Old Bailey Proceedings, 27th October 1802.
Reference Number: 18021027
Reference Number: f18021027-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 27th of OCTOBER, 1802, and following Days, BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALITY OF The Right Honourable SIR JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill,Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1802.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. EDWARD LORD ELLENBOROUGH , Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer, NATHANIEL NEWNHAM , Esq. WILLIAM CURTIS , Esq. and HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; CHARLES PRICE , Esq. GEORGE HIBBERT , Esq. and CHARLES FLOWER , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

Richard Francis ,

James Herbert ,

Edward Kent ,

Peter Bacon ,

James Powell ,

William Talbot ,

Richard Welch ,

George Harrison ,

James Fraser ,

Henry Robson Robley ,

John Miller ,

Alexander Duncan ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Cornwall ,

Hugh Wright ,

Robert Salter ,

Francis Brown ,

Henry Bourne ,

Waster Thwaites ,

John Browning ,

John Perry ,

Joseph Green ,

James Mari ,

James Stewart ,

John Whitehead ,

London Jury,

James Peppercorn ,

John Moffatt ,

Thomas Clarke ,

Joseph Pobjoy ,

Eldershaw Tunstall ,

John Burrock ,

Robert Marsden ,

Robert Bissett ,

Robert Jeffervs ,

Thomas Middleton ,

James Line ,

John Graves .

Reference Number: t18021027-1

747. HENRY WILLIAMS and JOSEPH CLARKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , nineteen yards of flannel, value 27s. 6d. the property of Elizabeth Beaumont , widow .

ELIZABETH BEAUMONT sworn. - I am a widow, and keep a haberdasher's shop in Aytebary-street, Clerkenwell : On the 15th of October, about one o'clock in the day, I was at dinner in the parlour behind the shop; I had left the shop door open; I heard a cry of stop thief; I immediately ran to the door, and saw the prisoner Williams turning the corner of Woodbridge street; I ran after him, and saw him drop a piece of flannel, which I picked up; he was taken, and brought back to my shop; the flannel has my private mark upon it; I am sure the prisoner, Williams, is the same person.

MARY ESTERBY sworn. - I was sitting with my barrow in the street, within three doors of Mrs. Beaumont's shop; I saw the two prisoners cross the way, they passed me, and Williams went into Mrs. Beaumont's shop, the other stood about a yard and a half from the door; Williams came out in less than half a minute, with a piece of flannel; he peeped twice into the shop before he went in; I ran from my barrow, and fell down; I then gave an alarm; I saw them both run down Wood-bridge-street; they were both brought back in less than ten minutes; I am sure the prisoners are the same persons.

JOSEPH WHITEHEAD sworn. - I heard the last witness make an alarm; I saw two men before me, one of them had a bundle; I pursued, and cried, stop thief; they both ran down Woodbridge-street, and I ran forward into St. John's-street, as I knew they must come out into St.John's-street; I pursued them into Northampton-street; one took one side of the way, and the other the other; Clarke turned down to some ruins; I pursued the other, laid hold of him, and brought him back; the other was secured immediately, and they were both brought back together.

FRANCES GREEN sworn. - I am Mrs. Beaumont's servant; I saw the two prisoners running down Woodbridge-street, but I did not see the flannel; I ran after them, and when I got to the ruins, Isaw Charke come out, and run into a court; I followed him, and found him in a necessary; I laid hold of him by the coat, and brought him out; a man then came up, and loosed him from me; I laid hold of him again, and a constable came up and took him from me.

( - Taverner, a constable, produced the stannel, which was identified by Mrs. Beaumont.)

Williams's defence. I am quite innocent; I heard an outcry, I went to see what was the matter; and a man laid hold of me.

Clarke's defence. I was going to look for work, I am quite innocent.

Williams, GUILTY , aged 17.

Clarke, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-2

748. CHARLES BAXTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, privily from the person of John-Christian-Frederick Wassman , on the 7th of October , a pocket-book, value 4s. two Banknotes. value 4l. and six Bank-notes, value 6l. the property of the said John .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN-CHRISTIAN-FREDERICK WASSMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. - On Thursday, the 7th of October, I was at Drury-lane Theatre ; when the piece was over, I came into the lobby; I then had my hand upon my pocketbook, in my right hand coat pocket; Mr. Schutz, my friend, was in the lobby; I put my right arm under his arm; at that moment there was a crowd pushing against us, and I immediately put my hand down to my pocket again, and found my pocketbook gone; I looked about me directly, and saw the prisoner with the pocket-book in his right hand, putting it into his bosom; I immediately turned my face towards him, laid hold of him by the breast, and said, you have my pocket-book; he then wanted to crowd away; I called out to Mr. Schutz, and told him this man had my pocket-book in his possession; Mr. Schutz laid hold of him directly; he wanted to get off, and stooped cowr, and then Mr. Smith, who is a witness, held the book up in his hand, and asked if that was the book that was lost; and I said, it was my pocket-book; it contained six Bank-notes of 1l. each, and two of 2l. each; he attempted as much as he could to get away; the crowd pushed me backwards, and forced me from him; Mr. Schutz kept held of him, and Pickering, the constable, came up, and took hold of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. There was a considerable crowd at this time? - A. Yes.

Q. At that time you felt something which induced you to put your hand to your pocket, and you missed your pocket-book? - A. Yes.

LUDOLPH SCHUTZ sworn. - On the 7th of Oc

tober I was at Drury-lane; I met with Mr. Wassman in the lobby, and he put his hand under my arm; he is a countryman and an acquaintance of mine; he almost immediately took his arm from me, and said, my pocket-book is gone, and pointing at Baxter, he said, that fellow has got my pocket-book, and having a suspicious look, I collared him; there was a great crowd immediately, and I got a blow from some person, I cannot say from whom: I was pushed about very much, but, with the assistance of another gentleman, I got him out of the lobby, and called out to one of the grenadiers, who came and laid hold of him; he was secured, and given in charge to the constable.

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - I was at Drury-lane; I saw a man stooping down, attempting to get away from some persons who had hold of him; I cannot say who those persons were; in about a minute afterwards, I picked up this pocket-book upon the very spot where I saw the man stoop down; I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not,(produces it); I held it up, and Mr. Wassman claimed it; I have had it ever since.(The pocket-book and notes were identified by Mr. Wassman).

Q. (To Mr. Wassman.) Who was the man that stopped? - A. The prisoner at the bar.

- PICKERING sworn. - I am one of the patrol of Bow-street; I took charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. At the time the gentleman charges me with putting his book in my bosom, I was putting my handkerchief in.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Of stealing, but not privily, from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-3

749. ELIJAH COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , a bag, value 1s. and eighty-four pounds weight of loaf sugar, value 4l. the property of William Smith and Joseph Travers .

WILLIAM IBELL sworn. - I am warehouseman to William Smith and Joseph Travers , wholesale grocer s, in St Swithin's-lane : On Saturday, the 25th of September, about four in the afternoon, I sent a cart loaded with bags of loaf sugar; the carman was to deliver them at Iron-gate-wharf; one of them was missing; I shall know it again when it is produced.

THOMAS KENNIE sworn. - I am carman to Messrs. Smith and Travers: On Saturday, the 25th of September, I received several packages of sugar.

Q. (To Ibell). How many packages were there? - A. A great many, but only three of the same mark with the one that was missing.

Kennie. I had packages to leave at different wharfs; I was to leave three at Iron-gate-wharf; I delivered the others, and it was then too late to go to Iron-gate, and I was going back; the tail ladder of the waggon was up; in crossing Little Tower-hill, towards the Minories, I turned round, and missed a bag of sugar; I did not see any body near the waggon; in about five minutes, a young man, with a one-horse cart, of the name of Charles Turner, came up, and, in consequence of information that I received from him, I went with him about 200 yards, when I saw the prisoner with the bag upon his back, I knew it to be the same that I had lost; I asked him how he came to take the bag out of my waggon, and he threw down the bag and ran away; Turner and another pursued and stopped him, I took possession of the bag, and put it in the waggon again; I took it back, and delivered it to the warehouseman.

CHARLES TURNER sworn. - I am carman to Messrs. Harris and Co. tea dealers: On Saturday, the 25th of September, about a quarter before eight o'clock, coming over Tower-hill, I saw a person with a bag upon his back, going towards Lower East Smithfield; I saw Kennie in about two minutes, or two minutes and a half afterwards. and told him of it; I pursued him with Kennie, and came up to him in about 200 yards; he asked him how he came to take the bag out of his waggon, and he threw it down and ran away; I called, stop thief, and he was taken by an officer before I lost fight of him.

BENJAMIN WRIGHT sworn. - I am a head borough; I was standing at a neighbour's door, in Upper East Smithfield, I head the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner running, and I stopped him, and took him into custody.(The property was produced and identified by Ibell and Kennie.)

Prisoner's defence. I went to Rosemary-lane to buy a jacket, and saw that bundle lying in the middle of the road. GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-4

750. THOMAS STEWART, alias CATON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , three pounds weight of sugar, value 2s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOSEPH CRAGG sworn. - I am an surveyor belonging to the East-India Company; the prisoner was employed by the Company's porter s to unload the craft; there was the Two Henrys lighter lying at Ralph's-quay , close to a ship belonging to the Company; the lighter had sugar on board be

longing to the Company. On the 16th of July last, between ten and eleven in the morning, I saw the prisoner on board, he was standing on one side of the scale board of sugar that was to be landed, and I on the other; I observed him shuffling with his hand behind him; seeing his hand come from behind him, I observed his hand covered with sugar, and the cuff of his coat, which raised a suspicion that he had been taking sugar; I said, what have you been after? he said, master I have only been taking a little sugar for some beer; I told him he knew he should no do that, and I immediately searched him, and found three pounds of sugar in his coat pocket; it belonged to the India Company; he begged forgiveness; I told him it was more than my place was worth of forgive him, and I sent for a constable; the prisoner endeavoured to make his escape before the constable came, he ran up to gateway where the constable was coming down; I said that is the man, and he stopped him; I saw it weighed, it weighed three pounds; (produces the sugar) I have no doubt of its being the Company's sugar; it is of the same quality.

THOMAS STEVENSON sworn. - I am a constable; I stopped the prisoner; he first offered me half a guinea, and then a guinea, to let him go.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the sugar as it scattered from a cart where the packages had broke.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-5

751. THOMAS DALEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , a pocket book, value 1s. two pieces of gold, called Louis d'ors, value 2l. and a Bill of Exchange, value 250l. the property of Francis Cameron ,

FRANCIS CAMERON sworn. - I am a German: On Saturday, the 18th of September, between two and three o'clock, I lost my pocket-book in the Minories ; I had my wife and two children with me; I was standing at a pawnbroker's door; my wife asked me to make her a present of a gold ring; we were looking at some rings in the window; my wife pointed to a ring, and I told her to have which she liked; my hand was in my pocket, upon my pocket-book; I then took it out and pointed at a ring, and asked her if she meant that one; I immediately found a man's hand upon my pocket; I put my hand to my left hand pocket and missed my pocket-book; I then turned to my right hand and went after the men; there were three of them; the prisoner was the man who had his hand at my pocket; I pursued him and took him; the other two made their escape; I faacs assisted me in taking him.

Q. Did you ever recover your pocket-book? - A. Never; it contained two Louis d'ors, and a Bill of Exchange for 250l.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. What distance was the prisoner from you at the time you say lie was running away? - A. About 20 yards.

Q. There were other people running besides the prisoner? - A. Yes; two other men.

Q. The first time you saw him he was 20 yards from you? - A. No; I saw him close to my pocket.

Q. There was nothing found upon him? - A. Nothing.

JOSEPH GUYER sworn. - I am apprentice to a poulterer: On Saturday the 18th, I was taking some poultry to Rosemary-lane; coming back in the Minories, I saw the prosecutor and his wife and two children; I then saw the prisoner and a ragged boy close behind them; the prosecutor stopped at a pawnbroker's window, two doors from America-square; the prisoner, and the boy went close up behind the prosecutor, and in about a minute I saw the prisoner put his hand up to his bosom; directly after that, the prosecutor said he was robbed, and they both ran away together; I immediately pointed out the prisoner, and told the prosecutor that man was behind him, and he ran after him directly; he turned up America-square, into John-street, and there is a court that comes into the Minories again; the prosecutor followed him, and I went round to meet him; the prisoner came out of the court into the Minories again, just as the prosecutor and several other people were calling out stop thief; the prisoner ran the length of two or three-streets before he was stopped; I did not see him stopped; he was taken to the office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. It was high change in Rosemary-lane at two or three o'clock in the day? - A. Not on a Saturday.

Q. Do you know whether this pawnbroker's shop is in the city of London, or the county of Middlesex? - A. I cannot say.

Q. There were a number of people running? - A. Yes.

Q. You ran as well as the prisoner? - A. Yes.

MOSES ISAACS sworn. - I am an assistant to the Sheriffs: On the 18th of September I heard the alarm of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running, and the prosecutor after him; he called to me for God's sake to stop that man, he had got his pocketbook; I immediately collared him; the prosecutor said he had lost his pocket-book with 250l. in it; I asked the prisoner if he had robbed him, and he said he had not, he was innocent; the prosecutor then said, that is the man who picked my pocket; I then took him to Lambeth-street Office, and delivered him to Griffiths, one of the officers; he was searched, but no pocket-book found; we observed a lump, he said it was a plaister, he had sore leg, and upon searching, Mr. Griffiths found three single pound notes between his stocking and his skin; he

was the next day taken before the Lord Mayor.

Q. Where was he when you first saw him; was it in the city? - A. No; in the county of Middlesex; the pawnbroker's shop is in the city of London; all that side of the Minories is in the city.

ABRAHAM LEVI sworn. - I know the pawnbroker's shop to be in the city of London; I stopped the payment of the Bill at Messrs Todd and Co. in Milk-street; the prosecutor went with me.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called four witnessess who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-6

752. DANIEL HOWARD, alias LEMON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , a silk handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Wm. Bowley , privily from his person .

WILLIAM BOWLEY sworn. - I am an oilman : On Saturday, the 2dof October, about a quarter after one in the afternoon, passing along Lower Thames-street , I had my pocket picked of a silk handkerchief; I turned round and saw the prisoner and a man in sailor's cloaths, the only two men near me; they sprang into the middle of the road, and I after them; when I was within about a yard of them the man who was with the prisoner passed my handkerchief into the hands of the prisoner at the bar, from whose hands I took it, and afterwards carried him to the Compter, the other man got away.( John Alderman , a constable, produced the handkerchief, which was identified by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the handkerchief on the spoke of a cart wheel; I don't know how it came there.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing, but not privily, from the person .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-7

753. HENRY WELCH and EDWARD ALLEN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a handkerchief, value 5s. the property of William Earle , privily from his person .

WILLIAM EARLE sworn. - I am a clerk in the house of Bird Savage, and Bird: On Monday, the 18th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning, I had my pocket picked in Leadenhall-street ; I did not know it till I was called to by Mr. Read; I then saw my handkerchief under the arm of the prisoner Allen, who was at that time behind me; the witness Read told me he was a constable, and he took them to the Mansion-house; I followed, and they were committed; I know nothing against Welch, Read had hold of them both.

Q. Did not you feel your handkerchief go at all? - A. No.

Q. You did not feel the least sensation? - A. Not the least.

RICHARD READ sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Lord Mayor: On Monday, the 18th of October, as I was coming from Newgate-street into Cheapside, I saw the two prisoners, and watched them to Leadenhall-street; Allen had got my handkerchief half out of my pocket; I felt it, and he then asked me the way to Greenwich; I directed them across the way, and Mr. Earle was before them; they followed him all through Cheapside till they got to Cornhill, and then Mr. Earle Crossed the way, and they followed him till he got to where the fire was; a cart was standing there taking away the rubbish; a plank went across the pavement, which stopped Mr. Earle half a minute; I then saw Allen and Welch go up to Mr. Earle; I saw Allen with the handkerchief in his hand; he gave it to Welch, and he put it under his arm.

Q. Did you see him take it out of the pocket? - A. No; I called to Mr. Earle and held the two boys; Mr. Earle said that was his handkerchief, and I told him he must go before the Lord Mayor, which he did. (Produces the handkerchief.)

Mr. Earle. This is my handkerchief.

Welch's defence. I picked up the handkerchief in the road and put it under my arm, and then that gentleman stopped me.

Allen's defence. I know nothing at all of the handkerchief; I did not know that this boy had it.

Welch, GUILTY, aged 12.

Allen, GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-8

754. JOHN MYERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , a pair of shoes, value 6s. the property of John Falkner , privately in his shop .

JOHN FALKNER sworn. - I am a boot and shoemaker , No. 17, Little New-street, Shoe-lane : On the 30th of September, about half past ten in the morning, the prisoner came into my shop while I was at work, and wished to give me a sum of money to finish teaching him the business; he had been an apprenetice to Mr. Allen, a gold beater in the same street; as soon as he was gone I missed a pair of shoes out of the window, I instantiy followed him and took him; I sent for a constable, and he was committed.

Q. Did you see him take them? - A. No.

Q. Did you see him do any thing near the window? - A. He stood with his back towards the window; I saw the costable take the shoes from

his pocket; they have my mark upon them, besides my own workmanship; I know them to be my shoes.

Q. Would you give 5s. for them? - A. Yes.( John Nash , the constable produced the shoes, which were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I found these shoes at the prosecutor's door. GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing goods, value 4s. 10d.

Transported for seven year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-9

755. ANN BARBARY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , a shirt, value 5s. the property of James Mulligan .

CATHERINE MULLIGAN sworn. - I am the wife of James Mulligan ; I lodge in West-street, Smithfield ; I employed the prisoner to wash for me; I take in washing; my husband has had a paralytic stroke, and is in the workhouse: On the 16th of September I went out between eight and nine in the morning, and when I came home in the evening, I missed a shirt that a gentleman had left with me that morning to be washed; I left my daughter at home; I had made the shirt; I saw it afterwards before the Magistrate; I found the prisoner in my apartment very much in liquor.( James Ing , a pawnbroker's servant, produced a shirt, which be received in pledge from the prisoner, on the 16th of September.(The shirt was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. Her daughter sent me to pledge it for liquor; I often pledge things for them both.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-10

756. ELIZABETH KELSO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , a cloak, value 2s. two mussing gowns, value 1l. 2s. two gowns, value 17s. an apron, value 3d a shawl, value 3d. and a night waistcoat, value 6d. the property of Henry Pritchard , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY PRITCHARD sworn. - I am a brushmaker , and keep a house, No. 54, Newgate-street ; I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment, on Saturday last, about one O'clock in the day, from the three pair of stairs room, which is my bed-room; the prisoner was a stranger to me; on the Monday following, in consequence of information, I went with Sarah Malin and the constable, to the prisoner's room behind St. Geroge's-market; I found the prisoner in the room; the door was locked, and we did not get admittance for some time; we then found a cotton gown and an apron belonging to me; the officer searched the room, but found no other part of the property; she was then secured; Miss Malin keeps a school, and lodges in my house.

SARAH MALIN sworn. - I keep a school in the prosecutor's house: On Saturday last, a little after one o'clock, our young ladies were nearly all gone, I was going up stairs, and upon opening the door, met a person very much resembling the prisoner, but I cannot swear to her; I believe her to be the person, but she was in a very different dress when I saw her again. I asked her what was her business, she told me she came from Mrs. Peppercorn, in Newgate-market, who wished to know what I had a quarter with a little girl; I said, if she would give me her mistress's address I would wait of her; she said I had better do so; she said her mistress did not live in the market, but in lodgings, which she described very particularly, as also the situation of the shop; she then bid me good morning; she had at that time a bundle in her apron; she had neither bonnet nor cloak on; I then went to Mrs. Peppercorn, but she knew nothing of it; I afterwards went to the prisoner's apartment, and saw her there; there was a gown and an apron found, which I shall know when they are produced; the constable has them.(William Shepherd, a constable, produced the property that he had found in the prisoner's apartment.)(Mary Britchard, the wife of the prosecutor, identified the gown and the apron.)

Q. What is the value of that gown and apron? A. I suppose the gown about 4s. and the apron 3d.

Prisoner's defence. That lady has sworn false.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing the goods, value 4s. 3d.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-11

757. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a portmauleau, value 10s. 6d. the property of Philip Day and John Day .

JOHN DAY sworn. - I am in partnership with my father, Philip Day, trunk-maker , in the Poultry : On Monday, the 20th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, I had seen the portmanteau in the window; I heard a noise, turned round and missed it; I then went to the door, and saw the prisoner with the trunk in his hand, going towards the Poultry Compter; I followed him into Grocer's-hall-passage, where I stopped him with the trunk in his hand; I brought him back, and had him secured; he said he wanted it to put a bundle in, which he had in his other hand.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not very much in liquor? - A. I don't think he was.( John Fenner , an officer, produced the trunk and three knives, which he found upon the prisoner.)(The trunk was identified by Mr. Day.)

Prisoner's defence. I was stupid in liquor; I don't know any thing of the trunk; I had a bundle with some bread and cheese in it.

Fenner. He had a bundle with some bread and cheese, but he was sober.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-12

758. CHARLES KERSHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , 31b. 1 oz. of Spanish juice, value 3s. the property of John Garcias and Thomas Lewis .

SAMUEL - sworn. - I am clerk in the house of John Garcias and Thomas Lewis: On Friday, the 17th of September, I was at Galley-quay , attending to the landing of some Spanish juice, and while I was in conversation with the surveyor, I heard that some persons had taken a sample of juice; I looked round and saw Mr. Stennett, who had hold of the prisoner's collar; he had seven sticks of Spanish juice, which he said he had taken from the prisoner; I went up to Mr. Stennett, and desired him to take care of the prisoner, for I must mind the remainder of the juice; there was no juice upon the Quay at that time, but the prosecutor's; I examined the case, and found one, near the prisoner, which had been broken open, and a quantity was gone out of it; the seven stcks weighed about three quarters of a pound; a constable was sent for, and Mr. Stennett gave charge of him.

BENJAMIN STENNETT sworn. - I am assistant at Galley-quay: On Friday, the 17th of September, between four and five o'clock, I heard a person call out that a man was robbing a case of juice; I immediately went up and collared the prisoner, as he was walking away from the case; I took out of his hand seven sticks of juice; I then took him back to the case, and found one side of the case broke; I secured him till the constable came, who searched him and found upon him nine more sticks; I saw it taken from his breeches and his coat, under his apron; the constable took charge of him.( Cornelius Riley , the constable, produced the property.)

Prisoner's defence. I was passing some chests, when I struck against something on the ground, I did not know what it was, and I picked it up and put it in the waistband of my breeches.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-13

759. FRANCIS ROBERTSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , a box. value 1s. 6d. twelve quarts of peas, value 1s. 6d. four quarts of beans, value 6d. and fifteen pounds eight ounces of feed, value 10s. 6d. the property of John Field , the elder, John Field , the younger, Thomas Field , and Isaac Field

(John Field, the younger, proved the firm as stated in the indictment.)

SAMUEL MARTIN sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Fields, No. 119. Lower Thames-street; I packed the articles stated in the indictment, on Monday last, in a box, for the West-Indies; I marked it K.W.H. I delivered it to our carman, on Monday evening, to go to No. 79, in Basinghall-street, with three other boxes; the carman is here.

SAMUEL ALLEN sworn. - I am carman to Messrs. Fields: On Monday evening last I received four boxes and two bags, from Mr. Martin, to go to No. 79, Basinghall-street; I was going along the Old Jewry , about half past six o'clock, and saw a man behind the cart, I drew back, he found me coming and dropped the box on the ground and ran away; I cried stop thief, and picked up the box; the prisoner was immediately stopped close to the horses head; the prisoner is the same man; I took the box to No. 11, Old Jewry, and delivered it to a constable.

SAMUEL ASHWIN sworn. - I am servant to a hosier, in Lothbury; I was in the Old Jewry; I heard stop thief cried; I was on the off side of Mr. Field's cart, and saw the prisoner drop a box; he came round on the off side of the horse; I ran across the way and stopped him directly; I took him into Mr. Dixon's shop, in the Old Jewry, and a constable was sent for; the prisoner and the box were given in charge to the constable.(The constable produced the box, which was identified by Martin and Allen.)

- BROWN sworn. - I am an attorney; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner at the horses head, making for the corner of a court; I immediately collared him; Mr. Ashwin collared him nearly at the same time; I did not see him with the box.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-14

760. WILLIAM WARNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a foot of leather hose, value 1s. 6d. the property of Robert Calvert , Charles Calvert , and Robert Ladbroke .

The witnesses not being able to state whether the pipe was fixed or not the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-15

761. JANE JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , a pint

pewter pot, value 1s. the property of Joseph Stayton .

JOSEPH STAYTON sworn. - I keep the Crown and Sugar-loaf, in Fleet-street : On Monday, the 11th of October, I lost a pint pot; my boy saw her take it.

- STAYTON sworn. - I am the wife of Joseph STAYTON: On the 11th of October, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner came in for half a pint of porter; when she went out the boy called out she has got a pot under her gown; he followed her into the street, and brought her back to the bar; she took the pot from under her gown, and put it down on the bar; I sent for a constable, and she was taken to Guildhall; I immediately missed a pint pot from the tap-room; it has my husband's name upon it.( James Chandler , the boy, corroborated the evidence of Mrs. Slayton, and added, that he saw the prisoner take it from the tap-room table.)(The pot was produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not know I had it till I was brought back; I was in liquor; I have three fatherless children.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-16

762, WILLIAM FICKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , a bag, value 6d. and twenty pound weight of nails. value 7s. the property of John Jackson and William Jackson .

FRANCIS MORGAN sworn. - I am warehouseman to John Jackson and William Jackson ; the prisoner occasionally worked on the wharf: On Saturday, the 17th of this month, in consequence of suspicion, seeing the prisoner with a basket, I called to him, and asked what he had got; he said, only a little straw; I told him I must see what he had got, and a bag of nalls immediately fell out of the basket; it is such a bag as they are usually packed in; it was marked S. I. and G. underneath; I missed the bag from the warehouse up stairs; I had put it there in the morning.( John Wainewright , a constable, produced the property, which was identified by Morgan.)

Prisoner's defence. I had the basket to get some straw; I had occasion to go into Mr. Maynes to get some money that was owing me; I let the basket at the door, and when I came out I picked it up, not knowing there was anything in it but straw.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-17

763. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a cask, value 8s. the property of Benjamin Shaw and Thomas Church .

THOMAS CHURCH sworn. - I am a cooper , in partnership with Benjamin Shaw : On Monday, the 18th of October, between three and four o'clock, we lost a cask; I did not see the transaction; I was called, and found the cask in possession of the constable; I knew it to be mine by the mark; I had seen it on the Saturday, in a yard of ours, in Distaff-lane .

THOMAS CUNNINGHAM sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Shaw and Church; I saw the prisoner coming out of the yard; he was rolling the hogshead out; he came out, and was putting the pin in to fasten the gate; he rolled it 10 or 12 yards from the gate, and I asked him where he was going with that; he said, he had a comrade who was gone on before; I said, it is my masters' property, and you shall not take it any farther; I took the prisoner to my masters' house,and left the hogshead in the street.

THOMAS HUGHES sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner, and delivered the hogshead to Mr. Church.

Prisoner's defence. I was going down Distaff-lane, there were several hogsheads on one side of the way, and a waggon unloading on the other, and it is possible my coat might have touched the hogshead, but my hand was never upon it.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-18

764. EDWARD MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , twelve ounces weight of Teathers, value 2s. the property of Thomas Seddon and George Seddon .

THOMAS SEDDON sworn. - I am in partner ship with George Seddon , in Aldersgate-street .

WILLIAM MARTIN sworn. - I am clerk to Mess. Seddon; the prisoner was employed in the feather-room; on Friday the 8th of October, about six o'clock, I had some suspicion, and informed Mr. Thomas Seddon of it; a constable was sent for, and when the prisoner left his work, the constable followed him; he went two or three yards out of the gate, and the watchman and I called him back into the accompting-house; he came back, and I saw him searched; a small bag of feathers was found upon him, and some wood in his inside coat-pocket; as soon as he was searched, I let Mr. Thomas Seddon know; I don't know who the bag belonged to; I cannot swear to the bag or the feathers; I did not see any thing remarkable about them.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. - I am clerk to

Mess. Seddon; I saw the prisoner searched, and the bag of feathers taken from him.( Alexander Grant , the watchman, corroborated the evidence of Martin.)( Francis Phipps , the constable, produced the property.)

Mr. Seddon. It is next to impossible to swear to feathers; but I have no doubt they are mine; they are the same sort of feathers that we had in the feather-room; the bag I cannot swear to.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-19

765. EDWARD MARTIN was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , seven knives, value 5s. and seven knives, value 3s. 6d. the property of Thomas Seddon .

There being no evidence of possession in the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18021027-20

766. JOHN EARLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , sixty-nine yards of ribbon, value 1l. 4s. 10d the property of Susannah Pussord , widow .

SUSANNAH PUSSORD sworn. - I am a widow; I keep a shop , No. 204, Upper Thames-street ; on Wednesday the 22d of September, about two o'clock, I lost some ribbon; I was not at home at the time.

( Mary-Ann Pussord , fourteen years old, was called, but not knowing the nature of an oath, she was not examined.)

MARY BATES sworn. - I was left in care of the shop; on the 22d of September, I came into the shop and found a little girl and the prisoner in the shop; there were two yards of ribbon lying on the counter; the prisoner asked for some patterns to shew his aunt, which the little girl gave him; he gave me half a guinea to change, and said he would call again for the change; he went away and staid about a quarter of an hour; he then came back, and said his aunt said he might have what ribbon he liked; he asked to see some silk handkerchiefs; the little girl shewed him one; he then asked to see another; while the little girl turned round, I saw him put his hand in the ribbon box, which laid on the counter, and then put his hand to his left hand breeches pocket; I cannot say what he took out; I then went up stairs and called a gentleman, who came down; I asked the prisoner to step in the parlour; I then told him to turn out his pockets; he said, if I dared to search him I should get a constable; I left him in charge with the gentleman, and got a constable, who searched him, and found four rolls of ribbon in his pocket; he said they were not ours, he had bought them of a Jew, in Rag-fair, for 4s. 6d.(The constable produced the property, which was identified by Mrs. Pussord.)

Prisoner's defence. I honestly bought these ribbons and paid for them. GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-21

767. JOHN WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , three pounds of coffee, value 5s. the property of a certain person or persons, to the Jurors unknown .

ABIJAH PENNY sworn. - I am an Excise watchman: On Tuesday, the 19th of October, about half past one o'clock, I was on Chester-quay ; I saw the scuttle of a lighter open; I had suspicion, and went down into the lighter, and found the prisoner cutting a bag, and letting the coffee run into his handkerchief and hat; I called Smith to my assistance, and he came; there were bags belonging to different people in the lighter; I don't know who this bag belonged to.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am a watchman belonging to the quays and the Thames Police; I was called; I went into the lower part of the lighter, and saw the prisoner and the coffee; the last witness gave me charge of him and the coffee; I gave the coffee to Hunter.( Thomas Hunter , a constable, produced the coffee.)

Prisoner's defence. I went down to look for a person, and saw the coffee running out of the bag; I was picking it up, with intent to save it, when this gentleman came up and said I should not have it. GUILTY , aged 45.

Fourteen days in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-22

768. WILLIAM RAWEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , three pounds and a half of raw sugar, value 1s. 6d. the property of Alexander Donaldson , George Glenning , William Morgan , and Alexander Macbean .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Peter Wright Gawthrop .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of a certain person or persons, to the Jurors unknown.

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Gleed, and the case by Mr. Jackson.)

ROBERT WILSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am foreman at the warehouse, No. 8, in the West-dock: On the 11th of October last, the prisoner was employed as a lumper , on board the ship Alexander ; she was lying right abreast of the warehouse; I went on board, about four o'clock in the afternoon, in consequence of suspicion; I saw the prisoner on board; I began to search some of the labourers, and while I was searching one of them, I observed the prisoner at the bar run forward on the forecastle, and throw from his person a bag, which I afterwards found to contain sugar;

he threw it under the heel of the ship's bowsprit; I took it up; it contained about three pounds and a half of raw sugar; I delivered the prisoner and the bag at the Shadwell Police-office.

Q. Was there any sugar of that quality in the ship? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the name of the captain of the ship ? - A. Peter Wright Gawthrop.( Joseph Holebrook , a constable, produced the sugar, which he had received from Wilson.

PETER WRIGHT GAWTHROP sworn. - I am Captain of the ship Alexander, the owner s are Alexander Donaldson, George Glenning , William Morgan , and Alexander Macbean .

Prisoner's defence. What I threw down, was a piece of canvas that I had been wiping my hands with, after I had done work. GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped, at the Wet Docks, in the Isle of Dogs .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-23

769. THOMAS PIPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , a glass quart bottle, filled with gin, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Tunbridge .

The prosecutor not being able to swear to the bottle, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18021027-24

770. ELIZABETH LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , four silver tea-spoons, value 8s. a silver pannikin, value 7s. and a pair of silver tongs, value 10s. the property of John Flinn .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, except her own confession, extorted by a promise, she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-25

771. JOSEPH-ALFORD SAVILLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , a mustin gown, value 20s. the property of Ann Renaud .

ANN RENAUD sworn. - I live at No. 51, Lower Brook-street , with my brother: On the 11th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, in company with an elderly man, came to my brother's house; the prisoner enquired for lodgings; I told him it was a second floor; he turned to the elderly man, and said, shall we go up stairs; he answered, with all my heart; then they went up stairs, and I went with them; in going up, they went into the first floor; I said, gentlemen, these apartments are lett; I said it was a second floor I was to shew them; they went up stairs, and the prisoner observed it was the same shape as the room on the first floor; they then went into the bed-room, and on looking out at the back window, observed that the situation was very airy; he then enquired concerning a servant's bed; I told him there was a kitchen for the servant, with a bed in it; he said that was awkward, but he would look at it; they then went down stairs, I went with them; then they again went into the first floor; he said he should like those apartments much better, and asked whether they wouldsoon be to left; I said they would; he then asked who lodged in those rooms, whether the gentleman was in the army; I replied, no, he is in the navy; he said, if he, the gentleman, would bear a-hand, another sailor would soon follow him; the old man answered and said, a proper sea phrase; he then went into the bed-room on the first floor; he said, he liked that much better, because he thought it was larger; I said I thought them equally the same size; he said I could not be correct, but he would ascertain it, by stepping up to see; he went up, and I was going to follow, till I recollected I should leave the other man in the gentleman's apartments; he was gone the space of a minute or better; at that time the told man was talking to me about the price of the lodging; I heard the prisoner returning, and the elderly man went down towards, the street door; the prisoner came into the first floor, and spoke to me, but I cannot recollect what he said, it was about the size of the room; I then observed a piece of a cotton band hanging from under his hat.

Q. With his hat on? - A. Yes; I said, pardon me, sir, what have you there; he said, it is only the string of my hat; whether in my hurry I knocked his hat off, or whether it came off by touching the band, I cannot say, but the hat fell, and I think the prisoner caught it, for it did not fall to the ground; I then saw a gown in the crown of his hat; I said, that is my gown; he then threw it on the bed in the other room; the door which goes out of one into the other was open: he said, I am a man of honour, and a gentleman, you cannot suppose a person of my appearance would be guilty of taking a gown, I merely did it out of a hit of fun; I then laid hold of him, and brought him down stairs, and when he was on the first floor landing, he called out, Jack, Jack; the street door was open when he came down; I still had hold of him, and called, stop him, stop him; a little girl who was in the house hearing me scream, came up from the kitchen; she screamed, and at that time the prisoner broke from me, and went out; a young man, of the name of Joseph Simpson, was standing at the door; I said, stop him, stop him, he has stole my gown; he then went after him; the prisoner was brought back by Simpson in about five minutes, and then he was taken to Marlborough-street; I am sure the prisoner is the same man; I saw nothing more of the elderly man.

Q. In what part of the room was your gown lying? - A. In a drawer belonging to the wardrobe

in the back room of the second floor, I had seen it there on the Sunday morning, this was on the Monday; it is a Japan Muslin gown. (Produces it).

JOSEPH SIMPSON sworn. - I am a bricklayer, I was employed at Mr. Renaud's; I was standing at the door, and saw an elderly man ran out of the house; about two minutes after the prisoner came to the door, and the lady said, stop him; I was going to stop him, and he went back to the lady, and the lady directly laid hold of him; the elderly man was then outside the door; the prisoner said, Jack, Jack; the man said, d - n you, and immediately ran away; the prisoner then got away from the lady; he got a few yards off, between a run and a walk; the lady desired me to run after him, for he had stole her gown; I immediately ran after him, I ran into Bond-street, and there I saw a mob before Mr. Dalby's, a silversmith; directly that I went up to the door, the prisoner came out, clapped me on the back, and said, I will go back with you to the lady myself.

Q. Had you said any thing to him? - A. No; I immediately laid of him, and when he got into Brook-street, he said, I will go and fetch the other man, he has got the gown; I said, never mind, I will take you first, and fetch the other man afterwards; I took him to the lady's house, and from there we took him to Marlborough-street.

Prisoner's defence. I came down stairs with the gown in my hand, it was lying on the bed; the lady said, I was going to stealher gown; she seemed very timid and frightened; I told her she need be under no apprehension of my taking it, it was not my intention; I then threw it on the bed in the first floor, and told her not to be a alarmed; I desired her to sit down, and be perfectly reconciled; I went down stairs, supposing she was perfectly reconciled, having her gown left there; when I got near the door, the brick layer's boy was standing at the door; the lady immediately followed, and took hold of me by the arm; I stopped a considerable time, and then she called, stop him; she let go my arm, and I was walking on; I went as far as Mr. Dalby's shop; when I went in, Mr. Dalby was very much surprised at seeing such a mob round the door; seeing the bricklayer's boy standing at the door, I came to the door, and told him I should return back with him to the lady very quietly, and I returned back to the lady's house; some people came into the parlour where I was, and they sent for a constable; not finding a constable, they proposed going to a Magistrate, and I was taken to Marlborough-street. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-26

772. JOHN STOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , a silk handkerchief, value 3s. a nutmeg-grater, value 1d. and a half-guinea , the property of Robert Lefevre .

SARAH LEFEVRE sworn. - I am the wife of Robert Lefevre, a seaman , who is now abroad in the East-India service: On the 25th of October I was coming through Ratcliff-highway, I was followed by several men, the prisoner was one; they followed me to Red-lion-street, Whitechapel , and there I found Stokes's hand in my pocket; he had walked and talked with me all the way.

Q. You were talking together? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. No.

Q. How long was he with you? - A. Not. long; I walked very fast, and he would insist upon walking by the side of me; I told him I did not want his company; when I got to Red-lion-street, I found his hand in my pocket; I asked him what he was doing in my pocket, and he said, nothing at all; I immediately laid hold of him; I put my hand in my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; he dragged his hand from my pocket, and wanted to get away; he then pushed me very much, but I kept hold of him, and crossed the way with him; I cried out, and two watchmen came to my assistance; when I cried out, the other men ran away, and the watchmen secured the prisoner; I missed a silk handkerchief, and a nutmeg-grater, with half-a-guinea in it.

Q. When had you last seen your money? - A. I had changed one shilling out of it at a public-house in Ratcliff highway.

Q. Were you sober at the time? - A. I was not the worse for liquor, I might have drank three or four glasses of spirits in the course of the day; I had drank some with a friend that I had been to see in Nightingale-lane.

Q. What liquor had you had before you went there? - A. I drank one glass at home, and one at her house; I drank one with her out, when she went out to buy a pair of shoes, and one glass coming home.

Q. What house was that? - A. The Ship and Horseshoe; my friend had a glass with me, and I paid for it; I took one shilling out of my nutmeggrater, and then there was half-a-guinea remaining in it; I received 9d. in change, which was left in my pocket; he was searched, but nothing found upon him; I have never found them since.

Q. Do you mean to swear you were perfectly sober? - A. I was quite sober.

JOHN HENRY sworn. - I am a watchman; I heard a terrible noise in the street; I went across from Red-lion-street to Essex-street, and there I saw this woman; she had hold of him, and would not let him go; she gave charge of him for robbing her of a silk handkerchief, a nutmeg grater, with a half-guinea in it; I took him to the watch-house; there were five or six other men, who all ran away when I came up; they were all close up together

with the woman and the prisoner; he was searched at the watch-house, but nothing found upon him; the woman did not appear to be in liquor.

Prisoner's defence. I had been at work all day; I was coming along, and saw this woman with five or six young men; I was going past Red-lion-street, when a young woman called me; I said I was only going over the way, and then the other men walked behind her; I asked where she lived; she said, in George-street, that she had been on board ship five or six days with a sailor, who had given her a 2l. note, and she had left the ship at Gravesend; she said these young men would not leave her alone; she clapped her hand in her pocket, and said, she had lost a silk handkerchief, and charged me with it; I then walked right up to the watchman, and told him to take me into custody, for I knew nothing of it.

Q. Is the story the prisoner has told, true or not? - A. It is not. GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-27

773. JOHN WEBBER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , two pounds three quarters of soap, value 2s. the property of James Clarke .

JOHN GILES sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Clarke, in Shoreditch : On Friday, the 17th of September, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into Mr. Clarke's shop, and lent himself over, on the counter, where some soap, was lying, and said give me some blue; I told him we did not give blue away; I would sell him some; I was packing up some goods in the middle of the shop, and called the other apprentice to serve him: he served him two ounces of blue, which he paid three halfpence for; he then went away, and in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour afterwards, Mr. Ekelso came into the shop; I had not then missed any soap; he informed me he had stopped a man with a cake of soap.

JOSEPH STORER sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Clarke; I served the prisoner with two ounces of blue; he lolled over the soap place; he paid me for the blue and went away; I did not then miss the soap; afterwards Mr. Ekeiso came in, and I missed a cake of mottled soap that I had cut a small corner off just before as a sample; the small bit was left on the counter.

JOHN EKELSO sworn. - On the 17th of September, about twenty minutes after five, I saw the prisoner come down Mr. Clarke's stable-yard;I was at my own stable door, in the same yard; the prisoner passed by me with a cake of soap, not in paper, under his coat; after he had passed me, I suspected him, and followed him into Magpye-alley; I tapped him on the shoulder, and asked him how he came by that soap, he said he did not know; he then said he had bought it of a Jew in the street; I took him to Worship-street-office.(Produced the soap.)

Storer. This is the cake of soap that I cut the corner from; that was the largest piece there was on the counter.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to a timberyard; I am a box-maker; I met with a Jew, who asked me if I would buy some soap of him; he asked me two shillings for it, and I gave him nineteen pence, and a quartern of gin.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-28

774. THOMAS YEOMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a hat, value 2s. the property of John Kingsbury .

JOHN KINGSBURY sworn. - On the 9th of October, I lodged at the Hampshire-hog, in Peartree-street, Goswell-street ; I came home about four o'clock, my hat was very wet, and I hung it upon the poker to dry, by the grate; I was sitting in one of the boxes, the landlord of the house was with me; in about a quarter of an hour I missed my hat; the prisoner had been in the tap-room after I hung it up, and was there then; I borrowed Mr. Salmon's hat, who keeps the house, and went out and bought another; when I came back, Mrs. Salmon gave me information, in consequence of which, we waited till the prisoner got up to go away, and then Mrs. Salmon said, that is the man that has got your hat; I immediately took my hat from under the prisoner's coat, behind him. (Produces it.)

SARAH SALMON sworn. - I saw Kingsbury's hat upon the poker; I took it off, and laid it on the tap-room table; I saw no more of it; the prisoner was in the tap-room; Kingsbury went out to buy another, and while he was gone, I thought I saw the hat under the slap of the prisoner's coat, as he sat on the form; I told Kingsbury of it, and saw him take it from behind his back, under his coat.

Prisoner's defence. I have served the landlord of that house, with corn and coals, for some years; I went to this house about four o'clock, and had some porter; Mrs. Kingsbury told me I had got a hat, and they took it from me; but whether it was put there as a trick or not, I cannot say; I don't know how it came there.

GUILTY, aged 55.

Of stealing to the value of 1s.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before, Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-29

775. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for

feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , a goose, value 6s. the property of Emanuel Castle .

EMANUEL CASTLE sworn. - I keep the Bull public-house, the corner of Saunder's gardens, Kingsland-road : Last Sunday was fortnight, the 17th of October, I bought two geese of the Leeds waggoner, they were picked, I gave thirteen and sixpence for the two; I hung them up backwards, by the safe, upon a hook, separately; I hung them up between six and seven o'clock in the morning; I lost one of them; between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner came in and had a glass of gin; he asked the way to the necessary, my little boy got a light for him, and when he had lit him down, he said he could do his business in the dark; he came up into the tap-room, and then went out that way; I missed the goose about a quarter, or half an hour afterwards; I went to different public-houses, and at last found him at the Adam and Eve, in Hoxton, and the goose; that was about six o'clock; he was sitting on a bench close to the fire; I called for a pint of beer, went into the second box, and then I saw a goose lying on the table, not near the prisoner; I took the goose up and said, if any body here has more right to this goose than I have let them own it; the prisoner immediately said it was his; he said he had bought it by Kingstand-turnpike, of a waggoner, and given four shillings and sixpence for it; then he went out of doors, I followed him, clapped him on the shoulder, and told him I wanted to speak to him; he said, what what; I told him I would let him know before I left him; I sent for Mason, the officer, and be took charge of him.

Q. You cannot swear to the goose? - A. Yes; he left this on the hook. (Producing the head.)

DAVID BROWNE sworn. - I was at the Adam and Eve public house, and saw the prisoner, and saw the goose; the prisoner said it is my property, Mr. Castle said it was his; I was sent for an officer.

Prisoner's defence. I never had the goose in my possession; Browne has known me for sixteen years.

Browne. I have known him for twelve or fourteen years; he has worked for me; I never heard any thing against him.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined one months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-30

776. MARY-JANE HASTED, otherwise WHITE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a silver tea-spoon, a plate, two pillows, two blankets, two sheets, three bed-curtains, and a variety of other articles, the property of Mathew Murdock , in a lodging-room .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-31

777. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , seven pounds weight of soap, value 4s. half a pound weight of carryway seeds, value 2d. the property of Richard Jones .

RICHARD JONES sworn. - I am a soap-maker and perfumer , in Holywell-street, Shoreditch ; the prisoner was my servant ; I had suspicion of him, and on the 15th of September; I stopped him, as he was going home from work, at seven o'clock in the evening; the officer took out of his pocket about half a pound of carraway seed, of the value of 2d. then we went to his lodgings, and found a quantity of soap, some yellow, some mottled, and some white; he lodged in Short-street, Cumberland-street; we took him to the office, and he confessed he had taken it.

Q. What did you say to him first? - Q. I did not say any thing; there is no particular mark upon the soap.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. - Q. Three men were taken up at this time for soap-stealing? - A. Yes.

Q. And the other two were both acquitted? - A. I had rather not go into that.

PETER MASON sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner; I found this soap at this lodging; he told us himself where he lived; he said he had taken the carraway seeds for his children.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-32

778. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , thirty pounds weight of iron nails, value 9s. and two bars of steel, value 4s. the property of Henry Martin .

(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

HENRY MARTIN sworn. - I am an ironmonger , in St. John's-street , the prisoner was my warehouseman and porter ; he lived with me about five years; in consequence of information I received, I attended at Worship-street, on the 17th of October, I found the prisoner there, and some nails were produced to me, such as I usually sold; the prisoner wished to speak to me after he was committed, and I had some conversation with him.

Q. Had you made any promise, any sort of inducement to him to confess? - A. None; he went down upon his knees and begged forgiveness; he then said he had collected them at different times, as they fell from the cart; he said they were my property; we fell them by weight, and then they are put into a nail bag; he did not say any thing about the steel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This man has lived with you five years? - A. Yes.

Q. Nails in their passage from the warehouse to the shop frequently drop? - A. Yes.

Q. They drop also from the cart now and then? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. The nails are of different sizes? - A. Yes.

JOHN MORTON sworn. - I am one of the patrols; on Saturday the 9th of October, between seven and eight in the evening, I was on duty in Old-street-road; I saw the prisoner with this bag on his shoulder; I stopped him, and asked him what he was carrying, he seemed very much agitated; he at last said they were nails; I asked him where he was going to carry them, he said, he was going to carry them to Mr. Gill, in Old-street, and that he brought them from St. John's-street; I told him, I would go with him to Mr. Gill, he refused going to Mr. Gill's, he said, he would go to a Magistrate's, and would tell them there; at the office, I asked him again where he brought them from, and he said, he had them from a man of the name of Houghton, under Charterhouse-wall, and he was going to carry them to Mr. James, the wheeler's; Mr. Houghton and Mr. James are here.

- HOUGHTON sworn. - I am a smith; I never employed the prisoner to carry any nails; he sent for me to the New-Prison, and told me he was stopped going with some nails to the Curtain-road, and he said, he had made use of my name, he said, he had never taken any.

- James deposed, that he had not employed the prisoner to carry any nails. (The nails produced.)

Martin; These are the same sort of nails that I had.

- LANGER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Martin; I found these two steel bars in my master's stable, the prisoner had the key.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-33

779. JAMES THANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , four pounds weight of coffee, value 8s. the property of Rebecca Brandon , Rachel Cortissos , Moses Brandon , Isaac Brandon , and Samuel Cortissos .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of James Harris .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of a certain person, or persons, to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

MAJOR PRATT sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Brandon and Co. at Hoxton ; there was a great quantity of coffee in their warehouses, under the Excise Lock, (proves the firm as stated in the indictment;) the prisoner was Excise-Locker : On the 5th of October, about half past five in the afternoon, he went to lock up the doors as usual; one of the labourers, Samuel Thomas, came and gave me some information, in consequence of which, when the prisoner had locked all the doors, I told him, I wanted to speak to him; I told him he had intimated to me, that the other officers were carrying on wrong practices; I now had an intention of searching him; I touched one of his pockets on the outside,and found it contained coffee; I then called in two of the labourers into the accompting-house; I said, Mr. Thane, you must deliver up this coffee, or I must send for an officer, and force you to deliver it up; he then said, well, I took hold of his pocket, and turned out a quantity of raw coffee into Thomas's apron; I asked him, if he had any more, he said, no; I think he added, upon his honour; I said, no; I must see, I moved his hat, and some grains came from under it; I then turned it over the man's apron, and a great quantity run out of the lining; he wanted me to overlook it, he was in liquor, and he would return it into the warehouse; I told him I would not do so, but if he chose to go with me to my masters, he would see that it was not from my passion, but from the order of my masters; it weighed four pounds and two ounces, I compared the coffee, it is the same; a constable was sent for, and he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This man, I believe, was not a regular officer, he was an extra-officer? - A. I believe he was.

Q. He was drunk, was not he? - A. He seemed to be very much in liquor.

SAMUEL THOMAS sworn. - I am a labourer in Messrs. Brandon's warehouses; on the 5th of October, a little before five o'clock, the prisoner came up to order the labourers out; I happened to shop a little longer in the warehouse, I turned my head round, and espied the prisoner did his left-hand into a cask of coffee, twice, and put it into his left-hand pocket; I came down below, and informed Major Pratt; he was drunk, but he could walk steady. (The coffee was produced in Court.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was in liquor at the time he committed the offence, and expressing great contrition.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-34

780. WILLIAM JENNINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , six planes, value 15s. and two saws, value 15s.the property of John Brooke ; three saws, value 24s. the property of Stephen Griffiths ; a plane, value 1s. the property of John Tyke , and a saw, value 7s. the property of Joseph Godwin .

JOHN TYKE sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Brooke, a carpenter ; the workshop in Leather-lane was broke open, on the night of Friday the 24th of September; I left it about fix in the evening; I locked it up, and left the tools in the shop; I went again the next morning about six o'clock, and found the window taken out, and laid upon the roof of the adjoining building; I lost one plane, the prisoner lodged just opposite, he has lately come from sea; I afterwards saw it in the custody of Mr. Nash, the officer, it has my name stamped upon it.

JOHN NASH sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for by Mrs. Frost, of George-alley, to take possession of the tools; I took then, and a person that was in the room, to Guildhall. (Produces the property.)

ANN BAKER sworn. - The prisoner brought home a great many tools in a basket; I lodge in the same house.

Tyke. This is my plane.

Q. (To Baker.) Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Was it not a man of the name of Cohen, a Jew, that brought them in? - A. No, it was the prisoner.

Q. Have you never said so? - A. I said, Cohen was in companny with him.

Q. The prisoner was once a sweet-heart of your's? - A. No.

Q. Has there been no dispute between you and him about another girl? - A. No.

Q. Don't you know Cohen is a notorious thief? - A. I don't know any thing about that.

Q. Do you recollect having been at the prisoner's father's house last Sunday week? - A. Yes.

Had you any conversation there about this business? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see a Mrs. Ratcliffe there, who had come from the country? - A. I don't know her name.

Q. Did you not tell her it was Cohen that brought the things, and that you would not have sworn against the prisoner, had you not been induced to do so, by Mrs. Hunter? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you not say, that what you said at Guildhall was false, and that you would unswear all you had sworn? - A. I did not.

Q. What are you? - A. An unfortunate girl.

Brooke. There are my planes.(Robert Starkey, a pawnbroker, produced two saws, which he received from a woman of the name of Hunter, one of which was identified by Griffiths.)

JOHN GODWIN sworn. - This is my saw, I was not at work in the shop that day.

Tyke. I saw that saw in particular, lying at the end of the bench, when I lest the shop.(Another pawnbroker produced two other saws, which were pledged by Hunter.)

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge.

For the prisoner.

CHARLOTTE RATCLIFFE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you a married woman? - A. Yes; my husband is principal clerk to Mr. Richardson, banker, at Derby, and has been a great many years, the prisoner is my brother; I saw Ann Baker at my father's house last Sunday was a week, with Mary Blower ; Mr. Blood and Mr. Dixon were there; I saw her take a glass of liquor, she burst out a crying, and said, Mr. Jennings, if ever I hurt your son, I wish this may turn to poison in my inside; she said, she believed him to be innocent, and was very sorry for what she had done, but she had done it at the instigation of Mr. Nash, the constable, and Mrs. Frost; she has said that more than once or twice upon my oath.

Court. Q. You are the prisoner's sister? - A. Yes.

JOHN BLOOD swron. - Examined by Mr. Alley

Q. What are you? - A. A china-painter; I saw Ann Baker take up a glass of liquor, she said, she wished it might turn to poison, if ever she hurt the prisoner; she said, she believed his innocence, and would not appear against him, and she said, if she was obliged to appear against him, she would answear what she had sworn; she said, she was sorry for it, but it was at the instigation of Mrs. Frost, and she mentioned Mr. Nash's name, and said, she would be out of they way.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-35

781. RICHARD LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , a basket, value 2s. and a spade, value 1s. the property of James Shepherd ; and a shovel, value 2s. the property of Edward Gray .

JAMES SHEPHERD Sworn. - I live in Globe-fields, Bethnal-green : On the 25th of October, at half past five in the morning, I was getting up, I heard somebody in my grounds; I afterwards let in my servant, and I saw that somebody had been over the fence into the grounds; I missed a new spade, a shovel, and a new basket; I found she footstep of some person where they had got over, and I found this bill close to where he had go over, (produces it); I saw the property the same night at Worship-street,

EDWARD GRAY Sworn. - I went to work and missed the tools; the shovel was mine: Between nine and then o'clock the same day, I met the prisoner in Baker's-row, with a basket on his head, and a spade and shovel under his left arm; I

passed him, and saw my own initial upon the shovel that I had wrote my self; I then examined the spade, and knew it by a river that I had put in myself; I dollowed him to Quaker-street, and collared him; I gave him in charge to Mr. Hart; he is not here.

Q. How far is that from Mr. Shepherd's? - A. Rather better than a mile.

(The property was produced and identified by Shepherd and Gray.)

The prisoner did not say any things in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 69.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-36

782. THOMAS PEARSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a blanket, value 3s. 6d. two sheets, vlaue 6s. a pillow-case, value 1s. a bolster, value 3s. and a counterpane, value 5s. the property of Eleanor Roberts , widow , in a lodging-room .

ELEANOR ROBERTS sworn. - I am a widow, and live at No. 8, Clarence-place, Hackney-road ; I let out part of my house in lodgings: On the 16th of September I let a one pair of stairs room to the prisoner, furnished, at 5s. per week it was to be paid weekly; I asked him his employment; he told me he belonged to a boat that attended the revenue officers down the river, and brought them back again; but I had very soon reason to suppose it was false; he was mostly at home, and therefore I conceived he could not follow any lawful employment; he was very idle, and run in debt in the neighbourhood; about eight or ten days after he had taken the lodgings, there was a quarrel between him and his wife, and I thought I heard blows; I desired him to get another apartment, I did not like such people in my house; he told me he would; about eleven o'clock the same night, he brought me down a week's rent, and begged that I wuold not take any more notice of what had happened; in the course of the week I spoke to the young woman he called his wife; I told her I thuoght him a suspicious chracter; on the 6th of October he came down in the morning, and asked me to lend him a basket to pack up some things; I knew they had nothing of their own, and I was suspicious they would take my things; I went out under pretence of going to borrow a basket, and fetched Mr. Mason, an officer; he staid in my apartment, and I went up stairs and desired him to let me examine my property; he refused to let me examine the bed; he seemed very much agitated, and said, Fanny, go and tell my brother to bring me money immediately; she went out, but never returned again; he wished very much to get out of the house; he wanted to go down and take in some milk, but I told him I would take it in; I at last examined the bed, and missed the articles mentioned in the indictment; I had lett them all with my lodgings; Mr. Mason asked him where they were; he replied, in pawn, and gave him the duplicates out of his pocket; he then took him in custody; he said, at Worship-street, that he had pawned them, but knew not the consequence.

( Peter Mason , an officer, produced the duplicates, which he had received from the prisoner.)

JAMES HALL sworn - I am servant to Mr. Neville, a pawnbroker, in Old-street-road, (produces the property); they were pawned at different times by the prisoner, in the name of Thomas Rhodes .

(The property was identified by Mrs. Roberts.)

Prisoner's defence I intended to redeem them.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-37

783. THOMAS RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , a gold watch, value 10l. the property of Henry Heathcote .

(There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was)

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-38

784. ELIZABETH THURGOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , six napkins, value 6s. the property of John Farley , Edward Terry , and John-Henry Peacock .

JOHN FARLEY sworn. - I keep the London Tavern , in partnership with Edward Terry , and John-Henry Peacock ; I missed a great number of napkins continually; in consequence of information, I went to Worship-street, and got a search-warrant; I searched the house of Mrs. Osborn, No. 3, Dolphin-court, and from there we went to Mrs. Simmons's, No. 7, in the same court, and from there to Mrs. Thurgood's, in Catherine-wheel-alley; Ray, the officer, was with me; she denied having any napkins at all, or ever having seen any; we searched her house, we found none in the house, but where she had been washing, with a pail, I moved a stone, and put down a poker into the gulley-hole, and brought up six napkins; the prisoner's husband works for me; she owned, in her fright, that she had put them there, and that her Tommy, meaning her husband, knew nothing of them; she was then taken to Worship-street; I had never seen the prisoner before: I have fought for her husband, but cannot find him.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I went with Mr. Farley to the prisoner's house, we went in, the back-door was open, and I observed the prisoner stooping down; I told her I was come in search of some napkins, she said, we were welcome to search, she had no napkins at all belonging to Mr. Farley; she was very much alarmed; I observed a stone loose, by the side of the drain; I got a poker, moved the stone,

and found six napkins; when I took them out, she fainted away; she begged Mr. Farley would not hurt her; she said her husband knew nothing about it, she had them brought there with broken victuals.

RACHEL SIMMONS sworn. - I am a Jewess; I bought fourteen napkins of a brother of mine, who deals in old cloath, about four months ago; I kept a stall in the Change; my husband told me I should leave off business; I had fix left, and I fold them to Mrs. Osborn.

MARTHA OSBORN sworn. - I live at No. 3, Dolphin-cout, Craven-row: About three months ago. I bought six napkins of Rachel Simmons for six shillings; I went to Rachel Simmon 's wedding, and I told her if she would accept of them, she should have them; I asked my opposite neighbour, Sophia Simons , to take them to her, which she did.

SOPHIA SIMONS sworn. - I am a Jewes; Mrs. Osborn brought six napkins to me, and asked me to take them to Rachel Simons , which I did; I gave them to her brother, and desired him to give them to his sister.

JACOB LEVI Sworn. - I am the brother of Rachel Simmons; about four months ago, I fold six napkins to my sister.

Q. (To Farley.) These are not the napkins that were found under the stone? - A. No.(The napkins found in the drain were identified by Mr. Farley.)

Prisoner's defence. I never knew of any thing from the London Tavern in my life.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Midllesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-39

785. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for that he, on the 11th of September being employed in the capacity of a clerk to James Yerraway , timber and coal-merchant , of Earl-street, Black-frairs , did, by virtue of his said employment, take and receive into his possession, of and from James Harrison , of Friar-street, Black-friars, carpenter, four Bank-notes, each of the value to 20l. one other Bank-note, of the value of 5l. and 1l. 10s. in monies numbered, for and on account of the said James Yerraway , his said master and employer, and that he afterwards, to wit, on the same day, fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Knowlys).

JAMES HARRISON swron. - Examined by Mr. knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A At No. 5, Friar-street, Black-srairs; I am a carpenter, I know the prisoner as clerk to Mr. Yerraway, with whom I have dealt a great many years, he is a timber and coal-merchant in Earl-street; there was a bound for 250l. between me and Mr. Yerraway; I called at the accompting house, and saw the prisoner; I went for the purpose of paying 861. 10s. which I paid to the prisoner on the account of Mr. Yerraway; I paid it in four twenty-pound Banknotes, a five-ponds Bank-note, and I believe a two-pound note; he gave me in change then shillings; he gave me a receipt for it. (Produces it.)

(It is read as follows) -

"Received Sept. 11, 1802, of Mr. James Harrison , eighty pounds for account of bond; also fix pounds then shillings in terest on the above bond, making together eighty-six pounds ten shillings for James Yerraway .

86 10s. J CLARKE."

Harrison. The prisoner wrote the receipt, and signed it in my presence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There was something of a bond between you and Mr. Yerraway? - A. Yes, there was.

Mr. Knapp. We have it here, and Mr. Yerraway is here.

Q. I believe the prisoner till this time bore an unexceptionable character? - A. I never heard any harm of him.

JAMES YERRAWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you are a timber and coal-merchant, in Earl-street, Black-friars? - A. Yes; the prisoner was my clerk; it was the business of my clerks to pay me money they have received the moment I come home.

Q. Did you ever receive from him eighty-fix pounds ten shillings as a payment from Mr. Harrison on a bound? - A. Never, from that time to this.

Q. Do you keep a banker? - A. I keep my money at the Bank of England.

Q. Were you in town on the 11th of September? - A. No; I was not in town till the 16th; when I came to town, I sent for the prisoner, and asked him if any person had wanted me during my absence; he said, no, three had not; I told him it was rather odd three or four days should elapse without my being wanted; he said, no person had wanted me; about half past nine, while I was at breaksast, the accompting-house bell was rang; I enquired for the clerk, but he was not to be found; I never saw him again till the Monday morning following, it was on the Thursday that I came to town; I found him on the Monday at his lodgings on St. Andrew's-hill, where I took him; I asked him about different sums, and among the rest, this, but could get no account from him; he said he could not account to me for it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you any partner in your business? - A. I have not.

Q. How long has this young man lived with you? - A. About fourteen months; he lived with me five or six years ago; he then behaved as well as any young man could do.

Q. I suppose you don't know of your own know

ledge, without the assistance of a book, whether this money was paid into the Bank or not? - A. This money would have been entered only in my cash-book.

Q. Is that book here? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. If the money had been received, you would have entered it with your own hand in the cash-book? - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 29.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

786. JOHN CLARKE was again indicted for that he on the 14th of September , being employed in the capacity of a clerk to James Yerraway , timber and coal-merchant, of Earl-street, Black-friars, did, by virtue of his said employment, receive and take into his possession, of and from John East, a Bank-note of the value of 25l. two other Bank-notes, each of the value of 10l. and one other Bank-note, of the value of 5l. for and on account of the said James Yerraway , his said master and employer, and that he afterwards, to wit, on the same day, fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN EAST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are servant to Mr. Yerraway? - A. I am.

Q. Was the prisoner clerk to him on the 14th of September? - A. He was; I received on that day 49l. 19s. from Mr. Wright, a carpenter, in Theobald's-road; the prisoner gave me a bill, and told me to go and receive it for Mr. Yerraway; I went to Mr. Wright, and he paid me one 25l. Bank-note, two 10l. Bank-notes, and a 5l. Banknote; the prisoner gave me one shilling, which I gave Mr. Wright in change; when I came home, I gave the prisoner the 49l. 19s. in Mr. Yerraway's accompting-house, the same as I had received it from Mr. Wright.

ROBERT WRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a carpenter in Theobald's-road? - A. I am: On the 14th of September, John East brought me a bill for payment, which was due that day I paid him a 25l. Bank-note, two tens, and a five, and he gave me one shilling in change. (Produces the bill.)

East. That is the bill, it has my receipt upon the back of it. (It is read as follow:)

"London, July 31, 1802.

"Six weeks after date, pay me or order 49l. 19s. for value received.

" JAMES YERRAWAY .

"Mr. Rober Wright, Theobald's-road.

"Accepted Robert Wright.

Endorsed "Received for Mr. Yerraway, John East ."

JAMES YERRAWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You had a bill upon Mr. Wright? - A. I had; I gave the prisoner directions to send for the payment of that bill; I went out of town on the 10th of September, and returned on the 16th.

Q. Have you ever received the payment of that bill, or any sum of money to that amount? - A. I have not.

Q. Did ou afterwards go to Mr. Wright, and make enquiry of him? - A. No, I did not; I enquired of the prisoner respecting it, but he gave me no account of it; he left my service the morning I came home.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-40

787. JOHN THATCHER was indicted for that he, on the 9th of July , being employed in the capacity of a servant to James Yerraway , timber and coal-merchant , of Earl-street, Blackfriars, did, by virtue of his said employment, receive and take into his possession of and from Thomas Cato , and Jesse Cato , of Holborn-hill , wireworkers, four Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. and 6s. in monies numbered, for and on account of the said James Yerraway , his said master and employer, and that he afterwards, to wit, on the same day, fraudulently and feloniously did secreate the same .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

JESSE CATO sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I believe you are a wire-worker, and live on Holborn-hill? - A. I am, in partnership with my father, Thomas Cato ; I knew the prisoner as a servant to Mr. Yerraway: On the 9th of July, he came to me for payment of a bill of 5l. 1s. I told him Mr. Yerraway was in a great hurry, but if he would take off the discount, I did not want credit, there was the money; he said he would go, and enquire; he went away, and in about twenty miutes returned, saying, he would take off the discount; he took off 5s. and I paid him 4l. 16s. he gave me a receipt, which I have here. (Produces it, and it is read.)

"Received July 9. 1802, of Messrs. Cato and Son, the sum of 5l. 1s. 2d. for J. Yerraway, by John Thatcher ."

Q. You are sure the prisoner is the person who gave you that receipt? - A. I am.

JAMES YERRAWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a timber and coal-merchant in Earl-street, Bank-friars? - A. I am; the prisoner was my servant.

Q. Did you authorize him on the 9th of July to call on Messrs. Cato and Son for 5l. 1s.? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you authorize him to allow any discount upon that bill? - A. No.

Q. Do you know the prisoner's hand-writting? - A. I believe this to be his hand-writing.

Q. Was that money ever brought to account? A. It was not; I did not discover it till October, when I went to demand 7l. of Meffrs. Cato, and adn they told me part of it had been paid.

Q. Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. Did not the prisoner say, that what he had done was by the direction of the young man who has just been convicted? - A. Yes.

Q. How many years has the prisoner lived with you? - A. Fourteen or fixteen years; I am very certain it is fourteen years; when the prisoner was apprehended, he said he had paid the money to my clerk.

Prisoner's defence. I was sent by Mr. Clarke for the money; Mr. Cato would not pay it without a discount being allowed; I went back to Mr. Clarke, adn he directed me to allow it; Mr. Cato paid me, and I never eat, drank, or stopped, till I had paid the money to Mr. Clarke, in Mr. Yerraway's counting-house.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-41

788. CHARLES ROBERTSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , three pounds of raw coffee, value 1s. 6d. the property of a certain person or persons, to the Jurors unknown .

ABIJAH PENNY sworn. - I am an Excise watchman, at Chester-quay ; I had charge of sixteen bags of coffee, on the 20th of October; I saw the prisoner cut one of the bags, and caught him putting some of it in his hat, and some in his pocket; I called Mr. Smith, an officer, to my assistance, and gave charge of the prisoner and the coffee; it was about one o'clock in the day; the prisoner worked on the quays.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner and the coffee; there is about three pounds of it.

Prisoner's defence. I throw myself on your Lordship's mercy.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Fourteen days in Newgate , and publicly whipped on Chester-quay .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-42

789. JOSEPH BLIGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , a saddle, value 2l. 12s. 6d. the property of Peter Laurie .

PETER LAURIE sworn. - I am a saddler , No. 283, Oxford-street ; the prisoner came, on the 22d of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, and said he lived with Colonel Bromley at Sabbaniere's Hotel, Leicester-field; that his master had bought a horse at Tatterfall's; I know the Colonel, and that the prisoner had lived with him in the summer, but had left him, as he confessed; he said he wanted to try the horse, and wished to borrow a saddle, which was to be returned that evening; and that if the horse was approved of, I was to make a new one; about half an hour after I lent it to him, James Balderson came with the same saddle; the name was on the stirrups, but the bill, which was on the saddle, was torn off; I saw it was the same I had lent the prisoner, for Colonel Bromley ; I went with Balderston, to Shepherd's-market, and secured the boy; he begged forgiveness, and said he had never done such a thing before; we took him to Marlborough-street.

THOMAS JOHNSON sworn. - I am a sadler, No. 5, Downe-street, Piccadily, about a mile from Mr. Lauine's: On th 22d of September, between four and five, the prisoner came and offered a saddle to me, at Mr. Pollock's, a sadler, for sale; I asked him what he wanted for it; he said 2l. taking up the saddle, I saw the bill of the maker's name torn across, but I saw it on the irons; I knew him, and asked the prisoner whose saddle it was? he said, Colonel Bromley 's, who had given it to him; I asked him to leave the saddle, as Mr. Pollock was not in the way; he said no, he was going out of town that evening; then I took the saddle to James Balderson , who I said was a friend of mine; I went, and said I did not like the appearance of it; and gave it to him to take of Laurie's; I told the prisoner I had left the saddle with a friend of mine, to try it on his horse; the prisoner said he was going a little further, and would call as he came back; then Balderson and Laurie came to me at he public house, and the prisoner came in and was secured.

JAMES BALDERSON sworn. - I am a sadler; Johnson brought me the saddle, on the 22d, for sale, and said it belonged to Colonel Brombley 's groom.

Court. (To Johnson). Q. I understood you that you took it to Balderson to take to Laurie, to enquire whether it was his? - A, I could not go myself to Laurie, and told Balkerson I had suspicion of it; before I left, I said the boy offered it for sale.

Balderson. He brought the saddle, and asked me if I wished to purchase it, for it was a very good one, but that he was not authorized to buy it; I examined it; the tearing of the bill was mentioned; he said the prisoner asked 2l. for it, but I might have it for five and twenty shillings, or thereabouts; I said I did not like the appearance of it, and before I bought it, I wished to see Mr. Laurie about it, and told him to detain the prisoner the while; I went and brought Mr. Laurie to the house, where the prisoner came, and was taken. (The saddle produced and identified).

Prisoner's defence. I went to Mr. Laurie to buy a second hand saddle; he said he had not one, but would lend me one till I got one; I said, if my master wanted a new one I would come again; I took the saddle and went to Piccadilly, to Mr. Pollock, and asked him to buy it; he said he would give me twenty-five shillings; I said I would take twenty-six shillings; he took the saddle, and took it to three different shops, to try to sell it; he came back and said a man was gone to try it, and then they took me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-43

790. JOHN COWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , a pocketbook, value 1s. the property of John Tilden .

(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN TILDEN sworn. - On the 18th of August last, about one o'clock, I was in Cheapside , with my wife and her sister, who were walking behind me; I found something gone from my pocket; Mrs. Tilden said, immediately,

"Your pocketbook;" I turned round, and saw a man running from me, across the street; I pursued him down Lawrence-lane, and followed him into King-street, where he took to the right hand of a stand of coaches; I got very near him, and he ran between two hackney coaches, rather under the poll of one; two ticket-porters caught him, and he was taken to Guildhall; my pocket-book was picked up and given to Mrs. Tilden; the person taken is the prisoner; I am quite sure that the prisoner is the person taken by them, and the person I saw first running.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You had never seen the person of the man before he ran from you? - A. No; I had not seen him.

Q. The street was very full of people; was it not? - A. As full as in general; he was the man that I saw running; there were others running about twenty yards from him, after him; he run down Lawrence-lane and Trump-street.

Q. Did you not lose sight of him turning the corners? - A. I was within fifteen or twenty yards from him.

Q. Were there not other people running? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there none who made the turning before you and the prisoner? - A. I will not swear there was not; I kept crying stop thief.

JANE TILDEN sworn. - On the 18th of August I was walking with my sister, in Cheapside; Mr. Tilden was before me two or three yards; a man passed between me and a shop window, rather roughly, which induced me to look up; he put his arm a-kimbo, and I looked at his face; I know him again; the prisoner is the man; I saw two men join him; he was the middle of the three; he put his hand in my husband's coat-pocket, which was open; I left my sister's arm, and took hold of his coat with one hand, and with the other touched Mr. Tilden's shoulder, and said, Mr. Tilden, your pocket or pocket-book, I don't know which; the prisoner slew from my husband, and run away, and Mr. Tilden pursued him; I stepped into a shop, and Mr. Tilden's pocket-book was brought to me by a gentleman; I saw the prisoner again before the sitting Alderman, and knew him again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were much alarmed? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing in his hand? - A. No.

Q. You never saw him before that day? - Q. No.

Q. Being alarmed, do you mean to swear to the person of the man? - A. I do, because his face made such an impression on me, when he passed me.

Q. Are you sure he was the person who had his hand in the pocket? - A. I am sure he is.

Q. Notwithstanding your alarm? - A. Yes; because I particularly observed him.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you sure the man who passed you was the man who put his hand in your husband's pocket? - A. I am positive.

JOHN ADLEBACK sworn. - I am clerk to the house of Ripley, in the city: On the 18th of August, I was in King-street, and heard the cry of stop thief, and saw a person coming between the coaches, who threw a pocket-book away; the person who run through the coaches was stopped, and I believe it to be the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The person Mr. Tilden pursued was stopped? - A. Yes.

Q. Whether the prisoner you cannot swear? - A. No. (The book produced and identified).

Prisoner's defence. I had been to Newgate-market, and just by King-street there was a cry of stop thief; I dropped my piece of meat, which I had in my hand, by the pushing of the people, and away I run as fast as any of them; upon which they took me, and said I was the thief.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who first gave him a good character; but upon the cross-examination of Mr. Gurney, three acknowledged he had been transported. GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-44

791. JOHN KENNEDY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Sharpe , about the hour of seven, on the 4th of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously

stealing therein, twelve pair of stockings, value 2l. 11s. the property of the said William .

It appearing that the offence was not compleated, in as much as the prisoner had not positively removed the property, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-45

792. EDWARD WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , four pair of stockings, value 15s. the property of Thomas Reeves , privately in his shop .

THOMAS REEVES sworn. - I am a hosier on Ludgate-hill : On the 17th of September, I was in the shop a little after three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in, and asked me what he could have a pair of black stockings for, I told him, for two shillings; as I turned round to look for a parcel, he went out of the shop, saying, very well, I will call again; I looked on the counter, and missed a parcel of stockings; I followed him, and overtook him just outside of the door, and found the parcel I missed, concealed under his arm, by a bag thrown over it; I secured him, sent for an officer, and gave charge of him.

JOHN KIMBER sworn. - I am a constable, and produce a parcel containing four pair of stockings, which were given me by Mr. Reeves. (The stockings were produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. Being in liquor, I laid the bag down on the counter, and by mistake took up the parcel; I have had several blows on my head, which, if I drink a little, makes me insensible of what I do.

Reeves. He did not appear to be in liquor.

GUILTY, Death , aged 77.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury and prosecutor, on account of his age .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-46

793. CHARLES WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , half a pound weight of powdered julap, value 39s. 6d. eight ounces of aloes, value 3s. one pound of cantharides, value 8s. one pound of red precipate, value 8s. eight ounces of mercurial ointment, value 2s. two syringes, value 2s. six pounds of antimony, value 3s. eight ounces of verdigrease, value 2s. four pounds of pepper, value 4s. four glass bottles, value 1s. and a wooden box, value 3s. the property of William Bulle .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of George Bainbridge , John Ainstie , George Ainstie , John Bainbridge , and Thomas Brown .

WILLIAM RADFORD sworn. - I am servant to Brown and Jackson, No. 4, Upper Thames-street, chemists and druggists; I packed up the box containing the articles, last Saturday fennight, and sent them to No. 52, Bread-street, directed P. H. L. C. No. 15, about half past seven.

JAMES HAWES sworn. - I am carter to Mr. Bulle, who is a carman , in Smithfield; last Wednesday, I was ordered to go to Mr. Bainbridge's, in Bread-street, to take a load to Porter's-Quay ; I staid under the gateway some time, and a little after six o'clock in the evening, I heard something rustling, nobody could pass, without getting over or under the cart; I heard a man jump off the cart, and, by the light of the lamp, I saw something white; I said, my friend, whoever you are, that belongs to me, you have robbed the cart; I called out, stop thief, and the box was thrown down from a man's back, who was out of the gateway; I saw a man run, but did not see his face.

MATTHIAS LUCAS sworn. - I am a Customhouse lighterman; on Wednesday, I was at Porter's-quay, and between six and seven o'clock, I went to the top of the gateway, where there were a number of carts, with goods, addressed to my care; I saw and heard something white fall, but could not distinguish what it was, I thought it was a box or case, a man ran by me, who was the prisoner; I cried out, that fellow has stolen something, and threw it down the gateway; I pursued him instantly, crying, stop thief; he run as fast as he could among the horses and carts, but I never lost sight of him; he was stopped at the bottom of Water-lane, by a man who he broke away from, but left the skirt of his coat in the man's hand, and ran away up Water-lane, the street pavement was up, where the paviours were at work with a light, and the prisoner ran into a hole and fell down, upon which he was taken, and the skirt of his coat was wanting.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me chuck the box down? - A. It was dark, I did not see it. (The box was produced and identified.)

WILLIAM BULLE sworn. - I am a carman, and the property taken out of my cart I am responsible for.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Billingsgate, running along, they called out, stop thief, when I came to a place where they were digging, I fell down, and a man said, you are the thief; I am as innocent of it as you are; my coat slap was not torn off till I was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-47

794. JOSEPH VICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , seven printed books, value 5l. the property of the Rev. William Vincent , doctor of divinity, and dean of the collegiate church of St. Peter, Westminster .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of the Rev. William Vincent .(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

The Rev. THOMAS-WATSON WARD sworn. - I know Mr. Mansell, a cheesemonger, in Charles-

street, Westminster: In September last, I was in his shop, and saw several books on the counter, amongst them a Bible; I examined it, and found a very curious edition, not according to the one we use in the church; it was printed according to Mr. Reeves's from of the Bible; I did not look much at it, as I had not time to examine it; I saw also, Apion, a Greek book, the covers were all off; it was perfect, and a very good edition; there was a plate also, but rather damaged; Testaments in various languages, one in the Malay language, with a Dutch preface, which, not understanding the language I rejected, there was a Thucidides, in fragments, there were seven altogether, and the Malay Testament, which had Dr. Busby's name in it; Mr. Mansell gave them to me, but a suspicion arose in my mind, and I sent them to Mr. Ginger's to be bound, he serves Westminster school, Welch was his servant, and was sometimes employed by the master of the school to put the library to rights; Dr. Vincent was then master, but is now dean; the books were then in his possession, as master; after the books were sent to be bound, on Saturday, we went again to Masell's, and found another book, Gage's Survey of the West-Indies, which had marks on it, that Welch immediately swore to.

JOSEPH WELCH sworn. - I was employed by Dr. Vincent to take a catalogue of the books in the Museum, Westminster School , and having seen the books, I knew them to be part of that library; On Thursday, the 16th of September, about eight o'clock, six books were sent to Mr. Ginger's, with whom I live, a bookseller, in College-street, Westminster, from the Rev. Mr. Ward, to be rebound; I took particular notice of the Plato, but did not look further into the books till Saturday morning, when I took up the Testament, and seeing it was the gift of Dr. Busby, I recollected it belonged to the library when I took the catalogue; I examined the others, and found they all belonged to the library, upon which I went to the Rev. Mr. Ward, and acquainted him with my suspicions; we went to Mr. Mansell's, and saw a book with a private mark, which was Gale's Survey of the West Indies, and several fragments of Greek, Latin, Arabic, and other valuable books; the books are here, (the books produced and identified); I know the prisoner, his wife cleans the school out, and he assists at times, by which means he had access to this room.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Is it not the school-room? - A. No.

Q. Who inhabits the house in which the books are kept? - A. There is no inhabitant.

WILLIAM MANSELL sworn. - I am a cheesemonger, King-street, Westminster, and know the prisoner; In the beginning of September, he came to my shop, and bought some trifling articles; when he had paid for them, he said he was clearing out an old library, and that he should have a parcel of waste paper to sell, and said he had been informed we purchased such things; next morning he brought as parcel of paper in books, which I bought; he came again about the 9th or 10th of September, with another parcel of paper and books in a green baize cloth, which were afterwards examined by Mr. Welch and Mr. Ward; I bought them, and paid him; this is Gage's Survey, which he brought amongst the rest.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You buy a great deal of waste paper? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say you are certain this is part of the parcel he brought? - A. Yes; those six books I swear to.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am a constable, and have had the books ever since.

Prisoner's defence. Some time in September I was sweeping the School, and found them laying about; I inadvertently took them, as I could not read, and thought they were waste paper; I am sorry I took them away, without the knowledge of any person.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-48

795. DAVID PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a gun, value 20s. the property of John Pedder .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gleed).

JOHN PEDDER sworn. - I live at Hounslow , next door to the prisoner: On the 25th of August I missed my gun from over a wash-house adjoining a necessary belonging to the prisoner, where I laid it up about the middle of April; the slint was waxed in, because the screw would not sit; there is also a silver sight to the barrel; I had suspicion of the prisoner, and went and asked him for it; he said he knew nothing of it: On the 28th I was standing at the door, talking about losing the gun, when Mary Lyse said, I know who took your gun, it was my master, at the time I lived with him; I went to the prisoner on the 29th, and asked him for the gun; he said he had not got it; I said the servant had seen him take it, and if he did not give it me, I would fetch a warrant; he began abusing me, and said, if you had not made a piece of work about your gun, I would have told you where it was, but now I never will; I got a warrant, but have never seen the gun.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a baker? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner keeps an inn, at Hounslow? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you happen to be a tenant of his? - A. Yes.

Q. His privy joins your's? - A. Yes, and there is a thoroughfare through our yards; I know John West , a horse-keeper, but never intersered to settle any dispute between him and the prisoner; I lent him some money, which he paid me again.

Q. The woman, Mary Lyse, passed by accident? - A. Yes, when my wife and I were talking about the gun, and she spoke of it.

Q. Was there any other person in conversation with you? - A. There was Mr. Landen, a shoemaker, next door, who is not here.

Q. Had not the woman been dismissed the prisoner's service near three months before that time? - A. It might be so.

Q. When had you last seen your gun? - A. I cleaned it, and laid it up in April; on the 25th of August I missed it; I have had no other of the same description since.

Q. You applied to Dr. Glasse for a warrant? - A. Yes; I applied to the Bench at Brentford.

Q. After you had been there, and was refused a warrant, did not the prisoner give you notice to quit your premises? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not tell him, if he did not withdraw the notice, you would take him up and prosecute him for stealing the gun? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hughes? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not say to him, that you would be revenged for it? - A. No, never.

Court. Q. Had you any quarrel with your landlord? - A. Never.

MARY LYSE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. Did you live as servant with the prisoner in June last? - A. Yes.

Q. State what you know of this transaction? - A. I saw him take Mr. Pedder's gun about five weeks a before I left his house, on the 28th of June; it was about seven or eight in the morning, when I was washing my pots, and putting them up to dry; I saw him take the gun through a hole in the tiling of Mr. Pedder's kitchen; he carried it under his coat, and I said, ah, master, what are you there? he said, hold your tongue, in a very crabbed way, to me; he carried the gun into the room called the double-bedded room, and I saw it and had it several times in my hand; there was an iron plate put on one side where it was split a little, and there was a waxed string round the flint, and some silver very near the flint; I had it in my hand when I was cleaning the room, and I saw it clearly when my master took it, and observed those marks on it then when he was concealing it under his coat.

Court. Q. When did you first mention the circumstance? - A. I was coming by Mr. Pedder's, and heard him say he had lost his gun; then I said I knew about it; he and his wife were the first I mentioned it to, as they stood at their own door.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you and Mr. Pedder acquainted much? - A. No; I have been there on errands for my master about three or four times.

Q. Where did you live at the time you told him? - A. I lodged down the town, and was going up the town on an errand for myself, and crossed over the way, because it was the cleanest walking.

Q. This was in August? - A. Yes, it was very wet.

Q. Do you mean to say it was very wet on the 25th of August? - A. Yes, it was quite wet.

Q. Who was with Mr. Pedder? - A. His wife, and one of the horse-keepers.

Q. That was John West? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Lander? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him in company with Mr. Pedder? - A. No.

Q. You never did? - A. No, I did not.

Q. How long were you in the prisoner's service? - A. Nineteen weeks.

Q. The stealing of the gun was a very dishonest thing, you knew? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not go and tell the baker of it? - A. No; I thought he had given him leave to take it, because he was often with Mr. Pedder, and I believe he asked him to lend it.

Q. Have you never said he took off two or three tiles, for the purpose of taking the gun out? - A. No; I will take my oath of it.

Q. Do you know Mr. Evans? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear you never said your master took some tiles off, for the purpose of taking the gun? - A. I never did.

Q. What were you dismissed from the prisoner's service for? - A. For his ill behaviour to me.

Q. He charged you with stealing something, I believe? - A. He charged me with stealing a bonnet; my mistress said, the cover of a muslin bonnet was her's, though it was given to me by a girl he cohabited with in the house; I was not turned away, but would not stay; there was not a word mentioned about the bonnet till I came down stairs and received my wages.

Q. You were never charged with stealing any thing else? - A. No.

Q. Were there any soldiers billetted on your master? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not accuse you of stealing the liquor, to regale the soldiers? - A. No; I never wronged him of half a pint of beer.

Q. How often have you seen the prisoner between that time and this? - A. Two or three times.

Q. Were you at Brentford before the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you say to Dr. Glasse, that it was between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, and not six or seven, that he stole the gun? - A. No, I said between seven and eight.

Court. Q. You said you thought Pedder had given him leave to take it? - A. I thought so.

Q. Were you not surprised when he told you to hold your tongue? - A. It did not strike me at all.

Q. Did it not surprise you that he put it under his coat for concealment, if he had liberty to take it; did it not strike you as very odd? - A. Yes, to be sure it did; I thought he had stole it then.

Q. Why did you not mention it? - A. It did not make any difference to me at all.

Q. You overheard their conversation as you accidentally passed? - A. Yes.

Q. How long were you at the door? - A. Not above a quarter of an hour.

Q. You are sure you saw nobody else but Pedder, his wife, and the horse-keeper? - A. Yes.

Q. If Lander had been there, you must have seen him? - A. Yes; he might be in the passage, and I not see him.

Q. You did not see a tile moved? - A. There was tiling off the place.

JOHN PULLIN sworn. - I live with Mr. Wilson, and borrowed the gun of Mr. Pedder about the middle of April to shoot some sparrows off my master's dunghill; the cock of it was broke, and he tied a waxed string round it, that I should fire it off; I don't know where it was kept.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but have witnesses.

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know Mary Lyse? - A. Yes; I heard her say at one time as she stood washing the pots, that it was between the hours of eleven and twelve that she saw her master get upon the seat of the necessary, and put his hand up through the lathing and plastering, and pull the gun out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. When was this? - A. In July.

Q. Did you inform Mr. Pedder of it? - A. No, I had no business with it.

Q. Was that the first time you heard it rumoured he had lost the gun? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did you mention this conversation to Mr. Price? - A. No.

Q. Did you not think it right you should? - A. I did not think it worth while to leave my business to do it, and I thought it was not true.

EDWARD LEPPARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know that woman? - A. Yes; she said she knew nothing about it; before they went to the Justice's, she asked me if I had heard about it, for that Mr. Pedder had been asking her about the gun, and she said she knew nothing about it.

Q. When was this? - A. In July, I believe, since she left Mr. Price.

ELIZABETH IRWIN sworn. - I know Lyse; she had been accused of robbing her master, by drawing ale instead of beer, and giving the soldiers things, and for bad conduct; I was on a visit there for a week, and saw her draw ale instead of beer; she was to have been turned out if she had not been ill; she knew it, and packed her things up.

ISAAC CLAYTON sworn. - I am headborough and beadle, and know Lyse; I don't think she is to be believed on her oath; she was in our poorhouse. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18021027-49

796. JOSEPH PICTON was indicted for feloniously stealing a quarter of lamb, value 7s. a linen cloth, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Williams .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a farmer at Theobald's park, in the parish of Enfield: last Thursday was a week, in the evening, I was robbed of a quarter of lamb and a linen cloth; my cart was standing at the door of the Fallow Buck, at Clay-Hill, Enfield ; I met with a friend, who asked me to drink; my friend walked into the house, and I staid at the door; the prisoner came rushing out of the house by me and the mistress, who were standing together, and made towards the cart; he seemed to be very much in liquor; he stood making water, apparently, some considerable time; the mistress and I went into the house to see after my friend, by which time the prisoner had returned into the house; I walked towards the door back again, where I met John Liberty , one of the witnesses, with something in a white cloth; he said do you own this; I said it looks like my quarter of lamb wrapped up in my cloth; it was nearly dark, but I took it, and went to see if mine was gone; I looked in the basket, which I found empty; I examined the cloth, and knew it to be mine, and the lamb too; we laid a parcel in the same place where the prisoner had put the lamb, which was over some pails on some brambles in an orchard, thirty yards from the cart; about half an hour after he went out again; Mrs. Frencham, the mistress, and I followed him to the same place; as he did not know we had got the lamb, and had put a parcel in its room, he put his hand over the pails, but seeing us he returned back, and we accused him with taking the lamb; he went into the house again, and we followed him; he said he did not take it, or know any thing of it; a constable was sent for, and took him to the watch-house; next morning the prisoner called me on one side, and wanted me to make it up; I told him it was out of my power; he was taken to Lambeth-street Office, and committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He was very drunk? - A. Yes, he seemed so.

Q. You say he went and put his arm over the rail? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he not so drunk he could hardly put his hand over? - A. Yes.

Q. You have got your lamb and cloth again? - A. Yes.

Q. And you have had a journey to London to prosecute him? - A. Yes, several; this is the fifth day.

JOHN LIBERTY sworn . - I am servant to the New River Company; going home from work, between six and seven, by the Fallow Buck, Clay-Hill, I met a man blundering along, who is the prisoner, and who seemed very tipsy; he had a cloth under his arm, with something in it; he was trying to wrap it round it; I did not know what; it drew my attention, and I stopped; in about half a minute I saw him lay it over the pails; as I knew Mr. Williams's cart, which I saw there, I watched the prisoner into the public-house, and looking through the window, I saw him sit himself down, and went to see what he had put over the pails; finding it to be meat, with the cloth thrown carelessly over it, I took it into the house; Mr. Williams was in the passage, and I shewed him the lamb; we agreed to wrap up something in its room, and I went and placed it where I took the lamb from, but left others to watch it; a constable was sent for.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This man was very drunk? - A. Yes; I expected him to fall.

Q. After he put his arm over the pails, he went back into the house where the prosecutor was, and began drinking again? - A. Yes.

Q. How far is this from town? - A. Fourteen miles; this is the fifth day we have been here.

Q. And Williams has his lamb and cloth? - A. Yes. - (The cloth produced and identified.)

Prisoner. I leave my case to my counsel.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-50

797. MICHAEL LAHEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , a great coat, value 40s. the property of Richard Richards , in the dwelling-house of Mary Littlewood .

RICHARD RICHARDS sworn. - Mrs. Mary Littlewood is a widow, and keeps a house in the parish of Hendon ; I am her mower , and left my great coat in the tool-house, which does not adjoin the dwelling-house; on Thursday, about eleven o'clock, I went away, and the next day I missed my coat, and have never seen it since.

MARY WESTON sworn. - I know Mrs. Littlewood, and am servant to her, and I know Richard Richards , who is a labouring man; his great coat was left in the tool-house on Thursday; I saw it, and took it out of that house into the kitchen, and hung it up, about half past six in the evening; the kitchen is part of the house; the prisoner was at work at our house, and was discharged that night; about a quarter before seven he made a great enquiry for this coat, swearing and saying it was his; I brought it to the door, and threw it down, saying it was Richards's coat, and would swear to it; he said it was his, and demanded it of me; he took it up, went away with it, and nobody has seen it since; I did not hear any thing of the prisoner till he was brought to Bow-street about a fortnight after, when I was sent for.

KEZIAH AMOSS sworn. - I was employed to work in the family of Mrs. Littlewood, and know the coat to be the prosecutor's; I saw it in the tool-house on the 9th of September, but did not see see it in the kitchen; I gave information where the prisoner was, and he was taken up on Monday the 20th; he owned he took it at Bow-street.

Richard Richards . I am a mower, the prisoner was a haymaker; I have known him about a fortnight in the fields.

Q. (To Mary Weston.) Was there more than one great coat? - A. No; the prisoner had none.

Richards. I have heard the prisoner say it was a noble great coat, and told me to take care of it.

Prisoner's defence. I don't know any more of it than the child unborn. GUILTY, aged 60.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-51

798. ANN WINTER and ANN FISHER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a Bank-note, value 5l. the property of John Emey .

JOHN EMEY sworn. - I am a Chelsea pensioner : On the 21st of October, I was at Chelsea, and met with Ann Winter, who took me to her lodgings, No. 51, Old Pye-street, Westminster ; it was between eight and nine o'clock; I had not known her before; Ann Fisher joined us in about half an hour, and said she must go and take a walk in the street, for she had not a farthing to get her breakfast next morning; I desired her not to go, for I would give her sixpence to buy a breakfast, and let her sleep in the bed I had hired with Ann Winter ; I had a 2l. note and a 5l. note; they saw them both, for I pulled them out, and then folded them up, and put them in my breeches pocket; we then all went to bed; in the night Ann Winter got up; I missed her, but she came up stairs again while it was dark; she got up again, between five and six, when it was light, and went away; I saw no more of her; Fisher staid with me; I examined my pocket, and there was only one note left; I had put my breeches under my head; I said I had lost my note; Fisher said she had not got it; I went then to the constable, and we went together in pursuit, and found them both, with another girl, in a hackney coach, about nine o'clock; they had got two new bonnets and several other articles; then the constable opened the door, and they began to

beg and pray; Ann Winter delivered the amount of 5l. in money and goods, all but 4s. 8d. saying they never were guilty of the like before, and never would any more; they said the bonnets cost a guinea.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes.

JOHN JONES sworn. - I am a constable: On the 2d of October, about eight o'clock, the prosecutor said he had been robbed; I went with him; the girls were gone out; we went after them, and found them in a coach, in Abingdon-street; I knew the girls, and opened the coach door; I said you have been doing very wrong in robbing this man; they began to cry, and said if you will let us go, we will give all the property; there was another girl, but she had nothing to do with it; on searching them we found about 2l. 2s. in money; I think there were two bonnets that cost a guinea, which they said they bought in Cranbourn-alley, and some Belcher's handkerchiefs, one cost 8s. and the other 4s. 6d. a pair of stockings, three ribbons, a pair of shoes, a piece of stannel for a petticoat; all of which we took; they said the people would return the money; I went with them in the coach to Cranbourn-alley to the shop; Fisher went with me, and the people took the things all back at the price the girls mentioned, in all that was 5l. but 4s. 8d. which they said they had spent.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH sworn. - As I was standing in the street, I saw one girl put her head out of the window, and another look back, and one bid the coachman drive on fast; I followed it, and stopped, thinking something was wrong, as I knew Winter before; in Abingdon-street she said drive on faster, coachman, and I will give you a guinea for your fare; they were stopped and taken; I received 2l. 2s. 6d. in notes and cash; from Winter a seven-shilling piece and silver, and from Fisher half-a-guinea and a one-pound note; the money returned for the things was 2l. 13s. making 5l. within 4s. 8d.

Winter's defence. In the morning when I got up, I saw a piece of paper on the floor; I did not know what it was till I opened it, and being to distress, I changed it.

Fisher's defence. When we met this man at Chelsea, he went home with Winter; I wanted to go out, but he would not let me, but gave me nothing in the morning; Winter found a note, and being distressed we changed it, and bought some articles, which we had when we were took. Winter GUILTY , aged 30.

Fisher GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-52

799. JOHN M'DONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , 27lb. of soap, value 1l. 1s. the property of Edward Frisby Howis , Edward Howis , and Stephen Howis .

EDWARD HOWIS sworn. - The prisoner was porter to me and my partners, Edward Frisby Howis and Stephen Howis , No. 220, in Piccadilly .

JOHN HOBBS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police Office, Queen's-square; On the 8th of October I met the prisoner in Darkhouse-street, Westminster, between nine and ten at night, with a bag on his back; my brother officers stopped him; I laid hold of the bag, and said, what have you got here? he seemed very frightened, and said"nothing;" I said you have soap here, and asked him where he was going with it, and whether he did not live in York-street; he said he did; I thought I knew him, but did not; I asked him how he came by the soap; he was very unwilling to tell; upon which I said he must go to the watchhouse to account for it; going along I asked him where he worked; he said in the City; I said you have robbed your master of this; at first he said no, he had not; he said afterwards he had taken it a bit at a time as he was carrying it to the customers, and begged hard not to be taken to the watch-house, for he had a wife and family; he said he lived in the gallery over St. James's Market; in the morning he was taken to the Magistrate, and I was sent to search his room, and bring down his wife; I searched his room, but found nothing of the fort.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you promise that it would be better for him, or threaten him? - A. No; I neither did so, or heard my brother officers do so.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH sworn. - I am a constable; I saw the prisoner in the watch-house; when the officers were gone, he wished me to let him out; I said I could not; he said he was a soldier in the Guards, and if he was detained all night it would be his ruin, for he was very wrongfully charged; no promise was made him; I asked him how he came by the soap he was charged with; he said he had bought it at two different times at a gentleman's house in Seymour-street, as the family was going to France; I asked what he gave a pound for it, he said sixpence; I asked how many pounds there were, he said he believed twenty-two, but was not sure; that his wife washed for soldiers in the regiment.

JOHN CRIDLAND sworn. - I am an officer, and was with Hobbs, who I saw lay hold of the bag; the prisoner said he worked at a soap-maker's; we took him to the watch-house; he wanted to get away, but was secured; I got this piece of soap from Bridget White . - (Produces a square of soap.)

Q. (To Mr. Howis.) Can you swear to the soap? - A. I cannot swear it is mine, I believe it is, we have such soap; when he was off duty he used to work at our house at so much per hour; we

have been moving from Jermyn-street to Piccadilly, and we had not power to secure the things properly, which left the door of temptation open.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-53

800. ANN FOULKES was indicted for feloloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , three tea-spoons, value 8s. the property of David Lewellyn .

SARAH LEWELLYN sworn. - My husband, David Lewellyn, and I live in Carpenter-street, Westminster ; about the middle of July I missed three tea-spoons, which had been in use; the prisoner has chaired for me ever since March; I saw the spoons again on the 21st of September, at Queen's-square Office.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not employ me to pledge things? - A. I once did when I had a large bill to make up, which was a counterpane and a gown, before I missed the spoons, that was the only time; I never employed her, or knew she had pledged spoons.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH sworn. - On the 18th of September the prisoner was brought to the watch-house on suspicion of stealing the tea-spoons; she was detained till Monday, and taken before the Magistrate, where she confessed she had pledged the spoons; the Magistrate gave a summons to Mr. Morritt, where she said she had pawned them; I went to the pawnbroker's with a duplicate for a tea-spoon and a shift, and found the tea-spoon; next morning the prisoner gave me two spoons herself. - (Produces the duplicate and tea-spoon.)

- MORRITT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; this is my duplicate; a tea-spoon was pledged with me in the name of Foulkes on the 12th of May; the young man who took it in has left me, and I cannot say who pledged it.

THOMAS SCOTT sworn. - I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner, at No. 2, Webb-street, on the 18th of September, at night, upon suspicion of stealing a pair of ear-rings, and the spoons; she said, the ear-rings were given her, and as to the spoons, she knew nothing of them; I took her to the watch-house, where I left her. (The spoons were produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutrix lent me spoons at different times, and I pledged many things for her at different times, but I was not to pledge them in her name, least her husband should find it out; she used to get tipsey, and make me so, that I did not know what I did.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-54

801. JOHN HEUSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , fourteen pounds of bacon, value 10s. the property of James Franklin .

JAMES FRANKLIN sworn. - I am a cheesemonger , in Brick-lane, Spital fields : On the 29th of September, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was behind the counter serving some customers, and I heard a noise behind some tubs of butter on the other side of the shop, opposite the door; I looked at the place where the bacon did lay, and missed it, it weighed about fourteen pounds; the people standing before me, prevented my seeing who took it; I ran down the next street, and took the prisoner with it under his arm; he asked me what I was going to do with him, I said, I would let him know presently, and I took him to my shop till an officer came. (The bacon was produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going on an errand to the Minories, and saw a man with this bacon, he said, he would give me two-pence to carry it; I was going along with it, and that man came out, and said, where are you going with that, and laid hold of me; I asked him what he was going to do with me, and he took me into the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-55

802. SARAH HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , a frock, value 2s. at cap, value 1s. a shirt, value 3d. and a pair of shoes, value 6d. the property of Zachariah Wealthdale .

SARAH WEALTHDALE sworn. - I live at North-green, Worship-street: On the 24th of September, about two o'clock, I was going for some butter, into Bishopsgate-street, at Norton-Falgate; I was sitting on the step of a door, and had this child in my arms; the prisoner came up to me, and asked me when the Cheshunt stage went off; I said, the best place to enquire was at the inn; she said, she did not know where the inn was; I said, I would shew her; she said, she never was in London before, and I shewed her the Bull-inn, Bishopsgate-street, when she found the stage was to go off at half past three; she wanted to come to my house, I said, no, she could not, for I was going up to Shoreditch-church; she said, she would go with me, and would have a pint of beer facing Shoreditch-church , and she seemed very fond of the child; we went, and set outside of the door, and had a pint of beer; she sat by me, and took the child in her arms; she said, she had a cousin, who lived two doors round the corner, and she would take him with her, but would not be gone five minutes; I desired her not to be gone long, and I would let her take him; I saw her turn the corner, but she

went further; I got up to look after her, in about ten minutes, and could not find her, when I saw her go down the first turning in Kingsland-road; I went into the house with the pot, and, on my return, missed her quite; I made an alarm after my child, which I lost for about an hour; Mr. Warner found it with the prisoner by Kingsland.

WILLIAM WARNER sworn. - I live at No. 10 Hare-walk, Kingstand-road: In consequence of seeing Mrs. Wealthdale, who had lost her child, I went in pursuit of it; she said the prisoner had gone up a court in Kingsland-road with her child; I advised her to get a constable to search the house; we got one, and searched three or four houses; I asked for a description of the prisoner and child; I said, if I saw them, I would bring her back; opposite Ironmongers's alms-houses, I met two young women, and described the prisoner to them; they had seen her, and I went on, and nearly opposite Kingsland Chapel, I overtook the prisoner, who was sitting down by the road side; she rose up; I went to her, and said, my dear, how far are you going with that child; she hesitated, and said, not much further; I asked her if the child was her own; she said, no, she had it from a woman in Shoreditch; I told her she had acted wrong in taking it there; she said she was sorry if she had caused the woman any uneasiness, but she was entirely mistaken; that she went to see her cousin, who lived in a court in Kingsland-road; that her cousin took her into the brick-field, in Kingsland-road, and upon coming out again across the bank, she lost her way; I persuaded her, if that was true, to come back, and I would endeavour to find the mother, and for her to make some apology for keeping the child; she took off a handkerchief of her own, which she had put round the child's neck, and gave me the child and came back with me along the road; when we got towards Shoreditch, I met the mother and the constable, and I delivered them up; she had got near a mile and a half from Shoreditch church; the handkerchief was put in a common way round the child, apparently to keep it from catching cold.

RICHARD LILLYWHITE sworn. - I am an officer, and went in search of the child, the prisoner was given into my custody, by Mr. Warner, and she told me the same she had done him; she was taken to my house, and asked me if I would send for her sister, I said, I would; she said, she was with her sister that morning, and the sister asked her if her child was dead; she said, yes; that her sister said she wanted a child, and if she could procure her one, it would be the making of her; the prisoner then said, how could the think of sending her out to steal a child; her sister said, you are a country girl, and a stranger in town, you can do it better than I can; in the evening, I took her before the Magistrate, and she told him the same, but afterwards she denied it.

Prisoner's defence. I did not intend to hurt the child, I meant to take it down into the country as my own. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-56

803. MARY KELLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , a silver watch, value 3l. 3s. the property of George Hoffman , in the dwelling-house of William Houseleak .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-57

804. EDWARD JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , a pair of stockings, value 3s. the property of Samuel Burford .

SAMUEL BURFORD sworn. - I live at No. 99, Oxford-street , and am a hosier : On the 16th of October, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner take the stockings from the door, which were pinned to a line; he ran away with them, about the distance of three doors; I called stop thief, and he threw them in my face. (The stockings produced and identified).

Prisoner's defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court; it is the first time I was ever guilty of any thing of the sort. GUILTY , aged 32.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-58

805. MARY LITTLEFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a shawl, value 3s. the property of William Clarke .

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - I am a linen-draper , at Shoreditch : On Monday, between ten and eleven, the prisoner came into the shop, where there was another customer, I asked her what she wanted, she said she wanted some black stockings; I brought her a pair, she said she would not have them, but asked for white worsted, or cotton; I fetched some; she bought two pair, but did not pay for them; she had her gown thrown over her shoulders, and at that time I observed she had something she should not have, between her knees, from her mode of conducting herself; she said she wanted some dark pocket handkerchiefs; I shewed her some, and she bought one, but did not pay for it; she then asked for a yellow handkerchief, I told her to go to look at some which hung up; she would not go, but said they would not wash well; she then asked me for some calimanco, which was behind me; I stood side ways and pulled it down, keeping my eye on her; she did not like any of them, but there was one in the next pile she thought she should like; I pulled it down, and bringing it to the counter, I perceived her put

something into her pocket; I said, you think you like this colour? she said yes; I asked her how much she wanted, she said seven yards; I then took hold of her arm, and took her into a little room behind the shop; I asked her what she had put into her pocket; she pulled the shawl out, and said that was what she put in; that she had nothing else, and that I might search her; there were several shawls laying on the counter when she came in; I asked her if she had money; she said she had not a farthing to pay for the things; I then went and got an officer. (The shawl produced and identified).

Prisoner's defence. I was distressed, as I had just come out of the country, and did not know what to do; I had had no victuals for two days.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-59

806. JOHN BROWNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , halfa-guinea and two farthings , the property of Ann Gorman .

ANN GORMAN sworn. - I am a single woman , and live in Blue Anchor-yard, East-Smithfield; the last house I lodged in, was Browne's, the prisoner's, in Sun-yard , and had done so about three weeks; about three or four o'clock in the afternoon, I went up stairs, into the one pair of stairs room, where we lodged, for I cohabited with the prisoner; I had the key of his chest in my pocket; I am not sure whether I was not intoxicated; I was laying on the bed when he came up stairs and put his hand in my pocket, on my right hand side, I caught his hand taking the key out; the money was in my pocket, but I cannot say whether he took it or no; I know one of the farthings had a cross on one side, and a bit out of the other; I had had it about three days; I don't know whether it is the same; nor can I say whether he took it, because I was intoxicated; I caught hold of his hand; he said it was his own property, and he had taken nothing else from me; I cannot swear to the farthing; the prisoner was taken up next day; I did not come to myself till betwixt seven and eight o'clock.

Prisoner. Q. Did I ask you for any thing? - A. He said he was afraid somebody would take his key from me.

- TROTT sworn. - I am an officer: On the 28th of September I met the prisoner; he said he wanted to speak to me about a person who had been robbing him of fourteen or fifteen shillings; I asked him the nature of it; he said, he had got to bed to a girl the day before, who had picked his pocket, but he could not swear it; says he, that is not all, I want to have the first pull, for if I don't take her, I am afraid she will take me about halfa-guinea, she says I have robbed her of; I said it was a poor story; when I went to the office I found the prosecutrix waiting to make a complaint, which she did, and described the fathing, that it had a cross and a piece out of the edge; we went in search after him, and found him in Nightingale-lane, and took him to the office, searched him, and found three shillings and sixpence in silver, a quantity of halfpence, and four farthings; I asked the girl if she should know the farthing; she said yes. (Produces the farthing).

Q. (To Gorman.) Look at that farthing? - A. I am not positive to it; I had such a one, but whether it is the same I cannot say; when I took it I said it was remarkable; I had taken it three or four days before.

Prisoner's defence. I got four shillings from the girl, on Monday morning to keep for her; she said, keep that for me; I went out, and on my return, laid down in my own bed; she came up intoxicated; when I awoke she was gone; I opened the door, and saw her coming into Sun-yard; she said, I hear you have lost your money Browne; if I have lost it, I said, I suspect you of it; I put my hand in my pocket, and my money was gone; she said she knew nothing of it, only she had lost half-a-guinea; then she got a warrant against me, fearing I should go first. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-60

807. EDWARD COATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , a coat, value 5s. a waistcoat, value 7s. a pair of shoes, value 1s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. a pair of Trowsers, value 1s. a jacket, value 2s. a knife, value 6d. two razors in a case, value 2s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of Daniel M'Carthey .

(The Court being of opinion that there was no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18021027-61

808. EDWARD COATES was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a feather bed, value 20s. a rug, value 1s. a blanket, value 1s. a bonnet, value 4d. and a pair of stockings, value 6d. the property of William Egan .

MARY EGAN sworn. - My husband is William Egan , we live at No. 10, Britannia-row Lambeth : On the 22d of October, the prisoner came into the house; I had seen him about a week before, as I knew his father; he came in, and said he was hungry; I told him there was a bit of meat, that he was welcome to eat of it, and that I would bring in a quartern loaf; I went for it, and to look for my husband; when I came in he was gone, and the candle near out; my husband went in with me;

I left the child, about two years and a half old, at home, and I said, Mary, you must go to bed; she said, mamma, we have no bed; I missed a rug, a blanket, the bed, and an old pair of stockings; I was informed he was taken in Holborn; two days after I saw my things again at St. Giles's watch-house; I know them to be mine.

JEREMIAH LINCH sworn. - I am a watchman in St. Gile's parish; I met me prisoner with another man and a woman in Holborn, after nine at night, on the 20th of October; the other man was carrying the bed, but the prisoner had the barnet; I stopped them both, and asked the man where he was going with the bed; he said it was not his; that the prisoner was the owner of it; the prisoner said it belonged to him, and that he bought it abroad of a soldier's wife; I took them all to the watch house; I found the bonnet under the prisoner's arm, and the stockings in his pocket; the rug was about the bed, and the blanket in it.

JOHN DATTON sworn. - The prisoner said the bed lay at the Crooked Billet by the Tower for nine weeks, and that the landlord would prove it, and as soon as he came out he would fell it, and pay M'Carthy for the things. - (The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. When the woman was gone for the bread a shipmate of mine called me out to some more of my old shipmates; we stopped at a public-house till nine or ten o'clock, and as I was going home I met a man with a bed, who said he was very much fatigued, and asked me to carry it; I said I was in a hurry, and at the time the watchman came up, and took us all to the watchhouse; I have served with Lord Nelson and Sir John Borlase Warren in all their actions this was.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-62

809. JAMES WHITE was indicted for that he, on the 22d of October , feloniously did personate and falsely assume the name and character of one James Bannon , who had lately served our Lord the King as a seaman , on board the ship Pompee, who was supposed to be entitled to certain wages and pay for his services done on board the said ship, in order to receive the said wages and pay .

(The case was opened by Mr. Watson, and stated by Mr. Knowlys.)

SAMUEL INMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. A clerk in the Navy Office; I produce the muster-book of the ship Pompee for the months of July and August, 1801, in which James Bannon appears as one of the ship's crew, and is described as a landman.

WILLIAM HILLIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you purser of the Pompee? - A. I was; we were in the Mole of Gibraltar, and shared the St. Anthony prize by agreement with he other ships.

Q. Was the crew entitled to a share of the prize? - A. They were; the Pompee was disabled in the battle at Algziras, and Sir. James Saumarez left her in Gibraltar Mole when he failed after the Spanish squadron; the ship's company and officers of the Pompee had agreed with the others to share in all prized taken upon the shilling of Sir James Saumarez after the Spanish squadron, and from that circumstance we became entitled to share on the capture of the St. Anthony.

Q. Was that a mutual agreement? - A. Yes, between all the ships that the Pompee should have the benefit of any prize they took, whether present or not, as she was disabled. James Bannon was on board; he came on board the Pompee from the Cambridge, rated as a landman by the books, on the 16th of June preceding the capture, which was made the 12th or 13th of July; I know him; and am certain the prisoner is not the James Bannon that belonged to the Pompee.

Q. Would James Bannon on board the Pompee be entitled to his share of the prize? - A. He would.

Q. PAUL LE MESURIER , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. A merchant, in partnership with my brother; we are prize agents for the ship Pompee, for the prize-ship St. Anthony, a ship of war taken by the squadron under Sir James Saumarez : On the 10th of September the prisoner came to our accomptinghouse, and applied for prize-money; I went out of the accompting-house, and heard him say he was James Bannon belonging to the Pompee, and demanded his prize-money; he produced a certificate, signed by Mr. Eastman, a Lieutenant of the Pompee, starting that James Bannon was on board the Pompee on June or July; the prisoner said he was the person; I looked at the pay-list, and saw the signature did not correspond with the signature of Mr. Eastman, and said he could not be the man; he said he had it from Mr. Eastman; I said I would not believe it, but would take him before the Lord Mayor; he persisted he was the man, and demanded the prize-money.

JOHN LANDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you are clerk to Messrs. Le Mesurier? - A. I am.

Q. Have you the prize-account of the ship Pompee? - A. I have, and there appears 1l. 6s. 6d. due to James Bannon , a landman, on the first payment; there will be more. I saw the prisoner at our house the 10th of September, about two or three o'clock; I came into the office when he was applying for prize-money, and thought I had seen him applying before; he represented himself as James Bannon , belonging to the Pompee, and pro

duced this certificate. - (Producing it.) (Certificate read.)

"These are to certify, that the bearer hereof,"James-Bannon, served, on board the Pompee at"the capture of the St. Anthony, and that he is"entitled to any prize-money that may be due for"the said ship.

(Signed) " JOHN EASTMAN ."

Q. When he produced that, what did he say? - A. I thought I recollected seeing him before, and told him I doubted his being James Bannon ; he said he was, and claimed the prize-money due to James Bannon, of La Pompee; I told him on comparing the signature of Capt. Eastman to our prize-list with that he produced, that it was not correct; he persisted after that, that he was the person mentioned; I said I had seen him before applying for money, and that it would be better for him to retire; he still persisted, and would not go; I mentioned the circumstance to Mr. Le Mesurier, and an officer was sent for; he was searched at the Mansion-house, and I saw two or three certificates different only in the names and ships, but of the same hand writing.

Court. Q. Is that certificate in the usual form? - A. They are usually printed, and signed by the Captain, but we sometimes pay to the signature of Lieutenants; they are something like that form.

Mr. Hillier I don't believe this is Mr. Eastman's writing, because his name is James Edwards Eastman, and this is John Eastman .

Q. Had you any Lieutenant John Eastman on board? - A. No; I belong to her now, and must know him if there was.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but that one Moses Bannon, belonging to the Pompee, sold me the ticket for eighteen shillings.

Court. Q. (To Mr. Lander.) Did he give you any account of his buying it for eighteen shillings? - A. No, he did not say any thing of the kind.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-63

810. THOMAS WYNCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , a pocket-book, value 1s. and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of William Ager , privily from his person .

WILLIAM AGER sworn. - I am a wool-sorter , and live at Northampton: On the 22d of September, (I came up to town on the 21st,) between the hours of eleven and twelve, coming up Ludgate-hill , towards St. Paul's, on the north-side; a man tapped me on the shoulder, and said, have you not lost something, I said, no, not that I know of; I felt, and found I had lost my pocket-book; I said, there was only a one pound note in it; we walked on sharp about one hundred yards, and he said, step on faster, which we did, about two hundred yards, and seized a man by the collar; I seized him on the other side, and accused him with taking my book, which he denied; another man, dressed like a sailor, came up, and took hold of the prisoner, upon which, the first man that took him, let him go; the sailor gave him a violent shake, and pressed him against the wall, as he did that, I saw the prisoner drop my pocket-book from his right-hand, I did not see him take it out of his pocket; the sailor said, he did; in the fall, the strap slipped out, and part of the contents fell in the dirt, the prisoner set his foot on it; the other man picked up the papers, and said, they must go to the Magistrate; we went to the Compter, and the book and papers were given to a gentleman in the prison; I had the one pound note to carry me home, by order of the Magistrate; there were no particular marks about it.

Prisoner. Q. Was any body there besides me, when I was taken? - A. I don't know, I had enough to do to look after you.

Court. Q. Did you not feel any person at your pocket? - A. No; I should have known I had lost it, and that would have been all, if I had not been told of it; the pocket-book is worth about one shilling.

IVERS sworn. - I am a patrol for St. George's in the East, and was coming up Ludgatehill, with a sailor, on the 22d of September, about twelve o'clock; the sailor said, there were four men who had robbed this gentleman; I asked him, if he had been robbed, he said, no; he felt, and said, he had lost his book; the sailor said, he saw them go up a court; we followed them, and saw all the four in company, in Warwick-lane; I took hold of the prisoner, who the sailor said was one; they all rushed together, and in the scrunmage they all run round us, there might be seven or eight, while we were engaging, I saw a pocket-book drop, but from whom I cannot tell, there were so many about; I scrambled and got the papers; the prisoner was near, but I cannot say who dropped it; I took the prisoner and the book to the Compter; I have kept the book from that time to this.(Produces the book, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. Q. Can you say you saw me follow you, or night you? - A. No, not till I took you.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 23.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-64

811. CHARLES REMINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of Oc

tober , a cord, value 1d. a mat, value 1s. and 112lb. weight of snuff, value 12l. the property of Martin Pearkes , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD COLEMAN sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Pearkes, and Co. in Newgate-street, it is only a nominal partnership, there is no partner, he is a tobacconist and snuff-maker , in Newgate-street : On the 14th of October, I was in the accompting-house, with my back to the shop, and coming into the warehouse, we missed the truss of snuff; next morning, we were informed the prisoner was taken with the goods; we attended at the Mansion-house, and swore to the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You said first, it was a partnership? - A. It goes so, but it is not; there is no one in partnership with him.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the City: In company with Read and another, on the 14th of October, between seven and eight o'clock, we stopped the prisoner with this truss, in Aldersgate-street; Tipper went up, and asked him what he had, then he hesitated, and said, he could not tell us, but that he was desired to go to Islington with it; Tipper asked him where he brought it from, he said, from St. Bartholomew-street; we asked him who the person was, he said, he did not know; we then took him to the Compter; I went to Mr. Pearkes, there were twelve bladdres in it.

Mr. Alley. Q. He was driving a horse and cart, was not he? - A. No, he was running very fast with it on his back. (The property was produced.)

Richard Robinson . This is the property of Mr. Pearkes; I was in the shop the whole evening, but never saw the prisoner.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-65

812. JAMES PEARSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , forty numbers of a publication, called magazines, value 2l. and fourteen numbers of a certain publication, called pamphlets, value 14s. the property of John Roberts , Burkes Thompson , and William Roberts .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of David-William Allen . And, Third, Count. Of William Pennington .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES RICHARDSON sworn. - I packed up the property, and directed it to William Pennington, at Kendall, there might be fifty, I suppose; they were to go by the Manchester mail, from the Crosskeys-inn, Wood-street ; I have seen the same parcel at the Mansion-house.

DAVID-WILLIAM ALLEN sworn. - I am bookkeeper , at the Cross-keys; I remember receiving a parcel, directed to Mr. Pennington, of Kendall, on the 1st of September, at the coach-office, it was booked to go by the Manchester Telegraph; I put a mark, No. 70, on it, it did not go by the coach, because it was not brought in time; it was put into the office and remained till about half past eight in the evening, when it stood on the counter with many other parcels, to go to the White-horse, in Fetter-lane; I was making out a bill, and I heard a parcel moved off the counter; I said, there was a parcel gone, and Joseph Taylor went out after the person; in about five minutes, he brought the parcel and the prisoner back, the parcel was the same as had been left.

JOSEPH TAYLOR sworn. - I am a porter: On the 1st of September, I saw the prisoner go out of the door with the parcel, I followed him, and overtook him before he got out of the yard; I had laid the parcel on the counter, and seeing it under his arm, I laid hold of it, and called for assistance; I got him back, and the parcel was the same I had put on the counter; we sent for the City-marshal, and delivered it to him.

WILLIAM CANNER sworn. - I am one of the the City-marshals, and produce the parcel; I took the prisoner into custody, and he said, it was distress drove him to it. (The parcel produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18021027-66

813. MICHAEL WELCH and JOHN M'LEOD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , a pair of shoes, value 4s. 6d. the property of James Hoppe .

JAMES HOPPE sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , and live at No. 32, St. Paul's church-yard : On the 21st of October, between one and two o'clock I lost the shoes; on my return home, I found the prisoners in the shop; my apprentice said, one of the prisoners had a pair of shoes concealed; they were taxed with it, and M'Leod said, he returned them to Tanner, my foreman; Tanner denied it, and then M'Leod said he gave them to Welch; Welch said it was no such thing, but thought M'Leod had put them in his pocket; I looked about him, and saw the point of a pair of shoes between his coat and his back; when he saw they were discovered, he pulled them down, and said, Welch desired him to hold them for him; I immediately sent for an officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. Did you come in at the time they were in Welch's hand? - A. Yes, he was trying on another pair.

Q. Did you see the appearance of shoes yourself under his coat? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing pass between Welch and the other prisoner? - A. No.

WILLIAM TURNER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hoppe: On Thursday the 21st of October, three men came in, Welch said, he wanted a pair of shoes, I took two pair out of the press, and tried on pair on, which sitted him, but he wanted a more fashionable pair; I went to get him another pair, and Welch came after me, and pointed to a pair of shoes, saying, they would do; when I turned round, I missed the first pair, which I had left in his possession; the third man went out; I looked to see if they had the shoes, and saw them behind M'Leod's back, and saw him push them up to hinder them from falling; I asked Welch where the shoes were, which had sitted him so well, he said, he and given them to somebody, pointing to the apprentice; my master said, M'Leod had them behind his back; he denied it till they were pointed to, and then he produced them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. Welch came to buy shoes, did he not? - A. I understood so, but I suspected him.

Q. Whether Welch gave them to M'Leod to hold, you cannot say? - A. I cannot.

Q. How far was he from Welch? - A. Standing still, close to him.

Q. You don't know how far the apprentice was concerned? - A. He knew nothing of it till I mentioned it.

Court. Q. Had Welch agreed to buy a pair of shoes? - A. No.( Joseph Tanner confirmed the two former witnesses.)(The shoes produced and identified.)

Welch's defence. I went along with M'Leod to buy the shoes, I sitted them on, and they were rather right; I said to M'Leod, hold them, while I sit on another pair, which he did.

M'Leod's defence. I went with Welch, and the first pair was tight, as he has said, and he gave them me to hold; I was speaking to a man at the door, and kept them in my hand under my coat behind, unthinkingly, while I was talking; they asked for the pair of shoes; I said, what is the matter, and immediately gave them to the master; I have been in his Majesthy's service nine years, and would not disgrace the cloth of a soldier by stealing a pair of shoes.

M'Leod. GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate .

Welch, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-67

814. JOHN PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , three iron bars, value 2s. the property of Anthony-Daffy Swinton , fixed to his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM PITCHER sworn. - I am a carpenter: On Tuesday, the 5th of October, I was told a person was robbing me, or my employer; on the 8th, about a quarter past eight, when all the workmen should be at break fast, I went to Mr. Swinton's premises in Salisbury-square , and caught the prisoner with three iron bars in his hand, tied up, which he had brought from the adjoining house, belonging to a copper, they were on Mr. Swinton's premises; the prisoner was a bricklayer , and at work there; I asked him what he was going to do with them; he said, to take care of them; I asked where he had them from; he said, from the still; I found the three other bars hid behind some old stuff; I examined them, and they did not belong, to the still, but to the copper; both houses belong to Mr. Swinton. (The bars produced and identified.)

JOHN CATOR sworn. - I live near Mr. Swinton, and watched the prisoner: On the 8th of October, after the carpenters were gone, I saw the prisoner peep betwixt the rafters, and look about; he came up with his handkerchief in his hand, and went back with three bars in his hand; he went a second time, and returned with something under his coat; I informed Mr. Pitcher, who detected him.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing about them any more than a child unborn.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-68

815. THOMAS NASH was indicted for that he, being a servant to William Hutchins , a baker , did, on the 2d. of September , receive the sum of 25s. for his said master, and did embezzle and secrete the same .

WILLIAM HUTCHINS sworn. - I am a baker, and live at No. 45, Cannon-street, St. George'sin-the-East; the prisoner was my servant.

ANN LOUGHMAN sworn. - My husband is a weaver, and we live on Bethnal-green , we had bread of Mr. Hutchins: On the 2d of September, I paid twenty-five shillings to the prisoner; he did not give any receipt, because it was to be set down in a small book, but which I could not then find.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How much did you owe Mr. Hutchins for bread? - A. It might be 20l. but we now pay him for what we have.

Q. When the prisoner received money, he put it down? - A. Yes.

Q. How many 25s. have you paid him? - A. Only once, and that was on the 2d of September, which I recollect, because I have children, and the fair was talked of.

WILLIAM LOUGHMAN sworn. - On the 2d of

September, I left orders for 25s. to be paid to the baker; I mostly keep this book, (producing it;) but then I said, never mind, let the baker set it down next time; there was another time before that it was not set down; there is only two marks of his.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Whose marks are those? - A. The two first are the prisoner's.

Q. Whose are the others? - A. I put his initials, T N, to it, after he went away.

Q. Then you forged the prisoner's receipt? - A. No; I put it down to shew Mr. Hutchins, whom I paid it to, as the prisoner was gone away; I paid for the bread I received.

Q. This book was kept in your hands, not in the hands of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 4th of August, you paid 1l.? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the book forth coming? - A. No; I said I told not find the book, and he should set it down another time.

Q. I suppose you told him to put it down the next time he came? - A. No; not till the next time I paid more money.

Q. How many times did you see him between the 4th of August and the 2d of September? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You saw him after the 2d of September, for he left his master's service on the 11th? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. When did you write that entry of the 4th of August? - A. Not till after the prisoner had left Mr. Hutchins, and I made them both at once.

Q. Can you give any reason for so closely representing the prisoner's signature? - A. Not at all; I did not attempt it, I write sometimes one way, and sometimes another, and the prisoner said he could not write, and said, he would thank me to write it for him the first time, and from that time I marked T N, and know no more about it.

Q. And after his having told you he could not write, yet he wrote T N twice, and you wrote as much like his as you could? - A. No; I wrote it with no other intention than to shew Mr. Hutchins who I had paid the money to, as I had paid him once a month, and I did not know it was not paid, till Mr. Hutchins sent for me.

JAMES FRANCIS sworn. - I was present when the money was paid to the prisoner; I saw my aunt give him a five shilling paper of halfpence, and a one pound note which she had in her hand.

Q. How do you know whether it was a one pound note? - A. I don't know.

Q. How do you know it was five shillings worth of halfpence? - A. I heard my aunt say so.

Prisoner's defence. The last money I received was a twenty shilling note.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him an excellent character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-69

816. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , a gallon of rum, value 3s. the property of persons unknown .(The case was opened by Mr. Jackson.)

BISHOP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. You are a private in the first regiment of foot Guards? - A. Yes, and was a sentinel on the 13th of October last on the quay of the Wet Docks , from seven to nine; the prisoner was an Excise watchman ; he came to me a little after eight, and asked me if I would come and have some wine; I said no; he said if I came to him after I came off centry, he would give me something to make some grog of; before that he asked me to let a friend of his go by, for he was in hopes of making a guinea or two that night; I said I could not do it, as it was out of my power; when I came off centry, I took a can to the prisoner on his post; I did not take the can quite to him, but put it down about nine or ten yards from him; he took it up, and went across among the puncheons of rum; he stooped down, and in a short time he brought me the rum in the same can; he gave it me, and bid me be off with it, which I did; in going out I was stopped by Dalton, the constable, and the prisoner was taken up in consequence of my information.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you been in the Guards? - A. About two years; I was put to watch that no people should pass but on business, or with a card.

Q. You would not let a friend of the prisoner pass? - A. No.

Q. How near was the next sentry? - A. About one hundred yards.

Q. You might let a man pass? - A. I did not.

Q. Might a man pass if you let him? - A. If I would let him, but it was against orders.

Q. The prisoner asked you to bring a bottle or can, and he would fill it? - A. Yes.

Q. That not being a wrong thing you did it? - A. I thougth it was no harm his giving me the liquor; it was not in my charge; he chose to give it to me.

Q. Unluckily as you were going out you were stopped? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you get the can? - A. From under the stairs of the guard-house; I don't know how it came there; I saw it there.

Q. Will you swear no other person challenged you with the can before Dalton? - A. No other person.

Q. How far had you run? - A. I did run, but cannot say how far.

Q. Were you walking when he challenged you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you run then? - A. Yes, I tried to get away.

Q. When he caught you, you thought you were in a scrape? - A. It was given to me.

Q. You thought it more convenient to save yourself from punishment by accusing another? - A. No, how could I expect it when it was given me, tho I was in a little sear.

Q. Did you not expect the consequence would be punsihment? - A. I knew I should be punished by the regiment.

Mr. Gleed. Q. Immediately you were stopped, did you point out the prisoner? - A. Yes.

JOSIAH STILES sworn. - I went on guard at the Wet Docks at nine o'clock; our orders were to let persons pass who had tickets, but no others; the prisoner was about eight or nine yards from me; I saw him pull a gimblet out of his pocket, and bore a hole in a cask, and let the liquor run into the can, and give it to Bishop, the soldier, and tell him to be off with it; a little time after Bishop was taken; there were a great number of puncheons all over the quay, and he was obliged to go among them when the alarm was made, for the constables halloa'd out, stop the man, before Bishop was taken; the prisoner went from his post to the other watchman, and got a coat; I did not hear him apply, but saw him go; it was a different coat from that he had before, which was blue; he came back in a sort of brown coat to his own station again; no conversation had passed between us; when I got back to the guardroom I informed my corporal.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had never seen the prisoner before till he was drawing the rum into the can? - A. I was distant about eight yards, and saw the prisoner with the can, but don't know where he got it; it was moon-light, and nobody passed me except Bishop.

Q. You thought it was no harm to take rum out of the casks? - A. There were officers over them, and I had no business with them; it was no odds to me; I saw him with the can, but had never seen the can before.

Q. How came you not to stop Bishop? - A. We have no orders to stop each other.

JOHN WRIGHT sworn. - I am an Excise watchman: On the 13th of October I was the next station to the prisoner; about half past ten I had my coat on my arm, and he asked me to lend it him; he took it off my arm, but I don't know what he did with it; I saw his own coat laying on a rum puncheon after he was taken; it was a blue one; mine was a light drab; he did not say what he wanted it for; I do not recollect that he had his coat on when he came.

THOMAS DALTON sworn. - I am a constable belonging to Black wall: On the 13th of October I was going on duty round the Dock, and just after I passed the wall of the Dock, I saw Bishop with a can in his hand; I asked him what he had got there; he immediately set off running; he run over the Dock gates, and I pursued him, and took him with a tin can with rum in it; I asked him where he got it; he said it was given him; I took him into custody; going along he pointed to the prisoner, and said he was the man who gave it him; in consequence I took them both; I carried Bishop to the watch-house, and Williams to my own house; I recollect he had a light drab coat on, rather short.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How far did Bishop run? - A. Near three hundred yards.

Q. He said the prisoner gave it him? - A. Yes; he went up to the prisoner in his box, and said that is the man; the prisoner said, mind you take me off my duty.

Q. Did you find any gimblet on him? - A. No.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped at the Wet Docks .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-70

817. EDWARD CHACKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , a gold ring, value 10s. and two cod fish, value 6d. the property of William Valentine .

WILLIAM VALENTINE sworn. - I am a shoemaker , and live on Bethnal-green : On the 27th of September, I was coming from Aldersgate-street, I stopped in Bishopsgate-street to buy two cod-fish; I walked as far as Webb-square, Shoreditch, and called on an acquaintance, where I understood the prisoner lodged; I sent for a pot of beer, and half a pint of gin; the prisoner came in, and partook, as he knew my acquaintance; five or six drank of it; I was there about an hour, and left it between eight and nine; the prisoner begged to walk home with me; I thanked him, but did not wish him to take that trouble; he overpressed me, and took up the fish; I was sober, as I had only drank part of the liquor there; he walked with me, and carried the fish as far as the Golden Key, about three or four hundred yards from my house; I took him into the Golden Key, and gave him a glass of peppermint at the bar, and changed a seven-shilling piece; he seeing me do that pleaded distress, and said the woman he lived with was in Coldbathfields Prison for an assault; that he was out of bread himself, and had nothing to subsist on; I gave him a shilling, and bid him good night; he insisted on going further, saying I was a good hearty fellow; he walked very near to my home, when I stopped him, and said he had gone far enough, and if he would have any thing more to drink he was welcome; he thanked me, and said he had rather not; I told him I was going into the Cornwallis public-house; he asked me it I would not shake hands with him, which I readily did, and

he instantly by main force twisted the ring off my finger, and ran across the road; it being very dark I could not see him, but halloa'd out stop thief, but could not catch him; he had the fish in his left hand; the next night I was coming from the same place, and looked to see if he was come home; I heard he was taken up on my account; I went to the watch-house, and saw the prisoner; the officer made me give charge, which I did, and he was taken before the Magistrate; I have never seen my ring, which I wore for the sake of my deceased wife, and cost me 14s.

Q. Could not the ring come off by shaking of hands? - A. No.

Q. Was it too big? - A. It was full big, but done round with silk to make it hold tight.

Q. Did you perceive it going? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you feel the twist to get it off? - A. Yes, I am positive, and a very great one.

WILLIAM BATTENBOW sworn. - I am a weaver, and was passing Valentine, who lives next door but one to me, on the night of the 27th of September; he called out stop thief; I said, have you been robbed; he said, yes, but I saw no other person; he asked me to go in pursuit of the prisoner; I did, and we went to the prisoner's lodging in Webb-square, but did not find him.

Prisoner's defence. The place where the prosecutor called is kept by two girls of the town; I lived there then, and he asked me to fetch the pot of beer, which I did and two others, and half a pint of gin; they then asked me to drink along with them at a gin-shop; I did so, and he was flashing his gold ring, a guinea, and a seven-shilling piece to the girls; I never saw it after; one of the girls went back, and the other went to the Golden Key with the prosecutor and me; we walked on till we came to the Green Gate, where he began to dance with a parcel of men and women who sold fish; they would not let him have any liquor there; he was so drunk, when we went out he tumbled down, and had liked to have pulled me down; when I helped him up he missed his ring, and said I must have taken it; I said if he thought I had, I would go back and look where he was dancing; I asked him to take his fish; he refused them, and I dropped them down, saying I would not carry them any farther.

Court. Q. (To Valentine.) What is the name of your acquaintance? - A. Greenwood, a carver and gilder, whom I have known twenty years; I understand the woman the prisoner lived with is a girl of the town, and she was not part of the company.

Q. Were there three pots of beer? - A. No, nor did I go into any gin-shop, or make any display of my money or ring, any further than it was on my finger. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-71

818. GRACE GABRIEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a copper tea-kettle, value 1s. and a silk handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Robert Hornblow .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18021027-72

819. FRANCISCO , a Tyrolese, was indicted, for that he, on the 16th of October , with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, unlawfully, wilfully, maliciously, and feloniously did shoot at Richard Marryan , he being in his dwelling house .

RICHARD MARRYAN sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 44, Lombard-street .

Q. What business are you? - A. A goldsmith : On the 16th of October, about half past five in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop, and placed himself about one yard from the fill of the door; I had two candles burning, tho it was not dark; I had just risen from my feat, and on turning round, I saw that the prisoner had advanced a little way into the shop, the door was standing open; as soon as I saw him, I was going to address him as I would a customer coming into the shop; he instantly drew a pistol from his broast, with his right hand, and pointed it directly to my body; immediately, the prisoner said, your money; I replied, what! he said again, your money; I said, I have none; he again said, your money, pointing the pistol rather nearer, and in a more resolute tone of voice, if possible, than before. Upon his last demand, and my refusal, Mr. Minett came in, and passed him behind, very near to his right hand; Mr. Minett could not see the pistol he had in his hand, from the position in which he stood, with his back towards the door, till after he had passed the prisoner; Mr. Minett then drew back, and the prisoner held a pistol to us both, in order to terrify us; I was going to desire Mr. Minett to seize him, but apprehending the prisoner might shoot him, I refrained; he still continued pointing the pistol at Mr. Minett, and I drew a little nearer, in case he had fired at Mr. Minett, to seize him; I believe the prisoner, seeing my motion, instantly pointed the pistol at my head, over the counter, at not more than a foot distance; I threw my hand back and shut my eyes, and the contents of the pistol went into the wall; I instantly put my hand to my head, for I felt my face burn and tingle very much; I thought I had received the contents in the upper part of my head; I clapped my hand to my forehead, and found no blood; the prisoner ran out of the shop, and I instantly pursued him into the street; I very soon got fight of him, with a pistol in one hand, if not in both; I called out stop him, that is he, stop him; every body was running

from him, in all directions, no one would pursue him; I came up with him in about a hundred yards; I have walked the ground over since, and I think it is about a hundred yards; I saw the prisoner on the pavement; I was in the middle of the street; the prisoner then halted, with his shoulder against the wall, as if to prevent any person from coming behind him, and pointed a pistol at me again; some person rushed in upon him, but I could not see who, my eyes were fixed upon the prisoner and his pistol; a Captain Stewart ran in upon him in front, at my right hand, and I immediately followed; the prisoner had a pistol in his right hand, endeavouring to defend himself, and I believe would have discharged it, but the hammer was down; I then left the prisoner, thinking he was secure, but finding he made great resistance, I returned and laid hold of his collar, and he was taken to the Poultry Compter.

Q. Are you sure he is the man that came into your shop? - A. I am positively sure I kept my eye upon him.

Q. Had he any other pistol when he was taken? - A. I understood he had, but I saw but one.

Q. Did you know any thing of this man before? - A. No.

Q. Considering the time that he was in the shop, and the short time that elapsed before he was taken, are you perfectly satisfied that he is the man? - A. Perfectly; my face was very much burnt for several days; the City Marthal said it was from the wadding.

Q. Can you tell whether it was loaded with ball? - A. The ball was taken out of the wainscoat.

Q. Was there no hole in the pannel before? - A. There was not; it had just been painted.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you yourself see the ball found? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. At the time the pistol was fired, was it in a direction towards you? - A. Over my head; it was within an inch; I think it was owing to my holding my head back, that I did not receive the contents; I saw the pistol very near my head, and I threw my head back.

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephens. Q. You must have been a good deal slurried I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you master of your own observations and ideas, at the time? - A. Yes.

Q. You must have possessed a very unusual presence of mind; when the prisoner came into the shop first, he left the door open? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he return to shut the door? - A. No, he made no return.

Q. Lombard-street is a very well frequented street at that time in the evening, I should suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there many people passing at that time? - A. Yes, for what I know, or there might be none passing.

Q. Generally the foot path is pretty well trodden? - A. Yes.

Q. Before your friend came into the shop, the prisoner did not present the pistol at you? - A. I thought that quite enough.

Q. Don't be pert; I shall expect you will give me your answeres with great coolness and great candor. He did not present the pistol at you till your friend came in? - A. He pointed it at my body.

Q. He did not pull the trigger? - A. No.

Q. And it was not till there was a witness in the shop that he discharged the pistol? - A. No.

Q. Mr. Minett passed him you say? - A. Yes.

Q. How near did Mr. Minett continue to him? - A. I cannot tell; I kept my eye upon the prisoner and his pistol.

Q. You cannot tell where Mr. Minett stood? - A. Not exactly; he went on towards the end of the shop.

Q. I thought you told us that he more than once pointed the pistol at Mr. Minett? - A. Yes.

Q. How can you say he pointed the pistol at Mr. Minett, when you don't know where Mr. Minett stood? - A. He stooped down, and I lost fight of him.

Q. How could you tell, if you had lost fight of him, that the prisoner pointed the pistol at him? - A. He pointed his pistol at Mr. Minett; Mr. Minett drew back and stooped down; I kept my eyes upon the prisoner directly, and drew a little nearer to him, in order to lay hold of him, in case he fired at Mr. Minett.

Q. Your attention was occupied at that awful moment in the safety of Mr. Minett, whom you did not see, and not upon the preservation of your own life? - A. My eye was upon the prisoner and the pistol.

Q. And yet you say you intersered to save Mr. Minett's life? - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw Mr. Minett no longer, it was your momentary apprehension that induced you to stop forward? - A. Not forward; I stepped rather aside.

Q. The process of your ideas were, I will step towards him, that I may be ready to seize him after he has committed the act? - A. Yes.

Q. Now I want some exact information respecting this place; what is the size of your shop; how wide is it? - A. It may be a little wider than that table, not much.

Q. There is a counter in the shop, I believe? -- A. There is.

Q. What is the width of that counter? - A. It is a very narrow one; it is narrower towards the door, where the prisoner and I stood, than towards any other part.

Q. How wide is it at that part where the prisoner and you stood? - A. I suppose about two foot.

Q. You were behind the counter? - A. Yes.

Q. What distance is there from the counter to the wainscot? - A. It is very narrow, there is not room for two to pass.

Q. Is there not a seat or a bench at that end of the counter? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the size of that bench? - A. I don't know, it may be six inches wide.

Q. Do you sit upon it? - A. Occasionally.

Q. That is hardly wide enough to sit upon, I should think? - A. It is hardly wide enough, but it is made narrow, in order to have room to pass.

Q. Is it a bench or a stool? - A. It is a bench fixed to the wainscot.

Q. That bench runs home to the window? - A. It does.

Q. Did you sit at the time between the bench and the counter? - A. Not when the prisoner came in.

Q. Where were you sitting then? - A. A little more to the left; a little more in the shop.

Q. When the prisoner first spoke to you, and asked your money, where were you? - A. In the same position, a little lower down.

Q. When you advanced towards the prisoner, where were you? - A. I advanced towards the bench, between the bench and the counter.

Q. At that time then you were at the narrowest part of the counter, where it does not exceed two seet? - A. Yes.

Q. You say the prisoner was standing close to the counter? - A. No, I never said he came close to the counter.

Q. Where did the prisoner stand at the time when you advanced towards him to be ready to seize him? - A. He never moved his seet, only his body.

Q. How near the counter did the prisoner stand? - A. I suppose about a foot, or rather more, from the counter.

Q. Are you sure? - A. I am not sure; I never measured it; he stood about the middle of the door-way.

Q. Did the prisoner stand where he had stood from the time he entered the shop, or did he move, and where? - A. He stood in the same place; only when he fired the pistol, he turned his body towards me.

Q. Then at that time did he touch the counter or not? - A. I cannot tell how near he touched the counter; I was looking at the pistol; my eye was directed to his face and to the pistol.

Q. Did he, in presenting the pistol, extend his arm? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure he extended his arm? - A. I am sure he extended his arm; I saw the pistol very near my head.

Q. What was the length of the pistol? - A. I cannot say the length; I saw it was an iron pistol the moments he drew it from his breast.

Q. At that time you had drawn towards the prisoner? - A. A little more to the right.

Q. And came to this narrower part? - A. Yes.

Q. How high was that part of the wainscot which the ball penetrated from the floor? - A. I believe it is about five feet eight from the floor.

Q. What is your own height? - A. Five foot five.

Q. Do you mean with your shoes, or without? - A. I believe without.

Q. Then I suppose about five foot six as you stood? - A. Yes.

Q. Then the hole was about two inches above your head? - A. Yes.

Q. As your eye was upon the pistol, in what manner did the prisoner present it; for instance, did he raise his hand, or did he, in holding the pistol to you, point it upwards? - A. He extended his arm, and pointed it at my head.

Q. Did he elevate the point of the pistol? - A. It was a very quick motion; I had not much time to see; I shut my eyes, and put my head back.

Q. You have already told us that the ball of this pistol passed over your head? - A. I did not see it go; it went very near my head I believe.

Q. The ball struck two inches above you? - A. Some where thereabout.

Q. The prisoner was at first only one foot, or at the utmost one foot and a half, and in swinging round to present, he approached nearer? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon these facts I wish you to lay your own ideas together, and tell me now, thinking of the question with that seriousness which its awful consequences require, whether you think it was possible for the prisoner to have missed your head, if he had not put his hand over your head when he fired? - A. I believe it was only prevented by my putting my head back, and I apprehend it was only the hand of Providence that directed my head back at that moment; if I had not been very collected, I should not have followed the prisoner instantly.

Q. You stated that the prisoner extended his arm; that the counter was only two foot, and as the prisoner approached the counter, having extended his arm with the lenght of the pistol in his hand, I ask you what distance could the muzzle of that pistol be from your head, if he pointed it at you? - A. I should suppose about a foot.

Q. Why then the prisoner's arm could not reach a foot? - A. I cannot tell to an inch.

Q. You don't speak then from the idea you had at the time so much, as from the effect of the pistol scorching your face; now I ask you whether that might not have happened if the prisoner had purposely put the muzzle of the pistol over your head

in the action of swinging round? - A. No, I really don't believe it.

Q. Was your hair singed? - A. No; there were several spots upon my nose, and upon my eye-lids.

FRANCIS MINETT sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 8, Old Broad-street.

Q. A merchant? - A. Yes.

Q. Be so kind as tell us the whole that you know of this? - A. On Saturday, the 16th of October, about half past five o'clock, I went into Mr. Marryan's shop for a tooth-pick-case, and saw a man standing at the counter, rather obliquely, the door was neither open nor shut, and I heard him say the word money, only money, to which I heard Mr. Marryan answer, that he had none; I suspected there was something wrong, upon which I rushed into the shop, and in so doing, I pushed his right elbow; I then observed that he had a pistol, upon which he put his pistol close to me; I drew myself back, and stooped down, facing the counter; he then took the pistol from me, and pointed it towards Mr. Marryan; the pistol was immediately fired, and the man ran out; Mr. Marryan put his hand to his forehead, crying, oh God! which made me think he was wounded in the head; he took his hand away, and then I saw he was not wounded; he ran out of the shop, before me, but very little; I followed, calling out, stop thief, but I did not see him apprehended, on account of the crowd.

Q. Did you see the pistol afterwards found upon him? - A. No; I saw one in captain Stewart's hand.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The pistol went off almost at the same time that you were stooping down? - A. No; it went off after I got up.

Q. Just in the act of rising? - A. No.

Q. Endeavouring to secure him? - A. No, I had endeavoured to secure him before.

Q. In the act of rising, had you endeavoured to lay hold of the prisoner? - A. Not in the act of rising, I did not at that moment.

Q. What is the height of the counter? - A. Probably about that height. (Describing it to be about three feet.)

Q. At the very moment you were rising, you found the pistol go off? - A. I heard it.

Q. How it went off, and under what circumstances, it is impossible for you to say? - A. It was pointed towards Mr. Marryan at the time it went off.

Q. You were rising from the stooping situation in which you were; how then is it possible for you to say, it was pointed towards Mr. Marryan; did you not mean that it was pointed across the counter? - A. Yes, I had my eyes fixed upon the prisoner, because I expected him to shoot me.

HENRY STEWART sworn. - On the 16th of October, I had passed Mr. Marryan's house, about a hundred yards; I heard a pistol go off about a minute after; I saw the prisoner following me; I turned round, and seized him by the right-hand, he had a pair of pistols, one in each hand; I took a loaded pistol out of his right-hand; I assisted in securing him, and he was taken to the Compter.

Q. What was it loaded with? - A. Powder and ball.

Q. How was the other pistol? - A. That had been fired.

Q. Did you see Mr. Marryan there? - A. I saw Mr. Marrayn there after the prisoner was taken.

Q. How soon after? - A. I suppose, a minute and a half.

Q. The whole was almost instantaneous? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephens. Q. What state of mind did the prisoner appear to be in? - A. He did not speak, nor make any resistance.

Q. What was the length of the pistol? - A. I cannot exactly tell, I can produce it. (Produces it.)

Q. Who has got the other? - A. The next witness.

JAMES BYALL sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A hair-dresser.

Q. What do you know of this? - A. On Saturday, the 16th of October, about half past five o'clock, I was sitting in my master's shop, No. 52, in Lombard-street; I heard a pistol go off, I went to the door, and saw the prisoner at the bar with one in his hand.

Q. Where was the prisoner? - A. Within three or four yards of me.

Q. On which hand? - A. I can't tell you exactly, I will tell you presently - I struggled with him just by the watch-house, in Lombard-street, and took from his left-hand, a pistol. (Produces it.)

Q. Was it loaded? - A. No, it was not loaded.

Q. Is that the fellow to the other pistol? - A. I believe it is.

WILLIAM CANNER sworn. - Q. You are one of the City-marshals? - A. I am.

Q. What do you know of this? - A. I don't know any thing more, than that after the examination, I thought it necessary to take down the pannel, through which the shot had passed; I went to Mr. Marryan's, and had the pannel taken out; I found the ball, which I have in my pocket, it had gone into the joint of the brick-work, about half an inch, the pannel is here. (Produces the pannel and the ball.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You went for the purpose of observing where this ball had entered the pannel? - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of your observations, when you went there, was your attention called to see what was the distance with respect to heighth, be

tween where the ball entered, and the counter? - A. I did; I requested Mr. Marryan, as he was standing behind the counter, to go back; I asked him for a rule, and I think it was just about three inches and a half above his heighth.

Q. Therefore the counter, from his description, must have been close to where he stood? - A. No.

Q. The ball, however, was about three inches and a half above his heighth? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. Did I stand accused of having presented a pistol with a view of extorting money, painful to me as the acknowledgment must be, I certainly could not but plead guilty to the charge: it was a rash and criminal action, (for it is not my intention to attempt in any manner to extenuate its guilt): it was an action which I cannot reflect upon but with the utmost astonishment, which I know not how to account for, which I most sincerely condemn, and the very idea of which overwhelms me with inexpressible contrition and shame, that I even proceeded so far as to fire the pistol, (though I shudder at the thought, yet consistently with truth), I cannot deny but that I fired it at the prosecutor, but not with any intention of killing or injuring him, that is a charge which my conscience will not suffer me to admit. The fact is, that without the smallest premeditation or reflection on my part, but from I know not what kind of sudden and momentary impulse, occasioned by extreme distress, I entered the house in which this melancholy event took place, and shewed the pistol, thought certainly without any intention of firing. - In the already extremely agitated and disordered state of my mind, I was, in all probability, as far as I can judge of my own sensations at that moment, so affected by the entrance of a person who came in after me, that I involuntarily pulled the trigger, but without pointing the pistol at the prosecutor, or any other person. This, to my conception, is the only possible way of explaining so very extraordinary and unpremeditated an act. Of the extreme agitation and disorder of my mind, some idea may be formed, when I declare, that almost perishing with hunger, (for I had taken no nourishment whatever during two days), a friend less wanderer by day, obliged at night to seek repose within the dismal walls of unfinished houses, unacquainted with a single individual to whom I could make application for relies, ashamed to beg, and destitute of every other resource, I was absolutely driven to such a pitch of desperation, that I had positively determined, about two hours before, in the Park, to put an end to my miserable existence, had loaded my pistols for that purpose, and should actually have perpetrated the horried deed, had I not been prevented by the presence of a lady and her two servants, who were at that time walking in the Park. In short, I am fully convinced, however unable to prove it, that I laboured under a kind of mental derangement at the time: that such was the idea of the keeper of the Poultry Computer, when I was taken into custody, is evident both from his own declaration, and his ordering a strait waistcoat to be put upon me; at all events, the firing of the pistol certainly was an act in which my will had not for a moment the smallest concern; for I do most solemnly declare, in the face of this awful tribunal, before which I am now arraigned, and in the presence of that omniscient Judge before whose still more awful bar I am shortly, perhaps, to appear, that it never was my intention to fire. What object, in fact, particularly at so early an hour, and in so public a street, could I expect to attain? what advantage could I hope to derive from it? I could not but foresee that the report of the pistol must necessarily alarm the neighbourhood, and cause my person, in all probability, to be seized: the act itself proves, that there could be no rational intention; and I solemnly aver, that there was no intention at all of pulling the trigger, much less to fire at the prosecutor. I am informed, and it has but this morning reached my ears, through the charity of a gentleman, who, from compassion, interested himself in my unfortunate case, that I stand accused before the public of actual robberies committed in shops and private dwellings, under circumstances similar to those of the charge I have now to answer to: this, I am told, has been asserted in the public newspapers; and yet from my ignorance of the language of this country, and my close imprisonment together, I have been so far from being able to answer the groundless and cruel report, that I was utterly ignorant of its existence. I throw myself upon the candour and humanity of the Court for protection from this source of prejudice: I am sure the justice and liberality of the English nation will hold it enough for a poor foreigner to answer to charges legally brought against him in a strange land, without being prejudged by the effect of calumnies which he has no means of disproving. For the charge upon which my life is now in your hands, my rash and criminal conduct had given but too much colour, though I certainly did not fire at the prosecutor, or meant for a moment to hurt him; but that I ever, in any other instance, offended against the laws of this country, in any degree, I most solemnly deny; and if any man can alledge the country against me, I desire him to stand forward, and am ready to meet death if it be found, that except in this instance, I ever attempted to invade the property of another, or gave a moment's alarm to any man for his personal safety. Whatever character may belong to the act now in question, it was my first and only action which can be taxed with criminality in the eye of the law of this or any other country; I had suffered

enough before, but had not before attempted to relieve my sufferings at the expence of any moral obligation.

Gentlemen of the Jury, I have nothing more to add in my defence; I rely on your equity and your charitable construction of my conduct; my life is in your hands; and whatever your decision may be, to that I shall bow in either case with respect, with resignation if it bid me die, and with gratitude if it save my life from a premature and dishonourable end.

For the Prisoner.(Mr. John Duggin called).

Mr. Marryan. My Lord, I beg leave to observe, this gentleman has been twice with me, and had conversations with me.

Mr. Stephens. We are not going into the subject of those conversations - you appear to feel too much in this cause.

Mr. DUGGIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Stephens. Q. Are you of any prosession? - A. None.

Q. With what motive did you go to Mr. Mar. ryan? - A. From motives of humanity.

Q. Explain your object? -

Court. We really cannot enquire into this gentleman's motives.

Mr. Stephens. Q. When you were in the shop of Mr. Marryan, did you take notice of the size of the counter, and of the heighth of the shot in the pannel? - A. Yes. I did; but I have taken more particular notice since, that, this day.

Q. State it as accurately as you can? - A. As Mr. Marryan has described it as near as can be, about twenty-one inches.

Q. Did you measure it? - A. I did.

Q. Did you measure the height of the shot? - A. Yes; my own heighth is about five feet nine inches, and it is about five inches above my heighth, I mean the aperture in the brick wall; I marked it upon a stick which is in Court, so that it appeared to me to be six feet two inches from the floor to the aperture in the wall where the ball entered.

JOHN TEAGUE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are the son of the keeper of the Poultry Compter? - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember the time when the prisoner was brought to the Compter by order of the Right Hon. the Lord Mayor? - A. I was not present when he was brought into custody.

Q. How soon did you see him after he was brought into custody? - A. About ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you think it necessary to put a strait waistcoat upon him? - A. A strait waistcoat was put upon him when he first came into the prison; I was not present, but I saw him after wards with a strait waistcoat upon him.

Q. Did you find his mind in a state which made it necessary? - A. It was done from the fear of his making away with himself, on account of the agitation of mind he was in.

GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-73

820. JANE RAFTRY, otherwise JANE, the wife of Thomas Holden , and THOMAS HOLDEN , were indicted, the first, for that she, on the 1st of September , at the parish of St. Andrew , a piece of false milled money and coin, made to the likeness of a good shilling, the same not being cut, did put off to John Watson , at a lower rate than it purported to be counterfeited for, that is to say, for a piece of coin of this realm, called a sixpence; and the other, for that he, on the same day, did counsel, aid, abet, and procure the said Jane to commit the said selony .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN WATSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. I make books for gold-beaters : On the 30th of August I went to the prisoner's house, No. 1, Plumb-tree-court, Shoe-lane , but had no dealings there; I went again on the 1st of September, with John Myers ; Thomas Holden let us in, shut the door, and bolted it; I saw no appearance of trade; he asked us what we wanted; we said, a bob, meaning a counterfeit shilling; he said he had none, that his wife was up stairs, but would be down directly; she came down with another woman, who went out, and the woman prisoner shut the door again; then Thomas Holden told her to let us have what we wanted; he went into the parlour and shut the door, leaving us three in the passage; she asked us what we wanted; Myers said, a bob; she understood him, and asked me what I wanted; I told her, the same, and gave her a good sixpence for the countterseit I received of her; I was then going, but she told us to stop; she then opened the door, and looked out; then she told us all was clear, and we might go, which we did; I immediately took the shilling to Mr. Powell, and gave him information; Clarke, the Marshalman, has it now: On the 10th of September we went again, having apprized seven officers to be in waiting; part of the court goes into Shoe-lane, and part into Holborn; when we came out, a signal was given to the officers; but first, Myers went in, and asked them if they had any half beans, meaning counterseit half-guineas; Holden was sitting on the chair by the window, but I did not hear any reply; Myers had a 2l. note, which Thomas Holden put his hand out for, and took it; and got up, and told Myers to follow him up stirs; I was going ot follow, but Thomas Holden told me to stop down, which I did; the woman remined below with me; they remained two or three minutes up stairs, when Thomas

Holden came down, and went to the woman, and got something out of a little tin-box; then he went up stairs again, and Myers came down directly; we both went out, and Myers went to the officers in Shoe-lane; I went to the officers in Holborn, and we all went into the house again; some of the officers went up stairs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long have you followed this trade of being a witness? - A. Only that time; Mr. Allen, the gold-beater, came to me, and asked me to go, which I did, with Myers; I had not seen Mr. Powell then, and went only for the good of the public.

Q. Have you not remuneration made you for the trouble you have had, and the information you gave? - A. No, I did it for the good of the public, though I expect to be paid for the time I lost, which is thirteen or fourteen days, but have not been promised it by any body.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - I am a Marshalman of the city of London: On the 10th of September I went to Plumb-tree-court with Watson and Myers, and saw them go into the house; I had the two Reads, Lawrence, Cartwright, Simpson, and Crabb with me; three of us stood at one end of the court, and three at the other; Watson and Myers staid about five or six minutes in the house, and on their coming out I took hold of Myers, who gave me two seven-shilling pieces; Watson gave me a paper with a shilling: we then went into the house, and up one-pair-of-stairs we saw Holden side into his seat, and take a piece of leather before him, as if he was at work; he had a knife in his hand cutting the leather, and there was a roll of scoweringpaper, which appeared as if it had been just used, with aqua-fortis, and likewise a piece of leather, with some cream of tartar.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Shoemakers have two or three different forts of knives? - A. Yes, but at first I saw but one; on searching the room I found what is called a crooked knife, and three shillings and two sixpences, rather on one side of the room; I also found a sleeve of a coat, which I thought had been used to rub the money with.

Q. You say Holden slid into his seat; don't you know he is a shoemaker? - A. Yes.

Q. I see you produce some files; don't shoemakers use files to their lasts? - A. Yes.

Q. And don't these poor sort of people use leather to clean their fire-irons? - A. Yes.

Q. And as for cream of tartar, you know it is a very good thing if a person gets a little drop too much? - A. I know nothing about that.

Q. The three shillings and sixpence you have produced, they seem to be good? - A. They may be.

Q. You say there is aqua-fortis, have you ever smelt oil of vitriol? - A. I have, but saw no oil of vitriol; I am sure it is aqua-fortis.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was there the appearance of shoe-making carrying on? - A. There were things sufficient, but I am convinced it was used merely as a clock.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not twenty or thirty lasts in the room? - A. There were a good many.

Q. Did you not begin to kick and knock all the things about? - A. No; I took hold of the knife.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did he attempt any violence? - A. No; I endeavoured to secure the knives when I got in.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I was present on the 10th of September, and observed a man's arm chuck a parcel out of the one-pair-of-stairs window, which upon examination appears to be a pair of breeches, with a great number of shillings and sixpences piled up in fives; I went up into the one-pair-of-stairs room, where there was a quantity of money packed up; I said to Thomas Holden , where is the 2l. note? but got no answer; at last Simpson found the note rolled up, and all wet, as if just taken from his mouth; he was searched and a small bit of silver found; in the fire-place there were two oyster-shells, with a sixpence in each; there was a green rag, which was damp at the time, laying by them; I afterwards went down to the woman, and observed that she had something in her mouth, and after long persuasion I got a shilling from it. - (Produces all the things described.)

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you see Holden with a knife in his hand? - A. No.

THOMAS LAWRENCE sworn. - I picked up the breeches, which lay in the gutter; there are forty shillings and forty sixpences in them. - (Produces them.)

ELIJAH CRABB sworn. - I searched Holden, and took a piece of silver out of his waistcoatpocket. - (Produces it.)

Mr. Alley. Q. Don't you know it is impossible for a man with such things as the prisoner had, to make a shillings or sixpence? - A. I cannot tell.

RICHARD READ sworn. - I went up stairs, and observed Holden had a knife in his hand; I said if he did not put it down, I would blow his brains out; upon which he did lay it down, and I saw him whip something under a skin of red Morocco leather; I picked up the paper, and it contained sixteen shillings wrapped up separate, and I found eight sixpences close by it, and a bag with some copper cuttings; on searching round the room Simpson found this bottle of aqua-fortis (produces it); I then went down stairs, and saw Read search the woman, and take a shilling from her mouth; we searched her box, from which she took some cloaths, and found a bad new shillings.

Mr. Alley. Q. You saw a knife in the prisoner's hand? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Clarke in the room before you? - A. Yes.

Q. Then he must see it as well as your? - A. I cannot say for that.

JOHN READ sworn. - I searched the woman, and found a bag in her pocket.(produces it), which contained twenty-five shillings, all bad; and in this paper, in a bad, some more bad silver, wrapped up all separate, and some loose silver, all bad; I found a small box with some bad silver, a bad half guinea, and some cream of tartar. - (Produces them.)

THOMAS SIMPSON sworn. - I found a 2l. note and a bottle.(Mr. Mencelin, one of the Moniers of the Mint, proved all the money produced to be counterfeit.)

Thomas Holden declined making a defence.

Jane Raftry. I leave my case to my counsel and the gentlemen of the Jury.

Jane Raftry , GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined twelve months in Newgate .

Thomas Holden , GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-74

821. JOHN STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , a pair of gaiters, value 3s. the property of John Luke .

MARY HAYWARD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Brockwell; Mr. Luke is a shoemaker in the Poultry ; I was looking through Mr. Brockwell's dining-room window, and saw the prisoner take the gaiters from Mr. Luke's, off a nail, outside the door, between eleven and twelve in the forenoon; I came down stairs, and told the shopman, upon which he went over to Mr. Luke's, and the prisoner was followed by. Mr. Luke's shopman; I am sure the prisoner is the man, for I saw him about three minutes afterwards, and he had the gaiters in his pocket.

ELIZABETH LUKE sworn. - I am the wife of John Luke ; on being informed the gaiters were stolen, our shopman followed the prisoner, and brought him back; I told him he had a pair of gaiters; he said, "I have, ma'am," and put his hand into a pocket under his coat. and said, "here they are;" I said how came you to take them; he said he did not know who they belonged to. - (The gaiters produced, and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going along, and saw them lay above a yard from the door; I picked them up; they took me; I said here are the gaiters; she gave them to one of the officers, and they took me to the Compter.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-75

822. ELIZABETH BEBBY was indicted so feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , a coat, value 2s. 6d. a frock, value 1s. 6d. a sheet, value 5s. a bed-gown, value 6d. two pillow-cases, value 1s. 6d. a waistcoat, value 2s. a flat-iron, value 6d. and a petticoat, value 6d. the property of John Farrer .

JOHN FARRER sworn. - I live at No. 12. Great Swan-alley, Coleman-street , and am a journeyman tailor ; I hired the prisoner as a weekly servant , and she had lived with me about five months; she took my cloaths and my children's, and pawned them without my knowledge or order; I taxed her with it, and she seemed to deny it; I said I must have the things, and sent for the constable, who searched her, and found some duplicates on her.

JOHN RENSHAW sworn. - I am an officer; on the 28th of September I took the prisoner into custody; she had a housewife in her hand, and a great many duplicates; I said I would search her; upon which she threw them all into the grate, though there was no fire.(The pawnbroker produced a sheet, a coat, waistcoat, flat-iron, two pillow-cases, child's frock, and two petticats, which were identified by the prosecutor.)

Pawnbroker. I know the prisoner very well, but cannot say whether she pledged them; the duplicates are all in the prisoner's name.

Prisoner. He sent me frequently to pawn things for him.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Is that true? - A. No.

Renshaw. She said she had pawned them, and was willing to get them again.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY .

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-76

823. ARMELL JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , a saw-set, and eight dozen of brass saw-screws , the property of Joseph Howell .

JOSEPH HOWELL sworn. - I live at Chelsea , and am a saw-maker ; in consequence of suspicion, I went to the prisoner's house, and by his wife I saw the saw-set, which I knew to be my property; he turned his back to me, took up the saw-set, and carried it to the other end of the shop out of my sight, though he did not know I had seen it; after that I asked him if he had any screws; he said he had a sew small ones, which he shewed me; I said they are good screws, and if my man does not let me have some soon, I will get some of you; I left him; knowing they were mine, and went to the Police-Office, and got a search warrant; when I returned I opened the door, and said, Mr. Jones, I am come to see you twice in one day, but now I have a warrant; I looked over his bench, and he had returned the saw-set to the place; I told him

he must bring out the screws; he hesitated, but went and brought about a couple of gross of screws of a different make; I said they were not the same I had seen: he said he had no more; we opened a drawer, and I saw a paper with some screws in, which I knew to be mine: they are the same;(the officer produces the screws); I am enabled to say that they are different screws from what any body else used by the makes of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You have sold saw-sets of different sorts? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you the only person who serves in your shop? - A. Me and my son; but that was stolen out of the window by my vise-bench.

Q. Are those screws of your own make? - A. No, they are made by one Watson, of Birmingham.

Q. Can you venture to swear that he only makes such for you? - A. I can shew his handwriting, where he says he does not.

Q. Cannot I in many shops get screws of this sort? - A. I rather think not; they are certainly my property; they are turned under as it is called; the saw-set is my own make, and is not such as are sold, it being figured, and is only used by sawmakers; I have no difficulty in swearing to it, because it is not finished.

WILLIAM HOWELL sworn. - I live with my father, at Chelsea, and can swear to the saw-set and to the screws; I gave a gross to a man to cut, and missed eight dozen and ten afterwards of them.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What is that man's name? - A. William Fisher ; he is not here; he is ashamed to come; I asked him to come, but he would not.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-77

824. JOHN VERNON, otherwise JOHN DAWES, otherwise JOHN TAWES , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a lace cloack, value 16l. 16s. the property of Maria Pearce , in the dwelling-house of Mary Hunter .

(The prosecutrix not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-78

825. JOHN VERNON, otherwise JOHN DAWES, otherwise JOHN TAWES , was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , a pair of gold ear-rings, value 4s. and a gold pin, value 1s. the property of Sarah Ithier .

SARAH ITHIER sworn. - I live in Clarges-street, Piccadilly : On Friday the 20th of August, the prisoner brought me from the Hay-market Theatre, and in the morning, he wished my servant to follow him to Bond-street, to his lodgings, saying, he would send me some money; she came up stairs, and I asked her why she did not follow him; she said, he told her to go to the Thatched-house Tavern, and she would find him; I would not let her go, and I went into my bed-room; I looked into my box, and on the toilet, and missed a pair of gold ear-rings, a gold pin, a gilt locket, and a shawl, which I had placed on the trunk, near the bed; I did not see any thing of the prisoner till the 24th of September, when I took him as I was coming out of Convent-garden Theatre; the duplicate of the pin and ear-rings were found in his apartment; he denied having robbed me, and wished to make his escape; I took him to the watch-house, and afterwards he was taken to Great Marlborough-street; I am positive he is the person.

ELIZABETH RANDALL sworn. - I am servant to Miss Ithier; and let the prisoner in about twelve o'clock in the evening of the 20th of August, I am sure he is the person: I let him out in the morning, and he said I was to follow him to the Thatched-house Tavern, but not immediately; by my mistress's order I did not go.

JAMES ROSS sworn. - My son is a pawnbroker, and I was minding his shop: On the 21st of August, the prisoner came in and pledged a pair of gold ear-rings, and a pin, in the name of Edwards, for 5s. I am certain of his person.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - I am an officer, and have a duplicate of the ear-rings and pin, which I found in the prisoner's box, at his lodgings, at the corner of Tom's-court, Bird-street, Grosvenor-square. (The articles produced and identified.)

The prisoner put in a written defence to the following purport:

My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. It is, with the deepest sense of shame and concern, that I find myself under the necessity of answering a charge I never expected to be brought against me; I looked upon the articles to be a free gift from the prosecutrix, who consented I should have them for her sake; the morning I left her, I asked them of her, and she consented to my request; when I left her lodgings, I desired her servant to follow me home, and I would send her mistress something for having staid with her all night; I was surprised she did not follow me, but intended to return again, and went home without an idea of what would be the consequence; being but a short time in London, and unacquainted with the town, I could not find out her lodgings, which I wished to do; when I met her afterwards, my satisfaction was much damped, by the charge of having robbed her; I might easily have avoided her, but I offered to go home with her, and might have quitted her in our walk to Half-moon-street, where she said she lived, if I had been so inclined; it happened that I had been disappointed of some money from my friend,

which subjected me to the inconvenience of pledging my apparel, and inadvertently those ear-rings; having been a short time in London, and my friends and relations being abroad, I have no friends here to speak for me; I hope, if my single asseveration can be taken, it will be believed, I had no intention to rob her, and that my conduct will be looked upon more as levity than an intention to injure; I humbly beg leave to say, that as this is the first time, so it shall be the last of my appearing at the bar of this or any other tribunal.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-79

826. THOMAS PARKER , THOMAS BROWN , and JAMES BROWN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , four napkins, value 4s. and a table cloth, value 5s. the property of George Scales .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knowlys).

MARY SCALES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you the wife of George Scales ? - A. Yes; I live at Homerton , the second door from the Adam and Eve: I saw the prisoner before I lost the things, in the gateway which adjoins my wash-houses, for two hours.

Q. Were they at work? - A. No; they said they were standing up for the rain; about two o'clock. I was in the kitchen, which overlooks the wash-house, and saw Tho. Brown come out of the wash-house; I ran to the fore door, and said, you villain, what business have you in that wash-house; Parker was with him under the gateway, but James Brown was gone; Thomas Brown answered, he had not been there; I said, how can you tell me such an infamous lie, when I saw you come out; he denied it, I said you have been there a thieving; he said, I went to get a pot to get some water; the person who worked for me said the things were all down, and some gone; I made an alarm, and called out, stop thief; Parker and Thomas Brown run away, and all three met at the bottom of the town, about a quarter of a mile; when I returned, the tablecloth was down upon the ground, close to the door; it had been at the further part of the washhouse, upon a stool; four napkins were carried away entirely, which were laying with the tablecloth, wet, upon a stool; I had seen them not ten minutes before; the napkins were brought back in about ten minutes.

Mr. Alley, Counsel for Parker. Q. You did not see Parker in the wash-house? - A. No.

Q. It was a very wet day? - A. Yes.

Q. And a number of people under the gate-way? - A. No, only them.

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - I live at Homerton, next door but one to Mrs. Scales; I heard he cry of stop thief, and pursued the prisoner at the bar running down the hill all altogether, about a quarter of a mile from Mrs. Scales's; they contiued running down towards Hackney Marsh; I went into Wick field, and saw them in the Marsh running; I made away towards the ofier-bed by the side of the Marsh, where Thomas Brown made a jump at the ditch, and jumped in; he came out, and I took him; I said he had been thieving from the laundress, upon which he fell crying; the other two kept running on.

Mr. Alley. Q. You did not see the faces of the others? - A. No, they were all running.

THOMAS DORE , sen. sworn. - I live at Homerton, about 20 yards from the prosecutor's house; I was coming from my own-door, and saw the prosecutrix and a woman or two at the door; I heard she was robbed by some boys, and pointed the way they had taken; while I was talking; James Brown and Parker came out of a gateway; about sixty yards from the prosecutor's house, and Mrs. Scales said, they are the boys; they run, and I followed them to Hackney-Wicks; I saw them before me, and Clarke with Thomas Brown in custody; my son run, and a neighbour had Parker, and delivered him to me; Mrs. Scales said he was one; he was delivered to the constable; while I had him, John Emmelt came up with four napkins, which he said he had found on Mr. Beausoy's wall, in the lane.

THOMAS DORE , jun. sworn. - When I got into the lane, as I was turning the corner. Parker and James Brown were about thirty yards from me; I pursued them, and took Parker and James Brown in about three minutes.

JOHN EMMETT sworn. - I was running down to the Wick alane, hearing the cry of stop thief, and saw the napkins on Mr. Beausoy's wall; I took them, and gave them to Mrs. Scales. - (The napkins produced, and identified.)

James Brown's defence. Parker and I took a walk to Hackney new church; it rained hard, and we stopped under this place for shelter about a quarter of an hour, and Thomas Brown came and stood under with us; Parker and me went away, and the woman came out, and charged Thomas Brown with stealing something; I walked on, and took no notice; it then began to rain very hard again, and Parker and I run.

Parker. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Thomas Brown 's defence. I had been to work with my father all the week, and on Saturday, about twelve o'clock, I took a walk from home towards Hackney, to get a few blackberies to make a dumplin; it began to rain very hard, and I was very dry, and went under this arch-way to the pump to drink; I could not drink, because there was no ladle; I went to the wash-house door to ask for a pot, and as I saw no body there, I was going away, and the gentlewoman asked me what

I did in the wash-house; I said I had been there for a pot for some water, but as I saw nobody I went away, and run, because it rained hard, and going across the field I happened to fall into a ditch, and the man took me.

Parker called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Thomas Brown , GUILTY , aged 12.

Thomas Parker , GUILTY , aged 15.

James Brown , GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-80

827. EDWARD CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a brown gelding, value 40s. the property of Thomas Saunders .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Health.

Reference Number: t18021027-81

828. JOHN SMITH and JOHN BAKER were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , twenty-two quires of paper, value 8s. the property of Edward Gabriel and Samuel Gardner ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-82

829. SIMON FULLER and ANN, otherwise NANCE PENNY , were indicted, the first for feloniously making an assault upon Josiah Raynes , in the dwelling-house of Eleanor Gibbs , and stealing a 10l. Bank-note, a gold watch, value 10l. a gold seal, value 5s. a gold key, value 5s. a hat, value 10ss. a coat, value 31s. two waistcoats, value 5s. a pair of gloves, value 6d. a guinea, a half guinea, and a 2l. Bank-note, the property of the said Josiah; and the other for counselling the said Simon to do and commit the said selony .

JOSIAH RAYNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you are an apothecary? - A. I am.

Q. And live in Great Mortimer-street? - A. I do.

Q. I believe you had been to dine with some friends on the 21st of September ? - A. I had.

Q. About what time did you leave them? - A. I dined at the Northumberland Coffee-house, in the Strand, on Tuesday the 21st of September, and left my friends about ten o'clock.

Q. Had you drank more than you usually do? - A. I had.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoner at the bar? - A. I don't recollect them.

Q. What happened to you in the course of the evening? - A. I took a walk over Blackfriars-bridge, and returned; as I was going along the Strand a woman accosted me, and asked me to go home with her; I consented, and she took me up a place called Marigold-court, in the Strand, near Exeter Change , to No. 5; I did not recollect it at the time, but since.

Q. What part of the house did she take you to? - A. To a back room on the second floor.

Q. Are you sure it was the back room? - A. I am not certain of it; it was a room on the second floor.

Q. How long had you been there before any thing happened to you? - A. I had not been above five minutes in the room.

Q. Was there any body else in the room but the woman and yourself? - A. No; I had been about five minutes, and a man came into the room, and knocked me down.

Q. Was the door open or not? - A. No, it was not, it was locked; I thought the woman had locked it; it appeared to me that the man rushed in and knocked me down; I struck him again; my coat and waistcoat were off at the time, and during the scussle he had taken my watch out of my pocket.

Q. Was it a gold watch? - A. It was a gold watch, with a chain, a gold key, and gold seal.

Q. Had you any money about you at the time? - A. I had a 10l. Bank-note, a 2l. note, a guinea, half a guinea, and some silver.

Q. Where was your hat at the time? - A. My hat was laying on the table.

Q. What became of the man and woman after the man had taken your watch? - A. They went away directly together.

Q. What became of your cloaths? - A. He took my cloaths with him.

Q. Who took them? - A. I don't exactly know which of them, but my cloaths were taken away.

Q. was your hat taken away at the same time? - A. It was, my hat, my coat, and two waistcoats, besides my money and watch.

Q. What did you do upon their running away? - A. I called for a watchman.

Q. How soon did any watchman make his appearance? - A. In about ten minutes afterwards; I was a long time calling.

Q. From what part did you call? - A. I called out of the window, and no watchman heard.

Q. Where were you when the watchman came up? - A. I was going down stairs into the court.

Q. What is the watchman's name? - A. Michael Coleman .

Q. Did you tell him what had happened to you? - A. I did, and took him to the place where I had been robbed.

Q. Was any thing found in the room? - A. There were some buttons; the man that robbed me had on a regimental jacket.

Q. What colour was it? - A. Green.

Q. What was on the buttons that were found

there? - A. I think there were 26, and a D under it.

Q. Has the watchman got them? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any thing else there? - A. A hat.

Q. Did you give any description of the persons. - A. No, I could not.

Q. Was the woman who kept the house called up? - A. I saw the woman of the house, but I believe she was in another house during the robbery.

Q. Was she made acquinted with the circumstance of the robbery? - A. Yes, and I charged her with keeping a disorderly house.

Q. Have you since seen any of the property you lost that night? - A. I have.

Q. Who produced it? - A. One of the Bow-street officers.

Q. What was it? - A. My coat, two waistcoats, the watch, the seal, and the key.

Q. How long after? - A. I dare say it was ten days after before I saw them.

Q. You did not take sufficient notice of the persons to speak to those who robbed you? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you tell her in what room you had been robbed in the house? - A. No.

Prisoner Fuller. Q. Did you ever see me in the room? - A. I don't know the person of the man.

Court. Q. You were very much intoxicated? - A. I was.

Q. You don't know whether it was a front or back room? - A. I do not.

Q. Do you know how many pair of stairs? - A. The two pair of stairs.

Q. You know that? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you be so particular as to the money at this time; how do you know you had the money in your pocket? - A. Because being over the bridge I stopped at the Museum tavern, and there had a pint of wine, and pulled out my notes, and a 1l. note I gave the waiter; they were all wrapped up together, and he gave me change, which I into my pocket, and went away, after I drank my wine.

Q. Are you sure you had a 10l. note and a 2l. note remaining? - A. I am certain of it.

Q. Notwithstanding the state you were in? - A. Yes.

Q. What is your reason for knowing how much gold you had? - A. I recollect I had it, because I pulled it out together.

Q. Where there a guinea and an half? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you had no occasion to have changed? - A. I had no occasion to change the 1l. note.

Q. Can you say whether the door was fastened? - A. I rather think it was: I cannot speak positively.

Q. Did you observe afterwards whether the door appeared to be broke? - A. No, I did not; I did not take notice.

Q. You say that during the scussle the man took the watch out of you pocket? - A. He did.

Q. Were you so sensible as to know whether it was the man that took it out? - A. It was the man that took it out.

Q. Did he give you more blows than one? - A. No, I had a lump on the side of my face for a week after with the blow.

Q. Were you on the ground when he took the watch from you? - A. No, I was standing up; after he knocked me down I got up again, and struck him; we had a scussle together.

Q. Did you perceive your money taken at the time? - A. No, the money was in my waistcoatpocket.

Q. You did not perceive that the woman offered any violence, or that she herself took any thing? - A. No.

Q. You did not see who it was that took your cloaths? - No; they both went off.

Q. How long did this take up? - A. About five minutes from the man's coming in to going out.

Q. What was done with the buttons? - A. The watchman found the buttons on the bed.

Q. Do you recollect the colour of the man's waistcoat? - A. I don't know.

Q. Was his jacket buttoned? - A. I believe it was.

ELEANOR GIBBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you the owner of the house, No. 5? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Do you know the two prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did they live? - A. They lived in the two-pair-of-stairs, at No. 5, in the front room.

Q. Did they live together in the same room? - A. Yes, upwards of three months; they lived as man and wife.

Q. What name did the woman go by? - A. Ann Penny .

Q. What name did he go by? - A. By the name of Simon Fuller .

Q. What way of life was he in? - A. He used to work at the water-side, and used to come home to dinner and breakfast.

Q. What sort of jacket did he wear? - A. He used to wear a blue jacket in his dirty work, and at other times a green one.

Q. Was that a military jacket? - A. A soldier's jacket; he used to wear the blue one at work; the green one was a soldier's jacket.

Q. Do you know what regiment it was the uniform of? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Were you called on the alarm of the gentlemen being robbed? - A. I was scouring a room at No. 12, up three-pair-of-stairs, and an alarm was made, I came down stairs, and went to No. 5, with Michael Coleman.

Q. What room did you go into? - A. Into the room where Ann Penny and Fuller kept.

Q. Did you find a hat there? - A. Yes, hat and a button.

Q. Did you know the hat when you saw it? - A. Yes, it was Fuller's working hat.

Q. It was the prisoner Faller's working hat? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear the gentleman give any account of what had happened to him there? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you see him there? - A. I saw him in the court.

Q. Did he go up with you? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Had he any cloaths on? - A. He had no cloaths, only his small-cloaths and his boots.

Q. No coat or waistcoat? - A. No.

Q. Had you seen Fuller or Penny in the course of the day before the robbery was done? - A. I had.

Q. Did they even return to their room before they were taken into custody? - A. No.

Q. About what time in the course of the day of the robbery had you seen Fuller and Penny there? - A. About three in the afternoon.

Q. They never returned again? - A. Never, till they were taken.

Prisoner Fuller. Q. Did you see me in the green jacket that day.

Court. Q. Do you know what cloathes he had on? - A. No, I did not take particular notice.

Q. How many rooms were there on a floor? - A. Only one upon a floor.

Q. Was there no back room? - A. Yes. there was a little back room, but nobody lived in it.

Q. Is it furnished? - A. No.

Q. There is no bed in that room? - A. No.

Q. Is there any fastening to the front room, any lock? - A. No.

Q. No lock at all? - A. No.

Q. Were there any means of fastening it on the inside? - A. No.

Q. Was there no latch? - A. No.

Q. Nothing to shut it inside or out? - A. No.

Court. Q. (To Mr. Raynes.) You told us you did not know whether is was a front or back room? - A. I don't know.

Q. Do you know whether the room you afterwards went to was the room you had been in before? - A. That was the same room I had been in before I am sure of, because I recollect the bed being tumbled, and the buttons being found.

Q. Can you recollect what time of night it was? - A. About half past ten or eleven.

MICHAEL COLEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you a watchman in the Strand? - A. Yes; and Marygold-Court is in my beat.

Q. Did you go up to No. 5, on any alarm being given? - A. Yes, I was calling the hour of ten o'clock, and heard a piece of work at the corner of the court; I went up and saw Mr. Raynes, in the passage, without his coat, waistcoat, or hat.

Q. What complaint did he make to you? - A. He said, he had lost his gold watch up two pair of stairs.

Q. Did he mention any thing else? - A. He did not mention any thing else till he came to the watch-house.

Q. Did he say nothing about his cloaths? - A. Not till we got him to the watch-house.

Q. Did he go up to any part of the house with you? - A. Yes, he shewed me into one room up two pair of stairs, at No. 5.

Q. Did he say any body had been with him? - A. Yes; he said, a girl had decoyed him up into the room.

Q. Did he say any thing else? - A. He said, he had been robbed.

Q. Did he say, whether any other person had been in the room with him and the girl? - A. He did not say any thing about any body else at that time, till he got to the watch-house; he had a mark under his left eye; I searched the room all over, and found this hat, (producing an old hat) on the table, and eight buttons on the bed, all marked 26 D.

Q. Did you know the person of Fuller? - A. Yes; I often saw him coming down the court, smoking his pipe at night.

Q. Did you know the woman? - A. No, I cannot say I know the woman, because she was a very quiet woman.

Q. You knew her when you saw her? - A. Yes; I knew her when she was brought from Maidstone.

Q. Did the prosecutor say at the watch-house, who or what kind of persons had robbed him? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did you ask him? - A. He said, a girl had decoyed him up, but he did not say how he had lost the watch; he took the landlady up, and then she told who it was.

Q. What did the prosecutor say? - A. All he said, was, that he had lost his gold watch and money in the waistcoat; he said, he had lost his two waistcoats, his coat, and his hat.

Q. Did he tell you how? - A. No.

Q. Did you ask him? - A. No.

Q. Did you hear the prosecutor say any thing about it afterwards? - A. Not till the next day, when Mrs. Gibbs was sent down for examination, then he said he was knocked down by a man on the bed.

Q. Did he describe what sort of man? - A. A man in a green jacket.

Q. Did he, the same night, say any thing about a man? - A. No, not till the next day.

Q. Did you know whether the prisoner wore a green jacket? - A. Yes, I had seen him in a green jacket, smoaking his pipe.

Q. Was the jacket military jacket with those sort of buttons? - A. I never took notice of the buttons.

Q. Was it made like a soldier's jacket? - A. Yes; with a lappel on the shoulder.

Q. Did you ever observe the woman or the man after that? - A. No.

Q. Did you make any search after them? - A. No, I did not.

Court. Q. Can you say whether you had seen him that day in the green jacket? - A. No; I have sometimes seen him at night in his green jacket, smoaking his pipe, and walking up and down the Court.

Prisoner Fuller. I wish him to bring forward the buttons and the jacket.

THOMAS HOUSE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you know the prisoner Fuller and the woman? - A. I know them by living in that house.

Q. Did you hear of the story of this robbery? - A. I was sitting at my own door, No. 12, opposite, smoaking my pipe.

Q. In consequence of hearing of the robbery, did you make any search after them? - A. No.

Q. Did they ever return to their lodging after this robbery, to your knowledge? - A. No.

Q. When did you see them again after the robbery? - A. I saw Fuller with a green jacket on, with two epaulets.

Q. How soon after? - A. Ten days after.

Q. Had he any thing with him? - A. He had a bundle upon his stick, across his shoulder.

Q. What did you do? - A. I asked him whether he would have a drink of beer.

Q. You were acquainted together by living opposite? - A. Yes; he said, he had no money.

Q. Where was it you met him? - A. Opposite Southampton-street, Bloomsbury-square, in Hol. born; he walked very fast, and I followed him up Dyot-street.

Q. Did you go to any public-house? - A. No; I had stepped in, to enquire for a constable.

Q. Then it was your intention to take him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you notfind a constable? - A. No.

Q. You followed him? - A. Yes; I followed him to Buckeridge-court, St. Giles's, near Dyot street.

Q. Did he perceive you were following him? - A. Yes; I told him he was wanted at Bow-street.

Q. Where was it you told him this, before he went into the court, or after? - A. Before.

Q. How long did you stay in the public-house? - A. Not a minute, I only asked for a constable, then I walked alongside of him, and he asked me what I wanted with him.

Q. Did he give any answer to what you said, when you said he was wanted at Bow-street? - A. He said, he would not go.

Q. Did you continue close to him? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you tell him what he was wanted for? - A. I told him Mrs. Gibbs was in prison, and if he would come, he would clear her.

Q. What did he say to that? - A. He said he would not.

Court. Q. You did not tell him what Mrs. Gibbs was in prison for, but merely that she was in prison? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You kept close by him? - A. Yes; then he went into a house, and asked for some woman; I followed him in, and he asked me what business I had with; him I told him I would not leave him till I got a constable to take him up; he had a large stick, and went to strike me with it, but did not; then he came out of the house, and left the bundle in it, and I missed him for about two or three minutes.

Q. Did you not go out when he did? - A. He got into a little bit of a yard, and the people would not let me follow him.

Q. What people? - A. The people in the court; I went out of the court again, and some woman told me he was in a Chandler's shop.

Q. Where was that? - A. In Buckeridge-street; I went into the chandler's-shop, and there he was behind the door; then he got out into the yard, and into the same house again, in the court where he first went in, and went up stairs, but they would not let me follow him.

Q. How far did you go? - A. I stopped at the stairs, and saw him go up; after being about ten minutes in the house, he came down again, I was waiting outside, and he came into the court with his bundle and stick.

Q. The same bundle he took in? - A. It appeared so to me.

Q. Was it in a coloured handkerchief? - A. In a red and white spotted handkerchief; he saw me, and was going to run away from me again.

Q. Did you speak to him? - A. No, I was afraid to speak to him; there was a bit of a brick place where he was going to get over, but I secured him at the top and held him fast for a quarter of an hour, and then he got away again; in about five or six minutes after that, I saw him in a brewhouse, at the end of Buckeridge-street, where he was secured.

Q. How was he secured? - A. By an officer; my wife was with me all the time, and went down to Bow-street for an officer.

Q. Had he a bundle with him, when Cline, the officer, took him, or did you find it afterwards? - A. Afterwards; the bundle was dropped.

Q. Did you see him drop the bundle? - A. Yes.

Q. Whereabouts? - A. In Buckeridge-court.

Q. How soon after he was taken, did you see the bundle again? - A. In about a quarter of an hour.

Q. What were you doing when he dropped the bundle? - A. I was scuffling with him, wanting to secure him before he got into the brewhouse.

Q. When the bundle was brought back, did it appear to be the same that was on the stick? - A. Yes, it did.

Q. You did not pick it up yourself? - A. No.

Q. How came it that you did not pick up the bundle? - A. Because I was thinking to keep him fast.

Q. You did not know what the bundle contained? - A. No.

Q. Did you see the bundle opened? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Fuller claim any part of the things in it? - A. He claimed a while shirt, marked S; there was a woman's pair of shoes in it, that is all; I took notice he claimed the shoes and the shirt.

Q. What were there in the bundle besides the things he claimed? - A. There were two waistcoats of the gentleman's, and a gold watch.

Q. Where was it that you saw the bundle first opened? - A. In a public house, where the officers went.

Q. How soon after you had seen it dropped, was the bundle brought back, and delivered to the officer? - A. It might be about half an hour, or a quarter of an hour.

Q. As you knew this man before, had you any conversation with him where he had been, or what had become of him since? - A. He said he had been to Maidstone.

Q. Did you make any enquiry after the woman? - A. No, he said he was going to Liverpool.

Q. Did he say who the shoes belonged to? - A. He said they were Mary Penny 's; then he was taken to the Jostice, and committed.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. I am one of the patrol belonging to Bow-street.

Q. Did you assist in taking this man? - A. I went to assist.

Q. Was Armfield present? - A. Not at that time.

Q. Was House present? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon after you had taken the man was there any bundle found? - A. In the course of 20 minutes.

Q. Who delivered the bundle to you? - A. The landlord of the Horse and Hounds public house, in Buckeridge-street.

Q. Was that the house you were in? - A. No, the prisoner was at the Office then.

Q. Did the prisoner see the bundle? - A. Yes, at the Office.

Q. Did he see it at the public-house? - A. No' not till he got to the Office.

Q. What did it contain? - A. A gold watch; two under waistcoats, a shirt marked S in the bosom, two pair of stockings, a waistcoat, a pair of women's shoes, a pair of men's shoes, and a pair of nankeen trowsers.

Q. Did the prisoner claim any part of the property in the bundle as his? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was that? - A. At Bow-street.

Q. What did he claim? - A. I shewed him the shirt, and asked him if that was his; he said, yes; I asked him what mark he had upon it; he said S; I asked him where the mark was; he said on the bosom of the shirt, which it was.

Q. Did he say any thing with regard to the stockings? - A. He owned all the stockings, the pair of women's shoes, and the waistcoat.

Q. Did he say any thing with regard to the gold watch and the two under waistcoats? - A. He did not.

Q. Were they afterwards shewn the prosecutor? - A. They were.

Q. Did he claim them as his? - A. He did.

Q. When you took the prisoner, had he any hat on? - A. No.

Q. Did you, at any future examination, see him with a hat on? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. How long was it after this that the woman was apprehended? - A. On the Saturday morning as this was on the Thursday.

Q. By whose information was the woman taken? - A. By the information of Fuller.

Q. You did not go down to Maidstone? - A. No; Armfield went.

Q. Have you had the things since? - A. I have had the watch. (Produces it.)

Q. (To Mr. Raynes.) Is that your gold watch? - A. Yes.

Q. Are the seal and key your's? - A. Yes. -(Identisies the watch, seal, key, coat, and waistcoats.)

Q. (To Smith.) Where did you get the hat? - A. At the same house with the bundle.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner with it? - A. No.

- ARMFIELD sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street, and went with Smith to St. Giles's after the bundle, which is here.

Q. Did you go after the woman to Maidstone? - A. Yes; Fuller told me where to find her, at Mr. Norman's, at the foot of the bridge, Maidstone, Kent; I found her there, and brought her to town; she then told me the coat was left behind; I sent one of the patrol for it, and he brought it to London.

WILLIAM CLINE sworn. - I am a patrol belong to Bow-street; House's wife came for an officer; I went and assisted in apprehending Fuller, and taking him to the Office.

Q. (To Smith.) Has any body got the prisoner's jacket, to compare the buttons? - A. Yes, I have; I took it off the prisoner's back; (produces it); there are some of one sort, and some of another.

Ann Penny 's defence. I know nothing of the gentleman; I went out to buy some things for breakfast, and during that time my husband came home; I saw the gentleman come into the room, but what passed afterwards I don't know.

Simon Fuller's defence. I had been at work all that day at the water-side, and when I went home, I found the door open, and the light out; I got a candle, and looked round the room, thinking my wife was in bed; I saw a strange man asleep on the bed; I shook him, but could not move him; he appeared to be very much in liquor; immediately I sell into such consusion, that I packed up every thing belonging to my wife and myself that I could see on the table; those things were laying on the table, and I picked them up, being mixed with my own things, saying I would not live any longer with my wife, if that was the way she followed; I went away, looking for work, to Maidstone; next day I got lodgings there, and examined the things; when I found what I had got, I was rather afraid of coming back, but did intend to return them, and met with that man who apprehended me. That is all I have to say. My wife had no hand in it; I did not see here for three or four days, till I wrote to her. I have been nineteen years in the service, and was wounded in Egypt, on the landing the troops, and in the East Indies; being so long abroad, I have no witnesses, for my regiment and officers are now at Gibraltar.

Q. (To Mrs. Gibbs.) How long have these people lived with you? - A. Three months.

Fuller, GUILTY , Death , aged 39.

Penny, GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-83

830. JOHN SMITH , WILLIAM HUGHES , and WILLIAM STAFFORD , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a hat, value 4s. the property of Richard Clements .

THOMAS GRAY sworn. - I am a watchman, in Middle-row , and was employed at Mr. Banks's shop, opposite the hatter 's, where the hat was stolen from; I saw some boys loitering about, whom I suspected; there were Stafford and Hughes, and the evidence, Farthing, who all three went up close to the hats, which hung outside the door; after being together some time, Hughes and Stafford left Farthing by himself, and went as far as Staples-inn-gate, and stood upon the watch; a constable came by, and Mr. Banks called him into his shop; I left the little boy at the hats, and saw no more.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I was called in, and watched the boys for ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour; I did not see Smith at all, but I saw Farthing take a knife, and cut a string with which the hat was tied outside the door; he put it on to try it, apparently, and in about half a minute he run off with it; I run after him, and took him with the hat on; I then pursued Hughes and Stafford, and they were taken.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not see either of those boys till the little one was taken, and he pointed them out? - A. No, I did not see them do any thing.

JAMES FARTHING sworn. - I am thirteen years old; my father is a printer, in Benjamin-street, Clerkenwell; I can work at his business if I like; but my mother keeps a cook-shop, and she employs me in going of errands, and cleaning knives and forks; I know the nature of an oath, and will speak the truth; I know Smith the best, because he lived in the next court to me; he and I went into Holborn with intent to steal a hat, and we agreed to divide the money it sold for; Smith, me, Hughes, and Stafford went, and Smith gave me the knife to cut the string, with which I did, and went away with the hat; Hugnes and Stafford run round Staples-inn to take the hat of me in Southamptonbuildings, and Smith had my hat; the hat was to be sold at Baker's, who keeps an old cloaths-shop in Whitecross-street, where we have often sold things.

Mr. Alley. Q. Had you said a word to Stafford and Hughes before you went to the shop? - A. No.

Q. You met them by accident? - A. Yes.

Q. Smith and you had agreed to thieve, but not the other two? - A. No.

All NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-84

831. JAMES FRANKLIN and JOHN WHITE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of William Archer .

WILLIAM ARCHER sworn. - I am a haberdasher , in Beak-street, Golden-square : On the 20th of September, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I lost a silk handkerchief from the show-line in the window; the two prisoners came into my shop; a little girl in the room adjoining the shop called me, and in about two or three minutes I saw Mr. Sanderson, the witness, and the two prisoners; I missed a handkerchief; Mr. Sanderson said, he saw one of them take it off the line; the prisoners did not make any reply to that, but I immediately picked up the handkerchief behind the little one (Franklin.)

JOHN SANDERSON sworn. - I am a grocer: On Monday the 20th of September, between seven and eight in the evening, I observed the two prisoners and another peeping in at the shop-window; I suspected them, and watched them; the two prisoners went into the shop; the other staid on the outside;

I then went near enough to observe what they did; I observed one of them, I cannot say which, lay hold of the corner of a handkerchief, and pull it down; I immediately went in, and called to the master of the shop, and asked him if he knew the prisoners; he said, no; I asked him if he had lost any thing, and he missed a handkerchief, which was found upon the floor.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence. Franklin, GUILTY , aged 27.

White, GUILTY , aged 13.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , whipped in the jail , and discharged

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-85

832. WILLIAM WEEKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , two children's dresses, value 5s. the property of James Waller .

JAMES WALLER sworn. - I live at No. 28, in Church-street, Bethnal-green ; I keep a cloaths-shop : On the evening of the 28th of September I returned home about nine o'clock, and found the shop had been robbed; on the morning of the 29th I attended at Worship-street, and found the prisoner and the property; they have no mark upon them, but I believe them to be mine; they had not been long in the shop; but I cannot swear to them.

MARK KING sworn. - I am one of the patrol belonging to Worship-street: On Tuesday evening the 28th of September, I was going up Church-street, with Ray, about half past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another boy at the door; I watched them, and saw the prisoner come out of the shop, with the property in his hand; I stopped him, and the other got away.

Prisoner's defence. A boy came out with the things, and dropped them close by me.

GUILTY , aged 10.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-86

833. DAVID JONAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , 18lb. of lead, value 6s. belonging to William Felton , fixed to his dwelling-house .

Second Count. Charging him with a like offence, only charging it to be fixed to a certain building, called a house.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOSEPH GOODERICK sworn. - I had the charge of Mr. Felton's house, in Wentworth street, Whitechapel ; it was a house nearly finished; I slept in the house, and a person of the name of Stratton slept there also: About one o'clock in the morning of the 1st of September, I was disturbed with a noise; I got out of bed; the noise continued; we both got up; I took a cutlass in my hand, and went out; I saw the prisoner on the ladder, in the act of cutting off the lead; I desired him to come down; he said he would not till he had helped himself; I shewed him the cutlass, and asked if he saw that; he said he did not care for that; he came down upon a rising ground, about two yards from me; I desired him to go about his business; he then threw a quantity of lead, about 4lb, at me, which made me stagger; he ran down the descent upon me; I just recovered myself, and he was closing upon me; as soon as I got clear of him, I cut him in the side with my cutlass; he then tumbled down, and directly made a blow; I cut him on the left side of the cheek; I gave him another blow, and he tumbled down again; he got up again, and pulled out a knife, and opened it; he expressed some threatening words, and closed in upon me again; I rather got away from him; he closed in upon me again, and stabbed me under my arms; the blood was running down my shirt; I had nothing on but my shirt; he saw the blood running, and said, "d - n your eyes you are a dead man, I have done your business for you;" I followed him down the sence, and I think he said, I had done him too; he made his escape, and I did not see him for thirteen days; I was then in the hospital.

Q. Have you any doubt that the prisoner is the same man? - A. I am sure he is the same; I had cut him in two or three places on the right side.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner on the 13th of September; I knew him before I took him on Tower Wharf; he had a sticking-plaister upon his cheek; the surgeon took it off; Gooderick said he was the man, and that he had a cut in the side; the surgeon and I took him into a private room, and stripped him; he found a cut in his side, apparently with a sharp instrument.

Prisoner's defence. I got the wound in my side while I was rolling a hogshead of sugar on the Quays; a nail took me in the side, and tore me.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-87

834. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , two gowns, value 25s. and a petticoat, value 5s. the property of Benjamin Whitrow .

BENJAMIN WHITROW sworn. - I am a stationer in Jewry-street, Aldgate : On Wednesday the 27th of October, about half past two in the day, my door being open, the house being under repair, the prisoner came in, and passed all the workmen; there were seven of them; I was up stairs, and they supposed he was coming to me; but instead of that, he went into the two-pair-of-stairs room, where there were two gowns and a petticoat, which had been put there about five minutes before; he

immediately put them under his jacket, and went down stairs; a carpenter followed him, and brought him back with the property; I asked him where he got them; he said he got them up stairs; I sent for a constable, and gave charge of him.

JOHN STEERS sworn. - I am a carpenter; I stopped the prisoner, and brought him back; I told him he had got more than he should have, and he said he knew that; I brought him back, unbuttoned his jacket, and there were two gowns and a petticoat.

Q. Was he sober? - A. Yes.( James Child , the constable, produced the property, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been only three days in town; I had not been in town for seventeen days.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-88

835. MARY TREDDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , a silver table-spoon, value 10s , the property of Edward Cockerton .

EDWARD COCKERTON sworn. - The prisoner was a chairwoman to me; I live at No. 29, Bread-street-hill : On the 23d of October I missed a tablespoon; the prisoner was asked if she had seen it, and she denied it, and on the Monday following I found it at Mr. Watson's, a pawnbroker, in Watling-street.

DAVID WATSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I took in a table-spoon from the prisoner on the 23d of October; I lent her 8s. upon it; I am sure she is the same person. - (The spoon produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I asked Mrs. Cockerton to lend me a little money, and she said she had none unknown to her husband, and she lent me the spoon till Monday.

Q. (To Cockerton.) Was Mrs. Cockerton without money? - A. No, I am an oilman, and in a retail shop; it is impossible to be without money.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-89

836. JAMES SHEEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , a hat, value 7s. the property of Samuel Clements .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-90

837. CHARLES O'CONNOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , thirty-seven sheep, value 40l. the property of William Wilson .

WILLIAM WILSON sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. Upon a farm of the Earl of Besborough, called Newland Farm, near the Bald-fac'd Stag, upon Putney Common .

Q. Do you rent the farm? - A. I act as bailiff to Lord Besborough ; it is situated in the parish of Putney, near Roehampton, within half a mile of my Lord's house.

Q. What do you know about these sheep? - A. Last Monday was a week there were thirty-seven sheep; twenty-six of them were South Down ewes, ten were horned wethers of the Wiltshire breed, and one horned ewe of the Wiltshire breed.

Q. That was the whole of the stock? - A. Yes.

Q. When had you last seen them? - A. I saw them myself on the Monday in the afternoon; they were all in the same field, and the gate locked; there was a large stake put down against the gate, because it had been broke open before.

Q. What time on the Monday? - A. About four o'clock; the next morning the shepherd informed me they were gone; the shepherd is here; I went in pursuit of them.

Q. Did you go yourself to the field? - A. Yes; the lock was broke open, and the stake pulled up, and thrown on one side.

Q. Did you yourself afterwards see any of those sheep again? - A. Not till the men were detected with them.

Q. When did you see the sheep again? - A. Last Thursday.

Q. You are sure they are my Lord's sheep? - A. Yes; they had the same marks as they had when I bought them; I bought the twenty-six South Downs at Croydon fair, about three weeks before.

Q. How long had you had the others? - A. Last May.

Q. Had any fresh marks been put upon them? - A. No.

Q. How were the South Downs marked? - A. There was the letter S inclosed within a circle.

Q. What marks had the Wiltshire sheep? - A. None, but I could distinguish them very well.

JAMES WALKER sworn. - Q. You are shepherd to Lord Besborough? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you look after the sheep at Newland Farm? - A. Yes.

Q. What number had you there? - A. Thirtyseven.

Q. Of what sort? - A. Twenty-seven ewes and ten wether sheep; twenty-six of them were South Downs, and the others were Wiltshire, and there was one horned ewe of the Wiltshire breed.

Q. As a shepherd, perhaps you know all these sheep? - A. Yes.

Q. How were the South Downs marked? - A. Some on the narrow side, and some on the

broad side; they had an S, and a kind of a round letter; the S was in the middle.

Q. How were there the Wiltshires marked? - A. They were not marked at all, only one of them had a sore back, and some pitch and tar had been put upon it.

Q. Did you put it on? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it one of the ewes, or one of the wethers? - A. One of the wethers.

Q. How long before had this pitch and tar been put on? - A. About five weeks.

Q. Have you skill enough as a shepherd to know how old these sheep were? - A. No.

Q. Where had you last seen these sheep before they were lost? - A. On Monday the 18th, about eight o'clock in the morning, they were all then in the field.

Q. Had you seen them later than eight o'clock? A. No; the steward went in the afternoon.

Q. Was the gate locked? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any stake drove in? - A. Yes.

Q. What time the next morning did you go to the field? - A. About eight o'clock.

Q. How did you find the gate? - A. Wide open.

Q. Was the lock broke? - A. No, it was squeezed out on one side, and the stake drawn up, and laid on one side.

Q. When did you see them again? - A. On the Thursday following, I saw them in a field belonging to Mr. Spragg, in the neighbourhood of Islington.

Q. Are you sure that the sheep you saw there were the sheep that were lost? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you swear to every one of them? - A. Yes.

Q. You know them well then? - A. Yes; I fetched them back to the farm on the Thursday.

Q. By what means do you swear to the wethers? - A. I can swear to their faces; I have been used to them.

JOSEPH SPRAGG sworn. - Q. You are a butcher? - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In St. James'smarket.

Q. When was it that you saw these sheep? - A. On Tuesday, the 19th of October, at the top of St. James's-market, what we call the country market, a few minutes before five in the morning; the man was standing at the paved stones, that we call the Terrace, with the sheep, that was not the prisoner; it was quite dark at that time; I went up to the man, and asked him who they belonged to; he said, they belonged to one O'Connor; I said, what is he going to do with them?

Q. Did you afterwards see any thing of the prisoner? - A. Yes; I went and called a gentleman, who is here, of the name of Higgs, and he came to me; I communicated to him a suspicion of these sheep being stolen; when I came back, I saw the same man that I had seen before, and asked him where O'Connor was; he said, he is gone down to Mr. Welch's, to sleep for a couple of hours, and while I was talking to him, the prisoner came up; I asked him whose sheep they were; he said, they are mine; says I, what are you going to do with them; he said, he had brought them there to be slaughtered; I asked him who was going to slaughter them for him; he said, a couple of young men, who lodged at a public-house hard by; I asked him who the young men were, and he could not tell me their names; I asked him the sign of the public-house they lodged at; he said he did not know the sign, but pointed to the door; he knocked at the door, and called several christian names, as Tom, Dick, William, and several other names; then he turned back again, and I said, it is not worth while to let the sheep abide here, you may as well drive them into the market; says he, I don't care, with all my heart, they will be safer in the market than they will be in the street; I asked him where he got the sheep; he said he bought them about seven miles on the other side of Bagshot; I asked him who he bought them of; he said, of one Mr. M'Andrews; he said, there should be forty of them, but he thought he had lost two in coming along, he was not sure; I then gave our watchman charge of them in the street, and then I gave charge of the prisoner to another watchman.

Q. What became of the sheep afterwards? - A. I sent them in the afternoon to St. John Wood Farm , at Islington, where they take in drift goods; on the Wednesday Mr. Wilson and the shepherd came, and saw them; Howard went with, them to shew them the sheep, and the next day they had them away.

THOMAS HIGGS sworn. - Q. When was it you first knew any thing of this matter? - A. On Tuesday morning, about five o'clock, Mr. Spragg called me up; I went to him in the country market, and found him talking with the prisoner; he said the sheep were his own; I asked him how he came by them; he said, he bought them; I asked him if he gave 60l. for them; he said, no, not quite so much; I asked him how far he had brought them that night; he said he had brought them from seven miles below Bagshot; I asked him if he was not afraid of losing any of them, driving them in the night; and he said, one walked before, and the other behind them, but he believed he had lost two; we then got them into the market, and there I asked him how much he gave a-piece for them, and he said, he bought them in four lots, one of the lots he gave 32s. a-piece, and another lots, 28s. another lot, 17s. 6d. a-piece, and another lot, 16s. and he said they should not be long before they had their jackets off; then I consulted with Mr. Spragg what was to be done, and we thought it was no use to detain the sheep without

detaining the man; we then gave charge of the sheep into the hands of the watchman belonging to the market, and then we went into the country market again, and gave charge of the prisoner; he told us likewise that he had eleven pigs in his possession, and the lads that he had engaged to kill the sheep, were to kill the pigs at 2s. 6d. a-piece, and seven sucking pigs at 6d. a-piece; he said he dealt largely in poultry likewise, and then we took him to the watch-house, and the sheep were sent away to the Farm; the sheep were very much out of condition, and not fit for slaughtering; we asked him how he could think of killing them, for he could not make any thing of them to sell again, but he said that was the best way to make the most of them; he said he would make us pay for any that were lost; the wethers were in a good deal better condition than the ewes.

THOMAS HOWARD sworn. - Q. Did Mr. Spragg give you any sheep to drive any where? - A. Yes; thirty-seven.

Q. Where did you take them to? - A. To St. John Wood Farm.

Q. That was on the Tuesday? - A. Yes; and the next day I went again with the steward and the shepherd, and saw the sheep.

Q. Were they the same that you had delivered the day before? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you there when they were taken away? - A. No.

Q. Did you see the shepherd afterwards? - A. No; the steward and the shepherd saw them at the Farm on the Wednesday.

Q. (To Walker.) You see that young man, the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the sheep at this Farm? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you undertake to swear they were all Lord Besborough's sheep? - A. They were all my Lord's, as far as I know.

Q. Do you know that they were the sheep you had the care of? - A. Yes, I am sure they are the same.

Q. (To Wilson.) Were you at St. John Wood Farm at the same time with the shepherd and Howard? - A. I was.

Q. You have no doubt these were the same sheep? - A. Not the least.

Q. The ewes were not fat, were they? - A. No.

Q. Were the wethers fat? - A. No.

Q. They were not fit for killing? - A. No; there might be two or three pretty fair sheep.

Prisoner's defence. I was hired to drive the sheep by the person that Mr. Spragg saw first with the sheep: I met him on the other side of Kingston; he had thirteen pigs with him; he called to me, shipmate, where are you going; I told him I was going out into the country, to look for work; says he, come along with me, and I will give you 5s. to assist me to drive some cattle that I have got along with these pigs: there was a public-house just by, and I went in with him and had some ale; he said there were two more men in the town of Kingston that were to be along with us, upon which he went to the house where these two men were, and we sat there drinking till I suppose about ten o'clock at night; he then told me we had to go down to a turnpike very near, where he had the rest of the cattle, he did not tell me what cattle they were; he called for half a pint of gin, and told me he would go and have the cattle out; and as soon as he had got the sheep out, he came to the turnpike again, and I overtook the sheep with the other two men, they were about four miles a-head of us; we drove the pigs, and the other two men drove the sheep, till we got to Charing-cross, and then he desired me to drive the sheep to St. James'smarket, and if any body asked me whose they were, he desired me to tell them they belonged to myself, and that I bought them seven miles beyond Bagshot, upon which we drove them to St. James'smarket; I went into a house to lie down, and left another man watching them; a man came to me, and said, one of the butchers had looked at the sheep, and said, he thought they were stolen; I said I did not believe so, for what profit, says I, would it be to him to pay me to drive these sheep here, if they were stolen: so with that I met this man, and, as he tells you, he talked with me about the sheep; the other man ran away, and I was taken up; I have but just come over from the East Indies. GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-91

838. MICHAEL CONOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , a pair of pantaloons, value 2s. the property of Andrew Bradley .

ANDREW BRADLEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker , in Anchor and Hope-alley, St. George's in the East : On the 28th of September I lost a pair of pantaloons from the door, about five o'clock in the afternoon; I missed them, and went in pursuit; Randall and I saw the prisoner running; we pursued; the pantaloons were thrown away upon a dung wharf; I did not see the pantaloons in his possession.

THOMAS RANDALL sworn. - I am a tallow-chandler; I saw the prisoner handling the pantaloons as they bung at the door; I went to turn some children from a little gate, and when I came back the pantaloons were gone; I told Mr. Bradley of it, and we ran after him; we got sight of him, and I saw him throw the pantaloons upon a dung-wharf; he was immediately secured.(An officer produced the pantaloons, which were identified the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-92

839. THOMAS HARRISON was indicted for that he, on the 20th of October , being a servant to George Watts , a druggist , did receive and take into his possession the sum of 2s. 6d. of and for his said master, and that he afterwards, to wit, on the same day, did embezzle and secrete the same .

Second Count. For stealing 2s. 6d. the property of the said George Watts.(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

- LOCKIE sworn. - I am a surveyor; I live in Dean-street, Soho: On the 20th of October I was at Mr. Hale's, a grocer, in Cockspur-street; Mr. Hale, in Mr. Watts's presence, gave me two shillings and half-a-crown marked, and a copy of the marks made upon paper; I went to Mr. Watts's that evening, and purchased a box of Dr. Jebb's pills, and a bottle of hartshorn; I paid the same marked money to the prisoner at the bar; I went back, delivered the articles to Mr. Watts, and Mr. Watts soon after left me.

GEORGE WATTS sworn. - I am a chemist and druggist, in the Strand ; the prisoner has been my servant about thirteen months; latterly he has served behind the counter: On the 20th of October I gave some marked money to Mr. Hale, which was given to Mr. Lockie in my presence; he went and brought the articles, and soon went away; I examined the till before I went; when I came home, I sent the prisoner out, and examined the till again, but perceived no addition or diminution whatever; none of the marked money was there; the prisoner came in, I went up stairs, and lent the prisoner in the shop alone; when I came down, I sent the prisoner out again, and examined the till again, and found the two marked shillings in the till, but not the half-crown, and a halfguinea was taken away, and a seven-shilling-piece substituted in its place.

Q. Was there any increase in the silver? - A. I believe there was one shilling increase, but I am consident no more: it was the indispensible duty of the prisoner to have entered these articles in the retail book; the book is here, but they are not entered; I called in Mr. Green and Mr. Christain, two neighbours; I then called the prisoner into the accompting-house, and told him I was sorry to accuse him of being a thief, I had long suspected him, but now I have good proof of it; I told him I had a constable at hand, and requested him to take out of his pocket what money he had; he pulled out four half-guineas, one shilling and sixpence, and half-a-crown, that was the marked halfcrown I had given to Mr. Lockie, I am sure it is the same, here is the paper upon which I copied the mark. (Produces it.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The mark was not put upon this half-crown by yourself? - A. It was not.

Q. The mark is a letter, is it not? - A. It is an I and a semicircle.

Q. The prisoner lived with you thirteen months? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you stop at Mr. Hale's, after the money was given to Mr. Lockie? - A. Not five minutes; it was the indispensible duty of the prisoner to enter those articles in the retail book.

Q. Is it not sometimes the case, that articles are omitted to be entered? - A. Yes; and then there has been a surplus.

Q. I think you said there might be an increase of a shilling in the till in the silver? - A. There might.

Q. If a customer wanted change, would not the person serving resort to the till for that purpose? - A. Assuredly.

Q. Supposing a half-crown was wanted, and there was no half-crown in the till, might he not give the change out of his own pocket? - A. He had a particular order from me never to give change out of his pocket, but to send the servant out for change.

Q. But he was alone at this time, and it was night? - A. Yes.

Q. From the hurry in which this business was transacted, which you say was not five minutes, do you, in your conscience, believe he had had time enough to have put it into the till? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Mr. Lockie had had time to come from your house to Cockspur-street, and you to return again? - A. Yes.

Mr. Lockie. This is the same half-crown.

Q. (To Mr. Watts.) How often do you settle your book? - A. Every night in general, and if I am not in the way, there is an entry made of the produce in the till.

- CHRISTIAN sworn. - I am a linen-draper, in the Strand; Mr. Watts called me in, and I saw the prisoner produce the half-crown.

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM HANSON sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Watts; I was going out with some sassafras on the evening the prisoner was taken up; I applied to him for change; he gave me half-a-guinea, two half-crowns, and three-pence.

Q. Where was it taken from? - A. I don't know; he gave me two shillings and sixpence for one of the half-crowns, for fear I should want small silver.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What time in the evening was this? - A. About seven o'clock, as near as I can tell.

Q. Who was there at the time? - A. Nobody but me and the prisoner.

Q. How soon did you hear he was taken up for embezzling half-crowns? - A. About an hour and a half.

Q. You told your master immediately that he had changed half a crown with you? - A. No.

Q. Have you ever told any body down to this day? - A. I told my master.

Q. When? - A. The next day.

Q. Where he took the money you cannot tell? - A. No.

The prisoner also called Dr. Campbell, Thomas Taylor , Esq. and five other witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-93

840. THOMAS HARRISON was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a case, containing three bottles of permanent ink, value 5s. six small boxes, value 5s. a bottle of alkaline solution, value 3s. and two pieces of Windsor soap, value 6d. the property of George Watts .

No evidence being offered, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-94

841. RICHARD HOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a linen sheet, value 5s. and a blanket, value 3s. the property of William Wilson .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ELIZABETH KEYMER sworn. - I am daughter-in-law to Mr. Wilson, who keeps the Plough, at Homerton : On the 5th of October the prisoner came and asked for a lodging, which he had; he got up about seven in the morning, and when he was gone, I heard from the servant that the things were gone; I saw him run; I followed him; he got over a bank into a field, and I followed him; he was putting the things up in a bundle, when I collared him; I told him he had stole my sheet; he begged I would let him go, and he would give me all he had taken; he then took the sheet from under his smock-frock; I then perceived the blanket in the bundle; a young man came to my assistance, and he was secured; when I went home, I found the things were gone. - The property was produced, and identified by the witness.)

Prisoner. That is not the same blanket that I had, and she sheet I know nothing about.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped one hundred yards at Hackney .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-95

842. WILLIAM HOWE and JOSEPH BOLSOVER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , two sculls, value 10s. and a boat-hook, value 2s. the property of Samuel Allen and William Holland .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM HOLLAND sworn. - I am in partner ship with Samuel Allen ; these sculls are ours; on the evening of the 8th of October they were in my skiff fastened to some timber under my premises; my servant locked them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you not know it is the constant practice for the men to take the nearest sculls, when they cannot conveniently get at their own? - A. I don't know of any such custom; I am not a waterman.

- CARTER sworn. - I locked up these sculls on the evening of the 8th of October, between six and seven o'clock; there is a bolt goes throught the sculls, and then there is an eye to which the padlock is fixed; the next morning they were gone; these are the sculls (pointing to them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long have you been used to the water? - A. About a year and a half.

Q. Have you not often seen watermen take other sculls than their own, and return them again? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ever see them pick locks? - A. No.

RICHARD DALBY sworn. - I am a Thames Police officer: About half past two in the morning of the 9th of October, I was at St. Catherine'sstairs; I was hailed, and I pulled after a skiff, which went against a sloating rast of timber; there were two men in the boat; one of them jumped out, and made his escape; I got into the boat, and found the prisoner Howe sitting down; I asked him what he had in the boat; he gave me a great deal of abusive language; I examined a great coat that laid in the boat, and found this dark-lantern and matches, and a picklock-key; there were also a pair of sculls and a boat-hook; he refilled very forcibly, and pulled out a knife, but was prevented from opening it; the other man was pursued and secured.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you not know it is the continual practice on the River for one waterman to take another man's sculls? - A. No, I do not know that it is; I am no waterman, nor Mr. Holland either.

Q. Perhaps you know these men were convited as rogues and vagrants for this very supposed offence?

Q. Court. That they could not be.

Mr. Gurney. It was not as that time discovered whose these sculls were.

WILLIAM MAIRE sworn. - I am a Thames Police officer; I was in the boat with Mr. Dalby; I assisted in securing Howe; he wrestled very hard, and would not come into our boat; I laid hold of

him by the collar, and he sell over one of the thwarts; he put his hand into his pocket, and pulled out this knife (producing it,) and said, "you b - r, I will cut your bl - y guts out; "I prevented his opening it.

WILLIAM THOMAS sworn. - I saw Bolsover jump out of the boat; I pursued him, and caught him about seven or eight seet from the boat; I had hold of him, and struggled with him for a considerable time; he dragged me into Mr. Holland's skiff, which was lying on the timber; I secured Bolsover; he never got out of my hands; I shewed Mr. Cowen the skiff into which Bolsover had dragged me.

GEORGE COWEN sworn. - On the morning of the 9th of October, I went up to St. Catherine's, about half past three o'clock; as soon as it was light I examined Mr. Holland's skiff; I found in midships a padlock and two bunches of picklockkeys; I found this hanger just over the bows of Mr. Holland's boat; it hung upon the chain (produces them); one of the picklock-keys opened the padlock.

Q. (To Carter.) Is that Mr. Holland's padlock? - A. It is.

Mr Alley. Q. (To Cowen.) Do you not know that watermen frequently take oats that don't belong to themselves? - A. I believe they borrow and lend.

Q. Is it not the custom to take them without asking leave? - A. I do not know; I am not a waterman.

Hawe's defence. I was going on board the Salem, of London; I was in liquor, and sell asleep in my boat.

Bolsover's defence. I rowed up a fare to the Tower; I went to look about twelve o'clock if my boat was safe, and found she was gone, and when I was taken, I was feeling under the timber to see if she had got under the timber.

For the prisoner's.

THOMAS HILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley Q. Here is an indictment with your name to it for stealing a boat; had you a boat stolen from you? - A. No.

Q. Did not the Police officers make you prefer the indictment? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it not a common thing for watermen to take boats and sculls, without any intention to steal? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you tell the Garand Jury you had not lost your boat? - A. Yes, I told the Grand Jury it was a common thing to take boats.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The boat in which the prisoners were is your boat? - A. Yes.

Q. You know the prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q. You know them well? - A. I know that man Bolsover, and and I know the other, but not so long as I have known Bolsover.

Q. They have been in the habit of borrowing your boat? - A. I have told him to take my boat whenever he wanted it.

Q. Did you tell the Grand Jury that? - A. I cannot recollect whether I told the Grand Jury so or not; I told the Grand Jury it was a common thing to take one another's boats.

Q. Did you tell the Grand Jury you had given him leave to take your boat? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Who has been with you since you were before the Grand Jury, to induce you not to give such evidence as you could give? - A. Nobody.

Q. Upon your oath have you not been applied to, to forbear prosecuting? - A. I have not.

Q. Have you not seen that gentleman, Mr. Ives, the solicitor for these prisoners? - A. I have seen him many times about the Court.

Q. Have you been in company with him? - A. I have not.

Q. Have you not been in company with the prisoners friends during the whole of this sessions? - A. They are all fellow-servants of mine.

Q. Have you not been in company with Mr. Ives within this fortnight? - A. I have been in the same room; we have not been drinking together.

Q. Have you had no conversation with him since the prisoners have been taken up? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. You say it is a customary thing to borrow each others boats and sculls? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you make free with boats that are not watermen's? - A. Our fellow-servants boats.

Q. Is it customary to break locks? - A. Yes, if they belong to our fellow-servants.

CHARLES PEARCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I believe you have been a waterman many years? - A. I have.

Q. Is it customary on the Thames to take boats and sculls away? - A. It is customary among watermen to take one anothers boats, and they are returned back again.

Q. You never consider it as stealing them? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Have you ever known when a lock has been fixed to a scull or a boat, that that lock has been broke? - A. No; when there has been a chain through them, and not locked, I have taken them myself.

Q. Would you, according to this custom, take a fail-maker's boat, and break a padlock? - A. No, I would not.

JAMES HINCKLING sworn. - I am a lighterman. Q. Is it customary for watermen to borrow each others boats and sculls? - A. Yes, it is done every day

Mr. Gurney. Q. Is it a part of this custom of

yours on the River to carry dark-lanterns and picklock-keys in your boats? - A. No.

Howe, GUILTY , aged 28.

Bolsover, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-96

843. MICHAEL SWAINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , eleven silk handkerchiefs, value 43s. the property of John Hooper , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL COOK sworn. - I live at Mr. Pickerings, No. 125, Cock-hill, Ratcliff , nearly opposite Mr. Hooper's shop: On Saturday the 16th of this month, a quarter before nine o'clock at night, I had some information, in consequence of which, I ran over to Mr. Hooper's shop; when I entered the door, I perceived the prisoner coming from under the slap of the counter, with eleven silk handkerchiefs in his hand.

Q. Were there any body in the shop besides? - A. Nobody at all; I seized him and took the handkerchiefs from him; Mr. Hooper entered the shop, and I delivered the handkerchiefs to him; the prisoner begged for mercy, and said, if I would let him go, he would not do the same again; an officer was then sent for, and he was taken into custody.

JOHN HOOPER sworn. - I keep a shop opposite Mr. Pickering's, at Cock-hill.

Q. Is your shop a part of your house? - A. Yes.

Q. You have a house entirely to yourself? - A. Entirely; on Saturday the 16th, I went down into the cellar, I was not absent more than four or five minutes.

Q. Did you leave any body in the shop? - A. No; I heard a violent noise, I ran up, and found the prisoner in the possession of Cooke, who gave me a parcel of handkerchiefs, which I knew to be my property.

Q. Whereabouts were they lying? - A. In the shop window, upon the stall-board.

Q. Were they in one piece? - A. No, they are separate handkerchiefs, of different forts, (produces them;) I have kept them ever since.

Q. Do you know them to be your's? - A. Yes.

Cooke. These are the same handkerchiefs that I delivered to Mr. Hooper; I put my mark upon all of them.

Prisoner's defence. I do not know what to say.

GUILTY, aged 11.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-97

844. WILLIAM VERLEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Wood , about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 29th of September , and burglariously stealing, two purses, value 2d. ten pounds fifteen shillings in money, a Bank note, value 20l. two Banknotes, value 10l. three Bank-notes, value 6l. and a Haverfordwest Bank-note, value 21l. the property of the said William Wood .

The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN WOOD sworn. - Q. You are the brother of William Wood? - A. I am.

Q. He is a currier, in Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner your brother's apprentice? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he lodge and board in the house? - A. He did.

Q. Was your brother in town when the till was robbed? - A. No, he was not.

Q. How lately, on the 29th of September, had you seen the till? - A. About nine o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was it your business to look and take care of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you locked it up for the evening? - A. Yes, I had.

Q. What property was in the till at the time you locked it up? - A. Seventy pounds fifteen shillings, or thereabouts; there was a twenty guinea Haverfordwest Bank-bill, a twenty pound Bank of England bill, two 5l. Bank-notes, and nine pounds in notes of one and two pounds each.

Q. Were there any purses, containing either notes or money? - A. There were two purses that contained the cash, one was a brown Holland purse, and the other a canvas purse.

Q. How lately had you seen this young lad at home that evening? - A. About half-past ten.

Q. How soon after that did you miss him? - A. About seven o'clock the next morning.

Q. When did you discover that any injury had been done to the till? - A. About seven o'clock, when I came into the shop.

Q. Were you the first person that came down? - A. No, the servant girl.

Q. Who was the first person that discovered the robbery? - A. Benjamin Bird, the other apprentice, informed me of it; we then looked for the prisoner, but could not find him.

Q. Do you know if he went to bed in your house that night? - A. I saw him undress himself, and thought he was going to bed.

Q. Did you see him again till he was apprehended at Nottingham? - A. No; I went to the till, and the lock appeared to have been forced, and all the money and notes gone.

Q. The prisoner lives at Rotherhithe? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make enquiry after him? - A. Yes, but without success.

Q. When was it you received any information respecting him? - A. Not till the bill was presented.

Q. When was that? - A. I think it was on the 20th of October.

Q. Did you go to Nottingham yourself? - A. No, I did not.

Q. When did you first see him? - A. Last Tuesday.

Q. Who brought him up from Nottingham? - A. Thomas Hutton .

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the brother of William Wood ? - A. Yes.

Q. You have a share in the business, I believe? - A. None at all.

Q. Nor any body else? - A. No, only my brother.

Q. As to these things, it is quite impossible for you to say, whether they were taken at one time or not? - A. No.

Q. What age is the boy? - A. About sixteen.

Q. How long had he lived with you? - A. About a twelvemonth.

BENJAMIN BIRD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you the apprentice of Mr. Wood? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you come to the house on the morning the till was discovered to be robbed? - A. Nearly seven o'clock.

Q. Did you go into the shop immediately? - A. I did.

Q. Did you discover any thing amiss? - A. Not the first time I went in, I discovered it almost immediately afterwards; I went to call the prisoner, but could not find him.

Q. He ought to have been up at that time? - A. Yes; I then called the servant-maid, and gave an alarm.

Q. In what state did you find the till? - A. The drawer was drawn out at full length, and the bolt forced up.

Q. You did not see him again till he was taken into custody? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How many persons are there in this house employed by Mr. Wood, journeymen and altogether? - A. At that time, I believe, there were two journeymen and myself.

Q. Had you gone away the preceding night before the journeymen? - A. I think I was the last.

Q. You will not undertake to swear that? - A. No.

Q. Are the journeymen here? - A. No.

SARAH LAVENDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you see any thing of this till before Bird? - A. No; I went to the shop, and saw the boy was not there, and Bird knocked at the door the same moment.

THOMAS HUTTON sworn. - I am a Sheriff's-officer, at Nottingham.

Q. In consequence of any information you received, did you take the young man at the bar into custody? - A. I did.

Q. Do you know what part of Nottingham he resided in? - A. No particular place I believe; when I found him, I told him he was a prisoner; that I had directions to take him up for robbing his master; he said he had robbed his master, and he was very sorry for it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you made him any promise? - A. None at all.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was that the immediate answer? - A. Nearly to; I asked him the amount, and he said between 60 and 70l. I took him into custody, and at the desire of the Magistrate, I brought him up to London.

Q. What did you find upon him? - A. A watch, two or three little trinkets, and a canvas bag.

Q. Have you the canvas bag here? - A. Yes -(produces it.)

Q. Did you ask him any question respecting the watch and trinkets? - A. Yes; I asked him where he bought the watch; he said he bought it of a person of the name of Hall, at Nottingham; I asked him how he paid for it, and he said by a 20l. Bank-bill; I asked him what time it was that he went away, and he said between three and four in the morning; that he walked on, and the Briton coach overtook him, and brought him to Nottingham.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This young boy was perfectly contrite, and ready to tell you every thing? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe he cried? - A. Yes, he did, and said, he was very sorry for what he had done.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. (To Wood.) Is that such a bag as your money was contained in? - A. Yes, it is such a one.

Mr. Knapp. Q. That bag is not worth a great deal? - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 15.

Of stealing the goods and monies, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's, mercy on account of his youth .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-98

845. CHARLES HAWKINS , EDWARD THOMPSON , KENNETH MACKENZIE , and JAMES KITCHENER , were indicted, the three first for making an assault, in the dwellinghouse of James Lechifflart , upon James Attkins , on the 1st of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 4l. two pounds in money, numbered, and a Bank-note, value 5l. the property of the said James .

JAMES ATTKINS sworn. - On the 1st of Octo

ber, I took a walk with Charles Hawkins; we went to the Strand, to a private house, and from there we went to a wine-vaults, in Drury-lane, and there we met with Mackenzie, Thompson, and two others.

Q. At that time you were acquainted with them? - A. No, I knew Hawkins.

Q. Did you join company with them? - A. Yes; Charles Hawkins spoke to them; we came out of the wine-vaults, and then we all went together to the Turk's Head, in Dyot-street .

Q. Were you sober at that time? - A. I was as sober as a Judge.

Q. How long had you been drinking at the winevaults? - A. We only drank a glass a piece.

Q. When you got to Dyot-street, what happened to you? - A. We called for a pot of ale.

Q. Were you and Hawkins to treat? - A. I paid for every thing they had the whole day; I said, who is to pay for that; Hawkins said, you pay for it, and I will pay you another time; after I had paid for it, Hawkins took his handkerchief off his neck, and gave it to me; he wanted me to take it till he had money to pay me; I gave him his handkerchief back, and told him I did not want his handkerchief, he might make it up to me another time; when the ale was almost out, I went out to see a bit of a row in the street; I saw a young fellow, whom I treated with a glass of peppermint; in this house I changed half-a-crown to pay for it, and put the change in my jacket pocket; as I was standing at the corner, Hawkins put his hand in my pocket, took out the change, and handed it over to the other parties.

Q. Hawkins and you were alone then? - A. No, all these jockies were out; I said, I think it is time to be off; upon that Hawkins and the rest of them laid hold of me, and dragged me into the house; then Hawkins said to the other, stand by; Thompson, Mackenzie, and the others said, "all ready, hurroo, hurroo, draw him, tingle, tingle;" Charles Hawkins was knocking me about at the time Thompson and Mackenzie were robbing me; they got me down, and ill-used me, and knocked me about.

Q. How did they rob you? - A. They broke the chain of the watch; the chain was drawn through my button-hole; they broke the chain in three pieces; I had these trowsers on at the time (producing them), and they tore the pocket right out as you see it, and in the same pocket where the watch was there was a 5l. Bank-note, which they took; there were two half guineas, and nineteen shillings in silver in my waistcoat pocket, which they tore out likewise; I got hold of Thompson's hand, and said, I don't care, I will lose my life before I let you go, and I kept hold of his hand while the others were knocking me about; I cried out murder almost all the time from the first beginning of it.

Q. Did any body come to your assistance? - A. Yes, a soldier came in, and then they all bolted out; I held fast hold of Thompson, the man that took the watch out of my pocket and the money.

Q. Was Thompson taken upon the spot? - A. Yes, he was taken directly; Mackenzie then came up directly, and knocked me down.

Q. Was that after the soldier came in? - A. Yes; Mackenzie knocked me down while the soldier was after Thompson; Mackenzie said to Thompson, "you b - r, don't go up that street; if you do, you will be caught."

Q. What street was that? - A. I don't know the name of the street; I never was in the place before in all my life.

Q. Was Mackenzie caught? - A. He was caught about an our afterwards.

Q. Thompson was taken immediately? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mackenzie make his escape? - A. While we were taking Thompson to the watch-house, I had hold of one side of him, and the officer on the other; Hawkins came up to me again, and knocked me down; I had hold of one side of him; I got up and caught hold of him directly, and gave him in charge to the officer; Mackenzie made off with the property; he took it out of Thompson's hands.

Q. Did you see him take the property from Thompson? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. You joined Hawkins at the public-house? - A. Yes, and he said he would take a walk with me.

Q. You had been drinking a good deal? - A. No I had not.

Q. You had been drinking at the wine-vaults? - A. No, I did not; I only treated them.

Q. How many public-houses were you at in St. Giles's? - A. Only the Turk's head.

Q. Recollect yourself; were not you among some women at another house? - A. No.

Q. You paid, I believe, for Hawkins the whole of the day? - A. I paid for every thing.

Q. And you offered to lend Hawkins money several times? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What did you offer? - A. When I caught his hand in my pocket, I said, Charles, you don't behave like a shipmate, and he immediately handed the money away to some of the rest of them; and I said, if you had not done that, I would have lent you half a guinea, or a guinea, if you wanted it.

Q. How came you to have disagreed with him so much; you had some kind of quarrel with him, and struck him, I believe? - A. No, I did not quarrel with him at all.

Q. After drinking all this while, you take upon you to say you were quite sober? - A. I was as sober as any person could be.

Q. How much do you think you had drank in the course of the whole day? - A. I had not

drank more than six glasses, and twice that would not make me drunk.

Q. Did Mackenzie take any thing from your person? - A. No.

Q. You don't mean to say Mackenzie struck you? - A. He knocked me down in the street several times, not in the house.

Prisoner Thompson. Q. I wish to ask him if I was out of his sight from the time he says he was robbed till I went to the watch-house? - A. No.

Q. Did you not stand by at the watch-house, and see me searched? - A. I don't know whether you were searched there; if you were, it were more than I know.

Q. I dare say you recollect there is a reward; have you ever been told there is a reward? - A. No, I have not; I never was before a Justice in my life before.

Q. Have not the officers given you money since you have been here, and tampered with you, and even given you victuals and drink? - A. No.

Q. Have you not received any emolument, nor have been told there is a reward? - A. No; they have not told me of it.

Mr. Peat. Q. Did you from any person hear that you were to have a reward if any of these persons are convicted? - A. No.

Q. Do you imagine or conceive in any way that you are to be benesited if these persons are convicted? - A. No.

JOHN SALMON sworn. - Q. You are the soldier that came up at the cry of murder? - A. No, that was another soldier.

Q. What do you know of it? - A. I saw the prisoner Thompson come out of the Turk's Head; James Attkins came out after him.

Q. Did Attkins appear to you to be drunk or sober? - A. He was no more in liquor than I am now; then I saw Mackenzie come out after him; Thompson ran round the corner of Church-lane, and Attkins ran after him; then Mackenzie came close after him, and just as Attkins got to the corner, Mackenzie knocked him down; Mackenzie cried out to Thompson, that if he ran that way he would be caught.

Q. Did you stay till any of them were taken? - A. We pursued after Thompson till he was taken.

Q. Did you see any thing of Mackenzie afterwards? - A. No, nothing at all.

Q. Did you see Hawkins? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. Did you see any of these persons before? - A. No; I am a stranger to the place.

Q. How did you happen to know their persons? - A. I stood at the door, and saw them all come out of the Turk's Head.

Q. How do you know whether it was Thompson, or Johnson, or any thing else? - A. I saw them all come out one after another.

Q. How can you tell the Court that one did this, and the other did that? - A. I don't know the names, but I know the men; the tall man is Mackenzie, and the stout man is Thompson.

Attkins. They sent me eight guineas and the watch; I would not take it; here is a direction where I was to go and receive eleven guineas, at eight o'clock at night. - (Produces a paper.)

Q. Who gave you that? - A. I don't know the man.

Q. ANN MORRIS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I keep a house, No. 26 and 27, in Dyot-street.

Q. Did you see any thing of this transaction? - A. Between the hours of five and six in the evening, I saw Mackenzie give Kitchener a watch facing No. 27, in Dyott-street, in the road.

Q. Was it near your house? - A. Facing the door; I stood at the door.

Q. Did you know Kitchener at this time? - A. No.

Q. Did you know Mackenzie? - A. I know them by seeing Mackenzie give him the watch, and I went to Bow-street, and knew them again; Mackenzie stooped down, and washed his hands in the kennel water, wiped them on his apron, and then went down the street.

Q. Were they walking or running? - A. Walking.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. You had a very great regard for Mackenzie, I believe; did you ever see him before that time? - A. Never in my life.

Q. Not ever disagreed with a man of his appearance? - A. No.

Q. What way of life are you in? - A. Dealer in green grocery and oysters.

Q. You don't buy watches, or plate, or any thing of that fort? - A. Never.

JAMES SAUNDERS sworn. - Q. What do you know of this matter? - A. On the 1st of October, between five and six o'clock, I was standing where I lodge, No. 27, Dyot-street, St. Giles's; I heard a cry of, stop thief, over and over; upon hearing the alarm, I proceeded to the spot, and saw the prisoner Thompson rush out of the door at the Turk's Head public-house, and the young man Attkins pursuing him; Attkins was bleeding very much at the mouth or nose, I could not say which; I immediately collared Thompson, when the prisoner Mackenzie rushed out immediately after the prosecutor, and made a bolt right against my arm, and rescued Thompson; immediately after he was rescued, Thompson returned into the house again, Mackenzie following him; I pursued him, and in the tap-room there is a door that leads back towards the vault in the yard, and Thompson attempted to bolt through towards the yard; there I saw Thompson give Mackenzie something that appeared to be a small thing, imitating a purse, or something of that description; he twisted the mouth of

it round, and put it into the fore part of his breeches; then Thompson bolted out again at the bar-door throught the house; I pursued him and collared him again a second time; Mackenzie said,"bolt, you b - r, bolt," and up with his first, compelling Thompson to run, as if he was going to strike him; Thompson ran up the street, and I followed him; he was soon taken by the assistance of me and the mob which was collected.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. You don't know what it was that Thompson gave Mackenzie? - A. No.

Prisoner Thompson. Q. Did you go to the watchhouse with me? - A. I went to the watch-house; the prisoner was taken in, but the watchman shut the door slap to, and I went away.

Q. You were not at the first examination? - A. No; and the second examination I was sent for by Mr. Bond; he sent a note to the commanding officer, requesting that I might attend as an evidence against Thompson.

Q. Were you ever in this Court before. - A. Never.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A patrol belonging to the Public Office, Bow-street.

Q. What do you know of this? - A. The prosecutor Attkins came to Bow-street, and, in consequence of the prosecutor's description, I apprehended Mackenzie about two hours after the robbery was committed; I apprehended Kitchener at the White Hart, in Parker's-lane, on the 3d of October, at nine o'clock.

Q. Did you find any thing upon Kitchener? - A. No.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am one of the patrols belonging to the Office, in Bow-street.

Q. You know no more than the apprehending? - A. No.

Hawkins's defence. This sailor asked me to go with him and take a walk, between one and two o'clock; I told him I had no money; he said he would treat me, as I was a shipmate; we went to Drury-lane, to the wine-vaults, and had a glass of gin a-piece; then we went to a private house with some lewd women; he was up there some time; I staid below; then we went down into the street, and had some ale; then we went home, and he said, "come with me, and I will shew you a shipmate of ours;" he took me to Dyot-street, where we had some ale; he asked me to pay for it; I told him I had no money; he made a grumbling, and I offered him my handkerchief, and then there was a piece of work among them, and I went away. This is all I now about it.

Thompson's defence. As for insinuating, as the prosecutor does, that I was in the company of the others, it is not true; I did not associate with them; there was a very great alarm in the house; the house was full of people; I was very much alarmed, and left the house.

Mackenzie's defence. I have nothing to say.

Kitchener's defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge; I never saw any watch at all.

Court. (To Attkins.) Q. Were you in any private house? - A. Not with any of them, but Charles Hawkins.

Q. He says you were at a house with some loose women? - A. I changed a 7s. piece in the house.

Q. (To Ann Morris.) What is the name of the man who keeps the house? - A. I cannot say; he was a Frenchman.

Q. (To Crocker.) Do you know what is the name of the man who keeps the house? - A. His name is Anthony Lechisslart .

Hawkins, GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Thompson, GUILTY , Death , aged 43.

Mackenzie, GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

Kitchener, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18021027-99

846. JOSEPH WARNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , a handkerchief, value 14d. the property of a certain person to the Jurors unknown .

The person to whom the property belonged not having been found, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-100

847. ELEANOR CASSON was indicted for the wilful murder of her female bastard child, on the 11th of October .

It being doubtful whether the child was born alive, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18021027-101

848. MORRIS HALEY , JUDITH QUINLAND , and JAMES BROWN , were indicted for making an assault on the King's highway upon William Bangs , on the 4th of October , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person a pocket-book, value 1s. 6d. and three Bank notes, value 15l. the property of the said William .

WILLIAM BANGS sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At Cheshunt, in Hertfordshire.

Q. What employment do you follow? - A. I am a plumber, painter, and glazier .

Q. On what day were you robbed? - A. On Monday the 4th of October, I set out from Cheshunt.

Q. Where were you going? - A. To Tooting, in Surrey, on business; I came from Cheshunt about half past three in the afternoon, to Waltham-Cross.

Q. That is in the road is it? - A. Yes; I applied to the Peterborough stage-coachman for a place, but he said he was loaded.

Q. Did you go by it or not? - A. No; I walked

on, and overtook another person, and he and I walked on together; I meant to go to London by the Tottenham coach, but it was gone.

Q. Did you know that other person? - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q. How far did you walk together? - A. We walked together till we came to Tottenham, and when we came to Tottenham, we overtook the prisoners at the bar.

Q. On the road? - A. Yes.

Q. Were they all three in company together? - A. They were; the young man who was with me spoke to them at a little distance from the White Hart public house.

Q. Did he seem to be acquainted with them? - A. I cannot say; he seemed to hold some conversation with them; I said I wanted to make haste to town; he directly said, we will go into this public house; I said I was dry, and the young man and I went in together.

Q. What became of the prisoners? - A. They came in afterwards.

Q. Did they come in together? - A. They did; they were all in the place together.

Q. What passed when you were at the public house? - A. I called for a pint of porter.

Q. About what time of day was it when you got into the White Hart? - A. I should suppose it might be about half past six in the evening: I cannot say exactly.

Q. How soon did the prisoners come in? - A. They were in as soon almost as the beer was drawn; I think they were in before; they were at the heels of us as it were.

Q. Did they join company with you? - A. The young man and I drank our beer; I said I had got a bit of cold leg of pork, and asked the landlord for a bid of bread, but he did not sell it, and I went out and purchased a two-penny loaf; when I came back the young man was in company with the prisoners at the bar; they were in conversation together, and had a pot of beer; they asked me to drink; I said, no, I would keep my own company.

Q. Who asked you? - A. Morris Haley .

Q. What did you mean by keeping your own company? Did you mean the young man that accompanied you? - A. Yes; the young man handed round part of the meat and bread to the prisoners at the bar, in the room; I got up and said, I must go.

Q. How long had you sat there? - A. Very likely it might be three quarters of an hour, or less.

Q. On your saying you would go, what then? - A. I paid a pint of porter towards the reckoning; the young man and I had two pants.

Q. That was all the liquor you had some? - A. No; the prisoners called for some go, I believe, I cannot exactly say; they handed it round among themselves, the young man, and me; they drank, and paid for it.

Q. How much spirits were there? - A. I think there was half a pint.

Q. How many glasses did you drink of it? - A. About half a glass.

Q. You had nothing sufficient to intoxicate you? - A. No.

Q. You were quite sober when you went into the house, were you? - A. I was.

Q. You had not drank before you went in? - A. No.

Q. Had you, during the time you were there, sufficient opportunities of noticing the prisoners? A. I had remarkably so.

Q. Did the young man go along with you, or did you go alone? - A. The prisoners wanted more liquor.

Q. And you were to have had more, I suppose? - A. I suppose so; the landlord would not let them have any more; here is a person who was in the house at the time.

Q. Did you go away alone, or in company? - A. I walked out first, the young man, I believe, was the next that came out, and then the prisoners; which came first I cannot ascertain.

Q. Did you part with the young man any where? - A. No, not then; we walked on together as it were.

Q. Do you mean the young man, the prisoners, and you? - A. No, the prisoners were all rather before me.

Q. You said you came out first? - A. Yes, but they passed me.

Q. Were you and the young man walking together when the prisoners passed you? - A. I was outside, first.

Q. You say the young man came out next? - A. Yes; he asked the prisoners how far they were going; they said they were going to London.

Q. I suppose some one said so? - A. One and all together; when we had walked on the road about twenty yards from the Bull inn, at Tottenham , they were all on before me some small distance, the young man and the prisoners.

Q. How far is the Bull from the White Hart? - A. I cannot ascertain; I think it is about a mile.

Q. When you walked there, was the young man and you together, or you by yourself? - A. The young man and all the prisoners were before me.

Q. They walked a little before you all the way? - A. Yes, they did.

Q. How far were they a-head? - A. They might be about the value of two yards.

Q. Were they about that distance from you all the way you walked? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you were nearly in a company? - A. Yes, they were in conversation together.

Q. What happened then? - A. Morris Haley, Judith Quinland , and James Brown were together.

Q. What was become of the young man? - A. I never saw him, when Morris Haley knocked me down.

Q. Did you see when he left them? - A. He left them just at the place where I was attacked.

Q. Before or after? - A. Before, I believe; I did not see him.

Q. You don't know who he is? - A. I never saw him in my life before.

Q. What happened then; were they all three together at that time? - A. Yes, as near as I can ascertain.

Q. Walking? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the account you have always given of it, that at the time you were attacked they were altogether? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the story you have always told before the Justice? - A. Yes, I believe so.

Q. Were they all in a line together, or near together? - A. James Brown was rather at a distance from them; how far I cannot say, but nearly together.

Q. He was rather a-head of them do you mean? - A. He was rather a-head I think.

Q. What happened to you? - A. All on a sudden Morris Haley knocked me down.

Q. Are you sure you saw Brown when this happened? - A. I saw him run away.

Q. How do you know it was Morris Haley ; did you see him strike you? - A. Yes, I did; he knocked me down three times with a stick, or some other weapon.

Q. Then you don't know what it was? - A. Yes, it was a stick which he had in his hand.

Q. Did he say any thing to you before he knocked you down? - A. No, he knocked me down three times; the first time I cried out, for God's sake, don't kill me; he gave me three blows; the first time he hit me was on the fore part of the head.

Q. You called out? - A. Yes, for God's sake, don't murder me; I got on my knees, and he repeated the blow nearly in the same place a second time.

Q. That knocked you down again? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do then? - A. I got up as well as I could; then he struck me at the hind part of the head, and I fell down; he cut thro my hat.

Q. Could that be done with a stick? - A. Yes; then him and the woman came about me, and took my pocket-book out of my pocket.

Q. Did you know who took it? - A. Morris Haley .

Q. The woman you say came with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Where were you, standing up or laying down? - A. I was on the ground.

Q. What pocket was it in? - A. In my left-hand side-pocket, inside the coat.

Q. Was any thing else taken? - A. Yes, there were the contents of it.

Q. Was any money taken or asked for? - A. No, I had some money in my pocket.

Q. Do you recollect whether you had the pocketbook out in the public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. For what purpose? - A. The woman wanted to carry my money; she said she would take care of it.

Q. How did she know you had it? - A. Because I pulled it out in the public-house.

Q. What did you pull it out for? - A. I meant to get change for a 5l. note.

Q. Had you taken any note out of the book? - A. Yes.

Q. You pulled out a 5l. note? - A. Yes; I had three.

Q. Did you offer it to any body to change? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You said you wanted to get change? - A. Yes, I said I should like to get change, but I did not.

Q. Was that in the presence of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you put it into your pocket-book again? - A. I did.

Q. What did the woman say? - A. She said she would take care of it for me; I told her I could take care of it myself.

Q. You had not pulled it out before? - A. Not that I recollect; I wanted to get change, thinking if I got a stage, I had not money enough to pay it, only having a shilling and four pennyworth of halfpence.

Q. Tell us the contents of your pocket-book? - A. There were three 5l. notes, some letters, and bills of parcels.

Q. You state that Haley and the woman came about you? - A. Yes, and Brown run away with them.

Q. Then they all run away together at the same time? - A. I did not see Brown there at the moment when I got up, but I saw him going away when I recovered myself; I saw him some little distance further than where the other prisoners were.

Q. Can you guess how many yards he might be from them when Haley knocked you down? - A. I don't think he was two yards.

Q. Further before them? - A. I cannot exactly say.

Q. When did you see any thing of Brown again; just at the time you were knocked down, you say you saw him; did he then go from you, or did you see him afterwards? - A. I saw him when I got up.

Q. Was that before or after they took the pocket-book? - A. It was after.

Q. How near was he then? - A. I think within about two yards, or more, I cannot exactly say.

Q. Did you say whether he went away before

them, or whether they all went together? - A. Before them.

Q. How long? - A. He was away from me first; the other two were behind.

Q. Did he go till after you were robbed? - A. No.

Q. Was he standing still when he was about this distance of two yards? - A. When I got up he was walking on, on the right-hand side.

Q. Did the others, immediately after you got up, leave you? - A. Yes, they run away.

Q. Did you see whether Brown run before them? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Which way did they run? - A. Towards London.

Q. What did you then do? - A. I cried out I had been robbed, and called to the watch.

Q. Then it was dark at this time? - A. It was moonshine.

Q. What time of night was it? - A. It might be eight o'clock.

Q. Was it a clear night? - A. Yes, it was light, so that I could see, and could distinguish the prisoners perfectly well; I never lost fight of them.

Q. Not of any of them? - A. Excepting Brown.

Q. Did the watch join you? - A. No, not at that moment.

Q. You lost sight of Brown, but not of the other prisoners? - A. No, I did not; a young man hearing the cry of, stop thief, run out.

Q. What is his name? - A. Robert Mews; he brought Morris Haley up first.

Q. Who was there to take care of him? - A. A gentleman, who is here, named Saunders; then Mews brought the woman up.

Q. How soon after did you see any thing of the woman? - A. Almost directly.

Q. Who brought her? - A. Robert Mews .

Q. Did you see any thing more that night of Brown? - A. No, I did not.

Q. When did you see Brown again? - A. I saw him the next morning after we came from the Magistrate's; I went into the Ship, at Tottenham.

Q. Was that by chance? - A. I went to get some refreshment.

Q. You did not go to look for Brown there? - A. No.

Q. What happened then? - A. The prisoner Brown was sitting there.

Q. Was any body with him? - A. Yes, another man.

Q. Is he here? - A. No; as soon as he saw me he run out.

Q. Did any body stop him? - A. Yes, I followed him.

Q. Had you spoke to him before he run out? - A. No.

Q. Was it nearly as you came in? - A. Directly.

Q. Did you see him stopped? - A. I followed him, and called Robert Mews.

Q. Where was he? - A. He was some little distance behind, coming from the Magistrate's with the other prisoners; he run, and called to Brown as he was getting over a stile.

Q. Did you see him getting over the stile? - A. Yes, I did; he was running away; Brown stopped as he was getting over the stile, and Mews said he must go with us.

Q. Who laid hold of him? - A. Mews.

Q. He stopped at the stile, did he? - A. Yes; we told him we wanted him, and I took him into the public-house again, charged the constable with him, handcuffed him, and took him to the Magistrate's.

Q. Did you ever afterwards see your pocketbook? - A. Yes.

Q. When? - A. The next morning.

Q. Who had it when you saw it? - A. A man found it.

Q. Is he here? - A. No, he was a stranger, and nobody knows where he is.

Q. Did he deliver it to you? - A. No; I saw him pick it up about fifty yards from where the robbery was committed.

Q. Upon the road, or where? - A. By the side of the ditch.

Q. Then it was by accident he found it? - A. It was early in the morning; I got up with a friend to look for it.

Q. What time was it? - A. About six o'clock.

Q. Did this man join you? - A. I was on the road, and he was on the foot-path; I saw him pick something up, and when I came up to him, he had picked up the pocket-book, which I believed to be mine; I told him there was a name in the inside; he opened it before he gave it me, and then he delivered it to me.

Q. I hardly suppose there were any notes in it? - A. There was nothing in it but a pair of brass compasses, a pencil, and two cards.

Q. You mentioned your having some little bills; did you ever afterwards see any thing of them? - A. I saw two produced by the gentleman who picked them up, Mr. Saunders.

Q. The same morning you found the book, somebody produced the bills of parcels? - A. Yes; they were produced that night before the Magistrate; I saw them the same night that I was robbed.

Q. Is the pocket-book here? - A. Yes; Mr. Holmes has it.

Q. You cannot be mistaken as to the persons of the prisoners? - A. No.

Q. Had you lost sight of them from the time you quitted the public-house till the time of the attack? - A. No.

Q. They were walking very close to you? - A. Yes.

Prisoner Haley. Q. I wish to ask him whether, after we left the public-house, he did not pull off

his coat, and kick up a great row, offering to fight any body in the street? - A. No.

Q. Was he not in a second public-house after he met with me at Edmonton? - A. I was.

Court. Q. What house was that? - A. I think it was the Red Lion.

Q. Was that before you came to the Bull? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to go in there? - A. The young man and the prisoners went in there together, to have something to drink, and had some peppermint.

Q. Did you go in? - A. Yes; we were all in there.

Q. Did you drink with them there? - A. Yes, I drank part of a glass of peppermint.

Q. How did you come out from thence? - A. We all came out together.

Q. How soon-after this was it that you missed the young man? - A. I missed him just before they knocked me down.

Q. How far had you walked from the second public-house before you were knocked down? - A. I suppose not half a mile.

Q. You are sure you had no more than part of a glass of peppermint? - A. Yes.

Q. You were quite sober? - A. Yes; I had nothing to drink but part of two pints of potter, part of a glass of gin, and part of a glass of peppermint.

Q. It was about half a mile from this second public-house? - A. I don't know exactly; I think thereabouts.

Prisoner Haley. Q. I wish to ask whether he did not want to court Judith Quinland , and want to go home with her? - A. They said they were going to town.

Court. Q. Was this at the second public-house? - A. Yes, they said they were going to town, and we walked on together.

Q. Did you say any thing about the woman going home with you? - A. No.

Prisoner Haley. He asked me whether I was her husband or her brother; I said I was not.

Court. Q. Did you ask any questions of that sort? - A. I asked him if she was his sister, and he said she was.

Q. Did you ask him the first question, whether she was his wife? - A. No, I don't recollect that I did.

Prisoner Haley. Q. Whether he was not courting the woman? - A. The woman got hold of my arm, and we walked a little way together; the young man took away the woman, and they went on together, and I never saw the young man afterwards.

Court. Q. Then the woman was not there when the robbery was committed? - A. Yes, she was, but the young man had left her.

Prisoner Quinland. He pulled out his book in the public-house, and said, if I would go with him, I should have it.

Court. Q. Had you made any offer of that kind to her? - A. No, I had not; the pocketbook was in my pocket when they knocked me down.

Q. The question is, whether you made any offer of the pocket-book and its contents for any purpose, to her? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Had you offered any invitation to her to go with you? - A. No, I had not.

Prisoner Quinland. He caught hold of me, and wanted me to go with him.

Witness. No, I did not.

Court. Q. Recollect yourself, whether you were sober or not? - A. I recollect I knew what I was doing perfectly well.

Q. You admit you were in some degree in liquor? - A. I cannot say I was as I am at this moment; I had been drinking these two glasses and a pint of porter, and I walked from Waltham-cross to that place without any thing.

Q. You will not say you were as sober as you are now? - A. No, because I have not drank any thing but tea this morning.

Q. When any persons came about you, did you tell them what persons it were that had robbed you? - A. Yes; I said it was a man with a patch on his shoulder.

Q. Who did you say that to? - A. To Mr. Saunders.

Q. Did you say any thing about the woman and other man? - A. I cannot ascertain to say, any further than that the other man who got away had a blue jacket on.

Q. I ask, whether you described who it was that robbed you? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you say any thing about the woman, or give any description of her person? - A. Yes; there was a number of people round, I cannot ascertain or say who it was to.

Q. Did you say any thing about Brown? - A. I did.

Q. I want to know whether you told any thing to the persons about you of these being the persons that robbed you, and that the prisoners were in company with you before? - A. Yes.

Q. To every body? - A. To those who were there.

Q. Did you say you had been drinking with them? - A. Yes; I said I had been in company with the people that were in custody, and I described them as near as I could.

Q. Had you your recollection about you immediately when you got up? - A. I had.

Q. You were not so stunned, but you had your recollection about you? - A. Yes; and I pursued the prisoners immediately as fast as I could run.

Q. You did not, immediately after the robbery, say, you did not know the persons that robbed you? - A. No, I did not, to my knowledge.

Q. Not to any body? - A. No.

Q. You did not say that to any body? - A. No.

Q. You are sure you mentioned the circumstances of having been together in the publichouses? - A. I did.

Q. I mean as soon as any body came up, after the robbery? - A. Yes, I think I did.

Q. Recollect yourself? - A. I did.

THOMAS SAUNDERS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A bricklayer.

Q. Where do you live? - A. On Tottenham-green.

Q. Where were you on the 4th of October? - A. In my own house.

Q. Did you hear any alarm? - A. Yes.

Q. What was it? - A. About the hour of eight o'clock the boy brought our supper beer; on opening the door, I heard the cry of stop thief; I caught up a stick, and run to the place from whence the found came; I think the first person I saw was the the watchman; I asked him whether he had not heard the alarm; he said he had; while I was talking with him, Judith Quinland, I believe it to be -

Q. Can you say whether it was her or not? - A. I have not a doubt of it, though I will not swear to it.

Q. Then a woman is all you can say? - A. Yes; she came across the Common in very great agitation; I said to the watchman, it strikes me they are Irish people who have committed this robbery, and desired him to go with me to search under the trees from whence she came.

Q. Did you see her come from under the trees on the Common? - A. Yes.

Q. You say she came across the Common from under some trees - did you observe in what posture she was under the trees? - A. No, I did not see her till I saw her walking.

Q. You did not see her stoop, or any thing of that kind? - A. No.

Q. How far were the trees off? - A. Close by the side of the foot-path; we went to the trees, but did not find any body; afterwards I desired the watchman to go to assist the others, in case the man should be stopped; I took to my heels, and run before him; when I came to the four mile stone, Robert Mews had taken the prisoner, Haley; and when I went up there, I saw Judith Quinland again.

Q. Was she then taken? - A. Yes, she was, she run that way.

Q. Did that woman, who came from under the trees, run that way were Quinland was afterwards taken? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you say the woman taken was the woman that came from under the trees? - A. Yes, I am sure of that.

Q. Who had got her in custody? - A. Robert Mews.

Q. Can you swear the woman you saw come from under the trees, was the same woman that was taken? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it from the time of the woman coming from under the trees, till you saw the woman they laid hold of? - A. Two or three minutes probably.

Q. Did you find any thing, and where? - A. When I went up, she was in custody of the watchman; the prosecutor was swearing they were the people that robbed him, and they declaring they were not; the watchman was not so attentive as he should have been, and I desired him to take them to the Magistrate's immediately, and I would follow them, which I did; we had walked about two hundred yards, and I was rather before Judith Quinland , she complained of walking so fast, and said she must pull up her shoe at the heel; I thought she might be going to drop something, and I rather stopped back, and picked up two bills, which I really believe she dropped; I told a gentleman who was on horseback I had got them, and we proceeded to the Magistrate's, where I produced the bills, and put my initials to them, and shall know them again.

Prisoner Quinland. He turned back, and asked me whether the bills came from me.

Witness. No, I did not, I could not, because I suspected her, and stooped down immediately and picked them up.

ROBERT MEWS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. Coachman to Richard Cooper , Esq. at the Seven Sisters, Tottenham High Cross.

Q. What have you to say? - A. I did not see the robbery done, but I heard an outcry or stop thief, about eight o'clock.

Q. What did you do? - A. I run out of the gates, and saw a gentleman on horseback first.

Q. Who was that? - A. Mr. Biggs; upon that I stopped his horse, and having so done, I begged his pardon for it, as I knew him; he said it was not a horseman, but footpads who had committed the robbery, and he believed he had over-rode them, or rode by them; I then went in pursuit of them, and run up the side of the turnpike-road a good distance, but never saw any thing of them; as I was standing still, I heard a person come running very hard towards me; when I first saw the man, he crossed over to the other side of the road when he saw me; I crossed over to him, caught hold of him, and asked him where he was going to; he said he was going after his partner; I told him to stop, and asked him what made him in such a hurry; in the mean time Mr. Biggs came up, and said, that is one of the men I saw in the

scrummage, don't let him go, young man, and we detained him.

Q. Which is that man? - A. Morris Haley.

Q. Did you see any thing of any other man? - A. When Mr. Biggs came up on horseback, the man that was knocked down came up.

Q. You mean the prosecutor; you did not see it done? - A. No, but I saw his head all over dirt; when he came up, he said, that man knocked me down three times; after that, I said, take care of him, and I will go and see after the others.

Q. How came you to know there were others? - A. The gentleman told me to take care of myself, for there were three or four others, and they were Irishmen, and a woman among them; I went into the grove, where there is a cluster of trees, a ditch parts it from the road, and there I saw that woman and Brown running down the grove together; I caught hold of the woman's shoulders, and made a catch at the man, but he sprang away from me, the woman stopped directly, and I saw no more of the man then, but I took him again the next morning.

Q. Which way did he run that night? - A. He ran towards town then.

Q. What time next morning did you see him? - A. About seven o'clock.

Q. Where were you then? - A. At my master's gate, and from thence I walked towards him.

Q. Where was he then? - A. About one hundred yards from me.

Q. Did you know him to be the person? - A. Yes, I had seen him by the lamps, and the lamp-lighter's torch.

Q. The lamps did not light much into the grove? - A. It was rather moonlight.

Q. What did you do upon seeing him? - A. When I saw him in the morning, he was going towards Essex.

Q. Then you made no attempt to stop him? - A. No, because he was so far off.

Q. How did you know him; will you undertake to say it was the same man you saw at night? - A. Yes, I was close to him at night, I saw his face, for he turned round and looked at me, and according to the dress he had on the over night, and by the description I had of him, and what I saw of him the night before, I am sure it is the same, I will swear to his face.

Q. What, at the distance of one hundred yards? - A. Yes.

Q. He passed by you? - A. Yes.

Q. Why did not you pursue him then? - A. Because I wanted to go down to the Justice, and as he did not seem to wish to leave the place; as I was going to the Justice afterwards, a woman called to me, and asked me if I should know the man again, if I saw him, that got away the over-night; I said I should, and she gave me some information: I then went on to the Justice.

Q. You did not go after him? - A. Not then; when we came back from the Justice we agreed to go into the Ship to have some refreshment; Bangs went in before me, and Brown was in there along with another Irishman; he ran out as soon as Bangs went in, and Bangs said there he goes; I ran after him over the brick-fields, and he had just got to the stile as I got up to him; I detained him and asked him where he was going to.

Q. You had an opportunity of having a close view of him? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you be positive he was the person you saw with the woman in the Grove? - A. Yes.

Q. Nothing was said to him, but he ran out directly? - A. Not that I heard; I was going towards the house, and was within about twenty yards.

Q. You saw Bangs go in? - A. Yes, and immediately the prisoner Brown ran out.

JOHN HOLMES sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A constable.

Q. When were you applied to on this business? - A. On the 4th of October; I saw the three prisoners, another man, and the prosecutor together, at the White Hart, at Tottenham; I asked Mr. Cantrill if he knew what company he had in the taproom, he said, no; I told him, I thought they were smashers, and to be careful what money he took.

Q. Did you see them go out? - A. No.

Q. Were you in the same room with them? - A. No.

Q. How did you see them? - A. I had been at dinner there, and came into the tap-room up to the bar, I saw them as I crossed the tap-room up to the bar, and went back again into the room where I left my company; I saw no more of them till I was sent for to take them into custody and to take them before the Magistrate.

Q. Are you sure the three prisoners are the persons who were in company with the prosecutor? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know any one of them before? - A. Yes, Brown.

Q. Were you sent for at night or in the morning? - A. At night, when there were only two taken, Haley and the woman, and in the morning I was sent for to take Brown.

Prisoner Brown. Q. Where did you see me before? - A. At Mr. Nixon's, the Roebuck.

Q. What was I doing, or what day was it? - A. I cannot say the particular day, I have seen him drinking there along with the rest of the Irishmen.

Court. Q. Are you sure you have seen him? - A. I am very sure of it; I produce the pocket-book and bills which I received from the Magistrate. (Produces them).

Q. (To Bangs.) Look at the pocket-book? - A. My brother's name is in it, Joshua Bangs.

Q. Is that your pocket-book? - A. Yes.

Q. How came your brother's name in it? - A. He gave it to me.

Q. Is that the book that was taken from you? - A. Yes.

Q. Where are the bills that were taken from you? - A. These are the bills.

Q. What are they? - A. One is a bill of parcels of goods I bought, the other is a smith's bill that I settled with a person in Brook's-market, in town.

Q. (To Saunders). You said you put your initials upon the bills you picked up? - A. Yes.

Q. Are those the bills you picked up? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Bangs). Those bills were in your pocketbook at the time? - A. Yes, they were.

Holmes. Here is a stick which the Magistrate delivered to me; (produces a stout crab stick).

Mews. I picked that stick up just by where I took Haley.

Q. Did you produce that stick before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. How near was it picked up to where you stopped Haley? - A. Two or three yards.

Q. You did not see him throw it down? - A. No, I did not.

Court. I understand there is a Gentleman in Court who wishes to say something relative to this business.

EDWARD BIGGS sworn. Q. What do you know of this? - A. I was exactly upon the spot, I came up just at the time.

Q. You did not see the transaction yourself? - A. I saw three or four persons running away.

Q. Had you seen the prosecutor before? - A. No,

Q. Had you heard any outcry? - A. I heard the cry of watch.

Q. How many persons did you see running away? - A. I saw three or four, I think there must be four.

Q. Was there any woman among them? - A. I cannot say, there was not light enough to distinguish.

Q. Which way did they run? - A. They ran different ways; the prosecutor cried out, watch; at first I thought it was a squabble, and could hardly think it was a robbery; when it was cried out a second time I went up to him, he was on the footpath, and he told me he had been knocked down and robbed by two men and a woman, who had ran away; I desired him to see where the watchmen were, upon which he called as hard as he could; I said I would go forward and take care they should not get towards London; being on horseback I got on rather fast; I met Mews, the coachman, and told him the circumstances; as I returned back towards the spot where the robbery was committed, on the dark side of the road, there was Haley under the trees, and he crossed over towards the side on which the coachman was; I asked him where his companions were; he said he did not know; his giving me that answer, gave me suspicion he had been in company before with them; the coachman took hold of him, and said, he must be one; we were going to take him to the prosecutor, who, at that instant, came up, and said, that was the man who had knocked him down, and that he would swear to him: I think the prisoner said, he had never seen him before; I desired them to see where the others were, and I would go on; I went on, and overtook another man, whom I supposed was the other; he was very near a watch-box, and I said, do you know any thing of the robbery at Tottenham?

Q. Was that Brown? - A. It was not Brown, but another man; I desired him to come back, he said he had been knocked down himself; I then took him and gave him in charge to the watchman, who let him go as soon as I left him, which I think it is very fit the trustees should know of; I then went back, and found they had got the woman; the prosecutor certainly was in liquor, and must have lost fight of them before they were taken.

Q. What makes you think so? - A. Because, between the time he was robbed, and when they were taken, must take two or three minutes.

Q. You did not yourself see the robbery? - A. There was a general run when I came up; my coming up, I suppose, was the cause of their running; I lost sight of them, and so must he; though it was moon light, it was a very dark moon-light.

Court. I did not understand him to have said they were not out of his fight till they were taken, but from the time they left the public-house, till the robbery was committed.

Hayley's defence. As I was returning from Edmonton

, I met my fellow prisoner, James Brown , and we talked together for a little while, till the prosecutor and his partner came up to us; they asked us where we were going, we said we would not go beyond that place, if we could get a lodging, but we could not; then they took us into a public-house to have some beer, we had some gin and beer, and the landlord asked for the money for the gin; the prosecutor and his partner said, when they had drank the gin, they would pay for it; the landlord said, the rules were up over the mantlepiece, and the prosecutor said, if we went into the parlour, we could drink a bottle of wine before we paid; after we left that place, they took us to another public-house, and there we had four half pints of pepper-mint; after we had had that, we went out into the street, and the prosecutor wanted this woman to go with him; strangers met him in the street after we left the second public-house, and he pulled off his coat and challenged to fight the people, and so he did his partner, which made me part company with him and walk on before; then

I heard the woman crying out with him, and James Brown went to assist her, and got striking him; I did not, nor do I know any thing of his property.

Quinland's defence. All I have to say is, that I am a poor lone girl, and have no one to take my part; being quite a stranger in London, as I have worked chiefly in Essex, I was told to go to Fdmonton, where I should find some work; I went, and met with these two men, standing at a publichouse door, and the prosecutor and his partner; the prosecutor was the first who asked me where I was going, I said, I should go no farther, if I could get lodgings there; he said, he would stop with me; I told him, I would not wish to trust myself with strange people I did not know; we went into a public-house to refresh ourselves, and the prosecutor went in with us, and told us, if we were bound for London, he would go along with us; he called for a pint of beer, and went out for some victuals, we called for a pot, and said, we would not be under a compliment to him while we could pay for a pint; we came out of that house and went into another, but I don't know which it is; we had some beer there, and four half pints of peppermint; the prosecutor began to offer me every thing he had got, his pocket-book, notes and all, if I would go with him; he told me he was a single man, and if I would go home with him, he would settle so much a year on me; I said, I did not want any such thing, that I was not of that cast, for that I always worked hard for my bread; he came out into the road, and laid hold of my hand, I pulled it away, and he said I would rather go with some other fellow than himself; then he stripped off his coat and hat, and said, he would fight the best man in the street; one of the men took him up, and struck him three times with a stick; we got him away from them, and got him to go along with us; we had walked but a few yards, when he got hold of me, and said, I should not go any farther; my fellow prisoners said, they might get into a bobble if they stopped any longer with us, for we were all drunk; I began to scream, and he let me loose, when he found that people came up; I was making towards this man to save me, and to take me to London, upon which he called out watch, and took up this man directly; I staid where I was, being so much amazed, that I did not know which way to go, and I stopped behind; I was then going to look for James Brown to assist me home; I met him on the road, and he said, he would have no more to do with me, but told me to go about my business wherever I liked; when I had no one to assist me, I began to cry in the middle of the road; they charged the watchman to take me up, and I was taken before a Magistrate; I know no more of his pocket-book, and what was in it than the child that was born last night; he said, his partner was along with him, three hours before, but he run away as fast as he could, and I have never seen him since. I know no more of it, and I leave it to your Lordships and the Gentlemen of the Jury.

Prisoner Brown's defence. (Read.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I humbly crave the indulgence of this Honourable Court to hear this paper read; for being unused to appear in this situation, I am not able to speak with that accuracy necessary to make my innocence appear, which I trust it will. I am a labourer, and went to get a job at Edmonton, and had engaged to work there the next day; going back to London, I met my fellow prisoners refreshing themselves; on their saying they were going to London, we agreed to walk together. Soon after we were overtaken by the prosecutor and another man; they asked us to to drink; we consented, and went into the Red Lion; the prosecutor called for liquor, and insisted on treating us; we would not consent to it, but would each pay a share of the reckoning. After this we went to another house, where we had more liquor, and the prosecutor pressed very much to pay; he seemed to be intoxicated, and to make very free with Quinland, which she refused to let him do, and seemed much terrified. We then went out of the house, and a scuffle ensued between Haley and the prosecutor; a number of people collected round, and the prosecutor began to strip. Being alarmed at my situation, and the company I was in, I thought it best to leave them, for I had no knowledge of my fellow-prisoners. I heard the screams of a woman, and somebody running towards me, which was Quinland; she appeared to be frightened, and crying; she said the prosecutor had used her ill, and wanted to force her against her will; I saw the others coming up, and not liking their company, I went way; next day I was going to my work, and went into the house to have a pint of beer with the prosecutor, who asked me if I was in his company last night, and I said, yes, and he had me taken into custody. My Lord, I have here related a plain and simple tale of facts, and humbly trust my case to your decision, fully confident a poor and friendless man will find that commiseration his innocence and unhappy condition requires.

Morris Haley , GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

Judith Quinland , GUILTY , Death , aged 22.

James Brown, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-102

849. JOHN WILLIAMS and WILLIAM WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a trunk, value 20s. a tea-caddy, value 7s. seven gowns, value 2l. 8s. six aprons, value 6s. three petticoats, value 18s. three books, value 3s. a pair of pockets, value 1s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 3s. two caps, value

2s. a shawl, value 1s. and a silver pin, value 6d. the property of Hannah Wild , in the dwelling-house of John Sayers .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of John Sayers .

HANNAH WILD sworn. - Q. Are you married? - A. No.

Q. When did this happen? - A. I came out of the country.

Q. Where from? - A. From Margate.

Q. Do you recollect the day of the month? - A. On Friday, a fortnight to-day, the 22d of October.

Q. How did you come to town? - A. By the hoy.

Q. Where did you land? - A. At Mr. Sayers's, the foot of Westminster-bridge, on this side the water.

Q. Did you bring any trunk with you? - A. Yes, two trunks.

Q. How long did you stay there? - A. I did not stop half an hour.

Q. Had you any body in your company? - A. No, I only just delivered up my boxes.

Q. Had you any refreshment there - how came you to go to the house? - A. The waterman told me I had better leave them there, as it did not suit me to take them any where else.

Q. You staid about half an hour? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you leave any trunks behind you? - A. Yes, I left them both.

Q. In whose charge? - A. In Mr. Sayers's.

Q. In the house? - A. Yes, in the parlour.

Q. Did Mr. Sayers, or any of the family, know of their being left there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he agree to take care of them? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you either of your trunks afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. When? - A. Two days after I went to take one away.

Q. When you left the house, did you take either of them with you? - A. Yes, I took one trunk away, and went back for the other, and it was gone.

Q. You say there were two trunks in Mr. Sayers's charge? - A. Yes.

Q. That same night did you take away one with you? - A. Yes, I took one, and when I went for the other, it was gone.

Q. Do you mean to say you left both the trunks for two days? - A. Yes.

Q. Then two days after you returned and fetched one away, did you? - A. Yes; but I don't recollect exactly what day it was I left them.

JOHN SAYERS sworn. - Q. When was it that she left the trunks? - A. On a Tuesday.

Q. When was the 22d? - A. On a Friday; this young woman came ashore with a waterman, and said she had been to Margate as a servant.

Q. What day was the trunk taken away? - A. On a Friday.

Q. Do you recollect the day that both trunks were taken away? - A. She brought a man in a smock frock to fetch one, and in about twenty minutes after the prisoners fetched the other.

Q. (To Hannah Wild.) Can you recollect any better now what day it was you came to the Swan, at Westminster-bridge? - A. I believe it was on a Tuesday.

Q. You came to the Swan by the recommendation of the waterman? - A. Yes.

Q. And you brought two trunks? - A. Yes.

Q. And you left them there? - A. Yes, in the care of Mr. Sayers.

Q. And you were to call again for them, were you? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you call for your trunks, supposing this Tuesday? - A. On the Friday following.

Q. That would be Friday, the 22d of October? - A. Yes.

Q. And you took them the Tuesday before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive the two trunks? - A. No, only one.

Q. Had you sent any body to fetch the trunk away? - A. No, I had not.

Q. Did you afterwards see any thing of the other trunk you had not fetched away? - A. Yes, I saw it again.

Q. How soon after this Friday was it? - A. I went to the Police-office, and the articles were brought to the Police-office the same day.

Q. On the Friday? - A. Yes; I have seen them, and know them again.

Q. You know nothing of either of the two prisoners? - A. No.

Q. You never saw them till they were in custody? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. (To John Sayers.) You keep the Swan public-house, at the foot of Westminster-bridge ? - A. Yes.

Q. Your house is in the parish of St. Margaret? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember that young woman coming to your house? - A. Yes, on a Tuesday, I don't know the day of the month, but it was last month.

Q. Did she bring any thing with her? - A. She came up with a waterman, and brought two trunks.

Q. What was done with them? - A. I asked her if she was going to take them away that evening; she said she did not know; I said, if you are not, I will put them in my own room, for fear they should be lost, and I did put them in my bedroom, this was on a Tuesday; and while I was at Guildhall, Westminster, upon the trial of a man who had robbed me, the prisoners came and fetched the trunk away.

Q. What day were the things missing? - A. Friday.

Q. (To Hannah Wild.) Had you fetched one away? - A. When I received one trunk, I left the other behind.

Q. What time did you go back again? - A. In about an hour and an half.

Q. You had the first conveyed away by a carman? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you not to take them both away? - A. The man did not understand that I had more than one.

Q. Why did you not take both away? - A. While I was paying Mr. Sayers for taking care of the trunks, the man was gone too far, and he did not chuse to come back again for the other.

Q. (To John Sayers .) Had you seen them in your bed-room that day? - A. Yes, and I bolted the door before I went out; they were safe when I went out, and were tied up in matting, so that I cannot tell what colour the trunks were.

JANE NEVILLE sworn. - Q. Are you servant to Mr. Sayers? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the trunks being left at his house by the first witness? - A. Yes.

Q. On the Friday do you remember her coming for the trunks? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Sayers was from home? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you deliver to her any trunks? - A. Yes, by my mistres's orders.

Q. What was done with the other trunk - were they both taken out of the room by your mistress's order? - A. No, only one.

Q. What room was it taken out of? - A. Out of my missres's bed-room.

Q. How came both not to be taken out? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did you see what was done with the trunk so brought out? - A. A carman took it away.

Q. What became of the young woman? - A. She stopped talking with my mistress, and the man drove away with it: she said she must go and see after her box.

Q. Then she meant to have taken both? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was she absent? - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did any thing happen in the mean time? - A. Yes.

Q. Before she came back? - A. Yes.

Q. What happened? - A. William Williams came in about five or ten minutes after the young woman went away.

Q. Were you present when he came in? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come alone? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw nobody with him at all? - A. No.

Q. Where did he come to? - A. He came into the tap-room, and said, if you please, ma'am, I want the box for the young woman who is at Charing-cross, waiting for it, and my mistress bid me give it him out.

Q. Did he appear to know where the box was put? - A. Yes, he pointed to the room, and said, it was in that room.

Q. Did he say then that he was sent for it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give it him? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you undertake to swear it was the prisoner, William Williams ? - A. Yes.

Q. How was he dressed? - A. Just as he is now.

Q. How soon after did you see him again? - A. Not till he was taken up.

Q. How soon was that? - A. It might be about a couple of days.

Q. How long did he stay with you before he took it away? - A. He did not stay a minute longer than getting the box.

Q. Are you sure it is William Williams ? - A. Yes.

ISAAC ELLSWOOD sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A watchman, and in the day-time I hang songs and set sticks for sale against the dead wall near Whitehall.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 2l, Cartwright-street, Westminster.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they lodge at your house? - A. No, I am only a lodger myself.

Q. Did you lodge in the same house? - A. No; the way I became acquainted with John Williams was buying small canes of him to sell in the street.

Q. Were you acquainted with William Williams ? - A. I was not.

Q. When did you see the two prisoners? - A. On Friday the 22d of last month; in the evening, near seven o'clock, John Williams came to my apartments, which is the kitchen of the house, and brought a bundle with him, which he asked me to let him leave all night.

Q. You saw him only at that time? - A. Only him at that time; he threw down half-a-crown for me to go and fetch half a pint of rum, and told me his brother was above stairs, desiring me to send him down; I went for the rum, saw William Williams in the street, and told him to go down, which he did.

Q. Did you bring the rum? - A. Yes.

Q. What passed between you? - A. There was nothing particular passed; he said it was a bundle of old rags of his own, or something to that purpose.

Q. Was William by then? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did they stay? - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did they go away together? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they say when they would call again? - A. Yes, the next morning.

Q. Who said that? - A. John.

Q. After they were gone what did you do? - A. He left the bundle laying on the floor at the foot of the bed, and my wife turning the bundle over saw the body of a gown bundled up; my wife said, he is not married, they are certainly stolen.

Q. What did you do in consequence of your suspicions? - A. I undid them, and found a quantity of women's wearing apparel.

Q. What did you do? - A. I did not stop to count them, but went to Queen-square to fetch a police officer.

Q. Did you get one? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do then? - A. He took them to the Magistrate.

Q. Did you give information where you had got it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know where the prisoners lodged at that time? - A. No.

Q. You knew their names? - A. John had told my wife, but I never heard him say where he lived.

Q. Did you give all the articles to the police officer? - A. Yes.

Q. After this did you see any thing of the prisoners? - A. Not till the Monday evening following, when I suppose they came for the things.

Q. Did they ask for the bundle, or what did they say? - A. I did not stop to ask many questions; I told them to sit down while I fetched a pot of beer; I put a soldier, who lives in the house, to watch the door while I fetched a police officer to fetch them away, and they were taken into custody.

FRANCES CANTY sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Simmons-buildings, Pye-street, Westminster.

Q. What do you know about any trunk? - A. Last Saturday was a week, when I was going out, about seven o'clock in the morning, to work, I met John Williams .

Q. Did he lodge in the house with you? - A. No, I know him by his coming backwards and forwards to his mother and sisters in the same court.

Q. What did he say? - A. I met him very much in liquor at the end of the court, and he asked me if I would have any thing to drink.

Q. What, at seven in the morning? - A. Yes; I said I could not stop, but he made me have a glass; coming back he told me he had a very handsome box he would make me a present of; I said I did not wish to accept of it without buying it of him; he told me he would not take any thing, but that he would give it me.

Q. Did he give it you? - A. In about a quarter of an hour he fetched it up stairs to my apartments.

Q. Is that in his mother's house? - A. No, just opposite.

Q. Did he give it you? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with it? - A. I went down to my brother's, who was at work at Millbank, and told him that John Williams had made me a present of it; he desired me to give it him back again directly; I went to his sister's with it, and desired her to take it, but she would not, and I left it in their passage.

Q. Who did you see when you offered the box? - A. I saw the sister and the mother.

Q. After you had been with your brother, did you see either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, up stairs, in the mother's house.

Q. You went to them? - A. Yes.

Q. And offered the box again? - A. Yes.

Q. John Williams would not take it? - A. No, they would not take it.

Q. Where did you leave the box? - A. In their passage, Where the mother lives.

Q. Do they lodge in the same house? - A. The prisoners did not, but they were there.

Q. What became of the box afterwards? - A. I don't know; I never saw it afterwards till I saw it at the Office, in Queen-square.

Q. What sort of box was it? - A. It was a hair trunk.

Q. Had you opened it? - A. It was open.

Q. Was any thing in it? - A. No.

ISAAC WILKINSON sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A coal-dealer.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Old Pye-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. What was your first acquaintance with them? - A. I let John Williams a room on the 18th of October last, but they both occupied it.

Q. Did they come the same night? - A. I don't know that both came that night; but one did, and the night after they were both there.

Q. Do you remember any trunk being found in this room? - A. I did not see it.

Q. Did you see any taken away? - A. No.

Q. What part of the house was the room you had let? - A. It is not in the house where I live; it was the lower room.

Q. On which hand as you go in? - A. The right hand.

Q. You were not present when the officers went? - A. No.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - Q. You are an officer of Police? - A. Yes, at Queen-square.

Q. What have you got there? - A. A trunk, which I found in the prisoners lodgings.

Q. What day was that? - A. On Tuesday the 26th of last month.

Q. Was it in the place that Wilkinson has described as their lodgings? - A. Yes.

Q. The trunk was empty then I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it locked or unlocked? - A. The lock was broke.

Q. Did you find any key any where? - A. I found a key on William.

Q. When was that? - A. On Monday evening the 25th.

Q. Does the key fit the lock? - A. It fitted the padlock on the door of the prisoners lodgings.

JOHN HOBBS sworn. - Q. Are you an officer? - A. Yes.

Q. From whom did you receive the bundle you are going to produce? - A. From Elswood; I met him as he was going to the Office. - (Produces a bundle.)

Q. Have you had it ever since? - A. Not ever since; Harper has had it locked up in a box.

Q. (To Harper.) Can you say it is in the same state you received it? - A. I locked it up, and have had the key in my pocket ever since; I delivered it to Hobbs this morning.

Q. (To Wild.) Say what you can speak to? - A. To a muslin gown.

Q. What do you know it by; have you examined them all? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you speak to them all? - A. Yes, I can.

Q. Are there any aprons? - A. Yes, three.

Q. Look at the petticoats; do you know them? - A. Yes.

Q. There are some books and a pair of pockets? - A. Yes, they are all her.

Q. Is a silver pin there? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you a tea-caddy there? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you positively swear they are all your's? - A. Yes.

Q. And they were in one of your trunks? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there in the bundle all the things the trunk contained, or have you lost any? - A. I lost two gowns.

Q. Is any thing else missing? - A. Two aprons.

Q. What do you value the things at; how much a-piece, according to their wear; first of all the gowns? - A. Half-a-guinea.

Q. Are they new, or much worn? - A. None of them are very much worn.

Q. You take them one with the other to be worth half-a-guinea a-piece? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. What do you value your tea-caddy at? - A. Half-a-guinea.

Q. Did you give that for it? - A. I did not buy it; I don't know exactly the value of it.

Q. There is a handkerchief, two caps, and a shawl, what is the value of these altogether? - A. About half-a-guinea.

Q. Including the petticoats? - A. No, only these things now in the box; I value them very low when I value them so.

Q. Do you think your seven gowns are lowly valued, or highly valued? - A. They are worth that; I cannot say exactly.

Q. Do you know the trunk? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you had it? - A. About three months.

Q. Was it new when you had it? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know it now? - A. Yes.

Q. What value is it? - A. About a guinea.

Q. Do you recollect what you gave for it? - A. I exchanged for another.

Q. Was the lock broke when you left it at the Swan? - A. No.

John William 's defence. Last Friday week I was at work in the London Road, at Mr. Barber's, stick-manufactory, when my brother came to me, and asked me if I was busy; I said not particularly, for it was the first day I had been at work there; he asked me if I could step along with him, and he would satisfy me for my trouble; I asked leave of my master to go, and went with him home to Westminster; he asked me if I knew of any person where I could leave a bundle for him; I told him I had nobody to leave it with as I knew of, but I would go to Mr. Ellswood's wife, and ask her if she would let me leave it there; I went, accompanied by my brother, and left it there, saying, I would call for it in the morning; as such I did not call till the Monday following, and we were both taken into custody; I know nothing more of the property.

William William 's defence. My brother, was at work when I fetched him; he knew nothing of the property, or where it came from; what he did, he did by my order, and left the bundle with his friend according to my order.

John William, NOT GUILTY .

William Williams , GUILTY . Death , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-103

850. JAMES BRISCOE , JOHN DENHAM , and JARVIS BAKER , were indicted for the wilful murder of James Pamphlin , on the 4th of October .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp, and stated by Mr. Const.)

THOMAS SHIFFNEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. A servant to Mr. Page, in St. John-street.

Q. Were you acquainted with Pamphlin, the deceased? - A. Yes, about six months before this happened.

Q. What time did you meet with him on Monday the 4th of October? - A. About 20 minutes before nine o'clock at night; he came to the Bell public-house, Clerkenwell-green, where I was.

Q. Did you drink any thing there? - A. Yes, we had some beer.

Q. Did you agree to go away together? - A. No, Pamphlin went first about three or four minutes.

Q. Was he in liquor? - A. He was not quite drunk: he was the worse for liquor, but was able to walk and talk.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I was sober.

Q. What quantity of beer had you? - A. There

were seven or eight in company, and I suppose we had a pot of beer a piece.

Q. Where did you see Pamphlin again? - A. At the steps going into the Sessions-house, Hicks's-hall, by himself.

Q. When you got up to him, was it proposed and agreed to that you should go home together to Goswell-street? - A. Yes; I live in Old-street, Pamphlin lived in Pear-tree-street; we proceeded as far as Aylesbury-street from the steps at Hicks'shall, when I told him my nearest way was to turn down St. John's-street, and go down Sutton-street, towards Old-street; he said it was no great round for me to go along Compton-street; upon which I agreed to go that way.

Q. What time did you get to Compton-street? - A. About half past nine.

Q. How far had you got in Compton-street before any thing happened to you? - A. Close to the Harrow public-house, in Compton-street .

Q. Were you then walking a-breast or not? - A. I was before Pamphlin about two or three yards, as near as I can say, walking one after the other.

Q. Before you come to the public-house, is there a fruit-shop? - A. Yes, a green-shop.

Q. You being before Pamphlin, what occurred there? - A. I passed two young women.

Q. Where were they? - A. At the green-shop, one was half and half in the door-way, and the other standing on the pavement.

Q. Did Pamphlin seem as if he was speaking to them? - A. Not at first; I cannot say whether he missed his step, and caught hold of the young woman to save himself, or whether he caught hold of her wilfully, I cannot say, for I kept walking on, and might be six or eight yards before him when I missed him.

Q. Whether from his missing his step or not, did you hear the women say any thing? - A. I heard one of the women say, "I am not one of that sort;" says Pamphlin,

"I like you the better for that;" then I heard the name of Jem called out, but I cannot say by whom; I returned back to Pamphlin, and asked him to come along home; as soon as I spoke, three men came round him.

Q. Where did they come from? - A. From the Harrow, as near as I can say; they did not come further than from the public-house door.

Q. Had you seen any person of their description in the street before that time? - A. No.

Q. Who were the three persons that you suppose came out of the public-house.

Q. Briscoe was the first, and another, of the name of Smith, was close to him, and Denham.

Q. Do you say that Smith, was the first who made any attempt? - A. No, Briscoe; I saw him make two attempts at Pamphlin, first with his fists; and observed that three or four more came round me, so that I was separated from Pamphlin.

Q. Who surrounded you? - A. I know none but Denham.

Q. Did you see any other attempt made by any body on Pamphlin, except what you have stated? - A. No, because I was separated from him, and drawn to the other side of the street, where I tried to make my escape, which I did at last.

Q. Before you made your escape, did you receive any injury? - A. I did not know of any, except one blow in the face, which I had a black eye through; that was all I knew of till I got home to my lodging.

Q. How soon after did you see Pamphlin? - A. He overtook me before I got to the top of Compton-street, into Goswell-street, and asked me how I came off; I said I had a blow in the face, and was afraid I should have a black eye.

Q. Did he make any complaint? - A. He complained of his sides being very sore, and did not know what was the matter.

Q. Where did you part? - A. Just at Mr. Gordon's, in Goswell-street; he went up Peartree-street, and I went home, to No. 3, Dolphin-court, Old-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley, Counsel for Briscot and Denham. Q. Your back was towards Pamphlin when this affray took place? - A. Yes.

Q. These young women had been buying fruit, or something? - A. I cannot say; I passed them.

Q. The first thing you heard was one of them say, we are not of your sort? - A. Those were the first words.

Q. Then you say you turned round, and saw Pamphlin strike against one of them? - A. It was before she made use of those words.

Q. Did you happen to see whether it was between her thighs, or upon her thighs, that he happened to strike? - A. No.

Q. You don't know whether it was about the thighs that he happened awkwardly to take her? - A. No.

Q. That woman he struck turned out to be the wife of Briscoe? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did not one of the women run to the publichouse before any of the men came out, and make an alarm? - A. I don't know; I heard the name of

"Jem

"called out.

Q. You don't know whether it was by accident or design he fell against the woman? - A. No.

Q. Can you account for her saying, I am not one of your sort, unless he put his hand upon her by design? - A. No.

Q. Did you hear any of the polite language he made use of? - A. No.

Q. Did you hear any observation made by him? - A. I heard Pamphlin say, he liked her the better for that.

Q. When the men came out, Briscoe squared at him with his fists? - A. Yes.

Q. Pamphlin was a strong sturdy fellow, was not he? - A. He was a strong young man.

Q. As big again as Briscoe, was not he? - A. Yes.

Q. After Briscoe squared at him, did you not see him knock Briscoe down? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you see Briscoe on the ground at all, as if he had been knocked down? - A. No.

Q. You say Smith was the second person who came up? - A. Smith was close to Briscoe.

Q. Denham was third man? - A. Yes.

Q. After you were separated from Pamphlin by the other people that came round you, Smith remained with the deceased; he did not attack you? - A. I cannot say whether he did or not; I partly judge he was one of the party, but cannot say positively only to Denham.

Q. Was not Smith one of the persons that remained with the deceased? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Cannot you say whether he was one who attacked you? - A. I partly think he was one by his size and description.

Court. Q. Can you say whether Smith remained with the deceased, or came up to you? - A. I cannot tell where Smith was after I was separated from the deceased; he was first with Briscoe.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you never said that Smith was the person who used the knife, and cut you? - A. No, I saw no knives.

Q. You did not see a knife in the hands of Briscoe or Denham? - A. No.

Court. Q. Can you say what time it took up? - A. It might be about five minutes from the first commencement till Pamphlin overtook me; it did not last longer than three or four minutes.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. What are you? - A. I have been to sea, and am just come home.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In St. John's-street, Clerkenwell.

Q. Do you know the prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you with them on the 4th of October, at the Harrow public-house, in Compton-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was in your company besides them? - A. One Lewis and a good many more.

Q. Men and women? - A. There were four women in the room, and their husbands with them.

Q. Had you been there long? - A. About an hour.

Q. Were they there before you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Briscoe's wife and sister being there? - A. Yes.

Q. All the time you were there? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it Briscoe's sister, or his wife's sister? -- A. His wife's sister.

Q. Do you recollect what passed that evening? - A. Yes; Mrs. Briscoe and her sister went out to buy some apples, and returned; in about half an hour they went out a second time; I went to the door to make water, and saw two young men come up to the girls, and behave very impudent.

Q. Do you recollect what they said or did? - A. No.

Q. Did they do any thing? - A. No; when they were impudent, Mrs. Briscoe went in for Briscoe.

Q. You must tell us what they said and did? - A. They said they would - them fairly; then Mrs. Briscoe went in for Briscoe and Denham, and Briscoe came out first with an open knife in his hand; he opened it first as he came out of the passage.

Q. Did you see him? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did he get it? - A. It was in his pocket; I saw him take it out; then Denham came out afterwards, and opened something that he pulled out of his pocket; it opened like a razor; Briscoe went up to the two young men, who were together, and Denham followed; Briscoe cut the man several times, and Denham cut him too.

Q. Which man did they cut? - A. I cannot say which it was; they were both together at the time; they both cut away at the men, and then the men run away.

Q. Had either of them struck before at Briscoe or Denham? - A. No, I did not see either of them; we then went back-again into the house.

Q. How far was this from the public-house? -

Q. Not above five or six yards; Briscoe, when he was going into the passage, gave the knife to Jarvis Baker , saying, "here is the knife,"

Q. Was it open or shut? - A. Shut; he said, here is the knife I have been using.

Q. What sort of knife was it? - A. A pocket clasp-knife.

Q. Had you seen it before? - A. Yes, that afternoon, as Briscoe and I were coming from Merlin's-Cave; he said, "I believe I have lost my knife;" then he selt in his pocket, "O no, I have not, here it is," and opened it, and shewed it to me.

Q. Who went into the public-house again? - A. All of them, Jarvis Baker , Briscoe, me, Denham, and the girls, and staid there till about eleven o'clock, when we went home.

Q. Did any thing pass? - A. Briscoe said there had been a bloody row.

Q. Did you see Baker do any thing? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys, Counsel for Baker.

Q. This was Briscoe's knife? - A. I don't know.

Q. You had seen it in the possession of him before? - A. Yes.

Q. You said before the Magistrates, as you say now, that Baker did not do any thing? - A. Nothing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You all went to the public-house for amusement? - A. Yes, to spend the evening.

Q. You had no intention to commit any assault? - A. No.

Q. Was not one of the four women Briscoe's wife, and the other her sister, going to be married to Denham? - A. I don't know whether she was or not, but she was Mrs. Briscoe's sister.

Q. The first you heard the deceased say, was that indecent language? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear either of the women say, they were not the sort of women he wanted? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not the deceased as impudently continue his indecency? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not leave them? - A. No.

Q. Did you see him put his hand upon any part of the women? - A. No.

Q. Mrs. Briscoe went for her husband and Denham? - A. Yes.

Q. And they came out? - A. Yes.

Q. The men still continuing there? - A. Yes, they were both together.

Q. After Briscoe came out, the deceased continued there? - A. Before Briscoe came out they were walking away.

Q. Where about were the two men when Briscoe came out? - A. About a yard and a half from the public-house door.

Q. Then I suppose they followed the women from the fruit-shop to the public-house? - A. The fruit-shop is next door to the public-house.

Q. Whether or not they followed the women to the public-house, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. Did you observe whether Briscoe was knocked down by the deceased? - A. He was not.

Q. You did not see him? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to say positively that Denham was the second man that came out after Briscoe? - A. Yes.

Q. You could not be mistaken; it could be yourself that followed him? - A. No, I am sure it was not.

Q. The man in company with the deceased had as good an opportunity of seeing as you? - A. No, he was further from the door.

Q. You said he was standing about a yard and a half from the door? - A. He was walking on.

Q. You say you did not come out second? - A. No.

Q. Were not you taken up and charged with committing the murder yourself? - A. I was taken up.

Q. And was charged as being the man who committed the murder? - A. Yes.

Q. You have told me this happened all on a sudden, and not by agreement? - A. No.

Q. Will you say that it was not Briscoe, but yourself, that gave the wound? - A. No, it was not; it was Briscoe.

Q. Recollect yourself, although you have escaped an indictment for murder, you may not escape the pillory; do you know William Langthorn ? - A. Yes; he is a coal-heaver.

Q. I ask you on your oath, did you not say to Langthorn, that it was you, and not Briscoe, that struck the blow? - A. No, I did not.

Q. I will give you time to recant; I ask you again, upon your oath, (because I will call him) have you not said that you struck the deceased? - A. No, I have not.

Q. Have you not said you struck the other man? - A. No.

Q. Do you know James Vernon? - A. No.

Q. You were confined in Coldbath-fields Prison? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect having had any conversation with a fellow-prisoner? - A. No; I recollect having conversation with one Peter Stokes , but not Vernon.

Q. Had you any conversation with a fellowprisoner about this assault? - A. No.

Q. You could not have said to a prisoner confined in the next cell, that you struck the blow yourself? - A. No.

Q. Do you know George Young ? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever tell him you had given the blow yourself? - A. No, or to any one else.

Q. How long were you confined before you were admitted an evidence for the Crown? - A. Near a fortnight.

Q. You were in a solitary cell before you turned evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. That worked upon you? - A. No, I told Mr. Bleamire.

Q. Perhaps you have heard of a reward of 50l.? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to say, that you don't know that the parish has offered a reward of 50 guineas, very laudably for the conviction of the persons concerned? - A. No, I have not.

Q. You know it has been posted up all over the town? - A. I cannot read.

Q. Do you mean to say you have never heard it? - A. No, I have not.

Q. You have not been with the witnesses, and heard it? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to say, although you have been in company with the witnesses, and examined three times at the Police Office, and accompanied backwards and forwards by the Police officers, that you did not hear from any of them about the reward of fifty guineas? - A. No, I did not.

Q. I am the first that gave you that information? - A. Yes.

Q. That you swear? - A. Yes.

Q. You told us a little while ago, you have just returned from sea; have you been travelling for the benefit of your health, or in the service of your country? - A. I went on board as a boy, and have been to China.

Q. Did you go to notany-Bay in your way? - A. No.

Mr. Const. Q. You were with the other persons before any thing took place? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw the whole from beginning to end? - A. Yes.

Q. When Briscoe came to the door, were you so situated that you could see all the parties? - A. Yes.

Q. If Briscoe had been knocked down, must you have seen it? - A. Yes.

Q. You said the two men were going off, say how they were going? - A. They were going up Compton-street.

Court. Q. When Briscoe came out, were the men walking or standing still? - A. They were walking up Compton-street.

Mr. Const. Q. Before Briscoe came out, had they left the women entirely? - A. Yes, they had.

Q. What distance might they have gone before Briscoe came up to them? - A. About a yard and a half; or two yards.

Q. You have been confined ever since, and have not heard about the reward? - A. No; I have been confined most of the time.

Court. Q. Do you mean to say that both Briscoe and Denham struck at the deceased? - A. I cannot say, but they struck at them both.

Q. Do you mean that both the prisoners struck at both the men? - A. Yes.

Q. Recollect the importance of the question, that both the prisoners, Briscoe and Denham, struck at both the men? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say, as soon as they got up to them, or some time after? - A. Directly.

Q. Did no words pass? - A. No.

Q. You were charged, I believe, by Shiffnell as one of the men who struck them? - A. No, not as I hear of; I did not.

Q. How came you to be taken up? - A. By being in company.

WILLIAM BENNETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. A file-cutter.

Q. Were you at the Harrow on Monday the 4th of October, and who with? - A. Yes, with Baker.

Q. Do you know Briscoe? - A. No; I only know him by seeing him in the house that night, and I saw Denham there.

Q. Were two women there? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect Denham being called by any name by Briscoe? - A. Yes, Copper smith.

Mr. Knapp. I understand he is a coppersmith by business.

Q. Do you remember, between nine and ten, the two women going out? - A. Yes.

Q. After they had been gone any time, did you hear one of the women say any thing? - A. Yes; one of them returned back into the room in about five or six minutes, and called "Jem;" but that was all the conversation I heard between them.

Q. Therefore, if any conversation passed between the women and the other persons, you not being out of the house, did not hear it? - A. No.

Q. What was done upon the woman calling out" Jem? " - A. Jem Briscoe went out directly, then came in again, and said, Coppersmith, there is a row outside the door; he said that to Denham, and more that were with him, but I cannot say how many more; upon which Briscoe and Denham went out, and Baker followed them.

Q. Before they went out, did you see Briscoe or Denham do any thing? - A. No.

Q. Did you go out? - A. No; soon after they all came in again, and Baker said to me, Bill, there is a row outside the door; I said, I have no business to interfere with other company, and shall not go out into it.

Q. Did you hear Briscoe say any thing? - A. Briscoe said to Denham, d-n it, we made the b - rs run; soon after that I went home.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. That was what Briscoe said, and not Baker? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. At that time you thought it was merely a row, and had no notion of a man being killed? - A. No.

Q. Did both women return to call Jem? - A. No, only one; where the other was I don't know.

Q. Briscoe and the others took no weapons? - A. Not that I saw.

Q. If a knife had been used, must you have seen it? - A. I did not see any such thing.

Q. Where you taken into custody? - A. Yes.

Q. And Smith? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you and Smith attended before the Grand Jury? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you had any conversation about this? - A. No.

Q. Have you heard of any reward? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to say you have not heard of the 50 guineas reward? - A. Yes, I have heard of that by the bills being up in the street, and not from any body; I never spoke to Smith in my lite, that I know of.

Q. Since you have known of the 50 guineas reward, have not the officers and witnesses been talking of it? - A. I have heard it talked of in company.

Q. Was Smith present? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was it at the time of the examination? - A. Yes.

ROBERT HEWLETT sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Were you at the Harrow public-house on the 4th of October? - A. Yes, in the room, but not in the prisoner's company, about eight o'clock in the evening, when Briscoe, his wife, and several more came in; in a short time Mrs. Briscoe and her sister went out, and soon after

Briscoe was called, and he and Denham went out with Baker.

Q. Where was Smith? - A. He was at the door, but I did not see him go out; presently they returned altogether, and said there had been a bloody row between them and two brewers; that is all I know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had no conception that a man was killed? - A. No.

Q. When Briscoe went out, did you see him take any weapon? - A. No.

Q. Where you taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. And you went to file the bill of indictment? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Smith there? - A. Yes.

Q. You have heard of a reward? - A. Yes.

Q. And in the presence of Smith? - A. Yes; we were at the Crown Tavern, Clerkenwell-green.

Q. It was generally understood and known? - A. Yes.

JAMES HURST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Do you know Briscoe? - A. Yes, very well.

Q. Did you see him accidentally on the 6th of October? - A. Yes, about six o'clock, at the corner of Cradle-court, St. John's-street, Clerkenwell.

Q. What did he say? - A. I passed him; but he said, "Jem, how are you?" I said, "how do you do;" as we walked up St. John's-street, he said, "did you bear of the row?" I said, "no further than seeing the papers;" he said, "he, his wife, her filler, and Denham, were together at the Harrow, with some more, on Monday evening; that about half past nine his wife and sister went to buy some fruit, and met two men; that one of them said to Mrs. Briscoe, come here, and I'll turn up the lap of your liver, and to the other he said, go home, Ma'am, or I'll kick your a -; that then Briscoe went up to him, and asked him what he wanted; that the man said, to wring his nose, and Briscoe said, he stabbed him in the side with a knife."

Q. Did he say where he got the knife from? - A. No, he did not; he said, that the man said oh! that he followed him, and gave it him again, meaning that he stabbed him again; that Denham came out and said to Briscoe, "Jem, shut your knife, and come away;" and that then they went again into the house.

Q. Did he say what became of the man? - A. No, but he told me that the man said he should know the knife by its having a long buck's-born handle.

Q. That was the man that was stabbed? - A. Yes, and he told me, that in the morning when he awoke he looked at the knife, and found it all blood in the socket, which was caked like bullock's liver, and that he threw it down the necessary; he said he thought the man would know him by the white buttons on his coat; that he would get his white buttons cut off, and have others put on; that a few days before he had sharpened the knife, and tempered it so, that it would not turn against any thing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What way of life are you in? - A. A farrier.

Q. Have you always got you livelihood by being a farrier? - A. No, but I have lately; I have been at work near six months.

Q. Where were you previous to that? - A. At work, at Islington; I have not been able to do any work since this business, because I have been looking after Denham.

Q. Don't you know that he surrendered himself? - A. I have heard so since.

Q. Have you been in prison? - A. Yes.

Q. How often? - A. Once or twice.

Q. What brought you there? - A. Because I could get no work; I will own I have been bad, but not for these six months.

Q. Have you ever been tried? - A. No.

Q. How often have you been in prison? - A. No more than twice.

Q. You met Briscoe by accident? - A. Yes.

Q. You went voluntarily before the Magistrate, and told him of this conversation? - A. Yes, and told the truth.

Q. Without a summons? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you heard any thing of fifty guineas reward? - A. I did not do it for that.

Q. Did you hear of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Before you met him? - A. Yes; I had seen the bills before, but did not know who it was till he told me.

Q. Did you see the reward offered? - A. Yes, fifty guineas; but I did not do it for that.

Q. Was any body in company with Briscoe and you? - A. Yes, a young man.

Q. An acquaintance of your's? - A. No; I have not seen him above three or four times; his name is Joseph, but I don't know his other name, or where he lives.

Q. Was Briscoe acquainted with him? - A. No.

Q. This man heard the conversation as well as you? - A. Yes.

Q. At that time there was a reward offered? - Yes; Briscoe was taken before I went.

Q. This was a matter of notoriety, and yet he told his conversation before a strange man with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you go first after it? - A. To Bow-street.

Q. When Briscoe told you, he was one of the persons, I suppose you said it was a sad and dismal transaction? - A. I did not say any thing to him.

Q. How long did you continue in company with your friend afterwards? - A. About half an hour.

Q. Your friend did not think it necessary to go to a Magistrate? - A. No; I did not let him know that I was going.

Q. You have been frequently in company with the witnesses for the prosecution? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell the Magistrate any thing about the knife being thrown down the privy? - A. Yes.

Q. What privy? - A. I don't know.

Q. Do you know whether any search was made for it? - A. Yes, but no such thing was found, the place is so deep.

Q. You knew about the fifty guineas? - A. Yes, but I don't want any thing more than to be paid for my time.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Seeing the bills, you went to Bow-street, and told the same story you have told here? - A. Yes, and by direction, I attended at Hatton-Garden.

THOMAS ELLIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You were fellow-servant with the deceased? - A. Yes, and lodged with him.

Q. Were you present when he came home on the 4th of October? - A. I was sitting in the chandler's-shop where we lodged, he went to bed and I followed him; he appeared as if he was rather in liquor, and he laid himself down on the bed; I told him to get into bed, but he did not; I then got into bed, and he lay as he was, till the candle went out, which might be about an hour; I called to him to get into bed, for he would get cold; he said, he could not, and asked me to help him; I went down stairs for a candle, and when I came up again, I told him to strip, he said, he could not; I pulled off his cloaths, and got him to bed, but I found a great quantity of blood, when I pulled his cloaths off, on his left-side, rather behind, under his arm; I fetched a surgeon, who dressed his wounds; one was under the blade-bone, and the other at the bottom of the belly; these two were found out that night, next morning, another was found on the other side his belly, just answering the other; he was then taken to the hospital.

JOSEPH COOKE sworn. - Q. You are housesurgeon, at Middlesex-hospital? - A. Yes.

Q. On Tuesday the 5th, did you see the deceased? - A. Yes.

Q. Describe his situation? - A. He had three wounds, one in the right shoulder, and two in the belly; two were not very considerable, but one was mortal.

Q. Where was that? - A. On the left-side of the belly; I cannot say how far it had penetrated, but it had wounded the intestines; it appeared to have been given with a sharp pointed instrument, but flat at the same time.

Q. Was a knife likely to inflict it? - A. I think very much so.

Q. How long did the patient live? - A. From Tuesday nine o'clock in the morning, till about half past five next afternoon.

Q. Was that wound the cause of his death? - A. I have no doubt it was; I have every reason to suppose it, though I cannot positively say, perhaps neglect might be partly the cause, though I don't think it was curable; the other wound was not sufficient to kill him, but that was.

Q. Had you any conversation with the deceased? - A. I asked him if he had had any quarrel? - A. He said, no, none at all.

Q. Had you any reason to believe he was conscious that death awaited him? - A. I don't think he was.

Mr. Alley. Q. You are of opinion that his wounds being neglected might occasion his death? - A. We look upon all wounds in the intestines, as mortal, but notwithstanding that, there have been some cases where such wounds have been cured.

Q. There is no doubt also, that a wound may be inflamed, and that inflammation may be promoted by a variety of means? - A. Yes.

Q. Would not intoxication have that effect? - A. Yes, certainly, but he had lost a considerable quantity of blood, which would counteract that.

Q. All you mean to say, is, that you believe it was the cause of his death? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was there any thing to justify your opinion, that neglect had taken place? - A. I don't think in any great degree, because inflammation don't come on so very quick, and we had him within twelve hours after the wound.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A constable, and produce a jacket belonging to the deceased, and a knife which was taken from Baker; as I stood by his side in the office, he offered it to somebody to give it to his father, and heard him say, "give this to my father."

Mr. Knowlys. Q. That is not a buck-horn handle knife? - A. No.

Briscoe's defence. I have only to say, that I went to the assistance of my wife, but had no weapon of any kind whatever; I am thoroughly innocent of the charge made against me, and firmly believe the witness, Smith, to be the person who did it.

Denham's defence. My Lord, I am innocent, but I really believe Smith to be the man who did the mischief.(Baker was not put upon his defence.)

Mr. Alley here submitted to the Court, that Mrs. Briscoe was a competent witness in behalf of Denham, although she could not be so for her husband, but inasmuch as her husband and Denham were both trying upon one indictment, Denham was intitled to the advantage of the evidence.

The Court were of opinion, that she could not be admitted an evidence for Denham, without being an evidence for her husband, which, according to the cases determined, could not be admitted, and therefore rejected her testimony.

For the Prisoners.

WILLIAM LANGTHORNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. A coal-heaver, and live in St. John's-street.

Q. Do you know Smith, the witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, on the Thursday after this unfortunate affair, seeing him? - A. Yes; at his father's garden, No. 8, Sleigh's-alley, St. John's-street.

Q. Did he say any thing about himself? - A. Yes; he said he came out of the Harrow on the Monday night, when the name of Jem was called, that he was the first that came out and stabbed the man.

Mr. Const. Q. How came you to be at the garden? - A. He sent his sister for me, and she said her brother wanted to speak to me.

Q. This was on the Thursday - did you see any bills up about it? - A. No.

Q. Did you know what had happened? - A. No, not till he told me.

Q. Where were you, when his sister found you? - A. At my father's, No. 13.

Q. How did he introduce the conversation? - A. When I went in to him, I asked him how it was, and what he wanted me for.

Q. What did you mean by how it was? - A. I wanted to know what he wanted with me; it was rather a mistake in speaking the word; then he told me the affair that happened on Monday night, and said, Briscoe and Denham were of the party; he said, that the two girls went out, and were insulted by two brewer's servants, and that being used so very ill, Briscoe's wife called out Jem.

Q. Did he tell you who came out of the house? - A. He said, he was the first, and that Briscoe followed, and Denham followed him.

Q. Only those three? - A. Only those three.

Q. Did he tell you whether he stabbed more than one? - A. No.

Q. Did he tell you whether he stabbed him once, twice, or ten times? - A. No, he told me he stabbed him, and that satisfied me, and I asked no further, but went away.

Q. Did you know Briscoe? - A. Yes, about five or six years; I knew Denham only a short time.

Q. Did you know they were, either of them in custody at that time? - A. I heard Briscoe was taken up on Wednesday night.

Q. Had you not some suspicion it was for what he, Smith, had done? - A. No, he did not tell me any thing about his being confined.

Q. Finding Briscoe was taken up, and Smith telling you he was in his company, did it not come into your mind he was taken up for the same thing? - A. It did not.

Q. I understand Briscoe lives in the same alley with you? - A. He had for a short time.

Q. You did not call upon his friends and tell them this? - A. No.

Q. The bills were posted up on the Wednesday? - A. I did not see or hear of them.

Q. How soon did you know there was suspicion against Briscoe? - A. When Smith told me on the Thursday, that they were taken on the Wednesday night.

Q. They lived in the same alley with you - Briscoe's wife and sister were taken up, were they not? - A. Yes, on Wednesday night.

Q. Who told you first? - A. Royston.

Q. Who is that? - A. Smith used to be called so.

Q. Did he tell you Briscoe was taken? - A. Yes.

Q. And he sent to you to tell you he was the man that had done it? - A. Yes.

Q. Of course you went before a Justice and told all this? - A. No, I did not; I did not relate it to any body, till the prisoners were sent to Newgate.

Q. Those men, being your friends, did you not know they were examined five times? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go any one of the times? - A. Yes, the officers came and fetched me.

Q. Did you tell what you have told now? - A. No.

Q. Was Smith and Briscoe there? - A. Yes.

Q. And Denham? - A. No, not till the last day.

Q. Did you tell any body then? - A. No.

Q. Did you hear any thing of Smith accusing them? - A. No; I did not know that he had turned any way against them; I understood they were all to be tried for the murder in Compton-street.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not tell the officers you knew nothing about it? - A. I did, and I knew nothing about it; they asked me if I was in the house.

Q. How happened you to mention it now? - A. Because I thought it very wrong for any person to be accused wrongfully, and when I knew he went to speak against the others, I mentioned it, or I should not.

Q. Have you been at work since Tuesday? - A. No.

Q. Were you at work on Thursday, when Smith sent for you? - A. No.

Q. You never mentioned this, till the prisoners were in Newgate? - A. No, because I did not know Smith had turned against them, which I first heard at the Hat and Tun public-house.

Mr. Alley. Q. So long as Smith did not accuse any body else, you did not accuse him? - A. No.

Q. As soon as you found he did, you told his secret? - A. Yes.

Q. Where does you employment lead you to? - A. To Mr. Eddington's, at Blackstiars.

Q. What time do you return at night? - A. About dark, and go about five in the morning.

Q. On the Wednesday, had you any opportunity of knowing, at Blackstiars, what was passing at home? - A. No.

Q. Those bills were posted on the Wednesday, and you did not see them? - A. No.

HENRY CROSSWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are turnkey at the New-Compter? - A. I am.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner, Denham? - A. Yes.

Q. When did he come to the prison? - A. Last Monday, he came to me, and told me, he came to surrender himself, concerning a bill that was stuck up in Compton-street, about a murder; I refused at first to receive him, but he insisted upon stopping.

Q. Why did you refuse to receive him? - A. I told him I did not know any thing of him, neither had I seen any of the bills.

Q. He importuned you, however, till you did receive him? - A. He did.

JAMES VERNON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had the misfortune to be confined in the New-Compter? - A. Yes.

Q. For some crime or other? - A. Yes; upon suspicion of felony.

Q. Have you been tried, or discharged? - A. I was discharged at Hatton-Garden.

Q. Where were you confined there? - A. In a cell; I was let out morning and night.

Q. During the time you were there, did you happen to meet with Smith, who has been a witness here? - A. Yes, he answered to the name of Royston

Q. Is that the man, (pointing to Smith?) - A. Yes.

Q. Where was he? - A. Close to the place where I got the water.

Q. Did it happen, that while you were in prison, you talked with each other, about what you were confined for? - A. Yes; I spoke to him two or three times, by the name of Royston; I was getting a pot of water, and I heard him at his cell door; I went up to his cell.

Q. Is there an opening near where you get the water? - A. There are some bars where I could just see the head of the man, and his handkerchief; he had a red silk handkerchief on; he got up upon the lock of the door.

Q. When a man gets up upon the lock, can he be seen on the outside of the cell? - A. Yes, he can; I said to him, young man, what are you confined for? he made answer, and said, it is all right with me; I made answer again, and said, how do you make that out, (this was in the evening) and he said he had been called down in the morning, and said, he should be anevidence; that he stuck the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. That is all you have got to say, is it? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you the satisfaction of being in the New-Prison? - A. I went in on the Saturday evening, and staid till yesterday was a week.

Q. I take it for granted you had never been in that prison before? - A. Yes, I had, the more is my misfortune.

Q. More than once? - A. No, not more than once; I was put in because I would not pay a fine; I was put in fourteen days.

Q. You could not see into the cell, without getting upon the lock? - A. Smith got on the lock.

Q. I understand you to say you could only see his head and his handkerchief? - A. I could only see that.

Q. You are quite sure of that? - A. Yes, I am quite sure of it.

Q. Then you did not see any other part of him at all? - A. No farther than seeing him go down the stairs once.

Q. But at the time you are speaking of, you only saw his head and his handkerchief? - A. That is all.

Q. What day was it? - A. On Thursday, about the day before I came out; it was the very day before I came out.

Q. Then, perhaps, you are not in the secret that he was admitted an evidence only last Tuesday? - A. I don't know, only that some gentlemen had been with him, and he said, it was all right with him.

Q. You are quite sure what he said, was the day before you came out, the day before Friday week? - A. Yes.

Q. And that he was the man that had stuck the man? - A. Yes; he said he had stuck the man in the side.

Q. And you never heard when he was admitted as an evidence? - A. Not till he told me the gentlemen said he should be admitted as an evidence.

Q. When were you desired to come here? - A. On the Thursday evening last; they told me I was subpoened here.

Q. Who told you so? - A. The father belonging to one of the prisoners told me so.

Q. Have you been in that strong place since the prisoner has been committed? - A. I have been once; I went there this morning, and took their breakfasts.

Q. You had a little conversation on the business, I suppose? - A. All the three prisoners said, I must come here and speak the truth.

Q. You told them what you could say? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath you never told them? - A. No, upon my oath, I never told them what I should say here.

Q. Smith, you say, told you a week ago, he should be admitted an evidence - how soon did you

tell that to any body? - A. On the Friday that I came out of prison.

Q. Who was it that you told of it? - A. Mr. Burt.

Q. Who is he? - A. I believe he is one of the constables.

Q. Belonging to where? - A. I cannot tell, whether he belongs to Hatton-Garden, or whether he belongs to the parish.

Q. You told him of it on the Friday? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you did not tell the prisoner of it, or any solicitor of theirs? - A. No.

Q. When did you swear you were subpoened? - A. On Thursday night.

Q. Do you mean in the prison? - A. No, Thursday last, the night before last.

Q. Where were you subpoenaed? - A. The father of Briscoe told me I was subpoenaed.

Q. Then had you any subpoena served upon you? - A. No.

Q. Is the New Prison the only prison that you know? - A. Yes, the only prison I was in.

Q. Except Newgate, you know? - A. Not for any misdemeanor.

Q. Have you ever been in any other jail? - A. Never.

BENJAMIN SOUTHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. A brazier.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Denham? - A. Yes; he worked for me better than two years.

Q. Do you remember hearing of this transaction? - A. Yes; he worked for me the Wednesday following that the transaction took place; I always found him of a very humane disposition, and bore a general good character.

The prisoner, Denham, called four other witnesses, who gave him the character of a humane man.

The prisoner, Briscoe, called three witnesses, who gave him a like character.

Briscoe, GUILTY of Manslaughter .

Denham, GUILTY of Manslaughter .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Baker, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18021027-104

851. CHARLES SOLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , in the dwelling-house of Atkin Phillips , three guineas, four half-guineas, four Bank-notes, value 8l. seven Bank-note, value 7l. a shilling, and two sixpences, the property of John Price .

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I am a sailor , in his Majesty's service, and have returned from sea about four months; I lodged at the Horseshoe and Magpie, in Burleigh-street, near Exeter-street , kept by one Phillips; the prisoner lodged in the same house, in the room adjoining mine; I had been drinking with him for several hours; it was between one and two in the morning when we parted; we went up stairs together into my room; he said he would assist me in getting into bed, as I was rather in liquor, though we drank nothing but malt liquor; the prisoner went into his room, and lighted a candle; then he lit my candle, and put his own candle into his own room; I got into bed after he had assisted in pulling off my coat, or something of that sort; then he proposed reading the Prayerbook to me, which he did; he sat on the side of the bed, and laid his arm on my pillow, and read for about a quarter of an hour; then he observed that the candle would last but a short time, and he would fetch his own; I observed his arm laying on the pillow, but did not say any thing to him; he went out, and in two or three minutes I had some suspicion; I immediately got up, searched under my bolster, and found my breeches gone, which I had put there when I went to bed; I called out to him, you rascal, Sole, bring my small clothes back; he returned into the room, and I observed him have them in his possession under his arm; he advanced to a chair, exactly opposite the door, and laid them down; I sprung up immediately, and seized hold of his hands, and took out of them 15l. in Bank-notes, four two-pound notes, and seven ones, half-a-guinea, a shilling, and two sixpences; I felt I had the notes in my waistcoat pocket when I went to bed, and the three guineas and half-guineas were wrapped in the notes, which I had looked at about two hours before; I found the Bank-notes all right, three guineas and three half guineas were gone; the half-guinea I took from him I had separate in another pocket, with some silver; I asked him what business he had with my clothes; he said, he had found them on the floor; I then took him down to the landlord's room door, undressed as I was, and requested him to get up, and have him secured, for he had robbed me; he did not get up, and the prisoner returned to his own room again; at eight o'clock in the morning I got up, and went to the landlord, and desired him to go to Bow-street for an officer; the prisoner came down into the tap-room, and remained there till the officer came; his room was searched, and his person also, but the money never was found; he had been in the yard, and might have got away had he pleased; he is a labourer, and I have asked him to eat and drink several times.

ATKIN PHILLIPS sworn. - I keep the Magpie and Horseshoe in Burleigh-street; the prosecutor and prisoner lodged with me, the prisoner for about six months, he is a porter: on the night of the 26th of October they were drinking together in the taproom about three hours, several others were with them in the course of the time; I wanted the prosecutor to go to bed about twelve o'clock, but he

would not, as he was in liquor; the prisoner was more sober than him; as I had got every body else to bed, I gave the prisoner a bit of candle and told him to help the prosecutor; I went to bed and left them alone; between two and three o'clock I heard a noise, and the prosecutor said he had been robbed; I know nobody was there but the prosecutor and him, and thought it was the effect of liquor, therefore I would not get up; between eight and nine in the morning the prosecutor said he was robbed, upon which I went up to the prisoner in his own room in bed, and asked him if he knew any thing of the man's money; he said he did not; I said I must be under the necessity of sending for a constable to search him; he said I might if I pleased; I fetched a constable, and his room was searched, but nothing found there; he was taken to Bow-street; he did not seem to wish to get away, but sat himself down very quiet till the office came.

Q. Do you recollect the prosecutor changing a note? - A. Yes, in the early part of the evening.

Prisoner's defence. I was drinking with the prosecutor and two soldiers till about half past two, and Mr. Phillips desired I would see the prosecutor to bed; before we two left the tap-room he was very much agitated, and fancied he saw his mother stand before him, and attempted to shake hands with her, but when he had lost her he went into a sort of hysterical sit for about a minute or so, and his eyes run over with water; I got him as far as the stairs and he was taken in the same manner, exclaiming, "Oh, my mother!" he said, that although he knew she was dead, he had been four hours on his knees in hopes he might see her again; then he began to pray to himself, and I begged him to go to bed, saying I would say prayers for him; I got him to bed and fetched my prayer-book, and read two or three evening prayers to him; I was going for a candle and he begged me not to leave him; I went for the candle and returned again instantly, but before I entered the door he called to me "where is my small cloaths;" I entered the room and pointed my finger to the floor, saying, there they lay; he said, give them to me; I did so; he pulled out his notes and counted them over and his cash, he then said he had been robbed of two or three guineas and two or three notes; I said I knew nothing of it; he said I must, for nobody else had been there; I wished him to search me, but he would not, only said he would take me to Bow-street next morning; he went to Phillips but he would not get up, as he did not believe him; in the morning they sent for an officer; I never attempted to get out of the house, which I might have done had I been guilty. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-105

852. JAMES BARRON was indicted, for that he, on the 18th of September , being in the dwelling-house of Catharine Barry , did steal therein three coats, value 30s. two handkerchiefs, value 2s. a pair of breeches, value 5s. two waistcoats, value 2s. a hat, value 5s. a half-guinea, two half-crowns, and eleven shillings and sixpence in money, the property of James Canty ; and that he afterwards feloniously and burglariously did break the said dwelling-house to get out .

JAMES CANTY sworn. - I am a coal-heaver , and lodge at Mrs. Barry's, No. 6, King-street, Wapping ; the prisoner lodged in the same room with me, up one pair of stairs, about a fortnight; there were three beds in the room: On Saturday night, the 18th of September, I went home between nine and ten o'clock, and went to bed; the prisoner was not at home, nor did I hear him all night; at five o'clock on Sunday morning I got up and missed my things; I found my box open, the key having been taken out of my pocket,(enumerates the property stolen); I am sure they were all there the night I went to bed: on Sunday morning, about nine or ten o'clock, I saw all my property at the watch-house, and the prisoner with my breeches and loose coat on his back; I told Mr. Dunbar, the constable, before he overhauled the prisoner, what money I had lost, and described the half-guinea being wrapped up in a piece of brown paper, which he found on the prisoner, and two half-crowns and a number of shillings.

CATHARINE BARRY sworn. - I am a widow , and live in King-street, Wapping; James Canty , and the prisoner lodged in the same room; I gave Canty a candle to go to bed between nine and ten o'clock; Barron was not then at home; but between eleven and twelve o'clock he came in with a boy who lodged in the same room; he had some victuals, then he took a candle, and went to bed; I was up till three o'clock, for I had a child very ill with the small pox; I bolted the street door soon after the prisoner came in; the back door opens into the yard, that bolts also on the inside; I looked at it, and it was shut, but I cannot swear it was fastened; between one and two o'clock I heard a man come down stairs, and asked who it was coming down at that time of night; I was answered, a friend, James Barron ; I knew his voice, and said, what is it you want down stairs at this time of night; he said, I want to go backwards to ease myself; he went out at the back door, and I heard nor saw nothing more of him till in the watchhouse on Sunday morning; I found his trowsers in the yard at five o'clock, which I knew, having seen him wear them a fortnight; when I saw him in the watch-house, he gave me four or five shillings for my lodging, saying, Mrs. Barry, I never can keep my hands to myself when I am half drunk, but I can when I am sober.

Q. How can any body get out of your yard? - A. There is only a low wall.

JOHN GUY sworn. - I live at No. 14, Ship-street, St. George's in the East, about 300 yards from King-street: About the hour of two o'clock on Sunday morning I saw the prisoner sitting in a chair in my house, between the drawers and a large table; I had never seen him before to my knowledge; I was alarmed by my neighbours with my house being broke open; I got up, and ran out of the back room into the front, where I saw the window broke, and the prisoner sitting in a chair; the people shewed a light into the window, and I immediately secured him, sent for a watchman, and had him to the watch-house; I found two coats, and an old blue cloth coat, in his possession, and he had a large brown great coat on; the others were laying on the floor; he claimed them, and I said, if they are your's, take them along with you; upon which he took them under his arm immediately, and carried them to the watch-house.

JOHN DUNBAR sworn. - I am a beadle: On Sunday morning I went to the watch-house, and found these clothes, (Producing them, and which were identfied by the prosecutor); I took one of the waistcoats from his back; Canty described the gold, and said, he had been robbed of thirty-two shillings in all; I searched the prisoner, and found the half-guinea wrapped up in brown paper, two half-crowns, and some shillings.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say in my defence, but leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. but not of breaking out .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-106

853. THOMAS CONNALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a gown, value 10s. and a petticoat, value 10s. the property of Catharine Hurley ; a coat, value 4s. and a pair of breeches, value 2s. the property of Christopher Hussey , in the dwelling-house of Catharine Hurley .

CATHARINE HURLEY sworn. - I am a widow, and keep a house at Whitechapel ; the prisoner lodged with me about three months, and left me last Monday week; a fortnight last Monday I missed a box, containing the things named in the indictment, two guineas and a half, and five shillings and sixpence; the prisoner returned about ten o'clock; I had seen the box about seven or eight; I did not then suspect him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your's is a lodging-house? - A. Yes.

Q. You took up another person, and charged him with robbing you? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Was not there some other man taken up? - A. One of my lodgers went away, and has not been heard of since.

Q. Did not the prisoner surrender himself voluntarily, and was discharged by the Magistrate? - A. Yes, because we had found nothing that day.

Q. He returned, and slept at your house? - A. He did, but not the second night after the robbery; he was taken again the next day.

CHRISTOPHER HUSSEY sworn. - I am a bricklaver's labourer, and lodged in Mrs. Hussey's house; I lost the property out of her box, and missed it when I came from work on Monday night; the prisoner came home the same night about ten o'clock, and when he was asked about it, offered to surrender himself; but the next day the box was found in a field, under a heap of clay.

JAMES WILLIAMSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dickson, a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel, and produce two coats and a red cloak, which I took in, pledged by the prisoner and another man; one handed them to the other; I advanced 11. 12s. to the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Whose name is on the duplicate? - A. Delany.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. What time was it? - A. In the evening, after the candles were lighted; there were a great many people in the shop.

Q. Will you venture to swear you gave any money to the prisoner? - A. I won't swear who took the money.

Q. Will you swear he was the person who pawned the things, or whether it was not the other man? - A. They were both standing together, and I put the money down on the counter; they were there but a very few minutes; if I had met the prisoner in the street, and had been asked if I knew him, I should say, yes; but if I had met him accidentally, I should not have given it a thought.

WILLIAM - sworn. - I found the box in a brick field, broke open. (The things produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I leave it all to my Counsel and the Jury.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18021027-107

854. WILLIAM SWEET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , a cloth coat, value 40s. a waistcoat, value 5s. a pair of breeches, value 8s. and half-a-guinea, the property of Peter Cavenaugh , in the dwelling-house of Margaret Carron .

PETER CAVENAUGH sworn. - I am a labourer ; between twelve and one o'clock at night, on the 15th of September, I met with the prisoner; I was looking for a lodging or a night-house; he said I

was like himself for he was locked out; he said he was going to a house he knew, and if I would go with him he thought I should have a lodging; I went with him to Margaret Carron 's; when he got there he enquired for a pocket-boot he had left there the night before; the woman said she would charge but 6d. each; he laid down some halfpence and a handkerchief for the lodging; I put down a shilling, and told him to take the handkerchief back; we both went into a room, the servant came and asked what time we wanted to be called, he said about five, or after; I said I had no particular place to go to work, and did not want to be called; between five and six I turned about and saw the prisoner bustling about, but making as little noise as possible; I saw him put my coat on, and with both his hands pulling up the collar; he saw me turning in the bed, he opened the door and ran down stairs as fast as he could, with the things named in the indictment; I called at the house again and enquired whether any person had come after the pocket-book, they said, no; I found some papers in it relating to Somerset-house, which led to the taking of the prisoner, at the Guy's Head, St. Thomas's-street, in the Borough.

GEORGE LONGDEN sworn. - I am an officer; the prisoner and the prosecutor's wife came to our office and asked for a constable; she said she had charge of the prisoner for stealing her husband's cloaths; I said I would take him into custody; afterwards the prosecutor came forward and swore he was the man.

ANN CAVENAUGH sworn. - I met with the prisoner at the Guy's Head, in Thomas-street, Borough, and took him to Hatton-garden, he went voluntarily when I told him there was suspicion against him; I gave charge of him there.

- WILLIAMS sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Carron; the pocket-book was not left by the prisoner at our house, but by a man the night before.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming there with the prosecutor? - A. No, I never saw the prisoner and Cavenaugh, I saw Cavenaugh and the man that left the pocket-book in pledge with me, they came and slept at our house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18021027-108

855. ANN DUBOIS and SARAH HALL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , a piece of handkerchiefs, value 13s. the property of William Taylor , privately in his shop .

On account of the absence of Mrs. Taylor the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18021027-109

856. JOHN CONNOR and MICHAEL CATON were indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 6th of October , upon the King's highway, on William Pate the younger, and taking from his person two yards of cloth, value 6s. a shirt, value 1s. a neck-handkerchief, value 2d. and a dish, value 2d. the property of William Pate the elder .

WILLIAM PATE , Jun. sworn. - I am thirteen years old, and know the nature of an oath: On the 6th of October, as I was going through St. Giles's , about eight o'clock at night, with a bundle; it was snatched from under my arm by John Connor , as I suspect; one of the others (for there was a good many more boys) halloaed out, go along Tom; one of the prisoners had the property found on him.

JANE PATE sworn. - I am mother to the last witness, and gave him a bundle on the 6th of October, to carry into the city to his father; I live in Charlotte-street.

- BLACKMAN sworn. - I am a constable; Crocker and I apprehended Caton in St. Giles's, upon suspicion; the boy came down to Bow-street and gave information, and we went with him to see whether he could identify the prisoners; he said he saw Caton go along from us; about an hour afterwards Crocker and I saw Caton coming along King-street with another boy, and we apprehended them; I searched Caton, and found in his hat a piece of cloth and a handkerchief, in his left hand coat pocket; we apprehended Connor the next morning, and the boy said he was the man. (The property produced and identified.)

Caton's defence. I bought those things of a labourer.

Caton, GUILTY of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

Connor, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Health.

Reference Number: t18021027-110

857. JOHN FRANCE and WILLIAM-HENRY CHAMPNESS were indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of James Angus , three half-guineas, six seven-shilling-pieces, and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Michael Burke .

MICHAEL BURKE sworn. - I am a sailor : On the 17th of October, between nine and ten in the morning, I went into the shop of James Angus , in Westminster , to be shaved; being a stranger, I don't know the street; the prisoners came in soon after; the barber and I were talking, and I told him I was a sailor, and was come up to town to get some prize-money.

Q. Did you shew him the money you had? - A. Yes; he proposed to sell me a coat, but I did not buy it; we had a pot of beer, which I paid for, and half a pint of gin, but I drank no liquor, nor never do.

Q. Did any women come in? - A. Yes, but I did not know them; the prisoner wanted to join

me in sending for liquor, I would not, and was going away; France said, no, sit down and I'll fetch you something to eat; he went and brought a small bit of meat, which he put on the coals to broil; the girls wanted me to treat them, and I pulled out the note with the money wrapped in it; France made a grab and snatched it from me and handed it round behind his back to Champness, who put it into his waistcoat pocket; they made off immediately; I went to the door and said I had been robbed; then Champness returned and asked me what was the matter, I told him; he shut his eyes and shook his head, saying, come along with me, I will get a constable and take the man up; when we got a few yards further he said, now you may go and look for a constable yourself, and left me; a little boy went with me to Queen-square, where I got an officer, and they were taken in about half an hour; France had then changed his dress.

Q. Had you been drinking before you went to the shop? - A. No, I had not; I drink no liquors.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you mean to swear you were quite sober? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Did you accuse the barber with preventing you getting out of the house? - A. I did.

Q. And you charged a woman named Sarah Edwards with robbing you? - A. No, I did not when France put his hand behind his back she wanted to take it, and I got hold of her hand, she lifted up a vessel and said she would break my head; I did not charge her with taking it.

Q. Will you tell me who the lady was at whose house you slept the night before, and who you slept with? - A. I slept with no woman, I had the bed to myself; I was going round the corner of a street the night before and met two girls, whom I asked where I could get lodging; they took me to a house where I slept, but they did not sleep there; I paid sixpence for my bed, it was the day I came from the country.

Q. When France was taken up did you not charge the woman who was with him? - A. No.

JAMES ANGUS sworn. - I am nine years old, and know if I swear what is not true I shall go to hell flames; I know Michael Burke, and was in the shop when he came in; he sent my mother for some gin, and pulled out six seven shilling-pieces and three half-guineas wrapped up in a Bank-note.

Q. How do you know it was a Bank-note? - A. I saw it was India paper, and a mark at the bottom of it; France snatched it out of his hand and gave it behind his back to Champness, and he put it into his pocket; a man outside came into the shop and the prisoners ran out; they were taken soon after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Burke drank a great deal of gin there, did not he? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he very drunk? - A. Yes, he was drunk.

Q. Did he send for liquor often? - A. Yes, and drank of it.

Q. You did not see the half guineas and seven shilling-pieces? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Where were you? - A. I was sitting by the fire, and Burke was close to me.

Q. You heard him say he was robbed, you did not see him robbed? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Who took it from him? - A. France, and gave it to Champness behind him.

Q. You did not see Champness take it? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Are you quite sure of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Burke desire Champness to go with him for a constable? - A. No.

SARAH EDWARDS sworn. - I was in Angus's shop, and saw Burke with a paper in his hand, which France snatched out of it, I did not see any money, and I think Champness received it from him.

JAMES JONES sworn. - I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoners.

John France's defence. I know myself innocent, and can say nothing else.

Champness's defence. I went into the shop to be shaved, where I found the prosecutor and the others drinking; the prosecutor said he was hungry, and France fetched some bacon, which they broiled; soon after a woman came and desired the prosecutor to come home to breakfast, for he was very drunk, and Sarah Edwards said, no my dear, you shall not go, you shall go home along with me; he came to the fire-place and said he was robbed, and that he thought it was Sarah Edwards ; I got up and desired him to search every body in the room; France offered to be searched, and I consented to go with him for a constable; we went about six or seven hundred yards and met with young Cridland; I said there was the son of an officer, and left him; in about half an hour I was taken.

France, GUILTY , aged 46.

Champness, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-111

857. JONATHAN COOMBES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , six shaving-boxes, value 6s. fifty-four brushes, value 30s. and four horn combs and cases, value 2s. the property of William Morley .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM MORLEY sworn. - I am a brushmaker , in Drury-lane , and a wholesale turner; the prisoner was in my service and used to go journies; he received a weekly salary, but I never authorised him to sell goods on his own account; I

was present when his lodgings were searched on the 16th of October, and found two clothes brushes, a two-foot rule with a slide to it, and a bone solder, in his box, belonging to me, I believe, but cannot say positively.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You first of all took up your carman? - A. I did.

Q. You never sold the prisoner any articles? - A. I never did.

Q. Upon your oath, don't you know your foreman has sold him many things? - A. I don't know that he did.

BENJAMIN JAMES sworn. - I am a hair-dresser, in White-hart-yard, Drury-lane, and have known the prisoner about a year and an half; he told me he was rider to Mr. Morley, to whom I have delivered up some brushes, horn combs, and cases, which I purchased of the prisoner at different times; the last I bought was about nine weeks ago, and he said he had commission to sell from his master; on the Friday before he was taken up, he told me his master and he had had some words concerning some sponge, and begged I would say nothing about dealing with him, as he was going to settle in the neighbourhood; I said I would not; next day I saw Mr. Morley, and told him what I had bought of him; he said there were none of his goods, and he walked away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The prisoner staid in his lodgings till he was taken up? - A. Yes, he was taken in bed.

Q. Did you ever say you never had these things from the prisoner? - A. Never; I told his master first, I never dealt with the prisoner.

Q. Did you not tell the Justice you had not those things from the prisoners? - A. Never; I was much alarmed, and when I had paid the value of them it was natural to be so.

Q. You expected to be taken up? - A. No, I was alarmed at the scandal, although I thought he came honestly by them.

It appearing that the warehouseman had liberty to sell articles to the different servants, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-112

858. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Martin Christopher Pust .

There being no evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-113

859. JOHN GILSON, otherwise GIBSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , eight loaves of bread, value 1s. 6d. the property of Thomas R -.

THOMAS R - sworn. - I am a baker , and the prisoner was my journeyman ; I observed him with something hid under his coat, searched him, and found several of these loaves, (producing them); and the rest were hid in the bake-house.

Prisoner's defence. When I went to work with my master, it was agreed I should have a weekly allowance of bread; he having a large quantity of loaves on hand, proposed that he and I should fill baskets, and sell them in St. Giles's at a low price; not doing so, it was to be kept for my use, and it was kept till it became so mouldy I could not eat it, and I made those cakes to eat instead, and not to sell. GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-114

860. WILLIAM ROBERTSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , a cloth coat, value 2s. the property of John Serratt .

JOHN SERRATT sworn. - I am a horse-keeper , at Uxbridge , and lost a coat out of the yard.

JOHN MOORE sworn. - On Saturday, the 23d of October, about a quarter before nine, the prisoner brought me a coat, and offered to sell it, saying, he was much distressed; I bought it, and soon after met Serratt looking after the man who stole it; I said I had bought it, and the man was just gone out of my shop. (The coat produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the coat the same morning for 1s. 6d. and finding it was not good enough to wear, I sold it for 2s.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-115

861. CATHARINE SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , a metal watch, value 12s. and two gold rings, value 4s. the property of John Holt .

There being no evidence to effect the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-116

862. CHARLES DELAFORCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , a great coat, value 2s. the property of John Jephson .

The property not being produced, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-117

863. JAMES STELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , a jacket, value 18s. 6d. the property of John Wilmot .

There being no evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-118

864. JOHN STRAIGHT was indicted for

breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Morris and John Morris , about the hour of one in the night of the 10th of October , and burglariously stealing eleven cotton gowns, value 5l. the property of the said William and John Morris .

JOHN MORRIS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker , in partnership with my brother William, No. 10, Rose-street .

Q. Do you both occupy the house? - A. Yes.

Q. And both live in it? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any other partner? - A. No; I sleep in the one-pair of stairs: On the 10th of October, about one in the morning, my wife waked me, saying, there was a noise up stairs; I jumped up in the bed, and listened, I heard some person walking without shoes over my heard; I heard a watchman's rattle spring in the street at the same time; I immediately jumped out of bed, and went to the window of the front room; I then opened the window, looked out, and asked what was the matter; the watchman said, there is a ladder; I looked down, and saw a ladder like a lamplighter's ladder, upon the leads of the shop window; the ladder reached to the two-pair of stairs window; my wife said, they were making their escape backwards; I learned that somebody had jumped out of the two-pair of stairs window backwards; I then took down one of the pistols from the mantle piece.

Q. Was it loaded? - A. Yes; I lifted up the fash of my bed-room window, which he had passed by; I put out a pistol with intent to fire, but did not see any body, the pistol missed fire; I then shut down the window again, and took down the other pistol; I then went to the window of the front room, got out upon the leads, and took down the ladder; I put it down to the watchmen, and desired some of them to come up that ladder; two came up into the front dining-room on the same floor that I sleep on; I told them to follow me up stairs; they followed me up into the warehouse.

Q. Was the room where you heard somebody walking, the warehouse? - A. Yes, both back and front; we then went up into the garnet, but we could not find any body; we then went down stairs, and I let in another watchman, and opened the yard door, and told them I was sure we should find one there; I then saw the prisoner at the bar lying on the ground; I presented a pistol at him, and told him, if he did not tell me where the rest were, I would blow his brans out; the pistol being full cocked, went off by accident.

Q. You did not mean to shoot him, when you had him in your power? - A. No; it was quite by accident; the flags entered the wall, about three inches above his head; the powder searched hisforehead a little, and he put his hand to his face, he cried out, O Lord, O'Lord; I was afraid I had shot him, but when the smoke went on one side, I saw I had not; he desired the watchman to take him to the watch-house; he complained that his arm was broke.

Q. That appeared to be so, did it? - A. No, his shoulder was wrenched; he had jumped from the two-pair of stairs window, which is between 20 and 30 feet from the ground, and he had fell upon the gutter at my bed-room window, and forced the holdfast out; his arm was not broke, but he was very much hurt.

Q. Was the ladder long enough to get upon the leads? - A. Yes; and then from the position of the ladder, he must have assisted himself by the ball irons; the prisoner told me he had brought the ladder from Lord John Cavendish's, near Vigo-lane; there were two ladders locked together, and he had picked the lock, and brought it away.

Q. Are you sure that your front two-pair of stairs window was shut down? - A. It was shut down within six or eight inches; it is left open, because the moth is apt to breed quick; but if there is air, they don't breed so quick.

Q. When had you last seen it? - A. I was in the warehouse sending some goods down the well after eleven o'clock that night.

Q. And you are positive that at that time it was down within six or eight inches? - A. I am.

Q. Did you miss any property? - A. I found eleven gowns removed from the rack in the twopair of stairs room.

Q. Are you sure these gowns had been upon the rack the night before? - A. Yes.

Q. Where were they lying? - A. There was one gown open on the floor, and the other ten were upon it, ready to tie up.

Q. How far from where you had left them? - A. About a yard and a half; they were the bottom her in the rack, it was quite full, and they were all pulled out.

Q. You could not have pulled out that parcel yourself the night before, without having known it? - A. No; one of the gowns was opened, the ticket taken off, and the other ten laid upon it.

Q. What is become of those things? - A. The officer has got them.

Prisoner. I don't with to give the Court any further trouble, I am guilty of the fact.

MATTHEW DILLMAN sworn. - Q. You are a watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you the first that perceived any thing? - A. Yes; on Sunday morning, between one and two o'clock, I was going round my beat, and saw the ladder upon the shop window of Mr. Morris; it went up to the window of the second floor, which was open; I thought there might be somebody in the house, and I sprung my rattle, upon which the landlord opened the window of the first floor, and asked what was the matter; I stood at the door, two other watchmen went up into the house by the ladder.

Q. Were you afterwards let in? - A. Yes; we found the prisoner in the yard.

Q. And you assisted in securing him? - A. Yes.

ISAAC JONES sworn. - Q. You are a watchman? - A. Yes; I heard the springing of a rattle and went to Mr. Morris's house.

Q. Did you go into the house up the ladder? - A. Yes, and another watchman followed me up; we searched about the house but could not find any body, then we went into the back yard, and found the prisoner lying upon his back, I assisted in taking him to the watch-house; I began to lay hold of him as he laid upon his back, and he said, for God's sake don't pull me for my arm is broke, and he begged to have a doctor when he got to the watch-house.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - I am one of the patrols belonging to Bow-street; I received this bundle the next morning from Mr. Morris; I went up into the warehouse and found these gowns lying spread upon the floor in another gown. (Produces them.)

Q. You have had them in your custody ever since? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Morris.) Did the things remain in the same situation from the time you first found them till Williams took them? - A. Yes, he took them as they laid on the ground.

Q. Look at them? - A. I know them all by the tickets, some are my writing and some my brother's.

Q. Are they all pledged goods? - A. Yes.

Q. They are not very valuable? - A. The prisoner admitted that he went round the warehouse and picked out the best; there is eight or nine shillings a-piece lent on them.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

Of stealing goods in the dwelling-house to the value of 40s. but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-119

865. JOHN JONES, alias DIGBY , was indicted for making an assault in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, upon Samuel Wilkinson , on the 11th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a metal watch, value 20s. a metal seal, value 1s. a metal key, value 3d. a piece of ribbon, value 1d. and three shillings in monies, numbered, the property of the said Samuel .

SAMUEL WILKINSON sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A gentleman's servant ; since the commitment of the prisoner I have had some doubts respecting the identity of his person.

Q. Had you any doubts before the commitment? - A. No, since the commitment.

Q. Is any of the property here? - A. No.

Q. Where were you going? - A. By Hampstead, from Upper Baker-street, crossing the fields in the way to Primrose-hill .

Q. When was it? - A. About nine o'clock in the afternoon of Monday the 11th of October.

Q. Did any body attack you? - A. Yes, a single person; I was in the act of getting under a stile; I heard a voice say stop, stop; I went on, I turned round, and saw him run; I did not at the first moment observe he had a pistol holding out towards me; knowing it was a gentleman I had before seen in the fields I did not think his intentions were to rob me, I turned about and went on a little bit; the man said, stop, d-n you stop, or I will blow your brains out; I said, what do you want with me; he said, all that you have got about you, d-n you stop and give it me or I will blow your brains out, or something to that effect; he came up to the stile with the pistol in his hand; I then stopped and gave him what I had, a metal watch, with a black shagreen case, two shillings, and two sixpences; he said, d-n you don't look at me, I am not to be looked at.

Q. Were you a good deal alarmed? - A. I was a great deal alarmed; he said, don't look which way I go; he went away and I went to my wife.

Q. Did he say any thing to your wife? - A. He asked her for what she had got about her; what she said I don't know, but I afterwards heard him say I won't take that.

Q. How long, upon the whole, was he with you? - A. Not above two minutes.

Q. Did you take particular notice of him? - A. Not at that time; I had seen the man that robbed me twice before in the fields within the hour.

Q. Then you had an opportunity of seeing him? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon after that did you see him at the Justice's? - A. I saw him on the Friday following at Knightsbridge.

Q. Were you positive of his person before the Justice? - A. I believed he was the man.

Q. Were you positive at that time? - A. I was.

Q. What is it now makes you less positive? - A. I cannot justly say; I have some doubts as to the identify of the person.

Q. You were very positive at that time, how came these doubts to arise in your mind? - A. It is a very serious thing.

Q. Take care what you swear; do you or not, upon consideration, believe that is the man, for if you screen him from justice you are guilty of perjury? - A. I have my doubts.

Q. From whence do your doubts arise, what makes you doubt now when you were so certain before the Justice, is there any thing you did not observe at that time in his person? (Hesitates.)

Q. Look at him, is there any thing about his person that you, did not see at that time and that you do see now? - A. I have my doubts.

Q. But from whence does that doubt arise; because unless you tell us from whence it arises, it creates a suspicion in one's mind? - A. I have my doubts.

ANN WILKINSON sworn. Q. Were you present when your husband was robbed? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner, is he the man? - A. I have not the least doubt of it.

Q. Did you take particular notice of him? - A. Yes; he passed us twice in the fields.

Q. How long was he with you? - A. A few minutes; I stood leaning on a stile, and looked at him all the time.

Q. Did you particularly notice him? - A. I took particular notice of him all the time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand your husband lost a watch, seal, and chain? - A. Yes.

Q. He has never recovered any of it? - A. No.

Q. Your husband entertains his doubts; you are quite sure? - A. I have not the least doubt.

Q. You were sitting on the stile, not at all alarmed? - A. No; I stood at the stile, while my husband got over it.

Q. You were not at all alarmed? - A. I was a little alarmed, but I was sure I should know the man again, having seen and twice before.

JONATHAN HILLIER sworn. Q. What are you? - A. A constable.

Q. Where did you apprehend him? - A. In Brompton.

Q. At his lodgings? - A. No, in the public road: On Monday, the 18th of October, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I took him to the Marquis of Granby, and searched him; I found nothing upon him but two shillings and a few halfpence in his pocket; no duplicates of any kind whatever.

Q. Did not you ask him his place of abode, and did he not tell you? - A. No, he refused to tell me; he said he lived in the neighbourhood of Brompton, but he would not tell me where he lived, though I asked him several times; he told me if I would treat him like a gentleman, he would go quietly with me to Bow-street; I took him there, and the prosecutors both seemed to be very positive to his person.

BENJAMIN GADD sworn. Q. What are you? - A. A cordwainer: On the 18th, coming up Knightsbridge, I met Wilkinson; he asked me to help him to take the prisoner.

Q. Have you any more to say than the last witness said? - A. No.

Court. (To Wilkinson.) Q. How came you to apprehend the prisoner? - A. On suspicion that he was the man that robbed me; he passed me by, I looked very hard at him, thinking he was the man.

Q. Was it by mere accident he passed by? - A. Mere accident.

The prisoner left his defence to Council.

For the Prisoner.

SARAH POOLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At Mr. Christie's, baker, No. 10, Queen's-row, Knightsbridge.

Q. Do you lodge there? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Perfectly well.

Q. What is he? - A. He is a medical gentleman.

Q. Did you see him on Monday, the 11th of October? - A. Yes; he came to my lodgings a little after one o'clock, dined with me at two o'clock, and staid with me the whole of the day; he drank tea with me at five o'clock, and did not leave my apartments till between eleven and twelve.

Q. Are you quite sure that he did not leave your apartments? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was there? - A. Mr. William Dewey, Catherine Poole , my daughter, and myself.

Q. Did any body come in during the time? - A. Yes, the gentlewoman of the house, and Elizabeth Jenkins , the servant of the house.

Q. How long have you known Mr. Jones? - A. About to three years.

Q. During that time, has his character been that of an honest man? - A. Perfectly so, a man of honour and honesty.

Count. Q. How did you employ your time from one to eleven? - A The prisoner sometimes read, and sometimes conversed.

Q. Was he any way related to you? - A. No, only a particular acquaintance.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with him? - A. Three years or more.

Q. How long was William Dewey with you? - A. He went out about half past two o'clock.

Q. He went out immediately after dinner then? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Catherine Poole there all the time? - A. She denid with us, and went out at three o'clock.

Q. Had the prisoner any business as an apotheeary there? - A. I believe Mr. Degby was under some disagreeable circumstances, and he had taken a lodging to avoid a write, till matters could be accomplished, and his father would come forward.

Q. Did Mr. Dewey come back again? - A. Yes, about a quarter past soon; Mr. Digby, my brother, and myself thank me at five o'clock; my doughter did no turn till about ten o'clock, and and Mr. Digby waited till her return, to bring a a escape from Mrs. Digby; it was then between ten an eleven o'clock.

Q. How soon after were you called upon to give an account of this? -

Mr. Knapp. This witness did attend at Bow-street, but the Magistrate said, we had better reserve ourselves till the trial, for he could not judge of it.

WILLIAM DEWEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; on the 11th of October, I saw him at my sister's house, Mrs. Poole's; he dined there, he came a little after one; I went away at half past two, and returned about half past four, he was then there.

CATHERINE POOLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the daughter of the lady who has been examined? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Mr. Jones? - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on the 11th of October? - A. Very well, at my mother's apartments; he came about one o'clock, and I left him there about three; I went out at the time to see a friend, and did not return till quite ten o'clock, when I found the prisoner at my mother's.

Q. Was Mr. Dewey there when you went out? - A. No.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, if you wish to hear any more witnesses, we will go on, but it seems to me, that there is a clear mistake in the person.

Jury. My Lord, we are satisfied.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18021027-120

866. JAMES JOHNSON and JOHN SHIRES were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Starkey , and John Jennings , about the hour of two in the night of the 5th of October , and burglariously stealing, a silver waiter, value 25l. three silver bottle stands, value 4l. and a gold watch, value 14l. 14s. the property of the said John Jennings .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM JENNINGS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Who are the partners in the brewery ? - A. Thomas Starkey and John Jennings.

Q. Are they proprietors of the dwelling house, in the brewery yard? - A. They are.

Q. Does the door of the house open into the street, or is the house inclosed in the yard? - A. It is inclosed in the yard.

Q. In what parish? - A. In the parish of St. James .

Q. Is there a gate through which persons come into the yard? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you a private watchman in the yard? - A. Yes.

Q. A person of the name of Holliday, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. At what time did you go to bed that night? - A. At ten o'clock.

Q. Was the house fast when you went to bed? - A. It was.

Q. Was the private watchman on duty in the yard at that time? - A. He was.

Q. About what time, in the course of the night, were you awaked? - A. A little before two o'clock; on Wednesday morning, the 6th of October, I was awaked by a singular noise, as if it proceeded from the yard; I listened, but did not hear a repetition of the noise, and therefore concluded it might be an engine, or some workmen that might be at work in the yard, not knowing, at that time the hour in the morning; I laid down to sleep, and was again alarmed by a crash, as if it was in the dwellinghouse; I got up, and went softly down stairs, listening as I went, to ascertain if my doubts were just; when I got a little below the first landing-place, on the stairs, I saw a glimmering light in the parlour, and could hear people talk, and could plainly see that the house-door was open.

Q. Are you sure the door was not open when you went to bed? - A. Yes, I fastened it myself.

Q. Did you lock it? - A. No, I left it on the spring-lock; I went out at the door so opened, and proceeded up the yard to the accompting-house, where I found the private watchman of the yard; I informed him there were thieves in the house, and desired that he would arm himself, and come with me, and assist in taking them; I proceeded again to the accompting-house.

Q. Did he arm himself to accompany you? - A. He did not, though I desired him several times; I went into the accompting-house, seized the firepoker, and desired him to come along with me, which he did; we proceeded across the hall together, towards the parlour door, two of the men immediately came out of the parlour into the hall; I struck at them with the poker; a scuffle ensued, and the watchman's light was immediately put out; I instantly went outside of the door.

Q. Did they appear to have any thing about them? - A. When I struck with the poker, some of the plate sell down from them; two of the men rushed out at the street-door; I called out, stop thieves, one man sprang over the rails, and ran towards the gates; I made a blow at the prisoner, Johnson.

Q. When you say, the prisoner, Johnson, had you light enough to see his person? - A. No.

Q. The man that you have since learned is Johnson? - A. I know him by never having lost fight of him.

Court. Q. It was not Johnson that sprang over? - A. No, another man sprang over the rails; I knock him down, and struck him again as he was rising, his hat came off. I knocked him down twice; he then proceeded towards the yard gate, I pursuing him, and striking him as he ran.

Q. How did he get over the rails? - A. Those rails go from the outside of the steps, leading to the dwelling-house; there are about five steps from the yard to the dwelling-house.

Q. Did he get over the rails? - A. No, I threw him head long down the steps.

Q. What gates do you mean? - A. The yard

gates; the rails were only on each side of the steps, there are no rails at the bottom; I then pursued him, striking him as he ran.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did your watchman attempt to give you any assistance? - A. I never once saw him after I had desired him to arm himself; the first man had got through the wicket, while I was engaged with Johnson; Johnson was going through the wicket, and I struck him several blows as he was getting through; he then proceeded through the wicket, along Little Pulteney-street; I followed close to him, through Crown-court, until he came to Little Pulteney-street again, where he was met by the watchman, O'Donnel, and secured; I followed him close all the way, striking him several blows as he ran.

Q. Did you lose sight of him before he was stopped by O'Donnell? - A. Never once; he was without his hat all the way he ran.

Q. I think you said, he lost his hat in the scuffle in the yard? - A. Yes, his hat was left in the yard, where I first knocked him down.

Q. Did you then return to the house? - A. I did.

Q. Was there light enough to enable you to see the features of the other man? - A. No, there was not, it was quite dark.

Q. Upon returning to the yard, did you find the hat belonging to Johnson? - A. It was picked up by the watchman, O'Donnell picked up one hat.

Q. Were both hats dropped in the yard? - A. Yes.

Q. When you returned, did you see that which had fallen from the persons, when you attacked them? - A. I did, on my return to the house; I went into the parlour, and found an iron crow lying close to a cupboard that had been broke open, and in the hall, and across the yard, I found several articles of plate, which had been taken therefrom.

Q. What articles? - A. Three silver bottlestands, several silver labels, a silver wine-strainer, and a silver waiter.

Q. Did you find all the silver labels that had been taken away in the yard? - A. Some were found in the yard, and I believe the street watchman picked up one.

Q. You did not find the whole that were lost, in the yard, and in the house? - A. No; on examination, I found one silver bottle-stand missing, which has not since been found.

Q. How had they got in? - A. By breaking the street door.

Q. How were you able to ascertain that? - A. There were impressions of the crow upon the street door.

Q. It appeared forced? - A. Yes.

Q. How was the lock of the street door? - A. The fastenings inside appeared to be very much strained; they were torn open, the screws were in a great measure drawn.

Q. In such a way as a crow would have occasioned? - A. Yes; the door-posts were very much torn.

Q. To whom did the plate belong that was found? - A. The private property of Mr. John Jennings .

Q. You did not find any watch, I believe? - A. Yes; I was in company when it was found, three hours after.

Q. How soon after did you see the other priprisoner, Shire? - A. In the course of five minutes.

Q. In whose custody? - A. In the custody of Remington and Smith, about three hours after the robbery was committed; I proposed to the servant to go over the ground that the thieves had run over.

Q. You did not trace Shires to the place where he was apprehended? - A. No.

Q. Tell us what track did you go, from your gate to the gate-way of Hopkin's-street? - A. I first went the track in which Johnson went in endeavouring to escape; Johnson went to the end of Crown-court, and at the end of Green's-court, where Johnson never was, we picked up a gold watch.

Q. Do you know whether that gold watch was in the house, the night the house was broke open? - A. I have every reason to believe the watch was in the house.

Q. Do you know how lately, before you had seen it? - A. I had frequently seen it in Mr. Jennings's possession, and can positively swear it is his watch.

Q. You cannot say how lately you had seen it? - A. I cannot.

Q. Mr. John Jennings , I believe, was out of town at this time? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Mr. John Jennings keeps this house, does not he? - A. Yes.

Q. Where does Mr. Starkey live? - A. At Renbury-hall, Namptwich, Cheshire.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Does Mr. Jennings constantly reside in this house? - A. He hardly ever sleeps there.

Q. In what house does he usually sleep? - A. Near Mary-le-bonne-park.

Q. Who are the general inhabitants of the house? - A. My cousin and myself, Mr. Jennings, and the servant.

Q. What is your cousin's name? - A. Cross, the nephew of Mr. Jennings.

Court. Q. What servants? - A. One maidservant.

Q. Are the expences of the house-keeping paid jointly? - A. Mr. Jennings alone pays the maid servant.

Q. Who pays the other servants, who inhabt the house besides the maid-servants? - A. There are no other servants that inhabit the house.

Q. Where do the other servants inhabit? - A. The servants that belong to the business can lodge where they please.

Q. None of the servants belonging to the business, lodge in the dwelling-house? - A. None.

Q. Whose is the property of the dwellinghouse? - A. Mr. Jennings is the proprietor of the furniture.

Q. To whom does the dwelling-house belong? - A. Starkey and Jennings.

Q. Is it Mr. Jennings's private furniture? - A. His private furniture, he has a managing part ner.

RICHARD O'DONNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I apprehended the prisoner Johnson; I was on my beat a few minutes after two o'clock, I heard a cry of stop thief, upon which I pursued towards it; passing the top of Crown-court I saw the prisoner Johnson come running without his hat, I laid hold of him, we scuffled some time, and Mr. Jennings came up, having a weapon in his hand, which I believe was a poker, and desired me to hold him fast; I asked Mr. Jennings if that was the thief, he said it is if he has a cut in his head, so I turned him about to the lamp and accordingly he had, upon that I conducted him to Mr. Jennings's house, where we found a number of things lying.

Q. Did you find any wearing-apparel of any sort in the yard? - A. Two hats and a handkerchief, lying in the yard; one of the hats I took down to the watch-house with me; when we went before the Justice, Johnson claimed it, and he had it; the other hat was not claimed by any body that I know of.

THOMAS REMINGTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. - I am a watchman of St. James's; I was calling the hour of two, and heard a hand go along the wicket-gate; they keep a dog in the yard; I thought it was the dog; I kept crying the hour, and in a minute or two after the gate flew open, and the prisoner, Shires, came out; I collared him directly, I asked him what business he had in the yard; he was very much out of wind; he wade me no answer; he broke his hold from me; I pursued him down Little Pulteney-street, and through Green's-court; he then went into the Gravel-pits, in Hopkins-street, and there the watchman and I caught him again.

Q. How did you get from the place you mentioned, into Hopkins-street? - A. There is a gateway leading to it at the bottom of Green's-court.

Q. Did you lose fight of him before he got to the gateway? - A. No, I never lost sight of him at all.

Q. Not when he was under the gateway? - A. No; Swift, another watchman, then came up Hopkins-street, from Green's-court, to meet me.

Q. Where was Shires when you took him? - Underneath the gateway, at the end of Green'scourt; I took him back to Mr. Jennings's house, and then to the watch-house; after I had taken him to the watch-house; I went with Mr. Jennings the way that Shires had gone, and picked up a watch in the high road in Little Puneney-street, near Green's-court.

Q. At what time was that? - A. Five o'clock in the morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. About two o'clock, when you passed by Mr. Jennings's gate, it was very dark, was it not? - A. Not very dark.

Q. You heard something which you supposed to be a dog, and you went on? - A. No, I had not passed the gate, it was about two doors before I came up to the gate, and then the prisoner came out; I asked him what business he had there, but he made me no answer.

Q. You have said you never lost fight of him? - A. I did not.

Q. Did not you pass any other watchman is you way? - A. No.

EDWARD SWIFT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a watchman, in Hopkins-street; a little after two o'clock in the morning, I heard the rattle spring; I ran from Husband-street into Hopkins-street.

Q. Did you meet with any body before you came to Green's-court? - A. When I came to the gateway, at the end of Green's court, I saw Remington, I then looked and saw a pair of white stockings standing up against a door which I found to be a man.

Q. Who did that turn out to be? - A. That is the man (pointing to Shires); I took him to Mr. Jennings's, and from there to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. When you first heard the rattle you were in Husband-street? - A. Yes.

Q. From thence you came to Hopkins-street? - A. Yes.

Q. And from Hopkins-street you came into this gateway? - A. Yes.

Q. Is Hopkins-street a thoroughfare? - A. Yes, there is coach way through.

Q. You did not see any body going the way you came? - A. No.

Q. But if any body had got into the gateway they might have gone the other way before you came up to them? - A. No, they could not, because there was another watchman coming after him from Green's-court.

Q. How long had you been at the end of the gateway before the other watchman came up? - A. About a minute.

Q. Then if any person had gone through the

gateway before you came up, that person must have gone a different way from that which you came? - A. I suppose so.

Q. When you took Shires had he a hat or was he without a hat? - A. He had his hat in his hand.

Q. Then wherever he had been he had not left his hat behind him? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you come up to the gateway as soon as Remington did? - A. Yes.

Q. Then could any man that Remington was pursuing have got through the gateway without your seeing him? - A. No, he could not.

PATRICK KIRLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where is your beat? - A. A part of it is in Berwick-street and part in Peter-street; I heard the rattles spring a little after two o'clock; I did not come up till after the prisoners were in custody; I went with them to Mr. Jennings's, after that I went with them to the watch-house; I went with Swift and Mr. Jones to Pulteney-street about five o'clock in the morning, and found a silver label for a bottle stand, which I gave to Mr. Jones, I found it about five yards from where the watch was picked up.

Q. Were you at the office when the prisoners were committed? - A. Yes; after they were committed Stires turned about to Remington, pointed to him and told him he might depend upon it he would have it served him cold some night.

Q. (To Jennings.) Have you got the watch here? - A. Yes; Mr. Jennings told me when he came to town that the watch was deposited in the drawer.

Court. Q. Was it used to be deposited there? - A. Yes, (produces it); I know this to be Mr. Jennings's watch, it had a bruise in it when it was found. (The silver bottle stands and waiter were produced and identified by Mr. Jennings.)

Johnson's defence. The watchman said before the Magistrates that the prosecutor was half a minute before he came up.

Shires's defence. I was under a gateway doing my business, when the watchman came up and accused me of being a thief; I had been out late drinking in St. George's-market, and was a little intoxicated with liquor.

Johnson, GUILTY, aged 23.

Shires, GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house, and not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-121

867. JOHN BURTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d. of October , six silver table-spoons, value 31. 3s. six silver tea-spoons, value 21s. a silver milk-pot, value 15s. forty-seven guineas, four half-guineas, and three seven shilling-pieces, the property of Thomas Roberts , in his dwelling-house .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-122

868. ROBERT BRAY and RICHARD YATES were indicted for that they, on the 3d of November , in the forty-first year of his Majesty's reign, knowingly, unlawfully, and wickedly, did send to Thomas Newman , of Rislip , baker , a certain letter, in writing, without any name subscribed thereto, directed to the said Thomas Newman, demanding certain valuable things, to wit, six half peck loaves, and eight pounds of cheese, in the words and letters following: - "Mr. Newman, you are desired to send out into the town this night, six half peck loaves, and eight pounds of cheese, and if you do not send it directly, you may depend, upon it your house will be turned inside out, and the sooner you send it the better;" to the great damage of the said Thomas Newman .

The original letter having been lost, no evidence was offered. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-123

869. WILLIAM TEMPLAR was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Dewey , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 16th of September , and burglariously stealing three yards of carpeting, value 3s. three fowls, value 4s. two pounds weight of bacon, value 1s. two gimblets, value 4d. a mat basket, value 2d. half a peck of barley, value 6d. and a plane, value 1s. the property of the said Henry .

There not being sufficient evidence to convict the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-124

870. THOMAS WHITFIELD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Neeves , about the hour of four in the night of the 30th of September , and burglariously stealing a blanket, value 5s. two petticoats, value 2s. six shirts, value 6s. four waistcoats, value 1s. 6d. two shifts, value 1s. five neck handkerchiefs, values 4s. six pocket handkerchiefs, value 4s. two shawls, value 2s. six towels, value 10d. a sheet, value 5s. a gown, value 6s. two aprons, value 1s. a pillow-case, value 1s. a cloak, value 2s. 6d. seven stockings, value 3s. 6d a handkerchief, value 1s. and eleven caps, value 5s. the property of the said James .

The person of the prisoner not being identified to the satisfaction of the Jury, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18021027-125

871. ROBERT WILSON was indicted for

feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Dalton , two coats, value 15s. a pair of breeches, value 12s. a waistcoat, value 3s. one pound eighteen shillings in monies numbered, and two Bank-notes, value 2l. the property of Robert Wilson .

The prosecutor not being able to identify the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-126

872. THOMAS PEARSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d. of October , three watches, valued 8l. the property of Thomas Wilson , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS WILSON sworn. - I am a watchmaker , No. 10, Well-yard, Little Britain : On Saturday, the 2d of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock at noon, I was sitting at work in the back part of my shop, which looks into a yard; the yard door was open, and it being very warm, the window was open; there were three watches lying before me at the window, I had them to regulate; a rap came to the front door; I went to the door, and a young lad asked me if I knew the name of Smith; I told him I did not; my mother immediately cried out, thief; I ran immediately, and followed the prisoner down Bartholomew-close, towards Smithfield; he then turned down a long arch-way, which leads to Queen-square, and I laid hold of him, and found the property upon him.(The watches were produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. It is my first offence, I beg for mercy. GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing the watches, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-127

873. MAURICE CONNOR and JOHN KELLY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Daniel Croney , about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 3d of October , and burglariously stealing, a coat, value 16s. and a waistcoat, value 4s. the property of Robert Miller ; a waistcoat, value 1s. 6d. the property of Cornelius Sullivan , and a coat, value 3s. the property of Thomas Harrington .

DANIEL CRONEY sworn. - I rent a house, No. 10, Little Prescot-street, Goodman's-fields , I slept in the one pair of stairs, Cornelius Sullivan and his wife in the two pair of stairs, and Robert Miller , Thomas Harrington,and four others,in the garret: On the 3d of October, I went to bed, and left my wife up, she is not here, I left the door on the spring-lock; between twelve and one o'clock, I was alarmed by my wife, I got up, struck a light, and found the prisoner, Kelly, at my room door; all the lodgers came down, and Kelly was taken away by the watchmen; we then found Connor under the bed, in Sullivan's room, with his hands up to his face, and he was secured; the next morning, I observed that the bolt of the door was forced.

GEORGE WALTON sworn. - I am a watchman; on the 3d of October, about half past twelve o'clock at night, I observed the prosecutor's door a-jar, I put my foot against it, and found some person push on the inside; I then called Leadbetter, another watchman, and we both tried the door, and still found there was somebody pushing against us; we got in, and found the prisoner, Kelly, in the passage; he endeavoured to bolt out at the door, and said, there were thieves in the house; I then shut the door, and bolted it inside; one of the lodgers came down in consequence of the alarm, and he and Leadbetter staid with Kelly, while I went up stairs, into the two pair of stairs room, where I found the prisoner, Connor, sitting on the floor; I asked him what he did there, and he said, he came there to sleep; I took him down stairs, and tied the prisoners together in the passage; I found two coats, and two waistcoats in a bundle; we took the prisoners to the watch-house, and returned back to the house; we found, that that part of the lock, which draws the spring back, was wrenched off, and laid in the inside of the passage.( - Leadbetter, the other watchman, corroborated the evidence of Walton.)(John Closs, the beadle, produced the property, which was identified by Robert Miller , Cornelius Sullivan, and Thomas Harrington.)

Connor's defence. I had been drinking that evening, till half past twelve o'clock, at the Fourteenstars; a woman came in, and said, she would shew us 10 a lodging-house, which she kept, and she took us to this house; she put me into a room, and told me to lie down where I liked, and left me, saying, she would find a lodging for the other man; I knew nothing more of it, till I was awaked, by an alarm of thieves.

Kelly's defence. I was stupified in liquor, I was brought into this house, and sell asleep in the passage.

Connor, GUILTY.

Kelly, GUILTY.

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18021027-128

874. JOHN MOLLOY was indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a sheet, value 5s. and a blanket, value 3s. the property of William Wilson .

WILLIAM CORBETT sworn. - I lodge at the Ship, in Finsbury-place , I am a coachman ; On the 5th of October, I lost my half-boots out of my

bed-room; the prisoner was at work as a bricklayer's labourer upon the roof of the house; in a day or two after, in consequence of information, I went after the prisoner, and took him with my half-boots upon his feet. - (The half-boots were produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that he was drinking with a man of the name of John Ballantine, who was attending as a witness for the prosecution, who sold him the half-boots.

JOHN BALLANTINE sworn. - Q. Did you sell him those boots? - A. No; the prisoner was my labourer; I was at work at the house.

For the prisoner.

HARRIOT LEE sworn. - I am a servant out of place.

Q. What do you know about these boots? - A. I saw the prisoner pay for a pair of boots at a public-house, where I was having a pint of beer.

Q. When was it? - A. I cannot rightly say what day.

Q. What month? - A. I really cannot say.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. Near twelve months.

Q. Did you live with him? - A. No, he lived about three doors from me.

Q. Did he live there the last twelve months before he was taken up? - A. Yes. - (The prosecutor and Ballantine were ordered to stand up.)

Q. Which of those two men was it? - A. I think I saw the further one (the prosecutor) sitting there drinking; I don't know the other man.

ZACHARIAH DUNCAN sworn. - I have known Ballantine for twenty years.

Q. Is he a likely man to perjure himself? - A. I should think not. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-129

875. MARY ROCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , three tablecloths, value 6s. a pillow, value 1s. a sheet, value 2s. two towels, value 1s. a silk handkerchief, value 3s. and two silver table-spoons, value 1l. the property of David Davis .

DAVID DAVIS sworn. - I am a vintner, and keep a hotel in Oxendon-street ; the prisoner was my cook ; she came into my service on the 4th of August, and about a week after I missed a tablespoon, and about a week after that I missed a teaspoon, and between that and the 8th of October I lost the other articles mentioned in the indictment(repeating them); I afterwards found three tablecloths and other things pledged at Mr. Brown's, in Penton-street; I had a five years character with her, as a sober, honest woman; but I found her mustly in liquor while she was in my service.

THOMAS COPE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Brown, in Penton-street (produces three table-cloths, two towels, one pillow-case, one sheet, and one silk handkerchief); I took them all in from the prisoner at the bar at different times.(The property was indentified by Mr. Davis.)

Prisoner's defence. I intended to bring them back before they should be missed.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-130

876. CHARLES GOSSETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a pair of stockings, value 3s. the property of James Chadwick .

JAMES CHADWICK sworn. - I am a hosier , and live at Wapping ; on the 20th of October, about six in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop to buy a pair of stockings; my young man shewed him a dozen; he wanted some with a broader rib, and while our backs were turned to reach some others down, he put a pair of those stockings under his coat; I heard him do it; I counted the stockings, and found only eleven pair; I walked round the counter, got between him and the door; I told him he had got a pair of stockings under his coat; upon which he very deliberately laid them down on the counter with a great deal of unconcern; I sent for an officer, and took him into custody. - (The stockings were produced.)

Chadwick. These are the stockings

Prisoner. I bought them of that gentleman, Mr. Driver.

THOMAS DRIVER sworn. - Mr. Chadwick sent to me upon the prisoner's saying he had bought the stockings of me; I sold him a pair, but these are worth one shilling a pair more than those he bought of me. GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-131

877. WILLIAM JONES and JOHN SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , a haversack, value 9d. a shirt, value 2s. four brushes, value 1s. a black-ball, value 2d. and sixty halfpence , the goods and monies of Thomas Worsdeal .

THOMAS WORSDEAL sworn. - I am a soldier in the first regiment of foot guards ; the prisoners are seamen ; I lost my property from the Black Horse, on Tower-hill , on the 5th of October, between six and seven at night; I had had two pints of beer, and having been on duty all night the night before, I fell asleep; I had my haversack by the side of me upon the table, and while I was asleep, the prisoners took it away; two persons saw them take it; after sometime the prisoner came in again, and the two men waked me, and told me these men had taken my haversak; I immediately gave charge of them.

JOHN SCUDEMORE sworn. - I am a salesman,

No. 16, Queen-street, Tower-hill; On the 12th of October, about half past six in the evening, the prisoners came out of Mr. Swift's shop, and came into my shop, and asked eighteen pence for a haversack, a shirt, four brushes, and old belt, and a coat; I asked Smith how he came by the property; he said, he was discharged out of the first regiment of guards for being so short; the other prisoner stood just within-side the door; he was dressed in a jacket and trowsers; I said it is a strange thing you should be a soldier, and dressed in a jacket and trowsers; he said he was going to his friends at Litchfield, and he had, not money enough to buy long elothes, and therefore he had bought short ones; I bought the things of him for 1s. 3d. - (Produces them.)

Worsdeal. All the things have my name upon them.

JOHN POPE sworn. - I keep a public-house; I saw the two prisoners sitting in the same box with the soldier.

Jones's defence. I was going over Tower-hill, and I was a little a-head of this man, and he called after me that he had got a prize, and shewed me these things.

Smith's defence. I have nothing more to say.

Jones, GUILTY , aged 33.

Smith, GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-132

878. JAMES TOOLE and WILLIAM MURPHY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , two handkerchiefs, value 8d. a table-cloth, value 3s. a bed-gown, value 3d. and an apron, value 6d. the property of James Archer .

MARGARET ARCHER sworn. - I am the wife of James Archer , a blind-maker , in Little St. Andrew's-street ; On the 23d of October, about seven in the evening, I lost some linen from a table in the shop; I went out for some coals; I returned in a minute, and the things were gone; it is an open shop; the prisoners were taken by Crocker at the door.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - On Saturday evening, the 23d of October, I with my party observed the two prisoners standing at the end of Dyot-street; they crossed over, and went into the Black Dog, and came out again; Michael Lee and I followed them up Great St. Andrew's-street; then they went down Little St. Andrew's-street; I observed them stop against a shop-door; I stopped on the opposite side, a little below them, and Lee went to the side on which theywere; the prisoner Murphy went into the shop; Toole stood against the end of the window, and in about two or three minutes Murphy came out with some thing on his arm; I called to Lee, and said he had got something; I went over, and secured him with the clothes on his arm; the prisoner Toole got off; I took Murphy to a public-house, and when we came out of the public-house with Murphy to go to the office, I observed the prisoner Toole, with another, coming down the street again.

Q. Are you sure it was the same person? - A. Yes, I knew them before; I then secured him. -(The property was produced, and identified by Mrs. Archer.)

Toole's defence. I never saw this young man in my life before.

Murphy. I know nothing of it.

Toole, GUILTY , aged 19.

Murphy, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-133

879. JOHN HOWARD and JOHN ASH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , a pair of shoes, value 5s. the property of James Griffiths .

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn. - I was not at home at the time of the loss.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am the son of James Griffiths, shoemaker , No. 1, Great Wild-street : On Wednesday, about half past seven in the evening, my sister was with me in the shop; the two prisoners came in and asked for a pair of shoe-strings, they had a pair for a halfpenny, and gave me sixpence; I sent my sister out for change; then John Ash, the little one, said,"you want a pair of strong shoes too, don't you?" There was a pair close by; the big one, Howard, and he, looked at them; then my sister came in with the change, which I gave to John Howard; and he,looked at them; then my sister came in with the change, which I gave to John Howard; be found fault with the halfpence, which I changed, and then they asked me to let them look at another pair of shoes that stood further off; he asked th price of them; I told him 6s. he then asked the price of the pair he took up first; I told him 6s. 6d. he then said, "here is a good black eye for you; "he struck me on the breast, and knocked me down; then they both ran away.

Q. ARE you sure these are the men? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon after were they taken? - A. About a couple of hours after, in Dyot-street.

JANE GRIFFITHS called. - I am eleven years old.

Q. Can you say your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a good or a bad thing to tell a lye? - A. A bad thing.

Q. Do you know what will become of people that tell lies? - A. Go into hell flames; (sworn;) the two prisoners came into the shop, about half past seven o'clock in the evening, my brother and me were in the shop, they asked for a pair of shoestrings, and my brother sent me out to get change for sixpence; when I came back with the change,

they asked the price of a pair of shoes, and then the big one said, here is a good black eye for you, and hit himin the breast; he knocked him down, and then ran away with the shoes.

Q. Look at these men? - A. They are the same men that came into the shop.

JAMES GRIFFITHS called again. - I was fetched home from the Theatre, I went in search of the prisoners for a considerable time, at last I met the two prisoners, and my boy said, father, these are the men; I seized them both, one in each hand; I found I could not hold them both, I let the little one go, and then he struck me several times over the big one's arm, and they both got away; I cried stop thief, and they were both taken; I saw the big one throw the shoes away, under a gate-way, but they have not been found.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am an officer, I searched one of them, and found two handkerchiefs tied round his thighs.

Howard, GUILTY , aged 19.

Ash, GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-134

880. THOMAS HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , a gown, value 14s. the property of Charlotte Stratford .

CHARLOTTE STRATFORD sworn. - I live at Kensington : On the 16th of September, I lost a gown out of my father's garden, he is a gardener , it was hung on a hedge with other things; I suspected the people that were at work in a turnipfield adjoining the garden, the prisoner was one of them; I went to look, and found the bedge broke through, it was some distance from the bedge.

GEORGE GARDNER called. - Q. How old are you? - A. Fourteen.

Q. How do you get your bread? - A. I work among the cows.

Q. Is it a good or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. A very bad thing.

Q. You will recollect you are going to call God to witness, that you will speak the truth? - A. Yes; (sworn); the prisoner and I were at work, pulling up turnips, the sun was very hot, and I went to this gentleman's house to get some water, and when I came back, I saw the prisoner and this other boy, coming from the hedge, and saw him putting something up in a black handkerchief; he hid it under some cooch grass, and when the cart was loaded, he put it in the cart, and then he told the other boy to go and pawn it, and he would give him three shillings, or else he would give him a good licking; he went away, and brought the prisoner a seven-shilling-piece, and a pocket full of halfpence, and then we stopped, and had some bread and cheese and porter.

WILLIAM ROBERTS sworn. - I work amongst the cows; on the 16th of September, the prisoner asked me to take a bundle, I told him I would not take it; he hid it under the cooch-grass, and when the cart was loaded, he threw it up in the cart; he wanted me to pawn it, and said, if I did not, he would cut my liver out; I asked him what would become of me, if I got into Newgate, and he said d - n Newgate, there is no danger of getting to Newgate for that, and then I went and pawned it.(A pawnbroker, at Chelsea, produced the gown, which was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it, I never was across the hedge, or near it; the boy went to the house to get something to drink, and while he was gone, I never left the piece of turnips that I was on.

The prisoner called his corporal and one other witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-135

881. WILLIAM SERATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , a coat, value 15s. an umbrella, value 10s. a telescope, value 18s. a silver pencil, value 2s. a dressing gown, value 4s. a waistcoat, value 2s. and a spencer, value 5s. the property of David Brown , and a pair of pantaloons, value 3s. and a shirt, value 3s. the property of David Baillen Brown .

DAVID BROWN sworn. - I am gunner of his Majesty's ship, Dictator , I live on board, the prisoner was my servant ; the Dictator, at that time, lay in the River Medway, near Chatham; the prisoner had been my servant six years ago, but this time he came to me in great distress, about a week before this happened; he went away on the 3d of October, and I saw no more of him till the 12th, when he was taken by one of the officers.

MARY KELLY sworn. - The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 4th of October, at No. 4, Nag's-head-court, Drury-lane; he was dressed very genteel; his hair was dressed and powdered, and a silk umbrella in his hand; he said he was going to Somerset-house to receive some prize-money; he asked me to go and pawn a coat for him, which I did; he went to the shop with me; a day or two after he went away, and brought a spying-glass, which I pawned at the same place; I did not pawn any thing else for him.

JOSEPH PLIMPTON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 318, in the Strand; the articles have been all delivered up; they were pledged by Mary Kelly; the prisoner was with her at the time the coat was pawned; I paid the money to the women; I lent 14s. on the coat, on the 4th of Octo

ber, and 12s. on the telescope on the 6th of October, and on the 7th of October the prisoner came, and had 3s. more on the same telescope; on the 8th of October I delivered them to Mr. Solomons; he fetched them out, and paid principal and interest for them. - (Produces the duplicate.)

- SOLOMONS sworn. - I redeemed these things; I live facing the Play-house, in Wooburn-street; Mary Kelly and the prisoner left the duplicates; I redeemed the coat and the telescope, and I gave 32s. for them (produces them); I had the duplicates from the prisoner; on the 12th of October the officer and the prosecutor came to me, and I shewed them the property; the coat was all over powder and dirt, and I had it scowered. - (The coat was identified by Mr. Brown.)

Prisoner's defence. I was never guilty of the like before, but I got a little liquor.

GUILTY , aged 27.

The prosecutor stated, that he had so good an opinion of the prisoner, that he would take him into his service again; upon which he was immediately discharged, after having received an admonition from the Court .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-136

882. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , a gown, value 10s. and a cap, value 2s. the property of Margaret Heffron .

MARGARET HEFFRON sworn. - I live at No. 2l. Lower Belgrave-place, Pimlico ; I gave a gown and coat and a cap to Elizabeth Butler , on Monday the 28th, to wash, with several other things; she lived in the neighbourhood; I heard no more of them till Tuesday night, between nine and the o'clock; she came and asked me if I had taken my things away myself, for she had lost them, and in consequence of information I took the prisoner myself, at the Gun Tavern, Pimlico; I asked her how she came by the gown; she said it was her own; I brought her to Queen-square, Westminster, and as I took her along she pinched my arms all the way, that I thought I must have let her go.

ELIZABETH BUTLER sworn. - I am a washer woman, and live at Pimlico; I had this younger woman's things to wash; the prisoner is a stranger to me; I went out washing on Tuesday morning, and left the place in care of my children.

- BUTLER called. - Q. How old are you? - A. I am thirteen.

Q. Is it a good or bad thing to tell a lie? - A. It is a bad thing.

Q. What will become of naughty people if they don't tell the truth? - A. Go to hell fire. -(Sworn.)

Q. What business does your mother follow? - A. Washing; I know the prisoner very well; she came to my mother's house on the Tuesday; my mother was gone out washing to No. 22. Belgraveplace; she had left a gown and some things upon the table, which she had to wash for this young woman; the prisoner came in, and asked if my mother was at home, about nine o'clock in the morning; she wanted me to go and fetch my mother; she said she wanted her upon particular business; she sat down by the fire; then she got up, and looked round; then she fat a good bit, and then she got up, and bid me good bye, and she came again a second time, and then there was my brother, less than me, and two little girls, and then I went out to Covent-Garden to get some elder berries, and left her there.(The officer produced a gown and cap, which he took from the prisoner's person, and which were identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought them of a Jew in Monmouth-street. GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-137

883. JOHN WOODFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , two saws, value 9s. the property of Edward Hynam .

EDWARD HYNAM sworn. - I am a carpenter ; I lost my saws from New-street, Spring-gardens , where I was doing a job, on Monday the 25th of October; I had left them there on the Saturday night, and on Monday morning they were gone.

ELIZABETH REEMAN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Frere, in New-street, Spring-gardens: On Monday morning, the 25th of October, the prisoner came to work about six o'clock in the morning; I looked out at the window, and saw him go out soon after with two saws; he is a carpenter.

PHILIP LEE sworn. - I am a carpenter; the prisoner lodged with me; he was in very great distress when he came to me; I received information of the saws being stolen, and I directed them where to find him. - (The saws identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the saws.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-138

884. JOHN GOODWIN was indicted for felonioufly stealing, on the 26th of October , a shirt, value 7s. the property of John Riley .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Frances Hurley , spinster .

FRANCES HURLEY sworn. - I live at No. 22, New-street, St. Catherine's ; the prisoner is a waterman ; I little suspected Mr. Goodwin had taken my shirt; I found it in his custody.

Q. Is it your shift or Riley's? - A. It is my

shift; it is Riley's house; it was under the counter: I had not had time to finish it, there was one sleeve wanting when I lost it, and when I found it there had been a sleeve put in.

JOHN GRIFFITH sworn. - On the 26th of October Mrs. Hurley came to the office in Lambeth-street and said she had been robbed, a warrant was granted, and I went with her to Goodwin's house, and on searching the house, in the bottom drawer, I found this shift, which she said was her's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You got the keys from the prisoner's wife? - A. Yes.

THOMAS TRUEWELL sworn. - I am a waterman and lighterman, and lodge in the prisoner's house; I know nothing further than what I heard the wife say.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-139

885. JOHN HUMPHRIES, otherwise PECK , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a set of bed-furniture, value 10s. and a great coat value 5s. the property of Samuel Cowling .

SAMUEL COWLING sworn. - I am a chairstuffer , in Long-alley, Moorfields ; I lost a set of bed-furniture on the 12th of October.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - On Tuesday, the 12th of August, about twelve at noon, in company with Reed, I saw the prisoner about the foot of London-bridge, with a set of bed-furniture, and thinking he did not come honestly by it, I stopped him, and asked him where he brought it from, and he said from his master's, in Fleet-market; Sapwell received information that some furniture was stolen from the prosecutor, and we went to him.(The property was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I leave it entirely to the mercy of the Court. GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-140

886. ANN DIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , three ounces of silk, value 6s. the property of Elizabeth Lewis , widow .

ELIZABETH LEWIS sworn. - I am a widow, No.3, Booth-street, Spitalfields; I am a silk-windster , I hired the prisoner to work with me; on the evening of the 29th of September I gave her nine knots and twelve bobbins of pink silk to wind, I missed some little quantity out of two of the knots that evening; the next morning my master sent me a parcel of black silk, and ordered me to leave off work; immediately I set the prisoner to work on the blacksilk; I went out the next morning, and she told me she wanted to go away at eight o'clock, but instead of that I understand she went away at seven; when I came home, at half past eight, she was gone; the next morning I looked into the prisoner's engine drawer and it was then all right; she came to work before breakfast, she went down stairs between ten and eleven, I thought she was going to the privy, and in about ten minutes after I went to the drawer, and three knots of the pink silk were gone.

SAMUEL LEMAIRE sworn. - I am an officer; I took the prisoner into custody; I know her very well, she told me she had sold the silk to a person of the name of Foster, in Angel-alley; I got a warrant from the Lord Mayor, I went to Foster's, but they had absconded.

Prisoner's defence. I Left it in the drawer.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common. Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-141

887. DAVID PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , two bushels of oats, value 6s. two trusses of hay, value 6s. and two trusses of straw, value 2s. the property of Thomas Wilson and William Waterhouse .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of John Rochley .

No evidence being offered on the part of the prosecution, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-142

888. ELEANOR DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a purse, value 1d. and a seven shilling-piece , the property of John Perry .

The prosecutor not being able to say whether the prisoner took his property of whether he had dropped it by a fall in consequence of intoxication, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-143

889. FRANCIS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , a quart pewter pot, value 2s. and two pint pewter pots, value 2s. 4d. the property of Robert Anderson .

ROBERT ANDERSON sworn. - I am a publican ; I know nothing of the loss myself.

THOMAS DENHAM sworn. - I was sitting at work in my shop about a quarter before nine in the evening, I heard somebody fall down at the street door; I went to the door, and saw the prisoner very much in liquor, and with the pots under his coat; I took four pots from him. (The pots were produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been at work at Paddington all day, and found these pots in the Park as I was coming home.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-144

890. JOHN WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , a copper pot, value 6s. the property of Edward Turner the elder.

EDWARD TURNER , the younger, sworn. - On the 2d of October I saw the prisoner go past our door, I thought I saw him stoop and pick up something, I then saw him take up a copper pot, upon which I called stop thief, he then put down the pot and ran; he was immediately stopped.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up in the Kennel.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-145

891. WILLIAM COTMORE and JAMES SEYMOUR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , a pound and three quarters of metal sheathing nails, value 1s. 6d. and ten ounces of copper, value 6d. the property of Richard Govey .

(The case was opened by Mr. Reynolds.)

SAMUEL PRICE sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Richard Govey : On Saturday, the 2d of October, the two prisoners came in from dinner; I removed a shutter, behind which I found some copper concealed in a bag; I had observed the prisoner Cotmore there; in the afternoon I observed him come up again, and Seymour after him; I had concealed myself; Seymour then asked where it was; Cotmore said, it is safe enough, it is behind the shutter; he then moved the shutter and went away; I remained in my station till six in the evening, when Seymour came close to where the copper was deposited; he took up the bag and put it up to his bosom, under his jacket; I waited the space of ten minutes and then my young master came up; they had both worked for Mr. Govey about two years.

RICHARD GOVEY sworn. - The prisoners were my servants; in consequence of information I took Seymour at a public-house; I asked him what he had done with the copper; he said at first he had not had any, but afterwards acknowledged it, and shewed me where he had concealed it; I sent for a headborough and delivered him up; I believe Cotmore to be a very honest young man, and to have had very little to do with it; he has had the care of upwards of two thousand pounds worth of property belonging to me.(The headborough produced the property.)

Seymour, GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Cotmore, GUILTY .

Cotmore was ordered to be delivered to his master .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjean.

Reference Number: t18021027-146

892. DANIEL PRICE was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences .

STEPHEN HABBERTON sworn. - I am a warehouseman , in Milk-street ; the prisoner had been for some time a servant to Ann Wilson, William and Edward Wilson, and in that capacity was frequently in the habit, for as long back as January last year, of coming to my house for goods, which it was usual for him to take with him; he has continued to do so up to the 10th of September last, and on the 11th I discovered the had left their service in March last; on the 2d of June he came, and, in their name, had a 14 quarter quilt, of the value of 4l. 10s. with which he had a bill in their name.

WILLIAM WILSON sworn. - I am in partnership with Ann and Edward Wilson: In December, 1800, the prisoner came inao our service, and left it on the 27th of March, 1802.

Q. Did you, on the 22d of June last, send him to Mr. Habberton's for a quilt? - A. No; he never transacted any business for us after the 27th of March last.

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. David Windsor, a pawnbroker, (produces the quilt); I took it in pledge on the 2d of June from the prisoner; I lent him 2l. 10s. upon it; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Mr. Habberton. This is my quilt; it has my private mark.

Prisoner's defence I did not take it in the name of Mr. Wilson; Mr. Habberton knew I had left Mr. Wilson's service.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-147

893. THOMAS PHILIP HAYES was indicted for obtaining 8s. 2d. under false pretences .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-148

894. JOHN ELLIS was indicted for that he, on the 25th of September , about the hour of seven in the forenoon, the dwelling-house of Edward Cowling did enter, with intent the goods therein being to steal, take, and carry away .

EDWARD COWLING sworn. - I live in the Poultry ; I know nothing of it myself, only that it is my dwelling-house.

FRANCIS COUSINS sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Cowling, a haberdasher : On the 25th of September, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the act of cutting open a truss; he ran away, I pursued him, and caught him near

the Mansion-house; I never lost fight of him till he was taken by the constable; the passage door was open; he had not time to take any thing out.( Edward Alderman produced two knives, which he found upon the prisoner.)

Prisoner's defence. I never was on that side of the way at all. GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18021027-149

895. JOHN STEIN was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Gurney, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

Mr. JAMES CHETHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 8th of September last, did you attend the Lord-Mayor? - A. I did; a person of the name of Charles Lyons was under examination accused of forging a power of attorney, signed by a person of the name of John Stein, in order to receive wages of the Sierra Leone Company; the prisoner at the bar attended as a witness; he was sworn and examined as a witness against Mr. Lyons; he came as the prosecutor, produced by a Mr. Chew, an attorney; his examination was not signed by himself; I took minutes of it as the solicitor for Mr. Lyons.

Q. Be so good as state his evidence from your notes? - A. (Reads).

" John Stein sworn: On the 18th of December, 1800, or 1801, I went on board the ship Nancy, and served about fourteen months and thirteen days; I was last Novomber at Torbay, and I then belonged to the Orion; I came from the Stratus in the St. Antoine, and was then drasted on board the Orion, I came down to England in the Orion last October, and in November I was on board that ship, cruizing in the Cnannel; I was at St. Helen's at that time; I went on those at Portsmouth for beef in November last."In answer to a question I then put to him, he said," I was only once on shore, and then it was for beef; I was never on board the Portland, at Spithead; we went out to the West Indies after Christmas last; I did not quit the boat, and did not go into Portsmouth town; I never did sign any power of attorney in my life; I did not sign that power of attorney now produced; I never did put that mark, I write my own name to every thing; I do not know the name of the captain of the Orion."

Q. Was this the power of attorney produced at the time, which he said he had never executed? - A. Yes, it was.

Mr. NEWMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you Clerk to the Lord-Mayor at the time Lyons was under examination, charged by this man with forging a power of attorney? - A. I was; he said that was not his power of attorney, that he never made his mark, and that he was never on board the Portland, at Spithead.

JOHN GODWIN , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you Mayor of Portsmouth in November, 180l? - A. I was.

Q. Was that power of attorney executed before you? - A. It was, it has my own hand-writing,"John Stein, his mark," is my hand-writing.

Q. Was it executed in your presence? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know who brought the man to you? - A. I believe Mr. Joseph Levy brought him to my own house, which makes me remember it particularly; if it had been at the Town-hall, it would have been written by one of the clerks.

JOSEPH LEVY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you live at Portsmouth? - A. I do, I am in the stop way.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A. I do, very well.

Q. Do you know Mr. Charles Lyons, whom he charged with forging that power of attorney? - A. I do, he is a neighbour of mine; I went with the prisoner to the Mayor of Portsmouth, Mr. Lyons being busy writing at the time asked me to go with the prisoner to the Mayor, and get the power of attorney of the prisoner's executed; the prisoner was with Mr. Lyons at that time; I had seen him two days before at Mr. Jacobs's house, at Portsmouth.

Q. Do you know what day it was you went before the Mayor? - A. I don't exactly know the date; it was some time in November last.

Court. (To Mr. Godwin.) Q. These powers of attorney must be executed before a Magistrate? - A. Where they belong to private ships they must.

Q. Tell me if you saw the Mayor execute that power of attorney? - A. I did; Mr. Godwin asked him if he could write his name, he said, no, he could not write; Mr. Godwin guided his hand while he made a mark; Mr. Godwin took his seal, which he put upon it, and he delivered this as his act and deed.

Q. Two days before that, what business was he upon with Mr. Jacobs; I heard him say he had some wages due from the Sierra Leone Company ; Mr. Jacobs said, he did not do that business, but Mr. Lyons would do it for him; Elizabeth Spraggs brought him to Mr. Jacobs's, she is here; I am sure the prisoner is the same person.

Q. How often did you see him in November? - A. I might have seen him go into Mr. Jacobs's house five or six times in a day, for four or five different days running.

CHARLES LYONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an agent, and live at Portsmouth.

Q. Were you charged by the prisoner before the Lord-Mayor, - with having forged this power of attorney? - A. I was.

Q. The Lord-Mayor discharged you? - A. Yes,

Q. In the month of November, in the last year, did you see the prisoner at Portsmouth? - A. I did; Mr. Michael Jacobs sent him to me to recover his wages from the Sierra Leone Company ; I took an order from him for his wages, and sent it up to my correspondent, Mr. Peacock, and an answer came that they would not pay it with that; that it must be signed by a Magistrate.

Q. Did you prepare the power of attorney? - A. I did; I was busy writing, and Mr. Levy went for me; they came back in about half an hour, and this power of attorney was produced to me by Mr. Levy and the prisoner; I sent it up to London, and received the wages under it; I advanced him a part of it at first, and afterwards the rest, in all 39l. 2s. 4d.

Q. Have you any receipt for it? - A. I had a receipt for it, which has been lost.

Q. Did you see him more days than one? - A. Yes, five or six days, or more.

Q. On shore, at Portsmouth? - A. On shore, at Portsmouth; he said he was drafted from the St. Antoine on board the Portland, which was at that time employed as a receiving ship.

MICHAEL JACOBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are in the stop line, and live at Portsmouth? - A. I do: In the month of November last the prisoner at the bar was frequently at my house, for the run of a whole week.

Q. Who introduced him to you? - A. Elizabeth Spraggs ; she brought him to me to receive his wages; I told him I could not do it, and recommended him to Mr. Lyons, upon which Mr. Lyons sent an order to a person to receive the money; he did that in my house, and I advanced him clothes and money to the amount of 18l. or 19l. which Mr. Lyons paid to me out of the wages; he received the balance of his account in my house; I once called upon him at Mrs. Spraggs's house, in Meeting-house-alley, and saw him there; she is the wife of a labourer in the Dock-yard; he said he came home in the St. Antoine.

Q. Have you any doubt of his being the same man? - A. I am sure he is the same man.

ELIZABETH SPRAGGS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the wife of a labourer in the dock-yard at Portsmouth? - A. I am, I live in Meeting-house-alley; about a twelvemonth ago the prisoner came to our house with a woman; I went with him to Jacobs's.

Q. How many different times did you see him on shore? - A. He was on shore a matter of a week; he then belonged to the Portland; I went to thePortland and brought him on shore to make a power for the money.

Q. Are you quite sure he is the man? - A. Yes, I am.

CORNELIUS PEACOCK . sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Surrey-street, Strand; I received this power of attorney for Mr. Lyons; I received the wages under that power of attorney for Mr. Lyons.

Q. Is that the receipt you gave for it? - A. It is; I transmitted the money to Mr. Charles Lyons.

SAMUEL INMAN sworn. - I am clerk in the Navy-office.

Q. Have you the books of the ship Portland in November 1801? - A. I have.

Q. Does it appear at that time that John Stein was serving on board the Portland? - A. Yes, he entered on board the 24th of October, 1801, and was drafted on the 16th of January, 1802, on board the Orion.

Q. Then on the 20th of November Stein did not belong to the Orion, but to the Portland? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you examined the books of the Orion? - A. Yes, he was regularly drafted from the Portland to the Orion.

The prisoner, when called upon for his defence, and denied the charge.

Mr. Gurney. (To Peacock.) Q. Have you the prisoner's receipt for this money? - A. I had it, but it is mislaid.

Q. Had it the prisoner's name or mark? - A. I think it was his mark.

Lyons. It had his mark. (The power of attorney read.) GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one month in Newgate , to stand upon the pillory , and then to be transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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