Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th September 1802.
Reference Number: 18020918
Reference Number: f18020918-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, THE 15th of SEPTEMBER, 1802, and following Days, BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1802.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDING ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, & c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir SIMON LE BLANC, Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ALLAN CHAMBRE, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common-Pleas; Sir WATKIN LEWES , Knight, THOMAS SKINNER , Esq. and Sir RICHARD CARR GLYN, Bart. Aldermen of the said City; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; PETER PERCHARD , Esq. JOHN ANSTEY , Esq. and TIPPING RIGBY, Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

John Savigny ,

Christopher Perkins ,

Thomas Dadley ,

Joseph Nutting ,

Abraham Walker ,

Richard Heap ,

George Fell ,

William Gustard ,

Thomas Dodd ,

George Long ,

Philip Cornman ,

John Young .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Peacock ,

Thomas Kingham ,

John Jenkins ,

James Sutton ,

John Strahan ,

Francis Hall ,

Robert Downs ,

John Machinlay ,

Joshua Chapman ,

Thomas Stiff ,

Thomas Cowie ,

David Ellis .

London Jury.

John Howe ,

John Smallpiece ,

Thomas Browne ,

James Bull ,

John-Hutchinson Browne ,

George Warner ,

Walter Emmett ,

Robert Hill ,

William Brooks ,

John De Force ,

Charles Doncaster ,

Samuel Barnes .

Reference Number: t18020918-1

586. JOHN DEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , two guineas, two half-guineas, and two seven-shilling-pieces, the property of Isaac Clarke , in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

ISAAC CLARKE sworn. - I live at Clapton , the prisoner was my servant : About the 18th of July, in consequence of a suspicion, I marked all the gold I had, and put it in my book-case, in the parlour, where I usually kept it; on the morning of the 22d, I went out, leaving my money all right; I returned in a few hours, and missed a guinea; I then sent for a constable, who searched the prisoner, but found nothing upon him; we then searched a press in which his clothes were kept, and out of his waistcoat pocket a picklock dropped, the constable then took charge of him; about two hours afterwards, in consequence of information that I received from Ann Vincent , I went to the press again and found two guineas, two half-guineas, and two seven-shilling-pieces, partly covered over with light-coloured brick-dust, among them was one of the guineas that I had marked.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You had this young man from the service of Captain Pole? - A. Yes.

Q. And received a very excellent character with him? - A. The character I received was, that he was sober, but that he was idle.

Q. You talk of a picklock - upon your oath was it any thing more than a mop nail? - A. It was a mop nail.

Q. Did he not say he picked it up in the green-house, and are there not such nails in the green-house? - A. I believe there are.

Q. Did you not take the opinion of a blacksmith, and did he not tell you, that the lock had not been picked? - A. Yes.

Q. Was not this press a place to which any person in the house had access? - A. Yes.

ANN VINCENT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Clarke; after the prisoner had been taken away, I went to put up the cloaths into the press again, which is used only for the man-servant's cloaths; I had a candle, by the light of which I observed something glisten, but did not touch it, my fellowservant, who was with me, went up and acquainted my master.

ELIZABETH FRAUNCE sworn. - I was present when the constable took out the money.(John Shepherd, a constable, produced the money, a a guinea of which was identified by Mr. Clarke.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called Captain Pole , and two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020918-2

587. ROBERT WHITTINGHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , eighty pounds weight of raw sugar, value 40s. the property of Robert Waghorn , John Senham , Joseph Sabine , Thomas Knight , John Blake , Henry Ventris , Timothy Hewlett , John England , Jonas Deare , and Thomas Hinton .( Thomas Hinton , a gangsman proved the firm as stated in the indictment.)

JOSEPH MILLS sworn. - I am a cooper: On Thursday the 10th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was looking out at the three story window of the warehouse, and saw the prisoner go out of one warehouse into the other, with a large bundle; I went down below and found the prisoner sitting on a knap-sack of sugar; I pointed him out to a constable, and he was taken away; I found a deficiency in one hogshead, of one hundred pounds, some of it was scattered on the floor.(Thomas Hunter, a constable, produced the property.)

SIMON MAZE sworn. - I was on Galley-quay; I heard an alarm; I went into the building; they had got the prisoner down on his back, and he was striving very hard to get away from them; I laid hold of him, and kept him till my master came up; he was taken on the same floor where the sugar was missing.

Hinton. This is the same sort of sugar that was missing; we are responsible for it.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor, but as to the sugar I know nothing about it; I have a wife and three children; I throw myself on the mercy of the Court and Jury.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-3

588. JOHN SNOWDEN and STEPHEN WOOD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , a black gelding, value 30l. and another gelding, value 15l. the property of George Fillingham , Esq. (The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JAMES CREW sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fillingham, who has a farm on the Harrow-road : On Tuesday the 24th of August, I left a black gelding and a grey poney safe in my master's field,

about eight o'clock in the evening, and missed them the next morning between four and five; the same black gelding was afterwards brought to town, by Mr. Fillingham's groom, Thacker.

WILLIAM FILLINGHAM sworn. - I am the son of the prosecutor; on the day on which the horses were missed, hand-bills were published describing them.

DAVID HUNT sworn. - I live at Old Brompton, near Chelsea; I have known the prisoners perfectly well since the middle of May last; Snowden occupied a house adjoining mine, at the end of the garden, and Wood was frequently there; Snowden occupied a stable of mine; on the morning of Wednesday of 25th of August, I went into the hay-lost over the stable, and saw three horses seeding, one was a black horse, apparently a carthorse, and a grey horse feeding from the rack; there was also another black horse, which belonged to Snowden; in the evening of that day, I heard Wood distinctly say to somebody, I cannot say who," I wish they were at home;" but whether he meant the horses or not, I cannot say, and I heard something, which appeared to me as if they were clipping with scissars; the next morning, about six o'clock, I went again to the same place, and the horses were all three gone; Mr. Fillingham's servant afterwards shewed me a cart-horse, which I believe to be one of the horses which I saw in the stable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you went into the stable, you had no suspicion that the horses had been stolen? - A. I had not; I thought it was odd that they should be brought there in the night, remain the whole day, and be taken away in the night again.

Q. How long were you in the hay-lost? - A. I suppose five or six minutes; Snowden had promised me the possession of the stable; it wanted some repairs, and I went to see the condition of them.

Q. You being above the horse, could not discover whether it was a horse, or a mare? - A. I cannot say.

WILLIAM WESTMORE sworn. - I am tap-boy, at the Greyhound, at Bath; on Friday the 27th of August, the two prisoners came into my master's stables, about nine o'clock in the evening; Wood rode upon a black poney, and Snowden on his own black horse; the black poney was a carthorse; I saw them delivered to Mr. Carey, and Mr. Bryant.

JAMES CAREY sworn. - I am a peace-officer, at Bath; on Saturday the 28th of August, I apprehended the two prisoners at Bath; Bryant asked them both, whether they had any horses in Bath, Snowden said, they had two horses at the old Bridge; I went with a Magistrate to the Greyhound, at the Old Bridge, where we found two horses; I then found an advertisement in the paper, describing the cart-horse, I delivered that to Thacker.

WILLIAM BRYANT sworn. - I am a Peaceofficer, at Bath, I was with Carey; after we had found the horses, I applied to Wood, and asked him who that cart-horse belonged to, and he said, to Snowden; I told him, I believed it belonged to Mr. Fillingham, for it answered every description.

ANTHONY THACKER sworn. - I received the horse from Mr. Carey, at Bath, it is my master's horse.

The prisoner left their defence to their Counsel.

For the Prisoners.

JOHN THOMAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Were you at Rumsey-fair, on a Thursday, this year? - A. Yes, the 26th of August, I saw the prisoner Wood there; I kept a shoe-stall in the fair, and he bought a pair of shoes of me, and I agreed, that out of the money, he should have a share of a pot of ale; we went to a public-house and drank it; while we were drinking, an elderly man came by, with a black gelding in his hand, in a halter; Wood asked him the price of the horse, and they agreed for twenty-eight guineas; Wood gave him a guinea earnest, and then went to Snowden, who was bargaining for another horse, and got some money of him; Wood desired me to take notice of the bargain; I said, why should I take notice of it; he said, there is no harm for you to take notice, and then he paid him two 10l. notes, and seven guineas in gold, besides the guinea he gave him first; it was a black horse with a long tail, a gelding, I believe.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What business are you? - A. A cordwainner.

Q. Living at Rumsey? - A. No, Southampton, and have done for six or eight months on and off.

Q. How far is Rumsey from London? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How far is Southampton from London? - A.I cannot rightly tell you, I look upon it, it may be between fifty and sixty miles.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. No.

Q. Will you swear it is less than seventy-eight? - A. I will not swear at all about it.

Q. Was your name up at the stall? - A. No.

Q. Was any receipt given? - A. No.

Q. You were called upon to witness the transaction? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner ask you your name? - A. Yes, on account of his buying the shoes; I told him, I should be much obliged to him for his custom when he came that way.

Q. Did you tell him where you lived? - A. Yes, at Southampton.

Q. What time of day was this? - A. Between four and five in the afternoon.

Q. How far from your stall was it, that you went to drink with him? - A. About eight or nine yards.

Q. Who minded your stall? - A. My brother, William Thomas.

Q. Where does he live? - A. At Southampton, with me.

Q. You are sure it was a gelding? - A. Yes, I am positive it was not a mare.

Q. Did you observe any marks? - A. Yes, he had a white leg behind.

Q. When did you first know you should be wanted as a witness here? - A. Last Saturday; I was over at the Isle of Wight, and when I came home, I found a letter that came from them.

Q. Have you got the letter with you? - A. No.

Q. Was there any subpoena with that letter? - A. No.

Q. Did it contain any money to bear your expences? - A. No; I want to know who is to pay my expences.

Q. There was no application made to you by an attorney? - A. No.

Q. You have not told your story to any body since you came to town? - A. No.

Q. You have not given any sort of account of it? - A. No.

Q. Nor had any conversation with the Solicitor for the prisoners? - A. No; I did not arrive in town till last night.

Q. And you have not been examined by any body? - A. No.

Court. (To Thacker.) Q. What were the marks? - A. One white heel behind, a star in the forehead, and a long tail.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020918-4

589. WILLIAM NORRIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Taylor , about the hour of two in the night of the 24th of July , with intent the goods therein being, burglariously to steal .

It appearing in evidence that it was day-light when the offence was committed, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-5

590. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a silver watch, value 40s. a steel chain, value 3d. and a brass key, value 1d. the property of John Howard , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN HOWARD sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , No. 9, White's-alley, Chancery-lane : On the 4th of September, about nine o'clock in the evening, while a man of a mean appearance was trying on a pair of shoes, my wife missed my watch, which had been hanging up where I was at work; it has my name at length in it, it was made for me.

ANN HOWARD sworn. - I am the wife of John Howard : On the 4th of September, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner went through the passage into the yard: I did not know him before the sash was up, and the watch hung up very near the window; I saw him take the watch off the nail, he attempted to make his escape, but I caught him round the neck, and held him fast; my husband immediately took him from me, the watch was found on the step of the door, about two yards from the prisoner.

ISSAC CHAPMAN sworn. - I saw Mrs. Howard lay hold of the prisoner in the passage; I saw the watch lying upon the step of the door; a man came out of the shop who had been trying on some shoes, and had hold of the chain of the watch; when I took it up, he said, here is the watch, let the boy go, and then ran away.( John Blundell , the constable of the Liberty of the Rolls, produced the watch, which was identified by the prosecutor.) GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-6

591. ROBERT TUCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a cask, value 3s. and six gallons of anniseed, value 8l. the property of Benjamin Hodges , and Thomas Chamberlain .

BENJAMIN HODGES sworn. - I am a distiller , my partner's name is Thomas Chamberlain; I had missed liquor before: On the 26th of January, I missed six gallons, a quart, and a pint of anniseed, in a cask, numbered 8483, sent in a waggon to be delivered in Houndsditch, by my servants; I did not see it again till the 27th, at the office in Lambert-street, with the spirits in it; I did not know the prisoner before; the value is about three pounds.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner on the 26th of January last, in Goodman's-yard, with two more men, he had a cask on his shoulder; I heard one say," Go in there," meaning to Mr. Levi's: the prisoner went up the step, I followed him, and asked him what he had there? he said, he did not know? I asked him how he came by it? he said, a man was to give him half a crown for carrying it; I asked him if he should know the man? he said, no; then I took him and the cask to the office; I saw Mr. Hodges's name on the cask; I went to him, and asked him if he had lost a cask, he said, he had, and came to the office, and swore to his property.

Q.(To Hodges.) Can you say when you had last seen it, before you saw it at the office? - A.

No; the cask is sent with the liquor, and then is returned; I cannot say any more, my servants are not here.

Prisoner's defence. I was hired as a porter to carry it to Mr. Levi's, who would not take it in; I said, I would not take it away, but he said, I should, when that man took me; I have no witnesses. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-7

592. JOHN EDY , alias JOHN-HUGHES EDY , and THOMAS BRANNAM , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a chaise, value 40l. the property of Murdock M'Kenzie .(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

GEORGE M'KENZIE sworn. - My father lives in Green-street, Grosvenor-square, and is a coachmaker ; I know the prisoner Edy, I first knew him by the name of House; he had hired chaises at our house before; On the 4th of August, he came to hire a chaise to go to Brighton, I told him it would be five shillings a day; he said, he should call on a friend of his at Hounslow, and if he did not go with him, he should return the chaise that night, which he did, by Brannam; next day, between two and four, he came and asked me if he could have the same chaise he had the day before; I said he might, he said he would take it to Brighton, but asked if he must pay five shillings a day; I said, yes; while the horse was putting in, he asked me if I would sell it; I said, I would, and the price was forty guineas; he asked what he should give if he paid directly; I said, forty pounds; he said he would try it, and send a draft for the money; I asked him what kind of draft, he said, a draft at a short date; I said, I could take no such draft, but that he might keep it on hire at five shillings a day to go to Brighton, that was all that passed; he then drove it out of the yard; the same evening, a servant, in the livery of the honourable Mrs. Duss, called with a letter, between eight and nine o'clock, addressed to my father; I opened it, and in it was a promissory note, at ten days, signed John Hughes , for forty pounds; I told the man I should not take it, and gave it back to him; he came into the room where I went to write a note, and I found the draft about half an hour after by the side of the desk I was going to write at; on the next day, I went to the lodgings of the prisoner Edy, No. 8, Bolton-street, Piccadilly, (he had told me where he lodged, and it was on the note) but I did not find him; on the Saturday following; the 7th of August, as I was coming up St. James's-street, in a chaise, with my father, I saw Edy with another man turn round the corner of a street, I got out of the chaise, and asked him what he had done with the chaise he had hired; he said, he had lent it to a gentleman to go into the country; I said, I did not believe but he had sold it; he said, upon his word and honour he had not, but had lent it; my father came up, and upon telling him we would take him up, he said, if we would go to the George-inn, Drury-lane, we might hear something of it, for the gentleman he had lent it to, had talked of putting it up there; he then got into the chaise with my father and I, and Mr. Hiscox, who was with us, went on before us to the George; Edy told Mr. Newman, the master of the inn, that he had only hired the horse and chaise, and if Brannam had sold it, it was without his knowledge; he asked Mr. Newman if he himself had sold it to him; he said, no, but Brannam had sold it for him; then Edy told Mr. Newman he must give the horse to Hiscox, and the chaise to my father, which was refused; I afterwards got the chaise on the Hammersmith-road; I did not see it at Newman's, as he said he had lent it to a pawnbroker.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you never said you sold the chaise, and took the note in payment? - A. No, never to any one.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner last year at all? - A. Yes, the first time was the 27th of December.

Q.Had there been any money transactions between you? - A. He paid one or two days hire for a chaise, at five shillings a day, before he took it out of the yard.

Q. Did he not tell you he was going to Brighton, and did you not tell him it would be better for him to buy the chaise? - A. Not to my recollection.

Q. Did you hear any conversation between your father and him before the chaise was taken away? - A. No.

Q. Is your father here? - A. No, he is in France; I never made any proposition to the prisoners to build a chaise for him.

Q. Did you not tell him he should have the chaise at forty pounds, if he paid you at a short period? - A. No.

Q. Did the person who brought the note to you, say, that it would be paid when due, and that he should have a doceur, or something of that sort? - A. No.

Q. Was forty pounds a fair ready money price for the chaise? - A. Yes.

Q. When you got to Newman's, did you not say, although you have sold the chaise, you have not sold the harness, and desired it to be returned, which was done? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Was the harness returned? - A. After I had taken the chaise it was.

Q. What was the date of the note? - A. The 5th of August.

Q. The prisoner was taken into custody before the note became due? - A. Yes, he was.

JOHN NEWMAN sworn. - I keep the Georgeinn, Drury-lane, and know the prisoners; I saw

them on the 4th of August, in the evening, between five and six, at my yard; Brannam came into the yard first, and asked me if I wanted to buy a one hore chaise; I said, I did not; he said, there were two gentlemen, West-Indians, at the door, who had got one to part with, for they were going to Brighton, and wanted money; I went out and saw two men in a chaise, who, I did not know; Edy was one of them; I had no conversation with them; I only told Brannam I would not buy it, and they went away; Edy in the chaise, the other got out; Brannam went up to Edy, but I don't know what he, said; next afternoon, at four or five o'clock, I saw Brannam again; he came in the same chaise, and asked me if I would buy it; I asked the price, he said he would take twenty-one guineas; I would not buy it without taking it to my coach-maker, which I did, and he said it was worth twenty-five guineas, upon which I bought it at twenty-one guineas; the harness was to be delivered up when sent for; in the evening, about seven or eight o'clock, I saw Brannam and Edy together, and I paid Brannam for it; Edy was present when he gave me the receipt; I knew Brannam was in the habit of selling horses and chaise for gentlemen; Edy signed the receipt, by the name of Hughes, I wrote the receipt, (receipt read.)

"August 5th, 1802.

"Received of Mr. John Newman , the sum of Twenty-two pounds one shilling, for a horse and chaise, the property of Mr. Hughes, No. 8, Bolton-street, Piccaddly, by me. T. Brannam."(Indorsed on the back.) "Deliver the harness to Mr. Mackenzie. J. Hughes."

Signed at the back, by Edy, by the name of Hughes.

I took the chaise home, and went out in it that day; I let it out afterwards, and have not seen it since the 15th, when it was taken away.

Mackenzie. I cannot tell who I took the chaise from; they would not give me any information about it, and they have served me with a copy of a writ for it; it was a one horse chaise, with horizontal springs, painted yellow and black, and lined with blue cloth, with yellow nails; it was a rumble tumble behind of a peculiar make.

Newman. That was the make of the chaise I brought on the 5th; Mackenzie insisted on having it; I said I had paid for it, but don't remember any conversation; Edy said, he had bought that chaise of him, which Mackenzie came to claim of me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You gave the fair value for it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Mackenzie acknowledge selling the chaise? - A. He acknowledged taking the draft.

Q. Did he say it was as a consideration for the chaise? - A. Yes, as a consideration for the chaise.

Mr. Const. Q. Did he not say that, although he had taken it, it was against his will, for that it was left there? - A. He said it was left by the man who brought it, and who insisted on leaving it; he was asked at Bow-street, whether he had taken the draft, and he said, Mrs. Duff's coachman came with it, and he refused to take it, but he would insist on leaving it on the desk.

Edy's defence. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

Brannam was not called on for his defence.

Edy, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

Brannam, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-8

593. ALEXANDER WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a quart of spirituous liquors, value 1s. 6d. and a pound weight of sugar, value 1s. the property of William Holme and Thomas Wilson .

JOHN SEWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am clerk to Messrs. William Holme and Thomas Wilson, rectisiers , No. 28, Upper Thames-street; the prisoner has been in their service twelve or thirteen years: On Saturday, the 24th of July, he came into the accompting-house to receive his wages; I told him I had every reason to think he had something that did not belong to him; he said he had not; I lifted up his coat, and saw something stick out; I sent for a constable, who searched him, and in one pocket he found a tin canister with the spirit, and in the other a lump of sugar, upwards of a pound; he said it was his first offence, and hoped Mr. Holmes would excuse him; it was impossible to miss the quantity put of so large a stock, but I have no doubt it is theirs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was not this spirit, gin? - A. Yes, it was gin.

Q. How much sugar was there? - A.Upwards of a pound.

Q. How long had he lived with your master? - A. Twelve or thirteen years, and always had a good character; they had so much sugar and spirit, that I cannot swear to it.

THOMAS HUGHES sworn. - I am a constable, and searched the prisoner; this tin-case was taken out of his pocket.

THOMAS WILSON sworn. - I am one of the prosecutor's; this spirit I believe to have been taken out of our store; the prisoner had lived with us twelve or thirteen years, and had behaved very well before this.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I should think you would not have kept him, unless you had thought him an honest man? - A. No.

Q. I suppose you will not venture to swear to the gin or sugar? - A. Certainly not.

Q. Had you an opportunity of knowing, by

taking an account of stock, that you had lost so small a quantity of gin or sugar? - A. No; it was quite impossible to miss it.

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely innocent; for I have lived thirteen years in their service, and never wronged them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-9

594. DAVID KINGSTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Gearing , no person being therein, about the hour of six, on the day of the 17th of July , and feloniously stealing, two shirts, value 10s. the property of John Little .

JOHN LITTLE sworn. - I am a sailor , and lodge at No. 15, Robinhood-court; I gave the shirts to my sister-in-law to wash, and she had liberty of Charles Gearing 's wife to hang them up in her room: on Saturday, the 17th of July, about six o'clock in the evening, they were missed; I saw them again when they were taken from the prisoner's pocket; I heard an alarm given, and followed him to the counter, where I saw them taken out of his pocket; they are not finished at the arms; the landlord's name is Bennett, but he does not live in the house; it is let out in tenements; the prisoner appeared to be sober.

JAMES WADE sworn. - I left off work at six o'clock on the evening of the 17th of July, and had just turned into the house, No. 18, Robinhood-court, where I live, and heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner run into the workhouse passage, Shoe-lane, and another man took him; I followed them back to the house he had taken the shirts from, and he attempted to take one out of his right-hand pocket, and drop it, which I stopped him doing; he said he would give me back my property, and did not mean to hurt me, thinking I belonged to them; I took them, and shewed them to Mr. Little; he said he hoped I would shew him lenity, and admitted it was a very bad thing he had done; I had made him no promise of favour.

ALICE HOTHRAM sworn. - I am sister-in-law to John Little , and lodge at No. 15, Robinhood-court ; the shirts were in Charles Gearing 's room; I had the washing of them, and put them there to dry; I was in the two pair, and heard a noise in Gearing's room; I came down stairs, and saw a man come out of the room with the shirts in his pocket; he went down stairs; I followed him, and gave the alarm; my brother's shirts were brought back; Gearing's wife rented the room at the time; I don't know whether Gearing ever lived in it.

ELIZABETH HILSTON sworn. - I live at No. 11; I was helping to wash the shirts, which were hung up in Mrs. Gearing's room; he is on board ship, and has been these seven years; I was not present when they were stolen.

WILLIAM RATCLIFF sworn. - I took the prisoner, and found the two shirts on him; I delivered them to the keeper of the Compter.(The shirts produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was in a state of intoxication if I did do it; when I was a boy, I fell out of a three pair of stairs window, and have a plate in my head; if I drink any thing, I don't know what I do; therefore I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 37.

Of stealing, but not of the breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-10

595. JOHN PARKER was indicted for that he, on the 29th of July , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Philip Matravers and Thomas Wilson , did, by virtue of such employment, take into his possession of and from Joseph Washington , who was then clerk and servant to Messrs. Bennet and Company, the sum of 6s. 10d. for and on account of his said masters, and afterwards did feloniously and fraudulently embezzle and secrete the same, and so the Jurors say he did steal the same .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing 6s. 10d. the property of the said Philip Matravers and Thomas Wilson.

THOMAS WILSON sworn. - I am a wharfinger , in partnership with Philip Matravers , in the carting line; the prisoner had been our servant as carman about six weeks: On the 29th of July, he took a double load of currants, for which he received 6s. 10d. and accounted only for one load.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is your partner, Mr. Matravers, liable to a share of the losses you may sustain? - A. Yes; the goods were loaded at Fresh-wharf, to go to Bennett and Co's, in Fenchurch-street.

JOHN BOWLER sworn. - I am porter to Matravers and Co. and know the prisoner, who was their carman: On the 29th of July, I went to Whitechapel, and left the prisoner in Thames-street, taking a turn there; I came back, and asked him what he had loaded since I left him; he told me, a butt of currants; I asked where to; he said, Bennett's, in Fenchurch-street; I did not know whether he had taken more, or not, till we received a summons next day from the Lord-Mayor for carrying a double load of currants in one cart, contrary to law; he had booked a single load only, and paid two shillings and nine-pence; the 2d of August, I went to Bennett and Co. to enquire what goods he had carried there; the pri

soner had run away, and I took measures to apprehend him, which I did.

JOSEPH WASHINGTON sworn. - I am clerk to Bennett and Co. I paid the prisoner six shillings and ten-pence for the cartage of two loads of currants on the 29th of July, about eleven o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. I never saw the carman before; when a man brings me a note, I pay him; I can swear to the man that I saw at the Mansion-house; I never saw him before the day I paid him; others came to me on that day.

Court. (To. Bowler.) Q. Did the carman settle accounts every night? - A. Always; it is a regular rule; it is entered in the book one load, two shillings and nine-pence. (Produces the book.)

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did not the prisoner say it was a mistake, and would set it right? - A. No, nothing like it; my master's son told him he had received six shillings and ten-pences for two butts of currants, but he sluck to it, he had taken but one.

Prisoner's defence. I leave my case to my Counsel.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 44.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-11

596. WILLIAM NAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , sixty glass bottles, value 15s. the property of the Rev. Thomas Wright .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-12

597. MARY MULLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , a silk cloak, value 50s. a shawl, value 8s. an apron, value 1s. three caps, value 4s. and a pair of pockets, value 1s. the property of Margaret Grady , in the dwelling-house of Cornelius Foley .

MARGARET GRADY sworn. - I am a milkwoman , and lodge in Bluewall-court, Tottenham Court-road , in the house of Cornelius Foley : On the 26th of July, the things were in my bed-room, when I was going to bed at nine o'clock; I had the key of my box in my pocket, and I got up between two and three in the morning to milk the cows; I put my hand in my pocket, and found the key gone; I told my master I had lost it, and asked him to let me go home, which I did, and the prisoner was gone out of the house where I lodge; she slept with me; I got up first, and left her in bed; I looked about for the key, but could not find it; I looked into the box, and the things were gone; I found them three weeks after, when I met the prisoner in St. Giles's; I took hold of her, and she drew a pocket-book out, and gave me the ticket of my silk cloak that cost me two guineas and more, and an odd shilling, which she pawned for three half guineas; she said, she bought a pair of shoes, which cost three shillings and ninepence; I told her she had better own, and then she gave me the ticket of the cloak and apron, and I went to the pawnbroker's, and got them.

JOHN - sworn. - I am a stone sawyer: On the 16th of August, the prosecutrix and the prisoner came to my door, No. 35, Short's Gardens; she told me this was the woman who had robbed her; the prisoner said it was distress; I told the girl it would be better to confess, and I took her to the watch-house. (The pawnbroker produced the cloak and apron pledged by the prisoner.)

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the cloak or she, till I came to this lodging, which was open for every one to go in and out; she took the cloak, and pawned it herself, which she does with her other things, and then says she is robbed.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing, to the value of 39s.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-13

598. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , four ounces of silver, value 20s. the property of Martha Clarke .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

CHARLES CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you son of Mrs. Clarke? - A. Yes; she is a watch-case maker in Bunhill-row ; in April, last year, the prisoner was in her service: On the 28th of April, I marked some silver wire; the prisoner came to work on the 29th, in the morning, and my brother and I were on the watch; the prisoner went out about ten o'clock; I followed him, but could not see him; however, he was found by Davis and Dublin, and brought back in a few minutes; I told him he had robbed us, and had silver about him; he said he had not; I said he had; then he began crying; I sent for an officer, and he pulled out a piece, which he said was his father's; he was searched, and several pieces were found in his breeches pocket, which I had marked.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you not in partnership with your mother? - A. No; she has no partner.

JOHN GASS sworn. - I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner; in his pocket I found some silver, which I put in a paper, and it was given to the Magistrate; I took the prisoner to our lock-up place, and he made his escape out of the top.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - The silver was delivered to me, and I have had it ever since.

(Produces it, and identified, it having such stamps on it.)

Prisoner's defence. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hatham .

Reference Number: t18020918-14

599. WILLIAM HAWES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , half an ounce of silver, value 2s. 6d. the property of Martha Clarke .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

CHARLES CLARKE sworn. - My mother lives at No. 17, Bunhill-row ; the prisoner has been in her service two months on liking up to the 21st of August: On Saturday morning, I went into the privy, and on one side was halfpence, pence, and bits of silver, and on the other side, two shillings and sixpence in silver; he was seen going in, and was watched; after he came out, there were four penny-worth of halfpence missing; I told him to give me the bit of silver; he said he had none; I searched him, and in one of his pockets was silver, in this bag (produces it;) the halfpence lay on the ledge that supported the roof, very open to the fight; it was the common necessary of the house.

- PHILLIPS sworn. - I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody; I went into the privy, and found two shillings and sixpence in silver, and more than two shillings in halfpence; I found three pieces of silver on the ledge, which the prisoner said he put there the week before. (Producing them.)

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - I am also employed by my mother, and know the silver by the marks of the plates which it is drawn through.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Of stealing to the value of 12d.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-15

600. JAMES KENT and JOSEPH SAVILLE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a pocket-book, value 5s. a silver knife, value 5s. a silver pencil-case, value 6d. a silver bodkin, value 6d. and a petticoat, value 5s. the property of Thomas Holbrooke .

ELIZABETH HOLBROOKE sworn. - I lost a pocket-book from the back parlour, where I was sitting at work, on the 10th of August, about one o'clock, in Pratt-street, Camden-town ; I went down stairs, leaving the window open, and staid about an hour, the things were on the table; I was informed I had been robbed, and saw the prisoners in custody.

JOSEPH BARNES sworn. - I was returning from Hampstead on horseback on the 10th of August, and heard the cry of stop thief; I saw Saville alone, running in the field from Camden-town to Kentish-town; I said, what have you been thieving of? he said, nothing; he run till he came to water, which he jumped into, then he got out again, and run across the field, where he was taken; I returned to the water, thinking he had put into it what he had stolen; there was something floating on the water, and on poking my whip into the water, up came the pocket-book, and a memorandum-book.

MARY BASS sworn. - I live very near Mr. Holbroke's; on the 10th of August, about half-past eleven, I saw the prisoners, and another with them, in a field, opposite our house, they went towards Mr. Holbrooke's; I saw Saville make several attempts to get upon a wall, the others were watching, and upon a signal, by whistling, he withdrew, but at last he got up, about nine feet, and sprung from the wall to the parlour window, about two feet; I went and got assistance, and when we went up to them, Saville was pulling from his dress different things, and giving them to the others; I told them I had seen them steal the things, upon which Saville made use of bad language, and said,"me, ma'am," I said, yes; then he pulled his shoes off, left them behind, and ran away, and Kent after him; there were a number of people about; they ran twenty yards and got into a field, and made away for Kentish-town; they were taken and brought back; I am sure they are the men.

JOHN WESTBROKE sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the book, which was identified by Mr. Holbroke.)

Kent's defence. I was bathing in a pond, the prisoner Saville was there; we put on our cloaths, and another boy said he would go with us home, we met the lady, who said I had robbed the house, but I am innocent.

Saville's defence. I have nothing to say.

Kent, GUILTY , aged 18.

Saville, GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-16

601. JAMES M'GUIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , two thousand sixpenny nails, value 5s. the property of Francis Baron , the elder.

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Francis Baron , the younger.

FRANCIS BARON sworn. - I am an ironmonger , the prisoner was porter to me near five years; I suspected him, and desired him to be watched; next morning, I heard some words between Mr. Broadnacks and the prisoner, in the shop, I was in the kitchen; I went up, and the shopman was taking one of these papers out of the prisoner's

pocket, the other he took out himself; the prisoner had nothing to do with them in the course of his employment.

JOHN BROADNACKS sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Baron; I watched the prisoner, and about a quarter after seven in the morning, on the 4th of September, as he was sweeping behind the counter, in the front shop, I saw him put two papers of nails in his pocket; he took one from a shelf under the counter, and the other from a recess; when he was going to breakfast, I stopped him, and accused him with robbing his master, he denied it; I put my hand to his coat-pocket, and took out one paper of nails, the other he took out himself; Mr. Baron came up, and an officer was sent for, and he was taken to the watch-house, the parcels are marked by me. (The property was produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. The nails were under the counter loose.

Mr. Baron. They were papered exactly as they are now.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Chambre .

Reference Number: t18020918-17

602. MARY M'DONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a Banknote, value 1l. the property of George Beaumont .

GEORGE BEAUMONT sworn. - I keep a public-house , in Rosemary-lane : On the 18th of July, a one pound Bank-note was in the till; I had seen it on Sunday the 18th; I missed it directly after the prisoner left the bar, who was my servant; I insisted on her giving it to me; she denied having it; I sent for an officer and had her searched in my presence; we did not then find it, but I sent for two or three women to search her, which they did and found it.

MARY TAYLOR sworn. - I was in the house on the 18th, and was present when the prisoner was searched; she pulled off her stays, and in the lefthand side of the back part of the stays, I found the note. (The note was produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. They did it among themselves, for I know nothing of it: they took me up stairs, and searched me a long time, then this gentlewoman was pleased to say she found it on me. which it was not. GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020918-18

603. JAMES SHEEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , five shirts, unmade, value 10s. the property of John Davidson .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-19

604. THOMAS JONES , alias SOLOMON ROBUS , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John-Edward Lawson , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 17th of June , and burglariously stealing five watch chains, value 6s. seven watch keys, value 1s. 6d. five rings, value 6d. and four watch hooks, value 6d. the property of the said John.

JOHN- EDWARD LAWSON sworn. - I am a watch and clock-maker , at No. 58, Bishopsgate-street Within : On the 17 th of June my house was broke open; a little after ten o'clock in the evenning, the prisoner came to my house for some watch papers; I told him I did not sell them; he then asked for watch-strings; I told him it was too late, he must call again in the morning; then he went away; I had seen every thing secure at half past nine o'clock; I was alarmed by the watchman a little before one; I went down in my shirt, and found the shop-window broke open, and the articles mentioned in the indictment taken out; they were safe in the tray the night before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you sure you had sold no goods out of the tray the day before? - A. I had not; the goods are remarkable; some of them are damaged.

Q. Does anybody else serve in your shop? - A. Yes, the boy; he is here.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - On the 18th of June, about a quarter past three in the morning, I was coming down Sun-street, into Bishopsgate-street; I saw three young men together talking; when they saw me, one of them ran away towards Shoreditch-church; I followed the other two, one went down Houndsditch, and the prisoner towards Cornhill; I asked him where he was going; he said he was going to Billingsgate, on board a Gravelend boat; I then took him over to Bishopslgate watch-house, and searched him; I found upon him all the articles mentioned in the indictment,(produces them); he said he dealt in hardware, and that he had received them from Birmingham; the next morning Mr. Lawson claimed them.( Henry Lewis corroborated the audience of Mr. Lawson, with respect to the prisoner asking for watch papers, and watch strings.)

ROBERT SELL sworn. - I am a watchman; I found the prosecutor's shop-window broke open a little before one o'clock, and gave an alarm; the middle shutter had been raised by a Dutch clinker.)(The property was identified by the prosecutor.) Prisoner's defence. I was going to Billingsgate; I travel the country with hardware; I bought these things at Birmingham. GUILTY.

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-20

605. JOHN BROOKES was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon John Sneaven , on the 11th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a metal watch chain, value 1s. and a metal watch-key, value 1s. the property of the said John.

JOHN SNEAVEN sworn. - I am a sugar-baker : On the 11th of August, about nine o'clock in the, evening, I was coming home from a public-house; and saw a mob, where there was a woman singing; when I had got a little way past the mob, the prisoner laid hold of my watch-chain; I laid hold of his collar; the chain broke off, and he threw it away; I held him fast, and delivered him to Mr. Nowlan; I cannot value it at more than a shilling.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence. GUILTY, aged 16.

Of petty larceny only .

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-21

606. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , a pocket-book, value 1s. three tooth-picks, value 6d. and a pencil, value 3d. the property of Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - On the 11th of September, about eleven o'clock in the day, I was going along Ludgate-hill ; I felt something at my left-hand coat pocket, I turned round, and saw my pocket-book in the prisoner's hand; I took hold of his hand with the pocket-book in it, saying, I would take care of him; upon which he turned away up Cock-court, where I saw him throw the book over his shoulder; he ran into the court on the left hand; I called stop thief, which gave an alarm, and he was stopped in Water-lane by one of the City constables; the book was brought to me by a young gentleman; I lost sight of him about a minute and a half.

Q. Can you undertake to swear that, at the time you felt something at your pocket, the prisoner had removed the pocket-book? - A. I have no doubt of it; his hand was at the very bottom of my pocket, and the book was in his hand; I am sure it is my pocket-book, there are memorandums in it.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a police officer: On Saturday, the 11th of September, I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner coming towards me, and a number of people after him; when I tried to stop him, he endeavoured to spar with me, and I struck him; he pulled off his hat, head, and then secured him; he pulled off his hat, and begged forgiveness of Mr. Smith.

JOHN BIGGS sworn. - I keep the Blue Last, Blackstiars; I heard a cry of stop thief; I immediately rushed out of the house, and saw the prisoner; I followed him into Water-lane, and there he was stopped by a constable.

Prisoner's defence. I am an innocent man.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-22

607. THOMAS YARMOUTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a glass bottle, value 6d. a quart of castor oil, value 4s. a leather bag, value 6d. a pound weight of jalap, value 3s. a cake of saffron, value 10s. a glass vial, value 1d. half an ounce of bark, value 3d. three quarters of a pound of salt of lemons, value 15s. one pound of other bark, value 6d. a piece of sponge, value 2d. and a box, value 3d. the property of John Horner and Edward Fawkes .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN HORNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partnership with Edward Fawkes , druggist , in Bucklersbury ; the prisoner was a porter with us, and had been so more than twelve months', we paid him eighteen shillings a week; the prisoner's department was to sweep the warehouse out, and rub the desk: On Saturday morning, the 10th of July, in consequence of a suspicion, I went round the warehouse, and looked into both his coat pockets, the staps were inside; there was not any thing at all in the left-hand pocket, I could see to the bottom of it; in his right-hand pocket there was a silk handkerchief; he then went into the warehouse, up three pair of stairs; he remained there three or four minutes; he then came down into the two pair of stairs warehouse, where he staid three or four minutes more; he then came very deliberately down stairs with a large sheet of brown paper before him, which he put into a drawer; I then observed that his right-hand pocket was buttoned up, the flaps were over it; he walked from me, and stood with his back towards me by the side of the counter; he then went to the sink to wash his hands; I observed that he straddled very much, and if he had something in his breeches; I ordered him to be sent to breakfast; he had got about twelve yards, when Fenner, the officer, came up, and asked the prisoner what he had got in his pocket; Fenner brought him back, and took the jalap root out of his pocket; he then untied his apron, and there was a great bulk in then front of his breeches; a leather bag was taken out, and in the bag a bottle of castor oil; the prisoner said it was the first time he had ever taken any thing; we afterwards went to a house in Cross-lane, where he lodged, and where he directed us; we found a cake of saffron, and two or three parcels of salt of lemons, and some bark; I have no doubt they were all our property; he said he had taken the bark as a curiosity; the leather bag I can swear to.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Of your own

knowledge you could not ascertain, that any of your property was gone? - A. No.

Q. You threatened to hang him, and then he said it was the first time he had ever taken any thing? - A. No, he said that long before.

JOHN FENNER sworn. - I am one of the City constables; I apprehended the prisoner and took charge of the property; he said, he had taken the castor-oil because he was very bad in his bowels; Mr. Horner then said, what did he take the jalap for, and he said, to sleep it, for the had rheumatism very bad.( John Horner , junr. corroborated the testimony of his uncle.)(The property was produced, and the leather bag and bottle identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-23

608. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Goodson , no person being therein, about the hour of twelve at noon of the 23d of July , and stealing a silver watch, value 20s. a metal seal, value 1d. a metal key, value one halfpenny, a pair of silver buckles, value 10s. and a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of the said Thomas.(The case was opened by Mr. Courthorpe.)

SARAH GOODSON sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Goodson; I was not at home at the time the property was taken.

DAVID GEORGE DAVIS sworn. - I am a schoolmaster, No. 1. Crescent, Kingsland-road; there is only a party-wall that divides my premises from the prosecutor's; on the 23d of July, I saw the prisoner lurking about the gate; I watched a few minutes, and saw him coming out of the yard, and the prosecutor's little girl following him, crying and saying, what shall I do, the house is robbed, and my mammy will beat me; I followed him; two young gentlemen, my parlour boarders, got before him, and he turned back; I stopped him, and asked him if he had taken any thing from the cottage, he was in a violent passion and said, you had better let me go, and kept feeling in his breast pockets with great violence; I took him back into the school-yard, and made him sit down upon a stool; I then saw a watch in his great-coat pocket; I asked him to let me look at it, and he put it in his job; I saw G. S. at the back of it; in the scuffle his hat fell off, and I saw a silk handkerchief in the crown of his hat; I sent for an officer, and he was taken into custody.(Peter Mason, an officer, produced the property, which was identified by Mrs. Goodson.)

Prisoner's defence. I heard a cry of stop thief, a man dropped these things, and I picked them up.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chamber.

Reference Number: t18020918-24

609. DANIEL BESSET , alias BISEX , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , a brown gelding, value 4l. the property of James Leake .

JAMES LEAKE sworn. - I am a jobbing man, and live at Walworth; I had a dark brown horse, which I used with my cart, worth about four pounds ten shillings; I turned him into Lock's-fields, on the 16th of July, at night, and I missed him the next morning at five o'clock; I found him again the same day in Whitechapel, in the possession of Mr. Griffiths; I am positive it was my horse; the prisoner had worked with me for a week.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - On Saturday the 17th of July, about six o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner at the bar, leaning upon a post by a horse-boiler's door, the horse was at a little distance from him, tied to a post; it was a dark brown horse, which Leake afterwards claimed; I took him into custody, and asked him whose horse it was; he said it was his, that he had bought it at Smithfield, and given three pounds ten shillings for it, three or four weeks before; I then went up to the horse, and saw that his throat was cut, so that I could have put my arm into his belly; his breath came out, he was standing by the post bleeding; I asked him how the horse's throat came to be cut; he said, he went to fetch it to go to work, from Walworth, and found his throat cut, and that was his reason for wishing to sell it; the prosecutor took the horse to the boiler's; I afterwards ordered a man to bring it to the Flyinghorse, in Lambeth-street, close to the office, which he did; some time after that, I took the prisoner before the Magistrate, and he confessed it was all false that he had told me, and then he told me whose the horse was.

Q. Is there any body here to prove this confession - did you see the Magistrate sign it? - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Whitechapel, I met with a young fellow who gave me some liquor, and I did not know what I was saying.

GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020918-25

610. MARY CALLAHAM was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Catherine Isaacs , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 30th of July , and burglariously steal

ing a cotton gown, value 8s. an apron, value 1s. and a loaf of bread, value 6d. the property of the said Catharine.

CATHARINE ISAACS sworn. - I keep a house in Catherine-street, Rosemary-lane : On Thursday the 29th of July, I left the articles mentioned in the indictment; I went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock, I saw the doors all safe; I got up about half-past four in the morning, and found the door open, the back door was wide open; the wood-work of the door, where the bolt goes in, had been cut away, I missed the property immediately; I met the prisoner soon afterwards, in Rosemary-lane; with my apron round her head; I asked her how she came by it, and she said, she had bought the apron and a quartern loaf for sixpence; I then sent for an officer and gave charge of her.

JOHN BASSETT sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner; I found this apron in her lap, with some bacon, some rump-streaks, some potatoes, and some cabbages; I asked her how she came by the apron, and she said, she gave sixpence for that and a quartern-loaf. (The apron was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I had had a fit of sickness, I bought this apron of a Jew, and tied it round my head. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-26

611. WILFRY EYRES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , a silver watch, value 42s. the property of Richard Taylor , in his dwelling-house .

REBECCA TAYLOR sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Taylor , who keeps an oil shop , No. 7, Vere-Street, Clare-market ; on the 12th of July, the watch was hanging up in the parlour; about a quarter before ten at night, the prisoner and two other boys, came in and asked for various articles, but purchased nothing, they were in the shop about five minutes; I did not observe either of them go into the parlour; I missed the watch the moment they were gone, and on the Wednesday following, I saw an advertisement, that the watch had been stopped, upon which I applied to the office in Marlborough-street, and found it to be my property.

- BROWN sworn. - I am a watchman in the parish of St. Giles's; I heard a rattle spring, and saw the prisoner run through Bowl-yard, that was between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, on the 12th of July; I caught the prisoner, and saw a watch taken from him, by an officer, who is here, it was in the prisoner's botom.

MICHAEL BUCKLEY sworn. - I am a watchman, I saw a parcel of boys gathering about twelve o'clock at night; I sprang my rattle, and they ran away; I cannot say whether the prisoner was one of them.( John Dalton , an officer, produced the watch, which was identified by Mrs. Taylor.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the watch in Broad-street, as I was coming from my aunt's in Holborn. GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020918-27

612. SARAH POWELL was indicted for feloniously, stealing, on the 7th of July , twenty-eight yards of calico, value 28s. two remnants of Irish cloth, value 2s. seven pair of stockings, value 5s. and two handkerchiefs, value 1s. the property of James Little .

JAMES LITTLE sworn. - I am an upholsterer , in Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square ; I know nothing of the loss.

MARY GARDENER sworn. - Mr. Little left home on the 29th of June; I was to sleep in the house during his absence; the prisoner was servant ; she was to go away on the 7th of July, and on that day I asked her for a pair of sheets from her bed in the front garret to send to wash with three other pair; as she was giving me the sheets, I saw between the sacking and the seather-bed some cloth; I asked her if she was going to make some shirts; she said, yes; I laid hold of the corner, and said, this is cotton, this is not for shirts; she said her mother had sent her seven yards to make some bedgown; I said, I was sure that was a great seven yards, and she said, her mother had sent seven yards for her, and seven for her sister; I then went down, and told Mr. Lee, the foreman of it, and he went up stairs.

JOSEPH LEE sworn. - I went up with the porter, and found the prisoner in the cutting-room, up there pair of stairs, measuring some cotton; I examined the marks, but did not know it to be Mr. Little's; I then came down stairs, and sent Marthe Mosely up to question her about it.

MARTHA MOSELY sworn. - I am servant to a lodger of Mr. Little's; I went up stairs at Mr. Lee's desire; I found the prisoner in the cuttingout room, rolling up the calico very carefully; I asked her what calico she had got there, and she said it was her own.

MICHAEL MADAN sworn. - I went up with Mr. Lee, and examined the cotton, but I did not know it; it measure twenty-two yards and a half, I marked it.( William Norris , a pawnbroker, produced a piece of calico, but could not say from whom he received it.)(Joseph Avery, a pawnbroker, produced a pair of stockings, and a neck handkerchief, which he received from the prisoner on the 13th of July, and a piece of calico, which he did not take in.)(The property was identified by Mr. Little.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-28

613. WILLIAM WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , six yards of cotton, value 18s. the property of Robert Wreaks .

- BROWN sworn. - I am assistant to Mr. Robert Wreaks , linen-draper , in Bishopgate-street Without ; I can only prove the property.

LEWIS LEWIS sworn. - On Wednesday, the 4th of August, I saw the prisoner take a piece of print from just within the door; he twisted it round his arm, and set off with it; I followed him about ten yards; I laid hold of him, and took him back to the shop with the print in his hand; a constable was sent for, who took him away; I never lost fight of him.( Thomas Sapwell , the officer, produced the cotton, which was identified by Brown.)

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor; I happened to roll against the window, and the cotton sell upon my arm; this gentleman immediately came up, and laid hold of me.

The prisoner called his mother, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 27.

One year in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-29

614. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a petticoat, value 12s. the property of William Lewis , Esq. (The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

WILLIAM LEWIS , Esq. sworn. - In March last, I hired some waggons to remove my goods from North Badgley, in Hampshire , to my house at Hammersmith ; I was present when they arrived, and missed a box, containing a great number of Jewels and trinkets, which was inclosed in a box in which the petticoat was placed.

Mrs. ROSETTA LEWIS sworn. - I assisted in packing the things; there was a box of jewels, which I put into another box, containing the petticoat charged in the indictment; when the waggon arrived at Hammersmith, I saw the cord of the box loose; I examined it, and missed the box of jewels, and the petticoat.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - On Thursday, the 29th of July, I went with Smith and Nowlan to the house of the prisoner, in a court in Bishopsgate-street; he was in bed; upon looking round the room, I saw this breadth of a muslin petticoat, hanging as a window curtain, (produces it); Smith found some duplicates; we took the prisoner to the office, and then I went to the pawnbroker's, and found a petticoat, which matched it exactly; Mrs. Lewis knew them to be her's by her own work.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I was with Griffiths; I found a pocket-book upon the mantle-piece; I said to the prisoner (knowing him), Bill, is this full of Bank-notes; he said, no, you will find nothing there but my duplicates, which will shew you my distressed situation, and convince you that I have done nothing lately among the duplicates; I found one, which was for a petticoat and gold seal; Mrs. Lewis claimed the petticoat; the prisoner's wife was in the room; I found in the pocket-book a certificate of their marriage.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. That which you have produced is a curtain, and not a petticoat? - A. Yes.( Thomas Milford , servant to Mr. Davison, a pawnbroker, produced a petticoat, which he received in pledge from the prisoner's wife.)

Mrs. Lewis. This petticoat was mine, but it has had a breadth taken out of it; I can swear to it by the work.

JAMES BREDMORE sworn. - I was hired as a guard to this waggon at Alion, and came with it to Hammersmith; the prisoner at the bar, and another man and woman, came with the waggon, sometimes walking, and sometimes riding; when we got to Staines, they all went to-bed at a public house; I am sure the prisoner was one of the men.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner on the 23d of March, in Castle-alley, Whitechapel, with a man of the name of John Nightingale , and, about two hours afterwards, the prisoner made his escape out of the lock-up house; Nightingale was discharged; the prisoner then delivered himself up, and there being no evidence against him, he was dismissed; we afterwards received fresh information, and he was apprehended again.

Prisoner's defence. When we got to Staines, we stopped and dined, and were drinking with the guard for two hours after dinner, and being a fine afternoon, we determined to walk to London; we bid the waggoner and guard a good afternoon, and came away; my wife bought this petticoat of a Jew last August was a twelvemonth.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020918-30

615. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a clarinet, value 5s. the property of the United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East-Indies .

There being not sufficient evidence of the clarinet belonging to the India Company, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-31

616. WILLIAM FLETCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , a handkerchief, value 4s. the property of Edward Bridges , privily from his person .

EDWARD BRIDGES sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Sutherland, a notary-public: On Saturday the 17th of July, I was robbed of my handkerchief, in Swithin's-alley, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was looking at a picture-shop; I observed the prisoner thrust his hand into his trowsers, I then missed my handkerchief; I followed him up a court, and stopped him; I took him to a public-house and searched him; I found my handkerchief, with another in his trowsers, next his thighs; it was a new blue and white silk handkerchief, and in the crown of his hat were two or three others, I am not sure which.

James Collier, a constable, produced the handkerchief, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the handkerchief, and asked several gentlemen if it was their's, and then this gentleman laid hold of me.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-32

617. SAMUEL DE GRAVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a tin box, value 2d. and four shillings, the property of George Sikes , privily from the person of Elizabeth, his wife .

ELIZABETH SIKES sworn. - I am the wife of George Sikes: I went to Bartholomew-fair the last day, about six o'clock in the evening, my husband was with me; I had not got ten yards in the fair, before I found my pockets hanging outside my cloaths; I missed a snuff-box, and a tin-box, with 4s. in it, and some halfpence; a gentleman behind me produced the box that had my money in it, and there were two baker's bills in it; the prisoner was taken immediately.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was this the first night of your appearance at this fair? - A. Yes.

Q. You were going to see punch and his wife, I understand? - A. No, I was not going to any shew.

Q. There was such a bustle, any body might have put their hands in your pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes, I am not given to liquor.

JOHN BECKETT sworn. - I am a watch-maker; on the 7th of September, I was passing through Bartholomew-fair; I saw the prisoner and another man very close to this woman, in short, hugging her; I suspected they were robbing the poor woman; I watched them, and seized the prisoner myself; I called to the woman, who said she had lost two boxes, one of them containing four shillings; I searched him, and found a box in his left-hand waistcoat-pocket, I heard the found of money in it, and I delivered it to Mr. Canner, the City-Marshal.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It would not have been a very difficult thing for a person to have put in into the prisoner's pocket? - A. I cannot say that. (The box was produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing the goods, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-33

618. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , a handkerchief, value 2s. 6d. the property of Charles Holland , privily from his person .

CHARLES HOLLAND sworn. - I am clerk to a sugar-broker, in Tower-street: On the 5th of August, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was looking at a caricature shop, the corner of Billiter-lane ; I felt my handkerchief drawn out of my pocket; I looked up Billiter-lane, and saw the prisoner; I followed him, and upon searching him, I found my handkerchief in his breeches; I delivered it to the constable, it has a mark of C. H. in the middle of it.(The constable produced the handkerchief, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up in the street.

GUILTY, aged 52.

Of stealing, but not privily, from his person .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-34

619. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , two seven-shilling-pieces, and five shillings , the property of William Runciman .

WILLIAM RUNCIMAN sworn. - I am a baker : On Tuesday night, in consequence of a suspicion, I marked some money in the till, the prisoner was my journeyman ; the next morning I got up at five o'clock, and missed two seven-shilling-pieces, five shillings in silver, eleven penny-pieces, and eleven old halfpence; I sent for a constable, but did not see him searched; I saw at Guildhall, two seven-shilling-pieces, and five shillings, which I knew to be mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What did you mark them with? - A. A smith's file.

Q. Did you never see a file mark upon silver before? - A. Yes, but not like this.

Q.Suppose I were to shew you, out of my

pocket, two seven-shilling-pieces, and some silver that had a file mark, should you know one from the other? - A. I don't know.

Q. How long has he lived with you? - A. Near two years.

Q. During that time, has he not maintained a good character? - A. I never knew any thing to the contrary.(Barrett, a constable, produced the money, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-35

620. JOHN CAPPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a chaise harness, value 30s. the property of Michael Landy .

MICHAEL LANDY sworn. - I live in Tottenharm-court-road : On Sunday morning, the 5th of July, between the hours of eleven and twelve, the prisoner was stopped at the door with the property; I had seen the harness hanging in the shop, about half an hour before; when he was stopped, he came running up stairs to me, and asked me for his wages; he had worked for me about seven weeks before, but I did not owe him any.

CHARLES BUCK sworn. - I live next door to Mr. Landy: On the 5th of July, I was going down Mr. Landy's passage, and saw the prisoner coming out with a chaise harness; as soon as he saw me, he went back again, opened the shopdoor, and put it down; he then went up stairs, and I informed Mr. Landy of it.(The harness produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Mr. Landy for my wages, and tumbled over this harness in the passage; as I had disentangled myself from it, this boy came in, and I threw it into the shop; I went up stairs to ask for my wages, and Mr. Landy said, he would send me to Botany-bay.

Buck. When I saw him, he was coming out of the passage with it. GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-36

621. MARGARET DOUGLAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , six pair of silk gloves, value 30s. and two silk hatbands, value 16s. the property of Joseph Davis .

JOSEPH DAVIS sworn. - I am a broker and undertaker : The prisoner was servant to a Mr. Williams, at Kensington, my, mother had the burying of Mr. Williams, and she gave me the job, on condition that I was to give her two-thirds of the profits arising from it; on the 31st of August, I attended the funeral: I afterwards undressed the gentlemen, and put the cloaks into the bag, they were then taken away in the mourning coach to the furnisher's, where the property was missed; the furnisher's man went back with me to Kensington; we called Mr. Lucas, the executor, down stairs, I informed him of what was missing, he made enquiry, and the prisoner Douglas, after rubbing her hands, said, she was very happy they were not women's gloves, for that men's gloves could be of no use to her; after some more questions, she said, she would find it out if it cost her a guinea; Mr. Lucas said, he would give five guineas; she said, she could know for half-a-crown, who was the thief; she would go to the cunning-man, at Westminster; she and Mrs. Taylor put on their hats and cloaks to go to this cunning-man; upon their leaving the room, I asked permission of the executor to follow the prisoner up stairs; upon my entering the room, I saw the prisoner in the act of secreting the property in question, among some rubbish in the fire-place; she laid hold of me, and said, Joe, don't say any thing; I called Mr. Lucas, and he and some of the relatives came up stairs; I told him what I had seen, and he sent for a constable; she was immediately taken to Bow-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. By the will of the deceased, the prisoner is the owner of the house you live in? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the rent of that house? - A. Forty pounds a year.

Q. You know, if she should be convicted, you will have a chance to live rent free? - A. I cannot say as to that.

Q. Your mother was to have two-thirds of the profits of this job? - A. Yes.

Q. Then, supposing these articles had never been recovered, they would have gone out of the profits of the job? - A. Yes, certainly.

Court. Q. Would your mother have paid her share of the loss? - A. No, the loss would have been my own.

Mr. Gurney. Q.Suppose, by any accident, there had been no profit at all, you would not have given her any? - A.Certainly not.

Q.Suppose you had lost a plume of feathers, or any things else that eat up the whole profit, would she have had any profit? - A. Yes, she would have had her share of the whole profit, all the loss would have been my own; I myself was answerable to the furnisher for every article that was sent.

JOHN ROBINSON sworn. - I was put in possession of the effects of the deceased, by Mr. Lucas, the executor; after the funeral, Mr. Davis came to inform Mr. Lucas of the property being missed; the prisoner said, it was between the parson and the clerk; she went up stairs; Mr. Davis followed her up, and called out, here they are, here they are,

I did not go up myself. (The property was produced in Court.)

Davis. These correspond with the property lost, but there are no particular marks.

Prisoner's defence. I have lived twenty-three years in two families, I have nothing more to say.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-37

622. PETER POVY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a Bank-note, value 2l. and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Michael Coleman .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

ELEANOR COLEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of Michael Coleman, a seaman , belonging to his Majesty's ship, Excellent; I had a remittance letter, by which I was to receive from Mr. Davis at Somerset-house, three pounds one shilling and sixpence; he gave me a two pound note, a one pound note and eighteen-pence; it rained very hard, and as I was going along, I turned up Exeter-street, when a gentleman came up and tapped me on the shoulder.

Q. Look round and say if you can see that gentleman? - A. Yes; that is him, (pointing to the prisoner;) he told me, Mr. Davis had sent him after me, that I had four pounds odd more to receive, and I said, thank God for it; then I went with him to the Baptist-head, Chancery-lane; he said, Mr. Davis used to give a great many bad Banknotes, and as I could not read or write, he would tell me whether they were good or bad.

Q. What were you to go to the Baptist-head for? - A. He said, there was an agent there, who was to pay me; I gave him the notes to tell me if they were good or bad; then he told me to take notice of a public-house opposite, the sign of the Grapes, where he said, I should receive a weekly allowance for my children; I looked across the way, and when I turned round again, the prisoner was gone; I put myself against the wall, and said, I am done; I saw the prisoner afterwards at Bow-street, and knew him again immediately, he was taken up upon another charge.

JOHN DAVIS , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are cashier at the Pay-office, at Somerset-house? - A. I am; I recollect this woman perfectly well; I paid her three pounds one shilling and sixpence; I never saw the prisoner, to my knowledge, before he was taken up.

ANN MANNING sworn. - On the 2d of August, I met with the prisoner on this side of Chancery-lane, and laid hold of his collar, and never let him go till he was secured; he robbed me on the 20th of July; I am certain he is the same man.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence. GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020918-38

623. EDWARD FOLEY was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon John Sole , on the 22d of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silver watch, value 40s. a steel watch-chain, value 6d. a metal seal, value 6d. a metal key, value 1d. and an oil skin case, value 1d. the property of the said John.

JOHN SOLE sworn. - I am a carpenter , and live at Wapping: On Saturday the 21st of August, about ten o'clock in the evening, I went to a public-house, with two young men that I met with, and staid till about three in the morning; the prisoner was drinking and smoaking with my two friends, I came away and left them; when I had got to Blue-gate-fields, Ratcliffe-highway , the prisoner came up, and gave me a blow in the neck, on the left-side.

Q. Did you know him before that evening? - A. No.

Q. Did he meet you or follow you? - A. He met me; I thought I was able to encounter with him; I asked him what he wanted of me, and he would not speak, he gave me a blow which knocked me down; we then had a scuffle, and when I got up, I missed my watch; I immediately seized the prisoner by the neck-handkerchief, and took him by myself into Ratcliff-highway; by the time I had got him there, two men came up to the prisoner, while I was holding of him, they jostled round us for the space of about five minutes, and spoke in a language I did not understand; I took him to be Irish, and then they ran away; I got assistance, and took the prisoner to the watch-house, but they said, they could not take charge of him without locking me up likewise; I would not consent to that, and they let him go; on Monday the 23d, I went round to the different pawnbrokers, and described the watch, and about seven in the evening I was sent for to Mr. Massinger's, a pawnbroker, whose servant had stopped the watch; the next morning, I saw the prisoner before the Magistrate, he had my oil-case on his hat when he stood at the bar; I lost it out of the inside of the lining of my hat; I was so much confused at the time, that I cannot recollect whether my hat fell off or not.

Q. You signed your examination before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it read over to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you say any thing before the Magistrate about receiving a blow? - A. I cannot say, it might slip my memory, I don't know now that it was the prisoner who struck me.

Q.Did you say any thing about a scuffle taking place between you and the prisoner, in consequence of that blow? - A. I cannot recollect that I did.

Q. Did you say any thing about the other two men coming up? - A. Yes.

JOHN GUEST sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Massinger, a pawnbroker, No. 63, Ratcliff-highway: On the 24th of August, in consequence of information, I stopped the prisoner with a watch, answering to the name and number described by the prosecutor; I had the prisoner taken into custody, and sent for Sole; he attended before the Magistrate, and claimed the watch. (The watch was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)( Patrick M'Rundell, a headborough, produced the oil-skin case, which was also identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I went to pawn this watch for a woman, whose husband is at sea.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing the goods, but not violently from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-39

624. ELIZABETH ROBERTS and ANN BRETT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a silver watch, value 42s. and 17s. in monies numbered, the property of Edward Paxton , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Blick .

EDWARD PAXTON sworn. - On the 7th of September, about six o'clock in the evening, I went into a public-house in Brook-street to have a pint of beer, the two prisoners were there; I had two pints, and went away; they went with me, and as we were going up Holborn , they asked me to go into another public-house, the Bull and Gate; we went in, and had eighteen-pennyworth of brandy and water; before I had been there five minutes, the prisoner Roberts took my watch out of my pocket, and I took it from her; I put it in my waistcoat pocket, and buttoned it over.

Q. Was it a public room in the house? - A. Yes; I was not there, in all, ten minutes, I never sat down; and before I came away, I missed my watch again; and when I came down stairs, I missed seventeen shillings in silver; one of the prisoners, Brett, had run down stairs; the chamber-maid came up, and asked me if I had lost any thing, and then I missed my watch; I secured Roberts, and the chamber-maid went after the other, and brought her back.

HETTY ALLEN sworn. - I am chamber-maid at the Bull and Gate; I never saw the prisoners till the day this happened; they had some brandy and water with the last witness; I was taking some tea into the next room, and heard one of the prisoners say, d - n you, why don't you brush; there was nobody else in the room but them and the prosecutor; I went into the room as soon as I could, and Brett was gone; I observed the prosecutor had a watch-string when he paid me for the brandy and water; I asked him if his watch was safe, and he immediately missed it; I went out after Brett, and saw her running as fast as she could towards St. Giles's; I ran after her, and stopped her, she had the watch in her right-hand; she told me she would knock my eyes out; John Sweet assisted me in bringing her back.

Q. What sort of room was this? - A. A sitting-room; there is no bed in it, nor no sofa.

JOHN SWEET sworn. - I saw the prisoner, Brett, running up Holborn; I assisted the last witness to bring her back; I forced the watch out of her hand. (Produces it.)

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I was talking with the last witness at his door, and assisted in bringing the prisoner back.

Roberts's defence. He was very much in liquor; I never saw his watch or money.

Brett's defence. He had no money to give me a compliment for what he had of me, and he gave me the watch to pawn for him; there was no bed or sofa in the room, and he used us both very ill on the floor, and took the liberty with us without a bed.

Roberts, GUILTY, aged 21.

Brett, GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-40

625. WILLIAM MARSHALL was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon Joseph Holloway , on the 19th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person two sheets, value 5s. a bolster, value 2s. and an apron, value 1s. the property of John Gill .

JOSEPH HOLLOWAY sworn. - I live with Mr. Gill, plumber and glazier at Kentish-town: On the 19th of August, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was standing at the door of Mr. Higginbotham, with a bundle containing the articles mentioned in the indictment; I rang the belt twice, and while I turned round, a man snatched the bundle out of my hand; I ran after him, carying stop thief, and did not lost fight of him till he was taken, I am sure he is the same man; I saw him drop the bundle just before he was taken.

JAMES BARTON sworn. - I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running, and laid hold of him by the collar; as we were taking him along, he drew from his pocket a large carving-knife, which Mr. Taylor took from him.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. - I was in my own apartment; I heard an alarm, I went out, and

met the prisoner and Mr. Barton; I followed them, and saw the prisoner with this knife in his hand, which I took from him. (Produces a carving knife.)(Charles Chinnery produced the property, which was identified by Elizabeth Gill, the wife of the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I made-use of no violence, nor put the prosecutor in bodily fear.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing the goods, but not violently from his person .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020918-41

626. JOHN SANDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a cockfowl, value 2s. 6d. and seven hen-fowls, value 17s. 6d. the property of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS sworn. - I live at No. 1, Pleasant-place, Kingsland-road : On the 15th of July, I lost seven hens and a cock; the prisoner was stopped with them in Bishopsgate-street; six of them are alive now, and are here.

PAUL HUTT sworn. - I am a watchman: On Thursday, the 15th of July, about half past two o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner with a bag containing fowls; he said he was going to take them to Finsbury-square; I said, my friend, you have passed Finsbury-square; he afterwards said it was not that Square, it was Grosvenor-square; the prosecutor came to my house the next day, and claimed them.

LEVY STAPLES sworn. - I was constable of the night; I received the prisoner and the fowls from the last witness.

JOHN KING sworn. - I am a watchman; I assisted Hutt in taking the prisoner to the watch-house; I found out the owner by the prisoner's own account before the Magistrate.(The fowls were produced, and identified by Davis.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the fowls in Kingsland-road.

The prisoner called his father, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-42

627. CHARLES VAUGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , a handkerchief, value 3s. the property of Robert Cecil .

ROBERT CECIL sworn. - I live in Mincing-lane: On the 31st of July, about eleven in the morning, as I was crossing Gracechurch-street , from one Eastcheap to the other, I felt something at my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner in the act of putting this handkerchief into his bosom, (produced it); I immediately collared him, and took him to the Mansion-house.

JOHN HODGES sworn. - I was with Mr. Cecil; I saw the prisoner in the act of putting the handkerchief in his bosom.

Mr. Cecil. I am sure it is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the handkerchief on the pavement; there were a great number of people collected. GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-43

628. JOSEPH MILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , privily from the person of Joseph Murdock , a pocketbook, value 6d. ten Bank-notes, value 50l. and another Bank-note, value 1l. the property of the said Joseph Murdock .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of a certain person to the Jurors unknown.

SUSANNAH ROBERTSON sworn. - Q. Do you know a person of the name of Murdock? - A. No: On Thursday, the 2d of September, just as the clock had struck two, I saw a person, whom I believe to be the prisoner at the bar, put his hand into the pocket of a gentleman who was walking between two sailors, and take out something, but I could not see what it was; two men, who were with the prisoner, immediately ran down Panyeralley; the gentleman turned round immediately, and said, I had got his pocket-book; I said, no, a man has got it, who has run across the way down King's-head-court, and the gentleman ran after him.( Joseph Murdock was called upon his recognizance.)

- KIRBY sworn. - I keep a shop in Paternoster-row; I heard a cry of stop thief, I went out, and saw the prisoner drop a pocket-book at my door; I picked it up; the prisoner was taken to a public-house; I went there, and examined the pocket-book; it contained ten five-pound notes, and one of one-pound, which were returned to the gentleman; he said his name was Joseph Murdock ; he told the Alderman he was obliged to go out of town the next morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Whether that pocket-book came out of Mr. Murdock's pocket, or not, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. And whether his name was Murdock, or not, you don't know? - A. No.

- BADCOCK sworn. - I am a bookseller: On the 2d of September, I heard a cry of stop thief; I went out, and saw the prisoner running down the Row, and a number of people after him; I stopped him; Mr. Murdock came up, and said, he had been robbed of seventy pounds; I then delivered the prisoner to a constable.

JOHN RENSHAW sworn. - I am an officer; I heard the cry of stop thief; I afterwards saw the prisoner in the custody of Mr. Badcock; I took

charge of him; I delivered up the money to Mr. Murdock, by the direction of the Magistrate.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY, aged 20.

On the 2nd count, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-44

629. JAMES MORRIS, alias STOKES , was indicted for feloniously, stealing, on the 21st of July , a linen sheet, value 4s. twelve towels, value 2s. a table cloth, value 2s. and two cloth dusters, value 6d. the property of Elizabeth Shadrack , widow .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ELIZABETH SHADRACH sworn. - Q. You take in washing, and live at Wanstead in Essex? - A. Yes; I am a widow; I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment: On Wednesday the 21st of July, before nine o'clock in the evening, I took the linen off the line where it had been hanging to dry, and laid it on the basket; then I went to take the lines down, and when I returned, the linen was gone.

JOSEPH COX sworn. - I am one of the patrols of the parish of Hackney: On the 21st of July, about half past twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoner, and two other men, with bundles, near Hackney-wick-lane, in the county of Middlesex; I asked what they had in their-bundles; I found they were different things to what they discribed, and I seized the prisoner; the other two ran away with their bundles; I took the prisoner to the guardhouse; I found two dusters in his hat, and a sheet bound round his body, (produces the property); Mrs. Shadrach claimed them on the Sunday following.(The property was identified by Mrs. Shadrach.)

Prisoner's defence. Two men asked me to carry these things, and they would give me something when I got to Town.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-45

630. MARY HEATH was indicted for that she, having been convicted at the General Quarter Sessions for the county of Middlesex, in the month of May, in the 40th year of his Majesty's reign, of being a common utterer, and adjudged to be imprisoned for one year, and until she found sureties for two years more; and that being so convicted, she, on the 8th of July last, a piece of false and counterfeit money made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a shilling, as and for a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to John Benalley , knowing it to be false and counterfeit .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp. and the case by Mr. Knowlys).

CALEB- EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are assistant to the solictor of the Mint? - A. I am; and produce a copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner, Mary-Heath, in May Session, 1800, which I got from the office of the clerk of the Peace for the county of Middlesex, and examined with the original. (The record read).

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are deputy-keeper of the New prison, Clerkenwell? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; in May Session, 1800, she was tried, convicted, and sentenced to be confined one year in the New Prison; I was present, and am sure she is the same person; she remained in our custody for one year.

JOHN BENALLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. I keep the Nag's-head public-house, in Carnaby-market .

Q. When did you see the prisoner, first? - A. To my knowledge, on the 6th of July, at my house.

Q. What passed between you? - A.She called for a glass of gin, and tendered me a bad sixpence, or a woman in her company, I cannot say which.

Q. Did you see her again after that? - A. The same morning.

Q. Did she come alone, or in company? - A.Alone.

Q. What did she do then? - A.She had a glass of gin.

Q. How did she pay for it? - A.With a bad shilling.

Q. When did you see her next? - A. On Thursday, the 8th.

Q. At what time of the day? - A. Between the hours of seven and eight, I believe, in the morning.

Q. What had she then? - A. She had a glass of gin then.

Q. How did she pay for it? - A. With a shilling, which has since turned out to be bad.

Court. Q. What is the price of a glass of gin? - A. Three halfpence.

Q. Did you suspect her? - A. I did.

Q. When did you see her again? - A. In the evening, I suppose between five and six o'clock.

Q. Did she come in alone? - A. Alone; my wife was there, and I heard the prisoner ask for two-pennyworth of brandy.

Q. Was she furnished with it? - A.She had it, but did not drink it; she made payment with a bad shilling.

Q. What became of that? - A. She gave it into my wife's hands; in consequence of suspicion, I took it from my wife, and examined it more close than I had the rest, and found it bad; I stopped the woman, and got a constable.

Q. Had she any other money about her? - A. Yes, two-pence in good money.

Q. Did you say any thing to her? - A. I told

her, I thought she had paid me bad money before, and made a practice of it, but I don't know that she said any thing.

Q. What have you done with the shilling she tendered you last? - A. I have it here, and have kept it apart from others; this is the shilling for which I took her up, (produces it).

Q. Produce the other two shillings which she tendered before? - (Produces them).

CATHERINE BENALLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. What are you? - A. I am wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house, and asking for some gin? - A. Yes.

Q. What quantity? - A. Three halfpenny worth.

Q. What did she ask for, when she tendered the last shilling? - A.Two-Pennyworth of brandy.

Q. What did she tender in payment? - A. A shilling.

Q. What did you do with that shilling? - A. I took it out of her hand, but had not power to give her change, for my husband took it out of my hand.

Court. Q. Do you mean she gave you the shilling? - A.She gave it me for change.

Q. The same shilling she gave you was delivered by you to your husband? - A. Yes.

- BOYD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you sent for to take charge of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you search her? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you find upon her? - A. Two Penny pieces.

Q. Were they good? - A. Yes.

Q. What did she say? - A. She did not say any thing in particular, but that she had no more bad money about her, which I found to be the case.

SAMUEL MENCELIN sworn. - Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's Mint? - A. I am.

Q. Is that shilling good or not? - A. It is a counterfeit.

Q. Look at those two shilling? - A. They are both counterfeits.

Q.(To Mr. Benalley.) Is the colour so good now as it was at first? - A. Not by a great deal, it has changed greatly.

Prisoner's defence. All I have go to say is, that I gave the shilling which I had received from another person, and the landlord gave me the change, it was for a quartern of gin; I gave the change to the person who gave me the shilling, I did not know whether it was good or bad; I gave him a shilling afterwards, to take for half a quartern of brandy, because I had not halfpence enough; I had been very ill with a pain in my bowels; and I did not know the shilling was bad, nor do I recollect giving the two shillings.

Q.(To Mrs. Benally). When she came the last time, you say she asked for two-pennyworth of brandy, did she ask for any quantity? - A.Twopennyworth was her expression.

GUILTY , Death , aged 44.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-46

631. JOSEPH DYSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Coleman , esq. about the hour of twelve in the night of the 5th of August , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, a shirt, value 2s. 6d. and a pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM COLEMAN , esq. sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. At Chelsea .

Q. What happened in your house on the 5th of August? - A. I was not in the house, I can only swear to the property.

CATHERINE GREEN sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am servant to Mr. Coleman.

Q.Were you so in August last? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know at what time the house was fastened up? - A. I don't know the exact time I went to bed, it might be a little after eleven; I fastened all the windows and doors up when I went to bed.

Q. Were you the last up that night? - A. Yes; and the first that was up in the morning.

Q. In what way did you fasten the doors and windows? - A. The front and back doors were locked and bolted, which are the two outer doors; the window shutters were fastened with iron bars across them.

Q. What happened in the course of the night? - A. I did not hear any thing.

Q. When you came down stairs, what did you perceive? - A. I perceived the street-door was open.

Q. What time in the morning was that? - A. I believe it might be about a quarter past six.

Q. Did you perceive in what manner it had been opened? - A. The front door was unlocked, and the key taken from behind the door; and the front gate was unlocked, and the key left in it.

Q. Did you observe any thing missing? - A. I missed a pair of stockings of my master's, and two shirts.

Q. In what part of the house had they been? - A. They hung on a horse in the kitchen; I left them there before I went to bed.

Q. Was there any thing else? - A. A Norwich shawl off the table in the parlour; the two shirts were in a small basket by our bed-room door; I had seen them the night before.

Q. That was all that you missed? - A. Yes.

Q. Who slept in the house the night? - A.Miss Coleman and I, nobody else.

Q. What did you do? - A. I found the house open and was much alarmed, and went to the gentleman at the next door.

Q. Did you make any discovery? - A. No, not

then; the property was brought to me, and the prisoner was found with the shirt on his back.

Q. Do you know the property? - A. Yes.

- LIMBRICK sworn. - Q. What are you? -- A. I amm a patrol belonging to Bow-street: When the prisoner was brought to Bow-street, on Saturday, the 7th of last month, I was ordered to take this shirt off his back, (Produces a shirt)

Q. Was he brought to the office upon any charge made by Mr. Coleman? - A. Yes.

Q. Who brought him? - A. I dont't know, it was a strange constable.

Q. Did you find any thing else on him? - A. No.

Green. It is my master's shirt.

Q.How do you know it? - A. By the make, and by the mark, W. C. it is made particular from any that I ever saw, in the neck gussets; and the collar is different from any I ever saw; I have been accustomed to take care of it, and an certian it is my master's.

Mr. Coleman. On Friday, the 6th, I came home, and on Saturday morning, a person told me there was a person in custody for another offence, and wished I would go and see him; I went to a public-house at Chelsea, and as soon as I saw him, I discovered he had my stocking on; I made him pull them off, and saw they had my mark upon them; they have been in my custody ever since, and I can swear to them being mine.

Green. I can swear these are the stocking that hung on the horse.

Q. Is the shirt one of them that were at the room door where you slept? - A. Yes.

Mr. Coleman. There were other things found upon him that did not belong to me; he broke open the top of a bureau, and took a key out, but that is not charged.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-47

632. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Randall , in the night of the 26th of July , and burglariously stealing five silver ladies, value 5l. 10s. a gravey spoon, value 2l. six table spoons, value 6l. 10s. six desert spoons, value 4l. six silver tea spoons, value 30s. a fish slice, value 1l. 6s. a tea scoop, value 5s. a top of a peppercastor, value 1s. a pencil-case, value 1s. 6d. four keys, value 6d. a pearl bracelet, value 3l. a pocket-book, value 2l. a thread case, value 6d. two pearl counters, value 6d. a pair of silk gloves, value 2s. two table-cloths value 2l. two napkins, value 5s. and two bell pulls, value 2s. the property of the said Richard.

RICHARD RANDALL sworn. - I am a Blackwell-hall factor , and live at No. 26, Cateaton-street : On the evening of Monday, the 26th of July, I was last up in the house; I went to bed about twelve o'clock, and believe every thing was safe, but did not examine; about three o'clock, I was alarmed by a violent ringing of the bell; it was rather twilight, and sufficient to distinguish a person in the street; I opened the window, and found the prisoner was taken; my servant had opened the door, and the constable, watchmen, and the prisoner, were in the house; the prisoner was searched, the property in the indictment was taken from him, and he was taken to the Poultrycompter; the value of the things are from twenty to thirty pounds.

- CLARKE sworn. - I am a constable: At three o'clock I was coming round, and could just discern the prisoner clearly; the watchman had just got hold of his collar; when I got up, I saw Mr. Randall's door open; I took the prisoner into the passage, and searched him; the watchman had rung at the bell; Mr. Randall came down, and we took this property from him, (produces it); there did not appear any violence to the housedoor; I laid hold of the prisoner about three yards from Mr. Randall's house.

RICHARD RUFFY sworn. - I am a watchman in Coleman-street Ward: On the 26th of July last, about three o'clock, I observed a light in the passage of Mr. Randall's house; I stood a few minues, and observed the light put out; I then withdrew a few yards from the door, and the prisoner soon after came out; he said he was servant to Mr. Randall, and would tell his master of my neglect of duty, in not attending to the persons who were making a noise at the door; I asked him where the light was which I had seen in the passage; he said his fellow-servant was gone backward with it; during the discourse, the prisoner ran off from me; I called out to my partner, John Farley, who stopped him, and brought him back to Mr. Randall's, alarming Mr. Randall that his servant had robbed him; then he came down, and said, he was not his servant; we searched him, and found this property; the prisoner owned the next morning every thing, and how he got in; we said nothing to him,nor promised him any favour; no promise was made him; he said, he got up the lamp iron, and entered the window of the drawingroom, which he forced open, got in and took the property; that he then went down into the pantry, and took some more plate, which he found there, and put into his waist and his pockets; that he then came into the passage with a lighted candle, unsastened the door, put his light out, and came into the street; he had a dark lanthorn, and an iron crow, inside his waistcoat, and two table-cloths wrapped round his body, besides four picklockkeys and matches.

Mr. Randall. As far as I can judge, the window

was down, but not fastened; any man might get in who was active; some of the articles were in the sideboard drawer, in the dining-room; the rest were in the store closet, in the same floor; I can swear to the pearl bracelet, which I bought myself; I had locked the drawer at night, and it was open in the morning; I can swear also to the pocket-book, value 2l. and I am satisfied all the rest of the articles belong to me; I asked the prisoner how he got in; he said, up the lamp iron, and in at the dinning-room window.

Prisoner's defence. I am a foreigner, and very much distressed; poverty brought me ine to it; I leave it to your Lordship, and mercy of the Court; I failed with Lord Cameford round the world, and I have fought for this country, though I belong to the City of Hanover.

GUILTY , Death .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-48

633. JOHN ALSOP and JOHN CROWSON were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September, one pair of shoes, value 2s. the property of Robert White , and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoners, but the confession of Alsop, which was obtained upon promise of favour, they were. Both ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-49

634. JOHN ALSOP was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of September , thirteen pair of men's shoes, value 3l. six pair of women's shoes, value 18s. and six pair of children's shoes, value 15s. the property of Robert White .

ROBERT WHITE sworn. I saw the prisoner take the shoes out of the shop in a bag, on Tuesday, the 7th of September; they were concealed in his bed.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am an officer: About a quarter past two, on Tuesday, the 7th of this month, I saw the prisoner coming out of his master's shop, and, about fifty or sixty yards from it, I stopped him; he had this bag in his left hand, in which there was twelve pair of men's shoes, six pair of women's shoes, and six pair of boy's shoes; I took them back to the prosecutor, and, on the Wednesday, they were taken before the Lord-Mayor.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a City constable? - A. Yes; and have been so seventeen years.

Q. How often have you been indicted? - A. Never; I deny the asstertion; nobody can say that of me.

Q. Have you ever been under any charge before the Lord-Mayor, or Aldermen? - A. Never.

Q. Do you know what this man is charged with at present? - A. With felony.

Q. Of what sort? - A. With a capital offence, of it is proved, as far as I know.

Q. Did you hear the indictment read against him? - A. I did.

Q. What is he charged with? - A. With stealing a dozen pair of shoes, and three seven-shilling pieces.

Q. Did you hear it read? - A. I did not particularly attend to it.

Q. Don't you know it is confined to shoes? - A. No.

Q. You know he carries out his master's shoes? - A. Yes; I have frequently seen him going home with work.

Q. Did you not see his master by him at the time he took the shoes out of the shop? - A. No, I did not.(The women's shoes identified.)

Q.(To Mr. White. ) Had you given him any orders to take those shoes? - A. No; he had no power to take out shoes without orders from Mrs. White, or me; whether she gave him orders, or not, I cannot tell; I saw him go out with them.

Q. How came you to suffer him to go by you with them? - A.Because I had an officer to secure him.

Jury. Q. Were you in a situation that he could see you? - A. Yes; I was not above a yard from the door.

Prisoner. I leave my defence of my Counsel.

Jury. (To Mr. White.) Q. Did you see the shoes collected together? - A. I did not see him collecting them together, but I saw the bag full concealed in his bed, before he took them out, and I missed the shoes out of their different places.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-50

635. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , a box, value 1s. 6d. four shirts value 2l. 8s. two shifts, value 10s. five table-cloths, value 1l. two napkins, value 5s. fifteen aprons, value 1l. 10s. six towels, value 6s. two pair of sheets, value 3l. two pillowcases, value 5s. three half handkerchiefs, value 6s. two stocks, value 5s. five neckcloths, value 10s. a flannel petticoat, value 3s. a pair of pockets, value 1s. four pair of stockings, value 12s. and two waistcoats, value 8s. the property of William Miller .

WILLIAM MILLER sworn. - I live at Wandsworth, in Surry: The box was delivered into my care on the morning of Thursday, the 12th of August, at Wandsworth, and I was to deliver it to Mr. Campbell, NO. 12, Newcastle-street, in the

Strand; I am answerable for it, if it should be lost; I saw the contents of it, and took it to an errandcart that goes to the same place I do; it was stole from Potter's cart; I received the box about nine o'clock in the morning.

THOMAS POTTER sworn. - I had the care of an errand-cart of my father's, and I received a box from Mr. Miller, which we took on account of Mr. Miller; I stopped the cart at the corner of Threadneedle-street , and went into the Flowerpot public-house, in Bishopsgate-street, to call for parcels; when I came back again, I missed the box our of the cart; I looked down Threadneedle-street, and saw the prisoner carrying it on his shoulder; I jumped down, ran after him, and pulled the box off his shoulder; he ran away; I called out stop thief, and he was taken in Broad-street; I missed him about a minute or two, after he threw the box down; two gentlemen stopped him; I saw his face, and took notice of his dress; he was stopped just as I came round the corner, that is the man; he had a pepper and salt-coloured coat, with a black collar.

HECTOR CAMPBELL sworn. - I live at No. 12, Newcastle-street, Strand; I delivered the box to the boy on Thursday the 12th of August, about half past one, with the linen in it, just as I saw it at the Magistrate's; I don't know wo is the proprietor of the cart.

THOMAS TERRY sworn. - I am an officer, and was in Finch-lane on the 12th of August; the prisoner was given in charge to me, and I took him to the Mansion-house; he ws charged with stealing a box out of the Wandsworth errand-cart; Miller brought the box to the Mansion-house, but I did not see the contents; I have three handkerchiefs that were taken out of the box. (Produces them.)

THOMAS WALKER sworn. - I keep the Fleece in Threadneedle-street, and was standing at the door when Potter pulled the box from the prisoner's shoulder; then the prisoner walked a few paces forward, upon which the boy caught hold of his coat, and called out, he is a thief, he stole the box, still holding him by the coat; the prisoner then pushed the boy violently from him into the kennel, and ran off, the boy after him, leaving the box on the ground; when he got to the corner of Broad-street, I said, I would take care of the box, which I did, and in a few minutes the prisoner was brought back; I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's defence. I am a collar-maker ; I went for harness to an inn; I met a man with the box in Threadneedle-street, who said he was going to the Excise-office, and asked me if I would give an eye to the box, for that it was going by the Islington stage; he stopping some time, I was taking it to the stage.

Potter, He gave no account of it at all; I told him he had stole the box; he said, it was no such thing; he said nothing about the Islington stage.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-51

636. JOHN BURROWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a shirt, value 4s. and a waistcoat, value 6s. the property of Thomas Standard .

HANNAH STANDARD sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Standard, and live No. 19, Old-change , we keep a tobacconists and cloaths shop : On the 11th of August, I was in a back-room and saw the prisoner standing in the shop, near the counter; he had got then a paper parcel, contianing a piece of balck kerseymere in his hand; I came forward, and he laid it down; I saw he had a yellow marcella waistcoat in his bosom, he run away, and I pursued him; I had seen the waistcoat not five minues before; he was taken by Mr. Maycock, and brought back; I did not lose sight of him; I missed other things, and when he was brought back, on being searched, Mr. Maycock pulled the waistcoat out of his bosom, and the prisoner threw a paper parcel from his pocket on the ground, which was a shirt unmade; I know the waistcoat to be mine.

- MAYCOCK sworn. - I was standing at the corner of the Old-change, and I heard the cry of stop thief; I took the prisoner, and he gave me a parcel out of his bosom, which I believe was the waistcoat; Mrs. Standard asked for the other parel, I looked about, and found one on the ground, and did not see him drop it. (Produces the waistcoat, which was identified.)

Mrs. Standard. I am positive he took it out of his pocket and dropped it.

Prisoner's defence. I am guilty concerning the waistcoat, but it was necessity drove me to it; I had not broke my fast for three days, and leave myself to your mercy. GUILTY .

Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-52

637. ELIJAH STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , four pounds weight of cotton, value 5s. the property of Thomas Bolt .

RICHARD DAVIS sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Bolt. the wharfinger : On Friday the 13the of August, Between two and three o'clock, I saw the prisoner take a knife out of his pocket, and cut the bag of cotton which lay on the wharf, and take some out; I run and took him back to the wharf, with the cotton in an apron; I have often seen him before.

(Thomas Hunter, a constable, produced the cotton.)

Prisoner's defence. I asked Davis if he saw me cut the bag, and he said, no, before the Magistrate. GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped 100 yards on Bolt's quay .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-53

638. THOMAS HENDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , a silver watch, value 3l. and three shirts, value 15s. the property of Peter-Nicholas Tuck .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-54

639. THOMAS DADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , a wooden box, value 1s. and ten pair of pearl ear-rings, value 40l. the property of William Basnett .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing the same, charging them to be the property of William Flower .

Third Count. For feloniously stealing like goods, charging them to be the property of Thomas Wilson , William Watchouse , Samuel Swinerton , William Wager , John Marson , - Potter , Richard Banks , and William Weeks .

Fourth Count. For feloniously stealing the same, charging them to be the property of James Whiteman . And,

Fifth Count. For feloniously stealing the same charging them to be the property of persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was stated by Mr. Woodfall.)

JOHN HAYWARD sworn. - I was clerk to Mr. flowers, a jeweller, in Chichelter-rents, Chancery-lane, he is now dead; we packed up ten pair of pearl ear-rings, in a box, directed to Mr. William Basnett, at Bath, on the 12th of May last, and I gave it to out porter to take to the Swan-with-twonecks, Lad-lane.

WILLIAM ANDERSON sworn. - I was porter to Mr. Flower, and took the box on the 12th of May, to the Swan-with-two-necks, from my master's house, which I received of Mr. Hayward, directed to Mr. William Basnett , Bath, by Mr. Hayward; I corded it myself; I delivered the parcel to the book-keeper, and paid him two-pence to book it.

DAVID PERRY sworn. - I am clerk at the Swanwith-two-necks; the parcel appears to have been received by me, there being my signature in the delivery-book, from Flowers's house. (Produces the book.)

SAMUEL PERRY sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Wilson and Waterhouse; I entered the parcel into the Bath and Exeter mail-book, on the 12th of May, (produces the book;) the parcels are all called over before they are sent off; I never saw the parcel after.

WILLIAM WATERHOUSE sworn. - I am one of the properietors of this mail, and we are responsible for whatever may be lost from our coaches.

WILLIAM BASNETT sworn. - I received no such parcel as described; I wrote to Mr. Flower this letter.

"Sir, - I wrote to you on the 8th, for pearl ear-rings, from three pounds to four pounds ten shillings, since which, I have not heard from you, but I find there was a parcel for me in the Exetermail, No. 11, which is supposed to have been delivered at Thatcham, where the coach changes horses; if the parcel was from your house, you will make the necessary enquiries as I have desired may be done on the road; at any rate, write to me whether you forwarded it, and the full particulars; I wait your reply, and am

"Your humble servant,

" William Basnett ."

WILLIAM ABRAHAMS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, and lived with Mr. Brown, Panton-street, Hay-market; I know the prisoner, and saw him on the 14th of May, when he brought a pair of pearl ear-rings to pledge, which I lent him a guinea and a half on; on the 15th of May, he brought a second pair; I asked him particularly if he was not a jeweller, from having two pair so much alike, he said, no, they were his own property, (produces the ear-rings;) on Tuesday the 18th of May following, bills came from Bow-street, respecting some pearl ear-rings, which had been stolen; I applied to the Magistrate, and in about three weeks, or a month after, I saw the prisoner in the House of Correction, for Middlesex; I immediately recollected his person, and gave information at Mr. Flowers's; I had never seen him before the 14th of May.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask me, if my name was Dadley, I never saw you before? - A. I said, his name was Thomas Dadley, but did not ask him.

WATTER MULCASTER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, in Jermyn-street, at Messrs. Hodgson's; I don't know the prisoner; on the 14th of May, I took in a pair of pearl ear-rings, though I don't know of whom; they were pawned in the name of Smith, (produces them;) I lent a guinea on them. (The property was identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I have no friends; as to the charge made against me, I know noting of it; the man who has sworn to me, I never saw till he came to the prison; therefore I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-55

640. JOHN FRANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a wooden-kit, value 2s. and twenty-six pounds weight of salmon, value 18s. the property of William Old .(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

HENRY COOKE sworn. - I land goods for Mr. William Old , a fish-factor , at Bilingsgate ; yesterday week, the 13th of September, I landed ninety-two kits of salmon, marked B. B. there was no other kits came to market, so marked; I left them on the wharf, and went into the warehouse to give an account; I was about three or four minutes, and when I came back, one was missing; I recollect the number, because I counted them three times over.

GEORGE LUSIGNIA sworn. - I was on the quay, at Billingsgate, on the 13th of September, and saw the prisoner there, in the action of putting a kit of salmon on his head, close by where Mr. Old's kits stood; I observed, by his countenance, he was doing wrong, he seemed all of a flustration as he passed me, and knowing me, made him so; I told Charles Bevan to pursue him.

CHARLES BEVAN sworn. - I was on the quay, and was directed by Lusignia to pursue the prisoner; I did so, and overtook him at the corner of Darkhouse-lane; I saw him shifting a kit of Salmon from his head to his shoulder, marked with two B's in a circle; I did not stop him, or follow him, because I had two hundred kits of salmon for my master; I knew that mark belonged to Mr. Old.

DANIEL CLARKE sworn. - I am a constable, and fish-salesman, I took the prisoner into custody; he said, I must pay for it, but did not say what it was, I suppose, he meant the kit of salmon.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did he not say, he was employed to carry it? - A. No.

RICHARD BEDWELL sworn. - I was along with Mr. Clarke and the prisoner; I heard Mr. Clarke say he took him up for stealing a kit of salmon, and he offered to pay for it.

JERMYN OLD sworn. - I am the son of the prosecutor, who is a fish-factor, and responsible for the fish sent to us; our mark is B. B. in a circle.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I suppose it is not possible for you, in consequence of your extensive trade, to speak to the kits or mark, without reference to the bill of lading? - A. No.

Q. Have you not known kits marked B. B. get into the hands of your neighbour salesmen? - A. Never.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-56

641. ABRAHAM MILLS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Giblon , about the hour of eight in the night of the 16th of September , and burglariously stealing, ten yards of cotton, value 30s. the property of the said Edward.

EDWARD GIBSON sworn. - I live at No. 149, Bishopsgate-without , and was out of town at the time of the robbery.

- HOLLAND sworn. - On Thursday, the 16th of September, between seven and eight at night, I heard the window break, there was light enough to know people's faces, and I run about twenty yards, and found the prisoner stopped, and a piece of printed cotton laying on the pavement; I took it up and brought the prisoner in.

THOMAS BOWEN sworn. - Last Thursday evening, I was going through Bishopsgate-street, when I heard a window break, I turned round, and saw the prisoner running off; I run after him, and caught him by the collar, he immediately let something drop from his apron; Mr. Gibson's shopman came and took the articles he dropped; I went into the shop, and a constable was sent for.

- BELLAMY sworn. - I am a rope-maker, and was along with Mr. Bowen when the property was dropped, and the prisoner taken.

PAUL HELP sworn. - I took the prisoner.(The property produced, which was identified.)

Prisoner's defence. Between seven and eight o'clock, I went up a place to make water, and picked it up, I run along, and they took me up; the gentleman said, there was a hole in the window.

Holland. There had been a hole, but I pasted a piece of paper over it. GUILTY, aged 11.

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-57

642. ISAAC BLANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , a handkerchief, value 2s. 6d. the property of Richard Browns privily from his person .

RICHARD BROWN sworn. - On the 30th of July, I was walking along Lombard-street , by the alley that leads to the' Change, and a gentleman observed to me, I had had my pocket picked, and pointed out the prisoner to me, as the person who had done it; I charged him with it, but he made no reply; he was so dirty, I did not chuse to touch him; a young man standing by, offered to search him, which he did, and the handkerchief was found; he was taken to the Mansion-house and examined, and several other handkerchiefs found upon him; my initials; and No. 4, are on the handkerchief, which is silk.

HENRY PIGGOTT sworn. - I was in Lombard-street, on Friday the 30th of July, between three and four o'clock; I saw Mr. Browne, who had stopped the prisoner, and a gentleman said, he had picked his pocket; I searched him; Mr. Browne told me it was a yellow handkerchief; I searched him, and under his shirt I found two or three handkerchiefs, in his pocket and hat, I found five or six others, neither of which was Mr. Browne's; on lifting up his arm, I saw the corner of the yellow handkerchief, between his jacket and shirt; I pulled it out, and asked Mr. Browne if it was his; he said, if it was, it had R. B. on it, which it has; he was taken to the Mansion-house. (The handkerchief was produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up, and asked a man who was coming along, if it was his, he said, no. GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing, but not privily .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-58

643. ALICE BENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , twenty-eight yards of cotton, value 39s. the property of William Hopwood .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-59

644. DAVID JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , nine pounds weight of iron, value 2s. the property of Richard Underwood .

RICHARD UNDERWOOD sworn. - I am a fanlight-maker and smith : On Friday morning last, at nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner, who was my servant , going towards the door; I told him to come back, he said, he was going to breakfast; I called him a thief, and said, he had some of my property about him; he walked sharp out of the door, and I desired my brother to run after him as last as he could; he was brought into the house again, and run down stairs into the necessary; I said, he had more iron, he said, he had not; he came up, and I sent for a constable; he was searched, and a little bit of iron found in his pocket; my brother brought in a piece of iron, value two shillings, which I know to be mine.

JOSEPH UNDERWOOD sworn. - I am brother to the last witness, and I followed the prisoner by his desire; I caught him as he was going into the public-house, next door, and said, he had some iron, and took a piece from him, which was between his jacket and waistcoat. (The piece of iron produced by the constable, which was identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I am not concerned in it; I was just going to see if I could get a couple of pots of beer on it, till Saturday night.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-60

645. CHARLES DUDGEON and ABRAHAM ALEXANDER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , one barrel, value 1d. and sixteen pounds weight of anchovies, value 1l. the property of George-Allen Aylwin .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

GEORGE PAVIOUR sworn. - I am a labourer on the quays: On Saturday the 14th of August, I saw two men, as I was sitting upon a tar-barrel, near Mr. Aylwin's warehouse, on Wigan's-quay ; I saw Alexander go into the cellar, and bring out something in a cloth, of the shape of an anchovy barrel, which he took and put into a tacklehouse, on the quay; then Richard Chitty went, and brought one out uncovered, which I saw the end of, and he put it into the same place; I saw a small one fetched out, by a person we call Jem, and that was put into the same place; I pointed the place out, and told Mr. John Aylwin , there were three barrels put into the tackle-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not think it any thing extraordinary to see Alexander do this - he worked there, did not he? - A. Yes, he was foreman over us in the sugar business, but he was in company with the other two, and carried something like a barrel of anchovies.

THOMAS CUNDEN sworn. - I am a watchman; on Tuesday, the 17th of August, I apprehended Dudgeon, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, about two hundred yards from Wigan's quay, with a bag wrapped up in his arms, containing what we call a double barrel of anch vies; I asked him how he came by it; he said, the person who belonged to it, would be there presently; I then took him back to Wigin's quay, and turned the cask out of the bag; a person laid, it came out of Aylwin's cellar; I saw Alexander the same evening, in the Compter; Dudgeon said nothing more; I went and gave notice to Mr. Aylwin, and a man came, and said, it was his master's.

WILLIAM LANE sworn. - I am a merchant's watchman, on Wigan's quay, and took the prisoner, Dudgeon, and a barrel of anchovies from the last witness; I asked Dudgeon who had employed him to take it; it was some time before he told me, then he said, Alexander employed him to carry it for him; I delivered the barrel to Mr. Hunter.( Thomas Hunter produced the barrel, which was identified.)

GEORGE AYLWIN sworn. - My brother is an oil and fruit cooper, has charge of anchovies, and is responsible for them; I missed ten barrels of the

same mark as this; I looked into the tackle house, in consequence of information, and found two barrels there, a single and a double barrel; the prisoners were not in our employ at any time; I was sent for to look at the barrel, and have every reason to believe it was my brother's; I saw Alexander in custody; he said it was given to him by a tall man, and he was to get what he could for it; that he gave it to Dudgeon for him, to do what he could with it; at the Mansion-house he said otherwise.

Alexander, GUILTY , aged 29.

Six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Dudgeon, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-61

646. WILLIAM THORLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , one hundred and ninety pounds weight of tea, value 3l. and two chests, value 3s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of persons unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE COWAN sworn. - I am surveyor to the Thames Police; my duty was on the river on the 27th, at night: About one o'clock, I was near London-bridge, and saw a boat row from Freshwharf to the southward; I perceived the boat was loaded, and rowed heavy; we got within a few boats length of her, when I saw something thrown overboard by the two men in the boat, which appeared to be very heavy; I saw the last, which I picked up, and it was a tea-chest, it was flood-tide, and the other parcel was picked up by the waterman, Warwick, and was a chest of tea with the East-India Company's and the ship's marks, which I know; we hauled them in, and gave chase to the persons who had thrown them over; the boat had rowed into Battle-bridge, Southwark; we could not see the men, but they run over the crast; I followed in, and found a boat there, booked to the crast; I cannot say I had seen the boat before, but I found this piece of a tea-chest in the boat,(produces it), and some loose tea; I afterwards examined the chests, and one had lost the top, and another the bottom; the lead is entire of one, and the other has received damage; I tried this piece of wood to one, and it sits very well, and the tea corresponded in quality; I took the chest to the office, and after I left it there, I went to the Company's wharf to enquire if any crast had been robbed; I found them all secure at Somer's quay; next morning, I saw the Essex hoy had swing among the Gravesend boats; I went to the house of the prisoner, in consequence of information, about eight o'clock, near to Battle-bridge, but did not see the prisoner till the 16th of August, between one and two o'clock, when I apprehended him in Amelia-row, St. George's-fields, with a girl; I got into the house after difficulty; I took him, after resistance, to my boat at St. Olave's stairs; he said, if I had known you had wanted me so long, I would have come forward, for you have nothing against me; I said I had been at his house every day, and his mother said he should come forward; says he, you have nothing against me, you did not find the sculls in my boat; I said I knew nothing of that, for there were no sculls in the boat when I found it; they were wet, when brought back to me, and one had the name of William Thorley. I took him to the office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were five or six boats lengths behind when something was thrown out? - A. Yes.

Q. You took both chests up? - A. Yes, which delayed us a little; the boat was in sight, about twenty yards distance, but I did not see the men, for it was dark; when we got to the crast, there was only one boat outside of it; as to the piece of tea-chest, I will not swear it belongs to either of these chest, but I think it does.

JAMES EVANS sworn. - I am a Thames policesurveyor, and was with Mr. Cowan: On the 28th of July, about one o'clock in the morning, I saw a boat row from Somer's quay, which we followed to Battle-bridge, Southwark, and saw some persons throw out something, which proved to be two chests of tea, and which we knew to belong to the East-India Company, knowing the mark; there were six in our boat, four men, and two surveyors; we chased the boat to Battle-bridge stairs, where I found in a crast a pair of sculls, which had been recently used, there were no sculls in the boat; one of them had the prisoner's name on it; the persons who were in the boat, made their escape; I was at the prisoner's father's house, next day, in Vine-yard, near Battle-bridge, when the prisoner made his escape.

THOMAS STEVENSON sworn. - I belong to the East-India Company, and was employed on board the Essex hoy, loaded with tea at Somer's quay; I left them between seven and eight in the evening locked up; I searched them all, and saw them again at ten minutes past five next morning; when the vessel swung down athwart Billingsgate, I went on board, and found one lock broke, and one bar drawn off, and a batch taken off; I can swear these chests are the Company's property, by the mark.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You don't think it a very extraordinary thing for watermen to borrow boats of one another, to commit robberies? - A. I cannot say; it may be so.

Q. You did not see the lighter loaded? - A. Yes, in part, and saw the lock put on; I saw the place from which the two chests were taken.

ROBERT-CARR WOOD sworn. - I am assistant elder in the East-India Company's service; I know the Essex boy employed by them: On the 27th of July, the lay at the East-India wharf, laden with 774 chests of tea, but I did not see that quantity on board; on the 28th, I went on board the crast, and perceived a lock had been opened, and a hatch laid aside, and vacancy made; I did not load her, nor do I exactly know what quantity was on board, except by a letter from the officer, but, on the 28th, a lock was broke open, and two chests appeared to have been taken out.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Can you venture to say, none of the chests of tea were broken in the loading of them? - A. I cannot say.

Prisoner's defence. My boat was stolen away, and I was at home when the robbery was committed, so that I know nothing of it; I leave my case to my Counsel. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-62

647. THOMAS PORTER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Brady , no person being therein, about the hour of eleven in the forenoon of the 31st of August , and feloniously stealing a feather-bed, value 40s. a blanket, value 2s. two sheets, value 2s. and a counterpane, value 10s. the property of the said Samuel.

THOMAS BURLAND sworn. - Q. Do you know the house of Samuel Brady? - A. Yes; in King of Prussia Walk, Hoxton-fields .

Q. Do you live near him? - A. Yes; very near.

Q. Do you know in what parish it is? - A. In St. Leonard's, Shoreditch.

Q. Do you recollect being near that house about the end of August? - A. On Tuesday, the 31st of August, about eleven in the forenoon, I was in my own privy, where I had a view of the door of Mr. Brady's house; I saw the prisoner go in at the front door.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. No; but I am sure he is the man; he went in at the front door, he had an instrument in his hand, which I saw him very plainly move; the door opened; and he went in.

Q.Was any body with him? - A. There was another in company, but he did not go into the house.

Q. Was the door shut afterwards? - A. Yes; as soon as I saw him go in, I called to my man that was at work for me in the shed, and told him to bring a stick, and follow me immediately, for there was a thief gone into Mr. Brady's house; I immediately ran, and called upon Fitzgeorge; as I went along, I desired Fitzgeorge to go round to the back door, and sent my man to watch upon the wall even with the front of the house; and I kept the front door myself; I had alarmed all the neighbourhood.

Q. Did you try the door to see if it was fast? - Yes, and it was fast.

Q. That was the door at which the man had gone in? - A. Yes; I might wait five, or six, or ten minutes, for any thing I know, or somewhere thereabouts; people came about, but nobody would believe there was any body in the house; my man was impatient, he jumped down from the wall, and looked through the key-hole; I immediately looked through the key-hole, and saw a man; I desired one of the people to fetch an axe, and I would break the door open on a minute, and immediately upon that, the door was opened from within; the prisoner forced himself against me, and tried to force me backwards; my man immediately assisted me, and we took him; Fitzgeorge and I searched the house; I left the prisoner in custody of my man.

Q. What did you observe? - A. I observed the bed thrown off the bedstead on to the floor.

Q. Was that in the upper chamber? - A. In the one pair of stairs room; the sheets and blankets were on the floor, on the right hand, by the side of the bedstead.

Q. Were they loose upon the floor? - A. All, except the bolster and one blanket, and a matrass, which were on the bedstead.

Q. Were they folded up, at all? - A. No; loose in a heap; then we took the prisoner to Worship-street; I saw him searched, and there were found upon him two picklock keys, and an iron crow, one of the keys had a double end.

Q. Where were they? - A. They were in his breeches pocket, between the breeches and the lining; one key and the crow were on one side, and the other key on the other side.

Cross-examined by Mr. Courthorpe. Q.These things appeared to be just thrown down, in such a way that the person last up might have thrown them there? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You had not previously locked the door? - A. No, I had not.

SOPHIA GREGORY sworn. - Q. Do you live with Mr. Brady? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the last day of August going out? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you servant with him? - A. Yes.

Q. What time in the morning did you go out? - A. At nine o'clock.

Q. Who did you leave at home? - A.Nobody.

Q. Which door of the house did you go out at? - A. The front door.

Q. When you were gone out, what did you do at the door? - A. I locked it, and took the key with me.

Q. Is there one bed-room, or two, up one pair of stairs? - A. Two; but only one bed.

Q.Had that bed been slept in the night before? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you done any thing to the bed before you went out? - A. Yes; I made the bed up for my young master to go to-bed.

Q. What is your master? - A. A tea-dealer; I came home about half past twelve.

Q. How did you find the door? - A. I found it locked, as I had left it; I opened it, and went in.

Q. In what state did you find the house? - A. I found bed and bedding thrown upon the floor.

Q. Was that the bed you made up in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find many people about your master's house? - A. No; I found one blanket folded upon a matrass.

Q. Do you know whether your master had come home since you went out at nine in the morning? - A. I am sure he had not.

Q. Had he a key of your house? - A. No.

Q. How soon after that, had you any information of what had happened? - A. Before I got home.

Q. Are you at all a judge of the value of that bed? - A. I don't know.

Q. Was it a good feather bed? - A. Yes.

Q. How were the blankets? - A. Very good.

Q. How many blankets were upon the floor? - A. Three, and two sheets.

Cross-examined by Mr. Courthorpe. Q. You were not with your master all the morning? - A. No.

Q. Where was your master? - A. In town; my mistress was with him.

Q. Then, of your own knowledge, you cannot tell whether he had been home or not? - A. They and the children were at St. Mary Axe.

Q. That is not such a distance but that, from nine to twelve, they might have been to the house? - A. No, that could not be, because I had the key.

Q. But they might have been in the house by other means? - A. No.

Court. Q. Where does your master carry on his business? - A. In St. Mary Axe.

Q. Is his son in the business? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did they go out? - A. About half past eight.

Q. And what time do they generally come home? - A. Not till the evening.

Q. They are not there in the day-time? - A. No, they are not.

WILLIAM GRAY sworn. - Are you servant to Burland? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go at the desire of your master? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember your master calling for something to break open the door? - A. My master placed me upon the wall; I would not believe there was any body in the premiles, and I got off the wall, looked throught the key-hole, and saw a man stooping down, and doing something to his shoe, but what I cannot tell; I was coming to the wall again, I heard my master call for a large axe, and immediately saw the door open, and my master got hold of the prisoner; I immediately laid hold of him, and held him while my master and Fitzgeorge went into the house.

Q. Did you see him searched? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not go into the house? - A. No.

Q. Was your master and Fitzgeorge the first persons that went into the house? - A. Yes.

- FITZGEORGE sworn. - Q. You were called upon by Burland to go to this house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the door open, and any person come out of it? - A. When Burland gave me the alarm, I went down the passage, knowing the premises, in order to secure the back part; Mr. Brady has a house there.

Q.Speak of the house where the wife lived? -The house that the prisoner went into, is not the house Mrs. Brady lived in; there is a party-wall between the two houses; it is now Mr. Brady's

Q. How long has he had it in his possession for the use of his own family? - A. I cannot say; I think, as near as I can recollect, five or six months, I am not certain; it adjoins to his own garden, and the green-house extends from Mr. Brady's house to this little house adjacent; I went with another man, a baker, and fixed him upon the wall while I went over into Mr. Morris's garden, and just as I was jumping over the sence, the man had unlocked the door, and came out.

Q. Did you see who the man was that came out? - A. I did.

Q. Who was it? - A. The prisoner, Thomas Porter ; I was the first that went into the house with Burland after the prisoner was secured.

Q. Did you, or Burland, first go up stairs to the bed-room? - A. We all three went up togethers, as near as could be; I found the clothes and the bed on the floor, except the pillow, which laid upon the matrass, with a blanket solded up.

Q. Did you see the prisoner searched? - A. No; I left Mrs. Marsom, and other people, to take care of the house till somebody came back.

Q. Can you form any judgment of the whole of these things? - A. The three blankets were worth at least a guinea and a half, and I would not make the bed under ten pounds.

Q. What is the age of young Mr. Brady? - A. I cannot tell his age.

Q. The father and mother never slept in the house? - A. Never.

Q. The young man is four or five and twenty, is not he? - A. I don't know; I was there when Harper and Burland came back with a key, which opened the door very easy.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - Q. You are an officer? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you search the prisoner? - A. Yes; in one thigh of his breeches I found this crow and this key, and in the back part of the other thigh, I found this key (producing them), which opened the door as well as any key in London, and the lock was a good way in; it took greatest part of the key, they are picklock keys.

Court. (To Gregory.) Q. How long has this house, adjoining to your master's green-house, been occupied by your master's family? - A. I cannot say.

Q.How long have you been servant to him? - A.Fifteen months.

Q. Was it then used by your master? - A. No.

Q. How long before this happened, had it been used by him? - A. I cannot say.

Q. A month, or two months? - A. More than that.

Q. What use has been made of it? - A. My young master sleeps there at nights,

Q. What age is your young master? - A.About five and twenty.

Q. Where did he eat, and have his diet? - A. In St. Mary Axe.

Q. Did he use to come home to sup? - A. Yes; he supped at my master's house.

Q. And went to this house to sleep? - A. Yes.

Q. And you went to this house, and looked after the bed, as a servant of the father? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did your young master sleep, before your master took that house into his possession? - A. He slept then at St. Mary Axe.

Q. How came he not to sleep at the other house in King of Prussia Row? - A. There was not room enough.

Cross-examined by Mr. Courthorpe. Q. I believe the father and son are partners? - A. Yes.

Fitzgeorge. No, they are not partners, the father is here.(Samuel Brady was called, but being a Quaker, refused to be sworn.)

Q.(To Gregory.) Do you know any thing of your master's business, whether they are partners or not? - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-63

648. JAMES M'CORMICK was indicted for that he, on the 12th of July , twenty-two yards of broad silk, value 43s. the property of Edward Hayley , then being in a loom, in the dwelling-house of the said, Edward, feloniously did cut and destroy, not having the consent of the said Edward so to do .

Second Count. Stating the loom to be in the shop, and not in the dwelling-house of the said Edward.

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blance.

Reference Number: t18020918-64

649. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for making an assault in the dwelling-house of -, upon William Bryant , on the 17th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silver watch, value 2l. and a pair of silver buckles, value 10s. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM BRYANT sworn. - On the 17th of August, I was coming from Knightsbridge, and went to the sign of the Turk's-head, in a street that goes up to Bloomsbury-square.

Q. Did you stay any time in this public-house? - A. Yes, it was about half-past eight when I came out; when I went in, I called for a pint of porter.

Q. How much had you? - A. Three or four pints, I don't know which.

Q. Were you sober when you went out? - A. I cannot say I was sober, because I had been drinking a little.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner? - A. He was in the same public-house, in a corner, all the time; he wanted to introduce himself to me, and I told him several times to keep his own company, and he was not content with that, but he took up the pot and drank; when I went away, as I was going out, the door was half open and half shut, when the prisoner passed me; and as he passed me, he put his hand into my waistcoat-pocket, and took hold of a silver watch that I had in my pocket, and a pair of silver buckles; I took hold of him directly, and he strucke me; he used very bad expressions, and said, if I did not let him go, he would have my life; I struck him several times myself; two more then came up to his assistance, and he got away; he ran down the street, and I after him, and the watchman caught hold of him; then some others endeavoured to rescue him from the watchman, and he ran into a public-house, in St. Giles's, the Black dog; I pulled out my handkerchief to wipe the blood off my face, and the prisoner run up stairs; in about two minutes, I went up stairs and found the prisoner undrest.

Q. Did you find your watch and buckles? - A. No; the man that came to his assistance, ran away.

Prisoner. There were about a dozen girls of the town in the house, and he was handing the watch and buckles about to the girls.

Court. Q. Were there any women with you at this public-house? - A. No; there was nobody with me any part of the time.

Q.Did you pull out your watch at all? - A. Yes, once, to see what o'clock it was.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am a patrol belonging in Bow-Street.

Q. Were you in the street, when Bryant was pursuing the prisoner? - A. No; I was coming down Bowl-yard, and, at the Black-dog, I saw a number of people round the door; I heard a young man had been robbed; I went into the house, and asked the landlord where the young man was; he was in the bar; I went up stairs, and in the room, behind the chair, I found the prisoner, with his coat, waistcoat, and shirt off, fitting down upon the ground, in the room, there was part of an old black coat and an apron; the prosecutor identified him immediately; I took him into custody, and searched him, but found nothing upon him.

Q.(To Bryant.) How was the prisoner dressed at the publie-huose, where you were fitting? - A. The room was dark, it appeared to be a dark coat, and a black apron.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

JOHN DALTON sworn. - I am a constable; I went up into the room with Crocker, the prisoner was standing by the door in custody of Burns, the watchman; the prisoner's clothes were upon the floor; he said, he had stripped in Dyot-street, to assist in fighting, and that he had no clothes when he came into the house, and the watchman and a little boy said, these were the clothes he had on when he came into the house.

JAMES BURNS sworn. - I am a watchman, I assisted in taking the prisoner, he was rescued away from me at the Black-dog; he ran into the house, and went up stairs, I went after him.

Q. Did you see enough of the man to know him again, when you saw him at the Blck-dog? - A. Yes, because I knew him before; I went up stairs, and was afraid to follow him into the room without help; I was close to him, at the same time, Crocker came up, and I went into the room and found him wihtout his clothes.

Prisoner's defence. This man lost his property among some girls, I know nothing about it.

GUILTY, aged 44,

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house, nor putting the person in fear .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Banc.

Reference Number: t18020918-65

650. BENJAMIN HARPUR was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Sweedland , Esq. about the hour of twelve in the night of the 8th of September , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a silver mug, value 2l. two silver gravy spoons, value 2l. six silver dessert spoons, value 3l. seven silver tea-spoons, value 14s. four silver salt-spoons, value 8s. a mustard spoon, vlue 2s. twelve silver forks, value 6l. a silver salt-seller, value 5s. two silver tureen-ladles, value 3l. two pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 10s. and a silver knife, value 10s. the property of the said Charles.(The case was opened by Mr. Alley)

JANE ROSE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 19, Berners-street , at Charles Sweedland's, Esq.

Q. Is your master in town? - A. No.

Q. Who did he leave in care of the house when he went out of town? - A. Me and my followservant, the cook; I am house-keeper.

Q. Did you examine the house every night? - A. Yes, every night; I examined every window and door.

Q. On Wednesday the 8th, did you examine them? - A. Yes; at half-past ten we went to bed, and left every thing secure.

Q. When you went to bed, were you disturbed by a noise? - A. I heard a noise.

Q. At what time? - A.Just as the clock had gone one; I got up and threw open the sash, as I lay in the back part of the house, I did not see any thing there; I shut the window agian, and directly heard another noise, which I was confident was in the house; I had a tinder-box in my room, and I struck a ligth, went to the front part of the house, where my fellow servant slept, and called her; we then locked ourselves in, therew up both the sashes, and waited aout a quarter of an hour, when the watchman came past; I called to him, and said, watchman, come to No. 19. for I hear a noise in the bottom of the house, which he did; I told him to ring the door bell, and pull it hard; he did so, and on his pulling the bell, it brought the villains up into the hall; upon which he knocked at the door, and five of them ran out.

Q. Did you see them? - A. Yes, my head was out of the window.

Q. Were you enabled to distinguish their persons? - A. No; I saw five of them run out, they all run towards the Middlesex-houspital way.

Q. What did the watchman do? - A. He run after them as fast as he could, and sprung his rattle.

Q. Did you see any body brought back? - A. I saw the watchman come back with the prisoner at the bar, into our hall, where they took the plate out of his pocket, and he was handcuffed.

Q. Your fellow-servant knows no more than you? - A. No.

JOHN MUNRULY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you, in consequence of any alarm, come to No, 19, Berner's-street? - A. Yes, after one o'clock in the morning.

Q. Was it moon-light? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you knock at the hall-door? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, after that, observe any body come out of the house? - A. I observed five men come out.

Q. Look round, and tell us if you see any body in Court who came out of that house? - A. The prisoner was one of the party; I sprung my rattle and they all ran away.

Q. Did you pursue them? - A. Yes.

Q. Which way did they run? - A.Towards Charles-street.

Q. Do you recollect meeting a person of the name of John Haynes , a baker? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any body in custody? - A. Yes, the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did he deliver the prisoner into your custody? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with him? - A. I brought him back to No. 19.

Q. Did you take him into the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you search him? - A. Yes; I found some plate and a handkerchief.

Q. Did you find nothing else? - A. Yes, four pick-lock keys.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. What do you know of me? - A. I saw you come out of No. 19, Berner's-street.

Q. Did you lose sight of me? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate, you lost fight of me in turning Newman-street? - A. No.

Q. Did you not say, a man coming round shopped me, and that you lost sight of me? - A. No.

JOHN HAYNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a baker, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember meeting any body on Thursday morning? - A. Yes; I met the prisoner about one o'clock in the morning; I caught him in my arms, at the corner of Charles-street, and Berner's-street.

Q. Was he running or walking? - A.Running; the last witness came up, and I delivered him up to him.

JAMES WRIGHT sworn. - Q. You have something to produce? - A. Yes, some plate that I received from Munruly.

Q.(To Munruly). Look at that plate? - A. This is the plate I took from the prisoner.

Q.(To Rose). Do you know that plate? - A. Yes.

Q.Who do they belong to? - A. Charles Sweedland , Esq.; there are two table-spoons, six dessert spoons, a silver mug, four salt spoons, and a mustard spoon.

Court. Q. What do you know the articles by? - A. His name is upon them, C. S.

Q. Are they all marked C. S.? - A. Yes, all.

Q.Have you been in the habit of frequently seeing it in the house? - A. Yes, for near twelve months.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you search to see if any part of the house had been broke? - A. Yes; the fore parlour shutters had been forced from the hinge.

Q. That looks into Berners-street? - A. Yes.

Q. The outside or inside shutters? - A. The inside shutters.

Q. How was the sash? - A. The fash was shoved up.

Q. Where was the plate kept? - A. In a cupboard in the sootman's pantry, in a box.

Q. Were they kept locked up? - A. Yes; and the lock was broke.

Q. Do you know that that cupboard and that box were locked? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the place where the plate was usually kept? - A. Yes, the plate that was used in common.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know that that plate is your master's property - there may be many crests and letters alike? - A. This jug I have very often put hot water in, for the sootman to carry up stairs.

Prisoner's defence. I was going, along, and picked up the plate; I did not know there was any harm in it.

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blace.

Reference Number: t18020918-66

651. DENNIS BURK was indicted for making an assault in the dwelling-house of Thomas Higgins , on the 2d of August , upon Edward Welch , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a pocket, value one halfpenny, four half-guineas, and two seven-shilling pieces , the property of the said Edward.

EDWARD WELCH sworn. - Q. Were you robbed on the 2d of August? - A. Yes.

Q. Where were you? - A. In the house of Thomas Higgins , where I and this man lodged.

Q. Was it a public-house? - A. No.

Q. Where is it situated? - A. In Snow's-rents, No. 9 .

Q. What time was it? - A. Between seven and eight o'clock in the morning.

Q. How did it happen? - A. I went out by four o'clock to my work, I returned home again, and had three glasses of liquor; I was not well, I had a pain in my belly, and the prisoner went up stairs with me, and asked me what money I had; I told him, I had four half-guineas and two seven-shilling pieces; he asked me, if I would give him any drink out of it, and I told him, for what.

Q. Where was it? - A. In my pocket, and a piece of packthread sewed at the bottom of it; I laid down upon the bed, and he asked me if I would lend him a seven-shilling piece; I said, I would not; then he said, if I would not give it him of

my own accord, he would have my life or the seven shilling piece.

Q. Did you give it him? - A. No, he took all the money I had away from me.

Q. Did he give you any blow? - A. Yes, in the pit of my stomach.

Q. Did it knock you down? - A. It did; he told me, he would either have my life or my money, if I did not hold my tongue; he took from me four half-guineas and two seven shillings pieces.

Q. What part of the house was this in? - A. The upper part of the house.

Q. Were there any other lodgers in the house? - A. No.

Q. Was there any body below? - A. Yes; a soldier's wife was below in the kitchen.

Q. What did you do then? - A. He was taken to Queen-square.

Q. How soon after? - A. About a couple of hours after.

Q. Did you get your money again? - A. No.

Q.Should you know it again? - A. No.

Q. You cannot swear to the money? - A. I can only swear to the rag that was about the money, which was found in his pocket.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH sworn. - Q. You are an officer? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take this man? - A. Yes; On the 2d. of August, the prosecutor brought the prisoner to me; he said, he had been robbed of four half guineas and two seven shillings pieces; I asked him what it was contained in; and he said, it was contained in a white rag purse; I searched the prisoner, and in his right hand waistcoat pocket, I found half-a-guinea in gold, five shillings in silver, and four-pence halfpenny in copper; upon searching him further, in his left-hand pocket, I found a woman's hussif, I selt it, and said; here is some money in this thing; he said, he did not know that there was any money at all; I said, I am sure there is; then he said, I believe there is a sevenshilling piece; I then took hold of the rag, and shewed it the prosecutor; he said, that was not his rag; I then unrolled it to see the contents, and found there was another rag in it; I asked him if that was his; and he said, he would swear to it; I found in that a penny-piece, a half-crown, and two seven-shilling pieces; (produces it).

Q.(To Welch). Look at that purse? - A. I know it to be mine by a hole near the top of it.

Q.(To Goodenough). Is there a hole near the top? - A. There is.

Q.(To Welch). Do you undertake to swear positively to it? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you had it? - A. About two months.

Q. And your money was in that purse that morning? - A. Yes.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , Death , aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020918-67

652. WILLIAM TOPPER was indicted for being at large before the expiration of the term for which he had been ordered to be transported .

JOHN LEAFORD sworn. - (Produces a copy of the record of conviction of the prisoner).

Q. Where did you get that? - A. I received it from Mr. Girdlestone, clerk of the Assize, at Wisbeach. (It was read).

Q. Were you present at the trial? - A. Yes, I conveyed him from Ely to Wisbeach, prior to the trial.

Q. Is the prisoner at the bar the same person? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure of it? - A. I am convinced of it; I saw him-again at Maidstone Assizes, on the 5th of August last, I saw him in Maidstone jail, I went to identify his person.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. When you saw him at Maidstone, was he not hightly recommended? - A. Mr. Watson told me, he stood first upon the list, the best behaved person in the world.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Q. You are an officer? - A. I belong to the Police-office, Worship-street: In consequence of information, I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of March last, in the parish of St. George, Middlesex, in a house.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you recollect whose house it was? - A. No, I do not.

Court. Q. Was he at work there? - A. He had been at work as a smith; he behaved himself remarkably civil; I have made every enquiry I could, and found that, from the time of his being at large, he has been constantly at work, up to the time of my apprehending him.

Q. And he was apprehended merely for being at large? - A. Only for being at large.

For the Prisoner.

SAMUEL PARKER sworn. - Q. You are a furnishing-ironmonger, and live in Duck-lane, St-George's in the East? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe the prisoner was your servant when he was taken up by Ray? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it he first came into your service? - A. In October last.

Q. Had you ever an honester or more faithful servant in your life? - A. Never; he was my porter and money-receiver; he always settled my money accounts in the most punctual manner, out of doors.

GUILTY , Death , aged 25.

The prisoner was recommended, by the Jury, to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his good behaviour.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-68

653. JOANNA BRAIDY was Indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Fullerton , nine Banknotes, each of the value of 1l. the property of Thomas Fletcher .

THOMAS FLETCHER sworn. - Q. What have you to say against the prisoner? - A. On Sunday the 8th of August, I was coming home from Blackwall to Chancery-lane, about half past twelve o'clock at night; I was knocking at my own door in Chancery-lane, where I have a lodging; the prisoner at the bar came up to me, and said, are you locked out? I said, yes; the prisoner said, I am chamber-maid at an inn, in Holborn, I can help you to a very good bed.

Q. Had you waited some time at the door? - A. I had been some time at the door; I told her, I should go, and she went along with me.

Q. Have you had that lodging in London, long? - A. Yes, a good many years.

Q. Have you been used to London? - A. Yes, a good many years; I went with her to the French Horn in Holborn , it is an inn-yard; she went into the kitchen, and brought out a candle, the door was open; she took me up one pair of stairs, and stiewed me a bed, which I approved of; then she said, you will pay for the bed, and I gave her a seven-shilling piece.

Q. Did she say what you were to pay for it? - A. Two shillings; She came up again, and said, her mistress thought the seven-shilling piece was a bad one; she gave me back the seven-shilling piece, and I gave her two shillings, and a shilling for her self.

Q. When she brought back the seven-shilling piece, were you in bed? - A. No, I was sitting by the side of the bed; she took the three shillings, and went down stairs, wishing me a good night.

Q. Leaving you alone in the room? - A. She left me alone in the room, I then undressed myself, and looked for a fastening to the door, but could not find any thing; I put a chair against the door, and then went to bed; the next morning, about half past five o'clock, I awaked; I had put my clothes on a chair by the bed-side; the first thing I did, was to look at my pocket-book in my coat pocket.

Q. When had you last before seen the pocketbook? - A. Before I set off from Blackwall, on the Sunday.

Q. When was the last time you felt the pocketbook? - A. When I pulled off my clothes, I am sure I had it in my pocket then.

Q. Did you miss that pocket-book? - A. No, I did not miss it; I looked into it, when I was getting up, and missed nine one-pound notes.

Q. Did you miss any thing else? - A. No, I found the door a-jar, and the chair moved a little on one side; I then went down stairs to the mistress of the house.

Q. Did you know her before? - A. No.

Q. You found a woman you supposed to be the mistress of the house? - A. Yes; I called her up; she got up, I told her what had happened, and she sent a black servant that she had, to different lodging-houses, to find out the prisoner, but we did not find her till the Tuesday morning, about nine o'clock; I asked her what she had done with the money.

Q. Was any body with you? - A. Yes, the black servant and another person.

Q. What did she say? - A. She gave no answer at all about it; I staid there while an officer was sent for, and she was taken into custody.

Q. Did you find any of your notes again? - A. Yes, the same morning, a man of the name of Bradley, who keeps a public-house, shewed me one of my notes.

Q. Who has that now? - A. The constable.

Q. Were you sober at the time? - A. I cannot say I was very sober.

Q. You were not to sleep with the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. You went with her as the servant of an inn? - A. Yes.

Q. And she was only in the room with you for the purpose of shewing you the bed, and bringing the seven-shilling piece back again? - A. For no other purpose at all.

Q. Were you sober enough to remember that you put the chair against the door? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you say you had those notes in your pocket-book, when you went to bed? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you suppose, it was while you were asleep, that she took it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not say, before the Magistrate, that you had every reason to believe the prisoner stole and carried away your notes at the time she returned into the room with the seven-shilling piece? - A. Not the second time; I said, I supposed she returned again after that.

Q. When she took the three shillings, was your coat upon your back? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you suppose she could not have taken it at that time? - A. No, it was impossible.

Q. Did you walk with her from your lodgings to the French-horn? - A. Yes; it is not above an hundred yards.

Q. Did you walk arm-in-arm? - A. No, I think she walked before me.

Q. Did you know this house, the French-horn? - A. I never was in it before in my life.

Q. Then you do not know whose house it is? - A. No, I do not.

Prisoner. It was a very old woman that shewed us the bed, and he was very much in liquor.

Court. Q. Can you recollect, with certainty, whether it was that woman, or another? - A. I have no doubt of this being the woman; I did not see any other woman.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not in company with two woman at the corner of Red-lion-street, drinking at the watering-house? - A. No, I did not drink any thing after I left Blackwall, and I had walked all the way from Blackwall; I was with no other woman at all.

JOHN BRADLEY sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. I keep a public-house in Dean-street, Holborn, the sign of the Cheshire-cheese; I know the prisoner perfectly well.

Q. Do you know the French-horn inn? - A. It is not the French-horn inn at present, the licence is taken away; the prisoner at the bar lodged there: On Monday, the 9th of August, she came to me to pay me a trifle of money that she owed me, thirteen-pence halfpenny; she gave me a one-pound note to change, I gave her change, and gave the note to my wife; she put it into her pocket-book; the next day she gave me the note again, and I took it before the Magistrate.

Q. Was there any particular mark upon it? -- A. Yes; my wife wrote the name of Braidy upon it at the time that I received it from the prisoner.

WILLIAM DUNCAN sworn. - Q. Are you a constable? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the French-horn? - A. Yes.

Q. Who keeps the house? - A. Elizabeth Fullerton.

Q. As an officer in the parish, you know that? - A. Yes.

Q. Does she lodge in the house herself? - A. Yes. (Produces a one-pound note.)

Q. Where did you find that Bank-note? - A. I took it into my care, by the direction of Mr. Bleamire; I saw it produced there by Bradley, after some little difficulty in coming; he was sent for I have had it ever since.

Bradley. This is the same note; it has the name of Braidy upon it, in my wife's hand-writing.

Q. Are you sure that it is the same note you received from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Fletcher.) Look at that note; is there any thing upon that note by which you know it? - A. Only the number, 11940; the notes were all running numbers; I received them from the office of Ordnance.

Q. You got the numbers from the office? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take notice of the numbers at the time you received them, and before you lost them? - A. Yes; they were No. 11940, and following numbers.

Q. Did you look at them all when you received them? - A. No; I looked at No. 11940, and 11941, and from that concluded that they were all following numbers; the note now produced is 11940.

Q.Have you ever found any of the others? - A. No, only this one.

Q. Had you any other notes in your pocketbook? - A. Three or four two-pound notes, and some bills of Exchange.

Prisoner. I beg I may have my clothes delivered to me, for I am naked.

Duncan. I should have told your Lordship, that I found upon her person this piece of linen for a gown, not made up, and this cloak, which she said she had had for two years, but which I doubted, because it is new, and the strings has never been put to it; I also found upon her eighteen shillings and sixpence in silver.

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-69

654. WILLIAM GREGORY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , in the dwelling-house of John-Poole Baker , two Bank-notes, each of the value of 15l. two other Bank-notes, each of the value of 10l. and two other Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of the said John.

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-70

655. WILLIAM HERBERT , JOHN REYNOLDS , JAMES PEACH , FRANCIS RILEY , CHARLES SMITH , JOHN ROBERTS , EDWARD GRIFFITHS , ELIZABETH LANE , and ELIZABETH EALEY , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Skillecorn , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 19th of July , and burglariously stealing a tin nutmeg-grater, value 1d. two wooden tills, value 6s. a medal, resembling a farthing, value one farthing, eighty-four pennypieces, seven hundred and twenty halfpence, and one hundred and forty-four farthings , the property of the said George.

GEORGE SKILLECORN sworn. - Q.Where is your house? - A. In Littile Queen-street, Holborn .

Q. Is it a public-house? - A. Yes, in the parish of St. Giles.

Q. Were you robbed in the month of July? - A. Yes.

Q. What night was it? - A. On Monday, the 20th of July.

Q. What time did you go to bed? - A. I locked up the cellar, and saw all safe, at a quarter past eleven, or somewhere thereabouts; I always go down stairs the last thing.

Q. How is the entrance into the cellar fastened?

- A. By two bolts; it was a door opening upon the pavement, in Parker's-lane; it is a corner house.

Q. That was fastened with a bolt on the inside? - A. Yes, with two bolts.

Q. Were they fastened when you went to bed? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you alarmed by any thing? - A. No.

Q. Were you called up? - A. Yes, at four o'clock in the morning.

Q.How did you find your house? - A. A lodger called me up, when I found the bar and street door open.

Q. Were they fastened over night? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any other part of your premises open? - A. The cellar door at the bottom of the stairs was open.

Q. You mean the stairs leading from the house to the cellar? - A. Yes; the cellar flap was open.

Q. That is outside, next to the street? - A. Yes.

Q. How were the bolts? - A. They were unbolted, and the flap shut to again, but the bolts not bolted.

Q. Were there any marks of violence? - A. A small part of the flap of the door was cut away, and part of the door split, then some instrument had been put in, and the bolts shoved back.

Q. How was the door at the foot of the cellar stairs? - A. It locks into a large staple, and the lock was shoved back.

Q. Could that he shoved back by any person who was in the cellar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe any thing else? - A. We found these shoes (producing a pair of old dirty shoes), laying under the slap of the cellar, very wet and dirty.

Q. Did you observe any thing more? - A. No. thing in the cellar.

Q. Did you miss any thing? - A. In the bar we found two drawers were taken away; the bottom part was locked, but the window that pulls down was not locked, for I had broke the lock the day before, (two draweres produced); this drawer contained the penny pieces and new halfpence, and this contained the old halfpence and farthings; the middle drawers were opened, the papers turned out, and twelve metal table-spoons taken away; in the left hand drawer was an old tin nutmeg grater, which I had seen at eleven o'clock that night.

Q.When you first came down stairs, was it dark or light? - A. It was quite light then; I went outside the door, and immediately two watchmen came up.

Q. Did you go with them in search of the thieves? - A.Immediately.

Q. Where did they carry you to? - A.Down Parker's-lane, and through Cross-lane, into Lewkner's-lane.

Q. How many watchmen went with you? - A. Two at first, but we were joined by another on the right hand side, pointing to a house, one of the watchmen said, there is one of them in that passage.

Q. Was the street door open? - A. Yes; we forced our way into the back parlour, and found the whole of the prisoners there, except Elizabeth Laue.

Q. In what manner were they employed, and in what parts of the room? - A.Elizabeth Ealey was in bed.

Q. How many beds were there in the room? - A. One.

Q.Was she dressed or undressed? - A.Undressed; one of the men was upon the bed likewise, but I cannot swear to which.

Q. In the bed or on the bed? - A. On the bed; he was dressed; Griffiths was standing against the window, with his arms across, looking towards the table; Reynolds was at the table, counting the money, without shoes.

Q. Were they dressed? - A. All the men were dressed; the penny pieces were arranged up in rows, and they were counting the money before them.

Q. You did not examine Reynolds's feet or stockings? - A. No, we were glad to secure them; Smith had made his escape up the chimney, before I got into the room.

Q. How soon after did he come down the chimney? - A. In about ten minutes.

Q. Did he come down of his own accord? - A. No, by frightening; as he went up the chimney, the halfpence kept tumbling down out of his pocket.

Q.That caused you to look up the chimney? - A. He had been seen to go up, but I did not see him.

Q. When he came down, what did you find upon him? - A. I did not search him, I was in the street, and had got hold of some of the others; we were glad to secure them, so that I did not take notice of any other positions.

Q. Where did you first see Elizabeth Lane? - A. She first came to clear her character up of her own accord.

Q. Where did you first find the drawers? - A. They were found in Stonecutter's-buildings.

PRIAM DOWLAN sworn. - Q. Are you a watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. Where is your stand? - A. I watch in Great Queen-street and in Little Queen-street, as far as Lincoln's-inn-fields, on the other side.

Q. Before Skillecorn came out of his house, and spoke to you, had you, in the course of the night, made any observation upon any person being about that spot? - A. I did.

Q.Give an account of it? - A. I made an observation.

Q. What time of night? - A. About twelve o'clock.

Q. What did you observe? - A. I saw Reynolds.

Q. Was any body with him? - A. No, I saw him come from the corner of Mr. Hunter's, the baker's, till he came as far as the shoe-maker's shop, then he crossed over the way, and saw me in my box, upon which he went round, till he came to Skillecorn's, the publican.

Q. Is that all you observed, before you received an alarm? - A. I heard an alarm, as I was standing at the corner; I heard Elizabeth Lane, to the best of my opinion, by her voice, for I have known her three or four years, though I cannot swear home to her, say, d-n your eyes, Jack, now is the time to make your ground good, for the watchman is out of the way.

Q. Was it day-light? - A. Between day and dark; it was so dark, he got out of my fight round the corner.

Q. Did you see any man there? - A.Reynolds I saw before, and I saw him cross from Stonecutters-buildings, where he did the drawers.

Q. You say you saw a woman, and heard her say something? - A. I did not say I saw her.

Q. Repeat the words she said? - A. D-n your eyes, Jack, now is the time to make your ground good, for the watchman is out of the way.

Q.Did you see any body to whom she said that? - A. I saw Reynolds cross over the way at that time, and I pursued him with a rattle; he ran across the way to the corner of Parker's-street.

Q. Did you see any body else, except the two you have mentioned? - A. I kept up the rattle, and kept him in view till the turning a coal-shed, when he got into a place, called Gold-beater's-alley; I was afraid of being murdered, and did not go up there; I went back to look for the woman, where she used to be, as I did not see her go into the alley, and Reynolds came up to me with shoes on as slippers, and his stockings quite wet; as soon as I saw him, I took him to the watch-house.

Q. Were they shoes or slippers which he wore? - A. They were shoes, but he wore them as slippers, with the heels down, they did not sit him at all.

Q.How long did he remain there? - A. A very few minutes; I told the constable how I had seen him about; he examined him, but found nothing on him, so let him go; he and I came together from the watch-house, and when I came to the corner, he said, Dowlan, I believe you are an honest watchman, and I will treat you to-morrow night; I said, I wanted no treat from him, for I worked for that with which I could treat myself; well, says he, I will give you a shilling, which I also refused; I then came on to the corner of Parker-street, where I saw one of the Bow-street officers in the buildings, who had found the drawers, after I had let Reynolds go; I marked the house Reynolds went into.

Q. Were you with the officer, when he found the drawers? - A. No.

Q. After having met the officer, where did you go? - A. I went to the watch-house with the drawers, and then came back.

Q. Where did you go next? - A. I came back again, as far as the Running-horse, and stood there; there was a man, who lodged with Skillecorny, came out with Skillecorn to the door; I asked them, if they knew of any person being robbed, and if they did, that the drawers' were in the watch-house; then Skillecorn told me, he was the person.

Q. Where did you take them to? - A. I told him, if he would come along with me, I dare say I could find out the thieves, or the people that had robbed him; but that it was no use to go one or two together, for we must get some more assistance; I got two watchmen, and we went up to Lewkner's lane, but it is wrote up, Charles-street; when we came opposite the door where I saw Reynolds go in, on this side of Goldsmith's-alley, Riley spied me, and said, here is Dowlan.

Q. Did you hear him say so? - A. Yes; he ran back, and made the alarm to them.

Q. You saw him, did you? - A. Yes; I did not see him in the room, but I found him under the stairs, in the house, covered over with straw.

Q. When you first heard him say, here is Dowlan, where was he, did you see him? - A. He was in the passage, and run back directly; I never gave the door any time till I burst it open, and told the rest to follow me.

Q. You run into the room? - A. I did.

Q. In that room who did you find? - A.Samuel Beach.

Q. What was he doing? - A. As soon as I came into the room, he jumped from the bed where he was, with some money, and threw it upon the table where the remaining part of the money was.

Q. Did you see him? - A. I saw him.

Q. Who else did you see? - A. I saw that small chap of a boy, Charles Smith.

Q. What was he doing? - A. As soon as he had an opportunity, he got up the chimney.

Q. Did you see him go up? - A. No, but I found him there, and I saw him when I first went into the room.

Q. Who else did you find? - A. This young man, in a brown coat, Butcher Grissiths.

Q. What was he doing? - A. He was standing between the window and table, where the money was dividing in penny-pieces, and Beach threw a cover over it, a sort of cloth; he wore a sailor's jacket at that time.

Q. Did you see either of the other prisoners? - A. Yes, I saw Reynolds opposite the fire place.

Q.What was he doing? - A. I said, Reynolds, above all, if you stir out; I will lose my life, because I know you to be a thief.

Q. Was there any body else - was Riley there? - A. I cannot say; the other chap, in a blue-coat, Roberts, was standing near to Griffiths.

Q. Was any body in bed? - A. Elizabeth Ealy lay with her face to the wall, but I don't know whether she was asleep or awake.

Q. Have you named all the prisoners? - A. No; the other man lay between the window and the table, on the ground, on the boards, his name is William Herbert.

Q. Are there any persons at the bar, whom you did not see in the room? - A. I don't know whether Riley was in the room or not, but Elizabeth Lane was not there; we found Riley, afterwards, under the stairs, covered over with a little straw.

Q. Did you observe the chimney while you were in the room? - A. I did; Herbert lay between the table and the window, I told him to get up, and one of them said, that man was drunk; I said, if he was drunk, I would wake him; I pulled him up, and handed him into custody, telling them to take him along with the rest, and take care of them; before he was taken out, he said, there is a silver shilling on the bed, which don't belong to the property, let me have it; I went to the bed, found the shilling, and gave it him; Smith got up the chimaey, and I heard the halfpence and penny pieces falling down, he goes by the name of Black Charles, because he is a sweep; I told him to come down, but he made no answer; upon which, I told the other watchman to go up stairs, (for I was afraid he would get off) and throw the chimney down upon him, and smother him; I took some wood, and told him, I would set it on fire, and bring him down, if he would not come; upon those conditions, he came down, and delivered to me, ninepennyworth of halfpence and penny pieces, saying, there is only nine-pence on me, that is all I have, you can neither hang me not transport me; before Reynolds went, he threw off his top coat and waist coat into a chair, in which there was about the amount of five shillings, and said, you found no money on me; and with that he dropped this nutmeg greater, (producing it).

Q. Did you find any thing in the pocket either of his coat or waistcoat? - A. Yes, copper penny pieces and halfpence, there was better than five shillings; I swore only to five shillings, but I dare say there was very near nine shillings; as he stood with his back to the chimney, he dropped this nutmeg-grater out of his left hand; I took it up, and said, Skillecorn, is this your property? yes, said he, I will swear to that being my property; we then took them to the watch-house, and all the money I found, I laid before the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson, Counsel for Roberts.

Q. You only saw Roberts standing by the table? - A.No more; I found no money on him.

Prisoner, Reynolds. He first swore, he saw me counting the money, and then that I was standing by the fine, and that he saw me drop the nutmeggrater; before the Justice, he said, that he knew nothing about it.

Q. Did you say so? - A. No, I said, I saw him drop it, and I took it up.

DANIEL CALLAGAN sworn. - Q. You are a watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen any body about on this night, before you saw Skillecorn? - A. No, my stand is in the row where these men were taken, in Parkerstreet.

Q. Upon being called, where did you go to? - I was crying two o'clock, when I heard the rattle going, I ran through the passage between King-street and Lewkner's-lane, and asked Dowlan what was the matter; he told me, there was such a person passed, and mentioned Reynolds and Lanc, and that they had got into the passage; I did not see Bet Lane till she gave herself up at the watch-house.

Q. Did you go with the other persons to the house where the prisoners were taken? - A. Yes, to Watkins's house.

Q.Did you go in at the same time? - A. Yes, I was along with them.

Q. Did you, in that room, see all the prisoners, or how many of them? - A. I saw six of them, and one woman, who was in bed, with her head against the wall, but I cannot say whether she was asleep, or not.

Q. Where did you see the others? - A. Riley was in the passage.

Q. You saw them all in this situation? - A. Yes.

Q. What was there on the table? - A.Some copper.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Reynolds? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Was he in the room? - A. He was.

Q.What was he doing? - A. To the best of my knowledge, he was sitting against the window, but he got up when I got in; I took hold of Beach.

Q.Where was he? - A. He was sitting on the bed, I took hold of him, and told him to get up.

Q. Do you recollect what the others were about? - A. I guarded the door; and my partner knows more about it than I do.

Dowlan. I handed them to his, and he took care of them.

JOSEPH HUGGENS sworn. - Q. Are you a watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go with the other watchman and Skillecorn to the house in Lewkner's-lane? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go into the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go after Donald, or with him? - A. I went along with him.

Q.What did you first observe? - A.When I first went in, I saw the money divided into heaps on the table which was in the room, and there were five of the prisoners about the table, where the money was.

Q. Were they sitting or standing? - A. There were four standing about the table, and one laying at the end of the table; when Dowlan and I went into the room, we immediately seized on one or two of them; Herbert was laying at the end of the table, between the table and the window; one said, he was drunk, then said Dowlan, if he is, he must get up; upon which he got up, and said, don't take me away, for there is a silver shilling of mine here, that don't belong to the money.

Q.Did you find the shilling? - A. We found the shilling, and he got it.

Q. Where did you find it? - A. In the bedclothes.

Q.Did you take them away? - A. We had not, as we thought, force enough to take them, being such a number as they were, for we had three watchmen only, till Skillecorn took the rattle and sprung it in the street, and some others came up and assisted us; then, while we were getting ourselves ready, and putting the money into a handkerchief, a nutmeg-grater sell out of Reynolds's pocket.

Q. Did you see it? - A. Yes, I saw it fall out of his hand or pocket.

Q. Out of which hand? - A. I believe it was his left-hand, or left-hand pocket.

Q. Who took it up? - A. The watchman, of the name of Dowian, and asked Skillecorn if it was his property, and he said it was.

Q. Then you took them away? - A. Then we handed them one by one to the watchmen at the door, in the street; at the time we handed the first out, the smallest of them, Smith, got up the chimney, I saw the foot, and the copper-money falling down.

Q. How soon after you came into the room was it, that Smith was getting up the chimney? - A. I suppose it might be about five minutes.

Q. Did you see him in the room before he got up the chimney? - A. I did; I saw him standing at the table when we entered the room.

Q. Did you see him come down the chimney? - A. Yes; we told him to come down, or that there were people at the top of the house that would throw the chimney down on him; but he kept going up, and after we had secured the rest, there being some old boards in the room, we threatened to set them on fire, upon which he came down, and said, I give myself up to you, I have only ninepence on me, you can neither hang or transport me for that, upon which we took him away, and put him with the rest; there was a bed in the room, which was very small, and on the bed there was a sailor, dressed in a blue jacket, and a woman lying in the bed on her left side, with her face to the wall; we took him likewise, and put him with the rest; when we broke into the room, I verily believe the woman was asleep, and did not know any thing of it.

JOHN WYGATE sworn. - Q.What are you? - A. I am a constable of the night, and was present when the prisoner were brought into the watch-house.

Q. Do you recollect Reynolds, one of the prisoners, being brought in earlier by one of the watchman? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. You examined him, and finding nothing on him, you discharged him? - A. Yes, by the consent of the watchman.

Q. Do you recollect what situation he was in as dress? - A. No.

Q. Do you know what time in the morning it was? - A. I believe, turned of one o'clock.

Q. Was it light or dark? - A. Dark.

Q. Do you recollect the property being brought in? - A. Yes, I had them all searched, and I found halfpenny, and penny-pieces only on one.

Q. Which was that? - A. That was Roberts; I found nothing on either of the others.

Q. Were the things distinguished at all from the others? - A. No, they were all put together.

Q. Were you in the watch-house, when Elizabeth Lane first appeared? - A. No, I was going to take the charge to the Magistrate; I saw her in the passage; I asked her what she did there; she said, she came to resign herself up, for she heard we wanted her.

Q. What time was that? - A. About half-past eleven o'clock, as we were going to take the charge from the watch-house to the Magistrate.

Q.Did you take charge of the drawers and the halfpence, and the penny-pieces? - A. Of the halfpence and penny-pieces, but not of the drawers, they were given back to Skillecorn, because he wanted to use them; here are the halfpence and penny-pieces which I have had in my possession ever since. (Produces them.)

WILLIAM CLINE sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. An officer belonging to Bow-street.

Q. Do you recollect being met by a watchman, and his taking you to look for some drawers? - A. No.

Q. What do you know? - A. It was during the election, and as I was going home, about half-past two in the morning, I went down Little Queen-street, and through Stone-cutter's-buildings, where, by accident, I saw three drawers.

Q.Was it light or dark? - A. It was just greylight; I saw a penny piece on the ground, which I picked up, and on looking further, I found four more; feeling about, I found seven halfpence, and one drawer, and looking further, I found the other box, on a piece of timber, which lay in the street; I kept them in my possession till I went before the Magistrate, and the publican wanting them, I was ordered to mark them, and let him have them, which I did; these are the drawers; I found some papers concerning a cloath's-club, which the publican swore to, they were laying near the drawers.

MARGARET WALKER sworn. - Q.What do you know of this transaction? - A. I know nothing very particular, except that I live in Stonecutter's-street, and was sitting up that night to get my son's breakfast, who belongs to the army, and was going to a review very early in the morning; the watch being close to me, and about a quarter before two, I heard a noise, upon which I went to the door, where I saw a person rapping; I asked him what he wanted, he said, nothing; I then went into the kitchen, and saw all the fastenings safe; in the course of a little time, I heard a great noise, and heard that the watchman had taken a man up upon suspicion of a robbery, and that some halfpence had been found with the drawers.

Q. Did you know the person who spoke to you at the door? - A. Yes, I know him now.

Q. Is he one of the prisoners? - A. No; I thought I would call the watchman to tell me who it was, when I understood they had taken the persons, who, I suppose, I had heard, and that the person I had spoke to belonged to Bow-street; I was desired to go to the watch-house, to declare what I had heard, and as I followed them, they went into a house, in Parker's-lane, and took the prisoners; as I was waiting, I discovered something laying near my foot, in a handkerchief, which I picked up and took to the watch-house, where it was examined, and contained the farthings.

Q.(To Skillecorn.) Did you receive a handkerchief from the last witness? - A. Yes, this is it.(Produces it.)

Q. Who does it belong to? - A. Nobody owns it.

Q. What was in it when she gave it you? - A. some farthings, but I don't know how many.

Q. Are those the drawers you lost out of your bar that night? - A. Yes, they are, I locked them up about a quarter before twelve.

Q. You spoke of there being a quantity of halfpence, penny-pieces, and farthings in those drawers? - A. Yes.

Q. To what amount? - A.About two poundsworth, or more, but I am sure there was that; there might be fifty shillingsworth, but I am positive there were above two pounds.

Q.Was there any particular piece among them? - A. Yes, it is like a something, it is Sir Isaac Newton's model; I received it that night for a pint of beer, and have received it twenty times over from one man, nobody else would take it.

Q. That was in the drawer? - A. It was in a little bowl in the drawer.

Q.Where did you find it? - A.Amongst the rest of the money, upon counting it out in the watch-house.

Q. What do you say to the nutmeg-grater? - A. I have had it these eighteen months, sometimes it was in the drawer, and sometimes I wore it in my pocket, on that night it was in the drawer.

Q. Do you remember receiving it again that night, when the men were taken up? - A.Dowlan gave it me in the room; he asked me, if I knew it, I said, I did; I saw him stoop to take up something, but I did not see it dropped.

Reynolds. Q. I wish to know what mark he knows the nutmeg-grater by? - A. In the first place it is nearly worn out, and it is difficult to shut; in the next place, the corners are so sharp, that it tears my pocket all to pieces, therefore I did not carry it for some time.

Court. Q. Those shoes were not fitted on them? - A. No.

Herbcross defence. I am a labouring man, Griffiths and I was going into the country to harvestwork, and he asked me to call for a shirt, which he had left to be washed; I said, I did not care, but he must make haste to be in time to go in the waggon; I went with him to this room, and had not been there long before the watchman came in and took us all.

Griffith's defence. I am a butcher, and did work in Clare-market, but having hurt my leg, I could not follow that business; wanting my shirt washed, I found out that one of these women took in washing, and when I was going to fetch it, I asked Herbert if he would go with me, which he did, and we were taken.

Reynolds, Beach, Riley, Smith, and Roberts, declined saying any thing, and Lane, and Easley were not put on their defence.

William Herbert, GUILTY , Death , aged 36.

John Reynolds, GUILTY , Death , aged 15.

Samuel Beach, GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

Francis Riley, GUILTY , Death , aged 15.

Charles Smith, GUILTY , Death , aged 13.

John Roberts, GUILTY , Death , aged 14.

Edward Griffiths , GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

Elizabeth Lane, NOT GUILTY .

Elizabeth Ealy , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-71

656. GEORGE STEWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , fifty-five yards of dimity, value 5l. the property of

Thomas Whitten , and William Bremridge , in their dwelling-house .

WILLIAM BOYCE sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. I live with Thomas Whitten, and William Bremridge, in Bond-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square .

Q. What do you know of this transaction? - A. On Thursday, the 13th instant, the prisoner came into the shop of my employers.

Q. At what time? - A.About three o'clock in the afternoon, while I was in the shop; he came and took up a parcel that contained a piece of dimity.

Q. What did he say? - A. Not a word.

Q. Were there any other persons in the shop? - A. There were other persons in the shop, but no one saw him besides me.

Q. Did you know what the parcel contained at that time, or only that he took a parcel? - A. I knew what it contained, for it was packed up and directed, I had seen it packed up that same morning.

Q.What did it contain? - A.Fifty five yards.

Q.When he had taken up the parcel, what did he do? - A. He walked out immediately, and said nothing; I called up one of our young men, and we pursued him and took him with the dimity, which is here.

Q. Was he walking or running? - A.Walking across the street.

Q. Did you say any thing to him? - A. I asked him where he was going with that parcel, he made for answer, "all's well;" then I took him back to the shop.

Q. Did any thing more pass? - A.Nothing more except that; I sent for an officer, and he was taken to Marlborough-street, where he was examined the same evening.

Q. Did you say any thing to him? - A. He would reply to nothing we asked him, but made as if he was drunk.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. I never saw him before.

Q. Who lives in this shop, in Bond-street? - A. Mr. Whitten and Mr. Bremridge both live in the house.

Q. Is the shop part of it? - A. Yes, it is, the bottom part.

Q. What is the value of the dimity? - A. The value of it is six-pounds.

Q. Is that the selling price? - A. It is the cost price, the manufacturer's price.

FREDERICK DESNAM sworn. - Q. Are you the young man who was in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not see him in the shop? - A. No.

Q. You helped to take him and bring him back? - A. Yes.

Q. You can say nothing more than the last witness? - A. Nothing more.

Q. Did he appear to be sober? - A. I believe so, he was walking very steady when we overtook him.

Q. What did he say? - A. He only once said, all was well; I never saw him before.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, all I can say is, that I have been at sea eight years, and was never known to do any thing dishonest, nor can any thing be alledged against me, except this; unfortunately I fell into my ship-mate's company, and they gave me liquor, which made me stupid; I really did not know what I was about.

GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-72

657. JAMES NEEDHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , a cask value Is. 6d. and two gallons of spirits of wine, value 30s. the property of William Orme and Son.

THOMAS COOPER sworn. - I am carman to William Orme and Son, rectifiers , at St. Margaret's-hill; I lost two casks, just opposite Dark-house-lane , on the 30th of August, about a quarter before twelve at noon; one cask contained two gallons of spirits of wine, and the other five gallons of bitters.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am an officer; on the 30th of August, I was standing with another officer, at the end of the Minories, two men came up and looked bard at me; I saw them cross the way, and go up to the prisoner, who was resting a small cask on a post; in consequence of their speaking to him, he walked off with it as fast as he could, into Petticoat-lane; I followed him, and spoke to him, upon which he threw the cask down and run away; I pursued him, and took him; he was very obstinate at first; he said, it was a keg of rum, which some man gave to him to carry, and offered me two guineas to let him go. (The cask was produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been to the other end of the town, a man asked me to carry it to Wingfield-street, that man followed me, and shoved me against the wall, and hurt my hand, which made me drop the cask. GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-73

658. HENRY OTWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , 68 lbs. weight of lead, value 8s. the property of John Musgrove .

JOHN MUSGROVE sworn. - I am a carpenter , at Homerton ; the prisoner was a labourer with me in August last; the lead was taken from the cellar, and I missed it on the 14th.

MRS. KINGSBURY sworn. - My husband is a plumber, in Hometton: On the 13th of August, some lead was brought, about the dusk of the even

ing, by the prisoner, I weighed it, and it was near half and hundred weight; he said, he would leave it till my husband came home.

- KINGSBURY sworn. - My wife said, some lead was left, the prisoner called next evening, and I paid him.(The lead identified).

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-74

659. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a wrapper, value 1s. 6d. a gross of card pasteboard, value 8s. twelve yards of canvass, value 15s. a gross of ferret, value 15s. a quarter of a pound of silk, value 9s. 6d. a piece of print, value 2l. 18s. 4d. two pieces of cotton, value 5l. 16s. 8d. a pound weight of twist, value 1l. 16s. four thousand needles, value 18s. a number of yarn needles, value 5s. 10d. a piece of thread web, value 7s. 6d. another piece of thread web, value 8s. 3d. and 2 lbs weight of silk wire, value 5s. the property of Horner Willis , - Pitman , and Richard Pitman .

Second count. Charging them to be the property of John-Douglas Middleton .

Third Count. Charging them to be the property of Richard Smith and Richard Dyson .

And fourth Count. Charging them to be the property of persons unknown.

RICHARD SMITH sworn. - I am a waggoner , and was driving the waggon, on the 4th of August, up Gerrard-street, about eleven o'clock at night; Richard Dawson, the guard, called me to stop the waggon, I did so, and he had got a truss in his hand; the waggon was unskewered on the off side; I asked him, if he saw any man get out of the waggon, if not, I was sure a man must be in the waggon; so we skewered it up, and drove on to the White-bear, in Piccadilly, where we took the prisoner out, and delivered him to the constable; I asked him, what business he had there; he said, he got in to rest himself. (The truss produced and identified).

RICHARD DYSON sworn. - I am the guard: On the 4th of August, in Grafton-street, I saw a number of men; three or four came up, and walked backward and forward, till we got to Gerrard-street, when they run up to the waggon; I went to see about it, and this truss was coming out of the waggon, somebody had hold of it, and three or four held their hands to take it; I said, what did they want; and they ran away.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-75

660. THOMAS WESKETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , 5 lbs weight of ham, value 3s. the property of Thomas Skollard .

- ATKINSON sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Skollard, a cheesemonger , in Charlotte-street, Rathbone-place : There were two boys at the door, and I ran after them into Rathbone-passage; a man saw them take the ham; I took the prisoner.

THOMAS BLACK sworn. - I live at No. 1, Bennet-street; the prisoner came by with the ham underneath his coat, about twelve o'clock at noon; then some boys came up to him, and said something, which made me suppose he had stolen it; I went to the cheesemonger, and gave notice, and the porter went and took him. (The bam produced, and identified).

THOMAS SKOLLARD sworn. - I am a cheesemonger: The ham was put out for sale; the prisoner said, he did not take it.

Prisoner's defence. The ham was not found on me, they took it from another boy, and then took me.

Atkinson. Another boy had the ham; I took the prisoner, because Mr. Black said he had it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-76

661. GEORGE WESTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a painting and frame, value 10s. 6d. the property of Thomas Atkinson .

MARY ATKINSON sworn. - I am wife of Thomas Atkinson, a broker , in Castle-street, Leicesterfields : On the 16th of August, about one o'clock, I had two pair of paintings at the door, one of Cattle, the other, Shipping; the prisoner brought the cattle piece into the shop, and asked the price of it; I told him, a guinea and a half; on looking at him, I knew him; I desired my boy to bring in the other pictures, as the prisoner had robbed me before; the prisoner said, he thought they were not safe at the door; and as I was ironing, he took up the shipping, and ran off with it; my husband went after him, and found him in about two or three hours.

THOMAS ATKINSON sworn. - My wife informed me of the transaction, and I went to Westminster, and enquired after him, for three hours; at last I saw him standing with the painting under his arm, talking with a woman in a shop, (the painting was produced and identified;) he said, he was just going to bring it home; I took him and the picture; I have seen him several times before; he run from me, but was stopped; I said, it would be better for him.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. He was coming towards your house? - A. No; he said, he was going to bring it back. GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-77

662. EDWARD O'DANNEL , otherwise O'DONNELL , was indicted for that he, on the 21st of January, in the 37th year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of St. James, Westminster, by the name of Edward O'Dannel, took to wife Julia-Ann Robertson , and to her was married; and that he afterwards, to wit, on the 15th of April last, by the name of Edward O'Donnel , feloniously did take to wife, Mary Price , the said Julia- Ann Robertson , his former wife being alive .(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

SAMUEL PRIDE sworn. - I am sexton of St. James's, Westminster; I do not know the prisoner, for it is five years since the transaction took place; but I was present at a marriage between a person of the name of O'Dannel and Julia-Ann Robertson.

Register read: Edward O'Dannel and Julia-Ann Robertson were married in this church, by banns, this 31st day of January, 1797.

Signed, Edward O'Dannel and Julia- Ann Robertson .

THOMAS O'DONNEL sworn. - I know the prisoner, and was at St. James's church when he was married to Julia- Ann Robertson ; I wrote my name, I know her, she is here.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Don't you know that she run away from him, and that she was reported to be dead? - A. I don't know any thing about their affairs.

Q. Then you did not continue to be acquainted with him, after she ran away from him? - A. No, nor a good while before.

Q. Are you any relation to the prisoner? - A. I don't know.

HENRY- WILLIAM FACEY sworn. - I am parish clerk of St. Luke, Middlesex, and know the prisoner; I was present when he was married, on the 15th of April last, to Mary Price .

Register read: Edward O'Donnel , of the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury, in the County of Middlesex, bachelor, and Mary Price, of this parish, spinster, were married in this church, by licence, on the 15th of April, 1802.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I shall trouble you with very few observations: When I became acquainted with my first wife, I was but 19 years of age, and was a dupe to a woman of the most depraved character; the represented herself to be a woman of respectability; but I found her mistress to be a kept woman, and she herself a woman of loose manners; I was unnable to support her in her extravagance, being only an articled servant; she stripped me of every thing I had, and went away, declaring, by an oath, she would never return; this is three years and a half ago, and I have never seen her till this time; and I frequently heard she was dead; I did not marry the second wife till after I heard of the death of the former, after a knowledge of her for a year and an half; I had no interested motive in this marriage, quite the contrary, she has not fortune or expectancy; it was a marriage of affection; we lived amicably together, and by my industry, were getting forward in the world.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.(To O'Donnel). Did his first wife live with him? - A. I don't know.

Q.How did they live together? - A. That is unknown to me; perhaps they would quarrel, but their family affairs I have nothing to do with.

Q.Have you not represented her to be a very abandoned and drunken woman? - A. I know nothing of her character; I know nothing that is dishonest of the woman, she might drink for what I know, I have seen her take a glass many times, that is nothing to me.

Court. Q. Is she an abandoned woman? - A. I never saw any thing dishonest or disgraceful, only just taking a glass, which many women are liable to.

Q. How long did they live together? - A. I don't know.

Q. Was she a drunken woman? - A. I never saw her, to say drunk, in my life.

Q. Tell us how many glasses of liquor have you seen her drink one after another? - A. Not more than three, one after another.

Q. Have you never said, she lived in a bawdy-house? - A. He told me so, I had nothing but his word for it.

MRS. MARY O'DONNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. When this young man married you, were you possessed of any fortune? - A. I was not.

Q. During the time you lived together, did he behave with affection and kindness? - A. The greatest.

Q. You heard some report which induced you to suspect he had been married? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he, throughout his whole conduct, do his best to forward your interest in the world? - A. Yes.

Q. Is this prosecution at your request? - A. No, it is not.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Your brother instituted this prosecution? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Before he was taken up, had you received any money from him? - A. Yes, one hundred and ten pounds.

MRS. JANE MATHEWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Miss Robertson, to whom he was married? - A. I knew his first wife, she is in Court.

Q. Did you know them for any time after they were married? - A. They lodged at my house twelve months.

Q. Do you know what situation of life she was

in? - A.She said, she was a servant, hut in what capacity she did not say; I was not at home when she left my house; but the returned, and said, she had a right to be in the house where he was; she conducted herself very well, though she might drink a drop; but I never saw her disguised in liquor.

Q. Do you mean to say, you never saw her intoxicated? - A.Never.

Q. Are you acquainted with them now? - A. Very little.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-78

663. WILLIAM SELLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , a hat, value 10s. the property of Richard Clements .

SUSAN CLEMENTS sworn. - I am the sister of Richard Clements , a hatter , in Middle-row, Holborn; I saw the prisoner seeling a hat at the door, and informed my brother I suspected him; he followed him, after missing the hat, which he found on the prisoner.

- BRIDGEN sworn. - I am an officer: On the 21st of July, I took the prisoner into custody.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS sworn. - I live at No. 327, Holborn, and saw Mr. Clements run after the prisoner, and take a hat from him. (The hat identified).

Prisoner's defence. The hat had been hanging on a peg, and was knocked off, I picked it up five yards from the door.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-79

664. ELIZABETH RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , two shirts, value 5s. the property of Sarah Adams .

The witnesses not appearing, were called upon their recognizances, and the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-80

665. RICHARD ENNIVER and WILLIAM DANIELS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , 6 lbs weight of lard, value 4s. the property of Edmund Cottrell the elder, Edmund Cotterell the younger, and Charles- George Cotterell .

The case stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS EVANS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Cotterell: On Thursday, before the prisoners were taken up, I was in the bacon-house, with Daniels, at work; Ennives was in the yard, washing bacon; they were both servants to Mess. Cotterells; Howe, another servant, came down, and I went up to take part of a pint of beer; and when I returned, I saw Howe with a bladder of lard, he was standing against the salt, and moving it; I did not see him move the lard afterwards; I pointed out the spot to my master, on Saturday, but was not present when he searched it; in the afternoon, on Saturday, I observed Enniver go into the bacon-house with Daniels, and come up into the yard; I heard Daniels say to Enniver, I believe Mr. Bell heard me; I was ordered to look about the yard, and went to some shavings, where I found a bladder of lard; I told my master, and he took it out.

Mr. Alley. Q. The business of Daniels calls him there? - A. Yes.

Q. If a man steals any thing, he must carry it through the shop? - A. Yes.

GEORGE BELL sworn. - I am clerk to the prosecutors: On Saturday, the 7th of August, in consequence of information, I and Mr. Charles George Cotteral went down to the bacon-house, and dug into a particular place in the salt, and found a bladder of lard; we put a skewer with three notches into it, and covered it up in the same manner as we found it; I concealed myself, and saw the two prisoners come there, they looked round, and observed it was clear, and would do; then William Daniels took the shovel, dug into the salt where the lard was, dug it out, and gave it to Enniver, who put it under his apron, and walked up the steps into the yard; Daniel went into the lower bacon-house, where he ought to be at work, about 40 feet from where the lard was concealed, I came out, and followed Enniver, thinking he had gone to the street, but he had gone to the yard; I sent for Mr. Cottereil, and the prisoners were taken into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Eaniver has been in your master's service, many years? - A. Yes, sixteen years; it is not possible, unless we had marked it, to miss it, or to know it again; this bladder was not marked till we found it; we had not sent out lard for sometime. Howe, the other person, has absconded. (Produces a bladder of lard).

CHARLES- GEORGE COTTERELL sworn. -Edmund Cotterel, sen. Edmund Cotterell, jun. and myself, are partners: The prisoners were our servants; I gave Enniver twenty-five shillings per week, and Daniells one guinea; we keep the lard in the bacon-house, Bell and I dug in the salt, and found a bladder of lard, I marked it, by putting a part of a skewer in it with three notches; (takes the skewer out of the lard); I left Mr. Bell concealed, and went away; I was sent for, and took a constable with me; Enniver was standing by Mr. Bell, I asked what was done with the bladder of lard, he said, he knew nothing about it; Bell selt about his apron, but it was not there; we searched about and found the lard; we have examined our stock, and find we have lost sixty or seventy.

Mr. Knapp. Q. That mark was to identify it? - A. Yes, or I could not swear to it; other persons deal in a similar article.

The prisoners lest their defence to their Counsel.

Enniver called five witnesses, and Daniel one, who gave them good characters.

Enniver, GUILTY , aged 57.

Daniel, GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , whipped in the jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-81

666. OWEN MOSS was indicted for that he, on the 24th of August , being servant to William Phillips , a baker , did take eighteen shillings for, and on account of his said master, and that the fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same from his said master .

There being a defect in the evedence, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-82

667. JOHN CONNOR was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil, on me 22d of August , upon Elizabeth Garret , spinster, did make an assault, and her the said Elizabeth, against her will, feloniously did ravish, and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-83

668. ANTHONY MARTIN (a black) was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a watch, value 40s. the property of Aaron Stearstray .

AARON STEARSTRAY sworn. - I am a sailor , the prisoner and I sailed together from the West-half; when I came ashore, we went and had beer; then he took me to a room, and we had some gin; I took out a sixpence, and a small parcel to pay for it, and he asked me what I had in my pocket, I said, a handkerchief and some papers; then he wrapped the parcel up, put it in my pocket, and took my watch out at the same time, and run away; I saw him two or three minutes after, and said, what did you run away for, he said, he had pawned the waten.

WILLIAM MATHEWS sworn. - I produce the property pawned by two black men, August the 28th, in the name of Sabera Martin.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicate on him, of a watch, pledged for fifteen shillings, he said, he pledged it this morning, and it was his own. (The watch was identified).

Prisoner's defence. I met the man late in the street, I picked up the duplicate in the street, I never saw the watch. GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-84

669. MARY INNAGAN , ELIZABETH RICHARDSON , and MARY SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , twenty-four yards of printed cotton, value 35s. the property of William Williams .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a linendraper , No. 152, Ratcliff-highway : On the 16th of August, about half-past one o'clock, I went out and saw a piece of print in the possession of Innagan, which had been hanging at the door, twenty-four yards were cut off; I took them all into the shop; the other two were on each side of the least(Innagan), I sent for a constable, they said the print was on the ground, but it was not; I saw Richardson watching me, they were all together.

JAMES SALES sworn. - I saw Innagan with a pair of seissars, and a gown in her hand, and Richardson said she should like such a gown.

JOHN DUNBAR sworn. - I am an officer and took the prisoners, I searched them and found several duplicates. (The print was indentified.)

Innagan's defence. I was going along with this young woman, and a man pushed me down; when I got up, Mr. Williams asked Smith if she wanted a gown, and took us into the shop, then he went out, and brought in the gown, and said, what had we been about; I had never seen the gown before.

Mary Smith called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Mary Innagan, GUILTY , aged 14.

Elizabeth Richardson, GUILTY , aged 17.

Mary Smith, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-85

670. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a cloak, value 21s. the property of Nathan Levy .

NATHAN LEVY sworn. - I live in Saunder'srow, Spital-fields , the prisoner was my servant about five months: On the 24th of August, she got up and took my wife's cloak with her, and an India counterpane; about seven o'clock in the even-ing, she was taken, she said she had no property of mine, at first, but at last, she said, she had sold my counterpane, at the corner of Fleet-market, for half-a-gaines; and the cloak she had pawned on Ludgate-hill for half-a-guinea; I took her to the pawnbroker, and found the cloak there.

RICHARD PERRY sworn. - I live with Mr. Patmore, pawnbroker; this cloak was pawned the 24th

of August, a quarter past seven in the morning, by the prisoner at the bar. (The cloak was identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I lived with them five months, and received only one quarter's wages, they owe me two months wages now.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-86

671. JOHN HANGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , two waistcoats, value 18s. a pair of breeches, value 20s. and a pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of Benjamin Pritchard .

FRANCES HUNT sworn. - I live at No. 47, Pennington-street, Ratchiff-highway , my husband's name is John Himt, a cooper; the prisoner came and asked for a lodging, on the 29th of July; I shewed him one, and asked him where I could get his character; he said, he had been but two days in London, and had slept at a public house; he staid with us till the 2d. of August, when about eleven or twelve, he asked me for a pen and ink, which I gave him; I was up stairs just before, and saw the young man's clothes in the room, who lodged in the same room; Pritchard came in after Hangan was gone, and said, he had lost his things; I am sure the prisoner was the only person who had been in the room; there were two waistcoats, a pair of breeches, one shirt, two handkerchiefs, and two pair of stockings; he went from his lodging, and never returned; he was found at Hackney.

BENJAMIN PRITCHARD sworn. - I am a journeyman-bricklayer , and lodged with Mrs. Hunt, the prisoner lodged with me in the same room; I went out and left my things in the room; I returned between eleven and twelve, or thereabouts, and found the things missing; we searched his lodgings at Ilford, and found an old handkerchief, which is mine, but nothing else. (The handkerchief was identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent, the handkerchief is mine. GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-87

672. ELIZABETH GARRETT and ROBERT HAYNES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , a watch, value 32s. a gold chain, value 10s. a gold seal, value 2s. a handkerchief, value 1s. and a pair of gloves, value 1s. the property of George Steel .(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE STEEL sworn. - On the night of the 24th of July, I lost my watch between the Borough, and Portman-street Barracks, but was so much in liquor that I don't know how.

ELIZABETH PAGE sworn. - I live in Quality-court, Goodge-street, and am an unfortunate woman; the prosecutor came up to me and Elizabeth Garrett , in Cavendish-square, about ten o'clock, when Elizabeth Garret took his watch, pockethandkerchief, and gloves, and run away; I left the gentleman, and went to the watering-house, where I saw her give the watch to Robert Haynes; I went and gave information to the Marlborough-street Office; Robert Haynes met me, and said he had not parted with the watch, but if I would come to the watering-house; in Balsover-street, I should have part; I said, I would, and went and fetched the officers.

Q. How long have you walked the square? - A.Twelve months.

Q. How long has she? - A. Three or four weeks, and we lodge in the same house.

Q. Did you not think it wrong for her to walk where you had been so long? - A. No.

Q. Had you quarrelled at all? - A. No.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - I belong to Great Marlborough-street, and went to the watering-house, where I found Haynes and this watch; I took the woman, she said, she was innocent.(The watch was produced and identified.)

Garrett's defence. I found the watch and handkerchief in the square; I had a quarrel with that girl, and I gave them to Haynes to keep till it was advertised.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before, Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-88

673. HASS SHFOLEY and ANN WOODHOUSE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , two blanket, value 6s. a rug, value 2s. a pair of tongs, value 6d. a poker, value 6d. a curtain, value 6d. and a flat iron, value 6d. the property of John Harlow , in a lodging room .

JOHN HARLOW sworn. - I am a broker , and live at Shoreditch ; I let lodings to me prisoners, Woodhouse first, about twelve months ago, are, pair of stairs room, and then they agreed to say the money between them, at two shillings and fixpence per week, they lived as mother and daughter: On the 31st of July, I went into the room and found all gone, they told me they were pawned; I took them into custody.

JAMES KAY sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Pearson, a pawnbroker, No. 16s. Shoreditch; I know Ann Woodhouse, having used our shop three or four years. (Produces a rug and blanket, pawned the 31st of July, and 14th of June.)

Woodhouse's defence. I used to take the things to pledge, but always got them out again, as I should have done these; we never had a poker or tongs. Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-89

674. RICHARD SALLOWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September ,

a pair of sheets, value 12s. and a blanket, value 3s. the property of Thomas Smeed .

THOMAS SMEED sworn. - I am a publican , in Amberton-street , the prisoner was quartered on me; the sheets were just made and put on his bed; at four o'clock, he asked for the key of his room, he went up stairs, and came down with his knap-sack very full; I suspected him, and went up stairs; I found the things gone, two sheets and a blanket; at night, when he came home, he was taken into custody; I never found the things again.

Mr. Hart. Q. He came home as usual? - A. Yes.

SARAH SMEED sworn. - I put the sheets on the bed, locked the door, and took the key down.

Smeed. I gave the prisoner the key, no other person had it.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the robbery. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-90

675. HANNAH RAVENSCROFT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a shirt, value 1s. a night-gown, value 1s. 6d. and a cap, value 2s. the property of Israel Watts .

Mrs. WATTS sworn. - My husband is a hairdresser , and lives in Church-street, Mile-end , the prisoner was servant in the house where we lodged; I missed the linen off a chest, and saw a part of the cap on her head, I knew it by the lace; she confessed it, and we found a calico gown behind her bed, and a shirt on her; I found some keys on her, which opened my drawers. (The property was produted and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. The shirt and cap lay on my bed, and being short of linen, I took the shirt till such time as I had washed my own; the woman saw the cap on my head, it belonged to her; I gave it her, and they took me up for stealing them, which I had not; as for the keys, I know nothing of them. GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-91

676. JOHN RUFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , one sixpence, two penny-pieces, and forty halfpence , the money of Thomas Priest .

THOMAS PRIEST sworn. - I keep an eating-house , in Grace's-alley, Welclose-square : On the 8th of August, at eleven o'clock at night, I was coming into the shop, and saw a man at my till, on opening the door, he heard me, and run out of the shop; I cannot swear the prisoner was the man, but I run out and called stop thief, he was stopped by the watchman, and taken to the watch-house; I searched him, and found sixpence in silver, two penny-pieces, and forty halfpence, and a pocket-piece; I cannot swear to any but the pocket-piece.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - I am a watchman, and took the prisoner, he dropped two shillings going along.

Prisoner's defence. That gentleman came and searched my pockets, and took the money and said, it was his; I was going home as fast as I could; I never saw him before. NOT GUILTY ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-92

677. THOMAS HARWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , two saw, value 5s, a plane, value 1s. a spoke-shave, value 1s. a hand-screw, value 6d. a plough-plane, value 4s. a bed-sacking, value 3s. and two pair of shoes, value 5s. the property of Stephen Bird .

STEPHEN BIRD sworn. - I am a cabinet-maker , in Russel-street, Covent-garden; I was robbed of the things at different times; the prisoner was employed by me; I had suspicion, and applied at Bow-street; the prisoner came to work and was taken into custody; I asked him what he did with the saw, he said, he had taken it to the top of Holborn to get it sharpened; I asked him what he did with the plough-plane, he said, he had lent that; he said, his tools were pawned; then the officer searched him, and found a number of duplicates; I saw two pair of shoes at one pawnbroker's, and two saws, one plane, a spoke-shave, a hand-screw, a plough, and a bed-seaking, at another, which are all mine.

JOSEPH TOWNSEND sworn. - I am one of the Bow-street patrols; I took the prisoner, and on searching him, I found a number of duplicates.(The things produced by the pawnbroker were pledged by the prisoner, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I took the tools and pawned them, thinking to get them out.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-93

678. FRANCES DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , a hat, value 5s. the property of John Browne .

JOHN BROWNE sworn. - I am a sailor ; I was walking in East-Smithfield , on the 6th of September, when I lost my hat, whether it was taken or fell off, I cannot say; I immediately saw the prisoner with it, and she ran off; I had not seen her before then, she was standing at the corner of Black-horse-yard; I saw her again about an hour after, near the same spot; she had the hat concealed in a cloth, in her hand, and she was taken into custody by the watchman. (The bat was produced by the constable, and identified by the prosecutor.)

- Sworn. - I am a watchman, and saw

the prisoner with the hat laying by her, she did not say any thing.

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutor came past me, and two men, and he began quarreling and fight ing; he gave me his hat, and said, I know you, and can trust you; the watch was called, and I went out of the way; a girl who was with me, said, I had better throw the hat away; I said, no, I would give it the man again, he came up to me, and I offered him his hat, but he would not take it.

Q.(To Browne.) Had you any quarrel? - A. Some men jostled me out of the road; my hat went amongst them, and as soon as I made the alarm, they all went away.

For the Prisoner.

EIZABETH ROACH sworn. - My husband is a sailor; the prosecutor came to my house without his hat late in the evening, and said, mistress, I have given my hat to a girl to keep, of the name of Fan, and asked my son if he would go along; with him to find her, for if he could, he would swear a robbery against her, above all other women; I said, how can you swear a robbery, when you gave it her; they went to the top of the yard, and found the girl, who offered him the hat, but he would not take it, and gave charge of her; J was going on an errand when he detected her.

MARY JOHNSON sworn. - My husband is a sailor; I was going for a pint of beer, when I saw a quarrel, and the prosecutor pull off his hat, and put it on the prisoner's head, saying, he could trust her; then the watchman sprung his rattle, and I went away. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-94

679. JOHN CASTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a sack, value 2s. and three bushel of peas, value 10s. the property of Benjamin West .

BENJAMIN WEST sworn. - On the 24th of July, I bought six sacks of peas in Spital-field. market, and loaded them in a cart; I lost one sack.

Mr. Alley. Q. Were the peas your's? - A. Yes.

THOMAS DODD sworn. - I saw the prisoner take a sack off a cart in Red-lion-street . which Mr. West was loading.

Mr. Alley. Q. You don't know what was in the sack? - A. No.

Q. It might be oats for what you know? - A. Yes.

JOHN BRIGGS sworn. - I am a pea-salesman in Spital-fields; I sold the peas to the prosecutor.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-95

680. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , one neckhandkerchief, value 2s. a purse, value 1d. a guinea, and an half-guinea , the property of James Fitzgerald .

BRIDGET FITZGERALD sworn. - My husband is a labourer ; I was robbed on the 24th of July of the things in the indictment; I hired the prisoner to mind my children and place; I kept the things in my pocket, and told her, to wake me in the morning, and while I was asleep, she took my pockets from under my head she slept in the same room, and got up before me, and when I waked, she was gone; I got up at half past five, and found the pocket under the bed, but the money was gone; I found her at half past seven on Towerhill; I asked her for the money, she gave me the purse, but said she had no money, for the bought a bonnet and shoes, (produces the purse, and identifies it); I never found the other things.

MARY COLLINS sworn. - I went with the prosecutrix, and found the prisoner on Tower-hill; she handed the purse to the prosecutrix, and said, she had no money; she acknowledged to 26s. and 6d. before I took her into a public-house, and told her it would be better to confess.

Prisoner's defence. I had a misfortune, and was obliged to pawn my things; she asked me what I had done with my things; I said I had pawned them; she said I had better bring my duplicates there, and she would get them out for me; she gave me this money to fetch them out, and I was to work it out.

Q.(To Mrs. Fitzgerall). Is there any truth in that? - A. No; I was so poor myself, I was obliged to pawn some of my own things.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before, Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-96

681. WILLIAM BOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , a tin watering-pot, value 1s. and a pair of garden shears, value 1s. the property of William Cockett ; and a stove, value 3s. the property of Thos. Bosher.

WILLIAM COCKETT sworn. - I am a bedsteadmaker , and live in Bethnal-green-road: On Sunday, the 11th of July, I got up about five o'clock, and found the lower part of my house open; I lost a watering-pot and garden shears; I missed the stove on Monday, which belonged to I Thomas Busher ; on the Tuesday, going along Long-alley, Moorfields, I saw the watering-pot and stove for sale; I fetched Busher, and he owned his stove; the prisoner was taken the next Monday.

THOMAS BUSHER sworn. - My stove was in the room, and I missed it on the Monday; I saw it

again on Tuesday, at Mr. Joel's; I had sold the stove, and waited for the person to fetch it away.

JOSEPH JOEL sworn. - I am a broker, and know the prisoner; he sold these things to me on Monday morning, the 12th of July, (produces the stove and pot.); he asked 9s. for them; I made a laugh at him; he said his wife and children were going into the country, and wanted money; I bid him 6s. but gave him 6s. 6d. On the 19th, being the Monday following, the prisoner came again; I run out, and said, what, are you come again; yes, said he, I have got another bargain for you; said he, what is the matter with you; I took him into custody; we searched him, and found a quantity of keys on him. (Produces them).

Mrs. JOEL sworn. - The prisoner came on Monday and, sold the articles; I paid him 6s. 6d.; on Wednesday Mr. Cockett claimed the garden-pot and stove; I went to the office, and on the Monday following the prisoner came again, and was apprehended.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q.Cockett came and bargained for the pot? - A. Yes, and paid part, but did not own it; Bushel came after wards, measured the stove, and went away without owning it.

- sworn. - I was going by, and assisted in taking the prisoner. (The property identified).

Prisoner's defence. I was a folder, and discharged from the army; on any return from Egypt, I carried about fish, and greens from my living, I have a wife and three small children.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-97

682. KITTY KETTH was indicted for feloniously stealing a gown, value 10s. and a pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of Marga Morgan .

The prosecutrix not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-98

683. JOHN STOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a silve watch, value 40s. a chain, value 4d. and a key, value 1s. the property of Charles Clarke .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-99

684. RICHARD KANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , three shirts, value 9s. two frocks, value 4s. a jacket value 3s. and a waistcoat, value 2s. the property of John Callender .

JOHN CALLENDER sworn. - I am a sea-fearing man , and live at Shadwell : I left the things tied up in a bag, about half past eight in the morning in the evening they were stole.

MARIA JOHNSON sworn. - I live in the same house; as I was going up stairs between seven and eight o'clock, I met the prisoner coming down with allbundle; I told my father of it.

JOHN BROWNE sworn. - I never saw the prisoner before that night; I stopped him, I took the bundle from him; the prosecutor owned it; he was not out of the house.( John Ryley produced the property, which was identified).

The prisoner put in a written defence, which stated, that the prosecution was malicious, because he would not submit to imposition, and declaring himself innocent. GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-100

685. JOHN CROWFOOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , two brass cocks, value 6d. three chissels, value 6d. a case of instruments, value 1s. three brass handles, value 6d. five pounds weight of iron, value 1d. two files, value 1d. and a gouge, value 6d. the property of persons unknown.

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-101

686. THOMAS CHANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , two jackets, value 30s. the property of Elizabeth Neale and Miriam Clarkson .

HANNAH BOWLER sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Neale and Miriam Clarkson , who keep a slop-shop , at Wapping-wall : On Saturday, the 31st of July, about eight o'clock, the prisoner came under pretence of buying jackets; he tried them, and kept them on; he sent me out for a pound of tobacco: I came back again, and he was gone; I saw him again on Monday, in Shakespeare's Walk, when I had him taken into custody; I know him, because I took particular notice of him. (Proinces the jackets.)

ELIZABETH NEALE sworn. - I keep a slopshop, with Mariam Clarkson; the prisoner was in the shop about an hour and a half; he put his own jacket down, and said, it was worth all the jackets in our shop, and told the servant to keep off, left she should take any of the property out; then he sent her for a pound of tobacco, and while she was gone, he run away; in his jacket there was a himble and a duplicate.

Prisoner's defence. I was not near the place.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-102

687. ELIZABETH ARMSTRONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August ; a pair of stockings, value 2s. a waistcoat, value 2s. and a waistcoat, value 5s. the property of Thomas Hamlin .

ANN HAMLIN sworn. - I live at No. 5, Field-street, Battle-bridge ; my husband is a carpenter ; the prisoner was recommended as a monthly nurse to a friend of mine; she came to me when I sent for her on Saturday, the 14th of August; she had some tea with me, and then I went to shew her the place she was to go to; she was engaged; she begged to step home, and at that time I lost a pair of stockings off the ironing-board, but did not miss them till the next week, when the prisoner was again in my house about half an hour, and I missed the pair of stockings and waistcoat.

WILLIAM ROBERTS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 2, Turnmill-street, and produce a pair of stockings pawned on the 14th of August by the prisoner, for 1s. 9d. (The stockings produced and identified).

ANN MOROAN sworn. - I heard the prisoner say she had the waistcoat, and sold it to a Jew for half-a-crown.

Prisoner's defence. I took the stockings, and meant to replace them; as to the waistcoat, I know nothing of it. GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-103

688. WILLIAM MATHEWS was indicted feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , a silver watch, value 20s. the property of Richard Sharpe .

MARY SHARPE sworn. - My husband is a labourer , and we live at Kensington Gravel Pits : On the 14th of September the prisoner called on me about eight or nine o'clock in the morning; I went out, and staid about half an hour, and left the watch hanging on a nail, and when I returned it was gone, and the prisoner too.

JOHN HARDY sworn. - I am a journeyman pawnbroker to Moore and Greenwood, in Bird-street, Manchester-square: On the 14th of September this watch was pawned by the prisoner for 15s. (The watch produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I called there, and we had been drinking, which I paid for out of my master's money, so I took the watch to make it up, meaning to return it. GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-104

689. JOHN LINTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , a coat, value 1s. 6d. a handkerchief, value 6d. a pair of pantaloons, value 1s. two pair of stockings, value 2s. and a waistcoat unmade, value 4s. the property of James Browne .

JAMES BROWNE sworn. - I am a tailor , No. 43, King-street, Seven Dials , the prisoner lodged in the same room with me for a fortnight; I left him in the room on Monday, the 2d of August, and when I went home in the afternoon, the door was locked; I opened it, and my things and the prisoner were gone.

GEORGE FRANK sworn. - I lodge in the next room; at night, I caught the prisoner coming down stairs with the things in a portmanteau; he said, pray let me go. (The things produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. On the 2d of August, I went to my lodging to go to-bed, and found the door broke open; I thought the place was robbed, but found all my things safe; I then gathered the prosecutor's things, and my own together, to put them under my landlord's care, and coming down stairs, I was stopped, and they sent for a constable.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Privately whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-105

690. MARY HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a pewter quartpot, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Lund .

SUSANNAH STANE sworn. - I live in Whitehorse-lane, Whitechapel : On the 24th of August, I was sweeping my door, a pot stood at the gate; a man said, does that belong to you; I said, no; he said a woman had taken it; I run after her, and overtook her; I told her she had the pot; she said she had not; I thought she had it, by her putting her hand on her cloaths from where I took the pot; I gave it to a girl to take home to the publican.

ANN SUBERGILL sworn. - I took the pot that Mrs. Stane gave me to the publican; I am sure this is the pot by a notch in the rim.

WILLIAM LUND sworn. - I took the prisoner to the office; the pot was sent home. (Identifies it.) GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one month in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-106

691. JOB COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , an iron vice, value 16s. the property of Jonathan Hazleby .

JONATHAN HAZLEBY sworn. - On the 31st of August, I let the prisoner in, who lodged in my house, No. 12, Cross-street, Newington Butts : On the morning of the 1st of September, I missed all the things.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I advance you three pounds? - A. You made a present of three pounds to the family, and was not to pawn the things.

- STANYEAR sworn. - A person came to me, and said, he was sent by Job Cox to know if I wanted any things of that kind; I said, if they suited me, I would buy them; I went to a pawn

broker's, and bought this vice, (produces it), and another thing, for which I paid one pound ten shillings; I found they were stole, and took Cox up, who said he had paid Mr. Hazleby for them.

JOHN PHILPOT sworn. - I am Hazleby's son-in-law; the tools were bought for me; when Job Cox came home, I found there was not work enough for us all, and I went away; Job Cox said, if I came back, he would go; he went to work; next morning all the things were gone.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the things, and paid for them. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-107

692. HENRY BRUCE and GEORGE FERGUSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a feather bed, value 21s. the property of Matthew M'Nolly .

MATTHEW M'NOLLY sworn. - I keep a coalshop , No. 3, Tanner-street, St. Giles's ; Bruce lived in the front room, the back room was locked up: On the 10th of September, between three and four o'clock, I was told I was robbed; I went up stairs, and found the staple was drawn, and the bed gone; I met Bruce's wife with some feathers; after they were taken up, they offered me fixpence a week each, till they had paid me for the bed.

SARAH TILBURY sworn. - I lodge in the house, and saw the prisoners go into the room, and shut the door; then they went down, and I saw the bed laying at the bottom of Bruce's bed; I said, if you don't carry it back, I shall let Mr. M'Nolly know; I saw all the feathers about, and told M'Nolly.

Ferguson. Q.Did you see me up stairs? - A. Yes, I saw you go into the room.

PHILIP SHEARING sworn. - I heard Bruce offer M'Nolly sixpence a week.

Bruce, GUILTY , aged 57.

Ferguson, GUILTY , aged 42.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-108

693. THOMAS SIMMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing five pair of leather shoes, value 5s. the property of John-William Page .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN- WILLIAM PAGE sworn. - I am a merchant , the prisoner was in my service ten months; in consequence of suspicion, I had a search-warrant against the prisoner; I saw the shoes at the Magistrate's; I cannot swear positively to them, but have no doubt of their being my shoes; there were 15000 pair he had the custody of, for which I had contracted.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer, and searched the prisoner's lodgings in Gibraltar-fields, Bethnalgreen; I read my warrant to him, he seemed much alarmed, and while I was searching one box, he stooped down to another, took the five pair of shoes out, and threw them into a closet; I said they were part of what I wanted; he begged I would not take them on account of his family, and fell down on his knees, and begged forgiveness, and said, they did belong to his master; I found in his pocket this paper. (Paper read.)

"Caution to merchants of the City not to have any thing to do with J. W. Page, as he is a downright swindler."

Ray. He said he had written it for amusement, and was sorry for it.

Prisoner's defence. I, moving Mr. Page's things when he left the warehouse, found the shoes, which I carried to my house to keep for him whenever he thought proper to ask for them.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-109

694. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , a piece of handkerchief, containing twelve handkerchiefs, value 10s. the property of John Whitfield and Joseph Wheelwright .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Henry Monteath and Joseph Monteath .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-110

695. ANN HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a silver watch, value 4l. and a silver seal, value 3s. the property of Jacob Smith , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Dolly .

JACOB SMITH sworn. - On the 12th of July, I met the prisoner about four o'clock in the afternoon, in Tothill-street, Westminster; I went with her to the Westminster Arms public-house, Tothill-street; I staid with her till seven or eight o'clock in the tap-room.

Q. Drinking? - A. Yes; then we went to the Bull's Head in Princes-street, and stopped there till ten o'clock, and then I went home, and slept with her till seven o'clock the next morning, when we went to the Bull's Head, in Princes-street , again, and had some ale; we sat there from seven o'clock till near eleven; I had my watch in my breeches pocket, inside of my fob pocket, because I had broke the glass; I took it out to get some money to pay for some ale; I laid it upon the table in the tap-room, and while I was getting change out of the shilling, the prisoner took the watch up; I asked her for it three times, and she said she would take as much care of it as I could.

Q. How long did you stop after that in the house? - A. A few minutes.

Q.Had you nothing more to drink? - A. No; then she got up, and went out, I did not see her.

Q.Were you sober? - A. I was rather fresh; when I missed her, I went after her, and found her in Tothill-street; I asked her how she came to run away, and asked her for my watch; she denied having it; I took her back to the Bull's Head in Princes-street, and sent for a constable, the constable came, and she was taken to Queen-square; in consequence of information, I found the chain of my watch, with the key and feals, stuffed up a pipe belonging to the wine-vauilts, where I found her standing along with a quantity of a pea haums, that was the next day about eleven o'clock.

JEREMIAH WESTWOOD sworn. - I saw the prisoner about ten o'clock at the Bull's Head in Princes-street, with the prosecutor, I lodged in that house; they were having something to drink; he was asking the woman how she came to run away with his watch; while they were talking together, I saw half-a-guinea in her mouth; she dropped it out of her mouth into her hand, and said, that was the remainder of the money that she got for the watch.

ELIZABETH PITTMAN sworn. - The prisoner asked me to pledge the watch for her, and I said I would not; she said I need not be afraid, for she had it from a young man she had slept with, who told her either to pawn it, or sell it, and a Jew coming by, bought it of her for twelve shillings.

Q. What day was this? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A.Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; I had a great quantity of pea-haums, and this man came up to her, and said, where is my watch, and she immediately stuffed the watch-chain among the pea-haums, and ran away, that was at the winevault door; I said to Mr. Jackson I have nothing to do with it, and I put it up the spout; I told Mr. Jackson, if he saw the man again, to give it him.

JOHN BLY sworn. - I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, which I did: Smith produced this chain at the office. (Produces it.)(The chain and feal were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. He asked me to pawn the watch, and I had some liquor in my head, and I suppose I did as that woman says.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-111

696. JAMES SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , four silver table-spoons, value 40s. three silver teaspoons, value 3s. and a pair of plated sugar-tongs, the property of Robert Robinson , Esq. in the dwelling-house of Maria Mackenzie , spinster.

JAMES COLEMAN sworn. - I am in the service of Captain Robinson.

Q.Where did he lodge in August last? - A. At No. 9, Bennett-street, St. James's .

Q. In whose house? - A. Mrs. Mackenzie's.

Q. What is the name of Mrs. Mackenzie? - A.Maria.

Q. Is she a married woman? - A. No.

Q. Does she live in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 5th of August, where did you see the prisoner? - A. I was standing in the kitchen; between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner come down the area steps, he was dressed like a butcher; I observed him coming down, and not seeing him come forward into the kitchen, I went out, knowing the pantry-door was not locked, and met him coming out of the pantry; I asked him what brought him there; he said he was looking after Lady Walker's housekeeper, and he thought that was her room.

Q. Does Lady Walker lodge in the same house? - A. No, nor ever did; I put my hand upon his breast to stop him; he stepped back, and I pulled the pantry door to, and locked it, it was a halfwire door, and I saw him put his hand into his apron-pocket, and take out some spoons, and put them down upon the table.

Q. Whose plate was this? - A.Captain Robinson had the use of it from Miss Mackenzie; it was her plate.

Q. Where did you keep the plate? - A. In that pantry.

Q. Did you examine him? - A. No, I did not; he laid it on the table.

Q.Are you sure he took the plate out of his pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. Could the plate have been seen from the street? - A. No.

Q. What part of the pantry did you keep it in? - A. On the shelf in the pantry; I kept him there till after five o'clock, locked up.

Q. Who opened the door? - A. My master, or Major Roberts, I don't know which; I went in with them.

Q. Where was the plate lying when you went in? - A. Where he had put it, on the table.

Q. Who took it? - A. I took it up first in my hand, (produces the property); three table-spoons were marked with the name of the lady that kept the house before Miss Mackenzie; the other tablespoon has Miss Mackenzie's mark, and the teaspoons; the tongs have no mark; I am sure they are the same spoons that I had under my care.

Prisoner's defence. I was sent by Mr. Marshall, in Carnaby-market, to Lady Walker's, for orders about some lamb that was to come the next day;

I went into this room, thinking that was the room, and this young man locked me in, and said, I wanted to rob the house.

GUILTY, aged 42.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-112

697. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , a hat, value 1s. a handkerchief, value 9d. and a waistcoat, value 1s. 6d. the property of James Budgell .

JAMES BUDGELL sworn. - I am a tailor , No. 22, Castle-street, Mary-le-bonne : On the 29th of August, about a quarter past four in the morning, I heard a rattling at the area gate as I laid in bed in the kitchen; the prisoner got over the rails, opened the shutter, lifted up the window, put in his hand, and took out a hat, a silk handkerchief, and an under waistcoat; I laid by the side of the window, and I immediately jumped upon the table, got through the window, and went up the area steps; I held the prisoner by the leg as he was getting over the rails, but he was too powerful for me, and got away; he chucked the things down; he was taken by Mackenzie, the constable, in less than five minutes.

Q.Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - A. I think he is the man.

Q.Have you any doubt about it; are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see his face when he took the things out? - A. Yes.

- MACKENZIE sworn. - I live next door to the prosecutor: On the 29th of August, about a quarter after four in the morning, I heard a cry of stop thief; I got up, and saw the prisoner run past the door, I was in my shirt; I ran after him, and turning down Winslow-street, in Oxford-road, I called stop thief, and a coachman was getting down off his box to lay hold of the prisoner, when he stopped, and I took him, he might have gone away if he would; we took him to the watch-house, and found upon him two shillings and sixpence, a hook, such as they use at sea for fishing, and a knife.

Q. Did you ever lose fight of him? - A. No.

Q.(To Budgell.) Where did you find these things? - A. He chucked them down in the area.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear I was the person you saw at the window? - A. Yes, I can.

Prisoner's defence. I had been from sea but three weeks; I heard the alarm of stop thief, several people were running, and I run with them.

Q.(To Mackenzie.) Was there any body else running when he passed your door? - A. No, not at that time.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-113

698. ELIZABETH ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of Jacob Hart .

JACOB HART sworn. - I keep a clothes shop at St. Catherine's, and deal in watches ; I was at a public-house, and had two watches in my waistcoat pocket, at the Hamburgh Arms; the prisoner took out one of them; I immediately caught hold of her arm, and said, you have got my watch; she immediately hand it over to a sailor; I made a great noise, and the landlord desired me to go for an officer, and the officers were all gone to Breutford; she gave me very bad language.

Q. How long have you known her? - A. I never saw her before that day; when I came back, she was gone away; she pawned the watch in the Minories for a guinea; the pawnbroker has got it, it cost me a guinea and a half.

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. David Windsor, a pawnbroker in the Minories; I took in this watch of a sailor, who told me his name was William Bennett , on the 19th of July. (The watch was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I had only been two days from Boston, in America; I am a stranger here; I never saw that man before he took me up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-114

699. CATHERINE GURBY was indicted for feloniously stealing; on the 4th of August , a pair of linen sheets, value 9s. the property of William Egerton , Esq.

WILLIAM HUMPHRIES sworn. - I am houseporter to William Egerton, Esq. in St. James's-square : On Wednesday, the 4th of August, about a quarter before twelve, I found the prisoner in the housekeeper's room, she had come down by the way of the area; I suspected she had something, I examined her, and found a pair of sheets in her apron under a long cloak.

Q. Had she the deplorable appearance that she has now? - A. No, not near so bad, (produces the property); I know these to be Mr. Egerton's, they have the name and number, and the date of the year; she went down upon her knees, and said they were her property; I said they were my master's. GUILTY , aged 78.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-115

700. WILLIAM M'LEVEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , two shirts, value 5s. two pair of stockings, value 2s. a foraging cap, value 2s. a blacking-ball, value 4d. and a brush, value 4d. the property of Thomas Adey .

THOMAS ADEY sworn. - I am a soldier in the

2d regiment: On the 14th of this month, I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment from the Swan, in Vere-street , I was quartered there at that time; I had got a furlough to go into the country to see my friends; on the 14th of this month, I packed up my things in my knapsack to go off; about twelve o'clock at night, I came down stairs, and had a pot of beer with the prisoner in the tap-room; I then went into the parlour to speak to the landlord, and while I was gone, the prisoner went up stairs, and took every thing out of my knapsack; I saw him come down stairs again, and had another pot of beer with him, but I had no suspicion of him till he was stopped in the street by the watchman.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No; he had lodged in the house the night before.

HANNAH MUSBANK sworn. - I was standing at my window, up two pair of stairs, in Vere-street, a little lower down than the public-house, about twenty minutes before one in the morning, I was sitting up for my husband; I saw a man standing at the corner, close to a pork-shop bench, I saw him pull something white from his left side; I pushed up my window gently; I saw him put three or four different parcels, a shirt at a time, and different things underneath the bench; he left them there, and went on, and tried the cellarwindow exactly opposite where I live; he went two doors further, and returned; he walked past the property, and spoke to the watchman; he walked a few doors up towards his lodgings, and then turned back again; I called to the watchman, and told him there was something placed under that bench; I told him that man at the corner had placed them there; he was never out of my sight from the time he put the things down till the watchman laid hold of him, and took him to the watch-house; I had no light myself.

Q. Who was that man? - A. I cannot swear to his face, but I am sure it was the same the watchman laid hold of.

JOHN LAVIERE sworn. - I am a watchman; about twenty minutes before one o'clock, I was coming down Vere-street, and in consequence of information from the last witness, I laid hold of the prisoner, and put my hand under the bench, and found the things, I held them in my hand, he immediately said, that is my property; I immediately took the things and the prisoner to the watch-house.(The property was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I lodged in the same room; I took these things not knowing they were not my own.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months in the House of Correction . and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-116

701. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , a hat, value 3s. the property of Robert Bates .

The prosecutor was called, but did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-117

702. SUSANNAH BRADFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a dimity petticoat, value 2s. and a cotton petticoat, value 2s. the property of Thomas Hayes .

There being no evidence of the loss of the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-118

703. THOMAS CULVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a mare, value 5l. the property of John Stiles , the elder.

There being no ground to charge the prisoner with felony, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-119

704. JOHN OLIVER was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon Francis Hilton , on the 2d of September , putting him in fear and taking from his person, a hat, value 4s. a gold watch, value 5l. a handkerchief, value 1s. a half-guinea, and a seven-shilling-piece , the property of the said Francis.

FRANCIS HILTON sworn. - Q.Were you robbed any time this month? - A Yes, on the 2d of September, about a quarter before ten o'clock, as I was returning home by the West-side of Finsbury-square ; I heard a noise at a distance, and could perceive a number of people coming towards me on foot, a number of them got before me, and without speaking, began knocking me about the head and face with their sticks; there were about half a dozen of them; I felt a pull at my watch, but they could not get it out at that pull; by laying hold of the rails, I forced my way up the steps before one of the houses, they followed me up, and one man laid hold of the ribbon of my watch, attempting to force it out, but the ribbon broke.

Q. Do you know who that man was? - A. No; I was apprehensive they would recommence their attack upon me, and I said, don't use me ill, and I will give you what money I have; I put my hand in my pocket, and took out what money I had and gave them; while I was doing this, the man had got his finger and thumb into my sob, and slipped the watch out; some signal was then given, and away they all ran; when they first came up, there was a kind of whisper amongst them, "has he got one?" by which I suppoted they meant a watch, and the man said, yes.

Q. How many of them were there? - A.There

must have been at least twenty before me, as I stood on the step.

Q.What sort of a watch was it? - A. A gold watch.

Q. You were not knocked down? - A. No, I saved myself by holding the rails, they took away my hat and my handkerchief.

Q. Do you know if the prisoner was one of them? - A. No, I cannot speak to his person.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A city officer; on the 6th of this month, the prisoner, in company with two others, was apprehended for bullock-hunting; he was taken before the Lord-Mayor, and searched; I took this hat from him, (producing it;) I examined the inside, and found there was no stamp in it; I then turned up the lining, and observed the name of Hilton; upon that the Lord-Mayor said, Tipper, let me look at that hat; the Lord-Mayor looked at it, and then sent me for Mr. Hilton; Mr. Hilton appeared and claimed the hat.

Q.(To Mr. Hilton.) Did you see that hat before the Lord-Mayor? - A. I did.

Q. Did you know it? - A. I examined it very attentively, I have no doubt it is the hat I lost that night.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you speak to it from its general appearance, or from any mark? - A. From the name being wrote in it, and from the general appearance of the hat, it is a remarkable thin hat.

Court. Q. How was it taken from you? - A. It was snatched off.

Q. Did you mark the hat yourself? - A. No.

WILLIAM BANKS sworn. - Q. Look at that hat? - A. This hat I sold to Mr. Hilton, there is my hand-writing in it; Mr. Hilton's name.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. At what time did you put the name in the hat? - A.Before it was bound.

Q. Supposing a hat should not fit, and it is returned, do you scratch out the name? - A. Yes, before we sell it to any body else.

Q.When did you sell it? - A. In June last.

Q. Who are you employed by? - A. Mr. Darwin, in the Poultry.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the hat of a Jew for four shillings, last Friday was a fortnight.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020918-120

705. HENRY ELMSTEAD was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon John Boreham , on the 27th of July , putting him in fear and taking from his person, a guinea, and three Bank-notes, value 3l. the property of the said John.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN BOREHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are upper servant to Lady Lee, sister to Lord Harcourt? - A. I am.

Q.How long have you lived in the service of Lady Lee? - A. Two years and a half.

Q. Where does she reside? - A. In Harley-street, Cavendish-square .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him on the 27th of July last? - A. I did.

Q. Where did you see him? - A. He knocked at my Lady's door, and the footman went to open the door.

Q. Were you present at the time? - A. I was informed some body wanted me; I went and found the prisoner; he told me I had injured his character, and that if I would give him all I had, I could not make him amends; I told him, I did not know what he could mean by that, I had never injured his character, and desired he would go about his business; I shut the door, and as soon as I had shut the door, he began knocking violently; the door was not opened, and he went down to the area door, and began knocking there; I went with the footman to the area door, and opened it; he began repeating again, that I had injured his character, and called me a f-e and a b-r, upon that I went for a constable.

Q. Did you tell him you should go for a constable? - A. I did; I got a constable, and found the prisoner at a public-house over the way; I took him to the watch-house.

Q. Did you tell the constable, in the presence of the prisoner, the nature of the charge? - A. I do not recollect that I did; we took him to the Justice's, and waited till the Justice fat, at seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. You took him before Mr. Conant? - A. Yes.

Q. He had not at that time got any money from you? - A. No.

Q.Nor had he demanded any? - A. No.

Q. He was afterwards discharged by Mr. Conant, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q.When did you see the prisoner again? - A. About a minute or two after; I had got home the same night, he knocked at the door again, and repeated the same kind of abuse; I took him again before the Justice, told him he had become troublesome again, and he discharged him again.

Q. He had not, at that time, demanded any money? - A. He had not; the prisoner then went home with me, and kept threatening me all the way, that I was a f-e and a b-r, and he would proclaim it in the neighbourhood where I lived; he said, he would tear my Lady's house down but he would get at me.

Q. He kept threatening you in that manner all

the way? - A. Yes; I was very much alarmed and frightened for my reputation, and for fear of losing my situation, in which I was very comfortable, and which I was sure I should, if he made a disturbance; he said, if I would make him a handsome present, he would not trouble me any more; I asked him what he meant; he said, if I would give him four guineas; after some hesitation, I consented to give him four guineas.

Q. Why did you give him the four guineas? - A.Because I was so alarmed and frightened, I thought, in all probability, I should lose my situation if I did not.

Q. How far was this conversation from your Lady's house? - A. About one hundred yards; I then went home and got a five pound note, and a one pound note; I went to the baker's to get change for the five pound note, and I could only get two one pound notes and a guinea in part; I then returned to him with the two one pound notes, the one I had before, and the guinea which I gave him.

Q.That was three shillings short of four guineas? - A. Yes; I then went home, and mentioned it to my Lady's brother, and he advised me to prosecute him; I went to Mr. Conant again, and he issued a warrant to apprehend him; I did not know in what part of the town to look for him, and I did not find him till the 9th; I met him in St. Paul's church-yard; he said to me, you owe me three shillings; I took him by the collar, and he struck me several times with his hat; two young men came up to my assistance, and the prisoner was secured and taken before Mr. Conant.

Q. Have you any doubt that the prisoner is the man who so conducted himself towards you? - A. I have not the least doubt.

Q.Have you ever done any thing yourself to work an injury to this man, in his character, in any way whatever? - A. Never in my life.

Q. I hardly need ask you - did you part with this money willingly, or did you do it from fear? - A. From the great apprehension and fear I had of losing my situation in life.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you know the place from whence the prisoner came? - A. Yes.

Q.Where is that place? - A.Bury St. Edmunds.

Q.Besides knowing the place from whence he came - did you not know him personally? - A. I did know him slightly personally.

Q.When he came, he enquired for you by name? - A. Yes.

Q.And the first complaint he made was, that you had injured his character very much, and that if you were to give him all you had, you could not make him remends? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not say where it was you had so injured this character? - A. No.

Q. How lately have you been at Norwich? - A. Not these seven years.

Q. Did he not mention any place whatever, where he said you had been spreading reports injurious to his character? - A. He said, some person at Norwich had told him so.

Q. You denied it? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner became in a passion, and used the opprobrious expressions you have mentioned? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not, when he came down the area, repeat his charge, that you had injured his character? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any person here who heard what passed, besides youself? - A. No.

Q. The charge made by him was utterly false? - A. Yes.

Q.However, he did not believe your denial? - A. No.

Q. In consequence of those expressions, he and you went to Mr. Conant? - A. Yes.

Q.Did not Mr. Conant tell you to go out and settle it between yourselves? - A. No, he did not.

Q.After he came back from Mr. Conant, did he not again repeat upon you the charge of having injured his character? - A. Yes.

Q. You still denied it? - A. I certainly did.

Q. He told you still he did not believe you? - A. Yes.

Q.He then repeated those opprobrious expressions, and he again went before Mr. Conant? - A. Yes.

Q.After he came from Mr. Conant the second time, did he not repeat his charge upon you, that you had injured his character? - A. I cannot say whether he did at that time or not.

Q. Did he not demand this money of you as a recompence for the injury you had done to his character? - A. No, he did not.

Q. No person but yourself was present at that conversation? - A. No.

Q. Therefore we must take your account of it entirely - one of the first things he said, was, if you were to give him all you had in the world, you could not make him a compensation for the injury you had done him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not make this demand of four guineas, as a compensation for that injury? - A.He did not.

Q.Did he not come to Clerkenwell Sessions last Saturday, in discharge of his bail, not in custody? - A. I saw him there.

Q. He had given bail to answer your charge? - A. I did not enquire into the bail.

Q. Do you mean to say there was any other charge against him? - A. No.

Q.Was he not at Clerkenwell Sessions, perfectly at liberty? - A. I saw him there.

Q. At large? - A. Yes.

Q. When you first of all saw him, you knew him perfectly well? - A. Yes.

Q.You knew his name? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.You knew his connections at Bury? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.When he came to Clerkenwell, he was not aware he was to be called upon to answer a capital charge? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever take away his character in any respect? - A.Never.

AMBROSE CAREY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a footman in Lady Lee's service? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the person of the man at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q.When did you first see him? - A. I opened the door to him.

Q.Did you hear what passed between him and the last witness? - A. I did not hear any thing till he went down to the area door, and I heard him call Mr. Boreham a f-g old b-r.

Q.Did you hear what he said to Mr. Boreham before that? - A. No, I did not, that was the first I heard; Mr. Boreham said, he would go and fetch a constable, I heard nothing else.

Q. Did Mr. Boreham fetch a constable? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you go with him to the Justice's? - A. No.

Q.Did you see him afterwards? - A. Yes, he was standing in the sheet.

Q.Did you see him with Mr. Boreham afterwards? - A. No.

ALBION SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you with Mr. Boreham on the 9th on August? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner? - A. I frequently saw him in St. Paul's Church-yard and Cheapside, and I gave Mr. Boreham information of it; he went with me to take him with a warrant; we found him walking in St. Paul's Church yard; Mr. Boreham was at a distance from me; the prisoner met Mr. Boreham, and said, you owe me three shillings; I believe I do, said Mr. Boreham, and something more, and directly collared him; the prisoner began to fight then as hard as he could, and I got hold of him as quick as I could.

Q.Was John Lee with you? - A. He was gone after a constable; we took him to a public-house, and they turned us out; then we had another scuffle.

Q. Did you acquaint him with the cause of your taking him up? - A. We told him we had a warrant against him; a constable came and took him to the Compter.

JOHN LEE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. Did you go with Mr. Boreham with warrant to apprehend to prisoner? - A. On the 9th of August I went with Mr. Boreham and Mr. Smith; we met him in St. Paul's Church-yard; the prisoner said something to Mr. Boreham, which I did not hear, and Mr. Boreham said, yes, and something more, and immediately collared him; we told him we had a warrant against him, and took him to a public-house; they turned us out, and then he rushed from us, but we caught him again.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty of what I am charged with.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020918-121

706. JAMES NORTON and MILES GRISTER were indicted for making an assault in the King's highway upon Thomas Warner , on the 7th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a leather purse, value 2d. two seven-shilling-pieces, and three shillings , the property of the said Thomas.

THOMAS WARNER sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At East Acton.

Q.Were you robbed at any time? - A. Yes, on the 7th of August, between the house of ten and eleven at night; I was going from Brompton, where I work, to East Acton.

Q.Were you on the road, or where? - A. On the foot-path, upon Shepherd's Bush Common ; the foot-path is alongside the road; I was stopped by the two prisoners at the bar.

Q. Do you mean to say you took notice of them at the time, so as to know them again? - A. Yes; they came from a gate leading into a field, about three yards from the foot-path.

Q.Did you see them before that? - A. I saw them coming towards me; they came angle ways upon me.

Q. Did they both come upon you together? - A. Yes, both together.

Q. Did either of them say any thing? - A. Yes, the man in the red jacket accosted me first.

Q. Do you know his name? - A. I believe his name is Norton; they both collared me immediately, and each of them held a stick over my head; the man in the red jacket said, d-n your eyes, have you got any silver; the other made use of words to the same effect, I do not exactly recollect the words; I told them I had a little, and hoped they would not take it away from me; they then risled my jacket pockets.

Q. What is your business? - A. A carpenter .

Q. Did both of them rifle your jacket pockets? - A. Yes.

Q.Did they take any thing out of your jacket pockets? - A. No, I had a cloth that I had carried some victuals in from home, and a night-cap; I told them what they were, and they did not take

them; I told them I would give them what money I had, and gave it to them; it was contained in a leather purse; there were two seven-shillingpieces, and three shillings in silver; I then asked for my purse; they said, d-n your eyes, no delay, be off.

Q. Did one of them say that, or both? - A.They both made use of the expression at one time, holding up their sticks; I followed them a few yards, and they ran away towards town.

Q. Did you give any alarm? - A. Not till I came to the White Horse, at Shepherd's Bush; I then pursued my way home.

Q. Who did you give your information to? - A. The Bow-street patrol, who were at the house.

Q. Did you see them after they were taken? - A. Yes, I saw them about ten minutes after they were taken; I walked with one of the patrole, the other patrole got into a gentleman's single-horse chaise, and rode with him.

Q. How long after the robbery were they taken? - A. About three quarters of an hour.

Q.What sort of night was it? - A. It was not light, it was light enough for me to distinguish their features and their dress.

Q. Was it star-light or moon-light? - A. It was star-light.

Q.Have you any doubt about their being the men? - A. No, I have not the least doubt about their being the persons.

Q. Were you present when they were searched? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. This was between ten and eleven o'clock at night? - A. Yes.

Q. There was no moon at that time? - A. I cannot say, I believe there was.

Q.Had you ever seen either of the men before? - A.Never to my knowledge.

Q.Whoever they were, they did not use you ill? - A. No.

Q. This was not long about? - A. A very sew minutes.

Q. Were you much alarmed? - A. I was rather alarmed at the time, certainly.

WILLIAM WOODBURY sworn. - Q. Are you one of the patrole? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at the White Horse, at Shepherd's Bush, on the 7th of August? - A. Yes, in the evening; I went after the prisoners in consequence of information we received from the last witness.

Q. You were on duty at the time? - A. We were.

Q. Did you go in the chaise with a gentleman, or did you walk on foot with the prosecutor? - A. We went on foot about three quarters of a mile towards London; we met a gentleman in a onehorse chaise; we asked him if he had met with two soldiers on the road with sticks; he said he had, and offered to turn his horse round and go in pursuit after them; I told him, if it was agreeable, I would go in the chaise with him, and he agreed to it; we came up with the prisoners at Bayswater-hill.

Q. What had they in their hands at the time you came up with them? - A.They had two sticks,(produces them); I laid hold of one of them, and the gentleman in the chaise laid hold of the other.

Q. Did any thing in particular pass? - A. No; we took them to the public-house at Bayswater, and searched them; I found upon Grister a purse, containing three shillings, and a lady's locket, in his waistcoat pocket, I also found a handkerchief and a knife, (produces them); upon the other prisoner I found a pocket-book, with a ring, and some duplicates.

Q. Did not you find any gold? - A. No, only three shillings in the purse; the prosecutor afterwards came into the house, and said, those were the two men that had robbed him, and the shortest was the man who had taken his purse from him; he had described the men and the sticks before we went after them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. You found the purse upon Grister? - A. Yes.

Q. You found no gold upon either of them? - A. No.

JOHN ANDIA sworn. - Q. You were in the chaise? - A. Yes, I took one of the patrole into my chaise, and went after the prisoners.

Q.Had you met the men before that? - A. Yes, I had met them as I was going from town; I took particular notice of them, they were walking very fast.

Q. Did you meet with them between Bayswater and Shepherd's Bush? - A. Yes, just at the end of the Gravel-pits, at the foot of Notting-hill.

Q. Where they coming from towards Shepherd's Bush? - A. Yes.

Q. You afterwards met the prosecutor and the patrol? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present at the search? - A. No; I had been obliged to leave the chaise standing in the middle of the road, and being uneasy about that, I did not see the search.

PETER ROBINSON sworn. - Q. What do you know of this? - A. I went in pursuit with the prosecutor.

Q. Are you one of the patrol? - A. I am.

Q. You did not come up till after they were taken? - A. No.

CHRISTOPHER CRIDLAND sworn. - Q. What do you know of this? - A. I was one of the patrol.

Q. You don't know any more than the other witnesses have stated? - A. NO.

Warner. This is my purse; I had seen the two

seven-shilling-pieces in it at Bompion after I had left work.

Q.Is there any mark about the purse? - A. Yes, there is an impression of a farthing stamped upon the purse on the woman's side.

Q.Have you any doubt of its being your purse? - A. No.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Norton, GUILTY , Death , aged 31.

Grister, GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-122

707. WALTER BOND was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway upon John Wight Wicks , on the 9th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person two gold seals, value 30s. a metal watch chain, value 1s. and a metal key, value 6d. the property of the said John.

JOHN-WIGHT WICKS sworn. - Q.Were you robbed at any time, and where? - A. Yes, on the 9th of September, between the hours of eight and nine in the evening; I was returning home from Somerset-street, Portman-square; I had a lady with me who had dined at the lame house.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Aikin's-row, Bayswater.

Q. What happened? - A. In passing from the turnpike which lies by a place called Bayswater-gardens , in pursuing the direct path, which is nearly straight, I passed two gentleman about midway in the road between path and path; when I came to road that leads to Craven-hill , just at the very angle of the turning, two men rushed upon me; one of them said, stop, sir.

Q.What sort of persons were they? - A. One was taller than the other by half a head, or thereabouts.

Q.Was it the taller or the shorter one that did you stop? - A. I think it was the taller one that cried stop, but that I can scarcely tell; the taller one, who immediately saced me, caught hold of my watch-chain and seal; of course momentary resistance took place, by putting my hand against both of them, leaving my companion by herself; during that momentary resistance, the taller one made off, and ran away; still resisting, or rather endeavouring to palliate any thing that might ensue from the shorter one, I was hustled or forced into the road from off the foot-path.

Q. By whom were you hustled and forced into the road? - A. By the shorster one; when in the road, the man who hustled me did not say any thing, but immediately drew a pistol, which he presented at me, the taller one being in the act of running away, crying, shoot him, d-n him, shoot him, or words to that amount; a coach was just at that moment coming near me; I immediately gave the glarm of thief, very loudly, the person at that time still holding his pistol, making his way, commencing his run, and I followed him down the road.

Q.During this time, was it sufficiently light to make any observation of the person? - A. It was so light, that I could distinguish the general aspect and appearance of the man who held the pistol.

Q. Who was it? - A.That man. (Pointing to the prisoner.)

Q. Are you certain? - A.Positively certain: I gave the alarm, and followed him immediately; he had commenced his running away, he was not out of my sight till two gentlemen, whom I had passed before, had stopped him; I myself not being three yards behind him, so that in fact he was between two sires; as soon as I had him in my own hand, which could not be half a second, or scarcely a second; I said, you are the man, sir, that offered the pistol at me; the man then offered to exculpate himself; I would not make any answer till we got him to a public-house, where he was taken by myself and the other two gentlemen, in the way to the public-house; the lady being at some little distance, came up, and immediately said, that is the man that stopped us.

Q. Where is that public-house? - A. At the end of the row where I reside, at the back part of Knesington-Gardens, it is a continuation of the road; when there I put him in custody of two men, who came in under the names of Bow-street patrols; the man most strennously denied the fact; I asserted positively, before every individual there, that I would describe the pistol, it was the object that struck me; when the prisoner denied having any pistol, I pledged myself, that I would mention it in this particular way; it is an old fashioned brown, round handled pistol, and has all the appearance of a muzzle of a bellows; it struck me at the time, when a school-boy, at Eton, I purchased such an one at an iron shop.

Q. Did you see the prisoner drop the pistol? - A. I did not.

Q. At the time you first described the pistol, it had not been found? - A. It had not.

Q. What did the patrol do with the prisoner? - A. I saw no more of him, till I saw him at Bow-street.

Q. Did you lose any of your property? - A. The prisoner did not get possession of any property, the one who ran away got possession of the watchchain and the seal, breaking it off close to the pendant of the watch.

Q. What sort of a chain was it? - A. A common gilt chain, and two seals, the one was a family gold seal, with the arms, they were both gold seals.

Q.Have you seen the seals since? - A.I have not.

Q.Nor chain? - A.Not any part of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe, at the time you took the prisoner, he denied he was the person who held the pistol? - A. He did.

Q.The lady who was with you, I believe, appeared alarmed, and he desired her not to be alarmed? - A.Certainly not, I believe she took no sort of notice of him.

Q. You did not see him throw the pistol away? - A. No.

Q.Perhaps, you were a little alarmed? - A. No, I was not.

Mrs. ROSE LEONARD sworn. - Q. Were you in company with Mr. Wicks, at the time of this transaction? - A. I was.

Q. You were walking home with him? - A. I was.

Q. Did you meet with any interruption? - A. Yes.

Q. You must state what that interruption was? - A. We met two men, one taller than the other; they both ran against Mr. Wicks; the shorter one drove him into the road, and then the taller one went off.

Q. Had you observed any thing more done before the tall one went off? - A. No; as he was running off, he said, shoot him, d-n him, shoot him.

Q. You did not see any thing taken from Mr. Wicks? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any instrument used by either of them, by which he might shoot him? - A. I did not see the pistol.

Q. Did you distinguish the persons of either of the men? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. I know him very well.

Q. Was he or not one of the men? - A. He was the one that drove Mr. Wicks into the road.

Q. Is there any other circumstance that you are enabled to speak to? - A.Nothing more than I picked up a stick in the road, which was dropped by the prisoner.

Q. Did you see him drop it? - A. No, but the taller one was never in the road.

Q. Are you positively sure the prisoner at the bar is the person you have described as the short one? - A. I am very sure of it.

Q. What became of the stick you picked up? - A. I delivered it to a person who is here.

Mr. Knowlys Q. All this violence was addressed to Mr. Wicks, there was none addressed to you? - A. None.

JOHN LATHRUM sworn. - Q. What do you know of this transaction? - A. I was walking with Mr. Sherwin, who had been to my house in Aikin's-row; I observed, when we got to the road, which leads up to Craven-hill, we met two men, one taller than the other; they had sticks in their hands; they ran against us, face to face, as close as could be; I suspected what their intentions were, and put myself in a posture of defence; they passed by, they dared not attack us, we had both of us, sticks; a short time after, we met a gentleman and lady, not above twenty yards from the place where we expected these men to stop us, in a short time after that, I heard a cry of thieves, thieves, stop thief; I immediately turned back, and Mr. Sherwin with me, as hard as we could; I could plainly see the men running away from the gentleman; I came up as quick as I could, one man jumped upon the bank, I saw him jump, and in a moment I seized the other by the breast; the prisoner at the bar immediately said, there he goes, pointing to the one over the hedge, yes, says I, and you shall go too.

Q. Did you see any thing in his hand? - A. I did not, I shook him two or three times, rather in a manner he did not like; he begged for God's sake I would not hurt him, and he would go any where with me; we took him to a public-house; Mr. Wick's was close by, and as soon as the lady saw me bring him up, she said, that is the man; Mr. Wicks desired me to take him to the Blacklion, and take care of him till he came up, which I did.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man that passed you? - A. I am sure of it; I said, you are the man that wanted to stop us, you had not courage, I believe.

JAMES SHERWIN sworn. - Q. You were in company with the last witness? - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember any person coming up against you? - A. Yes; two men rushed very rudely upon us, but passed by us.

Q. They did not say any thing to you, did they? - A. They did not; about thirty or forty yards further, we met the prosecutor and a lady; they passed us, and I suppose, they had not got more than an hundred yards, before we heard the cry of robbers and thieves; we immediately returned, and perceived two men, meeting us directly, and about eight or ten yards before we came up, one jumped up upon the bank; before he had effected his escape, we came up to the prisoner; I saw it was one of the two that we had just passed; we seized him in the way the other witness has described; Mr. Wicks immediately came up, and said, you are the man that held the pistol to my head; we took him to a public-house, and attended the next day; we saw no pistol, nor any weapon that we were afraid of.

Q. Did you look in the road for a pistol? - A. Yes, but it was then dark, and we could not find it.

Q.Did you go over the adjoining ground to see if it was there? - A. No.

JAMES MITCHELL sworn. - Q. Were you at Bayswater on the evening of the 9th? - A. Yes, between the hours of eight and nine; my wife being in the wash-house, heard a great cry out, and called me.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At a wax-factory, near Craven-hill; I immediately came up, and saw the two last witnesses have the prisoner in hold; I then went with them to the Black-lion, and after he was given into the custody of the patrol, some company borrowed a lantern, and we searched the ditch.

Q. How long might that be after the prisoner was secured? - A. It might be ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; some not into the turnip-field, and others searched the ditch; I proposed to Mr. Wicks, that the watchman at the factory should call us up as soon as it was light, in the morning; we searched for the space of five or ten minutes, and then found the pistol that I have now in my hand, in the ditch, it was loaded and cocked; Mr. Wicks had described it before I went to search.(Produces a pistol.)

Q.(To Mr. Wicks.) Look at that pistol, and say whether it is the same? - A.Identically the same; I immediately secured it, and put it upon the sideboard table till I went to the office.

JAMES GODDARD sworn. - Q. Did you assist the last witness in searching for the pistol? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you with him when it was found? - A. Yes, it was loaded and cocked.

Q. Look at that, is it the same? - A. Yes, this is the pistol.

CHRISTOPHER CRIDLAND sworn. - Q. Did you search the prisoner? - A. Yes; I found a knife, a key, and a small ball.

Q. Have you tried the bullet with the pistol? - A. It is a rifle barrel, and fits very well.

Prisoner's defence. I belonged to the Monarch Indiaman, and have just come home; I met with a man who pretended to be an agent, and shewed him my papers respecting some money due to me, which he said he could recover; he asked me to take a walk with him, which I did, and as I was rather lame, I rested with him several times; I had passed that gentleman some time (the prosecutor,) and I heard my companion sing out, "halloa;" I heard the word halloa, upon which I turned round, and they appeared to me to be struggling together; I thought it was with sticks, when I came up, the other man ran off, and this gentleman cried out, a thief, he ran away, and they took me; says I, you need not use me toughly, and I will go with you; that gentleman came up and challenged me with using a pistol, which I did not know of; we overtook the lady, who appeared to be fainting away; I told her not to be alarmed, as there was no danger; I never intended her any, or offered her any.

GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-123

708. WILLIAM STIRLING and RICHARD TOONE were indicted for making an assault in a certain field, and open place, near the King's highway, upon Ann Botterell , spinster , on the 7th of September , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, four shirts, value 22s. and a pair of stockings, value 1s. the property of William Botterell .

ANN BOTTERELL sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A.Twelve, I live in Cumberland-row, lslington: Last Tuesday fortnight, about half-past six in the morning, I was going from Islington to the City-gardens, with a bundle of shirts, and things to be washed; I was going down Islingtonfield , and the two prisoners came up to me, and helped me over a gate, and then there was a passage, and they told me to go and fetch out a little girl; I would not go, and they pushed me into the house; both of them gave me a slap of the face, and shut the door; they then ran away with my bundle; I then screamed out, and they were pursued and taken.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know, at all, the nature of an oath? - A. To speak the truth.

Q. Do you know what will become of you, if you do not speak the truth? - A. Go to hell.

Q. Were you at all struck, or hurt, till after your bundle was taken from you? - A.The man in the brown coat first laid hold of the bundle; I cried out, and then they both gave me a slap of the face.

Court. Q. Did you receive the slap of the face before you parted with the bundle, or afterwards? - A. He had the bundle, and I had hold of it.

Q. You were withinside the house at the time the bundle was taken from you? - A. Yes.

MARY BOTTERELL sworn. - I can only prove the property.

WILLIAM HEARNE sworn. - I was taking a walk in the fields between six and seven o'clock, and saw the two prisoners, one of them I knew particularly well; I saw them follow a little girl down a lane; I presently heard her scream out very loud; I turned round, and saw the prisoner running, and in an instant heard the cry of stop him, stop him; they were pursued and taken; I saw the bundle in the possession of one of them as he ran.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were

merely taking a walk? - A. I was looking for champilions.

Q.How far were you from them when you saw them running? - A.About 100 yards.

- sworn. - I was at work at the Pyed Bull stables in Islington; I saw the two prisoners pass; I heard an alarm of stop thief; I went after them, and overtook them; they came back with me voluntarily, and I took them to the watch-house.

- HAYDON sworn. - I live in the City-gardens: On the 7th of September, I saw the prisoner, Stirling, and another, I cannot swear to the other, about half past six in the morning, I heard a child scream; I then observed Stirling with a bundle in his hand; they passed me about fifty yards; I then heard an alarm given, and immediately called out, stop thief; Stirling then dropped the bundle, I ran after them, but they outran me.

ROBERT-BURKIT WYATT sworn. - I was on horseback with my father; we met the prisoners before the alarm; they then had a bundle with them, I am perfectly sure the two prisoners are the persons; we pursued them till they were taken.

GEORGE MAYNE sworn. - I was in the Citygardens repairing an old fence; I heard the child cry out, I went out, and saw two men running; I cried, stop them, and followed them till they dropped the bundle; I picked it up, and delivered it to the mother.(Nelson Stratton, an officer, produced the property, which was identified by Mrs. Botterell.)

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

The prisoner, Toone, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Stirling, GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

Toone, GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-124

709. HENRY CHANDLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , two wooden pails, value 2s. a wooden bowl, value 6d. and a fishing purse, value 1d. the property of John Carruthers .

JOHN CARRUTHERS sworn. - I am a warehouseman , and live at Shacklewell; I know nothing of the loss myself.

WILLIAM FIELD sworn. - I am a gardener: On Sunday, the 25th of July, about three o'clock in the morning, I heard some person try the door where I was in bed; I heard the door open; I then heard the other door tried, one goes into the garden, and the other into the field; I then got up, and a man who slept with me, and saw the prisoner come out of the pig-yard with two pails, a bowl, and a fishing purle; we then secured him.(- Harris corroborated the evidence of Field.)(The property was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-125

710. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , an iron bar, value 1s. 6d. belonging to Richard Fitzgerald , Esq. Georgiana Isabella Silha , his wife , and Caroline Sarah Hewitt , fixed to a certain gate, in an outlet belonging to a certain building of theirs .

Second Count. For a like offence, not charging it to be fixed.

PHILIP DAVIS sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Reardon, of Corbet-court, Solicitor to the prosecutors; the two ladies mentioned in the indictment are the Administratrixes of the late Baron -; I know the premises from which this property was taken to belong to them.

JOHN RAVEN sworn. - I met the prisoner coming out of the coach-yard of these premises, with a piece of iron, and a piece of wood upon it; he said, it was a piece of an old gate, and I took him into custody.(Thomas Franklin, a constable, produced the iron.)

Mr. Davis. I saw the iron matched to the gate; I really don't think the man is a thief; I think he saw it lying there, and supposed if he did not take it, somebody else would.

Prisoner's defence. I never was guilty of any such thing.

The prisoner called one witness who had known him fifteen years, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-126

711. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , a silver watch, value 30s. two silver table spoons, value 12s. and a silver tea-spoon, value 1s. the property of Henry Jardine , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY JARDINE sworn. - I lodge in the house of Mr. Gabriel, a hair-dresser near Fitzroy-square ; he lives on the ground-floor; I was in the country at the time of the robbery.

HARRIET JARDINE sworn. - On Friday, the 2d of July, I went out for about ten minutes; when I returned, I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment.

- CAFFHAM sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Edward Freers, a pawnbroker in Little Pulteney-street, about ten minutes walk from Fitzroy-square: On Friday, the 2d of July, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to our

shop, I have known him from a little boy, with a pair of table spoons, and tea spoons; he said he wanted to make up his rent; Mrs. Jardine claimed them the same morning: On Saturday, the 17th, the prisoner brought two sheets to pledge, and I sent for a constable, and stopped him; I saw Mr. Jardine's watch taken from his pocket.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; when I took him into custody, he was going to put the seal of his watch in; I said, don't do that, because I must have it; he said it was his own; I took it from him, (produces it), I have had it ever since.

Mrs. Jardine. I know these to be my spoons, one is stouter than the other, and they are a little rubbed at the back.

Q.Could you, merely from this circumstance, have been able to swear to them if you had found them any where else? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any mark upon the tea-spoon? - A. No, none; I cannot give any particular description of the watch, but it is familiar to my sight.

Prosecutor. I know these spoons well, I have had them more than a twelvemonth; I know the watch perfectly well, the regulator is marked like a star upon the face of it; it is different from any other regulator; the maker's name is Addis.

Q. Have you any doubt about its being your watch? - A. None; the seal and key are the same.

ANN NICHOLLS called up. - Q. Do you know that you ought to speak the truth, upon your oath? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what will happen to you if you do not? - A. No.

Q. Is it a right or a wrong thing to speak the truth? - A.Right.

Q. Do you know that you will be punished if you do not speak the truth? - A. Yes. (Sworn.)

Q. Do you know Mrs. Jardine? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you sometimes go to her room to help her? A. Yes; I went a little before nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. Do you recollect her stepping out for a short time? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you upon the stairs while she was out? - A. I was at the door of the one pair of stairs; I saw the prisoner coming down stairs; I did not see whether he had any thing with him.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - A. Yes; I told Mrs. Jardine that I had seen a man come down stairs.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-127

712. RICHARD CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a watch, value 3l. two watch chains, value 4d. a seal, value 8d. and a key, value 1d. the property of John Thomas .

JOHN THOMAS sworn. - I am a tailor by trade. On the 14th of September, I had been at Stockwell to visit a lady, and came away about half past ten at night, and it was turned of one o'clock when I got to Blackfriars-bridge , being obliged to stop many times in consequence of an asthma; I was sitting on a bench in the first archway on the Surry side of the Bridge, when the prisoner came up to me, in company with another man, from the middle of the road, and said, who are you; then he put his hand to my watch, and said, what is this, at the same time snatching it out; it was a metal watch, with two chains, a seal, and key; I jumped up, and said, give me my watch; upon which, he swung it round, and I saw no more of it; I took hold of him, and charged the watch with both of them; the other man was standing by the prisoner's right side; he said he had not got the watch, and if I took him to the watch-house, he would make me smart for it; they were both searched, but the watch was not found; I was not drunk, but sober enough to know I was on this side of the Bridge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you subponaed the watchman or officer? - A. No; I had my reasons for not doing it.

Q. You went to visit a young lady at Stockwell? - A. I went to enquire about some ground that was to be let.

Q. Did you fall in company with any other lady before you got to town? - A. No.

Q. Did you get into the company of any ladies? - A. I don't know what you mean by company; I met several, if you please to call them ladies, but I call them no better than brutes; I met twenty or thirty of them.

Q. Had any young woman her hands about you in your way to town? - A. No; I don't remember any.

Q. If such a thing had happened, you must remember it? - A. Yes; I remember two or three stopped me, and said, sir, will you go along with me.

Q. Where was it that the girl put her arms about your neck? - A. No one did, that I know of.

Q. Did not one of these brutes, as you call them, kiss you? - A. If she kissed me, I would not kiss her; I would as soon kiss a cow as one of those.

Q. You read the Scriptures, I know, and must be acquainted that it is a criminal thing to kiss a cow? - A. I would as soon kiss one, as kiss one of those women, for I abhor them.

Q. So do all men who are fond of kissing cows: so some one of those ladies put her arms about your neck? - A. If she did, it was not by my consent.

Q.Had you a sick of the asthma at that time? - A. I don't know when you mean.

Q.Where were you for three hours and an half; you say you left Stockwell at ten, and was on blackfriars-bridge at one? - A.Sometimes I could not walk it in three days.

Q. Do you mean to say, that you are sometimes three days on your journey from Stockwell to London? - A. No; but I cannot go up three pair of stairs sometimes, and am confined for two months together.

Q. Do you mean to say, that none of these women spoke to you on the road? - A. They asked me to stop, and go with them, but I never did.

Q. Did it happen by any accident that your breeches were unbuttoned in the road, and your shirt hanging out? - A. Not that I know of.

Q.Upon your oath, were not your breeches unbuttoned, and your shirt hanging out? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear it was not? - A. No, not at all; I will take my oath of it.

Q. Did you go into any house between Stockwell and London? - A. No.

Q.Where was it you did stop? - A. Where I could, sometimes against a post, or where I could rest myself.

Q. Where was it you met the girls first? - A.Soon after I passed the oblick.

Q.Somewhere near Hughes's? - A. They were scattered up and down all over the road.

Q. Do you mean to say you had not your breeches down, and that a mob followed you in consequence of it? - A. I will take my solemn oath it was not so.

Q. You were very drunk? - A. I was not very drunk, I was sensible; I cannot say I had not been drinking, but was not drunk.

Q.You say you sat down over the middle arch? - A. I say, it was the first arch, about the fifth lamp towards the Surry side; you asked me which side it was, I said, the London; as to my sitting down, I said it was the first arch; the arch I set down on was nearer the Surry side than the London side; it was the first arch, and the fifth lamp, from the Surry side.

Q. Do you know where the Albion Milis were? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it the first arch on that side? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. At what watch-house were the men searched? - A. It was by the Circus.

Mr. Alley. That is certainly in Surry, but I don't wish to avail myself of any objection.

Q. You say it was next to the Albion Mills? - Yes, it was.

Q. You say this young man came from the middle of the road? - A. Yes.

Q. When he left you, which way did he go? - A. He went to the watch-house with me and the watchman, and the other man with us.

Q.Did you catch hold of him in the instant? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. He came from the middle of the Bridge to where you were sitting down? - A. Yes, I think he did; I am certain he came up to me.

Q. You said he came from the middle of the road? - A. Yes, I think so.

Q.Where was his companion? - A.They were both standing together when he took the watch.

Q. Why did you not charge his companion, he was equally guilty you know? - A. I did not know that he was.

Q. Did you ever state this fact before? - A. I don't know, I might.

Q.Will you swear you did? - A. I told the constable I would not give charge of him, because I had nothing to do with him.

Q. You knew, if he was in company, he was equally guilty? - A. I don't know how that may be; I am not acquainted with the Law, for I am more acquainted with the Golpel.

Q.And I suppose you know the Commandment, which says, thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Did you ever take either the prisoner or the other in custody at all? - A.Certainly he is the man, though he is not dressed now as he was then.

Q. Did you ever take him or other man into custody? - A. I delivered them up to the watchman; I did this man, not both of them, though both went.

Q. When you said to the prisoner that he had stole your watch, did he not say that it was an impudent charge, and that you must accompany him, and his friend said he would go with him? - A. No.

Q. Did he not say you must go to the watch-house? - A. No; though I was used ill by the watchman and him, and while they were taking him to the watch-house, my pocket was picked of my handkerchief, but I did not lay that to their charge.

Court. Q. Did the prisoner say you must go with him to the watch-house, or did he make any charge against you? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean to say that neither the prisoner or his friend said, you must go to the watch-house? - A. No, they did not.

Q. How many watchmen did you pass on the road before the prisoner was taken into custody? - A.Not one.

Q. You mean to say, you gave charge to the first you met? - A. Yes; I called watch, and he came up.

Q. What distance was that from the Bridge? - A.Just a little from the end, not far.

Q.Did you not pass a watchman on the Bridge? - A. It was not my first design to prosecute the man; my design was to get my propety, nothing more; I would not prosecute a man if you would give me the Indies; I was ignorant of the nature of it, and was compelled.

Q. I ask you, did you not meet a watchman on the Bridge, before you came to the man who took charge of the prisoner? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q.Had you your senses about you? - A. Yes.

Q.If there was a watchman standing on the Bridge, after the time you lost your watch, must you not have seen him? - A. I don't know, I did not see any.

Q. Don't you know there was a watch-box within a yard or two of the place where you were robbed? - A. Yes, I believe there was, but if there was a box, there was no watchman there.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A.However, if there was, he was asleep; I called, watch, and the first that came I gave charge to.

Q. I will ask you, whether, at the moment you charged this man with picking your pocket, you called out, watch? - A.Certainly I did.

Q. That you mean to swear? - A. I called out, watch, as soon as ever I missed my watch.

Q.Do you mean to swear that, at the moment you were robbed, you called out, watch? - A. Yes.

Q. I wish to know, whether there is not a watch-box within two or three yards of the place? - A. I don't know any thing of the watch-box, there may be for what I know, but I am not certain; however, if there was a watch-box, there was no watchman.

Q. How many watchmen did you pass as you went over the bridge? - A. I cannot say.

Q.Whereabouts in the road was the prisoner when he was taken into custody? - A.Just by the turnpike; I cannot say positively to the spot; the watchman took him out of my hands.

Q. His friend accompanied him? - A. Yes.

Q. And they told you they would take care you should be punished for charging him with a robbery? - A. Yes.

Q.Nothing was found on them? - A. No.

Q.His friend insisted on being searched, did he not? - A. I don't know that he was searched; I did not charge the other with any thing.

Q. Was he not searched? - A. Yes.

Q. And nothing found? - A. No.

Q.Neither your pocket-handkerchief or watch? - A. No.

Q. When you first charged this young man, he told you where he had been, and that he was returning from the play, did he not? - A. No; a man came to me the next day, and told me so.

Q. Did he not lay so? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Do you recollect he said he would punish you for this? - A. He said, if he was locked up, he would make me suffer for it.

Q. You deny having been concerned with any girls on the road? - A. Yes.

Q. You never had your shirt hanging out of your breeches? - A. No.

Q. You give a negative to that? - A. Yes.

Q. And you mean to tell me, and those gentlemen, that you were that length of time coming the distance you have stated? - A. I was.(Here the whole of Blackfriars Bridge was proved to be within the City of London.)

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge, and leave my case to my Counsel.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN KARRENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What business are you? - A. A hatter, and worked with the prisoner, at Mr. Vaughan's, near the Borough.

Q. Were you in company with him when he met with the prosecutor? - A. I was, and had hold of his arm; it was on Monday night, the 14th of September, about one o'clock, about the middle of Blackfriars-bridge; we had been to the play, and were going straight home, when the prosecutor took hold of the prisoner by the shoulder, and said, you are the man that took my watch.

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk or sober at that time? - A. He was drunk.

Q. Had your friend, the prisoner, any opportunity of taking his watch? - A. No, nor did he attempt it; I was surprised at the man making such an assertion, and said, he wanted to quarrel with us; then I desired him to be gone, or I would give him a blow; the prisoner took the prosecutor's hand from his shoulder, and pushed him away, and we passed on.

Q. Did the prosecutor call out for watch, at the moment he seized the defendant? - A. No; he came up again, upon which I laid my hand on his shoulder, and pushed him off into the middle of the street, seeing he was in liquor.

Q. Did you pass any watchman? - A. We walked the usual pace over the Bridge, and passed a watchman.

Q. Was he asleep? - A. I don't think so; I saw him in his box.

Q. Must the prosecutor have seen him? - A. I think so.

Q. Was he visible? - A. The box was open.

Q. Where was it? - A.Just at the foot of the Bridge, when we came to turn down John-street, opposite the Leverian Museum, the watchman was standing by his box, and the prosecutor called, watchman.

Q. Was it there he first spoke to a watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he here to-night? - A. I believe so; we

stopped, and the watchman took the prisoner into custody; the prisoner told the prosecutor to take care what he was about, in charging him with taking his watch, and gave charge of the prosecutor, upon which we all went to the watch-house, by the Obelisk, I went voluntarily with my friend; the constable asked whether there was any charge against me; the watchman said, there was not; then the prisoner was searched, but nothing found of the prosecutor's, and I was searched at my own desire.

Q. You say the prosecutor was drunk? - A. Yes, very drunk, perceivable to any person.

Court. (To Thomas). Q. Is that the man who was with the prisoner? - A. Yes, I believe it is; the prisoner came up to me, and he stood at my right hand.

Karrens. I never saw the man till he took hold of the prisoner by the shoulder.

Court. Q. Did you see a watchman in his box, upon your oath? - A. I did.

Thomas. I did not see the box.

JOHN BURROWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. I am a hatter.

Q. Did you see the prosecutor on the night this robbery is stated to have happened? - A. Yes, in Blackfriars-road, about a quarter after twelve, near the Chapel.

Q. Was he in company with any body? - A. Yes.

Q. Who? - A. A lady, she appeared to be.

Q. Did they appear to you to be familiar together, or at a distance? - A. Very close together.

Q. Did you observe any part of his dress particularly? - A. Yes, the slap of his breeches, and the tail of his shirt.

Q. Did you observe them doing any thing? - A. The woman had her arm round his neck, and the other arm appeared to be at his breeches.

Q. Did he appear to be drunk or sober? - A. He appeared to be very drunk, because he asked me to let him lay hold of my arm.

Court. (To Thomas). Q. Had you or not any conversation with this man? - A. No, I never spoke to him.

Q. Did you ask any man to let you lay hold of his arm, in Blackfriars-road? - A. No, I never did, it is a falsity, I can positively say.

Q. Do you remember seeing him in Blackfriars-road that night? - A. No.

Q. Had you any conversation with any man that night? - A. No; no man I spoke to till I was robbed.

JAMES CAITHNESS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. A watchman, at the corner of John-street, Blackfriars-road.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prosecutor and the prisoner on this night? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk or sober? - A.Drunk.

Q.Had you seen him in the course of the evening, before you saw him in company with the prisoner? - A. Yes, in company with a woman.

Q. What description? - A. A woman of the town I took her to be, by her appearance; I have often seen her on the road.

Q.Which way were they going at that time? - A.Towards the Bridge.

Q. At what time? - A.Some time past twelve.

Q. And what time did he return with these young men? - A. At a quarter past one, exactly, I took the prisoner in charge.

Q. Your box is near the Bridge? - A. Not above one hundred yards.

Q. Was he attacked by a violent cough? - A. No, he called me very powerfully, and gave me charge of the prisoner, and the prisoner gave charge of him, saying that he was innocent, and should make him prove the robbery.

Court. (To Thomas.) Q. Upon your oath, were you in company with any woman near Blackfriars-bridge? - A. I was not, I will take my folemn oath.

Q. When you were near the Chapel, did any woman lay hold of you? - A. No.

Q. Were you in company with any woman there? - A. No, I was not.

Q. Did any woman put her hand round your neck, or treat you with indecency? - A. No.

Q. I don't ask you whether by your consent? - A.Neither without or with.

Q. You were not in company with any woman at all? - A. I was not.

Q. Or any woman with you, against your consent? - A. No further than they said, will you go with me.

Q. Did they put their hands round your neck, or unbutton your breeches at all? - A. No, nothing of that kind at all; I have a witness here who will say I was perfectly sensible.

JOSEPH BOOTH sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a constable.

Q. Did you see these parties? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk or sober? - A. I think very drunk, for his breath was so strong, I could not stand before him.

Thomas. I wish to call George Wright , to shew that Caithness has said otherwise, and contradicted himself.

GEORGE WRIGHT sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A turner by trade; we were in a public-house, in Union-street, and I remember hearing the constable saying -

Q. Which constable? - A. I don't know his name, it was him that was up last; I asked him whether Mr. Thomas was in liquor, and he said he was not sober.

Thomas. He said I was sensible, and knew what I was about.

Q.Did he say any thing more? - A. As near as I can recollect, but I will not be positive, he said, he was sensible.

Mr. Alley. Q. Don't you officiate as the prosecutor's clerk, at his meeting? - A. No; he only asked me to attend, and state what I heard.

Jury. My Lord, we are perfectly satisfied that the prisoner is NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-128

713. SIMON LINN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a pocket-book, value 6d. and a gilt medal, value 7s. the property of James Munyard , privily from his person .

JAMES MUNYARD sworn. - On the 21st of June, between the hours of one and three, I was standing in Cranbourn-alley , to hear a man sing, when the prisoner came up behing me, and took my book out of my pocket; I felt his hand, and caught him; he had the book in his hat; he hummed and hawed a good deal, but said nothing,(produces the book and medal;) the medal cost me seven shillings gilding, I had it in consequence of being out of the 1st of August, in the action of the Nile.

Cross-examined by M. Knapp. Q. You felt his hand in your pocket? - A. Yes, but did not see it.

Q. Did you catch him directly? - A. No; he run round the small mob; it might be a quarter of a minute.

Q. Did you see his hat taken off? - A. Yes, and the book taken out.

Prisoner's defence. I am a foreigner, and very innocent of this business; I was going through Cranbourn-alley, where I saw a mob, so that I could hardly pass; I saw the prosecutor in conversation with a man in a blue coat, whom he left, and immediately came up to me, saying, you have got my pocket-book; I produced my own red book, he said, no, that was not his; then my hat was knocked off, and a man said, here is your pocketbook, then he let me go; I was walking on, when he came after me, and said, I will stop you; I told him I would go with him any where, which I did; I am quite innocent.

Mr. Knapp. (To Munyard.) Q. Is it true, he offered to go to Bow-street, or any where, with you? - A. No, he ran away, and I took him again; he said, he was very sorry for it, as it was his first offence; he made resistance for a long time, till he found the people on my side.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020918-129

714. WILLIAM CHECKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , a cloth coat, value 2l. 10s. a waistcoat, value 6s. a pair of breeches, value 6s. two handkerchiefs, value 1s. a pencil case, value 1s. a reading-glass, value 1s. a gown, value 12s. a petticoat, value 24s. a shirt, value 8s. a frock, value 8s. a tippet, value 1s. and a pocket-handkerchief, value 1s. the property of William Lacey , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM LACEY sworn. - I live at No. 34, Charles-street, Goodman's-fields . I am a gunmaker , and work in the Tower: On the 30th of August, I lost the things named in the indictment, from my bed-room, a little before seven in the morning, when I was fetched home; I have not found any of them since.

WILLIAM LACEY , Junior, sworn. - About six o'clock in the morning, my father called me to get up, I laid a few minutes, and heard somebody lift up the latch, and go up stairs; in five or six minutes after, I heard the person come down again, upon which I jumped out of bed, for I laid below next the street, and caught the prisoner with a bundle under his arm; I asked him what business he had there; he said, he went up to Mr. Williams, but he was not at home; we had no lodgers at all; I tried to pull him back, and get the bundle from him, but he overpowered me, and made his escape; I don't know what was in the bundle.

JOHN BASSETT sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody, but found nothing on him; he said, he was at Rotherhithe, when the robbery was committed.

Prisoner's defence. I had been to Deptford, and was there when he says the robbery was committed; I know nothing of it, I happened to go into a public-house for a pint of beer, and they came and took me. GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020918-130

715. RICHARD DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , three blankets, value 20s. a counterpane, value 21s. a patchwork counterpane, value 4s. and three sheets, value 1l. 16s. the property of Richard Dixon , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD DIXON sworn. - I am a publican , at Charing-cross : About twelve o'clock, on Tuesday night, the 21st of July, the prisoner came into my house; I shewed him into a bed-room, and locked him in, it was a two pair of stairs room; I got up about twenty minutes after four, and while I was putting on my things, I saw something fall from the room above me into the yard; I went down and found the back door open; I could not see any body in Spring-gardens, and as I went back, I observed a sheet hanging out of the two pair of stairs window, tied to the end of a blanket; I called the watchman, and my servants and me searched the house; the prisoner was gone; the

window was open, and the sheet tied to the blanket, and another blanket to that, and a sheet; I lost three sheets, two blankets, a white counterpane, and a patch-work counterpane; the sheets and counterpanes were new, and worth about four pounds.

Q. What reason have you to suppose it was the prisoner? - A. There was no other person in the room, he had slept there one night before; he must have let himself down by the blankets and sheets.

Q. Where could the property be thrown to? - A.Into a yard.

Q. How could he get out of the yard? - A.Through the passage that leads into Spring-Gardens.

Prisoner's defence. I am in his Majesty's service; I went to that man's house, and was rather groggy; he forced me up stairs, and threw me on a bed, and locked the door on me; I remained there, till about four o'clock, when I got up, and wanted to get out, but could not; I knocked and called, but no answer; I did not know where I was, and as I could not get out, I took the sheet and blankets, knotted them together and got down, but did not take any thing.

Mr. Dixon. There were two sheets and two blankets he had left hanging at the window; he was a little in liquor. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020918-131

716. JOHN EDY , alias JOHN-HUGHES EDY , and JOHN BRANNAM , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a grey gelding, value 25l. the property of William Hiscox .

It appearing that the prosecutor had received a part of the sum he demanded for the horse, and taken a note of hand of Edy for the remainder, the prisoner were Both ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-132

717. MARY-ANN FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , a silver watch, value 30s. and 4s. 6d. in money, the property of Thomas Cook , privily from his person .

THOMAS COOK sworn. - I live at Dock-head: On the 30th of August, I was in Gray's-inn-lane, Holborn , between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, in my way home; I was a little mellow, but knew what I said and did; I passed the prisoner, who said, good night, my dear; I returned her the compliment, and went on; she followed me, caught hold of my arm, and begged me to go home with her, which I refused: then she clapped her hand on my breeches, when I found her very active about that part; I had put my chain and seals over the waistband of my breeches for safety; I had not done it a minute before I put my hand down, and the watch was gone; I then accused her with drawing my watch, as she had not quitted me; she said, no, my dear, you had lost it before you came here; I called the watchman, who came up, and he found the watch on the ground, just behind her heels, under her petticoats, he took it up, and has it now; he asked me, if I had lost any thing else I put my hand in my pocket, and found it partly inside out, and that I had lost my money, which was four shillings and sixpence; she was taken to the watch-house and searched, but only half-a-crown and some halfpence were found on her.

JOHN KIRBY sworn. - I am a watchman: About one o'clock, on the 30th of August, I was called by the prosecutor, who said, he had been drawn of his watch by the prisoner, which she denied; in the space of a minute, the lamp-lighter came by with his torch, and saw the watch laying behind the woman; I took it up, and have it here. (The watch was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I met that man, and he would go with me; I said, he could not; he tore my petticoats out of the plaits, and behaved in such a a manner, as was shameful, in the street; he dropped his watch from his breeches, and then said I had robbed him. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-133

718. FRANCIS ELLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , seven shirts, value 3l. 10s. seven handkerchiefs, value 7s. three pair of stockings, value 6s. a waistcoat, value 5s. a pair of sheets, value 16s. a pillow-case, value 2s. a bed-cover, value 5s. and a towel, value 6d. the property of John Warne , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Bunyan .

It appearing the prisoner was insane at the time of taking the things, on that ground he was

ACQUITTED .

The Court ordered the prisoner to be detained till his Majesty's pleasure should be known .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-134

719. JOANNA M'CARTHY was indicted for the wilful murder of her female bastard child , on the 24th of August .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ROBERT BARNETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What business are you? - A. I am an apothecary and man-midwife, at Limehouse.

Q.State what you know relating to that unfortunate woman? - A. On Tuesday the 24th of August, I saw a female infant, which I examined, to ascertain whether it was born dead or alive, and I gave my opinion on oath, before the Coroner, that it was born alive, and not above ten or twelve hours before, and been in the water about five hours; on Thursday the 26th, by the desire of the overfeers, I went to the house of the prisoner, who

was in the room with her mother and little sister; I said, it was supposed that one of them had been delivered of a child, and asked where the child was; the mother said, it was no such thing, of something of that kind; upon which I asked her to let me examine her daughter, to convince the public whether it was so or not; her mother desired her to go up stairs with me, which she did, but resused to let me examine her; however, after some time, I did, and had every reason to think she had been delivered of a child, but as to saying to a day or so, it is out of my power, but that she had been recently delivered; I asked her where the child was; they made no answer, but the mother said, the prisoner had miscarried, about a week before, of a boy, but afterwards she said she did not know what it was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The child found, was a female child? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear positively that the child you examined was born alive? - A. No, I do not, but to the best of my knowledge it was.

Q. Do you mean to be understood, that you have always said you believed the child was born alive? - A. Yes, I do, it was.

Q. Have you always said so, clear as you are now? - A. I don't know any thing to the contrary.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not before the Magistrate entertain a doubt whether the child was born alive or not? - A. No.

Q. You never entertained any doubt? - A. No.

Court. Q. It is my duty to warn you a little of what you have said; you there said it was im-possible for you to say it was born alive? - A.I was asked whether, by opening the body, I could, or not, then say, it was born alive; I said, if it was opened, and I had the things of the child, and they floated; I said, that even from that, no gentleman of the faculty could swear it was born alive.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you mean to say now, po sitively, that you believe it was born alive? - A.I have every reason to believe it was; the question put to me before the Magistrate was, whether I could not swear positively; I said, no, it was out of the power of any gentleman to swear it; a child coming into the would may fetch a gasp that will expand the lungs equally the same as though it lived twelve hours, with regard to the apprearance of the child, it appeared not to have been born above ten or twelve hours.

Q. From the appearance of the woman, are you enabled to form any opinion whether the had been delivered more than that time, or about that time? - A. No; I can form no opinion of that.

Court. Q. I want to know what it is you do mean; when I read your deposition before the Alderman, I was led to suppose that it amounted to your idea, and to the best of your opinion; I understand you will not now swear it as a positive fact? - A. I cannot swear it as a positive fact, though I believe it.

WILLIAM BAYLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Where do you live? - A. In Nightingale-lane, Limehouse, and am one of the bearers of the parish: I picked up a female insant, vwhich I found in the River Thames after the tide had left it, and when I washed it, there appeared to be a blow on the right side of its head.

JANE STEVENSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a widow, I believe? - A. Yes, and live at No. 16, John-court, Limehouse, next door to the prisoner; between the houses there is only a lath and plaster partition, so that I can hear every word that passes: On the Saturday morning before the child was found, I went into the prisoner's to light my candle, and saw her in the apparent agony of labour, and very sick; I was sure she was pregnant, and expected it every day, and so did all the neighbours.

Q. When did you see her again? - A. In the morning, in very strong labour.

Q. When did you see her next? - A. Not till she got better, on the Monday morning; she was sitting at the door with her brother's child in her arms; she sat all of a heap, so that I could well observe whether she was delivered, but I thought she had been; before I saw the child's body, I asked her to go with me, and see it; she said she would; I asked her again soon after, then she said her shoes were gone to be mended, and she could not go; I asked her mother to go, and she said she could not bear to see it.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are quite sure the was in the pains of labour on the a Saturday? - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw her on Monday, she had been in labour? - A. Yes.

Q. And you have no doubt but she was delivered on Saturday? - A. None at all.

CATHARINE SAVAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Where do you live? - A. I keep the house next door to the prisoner: On the Saturday night before the Tuesday on which the child was found, I went to-bed, and about half past four, I was awaked by a noise, which I thought was the noise of a young child; it was noon over, and presently I thought I heard something like a cackling, I thought it was the pigs, and went to sleep again; I did not see the prisoner till the Tuesday, when she seemed very low, and was washing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This noise, which you first thought was a child, was on Saturday night? - A. Yes; but I don't know when the was brought to-bed.

- DALTON sworn. - I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody; I asked her if she

had been guilty of it, she told me, when her mother came forward, she would tell the whole truth; I went back for her mother, but she had absconded; I told the prisoner, and she said, if I would hear her, she would confess; she said; she had a child that she was brought to bed with as she stood by the bed-side, on Saturday before the Tuesday when the child was found; that she put the child on one side, and after that she went and put it in the ditch at high water, where the tide flows in, but if her mother was found, she could tell better about it; I searched for her, and at last I found her locked up in a room in Catharine-wheel-alley, Whitechapel; the prisoner afterwards said that she threw it over the furthest bridge from her house, and that her mother had nothing to do with it; I asked her whether the child was alive or not; she said she could not tell, for she had a dimness come over her eyes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did she not say it was a male child? - A. She said it was, in the first instance, but afterwards she said she could not tell.

ANN HURST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. You are nurse at the parish work-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing respecting this matter? - A. I heard her tell Mr. Dalton she had been brought to-bed between six and seven o'clock on Saturday night; she did not say whether the child was alive or dead, or male or female.

Court. Q. Did you not hear her say whether the child was alive or dead? - A. No.

Q. It is extraordinary you should hear her say first, that she was delivered of a dead-born child, for you have sworn that once before the Alderman? - A. I did not hear her say so, for I am rather deaf.

Q. Was what you said taken down in writing? - A. I don't know; I was not there when it was taken down.

Q. Was it not read over to you? - A. I did not hear any.

Q. Did you not sign it? - A. I put a cross to something.

Q. You there said you heard her declare she had been delivered by the bed-side of a dead-born child? - A. No; I did not say any thing about it; I never heard her say any thing about dead-born, or live-born.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020918-135

720. JOHN JOBBINS was indicted for making an assault on the King's highway, on Louisa, the wife of David Scott , on the 28th of August , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, a purse, value 1d. three guineas, Half-a-guinea, a seven-shilling piece, and three shillings , the property of the said David.

Mrs. Scott not appearing against the prisoner to prove the robbery, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-136

721. THOMAS BATT was indicted for making an assault on the King's highway, on Richard Hancock , on the 26th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a gold watch, value 21l. and a cornelian seal set in gold, value 2l. the property of the said Richard.

In conscquence of the absence of James Barnes , who was called on his recognizance, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-137

722. JOHN BOWLEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Rebecca Kerrison , widow , about the hour of five in the forenoon of the 17th of July , no person being therein, and feloniously stealing three shifts, value 12s. four shirts, value 10s. three pair of stockings, value 3s. a gown, value 5s. and a linen sheet, value 8s. the property of the said Rebecca.

REBECCA KERRISON sworn. - I live at No. 4, in the New Road, behind Sloane-street , and take in washing : On Saturday, the 17th of July, a young man was to call for his things at five o'clock; I got up about ten minutes before five; while I was dressing myself, he knocked; I went down, and missed all the things; I let the young man in, and took down the shutters, upon which, the young man saw the prisoner in the adjoining garden, pushing back the lock of the gate; he ran out, and caught him coming out with a basket at his back, and a bundle containing the articles.

ELY CRANDELE sworn. - I went for my things, she let me in, and said she was robbed; when she pulled down the shutter, I saw a man in the adjoining garden, belonging to an empty house; I run down stairs, and caught him at the adjoining door, just going out; the bundle was about half a yard from his feet; I asked him what he had been doing; he said, nothing; I said, he had, and took him by the collar; I told the woman to hold him fast, for there was another man; I went and caught him, and just as I took him, the prisoner pulled out his knife, made use of ill expressions, and swore he would rip her open, if she did not let him go; I immediately loosed the other man, and took this into custody, with the things.

JONATHAN HILLIER sworn. - I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody. (The things produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going down the new road, and that young man told me the woman had been robbed; I said I knew nothing of it; then he

took me in, and asked me what I had in my basket; I said, they were welcome to look; then they took another man, but let him go, and I was taken to Bow-street.

GUILTY of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-138

723. ANN LOCKER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jeremiah M'Carthy , no person being therein, about the hour of one in the afternoon, of the 5th of September , and stealing two shirts, value 6s. two handkerchiefs, value 2s. a gown, value 8s. an apron, value 1s. and a pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of the said Jeremiah.

JEREMIAH M'CARTHY sworn. - I live at No. 7, New-street, St. Giles's , in the house of Richard Evans , which is let out in different tenements: On Sunday the 5th, I took a walk after dinner, leaving nobody at home, I locked the padlock of the door, and put the key in my pocket; on my return a little after two, I missed all the things stated in the indictment, which I am sure were there when I went out; I found the door broke open, and the lock on the ground; I cannot say whether it was picked or not, I can only say I locked it, and left it so; I found part of the things at Mrs. Esther Barrent 's, No 34, Monmouth-street, next day.

ESTHER BARRETT sworn. - I keep a cloathscellar, in Monmouth-street; I bought the handkerchief of the prisoner, who was a stranger to me: On the 5th of this month, between five and six o'clock in the evening, she came to my cellar, with two phials in her hand, and asked me if I would buy an old shirt, for that her husband was just come out of the hospital, that his thigh was broke in two places, and she was forely distressed, and had no other means of buying stuff for him; she said, she was also very ill with the complaint that was going about, and that it would be a charity to buy it out of compassion more than any thing; I agreed to give her two shillings for the shirt and handkerchief; the handkerchief, she said, was of no value; I got change, and paid her in the street; next day, the prosecutor's wife came and asked me the price of a new shirt; I told her, I had a dirty one down stairs, if she would look at it, it might answer her purpose as well; she came down stairs, and after looking at them, said, if they both belonged to me, she would bring her husband and buy them; accordingly, by and by her husband came, with another man; he seemed to own the shirt, but did not tell me directly; he seemed all of a slurry; at last, he told me it was his; I said, it he would lend for a constable, I would deliver it up; I described the woman to him, and he knew her to live in the house with him; I gave the shirt to the constable, and went and shewed him the thief.

Q. Are you sure the shirt and handkerchief you gave up, are the same you received from the prisoner? - A. The very same, and I am sure I had them of the prisoner.

SAMUEL SMALLHORN sworn. - I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner in the house where the robbery was committed; she keeps the parlour; I saw the two phials on the mantle-piece, which Mrs. Barrett described; I charged the prisoner with the robbery, but she denied it; as soon as Mrs. Barrett came in, she knew the phials; I received from Mrs. Barrett a shirt and a handkerchief. (Produces them.)

M'Carthy. This is my shirt and my handkerchief; I believe the prisoner's husband wears a wooden leg; I never saw him but once to my recollection.

Prisoner's defence. He offered to make it up for 9s.

Q.(To M'Carthy.) Is that true? - A. No such thing. GUILTY, aged 36.

Of stealing, to the value of 4s. 10d.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-139

724. JOHN JOHNSON and SOPHIA JOHNSON (two blacks) were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , in the dwelling-house of Mary Sullivan, two Bank-notes, value 40l. the property of Joseph Howard .

JOSEPH HOWARD (a black) sworn. - I am a seaman : On Tuesday the 4th of August, as near as I can recollect, I received two twenty pound Bank of England notes, from Francis Peterson , for wages, I put them into my waistcoat pocket, in my chest, at Mrs. Sullivan's, in Blue anchor-yard ; I was paid on the Tuesday, and came off from Woolwich on the Wednesday morning; I left them in the care of the prisoner John Johnson; I saw them there the Monday following, they both knew I had put them there; I do not know whether Johnson had received any wages or not, for I had not seen him since we were in the West-Indies before; on Wednesday night, before I went out, about eight o'clock, I looked at my chest, and the money was all safe; but on Thursday morning I looked at it, and the money was gone; Johnson was not at home, the woman was; I had locked the box, and given the key to Johnson; I asked for the key, she said, she did not know where it was, she believed that Johnson had carried it out with him, but after a time, looking round the room, she put her hand in her pocket, and gave me the key, saying, she did not know she had it, and that she had opened the box twice; all my cloaths were safe, but the two twenty pound notes were gone, and I have never been able to find them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You lived in Johnson's room some time, did not you? - A.Only one night.

Q.They lived as man and wife, did not they? - A. Yes, they appeared so.

Q. You had known the man before? - A. Yes, at St. Thomas's, in the West-Indies.

Q. You had lodged somewhere else before you slept at Johnson's? - A. Yes, at John Silly's, No. 9. Crown-court, Wapping.

Q.Had you not complained that you suspected your money was gone? - A. No.

Q. How long after you missed the notes did you take them up, I see the commitment is the 23d of August? - A.On Thursday morning I missed the notes, and I took them up on the next Tuesday.

Q.Where did you move your chest to on the Thursday? - A. I did not move it till the Tuesday, I was entirely a stranger to the laws of the country; I only accused Johnson, I knew how poor he was when I went there, and he began buying all sorts of things after I was robbed

Q. What place did you go to, when you quitted them? - A. Into Eagle-street.

Q. Is it a white or a black lady who lives with you? - A. A white.

Q.She persuaded you to accuse these black people? - A. No; when they sent me a lawyer's letter, I could not read it.

Q. So when they sent you a letter, threatening to prosecute you for desamation, you went to the Justice and had them apprehended? - A. Yes, if I did not take them up, they would take me.

Q.Have you seen the notes since? - A. No.

JOHN RYLEY sworn. - I am an officer, and produce a quantity of plate. In consequence of a warrant, on the 17th of August I went with Joseph Holbrooke , and apprehended Johnson at his lodgings; I asked him if he had any plate; he very readily told me had, and shewed me a chest or box which contained it, and told me where he bought it, (produces the plate); I searched them, but found nothing else.

HENRY MYERS sworn. - On the 5th of August the prisoner came to my shop, with another man, and bought a watch, for which he paid two guineas and a half; before he paid me, he counted his money, and had a 20l. Bank-note, and sixteen 1l. notes; he paid me two single notes; after that he bought half-a-dozen tea-spoons, a pair of sugartongs, six table-spoons, a large ladle, a tea-caddy, two pocket-books with instruments, and a pair of shoes, for which he paid 13l 7s. 6d. with the small notes; he put the 20l. note into his pocket, and desired a bill of the goods, which I gave him; he was perfectly sober: on the 6th he came with two other blacks, and asked me whether I could tell him what money he had with him, for that he had left the money and plate in a house, where it was lost, and desired another bill, which I gave him; he left his watch to be regulated, and in the evening he and the prosecutor came for it.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you sure this was Thursday, the 5th? - A. Yes, because the officers came to my house about a fortnight after about it, and I shewed my books.

Q. When the prosecutor came with the prisoner, did he say any thing about losing any money? - A. Not a word, they appeared very friendly; I told him, before the Magistrate, that he was at my house with the prisoner, but he denied it.

( Joseph Holbrooke , an officer, confirmed John Ryley in his testimony).

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you see the lady the prosecutor lives with? - A. Yes.

Q. Is she not a common prostitute? - A. Yes.

JOB WATKINS sworn. - On Thursday, the 4th or 5th, the, prisoner and another man came to my house, very much in liquor, the Green Man, in Cable-street; they asked me if I would take care of some property, which was tied up in a handkerchief; a person, named Morrison, who knew them, begged me to do it, and said, he would take a list, if I would take care of the property; I resused; then he took possession of it, carried it up stairs to his own room, and they went away; next morning the two prisoners came for it, and it was delivered to them.

JOHN MORRISON sworn. - (Confirmed the testimony of the last witness). - The prisoner, Johnson, said, his brother had come from a man of war, which was paid off, and had received a great deal of money; that he himself had a great deal coming to him, which he had employed a lawyer to get.

MARTHA PINDER sworn. - I go out washing and cleaning; I saw the woman prisoner buy a pair of gloves, and change a note, but cannot tell what note it was; it was on a Saturday, but I cannot say what day of the month; on Sunday she asked me to give her her blue shoes out of the chest, which I did, and a note dropped out, she told me to put it in again, I did not see what note it was.

The prisoners said they were innocent.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020918-140

725. DANIEL MAYNE was indicted for that he, being in the dwelling-house of Thomas Russell , on the 16th of September , feloniously did steal, a pair of boots, value 15s. a pair of false tops, value 3s. a pair of leather breeches, value 10s. a coat, value 10s. a waistcoat, value 3s. a pair of stockings, value 2s. a neck-handkerchief, value 6d. and a pocket-handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Benjamin Willis , and that he being in the said dwelling-house, and having committed the felony aforesaid, about the hour of twelve in the night of

the same day, did burglariously break the said dwelling-house to get out of the same .

BENJAMIN WILLIS sworn. - Q. Do you know Thomas Russell? - A. Yes, I rent a room in his apartments.

Q. Where does he himself live? - A. He did live in the house at the time of the robbery.

Q. Where was his house? - A. In Great Wild street ; on the 16th of this instant, I lost a pair of boots, a pair of leather-breeches, a coat, a waist coat, and a neck-handkerchief, a silk-handkerchief, and a hat.

Q. When had you seen them? - A. I had left them in the room at eight o'clock in the evening, I missed them the next morning about seven o'clock; the prisoner asked me to let him sleep with me.

Q. What time was that? - A. About four o'clock in the evening of the 16th; he went away an came again at eight o'clock in the evening; he asked me to go with him to have a pipe of tobacco, and some porten, at a public-house; I went with him, and we came home about eleven o'clock, and went to bed; I awoke about six in the morning, and found the prisoner gone.

Q. Did any body else sleep in your room? - A. No; I fastened the door myself, and in the morning I found the door a jar.

Q. Are you sure it was fastened the night before? - A. Yes; I knocked up the people at the landing-place opposite, and while I was dressing myself, the prisoner came up stairs, and said, good God, where is my hat; he had this hat on his head, which is mine, (produces it;) he had not his own hat; I asked him what he had done with my things; he said, don't say any thing, and you shall have them by the time you have done break fast; he asked me to give him some halfpence to buy some geneva with; I told him he had taken all the halfpence out of my breeches, and that I had not got any; he said, my things were left at a night-house, near the top of the Hay-marker; he asked me if I had received a note from him, I said, no; the next morning I went to his lodgings, with an officer, he said, I should have my things, if I would make it up; I said, I would not; we found a half-handkerchief in his room, which is mine.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect lending me the half-handkerchief to the round my head? - A. No; I told him there was some night-caps.

Court. Q. Was he sober? - A. Yes, he appeared to be so.

JOSEPH TOWNSEND sworn. - I am an officer; on Saturday last, I went to the prisoner, in St. Mary-le bonne-lane, he was in bed; on searching the room, I found this handkerchief, (the handkerchief produced and identified by the prosecutor;) I also found this paper, which the prisoner was going to burn. (Paper read as follows:)

Friend Willis, I am sorry I cannot, according to promise, but will make all well, in the course of twenty-four hours, so do not make yourself uneasy. D. Mayne.

Prisoner's defence. On the 15th, I met the prisoner, who I knew; we went and drank together, and he said, he would learn me his trade, if I would call again next day; I did so, and we had seven pots of beer, I was rather in liquor and he asked me to sleep with him, and he lent me the handkerchief; he began to behave in a very unbecoming manner; I told him it was conduct I was not acquainted with, and got up and went home; when I found I had mistaken my hat, I went back, but he did not say any thing about his things then; I have been in the army twenty-one years.

GUILTY of stealing, to the value of 39s. aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-141

726. ELIZABETH PROSSER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , a shirt, value 4. the property of John Bradstreet .

JOHN BRADSTREET sworn. - I know nothing of the loss.

Mrs. BRADSTREET sworn. - I am the wife of John Bradstreet , a gentleman's servant , No. 38, Gray's-inn-lane ; the prisoner lodged in the house with me; I had the two pair of stairs back-room, he prisoner lodged in the back-garret: On the 26th of July, I went out at a quarter past one, and returned at half-past four; I found I had been robbed; I missed out of the drawer, a shirt, a shirt, a gown, a dimity petticoat, and a child's nightgown; the door was wrenched open and the prisoner gone; the shirt was pawned at Mr. Armstrong's that very day, for three shillings.

THOMAS THOMAS sworn. - I am the landlord of the house; on the 6th of July, I saw Mrs. Presser come down stairs and go out of doors, with her apron full of something, I did not see what, it was near three o'clock, it was near four when Mrs. Bradstreet came home; she told me somebody had broke open her room; I told her, I was certain no person was gone out, except Mrs. Prosser; I had not been out of my room; I went up stairs with her, and saw that the staple was forced out; I then went into Mrs. Prosser's room, and found the staple upon her bed; I am certain it was the same staple.

Q.What is the prisoner? - A.Her husband is a horse-keeper.

(Robert Armstrong, a pawn-broker, in Baldwin's-gardens, produced a shirt, which he received in pledge from the prisoner, on the 26th of July, in the afternoon, between three and four o'clock)

Mrs. Bradstreet. This is my husband's shirt, it has the lower-button off, and it is marked in the

collar, by my husband's cleaning his master's leather breeches.

Prisoner's defence. It is one of my husband's shirts. GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-142

727. EDWARD FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , a siver tablespoon, value 15s. the property of Gilbert Cushion .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-143

728. MARY CALLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , four rabbits, value 4s. and four shillings in monies numbered , the property of Joseph Tomlin .

JOSEPH TOMLIN sworn. - I live at No. 1, Horn's-alley, Liquor-pond-street; I go out with a horse and cart, and sell things in the street ; I lost four rabbits, and four shillings; I don't know how they were taken; I heard the rabbits were stopped by an officer at Hotton-garden, and I went and described the rabbits.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody with four rabbits; she was offering them to sell at a chandler's shop at Hatton-wall.(Produces the rabbits).

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I searched the prisoner, and found sixteen penny-worth of halfpence, and a halfpenny in her shift; I took possession of the rabbits, and in the evening Tomlin came, and claimed the rabbits.

Q.(To Tomlin.) Where did you keep these rabbits? - A. In a two pair of stairs room; two were in a box, and two in a hutch.

Q. Could they get out? - A. Not without any body let them out.

Q. How could she get at them? - A. I don't know.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming home between two and three o'clock from work; I met a woman with these rabbits, and gave her two shillings for them. GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-144

729. JOSEPH PERKINS was indicted for feloniously obtaining the sum of four shillings and seven pence, under false pretences .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM DOBNEY sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Day, carmen: I took a puncheon of brandy from Summer's-quay, to Mr. Peters's, at Holborn-hill; he kept a liquor-shop there.

Q. Did you know the prisoner? - A. I met him on that day; I cannot say what day it was; he met me in St. Paul's Church-yard, when I had a load in my cart; he had worked for my master about two years ago.

Q. Was he at all employed by them at this time? - A. No; he followed me to about the middle of Ludgate-hill, and there I missed of him; after I had put the puncheon ready to rack the liquor out, at Mr. Peters's, I saw the prisoner inside the house.

Q. Did you at any time desire him to go, and receive the cartage for you or your master? - A. No.

Q. Did you know of his going at any time? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Look at that bit of paper, and see if that is your writing, or if it was written with your knowledge? - A. I wish I could write as well, it would be of great service to me.

Q. You did not know of its being written? - A. No.

Q. Do you know what the cartage of this would have been? - A. I believe, three shillings and sixpence.

ALICE HORDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was servant to Mr. James Peters, of Holborn-hill, on the 19th of June.

Q. Do you recollect a cask of brandy being brought to your master's house by Mr. Day's cart on that day? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; he was at our house that day.

Q. Is Mr. Peters alive now? - A. He is dead since; he has been dead about a fortnight; the brandy was drawn off at the door in cans; the prisoner chalked down the number of cans that came in; about three days after he came again, and brought the bill to receive the money for the cartage of the brandy.

Q. Is that the bill that he brought to you? - A. Yes, this is the bill; he said he came to receive the money for the cartage of the puncheon of brandy; he said he came from Mr. Day's; Mr. Peters was out; I said I did not know whether I was to pay him or not; he said, it was all the same, as if Mr. Day came himself; in consequence of his saying that, I paid him the amount of the bill.

Q. Did you belive that he came from Mr. Day? - A. Yes; about a week, or a fortnight after, Mr. Day called himself, and we found it was paid to the wrong person. (The bill of parcels read.)

Q. Who signed that receipt? - A. The prisoner.

THOMAS DAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a carman, in partnership with Samuel Day, and Isaac Day, in Castle-lane, Southwark.

Q. Was the prisoner in your service on the 19th of June last? - A. No.

Q. Had he at any time any authority to receive money due to you for cartage? - A.None at all.

Q. Or for this particular puncheon? - A. No.

Q.Should you have demanded four shillings and seven-pence for the cartage of this puncheon? - A. No; three shillings and six-pence.

SAMUEL DAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. On the 19th of June, was this man in your employ? - A. He was not.

Q. Did you give him any authority, or know of his demanding four shillings and seven-pence for the cartage of this brandy? - A. No, nor any thing else.

ISSAC DAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. On the 19th of June, was the prisoner in your employ? - A. He was not.

Q. Did you on that day give him any authority to demand four shillings and seven-pence for this puncheon of brandy? - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner's defence. On Saturday morning, I met a man of the name of Smith belonging to Mr. Day, and he asked me to receive that for him, as he was going to collect another way, and it would save him a great deal of ground, and I went and received it for him.

Q.(To Mr. Day.) Had you a servant of the name of Smith? - A. No; I never had a servant of that name that I can recollect.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-145

730. GEORGE DANBY and WILLIAM WELLINGS were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , a silk handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. the property of Thomas Sedgwick , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

THOMAS SEDCWICK sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I belong to Drury-lane Theatre: On Monday, the 30th of August, about six o'clock in the evening, I lost my handkerchief in King-street, Holborn ; I did not know that I was robbed till Mr. Hall called to me from a window, and informed me I was robbed; I immediately put my hand by my pocket, and found my handkerchief gone; I went in pursuit of the prisoner, Wellings, who was pointed out to me by Mr. Hall; he was stopped within about five houses by Mr. Hill; Danby came up to him, and at that time the handkerchief dropped between them; I cannot say which of them dropped it. (Produces it.)

JAMES HALL sworn. - I was standing at my drawing-room window in King-street, Holborn; about six o'clock, on the 30th of August; I saw Mr. Sedgwick, whom I did not know at that time, coming up the street with a red pocket handkerchief hanging in part out of his pocket; I saw a tall man come up on tip-toe, and snatch the handkerchief out of his pocket.

Q. Do you know that tall man? - A. I cannot swear to either of the men; he furled up the handkerchief, put it behind him, and immediately another man came up, and took it of him, and immediately walked down the street; the man that took it, then turned round, and followed him; I instantly called out to Mr. Sedgwick, and told him, that this man had taken his pocket handkerchief from him; they immediately ran down the street, and I saw no more of it; I did not go out of my house.

JOHN HILL sworn. - I am a copyist at Covent-garden Theatre: On Monday, the 30th of August, between six and seven o'clock, going up King-street from Holborn towards the fields, I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner, Wellings, running towards me, on the opposite side of the way; he called out in a tremulous, plaintive voice, do not, it is nothing; I stopped him, a young man came up, and he gave me a violent blow; while I had hold of him, Danby came down the street, and ran against us both; he had his arm round Wellings; I did not know then what was the matter, till I heard some person say there is another of the thieves; Danby then ran up the street, and in about a minute or two he was brought back again; at that instant somebody said, there is your handkerchief, sir; upon which Mr. Sedgwick stooped, and picked it up close to the prisoners; Danby fell down upon his knees, and begged for mercy, and they were taken to Bow-street.

Danby's defence. I was going up King-street; I heard a cry of stop thief; a great many people were running, and I ran with the crowd, and was taken in the pursuit.

Wellings's defence. I was going up King-street; I heard the alarm of stop thief; I ran when I got within two yards of Holborn; Mr. Sedgwick laid hold of me, I am quite innocent of the crime.

The prisoner, Danby, called his father, who gave him a good character for honesty, but said, he had got into loose company lately.

Danby, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

Wellings, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-146

731. CHARLOTTE ELLISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , a shirt, value 2s. a silk handkerchief, value 2s. a pair of trowsers, value 6d. a frock, value 6d. a pair of stockings, value 2d. a cotton handkerchief, value 2d. and an Uxbridge Bank-note, value 5l. the property of George Woldham .

GEORGE WOLDHAM sworn. - I am a limeburner , I had been at work at Uxbridge; when I got to London, I met the prisoner, and asked her the way to Charing-cross; I am a stranger in London; the witness who saw her take the bundle can

tell the street: On Wednesday, the 20th of August, between five and six o'clock in the evening, she asked me to give her a glass of liquor, and I did; I never saw her before; I had no silver, and I pulled out a bag, containing a 5l. Uxbridge Bank-note, and a 1l. note; I took the 1l. note to pay for the liquor, and the prisoner took the bag out of my hand; I asked her for it back, and she gave it me, and said, it was all right; I took up the change, and went to the door to see if it was good, and then put it in my pocket; before I looked at my bag, to see whether the papers were right, she snatched the bundle from under my arm; not thinking she was gone, I did not take any notice of that; I was looking at my papers, and when I turned round, she was gone, and the bundle too; a woman told me which way she was gone, and I went out, and a woman and another man caught her and brought her back; when I looked over my papers, I missed a 5l. Uxbridge note; the prisoner was taken to Bow-street.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not come out of a house of ill fame in Whitcomb-street, and go to a winevaults to drink with a woman of the town? - A. That was two hours before; I had my notes all safe after that.

ELIZABETH PRICE sworn. - On Wednesday, the 20th of August, between five and six in the evening, I saw the prisoner drag the bundle from the prosecutor, at Mr. Jones's wine-vaults, the bottom of Hedge-lane; I asked him if it was her bundle or his; he told me it was his; and while he was putting up the money, I ran after her, and did not find her till I got into Castle-street, and there I found her, with the bundle open in the street, with two women; I supposed she was selling them to the two women; I took the things from her, and brought her back; a young man helped me to take her back to the prosecutor, and from there she was taken to Bow-street, and delivered to the constable.

JOHN M'GREGOR sworn. - On the 25th of August, between five and six o'clock, I heard an alarm of stop thief; I took the prisoner into custody, with the bundle; I received the bundle from the last witness, tied up.

Q.(To Price). I understood you that you took the bundle from the prisoner, and delivered it to to this man? - Q. Yes, I had the bundle till we got to the public-house, in Bedfordbury, and there I put it upon the table, and delivered it to the constable, at Bow-street.

M'Gregor. To the best of my knowledge, the prisoner at the bar had the bundle in her custody; I took her to a public-house, in Bedfordbury, and there I delivered her to the constable.

DAVID EASTERWOOD sworn. - I am one of the patrols belonging to Bow-street, (produces the bundle); I received it from Elizabeth Price ; I took charge of the prisoner and the bundle; I asked the prisoner if that was her bundle, she said it was not; it was the woman's bundle that she had with her in the street; I asked her where the 5l. note was, and she said she knew nothing at all about it; I searched her, but could not find a farthing about her.(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that she met with the prosecutor and another woman; that they drank together, and that the other woman took the bundle.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Was there any other woman with you at the public-house. - A. No.

Q.(To Mrs. Price. Did you see any other woman with the prosecutor? - A. No, there was no other. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-147

732. MARTIN HENRICK PETERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a silver watch, value 2l. seven dollars, value 1l. 15s. the property of Moses Simons , in his dwelling-house .(The prisoner being a foreigner, a Jury of half foreigners were sworn.)

John Savigny ,

John Drury ,

George Trinback ,

Josoph Natting ,

John Henry Buck ,

Abraham Walker ,

George Dreger ,

George Hurl ,

Geroge Fell ,

John Imhoss .

MOSES SIMONS sworn. - I live in New-street, in the precinct of St. Catherine's ; the prisoner at the bar lodged at my house.

Q. What countryman is he? - A. A Hamburghman; he understands English. On Monday the 9th of August, between two and three o'clock in the day, I asked him to mind my shop for me while I went into the kitchen; I should not be gone long; I had occasion to go into the kitchen; after I came up he sat at the door about a quarter of an hour, and then went away.

Q. Did the prisoner owe you any thing? - A. No; I owed him 7s. 6d. which I sent to him; after he was gone I missed the watch, some French crowns and dollars; I cannot tell how many; I saw my watch the next day at a pawnbroker's; I found the prisoner the next day in a public-house at St. Catherine's, sitting with a girl; I told him a Hamburgh; Captain wanted to take him over to Hamburgh; he said he was very glad of it, and immediately came away; as soon as he got out he ran away, and I did not find him for three or four days after, when I found him in Gravel lane; he begged I would not hurt him; he said he had not had any bread for two days; I took him before the Magistrate.

Prisoner. I told Mr. Simons if he would not

let me have any money, I would go and pawn the watch.

Court. (To Simons.) Q. Did the prisoner ever tell you if you did not pay him 7s. 6d. he would pawn the watch? - A.Never.

JOHN PEGRIM sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Ray, a pawnbroker, Sparrow-corner, Minories; on Monday the 9th of August the prisoner, and another sailor in company with him, came to our shop about five o'clock in the afternoon to sell a watch; I told him I had rather he would pledge it, and then he could have it again; he seemed to wish to dispose of it, and I gave him 2l. for it; I have had it ever since (produces it) he told me he had bought the watch of one Mr. Mosely, in Wapping, and gave him 5l. for it.

Q. Is it worth 5l.? - A. No.

Q. Did he speak English? - A. He spoke so that I could understand him; on the Wednesday, following Simons came and claimed the watch.

Simons. I know this is my watch; I had 1l watches hanging up, the other 10 had chains, this was the only one that I had with a string and key to it, just as it came from the watchmaker's; there is no number upon it, but there is a name.

Q. What is the name? - A. I don't know, I cannot read or write, but all my watches have the same maker's mark upon it.

Q. You don't know the maker's name? - A.After.

Q. Does he put his own name upon his watches - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. There were only four watches that had chains, all the rest had strings; I did not go into that shop to tell the watch, only to pawn it, and the pawnbroker would not take it in pledge, he would buy it.

Q.(To Simons.) What is the value of that watch? - A. I would take 2l. 5s. for it.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction ,

fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-148

733. ELIZABETH GARDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , violin and bow, value 18s. the property of Patrick Lawler .

The prosecutor was called, but not a pearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-149

734. CHRISTIAN CEMMERMAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th July 24 yards of rope, value 5s. the property of William Bough and John Holmes .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

WILLIAM HALLETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was on the New Docks at Wapping on the 28th of August, between seven and eight in the evening; I saw the prisoner cut a rope made for a horse-run; it was cut out at the bottom of the Docks.

Q. How much did he cut off? - A.Twentyfour yards from a larger piece of 70 yards; he coiled it up, and put it on his shoulder; as soon as he had got off the works, I stopped him. - (The rope produced.)

JOHN SUMMERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am foreman to Mess. Bough and Holmes; this rope is my masters' property.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that he could not get a ship to return to his own country, so that hunger impelled him to commit the crime with which he was charged.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-150

735. STEPHEN ABRAHAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of September 24 pictures, value 37s. and a looking-glass, value 6d. the property of John Galli .

The evidence amounting only to a fraud, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by a Jury of half foreigners, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020918-151

736. JOHN PELANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of August three silver tea-spoons, value 7s. the property of Dennis Dullea .

DENNIS DULLEA sworn. - I am a dealer in loves , and live at No. 20, Fox-lane, Shadwell ; the prisoner lodged in the same house; on Friday the 6th of August he slept out; I breakfasted with Mrs. Kely, in whose house I lodged, and was going out; the prisoner was coming in; two other lodgers in the same house went out at the same time; I left Mrs. Kelly and the prisoner at the bar in the house, and no other person; I was not absent more than twenty minutes; when I came back the prisoner was gone out, and three silver tea-spoons belonging to me were gone from the breakfast-table; I went and got an officer of the name of Rogers, and found the prisoner in company with a girl; he was taken before the Magistrate, and committed.

MARY KELLY sworn. - I live at No. 20, Fox-lane; the prisoner was a boarder and lodger, and Mr. Dulia had lodgings in my house; the prisoner had been out all night; I told him I was afraid he was going on very indifferently, but desired him to sit down, and have his breakfast; I asked him to mind thehouse while I went to the while I was there, I saw the prisoner come out of the house, and run away; I went home, and immediately missed three tea-spoons from the table.

Q.Had any body been in the house? - A. Not a creature; I had my eye upon the door.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner with a girl; I took this box from the girl, which contained a duplicate of three spoons; I asked her who she got the spoons from, she told me she had them from the prisoner, and he acknowledged he had given them to her.(A pawnbroker's servant produced the spoons that he had received from Mary Wilson .)

MARY WILSON sworn. - Q.Where did you get these spoons? - A. That young man gave them to me. (The spoons were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but that I was stupid and drunk.

Prosecutor. He was as sober as I am at this moment. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-152

737. ISAAC HOYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July nine frocks, value 5s. two shawls, value 4s. a counterpane, value 3s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2s. the property of William Hutchinson .

MARY HUTCHINSON sworn. - I am the wife of William Hutchinson ; my husband keeps the Carpenters Arms, Shoreditch ; on the 15th of July I was washing; I left my clothes in a tub in the yard, and on the 16th in the morning I found they were all gone, and in about an hour afterwards the wife of the prisoner sent a man to my house to know where I might find the property; I then went to Old Nicol-street; I got a chair, and looked over a wall, and saw a part of the property hanging in the yard; the officer found the rest of the things, I cannot say where.

Q. Whose house was it you found those things in? - A. Bridget Crow 's; when I first went up to the house the prisoner was standing at the door, and when he saw me he walked away.

RICHARD LILLYWHITE sworn. - I am an officer (produces the property) I went with Mrs. Hutchinson on the 16th of July to Old Nicol-street; she got a chair, looked over the wall, and saw a part of the property hanging to dry; the prisoner was coming from the house towards me, and I stopped him; he made his escape over the house backwards; I found the property, some in the yard, and some in the cellar; I asked him how he came by them, he said he did not know any thing of them; I asked him where he lodged, and he said he did not lodge any where, and I did not suppose he did, for I met him at three o'clock that morning; he had nothing with him then; he had on this waistcoat, which was quite wet, over the shoulders, the back part. The wife of Crow was to have appeared as an evidence, but she has not appeared.

MARY BONSOR sworn. - I was going past on the 16th of July, in the morning, at half after seven, the prisoner asked me to go into Mr. Crow's house, he asked me to go into the yard; I went in, and he asked me if there was any thing amongst those things that would suit me; I told him, I could not stop, I would call again at nine o'clock; I did not observe any thing particular, but a child's frock, that I knew belonged to Mrs. Hutchinson, and a counterpane, that he said belonged to Crow.

Q. Are those the things that he shewed you? - A. I took notice of this frock particularly.

Q.Did he shew you any thing else? - A. He shewed me some handkerchiefs, but I cannot tell which they were.

Q. Did he shew you all the goods? - A. No.

Q. There were other goods with them? - A. Yes.

Q. And did not you see them? - A.There was a counterpane and several other things, he told me the thigns were all his, except the counterpane, and that was Crow's; they wer hanging upon a line in the back yard, they looked wet.

Prisoner. That woman is my Lawful wife.

Q. Were you married to the prisoner? - A. Yes, he was tried eight years ago, and was sent abroad.

Q. But you go by the name of Bonsor? - A. I am married again. (The property was identified by Mrs. Hutchinson.)

Prisoner's defence. I could not find this woman for four years, and the man that she lives with, who is her husband, said, he would not live with her, unless she tried to get me out of the Kingdom, it is done out of spite. GUILTY , age 27.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-153

738. ELIZABETH ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a gown, value 11s. a stuff petticoat, value 3s. a shirt, value 4s. and a pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of Israel Hart .

FRANCES HART sworn. - I am the wife of Israel Hart, hatter , in St. Catherine's lane ; I hired the prisoner as a servant maid , at one shilling and sixpence per week, she lived with me one day, and when I got up the next morning, I found she had robed me; I missed a cotton gown, a shirt, a pair of stockings, and a stuff petticoat; I heard that she was at a house in Nightingale-lane; the constable went and found her.

JONATHAN TROTT swron. - I am an office; on the 10th of August, I went with the last witness to the prisoner's mother's house, in a court, in Nightingal-lane; the prisoner was denied; I saw a number of women there, and they seemed confused; I suspected she was in the house; I searched, and found her concealed in a cupboards, in her mother's room, with all the things mentioned in the indictment, on her person. (They are produced and indntified by Mrs. Hart.)

Prisoner's defence. This woman keeps a bad house in St. Catherine's; she took me into the house, and made me go out to look for company, and I met with a man that gave me four shillings to sleep with him, and Mrs. Hart had the money; I slept with three other men that day, and in the evening she made me stand at the door, to look for compnay again, and there was a black man

offered three shillings to sleep with me, and I would not; then Mrs. Hart said, I should not be there; Mrs. dlart's girl put these things on me.

Q.(To Hart.) Is this true? - A. No, she robbed me of the things.

Q.(To Trott.) What sort of a house is this? - A. I have made enquiry, and I believe it is, in some respects, as the girl states.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-154

739. JOSEPH WILLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , two coach-glasses, value 1l. 4s. the property of George Mann .

GEORGE MANN sworn. I am a stable-keeper , in Duke-street, Manchester-square: On the 14th of August last, I missed a coach-glass, and a carpet, from the bottom of a coach, in the coach-house, about nine o'clock in the morning; the prisoner's father came to me about three o'clock in the afternoon, telling me, that I had lost two coach-glasses, and they were at Marlborough-street; I said, I had lost one, and a carpet, I did not know that I had lost two; the one that I had not missed, had a leather string to it, and I immediately took the father to the coach which it had been taken from.

JOHN FARRINGDON sworn. - I am a watchman, in St. Mary-le-bonne parish; on the 14th of August, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner pass with something, and I ran after him.

Q. Where was it? - A. In Wigmore-street; he said, they were coach glasses he had to carry to Hatchet's in Long-acre, that he was to have carried them over-night, but had got up early to carry them that morning; I took them from him, and took him to the watch-house, he made no resistance; I went to Marlborough-street in the morning, and he was committed for further examination; in the mean time, I heard that Mr. Ram had lost them. (The coach glasses were produced and identified, by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. A man asked me to carry them for him and he would give me a shilling.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-155

740. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a gown, value 12s. the property of William Windsor .

SILVANUS EVANS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Windsor, pawnbroker , No. 105, Red-lion-street, Whitechapel : On the 11th of August, and officer belonging to Lambeth-street, came to ask if we had lost any thing; I looked round the shop, and missed 2 gown, which had been hanging near the door, the officer produced the gown, and asked me if I knew it, it had our private mark upon it.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - On the 11th of August, about eleven o'clock, I was going down Red-lion-street, Whitechapel; I overtook the prisoner, I thought I observed something under his jacket.

Q. Did you know him before? - A.Perfectly well; I asked him what he had got; he said, nothing; I said, there is certainly something more; I turned him round, and found this gown by the side of him, (produces it); I asked him how he came by it; he said, it was his wife's; I told him I did not think he had a wife; then he said it was a gown he had given twelve shillings for, for a blowing of his; I then took him to the Office, and found it belonged to Mr. Windsor.

Evants. This is Mr. Windsor's property.

Prisoner's defence. I was going down Red Lion-street, and met with a girl that asked me if I would take that gown to her husband, who was on board the same ship with me; I said I would, and then this gentleman came up, and stopped me. GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-156

741. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for making an assault in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, on the 25th of July , upon Elizabeth, the wife of Stephen Plummer , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a pocket-book, value 3d. fourteen duplicates, value 7d. a prize-ticket, value 1d. two yards of ribbon, value 2d. and thirty-six halfpence , the goods and monies of the said Stephen.( Elizabeth Plummer diposed that she was so much in liquor, she knew nothing of the robbery.)

JAMES DAWSON sworn. - On Sunday evening, the 25th of July, about eleven o'clock, I was going along a narrow foot-path that leads to Limehouse ; I had got about forty of fifty yards up the path, when I heard somebody cry out, murder; I went to the extent of the field, and then there is another path that leads to a public-house; I went along the side of the pales, and found the prosecutrix lying moaning, and saw a man coming away from her, he passed me, and in about two minutes I saw a soldier, which was the prisoner, go up to her, take her pocket off, sold it up, and put it in his jacket pocket; the other man stood waiting about six yards off; I then went, and pulled the woman's cloaths down; I was afraid to take them by myself; I went up to the prisoner, and said, you have done that very eleverly, he said, d-n his eyes, if her shoes had been good for any thing, he would have had them too; I then walked with them to the extent of the field, and then met two gentlemen; I immediately seized the prisoner by the collar, and told the gentlemen what had happened; the other man ran away; the gentlemen seemed alarmed, and left me with the prisoner; I secured him, and took him to the watch-house; he had the property upon him.(Benjamin Purser, an officer, produced the property, which was identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing the goods, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020918-157

742. THOMAS GILL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Thompson , about the hour of ten in the night of the 15th of July , and burglariously stealing a pair of sheets, value 10s. a pair of pillow-cases, value 1s. and two cloaks, value 30s. the property of William Thompson; and a hat, value 10s. the property of James Thompson .

WILLIAM THOMPSON sworn. - I live in Norton-street, Portland-place : On the 15th of July, about half past nine o'clock, my brother, who was sitting in the parlour with me, heard a noise in the shop, it was then light; a little girl had come in a little before, and I be lieve had latched the door; I immediately ran out, and saw a woman pick up the articles mentioned in the indictment, except the cloaks, which I know to be my property; the cloaks have never been found; the hat belonged to my brother James; I have no partner.

EDWARD- WILLIAM THOMPSON sworn. - I was sitting with my brother; I heard a noise, I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner standing by the counter; it was dark; I could not distinguish his face; he ran out of the shop immediately, and I pursued him, and never lost fight of him till he was taken; a little girl, a sister of mine, had been in just before, and I sent her back to shut the door; I am sure the prisoner is the person; I saw him drop the bundle.

ELIZA HAWKINS sworn. - I was selling radishes in Great Marybone-street; a man, who was running, threw down a bundle of linen; I picked it up, and took it to Mr. Thompson's.( David Ryan , a watchman, deposed, that on hearing the cry of stop thief, he stopped the prisoner.)(The property was produced and identified by Mr. Thompson.)

Prisoner's defence. I heard the cry of stop thief, and I ran with the rest of the people.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing goods, value 39s. but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020918-158

743. GEORGE YATES and JOHN JONATHAN were indicted for feloniously stealing a quantity of books in sheets , the property of Luke Hansard .

LUKE HANSARD sworn. - I am a printer , in Lincoln's-inn-fields ; the prisoners worked in my warehouse; I can only swear to the property.

- WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a warehouseman to Mr. Hansard? - A. I am: On Friday evening, the 3d of September, I went to Mr. Limner's, where I found a bundle of paper, which I had missed from the middle warehouse; I had seen it on the 1st; the prisoners were employed in that warehouse; Yates has been with Mr. Hansard about three years, and Jonathan came in February last.

Mr. Alley. Q.There were a great many boys employed in this warehouse? - A. Yes.

JAMES LIMNER sworn. - I am a gold-beater, in Dean-street, Holborn; the two prisoners brought me a bundle of paper, for which they asked me seven shillings and sixpence, which I gave them, I bought it as wastepaper; there was a little contention between the two boys about the division of the money, which gave me a suspicion, and I gave Mr. Hansard information of it about an hour afterwards.

Mr. Alley. Q. Are you in the habit of buying wastepaper of such boys as these? - A. Yes; it is very common. (The paper produced.)

Mr. Hansard. This paper is not in a state sit for sale; it is called Peunant's Hindostan, and is two copies of two volumes, which I could not replace under a hundred pounds, as the loss of this spoils the whole work.

- FLAXMAN sworn. - I am a cheesemonger, in Red-Lion-street, Holborn; On the 3d of September, Yates came to my shop between one and two o'clock with some waste paper to sell; I asked him who it belonged to; he said it belonged to him, and some others, as their perquisites; he said his name was William Chapman , and his master was William Clay , No. 3, Inner Temple-lane, upon which I bought it; this is the paper. (Produces it, which was identified by Mr. Hansard.)

THOMAS BEAN sworn. - I live in Dean-street; On the 3d of September, Yates came to my shop to sell waste-paper, which I bought of him; this is the paper.(Produces it.)

Mr. Hansard. This is the Bishop of Lincoln's System of Theology, and my property.

Yates's defence. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

Jonathan's defence. I have no counsel.

The prisoner Yates called two, and Jonathan, three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Yates, GUILTY , aged 14.

Jonathan, GUILTY , aged 14.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-159

744. THOMAS YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a hat, value 10s. and a coat, value 10s. the property of William Pinnion .

There being no evidence of the property being in possession of the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-160

745. FRANCIS WALDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , a metal watch, value 25s. the property of Charles Hewitt .

CHARLES HEWITT sworn. - I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at Bow-street; I am an officer in the Royal navy ; On the 31st of August, I arrived at the St. Clement's Hotel ; I took a watch of my wife's with me to have repaired, it was an old watch, having no outside case; I left it either in my portmanteau, or my drawer, I cannot tell which; I went out of town on the 4th of September, and thought no more of the watch till I received a letter to come to town, and appear at Bow-street, where I found the same watch with an outside case put to it; the maker's name, the number, and the works are the same that I lost.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am one of the constables of St. Martin's-in the Fields: On Saturday, the 11th of this month, I went with a search-warrant to search the prisoner's room for some French half-crowns, and on searching his sob-pockets I found this watch, which he said his father gave him. (Produces it.)

JOHN BIRMINGHAM sworn. - I am a waiter at St. Clement's Hotel; the prisoner came to our house on the 9th of August; he is a midshipman in the Navy ; a gentleman in our house had missed some French halfcrowns, suspicion sell upon the prisoner, and he was searched, but no half-crowns were found; I saw the watch taken from him.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Mr. Hewill.) Q. I believe you

know this young man to be of a very respectable family? - A. I do.

Court. Q. Does he belong to the Navy? - A. Yes; he belonged to the Amazon frigate; the Dowager Lady de clifford, to whom he is well known, sent to me about him; his father is a man of large fortune in Ireland, and a Magistrate.(The watch was identified by Mr. Hewitt.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020918-161

746. PHILIP MABBOTT , WILLIAM ROBERTS , and JOHN KELSEY , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing on the 13th of August twenty-five Russia hides, value 13l. 15s. twenty five hides of leather, value 13l. 15s. three bales of tanned butt shoulders, of the weight of 500lb. value 23l. and three bales of leather, of the weight of 500lb. value 23l. the property of William Newman , Esq. John Newman . and Henry Newman ; and the other two for feloniously receiving the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN MANNING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Were you porter to Mess. Newmans on the 12th of August last? - A. I was; the prisoner Mabbott was carman .

Q. Had you any conversation with him on the sub ject of leather? - A. Yes; he said he could make away with some butt shoulders, provided he could get them conveyed away; I denied having any concern in it, an about ten days or a fortnight afterwards he put the question to me again, and after some hesitation I con sented to help pack three bundles of butt shoulders it mats, and I helped to put them into the tail of Mr. Newman's cart; Mabbott and I then left the warehouse with the cart locked up in the warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an honest servant of the late Mr. Alderman Newman's? - A. I was.

Q. I take it for granted you told your master of this? - A, No, I did not.

Q. Upon your oath did you say one word about it till you were taken up yourself? - A. I did the same evening that I was taken up.

Q. What money did you receive? - A. None at all; nor I don't know where they went, or who had them.

JOHN PYM sworn. - I am foreman to Mess. Newmans; on the 13th of August, about five o'clock in the morning, I thought I heard our cart go out; the prisoner Maboott had the key of the stable where the cart was kept.

Q. Was that an unusual hour? - A. I don't know that it is.

THOMAS LEIGHTON sworn. - I am journeyman to Mess. Newmans; on the 13th of August the cart came home about six o'clock in the morning empty; Mabbott was with it; he said he had been to the Custom-house.

ROBERT FRY sworn. - I am clerk to Mess. Newmans; it is my duty to order the cart out; I gave no orders for the 13th.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are one of the officers belonging to Worship-street? - A. I am; I went with a search warrant to Kelsey's house; on Tuesday the 17th of August, about half past one o'clock, to No. 23, Cresoont-place, Hackney-road, with Mr. Wyat and Mr. Newman; the house was shut up; we waited till Kelsey came home; bat his wife not coming home, he got in at the one, pair-of-stairs window, and let me in at the door; in a lower room, in a kind of wash-house fronting the door, were three parcels of butt leather, about two owt a piece, and 17 Russia hides (produce a part of them;) I was present afterwards at the apprehension of Roberts, in Coleman-street; I told him the charge against him, and sat with him, while Clarke went to apprehend Mabbott; I had informed Roberts that I had searched Kelsey's house; Roberts denied knowing any thing about it; after Mabbott came, I asked him, and he denied knowing any thing about it; I then took Mabbott into the room where Roberts was, with Mr. Newman and Mr. Wyatt; I told Mabbott what I had found at Kelsey's, and Roberts said, Mabbott was the man he had them of; a pocket-book was found upon Roberts, which is now in the possession of Clarke.(Mr. William Canner proved the signatures to the examinations of Roberts and Mabbott.)

JOHN NEWMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys, Q.At the time of the loss, who were the partners, in your house? - A. My father, William, and my brother, Henry; I went to the house of Kelsey, with Mr. Wyatt and Armstrong; the house was shut up; we left Mr. Armstrong at the front of the house; Mr. Wyatt and I went to the India Company's warehouses, in Seething-lane, Kelsey was a commodore in the warehouses; we found him there; I took him on one side, and told him I understood he had some leather, at his house, which I suspected was stolen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Before he said any thing to you about the leather, had you made him any promises? - A. I had not; he said William Roberts had frequently sold him wrappers and ropes, which the India goods were packed in; he said, Roberts said to him, there were long nights coming on, he understood him to, be in the leather line, and he could help him to some leather; Kelsey asked what it was; Roberts said he would bring a sample of two sorts; in a few days, Roberts brought a piece of leather, called a butt shoulder, and a Russia hide; Kelsey said he had said to Roberts, this is not leather that I know the value of; Roberts, said he would leave it with him; in a few days Roberts called upon him; Kelsey said, I have enquired about butt shoulders, and I find they are worth from ninepence to ten-pence per pound.

Q. What are they really worth? - A.From 11d. to 1s. then Robert agreed to fell him a quantity of butt shoulders, at 5d. per pound, and the Russia hides at 5l. 10s. which are worth about 13l. 15s.; we were wanted in gthe Leather market, and I desired Kelsey to come to us in half an hour, which he did; we then went in a coach to his house; he got in at the window and let us in, and we found gthe leather there; then we went to Roberts's house, in Bishop's-court, Coleman-street; he is a dealer in old ropes, wrapping, brown paper, and various other articles; we took him into custody, and he denied knowing any thing of any leather;

I told him that Kelsey had informed us he had brought him the leather for a sample.

Q. Was Mabbott by at that time ? - A. He was .

Q. Before Roberts had seen Mabbott , had you made him any promise or threat to induce him to relate the circumstances of this business ? - A. I did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney . Q. Did any other person , in your presence ? - A. No.

Q. Was there no hope held out to him of becoming a witness? - A. None in the least ; Mabbott said , Roberts was the man who went with him to Kelsey's house; Roberts made no answer ; I afterwards told Mabbott the story I had heard from Kelsey , and then he confessed ; I asked him if any other servant was concerned , and he said , yes, John Manning , the porter , and no one else ; I was present at the examination of Roberts , I saw it signed, and witnessed it.

Q. Do you remember any hopes being held out to him that he would be made use of as a witness? - A. Nothing of the kind.

Q. Was it not understood before the Lord Mayor, that he would be admitted a witness? - A. No.(Mr. Wyatt corroborated the evidence of Mr. Newman.)

The examination of Roberts read . - "The voluntary examination of William Roberts , dealer in old ropes, who faith , he hath known Philip Mabbott , carman to Messrs . Newman, about six years; that on Firday morning last he met Mabbott in Barbican , with three bundles of leather , which were taken to Kelsey's . Examinant three weeks before had a sample of leather , which he shewed to Kelsey , and he agreed to buy it; three or four days before, he believes on the Monday, he sent for Mabbott to Kelsey's some red leather, for which Kelsey agreed to pay 5l . 10s .

The examination of Mabbott read . - "The voluntary examination of Philip Mabbott , carman to Messrs . Newman and Sons , Giltspur-street , confesses he has known William Roberts , of Bishop's-court , three or four years; he was in the habit of selling to Messrs . Newmans boxes of rope, for packing goods; that the said Roberts had frequently asked him to get property of his this examinant's master , and he would make money of it; that on Friday night last this examinant made up a parcel , which he put in his master's cart; that Roberts met him at Mr. Newman's gate a little after five o'clock; examinant drove the cart to Crescent-place , Hackney-road , and delivered it to a tall man, to whom Roberts said he had sold it, the shoulders for 6d. per pound , and the Russia for 60s. per dozen ; examinant has not received any money from Roberts , or any body else ."( John Clarke , the Marshalman , produced the pocketbook found upon Roberts , with the following memorandum in it -"Kelsey, No. 22, Crescent-place , Hackney-road."

ROBERT NOYES sworn . - I knew Kelsey , and saw him at my master's , Mr. Holdworth , leather-seller , Aldgate, on the 10th or 11th of August ; he had a small piece of leather, and asked what sort it was; as it was not coloured, I could not tell whether it was a Russia hide, or not, but thought it was, and that it was worth eight , nine, or ten shillings , a skin; I cannot recollect who he said he bought it of, but I saw him again on Wednesday the 11th , and told him a person had enquired for such skins ; I saw him again afterwards, and told him the man did not like two of the skins ; upon which he brought two more on Thursday , (two skins produced and identified ); I gave him ten shillings a skin for them.

Mabbott did not say any thing in his defence.

Robert's defence . I leave it to my Counsel .

Kelsey's defence . When Mr. Noyes asked me where I got the skins from, I told him from a man in Coleman-street .

Mabbott called one, Roberts six , and Kelsey one witness, who gave them good characters .

Mabbott, GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

Roberts , GUILTY , aged 38.

Kelsey , GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant .


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