Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th January 1803.
Reference Number: 18030112
Reference Number: f18030112-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 12th of JANUARY, 1803, and following Days, BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , ESQUIRE, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1803.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &C.

BEFORE the Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , ESQUIRE, LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. Sir ARCHIBALD MACDONALD , Knight, Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir SOULDEN LAWRENCE, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Right Hon. THOMAS HARLEY , PAUL LE MESURIER , Esq. Sir Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; GEORGE MACKENZIE MACAULAY, Esq. GEORGE HIBBERT , Esq. and CHARLES FLOWER, Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

Walter Godfrey ,

John Rodbard ,

George Hulme ,

William Crockford ,

James Siveright ,

Samuel Heseltine ,

Alexander Ritchie ,

John Willis ,

Joshua Joyce ,

Robert Bickerstaffe ,

David Thomas ,

John Thomas .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Hector Esses ,

George Kibby ,

William Burton ,

John Lewthwaite ,

Thomas Lee ,

John Russell ,

John Rose ,

James Johnstone ,

Benjamin Tissin ,

George Taylor ,

James Allen ,

George Rumbold .

London Jury.

Joseph Wilkins ,

John Wade ,

Thomas Shelton ,

John Akers ,

Gregory Jarman ,

Henry Cape ,

William Nixon ,

John Gattley ,

John Meek ,

John Rutter ,

Thomas Cecil ,

John Slaymaker

Reference Number: t18030112-1

101. WILLIAM BARNSTAPLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , two gown-sleeves, value 3s. a gown-body, value 5s. a skirt of a gown, value 5s. five canvas bags, value 5s. and two breechings to a coach-barness, value 10s. the property of John Bolland , Esq.(The case was opened by Mr. Bolland.)

Mrs. ELIZABETH BOLLAND sworn. - I am the wife of Mr. John Bolland , of Mark-lane: On Wednesday the 14th of July, I put a gown into the carriage, with a view to have it made up at Norwood by the mantua-maker; the prisoner had been our coachman nine months; I had taken the gown to-pieces by way of having it re-made; I went to Norwood in our own carriage, and there saw the gown in the sword-case of the carriage; I returned to Clapham, our country-house, and on Sunday the 18th I made enquiry of the prisoner after the gown; he said he knew nothing of it; he remained in our service till December, during which time I frequently asked him if he knew any thing of it, and he always said he knew nothing of it; I have since seen the gown at Guildhall.

ROBETT SAINSBURY sworn. - I am an officer; I executed a search-warrant at the lodgings of the prisoner, in Queen-street, Cheapside; he was not there; his wife and sister-in-law sent for him, and he came in while we were searching the apartment; we found the articles mentioned in the indictment. - (Produces them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You did not know the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. You did not know that he lived there? - A. No.

Q. You never heard from the prisoner that those were his lodgings? - A. No.(The property was identified by Mrs. Bolland, and John Murray , warehouseman to Mr. Bolland.)

JOSEPH BOLLAND , Esq. sworn. - I am the brother of Mr. John Bolland; the prisoner sent for me to the lock-up-house on the 16th of December; I waited upon him, and he informed me he had taken the gown, the bags, and the harness, and that it was his intention the morning he was taken up to take them back, and thank his master and mistress for their civilities to him; that he hoped I would use my influence, and beg they would not prosecute; the prisoner had left his situation at that time.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up these things in the walk where the carriage comes up, at Clapham; my master gave me the bags to take to town.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-2

102. JOHN STEVENS and BENJAMIN WESTON were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , a bottle, value 3d. a pound of Currie powder, value 3s. a bottle, value 3d. a quart of capers, value 2s. a bottle, value 3d. containing mangoes, value 2s. and a case, value 1s. the property of Charles Graham ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence of the prosecutor's possession of the property in the City of London, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-3

103. WILLIAM TURNBULL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a handkerchief, value 3s. the property of Samuel Emden , privily from his person .

SAMUEL EMDEN sworn. - I am a conveyancer ; this day week, about one o'clock, I was coming down Fleet-street , towards Fleet-market; near Water-lane, a person informed me I had lost my handkerchief; I immediately turned round, and laid hold of the prisoner; I found my handkerchief inside his coat, under his arm; a constable immediately came up, and I gave charge of him; the handkerchief cost me 7s. it is a silk one; the prisoner said, as I dropped it out of my pocket, he picked it up.

JOHN SAMUEL sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Richardson, stock-brokers; this day week I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from Mr. Emden's pocket.(John Cordery, a constable, produced the handkerchief, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the handkerchief in the street; I did not see the gentleman drop it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-4

104. WILLIAM PLOMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of January , two pecks of coals, value 1s. the property of John Edington .

JOHN EDINGTON sworn. - I am a coal-merchant : On Sunday morning the 2d of January, between six and seven o'clock, the property was taken from my barge at my wharf, I had been frequently robbed, and desired a man to watch.

JOHN SAUCE sworn. - I am a watchman at Blackfriar's-bridge; on the 2d of this month, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner go down the steps, another man went down just before, I was at the last house in Bridge-street; I then went to the Crescent, and called another watchman to assist me, the prisoner was the first man that came up with a bag upon his shoulder, I laid hold of him.

Q. Could you see any thing they were doing? - A. No, I heard the coals rattle in the craft; I secured the prisoner, and found the bag contained coals, there was about a peck and a half.

JOHN Brown sworn. - I am a watchman; I saw the prisoner come up the steps, I assisted in securing him, he had a bag with some coals.

DANIEL INCH sworn. - I was a constable at the time this happened; I took charge of the coals, I have had them ever since. (Produces them.)

Mr. Edington: Q. There were no coals near that place but mine, or within one hundred yards of it; I missed the coals from a barge, No. 1003, it was full the night before.

HENRY SMITH sworn. - I am a lighterman; I cannot swear to these coals, they are the same sort of coals that were lost, there was no other craft near, or a passage to any other, unless a man jumped overboard; the barge was called the Hope, No. 1003, and an anchor painted on her stern.

Q. Was this a full room? - A. No, it was broken into the day before; there had been a great deal of rain in the night, which gives a different gloss to the coals, and these were taken after the rain left off; they had the appearance of having been raked out with the hands.

Prisoner's defence. My wife had laid in that morning, and I had no coals to warm my three children; I went on board a sailing barge, and the man gave me some coals.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined two months in Newgate , and publicly whipped 100 yards in Bridge-street .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-5

105. EDWARD ASBERY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , a sack, value 1s. and four bushels of wheat, value 33s. the property of John-Shepperd Killick .

THOMAS WHITEBREAD sworn. - I am a lighterman; I lost a sack containing four bushels of wheat, from the bow of the barge, about half past six in the evening of the 13th of December; we went on shore to get some beer, we were gone about a quarter of an hour, and when we came back, I saw a boat athwart the bow of the barge, and the prisoner and another were in it, the others got away; I found the sack in the boat; we immediately hauled the boat along side our craft with a hitcher, and they said directly, overboard with it, I suppose twenty times; the other man jumped over-board and swam away; the sack was thrown over-board, we got it up again afterwards, (produces the sack); it is my master's property; his name is John-Shepperd Killick; the sack contained four bushels of wheat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe maltsters, and persons dealing in corn, frequently lend their sacks? - A. Yes, they do.

Q. The prisoner was not the person who ran away? - A. No, he threw the sack over board.

Q. Did you leave any body on board when you went ashore? - A. Yes, a lad.

Q.Whether he gave any direction to the prisoner or the other man, you don't know? - A. No.

Q. Is he here? - A. No.

JAMES WATERMAN sworn. - I was at work with the last witness; when we returned, I saw a boat lying athwart the bow of our barge, I laid hold of it with the boat-hook; the barge laid off St. Catherine's stairs; as soon as I laid hold of it, they cried out, heave it overboard, which the prisoner immediately did; the other man jumped into the water, and swam away. I laid hold of the prisoner, and brought him into the barge.

Court. Q. Did the prisoner attempt to make his escape? - A. No; he wanted us to let him go.

Prisoner's defence. I had a fare, a man desired me to row to that barge, which I did, and he took the sack into the boat; when this man came and pulled the boat back again, the man then jumped over board, and swam away; I could have done the same, if I had been guilty.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Twelve months in the House of Correction , and publickly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-6

106. DOMINICK LOVELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , a great coat, value 6s. the property of Joseph Churton .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, except that of his own confession, which was extorted by a promise of favor, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-7

107. ROBERT TUCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , two packing-cloths, value 5s. the property of Edward Wakeling .

EDWARD WAKELING sworn. - I live at Clare in Suffolk; I am proprietor of a stage-waggon to

the Three Nuns-inn, Aldgate; I am answerable for all the property in the waggon. I can only prove the property.

THOMAS HURT sworn. - I am a butcher: On Christmas-eve last, I saw the prisoner take a bundle of cloths out of the apron of the Clare-waggon, opposite the Three Nuns-inn, Aldgate ; he carried them away under his arm; I went after him, and took him; I never lost sight of him, I brought him back with the burdle under his arm. I delivered them to the waggoner, George Jarvis, and he claimed them.

GEORGE JARVIS sworn. - I am a waggoner: The last witness brought the two cloths and the prisoner to me on Christmas-eve; the prisoner had the two packing-cloths under his arm; I had seen them about four hours before; they are marked with red ochre.

Robert Coomes , the officer, produced the property, which was identified by Jarvis.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up these cloths under the shafts of the waggon.

GUILTY , aged 22.

One year in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-8

108. JAMES YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Robert Crawford .

ROBERT CRAWFORD sworn. - I am a private gentleman: On Saturday the 11th of December, between three and four in the afternoon, I was going down Philpot-lane from Fenchurch-street, two men dressed like sailors came behind me, one touched me on the shoulder, and the other pulled the handkerchief out of my pocket, and immediately ran up Philpot lane; I pursued, crying stop thief; and the prisoner was stopped at the corner of Lime-street; I did not lose sight of him, except while he was crossing Fenchurch-street; the other man escaped; as soon as the prisoner was stopped, he pulled my handkerchief out of his pocket; he was immediately secured. The constable has had the handkerchief ever since. The other man ran down Philpot-lane.

Joseph Gregory, a constable, produced the handkerkerchief, which was identified by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I saw two sailors running in Fenchurch-street, this gentleman sung out stop thief, and I sung out stop thief; one of them dropped this handkerchief, and I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined three months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-9

109. THOMAS WOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of John Bentley .

JOHN BENTLEY sworn. - I am a merchant : On Tuesday, the 21st of December last, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going westward through Fleet-street, on the northward side of the way; when I got near Templebar , I heard a call of stop; behind me; upon which I turned round, put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; I then stepped back a few yards, and saw a handkerchief in a man's hand, which I immediately said was mine; he said, I know it is, for I saw this man (he had hold of the prisoner), take it out of your pocket. He was then delivered to a constable, with the handkerchief.

JOHN PERIAM sworn. - I am a confectioner: On the 21st of December, crossing from my master's house, I saw the prisoner with two other young men; the prisoner put his hand in Mr. Bentley's right-hand pocket, and took out a silk handkerchief; I immediately collared him; he then dropped the handkerchief, and I picked it up; I called to the prosecutor to stop, he came back, and seeing the handkerchief in my hand, he said it was his; we then took him to the constable's house.

Alexander Auld, a constable, produced the handkerchief, which was identified by Mr. Bentley.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-10

110. WILLIAM GIBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , three sheets, value 12s. the property of Thomas Hargrave .

THOMAS HARGRAVE sworn. - I keep the Ipswich-arms in Cullum-street ; the prisoner had worked for me about two months; he had left me about six weeks. I can only prove the property.

ANN DELAPP sworn. - My husband is a shoemaker. I was at a public-house, Mr. Moody's, in Field-lane; the prisoner was there, and asked me to pawn a pair of sheets for him, it was about three weeks ago, I cannot tell the day of the month, I pledged them in Fleet-market.

MARTIN JONES sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker; (produces the sheets). The last witness brought me a pair of sheets to pledge, on the 18th of December; she said she brought them from a Mrs. Morgan, in Fleet-street; she went out as I understood, to fetch Mrs. Morgan. In half an hour after, a person calling himself Delapp came, said they were his sheets, and he had come to settle it; he said, he lived in Field-lane, and I sent a young man with him to enquire; that is all I know of it. I have kept the sheets ever since. Mr.

Delapp was taken into custody, and was released on the Thursday following, when the prisoner was taken up; the sheets have the name printed in large letters in the middle.

Delapp. These are the same sheets.

THOMAS SIMPSON sworn. - I am a constable: On Sunday the 19th of December, Ann Delapp came to me; I went with her, and apprehended the prisoner by her direction; after I had secured him, I went back to the place where I took him from, and found this blanket and this sheet - (producing them.)(The property was identified by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through Leadenhall-market, and found a bundle, which contained these sheets. GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-11

111. SARAH WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a set of cotton bed-furniture, value 40s. a pair of sheets, value 20s. a quilt, value 5s. a tea-spoon, value 2s. and a napkin, value 1s. the property of Jesse Jones , in a lodging-room lett by contract by him .

It appearing in evidence that the contract was with the wife, and disapproved of by the husband, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-12

112. RICHARD LEROY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , a handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Thomas Wiltshire .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Nicholas Wiltshire .

THOMAS WILTSHIRE sworn. - I work at the upholstery business for Mr. Carr, in Pall-Mall: On the 20th of December, I was going home from West-street, Smithfield , to the Strand, I saw a parcel of people standing together round an ox; I went up to see what was the matter; Mr. Read asked me if I had lost a handkerchief; I felt in my pocket, and told him I had; he had hold of the prisoner at the time; he told me he saw the prisoner tucking it in his bosom, and I gave charge of him in Newgate.

NICHOLAS WILTSHIRE sworn. - The last witness is my son; I know nothing of the transaction.

JOHN READ sworn. - On the 20th of December, I was with Cartwright; one of the fat oxen was shewing in Smithfield, and I observed the prisoner outside the crowd putting something in his bosom; I went up to him as he was going into the crowd again, and laid hold of him; I asked him what he had got there; he said nothing; I put my hand in his bosom, and took out this handkerchief; I held it up, and asked who had lost a handkerchief; this young man then came up, and said, he had lost one, marked T. W. I shewed it him, and he said it was his.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I was with Read; I know no more than he does.(The handkerchief was produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel; and called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-13

113. THOMAS JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , three packs of cards, value 12s. the property of James Dowse .

JAMES DOWSE sworn. - I am a stationer , in Lime-street : On Tuesday the 21st of December, between one and two o'clock, I lost three packs of cards; my apprentice saw the prisoner take them; I was called down, and the prisoner was brought back with three packs of cards in his bosom; they were playing cards; the apprentice took them from him, and I delivered them to the constable; I had seen them in the window half an hour before; when I was called down, I missed them immediately; they had the picture of a Highlander upon them.

THOMAS NORMAN sworn. - The prisoner came into our house to buy a penny sheet of brown paper; he asked for a remarkable stout one; I stooped down to get him one, and while I was stooping down, I observed him shoving his hand into his bosom; I suspected he had taken something out of the window; when he went out of the shop, I called my master down to know if he missed any thing; he missed the cards, and I went after the prisoner, and caught him in Lime-street-square; I told him he must come back with me; he came back with me very quietly; when he came back, I put my hand into his bosom, and pulled out three packs of cards; there is no mark upon them; I cannot swear to them.( William Wood , a constable, produced the cards.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the cards in Fenchurch-street. GUILTY , aged 38.( The prisoner being sick, his sentence was postponed .)

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-14

114. JAMES DEARING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , twelve yards of ribbon, value 6s. the property of Thomas West and Matthew Spragge .

HERBERT RICHARDSON sworn. - On Friday the 31st of December, at a quarter before seven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner draw a ribbon

through the screw-hole of West and Spragge's window; I ran from behind the counter in pursuit of him; he ran across the road; I overtook him, and pushed him down; he jumped up, and ran away; I did not see him again till Wednesday the 5th of January; he was brought to our house by an officer; I knew him again; I have no doubt about his person in the least.

Q. Who do you live with? - A.Thomas West and Matthew Spragge , No. 60, Whitechapel-road ; it was a plaid ribbon.

ELIZABETH WOOD sworn. - I live servant at the Black Bull, Whitechapel-road; the last night in the year the prisoner gave me a bit of ribbon, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I wore it the next day, till the officer had it from me, I believe the next day.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer,(produces a piece of ribbon); I had this from the last witness; on Wednesday the 5th of January, in consequence of information, I went to this public-house, where there were a great number of these loose kind of lads, and the girl pointed out the prisoner among them; he said he bought it in Rag-fair for nine-pence.

Richardson. This is the same pattern as the ribbon I saw the prisoner take; there were upwards of twelve yards lost; this is about a yard.

Prisoner's defence. I bought it in Rosemary-lane of a woman that sits there and sells garters and ribbons and other things, and this girl asked me to give it to her, which I did.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-15

115. PETER DOSSAWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a jacket, value 1s. a pair of trowsers, value 2s. a waistcoat, value 1s. a shirt, value 2s. a frock, value 2s. and a silk handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Thomas Howell .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of John Perry .

The prosecutor having gone to sea, and there being no evidence to identify the property, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-16

116. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of January , two pair of sheets, value 20s. three blankets, value 20s. a counterpane, value 5s. and a pillow, value 2s. the property of Sarah Alstrom , widow , in her dwelling-house .

SARAH ALSTROM sworn. - I am a widow; I keep a house in Anchor and Hope-alley, St. George's in the East : On the 1st of this month, I found the prisoner in one of my bed-rooms, about seven in the evening, she had prepared a quantity of bed-linen in a bundle from off the beds; there were two pair of sheets, three blankets, a counterpane, and a pillow; they were lying in a heap upon the floor; I did not see her in the room; my servant did; I afterwards went up, and saw the things; I did not see her till she had got upon the stairs; the prisoner said, my servant cried thieves, and shoved her up the stairs.

ELEANOR AIKIN sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Alstrom: On Sunday evening, the 2d of December, I went up into the bed-room to shut the window-shutters; there was some person in the room in a drab jacket; I could not tell whether it was a man or woman; I saw the bed-cloaths on the floor; the person ran out immediately; I went back, and called thieves, and shut the stair-foot door, and kept my back against it till my mistress came; the prisoner had run down the back-stairs; when my mistress came, we found the prisoner with the drab jacket on upon the stairs that I went down; I knew the prisoner perfectly well; she lived a good while next door to us; she said there's thieves up stairs, I will catch them, I will catch them; and then my mistress sent for a patrol. -(The property was produced, and identified by Mrs. Alstrom.)

Prisoner's defence. There is a thoroughfare through this passage; the door is always left open for the sailor lodgers; when I got into the passage, the servant cried out stop thief, and they alledged it upon me; I was very much intoxicated.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing goods to the value of 30s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-17

117. JOHN WARNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , two books, value 5s. the property of John Eckford .

JOHN ECKFORD sworn. - I am a bookseller , in Crown-court, Salisbury-court, Fleet-street ; I lost two books from my stall on Tuesday the 7th of last month, to the best of my recollection, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon; I saw the prisoner take them from the stall; I was inside the shop; he ran away with them, and I came round the corner, and pursued him; he threw the books into the kennel, and I overtook him within twenty yards after he had thrown them away; they were Travels in North America; they had my private mark on them; I brought him back, and picked up the books; the constable has them.(Richard Templeman, a constable, produced the books, which were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the books.

The prisoner called one witness, with whom he had lived till within two days of the transaction,

and four other witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 12.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-18

118. JAMES MERCER and ANN ROBINSON were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , 21lb. of iron, value 2s. the property of Richard Underwood ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

RICHARD UNDERWOOD sworn. - I am in the metal fan-light and balcony business , in Houndsditch ; the prisoner was one of my workmen ; he used to stay in the shop to eat his dinner, and a little before the other men came in, he used to go out for his half pint of beer; I can only prove the iron to be mine.

JOSEPH UNDERWOOD sworn. - I am the brother of the last witness; I am his journeyman; I came into the shop a little before two o'clock, on Monday the 13th of December; the prisoner said, he was going to get half a pint of beer; soon after that one of the smiths came in, and I went after the prisoner to see whether he went for beer or not; I followed him through several alleys into Petticoat-lane, and saw him go into the prisoner, Robinson's shop; then I left him, and went back, and told my master he had a thief about him; the prisoner came in about a quarter of an hour afterwards, and my master asked him what he did in the shop in Petticoat-lane; he told him he had not been in any shop; I then went with the prisoner to the shop, to fetch the iron away: the prisoner, Robinson, was in the shop; I told her I had come for the iron this man had been selling; I said it was my master's property, and she said, there it is; it laid upon the floor; the prisoner brought it back in his apron.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You talk about Mrs. Robinson's shop, do you not know it is Mr. Croker's shop? - A. I don't know that it is; I saw her there.

Q. What is the name over the door? - A. I never looked; she paid the prisoner for the iron.

Q.Did you see that? - A. No; but I desired him to give her the money back, and he gave her seventeen pence halfpenny; I think she said it weighed seventeen pounds and a half, it was new hand railing.

Q. Was it all new? - A. No, not all; when I went to her, she said, he was the man that she bought the iron of, and she did not know it was stolen; he scrupled it's weighing seventeen pounds and a half, and she said, if you don't like my scales and weights, I will get some others.

Q. The prisoner carried the iron home himself? - A. Yes, and I came home with him, and when I weighed it, it weighed twenty-two pounds within a quarter.

Q. Is one penny a pound a fair full price for it? - A. I cannot tell the value.

Q.(To the Prosecutor.) Was the iron that was brought back your iron? - A. Yes, I know two or three of the pieces to be mine.

Q. It is worth more than one penny a pound? - A. Yes, it is worth one penny halfpenny, at least.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know Mr. Croker is the master of the house? - A. I do not know, the prisoner called herself Mrs. Croker, at that time, we found him up stairs in bed; she afterwards said, before the Lord-Mayor, that she was not married to him, and that her name was Robinson.

WOLFE SOLOMON sworn. - I am a constable.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you know Mr. Croker is the master of this house? - A. Yes, he is ill in bed, his name is in the parish-books for that house.

Prisoner Mercer's defence. I have nothing to say.

Robinson left her defence to her Counsel, and called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Mercer, GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Robinson, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-19

119. SAMUEL BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a watch, value 3l. a quarter of a yard of ribbon, value 1d. a seal, value 10s. and a watch-key, value 1d. the property of Thomas Bradshaw , in the dwelling-house of Ann Hill , widow .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the said Ann Hill , in her dwelling-house.

ANN HILL sworn. - I am a widow, I keep a house in Ball-alley, Lombard-street : Mr. Bradshaw keeps the Cross-keys-inn , close by, he sent a watch to me to be repaired, and to have a new chain to it, I carry on my husband's business; the prisoner did live servant with me ten or eleven years ago: On New-year's-day, about a quarter before five o'clock, I had occasion to go out; I returned in about ten minutes, and found the shop in confusion, and a number of people in it.

Q. The shop, I suppose, makes part of your dwelling-house? - A. Yes; I left an errand-boy in the shop when I went out, and when I came back the prisoner was in custody; a gentleman, who is not here, charged the prisoner with taking the watch; he denied taking it; the watch had been brought back from a gentleman's house, where the prisoner had dropped it.

Q. Did you yourself know that watch to be Mr.

Bradshaw's? - A. Yes, it was delivered to the constable; it had a small gold seal, with a ribbon and a key; I had received it from Mr. Bradshaw about three days before; I had seen it between four and five o'clock that afternoon, hanging up in the shop.

WILLIAM CROUCH sworn. - I am errand boy to Mrs. Hill, in Ball-alley: On New-year's-day, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the shop with a little child, I saw a man watching about, for, I dare say, a quarter of an hour, and when my mistress went out, he came in and took the watch off the hook.

Q. How did he get in? - A. The door was open, the little child opened it, I was standing behind the counter.

Q. Where was the hook upon which it hung? - A. Over the window; he ran away, and I ran after him; I did not lose sight of him all the way, till I saw him stopped in Lombard-street, the corner of George-yard, by a gentleman, who is here; he fell down in Lombard-street, where he was stopped; after he was brought back, I went to look where he sell down, and I saw the watch lying in an area; the gentleman belonging to the house brought it back, it was a metal watch, and had the appearance of being the same watch that was taken from the hook.

Prisoner. Q. Was there not music playing in the court, and a great many people about? - A. Yes, there was music playing at the door.

Q. How can you swear to me out of a mob of people that were standing there? - A. I did not see any mob of people at all.

BENJAMIN FRYDEBURGH sworn. - I am a tanner, on the 1st of January, about five o'clock, going through Lombard-street, I heard the voice of a child, crying, stop thief; I saw the prisoner running very fast, and when he got to the corner of George-yard, he sell down; he got up, and attempted to run off, but I collared him, and the little boy came up, and said, don't let him go, he has stolen our watch; I took him back to Mrs. Hill's, I did not loose him till I brought him back to the shop, he was searched, but nothing found; I saw the watch afterwards brought in; Mrs. Hill came in a little time after, the boy persisted he was the man that stole the watch, and he was given in charge to the constable, the prisoner made no kind of resistance.(Robert Scott, a constable, produced the watch.)

THOMAS BRADSHAW sworn. - I keep the Cross-keys-inn, in Gracechurch-street, this is my watch, they dial-plate was made on purpose for my sight; I bought it of Mr. Hill, he made it for me.

Crouch. This is the same watch, I saw it lying in the area, Mr. Stanson brought it back.

EDWARD OWEN sworn. - I picked up this watch in our area, I gave it to Mr. Stanson, and he cared it to Mrs. Hill's; I took the number of the watch before I gave it to him, it is 1303, or 5, the figures on the dial-plate are very large.

Crouch. I know this is the same watch by the cases, and by the shape of the seal, it had a black ribbon to it.

Frydeburgh. I did not take sufficient notice of the watch, to say whether this is the same or not.

Q.(To Mrs. Hill.) Do you ever attend to the business yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any thing particular about Mr. Bradshaw's watch? - A. Yes, the figures on the dial-plate are remarkably large, and I remarked the ribbon.

Q. When you came back and saw the watch, did you then know it to be the same? - A. Yes.

Q. Were all the watches you had in your shop either your own or some your had to repair? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. I think it is worth three pounds in the trade.

Q. The glass is broke, is it not? - A. Yes, it was perfect when it was taken away.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime alledged against me.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing goods, value 39s. ( The prisoner being sick, his sentence was postponed .)

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-20

120. JOHN DUNBAR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Shepherd , a shilling, a Bank-note, value 2l. and another Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Henry George .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-21

121. JAMES FRANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , a handkerchief, value 5s. the property of George Capper , privily from his person .

GEORGE CAPPER sworn. - I am a merchant : On the 7th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing along Fenchurch-street , I was going from Mark-lane to my accompting-house, in Castle-court, Birchin-lane, a man followed me, and asked me if I had lost my handkerchief, he is not here; I put my hand to my greatcoat pocket, and missed it; he said, the man who had got it, was run down Mincing-lane; I desired him to follow me, and point out the person he suspected; about half way down Mincing-lane, he pointed out the prisoner, I collared him, and accused him with having my handkerchief; upon moving his coat, I perceived the handkerchief be

tween his coat and waistcoat in his bosom; he had a great coat on; I took it out, and found it to be my own; I put it in my pocket, and desired him to come along with me; it was a silk handkerchief, yellow and red; it has no marks, but I believe it to be mine; I have others of the same piece- (Produces one.)

Q. What would you give for such a handkerchief? - A. Five shillings; it is nearly new; I gave eight shillings for it.

Prisoner's defence. I saw the handkerchief lying upon the ground in Fenchurch-street, and I picked it up. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-22

122. EDWARD MILLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , a great coat, value 1l. the property of Joseph Barrett , and a jacket, value 2s. the property of Joseph Lumley .

JOSEPH BARRETT sworn. - I am coachman to the York and Edinburgh Mail: On Friday, the 7th of January, about six o'clock in the morning, I left my coat in the care of the horse-keeper , at the Bull and Mouth, Joseph Lumley .

JOSEPH LUMLEY sworn. - I am horse-keeper at the Bull and Mouth: Barrett left a great coat with me on the 7th of January, in the morning; I hung it up to dry; there was a jacket of mine taken from the same stable; here is a witness that stopped him.

ROBERT HAWKINS sworn. - I am a porter at the Bull and Mouth; on the 7th of January I saw the prisoner taking a great coat and a jacket out of the yard; I saw him come out of the stable; I followed him to the gate; I asked the man that keeps the gate if he knew any thing of him, and he dropped both the articles immediately; I followed him a-cross Bull and Mouth street, laid hold of him, and brought him into the yard; I never lost sight of him; I took him to the book-keeper, and he charged a constable with him and the things.(The constable produced the property, which was identified by Barrett and Lumley.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; I leave it to the mercy of your Lordship.

GUILTY , aged 28.( The prisoner being sick, his sentence was postponed .)

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-23

123. THOMAS STONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , four deals, value 6s. the property of Henry King .

HENRY KING sworn. - I am a carpenter ; I know nothing of the transaction.

- ASTON sworn. - On Wednesday the 8th of December, I was painting at the end of Mr. King's yard; I saw the prisoner take four deals from under the shop in the yard; I went after him, and stopped him about one hundred yards off; he said he did not take them from there; I took them from him, and gave charge of him to a constable.

Q.(To King.) Were all the deals under your shop your property? - A. They were. From what I have known of the prisoner, I would take him into my service. GUILTY , aged 43.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-24

124. JAMES WORBYS and DANIEL DANIELS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , four bushels of coals, value 5s. the property of Robert Ward .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

DANIEL SWINEY sworn. - I am wharf-clerk to the prosecutor: On the 30th of December, I was at Golden Hart Wharf, Thames-street; there were thirty-six sacks put into the waggon, to be sent to Pullain and Leveck's brewhouse; I don't know whether I saw the waggon go or not, but I ordered the prisoner, Worbys, to take them to Pullain and Leveck's brewhouse, in Old-street; I counted the sacks myself.

WILLIAM SIMPSON sworn. - I live in Whitecross-street, near Cripplegate, in the county of Middlesex: On the 30th of December, I saw the two prisoners with a coal-waggon; they stopped opposite a hair-dresser's door, in Whitecross-street; the prisoner, Worbys, came up the court, and asked the people in my own house where the cooper lived; I told him he lived there; I was in the court at that time; he knocked at the cooper's room, and the door was opened; I saw Worbys bring a sack of coals out of the waggon, and take them up stairs; I went over to a public-house, and then I saw Worbys come back; the old man, Daniels, untied the cord, and then Worbys took another sack out, and carried it to the same place; I went over the way, and looked at the waggon; I found it was a coal-merchant's waggon; I could not read, and got my wife to read it, but I do not recollect the name; I followed the waggon to Mr. Leveck's; it stopped there ten minutes, or better; I informed Mr. Leveck of what I had seen; the two prisoners were there; they threw two empty sacks on the ground; then Mr. Leveck came out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. They emptied all the sacks at Mr. Leveck's, did they not? - A. All but the two that I saw emptied at my own house.

Q. You don't mean to distinguish one sack from another? - A. I saw them shoot the sacks.

Q. You don't mean to say those were the same sacks that were emptied at your house? - A. Yes, I followed them close.

JOHN LEVECK sworn. - I am a brewer, in Old-street: On the 30th of December, I received

some coals from Mr. Ward; the last witness gave me some information, in consequence of which I went upon the waggon, and endeavoured to tell the full sacks in the waggon; the two prisoners at the bar were with it; I found only thirty-four full sacks, and two empty sacks lay at the tail of the waggon, on the ground; I should have received thirty-six sacks, and I sent for Mr. Ward.

ROBERT WARD sworn. - I am a coal-merchant; the prisoner, Worbys, was my servant; the prisoner, Daniels, I had discharged about a week before; Mr. Leveck informed me of this transaction, and I went to the yard while the prisoners were there, and I took them into custody.

Court. Q. You are answerable for the coals till they are delivered? - A.Certainly, I have to make up two sacks; they were in my own waggon; I gave no orders for any delivery in Whitecross-street.

Worby's defence. Mr. Ward's clerk was on the craft when I went out of the yard, and how is it possible he can swear there were thirty-six sacks loaded.

Daniel's defence. I was hired by the waggoner to help him that day, and there were thirty-six sacks delivered at Mr. Leveck's that evening.

The prisoners each called two witnesses, who gave them good characters.

Worbys, GUILTY , aged 45.

Daniels, GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped one hundred yards in Whitecross-street .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-25

325. ANN BEDEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , a seven-shilling piece , the property of Thomas Molt .

PRISCILLA MOLT sworn. - I go out a chairing; I am the wife of Thomas Molt ; The prisoner lodged opposite my house; I was at a public-house in King-street, St. Giles's , and put down a seven-shilling piece for change; I went in with the prisoner; I had not been there more than three minutes before she took up my money, and went out of the house; I went over to her mother's after her as soon as I saw it off the table; her mother abused me, and used me very ill; she shut the door in my face; I asked her to be so kind as give me my money back again, and her mother immediately said, she had no money of mine, and the prisoner said she had not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. As soon as she had taken it up, you called after her, I take it for granted? - A. No, I did not, because I knew the girl, and I thought it was safe enough.

Q. You are sure you saw her take it up? - A. Yes; she snatched it up.

Q. You did not put your hand upon her's? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Ellis? - A. Yes.

Q. As you saw it yourself, you did not of course desire any body else to swear it? - A. I did not desire any body to swear it.

Q. Did you not promise him half a crown if he would swear it? - A. No.

Q. Is your throat quite well? - A. There is nothing the matter with it.

Q. How long has it been well? - A. About two months.

SARAH CROFTS sworn. - I was at the public-house; I went to get a drop of twopenny; I saw the prisoner's hand upon a seven-shilling piece, but I did not see her take it.

THOMAS ELLIS sworn. - I was at the public-house; I saw the prisoner take up the seven-shilling piece, and run away with it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Why did not you stop her? - A. It was no concern of mine.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with Mrs. Weldon about coming here? - A. No; I mentioned it to Mrs. Molt.

Q. Look at that woman, Mrs. Weldon? - A. I know her.

Q. Upon your oath did not Mrs. Molt promise you half a crown if you would swear it? - A. No, she did not.

Q. Nor any thing like it? - A. No.

Court. (To Mrs. Molt.) Q. Was it a good seven-shilling piece? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Upon your oath did you not apply to the mother of this young woman, and tell her, if she would pay you two-pence or three-pence a week, you would take it? - A. I did, before she was in confinement, but not to her mother, and another person offered me a seven-shilling piece afterwards.

Court. Q. Who was it you made that offer to? - A. To two women that I see here.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of it, if I was upon my dying bed.

MARY WELDON sworn. - I did live in John-street, but lost my place last night from attending this trial; I heard Mrs. Bedel say, she would give this man, Ellis, half a crown to swear he saw the prisoner take the seven-shilling piece off the table; I lived with Mr. Crossley, an engraver; I had lived there a fortnight.

Court. Q. When was it you heard this conversation? - A. The night this happened.

Q. What did he say to that? - A. He was not there.

Court. (To Mrs. Molt.) You have heard what this person has said, did you say any such thing? - A. I did not; this girl was better engaged than to.

attend to what was said; she was sitting in a young fellow's lap in the corner.

(To Weldon.) Q. Do you now mean to abide by what you have said? - A. Yes.

MARY YOXALL sworn. - I live in Old-street; I felloshish and other things; Mrs. Molt met me, and told me she was very uneasy, she could not rest in her bed, and begged me to go to Mrs. Bedel, and tell her she would take it at two-pence or three-pence a week; and Mrs. Bedel said, she saw no reason for it, when her child was innocent.

Q. Do you yourself know of any circumstance respecting Mrs. Molt's mind? - A. I have only heard the neighbours talk.

ANN BEDEL sworn. - I am the mother of the prisoner; I have known Mrs. Molt for twenty years as a neighbour.

Q. Has she been at times deranged? - A. Yes; I was called in to her when she had cut her throat; I and my son were the first persons that were called in, and I have heard her say, she had been six months out of her mind at Bristol; Mrs. Yoxall came to me with a message from Mrs. Molt, with two other women, that I should pay two-pence or three-pence a week, and I refused it, because I knew my daughter innocent.

Court. Q. Did you ever know Mrs. Molt consined at all? - A. No.

JOSEPH BEDEL sworn. - I am the brother of the prisoner; I was called in to Mrs. Molt after she had cut her throat.

Q. How long ago? - A. I think about a month.

Q. How long before your sister was taken up? - A. About three weeks.

Court. Q. Did you ever know her confined? - A. No.

Q.Was she and your sister a good deal together? - A. Yes, she was very fond of my sister.

Q. She was not afraid of this mad woman? - A. No.

The prisoner called five other witnesses, who gave her an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-26

126. JOHN GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , a gown, value 5s. a petticoat, value 3s. and a pair of stays, value 5s. the property of Sarah Dudley .

SARAH DUDLEY sworn. - I am a widow ; I lodge at the top of New Gravel-lane, Shadwell ; I lost a gown and petticoat from off a table; I know nothing of the prisoner: On Wednesday night before Christmas I laid them across the table before I went to bed, between ten and eleven o'clock; the next morning I got up between seven and eight o'clock, and found the place broke open; the door had been bolted, and the staple was forced; I immediately missed my gown and coat; I borrowed a gown of a neighbour, and I made enquiry, and found the officer had got the prisoner and my cloaths; I went to the officer, and found them.

JOSEPH WOODROOFFE sworn. - I am beadle of the parish; I received the prisoner from Ellis, the watchman, and also a gown, a petticoat, and a pair of stays, at the watch-house. - (Produces the property.)

WILLIAM ELLIS sworn. - I am a watchman of St. Paul, Shadwell: On the 23d of December, I was talking to my brother watchman, between twelve and one o'clock, at the top of Gravel-lane; I saw the prisoner come up the other side of the way, with something white; be was coming from the house that was robbed; he was about twenty or thirty yards from it; I asked him what he had got there, and he made no answer; I went towards him, and he ran into Union-street, and I ran after him, and in a few minutes I came up with him, and collared him; he then threw the property down; I called to my brother watchman to come and pick up the property, and we took him to the watch-house; I never lost sight of him from first to last.

JAMES DANIELS sworn. - I am a watchman; I saw the prisoner in Union-street; I picked up the things, and gave them to the beadle of the night. - (The property was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutrix took ten shillings from me, and wanted me to go and sleep with her.

Ellis. When I took him, he said he met the woman, and she asked him if he wanted a lodging; he said, yes; and what was the price; she said, half a crown; he gave her a guinea, and she did not give him the change, for which reason he took the things.

Prisoner. I then came out of the house, and a man beat me, taking the woman's part.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-27

127. RICHARD STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , three curtains, value 30s. the property of Evan Lewis .

EVAN LEWIS sworn. - I am a tailor , No. 13, Drury-lane: On last Saturday week I was moving from the Windsor Castle, in Holborn , to Drury-lane; in putting up my furniture, I missed three bed-curtains; the prisoner lodged at the Windsor Castle, while I was there; I suspected him; I found there was a person taken up for a fraud, and on Sunday I went to Tothill-fields, and saw the prisoner; I asked him what he had done with my curtains.

Q. Was that the first thing you said to him? - A. Yes, and he said they were pledged to Brewer street; I went there on Monday, and found my curtains.

JOSIAH HYAM sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Turner, pawnbroker, in Brewer-street, (produces two curtains); I took in one of them myself from the prisoner, and I was present when the other was taken in from the prisoner; one was on the 9th of December, and the other on the 11th. - (The curtains were identified by the prosecutor.)

JOHN TURNER sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, and found a great number of duplicates; two of them of curtains. - (Produces them.)

Hyam. These are my duplicates.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Jury.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-28

128. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , a pair of plated candlesticks, value 10s. the property of David Wedderburn , Esq.

MARY BLACK sworn. - I am cook at David Wedderburn's, Esq. No. 6, Hanover-square : On Sunday the 5th of December, the prisoner at the bar came down the area steps into the pantry; I went into the pantry, and asked him what he was doing there; he said, "nothing, ma'am;" I said, you are stealing the plate, and he shot a pair of plated candlesticks and snuffers, which he had in a blue apron, on to the table in the pantry; I told him I would shut him in, but I had a dish of fish in my hand; I did not like to throw that down, and I let him go through the passage; I called Thomas a great many times, but he did not hear me; I halloa'd in the area, stop thief, but he shut too the gate; he was stopped in Brunswick-square by the officers; I went to Hatton-garden to see him, and I am certain he is the man; I should know him from a thousand men; I did not see him till the 23d of December, but I am certain he is the man.

Q. You are sure he had the candlesticks in his apron? - A. Yes, these are them (produces them); it was half past two o'clock; there were more by, but he had not time.

THOMAS GRAY sworn. - This plate was in my charge; I know them to belong to Mr. David Wedderburn.

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. - The prisoner was brought to our office in custody; he had this blue apron and steel on, and a blue jacket; he broke the cieling of the lock-up house, and would have escaped if I had not come as I did.

Prisoner's defence. The young woman is mistaken in the person. GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-29

129. ANN LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of Dec . a silver watch, value 40s. a steel watch chain, value 1s. a seal, value 6d. and a watch key, value 1d. the property of William Robson .

WM. ROBSON sworn. - I was a mason ; on the 26th of last month I was going down Broad-street, St. Giles's , and the prisoner took hold of my arm, and said she wanted to speak to me; another came on the other side of me; the prisoner took my watch out of my pocket, and gave it to the other; I laid hold of the prisoner, and the other run away; I could not hold them both; I secured the prisoner immediately and took her to the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. This man was standing among a number of girls, and I went to see what was the matter, and he laid hold of me.

Robson. There was no other girl but those two.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-30

130. JOHN RUTLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , a hammock, value 2s. a mattrass, value 15s. two blankets, value 6s. a counterpane, value 3s. a pillow, value 5s. a coat, value 20s. two shirts, value 15s. a frock, value 2s. two pair of breeches, value 4s. two handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d. two pair of shoes, value 5s. and three pair of stockings, value 6s. the property of Edward Lawson .

EDWARD LAWSON sworn. I am a mariner ; I lost my apparel and bedding; I lived with my father at the time I hired the prisoner, as a porter , on the 9th of November, to carry my hammock and bag of cloaths to Blackwall; I ordered him to carry them to the Shoulder of Mutton and Pig; when I got to Black wall, I found he had not been there; I immediately went to the house I had hired him from, the Black Boy, at Wapping New Stairs; there was an officer in the house, who went in search of the prisoner; I did not see him again till I saw him at the office, near two months after. -(Repeats the articles mentioned in the indictment). - I never found any of them again; I am sure he is the man.

JOHN TIDMIRE sworn. - I am a victualler, in Old Gravel-lane; the prisoner came to my house with a bed and a bag of cloaths; he said a sailor desired him to bring them there; he left them and came again in two or three days, and said the sailor and sent 6d. for warehouse-room, and said he was going to take them to Blackwall.

JOHN FOX sworn. I am an officer; last Mon

day was fortnight, knowing the boy, I apprehended him.

Prisoner's defence. I did not make away with it; it was too heavy for me; a shipmate of mine took the bag of cloaths, and I saw no more of him; the hammock I sold. GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-31

131. SAMUEL SOLOMON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , two shirts, value 11s. a half shirt, value 2s. and an apron, value 1s. the property of Sarah Rusted , widow .

The prosecutrix was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-32

132. JAMES HORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , 9s. 11d. the monies of William Brown .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-33

133. EDWARD CROW and WILLIAM SAY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , two waistcoats, value 20s. the property of Thomas Lewis .

THOMAS LEWIS sworn. - I am a stay-maker , No. 1, George-street, Battle-bridge ; on the 18th of December, I lost a gown and two waistcoats out of my garden; they were hanging to dry; I was mangling about one o'clock; Mrs. Curl gave me an alarm; she is here; the child picked up the waistcoats.

MARY LEWIS sworn. - The child's mother brought in the waistcoats; that is all I know.

JAMES HUMPHREYS sworn. - I live at No. 23, George-street; I am a bricklayer: On the 18th of December last, as I was going up the street, I saw the two prisoners and George Davis, the evidence, standing under Mr. Lewis's wall; and, as I passed, Crow spoke to me; I knew him before; I made him no answer, but went about my business; I was gone about ten minutes; when I returned, the prisoners were gone, and Mr. Lewis made an outcry that he had lost a gown and two waistcoats; the prisoner Say at the Magistrates said, that if ever he got his liberty, he would be the death of me.

GEORGE DAVIS sworn. - I live in service; I slept with Crow the night before this happened, in Dyot-street; I got up the next morning and left him in bed; I went to the bottom of the street, and soon afterwards he came after me; we stood talking there till Say came up, and we all three made it agreeable to go together upon the look-out; we came to Battle-bridge, and Say jumped over the wall, and threw the gown and two waistcoats over.

Q. Where was he before he got over the wall? - A.Standing under the wall.

Q. Did either of them speak to any body? - A. Not that I know of; I observed this young man pass; Crow picked up the gown, and the two waistcoats remained on the ground; we had no time to pick them up.

Q. How so? - A. We all ran away.

Q. Was there any alarm? - A.There was a little girl cleaning the door; she went in to tell her friends, and then we all ran away; I was not acquainted with Say till that day; I had known Crow about a week.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Do you live in service now? - A. No; I did live at the Mortimer's Arms, in Oxford-street.

Q. What are you now? - A. I have been in New Prison ever since.

Q. You come here as King's evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. Who proposed going upon the look-out that day? - A. When Say came up we agreed to take a walk.

Q. You know what the walk was for? - A. I guessed what it was for.

Q.And you acquiesced immediately? - A. Yes.

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden; on the 18th of December, in consequence of information, I went with Wood to Dyot-street, with Mr. Lewis and Humphreys; Humphreys recognized the two prisoners and the evidence, in company together, coming up Dyot-street, and said, here they are; upon which I seized Davis, and Mr. Lewis, and my brother officer, stopped the other two; we searched them, but found no property.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - I am an officer; I went with Davis to the shop where the gown was sold, but the man has absconded; (produces the waistcoats) - they were quite wet when they were brought to the office by Mrs. Lewis.

MARY CURL called. - Q. How old are you? - A. Twelve years.

Q. Can you say your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q.Is it a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. A bad thing.

Q. Do you know where wicked people go, if they tell a lie? - A. Yes, to the naughty man. -The witness sworn. - I was going of an errand for my mother, and I picked up these two waistcoats under Mr. Lewis's garden wall, in the road; I took them home to my mother, and she took them to Mr. Lewis.

Mrs. LEWIS sworn. - My little girl brought me these two waistcoats, and knowing Mrs. Lewis to be a laundress, I went there, and asked Mr. Lewis if he had lost any thing; he went into the garden,

and missed them. - (The waistcoats were identified by Mr. Lewis.)

Crow's defence. I know nothing of it.

Say's defence. Davis, asked me to take some porter with him, and going up the street, the officers laid hold of us all.

The prisoner Say called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Crow, GUILTY , aged 18.

Say, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , whipped in the jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-34

134. JAMES PLUNKET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of George Higgins .

GEORGE HIGGINS sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Clarkson, at the Crown and Anchor, Judd-place, Sommers-town : On Monday the 10th of this month, about ten minutes past ten in the morning, I went up stairs to change my linen; I came down again, and left my watch on the bed; I desired the maid-servant, when she made the bed, not to disturb the watch; about two hours after, I went up for it, but did not find it; the prisoner was my fellow-servant ; he was gone to town, and when he came back, about five o'clock, I accused him of taking it, and he denied seeing it; my master and I searched the room again, but did not find it; a man that had been out with the prisoner all day, said, he thought he could tell me where to find it; I went with him to a pawnbroker's, the corner of Shug-lane, where I found my watch.

JAMES BRUCE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(produces a silver watch); I took it in of the prisoner on the 10th of January, in the early part of the day; I don't recollect to have seen him before, but I am sure he is the man; he told me he was out with a horse and cart, and that the cart had done some damage in the street; that it had been taken to the Green-yard, and the expences were 1l. 4s. he did not wish his master to know it, and therefore he pawned the watch.

PETER WHITEHAIR sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, and found a one-pound note and 7s. 6d. he denied knowing any thing of the watch. - (The watch was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. The money is my own; I was formerly a jockey, and a gentleman that I used to ride for, being successful for him, gave me the 1l. note some time ago.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-35

135. JOHN RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a waistcoat, value 1s. four handkerchiefs, value 10d. a pair of breeches, value 6d. and a cap, value 6d. the property of Joseph Jingle .

JOSEPH JINGLE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Copinger, belonging to the Court of Chancery, No. 24, Tottenham-court-road; at the time this happened, I lodged at the Running Horse, in Tottenham-court-road : On Monday night, the 14th of December, I left the articles mentioned in the indictment in a chair by the bed-side when I went to bed, about ten o'clock; I got up about half past seven, as soon as it was light, and missed them; the prisoner slept in the next bed to me; there were other persons slept in the room; I cannot say how many; the prisoner went out before I got up; I applied to the landlord, but he knew nothing of them; I was obliged to borrow some cloaths of the landlord; I afterwards found the waistcoat at Mr. Dobree's, in Charlotte-street; the rest were found in a stable where the prisoner was employed; he was servant to Mr. Marsden, who keeps the livery stables; the prisoner was taken at a house adjoining the livery stables, about one o'clock the same day.

- TURNER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dobree (Produces a waistcoat); I took it in on Tuesday the 14th of December from the prisoner; I had seen him frequently.

RICHARD LIMBRICK sworn. - I am one of the patrol belonging to Bow-street; on the 14th of December, about twelve o'clock, I received the prisoner from Michael Lee, one of the patrol; I searched him, and in the inside of the crown of his hat I found a duplicate. - (Produces it).

Turner. This is the duplicate I gave the prisoner.

MICHAEL LEE sworn. - I took the prisoner in custody on the 14th of December, at the sign of the Compasses, in Tottenham-court-road, and delivered him to Limbrick and Jones.

CHRISTIAN JONES sworn. - I received the prisoner from Lee; I was with Limbrick; I saw the duplicate found upon him, and then he said, if we would go with him up the stable-yard, he would give the remainder of the things up; we went with him, and found the things according to his direction. - Produces them.)(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-36

136. THOMAS SKINNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , eight pieces of wood, value 10s. the property of

George Astor , George Horwood and Benjamin Banks .

BENJAMIN BANKS sworn. - I am a musical instrument-maker , in partnership with George Astor and George Horwood, in Sun-street ; the prisoner was a servant in our house: In consequence of information, I went to the office in Worship-street, and saw the property; I knew it to be our's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you yourself miss any thing? - A. I did not miss this wood till I saw it at the office.

GEORGE ASTOR, junior, sworn. - On Sunday evening, the 5th of December, I saw the prisoner in New-court, Crown-street, with some wood under his arm, going towards his lodging, I think it was between six and nine in the evening, the moon shone very bright; I called to him, and asked him what he had got there; he at first said, he was going for a light; I insisted upon knowing what he had got; he said he had got some wood; I followed him up stairs, and before I could overtake him, he had placed the wood in the room above his lodging; I took the wood, there were eight pieces, and followed him down stairs. I asked him how he could rob his master, and he said, he had been persuaded to it.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him to give an account of it? - A.No. He seemed so very much frightened, that I could get hardly any thing out of him; I took him to the watch-house, and delivered the wood to the constable; I knew it to be the wood of Astor and Company from the quality and size of it. I am in the habit of frequenting the factory; I have the management of the business of that factory; it is called aire wood, it is used for veneering.

Q. Did you miss that wood? - A. On the Monday, I looked over the bundle, and found eight leaves missing.

JANE HOLLOWAY sworn. - On Sunday night, the 5th of December, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner knocked at my door, No. 5, New-court, Crown-street; he asked for a light, and seemed to be in a hurry; he put some boards down in my room, and left them; I heard somebody on the stairs say, you villan, what have you done with the boards; and I said, here are the boards, and gave them to the gentleman.

Thomas Ashton, an officer, produced the boards.

Q.How far is New-court from the factory? - A. An hundred yards, or rather better.

Mr. Banks. On the Monday morning, I examined, and missed eight boards out of the bundle; I have since compared them with the bundle, and they correspond in the quality and numbers. All the veneers are numbered.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long had the prisoner been your servant? - A. He was servant before I was in the partnership. I have been in the partnership nearly two years.

Q.(To Astor, jun.) You have sworn these are eight boards, would they be called in the trade eight boards? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-37

137. MARY ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a quart pewter pot, value 8d. and a pint pewter pot, value 6d. the property of John Campbell .

JOHN CAMPBELL sworn. - I keep the Prince of Wales public-house, in Holywell-lane : On the 4th of January, an officer brought the prisoner and the pots into my house, between four and five in the afternoon.

CHARLES WADE sworn. - I am pot-boy to Mr. Campbell: On the 4th of January, I left my pots at Mr. Gant's door in Shoreditch , tied to the scraper of a door with a string; I left two pints and one quart while I went to the turnpike for some more pots; I always the them there; when I came back I only found one pint pot there. I left them at a quarter past four, and did not see them again till half past six, when they were brought to my master's house.

CHARLES DUNCAN sworn. - I am brother-in-law to Mr. Clark, a publican: Yesterday was a week I was getting in my pots, and left my strap at Mr. Crosby's door, in Leonard-square; I saw the prisoner unsasten the strap, I came up and asked her what she did that for; and she said, a little boy had done it; but no little boy was near; I laid hold of her right arm, and saw a quart pot under her cloak; I sent for my brother-in-law, and a pint pot was found upon her. An officer was sent for, and I went with him to the prosecutor's, and he claimed the pots.

The constable produced the pots, which were identified by the prosecutor.

Prisoner. I leave it to the gentlemen of the Jury. GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-38

138. RICHARD FREEMANTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , thirty pounds weight of lead, value 10s. the property of John Wildman .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-39

139. CHARLOTTE JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , a gold ring, value 1l. a yard and a quarter of lace, value 5s. and a hat, value 6d. the property of Thomas Murray .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-40

140. JOHN JONES was indicted for that he, on the 8th of November, in the 34th year of his Majesty's regin, at the parish of St. James, Westminster, did marry Mary Francis , and afterwards, on the 23d of August, in the 42d year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish of St. George, Hanover-square, feloniously did marry Ann Brewer , his former wife being then alive .

The parish-clerks were called, but not appearing, and there being no evidence of the first marriage, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-41

141. FELIX O'NEIL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , a man's hat, value 4s. the property of John Spybey .

ISAAC NEWPON sworn. - I am a labouring man: On Tuesday the 7th of December, about a quarter past four in the afternoon, going through Broad-street, Bloomsbury , I was looking at some hats in Mr. Spybey's window; there were some hats hanging at the door-post outside, the prisoner took one of them, and I thought he was going into the shop with it, till I saw him put it under his left arm, and run off; I saw a woman in the shop, and give her notice of it; she then called James; James Tapperell then came across the shop to me, and I pointed out the prisoner; I saw him turn up a passage on the right hand side; we went after him, and when we got to the passage, the prisoner was concealing the hat under his coat; I immediately said, that is the man; the prisoner then took it from under his arm, the man took hold of it, and said, it was his master's property. We then took the prisoner back to the shop, and sent for a constable, and he was taken to the watch-house.

JAMES TAPPERELL sworn. - I live with Mr. Spybey, Broad-street, Bloomsbury: I received information from Newton, in consequence of which I went up a passage about six doors from our shop, and found the prisoner with a hat under his coat, he was standing making water, he had a great coat on; I took the hat from him, and brought him back to the shop; he said, a man had given him two shillings to hold it; Mr. Spybey then gave charge of him. This is the hat.

John Whitehead , a constable, produced the hat, which was identified by Tapperell.

Prisoner's defence. There was a great noise, and a cry of stop thief; I was stopping to make water, and a man running by threw a hat up the passage; I picked it up, and gave it to these two men, and then they laid hold of me.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , publickly whipped , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-42

142. MARY CROSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , two table, cloths, value 5s. the property of Job Matthews .

ANN MATTHEWS sworn. - I am the wife of Job Matthews, a plaisterer : The prisoner worked in our house a great many years; I live in Blackitt, Alms-house, Westminster ; we missed a great many things, there were a great many women washed for us, and I had them all taken up; I got Mr. Bly, the constable, who found at table cloth upon her; the other is at the pawnbroker's. We are laundresses, and take in washing; these table-cloths we had to wash, and are responsible for them; they are both marked.

- sworn. - I am the daughter-in-law to the last witness; I saw these table-cloths in the wash, I know them by the marks.

Benjamin Charlton , the pawnbroker, produced one table-cloth, pledged by a person whom he believed not to be the prisoner, in the name of Mary Williams, on the 1st of October.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am an officer; I received information, about the 16th of December, of the loss of these table-cloths; I apprehended the prisoner, and searched her; I found upon her this table-cloths, it has been out of my possession, but I believe it to be the same, by a mark I observed upon it before I gave it to Mrs. Matthews.

Mrs. Matthews. It is the same table-cloth.

Bly. I searched the prisoner's room the same day I had the key from her; I found a duplicate of a table-cloth, the 23d of October, I think the pawnbroker has brought the wrong. I went with the pawnbroker to a Mrs. Reddish, in St. James's street, where it was claimed.

The table-cloth found upon the prisoner was identified by Mrs. Matthews.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through Chapel-street, and kicked something before me, I picked it up, and it was a table-cloth all over dirt and fifth.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-43

143. WILLIAM VERNON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , two pistols, value 8s. the property of George-Charles-Brathwaite Boughton , Esq.

GEORGE-CHARLES-BRATHWAITY BOUGH-TON, Esq. sworn. - I live in Welbeck-street; I know nothing of the loss.

SIMON EMANUEL sworn. - I live at No. 10, Mary-lb-Bonne lane; I am a salesman: On the 15th of December last the prisoner came to my shop with a pair of pistols, and offered them for sale; I asked him if they were his own, he said, yes, he had had them five years, and as he was out of place now, he would sell them; I asked him the price, and he said 12s. I told him I would give him 8s. he said he would take 9s. I told him I would give no more than 8s. he said I should have them, and I gave him a seven shilling piece and a shilling; I asked him against they were his own, and he said, yes, they were, I told him not to deceive me, he said then that is betwixt me and you; he was going out of doors and I called him back again; he came in, and I desired him, to lay down my money and take his pistols again, for I did not think they were his property; he said I bought them, and I should keep them; he refused to give up the money; he took up the pistols, and was going away with the money and the pistols; I told him if he did not put down the money I would send for a constable; I then sent for a constable and gave charge of him. (Produces them.)

SAMUEL WALLINGTON sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-44

144. JOHN HAMMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , 5lb. three quarters of sugar, value 3s. 4d. the property of Matthew Craven .

WILLIAM FRYER sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Matthew Craven , No. 4, Leman-street, Goodman's-fields : On the 28th of December, being in the warehouse about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming down stairs; I asked him where he had been, he said he had been up stairs for a clay ladle: he was apprentice to a coppersmith , who does our business; I told him he had no business in the warehouse, if he wanted any thing he was to ask for it in the warehouse; I went up to him, and asked him what he had got upon him; he took out a small piece of sugar from under his jacket; he put it into my hand, and said he had only taken it to eat; I called one of our men and gave the prisoner in his charge; I went and informed Mr. Craven of the circumstance; I was sent to Lambeth-street for a Police-officer, into whose charge the prisoner was given; I took this piece of sugar from him (producing it); I cannot swear to its being Mr. Craven's.

GOTLIEB SHYDEN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Craven; Mr. Fryer gave the prisoner into my charge, and I saw him put down a large piece of sugar between two hogsheads; I cannot swear to it.

Fryer. It is a kind of sugar that is only to be found in a sugar-house.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called his master and one other witness, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined fourteen days in, Newgate .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-45

145. TIMOTHY LINES , JOHN HANNING , and THOMAS MARTIN , were indicted, the two first for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December, seventeen quarters of malt, value 39l. the property of Thomas Garnet Richmond , and the other for feloniously receiving the same knowing it to have been stolen .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

The evidence not being sufficient to bring the charge home to either of the prisoners, they were

All three ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-46

146. JOHN SHARP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a waistcoat, value 10s. the property of Sir Henry Peyton , Bart.

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, except his own confession, extorted by a promise of forgiveness, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-47

147. ELIZABETH LANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , ten pair of shoes, value 25s. the property of John Thomas .

JOHN THOMAS sworn. - I keep a shoe warehouse , No. 25, Upper East-Smithfield , the prisoner was chairing at our house, the servant being ill: On the 10th of January, some articles being missing in the house, my wife charged her with having taken them; she behaved very insolent, and threatened to knock her down for making such a charge; the prisoner took out some carpets, under pretence of dusting them, and ran home immediately; she left the carpets in the street, and I pursued her; when I went into the room, she was upon her knees at a box, in which were seven pair of men's shoes, and three pair of chidlren's; she then said she hoped I would shew her mercy, and not expose her; said, as she had that quantity, I did not doubt she had taken others; she said she had not, and pulled out some duplicates for some articles not belonging to me; she then pretended to be very ill; she put her hand to her pocket and then to her mouth, and pretending to vomit, threw

something into the fire-place; upon looking behind the stove, I found fifteen duplicates, five of them for shoes; the pawnbrokers gave up the shoes; there were eleven pair of men's, one woman's, and three pair of boys; she had been at work in the house four days. - (The shoes were produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-48

148. RICHARD GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , a silver watch, value 1l. 1s. a steel chain, value 1d. two seals, value 7d. and a watch key, value 1d. the property of William Tappin .

WILLIAM TAPPIN sworn. - I keep an eating-house , in Brick-lane, Spitalfields ; on the 11th of January, between four and five in the afternoon, I lost my watch; I saw it hanging over the fireplace in a little room even with the shop, just before the prisoner came in and called for something to eat; I was in a back kitchen even with the shop; I had a prospect all over the shop; I did not see him come in, but I saw no other person but him in the room from the last time, I saw it till I missed it; he sat down and eat his dinner; I neither saw him come in nor go out; I saw him in the room.

DINAH BOWLES sworn. My father keeps a public-house, the Black Swan, Brown's-lane, Spital-fields; the prisoner lodged there; on the 13th of January, I found a silver watch upon the landing place of the stairs, between the wainscoat and the partition; I was sweeping, and found it in a handkerchief; the partition is not fixed; it makes one large room into two; the partition was standing on the landing-place; I don't know who put it there;(produces it); the prisoner came to lodge with us the latter end of November; he is a carpenter.

Q. Are there any lodgers? - A. Yes, four; one is a weaver.

Q. Do you know whose handkerchief that is? -Q. No.

Q. When was the prisoner taken up? - A. On the 11th, and I found it on the 13th; I produced it before the Magistrate, and he denied knowing any thing of it. - (The watch was identified by the prosecutor.)

SARAH TAPPIN sworn. - On the 11th of January, between four and five o'clock, I was sitting in the parlour; the prisoner came in, and asked for some leg of beef soup; I went into the wash-house to get a saucepan to make it hot; upon my return I saw him coming out of the parlour rubbing his hands; I asked him to warm himself at the fire; be declined it, saying he was always colder for it, and immediately sat down in a box; he went away, and no person came in till my husband missed the watch, which was in a few minutes; after he was gone, I had often seen the prisoner before, he wanted to come and lodge with us, and he then told us where he lodged, and my husband had him taken up.

Prisoner' defence. I never saw the watch.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-49

149. BENJAMIN THOMPSON , and RICHARD GIBBERT, alias GILBERT , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , 140 yards of printed calico, value 17l. 10s. the property of Samuel Croughton .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Thomas Pickford , James Pickford , Matthew Pickford , Jonathan Higginson , Thomas Vaux , and John Vaux .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of Joseph Neale . And,

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

The case was opened by Mr. Watson.

JOHN OLIVER sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Samuel Croughton , who is in the bed-furniture line : On the 13th of August, I packed up five pieces of printed calico furniture, in Hessing, directed to Jackson and Co. Bannister-Hail, near Preston, Lancashire; I delivered it to the bookkeeper at the Castle Inn, Wood-street.

Q.Whose warehouses are they? - A. Mr. Pickford's; their clerk gave me a receipt for it in this book. - (Producing it.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q.Did you direct it? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe Mr. Croughton deals very largely in this way? - A. Yes, he does.

JOHN WRIGHT sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Pickfords, in Wood-street; I am stationed at the warehouse at Paddington; I received a package directed to Jackson and Co. Bannister-Hall, Preston, Lancashire, on the 26th of September.

JOHN MEAKIN sworn. - I am porter to Messrs. Pickfords, in Wood-street; I received a parcel, for which I signed that receipt; I sent it in the waggon on the 26th of September to go to Paddington.

Wright. I keep the package till the 29th, and then loaded it on board Joseph Neal 's boat; the prisoners were employed as boatmen on board; James Wright also assisted in loading the boat; they all assisted.(Mr. Matthew Pickford proved the firm.)

WILLIAM BAILEY sworn. - I am a sadler and harness-maker, at Berkhampstead, in Hertfordshire: On the 30th of September, between nine

and ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, Thompson, was going by where I stood with a horse that was ill; he had been to the farrier's; I perceived the horse to be very ill, and I spoke to the prisoner, but perceiving that if he stopped the horse would lie down, I told him to go on, and I would walk by the side of him; he said he was going to take it to the Cow Roast, a public-house about two miles and a half from Berkhampstead; I asked him who the horse belonged to; he told me to Joseph Neale ; I desired him to tell his master, if the horse did not live, I would give as much for him as any person would; he then asked me if I bought handkerchiefs, bed-furniture, and calico; I told him, yes; he then told me he would bring me a sample of the calico in the afternoon, and asked me what time I should be at home; I appointed three o'clock; accordingly he came; my man was in the shop, and he asked me if we could not go into some other room; I took him into a little back room, and he shewed me the sample; I then cheapened them, and he set a price upon them; I agreed for 2s. a yard for the printed calico; I asked him when he would bring it, and he said twelve o'clock; I apprehended he meant twelve at night; I told him it was dark at eight; he could bring them then; he said no, he would bring them at ten; he then went about his business; I then went to a constable, and desired him to be in the way about ten o'clock; they did not bring the good that night at all; they brought them the next morning.

Q. Who do you mean by they? - A. The two prisoners and James Wright; they came between five and six o'clock; I got up about six o'clock, and Thompson and Wright came in; Gibbert stood about ten yards from the shop-door; I had opened one parcel, and conceiving they had been come by dishonestly, I removed the goods up stairs; the two men came into the little room; I asked them if they had measured the goods, and they said, no; they would sell them me by the lump; I asked them what they asked for them; they asked me 4l. I said that was cheap enough, I did not desire them cheaper; they then said, give us a pot of beer a piece; I said, I will; I had desired my man, as soon as they came for the money, to go for a constable, which he did; one of them went out, and spoke to Gibbert; he came in again, and said Gibbert was not satisfied with the price; I must give them four guineas, or they would have them measured; I agreed to give it them; I told them to go over to the Prince's Arms, I would come over to them; they said they were going to the Goat at Berkhampstead, to seed their horses, and would soon return; the constable came in, and he and I pursued them; we met them coming from the Goat, and apprehended them all; I asked them if they came honestly by the things, and they said, yes; I told them, I had apprehensions they did not come honestly by them, and I gave charge of them; they were taken before a Magistrate, and committed, (produces the calico); there are five pieces; I have had them ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q.You are a sadler? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you deal in these articles? - A. I am in the brokery line, but I never buy any new; I frequent sales very much.

Q. Who was it you made the bargain with? - A.Thompson and Wright.

Q. Do you mean to say you saw one of them go out and speak to Gibbert? - A. Yes; mine is a bow window.

GEORGE BATEMAN sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Croughton.

Q. Look at these calicoes, and tell us if you know whose they are? - A. Yes, they are manufactured by Jackson and Co. of Bannister-Hall.

Q. What is the value of those five pieces? - A. They are worth about 3l. 10s. a piece to the retail dealer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q.Jackson and Co. print for your house? - A. Yes.

Q. You have a great quantity of such goods at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you don't know these from any other goods of the same description? - A. They were for shipping, and the crown mark had been omitted by mistake, and they were sent down again to have it put on, otherwise they would have been liable to be seized at the Custom-house.

Oliver. These are the same that I packed.

JAMES WRIGHT sworn. - I am a boatman, and know the prisoners: On the 29th of September, I assisted in loading the boat, Joseph Neale commanded it, I was at work on board eight days; I got on the boat to have my dinner, and Gibbert was getting these pieces of calico out of the package; he pulled a piece of a sheeting off another package to fill it up again, and it was left in the boat; Mr. Neale was asleep.

Q. How far had you got from Paddington? - A. About eight miles, we were towing the boat all the time; about two o'clock in the day we fastened up the packages as before, I got out then to drive the horse; we came to Berkhampstead about ten o'clock in the morning, and then Thompson went into the town with a bad horse; we then all went a-shore, and each carried a parcel to the collarmaker's house; Thompson made the bargain, I was with him, Gibbert was at the door; Bailey was to give us four pounds, we informed Gibbert, who said he would have four guineas; we went back to the Goat public-house, and as we were returning for the money we were taken up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. You say you went on board only to get your dinner? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not go with any intention to steal any thing? - A. No I was in the boat when they got in out, but I never meddled with it.

Q. Did you tell any body of it? - A. No.

Q. You carried a bundle? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not expect part of the money? - A. Yes; they told me I should have part, but I did not go for that, but merely because I was walking with the horses.

Mr. Watson. (To Mr. Pickford.) Q. What country is this in? - A. In the country of Middlesex.

Thompson. They have sworn very false against Gibbert, for he was asleep at the time.

Gibbert's defence. I know nothing about it, but am innocent; Thompson asked me to go and drink with him; I went, and we were coming down the town, when they took me along with him.

Gibbert called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Thompson, GUILTY , aged 19.

Gibbert, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-50

150. JAMES MASON was indicted for making an assault upon Thomas Lys , in a certain passage near the King's highway, on the 3d of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a hat, value 10s. 6d. a handkerchief, value 1s. a watch-ribbon, value 1d. two watch-keys, value 2d. a seal, value 6d. and five shilling , the goods and monies of the said Thomas Lys .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-51

151. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling-house of William Garland , on the 24th of August , a half-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, a half-crown, and four Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of the said William.

MILYAM GARLAND sworn. - I am the wife of William Garland , who keeps the Red-lion, Bermondsey . At the time of the robbery we kept the Carpnter's-arms, in the Dog-row, Bethnal green : On the 24th of August, the prisoner came to our house, with another person, in a chaise-cart, about three o'clock in the afternoon, my husband and Mr. Higgins, the distiller's clerk, were going out at the door at the time; Mr. Higgins seemed to be very well acquainted with the prisoner, they shook hands, and seemed to be very intimate; there was a shabby looking man with him. The prisoner asked me for a pen and ink, and a bit of paper, and said, if I had not got any he would send his man out for some; he said he wanted to make out a bill against one Mr. Potts, a cow-keeper; he then had sixpenny worth of rum and water, and asked me to give him change for a ten pound, or a fifteen pound note; I told him I would try what I could do, and went up stairs, and fetched four one pound notes, a half-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, and a half-crown, which I put upon the table; he said that was of no use, for he wanted to give change for a ten, or a fifteen pound note, remarking, at the same time, to me, that these gentlefolks did not care how they served a poor fellow when they got in his debt; he then went away, leaving the change, saying, I will be back in five minutes; the man that was with him asked me where I came from; I told him I came from Deptford, and he seemed to be acquainted with every body that I knew at Deptford. The prisoner then came back, and said, what sum can you make up; I said, there is five pounds, as I told you before; he said, there is five take that; he took it up, and said he would be back in five or ten minutes, and told the other man to wait; some people came in to be served, and when the man saw me busy, he came and asked me if I could get him a bit of salmon, I called to my niece to get some; the man said, I will not trouble your niece, I will go myself if you will lend me a bason; I gave him a bason, and saw no more of either of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You laid the money down upon the table, and has no objection to his taking it? - A. No.

Q. You expected he would return, and pay you? - A. Yes, certainly.

Court. Q. He had not shewed you any note? - A. No; and I think I must have been berest of my senses to let him have it.

Q. You expected a five pound note for it? - A. Yes.

Q. And instead of giving you a five pound note, he took up the money and walked off with it? - A. Yes.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street, I apprehended the prisoner in December last: He told me he had borrowed the five pounds, and meant to pay it again.

Prisoner's defence. I bought a cow of a cowkeeper, in the neighourhood of this lady, and borrowed the five pounds of her.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing the money and notes, but not in the dwelling-house .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-52

152. JOHN WILLIAMS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , a Bank-note, value 5l. the property of John Feary , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN FEARY sworn. - I keep the King's-arms, in Little John-street, Westminster : On the 1st of

September the prisoner came in, and said, how do you do, neighbour, and had a shillingsworth of brandy and water; he used the house for some time regularly, by the name of Smith; and on the 8th, he came in with another man, and asked for a shillingsworth of brandy and water; he talked with me about a Mr. Meyrick, of Westminster-market, whom I knew to be a very respectable man, he told me Mr. Meyrick and he were consulting about bringing their club to my house, he said he liked my liquor and usage much better than where they used; he used always to come in without his hat, and I supposed he belonged to the market; he called Mr. Meyrick's foreman to the door, and they had two pints of ale, he was with him, I suppose, three quarters of an hour; then the prisoner went away, and the other man entered into conversation with me, and said, if you can get Mr. Smith's custom it will be a great thing for your house, he is a very respectable man, and has large connections. In the course of the day the other man came in several times, and said, Mr. Smith, you are wanted; after he had been there some time, the prisoner said, go to my shop, and get some chops; they had some chops dressed, and about two o'clock they went away; the prisoner came in again about four o'clock without his hat, when I was very busy, he called me into the parlour, seemingly in a great hurry, and said, can you lend me three or four pounds for five minutes, my friend Meyrick is gone out, and my mistress is not at home; I said, I am very sorry Mr. Smith I cannot oblige you, I have nothing less than a five pound note; he took the five pound note out of my hand, and said, that will do, I will bring it you back in less than five minutes; I saw no more of him till I saw him at Hatton-garden.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing the note, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-53

153. THOMAS SEDGWICK was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James-George Gann , about the hour of ten, in the night of the 23d of December , and burglariously stealing six pounds weight of ham, value 6s. the property of the said James-George Gann.

JAMES- GEORGE GANN sworn. - I am a pastrycook and confectioner , in Major Foubert 's Passage, Swallow-street: On the 23d of December, in the evening, I was up stairs at supper, I heard a terrible noise on the stairs, of somebody calling out; I went down stairs, and saw a mob, with my apprentice-boy bringing back the prisoner.

AUGUSTUS THORNHILL sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Gann: I was standing at the bakehouse-door, and heard the latch of the shop-door go; I saw the prisoner come in, and take hold of the bone of ham that was in the shop, he ran towards Swallow-street; I cried, stop thief, and he was stopped by Mr. Thompson, a surgeon, I was not more than five yards from him: I am sure he was the same man, he had red facings to his great coat; I found the ham just where he had ran across.

Q.(To Gann.) How many hams had you in the shop? - A. Only that one dressed, it weighed about eight pounds.

Prisoner's defence. I am a shoe-maker, I work at Paddington, and I was in the care of a house in Hill-street, Betkeley-square: I went past this gentleman's house, and there was a man standing at the door; I had not got far, when I heard a cry out, and a man rushed by me; a gentleman stopped me, and I went immediately back with him.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY,

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-54

154. RICHARD HAFFORD , JOHN CONNOR , WILLIAM MINES , and BEN JAMIN JAMES , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William List , about the hour of two in the night of the 10th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing three hams, value 15s. three tongues, value 3s. and a pair of shoes, value 6d. the property of the said William List .

WILLIAM LIST sworn. - I am an accomptant , and live at Mile-End : On the morning of Saturday the 10th of December my house was broke open.

Q. In what condition did you find your premises? - A. An attempt had been made in the back part of the house, to open the shutter, by breaking the hinges; not succeeding-there, they took the tiles off the house.

Q. What premises are they? - A. They are adjoining the dwelling-house by a brick-wall; we use it as a wash-house, store-house, and lumber-room; it is not under the same roof, but it is connected with the dwelling-house by a wall that joins the wash-house and store-house, at the distance of about two feet and a half, or not so much.

Q. Did you miss any thing? - A. Yes, three hams, two English and one American, three-tongues, and a pair of shoes; in the whole to the value of not more than 20s.

Q. Does this wall go round your premises? - A. Completely round.

JAMES BROWN sworn. - I follow the sea; I know the prisoners: On a Saturday, about the 10th of 11th of December, I think between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, Benjamin James, came to my lodgings, at No. 13,

Denmark-street, and told me he had got some tongues from Mile-End, and he said he had one ham and four handkerchiefs that he got from the same place, and he said he had got some cards and gloves; I saw one pack of cards; he did not say where he had them from.

Q. How far is Denmark-street from Mile-End? - A. I dare say it is near two miles; I followed him to his lodgings, and while I was there, Hafford came in and Connor; James said, they had attacked some place, and got a coat and some load, and they were pursued, and obliged to leave it; he said they had been at Capt. Wright's, and that a man who was at the window might have shot one of them if he had had a mind.

Q. Did the others say any thing? - A. No.

Q. Did they contradict it? - A. No; Benjamin James said, they had sold two hams, and they had got one left, which they meant to make use of themselves.

Q. How came they to say all this to you? - A. I don't know; they were talking about it.

Q. Did you know of this before they went? - A. I heard James say the night before, that he was going to No. 7, to thieve something, to get some money.

Q.(To Mr. Lift.) What is your Number? - A.No. 1.

Q.(To Brown.) Who was by the night before when James said he was going to No. 7? - A. Dick and C nnor were both by; he asked them if they would go with him, and they said they believed they would.

Q. How came they to talk so openly to you; were you a shipmate of their's? - A.Mines was a shipmate of mine; they said this at the public-house; Mines was present then and Brown; they were saying it among themselves.

Q. Had you been acquainted with them before? - A. No; I was acquainted with Mines a great many years before, and I have seen the others once or twice before at the public-house.

Prisoner Hafford. Q. Had you ever seen me in company with these people before? - A. Yes, I had seen then with him two or three times; I was not acquainted with any of them but Mines.

Prisoner Mines. Q. I suppose you never saw me take any thing from any body? - A. Yes, I did indeed.

Prisoner Connor. When I was before the Justice, he never mentioned my name at all.

Griffiths. My Lord, Hafford and Connor had nothing to do with this robbery; there being a number of indictments, the Clerk of the Indictments put their names into it by mistake.

Court. (To Brown.) Q.James told you they had got two hams? - A. He told me they had sold two, and got one, which they meant to make use of themselves.

Q. Did he say who had got the money? - A. No.

JOHN BROWN (the accomplice) sworn. -Q. How do you get your livelihood? - A. I am a sailor.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoners at the bar? - A.Benjamin James and William Mines went out on the 10th of December, or the 11th, I don't know which, between two an three o'clock on Friday morning, to Mr. List's house.

Q. Did you go with them? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it on the Friday evening, or Saturday morning? - A. It was Saturday morning, between two and three o'clock.

Q. Who proposed your going together? - A. All of us.

Q. Did you all belong to the same ship? - A. No.

Q. How came you to meet together? - A. Being all acquaintances at the public-house.

Q. Who then proposed it? - A.Benjamin James.

Q. You all agreed to go? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you go? - A. To Mr. List's house.

Q. What time did you get there? - A. Between two and three o'clock.

Q. When you got there, what did you do? - A. Got over the back fence, and tried to get off the hinges of the window, but it was bolted inside, and then we took the tiles off.

Q.Mines and James were the only two that were with you? - A. Yes; James went in, and handed out three hams first, and then three tongues; then he broke open a small box that was in the place.

Q. Did you see him do it? - A. No, I was outside; he told me he had, and took out two pieces of silk handkerchiefs, 164 pair of women's gloves, sixty-four packs of cards, and three pair of shoes.

Q. How long did you stay there? - A. About an hour and a half.

Q. Who took the things? - A. I took them of him, and handed them to Mines over the fence; we took the gloves and handkerchiefs, and left the hams behind in the yard.

Q. Where did you take them to? - A. William Vining 's, in Dock-street.

Q. How far was that off? - A. About a mile and a half, as nigh as I can recollect; then we went back again for the hams; we fetched the hams, and left the tongues outside the fence.

Q. How came you to leave them? - A. We could not carry them.

Q. There were three of you; you carried a ham a piece; why could not you carry the tongues? - A. We could not stow them; we thought they were to heavy.

Q. What were the size of the hams? - A.Two of them weighed 13lb. I think.

Q.And you could not carry a ham and a tongue? - A. We did not; we sold two of the hams the next day to a woman in Rosemary-lane: I don't know her name.

Q. Who sold them? - A. I and Benjamin James.

Q. Where was Mines? - A. He stood in the street over the way.

Q. Who shared the money? Benjamin James.

Q. How much did you sell them for? - A. Eight-pence a pound.

Q. How much did you share? - A. We sold the cards and handkerchiefs, and gloves, to Mr. Levy, in Rosemary-lane.

Q. Is he here? - A. No.

Q. How much money did you share? - A. Twenty-two shilling a piece.

Q. How much had Mines? - A. An equal share.

Q. What became of the third ham? - A.We eat it.

Q. Who had it in his possession? - A.Benjamin James.

Jury. Q. Who dressed the ham for you? - A. We dressed it ourselves.

Q. Who was present when you eat it? - A.Mines, James, and myself, and Brown, the last witness, had some of it.

Q. Did James keep any of the handkerchiefs? - A. Yes, four.

MARGARET PATTERSON sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Rosemary-lane.

Q. Do you keep a shop there? - A. Yes.

Q. What shop? - A. A chandler's.

Q. Do you remember the last witness, Brown, coming to your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Who came with him? - A. That young man (pointing to James) was inside the shop-door.

Q. What did they bring with them? - A.They called at the door, and asked if I would purchase any hams; I came to the door, and told them I was a stranger, and was afraid to buy them, for fear they should be stolen, and Brown said, I might buy them very safely, for he should not carry them so openly if they had been stolen; he said he had got them for work.

Q. Had Brown both the hams? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the other say any thing? - A. No.

Q. But they came in together? - A. Yes.

Q. Who received the money? - A.Brown.

Q. How much did you pay him? - A.Eight shillings and eight-pence.

Q.Did you observe them talk together? - A. I observed them talk together once, while the hams were in he scale.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Whitechapel.

Q. Do you remember going to Mr. Lift's house? - A. Yes, I went with John Brown the evidence, and Jonathan Trott, a brother officer; he took us round to the back part of the house; he said, he did not know any other way; he took us to the Golden Eagle Gardens, Mile-end Road; he pointed out Mr. Lift's house, and said, that was the house; I found the hinges had been forced, but the window was not open; the tiles had been put the window was not open; the tiles had been put on again; I could see where they had been moved; Mrs. List produced me a pair of old shoes that were left there, and in consequence of the information of Brown, I took these shoes off James's feet, and gave him back those that Mrs. List had given him; they fitted him exactly.

Q. Did he own them? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Was James then in custody? - A. Yes, in our lock-up room.

Q. When was this? - A. On Saturday the 18th.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - Q. You have got a ham there? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you get that ham from? - A. On Saturday the 18th of December, I went with Brown, the accomplice, to the house of Patterson, in Rosemary-lane, where I found this ham? I asked Mrs Patterson where the hams were that she had bought of that person, and she said this was one; the other was eat; she shewed me the bone.

Q.(To Mr. List.) Should you know your ham again? - A. Yes, it is an American ham.

Q. Look at those shoes? - A. I can swear to the shoes; they are an old pair of shoes that have been mended in a particular manner; the man who made them is here.

DAVID M'ALLESTER sworn. - Q. Are you a shoemaker? - A. I am.

Q. Look at those shoes, is there any of your work upon them? - A. Yes, I made the shoes.

Q. Who for? - A. For Mr. List; I can swear to the work.

The prisoner, James, did not say any thing in his defence.

Mines's defence. It is very hard that man's evidence should be taken; he has been tried here and convicted, and I never was.

Hafford, NOT GUILTY .

Connor, NOT GUILTY .

Mines, NOT GUILTY .

James, GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18030112-55

155. RICHARD HAFFORD , JOHN CONNOR , WILLIAM MINES , and BENJAMIN JAMES , were again indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Wright , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 13th of December , with intent ot steal, and burglariously stealing a boat-cloak, value 10s. the property of the said Henry Wright .

The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.

HENRY WRIGHT sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At New Grove, Mile-end .

Q. In what parish? - A. In the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney.

Q. How is your house situated, is there a garden behind the house? A. Yes.

Q. At the end of the garden, is there a coach-house? - A. Not at the end of the garden, nearer the dwelling-house.

Q. How far is that coach-house from the dwelling-house? - Q. Five or six feet, connected by a paling.

Q. Is this paling that connects it, a paling that goes round the garden? - A. No, it is a paling that forms a door-way between the house and the coach-house.

Q.Besides the paling you have been speaking of and the door-way, is there no general fence? - A. Yes, a brick-wall down one side the garden, a brick-wall down the other side the garden, and in the front iron-railing.

Q.Have you a plan of it? - A. No, I can sketch one in a minute. (The witness sketched a plan of the premises.)

Q.Does the brick-wall go intirely round the whole of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Is Mile-end Road is the front of your house? - A. Yes.

Q.Then on the right-hand is the coach-way going into Mile-end Road? - A. Yes.

Q.Now then on going upon your right-hand, what is the fence? - A. A paling of forty feet from the road, and then a brick-wall which extends to the bottom of the garden and a part of the orchard.

Q. From that brick-wall, what is it separates the orchard from the garden? - A. Short paling that you may look over into the orchard.

Q. That is a continued fence, is it? - A. Yes.

Q. Having gone the length of that brick-wall and paling, what is the fence upon your right-hand? - A. A brick-wall.

Q. What is there in front towards Mile-end Road? - A.Iron-raisling.

Q. All iron-railing? - A. No, there are two large folding-doors, and a wooden-gate.

Q. Was your coach-house broke open at any time, and when? - A. On Sunday morning, the 12th of December; i left my house to go into Essex.

Q. What time of the day? - A.Between nine and ten in the morning; I know nothing more of it, but from the information, of my servants; I beg leave to say, that this coach-house and stables are connected together under one building, and my coachman and footman sleep over the coach-house.

JANE EASTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Capt. Wright.

Q. Were you so on the 12th of December? - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember his going into the country on that day? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on that evening fasten the coachhouse door? - A. Yes.

Q. How did you fasten it? - A. It catches with a latch.

Q. Did you go into the coach-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe a boat-cloak there. - A.No, I did not observe it.

Q. When had you seen it? - A. I saw it there in the morning, about nine o'clock.

Q. Did you observe the coach-house in the morning? - A. Yes; between eight and nine o'clock I found the door open.

Q.Had you heard that you had been robbed at that time? - A. Yes, the door was open, and there was a pail that had been taken out of the coach-house, and left outside the door.

Q. Had you observed that in the coach-house the night before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you look for the boat-cloak? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Were you the first person who went in the morning to this coach-house? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Were there any men servants in the house? - A. Yes, the footman, David Watkins.

Q. Is he here? - A. No.

Court. Q. How do you know he had not been there before you? - A. He was not up.

JOHN POULTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you coachman to Capt. Wright. - A. I am.

Q. Did you sleep on the 12th at your master's house? - A. No, I went out with my master on the 11th.

Q. Did you usually sleep in the coach-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Does the sooman sleep there too? - A. Yes.

Q.Before you went out on the Sunday, had you seen the boat-cloak? - A. Yes, I saw it on the Sunday morning, about nine o'clock, hanging where I had left it myself.

Q. Should you know the boat-cloak again? - A. Yes, it was very dirty; it had been dragged in the dirt.

Court. Q. How do you go up into the room where you sleep? - A. Up a stair-case that comes down by the side of the coach-house.

Q. You do not go through the coach-house to it? - A. No.

Q. Did Watkins go to bed after you? - A. No.

Q. In order to get to the room where he slept, he passes the coach-house door, does he not? - A. yes.

YAMES BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You live at No. 18, Denmark-street? - A. Yes.

Q. That is in Ratcliff-Highway? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Mines? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know John Brown? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Hafford? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know James? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Conner? - A. Yes, I know them when I see them.

Q.Look at them? - A. Yes, I saw them all.

Q. On Monday the 13th of December, do you remember seeing them? - A. I cannot recollect the day, it was on the Monday morning, at Mines's lodgings, at Saltpetre-bank.

Q. Who did you see? - A. William Mines, Richard Hafford, John Connor , John Brown, and Benjamin James.

Q. Tell us what passed when you were all together, as relating to Mr. Wright's business? - A.When I went in, they were all lying down asleep, except Connor, he was up; and I met Brown as he was going to the house, and he returned with me back to the house; James said, he had some stockings, and told Brown he had better try and get some money for him for the stockings; Brown overheard them, and James asked him how many there were.

Q. Did they say any thing about this boat-cloak? - A. James said they had a boat-cloak that would said, they had got it from Captain Wright's, and a man holloaed out to them from Captain Wright's window; Benjamin James said he answered, holloa! then they were pursued, and they had to leave the cloak in the field. He said, they had had some leaden pipe, and they were obliged to leave that.

Q. At the time James said this about the cloak, did the other prisoners say any thing? - A. One of them said, if he had had it, he would not have left it.

Q. Who was that? - A. William Mines . He said, he thought they might have carried it very handy.

Q. Did they all hear what James had said? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing more about the boat cloak? - A. No.

Q. Then when James said this, he did not speak particularly to you? - A. No.

JOHN BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know all the prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you know about Captain Wright's house? - A. I went out on Sunday night, the 12th of December, with John Connor , Richard Hafford, William Mines , and Benjamin James.

Q. Where did you go from? - A. From Dock-street, Saltpetre-bank.

Q. Who lived in the house? - A. I cannot say, William Mines kept the room. We went down Whitechapel-road.

Court. Q. What time of night was it? - A. Between twelve and one. We went along till we came to where there were new houses; then we got over the fence into the fields, and came round towards London again in the fields, and came to a place where there was a large garden; we all got over into the garden.

Q. What did you get over? - A. A wooden fence. We came behind a large out-house in the garden; we tore off two large leaden pipes; the we carried the pipes till we came to Mr. Wright's.

Court. Q. How far was this from Mr. Wright's? - A. About half a mile.

Q. How did you get into Mr. Wright's? - A. James got over the wall and opened the gate, and the others came in.

Q. What gate was it? - A. A back gate that led into the fields from the garden. We took eight pair of stockings off the currant bushes; then we went round the coach-house, and saw a small muslin frock hanging upon the Bush, we took that; then we came back to the coach-house, and James opened the coach-house door.

Q. How did he open it? - A. By lifting the latch.

Q. Who went into the coach-house? - A. Benjamin James , Richard Hafford, and me, the other two stood close by the coach-house.

Q. What time was this? - A. Between one and two. We went in and found a boat-cloak, I handed it down, and gave it to James; and when we came out of the coach-house, James gave it to Connor. Then we were coming away towards Mr. Wright's gardener's house; we were going into the house, when some man called out, holloa! he was inside the house.

Q. Was he at the window? - A. No, I think he was bed. James answered, holloa! and then we made our escape.

Court. Q. Was the gardener's house in the garden? - A. Yes, it joins the garden. When the man fung out, we jumped over the wall into the fields.

Q. What did you do with the cloak? - A. We carried it with us for about a mile across the fields; then we saw some linen hanging up in a yard, we were going into the yard, when there was a man at the window sung out; then we ran away, and John Connor dropped the cloak.

Q. What sort of a night was it? - A. It was moonlight all the time we were out.

Q. Did you afterwards see the cloak? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that that you have seen since the same? - A. Yes; we could not tell what it was, it had no sleeves to it, it was lined with green baize.

WILLIAM OLIVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you find any boat-cloak any where? - A. Yes, on Wednesday the 15th of December, in a little close where my cows go to grass.

Q. Where is that? - A. Just upon the turning that goes on to Bow-common.

Q. How far from Mr. Wright's? - A. I suppose about three quarters of a mile, or better.

Q. Is your field adjoining the garden? - A. No, it lies a good way from the garden.

Q. What did you do with that boat-cloak? - A. I carried it home.

Q. Did you afterwards produce it before the Justice? - A. I carried it to Capt. Wright's house.

Q. When? - A. On the Wednesday evening.

Q. Who did you leave the cloak with a Captain Wright's? - A. One of the servants; there was the cook, and either the coachman or footman, I don't know which.

Q. Is that witness, Jane Easter, the cook? - A. Yes, she was in the kitchen.

Q.(To Easter). Were you there when this man brought the boat-cloak? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it the same boat-cloak you lost? - A. Yes.

Q. And which belonged to your master? - A. Yes.

Q. And what became of the boat-cloak, afterwards? - A. It was shewn to my master.

Q.(To Captain Wright). This boat-cloak was shewn to you by the servants? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of it afterwards? - A. It was delivered to the officer by one of my servants, I cannot say which; I afterwards saw it at the office.

Q. It was the same cloak? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there a gardener's house in your garden? - A. Yes.

Q. Where a person sleeps? - A. Yes, in consequence of many robberies in the neighbourhood.

Q. Is there a gate going out there? - A. Yes, there is; and that gate is generally shut at night.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knopp. Q. Where did you get that cloak from? - A.From some of Mr. Wright's people, at the office, I cannot say which of them; I have had it ever since locked up.

Q. When was it you received it at the office? - A. the 16th of December. We apprehended Mines, James, and Brown on the 15th, at No. 7, Denmark-street, St. George's; I did not apprehend the other two prisoners.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I apprehended Hafford and Gonnor on the 15th, at Saltpetre-bank; I found Hafford, in the street, James Brown , the black, pointed him out to me; Connor was in a court that leads to Salpetre-bank. As soon as I laid hold of Hafford, I saw Connor turn his back to hide himself from me. We secured them both.

Q.(To Mr. Wright). Look at that cloak? - a. I know it to be my property.

Q. By what mark? - A. From it's general appearance; there is no particular mark upon it.

Q. How long have you had it? - A. About twelve or eighteen months.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. I have valued it at twelve shillings, it cost thirty shillings.

Court. Q.There is nothing peculiar in it's form or shape? - A. No.

Hafford's defence. I know nothing of it, but seeing the witness Brown with some stockings at the public-house, he went out to sell them, and came in again; I asked him if he had sold then, and he said, no, they would not give him money enough.

Connor's defence. I never was along with him in my life.

Mines's defence. I know nothing at all of what is alledged against me.

James. I have nothing at all to say.

Hafford, NOT GUILTY .

Connor, NOT GUILTY .

Mines, NOT GUILTY . James, GUILTY , Death .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-56

156. RICHARD HAFFORD , JOHN CONNOR , WILLIAM MINES , and BENJAMIN JAMES , were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , eight pair of stockings, value 7s. and a frock, value 4s. the property of Jane Easter .

JANE EASTER sworn. - On Sunday the 11th of December, I lost eight pair of stockings and a muslin frock, I had seen them about ten o'clock that morning in the garden behind the house, hanging upon the currant-bushes; I missed them on the Monday morning when I got up; I afterwards saw them at the office in Lambeth-street.

JAMES BROWN sworn. - I know nothing of it, but that I saw these stockings at William Mines 's, at Saltpetre-banks, on Monday morning, I don't recollect the day of the month, the prisoners were all there, and two women; I saw eight pair of stockings in Brown's hand; James told him he had better go out and sell them; he came back, and said, he could not get his price for them, and brought them back; James then sent him out with them again, and he came back again with them; Mines, and a woman that was in the house went out with four pair, saying, they would pawn them; they came back, and said they had pawned them for three shiling; they gave the money to John Brown, and he gave it to Benjamin James; Brown said, he had sold the frock while he was out, and Benjamin James did not like the price he had got for it; James said, he would go and get it back again, and James and Brown set off to go. I know nothing further of it.

The pawnbroker's servant produced four pair of stockings. which he took in pledge from Jone Nicholls.

JANE NICHOLLS sworn. - I happened to be with the woman that the prisoner Mines lives with, when Benjamin James asked me to go and pledge those things, which I did, I delivered the money and the tickets to Brown.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - On Wednesday, the 15th, I apprehended the prisoners: I went to Mines's

house, where I found the woman who has just given evidence; I searched her, and in a houfewife in her pocket I found a duplicate of four pair of stockings, pledged for three shillings: I went to the pawnbrokers and found them.

JOHN BROWN sworn. - I went with the prisoners to Mr. Wright's, and took eight pair of stockings from a currant-bush in the garden; I took them to Mines's, I lived with him for a day or two; this old woman went and pawned them. (The stockings were identified by the prosecutrix).

Hafford, NOT GUILTY .

Connor, NOT GUILTY .

Mines, NOT GUILTY .

James, GUILTY Death .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-57

157. ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , a watch, value 2l. the property of John Wislintons , in his dwelling-house .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Joshua Morning .

There being no evidence to show that the watch was in the possession of the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-58

158. THOMAS BRUCE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Daniel Willis , he and others being threrein, between the hours of eleven and twelve, in the forenoon of the 4th of December , and burglariously stealing six handkerchiefs, value 9s. the property of the said Davil.

DANIEL WILLIS sworn. - I am a linen-draper , on Fish-street-hill : On the 4th of December last, the prisoner was brought into my shop, with the handkerchiefs, by an officer, myself and family were at home at the time; the window was broke, but I heard no noise, I had not seen it since eight o'clock in the morning, the handkerchiefs lay close to the pane of glass, which had a piece broke out of the corner; the value is nine shillings.

GEORGE LINSEY sworn. - I am an officer: On the 4th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was coming up Fish-street-hill, and saw a person holding the prisoner by the collar; I asked what was the matter; he said the prisoner had taken the handkerchiefs out of the window, pointing to Mr. Willis's; I saw the prisoner's left hand under his coat, I pulled it up, and he dropped behind him this piece of handkercheiefs, (producing it); I took the prisoner and handkerchefs into Mr. Willis's shop, who owned them. I searched the prisoner, but found nothing; while I was searching him, the person who had hold of him went away, and I saw no more of him. (The handkerchiefs identified).

Prisoner's defence. I had just left my ship, and coming up this street, a man said I had something belonging to the shop, and another man run away at the time; I know nothing of the robbery.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-59

159. SAMUEL RICHARDS was indicted for that he, being in the dwelling-house of William Jobson , on the 6th of January, feloniously did steal seven silver table-spoons, value 3l. 10s, a silver gravy-spoon, value 2l. four silver ladies, value 5l. 10s. six silver dessert-spoons, value 30s. six silver tea spoons, value 15s. a silver - , value 5s. four silver salt-spoons, value 8s. a table-cloth, value 3s. and two towels, value 4d. the property of the said William; and afterwards, to wit, about the hour of one, in the night of the same day, burglariously did break the said dwelling-house to get out of the same .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JANE OUTREM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are house-maid to Mr. Jobson, in Finsbury-square ? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. The prisoner was the footman ? - A. Yes.

Q. And Susan Soanes was the cook? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you go to bed on the night this happened? - A. Between ten and eleven.

Q. You and the cook went up to bed together? - A. Yes.

Q. Before you went to bed had you fastened all the windows, and the scullery, and the area door? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you leave the prisoner up? - A. Yes.

Q. How came he to be up after you? - A. I don't know.

Q. But you left him in the kitchen? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to bed directly? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you sleep with? - A. The cook.

Q. Did you get up first the next morning? - A. About eight o'clock we went into the kitchen together.

Q. This was on the 6th of January? - A. Yes.

Q. When you came into the kitchen, did you observe any thing? - A. No.

Q. How soon after you got into the kitchen did the cook go up to the prisoner's room? - A. As soon as she had opened the shutters, she went up stairs to the prisoner's room.

Q. For what? - A. For the tinder-box.

Q. Did she return with the tiner-box? - A. No.

Q. Did you afterwards find any flint or steel any where? - A. Yes, under the parlour carpet.

Q. When was that? - A. About five minutes after she had got the light.

Q. Was that after, or before you lit the parlour fire? - A. After I had lit the parlour fire.

Q. How soon after she came down did the prisoner come down? - A. About ten minutes.

SUSANNAH SOANES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are cook to Mr. Jobson? - A. Yes: On the 6th of January, I went to bed with the last witness, I locked the scullery, and the area door.

Q. Did you leave the prisoner in the kitchen before you went to bed? - A. Yes; I was going to rake out the fire, and the prisoner desired me not to rake it out, for he was not going to hed just yet.

Q. Was Mr. Jobson in bed at this time? - A. I don't know.

Court. Q. Was it usual for the footman to go to bed at ten or eleven o'clock at night? - A. Yes; my master had ordered us all to go to bed at ten o'clock.

Q. Are you quite sure that all the doors were secured and bolted? - A. Yes.

Q. You and the last witness slept together? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you go down in the morning? - A. A little after eight, we went down in the kitchen together; I opened the shutters first, and then unlocked the kitchen and the area door, which I had double-locked the night before; the keys were left in the door.

Q. Then you found the doors in the same state in which you left them? - A. Yes.

Q. So that nobody inside could let themselves out? - A. Yes; I went into the prisoner's room for the timler-box, the door was open.

Q. Was the tinder-box usually kept in his room? - A. Yes; I asked Samuel for the tiner-box, and he said, he believed it was in the drawer; it was usually kept in the table-drawer; I looked in the drawer but could not find it there; I then went in to the nursery, and got a light.

Q. Did you return down stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you been down stairs before you saw the prisoner? - A. Not more than three or four minutes; he came into the kitchen, and asked me what had been the matter; I said, I did not know; he seemed very much agaitated, and said, there had been thieves in the house; then he went up the kitchen stairs, saying, he was going to call his master.

Q. Did you ever sind the tinder-box? - A. Yes; it was on the prisoner's pantry dresser.

Q. What time of the day was it you found it there? - A. I saw it there as I was coming down stairs, with a light, from the nursery.

Court. Q.Have you no means of knowing whether it was that night in the table-drawer? - A. It was there the night before, when I made the bed.

Q. Were you in the kitchen when your master and the prisoner came down together? - A. Yes.

Q. When they came down, what passed? - A. I did not give attention to what passed.

CHARLOTTE COVERLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were the nurse in Mr. Jobon's family at this time? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you down between the hours of ten at night and eight the next morning? - A. No.

Q. Did you see the prisoner the next morning? - A. Yes; he came up to call his master, and knocked at the nursery door.

Q. Did he say and thing? - A. He said the house had been robbed.

Q. What time was that? - A. About half past eight o'clock in the morning.

WILLIAM JOBSON , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You live in Finsbury-square? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was your footman? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any other man servant in your house? - A. No other.

Q. Had you any other maid servants, except those that I have examined? - A. No other.

Q. Mrs. Jobson was, at that time, out of town? - A. She had been out of town for a fortnight.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the morning that this happened? - A. Yes; a little after eight in the morning.

Q. Tell us what passed from the prisoner to you? - A. He came up, in great agitation, and told me the house had been robbed; he desired I would come down as soon as possible, which I told him I should do; the prisoner and I then went into the kitchen, I examined his pantry, where he keeps the plate.

Q. Had you learned, from the prisoner before, what sort of a robbery it had been, whether it was of plate, or any thing else? - A. He said the plate was gone.

Q. Did that induce you to go to the pantry? - A. It did, with the prisoner; I found that the edge of the door, outside of the pantry, had been scratched a little, to make it appear as if it had been broke open.

Q. Who kept the key of the pantry-door? - A. He kept the key himself; I examined the door, it is a very thick door, the lock is inside, I saw no appearance of force upon the lock.

Q. How does this scratching appear to have been done? - A. By a sort of a sugar chopper; I found the sugar-chopper, by which it was done, very near the pantry-door; there was no other appearance of force at all.

Q. Did you say any thing to the prisoner upon this circumstance? - A. I was afraid to awake suspicion, and I told him to go up stair's and lay the cloth for my breakfast, and make himself easy; and, privately, desired one of the maids to go for a constable; I tried the key in the lock first of all, and I found it opened and shut in the usual way.

Q. Where did you get the key from? - A. Out of his pocket, I desired him to give it me; I fol

lowed the prisoner up stairs, and kept my eye upon him, not to lose sight of him, till the constable came.

Q. Had you found any thing before the constable came? - A. I had observed the drawer in the pantry where the plate was usually kept, I found it open, and the plate was gone; the constable came, and took charge of the prisoner, and took him away to Worship-street.

Q. Were you present when the plate was found? - A. I was not; I saw it afterwards at Worship-street.

Q. What time did you go to bed that night? - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock; I had desired the servants to go to bed, as their mistress was from home, I should not want them any more.

Q. The plate was committed by you to his charge? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any table-cloths presented to you? - A. I saw one of my table-cloths, that he had the charge of, at Worship-street, wrapped round the plate.

Q. How long had the prisoner been in your service? - A. Only three weeks.

Q. Had you a character with him? - A. I had a very good character with him.

Q. THOMAS GREEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you a patrol in Finsbury-square? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know him as a servant of Mr. Jobson? - A. Yes; I had seen him there several times.

Q. Do you know the area belonging to the house in Finsbury-square? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner that night, the 6th of January? - A. Yes; I saw him, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, go across the area, as if he had been at the privy.

Q. Did you speak to him? - A. Yes; I told him he would catch cold, he was partly undressed.

Q. How much was he dressed? - A. He had not his coat or waistcoat on.

Q. Did he speak to you? - A. He spoke very low, that I could not hear what he said; then he went in, and shut the door softly after him.

Q. Are you quite sure with respect to his being the person? - A. I am positive he is the same man.

Q. Are you quite sure he is the person. have you any doubt? - A. Not the least; I had seen him lock the area-gate below at nine o'clock.

Q. Therefore you have no doubt upon earth about it? - A. I have not.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. We know you are an officer belonging to Worship-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to Mr. Jobson's house on the morning this affair was discovered? - A. Yes: On Friday, the 7th of January, the prisoner was brought to the office; I went to Mr. Jobson's house, I was shewn the pantry, the door, is painted chocolate, and the side of the door white; on the side of the door, by the lock, there was a little chipping on the edge.

Q. By the chipping, did it appear to you as if the lock had been broke? - A. It appeared to be done to shew that.

Court. Q. Could it be of any use to force the door? - A.Certainly not; I then tried the lock, and found it perfect; I then shut the door, and there was no appearance at all of force against the door.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Where did you go afterwards? - A. I then went to the kitchen-door, which commands the entrance from up stairs, which has nineteen steps to the kitchen-door, and there I found this box, which recieves the lock, lying upon the steps; and the screw of that door opens inwards from the house into the kitchen.

Q. In order to get that off, must it have been got off inside the kitchen? - A. It must; because I looked at teh jaumbs of the door to see if there had been any force used on the inside, and there was none.

Q. Was there any appearance of force as if the person had come from the area throught the kitchen? - A. None.

Q. Suppose any person came from the area through the kitchen towards the pantry, did it appear as if any person coming from the area had opened this door? - A. No, the contrary; I was then shewn another kitchen-door, which leads to the area under the stone steps; I looked at that door, and there was no violence at all, and that door lock inwards, and opens inwards into the kitchen; after viewing that, and finding no force there, I shut the door which leads into the area, and that door locked inside and opened inside, and there was no appearance of violence whatever; from there I went to a knife-place, in the area, and that door locked inside and opened inside, and there was no appearance of violence whatever; from there I went to a knife-place, in the area, underneath the pavement, at the end of that knifeplace was a privy, upon viewing this place I saw a number of bricks, and I called for a light, I looked in the dust-hole, Vickery immediately called out to me, Armstrong, I have found the plant; I looked down the privy, and at the end of the privy, under the seat, upon the side. I observed something white; I then got the kitchen tongs, and moved a brick that lay before it, and this tablecloth was produced, tied up, and when I opened it, it contained these articles of plate, and two more table-cloths, and two towels, on the soil;(produces all the articles mentioned in the indictment); this chopper was produced to me in the kitchen, I compared it, and in the door I found the impression of this chopper, upon the sill of the door, where it had been chopped.

Q.(To Soane.) Did you find this chopper? - A. Yes.

Q.What did you do with it? - A. I hung it up again in its place, and afterwards delivered it to Mr. Armstrong.

Q.(To Mr. Jobson.) Are these articles of plate your's? - A. They are.

Q. And these table-cloths and towels? - A. They are.

Prisoner's defence. I locked my pantry-door every night, but the lock catches; I am frequently obliged to lock it several times before I can make it lock. I went to bed that night, and did not come down any more till the next morning; but Susan came up for the tinder-box. I know nothing of any body getting into the house; I am very innocent of what I am charged with; there was no occasion for me to have broke the lock when I had the key in my pocket; there is a door at the back part of the house that is very seldom locked; there is nothing but a latch.

Prosecutor. There is a building behind the house, but it is impossible any body can come in that way; it is only a way from one part of the house to another.

Jury. Q.(To Green.) Had the prisoner any candle in his hand when you saw him? - A. No, he had not.

Q. Was there sufficient light for you to be able to see the face of a man? - A. Yes, I am quite positive he is the man.

GUILTY, aged 31,

Of stealing the goods, but not of burglariously breaking the dwelling-house to get out of the same .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-60

160. FRANCES ELLIOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , a for tippet, value 3l. 3s. the property of William-Church Morhall , privately in his shop .

Second Count. Charging it to be in his dwelling house.

WILLIAM-CHURCH MORHALL sworn. - I am a furrier and haberdasher , in Hayes's-court, St. Ann's : On the 2d of December, about nine in the morning, my sister came to me, and asked me if I had taken a tippet off the counter.

Q. What is her name? - A. Alice Morhall .

Q. Does she officiate in the shop? - A. Yes; I told her I had not taken it; I went up stairs, and there was one missing; I said it was the best tippet; it was the flank tippet that was gone; next day I was going through Covent-garden, and saw it upon the neck of the prisoner; it is composed of two different pieces of fur; I had not enough of the one sort to finish it; it is finished with a different sort of fur; I followed her the full length of the Piazza before I said any thing to her; I did not wish to make a disturbance; I laid hold of her arm and said "My dear will you go a little way with me:" she looked at me, smiled, and said "Yes, where shall we go." she had two young girls, one in each arm, and she bid them go away, saying she was going with a gentleman; we went very quietly down Russell-street; she looked very anxiously at me, and said, "Where are you going with me;" I told her "but a little way;" as we came near the corner of Bow-street, she said -"where are you going; good God, you alarm me;" I told her "to the office;" she said -"for God's sake, what is the matter? tell me if any thing is the matter? we will settle it without going there." I told her my name, and where I lived, and charged her with having the property upon her back that was stolen from my ware-room the night before; upon which the prisoner was alarmed, and said, "I bought the tippet honestly; if the woman I bought it of came dishonestly by it, here take the tippet for God's sake," and immediately put it into my bands; the Magistrates not being sitting, the officers refused to take her into custody, and said, I must have a warrant first; she was very near slipping through the hands of justice by that means; I told them at their peril to let her go; and then Macmanus desired me to give charge of her, which I did; she was taken into Carpmeal's, and I went to fetch my sister; when I came back, she wanted to have some conversation with me; she asked me the value of the tippet; I told her "to a surrier three guineas;" she said, "will you take three guineas; although I gave a guinea and a half for it, I will give you the three guineas;" I told her that would be compounding felony, and I could not do it. After the first examination, a man came and said he would give twenty guineas to make it up. (Produces the tippet.)

ALICE MORHALL sworn. - I am sister to the prosecutor: On the 1st of December, about half past six o'clock, the prisoner and an old woman came into our shop.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - A. Yes, she had been frequently in our shop; I had known her five years before; the old woman she called servant; I never recollected her coming to our shop above twice without having the old woman with her; the prisoner asked to look at velvet hats; we don't keep them in the shop, and I wished her to have an inferior chip, but she said, she would not wear one; I then took her up into the wareroom, and the old woman went with her; I had myself that day made three tippets, and laid them separate by themselves on the counter in the wareroom.

Q. That room up stairs is not a shop? - A. Yes, it is, where we shew several goods for sale; these three tippets I put there a little after five o'clock; no one had been in the room before they came in; the prisoner looked at several velvets, and did not

like them; she then returned down into the shop; I was pressing for her to buy, and she bought a black inferior chip, which she said before she would not wear; they were both in great haste to go, as they said they should be too late to go to the Play.

Q. How long was she in buying that? - A. They were about five minutes in the shop below, and about ten minutes in the ware-room; they were unusually quick below, for I have known them stop half an hour when they have come to purchase; the bonnet that she had bought of me was on her head when I saw her at Bow-street; she gave me half a guinea for it; I did not suspect the prisoner had taken it, nor any one, and therefore I did not look for the tippet that night; the next morning when I came down from breakfast, about half past eight in the morning, I found the two tippets in the same place I had left them, but the other was gone; I immediately asked my brother if he had taken one away, and he said he had not; no one had been in the room that night after she left it but our own family; the tippet is my own work, and I am positive it was never sold; I finished it but about an hour before she came in.

Q.(To Morhall.) Have you had the possession of the tippet ever since? - A. Yes, this is the same tippet.

Prisoner. Q.(To Miss Morhall.) Did you ever miss any thing after I had left your shop? - A. No, I never suspected ber.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the tippet some time ago of a person of the name of Sarah Moore.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18030112-61

161. LEWIS RICHARDS was indicted, for that he, on the 29th of October , did, with intent to defraud James Hogg , feloniously utter and publish, as true, a certain false, forged, and counterfeit indorsement of and upon a certain Bill of Exchange for payment of money , the tenor of which said Bill of Exchange is as follows, that is to say,"Portsmouth, July 27, 1802.

"Exchange for 450l. sterling.

"At thirty days sight of this first of Exchange, second and third of the same tenor and date unpaid, pay to Capt. Nathaniel Kennard, or order, four hundred and fifty pounds sterling, value received, and charge it, with or without further advice, to"Your humble servant,

" THOMAS MANNING .

"To Mess. Thomas Dickason,

Merchants, London."

And upon which said Bill of Exchange, or certain other indorsement thereon, made then and there, was as follows, that is to say.

"Pay the within to John M'Connell, Esq. of London, for account of Robert M'Dowell, Esq. of Grenada.

"NATHANIEL KENNARD."

And which said false, forged, and counterfeit indorsement was so made on the said Bill of Exchange, and was so uttered and published by the said Lewis Richards , as and for an indorsement and assignment thereof by the said John M'Connell, and then and there was and is as follows, that is to say, " J. MacConnell," he knowing it to be forged, false, and counterfeit, with intent to defraud the said James Hogg .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing, as true, a like forged indorsement of said Bill of Exchange, he knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

Third and Fourth Counts. The same as the first and second, only with intent to defraud John M'Connell .

Fifth and Sixth Counts. The same, only with intent to defrand Nathaniel Kennard .

Seventh and Eighth Counts. The same, only with intent to defraud Robert M'Dowell .

Ninth and Tenth Counts. The same, only with intent to defraud Thomas Dickason the younger, and William Burgess. And,

Eleventh and Twelfth Counts. The same, only with intent to defraud Thomas Manning .

The indictment was stated by Mr. Myers, and the case by Mr. Garrow.

JAMES HOGG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. In what situation of life are you? - A. I am agent for a very respectable house in Leeds, and another at Hull; I live in Sherborne-lane.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. Eighteen months.

Q. Previous to October last, had there been any money transactions between you and him? - A. There had; I had lent him 10l. he owed me, with the law expences, near 15l. I had taken out a writ against him.

Q. Did you happen to meet him in October? - A. Yes, upon Snow-hill; I asked him how he could serve me in that manner, by not having the bill which he had given me for thirteen guineas, drawn upon Mr. M'Connell, honoured.

Q. Is that the bill? (Shewing it to the witness.) - A. This is the bill. (It is read.)

"London, June 2d, 1802.

"£. 13 13 0.

"Forty-five days after date, pay to me, or my order, the sum of thirteen pounds thirteen shillings, for value received.

"L. RICHARDS.

"Accepted, James M'Connell.

"Payable at Mr. F. Woolleys, No. 34,

Duke-street, Grosvenor-square."

Q. At the time when you received this bill, did

you know the Mr. M'Connell upon whom it was drawn? - A. No, he sent me the bill in a letter; he told me Mr. M'Connell was a man of very considerable property; that the schedule of his property when taken amounted to 40,000l. he said he had been in the King's Bench, but was then out.

Q. Look at that (shewing the witness a letter), is that the letter that enclosed the bill? - A. Yes, the thirteen-guinea bill.(A letter addressed to Mr. James Hogg , Sherborne-lane, Lombard-street, read.)

"Mr. Hogg, Sir, I have enclosed the bill as mentioned; Mr. M'Connell had it drawn to a certainty of its being honoured, so that you may rely on the punctuality of it; I am sorry I could not get it at a shorter date, but hope it will answer your purpose. There must be a mistake as to the costs, as your attorney told a gentleman who called, that the costs were 2l. 10s. returning the writ 10s. three letters 10s. 6d. amounting to 3l. 10s. 6d. As I shall see you in a day or two, will arrange that matter to the satisfaction of both parties. The amount of the enclosed was the balance of one account between me and Mr. M'Connell, which was the reason of its being the sum of thirteen guineas.

"I remain your's sincerely,

"Your obedient humble servant,

"June 3, 1802. L. RICHARDS."

Q. That bill has the acceptance of James M'Connell? - A. Yes; when I met the prisoner upon Snow-hill, he told me the reason of the bill of thirteen guineas not being honoured was, that Mr. M'Connell had gone into the country, and that he had left my account and some others with a Mr. Bateman to settle during his absence; he promised to call at my office in a day or two to settle it, but did not; he was employed by a person in Billiter-square, I think of the name of Bozeur, a foreign merchant. On the 26th of October he called at my accompting-house, and left a note, which has been lost; I have taken every pains, but cannot find it; he wrote me word, that he was in possession of a bill for 450l. drawn upon a person of the name of Dickason, which he would endeavour to get cashed, and he would then call and pay me what he was in my debt. On the 29th of October he called, and said, he had not been able to get the bill discounted; but if I would discount it, he would pay me; I told him if he would leave the bill with me for an hour, I would enquire if it was a good house; I took the bill to Mr. Dickason's, the acceptor's, and asked them if it was their acceptance; one of the clerks told me it was a very good one; I then took it to my banker's, and the prisoner called immediately afterwards at my accompting-house, and I gave him a draft upon my banker for 411l. which was deducting the thirteen guineas and the discount; he said, if it would be of any use to me he would draw a bill upon me for 20l. at a month or two months; I told him it would not make much matter, but I would accept a bill; he then drew a bill at a month, and I accepted it; that 20l. with the draft upon my banker, the money that he owed me, and the discount, made the amount of 450l.(The Bill of Exchange stated in the indictment, with the acceptance and endrosement, read.)

Q. Did the bill for 20l. which you accepted, afterwards come to you for payment? - A. Yes, I paid it to a person of the name of Proctor; I heard no more of it till Mr. Parkin and Mr. M'Connell called at my accompting-house the letter end of November.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This bill of 450l. was brought to you in consequence of your first having received a letter from him, and then his coming himself? - A. Yes.

Q. He made no difficulty of acceding to your request that it might be left with you for the purpose of making any enquiry you thought proper? - A. None; it was left with me about two hours.

Q. Was it upon the faith of the name of Dickason, and finding those enquiries satisfactory, that you paid him the money? - A. It was.

Q. Was there any thing in his conduct at the time that could justify a suspicion in you that he was doing wrong? - A. None.

Q. You know enough of the world to know, that a schedule means the schedule of a person in insolvent circumstances? - A. I did not understand that it meant a schedule of a man in insolvent circumstances; I understood it to be an account of what he was worth.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Do you know Mr. James M'Connell? - A. Yes, he was a prisoner in the King's Bench till he was removed by Habeas Corpus, to take his trial for this forgery.

Q. What are you? - A. An attorney at law.

Q. Did you ever see him write? - A. Yes, I am well acquainted with his writing.

Q. Look at the back of that bill, and you will find it endorsed J. M'Connell? - A. I verily believe it to be the hand-writing of James M'Connell.

PHILIP STANNARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Are you a clerk in the house of Mess. Lang and Co.? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know Mr. John M'Connell? - A. I do, he lives near Reading.

Q. Do you know his hand-writing? - A. I do.

Q. Look at the name J. M'Connell at the back of that bill, is that his hand-writing? - A. I verily believe it is not his writing.

BARNARD BROOSHOOFF sworn. - Examined by

Mr. Abbott. Q. What are you? - A.Clerk to the Clerk of the Papers of the King's Bench Prison.

Q. What book have you there? - A. The book of the entry of the persons committed to the custody of the Marshal. - (Reads an entry of the commitment of Lewis Richards on the 15th of January, 1800, and of his discharge under the Insolvent Act on the 12th of August, 1801; also an entry of the commitment of James M'Connell on the 28th of February, 1800, and of his removal in the custody of the Sheriff of Surrey on the 13th of December, 1802.)

THOMAS EMERTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. What are you? - A. A turnkey to the King's Bench Prison; the prisoner and James M'Connell were chums, and occupied the same apartment in the prison, No. 4 in No. 5.

JOHN M'CONNELL, Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Where do you reside now? - A. At Reading, in Berkshire.

Q. Did you reside at any time in the island of Grenada? - A. I did some time.

Q. Look at that letter, was it ever in your possession till after James M'Connell was under examination upon this charge? - A. Never; I was present when it was found in the King's Bench Prison; it is dated the 31st of July, 1802; I received a letter, dated the 22d of September, 1802.

Q. Did that letter of the 22d of September contain the Bill of Exchange I now hand to you? - A. It did; I then made enquiry for a letter I ought to have received before; I presented this bill for acceptane, and it was refused.

Q. Did that lead you, with the Solicitor for the Post-Office, to the apartments of James M'Connell in the King's Bench Prisoner? - A. It did.

LAURENCE WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Are you a clerk in the house of Dickason and Co.? - A. I am.

Q. That bill for 450l. appears to be accepted by them? - A. It was on the 26th of October.

Q. What are the names of that house? - A. Thomas Dickason, jun. and William Burgess.

Q. Look at that bill, was it ever presented at your house for acceptance, and refused? - A. Yes, it was because the duplicate had been already accepted.

BENJAMIN CRITCHETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Do you hold any situation in the Post-Office? - A. Yes; Inspector of letters.

Q. Look at that letter, do you remember that letter coming to the General Post-Office? - A. Yes.

Mr. Abbott. That is the letter Mr. M'Connell saw found in the King's Bench Prison.

Q. Do you recollect whether the place of abode of the person to whom it was directed could be found? - A. It could not; he was not known to any of the letter carriers, and the name was put up in the Post-Office yard; it is usual to put up a list of the names of persons to whom letters are directed London only; it was put up on the 13th of October; some unknown person wrote with a pencil against the name, "King's Bench, St. George's-fields;" in consequence of which I wrote upon the letter the words, "King's Bench," and put it into the regular process for its arrival there; the passage was 1s. 8d.

(Isaac Beard, a letter-carrier, proved the delivery of the letter at the King's Benth Prison, and the receipt of the postage.)

JOHN HOWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Are you clerk to Mess. Bowles and Co. bankers? - A. I am.

Q. Does Mr. Hogg keep cash with them? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, on the 29th of October, pay a check for 411l. drawn by him? - A. Yes, 411l. 4s. it has the name of L. Richards upon the back of it.

Mr. Hogg called again.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Look at L. Richards on the back of that check, is that the hand-writing of the prisoner? - A. It is.

Q. Is that the check you gave him in part satisfaction for the 450l.? - A. Yes.

(Mr. John Stafford , Chief Clerk at the Police Office, Union-Hall, produced a great number of letters found upon the person and in the apartments of M'Connell, which were proved by Mr. Hogg to be the handwriting of the prisoner.)(A letter was then read, which had contained the bill in question.)

(A great number of other letters were then readmerely tending to shew that the prisoner was well acquainted with the situation and circumstances of M'Connell, and that in some instances he had concealed that he was a prisoner.)

JOHN PROCTOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that 20l. bill, did you give the prisoner cash for it? - A. I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you known the prisoner long? - A. About five years; I knew him when he was a Captain in the Manchester Fencibles, and he was a Captain in the St. George's Corps.

Q. What has been his general character during the time you have known him? - A. I have not seen him for about two years, till about three weeks previous to my giving him cash; I always considered him as an upright character; I was an officer with him in another regiment; he told me he was distressed, and I gave him cash for it.

Prisoner's defence. On the 25th of October I called at the King's Bench Prison; M'Connell told me he had got a bill which his brother had remitted by Post from his correspondent at Dover. I told him it was too late that evening to do any

thing with it, but I would call the next day. I called the next day, and carried it for acceptance. I got it accepted, and then I called upon Mr. Hogg, and he told me Mr. M'Connell had used him very ill not to pay his acceptance of 13l. I told him not to make himself uneasy, for he had received a remittance from abroad, and shewed him the bill. He told me it was a very good bill, and he would cash it for me. I told him I would inform Mr. M'Connell of it. I went to M'Connell, and he said he had got the promise of it from another gentleman, and desired me to call again the next day. The next day I went to M'Connell again (there was an account between us at that time); he desired me to get it cashed. I went to Mr. Hogg, and got it discounted. I wrote my name upon it, Oxford-street, where I then resided. I took the whole of it to the King's Bench, and gave it to M'Connell, in the presence of Mrs. M'Connell and my son. He gave me 2l. on account, which I have accounted for in my books, and then he said, he would settle the balance in a few days, and I heard no more of the business till I was taken up. I only acted as an agent. I was requested to take the bill for acceptance, which I did. I understood he had very great property, and I knew his schedule was 40,000l. when he wanted to take advantage of the Insolvent Act. I heard from a number of persons that he was a man of property; I knew he had recovered 2 or 3000l. upon the ship Hope, and I had no doubt of the bill, especially as he said it was a remittance from his brother. I did not observe the name of John, nor Mr. Hogg either.

Evidence for the Prisoner.

SARAH FRANCES HAWKES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know Mr. M'Connell, who is now in the Surrey jail, and was in the King's Bench prison? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you know any thing with respect to a 450l. bill? - A. Yes, I was present when Mr. M'Connell gave it to Captain Richards. Mr. M'Connell asked him if he would take a bill for acceptance that he had received from abroad; Mr. Richards said, certainly he would take it to oblige him, if he had no other person to send. It was too late that day; he came again the next day, and took the bill for acceptance; I was present when he returned in the evening; he gave Mr. M'Connell the bill, which was accepted, and said, if he wished to have it cashed, a friend of his in the City, of the name of Hogg, had offered to do it; and Mr. M'Connell said, he would consider of it.

Q. Was that all that passed at that time? - A. Yes. Two or three days afterwards, Mr. M'Connell gave Captain Richards the bill, to get it cashed by his friend; and he was to pay some bill that Mr. Hogg had upon him, Captain Richards came again that evening, and said, his friend, Mr. Hogg, had given him the cash, and he delivered it to Mr. M'Connell, begging of him to look over it, to see that it was right; and he said, it was right; then Captain Richards received a note, which I understood to be a five-pound note, on account of what Mr. M'Connell owed him; there was an account between them, which originated in a bill that Captain Richards accommodated Mr. M'Connell with.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. I observed, when Mrs. M'Connell was called, you presented yourself to the book to be sworn? - A. Yes, I have two subpoenas; one by the name of M'Connell, and the other by the name of Hawkes, which is my own name.

Q. How long has M'Connell been a prisoner in the King's Bench prison? - A. I cannot tell exactly, I believe nearly three years.

Q. When did he endeavour to obtain the benefit of the Insolvent-act? - A. In August last; I think the same day Captain Richards obtained the benefit of it.

Q. Are you the lady referred to in some of these letters by the name of Fanny? - A. Yes.

Q. You are the lady that Mr. Richards desired to be sent to him when he was in spunging-houses? - A. I went once.

Q. Was he removed to Newgate, or did he get bail? - A. I never knew him in Newgate at all.

Q. How many days were you visiting him there, passing between him and M'Connell? - A. I don't know, it might be four or five days, or a week.

Q. How long was this before the transaction of the foreign bill? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Which of these gentlemen was first a prisoner? - A. Captain Richards.

Q. Had you been a servant to Captain Richards ? - A. Yes; I went first as a servant in his family.

Q. Was he a married man? - A. I do not know.

Q. Upon your oath? - A. Upon my oath, I do not. There was a mistress, but I don't know whether he was married or not.

Q. Then you lived with him as a servant, while another woman lived with him as his wife? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any children by her? - A. Yes, two.

Q. Upon your oath, have you any doubt she was his wife? - A. I do not know.

Q. You mean you were not present at the ceremony? - A. I was not.

Q. You received your orders from a person living in the house, who acted as your mistress? - A. Yes.

Q. For how long? - A. For fifteen months.

Q. Have you any doubt she was his lawful wife? - A. No.

Q. He afterwards left his own house, and went into the army? - A. Yes.

Q. Who went with him? - A. All his men went with him.

Q. Did his wife go with him, or somebody in her place? - A. I went with him.

Q. How long was he in the army before he became a prisoner in the King's Bench? - A. It might be twenty months, or it might be two years.

Q. You continued with him all that time? - A. I did.

Q. And you went with him to the King's Bench? - A. I did.

Q. How long had he been there before Mr. Mac Connell came as a prisoner? - A. Not very long, it might be two or three months.

Q. Did you introduce them to each other? - A. No.

Q. Were you only a day inhabitant? - A. Yes, and sometimes not once a week.

Q.Capt. Richards got out under the Insolvent Act, and you remained behind with Mr. M'Connell? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever know him receive a foreign bill by the Post before or after that day? - A. No; he said he expected one.

Q. How many days did he keep it before he delivered it to Capt. Richards for acceptance? - A. I think it was two or three days.

Q. From the time M'Connell first came into the King's Bench, till the time he was removed to the jail of the county of Surrey, was he ever at large a single hour? - A. He was, I understand, at Guildhall, at the trial.

Q. Was Mr. Richards very intimate with him? - A. No more than being chummed with him.

Q. Don't you know Mr. Richards was a very distressed man in point of circumstances? - A. I have often heard him mention to Mr. M'Connell, that he would be much obliged to him if he would settle the account between them, for he was very much distressed.

Q. What was the amount of that sum which the one was distressed for, and the other was not able to pay? - A. Between forty and fifty pounds.

Q. When did you see M'Connell last? - A.At Guildhall, when he was upon the trial there.

Q. They do not admit you to him in the jail, do they? - A. No.

The prisoner called three other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-62

138. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for being found at large before the expiration of the term of seven years, for which he had been ordered to be transported .

RICHARD LIMERICK sworn. - On the 11th of December , as I was coming up King-street, Drury-lane , I overtook the prisoner at the bar, and knowing he had been transported, I took him into custody.

Q. Was he at large? - A. Yes, he was walking up King-street; I took him before a Magistrate, he did not give a satisfactory account how he came at large, and Mr. Kirby identified him. - Here is the certificate of his conviction, (produces it); I saw Mr. Shelton sign it. (It is read).

EDWARD KIRBY sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; he was tried here in September Sessions, and ordered to be transported; I delivered him on board the Captivity bulk, I think, on the 9th of October last.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing say; I am guilty. GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-63

162. MARY DOVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , three handkerchiefs, value 3s. a shirt, value 5s. a pair of stockings, value 2s. four sheets, value 40s. and a counterpane, value 10s. the property of Thomas Layton , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS LAYTON sworn. - I am an agent, and ship-broker , I live at No. 66, Duke-street, Manchester-square : On and before the 14th of December, I lost a great quantity of things to a large amount; I have recovered the articles mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them); I had not worn them for a long time, having a larger quantity than were immediatly necessary. In consequence of suspicion, I had the prisoner apprehended; she was a chairwoman in the house.

MARY LAYTON sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Layton: I lost a great number of articles in the wash; I could not suspect any body but the prisoner or the servant, I missed them for three or four months; I told the prisoner I had missed a great many things, and she said it was a sad thing to have a thief in the house; I said there was nobody in the house but herself and the servant; we got an officer from Marlborough-street, and they were both searched, there was nothing found upon them; I was not present at the search at the prisoner's lodgings.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - On the 14th of December, I was sent for to Mr. Layton's house; I searched the servant's box, but did not find any thing there; I then went to the lodgings of the prisoner, she was not at home, but was sent for; she came, and in her box I found a small wooden box, containing a number of duplicates of Mrs. Layton's property; I have the tickets; the pawnbrokers are here with the goods.

(Three pawnbroker's servants produced the articles mentioned in the indictment, which they deposed they had received in pledge from the prisoner; all of which were identified by Mrs. Layton.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her de

fence, but called four witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-64

163. JOHN MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , a silver watch, value 3l. the property of William Smith , in the dwelling-house of Henry Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I live at No. 8, Bethnal-green , with my father, who is a shoemaker: Last Wednesday morning, about half past seven o'clock, me and my brother Nathaniel were lying in bed, by watch was hanging on the righthand side of the bed, I heard somebody lift up the latch of the door,and come up stairs, a lodger had gone out about twenty minutes before and left the door on the latch; I was lying awake, when the prisoenr came in and took my watch; I said, holloa, who is that, and he made no answer; I saw him take it off the nail with his right-hand; I did not say any thing to him, I was afraid he might have some weapon; as soon as he got out of the room, I went out in my shirt, and pursued him to the back of the Peacock, in Bethnal-green; I took him there, and found the watch upon him; he said he he was a poor man, had got a wife and two children, in Shoreditch, and hoped I would forgive him; I brought him back to my father's, and he put him in Bethnal-green watch-green watch-house.

HENRY SMITH sworn. I am the father of the last witness: I came up when my son laid hold of the prisoner, I had seen the prisoner go out at the dor; I went after him, and came up with him just after my son had got hold of him; I took him into custody, and put him in the watch-house; he said he had a wife and children; the watch cost me three guineas, he has had it about two years.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 52.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18030112-65

164. JOHN POPKINS and JOSEPH ADAMS were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , 1150 lb. weight of sugar, value 19l. 928 lb. weight of other sugar, value 19l. and two wooden casks, value 10s. the property of John Inglis and James Forsyth ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

The Court being of opinion, upon the circumstances, in evidence, and after solemn argument, that it could only amount to a fraud, the prisoners were. ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-66

165. JOHN GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , two geldings, value 50l. the property of Ann Horsley .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Dorothy Mason , widow , and Charles Mason .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOSEPH AGAR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know Miss Horsley? - A. Yes.

Q. She jobs a pair of horses? - A. Yes.

Q. What is her name? - A. Ann: On Friday the 26th of November, at eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the hores safe in the stable.

Q. Your master lives at Shepperton? - A. In the parish of Shepperton .

Q. You have folding gates to the stable? - A. Yes.

Q. Were they fastened? - A. Yes; they were barred.

Q. So that no person could get from the outside, without forcing it? - A. No.

Q. What time did you go to the stables in the morning? - A. About peep of day; about seven, or hardly seven o'clock.

Q. How did you find the stable gate? - A. One side was open, the other fast; the lock of the stable door was broke all to pieces.

Q. What did you miss from the stable? - A. The two horses that I had left the night before.

Q. What colour were they? - A. Two black geldings; I looked into the coach-house, and the carriage-door was open; I had left there a livery coat and waistcoat, and a laced hat, I found they were gone; I look round and saw the harness was gone; I came out of the coach-house into the stable again, and missed a pair of new boots, a pair of breeches, and other articles.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at that time? - A. Yes; I knew him while he lived in the parish of Shepperton.

Q. How did he get his living? - A. By selling nuts, knives, garters, almanacks, and things of that sort.

Q. Did you ever see him at Shepperton from the time your stables were robbed till he was apprehended? - A. I did not, but he was there.

Q. When did you next see your horses? - A. The first horse that I saw was at Northampton, in the Dolphin Inn yard, at Mr. Benton's.

Q. Was the horse you found in the possession of Mr. Benton, one of the horses that had been stolen from your mistres's stables? - A. It was.

Q. The other, I believe, has never been found since? - A. No; nor yet heard of.

Q. Have you seen the harness since, and the livery coat and waistcoat? - A. Yes; they are here.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me in your house. that day, or for a week before? - A. Yes; you were selling nuts in my house the Sunday before.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. How far is your mistress's

from Barnet? - A. I cannot justly I don't know the cross-country road, it may be eigth or nine and twenty miles.

JOHN HUMBERSTONE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you ostler at the Royal Waggon, at Barnet? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how far it is from Shepperton to Barnet? - A. I do not.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I saw a man very much like him at our house, with a pair of horses, but I cannot swear to him.

Q. When was that? - A. I think about six weeks ago, on a Saturday.

Q. Did the person who came bring any thing with him besides a pair of horses? - A. He brought a pair of horses, a harness, and a saddle.

Q. What coloured horses? - A. Both black goldings.

Q. Had he any thing else? - A.He had a box livery coat.

Q. Did the man, whoever he was, dispose. of any articles while he was at your house? - A. Yes; he sold a harness to Mr. Dean.

Q.How came Mr. Dean to be there? - A. A man said, I have got a pair of harness to sell, and I sent for Mr. Dean to purchase it.

Q. Do you know if he disposed of any other articles? - A. He sold a great coat to Matthew Smith.

Q.Does he live at Barnet too? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was the man, altogether, at your house? - A. He might be there two hours and a half, as nigh as I can guess.

Q. As the man was two hours and a half at your house, looking at the prisoner, what do you think? - A. It is very much like him, but I cannot swear to him; I was very busy brewing at the time.

GEORGE DEAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where do you live? - A. At Hadley, near Barnet.

Q. Do you recollect being sent for to the Royal Waggon, to buy any harness? - A. Very well.

Q. Do you know the man of whom you bought it? - A. The prisoner at the bar was the man.

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. About half past eleven o'clock in the morning.

Q. Do you know the distance from Barnet to Shepperton, or near about? - A. I never was at Shepperton; but it is eighteen miles from Barnet to Uxbridge, and I believe that is the direct road; I went to the stabel and looked at the harness; I said to the prisoner, my friend, what do you ask for this harness; he said, one guinea and a half; I said very well, and directly went back to the house; I I asked him how he came by the harness, he said his master gave them to him three weeks before.

Q. Did he say who his master was? - A. Yes; Mr. Hinde, No. 2, Portland-place.

Q. Did you go into the stable? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you see there? - A. The harness, and two black horses.

Q. Had the prisoner any conversation with you respecting those two black horses? - A. Yes; he said one of them was to be sold, and his master, desired he might sell it in his passage to Birmingham, if he could get a customer for it.

Q. Had you any conversation about the price? - A. Yes; it was to be twelve guineas, or twelve pounds, I don't know which.

Q. Did you agree with him for the horse? - A. No; I bought the harness, took it home, and hung it up.

Q. Is the harness in Court? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the harness, and see if it is the same you bought of the prisoner? (it is produced.) - A. I believe it to be the same.

Q. Who did you deliver it to? - A. To the coachman, Agar.

Q. Have you seen the horse again that he offered to sell you? - A. Not since.

JOHN BENTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys, Q. I believe you are a coach-master, at Northampton? - A. I am

Q. Did you buy a black gelding at any time? - I did, about the beginning of December last.

Q. Who did you buy it of? - A. I bought it of the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Who did he say he was? - A. He told me he lived with a Mr. Hussey, who kept four black horses, and this was one of them; and that his master had bought four bay ones, and had desired him to take this black horse to Bristol Repository to be sold, if he could not meet with a customer before he got there.

Q. What did you give him for the horse? - A. Eighteen guineas and a half.

Q. How long after this was it that this horse was claimed? - A. I was going to London, about ten days after, and as I was getting a post-chaise at Barnet, a gentleman gave me a hand-bill, which bill I found described the horse, and the man I had bought it of; I told him I had no doubt I had the horse, and he came down to Northampton.

Q. It was Mr. Charles Mason? - A. Yes; he came, and claimed the horse, and I delivered it to him.

Q. That was the horse you bought of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

CHARLES MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you let this horse? - A. I let him on a job to Mrs. Horsley.

Q. The horse that was shewn to you by the last witness, was that one of the horse you let to Mrs. Horsley? - A. It was; Mr. Benton delivered the horse to me.

Q.(To Agar.) Was that one of the horses that you lost? - A. It was.

Court. (To Mason.) Q.Who is your partners? - A. My mother, Dorothy Mason .

Q. Is she a widow? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Hunber stone.) Have you seen the horse since it was recovered? - A. Yes, I saw the coachman bring it into the yard again.

Q. Do you know if that was one of the two horses that the person brought to the Royal Waggon? - A. I am sure it was one of the two, and I think it was the best of the two.

Court. (To Agar.) Q. In your way from Northampton, to fetch the horse, did you stop at the Royal Waggon, at Barnet? - A. I did.

Q. When was that? - A. The day before Chirstmas day.

Prisoner. When I was taken up, Mr. Agar was desired to look at a pair of breeches. He had a great mind to own them; they were a pair of breeches that I have had fourteen months, He told me I had broke open his master's stables, and that he had traced me to Northampton. I know he is a man of very bad character and would swear a man's life away almost for a guinea. He had offered several people thereabout then guineas to take me up on suspicion. I had been round about there handy times enough. At the time that they swore to me I was at Reading market.

Q.(To Agar.) Look at that harness. - A. This is the same harness.

Q. Has it any arest or cypher upon it? - A. Yes, A.H.

Q. The initials of your mistres's name? - A. Yes,

GUILTY , Death , aged 41.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-67

166. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , thirteen handkerchiefs, value 2l. 13s. the property of John Hogg , privately in his shop .

JOHN HOGG sworn. - I am a silk-weaver and keep a shop to sell silk in Jewry-street, Aldgate : The prisoner and another man came in under presence of buying a silk handkerchief, on the 6th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner said he should like a red one, I shewed him some; he asked about the colours, and a person outside the shop, in the street, said "have a red one, have a red one," then I shewed some yellow ones, and the same voice said

"have a yellow one, have a yellow one," I was going to open the piece, but the prisoner would do it himself; another young man then came in, and after looking at them, the prisoner said he would call in teh morning as he could not see the colours at night. I had some mistrust, and as they went out of the door I lifted up the piece, and missed five handkerchiefs of a red piece, six of another, and we odd ones. I pursued them and saw them running, some in the horse road and some in the too road; I called out stop thief, and a gentleman stopped the prisoner, who I had not lost sight of-I have never seen the handkerchiefs since. A.constable took the prisoner in charge, who offered all the money he had about him for his liberty.

- sworn. - I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge; he said he was innocent, and offered three or four shillings sooner than get into trouble.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it. I never saw the other persons who were in the shop before they were standing at the window when I went in.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-68

167. RICHARD RICHARDS and JOSEPH VINEQUEZ , two blacks, were indicted for feloniously stealing a pair of boots, value 1l; 11s. 6d. the property of Stephen Kempton , privately in his shop .

JAMES BIRKS sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Kempton, a shoemaker , No. 116, in Fleet-street , he was in the shop at the time of the robbery, but is not here. On Wednesday, December 22, aout 20 minutes after eight o'clock, the prisoners came in to buy a pair of shoes; Richards having a very large foot I could not find a pair very readily, I fittted him, and they were to be bound by eight o'clock next morning. Vinequez said to him he would go out and return in a few minutes. He went out and Richards then made haste out of the shop as fast as he could, I turned round and missed a pair of boots from the wainscot where they hung, and which Vivequez had fat close to; I went in search of them, but could not find them. On the Friday following I received information that a man was to be examined at Bow-street on suspicion of stealing some boots. I went and saw Richards, whom I knew, and who knew me, He said he had not stolen the boots, but would tell me where the man was who had, and would go with me, I went with him and the officer to Westminster and took the other, who I am positive is the man. I asked him what he had done with the boots he had stolen, he said they were at Wapping, Richards said he had better tell where they were, for they were not at Wapping. He did afterwards, and they were found at a saleshop in Dean-street, Westminster.

MOSES HYAMS sworn. - I live No. 2, Dean-street, Westminster, and know both the prisoners. I saw them, on the 22d. of December, at my house, they came with a pair of-boots, and Vinequez

asked me if I wanted to buy them. I asked them how they came by them. He said he bought them and gave a guinea for them, that he wanted money. I bought them, and gave 11s. to Vivequez, and Richards looked it over. I hung them up at the door for public sale, and the officer found them there the same day, about three o'clock.

EDWARD PASMORE sworn. - I am a Bow-street Officer. On the 23d of December, I was going into a wine vaults in Drury-lane, and saw the prisoner Richards with a pair of women's shoes in his hand and another pair in his pocket. I asked him how he came by them. He would not tell me. I searched him and found Mr. Kimpton's card. I put Richards into the watch-house, and next morning went to Mr. Kimpton's to ask if he had lost any shoes. We went to Bow-street, and Birks knew the prisoner Richards, who said he would tell where the man lived. I went and apprehended him; after some hesitation he said he had sold them in Westminster, and would shew us where. I went to Hyams, and the boots were hanging up by the door.(The boots produced and identified.)

Richard's defence. I went to buy a pair of shoes and set down in the shop, what the other man did I cannot answer for; he went away and left me there; I went to Charing-cross and bought two pair of women's shoes and was taken up for stealing them, not for the boots. I know nothing of them.

Vinequez's defence. I did not take the boots, it was another black man.

Richards, GUILTY, aged 32.

Vinequez, GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Both to be transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-69

168. CATHARINE MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of January , a Bank note value 10l. a Bank note value 5l. a Bank note value 2l. an order for the payment of 6l. os. 8d. and twelve penny pieces, the property of Charles Cross , in his dwelling-house .

MARY- ANN CROSS sworn. - Q. What is your husband's name? - A. Charles Cross.

Q.Where do you live? - A. No. 14, Christopher-street, Finsbury-square .

Q. In the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he a housekeeper? - A. Yes.

Q. What have you to say against the prisoner? - A. I lost a pocket-book containing the notes.

Q. When? - A. I missed it on the 9th.

Q. Did you see it on the 8th? - A. Yes, I put it away into the desk of the bureau.

Q. In what room? - A. On the second floor.

Q. A. bedchamber or what? - A.study.

Q. What was in the pocket-book? - A check for 6l. os. 8d.

Q. What do you call a check? - A. A banker's check.

Q. Did you ever recover any of the property? - A. The check was found on her.

Q. Did you lose any thing else? - A. Yes, a ten pound Bank note, a five pound note, and a two pound note.

Q. Were they all Bank notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any halfpence? - A. Not in the pocket-book, but in one of the holes of the desk there was a shillings worth of copper, I put it away myself the same night.

Q.Had you examined the contents of the pocket-book that night so as to know that the notes were in it? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you miss it the next morning? - A. About nine o'clock, as near as I can say.

Q. Was the desk locked or not? - A. I cannot positively say, I put the key into the bureau, but whether I unlocked it or not I cannot say.

Q. Was there any appearance of violence being done to the desk? - A. No, I did not see any.

Q. Having missed the things, what induced you to suppose that the prisoner took them, was she your servant? - A. She was chairwoman to us in consequence of my two women servants being ill. She only slept in the house that night, and I missed the book the next morning.

Q. Upon missing it what did you do? - A. I charged her with it, and she simply turned her pockets out. We sent for the beadle, but he was not at home, being at church he did not come till five o'clock in the evening, when he interrogated the servants and afterwards the prisoner. He then searched her, and found the check in her bosom and a memorandum.

Q. Did you find the notes? - A. No, nothing more.

Prisoner. Q. She first said she had left the penny pieces on the table? - A. No, before supper I had the penny pieces out as I was settling my books, of course they were removed from the table to the desk.

Court. Q. The prisoner says you first said they were lost from the table, but afterwards you said they were lost from the desk; before the magistrate did you say so? - A. No.

JAMES BLACK sworn. - Q. Are you the beadle of Shoreditch? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sent for, on the 9th of December, to search the prisoner? - A. I was.

Q. What did you do? - A. I wanted to know what I was sent for. Mrs. Cross told me she had been robbed by her chairwoman. I asked the pri

soner if she knew any thing of the book, or picked up any papers. She declared positively she had not. I searched her pockets, which she was much against, and said she would not be searched till all the children were searched, for Mrs. Cross keeps a boarding-school. I said I shall search you first, for I look upon it you are the first that ought to be searched. I then searched her pockets and found three penny pieces, four old halfpence, and two knobs of lump sugar. I told her she must pull off her handkerchief; she resused. I put my hand down her bosom, and the first thing I pulled out was this piece of paper, which Mrs. Cross said she would swear was in the pocket-book. I put my hand down her bosom again and found a bunker's check for 6l. 0s. 8d. I found also a bit of a hymn on which there was some writing in pencil, but nearly rubbed out. She said if I would go up stairs with her she would explain it, and that would tell me where the money was; but that was all a manoeuvre.

Court. Q.(To Mrs. Cross). Look at that paper and check, and tell me whether they were in the pocket-book? - A. They were.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes, I had received the check a day or two before, it was sent by the servant of Mr. Judd when the young ladies came to school.

Q. Do you know his hand writing? - A. Not particularly; but I know this was a check that was inclosed in my account.

Q. Did you ever discover what was become of the Bank notes? - A. No; I immediately sent to Mr. Judd and he sent to stop payment of the check. (The check and paper read).

Prisoner's defence. I had not to my knowledge any thing about me, I was searched in the morning, and Mrs. Cross bid me go to my work-again for that she suspected other people. I did, and cleaned a room out. She then asked me to go up stairs and clean some other rooms. I was called suddenly down, and just as was stooping to take the pail in my hand, I met with three papers, which I picked up and put into my bosom, not knowing what they were, but intended to take them to shew Mrs. Cross, as I had heard a great piece of work about them, the constable met me and took me into the parlour, where he put his hand in my bosom, and said, what is this you have got here. I said it is the papers which I have brought down to shew Mrs. Cross; then she said she is the thief then, take her away. I can say no more.

Q.(To Black). Did she say say had picked them up? - A. No.

Q. Did she say after you found them that she had picked them up? - A. No, she seemed very much slurried and begged of me to be as merciful as I could.

Q.(To Mrs. Cross). Was she searched in the morning? - A. To the best of my knowledge, she took some of her things off, I believe she turned out her pockets, and took off her gown.

Q. Did you examine her person? - A. Yes, I believe I did, as well as I was able; the business was quite strange to me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-70

169. JOHN BOWLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , 78lb. of beef, value 39s. the property of John Mellish .

JOHN MELLISH sworn. - I am a butcher in Newgate market : On Saturday last I lost a piece of beef; about ten or eleven o'clock at night the prisoner and beef were brought to my door; I know the beef by the cut ad quality; I examined my stock, and found a piece had been taken from the corner of the block at the sront of the shop; it is the sore ribs, and weighs 78lb. value 39s. (The bees produced and identified.)

GEORGE ESLET sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Mellish; between ten and eleven on Saturday night, as I was going along, a gentleman told me a piece of meat was stolen off the block; I ran through the market, and heard the cry of, stop thief; I saw the prisoner running, and another man; the prisoner was running to hide himself; I took him back to my master's shop; I did not see any meat on him, for he was runting from it.

- WATLINGTON sworn. - On Saturday night I saw the prisoner pass my shop very close, in company with another man, who had a knot on his arm, or a sack and large coarse cloth; they went past Mr. Mellish's, which is within four or five yards; they came back again, and I never saw the other man till he was taken, and who was discharged before the Alderman; the prisoner walked backwards and forwards for ten or twelve minutes; during that time he lifted up a rump and chump of beef of Mr. Mellish's twice; presently after I saw him at the end of Mr. Mellish's block, laying on his stomach, and dragging this piece of beef; I saw the other man take it, and go away; I immediately called out to Mr. Mellish's people; I am positive the prisoner is the same man I saw dragging it; the beef was dropped on the ground a few yards from the block.

Prisoner's defence. I am a staymaker, and left my work at eight o'clock; I went to market, and walked backwards and forwards to see what I liked; I heard the cry of, stop thief, and run, and they took me, and used me ill.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-71

170. THOMAS CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of December , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of Joseph Jackson .

JOSEPH JACKSON sworn. - I a servant out of place: On Christams-day last, in the evening, I lost my watch: I was in the King's Arms taproom, in Duke-street, Grosvenor-square ; the prisoner sat himself down by me; sometime after I went out; he follwed me, gave me a push, and plucked my watch out of my pocket, and run off; I followed, calling, stop thief; he got off; I went directly to the barracks in Portman-square, where the prisoner was brought to me in his shirt (for I enquired his name at the public-house) I knew him again; the serjeant has the watch here, which I know to be mine by the name, number, chain, and seal.

EDWARD LEES sworn. - I am serjeant of the first regiment of soot guards; the prisoner is in my company, and has been upwards of seven years; I called the roll over on the 25th of December, at Portman-street barracks, a quarter before nine, when I saw Clarke somewhat in liquor, but not so much so as he affected to be; I saw a chain of a watch hanging out, and knew he had no watch of his own at that time; at nine o'clock I went to deliver the report, and saw the prosecutor, who complained of having lost a watch, which Thomas Clarke had taken; I went back, and found Clarke half undressed; I told him to put on his shoes, which he was about to do, and stooping down, I observed him convey something not to his own bed, but to one four or five yards off; I immediately took it up, and found it to be a watch, which I have here. (Prisuces it, and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the watch or man at all; I was at the Coach and Horses that night with my comrades. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-72

171. HUGH CHARLES and HENRY BURGESS were indicted of feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , 6lb. of pork, value 4s. 6d. the property of William Jenkins .

WILLIAM JENKINS sworn. - I keep a porkshop in Jewin-street: On the 28th of December, about twelve o'clock, I sent my girl servant with two legs of pork; she lost one, and came and told me of it; I never saw them again; I went to a public-house, and found the prisoners; Hugh Charles offered me half a guinea, as we were going to the Hall, to pay for the leg of pork, and spend a crown, rather than go before the Alderman; I resused it, and a scussle took place; Burgess offered half a guinea also.

MARY ROBERTS sworn. - I live with Mr. Jenkins as servant; am twelve years old, and know the nature of an oath: On Tuesday my master sent we with two legs of pork to the Gentleman and Porter, in Nichol-square; I put them in the tray on the bar-door for the lady to take which she liked of the two; she took the bigger one, and left the other in the tray; I turned my face to the tap-room while the mistress gave the men change; when I turned about the leg of pork was gone; I asked the lady about it; she said she did not know; then I went home, and told my master.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Which went out of the house first? - A. The three men; there was another with the prisoners.

- BLAND sworn. - I am a cabinet-maker: On the 28th of December last, between twelve and one o'clock, I called at the Gentleman and Porter; on going in at the outward door on the lefthand is the bar directly by the door; the passage is rather narrow; there were several people standing at the bar, to the number of four or five, which rather obstructed my going forward; the first person next the outward door was Burgess; next to him was Charles, who had a leg of pork in his hand; a third person of their company was observing, that if it was to be baked, it would shrink up to nothing; the little girl stood close to the bar, and the tray was on the bar-door; they seemed to have got some change, and moved outward, which gave more room for me to pass, and I went into the tap-room; almost directly there was an alarm that the leg of pork was stolen; Charles was holding up the pork, looking at it, when I saw it.

Mr. Hart. Q. It was not concealed? - A. No.

Q. And what was said was loud enough to be heard? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.(To Roberts.) What became of the other leg of pork? - A. The mistress took the other leg, and put it in the bar.

JOHN NORRIS sworn. - I keep the Gentleman and Porter public-house; the two prisoners were at my bar with another person.

GOODACRE sworn. - I am a constable, and took the prisoners into custody at the corner of Golden-lane, as they were looking into a shop, about ten minutes after the pork was lest; I heard the prisoners offer half a guinea to make it up.

Prisoner Charles's defence. I had change, and met a few young men I knew; we had half a pint of gin; I left them at the bar, and went home; Mr. Norris came to my house, and asked me if I knew any thing of the pork; I said I would go and sind the men, if possible, who were in the house, for I knew nothing of it; I went and found them, and as I was returning with them, they took us all.

Burgess's defence. When I had drank a glass of gin I came out; I never saw the park.

Charles, GUILTY , aged 24. Burgess, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-73

172. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, on the 22d of September , on Joseph Thompson , putting him in fear, and taking from his person two Bank-notes, value 1l. each , the property of Joseph Thompson , the elder.

JOSEPH THOMPSON, jun. sworn. - I live with Joseph Thompson , my uncle, in Clement's-lane, Lombard-street, a merchant , and have lived with him a year and an half; he employs me as a garbler of cochineal: On the 22d of September I was robbed, between five and six o'clock, in Camomile-street, Bishopsgate-street ; I went there to pay John Heseltine two one-pound notes, who lodges at the Saracen's Head, Camomile-street; I was standing at his loding door, and I told him I had got the money, which I was going to give to him, when the prisoner came between us, and snatched the two onepound notes out of my hand; Heseltine took hold of him, and the prisoner dropped the notes, which I picked up; one of them was very much torn;" i said to Heseltine, "one is very much torn;" he said to the prisoner, "I insist upon it you make it good;" the prisoner said, "if uou'll go along with me to my master's, I will make it good;" he went with him, and I don't know any more. I saw the prisoner again the 16th of December, at Bow-street; there wre three more with him; I am sure he is the man who snatched the note.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You never had seen the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. It was dark, was it not? - A. Not quite.

Q.When you were talking, somebody snatched it? - A. Yes.

Q. Who else was there beside you and Heseltime? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Were there any other persons beside you and Heseltine? - A. Yes; but I cannot say who or how many.

Q. Have you always told the same story you have to-day? - A. yes.

Q. Did you never say that the notes were not taken from your hands, but that they were torn in the snatch? - A. No; he snatched the notes, and dropped them, and I picked them up.

Q. Which way was the person who you suppose to be the prisoner going? - A. I was standing face down wards to Camomile-street, and the prisoner came between us, and passed down, the street.

Q. How long did he stay after he had made the snatch? - A. He staid a little while before he said he would go to his master.

Q. What became of the notes? - A. I gave them to Heseltine the next morning, and he paid them away.

Q. Then the prisoner never had possession of them? - A. Not long; I picked them up when he dropped them, and gave them to Heseltine.

JOHN HESELTINE sworn. - I am a weekly servant to Mr. Joseph Thompson ; on the 22d of September last, as I was standing at the door of the Saracen's-head public-house, in Camomile-street, the prisoner, with two other men and a woman, came up to the door, and had some gin together; they were on my lest hand side; Joseph Thompson , my master's nephew brought me two one pound notes; when he pulled them out, the prisoner rushed between us and snatched them out of his hand, at one snatch; I ran and caught him by the collar; he immediately dropped them; the boy picked them up, and said John, there is one torn almost to pieces; I said to the prisoner, I insist upon your making that note good; he said, if I would go to his master he would make it good; I went with the prisoner and his companions down Camomile-street; when I got to the bottom, into St. Mary-Axe, I met Benjamin Mayo , who said, John, where are you going, I said, I am going to this man's master, and he went with us.

Q. Who had the notes? - A. The boy took them home to his uncle; next morning I had them from the boy; the prisoner took us into an alley, called Still-alley, across Houndsditch; he went first, I followed him, Mayo followed me, and the prisoner's companions followed him; a little way up the alley there is a turning to the right band; at the second door he knocked two or three times: there he turned himself round on his heel, drew a knife, or some sharp cutting instrument from the sleeve of his coat; and upon seeing that, I said to Benjamin Mayo , there is a knife; I dropped back a little, and the prisoner instantly struck the knife through Mayo's cheek, into his mouth; the prisoner said, there, you b-y b-r, that's my master, meaning his knife; his companions immediately knocked me down with a large stick, or butt end of a whip, and beat me mery much; in that time Mayo and the prisoner had a scuffle, the prisoner's companion, to assist him, jumped over me as I lay on the ground; I endeavoured to get up, as I was rising up on my hands and knees, the prisoner slipped on one side, and stabbed me on the left side of the back; I dropped, and then the prisoner and his companion made their escape; there are the cloaths I was stabbed in.(Produces coat, waistcoat, and shirt).

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What time was this? - A. About five or six o'clock.

Q. How many people were there beside you? - A. There was the boy and me, the prisoner, his two companions, and a woman who sold fruit.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. Not to my knowledge; I never saw him again till the 16th of December, from the 22d of September, at Bow-street, with three other prisoners; I knew him directly.

Q. Have you not got a detainer against the prisoner of the assault? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes, perfectly, for I did not leave work till between four and five o'clock.

BENJAMIN MAYO sworn. - I lived at No. 77, Sun-street, at that time; I met John Heseltine, and asked him what was the matter; the prisoner was with him; he said the prisoner had robbed the boy of two one pound notes, and one of them was torn very much, and the prisoner said, if he would go with him to his master, he would give him another for it; he took us into a place called Stillalley, and went to a door and tapped with his left hand; then he turned himself round and drew something out, and said, you b-y b-r that is my master, and stuck me right through the mouth; after he had stabbed me, and we had some scuffling, he stabbed Heseltine; after that I made my escape, and cried out murder; we were taken to the doctor, and the prisoner escaped, as nobody would go after them; the prisoner's companion beat us a good deal with a stick; I never saw the prisoner till at Bow-street; there were four taken up on suspicion.

Q. You met Heseltine and the prisoner walking along, but nobody else? - A. Yes, another man, and I understood there was another at first, but I did not see him.

Q. For the assault have you not also indicted the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Court. (To Heseltine.) Q. You had not the torn note to give in return for another, had you? A. No, the boy had it, waiting for my return, and I did not have it that night, because I went to the surgeons.

Q.(To Thompson.) Why did not you give the notes that night to Heseltine? - A.Because he gave it back to me to take care of.

EDWARD LEWIS sworn. - I am one of the Bow-street patrol, and apprehended the prisoner at the public house called the Valiant Soldier, in Bermondsey-street.

Prisoner's defence. I know no more of it than the child unborn.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing only .

The Court immediately passed sentence of transportation for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-74

173. JOHN DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , a great coat, value 1l. a watch, value 1l. 1s. a key, value 1d. a quarter of a yard of catgut, value one farthing, the property of Kyd Wake , in his dwelling house .

KYD WAKE sworn. - I am a printer , No. 1, Cow-lane : On the 20th of December, the prisoner was one of my pressmen ; I had been up stairs about two hours, and called a boy to put some coals on the parlour fire, which I had locked the door of when I left it, and had left the watch hanging over the parlour chimney-piece, and the great-coat I hung up on Sunday, in the parlour; the boy returned to me, I asked him if the door was locked, he said, yes, and gave me the key. About nine o'clock in the evening, Mrs. Wake came up to me, I gave her the key; she said, she had been in the parlour. Between nine and ten I went down; while I was at supper, she wished me to set her watch by mine; I looked at the chimney-piece, and missed the watch; I went into the office, but all the men were gone but one. I printed a hand-bill, describing the watch, and a pawnbroker brought my watch; this was Tuesday; on that evening I wanted to go out, and then I missed the great-coat; I sent two of my men to see if they could not find the prisoner, and I heard they had all got together to a public-house; I got a constable, and took the prisoner to the watch-house; I asked him where he had pawned the coat; be said, in Newgate-street; he pulled out the duplicates of the watch and coat, and gave them to the officer. I made him no threat or promise whatever.

- SMITH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. George Morris, pawnbroker, No. 119, Minories: A watch was pledged like that, but whether by the prisoner, I cannot say.

THOMAS JARMAN sworn. - I am an officer; and on examining the prisoner, he produced two duplicates, one of a watch, and the other of a coat.(Smith compares the duplicate for the watch, and says they perfectly agree.)

WILLIAM FLYNN sworn. - My father is a pawnbroker: I produced a great-coat, pawned by a person, whom I believe to be the prisoner. (Looks at the duplicate for the coat, dated 20th December, says it agrees).

THOMAS BROCKWAY sworn. - My master told me to go and put the coals on the fire; I asked the prisoner to lock the door, I did not try the door to see if he had locked it, and don't know whether he had; I then carried the key up to my master.(the property identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been out of work a long time, and being in distress, made me do what I did.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

The prisoner being sick, his sentence was postponed .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-75

174. ELEANOR MARNEY was indicted for

feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Simpson , no person being therein, about the hour of eleven in the forenoon of the 14th of December , and feloniously stealing a petticoat, value 12s. two gowns, value 12s. a gown and coat, value 10s. a petticoat, value 2s. two shifts, value 6s. an a cloak, value 10s. her property.

ELIZABETH SIMPSON sworn. Q.Where do you live? - A. In Whitechapel now.

Q. What are you? - A. I go out with greens and to washing.

Q. What have you to say against the prisoner? - A. I went out at eleven o'clock on Tuesday, in the middle of December, at a little after one; when I came home, my room door was broke open.

Q. Where was your room? - A. At the London Apprentice, near Shoreditch , which was a public-house, but is now a coal-shed.

Q.How had you fastened the door? - A. I had padlocked it.

Q. What did you do? - A. I went to the office directly.

Q. Did you lose any thing? - A. I missed all my cloaths out of the drawer.

Q. Was that locked also? - A. Yes.

Q. Whe had you last seen them in the drawer? - A. Just before I went out.

Q. Did any other person lodge in the house? - A. Yes, but nobody was at home.

Q. What things did you miss? - A. Three aprons three handkerchiefs, two pair of shoes, two pair of cotton stockings, a shawl, three gowns, and three shifts.

Q. Was one a black gown? - A. Yes, and coat.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. I value it at ten shillings, but it cost me more.

Q. There were two cotton gowns and three shifts, what is their value? - A. Twelve shillings; they cost me twenty-two shillings. The scarlet cloak I value at ten shillings, and two of the shifts at six shillings I went to the office and got a warrant, for I suspected the prisoner, because she always begrudged me the things when I had them on my back.

Q. Was she a lodger in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Up how many pair of stairs? - A. Up two pair of stairs; I lodge in the one pair.

Q.Did they search her room? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present? - A. Yes.

Q. What was found? - A. The two cotton gowns, the black gown and coat, under petticoat, and cloak; which are all here.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. Q. What are you? - A. I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street Office. On the 14th of November, I went with Nowlan to the prisoner's room, I searched every thing in the room but an oak chest, and asked her what was in that; she said, nothing but her own; I asked her where the key was; she said, she had not got it; I told he then, I most break it open immediately; she set down upon it, and said, I had got no authority to break it open, and I should not do it; I pushed her off the box, upon which she said, some strange man had put something in it; I immediately broke it open, and found the things stated in the indictment in a bag. (Produces them.)

Q.(To Simpson). Look at those things, and say whether you know them to be your's? - A. I know the cloak by a stain on the front of it. I have looked at them all before, and know them to be mine.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. Q. You are an officer? - A. Yes; I went with Trott, and know no more than he has told you.

Prisoner's defence. This was a discorderly house, and my room was without lock or key, and there were five more lodgers in the house, so that any body might go into my room; I know nothing of the things, and never was before a Justice in my life before. GUILTY , Death , aged 64.

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-76

175. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of January , in the dwelling-house of the Hon. William Monson , a Bank-note, value 5l. his property.(The case stated by Mr. Const.)

Col. William Monson sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. The prisoner I understand was a servant of your's? - A. He was.

Q. Did you miss a Bank-note at any time? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you received a letter containing any Bank-notes? - A. Yes.

Q. What day? - A. I came to town on Saturday evening, the 1st of January, and found several letters on the table, but was so very ill, that I went to bed immediately, and remained there till six o'clock the next day. On Sunday evening, I sent for the letters, and opened them; one of them contained five notes to the amount of forty-five pounds; four of them were ten-pound Bedford bank-notes, and a five-pound Bank of England note; I put the notes into the letter again, and left them in my bed-room on the table. Next day, I had not been below above three quarters of an hour to attend my physician, Sir Walter Farquhar, when I went up stairs again, and went to bed, having previously put the letters into the drawer of my secrefaire, but did not lock it. On the following morning, when I examined the letter, I found the five pound-note missing; upon which I sent for my valet, and told him the circumstance, commanding him to go to the different trades people I employed, and tell them, that if any servant of mine came with a five poundnote to change, to stop the person and the note. About two o'clock the next day, my servant, James Neale, brought me the five pound-note, saying, the

baker had brought it, having stopped it on one of my servants, naming the prisoner; I then taxed the prisoner with it, and be acknowledged it.

Q.Did you make him any promise or threat? - A. No; he fell down on his knees, and begged for mercy.

Q. What did you say to him? - A. I asked him why he had robbed me of my money, and taken such an advantage when I was so dangerously ill. I then sent for a constable, and gave him in charge. I delivered the note to a serjeant.

Q. Had you taken any particular notice of the note before? - A. No.

Q.Then you can give no particular description of it? - A. No.

Q. In what capacity was the prisoner? - A. My livery-servant, and had been one of my soldiers in the 76th regiment. He had not been with me a month as my servant.

JAMES NEALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const.

Q. Do you remember any letters being on the table on Colonel Monson 's return to town? - A. I do not.

Q. Do you remember Sir Walter Farquhar being in the dining-room on Sunday the 2d of January, and the Colonel going down to him? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell us who went into the Colonel's room that day? - A. Nobody but the prisoner and myself, to my knowledge; I and him were there.

Q. Do you mean that you were together all the time? - A. No, we were not together.

Q. Do you remember, when he was discovered, what passed? - A. When the baker sent for me to deliver the note to me, I met the prisoner in the passage, and he told me, he knew what the baker wanted with me.

Q. Then he knew the baker had sent to you? - A. Yes. I was going to the baker, as he had sent for me, and the prisoner stopped me, and passed a few words, desiring me to tell my master I had found the note in the room.

Q. This was before you went to the baker? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you accused him at that time? - A. I had not.

Q. Did any thing else pass between you? - A. No. I went to the baker, and he delivered the note to me, which I delivered to my master, without any further communication.

Q. Were you present when he was called up to your master? - A. No.

Q. What did the prisoner say to you? - A. He begged of me to tell my master that I had found it somewhere in the house; I said, I was very sorry for him, for I was afraid the baker wanted to see me about the note that was missing.

- M'DONALD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are a serjeant in Colonel Monson's regiment? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being sent by him to serch a constable? - A. I do.

Q. Did the Colonel give you a Bank-note? - A. He did, shortly after.

Q. What did you do with it? - A. I gave it to the constable.

HENRY OAKLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. What are you? - A. A constable.

Q. Do you produce a Bank-note? - A. Yes; which I received of the serjeant, and took the prisoner into custody. (Produces a note).

SYLVESTER SAPSFORD sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I live with my father, who is a baker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I know him as being one of Colonel Monson 's servants.

Q. Did you receive a five pound Bank-note of him at any time? - A. He presented a five pound note to be changed, on Tuesday the 4th.

Q. Look at that note, and see if it is the same? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Is that the note you delivered to James Neale ? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. The note that is produced I found; I was going to get change at the baker's, and he asked me if it was for Colonel Monson ; I said, yes; says he, I am told if any one comes for change for a five pound note it is to be stopped, very well, said I, I will immediately go and call James Neale; I went and told him the baker wanted him; that is all I know.

GUILTY , Death , aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18030112-77

176. SARAH ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , two gowns, value 15s. the property of Thomas Edwards .

Second Count. Charging one gown, value 10s. to be the property of James Russell ; and one gown, value 5s. to be the property of Christopher Jameson Clerk .

THOMAS EDWARDS sworn. - I take in mangling , and lodge in Holford-court, Fenchurch-street ; the prisoner came in, and asked me for her things, on the 1st of January, and pointed to one gown, and then to another, saying, they were her things, and she took them away; I wanted her to stop till my wife came home, but she would not.

EDWARD ALDERMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Poultry Compter, the prisoner was brought to the Compter, and said she had left a guinea on the table to pay for a leg of mutton: I went to look for it, with her in custody; she took me into Shoreditch, and said she was going to take the two gowns to Norwich with her, but wished me to take them, and let her go. (The gowns produced, and identified).

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; my father and mother were killed by a house falling on

them in Baker's-row, Whitechapel, and I have not a friend in the world. GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-78

177. CHARLES LOADER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , nine pigs of lead, value 16s. the property of John Ellis .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Margaret Bentley , James Grace , Joseph Freeman , and Thomas Bentley .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

EDWARD CHANDLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Who are you servant to? - A. To John Hamer , a lighterman, at Bank-side: I received three hundred pigs of lead into his barge, on Saturday the 18th of December, I took them from Bank-side to Millbank, to Bentley, Grace, and Co. I left the barge at Bentley's wharf at eight o'clock in the morning, and counted the pigs of lead before I left them.

RICHARD ROWEN sworn. - I was on some of my barges that lay near the Old Barge-house: On Saturday the 18th, about eight o'clock in the evening, I observed two boats coming down the river, one light, the other loaded; they made towards some sailing-boats belonging to Mr. Doe, at the Old Barge-house; I went to my boat, and rowed directly to them; there were three persons in the light boat towing the loaded one; before I made the last pull to get into the loaded boat, I saw something like a great coat in it, it was very dark, I could not see whether it was a man or not; I stepped into the boat, and found it was not a man; I then stepped into the other boat, and laid hold of the prisoner, who was standing close by the side of the loaded boat, but in the sailing-boat; I said, I have got you, where are the others? they were then running over the boats towards the shore; he said, the boat does not belong to me, Mr. Rowen; I stepped into another boat, laying along-side of the boat the prisoner was in, for the purpose of pursuing the other men, but found it useless; and, on my return, the prisoner stepped into a light boat, and made for the Old Barge-house stairs; I called stop thief, but he got away; I have known him some time, and am sure he is the man; I examined the boat they were towing, and saw nine pigs of lead, which I delivered to Mr. Gotty, the Police officer; the name of Butcher was on the boat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was dark, was it not? - A. Yes; I could-hardly see the persons.

Q. When you got up to the prisoner, you saw he was in a boat, but not either of the two first you saw? - A. No.

Q. You knew where he was to be found? - A. Yes.

JOHN GOTTY sworn. - I am a Thames Police officer: Mr. Rowen delivered me nine pigs of lead, I have one of them here; I apprchended the prisoner at the Fleece public-house, Old Barge-house, on the 20th of December.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you not go to meet him by appointment? - A. His wife told me he was at the public-house.

SAMUEL SMITH sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Bentley; the firm is, Margaret Elentley, Thomas Grace, Joseph Freeman, and Thomas Bentley ; I took an account of the cargo of Mr. Hamer's barge, on the 20th of December, and there were two hundred and ninety pigs of lead.

ISAAC CRISP sworn. - I am servant to Mr. John Ellin : I saw the lead in Mr. Gotty's custody.(A pig of lead produced, and identified).

Court. (To Rowen.) Q. Can you say which side of the river the boat was when you first saw it? - A. On the South, or Surry side.

Prisoner's defence. I was going on board my own boat, I happened to be in that boat where Mr. Rowen saw me; he asked me what boat it was, I said I did not know, and shoved my boat astern, and went about my business.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-79

178. HENRY DAVIS and THOMAS WRIGHT were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Horn , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 3d of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a wooden cask, value 3s. containing six quarts of bitters, value 11s. another cask, value 3s. containing six quarts of anniseed, value 10s. another cask, value 3s. containing ten quarts of rasberry, value 16s. another cask, value 3s. containing eleven quarts of gin and peppermint, mixed, value 13s. another cask, value 2s. containing four quarts of brandy, value 18s. another cask, value 2s. containing four quarts of rum, value 14s. and a gimlet, value 1d. the property of the said James Horn .

JAMES HORN sworn. - I keep the Coventrycross public-house, at Bromley : On the 4th of December, I was called up soon after three o'clock, and told my house had been broke open; I went down into the liquor-cellar, and found the staple had been drawn, a great deal of gin, and other spirits, were missing, which is stated in the indictment; I saw the staple was fast before I went to bed, and that the spirits were in the cellar; three of the casks were found in the skittle-ground, tied up in a sack, which contained the brandy, rum, and peppermint and gin mixed, and which I knew to be mine, by the marks, and the bill of parcels; I observed the slap where the beer is put down was moved, and was only half put on again, I had not fastened that, nor was it fastened at all, only laid

over; for I had just got into the house, and the man who had it before me had left it without fastenings. I went to bed about ten, or eleven o'clock, the night before, and saw the stap was down; there is a yard between the cellar slap and the street, but it is all paled in, though any body may come in and remove the slap.

JAMES SHEEN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police: I had information the prisoners were in the Plough tap, in Mile-end-road; I went there, and found them very much in liquor; I heard Davis say to the other, we brought it here, and offered it for sale, but have taken nothing for it. I heard him say also, that one of the casks was concealed in a ditch, near the Plough, covered with needs, or nettles; I then took them into custody, and the cask was searched for, and found.

WILLIAM FILBY sworn. - I was at plough in Bow-Common-field, and about nine o'clock in the morning of the 4th of December, I saw the prisoner, Wright, with something under his coat; as we had lost a great number of turnips, I asked him what he had got there; he said it was something good to drink, and asked me to drink; I tasted, and found it to be bitters; when I had been one round with my plough, I returned, and saw the two prisoners bury a cask in the ground. Davis was my fellow-servant, and worked in the field; I went up to him, and saw him sitting on the cask of bitters, and the cask of anniseed was buried in the ground; my master came into the field, and I related it to him; we went to the ground and found the cask of anniseed as I had told him.

Q. Then the men were gone before he came? - A. Yes; I carried the cask to Mr. Horn, and after that, Davis came and fetched another cask out of the ditch, which he wrapped up in his smock frock, and carried to the Plough public-house.(Three casks produced, and identified).

Wright's defence. I was looking for work as a labourer, and found two casks in a ditch; I did not know what was in them, but took them into the field where that man was at work; we drank of them, and Davis came up, and said he would get me some breakfast at a public-house, I went there with him, and was taken.

Davis's defence. I was at work, and Wright came by me; I saw him and the ploughman drinking, I went up and asked the man where he got it; he said he found it in a ditch.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-80

179. GEORGE DESTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of December , a coat, value 38s. the property of John Summers and John Prosser , privately in their shop .

JOHN PROSSER sworn. - My partner, John Summers , and myself, are tailors , No. 415, in the Strand : On the 22d of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, two young men came into the shop, and asked me if I had a waistcoat like that which one had on; I told them, no, and they went out, leaving the door open; I went round to shut it, and immediately a constable brought the coat and prisoner in.

Q. Was the prisoner one of the young men who had been in the shop? - A. No; the coat was made for a gentleman in St. Paul's Church yard; I had seen it about half past seven, for I put it down on a desk about two yards from the door; no other person had been in the shop but those two young men that I saw.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am a constable of St. Martin's: On the 22d of December, as I was going down the Strand, about a quarter past eight, I saw the prisoner and a boy together, which excited my suspicion; they were about five yards from Mr. Summers's shop-door when I first saw them; I immediately caught the prisoner by the collar, and the boy run off as hard as he could; I then took the prisoner back to Mr. Prosser's.

Q. Had you seen him come out? - A. No; seeing him so close to their shop with a great coat on his arm, I suspected him; as I was going into the door two young men rushed past me; directly I thought they were the two partners, or I should have stopped them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you see the boy deliver it to the prisoner? - A. No; I saw it on the prisoner's arm.

Q. It was after you had taken the prisoner that the two men came out? - A. Yes; I thought they were the partners alarmed at the robbery, and running after the thief.

Prisoner's defence. I had been of an errand, and a lad came up and asked me if I wanted to buy a great coat; I said, let me look at it, and I carried it four or five yards to a window to look at it, and that man took me back into the shop.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18030112-81

180. JOHN HOUSDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , a pair of shoes, value 5s. the property of William Elliott , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM ELLIOTT sworn. - I am a shoemaker , No. 43, Bantrer-street : On the 4th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked me if I sold partens; I said, yes; he produced a woman's shoe, and said, he wanted a pair to fit it; I fitted a pair, which he paid for, and asked me if I had any shoes that would fit him; I tried several pair, but none would fit; he said he would come another time

and went away; on putting the shoes up, I missed a pair of shoes, and suspected the person who had bought the pattens; the prisoner had asked me, before he went away, if I would change the pattens if they would not do; I said I would; accordingly he came back again, and said, they must be for a heeled shoe; I told him I had lost a pair of shoes, and suspected him; he said he was sorry for it, but never was guilty of any thing of the kind, and if I was not satisfied, he would take me to his lodgings; I sent for an officer, who searched him, but no property of mine was found on him; the constable took him to the watch-house, and then he told the constable where he lived; we went to his lodgings, and the pair of shoes were the first thing the constable clapped his hand upon, which I knew to be of my manufactory; the prisoner said he had bought them at half past six in the evening in my shop; I had sold several pair of the same sort in the morning, and missed a pair about ten minutes after the prisoner was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew his wife was ill? - A. Yes; she had just lain-in.

Q. How long before the prisoner came to buy the pattens, had you seen that particular pair of shoes? - A. I cannot say; several pair of such shoes had been sold in the course of the day; nobody serves but myself and my wife.

Q. Then you cannot say but the shoes were sold in the former part of the day? - A. No.

Q. He readily told you where he lived, and his right name? - A. Yes.

Q. Were the shoes concealed? - A. No.(The shoes were produced by the constable, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the shoes of the prosecutor in his shop at six o'clock that evening; he served me himself.

Court. Q.(To Elliott.) Is that true? - A. I cannot say; I don't take such notice of every customer, who perhaps I never saw before, to say I should know them again; I enquired about the prisoner's character in the neighbourhood, and received a most undeniable one.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-82

181. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Eleanor Carlton , widow , about the hour of five in the morning of the 10th of January , with intent to steal .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of Mary Bull .

ELEANOR CARLTON sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 37, Dorset-street .

Q. Did any thing particular happen to your house on the 10th of January? - A. Yes; a young person, who I put into the house to sleep, went in about half past ten at night.

Q. Is it an empty house? - A. It is an empty house, but which I let to a family.

Q. Was there any inhabitant at that time? - A.There was no inhabitant, but that young person who alarmed me; I know no more of it.

MARY BULL sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A.At. No. 37, Dorset-street.

Q. Do you live with Mrs. Carlton? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing that happened in the house which she let to a family? - A. Yes.

Q. What? - A. The family left it on Friday the 7th of January, and I slept in it the Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights following.

Q. What happened on the 10th? - A. On the Monday I went into the house, about half past ten; when I went up stairs to my bed-room, I was much surprised at seeing the sheets taken off my bed.

Q. What else? - A. And the blanket and quilt were thrown on the floor; I went into the next room, and the cloaths of that bed were likewise all turned up; I then went down to the next floor, and on going into the back-room, I saw the bed and blanket tied up as though ready for carrying away.

Q. Tell me whether you had seen the bed and blanket in their proper places before? - A. Yes, I had.

Q.How long before? - A. About three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Were they removed from the bed? - A. No, they were all tied up upon the bedstead.

Q. Were the sheets missing entirely off your bed? - A. Yes, off my bed entirely.

Q. When had you seen them? - A. In the morning.

Q. There was nobody in the house with you, was there? - A. Yes, a child eight years old; I then thought there was somebody in the house, and I went to Mrs. Carlton's house.

Q. How far is her house? - A. Three doors lower down; she sent over to the public-house opposite, and we got two soldiers and the landlord to go with us to search the house.

Q. Did you accompany them? - A. Yes; there was no person in the house; but on going into the drawing-room, we found the window curtains were taken down, and the sofa cover taken off, and taken away.

Q.Were they linen or what? - A.Printed calico.

Q. When had you seen the curtains up before? - A. In the afternoon; we went up to the second floor, and in the front bed-room the furniture of the four-post bedstead was taken down, except the tester, and taken away, and the counterpane; in the back bed-room the furniture of a tent bed and

quilt were taken away; that was the room where the bed was tied up and the three blankets; Mrs. Carlton then employed the guards to set up in the house to watch.

Q. They did so, did they? - A. Yes, but I was not there, and know nothing of what passed afterwards.

Q. Had you been at home the greater part, or the whole of the day; how long had you been out? - A. I went out in the morning; Mrs. Carlton was in the house at three o'clock to see all safe.

Q. Were you or her in the house all the day? - A. No; I left it between eight and nine in the morning, and did not go into it again till half past ten at night.

Q. Was it immediately upon your going in that you missed the things? - A. I went into my bedroom, and found my sheets gone.

Q. That led you to examine the other rooms? - A. Yes.

Q. What passed between eight and nine, and half past ten at night, you don't know? - A. No.

Q. I understood you had seen the things safe at three o'clock? - A. No, Mrs. Carlton had.

Q.(To Mrs. Carlton.) What time of day did you go into the house on the 10th? - A. At three o'clock.

Q. How long did you stay? - A. I only went over the house.

Q. Did you go through all the bed-rooms in the house? - A. No; I went up to the second floor to look at the things.

Q. Did you go into the front room? - A. Yes.

Q. In what state was the bed? - A. Every thing was safe.

Q. Did you go into the other rooms? - A. No, I did not; I went up stairs for a piece of green baize that I wanted.

Q. Then from three o'clock till ten nobody was in the house? - A. No.

Q. Were you present when the house was searched? - A. Yes.

Q. What state did you find the things in? - A. We went into the parlour first, but found no person; nothing was disturbed there; we went then to the first floor, and found the window-curtains were taken away.

Q. Those you had not observed at three o'clock? - A. No, I had not, and the sofa cover was gone.

Q. Tell me the room you had observed? - A. The front room forward; there the curtains were taken away, and the white counterpane off the bed.

Q. What steps did you take on finding the furniture had been removed? - A. We went to the public-house, and got two of the life guards, and the man at the public-house, to search; we all went over the house, but found nobody in it; then a patrol came up, to whom we gave the alarm, and he likewise went over the house.

Q. Did he find any body? - A. No; then I left these two life guards men in the house all night, and about half past five o'clock they saw the door was open; that is a 11 know.

JAMES HENSHAW sworn. - Q. Are you in the life guards? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed by Mrs. Carlton to stay in one of her houses all night? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us what passed? - A. I and Edward Bradley took our post in the front parlour, with the door shut, and a candle by us.

Q. How was the street-door? - A. It was fastened by a spring-lock; just after the watchman, at half past five o'clock, was gone by, I heard the street-door unlock, and somebody come in, and lock the door after them; I opened the parlourdoor to see who or what it was, and saw two men at the foot of the stairs.

Q. They had advanced as far as they could to the stairs? - A. Yes; as soon as as they saw me they tried to make the best of their way out of the house again, which one of them had the good fortune to do; the other I caught, just as he was going out of the door, and field him in my arms; the watchman then came, and I committed him to his charge, and saw him safe lodged in the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Was I in the street, or inside the door? - A.Inside the door when I saw him.

Court. Q. At the foot of the stairs? - A. Yes, when I first saw him, and caught him inside the door, just as he was going out.

EDWARD BRADLEY sworn. - Q. Were you in company with James Henshaw at Mrs. Carlton's house, on the 10th of January? - A. Yes.

Q.Relate what passed? - A. We were put into the house, to take care of it till morning, by Mrs. Carlton's orders; we stopped in the front parlour, and the watchmen had just gone half-past five when we heard the door open, we went out of the parlour door and saw two men at the bottom of the stairs; as soon as they saw us they burst out of the passage, and one got out of the street door, the other run towards the door, and James Henshaw took him.

Q.Have you any doubt of their being at the foot of the stairs and the door having been shut behind them? - A. No, none at all.

GEORGE DUCKHOUSE sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A. watchman.

Q. What happened to Mrs. Carlton's house on the 10th of January? - A. A gentleman came to me, and said, watchman, spring your rattle, there are thieves in the house. When I went to the house the soldier had got the man in his arms, he delivered him to me, and I took him to the watch-house.

Q. Look at the prisoner and say if he is the person.? - A. Yes.

James SUTHERLAND sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A constable of Mary-le-bone parish.

Q. What happened on the night of the 10th of January, respecting Mrs. Carlton's house? - A. On Tuesday morning the prisoner was brought into the watch-house, about a quarter before six; he was searched in my presence, and a dark lantern was found upon him. (Produces it.)

HENRY BETTS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I belong to Mary-le-bone watch-house.

Q. What passed at the watch-house respecting Mrs. Carlton's house? - A.Last Tuesday morning the prisoner was brought into the watch-house by George Duckhouse and a soldier. George Duckhouse said here is a thief; when he came in I searched him and found a dark lantern, and this I found in his waistcoat pocket, I don't know what you call it. (Produces a bottle of phosphorus).

Prisoner's defence. About half past five o'clock, as I was going by the door, I was struck down by two men who run out, and I picked up those two things which they threw away. I suppose they struck me with one of them at the door.

Sutherland. I never saw the bottle of phosphorus till I saw it before the Magistrate.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY Death , aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-83

182. JAMES HAYDON, alias MARTIN , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Rogers , about the hour of six in the night of the 4th of December , and burglarioufly stealing two gold rings, value 10s. the property of the said John.

JOHBN ROGERS sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 20, High-street, St. Giles's .

Q. What is your business? - A. A silversmith and jeweller .

Q. Did you lose any thing on the 6th of December last? - A. About five or six o'clock, in the evening, I lost a diamond ring, and several articles of value, to the amount of about 25l. in all.

Q. What wre the other articles? - A. Two gold rings.

Q. Where were they placed? - A. In a tray in the shop window for sale.

Q. How was that place secured? - A. It lay in the window loose with others. The glass was before it.

Q. When had you seen these panes of glass last? - A. In the course of the afternoon.

Q. How late? - A.Perhaps withing an hour before the circumstance happened.

Q. They then were all secure? - A. Yes; I was at tea in the parlour, when I was alarmed by a noise in the shop.

Q. What sort of a noise? - A. My young man's jumping across the counter made a noise; he was endeavouring to open the shop door, and on my going up to him I found it was tied. We succeeded, after some difficulty, in getting it open. The violence of our pulling had loosened the cord a little, so that we could get a hand out. On examining the cord I found it was tied to the railing of the area and to the handle of the door. I suspected the window ws broke, and found it was so, and several things were missing; a mob was collecting round the door, so that I found it necessary to shut up the shop for the evening. I went out and returned about ten o'clock in the evening, when I saw the rings, which were brought to me by the officer.

JOHN BACON swon. - Q. What are you? - A. I am shopman to Mr. Rogers.

Q. What do you know of this robbery? - A. I was standing, between five and six o'clock in the evening, in the shop, and heard a noise, and saw a man's hand in the window.

Q. What sort of noise was it? - A. The crashing of glass. I saw him taking the rings, and immeiately jumped over the counter.

Q. Did he take any thing else besides the ring? - A. Not to my knowledge. I proceeded to the door to open it, and found it fast, till such time as Mr. Rogers came up, and we got it open. I observed the cord, but cannot exactly say in what situation it was on the door. I went out and assisted in putting up the shutters, but know nothing more.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - What are you? - A. One of the patrol belonging to the Office in Bow-street. On Saturday evening, the 4th of December, I was standing with my brother officers opposite Dyot-street, St. Giles's, when we heard a great noise.

Q. What sort of noise? - A.There was a mob collected; we went up and saw the prisoner in the coustody of a watchman, named Kelly; there was a great scuffle between the prisoner and the watchman, but we got the prisoner to the watch-house. On searching him, in his fob pocket I found those two rings (producing them) wrapped up in this bit of paper, which I have kept ever since; the prisoner was very obstreperous indeed; we had the hardest matter in the world to get him to the watch-house. I then went to Mr. Rogers and shewed him the rings which he owned.

Prisoner. Q. What time did you take me? - A. Between eight and nine o'clock.

ROGER KELLY sworn. - Q.What are You? - A. A watchman. Between eight and nine o'clock as I was walking about my beat in St. Giles, a boy was sent after me by Mr. March, a salesman and goldsmith. I went to him and he gave me and prisoner in charge.

Q. Where was it - in High-street, St. Giles's?

- A. Yes. I laid hold of the prisoner, who asked me what I meant to do with him. I told him that by the account Mr. March gave me I would take him to the watch-house, which I did.

Q. Were you in company with the patrol then? - A. No; the prisoner was very desperate, and said he would not go along with me. I made an attmept to spring my rattle, and he laid hold of it; then I called Hogan, my brother watchman, who came up, and we took him with great difficulty. Going along he made several grabs at his pocket, as if to take something out; I made a grab to prevent him, and every grab I made he gave me a rap on the head for it. I was afraid it was a knife he was going to draw. Going along I met some Bow-street officers, and was very gald to see them.

Q. Did you deliver him up to them? - A. No, I stuck to him as well as they did; he was very resolute. When he was searched I saw them take the rings out; I was nearly out of breath with him.

What pocket was it? - A. I think the right hand fob pocket.

CHRISTOPHER JONES sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A conductor of the patrol of Bow-street.

Q.What do you know of this? - A. I was along with Crocker, and saw the prisoner searched and the rings found.

RICHARD LIMBRICK sworn. - I am one of the patrol, and was present in the watch-house when Crocker took the two rings out of the prisoner's pocket.(The rings produed and identified.

Prisoner's defence. As I was going up High-street, St. Giles's, I picked up the rings and went to a shop, where there was a light, to look what they were; I put them in my pocket, and the watchman immediatley came up and began to beat me with a stick without my knowing what it was for GUILTY , Death aged 26.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-84

183. WILLIAM VANDERBUST was inducted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Paine , about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 15th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a copper, value 47. the same being fixed to the said dwelling-house, a linen bag, value 6d. and three ounces of sewing silk, value 2s. the property of the said Thomas.

THOMAS PAINE sworn. - I am a dyer , and live in the City-road, St. Luke's : On the 15th of December last I lost a large copper, with a broad rim, which cost me six pounds, and was fixed in a sned separate from the dwelling house, to which shed there was no fastening; in the morning, when we got up to go to work, the copper was gone, and the brick work, in which it was set, was partly pulled down.

SAMUEL TAYLOR sworn. - I am a patrol; about four o'clock, on the morning of the 16th of December the prisoner and another man passed me, and went towards the prosecutor's; as I was going my rounds again, about half past five, I heard a noise, and saw the prisoner with a copper on his head, and a hank of silk in a small bag; I asked him how he came by them, he made no answer, but threw the copper down, and attempted to run away; I caught him by the collar, and we had a scuffle, in which he knocked my blunderbuss out of my hand; I got it up again, and told him I would fire upon him if he resisted; he then begged for mercy, and I sprung my rattle, at which a watchman came up; I asked the prisoner how he came by the property; he said, as he was coming along a man hired him to carry it to Old-street, for which he was to have 2s. but did not know who the man was, where it came from, or where he was to take it to; he was then taken to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask me what man run away from me? - A. No; one was with you then, there was at four o'clock.( William Lewis , the watchman, corroborated the testimony of the last witness, as to taking the prisoner to the watch-house.)(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was employed to carry the copper to Old-street, and was to have 2s. I never saw the silk. GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Confined one year to hard labour in the House of Correction , and twice publicy whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-85

184. JOHN FREDERICK TIER was indicted for the wilful murder of John Goldsmith .

The prisoner was also charged with the like murder upon the Coroner's Inquisition.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN POVEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. What are You? - A. A drover.

Q. Do you recollect having been at Cock and Bell public-house on Monday night? - A. Yes, from seven till about ten; I saw the prisoner there in the course of the evening, but not so late as that.

Q. Did you know John Goldsmith ? - A. Yes, very well; he was there when I went in; the prisoner came in after me, but I cannot tell how long.

Q. Were there other persons in the company of the prisoner? - A. He was in company with another gentleman.

Q. Was there any conversation about a wager of a guinea that evening? - A. Not to my know

ledge; the prisoner and another man came in, and had six pennyworth of gin and water, after that they had another, and then went away; in a very short time after the prisoner came in again, and looked round for a seat,one of the witnesses would not let him sit down by him, and I said come here, upon which he put his hand to his side and said some of you shall have the contents of this.

Q. Did you see what is was? - A. I did not properly see the rights of the property; a little while after I got up and stood at the bar door, and there was an argument between him and Mr. Telfar, and he went up towards him.

Q. How long was that after he said some of you shall have the contents of this? - A. I think it might be about five minutes; the deceased was getting up to go out of doors, and before he could get out, somebody shoved him against Mr. Tier; he immediatlely turned round and went to the end of the settle and drew a knife.

Q. Was Goldsmith near the settle at that time? - A. No, he was going out at the door; the prisoner drew a knife, and said any body that offended him should have the contents of it.

Q. Was the prisoner sober or not? - A. He was not sober, nor he was not drunk he was about half and half; Goldsmith then came back, went to the site place and caught hold of either the tongs or the poker, I don't know which; he immediately went round after the prisoner.

Q. Was there no outcry in the company, upon his producing his knife? - A. No, I did not hear any body say any thing; Goldsmith went round the settle after the prisoner.

Q. Was that the way to go into the street? - A. Yes, Goldsmith went after him; in a very short time the deceased cried out he is in me; upon that alarm one of the witnesses went to assist in getting the knife out of the man's body; he was led back into the tap-room, and said he was given me the contents of the knife; he unbuttoned his waistcoat, pulled up his shirt, and there was his bowels in his hand.

Q. Had there been any violence offered to the prisoner before that? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you mean to say no violence was offered to him? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there not a shove against him so violent as to make him reel against the kitchen grate? - A. It did not bruise him.

Q.Perhaps your memory will serve you to say that the majority of the company were calling out poker him, poker him? - A. I did not hear any body call out poker him.

Q. I should rather suspect you were not sober? - A. Yes I was, I had only had a pint of beer.

Q. How long had you been in the house? - A. I suppose about an hour.

Q. Can you recollect what time you came in? - A. No; I did not look at the dial.

GEORGE TELFAR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Were you at the public-house the night this happened? - A. I was; I saw the prisoner come in with a cheesemonger in Whilecross street, they sat on the opposite side of the room to me; soon after he was in, a dispute arose, about a wager of a guinea; I heard Mr. Tier say, he should insist upon having his guinea again.

Q. Who was that dispute with? - A. The landlord of the house, he is here; the landlord said, part of the guinea was spent in punch, and the parties must settle it among themselves for he had nothing to do with it; I know no more that passed between the parties till afterwards; Mr. Tier and me were having some words together, he was very near the table by the fire, and during that time somebody pushed Goldsmith against Tier.

Q. How long had Goldsmith been in the house? - A. I did not observe, nor did I know the man. Tier made a stagge against the fire-place, whether he sell or not I do not know, but he staggered; after which Tier withdrew to the corner of the settle, and then it was I saw the knife.

Q. What sort of a knife wa it? - A. A large knife, apparently a butcher's knife; some voices in the room then called out, knock him down, he has got a knife.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing first? - A. He said something, but what it was I cannot say.

Q. Were there more voice than one called out so? - A. Yes, there were.

Q. How many persons were in the room? - A. I dare say a dozen, or fourteen.

Q. How many voices did you hear call out? - A. I cannot say.

Q. More than one? - A. Yes; upon that Goldsmith ran towards the fire, and caught up the tongs; he followed the prisoner into the passage, with the tongs before him.

Q. Did he say any thing to him? - A. Not that I heard; in a few seconds, or a minutes, I heard the unfortunate man say, he is in me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. At this time the prisoner was in his working dress, a a butcher; he had his blue apron on, had he not? - A. I have not a doubt but he had.

Q. It was such a knife as butcher use, tucked in the girdle of their aprons? - A. I believe it was so.

Q. He was shoved against the fire? - A. Yes.

Q. That is what they call sky-larking, is it not? - A. I cannot say what they call it.

Q. The prisoner was making his way towards the door to go out of the house? - A. Yes.

Q. And then it was that Goldsmith followed with the tongs, pursuing him? - A. Yes.

Q. What passed in the passage you did not see?

- A. NO; there was a scuffle in the passage before the deceased cried out.

JOHN WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are the landlord of the Cock and Bell public-house? - A. Yes; I recollect seeing the prisoner and the deceased there, about half past seven o'clock in the evening; the prisoner and a cheesemonger called for sixpenny worth, and two pipes of tobacco, which I served them with, and the prisoner addressed himself to me respecting returning him a guinea, which he had left with me to make good a bet some time before; I told him I could not say any thing to it without the other parties were present, that they had seven shilling worth of punch out of it, and if he chose ot wait, I dared to say the other parties would no tbe long before they came; just as I said that, they came in; and I said to the prisoner, here they are, settle it with them, and whatever you agree to I have no objection; the prisoner after that, had a few words with Mr. Telfar, paid the reckoning, and left the house.

Q. Did you observe whether he had any knife with him or not? - A. I did not see any with him then In the course of five minutes, he returned into the house by himself.

Q. Did you observe whether he had a knife when he returned? - A. I did not.

Q.Before he left the house, the first time, did he say for what purpose he left it? - A. No; I conceived he was gone home; when he returned, he called for a pint of porter, and change for a sevenshilling-pieces, and set himself down by the side of Povey, when a conversation took palce between him and Mr. Telfar, respecting his going and making a complaint about having some wine at my house; Mr. Telfar accused him of having asserted it, he denied it, and a person was sent for to prove it; just as the person came in, and the question was put, the prisoner arose from his seat, went across the tap-room to continue the conversation across the table, and after some words between Mr. Telfar and him, the prisoner put himself in a position for fighting; I was in my bar, but I turned round, and saw the prisoner in the attitude for fighting, and doubling his sist.

Q. Had you seen any attempt made by any person to offer violence to him before you saw him in that attitude? - A. No, I had not.

Q. Was that effort towards fighting the first attempt towards riot you saw in the room? - A. Yes; in consequence of his being in that position, somebody shoved the deceased against him.

Q. Did you see any body attempt to shove him, or assault him, before he stood in that position? - A. I did not.

Q. Do you know who it was that shoved the deceased against him? - A. No; because the settle prevented my seeing.

Q. When the deceased was shoved against him, what did you see? - A. The prisoner see backwards towards the fire-place, and the deceased with him; the prisoner was next the fire-place, but neither of them fell, they only staggered with the shove against the fire-place.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing on receiving the shove? - A. He returned to the corner of the settle, and drew a knife; I did not see him draw it, but I saw him with it in his hand, holding it out towards the company, and exclaiming some words which I cannot repeat perfectly, but it was, that if they came near him again, they should have the contents of the knife, or something of that kind; I think they were very aggaravating words, and holding the knife in his hand; immediatley there was a hue and cry, he has drawn a knife; the general voice prevailed.

Q. That was after he drew the knife, and held it in that menacing poisition? - A. Yes.

Q. What else did they say? - A.Knock him down, or knock it out of his hand, I cannot say which, they might say both.

Q. Did more than one person say it? - A. Yes, the general voice; more than one, two, or three; according to the best of my opinion, I think it was, knock him down; and the deceased immediately turned towards the fire-place for the poker, or tongs, I don't know which, but he took up the tongs, and appeared to me to follow the prisoner behind the settle.

Q. Were you enabled to ascertain for what purpose he followed him? - A. I should suppose to knock him down, or to knock his knife down; almost instantly that he went behind the settle, I heard the deceased cry out, he is in me, or something of that sort.

Q. Did you hear any blows? - A. I think the deceased, after the knife was in him, made a blow with his hands.

Q. You say he had the tongs? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you hear any clashing of the tongs, so as to say there was a blow given the prisoner before you heard the deceased cry out? - A. No, I did not.

Court. I think this cannot be carried further that manslaughter.

Mr. Knowlys. No, my Lord; and I think I cannot make less of it.

- BADDELEY sworn. - I am a surgeon, and attended the deceased in St. Barholomew's-hospital; he was brought in on Monday evening, and died on Tuesday evening, in consequence of the wound in his belly.

Prisoner defence. I stood in my down defence, or I should have been a dead man.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Of Manslaughter .

Confined one year , and fined one shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18030112-86

185. GEORGE FOSTER was indicted for the wilful murder of Jane Foster , his wife , and Lousia Foster , his infant child .

The case stated by Mr. knowlys.

JAME HOBART sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Where do you live? - A.At No. 4, Old Boswell-court, Carey-street.

Q. Are you the mother of the deceased? - A. Yes.

Q. When was the last time you saw daughter? - A.She left me about five minutes before four o'clock three weeks before Christmas-day, which was the 5th of December; I took her from the poor-house, to take care of her and her child; she used to sleep on Saturday nights in general with her husband; she had left me for three Saturdays to go to him.

Q. How many children had she? - A. Four; two in the work-house at Barnet, not supported by him; one died, and one he drowned.

Q. Did she take her child with her when she left you? - A. Yes, and every rag of its dress.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long had she been in the work-house altogether? - A.She had been above twelve month.

Q. When you took hr home, was she not uneasy in her mind? - A. Yes; he wanted to put her child into the work-house at Barnet, and she was so fond of it, she would not let it go.

Q. That made her very unhappy in her mind? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH BRADFIELD sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. In North-row, Grosvenor-square; the prisoner lodged with me, but not his wife and child: On Saturday, the 4th of December, she came, with the child, and slept with him at my house, and I saw them all three together on Sunday morning, when they breakfasted with me and my wife, between nine and ten o'clock; after which we had each a glass of rum, and I saw him, his wife and child go together form my house at about ten o'clock; I did not see him again til the evening, about half past eight, after I came from chapel.

Q. Did he make any enquiry after his wife and child? - A. Not that Sunday, but the Sunday following he did; I had been to Highgate, and I believe he had been to Barnet; on his return he called for me at my mother in-law's at Highgate; her name is young; I believe he had called for me there once before in the summer; as the prisoner, my brother-in-law, and I were coming to town the Sunday after the prisoner's wife's death, he asked me if his wife had been at my house; I replied, no, not as I knew of, for I had been out in the morning.

Q. Did his wife usually call upon him in her course of the week? - A.sometimes on a Saturday, and sometimes on Monday or Tuesday, but generally twice a week for some little matter of subsistence.

Q. Did they live on good terms together? - A. It appeared to me, when I have heard his wife speak, that they were not on good terms,and from him the same.

Q. Had they lived together at all during the time he lodged with you? - A. No; he lodged with me about half a year, or three quarters of a year; the good woman wished to be taken home as his wife, I have no doubt; and I verily believe that was the sentiments of her heart.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. If I understand you, his wife used to come and sleep with him on Saturday nights? - A. Yes; she did not sleep many times at my house, it might be three or four times; she used to come about six o'clock to receive a little money, and stand in the street till such time a she left his business.

Q. Do you know whether she had been addicted to drinking? - A. I never saw her in liquor; I have seen her but few times.

Q.Perhaps no at all previous to her going to the work-house? - A. I believe never.

Q. What her habits of life were you don't know? - A. No.

Q. you have said, they left your house on the Sunday morning, and he returned abut eight in the evening? - A. Yes.

Q. He said nothing about his wife? - A. No, not till the Sunday following.

Q. Then there had been no rumour that she was lost? - A. No.

Q. And he enquired whether you had seen her? - A. Yes.

Q. As she was in the habit of coming to see him on a Saturday night, he was surprised at not seeing her? - A. I cannot say whether he was or not.

Q. What is his business? - A. A barnessmaker.

Q. Do you know whether he went to his work regular after the Sunday you last saw his wife? - A.Exactly; he came constant to his home, and went constant to his work.

Q. And as soon as he had an opportunity of speaking to you at Highgate, he asked you if you had seen his wife? - A. Yes.

MARGARET BRADFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - A. Yes; the prisoner lodged with us about six or eight months, and on the Saturday night before the death of his wife, she came and set with me for an hour, waiting for him, and she staid all night.

Q. You knew her and the child well? - A.Very well; I was at home when they left the house, about ten in the morning, on Sunday.

Q.Did you judge they lived on good terms? - A. Not at all.

Q.How soon after this Sunday was it that you saw the body of the child at Chelsea work-house? - A. On Wednesday week after.

Q.Did you know it then? - A. yes, it was the prisoner's child; I pulled up its eye-lids to look at the colour of its eyes; its name was Louisa.

Q. Did you see the body of the wife? - A. I did not.

Q.From what you have seen of the wife when living, do you judge her to have been given to liquor? - A. I cannot say; I never saw her in liquor; I saw her but few times.

ELEANOR WINTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Where do you live? - A. On Westbourne-Green, and keep what was usually called the Spotted Dog, but which is now called the Westbourne-Green tavern.

Q.Look at the prisoner, and say whether you ever saw him and his wife and child there? - A. Yes, I did, on Sunday the 5th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, and they staid till near one o'clock.

Q.What age do you suppose the child to be? - A. I suppose it to be near twelve months old.

Q.Had they any steaks? - A. yes, the prisoner cooked them himself; the woman had a twopenny galss of brandy, and they had four pints of porter between them.

Q. How far is your house from the Mitre te-ver? - A.About two miles; mine is on the towing-path side, and that is on the other side.

Q.When the wife was at your house, and while the Prisoner was by, did you hear her say any thing- in what sort of spirits was she? - A.She seemed rather low, and as if she had been crying; she observed to me, that she had been there three times to meet a man who owed her husband some money, and if the busniess was not settled on the that days, she would not come after it any more; I remember to have seen her before in my house three times, but do not recollect the days.

Q.Did you see which way they went when they left your house? - A. No.

Q. How soon after did you see the body of the woman? - A. I believe it was a fortnight all but one day, at Wormwood Scrubs.

Q.Do you know whether that was the body of the woman who was with the prisoer at your house? - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did she not say, she was determined not to come again? - A. I cannot say exactly the words.

Q. She seemed very uneasy? - A. YEs.

JOHN GOFF Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q.Were you waiter at the Mitre tavern, near Wormwood Scrubs, by the Paddington canal, on the 5th of December? - A. Yes, and recollect seeing the prisoner very well that day at two o'clock.

Q. Your house is on the opposite side to the towing-path? - A. yes; his wife and child were with him; he called for a quartern of rum, which I took, and poured him out a glass first: he offered it to his wife; she told him to drink it first, which he did, and she had the other; then they had four pennyworth of bread and cheese and a pint of beer, and another pint after that; they went away about half past four, but they had another quartern of rum about a quarter of an hour before they went.

Q. What makes you think it was half past foun? - A.Because it was getting quite dark.

Q.Then they could not have left your house so early as three? - A. No, it was half past four, as near as I can guess.

Q.Did they leave your house together? - A. yes.

Q.Were you in the house all the time they were there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did either of them request to have any bed, or propose to stay all night? - A. Not in my hearing.

Q.Which way did they go? - A. They turned to the left, to come towards London, on the side opposite to the towing-path.

Q.Setting off in that direction, how long would it be before they could get to the opposite side? - A.In about a quarter of an hour.

Q.How near is there a bridge from your house, to get the nearest way to the towing-path? - A. About fifty yards from our house, but they went the other way towards the swing bridge, which is a quarter of an hour's walk.

Q. Did you remark it at all? - A. No; I saw them about one hundred yards from our house.

Jury. Q. is that the common way to go to London? - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect Sarah Daniels coming to your house? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon after you last saw the man and woman? - A. About ten minutes.

Q.What did she come for? - A.Some candles and milk.

Q. As far as you could see the prisoner and his wife from your house, did they appear to go together? - A. Yes.

Q. Did either of them appear to be the least the worse for liquor? - A. No, not the least.

Q. Did you see the body of the woman which was found? - A. yes.

Q.Was it the same woman who was at your house? - A. Yes, the same woman, and the same cloaths.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How many other servants are there beside you? - A. None.

Q. Will you swear it was later than half past three when they left your house? A. Yes.

Q. Have you any clock in the tap-room? - A. No. we have none in the house.

Q.Then you only speak from a recollection that it was dark at the time? - A. Yes; it was not quite dark, there was a kind of fog coming on.

Q.Might it not be the effect of the fog? - A. It must be half past four I am certain; because my mistress came into the tap-room for a candle.

Q. Do you recollect any body asking your mistress what o'clock it was, after the prisoner was gone, and her saying it was, only half past three? - A. No; there was nobody in the house but my mistress and me.

Q. Sarah Daniels came there I understand - do you recollect any observation made by your mistress, that the reason of her lighting candles so soon was in consequence of the fog? - A. No.

Q.It is about an hour's walk from your house to town? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.Taking which road? - A. If they take the towing-path road.

Mr. Alley. Q. Is not the towing-path road a considerable round? - A.It is.

Q.Did not the man and woman take the properest road? - A. There is no road at all for carriages, horses, or foot-path.

Q.Do you know where Mr. Fillingham lives - was not by his house the nearest road? - A. Yes; but they did not go across the fields to Mr. Fillingham's house, they kept along side the canal.

Q. The way they went, was not there a path by the canl, and a paling? - A. Mr. Fillingham's paling is about ten feet from the water.

Court. Q. Is a person who goes that way obliged; to walk inside or outside the paling? - A.Outside; but nobody has any busness along there, for there is a couple of gates put up with bushes on them to prevent any body getting over.

Q.Is there not a large stump of a tree place by the gate, upon which persons step and get over? - A. No; but there are plenty of places where they may get over into Mr. Fillingham's fields, but that is not the road or path.

Q.You cannot say whether they went over his fields or not? - A. No, I cannot.

Jury. Q.Which is the proper road for travellers, or which people usually take? - A. The towing-path. They had got past the path that goes to Mr. Fillingham's when I last saw them, but had not got to the gates with the bushes, which was about two hundred yardsw distant.

HANNAH PATIENCE sworn. - I keep the Mitre tavern, and recollect seeing the prisoner there on Sunday the 5th of December, with a woman and child, they had been there a good while before I saw them; I served them with a quartern of rum, and they had a pint of beer after it. They left our house, as near as I can recollect, about half past four, by the grey of the evening coming on, for we have no clock.

Q. Did either of them appear to be the worse for liquor? - A. Not the least that I observed.

Q. Do you recollect Sarah Daniels being in your house? - A. She came to buy a candle to take to her master; they were then gone; and the man came back for a shoe which the child had left, but could not find it.

Q.How long had the man been gone before you saw Denilds? - A. Not a minute.

Q. Were you and your servant, Goff, the only persons there? - A. Yes, and the man, woman, and child.

Q.Did they ask to have a bed at your house? - A. No.

Q. DId you ask any person that day half-a-crown for a bed? - A. No; nor never since I have lived on that sopt.

Q. Did you afterwards see the body of the woman? - A. Yes, and am clear it is the same woman and the same cloaths.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You have said there was nobody but yourself and the young man your waiter? - A.Nobody, except the prisoner, his wife and child.

Q. The prisoner had been there some time, had he not? - A. I don't know what time he came; I went into the tap-room in the grey of the evening.

Q.You don't mean to say there had been nobody else there that day? - A. No, I don't know who was in the tap-room.

Q.Therefore whatever might be charged for a bed by any person there, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q.When the woman went away, did she not take her apron, and in a sort of desponding way say, she would never be there againgt? - A. she took her child on her left are, and threw the tail of her gown over its head, and I threw the other end over to her, in doing which she gave her elbow a twist, and said, this is the last time I shall come here.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did it appear in a desponding way? - A. No, I did not think so.

Court. Q.Then, by your account, she said it more in a huff than in a desponding way? - A.I don't know, I did not think any thing of it.

SARAH DANIELS, aged nine years, was examined by the Court as to her knowledge of the factity and solemnily of an oath, and being satisfied with her answers, she was sworn.

Q.Who do you live with? - A. Mr. Fillingham, near the Mitre. On Sunday evening, the 5th of December, I went there for two candles about five o'clock, when it was abot dusk -

Q.What time do you generally drink tea at Mr. Fillinghma's? - A.We generally drink tea about five o'clock.

Q.How soon was this before it was dark? - A. Not soon.

Q.How were the tea-things when you returned home? - A.They were being set.

Q. Did you meet any body as you went to the Mitre? - A. yes, a man and a woman with a child in her arms; I saw the woman first, and she said to the child, here's daddy coming.

Q. How far was the man from the woman? - A. Not far; about as far as I am from you, about four yards.

Q.How far from the Mitre? - A. Not far.

Corss-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You had never seen either of them before? - A.No.

Q.How long after was it that you saw the prisoner in custody? - A. A good while

Q.You were very angry with him for being guilty of this supposed crime? - a. yes.

Q.Did nobody tell you that the man who was in custody, and whom you were to see, was the man who had drowned his wife? - A. Yes, the officer.

Q.And he then told you that was the man you had seen on the road? - A. Yes.

Q.And it is in consequnece of that you say he is the man? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you recollect him agian when you saw him? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. It was only for a moment, you only passed the man? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Was ther any more than one man or one woman who passed by you? - A. No.

CHARLES WILLD sworn. Q.Are you fellow workman with the prisoner at Mr. Bushnell's, the coach-maker's? - A. yes.

Q.Did you know where the prisoner lodged? - A.perfectly well. I met him on Sunday the 5th of December, at Mr. Bradfield's door, about six o'clock, or very little after; and he went to the sign of the Horse Grnadier along with me.

Q.How long did you stay there? - A. I think we parted about a quarter past eight, or thereabouts.

Q.Are you quite sure it was not seven when you met him? - A. I am certain of that.

Q.Did he say any thing that evening about his wife or child? - A. No.

Q. Had he said any thing to you before respecting them? - A. No further than I asked him what could make him so uncontented as not to go along with me willingly; he said, he thought I was rather cleaner than he was.

Q.Did he and his wife live together? - A. No.

Q.Had you any conversatuion on that subject? - A. I told him, I wished they could live happy and comfortable together as I and my wife did; and he said, he was determined not to live with her any more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did he not appear as he usually did? - A. He appeared as though he had been out for a walk; he told me he had been drinking a little.

Q. He did not appear like a person with whom any struggle had been made? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Did he tell you where he had been at all? - A. No.

Q.Do you know the distance from the grenadier to whetstone? - A. About nine miles.

Q. Had the prisoner been into his lodgings before he went with you? - A. No.

JOHN ATKINS sworn. - I am a barge-man: On Monday the 6th of December, I found the body of an instant udner the bow of my barbe, covered with ice, about a mile from the Mitre, in the middle of Chelsea-reach, as it is called. By direction of Sir Richard Ford, I dragged for the body of a woman, and on the third day, I found it close to the Mitre public-house; I ha dragged upwards from London towards the house, and when we bauled the drag up, we found a bush and the woman together.

Sir RICHARD FORD sworn. - I am one of the Magistrate belonging to Bow-street, and ordered the prisoner to be apprehended, about a week after the body of the child was found; he was examined before me two or three times, and at two examinations, his defence was read distinctly over to him, and he desired some correction to be made, which was done; Iread it over to him paragraph by paragrah, and at each distinct period, I asked him if it was true, and he said, yes; I then told him, he might sign it or not, it was for him to consider the consequence of it, and he chose to sign it.

Q.Was there the least inducement or threat, or promise? - A. Not the least; it was perfectly voluntary on his part.

Q. The interlineations which appear in it were put in at his particular request, I believe? - A. Yes, at the second or thired examination. I read over the sumer examinations, and asked him if it was true; and he said, he wished that to be added.( The paper read):

" George Foster 's defence. My wife and child came to me on Saturday se'nnight, about eight o'clock in the evenig, and slept at my lodgings that night; the next morning, about nine or ten o'clock, I went out with them, and walked to the new cut at paddington; we went to the Mitre Tavern, and had some rum, some proter, and some bread and cheese; before that we had stopped at a public house near the first bridge, where we had soem beef steaks and some porter, after which she desired me to walk further on by the cut, so I went with her; I left her directly I came out of the Mitre Tavern, Which was about three o'clokc, and made the best of my way to Whestone, in order to go to Barnet, to see two of my children, who are in the work-house there; I went by the bye lanes, and ws about an hour and an half walking from

the Mitre to Whetstoe; when I got there I found if so dark, that I would not go on to Barnet, but came home that night; I have not seen my wife or child seince; I have not enquired after them, but I meant to have doen so to-morrow evening, at Mrs. Hobart's; I came home from Whestone that evening between seven and eight o'clokc; I saw no person in going to Whestone, nor did I stop any where, at any public house, or else where except the Green Dragon at Highgate, where I had a glass of rum; my wife had a balck gaown on and a balck bonnet; the child had a straw bonnet and white bed gown; my wife was a little in liquor.

(Signed) " GEORGE FOSTER .

"Witness Richard Ford, 27th December 1802.

"Prisoner says, before he left the Mitre Tavern, on the said Sunday, his wife asked the mistress of the Inn Whether she could have a bed there that night, which the prisoner afterwards repeated; that she asked half a crown for one, which the prisoner and his wife thought too much, and the latter said she would go hime to her mother."

The words in Italic were interlined, and the talter part added at the prisoner's request.

WILLIAM, GARDNER sworn. - Q.Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, he used to work in the same shop with me.

Q.Did you call upon him while he was in custody at the Brown-Bear, Bow-street, and what did he say? - A.I went on Monday, the 27th, and asked him how he did, he said middling; I said I am sorry to see you in this situation, he said he was so too, but was as innocent as the child unborn, and that if he could get any one to come forward to say, or swear, I think was the word, that he was at such a plae, he shoud be cleared immediately, but did not mention the place; I then left him, saying, good bye, I am sorry for you.

JAMES BUSHNELL sworn. - Q.You are the master of the prisoner? - A. Yes; He was a most diligent man, and earned about 24s. a week in the summer, and 21s. in winter, besies what time he made over.

Q.Did you visit him in his confinement? - A. Out of respect for so valuable a servant, and hosest, steady, and sober man, I did; I said, Foster, I am forty to see you in this situation; is there any thing I can do for you? he said, in case it was not too much trouble, he would request me to go to the Green Dragon, at

Highgate, and enquire whether he was not there who had a glass of rum; and enquired after Mrs. Yound.

ELIZABETH SOUTHALL sworn. - I keep the Green-Dragon at Highgate.

Q. Do you recollect any man enquiring after Mrs. Young? - A. Not a man only, there was a man and woman, and child, came to enquire after her one Sunday evening, when candles were lighted, but I cannot say what Sunday; the man, when he enquired after Mrs. Yound, turned to his wife. and said, that is Bradfields's mother; the woman had a child in her arms, and said she had bee somewhere to see her children, and seemed very fatigued with walking; I think she said either Whetstone or Barnet.

Prisoner's defence. I leave my defence to my counsel; the witer at the Mitre did not serve us with any thing; the mistress brought the first quartern of rum and poured it out.

Goss. I served the prisoner with rum, on my oath.

GEORGE HODGSON . Esq. sowrn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are Corner for the county of Middlesex? - A. I am.

Q.Did you take a view of the body? - A. yes.

Q. Did you observe any marks of violence, either on the mother or child? - A. Not the least; I had a surgeon to examine the child.

Q.Was the child's arm broke? - A. No such thing, there was not the least bruise.

Q.What was the verdict of the Corner's Jury? - A.Accidental death.

Q.Have you taken a view of the place in which this act is supposed to have been committed? - A. Yes, I know it very well.

Q.Describe whether going round by Mr. Fillingham's house is the shortest way to London or not, from the Mtre? - A. A considerable deal; if you go round by the towing-path, you must go by the canal all the way; it is a very short distance from the canal to Mr. Fillingham's house; between the rail and the side of the river it is impossible to walk with safety, it is so slippery it is likde soap: it is a very little way to Mr. Fillingham's, which is a good road, and then pass the house into the Harrow-road.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Can you state the distance from the Mitre tavern to Whetstone? - A. I suppose ten miles.

Q.How fae, going by the lanes? - A. I cannot tell which way to go by lanes; there may be a shorter way through that part of the country, but I should think that would be seven or eight miles, and from Whestone back again about nine, altogether about sixteen miles.

SARAH GORING sworn. - My husband is a smith, the prisoner and his wife lodged with us twice before she went to the work-house, about four years ago.

Mr. Alley. Q. Has she ever said any thing to you respecting her inclination or disinclination to remain in this world? - A. No, I was very much surprised to hear she was in the work-house, because he was a very tender husband and a good father.

Q.Have you heard her express any wish to continue in the world or to leave it? - A. No, I cannot recollect.

Four witnesses were called who gave the prisoner a good character. GUILTY , Death , aged 32.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-87

186. JAMES LILLEY was indcited for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Hurdle .

Mr. THOMAS SMART sworn. - Q. You are a surgeon? - A. I am.

Q.Did you examine the body of Elizabeth Hurdle ? - A. I did, the second day after her death.

Q.Are you able to form a judgment of what was the cause of her death? - A.She died of an inflammation of the lungs and heart.

Q. Can you judge what was the cause of it? - A.There waas not any marks externally to induce me to say violence was the cause of it.

Q.How long had the inflammation existed? - A. I don't think it could have existed more than twelve or fourteen hours.

Q. Would beating and ill usage produce that inflammation? - A. There are various causes.

Q.Is that a cause to which you can ascribe inflammation? - A. Beating and bruising will occation inflammation, but there was not any external appearance at that time to make me believe it was occasioned by violence, and had I opened the body without hearing the rumour, I should not have supposed it had been occasioned by violence.

Q. was it that sort of instammation that might be occasioned by drinking? - A. The very frequent use of strong spirituous liquors might produce a strong inflammation; this was more violent than any I ever saw.

Q. You should not have suspected any violence from the appearnace of the body? - A. I did not see any thing to induce me to suspect any.

Q. was there that appearance about the body to lead you to accunt for the infalmmation by violence? - A. no; I can only say that violence, such as is reported to have been used upon the body, would produce such disease.

Q.But would it not leave some external mark? - A. Yes; but there was not the least vestige of a bruise or contusion; I cannot pretend to say what squeezing or pressing might do, but blows or kicks must leave some marks.

Q. You say it could not without marks of violence; but squeezing, such as you have stated, might do it? - A. I think pressure might do it, but I cannot say what the cause of it was.

MARY WLKINGS sworn. - Q. Are you a married woman? - A. Yes; my husband is a groom; the prisoner is a chip hat weaver. On a Friday evening, in December, I cannot tell what day of the month, about five o'clock, I went to the prisoner's apartment and found him lying on the bed in liquor, and the deceased was smoaking her pipe by the fire. Her name was Elizabeth Hurdle ; she was also in liquor. I went there to speak to Mrs. Lilly, and she was not at home; when I had been there about ten minutes, I asked the deceased wehre Mrs. Lilly was, and she said she did not know; she expected her in every minute, and I sat down to wait for her. The deceased said to the prisoner, you dog you have hooked my child many a time, and now I will hook you.

Q.What did she mean by hooked? - A. He works with a hook at his business. She then began to scratch his face. She had been sitting by the fire side; she got up and went to the bed; I went to him, and held him down for fear he should strike her. I held him down while she scratched his face. During that time his wife came in; she was in liquor.

Q.How long did you hold him down? - A. I dare say about ten minutes.

Q.Why did you not take the woman off? - A.She was so obstreperous she would not be persuaded by me; then the wife came in, and she began to scratch his face as well as her sister; they were both so obstinate they would not go out.

Q.Why did the wife scratch him? - A.She thought he was ill using her sister, which was the deceased. I went and fetched in Mary Clarke; I was not gone above three or four minutes, and when I came back the deceased was on the floor; the prisoner was standing on her left hand.

Q. Had he shoes on? - A. No.

Q.What was he doing? - A. He was standing still.

Q.Where was his wife? - A. She was standing in the room.

Q. You saw no blows? - A. No.

Here the court interposed, and the Jury being satisfied, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18030112-88

187. SAMUEL JOHN HALL was indicted for feloniously and scralegiously stealing, on the 2d of January , six common prayer books, value 12s. the property of James Robson , Esq. in a certain chapel, called Trmity Chapel .

Second count. Charging them to be the property of Mary Bickley .

JAMES ROBSON , Esq. sworn. - I live in conduit-street, Hanover-square; the whole of Trinity Chapel is mine, which is a chapel of ease to St. Martine.

SARAH WATSON sworn. - On the 2d of January I heard a noise in the chapel, in the evening, soon after the congregation was gone. I opened the street door and looked to see if any body was on the steps. I then called Mrs. Bickley, and we both went into the chapel with a light. we saw

the cushions and books mislaid in different parts upon the ground. In this handkerchief I produce six prayer books which were found on the prisoner, one of which belongs to Mr. Robson, and another to Sir John Smith. (Produces them). We could not see any body below, and I thought somebody might be in the gallery. Thomas Preston went up with me, and in the second pew we found the boy, who is the prisoner, sitting upon a hassock, we asked him if there were any more. He said no, for he had just let the man out with some books. We asked him who the man was; he said he met him at the top of Swallow-street; that the man asked him to go with him to Trinity Chapel for some books, and he should have part of the money, which would be of service to him. The boy seemed very much frightened.

(Mr. Robson identified his book).

MARY BICKLEY sworn. - I was close by when the books were taken from the boy, and have had them ever since.

The prisoner declined making any defence.

One witness gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18030112-89

188. MOSES JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , three shirts, value 30s. and eight handkerchiefs, value 20s. the property of James Corder , in his dwellinghouse .

The prosecutor not being able to identify the person of the prisoner he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-90

189. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Watson , on the 13th of December , a Bank note, value 30l. her property.

The Court being of opinion there was not sufficient evidence to prove the prisoner ever had possession of the note he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-91

190. WILLIAM DICKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a metal watch, value 18s. two seals, value 2s. a silver milk pot, value 10s. a silver table spoon, value 10s. two silver salt spoons, value 2s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 4s. and two plated egg cups, value 2s. the property of Hendley Susman , in the dwelling-house of William Brown .

HENDLEY SUSMAN sworn. - I live at No. 9, Lisle-street, Leicester-fields , in the house of William Brown , who keeps a chandler's shop; but know nothing of the robbery.

SARAH LENOX sworn. - I am servant to Miss Susman. On the 30th of December, the prisoner knocked at the door, and asked of me for Miss Cato, which is the name she goes by, Susman being a hard name to recollect. I said she was not at home, but at the play. He asked me if he could go up and write a note. I said, yes. He went up but I could not find a pen. I went down a few stairs to call a servant, and in the mean time heard the plate rattle on the side-board in the room I had left the prisoner. I thought he was very curious and looking at it. I went up again as far as the window, when I met him on the stairs with the things in his pocket, which I heard rattle. I said you are not going. He said, yes. I said you have not wrote the note. He said no, neither am I going to write it. I immediately put my hands against his breast, and said you have got something in your pocket which don't belong to you, and desired him to go up stairs, which he did, and began to pull the things out of his pocket. I heard Mr. Brown on the stairs, and called him in, and he saw the prisoner pull a part of the things out of his pocket. The prisoner said it was only a joke, and wished to go away, but I sent for a constable and he was taken to the watch-house.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I keep the house: On the 30th of December, I was called in by the last witness, and saw the prisoner pulling the articles mentioned in the indictment out of his pocket, and he was taken to the watch-house.

(The articles produced, and identified by the prosecutrix).

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of 30s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-92

191. JAMES TYLER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lewis Lawrence , about the hour of eight, in the night of the 11th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing thirteen pair of leather shoes, value 3l. and a pair of girls leather shoes, value 3s. his property.

LEWIS LAWRENCE sworn. - I missed a quantity of shoes about eight or nine o'clock, in the evening of December the 11th, from the window, which I had seen not long before, but know nothing of the robbery.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: On the 11th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, I and Armstrong saw the prisoner, with some other boys, turning round a corner; the prisoner said to the others, this way, this way, this is the nearest way;

and they turned up a court; upon that, I caught hold of him by the coat, and the other two run away. I searched the prisoner, who set himself against the wall, and put his hand behind him, and dropped this pair of shoes, (produces them), which I picked up. Armstrong then returned, after pursuing the others, but could not overtake them; he picked up a quantity of shoes in a handkerchief, which he brought back, and then the prisoner said, the pair he dropped did not belong to him.

( James Armstrong corroborated the testimony of the last witness).

(The shoes produced, and identified).

Prisoner's defence. I had been on an errand, and saw several men pass me, who I did not know; then Vickery stopped me, and searched me, but found nothing; he then said there was a pair of shoes at my feet, but I know nothing of them.

Lawrence. A square of glass was cracked, and the piece taken out, through which they reached the shoes.

Seven witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Of stealing, to the value of 9d.

Privately whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18030112-93

192. WILLIAM MINES , (a Black), BENJAMIN JAMES , and WILLIAM BAKER , were indicted, the two first for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Phineas Kindred , about the hour of two, in the night of the 26th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a pocket-book, value 6d. a plane, value 1s. 6d. two saws, value 8s. two chissels, value 6d. a pair of compasses, value 3d. a hammer, value 4d. and a gimler, value one halfpenny , his property; and the last for receiving, on the 27th of November, a plane, value 1s. 6d. two saws, value 8s. two chissels, value 6d. a pair of compasses, value 3d. and a hammer, value 4d. part of the before-mentioned property, he well knowing the same to have been stolen .

PHINEAS KINDRED sworn. - I am a carpenter , in Redman's-row, Mile-end : On Friday the 26th of November, I left my work-shop about half past nine o'clock, in the evening, which was not quite finished, as it wanted a lock, and was only bolted by putting the hand in at the window, but I cannot say whether I sastened it that night; next morning I found the window forced out, and missed the saws; the Monday following, I was fetched by the Lambeth-street officers to an old iron-shop, in Rosemary-lane, where I found a number of other tools; my pocket-book, which I had left on the bench, was found in a field adjoining.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street office: On the 18th of December, I had information from Brown, the accomplice, that they had sold some tools at Baker's house, an old iron-shop, in Rosemary-lane, which they had stolen from Mr. Kindred's. Griffiths and I went there, and Griffiths and Baker went into a back place, while I went into a little room, where I found this small saw, (produces it); I asked Baker where he got it; he said he bought it of Mr. Mainwaring, the maker; I looked, and saw the name of Harrison on it, and took Baker into custody; in the evening, Smith and I went again, and he found a tenon saw, in a little cupboard, nearly covered with rags, as if it was concealed. On the 20th I went again, with the prosecutor, and found several things, which he owned, from among a vast number of tools which were there. Brown informed me that Mines had kept some nails, a gimlet, and two hammers, for his own use; upon which I went to his room, on Saltpetre-bank, and found them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You found the large saw hanging up? - A. Yes; but it was very dark.

Q.Was that not the prisoner Baker's workshop, and did you not find the things on his workbench? - A. We found part of them on a bench full of rags, and old junk, and those kind of things; the prisoner Baker calls himself a carpenter, but I don't think he is; I did not see a shaving, or any wood.

Q. Had he not time to have removed the things, before you went the second time? - A. Yes; but he must have removed a great many more if he had.

( Edward Smith , and John Griffiths , Corroborated the testimony of the last witness).

JOHN BROWN sworn. - I have been examined before on the former trials. On Saturday, November the 27th, about two or three o'clock in the morning, Mines, James, and myself, went to Redman's-row, and then got over the wall belonging to Mr. Kindred; James opened the window of the work-shop, went in and handed-out two large planes, a large saw, and tenon saw, and the other articles, and we took them home to Saltpetre-bank, to the house of William Mines , and he desired me, in the morning, to go and sell them; I took half of them to Baker's, and he asked me if that was all I had; I said, no; he asked me whether I was staunch or not, meaning whether I would tell; I said, yes, and went back and got the others; then he gave me nine shillings and sixpence for the whole, except the nails, the gimlet, and the hammers, which were left at Mines's. James had a a pocket-book, and coming across the fields he opened it, and threw a parcel of papers out, and after that, he threw the book away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Had you visited any other house that night? - A. No.

Q.When you took those things to Baker's, do you know where he put them; or whether he mixed them with any other tools? - A. No.

Q.You were taken up for some other offence? - A. Yes.

Q.What day did you sell the tools? - A. On a Saturday.

Q.Have you never said it was on a Sunday? - A. No.

Q. Was any body present when you sold them? - A. No.

Q.You never gave any account of this till you were taken up? - A. No.

(The articles produced, and identified).

The prisoners James and Mines, declined making any defence.

Baker's defence. Brown came to me on a Sunday, and asked me if I would buy some tools; being in the cabinet line myself, and having a wife, two children, and a mother, to support, I bought them for my own use, to save buying new ones; he came on Monday morning, and I gave him what he asked for them.

For the Prisoner, Baker.

WILLIAM PURCELL sworn. - I am a bricklayer, and have known Baker ten years: On Sunday the 28th of November last, I saw Brown at his house, and heard him say something about carpenter's tools that had come out of pawn, and that he had bought them with an intention of going to work, but could not get any, and wanted money, therefore wished to sell them. Baker said he did not make a practice of buying things on a Sunday, and desired him to go about his business, and I saw no more of him. Baker keeps an old iron-shop, and carries on business as a carpenter, and when he is not employed he assists his wife in the shop.

Baker called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

All NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18030112-94

193. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , a pair of silver candlesticks, value 5l. the property of Henry Penton , Esq. in his dwelling-house .

The person of the prisoner not being identified he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-95

194. WILLIAM THOMPSON , (a Black), and JOSEPH BENTLEY , were indicted, the first for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Carey , John Kelly , and James Carey , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 13th of November , and burglariously stealing six pair of shoes, value 30s. their property; and the other, for feloniously receiving, on the 14th of November , five pair of shoes, value 25s. part of the same, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES CAREY sworn. - Richard Carey , and John Kelly, are partners with me, as shoe-makers , No. 14, Great Saffron-hill , but I only live there; Thompson lives next door to me, and has done so for above twelve months. At the further end of our house we have a lost, about seven or eight feet high of brick-work, and wood-work above that. Last Friday was a week I examined it, and discovered it was possible for a person to get into it from the adjoining yard, and could come down into our shop.

JOHN WHITE sworn. - I live next door to Mr. Carey, and Thompson lodged with me: One morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw him standing upon some rasters in my yard, by which he could get into Mr. Carey's lost; there had been a chamber there, but the boards were off. I asked him what business he had there; and he said he was getting a bit of dry wood. I never knew any thing amiss of him before.

- CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden, and examined the premises belonging to Mr. Carey, where I saw, that by pulling one of the boards up, which swung like a swinging partition, a man could get into the lost from the rasters; that afternoon I also searched Bentley's shop, which is an old and new shoe-shop, in Dorrington-street, near Brook's-market, and found four pair of shoes in the window, for sale, which Mr. Carey owned; I asked Bentley how he came by them; he paused some time before he could recollect the description of the man he bought them of; at last he said he bought them of a mulatto man, to whom he paid one pound and sixpence, for five pair, near three months before.

ELIZABETH WHEELER sworn. - I am servant to the prisoner, Bentley: About two or three months ago, Thompson came to sell five pair of shoes, of which these four pair are part; he asked if Mr. Bentley would buy five pair of shoes, that he need not be afraid of buying them, for that he had been on board a ship two years, and could not get any money of the purser, but he let him have the shoes to make money of; then Bentley gave him one pound and sixpence, which he said he knew to be the full value of them, and said, he hoped Thompson came honestly by them; I saw him afterwards sell a pair for four shillings and sixpence, so he got four-pence three farthings by that pair. (The shoes produced, and identified).

Thompson's defence. I was going to work, and found five pair of shoes in the place where I used to get a bit of dry wood, I picked them up, and sold them to Bentley. As for going into Carey's shop, I did not know which way.

Bentley's defence. This man offered me the shoes

for four shillings and sixpence a pair; I said I would give him four shillings; he was going out of the door, and I offered him sixpence more, which he took; and I immediately put them in the window for sale, not knowing they were stolen.

Thompson, GUILTY.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Bentley, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18030112-96

195. THOMAS HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , a pocket-book, value 10d. the property of George Martin .

The prosecutor not appearing, was called upon his recognizance, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-97

196. ROBERT NASH and SUSANNAH NASH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , in the dwelling-house of the said Robert Nash, a pocket-book, value 6d. a Bank-note, value 5l. another Bank-note, value 25l. another Bank-note, value 10l. a promissory note, value 44l. another, value 25l. another, value 24l. and three other promissory notes, value 10l. each , the property of John Osborne .

JOHN OSBORNE sworn. - I now keep the White Horse, at Kensington , and collected the taxes in St. Botolph, Aldersgate, many years: On the 29th of October I called at the prisoner's house for some arrears, in a court in Noble-street ; he keeps a house there, and is beadle to the Court of Requests ; it was in the evening, between four and five o'clock, so dark that I did not see I had left my pocket-book behind, nor did I miss it till I got to Kensington; I called in the morning, and the prisoners denied any knowledge of the book; I first saw the wife and the maid, and called some days afterwards, when I saw the man; I did not speak to him, or he to me; but the wife and servant denied it in the presence of the husband; I advertised it, and about the 7th of December, one of the cashiers of the Bank sent me word a 25l. note was come in; I went to the Bank, and saw the note; I saw the name of Marsh, Church-street, Deptford; I could find no such person; I pursued it then by the next indorsement of Glynn and Halisax; I thought I had left the book at the prisoners, but cannot swear positively; this is the note, which I am sure is the same I lost (produces the note), For I had taken down the number.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Are you quite sure it was the prisoner's house? - A. There is his name on the door.

Q. You went through the public streets to Kensington? - A. I got into the stage at St. Paul's.

Q. You supposed the book was in your pocket? - A. Yes; there was near 200l. in it; the Banknotes I had received in Bartholomew-lane.

Q.They might have gone through a variety of hands before they came to the prisoners? - A. Yes.

JOHN HULL sworn. - I am a linen-draper, No. 39, Beech-street: On the 30th the two prisoners came to my shop, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and bought articles to the amount of 6 or 7l. and gave me this 25l. note to change, which I did, and asked their address; the man said, his name was Marsh, and he lived in Church-street, Deptford, which I wrote upon the note; they appeared in a great hurry, saying, they had taken places in the Deptford stage; I paid the note away to a gentleman I do business with(the note produced); this is the note, here is my hand-writing.

JOSHUA BRAY sworn. - I am a constable, took the prisoners into custody, and searched them, but found nothing on them; I searched their house, and found a quantity of linen, which I produce.(Produces it.)

Mr. Hull. This is the linen I sold them.

Prisoner Robert Nash. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Robert Nash , GUILTY, aged 58.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Susannah Nash , NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-98

197. JOHN HODGSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , a promissory note, value 20l. the property of Robert Harrison , Robert Prickett , and John Newman .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of John Perkins .

The case stated by Mr. Knapp.

The Jury not being able to discover the stamp upon the note, which is required by Act of Parliament, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-99

198. HUIN BLAG was indicted for feloniously uttering to Mary, the wife of Jasper Wilsher , a false and counterfeit half guinea, on the 7th of December , he knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

The case stated by Mr. Knowlys.

MARY WILSHER sworn. - My husband keeps the Bear public-house, in Eastcheap : On the 7th of December the prisoner came in with two men and a woman, and said he wanted a glass of liquor,

but could I give him change for a guinea; I examined the guinea, and found it a good one; upon which I gave a 7s. piece, half a guinea, and 3s. 6d. it was an old half guinea; when I laid it down, one of them said, we will not trouble the lady to change, I have got a shilling; I then looked towards my change, and saw they had put down a countersett half guinea, and taken my good one; the half guinea I saw then was quite a shining new one; I made no reply, but wishing to secure them, I went out of the bar to an officer who was in the house, and gave the prisoner in charge; the others made their escape; the prisoner said, he met them by chance, and as he had given me a good guinea, I must give him good change, for they must have changed it.

THOMAS WIER sworn. - I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody, who appeared to be intoxicated; I looked at the money he had in his hand, which was the bad half guinea and the rest of the change, and then I took him into the back room, where I expected to find the change still in his hand, but by some means he shifted the half guinea, and brought the good one forward; I then searched him, but could not find the bad one; it struck me that in pulling off his cloaths, he had thrown it into the fire; I looked there, and found it on the coals, just warm. (Produces it, which was proved to be counterfeit.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been in a public-house, and had asked change for a guinea; I could not get it, and two young men followed me out, and asked if I got change; I said, no; we then went into this house, and asked for change, and one of the men said to me, here, master, here is your change, you are in liquor; I said, very well, and was taking it up, when Mrs. Wisher said, stop, that is not the same half guinea I gave you; I laid the change down again, and said, I am sure it is; then she said, it was very surprizing it was her's, and then the two men run out, and I was stopped.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for six months more.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-100

199. CHARLES ARMSTEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , 40lb. of bacon, value 30s. the property of Thomas-Henry Marsh .

THOMAS- HENRY MARSH sworn. - I live at No. 30, Sandy's-row, Petticoat-lane , and missed a side of bacon from the door-post; I pursued the prisoner with the bacon, and he dropped it; I know it to be mine; the prisoner said he was not the man.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming out of my own court, and heard the cry of, stop thief; a man run against me, and knocked me down, and as I was getting up, they said I had stolen the bacon.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-101

200. JOHN STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , a teacaddy, value 2s. the property of Charles Stuart .

CHARLES STUART sworn. - I was a purser on board the ship Sarah Christiana East Indiaman, laying at Deptford ; when I left the ship to bring the dispatches on the 4th of September, I left the chest in the prisoner's care, who was Captain's steward , to bring on shore, and to deliver it at my father's house, but he did not; I asked him for it in October; he denied it, but said Mr. Moore, the chief mate, had taken it, who told him I had given it to him; I went to Bow-street, and obtained a search-warrant; his lodgings were searched, and the caddy found under his bed; he said it was my caddy, which he had brought from on board ship.

CHARLES GRAHAM sworn. - I am Captain of the ship, the prisoner was my steward; it was his business to see my stores on shore; the purser gave the prisoner charge of his stores in my hearing, and I gave him charge on the 6th, but did not see the caddy; I was present when the Bow-street officers found the caddy under the prisoner's bed.

GEORGE ALLEN sworn. - I am a Bow-street officer, and went and searched the prisoner's lodgings, No. 48, Little Bedford-street, Covent-garden, and found the box under the bed; the prisoner was not at home.

Prisoner's defence. I never had any care or charge of them; they were taken on shore by Joseph Gordon , and were found at his lodgings; I was ordered to throw them overboard; Gordon said, he would take them, as they would serve his wife for her caps and ribbons.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-102

201. JOHN VITER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a pair of trowsers, value 5s. 6d. and an oil-skin hat-cover, value 1s. the property of John Benn .

JOHN BENN sworn. - I am a tailor and slopseller , in Wapping High-street : On Saturday the 1st of January, I opened the shop about half past seven, and went up stairs to work about eight; I heard a violent ringing at the door-bell; I went down, and was told I was robbed; I followed the person described, and within one hundred yards of

the house I caught the prisoner, and turned him round, when I saw the trowsers under his coat; I dragged them out, and the hat-cover sell down; I said, you rascal, I have got you; I took him to the watch-house, and locked him up; the things were hanging at the side of the door, rather inside. - (The trowsers and hat-cover were produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going to work, and a person passed me very fast, who dropped the trowsers, I asked him who they belonged to; he said, I might have them; I then picked them up, and walked away; upon which the prosecutor followed me, and said I had stolen them.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18030112-103

202. JAMES WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , 140 lbs of lead, value 38s. fixed to a certain building called a house , the property of John West .

Second Count. Charging it to be fixed to a certain building only.

JOHN WEST sworn. - I live at Somers-Town , and am a plaisterer : On the 5th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, I lost some lead out of a gutter at the top of a house, it had been fixed about a month; the prisoner was caught by the watchman on the premises.

JOHN BOWERS sworn. - I am a patrol in the City-road, and was on duty between seven and eight o'clock; every now and then I heard something fall upon the floors in this unfinished house, for near an hour, from the top of the house; at last I heard something fall very heavy, I then called my fellow patrol, an said, there was somebody in it; we searched it, and the prisoner forced his way out f the first floor window, the other patrol took him; he asked where his hat was; he said, he did not know; I said, here it is, where you got out of window; I picked it up, and gave it to him, and he owned it. We then examined the house, and missed the lead from the top; we looked for the lead, and found it rolled up in three rolls, and thrown into the next yard.(Benjamin Taylor, a patrol, confirmed the last witness).(The lead produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was taken short, and stepped into the house; I was not two minutes there, when a man jumped out of window, knocked down a board, and knocked my hat off; I was going away, and the patrol came up and charged me with a robbery. GUILTY , aged 55.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-104

203. ROBERT COOPER and JOHN SCRUTON were indicted for feloniously-stealing, on the 10th of December , five muslin handkerchiefs, value 20s. fifty yards of muslin, value 50s. five shifts, value 20s. two pocket-handkerchiefs, value 4s. a dressing-gown, value 10s. a stannel petticoat, value 4s. a dressing-gown, value 10s. a muslin cap, value 2s. a habit shirt, value 3s. a cotton handkerchief, value 2s. twenty yards of ribbon, value 5s. eight pair of silk stockings, value 40s. a leather purse mounted with silver, value 4s. a medallion set in gold, value 20s. two yards of gold chain, value 10s. a leather case, value 2s. and a stone seal set in gold, value 58. the property of Dorothea Jordan .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Dorothea Bland .(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

MARGARET POLE sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Dorothea Jordan , and packed up the articles stated in a mahogany box on the 10th of December in Drury-lane. Theatre; the flannel petticoat was in a bundle; I gave them to Mrs. Jonlan's servant to put into the carriage, about eleven o'clock at night.

PETER REMINGTON sworn. - I am footman to Mrs. Jordan, and received the box from the last witness, which I put into the chariot, which stood in Drury-lane, opposite to the stage-door; I shut the door, and saw the other-door fly open; I called to the coachman, and run round, but found the box and bundle were gone, and the seat drawn partly out; I gave information immediately to Townsend.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - On Saturday the 11th of December, about eight in the morning, my brother officers and I saw the prisoners in King-street, Drury-lane, with two bundles; we followed them; I followed Cooper, and Crocker followed Scruton; we took them into the Bank public-house, where I searched Cooper, and found eight pair of silk stockings, a medallion, a red inorocco purse mounted with silver, a gold chain and seal.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I was with Blackman, and apprehended Scruton with a bundle, containing five muslin handkerchiefs, five shifts, two pocket-handkerchiefs, a dressing-gown, and other things. (The articles produced, and identified by Margaret Pole ).

Cooper's defence. I was going along on Friday, and found the things which I had; I went to my friends, and asked them what I had best to do; and they advised me to go to Hatton-garden office; and as I was going along next morning, they took me.

Scruton's defence. I was coming along King-street on Saturday morning, and saw a great-coat lay up an entry; I took hold of it, and there was

a bundle underneath, whith I took up under my arm, and was going along when they took me.

Cooper, GUILTY , aged 36.

Scruton, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-105

204. PATRICK CONNOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , three sheets, value 2s. and a cotton gown, value 2s. the property of William Webb .

WILLIAM WEBB sworn. - I live in Greenhill's Rents, Smithfield-bars , and am a bricklayer : On the 16th of December, I lost the sheets from the two pair of stairs front-room, and a cotton gown, but was not at home at the time.

MARY MILLAN sworn. - My mother keeps a baker's shop in Greenhill's Rents: I was at my mother's door, on the 16th of December, between four and five o'clock, and heard Mrs. Webb call out, stop him; I run after the prisoner down a sight of steps, and caught him by the skirt of his coat, and gave him into the hands of Newton, the constable; he had two sheets and a cotton gown in his abron.

MRS. WEBB sworn. - On the 16th of December, I heard a noise on the stairs, I went to see what it was, and saw the prisoner; I asked him what he wanted; he said, Mrs. Jones, and immediately run out of the house; I called out, stop him, and he was taken.

JOHN BOYLE sworn. - I am a patrol; Mr. Newton gave me the prisoner in charge, who begged for mercy, and said, that he was driven to it by distress.

Prisoner's defence. I was going along, and heard an outcry; I turned about and saw a man running; I said, my friend, there's a woman calling after you; upon which he dropped the things, and knocked me down.

Mrs. Webb. I never lost sight of him, he was not knocked down.

Evidence for the Prisoner.

SARAH SMITH sworn. - I am a silk-winder, and live at the top of Hoxton: I was coming from Tottenham-court-road up greenhill's-rents, and heard the cry of stop him; I then saw the prisoner laying on the ground by some steps, but cannot say how he came there. The way I came to see him again was, that a friend of mine was in Bridewell for an assault; and when I saw the prisoner, I asked him if he was the same person I had seen before.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-106

205. ALEXANDER MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a silver table-spoon, vaue 8s. a tea-spoon, value 1s. 6d. the property of Eliza Price ; a cloak, value 5s. the property of Mary Dymond ; a hat, value 5s. and an oil skin hat case, value 3s. the property of George Lane .

ELIZA PRICE sworn. - I live in Leicester-square, but know nothing of the robery; I lost one tablespoon and one tea-spoon. MARY DYMOND sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Price: I know nothing of the robbery, but lost a cloak, which I lent to my fellow servant.

GEORGE LANE sworn. - I am servant to the Rev. Mr. Howe, No. 9, Leicester-square, at Mrs. Price's; the hat is mine.

HESTER BURRELL sworn. - I live servant with Mrs. Price: About eight o'clock on Sunday morning, I went into the kitchen, and saw the prisoner at the closet-door with a spoon in his hand; I asked him who he wanted, and told him, if he did not lay the spoon down I would call for assistance; he then run up the area steps, and got over the gate; I followed him up, and called, stop thief; Richard Strickland, the milkman, run after him, and brought him back; he was taken to the watch-house and searched, and the table-spoon, tea spoon, the cloak, and hat, were found on him.

RICHARD STRICKLAND sworn. - I am a milkman; on Sunday, the 9th, a little after eight o'clock, I was going into Leicester-square, and heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner coming from Mrs. Price's house, and saw the servant calling out stop that man, he has stole our spoons; he passed me, and I pursued him into Whitecombe-street; I took him back to Mrs. Price's, and then to the watch-house; he was searched, and the property found on him.

RICHARD LEWIS sworn. - I am a constable, and produce the property found on the prisoner.(The articles produced and identified.)

Prisoner. I have no defence to make, but leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-107

206. RICHARD WOODESON and JAMES REED were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , a sack, value 1s. and four bushels of malt, value 20s. the property of Robert Letts .

There being no foundation for the charge, the prisoners were immediately ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-108

207. RICHARD BRITTON was indicted

for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , a pair of boots, value 19s. the property of John Legg .

JOHN LEGG sworn. - I am a carpenter and joiner , and lodge at No. 33, Bow-street, Westminster ; I lost my boots on the 27th of December; the prisoner lodged with me eight nights; he heard me tell my landlady I should come for my cloaths on Monday night, which I did, and found my boots were gone; the prisoner came home in liquor, and I had him taken up on suspicion; he confessed he took the boots, and pawned them at Mr. Edwards, a pawnbroker in Clare-street.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You have been paid for the boots? - A. His father gave me two shillings and sixpence for the pawnbroker.

- STUBBING sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Edwards, and took in the boots on the 27th of December, but cannot swear to the prisoner; when the officers brought him to the house he said I was the person who took them in.(The boots produced and identified.)

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-109

208. GEORGE CHAPMAN and JEREMIAH KELLY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , a barrel, value 10s. 6d. a half barrel, value 5s. the property of William Finch .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Thomas Oakley ; and

Third Count. Of persons unknown.

There being a defect in the evidence, the prisoners were. ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-110

209. ELIZABETH DORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , a shirt, value 3s. the property of William Jeffreys .

The prisoner not being proved to have had possession of the property, was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-111

210. ELIZABETH DORE was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , a cloak, value 7s. a gown, value 5s. and a handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Ann Nichols .

It appearing the prosecutrix name was Eleanor instead of Ann, the prisoner was ACUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-112

211. ELIZABETH DORE was again indicted for feloniously stealing a cloak, value 2s. three handkerchiefs, value 3s. and a shift, value 2s. the property of Elizabeth Powell .

The prosecutrix not appearing, she was ACQUITTED

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-113

212. JAMES GORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , a yard and one-sixteenth part of a yard of cloth, value 15s. the property of William Kimley .

the prisoner not being proved to have had possession of the property was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-114

213. JAMES GORMAN was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , a shirt, value 2s. the property of James Crosswell .

JAMES CROSSWELL sworn. - I was in the late 24th regiment , and missed my shirt of the 5th of December, from my quarters, at the Three Crowns in Chelsea ; the prisoner lay in the same room with me; I never found the shirt, but he acknowledged to having taken it, and gave the duplicate to a black man, which we have here.

JOHN BOSBERY sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody, and produce the duplicate.

- STOKES sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, the shirt was taken in of a woman.(The shirt produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the duplicate of a man who lodged in the house, and gave him two shillings for it.

GUILTY , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-115

214. SARAH WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a pair of sheets, value 18s. a pillow case, value 1s. a silver tea-spoon, value 2s. and a lace veil, value 12s. the property of Isaac Mendoza , in a lodging room .

The person of the prisoner not being identified, she was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-116

215. SARAH WALKER was again indicted for feloniously stealing a tea-tray, value 10s. two silver tea-spoons, value 5s. a silver dessert-spoon, value 4s. a damask table-cloth, value 5s. a pair of sheets, value 10s. a blanket, value 3s. two pillowcases, value 2s. and two cotton bed-curtains, value 10s. the property of William Wright , in a lodging room .

ELIZABETH WRIGHT sworn. - I live at No. 2, John's-row, St. Luke's, my husband, William Wright , is a labouring man : I let a lodging to the prisoner on the 4th of December, a front room, furnished, and all the things mentioned in the in

dictment; she staid till the 9th, and went away about half past two o'clock; I had a suspicion, and took a key which I always keep, and called a neighbour, and opened the door, and found the things gone.

GEOREG SHEPHERD sworn. - I live with Mr. Clarke, and produce a blanket and two curtains, pledged by the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-117

216. THOMAS WIESENER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , seven shillings and a sixpence , the property of Michael Ogden and Richard Hope .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-118

217. HUBBARD WILKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , seven pieces of elm quartering, value 4s. the property of John Foster , and three pieces of elm boards, value 3s. the property of James Fitzgerald .

JOHN FOSTER sworn - I am a farmer at Harrow, the prisoner is a labourer ; I lost some elm boards, which I saw at the saw pit on the waste land; I got a search warrant, on the 31st of December, and went with the constable and James Fitzgerald, to the prisoner's house, and in the oven I found seven pieces of new quartering, one which was damaged matched with the other.(The pieces produced.)

Mr. Knap. Q. Was the prisoner at home? - A. No.

JAMES FITZGERALD sworn. - I went with Mr. Foster to the prisoner's, and found three pieces of elm board hid under some furze up stairs, which I lost from my saw-pit.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped one hundred yards on Harrowweald Common .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-119

218. MARY ALDRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , a handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. and a flannel waistcoat, value 6d. the property of Mark Wood ; a pair of scissars, value 6d. six pair of stockings, value-4s. a waistcoat, value 6d. a pair of mitts, value 5s. a tippet, value 4s. two cloaks, value 8s. and two gowns, value 8s. the property of John Lacon .

JOHN LACON sworn. - I live at No. 19, Berkeley-square , and am a ladies hair-dresser : the prisoner lived with me a fortnight as a servant ; Mrs. Lacon went into Yorkshire, and took the children with her; I bought some black cotton stockings for the children; when the person called for them, he said, I had taken seven pair; I said it was possible in my hurry; I enquired if any body had meddled with the bundle; they denied it; the stockings were found under her bed.

ANN MILLS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lacon: On the 15th of December, going to bed, I was looking about, and under the prisoner's bed, between the sacking and the bed, I found a dress of my mistress's, and in that another, a cloak and a pair of black stockings; I lay in the same room, but not in the same bed; another servant slept with me. - (The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner. Q. Did I not put them under my head for a pillow? - A. I cannot say.

JOHN LEMAIRE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Wood, who lodges with Mr. Lacon: On the 16th I met the prisoner after she was discharged; she asked me if I would look under Col. Wood's bed for a bundle, and take it to her in the Square; I asked her if it belonged to her; she said, yes, except the handkerchief they were tied in; I told Colonel Wood of it, and we examined the bed; between the mattress and bed we found several pair of children's stockings, which were owned by Mr. Lacon.

Prisoner's defence. Those things were in the room when I went there; Colonel Wood asked for another pillow; I lent him mine, and took the bundle for a pillow, but did not know what was in it. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18030112-120

219. ANN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 14th of December , 21lb. weight of iron, the property of Richard Underwood , well knowing the same to have been stolen .

It appearing the prisoner acted in the capacity of servant , she was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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