Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th February 1803.
Reference Number: 18030216
Reference Number: f18030216-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 16th of FEBRUARY, 1803, and following Days, BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE, ESQUIRE, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1803.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE, ESQUIRE, LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. Sir SIMON LE BLANC, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; the Hon. Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM, Knight, one of the Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir ALAN CHAMBRE, one of His Majesty's Justices of the Court of Common Pleas; Sir WATKIN LEWES, THOMAS SKINNER, Esq. Sir RICHARD CARR GLYN, Bart. Aldermen of the said City; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN PERRING, Esq. JAMES SHAW , Esq. and GEORGE CLARK, Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY OF LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

William Porter ,

James Boyd ,

John Robertson ,

Robert Stone ,

Thomas-Linton Rogers ,

Franois Lyne ,

Stephen Cox ,

James Thompson ,

Robert Mackintosh ,

Robert Stone ,

Henry Robinson ,

William Thornton .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Hitchcock ,

John Burgess ,

John James ,

William Kennie ,

George Ross ,

Samuel Morris ,

William Gray ,

Walter Morris ,

William Jennings ,

Michael Hoyle ,

Jacob Lewis ,

Peter Wallis .

London Jury.

John Whiteman ,

Christopher Beechey ,

John Besher ,

John Foxall ,

John Hughes ,

Henry Allen ,

Robert Bromley ,

Robert Westwood ,

John Ashmore ,

John Wilson ,

Joseph James ,

Benjamin Crossby .

Reference Number: t18030216-1

220. HENRY MANKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , two shillings , the monies of John-Frederick Hartman .

JOHN-FREDERICK HARTMAN sworn. - I am a tailor , I do jobs for myself, the prisoner lodged in the same room with me, he is a sugar-baker : I thought it was a thieving house; I put the two shillings, in the morning, into my waistcoat-pocket; I left it on the trunk, in the room where I sleep, that was Wednesday evening the 19th of January; I went down stairs, between eight and nine, and left the prisoner in the room; soon after, he came down, as soon as he came down, I went up again, I left nobody in the room but the prisoner; I felt in my waistcoat-pocket, and found the money gone; I came down and told the landlord, he said, we have got a thief in the house, and called all the lodgers in to produce their money, there were two lodgers more besides the prisoner; they all produced their silver, and the prisoner put his hand in his right-hand pocket, pulled out some silver, and asked if it was mine, I said, no; he then pulled some halfpence out of his left-hand pocket, and among those halfpence I found my two shillings, I put an H on each the day before, and know them perfectly well; I left him in custody of the landlord, and went and fetched an officer, he was taken to the Office and examined; they were in the officer's hands, the prisoner is a foreigner.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - (Produces the two shillings;) I received them from the prosecutor; I asked the prisoner if this belonged to him, he said, they were his, he got them in change of a seven-shilling-piece the night before; I looked at the shillings, and saw an H on each.

Prisoner's defence. I don't know where I took the two shillings from, I got change in a tobacco-shop the night before for a seven-shilling-piece.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-2

221. CHRISTIAN MOSER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , a seven-shilling-piece, sixty-six penny-pieces, and one hundred and forty-eight halfpence , the property of William Haram .

WILLIAM HARAM sworn. - I am a publican , I keep the Sampton and Lion, Butcher-row, Lower East-Smithfield , the prisoner lodged in my house about six months, and had left it six weeks: On Saturday morning, the 16th of January, I missed my money out of my till, I saw it about twelve o'clock, it was in the bar; I usually lock the till, there had been force used, I have not been able to lock it since, I was not in bed the whole night, I had company till about twelve, and I fell asleep, the prisoner was in the house, and I trusted him to draw beer; I went to my till at five o'clock, I did not perceive that any violence had been used, I missed the money, and charged the prisoner with it; the patrol knocked at the door, the prisoner let him in; the patrol found on the prisoner two seven-shilling-pieces, eight shillings in silver, and eleven shillings and eight-pence farthing in halfpence and penny-pieces.

Q. How many penny-pieces? - A. I did not count them; the officer has them, they were in his pantaloons, and his jacket pockets; I cannot swear to any of the money, the till was not locked in the morning, I don't know how I left it.

Q.Were you in liquor? - A. I might be a little; I missed some halfpence and penny-pieces, I did not know I had any silver in the till.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I put him and his wife to-bed drunk that night? - A. No.

- LOVEDAY sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 16th of January, about a quarter after four in the morning, passing the house of the prosecutor, I saw a light through the window-shutter, I looked through, saw the prisoner go to the bardoor, open it, and go in; he had a candle and looked on the shelves; he took a silver spoon, and put it in his pocket; he put something in his pocket, opened a drawer by the till, and took a parcel out; he took a knife out of his pocket, and endeavoured to force the lock of the till, but could not effect it the first time; he tried to open it at the side, he could not; he then tried the lock again, and opened it; he took out a parcel of something, and put it in his jacket-pocket; he repeated it again; he took out something, and put in his pantaloons; then he put to the drawer again; he took a candle and looked about the bar; he came out, and went from the bar to the fire, the landlord was asleep in the tap-room at the time; I am sure it was the landlord, for I heard him cough, it was then near five o'clock; I called another watchman, we stopped about the house, expecting he would be coming out; he did not, I then knocked at the window, and told him I wanted something; the prisoner tapped at the window, and said, he was coming; about a quarter of an hour after, I knocked at the door, the prisoner opened it, I found Mr. Haram sleeping, with his head on the table, in the taproom, he was in liquor; I asked the prisoner if we

could not have somethink to drink; in order not to alarm the prisoner too much, we had something, and paid for it, and laid the money on the bar; I endeavoured to wake the landlord, which I did, with some difficulty; I took him without the taproom, and asked him if he knew the prisoner, he said, he did; I said, that man has robbed you; I took him into an adjoining room, and took some penny-pieces, and halfpence out of his waistcoat-pocket; I found a seven-shilling piece, and seven shillings in his pantaloons pocket, (produced the money and a knife with blood on it, with which he opened the drawer,) I suppose, he had cut his finger.

Prisoner's defence. The two seven-shilling-pieces is what my master King gave me; Mr. Haram changed a seven-shilling-piece, the landlady desired me to take care of the bar, her husband was so drunk; I gave her the money till she fell down in the bar, and they carried her up to-bed.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-3

222. JAMES CARNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , six sir joists, value 5s. the property of Thomas Barns .

THOMAS BARNS sworn. - I am a builder , and live at Mile-end; the joists were taken from the Horse-raddish Ground, Whitechapel , near Mr. Liptrap's distillery; it is a yard where I deposit my materials; I saw them there about a week before; Mr. Vickery and Kennedy came to me on the Sunday evening, the 30th of January, they informed me, they had stopped two men, with timber, in Wentworth-street; I told them to take care of the men and the property, and I would appear next day at the office, which I did, and saw the prisoners and the property; previous to my going, I went into the yard, and saw there were six missing; I had no doubt they were mine from the size, and a number of nails that had been taken down from an old building.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Did you pull down this old building for yourself, or some other person? - A. For myself, the ground is my own.

Q. You don't mean to say you had seen this timber before? - A. I had seen them many times; I ordered my men to deposit it in a particular place; I superintend all the business myself.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: On Sunday, the 30th of January, I was with Kennedy, I saw the prisoner and another man, with three pieces of timber each, in Wentworth-street; I crossed the way, it was dark; I asked him what he had got carrying, he answered me, some timber; Kennedy stopped the other man, they put the timber against the wall; I asked the prisoner where he got the timber from, he said, Mr. Barnes's yard, Mr. Barnes was his master; I asked him where Mr. Barnes lived, he said, by Mile-end Turnpike; I said, it was an odd thing to be removing them on a Sunday night, he said, he was taking them by his master's order, and going to carry them to Castle-yard, Whitechapel; I told him, we would go and see that they were deposited there, and then we should be satisfied; they went on with them, and we followed them; they went into a yard, in Castle-street, there the other man threw his load on the ground, and the prisoner put his against a pair of gates; the prisoner said, I will go and get the key, and put it in; I said to Kennedy, go with him, and fetch the key; there was another avenue into the yard, out of which the other man went, and ran away; I then called to Kennedy to take care of the prisoner, for the other man was gone; we told the prisoner we would take him to Mr. Barnes's; he then said, it was of no use to go to Mr. Barnes, for he had given him no orders about it; we moved the timber to the office, and locked it up, (produces one of the pieces;) I put a mark on it that night, with my knife.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I heard the last witness give his evidence, it was exactly as he stated.

Mr. Barnes. I have no doubt it is one of mine.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Mr. Barnes. I beg to recommend the prisoner, he was at work for me, and was one of the last men I should have suspected.

Court. Q. Had you given him any orders to remove them? - A.No.

Q.Have you any connection with Castle-street?- A. I have a shed there.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-4

223. JAMES SIMMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , two gowns, value 3l. three shirts, value 21s. two tablecloths, value 7s. a shift, value 4s. a pillow-case, value 1s. and a piece of cloth, value 1s. the property of Richard Collingdon .

RICHARD COLLINGDON sworn. - I live at Colnbrook, I am a publican , I keep the sign of the Green-man: I lost the property from Colnbrook ; the prisoner was taken at New Brentford, and the property found drying in a barn; my house is in Buckinghamshire; they were hung up to dry on Wednesday the 19th of January, and were missing on the Friday morning; I saw them at the Justices, in Bow-street, on Saturday morning;

they were in the possession of Collett, the officer; the prisoner acknowledged where he had disposed of some of them, those I have got, the officer has the rest; I should know them when I see them.

Q. Did you ever see the man on the premises?- A. He came to my house on the Thursday, and had a pint of beer; he said, he had been out of employ, and asked me to give him a bit of bread; then he asked me if I could give him a job, I was unloading some wood; he sat about to help me to get it in; I then got him to wheel some barrows of dung into the orchard, and then desired him to put the spade in the barn, where the things were drying, and I locked the barn, he staid till about nine o'clock, and then went away, this was Thursday night; on Friday morning, I went into the barn to get some coals, and saw two waistcoats of mine, and one of the boys, which had been removed, lying on the coals, it was then scarcely light; they were lying underneath the left-hand window, where he must have got in; on missing the things, I went in search of the man about eight o'clock at night; I heard of his being apprehended at Brentford; I saw the prisoner there in the cage; I enquired of the officer, he said, he had some things in his possession, and most likely they were mine, as I had described the marks.

CHARLES COLLETT sworn. - I am a constable; I stopped the prisoner in New Brentford, at a place called the Butts; on Friday, the 21st of January, about one o'clock, a person informed me a thief was gone through the town, with wet linen; I met a crowd of people with him, nobody would give charge of him, and I took charge of him myself; he had a bag in his hand; I asked him what he had in it, he said, his wife's clothes; this is the bag, (producing it;) there was one gown in the bag, and one in his pocket, three shirts, two tablecloths, one shift, and a piece of cloth.

Mr. Collingdon. I have looked at the things, I can swear to them.

Prisoner's defence. There was another man gave me them out of the barn, and told me to go along the road with them, and he never came after.

Q.(To Collingdon.) Was there any man with him at your house? - A.There was a marine, who treated him, but he staid all night.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-5

224. JOHN WOOTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , a dimity cloak, value 12s. the property of William Clarke .

LYDIA CLARKE sworn. - I am the wife of William Clarke , and live in St. Catherine's , I keep a hair-dresser's shop: On the 16th of January, I lost a dimity cloak, out of the cradle, in the back parlour; the prisoner, and two other men, came to enquire after a lodger of mine; I was in the shop alone, two of them went up stairs, and the prisoner staid in the parlour; I went up stairs to lock my door, when I came down, I saw a lump under the prisoner's jacket; when he was going out, I asked him if he had any thing about him that was not his own; he answered, no; I insisted upon his being unbuttoned, and then the cloak fell from him, and I picked it up, it was my child's long dimity cloak; - the other two were returned, and were all in the shop, they had to come through the parlour into the shop; I fetched Mr. Crump, the officer, and delivered the prisoner and cloak to him. (Crump, the officer, produced the cloak, which was deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; I expected my aunt, and two or three more to give me a character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-6

225. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , four remnants of woollen cloth, value 34s. the property of George Drager .

GEORGE DRAGER sworn. - I am a tailor , I keep a house, No. 2, in a court, in St. Martin's-lane : On the 27th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise, and saw something moving out of the window, I went to the door, and saw the window almost empty; I looked out at the door, and saw a person walking along with the cloth under his arm; I cried stop thief, and then he began to run very fast; he was stopped in New-street, by the patrol, I had not lost sight of him, the prisoner is the man, we brought him to Bow-street, and he was committed; it was taken out of the shop-door from the window; four pieces of cloth were taken upon him, I lost five, I knew it immediately.

ISAAC PIKE sworn. - I am a special constable; on the 27th of January, I was on duty, facing Bedford-bury, I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner and prosecutor running; I was three or four yards from the prisoner; I purfued him, just as I got close to his heels, he dropped the cloth from under his arm, I laid hold of the cloth, there were four pieces, he ran about four yards further, and was then stopped. (The cloth produced.)

Drager. There are the four pieces of cloth I lost out of the shop, I am sure they are my property.

Prisoner's defence. I was going up New-street, I heard a great noise of stop thief; I saw a man run

ning with a piece of cloth under his arm, and a gentleman came out and stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-7

226. JAMES HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , four loaves of bread, value 3s. the property of Thomas Harrison .

WILLIAM BOON sworn. - I am journeyman to Thomas Harrison, a master baker : On Tuesday, the 1st of February, I missed four loaves when I came to settle my bread; I went out that morning about eleven o'clock, and returned about two.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am a journey man baker; I met the prisoner on Tuesday morning, the 1st of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, in Bruton-street, near Berkeley-square; I took particular notice of him; I stopped the corner of Conduit-street ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I saw the prisoner coming with four loaves under his arm; I followed him from Marlborough-street into Poland-street; I came up to him, and said, baker, whose bread is that you have got there? he said, it belonged to Mr. Cook, of Covent-garden, that he lived with him; I told him, I knew that was false; for I knew he was out of place; he began to abuse me, and I said, I would follow him till I saw where he left the bread; I followed him to Crown-court, he then stopped, and began crying, and said, he had taken them out of a baker's basket in Grosvenor-square; he said, he knew the basket, and would take them back again, if I would let him; I told him, there was a great deal of bread lost in that quarter, and I would not. I gave him into the care of Jackson, an officer of Marlborough-street; I left three loaves with Jackson, and took one up to Mr. Harrison's. The prisoner had described a barrow that he took them out of with two baskets without handles, and I knew it to be Mr. Harrison's. I marked the bottom of the loaf with a cross with a knife.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer of Marborough-street: On the 1st of February, the prisoner was brought to me by the last witness, about twelve o'clock; he left three loaves with me, and took one with him, for he said, he thought it was Mr. Harrison's bread. I have kept the loaf ever fince. (The loaf produced).

Griffiths. That is the loaf I gave the officer.

Boon. I was in Grosvenor-square, I had two baskets in a barrow with the handles off; this is one of Mr. Harrison's loaves, I can swear to it by the making and setting of it.

Prisoner's defence. I was out of work, I have a wife and four children starving.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-8

227. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , a silver watch, value 5l. the property of Francis Chantry , in the dwelling-house of William Morris .

FRANCIS CHANTRY sworn. - I am a carver , I lodge in the house of Mr. Taylor, Queen-street: On the 27th of January, I laid at the house of Mr. William Morris; the premises had been broke open; Mr. Morris was out, Mrs. Morris desired me and another person to sleep in the house till he came home. In the evening I took the watch out of my pocket and laid it on some goods beside the bed. In the morning I went off to my employ, and forgot to take my watch with me; I returned in the evening, and told Mr. Morris I had left my watch, he was then returned home; I took a candle to look for it in the place I left it, when I came there I found the goods had been removed, and the watch gone; I told Mr. Morris; he said, nobody had any thing to do with the goods but his workmen. I returned the next Saturday, and found the prisoner was in custody. I saw my watch at the Mansion-house on Monday; the prisoner confessed, on his examination, he had took the watch, and pawned it; I knew it by the maker's name, Brown, Sheffield, and a notch I made in opening it; it is a silver hunting watch; there was a part of the ribbon I could swear to.

THOMAS NEWLAND sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: The prisoner pledged a silver hunting watch with me, the 28th of January, for one guinea; I am sure the prisoner is the person; I never saw him before; I gave him a duplicate. It was but the day after or next day I was called upon to speak to the business. (The watch was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prosecutor. The prisoner worked at Mr. Morris's; I had seen him about the premises.

Prisoner's defence. On Friday morning Mr. Morris came down, and said, if any one would confess what was become of the watch, he would say no more about it, but pay us our wages, and discharge us; I told him, the watch was pawned; I meant to return the watch as soon as I could take it out.

Q.(To the Prosecutor.) Is Mr. Morris's name William? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of the watch? - A.Five pounds; I gave six guineas for it three months ago.

GUILTY, of stealing to the value of 39s. aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18030216-9

228. ROBERT HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a box, value 6d. and a hat, value 15s. the property of Ann Huntley and Jephtha Huntley .

JEPHTHA HUNTLEY sworn. - I am a hatter , in partnership with my mother, Ann Huntley: Last Thursday I observed the prisoner going through a passage by my shop, the east passage leading into the Royal Exchange; he took the box with the hat off a deal box, and went towards the fouth passage leading into Cornhill; I pursued him a short distance from the gate, I stopped him, and took the hat and him together; he had the box in his hand; I brought him back, and gave him in charge of the constable. He said, he picked it up off the ground in the passage; it was in the passage opposite the shop, it remained there till it was sent home; the deal box was mine. When I first saw him he was walking; he was walking when I stopped him. I saw him take it off the box.

(On his cross-examination, he said, he Lived in Sweeting's alley; that this bat was laid on a deal box to be font to a customer; that the opposite shop, where it was lying is a watch-maker's.)

JAMES BENNETT sworn. - I am a constable; I received this box (producing it), from Mr. Hunt ley, on Thursday last; it has been in my possession ever since.

Mr. Huntley. This is my hat and box.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Recommended by the Jury on account of his youth and good character.

Publickly whipped , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-10

229. JOHN NICHOLAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , sixty-four pounds of lead, value 5s. the property of William Mills , fixed to his dwelling-house .

Second Count. Stating the lead to be fixed to a certain building used by Mr. Mills.

Third Count. Fixed to a certain building of his.

WILLIAM MILLS sworn. - I live at No. 67, Harley street : On the 11th of this month, Friday, the master of the prisoner came to me and informed me he believed I had been robbed; I went with him to his yard, he is a bricklayer; we found the piece of lead in the yard, and the prisoner was secured by the watchman; it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening; we went to the watch-house with the prisoner, and the constable said, he would come the next morning to see if the lead sitted the place; he came about nine o'clock the next morning with the lead; I was present when it was fitted.

Q.When did you first know any lead was taken from your house? - A. The same evening, I went up with the prisoner's master, and missed the lead, it was over the dressing-room, belonging to the Cold-bath; it is detached from the house, there is a yard between.

Q. Is there any wall runs from the house to the building? - A. Yes, a party-wall, my yard is surrounded by a wall; the lead was a slushing over the gutter part of it, it was over the sky-light.

Q. When before that had you seen the lead on the premises? - A. I may venture to say I saw it a month before, it appeared to be part cut, and part torn, it was freth done.

Q.Were you with the constable when he compared it with the place? - A. Yes.

Q. Did it cover the place, did the nail-holes correspond? - A. They corresponded with the slushing of the lead, I can swear that was my lead.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at any time on your premises? - A. No, never saw him before; his master's yard joins the premises.

Q. Was his master at work for you? - A.No.

WILLIAM GOODYER sworn. - I am a bricklayer, the prisoner was a labourer of mine, I live in Sheppard-street, this yard is in Queen-Ann's-street, West; on Friday the 11th, the keys of the yard not being as soon as usual, I went up to the yard about a quarter after six, and found the yard not locked, but a chain put up on the inside, I shook the door and the chain fell down; I went into the yard, and found the shed not locked; I saw two of my ladders against an open shed-roof that adjoins to Mr. Mills's premises, I thought there was something not right; I came out and locked the gate, and went opposite the yard, and watched about twenty minutes; when the watchman came to his box, I desired him to come to the yard, for I heard distinctly some knocking and thumping in the yard; he got another watchman, and we went into the yard, we saw nobody, I said, I was sure there was somebody, for the ladders were removed, and laid down; the watchman then found the prisoner, and said, we have got one; I left the gate, and went down to them, and saw the prisoner; I asked him what he was doing there at that time, he said, he was in liquor, and laid down there; he said, the other man that worked in the yard, as they were going home, led him back there, that man has escaped; going down the yard, I kicked my foot against some lead in the yard.

Q. Was that lead near Mr. Mills's premises?- A. Yes, close to my roof that joins his premises.

Q. Did it appear recently cut? - A. It did, I examined it that night, some was torn, and some was cut; I went immediately to Mr. Mills's, while

he was in custody in the yard; he went directly to the spot, and missed the lead; in one of my pails in the yard, there was about half a hundred weight beat up, and nearly filled the pail, it appeared to be the same sort as that found in the yard.

Q. You saw the whole of the lead? - A. Yes.

Q. Did there appear as much as would sit the place the lead had been taken from? - A. Yes; I had no lead in my yard; I left the gate open, and went to the yard when he was taken,

Jury. Q. Did he appear to be in liquor? - A. Yes, he was in liquor; I asked him if there was any body with him, he denied it, he said afterwards, another man brought him back.

WILLIAM PALMER sworn. - I am a watchman, I watched the yard; near half an hour after six, I went down to the shed, I looked about, and the prisoner was stopping by one of the posts that supports the shed; I laid hold of him by the collar. I brought him out of the shed, and called to Mr. Goodyer, here is one.

Q. What passed between you and the prisoner?- A. Not a word.

Q. Was he runk or sober? - A. He appeared to me not much in liquor, he trembled, he could stand and walk, I found nothing upon him; I took him to the watch-house.

Q.No knife found upon him? - A. No; I saw some lead in the yard on the ground, five or six yards from the shed; I saw some lead in a pail, behind some wood-work, in the yard; that in the pail was in small pieces, packed very close, I did not examine that, that in the yard appeared recently cut.

HENRY BATES sworn. - I belong to Mary-le-bonne watch-house; I was not in the yard, the prisoner was brought in the 11th of this month, by Goodyer and Palmer, near seven o'clock, he was searched, but nothing found upon him; the lead was brought, I have had it from that time to this, some was brought in a pail, and some open, (the lead produced;) there is about sixty-four pounds weight of it; I attended Mills to the premises the next morning, I compared the lead with the premises, it exactly corresponded, except a piece or two that would not sit, there was some gone.

Q. Did the nail holes sit? - A. Yes, I believe it to be the same lead, I have no doubt of it.

EDWARD MURPHY sworn. - I am a bricklayer; I can prove nothing about it, but locking Mr. Goodyer's gates a quarter before six, I delivered the keys to the prisoner, and the man working with him.

Q.(To Bates.) What condition was the prisoner in when brought to the watch-house? - A. He was in liquor, he could walk very well.

Q.(To Murphy.) In what condition was he, when he left the yard? - A. Very much in liquor; the other man and he had five half pints of gin in the course of the day; he could walk.

Q. Was he sober enough to stand at the bottom of the ladder while another man went up? - A. I don't know; he could stand.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor, we had three pints of gin going along; I fell down, he took me up, and went and laid me by the post of the shed, and I fell asleep, the watchman came in and waked me up; I never saw the lead, and know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-11

230. ALEXANDER ROBERTSON and WILLIAM TUCKER were indicted the first for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a half shawl, value 14d. the property of Catharine Minella , spinster , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

CATHARINE MINELLA sworn. - I live at No. 3, Red-lion-passage, Holborn, I am a servant : On the 12th of December, I had been to the play with my fellow-servant, and was going with her to her sister's, at Dock-head, about eleven o'clock at night; when we got past Exeter-change , I saw the prisoner Robertson standing with a common prostitute; he made a snatch at my shawl, it was a half shawl, pinned on my neck, he tore it off my neck; I turned round, and said, be so good as deliver me my shawl, he said, I have nothing belonging to you, ma'am, and began to swear at me very much, and I went on to my fellow-servant, she was about three yards from me; I told her, the prisoner had taken my shawl, she went back to him, I stood still, I did not hear what passed, but she came back without the shawl; as we were going home, we saw the prisoner Robertson again in the Savoy; Mr. Morgan came up, and saw us crying, and asked what was the matter; we told him what had happened, and he went after Robertson, and brought him up; I asked him for the shawl, he said, he had not seen me before, and had nothing belonging to me; Tucker, the watchman, searched him, and said he had nothing about him; Mr. Morgan insisted that they should both go to the watch-house, and be searched; we went to the night watch-house, and my fellow-servant and I saw Tucker searched, and the shawl found upon him; I gave four shillings and sixpence for the shawl, I had had it a twelvemonth, it is not worth more than a shilling.

(On her cross-examination, she said, Robertson did not appear to be drunk; that she indicted the prisoners at Hickes's-hall, but the indictment was wrong, and she got another; that Tucker's watch-box was in the Savoy.)

THOMAS HENRY MORGAN sworn. - I went to the Savoy for a pint of beer, and while I was waiting for it, I saw a soldier under the gateway, and these two girls crying; I asked what was the matter, they told me, the soldier had taken this shawl; I asked him, if he had got the girl's shawl, to give it her, he made no answer, but took to his heels, and ran into the watch-box; I stood about four yards off, and saw him pull the shawl out of his jacket, and give it to the watchman, and he put it in his left hand pocket; I said to the watchman, the soldier has robbed the two girls of their shawl: he cried, blood and hounds, and brought him up to the gateway, and searched him; there was nothing found upon him. The soldier then beat the two girls violently with his jacket, which he had in his hand; I said to the watchman, you have got the shawl in your pocket, remember; and he up with his fist and struck me; I repeated it, and he struck me again; he struck me three times. The woman, who keeps the snuff shop at the corner of the gateway, ordered the watchman to take the soldier to the watch-house, to be properly searched, which he did; I followed, but could not get in till the property was found.

- LINDSAY sworn. - I am a constable of St. Mary-le-Strand: On the 12th of December, at eleven at night, the two prisoners were brought to the watch-house, and the prosecutrix and her fellow servant came in; the prosecutrix gave charge of Robertson for stealing her shawl. I asked Robertson what he had to say to the change; he said, he knew nothing at all of it; I ordered him to strip, and search him, but found nothing upon him. The beadle said, it would be proper to search the watchman; the watchman said, do you suspect me; then I ordered him to strip; he took off his watchcoat, and threw it on the ground, and put his hands in his waistcoat pockets, and said, now search me; I took up the watch-coat, and found the shawl in the pocket where he keeps his rattle; I then said, I shall take charge of both of you. The watchman said, never fear, I shall get through it.(The shawl was produced, and deposed to by the prosesecutrix).

HANNAH MASON sworn. - I am fellow-servant with Catherine Minella : We were going by Exeter-'Change, the prisoner, Robertson, was standing with a young woman, he snatched at her shawl, and took it from her; I went back and asked for the shawl; he said, he had not got it; I said, if he did not deliver it, I would give charge of him; he said, d - n you, you b - h, I will give you a chace for that, and ran across the way to the gateway that goes into the Savoy. I saw the shawl taken out of the watchman's great-coat pocket; I know the shawl.

Robertson. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

Tucker was not put on his defence.

Robertson, GUILTY, aged 28, Of stealing to the value of 10d.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Tucker, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030216-12

231. JOHN ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , a looking-glass, value 2s. and three pictures framed and glazed, value 5s. the property of John Harris .

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I am a broker , in Tottenham-court-road : On the 13th of December, about a quarter before five o'clock in the evening, I lost a looking-glass and three pictures framed and glazed, I had seen them about a minute before; the two ovals were hanging on the door-post, the other two were hanging inside the shop; it is a corner house; I went to take something out of the shop into the passage, I came out at the private door which comes into the other street, to take the shutters to shut up the shop; as I opened the private door, I saw the prisoner passing with the things in his apron; I asked him how he came by those prints, he said, he had bought them round the corner. I had left two little girls in the shop, one about seven, and the other eight years old; Mrs. Harrison was not at home. I said, I knew better than that; I took him by the cape of the coat, and led him to the shop door, and said, now shew me who you bought them of; he then said, he had picked them up in the street, and offered to run away; I secured him, and took the articles from him; I then told him, he must go with me to the watch-house; he went very quietly till we came near the watch-house, he then endeavoured to extricate himself from me by pushing me against the wall; he got from me, I cried stop thief, and a man stopped him, and brought him back; he was taken to the watch-house, and I delivered the things to the constable; I missed them as soon as I got to the shop door; they cost me eight or nine shillings.

( George Chinnery , the constable, produced the property, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. Going along Tottenham-court-road, I heard the cry of stop thief; a man took me, and brought me to the watch-house, and sent for Mr. Harris; I never saw him till I saw him at the watch-house.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030216-13

232. WILLIAM LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , a silver cream pot, value 5l. a silver stand, value 10s. a silver ladle, value 20s. a silver cheese-knife, value 10s. a silver butter knife, value 10s. a silver mus

tard pot, value 10s. six silver table-spoons, value 3l. bottle stands, value 10s. ladles, value 10s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 5s. an optic glass, value 7s. and a gold watch, value 10l. the property of John Salkeld , John Dobree and George Dobree .

JOHN SALKELD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker , I am executor to Mr. Hills, with John and George Dobree : Mr. Hills died on the 21st of October; the executors took the direction of the business: The prisoner had been servant to the deceased four years and an half; we continued him in the business, there was no other servant but a little boy, the prisoner had the management of the shop; after the death of Mr. Hills, we took stock, the goods lay alphabetically; there is an entry of the gold watch, and the six table-spoons; it was made on the 23d of October, it is my own hand-writing; I saw the watch before the Justice's at Bow-street, about the 17th of December; I found the tablespoons at Mrs. Mills's lodgings, in Suffolk-street; on the 15th of December, Mrs. Mills came to the shop in a hackney-coach, the prisoner went over the counter to speak to her; the lady pulled up the glass and was going away; I jumped over the counter, stopped the coach, went into it, and shut the door, after that I found the spoons at her lodgings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Upon your oath, did you make an entry of that watch? - A. Yes.

Q.Shew it me, (refers to some papers;) that is no book? - A. I call that a book.

Q. How came you to be looking into that book,(a ledger;) you have turned over at least thirty pages of it -

Court. Q. The stock was taken on those bits of paper, and afterwards inserted in a book? - A. Certainly.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Point out an entry in the book? - A. I can only say from the general stock.

Q.Shew me an entry of any particular watch in that book? - A.(Points out an entry of a number of gold watches, one of which is 13l.)

Q. Is that your hand-writing? - A. No, it is the prisoner's hand-writing.

Q. You said, you made an entry of it in your hand-writing? - A. Yes; on that paper there is a watch, at the head it is No. 13, which is what it cost the estate, it is afterwards entered into a book, which was made the 23d of October.

Q. Will you say there is an entry of any individual watch? -

Mr. Alley. This is a book in the hand-writing of the prisoner, a book in his hand-writing cannot be evidence for him, we did not call for it.

Mr. Knowlys. I am on the cross-examination, and call for the entry, and he produces this book.

Salkkld. We take the regular numbers, they go on to 109, and then they are entered in the book.

Q. Is there an entry of a watch in this book? - A. It is included in that sum.

Court. They take the stock, there is such a number of watches, they all come to so much, they don't describe every watch, the 13l. with a number of other sums makes up the whole amount.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.There is no entry of any watch in particular? - A. No.

Q. That or any other watch may be included under that 13l. - will you swear there was no other watch in the stock, of the price of 13l.? - A. Not one, there is one 12l. 16s.

Mr. Alley. Q. You produce a book in the hand writing of the prisoner? - A. Yes; that was the stock at the death of Mr. Hills.

Q.Whether, in that stock, there is an entry of a watch of a particular number? - A. Yes, 1094.

Q.At the time you took the stock, was that number struck out as sold? - A. No, it was unsold.

Q. Did you see that number when you took stock? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Is there any entry of the name or number of that watch, in your handwriting? - A. No, only that thirteen pounds.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did that thirteen pounds refer to that watch? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any entry of the six table spoons in the stock-book? - A. Yes. (Produces the spoons.)

Q. Did you make any entry of these spoons in any other way than you have been describing on a bit of paper? - A. No.

Q. Can you speak to these spoons from your mere recollection of them? - A. I can; when we took stock, there was only one dozen of spoons in the window, tied in two half dozens; I missed one half dozen on the 15th of December, the price and weight of them corresponds with the stockbook.

Q. Did you accuse the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make him any promise of favour?- A. No, one of the executors did.

Mr. Knowlys. There is a crest on them, do you know them by that? - A.No, there is no private mark upon them.

Q. There is no mark at all upon them? - A. They are the same spoons according to all the information I have had, I would not swear not swear to them, I would not swear to a guinea.

Q.Have you any means of swearing to spoons without marks upon them? - A. I won't swear to them.

- MILLER sworn. - I have a duplicate, it was delivered to me by Mary Mills .

MARY MILLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Onst.

Court. Q.Where do you live? - A. No. 6, Suffolk-street.

Mr. Const. Q.This ticker, I understand, was in your possession? - A. I gave that ticket to Mr. Miller for a watch I bought of the prisoner.

Q.When did you get that watch from the prisoner? - A. I don't know, it was soon after I was acquainted with him.

Q.When were you first acquainted with him?- A.When the theatre was opened; I had some other things of him before I had the watch; I told him, I was going to have some plate at Mr. Wildman's; he said, he could help me to some on the same terms.

Q.How long had you the watch before you sent it to the pawnbroker's? - A. I suppose, three weeks.

Q. Should you know the watch again if you saw it? - A. I cannot swear to the watch.

Q.Were there any seals or keys to it? - A. Yes, there were some seals, the prisoner gave me one off his own watch; I sent it to pawn by my servant, Elizabeth Crew .

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Whether you had that watch from him before or after his master died? - A. I cannot tell.

Q.How long after the theatre was opened was it when he gave you that watch? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Do you remember the circumstance of his master's dving? - A. No.

ELIZABETH CREW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I live with Mrs. Mills; I carried the watch to Mr. Norris's, they gave me a duplicate and ten pounds, I gave the duplicate to my mistress.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Had you seen the watch in her possession before? - A. Yes.

Q.Had you seen it months before? - A. I cannot say that I saw it a month, it was a little before, I saw it about three weeks after the play-house was opened.

Q.(To Miller.) Do you know what time the play-house is opened? - A. I don't know.

Q.About the middle of September? - A. I believe about that time.

WILLIAM NORRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I know the last witness.

Q. Do you remember her pawning a watch with you? - A. Yes, I gave her a duplicate.

Q. Is that the duplicate? - A. Yes; I have the watch, I produced it at Bow-street. (The watch produced).

Crew. That is like the watch I pawned, I cannot swear to it.

Q.(To Mrs. Mills). Is that the watch you had of the prisoner? - A. I cannot swear to it.

Q.These seals were tied to it? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.Have you any doubt of that being the watch? - A. I cannot swear to it.

Salkeld. This is the watch, the number is 1904.

Q. Is that the same number you entered on the paper? - A. Yes.

Q.Who is the maker? - A. John Macrary.

Q. Does that number and name correspond with the stock-book? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.There is no entry at all in your hand-writing? - A.No.

Q.There is an entry of one hundred and nine as watches? - A. Yes.

Q.All you recollect it by, is this number thiacetiteen? - A. Yes, I put the gold watches together.

Q.How many gold watches were there? - at the cannot say, I think there were thirteen, any time

Q. How then can you remember the rbt that it 1094? - A. It is entered in that book, the amounted to 903l. in the window. im upon

Q.How can you swear to a particular walble; I- A. If you were to quibble for a month, I still the not swear any otherwise.

Q. Will you swear there is any entry of that was watch, on the 23d of October, by name or number? - A. I can give no other answer than I have given.

Court. Q.Did you take particular notice of the watch when it was in the window? - A. I did.

Q. You spoke to the prisoner, and asked him some questions about that watch? - A.About all the gold watches.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030216-14

233. JOHN SHOUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , a coat, value 7s. a waistcoat, value 3s. a saw, value 3s. thirty pencils, value 1s. two rulers, value 6d. a pair of nippers, value 6d. and a pair of boot-tops, value 2s. the property of John Condon .

The witnesses were called upon their recognizance, but did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030216-15

234. HENRY HILL was indicted for being at large before the expiration of seven years, for which term he had been ordered to be transported .

JOHN BICKERLEY sworn. - I produce a certificate from the clerk of the assize, of the conviction of the prisoner, and of the order to be transported for seven years.

Q.Were you present at the trial? - A. No, I know nothing but the apprehending him on the 2d of February , in Horseshoe-alley, Petticoat-lane .

Q.You did not know him before? - A. No.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I was with the other officer at the apprehending of him, I did not know him before.

JOHN SUTOR sworn. - I know the prisoner.

Q.Do you remember him in the month of March, 1800? - A. Yes; he was tried at Kingston, in Surrey, and convicted; I am turnkey of the prison for the county of Surrey.

Q.Are you sure he is the same man? - A. Yes.

Q.And he was tried and convicted at that Dassize? - A. Yes.

the Q. How long did he continue in goal after his The piction? - A. Till the 3d of February, then he years sent to the Staniflaus hulk.

finess, thOMAS NICHOLSON sworn. - I am mate of the prisonislaus hulk.

ter the Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, he goods in board the hulk.

gold w. How long did he continue there? - A.Nine on then months to the best of my knowledge.

I say Q. Do you know the occasion of his quitting a hit? - A.No.

Q.When did he leave it? - A. He escaped the 3d of February.

Q.Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

Q. The 3d of February last? - A.No, 1800, I believe.

Q.Have you any memorandums about you? - A. Yes, (refers to it;) he escaped the 3d of February, 1801.

Prisoner's defence. I had a master here, John Bates, by whom I have been employed ever since I escaped.(John Bates was called but did not appear.)

GUILTY . Death , aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030216-16

235. AMELIA DAVIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Worms , on the 18th of January , about the hour of nine in the night, with intent to steal, and stealing half a pound of nutmegs, value 9s. the property of the said Henry.

HENRY WORMS sworn. - I am a grocer , in Wentworth-street, Spitalfields : On Tuesday night was three weeks, I went to shut my shop between eight and nine o'clock, I found a pane of glass cut out, and a box of nutmegs taken out of the window; I had been out about half an hour, I left my wife and a little girl in the room fronting the shop; on the Friday morning following, a man, of the name of Jacobs, came in and asked me if I would buy some nutmegs, which he had in a handkerchief, there was about half a pound, I thought they looked like mine; I asked him how he came by them, he would not at first give an account, so I told him, I would stop them; he then said, he bought them of one Davis; he ran away, I took the nutmegs to the Justice's, and brought an officer to take him; when we were returned, he came in and brought Davis, and said, he bought them of her; I took them before the Justice, and he committed them, I think they are my nutmegs, they are worth about eight or nine shillings.

SOLOMON JACOBS sworn. - I am a dealer in oils and pickles: About a fortnight last Friday, I met Mrs. Davis, the prisoner, by the Mansion-house; the asked me if I would do her a favour; she said, she had a few nutmegs by her, if I would fell them for her; I said, if she would bring them, I would, and asked her what I might take for them; she said, six shillings. When I had been home about a quarter of an hour, a young woman brought the nutmegs, and said, Mrs. Davis had sent them to me to fell; I don't know who the young woman was, I had not seen her before. I went to Mrs. Davis, who keeps a chandler's shop, the corner of Wentworth street, and asked her if the nutmegs would suit her; she said, no, there were too many for her; a young woman in the shop said, if I would go to Mr. Worms, he would buy them; accordingly I went to Mr. Worms, and asked him to buy them; he asked the price, and I told him, six shillings; he said, they were his, he had been robbed of them; I told him, I would fetch the woman I had them of; he said, no, he would send for an officer, and give charge of me; in the mean time, I went away and fetched Mrs. Davis; I told her the man said he had lost some nutmegs, and desired her to go and satisfy him that I had them of her; she went immediately with me, and when we came, there was an officer in the shop.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer: On the 28th of January, I apprehended the prisoner and the last witness; just as I got to Mr. Worms, he was leading her by the arm down the street, she was crying; I took her into the back-room, and searched her, and found three handkerchiefs and a nutmeg upon her; she said, she kept that for her own use; she said, the last witness agreed to give her six shillings for the nutmegs, but not having the money, went to get it; she said, a boy gave them to her, but would give no account who the boy was; she was committed for examination; when she came up again, Worms found a nutmeg with a pin in it, he said, he knew that nutmeg.

Prosecutor. I believe them to be mine, I cannot swear to them.

Prisoner's defence. I have no witnesses, I am very innocent of the affair.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030216-17

236. THOMAS HAYNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a silver watch, value 42s. and a pair of shoes, value 3s. the property of John Shill , in his dwelling-house .

CATHARINE SHILL sworn. - I am the wife of

John Shill : On Saturday the 15th of January, a young man brought the prisoner Haynes to our house, and asked me to give him a night's lodging; the watch was hanging over the mantle-piece; I went out about ten o'clock in the evening, and left nobody in the room but the prisoner; I was not out above two minutes, he was coming out of the door as I came in, I thought he was going into the yard; as soon as I came in, I missed the watch, I am sure it was hanging there when I went out; the prisoner never returned to our house; I saw the prisoner on the Tuesday after, in custody; I never saw the watch; my husband valued it at two guineas; after the second hearing, the prisoner told me, if he got me my watch again, I might clear him at the sessions; I told him, he ought not to have brought it to that, I did not know what I could do.

Q.Was the prisoner sober or in liquor? - A. He had been drinking some liqor, but he told me he was not drunk.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - On the 19th of January, the prisoner was given into my custody, by a Mr. Davis, he was locked up; some little time after, I went to him, and asked him what he had done with the woman's watch.

Q.Had you made any promise to him, or threatened him? - A. No; he said the watch was very safe, it was in the hands of a very respectable friend of his, and that he got sixteen shillings on it, and if I would ask Mr. Davis, his solicitor, for sixteen shillings, he would go with me and get the watch out; I agreed to that, and as I was going out, I met him coming in, he gave me a guinea; I then told the prisoner I would go with him, and get the watch out; he said, he would not, unless he had a guinea given to him, and the promise of a free pardon; I told him such a thing could not be done, and I gave the guinea back to Mr. Davis; after he had been before the Magistrate, I heard him tell the prosecutrix, if he had got her the watch, he hoped she would forgive him; she said, he should have mentioned that before, that was all the answer she gave him.

Prisoner's defence. This witness offered me a guinea, if I would find the watch; I have no witnesses, I am a stranger in London.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing goods to the value of 30s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030216-18

237. WILLIAM COLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , four quarts of oil , the property of George Enderby , Samuel Enderby , and Charles Enderby .

GEORGE ENDERBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. My partners are Charles and Samuel Enderby, oil-merchants , in Upper Thames-street, the prisoner has been in our employ ever since the year 1795: On the 8th of February, when he went off the premises, I called him back, and sent for a constable, he was gone about half a dozen yards; the constable came, and the prisoner was searched in my presence, and a tin cannister with oil was found under his apron, it was a square cannister, and contained about two quarts of spermaceti oil.

Q.Had he an opportunity of getting at the spermaceti oil? - A. He could get at it at any time without my knowledge; I have no doubt that it belonged to me and my partners.

Court. Q.Did you say any thing to him upon calling him back? - A. I sent for a constable; I asked him no questions, but bid him stay till the constable came.

FRANCIS BOX sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for by Mr. Enderby, to search the prisoner; I found upon him a cann of oil, it was in this pocket, tied round his waist, under two or three aprons.

Q. Did you ask him any questions? - A. I did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You know nothing whose the oil was? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. (To Enderby.) Q. Is that a sort of cann that is used in your business? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. You cannot swear to the oil? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I did not take it to make any property of it, but only for my own use, times are very hard, and I have a family.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-19

238. THOMAS WIGG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , a coach cushion, value 5s. the property of John Chaplin , and William Franklin .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of George Smith .

GEORGE SMITH sworn. - I live at the Spread-Eagle, Gracechurch-street : I am ostler to Mr. Clinch; Chaplin and Franklin are proprietors of the Chatham coach , Mr. Clinch is master of the inn, where the Chatham coach puts up: On Thursday the 3d of this month, about half after eight o'clock at night, the cushion was taken from the coach, I assisted a man in the yard, who took the prisoner, with the cushion under his arm; I took the cushion from the prisoner, and gave him in charge to a constable; the coach was standing in the yard.

Q. Can you swear that that is one of the

cushions of the coach? - A. Yes, I have no doubt of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.When did you see the prisoner first? - A. In the alley, going out of the yard, about ten yards from the coach; he dropped the cushion when I collared him.

Q.How many partners are there in that coach?- A. Two, Chaplin and Franklin.

Q.How do you know there are not four? - A.There are two.

Q.Where do you find those names? - A. On the coach.

Q.Chaplin, Franklin, and Co.? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.You told the Counsel there is Chaplin, Franklin and Co. on the Coach, is that so? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether there are any more than two? - A. No; the coach is under my care.

Mr. Gurney. Q.Chaplin and Franklin both live in the country? - A. Yes, both at Chatham.

Q.Who is the other partner at Canterbury? - A. I don't know.

Q.There is a partner at Canterbury? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Are you responsible for this carriage, or Mr. Clinch? - A. I am responsible for every thing in the yard.

HENRY BURNETT sworn. - I am horse-keeper to the Chatham coach, it stands at the Spread-Eagle, Gracechurch-street: On Thursday evening, coming up the yard, I saw the coach-door open, and the prisoner searching the coach; I passed him, and turned my head, and saw him take the cushion; I went after him, and stopped him, and asked him what he was going to do with it; he said, the Chatham coachman bid him put it in the stable, with which he rushed into the stable; I took hold of him, and asked him to shew me the coachman who bid him put it there, he could not then; I called the watchman of the yard to my assistance, Smith came up and took him to the tap-room, and sent for a constable, the constable took charge of him, this is the cushion. (Producing it.)

FRANCIS BAILEY sworn. - I am a constable, the prisoner was delivered into my custody.

Prisoner's defence. I was going through the yard, the cushion lay on the ground, I picked it up, the last witness but one stopped me with it, and I threw it into the stable.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-20

239. THOMAS GOULD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , forty-eight yards of cotton, value 4l. the property of Anthony Rowlandson , Robert Barra , and Thomas Rowlandson , in their dwelling-house .

Second Count. In the dwelling-house of Thomas Rowlandson only.

ROBERT BARRA sworn. - I keep a Manchester-warehouse , in Watling-street , in partnership with Anthony Rowlandson and Thomas Rowlandson ; only Thomas Rowlandson lives in the house: On the 25th of January, about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the accompting-house, just within the warehouse door, on the right hand side, and some men came into the warehouse -

Q. Is the warehouse part of the dwelling-house of Mr. Rowlandson? - A. Yes, the bottom part of the house and cellar is the warehouse; the dwelling-house is up stairs; they are all under one roof. A man, who had the appearance of a countryman, with a whip in his hand, enquired for Mr. Mather; I told him, I did not know Mr. Mather; he hesitated a little, and then said, he believed he lived in Bush-lane; I told him Bush-lane was further on, and he went out; about two minutes after, I heard the cry of stop thief! in Bread-street, which is not above fifteen yards from our house; I went to the door, there was a crowd coming down the street, the prisoner was secured, and the piece of goods dropped, which I took up; he was brought back by a gentleman, who took him, who is here. I left him in charge of the persons in the warehouse, and went and got a constable; the constable has the property, it is a piece of striped cotton, forty-eight yards, the value is four pounds.

Q. What would you give for it? - A.Four pounds ten shillings; there was no mark upon it; the person that took the prisoner put a mark upon it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.There was no mark upon it till after it was found? - A. No.

Q.One of the Rowlandsons lives in the house?- A. Yes.

Q. The expence of the warehouse is paid out of the partnership fund? - A. Yes.

Q. The property was lost out of the warehouse?- A. Yes.

JOHN GREENOUGH sworn. - I am warehouseman to Rowlandson, Barra and Rowlandson: On Tuesday the 25th of January, about half after three o'clock, I was standing on the stairs leading out of the front warehouse into the cellar, there came a man into the warehouse, and went directly into the accounting-house; the prisoner came immediately into the warehouse, and was looking at some goods that lay on a bench between the accompting-house door and warehouse door; the prisoner cast his eyes round the warehouse, and perceiving no person, he conveyed a piece of striped cotton to the door, and then put it under his arm; I immediately ran across the warehouse, and saw the prisoner about four or five yards from the door, with the piece under his arm; I gave the alarm of stop thief! he hearing that, ran across Watling-street to the corner of Bread-street, and I after

him; he dropped the piece, I saw him drop it; I hesitated a moment whether I should pursue him, or stop to take up the piece; I pursued him, crying out, stop thief! a young man, coming out of Cheapside, heard the alarm, and stopped the prisoner; I saw him stop him.

Q.From the time he dropped the piece till the young man stopped him, did you lose fight of him?- A. I did not. The prisoner was delivered to a constable; I saw the piece about five minutes after in the warehouse.

Q.Did you know it to be the same the prisoner dropped? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Is the person here who took it up? - A. Yes. I was told it was the same in the presence of the prisoner, there was a bill of parcels in it.

Q.Was the street dirty or clean? - A.Clean; it was frosty. After it was brought back to the warehouse I marked it.

Q.What is the value of it? - A. Four pounds ten shillings.

Q. Who resides in the house? - A. Mr. Thomas Rowlandson , he is the only person that resides there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You do not know that this is the parcel which the prisoner dropped? - A.No.

Q. You saw the prisoner as you were standing on the stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. It was getting dark at that time? - A. It was getting dusk.

Q. Was there any door between you and him when you were standing on the stairs? - A. No.

Q.He had a round hat on? - A. Yes.

Q. You lost sight of the man when he went out of the shop? - A. Yes, till I got to the door.

Q. Do you mean to swear that the man you saw in the shop was the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Rowlandson pays for the part of the house in which he lives? - A. I don't know that.

Court. Q.He is a partner, and has servants?- A. Yes.

Q. You are a servant of the partnership? - A. Yes.

Q. He has private servants besides? - A. Yes, women servants.

Q. As to the bill of parcels, was it visible on the outside? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you observe whether the parcel taken away had a bill of parcels? - A. No, I did not.

Court. (To Barra). Q. The rent is paid by the partnership? - A. The rent of the warehouse is paid by the partnership; Mr. Thomas Rowlandson repays the partnership a sum of money for the part of the house he occupies, the whole of the dwelling-house; the other partners have nothing to do with the dwelling-house; we have partnership servants that dwell in the house, they board with Mr. Rowlandson, for which the house makes him an allowance.

Mr. Alley. Q.Some of the partnership servants board with Mr. Rowlandson? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you pay them salaries? - A. Yes.

Q.Out of that they pay for board and lodging?- A. No, they have a salary, and are allowed their board and lodging.

Q. Mr. Rowlandson lives there, and has the care of the premises? - A. Yes.

Q. He has separate servants of his own? - A. Yes.

Q. Those persons that board and lodge in the house are for the partnership? - A. Yes, some of them sleep in the warehouse.

JAMES DAVIS sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for on the 25th of January, between three and four o'clock, to take the prisoner into custody; I took him to the Compter; I received the goods of Mr. Barra.

Q.(To Rowlandson). Were you at home at the time? - A. No.

Q.(To Barra). Did you take up the parcel? - A. I did, I took it into the warehouse; there was a bill of parcels sticking within the string; it was sold, and lying to be delivered. I delivered it to the constable. I left it on the counter, and bid Greenough mark it while I went for a constable.

Q.Have you any doubt that that is the same?- A. I have none.

Q. Is that the piece you delivered to the constable? - A. I believe it is; this bill of parcels, I believe, was wrote by one of our servants.

Prisoner's defence. I had been in the Borough after a young man that owed me three shillings and six-pence; turning up Bread-street, as I was running to keep myself warm, I was taken hold of by a person, and charged with taking something out of a warehouse; I know no more of it than a child unborn.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . Death , aged 23.

Recommended by the Jury on account of his good character and youth.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-21

240. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , two bottles, value 6d. and three pints of brandy, value 4s. the property of William Pollard , Charles Oswin and Richard Oswin .

WILLIAM- SYLVESTER POLLARD sworn. - I am a merchant ; my partners are Charles Oswin and Richard Oswin : On Friday, the 14th of January, about half past three, I was in the accompting-house, No. 20, St. Swithin's-lane; I was apprised that a man was detected in the warehouse by one of our porters, William Knight, of having

stolen two bottles of brandy; I went into the warehouse, and saw the prisoner, he had nothing on him then; a constable was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, and the brandy was delivered to him. The prisoner appeared, as he does now, to be deaf and stupid.

WILLIAM KNIGHT sworn. - I am warehouseman and carman to Mess. Pollard and Company: On the 14th of January, as I was going from the dwelling-house to the accompting-house in St. Swithin's-lane, I saw the prisoner take two bottles of brandy out of a basket containing nine bottles; they were standing by the vault door, waiting for the permit to carry them out; I saw him putting them in his pocket, I taxed him with it as he was coming across the yard, I asked him what business he had there, or who he wanted; he could not give me any answer, he said, he wanted some liquor; I made him pull them out of his pocket, and replace them; I marked them immediately, and they were marked before the bottles were full, they don't hold quite two quarts; they are the property of Messrs. Pollard and Company. (They were produced).

EDWARD RICHARDSON sworn. - I am a constable: The prisoner was delivered to me; that is all I know about it.

Prisoner's defence. I was in liquor, coming by I saw the bottles standing, I tried to pull the cork out of one of them, I could not; then I tried another, and while I had hold of it, he came in. I could have gone away before the man came in if I had had a mind to it.

Q.(To the Constable). Did he appear drunk? - A. Yes, I think he was.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-22

241. ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , two gowns, value 16s. four chair covers, value 1s. a petticoat, value 2s. a shift, value 5s. a night gown, value 6d. and a pocket, value 6d. the property of Elizabeth M'Kenzie , spinster .

ELIZABETH M'KENZIE sworn. - I am a single woman, I live at No. 24, St. Martin's-court, Leicester-fields , with a relation, Mrs. Grant: On Saturday, the 22d of January, between three and four o'clock, I left the wet cloaths in a basket in the back kitchen; I was washing; in about five minutes after, I saw them lying on the pavement in the front kitchen; I caught the alarm, because the street door was open; I was coming-down stairs, I saw the prisoner stooping down to the cloaths, I laid hold of her arm, she called to me to search her, for she had nothing upon her, and tore off her cloak; I called for assistance, and Mrs. Grant came to my assistance; I stopped the prisoner, and got a constable; and then I went into the back kitchen, to see what was wrong, and found the cloaths moved out of the basket, and lying in a heap in the front kitchen; the constable tied them up in a handkerchief; there was nothing found upon her. The articles are all mine.

Q.Have they any marks upon them? - A. No, they have not; one gown is a blue and white stripe, the other a pink stripe.

ALEXANDER CLARKE sworn. - I am landlord of the house: I was up at my business in the garret; I came down on the alarm, and went for the constable; I saw nothing of the transaction; the prisoner was taken into custody.

JOHN TURNER sworn. - I am a constable. (Produces the things.)

M'Kenzie. These things are mine.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months in the House of Correction ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-23

242. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , six shovels, value 14s. the property of James Lessley .

JAMES LESSLEY sworn. - I am an ironmonger, ship and anchor-smith , No. 30, St. Catharine's-street , near the Tower: On Friday, February the 4th, I was informed that a man had taken some shovels away, I sent two men after him, and followed them myself; I went through a wheelwright's shop, into a blacksmith's-shop, and saw the prisoner just getting up out of the privy, my man stopped him, and brought him and the shovels back into the shop; my man has had them in his possession by the Magistrate's order, ever since, my name is on them, they came out of the country.

ROBERT BUNN sworn. - I am servant to the last witness: On Friday the 4th of February, a little after ten o'clock, a man gave an alarm, that a man had taken a bundle of shovels from the door; I went after him, the man said, he was gone over the bridge; I went over the bridge, and came in sight of him, he was running; he turned round to see if any body was after him; I said, I'll have you, and immediately he let the shovels drop; I did not stay to pick them up, but went after him; I was told that he had run up a yard, into a wheelwright's shop; my master came after me, and bid me go back, a man had picked up the shovels and gave them to me as I came back; they were tied up as they are now, when he dropped them; they were taken from the outside of the door, in the street; there were a great many more at the door, but none so black as these; I can say, with certainly, that these are the shovels that were taken away; my master's name is upon them, and I marked them when I brought them back; I saw

his face when he looked back, he had a smockfrock on; I am perfectly sure that the prisoner is the man that dropped the shovels.

Q.(To Lesley.) Were these articles at your door? - A. Yes; I did not miss them at that time, the shovels were brought to me, and I knew them directly.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor, I don't know whether I did it or not.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction . and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-24

243. HANNAH, the wife of CHARLES POLLEY , otherwise POLLARD , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , three yards of lace, value 22s. the property of Samuel Burford , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL BURFORD sworn. - I am a haberdasher , No. 99, Oxford-street : On the 29th of January, in the evening, about a quarter before five o'clock, I was informed that the prisoner had got some lace in her pocket, she was in the shop at the time, there were other people in the shop, I was in the back shop; I came forward to the prisoner, and told her to give me the lace she had in her pocket; she told me, she had no lace, upon which I desired her to go into the back shop and be searched, she would not go, but put her hand in her right-hand pocket, and pulled out some bits of paper, and with her left-hand took the lace from under her cloaths, and laid it on the counter, there were three yards of it, value twenty-two shillings; it was a remnant of lace, it was put on the counter for her to look at; I saw the basket of lace on the counter.

Q.How long had she been in the shop? - A. I don't know, I was not in the shop at the time, she appeared to be with-child.

ESTHER HARLEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Burford, I was in the shop; on the 29th of January, the prisoner came in between four and five o'clock to look at some lace edging; I shewed her some, she did not buy any thing, she was about half an hour looking at the edging; after she had been some time in the shop, I saw an end of lace hanging out of her pocket, with Mr. Burford's private mark upon it; I left the shop, and informed Mr. Burford what I had seen.

Q.Did you see her produce it afterwards? - A. No, I returned to the shop again, customers came in.(Jackson the constable produced the lace which he received of Mr. Burford.)

Harley. This is the lace.

Mr. Burford. This lace is my property.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Will either of you undertake to swear you had not sold that lace that day, or the day before.

Harley. I had not sold it.

Burford. I had not.

Q.Who else serves in the shop? - A. Mrs. Burford.

Court. Q.Was Mrs. Burford in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q.Was there any body else in the shop? - A.Only a servant boy, who never serves.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Jury. (To the Prosecutor.) Q.What is the value of the lace? - A. Twenty-two shillings.

Q. Is that the cost price or the selling price? - A. The selling price, it cost me seven shillings.

GUILTY of stealing goods to the value of 4s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030216-25

244. HANNAH POLLEY was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 10s. the property of Richard Matthews , and Penelope Matthews , privately in their shop .

The ribbon was found near the prisoner, in Mr. Burford's shop, and the private mark being torn off, the witnesses could not swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030216-26

245. JEREMIAH RAYNARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , a razor-case, value 1d. and 27l. 8s. in monies, numbered, the property of Richard Knowles , in his dwelling-house .

It appeared from the opening of the cause, that the prisoner was entrusted with the property, and therefore it did not amount to a felony.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030216-27

246. JOHN JONQUA and RICHARD GALE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Fich , on the 11th of November , about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing thirty yards of printed cotton, value 3l. eight yards of calico, value 20s. and thirty yards of flannel, value 2s. the property of the said John in his dwelling-house .

JOHN FICH sworn. - I am a publican , in Lamb's-street, Spitalfields : On the 11th of November, about nine o'clock at night, the property mentioned in the indictment, was put into a one pair of stairs front-room by my wife, I heard her lock the door, and she brought down the key to me, I was in the tap-room; I saw it immediately before it was carried up; I missed it that night; the

officers came to me on the 22d, and I went to Jonqua's house, and saw the property, it was made up into curtains, and a part of it put up, and part of it was left at home, it is lined with calico of two different qualities.

Q.Have you any other reason to know it was the property you lost, but its likeness to that which was left at home? - A. Yes, it is of two different qualities, bought of two different shops, the cotton is worth three pounds ten shillings, the calico, twenty shillings, the binding, two shillings.

Q. It is your dwelling-house? - A. Yes.

Q.You have no partner? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.What was the name of the woman that made up the calico? - A. Mrs. Newman; she took it up, and came down again.

Q. You never saw it after it was carried up? - A. No.

Q.You suppose, what you found at Jonqua's, to be a part of it? - A. Yes.

Q.Only because it was like the piece you had at home? - A. Yes.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer; on the prisoner Jonqua's being apprehended, I went to his house, No. 2, Pelham-street, and found in his apartment, part of a bed furniture, there was a window-curtain of the same quality, which the prosecutor said, was his property, as such, we brought it away; Jonqua's wife was in the apartment, he was apprehended the day before.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - In consequence of an information, I went to Jonqua's house, on the 21st of January, with the other officers, and took him into custody, Gale was then in the house.

Q. Does Gale lodge there? - A. No, but they were both in the same room with another man, Jellison and his wife.

Q.Did Jellison and his wife lodge there? - A. No, only Jonqua; on the Saturday, I received information that Fich had lost some property; I took him to Jonqua's house, that he might see some bed-furniture there, he described the pattern, and I took a piece with me; as soon as he saw it, he said, it was his property; it was hung on the bedstead as the furniture of the bed; I took it to the Magistrate and he was committed; Jonqua was asked, how long he had had it, he said, some months; that he bought it in a shop, but did not mention where; this is the furniture, I have had it ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.There was no concealment of this property? - A. No.

Q. You went the day before, and saw it? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fich. I can swear with certainty to this being my property, this is what I saw in Jonqua's house, the lining is of two different qualities, the one is finer than the other, it corresponds with what I lost.

Q. Does it comprehend all you lost? - A. It does, there were four curtains.

Q.There is no particular mark? - A. No, only the pattern of the binding corresponds.

Mr. Alley. Q. The lining is of two different sorts? - A. Yes.

Q. It is exactly like what it would be if bought at different times? - A. Yes.

Q.Examine the binding, is that all alike? - A.One is wider than the other; one is hemmed, the other bound over.

Jonqua's defence. I have some witnesses to call; the prosecutor said, before the Magistrate, it was of one quality; I can produce a person to prove I bought a part of the lining to finish them.

For Jonqua.

MARGARET SHORELEG sworn. - I am a weaver, I know Jonqua by working for her, I made her a set of bed-furniture, yellow and red stripes; there was only a part of the lining, and no binding; I sent a little girl to buy the lining, 10s. 6d. for twelve yards.

Q.How much of the calico lining was afterwards bought? - A. Four yards; this is the piece put on each side, I split it.

Court. Q. Who brought you the calico? - A. Mrs. Jonqua.

Mr. Alley. Q.Look at the calico, is it all alike in quality? - A. I believe it is, there is one breadth looks a little coarser than the other.

Q. Are you sure you made that furniture up? - A. Yes, I sent it home, and was paid five shillings and sixpence.

Q.(To Fich.) How much was there of the coarse calico? - A.About ten or twelve yards.

Q.See if you can find so much, or more, or less? - A.This is the coarse.

Q. It amounts to ten or twelve yards? - A. Yes.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030216-28

247. JOHN JONQUA and RICHARD GALE were again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Thomas , on the 10th of January , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing, a great coat, value 50s. the property of Richard Saunders ; four gowns, value 40s. five petticoats, value 19s. a pair of drawers, value 1s. four children's frocks, value 8s. four skirts, value 2s. a pair of pantaloons, value 7s. a set of bed furniture, value 12s. a gown and coat, value 10s. an apron, value 1s. a piece of muslin for a petticoat, value 1s. a piece of patchwork, value 1s. a piece of white silk, value 6d. three pair of silk stockings, value 3s. five pair of

cotton stockings, value 5s. a shirt, value 1s. a mantle, value 2s. a muslin robe, value 10s. and a scarf, value 5s. the property of the said William Thomas , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM THOMAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. - I am a journeyman plasterer , and live at St. George's Terrace : My house was broke open, on Monday, the 10th of January, at the one pair of stairs bed-room window, I was in the room at a quarter after seven in the evening -

Q.Was it dark then? - A. Yes, I had a candle; I went into the room, and saw the room perfectly safe, and the window fastened down with a hafp turned over, it is a sash window, here is the fastening, it is on the top of the sash, to prevent its being thrown up; there was a box in the room, containing the property mentioned in the indictment, the box was shut. I went up stairs about nine o'clock the same evening, I found the sash window forced up, and left up.

Q.How high is the sash from the street? - A. Nine feet nine inches from the fill of the window.

Q. The door and all the other places were secure, except the sash? - A.There is no lock to the bed-room door; I found the things were taken out of the box, and the lid of the box left up.

Q. Is your wife here? - A. Yes.

Q.You don't know the things that were in the box so well as your wife? - A.No.

Q.Did you miss any thing else? - A. Yes, the bed-furniture, it was clean, ready to be put up, it was on a shelf over the box; a great coat that hung up between the windows; a dirty shirt, and a pair of pantaloons.

Q. Did you go to the Office to give information? - A. Yes, the next morning.

Q.When did you receive any information of the things? - A. On Friday, the 21st, I went to the Office, and saw a part of the bed-furniture, not the shirt or pantaloons; there were some pieces for patch-work and a gown; the prisoners were all in custody when I went to the Office; I never saw the prisoners till I saw them at the Office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You never saw the prisoners till you saw them at the Office? - A. Yes, I saw Jonqua about six weeks before under my window.

Q.Was the room in which you fat under the room where the things were? - A. No; I was in the kitchen.

Q.Were there any servants in the house? - A. No.

Q.Nor lodgers? - A.No.

Court. Q.Was there any other way of getting up to the room without coming in at the street-door? - A. No.

Q.Was the door locked? - A. Yes, on a spring lock.

Q.When you found the window up, did you observe any marks in the window or in the room?- A.There was the dirt of shoes on the fill of the parlour window, underneath the bed-room window.

MARY THOMAS sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness.

Q.Did you go up with your husband at nine o'clock? - A. Yes, to put my little girl to bed.

Q.Had you seen the box in the room before? - A. Yes, at four o'clock; it contained five gowns, five petticoats -

Q.Any bed-furniture? - A. No, that lay on the shelf. - Three cotton gowns, four skirts, four child's frocks, a pair of drawers, a gown and coat, an apron, a piece of muslin for a petticoat, a piece of patch-work, a piece of white silk, three pair of silk stockings, five pair of cotton stockings, a shirt, a mantle, a muslin robe, and a scarf; I am sure they were there at four o'clock, I put them there; at nine o'clock, I found they were all gone.

Q.Did you observe the sash up? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you see the things at the Magistrates? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.When you make your bed, don't you open your window to let in some air? - A. It was remarkably windy, and I did not open it.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am one of the officers of Worship-street; I apprehended both the prisoners, on the 21st of January, at the house of Jonqua, in Pelham-street, with Jellison and his wife; I was in company with Armstrong; we had been at Gale's house before, and left Ray there. When we went into the house, Jellison and his wife were sitting by the fire-side, Jonqua, and his wife, and Gale, were in the room; they knew Armstrong, he was addressed by several of them with how do you do, Armstrong? he said, he had an information for stolen goods; we found an old black cloak, a man's shirt and a boy's shirt; Gale turned his back to the fire, and put a silver spoon into the fire; we took them all into custody; there was nothing found at that time that relates to this robbery. The same day, in the evening, we went again to the house, with Mrs. Thomas, and in a bag we found a piece of silk, which she said was her's; the bag was tucked behind the bed's head. When we took Gale, we asked him where he lived; he said, he lived in Compton-street, St. Giles's; we knew where he lived, and took him to his house, with Jonqua and his wife; he took us up into a one-pair of stairs room, and said that was his apartment; we searched the place, and turning over some things at the bottom of a chest, we found a piece of cotton of the pattern of a piece the prosecutor had given me, it was about half a yard; I said to Gale, I have a piece of cotton in my hand from the person robbed, with which this seems to correspond, is that your's? he said, yes, all that is in that chest belongs to me; from thence we took them all to

the Office. We then went to the apartment of Jellison and his wife, in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street: Jellison's wife at first went with us; we found the bed-furniture, which the prosecutrix afterwards spoke to. We went to the house again with Jellison and Mrs. Thomas; Mrs. Thomas picked out a part of a muslin apron, and some other things, which she said were her property; I have had the custody of the things ever since. The cotton found at Jonqua's house, Ray has the possession of. The prisoners were committed, and brought up the following day, and re-committed. Then Jellison and his wife said, they wanted to speak to the Magistrate. They had been up once before.

Q. In consequence of what they said to the Magistrate, they were admitted Evidences for the Crown? - A. Yes.

Q.Was it at their own desire they communicated what they did to the Magistrate? - A. It was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.When you were at Jellison's house, neither of the prisoners were with you? - A. No.

Q.There was nothing found at Jonqua's till you found the bit of silk in the evening? - A. No.

Court. Q.Did you see the bag when you were there before? - A. Yes, but we did not examine it; it stood then by the side of the bed.

Mr. Alley. Q.Did you see what the bag contained in the morning? - A. No, I did not.

Q.You don't know whether Armstrong examined it? - A. I do not.

Q. You went to Gale's with a pattern, and found a piece of patch-work? - A. Yes.

Q.When you came to Jellison's house, did you find the things concealed? - A. No; they were in a box with wearing apparel of their own.

PETER MASON sworn. - I was with Vickery and Mrs. Thomas at Jonqua's house; I know no more than Vickery has stated. This is the piece of silk found in the work bag at Jonqua's, (producing it).

Q. When the prisoners were apprehended, did you hear any thing pass between them? - A. I happened to be in the necessary when they were locked up; one was in one lock-up room, and the other in another; I heard Gale call to Jonqua, says he, this is turned out a pretty business; what a bl-d rogue Jellison has turned out; and Jonqua asked him, whether they should ask to go to Newgate at once; John Gale made answer, no, it is of no use, there are so many things against us, we must come up again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.This was after they had been examined? - A. Yes.

Q. And knew there were many charges against them? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any body hear this conversation but yourself? - A. No.

Q. How were they separated? - A. By a thick partition, that they were obliged to holloa to make one another hear.

Q. You know there is forty pounds reward if they are convicted? - A. Yes.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I went with the other officers to Jonqua's house, I was present at the first search, none of this property was found.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am one of the officers of the same office; I went in company with Vickery and Armstrong to Gale's house, Spitalfields; they went to Jonqua's house, I stopped at Gale's; when they came back with Gale, I searched and found this piece of patch-work in a box.

SUSANNAH JELLISON sworn. - Q.What is your husband's name? - A. John Jellison; we live in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street; my husband was brought up to the sea; we deal in second-hand cloaths, in Rosemary-lane.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.When did you see them at your house? - A. On Friday the 21st of January, I saw Richard Gale .

Q. Had you seen them before? - A. Yes.

Q. How long before? - A. The Sunday before.

Q. When before that? - A. The 11th of January I saw Gale and Jonqua, at Jonqua's house.

Q.What day of the week was it? - A.Tuesday the 11th of January, about eleven o'clock in the morning.

Q.Was your husband there? - A. No; I bought some wearing-apparel of them; four gowns of Jonqua and Gale, two dark cotton, one muslinet, and one pale blue silk; five petticoats, two of them quilted stuff, and three dimity; one shirt, a pair of nankeen pantaloons; two cotton frocks; one child's petticoat; a flounce of a petticoat, white muslin; a muslin apron; part of a bed-furniture, blue; and a dark-coloured great coat.

Q. What did you give for all these things? - A.3l. 15s. I asked if there was any danger in buying them; they said not.

Q. That is all that passed between you? - A. That was all.

Q.You had known them before? - A. Yes, a month or five weeks.

Q.What did you do with the things? - A. I sold a part, and had part in my apartments when I was taken; part of the bed-furniture, the flounce of an apron, and a gown and petticoat, I pledged at Mr. Davison's, a pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate-street.

Q.What did you sell? - A. The pantaloons and two of the gowns, a shirt, five petticoats, two frocks, and a great coat.

Q. A part of the things the officers afterwards found in your presence at your house? - A. Yes.

Q.Was your husband present at any part of

the time you were bargaining for these things at Jonqua's house? - A. No.

Q.When was it you told the Magistrate any thing of this? - A. I mentioned it on the Tuesday, but we were brought up again on the Thursday.

Q. There was nothing said to you to induce you to give this account? - A.No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have told the truth about this matter? - A. Yes.

Q. You have always, to the best of your knowledge, given a true account of the transaction? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you never said, that on the day you say you purchased these things at Jonqua's, you went for the purpose of selling something? - A. No.

Q.Have you never said you purchased the bedfurniture of another person? - A. On Friday I told the officers I bought it of a person I did not know.

Q. You did know the person you bought it of?- A. Yes.

Q.Then that was a story? - A. It was when I was frightened.

Q. Did not you say you bought it in Rosemary-lane? - A. I do not recollect that I did.

Q. Was not your husband taken up and charged with this crime? - A. I don't know that he ever was charged with this crime.

Q. You were taken up, and charged with this crime? - A. Yes.

Q. And the second time you told this to the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not give the officers the account you gave the Magistrate? - A.No.

Q. How long have you been married? - A. Twelve years.

Q. Has your husband always lived with you?- A. Yes, when at home.

Q.How long has he been absent from you? - A. Six or seven years.

Q. How long has he been at home? - A.Above two years.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You had intimated to the officers that you wished to say something to the Magistrate, but did not say what? - A. Yes.

GEORGE YOUNG sworn - I live with Mr. Davison, a pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate-street; I have a gown and petticoat pawned by a woman of the name of Jellison.

Q. Is that the woman? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What name was it pawned in? - A.Mary Jellison.

Q.(To Jellison.) What is your name? - A.Susannah.

Q.(To Young.) When were they pawned? - A. The 13th of January.

Q. Does the ticket describe where she lived? - A.Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street; they were pawned for 16s.

Q.(To Mrs. Thomas.) Is that petticoat your's?- A. Yes, and the gown likewise.

Q.Are you quite sure of it? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.Was that gown and petticoat in the box in that room? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q.What is the value of the gown and petticoat; are they worth a pound together?- A.More than a pound.

Q.Look at the silk? - A. That is mine; it was in the box.

Q. Look at the bed-furniture? - A.It is my property; I made the eyelet holes in it myself.

Q.Look at the patch-work? - A. It is mine; I am quite sure of it; the muslin apron is mine, and the pieces of the white gown, and a little skirt; they are all my property, and were all in the box, except the bed-furniture.

Mr. Alley. Q. The patch-work is only pieces not put together? - A. Yes.

Gale's defence. Since I was in trouble, Jellison said she bought the things in Rosemary-lane.

Jonqua's defence. At the time I was apprehended the things were lying about; Mrs. Jellison came in and said, I am come to sell you some children's caps; she had a heap of things in her apron, and when Armstrong came in, she let them down, and went to the window; she must certainly have dropped the things in the room.

Jonqua, GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

Gale, GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030216-29

248. MOSES SOLOMON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Whitworth , on the 20th of January , about the hour of six in the night, and stealing two handkerchiefs, value 4s. the property of the said Joseph.

JOSEPH WHITWORTH sworn. - I live at No. 20, Shoreditch ; I am a tailor : On the 20th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I had been out to King's-street, Spitalfields, and returned home; I had not been in above ten minutes before I heard a scuffling, at the door; I was in the adjoining room to the shop.

Q. Was any body in the shop? - A. No, not at that time; on hearing the scuffle, Mrs. Whitworth ran to the door, and refused to open it, supposing there was a sight; I went into the shop, and told her to open it; a young man held up a handkerchief, and said, the shop had been robbed, and Glee brought in the handkerchiefs and the prisoner; we then went off to Worship-street.

Q. Whose handkerchief was it? - A.Mine; it was missing from the window, and another with it.

Q. Where was it before? - A. In the window; we keep a hosier's shop, and sell these things; I saw it there myself just before dark, and the other;

the window was whole when I took the shutters down in the morning, and all day long for any thing we observed.

Q. You cannot say, after the morning, whether it was whole or not? - A. Nor particularly.

Q. Do you know any thing of the boy? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.What time did you open the shutters? - A.Between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. Your attention was not called to the window through the day? - A. No.

- GLEE sworn. - I am a patrol; I belong to the Office, in Worship-street; On the 20th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was going up Shoreditch; I saw the prisoner and two others with him, about eighteen or nineteen years of age; I saw them looking at this gentleman's window; I passed them, and looked at them; I came back again, and looked at the window; the window was then safe.

Q. Are you sure the window was safe? - A. I am confident of it. I went about two or three doors forwards, and stopped about ten minutes; they were walking backwards and forwards; while I was waiting there, Mr. Whitworth came home, and went in doors; soon after he went in, they called one another together, whistling, and calling Joe, for they had separated; the prisoner had his coat off his right arm, and his shirt tucked up; I saw the prisoner push his arm through the window, and take the handkerchief, and put it under his coat on the left-side.

Q. He put his naked arm through the wondow?- A. Yes.

Q. Did he cut his arm? - A. No, he pushed the glass right through.

Q. What sort of glass was it? - A. A very large pane of glass.

Q. The glass made a considerable noise I suppose? - A. No, it came out whole, and fell on the stockings in the inside; the other boys ran away; I caught the prisoner immediately; I was within three or four yards of him. Here is the handkerchief.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He pushed it in whole, and made no noise? - A. Yes.

Q. You were in Court when the prosecutor gave his evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. And heard him say the window was whole in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. You have heard there is 40l. reward? - A. Yes, if the Court please to allow it.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I went to the prosecutor's on being acquainted with it, and found this glass on the stockings in the shop. - (Producing it.)

JOHN RAY sworn. - Glee delivered the handkerchief to me, and gave me charge of the prisoner. - (The handkerchief produced.)

Mr. Whitworth. I can swear to the pattern and the quality, and that I had such a handkerchief missing; I cut the handkerchief off the day before; I had four.

Q. How many were there of that pattern in the window? - A.There was another in the window, but not of that pattern.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I observe you swear cautiously; do you mean to swear positively to it? - A. I cannot swear positively; other persons may have the same pattern; I won't swear to it.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 13.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his youth.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18030216-30

249. THOMAS MURRAY was indicted for that he, on the 12th of January , on the King's highway, upon Polle Elstrom ; did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person forty-two yards of lace, value 12l. six pair of silk stockings, value 3l. and a silk handkerchief, value 6s. the property of the said Polle Elstrom.(The witnesses were examined apart by the request of the prisoner.)

POLLE ELSTROM sworn. - I am mate of a Swedish ship , lying at Limehouse-hole; I was on shore on the 11th of January, to buy some things to take to my own country; I went up into the City, and bought a few articles of different kinds; on going down Whitechapel, just by the Seven Stars public-house, the prisoner stopped me in the street, with his hat in his hand, and said, I hope there is no offence; he asked me to step in, he wanted to speak to me; I asked him what he wanted; he said he was a French Captain, the owner of a vessel; he spoke very bad English; he said, you need not be afraid of me, and shewed me his papers; he said he had no money; that he was quite distressed for money, but he had a few things that he wanted to dispose of, or borrow money upon; he took me into a dark room backwards, where there was nobody but him and me.

Q. That was at the Seven Stairs? - A. Yes; he shewed me some white linen cloth, which he said was cambric; he said it was worth 18s. a yard; he would sell it for any thing; he was distressed for money; I bought two pieces of him, five yards each, at 4s. 6d. a yard, which amounted to 45s. he shewed me some waistcoat pieces afterwards; he wanted 12s. 6d. a piece; I bought five at 10s. each, which was 50s. I gave him two two-pound notes and a one-pound, and a seven-shilling piece; he said the things were worth four times the money; if I was dissatisfied, I might come the next day, and he would take the things back

again; I I went and left him, and carried the things to a public-house I use in Catherine-street, when I came there, I found the things were not worth thirty shillings:

Q.Was the room so dark you could not see the quality of the things? - A. Yes; I found I had miscounted, the goods came to four pounds sixteen shillings, I gave him five pounds and a seven-shilling-piece; the next day, I went up Cheapside, and bought twenty yards of lace, at six shillings a yard, and twenty-two yards, at five and sixpence a yard.

Q. Had you any lace with you when you were with the prisoner the day before? - A. Yes, he looked at it, it was in a handkerchief, not this lace; I bought six pair of silk stockings, ten shillings a pair, in the same shop, four pair of white, and four pair of black; as I was going home, I went to see if I could find the prisoner, to ask him if he would take his things back again; when I came into Whitechapel, I saw the prisoner go into the Seven-Stars, and another man in a brown coat stopped me in the street, exactly the same as the prisoner did the day before; he said, he had some goods to dispose of; I told him I would not buy any thing of them, I was cheated the day before by another such; he wanted to take me into the same dark room, I would not go in there, but went into the parlour, and sat down; when I had been in about two minutes, the prisoner came into the parlour to me.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner had seen your before you went in? - A. I think he did; I had seen him; the prisoner came in, and said, that man is my boatswain, he has failed with me six years; they both asked me several questions, if I would buy any of their articles; I said, I would not buy any; they asked me, if I had any thing to sell, I said, I had nothing to sell, but what I bought to day; I asked the prisoner if he would take his things back, and offered him half-a-guinea, at last I offered him a guinea to take them back; I told him I had not them with me, but I would go and fetch them; he did not agree to take them back, but his boatswain went and fetched a glass of grog, and asked me five or six times to drink with him, I would not at first, but at last I did; they took my handkerchief on the table, and would look at the lace.

Q.Which of them? - A.Both; the things were on the table; they asked me to let them look at them; I told them they were welcome to look at it, but I would not sell it; they took one piece out of the handkerchief, to see how many yards there were of it, and asked me how much I had paid for it; I told them, one piece cost six shillings a yard, the other six shillings and sixpence; have you any receipts to shew for it, says the boatswain; I took my pocket-book out to shew the receipts, they said it was a cheap bargain; they said, they would give me sixteen pounds for it; I said, the amount was fifteen pounds one shilling; I told them, I would not fell it; the prisoner had a false check of twenty-one pounds seventeen shillings, and wanted me to give him the difference; he asked, if I would give him four or five pounds difference; I said, I had not so much money about me, I would not agree to any thing; they took me to the bar to drink grog; the prisoner took the handkerchief off the table, and carried it to the bar; we drank a glass at the bar between three of us; I took my handkerchief from the prisoner, and walked away into the street, and the boatswain followed me; they walked both behind me, and talked French between them; I did not know what they said; the prisoner then spoke to the boatswain in English, and desired him to go on board, and tell the boys to take care of every thing on board till he came; the prisoner walked close to me about five or six houses further, and his boatswain behind him; the prisoner snatched the handkerchief out of my hand, and gave it to the boatswain, who ran away with it towards Whitechapel-road; the prisoner held me by my arm, and stopped me from going after the boatswain, there was a thick crowd of people, and I soon lost sight of him; I told the prisoner, you are a pretty captain of a ship, when you could not buy the goods you want to rob me; he said, he was a gentleman, and desired me to go over to Mr. Jones, and enquire his character; I went and enquired, but nobody knew him; he then said, when he got change for his draft, he would pay me; we went into five or six public-houses; he then said, have you any demand upon me, I want to be rid of your company; he went afterwards into the George, in Shoreditch, where he had several acquaintances, and I sent for a constable, but the people pushed and dragged me about, and he got out into the street before the constable came; he was taken four days afterwards.

Q. Were you present when he was taken up? - A. Yes, at his own house, No. 29, Huntingdon-street, Kingsland-road; when he was apprehended, he said, I know nothing of the man, but when he was in prison, he produced the duplicate of the things, they were found in pawn.

Q. Did you see him produce it? - A. No.

Q. Were you present when the things were found? - A. Yes; the officer and I went together to Mr. Barber's, in the Borough, and found them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You agreed for the sale of this lace? - A. No.

Q. How much did you drink together? - A. Two sixpenny worths.

Q. How much more? - A. No more in that house.

Q. Nor any where else? - A. No.

Q.Upon your oath, did not you bargain with him for the lace? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You stairdown, and let him look at the lace?- A. Yes, I thought him an honest man.

Q.You are quite sure you never offered to sell, him the lace? - A. Yes.

DAVID JONES sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. John Barber: On the 13th of January, I received of a person, in company with the prisoner, six pair of silk stockings, two pieces of lace and a silk handkerchief; they both came in together, they wanted twenty shillings on them; I saw the goods would do for the money, I made out a memorandum, and gave them a guinea; one of the persons said to the other, that would not be quite sufficient for them, and asked me, how much more I would advance on them; I looked it over more particularly, and asked how many yards there were, and they said there was the number marked on the card, but they had cut some off, I made it up six pounds, and made another memorandum; there was something in pledge, that they redeemed at the same time; I did not bear any more of this, till the 15th, when somebody else came with the memorandum, and wanted it put in another name, the former name was William Luffingham .

Q. Do you know who came on the 15th? - A. No, I do not; he intimated, that he had purchased the ticket, and put it in the name of Robert Johnson; about three days after, an officer brought the ticket, and said, they had been obtained from the prosecutor; I kept it in my possession till they were carried to the Office; I waited there during the examination, and took them back with me, and have had them ever since.

Q. Are you certain as to the prisoner? - A. I have no doubt of his person; the other man gave them to me, but the prisoner was with him; I had seen the other man two or three times before, and knew his face.

RICHARD OSBORNE sworn. - I am an officer: On the 16th of January, I went, in company with the prosecutor, to the prisoner's; I told him, I had an information that he had robbed the prosecutor of some lace and stockings; he told me, he knew nothing at all about it; I told him, he must go along with me to Lambeth-street office. In the course of the day, he said the things were pawned, and he thought he could find where the duplicate was; he sent his little boy over into the Borough, as he said, to see if he could find the person that bought the duplicate.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know if he had any thing to do with the sea-service? - A. No. He sent the boy to the Borough; he came back, and said, he could not find the person; he said, he would see for him in the morning. The next morning, a letter was delivered to him in the Office; I had the duplicate before, given to me by a friend of his at the Flying Horse; the prisoner was not present when he gave it me; but he saw it afterwards at the Office; he gave me a letter to give to the Magistrate on his examination. (The letter and duplicate produced).

Court. Q.There is no name signed to this? - A. No; it is exactly as it was.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing about the duplicate? - A. He wanted to get the things out for the man to have his property, and go about his business.

Q. When was it that he said he would try to get the duplicate, and get the things for the man? - A. On the Sunday, before me.

Jones. This is the new memorandum, made in the name of Robert Johnson .

Court. Q.Have you the original memorandum?- A. Yes; two remnants of lace, six pair of silk stockings. William Luffingham .

Elstrom. In the middle of the handkerchief there is P. and E. and there is the length and price of the lace on the card.

Q.Look at the articles? - A.There is twenty-two yards, five shillings and six-pence a yard; this is four yards short, it was measured at the Office; twenty yards, at six shillings a yard, there are only sixteen remaining.

Mr. Knapp. Q. All these marks were put upon them previous to your buying them? - A. Yes; there is the handkerchief with the two letters of my name in the middle of it.

Q. When you seanched the prisoner, did you find any papers upon him? - A. I don't recollect whether I searched him or not; he produced a parchment of his being captain of a ship.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, This gentleman accosted me in the street, in Whitechapel; I shewed him some goods I had to part with; I gave him my address to dine with me on Sunday. On the Wednesday, I went into the parlour at the Seven Stars, he was shewing some things to a person, and asked me to measure them: I went home with him, after he had lost his property; we were together four hours; he went home with me, and I invited him to dine with me on Sunday; he came, and I tried to find the man that pawned them; he acquitted me; if I deserve punishment, I hope I shall receive it, before God, the Jury, and the Court; if I do not deserve it, I hope I shall be liberated; I am an innocent man, he was dealing with a man of a foreign language, which he did not understand, and asked me to measure it.

GUILTY, of stealing the property, but not of the highway robbery , aged 52.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030216-31

250. ROBERT MATHEWS was indicted for

feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , a mare, value 11l. the property of Thomas Keates .

THOMAS KEATES sworn. - I live at the Swan and Hoop Livery-stables, Moorgate ; I let a mare to the prisoner, who came to me on the 8th of February, between ten and eleven o'clock, he called himself Captain Thompson.

Q.Had you ever seen him before? - A. Yes; he came into the yard, I asked his address, he gave it me, Captain Thomas, 16, in the Minories; he said, he wanted a mare, to go and see a friend some where about Somers Town; I asked how long he should want the mare; he said, about one hour, that he should not be more than an hour gone; he asked me what I should charge him for the ride; I said, five shillings; I let him have the mare, and he was to pay five shillings, on his return in one hour; that was the agreement between us. Not returning that hour nor that evening, I began to be a little alarmed about my horse, I thought it was likely I should not see it any more; the next day I went to where he gave me his address, 16, in the Minories, and enquired for such a person, and no such person was known. The next morning I went about to all the other stables, thinking he might have put it up somewhere else by mistake; that he might, perhaps be intoxicated with liquor; after making this enquiry, I could not hear any thing about the mare. On the 10th of February, I went to the Office in Worship-street, and had some bills printed. On the 12th, an officer from Westminster, of the name of Bly, came to me in the morning, and gave me information that my mare was at the Red Lion, Cockspur-street, where I saw the mare; and from thence I went to Westminster, where I saw the prisoner, at a little house where the officer took me to, in a little room. I swore to the mare, and the prisoner was committed.

Q. Are you sure the mare you saw at the Red Lion was your mare? - A. Yes, she was a bay mare, fifteen hands and three inches high, some white in her face, some saddle marks, with two black spavins; I have had her about five months; I am perfectly satisfied it was my mare.

Cross-examined. Q.On the 8th of February, a Captain Thompson came to your yard to have a horse? - A. Yes.

Q. You had never seen Captain Thompson before? - A. Never.

Q. And you let Captain Thompson this mare for an hour? - A. I did.

Q. You agreed with him for five shillings? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he give you any thing at the time? - A. No.

Q. Do you let horses to any stranger? - A. Yes, if they give me a good address. I would let you one.

JAMES GOADBY sworn. - I am ostler to Mr. Morley, at the Red Lion, Cockspur-street, Charing-cross: On Tuesday, the 8th of February, the prisoner came into our yard, and said, he had got a mare to sell -

Q. What time in the day? - A.About four o'clock, or it might be a quarter past; I asked him what he would take for her; he asked me what I thought she might be worth; I said, I knew what she was worth to me, what do you set upon her; how long have you had her; he said, he had had her three years and upwards; I asked whether he drove her in reins, or rode her; he said, he had her frequently in his cart, that he was a cheesemonger; he said, he used her to go in a one-horse chaise and a cart, and drove her fifty or sixty miles a day, frequently; he said, he had sold two the same day before; he said, his brother and he were cheesemongers, and came out of the lower part of Scotland, and wanted to make up their debts, as far as possible, and that they had a warehouse in the Minories; they wanted to get as much money as they could, for he thought they should be bankrupts; says I, I will give you five guineas for the mare; he said, O no, he could not take that; I said she was not worth more, she has two black spavins, and has been worked a great deal; I said, however, I would give him six pounds, and no more, and we went over to the public-house, and had something to drink, and I paid him six pounds, and the prisoner went away; I had three friends with me at the time. I suspected, some how, after that, that the mare was not come honestly by, and my friends and I went in pursuit of the prisoner, but could not find him that night. On the Friday in the next week, the prisoner came into the yard again, and brought a brown gelding for sale; I asked him what that had been used to; he said, it had been used to work along with the mare in the cart, at times; I said, it is very lame, what do you expect for him; says he, you must give me more for this than you did for the other; I said, no, I cannot give you any such thing, I would give him three guineas; and desired him to go over the way with a friend of mine; and in the mean time I went to Mr. Bly, the constable; I told my friend to keep him in tow while I went; I told him what I was going upon. I found Mr. Bly at home, and he came immediately with me; we did not find him in the house where I expected to meet him, we went into the yard, and saw him standing; Mr. Bly followed me; I asked where my friend was; he said, in a house near the King's-mews. We went into the Hope, in Cockspur-street, and there my friend was; I went into the back parlour, and called for a shilling's worth of brandy and water, and asked the prisoner if he had a receipt for the horse; in the mean time, I said, I would go and

get a stamp; I got one at the stationer's, and went into the room again where the prisoner and my friend was; the officer was then in the room; the prisoner said, will you write it; I said, no, write it yourself; and he wrote a receipt for the money; I said, can you give me change for a ten poundnote? and Mr. Bly came up, and said, I have a detainer against you, to know how you came by these horses; the prisoner said, do you accuse me as a thief, I have always lived in credit; he said, let me go, and I will give you my address; the officer said, I must do my duty, you must go before a Magistrate; he went with us very well a little way, and then he swore he would go no further; he swore he would shoot himself; then Mr. Bly said to me, take hold of his am, I insist upon your assisting me; we called a coach, and with difficulty got him into it, and took him to Queen-square.

Q. You are positively sure the prisoner is the man you bought the mare of? - A. Yes. He was committed; the Magistrate read the hand-bill he had received of the mare; I said, that is the mare.

Q. Did you shew the mare to Mr. Keates? - A. Yes, the morning after he was committed, he claimed her as his own.

Cross-examined. Q.On the 8th, about four o'clock, the prisoner came to you, and offered a mare to sell? - A. Yes.

Q. And said he was a cheesemonger? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the mare appear as if she had gone in harness? - A. Yes; she was marked with a blaze down her face, two blood spavins behind, white saddle marks on her back, and a little tender before.

Q. Was she very lame behind? - A. Yes.

Q. How high was she? - A.About fourteen hands three inches high.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. I thought afterwards, I had, with Captain Gray.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am a constable; I took up the prisoner on the 11th, at the sign of the Hope public-house, Charing-cross, upon the information of James Goadby , who thought he had got horses improperly; I got him to write a receipt, and then took him to the Office; when he had got part of the way, he resisted, and with difficulty we got him into a coach; I asked him how he got the horses; he said, honestly, they were his own; I said, if he would bring some respectable housekeeper, in the neighbourhood, I would not take him before the Magistrate.

Prisoner's defence. I hired the mare, to go to Nottingham-place, about some money; I did not find the person, I came to London, and being intoxicated, I put the mare in a stable, and as I was in want of money, I thought I would sell the mare, and I might go a voyage, and then I should be able to pay the prosecutor for the mare; I sold her for six pounds. As to my saying I was a cheesemonger, and drove her in a cart, I said no such thing.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Jury. (To Goadby). Q.Was the prisoner intoxicated when he sold the mare? - A.No; he conducted himself so that I could not suppose he stole it.

GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-32

251. PETER STOKES and JAMES HOKEWAY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , one wrapper, value 6d. twenty-one pounds of tea, value 5l. and seven pounds of coffee, value 1l. 2s. the property of John Hanson , Thomas Hanson , and Benjamin Hanson .

JOHN HANSON sworn. - I am a tea-dealer , in Holborn, in partnership with Thomas and Benjamin Hanson : All that I know is that I was sent for to go to Guildhall, to identify the property, which I did.

WILLIAM PUCKERIDGE sworn. - I am a carver and gilder: On the 26th of January, I was standing at my door in Hosier-lane, Smithfield, I saw the two prisoners following a cart; four doors above our's, I saw the prisoner, Hokeway, jump into the cart, take a parcel up, and give it to the other prisoner; I gave the alarm of stop thief! they were pursued into Smithfield, and I saw the prisoner, Stokes, drop the parcel; I did not lose sight of them, only as they turned the corner, till he dropped it; I took up the parcel, and carried it to the carman; they were pursued by others; they were brought back in the course of five minutes, Stokes to the George-inn, Smithfield, and the other to the Compter; I saw them both, and knew them to be the men.

WILLIAM BRENT sworn. - I am carman to Messrs. Hansons, in Holborn: On Tuesday, the 25th of January, about twelve o'clock, I had several chests of tea in a cart, nine or ten, I believe, and a truss in a bag; I was going with it from Messrs. Hansons, in Holborn, to the George-inn, Smithfield; at the top of Hosier-lane , just as I was going into Smithfield, I heard the cry of stop thief! that my cart was robbed; I stopped the cart, and pursued them into St. Bartholomew's-hospital, the people said, they were gone that way, I did not see them; I returned back to my cart, for fear of losing any more property; I missed a truss, containing twenty-one pounds of tea and seven pounds of coffee, it was sewed up in canvass; I saw the tallest prisoner, Stokes, brought into the Georgeyard, in Smithfield.

Q. Did you see either of them near your cart?- A. No, not till they were brought back to me. The property was brought to the George, and delivered to me by Puckeridge; I gave it to the officer, Chalice; it was in the same state as when I lost it.

GEORGE WARDEN sworn. - I saw the two prisoners follow the cart, I saw Hokeway jump on the cart, take the parcel, and deliver it to Stokes; I gave the alarm of stop thief, and Stokes dropped the parcel; I pursued them, I had not lost fight of him when he dropped it; I lost sight of both as they tusned the corner; Puckeridge took up the parcel; they ran as far as Bartholomew-close; they were both stopped before I came up to them.

Q. Are you sure they were the persons you had seen before? - A. Yes.

Q. Should you know the parcel if you were to see it? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM CHALICE sworn. - I am the patrol belonging to St. Sepulchre's; I produce the wrapper; I had it from the carman; I have kept it from that time to this: On the 25th of January, about twelve o'clock, I was at the top of Giltspur-street, going into Smithfield; I heard the last witness give the alarm of stop thief after the two prisoners; they went through the Hospital-yard; I was near the gate when they went in; I followed across the yard and Little Britain into Bartholomew-close; they were taken in Bartholomewclose; I took Hokeway myself, and took him to the Computer; I saw the other taken; he was carried to the George, in Smithfield.

- GRAHAM sworn. - I was sent for to take charge of the prisoners.

Hanson. This is my property; I opened it at Guildhall; it was sent out in the cart that day; there are 21lb. of tea and 7lb. of coffee; there was an invoice and permit with it, which I took out at Guildhall; it was going to the George, in Smithfield.

Q.(To Chalice.) Did you take that wrapper to the Alderman? - A. Yes; Mr. Hanson saw it there, and opened it.

Stokes's defence. I know nothing of the business whatever: there were a parcel of people running in Smithfield; I ran as well as they.

Hokeway's defence. I heard the cry of, stop thief; a gentleman stopped Stokes, and said he was one of them; another person stopped me, and said I was one; I asked him what he had against me; he said he did not know.

Hokeway called one witness, who have him a good character.

Stokes, GUILTY , aged 24.

Hokeway, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-33

252 THOMAS SPENCER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , 33lb. of sugar, value 1l. the property of John Blake , and others.

JOHN BLAKE sworn. - I am a gangsman ; I am partner with others in the gang (mentioning their names): On Wednesday the 2d of February, about ten o'clock in the day, I was informed by one of my weekly servants, that there was a man in the half story of the warehouses at Botolph Wharf ; I went with my servant to look after the man; I found the prisoner lying in the dock between the hogsheads in the half story; I called out for a man to come and assist me, and he jumped up, and ran away into No. 72; my servant followed him, and pulled him out; I saw him bring him out; I lifted up his apron, and saw a large quanity of something in his breeches; I pulled it out; it was a bag with 11lb. of sugar, and 22lb. in his jacket under his coat; we found a hogshead broke; we weighed it; it came in 2 cwt. and a half, and it had lost half a cwt. there was a good deal spilt about.

Q.Was this the sugar lost out of that hogshead? - A. It matched the sugar; the hogshead was not robbed half an hour before; we are answerable for the sugar in the warehouses; if it is lost, we must make it good.

Q. Was this sweepings? - A. No; it was taken out of the hogshead.

JOB HILLICK sworn. - I am a weekly porter: On the 2d of February, I found Thomas Spencer lying in the dock between the hogsheads in No.72, stooping down; it was between ten and eleven o'clock; I told the prisoner to get out; he came out; I saw a bag of sugar taken out of his breeches under his apron; the rest was concealed in a little jacket underneath his outside one; he had 33lb. about him; it was all of the same sort.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.There are a great many sorts of sugar in the warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot tell that any is taken out without weighing the hogsheads? - A. I can tell when the hogshead is weighted.

Q.Did you weigh that hogshead? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you weigh the hogshead before you found the sugar on the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Then what the weight was before you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. You cannot tell whether any was lost? - A. I cannot tell.

Court. Q.Was it a broken hogshead, or like the rest? - A. It was broken open.

Q. Were any other hogsheads broke? - A. No.

THOMAS MERRYMAN sworn. - I took the prisoner in custody, that is all I know; Dudley has the sugar.

GEORGE DUDLEY sworn. - I am a constable; I produce the sugar; I was sent for to a public-house where the sugar was; it was in two parcels; Merryman and Hillick were at the public-house, the Green Man, Darkhouse-lane, Thames-street.

Prisoner's defence. I ask the prosecutor whether he ever saw me break a hogshead, and take any sugar? I found the sugar going down the gate

way; I was going to seek for work; I went between the hogsheads, left should suspect me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped one hundred yards .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-34

253. MARGARET SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , a gown, value 12s. the property of Mary Drisdale .

MARY DRISDALE sworn. - I am a servant out of place; I lodge at No. 130, Gray's-inn-lane ; the gown was on my bed; the prisoner slept in the same bed I did; she got up on Tuesday the 11th of January before me, and took my gown on Wednesday morning off the bed; she left the room before I got out of bed. The woman where I lodged came up, and asked where Sullivan was; I said she was gone down; I got up and missed my gown; I saw it afterwards at Mr. Clement's, a pawnbroker, in Fetter-lane; I knew it again; it is a blue ground and yellow flower; in the course of a fortnight after I met the prisoner in Gray's-inn-lane; she was then in custody of the officer that is present; I asked her for, the ticket of my gown that she had pawned at Mr. Clement's; she said she had not; she was taken to Hatton-Garden, and had three hearings.

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. - I am an officer at Hatton-Garden: On the 25th of January, in consequence of a complaint of a man who had lost a shirt and some stockings, I apprehended the prisoner at the Bleeding Heart, Charles-street; going to the pawnbroker's I met the prosecutrix.

THOMAS NELSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Clement, a pawnbroker; I produce the gown pawned by the prisoner on the 12th of January.

Did you ever see the prisoner in your shop before? - A.Frequently; I know her perfectly(produces the gown); I gave her a duplicate.

Drisdale. That is my gown which I lost from the bed.

Prisoner's defence. She lent me the gown to pledge, and not being able to redeem it according to my promise, she took me up; she told the pawnbroker she sent me with it.

Q.(To Hancock.) When you me the prosecutrix did she charge the prisoner with stealing the gown? - A. Yes.

Nelson. Mrs. Drisdale came to me, and asked me if her gown was pledged with Mr. Clement; I said I would send the boy up to see; she said she had sent this woman with it, and had received 8s. but not the duplicate of it.

Q. You are perfectly sure she said that? - A. Yes; she asked for it as pledged for 8s. I searched the day-book, and found it was pledged for 10s. the boy went up, and brought it down, and delivered it to her.

Q.(To Drisdale.) You said you learned by information where this gown was pawned? - A. Yes, Mrs. Shirley told me she supposed it was pawned at Mr. Clement's.

Q. Did you tell the pawnbroker that you sent the prisoner with the gown? - A. I did, because Mrs. Shirley said, I had better say I sent it, or else they would not produce the gown, being a stolen article.

Q. You insist upon all you have originally sworn, that you lost it in the way described. - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. When did the woman come first? - A. On the Monday, that was the first time I saw her; she slept with me that night.

Q. When did you find the gown? - A. About a fortnight after she robbed me.

Court. Q. How came she to sleep with you?- A. There was but one bed in the room; she came on a visit to the woman I lodge with; we all three slept together; she rented the room I slept in; I had lodged with her only from the Sunday night.

Jury. Q. Is Mrs. Shirley here? - A. No.

Q. Did you go to any other pawnbroker's to enquire after the gown? - A. I went to a great many besides, and did not find it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-35

254. HENRY LAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , two pewter pint pots, value 16d. the property of William Ilet .

WILLIAM ILET sworn. - I keep the Fleece public-house, Old Tothill-street, Westminster ; I was robbed of two pewter pots on the 9th of February; I was informed a man had gone out of my house with two pots; I went out and saw a man running; I pursued him, and stopped him; he had two pewter pint pots upon him; my name is upon them; they are not numbered.

Q. How long have you been in business? - A. Six years.

Q. Have you ever sold any old pots? - A. No; they steal them so fast we cannot sell them.

MARY GRIFFITHS sworn. - I work in the gardens in the season; I went into Mr. Ilet's house, Tothill-street, for a pint of beer on Wednesday night; I don't know the day of the month; it was this month; I saw the prisoner put two pint pots in his pocket; I was sitting by the table in the tap-room, talking to another woman; there were more people in the tap-room; he took them off the table; he put them in his coat pocket; I was

afraid to speak to him; I spoke to the landlord, and he went out immediately, and the prisoner was brought in.

Prosecutor. When I brought him in, I insisted on his taking the pots out of his pocket; they are my pots; I have kept them ever since; one of them I purchased at a sale, at the Feathers; I had my name put on the side; I have seen the prisoner at my house before, he is a soldier.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor; the girl is a girl of the town; she had a spite against me, and I suppose put them into my pocket.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined one month in Newgate , fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-36

255. NEIL M'KELLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , two pair of sheets, value 10s. the property of Thomas Etherington .

THOMAS ETHERINGTON sworn. - I am a publican , and keep the Ship and Horse-shoe, Upper East Smithfield : On the 26th of January I took the prisoner going out of doors with the sheets upon him, about ten o'clock in the morning; they were concealed under his clothes; he had slept at my house that night; they were under all his cloaths but his shirt; as he was going out, he said he should want to sleep there again at night, and had a glass of gin; I said you had better pay for your bed now, and then you will be sure of it; he made no answer to that.

Q.What did he say over night? - A.He said he wanted a bed to himself and a room to himself; I told him he could not have a room to himself; he might have a bed to himself; that if he slept by himself it was 1s. if with another man 6d. he said he could not afford that; he would give me 8d. my wife said, as he is a poor man, let him sleep here for that; the sheets were taken off the bed he slept in.

Court. The prisoner must be acquitted; the indictment lays it as a single larceny; the sheets were stolen in a lodging. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-37

256. WILLIAM LEACH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Paul Jodrell , Esq. on the 2d of February , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing a pair of sheets, value 5s. the property of the said Richard; two waistcoats, value 2s. two shirts, value 2s. two handkerchiefs, value 1s. two pair of stockings, value 2s. and a pocket-book, value 6d. the property of James Seammell .

RICHARD PAUL JODRELL, Esq. sworn. - I am owner, proprietor, and occupier of a house in Berner's-street ; I was absent from home from the Monday preceding Christmas-Day to the 5th of February.

JAMES SEAMMELL sworn. - I live with Mr. Jodrell, I was not at home: On the 2d of February, Mr. Jodrell was from home, I went to fetch my mistress from Bentinck-street, at half-past twelve o'clock; when I came back, which was, as the watch was going one, I found the stable broke open; I asked the watchman to open the coach-house door, and I put up the coach, and took a light, and was going into the stable, I turned round to fasten the door that goes out of the stable into the coach-house, and the iron staple that fastens it was broke off, it was fast when I went out at half-past twelve, the watchman tried the door; I went up into the bed-room, and saw my box lying on a truss of hay, open, that is where I sleep; I had been to the hay-lost, close by the bed-room, about ten o'clock, when I went out with my lady, and put some clean shirts in; I locked it, and put the key on the shelf over the fire-place.

Q. Is the stable part of the dwelling-house? - A. Yes; I lost my coat and waistcoat, and a pair of sheets, they were taken from the bed, two waistcoats, two shirts, a handkerchief, two pair of stockings, and a pocket-book, they were all in the trunk, except the sheets; as I was going out with the carriage, at half-past twelve, the prisoner was standing, with two others, by the wall.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes; when I was out of place, I lodged at the same house he did; I took him up on suspicion.

Q. Was any thing found upon him in your presence? - A. Nothing but the key of a stable where the things were found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The key of the stable door found upon him, was the key of Mr. Fanblanc's stable? - A. Yes.

Q.He had permission from Mr. Fanblanc's coachman to sleep in that stable? - A. Yes.

Q.There was another man permitted to sleep in that stable, who is run away? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you say, the day he was taken up, that you believed the other was the man that stole the things, and not this man? - A. No, I said, I did not know which it was.

ROBERT PRIOR sworn. - I was Mr. Fanblanc's servant at that time, the prisoner was a man out of place, I knew him, and lent him a key to let him sleep in the stable, I had two keys, he slept in the lost, he had been with me for some time, I believe three or four weeks; another man came with this man, and asked me to let him sleep in the lost, which I did.

Q. What is his name? - A. I don't know, only John.

Q. What is become of that man? - A. I don't know; when this robbery was done, the things were found in my stable, in the lost; I was that evening, at Drury-lane Play-house, with my master, I came back about twelve, there was nobody in the stable, I came back again about ten minutes before one, and this man and the other were both in the stable, one above, and the other below.

Q.Did you see them before you went to the play? - A. No.

Q. Did you go into the hay-lost that night? - A. Yes, to give my horses some hay.

Q. Did you see any thing in the hay-loft then?- A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You lent this man your key to sleep in the stable? - A. Yes.

Q. You had a good opinion of him? - A. Yes.

Q. Since the robbery, the other man has run away? - A. Yes.

Q. This man was always to be found? - A. Yes.

Q.Did not you say, this man was so drunk, that he was not capable of picking up a Bank-note, much less of breaking open the stable? - A. He appeared to be in liquor, he was lying in the stable.

Q. The other man had equal access to the stable?- A. Yes; the other man was the first man given in charge to the officer, though they were both together at the time.

Q. He has run away, though he was given in charge to the officer? - A. Yes.

SAMUEL BOND sworn. - I was with the last witness at the play; I came home to the stable about ten minutes before one, I saw the prisoner inside the door, leaning on the corn-binn, in Mr. Fanblanc's stable, he was very much in liquor; there was another man in the lost.

Q. What is become of him? - A. I don't know; I saw him, because he came down in the stable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. That man has run away, this was always public? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it you that said, this man was so drunk, he could not pick up a Bank-note, much less break open a stable-door? - A. Yes.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - I have a bundle of things I had from the officer, Warren.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - I searched the coachman's stables, on Thursday the 3d of this month.

Q. Mr. Fanblanc's stables? - A. Yes; I found the things mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner was searched, there was nothing found upon him.

Seammell. This waistcoat I can swear to.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Councel.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18030216-38

257. JAMES NOWLAND and JOHN PRICE were indicted, the first for that he, on the 27th of January , in and upon Robert Pigeon , on purpose and of malice aforethought, and by lying in wait, unlawfully did make an assault, and that he the said James, with a certain clasp knife, value 6d. which he then and there held on purpose, and of malice aforethought, and lying in wait, did slit the nose of the said Robert, with intention the same to maim and disfigure. And the other, for being present, aiding, and abetting the said James Nowland , the said felony to commit and perpetrate .

ROBERT PIGEON sworn. - I am servant to Mess. Locke and Knight, wine and brandy merchants, Hammersmith: On the 27th of Jan. in the evening, I went with my fellow servant to the White-hart, to have a pint of beer; Brookes, the headborough, and two or three more, were there; when I had been there two or three minutes, the lad that drives the errand cart came and called, Brookes, Brookes, come out directly, there are three men have got a box from the errand cart, and are in Black-lion-lane. Brookes and another man, I believe Sharpe, went out; I did not go out immediately, but thinking it unmanly not to go when an errand cart had been robbed, I went to Blacklion-lane, and met a man coming out of the lane, and calling, Peter, Peter; then the boy came out and said, stop thief.

Q. The boy's name is Smith? - A. Yes; Thomas-Abraham Smith. I asked the boy which way they were gone; he said, towards Hammersmith; then I ran as fast as I could run, and came up with a man, the shortest of the prisoners, Price, that was in the road; I immediately looked to see if he had got any property, and could not see any thing; I looked to the right and the left to see if there were any of his accomplices; I looked forward and thought I saw the head of some person; Price looked at me, and said, why do you jostle me; I said, I did not jostle him, but I thought he was one of the thieves that had robbed the errand cart.

Q. What time was this? - A. I think a little after eight at night, the moon was not then two hours and an half high; then Brookes came up.

Q. Did you then see any body else there? - A. No; I looked to see if I could see any other person; Brookes laid hold of Price, and all of a sudden I lost him. Price calls, d-n you, Jack, come here; then Brookes called to me, I suppose, and said, I order you to aid and assist in the King's name; then a man I had never seen before, jumped from the foot-path.

Q. You had done nothing then? - A. No; Price, when he said, come here, said, we will do them both.

Q. It was Nowland that jumped off the foot

path? - A. Yes; Nowland jumped at me, and with a dreadful oath said, what do you do with that man, I will cut your b-y head off; then he struck me in the left eye with his fist, and I think at the same time, but I am not certain, he struck me with a knife, I felt something on my breast, and my coat is cut in the same place; I then struck him in the face; he then clapped his hand up to his face and said, you have done me; I then fastened both my hands to his collar, intending to drag him away towards Hammersmith after the others; as I had fast hold of him by the collar, he put up his right hand, and cut me across both the backs of my hands, as hard as he could press with his knife; I felt it very severely; I held him fast with my left hand, and let go with the right, with an intention to hit him; I hit at him two or three times; when I hit at him, I found I could make no impression, it was open handed, I could not clench my fist, I did not know the reason of it at the time; I hit at him and felt him cut me severely about the head; the first cut I think was about the lip, the next I think was in the temple, a stroke right down. I said to him, you villain, you have got a knife, you want to murder me; then said he, I will cut your b-y liver out. I thought then the case was dangerous, and I would put my hand to his collar and throw him down; in the mean time the blood flowed into my mouth, that I was almost smothered; I found myself weak, and called out murder, I was afraid I should not hold out. I heard a person spring his rattle, and then I found the knife stabbed into my mouth as far as it would go, for his hand came against my lips; I had still hold of him, I never let him go with my left hand till I had him down; he used a word too bad to express, and said, you b-r, let me go, or I will cut your b-y liver out. I caught hold of the knife with my two fingers and thumb, and snapped it two; I then pushed him back on the foot-path, and dragged him down on his back; he being higher then me he was like to get up, I took him by the legs, and dragged him beside the foot-path, and held him a short space to get a little breath, and get the blood out of my mouth, then a man of the name of Haynes came up, he did not know which part to take at first; I said I am Mr. Locke's man, this is the thief that has robbed the cart, and endeavoured to murder me; then Haynes dashed down upon him with his knee to keep him down, and he held him down; the other begged to let him get up, but Haynes refused, and said he should not till more assistance came.

Q. Then he was secured? - A. Yes.

Q. What were the wounds you received where the cuts were? - A. I received two cuts across my nose, one the right side of the tip of the nose, I had a cut across the gristle of the nose, towards the right eye; I had across the upper part of the cheek, from the eye to the nose, a cut across the upper part of the jaw, and a cut down the temple.

Q. Have you the use of your fingers? - A. The right hand is weak; two of the fingers of the left hand are quite dead.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q.Price went away after the first blow was given; he did not assist in the cutting? - A. No.

WILLIAM BROOKES sworn. - I am headboborough of the parish of Fulham: I was at the White-hart public-house, on the 27th of January, a little after eight in the evening, there was an alarm; the boy of the errand cart came in and said, that three men had cut a box from the errand cart, and that they were in Black-lion-lane. I went down the lane and saw two men in possession of a box, they had hold of it, it was bottom upwards; I asked how they came by the box, they said they found it, they supposed it was cut from some cart. I looked at the box, and turned round to the boy and said, is this your box? he said it was; seeing it broke in, I looked to see if there was any property in it; in the mean time the two men ran up the lane.

Q.The two men you saw with the box were the two prisoners? - A. Yes; the little boy set off after them, while I was looking at the box; as he got to the end of the lane, he holloaed out, stop thief. I immediately pursued them, they went towards Hammersmith; just opposite the four-mile stone I came up alongside Price; I saw a man whom I charged to aid and assist in the King's name, that turned out to be Pigeon. I immediately caught hold of Price with my left hand, and he struck me immediately; then he said, d-n - your eyes, come along, Jack; I turned my eye round, and saw a man spring out of the path to me, which proved to be Nowland.

Q. Had you seen him before? - A. Not from the time I saw him in Black-lion-lane; he immediately, as he sprang off the path, said, d-n your b-y eyes, we will do you both.

Q.That Nowland said? - A. Yes; Nowland and Price encountered me, and got me down under Price; then he sprang from me over to Pigeon, what passed after I cannot say.

Q.Was it light enough to see them? - A. Yes; the moon was not gone down, and there was snow on the ground, I could see fifty yards.

Q.Did you see him before he sprang on you? - A.No; there is a deep ditch behind the path; the path was not above three yards from me; I did not see him till charge was given to aid assist.

Q.You did not see Pigeon again till it was over?- A.No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. When you saw the men first, they were running away? - A. Yes, while I was looking at the box, I turned Price

over, and got him up, and was going to secure him to take him to the watch-house; he bit my hand, and got away from me; the boy and I pursued him, crying, stop thief; Millward, the bricklayer, stopped him by the Cock and Pye.

JAMES ABRAHAM SMITH sworn. - I work for John Francis , a carrier; I was going down Black Lion-lane, I saw three men with our box; Nowland was one of them.

Q. You are sure he is one of them? - A. Yes; I don't know either of the other two.

Q.Are you sure it was the same box? - A. Yes.

Q.And you are sure Nowland was one of the men? - A. Yes; I went to the public-house to give the alarm.

Q.Did you see any thing afterwards in the road? - A. I saw Nowland jump off the path; I saw him jumping; I did not see him before.

Q.Did you see him and Pigeon together? - A. No; I ran up against the rail.

CHARLES GROVER sworn. - I am a surgeon, and live at Hammersmith; I was sent to Pigeon at the White Hart; I found him having received a large cut on the right-hand and on the left-hand, across each hand; she cut on the right-hand had gone through the sinews of the little and ring fingers, in consequence of which he will probably never have the use of those fingers; the cut on the left-hand had cut one of the sinews, but not through it; there was a cut through the upper lip, which I was obliged to sew up; there was a cut on the top of the nose, and a cut on the bridge of the nose; it went slanting down by the side; there was a long and very deep cut on the left-side of the face, near the temple.

Q. Did the cut on the bridge of the nose fever it? - A.No; it was down the side, from the top along the gristle, and another cut across the cheek, from that these two joined in one; there was a cut over the left-eye, and under the left-eye there was a cut from the fore part to the back part of the head, and one across that. In that state I found him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The wounds on the fingers and hand and on the head were dreadful cuts? - A. Yes.

Q. That on the nose was a small cut? - A. Yes.

Nowland, NOT GUILTY .

Price, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030216-39

258. JAMES NOWLAND and JOHN PRICE were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a box, value 10s. 6d the property of James Dickinson , Edward Sage , William Rawden , and Francis Jennings .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of John Francis .

Third Count. The property of persons unknown.

ROB. PEARCE sworn. - I am servant to James Dickinson, Edward Sage , William Rawden, and Richard Jennings , Aldersgate-street; I delivered a box to James-Abraham Smith, servant to John Francis, of Chiswick; I saw the box afterwards at Bow-street, when the prisoners were examined.

JAMES-ABRAHAM SMITH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Francis, the carrier; I received a box from Pearce to take to Chiswick; I gave it to my master's nephew; I saw it about half an hour after at the Bell Savage, Ludgate-hill; it was put down there; we were loading goods; my master's nephew sent me on to Fleet-street; I saw it at Fleet-street; it was fastened with cords on the tail-ladder; I went with the cart as far as Kensington Palace; there I got down to deliver some goods to Lord Molesworth; he went on with the cart; I followed him, and as I was going down Black Lion-lane; I saw three men, one leaning on the box, the other two standing close to it.

Q. Do you know either of the men? - A. Yes, the man in the striped coat, Nowland; I asked them if they saw the cart go down the lane; they said, no; it is gone full gallop down the road; I said, thank you, and went to the White Hart to Mr. Brookes and Pigeon.

Q.Did you know the box when you saw it in the lane? - A. Yes; Brookes looked on the box, and I heard the men say, it has tumbled off a cart, and we found it.

Q. Who said that? - A.Nowland; they ran away, and I followed them, till I saw Brookes lay hold of Price, and the other jumped from the path; I then went away to the other side.

Court. Q. You are sure the box you saw in Fleet-street was the same? - A. Yes, I know the box, we have carried it so often.

Q. What time did you see the box in Black Lion-lane? - A. Near eight; it was light.

WILLIAM FRANCIS sworn. - I am nephew of John Francis .

Q. Do you remember the box delivered to you at Dickinson's? - A. Yes; I know the box; I tied it to the back of the cart; it was tied fast; I accompanied the cart to the Hampshire Hog, at Hammersmith; there I left the cart, and met it about half an hour after; Thomas Dalley was with it.

Q. Did you know what became of the box? - A.No, till the boy missed the box, and told me of it.

Q.Dalley went on with the cart, and you met the cart afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you miss the box then? - A. No, we did not miss it till we got almost to Chiswick.

WILLIAM BROOKES sworn. - There was an alarm given of a box being cut away by some people, and that they were in the lane with the box; I went down the lane, and as I was going

down one man passed me; I went a little further, and there was a box and two men with it; they said they had found the box, and supposed it had been cut from some cart; I made a reply, I dare say it is; I asked the boy if he knew it to be his; he said it was. I turned round to look at the box, and it was turned bottom upwards, and the middle broke in; while I was looking at the box, they both ran up the lane; the little boy was before me; he holloaed out, stop thief; at the top of the lane I came up with the boy, and we ran together; just as I came opposite the four mile stone, I came along-side Price; I was sure he was one of the men I saw in the lane; it was moon-light and starlight, and snow on the ground; I caught hold of him, and said, you are one of the thieves that cut the box off, and I immediately saw a man on the right-hand side, and charged him to aid and assist in the King's name, which proved to be Pigeon; as soon as I had got hold of him, he said, d-n your eyes, come along, Jack, and immediately a bit of tussle ensued, and I saw a man jump off the path, and he came to me and said, d-n your b-y eyes, we'll do you both; he came to Price's assistance, and fell upon me; and got me down; then immediately he flew over to Pigeon, and made a blow at him.

Q.When the other came to join him, did you know him again? - A. Yes.

Q.You can swear to him? - A. Yes; Francis has had the box, but I marked my name on it, and can swear to it. - (The box produced.)

Q.Is that the box you found in possession of these two men? - A. Yes, I can swear to it; I marked my name upon it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You don't mean to say Price was the other man you saw with the box; was it not Peter? - A. No, it was Price; I am sure of it.

Q.(To Pearce.) Is that the box you delivered to Francis? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Francis.) Is that the box delivered to you by Pearce? - A. Yes.

Price's defence. I was going to Hammersmith; I know nothing of the box.

Nowland did not say any thing in his defence.

Price called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Nowland, GUILTY , aged 19.

Price, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030216-40

259. JOHN SIBLEY was indicted for that he, on the 2d of February , an ewe lamb, value 28s. the property of Thomas Giddins , wilfully and feloniously did kill, with a feloniously intent to steal the whole carcase of the said lamb .

Second Count. For stealing the same lamb.

THOMAS GIDDINS sworn. - I am a wheelwright at South Mims; I rent a little land besides; I had a ewe lamb that I kept down in the field; I missed it on the 27th or 28th of January; I had seven or eight lambs in the whole; they were marked on the side with T.G. my name; I found the skin on Mims Common, adjoining to my ground, about a mile off; I knew it be my skin; I have sold it since to a neighbour, Thomas Stanley, a butcher, in the place; I found the skin on the 31st of January.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Can you tell from the skin whether it was an ewe or wether lamb? - A.No.

Q.You don't know whether it was a ewe or wether? - A.No.

THOMAS CHESTER sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner's house, and found a fore quarter of lamb, a leg, a blade-bone, and windpipe; I knew it belonged to an ewe lamb by the leg; the leg and quarter were behind an old bedstead up stairs; I asked him where he got it; he said, he found the leg, loin, and fore quarter; afterwards he said he found the whole sheep.

Q. Had you said any thing to induce him to tell you about it? - A.No; he said the windpipe belonged to a sheep's head he bought at Barnet; by the size I knew it to be a lamb.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You call them lambs under two years old? - A. No, under one year old.

Q. You have knowledge enough to distinguish whether it was a ewe or wether? - A.Certainly.

CHARLES ALLEN sworn. - I searched the prisoner's house with the last witness.

Q.Can you tell whether the joints belonged to a ewe lamb? - A. Yes, they did; he told us he had found the sheep, or a part of the sheep, in a sack, about two hundred yards from his own house; he first said he found a part of it, then the whole.

Prisoner's defence. I found this about six o'clock going to my work; they asked if it was a whole sheep; I said, no; besides, it had not the head on.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18030216-41

260. JOHN SIBLEY was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a sack, value 2s. the property of Archibald Paris .

THOMAS ARROWSMITH sworn. - I live with Mr. Archibald Paris , at Beach-hill, near Barnet; he is a merchant ; we are in the habit of losing many sacks; this sack was found when the prisoner's lodgings were searched; I don't know any thing of losing it.

THOMAS CHESTER sworn. - (Produces the sack.)

Arrowsmith. I know this to be Mr. Paris's sack, there is his mark upon it; I have the care of them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18030216-42

261. JOHN BROOKS and WILLIAM HORWOOD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , sixteen yards of lace, value 4l. the property of James Conrad Richman , privately in his shop .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Matthew Blowfield , and John Parkes , privately in their shop.

(The prisoners were taken to the Office, in Queen's-square, Westminster, on suspicion of stealing the lace, which was afterwards brought to the Office, by the Prosecutor, who did not appear.)

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030216-43

262. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , a seven shilling-piece , the monies of Richard Eland .

RICHARD ELAND sworn. - I am a butcher , No. 28, Cloth-fair : On Saturday, the 22d of January, near twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner and his wife came to my shop; one of them said, butcher, have you got a bit of mutton to sell, my man replied, yes; the prisoner went and took a piece of mutton off the hook, and said, what is this, my man said, nine-pence; he said, weigh it, it weighed two pounds two ounces, it came to one shilling and seven-pence; the woman threw down a guinea on the block; my man said, take it to my master, and he will give you change; the woman brought it to me, I took it and looked at it, and put my hand in my pocket, and took out two seven-shilling-pieces, and laid them on the ledge of the desk, they were both good, I had weighed them not five minutes before; I was going to give the rest of the change; before I got my hand out of my pocket, the prisoner said, my dear, you have no occasion to change, I have got change; the prisoner immediately comes up to the desk, and slings down one shilling and sixpence, and said, give me a penny; I said, how is that, it comes to a penny more than one shilling and sixpence, with that he slung down a penny, I took it up, and looked at it, and put my hand in my pocket, and took out the guinea, and gave the woman; at the time I was giving her the guinea, the prisoner took up my two seven-shilling-pieces off the ledge, and flings them down again upon my desk; he slung two out of his hand again, and then they both walked out of the shop; as soon as they had walked out, I took them off the desk, having no suspicion, and put them into my pocket, with four others, but they had all been weighed five minutes before; as soon as I had put them in my pocket, in consequence of something my man said, I pulled them all out again, I saw a counterfeit at the top as soon as I pulled them out.

Q. Are you quite sure, that that which you describe to be a counterfeit, had not been in your pocket before they came into the shop? - A. I am quite sure of it.

Q.How many seven-shilling-pieces had you, besides this? - A.Five good ones; I cried out to my man, Thomas, pursue them, they have done me; I put them all in my pocket, and went in pursuit of the prisoner; from some information I received, we found them in a gin-shop in the neighbourhood; I got there first, then my man, Thomas Dean , came in, and then Jones; I desired them to keep the door shut, that I wanted that man, meaning the prisoner; I laid hold of his collar, says I, you have been ringing the changes with me, he immediately replied, what I have done wrong, I will rectify; says he, let me look at them, I said, no; he said, you know nothing of me, I said, I will know before I let you go; we took him and the woman to the watch-house, and I gave him in charge to Anderson, the constable of the night; I told Anderson, they had been ringing the changes upon me; Anderson sent for the weights to weigh the six seven-shilling-pieces; I gave him the bad one first, and said, that is the counterfeit, he weighed it, and it was found a bad one, it would not weigh any thing at all hardly.

Q. Did you weigh the others? - A. I did, they were all good, I gave the bad one to Anderson.

Q. Are you perfectly sure, all you had in your pocket, when he came into the shop, were good?- A. Yes, I weighed them five minutes before; I attended before the Alderman, on Monday, he was committed for re-examination on the Wednesday.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You are a butcher? - A. Yes.

Q. Saturday is the busiest day you have? - A. Yes.

Q. A great many paid you gold, and received gold from you in change that day? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it customary, when you receive a seven-shilling-piece to weigh it? - A. I always weigh them as soon as I take them.

Q. How came you to weigh six seven-shilling-pieces together? - A. On Saturday afternoon, I put the money out of my pocket, at tea, and then I weighed the seven-shilling-pieces.

Court. Q. You weighed these seven-shilling-pieces twice? - A. Yes, when I took them, and when I took them out of the till, and put them in my pocket.

Mr. Alley. Q. How came you to weigh them?- A. I had nothing else to do.

Q. Where did you weigh them? - A. At my desk.

Q. You weighed them at the desk the first time?- A. Just so.

Q. Was Dean in the shop when you weighed them the second time? - A. I believe he was, he was hanging up the meat.

Q. Did he observe your weighing the seven-shilling-pieces? - A. That I cannot tell.

Q. Can you tell me what a seven-shilling-piece ought to weigh? - A. No.

Q. How can you swear then that it was not weight? - A. It was not weight by the balance we weigh seven-shilling-pieces with.

Q.What time did they come into your shop?- A. About twelve o'clock.

Q. Were there any other customers in the shop before? - A. Yes, they went out just as they came in, they gave me a seven-shilling-piece.

Q. Did you weigh the seven-shilling-piece those persons gave you, before you weighed the seven-shilling-piece you took of the prisoner? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did not you swear that it was five minutes before, that you weighed the six seven-shilling-pieces? - A. I weighed the five.

Q. Did not you say a while ago, that you weighed the six seven-shilling-pieces five minutes before, because you had nothing else to do? - A. I weighed the five.

Q. Did not you tell me you weighed the six, and this was the second time you weighed them?- A. I weighed the five I took out of the till, and then weighed the sixth.

Q. You saw the constable that night? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, did not you charge him, before the constable, with having stole two seven-shilling-pieces? - A. No; I said, I did not know till I weighed them, but there might be two; I cannot recollect what I told the constable, he took them and weighed them, and there was only one.

Q. I ask you, upon the oath you have taken, did not you charge the man with having stolen two seven-shilling-pieces? - A. I cannot recollect what I said to the constable, may be I might say two seven-shilling-pieces; I did not know till I weighed them.

Q. Did I understand you to say, you only weighed one, and therefore you did not know? - A. After the prisoner went out, I only weighed one in my shop.

Q. Where did you weigh the rest? - A. At the watch-house; the constable sent to my house for the weights.

Q. You said awhile ago, that a seven-shilling-piece was given you by the customer, just as the prisoner came in, had your servant gone out of the shop then? - A. No, he was there all the while.

Q. Did he say any thing about that seven-shilling-piece? - A. No, the woman that was with the prisoner, when I weighed the seven-shilling-piece I took of the other people, said, that was a good one.

Q. Have you never said, at any time, that you never weighed the money after the time that you weighed the six seven-shilling-pieces? - A. I weighed the five.

Q.Have not you said, that after you weighed all the seven-shilling-pieces in your pocket, no person came in before the prisoner? - A. No one came into the shop after the prisoner gave the seven-shilling-piece back.

Q. Did you not say, that no person came into your shop in the intrim, between your weighing the seven-shilling-pieces, till the prisoner came in? - A. Not after I took the seven-shilling-piece, there were two persons in the shop, when the prisoner and his wife came in.

Q. Had you marked the seven-shilling-pieces before you put them in your pocket? - A. Not at all.

Q. Did you know the dates? - A. No.

Q. You had no way of distinguishing them, but by the weight? - A. No, I always weigh every one I take.

Q. Your observation was drawn to the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. When you were attending to him, did you see him change either of the seven-shilling-pieces?- A. I saw him take up the seven-shilling-pieces, and throw them down again.

Q.Did you see him change either of them? - A. I did not know but they were my own two, when he slung them down.

Q. Did you see him change them? - A. I saw him take them up, and throw them down.

Court. Q.Did you see him change them or not? - A. I saw him take my two up, and saw him sling them down again.

Q. I must have an answer - did you or not see him change the money? - A. I did not know that he changed them, I certainly saw him change them; I did not see the change take place; I did not know what you meant by the question.

Mr. Alley. Q.Did not you say you saw him change them? - A. I saw him take them up, and sling them down.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-44

263. ABIJAH PENNY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , five china cups, two saucers, a sugar dish, a tea-pot stand, a spoon tray, and a bason, value 5s. the property of John Hoare .

Second Count. The property of Thomas Campigny and others.

Third Count. The property of Thomas Bunn , and others.

Fourth Count. The property of persons unknown.

JOHN SOWDEN sworn. - I am a Custom-house officer: On the 15th of November, I was stationed at the King's Cellar, Custom-house Quay ; I am put in charge of the cellar as under warehousekeeper; I examined some china, there were fifty-eight pieces; fifty-seven and one damaged; it was deposited in a back cellar adjoining to the place next to Sam's-passage, in Thames-street; there is no door into Sam's-passage, but there are two windows, iron bars on the outside, not glazed in the inside; there are two flaps called shutters; after I had examined the china, I left it on a shelf in two boxes. On the 20th of January I found one of the boxes standing upright, and one was turned down on one side; I left both standing upright; there were fourteen pieces missing, and some broke; I made a memorandum at the time of what was remaining.

Q. Who is the warehouse-keeper? - A. James Campigny; I act under him.

Q. Is he answerable for the property? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are responsible for it? - A. Yes.

Q. You had the charge of all these pieces that were missing? - A. Yes.

Q. And were answerable for them? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Campigny has the key of the warehouse? - A. Yes.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I am a constable; In consequence of an information, I went to the prisoner's house, I found five china cups, two saucers, a sugar-dish, a tea-pot stand, a spoon-tray, and a bason.

Q. Before you found these things, was there any conversation between you and the prisoner? - A. I told him, I came to seek for china; he said, he had got none, he had some Staffordshire ware, which he shewed me, in a corner cupboard; I desired Harding, the constable, who was with me, to get on a chair, and reach me a cup which I saw on the top of the cupboard; he gave it me down, and I said, search for more, this is the china I want; and he gave me down the different pieces; I had a pattern from the Custom-house warehouse, it matched that pattern; I told him, he must go along with me to the Custom-house; he said, with all his heart; he said, he had bought the china of Parsons, and gave him half a pint of gin for it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.This china was on the top of the cupboard? - A. Yes.

Q. Any body going into the room might see it?- A. Yes, if they went to that corner; the cupboard is in a corner behind a bed.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Which was the most visible, the Staffordshire ware or the china? - A. The Staffordshire ware. (The china produced).

JOHN HOARE sworn. - I am a shipwright.

Q. Had you any lot of china at the Custom-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that a part of the china that belongs to you? - A. It appears so to me from the pattern and the number of pieces; I believe this to be the number that belongs to the box, it was assigned to me by my son, from India.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp Q. Do you mean to swear to china? - A. I cannot swear to it, I think it is the pattern, and the same china, it corresponds in every respect with that left in the box.

GEORGE PARSONS sworn. - I am an Excise watchman; the prisoner was an Excise watchman; I was on the watch with the prisoner in Sam's-passage, in the latter end of November, I was at the upper end, and the prisoner at the lower end; I cannot recollect the day of the month or the day of the week, it was between the 25th of November and the 1st of December; Abijan Penny came to me between two and three o'clock in the morning, and asked me to lend him my stick, it is a stick with a hook; I asked him what he was going to do with it; he told me, he would tell me presently; I lent him my stick, and a short time after, he shewed me some china.

Q.What did he do with the stick? - A. He stooped down towards the warehouse window where the china was, he tied my stick to another stick which he had, it was a cellar window, I saw him put the sticks between the bars, I did not see him take any china out; I heard some china rattle, and heard some make a noise, as if breaking. A few minutes after, the prisoner shewed me some china cups and saucers, the cups had handles, they appeared like coffee cups, being dark, I could not observe the pattern; he told me, he had got it out of the warehouse, and pointed towards the cellar. I had a heavy charge of wine; he was relieved in the morning before me; when he was relieved, he told me he had got the china in his great-coat pocket, and pointed to his left side; he told me, he was going to Billingsgate, there was a fish cart going his way home, to Holborn, and he would take it home in that cart.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you come here in custody? - A. No.

Q. When did you give any account of this? - A. A few days after, when Grigg came into the passage, he belongs to the Excise watch; we got into conversation, and I mentioned about the china.

Q. Did not you forbear to mention it, because you expected yourself to be taken up, if it was known, and tried for it? - A. Yes, that was the reason.

Q. Did you ever give any intelligence of it till

you thought he would be taken up, and then you would be taken up, and tried for it? - A. No.

Q. It was for fear you should be tried? - A. Left any thing should happen.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was any enquiry made about the china before you told Grigg? - A. No.

Court. (To Hunter). Q. When was it you went to the prisoner's house? - A. On Tuesday, the 25th of January, between nine and ten o'clock.

JAMES CAMPIGNEY sworn. Q. Is this warehouse under your care? - A. Yes; the keys are lodged in my apartment.

Q. Do you know the value of this china? - A.About four or five shillings.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined one year in Newgate , and publicly whipped 100 yards .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-45

264. JOHN CONNOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a pocket-handkerchief, value 2s. 6d. the property of John-William Greace , privately from his person .

JOHN - WILLIAM GREACE sworn. - On the 15th of this month, about half past four o'clock, I was passing down Gracechurch-street in my way out of Town, a man passed me very rapidly, and exclaimed, sir, you have been robbed! almost at the same instant, about two yards before me, he seized the prisoner by the collar; I felt my pocket where my money was, and also where my handkerchief was, that was my coat pocket, I missed my pocket-handkerchief, my money was safe; I had not seen the handkerchief taken, nor had I seen or felt the prisoner at all, I was not conscious of it; I kept my eyes upon him, his breast was opened, and my pocket-handkerchief was between his skin and his shirt, under his arm; the officer desired him to submit, and go with him. I told the officer I should appear against him; I thought it my duty to the public. The officer kept the handkerchief, it was marked.

THOMAS SIMPSON sworn. - I am a constable: On Tuesday, the 15th, I observed this man in Cornhill; I followed him, about twenty minutes, in Cornhill, Bishopsgate-street, and Gracechurch-street; I saw him attempt several gentleman's pockets in Gracechurch-street, between Fenchurch-street and Eastcheap; I saw him very closely pursue this gentleman, who was walking arm in arm with another gentleman; I was on the right hand side of the way, and he on the left, going towards London-bridge; a post-chaise passed between him and me, the moment the post-chaise passed me, I saw the prisoner go by the gentleman as quick as he could; I thought the gentleman had lost something.

Q. You mean the prosecutor? - A. Yes. I ran, across the way, and took him by the collar, and said, stop! I said to Mr. Greace, I believe you have lost something.

Q. Did you see the prisoner do any thing? - A. I saw him do nothing but draw his hand out of his bosom, and run by the gentleman as fast as he could run; I thought he had picked the gentleman's pocket of something, because he passed him so quick. Mr. Greace felt in his pocket, and said, he had lost his handkerchief; I said to the prisoner, what you have got, give to me; he immediately put his right hand in his bosom under his arm, and brought out this handkerchief, it is a figured cotton handkerchief, I have kept it from that time to this. (Producing it).

Mr. Greace. This is my handkerchief, there is I.G. and No. 2; I have one of the same pattern in my pocket, I have had it about five weeks; I bought a dozen of them, they cost me at the rate of two shillings and seven pence each; I don't think it is diminished in it's value; I am certain I had it in my pocket at Lloyd's Coffee-house.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to work, going by this gentleman I picked up this handkerchief; I kept it in my left hand till I delivered it to the constable.

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing to the value of 10d.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-46

265. FORDYCE GOWLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , in the dwelling-house of James Sherwin , a bill of exchange, called a Bank-post bill, value 10l. a Bank-note, of the value of 10l. and another Banknote of the value of 5l. the property of Oliver Dowlin .

OLIVER DOWLIN sworn. - I lodge at Mr. Sherwin's, the Northumberland Coffee-house, in the Strand ; I came there, I think, on the 3d of September, and I did not lodge there after the 12th; I did not sleep there every night, I had a bed to myself.

Q. Did you give it up on the 12th? - A. I did not give it up, I left it; my portmanteau was there till after the 12th.

Q. What property was in the portmanteau that was missing afterwards? - A. One hundred and ten pounds, all in Bank-notes of different descriptions; I don't say certainly that the five-pound Bank-note was stole from me, because I passed some of them.

Q.Were there any other of the value of ten pounds? - A. Yes, two ten-pound Bank-notes.

Q.When had you seen them in your portmanteau last? - A. On Sunday, the 12th, they were in my portmanteau; I took out a five-pound note; the five-pound notes were in one bundle, and the others in another bundle; I did not open the bun

dle with the ten-pound notes, they were just as I had left them.

Q.When can you speak certainly that they were there? - A. I cannot say, they were just as I had folded them up, the portmanteau was locked. On the 12th, I took a five-pound note out, and locked it again.

Q.When did you examine the portmanteau again? - A. On Friday, the 17th, I went up to my room; it is a soft leather portmanteau. I went to unbuckle it, and found the chain run but half through, and the lock hanging to the staple, but not locked; it alarmed me a little, I knew somebody must have been at it; I put my hand in, and took out my pocket-book, the paper the notes were in was thrust into my pocket-book, and all the notes were gone.

Q. Have you seen any of the notes since? - A. Yes, they passed through the Bank; the Clerk of the Bank is here with them.

Q.Do you know the prisoner? - A. I never spoke to him; I understand he lodged in the next room, I don't know whether I have ever seen him in the house, I never spoke to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.What happened between the 12th and 17th, you know nothing about? - A. No.

Q. You did not unroll them to see if any of them were there? - A. No; they were folded up in the state I left them.

Court. Q.Did you know the numbers of them when they were in your portmanteau? - A. No, I did not know the numbers; I had a ten-pound Post-bill.

JAMES SHERWIN sworn. - I am master of the Northumberland Coffee-house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he a lodger in your house? - A. Yes, he has lodged at my house frequently; I have known him three years; he has frequented my house.

Q. Did he lodge with you in the month of September? - A. Yes, he was there on the 2d, and continued there till the 19th.

Q. How near did he lodge to the prosecutor? - A. In the adjoining apartment.

Q. The whole time? - A. The whole time.

Q. After the 12th, then Dowlin ceased to sleep in the house - was any other person put in that room? - A. No other person whatever; Mr. Dowlin sent for me, and told me he had lost the properly; I know nothing more myself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you any partner? - A.No.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes; I have none but my wife.

Q.None interested in the business? - A. No.

Q. There were several lodgers at your house? - A. Yes, I believe every room was occupied; I have ten rooms I let to gentlemen.

Q. You have some servants? - A. Yes.

Q. They have access to these rooms? - A. No, none but the chamber-maid and hair-dresser.

Q.The rooms are not kept locked in the daytime? - A.No, except the gentlemen desire it.

Prisoner. Q. How many bed-rooms are there on that floor? - A.Three; two rooms, single beds, and one double bedded; two persons occupied that room at that time; the prisoner's room, and Mr. Dowlin's were single beds.

Q. What number of days was Mr. Dowlin absent from your house? - A.He left my house the 12th of September, and did not return till the 17th.

Q. Before the 12th of September? - A. I can't exactly tell that.

Mr. Knapp. Q. From the 12th to the 17th, the chamber-maid and hair-dresser had access to those rooms? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any persons besides the chambermaid and hair-dresser, had access to any of the other rooms? - A. No.

Q. None of the doors were bolted or locked?- A. No.

Q. If any other lodgers had mistaken their room, they might have gone into this? - A. Yes.

Q.Whether, when Dowlin left the house, he said an thing of his property, or gave you charge of it? - A. No, if he had given me charge of it, I should have put it in another apartment.

RICHARD GALLEY sworn. - I live in Aldersgate-street, I am a linen-draper.

Q.Have you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. I have, on or about the 15th of September, he came to buy goods at my shop, he bought six pair of stockings.

Q. What was the price of them? - A.From twenty-seven shillings to thirty shillings; he paid me a Bank Post-Bill of ten pounds, I gave him change immediately; I believe it is in the possession of the Clerk of the Bank; I sent immediately to the Bank to see if it was right; when I sent it, he had purchased, in a quarter of an hour.

Q. Was there any thing written upon it before it went? - A.No, my brother, when he received the money at the Bank, wrote his name upon it, in was regularly indorsed, Bridges, Wilson, and Co. I did not recollect the name immediately.

Q. Is your brother here? - A.He is not.

Q. When the prisoner left you, did he take the goods with him? - A.No, he did not.

Q. You did not put your own name on it, or any indorsement, till after your brother took it to the Bank? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not know by whom it was indorsed till afterwards, when you were told? - A. No.

Q. He bought the goods, went away, had the

change, and came for the goods in a quarter of an hour? - A. Yes.

CHARLES RAVENHILL sworn. - I live in Beech-street, Barbican, I am a linen-draper.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. A person I believe to be the prisoner, called, and purchased some goods, on or about the 15th of September.

Q.What reason have you to believe it was the prisoner? - A.From my recollection; I believe he is the person, I don't undertake to be quite positive.

Q. You express a better, is that from the recollection of his person, or other circumstances? - A. He put his address on the note he gave me, a ten pound Bank-note to pay for some silk handkerchiefs, to the best of my recollection they were about seven shillings, or seven shillings and sixpence a piece, there were four of them; he produced that ten pound Bank-note, I gave him the change; the note was sent to our banker's, and from thence it went into the Bank.

Q. You have not the note now? - A.No, I wrote part of the address myself, and the person wrote the rest.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You don't mean to swear positively, that the prisoner was the man? - A.I can't swear positively.

Q. It was put with other Bank-notes, and went to the Banker's? - A. Yes.

Q. By whom? - A. I can't say whether I took them, or another person.

Q. You cannot be positive that you took it? - A. No.

CHRISTOPHER CARTER sworn. - The prisoner did lodge at my house in Windmill-street, Finsbury-square.

Q. When? - A. In November or December last; he left my lodging, and came and paid me.

Q.When did he come and pay you? - A. I cannot say; it might be in a week or a fortnight; he paid me with a 5l. Bank-note; I gave him the change, and he went about his business; I put my name and the prisoner's on the back of the bill, and the day of the month and the date of the year.

Q. Did the prisoner follow any business? - A. I believe he was something in the army; I don't know what; I don't know whether I paid the bill to the brewer or distiller.

EDWARD DUNNINGTON sworn. - I am clerk to Clarkett, Round, and Son, at Colchester: On the 20th of last July we gave change for a 200l. Bank-note belonging to Mr. Dowlin.

Q. Who did you receive the 200l. note from? - A. Martin Best ; he said it belonged to Dowlin; I gave one 20l. Bank-post bill, two 10l. Banknotes, one 10l. Bank-post bill, ten 5l. Bank-notes, and ten 10l. notes of our house, Colchester.

Q. Do you know the number of the 10l. Bankpost bill? - A. I don't exactly recollect it. -Looks at the entry.)

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was that made at the time?- A. Yes. Bank-post bill, Y, 1444, 19th of September, 1800.

Q. Did you put down to whom it was made payable? - A.No.

Q. That entry you made at the time you parted with the Bill? - A. Yes.

Q. Does it specify to whom you paid it - A. No.

Q.Are any of the bills dated November 28, 1799? - A. Yes, the number is 8027.

Q. Are any of the 5l. notes dated May, 1802?- A. Two are dated in May.

Q. What are the dates in May? - A. One 4279, the 14th of May.

Q. Do you know any thing else? - A. No.

MARTIN BEST sworn. - Q. Do you know the prosecutor Dowlin? - A. Yes.

Q. Where does he live? - A. I don't know now; I am an apprentice to Isaac Marsden, of Colchester; I received a note from Mr. Dowlin to get change the 10th of July, or thereabouts.

Q.What did you receive it for? - A.To go to Mr. Round's, the banker's, to get it changed.

Q. The house of Clarkett, Round, and Son?- A. Yes; I took it, and received the change of Mr. Dunnington.

Q. Did you take the numbers and dates? - A. No.

Q. What did you do with it? - A.I delivered it safe to Mr. Dowlin; when I gave the change to Mr. Dowlin, I asked him to see if it was right; he said, yes.

Q. The same notes? - A. Yes.

Q.How soon after did you give him the notes? A. In ten minutes.

Q. You had no opportunity to mix them with other notes? - A. No.

JAMES LUCAS sworn. - I am one of the clerks in the Accomptant's Office in the Bank.

Q. Have you any notes we are now enquiring about? - A. I have three, and a Bank-post bill of 10l.

Q. Are they all paid at the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. Does it appear when they were paid? - A. Not on the face of the bill; this is a Bank-post bill, Y, 1444; the date appears to me to be blotted out, 1800; exchange to Mess. Bridges and Co. regularly indorsed to them, as received from D. Galley, Aldersgate-street.

Q.At the Bank do you ever issue two Bankpost bills of the same number in the same year? - A. No; the same numbers may be in the same year, but not the same letter.

Q.Look at the 10l.? - A. It is in the year 1799, Nov. 28, 8027.

Q. Do you ever put the same number to Bank

notes In the same year? - A.No; there is an indorsement upon this note, Gowlan, Black Lion, Fleet-street.

Q. The 5l. note? - A.It is on the 14th of May, 1802, No. 4279.

Q. Is there any indorsement upon that? - A. Yes, several names, F. Gowlan and C. Carter, Sept. 15, 1802.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where did you get these notes from? - A.From the Library.

Q. Have they been in your possession ever since they were paid? - No.

Q. In whose possession have they been? - A. In the Library; they are put away in a box.

Q. Is the person here that received them? - A. He is not; they pass through a variety of hands into the Librarian's hand.

Q. Were they produced by you before the Justice? - A. No, they were not.

Q. Who produced them before the Justice? - A. The Librarian.

Q. He is not here? - A. No.

Court. Q. The Library is the proper place for the custody of them? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I observe it is not Dowlin? - A. No, Gowlan.

Q.(To Dowlin.) Did you receive from Martin Best the change for a 200l. note? - A. I did.

Q. Were all the notes in your portmanteau part of the change of that note? - A. They were.

Q. Had you not intermixed any others with them? - A. I had no other to mix with them.

Q. Are you sure you had not parted with the 10l. Bank-post bill at any time? - A. Yes, nor any of the 10l. Bank-notes. - (Looks at the 10l. post bill.)

Q. Is there nothing by which you can distinguish it? - A. No; I know I had a 10l. Bank-post bill.

Q. Nor any thing by which you can know the 10l. notes? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long had you left the property in the room unprotected? - A. From the 12th to the 17th.

Q.(To Galley.) Look at the 10l. Bank-post bill? - A. I can swear to my brother's hand-writing; I recollect it passed through the hands of Dorian and Co. Williams, Dorian and Co.

Q.(To Ravenhill.) Look at the 10l. Banknote; - A. Yes, Fleet-street is my hand-writing.

Q. What else is there? - A.Gowlan, Black Lion; that is the address stated at the time.

Q. Can you take upon you to swear that that is the bill you received for the handkerchiefs? - A. I can positively swear that that is the bill I gave change for.

Q.(To Carter.) Look at the 5l. note? - A. This is the note I gave change to the prisoner for.

Q. Was I correct in taking down the transaction as passing in November or December? - A. I made a mistake; it was in September, about the 15th.

Q. Are you sure that is the note you received from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Sherwin.) Look at the back of that note, have you ever seen the prisoner write? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever seen him write his name? - A. I cannot say I have ever seen him write his name; I have received letters from him.

Q. How many have you received? - A. Two; I recollect one from Canterbury, and the other from Windsor.

Q. Has he never said any thing to you about the contents of those letters? - A. No, only saying he had written to me.

Q. Did he say what about? - A. No.

Q.Can you form a belief whether the name of Gowlan is his hand-writing? - A. To the best of my belief it is.

Prisoner's defence. I was quarter-master in a regiment; I have been some years in the habit of having a good deal of money to pay away; I heard of the robbery that had been committed at the Northumberland Coffee-house; I remained five days after that; I went down into the country, and was absent six weeks; when I returned I was apprehended under suspicion of stealing the 110l. I was down in Scotland; I was apprehended there, and kept in Edinburgh jail three months; I petitioned, and by the assistance of Mr. Erskine got removed to London.

GUILTY , Death .

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, in consideration of his having served his King, and this probably being his first offence.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030216-47

266. JOHN BATCHELOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , 4lb. and two ounces of coffee, value 5s. the property of William Lingham .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of James Harris .

Third Count. The property of the Commissioners of the Excise .

Fourth Count. The property of persons unknown.

CHARLES CLARKE sworn. - I am an Excise inspector of imported liquors; it is my occasional duty to superintend the Excise and Custom-house lockers; On the 15th of January, about one o'clock, I went to Mr. Lingham's warehouse; it is situated in Thames-street , with an entrance from Bear-lane; there are sugars and a great quantity of coffee lodged there under the King's lock; the prisoner is a Custom-house locker ; I saw him and the rest of the lockers approach the top of the avenue leading from the warehouse to Bear-lane;

I desired them to return, for I wanted to go into the warehouse; they did return with apparent reluctance.

Q.How far was the prisoner from the warehouse? - A.About forty or fifty feet; they were retiring to dinner; the prisoner was coming in the direction from the warehouse; he had not reached the street; it is part of the premises, and at time considered as part of the warehouse; sugars are lodged there. One of the lockers opened the door, and I went in; the prisoner did not go in at that time; he ran up stairs into an higher story; I followed him, and brought him back, and after I had got them in the warehouse, I felt their cloaths, and discovered the prisoner and another had coffee about them; the prisoner had 4lb. two ounces secreted between the back and lining of his waistcoat, which communicated with his pockets; I took it from him; he assisted me; he listed it up, and it ran down into his pocket, which was the way he took it out; I asked him to inform me who were the receivers, but he did not; he said he had taken it out of the warehouse; that he had done it before, but that what he had taken was only for his family's use.

Q. Was the coffee found upon him of the same description as the coffee in Mr. Lingham's warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. It is impossible to miss so small a quantity?- A. Yes, it was clean raw coffee.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were very anxious to discover the depredators to get at the receivers, did you tell him it would be the better for him to tell who were the receivers? - A. No.

Q.Whether your object was to get at the receivers, and to admit this man an evidence against the receivers? - A. No.

Q.Have not these men little perquisites? - A. No.

Q. Are you quite sure that it was the prisoner that said, what you have stated, or a person of the name of Evans? - A.Evans said, he had never taken any before; the prisoner said, it is common for people to say, it is the first time, but I will not deny it, I have taken some before.

JAMES HARRIS sworn. - I was with the last witness; I saw Mr. Clark search the prisoner, he found some raw coffee in the back of his waistcoat; the prisoner said, that what he had taken, was for the use of his family; the constable has the coffee.

RICHARD HARDING sworn. - The coffee was given me by Mr. Clarke, at Mr. Lingham's warehouse.

Clarke. I delivered the coffee to Harding.

Q. It is impossible for you to swear that that is the identical coffee, taken out of the King's warehouse? - A. I cannot swear it.

Q.Is Mr. Lingham responsible for this property? - A. I cannot say; it is left under the King's lock.

Prisoner's defence. I seized the coffee in an unentered place out of the warehouse.

Q.(To Clarke.) This was under the key of the Commissioners of Excise? - A. Yes.

For the Prisoner.

CHARLES DUFF sworn. - I am a locker belonging to the Customs, and have been so seventeen years: I was on duty on the watch, on Saturday the 15th of January, attending the sugar-coopers, drawing some sugar; coming down from the half-story, behind the door, I observed some coffee concealed under some clover hay, I was going to the other side of the yard, I saw Batchelor, I told him there was some coffee concealed behind the door, and desired him to go and seize it.

Q.Did he do so? - A. Yes.

Q. Would that be the duty of a coffee-locker to do, if there was coffee concealed? - A.Certainly.

Q. Upon a seizure made by a locker, he is entitled to a part of it? - A. Yes.

Q. You was upon sugar, therefore it was not your duty to seize it? - A. Yes, I had a right as much as he, but I had not time to seize it, and referred it to Batchelor; I had three warehouses open at that time.

Q. Do you know the quantity behind the door?- A. No, it was laid open and covered with clover; I went to look for a piece of chalk, and put my hand upon it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Would it not have been a part of your duty to seize it? - A. Yes.

Q. Why did you not seize it? - A. I had not time, I had to look after the sugar.

Q.Is it customary for an officer, when he makes a seizure, to conceal it in his waistcoat? - A. That I did not see.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner? - A. I cannot say, I believe about eight months.

Q.When did you see him first, after he was charged with this? - A. I saw them when they came back, they called me up, they searched my pockets, and bid me go about my business.

Q. Had the prisoner been searched before you went away? - A. No.

Q. Did you give information to Mr. Clarke of the coffee behind the door? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. If you had not seen Batchelor, the coffee-locker, should not you have seized it yourself? - A. Yes.

Court. (To Clarke.) Q.Duff was not the other that coffee was found on? - A. No.

Q. Was he there while the prisoner was searched? - A. Yes, we called him up.

Q.Whether the prisoner, at the time, said any thing of this being a seizure, or did Duff say any thing of its being a seizure? - A. Not a word.

ROBERT POCK sworn. - I am a Custom-house locker; I was employed at the time this coffee was found.

Q. Did you ever hear that the coffee was secreted? - A. I did not see it secreted, I saw the prisoner in the warehouse, in the presence of Mr. Clarke, he was examined, he said, he did not wish to run away.

Q. Is it the duty of a locker to seize coffee, if found in an improper place? - A. Yes; I would seize coffee myself, if I found it.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. He was been there a year and a quarter; I believe he did his duty pretty well.

STEPHEN WILKINS sworn. - I am a locker at the Custom-house; I have known the prisoner ever since he came to the warehouse, fifteen or sixteen months; I was at the examination.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing? - A. No; I was there the whole time.

Q. If he had said any thing, you must have heard it? - A. Yes.

Q. It is the duty of a locker to seize coffee? - A.Certainly, if it was in an unentered place.

Q. If Batchelor seized any, he would be entitled to a part? - A. Yes, I believe, to a third.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-48

267. JOSEPH JEMMETT was indicted for forging, on the 14th of January, a promissory note , as follows:

"No. 1157. Suffolk and Essex Bank.

I promise to pay the bearer 5l. hire, or at Messrs. Barclay, Triton, and Company, Bankers, London.

Stowmarket, Signed George Brown .

With intent to defraud George Brown , James Crowe , and James-Goodeve Sparrow ."

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the said not as true, knowing it to be forged with the like intent.

Third and Fourth Counts. The same as the first and second, with intent to defraud William Porter .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN GIRTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an engraver, Little Newport-street: The prisoner came to me on the 3d of January, he pulled out his pocket-book, and from it took a letter, purporting to be an order to change their bankers; he gave me an order in writing, (producing it;) he put that into my hand, and said, they were going to change their bankers.

Q.Who? - A.Messrs. Crowe and Company, of the Suffolk and Essex Bank.

Q. Who did he say he was? - A. I cannot recollect what he said; in the course of conversation, he said, his brother was exceeding fond of prints, I suppose he meant Mr. Brown; I shewed him a work I was about to publish, Views of Paris.

Q. Did he say any thing more? - A.This little order I could not make out, this is the order he produced to me.

Q. He gave you that paper? - A. Yes, and told me to make an engraving from it.

Q. How many impressions did he order? - A. I did not print it.

Q. How many plates? - A. One plate.

Q. Was the plate to correspond with that paper?- A. Yes; there was a little part of the ornament I could not make out, he said, he would furnish me with one of the notes.

Q. When were you to get the plate ready by? - A. In a few days.

Q.Did you perform the order by getting the plate ready? - A. I said, I could do it in the course of a week; I got it ready in a week; he came in three or four days after, and said, they should not change their banker, and therefore I was to fill it up as the note was.

Q. Had you any more conversation then? - A. No; the prisoner went away, he gave me the note the first time.

Q. When he came the second time, did he give any direction about filling up the note? - A. Yes, as the old note, Barclay, Triton and Company; in about three days he called again.

Q. Had you compleated the plate then? - A. No; he called again in an hour, and it was done.

Q. Was the plate performed according to the order he had given you? - A. Yes, in every respect; I made him out a bill of parcels for the plate, in the name of Brown.

Q. What became of the plate? - A. He took it away with him; he gave me, I think, 2l. 5s. for it.

Q.Should you know the plate again? - A.Certainly.

Q. Was that all that passed? - A. Yes.

JOHN HAMMOND sworn. - I am a printer in St. Martin's-lane.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in January; on Monday, the 10th of January, he came into my shop, he appeared as if he had just come from the country, he had a couple of sporting dogs with him; he produced the plate, and told me, he wanted one hundred impressions taken from it as quick as possible; he told me, he must have them early the next morning, to take some of them to the Stamp-office, to get them stamped; he said, he wanted to send some of them out of town the next

day; he delivered the plate to me, to have the order executed.

Q.In consequence of this order, what did you do? - A. I cut the paper, and sent the paper and the plate to a man of the name of Prosser, that does piece work for me.

Q. Was the order executed by Prosser according to your direction? - A. Yes.

Q.When did you next see the prisoner? - A. The next morning, about eleven o'clock; he came into my shop, he looked at the notes, they were all spread upon my counters to dry, he found fault with them, and said, the paper was too thick.

Q. Had you the same plate back from Prosser?- A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner see it? - A. Yes; he complained the paper was too thick; he said, they were not worth a d - n, it had not the appearance of Bank-paper, that the people in the country would not look at it; he then told me I must print him another hundred from the same plate, and gave me directions where to go and buy proper sort of paper.

Q. Did you buy the paper according to his direction? - A. Yes, and sent them to Prosser to print, as I had done the former hundred.

Q. Was that order executed by Prosser? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - A.The same afternoon.

Q. Had you the second impression and the plate then? - A. Yes, they were spread out on the counter; he said, they would do very well; I made a parcel of them together with the plate, and gave them to him; he put them into his pocket, and paid me for them.

Q.What became of the first hundred? - A. He put them in his pocket when he ordered the second hundred.

Q. Are you quite sure the engraved plate you received from him, was the same you delivered back? - A. It is impossible for me to swear it, it had every appearance of being the same, it was out of my house in the hands of Prosser.

Court. Q. Did you know the prisoner before?- A. I never saw him in my life before.

Q. Are you confident he is the person? - A. I am confident of it.

THOMAS PROSSER sworn. - I am a copperplate printer, Tun-court, in the Strand.

Q. Did you receive any order from Hammond to make any impressions from an engraved plate?- A. I did.

Q. How many? - A.One hundred.

Q. Did you execute that order? - A. I did.

Q.What became of that plate and the one hundred impressions, when you had compleated the order? - A. I sent it by my son to Mr. Hammon's house; I received another order the following day.

Q. Did you execute that second order? - A. I did.

Q. Was that on the same sort of paper? - A. It was not.

Q. What sort of paper was that? - A. A much finer than the first hundred, I believe it is called Bank-post, I sent them to Mr. Hammond's house by my son.

Q. Was the plate you made the second hundred from the same as the first? - A. I believe it was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You sent them both by you son? - A. Yes.

Q. Who brought them? - A.Mr. Hammond's apprentice.

Q.Mr. Hammond's apprentice - both days? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take any notice of the plate? - A. I can't say that I did.

Q. Had you any other plate of that description?- A.None.

JEREMIAH BOKE sworn. - I am servant to a Mr. Porter, linen-draper, in Cranbourn-alley.

Q.Do you know the prisoner? - A.Perfectly well.

Q. Had you see him before this transaction? - A. I believe, half-a-dozen times before; he came to our shop, on Friday the 14th of January, to buy some goods.

Q. Did he make any purchase of goods? - A. He did, to the amount of 3l. 10s. for which he gave me a note of the Suffolk bank for 5l.

Q.Should you know the note if you saw it? - A. I took a note like this, I cannot swear to the note, as I made no mark; knowing the prisoner so perfectly well, I did not make any mark.

Q. Did you receive that day any other Suffolk not of 5l.? - A. No; nor any other country note.

Q. Did any thing pass between you and the prisoner concerning the note? - A. No; before he went away, not having change, I took the note up to Mr. Porter for change, and Mr. Porter gave me 1l. 10s. which was the difference, and I gave it to the prisoner; I left the note with Mr. Porter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You knew the prisoner before? - A. Yes; being a dashing-fellow, he generally came in a shooting-jacket, and a couple of dogs.

Court. Q. Had he two dogs with him then? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know what trade or business he was in? - A. No.

WILLIAM PORTER sworn. - I am a linendraper, in Cranbourn-alley: The last witness is my servant, I received a Suffolk and Essex Bank note of him, (looks at the note), in all respects like this; at the time he brought it to me I objected to it; I took particular notice of it.

Q. On that day, the 14th of January, did you take any other Suffolk and Essex note? - A. No other; nor had I any other country note in the house.

Q.What did you do with it? - A.Put it in an iron chest, where we keep our cash, and the next morning, Saturday, I took it, with other Bank of England notes, and cash, to Dorian's the Banker's.

Q. Do you know who you paid it to? - A. No.

Q. It was the same note you received from Boke?- A. Yes; I had no other country note whatever.

CHARLES ROWE sworn. - I am clerk to Mess. Dorians.

Q. Do you know Mr. Porter? - A.Very well.

Q. He cashes at your house? - A. He has for some years; On Saturday the 15th of January he paid me some cash, and Bank of England notes, and a country note.

Q. Do you know the note in any way but from the description in the book? - A. No.

Mr. Const. Q.Without the book you cannot say any thing about it? - A. No.

Q. If you had the book you could not tell that it was this identical Bank-note? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you receive any more country bank-notes from Porter but one? - A. No.

Mr. Const. Q. From the book you would not know what country bank-note it is? - A. No; I entered nothing but the sum and the drawer's name. - (The witness was sent for the book.)

THOMAS DICKINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Mess. Dorian.

Q. Did you receive any country bank-notes on Monday the 17th of January? - A. I received a 10l. and a 5l. on Barclay's house; what country bank it was I cannot say; I paid them into Barclay's house to John Lowes , and had a memorandum.

Q. Did you receive any other 5l. country banknote that day? - A. No, not on Barclay's house.

Q. Where did you receive it from? - A.From Mr. Rowe.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You have no recollection what it was? - A. No; I am positive they were both country bank notes; we don't take Bank of England notes to their house.

JOHN LOWES sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Barclays.

Q. Do you know the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember receiving from him any note? - A. Yes, the 17th of January, one 10l. and one 5l. this is the 5l. note I received; it is a Suffolk and Essex bank note, drawn by Crowe, Goodeve, Sparrow, and Brown.

Q. Did you receive any other note on the Suffolk and Essex bank that day? - A. Yes, but I put a mark on this after he was gone; I suspected it was forged, and I marked a note of Mossat's for 5l. that I suspected was forged.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - I am a Bow-street officer; I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday afternoon, the 19th of January, at No. 26, in Mercer's-street, Long-acre; he was at home at dinner; Mr. Brown, the prosecutor, accompanied me to the lodgings; Mr. Brown opened the door, and looked in, and said, there he is; I went into the room, and told him he was my prisoner; he then got up, and I began to search him, and in one of his waistcoat pockets I found a key that belonged to a black leather portmanteau trunk; when I opened it, I found these notes and this plate; I brought the trunk and the prisoner to the Office, and opened the trunk at the Office.

Q. With the key you took from the prisoner? - A. Yes, in the presence of the Magistrate; I went back, and brought away all his property; I have had them ever since.

Q. Was there any thing the prisoner said at any time that you recollect? - A. No, that I remember, he said nothing to me. - (The plate and notes produced.) - These seven are stamped and filled up, with the dates and the name; these are not; one parcel of them is thick, and the other thin paper; there are one hundred and fifty in the whole, including the seven.

Court. Q. Is it a fact that some of them are thicker paper than the others? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You took him away the first time you went? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. When you were first there you searched his pocket, and found a key; did you see the trunk then? - A.There was a great deal of rubbish; I did not observe the trunk.

Q. How soon did you go after he was at the Officer? - A. In about half an hour; there was a woman in the room; I believe he cohabited with her; she pointed out all the articles to me.

Q.(To Girton.) Look at the plate, is that the plate you furnished the prisoner with? - A. It is.

Q. You are quite certain of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the note? - A. This is an impression made from that plate.

Q. Was that plate made according to the direction in the order - do the plate and directions correspond? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Hammond.) Look at that plate? - A. I believe it to be the same.

Q. Did you give any direction for any thing to be struck off from that plate? - A. Yes two separate hundreds.

Q. Had you any other plate from the Suffolk bank from which you had any orders to strike off any impressions? - A. No.

Q.(To Prosser.) Look at the plate, is that the plate you received from Hammond to strike off any impressions? - A. I believe it to be the same.

Q. Look at those seven notes, do they appear to be struck off from that? - A. I believe they are.

Q. Look at them - one of the parcels? - A.

These appear to be the impressions first taken; they are the thick.

Q. Look at the other parcel? - A. I believe these were struck off that plate.

Q. Look at that bill, the bill in question? - A. I don't perceive any difference.

Q.Does that appear to be taken off the same plate? - A.Certainly.

Q. Did you strike off any notes for that bank before? - A.Never; I have for other banks.

Mr. Const. Q. Can you take upon you to swear that was taken from that plate? - A. I cannot take upon me to swear it was; it has every appearance of it.

Q. What is the difference between that and the others? - A. I cannot perceive any difference, only the impression is rather fainter; those done on a thicker paper appear stronger.

JAMES BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are brother to Mr. George Brown ? - A. Yes.

Q. Who is George Brown ? - A. He is a banker at Bury St. Edmund's.

Q. Do you know the names of the partnership?- A.Crowe, Sparrow, and Brown.

Q. Do you know their Christian names? - A. I believe James Crowe , Goodwin Sparrow, and George Brown .

Q. Do you know your brother's hand-writing?- A.Perfectly well.

Q. Is that signature your brother's hand-writing?- A. I think it is not.

Court. Q.According to your belief it is not?- A.According to my belief it is not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You have no concern in the house - A. No.

Q.You are not very conversant in the names of the partners? - A. No; James Crowe , Goodwin Sparrow, and George Brown , I believe.

Q. You are not very certain about the handwriting? - A. I know my brother's hand-writing; there is one letter strikingly unlike his writing.

Q.(To Lowe.) What is the firm of the house? - A. James Crowe , James Goodeve Sparrow , and George Brown .

Q.(To Lowe.) Read the entry of the note you received from Porter? - A.Barclay, Crowe, 5l. that is all the entry.

Q. Does there appear to be any other entry, Barclay and Crow, five pounds for that day? - A. no other.(The note was read.)

No. 1157. Suffolk and Essex Bank.

I promise to pay the bearer 5l. here or at Messrs. Barclay, Tritton and Company, bankers, London.

Stowmarket, signed George Brown, M.

Court. (To Brown.) Q. Do you yourself know any thing personally of the prisoner? - A. No, I do not.

Q. You have no personal concern in the Bank?- A.No.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Take those notes in your hand; is the name, George Brown , to those notes, your brother's hand-writing? - A. No; I think they are not.

Mr. Const. Q. Are you as equally clear about them as about the others? - A.Equally clear.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , Death , aged 29.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030216-49

268. JOHN GRIFFITHS and SAMPSON BERKS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , five guineas and a seven-shilling-piece, the monies of John Gafford , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Garrett .

JOHN GAFFORD sworn. - Thomas Garrett is a publican, at the Westminster-arms, Tothill-street : I slept there the last day in January, Griffiths slept in the same bed with me, and two other men in the same room; I have known Berks for four months past; Griffiths and I went to bed at twelve o'clock, and rose together at eight o'clock in the morning. I am a journeyman shoemaker; I had five guineas and three seven-shilling-pieces when I went to bed, I had not been at work, I had been at Norfolk, and had returned but four or five days before, I had not done any work; I got up in the morning and had my breakfast, with Griffiths and a sailor that was in the house, I paid one shilling and sixpence for the three breakfasts, I had my money then; I had a pint or two of porter, and some ale, between breakfast and dinner, the landlady dressed me some pork chops, which Griffiths took part of; after dinner Berks came in, and he partook of two or three pots of beer with Griffiths and me, then I left the room, this was about three o'clock; I happened to meet with a friend in the tap-room, he said he had no money, or we would have a pint together; I said, if he had no money I had, and would treat him; we had three pints together; I pulled out my pocketbook, with two seven-shilling-pieces and five guineas in gold; the two prisoners both came out of the room where I left them, and came into the tap-room, just as I pulled my money out, I took out a seven-shilling-piece to pay for what we had had, and Berks hit me a violent stroke on the wrist, and beat the two seven-shilling-pieces, and the five guineas, out of my hand; they fell upon the floor, and Berks stooped and took up a guinea, Griffiths gathered up four guineas, and one seven-shilling-piece, Griffiths gave it me into my hand; I laid it on the edge of the table, and said I had lost another seven-shilling-piece.

Q. Was this money knocked out of your hand in play? - A. The blow was so violent I could not think it in play, I felt the blow the next day; I told Berks he had got a guinea of my money, he

disowned having it; I desired him to strip, and be searched.

Q.Your friend was by at the time? - A. Yes; when he saw what they were about, he left the room.

Q. He was in the room when Berks struck your hand? - A. Yes; Berks pulled off some of his clothes, and said, when he was stripped he would give me a d-'d good basting; the landlord's maid, or daughter, brought me a candle to look for the seven-shilling-piece; it was a close box, I could not see well without a candle; I saw Griffiths take the four guineas and seven-shilling-piece off the table, I thought he was going to keep it safe for me, as he gave it me before, but he put it in his pocket; at that time Berks had got his clothes on again; Berks said to Griffiths let us brush, and they ran away out of the house.

Q. Did you say any thing to Griffiths that he had got your money? - A. Yes; I asked them both for my money, and they set off, they made me very little answer at all; I went to see for a constable, but did not find one immediately; I thought, as I knew Berks, and where he lodged, he would give me my money without a constable; I went to the house where they lodged, the Prince's-Head, Prince's-street; when I went they had changed their clothes, one had got on the other's great coat, and the other had got another great coat on; I asked them for my money, they had left me without a shilling to pay my reckoning or lodging; they went out of the house, I followed them, and asked them to give me my money, or some of it; they said if I followed them they would knock me down; I went and got an officer, Jones, and they were taken. I saw one of them at Marlborough-street on the Wednesday, and the other on Thursday.

Q. Did you get any of your money again? - A. I never got a farthing of it.

Q. You told us you had been drinking several pints of beer that day - were you sober? - A. The day before I was intoxicated, but the day I lost my money I was perfectly sober.

Q. Are you positively sure these are the two men?- A.These are the two men, and these only.

SUSANNAH GARRATT sworn. - I live at the Westminster-Arms, Tothill-street: The prisoner came the last day of January, and asked for a lodging, he had one, and staid the next day; about three o'clock he paid me for what he had had, and turned out of his pocket four or five guineas, I don't know which, and a seven-shilling-piece, he took it out of a little book; he dropped it at my bar-door, took it up, and went into the tap-room; in a very short time I heard a great noise, and sent my daughter to know what was the matter; she brought me word that he had lost his money; I heard Berks tell Gafford to fetch a constable, to search him for the guinea, I heard Gafford say he had a guinea; then they all left my house till eleven o'clock in the evening; then Griffiths knocked at the door, I went to see who it was, opened the door, and gave him a glass of brandy, he seemed to have been beat in the face; he said some villains had robbed him; paying for the brandy, he pulled out a little leather purse, in which I saw three guineas; he said to me, don't you know me; I said, no; he said I dined at your house this day off pork chops; I said to him, where is your friend; he said, he did not know; I said, he has been robbed in my tap-room; he said he did not know it, that he had been to buy a hat; I said, had you not better leave your money with me till the morning, as he was very much in liquor; he left three guineas in my hands, which he called for at seven o'clock in the morning, and I gave it him before witness.

WILLIAM BEATY sworn. - I assisted in apprehending the prisoners; I took them to the watch-house, and Gafford gave charge of them.

HENRY RICHARDSON sworn - I was coming past, in the scuffle, Berks dropped a guinea.

Q. Did you see him drop it? - A. No.

Griffiths's defence. The prosecutor came to our lodgings, and asked me to have some gin, which he shared out between me and himself, and two girls; he asked me if he could sleep with me; I told him, no, my bed was full, I could get a bed for him; I went and got him one, at the Westminster-arms, we lay there that night; the next morning we got up, and had some breakfast, we staid and dined there, there were some soldiers there and girls of the town; he had his pocket-book out, and people pushing about, pushed Berks against him, and knocked it out of his hand; I took up three guineas, and gave him; we went away, and at night we had a scuffle, and I dropped a guinea out of my pocket; I went and left three guineas in the landlady's hands, and fetched it next morning.

Berks's defence. I knew Griffiths was at the Westminster-arms; I went to him, and found Gafford in the tap-room, he desired me to wait a little, he said a pot of beer was coming, and drink before you go; by accident I hit his elbow, and knocked the money out of his hand; I begged his pardon, and said, let Griffiths pick it up; I did not stoop myself at all.

The prisoners, who were soldiers in the same regiment, called their serjeant, and two other witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Griffiths, GUILTY, aged 25.

Berks, GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing the money, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18030216-50

276. JOHN DEW was indicted for that he, on the 6th of January , in the King's Highway, upon George Millwood , with a certain pistol, did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his

person a purse, value 1d. and 5l. 18s. in monies numbered , the property of the said George.

GEORGE MILLWOOD sworn. - On the 6th of January, I was stopped on Ealing-common , on the Uxbridge-road, going towards Uxbridge, in a postchaise. About a quarter before ten o'clock in the morning, two men on horseback came up, with crape over their faces; they ordered the post-boy to stop, they met us.

Q. Did you hear one voice, or more? - A. One voice; he said, pull up; the boy did not immedidiately stop, and one of them fired.

Q. Did you see him fire? - A. I did not see him fire, but I heard the report; I did not see the flash.

Q. Did you see the person that fired? - A. No.

Q. You cannot say which way his hand was directed? - A. No; one came up to the chaise-door, and demanded my money, the other stood on the side of the horses; I threw out my purse.

Q. Did the man that demanded your money do any thing? - A. No; the one at the chaise-door held a pistol near me, they had each a brace of pistols; I threw my purse out at the window upon the ground, the one near the chaise dismounted, and picked up the purse; he mounted again, and wished us a good morning, and both went away together; it was near a cross-road, they went towards London.

Q. Who was in the chaise with you? - A. Two ladies.

Q. Both the men had crapes over their faces? -- A.Deep crapes over their faces.

Q. Did you observe the dress of either of them?- A. No.

Q. Did you observe the horses? - A. No.

Q. What was in the purse? - A.About five pounds eighteen shillings.

Q.You did not observe the persons of the men?- A. No.

Q. You don't know the prisoner was one? - A.No.

Q. Did you ever see your purse again? - A. No; we went on towards Uxbridge.

THOMAS BISHOP sworn. - On the 6th of January, I was driving Mr. Millwood, and two ladies, in a post-chaise; I saw two men riding immoderately fast towards me, with black crapes over their faces, one was a stout man, the other thinner, much of a height, apparently to me as they were on horseback; when they came up to me, the thinnest said, pull up, young man, I was going at the rate of seven miles an hour, and could not pull up so soon as they wished; the thinnest presented a short pistol to me, turned it to a different direction and discharged it; he turned it away from doing any mischief to the company or myself, or the horses, or the chaise; after that, the thinnest rode up to the off-side of the chaise, and said, your money, your money; the gentleman made answer, and said, I have thrown my purse out of the window, in the road, that was the right-side; the thinnest alighted and looked for the purse, and not finding it readily, he got warm in his temper; I looked round, and saw the purse at the toe of his right-foot, I pointed it out to him; he put his finger and thumb to the crape, listed it up, and took up the purse, and mounted his horse, and said, farewell.

Q. Where was the other man all the time? - A. Close by the side of me, he said, where is it, where is it, meaning the purse.

Q.Did you take any notice of the men or the horses? - A. I inspected minutely into the stoutest of the men, and imagined, if I saw him again, I should know him; the prisoner at the bar does not appear to be the man that stood at the side of me.

Q. What horse was the man on that stood next to you? - A. A dark chesnut horse; the thinnest was mounted on a bright bay horse.

Q. Did you take much notice of the thinnest, who came up to the chaise? - A. I saw no part of his face or flesh; I cannot take upon me to know him if I saw him.

JOHN DREWETT sworn. - I am an ostler, at Southall, on the Uxbridge-road; a gentleman came to me, on Thursday the 6th of January, I think, about eight o'clock, he was on foot; he asked me if Mr. Capel, the salesman was gone to Hounslow, or going; Mr. Capell always lies at our house on Wednesday, and goes on Thursday morning to Paddington market; I told him, I believed he was going to Paddington, his beasts were gone, and his sheep; I said, if he wanted any thing of Mr. Capell, he was in the ground; he said, he did not want any thing particular of him, and turned away, and went down the road again towards London.

Q.Should you know the man again if you saw him? - A. I don't know that I should.

Q. Is the prisoner at the bar the man? - A. He is like him, I cannot swear to him; I took a poney and rid round the pond, which is about one hundred yards from the house, to see if I could see him; there was another man riding a horse, and leading another, this man got on the horse, and they rid away together towards London; I did not see any more of them.

Q. How were they dressed? - A. The gentleman that came to me, had a brown great coat, and a red silk handkerchief tied round his neck, and his chin rather in; he had a pair of boots and spurs, and a little stick; I saw the ends of a brace of pistols he had in the inside pocket of his greatcoat, in his bosom; I did not observe any thing more.

Q.Should you know the man if you saw him?- A. No.

Q. Did Capell see these two men? - A. Yes;

he passed them both, before and after the men enquired for him.

Q.Did the man speak to him? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did you take notice of the horses the two men had? - A. No, I did not, I was not quite nigh enough to take notice of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. He asked if Capel was going to Hounslow? - A. Yes.

Q. How far is that from your house? - A. About three miles.

Court. Q. Does Capell sometimes go to Hounslow? - A. Yes, sometimes, he takes beasts to Hounslow, sometimes to Paddington.

JOHN FOX sworn. - On the 20th of January, I let out two horses, in the name of Nettlewell.

Q. Did you let out any before the 20th? - A. I let out two on the 6th of January; I was busy, and my son took the directions; I have no recolection of the men; the one was a chesnut, and the other a brown, they came home about three o'clock.

WILLIAM FOX sworn. - I am son of the last witness, I live with my father, at London-wall, he lets out horses; on the 5th of January, in the evening, two men came to me to hire two horses.

Q. Do you know either of them? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever let horses to them before? - A. No; one hired them, the other was with him; they wanted them for the next day; they gave a direction, Mr. Hawkes, No. 10, Chiswell-street; they came for them the next morning, about half after six o'clock, and went away immediately on the horses.

Q. Were they the same men? - A. Yes, they were both of them short men, and had darkish great-coats, and white handkerchiefs round their necks.

Q. Do you know whether they were booted? - A. I did not observe.

Q. What was the colour of the horses you let them? - A. The one a chesnut, the other a brown.

Q. Was the chesnut light or dark? - A.Rather a lightish colour.

Q. How was the brown? - A. A dark-brown.

Q. As you had seen them on the 5th, and the morning of the 6th, should you know them again?- A. Yes, the prisoner is not one of them.

Q. You let two horses on the 20th of January?- A. Yes.

Q. I am not enquiring respecting those two horses, but those on the 6th? - A. Yes, I understand so.

Q.When did the horses come in that were let on the 6th? - A.About three o'clock, I was not at home.

John Fox . I was in the yard when they came home, a boy brought them; they came home very well, not sweated, but fresh.

WILLIAM RENNISON sworn. - I live with Mr. Fox: On the 6th of January, in the morning, I saddled two horses, the one was a brown hogmane poney, the other a dark bay poney, a little higher than the other.

Q. Has your master a chesnut horse? - A.They might call the brown hogmane a chesnut.

Q. Is the other a dark bay, or a brown? - A. A dark bay.

Q. Do you know either of the men? - A. No.

Q. You did not take notice of their dress? - A. No.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I am an officer: I received an information, on the 20th of January, about twelve o'clock, that two highwaymen had rode into Liquorpond-street; I went there and was told they were gone into Gray's-inn-lane; I went, and found the prisoner in custody of my brother officer; we brought him down to the Office, and he was examined; Mr. Poole came after he was examined. The prisoner had this stick in his hand, I took it from him; I went to Mr. Fox, where he said, he had hired the horses; we took the horses into custody, and have kept them ever since; one is a chesnut horse with a cut mane, about thirteen hands and a half high, the other is a dark brown one.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - I searched the prisoner, I found a red silk handkerchief, a pair of spectacles, and a comb upon him.

JOHN POWER sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner in Guildford-street, on the 20th of January, he was on horseback; I took him and the horse, and gave them to the officer.

Q.(To Fox.) You let two horses on the 6th?- A. Yes.

Q. Did you let the same two on the 20th? - A.Yes, the name is entered as Nettlewell; they were quite different persons.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18030216-51

269. JOHN DEW was indicted for that he, on the 20th of January , in the King's highway, upon Charles Poole did make an assault with a certain pistol, putting him in fear, with intent the goods of the said Charles to take .(The indictment charged the assault to be with a pistol, but it appeared from the evidence to be with a small stick.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030216-52

270. MARY MACARTY , otherwise MACARTNEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , privately from the person of Francis Mason , a pocket-book, value 6s. a seven-shilling-piece, a Bank-note, value 1l. and another Bank-note, value 2l. his property.

FRANCIS MASON sworn. - I am a carman , and

live in Whitechapel: On Monday last, I had been spending the evening with two friends, in East-Smithfield, we parted about eleven or twelve o'clock; going home, I met the prisoner in Dock-street, I was rather intoxicated.

Q. What did the prisoner say to you? - A. I cannot remember.

Q. Did you speak to her first, or she to you? - A. I don't remember, we went to a house just by there.

Q. A public-house? - A. No; I had my pocketbook in my pocket, when I parted with my friends, I took it out to pay my share of the reckoning, we had some beer.

Q. How did you get supplied with that beer? - A. I don't know, and some gin; we were in a bed-room up stairs.

Q. Did you lie down on the bed while you were there? - A. I cannot remember.

Q. Do you know how long you staid there? - A. No; going home, I missed my money, I returned back to the same house where I thought I had been in, I knocked at the door.

Q. Did you get in? - A. No; I went home, and went again immediately with my wife, and a man that lives just by, that I called up, and the watchman.

Q. Did you get in then? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell what you had in your pocketbook when you left your friends? - A. A two pound note, and a one pound note, a seven-shilling-piece, and, I believe, two shillings. We endeavoured to find the person that I thought robbed me, but we could not; I saw the pocket-book at the Justices.

Q.Were there any notes in it at that time? - A. I cannot say.

JOHN GIBSON sworn. - I am a patrol, in Wapping: As I was going off my duty, on Tuesday, near seven o'clock, going by the Brown-bear, the prosecutor had a man with him, endeavouring to take this woman; I came to the public-house-door, the landlord of the house, I believe, pushed this woman out, and I took her into custody; the landlord said, he believed she had the man's money; I took her to the watch-house, and then to a public-house; the beadle took her into a private-room, I held her hands, and he put his hand down her bosom, and found under her arm this book, and a one pound note in it; Warner went to get the key of the watch-house; she wanted to go to the fire; I took her clothes, and a two pound note fell out, the servant-maid took it up; Warner has got them all.

ROBERT WARNER sworn. - I am beadle of St. John's, Wapping: On Tuesday morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I was called out of bed to take charge of the prisoner; the prosecutor said he had lost a pocket-book; I asked him what it contained, he told me a one pound Bank-note, a two Bank-note, a seven-shilling piece, and some memorandums; the prisoner was getting change of a shilling for some liquor; she pulled out a purse that contained some silver and halfpence; I got the servant-maid and patrol to go with me into a back-room to search her; I felt something under her arm, I desired the patrol to take hold of her arm, and hold it out; I put my hand in her bosom, and found this pocket-book, and a one-pound note upon it on the outside; I went for the key of the watch-house, and while I was gone, the two-pound note was found; I received it from the landlady; I have kept them ever since; there are memorandums in the pocket-book, with bills of work done, and his name to them.

Mason. I remember the two-pound note being torn in the middle as this is torn; I can swear to the papers and the pocket-book; some of the papers are my own hand-writing, and some other people's; they were in the pocket-book when I lost it.

Prisoner's defence. He dropped the pocket-book, I took it up, and wanted to go to him with it, but there was a drunken gang of people in the street, and I was afraid they would knock me down; I waited to give it to his wife, he was so drunk; he appointed a house to meet we with it; I went, and called for a shilling's-worth, and waited for him.

Q.(To Mason.) Had you any conversation with her? - A. I don't remember any.

Q.Did you make any appointment? - A. I don't believe I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18030216-53

271. ELIZABETH HOLLINGWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of William Adams .

WILLIAM ADAMS sworn. - I am a broker ; the prisoner is my servant , she had been with me four months: On the 1st of February, I received seven notes, six Bank-notes, and one country note; I put them into my pocket-book that night; there was no other with them when I went to-bed; I left my coat, as I always do in a morning, in my bed-room, with the pocket-book in the pocket; the next morning, Wednesday, when I took the notes out of my pocket-book, there were but five Bank-notes, and one country note; I did not take any notice to the prisoner that I had lost any note that morning. On Wednesday evening, I looked at my notes, there were five, four Bank-notes, one country note, and a five-pound Bank-note; when I went to put my coat on, on Thursday morning, I looked at my pocket-book the first thing I did when I went up after having my hair

dressed, which was about ten o'clock, I then missed another note; I came down, the prisoner was at breakfast in the kitchen; I said to Mrs. Adams, who was in the kitchen, you have not touched my pocket-book this morning; she said, no; I said, there is another note gone this morning, that makes two; the prisoner immediately said, if you have any suspicion of me, I have no objection to stand search; I told her I had very great reason to suspect her, and that confirmed my suspicion; I went for an officer; when he came, she said, she had no objection to his searching her, and if he thought fit, he might search her box; I desired the officer to search her box; he went up and searched it, and came down again; he said he had found no notes, but he had found five guineas in gold; he produced the guineas rolled up in an old pair of gloves; I asked her how she came by that money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had not you made some promise that you would be lenient to her? - A. None, at all; she said she had received them from her sister on Sunday night, to send into the country to her father to pay for nursing her sister's child; the sister living in the neighbourhood, I sent the officer for her, and asked her if she had given any money to her sister, and to what amount, on Sunday night.

Q. Was that in the presence of the prisoner? - A. No; I said I was not satisfied with the account of the five guineas, I would have her before a Magistrate; she then went down on her knees, and said, if I would forgive her, she would fetch me the notes; I asked her where they where; she said she would fetch them; she ran up stairs, and I followed her into my daughter's bed-room, and from between the two mattresses, the straw and wool mattress under the bed, she took out a handkerchief.

Q. Did she know you were in the room? - A. Yes, and the constable with me; she took out the handkerchief, which contained several other articles, among the rest, a small purse, which contained two notes; the constable has the notes in his possession, with some other articles.

Q. As a gentleman, you would not have taken a girl without a character? - A.Certainly not.

Q. How many notes did you miss? - A. Two, one on the Tuesday, and one on Wednesday.

Q. It is impossible for you to remember the numbers of the notes? - A.Certainly.

Q. When had you seen that note before? - A. The same morning.

Q. There were five guineas in her box? - A. Yes; when she said the constable might search her box, I asked if she had any money or notes in the box; she said, none at all.

Q. The five guineas were given her by her sister to send in the country? - A. Yes.

JOHN BRIDGE sworn. - I am a surgeon; Mr. Adams wrote to me, telling me of his loss, and asking me if I knew the number of the notes; I saw them the Saturday after it happened, before the Magistrate at Guildhall, and knew the numbers of them when I saw them.

Q. Where does the prosecutor live? - A. In Fore-street; the number of one of them was 18886, a Bank of England note, of the name of James Wright .

Q. When did you deliver this note to the prosecutor? - A. The 1st of February, in the afternoon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. From the number of notes that go through your hands, it is impossible to remember the number of any particular note? - A. No; the number of this note was entered on a slate, and afterwards in a memorandum book.

Q. When did you make the entry? - A. The 1st of February.

Court. Q. Did you make the entry before you delivered it to the prosecutor? - A.Before I left home; I live at Orset, in Essex, twenty-four miles from London; I copied it into my memorandum book that afternoon, prior to my hearing of the note being lost.

WILLIAM KING sworn. - I am a constable: Mr. Adams came for me, I went to his house; I searched the prisoner to see if I could find any notes, I found none; searching her box, I found five guineas in a pair of gloves; I have the notes, I received them from the prisoner tied up in this handkerchief; there are two one-pound notes in a leather pocket-book, half-a-guinea, and two shillings and five-pence halfpenny. (The notes produced.)

Bridge. This is the note, No. 18886.

Adams. That is one of the notes the girl brought down.

Q.Is there any thing about that note you can speak to? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. Can you undertake to say which note was taken on one day, and which on the other? - A.Certainly not.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-54

272. JOHN RUFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a silk purse, value 4s. a guinea, a half-guinea, one seven-shilling piece, the monies of Christiana Jones , widow ; and one Bank-note, value 1l. the property of the said Christiana Jones .

CHRISTIANA JONES sworn. - I am a widow; I live at Deptford, in Kent: On Tuesday, the 1st of this month, about eleven o'clock, I got out of the Deptford coach, at the corner of Lombard-street ; I paid the coachman, and was putting my

purse into my left-hand pocket, I felt it drawn from me, I turned round that instant, and saw the prisoner with it in his hand; I laid hold of his arm, and exclaimed, this man has got my purse, a gentleman, of the name of Dawson, crossed the way, and laid hold of his arm; the prisoner had got a guinea and a half out of it, it was a silk purse, he undrew it pulling it out of my hand, the seven-shilling-piece and Bank-note remained in the purse; I got my purse again from the witness, he was stopped, and a constable came up that instant.

THOMAS-WILLIAM DAWSON sworn. - I am shopman to Messrs. Dawson and Bryants, Cheapside; I was crossing the way to Lombard-street, on the 1st of February, I heard the lady say, this man has got my purse, I immediately looked round, and saw the prisoner with the purse in his hand, I took him by the collar; in giving the purse to Mrs. Jones, a guinea rolled out of it, and it ran on the ground before him, as he was going away, the prisoner took it up.

Q.Do you know any thing of a half-guinea? - A. I did not see a half-guinea; I took him again, and told him he had got the guinea, he denied it positively; I still kept hold of him with a great deal to do, he gave me the guinea out of his mouth, I returned it and the purse to Mrs. Jones.

Mrs. Jones. The half-guinea, I suppose, was dropped, I never found it, I am sure it was in my purse at nine o'clock, I had not used my purse afterwards.

WILLIAM WOOD sworn. - I am a constable, I saw something of a stir the corner of Lombard-street; I crossed the way, and the last witness had hold of the prisoner, he asked if I was an officer, I said, yes; the prisoner wanted to evade being taken, but I kept hold of him, and took him to the Compter; I found upon him nine penny-pieces, and a knife.

Prisoners defence. Going along the street, I found this purse, I heard the lady call out, I have lost my purse, and I immediately gave it into her hand; I saw a guinea roll along the ground, I took it up, and gave it her immediately.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-55

273. REBECCA MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , two yards of dimity, value 3s. one yard of calico, value 1s. one other yard of calico, value 1s. one other yard of calico, value 1s. six yards of cambric muslin, value 7s. and three other yards of cambric muslin, value 4s. the property of James Hartwell , and William Beaman .

JAMES HARTWELL sworn. - I am in partnership with William Beaman ; the prisoner lived in my service a year and a quarter, in consequence of some suspicion of the prisoner, on the 26th of January, I went for Alderman, the constable, and took him into the dining-room, and rang for the prisoner to come up; I said, Rebecca, I have strong reasons for believing you have been robbing me and my partner; she said, what me, sir, and coloured very much; I had missed some property, in consequence of taking stock that morning; the constable searched her pockets in my presence, and found the key of her box, and some money; the officer then desired to open her box, she went up stairs with him, with some reluctance; the box was opened in her presence, and there were found in it two different remnants of calico, a yard each, and a remnant of dimity, two yards, and one remnant of cambric muslin, about six yards afterwards, in a closet, in her bed-room; there was a bag belong ing to her, in which there was another remnant of calico, about a yard, and another remnant of cambric muslin, about three or four yards; I asked her how she came by them, she said, she had some long before she came to me, that she bought them in Yorkshire, and elsewhere; I can speak to the cambric muslin, when we took stock, we missed a piece of that kind, twelve yards, it is a very particular piece, we never had but four pieces of that sort, it has our own private mark, they are in the constable's possession; in a housewife of the prisoner's, we found a key which fitted the lock of the box, in which we kept the keys of the warehouse; when we found the key of her box, she said, she had no other key; I told her, I was certain she had; she went down stairs, the officer and myself followed her into the kitchen, she found this housewife, and took out the key; that box which held the keys was taken up stairs every night in case of fire, and put in a closet; the officer then took her to the Compter.

EDWARD ALDERMAN sworn. - I am a constable: On the 26th of January, I was sent for to Mr. Hartwell's, I searched the prisoner, and found a key which opened her box; I opened the box in her presence, and found a piece of muslin, and the other articles I have with me; she was asked by Mr. Beaman, who was present, if she had any other key, she said, she had no other key; in consequence of which, when we came into the kitchen, I said, it would give me less trouble, if she would produce the key that Mr. Hartwell said she had; she then opened a drawer, and took out a housewife, and took a key out of it, which opened Mr. Hartwell's box, Mr. Hartwell said, that is the key, I tried it, it opened the box very easily. (The key and the things mentioned in the indictment were produced.)

Q.(To Hartwell.) As this is a common key, how came you to hunt after such a key? - A. In consequence of some information I had received,(looks at the things;) this is a part of the 9-8ths

muslin we missed, on taking our stock; it has the No. 12 on it in a kind of buff-coloured thread, and No. 13 in a pencil mark, with our private mark, LIW, in my partner's hand-writing, it is a plain cambric muslin; the remnant of dimity was torn off a piece which I have in Court, I have no doubt of its being our property; we never sell any retail; we never cut any thing.

Q.She could not have bought this of you? - A.Never.

WILLIAM BEAMAN sworn. - That is my handwriting on the muslin.

Prisoner's defence. What I had in my box, I bought and paid honestly for; if there was any thing in my box not mine, I did not put it there.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-56

274. WILLIAM OAKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , 64lb. of mutton, value 40s. the property of William Harper .

WILLIAM HARPER sworn. - I am a butcher , I keep a shop in Shoreditch : On the 24th of January, the mutton was hanging on the hook at the door; I was informed the prisoner had taken it off the hook, I was not at home at the time; when I came in, I saw the prisoner and the witness in the shop, and the mutton lying on the block; I knew it to be mine; I saw the sheep hanging at the door when I went out; it was a whole carcase; I missed it as soon as I came to the door.

WALTER WHITEHEAD sworn. - On Monday evening, the 24th of January, coming along Shoreditch, I saw the prisoner, with the sheep, lodged up against the next house, putting it on his shoulder; I laid hold of him, and asked him where he was going with it; he said he was going home with it; I told him I though it belonged to Mr. Harper, and took hold of him, and took him into the shop with the sheep, and then I sent for Mr. Harper; he came and claimed it, and gave charge of him; I saw it hanging at the door about ten minutes before the prisoner took it.

RICHARD TAYLOR sworn. - I am a weaver: Coming by at the time, I saw the carcase of mutton on the prisoner's back, about three yards from Mr. Harper's door; Whitehead had stopped him before I came up; we took him into the shop; it was laid on the block; Mr. Harper came, and claimed it.

Prisoner's defence. I was having a pint of beer in the Gun ale-house; a gentleman came in, and asked who would carry a load for him to Cock-lane; he gave me a shilling and a glass of brandy, and went with me, and put it on my back, and desired me to carry it to Cock-lane.

Whitehead. There was nobody near him at the time.

GUILTY , aged 67.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-57

275. SAMUEL HADWICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , 19lb., of cheese, value 9s. the property of George Reaves .(By an error in the indictment, the prosecutor was called Reaves, instead of Rice.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-58

276. JOHN SHERRIFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , 14lb. of cork, value 7s. the property of John Bidgood , and William Brown .

THOMAS LOWTHER sworn. - I am a winecooper, I know John Bidgood and William Brown, cork-cutters , in Swallow-street : On Thursday night, the 31st of January, about nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing at their door, I stopped, and he ran across the way; I went about two doors off, and heard some one whistle, the prisoner then went to Mr. Bidgood's door, and brought away this parcel of cork, he went up Swallow-street, and turned into King-street, I followed him, and stopped him, he had the cork in his hand; I asked him where he had got it, he answered, he had bought it at Westminster.

Q.Where did you first see it upon him? - A. I saw him come from the door with it, it was given out to him by the apprentice, who has since absconded; I told him, that he had not got the cork at Westminster, that he should go back with me; coming along, I asked him if he knew Mr. Bidgood and Browns, he said, he did; I said, he had got it from there, he acknowledged he had; I took him into the shop of Bidgood and Brown, and he was given in charge to the watch.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - John Bidgood is my partner: On the 31st of January, a little after nine in the evening, the prisoner was brought into our house by the last witness, with the cork, he informed me he had caught the prisoner, taking cork away from our door, that he followed him into King's-street, took him into custody, and brought him to our house.

Q. Did he say this in the hearing of the prisoner? - A. Yes; I ordered the watchman to take him away to the watch-house; we had an apprentice in the house, James Withy, brother-in-law of the prisoner; James Withy shut up the shop, and was the last person in the shop, after the men were gone, my suspicions fell upon him, I asked him, if he knew any thing of that cork.

Q.Was that in the presence of the prisoner?- A. No.

Court. Then I can't hear it.

Brown. I then sent the apprentice likewise to the watch-house, and went to the watch-house, and gave charge of the prisoner and the apprentice; the apprentice has since run away from our house, he was examined by the Magistrate.

JOHN CONWAY sworn. - I attended the Magistrate.

Q. Was what passed taken down in writing? - A. Yes, the last day; I don't know, whether it was taken down at the first examination or not.

Q.(To Brown.) What passed at the first examination? - A. Mr. Brody ordered me to take back the apprentice, that he might be brought forward as an evidence against the prisoner; accordingly I did, and about two days after, he ran away, and took his clothes; we have advertised him, but have heard nothing of him since; Lowther has had the cork in his custody ever since. (Lowther produced the cork.)

Q.(To Brown.) Can you swear that to be your cork? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Did you miss any cork at that time? - A. Yes, about that quantity, the man informed me what state he left the cork in.

JOHN CONWAY sworn. - I am journeyman in the house of Bidgood and Brown; I cannot swear to the cork further than missing about this quantity; when I came to work in the morning, my master asked me if I knew how I left the cork, I told him, yes, I left it piled up behind me; when I came up stairs the cork was scattered about the shop.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the cork in the street, there was no person near, it was twenty yards from the door.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-59

277. RICHARD DAVIS and THOMAS DUNN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Johnson , on the 25th of January , about two in the night, and stealing three bridles, value 10s. three halters, value 1s. one pair of back bands, value 5s. two strap irons and leathers, value 2s. two pair of chaise harness and tugs, value 8s. two iron back pins, value 2s. three ferrets, value 3s. an iron lock, value 6d. seven chains, value 18d. a pair of snuffers, value 1d. a pair of spurs, value 6d. five hens, value 5s. a cock, value 1s. and a basket, value 1d. the property of the said John Johnson .

JOHN JOHNSON sworn. - I am a house-keeper, at St. Matthew's, Bethnal-green , I let out carts; my stable and accompting-house were broke open, they are facing the dwelling-house, it is all inclosed in a yard, nobody has access to it but me: On the 26th of January, about five o'clock in the morning, my man called me, and told me he had caught a thief in the yard, I got up and went down, he had him in the stable.

WILLIAM KINGSLAND sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Johnson, I live opposite the gates; coming out of my house, I heard chains, and the backbands rattle in the yard, it was as dark as it could be, I had a lantern; going to the stable about five o'clock, as near as could be, I asked who was there, two or three times, and received no answer; I was going to Stratford, for my master, and thought he had sent somebody else; I went round to the stable, and saw the accompting-house broke open; going into the stable, I found the back stable door broke open, I went into the yard, and heard the chains gingle still; I followed the found of the chains, and by the lantern, I had a glimpse of two men; I asked Davis what he wanted there, he asked who I was, and what I wanted, and said, if I came any further, I was a dead man, he would run me through; I took up a stone, and threw it at him, and hit him on his bank; I believe I took him with the iron back bands, the other got away; I called my master up, and he desired I would take him away to the watch-house, when I came to the watch-house, the watchman was gone; I called Griffiths the officer up, and delivered him to him; they had undone the gates to get at the wicket, which was latched, they came over the wall, or some place to unbolt the gates; Davis said, they were going to sell the things to a lusty woman in Cabell-street; Griffiths and I went there, and took the other prisoner with the fowls and other things upon him.

Q.(To Johnson.) How was your place broke open? - A. I don't know, only undoing the latches.

Q.How did they get into the yard? - A.Through the gates, they were all open, as my man told me; the desk in the accompting-house, which was locked, was broke open.

Q.Who was last in the yard that night? - A. I cannot tell, sometimes one, and sometimes another of the men are last.

Kingsland. I was the last that fastened the gates; I went with the team, I fastened the stable, I bolted the gates, and went out at the little front gate, about eight or nine o'clock.

Q. Are you sure no one went in afterwards? - A. That I cannot say.

Q.How could they unbolt the gates? - A. They They got over the wall, I suppose; the back gates come to the back part, and the front gates into the fore part.

Q. Are your fellow-servants here? - A.No.

Q.Might not they come in after that? - A. No, I always see them out.

Q.(To Johnson.) Suppose I was to come to your house, I could come in at that gate? - A. Not without ringing, unless you know how to open the gate.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer, I had the things delivered to me, iron back-bands, and different things I don't know the name of, this was between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I was called out of bed; after that, I left Davis with Kingsland, and went after the other prisoner to a house in Rosemary-lane, to Fishwick's, an iron shop, there we found five hens and a cock, dead, and a number of things; Dunn was there; I asked him, if he had sold these things to Fishwick, he said, no; I asked him what time they broke open this place, he said, about two o'clock; that he was concerned with others; he came away with these things, and they were to come to him, but he had not seen them; I found different things in Dunn's pocket, Mr. Johnson's property.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I have three bridles, three white leather halters, a martindale, a pair of back straps, and some reins, two pair of harness, with tugs to them; he said, he had not sold them, the others were to come and fell them.

Mr. Johnson. I can swear to all the things, except the back-bands, those I have not so much to do with, they are in the hands of my servants; these papers are mine, they were in my desk.

Kingsland. The back-bands are under my care, they are Mr. Johnson's property.

Davis's defence. He charges me with taking these back-bands, I had not them, they were in the field.

Kingsland. I took him with them on his shoulder.

Dunn did not say any thing in his defence.

Davis, GUILTY, aged 39.

Dunn, GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing the things, but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-60

278. JOHN JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , 6lb. of copper, value 5s. the property of William Blair .

JOHN RUMLEY sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. William Blair, a Gravesend waterman : On Sunday evening, the 23d of January, as I lay in the cabin, between six and seven o'clock, I heard a terrible rummage on deck, which I supposed to be the chimney funnel, I ran up on deck, and saw John Jacobs, with the funnel in his hand, going to make his escape with it, when I spoke to him, he let it fall down again; I saw the funnel on the stove, about three quarters of an hour before, when I put the fire out; I heard it taken off; I asked him what he wanted with that funnel, he said, he wanted a Gravesend boat; I said he should not go on shore; he said, if I stopped him he would prosecute me for detaining him; the vessel lay the third from Billingsgate platform; he went on shore; I and another lad followed him, and took him in Darkhouse-lane; I called Mr. Smith to our assistance, and he took him to the Compter; I gave the funnel to Mr. Smith.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am merchants' watchman: On the 23d of January the last witness and another lad brought the prisoner up to the Dark-house public-house; I took him into custody, and took him to the Compter; I went afterwards to see if the funnel fitted the place; I received it from Lumley; I found it fitted the other joint exactly; Mr. Hunter had it of me.(John Hunter, a constable, produced the funnel.)

Lumley. That is the funnel I saw in the hand of the prisoner, it is copper, and worth about five shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I went on board to enquire after a boat for a gentleman; a man came and said, what are you doing, you d-d rascal, you want to steal something; Lumley came on deck, and said, what are you doing with that funnel? I said, I was doing nothing with it; he said, you lie, you d-d rascal, I will take care of you; I never did a bad thing in my life.

Q.(To Lumley.) Did this vessel belong to Mr. Blair? - A. He is the master of it, not the owner, but he is accountable for every thing in it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-61

279. WILLIAM CLIMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , a wooden chest, value 10s. a bed, value 10s. two blankets, value 10s. a pillow case, value 2s. four pair of worsted stockings, value 4s. eight books, value 6s. a razor strop, value 2d. three razors, value 3s. and a fan, value 2s. the property of John Smith , in the dwelling-house of John Hoddy .

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a seaman ; I was paid off the 24th of January at Chatham; I came up with the coach to Gravesend, and came to London in the King George Gravesend boat; I arrived about two, or between two and three in the morning at Billingsgate; my wife was with me; I had a large bag and a chest; I employed a porter to carry the chest, and took the bag upon my shoulder; I told him to go to the first house he came to, as I was very much fatigued, and he went into the Queen's Head, Darkhouse-lane ; when we got into the house, the prisoner was very officious unloading the porter with the chest; the chest was placed in the tap-room; the prisoner helped the porter to carry it in; I kept the bag in my hand; John Carter , whom I took to be the landlord, was in the bar with a woman;

I desired him to take care of my chest; the prisoner came along-side me, and said, take care not to let any body have the chest but me or him; I said, what do you mean by that, the chest does not belong to you, and I said to Carter, take care of the chest, what is in it belongs to me, it was all my property, and if he lost it I would make him he answerable for it; I said I hoped the chest would be safe; the prisoner said, if there was gold in it it would be safe; I had got the bag in my hand at the bar; I kept it in my hand; my wife tied her pattens round it as a token; it was our bag, and it was put in the store-room; I went into the parlour, and had some porter; I put my coat under my head, and fell asleep; my wife waked me, and recommended me to have some tea to refresh me.

Q.When did you see the chest again? - A. About an hour after I awoke; there was a card with a direction nailed on the side, that was torn off; it was directed, John Smith, to be left till called for.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You came to town on the 24th? - A. Yes.

Q. The chest was marked that you could know it again? - A. Yes.

Q. You know nothing about the prisoner, he was a stranger to you? - A. Yes; he was very officious.

Q.Because he assisted you, you call him officious? - A. He was very officious.

Q. All the things that were in the box when it was brought to the Queen's Head, Darkhouse-lane, are in it now? - A. Yes.

Q. Then your box is safe? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the master of the Dark-house here? - A. Yes.

Q. He was not up I suppose? - A. No, I believe not; I did not see him.

Q. You did not say you wanted to go to Deptford? - A. No; I said I wanted to go to the Borough.

Q. Did not the prisoner say he had a boat, and could carry you across the River? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Was not the chest taken to a Custom-house officer? - A.Not that I know of.

Q.Did not you see a watch-box at the bottom of the stairs? - A. I heard there was a box left in the care of the watchman at Temple-stairs.

Q.You don't know that the box was left with the watchman to be examined? - A. Only what I heard.

THOMAS WRIGHT sworn. - I am in the Company's service; I am employed occasionally as a porter to carry any thing at Mr. Hoddy's, the Queen's Head, in Darkhouse-lane; I was there between three and four in the morning of the 25th of January; I saw Climer there; he employed me to carry a chest to a boat; when I had got the chest he ordered me to carry the chest to Temple-stairs; he told me it was his own property, and that he was going to Deptford; he went with me to Temple-stairs; when we came there, there was no boat; there was a King's watchman.

Q.Where is Temple-stairs? - A. The next plying-place below Billingsgate, between the Custom-house and Billingsgate; I set down the chest on some casks standing on end; we left it in the charge of the watchman till called for; he said a Captain was coming down with some more things in a boat, and then I should be paid for it; he told me not to make any charge to the gentleman, but leave it to his generosity, and he supposed it would be 2 or 3s. or more, in my way; Climer and I returned to the Queen's Head; Carter came down, and enquired who had taken the chest; I told him I had; he said, I think you have taken a wrong chest; he said, go down with the man, and see whether he has got a key that fits the chest; Climer went down with me to Temple-stairs, and pulled out something he pretended was the key, and applied it to the keyhole; being satisfied I came back with Climer; I had no suspicion of him; the chest was lashed as it is now; coming back he parted with me before we got to the Queen's Head.

Q. Did you see him go? - A. No, I missed him suddenly coming towards Billingsgate; I went to the Queen's Head, and Carter told me to go with another man, and bring back the chest, which I did; between six and seven I saw the prisoner at the Dark-house, (that is another house) in the custody of Thomas Stevenson .

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You came to the Dark-house, and found the man in custody?- A. Yes.

Q. He applied to you to do what you thought an honest act? - A. Yes.

Q. What time was it that he first applied to you? - A. Between three and four o'clock.

Q. What time did the tide come in? - A. It was about high water then.

Q. The box could not be disposed of without taking a boat? - A. No.

Q. It often happens that mistakes arise from the number of boxes at these houses? - A. No doubt of it.

THOMAS STEVENSON sworn. - I am a constable; the chest was delivered to me at the Queen's Head by John Carter on the 25th of January; I have had it ever since.

Smith. That box which was delivered to Stevenson is mine, and every thing in it; this is the chest I took to the Queen's Head; it contains a stock bed, two blankets, four pair of stockings, a feather pillow, eight or ten books, three razors, a strop, and a fan.

GEORGE HODDY sworn. - I keep the Queen's Head; John Carter was my servant; he is since dead; I never saw Climer before that morning to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Very often watermen come and apply at your house? - A. Not at that time in the morning.

Q.You did not see the prisoner? - A. I was not up.

Prisoner's defence. I was employed by a man to carry this chest to Deptford; I told him I should not go till day-light; there were thirty or forty men in the tap-room; I agreed with him for 5s. he asked me to get a porter, which I did till morning, and then they took me into custody.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-62

280. JEREMIAH PEACOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , thirty-six yards of binding, value 8s. the property of Thomas Johnson and Joseph Johnson , privately from the person of the said Thomas Johnson .

THOMAS JOHNSON sworn. - I keep a Manchester warehouse , in partnership with my brother, Joseph Johnson: On Wednesday night last, the 16th of the present month, just after I had crossed Fleet-market, Holborn-bridge . I was stopped by John Read, one of the City Police officers, who said, have you lost any thing? I applied my hand to my right-hand pocket, where I had a piece of silk binding, and missed thirty-six yards; it is charged to us in the piece 8s. he said we have got the person; I said, what must be done; he said, we must go to the Compter; the next day we went before Alderman Combe, and the prisoner was committed; the binding is in the possession of John Read .

Q.Did not you perceive the prisoner do any thing to you? - A. I knew nothing of it till Read told me; I never saw the prisoner near me.

JOHN READ sworn. - I am an officer; I was in company with Cartwright; turning out of Fleet-market, at Holborn-bridge, I observed the prosecutor with a bundle on his left shoulder; he had no sooner passed me but I turned round, and saw the prisoner close to his pocket; I observed the prisoner's hand come from his pocket; with that I laid hold of it, and took the binding out of his hand; it was a parcel of silk binding; I told Cartwright to run after the prosecutor, and ask him if he had lost any thing, which he did; he was gone about six yards; he came up, and I asked him if he had lost any thing; he said he had; I asked him what it was; he said silk binding; I opened it, and saw it was silk binding; I had the prisoner in my hand; he asked what must be done in it; I told him he must attend the next day before the Lord Mayor, which he did.

- CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I saw the prisoner's hand coming from the side of the prosecutor; Read kept hold of the prisoner while I fetched Mr. Johnson back; I asked him if he had lost any thing; he said, yes; I saw the property in Read's hand when I came back with Johnson.

JOHN COOPER sworn. - I am an officer; I was with the two last witnesses; I only saw the parcel in the prisoner's hand; I did not see him take it. -(The silk binding produced.)

Johnson. That is mine; it is a figured pattern.

Prisoner's defence. As I came down Holborn I picked this parcel up; I had it in my hand; that gentleman came up, and took it from me, and said I took it from a gentleman; I know nothing of it. GUILTY, aged 43.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined six months in Newgate , publicly whipped , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-63

281. JOHN CLARKE , otherwise CLARE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , a set of bed-furniture, value 2l. 10s. the property of Oliver Toulmin and Archibald Kerr , in their dwelling-house .

ARCHIBALD KERR sworn. - I am a broker, upholsterer, auctioneer, and appraiser , in partnership with Oliver Toulmin ; we keep a house in St. Stephen's parish, Coleman-street ; I sleep in it, and he does occasionally; we were sent for to attend before the Lord Mayor; we did, and there we saw the prisoner and two sets of bed-furniture; I know them to be ours by the pattern, having some of the remnants in the warehouse; on one of them there is a private mark; they are what we call whole stock furniture made up in one piece.

Prisoner. Q. I want to know if he thinks I took it with an intent to defraud them? - A. I could not think it a very honest act.

Court. Q. Was the prisoner servant to you? - A.Occasionally he has been porter to us four or five months.

Q. Was he working for you at that time? - A. He was; the pawnbroker's lad is here that he pawned them with.

WILLIAM THORNTON sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Crouch, pawnbroker, No. 42, Fore-street, Cripplegate; the prisoner pawned this bed-furniture with me on Friday the 28th of January, about ten in the morning.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. Never that I know of.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes; I gave him a duplicate of them; I have had

them ever since: On the 2d of February he brought another set; I thought it suspicious, and stopped him, and had him before the Lord Mayor; the officer, Clarke, found out who they belonged to.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - I am an officer; I was sent for on the 2d of February to Mr. Crouch's to take the prisoner into custody.

Q.(To Thornton.) Are you sure that is the piece he pawned the first time? - A. Yes.

Kerr. There is no mark on it; I have no doubt of its being mine; I cannot swear to it; we have the pattern of it at home; we bought a great quantity; I have seen the same pattern in other shops; we missed one furniture exactly of this description after we had been before the Magistrate.

Prisoner's defence. I took them with no intention of defrauding my employers; I owed some money, and was afraid of being arrested; I meant to take them out and replace them; I did it more through foolishness than a roguish intent; I had some money due to me; I thought I should get that money, and take them out.

Q.(To Kerr.) What is the value of that? - A. Forty shillings; it is the other that has the private mark. GUILTY, aged 32,

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-64

282. JOHN CLARKE, otherwise CLARE , was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a set of bed-furniture, value 2l. 10s. the property of Oliver Toulmin and Archibald Kerr , in their dwelling-house .

ARCHIBALD KERR sworn. - I am in partnership with Oliver Toulmin: On the 2d of February I saw this bed-furniture at the Mansion-house; it has our mark on it.

WILLIAM THORNTON sworn. - On the 2d of February the prisoner brought this furniture to pledge; I suspected him, and stopped him.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing further to say than what I have said.

GUILTY, aged 32,

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , whipped , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-65

283. THOMAS OLIPHANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , a basket, value 2s. and four loaves, value 3s. 1d. the property of John Flavel .

JOHN FLAVEL sworn. - I am a baker : On Friday the 21st of January, a little after four in the evening, I put down my basket of bread at Mr. Rigden's door, Holborn-hill , and took a loaf in; when I came out I saw the prisoner with the basket on his shoulder crossing St. Andrew's-hill; I went after him, and brought him back; there were four loaves in the basket; I knew it by a piece of sack we have in it to cover the bread,(the piece of sack and basket produced); I know the piece of sack; there is no mark on the basket; there is J. Sparks marked on the piece of sack.

RICHARD RIGDEN sworn. - I saw the last witness take the prisoner; he had the basket on his shoulder; I believe that is the basket; I saw the piece of sack; that is it.

Prisoner's defence. I did it out of distress; I was very hungry at the time.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in Newgate , publicly whipped , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-66

284. RICHARD HALFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of William Ward , privately from his person .

WILLIAM WARD sworn. - I am an independent gentleman: On Monday the 31st of January, about three o'clock, going along Cornhill , a person tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me if I had not lost a silk handkerchief; I put my hand in my pocket, and found it was gone; he told me an officer of the Lord Mayor had secured the person; I went on Tuesday to the Mansion-house, and saw my handkerchief; the prisoner had a hearing then; I knew the handkerchief by two W's upon it at different corners; it was a chocolate spotted silk handkerchief.

Q. When this man spoke to you, you had not found it taken from you? - A. No.

ISAAC BACKROW sworn. - I am a constable; as I was coming along the Poultry, I saw the prisoner put his hand in a gentleman's pocket, and pull out his handkerchief; I caught him by the collar, and said, you have taken a handkerchief out of that gentleman's pocket; he was going to put it into his breeches; I took the handkerchief out of his hand, and sent a person after the gentleman, to ask him if he had had his pocket picked, and bring him back; he came back, and we took the prisoner to the Mansion-house; the Lord Mayor was gone, and we took him to the Compter till the next day; he was then examined, and the prosecutor swore to the handkerchief; I have kept it in my possession; this is the handkerchief -(producing it.)

Mr. Ward. This is the handkerchief I missed; I know it by the marks; I have had it about six months.

Prisoner's defence. Walking along the street, I saw a woman going to pick up this handkerchief;

I stopped down, and picked it up before her; several people saw me pick it up; I had it open in my hand; nobody offered to own it; he came up; I said, I had found the handkerchief; he said I was a liar, I had picked a gentleman's pocket of it, and I should go to the Compter.

GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing to the value of 10d.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-67

285. GEORGE HARRISON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 3d of January , a certain paper writing, purporting to be the last will and testament of Joseph Dean, and to be signed by the said Joseph Dean with his mark, bearing date Martinique, 2d of May, 1794, with intention to defraud Garret Fisher .

The Court were of opinion, that the paper purporting to be a will not having been proved at the Commons, or such as any money could be received upon, it was not sufficient to support the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-68

286. JOHN HOLMES , JOHN BISHOP , and JOHN BUTLER , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the house of William Baker , on the 28th of January , about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing a side of bacon, value 5s. the property of John Shaw .

The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners.

JOHN SHAW sworn. - I am a cheesemonger , in St. Peter's-lane, St. John's-street; I have a warehouse at the bottom of Cow-cross : On the 28th of January, in consequence of being told by two little boys that my warehouse was broke open, I sent a constable to watch the warehouse; that is all I know.

Q. Was the property found? - A. Yes.

THOMAS DAVIS. - Q.How old are you? - A.Eleven the 12th of March.

Q. Do you go to school? - A. Yes.

Q. Do they teach you your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it good to tell a lie? - A. No.

Q. Do you know that you are going to call God to witness to the truth of what you say? - A. Yes.

Q. You know that it is a very bad thing if you tell a lie? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know if you tell a lie you will be punished in this world and in the next? - A. No.

Q. Did you never hear where wicked people go to after they die? - A. Yes, into a place of punishment. - (Sworn.)

Court. Q. You have been calling God to witness that every word you will tell us shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; now if you tell a lie you will be liable to be punished in this world as well as the next; now tell us the whole you know of this business? - A. I saw two men break open Mr. Shaw's warehouse with the claw of a hammer; I am not sure they are the men.

Q.What time was that? - A. Between eight and nine; my mother sent me out of an errand.

Q.What did they do? - A. They tried to wrench the lock off; I went and told Mr. Shaw.

Q. Did you ever see those men again? - A. I saw them at Hatton-Garden.

Q.Are you sure they were the two men you saw attempt to break Mr. Shaw's warehouse open?- A. I cannot say they were.

GEORGE DAVIS. - Q.How old are you? - A.Nine.

Q. Do you go to school? - A. Yes, to St. Sepulchre's.

Q. Can you read? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you say your catechism? - A.Some of it.

Q. Do you know whether it is good or bad to tell a lie? - A. Bad.

Q.Where do wicked men go to? - A. The naughty man.

Q. You know you come here to speak the truth? - A. Yes.

Q. If you tell a lie, do you know that you will be punished in this world, and go to the naughty man in the next? - A. Yes. - (Sworn.)

Court. Q.Now you have called God to witness that you will speak nothing but the truth, and the whole truth? - A. Thomas Davis is my brother; I was going home, and saw two men; they had a hammer in their hand; they tried to get the cellardoor open; we went and told the gentleman, and they crossed over the way.

Q. Are either of the prisoners the men? - A. I believe they are the men, but I am not sure.

Q.After you had seen them at the warehouse, did you go to the Justice's? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw the two men produced there? -- A. Yes.

Q.Were those two men you saw there the same that you saw at the warehouse? - A. I don't think they were.

Q. How many days after did you see them at the Justice's? - A. I don't know.

JOSEPH WENTWORTH sworn. - I am a coaldealer; I live at No. 15, Peter's-lane, Cow-cross; I was called on the 28th of January, between eight and nine in the evening, to go to Mr. Shaw's warehouses, by Thomas Davis; he told me there were two men had broke open the door of Mr. Shaw's warehouse at the bottom of Cow-cross; I went down; before I got to the place, about thirty yards from it, I discovered two men going away from the door of the warehouse; I went down immediately to the warehouse, and put my hand to

feel whether or no the doors had been broken; I found the door had been pinched open, so far as I could get my hand in.

Q. You mean forced open? - A. Yes, I saw no more of the men: I went to a public-house, the corner of Jacob's-court; I called the next witness, another officer, and gave him a description of what had passed, and information what to do; he sent a little boy to go into a public-house; I saw him repulsed twice, they would not let him in.

Q. What public-house? - A. I cannot tell, I am not acquainted with it; upon that I waited to watch the warehouse, till twelve o'clock; I saw a man lurking about, not one of these; I went up to our watch-house, where the two witnesses that are to be called were, and informed them there were persons lurking about; upon that I was sent out again, it was nigh twelve o'clock; some people were coming from the play, and I followed them close down to the warehouse side, where I saw a short man coming up Sharpe's-alley, from the back part of the warehouse; I took no notice, but went back again to the watch-house, and informed White what I saw; White went out upon that, and I staid in the watch-house, and he brought up a young lad, neither of these three, he delivered him into my custody, and went out again and brought in the prisoner Holmes; when he brought him into the watch-house, I observed something white on his back; I said to him, has the constable White been rolling you in the snow, there was snow on the ground; upon that he took off his coat and shook it, and said, he had fell down; upon that I put him back in the place for security; White, and Lammas, another officer, went out again from the watch-house; they next brought in the prisoner, Butler, we put them both back into our place for security; White and I went down to the warehouses, and went into Sharpe's-alley; the warehouse goes through from Cow-cross into Sharpe's-alley, into Mr. Lee's, a carcase-butcher's yard; there were two gates of Mr. Lee's to open, before we could get into the warehouse; when we got to the warehouse, I found a pair of large doors broke open by violence, they were the outer doors of the warehouse; we found one slitch of bacon out of the warehouse, lying under the wall, and in the warehouse two more taken out of a pack, and brought forward from where the pack of bacon lay, towards the door, the pack was cut open, it had contained four flitches, three were removed; upon that we called Mr. Shaw, but he did not come till we had brought the bacon to the watch-house; we left the bacon at the watch-house, and Lammas, White, and myself, went out to look about to see if we could see any more on the spot; as we were coming out of Sharpe's-alley, we heard a cart coming down Turnmill-street, leading to Cow-cross, he came up as far as the warehouse door, and there he made a kind of a stop; I followed the cart down to the alley, White was the first that followed it; when I came down, I asked Bishop, who brought the horse and cart down to the warehouse, down Sharpe's-alley, whether there was neither name or number on the cart, and where he was going, he said, he had had some words with his wife, and he was going to take his horse and cart down to his wife's mother, who lived in Sharpe's-alley; we got a watchman's lantern, and looked round the cart, and found neither name nor number on it; with that we took him into custody, and took him to the watch-house, and secured the cart.

Q. That is all that passed between you and Bishop? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you observe any thing about Holmes's coat? - A. I forgot to tell about that; when we got back into the warehouse, I told Lammas and White, that Holmes had something white on his coat, it was salt, I rasted it, and so did the others.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. So you tasted salt? - A. Yes.

Q. You know there are three forty pounds to be rasted? - A. I come on no such account.

Q.Have you never heard there is a reward of forty pounds on each head? - A. Yes.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - I am a constable: On the 28th of last month, I had information from these two boys, and Wentworth, that the warehouse of Mr. Shaw, in Cow-cross, was broke open; I asked the boys, if they knew where the men were; one of the boys said, they were in the adjoining public-house; I sent the boy to go in before me, he was sent back, he could not get in.

Q. What house is that? - A. I believe, the White-horse; I went in with the boy, and he said, there was none of them there, I came out, and agreed with Wentworth to watch the place, we did so, till twelve o'clock; a little after twelve, I saw Holmes come up from under the gateway, it was broke open in two places, one that comes into Sharpe's-alley, the other into Cow-cross; I saw Holmes coming under the gateway from Sharpe's-alley, I thought he had been in the snow, his coat appeared so white.

Q.What did that white turn out to be afterwards? - A. I did not examine his coat, I put him in the watch-house; I came again, and found Butler at some distance from the place broke open; I brought him to the watch-house, and left him there; Wentworth asked me to taste what was on Butler's coat, I did, and found it to be salt.

Q.Was his coat white too? - A. Yes, a little on the shoulder; I went down again, and saw Bishop come with his cart, I was waiting just by my own door, opposite the warehouse broke open.

Q. A cart with one horse? - A. Yes; he got out of the cart there, took the horse by the head,

and led him down Sharpe's-alley; he was stopped when he got about half-way down to the back-door that was broke open; I went to him, and got hold of the horse, and knew him, I had known him before; I asked him what he came there for, he said, to leave his cart for the night, and take his horse home.

Q.What time of night was this? - A. Very near one o'clock; I looked round the cart, and found neither name nor number; I took the man into custody, and the cart likewise.

Q.Are you sure he stopped close to the warehouse door? - A. Yes, there are two large pair of gates, a cart might back into the warehouse that was broke open.

Q. Did you observe how the warehouse had been broke open? - A. There was some wooden rails, some of the rails were broke, that a man might get through into the warehouse, and open the gates; the lock of the front door was wrenched off; the wooden railing was to let air into the cellar, the railing of the first door was broke, the wood was lying about.

Q. Do you know whose cart this was? - A. No, Bishop owned it; he is a higler, and goes about the country.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Which of the boys was it you sent to the public-house? - A. I believe, the eldest.

Q. The boy was repulsed, and you afterwards went in with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Neither of the prisoners were in the house? No.

Q. You know Bishop? - A. Yes.

Q. The first time you saw him, was, with the cart? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw nothing of him before? - A. No.

Q. You saw the warehouse was broke open before? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where Bishop's mother lives?- A. I believe lower down in Sharpe's-alley.

Court. Q.Has she any stable or coach-house? I believe not.

Q. Any conveniency to stow a cart? - A. I believe not, she has only a one pair of stairs room to herself, she is a very poor woman.

EDWARD LAMMAS sworn. - I am an officer; about twelve o'clock at night, on the 28th of January, I saw Holmes after he was brought to the watch-house; I was present with White when Butler was taken; I was present when Bishop was taken.

Q. Do you know any thing more? - A. No.

Q.(To John Shaw.) Does this warehouse belong to you? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you any partner? - A. No.

Q. Nobody lives there? - A. No.

Q. It is no dwelling-house at all? - A. No; I took it of a man that keeps a public-house next door.

Q.Have you got your bacon again? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. It is in the hands of the constable, he'll save it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.How do you know the bacon? - A. There is the name of the factors upon it.

Q. Any body else that deals with them, would have their name on the bacon? - A. Yes.

Holmes's defence. I have witnesses to prove where I was; when we were at Hatton-garden, the side was cut in pieces, now they have brought the whole side.

Butler's defence. I have witnesses to speak where I was.

Bishop. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Holmes, GUILTY, aged 23.

Butler, GUILTY, aged 24.

Bishop, GUILTY.

Of stealing the property, but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-69

287. WILLIAM PALLATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , seventy-four knives, value 7l. seventy-four forks, value 4l. and a piece of baize, value 1s. the property of John Armstrong , and William Moffat .

WILLIAM MOFFATT sworn. - I am an ironmonger , in Great Queen-street: On the 2d of this month, about half after eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner called at our house, and said, he came from Mr. Simpson, to know if we had any orders from him; Mr. Simpson is a manufacturer of japanned goods, we have considerable dealings with him in that line; I mentioned some articles that were in hand, and said, we should be glad to have them as soon as possible, he said, he would mention that to Mr. Simpson, and went away.

Q. Did he live with Mr. Simpson at that time?- A. I thought he did; he returned in about twenty minutes, and said he had been to Mr. Bennett's for some knives for Mr. Simpson; Mr. Bennett lives opposite to us; he said Mr. Bennett had not such knives as Mr. Simpson wanted, and therefore he came back to me, thinking we might have them; he then presented a written order for the knives, I took it from him, and observed it was not the hand-writing of Mr. Simpson, he said, it was not, it was wrote by his shopman, Mr. Mackey, I asked him, if he was apprentice to Mr. Simpson, he said, he was not, but expected to be taken apprentice; I observed to him, that it was very late to send out knives that evening, and asked him, if morning would not do, it was about half after eight, or ten minutes to nine o'clock, he observed, that morning would not do, that there was a lady wait

ing at Mr. Simpson's to see the knives, and wished to look at different patterns; about that time, one of one men, Humfrival, came in, and I told him I should want him to go with the prisoner to Mr. Simpson's, with some knives; I looked out seven parcels of knives, containing seventy-four knives and seventy-four forks, amounting to eleven pounds seven shillings; I took a baize cover and rolled them up carefully, and gave them to our man, and desired him to go along with him to Mr. Simpson's; that is all I know.

NATHANIEL GREEN sworn. - I was present during the conversation between the prosecutor and the prisoner.

SAMUEL- CHARLES HUMFRIVAL sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Moffatt and Armstrong; these knives were delivered to me, and I walked with the prisoner towards Mr. Simpson's, Coppice-row, Clerkenwell; going down Holborn, I was going to cross to Hatton-Garden; the prisoner said, that was not the way that he came from his Master's to Mr. Moffatt's; I said, then I would go his way, and accordingly went on down Holborn; he asked me where I lived, I told him; he asked me, if I had got to go there that night, I said, I had; he said it was a long way, I said, it was.

Q. Where was it? - A.Past Whitechapel-church; he said, he was very sorry to give me so much trouble, he was a poor boy, and afraid of being robbed; I asked him, what kind of man his master was, he said, he was a d-d sharp fellow, and wore powder; I knew Mr. Simpson before, but I had some suspicion in my mind, I thought he was not the same person; we went up Fieldlane; when we were about half-way up the lane, the boy said, he was very well known in Clerkenwell, and desired me to give him the knives and forks, which I refused, I thought he was in the worst part of his way, and I would carry them home, as I had got so far; we walked a little further, and he asked me to go into a public-house to drink, he told me I should be welcome, but I did not; we walked on to Hicks's-hall; he said, that was Hicks's-hall, that he had brought me a good way out of my way; I asked him how he knew that was Hicks's-hall, he said, he had seen women there, with irons on, for thieving; we went on a little further, and he asked me to give him the knives, I would not; we went on till we came nearly opposite Mr. Simpson's house; he then asked for the knives, and I gave them to him, I thought he was then perfectly safe.

Q. How came you not to take them to Mr. Simpson's house? - A. I had a long way to go, it was late, I thought it perfectly safe.(Mr. Moffatt produced the order the prisoner brought.)

WILLIAM SIMPSON sworn. - I live in Coppicerow, Clerkenwell; I am a japan manufacturer the prisoner was in my service, I discharged him some time towards the latter end of last November; he was with me two or three weeks, or it might be more.

Q. Was he in your service the 2d of February?- A. He was not.

Q. Did you send him to Mr. Moffatt's for the knives and forks? - A. I did not.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Mackey? - A. Yes, he is in my warehouse.

Q. Look at that order - is that his hand-writing?- A. It is not.

Q. Do you know whose it is? - A. No.

Q. Did you receive any knives and forks? - A. No.

WILLIAM MACKEY sworn. - Q. Is that order your hand-writing? - A. No.

Q. Do you know any thing of it? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I don't know any thing of the goods at all, I know nothing of the man nor the goods.

Q.(To Humsrival.) Are you sure that is the boy? - A. I believe it is.

Q.(To Moffatt.) Look at the prisoner? - A. I am sure he is the boy that came to our house.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-70

288. OWEN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , three shirts, value 10s. 6d. the property of Hannah Brown .

HANNAH BROWN sworn. - I am a slop-seller , No. 5, Little Hermitage-street : On the 1st of February, about seven o'clock, the prisoner came to my house with another man, to buy a jacket, the prisoner said, he would go to the door, and wait till he came to him, the prisoner turned his back to the other counter, apparently in liquor, and lifted up three shirts from the window, and ran away with them; I called my servant, and she pursued him, and took him, the other man followed him, I never saw him again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you a married lady? - A. I am a widow .

Q.It was dark? - A. Yes.

Q.Your maid brought him back? - A. Yes, a gentleman took him.

ANN ATKINS sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Brown, she called to me, and said, here is a thief, I saw the man go out of the door, and ran after him, when he got a-top of the Hermitage-bridge, he dropped the bundle, I did not stop to pick it up, but followed him, crying, stop thief; a gentleman caught him, I never lost sight of him, I am sure he is the same man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You never saw his face, till he was brought back? - A. No.

Q. Was it not dark? - A. No, it was moonlight.

WILLIAM COTTER sworn. - I am a cabinetmaker and upholsterer: Going home the 1st of this month, between seven and eight o'clock, I heard the cry of stop thief, the prisoner immediately fell down by me, and said, d-n my eyes, how drunk I am; a man came up, and said, what has he done, I thought him an accomplice, he got up and ran, I cried, stop thief; he was pursued and taken at the end of Burr-street.

Atkins. The bundle was picked up, and brought to me.

Mrs. Brown. These three shirts are mine, there is a mark upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor, I had been in liquor all day, I don't know whether I was in the house or not.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-71

289. THOMAS BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , a waterengine, value 5l. the property of John Baker .

JOHN BAKER sworn. - I am a tin-plater , No. 1, Hog-lane, Shoreditch: About half after nine o'clock, last Monday fortnight, a person came to me, and asked if I had lost an engine, I ran to the door, and found the engine was gone, he said, it was going down Norton-falgate; I went after it, and caught the prisoner wheeling it in a barrow; I asked him where he was taking it to, he said, he was going across the way; I said, it was my property; I collared him, and with the assistance of the watchman, took him to the watch-house.

Q. Is that the engine? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Is that the whole of the engine?- A. No, it wants the handle.

Prisoner's defence. I was hired to wheel it away, by a man.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Recommend by the Jury.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-72

290. STEPHEN BARTLET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a cask, value 4s. and nine gallons of beer, value 4s. 6d. the property of Sutton Sharpe and Charles Lucas .

CHARLES LUCAS sworn. - I am a brewer , in partnership with Sutton Sharpe, in King-street, Golden-square; the prisoner is a drayman of ours: I received a letter on Saturday, the 15th of January, from Mr. Hyde, who desired me to come over on Monday; I went, and he shewed me a cask of beer, which he said he bought of the prisoner.

JAMES HYDE sworn. - I am a publican, and live in Long-lane, in the Borough: On the 13th of last month, Stephen Bartlet came with Lucas and Sharpe's dray to my house; he laid down a cask of amber; he said to me, I have a cask of the best table beer on my dray; you shall have it for three shillings and sixpence rather than take it home; I said, I had never taken table beer into the house, and should not begin then; this was whilst he was putting down the cask of beer; when he had done he began to press me, and said, it was as good as twopenny, and would draw for twopenny; he said, if I rubbed the chalk-mark off it, if the cooper came he would think it fine; he likewise said, when the coopers got drunk at home, he could bring beer out almost at any time; as soon as I conceived he had come unfairly by it, it struck me it would be better to inform Mess. Sharpe and Lucas of it, which I did, by letter, within an hour.

Q. Did you pay the man for it? - A. Yes, three shillings and sixpence; we never purchase the cask; I shewed the cask to Mr. Sharpe.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The cask was to go back? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were to pay Sharpe and Lucas for the beer? - A. No, we only pay the collecting-clerk.

Lucas. That cask was my cask, and I believe the beer is mine.

Court. Q. Did you serve Mr. Hyde with any table beer? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. It was the bottoms I drained out of gentlemen's casks, and sold Mr. Hyde.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-73

291. CATHERINE WAYLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , four pair of trowsers, value 3s. 6d. two shirts, value 5s. a blanket, value 4s. and 7lb. of soap, value 3s. 6d. the property of Thomas Rathbone .

ANN RATHBONE sworn. - I live at No. 15, in Shakespeare's-walk, Shadwell; my husband's name is Thomas; he is gone out in the Lushington to the East Indies; I am in service; I bought the things mentioned in the indictment for him to take with him to sea; I got the things, and went to the waterman's house to ask him to carry my husband and his chest down the next day; I went out to

get my husband a little sugar, and when I came back, the prisoner and the things were gone.

JAMES SUTHERLAND sworn. - I am a waterman; Mr. Rathbone left a bundle at my house; they put it down on my bed; Mr. Rathbone and I sat by the fire; Mrs. Rathbone and my wife went out to buy some things; a little after the prisoner came in and sat down alongside the bed; we missed her a little time after, and the parcel.

EDWARD SUTHERLAND. - Q.How old are you? - A.Going of nine; my father is a waterman.

Q. He taught you your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether it is good or bad to tell a lie? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it good to tell a lie? - A. No.

Q. Do you know where wicked people go to?- A. Yes, to the naughty man.

Q. You are going now to call God to witness that you will speak the truth, and nothing but the truth; if you tell me a lie, you will be punished both in this world and the next. - (Sworn.)

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; she was sitting on the bed; she took the bundle, and went out and shut the door.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman? - A. Yes, I knew her before.

Q. Where she went to you don't know? - A. No.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you sitting when I went out of the room? - A. I was not sitting; I was standing by the table by the fire.

ALBERT- WILLIAM NICHOLAS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 11th of January, about seven in the evening, the prisoner pawned these things with me; I lent her 6s. on them, in the name of Elizabeth Moore , by Ann Wayland.

JOHN WARD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I have a pair of trowsers I received of the prisoner.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman? - A. Yes.

Rathbone. I can swear to the trowsers by the piece; I cannot swear to the rest; I believe they are all mine.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much distressed for work and money; I took the things, and made money of them. GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-74

292. JOHN BLIGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , two chariot cushions, value 10s. the property of James Lord Glastonbury .

WILLIAM STEVENS sworn. - I am coachman to James Lord Glastonbury: On Tuesday the 1st of February, I carried Lord Glastonbury out to dinner at six o'clock, and returned at half after; I drew up to the coach-house-door in Oxford-street , and took my horses off; I went to put them in, and left the chariot at the door, while I put them in and tied them up; I went to put my chariot in, a little boy that lives at the Noah's Ark said, a man had been and opened the chariot door, but did not see him take any thing; I opened the chariot and looked in, and my whip and the cushions were gone; I went the next morning to my Lord's coach-maker's, and borrowed a pair of cushions till he could make a pair; as I was coming out of the door, in George-street, Grosvenor-square, I saw a man with the cushions under his arm; I asked him if they were to sell; he said, no, he was going to Long-acre with them; I said I would take him to a coach-maker's nearer; I laid hold of him, and took him to the coach-maker's, and asked him if he knew them; he said, yes; I know them by the family lace they have on them.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court; he did not see me take them.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-75

293. SARAH FARREL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , two pair of stockings, value 3s. a towel, value 6d. a child's gown, value 3s. two handkerchiefs, value 2s. a gown, value 6s. a petticoat, value 2s. an apron, value 3s. a bonnet, value 1s. and a neckhandkerchief, value 1s. the property of James Keebel .

ANN KEEBEL sworn. - My husband, James Keebel, is in the army ; I live at No. 11, Steward's-rents, Wild-street ; I am left with four children; I was at work at a gentleman's house, and left the prisoner in care of my children in my lodgings; she was with me three months; I was coming from my place home to my children on the 9th of January; and on the morning she expected me home, she broke open my trunk, and made away with my things; I had the key in my pocket; I used to come home once a week to see my children; she took every thing I had, and went away; I found a very few of them at a pawnbroker's.

JOHN ENGLAND sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I live at Mr. Lane's, No. 135, Druary-lane; the prisoner came on the 30th of November, and pledged a handkerchief for half a crown; on the 1st of December she pledged a napkin for 1s. on the 26th of December a handkerchief for 1s. and a pair of stockings for 1s. on the 6th of January, which I took in of another young woman in the shop. - (The things produced.)

JOHN MERRY WEATHER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I live with Benjamin Winfield , Drury-lane; I have a pair of stockings pledged by the prisoner, the 6th of January, for 6d. a towel, the 3d

of January, for 6d. and a child's gown, the 10th of January, for 6d. - (Produced.)

Mrs. Keebel. They are all my property.

Prisoner's defence. I was in care of these children; she went to work, and came home in the evening, and went out to pick up gentlemen, and was away sometimes four days, and left me without a shilling.

Prosecutor. I was servant at Counsellor Butler's, Great Ormond-street; every thing she had on when she was before the Magistrate was mine.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-76

294. JOHN GILLIARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , a cloth coat, value 10s. a waistcoat, value 5s. and a pair of breeches, value 5s. the property of John Crichton , Esq.

JOHN CRICHTON sworn. - I live in Steven-street, in the parish of St. Pancras ; the prisoner was my footman ; he lived with me about five months: On or about the 30th of November I was robbed; my portmanteau was broke open; my suspicion fell on the prisoner; I wrote to his master where he had lived at Exeter, and was informed he had robbed him; I was at Margate, and could not easily get at a Magistrate, and before I could come to London, he decamped with his livery; I wrote to the people I dealt with in town, not to trust, except one person, a breeches-maker; he went to him, and ordered a pair of breeches; the breeches-maker sent to me, and I ordered him, when he came, to get a constable, and take him into custody; the things mentioned in the indictment are his livery; I made no agreement for any livery; he had not wore the livery above three weeks; he absconded from Margate on the 11th of December, and was taken in London the 8th of January.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am a constable: On Saturday evening the 8th of January, I was sent for to Swallow-street; I went with another officer, and found the prisoner sitting on his breeches; he went to the shop door; I desired him to walk back, I wanted to speak to him; we then took him to the Office.

JOHN FOY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street; I apprehended the prisoner at a breeches-maker's, in Swallow-street; he was sitting on a pair of breeches, and these breeches were lying by him; he said they were his; we took him to the Office.

JOHN COZENS sworn. - I am a shoemaker; I live at No. 4, Ogle-street; I have a coat and waistcoat I bought of the prisoner; I cannot justly say whether it was on Christmas-eve, or the day before; I sold him a pair of boots for 10s. I gave him the boots and 4s. for them.

Crichton. These are my property; the breeches I cannot so positively swear to as the coat and waistcoat; he had not wore them, I suppose, more than five or six times; there was also a laced hat.

Q. Had he any other cloaths? - A.Very few; I believe there was a jacket and waistcoat he left behind, very old; he went off in such great haste, he had not time to arrange his matters.

Prisoner's defence. I had been with my master six months; I thought the things belonged to me; they were given to me. GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-77

295. CHARLOTTE HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , 4s. and 2d. three farthings , the monies of Thomas Moody .

THOMAS MOODY sworn. - I am a publican , in Worship-street : On the 15th of January I had been out on the fore part of the day; when I returned I found both the witness and the prisoner in liquor; they were both my servants ; I began to question them how they got so in liquor, and the witness said, the prisoner had robbed me; in what manner I don't know; that it was out of the bar; 15d. was found on the prisoner, and 3s. all but a halfpenny on the witness; I don't know of my own knowledge that I lost any thing.

ELEANOR ALLEN sworn. - As I was lighting the kitchen fire, my fellow servant called me and told me the back door was open; I went up to call my master, and when I came down my fellow servant had some gin in a pot.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-78

296. THOMAS MARDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , a coat, value 10s. and a waistcoat, value 4s. the property of William Harrison .

There was no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-79

297. JOHN WILSHER was indicted for marrying a second wife, on the 7th of October , his former wife being then living, and that afterwards, on the 11th of February, he was arrested for the said felony .

JOHN CHALMERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Clerkenwell; I know the prisoner; I was present at his marriage to Ann Chapman at St. Saviour's, on the 23d of March, 1789.

Q.Was Ann Chapman at that time a single woman? - A. Yes.

Q. You are quite sure he was married to Ann Chapman ? - A.Quite sure; I was present, and gave Ann Chapman away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you, Clerk of the Parish? - A. No.

Q. A friend of Ann Chapman ? - A. Yes.

Q. Was her name Ann? - A. Yes.

Q. Were they married by banns or licence? - A.Banns.

Q. Did you hear the banns proclaimed? - A. Yes.

FRY HUNT sworn. - I was at St. Saviour's the time the prisoner was married, he married Ann Chapman.

Q. You know Ann Chapman ? - A. Yes.

Q. Is she now living? - A. Yes; I saw her here to-day.

MARY GARDINER sworn. - I know the prisoner.

Q. Were you ever married to him? - A. Yes, at St. James's, Clerkenwell, on the 7th of October last.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The first time you was married were on the 7th of October last?- A. No; I was married as a widow; the prisoner was taken in our house in Barbican, by Field; I was present when he was taken.

Q. Do you know whether he had a warrant to apprehend him? - A. I don't know.

Q. How long were you a widow? - A.Eight years.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. A year and a half.

Q. You were in habits of strict intimacy? - A. He was frequently calling.

Q. Do you know his relations? - A. None of them.

Q. You did not know at all that he had been a married man before he married you? - A. I did not.

Q. Who proposed the marriage, you or he?- A. I never proposed it; he proposed it a number of times.

Q.Whether you never desired he would marry you? - A. I did not.

Q. Who went to the Parson to desire the banns to be proclaimed? - A. I don't know.

Q. It was not you? - A. No.

Q. Who proposed to be married by banns? - A. He proposed it.

Q. Did you never propose it? - A. I did not.

Q. What parish do you live in? - A. The parish of St. Giles's, Cripplegate.

Prisoner's defence. I don't know who carried the banns to Clerkenwell; she sent them there by some means. GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-80

298. DANIEL MACARTHY was indicted for feloniously obtaining, by false pretences, from William Corderoy , the sum of 6l. 11s. the monies numbered of John Woolmer .

No evidence was called.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-81

299. MARY BERRY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 10th of January , eighty yards of woollen cloth, value 15l. well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen .

EDWARD SERJEANT sworn. - I am a factor and warehouseman of linen and woollen goods; I reside at Walworth, the warehouse is in Thames-street; I know nothing of the fact; I only speak to the goods.

WILLIAM STEVENSON sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Serjeant; the property was lost out of a cart, when the things were delivering at a house in Aldersgate-street.

Q. Were the goods Mr. Serjeant's? - A. Yes.

Q. Woollen cloth? - A. No swansdown for waistcoats.

Q. That is quite a different thing from woollen cloth? - A. Yes. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-82

300. JOSEPH GREGG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , two sheets of copper, value 30s. the property of John Keep .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Edward Millington , Henry Davison , and others.

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.

There being no proof of any felony having been committed, the Court directed the Jury to acquit the prisoner. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-83

301. JOHN MASON and JONATHAN FULLWOOD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , a bill of exchange for 69l. 10s. the property of William Gowin , the same being then due and unsatisfied to the said William .

Second Count. Laying it to be property of James Russell .

The proprietor of the note appearing to be a person of the name of Murphy, and not Gowin, the Court directed the Jury to acquit the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-84

302. ELIZABETH MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , one half guinea , the monies of Alexander Miller .

ALEXANDER MILLER sworn. - I am a marblecutter : On the 19th of January I had occasion to charge a twenty-shilling note; I went to a public-house to get it charged; the woman could not change it; the prisoner was there, and said, if I would give her some gin, she would take me to a house where I could get it changed; she took me to Martha Beale 's house, in Prince's-street , Westminster; I gave her the note; she brought me the change, and laid it down on the table; the prisoner took up half a guinea, and put it into her mouth; I tried to get it from her, but could not.

Q.Had you been acquainted with the prisoner?- A. I never saw her before in my life; I went into a public-house, and saw a soldier, and desired him to get me a constable.

Q. What became of the half guinea? - A. I don't know; I heard afterwards that she swallowed it.

MARTHA BEALE sworn. - I live in Prince's-street, Westminster; my husband is a soldier; Miller came into my house, between two and three o'clock, with the prisoner; he asked me if I would have any thing to drink, and gave me a twenty-shilling note, and desired me to bring half a pint of gin, and change; I got the change at the first wine-vaults in Tothill-street, and the gin at the public-house; I put the change down on the table; he took up the half guinea to look at it, and put it down again to take up the other money; Mitchell took up the half guinea; I don't know where she put it, but he asked her for it, and she would not give it him; she said, if he would go over to the public-house she would give it him; she was then taken into custody.

JOHN LLOYD sworn. - I was in the public-house; the prisoner and Miller came in; he had hold of her petticoat; he said she had got a half guinea of his; I desired her to give him the half guinea; she said she had the half guinea, and what was that to me, and I went and got a constable.

JAMES JONES sworn. - I am a constable; I was fetched by the last witness to take the prisoner into custody; I saw the half guinea in her mouth; she swallowed it instantly.

Prisoner's defence. We went over to her room; he was to give her a shilling.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-85

303. WILLIAM SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a leg of mutton, value 8s. the property of Henry Fleetwood .

HENRY FLEETWOOD sworn. - I keep a public-house in Belton-street, Long-acre : The prisoner came to my house on the 29th of January, and went backwards, and had a pint of twopenny; there was nobody backwards but him and his wife; they staid there near upon an hour; after they were gone, I missed a leg of mutton out of the cupboard; this was between five and six o'clock; I sent an information to Bow-street, and the officers found the leg of mutton according to the information.

Q. Did you know where the prisoner lived? - A. Yes, at the Black Dog, in St. Giles's; it was not found there, but at a butcher's in St. Giles's.

Prisoner. Q. Were you at home when the leg of mutton was stolen? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you see me take it? - A. No.

GEORGE RUSSELL sworn. - I am a butcher; I sold the leg of mutton to Mr. Fleetwood; the bone was saved, and taken to Bow-street; I saw it there on the 31st of January; I have no doubt it was the same I sold to Fleetwood; I sawed the bone about half through, and then broke it.

JOSEPH HUNT sworn. - I am a butcher, at No. 41, Broad-street, St. Giles's: On Saturday evening, the 29th of January, the prisoner brought a leg of mutton to me, and asked to leave it in my shop; knowing him, I said he might; about an hour after, the officers came, and found it on a block; one of the officers asked me if I would fell it him; I said, I could not, because it was not mine; they asked whose it was, I said it was left by a friend; they asked who it was; I said Bill Saunders ; he said he should take it away, and he did; it was in a cloth.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am a patrol of Bow-street: On the 29th of January I had an information that Mr. Fleetwood had been robbed of a leg of mutton, and that it was at Mr. Hunt's; I went in, and said, you have a nice leg of mutton here, will you sell it? he said, no, it was a friend's; I asked him, who; he said, Bill Saunders; and I took it. - (The bone produced.)

Russell. I have no doubt that this is the bone of the leg of mutton I sold Mr. Fleetwood.

Prisoner's defence. On Saturday evening I was going to the Seven Dials; I met a hawking butcher in St. Giles's; he asked me, what sort of trade have you had; I said, very bad; he said he had a good leg and shoulder of mutton; I asked him what he would have for the leg; he said, nine shillings; I bought it of him for eight shillings; I took it home; my wife was out, and I went and left it at Mr. Hunt's.

Q.(To Russell.) What is the prisoner? - A. A hawking butcher; a man of a very bad character.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I always pay you for what I had? - A. I took care of that; he has been had to Bow-street for stealing sheep.

Prisoner. I have been at Bow-street, but never stole a sheep in my life.

The prisoner called Mr. Hunt, who gave him the same character as Russell. GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-86

304. JOHN NORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , 28lb. of butter, value 30s. the property of Charles Fitzhugh .

CHARLES FITZHUGH sworn. - I live at Kingsthorp, in the county of Northampton; I lost 28lb. of butter on the 4th of February; I was in town the week before last; I said to Mr. Wicks, the inn-keeper of the Windmill, in St. John's-street, that I suspected that I was robbed by his servants, or by some of mine, and desired he would go and meet the waggon; he was not able to go himself, but sent a servant.

JOHN HUCKSLEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Wicks, who keeps the Windmill, St. John's-street; The 4th of February I was sent to meet the waggon; I met it at the alms-houses, I slington, about half after six in the morning; I followed the waggon to St. John's-street; before they go into the inn they always chain the wheel; I chained the wheel, and told the waggoner to draw on; when I came to the tail of the waggon, the prisoner slipped out of the waggon, and brought a lock flat out with him; the flat was locked; I said to the prisoner, where are you going with that? he said to the Bell public-house, where I always take my flat; I said, neither that nor any thing else should be taken out of the waggon till the waggon gets up the yard; he hesitated about taking the flat up the yard; I said, if he would not take it up, I would; I took the flat, and weighted it in my left hand; then he said he would take it up himself; he took it up the yard, and carried it into the stable.

Prosecutor. The prisoner was my servant, assistant to the waggoner.

JOHN HORNSEY sworn. - I am waggoner to Mr. Fitzhugh.

Q.When you drive the waggon, where is the prisoner? - A. In the waggon; after he carried the butter-flat into the stable, he took it up into the hay-lost; he unlocked the flat, and took the butter out, and laid it among some hay, and covered it with some more hay; then he locked the flat, and came down out of the lost.

Q. All your butter comes in flats? - A. Yes; this was a flat of his own.

Q.Whose butter was in the flat? - A. Mr. Pearce's, at the Bay Horse; Mr. Pearce's butter was missing that morning.

Q.Might not he have bought it in the country?- A. I don't know.

Q.(To Fitzbugh.) What is the price of butter in Northamptonshire? - A.Fourteen-pence or fifteen-pence a pound.

Q. What do you fell it for? - A.I don't fell any; I am only the carrier; I am answerable for it.

Q.Might he not have bought this butter in the country? - A. I think it is not likely; I don't allow my men to do that; I took it up in Northamptonshire, and was to deliver it in London.

EDWARD LAMMAS sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to the Windmill, to take charge of the prisoner; he was in the kitchen; they are allowed a flat to put their cloaths in; I desired him to open his flat; he did, and I felt in it, and there was nothing but a great coat; I found the butter in the hay-loft.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the butter; I never had it; I never was in the hay-loft; that man took the flat, and went and put it in the loft.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-87

305. SAMUEL BRADBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , a pair of braces, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Cox , the elder.

WILLIAM- THOMAS COX sworn. - I am son to Mr. William Cox , tailor , who keeps a mercer's shop, in Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury : On Friday night, the 11th, we missed three pieces of waistcoating and a pair of braces from the shopwindow; I did not know they were gone till the 12th, when Jones, the Bow-street officer, came and asked if we had lost any thing.

CHRISTOPHER JONES sworn. - On the 12th of this month, about four o'clock, we had a private information of a house being robbed in Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury; about half an hour after, we met the prisoner in Middle-row, St. Giles's; we took him into a public-house in Belton-street, and searched him; he put his left-hand in his coatpocket, and pulled out these braces; I asked him where he got them; he said he picked them up in Phoenix-alley; I and Crocker went to the shop that was robbed, and asked them if they had lost any thing; they said, yes, three waistcoat pieces and a pair of braces; I asked if they should know them; the boy said, yes; they marked all the things they had in the shop.

Cox. I know them; they are marked on one of the straps; I marked them; we lost them out of the window while I was out; I missed them when I came home.

Prisoner's defence. I picked them up on Friday evening. GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 12 months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-88

306. WILLIAM EVANS , WILLIAM BELLMAM , and JOHN PRICE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , four planes, value 10s. a stock-bit, value 8s. a

chissel, value 1s. a plow iron, value 6d. a gauge, value 2d. and a square, value 1s. the property of William Gee ; a hand-saw, value 2s. five planes, value 12s. a pair of pincers, value 4d. and three chissels, value 3s. the property of David Barnes ; three planes, value 9s. and two saws, value 5s. the property of John Penn .

WILLIAM GEE sworn. - I am a carpenter , I was at work, at Bedford-place-buildings , a new street, leading from Bloomsbury to Russel-square; David Barnes and John Penn , were at work in the same buildings: On the 31st of January, at night, we left our tools all safe, in the building; on Tuesday morning, we came about twenty minutes before seven; we perceived some person had been in the building, by the tools being removed, and not in the state we left them; somebody had been lying down in the shavings, at the end of the bench we had been working at; the tools were taken away; we had hid them among the shavings; the things I lost were found on the prisoners, by Blackman, the officer; we looked further about the building, and found somebody had been in the one pair of stairs, by means of some deals; there was a piece of a coat left on one of the joists, it corresponds to the coat found on Evans, we have got the coat.

DAVID BARNES sworn. - I am a carpenter; I left my tools in Bedford-place, in the same room, they were all safe on Monday night, when I came on Tuesday morning, they were gone; I lost one hand-saw, five planes, a pair of pincers, and three chissels, they have been found.

JOHN PENN sworn. - I am a carpenter, I left my tools in the same building, they were safe on Monday night, on Tuesday morning they were missing; I lost three planes and two saws.

JOHN DEAN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Burr, a corn-dealer: On Tuesday, the 1st of February, I saw the three prisoners in company together all the day, backwards and forwards, which gave me a suspicion, to go down into a cellar, which I had frequently seen them go down into, and up again; I went down, and found all these tools lying there.

Q. Who does the cellar belong to? - A.It is No. 3, in Well-street; the cellar is open, only a board over it, it is a place that people sift dust in; I made application to my master, that people were up and down in the cellar, and I expected there were some things there they would come for; I watched, and about six in the evening, Bellman and Evans came and went down, and Price stood at the end of the street; I had sent for an officer to be in readiness, to take them; seeing them go down, I gave information to the officer, and he came and took them immediately.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; I went to the cellar the 1st of February, pulled up the flap, and jumped down, and found the tools; I took Bellman and Evans; upon Evans, I found two duplicates, and some of the tools pawned at Mr. Pritchard's, Short's-Gardens. These are the things, two duplicates of three planes.

THOMAS PRITCHARD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: These are my duplicates.

Q.Who did you take these three planes of? - A. I believe, Evans; I have no doubt of it.

Gee. One of the planes belongs to me, one to Penn, and one to Barnes. (The coat and the piece found on one of the joists, were produced.)

Blackman. I took the coat from Evans, the piece fits the place where it is torn.

Price's defence. The first man swore he saw me at the top of the street, doing nothing, then he saw me passing by this cellar; I never was in company with these persons; I am innocent of what I am brought here for.

The other two prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Evans, GUILTY , aged 20.

Bellman, GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for seven years .

Price, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-89

307. RICHARD HOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , 40lb. of lead, value 20s. belonging to William Cottle , the same being fixed to a certain building, belonging to the said William Cottle .

WILLIAM COTTLE sworn. - I am a carpenter and builder , and live at No. 8, Windmill-street, Tottenham-court-road: On the 16th of February, I lost some lead from a house, No. 7, in Capel-street ; the prisoner had been at work for me the week before; the watchman stopped him with the lead; I compared it with the house, and it fitted.

WILLIAM TILLEN sworn. - I am a watchman; I stopped the prisoner about a quarter before seven o'clock, he had this piece of lead under his arm,(producing it;) I asked him where he got it from, he said, from the building where he was at work, and was going to take it to his master's shop, in Gore-street; I stopped him, he threw the lead down, and said, he had done a pretty thing for himself, and asked me to take the lead, he said, it would fetch me a trifle, and let him go, which I would not do.

Cottle. I have the piece it was cut from here, it matches.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming across Bloomsbury-square; as I turned across the street, I found it under the wall, I thought somebody had dropped it, and ventured to take it up.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publickly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-90

308. ANTHONY JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , two sheets, value 8s. a counterpane, value 6s. the property of Joseph Rawlinson , the same being in a lodging, let by him to the prisoner .

SARAH RAWLINSON sworn. - I keep the Shepherd and Dog public-house, Wapping : On the 6th of February, I let the prisoner a shilling room to himself; he came and asked for a lodging, I said, if he had a bed to himself, he must pay a shilling, if two in a bed, 6d. he had a bed; in the morning, my servant went up, and he was gone, and had taken the things.

MARY HEADING sworn. - I am daughter to Mrs. Rawlinson: On the 7th of February, I went up to the lodging, as is usual, if any body has slept in the house, to see if every thing was safe; the prisoner was gone, and had locked the door, and took the key away, I could not get in; my father went up, and the sheets and counterpane were gone; in the afternoon, my father and I, going up East Smithfield, saw the prisoner; I asked him what he had done with the goods, and we took him into custody; he then said, he sold the things at a shop in Rosemary-lane, and took us to the place, but we did not find them.

MARY HUNT sworn. - I lit the prisoner up to the room where he slept, the things were there then; he took the key out of my hand, and said, don't lock me in.

Prisoner's defence. I came from Gravesend, I went to that house, and asked for a lodging; I had a lodging, I left the key in the door; I had been to the India-House; I met that young woman and the man; she said, that is the man that slept at our house last night, and they laid hold of me; I did not take the things. GUILTY .

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-91

309. JOHN FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , a gown, value 9s. the property of Joseph Hill .

JOSEPH HILL sworn. - On the 3d of February, John Freeman came and took a lodging of my wife, I was not at home.

MARY HILL sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; the prisoner took a lodging of me, the 3d of February; he got up about nine o'clock, and took a gown away with him, it lay in a box in my room; I met him coming out of the room, with something under his coat; I went to see if the bedcloaths were safe.

Prisoner's defence. I stood by the fire about five minutes; she said nothing to me till the next day.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-92

310. JANE NEALE was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury , July the 21st .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030216-93

311. CHRISTIAN HORN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Christopher Barclay , on the 5th of December , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing a silver milk-pot, value 30s. six silver teaspoons, value 20s. a pair of tea-tongs, value 4s. a cloth coat, value 40s. four waistcoats, value 20s. four shirts, value 24s. eight handkerchiefs, value 20s. two pillow-cases, value 1s. four pair of stockings, value 4s. two brushes, value 6d. and a piece of binding, value 2d. the property of Christopher Barclay , and a Bank-note, value 10l. the property of the said Christopher, in his dwelling-house .

The prisoner being a foreigner, a Jury of half foreigners were sworn. - An interpreter was also sworn.

CHRISTOPHER BARCLAY sworn. - I live in Three Colt-street, Limehouse ; I am a pork butcher .

Q.Do you keep a house? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you any lodgers in your house? - A.No.

Q.What does your family consist of? - A.Only my wife and me: On Sunday the 5th of December, I left the house about the hour of six, I locked the front door, and left the back gate upon a wooden button.

Q. You are not sure the button was turned? - A. Yes, I am sure it was turned, and the backdoor, which comes into the little kitchen, was upon the latch.

Q.Are you sure that was shut? - A. Yes, because I did it myself.

Q.When you went out about five, where was your wife? - A. She went out with me, no person was left in the house, and nobody could get in without breaking the button.

Q. They could turn it? - A. Not without getting over; I returned about nine o'clock, and missed the silver milk-pot, six silver tea-spoons, and a pair of sugar tongs; I went up stairs, and looked under my bed, where I put my money, that was gone, forty-one pounds in Bank-notes, that was up two pair of stairs, there was one 15l. one 10l. two 5l. and one 2l. and the rest in one pounds; I looked in my chest, and missed one blue coat, four waistcoats, thirteen shirts, and thirty handkerchiefs, then I went and gave information to Mr. Dalton, the officer of the parish.

Q.Why do you accuse the prisoner? - A. He had been a servant to me six weeks; I found a key on the chopping-block, which I had lost about ten days; on the Monday morning, we went to look

after him; we got information, that he was gone on board a Dutch vessel; we found him there; we found a ten pound note on the prisoner, and a guinea; we asked him where his chest was, he told us it was ast; we looked into the chest, and there I found a blue coat, four waistcoats, four shirts, a silver milk-pot, six silver tea-spoons, a pair of sugar-tongs, and four watches.

Q. Were those things your property? - A. Yes, he acknowledged he took two of the watches out of pawn, and two he bought with my money; there was a new suit of cloaths, which he said, he bought with my money, breeches, waistcoat, and coat.

Q. I suppose the things are here? - A. Yes.

Q. When you returned at nine o'clock, how did you find the house? - A. The front door locked, and both the back doors open.

Q. How could the person have got in? - A. I suppose, by having the key of the house, which I had lost ten days before, and found on the choppingblock.

Jury. Q. Was the prisoner your servant at the time? - A. No, he had left me eight or nine days before.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer of the Public-office, Shadwell; I heard Barclay's house had been broke open; I went immediately, and asked how it was broke open, and in consequence of the information I received from him, I went to Gravesend, and took the captain with us, on the Tuesday morning following.

Q. Was it a Dutch ship? - A. Yes, a Dutch vessel.

Q. Was Mr. Barclay with you? - A. Yes; the first thing, they called the mate up, and asked if the man, called the butcher, was there; he went among the other sailors, and found the prisoner below fast asleep; I awoke him, he told him, he must get up, he had his clothes on; I searched him; in his jacket-pocket, I found a ten pound Bank-note, in his breeches pocket, I found a guinea, and some halfpence; I found a key upon him; I asked Barclay to look-down below, he accordingly did, and said, that is the man; I asked him if that was the key of his chest, he told me, yes; I asked where it was, he told me, in the cabin; accordingly I went into the cabin, and told him to shew me his chest; he shewed it me, I unlocked the chest, and found this blue coat, four waistcoats, several pair of cotton stockings, four shirts, and several neck handkerchiefs, a silver cream-pot, six silver tea-spoons, a pair of sugar tongs, a new suit of cloaths, and four watches; Mr. Barclay owned to the property; I asked him what he had done with the money, he said, he had bought a suit of cloaths, and four watches, and some other articles, with Mr. Barclay's money; I asked him, what time he got into Mr. Barclay's house, he told me, between seven and eight o'clock at night; he told me, he got in with the key, at the fore door.

Q. Did he say where he had the key? - A. No; I told him, Mr. Barclay had found his key; he begged Mr. Barclay to forgive him; Mr. Barclay said, he should have the laws of this country; I secured him, and brought him to the Office.

Q.(To Barclay.) Look at those things? - A.This ten pound note I believe to be mine, I don't know the number, I lost a ten pound note.

Q.You cannot be positive it is your note? - A. No; this blue coat is mine.

Q. You know that to be your's? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the four waistcoats to be your's? - A. Yes.

Q. The cotton stockings? - A. They are mine; the shirts are mine, there is my name on them.

Q. Do you know the neck handkerchief to be your's? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any mark on them? - A. No.

Q. How do you know them to be your's? - A. They are India handkerchiefs, I brought them from India with me; I know the cream-pot, it was a present to me.

Q.Are there letters upon it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you over see the letters upon it before you lost it? - A. Yes; I had forgot them, I am sure it is mine.

Q.The tea-spoons? - A.They have no mark?- A.But I can swear to them by the pattern.

Jury. Q.Had you them long before you lost them? - A.About eleven months.

Q.All these things you are sure are your property? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. I never told the witness that I got in with the key.

Q.(To Brown) Whether you are sure he told you he got in by means of the key? - A. Yes; Mr. Barclay heard it.

Prisoner's defence. I did not buy the watches with Mr. Barclay's money, I bought them for six pounds with my own money; the cream-pot, spoons and cloaths, I found.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury, on account of his being a young man, a foreigner, not knowing the laws of the country, and making a confession of the whole.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-94

312. ANN WINDSOR was indicted for that she, on the 8th of February , not having the fear of God before her eyes, feloniously did set fire to a dwelling-house , belonging to the Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London, the Governors of Christ-church Hospital .

Second Count. Laying it to be the house of John Dickinson .

Third Count. Laying it to be the house of Benjamin Hillingworth .

DANIEL MENDEZ sworn. - I am a pencil-maker, and live at No. 28, Princes-street, Soho.

Q. What part of the house do you inhabit? - A. I work in the back part of it, which looks into Hillingworth's yard, which is in Edmund's-court, Rupert-street .

Q. Do you remember the night of the 9th of February? - A.About two o'clock, as near as I can recollect, I had occasion to get out of bed; when I looked at the window, I saw a great smother come out of the back part of the house, at the parlour window.

Q. Smoke? - A. Yes.

Q. What house? - A.Hillingworth's house; I thought it was fire; I threw up the window, and then I saw the flame come out; upon which I called, fire! as loud as I could holla; after calling about ten minutes, the neighbours asked me where it was; after I had given the alarm, I came down stairs, and alarmed my brother, and then I went into the court, where I saw this woman walking about.

Q. When did you first see her? - A.When I first threw up the window, I saw the prisoner walking in the yard, and putting her hands up against the shutters, and putting them to.

Q. The same window where the smother and smoke came out? - A. Yes.

Q. How was she dressed? - A. She had a kind of bed-gown on; with that I went into the court, to the front of the house, and saw her in there.

Q. Describe her dress more particularly? - A. She was dressed, as she usually was, as I had seen her some days before; I went round into the court, and saw the prisoner.

Q. She did not say any thing to you, nor you to her? - A. No.

Q. When you saw her putting the shutters to, had she given an alarm? - A. No, none at all; I called, fire! as loud as I could.

Q. Did she hear you? - A. I don't know; I suppose she must.

Q. How high were you? - A.Two-pair-of-stairs.

Q. How far was the yard from you? - A.There were two yards from me, about two hundred yards, as far as that window (the window of the Sessions-House.)

Q. By what light did you distinguish her? - A. It was moon-light, and snow upon the houses; it was very light; I thought at first it was day-light, and that I had slept too long.

Q. When you saw her shutting the shutters, was that before you saw the flame? - A.As she shut them, the flame came towards her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You are a pencil-maker? - A. Yes.

Q. The room you saw the fire out of was the two-pair-of-stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. This was two o'clock in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. The smoke came out of the back parlour?- A. Yes.

Q. You being two story high, at two o'clock in the morning, speaking to nobody, saw a woman in a bed-gown? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw her shutting the shutters? - A. Yes.

Q. All the means of seeing her was the moonlight from a two-pair-of-stairs window? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear that she appeared to be dressed as usual, having a bed-gown on, or loosely thrown on? - A. She had a bed-gown on.

Q. Will you undertake to swear she was completely dressed; that the bed-gown was put on in the regular way? - A. Yes, it was.

Q.Were you alarmed? - A. Yes.

Q.Your attention was drawn to the fire? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean, under the alarm your mind was in, positively to swear this was the woman, and dressed in that particular way? - A. Yes, I will take upon me to swear it.

Court. Q.Had she called out, fire! or given any alarm? - A. Not in my hearing; I believe I was the first that gave the alarm.

Jury. Q. Did you give the alarm in the bed-room window? - A. Yes.

Q. How long before you got round to the court? - A.About twenty minutes; I had my clothes to put on.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You observed a woman shutting the shutters, might it not be to prevent the air from getting in, and encrease the flames? - A. I apprehend it was to prevent the fire being discovered.

Q. The flames, if not prevented by shutting the shutters, would have burnt any body standing so near? - A.No.

Q. The flames were rushing out? - A. The smoke and flame were coming out, and she went to shut the shutters.

Jury. Q. You have no doubt that the prisoner is the person you first saw? - A. No.

PETER MURRAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I lodged at the White Swan, Edmund's-court, Rupert-street.

Q. What is the name of the man that kept the house? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Was he at home at the time the fire happened? - A. No; I was informed that he was in prison for debt; he had been out of the house a month, I believe.

Q. Who acted as mistress of the house? - A. The prisoner at the bar.

Q. Were you alarmed at the time the fire broke

out? - A. I awoke in consequence of the smother of the smoke.

Q. What part of the house did you lodge in?- A. The garret.

Q. How many lodged in the garret? - A.Barnard M'Donald and his wife and children.

Q. How many children? - A. Three; I lodged with them; when I came down, I got out at the back-door; it was between two and three o'clock on Wednesday morning; when I came down stairs, there was fire at the bottom step but one; the front doot was shut.

Q. Was that usually shut of a night? - A. I cannot tell; I went to bed about nine o'clock.

Q. Did you go out at the back door? - A. Yes, into the yard.

Q. Was it open? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any body in the yard? - A. Yes, the prisoner.

Q. Any body else? - A. No, none as I could see.

Q. How was she dressed? - A. In the dress she used to wear every day; she seemed to me as if crying.

Q. Was she giving the alarm of fire? - A. Not as I heard.

Q. You must have heard her if she had been so doing? - A. Yes.

Q. She was not giving any alarm? - A. No.

Q. You found nobody down stairs but her? - A. No; I cried out, fire! in the yard; there was a woman at the back door of the next house; I got over the wall, and got out through that house; I gave the alarm of fire, knocked at the door and shutters, and a watchman sprung his rattle.

Q. Did you go into the back room? - A. No, I only saw the fire on the bottom step but one of the stairs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long had you lodged in the house? - A. A few days before Christmas-day.

Q. The man was in the house then? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they live as man and wife? - A. Yes.

Q. He was arrested for debt? - A. I heard so.

Q. The woman went backwards and forwards to the jail? - A. I heard her say so.

Q. You were very much alarmed? - A. Yes.

Q. And so was she? - A. She appeared to be crying.

Q. Was not she in such as a state as not to know what she did? - A. She might be troubled in her mind.

Q. You have known her ever since you lodged there? - A. Yes; I used to have a drop of beer and gin.

Q. Did she appear to you to be in a state to have the possession of her mind to cry out, fire! or any thing? - A. I cannot tell.

Jury. Q. When you came down stairs, could not you as easily have got out at the sore door as at the back door? - A. I did not know which way I was going, the smother of the smoke was such.

Q. Was she a sober woman? - A. She appeared to me to be a sober woman.

BARNARD MACDONALD sworn. - I am a labouring man; I have a wife and four children.

Q.Where did you live? - A. No. 5, Edmund's-court, Hillingworth's house; I lodged on the same floor with Murray, the White Swan, Edmund's-court, Rupert-street; Murray was the first man that alarmed us about the fire; he shouted, murder and fire! and my wife shouted to me to get up, the house was in flames; I got two children, one on each arm; she took another, and we came down; the stairs were on fire; we slept across the fire, and got out.

Q. Were the four children there? - A.Only three; when I got into the passage, I ran to the street door, it was fast; I saw the back door open; I made to the back door with my children; I saw my landlady.

Q. The prisoner? - A. Yes, between the passage and the back door.

Q. How was she dressed? - A. In a bed-gown, her wearing-apparel, as she was the night before I saw her.

Q. How late did you see her? - A. near eleven o'clock.

Q. You left her dressed, as you found her in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. How was she in the yard? - A. In great confusion; I spoke very angrily to her, and called her out of her name, and said, why did not you alarm us when the house was on fire.

Q. What did she say? - A. She made me no answer that I could hear; my wife ran up to see if she could get any things, and made an alarm the second time; the soldier that lodged there, came down and opened the front door, and we came out.

Q. How many lodged in the house? - A. The soldier and another man, me and my wife and three children, Doyle, and a man and his wife, I don't know; when the front door was opened, I saw fire in the back parlour, upon the left-hand as I went in.

Q. Was there a grate in the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any fire in the grate? - A. No.

Q. Where was the fire? - A. Turning round on the left-hand behind the door, up to the ceiling.

Q. What distance was between the fire in the back parlour and the stairs? - A. I cannot say; no great distance.

Q. What was become of Hillingworth? - A He was in Newgate, as I understood.

Q. Is it usual to shut the door at night? - A. He shut the house pretty early; when he was gone, it was generally open all hours of the night; he had been gone three weeks or a month.

Q. Did you see the back parlour before you went to bed? - A. I was not in the back parlour; there was no light in it.

Q. Was there no fire in the grate? - A. I did not see the grate; I was not in the room the night before.

Q. Do you remember having any conversation with the landlady? - A. Yes, about a fortnight before, I was in the tap-room, she told me she was very much distressed about making up some money.

Q. How long was that after he was arrested? - A. I cannot say; she asked me if I could get some for her; any little would be a help; I told her in a day or two I would see what I could make up for her; I told her, I heard a great noise in the house the night before; I thought some bad people were in the house; I got up, and stood on the stairs; she said, a woman came in, and had some words with the watchman; I said, it was a bad thing for her to keep the house; she said, the brewers would not let her lett it; she said, d-n the house, I would consume it before they should be allowed to get the money for letting it, for they would not allow her to get the money; that the brewers refused to let any body come in; that when she went to the brewer, he would not consent to let the people give the money to her for the house.

Q.Had you any more conversation? - A. No.

Q.You and your family got safe out into the street? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You knew the house before the prisoner's husband was taken out for debt? - A. Yes.

Q.It was his house, carried on for him? - A. I don't know.

Q. Do you know whether she went backwards and forwards to him? - A. Yes, she told me so.

Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, whether she used to support him in Newgate, and was accountable to him? - A. I don't know.

Q. When you came down stairs, you found her in great confusion? - A. Yes.

Q. Crying? - A. I don't know whether she was crying or not; I was very much confused myself.

Q. She appeared alarmed, as much alarmed as you were? - A. She appeared alarmed undoubtedly.

Q. Now as to this conversation, it was a fortnight before? - A. Yes.

Q. You entertained no suspicion from that expression, but remained still in the house? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Did you see the fire in the parlour in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it a boarded floor? - A. Yes.

Q. The fire was near the ceiling? - A. Yes, I saw the joist on fire; I did not wait to examine it; I went out to take care of my children.

MARY MACDONALD sworn. - Murray went down first; there was a great smother, you could not see your hand; he called out, thieves and fire! when I came down, the bottom step was all on a blaze; I went up for my children, and brought them down; then I went up again, and knocked at the doors, to see if there was any body alive; I made a great noise; then I came down again, and saw my landlady; she was dressed as usual; I saw her a little way from the back-door of the yard.

Q. Was she making any alarm? - A. Not as I heard.

Q. You heard Murray make an alarm? - A. Yes, that made me jump out of bed, and come down; I abused her very much, because I thought it very cruel to be walking about in the yard, and making no alarm, when my children and me were in so much danger; she made no answer, to my knowledge; the front door was closed, when I put my hand to it, I could not open it.

Q. Did you hear her say any thing about the brewers before this time? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Had she the appearance of being extremely alarmed herself? - A. I heard no noise at all.

Q. Did not she appear alarmed and troubled in mind? - A. I cannot say.

Jury. Q. How many of your children did you bring down? - A. One, my husband brought the other two down.

CHARLES SCOTTACK sworn. - I am a smith; I live next door to the Swan, in Edmund's-court, Rupert-street: On Wednesday morning, about half after two, the alarm of fire awaked me; I got up, and looked out at the window; I saw a man knocking at the door of the Swan, and calling out, fire! I came down stairs, the door was not open; then I went to No. 8, opposite, and called up my shop-mate, Richard Rich; when I got to his door, he was coming down stairs; I came back, the door was open, I went in, and saw the stairs all on fire on the right-hand; I cast my eye towards the yard-door, and saw Mrs. Windsor, the prisoner, on the threshold, and said, for God's sake come out, or you will be burnt alive; I laid hold of her, and brought her through the passage; she said, O dear! O dear! then I let go her hand.

Q. Was there any body else there? - A. Not that I perceived.

Q. Did you see any other fire? - A. No; I went to my shop, and struck a light, and saw a light in the back room, up one pair of stairs, at the Swan: I went to the parlour, and called John White , and brought him to shew him, and said, that room is on fire; I got on the wall, and broke the window, and saw all the floor was on fire.

Q. That back room is over the back parlour? -

A. Yes, the right-hand corner was all on a blaze; when I saw that, I went down and fetched two of the firemen, and told them of it; and then they went back again into the court to the engine.

Q. Did you see the fire on the stairs and in the back room? - A. Yes!

Q. Were they the same fire? - A. No; two fires.

Q. Could they have caught from one another?- A. I don't think they could, they were seven or eight feet distance, there was a wall separated them.

Jury. Q. Are you sure it was a wall, not a partition? - A. There is mortar.

Court. Q. It is a partition between the two fires? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You acted kindly, and did every thing you could? - A. Yes.

Q. You took this woman out left she should be burnt - did not she appear to be in such a state of alarm as not to be able to help herself? - A. She appeared to me to be in a good deal of trouble.

Q. In such a state of stupifaction, the could not have removed without your assistance? - A. Yes.

JOHN DAVIS sworn. - I am a watchman: I saw Murray first of all.

Q. Was the front door kept open or shut, latterly, of a night? - A. It was generally shut about eleven o'clock; they would open it to any body that knocked. About three or four days after he was arrested, I heard her say, she would go to an attorney, and enter an action against Mr. Dickinson, and have her revenge of him, for the man he had sent there, had broken two locks, and taken the key of the two-pair-of-stairs with him.

Q. You came when Murray was making an alarm, what did you do? - A. I knocked at the door with a great stick, four or five times, and cried out, fire!

Q. Was the door opened? - A. No. I then sprung my rattle, and alarmed the neighbours; I then went for the engine, and came back with it, and then the door was open; the soldier came out with the bar of the door in his hand; I went to work the engine, and saw no more.

Jury. Q. You knocked some time at the door? A. Four or five different times.

Q. Did you stand long enough for the door to have been opened? - A. Yes.

JOHN COX sworn. - I am a fireman of the British Fire-office; I was one of the first that got to this house; when I first came there it was a little after two o'clock in the morning, on the 9th of January, I went into the house, and went into the tap-room.

Q.You found the door open? - A. Yes; I went into the back room, where the fire was burning all round it.

Q.Describe the situation of it? - A. The fire was all round it, burning very rapidly.

Q. Was there any fire in the grate? - A. I did not observe any in the grate at all.

Q. Did you see the grate? - A. Yes; I went and put the Parish engine to work, and got the fire under as quick as we could; it burnt through the back parlour into the one-pair-of-stairs back room; after that, when we had got the fire under, we went up stairs, and did the rest with buckets.

Q. Did you observe the stairs? - A. Yes; the stairs go out of the tap-room into a beer-cellar, all on the ground-floor; the stair-case that comes over the cellar stairs were all on fire underneath them; that is the stairs that go up to the lodgers.

Q. How much of the stairs was burnt? - A. It had burnt right through the second stair.

Q. What distance was this fire under the stairs from that in the back-room? - A.Five feet distance.

Q.Whether the fire in the room could have caught from the stairs, or the fire on the stairs from the room? - A.There could not be any communication from the one to the other, there is large brick wall between the stairs and the room.

Q. Had any fire made its way through the brick wall? - A.None.

Q.It remained entire? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any joist burnt? - A. It had burnt through the joist into the room over the parlour.

Q. Did you take notice whether there was a good deal of furniture in the house? - A. I did not take much notice, there appeared to be very little in it.

Q. Did you see the woman there? - A. Yes, in the court, after the fire was over; I had no conversation with her.

Jury. Q. It seems the parlour was on fire before the room above it? - A. I suppose it was.

Court. Q. It had not burnt from the room to the parlour? - A. No; I suppose from the parlour to the room.

Court. Q.There was a brick wall between the two fires? - A. Yes.

Q. It was impossible the fire could get through that wall? - A. Yes.

Q. Did it appear to be the effect of accident? - A. No.

PETER FISH sworn. - I belong to the Phoenix Fire office; I was at the fire, they appeared to be two distinct and separate fires; there was not the appearance of accident, the one was distinct from the other.

Q. Could it be accidentally set on fire? - A. I have every reason to think it could not.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn. - I am an officer of Marlborough-street; I apprehended the prisoner on the Wednesday; I told her the charge on which she was taken up; her answer was, she made her escape as well as she could, and when she did so,

she was nearly naked; and she always continued in the same story.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This fire happened at two in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q.When did you find the prisoner there? - A. The day but one after; she remained in the house, and did not make her escape.

ROBERT HUGHES sworn. - I was brought up to the sea; I keep a coal-shed, No. 32, Rupert-street; about a week before the fire, I saw a bedstead and chairs standing at the door of the Swan, and a man taking them away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The landlord was in jail at that time? - A. Yes.

Q.You don't know whether it was not for the purpose of the landlord having a bed in jail? - A. I don't know.

RICHARD CORK sworn. - I am Secretary to Christ-church Hospital.

Q.Do you know this house belonging to Dickinson, in Rupert-street? - A. Yes, it belongs to the Governors of Christ-church Hospital; they have lett it, with three others, to Mess. Dickinson, the brewers.

Q. What are their names? - A.Mess. John and Richard Dickinson .

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel. The things that were removed belonged to a person that had the two-pair-of-stairs room, which was empty.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN BRYANT sworn. - I am clerk to Mess. Dickinson; I know Hillingworth; he took the house of us at 301. a year.

Q. He was tenant at the time of the fire? - A. We seized for one quarter's rent; this woman was left in the house; we supposed her to be his wife; be went in the 21st of October, we arrested him on the 21st of January.

Court. Q. He had only been in a quarter? - A. No.

Q. What is his name? - A. Benjamin Hillingworth .

Q. What are Dickinsons' names? - A.Mess. John and Richard.

WILLIAM PIKE sworn. - I am a shoe-maker; I live at No. 9, Edmund's-court, Rupert-street.

Q. Did you see the prisoner the night the fire happened? - A. Yes, between two and three in the morning, I went down, and saw the prisoner in the court, and seemingly all in confusion, in a terror as it were; her ideas seemed confused; I took her by the arm, and asked her to come up into my room; she did, and sat down by the fire; she had a bed-gown on, and her stays in her hand, and laid hold of the bannisters with the other hand; I asked her to sit down by the fire, and after some conversation, she put her stays round her; she appeared quite in a state of alarm at what had happened.

Q. You are quite sure she had her stays in her hand? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. What time was this? - A.Sometime after the alarm.

Q. After the engines were come? - A. Yes.

Q. Every body saw her in the same situation, I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how long the engines had been come before you came down? - A. I don't know; I suppose it was about three o'clock.

Q. Was there any body in the room but you and her? - A. No; I live by myself.

RICHARD HENRY sworn. - I am a watchman, in Wardour-street, adjoining the beat where the fire was; I came to the fire the first alarm of the rattle; I saw the prisoner a little after three o'clock in the street, assisted by her neighbours, very much distressed; she could not walk; her cloaths were very loose, and she had no bonnet on.

Q. Did you see the last witness, Pike? - A. No, I did not; I saw some goods carried away that morning; I stopped a man with a bedstead; I was there at ten o'clock the night before, and she said she was sick, and the watchman was to call her at half after three.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You went at half after three in the morning - the alarm was given at half past two - did you go when the alarm was first given? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see her then? - A. No, I went for the engine.

Q. Did you see her when you came with the engines? - A. No.

Q. Do you know what became of her afterwards? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You came on the alarm, went after the engines, came back, worked the engine, and after that saw this woman? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , Death , aged 29.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-95

313. JOHN EDDY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John King , on the 1st of February , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing four pair of shoes, value 4s. the property of the said John King.

JOHN KING sworn. - I live in Drury-lane , I am a master shoe-maker : On the 1st of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, as I was working at my cutting-board, facing the window, I heard a great crash in the window, it made so much noise that I thought there must be a waggon against it; I looked, and saw a man's arm through the window, taking a stack of shoes, nearly four or five pair, which were set up in the side of the window; the door was open, I rushed to the door, and was stopped

by two men, who said they wanted some shoes, and tried to confine me in; it came to my mind what they were upon; I rushed by, and after running fifty yards, I saw the prisoner with a pair of shoes in his hand; I cried out, stop thief! he threw them down, I took them up, and pursued him, crying out, stop thief! I never lost fight of him after; I saw the shoes in his hand, I ran forty or fifty yards more; I fell down on the top of him, I got assistance, and took him.

Q. Did he take the whole stack out? - A. Yes, almost; a boy took up three pair on the outside of the window.

Q. You are sure you never lost sight of him? - A. Yes.

Q.Was it his hand you saw, when the window was broke? - A. I cannot say that.

Jury. Q.Whether you saw, immediately as you went out of the door, the shoes in the prisoner's hand, before he set off to run away? - A. No.

Q.How far was he off when you first saw him?- A. Not four yards from the window.

WILLIAM HALFPENNY. - Q. How old are you?- A. Not quite fourteen.

Q.Have you learnt your catechism? - A. Not quite.

Q. Do you know it is a bad thing to tell a lie?- A. Yes.

Q. Don't you know you call God to witness when you take an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. And that you are liable to be punished if you tell a lie, not only in the next world, but in this, and that very severely? - A. Yes. (He is sworn.) I saw two hands up to the shoulder in the window; my master ran after the man, and I picked up three pair of shoes under the window.

VALENTINE LUMLEY sworn. - I am a constable: I have a pair of shoes; the prosecutor brought the prisoner to the watch-house; I asked him if there was any mark on the shoes; he said, yes, J. B. there is J. B. on them. (The shoes produced).

King. I can swear to these shoes, (looks at the three pair); I can swear to them.

Jury. Q.What is the mark you swear to them by? - A. I don't believe there is any mark upon them, I believe them to be my property; I should know them if I were to see them in France, by the work of the shoes; these two pair of shoes are very remarkable shoes, with a long side seam, which is not common now.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along the street, and being in liquor, I fell down, this man came and took me, I know nothing what for.

GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

He was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth, and no violence being connected with it.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030216-96

314. MICHAEL ELY was indicted for that he, well knowing that Murty Ryan had served our Lord the King, on board a ship, called the Audacious, on the 9th of December , did personate and assume the character of the said Murty Ryan , in order to receive the prize-money due to the said Murty Ryan, as a seaman on board the said ship .

FRANCIS SAWYER sworn. - Examined Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Mr. Tyson, of Woolwich, who is the prize-agent; I pay the prize-money of the Audacious, for Mr. Tyson.

Q. Have you got this prize-list, by which it appears that Murty Ryan is entitled to any prizemoney? - A. This is a copy of it, the original is at the Navy-office, it is a list by which we pay the prizes.

Court. Q. Is it signed by any body? - A. No, there is only one original, this is a copy of it, I had it from the Office.

Q. Does it appear that Murty Ryan was entitled to any prize-money? - A. Yes; 1149, Murty Ryan, 1l. 12s.

Q. That is the money Murty Ryan was entitled to? - A. Yes, for the capture of the Genereaux, by the Audacious; the Audacious is a seventy-four gun ship, the Genereaux is a seventy-four.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, perfectly well; he came to me the 9th of September last; he produced me a paper, signifying he was Murty Ryan, and it appeared to be signed by the officer of the Audacious.

Q. Have you got the paper here? - A. No, we mark it when we pay the money, and return it, it was signed Henry Tuckness; I told him I knew his name was not Murty Ryan, his name was Michael Ely.

Q. You knew Murty Ryan? - A. No, I knew the prisoner; he owned it, he said, he had deserted from the ship he belonged to for bad usage, and afterwards was pressed again, by that means, he changed his name, because he would not be detected again.

Court. Q. That is no uncommon thing, I believe? - A.Quite common, I told him the danger of it, in case he personated, and was not the right person; he said, he was very well aware of that, and was nut such a fool; I paid him one pound twelve shillings, and marked the certificate, and gave it him again, with the sum paid on it.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - A. Not till I was summoned last week before a Magistrate.

Court. Q. Do you know him to be the person?- A. Yes, I was near two years and a half with him in one ship.

Q. You have no doubt at all of his being the person? - A. Not the least; I made a note of it directly, that he had formerly passed by the name of Michael Ely , on board the Fortitude.

HENRY TUCKNESS sworn. - I am carpenter of the Audacious.

Q. Were you carpenter at the time of the capture of the Genereaux? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether there was, at that time, a seaman on board, of the name of Murty Ryan? - A. Yes, I knew him very well; he was on board at the time of the capture of the Genereaux.

Q. Was he entitled to a share of the prize-money ? - A. To be sure he was : On the 3d of September last , I gave a certificate to him , at Lewisham , in Kent , to certify that he was an able man on board the ship , and entitled to a share of all prizes taken by the ship .

Q. Did you see him after he had the certificate ?- A. No.

Q. Have you seen that certificate since ? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Murty Ryan ? - A. Yes, very well.

Q. Is the prisoner Murty Ryan ? - A. No, he never was on board the ship .

Q. This man was never on board the ship at all, and was not entitled to any prize-money ? - A. No.

Q. Is he like Murty Ryan ? - A. Not at all .

Q. Did you give the certificate to Murty Ryan, and nobody else ? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever give a certificate to the prisoner ?- A. No.

Q. How many men were there on board the ship? - A. Six hundred .

Q. Are you sure this man was never on board your ship by any name whatever ? - A. He never was on board the ship .

Q. Sometimes there are two men in a ship of the same name ? - A. Yes; then we call them first and second.

Q. You had not two persons on board , of the name of Murty Ryan ? - A. No.

Sawyer . A person of the name of Murty Ryan came afterwards with the last witness's certificate , I refused to pay him till I could find the prisoner .

Prisoner's defence . I was just come out of an hospital, a man came to me , and gave me five shillings to go and get the money , and I did, it was a man of the name of Meger , he was before the Magistrate , he owned he gave it me, and five shillings to get it.

Sawyer . He is sent into the country to be tried on a like charge .

Q. Are you sure you cautioned the man in this way - What was you on board of a ship with him?- A. A pursur's steward .

Q. He knew you? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was it you had this conversation with him? - A. No. 34, Arundel-street .

GUILTY , Death .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant .


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