Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th July 1802.
Reference Number: 18020714
Reference Number: f18020714-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 14th of JULY, 1802, and following Days, BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1802.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, & c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common-Pleas; Sir SOULDEN LAWRENCE , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; the Right Honourable THOMAS HARLEY , PAUL LE MESURIER , Esq. and Sir JOHN WILLIAM ANDERSON , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; GEORGE MACKENZIE MACAULEY , Esq. THOMAS CADELL , Esq. and Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , Knt. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Barber ,

William Eadys ,

James Priest ,

William Woodward ,

James Looker ,

William Bates ,

Francis Read ,

James Springall ,

Samuel Coke ,

James Greaves ,

Richard Besom ,

Thomas Barnes .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Price ,

James Stevenson ,

James Reynolds ,

John Gregory ,

Thomas Heath ,

John Hacking ,

William Palmer ,

John Jones ,

William Elborough ,

George Widt ,

James White ,

John Eaton .

London Jury.

Joseph Wegevina ,

Stephen-James Smith ,

George-Wren le Grand ,

Robert Huxley ,

John Hill ,

William Chaplain ,

Richard Harvey ,

Joseph Stafford ,

James-Edward Hall ,

Charles Wightman ,

William Barling ,

James Files .

Reference Number: t18020714-1

494. JEREMIAH EMBLIN was indicted for that he, on the 6th of May , being employed as clerk to John Benbow , gentleman, did, by virtue of such employment, take and receive into his possession, for, and on account of his said master, a banker's draft for the payment of 2091. 11s. and that he did afterwards embezzle, secrete, and make away with the said draft, and the Jurors say, he did thereby steal, take and carry away the said draft , being the property of the said John Benbow.

Second Count. For feloniously stealing four Banknotes, value 200l. the property of the said John Benbow.(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN BENBOW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are an attorney ? - A. I am, I have chambers in Lincoln's-inn , the prisoner was my clerk, he came into my service on the 14th of last March; on the 6th of May, early in the morning, a draft was presented at my chambers for 209l. 11s. I came to the chambers very soon after nine in the morning, and about half-past nine, I drew a draft upon Messrs. Gosling, for 209l. 11s. to pay the draft; I put the draft upon the desk before the prisoner, desiring him to go at four o'clock, and not before, to Messrs. Gosling and Sharpe's, to take the money and carry it to Esdailes' to take up the draft that had been presented at my chambers; I then went to the House of Commons, and returned between five and six in the afternoon; the prisoner was not at the chambers, nor ever returned after.

Q. Is that the draft you drew upon Goslings and Sharpe's? - A. It is.

Q. Had you sent the prisoner with drafts to your banker's before this? - A. Yes, to a small amount. I did not see the prisoner again till I saw him at Bow-street, on the 3d of June, in custody; his dress was then totally changed, and his hair cut off, which made a very material difference in his appearance.

Prisoner. Q. You have said, you intrusted me with drafts for small sums - did you not send me into the city to receive a bill for 250l.? - A. The question put to me was, as to sending him to my bankers; I certainly did send him into the city, with a draft of 250l. which he brought me back, and another time with 160 or 170l. that I think was two days before this happened.

WILLIAM EWINGS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are cashier to Goslings and Sharpe? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 6th of June, did you pay a check of Mr. Benbow's of 209l. 11s.? - A. I did; I gave the prisoner four 50l. Bank-notes, No. 51, 9410, 6304, and 1644.

Q. Do you know at what hour you paid that draft? - A. I think it was between the hours of ten and twelve in the forenoon.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate, that you could not swear to my person? - A. I said, he was so disguised, that I was not certain.

Q. Did you not say, you had no knowledge of the person whatever? - A. I said, I could not swear to him.

Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you had known him while he was clerk to Mr. Benbow? - A. I had frequently seen him.

Q. When you saw him at Bow-street, was he so altered, that you had some difficulty in knowing him? - A. Yes. (The check produced.)

BENJAMIN DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am clerk in the Bank of England; on the 6th of May, the prisoner came to the Bank of England to change four 50l. notes, he desired to have 10 tens, and 20 fives; I received from him, 4 fifties, (produces them;) No. 9410, 6304, 1644, and 51; the notes that were given to the prisoner were posted by me, and delivered to him by my partner, Mr. Sutton; Mr. Sutton took the four 50l. notes to another desk, and desired him to write his name; he indorsed them the 6th of May, J. Emblin, Lincoln's-inn.(The hand-writing indorsed upon the note, was proved to be the hand-writing of the prisoner, by Mr. Benbow.)

Court. (To Mr. Benbow.) Q. When you gave him this order, did you desire him to change any notes at the Bank? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you give him three notes, each for 10l. No. 8632, 8633, and 8634? - A. I did.

WILLIAM ATKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are an officer of Bow-street? - A. I am; I went to Bath to apprehend the prisoner; I apprehended him on the 1st of June, a few minutes before nine in the evening; I searched him, and found upon him two Banknotes, one of 10l. No. 8634, and one for 5l. No. 8717.

Q. (To Davis.) Was that one of the numbers that was given him? - A. Yes.

Atkins. He told me the next morning where his lodgings were; I went there, and found thirteen guineas, twenty half-guineas and sixteen seven-

shilling pieces; he told me he had got the guineas, half-guineas, and seven-shilling pieces in change for the notes he had received from the bankers, or Bank, I am not sure which; he said, he was always afraid of carrying them about him, except of an evening when he employed girls of the town to get them changed.

Q. Did you receive from him any directions respecting any box in London? - A. I did, at Bow-street; in consequence of which, I went to Southampton, and got the box; I found in it two 10l. Bank-notes, No. 8632, and 8633, and also two 5l. Bank-notes, No. 8720, and 8725.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not detained from me my box, and a gold watch? - A. Yes; Mr. Benbow has the watch which I found upon his person; I asked him if he had bought that watch, he told me he had, but refused to tell me where; Mr. Ford desired me to keep it, and deliver it to Mr. Benbow.

Q. Have you received a reward for apprehending me? - A. I have not.

Q. Do you expect a reward? - A. There was a reward offered certainly.

JOHN-CROSSLEY COGAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you, by the desire of Mr. Benbow, go to Messrs. Efdailes'? - A. Yes, on the morning of the 7th of May, where I found a draft for payment upon Mr. Benbow, for 209l. 11s. which I took up for Mr. Benbow.

Q. (To Mr. Benbow.) Is this the bill which Mr. Cogan took up for you at Efdailes'? - A. It is.

Prisoner. Before I make my defence, I submit to your Lordship, that the prosecutor being an attorney, my case comes within the description of a breach of trust; the act expresses merchants, bankers and tradesmen, and Mr. Benbow cannot be considered either as a tradesman, a banker, or a merchant.

Mr. Gurney. The act says, bankers, merchants, and others.

Prisoner's defence. I must throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for fourteen years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-2

495. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , an elephant's tooth, value 10s. 6d. the property of Robert Whitehorn , and other persons.

THOMAS HINTON sworn. - I am gangsman, at Galley-quay , in partnership with the other persons named in the indictment, (repeating their names;) on Friday last, the 9th of July, I was landing some elephant's teeth from a ship, called the Union; after having landed a quantity, we placed them at a distance from the scale, and set a man to watch; I did not see the prisoner take it; the weigher saw the prisoner go up the gate-way, with a tooth, and followed him.

Q. Are you, as gangsman, responsible for these elephants' teeth? - A. We are; I saw the prisoner brought back by the weigher, with the tooth.

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn. - I am weighter at Galley-quay; I saw the prisoner take up the tooth, put it under his jacket, and walk away up the gateway, towards Thames-street; I followed him, and caught hold of him, he immediately threw it down; I saw one of my partners take it up, he is not here; it was given to the constable, Mr. Green.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the tooth;) Green is ill, and could not come; he delivered this tooth to me about two minutes after the robbery; I have had it ever since, there is a mark upon it that the gangsman can swear to it by.

Davis. This is the same tooth, it has the ship mark and tvhe number upon it.

Prisoner's defence. I was at work at the Customhouse, and after being paid off, I was going up the gateway, and was counting my money, when he said hold of me; I never had the tooth in my possession at all.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Publicly whipped 100 yards in Thames-street, near Galley-quay .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-3

496. ROBERT LUCAS and SAMUEL TYLER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , four pounds eight ounces weight of coffee, value 6s. the property of Ann Pearson , widow .

PETER PEARSON sworn. - I am nephew of Mrs. Ann Pearson, widow, in Church-lane, Whitechapel: on Tuesday the 21st of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, a quantity of coffee was put into a bag by our men, and put into a cart; I was coming accidentally through Thames-street , I had been collecting some money, and saw the prisoner take some coffee out of a bag.

Q. Is the carman here? - A. No, it was my aunt's cart, he only drove the cart for that day, and he is ill; I saw the two prisoners take some coffee out of a cask, and put it into Tyler's hat, they both held the hat; then they went from the cart down to a gateway, into an area, and I saw Tyler put the coffee into Lucas's shirt; then they came up to the cart again, and I went up to them, and told them to go away; they both laid hold of my arm, and told me to say nothing; I told them, if they did not go away, I would have them taken up; I had seen the street-keeper just before that, and I went to him, and he came and took Lucas opposite the cart; I then went to the cart again, and saw Tyler taking another hat-full of coffee; he imme

diately ran away with it, he was taken up about five or six days after.

Q. Are you perfectly sure these are the two men? - A. I am sure of it; I know them both well.

Prisoner Lucas. Q. Did you not take a guinea from another man you caught stealing coffee? - A. No, I did not; I caught a man before, and was offered a guinea to let him go, and I would not take it.

Q. What is Mrs. Pearson? - A. A carwoman; she is answerable for every thing in the cart.

JOSEPH LUDLAM sworn. - I am a cooper: In consequence of information, I apprehended the prisoner, Lucas, with a quantity of coffee in his shirt; I took him immediately to the Compter; I apprehended Tyler on the 4th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, in Rosemary-lane.

THOMAS WOOD sworn. - I am a ticket-porter; I delivered the bag of coffee safe into the cart on the 21st of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, at Brewer's-quay; when they came home, one of the bags was very much cut, and a quantity of coffee gone.

ROBERT WRIGHT sworn. - I am one of the gangsmen on Brewer's-quay; I landed part of a cargo; this bag, when it was put into the cart, weighed one hundred and a half; I weighed it after wards, and it weighed only one hundred and a quarter, and ten pounds; there was a deficiency of eight pounds.

Lucas's defence. I know nothing of it; what coffee I had, I picked up in the street.

Tyler's defence. I know nothing of it any more than the child unborn.

Jury. (To Pearson.) Q. Did you know Tyler before? - A. Yes, I knew them both very well; they used to drive a cart some time ago.

Lucas, GUILTY , aged 29.

Tyler, GUILTY , aged 29.

Whipped one hundred yards in Thames-street .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-4

497. JOSEPH EARL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , a printed bound book, value 2s. 6d. and another printed bound book, value 2s. 6d. the property of William Laycock .

WILLIAM LAYCOCK sworn. - I am a bookseller , No. 1, Long-lane ; I have a shelf at each of my windows fastened into the wood work: On Thursday last, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner loitering about the window; having repeatedly lost books, I had a suspicion of him; I got right behind the partition in the shop, which had a window in it; I saw him make a push; I went after him; he had got about ten or a dozen yards; I laid hold of him, and took from his bosom two books, which I knew to be mine; they were both printed bound books, one of them was an Abridgement of the History of the Bible, the other was a Prayer Book; they were both marked two shillings and sixpence with a pencil, with my own hand; I had put them out at the door myself in the morning; they were fastened with a string; they could not have been taken out without the string being removed.( Francis Hewitt , a constable, produced the books, which were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going along to work; I saw these two books lying; I thought I might as well have them as any body else; I picked them up, and put them in my bosom; my poor mother has been blind these six years; I have worked very hard to keep her as well as I could; I never did such a thing in my life.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 17.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-5

498. ANN PRATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , a pewter quart pot, value 2s. and a pewter pint pot, value 1s. the property of Richard Chadwick .

RICHARD CHADWICK sworn. - I keep a public-house , in Seven Dials; I can only swear to the property.

ANN BOWMAN sworn. - On the 5th of June, I saw the prisoner going out of the street-door of my house; I missed some pots; I turned her cloak on one side, and found upon her a pint and a quart pot; I had seen them on the stairs not five minutes before; I took her to Mr. Chadwick's with the pots; they had his name upon them.(The pots were produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say thing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-6

499. RICHARD THROPP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , three ducks, value 5s. the property of Titus Farmer .

TITUS FARMER sworn. - I live in the parish of Bethnal-green : On Thursday, the 8th of July, I lost three ducks; I know nothing of it myself.

ROBERT PULLER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Farmer: On the 8th of July, between nine and ten in the evening, I heard a noise among the ducks; I went out into the yard, and heard the ducks cry; I saw the prisoner, but it was so dark that I could not see whether he had one in his hand or not; I heard him catch them up; I told him if he stirred, I would cut him down; he got over the fence, and I went after him, and gave him a blow on the side

of his head, which cut him down; he got up, and got away; I went after him, and cut him down again; I laid hold of him by the collar, and got some assistance; we secured him, and brought him back; I afterwards went to the place where I had seen the prisoner, and there I found a bag with three live ducks in it; I never lost fight of him all the way; we counted the ducks, and found two short of the number.

Q. You found three in the bag? - A. Yes, and when I went to lay hold of the bag, one of them run out; they were the same sort of ducks we had in the yard.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How many ducks had you in the yard? - A. Twenty-one dozen and five.

Q. You do not mean to swear to the ducks? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. There was nothing remarkable in the colour of those ducks? - A. No.

Q. Did you count them over? - A. No; the man that counted them is not here.

Q. You fought stoutly, and gave him a pretty handsome cut; that mark upon his cheek, which he will carry to his grave, is your cut, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you cut him with, a cutlass? - A. Yes.

- HOWES sworn. - I am inspector of the watch at Bethnal-green: On the 8th of July the prisoner was brought to our watch-house, with this bag and these ducks. (Produces them.)

THOMAS PRYKE sworn. - I assisted in securing the prisoner.

Farmer. I believe the ducks to be mine, but I cannot positively swear to them.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-7

500. CHARLES WILLIAMS, alias ROBERT NEWTON , was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon John Ward , on the 5th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 2l. 12s. the property of the said John.

JOHN WARD sworn. - Q. On the 5th of July were you in Baker-street when the balloon went up? - A. I was in North Baker-street , between three and four o'clock, just at the time the balloon was in the air; I saw the prisoner in the crowd; I felt a hand at my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner; there was a gang of them; it was one of the others that had his hand upon my watch; I put my hand to save my watch, when three or four squeezed me so, that I could not move, and at that time the watch was taken from me.

Q. While you were so pressed, somebody took your watch from you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, about that time, see the prisoner? - A. Yes, I saw him about a minute after.

Q. How near was he to you? - A. Close to me.

Q. You did not perceive him till after the watch was gone? - A. No.

Q. Did you observe the persons that pressed upon you? - A. I did not observe any one but him; several put up their hands to knock me down, when I laid hold of the prisoner; he was one that was in the gang.

Q. Was he one that held up his hands to strike you? - A. I think he was; I cannot be positive.

Q. What do you mean by saying he was one of the gang? - A. The watch was found upon him.

Q. Was there any thing before the watch was found upon him, that induced you to think he was one of the gang? - A. Because he was close to me; he was one of those that squeezed round me to hold me fast.

Q. Did you perceive him pressing upon you? - A. Yes.

Q. You said you did not see him till about a minute after the watch was taken from you? - A. He had the watch in his hand.

Q. Was the pressure while the watch was going or before? - A. It was after the watch was gone.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you could distinctly perceive Charles Williams press upon you, or did you only conclude he was one from seeing the watch in his hand? - A. He pressed upon me very much after the watch was gone.

Q. Do you mean to swear distinctly you observed the prisoner press upon you after the watch was gone? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to stick to this, that you saw him distinctly press upon you after the watch was gone out of your pocket? - A. Yes, while I was attempting to lay hold of one of the gang, immediately the crowd pressed upon me.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you saw the prisoner at the bar press upon you? - A. Yes, about a minute after the watch was gone.

Q. You absolutely saw him press upon you? - A. I saw him press upon me.

Q. At the time the balloon went up, there must have been a great number of spectators pressing upon one another? - A. Yes, there was a bull brought in, and there was a great pressure.

Q. I want to know whether there was any more pressure upon you than there was upon any other person? - A. I cannot say that there was; there was a very great pressing upon me.

Q. And great pressing upon every body else, was there not? - A. Yes.

Q. Charles Williams did not lift up his hand to strike you? - A. No.

Q. Did any of them say any thing? - A. One of them said, I have got it, at the time the watch was taken; the man who said I have got it, was

not the man that took it out of my pocket, and I caught hold of him.

Q. From whence do you conclude that they meant to knock you down, by lifting up their hands? - A. They held their hands to me almost in my face; I immediately got out of the crowd as fast as I could, leaving the person that I had laid hold of.

Q. Have you ever seen your watch since? - A. Yes, I saw it about five minutes after, at a public-house in Baker-street, in the possession of James Munyard, a constable: the prisoner was then gone in the care of a constable.

THOMAS MAYHEW sworn. - I am one of the conductors of the patrol belonging to Bow-street.

Q. Were you in North Baker-street on the 5th of July, at the time the ballon went up? - A. Yes, I perceived the prisoner, and about seven or eight other men.

Q. When was that? - A. About five or ten minutes after the balloon went up, or it might be rather more; there was a narrow passage between the carts where the people had to pass through, and there were four or five of them on each side of that passage, close to each other; I saw them pushing and huslling people about; the prisoner was in front; I observed a silver watch in his hand.

Q. What was he doing? - A. I did not observe any particluar thing till I saw the watch in his hand.

Q. Are you sure he was one of this party who were pushing the people about? - A. Yes, I am sure of it; I then followed the prisoner, and laid hold of his collar; I was then immediately knocked down, and received several blows on my back; I called to the patrols behind me to take care of him; upon that a scuffle enfued; I recovered myself, and got hold of the prisoner again, with one of the patrols; after I got hold of him, endeavouring to bring him up Baker-street, he asked me to let him stoop down, and pull his shoe up at heel; and, in stooping down, I saw him throw the watch away; I ordered James Munyard, one of the men with me, to pick it up; I saw him pick it up.

JAMES MUNYARD sworn. - I am one of the patrols; I was in North Baker-street at the time the balloon went up; Mayhew called out to me to lay hold of the prisoner; Mayhew had laid hold of him, and I saw him knocked down; I immediately caught hold of the prisoner; I had not bad hold of him two minutes before I received a blow from a stick; the prisoner then sung out, serve it out, you b - r, serve it out.

Q. Was that before or after you were struck? - A. Afterwards; the patrol came up immediately, and dispersed the mob; I laid hold of the prisoner, and Mr. Mayhew laid hold of him; and, as we were taking him to Bow-street, he stooped down, and I saw him throw this watch down, (producing it;) he threw it, I dare say, four yards behind him; I immediately stooped down upon my hands and knees, and picked it up.

Q. (To Ward.) We have heard of some carts standing there - was that the place where you lost your watch? - A. No; I lost it upon the bridge at the top of Baker-street, North, which leads to a field.

Mayhew. This bridge is close to where the carts were; they were drawn up close to the side of the ditch for the people to see the balloon.

Q. (To Ward.) Look at that watch? - A. That is the watch that I lost; I know it by the ribbon, the case, and by the number and the name, Downham, No. 4958.

Prisoner's defence. On the Monday morning, I went, out of curiousity, to see the balloon; and, on my way home, coming over the bridge, somebody said there was a mad bullock, and there was a great press and a cry of thieves; upon which a scuffle ensued, and they all got away, and I was then taken; there was another watch produced at Bow-street, and an officer, of the name of Lloyd, swore that I had taken that watch from another man; and the man said, I was not the person; Mr. Justice Ford asked him how he could take his oath that I had taken it from the man, and then he said, he had not taken his oath.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-8

501. JOSEPH RODGERS , MARY RODGERS , and EDWARD HORN , were indicted for that they, on the 26th of June , a piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of the current coin of this realm, called a shilling, did coin and counterfeit, against the duty of their allegiance, and against the form of the statute .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Gleed, and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

EDWARD RODGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are one of the officers of the Police, at Shadwell? - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of some information that you received, you went to what place? - A. To a house in Suffolk-street, Pentonville, on Saturday, the 26th of June, where I had a view of the prisoner's house, No. 4, Charlotte-place; the prisoner's, Rodgers, himself told me he rented it.

Q. Describe what you observed? - A. A little after eight o'clock, I went to the house in Suffolk-street; there were only two rooms in the house; I noticed that the windows of the upper story had cloths before them, about half way up, and the upper part of the windows were exceedingly dirty, so that I could have no view whatever of any thing

that was done in the upper part of the house, but any person that went up stairs I had a full view of; I was waiting from half past eight till two o'clock, no person went in or came out of the house during that time; about two o'clock, the prisoner, Mary Rodgers, came down stairs; a little after I saw her wipe her hands and arms with a cloth; she then went out, and in a few minutes returned with a pot, which, I suppose, contained beer; she looked very much about her when she came out, and also when she returned; she instantly went up stairs, and no person went in or came out of the house till four o'clock; about four o'clock, the prisoner, Horn, came to the house; how he opened the door I do not know, but it was opened instantly, and he went up stairs; no person went in or came out till after five, then Mary Rodgers came down stairs; she staid a little while below, and then went out again, and shut the door after her; she looked very much about her, at the top of the place, as before; she returned in a few minutes with a loaf and some butter; the door was then shut, and it appeared to me she had no key, for she called out, and somebody opened the door, which was a man, but I could not see who; then she went up stairs; no person went in or out of the house then till half past six o'clock; in the mean time I spoke to Mr. Springall, a clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint, that, in case Horn should come out, they should watch him; about half past six, Horn came out, and I sent Springall after him to watch him, and I followed; Horn went into a wine-vault the corner of Suffolk-street; he returned, and looked very much about him; before this, I sent Daniel Holland to the office to get some more assistance and a search-warrant; when Horn returned, he went up stairs as usual; I saw no person come out again till half past seven; Horn then came out, and looked very much about him; by this time Holland returned to me with a warrant; Horn, after having looked about him, turned into the house again.

Q. Did he see Holland return? - A. No, he did not; then we concluded that was the time to get into the house; I desired Holland to rap at the door, because the maid knew me; Mary Rodgers opened the door, and endeavoured to shut it again when she saw us; I then started in; Horn and Mary Rodgers were below; she called out, here they are; I ran up stairs, and desired Holland to take Horn and Mary Rodgers; I caught Rodgers upon the window endeavouring to get out; upon which Holland brought the other two up stairs, and we secured all the three; there was a half teaster bed in the room, rather inclining towards the window; the first thing that struck my attention, was a furnace made of brick in the chimney-place; that furnace had a fire in it of coke, and also a quantity of coke lying in the fire-place; there were a number of crucibles, some lying upon the side of the furnace, some upon the mantle-piece, and some upon the floor; some had the remains of metal in them; here is one of them new, that has never been used,(produces it;) the next thing I observed, was a little bench fixed under one of the windows, so that a person could sit at work at it; it was fixed to the wall, and upon the bench I found these sciffars, files, and plyers, (produces them;) there was also this child's hat, containing these blanks, which adhere together, (producing them;) there are some of different coin; I found these things, with some metal upon the point of them; from the appearance of them, they are used for the purpose or lifting the melting pots off the fire; the next thing that struck my attention, was a flask, which is used in coining, and a sort of trough, in the corner of the room, containing a quantity of sounder's earth.

Q. Have you been used to these sort of things, so as to know the common use of them? - A. I have been very much; in my hurry in taking up the flask, I found the founder's earth coming out of the flask; the earth is put into these frames, and beat with a mallet till it is a pretty hard substance; the oil and lamp black are put over it to harden the earth, in order to receive the fresh metal more easy; the impression is generally taken from good coin; the metal is poured in, and takes the impression without the assistance of a dye or press, and they can take the impression of the coin of different kingdoms all at once; I found some founder's earth where I found the flask; close by that trough was hanging these two sieves, (produces them,) which are used for sitting the earth, and putting it in a proper state to be used; the room was exceedingly black, so black that there was the mark of the sieves where they hung up; here is a composition for hardening the day, which is made of black lead, and lamp black and oil, which is burnt; I found that in the same room, in a cupboard; this is a piece of coke that was found by the fire-side; I found a quantity of sand-paper, some used, and some not.

Mr. Gleed. Q. What is the use of the sandpaper? - A. To take off the rough edges after the sciffars had been used to cut them apart; they are taken with a small pair of players, and filed, and then the sand-paper is used to take off the rough edges; I found this pipkin, (produces it,) with some oil and some cotton, which is used to burn this compositioin, which is put into the flask to harden the earth, and make it fit to receive the impression; the next thing I found was, on the bed, this dirty apron, which contained this money and this piece of cork; the cork is used for smoothing the money;(produces a large quantity of unfinished coin;) here is a remarkable piece adhering together, they have J. S. upon them; I found that in the child's hat,

upon the bed; here is another, in a more finished state, with J. S. upon it, which I found upon the bed; a person could sit upon the bed working at the bench, and place the money, some on the bench and some on the bed; here is one that was in a state sit for circulation at the time I found it, and so were these three shillings and a sixpence, (produces them,) but they are discoloured since; they are all copper; it is but a common wash, and is very soon discoloured; the utteres generally keep them in papers separately.

Q. You mixed that shilling with the others? - A. Yes.

Q. Would that mixing it with the others tenders take off the colouring? - A. Yes; I also found on the mantle-piece this paper, containing white vitriol, (produce it,) which is used to give a sort of dimness to the silver; I also found a paper, containing white arsenic, which is for mixing with the copper; it is in consequence of the white arsenic being put in the crucible with the copper, that it comes out quite white; I also found this apron by the bed-side, which smelt very strong of aquafortis; I also found these pieces of copper cut into pieces, to put into the surnace. (Producing them.)

Q. Were all the prisoners in the room at the time you found those things? - A. Yes, they were present when every thing was found, and I desire the to take particular notice; this was on the Saturday evening; on the Sunday morning, I went to the house to make farther search; Mr. Springall had the key, and, in the back shed, I found this brush, (produces it,) which smelt very strong of aqua fortis.

Court. Q. That shed was not locked up? - A. No, it was belonging to the house; you could not get at the shed without passing through the house; we found, on the Sunday, also a quantity of black ing and black lead, and things mixed up for burning, and other things.

Q. Are all the things that you have produced to-day used for the purpose of coining? - A. Persons, in the habit of coming, make use of all.

Q. In what condition did you find their persons? A. At the time I went up stairs, Joseph Rodgers was on the window with his waistcoat on, but no shirt, and this old apron. I could see his arms all the way up, they were yellow, green, and black; at the time that Horn and Mary Rodgers were brought up, I looked at their hands; they were both of them very duty, with some sort of dirt, but only about the palm of the hand and the fingers; I desired Holland to take particular notice of the prisoner's hands; I said, they had been at work; they said, they had not; Horn said, he had only been in a few minutes, that he came to see them.

Mr. Gleed. Q. Would aqua-fortis give that appearance? - A. It would; Horn afterwards acknowledged that he had been there from four o'clock.

Court. Q. Were his hands dirty when he came to the door at four o'clock? - A. I cannot tell, I was at such a distance; he then had an apron of the colour of this upon him; on the table below there was a bason with some water, which some person had washed their hands in.

Q. I think you told me aqua-fortis was a necessary ingredient in the colouring of base metal? - A. Yes, it is a very material ingredient.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. In cases where silver is put into the composition, in order to throw the silver on the outside, aqua-fortis must be used; but here there is no silver in the composition? - A. Aqua-fortis is necessary in every process that I know of.

Q. As to this shilling upon which the indictment is framed, did you, at any time, shew it to any persons belonging to the Mint? - A. I shewed it to Mr. Powell.

Q. How long was it from the time you got that shilling from the house of the prisoner before you shewed it to Mr. Powell? - A. At the examination, on the Thursday following; I had them locked up in the office.

Q. On the Thursday were they in the same state as when you found them? - A. No, they were much discoloured; they appeared many of them passable, but on Thursday much discoloured.

Q. I believe the last process through which they pass, is to have them dulled? - A. Yes.

Q. Did this appear to you to have passed through that process? - A. It was in that state, that a man, who was not a good judge of silver, would have taken it.

Q. Do you mean to say any common tradesman would have taken it? - A. Many common tradesmen would have taken it.

Q. How came this shilling to be altered between the Saturday and the Thursday? - A. It was very much dulled.

Q. Am I to understand you, that on Thursday it was passable when it was seen by Mr. Powell? - A. In my opinion.

Q. Did you, previous to this time, know Horn? - A. I have know Horn many years.

Q. Horn said he had been there a few minutes? - A. Yes.

Q. And that was true, because he had been out just before - how far was the house where you were concealed from the house where the prisoner lived? - A. I suppose fifteen or sixteen yards; the windows up stairs were half blinded, and a large blanket hung up, so that it was impossible to see any thing that was going on.

Mr. Gleed. Q. These people were apprehended on the Saturday? - A. Yes.

Q. And they were not examined till Thursday?

- A. No; on the Monday the King went to the Parliament-house, and the Magistrate was attending at St. James's, so that it stood over to Thursday.

JOHN SPRINGALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Vernon? - A. I am.

Q. You, I believe, with Rodgers, were looking from some window which commanded a view of the house of the prisoner? - A. We were.

Q. You were particularly directed to observe the prisoner, Horn? - A. I was.

Q. What observations did you make? - A. I saw the prisoner, Horn, come out of the house, and I followed him; upon his first coming out, he looked in a very suspicious manner about him, as if he was looking to see if any body was about; I saw him go into a wine-vaults; I went in after him, and saw him having some gin put into a bottle; there were two doors to the house; I thought it very singular that he passed one door, and went in at the farthest door, and he came back the same way; he looked about, as he had done before, and then he went into the house from which he had first come; Rodgers then followed me into the house where we were watching; after waiting about half an hour, the prisoner, Horn, came out again, and looked about him in the same way; he returned in a short timet, and looked each way again, and then went into the houset; in about ten minutes after, he came out again.

Q. Then Rodgers and Holland came up? - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner, Rodgers, lift up the fash, and throw two bags out of the window, which fell over into the garden; he was going out too, till I told him to retire, or I should knock him down.

Q. Did he, in point of fact, get out? - A. No, he came in; I then went into the garden, and found these two bags, (produces them,) one of them containing a number of good pattern shillings, and the other pattern six-pences.

Q. Is there any one in particular? - A. Yes; here is one which exactly corresponds with the impression on the counterfeit. (Produces it.)

Q. By pattern shillings, you mean shillings to cast from? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. Did you see the shillings that were found on the bed at the time they were found? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you see them that day? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see them on the Thursday following? - A. I did.

Q. Did you particularly attend to the shilling which is the subject of this indictment? - A. I did.

Q. Are you sufficiently conversant with the good coin and counterfeit coin to know one from the other? - A. I am not.

DANIEL HOLLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are an officer of the Police? - A. I am an extra constable.

Q. You were with Rodgers when these things were collected, and brought to the office? - A. I was.

Mr. CALEB- EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are an assistant to the Solicitor for the Mint? - A. I am.

Q. Can you explain the use of these implements? - A. I can give no further explanation than Rodgers has given; he has given a very correct explanation. I can only say, that the whole of the apparatus is such as is used for the process that seems to have been adopted on this occasion, except the aqua-fortis, which is necessary to the colouring; these blanks contain no particle of silver whatever in them; I have tried them, therefore the mode of colouring them would be by doing them with a solution of silver in aqua-fortis; I have one in my pocket, which is one of the blanks found at the house of the prisoner, and which I had coloured myself. (Produces it.)

Court. Q. Do you mean that you have not found in this house that by which this process must have been compleated? - A. There was no solution of silver found.

Q. But there was an apron and a brush found, which smelt of aqua-fortis? - A. Yes; the brush, I take it, has been used for stirring the pickle; there are no materials found that they could colour with.

Q. There is no solution nor any vessel with the remains found? - A. No, but there is not one instance in twenty in which we do find them; they only prepare so much of the pickle, or of the solution of silver, as they immediately want.

Mr. Gleed. Q. Being in small quantities, it is easily thrown away? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present at the Magistrate's on the Thursday? - A. Yes, I attended the examination.

Q. Did you observe, on that day, the shilling which is the subject matter of this inquiry? - A. I did.

Q. In what state did you observe it? - A. I was confident it had been coloured, and an incautious person certainly might have taken it; I am positive it had been coloured; it had lost part of its colour, but even then an incautious person might have taken it.

Q. What do you mean by an incautious person? - A. It might be passed to a tradesman, but a person who is skilled in silver would not have taken it certainly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. That pattern, I believe, is from the dye of the year 1758? - A. Yes.

Q. You consider that as the pattern of this shilling? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe the graining at the edges is very full? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see any of that dye so worn

as to lose the grain? - A. I cannot say; here are two letters upon it, which makes it more remarkable, J.S.

Q. Has the edge of that any thing like a resemblance to the pattern one? - A. No, and I can explain to you why.

Q. If you will look at the counterfeit one, you will see that it is not round? - A. It is not.

REUBEN FLETCHER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. I need not ask you if that is a counterfeit? - A. It is a counterfeit.

Q. Does it appear to be made after the likeness and similitude of the current coin of the realm? - A. It appears to me to be a counterpart of this pattern shilling.

Joseph Rodgers, GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

Mary Rodgers, NOT GUILTY .

Edward Horn, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-9

502. GEORGE CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously, stealing, on the 5th of June , six yards of floor-cloth, value 30s. the property of John Harvey .

WILLIAM COOPER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Harvey, floor-cloth manufacturer at Lambeth, he has a shop, No. 57, Broad-street, Bloomsbury ; On the 5th of June, I was at the George and Crown, having a pint of beer after my dinner, about half-past two o'clock, nearly opposite my master's; I observed the prisoner reaching over some Chinese railing that was fixed in the front of the shop; I saw him try the hatch door to get in; I then saw him put his foot upon the scraper, and get over the rails, and in at the shop window; I ran over from the public-house, and when I came there, he had got this piece of floor-cloth under his arm, he had not got out of the shop; I stopped him, and took it from him.

Prisoner's defence. I was in a very bad way, and could not do any work; I don't know any thing about the oil-cloth. GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-10

503. SAMUEL ROBINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , two doe slops, value 18s. eighteen pair of gloves unsewed, value 10s. and a pair of breeches, value 5s. the property of Thomas Lingham .

THOMAS LINGHAM sworn. - I am a breeches-maker , in the Strand, the prisoner was in my employ; In consequence of information, I went to the house where the prisoner lodged, where I found some duplicates which led to the property in the indictment; he had worked for me about three months.

- PRITCHARD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Short's-gardens, (produces two pair of breeches;) I took them in of a woman, who said her name was Robins; I never saw the prisoner, till I saw him at Bow-street; I saw his wife there, and knew her to be the same woman that had pledged these articles. (The examination of the prisoner produced.)

Mr. Lingham. I saw the prisoner sign this, it was quite voluntary, (it is read;) the prisoner, Samuel Robins , says, he purchased the two pair of breeches now produced, for one pound, three shillings, and sixpence, of a man who looked like a gentleman's servant, but he cannot tell who the man is, or what is his name, and that he sent Lucy Robins, his wife, to pawn them.

MICHAEL CROWAN sworn. - I made these leather-breeches, they were brought to me to make by the prisoner, he told me they were for a customer, (produces eighteen pair of gloves, unsewed;) the prisoner employed me to get these gloves made; Mr. Lingham has had them in his possession.

Mr. Lingham. The leather breeches are called in the indictment, doe slops, that is the name they are known by in the trade; I know these to be mine, we stamped every skin we had with a stamp I have in my hand; the gloves are stamped in the same way; I know the nankeens by the particular way in which we have them made; we have an exclusive right of making them so by patent.

Q. Have you never sold any leather? - A. No.

For the Prisoner.

ANN GRACE sworn. - I have lived with Mrs. Robins since her husband has been in trouble; I was there drinking tea with Mrs. Robins, the week before Easter, when a man came in and asked Mr. Robins if he would buy some leather, he looked at it, and Mr. Robins said it was damaged leather, that is all I know about it.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-11

504. GEORGE SPIKES and JAMES SOLLIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , a pair of stays, value 10s. two gowns, value 21s. and a petticoat, value 5s. the property of Joyce Duce .

ELIZABETH LEIGHTON sworn. - I live near Mrs. Duce, at Pancras: On the 2d of July, I saw the prisoner Sollis go into Mrs. Duce's house, and the other was standing at the door, with a basket; from the basket hung a gown, which I knew to be Mrs. Duce's; they made a way towards Tottencourt-road, Sollis and he went away together.

JOYCE DUCE sworn. - In consequence of an alarm I received, I ran into the street, and saw the two prisoners in a field under a wall; they were walking till I called out stop thief, then they began to run, as they run, they threw the basket down over the wall, into a field.

- sworn. - I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw Sollis throw down a basket, they were both running; I picked up the basket and gave it to Mrs. Marsh.

- STONE sworn. - I was passing by, and heard the cry of stop thief; I took Spikes, and a solider afterwards took the other into custody.

(The property was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner Sollis's defence. I know nothing of this young man, he is as innocent as a child unborn.

Sollis, GUILTY , aged 20.

Spikes, GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence

Reference Number: t18020714-12

505. CHARLES PACKEVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , two yards and three quarters of cotton velvet, value 8s. the property of Mary Phillips , widow .

MARY PHILLIPS sworn. - I am a widow, I keep a shop , No. 36, Whitechapel road: On Monday the 7th of June, between two and three in the afternoon, I was going out of Cloth-fair into Long-lane , when the prisoner snatched my bundle from under my arm, behind me; it contained two yards and three quarters of velvet; he ran away, I ran after him all through Cloth-street, and then I lost fight of him; he was brought back to me in about seven or eight minutes; I am certain he is the same man.

Q. Did you see him before he snatched the bundle; Yes, I saw him by the posts.

Q. Did you observe enough to be sure that the man that was brought back to you, was the same man that had snatched your bundle? - A. I am sure of it; the cloth was brought back at the same time; I have no doubt of it's being the same velvet.

JAMES STEELE sworn. - I am a smith; I was standing at No. 26, King-street, Cloth-fair, on the 7th of June, between two and three o'clock, I heard Mrs. Phillips cry stop thief; I looked up the passage and saw the prisoner running with a parcel under his arm; I ran after him, and saw him drop the parcel, I picked it up; I then went after the prisoner; I lost fight of him in turning the corner; I afterwards saw him stopped; I am certain it was the same man that dropped the parcel, I know him by his dress; I delivered the parcel to Mr. Newman, at the Compter.

Q. Do you think you should know the prisoner again? - A. I do not think I should; I did not take any particular notice of him.

GEORGE DENNISON sworn. - I am a greengrocer; I heard a cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner running with a parcel in a paper; I ran after the prisoner and called stop thief; I followed him to the corner of New-street; he took the parcel from under his right-arm, and threw it into the middle of the street; James Steele picked it up; he ran down New-street, into Little Bartholomew-close, he turned into a yard that was no thoroughfare, there he was stopped by two men, I don't know who they were; I went with him to the Compter; I am sure he is the same person I first saw running.(Richard Dean, a constable, produced the velvet, which was identified by Mrs. Phillips.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-13

506. WILLIAM WACY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , a pocketbook, value 2s. the property of William Newhouse .

WILLIAM NEWHOUSE sworn. - I am a worsted - weaver : On Friday the 18th of June, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was robbed of my pocket-book, in Leadenhall-street ; I was looking at a print-shop, the corner of Cree-church; I had not stopped half a minute before I found something rush past me, which gave me a suspicion; I directly put my hand to my pocket, and missed my pocket book; I directly turned on the right-hand, and saw the prisoner with it in his hand; I pursued him, and as soon as he found I was close upon him, he hurled it across the road, I picked it up immediately.

Q. What coloured pocket-book was it? - A. A black one; I never lost fight of him till he was stopped; a gentleman, who is a stranger to me, stopped him; I took him into custody and gave charge of him. (Produces the pocket book)

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a constable, the prisoner was delivered into my custody, by Mr. Newhouse; I know nothing of the transaction.

Prisoner's defence. I was going down Fenchurch-street, and heard a sing out of stop thief, and two gentlemen stopped me; I am quite an innocent man, it is a malicious piece of business; my uncle and aunt are now lying bad of a fever; I very lately came from sea.

Q. (To Newhouse.) Did you know any thing of the prisoner before? - A. Never in my life.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes; and he told me I had sworn his life away, and I should not be guilty of the like again.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-14

507. ELIZABETH KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , a child's dress, value 13s. 6d. the property of William Hayward .

WILLIAM HAYWARD sworn. - I am a tailor and salesman , the prisoner has made waistcoats for me these five years; having lost a great number of articles, and having a suspicion of the prisoner, I went, on Friday last, with an officer to her lodgings, in Red-lion-market, where I found several duplicates; among them was a duplicate of this child's dress; I found it at a pawnbroker's in Little-Britain. (The pawnbroker's servant produced a child's dress, which he deposed he had received from the prisoner on the 5th of June.)

Hayward. This is a dress which I lost out of my shop, I know it by the mark; I had seen it at the latter end of May, or beginning of June; it must have been taken from the counter; the prisoner was frequently left there for half an hour together, and sometimes an hour.

(The prisoner put in a paper, which was read as follows:)

"My Lord, I very much lament my inability, and my extreme poverty to procure legal assistance; but I trust to the humanity of your Lordship to supply that defect; I humbly take the liberty of informing your Lordship, I have worked for the prosecutor upwards of five years, without any impeachment of character, and I most solemnly assure your Lordship the property pledged was my own, and was bought by me in remnants, and made up for sale at my leisure intervals; I shall have the honour of producing witnesses to your Lordship, to whom I have been known for years, and for whom I have worked, who will say what character I have always borne, and what my character really is."

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the Jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-15

508. JOHN BRADY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , two pair of stockings, value 5s. the property of Louis Le Sage .

LOUIS LE SAGE sworn. - I am a hosier , No. 2, King-street, St. Giles's : About eleven o'clock on the 26th of June, the prisoner and another man came into my shop, and asked for some stockings; I shewed them some, and while I only turned my back, he ran away with two pair; Mr. Wilkinson brought back the stockings.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn. - On Saturday the 26th of June, about eleven o'clock at night, I was at the bottom of King-street, I saw four men standing together, that I had a suspicion of; I went on the other side of the street, and saw two of them going into the prosecutor's shop; they had not been in above five minutes, before the prisoner ran out of the shop with two pair of stockings; I followed him; he had not got two hundred yards before I stopped him, and asked him what he had got there; he said, he had got a pair of stockings his messmate had given him; I took the stockings from him, and laid hold of him; he rescued himself from me, but I got hold of him again, and took him into a grocer's shop, where I left him in custody; I then went to Mr. Le Sage's shop, and informed him of it; he came to the grocer's shop, and knew the man and stockings; I have had them ever since.(Produces them.)

(The stockings were identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-16

509. JEREMIAH DALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , a silver watch, value 30s. a steel chain, value 6d. and a metal watch-key, value 1d. the property of Richard Adams .

RICHARD ADAMS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Williams, of Bedford-square: On the 30th of June, about ten o'clock in the morning, I put my watch over the chimney-piece; I saw the prisoner coming down the area, but did not suspect he was coming down to take any thing; I was coming out of the pantry into the passage, when I saw him with my watch in his hand; I immediately took him; he said, he came down to beg a drop of water; he said, he had picked up the watch from the ground; I took it out of his hand, (produces the watch;) it is mine.

Prisoner's defence. I was very hungry, and I went to ask for a drop of water.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-17

510. ROBERT ANDERSON was indicted for making an assault, in the King's highway, upon John Townsend , on the 25th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silver watch-chain, value 1s. a silver seal, value 1s. a brass watch-key, value 1d. and two pieces of foreign coin, value 6d. the property of the said John.

JOHN TOWNSEND sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. One hundred and seven miles from Hyde-park-corner, in the county of Gloucester; I am a labouring man .

Q. What have you to say against the prisoner?

- A. On the 25th of June, a little before ten o'clock at night, I was going from my lodgings in East-Smithfield to Butcher-row, to get a pair of shoes; I was going home to my family the next morning; I saw three men, Anderson was in the middle; as I came up, Anderson said, what cheer, shipmate? I answered, what cheer? upon that, he immediately lifted up his fist, and gave me a violent blow, which cut me in the ear, at the same time he had my watch-chain in his hand; I immediately gave him a blow, and tripped up his heels; one of the others then struck me, and I sung out murder, robbery, watch, as loud as I could; the watchman then came up, I had treated him with a glass of gin but a minute before; I told the watchman this man had attempted to rob me, they had broke my watchchain, and when the watch - man came up, the prisoner threw down the chain by his feet, and they all ran away; the watchman picked up the chain; I never lost fight of the prisoner; two other watchmen came up, I told them if they would guard me, I would guard the man; I did not like to let go my hold.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This was a dark night - was it not? - A. There was no moon, I believe.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. Never in my life before, to my knowledge.

Q. You had been drinking that afternoon? - A. Yes, but I was not disguised in liquor; I had been drinking some beer.

Q. And some gin? - A. No, I never drink any spirituous liquors; I used to do, but I have left it off.

Q. Had you seen any women in the course of your journey towards home? - A. Yes, a number.

Q. Have you had any conversation with any of them? - A. Yes, a great many.

Q. They had made an attempt at your watch - had not they? - A. Not that I saw or felt.

Q. How long had you been in company with the women during that afternoon? - A. I cannot rightly tell, because I was going backwards and forwards, but never to sit down in company with them.

Q. But to talk to them? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time you say this happened, were not these women by that you had been talking to? - A. Not that I know of; there were no women nor men but the three men that I have mentioned.

Q. You know there is a reward of forty pounds if this man is convicted? - A. I did not know it till the Justice told me of it; he said, if he was hanged, there would be a reward, and I told him I hoped he would not be hanged, as I did not want the blood of any man.

BENJAMIN WRIGHT sworn. - Q. Are you a watchman? - A. I am a headborough; I took charge of the prisoner, and the Magistrates bound me over; I have the watch-chain. (Produces it.)

JAMES INCH sworn. - Q. You are a watchman? - A. Yes; On the 25th of June, I heard thieves, murder, watchman, cried; I ran, and saw the prosecutor; he had got hold of the prisoner; he told me the watch-chain was upon the ground; it was found, and he said it was his watch-chain; the prosecutor never let go of him till he got to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. There were women of the town about - were there not? - A. Yes; there are always women of the town.

Q. But there were a great many at that particular time? - A. It was all done in such a hurry, that I did not take particular notice.

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk or sober? - A. He did not shew in liquor to me.

Q. Do you mean to say he was not at all in all. liquor? - A. He did not seem to be in liquor at

Q. Had you been drinking with him? - A. Yes, he asked me to have a glass of gin.

Q. Did you drink? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he drink gin with you? - A. I cannot say whether he did or not, for when I had had my glass, I came away directly; I did not see him drink any.

Q. (To Townsend.) Look at the watch - chain - do you know it? - A. Yes, it is my property; I can swear to the chain by this three-penny-piece, that I cut a notch in myself, near the hole; I have had it a great while; the chain I have not had long; I bought it of a pawnbroker.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

For the Prisoner.

LAW RUSSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Sun-yard, East-Smithfield.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, very well.

Q. Were you in East-Smithfield, and saw the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. When? - A. I cannot recollect the day of the month.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you recollect the prisoner being taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. On that night did you see any thing? - A. I saw the prosecutor; he was very fore in liquor; he challenged the watchman; he would give him a glass of gin, and went into the sign of the Sun; I saw him come out of the Sun; after that, I saw the prisoner come rushing past against this man, and by that means he called it a robbery; I was not a yard from my own door; I went to assist him, and then he called out watch, and that was near a quarter of an hour before the watch came to his assistance; when the watchman came, I took his lantern from his hand to see what was lost; upon that a woman or two cried, there is the chain down

there; I picked it up, and conveyed the prisoner to the watch-house.

Q. Did you see the prisoner make a snatch, or attempt to take the property at all from the prosecutor? - A. No.

Q. Who did you give the chain to? - A. To the watchman.

Q. Are you quite sure the prosecutor was drunk? - A. Very much in liquor.

Q. Did you see him, before that time, in the company of the women? - A. Yes, he was with several women of the town; he would not pass any one.

Q. Were there any other men there? - A. No, none but women.

Q. If he had been in company with other men, must you have seen them? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. Did you go to the watch-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you saw the headborough? - A. I did.

Q. What led you to go to the watch-house? - A. By being a house-keeper; I thought he might be guilty or not guilty.

Q. Then the watchman did not ask you to go? - A. He insisted upon my going.

Q. Then why did you say you went to the watch-house because you thought he might be guilty or not guilty? - A. That I don't know any thing about.

Q. Tell me what you went to the watch-house for? - A. To protect the man that was robbed.

Q. Then you did not go to protect the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. But to protect the prosecutor? - A. Yes.

Q. Now, turn to the Jury, and I ask you again why you went to the watch-house? - A. There was nobody to keep guard of this man but me and the watchman; I went to the watch-house to give such evidence as I could prove, but there was no proving of the kind; there were no questions asked, and therefore I never was asked a question.

Q. Then you were not desired to go? - A. I was desired by the watchman to go.

Inch. I never desired any assistance at all, because the prosecutor had kept his hold of him.

Russell. There was another man came up, and went to the watch-house.

Q. Who was that? - A. I don't know his name; he is here.

Q. What did he go to the watch-house for? - A. He knew that I picked up the chain.

Q. (To Inch.) Who picked up the chain? - A. I cannot say; some person picked it up, and said, here is the chain; it was a man, but I cannot say who.

Q. (To Russell.) Did that other man go to the watch-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Why did he go? - A. He knows no more of the matter than, I do.

Q. Do you know his name? - A. No.

Q. Are you acquainted with him? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with him? - A. About six months, but I don't know his name; I think his name is Anderson; he is a tradesman in the same street where I am.

Q. When did you first see him that night? - A. Just as the chain was dropped.

Q. You had not been in company with him before? - A. No.

Q. How near was he to you when you saw him? - A. A yard.

Q. Did he say any thing? - A. He did not say any thing to me.

Q. Nor you to him? - A. Not at that time.

Q. When did you first speak to each other? - A. Not till he came to the watch-house.

Q. Did he assist in holding the prisoner? - A. I cannot say he did.

Q. Did he, or did he not? - A. He did not; I was the person holding the prisoner.

Q. Were you the only person who held the prisoner from the time the chain was picked up at the watch-house? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. The watchman did not hold him? - A. I gave the watchman charge of the prisoner.

Q. Did the watchman hold him, or did you? - A. I did.

Q. Why did you give the prisoner in charge to the watchman? - A. Because the man called watch close to my own door.

Q. Had you no other reason for giving charge of the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. You know nothing of any thing that was lost? - A. No.

Q. Before you gave any charge to the watchman, who was the first person that laid hold of him? - A. I laid hold of him; I was the next man to him.

Q. The prosecutor did not lay hold of him? - A. I did not see the prosecutor hold him at all.

Q. And how long after you laid hold of him was it that the chain was picked up? - A. A quarter of an hour.

Q. Was your wife there when you picked up the chain? - A. Yes; she saw me pick up the chain.

Mrs. RUSSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Tell the Court what you know of this? - A. I was preparing for bed; I heard an uproar in the street, I took no notice of it till I heard my husband's voice; I then came to the door, and saw the prisoner with the prosecutor on one side, and my husband on the other; there was a cry of watch, and the watchman came up, and my husband delivered the man up to the watchman, and took the watchman's lantern and picked up the chain; some women came past, and said, this man

has been drinking about the neighbouthood all the afternoon, and he had liked to have lost his watch once before.

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk or sober? - A. He appeared to me to be very much intoxicated.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. You say, when you came up, your husband had hold of him on one side, and the prosecutor had hold of him on the other? - A. Yes, and upon finding the chain, the prosecutor searched for his watch, and found his watch safe in his pocket.

Q. Did you go to the watch-house? - A. No.

Q. How came your husband to go to the watch-house? - A. Because he was at the taking of the man.

Q. Did any body desire him to go? - A. No, I do not think any body desired him to go.

Q. Who had hold of the prisoner? - A. The prosecutor and the watchman; my husband had given up his hold on the watchman's approach.

NATHANIEL ATKINS sworn. - I live in Sunyard, Nightingale-lane; I am a tin-man.

Q. Whatever you know of this business, state it to the Court? - A. I don't know what evening it was; the prosecutor was very much intoxicated, going up and down the yard; bye and bye I heard him call out robbery; he had then hold of the prisoner; the prosecutor had been inquiring for a girl; when he called the watch, I went up; he had got hold of the prisoner; the watchman came up, and Russell took the lantern from the watchman to look for the watch-chain; some girls, who stood near at hand, said, here it is; Russell picked it up, and gave it to the headborough.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner conversing with any girls? - A. No.

Q. Were there none thereabout? - A. Yes, swarms.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. Who had hold of the prisoner when you came up? - A. The prosecutor.

Q. Any body else? - A. Mr. Russell was standing close to him, but whether he had hold of him on not I cannot pretend to say.

Q. Who carried the prisoner away to the watchhouse? - A. The prosecutor and the watchman had hold of him all the way.

Q. Did Russell go to the watch-house? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Why? - A. I don't know that.

Q. You did not hear any reason? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you hear any body require him to go? - A. I did not.

Q. Were there more than one watchman? - A. Yes, there might be four or five watchman that went along with him.

Q. Was this watchman sober or drunk? - A. That I cannot pretend to say; he had been having something to drink with the prosecutor.

Q. Was he drunk or sober? - A. I cannot say; I know he is a very neglecsful watchman, for the bar of our window has been left unlastened several times, and he has taken no notice of it.

Q. Did you go to the watch-house? - A. Yes; I was going to my master's, in the Minories, for some tea-kettle knobs, because I could not get them early enough in the morning.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Court. (To Wright.) Q. You received the prisoner in charge? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prosecutor? - A. Yes; I took the charge from the prosecutor.

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk or sober? - A. He was certainly the worse for liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-18

511. MARY SWANN and JOSEPH SPURR were indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon John Tothill on the 6th of June , putting him in fear and taking from his person, a silver watch, value 50s. the property of the said John.

JOHN TOTHILL sworn. - On the 6th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner, Swann, stopped me in St. John's-street , and said, my dear, will you go with me? I said, good God, don't detain me, I am going home; then pulling me close towards her, by my coat, she put her hand to my watch pocket, and pulled out my watch; she put it into her bosom; I said, don't steal my watch, upon that she-sung out, Jack, and the other prisoner came running from the opposite side of the street; he asked what was the matter? Jack says she, this man says I have stole his watch; upon which he immediately caught me by my shirt, which put me in bodily sear, and said, d - n you, leave the girl alone; then he caught the girl by the hair of the head, and said, d - n you, you b - h, come home; be pulled her towards the gutter, I had hold of her at the same time; some young men were then coming past, and I begged their assistance; I told them this girl had stole my watch, upon which they sung out for the watch; the watchmen were coming down very quick, Spurr then caught me by the flap of my coat, and gave me a blow with his sift against the shoulder, which knocked me into the gutter; but as I had hold of the girl at the same time, I pulled her down with me; she then held her hand out to him, and he received something, but what it was I could not see; when I got up the man was gone off; the watchman came up, and I gave change of the girl; she was taken to the watch-house, and in about five minotes the man came; I knew him to be the same man that had knocked me down in the gutter, and the constable detained them both.

Q. Has your watch been found? - A. Yes; the watchman found it after I was gone.

Q. Whereahouse in St. John's-street? - A. Next door to Mr. Clarke's, a coach harness-maker, nearer Smithfield than the other end.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. (Counsel for Spurr.)

Q. I understand you, the woman it was that took the watch, and the man was at a distance from you? - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore did not see what she took? - A. I do not know that he did.

Q. You saw nothing of him till she called Jack? - A. No.

JOHN DAVIS sworn. - On the 6th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was going through the Broadway, St. John's-street; I saw the prosecutor and the young woman together, she had hold of his coat; I had not gone above six or seven yards from them, when he called out, gentlemen, she has robbed me of my watch.

Q. Was any body with you? - A. Yes, my wife; I stopped then, and she tried to get away from him, but sinding she could not get away, she called out, Jack, Jack, upon which the other prisoner came running from the other side of the street; when he came, she said, Jack, this man says, I have robbed him of his watch; the prisoner caught hold of the prosecutor's collar, and said, d - n you, Sir, leave the girl alone; upon that he loosed him, and laid hold of Mary Swann by the head, and said, d - n your blood, you b - h, come home; the prosecutor holding her fast round the waist, she could not go; Spurr then caught hold of the prosecutor by his coat, and gave him a blow on his breast, upon which the prosecutor fell in the kennel, and the woman upon him; I cannot tell whether the prisoner Spurr fell with him, but he was upon his knees at the same time.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes; she then reached out her hand to him, and he received her hand in his, but what she gave him I cannot say; then he got up and went across the way, and the watchman coming up, the prosecutor charged the watch with her, she was taken to the watch-house, and I followed them; some little time after, the prisoner, Spurr, came into the watch-house.

THOMAS KEEP sworn. - On the 6th of June, I saw the prosecutor lying in the kennel, opposite my house; I came up and pulled him by the coat, and he said, he had been robbed of his watch; I asked him who had got it, be said, he did not know, she called, Jack, and then the other prisoner came over, and asked what business he had with the girl; the watchman then came up, and she was taken to the watch-house.

WILLIAM COUNT sworn. - I am a watchman; on the 6th of June, I heard a cry of watch, in St. John's-street; I came up to the assistance of the patrol, and the prosecutor said he was robbed of his watch, and when he was secured, I went to my box; about an hour after, I was going round my beat, and I saw a bit of red ribbon hanging down between the stone and the gate; I went up to the gate, and picking up the bit of ribbon, I drew the watch out.

Q. Was this gate near the place where the prosecutor and the woman were? - A. It was about twenty yards off, on the right-hand side of the way, going from Smithfield, just by Mr. Sparkes's gate.

Q. Was it the same side of the way that the prosecutor and the woman were? - A. Yes; I took the watch directly down to the watch-house, and gave it to the constable of the night, Mr. Lammas.

- LAMMAS sworn. - I was constable of the night; I received the watch from the last witness,(produces it;) I was at the watch-house at Cowcross, the 6th of June.

Tothill. This is my watch, I know it by the number and maker's name, Charles Dixon, No. 8277.

Swann's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

Spurr's defence. I never saw this woman, or either of these gentlemen till I saw them at the watch-house.

Lammas. Spurr was very much in liquor, when he came to the watch-house.

Q. (To Keep.) How near is your house to Sparkes's gate? - A. There is one house between; when I saw them, they were opposite Sparkes's gate-way.

Spurr called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Swann, GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing, but not violently .

Spurr, GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-19

512. JOHN SCHOFIELD , JAMES SCHOFIELD , and CHARLES SCHOFIELD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , five garden pots, value 10d. and thirteen plants, value 13d. the property of John Wright .

JOHN WRIGHT sworn. - I am a gardener , in Hackney-fields : Last Sunday fortnight, I lost five garden-pots from my garden, and thirteen plants; the prisoners were stopped with them.

- LEVENHAM sworn. - I am one of the patrols; on Sunday the 27th of June, about half past five in the morning, I took all the three prisoners; they had got five garden-pots, each of the prisoners had got some of them, (the property produced;) I asked them where they were going with these things, and they said, they had a little garden

of their own, that they were going to plant them in.

Q. Did you know the prisoners before? - A. No.

Wright. Here is one of the pots without a rim, which I can swear to; I believe them all to be mime, but one plant may be like another.

John Schofield 's defence. We found these pots in the road, and took them into Hackney, to see if we could find any body to own them.

The prisoners called six witnesses, who gave them a good character.

All three, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-20

513. JOHN CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a great-coat, value 6s. the property of Peter Pendergrass .

PETER PENDERGRASS sworn. - On the 12th of this month, I was beating a carpet near Bayswater, by the turnpike, about seven o'clock in the morning; I left my great-coat at the Three-compasses, Orchard-street, Portman-square ; I came back there between four and five in the afternoon; my coat was there then, and between seven and eight I saw it in the prisoner's possession, and I took it from him.

- EDWARDS sworn. - I was at the Threecompasses, on the 12th of this month, the prisoner was there; I saw him take a handkerchief out of his pocket and lay it upon the table open; then he took the coat off the peg, and put it under the table, it was a coat belonging to the last witness; I'endergrass came in and saw it, and took it from him. (The coat produced and identified by Pendegrass.)

Prisoner's defence. I was forward in liquor, I know nothing of it.

GUILTY, aged 49.

Of stealing to the value of 10d.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-21

514. JAMES KENNEDY was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon Elizabeth, the wife of Samuel Butcher , on the 7th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, two pair of stockings, value 10s. a half shawl, value 5s. a pair of slippers, value 2s. a pair of sciffars, value 1s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2s. the property of the said Samuel.

ELIZABETH BUTCHER sworn. - I am the wife of Samuel Butcher: I was in High-street, St. Giles's, on the 7th of this month, about ten o'clock at night, with my sister, Mary Morgan .

Q. Had you any bundle? - A. Yes, containing two pair of cotton stockings, a half Norwich shawl, a pair of scissars, a pair of Spanish leather slippers, and some trifling things besides, there were two pocket handkerchiefs.

Q. Did any thing happen to you? - A. Yes, three boys followed us from the corner of Dyot-street, to the Hampshire-hog yard, nearly oppsite the church gate.

Q. Had you ever seen them before? - A. Not to my knowledge; they passed us several times so close as to brush our clothes as they passed, the prisoner was one of them.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes; I communicated to my sister a suspicion of one of these boys, when one of them stopped at my side, under pretence of buckling his shoe; the prisoner at the bar immediately snatched at my bundle, which I had on my arm; I held it tight; he made a second attempt immediately, and got it from me; he ran down Hampshire-hog-yard, with one of the others.

Q. You had never seen the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. When did you see him again? - A. I saw him the next morning, at St. Giles's watch-house.

Q. Have you even seen the bundle since? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure he was one of them? - A. Yes, but he was not in the same dress that he is now, he was dressed more like a working person.

SARAH MORGAN sworn. - Q. Were you with your sister? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it? - A. On the 7th of June; the watch had just done crying ten, my sister had hold of my arm; I observed three boys dogging us, the prisoner was one of them; they were sometimes behind us, sometimes before us, and sometimes at the side of us.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. Yes, I had.

Q. Are you certain he was one of them? - A. Yes, they took the bundle from my sister's arm.

JOHN DALTON sworn. - I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner, but found no property.

Prisoner's defence. At the time the robbery was committed, I was at home at supper.

Q. (To Dalton.) Where did you take the prisoner? - A. I took him the next evening, at the ruins, the bottom of Cross-lane, where the gang meet and consult before they go to work.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes, I have known him for a long time.

Q. Did he appear to you to be deaf? - A. No, I did not know he was deaf; I spoke to him in the usual way of speaking, and he answered me every word.

For the Prisoner.

ANN READ sworn. - I lodge in the same house with the prisoner and his mother, No. 9. Bowlyard; I went up stairs, last Wednesday week to get

a light, as near as I can guess, about ten o'clock, in his mother's room; I saw the prisoner then in the room; he was apparently at supper; he sat at the table eating, but I cannot say what; his mother was in the room with him, and his father, and there was another person, who lives in the house, Mrs. Colleit, was at supper with him.

Q. How did you get the light? - A. They gave me a light from their candle.

Q. Where did you get that light? - A. I stood at the door, neither in nor out, when they gave me a light.

Q. Who brought the candle to the door? - A. The mother.

Q. Was there any other candle in the room? - A. I did not see any other.

Q. Was there any other man besides him and his father? - A. No.

Q. Did you observe any thing on the table? - A. I did not take notice.

Q. Did you see whether there were plates upon the table or not? - A. I cannot say positively, whether there were or not; I saw a dish, and I thought I saw some plates.

Q. Did you see any plates? - A. Yes, there were two plates.

Q. Are you sure there were two plates? - A. I am positive there were.

Q. Was there any liquor upon the table? - A. I did not see any.

Q. No pot, or any thing of that kind? - A. No.

Q. Any cloth upon the table? - A. No, I saw no cloth.

Q. Whereabout was the prisoner sitting or standing? - A. He sat near the fire-place.

Q. Was here any fire? - A. I did not see any fire.

Q. Were all the others standing? - A. Yes; the room is a very small one.

Q. Whereabout is the fire-place, is it on the side which faces the door? - A. The fire-place is on the left-side as you enter the room, and the window faces the door.

Q. Did you see him afterwards that night? - A. No, I did not.

Q. There was a house burnt down lately in St. Giles's, how far is that from Bowl-yard? - A. The back of the bake-house that was burnt comes into Bowl-yard.

Q. How near the end of Bowl-yard, that comes into High-street, is the place where Kennedy lived? - A. Our house is at the end of Bowl-yard, nearest to Belton-street.

Q. How do you know it was about ten o'clock? - A. I heard the watchman going ten a few minutes after I had got up stairs with the light.

Q. How many people lodge in the house besides Kennedy? - A. I cannot tell, the house is four stories high, and two rooms on a floor.

Q. Is there a separate family in each room? - A. Yes.

Q. And the door left open all night, perhaps? - A. No.

ELEANOR COLLETT sworn. - The same night that this happened, I was eating a bit of supper with this young man.

Q. Do you live in the same house with him? - A. Yes, at the bottom of the house, at the ground-floor.

Q. How soon did you quit the room where he was? - A. Directly after ten o'clock.

Q. How long had you been in the room? - A. About half an hour.

Q. Who were at supper besides you? - A. His father, his mother, his sister, my sister, and myself.

Q. What had you for supper? - A. A piece of corned beef.

Q. Was there any fire in the room? - A. A very little.

Q. Who sat next the fire? - A. The father.

Q. Where did the mother sit? - A. At the head of the table, by the side of his father; I sat next to the mother.

Q. Where did the daughter sit? - A. The opposite side next to me.

Q. Where did the prisoner sit? - A. Next to his sister, between his sister and the fire, on the other side of the table.

Q. How far was he from the father? - A. Very near.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Read coming for a light? - A. Yes, just as I was done supper.

Q. Did she come into the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she sit down? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. How long she stay in the room? - A. Not two minutes to my knowledge.

Q. What did she come for? - A. A light.

Q. Who gave her the light? - A. The mother.

Q. Did she go down stairs before you? - A. Yes.

Q. How long after her did you go down? - A. Not many minutes for the watch was just gone ten.

Q. Did you leave him in the room? - A. I did.

Q. Did you see him afterwards that night? - A. No, I did not.

Q. How many people live in this house? - A. There are nine families in the house, I have got two children.

Q. (To Mrs. Butcher.) Where had you been before this happened? - A. At my sister's, they keep St. Giles's watch-house.

Q. Had you come immediately from St. Giles's watch-house? - A. Yes, the watch-house clock had struck ten, and we came away immediately after.

Q. How long did you stay in the watch-house after the clock struck ten? - A. No longer than while I put my cloak on.

Q. How far is the watch-house from Dyot-street? - A. About a quarter of a mile.

Q. Whereabout is the watch-house? - A. At the bottom of Smart's-buildings, Holborn, the first turning from Drury-lane.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-22

515. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , nine pounds weight of coffee, value 8s. the property of Richard Cooke .

THOMAS HEVERITT sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Richard Cooke: On Saturday, the 12th of June, we had a quantity of coffee upon Bear-quay ; about five o'clock in the morning, I received information that one of the bags of coffee was cut; I went down to the quay, and found the prisoner in custody; part of the coffee was in the watchman's apron, and the other part was in the prisoner's hat; that part, which was in the prisoner's hat, I put into my apron; I delivered it to the officer; it was raw coffee, of the same quality with that in the bag; it was very indifferent coffee, what they call exportation-coffee; I had trusted the prisoner with a great variety of goods, and always found him very honest till this time; he was not under the employment of Mr. Cooke when this happened.

JOHN FLETCHER sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 12th of June, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I was going round, and saw a bag of coffee cut; there were about a hundred bags one upon another; I then saw the prisoner concealed between a bag of coffee and some casks; I pulled him out, and searched him; I found a quantity of coffee in his breeches, and in his trowsers, and different parts about him; he then begged of me to let him go; I took him into custody, and delivered the coffee into the custody of the street-keeper.

(Isaac Rolse, the street-keeper, produced the coffee.)

Heveritt. This is the same sort of coffee that was in the bag.

Prisoner's defence. This coffee was given to me upon the wharf.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 19.

Whipped one hundred yards, near Porter's-quay .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-23

516. JAMES SHEPPARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , a knifecase, value 12s. the property of Marmaduke Westwood .

(The prosecutor, being a quaker , refused to be sworn.)

JOHN CROSBY sworn. - I am errand-boy to Mr. Marmaduke Westwood, a cabinet-maker , in Crooked-lane : On Tuesday last, I observed the prisoner pass through and through the place several times, about eleven o'clock in the day; he then came into the shop, and took up a knife-case in his arm, and carried it out of doors; I was standing on a chest of drawers at the end of the counter; I was in a little accompting-house at the back of the shop; I ran out after him; I called out stop thief, and saw him stopped; he threw the knife-case away; I don't know who picked it up; I saw it again in the course of a couple of minutes in the hands of our apprentice.

Q. All the property that was thereabout was your master's? - A. Yes.

GEORGE SPOUT sworn. - I am a constable; I was going through Crooked-lane, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner with this knifecase, (producing it,) in his arms; he was not then ten yards from the house; I ran immediately towards him to say hold of him, and he threw down the property.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to your Lordship.

GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in Newgate , publicly whipped , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-24

517. JOHN RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a silver watch, value 40s. the property of Christopher Hall .

CHRISTOPHER HALL sworn. - I am a seafaring man ; I lost my watch from on board the Ann, of Blyth, lying in New-Crane tier, in the middle of the river, on the north side of the stream ; the prisoner was a stranger to me; the last time I saw it was at ten o'clock at night, on Friday night, the 25th of June, where I slept in the steerage; I put it into an old shoe that was nailed up against the side of the cabin; I missed it the next morning, between four and five; I heard that a man had been taken with two watches upon him, and I went at eleven o'clock in the morning to the Police-Office, and there I found my watch; it had a string to it, and a jointed key; I know it by the name and number, 67138, R. T. Portal, London.

ISAAC WELLS sworn. - I belong to the Police-Office, Wapping: On Saturday morning, the 26th of June, about two o'clock, I found the prisoner at the bar going ashore in the ship's boat off New-Crane; he was rowing himself towards New-Crane stairs; I asked him where he was going; he said, he was going on shore to run away from his master; he said, his master had used him very ill; I rather suspected he had done something wrong, and I immediately searched him in the boat, and found two watches upon him; I asked him how he came by them; he said, they were his own pro

perty; I detained him, and took him to the Office; the prosecutor came to the Office the same morning, and claimed the watch; he deseribed the name and number.(The watch was produced, and identified by Hall.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the two watches that night. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-25

518. JAMES FOX and HENRY PROBY were indicted, the first, for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the Devil, upon Henry Proby , wickedly and feloniously did make an assault, and that he diabolically, and against the order of nature, had a venereal affair with the said Henry, and then and there did carnally know him, and did perpetrate that abominable and detestable crime, called sodomy; and the other, for feloniously, wickedly, and diabolically consenting with the said James Fox, and permitting the said James carnally to know him, and commit the said detestable and abominable crime, called sodomy .

Mr. Const, on the part of the prosecution, stated, that evidence had been given against the prisoners to induce a Grand Jury to find a true bill; but, feeling he had not sufficient evidence to convict them of a capital crime, he declined offering any, and requested they might be detained to take their trials for a misdemeanor, which they accordingly were.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-26

519. ROBERT COOMBES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , three shirts, value 3s. two waistcoats, value 3s. a hat, value 1s. a pair of pantaloons, value 2s. a coat, value 2s. a pair of trowsers, value 1s. a cravat, value 1s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of James Stewart .

JAMES STEWART sworn. - I am an American sailor ; I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment from on board the ship on Friday last; the prisoner came with us from America, as a sailor ; we came last from Petersburgh; I lost them out of my chest while I was asleep; the Police officers came on board with the prisoner on Friday night, between eleven and twelve o'clock, and inquired if I had lost these things.

HENRY CRIPPS sworn. - On Friday night last, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I derected the prisoner at Wapping-stairs, with a large bundle; I did not see him land, he was at the stair-head; I asked him where he was going with that bundle; he told me he was going to his washer-woman's; I asked him where she lived, and he could not tell me; I asked him what ship he belonged to; he told me the Suffolk; I had another officer with me, and we took him on board the Suffolk; after overhauling the bundle, Stewart claimed the property.(Ralph Thomas corroborated the evidence of Cripps.)(The property was produced, and identified by Stewart.)

Prisoner's defence. I took them by mistake.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-27

520. FRANCIS DRING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , nine ton weight of sugar, value 500l. and a wooden hogshead, value 2s. the property of James French .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of James Davis .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

JAMES DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Where do you live? - A. My accomptinghouse is on St. Dunstan's-hill; I am a sugar-broker and merchant ; I employed Mr. Dring as a warehouseman , to house sugars, in Wheeler-street, Spital-fields.

Q. Look at that order - did you order twenty hogsheads' to be housed at Mr. Dring's warehouse? - A. I did.

Court. Q. Did you ever see them there? - A. I cannot say I saw those particular casks there.

Q. When was that order given? - A. On the 13th of October.

JAMES BRIDGMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. What are you? - A. I work in Mr. Dring's warehouse.

Q. Do you remember going for any sugar of Mr. Davis's? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that order - did you go for twenty hogsheads of sugar? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with them? - A. I took them to Mr. Dring's warehouse.

Q. By that order from Mr. Davis? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the hogsheads appear to be all tight? - A. Yes, they did.

Q. Did you, at any time afterwards, see them in the warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards sec them in any other situation than tight? - A. Yes, a good while after; when it was found out, I saw a great many of them empty; I saw three of them first.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Davis of it? - A. I did.

Q. SAMUEL- JOHN DOBSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. What are you? - A. I am servant to Mr. Dring; these casks of sugar came to Mr. Dring's before I came there.

Q. Do you remember any casks in the warehouse marked I diamond F? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whose property they were? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Do you remember any of these casks being opened? - A. I do.

Q. Who opened them? - A. According to my master's orders, sometimes I opened them, and sometimes he opened them himself.

Q. Do you remember the opening of any particular cask - can you separate any particular day? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. At the time that they were opened, was your master privy to it? - A. Yes, he was there.

Q. Was there any one time when the whole contents of a cask were taken out in any one day? - A. Yes, and put into barrels and casks.

Q. Did he ever empty a hogshead in a day? - A. Yes, there has been a hogshead emptied in a day.

Q. Do you know the weight of an hogshead? - A. The common run, I believe, is about fifteen hundred weight.

Q. Do you remember, at any time, more than one hogshead in one day? - A. No, not more than one hogshead in one day.

Q. What became of the sugar that was so taken? - A. It was sent, according to my master's order, to different grocers; there was a whole hogshead emptied in one day into casks, and part of it sent to Mr. Heseldine.

Q. Can you fix what day that was? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever hear from your master whose property that sugar was? - A. His own.

Q. Were any samples of this sugar drawn? - A. I did not see any.

Court. Q. The hogshead itself was never sent? - A. The hogshead was left behind.

Q. How was that hogshead marked? - A. I diamond F.

THOMAS HESELDINE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Where do you live? - A. In Lamb-street, Spital-fields.

Q. Do you know Mr. Dring? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember buying any sugar of him? - A. Yes.

Q. At what time? - A. At different times; I cannot say as to any particular day.

Q. You have been examined before? - A. Yes, but I did not then speak to a particular day; I could not.

Q. Don't you keep books? - A. Yes.

Q. Don't you make entries? - A. Sometimes I do, and sometimes I do not.

Q. How came you not to make an entry of this? - A. It was weighed, and I paid for it immediately.

Q. That is not your constant practice in your business? - A. Yes, I did it the other day; I keep no account of sugar; if I go to the refiner's, there is the money for it.

Q. And you cannot, by your books, afertain any thing with respect to this sugar? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your mode of buying sugar is by the whole hogshead at a time? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore, what you bought of Mr. Dring, must have been a whole hogshead? - A. Yes.

Mr. Const. Q. Did you ever have delivered to you a whole hogshead at a time? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say you ever had a hogshead in your life, or that it could come into your house? - A. Yes, surely I have.

Court. Q. If you bought nothing but a whole hogshead, you had none brought in casks? - A. There was one, that, at my request, was put into a rice-barrel, for the greater facility of carriage.

Mr. Alley. Q. Your original purchase was a whole hogshead? - A. Yes.

Q. You had been in Mr. Dring's warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there not a great variety of hogsheads in the warehouse? - A. I suppose 1500 hogsheads.

SAMUEL KING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. How old are you? - A. Turned of thirteen.

Q. Were you employed in Mr. Dring's warehouse? -

Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know what you are sworn to? - A. Yes.

Q. What would be the consequence of a bad oath? - A. I should go to a bad place.

Mr. Const. Q. Were you employed to do any thing in Mr. Dring's warehouse? - A. Yes, knocking in the heads.

Q. Do you remember any casks in the warehouse with the mark I diamond F upon them? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a cask being opened? - A. Yes.

Q. At what time? - A. I cannot say at what time.

Q. Do you remember seeing Dobson open one? - A. Yes.

Q. And what was done with it? - A. Put into casks, and sent to the grocers.

Mr. Const. Q. (To Mr. Davis.) I believe I asked you if that order was your writing? - A. It is.

Q. How were these casks marked? - A. I diamond F.

Q. Had Mr. Dring any power or authority from you to sell sugar? - A. None whatever.

Q. Tell us how you found the casks afterwards? - A. Two of Mr. Dring's men came to me, and, in consequence of their information, I went there.

Q. When was that? - A. In May last.

Q. You had been absent from business, I believe, some time before? - A. Yes, I had.

Q. In what condition did you find your goods? - A. Fifteen hogsheads were quite gone, one hogshead removed, and the other four in part empty.

Q. At that time you called upon Mr. Dring

to make up what was dificient by an action -

A. Yes.

Q. And upon information that you received, you were advised to proceed as you have now done? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. In October last, how many hogsheads did you land? - A. In the course of the year I suppose two or three hundred.

Q. Twenty of which were deposited in this warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe the custom is, when a sugar-broker deposits sugar with a warehouseman, he pays him a rent per ton? - A. Yes, he does.

Q. What rent per ton were you to pay him? - A. Seven-pence per ton for a week, the usual rent.

Q. At the time you visited the warehouse, Mr. Dring was arrested, and under confinement, at your suit? - A. He was.

Q. You arrested him at Dover for this very sugar for which you now indict him? - A. Yes.

Q. How long has that action been stopped? - A. I gave an order for stopping it eight or ten days ago.

Q. Do you know whether that action is or not going on? - A. I don't think it can; I don't know.

Court. Q. Did you give any order to the prisoner to send any sugar to Heselaine? - A. Never.

Q. Did you give any order to the prisoner to send sugar to any body, and put it to your account? - A. Never, I believe.

Mr. - sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are a solicitor, I believe, in Broad-street? - A. I am.

Q. You commenced an action of trover for Mr. Davis against Mr. Dring, to recover the amount of this sugar? - A. I did.

Q. Has that action been stopped? - A. Yes, here is the rule; (produces it, dated Thursday, the 8th of July.)

Q. It is dated before the bill was found? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. When was it served? - A. I do not know; the first appointment appears to be the 12th of July.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-28

521. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for that he, on the 4th of July , about the hour of eleven in the night, being in the dwelling-house of Samuel Payne , feloniously did steal a coat, value 3s. a pair of breeches, value 14s. three waistcoats, value 8s. a jacket, value 3s. a shirt, value 3s. a silk handkerchief, value 2s. a pair of shoes, value 3s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. and a towel, value 6d. the property of the said Samuel, in the same dwelling-house, and having so committed the said felony, about the same hour, the said dwelling-house burglariously did break to get out of the same .

ELIZABETH PAYNE sworn. - My husband is a waterman ; the prisoner came to us as an apprentice on liking; he was only with us a week: On Sunday afternoon, the 4th of July, I gave him liberty to go to his uncle's to get some clean linen; he came back about half after nine at night; our eldest apprentice came home about the same time; they had their suppers; my husband and I had our suppers, and went to bed about half past ten, after seeing the fires all out; about six o'clock the next morning, the eldest apprentice, James Arnold, came to the room, and desired me to get up, for he was robbed.

Q. Were they your husband's things or your apprentice's that were taken? - A. They were my husbands, he finds them all in clothes; I got up, and went to look for the prisoner, and found him in the Borough, with part of the things upon his back; I took him to Mr. Brown, the constable.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer; I took charge of the prisoner; part of the clothes I found upon him; he directed me to a public-house, where I found the rest.

(The property was produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say for myself. GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing goods, but not of breaking out of the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-29

522. JAMES MARTIN was indicted for that he, on the 4th of February , about the hour of six in the night, being in the dwelling-house of Joseph Rollinson , feloniously did steal two coats, value 40s. two waistcoats, value 20s. three shirts, value 10s. a pair of breeches, value 5s. two handkerchiefs, value 2s. and a hat, value 2s. the property of the said Joseph, in the same dwelling-house, and having so committed the said felony, about the same hour, the said dwelling-house burglariously did break to get out of the same .

JOSEPH ROLLINSON sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In East-Smithfield , I keep a public-house ; the prisoner came to lodge with me, he went to bed about eleven o'clock at night, and instead of going to bed in the same room that he had slept in two nights before, he went to another room.

Q. How do you know that? - A. Because I heard him get up in the morning, I slept under him; my son got up and went out to work, and then the prisoner got up; I heard him walking backwards and forwards from the room where he slept, to the room in which he had slept before,

without his shoes, at last he came down stairs; I called, who is there, he said, Martin; my wife went up stairs immediately, but I did not miss any thing; when she got up, between seven and eight, she missed the things from the other room.

MARY HAYMAN sworn. - I am daughter-in-law to Mr. Rollinson; I generally get up about halfpast six, or half-past seven, I went up into Ben-Jamin Rollinson's room for a pair of breeches, but I could not find any thing but an old hat, an old waistcoat and an old shirt belonging to the prisoner; I had seen him wear the hat and the waistcoat the day before; Joseph Rawlinson then went up stairs, and missed the property out of Benjamin's box.

Q. (To Joseph Rollinson.) Did you miss these things? - A. Yes; I went up stairs and found the box broke open, and all my son's things gone, I found this hat.

Q. These things in the indictment are all your son's? - A. Yes.

Q. What age is your son? - A. Turned of eighteen.

Q. What is his name? - A. Benjamin.

Q. What is he? - A. A stove-grate maker, and works at Mr. Brodie's, in Cary-street.

Q. Does your son receive wages? - A. Yes; he entrusts his wages to me, and I find him in clothes, he is apprentice to me; I put him apprentice to the gun trade, but the business becoming had, I turned him over to me.

Q. Did you ever find any of the things again? - A. No.

Q. Did any body else sleep in the house? - A. Yes, another man slept in the same room with my son.

BENJAMIN ROLLINSON sworn. - Q. You are son of the last witness? - A. Yes; on the 5th of February, I got up and went to work, the man who slept in the same room went out with me, the prisoner slept in an adjoining room; I took out my breeches the night before; I went out, and all the rest of the things were in the box then; I locked the box, and the next morning I missed a shilling out of my breeches pocket; I moved the box to look for it, the box was safe then; when I came home at night, I found the box had been broke open, the bolt of the lock had been shoved back.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s. but not of breaking the house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-30

523. JOHN M'DONALD and WILLIAM CARR , were indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon John Hope , on the 27th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his per son a silver watch, value 40s. and a hat value 5s. the property of the said John.

JOHN HOPE sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A journeyman carpenter and builder : On Sunday morning, the 27th of June, as I was going home, between two and three o'clock in the morning, the two prisoners overtook me in Blackmoor-street, Drury-lane ; they came up to me, and asked me to treat them, I told them I knew nothing of them, and should not treat them, they immediately hustled me, took my watch, and ran away.

Q. What do you mean by hustling,? - A. They shoved up against me, and I found my watch go instantly.

Q. Do you know which of them took it? - A. I believe the prisoner M'Donald, he was nearest to me; I pursued them, crying, stop thief.

Q. Was it day-light? - A. Yes.

Q. So that you could see their countenances? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure they are the men? - A. Yes; I took one of them, they ran down into Drury-lane, and turned up Clare-court, and there I caught hold of the prisoner M'Donald, upon that Carr got behind me, and struck me several times over my head.

Q. What with? - A. I don't know; I did not observe any thing in his hand, but my head was violently cut, which obliged me to let go my hold, I got my hat knocked off in the struggle; the prisoner then took different ways; I pursued M'Donald into Drury-lane, the watchman came up and took hold of him; he was taken to the watch-house, and I gave charge of him; on the Monday morning following, as we were going to Bow-street with him, he told the constable where Cart was to be found; I went with the constables, and when we had got within a few doors of the house, M'Donald pointed out Carr, and said, that is the man that struck the gentleman's head, he was then taken to Bow-street.

Q. Have you ever seen your watch since? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure Carr was one of the men? - A. Yes.

Q. When they shoved against you, did you resist at all? - A. No.

Q. Were you aware at all of what they were going to do? - A. No, it was done so instantaneously, that I had not time to think what they were going to do, I selt my watch taken from my sob in an instant.

Q. Did they appear to be drunk or sober? - A. They appeared to be rather in liquor.

ROBERT WILSON sworn. - Q. You are a watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prosecutor calling out stop thief? - A. Yes, and the rattles spring; I

stopped M'Donald, and some person on the other side of the way, said, you have got the wrong man; but I held him till the prusecutor came up, and took hold of his arm.

ADAM BURBIDGE sworn. - Q. Do you belong to Bow-street? - A. I belong to the watch-house; as I was going with M'Donald to Bow-street, he said it was very hard he should suffer, when it was the other man that cut Hope's head open; I asked him if he knew the man, he said, he went by the name of Bill or Will, I cannot say which; he said, he was to be found at the Conssitution; he said, he had been drinking with him all the night before; I then called up my brother officer, and told him of it, and we went with Hope towards the Constitution, and before we got there, M'Donard pointed out the prisoner Carr, and said, that is the man that cut Hope's head open; he seemed confused at first, but said afterwards, he knew nothing about it, and was willing to go with us; the prosecutor immediately said, that is the man, I know him well; I told him Hope had alledged a charge against him, that he was the man that had cut his head open; when M'Donald was brought to the watch-house, I searched him, but found nothing upon him, except this small whistle. (Producing it.)

M'Donald's defence. I never saw the watch, nor ever had any hand in what is alledged to me.

Carr's defence. I know nothing of this man, but by having seen him at the Constitution; he has said I was the person that was with him, for the sake of getting him self off; I was asleep at the Brownbear, in Bow-street, at the time.

M'Donald, GUILTY, aged 27.

Carr, GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-31

524. JOSEPH COLLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , a basket, value 3s. and seven pecks of beans, value 3s. the property of Thomas Oates .

There being no evidence to substantiate the charge, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-32

525. JOSEPH COLLYER was indicted for making an assault, in the King's highway, upon John Smith , on the 14th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silk handkerchief, value 6d. the property of the said John.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - On the 14th of June, at twelve o'clock at night, or between eleven and twelve, I was going home into Oxford-street.

Q. Where did this happen to you? - A. In Hampshire-hog-yard, facing St. Giles's-church , three men pushed up against me in the dark, under the arch-way, and one of them took my handkerchief from my neck, and ran away, it was a silk handkerchief; I cannot swear the prisoner was the man that took it, he was one of them.

Q. In what way did they push against you? - A. They jostled me.

Q. How long were they jostling you? - A. Not above three minutes, they gathered round me in a cluster.

Q. Were they so long? - A. I cannot swear to a minute, it might be two or three minutes.

Q. Did any of them strike you? - A. No, they only gathered round me, and shoved me backwards and forwards, I struggled with them.

Q. Did they lay hold of your hands? - A. No, only round my body.

Q. Were you thrown down at all? - A. No, they felt round me, but not finding any thing there, they whipped my handkerchief off my neck.

Q. How did you struggle with them? - A. I made a blow at one of them, and fung out for the watchman.

Q. They did not make a blow at you? - A. No.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner before? - A. I had seen them all three together about ten minutes before.

Q. Where? - A. Going along by the church, some of them were before me, and some behind me.

Q. How far from them did you walk? - A. About the length of this place.

Q. How came you in the Hampshire-hog-yard? - A. I went in to make water, and they followed me in.

Q. Had you observed the prisoner before you went into the Hampshire-hog-yard? - A. Yes, he was walking along side of me.

Q. How long was he walking by the side of you? - About ten minutes.

Q. Were you ten minutes walking the length of this court? - A. No, they talked with me out of freedom from the other side of Drury-lane; they said they belonged to the Leander, sixty-four; I had a coloured shirt on at the time, and they said, how do you do, shipmate.

Q. Did they speak to you in the broad part? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner speak to you? - A. I cannot tell whether he was one that spoke to me or not.

Q. How near were they when you turned up this yard? - A. They were quite close to me.

Q. You had never seen him before, had you? - No, not to my knowledge.

Q. What light was there to enable you to be certain of his person? - A. The lighted lamps.

Q. It was not moon-light? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. There was a moon was there? - A. I cannot swear to that, it was quite light: the prisoner was rather in liquor; I ran after him, and knocked him down, and held him till the watchman came up.

Q. Was he running or walking? - A. I cannot say, I delivered him up to the watchman.

Q. Have you ever seen your handkerchief since? - A. No, it was a tall man that run away with the handkerchief, in a pair of trowsers and a light coat.

Q. They did not force you up the gateway? - A. No.

Q. Did any person come up to the gateway while you were there? - A. No.

Q. Is this the account you have always given of this transaction? - A. Yes.

Q. Look if that is your hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. You were examined before Mr. Conant the Justice? - A. Yes, and there was a gentleman there said, there had been three or four robberies committed in that place, and he was committed.

Q. I will read the account you gave to Mr. Conant - John Smith says, that last night, passing through St. Giles's, he met with the prisoner Collyer, and two other men, who asked him to drink with them, and when he got to the corner of the gateway, they violently pulled him up the gateway, and knocked him down, but some people coming up they ran away? - A. They asked me to drink with them, and I would not go.

Q. How came you to tell Mr. Conant they dragged you up the gateway, and knocked you down, and upon some people coming up they ran away, and now you have told me they did not drag you up the gateway, that they did not knock you down, and that nobody came up? - A. I have told nothing but the truth.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say before the Magiftrate, that you knew I was not the man, and if I would pay you for your day's work, and for the handkerchief, you would not prosecute me? - A. I told the Magistrate I was a poor man, and could not stand a prosecution.

Prisoner's defence. I was going through St. Giles's, I had been to receive some prize-money, and this man charged me with having robbed him; I never saw him with my eyes till he collared me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-33

526. HENRY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , a mare, value 5l. the property of Anthony Harding , and Jeremiah Gatehouse .(The case was opened by Mr. Gleed.)

ANTHONY HARDING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Where do you live? - A. At Kingston, in partnership with Jeremiah Gatehouse.

Q. Did you turn your mare out upon Norburton-common at any time? - A. Yes, I turned her out on the 13th, and missed her on Sunday the 16th.

Q. How soon did you see her afterwards? - A. On the 4th of June, at Smithfield, in the possession of a person of the name of Hawkins.

JOHN HAWKINS sworn. - On the 19th of May, I purchased a mare of the prisoner, for four pounds, which was afterwards claimed by Mr. Harding.

WILLIAM SIMMONS sworn. - I keep the Redcross, at Maldon, about a mile from Norburtoncommon: On the 15th of May, I saw the prisoner at my house about seven or eight o'clock in the evening.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How do you know it was the 15th of May? - A. I remarked the almanack.

Q. When were you called upon to look at the almanack? - A. Mr. Harding called upon me about a fortnight after.

Q. The prisoner was taken up, was not he? - A. Yes.

Q. That was about three weeks afterwards, and then you recollected it was the 15th of May? - A. Yes.

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. Friday.

Q. If I was to ask you who was there on the 14th, perhaps you could not tell me? - A. Not particular.

Court. Q. What led you to recollect so long afterwards, that it was the 15th of May? - A. I knew the man perfectly well.

Q. That you might, if it had been the Thursday - why do you six upon the Friday particularly, did any thing remarkable happen at your house? - A. No.

Q. Can you give us any reason why you know it to be the Friday? - A. I am certain he was there the 15th.

Q. What leads you to know it was the 15th, did you make any minute of it? - A. No.

Q. How can you satisfy the Jury why you state it to be the 15th, or do you mean to say more than this, that he was there about a fortnight before you were called upon? - A. I am sure it was the 15th.

Q. (To Hawkins.) Where did you purchase the horse? - A. At my own home, at North-End, Fulham.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am an officer of his Majesty's Palace-Court; On Saturday the 5th of June, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner; I was at the constable's house, the constable called me up, and I went to apprehend the prisoner in Old Brentford, at Mr. Calhs's, the back of the One-tun; I called him three times before he came down stairs, and

then he came down in his shirt; I told him I wished to speak with him, about something particular, he said, he would put on his clothes, and be with me directly, but instead of coming down, he put on his clothes, and made his escape out at the back window; I followed him, he took down Catherinewheel-yard, and there we took him.

Court. Q. How did he behave when you took him? - A. He behaved very well.

Q. What place did you take him in? - A. He jumped into twelve foot of water, and must have been drowned, if it had not been for a man who had a barge there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe the ordinary business of a Palace-court Officer is to arrest a man for debt, and not to apprehend persons for felony? - A. Yes.

Q. And he not liking to be apprehended by a Palace-court Officer, made his escape? - A. He did not know who I was.

Mr. Gurney. (To Harding.) Q. When the prisoner was first of all taken, did you ask him how he came by the horse? - A. No, I did not.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

Mr. Gurney. (To Harding.) Q. What fort of a mare was this? - A. A bay mare, about fifteen hands high, aged, a blaze in her face, fired in her off hoof behind, and some white hairs in her tail.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS BROMMAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. A servant.

Q. Where do you live? - A. With Mr. Abbey, at Epsom.

Q. Do you remember being on Wallingtoncommon, on the 16th of May last? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar there? - A. I did.

Q. Did you see any transaction take place there? - A. Yes; there was him and another man, I was going to Westerham, across the common, on horseback, and they asked me to stop to see some money paid for a mare, the prisoner was paying for it.

Q. What sum of money was paid for it? - A. Four Bank-notes and ten shillings in silver, but I cannot tell what the notes were.

Court. Q. They desired you to stop and see the money paid, but did not tell you what it was for? - A. No; I understood it was four pounds ten shillings.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you seen the mare since? - A. No.

Q. What was the height of the mare? - A. I think about fifteen hands high, as near as I can guess, with a blaze in her face, and white legs; when the prisoner was taken up, he sent for me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You never saw the prisoner before this transaction? - A. Never in my life to the best of my knowledge.

Q. When he was taken up, who sent for you? - A. One Gaime, a butcher, of Fulham.

Q. How did he know you to find you out? - A. I have known him for twelve or fourteen years.

Q. Did you tell the prisoner your name? - A. No.

Q. Or where you lived? - A. No.

Q. And not having told him your name, or where you lived, he found out where to send for you when he was taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you live with this gentleman, Mr. Abbey, now? - A. No.

Q. You said, just now, when you were asked, that you lived with Mr. Abbey? - A. No, I live with Mr. Bradley, a horse-dealer, in Mount-street.

Q. How came you to recollect the day of the month so particularly? - A. I don't exactly recollect the day of the month, the gentleman mentioned the 16th, I know it was about the middle of May.

Q. You do not know whether it was the 16th or not? - A. No; it was thereabout.

Q. How far were you from these parties? - A. About four yards; I was on horseback.

Q. How long did this transaction take? - A. It was all done in about a minute or two.

Q. Being then in so much hurry, how do you know they were Bank-notes? - A. They looked like Bank-notes.

Q. Upon your oath, have not you seen a handbill like that, (shewing him a bill giving a description of the mare)? - A. No, never in my life before.

Q. And yet you lived in that neighbourhood? - Yes.

Q. And you will swear you never saw that bill? - A. I never did.

Q. What was the description of her? - A. She was a bay, with a white face, and two white legs behind.

Q. Was there any thing remarkable in her tail? - A. No, I took no other notice than that.

Court. Q. You were going accidentally over the common? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon after did you see Gaime? - A. I never saw Gaime again till the man was a prisoner, and that was in Smithfield.

Q. And when the man was a prisoner, how came you to see Gaime? - A. I met him by accident, and he asked me if I recollected any thing of such a transaction, and I said, yes; he told me a man was taken up, and I told him I saw the business transacted.

Q. Why should Gaime tell you of a man being taken up for horse stealing? - A. The man was taken up in Smithfield market, I understood.

Q. Why should Ga me tell you that? - A. I cannot tell why he should tell me that.

Q. Is he here? - A. No.

Q. Where does he live? - A. At Walham-green.

GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-34

527. THOMAS STEELE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , four pounds of hogs bristles, value 10s. and six brushes, value 4s. the property of James Smith .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-35

528. EDWARD RICHES, otherwise RICHARDS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July, a bullock, value 18l. the property of Richard Harper .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

RICHARD HARPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a drover , I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 5th of July last, were you in Whitechapel with any cattle? - A. Yes.

Q. Which way were you going? - A. To Rumford.

Q. At what time? - A. About ten o'clock in the day.

Q. What number of bullocks had you under your care? - A. I had sixteen.

Q. When you were at Whitechapel, did you see the prisoner at the bar? - A. No; I did not see him then.

Q. How soon did you see him? - A. Just by the London Hospital.

Q. What did he do? - A. He went into the drove, took one out, and took it down Duckingpond-lane with his hand upon the rump of the beast, and a knife in his other hand; after that, he came into the drove again.

Q. What became of the beast he took out? - A. That bullock returned into the drove again after some time; he then said to some of his companions, draw your chives, that is, knives.

Q. What number of companions had he? - A. Twenty, or more.

Q. Did any of them draw their knives? - A. Yes; I saw three or four knives drawn; I cannot tell exactly the number.

Q. Where did he drive the second bullock? - A. It was the same bullock again; he drove it towards Whitechapel; I sent my dog after it.

Q. What did the prisoner do when he got a second bullock from the drove? - A. He followed it some rods.

Q. Did you raise any alarm? - A. I did.

Q. In consequence of that, did any persons come to your assistance? - A. A great number.

Q. Did you and they pursue him? - A. I did, myself.

Q. When you came hear him, what did he say to you? - A. He made a stop, and then made three stabs at my left breast with a clasp knife.

Q. Did the knife penetrate it? - A. No; I felt my breast painful three or four days after; he then took to his heels, and before I could recover, he got a few yards from me; then I went after him, and called, stop thief, and when he found he was near being taken, he sat down on the but end of a tray with his knife out; he then said, the first b-r that comes in the way, I will let his b-y intrails out; upon that, some gentleman threw a brick-bat at him, struck him on the side of the head, and knocked him down, and then I seized him, and took him away to the Police-office.

Q. Did you afterwards recover your bullock? -One Mr. Young did for me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. These bullocks belonged to you? - A. Yes.

Q. On that day you were driving them from Smithfield? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not observe the prisoner in Smithfield? - A. No.

Q. Are you in the habit of coming into Smithfield frequently? - A. Yes.

Q. It is a very wanton, but I believe a very common thing, for people of the description of the prisoner to drive bullocks out of the drove for amusement? - A. Yes, they do; I don't know what they mean by it.

Q. The first bullock returned to your drove? - A. Yes; and it was the same bullock that he took out again.

Q. The prisoner did not continue to pursue the bullock? - A. No; they all dispersed.

Q. The bullock has been returned to you again? - A. Yes.

Q. This was in the middle of the day? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. Coming down Whitechapel-road, Mr. Harper said to some of the chaps, he would treat them with half a pint of gin, because the beasts belonged to a very good master; he knows very well it was not taken with intent to steal it.

Court. (To Harper.) Q. Do you know who this man is? - A. No; he goes by the name of Belcher, being a resolute man.

Q. Do you know what way of life he is in? - A. No.

Q. Did you never see him before? - A. Not to my knowledge; I have heard a great deal of talk of him. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-36

529. ISAAC ISAACS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a silver watch

value 40s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of John Edeyman .

JOHN EDEYMAN sworn. - I was coming through Stepney-fair , in the crowd -

Q. When was it? - A. On a Tuesday, about five o'clock in the afternoon; I selt somebody touching the slap of my trowsers; I put my hand down directly, and missed my watch; I went back about a couple of yards, and said, I had lost my watch; a Mr. Parker then pointed out the prisoner to me, and a little while after I picked up the outside case of the watch, and then the watch.

Q. Were they near together? - A. I suppose they might be about half a yard from one another.

Q. What did you do with them? - A. I gave them to the constable, when I gave the man in charge.

Q. Had you seen the man about you before? - A. No; I cannot say I did.

Q. Did you lose any thing else? - A. Yes; I lost my handkerchief from my jacket pocket; my handkerchief was found upon the prisoner.

Q. What was your handkerchief worth? - A. One shilling.

- PARKER sworn. - I am a butcher in Newport-market; I was at Stepney-fair, and saw the prisoner there; I heard the sailor say he had lost his watch; I looked round, and saw the prisoner with the slap of his breeches down; I saw him deliver the watch to a boy, and the case dropped from him; I brought the boy back to where the sailor was, and he dropped the watch.

Q. Are you positive as to the person of the prisoner? - A. Yes; I pointed him out to the sailor, and he had him apprehended.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street; I searched the prisoner; he said, you have no occasion to search me, I have nothing about me; I searched in his breeches, and found this handkerchief. (Producing it.)

Edeyman. I believe this handkerchief to be mine; there is no mark upon it; I lost such a one; I had the fellow to it. (Produces it.)

THOMAS CRIDMOUTH sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the watch;) I received it from the prosecutor.

Edeyman. I know my watch by the No. 10287.

Prisoner's defence. There were a parcel of chaps running, and some of them dropped the watch, and they laid hold of me. GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-37

531. JOHN ALBANY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a waistcoat, value 2s. a shirt, value 4s. two handkerchiefs, value 3s. a hat, value 6s. a jacket, value 7s. a pair of breeches, value 5s. a quart of Hollands, value 3s. and a glass bottle, value 3d. the property of Joseph Teasdale .

JOSEPH TEASDALE sworn. - I am apprentice to a waterman : On the 27th of June, between three and four in the morning, Thomas Barker turned out to get a drink of water, I was asleep on board a Gravesend boat; my boat lay along-side; he halloaed out, Joe, Joe, our boat is being robbed; I turned out of the cabin, and saw my cupboard open, and another key in it; I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); and about twenty-three shillings in money; the prisoner was apprentice to the owner of the boat.

THOMAS BARKER sworn. - I am a waterman: I was on board a boat that lay along-side the Sally Gravesend boat: On Sunday morning, I turned out about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner on deck tying something in a handkerchief, and making toward the shore; I immediately took hold of him, and said, you rascal, you have been robbing the boat; he said, no, he had not, he had been sleeping there all night; upon that, he took the clothes up in his arms, and threw them down below again, and went below himself; he called out, Joe, Joe. you know me; he told me he had been sleeping with him all night; when the money was taken from him, he said, don't take that half-crown, it is mine. (The property was produced and identified by Teasdale.)

Prisoner's defence. The money is all my own.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-38

532. JOHN HARRYMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , two pounds of wax candles , the property of Benjamin Lazenby .

The Court being of opinion the evidence amounted only to a fraud, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-39

533. WILLIAM VINCENT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Goulding , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 2d of January, and stealing two stitches of bacon, value 2l. the property of the said Richard.

There being no evidence to effect the prisoner but that of an accomplice, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-40

534. JAMES DEMPSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a child's cloth dress, value 16s. and a cloth gaiter, value 2s. the property of William Newton .

WILLIAM NEWTON sworn. - I am a tailor and salesman , No. 127, Jermyn-street : On the evening of the 29th of July, I was coming home, and observed two soldiers standing at my door fingering some clothes; I had a suspicion of them, and walked gently to see what they were doing, and just as I got to the door, the prisoner had got a child's dress, and a gaiter hanging to it, which he put into a long cap which is worn in his regiment, and was putting it on his head; I immediately caught hold of him, and took the dress out of the cap; being a tall man, I was afraid to take him, and I went for a constable; in the mean time, the serjeant of his regiment came up, and a young man that I had left with him, delivered him up to him, and he took him to the guard-room; the next day I went to Bow-street, and they sent a man for him.

JOHN QUIN sworn. - I am a warehouseman in Round-court, in the Strand; I was coming down Jermyn-street, and saw the prisoner at Mr. Newton's door; I saw him take this dress, and put it into his cap; I followed him, and delivered him to the serjeant, while Mr. Newton was looking for a constable; Mr. Newton took the things from him.

Prisoner's defence. I was going home from a fieldday, and met with a comrade just come home from abroad; he said he wanted to buy a dress for his little boy, and going by this gentleman's door, he said he thought it would do; the pin came undone, and, in stooping to pick them up, my cap fell off; this gentleman came up, when I had my cap in one hand, and the dress in the other, and said, I had been stealing it.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who had known him seven years, and gave him a good character as a soldier, but could not say any thing as to his private character. GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-41

535. JAMES STEELE and JOSEPH BANNISTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , nine fowls, value 9s. the property of John Gardiner .

The prosecutor not being able to identify the fowls, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-42

536. ELLICK, alias WILLIAM CLEUGH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , two pewter quart pots, value 3s. 6d. and a pewter half pint measure, value 1s. the property of Moses Knight .

MOSES KNIGHT sworn. - I keep the sign of the Britannia , Gloucester-place, St. George's in the East : On the 23d of June last, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came into my house while I was scoring some beer to my customers; he went up stairs where there were two other customers drinking a shilling's-worth of rum and water; he got into discourse with them, and talking pretty loud, my wife thought I was called up stairs; I went up stairs, and the prisoner said, how do you do Mr. Knight; I said, very well, I thank you, sir; I did not immediately recollect his countenance; I then asked the gentlemen if they called me; they said, no; a very little time afterwards, the two gentlemen and he came down stairs; the prisoner at the bar went backwards; the other two gentlemen stopped at the bar, and had another shilling's worth; they sat down in the bar to drink it; upon that, the prisoner came in from our yard, and sat down with them, and entered into conversation; he drank with them, and paid his share for the reckoning; upon that, one of the gentlemen said to the prisoner, I am dry, I wish to have a pint of porter, or a pint of ale, which we drank amongst us; I drank with them; then the two gentlemen paid for their ale and porter, and went away; as they went out at the door, they asked the prisoner if he would go with them; he said he would go in a few minutes; they said they could not stay; they went away immediately; I then said to Mr. Cleugh, it is very late, I will thank you to go home, I want to go to-bed; I dare say it was then twelve o'clock; upon that he immediately enquired after a book, which he called his day-book; when I went up stairs at first, I observed the book lying upon the table, with a string round it, before him; I went up stairs, but could not find it; I came down to the bar again; I observed between him and the fire-place, upon the hearth-stone, a spouted quart pot, bent more than I know it had been when I drew beer in it, in the course of the evening; and as I could not find the book, I asked him again where his book was; he said, he might have left it in the parlour; I said, I believe you have not been there; I then went, and looked round the tap-room again, and in the parlour, and kitchen, but not finding any thing of it, I came back to the fire again; while I was gone, I thought I heard my pots rattle; I saw him pretend to take a pot off the table to drink, and then drop the pot on the table again; upon that, I said, I cannot find your book, it is very odd what you have done with it; he said, never mind it, you will find it to-morrow; upon that, I said, Mr. Cleugh, I had rather you

should find it to-night, I don't like a book of that kind being left in my house; he said, perhaps those gentlemen had played their sun; I said, I did not think they would, I should rather find it myself, he then said, I believe it is in the chair in the club-room; I went immediately, and searched the club-room, and looked over every part of the bottom of the house again, and came into the bar again; and asked him to get up to let me see if he sat on it; I then observed that the pot was gone from the fire-place; I called my wife to get up, and she got up; I went to the bar, and desired the prisoner to go home; when he came to the door, I did not know but I should do wrong in taking him, as I had no witness; I told him I had to go to the watch-box to desire the watchman to call a man up in the morning, and if he would walk with me, it would be in his way home; I did not know his way home, but I said so; when I came near the box, I said, watchman; he answered me immediately, and the prisoner directly gave me his hand, and bid me good morning; I immediately seized him by the collar, and told him he had robbed me; the watchman immediately jumped out of his box, and searched him; he attempted to get away from us, and tore his coat, but he did not get away; when we had got about three doors from the watch-box, he turned the quart-pot out of his pocket; I then turned round, and took the quart pot up, and gave it to the watchman; he then begged for mercy, and that I would not take him to the watch-house; however, we took him to the watch-house; we then searched him, and in his great-coat pocket found another quart-pot, and in searching him farther, we found a half-pint gin measure of mine jucked into the flap of his breeches; he was then locked up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Do you mean to say the prisoner had not frequented your house? - A. I had seen him twice before.

Q. Was he not a member of a club? - A. He was not a member of the society that was held a my house, but being a member of another society of the same order, he had a right to come.

Q. What order was that? - A. Old Fellows.

Q. Was the book found at all? - A. Yes; the nurse found it the next day in the yard.

Q. He was very much in liquor, was he not? - A. I cannot say that he was; I know his brother very well.

Q. His brother is a member of your society, is he not? - A. Yes.(Thomas Eager, the watchman, produced the property, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury - With that submission and respect which I am aware is due from a person in my situation to this Court, and that candid impartiality which is the characteristic of an English Jury, I presume to state some facts which may take off some degree of the weight which my prosecutor wishes to impress upon your minds with respect to me; I have been brought up under a rigid, but respectable, worthy, and honest, parent, who has ever taught me the paths of rectitude, honour, and propriety, and given me a liberal education; at a certain period, I was placed under the care of an affectionate uncle, who gave me an extensive property, with a house of forty guineas a year; having met with the greatest duplicity from those whom I have called my friends, and particularly that society which was held at Mr. Knight's house, as well as others, I had lost between four and five hundred pounds; those injuries I could have borne without regret, but this last injury has stung me to the quick; with these repeated losses I left business, and retired with the remainder of my property, which I had carefully deposited in the hands of an honest relation; the book in question, which the prosecutor alludes to, I had under my arm on the afternoon of the evening I went to his house, for the purpose of getting some little money due to me at Black wall, and to a house of the same description; I went there, and drank several pints of porter, and some shares of sixpenny-worths of rum and water; in passing this house, I knew the house, and I can bring respectable witnesses to prove that I have been many times at his house, I went into the house, and in that state in which a young man of my description ought not to have appeared; I was in a state of some intoxication, and from the admonition of my friends I had made a now not to go into a lodge-room again, having sustained so much injury from these clubs; I went in, expecting to see some persons who owed me money; I asked the girl for Mr. such a one; the girl said, she did not know the names of the persons who were there; I waited till the lodge was closed, and after it was closed, I went up stairs, and met with some persons that I knew; I went up, and had some rum and water with them; it was proposed by them to go down stairs; I went down stairs, and I know not why we should be introduced into the bar, in preference to any other part of the house - a part of the house which I should not have presumed to have entered, and there we had more rum and water; they wanted to drink some ale, but I gave my negative to that, chusing rather to drink porter, and I know not from that time who came in, or what time they went out; by this time I was in a great state of in oxication, I found that I was so, and as a proof of it, if I were placed upon an oath, which I would not forfeit, I should say I did not know the time of the night, whether it was eleven, twelve, one, or two, nor did I, upon my oath, were I put to it, know in what manner these people, whom they may call my friends, left me; I was accossed

by Mr. Knight, telling me it was time to go home; I got up, and knowing I had this book, I asked for it, he said, I had left it up stairs probably; he went up stairs, and said, it was not there; I told him it was of great consequence to me; they begged of him to look for it, as being at a publichouse, it was the more likely to be lost in the morning; I begged of him, and he was, as I then though, kind enough to go to several parts of the house, but his endeavours were fruitless; in coming down stairs, he said, I will take care of it if I find it, and wished me to go home; I went out for the purpose of going home, and he said, I have to speak to a watchman to call some one up, and, says he, you can go along with me; I went with him, and took hold of his arm, thinking him a friend, and walked with him; but instead of being in my own road to go home, I actually crossed a road almost uninhabited, which was the direct contrary way to my own home: My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I did not know that I had any thing in my pocket at the time, and when I came up with him to the watchman, he said, you have a pot of mine in your pocket; when I offered to wish him good night, I was astonished, and asked him if he was serious; I put my hand in my pocket, and found one, I put my hand in my other pocket, and found another; the measure was in my waistcoat-pocket, there was a large hole in it, and the measure went through.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-43

537. ANN COWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a petticoat, value 5s. two aprons, value 2s. a gown, value 5s. and a pair of stays, value 6s. the property of Mary Yates , spinster ; a petticoat, value 4s. and an apron, value 1s. the property of Phoeby Yates , spinster .

MARY YATES sworn. - I am a single woman, a muff-maker , and live in Hatfield-street, Goswell street : On Sunday morning, the 20th of June, I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment, while I was asleep; I had pulled off part of them; when I went to bed over-night, I left them on the back of the chair; the prisoner is a stranger, my sister and I were in bed together; part of the things were brought to me about half an hour after we got up, the prisoner was in custody, and we delivered them to the constable.

Q. Was the door of the room locked? - A. No, it was fastened with a bar, but the bar was pushed away; we were not alarmed in the night, and did not miss them till we got up in the morning, about seven o'clock.

PHOEBY YATES sworn. - I am sister of the last witness, I sleep with my sister; on the 20th of June, I got up about seven o'clock, or it might be a little later; I got up first, and missed our clothes, we had left them on the back of the chair; part of the things were brought to us in about half an hour, the prisoner at the bar had part of them on; she was brought back by Thomas Bell to our lodgings, and we took from her a petticoat, an apron and a gown, the other things were found at a public-house, in Golden-lane.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate, that some person had knocked at your door and asked for coals? - A. No, I did not.

Q. (To Mary Yates.) Did you every say any thing like that? - A. No, I did not.

THOMAS BELL sworn. - I am a picture-framemaker; on the 20th of June, about seven o'clock, Mary Yates informed me she had been robbed; I lodged in the same house; I got up and dressed myself, and went to White-cross-street, to a clothes-shop; I made enquiry there, but nobody had been to sell them; I came away from there, and met the prisoner in Golden-lane, with Mary Yates 's gown on; I kept company with Mary Yates, she had been mending it the night before; I know it to be her gown, it is a long stripe; I immediately asked her where she had got these things from, she said, she had given four shillings for them, at the top of Golden-lane; I told her, she must go along with me, for two young women had lost their property not half an hour before; I brought her back to the house, and left her in charge, while I went for one of the Hatton-Garden officers, the things were delivered to John Rittson.

JOHN RITTSON sworn. - I keep a public-house; I took charge of the prisoner while Bell went for an officer; I took the apron, and petticoat, and gown from off her back; I delivered them to Chapman, the officer.(William Chapman, the officer, produced the property.)

ELIZABETH TIBBS sworn. - I keep a shop in Whitecross street; I bought a pair of stays of the prisoner, on Sunday the 20th of June, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, for four shillings, she said they were her daughters, that she was in distress for a bit of bread.

JOHN MOORCRAFT sworn. - I keep the Lion and Lamb, in Golden-lane; the prisoner at the bar left two aprons and a petticoat at my house, on the 20th of June, about seven o'clock in the morning, asking my permission to leave them, while she went to Oxford-road. (The property was identified by Mary and Phoebe Yates .)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it any more than a child unborn, these things I purchased for seven shillings and sixpence.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-44

538. GEORGE BOWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , two ducks, value 4s. the property of Joseph Lawson .

JOSEPH LAWSON , junr. sworn. - I live at Middle Holloway : On Wednesday, the 14th of June, I had seen the ducks in a little out-house of my father's, at about eleven o'clock at night; about a quarter before one, next morning, I was alarmed by the noise they made; I looked out at the window and saw the prisoner at the bar with two ducks in his possession, in a sack, and the mouth of the sack was folded over his arm; he went about one hundred yards from the door, and returned again; I then went down to call my brother to my assistance, we went into the yard the same way that he did, and I saw him near the place again, with his sack; he dropped the sack on the premises, and ran away; I ran after him, and never lost fight of him till he was taken; he got over some pales, and my brother and I followed him, my brother laid hold of him, and we secured him; we told him he had been stealing the ducks, he said, he had not, he was looking for a place to lie down; we delivered him to the watchman, my brother picked up the ducks, and they went to their roost again.

Robert Lawson corroborated the evidence of the last witness.(The ducks were produced and identified by Joseph and Robert Lawson .)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about the ducks, I was upon the high-road when they stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-45

539. FRANCES WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on 10th of July , a handkerchief, value 6d. and eight shillings , the property of Robert Rattley .

The prosecutor was called, but did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-46

540. RICHARD EADY , JAMES BURK , and SARAH WEBBER were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wood , about the hour of nine in the night of the 17th. of April , and burglariously stealing, a silver watch value 30s. the property of the said John.

JOHN WOOD sworn. - Previous to Lady-day, I kept a house, No. 25, Leather-lane , my son keeps the house now, and did at the time of the robbery; I am a lodger in his house, his name is John-Bowley Wood, he lives in the house; I lost a silver watch, with gold hands from a little shelf in the front of the house, next the street, I saw it there on the 17th of April, Saturday evening, previous to Easter; I was sitting by the fire-side, it was dusk; I heard a window broke, and I went into the street, supposing something to be gone, but I did not miss the watch till Monday morning, when I recollected my watch had been laid there; it had been there, I believe, about four weeks, the glass was broke, and my son had not had time to put another glass in; about five weeks after, I received information from a chimney-sweep, who was to have been here to give evidence, but he is not here, in consequence of which, I got my watch at the office from a pawnbroker.

JOHN DOBREE sworn. - I manage my father's business, at No. 135, Holborn; I took in a silver watch from the prisoner Webber, on the 17th of April, about nine in the evening; I knew her before; I delivered up the watch in Hatton-garden.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden; in consequence of information I received from the prosecutor, I went with him to the pawnbroker's, where I found my watch. (The watch was produced, and identified by Wood.)

Webber's defence. I was in the House of Correction three weeks, and I was to be discharged upon paying the expences and the sees, and the fees were paid, and then I was taken back again for the very same thing.

For the prisoner Webber.

JOHN LANE sworn. - I work at a coal-wharf; the prosecutor agreed to liberate the woman, if he had his property; I paid for his property one pound two shillings, he received it.

Q. What is the prisoner Webber? - A. She sells fish about the town.

Q. Is she related to the other prisoners? - A. No.

The prisoner Webber also called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

All three NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-47

541. DANIEL CAMPBELL and JOHN BAYLISS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a coat, value 5s. two jackets, value. 5s. three waistcoats, value 3s. eight pair of trowsers, value 8s. three shirts, value 3s. a frock, value 1s. two pair of shoes, value 1s. a pair of breeches, value 2s.

four pair of stockings, value 2s. a handkerchief, value 6d. nine bound books, value 1s. 6d. and a box, value 6d. the property of John Soaper .

JOHN SOAPER sworn. - I am carpenter's boy on board the Windham, a merchant ship , lying at Blackwall : On Thursday morning last, I lost my things from my chest under my hammock, abreast the main hatchway -

Q. Are the cloaths your's - how do you pay for them out of your wages? - A. I am bound to Mr. Sturt, and he finds me in cloaths.

Q. They were given to you by your master? - A. Some of them; the others I brought away from my father and mother.

Q. Was the chest taken away as well as the things? - A. Yes; I had seen them safe in the chest when I went to bed; the boatswain's boy turned me out of my bed about four o'clock in the morning, and I found my chest upon the deck, with all my things in it.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoners on board your ship? - A. Yes; they were employed as lumpers .

ROBERT STURT sworn. - The last witness is my apprentice; I found him in some cloaths at China, he had some other things which he had taken from home with him: On Thursday morning, the 15th of this month, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoners on board my vessel, they were brought on board by Crossley; the chest was brought on board at the same time; Campbell was brought on board first; they were charged with stealing the trunk, and were delivered to the officer.

- CROSSLEY sworn. - I am an officer of the customs: On Thursday morning last, between one and two o'clock, as we were on duty, guarding the ship, we heard an altercation between the keeper of the ship, John Brown, and Campbell, the prisoner at the bar; we told Campbell, if he did not sheer off, we would heave a shot into his boat, as we suspected there was something improper; Campbell said, he would shoot, and the ship-keeper then called to the galley, the prisoner then let his boat go, and she drifted; I came up, and jumped into the boat, where I found this chest in the boat, with the prisoner; we then rowed along side the ship, where there was a barge, and in that barge we found a great number of things that had been thrown out of the ship; we took him within board, and there kept him till we could get a peace-officer to take him in charge; it was then said, there was some other person on board the ship that was concerned with the prisoner; and we found Bayliss, and took him into custody; I kept the chest within board in the custody of Mr. Sturt, and other officers on board.

JOSEPH COLLETT sworn. - I was fetter of the galley on the Blackwall station; I assisted in securing Campbell, we took him on board the ship with the chest, I took care of it till I delivered it into the hands of the constable; when I first saw him, he was within about twenty yards from the ship, rowing away; I found the other prisoner between the bits stowed away between decks; he said, he did not know how he came on board, but somebody had brought him on board in the evening, to help bring a hammock on shore.

JOHN BROWN sworn. - I am ship-keeper: I had the care of the ship, and the stores, and every thing belonging to her; I came up about one o'clock, and observed the tackle over the gangway loose, and hanging over the water, which I was sut prised at, I made it fast as it was before; I then heard a noise forward, I went forward upon the forecastle, and saw Campbell in his boat along side; I asked him, what he wanted at that time in the morning, he gave me no answer; I told him, if he did not go away, I would heave a nine-pounder into his boat, I went to look for a shot, but I could not find one; I came up again, and told him, I would hail the galley, which did; I then saw Bayliss hanging in the fore chains, and he ran between decks; the galley brought Campbell on board, with the chest; I enquired, and found the ship had been robbed; I alarmed every person that was in the ship, and told the galley-men there was another man on board; they were then both secured, and delivered to the officer; they had both been at work on board the ship, the day before.

JOSEPH JARVIS sworn. - I keep the Coopers' arms, Poplar: On Wednesday morning, preceding the robbery, about ten o'clock, the two prisoners called at my house, and called for a quartern of gin, which my brother served them; when they had drank the gin, they would neither pay for it, not go out of the house, I forced them out of the house; I saw no more of them till I saw them next morning, tied together.(Thomas Gordon, an officer, produced the property, which was identified by Soaper).

Compbell's defence. I was very much in liquor, I came down to the water-side, to get some sugars on board; we were to be on board very early in the morning, to remove a quantity of sugar; I met with a man in a skiff, and this box in it; I asked him to take me on board, and when I had got-along side, be ran over the lighters, and got away.

Collett. There was nobody on board the skiff but himself.

Bayliss' defence. I was very much in liquor, and was locked out of my lodgings; I went on board again, and sell asleep till I was waked by one of the gentlemen.

Q. Did Bayliss appear to be in liquor? - A. Very little indeed.

Q. (To Brown). Are the lumpers permitted to sleep on board the ship? - A. Not at Blackwall.

Q. (To Collett). Could one man have got the chest out of the ship without the assistance of another? - A. No, he could not.

Campbell, GUILTY , aged 41.

Bayliss, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-48

542. ROBERT GRIFFITHS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Miller , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 20th of June , and burglariously stealing six silver spoons, value 20s. two table cloths, value 6s. a coat, value 5s. two pair of shoes, value 6s. and a hat, value 3s. the property of the said Henry.

HENRY MILLER sworn. - I live at No. 9, London-place, Hackney , I am a clerk in the Bank of England : On the morning of the 21st of June, about four o'clock, I was awaked by the patrole, who asked me, if I did not think I had been robbed -

Q. Do you know if your doors had been fastened that night? - A. I cannot answer to that, my servant is here. The patrol told me, one of my back windows, which looked into the garden, was open; in consequence of that, I went down, and found it wide open; the garden is about forty feet long, and has protection by a wooden sence about five feet high.

Q. Did the window appear to have been broken? - A. No; I found the things in disorder, but did not miss any thing at that time. The patrol then immediately asked me, if I had missed no silver spoons, and also a piece of beef in salt, a great coat, and shoes; I then went down again, and missed them; I had not looked particularly before; I also missed a hat which they had not mentioned; and then said, they had taken a man with property of that description.

JOSEPH COX sworn. - I am one of the patrols of Hackney parish: On the 21st of June, John Webb and I went to the boarded sence of the garden belonging to Mr. Gray, at the end of London-place, about half past two in the morning, about thirty or forty yards from Mr. Miller's; in a few minutes afterwards, we heard a foot on the other side of the paling, in the garden; I looked over the paling, and saw the prisoner with the bundle in his lap; I asked him, what he did there; he said, he got over to case himself; I then got over, and asked him, if that bundle was his own; he said, it was; I opened the bundle, and found it contained two table-cloths and a pair of shoes; I told him, he must go with us to the guard-room; I then observed some more things in his pocket, I pulled out a piece of beef, another pair of shoes, and six silver table-spoons; we took him to the guard-room, and delivered him up to the officer of the night. I have the things here.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn. - I searched the prisoner after he was brought to the watch-house; he had a great coat on, which I thought was not his own, and I took it off; I took his hat off, and in the lining of his hat was this child's frock; round his neck he had this green silk shawl; I took the hat off his head; the other things were delivered to me by Cox.(The property was produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

CATHERINE CHAPMAN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Miller: The shutters were put to, there is no fastening to them; I am sure the sash was down, the bar was not up.

Q. How came you not to put the bar up? - A. I did not take particular notice of it, I forgot it.

Q. Then you may not be sure that the sash was down? - A. Yes, I am sure the sash was down, I put it down at dusk, between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. (To Cox). You saw this man, when you looked over the paling? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him plainly? - A. Yes, I saw him plainly; it was rather dusk, but I could see him.

Q. (To Miller.) What do you say to the value of those things? - A. I value them altogether at about 40s.; the prisoner was in the house a considerable time, he supped there.

Q. (To Cox.) What sort of a light was it - the same that it had been all night, or was it lighter than it had been? - A. It was rather lighter than it had been.

Q. Was it so dark half an hour before, that you could not have seen his face? - A. An hour before, most likely I could not.

Prisoner's defence. I throw myself upon the mercy of the Court. GUILTY, aged 45.

Of stealing goods, value 39s. but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-49

543. ROBERT DELAMAINE was indicted for making an assault, in the king's highway, upon Simon Nazaret , on the 19th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, two half-guineas, six Bank-notes, each of the value of 5l. and three other Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of the said Simon.

SIMON NAZARET sworn. - I am a seaman belonging to the Friendship ; I was paid my wages three weeks ago last Saturday, at Deptford; I received six 5l. notes, three 1l. notes, and two half-guineas, about eleven o'clock in the morning; I put them into my breeches pocket, and the half-guineas into my waistcoat pocket.

Q. How soon after you received your wages, did you leave your ship? - A. I came on shore at seven o'clock in the evening; I called the prisoner, who is a waterman, and told him I would give him sixpence and a pot of beer; he put me on shore at Deptford; I went to a public-house, and I went to the bar to pay the mistress for a pot of beer, and the prisoner left the house while I was paying for the beer, they waited for me next to the windmill; he had a stick, about half the length of his arm, and the first rap he gave me with it, was on the right side of my neck.

Q. How long before you left the public-house, did the prisoner leave it? - A. In a minute, the second rap he gave me over my side, then he struck me on the head, then he collared me, and put his hand into my trowsers pocket, and turned it inside out, he took out the notes, and from my waistcoat pocket he took the two half-guineas, and two-pence; there was a man with a brown coat with him, that man collared me and took my silk handkerchief from me, which cost me two Spanish dollars; I had had a drop on board the ship, when the captain paid me my money.

Q. Did the other man put his hand in your pocket? - A. No.

Q. How soon did you see the other man? - A. He was in the boat with the waterman, when I left the ship.

Q. Did he go into the public-house with the waterman? - A. Yes; after they had taken my handkerchief and money, they ran away directly to the boat, I staid three hours upon the same spot; I was sick by the stroke I got upon my head, I could not go any further, I was neither drunk nor quite sober.

Q. Where was it that all this happened? - A. It all happened at Deptsord, alongside the windmill.

Q. You are sure it was Deptsord? - A. Yes.

Q. What side of the river was it, the northside or the south-side? - A. This side of the water.

Q. The north-side, or the south-side? - A. The north side.

Q. How many mills were there on the side of the water where this happened? - A. Two.

Q. Why did you say it was at Deptsord? - A. I landed there when I was paid.

Q. Where was it you lodged? - A. At Mrs. Alstrom's.

Q. How far is Alstrom's house from the place where you were robbed? - A. Ten miles.

Q. Which side of the water did you land upon, the north or fourth? - A. Where the flour mills are.

Q. Was it the north or south-side? - A. The north-side.

Court. He describes it to be at Deptsord, but in that he is certainly mistaken, from his description of the place, it must have been the Poplar side of the water.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. Is not the public-house where you landed, called the King's arms? - A. I do not know.

Q. Have you ever been there since this accident happened? - A. No.

Q. How long was this since - was it three or four weeks since? - A. Four weeks next Saturday.

Q. Was it on the same day you were paid your wages? - A. Yes.

Q. You are quite sure you received six fivepound notes, three one-pound notes, and two halfguineas? - A. Yes, the captain gave it to me.

Q. Where is it Mrs. Alstrom lives - in Angel and Hope-alley, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ask him to put you on shore there? - A. No, I told him to put me on shore where he pleased.

Q. After you came out of the public-house, the prisoner knocked you down, and risled your pockets, and then the other man collared you? - A. Yes.

Q. You received a violent blow at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you get home? - A. The next morning, about half past seven.

Q. Were you there all night? - A. Yes.

Q. I understood you to say, you laid there three hours only? - A. When I got up, I moved back to the mill, and staid there all night.

Q. Had you left Mrs. Alstrom's that morning? - A. Yes.

Q. How much money had you when you left Mrs. Alstrom's house that morning? - A. Not a penny.

Q. What time did you leave her house that morning? - A. About ten or eleven o'clock.

Q. Do you recollect the waterman coming to fetch your bedding from the ship to your lodgings that morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it before or after you were paid? - A. Before I was paid.

Q. At the time the waterman came to fetch your things, were you drunk or sober? - A. I had nothing but a glass of liquor; I was not quite sober or quite drunk.

Q. Did you give him the bedding, or did somebody else give it him? - A. I gave it him myself, and lashed my hammock up with a piece of line.

Q. Are you quite sure the account you have given now, agrees with any other account that you have given of this transaction? - A. It is the same account.

Q. You have never said, you laid upon the bank all night? - A. All night upon the bank.

Q. Have you never said, that after you were knocked down, you got up, and ran after the man? - A. No, I could, not move my self from the spot.

Q. You have never said you got up and ran after

the man? - A. I have said, if I could get up, I would run after the man.

Q. Have you never said you were so sick, that you could not speak? - A. Never.

Q. Have you never heard of a reward for convicting a man of a highway robbery? - A. Never.

Q. Were you never told, if you would swear to this man, you would soon have your money again? - A. No, never; I have a good pair of hands to work for myself.

Q. When did you first complain to any person of having been robbed? - A. I told it to the mistress of the house, on Sunday morning.

Q. Have you never said you were at the public-house, close by where you were robbed on the Sunday morning? - A. Never.

Q. As soon as you had recovered yourself, did you not go to some place that was near, to make a complaint? - A. No; as soon as I recovered, I went straight home.

Q. How far is it from the place where you were robbed, to your own home? - A. It is a long way.

Q. Did you come home by water? - A. No, by land.

Court. Q. What became of you after you had been lying there three hours? - A. I staid there about three hours, more or less.

Q. At what hour were you knocked down? - A. It was about half past seven.

Q. Three hours will make it half past ten - what became of you after half past ten at night? - A. I staid all night along side the windmill, I could not move myself.

RICHARD PERRY sworn. - Q. You are an officer? - A. I am an officer of the Thames Police, Wapping.

Q. When did you apprehend the prisoner? - A. On Wednesday the 23d of June, at Deptford, in his boat; the prosecutor described him in such a manner to me and the other officer, that we could not possibly miss the man.

Q. Is Joseph Innes here? - A. No, we have not been able to find him.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the man with my eyes till the day I was apprehended.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES MARTIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. What are you? - A. A carpenter and joiner, at Deptford-green.

Q. Where does the prisoner live? - A. At Deptford-green, next door but one to me.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner on the evening of Saturday, the 12th of June? - A. Yes, about six o'clock in the evening; I saw him turn up the Green, and come in at his own door.

ALICE BONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bevil. I lodge in the same house with the prisoner.

Q. Do you recollect seeing him on Saturday, the 12th of June? - A. Yes.

Q. About what time? - A. About six o'clock, I cannot say for a few minutes.

Q. Do you know what he came for? - A. He came home to tea, his wife had water of me.

ELIZABETH BOWMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bivil. Q. What are you? - A. I am servant at the Sir John Falstaff.

Q. Do you remember, on Saturday, the 12th of June, feeing the prisoner come to your house? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. At what time? - A. About half past six.

Q. How long did he stay? - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. What had he? - A. He had a pint of beer and a pipe of tobacco.

MARY NODRUM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. You are sister-in-law to the prisoner? - A. I am.

Q. Do you recollect, on Saturday, the 12th of June, the prisoner coming to your house? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. At what time did he come to your house? - A. As soon as the clock struck seven.

Q. Where is your house? - A. In Queen-court, Deptford; he staid there till nine.

Q. What he ever out of the house during that time? - A. No.

Court. Q. How came you to say it was the 12th of June? - A. I am positive to its being the 12th of June.

Q. But I should like to know why? - A. I am very particular to the day.

Q. But why are you thus positive? - A. I went that day to give warning to my landlady to quit the house; I had been to give warning before, but my landlady was not at home.

Q. What time did he come to your house? - A. The clock struck seven as he sat down in the chair.

Q. How came you to notice the time so exactly- does he not frequently come to your house? - A. He and his wife came every night.

Q. How came you to remark the time? - A. On account of giving warning.

Q. But how are you able to state the hour of the night so exactly? - A. I took particular notice, that when I came home, the clock struck seven, but not the yard clock.

Q. What time did he come into your house the night before? - A. The night before, I think it was nine.

Q. What makes you think it was nine o'clock? - A. He told me his wife was poorly.

Q. His wife being poorly does not prove it was nine o'clock? - A. My husband came in from work about the same time.

Q. Do you remember at what time of night of the 13th he came in? - A. I cannot say.

Q. The 14th? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. The 15th? - A. I cannot.

Q. The 16th? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. I think it rather extraordinary you should know the time of his coming in upon the 11th and 12th, and yet not know those other times? - A. That was the time.

Q. Was he with you on the 15th? - A. No.

Q. Was he with you on the 14th? - A. No.

Q. How came you to say he came almost every night? - A. He did not come after this affair happened; he could not come after he was in confinement.

Q. When was he apprehended? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. I should think you might have recollected that? - A. I think it was the 23d.

Q. Was he at your house upon the 13th? - A. It was seldom that he ever missed.

Q. Was he at your house the 13th? - A. Sunday night, I think he was.

Q. Are you sure of it? - A. Yes; I am positive he was there on Sunday night.

Q. What time did he come on Sunday night? - A. About half past eight.

Q. How do you know that? - A. My sister came in first; I had had my beer about half an hour.

Q. On the Monday night did he come? - A. I cannot be positive.

Q. On the Tuesday night? - A. I cannot say, on the Monday night; I recollect I was at his house, that was Trinity-Monday.

Q. What was he doing at your house on the 12th; because he had a house of his own you know? - A. I had some things of his wife's to wash, she was not well.

Q. What was his business on Sunday? - A. Merely to sit down and talk.

Q. The business of a waterman is not over so early as seven o'clock, at this time of year? - A. My husband is a waterman, and when he is tired, he will come home as soon as seven; Mr. Delamaine said he was tired.

Q. Did he come to your house on the Saturday before the 12th? - A. I dare say he did.

Q. Do you know that he did? - A. Yes.

Q. What time? - A. I did not take particular notice.

Q. How came you to take particular notice on the 12th? - A. I remarked that I had made so much haste.

Q. That is no reason that he should come to you upon that day? - A. He did come that day.

Q. Who lived in the house with you? - A. No one at all.

Q. You have no servant? - A. No.

Q. Who had he to take care of his wife, has he any servant? - A. No, only the nurse.

Q. And what was the occasion of his coming to you? - A. He came to fetch a bundle of clothes I had taken to wash.

Q. Was the bundle ready for him when he came? - A. No, the things were not all troned, I ironed them in the evening, and carried them the next morning.

Q. You gave him what was finished as soon as he came? - A. Yes.

Q. How came he not to go away with them? - A. I asked him if he would stop and take a mouthful of bread and cheese; they supped with me, and his wife went out and fetched some lettices.

JAMES SINCLAIR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. You are mate of the Friendship? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you on board the Friendship on the 12th of June? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the day the ship was paid off? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did she lie? - A. At the King's moorings.

Q. Is there a public-house on the opposite side of the shore? - A. Yes, at the mast-house.

Q. There is a mill between that and Limehouse, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. How far is the mill from the public-house? - A. I cannot positively say, I suppose seven or eight hundred yards.

Q. Is this walk much frequented? - A. Yes.

Q. It would be very much frequented from seven o'clock till nine o'clock of the Saturday night? - A. Yes, very much.

Q. The men leave work at that time, and there are a great many passing? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it possible for a person to lie there three house, without being noticed? - A. I should think not.

Q. Do you recollect seeing Nazaret on board your ship on this day? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect what sum he was paid? - A. I think it was 32l. old.

Q. Was he drunk or sober? - A. He was intoxicated, and much more after he was paid.

Q. Was he drunk with liquor given him by the captain? - A. The captain did not give him any.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. Do you know how he was paid? - A. He was paid in Bank of England notes.

Q. What were the sums? - A. I think ten, five, and two, I cannot say.

Q. Did you see him go away? - A. No, I believe I was below.

Q. Did you see him in the course of the evening? - A. To the best of my recollection, the last time I saw him was about four o'clock, and then he appeared to be more in liquor than he was before he received his wages.

HENRY SAUNDERS sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Bevil. Q. You are a waterman, and live at Deptford? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where the prisoner lives? - A. Yes, at Deptford-green.

Q. Do you know the distance of his house from the Friendship, and from thence to the King's-arms? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. How long would it have taken a man to go from the prisoner's house to the Friendship, and from there to the King's-arms? - A. I think it would take three quarters of an hour, particularly if I was detained to go from the prisoner's house to the Chalk-stone, upon the Mill-wall.

Q. The Mill-wall is a great thoroughsare, is it not? - A. Particularly on a Saturday night it is very much thronged; all manner of working people are passing and repassing.

The prisoner called Mr. Wells, the captain of the Geory, who gave him and excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence

Reference Number: t18020714-50

544. JOHN CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a hat, value 10s. 6d. the property of William Morgan .

JOHN JENKINS sworn. - I am a hatter, servant to Mr. William Morgan , New-street, Coventgarden ; the prisoner came into our shop on Tuesday, the 29th of June, between nine and ten o'clock; I was not in the shop, being at work below stairs; a bell was rung for me to come up; when I came up, the prisoner wanted to see some hats; I shewed him this one, (producing it,) and another; this he did not approve, the other he did; I just turned my back to get a stamp, and I saw him go out of the shop with this hat on his head; I ran after him, and stopped him, not more than a quarter of a mile from our house, on my taking hold of him, he immediately gave me the hat; it was Mr. Morgan's hat; it had neither band, buckle, nor stamp, by which I knew it; he gave a spring, as if surprized; I am certain this is the same hat; when he came back to the shop, I gave him his old hat which he had left there; he had not paid for any hat.

JOHN HUGHES sworn. - I am a carpenter; I was passing by at the time; I stopped at the door of Mr. Morgan's to see what was the matter; we were taking the prisoner to Bow-street, and at the corner of James-street, the prisoner said to Jenkins, where are you going, he answered, going to Bow-street; the prisoner then ran away, I ran after him, and caught him by the collar.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the shop to purchase a hat, I did not know what I did as I was in liquor. GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-51

545. JOHN TYNE , THOMAS WILLIAMS , and SUSANNAH WHITE were indicted, the two first for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , a trunk, value 1s. a coat, value 10s. a pair of breeches, value 5s. two pair of drawers, value 2s. three waistcoats, value 10s. and three shirts, value 12s. with a quantity of other articles , the property of John Spranger , and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN SPRANGER sworn. - I only prove the property.

GEORGE SAUNDERS sworn. - I was driving a cart along a lane, in St. Giles's, on the Saturday before Whitsunday, at half-past nine in the morning; I was told the cart was robbed, I examined it and missed a box; the box was put into the cart that morning a little before nine, it was taken from Mr. Spranger's house; on missing the box, I went up the street, but could not discover who had taken it; I immediately went to a constable, who pursued him.

JOHN NEWLAN sworn. - According to information of the cart being robbed, I went to the avenues of St. Giles's, on Saturday morning the 5th of June; the carter was with the some time; I saw the prisoner Tyne coming up Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's; I took him into custody; I had got him as far as King-street, Seven-dials, when the prisoner Williams, and two more, came up and rescued him; Tyne drew his knife, Williams struck at me with a knife, and pierced my jacket; Williams struck me several times in rescuing the prisoner; on making his escape, I pursued him; he cut at every body as he went, he would otherwife have been stopped; I pursued him to a street, where he jumped into a cellar, and I took him with assistance to the office; afterwards I searched the premises, No. 9, in Dyot-street, and found there this trunk, (producing it;) the lock of the trunk was wrenched off, it was behind the head of the bed; Susannah White was on the bed, she lodged there, she would not tell where the property was that was in the trunk, but said, when one split, she would split; I took her to the office, she was examined and committed; on the Sunday morning, as I was coming down Dyot-street, I saw the prisoner Williams, I recognized his face, he ran away, but I pursued him, took him and brought him to the office; I am certain it was he who struck with the knife.

WILLIAM CLIVE sworn. - On Saturday, June the 5th, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner Tyne, and many people about him, in Church-lane; in bringing him to the the office, he behaved very insolent, and endeavoured to get away; after he was committed, I went to No. 9, Dyot-street, and found the trunk concealed behind the bed; there were two women in

the room, it was above five or six in the evening; there was a padlock on the door of the room; I forced it; the prisoner, White, said, nobody slept there but herself, it was her room; on asking her about the property taken out of the trunk, she said, she knew, but would not tell; when one split, all would split.

EDWARD TIERNEY sworn. - I saw the prisoner, Williams, on Saturday, the 5th of June, between nine and ten in the forenoon, and Tyne with him; Williams had a trunk under his left arm, the same as is here produced; I was within a few yards; he was running as fast as he could; Tyne was running after him, and said, make haste, run on, thou b-r; they were soon out of fight, nobody pursuing them; I had seen Williams before; he has often threatened to kill me; I never saw Tyne before; on the Sunday, I saw him, and as soon as he saw the constable, he ran up Dyot-street, as hard as he could; the constable, was just behind me, and we took him.

Prisoner. Tierney told me, if I would give him money, he would make it up.

Tierney. I never did say so.

JOHN HANNEL sworn. - I packed this trunk on the 5th of June, and delivered it to Saunders, for Mr. Spranger's country-house, about eight o'clock in the morning; the way to which is along St. Giles's, and down Oxford-road; the trunk contained the articles mentioned in the indictment,(repeating them).

Willam's defence. I never saw the trunk.

Tyne's defence. I never saw it; I should not have made any resistance to Nowlan, but that I thought he was going to take my money from me.

White's defence. I never saw the men before in my life; I did not know for what I was taken to the office. All three NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-52

546. JOHN GWYN was indicted for that he, being in the dwelling-house of John Hathaway , about the hour of ten in the night of the 2d of July , feloniously did steal two neck handkerchiefs, value 2s. and a child's spencer, value 2s. the property of the said, John; and afterwards, burglariously did break the said dwelling-house, in order to get out thereof .

CHARLES GREECE sworn. - I am a stay and habit-maker, in Rathbone-place: On the 2d of July, about half past ten at night, I was at Mr. Hathaway's, he is a clerk in the Bank , and lives at No. 4, Bury-place, Bloomsbury ; there was a noise heard, and I asked what it was; I saw all the family present; I ran up stairs, and saw a person going from the front parlour towards the street door; he opened it, and pulled it after him; the door was sastened by a spring-latch lock; I opened it, and pursued him across Bury-place; as he was running, he threw from his left hand some artilces; I pursued him, calling out, stop thief; he was stopped, about one hundred yards further on, by a watchman; I never lost-sight of him from the time of my first pursuit; he said, it was not him; I told him, I saw him in the house. (The property was produced).

REBECCA HATHAWAY sworn. - I am the wife of John Hathaway; Mr. Greece was at our house the beginning of this month; the articles produced, are my husband's property; they were left on the parlour table, and were there about nine o'clock; on hearing a noise, going into the parlour, the things were missing; I did not see them again till they were brought to me. GUILTY,

Of stealing the goods, but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-53

547. WILLIAM MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , seven pounds of lead, value 2s. 6d. and a brass cock, value 1s. the property of Francis Saunders , fixed to his dwelling-house .

FRANCIS SAUNDERS sworn. - I live at No. 45, Marshall-street ; the New River water runs into the house, conveyed into a water-tub by a leaden pipe that runs through the kitchen from the main pipe; it stands by the back of the stairs, near the kitchen; it had a brass cock fixed to it; this pipe was fixed to the house: On the 30th of June last, I observed at six in the morning, that the pipe and cock were safe; I was sent for to Marlborough-street; on my return, the pipe and cock were gone; it appeared to have been cut off.

JANE TERLE sworn. - I live at Mr. Saunders's house; I saw the prisoner standing against the water-tub at the bottom of the kitchen stairs, about six in the evening; I asked him what he was doing there; he said, he had got a sister in the house; I said, if so, you have no business there; I saw him with the pipe in his hand under his coat; he instantly laid it down, and ran up stairs; the cock was fixed to the pipe; he was stopped in the passage by a little boy; in a few minutes after, I carried the pipe and cock up stairs, and gave it to a woman who was in the house; but I know not to whom, through the hurry; I do not remember ever to have seen the man before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Is not the house you speak of a lodging-house? - A. Yes.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - On the 30th of June, I was going to the Haymarket; there was a great row at the door of Mr. Sauncers's house; I found the prisoner in the house, and took him in custody; some person gave me this pipe; it appears to be wrenched off, as the two parts exactly answer.

The prisoner, in his defence, said, he hoped the Court would he as favourable as possible, as he was never in a Court before. GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-54

548. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , a table, value 10s. the property of John Britt .

SARAH TYLER sworn. - I am servant to John Britt , a broker : On Thursday, the 8th of this month, between eight and nine in the morning, in consequence of information from Mr. Brown, I followed the prisoner, and overtook her in Leicester-street, with a mahogany table of Mr. Britt's property; I took it from her; she said, take the table, and let me go; I took it; and my master came up, and took her into custody; I had seen the table at my master's.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I keep a grocer's shop in Lisle-street; my house is near the prosecutor's: I saw the prisoner take it on the 8th of July, about nine in the morning.

JOHN BRITT sworn. - I am a broker; I followed Sarah Tyler , and took the prisoner; she had my table; I had not sold it to her.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-55

549. JAMES DEWDNEY and SARAH CASHMAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , a gold watch, value 5l. a silver pencil case, value 2s. a pair of buckles, value 2s. and various other articles , the property of James Brown .

JAMES BROWN sworn. - On the 4th of June, I met the woman prisoner at the bar, at the bottom of St. James's Park, about two o'clock in the morning; I went to her lodging in Duck-lane, Westminster ; I went into her room, and fell asleep; I was not sober; I had a gold watch, a silver pencil case, a pen-knife, a pair of silk stockings, which I had taken off, a pocket handkerchief, and a pair of plated buckles; the gold watch was put in my fob, the pencil case and knife in my pocket, and my buckles in my shoes; I awoke about six o'clock in the morning; she was gone from the room; I missed all my property, except a neck-handkerchief, and twelve shillings and sixpence in money; a seven-shilling piece, and five shillings and sixpence in silver.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You say, you met her about two o'clock in the morning - where did you spend the evening? - A. At Brompton.

Q. If you had not been drunk, you would not have been there? - A. Certainly not; some man forced open the door; she said, she had lost the key; I had so much recollection as to know the woman was in the room.

Q. Did you not go on purpose to sleep with her? - A. Yes.

JAMES BLY sworn. - Having information of the gentleman having lost his property, I went in search of the prisoner; I found her in Cock-yard, Duck-lane; I also found the property, which the prosecutor said was his, and I took her to a magistrate. The witness produced a memorandum, which he found upon the prisoner, and Mr. Brown identified it to be his property.

THOMAS HATCHARD sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, Dewdney, on the Friday afternoon, at the sign of the Green-coat Boy, a public-house in Tothill-street; I found on him a duplicate; (it was produced, and identified by Brown.)

ANN KELLEY sworn. - I lived in the same house with Cashman, No. 45, Duck-lane, Westminster; she lived in the same room with Dewdney; I lived in the room underneath: On the 4th of June, at two o'clock, I remember Dewdney rapped at my door, and asked if I would let him in, for Sally had not left the key for him; I let him in; he was some time in the room; I heard Cashman's voice; she went up stairs, with a person with her, to the room; she came down in a minute or so, she said, the had lost the key of the door; on which, Dewdney asked, if I had a poker; I did not know there was a poker; but with a piece of iron he broke open the door, and they went in; he came down, and stayed in my room about half an hour, when Cashman came down stairs again, and said something to him in private; on which Cashman went up stairs again, and stayed a short time; he stayed in the room while she came down; he said, he wished to go to bed, and took off his shoes and jacket, and left them in my room; he went up stairs, but she stayed in the room with me; he stayed up stairs not more than ten minutes; he had in his hand, a pair of silver buckles, a neck-handkerchief, a pencil-case, a pair, of silk stockings, and some other things; on which he went into the room, and put on his jacket and shoes; then they both went down stairs; I went down shortly after them; Sarah Cashman as in my room; she asked me, if I knew whether it was gold or silver, or what value; I told her, I could not tell; she asked me to keep it for her; we went and had some gin at several public houses; when we came to Oxford-street, Dewdney asked me for his property, he meant the watch; I said, I had a watch, but did not know whose property it was; but that I would return it to the person who entrusted me with it; on which he struck me a violent blow across my mouth with his hand; he gave me more gin to wash my mouth; I gave the watch to

Cashman, and left them in Oxford-street, and came home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. An unfortunate woman.

Q. Was Sarah Cashman dressed, when she came down the second time? - A. She had not her cloaths quite on; she was partly dressed; she had her gown on.

Q. Did she desire any body to bring down her cloaths? - A. She desired Dewdney to bring her cloaths.

Q. Were you taken up in this business? - A. Yes; they had said, they received the things from me; I was taken up, to know how I came by them.

Q. Have you never been in custody before? - A. Never for any thing of this kind; for being disorderly, but not for stealing.

Court. Q. Were the two prisoners in the room together after the person in liquor went up stairs - were they in the room with him? - A. No; she stayed in my room till she had put on her wearing apparel.

THOMAS CROP sworn. - I keep a public-house, the sign of the Green-coat Boy, near Tothill-fields Bridewell: The prisoner, Dewdney, came to me about the 4th of June, and two soldiers; he had no woman with him; he produced the watch, pencil-case, and buckles, to the two soldiers; he carried them away with him; I saw him in the street, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon, near my house; and I gave him into the custody of Mr. Hatchard; he was searched, but nothing of this sort found upon him; I got these things from Mrs. Pledge, in Gardener's-lane, on the 5th of June.

HANNAH PLEDGE sworn. - Dewdney came to my house, in York-street, near the Park, on the 4th of June, about half past two in the morning, very much in liquor; he went into the yard, and fell down; and the watch nearly falling out of his pocket, I took it out to take care of it; he slept near two hours in the yard; he then gave me a pair of silk stockings; about nine o'clock, I found a pencil-case and a pair of buckles: on the 5th of June, I received a letter from him, brought by a woman named Hunt; I gave the things to Mr. Crop. I have known Dewdney some years, he belongs to the Guards; he has been abroad; I never knew otherwise than that he was an honest man; he is my cousin.

GRACE HUNT sworn. - I saw the prisoner, Dewdney, in Tothill-fields Bridewell, on the 5th of June; he desired me to carry a letter to Mrs. Pledge; the paper produced is the same. (It is read.)

"Mrs. Pledge, this is to inform you that I am in Tothill-fields Bridewell, and shall be much obliged to you, if you will come down and speak to me about what I did at your house, yesterday.

James Dewdney ."

Brown. The watch, and the other articles produced, are all mine, which I had when I went to the lodging.

Dewdney's defence. I had been on duty at the Opera, on the 3d of June; I was relieved about one o'clock in the morning; I came to Westminster, at the apartments I rented, where I found Cashman and some other person trying the door; they asked me to help them to open it; the girls asked me to give them some drink; they put on their cloaths, and we went to a gin-shop. I have no witness.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character.

Cashman's defence. I met the gentleman at the top of Sloane-street; he asked me to take him home with me; he told me to take his things, and keep them till the morning.

Dewdney, GUILTY , aged 30.

Cashman, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-56

550. JAMES LANGLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a pair of boots, value 12s. the property of Thomas Kennedy .

THOMAS KENNEDY sworn. - I am a boot and shoe-maker , No. 437, Oxford-street : I lost two boots on the 29th of May; I saw them at the place where the prisoner was selling them, about half an hour after I missed them.

CHARLES WARREN sworn. - I saw Langley take one of the boots off Mr. Kennedy's window, between eight and nine in the evening, and another in a sailor's dress, took another; I went and told Mr. Kennedy, that the men went up Oxford-street; I would have taken them, but was loaded: I am a porter.

RICHARD LIMBRICK sworn. - I belong to Bow-street office: On the 29th of May, coming down Oxford-street, I saw the prisoner with two other men; the sailor that was with him, took one of the boots out of the window; I ran, but tumbled, and he made his escape; I turned back to Kennedy's shop, and took Kennedy with me to a house in Bowl-yard; in the house of Mr. Sherrat I saw Langley with the boots tied up in a handkerchief; I had seen Langley with the sailor for a good while; I took him in custody to Bow-Street.

Kennedy. These boots are mine; my name is stamped upon them. GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-57

551. ANN DUFFIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , a sheet, value 2s. and a table cloth, value 2s. the property of William Granger .

ELIZABETH GRANGER sworn. - I am the wife

of William Granger , a carpenter ; the prisoner chairs for me; I missed a sheet and a table-cloth, sometime in April; a neighbour who lost some articles, suspected her; I went and found the things at a pawnbroker's.

JOHN KENNET, jun. sworn. - I live with Mr. Sherrard, a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned the things now claimed by Mr. Granger, on the 29th of March. (Produces them.)(Mrs. Granger was called, who identified the articles.)

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH sworn. - On the 17th of June, I took the prisoner into custody, she acknowledged her guilt, and took me to the pawnbroker's.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-58

552. JAMES CASELY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , a gold ring, value 2s. the property of James Gonsells .

JAMES GONSELLS sworn - I am a Portuguese sailor : On Friday the 11th of June, the prisoner came with milk to my house, in Black-horse-yard, East-Smithfield ; I was sitting down, leaning upon my hand, with my ring on my finger almost asleep; he took my ring off my singer, I said, give me my ring; he said, do you think I would rob you of your ring; he turned round and ran away.

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - I live with Mr. Manrice, pawnbroker; the prisoner pledged in a ring on the 11th of June, and said, it was his; it was since delivered to a man who bought the duplicate, Mr. Davis.

MOSES DAVIS sworn. - I got this duplicate from Eliezer Hiams, who had it from James Rustel .

JAMES RUSTEL sworn. - I told it to Hiams.

(Davis produced the ring, which was identified by the prosecutor.) GUILTY , aged 23.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-59

553. FRANCIS CONSTABLE and JAMES PENNYFEATHER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , sixty penny-pieces, value 5s. the property of Hannah Judd , widow .

JOHN JUDD sworn. - I am foreman in my mother's shop: On the 26th of June, about eleven in the morning, I counted twenty-five shillings in penny-pieces, and some hallpence: they were my mother's; I put them in parcels, five shillings in a paper, on a stand, in the market-place, Spital fields, the outside of a warehouse; as I was counting them, I was called away to attend a customer; on turning round, I missed a paper of pennypieces; the two prisoners were close by, whom I knew before, they were porters in the market; I charged them with it; they denied it, and said, I might search them, but I did not; James Penny feather said, I have got some penny-pieces, but they are not your's.

HUMPHRY LEVI sworn. - I am a Jew: I have known the prisoners by sight: On Saturday fortnight I saw Constable, the prisoner, take five shillings-worth of penny-pieces, tied in a paper; he ran under the court, and Pennyfeather too; Pennyfeather had them under his apron; soon afterwards they went up to the church, a little way off, and divided them amongst them all, for there were five who shared them; I then went to Mr. Judd's mother, and told her, and then the two boys were taken up. I dared not go before, for they would have beat me, as they were bigger than I.

The prisoner, Constable, called one, and Pennyfeather two witnesses, who gave them good characters. Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-60

554. JANE DUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , twelve china plates, value 6s. the property of John Clancey .

CHARLES HEWIT sworn. - I am a carpenter, I live opposite Mr. Clancey's; I saw the prisoner on the 10th of June, take twelve china plates, and put them under her cloak; she took them from a sideboard, close to the window; when she was gone a few yards from the place, I went and took her, and delivered her up to Mr. Clancey's wife.

(The plates were produced, and identified by Mrs. Claney.) GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-61

553. CHRISTOPHER THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , twenty-five pounds of lead, value 5s. the property of William Jones , fixed to his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a carpenter; I know the prisoner: On the 5th of July, in he afternoon, I saw him strip the lead off, and take at down through the trap door; I saw him come again through the trap-door, and begin to cut the gutters; this lead had been nailed on the trap-door; here were about ten or twelve pounds of lead taken.

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - In consequence of what had been told me, I went with one Mosely, Williams, and another carpenter, and saw the prisoner come from the top of the house.

THOMAS MOSELY sworn. - I went to the top of an adjoining house, and there I saw the prisoner running along the top; he jumped down and got on the garden wall; I cried out, stop thief.

EDWARD COLE sworn. - I had the key of Mr. Jones's house; I went in and up stairs; before I

got up, I saw the prisoner jump off the third house from our's, and run away; I called, stop thief; on the prisoner's being taken, I saw the lead; it sitted the trap-door; I saw a piece that came out of the middle of the gutter; I sitted it with the rest.

GUILTY of stealing, value 1s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-62

556. HENRY WILKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , six yards of linen cloth, value 9s. and a cotton handkerchief, value 1s. the property of Thomas Norris .

ELIZABETH NORRIS sworn. - I am the wife of the prosecutor: On the 5th of July, I went to Robinson's and Brown's, Shoreditch, to buy some cloth and other articles; I then went to Mr. Lewis's, to buy some stockings; while I was bargaining for the stockings, I missed my bundle; I suspected the prisoner, as Mr. Lewis had found stockings on him which he had missed; he said, if I would go with him to the Pewter Platter, I should have my bundle again; he had it not about him; I asked him to deposit money for the cloth; he came back, and brought me the cloth, and demanded his money; I let him go; by that time he was taken into custody; he stood in the shop all the time I was bargaining for the stockings; there was another man with him; the other went away.

- LEWIS sworn. - I saw the man bring the linen back; another man came with him, stopped a minute or two, and went away.

- MESSENGER sworn. - I took the other man into custody first, and afterwards this man, about four o'clock in the morning.(The cloth was produced, and identified by Mrs. Norris.)

Prisoner's defence. I went to buy a pair of stockings at Mr. Lewis's; my neighbour followed me quickly, and was immediately gone; I denied knowing any thing of the cloth; she desired me to deposit the money for the value of the cloth; I pursued the man, and said to him, it is time to take back the cloth; I thought no more of it.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-63

557. WILLIAM WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , twenty pigeons, value 20s. the property of William Clarke .

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - I live in Brick-lane, behind St. Luke's : I am a butcher ; I have a pigeon-house on the top of the kitchen, I lost twenty, I missed them on the 27th of May last; I found one at Mr. Preston's, alive; a fortnight after, I found another in Single-street the same day; I never saw the prisoner before, I know nothing of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You had no acquaintance with the prisoner? - A. None.

Q. Did you never hear that he dealt in birds? - A. No.

Q. That he bought them with a view to sell again? - A. I have heard so since; I know this to be my pigeon, by several marks.

JAMES BERNADIER sworn. - I bought that pigeon of William Wright, I cannot absolutely swear to it; I deal in birds.

JOHN PRESTON sworn. - I deal in pigeons; the pigeon now produced is like the one I bought.

- TRUSTY sworn. - I sold the pigeon to Mr. Preston, which I bought of Mr. Boyd.

- BOYD sworn. - I sold a piegon to Mr. Trusty, I had it of Wright; so many are alike, I cannot swear to it. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-64

558. SARAH WALSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , a Bank-note, value 10l. and another Bank-note, value 5l. the property of Henry Forbes .

HENRY FORBES sworn. - About a month ago, I went to Somerset house to receive my wages; in Drury-lane, I saw the prisoner about twelve o'clock at night; I asked her for a lodging; she asked me if I wanted a wife; I told her, no; there was another girl with her, they asked me to treat them, I gave them a shilling; this girl stayed in the room with me, she shut the door; I went down stairs, the prisoner went with me, with a candle; she blowed out the candle, and then three men laid hold of me, and took what I had from me, a five pound note and a ten pound note; I have never found my notes again. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-65

559. MARGARET COPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , seven straw bonnets, value 26s. two knives, value 1s. a pair of snuffers, value 1s. and two pillow-cases, value 3s. the property of Sampson Pierce , Thomas Brown , and Robert Hogard .

SAMPSON PIERCE sworn. - I live in St. Paul's church-yard , I am a haberdasher , in partnership with Thomas Brown, and Robert Hogard ; the prisoner lived as cook about five weeks, my sister had a character with her; she had access to the place where the goods now charged were deposited, they were found in her box; she was dismissed on the 8th of June; I saw my property on that day; my partner shewed me a cloth with seven straw bonnets, two knives, snuffers, towel, and two pillow-cases, marked with my initials, all my property.

ROBERT HOGARD sworn. - I am partner in the house; I was present at opening the box, on the 8th of June, she opened it herself; I found the

specified articles, the towel was at her lodgings; she gave the direction, and I went there; I can swear to the whole.

(Thomas Rence, the constable, produced the articles found in the prisoner's box, and Green, a pawnbroker's servant, produced two pillow-cases, which he took in from the prisoner.)(The property was identified by Mr. Pierce.)

Prisoner's defence. I received the bonnets from a young woman; I bought the pillow-cases a year ago, the knives I had had some years.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character. GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-66

560. JOHN CONDER and JOHN EVANS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Anthony Lear , with intent to steal, about the hour of nine. on the night of the 15th of June , and burglariously stealing half a gallon of brandy, value 8s. half a gallon of rasberry, value 5s a Bank-note, value 10l. a waistcoat, value 1s a handkerchief, value 2s. and two other Bank-notes, value 2l. the property of Francisco Martini .

Second Count. For feloniously breaking and entering the said dwelling-house, the said Anthony Lear being therein, about the hour of eight of the same day, and stealing the said property.(The case was opened by Mr. Glead.)

There being no evidence to affect the prisoners, they were both ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-67

561. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , a deal box, value 2s. twenty-eight yards of bed furniture, value 2l. 16s. a pair of breeches, value 2s. a waistcoat-piece, value 1s 6d. six gowns, value 6l. a counterpane, value 5s. a silk sash, value 1s. and two pair of shoes, value 6s. in the dwelling-house of Henry Isaacs .

RACHAEL ISAACS sworn. - Henry Isaacs is my husband, we live in St. Catharine's and deal in cloaths , the prisoner had lived a servant with us about a fortnight: On Thursday was a week, I went to market about eleven o'clock, and left her in care of the house and the children; I returned in about an hour, when my little boy told me she had been up stairs and taken some things; I went up and found the things named in the indictment, and many more were gone, she left me quite naked, except what I had on; she had left this key behind her,(produces a key;) there were three muslin and three cotton gowns, which are worth more than three pounds; the next morning we found her and the things at St. Giles's; I said, Sarah. you have got all my things, how could you do so; she said, give me a knife, and I'll cut my throat, but was willing to go with us.

RICHARD OSBORNE sworn. - I belong to Lambeth street office, and took the prisoner into custody, at the top of Holborn, at the window of George Lane, a pawnbroker, where she had pawned one of the cotton gowns for then shillings; she had a gown, petticoat, stockings and shoes on her; when I told her what I wanted her for, she took me to where the things were in St. Giles's.(The things produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

The pawnbroker produced a gown, which he stated the prisoner pledged for ten shillings, and which was also identified.)

Mrs. Isaacs. The bed furniture is my sons, and cost two pounds sixteen shillings.

JOHN LEVI sworn. - The bed furniture is my property.

Prisoner's defence. That woman keeps a bad house, and enticed me from my father and mother, and took off the things I had on, and put on others, and her husband gave me some things; every halfpenny of money I got she had, while I was there, which was three weeks.

GUILTY Death , aged 19.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of her youth, apparent innocence, and the probability of her having been decoyed from her father and mother .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18020714-68

562. JAMES COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , a diamond bracelet ring, value 30s. a silver fish trowel, value 10s. a gold hair ring, value 5s. two cornelian crosses, value 5s. five silver tablespoons, value 50s a gold ring, value 5s. two gold clasps, value 4s. and a pocket book, value 1s. the property of Philip Gilbert in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

PHILIP GILBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const.

Q. You are a goldsmith , in Cockspur-street ? - A. Yes, the prisoner was my clerk ; about three months ago, I asked him for his cash-book, and when I examined it, I found he was twenty-seven pounds short, as well as some articles he had omitted to enter into his book; I put the book into the drawer, and when I looked for it afterwards, it was gone; I asked him for it, he said, he had not seen it since he gave it to me; I said, I was confident, from his manner, he had it, and proposed going to his lodgings, which he refused; having lost several things, I began to have some suspicion of him, and sent for a constable; we went to his lodgings, and on opening his box, this book was discovered, together with a silver fish-knife, a diamond ring. gold rings, five table spoons, and all those articles named in the indictment, which the officer has; I never entrusted the prisoner with them, nor had he any right to take them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not make him any promise, did you? - A. No.

Q. You had lost those things at a variety of times, so that it is impossible for you to say, they went all at once? - A. I cannot say.

PETER PERRY sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Bow street, and accompanied Mr. Gilbert to the prisoner's lodgings, who went with us. where we found these articles. (Produces the articles which were identified by the Prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing to the amount of 20s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18020714-69

563. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a promisory-note, value 60l. a warrant for the payment of money, value 20l. a Bill of Exchange, value 15l. 1s. 6d. four Banknotes, value 20l. each, five other Bank-notes, value 10l. each, one other Bank-note, value 5l. and two other Bank-notes, value 1l. each, the property of Peter Martin , privily from his person .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

PETER MARTIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. What are you? - A. A wine and brandy-merchant , in Wapping: On the 9th of July last. I took out 145l. 8s. including eight guineas, with me, from home, and a 20l. note I had received of Mr. M'Allister, a customer of mine, in Holborn, making together 165l. 8s.; when I received the 20l. note, I took the other out of my pocket, and wrapped it round them, and put them altogether in my right hand breeches pocket; I then went to the house of John Barker, a customer of mine, who keeps a liquor-shop in High-Holborn; I had a bottle of wine, in company with some persons in the back parlour; there were eight or nine gentlemen there; one of whom was the prisoner; I sat down, and he was at my right hand side, next my pocket in which the notes were; I stayed there about three hours, and got up to go a little before five; a coach was sent for, and my son and myself, and a gentleman who was acquainted with Mr. Barker and myself, got into it; they called him, Mr. Ellis; and he went as far as Cheapside, where he got out; at which time I had not missed my property; I discovered I had lost it, when I got to Messrs. Were's, the banker's; the notes were gone, but the guineas were left; I said, I was robbed; and Mr. Taylor, who is a partner in the house, went back with me to Barker's; I found partly the same customers there, but I believe the prisoner was not there; he was there when I went away, and was very 10th for me to go; I told the company of my loss, and went away some time after; I have seen the Bank note which I took of M'Allister, and which was produced to me at Bow-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were three hours in this public-house? - A. I was.

Q. How many in company were there? - A. I think, eight or nine.

Q. Did you drink more than one bottle of wine? - A. I think me and the rest of the company drank three or four.

Q. You had received the 20l. note of M'Allister? - A. Yes, a few minutes before; I took the other notes from my house, to pay into my banker's, with what I should collect, and I rolled that 20l. note round them.

Q. Making no particular remark on it? - A. Yes, I did; I know the indorsement on it; there is the initials of M'Allister's name.

Q. You went away towards the banker's? - A. I did.

Q. Was the prisoner left there? - A. Yes.

Q. When you came back, he was not? - A. I believe he was not.

Q. He returned afterwards to the house? - A. I did not see him.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I was a little merry, but not drunk.

Q. A person named Ellis, went with you in the coach? - A. Yes.

Q. Did curiosity induce you to look at the notes, before you went out of Barker's? - A. No; I neither pulled them out, or looked at them.

Q. Then the time you lost them you do not know? - A. No.

Q. Whether they were taken in the coach, or not, you do not know? - A. It was impossible for them to be taken out of my pocket in the coach.

Q. It was a hackney-coach? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any body open the door to let you into the coach? - A. Yes; but I don't know who.

Q. Had you drank so much, that you don't recollect? - A. Not so much.

Q. You never missed them till you got to Were's? - A. No.

Q. Is Mr. Ellis here? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did he sit on the same side of the coach with you, or opposite to you? - A. My son sat next to me, and Ellis opposite to him; he got out of the coach in Newgate-street, Cheapside, or thereabouts; I have not seen him since.

JOHN BARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Do you keep the house Mr. Martin has spoke of? - A. Yes, the Coach and Horses, in High Holborn: On the 9th of July, the prosecutor came between one and two o'clock, and sat down in the parlour with several gentlemen who had dined there; the prisoner was one of the company; and Mr. Martin sat next to him; there were three or four bottles of wine drank; and after Mr. Martin had stayed three or four hours, I sent for a coach for him, and saw him into it; Mr. Ellis, who is a farmer, at Elton, near Stilton, in Huntingdonshire, went with him; the prisoner remained some little time after them in the room; when he got up, he said, he was going away, but would forfeit a shilling, if he did not return in ten minutes; in about an hour after, he did return; but I do not know whether Martin had been back then, or not; but he did come with a partner of the Bank, and said, he had lost his property; and went away soon after; when he was gone, there was some conversation about the notes; and they said, it was a reflection upon the company, as it was lost in the room; it was proposed for them all to stand search; and by their desire, I fetched the high-constable, Mr. Bell, who came; and Mr. Jones, the prisoner, after opening his waistcoat, pulling out a shilling, and some loose papers, said, I will not be searched by any man, pray who are you? to Mr. Bell; say Mr. Bell, here is my authority, and I'll search you first; which he did; and in his left hand coat pocket, he found a 20l. Bank-note; then I took a coach, and fetched Mr. Martin; and the prisoner was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner frequented your house, I believe? - A. Yes; and has for four years.

Q. You were a good deal surprised at this charge against him? - A. Yes.

Q. He was one of the last persons in the world you could suspect? - A. Indeed he was; he always behaved genteelly, and with the greatest respectability.

Q. Did Martin say he would have a coach? - A. He did; and I thought a coach would be better for him, old and feeble as he is, and his condition being such.

Q. What do you mean by such a condition? - A. He

is a seeble old man, and considering the distance from my house to his, and he having had a glass or two of wine, I thought a coach would be better.

Court. Q. Was he intoxicated or not? - A. He was not.

Mr. Alley. Q. When he went away, did he not say, he had lost something? - A. No.

Q. Some of the party were gone? - A. Yes.

Q. You know he is a tradesman, and keeps a shop? - A. I have always understood so.

Q. It is nothing uncommon for a tradesman to go away for a short time? - A. No.

Q. Did he return, as he said he would? - A. He did.

Q. Martin had not arrived then? - A. I don't know that he had.

Q. Had Martin communicated that he would return to the house? - A. No.

Q. You say, there was a general agreement to search? - A. They all agreed to it.

Q. The prisoner was rather drunk? - A. I rather think he was not at all; he had a pint of ale first, and then part of a bottle of wine with Mr. Martin; and he had dined there; he said, he would be searched by no man, when the constable was there.

Q. Did they all know he was a constable? - A. All, except Mr. Jones.

Q. You found the note rolled up in a little lump? - A. I did not see it at all.

WILLIAM BELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. What are you? - A. An iron-founder, in Cross-street, Wilderness-row, Clerkenwell: I was at Barker's, on the 9th of July; the prisoner and Martin were there, and next to each other, except a little boy, who stood between them most of the time; we sat on chairs, and I don't think he had a seat.

Q. Was your attention called by any thing you saw done by the prisoner at the bar? - A. When Mr. Martin was told the coach was at the door, and after a great deal of shaking hands between the prisoner and him, he went; I thought both of them were a little overtaken; it was frequently the case that Martin was offering his hand to Jones, and Jones to him, with particular familiarity; when Martin rose, Jones rose with him, and they were shaking each other by the hand very cordially, and I was not very well pleased with it; for I had rather a suspicion, as I thought I saw Mr. Jones draw his hand from Mr. Martin's right hand breeches pocket, but did not see that he took any thing; I believe he did not at that time; Martin directly after left the room; and Jones stayed a very short time, promising to return in ten minutes, or he would forfeit a shilling, which he threw on the table.

Q. After he was gone, did you communicate to any one of the company what you thought? - A. I did, to Mr. John Graut . I and five or six more were in another room, when Mr. Martin returned; and I did not see him that night, but I heard him; the prisoner, I think, returned in about three quarters of an hour, when Mr. Barker came into the room, and announced the loss. I was present when the constable came, and saw the prisoner searched and the note that Mr. Bell said, in the prisoner's hearing, he had taken out his coat-pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have known the prisoner some years? - A. I have, and been many times in his company; I entertained the highest opinion of his honesty up to that time, and was very much surprised at this charge; I never met with greater uneasiness than to find such a charge against a man, whom I had the highest esteem for.

Q. Were they what you call mellow? - A. They were in liquor; they seemed to be old men, and easily affected by liquor; I thought they were in liquor, from the observation I made.

Court. Q. What business is the prisoner? - A. In the comb and brush-making business, as well as a dealer in persumery, in St. Martin's-lane.

HENRY BELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Are you high-constable of that district? - A. Yes. On the 9th of July, in the afternoon, I was sent for to Barker's house; I went into the back parlour where the prisoner was, and five gentlemen beside; I said, I am come to make a search, but I don't know that I am altogether authorised, without consent; they said, they would esteem it a favour, if I would.

Q. Did all say that? - A. All but Mr. Jones, who said, he would not be searched by any man; I then shewed my staff, and said, sir, I shall begin with you first.

Q. Did you ask him, what he had about him? - A. No. In searching him, I found this 20l. note in his left hand coat pocket, (produces it); rumpled up much as it is now; I asked him, how he came by it; he said, it did not belong to him; but, before I had done, he insisted upon my returning it, for that it was his property; I asked him, how he came by it, and he said, he took it of Mrs. Sowden or Snowden, a persumer in the I say market; I said, the note was safe, and I would take him into custody, which I did; he very artfully endeavoured to make his escape, but when he found that would not do, he was violent, but not with any effect; he had a large stick, which he began to use, till I took it away; then he began to kick; and I have now a blow on my leg, which he gave me; at last I was obliged to knock him down in the street, more than once. (The note read.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you first went there, the prisoner did not know the high office you held? - A. I don't know.

Q. You were known to many there? - A. Yes.

Q. We have been told, he was a little intoxicated - have you ever arrested a drunken man before? - A. Yes.

Q. You say, he resisted? - A. Yes.

Q. You hardly ever took a drunken man, charged with felony, who was willing to go? - A. I never took one before.

Q. This Bank-note was found concealed, but loose in his coat pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. He said of whom he had taken it? - A. Yes; but I cannot find such a person.

Mr. Gurney. (To Martin.) Q. Look at that note, and say, whether you received it from Mr. M'Allister? - A. Yes; I know it by the endorsement of Mr. Hall, and E. M'A. the initials of M'Allister.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long had you had that note? - A. Only a few minutes.

Q. You had only a few minutes to make those observations? - A. I made no observations then; I put it into my pocket, wrapped found the others; I saw M'Allister put his initials, and saw the name of Mr. Hall there at that time.

EDWARD M'ALLISTER sworn. - I keep the Castle-Tavern, No. 25, High-Holborn: On the 9th of July, Mr. Martin called upon me with his son, and I paid him a Bank-note of twenty pounds; this is the same, I know it by Mr. Hall's name, and my own initials; Mr. Hall's young man paid it to me, and wrote the name of Hall on it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Hall and you had frequent dealings together? - A. Yes.

Q. It is not the first time you have had a name on a note? - A. Not by hundreds.

Q. And you put your initials on it? - A. Yes, I do on all my notes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you believe that to be the note you paid to Martin? - A. I am sure it is.

JOHN HALL sworn. - On the 6th of June, I changed a twenty-pound note with Mr. M'Allister; this is the note, and it has my hand-writing on it.

WILLIAM COOMBE sworn. - I have gone from top to bottom of the Hay-market, and made every possible enquiry for Mr. Sowden, or Snowden, a perfumer, but no such person lives there; I enquired at almost every shop on each side of the way.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I beg leave to say, that I had that morning taken a little drop of ale, and calling at Mr. Barker's, where this unfortunate affair seems to have arisen, I stopped to dine with some gentlemen; instead of drinking three or four bottles of wine, I am confident we had eight or ten; I believe Mr. Martin paid for five, being the wine-merchant of the house; I was in a state of intoxication; and when I went from Barker's, I went home, which is a distance of three quarters of a mile at least; I took a 20l. note in the shop that evening, which, fortunately, I believe, a gentleman in Court can prove, who assisted me with part of the change; with respect to Mrs. Snowden, whom they have mentioned, it is a plain proof that I was very much in liquor, for I never knew or heard of the name before; and I think it is very hard a man cannot take a 20l. note, as I took that, without being tried for it.

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM NUGENT CUMMINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 11, Exeter court, in the Strand; and know the prisoner very well: I called at his shop on Thursday evening, to see him, but did not; on Friday evening, the 9th, I called again, and saw him, some time between five and seven; I don't know what he came home about, but while I was waiting, he came in; and presently a decent dressed person came in also, and asked him for change for a note, but what the value of it was, I did not then know; he said, he did not think he could change it, without they would purchase something, he not knowing him; and the person laid out some money, perhaps four or five pounds, or something of that kind, in combs, I believe; I thought Jones was a litte tipsey; and he asked me if I could lend him any change; to oblige him who was a person I was very intimate with, I did lend him some, sooner than he should loose the sale of his goods, I think it was nine pounds, for I received a 10l. note afterwards from him, and I gave him a 1l. note; - it was three 2l. notes, and three 1l. notes; now I perfectly recollect; I understood the note he wanted change for was 20l.; I did not see the amount of the note, or the value of it; I did not pay much attention to it, and I suppose it was not above ten or fifteen minutes about; I have known the prisoner two years off and on, and I should have trusted him with any sum of money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I have been an officer in the navy, but am not at this moment.

Q. How long have you ceased to be so? - A. Since I was wounded in the West-Indies, about two years ago.

Q. Have you been on half-pay ever since? - A. No, I was a warrant officer, a gunner, doing Lieutenant's duty.

Q. What business have you been in? - A. I made a good deal of Prize-money, and I have a good deal of business in the navy agency way; I am agent for a number of officers, whose powers I have now in my pocket-book.

Q. Do you keep a house? - A. Yes, I do, and voted for Lord Gardner at the last election.

Q. When this person came for change, Mr. Jones could not do it, unless he would take goods? - A. I believe that was it.

Q. And in order to get change for a Bank-note, the person took four or five pounds worth of combs? - A. I cannot be certain, thereabouts.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 59.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-70

564. WILLIAM GOODIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the Ist of June , two gowns, value 10s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of John Adams .

The offence not being compleated, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-71

566. WILLIAM STOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May, 1801 , a shirt, value 10s. the property of Jonathan Denight .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-72

567. DAVID JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of June , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of Ann M'lntosh .

ANN M'INTOSH sworn. - I keep the Star and Garter , at Islington : On Tuesday, the 22d of June, I was robbed of a silver watch which I missed a little after six in the evening; I left it hanging up at the head of my bed in the morning; about twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner, who was quartered at my house, was searched

in his bed-room, and the watch was taken out of his pantaloons, or breeches; there was a woman's chain to it, but it is gone; the outside case he had pawned.

EDWARD WEDDOW sworn. - I am shopman to a pawnbroker, and produce a watch-case, which I lent four shillings on to a man in regimentals, but don't think it was the prisoner, but cannot say.

THOMAS FRANKLIN sworn. - I am a constable, and saw the prisoner searched and the watch and duplicate of the case taken out of his pocket; he did not take any notice, but seemed very stupid

NELSON STRATTON sworn. - I am an officer, and searched the prisoner, and found the watch and duplicate.(The watch and case produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but leave it to the Gentlemen of the Jury.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-73

568. JOHN MASCALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , forty yards of calico, value 35s. the property of Thomas Keate .

THOMAS KEATE sworn. - I am a tailor, and keep a small shop : On the 12th of June, the prisoner took the roll of calico off the counter; I saw it in his hand when he was about ten yards from the door; I pursued him, and he threw the roll down; he run up a coach yard, where there was no thoroughfare, and was taken.

ELIZABETH KEATE sworn. - I am wife to the prosecutor; I saw the prisoner in the shop, and take the calico and walk off; he dropped it, and I picked it up.(The calico produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Wapping, and coming past the shop. I heard the gentleman cry, stop thief; I ran after the man who dropped the calico, and they immediately took me, when I was running after him. GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the gaol .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-74

569. JOHN BOLTER , JOHN CHALLINGER , and THOMAS SHARPE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , four gallon of rum. value 40s. the property of Joseph Fawcett .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Henry Jackson .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of persons to the Jurors anknown.(There being no evidence to affect the prisoners, they were all ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020714-75

570. JOHN WILLIAMSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , six pair of shoes, value 34s. the property of Richard Bond .

RICHARD BOND sworn. - I live at No. 19, High-street, St. Giles's . and am a shoe-maker : On the 7th of June I observed the prisoner looking at the shoes, as they hung up at the door, between three and four o'clock; I thought he was going to purchase a pair; in a few minutes he went away, and I instantly missed the shoes; I followed him, and took him with the shoes, about four doors off; my wife had ran after him before I did, and he was delivering the shoes to her; he said he would pay for them, but I had him taken into custody.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - I am one of the Bow-street patrol, and took the prisoner into custody, and searched him, but found nothing on him; he said you need not search me, for I was b-y pushed, or should not have done this. (The shoes produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge; he said, what are you going to do with the shoes; I said, I was going to buy a pair. GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-76

571. WILLIAM SPORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , a pocket-book, value 6d. a Bank-note, value 5l. two other Bank-notes, value 2l. each, and six other Bank-notes, value 1l. each, the property of Peter Poland .

PETER POLAND sworn. - I am a furrier , in the Strand: On Wednesday, the 30th of June, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, going out of Oxford-street, down Tottenham-court-road , I felt my pocketbook snatched out of my pocket; I immediately put my hand down, and caught the prisoner's hand coming from my pocket; I turned round, and the prisoner stood close behind me, with one of his companions, rather behind him, on his right side, and another next to me; I said to the prisoner, you villain, where is my book which you have taken; he said, he had not got it, and clapped his hand to his pocket; then he ran one way, and the other two another way; I ran after him crying, stop thief; two or three men attempted to stop him, but he knocked them down by running; at last he was taken, but no book was found; I am sure it was the prisoner's hand that took it.

JOSEPH MITCHELL sworn. - I am a post-man, and was returning home just as the alarm was given; I attemped to stop him, but could not; he knocked two men and three children down.

Prisoner's defence. He never mentioned any thing about the children before; I had been three days from Rochester, and going up Tottenham-court-road, he accused me; I was stopped, and was searched; I was frightened at the charge, and ran away; but as to knocking any body down, I did not.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-77

572. WILLIAM MACKEVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , a pocketbook, value 1s. two guineas, six shillings, four Banknotes, value 5l. each, and thirty other Bank-notes, value 1l. each , the property of Eliza Graves .

There not being the least evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-78

573. MARY DOTERY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , four planes, value 6s. a gimlet, value 2d, a mallet, value 2d. and a pin, value 1d. the property of John Hardingham .

JOHN HARDINGHAM sworn. - I am a carpenter and joiner ; the things belong to me, but I know nothing of the stealing them.

DANIEL NICHOLS sworn. - I am a carpenter: On the 5th of June I was going to my work in the morning by Mr. Hardingham's door, and saw the prisoner in the area which leads to his shop; I asked her what she did there; she said she went there to make water; while I was discoursing with her; the wind blew her clothes aside, and I saw a plane behind her against the wall; I took it up, and desired her to go away, which she did I opened the window, and put the plane into the shop; I knocked at the door, but could not make any body hear; on my return, I called and told him; he then said he had lost a great number of tools.

JOSEPH SAUNDERS sworn. - On the 5th of June, early in the morning, some planes were pledged at our house in Westminster-bridge-road, by the prisoner, to the best of my recollection; four shillings were lent on them. (The planes produced and identified.)

WILLIAM MOORE sworn. - On the 5th of June, about four o'clock in the morning, as I was loading my cart, I saw the prisoner go by with a sack on her back, and had rather a suspicion of her; she is an old rag and bone picket in the street; on my return to breakfast. I heard of the robbery, and knowing where she lived, I went to her place, and searched the room, where I found this mallet and gimlet, (produces them); I said, old girl, what did you do with the rest of the tools you had in the sack this morning; she said, it was paper; I searched her, and she took something out of her pocket; which she wanted to put into her mouth, but I stopped her, and it appears to be the duplicate of these planes; she wears breeches, and in her breeches pockets I found this book and other duplicates. (Produces them.)

Prisoner's defence. As I was going over Westminsterbridge, I asked a man for work, and he said, he wished I would pawn the planes for him, and he would give me 4d. which I did; I went down the area for the purpose the man has stated, but never touched a plane.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-79

574. JOHN DE COSTA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of June , a sheet, value 5s. the property of Thomas Etherington .

THOMAS ETHERINGTON sworn. - I keep the Ship and Horseshoe public-house , in Nightingale-lane, East-Smithfield ; the prisoner; who is a seafaring man , lodged at my house one night; in the morning, as he was going out, I thought he looked rather thicker in the body than the night before, therefore I followed him, and said, I thought he had got something of mine; he said, no, but I took him back; then, he said, I beg your pardon, I have got a sheet, and pulled it from underneath his shirt; I then took him into custody. (Produces the sheet and identifes it.)

Prisoner's defence. I had no money to pay for my lodging; or to support me, so I meant to pawn the sheet, in order to pay him, and to take it out again.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-80

575. JOHN CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a seven-shilling piece , the property of James Pobjoy .

The charge not being made out against the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-81

576. JAMES GILLETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , two shirts, value 4s. the property of Alexander Austin .

ISABELLA AUSTIN sworn. - My husband is a porter , and I keep a clothes-shop, in a cellar, in Monmouth-street: On the 5th of June, two men stopped, one asked me to sell him a shirt and the prisoner snatched two as they hung up, and ran away; he was taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not know the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. This was at eleven o'clock at night? - A. Yes; I had very little opportunity of seeing him; I was down stairs, and he was at top; there are eight stairs; I saw a hand tear them away, but I cannot say who it belonged to.

FRANCIS DENNIS sworn. - I am a soldier, and was standing at my own door opposite, I heard the cry of stop thief, I turned round, and saw a man run with some linen under his arm; I followed him, and took him about one hundred yards from the door. (The shirts produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. On Saturday evening a person called upon me and requested I would go with him to purchase a pair of stockings, which I did, and having an Indian shawl which I brought home, I took it with me, and asked the prosecutrix the value of it; he stood bargaining for the stockings till I was tired, and walked on, but not ten yards from the cellar, then I was challenged with having the shirts, but they were picked up several yards from me; several people were rushing forward at once, and that man took me; the chief part of my time has been spent in the navy. GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-82

577. JOHN HURLOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , sixteen pounds weight of beef, value 8s , the property of John Gould .

JOHN GOULD sworn. - I am a butcher in Whitecross-street : On the 10th of July, the prisoner cheapened a haunch-bone of beef, for which I asked sixpencehalfpenny per pound; he said it would not do, and went away; my attention was drawn to another part of the shop, and when I turned my head, the beef was gone; I saw the prisoner about ten yards off, with the beef under his right-arm, which I took from him, and he was taken to the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. I worked till half-past eight, and bought a piece of beef in Newgate-market; going past that man's shop, he said, I must go back, for that I had stolen a piece of his beef; I cannot tell the name of the person I bought it of but it was at a shop.

Could. I am sure it was my beef.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-83

578. EDWARD JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , a bridle, value 21s. the property of Samuel Winbush .

- FIELD sworn. - I am osler to Samuel Winbush , in Swallow-street , who is a stable-keeper and hackney-man : Last Wednesday, the prisoner was in the yard, and went out on the box with a coachman, with something in his pocket, which he did not take into the yard; the coachman knew it, and stopped to have a pint of beer at the corner; as soon as they were down from off the box, the coachman laid hold of his collar; and asked me to search him, which I did, and found this bridle. (The bridle produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I went to ask for work as I was much distressed, and found the bridle laying in the yard, on the ground.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-84

579. JAMES KIRTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , a jacket; value 2s. a pair of trowsers, value 2s. and a handkerchief , the property of John Vere .

JOHN VERE sworn. - I am a Portuguese sailor , and lost the things stated in the indictment.

THOMAS ETHERINGTON sworn. - I am the landlord of a public-house, the prisoner and prosecutor slept together in my house; in the morning, the prisoner said,"let me out, let me out," I thought there was something wrong, and watched him out; I immediately run up stairs to the prosecutor, and asked him if he had lost any thing, he said he had lost his cloaths; I run after the prisoner, and brought him back with the things on his back, under his own, he had two suits on. (The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I had two shillings in my waistcoat, which was gone, and I only took the cloaths up to see if I could find it, when the landlord asked me what I was doing with them, I said, looking for my money.

Etherington. I stopped him in Queen-street, Towerhill, with them on. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-85

580. JOSEPH NETTLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, a shilling and a six-pence , the property of John Haynes .

There being no evidence to criminate the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-86

581. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing. on the 4th of July , forty five pounds weight of sugar, value 22s. the property of James Stranach .

JAMES STRANACH sworn. - I am master of a ship : The prisoner asked for work as a lumper , and said he was starving, and would work for his victuals; I said, I would pay him if he behaved well; he went to work. and on the 4th of July he was discovered concealing a bag of sugar in the cook's caboose; he said, he took it for sea-stock; I sent for an officer, and he was taken into custody.

JOHN HUNT sworn. - On Sunday, I saw the prisoner take a bag and carry it into the caboose; I called the watch, and acquainted the master with it.

JOHN GOTTY sworn. - I am surveyor of the Thames Police-office; I took the prisoner into custody; this is the bag of sugar. (Produces it.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been working in the house where there was a cask of sugar open, and saw a Custom house officer bring up a basket full, he said, I might take a little for my own sea-stock; I said, I was afraid but he said, there was no danger, for no body took notice, of such a thing as that; I did so, and thought no harms Hunt was the man who told us to stow it in the tops.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-87

582. SARAH STOKES and JANE WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , two pair of boots, value 3s. and five pair of shoes, value 1s. the property of Charles Mason .

CHARLES MASON sworn. - I am a cobbler , and my stall is in Castle-street, Leicester-fields : On the 9th of June, I went to work, and found the door open, and the articles lost, whether I locked it over night or not, I cannot say.

BENJAMIN TEMBRELL sworn. - I am a watchman; on the 9th of June, at five o'clock, I saw the prisoners in King-street, Westminster; Jane Williams had some thing in her apron; I asked her what it was, she said, nothing of mine; I took them to the watch-house, and found these boots and shoes, (Producing them which were identified;) before the Magistrate they confessed they got them from a stall, in Castle-street, Leicester-fields, that they had pushed it open between them; there was a dressing-case with a glass. which was not owned; I went to Mason's, and fetched him; Stokes had only one pair of the shoes.

Jane Williams 's defence. I was with Stokes, who knew Mr. Mason, and finding the door of the stall open, she took the things out as she thought they would be lost, and she put them into my lap.

Sarah Stokes's defence. I was going out to see for some work, and seeing the door open I took them out for fear they should be stolen.

Court. (To Mason.) Q. Do you know either? - A. I knew Stokes and her friends, for seven or eight years; I have worked for them; I live in Castle-street, and there were other articles of more value left in the shop.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-88

583. WILLIAM VINCENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , three timber chair, value 50s. the property of Thomas Waterers .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-89

584. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , 20lb. weight of iron nails, value 12s. the property of Matthew Wharton .

GEORGE GRIMMETT sworn. - I am a soldier; and was on guard down at Limehouse-hole: At nine o'clock. I saw the prisoner coming out of the fourth story of the

warehouse, down the ladder; when he got down, I examined him, and found twenty pounds weight of nails; I took them and him to the guard-room; going along, he said, he had a wife and family, and hoped I would let him go; he said, somebody had put the nails in his basket, he did not know how they came there. (The nails produced.)

- REED sworn. - These are a sors of nails we use at the New Docks, and they belong to Mr. Wharton, the carpenter; the prisoner had worked there about twelve months, and was a steady man; our regular time is till seven o'clock, but we were in a hurry, and allowed the men to work as long as they could see.

The prisoner put in a written defence, as follows:

My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have only to say, I am entirely innocent of the crime; how the nails came into my basket, or by whom they were put there, I cannot tell, unless the soldiers in the building put them in, and then gave notice to below, to extort money. The soldier called to me, saying, you have got nails in your basket; and if I had been guilty, I might have gone up the ladder again, and put them out; but being certain of my innocence, I gave the basket to be examined, and to my great surprise, saw the nails; the soldier was drunk at the time, therefore what credit will you give to him, particularly, as since my confinement, he had made an attempt to seduce my wife, and threatened he would break open her room-door; but promising, if she would grant him a certain favour, he would save her husband: to prove which, I can call respectable witnesses.

Court. (To Grimmett.) Q. Were you sober, or not? - A. Sober, or I should not have been placed on the sentry. The nails were covered with chips; I did not call to him till he came to the bottom.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN SOTCHER sworn. - I was at my cutting board, and saw the prisoner's wife come up in a fright, and the soldier behind her; she said to her son, you dog, you have lost the key; that was merely an excuse to get rid of the soldier; he said, I can open the door, and wanted to get into her room.

Q. (To Grimmel.) Is any part of this true? - A. No; the whole is this; I and several comrades passed the door, and I said, this is the house where the prisoner's wife lives, and went away directly.

RICHARD SOTCHER sworn. - The woman came in a great fright, and said, I expect the soldier down here every minute, he is just behind; in about five minutes, somebody knocked; I said, who do you want; says he, I want the woman, who is just come in; she sat in the shop; and he said, he could not come in, he was so bashful; my uncle heard him; and our apprentice heard him say, he could break the door open.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020714-90

585. JOHN HAWKINS was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences .

RICHARD SMITH sworn - I am a silk manufacterer, in partnership with Richard Clay, William Clay , and William Clay , junior: On the 5th of June, the prisoner came to me in Town-court, Cheapside, about five o'clock in the afternoon, saying that he came from Wells and Co. Fleet-street, and wanted apiece of mode, at about five shillings per ell; I told him, I had not got one at that price; and he wished to see one as near the price as I had got one; I let him see one at 4s. 3d. per ell, which he said, would do very well; and he wished to take it with him, because it was wanted immediately; he was asked what his name was, and he said it was John Hall; he took with him, a piece of mode, about 62 ells, making about 77 yards and a half.

Q. How came you to part with this property? - A. He said, he came from Wells and Company, who are customers of our's; it is very customary in the silk trade, for gentlemen to send a porter, or some other person, without a note.

Q. Then you parted with your property, believing the person came from Wells and Company? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear positively to my person? - A. I can.

BENJAMIN GILCHRIST sworn. - I am partner in the house of Wells and Company, haberdahsers, Fleet-street.

Q. Do you know of any other house of Wells and Company, in Fleet-street? - A. There is no other house.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A. I knew him about four years back, I bought some fans of him.

Q. Did you send him at any time, about the 5th of June, to Smith and Clay, for some mode? - A. I never did, at any time.

Q. Or give him any directions for that purpose? - A. Never.( Joseph Macartney . a servant to Mr. Collins, pawnbroker in Long-acre, produced a piece of mode, seven yards, which he had taken in of the prisoner, on the 12th of June.)

Mr. Smith. There are some peculiarities in the fabric, which make it almost impossible for a manufacturer to be mistaken; it is mine.(Mr. Holosworth, the City-martial, produced a number of duplicates, which he received from the prisoner, among which was one that applied to the property produced by Macarlney)( Thomas Martin , servant to Mr. Cordy, pawnbroker, produced a piece of mode pledged on the 5th of June, by a man of the name of Hill, the duplicate of which was produced by Mr. Holdsworth, and the mode identifid in the same manner by Mr. Smith.)

( Edward Swaine , a servant to Mrs. Merritt, pawnbroker in Long-acre, produced two remnants of silk, which he received on the 15th of June, in the name of John Wilson , the duplicate of which was produced by Mr. Holdsworth, and the mode identified in the same manner by Mr. Smith.)

( Joseph Thomas , a servant to Mr. Harris, pawnbroker, Fleet-street, produced four remnants of mode, containing thirteen yards, which he received in pledge from the prisoner, on the 11th of June, the duplicate of which was produced by Mr. Holdsworth, and the mode identified in the same manner by Mr. Smith.)

( Robert Starkey , a servant to Mr. Fleming, produced four remnants of mode, containing thirteen yards, which he, received in the pledge, on the 5th of June, from the prisoner; the duplicate was produced by Mr. Holdsworth, and three of the remnants identified in like manner by Mr. Smith.)

JOHN HEANES sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs Smith and Clay; I was present when the prisoner came to our house, on the 5th of June.

Q. Have you heard the evidence of your master? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any variation of that evidence to state? - A. None whatever.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was the person? - A. Yes; the first time I saw him, which was the day he was apprehended; I knew him immediately to be the man who had had this mode; I never had a doubt of his person.

Q. (To Smith.) Had you? - A. I never had any doubt of his being the person.

Prisoner's defence. At the time I was detained, Mr. Heanes declared he did not know me; nor Mr. Smith either.

The Prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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