22d, about six o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by a person who lodges in my house; I came down stairs, and found the two parlour-doors open, and the shopdoor, and the property taken out.

Q.How came those doors open? - A.They were entered by means of some person or persons sealing the wall which has access to the parlourdoor; they broke open the parlour-door, which goes into the yard; they must have got over the wall in the yard, which is about ten feet high.

Q.How was that door broke? - A. By taking away the grove which supports the shutter; that was knocked away, and the shutter fell down.

Q.Was there no pin to fasten it? - A.No, I did not think it necessary, as there was such a high wall; it was a glass door, and the glass was broken, by which means they got in; then they had to break open an inner parlour-door, which was locked; I think I took the key of the shop up into the bed-room, but I may be mistaken in that; if I did, they must have gone up into the bed-room, and taken the key off the drawers; the shop-door was broke open by splitting the pannel of the door; I lost about twenty loaves of sugar, and at least twelve hundred weight of moist sugar, forty pounds weight of tea, five silver tea-spoons, one table-spoon, and two shirts.

Q. The sugar, I suppose, was in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q.Where were the spoons? - A. In the parlour.

Q.And the shirts? - A. In the parlour also.

Q. Is your lodger here? - A.No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Have you more than one lodger? - A. Yes, three.

Q.None of them are here? - A.No.

Q. The key of the shop-door it was your habit to take up with you? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you any doubt that you took it up with you that night? - A. I came down stairs again for the key of my bed-room, which I had forgot, and I might have left the key of the shop-door.

Q.Did you not tell the Magistrate that you did take the key up, and put it by your bed-side? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.One should think it must be somebody pretty well acquainted with your house that had done this? - A.No, I don't know that.

Q.Do you think any stranger might have found it without any difficulty? - A.There might be persons out of the house as well acquainted with it as persons in the house.

Q.Do you mean to say the two prisoners were acquainted with your house? - A.No.

Q.Did not you find that your shop-door had been opened by a key? - A. Yes.

Q. And that key was left in the lock inside? - A. Yes.

Q. You say this wall is ten feet high? - A. Yes.

Q. Not a very convenient wall for women to scale? - A. No.

Q. When you was awoke at six o'clock in the morning, it was light? - A. Yes, it was.

THOMAS HAWKINS sworn. - I am a watchman belonging to St. Andrew's: About five o'clock in the morning of the 22d of March, I saw the two prisoners make a full stand facing St. Andrew's church; then they crossed over, and went up Shoe-lane; I called to the other watchman coming down Shoe-lane to stop them, and he stopped Mary Chambers , and I stopped Elizabeth Price ; they had each of them two loaves of sugar; they said first that they had one loaf of sugar, and that they had found it at I flington.

Q. What did you find upon Elizabeth Price ? - A. Two loaves of sugar.

Q. How was she carrying it? - A. In her apron; we took them to the watch-house.

Q. Did you know these women before? - A. No; these are the two loaves of sugar that I found on Price, (Producing them;) the other watchman and I marked two each, but I cannot say which.

Q. Are you sure these four were them? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn. - I am a watchman; I detected the prisoner at the bar at five o'clock in the morning with some sugar; I asked her where she got it; she said, she found it in I slington-road, and I took her to our watch-house; when we took them there, we found four loaves of sugar, two upon each.

Q. Did you know any thing of these women? - A. I know nothing of them before, any further than taking them up on suspicion.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. It was daylight then? - A. No, it was not quite light.

Q. It was light enough to see a man's face? - A. It was light enough to detect the property.

Taylor. These are my loaves of sugar; they were done up in papers like these; here is No. 79 upon one of them.

Q. Are those your figures? - A. No.

Q. Whose figures are they? - A. The figures of the wholesale grocer, Samuel Yockney , of Bedford-street, Covent-garden.

Q. He is a very large dealer? - A. Yes.

Q. These figures might equally apply to those who were sold to other persons as those that were sold to you? - A. They might.

Q. This is the same sort of paper in which they pack sugar to other people? - A. Very seldom; in general it is blue paper.

Q. There is no mark of your's upon any of them? - A. No.

Q. They are all marked 79 - are they not? - A. Yes; here is one that is broke in a particular manner; I am very well satisfied that that loaf of sugar is my property.

Q. Do you know the meaning of the mark 79 - is it for a particular sort of sugar? - A. Yes; on the paper that was lost there were my initials, and they have been torn off.

Q. Upon the paper found there are not your initials? - A. No.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, Before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18030420-74

388. JOHN WHITE was indicted for making an assault, in the King's highway, upon John Molteno , on the 16th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silver, watch, value 1l. 11s. 6d. the property of the said John.

JOHN MOLTENO sworn. - I live with my father, a print-seller, in Pall-Mall: On Saturday, the 16th of April, about half past eight in the evening, I was crossing over Marybone-street to go down Vine-street, the prisoner at the bar came up to me, and snatched my watch out of my fob; I ran after him directly, and called stop thief; a young man, who was running up the street, stopped him, and knocked him down.

Q. Where was your watch found? - A. Under him.

Q. Had he said any thing to you before he snatched your watch? - A. No.

Q. He did not say a word to you, or strike you, or any thing? - A. No.

- NORTHBRIDGE sworn. - I am a confectioner; I was coming in at one end of Marybone-street, I heard a cry of stop thief at the other end; I saw the prisoner running, and the young man that the watch belonged to; I stopped him directly, and knocked him down; I had fast hold of him by the collar, and he shuffled the watch upon the ground; some strange man picked it up; the officer has it.

WILLIAM SHADWELL sworn. - I am an officer; I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in by Northbridge and the prosecutor.(Produces the watch.)

Molteno. This is my watch; the outside case is lost; I looked for it, but could not find it; I did not look directly, because I went to the watch-house with the prisoner first.

Prisoner's defence. I was going down Marybone-street, that gentleman knocked me down, and said I had robbed him.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-75

389. ANN READING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , privily from the person of William Austin , four half-guineas, five shillings, and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of the said William.

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-76

390. ELIZABETH FORD was indicted for stealing in the dwelling-house of Thomas Gordon , on the 18th of February , a silk handkerchief, value 3s. seven guineas, and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of James Rodden .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-77

391. CHARLES BOWDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , a gold watch, value 6l. and seven silver tea-spoons, value 7s. the property of John Fourdrinier , in his dwelling-house .

The prosecutor was called, but did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-78

392. JOHN MACKAY , HENRY FOSS , and PETER CATAPODI , were indicted for feloniously forging, on the 6th of December , a promissory note for the payment of money , to the tenor following:

No. 23,763. Edinburgh, 1st August, 1780. £5.

"The British Linen Company promise to pay on demand to William, Baillie, or bearer, five pounds Herling, value received, by order of the Court of Directors, William Henderson, per Manager, L 5. D. Hogarth, per Account, "with intent to defraud John Newell .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third and Fourth Counts. Charging the intention to be to defraud the British Linen Company .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN ALDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q.Did you keep the Cock and Lion public-house on the 6th of December last? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you know the person of the prisoner, Mackay? - A. Yes.

Q.Which is he? - A. The man in a blue coat.

Q. Do you remember his coming to your house that day? - A. To the best of my knowledge.

Q.Will you swear he is the man? - A.No, I cannot swear it.

Q.Have you any doubt about it? - A.No.

Q.What time did he come to your house? - A. About four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Was there a Captain Ward there? - A. Yes, he was writing a letter there.

Q.He is the Captain of a Berwick smack? - A. He was Captain of the Tweed packet.

Q.Do you remember the prisoner, Mackay, making any application to Captain Ward? - A. I was not in the room at the time he made application to Captain Ward.

Q.Were you in the room when he applied to any body? - A. I was present when he applied to Mr. Newell, and got change for a five-pound Scotch note; Mr. Newell came in after Mackay was there; Mackay said, he had taken it in payment of ten pounds.

Q.Did you see the Scotch note? - A. I saw it afterwards.

Q.It was a five-pound Bank-note? - A. Yes, of the British Linen Company, at Edinburgh.

Q.Did Newell give him the charge? - A. He did.

Q.After he had given him the change, did Mackay pay you for any liquor that he had? - A. He paid me for four pennyworth of gin and water.

Q.Before he went out in the prefence of Mackay, was any thing discovered respecting this note? - A. No, I saw the note given, but did not see it changed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Your memory is better now than when you were at Bow-street - you could not recollect his person at all there? - A. I believed he was the person.

Q.Did you say you had no doubt about it there? - A. I said I believed he was the person, and then I said I had no doubt.

Q.Are you sure of it? - A. Yes.

Q.Had you ever seen him before? - A.No.

Q.When you saw him at Bow-street, you saw him in custody? - A. Yes.

Q.You were told that you should find the man there that had changed the note? - A. Yes.

JOHN NEWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a coal-merchant, and live in Burr-street, East Smithfield.

Q.Were you at the Cock and Lion on the 6th of December? - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember Captain Ward being there? - A. Yes, he was there.

Q. Do you remember seeing any person coming there that evening? - A. No, I did not see any body come in; I was just come in myself.

Q. Do you remember any person making application to you about a note? - A.There was a person sitting in the dark part of the room, for it was very near night; Captain Ward said the person had been waiting half an hour for change for a fivepound note, and he said, as I had been in the habit of taking Scotch notes, it would oblige the man if I would change it; the man came to me, and pro

duced me note in the middle of the room; I took the note to the window, and observed it was the British Linen Company's note; I had no doubt at that time of its being a good one.

Q.Do you know now who that person was who gave you the note? - A.No, I do not.

Q.Did you give the change for the note to that person, whoever he was? - A. I did.

Q.Did you keep the note? - A. Yes.

Q.How soon did you discover that that note was a bad one? - A.About ten minutes.

Q.How long did the man stay in the room after he had given you the note? - A.Not a minute; as soon as he had got the change, he went away directly; I went to the light to see the note; I observed the two signatures to the note to be of the same hand-writing; there was no water-mark, and therefore I suspected it.

Q.Should you know the note again if you was to see it? - A. Yes, I put my initials upon it before I parted with it, and it has a spot of grease upon the middle of it.

Q. Is that the note? (Shewing it him) - A. Yes, it is.

WILLIAM SINCLAIR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have got the charter of the British Linen Company? - A. I have. (Produces it.)

Q. Be so good as look at that note, and tell me if you are acquainted with the British Linen Company, and if the names of Henderson and Hogarth are the hand-writing of those gentlemen? - A. That is not a genuine note of the British Linen Company; these are not the subscriptions of William Henderson or David Hogarth .

Q.Are you acquainted with their hand-writing? - A. Yes, I am quite samilar with their handwriting; I have seen them write often.

Q.You are sure it is not their signatures? - A. I am sure of it.

Q.Are those persons employed to sign notes? - A. Yes, with others; they have authority from the Court of Directors to do so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was the charter granted before or since the Union? - A.Since the Union; I think it was in the year 1744.

Q.Have you a share in this Company? - A. No.

DAVID HOGARTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. knapp. Q.Are you a member of the Company? - A.No.

Q.Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of the gentleman who subscribed that note? - A. Yes, perfectly.

Q.You are one? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that David Hogarth your hand-writing? - A.It is not.

Q. Is Mr. Henderson's name his hand-writing? - A.It is not.

Q.Are you perfectly well acquainted with his hand-writing - A. Yes, I am. (The note read.)

ANDREW READ sworn - Q. I believe you keep a public-house? - A. Yes, the St. Andrew, in Lower East-Smithfield, near the Hermitage-bridge.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Piper? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. A man who was examined at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q.Tell me if you know either of the three prisoners at the bar? - A. I do not personally know them.

Q. Do you recollect the persons of either of them? - A. I recollect a person similar to that man at the bar in the blue coat, Mackay.

Q.Looking at that man, do you believe he was the man that was at your house? - A. I believe that is the man that stood at the door when Piper presented a note to me.

Q.What day was it that Piper came to your house? - A. I think it was the 5th of December.

Q.What business did Piper come to your house upon? - A.Piper came to the bar, and asked me how I did; I told him I was very well; he said, he wished to speak to me; I shewed him into a small room, and he presented a 51. note; he wished to borrow 4l. upon that note; it was the British Linen Company's note; he wanted some money to pay his landlord; I told him I did not with for the note, I would lend him 4l. he said he did not wish to borrow the money, he wanted to have the note changed; he delivered the note into my hand; I looked at it, and discovered it to be a common piece of paper, with a stamp at the top of it; I told him to take it to the person from whom he received it, and not to offer it to any body again; I told him it was a forgery.

Q.Did you make any observation upon the note? - A. Yes, I shewed him the signature of the accomptant and cashier, that they were both one hand-writing; I discoveved there was a drop of grease in the middle of it.

Q.Look at that note? - A. I believe that was the note that was offered to me.

JAMES WEBSTER sworn. - Q.You are an apprentice to Mr. David Howie , master of the Osnaburgh Packet to Dundee? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you fail in the Osnaburgh Packet on Tuesday the 7th of December last for Dundee? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a person of the name of John Piper coming on board? - A.Mackay came on board first.

Q.Which is Mackay? - A. That is him, that long, tall man in a blue coat; the hawser was cast out, and just as we were going away he came on board; he asked to come on board, and my master said, he would not stop for any body; he

came on board, and brought three bundles with him.

Q.Do you mean that Mackay brought them on board? - A. I think so, but I cannot be certain; Piper came on board in the Pool.

Q.Which of the men brought the bundles you don't recollect? - A.No.

Q.Were they brought by one or the other of them? - A.After they were on board, Piper came and asked where these bundles were; I took him down to the cabin, and shewed him where they were; I came out of the cabin, and left him there.

Q.Where was Mackay? - A.He was upon deck.

Q.Did Piper and Mackay seem to be acquainted together? - A.No, they did not; they did not speak a word during the passage; I put the bundles into one of the beds.

Q.Whose bed? - A.Into Piper's bed; they were all packed together, and when night came, Piper handed them over to Mackay, and Mackay put them into his bed, and when they got a shore at Dundee, some town officers came on board.

Q. To whom were the bundles delivered then? A.One of the officers told Mackay to get out his bundle, and he only took up two bundles; he left the other in his bed; the next day, when the Captain came on board, he ordered me to clean out the cabin; I made Mackay's bed first, and I wondered to see the pillow lay so high at the head; I listed up the pillow, and there I saw a bundle.

Q.Was it one of the three bundles that you had placed in Mackay's bed? - A. Yes.

Q.To whom did you deliver that bundle? - A. I gave it to my master.

Q.Do you know what he did with it? - A.He took it, and locked it in his chest.

Q.Did you see him afterwards give that bundle to any body? - A.No, I did not; my master went away, and informed the Magistrate of it.

Captain HOWIE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You are captain of the Osnaburgh? - A. Yes.

Q.You set sall for Dundee on the 6th of December? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mackay being on board you? - A. Yes, I remember him very well.

Q.Do you remember a person of the name of Piper being on board? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you on board at the time Mackay came on board? - A. Yes.

Q.And the time Piper came on board? - A. Yes.

Q.Did they bring any bundles with them? - A. I don't know.

Q.Had you any bundle delivered to you afterwards by the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q.What did you do with that bundle? - A. I put it in my chest.

Q.Were Piper and Mackay taken into custody on board your vessel? - A.They were.

Q.What did you do with the bundle after you put it in the chest? - A. I looked at it before I put it in my chest, and discovered twelve notes of the British Linen Company, six filled up and six not.

Q.Did you deliver them to any body, and to whom? - A. I delivered them to the town officer, Moncrief.

Q.Should you know them again if you were to see them? - A. Yes.

Q.Take them in your own hand (shewing them to him,) and looking at them all, tell us if you believe these to be the ones you delivered to Moncrief? - A. I have no doubt they are the same; I marked them before I delivered them to him.

Q.They all appear to be notes of the British Linen Company of Edinburgh? - A. Yes.

Q.Six filled up and six not? - A. Yes.

Q.Was Clark with Moncrief at the time the prisoner was taken into custody? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Sinclair.) Take these notes into your hand, and tell us whether these notes that are filled up are genuine notes? - A.They are all forged notes.

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.You are one of the town officers of Dundee? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any information, did you apprehend Mackay and Piper? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you take them before they landed from the Osnaburgh packet? - A. Yes.

Q.Was Moncrief with you? - A. Yes, there were three of us; Colin M'Ewen was with us.

Q.At the time you apprehended these two persons, did you observe Mackay do any thing particular between the vessel and the shore? - A. Mackay took up the skirts of his coat, and while I was looking at him, a man called to me to steer to such a point of the land, in order to escape the crowd that was upon the Pier; I was at the helm; while I was looking at that, I heard a sharp splash in the water; then I looked very earnestly, but did not see any thing.

Q.Had you observed Mackay at that time? - A. No, only a sort of motion, but what it was I cannot say.

Q.What sort of a motion? - A.He was just moving himself on his seat.

ISABEL BARCLAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Where do you live? - A.At Balmerino.

Q.How far from Dundee? - A.About three miles.

Q.On Friday the 17th of December, were you with your sister Agnes at the sea-side? - A. Yes.

Q.At what time of the day? - A. It was in the forenoon, after breakfast time.

Q.What were you doing there? - A.Getting pebble stones.

Q.Did you find any thing? - A. Yes; my sister was before me, and she found the notes in a book; she took out the notes, and shewed them me; she found one note first, and then she found the book.

Q.Can you read? - A. No.

Q.Did you find any thing else? - A. Yes, a torn letter.

Q. Did you find any thing else? - A. Yes, we found two other notes.

Q.Did you find any thing else? - A.No.

Q.Did you give all you found to your mother? - A. Yes.

AGNES BARCLAY Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. A.You live at Balmerino? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you recollect being on the shore with your sister picking pebbles? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you find any thing while you were by the ses-side? - A.I found a note first.

Q.Can you read; - A.No.

Q.It was a bit of paper that they told you afterwards was a note? - A. Yes; then I found a torn letter.

Q.Whatever you found by the ses-shore, did you give to your mother? - A. Yes.

Mrs. BARCLAY sworn. - Q.Are you the mother of these two little girls? - A. Yes, I sent them to gather pebble stones, and they brought me back a pocket-book and some paper.

Q.Can you read? - A. Yes; they brought me a torn letter, directed to John Mackay .

Q.Look at these things, did they give you all of them? - A. Yes, they did.

Q.Did they give you any thing else that has been destroyed? - A. Yes, they brought me a torn letter, which my bairns have destroyed.

Q.Did you see your children destroy it? - A.Indeed I did; it was directed to John Mackay, at the Blue Boar, in London.

Q.Did it mention any part of London? - A.The Blue Boar, in London; it was signed by John Syme .

Q.Who did you afterwards deliver them up to? - A.To Mr. Ogilvie, at the bank of Dundee; I took them all to Dundee.

Q.Did you appear before Mr. Bell, the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q.Did Mr. Bell mark them in your presence? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Your children brought you a pocket-book and some notes? - A. Yes.

Q.You shewed them about to your neighbours, did not you? - A.No, not till I went to Dundee with them.

Q.When was it you took them to Dundee? - A.I had them from Friday to Tuesday.

Q.Do you mean to say that none of them were out of your possession? - A. No foul had them but me.

Q. Did not you offer some of them? - A. I took one to Dundee, and the man told me there were two men taken up about them.

Q.Did you leave them with that man? - A.No.

Q.Were ever any of them out of your custody? - A.No.

Mr. BELL Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q.You are a Magistrate in Dundee? - A. Yes.

Q.Was the last witness and her daughters examined before you? - A.They made a declaration before me, as we call it in Scotland.

Q.Where the notes they produced marked by you as produced before you? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you mark the pocket-book as produced before you? - A. Yes.

Q.Look at these? - A.They are all marked by me.

Q.(To Sinclair.) Look at these four notes picked up on the shore, are they forged notes or not? - A. They are forged notes.

GARNETT TERRY Sworn - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.I believe you are an engraver to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England? - A.I am.

Q.How many years have you been an engraver? - A.Between thirty and forty years.

Q.Look at the note in question (shewing is to him,) and look at this plate, and tell me if that note appears to you to be printed from that plate? A.It is.

Q.Now look at these twelve notes found in the bundle, and tell me if they have been printed from that plate? - A.These were all printed from one plate, and from this plate which I have in my hand.

Q.Now look at these four? - (The four found on the sea-shore.) - A.These are printed from one plate, and the plate I have in my hand.

NATHANIEL LOARING Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to the Solicitor for the Bank of England.

Q.Did you go with an officer of the name of Parkhurst to apprchend Catapodi? - A.I did.

Q.When? - A.On Christmas-day laft.

Q.Where did you go to? - A.To his house in Surrey, near the Obelisk, in St. George's fields; when we went, he was not at home; we made a fearch in his boxes, bureau, and so on.

Q.Did you find any thing? - A. The officer in my prefence took an engraved copper-plate out of the bureau.

Q.Look at that plate, and tell us if that is the plate he found? - A. Yes, it is; it was in one of the drawers of the bureau; his wife gave the officer the key.

Q.Did you find any thing else that is material? A.No.

Q.How soon did Catapodi come home? - A.After waiting about an hour, he came home; his

wife told him, we had been fearching his bureau, and taken something out; he said oh! what, the plate for the Scotch notes? oh, certainly, I put that there myself! he said he got the plate engraved and the notes printed for some people, but he would not tell us the name of the people; he said they were Scotch notes; it was no offence in this country, and he said he should have no objection to tell us every particular about it; I asked him who was the printer, and who was the engraver, and he refused to tell me.

Mr. Alley. Q.Did he not say this under and expectation of becoming a witness? - A.Not that I know of; I asked him why he would not tell me; he said, it was only wasting the young man's time to take him up; I told him the officer must take him to Bow-street, and he would undergo some examination; but while we were at the officer's house, I think Carprneal's, or at the Office, I cannot recollect which, the prisoner Foss, was also in custody; he had been apprehended; first, Catapodi said, Foss had got the Company's seal engraved; Foss was present, and heard it; he desired Foss to give up the feal, telling him they could not hurt him for it, and it was of no confequence; Foss said, he certainly had no such thing, and he did not know what Catapodi had been talking about; he offered the next morning, before the magistrate, if he would admit him an evidence, that he would tell who he got it done for.

Q.Did you see any thing found upon Foss? - A.There was a watch upon the table at Foss's lodgings, which I took, and delivered it to the officer; I have not seen it since; Foss told me, it was his watch, in his lodgings.

Q.The watch was taken before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

( Jonathan Trott produces the watch.)

Q.(To Mr. Loaring.) Is that the watch? - A.I cannot swear to its being the watch, it is like it.

Q.(To Trott.) Who did you get the watch from? - A.From Carpmeal; he is very ill in bed.

Q.Had the watch, found at Foss's lodgings, any chain of seal to it? - A. Yes, it had.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did not Catapodi expect, when he faid this, that he would be admitted King's evidence. - A.I did not say any thing to him, from which he could expect that.

MR. FRESHFIELD Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.You are one of the Solicitors for the Bank of England? - A. Yes.

Q.And the Solicitor who conducts this prosecution? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present before the Magistrate, when Foss and Catapodi were in custody? - A. I was there on the 25th of January.

Q.At that time was there any examination taken in writing? - A.None of the prisoner.

Q.Do you recollect seeing a watch there? - A. The prisoner, Foss, applied to have some money delivered up to him, which the officer had; the officer produced some money, and also the watch, with the chain and seal belonging to Foss.

Q.What officer was that? - A. Carpmeal.

Q. Was any thing said respecting the watch? - A. Mackay claimed the watch as his.

Q. That watch that was produced by Carpmeal? - A. Yes, and Foss said it was Mackay's, but the chain and feal belonged to him; the chain and seal were then taken off, and given to Foss; I desired the officer to keep the watch.

Q.(To Mr. Loaring.) Was there any more than one watch taken from Foss at his lodgings? - A.No, no more than one.

JOHN PIPER Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q.How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner, Mackay? - A.Eight or nine months.

Q.When did you first come to London? - A. The Ist of August last.

Q.At whose desire did you come to London then? - A.At the desire of Mr. Mackay.

Q. What were you to do for Mackay in London? - A. I carried some letters for him.

Q.Do you know the two other prisoners at the bar, Foss and Catapodi? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Upon that occasion, did you bring any letter to Foss? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you know how to find Foss by the direction, or did you enquiry for him? - A. I found him out by enquiry.

Q.Did you deliver the letter to him which Mackay gave you for him? - A. Yes.

Q.Had Mackay led you to expect any thing for yourself in coming to London? - A. I was to get the loan of one hundred pounds for twelve months, and my expences paid.

Q.Did Mackay tell you the contents of that letter at all? - A. Yes, he did, of one of the letters, but not of the others.

Q.Did you get the loan, as you were promised, in London? - A.No.

Q.In whole house did you see Foss? - A.At his brother's house, in Queen-street, Seven Dials.

Q.Did Foss recommend you to any house? - A. Yes, to one Smith's, who keeps the Cock and Magpye, in Drury-lane.

Q.How long did you stay in London, expecting this loan? - A.I suppose about three weeks.

Q.Before you left London, did you fee Catapodi? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Who shewed you Catapodi? - A.The prisoner, Foss.

Q.Where did he introduce you to Catapodi? - A.At a public-house, in St. George's-fields, the Duke of York.

Q.Not getting your loan, did Foss say any thing to you for you to report to Mackay, respecting Catapodi? - A. Yes, Foss and Catapodi had some private conversation.

Q.Did they appear like persons well acquainted together before? - A. Yes, very well; after that conversation (which I did not hear) Foss delivered me a message; he desired I would tell Mackay, that I had been in company with a gentleman that used to do business for him when he was at Liverpool.

Q.Did you learn his name at that time? - A.I did not.

Q. At that time you were not acquainted with his name? - A.No.

Q.Did you then return to Scotland? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you see Mackay? - A. In my way to Scotland I did.

Q.Did you deliver the message which Foss had desired you to deliver to Mackay? - A. Yes.

Q.How long after was it before you were applied to again to come to London with Mackay? - A. I suppose about two months after.

Q.I believe you were a little despleased at being disappointed? - A.Very much, indeed.

Q.Did you consent to come up to town with Mackay? - A. At the first I refused to go, because my friends were against it; I afterwards consented.

Q.Were you at all at this time acquainted with any thing that took place respecting these Linen Company's notes? - A.Nothing at all.

Q.You came up to London with Mackay? - A. Yes.

Q.Where did you lodge when you came to town with Mackay? - A. At the Blue-Boar, in Rosemary-lane, kept by a person of the name of Hall.

Q.Had you different beds? - A. We slept together in one bed.

Q.How came Mackay to find out Foss and Catapodi? - A. I found them out for him.

Q.Did you accompany him while you were in London to Foss and Catapodi? - A. I did.

Q.When you first accompanied him to Foss and Catapodi, did you know the nature of the business they were transacting together? - A.By no means.

Q.Did they permit you to be of their counsels when talking in private? - A. They did not.

Q.Where did you meet Foss and Catapodi? - A. I met Catapodi at the Duke of York, St. George's-fields, and Foss at his brother's house, in Queen-street, Seven-Dials.

Q.Did you meet Foss at any other place besides his brother's? - A. Yes, a house in Threadneedle-street, the King's-Arms, I think.

Q.Who did you meet there? - A.Catapodi, Foss, and Mackay; we were all four together.

Q.Do you know a house, the sign of the Dolphin, on Ludgate-hill? - A. No, I never was there.

Q.Did you go to Smith's, in Drury-lane, the second time of your coming up? - A. Yes.

Q.Who went with you? - A. I met Foss and Mackay at Smith's house.

Q.Tell us when you became acquainted first with what they were transacting together? - A.It was in Rosemary-lane.

Q.How long did you stay in London with Mackay? - A.Very nigh a month.

Q.Do you know whether Mackay, at the time he lodged at the Blue-Boar, was acquainted with any man of the name of Syme? - A. He was acquainted with a man of the name of Syme, in Scotland, but not in England that I know of.

Q. Do you know if he had any correspondence with that person while he was in London? - A.There is no doubt of it, I am sure he had.

Q.How do you know it? - A. I saw him write a letter to him; he holds a house of him.

Q.Where does he live? - A.At Forres, in Scotland.

Q.Do you know if Syme wrote to him while he was in London? - A. Yes, while he was at the Blue-Boar; I saw the letter.

Q.Tell us what acquaintance you had with this transaction of the notes? - A. I got three notes from the prisoner, Mackay, one after another, to go and cash for him, in the month of December last.

Q.Do you know a person of the name of Read? A.I do.

Q.What public-house does he keep? - A. The St. Andrew, in Wapping.

Q.Did you go there upon any business? - A.I did.

Q.Tell us what business you went for to Read's? - A.To get a Scoth note cashed.

Q. Of what value, and of what bank? - A.Five pounds was the value, and the bank was the British Linen Company.

Q.Did you get the cash for it at Read's? - A.No.

Q.Who went with you to Read's? - A.Mackay.

Q.Tell us all that passed at Read's respecting that note? - A. Mr. Read said he could not spare the cash for it; and I told Mackay so, but he would let him have what cash he had got, and let him have the balance when he left the town; I then returned to Read, who had no objection to give me the 4l.

Q.You say you returned to Mr. Read, where was Mackay at that time? - A.Mackay was waiting at the door.

Q.Did you desire him to advance you money upon the note? - A. Yes; Read told me he had

no objection to give me 4l. upon the notes as Mackay requested, and I gave him the notes; Read then went our with the note, and was about two or three minutes out; when Mackay saw that he went away, he left me there.

Q.When Read returned, did he advance the money upon it? - A. No, he returned and told me it was a bad note.

Q.Did he return you the note? - A. He returned me the note.

Q.Who did you give it to after he returned it? - A.To him, in his own lodging, in Rosemary-lane.

Q.Was there any thing particular about that note by which you should know it again? - A. Yes, there was a small spot of grease upon it.

Q.Look at that note? - A. This is very like it, I think.

Q. Do you believe it to be the same note? - A.I think that is it; the spot of grease is rather larger.

Q.Did you tell Mackay what Read had told you? - A.I did.

Q.What did Mackay say? - A.He said, it was a good one, and the people in London did not know any thing about Scotch notes; that if he was in Scotland, there would he no hesitarion about it.

Q.At this time do you know whether Mackay had any other notes? - A. Yes, he had.

Q.How many? - A. I suppose eighteen or twenty.

Q.How do you know? - A. I saw them that night in his pocket-book.

Q.Did he say any thing more about these notes? - A.After a great deal of conversation, he shewed me the notes, and told me they were bad ones; I was very much displeased at his imposing upon me to go out and cash these bad notes for him.

Q.Tell us all that he said about these bad notes? - A.He told me at length that they really were bad ones; that he was going to meet the party in Threadneedle-street on Saturday night, and if I chose to go with him, I should see the person that made them.

Q.Did you go with him? - A. I went with him at last to a house called the King's Arms, or the King's Head, in Threadneedle-street.

Q.Did he at all explain to you, before you went to the King's Head, what was his errand in London? - A.He told me it was for the purpose of getting some of these notes from Catapodi.

Q.When you went with him to Threadneedle-street, who did you see there? - A.I was desired by him to go to Foss at his own house, and to say that he and Catapodi would wait for him at the King's Head, in Threadneedle-street.

Q.Did you all meet together there? - A. We all met together.

Q.What passed then? - A.The prisoner, Catapodi, did not seem much to agree to take me into company.

Q.Did Mackay or Foss say any thing to that? - A.They had no objection; Mackay said, he had nothing to fear from me, that I was a friend of his.

Q.Did they then permit you to stay among them? - A. Yes, they had no objection.

Q.What passed then? - A.They were talking about the superscriptions of these notes, and about the feal.

Q.Did you see any thing produced? - A. I saw there a steel seal produced.

Q.Who produced it? - A. I suppose it was Catapodi's, but I saw it in the hands of Foss.

Q.Why did you suppose it was Catapodi's? - A.Because Mackay told me that Catapodi had the whole management of the business.

Q.Besides the seal, what else did you observe? - A. I saw a small slip of paper, with three impressions of the seal made upon it.

Q.What was said about these three impressions? - A.Mackay said these three impressions were too slight to have the desired effect upon the notes.

Q.Did any body make any observation upon that? - A. Yes; Catapodi said he would after it, and recommended that a small piece of lead should be got; that they should put the note upon the lead, and stamp it on the lead, it would then have the desired effect.

Q.What was said to that? - A. It was agreed upon by the whole party that they should take that method.

Q.Who took away the seal then? - A.Henry Foss.

Q. You have talked about notes, did you see any notes at that meeting? - A. I saw Mackay take out his pocket-book, shew some of the notes, and find fault with the superscription.

Q.Was there any thing else produced? - A.Nothing else at that time.

Q.Did you, at any time, see any ink produced? - A.There were two phials of ink produced that night; Catapodi produced them, and gave them to Mackay; one was red, and the other black; Catapodi told me the ink he had formerly procured he thought infufficient for the purpose; then he put these two bottles into his hand, and he told him, that whatever quantity he wanted when he was in Scotland, he would send it upon his sending the money.

Q.Who was to keep this ink? - A.Mackay himself.

Q.For what purpose? - A. I don't know.

Q.Did Mackay say whether he should want any or not? - A.He said he should have occasion for more soon.

Q.More notes, or more ink, or what? - A.More notes.

Q.After you had parted, and Foss taken away the seal, did you afterwards see Foss? - A. Yes,

there was an appointment made the next day; Foss and Mackay were to meet at Foss's house.

Q.Did you meet? - A.We did.

Q.Did you see what Mackay did with the notes? - A. Yes, at the meeting, the next day, he gave them to Foss.

Q.Do you know how many, as near as you can guess? - A.Twelve or thirteen.

Q.You did not count them? - A. No.

Q.Did you see what Foss did with them after Mackay had given them to him? - A. No; he ordered Foss to go to some person with these notes.

Q.For what purpose? - A.For the purpose of stamping them, as I understood from Mackay.

Q.What became of Foss after this? - A.He went out, and was absent about half an hour.

Q.What did he bring back with him? - A.He brought some notes back, stamped, with a seal upon them.

Q.Did you go home with Mackay after he had got the notes stamped? - A.I did.

Q.Did Mackay look at them before you parted? - A.He did.

Q.Did he say any thing about them? - A.Not till he got home to the Blue Boar; he said they were very well done.

Q.What did he do with them? - A.He put them into his pocket-book; but upon putting them in, he found that three were not stamped.

Q.Did you sleep together that night? - A. Yes; next morning he told me to take these notes to Foss, and desire him to get them done like the other.

Q.Before you left the house, did you see Mackay do any thing? - A. I saw him on the Sunday; he got up a little before me, and came to a small table, and took out four notes, and I saw him write upon three notes from a fourth, which he had by him.

Q. That was the writing part? - A. Yes.

Q.How soon after that was it that you left the house? - A.On Monday morning; I went with the three unstamped notes to Foss.

Q.Did you find Foss? - A.No, I found him on Tuesday morning; I delivered him three unstamped notes.

Q.Did you see what he did with them? - A.He ordered me to wait till he returned; after he had been gone about half an hour, or twenty minutes, he returned with a bit of lead in one pocket, and a feal in the other.

Q.Did you see what he did with the lead and the seal? - A. Yes; he put the lead upon the ground, put the notes one by one upon the lead, then he put the seal upon them, and knocked it with a hammer, which produced the impression very clearly.

Q.What did you do with them? - A. I returned to Mackay, and found he was gone on board a ship; I wished to go with him, as he promised to pay my passage.

Q.Did you follow him on board the ship? - A.I did.

Q.What ship was it? - A.The Osnaburgh packet.

Q.Did you find the ship at the wharf? - A. No, she had left the wharf; I took a boat, and overtook her; I found Mackay on board.

Q.Did you deliver any thing to Mackay when you got on board? - A. Yes, the three notes.

Q.Do you know of any bundles? - A. Yes, he had a bundle, and I had a small bundle myself.

Q.Did you keep any of those notes in your bundle? - A.No, I never had any.

Q.At the time you delivered the notes to Mackay, was all the printed part done? - A. Yes.

Q.When you got on board the packet, you went to Dundee? - A. Yes.

Q.You were both apprehended at Dundee? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you taken from the ship directly on shore, or from some distance? - A. We were taken at a distance from shore in the river.

Q.Do you recollect any thing happening before you got on shore? - A. I saw Mackay take out his pocket-book, and slip it over the edge of the boat.

Q.Did you know what pocket-book he had at that time? - A.I think it was a red Turkey one; I never saw him with more than one.

Q.Was it such a one as this? - A. Yes, I believe that is the pocket-book.

Q.And that you saw him slip over-board? - A. Yes.

Q.You were taken into custody, brought up to London, and then you gave your information? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.You had no notion at all of these notes being forged? - A.Not till I was detected offering a bad note to be oashed to Read.

A.You had no suspicion at all till then? - A.No.

Q.You were a very honest man, had fallen into bad hands, and had not the least notion that any of these notes were forged? - A.I had not.

Q.I dare say you can read and write? - A. Yes.

Q.Before that, according to your own account, you had heard some conversation about stamps? - A. No, I don't recollect.

Q.You have given some account to day of a conversation about stamps before you went to Read? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you think London was the place in which the British Linen Company manufactured their notes? - A.No, I had no reason to think so.

Q. And yet you thought the notes genuine at that time? - A. Yes.

Q.If you had not thought they were genuine,

you would not have done any thing whatever respecting them? - A. No, I should have had no part in it whatever.

Q.When you went, according to your own account, to Foss to get them stamped, you thought they were genuine notes? - A.No.

Q.You said you would not have had any thing to do with them if you had known it - why did not you leave their company directly? - A.Because I could not get home; it was merely for the purpose of getting home to Scotland.

Q.You went to Foss, and saw him stamp them, and you did all this merely to get home to Scotland, and that you expect to be believed? - A. I hope so.

Q.Had you ever seen any of these notes in Scotland? - A.But very few of the five-pound ones.

Q.As five-pound notes were searce in Scotland, you was surprised there were so many in London? - A.There were but eighteen.

Q.This inflexible honesty, that was not to be overcome but by the hope of a voyage home, of course led you to give information to the Magistrate? - A.No, I did not.

Q.When was it you first gave information about this business? - A.At Dundee.

Q.Perhaps at that time you were in custody? - A. I was.

Q.You know you were in custody respecting forged notes? - A. Yes.

Q.And then you rather chose to give evidence against somebody else, than that any body should give evidence against you? - A. I did not mind who gave evidence against me.

Q.Had you no fears about it for yourself? - A. No, only for fear of being disrgraced.

Q.But no fear of being punished? - A. No.

Q.Then you gave evidence upon patriotic principles, to punish guilty men - purely for the sake of public justice? - A. I think it is very proper.

Q.And you did it merely because it was proper, and not for your own safety? - A. Yes, I did.

The prisoner, Mackay, left his defence to his Counsel.

The other two prisoners were not put upon their defence.

Mackay, GUILTY, Death, aged 34. Of uttering knowing it to be forged.

[ Case reserved for the opinion of the Twelve Judges .]

Foss, NOT GUILTY .

Catapodi, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18030420-79

393. ROBERT SMITH , alias ALEXANDER GORDON , was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 6th of March , upon Francis Treadwell , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, against his will, 1l. 2s. 6d. in monies, numbered , his property.

FRANCIS TREADWELL Sworn. - I am a hackney-coachman : On the 6th of March, about seven or eight minutes past eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner came to me at Charing-cross, and desired me to drive him to Bayswater; when I came to Tyburn-turnpike, I told him it would be ten-pence, it being the Sunday toll; he gave me a shilling, I offered him two-pence in change, and he said, never mind it, put it into your pocket; just as I got beyond St. George's-row , he said, coachman, your door is open; I got down to shut it, and before I was rightly off the wheel, he was out of the coach, and met me with a pistol, and demanded my money; I gave him a seven-shilling-piece, and five shillings and sixpence in silver; he asked me for my watch, I told him, I had none; he then struck me with a turck stick, the spear went through my coat, and about an inch long under my left arm; he then asked me for more, and I gave him a seven-shilling-piece, and three shillings; after he got my money, he said, if I followed him an inch, he would blow my brains out instantly.

Q.What opportunity had you of seeing the prisoner? - A. I knew his voice by his speaking when he got into the coach.

Q.What sort of night was it? - A. A moonlight night, the moon had been up some time.

Q.Do you recollect him by his features? - A. I knew him nearly four years; I have no doubt about his person, he was a private soldier in the artillery, at Woolwhich, and he and I were fellowprisoners together in the King's-bench, nine months, when he lived with a Mr. Bentley, in prison.

Q.Did you talk to him as if you had known him? - A.No, or he to me, I don't think he had any knowledge of me, I saw him the Monday fortnight following, at Bow-street, when I swore to him.

- EASTWOOD Sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street, and met the prisoner in the King's private road, this side of Sloane-square, on the 20th of March, about a quarter past ten, at night; I stopped him on suspicion, and found on his person a pistol, loaded with broken glass and powder; he would not give any account of himself.

( William Lee , a patrol, produced the pistol, and its contents.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say in my defence, I only with to observe to your Lordship and the Jury, that all the depredations laid to my charge, I plead guilty to.*

*There were five other indictment against the prisoner.

GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18030420-80

394. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , a silver

watch, value 40s. two guineas, a seven-shilling-piece, two half-crowns, a pocket-handkerchief, value 6d. and a knife, value 2d. the property of James-Stone Gibbs , in the dwelling-house of Ann Wilson .

JAMES-STONE GIBBS Sworn. - I am a gentleman's servant , out of place: I met the prisoner on the 8th of March, at the top of the Haymarket, and she took me to the house of Ann Wilson, in Prince's-court , between nine and ten o'clock at night, we remained there about ten minutes, I found I was robbed of my watch, and the prisoner was gone; I was not quite sober, but about half and half; she took my silver watch, two guineas, a seven-shilling-piece, two half-crowns, a pockethandkerchief and a knife; when I missed them, I went down stairs, and said to Mrs. Wilson, did you see so and so go out, she said, she had been gone about five or six minutes; I am certain the prisoner is the woman.

ANN WILSON Sworn . - I recollect the prosecutor and prisoner coming into my house between nine and ten o'clock, on the 8th of March, and staying about a quarter of an hour, when they both came down and went out together, I am positive; the man was gone about ten or twenty minutes out of the house before he came back, then he asked for a light to go up stairs, saying, he had been robbed of his watch and money; I asked him where the woman was, who went out with him, he said, he did not know, for she was gone away; I asked him if he knew her, he said, not by name, but he should know her face if he saw her again; I told him the most likely place to find her, upon which he went away, and I saw no more of him till the next morning, when he came with a constable, to whom I told her name, as I had seen her before.

- DONALDSON Sworn. - I am an officer: On Wednesday the 9th of March, I went to Wilson's with the prosecutor, to see if we could find out the prisoner, she told me her name, and I knew her well; I took her up and searched her; among the duplicates, she had one for a watch, pawned on the 9th of March, in the name of Duggan.

EDWARD BAILEY Sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lane, No. 185, Holborn, and took in this watch of Phoebe Duggan , on the 9th of March. (The watch produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

PHOEBE DUGGAN Sworn. - I live at No. 4, Smart's-buildings, Holborn, and take in washing: On the 9th of March, Mary Evans, who I had known some years, brought me a watch, which she asked me to pawn, saying, a man had no money, but left it in pledge till he called again, and that she knew him well; I pledged it, and gave her the money.

Prisoner's defence. The young man had no more than three shillings, and gave me the watch till he came again, and I gave him my direction, but he never came.

Prosecutor. I did not give her the watch, or say I would call again.

GUILTY, aged 37.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-81

395. ELIZABETH HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , a coat, value 2l. a waistcoat, value 10s. the property of William Reynolds , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM REYNOLDS sworn. - I am a weaver , and live at No. 29, Montague-street, Spital-fields , the prisoner was my weekly servant , and had been so two or three months, and had behaved herself well: On the 29th of March last, I and my wife went up stairs to work, about two o'clock, and when we came down to tea about four o'clock, she was missing; next day, a sheet was missed, and a suit of cloaths; next day I took the prisoner near Shoreditch-church.

(Mary Reynolds confirmed the testimony of her husband.)

JOSEPH SAUNDERS Sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Clarke, pawnbroker, No. 158, Bishopsgate-street, and produce a suit of clothes and a sheet, which I took in of the prisoner at the bar, between three and five o'clock on the 29th of March; she pawned them in her own name.

(The property produced, and indentified.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to urge in my defence.

Prosecutor. She seemed very uneasy in her mind on that day; her brother was pressed, and she had been to take leave of him.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Recommended to mercy, on account of her good character.

Fined 1s. and dischared.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-82

396. ANN LOMAX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , one guinea, four half-guineas, a seven-shilling-piece, a one pound note, a half-crown, three shillings, two sixpences, and a purse, value 1d. the property of David Jennings , privily from his person .

DAVID JENNINGS Sworn. - I am a ladies shoemaker , and live at No. 12, Noble-street, Mary-le-bonne: On the 24th of March, I was returning from Pratt-street, Lambeth, and passing between Whitehall and Charing-cross , I was accosted by the prisoner, with How do you do, serjeant? I thought it was a soldier's wife belonging to the same

regiment with myself; I stopped to hear what she had to say; during the conversation, she picked my waistcoat pocket of my purse, containing one guinea, four half-guineas, a seven-shilling piece, a one-pound note, one half-crown, three shillings, and two sixpences; I seized her by the arm, and accused her, she denied it; I charged the watch with her, she was examined by the constable at the watch-house, and he found the property at the back of her head, in her hair.

PHILIP PILGRIM Sworn. - I am constable, in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields: On the 24th of March, between nine and ten in the evening, the prosecutor brought the prisoner into the watch-house, and said, he had been robbed, and explained what it was; I searched the prisoner, and under her cap I found a leather purse, which is part of a woman's glove, containing the property stated in the indictment.

(The property produced, and the purse and note indentified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say; I hope you will forgive me. GUILTY, aged 42,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-83

397. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , a coat, value 2l. a pair of overalls, value 6d. a pair of shoes, value 2s. and a waistcoat, value 7s. the property of Jonathan Garnett .

JONATHAN GARNETT Sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Carr, in Oxford-street; the prisoner was helper in the yard: I lost the things stated, on Sunday, the 6th of March, about eleven o'clock in the evening; I left them on the binn in the stable, but the coat was in the coach in the coach-house; I missed them next day, and saw them again at Marlborough-street, on the 7th, about one o'clock.

WILLIAM RUSSELL Sworn . I am a watchman in the parish of St. James's: On Monday morning, near one o'clock, at the top of the Haymarker, I saw the prisoner with the coat on, and a white bag at his back, full of things; I asked him what he had there; he said, his own things, and wanted a lodging; I, having suspicion, detatsied him; next day he was committed.(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner. I leave my case to the mercy of the Court. GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-84

398. THOMAS MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , a silver watch, value 30s. a steel chain, value 6d. two metal keys, value 1d. and a gold ring, value 2s. the property of Benjamin Capper .

BENJAMIN CAPPER Sworn. - I keep the Hungerford coffee-house in the Strand ; I saw the prisoner in the coffee-room between two and three o'clock, on the 7th of January, I thought he wanted something; he asked the bar-maid for some paper, and set down in one of the boxes; I went to dinner, and in about five minutes I heard some person was in my bed-room; I went in, and immediately missed my watch; in about two hours after, the watch was found at a pawnbroker's.

ELIZABETH HART Sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Capper: On the 7th of January, the prisoner was sitting in the coffee-room; he looked into the bar, and immediately went up stairs, I thought he had slept in the house; he came down in a few minutes, and walked hastily out of the coffee-room.

JANE ELDERTON Sworn. - I am bar-maid; the prisoner asked me for a piece of paper; he set himself down in a box for a few minutes, and then went up stairs; in about five minutes he came quickly down, and went out.

ALICE PRITCHARD Sworn. - I am chambermaid to Mr. Capper, and know there was a watch in his bed-room, having seen it about two o'clock; I opened the bed-room door, as I passed it, and saw a young man in the room, to the best of my knowledge it was the prisoner; I asked him his business there, he made no reply, but walked quickly past me; I told the waiter, and he gave the alarm.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.This took place in January last? - A. Yes.

Q.The person passed you very quick? - A. Yes.

Q.He did not answer you? - A. No.

Q.Therefore you had but little time to see him? - A.No.

Q.You were frightened? - A. Yes.

Q.Will you venture to swear positively to the person of the prisoner? - A.No, I cannot swear positively.

Q.The dining-room door is next to the bedroom door, is it not? - A. Yes.

BENJAMIN CHAMBERS Sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Morris, a pawnbroker, in York-street, Westminster: On the 7th of January, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner brought a silver watch, and asked twenty-five shillings on it; I said, I would lend fifteen shillings; he agreed to take sixteen shillings, which I gave him, and he went away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Did you not swear before the Justice, that you could not swear to his person, but to his voice? - A.I said, I believed it was the prisoner, and after he spoke, I said, I was sure it was him by his voice; I did not go to the Magistrate's for two months after the robbery.

(The watch produced, and identified.)

THOMAS MOSS Sworn . - I am a patrol, and apprehended the prisoner, but did not find any thing on him but his own property.

Prisoner. I am innocent of the charge.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-85

399. GEORGE BROWN and THOMAS WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a skiff, value 15l and a pair of sculls, value 10s. the goods of Margaret Anderson and Jannet Johnstone .(The case opened by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS SAMPSON Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a watchman; I was employed upon Williams's wharf, it is next to Anderson's wharf.

Q.On the night of the 3d of March last, were you upon Williams's wharf? - A. Yes, I was; it was a moon-light night; I saw two men take a skiff from Anderson's wharf; they were of different sizes, one was a good deal shorter than the other; I took them to be two big lads; it was about seven o'clock in the evening; they unloosed the skiff from her moorings, and carried her off.

Q.Did you give any information to Anderson's servants, and how soon afterwards? - A. It might be twenty minutes; a servant enquired whether I saw any thing of the skiff being carried away, and I told him.

Q.Look at the two prisoners at the bar, and tell me whether you have any knowledge of their persons who took away the skiff? - A. I cannot say; by size they appear to be the same.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q.You are the watchman at Williams's wharf? - A. Yes.

Q.How far is that distant from Anderson's? - A. There is a brick wall between them; not more than two yards distance.

Q.Had you ever seen this skiff before? - A.I never had, to my knowledge, she was a new skiff.

Q.Before you saw the skiff put off, had you observed her at all? - A. No, I had taken no notice of her.

Q.Whether she was moored or not, you know nothing about? - A. I know she was moored, by seeing them cast her off; I saw them undo her, and push her off, and take her away.

Court. Q.You say it was a skiff that was taken- you don't know who it was taken by? - A.No.

Q.Do you know whether there were any sculls in the boat? - A. Yes, there were sculls, but they were fastened to it.

ROBERT GEORGE Sworn . - I work at Anderson's wharf.

Q.Who are your proprietors? - A. Margaret Anderson and Jannet Johnstone.

Q.Are the same persons who are proprietors of the wharf proprietors of the skiff? - A. Yes; the last time I saw the skiff was about eleven o'clock in the morning on the 3d of March.

Q.Where did you see her? - A. On the premises of Mrs. Andersons wharf; it is called Anderson's coal wharf; I moored her myself both head and stern.

Q.Is that in the City of London? - A. Yes; I missed her between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and I made enquiry of the last witness, Mr. Sampson; there were a pair of sculls in her, secured by an iron bolt, and that bolt fastened by a chain; I went in pursuit of the skiff, in consequence of the information I had received, and in about an hour after I discovered her going by Queenhithe; she was coming from Blackfriars-bridge towards London-bridge.

Q.Was that in a direction from Anderson's wharf? - A. Yes; I pursued her, and caught them on the Surrey side of the water; I found the two prisoners at the bar on board.

Q.Any other persons? - A.No.

Q.Did you find the two sculls on board? - A. I did; the two prisoners had each of them one in their hands; it appeared to me that the eye of the bolt had been cut, or forced off, by that means the lock got off; I brought them to the wharf where the boat had been taken from, and a patrol was sent for to take charge of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q.When you saw them, they were rowing on the North side? - A. The tide was running up.

Q.How would that have been for making their way to Horsham stairs? - A. It was almost in a direct line; the tide would not have answered completely to have fetched her there.

Q.Would that have been a course much out of the way? - A.They were rowing against the tide.

Q.How far were they got over the Thames when you overtook them? - A.The nearest landing-place was at Bank-end.

Court. Q.Were they rowing in a direction to Bank-end? - A. Yes.

Q.How is the skiff constructed? - A.She is made in the same form as other boats are; what we call lightermen's skiffs.

Q.She is a boat that was used at Anderson's wharf? - A. Yes.

Q.At the time you saw this skiff, what had she on board? - A. I found a bed there, and a large bag, but what the contents were I did not look.

Q.What time did you first come to the wharf after that? - A. I think it wanted about twenty minutes of eight.

Court. Q.Do you know who this bed and bag belonged to? - A.No, not of my own knowledge; they did not belong to any body at the wharf.

Mr. Gurney. Q.Did the persons in the skiff do

all they could to get away from you? - A.Apparently they did.

Brown's defence. This young lad and I happened to meet together in the City, and we went down to the water-side with intent to go by water, and there was nothing but this skiff, and a man was standing by her, and he said he would give us a cast over; he said, if we would row over, he would meet us on the other side.

Williams's defence. I have nothing further to say than the other young man has said.

Both NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-86

400. THOMAS MURKY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , sixty pounds weight of lead, value 11s. belonging and affixed to the house of Zachariah Skyring .

Second Court. Laying it to belong to the Mayor and Corporation of London .

ZACHARIAH SKYRING Sworn. - I am a builder ; I built two shops at the North end of Fleet-market , in the City of London.

Court. Q.Then the buildings belong to the Corporation? - A. Yes; about the middle of March, the constable and watchman came and acquainted me that the lead was stolen off a part of those buildings, and desired I would come to the Justice Room; I went there, and was bound over to prosecute; that is all I know about it; I went to the premises, and found the lead was gone; it was all affixed to one building; the plumber can speak more particularly about it, he can ascertain the pieces of lead that were missing on the 12th or 13th of March.

Q. On what part of the building? - A.What we call the front projection.

Q.How much? - A.About half a hundred weight; there was about sixty pounds weight that was found upon the prisoner, and there was missing about another sixty pounds.

THOMAS HAWKINS Sworn. - I am a watchman belonging to St. Andrews; it wanted about twenty minutes to eleven o'clock, on Friday night, the 11th of March, when I saw four boys coming down Field-lane; as soon as I went up to them, Thomas Murky throwed the lead down; I catched hold of him directly, and the others ran down Field-lane; he began to cry, and then I delivered him to the other watchman that came over, Henry Elsby , who took him to the watch-house; I delivered the lead to Mr. Hayward, the inspector, at the watch-house.

WILLIAM DENNISON Sworn. - I did the plumbering work for Mr. Skyring.

Court. Q.When did you last see this lead before it was taken away? - A.It was put on in the beginning of March; I saw it about three days after it was first put on; I called upon Mr. Skyring the Sunday following, and he said the lead was taken off the front; it was off from the cornice; I saw that there were two pieces taken away, a circular piece and a straight piece; it was the same lead that was on the cornice; I can prove it by the number that was on it.

Q.What was the number? - A. No. 1807; I saw the lead at Guildhall with the number on it; I can venture to swear that it is the piece of lead that was cut off; there were two pieces lost, but only one found.

HENRY ELSBY Sworn. - I am a watchman; I saw the lead laying by the prisoner; I took possession of the property; we took the lad to the watch-house.

- HAYWARD Sworn. - I am inspector of the watch and lamps: The prisoner was brought to the watch-house upon the 11th of March, a little before eleven o'clock, together with the lead; I have kept the lead from that time to this.

Dennison. It is the same lead that was put on the cornice, I am sure of it.

Prisoner's defence. About half after ten o'clock, as I was coming down Field-lane, I kicked against it, and I could hardly life it up at all.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-87

401. WILLIAM BRITTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of Philip-Western Wood .

PHILIP-WESTERN WOOD Sworn . - I am a druggist : On the 25th of February, between the hour of twelve and one, passing through Thames-street , I felt my pocket lighter on a sudden, as if something had been taken out; I immediately put my hand into my pocket, and found my pocket-handkerchief had been taken; I turned round, and saw two stout boys, one of them was the prisoner; I seized this boy by the collar, and said, you rascal, you have picked my pocket; and under the slap of his coat I discovered the pocket-handkerchief which I had just lost; he immediately dropped it; I saw him drop it; I then took him to a constable, and we took him to the Mansion-house, and he was committed; the constable has had the handkerchief ever since.

JOHN BATES Sworn. - I am constable of the ward of Billingsgate; the prisoner was delivered into my custody, and the handkerchief was delivered to me. (Produces it.)

Prosecutor. I have no doubt but it is my handkerchief; I have many of the same piece.

Prisoner's defence. As I was going down Thames-street, between twelve and one o'clock, I was walking behind this man, and there was another boy betwixt him and me, and whether the boy picked it out of this man's pocket I don't know;

this boy ran away, and the gentleman said to me, you have took my handkerchief, and I will punish you, as the law directs. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-88

402. RALPH CLOWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , two pint glass decanters, value 15s. and a china tea pot stand, value 3s. the property of Josiah Spode .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM SPODE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. My father keeps a Staffordshire warehouse, and deals in glass , in Portugal-street ; my father has no partner; the prisoner at the bar was employed as a packer in the house: On the 28th of February, I called all the men to go to dinner at one o'clock; when they had got off the premises, I called the prisoner and several others back; I took them up stairs into the accompting-house, and had them all searched in my presence; on the person of the prisoner at the bar we found the two decanters, stated in the indictment, in his breeches; he was then asked, with the others, whether they would have any objection to have their lodgings searched; the prisoner and they made no objection; the prisoner's box was brought to the accompting-house, and the tea-pot stand was found in his box, there is not a doubt of its being our manufactory; we asked him whether he had taken any thing previous to that; he said, it was the first time; there was no promise made him, that is all I know about it; he had lived with us nearly a twelvemonth.

- POTTER sworn. - I am clerk to the prosecutor: The officer went to the prisoner's lodging with our cashier; I have got the two decanters, which I found upon his person, and the tea-pot stand, which I found in his box; I cannot say they are Mr. Spode's property, though it is our manufactory; he said, he had found it among the straw; he did not say he found it in the packingroom particularly.

HENRY GRIFFITH sworn - I only know there were a few of that pattern brought into Mr. Spode's warehouse that we had bought at a sale.

Prisoner's defence. I have served the king and country five years during this war. In the habit of packing, we very often break things, and in order to save disputes with our master, we take these things to replace what we have broke.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-89

403. JAMES CATLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , a cloth coat, value 7s. and a flannel waistcoat, value 3s. the property of Thomas Hodges .

MARY HODGES sworn. - My husband's name is Thomas Hodges: I lost a coat and waistcoat on the 5th of March, I was out at the time; I am a housekeeper, No. 88, Golden-lane ; between twelve and one o'clock, when I returned, they were gone, my husband is a tailor ; they were hanging at the door for sale; Mr. Dickenson saw this man pass his window with the cloaths upon his arm.

JOHN DICKENSON sworn. - I am a shoemaker, No. 58, Golden-lane; I saw the prisoner, about a quarter before one, on the 5th of March, with a black coat and waistcoat on his arm, pass my window; I whipt out after him, and secured him; they were both pinned together.

Court. Q.How far was it from Mrs. Hodges's house? - A.About eighty yards from where I saw him.

JAMES GEARY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police-office, St. Luke's: On Saturday, the 5th of March, the prisoner was gave into my custody for stealing this black coat and waistcoat.

THOMAS WALKER sworn. - I was going down Golden-lane, on the 5th of March, I met Mr. Dickenson and the prisoner both together, the prisoner had got the coat and waistcoat upon his arm; I took him, and lodged him in the watch-house.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt but it is my property.

Prisoner's defence. I have lost my sight; I deal in cloaths; I bought these cloaths of a woman in Golden-lane, I gave her five shilling and two pence for them. GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-90

404. JOHN CHAPLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , a gown, value 5s. the property of James Porter .

ISABELLA PORTER sworn. - My husband's name is James Porter : I lost a gown on the 8th of April; I live in St. Ann's-court, Soho ; my husband is a tailor ; the gown was taken out of the shop a little past ten o'clock at night, it was hooked off the line by means of a hook or stick, it hung by the shop door; he was watched by a woman, who saw him pull it off.

LOUISA ALLEN sworn. - I live in St. Ann's-court: I saw two men walking up and down the court, they stopped at several doors; it was before ten at night, the prisoner was one of them; I saw the prisoner go to a butcher's shop, and try to open the door with his hand; he then looked through the window to see where the fastening was; he then tried to push up the window; the watchman then came out of a court, about fifty yards from them, and cried, past ten o'clock; they then ran

away; I went and told the butcher that there had been two men trying to open his shop, the butcher then came out, and stood opposite his own shop, and watched till they came back again; when they came back, I looked them both in the face, John Chaple I could swear to, the other I could not; they went to the butcher's shop, and then to the door of Mrs. Porter; I saw them hook the gown down with a hooked stick, the other man, not this one; the butcher then cried, stop thief, and ran after them, one ran one way, and the other the other; the one that took the gown was not taken, that is all I know about it.

JOHN HANDWIDGE sworn. - I am a butcher in St. Ann's-court: I went out to watch these men, I stood just opposite my own shop; they could not see me, I was in a gateway; I saw two men come up, and went to my shop window; I heard the other whisper to him, and they both went back; they went to Mrs. Porter's shop, and there they stood for about half a minute before they hooked the gown off; I did not know what the thing was then, I saw the stick, it looked like a very large walking stick; I immediately ran after them, and cried, stop thief; one ran down Swan-alley, and the other across Wardour-street; I pursued the prisoner at the bar into a little place, called Duck-lane; there was no thoroughfare; the watchman hearing me calling stop thief, he went after him, and laid hold of him just before me; he was taken to the watch-house; I lost sight of him just turning round the corner of St. Ann's-court, I am sure he is the same man; the other man escaped; they dropped the property just at the corner of Swanalley.

Prisoner. Q. Can you say I am the same man that was in the court? - A. You are the man I pursued.

JAMES CLARKE sworn. - I am a watchman of St. James's; I had done calling ten o'clock at the time I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running, I ran after him, and caught him; I took him to the watch-house.

- PAINE sworn. - I was constable of the night; the prisoner and the property were brought to me.

Prosecutor. This is my property, it was hanging up in the shop; it was in my hands ten minutes before.

Prisoner's defence. I had been to spend the evening along with a friend, and I was going home up Wardour-street; I heard a noise, and went to see what was the matter, and the watchman laid hold of me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-91

405. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , 4lb. of copper, value 4l. a brass mortar, value 2s. and a pestle, value 6d. the property of John Stroble .

JOHN STROBLE sworn. - I am a brazier by trade, I live at No. 5, Great Saffron-hill : On the 19th of last month, my shop was broke into, and robbed of several articles; I lost a five-quart teaurn, a five-quart tea-kettle, and a wash-hand bowl, and several other articles that are here; the prisoner was catched with some of the property on him.

GEORGE GRIFFITH sworn. - I am a watchman of St. Sepulchre's parish: On the 19th of March, I was upon duty; between the hours of five and six in the morning, as I was standing, the prisoner came up with this apron in his hand, with all these articles in it, (the things produced); I said, my lad, what have you got there; he said, he had some tin; I opened the cloth, and I saw what he had; I took him to St. Sepulchre's watch-house, there was nobody else with him, this is the property I stopped.

Prosecutor. This is all my property; I left it on the Friday night, and I missed it on the Saturday morning; it is my own work.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to work on the Saturday morning, and I saw something lay facing the church; I thought they were a bundle of tools, and I untied them. GUILTY , aged 13.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-92

406. WILLIAM ELWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , one whip, value 7s. the property of Margaret Bentley , Thomas Bentley , and James Dawson ; and a Banknote, value 2l. the property of the same persons.

THOMAS BENTLEY sworn. - Being absent on business, my brother can give you the particulars.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What is your firm? - A. Margaret Bentley, Thomas Bentley, and James Dawson .

GEORGE BENTLEY sworn. - I conduct the business when my brother is away; we have a turpentine manufactory , and live at Chelsea: On the 2d of April, I sent the prisoner to get a load of rape at Mr. Adley's, Fleet-street, to assist in making vinegar; the prisoner was a carter to our firm; he returned home that evening, and did not pay for it; he had some money to pay for it. On the Thursday following, I sent him for another load, and gave him a 2l. note, it was upon the 7th of April, to pay Mr. Adley for the former load, and the one he was to bring home that day; he came home in the evening without the rape, and put his horses into the stable, and went away, and absconded with the whip belonging to the cart; I never saw the man afterwards till we sent two of our men servants and an officer to apprehend him at Croydon, on the Wednesday following, the 13th;

it was a Bank of England note; I believe he may have lost it; we don't know what he did with it.

Court. If he lost it, there is an end of the felony.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did he not give it as a reason when he came back, that he had lost the note? -- A. Yes, and he said that was the reason he kept out of the way. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-93

407. LYON ABRAHAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , one handkerchief, value 1s. 8d. and 2lb. of tobacco, value 6s. the property of David Hutchinson .

DAVID HUTCHINSON sworn. - I am a tobacconist , No. 7, York-street, Queen-square, Westminster; I keep a shop: On the 5th of this month, about one o'clock in the day time, I went to Mr. King's house, the sign of the Coach and Horses, Brewer-street, Golden-square , with two pounds of cut tobacco; I laid it down on a box facing the bar door; I called for a pint of beer, and sat down and looked at the news-paper; about five or six minutes afterwards, the prisoner came in, and placed his bag on the same box where my tobacco was, and called for a pint of beer; he sat down, and after he had drank his beer, he called for Mrs. King to give him change for sixpence, and to take the pint of beer out of it; he said, he was in a great hurry, for there was somebody waiting for him; after he got it he went out, and as soon as I got up to deliver the goods, I missed the parcel; I immediately ran out of the door, and saw the prisoner at the bar running along the street from the house; I ran after him, and caught him by the collar the corner of Windmill-street, the top of the Haymarket; he was just turning the corner; I shook him by the shoulder, and told him, "you villain, you have got my goods in your bag;" he said, he had not; I said, I insist upon searching you; he put down his bag, and I looked into it, and the parcel was at the mouth of his bag; I took him back to the public-house, and sent for a constable; during the time the constable was gone for, the prisoner at the bar called me, and said, if you don't take me to Marlborough-street, I will make you a very handsome present, saying, "me don't like justice." When the constable came, I gave him charge of the prisoner, and he took every thing out of his bag; there were four or five pounds worth of clothes in the bag, and there was nothing more than my tobacco. That is all I have got to say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have told us all, I dare say? - A. All that I have got to say.

Q. Have you told us all that belongs to this transaction? - A.Everything.

Q. There was nobody in the box but himself? - A. No.

Q. Nor in the room? - A. Yes, five others.

Q. There was no quarrel in the tap-room? - A. None at all.

Q. Were there any soldiers? - A. Two, one I have brought as a witness; they were as still as any thing could be; there was no fun going forward.

Q. No abuse of the Jewish nation? - A. None at all.

Q. You expected to find it in the bag? - A. When I went out of the house, I was sure to find it in the bag.

Q. Did not he go to the fire? - A.Upon my oath he never left the box.

Q. Was not his beer warmed? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Upon your oath will you swear he did not go to the fire, while his beer was warming? - A. I never saw him; he never left the box, as I told you before.

Q. Did not you tell him that he had better confess what he knew about it? - A. I said nothing at all; I said, let the consequence be what it would, he should go to Marlborough-street.

Court. Q.This tobacco was for Mr. King? - A. Yes, I have got the permit.

Q. You went to Mr. King's, for the purpose of delivering the tobacco, why did you not deliver it? - A. Mrs. King was busy in the bar; she said, sit down, and I will pay for it by and by.

Q. I want to know the reason why; it might have been delivered, and paid for afterwards? - A.Because Mrs. King was busy at the time.

Q. There was no sun going forward, namely, smoke the old cloathsman? - A.Not any impropriety or rioting.

URIAH COSSEY sworn. - I am a soldier belonging to the Coldstream regiment; I was drinking a pot of beer at Mr. King's, in Brewer-street, Golden-square, about one o'clock, when the prisoner came in, and went out again; about two minutes after the prisoner came back; he called for a pint of porter; he took the box to himself where this parcel laid, fronting the bar-door; he changed sixpence, and asked Mrs. King for his change; he then went out, and this gentleman got up, and asked Mrs. King whether she had seen his parcel.

Court. Q. What was Mrs. King about all this time? - A.She was in the bar, and walking about the tap-room about her business; she did not seem to be busy about any thing in particular, only serving the Jew with a pint of porter; there were about five people in company.

Q. There was not a throng of business just at the moment? - A. No, there was not; they draw the beer in the bar; as soon as the prisoner was gone, the prosecutor asked Mrs. King whether she had the parcel, and she said, no; he said he was certain that the Jew must have got it; he

went out, and brought the prisoner back; that is all I saw of it; he said, I will give you any thing to make it up, for consider my wife and family.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The poor fellow had a feeling for his wife and family, and begged the prosecutor to have mercy on him? - A. Yes.

Q. You know a little what we mean by skylarking? - A. Yes, some soldiers are fond of it.

Q. How many soldiers were in the room? - A. There was only one, of the name of Dawson; the prisoner went out at first, and then came in again, and called for his beer; he was out about two minutes; his bag was full of clothes; I saw him come in with his bag.

Q. When the prisoner went out the first time, did neither of you, or Dawson, say, it would be a good thing to skylark the Jew? - A. No, never was a word of the kind spoken.

Q. Did you not see a hat produced? - A. He never shewed a hat.

Court. Q. Do you remember the man coming in with the tobacco? - A. He was in before I came in.

Q. There was a box between him and his tobacco? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you mean by skylarking? - A. Sometimes persons play the rogue with each other, making a derision, or joke of a man.

Q.(To Hutchinson.) I should like to look at your permit; you say this happened on Tuesday the 5th of March, and I see this permit bears date the 4th, and was to be in use only one hour - how came you not to go on the 4th? - A.Because I had not an opportunity.

Q. How came you to deceive me, and say it was all right, when the permit was nothing but waste paper? - A.Because I had not an opportunity to take it before.

Prisoner's defence. I have been in this country for forty years, and I never wronged any body of a piece of paper.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-94

408. JOSEPH BUDD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , 80lb. of lead, value 20s. affixed to a certain building, called a house , belonging to Joseph Warren .

Second Count. Charging him with feloniously ripping and cutting the like quantity of lead, with intent to steal it.

JOSEPH WARREN sworn. - I am a carpenter ; I have a house situated in George-court, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell; a few days prior to my detecting the prisoner at the bar, I discovered I had lost the greatest part of the lead from the tops of three of my houses, all occupied, NO. 1, 2, and 3; I gave information at Hatton-garden; I suspected the prisoner, and Mr. Bleamire wished me to wait a while, and I had some bills printed; after I found I had lost so much lead, I noticed the pipe which served the house with water, and it was very safe against the wall on Monday the 14th of February; there were two lodgers in the house; on the Saturday afternoon following, between five and six o'clock, I went with an intention to put a padlock on the door, and recollecting I had better see whether the lodgers were all gone or not, I went into the house, and at the further end of the passage, I discovered the prisoner at the bar rolling up this lead-pipe; the pipe was all secure against the wall three or four days before; I said to him, what business have you with it; he said, he heard the water running in the cellar, and he went down to see what was the matter, and he saw the pipe had all fell down, and he had taken it up into the yard, and rolled it up, and put it by for me in one corner of the yard; I collared him, and took him into custody immediately (the lead produced); this lead was fixed to the building with a wall-hook; it is my property.

Prisoner's defence. I lodged in the house; I was going to quit the house that evening; I went down to get some water to wash my hands, and could not get any; the pipe was bursted with the frost, and had fell down; there was no hold-fast to it.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-95

409. JOHN BEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , one jacket, value 3s. one waistcoat, value 2s. and a pair of breeches, value 3s. the property of James Davis .

JAMES WARREN sworn. - I keep a chandler's shop , No. 2, Newton-street, High Holborn : Upon the 12th of April, about a quarter after ten at night, I saw a man go up stairs; I did not take any particular notice of him; I was standing behind the counter; I thought he had been some acquaintance of the lodgers; in about six or seven minutes, I lighted a candle to go down into the cellar; as I came to the door with a light, I saw the prisoner run down the stairs with the clothes under his left arm; I stepped back, and put the candle down upon the counter; I ran across the street, and I caught him by the shoulder with my left hand; I asked him what he had there, he said he had nothing belonging to me; I told him, I did not know that; I asked him to come back, and let me see; he said he would not; I asked him if he would go a little way down Holborn with me (it struck me then to charge the watch with him), he said he would; when he came in sight of the watch-box, he dropped the clothes, and laid hold of me with both hands, and tried

to make his escape; I called the watch, and I secured him.

JAMES DAVIS sworn. - I lodge at Mr. Warren's house, up one pair of stairs; I went to bed about nine o'clock; I had been in bed some time, when Mr. Warren came up stairs, saying I was robbed, with the clothes under his arm; these are my property; he took a jacket waistcoat, and a pair of breeches; I know nothing of this man.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-96

410. JOHN COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , two carriage wheels, value 3l. 3s. the property of Edward Houlditch and James Houlditch .

EDWARD HOULDITCH sworn. - I have no other partner but my brother James, I am a coachmaker , in Long-acre; my foreman and another man know most about it.

JOHN JAQUES sworn. - I am foreman to Mess. Houlditch; they are coach-makers, in Long-acre ; I know that we had lost a number of wheels; the prisoner was a person who worked in the shop , something of a jobbing man; in consequence of losing so many wheels, I had a suspicion of the prisoner, with others; while the prisoner was at work in Mr. Houlditch's shop, I went with another person, who is a clerk also of Mr. Houlditch's, to the prisoner's lodgings, No. 6, George-street, near Portland Chapel, to the house of one Smith; when the door was opened, I saw the glance of a wheel in the yard; I went in, and looked at these wheels; I found one pair immediately; upon going up to them, I knew the wheels to be the property of Mess. Houlditch; the wheels were of a different colour from what they were in Mess. Houlditch's shop; I have known the wheels for two years; they are such wheels as are not used now; they had been newly painted.

Court. Q.Could you know them again, although they had a different coat on them? - A. I could not miss knowing them, having had them in my hands twenty times; we went to Bow-street, and got two officers; the two officers, and the two Mr. Houlditchs' and myself, went up to the prisoner's lodgings; I knocked at the door, and got into the house, and the two officers went up stairs; I heard a little bit of a scuffle as I thought, so I followed up close to the landing-place; the prisoner was just come out of his room upon the landing-place, and the two officers with him; they brought him down stairs; they went into the yard, and found the wheels there; we brought him and the wheels to the Office in Bow-street.

JOHN COCKING sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; I know no more than going on the 1st of April to the prisoner's lodging, and apprehending him; I secured the prisoner and the wheels, and brought them to Bow-street; that is all I know of it.

JOSEPH WESTBROOKE sworn. - I am a butcher by trade; about the middle of February last, Cook and myself went into Mess. Houlditchs' premises, Long-acre, between the hours of six and eight at night, and took out a pair of wheels; Cook took one, and I took the other; we took them to my lodgings, No. 17, Brownlow-street; Cook took the wheels the same evening to his own lodgings, in George-street, Portland Chapel; the landlord's name is Smith; a morning or two afterwards the prisoner brought some paint down out of the painting-lost, which paint he desired me to take home to my lodgings; it was red paint; the wheels were a lead colour before; he told me he had coloured the wheels over twice with the said paint; I cannot swear to the wheels. That is all I know about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say you cannot swear to the wheels? - A. I cannot; I had been employed near two years by these gentlemen.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I live at No. 6, in George-street, Portland Chapel; the prisoner, Cook, took my lodging, a two-pair-of-stars front room, about a year and a half ago, to the best of my recollection, and he has continued to lodge with me till he was taken up. I am a carman; he asked for liberty to box a wheel, or a pair of wheels, which he had done several times whilst he worked at Mr. Thompson's, in Mortimer-street, which he used to do in his dinner hours, and at night when he had done work; these were small wheels for trucks; I don't know who brought the wheels that were found in my yard.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. He used to do these odd jobs at dinner time? - A. Yes.(One of the wheels produced.)

Jagues. This is one of the wheels we lost; you will find it a lead colour underneath, if you scrape a little of the paint off; I have had it in my hands a hundred times.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, the wheels don't belong to me; I don't know whose they are.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-97

411. JOHN FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , two shirts, value 2s. the property of Thomas Grubb .

MARGARET GRUBB sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Grubb ; my husband is a blacksmith , and lives in Vinegar-yard, East Smithfield : On the 4th

of this month, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I stepped out to a neighbour; I left my little girl asleep in the cradle, and I locked my door, and when I returned back, in about a quarter of an hour, as near as I can guess, I found the door just as I left it; I lifted up my latch to go in, and I saw a man draw towards me, as if he was coming from my drawers; he asked me for some man's name; I cannot recollect the name, I was in a fright; I asked him how he came to shut himself up in my place; he drove closer to me, and I saw a budge under the side of his coat; he said, I am not come to rob you; I said, what have you got under your coat; I put my hand up, and I pulled out my husband's clean white shirt, that was in one of my drawers; I then called to one of my neighbours that lived across the way, who came directly; some of the neighbours went and fetched an officer and my husband; the man begged our pardon, and said, he was very sorry for what he had done; one of the neighbours said, the prisoner had something under his hat; my husband took his hat off (the officer was present at the time) and there was a clean check shirt taken out of the same drawer where the white one was; the officer has got the two shirts.

THOMAS GRUBB sworn. - I am the husband of the last witness; I was sent for, and I saw the prisoner in custody; I asked him how he came to do so; he immediately begged my pardon, and said, he had never done the like before; one of the neighbours said, there was something in his hat, and being nearest to him, I uncovered him, and there I found a clean check shirt that had been in the drawer where the white one was. That is all I know about it.

DAVID CALLELL sworn. - I was an officer at the time, but am not at present: Upon the 4th of April, about four o'clock, a man came for me, and I found at the prosecutor's house the prisoner; the prisoner was searched by Thomas Grubb, and he found this check shirt in the crown of his hat.

Mrs. Grubb. I know the white shirt by mending the risbands; the check shirt is also my property.

Prisoner's defence. I was working down at Ryegate, and I came to Wapping to get a job, and I met a bricklayer, who told me he could get me a job; he said, I had been treating him, and he would treat me; I said, never mind, if you can get me a job; he went into this house, and said, take hold of these shirts, and go and pawn them; I said, I would have no concern with them; I said, I would stop till his wife came; in came this woman, and I asked if her name was Johnson; I told her that her husband was just gone out, and I did not offer to go out till such time as somebody came in. I have a wife and family at Ryegate.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-98

412. MARGARET SALMON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , a pair of sheets, value 10s. the property of Judah Moses .

MARY MOSES sworn. - My husband's name is Judah Moses ; we keep a shop in Russell-court, Drury-lane . On the 13th of March the prisoner knocked at the private door, and asked to go up to the second floor to borrow a shilling of a person who lives on the second floor; instead of that she went up into the garret, and stripped the garret bed of the sheets. That is all I know about it.

Prisoner. My husband gave Mrs. Moses a guinea last Saturday night not to hurt me.

Court. Q.(To Mrs. Moses.) Did you see her husband - did you take any money from any body? - A. No, my Lord.

- MOODY sworn. - I am shopman to a pawnbroker, No. 26, Cranbourn-street, Leicester-square; the prisoner at the bar came on the 14th of March, between the hours of nine and ten in the morning, to pledge these sheets for 10s. That is all I know about it; I am sure that is the woman; I have known her for these two or three years.

Prosecutrix. These are my sheets; here is the mark which I put on them with my own hands when I gave them to a person to wash.

Prisoner's defence. I did not steal the sheets; she received one guinea from my husband not to hurt me at all. GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-99

413. THOMAS STONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , a pair of plated sugar-tongs, value 1s. and a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of Thomas Newton .

JANE GARLAND sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Newton; the prisoner came on Saturday morning, the 2d of April, I believe, with a letter to give to my master; it was between seven and eight o'clock; I knew him before; I carried it up stairs to my master, and desired the prisoner to wait two or three minutes, and he should have an answer; he said, he would go away, and come again at breastfast time; he came again in about a quarter of an hour; I went up for the answer, but when I came down he was gone; I did not miss any thing till my master came down;

then I missed a silk handkerchief, and a pair of plated tea-tongs; I had seen them just before I went up stairs; I laid them on one side of the caddy; I am sure this was the man.

THOMAS NEWTON sworn. - I am the master of this girl; this letter is the letter my girl brought up to me (produces it.) I have been a friend to the prisoner; the letter is stiled - respected friend.

ANN MORLAND sworn. - I am servant at Mr. Kerr's public-house; he came to my master's with a pair of tea-tongs in his hand, and asked me to buy them; I gave him six-pence for them.

JAMES DALE sworn. - I am servant at the Bull, the prisoner came in about eight o'clock, and called for a pint of beer; he said he thought he had found a prize, but found them to be plated; he asked me a shilling for them; the gentleman that belonged to the tongs asked me whether I had them, and I said no; he then sent for a constable.

THOMAS PIKE sworn. - I live at the Jane Shore, Shoreditch, as a servant; he came about nine o'clock on the 2d of April, and he offered me a silk handkerchief; no body would buy it at the house, it was carried to the pawnbroker's; I have not got it; he asked four shillings and six-pence for it. - (The Constable produced the handkerchief, and said he found it at a pawnbroker's shop.)

Prosecutor. These tea tongs are mine; this handkerchief is my property also.

Prisoner's defence. I never pawned the handkerchief at all.

Court. That is not brought home to you - what do you say to the tea-tongs?

Prisoner. I found the tea-tongs on Holywell-Mount; I never entered the room, I stood outside the door.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-100

414. ELIZABETH WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing. on the 20th of April , two guineas, a half guinea, seven shillings, and three sixpences , the monies of Claude Francois de Stevenot .

CLAUDE FRANCOIS DE STEVENOT sworn. -Examined by an Interpreter. I live in Silver-street, No.2, Golden-square; I lost my money on Wednesday night, or Thursday morning, between twelve and one; I had been dining with one of my friends; the prisoner stopped me the corner of Crown-street, St. Giles's ; she laid hold of the flap of my coat, and wanted me to give her a six-pence or a shilling, on account of her unfortunate or distressed situation she was in; I was disposed to give her something, and went to put my hand into my pocket, and I found her hand in it, and she pulled all the money out of my pocket, and a half-guinea and two six-pences sell; oh, says she, God bless me! the money is fell down, and she ran away immediately; I kept my eye upon her, and observed the door where she went in; I called the watchman, and we looked at the place where the money fell, and we found the half-guinea and the two sixpences, which I gave to the watchman, having no other money about me, my pocket was turned inside out; this is the half-guinea which the watchman took up, and it is the same half-guinea I lost; I lost two guineas in gold, seven shillings in silver, and two six-pences.

Q. Have you found the two guineas? - A. No, nor the seven shillings.

Q. How soon was the prisoner taken up? - A. About four or five minutes after; she was apprehended in her own appartment.

JAMES MANNING sworn. - I am a watchman, at St. Giles's; it was between twelve and one o'clock when I was called; this gentleman called watchman, and I came immediately up to him, he shewed his pocket, and the place where the money was dropped, and I picked up half-a-guinea, and two six-pences; he shewed me the alley the woman was gone into; he told me that a person went into that house; there was an old woman, and I asked him, if that was the person that he wanted; no, says he; we went up stairs, and he said that was the person, and gave charge of her; she was in bed; I found two shillings and five-pence half-penny upon her.

JAMES PARRY sworn. - I am a patrol, belonging to St. Giles's parish; I was standing at the watch-box, at the time the prosecutor was crying out watchman, I am robbed, I am robbed! he said he had been robbed by one sat woman; he said that she went down this passage.

Court. Q. Did the prosecutor charge any body else besides this woman? - A. No, he did not; this woman had a light in her apartment, and the moment we knocked at the door to get in, the light went out immediately; the house is inhabited by unfortunate women.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the prosecutor in my life, until I was apprehended.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-101

415. WILLIAM SITZLER was indicted, for that he, on the 20th of February , unlawfully and maliciously did set fire to a certain wooden cask, belonging to Anthony Geledneki, with intent feloniously to set on fire and burn the warehouse of the said Anthony Geledneki , and dwelling-house of James Lobban , there to adjoining, to the value of 4000l. (The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ANTHONY GELEDNEKI sworn. - Examined by

Mr. Clifford. I live in New Broad-street, I am a merchant, and dealer in furs .

Q.Where is your warehouse for the purpose of carrying on that business? - A. No. 28, Great Winchester-street ; I am a tenant to Mr. James Lobban , the warehouse is under Mr. Lobban's house.

Q. Can you describe to us what kind of floor there is to the warehouse? - A. It is an old floor, it is wood; the prisoner has been eleven years warehouseman with me.

Q. How is this warehouse situated with respect to the street? - A.There is a court-yard; Mr. Lobban's house stands in the yard.

Q. How is the entrance into this yard? - A. Through a pair of great gates, or otherwise a hatch, which a coach can drive in.

Q. How is the warehouse generally secured? - A. There are shutters, and a lock to the door, and a staple over the lock, to which a padlock is affixed; the padlock was put on in the evening, when the warehouse was done with.

Q. In whose possession were the keys of the lock of the door kept? - A. The prisoner had a key, and I had a key, and no body else.

Q. Who generally kept the key of the padlock? - A. No body but the prisoner.

Q. Can you tell me who had the possession on the 20th of February last? - A.The prisoner; it was on a Sunday.

Q. Had you the key of the padlock upon that occasion? - A.Never.

Q.Relate to his Lordship and the Jury if any thing passed upon the 20th of February respecting this warehouse? - A. As near as I can guess, sometime after seven in the evening, there came a knock at the door very violent; the servant called me out; I immediately went to the warehouse on hearing it was on fire; I found a crowd in the yard, the padlock was knocked off, and the door bursted open; the warehouse was full of smoke, and the cask, which had been on fire, rolled out into the yard to be extinguished, which saved the warehouse; it was a whole cask, with the head out of it.

Q. Was any thing in the cask? - A. It was full of ashes, or something, I presume shavings; indeed I will say there were shavings that were left.

Q.When had you been last there? - A. To the best of my recollection not since the Thursday evening myself.

Q.Had you observed any cask in your warehouse of that description? - A. There certainly was a cask.

Q. Had you had any carpenters' there? - A.There had been a door mended on the opposite side of the yard; that door belonged to me, it was an outward door; it might be a week or twelve days before this conslagration.

Q.The prisoner came to the warehouse that evening? - A. Yes, nearly as I can recollect, about half an hour after I got there; when the man came into the yard there was a general buzz; here comes the warehouseman; I said, say nothing, let him come in; I let him come into the warehouse, and asked him rather sharply what business he had there that afternoon, his answer was, I came to feed the cat; I said you must give a better account of this business before we part; he turned round as if to go away; upon which I observed, as that is the case, Sir, I shall cut the matter short; I asked whether there was a constable present; there was one, whom I delivered him to, to take to the Compter immediately, and bring him before the Lord Mayor the next morning, which he did.

Q. What became of the key which you had in your possession? - A. It always hung before my desk in the accompting-house; I took the key with me in consequence of the alarm of fire.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner at any time after this, which did not occur before the Lord Mayor? - A. I had.

Court. Q. Had you made him any offers of favour? - A. I am positive I did not; I went to him about a fortnight after this business, for in taking the stock I missed a considerable quantity of goods in this warehouse, and asked him what had become of these goods; he at first denied knowing any thing about them; I told him that he must know what was become of them; I made use of this observation to him - I have often suspected people that may be innocent; the warehouse was broke open twice two years running, you have now heaped guilt enough upon your head, and may as well tell the truth, and I shall no longer suspect innocent people; says he, Sir, I will tell you to morrow; I said you may as well tell me now, upon which he walked up and down the room two or three times agitated, and said, I took them, and sold them to such and such people, naming the people.

Q.Where are those people now? - A. I took them up before a Magistrate, and they are now upon bail.

Q.Will you have the goodness to tell us in what state the windows are in at your warehouse? - A.The windows which have no shutters are, certainly broke a good deal, but there is a very thick iron grating before the windows; they are not wide enough to admit of a child; they are about six inches apart.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. The prisoner lived eleven years with you? - A. Yes.

Q. And had a favourite cat in the warehouse? - A. Yes.

Court. What is the value of the property you have missed? - A. As near as I could calculate between two and three hundred pounds, at least.

JUDITH KING sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lobban; I have lived in his service near a quarter of a year; I was there at the time of the fire; he lives in Great Winchester-street, No. 28; I know the prisoner at the bar; I don't know in whose employ he was; I saw him on the day the fire happened, at Mr. Lobban's, in Winchester-street, as near as I can guess between four and five in the afternoon; he rung at the bell and I let him in; I did not let any other person in with him; he went to Mr. Geledneki's warehouse; I don't know where he went in; I saw him take the lock in his hand, and that was all I saw.

Q. After you had gone into the house, how long was it before the fire happened? - A. As near as I can guess seven o'clock, it might be ten minutes after; I went to the finishing shop to get some coals, it is across the yard, and as I came out I saw Mr. Geledneke's warehouse on fire; I immediately set my coal-scuttle down, and gave the alarm to my mistress that the premises were on fire, and then I ran to the gate and gave the same alarm.

Q. Do you know how long the prisoner staid there after you admitted him into the yard? - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Who let him out? - A. He went across the yard, and I went to see if the gate was shut, and it was.

Q.Could any one come into the yard when the gate was shut, unless it was opened on the inside? - A.No.

Q. After you had let the prisoner out, and before you discovered the fire, had you admitted any other person into the yard? - A. Yes, an acquaintance of my fellow-servant's.

Q. After the prisoner went out, how long was it before your fellow-servant's acquaintance came in? - A. As near as I can guess about six o'clock.

Q. Now where did your fellow-servant's acquaintance go to? - A. He came across the yard into Mr. Lobban's kitchen; he continued in the house about ten minutes.

Q.Was he the whole of the ten minutes in the house? - A. Yes, talking to my fellow-servant; I let him out again; I went with him to the gate; he went directly out without stopping in the yard; I shut the gate after him.

Q. Did you let in any other person before the fire happened? - A. No.

Q. Did any person go out of the house into the street? - A. No.

Q. Did the gate continue shut until you gave the alarm of fire? - A. Yes.

Q. When you gave the alarm of fire, was the warehouse door shut or open? - A.Shut.

Q. Did any one come into the yard upon your giving the alarm? - A. No, not till I opened the gate to let them come into the yard.

Q. Did you afterwards see any one open the warehouse door after the people were admitted into the yard? - A. I opened the gate, and a great many people came in, and a gentleman broke the door open with a poker; I have seen the gentleman here to day, this is the gentleman, Mr. Jepson.

JOHN JEPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Mr. Boldero, the banker.

Q. Were you in Winchester-street, at Mr. Lobban's house, at the time of the alarm of fire being given? - A. I was not there at the time the alarm was given, but I was there between the hours of seven and eight o'clock at night, I cannot exactly speak to the time; when I got into Mr. Lobban's yard, there were three females.

Q. How came you to get into Mr. Lobban's yard? - A. The first thing that I heard was the screaming of female voices; I was in my way home; I turned round, and a man came running down the street crying fire; I went into Mr. Lobban's yard, the gate was open, and first I observed three ladies standing there; I asked them where the fire was; I observed the fire through the window of a warehouse, which I understood to belong to Mr. Geledneki; I asked the ladies if they had got the key of the warehouse; they said, no; I asked them if they had a crow, or any thing I could force the door with; they then brought me a poker; I observed there was a lock and a padlock; I resorted to the poker, and broke the hanging lock off; the other lock was not locked; as soon as ever the padlock was off, I took the catch off, and got in.

Q. What was the appearance of the warehouse at the time? - A.Directly opposite the door there was a large cask, or hogshead, which was on fire, and blazed nearly to the roof of the premises; the head of the cask was open.

Q. Did the flames force their way through the hoops of the cask? - A. They came through the staves, and came right up as well as out of the head of the cask; we called immediately for water.

Q. Did you observe any part of the warehouse having been burnt? - A. We did not go so nigh; we called for water, and we succeeded in a few minutes in putting out the fire; after the fire had been extinguished, I desired first of all that the cask might not be brought into the warehouse, for fear there might be any fire in it; in turning the cask upside down, a quantity of burnt shavings appeared to fall out of it, with a piece of the cask, or some other matter, which appeared nearly consumed.

Q. Did you then return to the warehouse? - A. I did; I first looked into the shavings to see if I could find any thing by which I could suppose it had been set on fire, and there was a flat piece of board, near the place where the cask was, which appeared to be a lid of a box; it was scorched a

little; very near the mouth of the cask, there was a box to which that flat piece of board seemed to be the lid of; there was likewise a large cask, which stood by the side, which appeared to be very much scorched, and which I have no doubt would very soon have been on fire; I was very much afraid that the fire had got into the cask, as smoke appeared to be issuing from it, and therefore I imagined there was fire inside of it; I wished it to be opened, and it was opened by Mr. Geledneki's desire; it was filled with furs; it appeared this cask was not on fire; I observed three or four other casks standing round, but they were not scorched.

JOHN WEST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifford. Q. You are fireman to the London Insurance Company? - A. Yes, about sixteen years, and foreman about five.

Q. Do you remember being called upon on Sunday, the 20th of February, to any place? - A. Yes, I was called to Chigwell; I was coming by Great Winchester-street, and stopped my engine there; I heard a piece of work, and people run after me to stop my engine; I went to Winchester-street, to Mr. Geledneki's warehouse, the fire was out; I went into the warehouse, and made an enquiry about the fire, how it might happen; I went to inspect into it, and I saw a quantity of shavings lay close by the door, part burnt and part unburnt; I examined the flooring, and found it was burnt; I examined the cask, and I saw part of it was burnt.

Q. Having been a fireman for sixteen years, you can tell us whether that appearance of fire was of long standing, or whether it immediately happened? - A. It could not have been, to the best of my judgment, more than two or three hours burning.(Mr. Alley then addressed the Court and Jury on behalf of the prisoner.)

Jury. Q.(To Mr. Geledneki.) Was there any body, besides the prisoner, that went into the warehouse between the Thursday and the Sunday, and was that at candle-light or day-light? - A.Not any body but the prisoner only, by day-light, to the best of my knowledge.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-102

416. THOMAS HULET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , a pitchfork, value 1s. and six horse-shoes, value 6s. the goods of Thomas Willan .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

ROBERT TUCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am servant to Mr. Thomas Willan; he is a farmer , and had a number of horses at Marybone-park farm : On Thursday night the 10th of March, before nine o'clock, I went down by the side of the stable-door, and I found the lock of the door off; it was the place where the horse-shoes were kept; my master bought them for Government; those shoes were made to go abroad with the horses.

Q. Now, after you had made this discovery about the stable-door, did you go into the rickyard? - A. I went straight into the rick-yard, and I had my lantern in my hand, I saw a man lay under a stack of wood; he was stooping down, apparently to conceal himself; I endeavoured to lay hold of him; immediately he saw me he ran away, and jumped over the paling; I had no opportunity of observing his face, only his back; he was not very tall, he was a middling size man; he did work for Mr. Willian at the time.

Q. How far was the stack of wood, under which the man was standing, from the stable-door which had been broke open? - A. About one hundred and fifty yards, as near as I can guess; I followed the man, and tried to catch him, but could not; I came back, and I found the tub with about half of the horse-shoes gone out of it, and likewise a sack, with three pair of horse-shoes in it, under the stack of wood; I found a pitchfork by the side of the tub, with the times bent three or four ways; they were bent in breaking open the door, to my belief.

Q.You mean the prongs, don't you? - A. Yes; I informed Mr. Clark about ten minutes after; the horse-shoes are here.

JOHN CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am foreman to Mr. Willan; from the information of the last witness, I went immediately to the lodging of the prisoner, at the Coach and Horses, in Graston-court; I took the sack down with me; it is about three quarters of a mile; it is kept by a person of the name of Backston.

Q.Did Mr. Backston give you any shoe? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go up into the prisoner's room to take him? - A. Not till the next morning; the landlord gave me the shoe the over night; I reckon I got in about twenty minutes after he had got in; he was sitting in the tap-room of Mr. Backston's house.

Court. Q. How long might that be after the robbery? - A. It might be about twenty minutes, or half an hour.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Was that a left shoe, or a right shoe? - A. A left shoe (a man's shoe produced) this is a left shoe.

Q. You mean a shoe that has apparently been worn upon the left foot? - A. Yes; I had seen the stable-door as late as five o'clock that evening.

Q. At that time where were the horse-shoes that were found by Tuck under the stack of wood? - A. The inside of the door of the stable there was above 200 weight in the tub, it was nailed down, and the stable-door was locked; the pitch-fork was laying close by the tub, it was in the cow-shed about four o'clock in the afternoon; the cow-shed

is close to the stable, the prisoner had worked in the cow-shed. (The horse-shoes and pitchfork produced.)

Q. Is the pitch-fork Mr. Willan's property? - A. His mark is there, T. W.

Q. Are the horse-shoes Mr. Willan's property? - A. I don't know; the horse-shoes that were in the tub were Mr. Willan's property.

Q.Did they match exactly? - A. I think verily they be the same; the tub had been broke open, and horse-shoes taken out.

JOHN BACKSTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I keep the Coach and Horses publichouse in Grafton-court; I remember the prisoner coming on the evening of the 10th of March, he might have been home twenty minutes before the last witness came; as soon as the prisoner came in, he asked me for a pair of shoes which he had left in the bar; I gave them to him; he then asked for a candle, and the key of his room. On giving him the key and candle, seeing him agitated, and out of breath, I had the curiosity to look over the bar-door, and I saw he had but one shoe on; I watched the man to the landing-place of the stairs, and saw him pull off the left-foot shoe, and put it behind the shutters; he went up stairs, and put on the shoes which he had in my bar; when he was gone up stairs, I took the shoe, and locked it up in my parlour cupboard, and when Mr. Clark came, I shewed it to him; I kept the shoe that night, but the next morning I gave it to Mr. Clark.

ABRAHAM MOORE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you remember this affair of the horse-shoes being stolen? - A. No; I heard that the man had lost a shoe, and I found it early on the Friday morning about seven o'clock; I heard of the robbery the night before; this is the shoe which I hold in my hand, it is a right foot shoe, (produces it); I found it about too yards from the pales which divide the cow-yard from the rick-yard.

Jury. I have compared it with the other shoe, and they do appear to be fellows.

Court. Q.Are they with strings or buckles?

Jury. A. With strings, both.

Prisoner's defence. I was at home at nine o'clock, and I know nothing of it; I went down to the cook-shop to get my supper, I had a pair of old shoes on, a man slepped upon it, and tore my shoe; I threw it away into the road, and went home with one shoe.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-103

417. GEORGE CHEESEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , three coats, value 40s. two pair of breeches, value 10s. and various other articles , the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I know nothing of the transaction myself; William Blunt does.

WILLIAM BLUNT sworn. - I serve a plasterer: On the 6th of April I was at work at Tavistocksquare; about half after six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come up the area-steps, No. 4, with a blue box on his head, going towards Somers Town, I was at work at No. 1; I followed him twenty yards with a pail of water for the men; I knew the man before, he was at work at No. 7 and 8 for Mr. Scrimshaw, cleaning out the houses; that is all I know about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This was about half past six, either five minutes after, or five over? - A. Yes.

Q. There were a good many men working there, dressed in the same way? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Do you know enough of him to be sure he was the man? - A. I am sure he is the man.

GEORGE FULLER sworn. - I am a plasterer; I was at work at those buildings between six and seven o'clock on the morning of the 6th of April; I saw the prisoner standing within twenty yards of the house, No. 4, Tavistock-square, but whether he went into the house, or straight on, I don't know; I am sure it was the man; I knew the man before by working in the houses.

WILLIAM BLACKBURN sworn. - I am a constable belonging to Bow-street: I had information from Smith, that he had been robbed of his blue box, containing wearing apparel; I went in search of the prisoner on the 6th of April, and I found him in the Duke of Bedford's fields, about one o'clock in the day, I took him into custody; he had only his round frock on his arm, I did not tell him what it was for; he walked about 300 yards with me, and he set off and ran away; I ran after him, and caught him again, and took him to Bow-street; one witness (the lad) only was examined before Sir Richard Ford, and in consequence of that, Sir Richard Ford discharged him; the prosecutor got another witness to come forward, and Sir Richard desired me to apprehend him again. On the 8th of April, I found him about one or two o'clock in the Long Fields, in a load of straw, covered over; I walked over him, and I found something under my feet; Hallao, who is here, what George! says I, come get up, you must go along with me; I collared him, and took him to St. Giles's watch-house; this was on the Friday, and on the Saturday I took him to Bow-street, and Sir Richard Ford committed him; there was no property found.

Prosecutor. My property has never been found, I left it in the room; I am a mason ; I left my property at No. 4, Tavistock-square ; I had left

the house about half after five, or a quarter before six o'clock; I left two blue boxes, with all my wearing apparel in them; I returned about eight o'clock, and I found the room-door broke open, one of the boxes unlocked, and the other box gone, the hasps broke, and left behind; there were three coats, two pair of breeches, two waistcoats, one hat, one pair of shoes, one shirt, and four neck handkerchiefs; I never found any of them.

The prisoner called three witnesses to prove an alibi. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-104

418. JOHN UPSDELL was indicted for that he, on the 16th of April , was servant to a Thomas Coleman , brick-maker , and being such servant, did take into his possession the sum of 50l. and that he did afterwards fraudulently and feloniously embezzle the same .(The case was opened by Mr. Watson.)

THOMAS COLEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a brick-maker and scavenger; I know the prisoner at the bar, he was in my service; he first came into my service about the beginning of 1799.

Q. What was he in your service? - A.Latterly, the last two years, he was the clerk and managing man for every thing - both collector and payer of workmen employed by me.

Q. At what time did you discharge him? - A. The 16th of April, 1802, being of a Good Friday.

Q. Did you at any time miss any money that he was authorized to collect for you on your account, and what sum did you miss? - A.Forty pounds, received of a Mr. Parker on the 17th of July, 1801.

Q. Had the prisoner accounted to you for that sum of money? - A. No, he had not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Was any body concerned with you at this time? - A.There was.

Q.Whether on the 17th of July, 1801, you had a partner? - A. In a field, but I had no partner in this business.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. No, I will not.

Court. Q. Here is 40l. received on the 17th of July, 1801, was that for your own separate account, or on account of you and Mr. Dennett? - A. He never was in partnership, it was wholly upon my own account; Mr. Dennett's name was not in it.

Q. Was he intided to any part of this 40l.? - A. Yes.

Q. What share was he to have? - A. A half share of it.

Q. It is a simple question, whether this money received by the prisoner was wholly on your account, or that of your partner, Dennett? - A. It was received on my account, but it was a partnership account. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

The prisoner stood again indicted upon two other indictments for obtaining money under false pretences, but there not being sufficient evidence to convict him upon either, he was accordingly Acquitted.

Reference Number: t18030420-105

419. JOHN FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , one coat, value 7s. one-waistcoat, value 5s. two handkerchiefs, value 1s. and other articles , the property of James Strickler .

JAMES STRICKLER sworn. - I don't know who stole the things.

- TUBB sworn. - I am a patrol: On the 2d of April, about a quarter before-twelve o'clock at night, the watchman and I was talking together in Bunhillrow, the prisoner came along with a coat and waistcoat under his arm; I asked him what he had got there, and he said it was his own property; the watchman and I took him into custody, and carried him to the watch-house; he had a coat and waistcoat, and in the pockets were a couple of pocket handkerchiefs; the officer of the night asked where he got them; he said he bought them in Rosemary-lane; that is all I know about it.

THOMAS GERRARD sworn. - I am constable of St. Luke's: I was the officer on duty that night; I asked him if he knew the contents, he made no answer, but said it was his property; on searching the property I found it belonged to James Strickler.

Strickler. I am a stone-mason by trade, I live in Gravel-alley, Blue Anchor-walk, it is in the parish of St. Luke's , I lodged there; I know nothing of the prisoner; I lost the things out of my bed-room on Saturday, the 2d of April; the person who slept in the same bed with me was out, and I left the door open for him; he lodged in the same house, up one pair of stairs; this is my coat, they are all my property.

The prisoner made no defence, but said, I am almost dead now. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-106

420. THOMAS WATKINS , THOMAS BROWN , and EDWARD OSWELL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , one roll of carpeting, value 30s. the property of George Osborn .

GEORGE OSBORN sworn. - I can only swear to the property.

SARAH BURGEN sworn. - I am the wife of George Burgen : I was coming from dinner about three o'clock of the day, and about twenty yards off Mr. Osborn's shop, I heard the prisoner Watkins say, d - n your eyes, come along; I immediately turned my head, he was speaking to Brown, and Brown took up the carpet right before him, and brought it away, the carpeting was standing against their own door upon a mahogany table; Brown came away with it, and they turned the corner; I immediately made an alarm to Mrs. Osborn, and the shopman directly went after them, and took them.

JAMES NELSON sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Osborn, No. 135, Tottenham Court-road; he keeps two shops nearly opposite each other: On the 2d of

April, about three o'clock, my mistress asked me to take down a half rester bedstead which stood on the opposite side of my shop, at the same time an alarm was given by Mrs. Burgen, that two men had taken a roll of carpeting; I pursued them round the New Road; they turned the corner; I took Oswell, the lad, with it on his shoulder; I asked him how he came by it; he said a man had hired him to carry it, and told him he would give him six-pence; whilst I was asking him that, up comes Brown, and he asked me what was the matter; I caught hold of him by the collar, and told him he was a party concerned, and he should not go neither; the carpet was then thrown down in the dirt; by some means Brown got from me, and ran down a passage; there was no thoroughfare, and he could not get out; a young man came up, of the name of Cheese; I said run down there, and he took him; a gentleman on horseback came up, and said, is there any body else; I told him there was a man gone forward with a brown coat, he went and fetched him back; we then took them into custody, and Mr. Tomlins, the constable, took them to the watch-house.

WILLIAM CHEESE sworn. - I ran up the court, and caught the prisoner walking down the passage.

WILLIAM TOMLINS sworn. - On Saturday the 2d of April, I was constable; this carpeting, and the three men were brought to me to take charge of them; this is the same carpeting; I have had it in my possession ever since.

Prosecutor. This is my property; it was partly sold to a lady at Kentish-town.

Prisoner Brown's defence. I am a tailor by trade; I was coming from Kentish-town, and a man stopped me, very much in liquor, and asked me the way to St. Giles's; I am entirely innocent.

Prisoner Watkins's defence. I know nothing about it.

Prisoner Oswell's defence. I was walking along the King's-road, and this man gave me the carpet to carry, and he gave me six-pence.

Thomas Watkins , GUILTY , aged 40.

Thomas Brown , GUILTY , aged 26.

Edward Oswell , GUILTY , aged 12.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-107

421. PETER WEAVER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , 2s. in silver , the monies of William Muffin .

WILLIAM MUFFIN sworn. - I am a servant out of place, the prisoner is a soldier ; I left my place on the 7th of April, and this man slept in the same room that I did, at the Green Dragon, in Swallow-street ; after I had been two or three nights in the house, he stole a guinea out of my pocket; he acknowledged it to me; I said if he would give me the money, I would not prosecute him, he said he would; it was only two shillings that were marked with a private mark, which I marked last Monday night a week, and put them in my breeches pocket, and he took the money out just as he did before, I took him to Marlborough-street, and an officer searched him, and found the money upon him.

SAMUEL NEWMAN sworn. - I am the landlord of the house; the prisoner was quartered on me, the prosecutor slept in the same room with the soldier, the prosecutor had been there three or four days, and he complained that he had lost a guinea, and about three or four days after that, he lost another guinea, and then a seven shilling piece. One night when the prosecutor went to bed, he marked five shillings, and put them into his pocket, and when he looked into his pocket in the morning, there were three gone out of the five; in the evening I asked the prisoner if he would lend me any money, and he pulled out five shillings and some half-pence, and there were two shillings with the prosecutor's mark upon them.(Produces them.)

JAMES KERNEY sworn. - I was present on Monday night, when the prosecutor was going to bed; I saw him mark a shilling; to the best of my knowledge that is the shilling.

Prosecutor. That is one of the shillings, and this is one that I marked myself with a pen-knife; I am sure they are the same; I made a scratch of a W. with a penknife.

Prisoner's defence. I received my pay on that morning, 6s. 3d. and after that I went to work and got 1s. 6d. I belong to the first regiment of guards.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-108

422. ELIZABETH OUSTON was indicted for feloniously marrying Seargent Thompson , on the 15th of July last, her former husband, Thomas Ouston , being then alive and still living .

JAMES OUSTON sworn. - Thomas Ouston is my nephew; I saw them first married at St. Mary's church, Whitechapel; I gave her away, it is about ten years ago; I am sure the prisoner is the person that was married.

THOMAS MARTIN sworn. - I am clerk of St. Mary's, Whitechapel. It says here, 24th day of December, 1792, by me John Holmes, rector of the said parish, Thomas Ouston, and Elizabeth Crispin, spinster, by banns; witness James Ouston; it is signed by Thomas Ouston and Elizabeth Crispin.

Court. Q.(To James Ouston.) Did they live long together? - A. I cannot say how long they lived together.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.What was he when he married her? - A. An umbrella-maker.

Q. And this girl's mother got him a place in the India-House? - A. I don't know it.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In White's-yard, Rosemary-lane.

Q. Where did your nephew live? - A. I cannot tell the exact house they lived at.

Q. Don't you know whether they lived together or not? - A. I never was with them; they have lived together, and have had two children; I cannot tell whether they have parted.

Q. You don't know whether they don't live together, at this very moment? - [No answer.]

MARTHA SAUNDERS sworn. - I saw the prisoner married to Seargent Thompson, in Stepney church, in July last, 1802; Thompson is a cabinet-maker, I am sure that is the young woman; they were married by licence.

- PRIGE sworn. - I am clerk of the parish of St. John Stepney; I have the register and licence in my pocket; I have been three years clerk. - (Licence produced) I was present when they were married by this licence; I cannot swear to the prisoner's person; this is a copy of the register of the book.

JANE NOBLE sworn. - I was at the church, but I did not hear the ceremony; I cannot tell the parties; there were four or five couple; I know the prisoner.

Q. Was she there? - A. I believe she was to the best of my knowledge; I believe I saw her there.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel.

Mrs. - CRISPIN sworn. - I am the mother of the prisoner; I remember she was married to this man, about ten years ago; they have had two children; they have been separated many times; he used her very ill; I got him into the India-House; I took one child; he never made any provision or allowance for her, or her child; he would sometimes come and sleep with her; I applied to him several times to take her home.

Q. Did you ever see any marks of violence upon her? - A. A great many times; I saw that in her own house. GUILTY , aged 25.

The Jury recommended her to mercy.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-109

423. WILLIAM ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one plane, value 1s. 6d. the goods of Edward Magnus .

EDWARD MAGNUS sworn. - I am a coachmaker , and work for Messrs Lucas, and Co. the prisoner works there also; I lost a plane on the 7th or 8th of February; the prisoner was taken up on suspicion of stealing a saw.

GEORGE LONGDEN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden; upon the 22d of February last, I was font for to take the prisoner into custody, he having stolen several planes; I searched him, and found some duplicates, and I went to the pawnbroker's; two of the pawnbrokers gave up two planes without paying any money for them.

Prosecutor. This is my plane.

Court. Q.(To Longden.) Where is the duplicate? - A. I gave it to the pawnbroker, and he gave me the plane.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, we don't know that the prisoner pawned the plane, therefore you must acquit him. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

The prisoner was again tried upon three other indictments, but the evidence being of a similar nature to the first indictment, he was accordingly acquitted.

Reference Number: t18030420-110

424. JOHN BAMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , one hat, value 10s. one neckhandkerchief, value 6d. the property of Matthew Fitzgerald .

MATTHEW FITZCERALD sworn. - I am a gardener , I work in a market-garden at Ealing; on the night of the 18th of April, the prisoner at the bar came to my quarters, and said he was very badly off for a lodging, and he called for a pint of beer, he told me he could get no lodging in the town, there were so many soldiers, he was afraid he should walk the street, and I made reply to him, and said, he should have half my bed before he should walk the street; he was complaining he had no money, and I called for four pints of beer at different times, and gave him his supper, and put him to bed alone with my self, and the next morning when I went off at five o'clock to work, I left him in bed; he took a hat, a pair of stockings, and a shirt and handkerchief; when I came home to dinner I found the prisoner was gone, and I missed my things; I followed him in pursuit to Brentford, and I heard that he went off in the Windsor coach; I found the prisoner; I said you have used me very bad for my civility last night, you took away my things; I took him to the Feathers, and kept him there until the constable was fetched; the hat and handkerchief were found; I did not find the stockings or shirt, I am sure he is the man.

JAMES FULLER sworn. I belong to the Westminster militia; the prisoner came into my quarters at Brentford, the sign of the Goat, about half after four o'clock, and said that he had enlisted with James Brisley; he said he was very much distressed, and wished to swap his hat for another old one; this is the hat; I gave him also 3s. I swap'd with him for the serjeant.

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn. - The hat I received from the last witness, on Tuesday the 19th of April, at my quarters; I heard that the prisoner was in custody at the sign of the Feathers.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief and my hat.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the hat and the handkerchief together, in the street.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-111

425. SARAH FRIGHT was indicted for stealing on the 19th of March , one pocket, and half-a-guinea , the property and monies of Edward Davis .

EDWARD DAVIS sworn. - I am a tailor ; I live at No. 3, Charles-street, Drury-lane ; I was down at Westminster, at a public-house, and called for a pint of beer, and drank it, and got change for a one-pound note; the prisoner was at the end of the table making complaint, and said I have no bed; I said I had a bed, and I would give her part of it, accordingly I had another pint of beer; I stood at the door a bit, and the prisoner came home with me, and then I had a quart of beer; the prisoner and I, some time after, laid down with our clothes on; the landlord being aware of it, came up and took us both to the watch-house, and afterwards I returned home, and she went away, and on coming home I missed my money; the prisoner was taken again, and the pocket-book was found upon her, and 4s. 6d. in silver, but I cannot tell whether it was my property, but the half-guinea was never found; I was not very sober.

MOSES MOSS sworn. - I was constable of the night; on the 19th of March, the prosecutor and prisoner, and another woman, were brought down to the watch-house charged as disorderly, but were discharged; between one and two o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was again brought in, and charged with robbing this gentleman of half a guinea and a pocket-book; she had got a bundle, and two cotton gowns; I found nothing in the bundle; a watchman sometime after said, here is a pocket

book; I said to the prosecutor, is this your pocketbook; he said, no; he was not sober.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-112

426. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , 5lb of lead pipe, value 1s. a brass cock, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Green .

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. - I am a wheel wright ; I live in White Horse-street, Stepney; I know nothing of the transaction.

RICHARD LAWRENCE sworn. - I am a gardener: On the 8th of March, I was patrol to St. George's, Middlesex; about half past five in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the bar pass Ratcliffe-highway; I saw him with a bag upon his back; I asked him what he had got; he said some clothes; I said they were very heavy clothes, and I found fifteen pieces of lead-pipe, and a brass cock, and several other articles. This is part of the brass cock and the lead. (Produces them.)

WILLIAM MANNING sworn. - I am tenant to Mr. Green; I used to receive the water from this cock; I tied it on; I am perfectly sure that is the cock belonging to my water-tub; it seems to be broke off.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-113

427. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , two pewter quarter pots, value 2s. 6d. the property of Zachary Stanbridge .

ZACHARY STANBRIDGE sworn. - I am a publican , I keep the Burton Arms; I know nothing of the transaction.

WILLIAM KITCHENER sworn. - I am a gardener; I was coming from my own place on Sunday morning the 13th of March; I came out of Gloucester-street to Portland-square; I saw the prisoner come up the area with something in his lap; he ran away, and I pursued him; just as I got towards Orchard-street, I cried out stop him, and the prisoner immediately threw the pots out upon the pavement; I took up the pots; I don't know whose house the area belonged to.

Prosecutor. These pots are my property; the Burton Arms are upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I had a wife and four children, and they had not had any bread for two days; they were starving for bread.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-114

428. WILLIAM MORRIS and JOHN BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , 40lb. of lead, value 10s. 6d. the property of Matthew Easum , and which said lead was affixed to his dwelling-house .

MATTHEW EASUM, sen. sworn. - I caught the prisoner upon the premises; I am a rope-maker ; the house is situated in Steel's-lane, Ratcliffe : On the 1st of March I sent my son of an errand, and about five minutes after he was gone a man came and said, there were some men on the top of my rope-warehouse; the two prisoners had just come off the building, when I caught hold of them; they were standing by the lead.

MATTHEW EASUM , jun. sworn. - About eight o'clock on the 1st of March, I was coming along Steel's-lane, Ratcliffe, by the upper end of my father's ropeground; and I saw somebody on the hemp-warehouse; I ran immediately to the foreman's house, but he was not at home; then I sent for my father. I saw Morris on the top of the warehouse handing something down to Brown, who put it on the ground, and then they both went towards the lead; I jumped over the pales immediately; by that time my father came, and when they saw him coming, they ran up to the gate, and hid themselves by the shade of the moon; I am sure these are the men. - The lead produced.)

- JOHNSON sworn - I am a plumber; I have observed the lead on the building, and it tallies exactly; there is about nine feet six inches of it.

The prisoners made no defence.

William Morris, GUILTY , aged 22.

John Brown, GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-115

429. JOHN KING and JOHN TUNBRIDGE were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , two casks, value 20s. and eighteen gallons of beer, value 40s. the property of Marmaduke Sellon ; and the latter for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

- UNDERWOOD sworn. - I am a cutler, in Great Turnstile, Lincoln's-inn-fields: On Wednesday the 20th of April, I was going down Lincoln's-innfields, on the side the dead wall is on, and I observed a dray standing next to the iron, rails, with the horses heads towards the iron-rails, in an unusual manner, and when I came opposite the dray, I observed two men behind it, one upon his knees with a cask standing upon the ground upon its head, and a peg in the head of the cask that laid on the dray; I observed one of the men pull the peg out of the cask that laid on the dray, and the beer run into the cask that stood on the ground; I thought it was not a common transaction, and I went and informed a neighbour in Holborn of it, who came along with me, and observed it likewise; I believe the prisoner, King, to be one of the men.

Court. After it had run out, what did they do with the cask that stood on the ground? - A. They listed it up, and put it on the dray.

Q. Did they fill it? - A. They were a long while about it, because it frothed so much, they laid it on the dray, and brought it round the corner going towards Great Queen-street.

DANIEL EDWARDS sworn. - My father is a brewer, in Holborn; Mr. Underwood pointed out the dray, and I followed it from Lincoln's-inn-fields to St. Martin's work-house, by Hemming's-row; I observed who was with the dray, King was one of them; I saw them lay down the ten barrels of beer which they had in the dray into

St. Martin's work-house, and laid this cask, which they had filled out of the ten barrels, on the pulley which was behind, it is a ladder; they went back to Mr. Sellon's house, and on returning home, they left it at a little house on Back-hill; I cannot tell whose house; they went home and loaded again five hogsheads, and when they came out they called for the cask which they had left on Back-hill; it was an eighteen gallon cask, they took it down to the Westminster Infirmary, where they laid the five hogsheads down, then they went from there to Chiswell-street, the Coach and Horses, and they laid down this eighteen gallon cask which they had drawn off at the Coach and Horses.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. Have you been always sure that King was one of the persons? - A. Yes, I am sure he was one of the men.

Court. Q. Who keeps the Coach and Horses? - A. Mr. Tunbridge.

THOMAS EVANS sworn. - I am an Inspector for the Committee of Brewers, to inspect into the casks; I took a warrant to Mr. Tunbridge, and told him there was a warrant against him for an eighteen gallon cask of beer, we told him it was of no use to deny it, we knew it was on the premises, and when we told him so, he immediately shewed us the cask; it was in a back kitchen, under the bench, and while I was looking at this cask one of the people went into the back yard, and looked there, and there was an empty cask belonging to Mr. Sellon.

Court. Q. Was this cask in the back kitchen full or empty. - A. Full, the other in the yard was empty; I have got the marks of the brewers in my possession, and I can swear to their property; I can swear to Mr. Sellon's mark, it is W.S. and on the eighteen gallon cask there is his name in full.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Casks get into various hands? - A. They get to various public-houses in the course of trade.

Q.Whether they are the customers of Mr. Sellon, or not? - A. Yes, they do by accident.

Q. He shewed you this cask, which you had been describing? - A. Yes.

Q. He told you likewise he was not at home when it was brought? - A. I recollect him saying that the men had brought him a cask.

Q. He made no difficulty in shewing you this cask? - A. Not the least; he said that he was so busy, if they had one to leave it, and call to-morrow; to the best of my recollection those were his words.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Sellon allowed so much for the drainings of the casks? - A. I believe not, none at all.

PATRICK DEVINE sworn. - On the 21st of this month I had a search-warrant, and I went to Mr. Tunbridge's house along with Mr. Evans, and there were two excisemen with him; I never saw him before; I found two casks of beer there; he said, that the men told him it was bottoms of tubs, and that it was their perquisites; as soon as I told him the business, he went into the wash-house, and told us where the beer was; he shewed us the cask afterwards in the yard.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know Mr. Nares, the Magistrate? - A. Yes; I took him to the Office, in Hatton-garden; Mr. Bleamire was there; the prisoner was not committed at first; he was permitted by Mr. Nares to go away, and appear again.

Q.What was the first time you took him to Hatton-street? - A. I believe it was about three o'clock.

Q. What was the second time that he made his appearance at the Office upon the word of Mr. Nares and another Magistrate? - A. He came about six o'clock.

Q. In short, there were three hours in which he was at perfect liberty to go where he would? - A. Yes.(The casks produced, one full, the other empty.)

MARMADUKE SELLON , Esq. sworn. - Court. Q. Have you seen those casks? - A. Just now, and at the Office; these casks are my property.

Q. Do you serve the Coach and Horses with beer? - A. No.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners? - A. One is John King; he was my servant at the time of this robbery on the 20th of April last; he was my drayman; I sent out two men with the dray.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

The prisoner Tunbridge called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner King called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

John King , GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for seven years .

John Tunbridge, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-116

430. JOHN MITCHELL and JAMES CARNEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , one wooden till, value 6d. 18s. and 240 halfpence , the goods and monies of John Holt .

THOMAS DALE sworn. - I am a gardener; I live in Canonbury-lane, Islington; I was going from my dinner, about half past one o'clock on the 20th of April; I was standing in Canonbury-lane, and I observed that boy, John Mitchell, with the till in his hand, running across the road, and give the till to the other boy, Carney; they ran down the lane; I observed to a baker that was pitching his basket, that they were bad boys, they had stole that till; I got the baker to go into Mr. Holt's, a chandler's shop, and he came out, and said, that they had lost their till; we pursued the boys more than a mile before we could take them; they are the same boys; I know no further.

Court. Q. What makes you think the till came from Mr. Holt's? - A.Because they were near the shop-door, and there is never another shop.

Q. What became of the till? - A. It was thrown over into my garden; I did not observe who threw it over; it is in the officer's possession.

JOHN HOLT sworn. - I live in Canonbury-lane; I keep a cheesemonger's and chandler's shop; I have lost a till; I was absent, and know nothing of it myself.

JAMES MURRAY sworn. - I am a patrol; I was coming down Bail's-pond road, about half past one o'clock on the 20th of April; it is a good way from Canonbury-house; I was coming into the Islington-road, and I heard Dale call out, but could not tell what he said; I saw these two lads running across Scott's brick-field; I directly ran out of the road after the boys; I took them both, and kept them there till Mr. Dale came down; I asked him what they had done; he said, they had stole a till; I took them up to Mr.

Holt's house, and we found the till in Mr. Dale's garden. - (The till produced.)

Q.(To Dale.) Was that the till you saw the boys have? - A. Yes; it was thrown over into my garden.

Holt. It has some resemblance of my till; one drawer may be like another; I will not take upon me to swear it is mine.

John Mitchell , NOT GUILTY .

James Carney, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-117

431. JOHN PATMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , seven sacks, value 7s. twenty eight bushels of wheat, value 9l. 16s. the property of Charles Cracknell .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of William Cash .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM CASH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. You rent a mill in the neighbourhood of Edmonton ? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see the mill? - A. On the 13th of March, on Sunday, at four o'clock in the afternoon, I had eleven sacks of wheat in my mill then; I locked the mill-door after me, at four o'clock in the afternoon, and went home; I did not return to the mill till Tuesday morning, ten o'clock; I found the mill-door open, and seven sacks of wheat were missing out of eleven; apparently no violence had been used to the lock; seemingly it must have been opened by some key, or picklock of the kind.

Q.Where did the prisoner live? - A. He lived in Silver-street, Edmonton, to the best of my knowledge, near a quarter of a mile from the mill; the prisoner is a corn-chandler; he was acquainted with the mill; I let the mill to him myself; he quitted it at Christmas last; he had a cart at the time.

Q. What sort of cart? - A. It was a yellow cart and narrow wheels, and two side ladders standing up on the sides; a very particular cart.

Q.When had you first any information respecting this? - A. It gave me suspicion seeing the door opened not by forcible appearance; it struck me that somebody must have gone in that knew the mill.

Q. How soon had you any information respecting it? - A. It was on the Friday evening following, and I think the Wednesday in the next week I got a search warrant; I found nothing but the cart; I sold him the cart.

Q. When did he appear before the Justice? - A. On the Saturday following, in the same week.

Q. Were you before the justice when he was examined? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Did you hear what he said? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Was what he said taken in writing? - A. Yes, it was; Mr. Morris, the Justice, wrote it down; the prisoner signed it; I saw him sign it with a cross.

Q. Is this it which you saw the Magistrate write, and the prisoner put his mark to? - (Shews him the paper.) - A. Yes, it is, and signed by the constable.

Mr. Alley. This cannot be received as evidence.

Court. I think this is not evidence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had had a dispute about the mill? - A. Yes, we had some difference.

Q. He brought an action against you? - A. No, he did not; I brought an action against him; I never have found my corn since.

Court. Q. Do you know of the house being searched yourself? - A. I heard of it, but I did not see it, I was not there.

CHARLES CRACKNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Had you any corn at the mill? - A. That corn was my property in the mill.

Q. Did you go to the house of the prisoner? - A. I only proposed he would suffer his house to be searched without any particular notice, and I went with a constable in a very private manner on the Wednesday week, and found nothing there.

Q. On the Saturday was he permitted to go home from the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. And you did not go to make the search till the Wednesday week? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner went voluntarily? - A. He went in consequence of a summons.

JOSEPH WOODFINE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am carman to Mr. Whitebread, he is a farmer; I have known Patmore very near a twelvemonth; I know Mr. Cash's mill; as I was going up the road, I met the prisoner about a quarter before four o'clock in the morning, pretty near a quarter of a mile from the mill.

Q. Did you know him when you saw him? - A. Yes, he was on foot, leading his horse.

Q. What was the horse drawing? - A.Drawing a cart; I knew the cart, it was his own cart, it was yellow; there were sacks in it that appeared full.

Q. How many? - A. I could not tell, nor what was in them; I spoke to him, but he would not speak to me.

Q.When did you tell this? - A. I told it on the Friday, and went before a Justice.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was on the Friday? - A. I think so.

Court. Q. What month was it? - A. The 4th of March.

Mr. Alley. Q. On Monday morning the 4th of March? - A. It was the same week we went before the Justice; it was the 14th of March; I made a mistake.

Jury. Q.Which way was the cart going? - A. It was coming towards Edmonton from the mill.

Mr. Alley. Q. You mean to swear it was the 14th? - A. On the 14th.

Q. Has it ever happened for you to have been in prison? - A. Yes, in Cold-bath-fields.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prosecutor? - A. I never was acquainted with him before.

Court. Q.What do you mean to say? - A. I have spoke to him before, but no acquaintance with him to my knowledge.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you never been in the publichouse with him? - A. I have been with him to day.

Q. I ask you, have you, or have you not? - A. Yes, I have been in the public-house with him several times this week.

Jury. Q. Did not you run away from Mr. Cash on the first day of the Sessions? - A. I did not run away;

it was a piece of business I did not like to come forward in, and therefore I went another way.

JOSEPH DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you recollect the Monday before you heard of the robbery? - A. Yes, the 14th of March, I was about sixty yards from the mill, and I saw a yellow cart go down the road, and turn up to the right; it was a particular cart, with two side ladders; going down towards the road from the mill, there was a man and a cart with a horse, but I cannot swear either to the man or the horse; I knew the cart; it was a cart I once knew to be Mr. Cash's.

Q.There is a public road to the mill? - A. It is out of the main road.

Court. Q. Does it go to any other place besides the mill? - A. No; I saw the cart in this road before it got into the main road.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent; I was in bed at the time this transaction is said to have taken place.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-118

432. THOMAS ROGERS and WILLIAM GURLICK were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , 20lb. of iron, value 5s. and 28lb. of wrought steel, value 8s. the property of John Short ; and the latter for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

- EBDEN sworn. - I am a smith, I work for Mr. Short; Rogers is a smith , he worked for Mr. Short; On Saturday evening the 5th of March, the prisoner puffed the bellows with one hand, and he stooped down with his other hand, and I could not think what he was at; I took no notice; accordingly, in the evening, when it was time to leave off, while he went away, I took an opportunity of feeling in the hole of the wall, and I laid hold of a piece of iron, which I knew very well; I waited till such time he put the fire out and his jacket on, and watched him out of the door, and then I told the apprentice to come along with me, and when I went to the place it was all mis sing; I cannot say the quantity, because I had the handling of only a piece; I suppose it would not be worth above a shilling or sixpence; there were several pieces.

Court. Q. Had any body been near this hole as to take it out? - A. No.

Q. Was it found ever afterwards? - A. I have seen this piece since at an old-iron shop, in Chick-lane.

- LONGDEN sworn. - I am an officer; Mr. Short came to the Office, and said, he had been robbed of a quantity of iron and steel; the prisoner told me where he had sold this property; I went to an old-iron shop, in Chick-lane; he could not tell me the name; I found the son, who is not the owner of it; I asked him whether he had no old iron (produces it); he made no hesitation whatever, but pulled it out from under the counter; he said, he had bought it, but did not know from whom; he is lately come.

Q.(To Ebden) Do you know any of that iron? - A. That is the piece I had in my hand; it is my master's property.

Rogers's defence. I have got no friends.

Gurlick made no defence.

Rogers, GUILTY , aged 36.

Six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Gurlick, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-119

433. WILLIAM OWEN and DAVID GENT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , one hundred and twenty-six pair of shoes, value 33l. 14s. the property of Duncan Sinclair .

DUNCAN SINCLAIR sworn. - I am a shoe-maker ; I live in the Strand, No. 330, facing Somerset-house; On Monday, the 28th of February last, I sold that quantity of shoes, 126 pair, to a person living in Oxford-street; I employed a porter to carry these goods home, the porter's name was Thomas Stedman; about half past five o'clock on the same afternoon, Stedman left my house with the goods, I have not been able to find him since; the prisoners have been apprehended; the goods were all tied up in a large bag. A little before eight o'clock in the same evening, he returned, and gave me some information; I took him up to the Public Office, Bow-street, and gave what information I could to the officers; I asked him to go with me, he did not require any compulsion, because I did not tell him where I was going; the rest of the information the officers can tell you better than I can. That same evening there were seven pair of the same shoes found; I saw them taken from the prisoners, part of them, I believe two or three pair were taken from the prisoners, and one pair taken off their feet, it was Gent. I saw the others at the Brown Bear, where the prisoners were locked up; I saw one pair taken from Owen, that is all that I recollect at present.

Cross-examined by Mr. Cl fford. Q. What is the name of your partner? - A. I had none when these shoes were taken away.

Q. Who did you sell them to? - A. I sold them to a Mr. Mark Yelp , No. 102, Oxford-road.

Q. You remember the prisoners at the bar telling you that they had purchased the shoes of a Jew? - A. No; they said nothing to me; I heard Owen say he had bought eight pair, but of whom he did not say.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am a Bow-street officer; I apprehended the prisoners.

Q. Was it in your hearing that Owen said that he had bought eight pair of the porter? - A. I did not hear him say that he had purchased them at all; I found a pair upon Owen.

CHRISTOPHER JONES sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street: I was present at the taking one of these men; I was not present when one of the men said that he had them from a Jew; I had a pair off Gent's feet, and the prosecutor owned them.

THOMAS TAYLOR sworn. - I am a coachman: I was called to at Broad-street, St. Giles's, to take up four men, I cannot tell which called me; it was the latter end of February, I cannot say the day; they got into my coach in Parker's-lane; they ordered me to drive to Leadenhall-street; they got out, and what they took out of the coach, I cannot tell; two of them got out, and took a walk, the two prisoners remained, and when the others came back, they desired me to drive them back again to Parker's-lane; I was going to stop

where I took them up, and they told me to drive them to the first public-house, I don't know the name of it; the officers came and took them into custody, and took them to Bow-street; that is all I know about it.

Court. It is impossible to go on with this business; these men have declared that the porter sold them the shoes, and he has absconded. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030420-120

434. MILES HUDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , three coats, value 3l. two blankets, value 10s. one hat, value 2s. and other articles , the property of Edward Birch .

EDWARD BIRCH sworn. - I belong to the Ruse lighter: On the 24th of February, we were lying along side the Tower wharf ; on Thursday, about six o'clock, I left the vessel, and returned again about seven, the Sincerity laid there at the same time, an ordnance vessel; when I returned at seven o'clock that evening, there was one of the people of the Sincerity walking the deck; he told me there had been somebody on board inquiring for me, he said, a young man belonging to the vessel; I said, there was nobody but myself and the master; I saw a young man, and I asked him what he did there; I asked him what business he had there; he jumped into a long boat along-side, and rowed away, and left the prisoner on board my vessel; I suppose the prisoner was below at the same time; I got on board, and took him by the collar, and I called out for assistance; I took him abast, and I saw a basket hanging up in the cabin with my coat in it; I desired the man to hold him till I struck a light, it was dark below; I went below, and struck a light to see what things I had lost; I missed nothing in the cabin, the coat was there; I took the prisoner to the guard-room, and put him under the care of the guard; I left him in care of the sailor of the Sincerity, his name is Philip Banks ; in my bed-cabin, I missed three coats, two blankets, a rug, and a hat; I found all, except the hat, the blankets, and the rug; I found the three coats the next morning between the combings of the hatchway and the mast-head; I have no doubt but they were my property.

PHILIP BANKS sworn. - On the 24th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was walking on the deck of the Sincerity; the prisoner came to me, and asked me if I knew where the mate of the Ruse was; I told him, no, I did not know where he was, but I believed he was gone on shore; he said that he belonged to the Ruse, that he was obliged to sleep on shore the night before, on account of the master and mate having taken the key out of the batch, and he could not get below; he said, he was then come for his dirty linen to get them washed, but he could not get below, because the captain and mate were gone on shore; he asked me if I had a key that I could lend him; I told him, no; he said, if he had a hammer, he would break the lock; I made him no answer to that; at the time he was talking to me, a man on board the Ruse called out, and told him, he had found the key of the batch; he immediately left me, and went on board the Ruse; the vessels were both along-side the wharf, but they lay so near together, that they could get from one to the other; a few minutes after, Birch came down upon the wharf; I told him, a young man that belonged to his vessel had been inquiring for him; he told me there was nobody belonging to the vessel but himself and the master, and he asked me if it was the master; I told him it was not; he saw somebody on board the vessel, and he called to them, and asked them what they did there; the answer they made him, what was it to him; he said, yes, it was to him; I saw a boat go away from the Ruse directly; whether there was one man or two in it I cannot say; Birch immediately came over our vessel, and went on board his own, and he saw the prisoner at the bar on the deck of the Ruse, and he called me to come and assist him; I came to his assistance, and held the prisoner while he went below; he went below, and said, he had missed all these clothes; he took the prisoner away. That is all I know about it.

Prisoner's defence. About half past five o'clock, when I came from on board the Neptune, this gentleman apprehended me by the collar.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-121

435. ELIZABETH RANDAL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a blanket, value 1s. 6d. a pair of sheets, value 7s. and various other articles , the property of Thomas Grant .

THOMAS GRANT sworn. - I keep a house, No. 10, Dartmouth-row, Westminster ; me and my wife lett the prisoner a lodging just after Christmas; I cannot tell the day; she continued with us about eight weeks; it was a furnished lodging; she was to pay me 2s. 9d. per week for the lodging and furniture. On the Friday morning she came down stairs, and asked my wife to lend her her cloak; I think it was the 25th of February; she said, she was going to her uncle's to work, at a coffee-house, near St. Paul's; my wife told her not to detain herself long, because she wanted the cloak to go to market; she said, she should be back in a few hours; she did not return that night. Thomas Raynard , the man she lived with, came home about nine o'clock, as near as I can guess; he asked if Bet was come home; we said, no; she came home the next morning. Before she came home I had a mistrust of some of the things being gone; I got a ladder, and set it up against the window; I shoved up the sash, and looked through, and I saw the bed-clothes absent; I missed a pair of sheets, a blanket, frying-pan, candlestick, and other articles; I saw them at Queen's-square before the Justice; I know them to be my property. I have nothing else to say.

SUSANNAH GRANT sworn. - The last witness is my husband; I know no more than my husband has told you; when they are produced, I can speak to them. -(The things produced)

Mrs. Grant. I can swear to the blanket; there is a mark upon the corner. These articles are all my property. GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-122

436. MARY WELCH was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 26th of March , a pair of breeches, value 15s. the property of Richard Taylor .

RICHARD TAYLOR sworn. - I work in Mr. Pearce's brewhouse, Millbank, Westminster; I lost a pair of breeches on Saturday the 26th of March; I was going along Jury-street, St. Giles's, and I met the prisoner; I was sober; it was between six and seven in the evening; she asked me if I would go home to her house; I said, I could not stop, my master wanted me; I went into the room with the prisoner; there was another woman there, who went in at the same time; as soon as I got in, this other woman fell into discourse with me; I had a pair of new velveteen breeches in a bundle under my arm; I laid them down upon the table, I sat down upon the table, and the prisoner took them up, and made towards the door with them; I was following her, and the other woman was not willing for me to follow her; I never saw the prisoner till I saw her in the watch-house; the prisoner got quite out of sight; I saw her between ten and eleven o'clock at night; I had a friend that let me know she was there; I described the clothes that she had on; I saw her searched, and I saw a duplicate of a pair of velveteen breeches; I shall know the breeches if I see them; I am sure that is the woman.

JOHN WYEGATE sworn. - I am a constable; I saw the prisoner at the watch-house, on Saturday the 26th of March; she was brought in between nine and ten o'clock; I took the duplicate out of her pocket myself, and I have kept it from that time to this. -(Produces it.)

NATHANIEL HAMMOCK sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Howell, No. 29, Bridges-street, Covent-garden; the prisoner is not the person that pawned them; it was a woman, apparently a market-woman, much stouter than her; it was a pair of velveteen breeches.

Court. Q. Look at that duplicate? - A. It is one of the duplicates; it is dated the 26th of March, 1803; the breeches were pawned about eight or nine o'clock in the evening; they have been in our custody ever since.(The breeches produced.)

Prosecutor. These are my breeches; my name is upon them.

TIMOTHY LANE sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner between nine and ten o'clock at night, on a Saturday; the prosecutor came to me at the bottom of Dyot street; he asked me whether there was a watchman in the street; I told him, I was the man; he asked me whether I knew Mary Welch ; I did not; I found her by his description at a public-house, called the Black Horse; she had not the breeches about her when I searched her; I took her to the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; I know I am clear; I know no more of it than you do.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-123

437. ELIZABETH BRANNING was indicted for uttering, on the 23d of October, to one William Clay , a counterfeit sixpence, knowing it to be false and counterfeit .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM CLAY sworn. - I keep the Boy and Camel, in Leadenhall-street : On the 23d of October, 1801 , the prisoner came to my house, between two and three o'clock in the day, for a glass of gin; she tendered down a half crown, and I gave her two good shillings and four-pence halfpenny; I am positive the two shillings were good, she stood close to the bar, put one of the shillings in her mouth, and took it out again, and said, it was a bad one; I changed it, and she put that in her mouth, and took it out again, and said, that was a bad one; I said, I am positive I did not give you that shillings; neither of the shillings that she produced to me were the shillings that I gave to her; they were both bad ones that she returned to me; she left the house directly, and an acquaintance of mine went after her, his name is Hynart; I put the two shillings that I had back from her into the till, but I knew them from the others; there were but four shillings in the till; the prisoner was taken at Richardson and Goodluck's office about twenty minutes afterwards; I gave the two shillings from the till to Lawrence, the marshalman; I am sure they are the same she gave to me.

THOMAS LAWRENCE sworn. - I am one of the marshalmen: On the 23d of October, 1801, I apprehended the prisoner, in consequence of information I received; I went with Hynart; I saw her go into Richardson and Goodluck's; I went in, and stopped her; I searched her, and in her left-hand pocket was nothing of any kind but four base shillings (produces them); in her right hand pocket I found four or five guineas in gold, and two Bank-notes of one-pound each, all good; I took her to the Compter, and Mr. Clay delivered me these two shillings (producing them); the four shillings I found upon her I do not think had been in circulation; the other two shillings that I had from Mr. Clay did not appear to have been in circulation. She was admitted to bail, but has not appeared till she was taken into custody lately.(Mr. William Parker proved all the shillings to be counterfeit, and merely washed over.)(The prisoner in her defence denied having any knowledge of their being counterfeit.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-124

438. THOMAS FREEMAN JONES was indicted for uttering, on the 12th of April , to one Eleanor Pittard , a counterfeit shilling, knowing it to be false and counterfeit .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ELEANOR PITTARD sworn. - I served in Mr. Debatt's shop, in the Poultry: On the 12th of April the prisoner came in and asked me for two plumb buns; I served him, and he gave me a shilling; I took it into the parlour to Mr. and Mrs. Debatt; I gave it to Mrs. Debatt; she came out immediately, and took him to task about coming there before; Mr. Debatt came out, and said, you have been here before, and now I shall send you to the Compter; he said, he hoped not; if the lady does not like the shilling, he would give her a good one, or another, I am not sure which; I then went to another part of the shop; a constable was sent for, and he was secured; I gave the same shilling to Mrs. Debatt that I received from the prisoner.

ELIZABETH DEBATT sworn. - I am the wife of James Debatt; I have known him a long time by sight; I saw him in our shop on the 12th of April; Eleanor Pittard came into the parlour to me with a shilling; as soon as I saw the man I recollected him; I began to rub the shilling I had received from Mrs. Pittard; the prisoner said, if I rubbed it I should spoil it; I told him I wondered he should offer me bad money, when he had tendered me bad money so often before; the prisoner made no answer to that. This conversation brought out Mr. Debatt; he told him, he recollected his being there two or three days prior to that, when he had tendered three bad shillings one after the other; he desired Mr. Debatt not to send for an officer, but he told him he would. Mr. Debatt sent for an officer, and gave charge of him. I delivered the shilling to Mr. Debatt, and he delivered it to the officer in my presence.

JOHN DEBATT sworn. - I am a pastrycook, at the Mansion-house: On the 12th of April I was at tea; I heard an altercation, and came into the shop; I recollected the prisoner's person immediately; I told him, I was surprised he should come again, after the remonstrance I made with him last time; I do not recollect what his reply was. I received a shilling from Mrs. Debatt; I sent for an officer; I do not recollect whether I gave the shilling to the officer or to the prisoner; I saw him searched; in one pocket were found two sixpences, one shilling, and some halfpence, all good; and in the other pocket two half crowns and eight shillings, all bad apparently; he was then taken to the Compter.(Edward Alderman, a constable, produced the money.)(Mrs. Debatt identified the shilling she received from the prisoner.)(Mr. William Parker proved the shilling to be a bad one; as also the two half crowns and the eight shillings found upon the prisoner.)

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant. GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and find security for good behaviour for another twelve months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-125

439. SARAH GRAY and ANN WILLIAMS were indicted for uttering, on the 1st of April , to one Charles Holmes , a counterfeit shilling, knowing it to be false and counterfeit .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

CHARLES HOLMES sworn. - I am a stationer , under the Royal Exchange : On the 1st of April the prisoner, Williams, came into my shop, about eleven o'clock in the day, for a twopenny stamp; she gave me a shilling, which I rubbed, and observed it was a bad one; I stopped her, and sent for Thomas Terry, a constable; he searched her, but did not find any money about, good or bad; she told me she lived with Mrs. Brown, at the Old Jerusalem, in Cheapside; I delivered her to the constable, and she was taken to the Mansion-house; I kept the shilling separate from any other money, and delivered it to the constable; there was no other person with her.

THOMAS TERRY sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to Mr. Holmes's shop to take charge of Williams; I searched her, but found no money upon her whatever; I took her to the Mansion-house; in going to the Mansion-house, I saw the woman with the child in her arms, (Gray;) she came up, and spoke to Williams, about twenty yards from Mr. Holmes's; we were going towards the Mansion-house, and she was coming the contrary way, and met us; she asked Williams where she was going; her answer was, along with that man, meaning me; I had not hold of her at that time; I said to Williams, do you know that woman; she said, she did very well.

Q. Was that in the hearing of Gray? - A. I cannot be positive, she might be about a couple of yards off; I immediately laid hold of Gray, and took them both to the Mansion-house. Before we went into the Justiceroom, I searched Gray, and in her right-hand pocket I found this screw box, which I opened, and found it contained, in a paper, twenty bad shillings; in the bottom of the box, between the paper and the bottom, there was a seven-shilling piece, two shillings, and a sixpence, all good; they were loose; I then turned to Williams, and said, I believe you have had that shilling from this woman; they were close by each other; she told me she had; the prisoner, Gray, said, she was a bad girl for saying so, and that she knew better.

Both NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-126

440. MARY SMITH , alias TAYLOR , was indicted for uttering, on the 15th of March , to one John-Richard Wilkins , a counterfeit shilling, knowing it to be false and counterfeit .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN- RICHARD WILKINS sworn. - I am shopman to Scarle and Cator, linen-drapers, St. Paul's Churchyard: On Monday, the 14th of March, the prisoner and another person came in; the other person purchased a gown.

Q. Who was that person? - A. Ann Williams, the person who has just left the bar; the next day the prisoner came again, and purchased a gown, five yards at two shillings; she would not have any other, because it was not exactly ten shillings; she said she could not pay the whole, but would call in the morning and pay the rest; she then paid me three shillings first, and then one shilling; I put the four shillings in the till; then, after hesitating a little, she asked me what remained to be paid; I told her six shillings; she said, dear me, I believe I may have as much, and produced six shillings, which immediately excited in me a suspicion; she put them all down at once upon a piece of print; I then looked at the shillings very minutely, and found them all very bad; I then charged her with knowing perfectly well that they were bad, from the peculiar manner of offering them in part; I told her I had seen her before; she said, she had never been there before in her life; she said, she wondered at my impudence in charging her, and said she would make me pay for it if I sent for a constable; I had threatened to send for a constable; I sent for David Hughes; she still said she was not guilty, but when a coach came to the door to take her off, she begged pardon, offered to leave all the money, or do any thing rather than go to prison; I kept the six shillings in my own possession, and have had them ever since;

I kept them separate from any other money. (Produce them.)

DAVID HUGHES sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner for uttering bad money; she said, she did not know they were bad; I searched her, but did not find any other money whatever; I asked her where she got the money, and she said she was an unfortunate woman, and had it from a gentleman sailor with a cocked hat; then I took her to the Compter.

JAMES PIGWELL sworn. - I am porter to Messrs. Searle and Cator; I saw the prisoner in my master's shop on the 14th of March, the day before she was taken up.(Mr. William Parker proved the six shillings to be counterfeit.)

Prisoner's defence. I am an unfortunate woman; a gentleman that I met with gave me this money, and I went to buy a gown with it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and give security for good behaviour for six months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-127

441. WILLIAM BAYNES was indicted for unlawfully publishing, and causing to be procured and published, a lewd, filthy, and obscene libel .

GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and find security .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-128

442. RICHARD JOYCE and JOHN HALFPENNY were indicted for feloniously uttering a false and counterfeit shilling to Margaret, the wife of Thomas Singleton, on the 15th of March , as good, they knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

MARGARET SINGLETON sworn. - My husband, Thomas Singleton, keeps the Cock and Horn public-house, in Creechurch-lane, Leadenhall-street ; I recollect the two prisoners coming to my house on Tuesday, the 15th of March, between four and five in the afternoon; Halfpenny asked for a glass of gin, and put down a crooked shilling, with a head on it, which I saw was a bad one; I refused it; Joyce was close to him, and said, never mind, fill me a glass, and I'll pay for both; I did so, and Joyce put down a very bad shilling, but did not drink the gin; I refused the shilling, and one of them put down three halfpence, and went away.

CHARLES BLOXAM sworn. - I live in Bury-street, St. Mary Axe, and keep a green-grocer's shop; I know both the prisoners, and saw them together on the 15th of March; Joyce came to my shop to buy three pennyworth of greens, which I sold him; he offered me a shilling, which I thought was not a good one, and shewed it to my wife; she said to the prisoner, how can you think of coming here to pass bad money, and returned him the shilling; upon which he made use of bad language; my boy came in, and gave me a caution of the man; I said to Joyce, don't kick up a bobbery here, but be careful how you get rid of your bad money, otherwife I shall secure you; he went away; I watched him, and saw Halfpenny join him; they went into Bury-court, where they were in conversation about two minutes; I then saw Halfpenny go into Mr. Lye's shop; Joyce waited in the street at first, and then followed Halfpenny; I am a constable, and followed them in; I heard Halfpenny ask for half an ounce of tobacco; when the tobacco was weighed, Halfpenny threw down a shilling; Mr. Lye said, am I to take both half ounces out of the shilling; Joyce said, no, I shall pay for mine; Lye said, this is a bad shilling, and Halfpenny threw down three halfpence to pay for it; I made reply to Mr. Lye, those men are in the habit of passing bad money, they have been to my house and Mrs. Singleton's, and I mean to secure and search them; they seemed flurried, and said it was no such thing; that they had neither been to my house or Singleton's; that they did not know each other; I shut them in the shop till I sent for Mr. Singleton, and saw Halfpenny shuffling his pocket; and when we came to search, we could not find the crooked shilling which had been offered to Mr. Lye; in searching him, we found one more bad shilling, and two good sixpences, and copper; we then attempted to search Joyce; and I found the shilling he had offered to me under his feet, and six good sixpences in his pocket, and copper to the amount of one shilling and nine-pence farthing, therefore he had no occasion to offer me a shilling; we then secured them; I have got the shilling Joyce offered me, and the shilling I found upon Halfpenny. (Produces them.)

JOHN LYE sworn. - I keep a chandler's shop in St. Mary Axe, and know the prisoners; I recollect them coming to my shop; Joyce asked for half an ounce of tobacco; I weighed it, and he paid me for it; Halfpenny asked for half an ounce; I was going to weigh it, and then he tendered me a crooked shilling; I said, it was not good; I gave it him again, and then he said he must have a halfpenny worth; then Bloxam came in, and seized them; I found two shillings under my beer barrel three days after; one was the shilling Halfpenny offered me; I gave them to Mr. Bloxam.(The shillings produced, and proved to be counterfeits.)

Half Penny's defence. I am innocent of the charge laid against me.

Joyce's defence. I am a working man, and got rather suddled that day; I know nothing of what is laid against me, and as for those gentlemen, I never saw them in my life, or was in their houses.

Halfpenny, GUILTY .

Joyce, GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and give security for good behaviour for six months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-129

443. MARY ANN COLE was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp, and stated by Mr. Knowlys.)

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030420-130

444. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously uttering, on the 18th of February , a false and counterfeit half guinea to Sarah, the wife of Richard Maypowder, he well knowing the same to be bad .

(The case stated by Mr. Knowlys)

SARAH MAYPOWDER sworn. - My husband, Richard Maypowder, keeps the Plough public-house in Blackhorse-court, Fleet-street :- The prisoner came in with another man about half past ten at night, on Friday, the 18th of February; they called for sixpenny worth of gin and water, and the prisoner gave me a good sixpence; I told them it was near eleven o'clock, and they must break up; they came to the bar, and had a glass of rum, the prisoner gave me a good half guinea; I delivered it to my son to look at, and he agreed it was good, and gave it me again; then the prisoner said to the other man, you pay for it; and the other said, you pay for it, several times over; the prisoner asked for the half guinea again, saying, the other man would pay for it; I gave it him, and then he asked for change, because his companion would not pay, and he put down a half guinea on the bar, and I gave him ten shillings and twopence. Upon taking up the half guinea, I saw it was a bad one. and shewed it my son, and desired him and the patrol to go after the prisoners; they did so, and brought them back; I told them they had passed a bad half guinea; they said, if I would not take them to the watch-house, they would give any thing; they were then taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What sort of half guinea was given to you first? - A. A straight one.

Q. How long had the men been gone out of the house before they were brought back? - A. Not a minute.

JAMES MAYPOWDER sworn - (Confirmed Mrs. Maypowder in her testimony.) I was present at the watch-house, and saw them searched; the prisoner had two good seven-shilling pieces in his pocket; the other man had fifteen shilling in silver, and about tenpenny-worth of halfpence; they let the other man go. When I first went up to the prisoner, he wanted to resist; I shook him, and he put his hand in his pocket, pulled out the half guinea, and let it fall; I called the watchman, who brought a light, and the patrol found it; it appeared to be the half guinea first paid to my mother.

JOHN CHAFFEY sworn. - I am a patrol, and was standing at the bar; I was desired by Mrs. Maypowder to go after the men; I said hold of the other man, and Maypowder of the prisoner; I said, there is something dropped, I got a light, and found the good half guinea, which he laid down the first time on the bar door.(John Forster, the constable, produced the money found on the prisoner, the bad half guinea, and the good half guinea found in the court, which was of the last new coinage. GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and give security for good behaviour six months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


View as XML