Old Bailey Proceedings, 1st December 1802.
Reference Number: 18021201
Reference Number: f18021201-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Comission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 1st of DECEMBER, 1802, and following Days, BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , ESQUIRE, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1802.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , ESQUIRE, LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. RICHARD LORD ALVANLEY , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir NASH GROSE, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ROBERT GRAHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; JOHN BOYDELL , Esq. BROOK WATSON, Esq. Sir WILLIAM STAINES , Knt. Sir JOHN EAMER , Knt. Aldermen of the said City; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; PETER PERCHARD ; Esq. JOHN ANSLEY, Esq. and THOMAS SMITH , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Thomas Perkins ,

Joseph Humpleby ,

James Lavender ,

John Rooke ,

Jeremiah Hart ,

Matthew Sheffield ,

Edward Simkin ,

James Atkins ,

John Stirland ,

William Downing ,

Abraham Gray ,

James Couchman .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Dawes ,

Thomas Atkinson ,

John Aldey ,

John Hearn ,

Samuel Berry ,

Isaac Spurrier ,

George Raby ,

Edward Hammond ,

Edward Purkis ,

Richard Forster ,

Henry Schultz ,

Thomas George .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Philips ,

Samuel Scatchard ,

John Pitman ,

Samuel Winbush ,

James Chadwick ,

Samuel Furness ,

Robert Burn ,

William Shields ,

John Drummond ,

Thomas Hunter ,

Charles Ballard ,

Thomas Lewther .

Reference Number: t18021201-1

1. WILLIAM DRAPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a looking-glass, value 5s. the property of Elizabeth West , widow .

LOUISA WEST sworn. - Elizabeth West, widow, is my aunt. she keeps the King's-arms Coffee-house, in Newgate market : On Wednesday, the 10th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in, and orderd sixpenny-worth of brandy and water; when he had drank it half, he came to the bar and paid for it; he went back, drank the rest, and then ordered another sixpenny-worth; he went out at the door, and came in again; I had a suspicion of him; I watched him, and observed him twice attempt to take down a glass which hung in the parlour; then he took it down, and put it under his great coat; he attempted to go out, I had him stopped, and saw the glass taken from him; he was then taken into custody.

JOHN PAGE sworn. - I was in the bar of the house; an alarm was given by Miss West; I went into the parlour, and took the prisoner; he had the glass buttoned up under his great coat.(David Hughes, a constable, produced the glass).

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was chairman to the Duchess of Somerset; that he went into this house to have a glass of brandy and water; that some boys had made a bonfire; that he got up in the window to look at it, and had the misfortune to knock the glass down, upon which Mr. Page immediately seized him.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-2

2. HENRY MICHAEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , a handkerchief, value 3s. the property of William-Morley Evans , privily from his person .

WILLIAM- MORLEY EVANS sworn. - I am a ship broker : On Thursday, the 28th of October, about ten or eleven o'clock in the morning, I lost my handkerchief in Cannon-street , I was going towards the Bank; as I was passing Mr. Atkinson's, a surgeon, in Cannon-street, I heard a voice calling, stop, or sir, I am not certain which, and on turning round, Mr. Atkinson said to me, sir, have you lost your handkerchief, he was on the threshold of his door; I felt in my pocket, and missed a silk handkerchief; I immediately saw the prisoner near the kirb stone, on a line with Mr. Atkinson, and my handkerchief at his feet; I had got about the length of Mr. Atkinson's shop window; I picked up the handkerchief, and knew it to be mine; it was ravelled at the edge, and one side was hemmed the wrong side by the servant.

Q. Did you not perceive it go from your pocket? - A. No.

Q. Were you sensible of any thing moving at your pocket? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long had you had the handkerchief? - A. Not above two days.

Q. Is the servant here who hemmed the handkerchief? - A. No.

Q. Is she in your service now? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner is a cripple, is he not? - A. do not think he is; he attempted to be a cripple as he was going along.

Mr. ATKINSON sworn. - On Thursday, the 28th of October, I was standing at my door, and saw Mr. Evans, and the prisoner behind him; I saw the prisoner distinctly draw a handkerchief out of his pocket, and put it behind him; I took hold of the prisoner, and called after Mr. Evans, and he claimed the handkerchief; I did not see him throw it down.( Samuel Porter , a Marshalman, produced the handkerchief.)

Mr. Evans. I have no doubt of this being my handkerchief.

The prisoner left his defence to this Counsel.

GUILTY, aged 12.

Of stealing the handkerchief, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-3

3. WILLIAM-GEORGE JONES was indicted, for that he, on the 15th of July, in the 32d year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish church of St. Lawrence Jewry, did marry Penelope Bender , spinster , and then and there had her to wife; and afterwards, on the 2d of October last, at the parish of Paddington, feloniously did marry and take to wife Frances-Maria Drought , the said Penelope, his former wife, being then alive .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

BENJAMIN HOLLOWAY sworn. - I am clerk of the parish of St. Lawrence Jewry; I was present at the prisoner's marriage; I had known him before very well; he was married to Penelope Bender, a single woman, on the 15th of July, 1792, at the parish church of St. Lawrence Jewry; I witnessed the marriage; I knew Miss Beuder before. -(Reads the register). - "William- George Jones ,

of the parish of St. Lawrence Jewry, London, batchelor, and Penelope Bender , of the parish of St. Stephen, Coleman-street, London, spinster, were married by licence the 15th day of July, 1792, by me, William Lucas , minister."

Q. Do you know if that Miss Bender is now living? - A. Yes, she is now in Court.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect going with me for this licence? - A. I do not.

Q. Did you not ask me if I was of age, and I told you I was not? - A. I don't know any thing of it.

Rev. JOSEPH PICKERING sworn. - I am the Minister of Paddington; I recollect the prisoner's person: On the 2d of October last he was married by me to Frances-Maria Drought, (produces the register). Reads it: - " William George Jones , of this parish, batchelor, and Frances- Maria Drought , of this parish, spinster, were married in this church by banns, this 2d day of October, in the year 1802.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Who gave the order for the banns? - A. I received the order from the clerk, as I always do.

Q. Was there not a disappointment in the day? - A. It was appointed a previous day, and you did not come.

FRANCES- MARIA DROUGHT sworn. - I am the mother of the young woman who was married to the prisoner on the 2d of October; the prisoner is the man; about a fortnight after the marriage, I had some reason to believe he was a married man before.

Q. Has the news of his being a married man had an effect upon your daughter's mind? - A. It has.

Court. Q. Has she been deranged? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM NEWHOUSE sworn. I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner at the Adam and Eve, in Jewin-street.

Q. Is that in the City of London? - A. Yes.

Mrs. DROUGHT - Cross-examined by the Prisoner.

Q. When was the first time you ever saw me? - A. I cannot say exactly; since August.

Q.Where was it? - A. The first time I saw him was at Chelsea.

Q. Do you recollect what passed there? - A.Perfectly.

Q. Do you recollect saying, your daughter had a strong affection for me, and requesting me to marry her? - A. I told him I had learned my daughter had a particular affection for him, and I wished her to wait till I had the opinion of a particular friend of mine.

Q. Do you recollect my telling you I had much rather have nothing to do with your daughter, that she was not fit for the wife of a tradesman? - A. I don't recollect; I think he said my daughter was not a fit wife for a tradesman, but at the same time said, his whole happiness depended upon having her said his wife.

Q. Do you recollect coming to Islington after me with Miss Welling and Captain Brien to my lodgings? - A. I do.

Q. Do you recollect what passed there? - A. Yes; I think I told you I had received a letter from a friend.

Q. It was on the Sunday that I came to you at Cheisea; it was on the Tuesday night following you came to Islington; no letter had passed then? - A. I don't think it was, but I cannot be positive as to the very day.

Q. I believe you recollect I there declined having any thing to do with your daughter? - A. No, I never should have made such a favour of it.

Q. You asked my opinion what was best to do with her? - A. No, I never asked your opinion; you were a stranger to me.

Q. Do you know how I first became acquainted with her? - A. I do not of my own knowledge.

Q. Do you not know she was upon the town?

Mr. Knowlys. The infamy of the question is its own answer. Is it not a question to be put, and I am sure your Lordship will not suffer such a question to be put by a man who has married a woman, whether she was ever upon the town or not.

Prisoner. I have as much right to put those questions in as they have against me.

Court. You may prove any facts yourself, but you must not put questions in an irregular way.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, This crime which I have committed, I was totally drawn into. This first wife of mine which I married, I lived ten years happy with; I used her well, till I had the misfortune to be confined 18 months in the Marshalsea Prison, and this girl was brought there for a mantua-maker's bill; she there used all the insinuating manners that a girl of her description could possibly, and I resisted it; she was upon the town a twelvemonth and more; after this girl had been there a month, she wrote to her plaintiff to make it up with her; she made it up, and I had the misfortune likewise to join in a note with her for that debt, and she got out upon that, and in the course of a month after I got out myself; but while I was in the Marshalsea, and she was out, I used to have letters from her every day, and in all these letters she extolled every thing that was good of myself, and that was bad of my wife, and said she wondered I could live with such a dirty drab; that she herself was an accomplished girl of family, and had given up the first company, that of the Prince of Wales, Duke of Clarence, and Marquis of Hertford, upon my account. To all this I always resisted. I told her she knew that I was married, for in fact my wife was along with me when I came out. I did not go to her, but she found me out, and when she found me out, she got me to her, and after

that I was one day from her, she used to send six or seven people after me with messages continually. Soon after this the mother came to town, and took her to Edgware road; the girl sent to me to come there; I went there, and she said I must marry her; I told her it was impossible for me to marry her, for she well knew, as she had seen the certificate of my wife's marriage, that I was married; I told her it was impossible that I could marry her; she was there about a week in the Edgware-road, and after that she went to Chelsea, where I saw the mother; on the Sauturday evening I received a note by Captain Brien 's servant to come and drink tea on Sunday afternoon; accordingly I went; when I came there the mother asked me the questions that I have asked her, which I declined; the first question her mother asked me was, what were my pursuts in life? - I told her my circumstances; that I came from the Marshalsea; I was very poor when I came out, and my income could not exceed 150l. a year; she said that was very little to main tain a wife; I told her it was, but the girl had represented me to be a merchant of 800l. a year. I told her it was not such thing, and she said she had a very strong, affection for me; I told her I wished her very well; but as to marrying her, that was impossible, the narrowness of my circumstances would not allow it; after that she said she would consult some friends of her's, and would let me know further about it; on Monday I received a letter, saying she had consulted a male friend, and I was to call at Captain Brien 's, in Baker-street, in the evening, where she would meet me; I sent her letter that a lodged at such a place at Islington, where I should be very happy to see any male friend of her's; that was on Monday; or Tuesday night, about eight o'clock, with I went home a cartage alighed at she door, with two footmen; the mother was there, with two other persons, and asked me of there was a possibility of my income being increased; I told her the girl was not a sit person for me; I persuaded her to send her to her friends; she might perhaps come round, and be virtuous once more, but they would not take that answer; then she said she would send to Dr. Drought, at Bath, a relation of her father's; she said she had left her father twelve years ago; they were to try if they could not make a fortune for me; Captain Brien said they could not do less than 50l. a year at any rate; about a week after that I received a letter from Mrs. Drought, saying she had received a letter from Dr. Drought, at Bath, declining having any thing to do with it, and she wished me to settle it as soon as possible; she desired me to get a licence the next day; I hesitated at that, but did not say immediately I would not; but the next night I went and told her I could not get the licence, and then they proposed to have the banns published; I said they might do as they liked about it, and they had the banns published; I desired the girl to inform her mother I was a married man; she laid it was nothning to her two or three times, declining coming near her; but she insisted upon my coming; when the day came I did not go; I was determined to find out my wife; she was in service somewhere; I meant to send her to the girl and the mother, and let her tell them herself; I went in the evening, and told the mother I was ill was the reason of my not attending; I took her into another room, and begged of her to tell her mother I was married, she said her mother knew it as well as herself, and desired me to come the next day; I did not go till eleven o'clock; I was in hopes that would he too late, but they took care to catch me then. Mr Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I must throw myself upon your mercy; this girl was a girl of illfame; she even told my wife she had deluded a better man than ever I was from his wife; that I was not the first, not should not be the last.

Court. (To Mrs. Drought.) Q.Do you know whether your daughter ever was in the Marshalsea? A. I do not know it.

For the prisoner.

WILLIAM STEVENS sworn. - Q. Did you know a person of the name of Drought in the Marthalsea? - A. No, I did not; I have seen a person there who went by the name of Miss Hertfont.

Prisoner. She went by a dozen different names.

Court. Q. Have you ever seen her since? - A. No, I have not.

Q.Do you know any thing about Miss Drought? - A. No; I have know the prisoner for two years; for a twelvenmonth I never saw a happier couple than he and his wife were, he always bore a very good meral character.

Court. (to Mrs. Drought.) Q. Did your Daughter ever tell you the prisoner was a married man? - A. Never. GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in Newgate , fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-4

4. THOMAS PINCKNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , four ounces of twist, value 8s. 6d. the property of Thomas Hunter .

JAMES BRAIDLEY sworn. - I an shopman to Mr. Hunter, a man's mercer : On Thursday the 4th of Novemeber, between nine and ten o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop; I observed him to put his hand in his pocket, and I suspected he had taken something; I took him on one side, and asked him if he had not got something in his pocket; he hesiated at first, and said, no, he had not;

I insisted upon seeing; he then pulled out four ounces of twist from his left-hand coat-pocket; he put it on the counter; I told him to take it up again; I sent for Mr. Hunter down stairs; he sent for a constable; and the prisoner and the twist were taken away; he said it was Mr. Hunter's property.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you not tell him it would be better for him to tell the truth? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Can you swear to the twist? - A. I cannot.

Q. Did you miss it? - A. No; the twist is kept in a drawer; I saw the prisoner close by the drawer; I don't know whether it was open or not.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I am a man's-mercer; I was at breakfast; I was called down, and I found the prisoner and Braidley together; Braidley charged him with taking twist, which I saw on the counter, but I cannot swear to it; the prisoner lived with me about twenty years ago; I had then a high opinion of him; I parted with him because he married; he has come to my shop frequently since; but I never had the least reason to suspect him.( William Price , a constable, produced the twist, which could not be identified by Mr. Hunter or Braidley.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called his master, who gave him an excellent character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-5

5. JAMES GOODGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , 28lb. of shot, value 5s. the property of Mildred Addis , Thomas Johnson , Henry Addis , and Geo. Adds.

GEORGE ADDIS sworn. - I am a shot-manufacturer , in Tooley-street, in partnership with Mildred Addis , Thomas Johnson , and Henry Addis; yesterday morning I lost a bag of shot from our cart; it is kept in bags of 28lb. each; the cart went from our door about nine o'clock in the morning.

THOMAS - sworn. - I am a carman; I left Tooley-street about a quarter after nine; I had nine bags of shot in the cart; I went to Thames-street , opposite Dice Quay; I took five bags out of the cart, and put them on board the Woodbridge hoy, and as I was waiting I saw the prisoner take a bag out, and put it under his waistcoat; I went up to him, and took him by the collar, and asked him for that bag of shot; he said he was very sorry he had done it; he begged I would give him a good whipping, and not send him to jail; a constable then came up, and I gave charge of him.( George Deverell , a constable, produced the bag of shot.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not take it out of the cart; another man took it out, and gave it to me. GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-6

6. JAMES HAYNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a pair of silk stockings, value 5s. a silver table-spoon, value 8s. two silver dessert spoons, value 1s. five silver tea-spoons, value 12s. ten towels, value 6s. a pillow slip; value 1s. a sheet, value 8s. and eight table-cloths, value 24s. the property of John Stevens , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN STEVENS sworn. - I keep a coffee-house in Bond-street ; the prisoner was my waiter ; I missed articles at various times; having a suspicion of the prisoner, I went, on the 31st of October, to Marlborough-street for an officer, I went with him to the prisoner's apartment, No. 2, Whitcomb-street, where we found all the articles mentioned in the indictment in boxes; the officer has the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This man had lived with you some time? - A. He came to me the last week in February.

Q. What quantity of things were taken at one time you cannot say? - A. I cannot.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: On the 31st of October I went with the last winess to the prisoner's apartment, and found the articles mentioned in the indictment (produces them); the prisoner was not at home; I found him there in the evening: the property was in boxes, two of them I think were locked, I was obliged to break them open.(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

JOHN ELDRIDGE sworn. - I keep the house in which the prisoner lived; I saw part of the property taken from the boxes in his apartment.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence but called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-7

7. MARGARET STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , two curtains, value 20s. a head-piece, value 10s. a pillow case, value 1s. and six table-cloths, value 40s. the property of John Cole .

JOHN COLE sworn. - I keep the Jamaica Coffee-house, Cornhill ; the prisoner was a servant of mine, and had been about eight or nine months as house-maid; I had a very good character with her; I missed a great number of articles the latter part of the time she was with me; I found the articles in the indictment at the pawnbroker's about four months after she had left me; I apprehended her

on Monday the 15th of last month, in her lodgings.

JAMES NEWTH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in the Borough; I do not know the prisoner (produces three curtains), they were taken in by my shopman; he went away three months ago.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I belong to the office in Worship-street: On Monday, the 15th of last month, Mr. Cole came to the office for a warrant to search the prisoner's apartment in Long-alley, Moorfields; I went with Mr. Cole; I found the prisoner was out nursing; I found where she was nursing, she came home with me, took the key out of her pocket, and unlocked the room door; there was a box in the room, of which she had the key, in that box I found a number of duplicates, and among them one for three curtains, pawned for three shillings, at Mr. Willis's, in the Borough, March 31st, and another of a pillowcase pawned at Mr. Crouch's, in Fore-street.(Produces them).

Q.(To Willis.) Is that your duplicate? - A. It is, it is my man's writing.(The curtains were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. A fellow-servant of mine at Mr. Cole's called to see me last summer, and left a tea-chest containing these duplicates.

WILLIAM FOLKARD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Crouch, (produces a pillow-case); it was pledged on the 1st of July, in the name of Ann Stevens , but I have no recollection who pledged it it is so long ago; I know the prisoner very well; I gave the person a duplicate,

Q. Is that other duplicate your's? - A. It is.

Prisoner. I have two small children in the country, and I brought some garden-stuff back with me in that pillow-case, and in washing for Mr. Cole, I suppose Mr. Cole must have my pillowcase if that is his. The pillow-case identified by Mr. Cole.)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in Newgate , whipped in jail , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-8

8. JOHN MONAT was indicted for that he, on the 20th of November , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Richard Abbey , did, by virtue of such employment, take into possession, of and from Richard Bussell , 10l. 5s. for and on account of his said master, and afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and make away with a part of the same, to wit, 2l. and so the Jurors say he feloniously did steal the same .

RICHARD BUSSELL sworn. - I am a grocer, at No. 23, Henrietta-street, Manchester-square; I know the prisoner perfectly well: On the 20th of November; I paid the prisoner 10l. 5s. 3d. for Mr. Richard Abbey .

Q. Were you indebted to Mr. Abbey so much? - A. I was.

Q. Is the prisoner a clerk to Mr. Abbey? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he demand it of you as a debt owing to Mr. Abbey? - A. Yes.

RICHARD ABBEY sworn. - On the 20th of November I sent the prisoner to Mr. Bussell to receive money on account; I did not see him again that evening; the next morning he said Mr. Bussell would call upon me on Monday morning; Mr. Bussell not calling on Monday or Tuesday, I called upon him on Tuesday evening, I then found Mr. Bussell had paid him 10l. 5s. 3d.; I begged he would call on me the next day about eleven o'clock, I would take care the prisoner should be alone, and desired him to ask the prisoner for a receipt for the money he had paid him; he called, and the prisoner gave him a receipt; I came in about twelve o'clock and the prisoner had put upon my desk 8l. 5s. 3d.; I waited a little and Mr. Bussell came in and produced me a receipt for 10l. 5s. 3d.; it was taken to the Mansion-house and delivered to the Lord Mayor, and I thought his Lordship had returned it to Mr. Bussell, but he does not recollect that he ever had it from his Lordship; I have not seen it since; I asked the prisoner what money that was on my desk, and he said it was from Mr. Bussell; Mr. Bussell then came in, and upon finding a deficiency of 2l. I immediately sent for a constable.

Q.(To Bussell). Have you made any enquiries of my Lord Mayor respecting this receipt? - A. I have not.

Q.(To Abbey). Had you sent him for 8l. 5s. 3d.? - A. No; I sent for 29l. or something on account.

Q. Will you swear that this sum of 10l. 5s. 3d. was due to you? - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months in Newgate and fined 1s

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-9

9. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for that he, on the 30th of October , being employed in the capacity of servant to Caleb-Welch Collins , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession, for and on account of his said master and employer, of and from Robert Hill, 18s. and afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and make away with a part of the same, to wit, 6s. and so the Jurors say he feloniously did steal the same .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-10

10. CHARLES GOULDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a bed-gown. value 3s. the property of William White .

ELIZABETH WHITE sworn. - I am the wife of William White ; I am servant at the Thatched-house, Field-lane, Holborn , the prisoner is a stranger to me: On the 13th of last month, I lost my bed gown; I did not miss it till Mooney told me of it; the prisoner went to sell the gown, and the person knew it was mine; after that, the prisoner came back again, and called for a pint of beer, and he was apprehended immediately.

THOMAS MOONEY sworn. - I keep a shoemaker's-shop, on Saffron-hill, my wife keeps another shop below for clothes; the prisoner brought a bed-gown to sell, my wife called me in, and told me, she thought she knew that gown; I saw it in the prisoner's hand, I bought it of him for one shilling and sixpence, and then I followed him to the public-house, and had him detained; the constable has the bed-gown.( James Coleman produced the bed-gown, which was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up at the door of the public-house, wrapped up in a paper.

Coleman. He told me he had bought it in Rosemary-lane. GUILTY , aged 22.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-11

11. WILLIAM KIRVIN and MARY CONNOR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a pair of spectacles, value 15s. a thimble, value 6d. two seven-shilling-pieces, a sixpence and three halfpence, the property of William Lloyd , privily from the person of Susannah Lloyd .

LYON BACKROW sworn. - I am a constable: On the 9th of November, I was standing at the corner of Queen-street , and observed the two prisoners pass four or five times backwards and forwards; they were walking together, but I did not see them talking; after the procession had passed down Queen-street, I saw the two prisoners following close behind this lady, the man was before the lady, and the woman behind, they were crossing Queen-street, when I heard the man say to the prosecutrix, I will conduct you safe over; then I saw the woman prisoner take her cloak from her right-arm, and throw it over her left arm; as soon as the man let the prosecutrix go, I seized hold of the woman prisoner's hand, and took this pair of spectables out of her hand; I took the woman to the Compter, and the prosecutrix followed me; she came in about four or five minutes after, I asked her, if she had lost any thing, she said, yes, a pair of spectacles, I shewed them to her, and she said, they were her's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp, Counsel for Kirvin.

Q. It was the woman that was behind? - A. Yes.

Q. And it was the woman who had the spectacles? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley, Counsel for Comor.

Q. Are you the Mr. Backrow we have had here before? - A. Yes, and Mr. Knapp knows it.

Q. How long ago? - A.Seven years ago.

Q. Have you ever been here since? - A.Once as a witness.

Q. You were an extraordinary constable on that day? - A. I don't understand you.

Q. You were an extra constable? - A. Yes.

Q. There was one other time that you were at that bar? - A. No, only once, that my Lord knows, and my prosecutor was tried afterwards by the Middlesex Jury, he was an honest Jew.

Q. You are an honest Jew too, are you not? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not the prosecutrix tell you the spectacles she lost, were in a case? - A. No, she did not mention any thing about a case.

ISAAC BACKROW sworn. - I am a constable; I was with my brother, on the 9th of November, standing at the corner of Queen-street; just before the procession came by, I saw the two prisoners walking backwards and forwards, several times; I saw them talking together; the prosecutrix came by, and then the man prisoner walked before her, and the woman walked behind; the man would not let the prosecutrix go by for very near a minute; she might have passed by, and he obsturcted her several times, she was going towards the City coffee-house; as soon as the prosecutrix got by, I caught hold of the woman's right-hand, and took a silver thimble and three halfpence out of her hand; the man wanted to go down Queen-street, and I caught him by the collar; I told him, he must go along with me, he resisted, and got out of my hands, a gentleman came up and assisted me; I never lost fight of him; we took him to the Compter, the prosecutrix came and claimed the things.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Were you tried here along with your brother? - A. Yes.

SUSANNAH LLOYD sworn. - I am the wife of William Lloyd ,; on Lord-Mayor's day, I was going through Cheapside, between twelve and one o'clock; when I came to Queen-street, a great crowd obstructed my passing; I stood up at a door-way, till the crowd apparently was dispersing; there appeared a possibility of getting a cross the end of Queen-street, and I attempted it; I was looking carefully if any carriages were passing, when the man prisoner said, madam, you seem flurried, I said, I was; he said, madam, don't be afraid, I will take care you shall not slip in crossing, and thought he made an attempt to prevent my slipping, he obstructed me, and raised my leftarm.

Q. Had you an idea at the time, that the obstruction was on purpose? - A. No; a carriage was then turning round, and I made a run; at that

time, something appeared to stop me, but I cannot say what; I did not feel any thing about my pockets, and at that moment I heard a voice behind me, saying, ah, have I got you, you could not let the lady pass; I don't know who it was that said so, I was frightened, and ran into a linen-draper's shop, there I found my pocket entirely emptied, it was twisted in a heap under my white petticoat; at first I thought my pockets had been cut off, then I went to the Compter; I lost a pair of spectable, a thimble, and a purse containing two seven shilling pieces, and a sixpence; when I got to the Compter, I immediately said, that was the man that made an attempt to hand me across the road; the officer stood by, and asked me if I had lost any thing, I told him what I had lost, and he shewed me my spectacles, which I knew to be mine, and a thimble which I cannot swear to, but I believe it to be the same that I lost, I have not found any thing else.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.There was a very considerable crowd on this day? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear you did not lose your property before you got to Bow-church? - A. No.

Q. How long had you had your spectacles? - A. I dare say, ten years.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

For the Prisoners.

JAMES RACKSTRAW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you in Cheapside on the 9th of November? - A. Yes, I think between twelve and one o'clock; I saw that lusty woman at the bar pick up a pair of spectacles and a thimble, which appeared white, and I saw a man in a brown coat lay hold of her directly afterwards.

Q.Should you know that man again? - A. I don't think I should, for I was hustled away in the crowd.

Q. Did you know her before? - A. No.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. What are you? - A. A master tailor, in Gravel-lane, Southwark.

Q. Do you keep house there? - A. No, I am a lodger.

Q. How long have you lived there? - A. I believe twelve or fourteen years.

Q. In the same house? - A.Within twenty yards.

Q. How long have you lived in the same house? - A. Three quarters of a year.

Q. Where did you live before that? - A. Two doors below.

Q. How long did you live there? - A. About three years and a half, or four years.

Q. What is the number of the house where you lived four years? - A.Sixty-one, I think.

Q. How came you to find your way here today? - A. I have been attending here all the week.

Q. What brought you here? - A.Because I was ordered by a man that knew me and brought me forward.

Q. What is that man's name? - A. Mr. Pring, a glass-blower, at Whitesriars.

Q. Is he here? - A. I believe so.

Q. How came Mr. Pring to bring you here? - A. Because he knew me, and heard me cry halves, when the prisoner picked up the spectacles and thimble.

Q. How came you to cry halves? - A. Because I was a tailor, and wanted a thimble.

Q. You don't know why Mr. Pring brought you here? - A. No, he came to me last week.

Q. Did he give you a subpoena here? - A. No.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes.

Q. You were not walking with him on Lord-Mayor's-day? - A. No, I did not see him on the Lord-Mayor's-day, but he saw me.

Q. Did he tell you what you were to come here for? - A. He said, you saw a person pick up a pair of spectarles and a thimble, did not you? and I said, yes; that was the way he brought me forward.

Pring was called, but did not appear.

The prisoner, Connor, called one witness who had known her fifteen years, and gave her a good character.

Kirvin's defence. I know nothing of the business, I have been forty years in his Majesty's navy.

The prisoner, Kirvin, called one witness, who had known him eleven years ago, and gave him a good character.

Kirvin, NOT GUILTY .

Connor, GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing, to the value of 10d.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-12

12. PETER FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , one hundred pounds weight of iron rail-way, value 2s. the property of the London Dock Company .

It appearing in evidence that the iron rail-way was fixed to the freehold, and not being so charged in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-13

13. JAMES SMALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , thirty-six pounds weight of wrought iron, value 10s. the property of the London Dock Company .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Bosanquet, and the case by Mr. Pooley.)

SAMUEL DENNIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. What are you? - A. A watchman to the London Dock Company; the prisoner was a labourer about the docks, I did not know him till I apprehended him: On the 17th of November,

between five and six o'clock in the evening, William Oakley and I were going to our muster-room for our names to be called over, to go upon duty; when I saw the prisoner, we were near Samson's gardens, on the premises of the Dock Company; Oakley was rather a little before me with a light, and I thought I heard the found of a foot among the gravel; we stopped, and upon looking about, we saw a man in a stooping posture at the top of a hill within the dock; I asked him what he was doing; he said he was going home, and made several excuses; I told him I was suspicious he was after no good; when the man came down the hill, I sent Oakley up the hill with a lantern; I kept the prisoner in custody till Oakley came down with this iron, (produces it); I asked the prisoner how he came by it; he said he had found it among the gravel and sand where he was at work; I asked him who was with him when he found it; he said there was another man who was at work with him; he said, as he found it, he thought it was his property; I asked him why then he did not take it off in the day time; he said he was afraid of being seen by somebody or other that had bid it; he said he was going to take it home, he thought it was his right.

WILLIAM OAKLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. - I am a watchman belonging to the Dock Company; I was with Dennis with a lantern on the dock; I say a man upon a hill; I went up with a lantern, and the prisoner was coming down; Dennis called to me to go further, and look if I could see any thing further; I went a little further, and found this iron.

Q. Did you ever see it in his hand? - A. No; the prisoner said he had found it in the sand; I asked him when; he said, in the early part of the day; I asked him why he did not take it with him before; he said he was afraid of being seen by those that had buried it; we then took him into custody; the prisoner carried the iron to our watch-office.

RICHARD SAUNDERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Besanquet. I superintend the dock watch; this bolt belongs to the London Dock Company; there are but four in the dock; there is no particular mark; it was straight when it was lost; it is ten feet long; it belongs to a chain pump; I cannot say how long it has been lost; this is a particular bolt, it is bevil-headed.

Q. Are there not other things of that sort bevilheaded? - A. I cannot say.

Prisoner's defence. I knew nothing of the bolt till that gentleman gave it into my hand, and made me carry it. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-14

14. SARAH EATON, alias CLOUDER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , two handkerchiefs, value 4s. the property of David Stevens .(The case was opened by Mr. Reynolds.)

MARY STEVENS sworn. - I am the wife of David Stevens, a dyer , No. 7, Eyre-street, Bethnal-green ; I received the beginning of November, from Mr. Lee, some silk to weave into handkerchiefs: On the 9th of November I went to Oxford-street, and left the house in the care of Ann Cox; I went out between eight and nine in the morning, and returned between four and five; I found the prisoner in my room; Ann Cox came down from her own room into mine; she said, Mrs. Stevens, somebody has been at your work; upon that I turned round, looked at my work, and found it had been undone; I examined my work, and missed two handkerchiefs, and had one damaged; the next morning I took two quills of the same silk, one purple and one white, and went to Mr. Gaunt's, a pawnbroker, in Holywell-lane; he shewed me a handkerchief, which I knew to be mine.

ANN COX sworn. - I live in the same house with the last witness: On the 9th of November I heard somebody at Mrs. Stevens's door, I went down stairs, and found the prisoner in Mrs. Stevens's room; I asked her how she came there, and she said, the door was open; the work was tightened up then, as a man might shoot on it; I went up to my room, and came down again in about a quarter of an hour; I found the door bolted; I knocked, and said, Sally, are you there, is Mrs. Stevens come home; she undid the door, and said, she was not; I turned round, and saw the work slack down to the threddles; I said, O, my God, the work is all slack; she said, she knew nothing about it; I heard Mrs. Stevens coming up stairs in a very few minutes, and I stood in the entry.

Q. Had you parted from the prisoner between that conversation and Mrs. Stevens coming up? - A. Yes; I went to look for her son, and left her in the room; when Mrs. Stevens came in, I said, for God's sake, come up, here has something happened to your work; then she came up, and examined her work; she had twelve handkerchiefs done all but a piece, and when she counted them in the loom, she had but ten all but a piece; then I left them.

RICHARD MATTHEWS sworn. - I am a journeymen to Mr. Gaunt, pawnbroker, in Shoreduch.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. I cannot say that I can swear to her: On the 9th of November I took in several handkerchiefs, I cannot say from whom I took them, (produces a handkerchief); I took in this handkerchief.

Q.Produce your own duplicate? - A.Here it is.

Q. In what name is that handkerchief pawned? - A. Sarah Eaton .

Q. Were many of the handkerchiefs you took in that day of the same pattern? - A. I cannot tell; I took in thirteen that day.

Q. Did you attend at the Magistrate's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you then know the prisoner? - A. No; I said I could not tell from whom I received it.

Q.Look at the prisoner steadily, and tell me if you have no belief upon the subject? - A. I believe I had seen the prisoner before.

Q. Before the 9th of November? - A. I cannot. say; I believe that woman was in the shop that night, but I cannot say whether I took in this hankerchief from her or not. (The hankerchief was identified by Mrs. Stevens.)

Prisoner's defence. I was out of place; I went there as I usully did to mend my things; I found the door wide open; Mrs. Cox came down, and said, Mrs. Stevens was gone out; I said, what, and leave the door open; Mrs. Cox said, no, her son had been there doing something to the work, and did not know he was gone; I have know Mrs. Stevens these six years.

Mrs. Stevens. She is a relation of my husband's; she came to me very low, and I succoured her the same as my own child.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18021201-15

15. WILLIAM MARRIOIT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a cask, value 2s. and 40lb. of tamarinds, value 30s. the property of John Johnson .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Thomas Pincot .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of Thomas Anni .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of Thomas-John Parker .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS ANNIS sworn. - I am a deputed officer of the Customs , and a watchman on the quays: On Wednesday the 17th of November, I was watching the goods on Galley-quay ; about five o'clock in the afternoon I saw the prisoner on the quay, with a keg on his back; I saw him take it from the crane-post; he was going away up the gate-way with it; seeing the broad-arrow upon it, I went up to him, and asked him what he did with that keg; he told me it was given to him by a man; I asked him what man, or where the man was; he said he did not know; I then took him by the collar, and brought him back; I took the keg from him, and called Brandon to my assistance, and we took him to the Compter; I never quitted my hold of him; I delivered the keg into the hands of George Harvey , till we came back from the Compter; the broad-arrow is a mark put upon all the goods in our charge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. I cannot say that I did.

Q.There are other porters employed upon the quay? - A. None, except we have an additional quantity of goods, and then we are allowed another man as a watchman.

Q.There were a great many people on the quays? - A. Yes.

Q. Was this keg lying by itself? - A. No, among other goods.

Q. How many persons were by at the time? - A. I think there might be a dozen.

Q. And he was taking it away in the face of you all? - A. Yes; he first told me he was going to Globe-yard, and then he said he was going to Tower-street.

THOMAS- JOHN PARKER sworn. - I was employed to enter this keg of tamarinds; and I entered them as mine; they were landed and left on the quay; it has a mark of J. J. in a diamond, upon it (the property produced); I will swear this is the same keg that I entered.

GEORGE BRANDON sworn. - I assisted in securing the prisoner; he attempted to get away, and told two or three others that he was going to jail, and I drew my cutlass.

Prisoner's defence. As I was coming from my work, a gentleman employed me to carry this cask to Tower-street.

The prisoner called his serjeant-major and a corporal, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-16

16. SARAH CHARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , a shift, value 1s. a pair of pockets, value 6d. a bed-gown, value 6d. a pair of stockings, value 2s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2s. the property of James-Cromp Lowe .

JAMES CROMP LOWE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker and silversmith ; the prisoner was my servant : On Saturday last, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was up in the warehouse; I was at a distance from the stair-case, and I perceived a hand take a pledge from one of the racks; I could then only see the naked part of the arm; I stepped forward, and saw the prisoner; she turned into her bed-room; I went into the bed-room, and she was then in the act of putting the coverlid staraight; upon removing the coverlid, I discovered the article she had pulled out placed between the bed and the sacking; it being a piece of striped cotton, I knew it to be the same that I had seen the hand draw out; I told her to go down stairs, and I would send for an officer, and asked her at the same time if she had ever been guilty of the like before; she had only been with me seven or eight days; she told me she had not taken any thing before; when the officer came, her pocket was searched, and there, two handkerchiefs and a

pair of stockings were found; the pledge that I found under the bed was a bed-gown, a shift, and a pair of pockets; I know them to be mine, because the counterpart of my ticket was upon them; the stockings were my wife's.

Prisoner. I never was guilty of an offence before. GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-17

17. THOMAS CRONING and THOMAS EDWARDS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , a handkerchief, value 6d. the property of a certain person or persons to the Jurors unknown.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am a constable: On the 17th of September, I was standing at the corner of Field-lane, Holborn , I saw the two prisoners walking and talking together; I saw Edwards put his hand into a man's pocket, and draw out a pocket-handkerchief, and give it to Croning; I then holloa'd to Lee and Pope, that there were a couple of pickpockets; I attempted to take Edwards, and he ran towards Field-lane; I followed him, and took him; I brought him to a public-house at the corner of Field-lane, and my partners came in soon after with Croning; Pope then produced the handkerchief; the prosecutor wanted his handkerchief back, and I would not let him have it, unless he would prosecute, and he said he could not spare time to attend; I kept the handkerchief, and went before the Lord Mayor, who bound us over.( John Pope and John Lee , who were with the last witness, corroborated his testimony,)

Edwards's defence. It was my own handkerchief.

Croning's defence. I know nothing at all of it.

Croning, GUILTY , aged 23.

Edwards, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-18

18. MAURICE DOYLE and JOHN HALESWORTH were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , thirty hods of lime, mixed with hair, value 15s. the property of William Roberts , the younger; and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM ROBERTS , the younger, sworn. - I am a plaisterer , in Cullum-street, Fenchurch-street, and have a yard in Jewin-street; the prisoner has been sixteen or seventeen years in my father's employ, as a labourer and carter : On Monday the 1st of November he was employed as my carter; I sent him with a load of lime to New Road, Whitechapel; it was what we call coarse stuff, lime and hair mixed, and a little rubbish; I saw him about eight or nine o'clock in the morning; he was then going; we call a load thirty hods, or thereabouts; about three o'clock in the afternoon I received some information; in consequence of which I spoke to Doyle about seven o'clock in the evening, at my father's shed, in Gitter lane.

Q. Has your father any share in this business? - A. None; I asked the prisoner where he had been that day with the stuff; he told me he had been to the New-road, Whitechapel, and had likewise brought another load to Cullum-street; he had taken out three loads that day, two of them to the New-road.

Q. How many loads had he in fact taken to the New-road? - A. Two, and one to Cullum-street.

Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, whether he had taken more than three loads from your yard, that day? - A. I do not; I asked the prisoner what he was doing in Aldersgate-street between twelve and two; he made me not answer at first, he seemed to be quite struck, and I told him he had better tell me the truth.

Q. Then don't tell us what he said? - A. I then gave charge of the prisoner, and went to a place called Little Greenwich, in Aldersgate-street, where the prisoner Halesworth has some houses, and a stable, or shed; I found a load of lime and hair there.

Q.When was that? - A. The same evening.

Q. Was it like such as you had? - A. I can positively swear to it; I had mixed some rubbish with it, which rather changes its colour; I did not see Halesworth till the Friday; his attorney appeared for him, and answered for his appearance.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is not your father in partnership with you? - A. Not in the business in Cullum-street; he carries on business in Gutter-lane.

Q. Two loads were to go to the New Road, and two loads were taken to the New Road? - A. Yes.

Q.Jewin-street leads into Aldersgate-street? - A. Yes, one end of it, and the other into Redcross-street.

Q. So that he might have gone out at either end of Jewin-street? - A.He might, but it is a long way round.

Q. This lime and hair was mixed with rubbish? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not other plaisterers mix rubbish with lime and hair? - A. Yes, but when I brought it back to that which remained in my yard, there was not a shade of difference.

Q. You don't know that the place you went to was Halesworth's? - A. No, only from Doyle.

Q. Did not Mr. Humphreys, Halesworth's solicitor, answer for his appearance, and did he not attend? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.What is the rubbish composed of? -

A.Sand and old stuff that we knock out of ceilings, and earth; there was as much earth as rubbish; sometimes we use druft sand; it is what we call in the trade coarse stuff.

Q.That is the term by which it is known in the trade? - A. Yes; it is sometimes called coarse stuff, and sometimes lime and hair; it is understood in the trade as the same thing.

Court. Q.Suppose you were to give an order to a person to send you lime and hair, and he sent you lime and hair, with rubbish mixed with it, should you think yourself defrauded? - A. Certainly not; I should be perfectly satisfied with it.

JOSEPH GREGURY sworn. - I live in Little Greenwhich, Alaersgate-street; it is a place for carts and carriages; the prisoner Halesworth does not live there; he told me be had some houses there upon a reparing lease.

Q.In the begining of November, did you see Mr. Roberts's cart there? - A. I did, and I saw the prisoner Doyle there; he brought a load of lime, and was going to shoot it opposite my window; that was about one o'clock; I told him he should not shot it there, we had had rubbish enough before; Mr. Halesworth stepped up, and said, draw it up here, either I or we are going to me in; I cannot say which; he took it up, and it was shot close to Mr. Halesworth's premises.

Q.Where was Mr. Halesworth at the time is was shot upon his premises? - A. With the car man: I then gave information to Mr. Roberts, seeing his name upon the care: I had often seen I there before.

Def's defence. The horse that I had was a sickly horse and subject to garping, and was I was coming out of Jowln-street the horse wanted to bye down, and I thought I had better shoot the load in Little Greenwich man in the street; Mr. Halesworth came up, and said you had better not shoot it there; and when I was asked what I had done with it I was terrified, because I thought my made was indicted for a nuisance for putting it there; I have been seventeen years with my master, and he was always too good a master to rob; I went through Aldersgate-street for fear I should be stopped in the short was going through Castle-street.

Q.(To Gregery.) Did the horse appear to be ill when you saw it? - A. No.

Q. When you spoke to him about shooting his load there, did he give that as a reason? - A. No.

Mr. Roberts. Nor did he mention that to me.

Halesworth left his defence to his counsel.

The prisoner Doyle called five, and Halesworth nine witnesses, who gave them good characters.

Doyle, GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Halesworth, GUILTY , aged 53.

Transported for fourteen years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-19

19. THOMAS PERKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , two shawls, value 25s. the property of Thomas Roberts , privately in his shop .

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - I am a linen-draper in Holborn ; I was not at home at the time of the loss.

JOHN CROFT sworn. - I am articled to Mr. Roberts: On Friday, the 29th of October, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop to look at some Norwich shawls; he asked me the price of some at the door; I desired him to walk in; after looking some time he fixed upon two, I shewed then to him on the counter; there were two ro three ladies in the shop, and two other young men belonging to us, one of them is here; he asked me the lowest price of those two shawls, I told him two guineas and a half; he said he would give me 2l. 6s. 6d.; I told him I could not take it; as he was going out I looked at the shawls and missed one; our young man in the shop hearing me say I missed one, immediately said, hollea, that will not do; I turned round, and saw the young man having hold of the prisoner, and two shawls in the crown of his hat; I immediately took; the two shawls out of the hat and sent for a constable; one of them cost 19s. 6d. and the other 18s. 6d.; they were neither of them the shawls he asked the price of.

FRANIS COLE sworn. - I was standing very near the last witness; I heard him say I have missed a shawls; I immediately kept my eye on the prisoner, and he took up shawl with his left hand and shook it as if he was seeking for the one that was lost; his hat was then on his head, which had before been on the counter: he then slipped his hat from his head; I then observed the corner of a shawl in his hat; I then snatched his hat and found two shawls in it; they were both crammed in very tight; I then sent for a constable; he asked me if I thought he intended stealing them; I said, from his manner, I did not doubt it.( John Lee , a constable, produced the shawls, which were identified by Mr. Roberts and the other two witnesses.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was a sailor, that on the day of the offence having been committed he met with some shipmates, with whom he had been drinking to intoxication, that he had no intention of committing felony, and that he has been in the navy nineteen years.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 35.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-20

20. JAMES LAMB was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 22d of April , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of Thomas Tuck .

THOMAS TUCK sworn. - I am a hair-dresser in Brook-street, Ratcliff , the prisoner worked for me: On Thursday, the 22d of April last, I went out a little before three o'clock, and left the watch hanging in the back room; I returned in about ten minutes and missed the prisoner and the watch; I saw nothing of my watch from that time till the 17th of November; I apprehended the prisoner at work in a hair-dresser's shop in Catherine Wheel-alley, Whitechapel; I saw my watch the same evening at the office, in prossession of a pawnbroker; the prisoner had worked for me seven weeks.

ROBERT STARKE sworn. - I am servant to a a pawnbroker, in Fetter-lane, (produces a silver watch); I have no recollection of the person who pledged it, it was pledged in the name of James Lamb .

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street: On the 17th of November the prosecutor came to me; I went with him to Catherine Wheel-alley, Whitechapel; as we passed a window the prosecutor saw the prisoner sitting at work in the shop, we went in and I apprehended him; the prosecutor said, what have you done with my watch; the prisoner said he had pawned it; I asked him where the duplicate was, and he said he had lost it; I then took him out of the shop, and in our way to the office he said he pledged it at a shop in the second street going up Holborn-hill; I went to Fetter-lane and found the watch pledged there; the pawnbroker attended at the office, and the prosecutor swore to his watch. (The watch was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, you must settle it the best way you can.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-21

21. JEREMIAH MAHONEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a coat, value 12s. the property of Joseph Wolfe .

JOSEPH WOLFE sworn. - I am a tailor and salesman , No. 17, Panton-street : On Wednesday, the 17th of November, I missed a coat between ten and eleven o'clock from the shop door, I went out and saw the prisoner with the coat under his arm; I stopped him about twenty yards from my door; it has my private mark upon it.

Q. Did you miss it before you went after him? - A. A gentleman gave me information that a coat was taken from the door and pointed out the man,(produces the coat.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the coat of a man in the street.

Prosecutor. When I stopped him, he said he bought it of a man in Monmouth-street.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Six months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-22

22. JAMES HIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a goose, value 4s. of George Krimmelmeyer .

GEORGE KRIMMELMEYER sworn. - I live in Plough-street, Whitechapel; I have a stand in High-street, Whitechapel : on Saturday night, the 13th of November, about nine o'clock, a person told me a man was taking a goose, it was the only goose I had; I then went after the man; I laid hold of the prisoner with my left hand, about four or five yards from the stand, and picked up the goose with my right hand; he then gave a start into the middle of the street, and I could not hold him, but the patrol laid hold of him immediately.

RICHARD WHITFIELD sworn. - I am a patrol of Whitehapel; I stood within a yard or two of the prosecutor's stand; I saw the goose in the prisoner's hand, he dropped it close to my feet; the prosecutor immediately gave me charge of him.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the goose till I was laid hold of. GUILTY , aged 66.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-23

23. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , a sheet, value 5s. the property of Thomas Keppel .

ANN KEPPEL sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Keppel ; the prisoner was a stranger to me, I had hired her to work for me on the 25th of October; the next morning I missed a sheet, I saw it again the next day but one before the Magistrate.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - My father is a pawnbroker: On the 26th of October I took in a sheet from the prisoner in the name of Mary William ; she left the duplicate on the counter, (produces the sheet); I had seen her several times before.(The sheet was identified by Mrs. Keppel from the geneeral appearance of it, not having any particular mark upon it.)

Prisoner's defence. A woman in the house took the sheet off the bed, and desired me to pawn it for her.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-24

24. JOSEPH COLLIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , two gowns, valeu 20s. two petticoats, value 12s. a pair of stays, value 10s. a cap, value 2s. a pair of leather gloves, value 1s. a pair of leather shoes, value 2s. two

neck-handkerchief, value 5s. and a cotton handckerhief, value 6d. the property of Harriot Richardson , Spinster .

WILLIAM HARRISON sworn. - I was riding home form Chelsea, on Sunday eveing the 26th of July, about nine o'clock in the evening, in a one-horse, chaise, with Miss Harriot Richardson, my wife's sister, and in passing St. Giles's church, I perceived the head of the chaise fall back; on which I stopped the horse, and looked behind, and perceived a man hanging by his arm upon the head of the chaise; I bid him get down, whipped him, and he ran away; he ran by the chaise before the horse; this bundle hand been lying in the head of the chaise, and I immediately missed it; the man was still in fight, and I pursued him, crying stop thief; he ran down Denmark-street, I pursuing; at the end of that street a number of people assembled on he cry of stop thief, and he threw away the bundle; he was taken in Rose-street; I had remarked the dress of the man; he was in a blue jacket and trowsers, which was the dress of the prisoner; I had not seen his face. (Produces the bundle.)

JAMES COX sworn. - I am a labourer; going through Crown-street, I saw a crowd of people, and the prisoner before them, with something in his hand; I threatened him not to go any further, and he immediately threw a bundle down, which was tied up in a handkerchief; this is the bundle; I cannot say the prisoner is the same man, because he ran across the street from me into Rose-street.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to St. Ann's; On Sunday night the 26th of July, I saw the prisoner throw something away, but what I could not tell, at the end of Denmark-street; I pursued him up Rose-street, and took him up a gateway. - (The bundle was identified by Miss Richardson.)

Prisoner's defence. I have been sick in prison, and out of my senses almost ever since; I have no recollection of the charge at all; I am now in a deep consumption. GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined seven days in Newgate , fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-25

25. THOMAS HOTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , a silver watch, value 25s. The property of Joseph Francis .

JOSEPH FRANCIS sworn. - I am a baker , No. 97, East Smithfield : On Thursday the 28th of Septemeber, the prisoner came into my house, between five and six o'clock in the evening, with one of my lodgers, to get change: nobody being in the shop, the lodger walked through into the parlour; the prisoner followed her; my wife desired her to go into the shop, and she would give change from the till; I was present; the prisoner did not immediately follow her, but in less than a minute he walked away without his change; I went into the parlour, and missed my watch; I had seen it about three quarters of an hour before; I took him on the 26th of October, and found the duplicate upon him; I went to the pawnbroker's, and found my watch.

WILLIAM-THOMAS LINLEY sworn - I am servant to Mr. Bunn, a pawnbroker (produces the watch); I took it in of the prisoner at the bar on the 28th of September. - (The watch was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. The watch was given to me by the woman that went in with me.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-26

26. BENJAMIN JACOBS , JAMES PASS , and BENJAMIN DAVIS , were indicted, the two first for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a deal box, value 6d. and one hundred and eighty squares of crown glass, value 54s. the property of Benjamin Hall .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Paul Cadman .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of John Clarke .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of George Lovell , the elder.

And the other for receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

GEORGE LOVELL , the elder, sworn. - I live in Red Lion-street, Holborn; I am a glass-cutter and glazier : On the 11th or 12th of November, I was applied to to execute an order for Mr. Benjamin Hall, of Harlow, for a quantity of small cut glass for a green-house; here is a list of the numbers and sizes; he desired me to execute as much as I could by the Tuesday following, and he would send a country cart for it; On Tuesday the 16th a waggon called in the afternoon; I packed up the glass in two boxes; one contained about three hundred squares; the other, which was lost, contained seventy squares, 10 1-half, 7 1-half, and one hundred and ten squares, 9 by 7 1-4th; it was directed to Mr. Benjamin Hall, Harlow, Essex; they were delivered to a carter of the name of Paul Cadman ; I was not present; about a week afterwards I received notice to attend at the examination of the prisoners; I attended, and found that the glass corresponded with what I had sent.

Q. Did you see the box? - A. Yes, but I cannot swear to the box; he squares were the same size that I had packed; but the quantity I could not ascertain, part of it being broke.

GEORGE LOVELL , the younger, sworn. - I am the son of the last witness; I know nothing of the transaction; I saw the glass at the Magistrate's, and have no hesitation in saying, the figure upon the glass is my own.

PAUL CADMAN sworn. - I am servant to Thomas Fordham , who keeps the White Swan, in Whitechapel; John Clarke brought to our inn 3cwt. and a quarter of broken glass, to go to Mr. Lovell's, and I went with it to his house on Tuesday the 16th of November; there were two boxes of glass to bring back, which I received from Mr. Lovell's men; they were both directed to Benjamin Hall, of Harlow, in Essex; they were put into a waggon; I brought them safe to Whitechapel; I rode all the way in the waggon; I had a message to leave at Mr. Fordham's, my master's brother, the corner of Petticoat-lane; I did not stay two minutes; I did not notice the waggon till I drove into the yard, and found one of the boxes gone.

Q. What time in the evening was this? - A. About seven o'clock; my master's house is about one hundered yards from Petticoat-lane, on the other side of the way.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Can you write or read? - A. Yes.

Q. It was too dark for you to read the direction? - A. I saw the direction as they laid in the shop.

SARAH BURN sworn. - I live at No. 1, King's-head-court, Rose-lane, Spitalfields; this day three weeks, the 16th of November, Mrs. Davis asked my mother to let me foot her a pair of stockings, and she would give me a penny; my mother said I might; she lives at the corner of King's-head-court; I was sooting the stockings, and Polly Levy came in to ask Mrs. Davis if she was going to her sister's, Mrs. Davis if she was going to her sister's, Mrs. Goldsmith's, and while she was there, two men came in; one had a box upon his head.

Q. Should you know the men again? - A. Yes; those are them (pointing to Jacobs and Pass); Mrs. Davis asked what they wanted, and they said, I want your husband, never you mind what I want; Mrs. Davis sent me for a penny candle, and to tell her husband to come in, he was wanted; I went to a public-house by Mr. Matthews's, and told him he was wanted at home; he went in, and I went for the candle; when I came back, Mr. Davis was standing with his back against the table, and the two men were covering some glass over in a basket with some straw, and Mr. Davis asked what they were going to do with it; they said, let us leave it in your yard a little while; Mr. Davis did not give any answer before three officers came in, and took us all up.

Q. Was the box the officers found the same box these two men brought in? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of night was it? - A.Between seven and eight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.There was no light in the room, as you were sent to get a candle? - A. Yes, there was.

Q.Davis had not time to give any answer before the officers came in? - A. No.

Prisoner Pass. Q. Was there not a third man came in with us? - A. No; there was a carroty headed man came in after them, a youngish man.

Mr. Alley. Q. And that man was taken up and discharged by the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

MARY LEVY sworn. - I was at Mrs. Davis's when two men came in; one had a box on his shoulder.

Q. What was in it? - A. I cannot say; it was the same box that was taken by the officers.

Q. Do you know the men? - A. Yes, those are them (pointing to Jacobs and Pass.)

EDWARD SMITH sworn - I am an officer; I went with Nowlan and Trott on the 16th of last month; we were perambulating in the evening, and received an information that there was something gone into Davis's; I knocked at the door, and got admittance; I found the three prisoners, and another man, who was discharged at the office, the two girls who have been witnesses now, and Mrs. Davis; we found this basket of glass (producing it), and this box; the lid of the box was gone; the box stood by the basket; we secured the parties, and they were committed.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer: On Tuesday the 16th of November, Smith, Nowlan, and myself, went to Davis's; we found these things and the prisoners.

Q.(To Lovell, jun.) Was your box like that? - A. I don't know; I can only speak to the figures on the glass; I am sure those figures are my writing.

Q. Was the glass packed up for Mr. Hall? - A. I cannot say that.

Lovell, sen. The sizes correspond.

The prisoner Jacoas left his defence to his counsel.

Pass's defence. Going through Rose-lane, I observed a box up in a corner; a gentleman was coming along, and I shewed it to him, and asked him what he would advise me to do with it; he advised me to take it to some house, and leave it till it was advertised; I told him I would, if he would go with me, and see where I lodged it, and I took it to Mr. Davis's, and he went with us; he was taken up with us, and was discharged the next day.

Smith. That was a man of the name of Birkett, who said before the Magistrate he saw them pick

it up; we had him here some time ago for stealing a banker's check for 100l. and he was convicted.

Jacobs, GUILTY , aged 25.

Pass, GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven years.

Davis, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-27

27. ROGER RODEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a saw, value 3s. the property of William Hogben .

WILLIAM HOGBEN sworn. - I am a cabinetmaker , No. 19, Vine-court, Spitalfields; the prisoner worked for me; I had not room enough at home, and I hired a shop out for the prisoner to work at: On the 16th of November I missed a saw; he worked with some of my tools and some of his own; upon missing it I immediately went to Mr. Davidson's, a pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate-street, and found the saw pledged in the prisoner's name; I took him to Worship-street; they searched him, and found the duplicate upon him.

GEORGE YOUNG sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Davidson; I took this saw in pledge on the 16th of November, in the name of Roger Roden . -(Produces it.)

Hogben. That is my saw.

Young. The prosecutor told me the prisoner was about buying the saw, but had not paid for it.

Hogben. He was about buying it of me.

Prisoner's defence. I bought a saw very much like my master's, and he lent me the money to pay for it; I went to pawn my saw, and in the dark I don't know whether I took my own saw or my master's.

Prosecutor. They are very much alike.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-28

28. MARY HYDE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , a shirt, value 4s. and a neck-handkerchief, value 6d. the property of James Churchill .(The officer who was in possession of the property being called, and not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-29

29. HENRY JENNINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , 8lb. of sugar, value 4s. the property of Charles Theophilus Cassino and John Batard .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Francis Cooke .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-30

30. WILLIAM ATKINS , ELIZABETH ATKINS , and ANN FLYNN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , two sheets, value 6s. two pillows, value 4s. and two pillow-cases, value 2s. the property of Joseph Green , in a lodging-room .

SUSAN GREEN sworn. - I am the wife of Joseph Green, in Round-court, in the Strand ; the prisoner Atkins and his wife took lodgings of me on the 2d of October, at 3s. 9d. a week; it was a ready-furnished room; he told me he was a smith; they left my lodgings about the 27th of October; they went away unknown to me; I began to suspect something, and at the end of the week I opened the door, and missed the sheets, pillows, pillow-cases, and several other articles; I saw nothing of them for a fortnight, till I met with Ann Flynn; she was to sleep in the house that night only, but I never could get her out afterwards; when I found her in Bedfordbury, I got assistance, and took her to Bow-street; she told where the man and his wife were, in Dyot-street; the officers went and found them there; Mrs. Atkins told me Ann Flynn came to learn her the muss-making business.( Thomas Chapman , a servant to a pawnbroker, produced two sheets, one pledged on the 4th of October, and the other on the 15th, with two pillow-cases, by the prisoner Flynn, in the name of Webber.)(Thomas Smith, servant to Mr. Morris, No. 119, Minories, produced two pillows pledged by the prisoner William Atkins.)

WILLIAM PICKERING sworn. - I am an officer: On Monday the 8th of November, I went, according to the direction of Flynn, to Dyot-street, where I found the other two prisoners.(Joseph Tounsend, another officer, produced the duplicates of the articles mentioned in the indictment, which he found upon Elizabeth Atkins.)(The property was identified by Mrs. Green.)

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

William Atkins, GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Elizabeth Atkins, NOT GUILTY .

Ann Flynn, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-31

31. MATTHEW STRETCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , four quarts of beer, value 2s. the property of George Rant .

GEORGE RANT sworn. - I am a publican at Mile-end ; the prisoner is a watchman of the parish; I have several times found my premises broke open, but I don't know any thing of it myself.

EDWARD SHADLOW sworn. - I was ostler to

Mr. Rant, at the Plough, at Mile-End; William Siggins asked me to go and take some beer from under the tea-room in the garden, where the ale and cyder were kept, and I refused to go; the prisoner asked me to go, and take some liquor out of the chaise-house, at the back of the dwelling-house, and I refused to go.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Don't you know it was a little smuggled liquor that they wanted you to take, that was concealed in a sly way? - A. I do not know.

Q. He never asked you to take any out of the cellar? - A. No.

Q. You don't know that it was your master's liquor he wanted you to take? - A. I cannot say.

DOLLY BEAZLEY sworn. - One evening in June last, I don't know the day of the month, Stretch, the watchman, called William Siggins , the young man I live with, and told him he had no call to be afraid, for every thing was ready; he made use of very improper words, and told him he was afraid of himself; he refused to go very much, and with a deal of persuasion he did go; Stretch and Siggins came back, and said the liquor was very stale; they called it Old Hock; they said they had got it from under Mr. Rant's tea-room; there were about nine bottles brought into the room; four bottles were emptied; some had very little in; they were not gone above ten minutes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You keep company with Siggins? - A. He keeps company with me.

Q. And you persuaded him to charge the prisoner with this to save himself? - A. No, I did not.

Q. He was admitted an evidence before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM SIGGINS sworn. - I am a labouring man; I live next door to Mr. Rant's; I had been to market on Saturday night; I was going to-bed, and Stretch called me, and I denied going; he told me I had no need to be afraid, for every thing was all safe; then he called me down, and over persuaded me to go with him; we went to Mr. Rant's tea-room; he put down his hand, and pulled out two boards; then he borrowed a hammer to straighten the nails to do it up again; he went in first; I followed, and he drew off about four quarts of liquor.

Q. What liquor? - A.Hock; it is old beer; he wanted me to go again after that, but I never would; he drew it into empty bottles, and we took it home, and drank it; I put the empty bottles back on the premises again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You never asked any body else to go with you? - A. Yes, he desired me to ask Shadlow to go, but I never did go.

Q. You never went after it yourself? - A. No.

Court. (To Rant.) Q. What liquors had you in this place? - A. Stout and hock, and I am not sure whether there was any cyder or not.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty.

The prisoner called Mr. Bliss, the inspector of Bank-notes, and nine other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-32

32. WILLIAM COATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , two razors, value 2s. a case, value 6d. and a strop, value 6d. the property of Alexander-Sinclair Gordon , Esq.

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-33

33. JOHN COWLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am a journeyman baker , I work at No. 8, Litchfield-street , the prisoner was pot-boy , at the George, in Grafton-street: On the 25th of November, I went out and left my watch hanging against the wall, when I came back it was gone; I had a suspicion of the prisoner, I got a warrant and took him up.

JOHN LEDGER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 21, Green-street, Leicester-square; on the 25th of November, I took in a silver watch of the prisoner, between the hours of ten and two; I am positive the prisoner is the person, I knew him before; I lent a guinea upon it. (Produces it.)

Mr. Alley. Q. Did he not tell you he pledged it for another person? - A. He did.(The watch was identified by the prosecutor.)

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - On the 26th of last month, I took the prisoner in custody, I found up on him a seven-shilling-piece, he said it belonged to the servant-maid; I called her, and asked her, and she said it was not her's; I asked him where the watch was, he said, he had pawned it, and had lost the duplicate.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 14.

Privately whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-34

34. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a silver tea spoon, value 1s. and two pair of stockings, value 1s. the property of John Trueby .

SARAH TRUEBY sworn. - I am the wife of John Trueby , a publican , in Church-street, Shore

ditch : On the 13th of November, the prisoner came and asked if any body had enquired for her, I told her, no; she returned again in a few minutes, and asked for a glass of beer, saying, she would sit down in the kitchen, for it was cold in the parlour; her friend came soon after, and they went into the parlour together; they had a glass of liquor, and the man went out first, and she followed; I went into the parlour, and found two pair of stockings gone off the horse; the servant went after her, and brought her back; I accused her of taking the stockings, she denied it; I forced her into the parlour, and she threw the stockings on the floor from her pocket; I detained her till my husband came in; he enquired after the spoon, and I asked the prisoner after it, she was searched, and it was found in her pocket. (The stockings were produced and identified.)

Mr. Knowlys. Q. This poor woman has no husband and two children to support? - A. I undestand she has one.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody, searched her, and found the spoon; in the neighbourhood she bears a very good character.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-35

35. HENRY VANDENBERG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , two pair of stockings, value 3s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of William White .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-36

36. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , a pewter pint pot, value 6d. the property of Edward Williams .

EDWARD WILLIAMS sworn. - I keep the Three Morris Dancers, in the Old-Change ; I know no thing of the prisoner.

THOMAS EVANS sworn. - I am a cabinet-maker: On Sunday the 28th of November, the prisoner came into the court where I lodge, Salisbury-court, Fleet-street; she came to the door, and I saw her take a quart and a pint from within the door, and put them in her apron; she went out at the door, a woman on the other side of the way called out to her, and she dropped them in the court, and ran away; I went after her, laid hold of her, and found a pint not upon her; I asked her what she had got, and she said, nothing; I found it concealed under her petticoats, tied behind her; I took her to a public-house in Derset-street, and charged a constable with her; I then took the pot to the prosecutor's house in the Old-change, it had his name upon it. (The pint pot was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. It never was tied to my petticoats.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-37

37. MARY GROSVENOR and WILLIAM BARRETT were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , in the dwelling-house of Abraham Polley, a pocket-book, value 1s. 6d. a Bank-note, value 200l. two other Banknotes, each of the value of 2l. and eight other Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of Joseph Hodgetts , and the other for that he, knowing the said Mary to have committed the said felony, her the said Mary feloniously did receive, harbour and maintain .

(The prosecutor not being able to identify the notes, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-38

38. CATHERINE MEAD and JOHN DORAN were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , a gold watch, value 10l. a silk handkerchief, value 5s. and a linen handkerchief, value 8d. the property of William Ford , privily from his person , and the other for receiving a gold watch, parcel of the aforesaid goods, knowing it to have been stolen .(Mr. Knapp having opened the case on the part of the prosecution, and the Court being of opinion there was not sufficient evidence to go to the Jury, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-39

39. FRANCIS KEOFFE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Kelley , Esq ; about the hour of twelve in the night of the 2d of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, a silver spoon, value 2s. two jugs, value 1s. a brush, value 2d. a knife, value 2d. and a pound of butter, value 6d. the property of the said William.

ANTHONY HUNTER sworn. - Q. Do you know Mr. Kelley? - A. Yes.

Q.Where does he live? - A. In Upper Holloway .

Q. Do you remember your master's house being broke open? - A. Yes; on the evening of the 3d of November.

Q. At what time, I cannot state the time, we were in bed.

Q. Who was the last up? - A. I was the last up.

Q.Were the doors and windows all fastened? - A. Yes, I went round to look.

Q. What time did you rise in the morning? - A.Between seven and eight.

Q.Were you the first up? - A. No, the house maid was first up.

Q. Is she here? - A.No.

Q. How did you find the house when you got up? - A. I found the scullery window broke open, and a scrubbing-brush taken out, which was in the window seat over-night, and a case-knife; we missed a silver spoon, which we were not sure whether it was taken from the scullery or the dairy; after we went into the yard, we found the dairy window was taken out, and laid by the dairy; we went into the dairy, and found that some milk had been drank, and sometime after we discovered two mugs being gone from the dairy, and some butter had been taken out from one of the butter-pots.

Q.Where is this dairy? - A. It is separated from the house.

Q.Then it is not a part of the dwelling-house? - A. No.

NELSON STRATTON sworn. - Q. Are you a constable? - A. I am a constable of St. Mary Islington ; on Wednesday, the 3d of November, about half past five in the morning, I was looking after the watchmen, to see that they were doing their duty, and I heard something in the road; I went into the road, and saw a man, who turned out to be the prisoner; he seemed to wish to shun me, and went out of the road into the foot-path; I stopped him in the path, and asked him what he had got; he had a bundle, he spoke broken English, he is a German, I believe; I put my hand into the bundle, and found some wet linen, I put my hand in his pocket, and found this knife, this silver spoon, these two jugs of butter, and a scrubbing-brush.(Produces them.)

Q. Does Ray know any more than you? - A. No.

Q.(To Hunter.) Look at these things and tell me whose property they are? - A. They are the property of Mr. William Kelly , my master.

Q. How do you know that? - A. I know the spoon by having it frequently in use.

Jury. Q. Has it any mark? - A. It has not.

Q. Do you know the pots too? - A. Yes; I have no doubt in the least.

Stratton. I asked the prisoner how he came by them, he said, he took them from the cookery.

Prisoner's defence. I took them from a cook-house, I don't know what to say, the window was open. GUILTY, aged 45.

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-40

40. ELIZABETH WILDE was indicted for making an assault in a certain passage near the King's highway, on the 19th of November , upon Mary Porter , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, a muff, value 20s. the property of the said Mary.

MARY PORTER sworn. - Q. Do you remember being in one of the passages near Leicester-fields, on the 26th of November last? - A. On the 19th of November, I had been to see a lady home, and was returning home through Ryder's-court , into Cranbourn-alley.

Q.What time in the evening was it? - A.About a quarter past eleven o'clock at night; as I was coming through, a woman slapped my face.

Q. Could you tell what woman it was? - A. No, I did not know her.

Q. Did you afterwards know her? - A. No, I should not know her if I was to see her; she then pushed me against Elizabeth Wild, and she struck me.

Q. Where is Elizabeth Wild ? - A. That is the person. (Pointing to the prisoner.)

Q. Are you quite sure it was the prisoner? - A. Yes; I am convinced that is the person that took my muff from me.

Q. She took your muff, did she? - A. Yes, she took my muff, and slapped me several times afterwards.

Q.Did she strike you violently? - A. Yes, she struck me so that I had a black eye, which is not gone off yet.

Q. Were you frightened? - A. Yes, very much; there were several other women there besides her.

Q. Did the women all seem to be of the same party? - A. Yes, they did.

Q.Were there any passengers going by? - A. Not a creature; I staid, I suppose, five minutes, and no person came to assist me.

Q. Did she snatch your muff? - A. Yes; when I found it going, I turned round to see who was taking it, and saw the prisoner, and I knew her by fight, I held it as long as I could.

Q.Were there sufficient light for you to see her distinctly? - A. Yes; there was a lamp at the corner; some of the other women took my hat and tore it to pieces, and bit me; I was very violently bit in my arm.

Q. Did any thing else happen to you? - A. No, the prisoner went away.

Q. How soon did she go away? - A. She was gone in an instant.

Q. Did she run or walk? - A. Upon my honour I cannot say, she was gone in an instant.

Q. Did the prisoner and the other woman abuse you very much? - A. Yes, and swore at me a good deal.

Q. Do you recollect any expression? - A. Yes, they d - d my eyes and limbs.

Q. What did they call you? - A. They did not call me any thing in particular, they began without speaking at first.

Q. Did they tell you you had no business there? - A. No.

Q. Did this woman appear to you to be in liquor? - A. No, not that I know of.

Q. Who was the lady you went to see home? - A. A Miss Digmond, she lives at a hatter's in that court, she had been to see me.

Q. You were going home to your own lodgings? - A. Yes; I had not been out a quarter of an hour altogether.

Q. Where are your lodgings? - A. No. 2, Leicester-street, Leicester-square.

Q. Do you live by yourself? - A. Yes, I have lived there almost five years.

Q.You are a single woman? - A. Yes.

Q. And this lady you went home with is a single woman, and lives by herself? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it your cap or bonnet that they took off? - A. It was a hat.

Q. You did not see what was done with your muff? - A. No.

Q. What was your muff worth? - A. A guinea, or twenty shillings, I suppose; there was another person taken up, who said, she had found the muff, and fold it for 3s. 6d.; the Grand Jury did not find a bill against her.

Prisoner's defence. Last Friday night was a week I was coming through Cranbourn-alley, and it rained very hard, and I stood under a court for shelter, and this young woman and some others began fighting, and the little girl that was taken up first picked it up in the court; a person of the name of Bird saw her pick it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18021201-41

41. ELEANOR CARTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , a cloak, value 10s. and a skirt, value 7s. the property of Mary Thompson , widow , privately in her shop .

THOMAS KIRKPATRICK sworn. - I am shopman to Mary Thompson, widow, linen-draper , No. 339, Oxford-street ; I was at dinner when it happened; when I came down from dinner, the prisoner was pointed out to me; I followed her about forty yards; I overtook her, and took out of her apron a scarlet cloak, and a calimanco skirt,(produces them)

Q. Whote property are they? - A. They are the property of Mary Thompson.

Q. How long was it that you had seen them before? - A. I don't recollect seeing them since the morning they laid on the counter.

Q. Was any body in the shop? - A. Yes, Mrs. Thompson was in the shop.

Q. Is Mrs. Thompson here? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming by selling two ropes of onions; I picked them up, not knowing whose they were. GUILTY, aged 56.

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-42

42. MARY COLLINS was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, on the 10th of November , upon Mary-Ann Jackson , putting her in fear, and taking from her person eight aprons, value 16s. four handkerchiefs, value 4s. three gowns, value 10s. two petticoats, value 4s. and two child's clouts, value 1s. the property of the said Mary-Ann.

MARY- ANN JACKSON sworn. - Q. What besel you on the 10th of November last? - A. I had come from the country, and going down Cross-lane , which goes out of Holborn, I saw this young woman and her aunt together, and I asked them if they would have any gin.

Q.Had you seen them before? - A. Yes; she has lived in the neighbourhood a long while; immediately upon my asking of her if she would have any gin, she hit me in the face, and took away my bundle, which I had in my gown.

Q. Was this in the street? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. What time of the night was it? - A. I can not say the hour, it was between light and dark.

Q.What did she do when she got your bundle? - A. She ran away up a pair of stairs; she beat me so that I was covered with blood when I went to the Justice's with her.

Q.When she went up stairs, did she go out of your fight? - A. Yes, I could not find her.

Q.Was it a strange house? - A. Yes, it was a strange house to me.

Q. What became of her aunt? - A. She said, don't beat her any more, for you will kill her.

Q. Did she strike you with her hand open, or clenched? - A.Clenched.

Q. How long was she out of your fight? - A. I suppose half an hour, then she came down stairs and beat me again.

Q. By this time there were a great number of people in the street? - A. I don't know whether there were or not, for I went to my acquaintance and went to bed; my home was in the country.

Q.How far was this from your acquaintance's? - A. About eleven yards.

Q. Did she afterwards come to you to your acquaintance's house? - A. No, I went to her, and saw her again; I asked her for the things, and told her, if she would let me have the duplicates, I would be glad; she told me I might be d - d, and the duplicates too; then I went and found the watchman.

Q.What is his name? - A.Callahan; he went to look for her, and it was late at night before he could find her; 2 about twelve o'clock at night he found

her in the same room that she ran up to; the watchman brought her up stairs to where I was in bed; she brought an old coloured apron and two clouts and asked me if they were mine; she then went upon her knees, and asked for mercy; I said, if she had done nothing to me, what did she want with mercy from me.

Q. Were the things which she brought your's? - A. The clouts were mine, but the apron I never saw before.

Q.They were a part of your bundle? - A. Yes, they were in the bundle.

Q. Had you and the prisoner, and the aunt, been talking before? - A. No; I went down the street, and saw her aunt and her at the door, and I asked them to have some gin.

Q.What is the name of this place? - A. It used to be called Lewkner's-lane.

Q. Did the prisoner appear to be in liquor when she used all this violence? - A. Yes, she was in liquor.

Q. Did not you call out for assistance? - A. I did.

Q. Did any body come to your assistance? - A. No.

Q. Was any body passing? - A. If there was, they all knew one another, and would not come to assist any body in trouble.

Q. What way of life are they in? - A. The prisoner sells matches about the streets.

Prisoner. Q.Did not you give my aunt two clouts, she being big with child? - A. I did not; what I had, my all and whole, was in the bundle.

DANIEL CALLAHAN sworn. - I am a watchman.

Q. Do you remember going to apprehend the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you apprehend her? - A. At her aunt's place; I don't know whether it belonged to her or to her aunt.

Q. What street was it? - A.Lewkner's-lane; there is no number to the house; my partner was with me; we searched the room, but did not see the bundle.

THOMAS BRESSNAN sworn. - Q. Do you remember this house where the prisoner and her aunt were? - A. Yes.

Q.What did you find there? - A. I found these two clouts, and a piece of slannel, that Mrs. Jackson said was her's, but that was left at the watch-house; we took this girl and her aunt to Mrs. Jackson, where she was in bed, and she said these were her clouts.

Q.(To Jackson.) Look at those two clouts? - A. They are my clouts.

Q.What do you know them by? - A. About a twelvemonth ago I was obliged to piece them as well as I could, with different things; here is a piece of an old petticoat of mine; I am sure they are mine.

Q. And were they in the bundle at the time you lost it? - A. Yes.

Q. What else was there in the bundle? - A. There were eight aprons, three gowns, a white petticoat, and a slannel petticoat.

Q. Do you remember seeing a piece of slannel? - A. Yes; the prisoner brought the slannel, and said, here is a piece of your flannel; it was a piece of a waistcoat that I had formerly slept in.

Q.Was the piece of flannel in your bundle? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. These two clouts she gave to my aunt; she pulled them out of her pocket, and a bit of flannel, and gave them my aunt for her child; she sent for something to drink, and told us she had lost her bundle; I saw no bundle at all; I never laid my hands upon her.

Q.(To Jackson.) What was your errand in town? - A. To go into servitude.

Q. Had you been drinking before you got into town? - A. Yes, I had.

Q. Had you drank gin, or only beer? - A. Both.

Q. You did not feel your head quite as steady as usual, did you? - A. No, certainly not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18021201-43

43. JAMES KITCHENER and SARAH ARTHUR were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , twenty-three yards of check, value 42s. the property of Marmaduke Strother , in his dwelling-house ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

MARMADUKE STROTHER sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. No. 45, Broad-street, St. Giles's .

Q.What are you? - A. A linen-draper : On the 11th of November, between nine and ten in the morning, the boy, John Mountain, came to me, and gave me some information, in consequence of which I came up into the shop, and missed a roll of check, which I had laid at the door, four threads of blue cotton, and three threads of white linen.

Q.Whereabouts had you laid it? - A. I laid it within six inches of the iron bar which goes about six inches from the door jam.

Q.Might a person going by easily have taken it? - A. Yes, by pulling it hard; I immediately asked a friend's advice, and he recommended me to go to Bow-street; I went there immediately; then I went to Crocker's lodgings.

Q. Who is Crocker? - A. A Bow-street officer; according to his directions, I went to the top of Doyl-street, and stood within Russell-street, at the top of Dyot-street, in company with John Mountain.

Q. Who is John Mountain? - A. A boy who lives with his parents in Middle-row, St. Giles's;

in a very little time after that, Crocker came up with two persons, neither of whom I knew, but Mountain pointing to one person, said, that is him, that is him.

Q. Was that the man at the bar? - A. Yes; we took him to Bow-street; I had not been in Russell-street long, before Crocker brought in a piece of check that answered the description I had given.

Q. Was it your check? - A. It is rather more than a half quarter wide.

Q. Will you swear it to be your's? - A. When it was taken from my door, it had a private mark upon it, and was rolled up in a roll; this check answers exactly to the same pattern and the same width.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - (Produces the check.) I found it in the possession of the woman prisoner on Thursday, the 11th of November, somewhere between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Strother. The private mark was upon a piece of buckram, pinned on.

Q. Can you swear to it? - A. As my mark is gone I cannot.

JOHN MOUNTAIN called. - Q. How old are you? - A. I am in my fourteenth year.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the consequence of taking a false oath? - A. Yes, it is perjury, my Lord -(sworn), I was standing opposite Mr. Strother's, and saw the prisoner Kitchener go within side the door and take a piece of check and run away with it; I went over to give information of it; I lost him in Middle-row; Mr. Strother then went for Mr. Crocker, and I went with Mr. Strother and Mr. Crocker to the top of Dyot-street; I said with Mr. Strother, and Mr. Crocker went and brought the prisoner Kitchener, and asked me if that was the man; I told him it was, and then they took him to Bow street.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

Q.Had you ever seen him before? - A. Yes, I knew him by fight.

Q. How long had you know him? - A. I had known him walking about the neighbourhood.

Prisoner. Q. What time of the day was it you saw it taken? - A. About ten o'clock; it might be before or after, I cannot say rightly.

Q. Why did you not give the alarm when you saw me take it? - A. I had not presence of mind, but went over immediately to Mr. Strother's.

Q.(To Crocker). You are an officer of Bow-street? - A. Yes: On Thursday morning, the 11th of November, Mr. Strother came to me about half past ten, or between that and eleven, and told me he had lost a piece of check, and from the description he gave me of the person, I went with some brother officers up into St. Giles's; I advised Mr. Strother to get the boy, and go to the top of Dyot-street, and to wait there till he saw me; we found the prisoner Kitchener in the dress the boy described, with another person; I then took him to the top of Dyot-street to Mr. Strother and the boy, and the boy identified him, and we took him to the Brown Bear , in Bow-street; we left him there, and went up into St. Giles's again, and from information we went to the aprtments of the prisoner Arthur; I made an excuse; and went into the apartments; I came up again, and went down a second time with Limbrick; when I went down the second time, I told her what we came after; we looked about, and I asked her if she had any other apartments; she then took me up to the twopair of stairs front room; when I came down stairs again, Limbrick said, pointing to the corner of the Chimney, look there, Ned; I took up an old coat, and under it I found this piece of check; we asked her where she got it; she would not make answer for a good while; after a little while, she said, she had it of Kitchener, and that she was to give him a guinea for it; she was brought to Bow-street.

Q. Does Kitchener lieve in that house? - A. No, not that I know of.

Q. What is the prisoner Arthur? - A. She lives in a kind of cellar, where they sell old shoes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Had you made this woman any promise before she said she had it of Kitchener? - A. No, I did not.

RICHARD LIMBRICK sworn. - I am an officer; I was in company with Crocker; we went down into Mrs. Arthur's kitchen; we told her we came after a piece of check; we did not see it below at first, and I desired her to go up stairs with Crocker and shew the other apartments.

Q. Did you know she had another apartment? - A. I did not see any bed below stairs, and judged she had another apartment; they went up stairs, I was watching her son and another man that were below stairs at the same time; when Crocker came down stairs I told him to look behind the chimney, there was a dark corner by the side of the chimney, and underneath a great coat Crocker pulled out this piece of check; we then asked her how she came by it, she was a long time before she would give any answer at all, and she then said she had it of Kitchener; Crocker then took her son to the office, and I remained with her while she put on her cloak and bonnet, and as she was going along she told me she was obliged to pawn for the money she gave to Kitchener; she was to give him a guinea for it, and she had given him fourteen shillings in part, and was to give him seven more; before they were examined Kitchener changed his geat coat and put on another very ragged one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do not you know it is this woman's son that keeps the house and not herself? - A. No.

Q. The place was very dark, was it not? - A. Yes.

Q.And did she not offer you a light? - A. Yes, after the property was found.

Kitchener's defence. I am quite entirely innocent; I was not near the place the time.

I was not near the place at the time.(For prisoner Kitchener.)

GEORGE LEE sworn. - Prisoner Q. What time was I at your house? -

Court. Q. Where do you live? - A. I keep the King's Arms, Durry-lane: On the 11th of November the prisoner came in about nine o'clock, and stopped till half past ten; he had half a pint of purl while he stopped.

Q. How do you know it was half past ten? - A. I know it by the clock; it was near eleven.

The prisoner Arthur called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Court. (To Mountain.) Q. You say you saw the prisoner the something from Mr. Strother's shop? - A. Yes.

Q.What frot of looking thing was it. such a looking thing as that? - A. Yes it was.

Q. How far does Mr. Strother live from Lee's house? - A. I don't know the house.

Q.(To Croker.) How far is the King's Arms Druty-lane, from Strother's? - A. About two hundred yards.

Q.(To Strother.) What is the value of this cheek? - A.It is worth two guineas, it cannot be manufactured for less.

Kitchener, GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing goods value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Arthur, Not GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gross.

Reference Number: t18021201-44

44. JOSEPH ROBINSON was indicted for making an assault, in the King's highway, on the 11th of November , upon Joseph Wilkin , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a cloak, value 10s. 6d. and a handkerchief, value 1d. the property of John Wilkin .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Joseph Beloudy .

JOSEPH WILKIN called. - Q. You know you are come to take an oath here? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the meaning of taking that oath? - A. Yes.

Q. What will become of you if you do not tell the truth? - A. I shall not go to God. (Sworn.)

Q. Do you remember being in White Lion street, Islington ? - A. Yes, this day fortnight; I had a bundle in my hand, which contained a large cloak and a piece of skipping-rope; it was wrapped in a pocket-handkerchief.

Q. Who did the cloak belong to? - A. My grandmother, Mrs. Beloudy.

Q. Who did the handkerchief belong to? - A. That belonged to my grandmother.

Q. What time of day was it? - A.Between five and six o'clock, near dusk.

Q.Was it very dark? - A. No.

Q.Did any body come up to you? - A. Yes, A young man.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. No, nor to my knowledge; I might know him if I was to see him again, but I did not take much notice of him.

Q.Look at the prisoner at the bar, and see if you think that is the man? - A. It seems to be him by the face.

Q.When he came up to you what did he say to you? - A. He asked me where John-street was, I told him I did not know; he asked me what I had in the bundle, I said my grand-mother's cloak; he asked me to let him tie it tighter, I said I would not; he had it his hand he would not let it go; then he made a snatch at it and ran a way with it.

Q.Did he snatch it out of your hand? - A. Yes, and ran down the street into Islington.

Q. Dit you lose fight of him? - A. Yes; I ran after him and cried out stop thief; a gentleman stopped him in Islington; he had dropped the bundle.

Q. Did you see the gentleman stop him? - A. No.

Q. Did you see the man after he was stopped? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BENHAM sworn - I am a grocer, cheesemonger, and shop-keeper, on the 11th of November, between the hours of five and six in the evening, I was in Islington, between the Angel and White-lion-street; I was driving my own cart, and walking by the side of it.

Q. Do you remember hearing any cry of stop thief? - A. Yes, by a great many voices.

Q. You did not see the boy at time you heard the cry? - A. No, he was far distant behind: I saw a person running down the middle of the road, with a bundle.

Q. Did you stop him? - A. No; I saw him throw the bundle away, and I picked it up, and put it in the cart, and took it to my brother's in Cross-street, Islington, and there left it.

Q. You did not pursue the man at all? - A. No, I did not; I then went home; I afterwards saw the prisoner in custody, when he was taken by my brother.

JOHN BENHEM sworn. - Q. Do you remember the cry of stop thief, on the 11th of November last? - A. Yes, I was with my brother; I observed a man running very swiftly down the middle of the road; I instantly spitung from the side of my brother, and ran into the middle of the road; at the same time, observing the man to have a white bundle under his arm, I put myself in a position to stop him.

Q.Were you meeting him? - A. Yes, he was going towards London, and I was going from London, be immediately threw the bundle down; by his throwing down the bundle, I immediately conceived that was the man called after; he passed me, I immediately turned round and followed him, I overtook him as he was turning down the City-road.

Q. Are you quite clear that he was the same man that dropped the bundle? - A. Yes, I stopped him, and told him he must go with me to the watch-house.

Q. Did he make much resistance? - A. No.

Q.There were a great many people, I suppose, close after you? - A. A great many; I took him to the watch-house.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar - are you quite sure he is the man? - A. I am quite sure.

Q.What was done with the bundle? - A. It was left at my house till the constable came and fetched it.

Q. Did you lock up the bundle while you had it? - A. No, I put it in the parlour.

Q. Are you sure the bundle you delivered to the constable is the same? - A. Yes.

NELSON STRATTON sworn. - I am constable of Islington. (Produces a bundle.)

Q.Where did you receive that bundle from? - A. From Mr. John Benharn 's house in Cross-street.

Q. In what part of the house? - A. Mr. Benham fetched it from the parlour, and delivered it to me.

Q.(To, Joseph Wilkin .) Look at that bundle? - A.This is my skipping-rope.

Q.Whose handkerchief is that? - A.It is my grandmother's.

Q. What do you know it by? - A. By a tear in it.

Q. Do you know the cloak? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Are you quite sure it was this day fortnight? - A. I am not.

ANN WILKIN sworn. - Q.Look at that cloak? - A. I son my little boy with this cloak to my mother's, Mrs. Beloudy.

Q. Look both at the cloak and handkerchief? - A. The cloak I have to doubt is my mother's; the handkerchief is the child's pocket-hundkerchief.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through Islington, and there was a cry of stop thief, and that gentleman laid hold of me.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but no violently from the person

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18021201-45

45. JOHN VICKERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , six half-guineas, fifty-four seven-shilling-pieces, twenty-six shilling, and thirty one sixpences, the property of Charles Robertson , in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Konowlys.)

CHARLES ROBERTSON sworn. - I keep the public-house , called the New-River-head, at Lime-house .

Q. In what parish is that? - A. In the parish of St. Ann's, Limehouse.

Q. How long had the prisoner been in your service before this happened? - A. About ten days.

Q. Are you intrusted with the payment of a number of rope-maker's servants? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of that, you keep a good deal of change in your house? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 23d of November, at night, did you secure you house? - A. Yes.

Q. How much had you in the house at that time? - A.Forty pounds in small gold, and about five pounds in silver; I cannot swear to the amount.

Q.What was it in? - A. The gold was in one bason, and the silver in another.

Q. Did you usually lock these basons up of 2 night? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take them up stairs with you that night? - A. No, I lest them below, by mistake, close to the bar door, in the passage.

Q.Was the prisoner gone to bed when you left it in the passage? - A. Yes.

Q.What was his usual time of getting up to light the tap-room fire? - A. About five o'clock.

Q. How soon the next morning did you entertain a suspicion that this was gone? - A. A little before six the prisoner had the key of the kitchen from my room to light a fire in the kitchen.

Q. Was the prisoner the first person up in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon after did your wife get up? - A This was a few minutes before six, and she got up in less than a quarter of an hour after.

Q. How soon after that did you hear her call the sad? - A.Instantly that she came down I heard her call John, and he did not answer; I went down immediately, half dressed, and found the money was gone; I then called up the other servant.

Q. Did you make immediate enquiry after the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it you found him? - A.Between twelve and one o'clock that day.

Q.Where did you first see him? - A. At the office in Whitechapel.

Q.Lambeth-street office? - A. Yes.

Q. He was then in the custody of Nowlan? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you say any thing to him when you

saw him? - A.After he was examined and sent away, I said, how could you be so cruel as to serve me as you have done.

Q. Did you say any thing else to him before he made you an answer? - A. No.

Q. Did you make any promise or use any threat? - A.Nothing of the kind; he began crying, said he was very sorry, and wished to come back to live with me, to make me a recompence for his misconduct.

Q. Had you, before that, received any pocketbook from Mrs. Flinn? - A. That was afterwards; I received two pocket-books.

Q.Before you saw him, had you recovered any part of your money? - A. No, the officer had got the money.

Q. Did you know the officer had the money, before the lad said this to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he say any thing to you respecting the money you have seen in the officer's possession? - A. I asked him how much he had robbed me of; he said, about thirty pounds in the whole; he told me, he had laid out about six or seven pounds to clothe himself, and had bought a watch out of my money.

Q. Did he say how he had disposed of the rest of the money? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Do you know a Mrs. Mary Flinn ? - A. Yes; she is here; he told me she had two pocketbooks, he desired her to give them to me, for they were of no use to her.

MARY FLINN sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At the bottom of Castle-street.

Q. How far from Mr. Robertson's house? - A. I don't know.

Q. What part of the town is it in? - A.Whitechapel.

Q. Do you know the lad at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him on the day he was taken up? - A. Yes, about ten o'clock; he said he was come to take his leave of me, and to pay me what he owed me; he said his father had sent for him, and had sent him ten pounds to take him home; he asked me, if I would go with him to Whitechapel to buy a few things, and accordingly I went with him.

Q. How much did he lay out? - A. I cannot tell how much; he bought a watch, and gave two pounds fourteen shillings, I think it was.

Q. Did he buy any other thing? - A. Not while I was with him.

Q. Did he leave any thing with you? - A. He left his old clothes, which contained two pocketbooks.

Q. Did he deliver you any thing before the officers took him into custody? - A. Yes, he gave me a pocket-book just as the officer was coming in, about a minute, I believe, before the officer came in.

Q. Did you see what that pocket-book contained before you gave it to the officer? - A. No, I had never looked at it.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that woman by at the time? - A. Not when I first apprehended him.

Q. How soon after you apprehended him did you see her? - A. About ten minutes.

Q. Did the deliver any thing to you? - A. Yes; she delivered me this pocket-book, containing fiftyfour seven-shilling-pieces, six half-guineas, twentythree shillings, and twenty-six-sixpences.

Q. Did she, while the prisoner was present, tell you how she came by that pocket-book? - A. No, the prisoner was not present; I found three shillings, and five sixpences upon the prisoner.

Q. Had he any watch when you took him? - A. Yes; the prosecutor came to the office in the evening, and desired to see the prisoner; I took him to the lock-up house, and went in with him; he said, John, how could you use me so cruelly to rob me in that manner; he said, I am very sorry for it; I was over persuaded to do it; the prosecutor said, how much have you robbed me of; he said, I believe, about thirty pounds; he said, how much have you laid out in rigging yourself in the manner you are; he said, six or seven pounds he asked him, is that out of my money, and the prisoner said, yes; he had bought all these cloaths and the watch.

Q. Did you say any thing to him about the pocket-books you received from Mrs. Flinn? - A. Not till after he was committed.

Q. Did you say any thing about the pocket-book that Mrs. Flinn had delivered to you? - A. Yes; he said, if I went to Mrs. Flinn's, I should find it; he said, he had given it to Mrs. Flinn; after him, in the lock-up house, for the two memorandum books, where he had scores down; he said, if we went to Mrs. Flinn's house, we should find them there in his coat-pocket; I went to Mrs. Flinn's house, and found the pocket-books.

Q.(To Robertson.) Were these memorandumbooks lost at the same time with the money? - A. Yes, they are books that he used to wear in his pocket to put the scores down upon.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but throw myself upon the mercy of the court.(The prisoner was recommended by the Jury, on account of the temptation laid before him, from the money being left in the passage.)

GUILTY Death aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-46

46. JOHN DORAN was indicted for making an assault in a certain passage and open place, near

the King's highway, on the 13th of November , upon Antonio Joseph , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silver watch, value 3l. a silver watch chain, value 3s. and a watch-key, value 1d. the property of the said Antonio.(The prosecutor being a foreigner, an interpreter was sworn.)

ANTONIO JOSEPH sworn. - Q. What happened to you on the 13th of November last? - A. I don't know the nature of the street.

Q. Was it near Tower-hill? - A. A little below Tower-hill.

Q.At what time in the evening were your robbed? - A.Between five and six in the evening.

Q. What happened to you then? - A. was walking up the Dark-entry, the street is called the Dark-entry .

Q. What happed to you? - A short man snatched my watch entirely out of my fob.

Q. Did you resist the man snatching it out of your pocket? - A.Immediately he drew my watch out, he ran away, I immediately called out stop thief.

Q. Did you run after him? - A. I did my endeavour to run after him, but having a fore thigh, being lame, two men came behind me, and gave me several blows in the back part of my head, and knocked me down; I fell on my hands, my slick went one way, and my hat another; I cried out stop thief, as loud as I could, being unable to run, having such a bad thigh.

Q. Did you see the prisoner after he was taken? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say, that the man you saw afterwards, was the man the took your watch? - A. I will swear, that the man I saw at the Police-office, is the same man that took my watch the same evening.

Q. Look at the prisoner - can you take upon you to say that is the man? - A. I can take a safe oath of it.

Q. Was the watch a gold one or a silver one? - A. The watch, chain, seal, and key were all silver.

THOMAS SERJEANT sworn. Q. Are you acquainted with the prosecutor? - A. Yes; I was standing at my own door, at the bottom of Butcher-row, opposite the Dark-entry, in the parish of St. Botolphs's, Aldgate, I heard a cry of stop thief, stop thief.

Q. Could you perceive, at that time, the person from whom the cry came? - A. No, I immediatey crossed over towards the Dark-entry, where I thought the voice came from.

Q. Is your own door in the City of London? - No, my own door is the precinct of St. Catherine's.

Q. And where is this dark entry? - A. One side of the way is in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate, and the other side is in the precinct of St. Catherlne's.

Q. Is it Aldate without the City of London? - A. Yes; I am positively sure it is without the City of London; I made for the Dark-entry, and as I was going over, I saw the prisoner, with two other men, run from the passage down the street, very fast; I am positive the prisoner was one of them; I then saw the prosecutor endeavouring to make after him, without hat or stick, I knew Joseph to be very lame.

Q.Did you know him before? - A. I have known him these four years; knowing him to be lame, and hearing they had robbed him of his watch, I immediately pursued them to the Army Victualling-office, the space of about two hundred and fifty yards; I called out stop thief, and the prisoner, and two other men endeavoured to drown my noise, by making a noise as if there was a mad bull coming; I kept fight of the prisoner till he was stopped by Mr. Young, a painter; when I came up, he was in Mr. Young's custody.

GEORGE YOUNG sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 3l, Lower East Smithfield.

Q. No you remember, on the 13th of November last, hearing a cry of stop thief? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. You did not see the person who uttered that cry, did you? - A. No; I was in my own shop; I heard a noise in the street, I went to the door, and saw the prisoner coming past my door, running very fast.

Q. Was any body with him? - A. I saw several people at a distance, but no body with him; I asked him, what is the matter, my lad, he said, only a mad bull, Sir.

Q. Do you happen to know if that is a cant phrase? - A. I only know, that about ten days before this, a clergyman was robbed, and upon calling stop thief, the thieves made a cry of a mad bull; I seized the prisoner immediately; he asked me, what I meant by stopping him, I told him, I should stop him till the mad bull came up, for I suspected what he was, and while I had hold of him by the collar, he dropped a silver watch between his legs, upon the ground; I said to a person standing by, sir, I will thank you to pick up this watch, and give it to me, which the person did; he that time there was a vast concourse of people.

Q.Amongst them, did you see Anthony Joseph? - A. Yes; the prisoner begged that he might not be ill used; I immediately put him into the little watch-house, belonging to the Army Victualling-office; we then sent for a Police-officer, and he was taken to the office; I delivered the watch to an officer or the name of Smith.

Q. That is all you know of it? - A. Yes.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Q. Do you remember taking the prisoner into cutody? - A. Yes, upon the 30th of November.

Q. Do you remmeber Mr. Young, the last witness, giving you a watch, with the prisoner? - A. Yes, I have had it ever since. (Produces the watch.)

Q.(To Anthony Joseph .) Look at that watch, chain, and seal, and say whether, upon your oath, you can swear they are your's? - A. I can take a safe oath of it; I know it well.

Prisoner's defence. I live at a cooper's, I went with a journeyman, to Rotherhithe, to buy some casks; as I was coming along, there was a great outcry of mad bull, and I was running with the rest, and this gentleman laid hold of me; I know nothing of the watch.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing, but not violently, from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18021201-47

47. JOHN MEHARNEY was indicted for being found at large before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

EDWARD RODGHERS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. An officer of the police.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner being convicted at the gaol delivery for the county of Middlesex? - A. Yes; I apprehended him in the year 1796, previous to his conviction.

Q.Was he tried? - A. He was, at the Old Balley.

Q. Have you seen the record of his conviction? - A. I have.

Q. Have you got it by you? - A. I have, (produced the certificate of the conviction of the prisoner); I did not see it figned.

Mr. MICHAEL- JOHN FITZAPTRICK sworn. -Q. Do you know the hand-writing of Mr. Thomas Shelton? - A. Yes, I have seen him write many times.

Q.Is that Mr. Shelton's signature? - A. It is.(The certificate read.)

Q.(To Rodgers.) Were you present in Court when this man was tried? - A. I was.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar; is that the man that was then tried? - A. It is; I knew him in the street, and took him.

Q. Had you known him before? - A. I had.

Q.Have you any doubt about his person? - A. Not the smallest.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It is six years and a half since that trial? - A. Yes.

Q.During that time you have not seen him? - A. Yes, I saw him about three months since, but I was then in search of a man upon suspicion of murder, and I could not take him.

Captain READ sworn. - Q. What are you? - A.Deputy overseer of the hulks on the River Thames.

Q.Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you remember his being delivered into your custody? - A.Perfectly well.

Q. When? - A. On the 13th of December, 1796.

Q. By whom was he delivered into your custody? - A. By Mr. Kirby.

Q. How long did he remain in your custody? - A.Until the 26th of July, 1797.

Q. How did he escape from you? - A. He was at work on shore in the dock-yard, and on retuning from work, forty of fifty of the seized several ladders that the bricklayers and carpenters had been at work with, and placed them against the boundary wall of the yard, and before our officers could get the ladders, seven of them got outside the wall.

Q. Do you know if the prisoner at the bar was one of the seven? - A. He was; the other six were taken within half an hour; the prisoner was the only one that escaped.

Q. I suppose, from the prisoner having been a year in your custody, you have no boubt of his person? - A. No, not at all; it was my province to attend them in their labour from morning to night.

Q. Who was it took him up upon his last occasion? - A.Rodgers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate that you doubted whether he was the person? - A. No, I did not, I know him perfecty well.

Q.(To Rodgers.) When did you take the prisoner? - A. On the 30th day of October last.

Q.Where? - A. I took him in Ratcliff-highway, between seven and eight at night.

Q. He was quite at large, was he? - A. He was at large, and another man with him.

Q.In what parish? - A.In the parish of St. George's, Middlesex.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you attend here the whole of that Session in which he was tried? - A. I was here when sentence was passed.

Q. You know there is a reward of 20l. if this man is convicted? - A. I suppose there is.

Q. I will ask you again, do you mean to swear you were in Court when sentence was passed? - A. Yes, I was here.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing at all to do with it, I am not the man, that is not my name.

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18021201-48

48. ANN GERMAINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , a silver watch, value 42s. the property of John Holloway , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Kenney .

It appearing in evidence that the prosecutor was excessively intoxicated at the time he lost his watch, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-49

49. GEORGE SAVAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , one dozen of ink pots, value 3s. the property of Thomas Flight , James Williams , and William Cooper .(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

JAMES WILLIAMS sworn. - My partners names are Thomas Flight, and William Cooper, stationers , in Holborn ; the prisoner had been our servant about a month before the 4th of November: On that day, I marked a number of ink-pots, which were tied up in dozens, in brown paper; I saw one dozen removed from the main quantity to behind some books, apparently to be concealed; the prisoner went to dinner about one o'clock; I examined the spot where I had seen the dozen hid, and they were gone; I sent after the prisoner, he came back, and I told him he was suspected, he denied it, and wanted to go backwards; I would not allow it, then he begged forgiveness; I told him I would prosecute; he then unbuttoned the slap of his breeches, and with difficulty drew out the dozen of ink-pots which I had marked; I sent for an officer, who took him into custody.

JOHN DIXON sworn. - I am an officer, and produce the ink-pots. (The property produced and identified.)

WILLIAM PHELPS sworn. - I am servant to Flight, Williams, and Cooper; on the 4th of November, I marked the parcel W. P. November the 4th, twelve o'clock.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 38.

The prisoner died before sentence was passed .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-50

50. ANN BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , four gowns, value 35s. a petticoat, value 10s. and three pair of stockings, value 6s. the property of Mary-Jane Notra , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MARY-JANE NOTRA sworn. - I live at Hammersmith , am a widow, and keep the house myself and a boarding-school ; the prisoner was my servant , and lived in the evening, on the 29th of October, I missed the articles from my bed-room, where they lay loose; I saw them before the Magistrate next day evening; the prisoner went away the same day; I missed the thing after she was gone; she had given warning, but the time was not expired; my partner has seen them in the possession of the constable.

WILLIAM BROOKES sworn. - I am a constable,(produces four gowns, a petticoat, and two pair of stockings); Mrs. Ann Frieth, the partner of Mrs. Notra, gave me charge of the prisoner for robbing her mistress; I took two gowns and two pair of stockings from the prisoner, which were in a bundle on Saturday, the 30th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock, at the Swan Inn, at Hammetsmith; the prisoner said she was guilty of the charge; she had the third pair of stockings on which we did not take; she said the other things were at a pwnbroker's at Hammersmith; I went with her there, and he delivered up two gowns and a petticoat. (The property identified.)

Q.(To Mrs. Notra.) Are they all your property? - A. One of the gowns is mine, and three of my partner's, which I bought for her; I value my gown at 10s. 6d.; the stockings belong to one of my scholars.

Prisoner's defece. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 5s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-51

51. WILLIAM BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , 18lb. of mutton, value 11s. the property of Isaac Cooper .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18021201-52

52. ISAAC PETTIT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , a watch, value 20s. two coats, value 15s. a cloak, value 3s. and a petticoat, value 5s. the property of John Morris , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN MORRIS sworn. - On the 11th of November I was fetched from my work, being informed I was robbed of the articles mentioned in the indictment; I went about to the different pawnbrokers, and while I was in at Chandler's, in Holborn, the prisoner came in with my watch to pledge; I asked him how he came by it, he said, a man had given it to him to pledge, but did not know where that man was; on searching him, I found my handkerchief, the other things were found at a Jew's, in Russell-court.

SARAH MORRIS sworn. - I am the wife of Mr. Morris; I went out on an errand, on Thursday the 11th of November, and was gone about ten minutes, the parlour door was fast when I went out; I was washing below, and when I returned, and went down stairs, one of my children said, the parlour door was wide open, I run up stairs, and

found the door was wide open, and the street door which I left on the latch, the parlour door I left locked, I missed the things and sent for my husband; I went to Mr. Chandler's accidentally, and the prisoner was there, I had not seen him before.

CHARLES TRUEPECAK sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Chandler; the prisoner brought the watch to pledge, on Thursday the 11th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon: Mr. Morris was in the shop, giving a description of the watch, and the prisoner was taken in custody. (The watch produced and identified.)

SIMON LEVI sworn. - I keep a sale-shop, in Russel-court; on Thursday three weeks, a man brought some clothes, and asked me if I bought second-hand things, I said, yes; he asked me twenty-six shillings for them, I gave him nineteen shillings and sixpence, which is the full value of them; I cannot swear to the prisoner. (Produces two coats, a petticoat, and a handkerchief, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, declaring his innocence generally, GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-53

53. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a pocket-book, value 6d. and a one pound note, the property of Owen Gething , privily fron his person .

OWEN GETHING sworn. - I am one of the cashiers of the Bank: On the 9th of November, as I was going over blackfriar's-bridge , about two o'clock, the bridge was full of people, who were seeing the show; about the centre of the bridge, on the west-side, I was surrounded by a great mob, and pressed so very hard, that I could hardly sir; when I got at liberty, I put my hand to my breeches pocket, and found it turned inside out; I had a little pocket-book in my close coat-pocket, which I thought was safe, but which was taken from me; I had a great-coat on, buttoned; next morning, a constable brought the book to me, at the Bank, it having my name in it; I was not the least sensible of the book being taken from me, I did not know I had lost it till the man brought it me; it contained a few memorandums, and a one pound note.

JOHN NASH sworn. - I am a constable, and produce a pocket-book containing a one pound note and sundrry papers; on the 9th of November, I was on Blackfriar's-bridge, about two o'clock, when there was a great crowd; I saw a number of pick-pockets together, and saw the prisoner rush forward from the crowd, with the book in his hand; as soon as he got out, he put it in between his coat and waistcoat; I collared him, and he threw the book down, and begged I would let him go, and in about half a minute he was pulled from me by some people near me; I did not lose fight of him, but took him again; he was taken to the Acorn public-house, in William-street, and searched, but I found nothing, except a white pockethandkerchief; he was taken to Guildhall, and committed, he told the Justice he picked the book up.(Produces the book which was identified by Mr. Gething.)

Prisoner's defence. On the 9th of November, I went to see the show, on the bridge, I turned round and kicked something, and picked the book up, and put it in my bosom, when I was taken into custody. NOT GUITLY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-54

54. THOMAS LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , seven yards of cambric value 3l. 2s. 6d. the property of Samuel Troughton , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL TROUGHTON sworn. - I am a linendraper , No. 33, St. Paul's Church-yard : On the 10th of November, I was informed I was robbed, but know nothing of the robbery, being out of town.

ROBERTS SIMMONDS sworn. - I live at No. 174, Fleet-street, with Mr. Parker, a pwanbroker, and produce seven yards and a half of cambric; on the 29th of September, the prisoner brought this cambric to pawn, about nine o'clock in the morning; he asked ten shillings which gave me suspicion; I asked him if it was his own, he said, it was not, but he brought it for John Morgan, with whom he lived, at No. 44, Drury-lane; I told him, I would send there to know; I did so, and while the boy was gone, the prisoner said, he would step out, and return again in about five minutes; from his plausible story, I said he might, but he never returned; he was with me near twenty minutes, from which I know him; I saw him again about four weeks after, when he was brought to our shop; I have no doubt as to his person, and he pointed me out as the person who had taken the cambric from him.

JOHN OLIVER sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Troughton; the prisoner lived there about five days, while I was ill; I went to his lodgings, to tell him of a porter's place, on the 6th of November, and asked the landlord for Thomas Lewis, as I could inform him of a place; he said, he was in place, in St. Paul's Church-yard, for the brought a piece of lawn home; which he bought; I went home to shut up, and went back to the prisoner's lodgings, and asked him where he was going to take the piece of lawn to which he shewed she landlord, he made no answer, or spoke at all; I then took him by the collar, and took him to my master's warehouse, there was no body at home

but my fellow-servant, and I left him in the dining-room, while I went for a constable, and told him, it would be better confess; he first said, he had found the lawn in Fleet-street, and then he said, that was all he had taken from the warehouse; my master told me to ask him to confess where the rest of the things were, and he would do the best he could for him; I did so, and he said a Jew had it, and had pawned some in Fleet-street. (The cambric produced, but there being no private mark, the prosecutor could not swear to it.)

Q. How did you describe the cambric? - A. I asked him how he came by that cambric.

Q. What did you refer to, what piece of lawn? - A. The piece of lawn he had taken from my master's warehouse.

Q. You charged him with stealing you master's lawn? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-55

55. THOMAS LEWIS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , seven yards of cambric, value 1l. 19s. the property of Samuel Troughton .(The cambric having no private mark, could not be identified). NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-56

56. HENRY LAZARUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , two pair of leather breeches, value 40s. and a trunk, value 4s. the property of Walter Powell , Esq.

WALTER POWELL , Esq. sworn. - I was robbed, but know nothing of the circumstances, I can only identify the property.

THOMAS JONES sworn. - I am groom to Mr. Powell; On the 8th of November, I put two pair of leather breeches into a trunk, at Enfield, and corded it up, and put a direction to it, for Mr. Walter Powell , Lombard-street; I sent it by the Enfield stage, and saw it again at the Matision-house, three days after.

Mr. Knapp. Q. There is more than one Enfield stage, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the name of the person you sent the trunk by to the coach? - A.John.

Q. He is not here? - A. No.

THOMAS CHAPMAN sworn. - I drive the Enfield stage, belonging to Mr. Glover; on the 8th of November, I received a trunk, directed to Mr. Walter Powell , about a quarter before four from the booking house, which I put into the boot; when I came to the Bull-inn, Bishopsgate-street, the box was stolen, I missed it, and the prisoner was caught.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You set off at four o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. You came through Edmonton to the Flower pot? - A. Yes.

Q. How many times did you stop between Enfield and Bishopsgate-street? - A. Only when I took up, or set down.

Q. When did you miss the trunk? - A. It was in the boot at shoreditch-church.

Q. Did you see it again before it was stolen? - A. No, I saw it next Mr. Jones's, a hair-dresser.

THOMAS NICHOL sworn. - I belong to Mr. Wigan, of Crosby-square; On the 8th of November, I heard the cry of stop thief as I stood in Clarke's-court; I saw the prisoner coming across the road, in Bishopsgate-street, with a trunk on his shoulder; three or four yards before he came to me, he threw down the trunk, and turned through Clarke's-court; I caught hold of him by the jacket, but could not hold him, he ran, crying, stop, thief, as well as rest of the people, till he was stopped.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You had never seen the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. This was near seven o'clock, and Bishopsgate-street is a wide street - can you swear to him? - A. Yes, I swear that is the man.

WILLIAM DOCKER sworn. - On the 8th of November, about half past six o'clock, I heard the cry of stop thief, I went to my door, in St. Maryaxe, and the prisoner came round the corner, calling, stop thief; I did not see any person running before him, upon which I followed and took him; a man came up and said, sir, that is not the man; I expected a rescue, and I got assistance; Mr. Nichols came up then, and said, the prisoner was the man; he begged hard for me to let him go, saying, he had a wife and family.

Mr. Knapp. Q. He had no trunk? - A. No.

Q. A man said, he was not the man? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not know the prisoner? - A. No.

- MULLINS sworn. - I am constable of Bread-street Ward, and took the prisoner into custody. (The property produced and identified.)

JOHN JONES sworn. I live at the corner of the Green-dragon, in Bishopsgate-street, and picked the trunk up, near the end of Clarke's-court; seeing the direction on it, I took it home.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through Bishopsgate-street, and heard the cry of stop thief, and I run as well as the rest, seeing another man run before Me. GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-57

57. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of George Barrow .(The case stated by Mr. Clifford.)

GEORGE BARROW sworn. - About half past 12

o'clock, on Tuesday morning the 23d of November, I was going home, which is Threadneedle-street, and in the Poultry I felt a pull at my lefthand pocket; I turned round, and saw a person in a sailor's dress, about four or five yards from me, with something in his hand; I felt in my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; he was then running from me; I run after him, and called out, stop thief; I overtook him in Grocer's-hall-court, having never lost fight of him; struck him, and he fell, the watchman came up, and I told him I thought the prisoner and thrown away my handkerchief at the end of the court; he was taken to the watch-house, and the watchman went back, and looked for the handkerchief, and brought it with him.

PHILIP DAVIS sworn. - I am watchman: On the 23d of November I saw the prosecutor and prisoner; I saw the prisoner walking down the Poultry after prosecutor; I turned round after him, being told there was pickpocket; after he had picked the pocket, I followed the up the Old Jewry, through Dove-court, into Grocer's-hall-court, where he was taken; I left him in charge of the constable, and went to look after the handkerchief; I found it in Gocer's-hall-court; I carried it to the watch-house, and gave it Mr. Barrow.

JOHN COFFY sworn. - I am a constable, and on the 23d of November the prisoner was brought to the watch-house by Mr. Barrow and Daivs; Davis went and setched the handkerchief, which Mr. Barrow owned (the handkerchief produced and identified by Mr. Barrow); before the Lord Mayor the prisoner admitted he had taken the handkerchief; said it was his first offence; begged for mercy, and hoped his Lordship would send him to sea; no promise or threat was made use of.

Prisoner's defence. I was going on board the Bombay-Castle Indiaman, when I was stopped. I know nothing of the robbery.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-58

58. BRIDGET BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a gown, value 28s. a shawl, value 3s. and an apron value 3s. the property of Patrick Bulger .

HANNAH BULGER sworn. - Patrick Bulger is my husband, and we lodge at No. 2, Swan-alley, East Smithfield ; on the 7th of October I lost the thing from my own bed; I left them there on the Tuesday night, and missed them on the Wednesday morning when I got up; I slept in the front room, and the prisoner slept in the back room; my mother having given her leave to sleep there for two nights, she went through my bed-room; I have seen half the shawl on her neck; it was whole when I lost it; I saw her with it on about seven weeks after; she told me my gown was in pawn at Clare-market, but I have never seen any thing except the shawl; I met her in Tooley-street, and said,"Bridget, have I got you? and she immediately said, I have never robbed you; I told her she had my shawl on; she said my mother had lent it to her; I had her taken into custody, and she was committed next day.( Patrick Buglger confirmed the testimoney of his wife.)

CATHERINE KETH sworn. - I am mother to Mrs. Bulger, and did not lend the prisoner the shawl, or give her leave to take any of the things.

The prisoner declined making any defence.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months in the House of correction , and whipped in the Jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-59

59. JOHN PATRICK NOWLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , forty yards of woollen-cloth, value 10l. the property of Daniel Britten .

DANIEL BRITTEN sworn. - I am a packer , at No. 20, Basinghall-street ; I missed about forty yards of Woolen cloth, in different pieces; the prisoner is servant to Mr. Martin, who has an accompting house on my premises; the cloth was taken out of a little warehouse over Mr. Martin's, which was not locked.

THOMAS MARTIN sworn. - I am a broker, in the spanish wool line, and had an accompting-house at Mr. Britten's; the prisoner was my apprentice: On the 6th of November, about a quarter before three o'clock, I was going to Change; he asked me if I should he back again before'Change was over; I said I did not suppose I should; and if any body should call, to send them to me; I went as far as Coleman-street, and having forgot something, I went back, and going to the street-door, I met the prisoner with a parcel under his arm; I asked him where he was going; he turned round, and went up stairs; he threw the parcel, which was in brown paper, into a chair; I opened it, and found a piece of green cloth, about five yards; I asked him where he got it; he said of a gentleman in Basinghall-street, named Hayward, a repectable Blackwell-hall factor; he said Mr. Gayward wanted him to buy it, and as he had not money to pay for it, he was then going to return it; on which I went to Mr. Hayward, and took the prisoner with me; Mr. Hayward, said he had not had it of him; the prisoner then said he had it of another man, named Danies, a porter at a house I deal with; eight or ten days after, Mr. Britten was at his door, and from what he said, I shewed him the piece of cloth I had found on the boy, and he claimed it as his.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner was apprentice? - A. Yes.

Q.You have a brother? - A. I have.

Q. Is he is this country? - A I don't know where he is.

Q. He came to your house sometimes? - A. He did.

Q. And he had some connection with the prisoner? - A. So I understand.

Q. And is unfortunately implicated in this transaction? - A. It seem so from the account the prisoner gives.

Q.Don't you know he has gone away on account of it, don't think I mean to offend you in putting these questions, as I know you to be a very honourable man? - A. I suppose he is gone away, from my not being able to find him.

Q. Do you recollect his being searched and dulicates being found on him? - A. I examined him myself, and found some, according to the account of the prisoner; I asked him how he came by them, he said the prisoner had sent them to him.

Q. Did you ever find him in company with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q.(To Mr. Britten) You have other servants who have access to this warehouse? - A. I have.

Court. Q. What is the value of the cloth? - A.About twenty five shillings.

WILLIAM FALKENER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Crouch, a pawnbroker, in Fore street; I produce about five yards of cloth pawned by the prisoner on the 4th of November - (the piece of cloth produced, and identified by Mr. Britten.)

Prisoner's defence. I was desired by Mr. Martin's brother to pawn the goods, and to give him the money, which I did. GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-60

60. MARTHA SMITH was indicted for feloniously uttering a counterfeit shilling, knowing the same to be so , she having been before convicted of a similar offence.(The case stated by Mr. knowlys.)

Mr. CLAEB EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you the conviction of Martha Smith? - A. Yes.

Q.Where did you get it? - A.This is a copy of the record of the conviction, which I examined with the original at the office of the Clerk of the Peace for the county of Middlesex - (The copy of the record read)

Q. Did you attend the trail upon which this conviction took place, as the Solicitor employed by the Mint? - A. Yes I did.

Q. Is the prisoner now at the bar the person who was then tried and convicted? - A. I have no don't of it.

Q.Were you present at the time she received the sentence of the Court? - A. Yes.

Did she receive any admonition? -

Mr. Justice Grose. I don't see how that is evidence.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you are deputy-keeper of Clerkenwell prison? - A. I am.

Q. Were you present at the Sessions-house in April Sessions, 1801, when that woman was tried? - A. I was.

Q. Is that the woman? - A. That is the same identical woman.

Q. Was she ordered into your custody? - A. she was, and I kept her for a year; I have no doubt at all of her.

SARAH COOPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How old are you? - A.Thirteen.

Q. Where does your father live? - A. In Oxford-street.

Q. What shop does he keep? - A. A tobacconist's.

Q. Did you serve in the shop on the 1st of November last? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you alone in the shop when the prisoner came in? - A. There was another customer.

Q.Were you the only person serving in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell us whether that is the person who came into your shop? - A. Yes it is.

Q. What did she ask for? - A. An ounce of tobacco, and a quarter of an ounce of snuff.

Q. What was the price of those articles? - A. Three pence farthing.

Q. Did you serve her with them? - A. Yes.

Q. What you did she give you in payment? - A. A shilling.

Q. Have you been accustomed to serve in the shop some time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you look at the shilling? - A. No, I took it to my mother.

Q.Where was she? - A. In the parlour.

Q. Did your father see it too? - A. Yes, I believe he did.

Q.After you shewed it to your mother, did they come into the shop with you? - A. Only my mother.

Q. When your mother came into the shop, what did she say to the prisoner? - A. She said she did not think it was a good shilling.

Q. What did she say to the prisoner? - A,. Then my father came into the shop.

Q. What did he say? - A. I left the shop, then.

Q. Did you give your mother the same shilling you received from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before in your shop? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you quite sure she offered you that shilling? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she not lay down that and some other money together, and did you not take up the shilling? - A. She threw down the shilling, and three halfpence dropped out of her hand.

Q. Did she not call after you, and say she had halfpence enough, and you need not get change? - A. No, I am not sure; I don't think she did.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. If she had offered good halfpence, should you have taken them? - A. Yes.

MARGARET COOPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are the mother of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you know of this business? - A. My daughter brought the shilling to me, to ask if it was a good one.

Q. Did you look at it? - A. I did.

Q. Did it appear to be good or bad? - A. Bad in my opinion.

Q. What did you do in consequence of that? - A. The prisoner asked me to try it; I told her I need not, for in my opinion it was a bad one; my husband then came into the shop, and attempted to take the shilling, but she kept it.

Q. What became of the shilling when you said it was a bad one? - A. I gave it into the hands of the prisoner.

Q. Then your husband came in you say? - A. Yes; he attempted to take it from her, but she threw it down on the floor.

Q. Did he say any thing to her before he attempted to take it from her? - A. He asked her where she got the bad money, and told her he would send for a constable, to see if she had any more.

Q. Who picked the shilling up? - A. I think my husband did, but I am not sure.

Q. If you had given her the shilling back into her hand, was the tobacco and snuff paid for? - A. She threw the money down on the counter.

Mr. Justice Grose. Q. What money did she throw down? - A. The goods were three-pence farthing; but I was so frightened, I don't exactly recollect what she threw down.

Q. Did she throw down a quantity of halfpence? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Then a constable was sent for? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.When the shilling was brought into the parlour, were any other persons there? - A. Yes.

Q. How many others? - A.Three or four of my children.

Q. Was the shilling handed about? - A. No.

Q. It did not go out of your fight? - A. Only on the floor.

Q. Who threw it there? - A. The woman.

Q. I am asking about what passed in the parlour? - A. It was not in any body's hands but mine there.

JOHN COOPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Tell me all you know of this transaction on the 1st of November? - A. I was at dinner with my family in the parlour adjoining the shop, when the prisoner came into the shop; I sent my daughter Sarah to serve her, and she brought a shilling into the parlour, gave it my wife, and said, look well at it, mother; my wife got up immediately, went into the shop, and rung the shilling on the counter.

Q. Did you see that? - A. No, I heard the shilling ring, and thought it to be a bad one; I went immediately into the shop, and saw it laying on the counter; the moment the woman saw me, she got hold of it with one hand, and threw the halfpence down with the other; I said, stop, mistress, I must see what you have got in that hand; I struggled to get it from her, and she threw it on the floor; I picked it up.

Q. Had you ever seen the woman before? - A. I had not.

Q. Have you had the shilling ever since in your custody? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Did you then send for a constable? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you see her searched? - A. I did.

Q. What was found? - A.There were six or seven bad shillings; in my opinion they are bad.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Has that shilling been mixed with no other since? - A. No, I have kept it in a paper separate.

Q. It has been always in your custody has it? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM OSBORNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you a constable? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sent for to Mr. Cooper's on the 1st of November? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you search the prisoner? - A. I did.

Q. What did you find? - A. I found seven bad shillings, I believe they are; I marked them all.

Q. Were they all those? - A. All loose in her pocket; six sixpences, and a quantity of copper.

Q. Were those six sixpences loose? - A. All loose.

Mr. Justice Grose. Q.Were they good or bad? - A. All good.

Q. Have you got them here? - A. They are all in that paper - (Producing them.)

Q. Did you find any thing else? - A. I gave her one of them back again.

Q. Did you find any paper? - A. The paper with some calico and tobacco I found.

Q. Did you find any paper containing money? - A. No; one of the sixpences were given to her at the Office, as she asked for some money.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. When this woman was brought to the Office, did you search her? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you find on her? - A. Ten penny-pieces and five pence halfpenny in halfpence, and some paper and cotton.

Q. What paper? - A. Three or four sheets; it was clean then; and about half a yard of cotton.

Q. Did you find any good shillings about her? - A. No.

Mr. JOHN NICHOL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are one of the Moniers of the Mint? - A. I am.

Q. Look at that shilling which was offered in payment? - A. It is a bad one, merely coloured.

Q. Look at that paper containing seven shillings found upon her, are those good or counterseit? - A. They are all bad.

Q. Are those sixpences good? - A. I cannot say they are bad.

Q. Are those sixpences good? - A. I cannot say they are bad.

Prisoner's defence. I paid for the tobacco before I gave the shilling at all; I laid the shilling down, and the girl took it up as I was going to pay for it in halfpence; I never offered it at all.

GUILTY , Death , aged 34.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-61

61. CHARLES BURNE and THOMAS WHITE were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Eater , on the King's highway, on the 20th of November , and taking from his person, against his will, a shilling, twelve penny-pieces, a pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d. and a tobacco-box, value 2d. his property.

JOHN EATER sworn. - Q. What trade are you? - A. A cooper .

Q.Where do you live? - A. In Ratcliff-Highway.

Q. Do you remember, on the 20th of November last, being in a public-house there? - A. Yes; the first house was the Dover Castle, Red Lion-street, Whitechapel.

Q. Are you a foreigner? - A. Yes.

Q. Of what country? - A. A German.

Q. Who was with you? - A.Nobody but my shop-mate.

Q. What is his name? - A. Robert Scott .

Q. What time did you go to the public-house, and what time did you come away? - A. I came away about a quarter past twelve at night.

Q. What time did you go there? - A. About nine o'clock.

Q. What day in the week was it? - A.Last Saturday week, the 20th of November.

Q. Had you drank a good deal? - A. I was a little merry; I drank about a couple of pots.

Q. Where did you go after a you left the public-house? - A. I went with Scott to his house, as his wife washed for me.

Q. What time might it be when you got to Scott's? - A. It was about ten minutes after one when I left Scott's.

Q. How long did you stay there? - A. From the time I went from the public-house till I went home.

Q. You changed your linen, did you not? - A. Yes; I wanted to take my shirt with me, but Mrs. Scott said I had better put it on, for fear I should lose it.

Q. When you put it on, you went away? - A. I left Scott at home, put a clean pair of stockings in my pocket, and put a clean shirt on, and left the dirty one there.

Q. Where were you going then? - A. I was going home, and when I came out of Buckle-street, round the corner, the prisoner followed me, and when I came into Red Lion-street, I saw them.

Q. Am I to understand you that you saw the two prisoners at the bar? - A. The two prisoners at the bar.

Q. What fort of night was it? - A. It was not moon-light; it was between dark and moon-light; not quite dark.

Q. Had you ever seen them before? - A. I never saw them before; we went into the public-house, and had some gin together.

Q. What public-house? - A. The King Harry, kept by Mr. Linch, in Red Lion-street, Whitechapel.

Q. You had some gin with them? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any thing else beside the gin? - A. I had a pipe of tobacco.

Q. What else? - A.Nothing.

Q. Had you not some anniseed? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you pay, or did the prisoners? - A. They paid a quartern, and I paid a quartern.

Q. How long did you stay at Linch's? - A. About five minutes, or not so long; hardly time just to drink the gin, and went away.

Q. Then you went away to go home? - A. Yes.

Q. How far is your home from that house? - A. Through Wellclose-square into Ratcliff-Highway.

Q. Did the prisoner follow you? - A. Yes, they went with me.

Q. Are they the same two men? - A. I am positive they are the two men.

Q. When you got out of the public-house what happened? - A. I went down Leman-street, and down White Lion-street, when I came to the bottom of White Lion-street, and was crossing the way over the street, there were three women standing at the corner of Well-street; I stopped there, and one of the women asked me if I would go home with her.

Q. Do you know her name? - A. No, I never saw her before.

Q. Did you go with her? - A. Yes.

Q.Where to? - A. To Saltpetre-bank; she wanted me to go with her, but I would not go any further with her; I only saw her to Saltpetre-bank, and wished her a good night; when I came back again, there is a small passage in Saltpetre-bank, to the right hand, and before I had hardly entered one step into the passage, the prisoner, Burne, knocked me down.

Q. How did you know it was the same man? - A. I know it, because he had an apron on at the time.

Q. You went with the woman there - they did not follow you, did they? - A. Yes; they followed me all the way there, and all the way back.

Q.Close to you? - A. Yes, not out of my fight.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar appear to know the three women? - A. I dare say they did.

Q. You did not gather that from any circumstance? - A. No.

Q. What did the man knock you down with? - A. With his fists; and the little one came up and stopped my mouth.

Q. Was the before or behind when he knocked you down? - A. He came behind me.

Q. When he knocked you down, what did you say the little one did? - A. He stopped my mouth; the little one came to assist him; I was afraid they would kill me.

Q. What did Burne do? - A. He felt in my pocket, and took every thing from me.

Q. What did he take out? - A. He took every thing from me, except a pocket knife he left me; he took money, and every thing.

Q. What money had you? - A. I had one shilling in silver, and a shilling in copper, in penny pieces and halfpence.

Q. Did you feel him take the money from you? - A. Yes, I cried out, for God's sake, let me alone, and I will give you what I have got; they hurt me in such a manner.

Q. Were you prevented from crying out? - A. Yes; he held my mouth with great force, I snatched it away twice or three times, and then he put his hand again.

Q. Did they take any thing from you besides the shilling in the silver and the copper? - A. My tobacco box, and a pair of stockings besides.

Q. Did you see any thing of the women during this time? - A. No.

Q. How far might this be from the place where the women were? - A. About ten feet from where I lest the women.

Q. What did they do when they had taken, the things from you? - A. They then ran away down Saltpetre-bank as fast as they could.

Q. Can you recollect yourself so far as to say positively which it was that took your money from you? - A. Both of them were upon me, I cannot say rightly which it was; they blinded me almost with knocking me about; I was afraid they would kill me, if I did cry out; I could not cry out, because I was afraid they would kill me.

Q. How much gin did you drink? - A. We had two quarterns together.

Q. You drank a couple of glasses yourself? - A. No.

Q. How much did you drink? - A. I drank one glass.

Q. When they ran off, did you call to the watchman to pursue them? - A. No; I was in such a condition, I hardly knew where I was; I could hardly walk.

Q. Where did they strike you? - A. In my face and in my eye.

Q. Was your eye cut? - A. It was quite black the next morning all the way up.

Q. As soon you found you could walk pretty well, you went home, I suppose? - A. I went straight home.

Q. Who lives with you at home? - A. One Staggles; I am a lodger; he keeps the house.

Q. Has he a wife? - A. Yes, a wife and child.

Q. What time did you get home? - A. About two o'clock.

Q. Did you tell Staggles you had been robbed? - A. I told Mrs. Staggles, who let me in.

Q. How far is your lodging from the place where you were robbed? - A. Not far.

Q. How far? - A. I suppose about two streets; through Wellclose-square and another long street; it may be about a quarter of a mile.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What way of life are you in? - A. A copper.

Q. This was a late hour of night? - A. We generally keep it up a little on Saturday night.

Q. You don't mean to say you were sober? - A. I was so sober that I knew what passed.

Q. The prisoners you had never seen before? - A. Never before, except that night.

Q. Is it usual with you to join company with strange men? - A.Sometimes I do, as I am rather good-natured.

Q. Do you mean to say that you do so when you are sober? - A. Yes.

Q. At that hour of the night? - A. No; they asked me to have some gin, at first I said, no, that I had had enough; they said, a drop of gin would not hurt me, and I went in.

Q. Do you mean to say that you have never said, that you had anniseed, and that you were in a state of intoxication? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear you were sober? - A. I cannot say I was quite sober, I had drank a little; I knew what I was about, and every thing that went forward.

Q.Are you a married man? - A. No, I am single.

Q. You met with a lady on the road? - A. She stopped me.

Q. Did you not meet with two or three others? - A.Those were three at the corner, and one of them stopped me.

Q. Did not the other two accompany you, and did you not play tricks with them? - A. No.

Q. How far did they accompany you? - A. A little distance.

Q. They had not left you when the prisoners came up? - A. I left the woman just before I was knocked down.

Q. Have you ever recovered any of your property? - A. No.

Q. What was it? - A. A pair of stockings, an tobacco-box, a shilling in silver, and a shilling in penny-pieces and halfpence.

Q. Are there any watchmen about that part? - A. There are some, but I could not cry out.

Q. Do you mean to say they struck you, so that you could not cry out? - A. Yes.

Q. You could not cry out; when they lest you? - A. It was too late, I could not catch them.

Q. What sort of stockings were they? - A.worsted.

Q. New or old? - A. Not very old.

Q. You never saw them in the box since? - A. No.

Q. You know there is forty pounds a-piece for those men, if they are convicted? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear you have never heard from the officers, that there is a reward of forty pounds, each? - A. I never did.

Q. Do you mean to say you never, in the course of your life, heard there was such a reward? - A. I never heard any thing of it in my life.

Jury. Q. When you went to the washer-woman, I understood you to say, she advised you to change your linen, because you might lose it - what was her reason for saying that, if you were not in liquor? - A.Because it was late.

DENNIS LINCH sworn. - Q. You keep the King Henry public-house, in Red Lion-street, Whitechapel? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prosecutor at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. At what time of night? - A.Between twelve and one o'clock.

Q. Do you know who came with him? - A. John Exter , the prosecutor, came with a watchman and the two prisoners.

Q. Is the watchman here? - A. No.

Q. Do you know who the two men were? - A. The prisoners at the bar.

Q. How came the watchman and Exter to come together, had he hold of Exter? - A. No; the watchman came in behind them, they came in first, and the watchman had some liquor as well as them.

Q. Then the watchman had not either of them in custody, only came to drink as the others did? - A. Only came to drink as the others did.

Q. Do you remember the condition that Exter appeared to be in? - A. He appeared to be, rather in liquor, and I scrupled serving them, but to get rid of them I did; they had a glass of gin, and one had a small glass of anniseed; one of the prisoners said, he could not drink gin.

Q. Who had the anniseed? - A. White, who is the shortest.

Q. Did the prosecutor stagger much? - A. He did stagger, rather.

Q. Did he appear to be dirty, as having fallen down? - A. Not the least, he appeared to have a clean shirt on at the time, as his bosom was open.

Q. Like a man in a disordered state? - A. No; he told me he had been to his washerwoman, and that she wanted him to button his waistcoat up, but he would not stop, and she told me so the next morning.

Q. They staid but a little time, did they? - A. Not five minutes.

Q. Did they all go together? - A.They all went together.

Q. What became of the watchman? - A. I rather think he went out first, or rather before them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prosecutor was in such a state, that you did not like to serve him? - A. Yes; but the prisoners persisted, and said, you had better have a glass with us.

Q. One of them had a glass of gin? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you known the prosecutor before, or was he a stranger to you? - A. He was not.

Q. Had you any stockings? - A. No.

Q. Had you any conversation with him and the officers? - A. I went to the Police-office, where I saw him, the prisoners, and the officers.

Q. Some of them are to be witnesses to day - are they not? - A. They are here.

Q. Had you any conversation about the reward? - A. No, I would not wish for any of it.

Q. I only wish to ascertain whether you did not hear a conversation about a reward? - A. No, I did not; they are not in the habit of using my house; I should think there is a reward, because she law speaks of it.

Q. The prosecutor knew of it as well as you? - A. No doubt of it.

Court Q. How do you know? - A. I doubt whether he does or not.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you not heard him speak of it? - A. No, I never heard him, or the officers, or any body else.

Court Q. You had some conversation with the prosecutor-did he talk rationally? - A. He did not talk much.

Q. Did he appear to have his understanding? - A. He appeared to me to conduct himself very well; I should not have served either of them, if the watchman had not come in with them.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - Q. You are an officer of the Police? - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose, you know nothing more than that you apprehended them? - A.Nothing more, than from the description the prosecutor gave; I and Griffiths went in search of them.

Q. When? - A. On Monday the 22d; I went to different places, where I thought it was likely to find them, and between seven and eight o'clock, on Monday night, I apprehended them both in company together, in Rosemary-lane, going along the street.

Q. What time did the prosecutor come to the office? - A. About twelve o'clock, on Monday; I asked him if he should know the men, he said, yes; when I apprehended them, I put them into the watch-house that night, and the next morning I took them to the office.

Q. Did either of the prisoners say any thing. when you apprehended them? - A. They said, they were drinking at the King Harry.

Q. Did they say any thing else? - A. They said they parted with the prosecutor, in Lemon-street.

Q. When did you take them before the Magistrate? - A. On Tuesday morning.

Q. Where you present at the examination? - A. I was.

Q. Was that taken down in writing? - A. No.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - Q. Are you a Police-Officer? - A. Yes.

Q. You went with Nowlan to apprehend the prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you apprehend them? - A. Yes.

Q. From the description the prosecutor gave? - A. Yes; they said it was true, they had been drinking together, and they parted from him near Rosemary-lane.

Prisoner Burne's defence. I know nothing of the man, I leave it to the mercy of the Jury.

Court. Q.(To the prisoner Burne.) Do you mean to say, you know nothing of Exter, the prosecutor? - A. I own I was drinking with him, and he was very drunk.

Q. That is all you have to say, is it? - A. I parted with him in Leman-street.

Prisoner White's defence. I am innocent of it, I know nothing of the robbery; I never robbed a man in my life, or took a penny from any body in my life.

White called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Burne, GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

White, GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18021201-62

62. FRANCIS FINLAY was indicted for feloniously forging on the 6th of October , a certain Bill of Exchange , in words and figures following, viz."42l. - London, 1st Oct. 1802.

"Sir, Twenty-one days after date, please to pay to my order the sum of Forty-two pounds, for value received, which place to my account.

"WM. FOOTE, Cap. Royal Navy.

"To James Sykes, Esq. Army Agent,

Arundel-street, Strand, London." With intent to defraud William Earnshaw .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third Court. For forging an acceptance to the said Bill of Exchange as follows:

"Accepted, James Sykes ."

Fourth Count. For uttering and publising the said acceptance as true, knowing it to be forged.

And four other counts for similar offences, with intention to defraud James Sykes .

WILLIAM EARNSHAW sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do.

Q. State what you know respecting this transaction? - A. On the 6th of October the prisoner called at my shop to receive a gold time keeper.

Q. Had you seen him before? - A. Yes; about a week before that he called to give the order for it.

Q. When was the first time he called? - A.About the 25th or 26th of September.

Q. Where is your shop? - A. No. 119, High Holborn; he gave an order for the best gold timekeeper; I had none ready at that time, and told him I could not provide one by the time he wanted, but would provide one for him by that day week, and the price of it would be sixty-five guineas, for that it was not one of the best; he said he would call for it that day week, which I believe was on Saturday; he did not call till the Tuesday following, when I was not in the way, but I had left the time-keeper for him; he did not take it away, but called again on the Wednesday, when I was at home, and told me he had called the day before, but would not take the time-keeper as I was not at home; I gave him the time-keeper, and, in payment for it, he offered me those Bills, saying his name was Capt. Foote; there were two Bills to the amount of 681. 5s. one of which is for 421. signed William Foote , Capt. of the Royal Navy, and drawn, on Mr. Sykes, Navy Agent.

Q. What did he say his name was? - A. Capt. Foote, of the Royal Navy: The Bills were accepted so very faintly that I could not perceive they were accepted, and I sent my man down to Mr. Sykes to get them accepted immediately, but they were brought back without acceptance.

Q. Did you communicate the message to the prisoner? - A. I did not see him afterwards; he took

the time-keeper with him, and I applied to Bow-street, and caused him to be apprehended.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were not at all acquainted with the prisoner? - A. Not at all.

Court. Q.What day did he come the second time? - A. It was on the 6th of October he obtained the time-keeper.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you had the Bills in your possession ever since? - A. Ever since.(Bill read.)

£42 "London, Oct. 1, 1802.

"Sir, - Twenty-one days after date, please to pay to my order the sum of 421. value received, which place to my account.

" Wm. Foote , Cap. Royal. Navy.

"To James Sykes, Esq. Navy Agent, Arundel-street, Strand. Endorsed "W. Foote.

"Accepted J. Sykes."

Court. Q. Did he tell you where he lived? - A. Yes, at the Hummums, Covent-garden.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - A. As far as one man can possibly swear to another.

Q. Are you positive? - A. I am satisfied in my own mind the prisoner is the man.

JAMES SYKES , jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you in partnership with your father? - A. No.

Q. Have you any share in the business whatever? - A. None whatever.

Court. Q. Do you see the prisoner? - A. I do.

Q. What do you know concerning that bill? - A. I believe this to be the bill that came from Mr. Earnstraw for acceptance; I noticed it was accepted, but not by my father, James Sykes .

CHARLES COPE sworn. - Q. Do you recollect the prisoner coming into your master's shop? - A. I recollect his coming on the 6th of October; he went into the parlour beyond the shop, and stopped half an hour, or there abouts; he came out, and Mr. Earnshaw immediately brought out two notes for me to take to Mr. Sykes for acceptance; I took them to Mr. Sykes, and presented them to this Mr. Sykes, who told me they were forgeries.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Was the note out of your custody? - A. I gave it to Mr. Sykes.

Q. Did you receive it from Mr. Sykes again? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you put it into no hands but Mr. Sykes? - A. No.

Q. And it has been in no other hands but your's since? - A. No.

Court. Q. Mr. Sykes gave you the bill, and you carried it back to your master? - A. I did.

Court. Q.(To Mr. Sykes.) Look at that 42l. bill; whose acceptance is that? - A. It is not James Sykes , my father's.

Q.Is he the person to whom it purports to be directed? - A. He is.

Q. Who is it directed to? - A. To James Sykes, Esq. Navy Agent, Arundel-street, Strand.

Q. Is your father a Navy Agent, and does he live in Arundel-street? - A. He does.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say positively it is not his acceptance? - A. I can.

Q. Has it any similarity to it? - A. Not the least in the would.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Is there no other James Sykes , Navy Agent, in Arundel-street, Strand? - A. Not that I know of.

WILLIAM BIRKITT sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A. pawnbroker; on the 7th of October the prisoner came to our shop, and offered a gold chronometer or time-keeper to pledge; I had a suspicion, and put many questions to him, which I thought would induce him to answer clearly as to how much he gave for it, and where he got it; in consequence of which, he shewed me a receipt for it, from Mr. Earnshaw; the nature of the timekeeper is such, that it is screamed down in a box, so that I could not open it; I begged the prisoner would suffer me to send it to a watch-maker to get it opened, but that he declined, saying he would take it to a watch-maker, and get it unscrewed. and bring it back again. As soon as he was gone, I desired my brother to go to Mr. Earnshaw's and enquire as to the truth of what the prisoner had said. As my brother was going to leave the shop, a hand-bill was brought in from Bow-street, describing the watch. I desired him to go to Mr. Earnshaw, and say, in case the prisoner should re-turn, I would secure him. The prisoner returned in about half an hour, as near as possible; but before that, I had given orders to one of our young men, in case the prisoner did come, to shut the back-door, in order to prevent his making his escape. The young man went to the back-door, and in fastening it, the bolts being loose, made a grating noise; the prisoner immediately stepped back, and wanted to know what that noise was, or the reason of it; I told him he must be secured, and shewed him the hand-bill; he begged I would not send to Bow-street, but that I would send for Mr. Earnshaw, who, he made no doubt, would be satisfied by having his watch returned.

Q. Have you got the hand-bill? - A. No, I shewed it to him; but previous to that I had sent to Bow-street for a constable, and in a few minutes Miller, the officer, arrived, to whom I delivered the prisoner in custody: That is all I remember.

Q. He did not state any particulars of what had passed between him and Mr. Earnshaw? - A. No, he did not.Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You did not

know the prisoner before? - A. I had seen him the night before.

Q. You were not at all acquainted with him? - A. No.

Court. Q.Where did you see him the night before? - A. At our house; he offered some telescopes, of which we had the same suspictions.

Q. Were you present when he offered them? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I rested my defence principally upon the evidence of a medical gentleman, who is not here, and I applied to the Court to put off my trial, in the hopes of obtaining his testimony, to shew that I was in a state of mental derangement months prior to the time mentioned, which that gentleman could, to the satisfaction of your Lordship and the Jury, have shewn. I have no recollection or knowledge of the charges exhibited against me. I have nothing further to say, only to recommend myself to your Lordship's mercy, and that of the Gentlemen of the Jury. I rested my defence solely on him and the other medical gentlemen, who had known me in that state for three years before.

Court. Q.(To Mr. Earnshaw.) Upon your observation of what passed, did the prisoner appear to be under any mental derangement? - A. Very far from it. There was one circumstance which will let you see he was very keen in his endeavours. He called on Tuesday for the watch, which I had left, with a bill and recept, and finding I was not at home, he went away without it. He told me himself that he had called on the Tuesday," and the reason," says he, "Mr. Earnshaw, that I did not take the watch was, that you were not at home." I apprehended that he suspected it would not have been delivered to him by my people without the money, and I set it down to him as a piece of art. He told me that he called on the Tuesday for the watch, but as I was not in the way, he would not take it, and seemed to hold himself much upon that.

Q. Did you perceive any symptoms of mental derangement? - A. Not the least.

Q.(To Mr. Birkitt) Did you perceive at the time the prisoner called before, and at the time he brought the time-keeper, any symptoms of mental derangement? - A. Not in any respect whatever.

The prisoner called the Chevalier Ruspmi; who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 37.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

Reference Number: t18021201-63

63. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , five Bank notes, value 1l. each, and an order for the payment of money, value 24. the property of John Solomons , privily from his person .

JOHN SOLOMONS sworn. - I am a tallow-chandler : On the 20th of November, between twelve and one on Saturday morning, I and my friend came from Drury-lane Theatre, and called in at the Mitre, in Fleet-street, where we had one shillings worth of brandy and water; I was accosted by the prisoner at the corner of St. Paul's Churchyard, Ludgate-hill , who asked me to give her a shilling to drink; I said, I had no money; she put her hand to my breeches pocket to feel, I thought she attempted to take my watch; I told her to go about her business, and left her; I went about half a dozen yards from her, and accidentally put my hand into my pocket, I found my money gone; I lost five one-pound notes and a draft for twenty-four pounds four shillings, from my breeches pocket, this was about a minute after I left the prisoner; I turned back to her about three yards, and she was going the way I was; I accused her with taking my notes; she made me no answer; I put my hand to her left hand pocket, and pulled them out; I called the watch, and she was taken to the watch-house; she wanted me to let her go, saying, as I had my property, I might as well let her go. I have kept the notes, the draft I have made use of. (Produces the notes).

Q. Had you been drinking? - A. I had part of a shilling's worth of brandy and water, and was quite sober, as I had not drank any thing else.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had you been in company with any other women? - A. No.

Q. Had you stopped in the street any where? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to say you walked from Drury-lane to St. Paul's, without being accosted by or speaking to any woman? - A. I am certain I did.

Q. The play is over about eleven o'clock - this was between twelve and one? - A. It was not over till very near twelve that night.

Q. Were many people walking in St. Paul's Church-yard? - A. No, very few.

Q. You know the narrow passage in the corner, near Newbery's, the bookseller? - A. No, I don't.

Q. Then you had not stopped in any private passage? - A. No.

Q. What kind of pocket was your's? - A. A slap pocket at the side.

Q. Was it buttoned after you paid your reckoning at the public-house? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did it happen by any accident that the slap of your breeches were down? - A. No, I am certain of it; but whether the slap of my pocket was buttoned or not, I cannot say.

Q. How long were you in company with this woman? - A. About two minutes.

Q. Recollect yourself, had you not been toying with the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. What did you stay two minutes with her for? - A.She asked me to give her something.

Q. Did it happen that her petticoats were disturbed? - A. I did not disturb them.

Q.Did your friend? - A. No.

Q.Were the notes rolled up together? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say you did not take any thing out of your pocket to give her? - A. No, I did not.

Q. She did not run away, but was following you? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, were not her petticoats almost thrown over her head? - A. I did not see them.

Q. Was it dark or light? - A. It was dark and rainy.

Q. Did you or not go into the passage with her? - A. I did not, nor my friend.

Q. What did you say to her, when she put her hand near your pocket? - A. I did not say any thing.

Q. Did she put her hand on any other part of your breeches? - A. On my watch chain; my friend told me to take care of my watch.

Q. You did not know the numbers of the notes before you lost them? - A. No.

LEWIS ISAACS sworn. - We were coming from the Theatre on the 19th, and on the 20th, after twelve, we went into the Mitre, in Fleet-street, and had a glass of mixed liquor; we then went on, and at the corner of St. Paul's Church-yard, the prisoner accosted my friend, and asked for a shilling to get something to drink; he said, I have none; I proceeded about a yard before him; they made a pause for about a minute; I turned to him, and said, come along; I walked on, and he overtook me, about half a dozen yards from the spot, where the prisoner first accosted him; he put his hand to his pocket, and said to me, in the German Language, by G - D, I have been robbed, the woman following, came up, he instantly seized her, and said, you have robbed me, putting his hand in each of her pocket-holes, and pulled out the notes, and called watch; I assisted, two or three watchmen came up, laid hold of the prisoner, and took her to the watch-house; she denied the charge, and said, she had only half-a-crown; she had not denied it before she got to the watch-house; after being there two or three minutes, she said, you have got your property, you may as well let me go; the constable said, I shall not let you go, if he does, because it will be compounding felony, and they took her away; the constable let my friend have one or two of the notes back, and kept the rest.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your friend stopped with the woman, and you went on? - A. Yes, about a yard before.

Q. You said something about six yards? - A. I said, come along, and he overtook me in about six yards.

Q. What was he doing with the woman? - A. I cannot say.

JAMES M'GUIRE sworn. - I am a constable; on the 20th of November, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner was brought in charge for robbing the prosecutor of five 1l. notes, and a draft of 24l. 4s. I sent her to the Compter; the prosecutor wished to have four pounds, which I let him, and he produced them the next morning before the Alderman.

Prisoner's defence. They pulled my petticoats over my head, and got me in such a situation, that I could not stir, and said they would cut me up if they had a knife, and made use of worse words than I can name.

M'Guire. There was a person genteelly dressed in the watch-house, who said it was so.

Court. Q.(To Solomons.) Did you say so? - A. I did not.

Q. Upon your oath, did you take any liberties with her? - A. No, I did not.

Q.(To Jacobs.) Did you take any liberties with her? - A. No, I did not stop with her.

Q. Did you attempt to throw her petticoats over her head? - A. By no means.

Q. Did you solicit any connection with her? - A. None.

Q. Will you swear, that what she states in her defence, is false? - A. It is false entirely.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-64

64. ABRAHAM LAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , ten ounces of silk, value 1l. 10s. the property of Tobias Hammond Smith .

TOBIAS- HAMMOND SMITH sworn. - I live at Bethnal-green; the property was upon the quay; as merchants' agent , we look upon ourselves to be responsible for any property lost; I was informed I was robbed, the prisoner was apprehended, and the silk taken from him.

ROBERT REED sworn. - I am a labourer, and watch on Galley-quay, for Mr. Smith; I saw the prisoner at the bale, and putting silk in his pocket; I caught hold of him, and held him till Mr. Smith came, he was searched, and ten ounces of silk was taken out of his jacket-pocket. (The silk produced by the constable and identified.)

Constable. I took it from the prisoner, who said he did not cut the bag, but was employed to take the silk away.

Smith. There was about this quantity taken from the bale.

Prisoner. I did not take the silk. GUILTY .

Whipped one hundred yards on Galley-Quay , and confined six months in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-65

65. WILLIAM HADLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a pair of sheets, value 10s. the property of Jeremiah Garret , and a shirt, value 2s. the property of William Bowland .

SARAH GARRETT sworn. - My husband and I keep the Feathers public-house, in Charles-court, in the Strand : On the 9th of October I lost the sheets, but did not miss them till 12 o'clock at night; it was a soldier's bed; the soldier quartered on us, when going to bed, said the sheets were missing; I did not go up to see, but gave him a clean pair; the prisoner and his wife quarrelled, and she told us of it, and gave us the duplicate a fortnight or three weeks after; I went to the pawnbroker's, and got the sheets which I know to be mine.

MARIA FENNER sworn. - I am servant to the last witness: On the 9th of October the things were missed, and the soldier put the sheets on the bed himself; I did not go up to see that the things were gone, and do not know it, except from the soldier saying so; the shirt belonged to William Bowland , the apprentice; it hung up in the garret, which was found pawned with the sheets.

BENJAMIN HART sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, at No. 32, York-street, Westminster, and produce a sheet and shirt pledged on the 11th of October by Clarke.

JAME CLARKE sworn. - I am a soldier's wife; the prisoner brought a sheet and shirt to me, and asked me if I would oblige him by pawning them for him, as he was distressed for money; I don't know what day it was; I did so, and gave the duplicate to the prisoner with the money; he said his wife was lying-in, and in great distress, and asked me to pawn it.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - On Thursday the 18th of November, I apprehended the prisoner on guard; he had some duplicates on him, but not belonging to the prosecutor. - (The things produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was drinking in a public house, and went out to make water, and picked the things up outside the house; my wife heard they were lost, and she and I having quarrelled, she went and told Garret I had stolen them; he came to me, and claimed them: I said I would pay for them, as I did not know who they belonged to when I pawned them, and gave him seven shillings and the duplicate; upon which he took me into custody.

GUILTY .

Confined one month in Newgate , fined 1s. and delivered to his regiment.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-66

66. JOHN WESTERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , 14lb. of tobacco, value 20s. the property of Henry Lee .

PHILIP BELL sworn. - I have the superintendance of Mr. Henry Lee 's business, who is a tobacconist ; the prisoner worked in the manufactory, and on the 5th of November one of the officers belonging to Worship-street came and said the prisoner was in custody with some tobacco; I went to the Office, and took a sample of the same sort which we had been manufacturing, and the tobacco I saw at the Office exactly corresponded with it; we always rub our men lightly down when they leave work.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - On Thursday the 4th of November, between eight and nine o'clock, I was in Wentworth street, with Mason and Vickery, and saw the prisoner pass us with a basket over his shoulder; I followed him; he went into a huckester's shop, and put it down by the side of the counter, and went into a room adjoining the shop; a little girl was serving, and I said, loud enough for the man to hear, what is in that basket the man has got? the prisoner said directly, it was tobacco; I said I should take him and his tobacco too; I asked him who he had it of; he said a man gave it him, but did not know his name, or where he lived, or where he was to be found: I asked him what he was going to do with it there; he said to fell it, and he was to be allowed something for selling it; he was taken to the Office, and committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He answered you very readily? - A. Very.

- VICKERY sworn. - I heard the prisoner say, on being asked how many times he had been to the house before with tobacco, that it did not signify, for that justice had overtaken him at last; I asked him how much a pound he was to have for it; he said two shillings.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You have a good deal of business? - A. Yes; I have several cases to attend, but the words struck me, and I have them steady in my mind.

Prisoner. I am innocent, and leave it to my counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-67

67. THOMAS COOKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , a silver label, value 5s. a knife, value 2s. and a sevenshilling piece , the property of Thomas Groves .

THOMAS GROVES sworn. - I keep the Sun public house in Newman-street : On the 6th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I was coming down stairs, and saw my

bar-window open; I looked into the bar, and saw the prisoner, who lodged in my house, lay down at his full length; I turned back up-stairs, and told my wife to come down as quick as possible, for the baker was got into the bar; I came down stairs, and unlocked the bar-door; the prisoner had got in at the window which goes backwards and forwards, and fastens by a bolt, which he had driven out; I sent a porter for a constable, and the prisoner lay there till he came; he was very much intoxicated, as he had been drinking brandy in the bar; I unlocked the till to see what was gone; I found a silver port-wine label was gone, a knife, and a seven-shilling piece; when the constable came, the prisoner was taken into the parlour and searched, and the property found on him.

- SUTHRLAND sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, and found the articles on him, and key, which I produce; the seven; shilling piece dropped from his cloaths when we lifted him up; the others were in his pocket(produces them); I tried the key, and it opens the till, the key appears to be fresh field - (the articles identified.)

Prisoner I know nothing of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Jutice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-68

68. HUMPHRY GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , a basket, value 1s. and a bushel of apples, value 4s. the property of Charles Crouch .

ROBERT CONDEN sworn. - I am a watchman at Corvent-Garden: On the 11th of November, in the morning, I saw the prisoner with a basket of apples; I stopped him, and took him into custody.

JOHN CRAWLEY sworn. - This basket is my master's property; his name is Charles Crouch , he is a fruit-salesman , and has a stand in Covent-Garden : On the 11th of November I missed a basket of apples, about half past four in the morning, which I had packed up on the 10th; the watchman came round, and asked who had lost the property; I went to the watch-house, and saw the basket and fruit in it.

Prisoner's defence. - I get my bread by buying in the market, and I went to the market, and met, young man I knew, who had bought two bushels of apples, and he asked me to take them for him to Westminster, and he would give me 6d. I was going with him, and was taken; I work with a horse and cart, selling apples, onions, and other things, about the streets.

HUMPHRY LANE sworn. - I am a watchman and took him; he said a man had given them to him; I asked him who had, and he could not tell; I asked him what the man was to give him; he said he did not know, he had made no agreement; then we took him to the watch-house.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18021201-69

69. ANN LYONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th on November , a pair of stockings, value 2s. two neck-handkerchiefs, value 2s. a gold pin, value 2s. a snuff-box, value 2s. and a pocket handkerchief, value 6d. the property of George Granger .

GEORGE GRANGER sworn. - I am tailor , No. 5, Panton-square ; the prisoner was my servant eighteen months; On the 20th of November I went down stairs, and found a small hamper packed up, which led me to suspect some of my property was in it; I took it up stairs for my wife to examine; we opened it, and found several of my articles in it, such as knives, forks, and glasses; I then sent for the constable to search the prisoner's box, in it we found a pair of black silk stockings, a gold pin, two neck-handkerchiefs, and a pocket handkerchief, and snuff-box.

Mr. Alley. Q. You had a good opinion of her? - A. Yes; my wife has a very bad state of health, and every thing was left to her.

- LUPING sworn. - On the 20th of November last, I was sent for, being a constable, to examine a basket, in which was found a snuff-box, knives, forks, soap, and starch; the prisoner came in, and I desired to search her boxes; she was agitated, and gave me the keys; I said I should not search them without her; she went with me, and as I took the articles out, I asked her which was her's, and which was her master's; she pointed out the neck-handkerchiefs, a pair of silk stockings, and too much tempation.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-70

70. JOHN CORDELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , twentythree sheep, value 23l. the property of William Geeves , the elder.

WILLIAM GEEVES sworn. - Q.You are the son of William Geeves , the elder? - A. I am.

Q. What is your father? - A. A farmer and grazier .

Q. Where does he live? - A. At Hendon, in Middlesex .

Q. Do you remember, on the 13th of November last, any sheep of your father's at pasture? - A. Yes, fifty in all.

Q.Were they in a close of your father's? - A. Yes, they were.

Q.When did you last see them? - A. On the evening of the 18th.

Q. When did you first miss any of them? - A. On the morning of the 19th Friday.

Q. How many did you miss? - A.Twenty-three.

Q. Did you miss them? - A. Yes; I saw the remainder of them afterwards; my father's man counted them.

Q. Is he here? - A. Yes.

Q. What is his name? - A. Joseph Adams .

Q. When did you count them? - A. I did not count them on the Friday at all.

Q. What did you do in consequence of missing them? - A. I took my horse in pursuit of them; I came along the road form Hendon to Kilburn. and upon enquiry I traced the sheep along the road, and followed them as far as Paddington, but could not hear any thing farther of them; I heard nothing of them till Saturday morning last, when, in consequence of information, I went to a field in the parish of Battersea; I there found ten of the sheep; it was nearly dark, and I could not ascertain whether they were my father's sheep or not by that light: On Sunday morning I called upon Crocker, one of the Bow-street officers, and took him with me; Adams also went with me; we went to the field, and knew the sheep; I saw a man in the field, and enquired of him who was the owner; Crocker went with the man to the house of the person that owned them.

Q. How did you know these ten sheep? - A. I knew them by the marks.

Q. What were the marks? - A. They had been marked with a G on the near side, with a pitch mark.

Q. Had any pains been taken to obliterate that mark? - A. Yes, a great deal of pains I dare say.

Q. Was there any part of the letter G remaining? - A. On some of the sheep there was, and one in particular the greatest part of the mark remained; the others were visible, although pluoked out.

Q. Upon that one in particular, what marks were there? - A. The greatest part of the G was left; it was only defaced with red ochre; it had been marked with a B on the near hip as well.

Q. On the same spot where the G was? - A. No; the G was on the side, and the B on the hip.

Q. Was that a pitch mark? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any other mark by which you knew those sheep to be your father's? - A. Yes, I know them by their appearance and the breed.

Q. You are yourself a farmer and grazier, are you not? - A. Yes.

Q.Where are the sheep now? - A. At home, Hendon.

Q. How many did you get home? - A.Twelve; I knew them myself before the mark of the G was put upon them, I had drawn them from a lot of one hundred and fifty.

Q. You would have known them without the letter G then? - A. Yes, I think I should.

Q. There was no other mark besitles the G when your father lost them? - A. Yes, the mark of the B was upon them when they were bought, and the G was put on afterwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Has your father any partner? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. You have no property in these sheep? - A. No.

Q. Is it not usual when sheep change their masters to put a fresh mark upon them instead of the old one? - A. No; we put our own brand on them, but never take any others out.

Q. What breed are they? - A. They are what we call between a Dorset and a Somersetshire.

Q. Your father had more of the same breed? - A. NO, he had not.

JOSEPH ADAMS sworn. - Q. You are servant to Mr. Geeves, at Hendon? - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember a lot of fifty sheep being in your master's grounds? - A. Yes, they were there on the Thursday night, the 18th; I counted them; there were fifty of them.

Q. What time did you go to the close the next morning? - A. Very soon after six o'clock; I counted them then, and there were but twenty-seven.

Q. Then you had lost twenty-three? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do then? - A. The old gentleman went to his son.

Q. Did you go in quest of them? - A. No, not that day.

Q. Then you knew nothing of them till the Sunday? - A. I knew nothing of them, or where they were, till Sunday.

Q. Did you go over to Battersea? - A. I went to Battersea on the Sunday morning.

Q. Did you go to a close there? - A. I went to a close.

Q. You don't know whose close it was? - A. No.

Q.Nobody prevented you going into the close to look at the sheep? - A. No.

Q. You went and looked at them? - A. I did.

Q. Did you know them to be your master's? - A. I was certain of that.

Q. Had the sheep been long in your custody? - A. Yes, near three months, or quite.

Q. What did you know them by? - A. By the pitch brand mark on the side.

Q. What was that? - A. A single G.

Q.Where was it? - A. On the nearside.

Q. Was there no other mark? - A. There had been a B on the hip, but that was plucked out.

Q. Were there any remains of it? - A. There are some romains visible.

Q. I supppose they had the B when they were delivered into your possession? - A.That is a mark that was put on them before they came to the fair, where they were purchased.

Q. Was there any other circumstance from whence you concluded they were your master's? - A. I would take my oath of it from the pitch brand marks, and by the nature of the sheep.

Q. What is the nature of them? - A. It is, that there are none like them near the place, that we know of.

Q. You can swear positively to the sheep being your master's? - A. I can swear to the sheep.

WILLIAM MITCHELL sworn. Q. What are you? - A. A drover.

Q. Do you remember on the 19th of November last salling in with a drove of sheep any where? - A.es, I got up to come to Smithfield, on Friday moning, from Hendon, about three o'clock, and saw a drove of sheep coming from towards Mr. Geeves's field, at Hendon, towards London; as they came near me, I went up to the man that was with them, and said, Charles.

Q.Whose neme was Charles? - A. A man whom I knew, and who lived it the parish of Wrilsden; the man made answer and said, it is not Charles; I said, what is it o'clock? he said a quarter to four? I went about my business, and he went about his.

Q. What sort of man was it you spoke to? - A. He stood about five feet ten inches high, and had on a brown coat, and a round hat; when I spoke to him, he hung down his head.

Q. You went away then? - A. Yes; I was with a horse and cart then, and had no sheep at all.

Q. Look at the prisoner; was the person you called Charles like the prisoner? - A. If he had a brown coat on now I could be more sure; he was very like the prisoner in size and height.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. This was between three and four o'clock in the morning, when it was not very light I believe? - A. No; there was a moon, but it was not very light.

Q. It was the last quarter of the moon, was it not? - A. Yes.

Q. How near were you to the person who was driving the sheep? - A. About two yards off.

Q. You being in your cart? - A. No, I was walking; I went up and spoke to him.

Q. All you can say is, that the person was about five feet ten inches high, and had on a brown coat? - A. Yes.

Q. Both of which is common enough? - A. Yes.

JAMES CLARKE sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A farmer's servant.

Q. Where did you work on the 19th of November last? - A. At Kilburn.

Q. Were you there early in the morning of the 19th of November? - A. Yes.

Q. About what time? - A.Near About five as possible.

Q. When you were there, where, what did you see? - A. I was going to Smithfield that morning with some sheep, and while I stood at my master's door for the servant to come and count out the sheep to me, there came a man with a little lot of sheep along the road.

Q. How many might there be? - A. There might be a score; I could not exactly say at that time in the morning; I said, hulloa, mate, I am coming with such a little lot; he said, come along.

Q. Did he say it in the sort of low way you now say it? - A. Yes; then I stepped forward to him, and asked him who sold his sheep.

Q. Did you go close up to him? - A. I went abroad-side of him.

Q. What did he say? - A. He made a bit of a halt, and said, Welch, he believed; who was the salesman was my meaning.

Q. The man who was to sell them at Smithfield? - A. Yes.

Q.What did he say to that? - A. He made a bit of a halt, and said, Welch, he believed; he then went on, and I saw no more of him.

Q. He gave you no other answer? - A. No, he did not stop to speak; he kept on, while he said come along.

Q. Was he driving the sheep pretty fast? - A. He was in a good sharp walk; the sheep were running.

Q. When you got you own sheep, did you try to overtake him? - A. Yes; I drove pretty fast, but I saw no more of him.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. It was a man about his size, that is all that I know, in a brown coat, and a round hat, as near as I can tell at the moment.

Q. Was it about his height? - A. Yes, as near as I can recollect, he was a stont man.

Q. Did he appear to be broad over the shoulders? - A. I cannot exactly say; he had a brown great coat on, which might make him appear something larger.

JOHN BENGO sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. At No 7, North-row, Battersea-fields.

Q. What do you know about these sheep? - A. I had got a mare grazing in the same pasture where the prisoner's sheep were, and last Sunday was a week I was going down to see my mare, and met the prisoner coming out of the field.

Q. You know the prisoner very well? - A. Yes; I asked him if he had seen his sheep; he said, yes; I asked him if he had seen my mare; he said, yes; I then asked him how many sheep he had bought; he told me a score; we walked on together, and he went to his home, and I to mine; this was on Sunday.

Q. Were his sleep in the close then? - A. I cannot pretend to say; I did not go into the close myself; he was coming out of the field, and as he had seen my mare, I did not go any further; he lives almost by me.

Q. He lives at Battersea-field, does he? - A. Yes.

Q. What is he? - A. A labouring man; he used to go harvesting in the harvest time, and threshing in the winter; on Monday evening he came to me, and asked me if I would take some carecases to Leadenhall-market for him.

Q. What was his expression? - A. He did not say how many, but asked if I would take him some carcases to market.

Q. What did you say? - A. The butcher disappointed him, and he did not come to kill them that day; he killed them upon the Tuesday evening, and the prisoner asked me if I would take some carcases to the market on Wednesday morning.

Q. Did he tell you the butcher had disappointed him? - A. Yes.

Q. He asked you to carry them on Tuesday morning first? - A. Yes.

Q. Then he told you that the butcher had disappointed him, and that you were to take them on the Wednesday morning? - A. Yes; on Wednesday morning, about four o'clock, I took my horse and cart to his door, and he carried five carcases of dead sheep into the cart.

Q. He told you the butcher had killed them for him the day before? - A. No, he did not say any thing about it.

Q. You took them to Leadenhall-market? - A. I did, and he came along with me; I drove to the back of the market, where the carts go to be unloaded, and stood by them while the porter and the prisoner took the five carcases out of the cart into the market; I waited there about half an hour, when he came to me, and said, I have done, and will go home with you; we then went home together: On the Thursday evening, pretty late, to the best of my knowledge, I asked the prisoner if he had seen the sheep that day; he said, no; I said I was going down to see my mare, and would see if they were safe in the pasture; I looked, and they were not there.

Q. In the pasture, or in his pasture, do you mean? - A. In his pasture.

Q. What did he say? - A.Very well; I did not see the sheep, it being rather dark; I said you had better go to-morrow morning early, for teat the sheep should get any damage; I was at work that day on the road, which was Friday; the prisoner came by, and I said, have you seen your sheep this morning? yes, says he, they are all very safe; says I, did you see my mare? yes, says he, they are all safe.

What time on Friday was this? - A. In the forenoon, and I saw no more of him.

Q. He said all was well? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner has any closes about that part? - A. Yes, he rents them of George Jewer , the gardener.

Q. One field or more? - A. There are two fields pretty well open to each other.

Q. Is that all you know? - A. Next Monday morning, I went down to see the mare, and saw some of the sheep in the pasture.

Q. Was your mare in his pasture? - A. Yes; we had made no agreement, he told me I might turn it in, and we should not disagree; last Sunday morning, I saw my mare very safe; I came along the field over the hedge, into Battersea-field, and two gentlemen came up to me, and asked me if I knew who owned those sheep.

Q. Did you see some sheep in the field then? - A. I saw some of some sort, but was not near enough to count them.

Q. Were Geeves and Adams the persons who asked you? - A. No, it was Rose and Crocker; they asked me if I knew who owned those sheep, I said, yes, they were a near neighbour's of mine; they asked me, if I thought the man would sell them, I said, I did not know.

Q. Were you near the field when they spoke to you? - A. Yes, the field was on one side the hedge, and I on the other.

Q. Did they ask whose close it was? - A. Yes; I told them it was Mr. Cordell's close, which he rented of George Jewer ; I said, I did not know whether he would fell them at all, because he bought them on purpose to kill.

Q. Were you in the close? - A. No, in Batterseafield.

Q. Were they in the prisoner's close? - A. Yes, and Crocker came over to me, and asked me if I would go along with him, and shew him the man's house.

Q. That was the close the prisoner told you he rented of Mr. Jewer? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. Seven or eight years.

Q. All that time, he has lived at or near Battersea? - A. In Battersea-town, or Battersea-fields, the whole of that time.

Q. How long has he had those two closes? - A.Since hay harvest.

Q. Do you happen to know whether he has jobbed in sheep before this time, and kept them in a close? - A. Yes, he had sheep before.

Q. He had jobbed, and sent them to market? - A. Yes.

Q. I will ask you, whether he has not borne a very excellent character? - A. Yes, as any man in the county of Surry, as far as I know of him.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - Q.When were you applied to about the sheep? - A.Last Saturday morning was a week; last Sunday morning, Mr. Geeves came to me, and said, he had got some information where his sheep were; I went with him to a close in Battersea-fields, with a person of the name of Partridge, who lives at Hendon, and Mr. Geeves's man, Adams, went into the field.

Q. Which you took to be the prisoner's? - A. Yes, he looked at the sheep.

Q. How many were there? - A. Ten; he came back to Mr. Geeves,and told him they were his property; I observed the last witness at one end of the field, and Partridge and I went up to him, and asked him, if he knew whole sheep they were; he said, yes, they belonged to Mr. cordell.

Q. Did he tell you the close-belonged to Mr. Cornell? - A. I cannot say, whether he did or not, or other I asked that question; we went to cordells house, and Bengo knocked at the door, and a child opened it; he asked, if Mr. Cordell was at home; at that time, Cordell came up from out of the kitchen, and Bengo then said, here were two gentlemen, who wanted to buy that little stock of sheep; he looked at Bengo, and said, I have no sheep to sell, I did not buy them to sell; he said it very low, and seemed very much consused; I called him to the door, and told him, I was an officer, and should take him into custody, on suspicion of stealing those sheep that were in the field, then I took him in doors again with Bengo.

Q. What answer did he make? - A. He did not make any; I asked him if he had any more in his yard, he said, no, he had no more than what were in the field; I left him in the room, and went into the yard to look for sheep; I could see nothing there, but went down stairs into the kitchen, where I saw two sheep alive; when I came up stairs again, I asked him where he got them, he wife made answer, he bought them last Friday was a week.

Q. He answered nothing? - A. He answered nothing at that time; afterwards he said it was on Saturday week last, he bought them at Kilburn, and gave forty-eight shillings a piece for them; I asked him who he bought them of, he said, a drover; I asked him if he knew him, he said, no; I asked him whether it was at a public-house, he said, he paid the money at a public-house; we told him we would go to that house with him; he made an excuse, and said, he did not know that he should know the house again; Mr. Geeves owned the property, and I took the prisoner into custody; this is the coat I took off his back last Monday morning. (Producing a great-coat.)

Q. Did you shew the sheep that were in the kitchen, to MR. Geeves? - A. Yes; on one of the sheep in the kitchen, there had been the mark of a B, Which apparently had been a pitch mark, but pulled out.

Q. This was last Monday morning? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Mr. Geeves.) Do you remember being at the prisoner's house last Sunday morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Crocker shewing you two sheep in Cordell's kitchen? - A. Yes, he brought them up stairs out of the kitchen.

Q. Did you examine those sheep? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Can you say, upon your oath now, that those sheep were your father's property? - A. Yes, I can.

Q. By what marks? - A. By the pitch mark that had been taken out, the same that I have already described; there are the traces of the same marks left in them.

Q. Were those sheep of the Dorsetshire breed? - A.They were of the same breed with the other at home, and accompanied them the moment they came together.

Q. Look at that great-coat? - A. This was on the prisoner's back; I believe it to be the same I saw him with on Sunday morning.

Q. You saw that on his back? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Can there be a more-common great-coat on any body's back? - A. Not that I know of, it is a very common great-coat, but I saw on his back; I know nothing more of the coat, out I know the sheep.

Crocker. Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You said, you asked the prisoner, whether he had any more sheep in the yard? - A. He said he had no more than what were in the field.

Q. Did You perceive whether his hearing was very quick or not? - A. I thought so.

Prisoner's defence. Last Friday week, about a quarter after five in the morning, I set out to go into the country, to buy some sheep worth my money, or a cow or a horse, or any thing else, to put into my pasture, which I hired to Mr. Jewer, of Battersea, to turn a shilling by; as I was going along Paddington, I met a drover with a lot of sheep; he said, farmer, will you buy a lot of sheep; I said, if you can sell them worth the money, I will buy them, if I can; he said, I have a little of I can sell, worth your money; I said, how many have you; he said, twenty-three; I said, at how much a piece; he laid, fifty shillings a piece; I said, they would not do, for that was too much, but I would give him, forty-six shillings; he said, no; I said, they were not worth the money; he said, they were worth all he asked; I said, I would give him forty-seven shillings; he would not take it, but said, he would abate a shilling a head; I would not give it him, but said, I would give him forty-eight, if that would do; he said, no; I said I would not have them at all, and went on; he said, come back, and you shall have them; then we went into a public-house, and had a pot of beer,

and I paid him forty-eight shillings a piece for them.

Evidence for the prisoner.

RICHARD BERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Last Friday week, in the morning, do you remember seeing the prisoner? - A. Yes, I do; about a quarter before six, I saw him come out of his own house, yesterday was a fortnight.

Q. Had you seen or heard any thing respecting him that morning before - had you heard him called, or any thing of that sort? - A. No; I am a farrier, and was called up to shoe a horse at five o'clock, and a quarter before six, I saw him come out of his house.

Q. In his ordinary way? - A. Yes; and the night before I saw him into his own house.

Q. What time the night before? - A. About a quarter past ten; I had been putting up a rail for him, and some small hooks, in his stanghter-house.

Court. Q. What is he? - A. A butcher.

Q. Is he a butcher? - A. Yes, we always understood so at Battersea; I have bought beef of him; I saw him backwards and forwards at my house. When I had finished my job, I went in about a quarter past ten, and saw him go into his own house; I left him, and he went in, and locked the door after him.

Q. Do you know how far your house is from Kilburn? - A. NO, I don't know such a place.

Q. From the time you saw him go into his house at night till you saw him the next morning, did you hear any body go in or out of his house? - A. No.

Q. Is your house next door? - A.Next door but one; but if he or any body had gone out, I think there is a dog at the next door that would have given the alarm.

Q. When you saw him in the morning, had he the appearnace of a man who had been up all night? - A. No, not at all.

Q. You say you are a farrier? - A. Yes.

Q. You generally get up about six o'clock? - A. I am generally called up about five.

Q. What is the circumstance that sixes it in your memory that this was Friday morning was a week? - A.Because I put the job down on the state.

Q. Have you got the state here? - A. No.

Q. When did you look at the state? - A. The day before yesterday, and not before, though he was in trouble before; and the reason was, that his wife came and paid me four shillings and threepence for the job.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you a family of children? - A. I have three children, likely to die of the small-pox.

Q. You don't recollect any other circumstance to six it to Friday se'nnight; but because you did this job for him? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you, when you knew that your next door neighbour was in difficulty, not to look at your state before? - A.Because I never expected to be called for.

Q. When was it intimated to you that you would be called upon? - A. The day before yesterday, his wife said, I should be subpoenaed.

Q. Did any body else tell you so? - A. No; she said, I did the work for him, and knew he was at home.

Q. Were you subpoenaed? - A. No, I was not.

Q. You never talked with his attorney? - A. I never spoke to him in my life.

Q. Did not his attorney know what you were coming to say? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Was nobody else there who knew you did the work for him? - A. Yes; there are several here who know that I did the work for him; I don't know whether Mr. Henney did not see me; if he did not see me doing the work, he has seen it since it has been done.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are solicitor for the prisoner? - A. I am.

Q. Have you examined the last witness at all? - A. No.

Court. Q. You have clerks, I suppose? - A. No, I have not; my nephew assists me in my business, but he has never seen him.

Q. By what means did you know what he would say? - A. I did not know what he would say till this morning, when understanding from the prisoner's wife, that he would give evidence of such importance, I sent a messenger off to desire his attendance; and Mr. Gurney made an application to the Court, to put off the trial till two o'clock, to give us an opportunity of getting him.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 39.

Recommended to mercy on account of his good character.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-71

72. MARGARET RADSHAW was indicted for that she, about the hour of five in the night of the 2d of November , being in the dwelling-house of James Hadland , feloniously did steal, a cloak, value 3l. three gowns, value 40s. three petticoats, value 20s. a straw bonnet, value 5s. two shawls, value 10s. two shifts, vlaue 5s. five pair of stockings. value 7s. three handkerchiefs, value 3s. four hundred and thirty two penny pieces, and one hundred and ninety two halfpence,the property of the said James; and for that she, after having committed the felony aforesaid, the same dwelling-house burglariously did break, to get out of the same .

JAMES HADLAND sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. At Twickenham .

Q. What trade are you? - A. A baker and cornchandler .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. When did the girl leave your service? - A. On Wednesday, the 3d of December.

Q. How long had she been with you? - A. She came to the house in May last.

Can you tell, from any circumstance, what time in the morning she left your house? - A. About five o'clock.

Q. What makes you suppose it was about five o'clock? - A.Because our man was up, and saw her.

Q. When did you first know she was gone? - A. About seven, when I got up, I found her dirty things lay straggling about in the parlour; I told my wife of it, I went up stairs with her, and we found the girl's bonnet there; we came down stairs again, I observed one of the drawers of the bureau open, my wife opened it, and missed some things out of it; then we went up stairs, and searched a chest of drawers; my wife missed three of her gowns; then we went to a cupboard, and she missed a yellow chip bonnet trimmed with black ribbon; my wife then observed the bottom drawer of the same chest rather open, she opened the drawers, and found one of her silk cloaks gone.

Q. In short, you found a number of other articles gone? - A. Yes.

Q. At seven o'clock, when you got up, and found the prisoner gone, was it light or dark? - A. It was not quite light.

Q. Did you, at that time, look to see which way she had gone out? - A. No; because the boy had taken down the shop shutters then.

Q. Then there was nothing in the house which shewed any marks of violence by which she got out? - A. No.

Q. You are sure she was in your house the overnight? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did she go to bed? - A.Between ten and eleven.

Q. You saw her between ten and eleven? - A. Yes.

Q. And you saw her as if going to bed? - A. Yes; I saw her go up stairs.

Q. When you found your house had been fifted, what did you do? - A. She had a sweetheart at Brentford, I thought he might have some connection with this business; there was a Bench of Justices sitting, and I got a search-warrant, to search his premises, but found nothing; he offered his assistance to apprehend her, and on the Thursday we came to London.

Q. Did your wife go with you? - A. No; I and this young man went together; we could not find her at any of the places she used to be at in town; then I heard she was gone to Hounslow; I did not find her there; on the Friday morning, I went to Brentsord, it struck me, that I would go to the Magpye, where this young man used, thinking she might write to him, to let him know where she was; when I got there, I saw the post-man giving him a letter in the bar, which he said, he would swear was her hand-writing; and I opened it, and found where she was; I then went to Bow-street, and took an officer with me.

Q. Is that officer here? - A. No; he could not find her; then we went to the Almonry, Westminster, to look for her, according to the direction; I found her at a very bad house in the Almonry; I found she was there, and told the girl, that her sweetheart wanted to see her; her sweetheart went to her, and told me, he would take care of her; I then went to the office, and got Bly and Jones, two officers.

Q. Did you, or any body in your presence, search the prisoner? - A. Yes, Bly pulled her things off, and I stood by to see what she had got.

Q. What was found? - A. She had a pair of pockets belonging to my children.

Q. What might be the value of those pockets? - A. One shilling, perhaps, I cannot say; I then asked her where her mistress's silk cloak was, and she said, it laid in the window, pointing to the corner; Jones immediately went to the corner, and she said, it laid in the window, pointing to the corner; Jones immediately went to the corner, and took the cloak out of the window, and under that cloak laid the tell of the bundle of things; Bly took the things with him, he tied them in a bundle, and has had them ever since.

JAMES BLY sworn. Q. You are a constable. - A. Yes.

Q.Belonging to what office? - A.Queen-square, Westminster.

Q. Do you remember being present at this search, at the Almonry? - A. Yes, about seven o'clock in the evening, Friday, the 5th of Novembember; I had information that the prisoner was at a certain house there.

Q. You saw her in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember asking her where her mistress's cloak was? - A. I do, perfectly.

Q. Do you remember what answer the prisoner made? - A. Yes; she said, it was in the window.

Q. Did you go the window? - A. I saw Jones go to the window; I saw him take the cloak, and give it to Mr. Hadland; I told him to take care of it.

Q. Did he find any thing else under the cloak? - A. YEs, this bundle; they were not all found under the cloak, some of them were found in other parts of the room; I found a guinea and a half in gold in the prisoner's pocket, a few shilling, and some halfpence; the silver and halfpence were returned to her, by order of the Magistrate.

Q.(To Hadland). Look at the things in that

bundle, and tell me whether they are your property? - A.Here is a pair of stockings that I can swear to, they have my name to them; my wife knows the remainder of the things.

Q. What do you suppose these stockings are worth? - A.They cost me six shillings, I will say four shillings.

LOUISA HADLAND sworn. Q. Look at that cloak? - A. I know this cloak to be mine, it had just come home from the milliner's; I know it by a mark the milliner had put on it.

Q. What is it worth? - A.Three pounds.

Q. Would you give that for it? - A. It cost me five pounds ten shillings; I have put every thing a great deal under the mark; she had a pair of stockings on when she was taken.

Q. How many pair of stockings were there? - A.Five pair.

Hadland. My wife's bonnet was taken from the prisoner's head at the office.

Q. Did you see any thing else of your wife's upon her? - A. Not that night; afterwards, at the office, a petticoat of my wife's was taken off her.

Q.( To Mrs. Hadland.) Is that bonnet and petticoat yours's? - A. Yes, they are.

HENRY WHITE sworn. Q. Where do you live? At Richmond, I keep the sign of the Ship, where the coach goes from.

Q. Do you remember the time when Hadland's house was robbed? - A. I only remember the prisoner at the bar coming there between six and seven in the morning of Wednesday, the 3d of November.

Q. Had she any thing with her? - A. A large bundle under her arm.

Q. Did she stay with you any time? - A. She stopped from that time till eight in the morning. and then she went away with the coach to town; she had a handkerchief with penny pieces in it, to the amount of two pounds.

Q. Did you see them? - A. Yes, I gave her cash for them; she said, there were two poundsworth; I told her, as they seemed to be very heavy, I would give her, two-pound note for them; I told them out, and they amounted to two pounds three shillings and sixpence; and I gave her two pounds three shillings and sixpence for them.

Q.( To Hadland). On the morning of the 3d of November, did you miss any penny-pieces? - A. Yes, to the amount of two pounds four shillings.

Q. All in penny-pieces? - A. No, there were about eight shillings in halfpence, and the rest in penny-pieces.

Q.( To White). In the two pounds three shillings and sixpence, were there any halfpence mixed? - A. They were, but I cannot say how many.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, of stealing goods in the dwelling-house, value 40s. but not guilty of the burglary , Death .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18021201-72

73. THOMAS HOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , nine silk handkerchiefs, value 18s. and four pair of shoes, value 6s. the property of Henry Moses and Abraham Moses , in their dwelling-house .

HENRY MOSES sworn. Q. Did the prisoner live with you? - A. Yes.

Q. When? - A.About the 25th of October last, he came to me on trial; and on the 25th of November, some police-officers brought him to my house, and asked me if I knew him; I told them I did; they asked me if I missed any thing.

Q. Had he quitted your service? - A. No; they told me the pawnbroker had stopped him with some silk handkerchiefs offering to pawn; some duplicates of the other things were found upon him.

CHRISTIAN MATHEWS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 25th of November, the prisoner at the bar came into our shop about twelve o'clock, and offered these handkerchiefs to pledge, (produces them); he asked twelve shillings upon them; I asked him several questions concerning them, and he did not give satisfactory answers; a young man who was in our shop jumped over the counter, and took hold of him, and took him before the Magistrate at Lambeth-street.

Q. Did you search him? - A. No; here is a pair of shoes that he pledged on the 16th of November, which I lent him half-a-crown upon.

Q.(To Moses). Look at those handkerchiefs? - A. I cannot say positivily they are mine, because the mark is gone off; they are the same sort of handkerchiefs, and the shoes never had any mark, but I know them to be mine, they are the sort of shoes we generally have; I cannot swear to them, I never missed them; goods are continually coming in and going out; and therefore I could not miss them.

Q. What did the prisoner say? - A. When the officer brought him to my house, he confessed it.

Q. Did you make him any promise? - A. No; in fact I did not ask him a single question; when the officers brought him to my house, he went down upon his knees, begged for mercy, and said, they were all my property, and he would give me back all that he had.

Q. Had he the goods with him? - A. No, I never saw him with the goods; they were brought to me the next day, and he said they were all mine; I told him it was not in my power to shew him mercy; the law must take its course.

Q. Where were your handkerchiefs kept? - A. In a glass in the shop.

Q. Was he shop-boy? - A. No, he was hired to go on errands.

Q. Are the shoes your own wear? - A. No, we keep a shop-shop.

Q. Is your son in partnership with you? - A. Yes, the firm of the house is Moese and son.

Q.What is the lowest value you can fix upon the handkerchiefs? - A.Suppose about 2s. a piece.

Q.What are the shoes worth? - A. About one shilling and sixpence.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - On the 25th of November last, the prisoner was brought to the Office by one of Mr. Mathews's man, a pawnbroker, in the Minories; he was taken before a Magistrate, and a handkerchief was produced; I searched him, and found a great quantity of duplicates upon him; I asked him if he had any thing else about him, and he said, no; I searched him, and found a watch upon him, which he said was his own, that his father had given him a twelvemonth ago; I found upon him a leather purse; there was a piece of parchment in the purse, with two pieces of paper in it; one paper had got three guineas in it; it was pinned in his breeches pocket; and the other paper two guineas and a half; I then searched another pocket, and found a sevenshilling piece, a half guinea, three shillings, and a sixpence; I asked him how he came by that money; he told me his father had given it him to take care of for him; I then put my hand in one of his pockets, and found a card, with Moses and son upon it, in Nigtingale-lane; I told him, I am afraid you are a bad boy; you have been robbing your master, and this is a card of his shop; he said it was not his master; he did not live there at all; I then took him before the Magistrate again, and acquainted the Magistrate with what I had found; he told the Magistrate, if he would let the officer go with him, he would shew where his master lived, and his father too; I thought it prudent to take some more officers with me, and search the father's house; he took us to his master's first, which proved to be the same place which the card directed me to; I asked the master if he had lived with him; I asked him if he had sent him to pledge any silk handkerchiefs; he said, no; I then asked him if he had lost any; he said, there were so many things in the shop, he could not tell; I then took hold of his arm, to take him back again to the Office; he said, let me go on one side, and speak to my master; I told him if he had any thing to say to his master; he must say it in my presence; he then said all the things that were pledged at the different pawnbrokers that the tickets belonged to, except the watch and the pin, which I forgot to mention, were his masters; he said the half guinea and seven-shilling piece and the 3s. 6d. were the produce of them; he told his master he hoped he would forgive him, and he would come back, and live in his service.

Q. Were the shoes and the neck-handkerchiefs part of the things he admitted he had taken? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not admit that the rest of money came from that? - A. No, he did not.

Prisoner's defence. The three guineas and the two guineas and a half, the watch and the pin, were my own property; and as to the other things, my master said he would be as favourable as he could. GUILTY aged 15.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

Reference Number: t18021201-73

74. WILLIAM VERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a silver watch, value 3l. 3s. the property of Thomas Welsh , in the dwelling-house of David Brine .

THOMAS WELSH sworn. Q. Where did you lodge on the 31st of October last? - A. In Oxfordbuildings.

Q. At whose house? - A. David Brine's.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do, to my sorrow.

Q. Did he lodge with you? - A.Only one night.

Q. Did he sleep with you? - A. He had half a bed in the same room that I slept in; it was on the Saturday night that he went away with my property, about eight o'clock in the evening; I drew the watch out of my pocket, and called to my landlady for a candle to go to bed; the prisoner said he would go to bed too; the landlady let him into my room; then I would up my watch, and laid it down on the side of my bed; then this jockey, instead of going to his own bed came up mine; the landlady went out of the room, and left the light; the prisoner laid his snuff-box down on my pillow, and then took up my watch to look at it; as soon as I turned my back, he ran out with the watch, and I cried out murder to my landlord and landlady, that the shoemaker had run off with my watch; my landlord and I went after him into a narrow court; on went this way and another that way, to see if we could find him; at the same time the slipped into the passage of the same lodgings again that he had come out of.

Q. Did you see him slip into the same lodgings again that he had come out of? - A. I did; we were not twenty yards off; the landlady had hold of his hair with both her hands; when we came up I laid hold of him, and he said, try me, try me, I have no watch; then we took him to watch-house.

Q. Did you ever find your watch? - A. Not. from that day to this; he was searched at the watch-house, but there was no use in it.

MARGARET BRINE sworn - Q. Do you remember lighting Welsh to bed on the 31st of October last? - A. I remember lighting Welsh and the prisoner; they slept below stairs; I was in the opposite parlour; there was nobody else in the house but me and my husband, and them; after I had let them in, I heard a cry of murder, and my

husband and Welsh went in search of the men; vernon came running back, and said he had left his snuff-box on the bed; I laid hold of him, and kept him till my husband and Welsh came back.

Q.Had Welsh told you he had stolen his watch. - A. Yes.

Q. How did you lay hold of him? - A. By the collar; my husband and Welsh took him into custody.

Jury. Q. Did you see the watch on the bed? - A. I saw the old man wind it up, and put it on the bed.

DAVID BRINE sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. He lodged at my house two nights. Q. Do you remember, on the 31st of October, hearing Welsh cry out murder? - A. Yes, he said the cobler had run away with his watch; I instantly got out of the chair in which I sat, and ran out into the buildings; Welsh was gone out before me; then I went up into Oxford-street; I looked into the public-house, but could not find the prisoner; I immediately returned back to my own apartments.

Q. How long were you gone? - A. Not more than five or six minutes; when I returned, I saw my wife having the prisoner in custody in the passage; then we took him into the room where the watch was stolen from; I asked him if he knew any thing of the watch, and he said he would stand search, and began to rummage his own clothes, and said he had it not; we took him to the watch-house; he was searched, but nothing found upon him.

Prisoner's defence. I was never out of the room till they dragged me to the watch-house; I was never in a hobble in all my life, and I am 65 years of age.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

(To Welsb, What is the watch worth? - A. It cost me five golden guineas.

Q.What is the worth? - A.Three guineas.

Q. Is it a silver watch? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you had it? - A. A little better than two years.

Q. What way of life are you in? - A. A bricklayer's labourer.

Q. When you were in the street, did you see the prisoner run out of the street into the passage? - A. I did.

Q.(To Brine.) Remember this man's life is at stake; you went out with the prosecutor in quest of the prisoner? - A. Yes, five or six minutes.

Q. When you were about returning to your own house, did you or not see him run into the house? - A. I did not see him, till I saw him in the passage. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18021201-74

75. SARAH HOLT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , in the dwelling-house of William Smith , thirteen guineas, two half-guineas, a Bank-note, value 10l. another Bank-note, value 5l. and six other Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of the said William.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

MARTHA SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you the wife of William Smith? - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At the corner of Union-street, in Hackney-road .

Q. What is his business? - A. He keeps the Duke of Clarence public-house .

Court. Q. In what parish is your house? - A. St. Leonard, Shoreditch.

Mr. Kanpp. Q. In what part of the house did you keep your notes and money? - A. In a drawer in my bed-room.

Q. Had you missed any of your notes and money, previous to the 29th of November? - A. Yes, I had.

Q. In what situation was the prisoner in your house? - A. She was a servant .

Q. Was it her business to sweep the house, and take care of the up stairs rooms? - A. Yes.

Q. Would she have access to your room amongst the others to sweep and clean? - A. Yes.

Q. Your sister slept with her, did she? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she sleep with her on the 29th of November? - A. Yes.

Q. Had she sleep with her before that? - A. Yes, several nights.

Q. On that night, did you see the pockets of the prisoner, and by whom were they produced to you? - A. About one o'clock in the morning, my sister produced a pocket to me, I was in bed; I found in it a red morocco purse, containing a 10l. Bank-note, six 1l. a 5l. thirteen guineas, and two half-guineas; after I looked at them, I put the purse in again, and kept them till I delivered them to Armstrong the next morning.

Q. Did you look at the notes particularly? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any mark upon them by which you knew them? - A. My hand-wrting was upon four of the ones.

Q. Was than your name? - A. No, the names of the persons I took them of, and on the 5l.

Court. Q. When had you taken them? - A. I cannot exactly say, they were not dated.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How lately had you seen them? - A. In the course of the month past; I had told up part of them on the Wednesday before, I was to make a payment the Wednesday following.

Q. What did you notice on the Wednesday

before? - A. I noticed a one pound note, with the name of Grew upon it, when I put it out of my purse which I carry in my pocket.

Q. Did you observe any other? - A. No,

Q. The next morning were you present when Armstrong came? - A. Yes.

Q. Court. Q. Had you looked at your money the night before the pocket was found? - A. No, on the Sunday before, I had missed a one pound note and a guinea, I was certain no body had had access to my room but the prisoner, my husband, and my sister.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Is your sister here? - A. Yes.

Q. When Armstrong came the next morning, tell us what passed between you and the prisoner? - A. She confessed -

Q. Did you make any promises to her, that you would prosecute her? - A. No; I threatened her that I would do it; when Armstrong came at eight o'clock, he called the prisoner down stairs, I then produced the pocket.

Q. Had there been any conversation between you and the prisoner, previous to Armstrong coming? - A. She confessed to me up stairs -

Q. Did you make her any promise? - A. I did not; I thought I heard her getting up, and I went up to see, and found she was; she said, shehad lost her under petticoat; she begged of me to ask my sister had got her under petticoat, but that I had got her pocket, upon which she fell into tears, and said, my blessed mistress, have mercy on me; I then said, a great deal of mercy you have had on me; now I will hang you, I can hang you, and I will; I put her into the club-room, and locked the door, I then left her, and went down stairs.

Q. How soon after did Armstrong come? - A. I think, about an hour, or something less, he called her down; I then produced a pocket, and laid it on the table; Armstrong desired to see the contents of it; I then put my hand in my pocket, and pulled out the morocco pocket purse.

Q. Did you find the same notes and money that were in the pocket before, yes; then Armstrong asked her, whose the notes were, she said, my mistress's; he then asked her, whose guineas they were, she said, my mistress's.

Q. Was you present when she was searched? - A. She was not searched, I had her pocket.

Q. Was there any key in her pocket? - A. Yes, there was a key taken out of her pocket which opened the drawer where my money and notes were; I should have said, that before Armstrong came, I asked her how she had got at the money, she said, she found the key in the cellar, and did not think she was going any harm.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Then it is not true, that you said up stairs; you would not hurt a hair of her head? - A. I did not.

Q. How long had she lived with you? - A. She came the 29th of March, I had her from her father and mother; I enquired about them, and the neighbours said, they were very honest people, and the girl was a very honest girl.

Q. she is very young, is she not? - A. I think she told me seventeen.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you seen any of the notes you have been speaking of in he pocket-book? - A. Yes.

Q. Are there any of those notes, that, when produced, you shall be able to speak to as being your's? - A. Yes, a ten and a one.

Q. By what mark? - A. My own hand-writing of the person's name from whom I received them, the ten pound note I received on the 6th of October.

MARY GIBBONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You live with your sister at her house? - A. Yes.

Q. You did so on the 29th of November? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you sleep with the prisoner on that night? - A. Yes; I had slept with her for some night.

Q. In consequence of any agreement between you and your sister, did you report to the pocket of the prisoner? - A. Yes, I found their prisoner's pocket behind her pillow, about one o'clock in the morning of Wednesday, while she was asleep.

Q.What did you do with the pocket? - A. I took it to my sister's room, and gave it to her.

Q. Did you at all look into the pocket, or open the pocket, till you delivered it to your sister? - A. I put my hand into the pocket; I had no light, and I put my hand upon something, which I shook, and throught I heard the sound of gold.

Q. Did you take any thing out at all? - A. No, I did not; Mr. Smith let me into his bed-room, and I gave the pocket to my sister as she sat up in the bed.

Q. Did you see the red morocco pocket-book produced? - A. Yes; My sister put her hand in the pocket, and took out a pocket-book, wrapped up in a pocket handkerchief.

Q. Did you see the contents of that pocket-book produced? - A. I did, thirteen guineas, and two half-guineas; she opened the other side of the pocket-book, and found a ten pound Bank-note, five pound Bank-note, and six ones; then my sister put them into the pocket-book again, and kept them in the pocket.

Count. Q. What time in the morning was it, when you took the pocket away? - A. About one o'clock.

Q. How long had she been in bed? - A. But a

few minutes, she was asleep almost at soon as she got into bed, she walked while I was getting out of bed, and said, oh Hetty, I don't know what she meant, that is not my name, I said, I was going to get out of bed.

Q. Did you go to bed again afterwards? - A. No, I did not; I dressed myself, and went to clean the parlour out, ready for the morning; my brother told me to go to bed again, but I said, I would not go to bed to her again.

Q. Where did you get the candle from? - A. My sister burns a light in her room, and my brother lit the candle.

Q. Did you dress yourself in the dark? - A. No, I fetched my cloaths down, and she had tucked my petticoat behind her pillow.

Q. When you took your things, did you take your candle into the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she wake at that time? - A. No.

Q. So that in the morning, when your sister saw her, she knew nothing at all from you of what, had passed? - A. Nothing.

Q. Then you had no conversation with her after you left the room, and she said, oh, Hetty, and you told her you were getting out of bed, before Armstrong came, concerning the pocket or pocketbook? - A. No, nothing at all.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn, - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer belonging to Worship-street? - A. I am; I was sent for to the prosecutor's house; the prisoner at the bar was given me in charge, there was a pocket produced by Mr. Smith, and I said, call the prisoner down.

Court. Q. You did not call her prisoner then? - A. Yes, she was locked inthe club-room; when she came down, the pocket was then open, and from out of the pocket was taken this leather purse, with a key and knife, some penny-pieces, and a few halfpence. (Produces them.)

Mr. Knapp. Q. Are those the notes you received at that time with the pocket-book? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any money? - A. Yes, thirteen guineas and two half-guineas, (produce them;) when the notes were all produced on the table, and the money, I spread them, and seeing the quantity and the value, I said to the girl, Mrs. Smith and her sister being in the room, who do these notes belong to, she said, to my mistress; I then said, who do the guineas belong to, she said, to my mistress; I said, who do the half-guineas belong to, she said, to my mistress, and I thought to harm in taking them; I then went up stairs, taking the key with me, to the bed-room, with Mrs. Smith, and she shewed me a drawer belonging to a doublechest; I put this key in,and found in unlocked it, and locked it again; I then returned to the prisoner, and took her into custody.

Court. Q.Was it an upper drawer, or a lower drawer? - A. I believe it might be the third from the ground.

Court (to Mrs. Smith.) Q.What drawer was it? - A. The third from the bottom.

Armstrong. I knew her friends very well, and being so young a girl I took her to my own house, instead of locking her up.

The Bank notes were then identified by Mr. and Mrs. Smith.

Prisoner's defence. My mistress said if I would but tell her the truth she would not hurt me. I told her the truth, and she directly sent for Mr. Armstrong; my mistress told me two or three time she would not hurt me if I would tell her the truth for my father and mother's sake.

Court (to Mrs. Smith.) Q. You have heard what the prisoner has just now said? - A. I never said any such words.

Q. Do you mean you did not say any such thing in substance? - A. I did not make use of any such expression. Q. You said you could hang her and would hang her? - A. Yes, I did.

GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of her good character and youth.

The prosecutor also joined in the recommendation.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-75

76. EDWARD NELSON , was indicted for making an assault in the king's highway, upon Robert Bartlett , on the 27th of November , putting him in fear and taking from his person a steel watch chain, value 1s. and three metal seals, value 3s. the property of the said Robert.

ROBERT BARTLETT sworn. - I keep the Gloucester Arms Public-house, in Rochester-row, Tothill-fields : On the 27th of November last, two men were to run upon a common, facing my house; I went out to see them, and while the men were running I found somebody at my fob pocket; I caught the prisoner fast by the wrist which had hold of the chain; he did not cease pulling the chain, till it broke from the watch, it went with a jerk.

Q. Did you do all you could to keep his hand fast? - A. Yes, I did; I still held him fast by the hand, and collared him with my other hand; then another man came to his assitance to rescue him from me.

Q. Do you know that other man? - A. No, I do not; the other man laid hold of me and tried to pull me from him; I threw the prisoner on the ground, and kept fast hold of him; they shoved me down, and while I was down I recived a violent blow on my cheek, which is swelled now; there were then two more besides the prisoner; I was afraid they would use me worse, and I let the prisoner loose.

Q.What time of day was this? - A.Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q.There were a great number of persons about? - A. There were only the prisoner and those two men near me, they went away together among the crowd, my month was full of blood, and Mr. Williams came up to me, I pointed out the prisoner to him, and told him he had robbed me; the prisoner had not then gone more than three or four yards; then some more people came up who said they would assist me in taking him; I went up to the crowd to see if I could see him, but I had lost fight of him; Mr. Williams then saw several people at one hundred yards distance, or it might be two hundred, and said there he is going off the common now; Mr. Williams and I and two or three more went after him, and when he saw us coming after him, he began to run.

Q. How near were you when he began to run? - A. One hundred yards or better, we followed after him.

Q. Did those who were with him run too?-A.Some of them did, and one endeavoured to stop Mr. Williams, and said let him go, let him go; we passed them and pursued the prisoner, who was then running alone. I lost fight of him, and did not know which way he was gone, Mr. Williams and another were before me when I had lost fight of him; I went home, and having been home about half an hour, a person came from Queen-square to let me know the prisoner was taken; I went to Queen-square, and there I saw the prisoner, he was examined before the Justice; he had been searched but nothing found upon him.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not hundred people round you when you lost your watch chain? - A. No, not very near me, there was nobody within five or six yards.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I stand directly before you? - A. No, he stood close to my right side.

FRANCIS WILLIAMS sworn. On the 27th of November last, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw a scuffle between the prosecutor and the prisoner. I know his person perfectly well.

Q.Had you known him before? - A. Not before that day. I went up to Mr. Bartlett and asked him what was the matter, his mouth was bleeding at the time the prisoner got out of Mr. Bartlett's hands, and rushed into the crowd of people. I then looked round, and saw a corporal of the guards; I said, corporal, call up your men, here are pickpockets here; upon that I saw the prisoner and four or five more, going off from the mob on the other side of us, making the best of their way off. I said to Bartlett there he goes, he was then a hundred yards, or perhaps a hundred and fifty yards, from the prisoner; the prisoner seeing me observe him, immediately began to run and left the other behind him; French and I immediately went off in pursuit of him; we ran after him and cried stop thief; several of those who were in company with him, ran with us and said no! no! let him go; till at last we ran too fast for them, and got into Horseferry-road, the prisoner was a good distance a-head of us; we halloaed out stop thief, the prisoner halloaed out no! no! it is for a bastard child, let me go. I was then got foremost, and several people who had got hold of him let him go. I still continued in pursuit till I got down to Abingdon-street; and just in turning a corner to get out of the way he turned into a public-house; I ran into the house, and French went down the stable-yard; I found him in the parlour; I was in the house in less than half a minute after him; I laid hold of him, and continued my hold, till I sent to Queen-square for Mr. Blys he came and took him into custody, and then we sent for Mr. Bartlett.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not upon the green twenty minutes after the prosecutor lost his watch-chain? - A. No, I don't think it was more than five or six minutes.

- FRENCH sworn. - I joined in pursuit of the prisoner with Mr. Williams; I lost fight of him at the corner of Milbank-street, I did not see him go into the public-house, I ran down the stable yard, while Mr. Willaims went into the house; I afterwards went into the house and found the prisoner and Mr. William in the parlour; he was searched, but nothing found upon him.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner; and he was committed; I know nothing more of it.

Prisoner's defence. I went to see this race, there was a great multitude of people; I was standing before the prosecutor, there were a great number of people round him, and a man in a blue coat snatched the watch chain from him and ran away; he charged me with it, I told him I had not got it, and he let me go; I was walking about there for twenty minutes, and then some people said they were coming to duck me, and I said, rather than be ducked, I would run away, and I did run away; I was in the public-house where I was taken twenty minutes before they came in.

GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18021201-76

77. WILLIAM BLAKE , ELIZABETH BLAKE , and MARIA ROBINSON were indicted for burglariously breaking, and entering the dwelling house of James Fletcher , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 18th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, a cloak, value 5s. a table cloth, value 1s. a chair cover, value 2s. a pair of nankeen drawers, value 2s. two tea spoons, value 3s. and two handkerchiefs, value 1s. the property of the said James.

JAMES FLETCHER sworn. - I am a broker , and live on Bethnal-green : On the night of the 18th of November I went to bed after seeing the house was fastened; and about three o'clock in the morning my wife and I heard a noise, but did not take much notice of it; when I came down between seven and eight in morning, I found the house had been broken open by taking the hinges off the shutter of the back parlour window, and taking the shutter down, which was set in the yard. I missed three small silver spoons, but nothing further till my wife came down.

ELIZABETH FEETCHER sworn. I am wife to the last witness; we went to bed on the 18th of November about ten o'clock, after my husband had seen the house was fastened, in which he is very particular; a little after three in the morning we heard a noise but did not suspect it ws at our house; in the morning we found the back parlour window open, and the sash quite up; I went into the yard, and found the shutter standing against the side, without any hinges; which were lost on the frame, and the bell was on the ground; which I cannot account for not ringing; I found a tea-chest, a bird-cage, but the bird was gone, and a little short dirty pipe; I then went in and missed the spoons and my red coak, two pocket handkerchiefs, a pepper box, a chair cover, and a pair of nankeen breeches. I have seen the cloak, the chair cover, and pair of nankeen breeches.

JOHN ARMSTONG sworn. I am an officer, belonging to Worship-street; On Friday the 19th of November, I went with Mason and Vickery between ten and eleven to a house in Nichol-row, Beual-greet, about six or eight minutes walk from Fletcher's when I opened the door I saw Mrs. Blake and Mrs. Robinson in a room below, Mrs. Blake was sitting with a child in her lap, and a little girl standing by her; I said I had a warrant to search the house, and disired Vickery to go outside the door to watch; I left Mason below while I went up stairs to search, I found a bed on the floor, and another on a bedstead; I desired Mason to let nobody to go out for I was in possession of some goods which I had found on the bed, (producing a table cloth, a pair of breeches, and a chair cover, which were identified by Mrs. Fletcher); I secured those goods with others, and chucked them down to Mason; I then went down and asked Mrs. Robinson who they belonged to; Mrs. Blake said, it is nothing to you; in a few minutes after Vickery brought Blake in; then the prisoner were all secured, taken to the office, and committed: On Monday the prosecutrix brought a memorandum to the office of some goods she had lost; I then shewed her the things I had taken from the house with the prisoners, and she owned some of them; I desired William Blake to pick out what was his own, and be picked out the chair cover, the table cloth, and breeches which have been sworn to by the prosecutrix, and said they were his.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - On the 19th of November I went with Armstrong and Mason to Nichols-row; they went into a house, and I went into a public-house very near, which I know Blake used I saw him standing by the fire, I called him out and told him I wanted him, and he must go along with me, for that Armstrong was at his house searching for some goods; he went close before me, and I folowed him into the house where Armstrong was; he was asked what property belonged to him, he ownned some of the things, and some he would not own; when we were taking them to the office, he said he had been in that house three weeks as a lodger, that some little difference had happened to him respecting some business in the city, for which he had left his house, and that his wife had only come down there that morning to bring him some breakfast; I knew him before very well when he used to keep an old iron shop in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street I then went and examined the prisecutor's house, which is next to a corner, and found they were obliged to get over the neighbour's wall at the corner, and there to break through a little fence, that fenced off a garden; I saw the shutter had been forced off by means of a large chissel or a crow; and I saw a pipe with some tobacco in it.

PETER MASON sworn. - I asked Mrs. Blake and Robinson who was the owner of the house; Robinson said it was her house, and that Blake had lodged there a little while; I asked her how the things came there without her knowledge; she said she was a milk woman, and went out very early in the morning, and they might have been brought in, in her absence.

William Blake 's defence. - I was under some difficulties, and went to Robinson's house, who I am positive is innocent, to secrete myself, and staid there for three weeks; I used to go about with fish, and last Friday I went to Billingsgate and returned to the public-house about nine o'clcok in the morning; I neither saw the property, or knew any thing of it, till the offficers apprehended me; Armstrong asked me whether any of the property belonged to me, and I told him it did not, but took up some of own things, and the table cloth, and nankeen drawers were intermixed with them; the chair-cover I never saw, and I believe they were secreted for the purpose of taking away the life of a poor individual like me.

Elizabeth Blake and Maria Robinson were not put on their defence.

ALL NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before M.r Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-77

78. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, on the 22d of November , upon John Harris , put

ting him in fear, and taking from his person against his will, two shirts, value 20s. two waistcoats, value 20s. two neck-handkerchiefs, value 2s. and a pocket-handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Richard Lamb .

RICHARD LAMB sworn. - On Monday, the 22d of November, I delivered the property stated, to John Harris , for the purpose of getting them washed, but I know nothing of the robbery.

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I am twelve years old next April, and know the nature of an oath: On the 22d of November, I received the things stated in the indictment of Mr. Lamb, which I was to take to be washed, it was about five o'clock in the evening; when I was going along the Strand, and by Hewitt's-court, the prisoner came behind me, and snatched the bundle from me; I am certain it was him; he snatched it at once from me, and ran up the court: I followed him, and called out, stop thief; Mr. Buston, at No. 10, caught hold of him, upon which the prisoner threw the bundle behind him, which I picked up; I saw the things put into the handkerchief. (Produces the property, which was identified by the prosecutor).

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You lost fight of the person who took the bundle? - A. No.

Q. It was dark, was not it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see whether he had the bundle? - A. Yes, I saw it under his arm.

JOHN BUSTON sworn. - I live at No. 22, St. Martin's-lane, but was at No. 10, Hewitt's-court, Strand, on the 22d of November: About a quarter before six, I heard the cry of stop thief twice or three times; I immediately ran out, and saw the prisoner run by me with a bundle under his arm; seeing pobody else, I secured him, and he immediately dropped the bundle, which was picked up by Harris; I then took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. I was going up Hewitt's-court, and a person-stopped me, and said I had taken a bundle from the lad; and I said, I had not; that is all I know of it.

GUILTY, of stealing only , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-78

79. RUTH-MARY-ANN TURNER was indicted for that she, about the hour of one in the night of the 9th of November , being in the dwelling-house of Sarah Green , feloniously did steal therein, a gown, value 1l. a petticoat, value 10s. two dress caps, value 30s. a cap with a lace border, value 5s. four yards of lace, value 20s. another yard of lace, value 3s. a cloak, value 2l. six pocket-handkerchiefs, value 6s. six half handkerchiefs, value 6s. three shirts, value 15s. two shifts unmade, value 15s. a locket set in gold, value 42s. a gold ring, value 21s. a netting case, value 1s. two pair of silk stockings, value 10s. five pair of cotton stockings, value 5s. a napkin, value 1s. four towels, value 2s. a square of silk, value 2s. a pair of silk gloves, value 2s. two pair of other gloves, value 3s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 4s. a muslin shirt, value 4s. a pair of slippers, value 3s. a straw hat, value 5s. a bonnet, value 5s. two pieces of lace, value 7s. a velvet handkerchief, value 5s. and a muslin cloak, value 12s. the property of the said Sarah Green; and that she afterwards, about the same hour, the said dwelling-house feloniously and burglariously did break, to get out of the same .

SARAH GREEN sworn. - I live at Limehouse ; and the prisoner was my servant : On the 9th of November last, I lost a great quantity of wearing apparel, rings, trinkets, and other ornaments, our of a window up one pair of stairs, which appeared to have been cutered or broke out of, for when I entered that room early in the morning, I saw the window propped up with a bar, which I had seen fast the night before, as I always look to the fastenings myself; there was nobody in the house but the prisoner and myself; the property I lost was worth fifteen pounds; I mentioned it to the prisoner, and she said, she knew nothing about it.

DANIEL WHITE sworn. - I am a labourer at the New Docks: On the night of Saturday, the 9th or 10th of November last, about twelve o'clock, as Richard Smith and I were going home, in the neighbourhood of the Docks, I observed a parcel lying over the rails, which I picked up, and carried to the watch-house; that is all I know about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. How far is the place where you found it from Mrs. Green's house? - A. The space of a mile.

Court. (To Mrs. Green). Q. What day of the week was it that you suppose your house was robbed? - A. On the Wednesday morning early; the prisoner continued with me till Saturday evening, when she was taken up.

EDWARD RODGERS sworn. - I am a Policeofficer, and apprehended the prisoner on the Saturday evening; the robbery having been committed the Tuesday night or Wednesday morning before: I went to inspect the place, and Miss Green and the prisoner went up stairs with me; the prisoner held the candle, and I found the lines which hold the weights of the window were cut; but it appeared they were cut in an awkward manner, and not in the way a house-breaker would cut them; and my reason for supposing so is, that the knife must have missed in the cutting, because it broke a bit of the window, about an inch broad; in my opinion there had been no breaking on the outside, there being no marks; I also saw that it was impossible to cut the cord on the other side of the window, because the hole in the window was not big enough to admit an infant's hand, therefore it must have been cut inside; I then thought it proper to ask the prisoner some questions, and took her to the counting-house,

and asked her about her father, mother, and relation; I told her to be cautious in what she said as I did not mean to take any advantage of what she said, but only wanted to know if she could inform me any thing relative to the robbery; she said, that sometime before she had seen a man in a sailor's dress walking very often backwards and forwards before the door; that was all she told me; I called Miss Green, and said I should be obliged to take her servant with me, which I did, to a public-house, near the office, and ordered the master to let her have every thing proper, and not confine her too close; the prisoner did not appear at all agitated, but only pleaded ignorant to the transaction; next day being Sunday, I told the landlord not to let any body see her, she being very young; and as I did not suppose her to be an old offender, I did not search her so much as I otherwise should have done, so that I found nothing upon her that night; on Monday, I took her before the Magistrate, and Miss, Green attended.

Court. Q. This was the one-pair of stairs window, could a person of the prisoner's description safely get out of it? - A. There is a sort of penthouse under it, which I did not examine; though I don't think it is very probable that such a girl could get down from it, it would be dangerous, as it is a loftyhouse. Miss Green, Daniel White, and the two Daltons, attended at the Magistrate's, who thougth proper, upon the evidence, to recommit the prisoner for further examination, but did not send her to prison; the day following, in consequence of information I received, that she had some letters which she was looking at, I went up stairs, and took the servant of the house with me to be present; I desired the prisoner to set me see her pockets; she took off one which was empty, and handed it to me; I told her, I was not satisfied with that, but must see the other; she said, she had no other, and set herself down upon the bed; I then said, I would not do any thing that was wrong, and desired the servant to take notice of what I did, and had done; I insisted on having the pocket, which was refused; and at length I felt under her petticoats, and found a bundle, I took it out, and found it to be her pocket, in which was this lace, and a small lace called Tooting, (producing them); I asked her how she came by it; she said, she found it, but Miss Green swore to it, and the prisoner was committed for trail.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. What part of the window was broke? - A. The window on the right hand entering the room; the cords were cut, and a pane broke.

Q.Was it large enough to let in an instrument from without side? - A. It might be put in, but it could not cut the line on the other side, and yet they were cut on both sides.

Q. You searched the prisoner the first night? - A. On the Saturday night, I very gently searched her, I only rubbed her things down, I was very delicate with her, she being a young girl, and not supposing her to be guilty of any former offence.

Q. You found some letters in her pocket, which she did not like you to look at, I believe? - A. Very likely that might be her reason for refusing her pocket.

Q.Does Miss Green keep more servants than one? - A. She has some men who cut corks in the warehouse.

Jury. Q. Was the glass inside the room, or outside? - A. It was a very small bit of glass, I searched for it, but could not find it, it was dark, being eight o'clock at night when I looked for it.

WILLIAM DALTON sworn. - I am a constable of Limehouse, and was called up the 14th of November last, about one o'clock in the morning; I went to the watch-house, and saw the bundle which was found by White, I examined it, and by the markes, discovered who it belonged to.

Mr. Hart. Q. How far is the watch-house from Mrs. Green's? - A. About half a mile; the place where the bundle was found is near a mile and a half

THOMAS DALTON sworn. - I was called up, and went to the watch-house, where I saw this bundle of things wrapped in the tail of a muslin gown. (Producing it; the lace produced by Rodgers, was here sworn to be Mrs, Green, and several other articles were also identified by her.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the robbery, except by what my mistress has been telling you.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18021201-79

80. ISABELLA COLLIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , eight yards of cotton, value 14s. the property of John Taylor , privately in his shop .

JOHN TAYLOR sworn. - I am linen-draper , in Ratcliff-highway ; On the 1st of November, the prisoner came to my shop in company with another woman, we were very busy at that time, and could not attend them, they might wait about ten minutes; I asked the lady I was serving, to wait a few minutes, while I saw what they wanted; she did so, and I asked the prisoner what she wanted; the other woman said, some cloth; while I was shewing it, I observed the prisoner had something on her breasts, under her gown; I asked her what it was, and attempted to put my hand on it, she said it was her handkerchief; not being satisfied with that, I asked her again to shew it to me; she said, she would not, and went out of the shop; I followed her, and observed her to take something from her breast, and throw it into the adjoining

shop, she ran away, but I pursued her, and brought her back; I then picked up eight yards of printed cotton, and gave her in charge of an officer; I know the cotton by the private mark, and had seen it about three or four hours before; me shopmen were present, but are not here to-day.

JOSEPH EMBERLEY sworn. - I am headbrough of St. George's, and took the prisoner into custody.(The cotton produced and identified.)

Prisoner defence. A gentlewoman took me to the shop to by some cloth, which I was to make up; having made free with a little liquor, which I suppose Mr. Taylor observed, he made rather free with me, and in reaching over to me, to put his hand on my neck, he threw the piece of cotton off a stool; in the struggle, I picked it up, and said, I would take it to make my child a frock of, in a joking way; I am positive he might have seen me pick it up.

Mr. Taylor. It is entirely false, there were several other women in the shop, and I could not have taken any liberty with her, any further than asking her what she had there, upon which she was very insolent, and went away neither was she in liquor.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately , aged 27.

Confined eighteen calendar months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley

Reference Number: t18021201-80

81. WILLIAM COOKHAM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Ryder , about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 15th of November , and burglariously stealing silver watch, value 40s. a coat, value 30s. a waistcoat, value 5s. a pair of boots, value 7s. two handkerchiefs, value 15d. and a pair of leather gloves, value 2d. the property of Joseph Ryder.

JOSEPH RYDER sworn. - I am servant to my father, and live in his house, in Air-sheet : On the night of the 15th of November, I went to bed about twelve o'clock, and about three I was awaked by a noise in the room; I called out, but nobody answered; I got out of bed, and found my door, which I had left latched when I went to bed, wide open, I went down stairs.

Q. Was the street door fastended? - A. It is seldom fastened, on account of there being nine families in the house, and nobody knows who is out; when I got to the street door, I saw a man running on the opposite side of the way, I was in my shirt. but I immediately called, stop thief, and followed him near a quarter of a mile; when I took him, the first words he said, was, he had been in a great deal of distress; I knew him before, he is a weaver by trade, and had been once or twice up stairs into my room; I saw he had my blue coat and waistcoat on over his own; I asked him if he had my watch, he said, he had, and would give me every thing if I would let him go; I called assistance, and going along, he shewed me where he had thrown my boots; he was then taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. There are eight or nine familes in the house? - A.Nine; I live in the first floor back-room.

Q. You knew the prisoner some time? - A Yes; I suppose, I have known him nine or ten years by living in the same street, but have not spoke to him for four or five weeks.

Q. You have played him a variety of tricks, I believe? - A. Yes, and he has played me some.

Q. Have you frequently been out all night together? - A. Yes, once.

Q. But you have had a quarrel? - A. No, no particular quarrel. (The things produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

JOHN QUIN sworn. - I searched the prisoner, and found the two handkerchiefs, and a pair of leather gloves on him.

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutor has been my acquaintance for a year or two, and has played me several tricks, by which he always had the laugh against me; I, knowing his room, took his things to retaliate upon him, with an intention of telling him of it.

Q. Jury. (To Ryder.) Q. Did you ever take his things from him? - A. He slept with me one Saturday night, and laid his breeches on the bed, with three shillings in the pocket, two shillings fell on the bed, and one on the floor; I picked up one and let him look a long time for it; then I told him I had one, and that if it would make no difference to him, I would return it to him the next Sunday, which I did, and he took a silk handkerchief away from me.

Q. Were you on intimate terms with him? - A. I was, till I heard the badness of his character, and that he would not work.

Q. Was that the only time you had any thing of his? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, was gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-81

82. MARIA SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of November , two petticoats, value 3s. a gown, value 3s. a pair of shoes, value 2s. a silk handkerchief, value 2s. a pair of pattens, value 6d. and four muslin handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d. the property of George Debus .

CATHARINE DEBUS sworn. - I live at No. 3, Neptune-street, Wellclose-square , my husband is a boot-closer ; On the 1st of November Maria Smith lay with me, and got up to light the fire for me on the 2d, as I was not well; I did not know her before, but she said she was a stranger in London, and came into my house, which is a lodging -

house; she asked me where the key of the kitchen was, I said in the window; she went down stairs as I thought to light the fire, in half an hour after I heard a person at the street-door, I called twice, Maria, which she said was her name; she did not answer, and I went down stairs and found the yard and kitchen doors open, I took the milk in and looked into the kitchen for my gown and petticoat which I wear in the morning, it was not there; I looked about and missed a dark cotton gown, a stuff petticoat, a cotton petticoat, a silk handkerchief of my husband's, a pair of shoes and pattens, a night jacket, four handkerchief; two old shawls, and two pocket-handkerchiefs; I told my husband and he went in search of them to Mr. Mashiter's, the corner of Betsy-street Ratcliff-highway.

ELIZABETH DICKEY sworn. - I have known the prisoner about five months: My mother keeps a public-house; Smith came to our house the 1st of November, about eight or nine in the morning with a bundle, which she untied, and took out a white jacket, several handkerchiefs, a dark cotton gown, and white gown, and asked me to go of an errand; and I went with a gown and silk handkerchief to Mr. Mashiter's, at the corner of Betsy-street, where I pawned them.

JOHN GUEST sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Mashiter; On the 1st of November Elizabeth Dickey brought the dark gown and silk handkerchief to pledge for 8s. soon after Debhus came in, and owned them; On the 2d. of November the last witness came with a shuff petticoat; I stopped her and she took us to the prisoner.(The gown, petticoat, and handkerchief, produced and identified by Dickey and Debus.)

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner with part of the property on her; a petticoat, two neck handkerchiefs, a pair of shoes, and a pocket handkerchief.(The articles identified by Mrs. Debus.)

Prisoner's defence. I came from Gravesend and stopped at Dartford, and got to London on Saturday; I went to Neptune-street, no knowing where to lay; a gentleman asked me to sleep with him, and took me to that woman's house; I got up in the morning, and saw her in bed with a man; I said I was going, she said she kept girls, and if I was not situated, she would be glad of me; I agreed to stay, and did all the Sunday, but seeing them all in liquor, I thought it would not suit me, and went away with the things she had lent me, and left my own gown behind; I unfortunately happened to take two or three things which were not my own, and that is the truth.

Mrs. Debus. I have no ladies in the house: she did leave a dark gown behind her, but I neverlent her any cloaths, for any infamy whatever.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-82

83. ROBERT HOLLIDAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th October , six quarts of beer, value 2s. the property of Thomas Starkey and John Jenings .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-83

84. ANN BARNETT and ANN FISHER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of November , sixteen yards of ribbon, value 18s. the property of Samuel Barnard .

SAMUEL BARNARD sworn. - I am haberdasher in Fore-street , but know nothing of the robbery, not being at home.

JOHN JONES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Barnard; On the 1st of Novemebr, between eight and nine in the evening, the prisoners came into the shop, and asked to see some figured sarsent ribbon; when they looked at it sometime, Barnett asked Fisher to take off her bonnett, for them to seen which ribbon looked best; they looked some time, and Barnett took Fisher's bonnet in her hand; I suspected them, and put the drawer away, and put other ribbon before them; after looking at that sometime, I observed Barnett take a piece of pink searsent out of the drawer, she had Ann Fisher 's bonnet in her hand at the time; she was very particular how she returned the bonnet; and by Fisher being so particular how she put her bonnet on, I suspected the ribbon was in it; they looked at the drawer of ribbon sometime after, and rather scrupled the prices; I told them they and better look at some narrower ones; when I put the articles before them, I asked the young woman of the shop to serve them, and fetched Mr. Irving, and then I went to Fisher and desired her to pull off her bonnet, for I suspected she had a piece of ribbon in it; she pulled it off, and I saw the piece of ribbon drop on the floor; it was about sixteen or seventeen yards; I then went for a constable, and they were taken into custody.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Which got hold of the ribbon first? - A. Ann Barnett.

Q. And the other took the bonnet; is it not usual to take off the bonnet to cotnpare with ribbon? - A.Some do, and some do not. (The ribbon produced and identified.)

Q. You know ladies wear bonnets with false linings, and it might drop in? - A. No; I saw her take it, and found it in the bonnet.

Why did you not tell her? - A.She took it; I did not know where she put it; I suspected them I did not ask her for it; I saw it drop out of the bonnet.

Mr. Gleed. Q. Who enquired for the ribbon? - A. Ann Barnett, her bonnet was taken off, and the ribbon was in it.

JOHN IRVING sworn. - I am a merchant, and

lodge in Mr. Barnard's house; I was requested by the young man to go into the shop; I did so, and he accused one of the women, Fisher, with having a piece of ribbon, and desired her to pull her bonnet off; on taking it off the ribbon fell on the floor; an officer was sent for, and they were taken into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Did he charge the woman who pulled off her bonnet with taking it? - A. Yes, I think he said you have taken a piece of ribbon.

Ann Barnett 's defence. I am entirely innocent; the ribbon must have caught to the bonnet.

Barnett called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Fisher declined making any defence.

Barnett, GUILTY , aged 29.

Fisher, GUILTY , aged 22.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-84

85. SARAH MATHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , two gowns, value 6s. 6d. a shirt, value 1s. 6d. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 3s. two pillow cases, value 10d. a petticoat, value 1s. 6d. two yards of dimity, value 1s. a book, value 3d. and a bason, value 3d. the property of John Daly .(The case stated by Mr. Alley.)

JOHN DALY sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Jackson and Lempiere, oil-pressers; the prisoner was my servant , and left the place on the 4th of October; I missed the several articles stated; I searched the prisoner's lodgings, and found the bason, prayer-book, and two pieces of muslin; she was searched, and some duplicates were found by Armstrong.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am an officer, and searched a room, No. 8 Worship-street on the ground floor, on the 4th of November; I waited till Mrs. Mathews came home; I read my warrant and desired her to turn out her pockets, which she readily did, and produced four duplicates, one for a gown and shirt 18s. I told her she had more; she sent for a person, who brought a little book, and in it was a duplicate of a pair of tea-tongs; she opened her drawers, and let down her bed very readily, and shewed her apartment.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. When you shewed your warrant she readily complied? - A. Very.

Q. You have known her along time? - A. I have, and she had a good character.

GEORGE YOUNG sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Davison in Bishopsgate-street, and produce a variety of articles, a pair of tea-tongs, gown and shirt, which I received of the prisoner; I did not take the tongs in pledge.(The property identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I have only to say that I was employed by Mrs. Daly to pawn the articles for her, and desired not to let Mr. Daly know; I complied and gave her the money.

Mr. Daly. I have had the misfortune to lose my wife within two months, but do not believe she ever employed the prisoner in such a way.

The prisoner called ten witnesses who gave her a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-85

86. WILLIAM YOUNG was indicted for that he, being employed in the capacity of servant to Joseph Staines and James Carpenter , for the purpose of receiving monies for, and on account of the said Joseph and James, did by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession, of and from William Rowley , servant to James Thomas, the sum of 4l. 3s. being then due from the said James Thomas to the said Joseph Staines and James Carpenter, for, and on account of, the said Joseph and James, his masters and employers; and afterwards, to wit, on the same day, fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and make away with, the said sum of 4l. 3s. the monies of the said Joseph Staines and James Carpenter; and that he did take, steal, and carry away, from the said Joseph Staines and James Carpenter, his said masters and employers, the said monies, for, and on whose account the same was taken into his possession .

Second Count. For stealing the said monies at common law.(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM ROWLEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. James Thomas of Mumford-court, Milk-street, a woollen-draper, and a customer of Staines and Carpenter: On the 21st of June, I paid 4l. 3s. at their counting-house for the prosecutors, to the prisoner in gold, four guineas, and he gave me a shilling; it was paid for goods had of them.

Mr. Alley. - Q. What is Mr. Thomas's partner's name? - A. He had none then, he was once in partnership, but whether the person is alive or dead I cannot say; Mr. Thomas is not here, but I saw the dissolution of the partnership advertised in the Gazette.

Q. Did the prisoner give you any receipt? - A. I have a memorandum. (Produces it.)

JOSEPH STAINES sworn. - My partner's name is James Carpenter: the prisoner was employed by us to collect money; and Mr. Thomas bought goods of us.

Q. Do you know that hand-writing? - A. Yes, it is William Young 's the prisoner.

Q. Did you ever receive 4l. 3s. from the prisoner, as paid to him by Mr. Thomas? - A. No, neither from the prisoner, Rowley, or Mr. Thomas; the prisoner came the 8th of February, and

staid till July, when I turned him away for irregularity.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. How many clerks had you at that time? - A. Only the prisoner.

Mr. Knapp. - Q. Will you swear that this sum of 4l. 3s. was not accounted for? - A. I will.

James Carpenter confirmed the testimony of Mr. Staines.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to my counsel, and the mercy of the Court. GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-86

87. JOSEPH GILLIES , alias GILLIS , (a black), was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of November , twenty-one gross of metal buttons, value 9l. 15s. 4d. one gross of other metal buttons, value 19s. eighty four pair of leather gloves, value 12l. 11s. and a wooden case, value 3s. 6d. the property of Theophilus Richards , John Philip Marrendon , Samuel Marrendon , and John Deacon .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of John Roger Teschemacher.(The case stated by Mr. Alley.)

RICHARD HART sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Richards and Co. merchants of Birmingham, who sent the goods to Mr. Teschemacher a merchant, this is the invoice of the articles consigned; I marked the case on the 24th of November.

JOHN JOBLING sworn. - I keep the White-horse Inn at Cripplegate, the Birmingham waggon comes there; if the waggon sets out from Birmingham on the 24th, it should be in London at five or six o'clock on the 27th, which would be Saturday; if did arrive with a number of packages for Mr. Teschemacher, which were taken to the Custom-house quay by Richards, my carman, to go to the Fishmonger's porters for Mr. Teschemacher, by a general order from him.

WILLIAM RICHARDS sworn. - I am carman to Mr. Jobling and carried four packages to Custom-house quay for Mr. Teschemacher; I delivered them to the Fishmongers' porters.

JAMES OWEN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Owen Fishmongers' porter: I saw the packages on the quays, in the Fishmongers' porters custody, on account of Mr. Teschemacher; one package was missed, and is now in Court.

WILLIAM HENMAN sworn. - I am one of the Fishmongers' porters; we had four packages for Mr. Teschemacher; a note comes to us with the marks on it; one of the packages was missed.

ABEL TEWSON sworn. - On the 27th I saw the prisoner coming along Galley quay with a wooden case on his head; I called the Fishmongers' porters, and he was apprehended.(The case produced and identified.)

RICHARD HARLEY sworn. - I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody.

JOHN ROGER TESCHEMACHER sworn. -(Names the parties names). The Fishmongers' porters are entrusted with my packages.

Prisoner's defence. A gentlemen gave me the case and desired me to carry it to a yard; I don't know who it was. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-87

88. JOHN BOSWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d. of December a man's frock, value 5s. the property of John Hallet .

ELIZABETH HALLET sworn. - My husband keeps a house at Finchley , the prisoner was a stranger to me: Last Thursday, about four o'clock, I saw the frock hanging in the garden, and in about five minutes after, I missed it, the line was broke, and part of it taken away. (The frock produced and identified.)

JAMES WINTERBOURNE sworn. - I went by my father-in-laws, and saw the frock hanging in the garden; I saw the prisoner in the field in a path, an hour after, about an hundred yards from the garden, with the frock hanging on his left-arm, running from the garden, about a quarter before four; I pursued him, and he would have hid himself, if possible, but could not; just before I took him, he threw the frock down in the field, I picked it up, and gave it to one of the men who came to my assistance.

Prisoner's defence. I was out of employment, and went down the path, and this frock lay between the road and pails; I picked it up and saw that young man, who called out, stop thief; I said, if it is your's, take it, and threw it down; then they used me very ill, which I begged they would not do, as I would go with them, being innocent of stealing it. GUILTY , aged 48.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-88

89. WILLIAM ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a half-guinea and a seven-shilling piece , the property of John Moorman and Thomas Moorman .

JOHN SLADE sworn. - I am clerk to John and Thomas Moorman, smiths and saw-makers : On the 4th of November, about half-past three, the prisoner came to ask for employ into our accompting-house, in Old-street ; while I went to ask if they wanted a hammer-man, I left him in the accompting-house, by himself; on my return, I saw him come out of the accompting-house, and go away through the gate; I then missed the money off the desk, and pursued him; I took him in Barbican, and asked him how he came to go away without an answer, and why he took the half-guinea and seven-shilling-piece; he said, he had not taken

it; I took him back, sent for a constable, and searched him, and found the half-guinea, and seven shillings loose in his breeches pocket; I cannot swear to the half-guinea; the prisoner told me he had changed the seven shilling-piece, and bought a handkerchief, which he had in his hand.

GEORGE STOKELEY sworn. - I went out of the accompting-house as the prisoner went in; I had just put down half-a-guinea, and a seven-shillingpiece on the desk; I knew the half-guinea again, and described the marks on it before it was found, but I cannot swear to it; I have no doubt it is the same, it was an old half-guinea, bent down in a particular way on one side, not in the common way. (The constable produced a half-guinea found on the prisoner.)

Prisoner's defence. It was my own property, as I pawned a suit of cloaths for eighteen shillings, and shewed the ticket at the office.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-89

90. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , a gown, value 2s. and a shift, value 2s. the property of Sarah King .

SARAH KING sworn. - I am a single woman , and lodge at Mr. Townsend's, in Frog-lane, Islington : I missed a gown and shift, about six weeks ago, which were hanging out in the garden, about twelve o'clock at noon; I saw the shift again in about ten minutes after it was missed, Mrs. Townsend had it; I cannot swear to it, I have never seen the gown since.

BENJAMIN TOWNSEND sworn. - I was in the garden on the 28th of October, and saw the prisoner come into it; I did not take any notice, but presently I lost him; then I saw him come in again, and go up to the lines, where the shift was hanging, and take the pegs and throw them on the ground, and take the shift, and run off as fast as he could; I pursued him, he dropped the shift; my son overtook him, and he was taken to the watch-house.(William Townsend confirmed the testimony of Benjamin Townsend.)(The shift produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going down the lane, and they cried out, stop thief, I never saw the shift. GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-90

91. JOHN KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a metal watch, value 25s. the property of John Sharpe .

JOHN SHARPE sworn. - I lodge at the White-Hart, Battle-bridge , with John Kentish: I had the watch on the 24th of November, and went to bed exactly at ten o'clock; I got up in the morning at four o'clock, and found my breeches were taken from under my head, and the watch gone out of my pocket; I called the landlord, and the stairfoot door was locked, and as the lodgers came down, they were searched; the watch was found on the prisoner, tied up in his shirt, between the shoulders.

JOHN KENTISH sworn. - I keep the White-Hart, Battle-bridge, and saw the watch tied up in the prisoner's shirt.

JAMES KING sworn. - I am a watchman, and went into the White-Hart, and searched the prisoner, and found the watch tied up in his shirt, next to his skin, between his shoulders.(The watch produced by the constables, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. About seven o'clock I got up, and saw the watch wrapped up in a rag, under a table in the passage.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021201-91

92. JOHN MULLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , fourteen yards of carpet, value 35s. the property of Philip-Jones Philips .

JOHN WINDEYER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Phillips, in Oxford-street , who is a paperhanger and upholsterer , I can swear to the property.

THOMAS LOWTHER sworn. - I am a winecooper; passing through Oxford-street about ten o'clock in the morning; I saw the prisoner and another boy, standing at Mr. Phillips's door; the prisoner attempted to go into the shop once or twice, they both then crossed over the way, and I went away; on my return, in about half an hour, I found them in the same situation; a servant went into the shop, and the prisoner followed; the servant came out, and Mullins followed with the other boy, as far as Holles-street; they then talked together, and turned back; I went back on the other side of the way, and saw the prisoner go into the shop; I then went into Mr. Collins's, opposite, and asked for assistance; I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Phillips's, with the roll of carpet; I followed him, he saw me, and threw it down, and run down Red-Lion-yard; I followed him, and brought him back, with his companion, they were taken to Marlborough-street, and committed.

JOHN BLACKBURN sworn. - (Produces the carpet,) and confirmed the last witness. (The property identified.)

Prisoner's defence. The man said, fetch that carpet, and I'll give you a shilling; I did so, and when the people came up, he said, throw it away.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-92

93. ANN READING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , three pewter quart pots, value 3s. the property of James Lawson .

JAMES LAWSON sworn. - I am a publican , and keep the Thatched-House, in Red-Lion-street, Holborn: On the 30th of November, I received information of my pots being at Mr. Fontaine's, a brazier and tin-man, in Middle-row; I went there, and saw the prisoner, and two of my pots; she said, she had met with accidents with them, and would make me recompence for them; I went for an officer, and when I came back, I found another pot there, she was then taken to Hatton-Garden office.

JOHN THOMPSON sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Fontaine: On the 26th of October the prisoner brought three pots to sell; I was very busy, and told her to stop a minute or two; I weighed them, and said your pots come to 1s. 6d. and asked what she wanted in exchange; she said she wanted two candlesticks, and two spoons; but she had only one candlestick, and one spoon in exchange, and went away; I left the pots on the counter, and in about an hour after my master came in and asked me what I had been doing of, and who I bought the pots of; I said I did not know, that a woman came into the shop, and said she had been in the public line, that people had set the pots before the fire, and melted them, and it would have been a good thing if she had not been in the line at all; my master said it was evident the front of the pots had been melted to put the name out, for they were all melted in the fronts; I said I would endeavour to find her, and that I would be more cautious, being but little acquainted with London: On the 30th of November she brought two more pots; I run up to my master and told him the woman was come again, with more pots, she said I have brought you some more pots, as I am now going to leave off the public line, and I dare say they will be the last; my master came down, and Mr. Lawson was sent for.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman who brought the first pots to your house? - A. Yes; and she acknowledged it before the magistrate.

Q. What became of the three first pots? - A. They are here, five in all.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - On the 30th of last month I took the prisoner into custody, and the pots. (Produces the pots which were identified by Lawson.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not rob Mr. Lawson, for I have not been in his house these five months; I have dealt with him four or five years and had an accident with two of the pots, which I was ashamed to return in that state, and meant to make him recompence for, as soon as my son got into employ.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined seven days in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-93

94. JOHN MULLENS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of December , a shilling, a sixpence, and six half-pence , the property of John Fellowes .

MARTHA FELLOWES sworn. - My husband is a bricklayer : On the 1st of December I was standing at a neighbour's door, and saw the prisoner come out of my shop, which is a chandler's shop, No. 48, New Gravel-lane, Shadwell ; I asked what he wanted, he said some bread; I went in to serve him, and saw the candles, that hung over the counter, in motion; I gave him a loaf, and opened the till for change, and missed the money; I charged him with robbing me, and searched him, and found my shilling which I described before as being marked with a P.

Prisoner's defence. I received the shilling of Messrs. Clarke and Lyon, for two ship's papers.

SARAH MORRIS sworn. - On the 1st of December I sent for change for that shilling of Mrs. Fellowers.(The shilling produced and identified.)

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-94

95. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , four fowls, value 6s. the property of William Potts .

WILLIAM POTTS sworn. - I live at Dog-row, Bethnal Green : On the 26th of November last, I lost 40 fowls out of my hen-house in the yard; the prisoner has been a servant to me; I saw his smock frock bloody about two o'clock the next day, and feather down stocking upon it, and in his hair; I asked him where he had been working, he said with a cow-keeper at Bow, but could not tell his name; I told him about my fowls, and I said I could trace two people with nails in their shoes; I desired him to hold up his foot, he said he had no nails in his shoes, but I measured his shoe, and it corresponded exactly having nails in it; I asked him who was with him; he denied any knowledge of it; I got an officer, and he was taken; then we got to his lodgings, and found four fowls, but I cannot

swear to them, as they were plucked; I had lost upwards of forty.

COOMBES sworn. - I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner; when the fowls were found, he said he was very sorry, and owned he had stolen the fowls.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021201-95

96. ANN CHRINE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Margaret Gill , widow, about the hour of six in the night of the 29th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, a handkerchief, value 4d. an apron, value 1d. two caps, value 1d. eight cups and saucers, value 6d. a tin cannister, value 3d. two ounces of tea, value 3d. a sixpence, and six penny-pieces , the property of the said Margaret.

MARGARET GILL sworn. - I live in Sun-street, Bethnal-green , the house is let out in different tenements; I work out of doors at three shillings and sixpence a week; last Monday week, I left the house at five o'clock, and returned at seven, when I found the things were stolen; I live in the back-room, on the ground-floor, and found the shutters taken down, a pane of glass taken out, and the window opened.

JANE SMITH sworn. - I keep a clothes-shop, and live in Webb-square, Bethnal-green; on Tuesday last, the prisoner brought a handkerchief and two caps, for which I gave her five-pence, which is the full value.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - I am a Police-officer, and went in pursuit of the prisoner, and took her, with an old apron on her, belonging to the prosecutrix.(The things produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I found those things, and as I had happened to fall down, I put the apron on, and fold the rest. GUILTY, aged 46.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlessex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-96

97. RALPH NORRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a set of fire-irons, value 50s the property of George Stratton , and Henry Stratton , in their dwelling-house .

HENRY STRATTON sworn. - My brother and I are furnishing ironmongers , in Blackfriar's-road : On Thursday, the 11th of November, we lost a set of fire-irons from our factory, which is part of our dwelling-house, and under the same roof; I cannot exactly say when I had last seen them, but I think within a few days of their being stolen.

JOHN GODDARD sworn. - I work with Messrs. Stratton: On the 10th of November, Mr. George Stratton gave me the irons to clean, I looked at them, and saw what was necessary to be done, but being engaged, I gave them to another man, who works up stairs; on Thursday morning, the man missed them, and said to me, have you taken that set of fire-irons, I said, no, but that Mr. Henry Stratton must have taken them; it struck me, in a few minutes, and I went and asked him, he said, no; we searched, but could not find them; I know the prisoner, who had worked shop mate with me, and had quitted Mr. Stratton's service only two or three months.

SAMUEL PARKER sworn. - I am a furnishing-ironmonger, the prisoner worked for me on the 10th of November; on Saturday the 13th, he brought a set of fireirons, and asked me to buy them, for which, saying, he would take twenty-four shillings; I asked him how he came by them, he said, he had raffled for them, and won them; I thought they were not honestly come by, because the price was too small; I enquired where he raffled for them, he said, the King's-arms, in St. George's-fields, I went there to enquire, and many other public-houses, but it was not so; it struck me then, that he had been servant to Mr. Stratton, and a few other circumstances led me to suppose they were his irons; I went to him, and he saw the irons, which he owned, and the prisoner was then apprehended, (the irons produced, and identified by Geddard;) I should have been glad to have bought them at 40s.

SAMUEL JOHNSON sworn. - I work with Messrs. Stratton, and know the prisoner; I went to work on the Thursday morning, about half past five, and found a hat with the him cut off, behind some sender plates, which I believe to belong to the prisoner. (Produces it.)

Mr. Parker. The prisoner worked in that hat in my shop, he lost it the day of the robbery, and came in another the next day.

Prisoner's defence. I did not steal the irons, they were given to me by a man, looking like a porter, in a blue jacket and white trowsers, on London-bridge; I took them to my master, and asked twenty-four shillings, and he said, he would give a guinea for them at night.

GUILTY of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18021201-97

98. JOHN CROW and JOHN BROWN were indicted, for feloniously stealing on the 3d of November , ten shifts, value 40s. two petticoats, value 10s. two bedgowns, value 4s. a cloak, value 10s. and a gown, value 5s. the property of Hannah Walsh , in the dwelling-house of John Lee .

HANNAH WALSH sworn. - I live down in a cellar, in Buckeridge-street, St. Giles's , in the dwelling-house of John Lee ; on the 3d of November, I lost the things stated in the indictment, out of a chest which stood at the foot of the prisoner's bed, who lodged with me; I let the back cellar out in lodgings, and the prisoners and William Barney slept in one bed, and several others in the cellar; I had the key of the chest in my pocket, and missed the things the day they were stolen.

WILLIAM BARNEY sworn. - I lodge with Mrs. Walsh, and five others, in the cellar; on the morning of the 3d of November, I saw the prisoner Crow open the lid of the chest, but I did not see any thing taken out; I was getting up, Brown was in bed, and I came out almost immediately as soon as I saw the lid of the chest open, which stood at the foot of the bed; Mrs. Walsh sleeps in the front cellar.

Grow. Q. Did not you and I go out together? - A.

I went out before you, you were dressing yourself at the time I was, you came out very shortly after me.

- COSTER sworn. - I lodge at Mrs. Walsh's, and slept, with Brown on the 3d of November, I saw him get up between seven and eight in the morning, and take a flannel petticoat, which he wrapped round his body, it was under his own pillow, and he went out with it, that is all I know.

DANIEL BEIAN sworn. - I know the prisoner Brown, and met him in a public-house, when he was in liquor; he said, that mother Walsh's chest was broke open, and her things taken away, but did not say by whom; I told Mrs. Walsh of it, she went and examined the chest, and found her things were gone.

Prisoner Brown. I have nothing to say in my defence.

Prisoner Crow. I have nothing to say, but leave it to the mercy of the Court.

Crow called one witness, who gave him a good character. Brown, GUILTY aged 25.

Of stealing the petticoat .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Crow, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18021201-98

99. DAVID MILTON and JOHN COSSEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of George Clarke, a pair of gloves, value 6d. a handkerchief, value 1s. a Bank-note, value 10l. and a Banknote, value 1l. the property of Peter Deane .

PETHER DEANE sworn. - On the 20th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock-at night, as I was going between Northumber land-house and the corner of Scotland-yard, Milton came up, and laid hold of my rightarm, and said, sir, I think you are a little in liquor, we will see you home; Coffey was at his left-hand; I was rather intoxicated, but knew what I was doing, and was walking home quietly to my lodging, from Claremarket; I said, I want no one to see me home; then he said to Coffey, but we will see you home, won't we, it is our business; I asked them what they were, whether they were constables or not, and they said, they were; I asked them where they belonged to, Coffey said, to Bow-street, very well, said I, then one laid hold of my right arm, and the other of my left, so that I found myself between the two, and could make no resistance; we walked on about one hundred yards, when we came to a public-house; I said, will you go in, and have something to drink, which they did; I had a suspicion they were not what they represented themselves to be; we went in and called for a pot of beer, the prisoners wished to have something else, and we had a shillingsworth of brandy and water, and a shillingsworth of oysters; after which, I changed a seven-shilling-piece, and received six shillings; at the time I had the change. I felt the prisoner Miston's hand at my right hand pocket, as he sat at my right hand in the box, directly one said to the other, we will go, and they left the box in about three or four minutes after, and I never saw them till they were taken, three days after; I was sent for by the constable, to know if Milton was one of those who had robbed me, I knew his face directly; Coffey was not taken till the Sunday following, and I knew him directly, though he was not dressed in the same clothes he is now.

Q.Where was your money? - A. In my right hand pocket, I felt it when I pulled out the last seven-shilling-pieces; I changed two, but did not pull out the rest of my money; when they were gone, I was a little intoxicated, but I found I was robbed, and sat there for some time; I put my hand into my right hand breeches pocket, and my finger came through exactly where the money was.(Produces the breeces, which were cut across the right thing, and a hole cut at the bottom of the pocket.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Where had you come from? - A. From Portugal-street, Clare-market; where I had been on business, and had had part of three sixpennyworths of brandy and water.

Q.Were you alone when the prisoners first spoke to you? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you always given that account? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it for granted, when you got into the public-house, you complained of their treatment? - A. I asked for the landlord, and the landlady said, he was busy, so I did not complain, as I did not see any body to complain to; there were two or three soldiers, but I was afraid they all belonged to the same party; I sat down with the prisoners, thinking, if they had a little liquor, I should get rid of them.

Q.What did you drink? - A. We drank a pot of porter, and three shillingsworth of brandy and water; there was another man in the box who followed us the whole way, but he is not taken.

Q.How came you not to mention this before? - A. I mentioned it to the Magistrate.

Q.Where did that man sit? - A. At the far end of the box.

Q. Was any body else in the box? - A. No, it was a close box with a door, which is very uncommon.

Q. Were there no woman, upon your oath? - A. Upon my oath there was a woman, who seemed to be connected with one of the prisoners, Milton was the man who spoke to her, and said, we were a party by ourselves, and no body but our own company; by what they said to one another, I should conceive they were acquainted; she wished to come in to have something to drink, and Milton said, leave it to me, we are a company by ourselves.

Q. Are you sure there was no more than one woman, who looked into the box? - A. I am not sure.

Q. You say you were sober enough to know all that passed, you can tell whether there was more than one woman who came into the box? - A. She did not come into the box, she was at the door, no woman came in.

Q. Did you see the landlord? - A. The landlord came to hand me into the coach, pretending I was very much in liquor, and a soldier with a red jacket came along with him.

Q. Did you go away in a coach? - A. Yes; I wanted no help, but they helped me into the coach; I was going to No. 13, Tuston street, Westminster.

Q. Did you order him to drive you to the Borough? - A.No.

Q. It is not true you ordered him to drive you to the Borough? - A. I told them to tell the captain to drive to Tuston-street, and the soldier wished very much to go along with me.

Q. At this time you had found out that the money

was gone? - A. I found it out two or three minutes after the prisoners had gone from the box.

Q. Did you make any complaint when you got into the coach? - A. I saw no one to make a complaint to, I was afraid of getting abused if I did.

Q. Who did you see? - A. I saw the soldier, and the landlord come and just handed me into the coach, that was all I saw of him.

Q. Did you see the landlord's mother? - A. Yes.

Q. How long were you in the house? - A. I suppose, very near an hour.

Q. Did you hear any watchman? - A. No.

Q. Did you go alone in the coach? - A. Yes, the soldier said he would go with me; no, said the coachman, you shall not go with him, the man has been robbed; I went by myself, and gave a proper direction where to drive to; the coachman said to the soldier, the man has been robbed already, you shall not go into my coach, I will take him home, and you have the number of my coach; he knew I had been robbed, because he saw my breeches were cut, and my hand through my pocket.

Q. How came you to change two seven-shillingpieces? - A. The first I changed to pay for two shilling's worth of brandy and water, and a shilling's worth of oysters for the prisoners; I put the remaining silver in my left-hand waistcoat pocket, but when I came to look for it to pay for another shilling's worth of brandy and water I found it was gone; the landlady said, you have silver, sir, have not you? I said, no; and Milton said directly, we have had some oysters since you gave change.

Q. Then, if I understand you, you treated these men after you suspected them, and after losing you silver, and changed another seven-shilling-piece? - A. I treated them through fear.

Q.How came you to mention only paying one shilling at first? - A. I meant the last shilling's worth, I paid three shillings for brandy and water, and one shilling for oysters, besides a pot of porter.

- BLY sworn. - I am a constable belonging to Queen-square; on Saturday the 23d of October, in consequence of information, I apprehended Milton, who appeared to be dressed in new clothes; on the night of the robbery, I was coming from Covent-garden Theatre, about eleven o'clock to my house, at Westminster, and a little below Northumberland-house, I heard two or three men hooping out, boy, boy, I could not distinctly see their persons, but from the shadow they appeared to be tall men, ronning; I suspected that something amiss had taken place, and immediately crossed towards the Admiralty, nearly opposite to where Deane was robbed; I went very fast, till I came to Lord Melbourne's, where there is a stall with a light for selling cakes and saloop, I there saw two or three men; I came up with Milton first, who I knew before, he was holding something like writing-paper towards the light at the stall, I looked in his face, and I believe he spoke to me by name; I then faced the other two men, one of them was Coffey, who I knew also, the third I did not know; Milton was very anxious for me to take a glass of some thing to drink; I refused at first, but our of curiosity I did, in order to discover the person of the third, who is not yet taken.

Court. Q. Then you mean to say, that from the circumstance of seeing the men together at that place and time, and from the description the prosecutor gave, you procured the arrest of the prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the paper Milton had, like a Bank-note? - A. No; when I apprehended them, I searched them, but found nothing.

ELIZABETH CLARKE sworn. - My son keeps the Duke of Clarence public-house Charing-cross: I remember that on the 20th of October, I saw Milton and Deane there, but do not recollect the two others; they came in about ten o'clock, and all four went into a box by themselves, and had a pot of beer, then they had a shillings worth of brandy and water, and Deane gave a seven shilling piece; I gave him six shillings in change; after that they had another shillings worth of brandy and water, which I was paid for in silver; they then had some oysters, how many I cannot say; after that I made another shilling's worth of brandy and water; and Deane gave another seven shilling piece to change; I said I thought he must have change about him, as he had paid but one shilling; they said he had been buying oysters, and had no more change; I then changed the other seven shilling piece and laid six shillings on the table; one of the men said he would look at it, and see it was good he did so, and said it was good; sometime after that they went away one by one, and left Deane behind; I told him I thought his friends had used him very ill to leave him behind, as I looked upon it they were all friends and neighbours; I did not see any thing the matter with his pocket, nor did he complain in our house; a coach was then sent for; but I did not go to the door.

Mr. Hart. Q. How many people were in the house beside this party? - A. Very few, but nobody near them.

Jury. Q. Did Mr. Deane appear very much intoxicated before he went? - A. He was a good deal so before he went, but not at first.

GEORGE SMITH sworn. - I am a hackney coachman, and was called to the Duke of Clarence public-house, a little before twelve, the 20th of October, and took Mr. Deane into my coach; he was rather intoxicated, but told me where to drive, No. 13, Tuston-street, Westminister; when I went to take up my fare, a parcel of soldiers came out with him, and I observed on Mr. Deane slepping into the coach, his breeches pocket had apparently been cut; I said, why this gentleman has been robbed, which was all I said; he put his hand into his pocket to feel for his money, and his fingers came through; there was a soldier who appeared to be very busy with him, and wanted to get into the coach to drive home with him, but I objected to it, and said his company was not wanted; I then drove Mr. Deane home; I cannot swear to either of the prisoners.

Jury. Q. Who helped him into the coach? - A. The soldier was very busy; there were two or three people about him, the landlady and mistress of the house lighting him; that is all I know.

GEORGE CLARKE sworn. - On Wednesday evening, between nine and ten o'clock, I saw Mr. Deane in a back room, taking some supper with a friend; he stopped till about half past eleven; he was then very much in liquor; I helped him into a coach; after he had got into the coach, the coachman asked who was to pay him, my mother said the gentleman had money in his pocket for she had not long since given him change for a seven

shilling piece, the gentlemen put his hand to his pocket and I then saw that his breeches were tore or cut, and he told the coachman he had no money; he first told him to drive to No. 19, in the Borough, and afterwards to Tufton-street, Westminster; on the Saturday following the tallest of the two prisoners called upon me, in company with two or three more; but I cannot say that I saw them that evening; there were four men sitting together in a box, but who they were I cannot say.

Milton's defence. I went to this house on the Wednesday, and the landlady said you are one of the men that was in the box that night, I said I was; she immediately said the gentlemen was robbed; I asked her where the gentleman lived and she could not tell me; I heard Mr. Bly was after me, and I went to his house to deliver myself up.

Bly. He might have come to my house, but I did not see him; I met him while I was looking for him; it is very probable he might have come, for I knew him before; he told me he meant to do what he could towards public justice, and in consequence of that I had a little conversation with him.

Milton, GUILTY, aged 28.

Coffey, GUILTY, aged 33.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18021201-99

100. THOMAS THORNTON was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)(The affidavit of Colonel Thomas Thoruton, the several writs, bail-pieces, &c. were produced, proved, and read.)

- MARTYN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. In the beginning of June 1801, where did you live? - A. In Well-street in the county of Middlesex.

Q. You are a clergyman of the Church of England? - A. Yes, in Priests orders.

Q. When did you first become acquainted with Colonel Thornton? - A. At the latter end of May, 1799.

Q.Were you employed by him to do any thing for him? - A. Yes, to arrange a great quantity of papers, and to peruse them with a view to their being published, which I did, and he paid me 34l. 14s. I believe on the 30th of January, 1800.

Q.After you had arranged those papers were you employed by Colonel Thornton to compose any work in his vindication, and was any specific agreement made between you, and when? - A. Yes, on the 23d of February, 1800, both for the quantity, and the price; the quantity was twenty sheets of letter-press, or three hundred and twenty pages for seventy guineeas; to be compleated time enough to be published on the 30th of June, 1800, the composition was to come down to 1794; I composed and finished it about the middle of May, 1800, and saw Colonel Thornton , to whom I delivered it, and he was perfectly satisfied.

Q. Did you receive the seventy guineas stipulated? - A. No, I had received 26l. 1s.

Q. Did you afterwards receive any more? - A. I did not specisioally on that account, but I received money on account; it was afterwards agreed between us that the memorial should be extended to the end of the year 1795; no time was fixed at the agreement for its completion; but in December following I delivered a great part of it, and it was then agreed that fifty guineas should be paid for it, twenty-five of which was to be paid immediately, and that it should be completed by the end of January, 1801. which it was.

Q.What was the nature of the business on which you employed this composition? - A. Upon the Courts Martial; there had been five Courts Martial and a Court of Enquiry, in which Colonel Thornton was the prosecutor, respecting the West York militia, and the Court of Enquiry was appointed to enquire into his conduct; Col. Thornton said there had been two other Courts Martial, before which he was defendant; with regard to the Courts Martial, I was to do every thing in which the Colonel was prosecutor, and to make such objections as occurred to me, and he reserved the desence of those Courts Martial where he was defendant to himself; he furnished me with hints and instructions, with letters and minutes of the Courts Martial; I had a prodigious quantity of papers some thousand sheets I suppose; while I was composing this last memorial, he applied to me to review those two Courts Martial before which he was defendant, and after I had finished the first, I undertook it, and finished that sometime in May, 1801; no price was stipulated for those two Courts Martial; but in May, 1801. I saw Colonel Thornton , and read the whole over to him; but prior to that, he came to town, and I delivered him the memoir that ended the 31st of January; I then read part of the strictures, and delivered to him a copy of the other.

Q.Had you then received any money from him? - A. I did; for the stricture I finished in January, I received twenty five guineas.

Q. How much did you receive in the whole? - A. One hundred and eighteen pounds six shillings.

Q. Did that amount to the sum Colonel Thornton engaged to pay you for all the prior parts, exclusive of the strictures? - A. No.

Q.After you received that money, and had read the strictures, did any conversation pass between you respecting the price to be paid for those strictures? - A. Yes; I demanded one hundred guineas for the extra statement of a great part of his case, and the correction of the press. which before had been agreed upon at half a guine per sheet; I had estimated the statement at 30l.

Q. What did you reckon for those strictures on the two Courts Martial? - A. I reckoned the remainder, the corrections of the press, and the strictures, at one hundred guineas; Colonel Thornton said, he would consider of it, and let me know next day; the day but one after the 3d of June, I saw him, and he offered me 50l. which I refused; he said he was going out of twon the next day for Yorkshire, and that he should set out in three days for France; I still refused it, and he wished me good day: On the 5th of June I was arrested by him, at the house of Mr. Bateson, the printer of the work, employed by Colonel Thornton , who was present; I called at Bateson's house, and was

shewn into a parlour, without any thing being said; I there saw Colonel Thornton and two or three other people; he desired me to walk in; I said I was going home; he said, we may as well settle our business here, and wished me to walk in; I said, I certainly should not settle it there, and Colonel Thornton then said, you must give me leave to arrest you, and in an instant two officers came from the back parlour; Colonel Thornton said, "officers, do your duty's, that is Mr. Martyn;" the officers then said, they had a writ against me at that gentleman's suit, pointing to Colonel Thornton , and I went to a spunging-house, where I remained till the evening of the next day, when I got bail.

Q.At the time Colonel Thornton so arrested you were you indebted to him in any thing whatever? - A. No, never; I never had been.

Q.It is hardly necessary to ask, were you indebted to him one hundred pounds? - A. I never was indebted to him one shilling in my life time.

Q.Had you ever received any money from him, except the one hundred and eighteen pounds in part of payment for the labours you had performed? - A.Never.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. As a matter of form, more than as a matter of substance, you have stated that you are a Clergyman of the Church of England? - A. I have.

Q. Where is your preserment? - A. I have none.

Q. Where do you do duty? - A. At no place.

Q. Is it long since you did any of the duties of a Clergyman? - A. Yes.

Q. How many years? - A. I have done duty as a Clergyman repeatedly, but not in any employment.

Q. How lately? - A. I believe ten or twelve years ago.

Q. Are you the same Mr. Martyn who was the Curate of St. Ann's, Soho? - A. I am.

Q. Are you the same Mr. Martyn who was a silversmith in the neighbourhood of St. Martin's-lane? - A. I am the same Mr. Martyn into whose hands the business sell by the death of my brother-in-law.

Q. And who conducted it? - A. I had a person who conducted it for me.

Q. You did not interfere in it youself? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. It was at the corner of Hemmings's-row, I believe? - A. It was.

Q. I believe you occupied it for some years, Mr. Martyn, did you not? - A. About two years, and the object was to dispose of the stock, to prevent the value of it being reduced.

Q.During that period, it would have been unseemly to have had the air, dress, or appearance of a Clergyman, therefore you cast them all off; one cannot forget these things, because we all remember seeing you in your pig-railed wig and brown coat? - A.It was not a brown coat; if not black, it was blue.

Q.Indulging in all lay habits? - A. If you please, let it stand so.

Q. It would not have been decent to have been seen in your shop in a clerical habit: it seems to me to be an odd thing, but we have heard something about a reserence to an arbitration; did he order this blow composition of your's to be burnit? - A. He did.

Court. Q.Was it burnt? - A. No, the arbitrator ordered it to be burnt, if the parties should desire it.

Mr. Garrow. Q. I know who the man is to whom it was referred; he is a man of no sense or religion to do that? - A. He has the reputation of being a man of tasle and religion too.

Q.Did he order it to be burnt by the hands of the common-hangman? - A. No.

Q.Then his award was good for nothing? - A. You speak-from your own opinion.

Q.You have written a great deal of one sort or another, I should rend your sermons with much pleasure? - A. You shall, if you think they will edify you.

Q.It seems an odd thing to me, that a grave reverend clergyman should have been selected to compose such a work as this - pray did the arbitrator take it into his head that it was libellous? - A. I don't know what was Mr. Maurice's motive.

Q.Then he kept his own secret, and did not declare why he rodered it to be burnt? - A. He did not.

Q.Did he not order it to be burnt as a most atrocious libel? - A. No.

Q.Then you have not the least imagination why he ordered it to be burnt? - A. I have an imagination that he might have had that opinion of it, but that he never intimated it.

Q.We collected from the opening speech, that you cannot be much of a judge of that, because you are no lawyer? - A. I am not.

Q.That Mr. Martyn was a very good lawyer, who pleaced his own cause in the Court-of-King's-Bench, was that the same Mr. Martyn, who was curate of St. Ann's, Soho? - A. Yes, it was.

Q.Upon the subject of the law of libele, you cannot be supposed to know much? - A. No.

Q.This was the first libel you ever had the misfertune to write, if it was a libel, and Mr. Maursee was foolish enough to call it so? - A. You say it is.

Q.I put it as a question - where were you when Mr. Thornton first had the honour of becoming acquainted with you? - A. In the King's-Bench prison.

Q.Did it so happen that you were unrighteously there? - A. I dare say, you know. I was suffeering the judgment of the Court for a libel, for endeavouring to guard against a new sangled imposition, under the deseription of country Banks, and sell onder the imputation of having written a libel against John King .

Q.In a printed book? - A. In a printed book.

Q.And there it was, that Mr. Thornton had the honour of being introduced to you? - A. It was.

Court. Q. By a judgment of Court? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Upon a judgments by default, I believe? - A. No, it was not.

Q.Was it upon a verdict found? - A. It was by an indictment.

Q.Do you recollect the first conversation that Mr. Thornton had with you in which he desired that you would take care you would not get him into the same situation with yourself; and that you made answer there was no man in England who kinew the law of libels better than you? - A. To the first part of the question I deny that I ever said any thing, or that Colonel Thorn -

ton two mentioned the word libel, for I was to write nothing, it was to arrange the paper which he said contoined full justification; I had nothing to do but that; as to making a prosession that I knew more of libels than any man in, England, my situation gave the lie to it, because he found me in prison for a libel.

Q.Which proves, that with all your knowledge of the law of libels, the deveil deserted you for once? - A. You did not give. me the opportunity of having your opinion upon it.

Q.You had better opinions than mine, for you had the opinions of the Judges, who gave you a sententious opinion, and sent you to prison? - A. They did.

Q.I will ask you who drew this indictment? - A. A Mr. Dogherty.

Q.Have you never said otherwise? - A. No.

Q.Be a little cautions, Mr. Dogherty drew it? - A. He did.

Q.Do you mean to be understood, and I desire you to be cautious, that you never said you drew it yourself, and for a special reason? - A. I drew one myself first, which was afterwards laid aside.

Q.You drew an indictment for perjury against Colonel Thornton ? - A. I did; I sketched the plan of an indictment, and slibmitted it to Counsel.

Q.You took down a volume of Bishop Atterbury's fermons; and sketched the plan of an indictment? - A. I did not prefer that indictment.

Q.Have you never said the present indictment was drawn by youself, and that afterwards it was found, and have you not said it was known to nobody but the Grand Jury and yourself? - A. I swear I never said it was drawn by myself.

Q.Have you never said it was drawn by myself, and at the time you were speaking, known only to myself, and the Grand Jury, or that no other person is acquainted with it, but the Grand Jury and me? - A. I do not recollect ever saying any such thing.

Q.Now you come to recollect, will you swear you never did? - A. I cannot; I am aware, by experience, of the evidence that may be brought against me, and although I may be able to speak positively, I think it necessary to speak with that guard which I know to be nesessary with respect to truth; I say, I do not remember it; I drew the form of an indictment first, I then I had's second drawn, and this third was drawn by Mr. Dogherty.

Q.By your direction? - A. By the direction of Mr. Davison.

Q.I shall remind you of the time, and occasion on which this conversation took place, and ask you if you mean to deny it - do you recollect being applied to by the solicitor, for Mr. Thornton, to know what the warrant was for, which you had against Mr. Thornton? - A. Yes, I do.

Q.Did you not say to him, you had better not stir in it, for I drew the indictment myself, and nobody knows any thing of it but myself, and the Grand Jury? - A. Upon my oath, I never said any such thing; it would have been very absurd, and you will do me the credit to suppose I should not express myself in those terms, or that I should syllogistically shew that, because I drew the indictment, and that because nobody-knew of it but myself, that I should say to him, you had better not stir in it.

Q.There are few to whom folly is torbe for tenderly imputed, but I am not asking whether it was wife to do it or not; am I to take the fact to be that you never said so? - A. I never did; the whole conversation that passed between us was, he asked me in so arrogant a manner that I refused him; I thought I had done a courtesy to Mr. Thornton in telling him I had done a courtesy to Mr. Thornton in telling him I had such a warrant, and that there was no occasion to make the prosecution more severe by taking him into custody; and there was another motive, to let him plead to the indictment that Sessions, to prevent it being delayed.

Q.It would have been an unhandsome thing to prevent a gentleman from his pleasure? - A. It was to prevent the prosecution being delayed.

Court. Q.Were you bound over to prosecute? - A. No.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Was it a part of the same conversation, where you said, no person could interfere between you and Colonel Thornton ? - A. I certainly did object to any conversation with any person but him; I have refused it repeatedly, for I have experienced the dangerous consequences of conserning with people.

Q.Would to God that Mr. Thornton had taken the same precaution; then all the money you ever received on the subject of this work was 118l. 6s. - A.That was the whole.

Q.And you insisted that before you would deliver the remainder you would be paid one hundred pounds? - A. I had no remainder; I delivered the whole I had engaged for.

Q.Then you had no manuscript work in your hands? - A. Yes, I had; but you will not perplex that point.

Q. Had you any manuscript to prepare by order of Colonel Thornton ? - A. Yes, which he was at liberty to take or not; but there was 30l. due to me for the extra statement; my engagement was finished and delivered in, the 30th of January.

Mr. Gurney. I shall prove the tender.

Mr. Garrow. I admit the tender was made to get out of the hands of Mr. Martyn.

Court. Q.You claim a sum beyond the one hundred and eighteen pounds which you received? - A. Yes; I delivered up what would come to one hundred and ninety pounds.

Mr. Garrow. Q.What had you still remaining in your hands, for which Colonel Thornton was to give you 100 guineas? - A. The strictures on his own Court Martial, that was all.

Q. You have sometimes, by way of filling up a leisure moment, written the Thorntonian? - A. I wrote a journal of all the proceedings in this matter, between Colonel Thornton and me, when he was in the situation from which I extricated him.

Q. It was exactly the fort of thing that a man of rank and taste would like to have published about him? - A. It contained such facts as I think the man who was guilty of them would not be ashamed of having published; I stated the way in which Colonel Thornton treated me.

Q.Was it not such a thing that any man would empty his strong chest to prevent being published? - A. No, I think not.

Q.Was it not calculated to represent him as a man of dishonor? - A.As far as the facts that I stated went, no farther.

Q. Was not that journal of facts, or pretended facts,

calculated to destroy his character as a man of honor? - A. No; every transaction between Colonel Thornton and me, was explained in what I called Thorntoniana.

Q.Did you not threated to publish it upon your oath? - A. There was no threat.

Q.Did you not say, unless he gave you a sum of money, you would publish it? - A. I did not.

Q. I will put it to you again, with a very remarkable expression for a Clergyman of the Church of England. Upon your oath did you not say you would publish it, and that you would send him to the devil and damnation? - A. Never in my life.

Q.Nor any such expression? - A. No, nor any such expression; I have heard such an evidence given, but I swear I never did use any such expression.

Q.Or that you would blow him to hell? - A. Never; I never said I would publish it; I have said I would print it as an answer to the calumnies that Colonel Thomton was throwing ever lastingly upon me.

Q.In what event were you or not to print it? - A. I did it to give an opportunity to any person who told me the things Colonel Thornton had said of me, instead of entering into a long explanation to shew what passed; there is all that passed between Col. Thornton and me; I put things down as they arose; they were derogatory to a man of honor, but it was the behaviour I had received from him; if I had related any thing between you and Col. Thornton that was derogatory to a man of honour, your objection might have been good; there were some very extraordinary circumstances attending it; and if my life had been depending upon it, I could not have been more careful in making that journal.

Q.In relating such circumstances as no man of honour could bear to have stated? - A. I never printed it.

Q.But you did a great deal worse; you threatened you would print it? - A. I said I would print it.

Q. Then threatening or saying depends upon the tone of voice in which it is pronounced? - A. No, I don't agree perfectly with you; there I intended it for Col. Thornton's own inspection.

Q.To reform his life? - A. No; I will tell you why; so many disagreements had arisen between us very early in the writing of the work, that we had every thing to run over again.

Q. When did you begin your journal, I should be glad to know? - A. It was sometime in 1800.

Q. In which there were many remarkable circumstances, as you have told us? - A. Yes.

Q. And many of them confidential? - A. No.

Q. Mr. Martyn, the Clergyman, having a knowledge of the Court Martial, and of the transactions of the West Riding militia? - A. That was not in the Thorntoniana.

Q.Is there any part of the book that might not be the subject of an indictment for a libel? - A.I think so.

Q. You think it a dispassionate statement of facts, not reflecting upon the character of Colonel Thornton? - A.It was a fair statement of facts.

Court. You surely forget yourself; you are a man of great abilities, I know you are, and therefore one expects precision from you; you have said enough to convince any body, that you have stated that which no man of honour would wish to have stated to the public, and you must know that that is a libel upon him, because you are not an author of to-day; we have known your works long, your poems, and other writings, and therefore you can give a direct and positive answer.

Mr. Garrow. I will help you, because, for old acquaintance sake, I should like to get you out of this scrape; did you do it in your best manner? - A. I don't know as to that.

Court. Q. Was it poetry or prose? -

Mr. Garrow. It was prose, because that conveys the sting the better; the jingle of the rhyme sometimes throws one out of one's way.

Q. Was there any thing in the libel against John King that was more severe than this against Colonel Thornton ? - A. A thousand times more.

Q. The Stool and the Blacking-brush? - A. No; the Stool and the Blacking-brush were hypothetical.

Q. To come to plain English, because, though we may have our laugh, this is a very serious subject to the gentleman who is brought here; I am really so ignorant of the ways of the world, that I wish to know what Thorntoniana means; I like to get information from a master, and upon the subject of libels from Mr. Martyn? - A. The meaning is an ideal one.

Q. Give it us? - A. That I leave to yourself.

Q. I want the fence you annex to it? - A. The fence is expressed in the book itself.

Q. I want to know the fence of the word; we have Diaboliads, and various other names in this fashionable world in which you and I have the good fortune to live; now I want to know the meaning of the word Thorntoniana? - A.Thorntoniana is in the manner of Walpoliana, publishing things produced by great men.

Q.Great men have their biographers, and you in kindness to Colonel Thornton did the same by him? - A. If I were to speak of your as an eminent Counsel, if I had opinions of your's to encounter, I should certainly call them Garrowniana; now you understand by that what I mean by Thorntoniana.

Q. You mean my cross-examinations; perhaps you would call them Garrowniana? - A. No, I should not think them worth -

Q. Not worth taking notice of? - A. There are so many things more worthy of the man, that I should not think of them.

Q.Now one question more before we part with Thorntoniana. When you communicated its contents to Colonel Thornton , did you do it as a matter of gratisication to him, or the contrary? - A. No; I did it to prevent our traversing the ground we had gone over 50 times before.

Q. That is to deter him from permitting this Thorntoniana to be published? - A. No; my object was to give him a state of facts, that I am sure he would not approve in another, and to induce him to come to a fair settlement of the account between us, and that we might settle it amicably, I shewed him the particulars of all the transactions between us, that he might see the manner in which he had treated me, and that we might not go over the same ground again, but that we might come immediately to the point of settling the copy that was then before us.

Q. Which copy you would not deliver without being paid one hundred pounds? - A. No, the copy was not agreed for then, and my purpose in meeting Colonel

Thornton was to read the copy to him, and to agree upon the price.

Q.The price of what? - A. The second part of the memoirs; Colonel Thornton wanted me to state to a gentleman now in Court what I meant.

Q. A gentleman of the Bar you mean perhaps? - A. A gentleman of the Bar; Col. Thornton said I had written a memorandum of the whole that he wanted to enter into conversation about, and desired I would either shew it to him or his friend; that it would save a great deal of trouble to us both, and would prevent altercation; I consequently read the copy of the memoirs.

Q.Did you read them just by way of sample of this mirror, which was to be held up to Colonel Thornton, to reform his life? - A. I read a part of the memoirs.

Q.Did you not read any part of the Thorntoniana? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.To Mr. Sinclair? - A. I did.

Q. For what purpose; it could not be calculated to reform the life of Mr. Sinclair, to hold up this mirror to him; was it to raise Col, Thornton's character in the opinion of Mr. Sinclair? - A.No; to acquaint him with all the transactions.

Q.Then it was to debase Colonel Thornton in his estimation? - A. I did not do it for that purpose.

Q.Do you mean to state that if Mr. Sinclair had read what was stated in that book, it must not have degraded Colonel Thornton in his opinion? - A. I do not think it was so degrading as you represent it.

Q. I see there are degrees of comparison - it might have been a little worse - you could have thrown a little more spice into it ? - A. There was nothing in the book that Mr. Sinclair did not say was less than he deserved ; he said, it would do him no harm .

Court . Q. Perhaps he said, what was said by you would do no harm , because , by your own account , it was a very severe attack upon Colonel Thornton ? - A. No, I don't think it so .

Court . Q. You have said as much - in other words, you have said , no man of honour would wish stated what was stared in this work ? - A. I mean to say, if there is any thing improper , no man of honour would wish to have it said of him , and yet it might be no libel . Colonel Thornton agreed to pay me two guineas and a half a week .

Court . Q. How did you represent that in your book , as not being a man of honour , nor a man of his word ? - A. No; I represented that he did not fulfil his engagement . I was not in a situation to keep a work two years in hand , and receive nothing ; and I had other literary engagements , which I relinquished to do this. Colonel Thornton never fulfilled his engagement in any instance ; and if I relate that , it is no libel .

Mr. Gurney . Q. At the time that Colonel Thornton arrested you, had delivered as much composition as came to seventy pounds more than he had paid you? - A. Yes; I include in that the correction of the press.

Court . Q. Was any body present at the agreement between you and Colonel Thornton ? - A. Nobody was present , but I will prove the acknowledgement .

Mr. Garrow . Q. Who was present at the acknowledgment? - A. Mr. Bateson .

Mr. James- Noble Bateson deposed that Colonel Thornton agreed for seventy guineas, but that the work was afterwards extended, and what further arrangement was made he did not know .

EDWARD MAURICE , Esq. sworn . - Examined by Mr. Gurney . Q. You are a gentleman of the bar ? - A. I am.

Q. To you these matters in dispute between Colonel Thornton and Mr. Martyn were referred ? - A. They were.

Q. Upon that reference , was Colonel Thornton examined upon oath , before you? - A. He was. I will read from the notes I took at the time , all that Colonel Thornton said upon that subject . ( Reads ), "We went in to Mr. Caton's chambers , Mr. Crawford , Mr. Caton , and myself , and we extracted from letters and papers , the sum which Mr. Martyn had received ; I thought , that having made a bargain with Mr. Martyn, and bargains , that Mr. Martyn had not delivered up the up the work complete to the time he had named, and being determined to bring this matter to a final issne, I thought I might with safety swear to his owing me one hundred pounds, and upwards." It had been previously admitted before me, on the part of Mr. Martyn , that he had received one hundred pounds , and upwards , I think, one hundred and eighteen pounds . I perhaps ought to state this, that the only way in which it could have been material for my attention to have been drawn to Colonel Thornton , was with a view to any damages which Mr. Martyn might have been entitled to receive at the hands of Colonel Thornton , for the arrest; I considered that as one of the subjects of difference between the parties; one Mr. Martyn's claims before me was damages for this arrest; but from the evidence which has been already alluded to , to have been given by Mr. Sinclair , before me, I did not think I should have been justified in giving Mr. Martyn any damages , in respect of that arrest, from the expressions he was sworn, by Mr. Sinclair , to have made use of, with respect to Colonel Thornton , I did not think him entitled to any damages from me upon that subject , and therefore I did not give him any .

Court . It did not appear to you to be a malicious arrest ? - A. I was not called to look at it in that point of view, because there was a collateral ground upon which I felt myself bound to withhold damages ; in that respect the terms were much stronger than those which have been repeated to-day .

Mr. Garrow . Q. And I believe you gave orders , for the interests of the public , that the work should be burnt ; I am afraid that has not been done ? - A. I thought it right to order it to be burnt .

The Court being of opinion that the prosecutor had not made out his case, the Jury found a verdict of

NOT GUILTY .

Mr. Garrow . It will be understood , I hope, that there are a great number of witnesses attending to this gentleman's character . You will understand , Gentlemen , that I don't call them , because the learned Judge thinks it unnecessary .

Court . The Counsel has told you truly that they have a great number of witnesses to the character of Colonel Thornton , but you have attended here long enough to know that the reason why a defendant is not called upon for his defence is, that there is no case made against him.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant .


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