Old Bailey Proceedings, 28th April 1802.
Reference Number: 18020428
Reference Number: f18020428-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 28th of APRIL, 1802, and following Days, BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD, LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1802.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir JOHN EAMER, KNIGHT, LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. EDWARD Lord ELLENBOROUGH, Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON, Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; NATHANIEL NEWNHAM , Esq. WILLIAM CURTIS , Esq. and HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; CHARLES PRICE , Esq. GEORGE HIBBERT, Esq. and CHARLES FLOWER, Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

John Rutt ,

William Colley ,

John Oliver ,

James Adams ,

John Saunders ,

Richard Speares ,

George Hewart ,

Charles Pepper ,

William Whitby ,

James Jessop ,

Joseph Cromwell ,

John Groom .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Griffin ,

George Stow ,

Thomas White ,

William Finch ,

George Dobson ,

Edward Roberts ,

William Clements ,

Robert West ,

Allen Newman ,

William Rimor ,

Thomas Cloud ,

William Salter .

London Jury.

Junius Bumsted ,

Thomas Lee ,

James Hewitson ,

Henry Stent ,

Thomas Cordell ,

John Smart ,

John Hester ,

Jonathan Robson ,

William Saltmarsh ,

Richard Ravenhill ,

Thomas Clarke ,

Joseph Nicholls .

Reference Number: t18020428-1

266. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, upon George Gregory , the younger, on the 15th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silver watch, value 4l. and a steel watch-chain, value 1s. the property of George Gregory , the elder.

It appearing that the watch and chain was the property of George Gregory , the younger, and not of the elder, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020428-2

267. ASHER HAYCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , three shillings , the property of Samuel Griffiths .

SAMUEL GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am a chemist in Tottenham-court-road ; the prisoner was my groom ; he had lived with me three weeks: On Tuesday, about the 9th of March, I missed some money from the till, and the next morning I missed more; and on Thursday night I marked fourteen shillings and a half-guinea, some with stars, and some with crosses, with an awl; the next morning I missed three shillings; I fetched a constable, and ordered all my servants to produce what silver they had in their pockets; the prisoner produced ten or twelve shillings; the prisoner said, I suppose, Sir, you suspect me; I told him I did not suspect him in particular, I suspected them all till it was found out; I looked at the money in the prisoner's hand, and immediately saw three of the shillings that I had marked; I told him they were mine, and asked him how he could commit such an action; to which he answered, it is my money; I then gave charge of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I take it, it has occurred to you as well as to others, to have seen crosses and stars upon shillings very frequently? - A. Yes, very common.

Q. The prisoner claimed these three shillings as his own? - A. Yes, he said he should make no other answer; he was exhorted to confess.

Q. Did you look at the other shillings in the prisoner's hand to see if they had crosses or stars? - A. No.(The money was produced by the constable, and identified by Mr. Griffiths.)

Prisoner's defence. The money belonged to me; I had it in change.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18020428-3

268. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , six printed shawls, value 17s. the property of Little Thirlwall .

LITTLE THIRLWALL sworn. - I am a linendraper , in St. John's-street ; I know nothing of the robbery.

HUGH DOUGLAS sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Thirlwall: On Saturday evening, the 30th of January, between five and six o'clock, I heard a noise at the shop-door; I missed six shawls from a wooden horse inside the door; I went out, and, seeing the prisoner buttoning his coat, I went before him, and saw part of the shawls out of the breast of his coat; I immediately took hold of him, and brought him back to the shop; I called down Mr. Thirlwall, and fetched a constable; I took the shawls from the prisoner myself; the prisoner said, he was very much distressed, and was very sorry for what he had done.( Joseph Davis , a constable, produced the shawls, which were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have not a friend in the world: I was a dropped child. GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18020428-4

269. WILLIAM BITTEN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Sullivan , about the hour of eight in the night of the 14th of March , and burglariously stealing six petticoats, value 1l. four gowns, value 2l. two cloaks, value 1l. two aprons, value 1s. 6d. a shirt, value 2s. 6d. two handkerchiefs, value 6d. and a cloth, value 6d. the property of the said John.

CATHERINE SULLIVAN sworn. - I am the wife of John Sullivan ; my husband has been at sea five years; I live at No. 7, George-alley, Fleet-market ; I rent the lower room; the house belongs to Mr. George Frost; he has fourteen houses in the same place; he does not live there himself: On Sunday, the 14th of March, I came home between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I did not light a candle, but went to bed; I bolted my door inside, and fastened my windows; the next morning I got up between six and seven o'clock; I went to the box for my clothes, and found it empty; it had contained all the articles mentioned in the indictment; I did not do any thing till Thursday morning, and then I got a constable, and searched all the neighbours round; I found some of the things, a bit here and a bit there, in the neighbourhood.

Q. How do you suppose the persons had got into your room? - A. By going down into the cellar, and coming up through the floor; the boards were taken up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the wife of John Sullivan ? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are quite sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. How long is it since you last saw him? - A. Two years last Christmas; the last time I heard from him he was in the Streights of Gibraltar.

Q. It was broad day-light when you went out? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you drunk or sober when you cam home? - A. I was sober; I am not given to liquor.

Q. How many people did you take up before you took up the prisoner? - A. Nine.

Q. And they were all discharged before the Alderman? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were sober then? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did you ever charge this man till a month afterwards? - A. No, not till last Saturday week.

Q. Whether the floor was whole or not when you came home you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. How many people lodged in this house? - A. There is only one room on a floor; the prisoner lodged in the two pair of stairs, and there is another man and his wife.

Q. The nine persons you took up lived close to you? - A. Five of them lived next door; the constable found some of my property under the bed of Jem Young and Mary Morley, at the next house.

Q. Do people of different names sleep together in your neighbourhood? - A. Yes, and there is a sister of her's in the same room.( John Bridgen , a pawnbroker, in Houndsditch, produced a cotton gown and a red cloak, which he had received in pledge from the prisoner on Monday, the 15th of March, and which were identified by the prosecutrix.)

Mr. Gurney. (To Sullivan.) Q. Who put it in your head to indict for a burglary - who told you you could get forty pounds? - A. I don't understand your language.

Q. Yes, you do - who advised you to indict this man so as to get forty pounds? - A. Nobody in the world.( Benjamin Charlton , a pawnbroker's servant, produced a muslin gown and two dimity petticoats, which he had taken in pledge from the prisoner on the 15th of March, and which were identified by the prosecutrix.)

DAVID WAISON sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, in Watling-street: On the 15th of March, the prisoner at the bar pledged with me a red cloak, a gown, and two petticoats, which I delivered to Mrs. Sullivan some time ago.(Mrs. Sullivan produced and identified them.)

JAMES COLEMAN sworn. - I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner last Saturday was a week; I found nothing upon him.

Prisoner's defence. I went down into the cellar to ease myself, and saw the bundle lying in the cellar; I made free to take it, and brought it up stairs. GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-5

270. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Spence , about the hour of six in the night of the 24th of February , and burglariously stealing a boot, value 10s. the property of the said George.

GEORGE SPENCE sworn. - I am a shoe-maker in Bartholomew Close : My window was broke on Wednesday the 24th of February, between six and seven in the evening.

Q. Was it quite dark? - A. Yes, it was; I had a light in the shop; I had occasion to go into the cellar, I was gone about two minutes, when I heard somebody at the street-door; a child was sent, but saw nobody; a short time afterwards, the same noise was heard again at the door, I was still in the cellar; the same noise was heard a third time; I then blew out the candle, and crept forty up stairs; when I got to the top of the stairs, I saw the door three parts open, I had left it on the latch.

Q. Had any body gone out of the house while you went into the cellar? - A. No one soul.

Q. Are you perfectly sure the latch was down? - A. I am; I turned my eye to the left, and saw the prisoner at the bar with one boot in his hand in the shop; I had left it hanging up on one side of the shop, and he was reaching for more; I immediately laid hold of him, and called for assistance; he then said, he hoped I would not hurt him, the constable has got the boot; the fellow to it was hanging up close by it; I am positive to the boot being mine.

AMY PATERSON sworn. - I lodge in Mr. Spence's house: On Wednesday, the 24th of February, I was up in my own apartment on the second floor, and heard a noise; I went down stairs, and saw Mr. Spence had hold of the prisoner now at the bar; he told me he had caught him with the boot in his hand, that he was reaching his hand to take down the other boot; the prisoner told me he came in to purchase a pair of shoe-strings.

Prisoner's defence. I went into Mr. Spence's shop, the door was a-jar; I went to purchase a pair of shoe-strings and a pair of boots; I put my hand to a boot, and it came off the nail; Mr. Spence immediately laid hold of me; I told him not to be angry, I had done no harm; Mrs. Spence and two more ladies came into the shop, and were

very much flustrated; he left me in their custody, and got a constable.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-6

271. JAMES JONES , alias SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , a tea-tray, value 2l. 16s. the property of David Evans , in his dwelling-house .

DAVID EVANS sworn. - I keep a house, at No. 5, John-street, Crutched-friars ; I did not see the transaction till the prisoner was taken; he was brought into the house about eight o'clock in the evening.

JAMES EVANS sworn. - I am shopman to my brother: On Friday, the 12th of March, I was in the shop, and heard the tray taken away; it stood at the side of the door in the shop; I heard it fall down; I went out, and overtook the prisoner with the tray before him.

Q. Had you seen him in the shop? - A. No, I had not.

Q. How do you know that to be your brother's tray? - A. It has my brother's private mark upon it.

Q.How far had he got from the door? - A.About thirty yards; I took it out of his hand, and he ran away across the road; I pursued him, but never lost fight of him till he was taken; I delivered the tray to the constable.( Joseph Hunt produced the tray.)

THOMAS BROWN sworn. - I am a smith: On the evening of the 12th of March, I was going up John-street, I saw the prisoner standing at Mr. Evans's door; I then saw a tray fall, which the prisoner took up, and walked away with.

Q. How near the door was it? - A. It was partly in and partly out; I saw James Evans go after him, and take him; the tray was brought back to the shop; this is the same tray.

PHILIP SIMMONS sworn. - I am a butcher: I had been to Newgate-market, I was going up John-street home, and saw the prisoner looking at a tea-board; it was hanging at the side of the door; I waited, turned myself round, and saw the prisoner walk away for the space of five yards; he came back again, and looked at it a second time, and turned it over; I thought to see in what manner it was fastened; I desired a young man and a young woman, that was coming by, to take notice of that man, for I did not think he was after any good; and, as I was speaking to them, I heard the tea-board fall; he went away with it, and young Mr. Evans came out, and I told him to go round the corner directly; I had a load upon my head, that I could not go after him myself; I waited there till the man and the board were both brought back.(The tray was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have very little to say: I think they have aggravated the business in two instances, to make it a capital offence. In the first place, charging it to be in the dwelling-house; and, in the next place, in the value of the article; but I leave it to your Lordship and the Gentlemen of the Jury. GUILTY, aged 58.

Of stealing goods, to the value of 39s.

Confined one year in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-7

272. ROBERT HUMMERSTON was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, upon Francis Clarke , on the 28th of January , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, one bag, value 1d. and 11l. in monies, numbered, a Bank-note, value 5l. and two other Bank-notes, each of the value of 2l. the property of the said Francis Clarke .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

FRANCIS CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where do you live? - A. At Stainesmoor, about three miles from the King's-arms public-house, at Colnbrook, which is kept by one Hummerston, the brother of the prisoner.

Q. What day were you robbed? - A. On Thursday night, the 28th of January; the prisoner lived with his brother, and I was taking some money of John Stevenson, at the King's-arms.

Q. What time did you get there? - A.Between six and seven o'clock, and staid till after nine.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I had been drinking a little, but not to hurt me; as I was going home from there, down Colnbrook-lane , three men met me, one laid hold of my horse's head, the others pulled my feet out of the stirrups, threw me over, and robbed me in a minute; for as soon as I was off the horse, they took the purse out of my right-hand breeches-pocket; I said, d - n you, I know you, and they gave me a little bit of a pat here,(pointing to his forehead,) and down I went into a ditch.

Q. Did you, at that time, know either or all of them? - A. I knew the prisoner, for he saw me put the money into my pocket, and he called a man up to help him, saying, it was a twenty pound job.

Q. What sort of a night was it? - A.Rather darkish; next day I said, three thieves had robbed me, to my family, and that Hummerston was one of the gang, but only said so to my family, who are not here; having lost two horses, and my cattle dying, I made no enquiry about it, as I could not afford expence; I was sent for to the Justices, and the prisoner was brought in.

Q. Are you sure you were sober enough to know him? - A. I don't know all the people that were

there, but he was peeping in at the door, and saw me put the money into my pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You had been drinking? - A. Yes, a little hot-pot, which is been and gin.

Q. You knew the prisoner lived with his brother, yet you did not go to any constable or Justice? - A. No.

Q. There was a month between the time you were robbed and when he was taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Aldridge, and what you said to him? - A. Yes; I said, I had been robbed by some of Hummerstone's gang, disguised in light-horseman's jackets, but I won't say whether I told him two or three, nor can I say whether I saw him that night, but think I did, and told him I had been robbed by three men.

Q. Was it light or dark? - A.Darkish.

Q. Did you everhear there was forty pounds reward, as you have told us you were low in money? - A. Yes; but I don't do it for the sake of that, it is done to break up the gang.

Q. Did you ever charge Stevenson with robbing you? - A. No; I said he kept me dilly daily so long getting change, or it would not have happened.

JOHN STEVENSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where do you live? - A. At Colnbrook: On the 28th of January, I met Francis Clarke, at Hummerston's, at Cotnbrook, the brother of the prisoner, about nine o'clock, and paid him three pounds nine shillings and sixpence; I never saw the prisoner in the room at any time, the prosecutor was there.

Q. Do you mean to say he was not there, or, that you did not observe him? - A. He was not there till after I had paid him the three pounds nine shillings and sixpence, and called Thomas Hummerston to witness that I had paid it.

Q.(To Clarke.) Who was present when you received the money? - A. Bob Hummerston was just behind me.

Q.(To Stevenson.) You hear he was not? - A. Thomas Hummerston was in the room, but Robert was not in the room at all at that time; Thomas gave me change for a twenty pound note, and I saw Robert about an hour, or an hour and a half after Clarke was gone.

Q. When you first saw him, what condition was he in? - A. He came and set down, giving himself a thing, and I saw the sweat running down his face; but, before he came in, Thomas said, I will shew you my sow and pigs, and my calf, which he did; and while I was looking at the calf, says he, I have a hen's' nest on that truss of straw, which there was; then, when we went back, and Robert came in, Thomas says, d - n your blood, where have you been whoring about to? says Robert, I have been laying on a truss of straw in the calfstall; says I, Bob, that's a lie, for I have been looking at the calf, and, more than that, your brother has been looking at the hen's nest in the straw; then, says he, I have been lying under the horse's manger; says I, that is a lie too, for I have been looking into the horse's mouth to see how old he is; then, says he, d - n my blood, I have been where I like.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you see the prisoner between the 28th of January and when he was taken up? - A. Yes, a good many times at home, and standing at the door.

Q. So that any body might have found him at his brother's house? - A. They might.

ROBERT WENMAN sworn. - I am headborough, and apprehended the prisoner on the 2d of March at his brother's house; then the prosecutor was sent for.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS ALDRIDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A. At Horton, by Colnbrook; I saw Clarke on the night he said he had been robbed, and he told me he had been robbed by two light horsemen; it was very dark, and I did not know him till they brought a light, then I said, Mr. Clarke, it is you, don't you know me? he said, no, thought he used to know me very well, but he seemed to be very much in liquor.

Court. Q. Did he say there were only two present at the robbery? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Did he appear to be wet at the time? - A. Yes, and he had lost his hat, his horse, and his money.

Q. He was a good deal confused? - A. Yes, he looked so, and being in liquor, I could not understand him.

Q. Can you say whether it was in consequence of liquor or a blow? - A. No; he told me two light horsemen knocked him off his horse into a ditch; he did not mension any thing about their clothes, or any gang, or did he tell me he had been receiving any money at Hummerston's.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18020428-8

273. ANN REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a gown, value 7s. a table-cloth, value 1s. 6d. an apron, value 1s. a shirt value 3s. a handkerchief, value 1s and 5s. 10d. in monies numbered , the property of William Livermore .

ANN LIVERMORE sworn. - My husband keeps a public-house near Bridgewater-square : The prisoner was servant to us, and robbed us on the 19th of March, before I got up; I left her 5s. 10d. the over-night to pay the milk-score, and told her the

place I had put it in; she was gone away when I came down stairs, upon which I looked about, and saw the money was gone, and I missed the other articles, all which I afterwards found at the pawnbroker's; On the 24th of March, I found the prisoner going into a house in Dyot-street, St. Giles's, where she lodged; I had a person with me, and we followed her in, and took her; I found an apron upon her, and the handkerchief in her hand; I asked her what she had done with the money and things; she said she had spent the money, and pawned the things; then I took her to the workhouse, where I had her from.

MARTHA CARROL sworn. - The prisoner lodged at my house from the Friday to the Wednesday, and left some duplicates with me, which I gave to the constable.

THOMAS ELLIS sworn. - I was with Mrs. Livermore, and saw her take the handkerchief from the prisoner, who acknowledged the robbery, and said, she had pawned the things, and left the duplicates in the hands of her landlady.(The articles were produced by different pawnbrokers, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty of taking the money. GUILTY , aged 18.

One year in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-9

274. SUSANNAH COLES was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 19th of March , seven pounds weight of tobacco, value 7s. 6d. being a parcel of the property of Ann Kent , stolen by John Hobleman , she knowing, it to have been so stolen .

No evidence being offered, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18020428-10

275. CHARLES HAMMOND was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Cowen , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 19th April , and burglariously stealing two waistcoats, value 7s. and a shirt, value 9s. the property of the said George.

GEORGE COWEN sworn. - I am a salesman : I have part of a house in Cross-court, Russel-court, Drury-lane ; I have a shop and parlour, and a room up stairs; Mr. Baynes keeps the house, who keeps the Crown and Thistle in Russel-court: On Tuesday morning, the 20th of April, about half past six, I discovered that I had been robbed; I went to bed about half past eleven, or a quarter before twelve, the night before; I saw the house fastened.

Q. Was it light when you came down stairs? - A. Yes; I was going to take down the shutters, and saw a pane of glass in the door broke; I then observed that the lock of the door was broke, it was put to, but not locked, the wood was shaved away on each side with a chisel.

Q. Was the lock forced? - A. No; the woodwork gave way; I went up stairs to my wife, and in coming down again I found a soldier's button, marked Coldstream, in the passage near the door; the shop-door is in the passage.

Q. Was the street-door broke open? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the street-door secured the night before? - A. Yes; I immediately missed a pair of leather breeches, coats, waistcoats, shirts, and a great number of other articles, and there were coats, waistcoats, and breeches, lying upon the floor; the prisoner was quartered in a public-house adjoining me.

Prisoner. Q. Are there not plenty of people lodging in the house beside me? - A. No; there was nobody else that night.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am a constable of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields: On Tuesday, the 20th of April, about nine in the morning, Mr. Cowen gave me information of the robbery; I went up to Hyde-Park, where I understood the prisoner was, it being a field-day, and applied to the commanding officer; Cowen pointed out the prisoner, and I brought run away in, a coach; I thought he might have left the cloaths at the barracks at Knightsbridge, and in my way there I searched him, and, upon opening his coat, I found these two waistcoats upon him, and a shirt on him; I have kept them ever since.

Cowen. One of these waistcoats has my private mark upon it, E; the other waistcoat has got a little bit of a darn upon the front of it; the white waistcoat was my own wear, I had not such another figured waistcoat in the house; the shirt is marked K.

Prisoner. Q. Are you sure you did not sell those things to any body the day before? - A. I am.

Prisoner's defence. I bought these things of a Jew; if I had stolen them, I should hardly have worn them the same day.

Q.(To Donaldson.) Have you examined this button with the prisoner's buttons? - A. Yes, it is the same sort of button.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who had known him in the regiment seven years, and gave him an excellent character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-11

276. MARY MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing four yards of muslin, value 16s. the property of George Warren , privately in his shop .

GEORGE WARREN sworn. - I am a linendraper , and keep a shop at No. 42, Fish-street-hill : On the 19th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, the shopman attended her, and I saw her purchase

two or three trifling articles, which she paid for, and was out of the shop on the pavement, when my young man followed her, took her by the arm, and said, he missed a piece of muslin, and thought she must be the person who had it; I then said to her, give me the muslin, upon which she put her hand into her pocket, and brought four yards of muslin out, with my private mark on it, in my own writing; I took it from her, and delivered it with her to an officer; the muslin cost me four shillings and fourpence per yard.

THOMAS BAXTER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Warren: On Friday, the 19th of March, the prisoner came, and asked me to change two lawn handkerchiefs which she had bought a day or two before, and left at the shop, saying she would call for them in a day or two; she then had them changed for two policat handkerchiefs, and wished to look at some muslins, saying, she wanted a dress for a friend; there was a piece in a manner fixed upon, but there was not enough of it, and she said she would only take half a yard; I pressed her to purchase a quantity, and in looking over the wrapper to find a piece of a sufficient length, I missed a piece of muslin, but did not take any notice of it to her then; the only reason I had to suspect her was, that she had been twice before to the shop, and I saw her put her hand under her cloak, and rather suppose she took it at that time; she paid the difference of the handkerchiefs and the muslin, and went out of the shop; I followed her, and brought her back, upon which she gave Mr. Warner the muslin, as he has related; I fetched Mr. Saunders, the constable, who has had the muslin ever since, which I am sure was in the wrapper, and which I afterwards missed.(Nathaniel Saunders produced the musli, which was identified by Mr. Warren.)

Prisoner's defence. I brought it away in a mistake; for I put the things I had bought and that muslin all in my pocket at the same time; I was not over the threshold of the door when the gentleman laid hold of my arm.

Jury. (To Baxter.) Q. Did you wrap the things up yourself? - A. I put them in a paper, and rolled them up, and gave them to her; the muslin she stole. GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-12

277. RICHARD SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , thirty yards of linen cloth, value 30s. the property of Thomas Knight and James Andrews .

WILLIAM ROBINS sworn. - Thomas Knight and James Andrews are warehouse-porters , and are my masters; they take care of the goods, and are responsible for the property: On the 1st of April, about one o'clock, at Galley-quay , there were nineteen cases of linen, and every one was opened for the officers to ascertain what they were; I was informed the cases were broke open, and the prisoner was pointed out to me, upon which I gave charge of him.

- PATRICK sworn. - I am a weaver, and was at Galley-quay: On the 1st of April, I had the care of then hogsheads of sugar; I saw the prisoner come from Chester-quay to Galley-quay, and walk round the cases of linen; he rested his elbow upon one, and looked about him for the space of two minutes; then he walked round between the cases and the building to Chester-quay, where he staid for about five minutes talking with some of his companions, and returned back again; he then wrenched one of the cases open with all his force, took three pieces of linen out, and threw it from him over his left arm to his comrades, the officer has it in his possession; I gave information, and the prisoner was taken.(The pieces of linen produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing about this affair at all; I was walking about looking for work.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped one hundred yards on Gallery-quay .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-13

278. DANIEL M'CARTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , a silver table-spoon, value 10s. the property of Richard-Alexander Nelson .

RICHARD- ALEXANDER NELSON sworn. - I keep a house in Somerset Place : On Tuesday, the 2d of March, the prisoner came to my house, and a child opened the door to him; the child called me, I went, and the man appeared to be drunk, and said, he wanted to enquire for Captain Smith; I told him to come when he was sober, and I would give him an answer; he then went away very quietly; I looked round upon the table that was laid for dinner, and missed a spoon; I immediately went after him, and detained him; I sent for a constable, who searched him, and found the spoon upon him; I saw it taken from him.(John Biggs, the constable, produced a silver tablespoon, which was identified by Mr. Nelson.)

Prisoner's defence. Coming along from the waterworks by Somerset-house, I saw this spoon lying against the rails; I had it in my hand two minutes, and I put it under my jacket; a man came up, and said, I had got a spoon of his; I said, not to my knowledge, and he went away; I staid above a quarter of an hour longer, looking at the waterworks; I was bred to the sea; I was in all the American war, was in every action with Lord Howe, have been wounded with seven shots, and have served in the Navy in the reigns of George II .

and III. I am close upon seventy-one years of age. GUILTY , aged 71.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-14

279. ELIZA JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , thirty-nine yards of lace, value 12l. 18s. fifteen yards of muslin, value 3l. 5s. twenty-two yards of sarcenet, value 2l. 13s. two silver table-spoons, value 1l. fifty-eight pair of stockings, value 25l. six yards of lawn, value 12s. four yards of cambric, value 1l. and one hundred and twenty yards of straw strippings, value 6l. the property of Thomas Sowerby : a silver table-spoon, value 10s. the property of Thomas Lockwood ; and a silver cream ewer, value 1l. 5s. the property of Susan Lockwood , in the dwelling house of Thomas Sowerby .

THOMAS SOWERBY sworn. - I am a milliner and fancy-dress market : On the 29th of December the prisoner came to our house for improvement; the boarded and lodged in my house till the 9th of March; I know nothing of the loss myself.

MARY SOWERBY sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I lost a great many things; the first thing I missed was a card of black lace, about twelve yards.

Q.What was the value of that card of black lace? - A.Six guineas.

Q.Did you miss any other card of black lace? - A. Yes, I missed a quantity of brown striped sarcenet, I should suppose about twelve yards.

Q. What is the value of that? - A. I should suppose about two shillings and six-pence a yard; these are the only things I recollect missing myself.

Q. Where did you miss them from? - A. We only missed them by searching; there was a small piece of white lace missing, I understood Miss Jones had taken it up stairs; I enquired of her for it, and she said she could not tell where it was.

Q.When was that? - A. On Thursday, the 8th of April.

Q. Did she continue in your house till the 8th of April? - A. Yes, Mr. Sowerby made a mistake; it was April, and not March; she staid in the house till the 10th.

Q. Where did you miss the card of black lace from? - A. I missed it from the lace-box, on the 8th of April.

Q. How long before that had you looked into that box? - A. I cannot exactly say; I had not an idea that such a thing was gone; it might be more than a month or six weeks.

Q. Did you miss any thing else? - A.No; we found other things which I had not missed.

Q. What led you to imagine it was the prisoner who had taken these things? - A. Being informed that she had taken a bit of white lace up stairs, I asked her for it, and she said she could not find it.

Q. Did she admit that she had taken it up stairs? - A. Yes; she said she meant to card it, and had put it in her bosom, and took it up stairs; the sarcenet was found in a small box of her's; a lady's pelice had been cut off it; I brought it down stairs, and asked Miss Jones if she had taken that up too, and she said, no, she had bought it.

Q. Have you had the care of the sarcenet ever since? - A. Yes. (Produces it.)

Q. Look at it, and say if you are sure that is the sarcenet from which the lady's pelice was cut off? - A. Yes; this is the place where it was cut from; here is another piece of sarcenet that I found in her box; I thought I had some like it, and I sent for my own, and found this piece join it exactly.

Q. Have you that piece here? - A. I have;(Produces it.) I had desired Miss Jones to go up stairs with me, and let me see her box; I found a number of pieces of muslin and a variety of triffling articles.

Q. When did you find the goods in question? - A. On the 8th of April; the other articles are pledged.

Q. Who are the persons who had the care of those things - who missed them? - A. All the young people.

Q. Are they here? - A. Here is one, Miss Wilson; every young person in the house has access to all those articles; when a dress is wanted, they go and take what they want.

Q. Did you communicate to Miss Jones the loss that you had sustained? - A. Yes, and she said she did not know any thing of it.

Q. When did you make that communication? - A. On the 9th; she cried very much, and gave me three duplicates that morning, and said, that was all that she knew about it.

Q. What are the duplicates? - A. Eighteen pair of stockings, two table-spoons, and twelve pair of stockings.

Q. Did you, in consequence of receiving these duplicates, go to the pawnbrokers? - A. No; the pawnbrokers are here.

Q.Who is Lockwood? - A. Mrs. Lockwood is my mother.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This young lady came to you in December? - A. Yes.

Q. She came to improve herself in her own line of business? - A. Yes.

Q. Had she been in the business before? - A. She told me so.

Q. Did she offer her services for wages, or upon a premium that she was to give you to learn the business? - A. Upon a premium; she was to give me at first twenty pounds, and she was to stay three years.

Court. Q. What was she to learn? - A. Mil

linery and mantua-making; but, before it was finally settled, I thought it too long, and we agreed that she should pay thirty pounds, and stay one year.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was that paid? - A. She said it was not quite convenient for her father to pay it till the last day of February.

Q. How many persons have the conduct of your business? - A.Sometimes more, and sometimes less.

Q. How many, from the month of December to April, were concerned in the management of your business, under your control? - A. Six.

Q.Therefore, if any customer were to come to your shop? - A. It is not a shop; it is a private house.

Q. If any customer came to you, they might all have the control, and serve your customers? - A. Yes, at different times.

Q. I understand you there were fourteen yards, you suppose, of black lace? - A. No, I said I thought about twelve, but I was not quite certain; it is point ground lace.

Q. Of course, in your line of business, you had a large quantity of black lace? - A.No.

Q. More than one card, I suppose? - A. Yes, a great many cards.

Q. Had you taken stock shortly before? - A.It might be six weeks.

Q.There was nothing particular in your black lace distingushable from other black lace? - A. No.

Q. Neither can you tell us, in the course of six months, how much you might have sold? - A. No.

Q. When these things were taken, the probability would be, that they might have been taken at different times? - A. Yes.

Q. As you cannot ascertain the exact quantity, you cannot, of course, six the value? - A. No.

Court. Q.Have you measured the card of lace? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Can you state, that that card of lace positively had not been sold in your shop during six months? - A. Yes.

Q. You can venture to swear that? - A. Yes.

Q.Miss Jones was crying at the time, and shewed great contrition? - A. At first she denied it; then she gave me three duplicates, and said, that was all; and afterwards she gave Miss Wilson two duplicates.

MARY WILSON sworn. - Q. When did the prisoner at the bar give you two duplicates? - A. The 9th of April, the morning of the discovery; (produces them.) One is for eleven pair of hose, and the other for silk, without saying what quantity.

Q. Did you miss any goods? - A. No; I only had the duplicates from Miss Jones.

Q. At the time she delivered you these duplicates, did she appear to be much affected? - A. Yes, we were alone; she told me she was very sorry for what she had done, and declared that was all she had in her possession.

Mrs. LOCKWOOD sworn. - Q. Did you receive any duplicate from the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, this is it, (produces it?) it is of black lace; I afterwards went to the watch-house to her, and she delivered me there three duplicates, (producing them;) one is for four pair of silk hose, one pound ten shillings; another, eight yards of muslin, and three yards of lawn; another, two gowns, a shift, and black lace, not naming the quantity.

Q. Did she say any thing at the time? - A. She cried very much.

Q. How had she behaved in the family before? - A. I never saw any thing amiss in her.

- TURNER sworn. - On the 23d of January, I received in pledge from the prisoner, twelve yards of black lace, and three remnants of linen, opon which I advanced one pound, there was no more asked upon the pledge.

Q. What is the value of the black lace? - A. I cannot say.

Q.(To Mrs. Sowerby.) How many yards are there? - A. I have measured, and it is very near twelve yards.

Q. What is the value of it? - A.Half-a-guinea a yard; the linen has no mark upon it.

Mr. Knapp. (To Turner.) Q. A great number of persons resort to you to pledge goods? - A. Yes.

Q. It does not occur to you to be able to identify persons? - A. I cannot positively swear to the prisoner, a genteel young woman came into one of the boxes.

Court. Q. What is the name upon the duplicates? - A. Miss Jones, Air-street.

JAMES COURTNEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lane; (produces twelve pair of silk stockings;) they were pledged with me in the name of Elizabeth Jones.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A. I cannot say I recollect her, I never saw her but that once.

Q. What is the value of those stockings, about eleven shillings a pair.

Mrs. Sowerby. I cannot identify these to be mine.

Q. Are there any other articles pledged that you can speak to? - A. Yes, the muslin.

THOMAS CHIFFING sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker, (produces a remnant of muslin;) it was pledged in the name of Mrs. Nelson, Cavendish-square.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A. No.

Q.(To Mrs. Sowerby.) Do you know that muslin to be your property? - A. Yes.

Q.By what mark? - A.By a mark in Mr. Sowerby's writing, 6136.

Q. When and where had you last seen it? - A. I don't think I have seen it since I returned from Brighton, the latter end of October.

Q. Are you sure you had not sold it between October and March? - A. Yes.

Q. Had it been in your house, or where? - A. Yes, in the show-room, where they were all kept.

Q. What is the value of that? - A. About four shillings a yard, there are eight yards of it.

Q. Are there any other goods that you can swear to? - A. No, except one spoon.

Q. What is the value of that? - A. About fifteen shillings.

Q.Are you sure you have not sold the black lace? - A. Yes.

Q. How many cards of lace might you have in your boxes? - A. Five or six.

Q. Can you swear to that lace being yours? - A. There is my own hand-writing on the card.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you this was point ground lace? - A. Yes.

Q.In that box? - A. Yes.

Q. To that box, any person, who had an opportunity of selling in your shop, might sell? - A. Yes.

Q. They had an opportunity of doing so if they chose? - A. Yes.

Q. With respect to the precise number of cards in that box, you cannot be accurate? - A. No.

Q. Then, how is it possible you can be accurate, with respect to this particular one, that this had not been sold? - A. I keep my own books.

Q.Your books are not here? - A. No.

Q. Nor are all the persons in your employ, and who might have sold from December to April here? - A. No.

Q.Prisoner's defence. The muslin I brought with me from the country, and the lace I bought of Miss Wilson, which she bought of Mrs. Sowerby.

Miss Wilson. It is a different description of lace, there were thirteen yards; I paid Mrs. Sowerby seven shilling a yard for it, and this is what is sold at about sixteen shillings a yard, it is not the same lace.

Court. (To Mrs. Sowerby.) Q. You carried this stock to Brighton last summer? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you quite sure these goods came back, all of them? - A. Yes; I have seen it since I came from Brighton, but cannot ascertain the time.

Q. This discovery was made on the 9th of April? Yes.

Q.Will you venture to swear you had seen it after the prisoner came to live with you? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you never had parcels of lace taken out of that box for customers to look at? - A.Yes; the reason why I missed this particular lace, was, I intended to wear it myself; I went to look for it, and found it was gone.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18020428-15

280. JOHN DYKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , twelve yards of cloth, value 3l. the property of George Williams , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a slop-seller at St. George's in the East : On Thursday the 3d of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in, I was serving in the shop, I did not see him; I had information that a man had stole a piece of cloth, I and the witness pursued the prisoner, and saw him drop the cloth, he had got about twenty or thirty yards; he had not got three yards from where he dropped the cloth when he was taken; I am sure he is the man.

JOSETH SCOTT sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Spencer, No. 66, Wapping: I was standing at the next door to Mr. Williams's shop, I heard the prisoner call for assistance, with the cloth, he called, holloa, come hither, but I saw no one come; then I saw him kneel down on the stone step, and draw the cloth out of the shop on the pavement; he then laid it on his shoulder, and ran away with it; I ran after him, and when he found I was after him, he slung it down again.

Q.Was it dark? - A. It was half an hour after seven o'clock.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing goods value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-16

281. JOHN SADLER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Payne , about the hour of seven in the night of the 7th of March , and burglariously stealing two boots, value 10s. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn. - I keep a house, No. 2, Kingsgate-street, Holborn, in the parish of St. George's, Bloomsbury : On Sunday night the 7th of March, about seven o'clock, I was standing in my own kitchen, I suddenly heard the door broke open; I listened for a moment, and heard a noise over my head; I immediately ran up stairs, and caught the prisoner at the bar taking boots from the window, I both work and sleep in the shop where the boots were; I let out two rooms in the house; I went up to him, and he immediately collared me, he immediately let the property he had in his hand loose; he collared me, and threw me on the floor; we were then in the dark, the candle was knocked down, he struggled to get loose, but

I still hold fast hold of him; we continued in that state a few minutes, till my wife had alarmed the neighbourhood, we had a violent fall both of us at the street-door; I was then assisted by some-person about the door, and we got him back into the shop; we searched, but found nothing upon him at that time.

Q. Are you sure this is the man? - A. I am positive he is the man; I never let him go from the time I laid hold of him till I delivered him to the watch-house-keeper in the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. Q.It was light? - A. No, it was quite dark.

Q. We all know it is not dark at that time of the year, at seven o'clock? - A.It was not light.

Q. It was so light you could distinguish his face? - A. I had a candle in my hand.

Q. But you could see his face as you went to the watch-house? - A. I could see his face as he went along, because I was quite close to him; if it is ever so dark I can see a man's face that is close to me.

Q. You know there is a reward of forty pounds if this man is convicted of a burglary? - A. I have heard of such things.

Court. Q.How did the person get in? - A.By opening the street-door, with a latch; it was upon the latch, and bursting open the shop-door; it is left upon the latch for the benefit of the lodgers.

Q.Therefore your lodgers might go in and out as they pleased? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you been in the house that night? - A. I had not been out the whole day.

Q.Anybody might open the latch? - A. Yes.

Q.How lately before had you been at the street-door? - A. A few minutes before; I fastened the kitchen-window, and came down again, and had only taken a book and sat down when it happened.

Q. How was the other door broke open? - A. It was bolted, as well as locked, inside.

Q. How had it been opened? - A. It was burst open, the staple was burst off; it was the bursting of that open that alarmed me.

VALENTINE ROMLEY sworn. - I am an officer,(produces the property); I searched the prisoner, and found nothing upon him but a common knife; being without a hat I asked him what had become of his hat; he said he had lost it in the scuffle; the prosecutor went back and found the hat.

Payne. Q.These are my boots, they were hanging up in the window; when I caught him he had them in his hand; on my return from the watch-house, I found his hat in the passage, some matches, and a bottle of phosphorus.

Prisoner's defence. I understand that Mr. Romley has been putting this man in the way of getting forty pounds upon my conviction; I have not been out of trouble long; I went to inquire for a man of the name of Murray, and being in liquor I went to a wrong house, and when I went in, that man knocked me down; and, as I had an undoubted right, I knocked him down again.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing the goods, but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-17

282. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , twenty-one yards of cotton, value 42s. the property of James Janaway , and Charles-Thomas Brookes , privately in their shop .

JAMES JANAWAY sworn. - I am a linen-draper , No. 30, Parliament-street : On Saturday the 27th of March, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to our shop for some Irish linen, the same that her friend bought the Monday before, the price, she said, was two shillings and a penny; she described it as a remnant of about five yards; I shewed her two or three, to which she objected; I turned to look for another piece, and on turning towards her, I suspected, from her confused manner, that she had taken something; we had five pieces of print come in the evening before, which I had just shewn to a lady, and were lying on the counter, and upon looking them over I missed one; the prisoner desired me to measure a piece of cloth, and while I was measuring it, she removed to the other end of the counter, and seemed very much encumbered with something; the piece I measured was five yards and a quarter; she said that was not the same, being more in quantity; I shewed her one or two others, and went round the counter where the prisoner was standing, to see if I could discover what she had taken; I observed she was standing with her legs across; I saw her take a piece of print from between her thighs, and throw it on the opposite side of the counter, and it fell on the ground; I said to her, I thought what she had been about; I desired Mr. Willes to piece up the piece of print; we detained her, and sent for a Police officer.

Q. Who else were there in the shop? - A. Mr. Willes, and John-Augustus Brookes.

Q. Is he your partner? - A. No; they were setting an account.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You said nothing to this woman before she put this piece of cotton to the other side of the counter? - A. No.

Q. You had not charged her with any thing? - A. No, I had not.

Q. How lately before had you been serving upon that spot? - A. On the spot where the prisoner first came in, I had shewn a lady some things; but where the prisoner threw the print from her, was three yards from where the print had laid.

Q. All that she did, was to remove this to the other side of the counter? - A. No; she had it between her thighs.

Q. Did you see it between her thighs? - A. No. I saw her take it from there; she put her hand there, and the print flew from there to the other side.

Q. Might it not have been sliding down, and she removed it up? - A. No.

Q. Why not - do you mean to swear the print might not have slipped down on the side of the counter on which she was? - A. She was not near enough to catch it; if the print had been lying there, I must have seen it.

Q. You had not come up to her? - A. Yes; I was standing close by the side of her.

Court. Q. Did you know any thing of this woman before? - A. No, I have never seen her before to my knowledge.

THOMAS-FAIR WILLES sworn. - I am shopman to Messrs. Janaway and Brookes; I was standing at the farther end of the shop, and was desired by Mr. Janaway to pick up a piece of print, which I did; how it came there I do not know; I had my back towards her at the time.(John Hobbs, the officer, produced the property, which was identified by the prosecutors.)

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the piece of print till the gentleman picked it off the ground, and said, I meant to steal it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her an excellent character. GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-18

283. HENRY COCK was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 20th of April , a certain letter of attorney, to sell, assign, or transfer, all or any part of the sum of 5000l. 5 per Cent. Annuities , with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the same as true, with the like intent.

Third and Fourth Counts. For feloniously forging and uttering, and publishing as true, a like deed, with intention to defraud William Storey .

And in Four other Counts, for a like offence, varying the manner of charging it.(The indictment was opened by Mr. Giles, and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

DUNCAN HAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Were you acquainted with Captain George- Samuel Smith , of the Navy? - A. Yes, I did know him.

Q. Is he living or dead? - A. Dead; he died in December, 1796.

THOMAS GOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Were you acquainted with the late Captain Smith? - A. I knew him, as being clerk to the late Mr. Robson.

Q. Do you know his hand-writing - look at that? (shewing him the original power of attorney given by William Storey to the prisoner, authorizing him to receive dividends.) - A. I believe this to be his hand-writing from the similarity between it and that which I have seen; I have his signature, and have seen him write.

Mr. JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding Q. Were you acquainted with Mr. Edward- Evan Rice ? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Are you acquainted with his hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that his hand-writing? - A. Yes, I believe it is.

Q. Did you know the hand-writing of Mr. Storey? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that his hand-writing? - A. I believe it is.

Mr. Gibbs. Q. Did you ever see Captain Storey write? - A. Yes.(The power of attorney read, date 20th October, 1796, appointing Henry Cock , of the Old Jewr, London, Gentleman, the true and lawful attorney of William Storey, to execute all transers, and receive all dividends upon his property in the 5 per Cent. Annuities.)

Mr. CHARLES NORRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Are you a clerk in the Navy 5 per Cent. Office, in the Bank? - A. Yes, I am chief clerk of the 4 and 5 per Cent. Office.

Q. To whom were the dividends paid on the property in the name of William Storey? - A. It appears by the books they were paid to Henry Cock .

Q. What was the amount of the dividends due on that stock paid to Henry Cock, in January, 1797? - A. The first dividend upon the power of attorney became due the 5th of January, 1797.

Q. Upon how much stock? - A. Six thousand eight hundred pounds.

Q.Look to the next dividend - was that paid to Henry Cock, as attorney to William Storey? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. What is the next? - A. The 5th of July, 1797, upon 7000l. 5 per Cent. stock.

Mr. Gibbs. Q. Do you make those entries? - A. They are made by the different clerks of the Bank.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.They are the public books of the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that paid to Henry Cock? - A. Yes, in virtue of the instrument.

Q. What is the next? - A. It became due on the 5th of January, 1798, still on 7000l.

Q. That was paid to the same person, was it? - A. Yes, to the same person, on the 5th of July, 1798, on the same sum of 7000l. paid to Henry Cock.

Mr. WILLIAM JEFFEREYS sworn. - Examined

by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are an attorney, at Rochester, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. You are one of the executors named in the will of the late Mr. William Storey ? - A. Yes.

Q.And are well acquainted with the handwriting of Mr. Cock, the prisoner? - A. Yes, I am.

Q.Look at the signatures as they appear in the Bank books, and tell us whether they are the signatures of the prisoner? - A. I believe the 5th of January, 1797, to be his.

Q.And the 5th of July, 1797? - A. I believe it is.

Q. The 5th of January, 1798, on 7000l.? - A. I believe it is.

Q. The 5th of July, 1798, on 7000l? - A. I think it is.

Q. The 5th of January, 1799, on 7000l. - is that receipt the hand-writing of the prisoner at the bar? - A. I think it is.

Q. The 5th of July, 1799, on 7000l. - is that his hand-writing? - A. I believe it is.

Q.(To Mr. Norris.) The next is the 5th of January, 1800? - A. Yes, on 6000l.

Q.Then, the stock between July 1799, and 1800, was diminished one thousand pounds? - A. It was, of course.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) Is that the hand-writing of the prisoner at the bar? - A. I think it is.

Q.(To Mr. Norris.) What is the amount of the dividend in money? - A. One hundred and fifty pounds.

Q. What is the next date? - A. The 5th of July, 1800, on 6000l.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) Does that appear to be the hand-writing of the prisoner? - A. It does not appear altogether to be the name; the Christian name is, the surname does not appear to be the name of Cock; it seems more like an R than a C.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Do you believe it to be his signature? - A. I have no doubt at all upon the Christian name; indeed I have very little on the surname; the Christian name I am sure is his writing.

Mr. Norris. The next is the 5th of January, 1801, on 5000l.

Q.(To Mr. Jessereys.) Is the receipt of the dividend the hand-writing of the prisoner? - A. I believe it is.

Q.(To Mr. Norris.) Turn to the next? - A. I must have the warrants for them.

Mr. JOHN TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What office do you hold in the Bank? - A. I am clerk in the 5 per Cent. Navy Office.

Q. Look at those dividend-warrants, and give us the first in point of date? - A. The 5th of January, 1801.

Q. To whom does it appear to be paid? - A. It appears to be paid to Henry Cock, attorney of William Storey, of Chatham.

Q. What is the sum upon which that dividend is? - A. Five thousand pounds; dividend 1251.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) Look at that signature, and see whether it is the signature of the prisoner? - A. I believe it is; it is only the expression, attorney abbreviated, not saying to Mr. Storey; I believe they are both his writing.

Q.(To Mr. Taylor.) For what quantity of stock is the power of attorney of the 5th of July, 1801? - A. Three thousand pounds.

Q. Between January and July, there had been a diminution of two thousand pounds in the principal stock? - A. Yes, two thousand pounds stock.

Q. Are you a subscribing witness to one of those warrants? - A. Yes, to that of the 5th of July, 1801, for 3000l.

Q. Who is the subscribing witness to the other dividend-warrant? - A. A person of the name of William Divers, who is since deceased.

Q. You are his executor, I believe? - A. I am

Q. Do you believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. I believe it is.

Q. Was it his business to witness the dividend-warrants? - A. It was. (The warrants read.)

Mr. Giles. (To Mr. Notris.) Q. The transferbooks will shew that the stock has been replaced?(The entry read, dated 28th April, 1802. Transfer by the Rev. Thomas Leman, of Bath, of 2000l. 5 per Cent. Annuities, to the executors of William Storey, late of Chatham, Gentleman, deceased; accepted by all the parties. Another entry road, dated 28th April, 1802, a transfer by Thomas Corney, of the Strand, laceman, of 5000l. to the executors of William Storey , late of Chatham, Gentleman, deceased; accepted by all the parties.)

JOSEPH KAYE sworn. - Mr. Newland was desired to purchase the stock by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, he received this note which I will read:

24th April, 1802.

"Mr. Newland,

"Please to purchase 5000l. the same having been received by Henry Cock," which was done.

Mr. Garrow. (To Mr. Norris.) Q. These executors are no creditors on the stock, are they? - A. They are intitled to sell the stock to-morrow, if they please, they receive the dividends.

(The names of the executors read from the will of William Storey, dated the 2d. of December, 1799, Benjamin Cock, Sir Andrew-Snape Hammond, Henry-James Jones, William Jeffereys , and probate granted to all of them, the 9th of October, 1801.)

Mr. Garrow, We will now begin with the transfer of the stock, in July 1799.

Mr. Norris. This is the transfer of the 18th of July, 1799.

Mr. Giles. Q. Who is it made by? - A.By

Henry Cock, as attorney to William Storey, of Chatham, gentleman, of 1000l. 5 per Cent. stock.

Q. Who is the witness? - A. The witnessing clerk is John Taylor, the transfer is to Harry Smith .

WILLIAM DAWES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You are deputy secretary of the Bank, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you witness the identities? - A. I witness the identity of the person who makes the transfer.

Q. Is the prisoner at the bar the person? - A. Yes, he is.

Q.(To Mr. Norris.) Look to the other transfer of the 28th of July, 1800? - A. Henry Cock, as attorney to William Storey, transferred 1000l. 5 per cents. to John Pyecrost, identified by Mr. Chevalier, witnessed by William Divers , and I believe this to be his hand-writing.

CHARLES CHEVALIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Did you witness the identity of the person making that transfer? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was that person? - A. Henry Cock, the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you sell out any stock, by the direction of Mr. Cock, in July, 1799? - A. Yes I did.

Q. To whom did you pay the money, the produce of that stock? - A. To Henry Cock, the prisoner.

Q. Did you do the same with the stock transfered on the 28th of July, 1800? - A. Yes, I did; I paid him by a draft, which I have got.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) (The Power of Attorney shewn the witness.) You was well acquainted with the hand-writing of Mr. Storey? - A. I was.

Q. He was a man 80 years of age when he died? - A. He was.

Q. Is that his writing? - A. I believe not.

Q. Have you any doubt of it? - A.None.

Court. Q. Had you seen his hand-writing recently? - A. I saw him write the last he ever wrote in his life. I frequently saw him write; he hardly signed an instrument but I saw him do it.

Q.With as much certainly as the subject is capable of, you do think it is not his writing? - A. with as much certainly as the subject is capable of, I do.

ROBERT PACKHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You lived with Captain Storey for some years? - A. Yes.

Q. How long? - A. Better than six years.

Q. Were you acquainted with your master's hand-writing - did you ever see him write? - A. Yes; but I am not acquainted with it.

Q. You are acquainted with your own? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell me whether those words "Robert Packham," were written by you? - A. No, they were not.

Q. Are you sure of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Mr. Henry Cock? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he do any business for you respecting your stock? - A. Yes.

Q. What did he do for you? - A. He used to receive the dividends for me.

Q. How long? - A. All the time.

Q.How long was that? - A. Five years.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) Have you lived long at Rochester? - A. Yes.

Q. And are well acquainted with the principal persons there? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any person of the name of Edward Bishop , a warfinger? - A. No, I do not; there may be such a person existing, but I never knew him.

Q. Did you know such a person as an acquaintance of Mr. Storey's? - A.No.

Q.(To Packham.) Did you? - A. No.

Q. Or any way thereabouts? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gibbs. Q. Are you much used to write? - A. No.

Q. You cannot write well? - A. No.

Q. Very little? - A. Very little.

Mr. Garrow. (Shewing a banker's draft to the witness.) Q. The words, Robert Packham, on that draft, are your writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know on what occasion you wrote them? - A. Upon receiving a dividend.

Q.Did the prisoner give you a draft on his banker? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You wrote on the back of that paper? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gibbs. Q. Do you remember writing it? A. Yes; but not the particular day of the month.

Q. Do you remember where? - A. At Captain Storey 's.

Q. Who was there besides? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Garrow. (To Mr. Jeffereys.) Q. Is that the writing of the prisoner? - A. I believe it is.(The draft read, dated 12th October, 1801, Messrs. Mainwaring, Chatteris, and Co. pay Robert Packham , 8l. signed Henry Cock.)

WILLIAM FRANCIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You live at Rochester, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. What are you? - A.Postmaster, and collector of the assessed taxes in the city of Rochester.

Q. Do you know any person there of the name of Edward, or Edmund Bishop, a warfinger? - A. No.

Q. Are you well acquainted with the people that reside there? - A. I have lived there thirty six years, and am well acquainted with all the people in the town.

Q. Are you well acquainted with all the wharfingers? - A. I have known them all for many years.

Q. Was there such a person in 1801? - A. No such person since I have known the place.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) Is that Henry Cock's

writing? - A. I should think it was; but, I think it is different from many of his signatures, inasmuch as the christian name is not abbreviated, but written at length.

Q.Have you any doubt but it is his writing? - A. I think it is.

Q. Have you any doubt? - A. No; I cannot say I have. (The power of Attorney read.)

"Know all men by these presents, that I, William Storey , of Chatham, in the county of Kent, Gent. do make, constitute, and appoint Henry Cock , of Brewers Hall, London, Gent. my true and lawful attorney, for me, in my name, and in my behalf, to sell, assign, and transfer all, or any part of 5000l. being all my interest or share in the Capital or Joint Stock of five per cent. Annuities, erected by an Act of Parliament of the 24th year of the reign of his Majesty, King George III . intitled an Act to grant Annuities to satisfy certain Navy, Victualling, and Transport Bills, and Ordinance Debentures; and by other subsequent acts transferable at the Bank of England; also to receive and give receipts for the consolidation money, and to do all lawful acts; and I hereby ratify and confirm all that he shall do. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set

my hand and seal, on the 28th day of April, in the year of our Lord, 1801.

(Signed) "WM. STOREY."

Signed, sealed, and delivered, being first duly stamped in the presence of us, Edward Bishop, wharfinger, Rochester, and Robert Packham , coachman to Captain Storey .

Court. (To Packham.) Q. Were you ever witness to any deed executed by Mr. Storey? - A. No, never.(The Indorsement read, I demand to act by this Letter of Attorney, 24th April 1801; signed Henry Cock.

Mr. Norris. Here are three transfers on the 24th of April, 1801; the first is 160l. to Jacob Clements , transferred by Henry Cock, attorney to William Storey; witnessed by William Divers, identified by Charles Chevalier. - I believe it to be William Divers's hand-writing.

Q.(To Mr. Chevalier.) You witnessed the identity? - A. Yes.

Mr. Narris. They follow each other, and one is identified by the broker. The second is for a 1000l. Capital Stock, to the Rev. Samuel Barwick, by Henry Cock ; witnessed by William Divers - it is his hand-writing. The next transfer is for 840l. to Martha Shiells, by Henry Cock; witnessed by William Divers - the identification of these two is implied in the first.

Q.(To Mr. Chevalier.) Did you sell this stock. A. Yes; by the order of Mr. Henry Cock, the prisoner.

Court. Q. These three several sums you sold for Henry Cock ? - A. Yes, and paid him the money.

Mr. Garrow. Q. On the 22d of July, 1801, what transfer was there? - A. A 1000l. transfer to Joachim Hockey , by Henry Cock, attorney to William Storey; identified by Charles Chevalier, and witnessed by John Cherry.

Q.(To Mr. Chevalier.) Did you identify this? A. Yes; and paid the money to Mr. Cock.

JOHN CHERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q.Did you witness that? - A. Yes I did.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) When did Captain Storey die? - A. On the 14th of August, 1801.

Q.Did the prisoner attend his funeral? - A. He did.

Q. On what day? - A. On the 29th of August - the particular request of the testator was, to be buried after the manner of his wife.

Q. How soon after the death of Captain Storey did the prisoner know of his death? - A. I don't know when he knew it exactly; the first time I saw him after the death of Mr. Storey was the morning of the funeral.

Q. Mrs. Coxhead had been many years housekeeper to Captain Storey ? - A. Many years.

Q.Look at that letter, and tell me whether it is the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. Yes it is.

Q.(To Mr. Norris.) Have you a transfer of the 21st of August, 1801? - A. Yes; 21st August, 1801, 2000l. five per Cent Annuities, transferred by Henry Cock, as attorney to William Storey .

Q. Does it appear whether it is the whole or part? - A. It says, all my interest to Richard West - that cleared the account, Mr. Charles Chevalier identified it.

Q. Mr. Chevalier. I sold the stock out by order of Mr. Henry Cock, and paid it to Mr. Heny Cock, by draft.

Q. Who is Francis Devey? - A. He is the witnessing clerk.

FRANCIS DEVEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Did you witness that? - A. Yes I did.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) You, as we have seen, are one of the executors of the deceased Mr. Storey? - A. I was appointed to act - particularly so by the will.

Q. How soon after his death did you first see the prisoner? - A. The morning of the funeral.

Q. How soon after the death of Mr. Storey had you any conversation with the prisoner, with regard to the funds of the deceased, in discharge of the legacies? - A. I suppose it might be near three months.

Q. Did you appoint him to act for you in town, in such matters as were to be transacted in regard to the estate here? - A. Yes; he offered his services, and I accepted them.

Q.Tell us what conversation you had with Mr. Cock respecting the property of the deceased; and particularly, whether you had any respecting the five per Cent Annuities? - A. Yes, we had; because we calculated what the profits of the three and four

per Cents would produce, and what the amount of the legacies would be.

Q. Mr. Storey had stock in the three and four per Cents as well as in the five per Cents? - A. We had.

Q. You calculated them, and had conversation with respect to the five per cents? - A. We had.

Q. What was the nature of the conversation you had with the prisoner respecting the five per Cents? - A. The general drift was, whether it should be parted with previous to the dividends becoming due at Christmas, or whether we should wait till after Christmas.

Q. What opinion or advice did the prisoner give respecting that? - A. He mentioned to me what he stated to be the opinion of Sir Andrew Hammond .

Q. What did he say? - A. That is would be better to postpone receiving the dividends on the five per Cents.

Q. Did you make any objection? - A. I did; because the testator ordered the legacies to be paid within three months.

Q.Had you any paper of the testators which purported to be an account of his property? - A. I found an account between the testator and Mr. Benjamin Cock.

Q. Did you converse with Henry Cock expressly on that account? - A. I don't recollect that I did.

Q. Did the prisoner, in any conversation you held with him respecting the sale of the five per Cents intimate any knowledge of his that the testator had realized the quantity of stock? - A. On no occasion.

Q. I need hardly ask you whether he communicated to you that it was all exhausted and gone? - A. He never did.

Q. You spoke of making calculations - look at this, and tell me whether it is the writing of the prisoner? - A. Yes; he copied this from a similar account which I drew out.

Q. Is there any statement respecting the supposed 7000l. five per Cent Annuities? - A. Yes there is.

Q. He making no observation to induce to believe it was not standing there, copied that paper, and took it by way of direction for his conduct, for the manner in which he was to act, making no observation that there was no such fund to act upon? - A. No.

Q. Look at this letter and tell me if it is your writing? - A. Yes; except the copy of a letter from John Storey, which was copied by my direction.

Mr. Garrow. It is a letter addressed to the prisoner, and found in his possession, which we shall read, and his answer to it.

- MEAD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow.

Q. Do you live at No. 9, King's-street, Cheapside? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge at your house? - A. Yes he did.

Q. Were letters addressed to him? - A. Yes. there were.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) Look at this letter; is that the prisoner's hand writing? - A. Yes; I have no doubt of it.

Mr. Garrow. It is dated the 20th of November, from the prisoner, in answer to that of the 9th of November. - Here is one of the 23d of November; is that the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. Yes, I believe it is.

Q.Here is another of the 1st of December; is that of his hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q.Another of the 25th of January, 1802? - A. Yes.

Q.Another of the 5th of February? - A. Yes.

ROBERT TOWNSEND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q.Did you search any apartment at Mr. Mead's, in King-street, Cheapside? - A. I did.

Q.Did you find any papers there? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.What did you do with them? - A. I delivered them to a gentleman at Messrs. Winter and Kaye's office.

Q.(To Mr. Mead.) Was the apartment which was searched, the prisoners? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. (To Townsend.) Q. You searched some lodgings in King-street? - A. Yes; and searched a bureau belonging to you.

Q. Was there any appearance of concealment? - A. No; they were open to me.

Q. You saw, in the regular way, without any concealment or suspicion? - A. I saw none.

- FRESHFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. I believe you are in the office of Messrs. Winter and Kaye? - A. I am.

Q. Did you receive the letters which have been produced, and which are proved to be the handwriting of the prisoner, from Townsend? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner's lodgings in King-street? - A. Yes; in the morning of the 8th of March, I went to the prisoner's lodgings in King-street, and selected the paper's in the secretaire of that room, such as appeared to be material; I left an officer in the house, and afterwards sent for all the papers.

Mr. Gibbs. Q. Were you there before Townsend? - A. I was.

Q. You selected all the papers that you thought material? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. You found the papers in order? - A. Yes, and the secretaire open.

Q. Then any body, who had curiosity, might open it. and look at them? - A. Yes.

Q. There was not the least appearance of concealment? - A.Certainly not.

Mr. Garrow. (To Mr. Jeffereys.) Q. What was to be done with regard to Sir Andrew Snape Hammond's legacy? - A. By a transfer of stock.

Q. What was that 7000l. which I see on that paper, from which 1800l. is deducted? - A.7000l. five per Cent Stock.

Q.Did you so talk of it with the prisoner? - A. I did.

Q. Had there been any arrangement that he knew of? - A. We made it then.

Q. What was arranged? - A. With regard to transferring stock; instead of giving time, we settled it; and he said, Sir Andrew Hammond left it to my discretion; he was to pay the difference, or receive it, as it might be taking a hundred stock as a hundred pounds value.

Q. In the whole of that conversation he never communicated that it had been diminished? - A. Never.(Extract of a letter, dated Chatham, November 17, 1801, signed William Jeffereys, directed to Mr. Henry Cock, Solicitor, No. 9, King-street, Cheapside, London.)

"Respecting the payment of the pecuniary legacies to the legatees, I have duly considered, and the best opinion I can form of the subject is, that they should, agreeable to the will of the testator, be paid immediately to all, as well to the residuary legatees as to the others; it was proposed to leave the legacies to the residuary legatees unpaid until the final share was made, but as that will, from necessity, be some time first, and as the proposed forbearance was on account of interest, I think they had better be discharged at once; the legacies given to the residuary legatees are various in amount, and consequently will be intitled to have a proportion of the accumulated interest; and it would puzzle and perplex much to make such division of the whole, to pay each alike would be unfair; and to pay the whole, at present, each would reap the benefit arising from the legacy in proportion to the worth; if interest was my motive, for this advice I should enjoy that interest; by forsaking my plan, therefore, that cannot interfere; I have no other wish but to do what is right, and simplify the accounts; I wish, therefore, with the approbation of your brother, and Sir Andrew Hammond , the powers of attorney shall be granted to you to do the needful, the amount is 5000l. to sell out the 1600l. four per Cents, and receive the dividends due thereon, amounting to 1370l. to transfer 2500l. three per Cents into the name of Captain Storey 's executors for young Smith, and receive the dividends for their use as they become due, to sell the remaining part of the three per Cents, the produce of which I estimate at 1700l. to transfer 750l. of the five per Cents into the name of Jane Coxhead, in discharge of her legacy of 700l. and she has agreed to pay me the difference, due on the value of the stock, on the 14th of September, a month after the testator's death, according to the terms I made with her; and to sell out 1550l. more, leaving 4700l. five per Cents, with what I calculate, will bring 1700l. it will make 5470l. and enable me to pay 4330l. exclusive of Jones's legacy, and the debts, 280l. and upwards, in the whole. I hope I have made myself understood, and will thank you to confer with your brother, and Sir Andrew Hammond , thereon; thinking them gentlemen of business, I think it right not to trouble them too much, as you have a head able to comprehend, and a hand to execute, much better than they, without some pains and extra trouble, could do. I submit the affairs first to your consideration, then for your opinion and advice, in what I have misconceived, or misrepresented; afterwards, your communication to the parties; and lastly, such due execution as to you shall seem expedient; will thank you to send me the letters of attorney, that I may make them conformable to each other; the money to be lodged in the banker's hands; and I can give you checks as usual to save trouble in payment, and which will form a class of evidence of such payment.(Answer to the above, dated No. 9. King-street, 20th of November, 1801, signed Henry Cock , - addressed Mr. Jeffereys.)

"Dear Sir,

"In consequence of your letter, I have bespoken the powers of attorney at the Bank, and was in hopes to have been able to send them to-morrow, but am prevented, by reason that our late friend is described, in the three per Cent Stock, Gentleman; in the others he is described differently; this will be obviated in a few days at the Bank, when the powers will be issued; I have not been able to see Sir Andrew, as I was in hopes I should, but will lay your letter before him, and will write to you the result. Best respects to Mrs. Jeffereys, &c."(Extract from a letter, signed Henry Cock, dated 23d November, 1801, - addressed to Mr. Jeffereys.)

"It seems desirable, I confess, to preserve, if we can, the interest that will become due on the Fives."

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) In a part of this letter it is imported, that you were to have a visit from the prisoner; I wish to know whether, in the course of that week, you saw him, and had conversation with him? - A. Some where about the 1st of November, and I believe he wrote to me the same day, or it might be the next post.(Letter read, dated 1st of December, 1801, signed Henry Cock, - addressed to Mr. Jeffereys.)

"2500l. Consols, at 67 1/4.

"Dear Sir,

"Above you have a copy of the broker's account, the balance of 3026l. which I have paid in to your account, the amount of the dividends upon the four per Cents; I am sorry to say the five per Cents shut to-day, and no business is done in it till after Christmas; but I hope we shall hit upon some plan to obviate the difficulty arising from letting the fives remain. Inclosed is a receipt from the Smiths.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) Did the prisoner procure any power of attorney respecting the five per Cents; did he undertake to transact the business relating to them? - A. Yes.(Letter read, dated 25th of January, 1802, King-street, signed Henry Cock , - addressed to Mr. Jeffereys, attorney at law, Chatham.)

"Dear Sir,

"I did not know, till yesterday, that the inclosed power was executed by Sir Andrew Snape Hammond, and sent under his cover; however, I have lost no time in sending it to you."

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) Did that letter convey a paper to you? - A. Yes; I have no doubt it did.

Q.What did you do with that paper? - A. Mr. Jones and myself executed it, and I returned it to the prisoner.(Letter read, dated 5th of February, 1802, signed H. Cock.)

"My dear Sir,

"I duly received the power of attorney, and afterwards a parcel with the deeds, and I proceeded to do the needfull with all dispatch. The reason the forms were not made to embrace the dividends, was because the exedutors, in virtue of being such, would receive their dividends without having occasion to be parties."

JOHN LUCAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. Did you serve that notice (shewing him a paper,) on the prisoner? - A. I did.

Q.When did you serve it? - A. The 23d of April. (The notice read.)

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) What was that power of attorney? - A. To transfer 7000l. five per Cent. Stock.

Q.Did it appear to be executed by any other executor before you had it? - A. No; Mr. Jones and myself executed it, and returned it.

Mr. Gibbs. (To Mr. Jeffereys.) Q. You had an opportunity of knowing a great deal of the prisoner? - A. I have had.

Q. You have known him from his infancy? - A. I have known him near seventeen years.

Q. After the death of Captain Storey , he was employed to conduct the affairs? - A. I employed him.

Q. You had intrusted him with considerable property in the couse of his employment? - A. Yes; such as arose from the sale of property in the three and four per Cent. Stocks, and some others.

Q.I observe here are three and four per Cents sold by him to a considerable amount, under the powers that were given him? - A. Yes.

Q.Those in course he was intrusted with? - A. Yes; letters of attorney were sent down by my desire; they were executed, and I found the produce in the banker's-hands to my account, by the letters, as he had informed me - when I speak about the produce in the banker's hands, I don't know exactly whether I sent him legacies to discharge, or checks to the amount.

Q. By the confidence you reposed in him he was intrusted with all this money? - A.He was.

Q. On the 14th of August, 1801, Mr. Storey died? - A; It was so.

Q. You went on in correspondence with the prisoner, conversing with him, and transacting business of this sort up to February, 1802? - A. Yes.

Q. This was a space of six or seven months; during which this transaction was going on? - A. Yes.

Q. It was as early as the 1st of December that conversation took place, in the course of which this account was drawn out? - A. About that day.

Q. It was previous to that letter of the 1st of December, in which he speaks of the stock? - A. It was after the 28th of November.

Q.And he was, during the whole of this time, publicly about transacting his own business? - A. Just as he had done before; I know no odds.

Q. No apparent desire of concealing himself? - A. Not the least; he was down with me frequently, at Chatham.

Q. After this conversation he came down to you again? - A. Yes; he came down to the parsonage house, and I was with him; he was there two or three days.

Q. You have known him seventeen years? - A. Yes.

Q. Has he not, during the whole of that time, borne a most excellent character? - A. He has a most exalted character.

Q.During the whole of that time is there any young man who appears to you to deserve a higher? - A. I cannot say I know one in the world that I would place more confidence in than I would Mr. Cock.

Q. You speak from the knowledge you have of him? - A.From his conduct on every occasion.

- JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. Did you execute the paper which was executed by Mr. Jeffereys? - A. I did, to transfer the 7000l. stock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. - Q. How long have you known Mr. Cock? - A. Since I first lived at Chatham, about fifteen or sixteen years, by going backwards and forwards to the parsonage house.

Q. What has been his character? - A. He has always borne a very high character.

Q.Remarkably good? - A.Remarkably good.

BENJAMIN COCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are brother to this unfortunate young man? - A. Yes.

Q. And are one of the executors to Captain Storey? - A. Yes.

Q. It is necessary, for the purpose of justice, notwithstanding it must be very unpleasant to you,

that I should ask whether you did not, in the lifetime of Mr. Storey, transact business for him? - A. I did.

Q. Did you, in the course of that employment, receive any sum of money for dividends upon any stock? - A. I received 175l. at different periods.

Q. From what time did you begin to receive 1751.? - A. I don't recollect.

Q.Endeavour to recollect? - A. About four or five years.

Q.Whether your commencing the receipt was in the beginning of the year 1797? - A. I don't recollect.

Q.Endeavour to recollect as near as you can? A. It is impossible to recollect that immediately.

Q. At what periods did you received those payments? - A. At no precise times.

Q. Were they yearly or half yearly payments? A. Half yearly generally, but there was no precise time.

Q.Did he pay you them as half yearly payments? - A. I suppose so.

Q. You acted upon them as such? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you continue, from the time you first began to receive the same sum annually, to go on receiving it at stated periods, or was there any intervention? - A. At times the payments used to vary.

Q.Though the time was not precise, was the sum always the same, amounting to twice 1751. annually? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you continued to receive it down to the time of Captain Storey's death? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you receive the 175l. for dividend, after Capt. Storey's death? - A. I found in the banker's book 175l.

Q. Had you any conversation with your brother about it? - A. It was passed to my account without my knowledge.

Q.(To Mr. Jeffereys.) Is that the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. It is. (Check read.)

"London, 25th of January, 1802.

"Messrs. Mainwaring, Chatteris, and Co. pay to B. Cock 1751. (signed) Henry Cock .

Q.(To Mr. B. Cock.) Do you know, from your brother, upon what account the 175l. was paid? - A.On the banker's account.

Q. Do you keep cash at the same bankers? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know on what account it was paid? A. The last 175l. I did not know on what account it was paid; I found it in my book.

Prisoner's defence. May it please your Lordships, Gentlemen of the Jury, very little capable at any time of addressing a Jury of my country, I am much less able to do so upon an awful occasion like the present, yet I confess to you my feelings have been considerably relieved by the extreme, liberal and candid manner, in which the Gentlemen have conducted themselves towards me this day, and I am the better enabled to address you, because the result of this enquiry is so different from that which has gone forth to the world, and is so inconsistent, that I humbly look with confidence to an honourable acquittal, and towards being restored by your verdict to Society.

Gentlemen, you have an important duty to perform; you have either to restore an individual to society, or to send him to certain death; I may say certain death, because we all know that you are the dernier resort, from your verdict there lies no appeal, and I am confident you will weigh it with judgment and with mercy, peculiarly in a case of this sort, where there is no ulterior resort whatever.

Gentlemen, I should not have the presumption to address you, if the law of the land had not prevented the learned Gentleman, who has paid such unremitted attention to the case, from doing it for me, he could do me justice in much stronger terms than I can myself; but when I look to the noble Lord, who presides, and to you, Gentlemen, I have nothing to fear; I trust you will allow for the inaccuracies of my speech, and that you will look at the case in all its bearings, and if you are convinced, upon the evidence that has been adduced against me, I am guilty, let me be consigned over to the laws of my country; but if the whole tenor of my life has been according to the rule of right; if I have continued to act upon the principles of honour and honesty, and if the evidence, as far as it has gone, has been consistent with that character which has been gone into, then, Gentlemen, I feel confident in the event of your verdict.

Gentlemen, I did think, on the part of the prosecution, there would have been a clear consistent statement before you; I should have thought charging me to have forged this power of attorney, that they would have begun at the foundation of the crime to shew that that power of attorney was forged; they have shewn no such thing, or attempted it; they ought to have gone on, and to have shewn you that the power of attorney, in October, 1800, was a forgery; that they have not done. What is it we then come to? the power of attorney in April, which is charged to be the forgery, and we will go to the evidence on which it is founded. There is one thing before that, because the Gentleman has been pleased to say, that it afforded some strong presumption, and I admit that suspicious circumstances have been laid before you, but unfortunately I have not the opportunity, by evidence, of compleatly elucidating them, but will say, it is bare statement; there is not positive evidence against me. I shall pass over all the different witnesses which have been called as to the entries in the Bank-books for form's fake, and will admit that there was such a sum as 5000l. sold out; the only questions you have to try, are, first, whether it was

under a forged instrument, and, in the next place, whether, if it was a forged instrument, I was the perpetrator of it, or uttered it, knowing it to be forged.

Gentlemen, the first material circumstance, I shall observe upon, is this, I take it in all cases, it certainly is not possible to shew the perpetrator of the act; in this case they cannot, for it is impossible to shew the perpetration of the deed; in order to be convinced that an instrument of this fort is a forgery, you will first look to the signature of the party himself, and next to those of the attesting witnesses; what is the evidence, taking the signatures first, I think it is clear, that I was in the habit of confidence sufficient to be intitled to receive under it; I think the gentlemen have produced to you a power of attorney, authorizing me to receive dividends upon the then stock, therefore you have it before you on the shewing of the prosecution, that I was in the confidence of the testator, and was allowed to receive his dividends; was it inconsistent, therefore, that he should allow me to sell it out when necessary? and here I must make an observation upon the evidence of Mr. Packham, who said I had received the dividends on his stock, implying that stock was gone, though it will be found through the whole transaction, his confidence had not been broken in upon.

Mr. Garrow. It is but justice, if it will assist you, to say, that respecting the servants of Mr. Storey's, you conducted yourself with great fidelity.

Prisoner. Sir, I thank you for correction me, I may have mistaken the evidence. Gentlemen, you have the evidence before you of Mr. Jeffereys, that this hand-writing is not, in his opinion, the hand-writing of Mr. Storey; there is not one single other witness, nor is there an iota of evidence before you that it is my hand-writing. I will now resort to the attesting witnesses - the first is Robert Packham , he is called, and from his appearance, he is little conversant in hand-writing; he however denies that he attested it; you will recollect, that it is required at the foot of instruments of this sort, the parties should not merely subscribe their names, but their residence and prosessions; these forms have been complied with, and I should like to know if it is not the handwriting of Packham, why they have not brought you other evidence to shew whose it is; it is not the mere signature of Robert Packham , and is it possible for you to conceive if they were written by me, that they would not have got persons to prove it was my writing? They ought to have gone to that point, and shewn to you that it was not merely suspected to be a forgery, but that it was a forgery created by my hand; they have attempted to effect it out of Court, but they failed in effecting it in Court.

Gentlemen, Mr. Francis is asked whether there was one Edward Bishop living at Rochester; he tells you there was not. I am not disposed to quarrel with that - but the solicitors who conduct this prosecution were, so soon as the circuit was over, required to give me the names of the witnesses, which was refused, and which, if it had been complied with, I would not have been contented with calling a single tax-gatherer - I should not have stopped there; I should have sent down persons of diligence and activity, and if I found it was impossible to discover them, I should have put One Hundred Pounds Reward in as large figures as they put for my apprehension, and called upon them, for the sake of public justice, to come and speak before you. On this part of the question, I think they have gone a very little way; they have given us very flight evidence indeed, and it merely depends upon the opinion of Mr. Jeffereys, that this is not the hand-writing of Mr. Story, who was a man afflicted with the gout, eighty years of age, and liable to an hundred variations in his hand-writing.

Gentlemen, The greater part of this case has been occupied by inquiring not so much whether it is a forgery or not, but with reading the correspondence between me and the executors, subsequent to the death of Mr. Storey, all tending to shew most unquestionably that there existed, at the period of Mr. Storey's death, 7000l. stock. I do not mean to deny those representations, they are proved; I would have admitted them, if my Counsel would have permitted me; it is unquestionably true, I have constantly admitted to the executors that 7000l. was there, and have acted upon it as such, and if the thing had remained undiscovered till this moment, I should have continued to do so, but does that prove the charge? The question is, Whether it be a forgery or not? Whether their confidence was broken in upon by the conduct I pursued, and not giving me an opportunity of replacing the money which I acknowledge is converted, but I say there is no proof of forgery, and you have a right to infer from the confidence placed in me by Mr. Storey, with respect to his own dealings, that I might be authorized to transfer any of the stock, and I might have gone on representing it as still standing in the books, whereas it was not; for I wished to keep the deception up, and I did keep it up to the testator till his death.

Gentlemen, If there was any idea in my mind that I should be placed in this tremendous situation, is it probable, that on the 19th of August I should be at the Parsonage-house, and every where to be found, and my papers liable to be inspected by every body who chose - is it not more likely, that, after the death of Mr. Storey, I should have gone off with those sands which Mr. Jeffereys intrusted

me with? The fact is this, and you ought to try that fact, Whether it be most consistent with my representation, or with the representation made by the prosecution, then you ought to pause, and consider whether it is a forgery, and whether I am the perpetrator of it.

Gentlemen, The probate of the will was produced to you, and I apprehend it may be read in evidence; I defy them to shew that any sum of 7000l. 5 per Cents. is taken notice of by the testator by any one letter or declaration of the testator, that he had such stock, because it does not exist; they cannot prove it - they cannot shew it.

Gentlemen, There is another thing: When one of the witnesses was asked as to the testator's handwriting to this instrument, the learned Judge was pleased to ask whether he spoke with as much certainly as the subject was capable of? Most undoubtedly, the witness did say, I speak with as much certainly as the subject is capable of.

Gentlemen, I have now given you a few observations, not with that ability with which they would have been given by my Counsel, but in the best manner I am able, considering the agitation of my mind. Hasty, crude, and undigested as they are, arising from my unfortunate situation, I trust you will give such weight to them as you think they deserve. The correspondence between me and Mr. Storey is destroyed, and it is utterly impossible to shew his directions to me; you will give the due weight to me observations I have made, and it only remains for me to address you upon my character - that character has been in part given to and I slatter myslef, those who will be seen here to-day, will not diminsh that which I have received; on that, I am willing to go to a Jury of my country, trussing my life in their hands, and to the law, perfectly satisfied that whatever they do, they will neither injure the one, or sacrifice the other.

The prisoner called William Mainwaring, Esq. M. P. Mr. Alderman Price, Mr. Stevens, Doctor Keeling , Rice Davies, Esq. Smith Ward, Esq. Mr. Stevens, merchant, Sir Andrew Snape Hammound, Mr. Hartshorn, Mr. Bawtry, Mark Hodgson, Esq. and Kilby Cox, Esq. who all gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

London Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18020428-19

284. JOSEPH ABNEY and RICHARD BAILEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , a telescope, value 1l. the property of Thomas Parnell .

THOMAS PARNELL sworn. - I am a mathematical instrument-maker , at St. Botolph, Aldgate : On the 9th of March I lost a telescope; I had seen it in the shop the same day.

ELIZABETH FOX sworn. - I live at Mr. Parnell's, and saw both the prisoners in the shop; they asked for some sail needles; while the man turned round to get the needles, I saw the prisoner, Bailey, take up the telescope, and put it under his clothes, but it was too high above his clothes, and he put it down again; the man turned round, and locked the door, with the prisoners in the shop; he got assistance, and then they were taken into custody.

Court. Q.Did they speak to each other? - A. Yes, they appeared to belong to each other.

- WILLIAMS sworn. - I was on the cellarstairs, and saw the two prisoners and Henry Ward all come in together; when the man turned his back to serve the needles, I saw the telescope move, but I cannot say which of them took it.

HENRY WARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. The prisoners asked me to go into the shop with them to buy some needles, and Richard Bailey took up the telescope, and put it down again.

Q.Had you made any agreement before you went in? - A. Yes, one was to buy some needles, while the other thieved the telescope.

Q. What are they? - A.They work on the quays; I drive a brick cart; I have been led away by had company.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Abney, Guilty , aged 25.

Bailey, Guilty , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-20

285. HENRY ROOKE and JOHN LOVELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a pair of pincers, value 8d. a turnscrew, value 4d. three chisels, value 6d. and two augurs, value 2s. 6d. the property of Robert Craig ; an oil-stone, value 6d. a pair of pincers, value 6d. a pair of compasses, value 9d. three chisels, value 1s. a spike-bit, value 6d. a plumb-ball, value 2d. a hammer, value 6d. a jacket, value 6d. an apron, value 2d. and a grease-box, value 1d. the property of Peter Summers .

ROBERT CRAIG sworn. - I am a carpenter ; I was at work at the Spice-gardens, St. George's in the East ; the tools were lost on Tuesday, the 16th of February, at night; the next morning the padlock was wrenched off the building, and the tools gone; the officer belonging to Shadwell found some of the tools at a public-house in Spital-fields, and I asked Rooke what time he broke in, and he said, about eight o'clock at night.

PETER SUMMERS sworn. - I know nothing of the transaction; Mr. Brown, the officer, gave me information about it.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - On the 16th, I went to the house of Mr. Blakeley with a search-warrant;

I apprehended Rooke, and he told me the tools were at the Black Horse, George-street, Spitalfields, at Ann Goldspring's; I went there, and found them.

ANN GOLDSPRING sworn. - I keep the Black Horse, in George-yard, Spital-fields; the two prisoners left these tools at my house; they said, they had been at a job, and finished it, and asked me to let them leave them; they divided some money between them, but I cannot tell what; I thought it had been for wages.

CHARLES BLAKELEY sworn. - Rooke came to my house in the afternoon of the 16th of February, between four and five o'clock; my wife fetched me home; she informed me the prisoners had been there; I went after them, and, near the Seven Stars, in Brick-lane, I saw them; I seized Rooke, and another person went after Lovell.

Summers. These are my tools, and this apron that they are tied up in is mine.

Rooke's defence. I know nothing at all of the tools.

Lovell's defence. I know nothing of them.

Rooke, GUILTY , aged 34.

Lovell, GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-21

286. WILLIAM ROLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , a shirt, value 2s. the property of Daniel Thomas ; and a pair of shoes, value 3s. the property of Richard Vining .

SIDLAND COMBE sworn. - I keep a lodging-house; the prisoner, and Daniel Thomas , and Richard Vining, all lodged in one room; all the men were gone to work, except the prisoner; at about a quarter before eight in the morning, I heard him walking about over-head; when Daniel Thomas came home, he missed his clothes from his box; the prisoner told me he was a brushmaker, and worked at Mr. Allen's, opposite Whitechapel-church; he did not come home in the evening; I went to Mr. Allen's, but could not find any such person.

Q.Have the things been found since? - A. Yes, another lodger saw the prisoner in Whitechapel-road, and told me of it; I got an officer, and went and found him; I told him to let me have the things, and he should not be hurt if I could help it; and then he put his hand in his pocket, and gave me the duplicates; I gave them to Tuffing, the officer.

JOHN TUFFING sworn. - I received the duplicates from the last witness, and last Friday I went to see a friend in Newgate, and I was knocked down, and robbed of the duplicates.

- HARDY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Mather, a pawnbroker, in the Minories; (Produces a shirt.) I took it in of a person I do not know; I know nothing of the prisoner; it has a duplicate upon it.

Q.(To Tuffing.) Look at that duplicate - does it correspond with the duplicate the prisoner gave you? - A. Yes.

- SMITH sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, (produces a pair of shoes;) I cannot say who I took them in of.

Thomas. I can't swear to the shirt.

Vining. Upon my oath, these are my shoes; they are tied with leather strings, and a knot in each string.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-22

287. SAMUEL JEFFERYS and THOMAS GRAIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , eight box rules, value 8s. five ivory rules, value 1s. 6d. a plated half pint mug, value 5s. fourteen pair of knee-buckles, value 14d. three pair of scissars, value 2s. a plated scissar-case, value 2d. twelve hat boxes, value 1s. two iron tobacco-boxes, value 1s. two pair of snuffers, value 1s. a crok-screw, value 6d. a brass key, value 2d. and a brass seal, value 4d. the property of William Deacon .

There being no evidence to identify the property, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-23

288. JOHN HOBLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , thirteen pounds of tobacco, value 14s. the property of Ann Kemp , widow .(The prisoner being a foreigner, a Jury of half foreigners were sworn.)

John Griffin ,

John-Gotlieb Braun ,

Thomas White ,

George Dupple ,

William Finch ,

George Roebuck ,

George Dobson ,

Gaspar Melanscheg ,

Edward Ropberts ,

James Tregent ,

William Clements ,

Andrew Schabner .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

ANN KEMP sworn. - I am a manufacturer of tobacco , in Whitechapel-road : On the 19th of March, the prisoner was in my service, he was employed in manufacturing tobacco ; I went into the cellar under the shop, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw four boxes, each box containing about five pounds of cut tobacco, they were all full, there were no lids to the boxes; the prisoner at the bar was then at work in the cellar, there was no other person there, I left him there, I gave him no orders respecting the tobacco in the boxes; about half an hour afterwards, before he went to dinner, I went out, and left my son to mind the shop.

Q. Is there any way to go to the cellar without coming through your shop? - A. There is no other way, it is impossible; I came back between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was then in the cellar; I had not time to pull off my bonnet and cloak when the officer came and took the prisoner into custody, he told him he wanted him about a little tobacco; he seemed very much confused, and said he did not know any thing about a little tobacco; I went down stairs directly the officer took him away, and examined the boxes; upon a large cover-head, upon which the boxes stood, was some loose tobacco, about six pounds, and the boxes standing by the side of a tub, quite empty.

Q.Did they stand in the same place in which they were in the morning? - A. No.

Q.During the time you were in the house, after you had seen the boxes filled, did any body else than the prisoner go into the cellar before you went out? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This man had been a manufacturer of tobacco for himself, had not be? - A. Never.

Q. Had he carried on no business in tobacco himself? - A.For the sale of tobacco, about a year and a half ago.

Q. Who was the journeyman then employed with him? - A. Not any one.

Q. You had employed a man of the name of Stevens before, had not you? - A. Never in the warehouse.

Q. You did not weigh the tobacco in the morning? - A. I did not; the boxes generally contain about five pounds each.

Q. What age is your son? - A. Twelve years old.

Court. Q. Was there any thing more to be done by the prisoner to this tobacco, in order to manufacture it? - A. Only to run it through a sieve.

Q. He must have taken it out of the boxes for that purpose? - A. He must.

Q. And would this cover-head be a proper place for him to put it before he put it in the sieve? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM KEMP called. Q. How old are you? - A. Twelve.

Q. Do you know what you are to be sworn to? - A. To speak the truth.

Q. What will become of any person, if, having sworn to speak the truth, they should speak that which is not true? - A. They will go into flames.(He is sworn.)

Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 19th of March, did you take care of the shop while your mother was out? - A. Yes; she went out about twelve o'clock.

Q. At that time who was in the cellar? - A.Hobleman; he went away to dinner in about half an hour, he usually came back from dinner about one o'clock; that day he did not come back till above half after four.

Q.During the time he was gone, did any other person go into the cellar? - A. No; he went down into the cellar before he went out; I asked him what made him stay so late; he said his child had had an accident, and had fell in the fire; I said, very well, and he went down; my mother came in in about twenty minutes, or half an hour after; and in about ten minutes after that the officer came.

Q. Then from that time, till the officer came, had any other person but your mother been into the cellar? - A. No; I had been in the shop the whole time.

Q. Are you quite sure nobody had been in the cellar? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. He did not take any bundle with him, did he? - A. No; he went with his hat under his coat, as he generally does.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am one of the officers employed at Shadwell-office: On the 19th of March, I was sent for to the shop of a Mrs. Stevens, in Ratcliff-highway, where I found a woman of the name of Coles, in the custody of Elby; Mrs. Stevens, and I, went to the house of Mrs. Kemp, and took the prisoner into custody.

Q. How far is Stevens's house from Mrs. Kemp's? - A.About three quarters of a mile; Hobleman asked me what I took him for; I told him for a little tobacco; he told me he knew nothing about it. I took him into custody, and brought him away to Shadwell office; in going along to the office, he told me his mistress allowed him tobacco; I then asked him where he lived, and he pointed the house out to me; I afterwards went and searched that house, and, in a cupboard in the bed-room, I found these two parcels of tobacco, weighing six pounds and a half, (produces them;) I searched further in a little bit of a shed in a back part of the house, and found several parcels of tobacco in different parts of the place, but Mrs. Kemp did not identify them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Who was present when this conversation passed about his mistress allowing him tobacco? - A.There was no person with me, Elby was waiting in the New-road for me.

Q. He does not talk very good English, does he? - A. Very good for a German.

Q. He speaks broken English, like a German? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore you might very easily have mistaken what he said? - A. No.

Q. You found a quantity of ochre at his house, did not you? - A. Yes.

Q. A large quantity? - A. Yes, there was a little cask about three parts full.

Q. They tell me that will give a colour to tobacco? - A. I do not know.

Q.Upon your oath, did not his master admit

that she had sent that ochre to his house? - A. Yes, she did.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn. - A. On the 19th of March, I was sent for to Mr. Stevens's, in Ratcliff-highway, to take into custody a woman of the name of Coles; I received this parcel of tobacco from Mr. Stevens. (Produces it.)

THOMAS ELLISON sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Stevens, a tobacconist: On the 19th of March, Susannah Coles brought some tobacco, to our shop, which was afterwards delivered to Elby, the officer; she was at our shop twice that day; she came first about half past one, and then, by my master's directions, I followed her about a quarter of a mile: as she was going along the New-road, she spoke to the prisoner at the bar; Coles waited at the corner of Union-street about half an hour, till she saw him coming down the New-road; as soon as she saw him, she ran across the road to him; I saw her give him something, but what it was I cannot tell; after their conversation together for some time, about a quarter of an hour, I missed them.

Q. Had she received any thing at your shop? - A. She had received fourteen shillings for the tobacco that she had brought.

Q. Did you know Hobleman? - A. Yes, I knew where he lived; she came again in the afternoon, and brought seven pounds of tobacco.

Q. At that time you had the officer waiting to take her into custody? - A. No; I fetched the officer, and she was taken into custody; the tobacco was given to Elby.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. - Q. You never saw her at the man's house? - A. No.

Q. This was in the street? - A. Yes.

Q. So they talked together; but you did not hear a word? - A. No.

Q.(To Mrs. Kemp.) Look at these parcels of tobacco found at his house; is it the same sort of tobacco that was contained in the boxes you speak of? - A. The very same; it had been cut that morning, I saw him at work upon it.

Q. Was it finished tobacco? - A. It was not; it had not gone through the sieve, nor ever does, it is returns, which will not go through.

Q. Had the operation of sisting been performed when you saw it in the morning? - A. No.

Q. Has it since? - A. Yes it has.

Q. Was there time enough for him to have fisted it before he went away to dinner? - A.He might rub a box through in a few minutes.

Q. You saw the tobacco the next day before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. Had it the appearance of fresh manufactured tobacco? - A. It had.

Q. Did you compare it with the tobacco that was left upon the cover head? - A. No.

Q. Was it the same sort of tobacco that was contained in the boxes? - A. It was.

Q. How long have you been in the tobacco manufactory? - A. My husband was sixteen years.

Q. How long were you yourself employed in it? A.Almost all the time; my husband was almost always ill.

Q. Are you able to judge of tobacco? - A.Yes; it was of a particular flavour.

Q. Are you able to say, with certainly, that it was newly cut tobacco? - A. I am certainly positive of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Can you tell me what is the use of ochre? - A. For many things in the tobacco business.

Q. It will give a colour to tobacco? - A.It will, to what you call dark sisting from shag tobacco.

Q. It will have the effect of making an inserior sort of tobacco look like a superior tobacco? - A. I never used any.

Q. I believe it is forbid to be in the possession of a tobacco manufacturer? - A. I don't know; a cask of ochre was sent to his house, but what he used it for I can truly say I don't know.

Q. This never was your ochre? - A. I paid for it; he bought it; he said he wanted it.

Q.Was it your's or his? - A. I paid for it.

Q.Was it your's or his? - A. It was his while it was in his possession.

Q. Was it your property or his property? - A. I paid for it.

Q. Did you pay for it for your own? - A. I did; he persuaded me to buy it.

Q. It was removed to his house by your desire? - A. No.

Q. He took it by your authority? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had it been kept at his house? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How many months had it been kept at his house? - A. Not weeks, I dare say.

Q. Can you give us some sort of guess? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Was it removed to his house the first day you bought it? - A. No; it had been there some weeks.

Q. So that your manufacturer of tobacco took this ochre to his house? - A. Yes, it was in a stable where my horse stands, at his house.

Q. Do you keep a horse and chaise? - A. A little cart.

Court. Q.Do you allow the prisoner any tobacco? - A.Never.

Q. Do you ever know of any tobacco being carried from your house to his? - A. No.

Q.Not to be manufactured in any shape or way? - A. No.

- STEVENS sworn. - I am a tobacconist.

Q. Is a tobacconist able to speak to tobacco newly cut? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see that tobacco produced at the Justice's, which was found at the prisoner's house? - A. I did.

Q.Was it or not newly manufactured tobacco? - A. It was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Fourteen pounds of tobacco would make a pretty large bundle? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there not a process by which old tobacco may be made to resemble newly cut tobacco? - A. It may be mended, but cannot be made so perfect as that.

Q. I believe ochre will give it a better appearance? - A. Ochre never was used by any person in the trade to tobacco of this description.

Q. What effect will ochre have upon tobacco? - A. Ochre, when used, is used to tobacco of a different colour, to make it appear the colour of this.

Q. Will that give to inferior tobacco the appearance of superior? - A. It is never used for that purpose, it is merely to alter the colour, and not the qualtity.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18020428-24

289. THOMAS LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , a tea caddy, value 10s. the property of Aaron Booth .

AARON BOOTH sworn. - I keep a cabinet maker's shop , at No. 25, Gloucester-place, lslington-green ; I know nothing of the transaction myself.

MARGARET BOOTH sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: On the 10th of March I saw the prisoner come into our shop, as any person would who was coming about business, and in a minute or two he came out with a caddy under his right arm, and walked away the length of two houses, then he began to run; I went into the shop, he had not shut the door; I gave the alarm, he was followed and brought back in less than an hour.

RICHARD HOBBS sworn. - I was where Mr. Booth was at work, Mrs. Booth gave the alarm that a man had taken a caddy; I ran out immediately, I saw a man with a caddy under his arm, there were three together, one of them ran one way and the other two ran the other; I saw the man throw the caddy over an area, he was pursued and taken in Pentonville-road.

Q. Is the prisoner the man? - A. The man that had the caddy I believe to be the prisoner at the bar; I cannot be positive.

JOHN LUM sworn. - I was called in to take charge of the prisoner on the 10th of March. (Produces it.)

Booth. This is my caddy.

Q.(To Mrs. Booth.) How long before the prisoner was brought back had you seen the caddy? - A. About an hour.

Q. Is the prisoner the man? - A. I am positive he is the man.

Prisoner's defence. I solemnly declare I was never in the house till I was a prisoner; I was taken near a mile from the place; a man was pursued, who drew a knife and swore, if they attempted to take him, he would stick it into them; they then let him go and seized me; half the people that took me have been kept back, because they should not give evidence in this Court.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-25

290. WILLIAM MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , a pair of trowsers, value 5s. the property of David Richardson .

- FRANCIS sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. David Richardson , slop-seller , Bell-dock, Wapping : On Monday, the 12th of April, I was standing at the door, and heard a bolt drop, to which a pair of trowsers were suspended with a string; I sent the porter to see; I immediately heard him cry stop him, stop him; in about five minutes he returned with the prisoner and trowsers; I know them to be my master's property, they have his private mark.

JOHN WALTER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Richardson; by the direction of the last witness I went after the prisoner, and saw him with a pair of trowsers under his arm; I called out stop him, and two men coming round the corner stopped him.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's defence. I found them at the door.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-26

291. WILLIAM MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , a bed curtain, value 10s. the property of Thomas Burke , in a lodging-room in his dwelling-house, let by contract by him to the said William .

There being no evidence to effect the prisoner but his own confession extorted by a promise, that he should not be prosecuted, he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-27

292. ANN HATHAWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March, a cot

ton gown, value 10s. the property of Thomas Elliott .

THOMAS ELLIOTT sworn. - I am a locksmith , No. 53, Gun-street, Old Artillery Ground : On Wednesday night, the 10th of March, I secured the prisoner about twelve o'clock at night; I found no property upon her; I know nothing of the loss.

CHARLOTTE ELLIOTT sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: On Wednesday, the 10th of March, the prisoner knocked at the door between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was busy washing; I came to the door, and she asked me to buy some coffee; I told her I wanted some, but I had no money; then she went into my room, and staid a quarter of an hour, walking backwards and forwards, and then she went away; after she had been gone about two minutes, I missed my new gown from the back of the chair; I am sure it was there when she came in; I am sure nobody else had been in the room; I found out the same evening where she lived.

Q. Did you ever find your gown again? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. To the best of my knowledge, I never saw the gown; I am innocent of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-28

293. ANN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a piece of muslin, value 3s. a cotton gown, value 6s. and a petticoat, value 3s. the property of William Nightingale .

MARGARET NIGHTINGALE sworn. - I live at No. 9, White Horse-yard, East Smithfield; my husband is on board the L'Amiable frigate , in the West-Indies: On the 10th of April I went to Somerset-house to get my husband's half-pay; these things were lent to me to make some money of, till I got some money; when I got my money, I redeemed them, and I met with a friend, who asked me to go and drink; the prisoner was in company, and had two glasses of liquor; we got into a coach, and through low living and hard working, I found it made an impression on me; I laid my head against the side of the coach, and Ann Martin took the things, and put them in her lap; another woman got out in Leman-street; we were going to Mr. Motts's, and I thought she was going into the house with us, but she went away; when I got into the house, and found she was gone, I made an alarm, and this woman said, don't make a piece of work, I will take you to where she lives.

Q. Did you ever see the woman before? - A. No.

Q. Have you ever got your property again? - A. No.

- HURST sworn. - I have known the prisoner three or four years; I never knew her guilty of any thing of the kind before; she went with these people in a coach, and when she came back, I saw, she had been drinking; I got into the coach, and, the prisoner took the things out of the woman's lap, I don't think she intended to keep them; I told her not to be alarmed, I would shew her where the woman lived; I went to the woman's landlady, and she was not at home; they told me she was at the White Lion, in St. Catherine's she said she was drunk, and had been to sleep, and the things were pawned, she did not know where the duplicates were; I got a constable; I wanted to have got the landlady and the prisoner taken up too, because she was in the coach, and when they got out, she went round the coach, and met her on the other side, but I don't think she took them with an intent to steal them.

Prisoner's defence. We were all very drunk; I took the things to my landlady; I went to sleep, and what became of the things, I don't know.

For the Prisoner.

ANN WENTWORTH sworn. - I am a chairwoman: I was cleaning the house where the prisoner lived; she brought in the property, very much in liquor, and so was the mistress of the house, and the landlady took the property out, and made away with it, while this poor creature was drunk and asleep. GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-29

294. JAMES RYLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , a silk handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. the property of George Naylor .

GEORGE NAYLOR sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am the York Herald: On the 30th of March, I was walking from the Strand towards Temple-bar ; at the middle part, near St. Clement's-church, I felt my handkerchief go from my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner go round the alms-houses; I went on as far as Snow's the banker's, I then saw him go up a court on the opposite side of the way; I caught his eye, and he ran; I immediately followed him, and called out, stop thief, and, in the course of a minute, I came up with him in Hemlock-court, and collared him; I charged him with having taken my handkerchief; he said, he had not; a man came up, and said, I saw the rascal throw your handkerchief away; he immediately took me to a passage in the court where the handkerchief was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. There were a great number of people about that day? - A. Yes.

Q.Who took your handkerchief, you do not know? - A. No; I suspected him from seeing him cross the way immediately.

- JACKSON sworn. - I am a brass-founder: I saw the prisoner running; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw him throw a handkerchief into the passage; I tried to stop him, but he was too quick for me; he was stopped immediately, I was close to him when he threw it away; I picked up the handkerchief, and gave it to Mr. Naylor.

Mr. Naylor. This is the handkerchief; it is mine.

Prisoner's defence. I did not take the handkerchief, neither did that gentleman fetch the handkerchief out of the passage.

GUILTY , aged 27. - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-30

295. WILLIAM STOICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , an oil-stone, value 4s. a plane, value 10d. an axe, value 1s. and an adze, value 9d. the property of Thomas Slater .

THOMAS SLATER sworn. - I am a carpenter ; I was at work in Bloomsbury-square : I lost the articles in the indictment between the 13th and 14th of February; I left them in the building on the night of the 13th of February, I went to work the next morning, and missed them; on the 16th, about one o'clock, I saw my tools at a shop-door in Compton-street, hung out for sale, and I claimed them.

RICHARD DAYFEAR sworn. - I live at No. 23, New Compton-street, (produces the property); On the 16th of February, the prisoner came to my house, and offered them for sale; he said he brought them for a person who was in distress; I gave him three shillings for them.

Q.(To Slater.) Do you know any thing of this man? - A. No; I had lost a great quantity of tools about ten days before.

Prisoner's defence. I worked some time ago in the country with a carpenter; I met him promiscuously in the street, and he asked me to sell some tools for him.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-31

296. THOMAS SKELTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , two pistols, value 30s. the property of John Manton .

JOHN MANTON sworn. - I am a gun-maker in Dover-street: The prisoner was stopped at Messrs. Parker and Perkins, in Princes-street, offering the pistols for sale; he was my servant .

TIMOTHY DOCKWAY sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Parker and Perkins, in Princes-street: On the 18th of March, the prisoner brought two pistols, and offered them to pledge; he did not give a satisfactory account of them; he said he had bought them in the Strand, and given two guineas for them; we stopped him, and he confessed they belonged to Mr. Manton. (Produces the pistols.)

Mr. Manton. These pistols were the property of the Hon. Mr. Beauclerc; they were brought to my house to repair.

Mr. Alley. Q. You had a very good opinion of this young man? - A. Yes; he was the last person I should have suspected.

Q. I believe there were some wages due to him? - A. Yes; somewhere about twenty shillings; I have trusted him with thirty or forty pounds at a time; I paid him twenty guineas a year.

Q. Did he not say that he took them for a temprorary purpose? - A. No; he did not.

GUILTY , aged 23. - Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-32

297. FRANCES WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , a ball of silk twist, value 4s. the property of James Sebastian Wilmot .

- WILMOT sworn. - I am brother to James Sebastian Wilmot, linen-draper in East-Smithfield : On the 13th of March, the prisoner came to our house for some silk twist; she brought three patterns to match; while the man was serving her, I saw her take one out of the drawer; when she got to the door, I stopped her, and a young lady in our shop took her from me backwards, and searched her; she found it upon her.

Q. Are you sure you saw her take it? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Has not the prisoner dealt at your shop these nine or ten years? - A. I have only been there since January.

Q. She used to deal there? - A. Yes; for twist.

MARY FLETCHER sworn. - I partly undrest the prisoner, and then she took a ball of twist from under her stays, and said, that was all she had taken.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-33

298. SCHUBEL CUNNINGHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a shirt, value 2s. the property of Ephrain Stevens .

MARY STEVENS sworn. - I am the wife of Ephraim Stevens: On the 10th of April, I lost a shirt out of the yard, (I live at No. 22, Lower Gun-alley ,) between seven and eight in the evening; I found it within half an hour after I had missed it at a pawnbroker's; the prisoner came to see a woman that lived in the house.

THOMAS ROGERS sworn. - I am an officer: I apprehended the prisoner, and found this duplicate upon him with six others.(The pawnbroker produced the shirt, which he de

posed he took in of the prisoner at the bar, and which was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-34

299. WILLIAM FARRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a metal seal, value 6d. and two watch keys, value 8d. the property of Edward Keate .

EDWARD KEATE sworn. - I am a musical instrument-maker , No. 71, Drury-lane: On Wednesday the 7th of April, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the sign of the Three Tuns, Houghton-street, Clare-market ; I called for a pint of beer; I sat there about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour; I went to the bar and paid for my beer, and coming out of the door there were three men standing on the threshold, and one appeared to be in the street; on my attempting to pass them, they stopped me, and attempted to hold my hands up; upon thrusting my hands down by force, I found my watch was going, I held it very firm, and the chain broke off.

Q. Was the prisoner one of them? - A. I cannot swear that he was one.

Q. Did you ever get your property again? - A. No.

- HILL sworn. - Keate came into my house for a pint of beer, he paid my wife for the beer; he went to the door, and in a minute I heard him cry out murder; I went to see what was the matter, and when I got there, William Farrell, and a man of the name of Thomas Johnson , and James Hayes, were hustling him in the passage.

Q. Are you sure Farrell was one of them? - A. Yes; the prisoner then got past me into the taproom, I said, you rascal, what are you doing, are you not bringing me into very great distress, one of them said, what a bl - y lark this is, we have not got his watch; I followed Farrell into the tap-room.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was one of the three that surrounded him? - A. Yes.

Q. How were his hands? - A. They were up in this manner. (Describing it.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You keep this very respectable public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you kept it? - A.Seven months.

Q. The first thing you saw, was the prisoner coming into your house? - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-35

300. THOMAS LEVERSIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of Philip Wilkinson .

PHILIP WILKINSON sworn. - I am a private belonging to the 1st regiment of life-guards : On Sunday morning, the 14th of March, feeling for my watch, I missed it; I had left it in the fob the night before; I made enquiry amongst my comrades, but could hear nothing of it; the next morning, I found it at the pawnbroker's; the prisoner was a private in the same regiment.

HENRY RICE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Tothill-street, Westminster; I took in this watch of the prisoner at the bar, on Saturday the 13th of March.

Q. Was he dressed in a soldier's dress? - A. He was.

Wilkinson. It is my watch.

Prisoner's defence. I have been three years and a half in the first regiment of Life-guards ; I never had any crime laid to my charge till this time; I was in the barrack room where twenty-seven men slept, many of them resembling me in person and dress, and you must clearly see that my comrade was so drunk that night, he might either have pawned it himself, or got some body else to do it for him. GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-36

301. DAVID DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , four pair of shoes, value 20s. the property of Charles Boreham .

CHARLES BOREHAM sworn. - I am a shoemaker , in Broad-street, Ratcliff : On the 12th of March, between seven and eight in the evening, a lad, about twelve or thirteen years of age, came into the shop, and asked me to let him look at some half-boots, I was standing behind the counter; I shewed him a pair, and he said they were not the sort he wanted, they were not smart enough; he went towards the door, and I heard him whisper, be off, upon which I turned my head, and saw the prisoner at the bar take four pair of shoes from a box near the door, and run away with them; I went after him, and when he had got the distance of ten doors, he dropped the shoes; I followed him and brought him back to my shop.

Q. Are you sure he was the person that dropped the shoes? - A. Yes; I never lost sight of him, they are my shoes.

Prisoner's defence. I never touched them, I was going by the shop and heard that gentleman cry stop thief; I ran up to see what was the matter, and he laid hold of me.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-37

302. ANN ARCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , a pair of blankets, value 10s. a pair of sheets, value 6s. a shirt, value 3s. a handkerchief, value 1s. a pair of overalls, value 1s. and a smock-frock, value 6d. the property of William Padger .

WILLIAM PADGER sworn. - I keep a house in George-yard, Whitcomb-street : On Saturday the 27th of February, I lost my property, the prisoner was a stranger to me, my wife took her.

ELIZABETH PADGER sworn. - I am the wife of William Padger; I have a private closet on the stairs, I was at that, and heard a ratling on the stairs; I moved the door to see what it was, and saw the prisoner with a large bundle under her arm, going down stairs; I immediately went after her, and took her within a few yards of the door, under a gate-way, and brought her back, she dropped the property just by the door; I sent for an officer; the things laid in a heap till he came and gathered them up, then she was taken to Bow-street: the sheets and the blankets were taken off the bed, I made it myself in the morning, the other articles were in the same room, it was a two pair of stairs back room.

George Donaldson , a constable, produced the property which was identified by Mrs. Padger.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that she laboured under a mental derangement at the time she committed the offence, in consequence of a dispute between herself and her husband.

Prisoner. I declare before the Court, and Heaven and Earth, that I am ignorant of having committed the offence.

Donaldson. I never saw a person behave more like a madwoman, than the prisoner did, all the while she was in my custody, or else she must have been very much in liquor indeed.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-38

303. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a tanned seal-skin, value 6s. the property of John Dyster .

JOHN DYSTER sworn. - I am a leather-factor , in Leadenhall-market: On Monday evening, the 1st of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the bar collared by one of my porters, upon which I walked up to him, and saw him take a seal-skin from under the prisoner's coat, I cannot swear to it myself.

JOHN WATKINS sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Dyster; on the 1st of March, I saw the prisoner take up a tanned seal-skin belonging to Mr. Dyster, he put it under his coat and ran off as fast as he could; I pursued him, and stopped him with it upon him; I took it from him, and delivered him and the skin to the constable.

Q. Did he say any thing when you stopped him? - A. No, he only seemed to cry.

THOMAS BRADLEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dyster.

Q. Was the skin shewn to you after it was taken from the prisoner? - A. Yes, I saw it in the hands of the constable; I know this skin to be Mr. Dyster's, I put it out to sell in the market that morning; I had put a mark upon it, Mr. Dyster's name, and the number of the skins. (The constable produced the skin which was identified by Bradley.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Whipped 100 yards up and down the Leather-market, Leadenhall .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-39

304. THOMAS WATSON and SAMUEL RUTTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , eighty-six quires of paper, value 61. the property of Charles Whittingham .

CHARLES WHITTINGHAM sworn. - I am a printer ; I live at No. 16, Dean-street, Fetter-lane: On Monday, the 29th of March, about half past one o'clock, I observed the two prisoners coming out of my office, No. 1, Dean-street , each with a bundle of paper on their shoulder, containing the number of quires specified in the indictment; I immediately crossed over the way to the printing-office, and met the prisoners; I laid hold of one of them, I think it was Watson, and he threw the paper down upon my arm; I lost my hold, and he ran away; the other prisoner threw down the paper, and ran away also; I immediately cried stop thief, and followed them; they ran to the top of the street which leads into Fetter-lane, one turned to the right, and the other to the left; I followed the one to the left, which was Watson, and took him into custody; in consequence of my crying out stop thief, Rutter was taken by a constable, who is in Court; his name is Fletcher.

Q. Had you observed Rutter sufficiently to know he was the same man when he was brought back? - A. Yes, I had spoke to him on the steps of the printing-office door about ten minutes before; I asked him what he wanted there; he told me he wanted no person in particular, and walked away; I am sure he is the same person.

Q. Do you know if there was any body in your office at the time? - A. Yes, but not in the room where the paper was.

JOHN HOUGHTON sworn. - I am a carpenter: On the 29th of March last, about half past one o'clock, I saw the two prisoners at the bar come out of Mr. Whittingham's warehouse with the paper on their shoulders; they came out at the front door; I first thought they were two of Mr. Whittingham's men; I turned to the right, and went down Dean-street; when they had got about

twenty yards down, I saw Mr. Whittingham cross the way; he collared the first, which was Watson, and asked him where he got that paper from; he threw down the paper upon Mr. Whittingham's arm, and Mr. Whittingham lost hold of him; he then turned round, and ran up Dean-street; then Mr. Whittingham called out stop thief; one of them turned to the right, and the other to the left, into Fetter-lane; then they were taken in Fetter-lane, and brought back.

Q. Are you sure that the people that you saw running were the same that were brought back? - A. Yes; we sent for Mr. Fletcher, the constable, and they were delivered to him.

THOMAS FLETCHER sworn. - On Monday, the 29th of March, about half past one o'clock, I was standing within my own door, and saw a person run very furious past the door; I then heard the cry of stop thief; I immediately opened the door, and ran out; the prisoner, Rutter, was then stopped by being thrown down; his heels were kicked up; I immediately took him into custody; I had information that Mr. Whittingham was robbed; I then took him to the corner of Dean-street, and by that time the other prisoner was taken. I called for assistance, and took them both to the Compter; the paper was delivered to me by Mr. Whittingham, and I have had it ever since; (produceit.)

Whittingham. This is my paper; it is part of a quantity of paper that came in on the preceding Saturday; there were twenty-six bundles of it; I went into the room just before the robbery, for I had a suspicion of the prisoner Rutter; the paper was there then; when I came back, I looked at the room, and missed two bundles; the number on the paper is 620; I believe the Exciseman's name is Thomas Cook .

Mr. Greed Q. You did not take the precaution of counting your bundles? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. I believe all paper of that description has the same mark 620? - A. No, I don't know that I have any of the same quality as this.

Q. You have a great deal of that paper in your warehouse? - A. No, I have but little.

Court. Q. Do you know that such a name was on that paper? - A. Yes.

The prisoner, Watson, left his defence to his Counsel.

Rutter's defence. Coming down Dean-street, we saw these two bundles of paper on a step; we knocked at the door, and nobody answered; then we were going to take them to the Gentleman and Porter public-house, when Mr. Whittingham stopped us.

Rutter called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. Watson, GUILTY , aged 22.

Rutter, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-40

305. THOMAS CAINES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , thirty-six pieces of soap, value 28s. and a hempen bag, value 6d. the property of Daniel Hawkins , the younger.

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-41

306. MARY LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of March , nine yards of cotton, value 10s. the property of Francis Hanford , privately in his shop .

FRANCIS HANSORD sworn. - I keep a linendraper's shop , in Newgate-street : On Monday, the 22d of March, the prisoner, in company with another woman, came into my shop, and asked to look at some remnants of furniture; after having shewed them a great many, and been there near half an hour, they could not be suited, the woman, who was with the prisoner, bid a considerable less price than it cost me; I endeavoured to shew them some others, but still could not find any that would suit them; I suspected the prisoner at the bar had taken something; I saw her folding her cloak and gown close round her; I was determined to be satisfied, and I took hold of her clothes, and found a piece of printed cotton in her possession; it contains three yards and a half; it was one of the pieces that had been shewn to her; I delivered it to the constable, who has it here; when I had detected her, she went a little distance, and pulled two other quantities, one out of each pocket; they were the same sort of cotton; I delivered all the three quantities to the constable; they have my mark upon them in my writing.

ESTHER FRANK sworn. - I went to Mr. Hanford's shop with the prisoner; she was a lodger of mine, No. 7, Bull-Head-court, Cow-lane; there was a great chair in the room wanted a cover; I asked her to go with me to get a bit for a chair cover; I had a very good character with her; I wanted her to choose the pattern; we went to this gentleman's shop; he shewed us some remnants, and while the shopman was reaching down some more pieces, I thought I saw her take a piece off the counter, and put between her gown and cloak; I could not believe it was so, till I saw her take another piece in her right hand, and put it in her right hand pocket; then Mr. Hanford came-over, and asked her what she had got there; and she said, nothing; then she dropped the piece on the ground; then she backed herself to the stairs, and, with her right hand, dropped a piece upon the stairs.

Q. Are you a married woman? - A. Yes.

Q.What business are you? - A. A dutcher of quills.

Q. What business does the prisoner follow? - A.None that I know of.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You did not say a word to Mr. Hanford? - A. No; I should have done before I went away.

Q. You saw her take a piece, and could not believe it? - A. I said, Lord have mercy upon me, it cannot be.

Q. You asked her to go, not she you? - A. Yes.( James Goodman , a constable, produced the property, which was identified by Mr. Hanford.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called one witness, who gave her a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-42

307. BENJAMIN BRISCO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , a pocket-book, value 1s. and two bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of James Barton .

JAMES BARTON sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Callaghan, No. 3, Swithin's-lane: On the 22d of February, returning from the Minories, a few doors from the Saracen's-head, Aldgate , there was a crowd collected, and, upon stepping outside of the crowd to see what was the matter, I found the prisoner at the bar pressing very hard against my side; I turned round and found him with my pocket-book in his hand, containing, at that time, two one-pound notes and other papers; seeing he had my pocket-book in his hand, I made a snatch at it, upon which it fell to the ground; the prisoner then ran away, and, in running after him, I fell down; upon which a person, named Ellery, ran after him, who had seen the book in his possession; upon seeing me fall, he cried stop thief, upon which a Mr. Neve secured him; he was taken before the Lord-Mayor, and committed.

Q. Where did you carry this pocket-book? - A. In my outside coat pocket.

Q.Who picked up the pocket-book? - A. I did. (Produces it.)

Q. Are you perfectly sure, that the man stopped by Mr. Neve, was the man who had your pocketbook? - A. Yes, he was not out of my sight at all till he was apprehended.

THOMAS ELLERY sworn. - I am shopman to a grocer; I saw the pocket-book in the hands of the prisoner; I saw him drop it; he made his escape towards Whitechapel-church; I immediately cried out stop thief, upon which Mr. Neve, a gentleman in Aldgate, ran out of the shop, and caught him; Mr. Barton ran after him with the pocket-book in his hand; I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's defence. I was going along, I heard a cry of stop thief, and ran, and this gentleman laid hold of me.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-43

308. SAMUEL GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , nine pounds weight of type, value 5s. the property of Samuel Hamilton .(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

JOHN DENCH sworn. - I live with Mr. Hamilton; the prisoner is a compositor , but not at Mr. Hamilton's: On Tuesday, the 9th of March, the prisoner came up into Mr. Hamilton's printing-office, between eleven and twelve o'clock; I observed him move about the composing-room; he came to speak to several people that were in the printing-office; I observed him move about in different directions in the composing-room, and speak to several people; he did so for a considerable time; I watched him till the dinner-hour drew on, when I told John Wilson to desire the prisoner to go down stairs; in consequence of some information, I looked under the frame where the letter was deposited, and thought I missed some; I instantly followed the prisoner down stairs, and, near the bottom of the stairs, I stopped him; I said, I hope you have not taken any thing from up stairs; he said, he had not; I told him I did not wish to search the inside of his pocket, but I insisted on searching the outside; I felt, and my suspicions were increased; I then put my hand into his pocket, and pulled out a complete page of composed letter; the prisoner then got towards the door, where I called out for a person to secure him, and then he produced another page from his pocket himself; one has been since broke up by accident, the other is complete, or nearly so; a constable was sent for; I delivered the letter to Mr. Watts, and he delivered it to the constable.

RICHARD WATTS sworn. - I am in the employ of Mr. Hamilton; the prisoner and two pages of letter were delivered to me, and I delivered them to Auld, the constable.( Alexander Auld , a constable, produced the property.)

Dench. This is the property of Mr. Hamilton; it is not broke; it is a part of a work that was printing at our house.

Prisoner's defence. I went to Mr. Hamilton's for the purpose of inquiring for a person, who, I understood, worked for Mr. Hamilton; I was in such distress, I had not, at that time, eat any thing for two days.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-44

309. JULIA CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , seven waistcoats, value 7s. a handkerchief, value 1s. a cotton stocking, value 1s. four pair of silk stockings, value

8s. and a night cap, value 6d. the property of James Christie , the younger.(The case was opened by Mr. Raine.)

SARAH BRANSOM sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Christie, the elder, in Pall-Mall ; his son's name is James: On the 2d of April, about half past four o'clock, I was in Mrs. Christie's bed-room, on the second floor; I heard somebody go up stairs to the third floor; soon after that, I heard a footstep of somebody coming down; I came out of the room, and saw the prisoner going down; she was an entire stranger to me; I pursued her, and caught her near the drawing-room door, with the property mentioned in the indictment in her apron; the stockings I took from her pocket; they were all taken from the three pair of stairs back room.

ELIZABETH SPARKES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am cook to Mr. Christie; I saw the stockings taken from the prisoner's pocket; the other things were lying upon the floor; I delivered them to Mr. Abbott.

JAMES ABBOTT sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Christie; I received the property from Elizabeth Sparkes, and delivered them to Jackson, the officer.(William Jackson, an officer belonging to Marlborough-street, produced the property.)

JAMES CHRISTIE , Jun. sworn. - I am the son of Mr. Christie, in Pall-Mall; these things are my property; I had put them in an unlocked drawer, where I usually keep them, in a back bed-chamber on the third floor; I had seen them about two days before.

Prisoner's defence. I am totally insensible of any act I committed on that day; that was not the house I intended to have gone into; I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

Q.(To Bransom.) Did the prisoner say any thing? - A. I asked her what she had got there, and she said, nothing.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-45

310. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , eight silk handkerchiefs, value 18s. the property of Robert Robinson , privately in his shop .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, but not appearing, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-46

311. HYAM MENDEZ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , a bonnet, value 8s. 6d. the property of William Dalby .

WILLIAM DALBY sworn. - I am an extra surveyor in the East-India Company's warehouses; I know nothing of the loss.

Mrs. DALBY sworn. - I lost my bonnet in Fieldgate-street, Whitechapel , on Wednesday, the 21st of April, a little before nine in the evening; I had a little boy with me about seven years of age; I was crossing the end of New-street, in Fieldgate-street, when somebody snatched the bonnet out of my hand, and ran down New-street, it was dark; I cried, stop thief, and a person who is here jumped down out of a cart, and caught him.

Q. Did you lose sight of the person? - A. I saw him but a very little time; I then lost sight of him; it was a bonnet I had just brought from the milliner's; the bonnet was picked up, and given to me; the prisoner said he had been knocked down by two men; he said he was sure, if I looked at him, I should say it was not him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When you called out stop thief, a great number of persons came about? - A. No; there was only one person unloading a cart.

Q.But when you came up to him, there were a great many? - A. Yes.

Q. And he said, if you looked at him, he was sure you would say it was not him? - A. Yes.

Q. It was so dark, it was impossible for you to swear to the person? - A. Yes.

CHARLES BASSETT sworn. - I am a nightman: I was at my back gate in New-street unloading the cart; I heard a cry of stop thief; I jumped from my cart, and laid hold of the prisoner, who had the bonnet in his hand; she claimed it; I had very great difficulty in holding him; he got away from me, but he was caught again before he had got three yards; he threw down the bonnet, and a neighbour picked it up.

THOMAS WILTSHIRE sworn. - I am a soldier; I took the prisoner after he had escaped from the other man.

Prisoner's defence. I was running home from Greenwich Fair; I saw a good many people running, and a man knocked my hat off and stopped me; that is all I know about it.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-47

312. JAMES FOUNDERY was indicated for making an assault in the King's highway upon Peter Gibberd the younger, on the 3d of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a pair of stockings, value 6d. a table-cloth, vlaue 1s. a bed-gown, value 2s. a frock, value 6d. two shirts, value 2s. a towel, value 2d. and a shift, value 1s. the property of Peter Gibberd the elder.

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, but not appearing, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-48

313. SAMUEL CLARKE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Stiles , about the hour of one in the night of the 9th of March , and burglariously stealing a silver tankard, value 4l. two silver salt cellars, value 20s. two silver salt spoons, value 2s. eleven silver castor tops, value 5s. and a silver prepper-box, value 7s. the property of the said Henry; a silver pint mug, value 2l. a silver salver, value 2l. nine table spoons, value 4l. eighteen silver teaspoons, value 1l. 10s. and two silver tea-tongs, value 7s. the property of the said Henry Stiles , and Mary Stiles , spinster .

Second Count. Laying it to be the dwelling-house of Henry Stiles , and Mary Stiles, spinster.

Third Count. Laying it to be the dwelling-house of Mary Stiles, spinster.

Fourth Count. Laying it to be the dwelling-house of Henry Stiles, and laying all the goods charged to have been stolen to be his property.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

HENRY STILES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A. At Staines .

Q. Does your sister live with you? - A. My sister lives with me.

Q. Who pays the rent and taxes of the house? - A. I do.

Q. It is your house then? - A. No; it is my sister's house; we jointly live together; I pay all taxes.

Court. Q. She is the owner of the house, is she? - A. She is the owner of the house.

Q. Does she board with you? - A. No; we live together; she has a competency, and I am a basket maker.

Mr. Knapp. Q. On the 10th of March, was your house broke open in the night? - A. Yes, it was.

Q.What time did you go to bed at night? - A.About ten o'clock.

Q. Was your house secure when you went to bed? - A. I was ill in bed with the gout.

Q.When did you, yourself, discover any thing? - A. I got up between ten and eleven in the morning, and found in the parlour, where we commonly sit, that the lock of the bureau had been broke open; a piece of the desk was broke off.

Q. What did you miss from that bureau? - A. I missed some money, I cannot say how much; the beauset over the bureau was broke open; I missed from the beauset a silver tankard, two silver salt-cellars, two silver salt-spoons, eleven silver castor tops, and a silver pepper-box.

Q. Were they your property? - A. Yes.

Q.Was there a silver mug missed from there? - A. Yes.

Q. A silver salver? - A. Yes; nine silver table spoons, eighteen silver tea spoons, and two pair of silver tea-tongs.

Q. How did it appear that any body had come into the house? - A. The shutters of the parlour-window had a pannel out, both of the inside and outside shutters.

Q. Where did that parlour-window look? - A. Into the street, next the street-door.

Q.Did you know the prisoner? - A. He was a neighbour of mine, and a tenant of mine; he had been in my parlour several times.

MARY STILES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the sister of Henry Stiles? - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 9th of March, did you secure the doors? - A. No; the maid did.

Q. Do you know where the things that were lost where the night before? - A. Yes; in a book-case over the bureau that was broke open.

Court. Q. Are you sure that you left it safe when you went to-bed? - A. I am perfectly sure of that.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Have you seen that property since? - A. Yes; before the Magistrate.

Q. Was that property, which you saw at the Justice's, your property? - A. Yes.

CHARLOTTE ELLENEOROUGH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the maid of Mr. Stiles? - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the ninth, did you secure the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you secure the window that was found to be broke? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you go to-bed? - A. About ten o'clock.

Q. Was that window particularly, perfectly, safe? - A. Yes; I fastened the outside shutter on the inside by a bolt, and then pulied down the fash; the inside shutter was fastened by an iron bar and a screw.

Q. Was the outside shutter bolted, and the bar fastened by the screw secure, when you went tobed? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you get up first in the morning? - A. Yes; I got up about six o'clock.

Q. Did you go into the parlour when you came down stairs? - A. I first opened the hall window, and the street-door; then I unlocked the parlourdoor; I went into the parlour, and saw the glass cupboard, where the plate was, open.

Q. How did it appear to have been opened? - A. They were both thrown open.

Q. Did you observe if any force had been used? - A. Not then; I went up, and told my mistress what I had seen; I came down again, and opened

the windows; I picked up a little drawer which had been pulled out of the bureau, and I put it in its place; I picked up a pepper castor, the top of it had been taken of; I shut the glass cupboard and the bureau, they had both been opened; I shut them together; I went about my work.

Q. Did there appear to be a hole through the inside shutter, as well as the outside shutter? - A. The inside shutter had the screw forced off.

Q. Was the fash thrown up? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. How lately had you seen the plate? - A. I cleaned the bureau the day before, and I saw it then.

Q. Did you see it before the Justice? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Were the outside shutters open when you came down? - A. They were pushed together.

Q. What sort of light was it when you came down? - A. It was day-light.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adams. Q. Do you know at what time this breaking of the house took place? - A. No.

BARNET ELIAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Where do you live? - A. In Mileend New-town.

Q.What are you? - A. A pedlar.

Q. Do you know Mr. Owen Davis of Hoonslow? - A. I went to sleep there on the 9th of March.

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. I did not take particular notice of the day; I went from there to Staines; I arrived at Staines about nine o'clock in the morning, I was going to Chertsey.

Q. In your way to Chertsey, who did you see? - A. A man jumped over a gate to me.

Q. Do you know who that man was? - A. Yes; that was the man. (Pointing to the prisoner.)

Q. Now tell us if any conversation took place between you? - A. He jumped over the gate, and asked me if I was a Jew; I told him, yes; he asked me whether I would buy some wedge.

Q. What is wedge? - A.Silver; he pulled out of his pocket a little salt-spoon; I asked him whether he had got any more; he told me, yes, he had got mere in plant.

Q. What did you understand by plant? - A. Hid; I asked him why he would not get it now? he told me no, it would not do now, for there was a man at work very near where the property laid, but he said, if you will meet me between six and seven, upon Staine's-bridge, I will go with you and sell it with you; then I said, suppose I meet you at home at your house? he said, no, it will not do at my house, I am suspected as a suspicious person in the town, and it is very likely I may have my house searched; I told him it was dangerous for him to keep that spoon in his pocket if he was in danger of having his house searched; he immediately took and dug a hole, and put the spoon into the earth, just by the gate where he got over; I walked with him better than half a mile back towards Staines, and told him not to deceive me, but to meet me there at the time; I left him, and wished him good-bye, then I went to the place where he had hid the spoon.

Q.Why did you go back to that place? - A. I thought very likely he might meet some body else, and take the spoon out, and sell it; I dug up the spoon, and took it to a very remarkable place where there are three trees, and buried it again very safe; I immediately went straight to Chetrsey; when I came to Chetrsey, I went to an old woman, and enquired for a Justice of the Peace; I went before Mr. Whitaker, the Surry Magistrate.

Q. Did you then give the same account you have been giving to-day, and afterwards pursue the directions of the Justice? - A. Yes, I told him every thing.

Q. What did you do, in consequence of the directions of Mr. Whitaker? - A. I went to Mr. James, the Middlesex Magistrate.

Q. Did you give the same account to Mr. James that you had before given to Mr. Whitaker? - A. The very same.

Q. In consequence of having given that account, what did you do? - A. Mr. James gave me a shilling to go to a public-house till the time appointed; I went, and the very moment I got to Staines-bridge, the prisoner came up to me, and said, it is rather too soon to go yet, let us wait here a little; He told me, on the very spot where he stood, underneath the Bridge were two watches that he had hid there, that he had got some time back; I asked him if he was ready to go, he said, yes, follow me; I followed him across a field, then he got over a white railing; I saw him stoop down, he took some turf off the ground, and took out a bag; he told me, here it is; I told him, bring it over to me, and as he was getting over, the constable came up to him, and said, you are my prisoner; it was agreed that the constable should be in waiting.

Q. Had he the bag in his hand? - A. Yes; I immediately went over to him, and drew this knife upon him, and told him, if he offered to stir I would cut his head off; I endeavoured to catch hold of the bag, he gave it a bit of a swing, and threw it over into the Thames.

Q.Was the constable's name Holden? - A. Yes, a little man in a white coat; I saw a boat on the other side, and I called over, over; and then several people came round, one had a gun, and the prisoner was secured.

Q.Did the boat come over? - A. Yes; and there was a barge coming through the lock, with several people in her, and they came to my assistance; the constable sent him away, and he was taken before Mr. James.

Q. At the time the prisoner was apprehended,

did you hear him say any thing about this? - A. All he said, was, you need not be afraid of me, I shall not run away, I may as well be hanged as shot in the back; when I first saw the prisoner in the morning, he told me there was a quart pot, a pint pot, several table-spoons, several tea-spoons, several tops of pepper-castors, and I believe a pair of tea tongs.

Q. Did he ever tell you where he got these things? - A. He said he had got them not far from the town.

Q.What town did you understand him to mean? - A.Staines.

Q. Did you ever mean to sell these things when you should have got them from him? - A. I never meant to buy them.

Q. What did you mean then? - A. I meant to have him apprehended immediately.

Q. And with that view you went to the two Justices? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of the salt-spoon that you dug up? - A. The next morning, after the prisoner was apprehended, I took it out, I found it where I had buried it, the high-constable went with me.

Q. Who was the high-constable? - A. Mr. Slark.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adams. Q. What is your name? - A. Barnet Elias.

Q. Have not you another name? - A. No.

Q. How long is it since you were here? - A. I was called here once.

Q. How long is it since you were tried here? - A. Never in my life.

Q. You say you are a hawker and pedlar? - A. Yes.

Q. What kind of things do you hawk? - A.Shoe-strings, and caps and things.

Q.Bad shillings -

Mr. Knapp. I object to that.

Court. You cannot ask such questions, certainly.

Q. You know of a reward of sorty pounds, don't you? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did he tell you how he came by them? - A. He said, he had broke open a house himself, not very far from Staines.

Q. Did he say any thing particular about it? - A. He said it was done the very same morning; he said he broke the window shutters, he wanted to know where I lived, and he would make a gentleman of me in six months; he asked me where I lived, and I told him to ask for the French girl in Tower-court; I did not know-such a place.

Mr. Knapp. (To Mr. Stiles.) Q.Were you disturbed in the night at all? - A. I heard a noise, and I pulled my curtain on one side, and I think it was moon-light.

RICHARD HOLDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you; - A. A constable.

Q. Of what parish? - A. Of Thorpe, close to Chertsey.

Q. In consequence of the information that was given you by Elias, did you go to Staines-bridge on the 10th of March? - A. Yes.

Q. At what time? - A. Just before I got there, Staines town clock struck six.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q.When you came to Staines-bridge, did you see Barnet there? - A. Yes, he and the prisoner were together; I passed by them twice; they stopped there a little while, but how long I cannot say, and then they went away; they went off the bridge, and I followed them; they went into a field, the Jew followed the prisoner, I walked about till the Jew and the prisoner met together; they got over a withy plantation, they call it an Ait, by the Thames side; I asked the prisoner the way to Chertsey, then I laid hold of him by the right shoulder, and told him he was my prisoner.

Q. Had you gone there, by the Justice's direction, to meet Barnet and the prisoner? - A. Yes; the prisoner asked me what for, I told him I believed for that he had got in his hand, he had a brown bag; he gave his hand a swing and threw it into the Thames; I heard it jingle all the way it went; then I took the prisoner into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adams. Q. The prisoner made no resistance at all, but went very quietly? - A. Yes; there were a great number of people to my assistance.

JOHN SLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are the high constable of Staines? - A. Yes: On the 10th of March, in the evening, I went by the direction of the Magistrate in pursuit of the prisoner; a person of the name of John Fletcher , and several others, had drags, which are used to lay hold of any thing that may be lost; I had had information that the plate was thrown in; I found the prisoner there, and at last a brown bag was brought up by a gudgeon-rake; I took the bag into my custody, and have had it ever since, (produces it); I opened it at the Magistrate's, and found in it the plate that is now in it; it was shewn to Mr. and Mrs. Stiles, and they claimed it as their property.

Q.(To Holder.) Where was it he threw the bag in? - A. At Egham Ait.

Q.(To Slack.) Is that the place where you saw it raked up? - A. Yes.(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

- DENYER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are a constable of Staines? - A. Yes; the prisoner was delivered to me on the 10th of March, by Mr. Slark; he said, among other things, who would have thought of that d - d Jew doing of me; but, says he, if he had purchased them I

should have done him, for I had taken eight spoons out; he said he had buried them in Mr. Christie's paddock, at Egham Ait, where the bag was taken from; I went the next morning and found them; William Foster was with me; these are the spoons.(Produces them.)(The spoons were identified by the prosecutor.)

Slark. This salt-spoon I had from Barnet.(Produces it.) I went with him, and saw him take it out of the earth, in Chertsey-lane; there were some trees near, but I cannot say how many.

Stiles. This is my salt spoon.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

Court. (To Mr. Stiles.) Have you any thing in your recollection, that will enable you to six, at all, the time when you heard any noise after you had been in bed, or do you know how long it was after you were in bed? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Were there any curtains to your window? - A. No.

Q. Can you undertake to say whether it was break of day? - A. I think it was moon light; I should suppose I had not been in bed long.

Q. What reason have you for supposing you had not been long in bed? - A. I rather think it was the turn of the night.

Q. Are you sure it was moon light? - A. Yes; I saw the stars.

GUILTY , Death , aged 34.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18020428-49

314. JAMES TOWNSEND was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 26th of April , a certain order for payment of money , as follows, that is to say,

"April 26th, 1802.

"Messrs. Snow and Company,

"Pay to T. Cavendish, Esq. or Bearer, one thousand pounds, for HENRY CAVENDISH," with intent to defraud Henry Cavendish , Esq.

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third and Fourth Counts. The same as the First and Second, only charging an intention to defraud Robert Snow , William Sandby , and John-Deane Paul .

Fifth Count. For uttering and publishing as true, a like order for the payment of money, knowing it to be forged, with intention to defraud Michael Grayhurst and Susannah-Ann Grayhurst .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JAMES HARVEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Grayhurst and Company? - A. Yes, Michael and Susannah-Ann Grayhurst.

Q. Look at the gentleman at the bar, and tell us if you saw him at Mr. Grayhurst's shop on the 26th of April last? - A. I did, on Monday, this day week.

Q. Where is that shop? - A. No. 65, in the Strand.

Q. What was his business at the shop? - A. When he first came in, I was not present; I was called up to shew him the things that he asked for.

Court. Q. What sort of a shop is it? - A. A silversmith, jeweller, and watch-maker.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Did you shew him any thing? - A. I did; there were two or three articles shewn him before I came in; I was called to state the prices to him.

Q. What had you shewn him? - A. A silver tea-pot and a plated tea-urn; the next articles I shewed him were a dozen knives and forks, a dozen deserts, and a plated bread-basket; he was then asked if he would like a coffee-urn to match the tea-urn; he asked me what a coffee-urn was; I pointed to it, and shewed it him; he said he would have it; I don't know that there was any thing else; he desired me to cast up the whole of them; I did so, to the amount of thirty-nine pounds, as near as I can recollect; he was in a great hurry.

Q. Did he offer to pay you for them? - A. He doubled up a piece of paper, and walked up and down the shop; the whole of the time that he was in the shop, he appeared to me very much deranged; he appeared to stare at me very wildly several times; after I had added up the amount, and told him what it came to, he presented a piece of paper to me, solded up; he desired me to take it to where it was addressed, to bring the goods and the balance to Millington's coffee-house to Sir Thomas White; he then left the shop.

Q. You of course looked at the paper that he gave to you? - A. Yes.

Q. What was it? - A. A draft to Messrs. Snow and Company for one thousand pounds.

Court. Q.Did you look at it before he left the shop, or afterwards? - A. I looked at it before he left the shop.

Q. Look at that paper? - A.This is the same.

Q.Is there any drection upon the draft where Messrs. Snow resided? - A. No.

Q. Had you any conversation with him upon that subject? - A. No.

Q. What did you afterwards do with that draft? - A. I took it to a neighbour's, Mr. John Sommers, and desired him to present it; I told him the circumstance that I have stated before you, my Lord, and added, that I thought the person was deranged.

Q. How far does Mr. Sommers live from you? - A.Just across the street; I returned again to Mr. Grayhurst's shop.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - A. About an hour after I came back; I understood he had been there while I was gone to Mr. Som

mers's; I was called into the shop, and saw him there.

Q. Who were present then? - A. Mr. Sommers was in the shop, and James Inglish , and Mr. Paul; a conversation took place between Mr. Paul and the prisoner; he is a partner in the house of Snow and Company; some conversation had taken place before I came in; I heard the prisoner say, I supposed (to Mr. Paul,) if I told you that Mr. Cavendish gave me a thousand pound check, I mistated it; he, did not give me the thousand pound check, he gave me only a fifty pound; he then stated that a man on horseback rode after him, overtook him on the way, and gave him this thousand pound check.

Q. Did he state for what purpose he gave it him? - A. No; Mr. Paul stated to him that it was a serious circumstance, or something to that effect; Mr. Paul asked him to walk with him to the house; I imagined he meant his own house; he said, he would go with him; he said so readily; then he went away with Mr. Paul, and I saw no more of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. It struck you very early that he was deranged and wild? - A. Yes.

Q.These articles are not all plate, but several of them plated? - A. The best part of them.

Q.When it was recommended to him to have a coffee-urn, he did not know what it was? - A. No, he asked the question.

Q. I take it for granted, you were more and more convinced of his derangement? - A. Yes; then he pointed at some candlesticks, and said, I will have them.

Q.And then, with a flourish, he gave you a check for one thousand pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you looked upon it as the act of a madman, and returned the things that he had bargained for to their places? - A. Yes, there were but few of them taken out, and those were returned to their places.

Q. In fact, you did not consider that any sale had taken place of these articles? - A. No, I did not.

Q. The note was thrown down, saying, send the goods and the change to Millington's coffee-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Of course, when he went out of the shop, you looked upon him to be a madman? - A. I did.

Q.And you did not expect, when you went to Sommers, that the draft would be paid? - A. No. I never expected it would.

Q. I believe you made use of the word to Mr. Sommers, that you would have it presented for form's sake? - A. I don't know that I exactly said for form's sake; I said, it must be presented, as it was given to me.

Q. During this conversation, his manner was wild in general - here and there, there was a connected sentence? - A. Yes.

Q.And he came into the shop, I believe, about an hour afterwards? - A. Yes, the third time.

Court. Q. Did you make out any bill of these things? - A. NO.

Q. How came you to expect the draft would never be paid? - A.From the manner in which he gave it me, and the general tenor of his conduct in the shop.

Q.What was there to prevent the draft being paid - it was not a draft of his own? - A. It was a supposition of my own, which I stated to Mr. Sommers.

JAMES INGLISH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. Q. You are foreman to Messrs. Grayhurst? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner in their shop at any time? - A. Yes, on Monday last, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; the prisoner came in, and asked the price of a silver tea-pot; I was in the shop when he came in; from the manner of his behaviour in coming in, I thought it was necessary to call Mr. Harvey up, to have more assistance in the shop; there were a number of goods shewn to him, and, as the things stood in the glass, he said, what is the price of these candlesticks? as soon as he was told the price of them, he said, I will have them, without examining the articles, to see whether they were good or bad; after looking at a number of articles my attention was taken to see that he did not commit any outrage, that I did not pay much attention to the things that were picked out; I recollect the tea-urn, and the coffee urn, and the tea-pot, and several other things; after they were looked out, he desired them to be cast up; they were cast up by Mr. Harvey.

Q.Did Mr. Harvey inform him of the amount? - A. He did; he then gave him a piece of paper, which appeared to be, when it was opened, a draft of a thousand pounds upon Mr. Snow's banking-house; he ordered then the goods and the change of that draft to be brought to Millington's coffee-house; upon which he took himself away.

Q. Did he say who they were for? - A. I think he desired them to be left in the name of Townsend, in the care of Sir Thomas White; after he was gone, Mr. Harvey said, this man never intends to have the goods, let us put them away; then Mr. Harvey went out of the shop with the draft in his hand; while he was absent, the prisoner returned; he asked me if it was gone to the banker's; upon which I told him it was; he said, good God, and away he went immediately.

Q.Did you see him at any time after that? - A. Yes, an hour, or it might be two hours, I cannot say exactly the time the prisoner returned again; he asked if the draft was paid; a gentleman from

the banking house, I believe his name was Paul, was close by the prisoner at that time; upon his asking me whether the draft was paid, Mr. Sommers said, that gentleman will best inform you, which was Mr. Paul; Mr. Paul asked him how he came by the draft, and he said, that he went down to Mr. Cavendish, and he gave him a draft of 50l. and that was all he would give him; he said, that going down the road a man came galloping after him on horseback, and gave him a draft of 1000l. and he said, good God! the old gentleman is in his dotage sure.

Q. Did the prisoner say he had said this upon receiving the draft, or did he say it in the shop? -- A. He said it in the shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. If I understand you right, from the time he first came into the shop, his conduct was so strange, and he looked so, that you thought it right to call for Mr. Harvey? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you mean by that, that he stared widly? - A.He did, and walked about the shop.

Q.Was it the stare of a man out of his mind, as you judged? - A.It was, or I should not have left off serving him, and gone out of the shop for fear he should commit any outrage.

Q.And when he was gone, you so little considered this a serious bargain to a man in his right mind, that you said the things should be put in their places again? - A. I did, and they were.

Q. And many of the things that he took a fancy to, were not even taken from their places? - A. They were not removed from their places.

Q.Did you happen to hear him ask what the coffee-urn meant? - A. I did, which struck me more that he was mad; I shewed him nothing after the tea-pot, for he walked up and down in that agitation, that it appeared clear to me the man was mad, and I went to the door for fear he should commit any outrage; I don't suppose the whole time of his being there was more than six minutes.

Q. From the whole of his demeanor, were you not satisfied that he was out of his senses? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.You did not know the reason why the note was not given back to him? - A. NO.

JOHN SOMMERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. A tailor, in the Strand.

Q.On Friday, the 26th of April, did James Harvey deliver to you a draft to take to Snow's banking-house? - A. Yes, he did.

Court. (To Harvey.) What reason had you to employ Sommers to go with this draft? - A. Mr. Grayhurst was out of town, and he has often employed Mr. Sommers, when he has been in town, to present a bill for him, or any thing of that kind.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Sommers.) Q. Is that the draft you were employed by Harvey to take to Mr. Snow's banking-house? - A. The same.

Q. Did you present it for payment? - A. I did.

Q.Was it paid or refused? - A. It was refused and stopped.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at all before you had presented it? - A. I did not at all, to my knowledge; I was at Mr. Grayhurst's shop when the prisoner came in, and Mr. Paul followed him.

Q.Did the prisoner say any thing when he came in? - A.When he came in he asked, with a very quick voice, and a vacant look, if the note was paid.

Q. How did he know you had any thing to do with the note? - A. He did not know any thing at all about it; I was sitting in the middle of the shop, and he might suppose I belonged to it; I at that time saw Mr. Paul coming to the door; I told him, that gentleman, now coming in, would give him every satisfaction; I immediately addressed myself to Mr. Paul, and said, this is the gentleman, sir.

Q.You had not seen him yourself before? - A. No.

Q. Therefore, your saying this is the gentleman, was merely supposition? - A.From the description I had had of him, I knew he was the man; Mr. Paul immediately took the prisoner again, and entered into conversation with him; Mr. Paul prefaced his observation, by saying, it was a delicate and unpleasant business, for the draft that was sent to the house that morning, was suspected to be a forgery; to the best of my recollection, Mr. Paul asked him if he had the draft from Mr. Cavendish; the prisoner immediately answered, yes; but in a moment, he asked Mr. Paul, did I say I had it from Mr. Cavendish, I beg leave to correct that, for I had only fifty pounds of Mr. Cavendish; says he, upon my way back, on some common, which he mentioned, I don't recollect what common, I was overtaken by a man on horseback, who gave me a 1000l. draft, he said, good God, the old gentleman is in his dotage, sure.

Q. Was that reflection made, as applied to Mr. Cavendish, giving him a draft upon the common? - A. I understood him so; Mr. Paul then asked him for his address, he immediately took a card out of his pocket, and under the printed words of his name, he wrote his address; the prisoner observed, that as the note was stopped, the business had better rest there; that he approved of Mr. Paul's precaution in stopping the draft, if he was not satisfied. Mr. Paul said, then I dare say you will have no objection to go to the house, meaning their banking-house; the prisoner immediately consented; I followed him all the way up, and saw him safe into the banking-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Curiosity took

you over to see if the man was come back? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were the person that he addressed? - A. Yes.

Q. And while the conversation was going on between Mr. Paul and him, he heartily approved of what Mr. Paul had done? - A. He did.

HENRY GUBBING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a clerk in the banking-house of Messrs. Snow and Co.? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect a draft being presented at your house, by a person of the name of Sommers? - A. Yes.

Q. Does Mr. Cavendish keep cash at your master's house? - A. He does.

Q. Had he at that time to the amount of 1000l. at your house? - A. I dare say he had.

Q. Is that the writing of Mr. Cavendish? - A. I think not.

Q.Have you any doubt that it is not his handwriting? - A. I don't believe it is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Did you ever see Mr. Cavendish write? - A. I don't remember to have seen him write.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You have been in the habit of paying his drafts? - A. I have.

Q. For how long? - A.Upwards of twelve months.

Mr. Fielding. Q. What Mr. Cavendish are you speaking of? - A. The Hon. Mr. Henry Cavendish .

Q. Look at that draft, and tell me if it was paid at your house the same day as the draft of Mr. Cavendish? - A. This draft was paid the following day.

Q. Do you believe that to be Mr. Cavendish's hand-writing? - A. I do; it is a sort of handwriting that I have been used to.

Q.Before the draft for 1000l. was presented at your house, did you see the gentleman at the bar? - A. Yes, about ten minutes before.

Q. Relate exactly and minutely all that passed between you and him before the 1000l. note was presented? - A. He came into the house, and enquired whether a draft of 1000l. had been presented for payment.

Q. Did he mention whose draft for 1000l.? - A. I enquired of him whose draft for 1000l. and he replied Mr. Henry Cavendish's; he then went out.

Q. Did you take any means to satisfy him whether it was or not? - A. He did not give me time, he went away immediately.

Q. Then you did not tell him whether the draft had been paid or not? - A. I told him no, it had not been presented, and then he went out.

Q. Did you tell him that of your own recollection, or did you refer to the book to ascertain? - A. Yes, I referred to the book; he came in the second time, and did not speak, but sat down on a stool by the sine of the counter, and pulled off his hat, wiped his face, and seemed agitated; then he got up and went out; I had not missed him from the counter a minute, I dare say, before the draft arrived.

Q. Did you afterwards receive that paper? - A. Yes I did.

Q. How soon after the draft had been presented did that paper come? - A. About three minutes after the 1000l. draft was brought in.

Q.Did you know who brought it? - A. I don't know his name, the man who keeps a small shop.

Q. Is it Williams, who keeps the chandler's shop in Devereux-court? - A.It is his son I believe.

Q. Did you see the prisoner again afterwards? - A. Yes, I saw him come into the house with Mr. Paul.

Q. Did you hear what passed after he returned with Mr. Paul? - A. NO, I did not; a constable was sent for and he was secured.

Cross examined by Mr. Raine. Q. The second time that this gentleman came into your shop, he sat down, wiped his face, and seemed in a state of agitation? - A. Yes.

Q. And went out again without enquiring after this or any thing else? - A. Yes.

Q. That appeared strange to you, did it not? - A.It looked odd certainly.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you at all expect that the person who came there was at all deranged? - A. I had not time to form an opinion, he was there so short a time.

Court. Q. What did he first ask you? - A.Whether a draft of 1000l. had been presented.

Q. Had you given him any answer before you enquired whose draft he meant? - A.No, he had got the door in his hand when I asked him whose draft he meant, and he said Henry Cavendish.

Q. Had you asked him that before he had the door in his hand to go out? - A. That was the only enquiry he made; whether a draft had been presented of a 1000l. I asked whose draft, he said Mr. Henry Cavendish's.

Q. Then you had given him no answer before you asked him whose draft? - A. No, I had not: I reserved to my book and said no; it was then that he had the door in his hand and went out.

JOHN DEAN PAUL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a partner in the house of Messrs. Snow and Company.

Q. What is the firm? - A. Robert Snow , William Sand by, and John Dean Paul .

Q. Do you recollect on Monday last a draft for 1000l. being presented at your house, by a person of the name of Sommers? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that? - A. This is the draft.

Q. Had you property to that amount, in your house, belonging to Mr. Cavendish? - A. I had.

Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Henry Cavendish's hand-writing? - A. I am.

Q. Is that his hand-writing? - A. I believe it not to be his hand-writing.

Q. I believe, in consequence of some conversation you had with Sommers, you stopped payment? - A.Mr. Gubbins came to me with this draft, to ask me if I thought it was Mr. Cavendish's hand, and whether I would have it paid, I told him I thought it was not his writing, and I would not have it paid.

Q. The paper you now have in your hand is a draft for 50l.? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that his hand-writing? - A. Yes, I believe it is.

Q. Did you pay that? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. I will just take the liberty, for form sake, of asking did you ever see Mr. Cavendish write? - A. I have seen him write often.

Mr. Jackson. Q. After you had stopped payment of the draft of 1000l. what then? - A. At the moment I was questioning Sommers, a boy brought in the paper which I have in my hand.

Q.In consequence of what the boy stated to you, where did you go? - A. I first went to Mr. Grayhurst's shop, in order to ascertain that that was the person who brought the draft, I then went to Bow-street to consult with Townsend, and then I went home.

Q. In consequence of what the boy had told you did you go to Devereaux-court? - A. I did sometime after.

Q. How soon after? - A. I should suppose rather more than an hour; I went into a chandler's shop in Devereaux-court, and there I saw the prisoner at the bar conversing with a woman, who seemed to keep the shop; from his conversation with the woman, I conceived he might be the man in question; I asked the woman if the boy was within who had brought a note to our house, upon which the prisoner left the shop.

Q. How close was he to you at the time? - A. Quite close; it is a very small shop; I followed the prisoner.

Q. Had the woman made you an answer whether the boy was within or not? - A. She said the boy was not within, and then the prisoner left the shop; I followed him and kept him in fight, and I fancied he saw I observed him; I still followed him; he crossed the way, as wishing rather to avoid me; he then passed up between the New-Church, in the Strand; I still followed him; he soon after stopped and looked in at a print shop; I did the same, until he went on again; he soon after turned into Mr. Grayhurst's shop, which confirmed me in the belief that he was the man I wanted.

Q. Did you follow him into the shop? - A. I did; upon coming into the shop, I found him conversing with persons in the shop, and asking why the draft was not paid, upon which, one of Mr. Grayhurst's people seeing me come in, said, here is the gentleman who will tell you why it is not paid; upon which I said, to the prisoner, there are some suspicious circumstances about this draft that I shall be glad to have explained; I said, considering him as a gentleman, I wished he would sit down, and let me converse with him upon the subject; he said readily, I will give you any information in my power, upon which we both fat down in the shop; I said, will you be so good, Sir, as to tell me how you came in possession of this draft? he said, I was sent by the Duke of Devonshire to his cousin Mr. Henry Cavendish, for the purpose of soliciting relief for Mr. J. Cavendish, a prisoner in the Fleet, which is the name the draft is made payable to; he stated that Mr. Cavendish gave him two drafts, one for 1000l. and one for 50l. that the 50l. he had paid into his bankers, Messrs. Biddulph and Cocks, and the 1000l. was the note in question; very soon after this he corrected himself and said, I mistated to you that I got the 1000l. from Mr. Cavendish, I only got 50l. from Mr. Cavendish, a man on horse back came gallopping after me, whom I do not know, and said Mr. Cavendish has relented, and sent 1000l. more; upon which he took up his hat and was preparing to go away; he said, I am not in want of money, when you have satisfied yourself of the truth of the draft, I conclude you will pay it; he was preparing to go away, I felt determined he should not go away without being further questioned, I then asked him if he would be so good as to go with me to the banking house, and enable himself to judge of our reasons for refusing it; to this he readily consented; we went together from Mr. Grayhurst's to the banking-house, and in going along conversed on many subjects, particularly as to Mr. Cavendish's habits of life, in which conversation he was perfectly clear; he gave me an account of Mr. Cavendish and his habits, which led me to conclude he knew something of him; he also told me some of the particulars of the causes of the imprisonment of Mr. Cavendish, who is in the steet, by which time we got to the banking-house, I put him into the back room, and told him I must be under the necessity of detaining him; I sent for a constable, and then for a Bow-street officer; he said it was very inconvenient to him to be detained there; he had business in the city which would suffer by his absence, and requested I would let him go; he was then taken to Bow-street, and there left.

Q.During the whole of your interview with him, from the time yousaw him in Deverea uxcourt till you left him at Bow-street, did it ever occur to your mind, that, from his general department, he was a man labouring under any derange

ment of mind? - A. No, certainly not, on the contrary I thought his general deportment that of an innocent man, or rather of a man who made himself appear innocent.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. After he had told you he had received them both from Mr. Caveadish, he corrected himself? - A. Yes.

Q. When you went home from Mr. Grayhurst's shop, he entored familiarly and reasonably into a full conversation with respect to Mr. Cavendish, and the young man in the Fleet? - A. I led him into conversation to amuse him as we past along, to find how far he was acquainted with the family.

Q.And he communicated his knowledge of the family without any reserve? - A. Yes, and with a great appearance of innocence, as I thought.(The thousand pound draft read.)

RICHARD WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. Q. Where do you live? - A. In Devereaux-court.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. Four or five years, or longer.

Q.Was he at your shop on Monday last? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Was it your shop, or your mother's? - A. My father's.

Q. Were you there when he came in? - A. Yes; he asked for a pen and ink, and a piece of paper, which I gave him, and he wrote some lines.

Q. Look at that paper? - A. That is the paper; he desired me to take it up to Mr. Denne's, the banker's; I took it, and left it there.

Q. Did the prisoner say for what purpose you were to carry the note? - A. He desired me to stop the note from being paid, for he had sufficient cash in his hand to pay it.

Q. Did he say any thing more to you? - A. No.

Q. Did you see him afterwards? - A. No; he seemed to be in a great flurry when he gave it me, in great haste.(The note read:)

"Sir, April 26th, 1802.

"Please to return the check to the bearer, as I have sufficient cash at home to pay you. J. TOWNSEND."

Mr. Fielding. Q. And that you were to carry to Mr. Denne's? - A. Yes.

SARAH WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you serve in your fatehr's shop, in Devereaux-court? - A. Yes.

Q. How old are you? - A.Fourteen.

Q. Do you know Mr. Townsend? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. Not long.

Q. Did you see him in your shop last Monday? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in the shop when he first came in? - A. Yes; when he first came in, he asked me, is he come back, is he come back, is he come back, three times.

Q. Had any body gone out of your shop, to your knowledge? - A. No.

Q. What did you say to him? - A. I told him I did not know any thing at all about it; he asked me if he had got the note.

Q. Did he explain to you who he meant? - A. No.

Q. What did you say to that? - A. I did not say any thing; then he went away.

Q. Did you see Mr. Paul? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come into your shop? - A. Yes, just at the time Mr. Townsend came in.

Q. Was he near enough to hear Mr. Townsend ask you this question? - A. Yes, and when Mr. Townsend went out, Mr. Paul went after him.

Court. Q.(To Richard Williams .) Did he tell you who that paper was to be delivered to? - A. No, but that I was to take it to Mr. Denne's, the banker's.

AARON GRAHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were one of the Magistrates of Bow-street when this gentleman was brought there? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the examination signed by him? - A. It was written by me, and signed by him in my presence.

Q. Were the contents read over to him before he signed it? - A. I read it over to him myself, and asked him if he perfectly understood it, and whether he had any objection to sign it; he said, he perfectly understood it, that it was true, and therefore he could have no objection to sign it.

Q. Had you, at that time, the least suspicion that he was a man who had not his inte lects about him? - A. There was one part particularly; that, in which he says, Mr. Chesterman overtook him upon the road, and delivered the note to him; to which I called his particular attention, stating to him, that the truth or salsehood of tha would be so easily proved, as he assured me he knew Mr. Chesterman, and there was extreme danger in admitting such a knowledge of the gentleman, unless it was true that he actually did know him, and delivered to him the note; but he was so consident, and behaved in such a manner, that convinced me the impression was strong on his mind that the fact had really taken place the preceding day, and therefore I really did believe that he actually was in a deranged state, for that reason.

Q. That was the only reason for your thinking so? - A. No; he afterwards walked about the room singing and whistling, shewing evident signs beyond what I have now stated of a deranged mind, or such a degree of insanity as to throw one off one's guard, and make one believe he was innocent.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. If I under

stand you right, your notion was, that he was at that time acting, as is very common for a madman, under mistaken impressions? - A. Yes.(The examination of the prisoner at Bow-street, read:)

" James Townsend , of Bedford-row, Bloomsbury, says, that yesterday morning, the Duke of Devonshire sent him to his cousin, Mr. Henry Cavendish , of Clapham, to request he would send fifty pounds for the relief of his kinsman, Mr James Cavendish , a prisoner in the Fleet. Mr. H. Cavendish gave the prisoner fifty pounds, saying, he would not advance another farthing for Mr. J. Cavendish; the prisoner was riding home across Clapham-common, where he was overtaken by a welldressed man, calling himself Ch sterman, who was well known to the prisoner, and who said Mr. H. Cavendish had relented, and sent an additional thousand pounds for his kinsman, and delivered the draft in question to the prisoner, which he sent this morning by a person belonging to Mr. Grayhurst's shop, where he had purchased forty pounds worth of goods, which were to he paid for out of the note; the prisoner defined Mr. Grayhurst to send the plate to Sir Thomas White , at Millington's coffee house, Holborn."

JAMES CAVENDISH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Mr. Townsend? - A. I have known him since the middle of last April; he was recommended to me as a man of honour.

Q. Had he, to your knowledge, or by your authority, made any applications for pecuniary assistance among your friends? - A. He had.

Q.Were you aware, before the Monday on which this business happened, of any intended application by him to Mr. Cavendish, of Clapham? - A. Yes, I did, in consequence of a letter I received from the Duke of Devonshire.

Q.Were you aware, from any thing the prisoner had told you, that he meant to make application to Mr. Cavendish, of Clapham? - A. He told me some days before that he had made an application to him.

Q. Did you see him on Monday morning, the 26th of April? - A. I did, about eleven o'clock, or between eleven and twelve.

Q. Tell us what conversation happened respecting this business of Mr. Cavendish? - A. I asked him if he had obtained any money from Mr. Cavendish, and he said he had not received any money from Mr. Cavendish, but Mr. Cavendish does not say but what he will assist you at a future time.

Q. At the time that you saw him on the Monday, did his manner at all strike you as being particular? - A. He seemed to be in a great hurry, as he generally was when he came to me.

Q. Was that all that struck you on that day? - A. Nothing more; I had been accustomed to see him conduct himself in that way, always in a great hurry, and wishing to get away.

Q. Had you any suspicion of his being incapable of doing business from derangement? - A. If I had suspected him to be incapable, I should not have taken the liberty of sending him with a letter to the Duke of Devonshire.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. I take it, unless you had supposed he was in his right mind, you would not have commissioned him to apply to any of your relations? - A.Certainly not; he was recommended to me, in a very strong manner, as a man of humanity and honour.

Q. It was not from any accidental intimacy between you and him, but from the recommendation of other? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it by the recommendation of one, or two, or three? - A. By the recommendation of one.

Q. His constant way was to be in a hurry? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM HARE sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Biddulph and Cocks.

Q. Did Mr. Townsend keep cash at that house? - A.Yes, he has for several years.

Q. Look at that draft for fifty-pounds - was that paid in by the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, it was on Monday, the 26th of April.

Q. How early in that day? - A.About eleven o'clock, just in the bustle of the day.

Q. Did he leave it with you, or did he leave any cash? - A. I paid him five pounds, the other forty-five pounds was placed to the credit of his account.

Q.Did you observe any thing particular at that time more than at any other time? - A. Not that day particularly, but at other times latterly I have; he has been particularly enervated; his hands shook a great deal.

Q.From his behaviour, had you any idea that he was deranged at all in his intellects? - A. I cannot say my observation went so far as that.

Q. That draft was afterwards honoured at Mr. Cavendish's bankers? - A. Yes.(The draft on Messrs. Biddulph and Cocks read:)

Mr. Fielding. Q. The draft was paid into your house? - A. It was.

Q.You have observed of late years an alteration in this unhappy man? - A. Not much of late years, but within two or three months different from what I observed before.

Prisoner. Having the honour to be in the hands of gentlemen of such dishinguished talents, I should deem it extreme arrogance to say any thing in my own behalf.

For the prisoner.

The MARQUIS of TOWNSEND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. I believe the unhappy man at the bar had the honour of being known to your Lordship? - A. Many years.

Q.Has your Lordship observed any recent con

duct in him from which you considered him as deranged? - A.Certainly: On Saturday, the 17th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock, Mr. Townsend, with another person, was shewn into the room where I was, and there seemed a strange wildness in his manner; he came in a hurry, and in a very wild manner; I told him I was going out of town, but asked him to have some refreshment, which he accepted, and I left him; I thought his conduct very extraordinary and different from his usual manner.

Mr. JOSEPH HIGGINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You are a merchant? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you were acquainted with the gentleman at the bar for many years? - A. For many years; we were at College together.

Q. What were his habits of life - polished or otherwise? - A. A man of education, accustomed to fashionable society, and perfectly discreet in his demeanor: On Sunday, the 18th of last month, I went to dine with the Rev. Mr. Maule, who is chaplain to Greenwich Hospital, and we were sitting after dinner, Mrs. Higginson, Mr. Maule's family, and I; when, about five or six o'clock, Mr. Townsend entered the room, much to my surprise, as I knew he had not been invited, and was scarcely known to the family; and his manner surprised me still more, for, without addressing himself particularly to any of the company, or apologising for his extraordinary intrusion, he laid hold of a small table, which stood in a corner of the room, pushed it forward, set down, and said he would dine there; Mrs. Maule expressed her concern that the dinner had been removed some time, and, being neither hot or cold, it would be unpleasant, but said, there was cold meat in the house; he answered, in a hurried manner, that that would do, but that he must have potatoes; the servant was desired to bring up the cold meat and potatoes, but on returning with the cold meat, he said there were no potatoes; on which Mr. Townsend surprised me, by desiring him to go to the Sceptre tavern for some; I expostulated upon the impropriety of giving such trouble, upon which he made use of an oath, saying, d - n it, I have credit there, let them charge it to my account, or I will pay for it. In the interval, before dinner was brought up, Mr. Townsend had some conversation about our friends at Bath, which appeared incoherent; he said, he had just returned from Bath, and had been overturned in a gig at Reading, and bled five times, which led to the conversation, and his answers appeared very unsatisfactory and incoherent; when the ladies departed to the drawing-room, to whom he was very inattentive when present, he still surprised and mortified me by the indelicacy of his conversation with Mr. Maule, a respectable clergyman, with whom he was scarcely acquianted; I had never observed such conduct in him before; his conduct was so eccentric, so extravagant, and so wild, that I considered him under temporary derangement, or that it must be the effect of continued intoxication; I took him in my carriage part of the way home, when he left me. The next morning he called upon me, when his conduct was very unusual and extraordinary, for, when he came into the room, he neither inquired how we got home or any other circumstance; then he looked at the tea-table, and expressed a wish to have such a tea equipage; and, among other things, he told me that the Duke of Devonshire was to bring him into Parliament, and that he expected to get the agency or receivership of his Grace's rents, so that he expected they would produce him a thousand pounds in the course of the year. I then began to think him an object sit to be confined, which idea was corroborated by what I heard; and I even consulted my friend, Dr. Hamilton, and eminent physician, on the subject: On Friday I saw him again; Mrs. Higginson had asked me permission to give orders to the servants to deny him, on account of his wild manner, and accordingly had been denied on the Thursday, but on Friday I was called down, and found him there; he addressed me in a very abrupt manner, desiring me to write to my friend, Sir Michael Smith , Master of the Rolls in Ireland, or to Judge Chambre, and several others of rank at the bar, who he knew I was intimate with, to speak to Lord Redesdale, to procure him a commissioner of bankrupts appointment in Ireland. I knew he was settled in England, and had left the Irish bar several years; I expostulated upon the absurdity of such an idea, and he said, he could attend to the duties of his office, and still live in England, which confirmed the suspicions I had he was deranged; and, on Monday, the 26th, I made application to Mr. O'Brien; I did not know any of his relations in England, and not withing to take upon myself the responsibility of confining him, I went to Mr. O'Brien's house, but he not being at home, I left a card, informing him I had called respecting a mutual friend, but that the subject was of too delicate a nature to state on paper, and therefore requested an interview with him as soon as he could favour me with it, or words to that effect; I did not receive any answer from him till Tuesday night, and on the following morning I waited on him, and then, for the first time, to my astonishment, learnt he was confined upon a charge of forgery.

Mr. HUGH BELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. I believe you are a merchant, and in partnership with Mr. Higginson? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the unhappy gentleman? - A. Yes, several years.

Q.Having been acquainted with his demeanor and conduct, have you observed any great alteration of late? - A. Yes, the most striking has not

been longer than ten days; he called on Mr. Higginson on Thursday was a week, and begged I would tell him to write to Sir Michael Smith , to write to Lord Eldon, to write to Lord Redesdale, to get him a place of commissioner of hankrupts; his manner was so wild and incoherent, it confirmed me he was insane, and I urged my partner to take some sleps towards getting him confined. Mr. Townsend called on the Sunday morning, and then his behaviour was wild and incoherent; he told me he was going to Elstree to visit Mr. O'Connol's family, and, from the state of his mind, as it appeared to me. I lamented very much that he should think of going there at all.

Mr. THOMAS POOLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You are an attorney? - A. Yes, and have known Mr. Townsend two or three years.

Q. Have you, of late, observed any alteration in his conduct? - A. Yes; last Wednesday week he called upon me in Serjeant's Inn, and came into the room in a very volatile and particular manner - in a very hurried manner, and said he wanted 30,000l. upon an estate, that a receiver was to be appointed, and then he was going out of the room again; I called him back, and laughed at his request, it being so ridiculous, and asked him where he was going? he said, he was going to Hampstead; I asked him if he would go with me to Hornsey, which he did. Going along, he talked of having taken a house at Camberwell, and that he was about to be married to a lady of large fortune, and many other extraordinary subjects of conversation; when we got to Hornsey, he in an unusual manner, set himself down, with his knees close to the fire, and asked what we had for dinner. and said he must have some cold roast bees and potatoes, which we had not; he found fault with the fallad, and otherwise conducted himself in a way that struck me with astonishment; the next day, when he was going away, he walked off with a favourite dog, and went on so as to induce me, at the time, to declare I was sure he was out of his mind, and that I would go after him, which I did, and got the dog back; the whole of his conversation was so indecorous, indecent, and unlike what it ever was before, that I was convinced he was out of his mind, and, upon coming to town, I communicated it to Mr. Higginson the next morning.

Mr. RODERICK O'CONNOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q.Did you see that unfortunate man at your mother's on the 17th of April? - A. Yes, and on the 24th, when I thought his conduct very odd to what it was before; he asked my mother for a piece of beef that lay on the table, to take home with him in his gig, wrapped up in a napkin; he told my mother he would pray for her all the days of his life, if she would let him take the piece of beef away with him, which he did, but before he went, he invited himself to dinner the next day, and said, he would come at three o'clock, and we might dine at any time we liked; on Sunday he came after we had all dined, and he sent me into the other room to see if there was a fire, for he was very cold; the fire had been just lit, and he told my mother to come and make it up, and bring the bellows to blow it; I hardly knew what to think of his conduct.

NOT GUILTY .

Mr. Recorder. Q.Gentlemen of the Jury, I am directed by the Act of Parliament to ask, whether you acquit the prisoner upon the ground of his being insane at the time of committing the offence? - A. On that ground alone.

Mr. Recorder. Then the order of the Court is, that the prisoner be kept in strict custody in Newgate, till his Majesty's pleasure be known .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson ;

Reference Number: t18020428-50

315. JOHN FENNELL was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 12th of March , a Banknote , the tenor of which is as follows.

"No. 8612. No. 8612.

"18 Dec. 1801.

"I promise to pay to Mr. Abraham Newland, or beater, on demand, the sum of Five Pounds.

"London, the 18th day of Dec. 1801,

"For the Governor and Company of the

"BANK of ENGLAND.

"Ent E. LAMPERT. W. JOHNSON."

With intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged and counterfeit Banknote, as and for a true Bank-note, knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited, with the like intent.

Third Count. For feloniously forging and counterfeiting a promissory note for the payment of five pounds, with the like intent.(The indictment was opened by Mr. Giles, and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

SUSAN SIDDONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Were you at either of the theatres in March last? - A. Yes; I was at Covent-garden theatre on the 12th of March.

Q. Were you there accosted by a man whom you have since understood to be a man of the name of Gillington? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he accompany you home to your lodgings? - A. Yes.

Q.When he came there, did he give you or your servant any thing? - A. He gave in my presence a five-pound note to my servant, Phoebe Pavey , to get a bottle of wine.

Q. Did the servant go out, and return with the note? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any application, did the person who gave it write any thing upon the note? - A. Yes; he indorsed it in my presence.

Q.Look if that is the note that was given by him? - A. Yes; this is the note; he wrote upon it, G. Williams.

Q. You have seen Gillington since at the Magistrate's? - A. Yes.

Q. You have no doubt of his being the person? - A. No; I have sworn to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I take it for granted, you can read and write? - A. No; I can't.

PHCBE PAVEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You was servant to Miss Siddons in March last? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a person coming home with her from the theatre? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he give you any thing to get a bottle of wine from Mr. Belcher's? - A. Yes, a five-pound note.

Q. Did you return with it? - A. Yes; Mr. Belcher desired me to bring it back, and ask the gentleman to indorse it.

Q. Did you see him write upon it? - A.No, I did not.

Q. Mrs. Freeman is your mistress's landlady? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you shew it to her? - A. Yes; she put her name upon it.

Q. You are quite sure the note, upon which Mrs. Freeman put her name, is the same that the gentleman gave to you to carry to Mr. Belcher's? - A. I am quite sure of it.

Q. Have you seen the gentleman since? - A. I think I have.

Q. Is that the person that calls himself Gillington? - A. I think so.

MARY FREEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You live in Denmark-court in the Strand? - A. Yes.

Q. Did this young woman lodge at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Phoebe Pavey bring you any five-pound note for you to write your name upon? - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose you did not see the visitor to your lodger? - A. No.

Court. Q. Do you recollect the day? - A. It was the 12th of March.

Mr. Garrow. Q. You wrote the date upon it? - A. Yes.

JAMES GILLINGTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. What are you? - A. An upholsterer.

Q. What countryman are you? - A. An Irishman.

Q. What time did you come to England? - A.In November, 1799.

Q. Did you accompany a young woman from the theatre on the 12th of March - a Miss Siddons? - A. I did.

Q.Look at that Bank-note; did you give her a Bank-note? - A. I gave her this.

Court. Q. You accompanied her to what place? - A.To her lodgings in Denmark-court.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Did you know at that time what sort of a note you had put into her hands? - A. I knew it was a forged note.

Q. How came you by that note? - A. I got it from John Fennell, the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Where did you get it from him? - A. In the Strand.

Q. Where there? - A. At a tavern there.

Q. How long before? - A.About an hour.

Q. What tavern was it? - A. Near Charing-cross, on the left-hand side.

Q. You knew it to be a forged note at that time? - A. I did.

Q.Did you know who forged it? - A. I have no doubt but it was he forged it.

Q. What reason had you to think he was the person who forged the note? - A. Because I have seen him forge notes, and I have got many from him.

Q.Did you get any more than this note from him at the tavern in the Strand? - A. No; only that.

Q.You say you have got many from him, and you have seen him forging them - where was it you have seen him forging them? - A. In Weston-street, Pentonville, and at other places.

Q.Describe the house? - A. No. 16.

Q. Was that a house that he kept, or had he a lodging there? - A. He and I had the house between us.

Q. How long before this was it that you had seen him forging them? - A. About a fortnight or three weeks.

Q. In what manner was it that you saw him forging the notes? - A. I saw him put the watermark in the paper.

Q. Upon any other parts of the note did you see him at work? - A. I saw him printing them.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner at the bar? - A. Since the year 1795.

Q. Have you been intimately acquainted with him for the last two years? - A.Intirely, in forging Bank-notes.

Q. I did not ask you that; have you been intimate with him for the last two years? - A. Yes.

Q.How long have you lived together in this house in Pentonville? - A. Since the latter end of September last.

Q.What people inhabited the house with you? - A. Two women more.

Q.By what name? - A. One, Betsey Evans, and the other, Mary- Ann Powell .

Q. Were they living with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Which of the young women lived with him? - A.Betsey Evans.

Q.Married? - A.Not married.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. Yes.

Q. Then your wives did not live with you, but these two young women? - A. Yes.

Q.What has become of your wives? - A. I don't know where mine is.

Q.Have you ever seen the wife of the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, very often.

Q.Where was she? - A.She was at Bristol some time back.

Q.Did you ever see her at the house at Pentonville? - A.Never.

Q. Did you ever see her at Bristol? - A. Yes, I did, very often.

Q. Did the prisoner live with her at Bristol? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where he became acquainted with the young woman of the name of Evans? - A. At Bristol.

Q. Was his wife living there at that time? - A. Yes; in the same house.

Q. Where did you become acquainted with the young woman who lived with you? - A. At Bristol.

Q.Where were you apprehended? - A. At Liverpool, at the Post-office.

Q. He was apprehended at the same time? - A. Yes.

Q. You were taken before the Mayor, and were committed to prison? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. When were you apprehended? - A. I believe, about the 20th of March.

Q.In company together? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. Q.Whereabouts in Liverpool was it? - A. At the Post-office.

Q. What did you go to the Post-office for? - A. To get letters from the girls at Pentonville.

Q. What did you go to Liverpool for? - A. I went to meet my wife.

Q. Any other business? - A. No other business particular.

Q.Were you and the prisoner afterwards committed to the same prison? - A. I asked him if there were any forged notes found upon him; for two hours before that he did not speak at all; he never spoke when he was examined before the Mayor; then he opened his mouth, and took out a parcel of Bank-notes, which he had conveyed from his pocket, while the officer was handcuffing him and me.

Q. How many were there? - A. He told me, sixteen.

Q. Did he say of what description they were, as to the sum? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What became of them? - A. He put them into his mouth, chewed, and swallowed them.

Q. Was there any other conversation with respect to that circumstance between you and the prisoner? - A. Nothing; only that he considered it very fortunate.

Q.Whereabouts had you lived while he, was at Liverpool? - A. At a public-house.

Q. Do you know what things there were left in your apartments at the public-house before the time when you were apprehended? - A.Nothing, but my clothes, and wearing apparel.

Q. Do you know what the goods were that he had? - A. He did not live with me.

Q. Where did he live? - A. In Williamson-street.

Q.Whereabouts in Williamson-street? - A. I don't know the number.

Q. Were you acquainted with other men who were of your party? - A. Yes.

Q. How many intimate acquaintances do you know with whom you were equally acquainted with the prisoner at the bar? - A. Two.

Q. Give me their names? - A.Matthew Power, and Richard Bourne .

Q. Having told me you had seen him forging, were you present when any other person had seen him at work? - A. Yes; Betsey Evans has seen him at every part of the business, putting in the water-mark, and filling it up.

Q.Did the other girl? - A. Not in my presence; Betsey Evans was sitting at work at the same table.

Q.Do you know any brother of his? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where he lived? - A. I believe, latterly, at Back-hill.

Q. You have seen him frequently with his brother? - A.Not often.

Q. What trade is he - do you know? - A. A carpenter.

Q. Now I would ask you to tell my Lord, according to the best of your memory, any of the implements you had seen him at work with, in Weston-street, Pentonville, and describe, as accurately as you can, the whole of them? - A. He had a piece of copper, one side of which was engraved for a one-pound note, and on the other side was raised letters, with the words "Bank of England," and a border all round, with a large flousirh.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge, or from having been told the circumstance by the prisoner at the bar, what became of the implements you saw at Pentonville? - A. He told me he had left them all with his brother.

Q.Did he tell you at what time he had left them with his brother? - A. About February last.

Q. How long was that before you went out of town to Liverpool? - A. Not long; about a fortnight.

Q.What conversation, if any, have you had with him, either before that time or since, respecting these instruments? - A. He told me that, the day his wife came to town from Liverpool.

Q.Had his wife been with him at Liverpool? - A. Yes, she went from London with him; he told the his wife had been to his brother, that the press was burnt, and that he, his brother, had thrown the plates over blackfriars-bridge.

Q. Go on, and tell me every thing he communicated to you? - A. That is all the conversation that I recollect we had, about these things.

Court. Q. Was there a press used? - A. Yes.

Q. Where? - A. At Weston-street.

Q. For what purpose? - A. For printing Banknotes.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Had you ever seen a press used by him at Weston-street? - A. Very often.

Q. In what manner was it used? - A.The bottom part of it was a board, about twelve inches long, and six inches broad; there were two pieces about ten or twelve inches long, one let into each end of the bottom, and a brace that went on the top, and in each of these places were two holes, into which two rollers were let in.

Q. So that you had it from himself, that all the implements and tools were left with the brother? - A. Yes.

Q. And you had it from himself, that his wife went to the brother to get these things? - A. Yes.

Q. And that the plates were thrown over the bridge? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen, at any other place, at any other time, any implements like that that you saw him using? - A. I have seen another kind of a press the same as that.

Q.Where? - A. In Wardour-street, and in Dean-street; I am certain I did not see the same there.

Q.When you left Liverpool, how were you disposed of? - A. We were brought first of all to Old-street, and from that to Cold-Bath-fields, where I have remained ever since.

Q. Put into separate confinement? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you not seen each other since that time till now? - A. Yes, in prison, very often.

Q. While you were separated, did you receive any letters from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know his writing? - A. I do.

Court. Q. How many letters did you receive from him? - A. Two, I received them from him at separate times.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Point out to me which you received first, and where it was you received them? - A.This is the first. (Pointing to it).

Q. In what prison was he at that time? - A. In cold-Bath-fields; we were brought there.

Court. Q. I thought you were separate? - A. We were separate in the prison.

Q.You had an opportunity of speaking to each other? - A. Not long at a time.

Q.Were you separately or together, at Bow-street? - A.Separately.

Q.Was he present when you had your examination before the Magistrate? - A. He was in the house, but not in the same room.

Q.Was he present at Bow-street when you made your confession? - A. No.

Court. Q.When was it you was examined and made your confession? - A. I think it was the 29th of March that we came to town, and on the Tuesday following I gave evidence.

Q. How long had you given evidence before you received that letter? - A. I believe about a fortnight.

Q.Having had all this time to reflect upon the dreadful situation of the prisoner himself, and of your own situation, you have disclosed to the Solicitor of the Bank, and to the Magistrates, all that you know? - A. I have, to the best of my recollection.

Q.Let me exhort you to consider where you stand, and tell me if it is true, as far as you have related, that the prisoner was so concerned? - A. Every thing I have said is true.

Q. You are aware you have called God to witness the truth of what you have said; and also, of the dreadful situation of that man? - A. I am.

Q. Let me call your attention back again to Weston street; all the implements that were made use of there, you learnt from him, were destroyed? - A. Yes.

Q. What notes were struck off from any of the implements that he had at Weston-street when you saw him at work - what sums? - A. Five pound notes; nothing else at Weston-street.

Q. And after this it was, that you received from him this five pound note that you gave to Miss Siddons? - A. Yes.(Two letters from the prisoner to Gillington, read as follows:)"My Dear Gillington,"I have seriously considered my situation, and how I stand for mercy at their hands if I do not exert myself in time; for by lying by dormant, and saying nothing, would never get me off; therefore it is the best to take advantage of what little time there is left, to persuade them to accept of my plan, and so soften them to save my life for transportation; for if I receive sentence of death they cannot save me, as the public clamor would be so great against me then. - What you alone have said is sufficient to do me out, though I know you cannot help in on your own account, but be as light as possible on me, as I hope that Dick will be sent to Canterbury out of the way. I am very much in doubt of my plan being accepted, as there was a man of the name of Weston suffered six years ago, who offered another for the same purpose, but they would not listen to him; and by their eagerness at present, in prosecuting me, I sear they are determined on my ruin; but they never shall know a word of it without saving my life first.

"I write you this, that your sears might not take the alarm, as you might think I wanted to get the inside of you, as an evidence, by my sending letters out, and thereby you might conceive a dislike to me, and so injure me the more on my trial; but may I never see God if I have the least notion any longer of such a proceeding, nor had I since you done so yourself. If nothing does to save me, let my death be a curse on England for ever; indeed, it is the only consolation I have, because, if England had not stirred up a rebellion in Ireland for its own purposes, and so set us all starving, we never should think of doing what we have done.

"If I'm cast, offer to transport yourself to save me for the same, as I intended to do so for you, because we might get off for America from the Bay. If I die, I intend to have a merry death, for I will petition the Bank to allow me an Irish piper, from the time I receive sentence, to play in my cell, and promise to give them the plan before I am turned off, but disappoint them after in giving it.

"I intend from this out to pester them with letters, and enlarge on the merits of my plan, and tell them what advantage it will be to them, and the nation at large, (for it really is a capital one) as by it their credit will be firm, &c. &c. and it is impossible to imitate it without a speedy detection.

"I must put a great deal of blarney and boasting in it also, as there is nothing like impudence and persuasion in such a desperate case as this, for it will do more than the interest of the Court with them, or the first man in the land, for instance, Governor Wall for that.

"If they reject my offer, I must change my battery with them after sentence, and get friends out doors to annoy and frighten them into compliance by the transparency, and threaten to spread it like wild-fire, over town and country; this, or something like it, saved Lane."

"Dear James,"If Betsey has stagged on us our sate hangs on a wire; therefore, you must only make the best of it on the trial to clear up the point about the girl's knowing of it. I am sorry you did not tell it at first more clear, and it would have saved you from anxiety of mind; as well as me, if any thing bad should happen to you, I have no chance at all.

"If in case that my plan is rejected, and that "I am doomed to de gad," (which God forbid) they will, of course, get a letter from abroad about the transparency; of course, you will be questioned about it; do you then deny any knowledge of the party or parties concerned, but that you believe that there are a great number of my particular friends who know it, which I have told it purposely to, in case any thing had should happen me; you may say there are three or four in Ireland who know it, as you heard me several times say so, and those are relations of mine, (young men); say then that I have a great number (you believe) of acquaintances from different parts of Ireland, for that I have been in a great many towns in my rambles through Ireland, and that I have lived in Cork, Limerick, Kilkenny,&c. &c. where it was impossible for you to know my acquaintances, as you never were in any of them towns; besides, I was twelve months, or more, here before you came.

This is the way Newell worked on the Secret Committee, and so horrified them to proclaim Martial Law.

If you see the Griffin then any way thoughtful, or thinking what to do, take advantage of it, and say that you also heard me often talk of a plan I had in view to prevent forgeries, but that I said I was afraid of their having some knowledge of me, which prevented my ever offering it; pretend to be innocent of my having any discourse with you in the prison.

If all this does not do, and that you don't stand my friend so far, the Lord have mercy on my soul! I communicate my last thoughts to you on this paper having a confidence in you, that you won't betray my intentions, even if it was to save your life, which it would not if you were cast.

I would have wrote to them about the plan before, only I knew when you would hear it you might suspect it was about other business, therefore I thought it better to defer it till I communicated my thoughts to you on the subject, to make your mind easy; however, if you have any doubts still on your mind, tell me candidly of it to day.

By writing to them in time, they may take my letter into consideration, and it might hinder them from looking for evidence to swear against me, as I have put off so little - and they might overlook the printing of them, &c. As Dick would be a sufficient meal for them to satiate their vengeance on, and they might say the rest were sled.

In case I die, and that you survive, petition to have me buried in Pancras, Sommers Town; but I cannot tell, in case of forgery, whether my friends or the b - y doctors can have my body; I would like my friends to have it of course, and to be buried six feet deep.

I believe Lymbery is in custody since the day he went to Pentonville, as he would have gone to tell Dick of what happened; it is natural to think so, as being an acquaintance, same as Miller; besides they might have doubt of your information, which would make them keep him; it was lucky, however, for had Dick heard of our being in custody he would have come forward without asking, or running away, which you may judge from his letter, and so swear every thing plump, as to leave no hopes for either of us.

"Lymbery gave me to understand that he heard some broad hints of the cran from Lauglin, &c. &c.

so I told him about it, for the purpose of bringing me news, but he never got one, as I knew he had not the courage to do it.

"I will write to Carolan to-day, watch for him at the window at one the next day, and at three o'clock also; if he puts up both his hands in the air, it is a token that he got two letters from me, and one for Beisey. And if he points to Pentonville with his hand, it is a token that she got it safe. - If he is determined to stand my friend he will put his hand on his breast. - If there is a shark in the house he will take off his hat.

Q.(To Gillington.) Q. Do you know who is meant by Dick? - A. Power.

Q. Was Power a man connected with you in this business? - A. Yes.

Q. Is Matthew Power the same person? - A. Yes.

Q. What is meant by the word cran? - A.Forged notes.

Q. Who is meant by Carolan? - A. He was an apothecary.

Q. What connections had you two with Carolan? - A. We were very intimate with him two years; and latterly, we joined in a medicine, he was a proprietor, and we gave him money.

Q. How did you become possessed of that money? - A. By forged notes.

Q. Do you happen to know, of your own knowledge, or from any thing the prisoner has told you, where it was he frabricated the paper, if he did fabricate it? - A. I saw him compleat it in Bristol.

Q.Do you know from him how he came first to forge a five pound note? - A. I believe, by the instigation of Power.

Q. Were you in company when there was any conversation between him and Power upon this business? - A. I was; Power told him it would be better for him to engrave a five pound plate; he said, there was no more danger, or not so much, in passing a five pound note than a one; this conversation was at Bath, and the prisoner agreed that he would engrave the plate if Power would get him a good copy.

Q. What did he mean by a good copy? - A. A new note; a new original Bank of England note.

Q. Did Power procure him one? - A. He did, for cash, at the Bank, which e gave to Fennell.

Q. Did he go to Bath? - A.He did.

Q. Did he commence his work of engraving? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the plate that he afterwards worked at Pentonville? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of his having been in possession of any other plates at any time? - A. Yes; a two pound plate I saw him engrave.

Q. What became of that? - A. He told me he left it on the step of a door, somewhere about the neighbourhood of Clerkenwell, or Grays-Inn-lane.

Q.When did he say that? - A.About August last.

Q. Had you ever, in your own custody, that plate? - A. I have.

Q.How did it get out of your hands? - A. I gave it to him.

Q. And he told you he had left this plate at the step of a door as you have described it? - A. Yes.

Q.When you had the possession of the plate, and had an opportunity of taking notice of it, was there any thing upon it, by which you can safely say you should know it again? - A. Yes; it was bruised on or near the edge of it, as if by accident, and the maker's name stamped upon the back of it, it was delivered to me by his wife.

Q.Just cast your eye upon that, and say, if you think that is or is not the same plate that you delivered back? - A. There is a mark on this that there was not on that, here is the remains of the mark yet, and there was something on the plate then that does not now appear.

Q. Do you, or not, believe that that is the plate you delivered back? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there an x at the back of it? - A. Yes, there is.

Q. Is there any thing about the maker's name that leads you to believe it is the same? - A. All that I remember of it is, that there is an x in it.

Court. Q. Was this mark over the figure of 2 upon it when you had it? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Did he tell you why he desired to get rid of this plate? - A.Because there was no paper made for one and two pound notes, and he should have the trouble of making another machine, for the engraving was altered in the two pound notes, and that was of no use to him.

Q. Did he say any thing else? - A. He said, out of a joke, he would send it to the Bank.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were examined against the prisoner on the Tuesday after he was brought to town? - A. Not against him; on my own account.

Q. When was it you were first examined against the prisoner? - A. I do not exactly remember the day.

Q. How long after you were brought to town? - A. I believe about a fortnight, or three weeks.

Q.Before you were examined before the Magistrate, you were examined at the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. My learned friend asked you whether you had disclosed the whole to the Bank, and you said you had? - A. Yes.

Q.Can you give me within a trifle, the number of forged Bank-notes you told the Directors of the Bank you had put off? - A. I believe I did not tell them.

Q. Now speaking quite within compass, can you tell us how many forged Bank-notes you have put off, one hundred? - A. Yes, more than that.

Q. Two hundred? - A. More.

Q. Three hundred? - A.More than that, I suppose five or six hundred.

Q. You know them all to be forged? - A. Yes.

Q. You was taken up at Liverpool, and when you was brought to town, and charged before the Magistrate, you knew perfectly well you were charged with the crime of forgery? - A. Yes.

Q. Then, with a consciousness in your own mind of having put off five or six hundred, and that you were in custody upon that charge, I take it for granted, you began to think your days were numbered, that your end was near? - A. I did.

Q. It then occurred to you, that it was a more convenient thing to be hanged by proxy than in person? - A. Yes.

Q. And you told the Bank, if they would save you, you would give evidence against the prisoner? - A. I told them I would tell all I knew.

Q. Did you not expressly state that you would give evidence against the prisoner, if they would spare you? - A. No.

Q. Did you give them so to understand? - A. I told them I would tell all I knew concerning the forgery, and all who were concerned in it.

Q. Then you named Power to them, did you? - A. I did.

Q. You named the prisoner to them? - A. I did.

Q. And Miller? - A. No, he was not concerned.

Q. He was your very particular friend? - A. He was.

Q. You offered to give evidence against these persons, if they would save you? - A. Yes.

Q. We have heard that Miss Belley Evans was seduced by the prisoner, under a promise of marriage - was she not living in the house with him and his wife? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was lodging in the same house? - A. Yes.

Q. After you were confined, you and he were both confined in Cold Bath fields prison? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw each other frequently? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw each other after you had given information? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you intended to do it before you did it? - A. Not long, it was asked of me.

Q. You knew perfectly well you should be hanged if you did not - A. I did not know.

Had you the least doubt that you should be hanged? - A. I thought I should.

Q. You knew you should be tried? - A. Yes.

Q. And that you should be hanged? - A. No, I did not know whether I should or not.

Q. Had you any doubt? - A. I was tolerably sure I should.

Q. Now, in order to make sure that you should not, you knew it was convenient to get his hand; did you not tell him, if he wrote to the Bank, it might save him? - A. I told him it might.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not get the letters from him for the very purpose of producing them in evidence? - A. No.

Q. What then? - A. That he might save himself, because he told me his plan would save him.

Q. Did you not desire him to write these very letters for the purpose of you yourself giving evidence of them? - A. No, I did not.

Q. What did you desire him to write them for? - A. I did not desire him.

Q. You mean to say, you desired him to offer his plan to the Bank, with a perfectly friendly view to serve him? - A. Yes, certainly I did.

Q. Had you not told any body before hand, that you could get a little writing from him? - A. No, not at all.

Q. Had you not suggested that it would be convenient to get a little of his writing to confirm the evidence of a man like you? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. It passed but lately - you have been telling us the transactions of months and years past, you might tell us what has passed within these six weeks? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. You were kept separately - for what purpose was it you were suffered to talk to him, was it not on purpose to get something out of him? - A. No, it was not, the room that I was in was at the top, and he was at the bottom, and my door was left open, so that I might have gone down into the yard, and spoke to him through his window.

Q. The door was left open that you might go and converse with him? - A. Not for that purpose.

Q. Had you not these conversations for the purpose of getting evidence against him? - A. No.

Q. I dare say you never wrote to him with a view to get any thing from him? - A. Not any thing to give in evidence.

Q. Did you never write to him with a view of getting an answer from him of any sort? - A. I wrote to him about some money that he owed me.

Q. About nothing else? - A. And to tell him to exert himself with his plan, and send it to the Bank.

Q. Any thing else? - A. That I would serve his wife if I could.

Q. You did not write with a view of an answer? - A. I expected he would send an answer.

Q. Who did you employ as your messenger? - A. The turnkey.

Q. Was the prisoner then in Cold Bath-fields? - A. No, in Newgate.

Q.Did you not send by the turnkey a pencil, for the purpose of getting an answer? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you not tell the turnkey to take a pencil with him? - A. No.

Q. Now man, look that Jury in the face, and say if you did not write that to get an answer to give in evidence against him? - A. I did not.

Q. And that is as true as all the rest you have sworn? - A. Yes.

Q.Though you would utter five or six hundred forged Bank-notes, I dare say you would not tell a lie for the world, you are a man of great veracity - have you never said, you would not mind how you swore? - A. I don't understand you.

Q. Did you never say, you should not much regret a false oath? - A. Never.

Q. You have never said, you would no more mind taking a false oath, than swallowing an oyster? - A. No.

Q. You have never said you would not mind swearing falsely to an Orange man? - A. No.

Q. You have been a little awkwardly situated in Ireland, have you not? - A. Not much.

Q. What sort of charge did any wicked man bring against you, a worthy member of society, I dare say you were innocent. -

Court. You cannot make him worse than he has made himself.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did some vile, wicked, ras cally informer charge you with any thing? - A. I was taken up as a United Irishman.

Q. I will not ask you what oath you took, because we knew that before - were you ever questioned in any other sort of Court in London? - A. No.

Q.Nor in Dublin? - A. I was by the prisoner.

Q. You never said, you would no more mind swearing falsely against an Orange man, than you would eating an oyster? - A. I never did.

Q. Did you know a man of the name of Barton? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, did you never say that in the presence of Barton? - A. I never said it in any one's presence to my knowledge.

Q. To your knowledge - it is a matter of doubt then, is it? - A. I am almost certain I did not; I do not recollect ever so expressing myself.

Mr. Fielding. Q. The prisoner knew that you had given information before the Magistrate, and had made your terms with the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. And you would very willingly that his life should be saved by his plan going to the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. And that forms a great part of the letters? - A. Yes.

Q. He himself knowing, when he conversed with you, and when he wrote to you, that you had given evidence against him, and were to come here against him? - A. Yes.

Q. You are both of the same persuasion, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. My learned friend asked you if you had not been concerned in these iniquitous transactions to the amount of five hundred pounds - who had you all these notes from? - A. From Fennell.

Q. How long had you been in town before you sent to the solicitor of the Bank, telling him what you would do? - A.Three or four days.

Q. Then you always wished this proposal to the Bank might be of service to him? - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where did you live when you first became acquainted with the prisoner at the bar? - A. In Bristol.

Q. In what house? - A. In the house of one Powell.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in the house at the time you first became acquainted with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any person living in the house with him? - A. Yes; there were two women.

Q. In what way of life were you when you first became acquainted with him? - A. I came there to service.

Q. When was it you first became acquainted with him? - A. I think it is about a year and a half since I first became acquainted with him.

Q. Did you afterwards reside with him, and live with him? - A. Yes; ever since the first of last March twelvemonth.

Q. Do you happen to reside with him, and live with him any where in the City of Bath? - A. Yes.

Q. In the same house with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know who the woman was that lived in the house with him? - A. No; I suspected her to be his wife, but when I asked him, he said she was not his wife.

Q. Do you know whether at this time he was acquainted with a person of the name of Gillington? - A. Yes; I saw the man while he was at Bristol.

Q. Did they appear at that time to be acquainted with each other? - A. Yes, they did.

Q. How long after they left Bristol was it, as near as you can guess, that you went to Bath with him? - A. About two months, or thereabouts.

Q. While at Bath, was Gillington in his company at all? - A. Yes; they used to be together.

Q. Do you know a person who went by the name of Power? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him at Bath, while the prisoner and you were living at Bath? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Tell us whether they had any conversation together? - A. I saw Power in our lodgings.

Q. Did he make any proposal to the prisoner? - A. No; he was there talking to Fennell, but what passed between them, I really cannot tell.

Q. What did Power do - did he bring any thing

to Fennell? - A. He brought down a roll of paper.

Q. What sort of paper? - A.Fine paper.

Q.Finer than writing paper? - A. Yes; like gauze paper.

Q. Did he bring any thing else besides this gauze paper? - A. He brought a piece of copper.

Q. What was it like? - A. A plain plate.

Q. About what size was it - was it of this size?(showing her a plate) - A. It was something larger.

Q. What conversation had they respecting this paper, or this plate? - A. I did not see at Bath any thing further; there was a conversation between Power and Fennell; Power wanted Fennell to engrave a five-pound, and Fennell made answer, he did not choose to do it.

Q. Did Fennell give any reason why he did not choose to do it? - A. No; he did not; Power said, there was no more harm in the doing of that than any thing else, and Power called him a fool, and told him to do it.

Q. Did Power give him any thing after this conversation? - A. Yes; he gave him a copy.

Q. What do you mean by a copy? - A. He gave him a five-pound note to do it by.

Q.Where did you go to from Bath? - A. To Bristol.

Q. What did you see done, when you got to Bristol? - A. It was there this plate was done.

Q. A plate, for what? - A. It was what he did be lower's desire.

Q. Was the five-pound note engraved? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see it while he was doing it? - A. I saw him engrave a piece of copper, but to say that it was really that, I cannot.

Q. What had he to engrave it from? - A. I saw a five-pound note lying before him, while he was engraving it.

Q. Where did you go to from Bristol? - A. To London.

Q. What lodging did you take in London? - A. At first, they all lodged at Pleasant-row, Pentonvide.

Q.Where did you live after that? - A. At No. 16, Weston-street.

Q. Who lived in the house with you and the prisoner? - A. Gillington, and a young woman of the name of Powell.

Q. Did she live with Gillington? - A. Yes.

Q.Where had she become acquainted with Gillington? - A. At her mother's house.

Q. Was that the house in which the prisoner became acquainted with you? - A. Yes.

Q. After you got to Weston-street, did you see any thing done with the five-pound plate that you had seen at Bristol? - A. I saw theprisoner take off some notes.

Q. From what? - A. From the five-pound plate.

Court. Q. By what means were they taken off? - A. A kind of press I never saw but that and one I saw at Bow-street, that was something like it.

Q. Were any rollers used with the press? - A. Yes; two.

Q. You were in the room when this was done? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see any other person in the room when this was done? - A. Yes; Gillington was there.

Q. Was any other person present when he was taking off these notes from the plate? - A. No. 9

Q. After having printed these notes off; did you see him do any thing afterwards? - A. I saw him sign them.

Q. When he was signing them, do you ever recollect seeing a young woman that lived with Gillington - Powell? - A. I don't recollect that I ever did.

Q. Had he done any thing before he went to Liverpool? - A. Yes; he had hid some five-pound notes.

Q. You told us, there was a plate and a press; do you know what became of them before you went to Liverpool? - A. I saw him take two plates and part of the press away, the Sunday before he went to Liverpool.

Q. How did he take them? - A. He put them in a small box.

Q. Did he tell you, at all, to what place he took them? - A. No, he did not tell me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You went to Bristol to seek your fortune in service? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it, therefore, you are no great scholar - can you read or write? - A. I can read, but I cannot write.

Q.Therefore you cannot read writing? - A. Not perfectly.

Q. You have been talking about five-pound notes, and two-pound notes? - A. Five-pound notes I saw, and one-pound notes, but no two-pound.

Q. Can you undertake to swear what notes they were? - A. They were the imitation of Bank-notes.

Q. You do not know what the contents of them were, only from what Mr. Gillington has told you, or somebody else? - A. I don't know much about it; I don't concern myself with it; I never had one of them in my hand.

Q. You have often seen Gillington since he was taken into custody? - A. I have seen him three or four times.

Q. And conversed with him about the evidence you were to give? - A.No.

Q. Have you not frequently conversed with him about the evidence you were to give here to-day, upon the subject upon which you were in custody? - A. Yes; I have done that.

Q. Have you and he talked over what you were to say to-day? - A. No, we have not.

Q. Have you conversed with any body about it? - A. No.

Q. Have you never told your story to any body before you came here? - A. Yes; to Mr. Winter.

Q. You were taken into custody? - A. Yes.

Q. In what prison were you? - A. I was not in any prison; I was at Bow-street.

Q. Under the care of an officer, in a house; you came then to see Gillington; did you, or did you not, go to Cold-bath-fields prison for the purpose of speaking to Gillington? - A. No, I did not; I saw him there; Gillington told me it was a very serious business; I said it was, and Gillington said, I had nothing to do with it, but to speak the truth.

Q. Did you not say, that you had seen Gillington three or four times since he has been in custody? - A. Yes; I saw him at Cold-bath-fields, and twice at the hall.

Court. Q. What hall? - A.Hicks's-hall; he cautioned me not to tell a lie about it.

Q.Recollect, if you have told me the truth, that those are the only times at which you have conversed with him? - A. Yes.

Q. You have never dined with him since? - A. No.

Q. Has not be dined with you? - A. No.

Q. Not at Bow-street? - A. Yes; he dined at Bow-street.

Q. When was that? - A. I think it was last Friday week.

Q. Was not that after he had been in custody in Cold-bath-fields prison? - A. Yes.

Q. Why did you not tell me that? - A. I did not think of it.

Q. It was a very convenient thing, that he being charged with this offence, and you being charged with this offence, should get together to feast at Bow-street? - A. It was so.

Q. Nobody was present at the conversation but yourself? - A. No.

Q. Then, if Gillington has said he was present at the time that the prisoner was asked by Power to forge these five-pound notes, it was not true? - A.Gillington was not present at the time.

Q. Now, another thing, you say Power produced a five-pound note, and gave it to the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. He gave it him out of his pocket-book, I suppose? - A. No.

Q. He gave it him directly? - A. Yes.

Q. There was no occasion to go up stairs, or down stairs? - A.No.

Q. And, therefore, if Gillington has said he went to the Bank to get it, that is not true? - A.Power went with notes to change, and brought in a five-pound note; Power came to see Fennell, and he went to the Bank, or wherever he got it, with some one-pound notes, and then he brought the five-pound note, and gave it to him.

Q.Recollect yourself again - you are sure he went out with notes to change, and brought in a five-pound? - A. Yes.

Q. Then, can it be true that he went with cash? - A. I cannot say; he might have gone several times.

Q. Do you mean to swear he went out of the house at all? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew the prisoner was a married man? - A. I thought he was, but he denied it.

Q. Had you the curiosity to ask his wife before you came away? - A. No.

Q. You were intimate with her, and drank tea, and supped with her? - A. I drank tea with her once.

Q. What way of life might you have been in before? - A.I used to do plain work for a short time.

Q. This was the first man you ever lived with? - A. That is not a fair question.

Q. Do you know Mr. Guy? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you not in habits of particular friendship with Mr. Guy? - A. No more, than I served him for fifteen months.

Q. Did you live in the same house with him, when you served him? - A. Yes; with his wife.

Q. Were you taken up yourself, or concerned with these people? - A. Mr. Winter came to the house where I was, and put me into the custody of an officer.

ANN POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles.

Q. Do you know Gillingon, who has been examined here to-day? - A. Yes.

Q. And the prisoner, Fennell? - A. Yes.

Q.Where did you first become acquainted with him? - A. At Bristol.

Q. Where? - A. At my mother's.

Q. Do you know the last witness, Elizabeth Evans? - A. Yes; she lodged in my mother's house.

Q. Who did you live at Bristol with? - A.Gillington.

Q. About what time? - A. About December, 1800.

Q.Where did you go to with him? - A. I came to London.

Q.Where did you leave Elizabeth Evans? - A. We came together to London.

Q. Was the prisoner with you? - A. Yes.

Q.And Gillington? - A. Yes.

Q. You came all four together? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you remain in London? - A. Till April following.

Q.Where did you go from London? - A. To different places - to Portsmouth and Bath.

Q. Did you afterwards go to lodge in Weston-street? - A. Yes; No. 16.

Q. Do you now lodge there? - A. Yes.

Q. How have you seen the prisoner employing

himself in Weston-street, Pentonville? - A. I have seen him writing, and I have seen him painting.

Q.What was he writing? - A.On notes.

Q. What notes? - A.Bank-notes.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular in Elizabeth Evans 's apartments? - A. No.

Court. Q. What was he writing upon notes? - A. I do not know.

Q. Upon what part? - A.Upon the faces.

Q.How many? - A.Three or four.

Q. Do you mean, he wrote upon three or four? - A. No; they were lying before him.

Q. Do you happen to know the value of these notes? - A.Five-pound notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are quite sure you were present when the notes were signed? - A. Yes.

Q. And you are quite sure that Evans, the last witness, was present when he signed them? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are quite sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. You say he wrote upon notes? - A. Yes.

Q. That is all you mean to say? - A. Yes.

Q.Miss Evans was present in the room at the same time? - A. Yes.

Q. How often might you see this during your residence in Weston-street? - A. Two or three times.

EDWARD FENNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. I am extremely sorry, that my duty should oblige me to call you here; you are the brother of the unhappy man at the bar? - A. I am.

Q.Where do you live now? - A. At No. 10, Back-hill.

Q. Did your brother make any application to you in July, or August, to do any carpenter's work for him? - A. He did.

Q. What was it? - A.Some kind of a press.

PETER PERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. (Produces a press.) Q. Where did you get that press? - A. In the prisoner's lodgings at Liverpool.

Q. You are the officer that apprehended the prisoner, and Gillington? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Fennell.) Look at that press? - A. That is the press.

Q. Did he give you particular direction how it was to be made? - A. Yes; upon paper.

Q. Were there any rollers? - A. Yes; two rollers.

Q.(To Perry.) Were there any rollers to that? - A. Not that I found.

Q.(To Fennell.) For what was it to be used? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What axis's were they? - A.They were two single rollers.

Q. Were they of the same size? - A. Nearly so; there might be a little difference, but that I don't take any account of.

Q. Was any part of the work left undone at his desire? - A. He said there were some holes to be made, but he would make them himself.

Q. When did you see him after that? - A. About a week after; I delivered it to the prisoner in the street; my wife was along with me; he said, he had no money about him at that time, but he would give me something the next time he saw me.

Q. How long was it before you saw him again? - A. It might be a fortnight, or three weeks.

Q. What was his business with you, when you did ice him? - A. He told me he was going out of town.

Q. Did he say where? - A. No; then he gave me twenty shillings.

Q. What more passed? - A.Nothing; only he wished me good bye.

Q. Did you get any thing from him, to keep till his return? - A. Not at that time.

Q. When was that? - A. I cannot justly say; it might be a month, or five weeks, before I was taken up for it.

Q. What did you get from him at that time? - A. I was out; he left a box with my wife.

Q. What became of that box? - A. His wife came to me.

Q. How do you know it was his wife? - A.Very well.

Q. Had you seen them in a state of cohabitation together? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, in consequence of any advice, or any desire, from any body, do any thing with the box that was in your house? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you open that box? - A. Yes.

Q. What did it contain? - A. It contained a paper sealed up, and a part of a press.

Q. And what else? - A. A piece of cloth; John Fennell and his wife opened the paper, and took out three square pieces of copper; two had writing, and the other had none; Fennell's wife put one in her pocket, Mrs. Gillington took another, and the other was left with me; they called me out, and gave me three plates, and I dropped them over a sewer.

Q. Did you drop them through the grating? - A. I cannot tell; I let them fall out of my hand, and whether they staid out, or got in, I don't know.

Q. Where was that? - A. I went through Charing-cross to it.

Q. What did you do with the box? - A. There is a part of it at home, and part of it my wife burnt.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you, yourself, taken up, charged with participating in this offence? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you were admitted to be a witness against your brother? - A. I cannot tell what they did; I did as they desired me, and I they put me to my oath; it has hurt my character very much; they know they have nothing against me.

Q. What time of the day was it you went to Charing-cross with the plates? - A. Nine o'clock at night.

Q. And you cannot tell whether you dropped them in the sewer or not? - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect telling any body that they were dropped there - was not the sewer searched, and it turned out there was no such thing there? - A. Yes, I dropped them on the sewer; whether they went in or not, I cannot tell.

Q. Have you ever said you threw them over Blackfriars-bridge? - A. No; I told his wife that same night I had thrown them over Westminster-bridge, to make her a little reconciled.

Q. Did you not say so when you were examined before Mr. Winter? - A. No, only that night.

Mr. JOHN REEVES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are clerk to the Magistrates at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you the examination of the prisoner? - A. I was not present at the time this examination was taken, but this is the Magistrate's handwriting; I was present at a subsequent examination.

Mr. Fielding. Q.(To Perry.) You have told us you apprehended these two men at the Post-Office? - A. I did.

Q. What day was it? - A. The 25th of March.

Q.When you apprehenced Fennell, did he say any thing? - A.When I took him into custody, I asked him if his name was Fennell; he said, it was; I took one in one arm, and one in the other; I said to Gillington, your name is Gillington; he said, it is; I took them into the Post Office, and, having no assistance, I took a pair of handcuffs out of my pocket, and handcuffed them; I was obliged to stand behind them to do it, having no assistance, and to take care that neither of them should escape.

Q. Having done this, what did you afterwards do? - A. I attempted to search them, and the prisoner at the bar resisted; I said, it was too late, and I must take all from them; I searched them, and found a quantity of money, gold watches, one upon each, bank-notes, breast-pins, and trinkets of that nature; I sent for a hackney-coach, and took them before the Mayor.

Q. Did Fennell at this time say any thing? - A. I never heard him speak from the time I took him into the Post-office till I got him before the Mayot.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long have you been an officer? - A. About five or six years, belonging to Bow-street.

Q. You did your duty by these men as you did by others, and secured them? - A. I did my endeavours.

Q. Have you told us every thing you found? - A. I have.

Q. Had you no conversation with him? - A.Not at that time.

Q. Did he ask what charge there was against him? - A. He did afterwards; I believe it might be in the coach, or the jail, but I don't know which; I mean in the stage-coach coming to London.

Mr. THOMAS GLOVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are Inspector of banknotes to the Bank of England? - A. I am.

Q. Is that a genuine, or a forged note? (shewing him the note in question.) - A. It is a forged note, the whole of it. (The note read.)

Mr. WINTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. You are Solicitor to the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when the examination of the prisoner was taken? - A. Yes, I heard it read over to him, and saw him sign it.

Q. Was any promise or threat held out to him? - A. Not any.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was any body admitted, on the part of the prisoner, to be in the room at the time? - A. I believe not.

Q. Don't you know there was an application to have his friends about him, and a dental given? - A. The Magistrates used their discretion; I rather think, previous to it, there was not till he was fully committed.

Q. Was it not had in a private room, when nobody was by? - A.Nobody but the Magistrates.(The examination, signed John Fennell , late of the City of Bristol, read.)

"The examinant says, that he is about twenty-eight years old, and was born in the county of Kilkenny, in Ireland; that he is the son of David Fennell, who is a carpenter; that he has been in England since 1798; that he served his time to Mr. Paul, printer, at Waterord, with whom he staid four or five years; that he went to Dublin, and worked as a compositor in London and Liverpool; that he worked with Mr. Bensley, in Fleet-street, a few months, and then with Mr. Pace, in the Borough High-street, about six months, after which he returned to Ireland, where he remained one month, and from thence came to Bristol, and remained a month unemployed, when he again came to London, and followed the employment of a miniature-painter; that he went to Bristol till about a month ago; that, during his residence there, he frequently made journies to London with the intention of forming a connection with a person in the medicine line, to vend a medicine, called the Philanthrophic Balsam; that he took lodgings at the house of a woman, No. 17, York-place, Westminster-bridge, where he remained fourteen days, when he went to Liverpool, where he was taken; that he has not been taught the art of engraving, but has practised the art of wood-cutting; that Mr. Hall has been the vender of the medicine; that

James Gillington , his companion, is not interested with him, nor is he employed in that or any other line; that this examinant and Gillington left London upon the 15th of March, from the Golden Cross, Charing-cross, for Liverpool, where he arrived on St. Patrick's day, the 17th of March; that he never went by any other name than his own; that the several trinkess found upon him he purchased at different times, some at Bristol, and some at other places; he further accounts for the money by his success in the lottery, in which he gained a hundred pounds, and his savings in his profession; that the hundred pound note in his possession belongs to Gillington; that he has never purchased any articles in London, except linen and trinkets, for his own use; and further says, that he has not resided in any other place than before stated, or with any other woman than his wife. Taken before us,

N. BOND, and W. PARSONS."

WILLIAM ADAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You live in Dean-street, Soho, and, know the prisoner? - A. He lodged with me in the month of August, 1799, and for about five or six months he went by the name of Findlay; I know Gillington, who used to come backwards and forwards; he went by his own name.

AMY DANSEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles.

Q. Did you find a plate of copper at any time? - A. Yes.

Q.When was it? - A. I don't know the day of the month; it is six or seven months ago.

Q.Where did you find it? - A. At the end of Sassion-hill.

Q. Was it on any Fair day? - A. Yes, on Peckham Fair day; I found it at No. 11, Little Saffronhill, on the third step of the door.

Q. Look at that, and say whether it is the same? (shewing her a plate.) - A. Mr. Pontisex's name is on it, Shoe-lane.

Q.Where did you take it to? - A. To Mr. Butler, of Wood-street, Spa-fields; it was mentioned to the Gentlemen of Hatton-garden, and I was fetched there directly; Mr. Butler took me and the plate together, and there it was left.

Mr. GARNETT TERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr Fielding. Q. You are engraver to the Bank of England? - A. I am.

Q. Look at that five-pound bank-note? - A. It is a forged one.

Q. Look at that plate - how long have you been an engraver? - A.Thirty years.

Q. Are you able to form any judgment whether the engraving of that plate and the five-pound note are done by the same person? - A. I examined them by two impressions, and I believe they are done by the same hand; the same mode of applying the tool, and the same mode of finishing the up and down stroke of the legs of the M's and N's, in each, of them; we find no difficulty; we know different person's work, and we know the mode of applying the tool, and cutting the stroke.

Q. What is that now produced? (shewing him a round piece of wood.) - A. This appears to be a bit of box, and this to be a part of the bottom of another press.

Q. What is that flat board? - A. I never saw it before; it seems to have had whiting on it.

Q. Is it to lay work upon? - A. Such a thing as this would do as a plank to put between two rollers for printing, and then the impression would be made; this is what we call the part of a cross, which is applied to a spindle.

Q. Would that be an effential article to complete any thing printed? - A. Yes, it is stained with printing-ink, I perceive.

- CARPMEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are an officer? - A. Yes, I searched the lodgings of the prisoner, in Weston-street, on the 27th of March.

Q. Did you find any graving tools? - A. Yes.(Produces them.)

Mr. Terry. This is a proper graving tool; this we call a draw-point, or burnisher, but I don't think it has been used for that; they are part of such tools as must be used in engraving.

Q. Look at the paper which was found there - is that a paper upon which a fabrication may be made? - A.It is not such paper as the note is; it is extra thin post.

Mr. Terry, Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You say that note, which you have examined, and the paper, are not of the same quality? - A. No.

Q. With regard to the press, it is not complete? - A. No.

Q.Now, are the other things in such a complete state to be used without something else belonging to them? - A. No, there must be something else.

Q. Every engraver must have a complete press for the purpose of taking off impressions? - A. Yes, he could not do it with such as these.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, the papers which were found in Mr. Gillington's possession, which he says were of my writing, are nothing but a gross forgery of his own, I fancy; I have some witnesses to prove Gillington's oath is not to be taken.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN BARTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. What are you? - A. A victualler, in Windmill-street, in the Haymarket, and keep the Ham and Windmill.

Q. Do you know Gillington, the witness, who has been examined here to-day? - A. Yes, he lodged at my mother's house.

Q. Have you known much of him? - A. I have known him for about three years.

Q.Is he a man, who, from your knowledge of

him, you would venture to believe upon his oath? - A. No.

Q. Why would you not believe him on his oath? - A.Because I have heard him make frequent declarations that he would not mind taking a false oath if he had any interest at stake.

Q. Has he more than once repeated that, or once particularly? - A. I recollect a particular circumstrice; there was a dispute about whether any Lord was called upon to take an oath, and one said, he only said upon his honour; and then Mr. Gillington said, it was all nonsense about an oath, he would no more mind swallowing an oath than he would swallowing an oyster.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. What were they talking about at this time - about the united Irish? - A. No; some one said, a Lord was not called upon to take an oath, only to declare upon his honour; and another said, a Lord was sworn the same as any one else.

Q. How came it that you were singled out to-day to tell us this? - A. I don't know I am sure.

Court. Q. This was in a public-house where they were all drinking? - A. Yes, about nine months ago, as near as I can recollect.

Q. Who was the company? - A. A man of the name of Moore, and another of the name of Sarson; I only saw the prisoner two or three times with Mr. Gillington; he came to my house.

Q. It shocked you very much to hear a man talk so? - A. I thought it a very improper expression.

Q. What countryman are you? - A. An Englishman; I was shocked at the expression, or I should not have remarked it.

MICHAEL STANDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. A tailor.

Q. Do you know Gillington, the witness, who has been examined? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been in his company? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any conversation about the Orange men, in Ireland? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he say any thing particular? - A. I met with Gillington at a public-house, in Poland-street, and the conversation was with respect to a man who had fled from Ireland, and for whom there was a reward offered; Gillington, at the same time, got me to write a letter to this young man; he had fled for a rape committed on a young lady, a relation of the post-master of the town where Gillington came from; he fled, and two men were hung; there was a reward for him; I wrote a letter for him, and saw Gillington some time after, and asked him if he had sent it off; he said, no; but he had copied it, and put another name to it; he wanted me to have this man apprehended, and I received a letter from Mr. Fennell some time after, not to have any thing to do with the man's life; I talked to Gillington respecting the affair; he laughed at me, and said, he would think nothing of taking a thousand false oaths to hang an Orange man if it came to that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 3, Star-court, Compton-street.

Q. What countryman are you? - A. An Irishman.

Q. How long is it since the prisoner wrote the letter; cautioning you not to keep company with Gillington? - A. In the month of June last.

Q. Are you quite sure he cautioned you not to keep company with him so far back? - A. He cautioned me to have nothing to do with the man's life; there was no mention made of the badness of Gillington.

Q. You have seen Fennell and Gillington in company together since that? - A. They were in company.

Q. They were very intimate - were they not? - A. I cannot say particularly.

Q. How often have you seen them in company together? - A. Four times, I suppose.

Q. How long since? - A. The last time I saw them was in the beginning of last August; there were a great many in company.

Q.Where did the prisoner live in August last? - A. His house was in Bristol.

Q. Did not he live in London? - A. He did, for he was in London, but I cannot say where he lived.

Mr. Alley. Q.Is he a man you would believe upon his oath? - A. No, he is not.

JAMES COSGROVE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 17, Berwick-street, Soho.

Q. What are you? - A. A compositor.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner's handwriting? - A. I have seen him write several times, and I think I should know it.

Q. Look at those two letters? - A. If those are his hand-writing, it is not similar to any I have seen.

Q. Do you believe it is or not? - A. I do believe it is not, but I cannot say it is not upon my oath.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. How long have you been acquainted with him? - A. I have known him about four years, and have been in his company a dozen times; I have seen his letters to his wife.

Q. How many times have you seen him write? - A. In all probability, three or four times that I have seen.

Q. Where was it? - A. At the Apple-tree public-house, in Queen-street.

Q. What was he writing? - A. It was a letter of some sort, but what it was I cannot tell.

Q. Who was he writing to? - A. It was either to Liverpool, or Bristol.

Q. You don't know who it was to? - A. No, 11 do not.

Q.You never read the inside of it? - A. No.

Q. Now, for another time? - A.Another time was at the Paviour's-arms, in Wardour-street; I cannot say the contents of what he was writing, or to whom; I saw him draw up an account of some medicines he had in my lodging, but I cannot recollect the contents of it.

Q. Did you read the whole of it? - A. No.

Q. There is a fourth time? - A. I cannot swear to the fourth time; I might see him write many more than four times, but three I will swear to.

- KIMBER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Do you know the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. I don't know, whether I do or not.

Q. Have you seen him write? - A.Only five or six weeks in another man's books; I have known him to write, but not seen him write; I have been concerned in business belonging to another man, and he has wrote in the book; I have not seen him writing, but I have seen his writing.

Prisoner. While I was confined in Cold Bathfields-prison, I was not allowed pen, ink, or paper, which Mr. Aris can prove.

JAMES ARIS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am son to Mr. Aris, who keeps the Cold Bathfields-prison.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being there before he was committed to Newgate? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether he was permitted to have the use of pen, ink, and paper? - A. I believe he was.

Q. Are you quite sure of it? - A. I will not be positive; I won't take upon myself to swear it.

Q. You do allow prisoners pens and ink, but see what they send out - was Gillington allowed pen, ink, and paper? - A. He was.

Prisoner. Q. You ordered no pens, ink, and paper to me before I was sent to Newgate? - A. No, I did not, probably my father did; prior to your last examination, you wrote letters privately to Gillington, that is a convincing proof you had pens, ink, and paper.

Q. How could I come by it? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. You never saw me write letters? - A.Never.

GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-51

316. EDWARD HARTWRIGHT was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 11th of February , a certain promissory note for the payment of money , to the tenor and effect following:

"No. 564. Woodbridge Bank. No. 564.

"I promise to pay the bearer, on demand, the sum of five pounds, here, or at Messrs. Downe, Thornton, and Free, bankers, in London, value received. 29th January, 1802.

"For Philip Richie , Cornelius Collett, and Co.

"£5. B. HARRIS.

"Entered, George Allbone ." With intent to defraud Messrs. Downe , Thornton , Free , and Co.

Second Count. With uttering and publishing the same knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud the same persons.

Third and Fourth Counts. Charging it to be with intent to defraud John Rogers . And the

Fifth and Sixth Counts. With intent to defraud Philip Richie , and Cornelius Collett .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOSEPH METCALF sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Where did you live on the 11th of February? - A. With Mr. Rogers, No. 20, High-street, St. Giles's.

Q. What is he? - A. He is a silversmith, and dealer in paintings .

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A.I do.

Q. What time did the prisoner come to your shop? - A. About half past eight o'clock in the evening, or thereabouts.

Q. Did he inquire for any thing? - A. He said, that some time ago he sold Mr. Rogers three pictures; he said one was a fruit-piece, and he wanted it back again; he purchased the fruit-piece, and a gold seal, for which he was to pay three guineas, and offered me a five pound Woodbridge Bank note; as soon as I perceived it to be a country note, I asked where it was payable; he said he believed somewhere in Lombard-street; I then asked him to put his name and address on the back of the note.

Q. What address did he put? - A. I believe it was Thomas Wilson, Norton-street, Penton-Chapel; this is the note. (The note produced.)

Q. Did you give the change? - A. I did.

Q. What did you do with it? - A. The next morning we sent it to the bankers.

Q. Did you get it paid? - A. No.

Q. It was objected to? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before you saw the prisoner again? - A. Not till I saw him at the Mansion-house.

Q. How long was that? - A. About a fortnight, or three weeks.

Q.Shall you know the picture when you see it again? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. When you saw him at the Mansion-house, did you know whether it was the same man or not? - A. Yes, I did; I am sure he is the man.

Q. Did you ever see the picture again? - A. I did, at the Mansion-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are shopman to Mr. Rogers? - A. Yes.

Q.In whose shop you see a great number of persons every day? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before the 11th of February? - A. No.

Q. Do you speak positively to him, or only to belief? - A. I am positive he is the person, because

I conversed with him a quarter of an hour; I am certain he is the man.

Q. Did you carry the note to the bankers yourself? - A. No.

Q. You delivered it to Mr. Rogers? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you put your name upon it? - A. I did, at the Mansion-house.

Q. You know it by the name of Thomas Wilson being written on the back of it? - A. That is all; I saw him write it.

Q.Suppose I was to present you with another Woodbridge note, with the same name, written in the same hand-writing, could you tell the difference? - A. I cannot say; but I have no doubt it is the note.

Mr. Gleed. Q. That is the same man who came to the shop? - A. Yes.

- RICHIE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You live at Woodbridge? - A. Yes.

Q.Are you a proprietor of the Bank? - A. No, my father is; I have no interest in it.

Q. Is that the engraving used by the Woodbridge Bank at the time it bears date? - (Shewing the note.) A. No.

Q.Is that the writing of any signing clerk of the Woodbridge Bank? - A. No, it is not.

Q. Is it the signature of the entering clerk? -- A. No.

Q. Is it a forgery? - A.It is.

Court. Q.Has your father clerks of the same names? - A. No.

Q. What is the firm of the company? - A.Philip Richie, and Cornelius Collett , and no others.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know whether your father has or not such clerks, except from your father's information.? - A. I am sure there never was, I live at the house.

- INMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Downe, Thornton, and Co.? - A. Yes.

Q. The Woodbridge Bank-notes are payable at your house? - A. They are.

Q. Do you recollect that note being presented for payment? - A. Yes.

Q.Is it a good, or a forged note? - A. A forged note; it was presented on the 12th of February, by a man from Mr. Rogers.

JAMES CHETHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long have you lived at Pentonville? - A. Two years.

Q. Do you know the neighbourhood of Pentonville Chapel? - A. Yes.

Q.Is there such a place as Norton-street? - A.There is not.

HENRY CHURCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a constable? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. When? - A. On the 24th of February.

Q.Where? - A. At his own appartments at a house in Aldersgate-street, and found laying before him this pocket-book. (Producing it.)

Q. Did it contain any Woodbridge Bank-notes? - A. Yes, three.

Q. What else? - A. In the same pocket-book there are two promissory notes, and six duplicates, and a one pound Bank of England note.

Q. Did you find any blank engravings? - A. Yes; in another part of the same room, in this shavingcase, forty prints of Woodbridge Bank-notes unfilled up, and this picture and frame were hanging up at the time.

Q.(To Metcalf.) Is that the same picture he bought at your house when he tendered the five pound note? - A. Yes.

Q. You said your master's name was John Rogers ? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Has he any partners? - A. No.(The note read.)

Mr. Knowlys. (To Richie,) Q. Are those from the same plate as the note first shewn you? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you entering clerks of those names? - A. No; this is off our old plate.

BENJAMIN SLOCOT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Where do you live? - A. In Aldersgate-street: The prisoner lodged at my house from the middle of December, 1801, till the officer took him.

Q. What name did he go by? - A. By Edward Hartwright ; while he lived in my house he ordered some goods for himself, in his own name.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I was out on business in the early part of February, at Mr. Alcock's, in Aldersgate-street, and on my return, one day, I found the notes, partly folded up, two hundred of them; I went home immediately with them in the same state, and accordingly I passed them, thinking them real notes, not knowing they were any other than real notes; I might find them, or any other gentleman in this Court might find them.

GUILTY , Death , aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-52

317. HENRY BORCOMBE , JOSEPH RAPHELL , JOHN STOKES , and JOHN HARRIS , were indicted for making an assaults in the King's highway, on Peter Theodory , on the 14th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silver watch, value 3l. a silver watch chain, value 7s. a silver seal, value 1s. a coat, value 3l. a waistcoat, value 10s. a pair of breeches, value 20s. a shirt, value 5s. and a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of the said Peter.( Peter Theodory , the prosecutor, being a foreigner, an interpreter was sworn.)

Q. What happened to you on Sunday, the 14th of March? - A. I was robbed about two o'clock.

Q. Where had you been? - A. I was going from a public-house by Wapping to Whitechapel .

Q. Was any body with you? - A.Nobody.

Q.Relate the circumstances of the robbery? - A.There were about four or five of them together.

Q. Of what were you robbed? - A. A watch, with a silver chain.

Q. Had you any bundle with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that bundle taken from you? - A. I cannot say as to the bundle, whether it was taken from me, or whether I dropped it.

Q. Are you sure the watch was taken from you? - A. Yes, I am sure of that.

Q.Describe the manner in which it was taken from you? - A.They ran against me, opened my coat, and put their hands into my pocket, and took out the watch.

Q. Was the taking of the watch done by one, or more of those persons? - A. By one.

Q. Was it taken from you by force, or were you consenting to its being taken away? - A. By force.

Q. Do you know the person of the man who took the watch from you? - A. If I see him, I should know him.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar, and see if either of those persons is the man? - A. Yes; that man. (Pointing to Harris.)

Q. Are you sure that man was actually the same person? - A. I am positively sure.

Q. Were you sober, or drunk? - A. I was rather merry.

Q. What countryman are you? - A.From Lisbon.

Q. How much had you been drinking? - A I was at a public-house in Black-horse-yard, and drank some gin and beer.

Q. What quantity? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Were you able to know the person of the man who robbed you, so as to be certain Harris was the man who took the watch? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of the persons of the other three men? - A. Yes, the little one, Raphell.

Q. Had you ever seen either of these men before? - A. Never before.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see them again? - A. The next day, at the Justice's.

Q. What did you do after you were robbed - where did you go? - A. I went into a public-house close by.

Q. Had you nobody with you at the time you were robbed? - A. There was nobody in company with me; several people were passing by that saw it.

Q. Was the watch taken out of your pocket by force, or did it come away readily? - A. By force.

Q. Was it in your sob? - A. No; in my jacket pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner, Harris, before? - A. Never.

Q. How many glasses of gin had you been drinking that morning? - A. I am not certain to the number of glasses.

Q. Were you not so drunk that you had employed a boy to shew you the way to Blackwall? - A. No.

Q. What quantity of beer did you drink, as well as gin? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Had you been drinking alone, or in company? - A. With company.

Q. With how many? - A. With some shipmates of mine, but I don't know how many.

Q. Were the shipmates, in company with you, by at the time you were robbed? - A. No; I was alone.

Q. Do you not know that you shall be entitled to a reward of forty pounds for each of these men that are convicted? - A. I don't know any thing of that.

Q. Have you never been told of it by any of the officers? - A. I never heard such a thing.

Q. Since this happened, have you not been living with the officers, and kept at their expence? - A. I was there, and I believe the Justice pays for me; I don't know who.

Q. How happens it you are able to speak to one person, when you cannot speak to the others? - A.Because I could recognize this man that robbed me, because he came in front of me.

Q. Did they not all come in front of you? - A. There were four or five all round me, and this man came in front of me.

Q. The persons who robbed you, were not taken till the next day? - A. That night.

Q. When you did see them, did not the officers of Justice point them out to you? - A. I pointed to this man who took the watch, the moment I saw him.

ELIZABETH SMITH sworn. - Q. You are the wife of Robert Smith ? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you live? - A. I live at No. 4, Lombard-street, Mile-end.

Q. Where were you on Sunday, the 14th of March, about two o'clock? - A. I was going to Bethnal-green to see my mother, and I saw the foreigner; when I saw him first, he was led by a boy; he was coming up Hunt-street, on the other side of the way, in Hunt-street, I saw three or four young men, one crossed over.

Q. Were there only three or four, or a great number? - A. I cannot say whether it was three or four; one of them crossed over, and he went in front of the foreigner to tantalize him, like as if he wanted to play with him.

Q. What did he do to him? - A. He did nothing at all to him; the foreigner then kicked at the boy.

Q. What did the boy then do? - A.Nothing at all, that I saw; then John Harris, and another came over.

Q. Was Harris the person who came in front of the foreigner? - A. No.

Q. Did you know John Harris before? - A. Yes; I saw him cross over, and another young man.

Q. Was that other young man one of the prisoners at the bar? - A. I cannot take upon me to say; John Harris pushed the foreigner down, and kneeled upon him, and took his watch.

Q. Where was his watch? - A. I cannot say whether it was in his sob, or not.

Q. Did you see him take hold of the watchchain? - A. No.

Q. How do you know it was the watch? - A. I saw him snatch, and afterwards had a glimpse of it in his hand.

Q. Were you near enough to know it was the watch? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing of the bundle? - A.After he took the watch, he and another ran over the way, and then the others ran the other way with the bundle.

Q. Did you know the persons of any of them before this time? - A. I have known Harris a good while.

Q. What is he? - A. I don't know.

Q. Do not you know what his occupation in life is? - A. I don't know that he is in trade at all; his mother takes in washing.

Q. Does the son do nothing for his livelihood? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you know any of the others? - A. I have known them all by sight a good bit; I know that young man, (pointing to Barcombe), but I always thought his name was Hoyle.

Q. When the foreigner had his watch taken from him, did you hear him call out? - A. He made a very comical noise in his way; he called for his watch and his bundle.

Q. Did he say, watch? - A. He said, watch.

Q. Did he mention the bundle? - A. I knew what he meant, because I saw the bundle.

Q. Will you take upon you to say, whether that bundle was taken from him, or whether it dropped from him? - A. No, I cannot; I saw some of the men running away with it.

Q. Did the man run away with it, before Harris took the watch? - A. No; after Harris took the watch, the other ran away with the bundle.

Q. Did you see any of the prisoners at the bar, besides Harris, do any thing to him? - A. No.

Q. What were they doing when the foreigner kicked at one of them? - A.Trying to play with him.

Q. Did they offer him any violence, to make him kick at them? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. What became of the boy during this? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was the boy by at the time the watch was taken? - A. I do not know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are sure he was led by a boy? - A. Yes.

Q. The foreigner began upon them first by kicking? - A.Because they went before him.

JOHN WILLES called. - Court. Q. How old are you? - A.Going of thirteen.

Q. Do you know what an oath means? - A. No.

Q. When you are sworn to tell the truth, do you know what will become of you, if you tell a lie? - A. No, I don't.

Q. If you are wicked, what is to become of you? - A. I don't know.

Q. Have you heard of a God? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you heard what is done with wicked people after they die? - A. No.

Q. Have you a father and mother? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you ever go to church? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever been taught your cathecism? - A. Yes.

Q. What is your father and mother? - A. My father is a sawyer, and my mother is a washerwoman.

Q.Were you never taught any prayers? - A. Yes.

Q. If you are wicked and tell lies, are you to be punished; what is to become of you. - A. I don't know, indeed.

Q. Did you ever go to school? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you never taught any difference between good and evil? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you never read any of the Bible? - A. No.

Q.When you went to school, what did you read? - A.Nothing but the spelling-book.

Q. You have heard of a God? - A. Yes.

Q. What does God do to wicked people after they die? - A. I don't know.

Q. Have you never heard, if it makes any difference whether you live wickedly or virtuously? - A. No.

BENJAMIN MARTIN sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. At No. 13, Clement's-Inn.

Q. With whom? - A. Mr. Macdonald, an officer in the army.

Q. Were you near Bethnal-Green on Sunday, 14th of March, about two o'clock? - A. Yes; I had the liberty to spend the evening where I thought proper, and I went to my father's - I was going along Spital-street, and I saw three of the prisoners going down Spicer-street.

Q. Look at them? - A. I am confident they are the same: I followed them a little way, and then two others joined them against Ram-alley.

Q. Who were the first three that you saw? - A. I was too far off to distinguish them, till after they were joined; I followed them till they came to Hunt-street-They consulted together under the sign of the Red Lion window, and the foreigner turned into Hunt-street with them.

Q. Where was the foreigner? - A.They met together at the end of Hunt-street; the foreigner went up on one side the way, and they on the other - They crossed over to the foreigner; I did not see them take any thing from him; I had no suspicion of there robbing a man in the day time - I saw them going up to him in a disorderly manner: it appeared to me the foreigner was very much in liquor.

Q. Did you see any of the prisoners at the bar cross over to him? - A. I recollect them all four perfectly well.

Q. At the time they were concerting, did you hear any thing? - A. When they were under the Red Lion window, one of them said, d-n you, now is the time, if it is to be done.

Q.Which of them said that? - A. I cannot say.

Q. After saying that they immediately crossed over to the foreigner? - A. Yes, immediately.

Q. What did you see then? - A. I did not see them do any thing, only going up to him in a disorderly manner: I did not observe any thing more till I saw some of them run away.

Q. Can you now speak to any one with certainty who did run away? - A. I did not speak to them before the Justices, because it is a critical thing to swear to a man running.

Q. Can you say with certainty which of them then run away? - A.Those two in the middle(Stokes and Raphell) - Stokes had a bundle under his apron; they ran down Ram-alley together.

Q. Did you see any thing of Harris? - A. I did not see him run away; I cannot say; I know Harris by fight very well.

Q. How came you to know him? - A. I used to see him in that neighbourhood very often; I lived there with my father.

Q. Did you see any boy? - A. Yes, leading him by the hand; the prisoners pushed the boy away from the foreigner.

Q. Did you know who that boy was? - A. There were two or three boys round the foreigner; and one of them was leading him, a little boy of the name of Downes.

Q. Had you ever seen Downes before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing of any watch? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you sure he was led by a boy? - A. Yes.

Q. And you are sure the foreigner was very much in liquor? - A. He appeared to me to be in liquor.

ROBERT WALKER sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A weaver in Carter's-rents, Spital-fields.

Q. Do you remember, on the 14th of March last, being in company with any of the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes; at first I was only in company with John Harris , Joseph Raphell , and Joseph Nowlan, who is not taken: I met with them in Whitechapel-road-Going along we saw this foreigner lying upon a bench tipsy; he had a bundle lying by him at a public-house door, facing Whitechapel-church; they all sat down by him; the foreigner rose, and they began teazing of him, by catching hold of him, and pulling him about, and he ran after them, being a little in liquor: then the foreigner came into Brick-lane to buy some oranges of a Jew; they kept teazing him, putting their hands towards his pockets, and he called Raphell a tees.

Q. Did he speak English? - A. He said he was a tees; he did not speak it plain, but I could understand what he meant - Then he went and bought sixpenny-worth of apples at an apple-stall, and Raphell put them into the foreigner's pocket for him; and then John Harris threw the foreigner down.

Q. In what way? - A. He put his foot before him, and he sell down; then the foreigner's bundle sell down, and Harris told the foreigner to take the bundle up and not be afraid; then he got up and went walking along the streets, and they plaguing him; and a great many people took the foreigner's part - Raphell told the people he had bought sixpenny-worth of apples, and would not pay for them.

Q. That was not true; was it? - A. No, he had paid for them.

Q. What passed then? - A.Raphell took a hat off a boy's head that was with us, to take it to the foreigner to sell it.

Q. What was the name of that boy? - A.Thomas Carpenter, he is not taken yet: then the foreigner threw bricks at Raphell, and kicked him; he would not let him come high him - Then when we got into Hunt-street, Borcombe and Stokes joined us; I had hold of the foreigner's arm, and Harris shoved him down on the steps, and took his watch out of his waistcoat-pocket; the foreigner called out after his watch, and he ran; then I picked up the foreigner's bundle and his hat myself, and one of them whipped the bundle out of my hand, but I cannot tell which it was; it was taken from me backwards - then I gave the foreigner his hat, and I went along with Harris.

Q. What did Harris say? - A. He said come along, I will go home and change my dress.

Q. You cannot take upon you to say, which of them it was that took the bundle? - A. No.

Q. Did Harris go home and change his dress? - Yes; he put on a pair of blue trowsers and a black handkerchief.

Q. Had he any trowsers on before? - A. No, he had on velveteen breeches and a yellow handkerchief; then I went with him to sell the watch.

Q. Was any body else with you? - A. Yes; Carpenter.

Q. Did he sell the watch? - A. He would not let us go in; he told us to stay at the door.

Q. Whose house was it? - A. I do not know.

Q. How many of them were by when Harris shoved him down? - A.There were seven of us altogether when the watch was taken; the four prisoners were there, but I did not know the names of Stokes and Borcombe.

Q. Did he give you any thing out of the watch? - A.Raphell and Nowlan came up, and asked me if Harris was in there; I told them yes.

Q. None of the others besides Raphell were there then? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure it was him? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that Raphell was by, at the time the watch was taken? - A. Yes; after we had been there a little while, Raphell brought out 1s. a piece for us, and I refused it, and said I would have more; then he went in and brought out 1s. more, and I took that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. You have not been in custody, have you? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. You were admitted a witness by the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you tell the Justice this story? - A. A fortnight afterwards; my master told me it was better for me to surrender myself up to Mr. Nowlan.

Q. And you should get clear yourself by so doing? - A. No; he said that I suould suffer the law; if I was not taken now, I should some other time - The officers had been to my master's, and my master told me of it; I heard they were taken, and I was frightened.

Q. One shilling was not pay enough? - A. I asked for more.

Court. Q. How came your master to know you were concerned with them? - A. I never went home afterwards - My master told me Mr. Nowlan, the officer, had been after me; and then I determined to deliver myself up: I would have gone of my own accord, but I did not know how to go about it.

Q. How long have you known Harris and these other people? - A. I have known Harris and Raphell only this last Summer.

Q. How long have you known the others? - A. I had never been in their company before.

FRANKS JONAS sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. At No. 1, Flower and Dean-street, Spital-fields.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a Jew.

Q. What do you deal in? - A. I deal in clothes; I buy lots of pawnbrokers, and at sales, and any where.

Q. Do you remember, on the 14th of March last, any of the prisoner at the bar coming to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoners, and see whether you recollect them? - A. Yes, Harris I have known many years; he came to my house on Sunday afternoon; he said he wanted money and brought his own watch to sell.

Q. Did he produce that watch to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Where is that watch? - A. I bought it, the officer, Griffiths, has got it.

Q. He called it his own watch? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you give him for it? - A. One pound six shillings.

Q. Did he come alone, or was there any body with him? - A. Alone.

Q. Did any body come in afterwards? - A. Yes, Raphell.

Q. Do you know his person? - A. Yes, his father lived neighbour by me.

Q. What did Raphell say? - A. He asked me if I had bought a watch from Jack Harris , I told him, I would not tell him, and so he went away; I would not satisfy him, he wanted to know what Harris had sold the watch for, and I would not tell him.

Q. Did you see any body waiting at the door at that time? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see either Harris or Raphell come out and speak to any body near your house? - A. I did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.What did you say your trade was? - A. I deal in clothes.

Q. You buy any where, any thing, and at any price? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been in this Court before? - A. No, and I hope I shall never see it again.

Q. One pound six shillings was a fair price? - A. I could not get my money again for it.

Q. You would not satisfy Raphell about it - you do not very often tell people, when they come to enquire after watches? - A. No; when I heard it was stolen, I gave it up directly.

Q. That was after the officers had been after you? - A. Yes.

Q. You never had the officers of Justice making any enquiries at your house before? - A. Not that I know of, never, they have asked about it, but never found nothing.

Q. I did not accuse you of having property ready for the officers to find? - A.When I heard the watch was stole I delivered it up.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street; I was employed to apprehend the prisoner on the 14th of March, between two and three o'clock; I took them at the sign of the Prince of Wales public-house, the corner of George-street, Spital-fields.

Q. How far is that from Hunt-street? - A. Very high half a mile.

Q.Where were they? - A.Sitting in a box by themselves, in a dark corner, that was between three and four o'clock, or near four.

Q. How was Harris dress? - A. In a blue jacket and trowsers, and a black silk handkerchief about his neck; I went to the house of Jonas with Thomas Griffiths three or four days after, and Smith and I went that evening, but Jonas and his wife were not at home; we asked about a watch, and took his wife into custody; I was not present when he produced the watch.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He did not deliver the watch till his wife was in custody? - A. No.

Q. YOu knew Jonas before? - A. Yes.

Q. You have had him at the office, have you not? - A. No, I have had his wife in custody.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - Q. Did you go to search Jonas's house? - A. Yes; I took his wife into custody, upon suspicion of receiving the watch; then Jonas came to the Flying-horse, just by the office, to see his wife, and he said his wife did not buy the watch, he had bought it of Harris; he said he gave twenty-six shillings for it; he said, he would go and fetch the watch, and he did; I have had the watch in my possession ever since. (Produces it.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You called him Franks? - A.His name is Franks Jonas, or Jonas Franks, I do not know which.

Q. Did you ever know any thing of him before? - A. I never knew any thing bad of him, I have had his wife.

Q. You did not get the watch from him till after his wife was in custody? - A. No.

Court. Q. Do you know that he was acquainted with the cause of his wife's being detained before he came to you? - A.When he came to me, he told me he had bought the watch.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Look at that watch, and say if it is your's? - A. It is my watch.

Q. Do you know the number of it? - A. There is no number in it, I have had it above four years.

Q. Is there any particular mark? - A. No particular mark.

Q. Is there any watch-paper in it? - A. Yes, a red one; I have no doubt but it is mine.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - Q. You were with Nowlan? - A. I was.

Q. What time of day was it? - A. About half past three, I believe between three and four; they were sitting together at a public-house, in Wentworth-street, in the parish of Christchurch, and we took them into custody.

Borcombe's defence. I was sitting in the public-house, having a pint of beer, where these three young men were, and the officers took me out with them.

Raphell's defence. I was out with some oranges till about two o'clock; I went home to my father's and I got some meat and bread, and I went into a public-house to get a pint of beer, and these three young gentlemen were there, and Mr. Nowlan came in and took us altogether.

Slokes's defence. I went into a public-house to have a pint of beer, and the officers came and took me, I was eating some bread and cheese at the same time; I knew nothing of the other prisoners.

Harris's defence. I had been discharged that morning from the Tower-hamlets; I went into the public-house for a pint of beer, and the officers came in and took me into custody.

For Harris.

Mrs. LEWIS sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. In Bethnal-green; my husband is a coal-merchant; I have known Harris upwards of twelve years; his sister lived servant with me; I got his discharge from the Tower-hamlets the very day he was taken up; he always bore a good character.

Raphell, GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

Harris, GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

Borcombe, NOT GUILTY .

Stokes, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18020428-53

318. JAMES LANE and JOHN WATSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a silver watch, value 4l. 4s. the property of William Greenwood .

WILLIAM GREENWOOD sworn. - I am a journeyman cabinet-maker , No. 4, Vine-court, High Holborn: On the night of the 26th of April, I was waiting near my own lodgings for a young man who lodges in the same house, I saw three men coming up Holborn ; when they had got opposite me, one of them said, silence for plunder, and snatched away my watch.

Q. Did it come quite out of your pocket? - A. Yes, it came clean out; I immediately laid hold of the man that took it, which was the prisoner; he handed it to a man at his left hand, who made off with it; I still kept hold of the man who took it; I told the young man to go and fetch the watch man; he went, and fetched the watchman, and in that time the other man had made off; then one of them came back, and asked what was the matter, and the soldier wanted to get away; he said, do you think I have got your watch? I am a King's man; and then opened his outside coat, and shewed me his red coat under it; I told the young man that was one of them, and he secured him.

BENJAMIN SMITH sworn. - I am a journeyman cabinet-maker; I was with the last witness; I had been at a benefit-society with this young man, and, coming home, I met with a young woman of my acquaintance, and I stopped to speak to her, and he went on a little way, and waited for me;

then I saw three men come up Holborn, and, when they got opposite this young man, they stopped; I looked round, and saw he had hold of the soldier; the other men ran away; the other prisoner was one of them; I went after him, and he ran; I followed him, and secured him.

JOHN BROUGHTON sworn. - I am a watchman; I came up, the two prisoners were in custody; I took charge of them, and conveyed them to the watch-house.

Lane's defence. I was at a public-house, where there was a pay-table, till ten o'clock; this man is a stranger to me; I was going along, humming a song to myself, and, when I came up to this man, I was humming the words "impatient for plundet;" he immediately laid hold of me, and said I had got his watch.

Watson's defence. I was going up Holborn, and this man laid hold of me, and said I had run away with the watch; I, being alarmed at that, did attempt to run; I never saw this man before.

Lane, GUILTY , aged 32.

Watson, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Me. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-54

319. JOHN GIDDINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , three handkerchiefs, value 3s. two shawls, value 4s. a pair of stockings, value 2s. and a pair of pockets, value 1s. the property of Elizabeth Aston , spinster , privately in her shop .

ELIZABETH ASTON sworn. - I keep a shop , in the parish of lsleworth .

Q. Are you a single woman? - A. Yes; on Friday, the 26th of February, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop, and inquired for a pair of worsted gloves and a pocket-handerchief; he agreed for them, and paid for them; a woman came into the shop with him; the woman wanted a bonnet, which I was sitting on her head; while I was employed with her, the prisoner concealed the articles in question; I did not see him take them; I missed them almost immediately.

Q. Did she pay for the bonnet? - A.She did not have the bonnet.

Q. Did you ever see these things again? - A. Yes; as soon as I missed them, I sent a peace-officer after them, and he brought them both back to me, with the property, about seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. How long after they had left your shop? - A. About an hour, or an hour and a half; the constable has had the care of them ever since.

Q. Are you sure you did not see the prisoner take them? - A. Upon my oath, I never saw him near them.

Q. Did you see him do any act which you suspected to be a taking of them? - A. No.

JOHN KENDALL sworn. - I am a constable: On Friday, the 26th of February, I was sent for to go after the prisoner by Mrs. Aston, between the hours of six and seven; I went after the prisoner, and found him by the George door, at Isleworth, about one hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutrix's; he had a woman with him; I brought them back to Mrs. Aston's house; I was going to search the prisoner, when he drew the articles from his breast, under his waistcoat; I searched the woman, but found nothing upon her; I took him to the cage, and from there to Bow-street.(The property was produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it any further than the woman gave them to me when she got out into the street, and said, she had bought them and paid for them; I was very much in liquor.

Q.(To Kendall.) Was this man very much in liquor when you took him? - A. He was.

Q.(To Mrs. Aston.) Did they appear to be in liquor? - A.They appeared to be in liquor, but knew what they were about, for they could not make a harder bargain than they did.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing goods, value 4s. 10d.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-55

320. JAMES COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , four bushels of coals, value 3s. the property of James Yerraway .

JOHN EDDINGTON sworn. - I keep the wharf from where the property was stolen, at the northeast corner of Blackfriars-bridge ; they were stolen from my barge; I know nothing of the loss.

HENRY SMITH sworn. - I am a lighterman: On the 23d of last February, a little past two o'clock in the morning, I was going with that barge to Wandsworth; it was Mr. Eddington's barge, and contained Mr. Yerraway's coals; I know they were Mr. Yerraway's property, because I have the sale note in my pocket; I was going to take them to Wandsworth for Mr. Yerraway's own use; when I got to the parapet of the bridge, I distinctly saw three persons getting coals out of a craft into a boat lying along-side; it was the Henry barge, lying sixty yards from the parapet of the bridge; I got into a skiff that was lying close to the stairs, and rowed under the light craft till I was close to the prisoner at the bar; I saw a boy handing a basket of coals into the boat, which was placed upon the boat's well; it was a fishingboat; then the boy jumped in also; I never saw the prisoner in the barge at all, he was receiving

the coals from the boy; we all drove away together, and, being full tide, we both came athwart the bridge; he then dropped upon his knees, and begged for mercy, saying, he had a wife and a large family; he told me his name and plate of abode, and said, for God's sake, have mercy on my wife and children; I told him to go away; he said, I will be d - d if I do, for you will bone me; we drove together as far as the patent shot manufactory; it was moon-light; I saw his face as plain as I see it now; I let him go, and he was taken by an officer; I knew him again immediately; I took one basket of coals that was upon the well of the boat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You are a lighterman employed by Mr. Eddington? - A. Yes.

Q. The coals had not been delivered at that time to Mr. Yerraway? - A. I was present when Mr. Yerraway bought them of Mr. Eddington.

Q. You were threescore yards from the barge? - A. Yes.

Q.The parapet was considerably below the lamps? - A. We did not want lamps, there was a moon.

Q. You don't mean to swear that you observed his face at that distance? - A. No; I would not have sworn to him if I had not been near him; I was close to him for a quarter of an hour.

Q. Do you mean to say that the prisoner said his name was James Collins , or was it the boy that said so? - A. It was the prisoner himself.

Q. Did he not surrender himself? - A.He was entrapped by Butt, the constable.

Q. That you mean to swear? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it, you mean to swear as safely to the identity of coals? - A. Yes, that I can with a safe conscience; they were never out of my sight

JOHN BUTT sworn. - I am a constable of the county of Surrey: On the 23d of February in consequence of information, I went to the house of the prisoner, in Fore-street, Lambeth; I searched his house; I left word with his wife that I wanted to see him; I did not tell his wife what it was for; but he came to Westminster-bridge, and resigned himself to me; I then told him there was a charge against him for felony, in the city of London; he said he knew nothing of it; I took him into the city of London, and Mr. Smith, the lighterman, said this was the man; I put him in the watch-house, and Mr. Smith pointed him out again, from eight or nine others.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. I understand, from the last witness, that the prisoner was entrapped; are you guilty of entrapping prisoners into your custody? - A.Never in my life.

Q. You did not tell his wife what you wanted him for, but she knew you were an officer of justice? - A.Perfectly well.

Q. Then was the prisoner entrapped, or did he surrender himself voluntarily? - A.He went to the Red Lion first; I was not there, and he found me at Westminster-bridge, and asked me what I had searched his house for.

Prisoner's defence. I am an innocent man: Butt came to my house, I was not at home; my wife told me Mr. Butt had been after me, and I went and found Mr. Butt; I Knew my conscience very clear; he told me a man wanted to see me, and he took me to Mr. Smith; I am innocent of the crime.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-56

321. JAMES GILBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a handkerchief, value 3s. 8d. the property of Edward Buttenshaw .

ANN HILL sworn. - I live with Mr. Edward Buttenshaw , haberdasher , No. 130, Minories : On Monday last, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in and asked for some stockings; I shewed him some; he told me he wanted some better; I shewed him some better; I asked him two shillings and ninepence; he said he would give me two shillings; I told him I could not afford them at that, and he went out of the shop; soon after he was brought back by a constable, who produced a handkerchief; I know it to be Mr. Buttenshaw's property, it has his private mark upon it in his own hand-writing; it is marked O. N.; I had seen the handkerchief about an hour before the prisoner came in.

EDWARD DAVIS sworn. - I am an officer; On Monday last, about two o'clock, I took this handkerchief from the prisoner (produces it.) I was sent for by Mr. Lawrence, a salesman in the Minories, who suspected the prisoner had stolen something; I did not search him upon this charge; I asked him what he had got about him; he said he had got nothing; I told him I must search him, and in his left side great-coat pocket I found this handkerchief; I asked him where he got it; he told me he had bought it on Tower-hill on Saturday; I told him he must go with me and shew me the shop: he said he would; he took me to a shop on Tower-hill; the gentleman of the shop said he had no recollection of him; I then shewed him the handkerchief, and asked him if he had sold that; he said no, he had never sold that handkerchief: I received information that the prisoner had been at Mr. Buttenshaw's, I took him to Mr. Buttenshaw's, and the young lady claimed it; I have had it ever since.(The property was identified by Miss Hill.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the handkerchief at

the shop I took the officer to, but the gentleman did not recollect me again.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-57

322. JOHN BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a saddle and bridle, value 15s. the property of Henry Curzon , Esq.

ROBERT LUCAS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Henry Curzon: On Wednesday, the 24th of March, I lost a bridle and saddle from a liverystable in Lower Duke-street, Manchester-square , between six and eight o'clock in the evening; I found it the Saturday following, at No. 3, Swallow-street, at Mr. Helder's, a sadler and harnessmaker; I know the saddle to be my master's; the bridle has no particular mark, but I know it to be his.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me in the house? - A. No.

ROBERT HELDER sworn. - I am a sadler, No. 3, Swallow-street; I bought this saddle and bridle of John Bell , on Wednesday, the 24th of March, about six o'clock in the evening; I gave him fifteen shillings for them; I knew him before when he was postilion, and afterwards coachman, to Sir John Smith Burgess; he told me he had it of the groom: On the Saturday following Mr. Curzon claimed it; and, on the Saturday after that, the prisoner came again with another saddle to sell; I stopped him and sent for an officer; I had known him several years, and had never heard any thing amiss of him before.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer(produces the saddle) - I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner; I delivered the saddle and bridle to Lucas; I marked it first, and afterwards Lucas delivered it to me again.(The property was identified by Lucas.)

Helder. This is the saddle and bridle that I bought of the prisoner; I marked them at the office.

Prisoner's defence. I bought this saddle of a man in the street, who was going to Yorkshire for some horses from the country. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-58

323. JOHN WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , a bed, value 7s. a pillow, value 1s. two blankets, value 6s. and a rug, value 2s. the property of Richard Bannister .

RICHARD BANNISTER sworn. - I keep a shop in the slop business , in Broad-street, Radcliff-highway : On Thursday, the 15th of April, about eight o'clock in the morning, I put the articles, mentioned in the indictment, upon a box by the door, in the shop; about nine o'clock I heard an alarm that they were gone; I came out of the shop immediately; I went after the prisoner and took him, with the goods on his shoulder; the prisoner delivered them to the constable.

JOHN CARR sworn. - I am a labouring man; on the 15th of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner take these things from the shop-door; I pointed out the prisoner to Mr. Bannister, before he got twenty yards from the house, and he stopped him.( William Elby , an officer, produced the property, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. It was given to me to carry over London-bridge.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-59

324. JAMES GETERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , a silk handkerchief, value 1s. and a silver watch, value 50s. the property of Harriet Barker .

HARRIET BARKER sworn. - I lived, at the time I lost my property, with the Honourable Richard King , West Moulsey-lodge, Surrey; on the 13th of March, I came to town to see my friends; I went into the city, and returned towards home about three o'clock in the afternoon: I parted with a friend of mine in Fleet-street, that was between three and four o'clock; I then took a hackneycoach to the Golden-Cross, Charing-cross, because I thought I was rather behind my time.

Q. Was that your only reason for taking a hackney-coach? - A. No.

Q. What state were you in? - A. I was not in a state of sensibility.

Q. You mean that you had drank too much? - A. I do; I was set down at the Golden Cross, Charing-cross; and there I requested of the prisoner at the bar to direct me the way to the White-Horse-Cellar, where the coach went from; he was standing near the gate-way of the Golden-Cross; he was dressed in a white jacket, to the best of my recollection.

Q. Did the stage go from the Golden-Cross? - A. No; I told him I wanted to take the stage to go to Hampton; he agreed to go with me, and I gave him fifteen-pence; I had a bundle, which I desired him to carry: He took me out of the road, but not being acquainted with that part of the town, I could not tell where I was.

Q. Do you now know where he took you to? - A. Yes, to St. James's, near Jermyn-street .

Q. That is the direct road; what passed then? - A. He told me the Hampton coach was gone.

Q.Where were you when he told you that? -

A.Near St. James's Church; I refused to go any further, and he desired to be satisfied.

Q. You had given him fifteen-pence? - A. Yes.

Q. What passed then? - A. He insisted upon having what property I had about me: I put my hand to my pocket, with a view of securing my watch; I had it in my hand, and he snatched it from me; at that moment a young man collared him, his name is Terry; he asked him what he was going to do with me; the prisoner told him I was his sister, and he was going to take care of me to the inn.

Q. You recollect all this, you are sure? - A. Yes; the young man took him into a public-house and sent for a constable; the property was taken from him, and he was taken to Marlborough-street.

Q.Whose watch was this? - A. It was a watch belonging to the Honourable Richard King 's groom, my fellow-servant; he had lent it me the night before, as I had to get up early: A silk-handkerchief of mine was taken from the prisoner's jacket pocket; I lost it out of my pocket, but did not perceive him take it.

Prisoner. Q.Where was it you gave me the money? - A. I gave it him between Charing-cross and Piccadilly; I gave him one shilling and three-pence.

JOHN TERRY sworn. - I am a serjeant of the First Regiment of Foot Guards: On the 13th of March, about five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner and the last witness together; the was hanging on his arm, in Duke street, St. James's; seeing the witness in liquor, and the prisoner with a bundle under his arm, I supposed he might have been robbing her of that bundle, and I turned and watched him; I saw a red silk handkerchief in his hand, beside the bundle; a young man, who has since gone to the Indies, came up and intimated some suspicion; I followed him down Duke-street, and along Jermyn-street, to the wall at St. James's Church; the prisoner stopped; I went as low as the corner. of the wall; I then turned round to watch them again; I observed the prisoner attempting to force his hand into her pocket; I observed her pull a watch out of her pocket; I was too far off to hear what was said; the prisoner snatched it from her; I went up to the prisoner, tapped him on the shoulder, and said, what are you doing with this good woman; he said it was his sister; I said, if it is your sister, why not take her into some house, and not let her stand here to expose herself; as soon as I had said so, the prisoner made a start; I seized him by the collar, took the handkerchief from his right hand jacket-pocket, made him open his left hand, and took the watch, which I had seen him take from this young woman, from his hand; I conveyed him to a public-house, and sent for a constable; I delivered the watch and the handkerchief into the constable's possession.

THOMAS HATTON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Bird, in Spring Gardens; I was going to Saville-row, and, as I was going up York-street, I saw the prisoner and the young woman with their backs against the wall of St. James's burying-ground, and she was apparently crying; as I went by I saw the prisoner with his hand towards her pocket, between her clothes; she had one hand on each side the pocket, and he was apparently forcing his hand in; he had in his hand something, which appeared to be a red silk handkerchief; I went on to Saville-row; I then went back to Jermyn-street, and went into the public-house where they were; the serjeant told me, in the hearing of the prisoner, that he had taken that handkerchief and watch from him; the constable came, and he was taken to the watch-house.

THOMAS DENIGHT sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to the Blackmoor's Head, in Jermyn-street; I found the prisoner and prosecutor, the serjeant, and Hatton, there; I found the watch and handkerchief lying on the table; the prisoner acknowledged he had them from her, but said he had them to take care of.(The property was produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. This woman came to me at Charing-cross, about three o'clock, to go by the Hampton-Court stage, which goes from Charing-cross; I told her it was gone, but it would stop at the White Horse Cellar, to take up more luggage; she desired me to go with her, to shew her the way, and she would satisfy me; I went with her, and when I got to St. James's-street, I saw the stage was gone; she was very much in liquor, and asked me what she was to do; I advised her to go back to the inn, sleep there that night, and go with the coach early in the morning; she came back as far as St. James's Church, in Jermyn-street, and there, she said, she could not walk any further; she put her hand in her right hand pocket, and pulled out a watch and handkerchief; I told her to put them in again; she tried to put them in and could not; then she gave me the watch and handkerchief, to put them into her pocket for her: the serjeant then came up, took me to a public-house, and sent for a constable; I did not say she was my sister; I said I was assisting her.

Q.(To Terry). Did he say he was assisting her, or that she was his sister? - A. He said she was his sister; for I put the question to her - young woman, is this your brother; and she said, no, it is not.

Q. You could not mistake the one expression for the other? - A.No, I am positive he said she was his sister. GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18020428-60

325. JOHN BAZELY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John and Edward Troughton , on the 9th of February , about the hour of twelve in the night, and burglariously stealing a sextant, value 8l. 8s. a pair of elliptical compasses, value 3l. 3s. two hydrometers, value 1l.110s. a turn-bench, value 4l. and the brass work of a reslecting telescope, value 4l. the property of the said John and Edward.(The case was opened by Mr. Gleed.)

EDWARD TROUGHTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I live at No. 136, Fleet-street, in partnership with John Troughton , mathematical instrument-maker ; I also occupy a house in Peterborough-court, for work-shops and warehouses.

Q. Had you any person slept in that house? - A. Only an errand-boy, his name is John Burford: On the night of the 9th of February last, I was alarmed by my niece, at near one o'clock; I put my clothes on, went softly down into the street, with a bayonet in my hand, and called the watchman, I took him into my house in Peterborough-court ; one man came out of our house with a steady slow pace, and endeavoured to pass us; I stood in his way, put up my hand to prevent his passing, and asked him what he had been about; he immediately struck me a blow in the mouth, which cut my lip against my teeth; I struck him with the bayonet, and then he scuffled past me, and got out of the court.

Q.Were you able to discover the countenance of the man? - A. No, he held down his head with a disposition to hide his face; two other men then came running violently down the court in a direction from the house.

Q. What became of those men? - A.At the end of the court there is a small gate, the first man that went out shut the gate after him, and the other two men got to the gate together; a scuffle ensued between them and me, they got the gate open; I did not observe them sufficiently to know their countenances; I pursued them into Wine-office-court, where the man was found, who was tried and convicted at the last Sessions.

Q. What was his name? - A. William Bean ; I then returned to my premises.

Q. How did you yourself get into the house? - A. I went in at the street door, which the robbers had left open.

Q. What is the nature of the communication between your cellar and the first floor of your house? - A. A very strong door at the top of the cellar stair-case, which had been broke open.

Q. What was the nature of the fastening to that door? - A. A latch and two bolts.

Q.How did you find the cellar door? - A. The cellar door was open, and the bolts drawn, there were evident marks of a crow or lever.

Q. Upon examining your house, did you find that any of your property was gone? - A. Two hydrometers were entirely gone, a pair of elliptical compasses were found outside the street-door, in the court; the sextant and turn-bench were lying at the foot of the stairs, wrapped up in one of the men's great coats; I lost nothing but the hydrometers, the other things were only removed from their places.

Q. Who was William Bean ? - A. He had been one of my journeymen.

JOHN BUFFLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am servant to Mr. Troughton, and slept in Peterborough-court: The night of the 9th of February, I went to bed a little after ten, I fastened every thing that had any fastenings to them, windows and doors.

Q. How did you leave the cellar window? - A. The cellar window had no fastening; the door at the top of the cellar stairs was fastened with two strong bolts and a latch.

Q. Who first waked you? - A. Mr. Troughton.

Q. How did you find the door when you came down stairs? - A. I did not come down till after Mr. Troughton had been, and found it had been broke open.

Q.Did you see any of the property lying about the floor? - A. No.

Q. How was the street door? - A. Two bolts, a lock, and a latch; it was locked and bolted, all the other doors were locked.

JOSIAH RUSHWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q.You are a watchman, in Fleet-street? - A. I am; I was called by Mr. Troughton in the night of the 9th of February, about a quarter before one o'clock; I went up Peterborough-court with him; Mr. Troughton saw a man standing by the cellar door; Mr. Troughton asked him what he had been doing there; he said, he had been up the court; he desired me to lay gold of him, and stop till he saw a little further; I had my lanthorn in my hand; Mr. Troughton laid hold of him, and he struck Mr. Troughton; the prisoner is the man, I had seen him before in Fleet-street; I helf up my lanthorn to see what he and Mr. Troughton wer going about; I am sure the prisoner is he man, I have no doubt at all of it; he broke his hold, got away from Mr. Troughton, and made his escape.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You knew the prisoner perfectly well before? - A. Yes.

Q.You have told this story before? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time you were examined before, did you say that you knew any one of the men? - A. I said, the man that struck Mr. Troughton was dressed in a light coloured great-coat.

Q.That is any thing but an answer - when you were examined before upon the trial of Bean, did you say you knew any one of the men you saw

there? - A. Yes, the man that struck Mr. Troughtort was a hard looking man.

Q. I will read over to you the evidence you gave upon that occasion - (reads it, See Page 179.) Did you venture to swear that you knew that man? - A. Yes, I was asked the question if I had known the man before, and I said I had seen him in Fleet-street, and knew him by having that great coat on.

Q. Do you mean to say you swore you had seen that man in Fleet-street, whoever he was? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the former trial? - A. I swore so here.

Q. In this Court? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.Upon Bean's trial? - A. Yes.

Q. You now venture to swear positively, that, upon that former trial, you swore you knew that man by having seen him in Fleet-street? - A. Yes, by the same reason Mr. Troughton thought it was Bean who struck him, and I made answer, and said, it was not Bean that struck him, on the account that he was a hard looking man.

Q. How long have you been a watchman? - A. About six months.

Q. How much a day are you paid? - A.According to the months; sometimes one shilling and sixpence a night, and sometimes one shilling a night.

Q. What is the consequence, if this man is convicted? - A. I look upon it my poor foul will be in torment.

Q. I want to know the consequence, before a man leaves this world; there was a reward of forty pounds in the case of Bean, was there not? - A. I did not know it, for I was never acquainted with it before.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not go, the next Sessions, before the Judge who is now trying, and receive your share of the reward? - A. I have since.

Q. Do you not expect a share of the reward, if this man is convicted? - A. I shall expect it, as well as another; but I would not be here for that.

Q. I did not ask you that; do you not expect it? - A. To be sure I do.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Holland? - A. I have heard of him, but never had any conversation with him.

Mr. Gleed. Q. Have you any doubt of the prisoner being the man who struck Mr. Troughton? - A. Not the least.

EDWARD RODGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are a Police officer? - A. I am; I, in company with Riley, apprehended the prisoner in High-street, Shadwell; he was apprehended in consequence of the information of Holland.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. And nothing found upon him relative to this charge? - A. Nothing; this lanthorn dropped either from the prisoner, or another man who was with him, when we apprehended him.

Q. Did you say a word about that, in your examination before the Magistrate? - A. Yes; but the Magistrate did not think proper to insert it.

Q. When was he apprehended? - A. On the 4th of March, at twelve o'clock at night.

Q. And was not committed till the 7th of April? - A. He underwent four examinations, and was detained upon suspicion of other robberies.

Q. What was the name of the Magistrate, who dare detain a man for a month? - A. Mr. Rupert Clarke.

Q.Holland is an intimate friend of your's? - A. He has lived in my neighbourhood for many years.

Q. Are you, or not, intimate with him? - A. I am very intimate with him.

Q.Holland gave evidence before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. You know that, if this man is convicted, there is a reward of forty pounds? - A.Every officer must know it.

Q. And Holland and you are very intimate? - A. Yes; I never knew any thing to his disadvantage; we have very frequently drank together.( John Riley corroborated the evidence of Rodgers.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence; but called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on the ground of humanity.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-61

326. JOHN CASTLEDINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , a Bank Note, value 5l. the property of Cornelius Neill .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

CORNELIUS NEILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. Q. You are a tailor ? - A. Yes.

Q. What countryman are you? - A. An Irishman: On the 6th of January I went to Somerset-house for my wages; I received a 5l. note and a sixpence; when I came out of the Pay Office I saw the prisoner, I am sure he is the man; he said young man you seem to be lame; I said yes, he said he was very sorry for my being so bad; he said he had a brother who died at sea, and he was come up from the country to receive his prizemoney: Upon that he walked along, and a pocketbook dropped before us; he reached to it, and I reached to it, but he had it first; upon that he laid hold of my hand, and said, whatever is in this book is half your's; with that he brought me down Fleet-street to Salisbury-court; we went into the parlour of the Blue Last public-house, in Salisbury-court; there was nobody in the room; she

prisoner called for a pot of beer, or a pot of ale; we had not been in the room two minutes, before another man came in, with a newspaper in his hand; he asked if there was any thing particular between us; he wished to read the newspaper; he did not wish to disturb us: The prisoner pulled out the pocket-book, and opened it; on one side he found a bill, and, on the other side, a diamond cross; he shewed the bill to the gentleman to read; he said the bill was of no consequence to either of us, and kept it; he said the bill was for one hundred pounds; that the diamond was worth the same: The prisoner said, he had a friend in town, and he would go out and get me forty pounds to my share of it; he went out, and, all the time he was gone, the other man was doing me, and trying to get out of me what money I had got: He asked me if I had any money; I, at first, said no; he said, he would not bring any money back with him, and it was bad for me; I had better get some money for him: The gentleman said, he had fifteen pounds that he would help me to; then the prisoner came in, and said, he could not find his friend; he asked me, what money I had got; I said I had got five pounds, and the other man said he had fifteen pounds; that would make it twenty pounds for him, till eleven o'clock the next day when he would sell the cross, and call upon me and settle it between us: He took down my name, and where I lived, No. 63, King-street, Bloomsbury; I gave the five pounds to the prisoner, and the other man gave him some paper; I did not see whether it was notes or not: The prisoner then gave me the cross; the other man came out with me; I left the prisoner at the door, then I went home; I staid at home the next day, expecting him, till half an hour past the time.

Q. How long afterwards was it, before you saw the prisoner? - A. On the 2d of March, I saw him facing Somerset House; his partner, the gentleman who was reading the paper, was with him; I saw him first; they were together, with three or four tailors, up a court; I ran over towards them, and, the moment they saw me, they ran up the court; I went after them and secured the prisoner; I laid hold of both, but I was very lame at the time, and I could not keep them both; I took him to Bow-street, and I was sent from Bow-street to the Lord Mayor, at the Mansion-House: I gave the cross to Mr. Canner.

ROBERT BOONE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are an officer belonging to Bow-street? - A. Yes; I was present when the prisoner was brought to Bow-street, by the last witness; I searched him, and found a pocket-book, containing a note for one hundred and twenty-five pounds, and a cross; I delivered it to Mr. Canner; Neill produced one cross, and shewed it to Mr. Bond.

Mr. WILLIAM CANNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are one of the City-Marshals? - A. Yes; the prisoner was brought to me at the Mansion-House; I received from the prosecutor this book, containing a cross, and also this bag, and this book; the bag contains some tissue paper, endorsed; and the book contains a receipt and a cross. (The receipt read.)

"London, Feb. 5, 1802.

"Received of the Right Honourable Lady Dupree, the sum of one hundred and twenty-five pounds, for one brilliant diamond cross; by me,

" WILLIAM SMITH ,

"Goldsmith and Jeweller."

Court. Has it a stamp upon it? - A. Yes, a two-penny-one.(Mr. Timothy Roberts , a jeweller, proved the value of the cross to be about four shillings and sixpence.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, but to beg for mercy. GUILTY , aged 64.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-62

327. RICHARD SWALLOW was indicted for that he, on the 2d of March , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Fulcher Holyland , did, by virtue of such employment, receive, and take into his possession, of and from Edward Chippendale, the sum of ten shillings, in monies numbered, for and on account of the said Fulcher Holyland, his master and employer; and afterwards, on the same day, fraudulently did embezzle and secrete part of the said sum of ten shillings, to wit, four shillings, in monies numbered, the property of the said Fulcher Holyland; and so, the Jurors say, that he did feloniously steal, take, and carry away, from the said Fulcher Holyland, four shillings in monies, numbered the monies of the said Fulcher Holyland; for whose use, and on whole account, the same was delivered to, and taken into, his possession, as aforesaid, against the form of the statute .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing four shillings, the property of Fulcher Holyland.

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-63

328. PHILIP GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , three pieces of brass centers, value 5s. the property of William Coslett .

The property being under an assignment to trustees, and William Coslett not being responsible for it, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-64

329. HENRY KEMP and JOHN NORRISH were indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , two pieces of timber, value 5s. the property of John Waller .

JOHN WALLER sworn. - I am a bricklayer : On the 1st of April, I think Thursday, I lost the property in the indictment; I missed it the next day from Well's Gardens ; I saw it, on that day, in the morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pratt. Q.When you saw it in the morning; did you examine it particularly; or did you observe it merely in passing, in a cursory manner? - A. I examined them all every morning; I know the timbers very well.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am an officer: On the 1st of April, a little before nine at night, in Wellclose-square, I saw the two prisoners in close conversation together; Kemp had a piece of timber; they were talking very low, which gave me a suspicion; after a few minutes they parted; the prisoner Kemp put the timber on his shoulder, and went towards Parson's-street, East-Smithfield, and Norrish went towards Well's-Gardens; I followed the prisoner Kemp into Parson's-street; he stopped at a chandler's-shop, and took the timber off his shoulder, and laid it down by the kerb-stone; he then went into the shop, and, in about seven or eight minutes after that, he returned with a lighted candle; he then went into the cellar underneath the shop; he came out of the cellar again with a saw; he then took up the timber, and was going to cut it; I caught him by the collar, and asked him where he brought that from; he told me a man had given it to him to carry, but he did not know who that man was; at that time the prisoner Norrish came down to the same shop, with the fellowpiece; my brother officer, John Cox , immediately took him into custody, and I took Kemp; I judged, from the direction that Norrish took, that it came from this building of Mr. Waller's; and so it turned out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peatt. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. Not to my knowledge.

JOHN COX sworn. - Corroborated the evidence of Smith.

- SIMMONDS sworn. - I am a lawyer; I sawed this timber for Mr. Waller before it was stolen; I knew it to be his property; I had seen it about two or three days before it was taken away; they were both cut out of one piece; I sawed them at Mr. Bartlett's timber-yard.

Q. Did you take them to the building in Well's-Gardens? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pratt. Q. Was this shiptimber? - A. No; I cut it for joists; I cut a nail in two in it with a saw, which is very remarkable.

Q. I should think pieces of joists must be very much alike; how could you know every distinct piece? - A. I cannot say as to that.

Q. It is nothing extraordinary that you should meet with a nail in an old piece of timber? - A. No.

Q. Did you never saw any other piece of timber, of the same length, the same thickness, and the same quality? - A. Yes, a great number, the same day, for Mr. Waller.

Waller. I have no doubt of its being my timber; there were two mortice holes, at a certain distance from the end, which is very different from any of the rest; they laid at the outside of the rest; I missed them from the outside; it is twenty-five feet long.

Kemp's defence. On the 1st of April, I was at a public-house, eating my supper, about eight o'clock in the evening; Norrish told me he had brought two pieces of wood, and asked me to assist in taking it home; I went with him, and he brought two pieces, and placed them against the rails; I took it for him to where this cellar was, and the officer took me.

Norrish's defence. I bought them for five shillings, for fire-wood.

The prisoners each called four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Kemp, GUILTY , aged 48.

Norrish, GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-65

JOHN PERCIVAL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March ; six fowls, value 6s. two blankets, value 4s. a stock-bed, value 10s. a gun, value 10s. and a blunderbuss, value 10s. the property of Phineas Borrett .

PHINEAS BORRETT sworn. - I live at No. 11, Scott's-Place, Islington ; I am a goldsmith : On Wednesday night, the 3d of March, I lost the articles in the indictment, out of my stable.

Q. How did they get into your stable? - A. Over a very high fence into the garden: On the 4th of March, about seven o'clock in the morning, I got up, and my servant informed me the stable had been robbed; I know nothing of the prisoner.

HENRY CROCKER sworn. - I was with Limbrick, and two other officers: On the 4th of March, about half-past six in the morning, in Cow-cross, I saw the prisoner coming along with a jackass and a pair of hampers; we followed him to a court in Blackboy-ally; I understood he lived there; he got of his jackats, and took him away, leaving the panniers; we stopped the panniers, and found in them six dead fowls, two blankets, a bed-tick, and a blunderbuss; there was no gun;

the prisoner was apprehended about six days afterwards; we went there to apprehend Barrett; the fowls were alive over-night; the fence was sixteen feet high.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence. GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-66

331. JAMES TEW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a child's dress, value 12s. the property of Samuel Warrington .

SAMUEL WARRINGTON sworn. - I know nothing of the loss.

WILLIAM GAMM sworn. - I am a hatter, next door to Mr. Warrington, the corner of Monmouth-street : I was in my own shop, on the 7th of April, about ten or eleven o'clock; I saw a man leaning over a post, and the prisoner walking by the next door, and going back again to the other man; I saw him do so once or twice; I was conscious they were going to take something, and I paid attention; I was going to take my hat to prevent there taking any thing, and I immediately saw the prisoner going past my window, with something in his apron; I pursued him about forty yards, and told him, I wanted what he had got in his apron; he ran a very little way further, and then threw the child's dress out of his apron; I did not pick up the dress, but pursued him about forty yards more, and took him; coming back again, a neighbour had picked up the dress; I took the prisoner to Mr. Warrington.

RICHARD GOUGH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Warrington; I hung that dress up at our shop door; it was fastened by a pin to other clothes, and hung by a string to a nail.(The property was produced, and identified by Warrington.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked the things up from the ground; I walked backwards and forwards two or three times, and then I went away with it. GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-67

332. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , a pair of sheets, value 5s. the property of Benjamin Steel , in a lodging-room .

BENJAMIN STEEL sworn. - I am a victualler , in Oxford-street : On the 24th of April, the prisoner came to me, and asked me if he could sleep there that night; I told him he could; he went to bed about ten o'clock; the next morning he came down about ten o'clock; he paid for his bed overnight; I went up stairs and looked at the bed, and there were no sheets; I pursued him, and, in less than ten minutes, I took him in Henrietta-street, Cavendish-square; I brought him back to the house, and sent for an officer; he sat down in a box by himself, and, when the officer came, the sheets were at his feet; when I brought him back, he denied having them, but wanted to go into the back-parlour, for he wanted to speak to me; there were no sheets in the box when he went in.

ANN TODD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Steel: A little before ten o'clock, I went up stairs, and put a bolster upon the bed; I then shewed him the room he was to sleep in; I shut the door and left him; the sheets were on then; the next morning they were gone; it was a small room that he had, hardly room to go in without moving the bedstead.

RICHARD LOVATT sworn. - I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner and the sheets; I found them lying between his feet, loose. (Produces them.)(The sheets were identified by Todd.)

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent of it as the child unborn. GUILTY , aged 54.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-68

333. ANN COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a linen shirt, value 2s. 6d. a check apron, value 1s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. a silk ribbon, value 6d. and a wooden trunk, value 1s. the property of Elizabeth Crettee .

ELIZABETH CRETTEE sworn. - I live at No. 9, Phoenix-street, Spital-fields ; I am a silk windster ; the prisoner is the same; I lost a shirt, an apron, a handkerchief, a ribbon, and my trunk; the shift and apron were hanging up to dry; she lodged with me; I went out in the morning to work; I left her in bed; when I came home, I missed my things out of the room; I went to look for her, and found her in Shoreditch; she said she was no thief; I took her to the watch-house, and found the ribbon down her bosom; I had left it in the trunk, wrapped up in the handkerchief; the trunk was broke open; I found nothing else upon her.( Thomas Hart , the constable, produced the ribbon, which was identified by Cratee.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked up four shillings wrapped in this ribbon. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-69

334. CHRISTOPHER DAVENPORT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February, a saddle, value 21s. the property of Thomas Lynn .

There not being sufficient evidence to being the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-70

335. MARY GROSVENOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , a great coat, value 4s. the property of Godfreid Schmid .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-71

336 JOHN FOX was indicted for that he, on the 11th of June , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Robert Emmott , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession, the sum of 20l. for and on account of his said master; afterwards fraudulently did embezzle and secrete the same; and so, the Jurors say, in manner and form aforesaid, he feloniously did steal the same .

There no being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-72

337. JANE JUDGE, alias CANNON , and MARY SOWINGS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a silk bonnet, value 1s. a great coat, value 10s. a gown, value 10s. a shawl, value 1s. a pair of stays, value 1s. a pair of shoes, value 6d. a pair of stockings, value 6d. and an apron, value 1s. the property of Samuel Johnson ; a bonnet, value 6d. a bed-gown, value 6d. and gown, value 3d. the property of Mary Jordan .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-73

338. RICHARD-HILL MATHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , two boots, value 10s. the property of Thomas Woodward .

THOMAS WOODWARD sworn. - I am a boot and shoemaker ; I lost two odd boots; I know nothing of it myself.

CHARLES HENLEY swown. - I am a cheese monger, in South-street, Manchester-square, next door to Mr. Woodward: I saw a tailor go up the street, on the 14th of April, with a pair of new boots, about five o'clock in the afternoon; having a suspicion, I went into Mr. Woodward's, to know if they had lost any: Mr. Woodward missed a pair, and I went after the prisoner, and caught him in the next street, with the boots buttoned up under his blue jacket; I asked him what he had got; he said nothing; I tore open his waistcoat, and there were the boots; I told him he had taken a pair of boots from the window; he said, I would have taken you if you had hung there; I brought the prisoner back, and Mr. Woodward's maid brought the boots back.

CHARLOTTE LONG sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Woodward, (produces the books); I hung the boots up that morning; I am sure they are Mr. Woodward's back.(The boots were indentified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the boots as I was going along.

Woodward. He said, before the Magistrate, two gentlemen in black gave them to him.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-74

339. EDMUND NOWLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , a coat, value 3s. a waistcoat, value 3s. and a shirt, value 2s. the property of James Byrne .

JAMES BYRNE sworn. - I am a labouring man ; I live in Bowl-yard, Broad St. Giles's ; the prisoner at the bar and I slept together, for five or six nights; he used to be backwards and forwards in the room, and generally had a key; he was a supernumerary watchman: On Saturday, the 20th of February, I came home, and he was in the tap-room; we had some beer together, and then I asked him for the key of the room; I had got some money in my pocket; my pocket was had, and I wanted to put it in my box up stairs; he gave me the key; I went up stairs, and he went with me, and he saw me put the money into my box, and the clothes over them; then I locked the room-door, and we both went down to drink the beer; and, while we were there, he stole the key out of my pocket; he went away, and, some time after, I went up stairs and looked through the keyhole, and saw the prisoner, with my box open, and my clothes tied up in a bundle, as they are now; he was kneeling at the box; I said, you villain, what are you going to rob me; he said, you know I told you, a week ago, I wanted to go to Botany Bay for Government, and now I think I shall; he struck me a violent blow on the head, and I knocked him down and secured him; he bit my hands very much. (Produces the clothes.)

Prisoner's defence. He does not speak one words but falsly; the clothes were never in the box at all; he had brought them out of the pawnbroker's an hour before; he had broke open a house the Monday before, and desired me to take a lodging for him and me; he has done this for thirst of blood-money; he said he was very sorry he had not blood money as well as other watchmen in St. Giles's; he sent a strange man to me in Newgate, with a stamp paper, which was a bond for eight pounds; and afterwards another bond for six pounds; and said, if I would sign that, he would not appear against me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-75

340. CHRISTOPHER THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , 20lb. weight of lead, value 5s. the property of John Harcourt , Esq. fixed to a certain building of his, called a house .

Second Count. Charging it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

JAMES NORTHWOOD sworn. - I am a surveyor: I can only prove the property.

JOHN WILD sworn. - I am a carpenter: I was coming round the corner of York-street, and Cumberland-street, Mary-le-bonne ; I heard a person at the top of the house, making a noise; I listened to hear what it was; it was about three o'clock in the afternoon; it appeared to me like lead ripping up; I heard the states rattling; a man was by me that went up stairs; and, upon hearing somebody coming up, he went down the back front, and his hat fell off into the street; I had taken the third house from it, and I went through and caught the prisoner on the back-yard wall of the premises; I asked him what he was after there; the prisoner said, I am after some wood, master; I said, you have no business here after wood, or any thing else; the prisoner said, I have lost my hat; oh! says I, come along with me; here is your hat at the front part of the house: Some persons went up through the house, to see what they had been at; they found the lead taken out of the gutter; I then took him to Mary-lebonne watch-house.

Q. Did he say it was his hat? - A. He owned to it, and took it; I said to the prisoner, you are a carpenter, are not you; he replied, yes; I said, how came you to do such a thing as this; he said, I had better do that than worse, they can't hang me; they can only transport me; says I, if we let you go on this way, you may get at my house; he said, no; you know the gutter is not so easy got at there: Going down Oxford-street, he wanted me to let him run away, and tried several times to get from me; but I kept hold of him.

Q. Where is the lead? - A. It was not taken off the premises; it is rolled up, I suppose, about two foot at each end; it was begun at both ends, but not cut, the whole length of the middle gutter.

Q. Was it separated from the building at all? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-76

341. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , a shirt, value 3s. 6d. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of Robert Willis .

ROBERT WILLIS sworn. - I am a servant ; the prisoner slept in the same house that I did, No. 4, Black Swan-court, Golden-lane : On Sunday, the 24th of January, when I came home in the evening, I missed my clothes; I had the prisoner taken up; he said they were pledged at Mr. Brown's, at Westminster, we went to Mr. Brown's, but found nothing pledged in his name; then we went to his mother's, and found a handkerchief of mine; I learned that his mother's name was Halesworth; then we went to Mr. Brown's again, and found a shirt pledged in the name of Halesworth.

JOHN FARREN sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Brown, pawnbroker, No. 6l, Strutton-ground, Westminster; I know nothing of the prisoner; here is a linen shirt pledged by Martha Halesworth for half-a-crown; she is the sister of the prisoner.

JAMES - sworn. - I am a watchman of St. Luke's: The prosecutor came to me, and asked me if I knew a man of the name of William Williams ; I told him, yes; he desired that I would apprehend him; Willis met him himself, and apprehended him; he told me that the things were at Mr. Brown's in Strution-ground, Westminster; we went there, but could not find any property in that name; we went to his mother's.

Prisoner. I told him what I did, upon his promising that I should be liberated.

Court. Q. Is that true? - A. No; I said, the young man is a stranger to this part of the country, you had better give me the duplicate, and I dare say he will be satisfied; on Monday, the 22d of February, I took charge of the prisoner. (Produces a handkerchief.)

MARTHA HALESWORTH sworn. - This handkerchief my brother brought to my mother's very dirty, and he asked me to change it for another; my mother gave him a silk handkerchief instead of it, which she had on; he said, Mrs. Francis gave it to him; I pledged it for half-a-crown, and gave him the duplicate.

Q. Are you sure that is the handkerchief you had from him? - A. Yes.

Q. And that shirt? - A. I pledged the shirt at Mr. Brown's too.

Q. What is your brother? - A. A watch finisher.

Q. What is your mother? - A. A widow, and goes out chairing; I have worked for Mr. Mills, a stay-maker, in Holywell-street, these eight years.(The property was identified by Willis.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-77

342. MICHAEL DUMFEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , a boat, value 3l. the property of William Harvey .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-78

343. MARY WHELDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , a quart

pewter pot, value 1s. and a pint pewter pot, value 6d. the property of John Kendall .

JOHN KENDALL sworn. - I keep the Hat and Ton, Hatton-wall : On Sunday night, the 11th of April, about half past eight, the prisoner came in for half a pint of beer, and I saw her pull a curtain back, and take a quart and a pint pewterpot, and brush out of doors very quick; I went out at the door, and caught her by the skirts.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden: I was at Mr. Kendall's; he called me, I searched the prisoner, and found a quart pot, and a pint pot, in her apron; I found this piece of metal in her pocket.

Prisoner's defence. I beg for the mercy of the Court. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-79

344. WILLIAM HUME was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , a man's hat, value 2s. two parasols, value 10s. four gold rings, value 13s. and two printed books, value 2s. the property of John Davis .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-80

345. HARRIET LAMBERT and SARAH HOAR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , three bed gowns, value 3s. the property of Robert Ward .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoners, they were both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-81

346. MARTS NACLANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a hat, value 4s. the property of William Stocks .(The prisoner being a foreigner, an interpreter was sworn.)

WILLIAM STOCKS sworn. - I live at No. 145, Wapping-street: On the 23d of March, I think Tuesday, four foreigners came into my shop to buy a hat, the prisoner was not one of them; I sold one of them a three-shilling hat; as soon as they were gone, in consequence of information, I went out, and perceived the prisoner making towards a wharf, where one of the men was that had been in my shop; I saw that the prisoner had something like a bundle under his jacket; I asked him what he had got there; he went away, and I followed him to the Dundee Arms, where I took him with my hat upon him; it hung outside my door; it has my private mark in it; I had put it at the door about three hours before; the prisoner was rather tipsey.( Matthew Connerley , the officer, produced the hat, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. One of my comrades came out of the shop, and gave me the hat to carry on board; I thought he had bought it; when the gentleman came up, the man that gave me the hat ran away. GUILTY , aged 16.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-82

347. THOMAS KERNAN and PATRICK ROWAN were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , two pieces of timber, value 6s. the property of Edward Taylor , and James Taylor ; and the other for receiving one piece of timber, value 3s. parcel of the before-mentioned goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES TAYLOR sworn. - I am a carpenter and builder , at Balam, in the parish of Streatham, in partnership with my brother, Edward; we lost the timber from Westminster ; I know nothing of it myself.

RICHARD BROCK sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Taylors: On the 17th of March, I had taken a piece of timber, seventeen feet long, to make a scaffold in Dartmouth-street, but finding I should not want it, I left one end on the brickwork, and the other in the cellar; the next morning, the watchman informed me he had detected a man in stealing timber; I went up directly, and missed it; I found another piece of timber in the possession of the landlord of the house, which I had not missed; one piece I can swear to; the other has no particular mark.

BENJAMIN WADE sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 18th of March, I was calling the hour of two o'clock; I heard a great noise; I left my lanthorn in my box, and made to the noise; it was at the two Chairmen public-house, in Dartmouth-street; I saw the prisoner, Kernan, with a piece of timber on his shoulder; he is a supernumerary watchman in the same parish; I immediately sprung my rattle, and seized the prisoner; two men sprung out upon me, and rescued him; Hugh M'Duffey was the first that came up to my assistance; Kernan was rescued away into Patrick Rowan's house; I then went, and got more assistance, but they would not allow us admittance for the space of half an hour; they had got the prisoner concealed at the very top of the house; I was afraid to go up, for they broke the roof of the house down upon us; I took him three quarters of an hour afterwards in bed, in Rowan's house; I did not see Rowan.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This was the night of St. Patrick's day? - A. Yes.

Q. That is a day upon which these fort of people generally make mercy? - A. Yes.

Q.The first time you saw Rowan, he was in his shirt? - A. Yes, he was.

Q. And rather drunk? - A. They were all very mercy.

HUGH M'DUFFEY sworn. - On the morning of the 18th of March, Wade sprung his rattle; I went to his assistance, and found him and two or three more engaged; I knew the prisoner, Kernan; the stoutest of the men laid hold of the prisoner, and a woman fastened on me behind, and they forcibly dragged him into Rowan's house; it is a private house; Rowan was then standing behind the door; I desired him to let me in; he told me, me, nor no one, should come in that night; he then forced the door too, and fastened it; we sprung our rattles at the end of Dartmouth-street, and the patrols came up; they ordered the doors to be opened, which was refused; I then took the woman to the watch-house that had assaulted me; I gave charge of her, and came back again; they had then got in; I dare say it was three quarters of an hour before they opened the door; the house was searched, but the prisoner was not found the first time; I was not present at the first search; we searched the second time, and found him in bed; the timber was taken to the watch-house; I cannot say who brought it out of the cellar.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You think you saw Rowan behind the door? - A. I am positive I saw him, and spoke to him.

Q. You did not tell him you was come to take a man for felony? - A. I told him he had been taking timber, and desired him to let me in.

Q. In the course of that three-quarters of an hour, he had time enough to have removed the timber? - A. No; there was always somebody at the door the whole of the time.( Walter Cross , Benjamin Timbrell , and Robert Fane, watchman and patrols, corroborated the testimony of M'Duffey.)( Thomas Penny , a patrol, produced the timber, and deposed that be found it in the cellar of Rowan's house.)

Kernan's defence. I never was before Judge or Jury in my life before, nor would I now, but for this man; he often wanted me to go, and take wood, which I never did when I was in my sober senses.

The prisoner, Rowan, called Mary Colney , who deposed that she spent the evening at his house, and that they were all drunk. He also called five other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Kernan, GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

Rowan, GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-83

348. JANE SKAISBRICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , a gown, value 1s, and a pair of stockings, value 8d. the property of Sarah Holliday .

SARAH HOLLIDAY sworn. - I make door-mats ; I live at No. 40, Christopher's-alley, Finsbury-square ; the prisoner slept in the same room with me: On Sunday morning, the 4th of April, I got up between six and seven o'clock, and enquired where the prisoner was; she was gone, and I found that I had neither gown, stockings, or shoes, to put on; the gown I have on is borrowed, she was found at Westminster, on the 8th of April, with my things upon her.

WILLIAM FORD sworn. - The prisoner was a servant to me; I saw these things taken from her.(The property was produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. She promised me them, before I took them. GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-84

349. JOSEPH SLAUGHTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , a sow, value 3l. and seven pigs, value 7l. the property of Thomas Chipps .

THOMAS CHIPPS sworn. - I live at Farnham-Royal, in Buckinghamshire ; I am a cordwainer : On the 3d of March, between the hours of ten at night, and six in the morning, I lost my sow and pigs from a little house adjoining my dwelling-house; they were in a fly; they were nineteen weeks old; I afterwards found three of the pigs at Dock-head, three at Mr. Mills's, in Oxford-street, and the sow, at James Smith's, at Bexley, in Kent; the other I have not found; it was sold in Smithfield-market for twenty-five shillings; the sow I have bred up from a little one; three of the boar-pigs were lately cut, so that any man could swear to them from letting them run to that age, they are generally cut at about a month or five weeks; the prisoner called upon me to buy them, and said, he would call again in a fortnight, and it was that very day fortnight I lost them.

JOHN PETERS sworn. - I am a chaff cutter and labourer, at Harmondsworth: I was going to Uxbridge on Thursday, the 4th of March, at nearly seven o'clock in the evening; I met the prisoner with a sow and seven pigs; he asked me five pounds for the sow; I asked him if he was joking; he said, no, that was the lowest; he turned out of the Bath road into the Hayes road, which comes from Uxbridge, and went towards Harlington; I am sure the prisoner is the man; the pigs were somewhere about twenty weeks old, three of them were barrow pigs, they appeared to have been lately cut; and four sow pigs; I have seen three of them since at Mr. Mills's, In Oxford-road, and three at Dockhead, at Mr. Davis's; I have not seen the sow since; I am sure the pigs were the same that I saw

the prisoner driving, about eleven or twelve miles from Farnham-Royal; he drove them as fast as he could, I should suppose, better than four miles an hour.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You met the prisoner in the high Bath road, near Harlington-corner? - A. Yes.

Q. Any person wishing to go to Uxbridge, would go that way? - A. Yes.

Q. Was not Wednesday the day before Etonfair? - A. Yes.

JOHN EVANS sworn. - I am a dealer in hay and straw, at Hayes, and I have another place in Vigo-lane: On the 2d of March, I was at Brentford-market, I had twenty-four pigs left; I hired the prisoner, and another man, to go to Eton-fair with them, and, on Thursday morning, I went towards Uxbridge with the Banbury coach; when the coach changed horses, I got down, and walked and I met the prisoner near Southall, driving a sow and eight pig, four barrow pigs, and four sow pigs; I cannot speak to the age; I took them to Smithfield, and sold them; I sold three to Mr. Davis, at Dock-head, at twenty-nine shillings apiece, three to Mr. Mills, in Oxford-road, at twenty-eight shillings, and two, at fifty shillings, a barrow-pig, and a sow-pig; the sow-pig I sold to one Smith; there are six out of the seven that I am certain are the pigs I had from the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you a brother of the name of Evans? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you employ the prisoner and him together, for the purpose of buying and telling pigs? - A. No; I employed them to go to Eton.

Q. The pigs were sold as your property? - A Yes.

Q. You were taken up for this? - A. Yes; a Uxbridge.

Q. You were in custody sometime? - A. Yes; I told slaughter of it, and he told me not to be in sear, or have any dread, for he came honestly b them; I was in custody from ten o'clock in the morning till twelve the next day.

JAMES MILLS sworn. - On the 5th of March, I purchased three pigs of the last witness; Mr. Chipps afterwards owned them.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am a labouring man; I purchased a sow of John Evans , in the public market, at Smithfield; it was afterwards owned by Thomas Chipps .

Prisoner's defence. I bought these pigs; I gave fourteen pounds for them, and took a receipt from him. GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-85

350. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a sow-pig, value 5l. the property of Joseph Cooper .

It appearing in evidence, that the prisoner had picked up the pig in the Thames, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-86

351. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , a table-cloth, value 10. a gown, value 5s. and four silk handkerchiefs, value 4s. the property of Sarah Saunders , widow .

SARAH SAUNDERS sworn. - I am a laundress , No. 12, Bowling-street, Westminster : On Saturday morning, the 6th of March, I lost my property from a line where they were hanging to dry, on the landing-place of the second-floor; I knew the prisoner when she was a servant, and brought me things to mangle.

EDWARD BRAMWELL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Wright, a pawnbroker, in Tothill-fields; on Saturday morning the 6th of March, about a quarter after nine, the prisoner offered this handkerchief to pledge, I advanced her one shilling and sixpence on it; she then offered a damask table-cloth to pledge, which being wet, and the marks not an swering to the name she gave, I questioned her as to where she got it; she said, she had it front Mrs. Goodrich, in Peter-street; I went to Mrs. Good on, and she said, she had sent no such person; I hen stopped her, and sent for Mr. Bly; the gown was taken from her in our shop.(Jame Bly, an officer, produced the property, which was identified by Mrs. Saunders.)

Prisoner's defence. I had the things from this woman, she said she would make me a compliment if I would pledge them for her; she told me her name was Goodrich.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-87

352. WILLIAM TUPPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a pair of breeches, value 10s. two half handkerchiefs, value 5s. two pocket handkerchiefs, value 1s. a waistcoat, value 2s. and a shirt, value 2s. the property of Charles Bullard .

CHARLES BULLARD sworn. - I am a labouring man , I work in closes and commons: On the 26th of March, the prisoner and I, and several more, were playing at quoits, all till dark, at Feltham ; we went to bed about twelve o'clock, and contrived to sleep three in a bed; the prisoner sat up in the next room; when I waked in the morning, the prisoner was gone, and my bundle; I and three more went after him; we had passed the prisoner, I suppose about three miles, before morning, on the Western-road, I suppose he must have laid down in a barn; we came back, and met him coming up Egham-hill, he was near three hundred yards off,

when he saw us he began to run, with the things in a bag, he had them in a bag across his shoulder, he ran over hedge and ditch, and threw down the things in the middle of the road; a young farmer and I overtook him, and brought him back; he cried and begged I would not hurt him; he said, it was the first thing that he had ever done; I asked him how he could think of robbing a poor person that had not had any work for some time; I charged a constable with him at Feltham, and took him before a Justice, (produces the property;) I know these things to be mine; I emptied the bag out into a room, and this pistol fell out. (Producingit.)

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor, God knows how they came in my bag, I don't know how they came there; the pistol I found upon a common when we were grubbing it.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-88

353. SARAH SHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , 5lb. weight of beef, value 3s. 6d. the property of William Lindus .

WILLIAM COLLIER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. William Lindus , a butcher : On the 7th of April, I saw the prisoner put her hand upon a piece of beef upon the stall, outside the shop; I turned round to weigh some steaks, and immediately missed the beef; I went after the prisoner, and brought her back with it under her cloak; she was taken before a Magistrate, and committed; it weighed five pounds and a half.

Prisoner's defence. I was going through Whitechapel, and a man ran past me, and whether he dropped it, or whether it fell off the stall, I cannot tell, but I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Privately whipped , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-89

354. JANE VENNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, two child's caps, value 2s. a knife, value 3d. two printed books, value 1s. a yard of dimity, value 6d. a quarter of a yard of muslin, value 6d. the property of Michael Abrahams .

MICHAEL ABRAHAMS sworn. - The prisoner is my servant : On Monday the 26th of April, about ten o'clock at night, there was an alarm of fire in the Minories, very near a friend of ours; my wife and myself went to assist them if we could; we stopped there till about eleven o'clock at night before the fire was extinguished; we got home at almost twelve o'clock at night; the prisoner came to the door, and I thought she smelt very strong of liquor; I said to my wife, my dear, you have left the key in the liquor closet; she said, she had not; I sent her for some beer, and while she was gone, between the bed and the sacking, she found part of the things mentioned in the indictment, and the rest were in an old box of her's that was not locked; upon that I sent for a watchman, and gave charge of her.

JULIA ABRAHAMS sworn. - I am the wife of Michael Abrahams ; when I came home with him, I went into the parlour even with the kitchen; Mr. Abrahams said, this woman has opened the door of the liquor closet, she smells so strong of liquor; we could not find her; I opened her box, and found two books, one a prayer-book, belonging to a former servant, the other a tutor to my daughter, when she was a child; the other things were found between the sacking and the bed; this sheet I had missed ever since Good-Friday; it was whole when I missed it, it is now cut to pieces; I was really suspicious that she had taken a bottle of liquor, and concealed it in the room.

Prisoner's defence. I had but five pounds ten shillings a year, and I had received but one shilling and sixpence, and therefore I could not have much to spend in liquor.

Q.(To Mr. Abrahams.) Had you a good character with her? - A. Yes, a very good character, where she had lived two years and a half.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-90

355. SARAH ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , three sheets, value 42s. two peticoats, value 20s. three pillow-cases, value 12s. four shirts, value 42s. two bed gowns, value 5s. twelve towels, value 12s. eighteen pair of stockings, value 20s. three shifts, value 10s. a pair of pockets, value 1s. a night-cap, value 1s. and a table-cloth, value 10s. the property of Samuel-Gould Underhill .

SAMUEL GOULD UNDERHILL sworn. - I live in Edward's-low, Hackney-road : I am a clerk in the Bank ; the prisoner lived servant with Mrs. Phipps, a laundress; I know nothing of it myself.

MARY LOWE sworn. - I live at Mr. Underhill's: On the 30th of November; the prisoner came to fetch a bundle of dirty linen; I knowing she did live with Mrs. Phipps, I gave it her, the bundle contained the things mentioned in the indictment.

WILLIAM PHIPPS sworn. - The prisoner left our employ the 16th of November; on the 30th of November we sent to Mr. Underhill's for the things, and were told that the prisoner had had them.

ANN PHIPPS sworn. - I am a laundress, at Hemerton; the prisoner left my service on the 16th of November.

Q. Was she your servant on the 30th? - A. No.

Q. Did she bring these things to you? - A. No.

Q.(To Lowe.) Are you sure the prisoner is the person? - A. I am very sure of it, for I know her very well.

Q.(To Mr. Underhill.) Have you ever found your things? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it; I never went for the things.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-91

356. ANN HARRIS , alias COOPER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , four shirts, value 4s. and a shift, value 1s. the property of Samuel Pollard .

SARAH POLLARD sworn. - My husband, Samuel Pollard , is a cow-keeper , in Tothill-fields, Westminster ; the prisoner was my servant three or four months, and had the care of those things; I missed them on the 4th of March; there were no other person came into the premises but my husband, myself, and she; I told her I missed those things, and she left my service immediately.

Q. Without giving you any warning? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you found them again? - A. Yes, they were found at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES GOULDING sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, (produces four shirts:) the first was taken in on the 26th of December; another the 17th of January; another the 15th of February; and another the 16th of February; I took them in of the prisoner at the bar.(They were identified by Mrs. Pollard.)

Goulding. Here is a shirt which was not pledged by the prisoner.

GEORGE CLEVELAND sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner in the work-house at St. George's.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of these things.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-92

357. ELIZABETH HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , a cloak, value 18s. the property of Emanuel Moses , privately in his shop .

EMANUEL MOSES sworn. - I am a dealer and salesman in clothes , No. 67, Bunhill-row : I lost a cloak between four and five in the afternoon of the 1st of April; there were several articles of petticoats and gowns, and three cloaks, hanging outside the door; I saw them safe at three o'clock; while I was having my dinner, I heard a person call, and ask the price of a blue sattin cloak; I answered, twelve shillings; I went out to the door, and found my cloak was gone, and the person I could not see.

Q. How soon after was it? - A. About one minute; I was very much alarmed, and a lady opposite gave me information; in consequence of which I went after the prisoner; I called to her, and beckoned her, and then she run away; I followed her into a house up one pair of stairs, and there I catched her by her gown; I took the woman in one hand, and the cloak in the other; I brought her into the street, and delivered her to the constable, with the cloak.

THOMAS GERRARD sworn. - I am a constable of St. Luke's; (produces the cloak;) I received it from Mr. Moses.

MARIA LOCK sworn. - I live in Bunhill-row, opposite Mr. Moses; I was sitting near the window, and saw the prisoner take something, but what it was I could not tell; she went from the door, I saw no more of her.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person? - A. No, I cannot say.(The cloak was identified by Mr. Moses.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

"My Lord, with the greatest deference to your Lordship, and this honourable Court, before whom I stand, I humbly address myself. The offence of which I stand accused, I am innocent of, as I never saw the property till I saw it in my prosecutor's hand; my prosecutor offered my father to make it up for the sum of three guineas, which my father, being but a poor working man, could not give him; and now have nothing to depend upon but your Lordship's justice and mercy; the prosecutor's wife struck me several times, without giving her any provocation. As I am innocent, I trust to your Lordship, and the laws of my country, being quite ignorant, and unable to speak for myself. I remain, with the utmost respect, your Lordship's obedient and very humble servant."

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-93

358. WILLIAM LOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , three yards of muslin, value 30s. the property of William Gedge and Joseph Gedge .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

- RICHARDSON sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. William and Joseph Gedge, linen-drapers : On Wednesday, the 17th of February, the prisoner came to our shop, and requested to look at some muslin for neck-handkerchiefs; he requested I would let him have a good article, for the last he had was not so good as it ought to have been; I recommended him a piece of muslin, which he requested me to cut three squares off from; I did so, I put them in a paper, and made a parcel of them, and the bill of parcels I gave into his hand.

Q. Had the bill of parcels any endorsement except upon the face of it? - A. None; he wished me to send some person with them, and he would return the money; upon which he asked if there was not an army agent's office in the neighbourhood; I told him there was; Christie and Shaw's, in Leicester-place; he then said, is there not an attorney in Leicester-place, a Mr. Cannon? I told him there was; he said, he knew him; he went away, and the little boy with him.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Have you not, in your time, seen a person you may have taken for me? - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect having seen me in your shop before? - A. No.

Q. Did you not consider me as responsible for the goods in question? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not sell the articles in question to me? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you doubtful whether I should pay for them? - A. No; you told me you would give te money to the person who brought the parcel.

Q. Are you not in the habit of letting goods go out of your shop upon credit? - A. Not with strangers.

Q. It is impossible you can swear you have not given credit at times where you form an idea that the party is responsible for the amount? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give the bill into my hands, or the hands of the boy? - A. Into your hands, and you returned it; and I gave it into the hands of the boy, with the goods.

WILLIAM ABBOTT sworn. - I am shop-boy to Messrs. Gedge's: On the 17th of February, the prisoner came into our shop; I went with the prisoner to Mr. Cannon's, No. 5, Leicester-place; the prisoner knocked at the door, and asked if Mr. Cannon was within; he knocked at the door, and the servant said, Mr. Cannon was not at home; then he went over to Messrs. Christie and Shaw's; I went with him; he knocked at the door, and asked if Mr. Christie was within; the boy told him he was not within; and he asked if Mr. Shaw was within; he said, Mr. Shaw was within; he said, that would do all the same, and he went up stairs; Mr. Richardson gave me the bill of parcels to go with the prisoner, and I gave it to the prisoner in Messrs. Christie and Shaw's passage; he said, he would bring the money in a few minutes; he came down in about five minutes, and asked the boy for a pen and ink; he took him into the office, and he wrote at the bottom of the bill, "Mr. Cutfield, pay the above to the bearer;" he told me to go to No. 4, Leicester-place, and Mr. Cutfield would give me the money; I went there, but no such person lived there; while I was standing at the door, I saw the prisoner go up Leicester-place.

Q. Did you ever see him again till he was taken up? - A. No.

Q. How long was it before he was taken up? - A. I don't know.

Court. Q. Are you sure he is the same man? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you deliver the parcel to him without meaning to receive the money? - A. I meant to receive the money when he brought it down.

Q. Have you ever received the money at all? - A. No.

Court. Q. How much was it to come to? - A. One pound fifteen shillings.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Can you swear to my being in your shop on the 17th of February? - A. I can.

Q. Did you ever see me before that period? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did you ever receive any instructions from your master what to say before you came to this Court? - A. No.

The prisoner put in a written defence, denying the charge. GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-94

359. ESTHER WELLINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a pair of cotton stockings, value 2s. and a towel, value 6d. the property of William Northey , Esq.

ANN WHITAKER sworn. - I am servant to William Northey , Esq. at Epsom; the prisoner was a chair-woman at Mr. Northey's town-house, No. 2, Mortimer-street ; she has been chair-woman there three or four years; there have been a great number of articles lost from the house; the pawnbroker she chairs for had some suspicion of her, and they came to me to inquire her character; I knew nothing of the loss of the things till they were found.

JOHN MORRIS sworn. - I live with my brother, a pawn-broker; the prisoner chaired at our house; we were robbed, and I suspected nobody but her; I got a search-warrant, and found thirty duplicates in her lodgings, but none of them leading to our property; eighteen of them were articles pledged at our shop, among which was the property in the indictment, (produces the stockings and towel;) the stockings were pledged on the 12th of October, by the prisoner, for one shilling.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you had any quarrel with the prisoner? - A. Never.

Q. She is a woman having children - is she not? - A.Several; she had a daughter at my house.

Ann Whitaker. The stockings have Mr. Northey's name, wove by the maker, in the stockings; they are Mrs. Northey's stockings.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Whether Mrs. Northey gave them the prisoner or not, you do not know? - A. No.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I searched the prisoner's apartments, and found the duplicates belonging to this property.

Prisoner's defence. I came by them honestly.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-95

360. GEORGE-SAMUEL WARRINER was indicted for that he, on the 21st of November , being employed in the capacity of clerk to William Bayley and William Blew , did receive and take into his possession, of and from George Hayes , a certain banker's draft for the payment of 11l. 1s. 6d. for and on account of his said masters and employers, and that he did afterwards fraudulently and feloniously embezzle the said banker's draft; and the Jurors say, that he, in manner and form aforesaid, feloniously did steal it .

There were two other Counts, varying the manner of charging the offence.

WILLIAM BLEW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I am in partnership with William Bavley , perfumer , in Cockspur-street; the prisoner was our clerk to collect and receive money; he kept our books; we had an account with Mr Hayes of 25l. 19s. 2d. due to us for two quarter accounts.

Q. Did you ever receive that money from Mr. Hayes? - A. Never.

Q. Are your books here? - A. Yes, the prisoner kept the waste-book and the ledger. (Produces them.)

Q. Is that sum brought to account in either of these books? - A. No, it is not: On the 21st of January, he went at his usual time to dinner; he did not return that day; but, on the following day, a little girl came with a message that he was too unwell to come to business, and he never returned afterwards; I went round to Deal, Dover, and Folkstone, in pursuit of him; he was at last found at Liverpool; I was directed to him by the name of West.

Q. There are sums accounted for by him after the 21st of November? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have no other partner in business? - A. None.

Q. Has Mr. Scarmer no interest in any part of your business? - A. No.

Q. You have other persons collecting and receiving money in your business? - A.It was his business to receive and collect the wholesale accounts in the Westminster part of the town; the wholesale accounts, both east and west, were received by him.

Q. Do you mean to say that no other person received any of the wholesale accounts? - A. There might be a chance case, if a person was going by a person's door, I might have desired him to receive it, but I do not know that I ever did.

GEORGE HAYES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a merchant, in Little James-street, Bedford-row? - A. Yes: On the 21st of November, the prisoner at the bar called on me from Messrs. Bayley and Blew; I paid him a draft upon Dorrien's and Company for 11l. 1s. 6d.

Q. Is there any name indorsed upon it? - A. Yes,"Received for Bayley and Blew,

G. S. WARRINER."

Q. Has that draft been returned since by your banker's as paid? - A. Yes.

CHARLES ROWE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk in the house of Dorrien's and Company, in Finch-lane.

Q. Look at that draft? - A. This draft was paid at our house by two five-pound notes, and the rest in cash.

Court. Q. Do you recollect to whom it was paid? - A. I cannot say.

WILLIAM BAYLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston Q. At any time did you receive from the prisoner, or did he at any time account to you for 11l. 1s. 6d. received from Mr. George Hayes ? - A. Never.

Prisoner's defence. I was intrusted with this money on the day upon which Mr. Bayley never saw me afterwards.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-96

361. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a child's frock, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Chapman .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-97

362. JOHN THOMAS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a silk cloak, value 5s. the property of Thomas Roberts .

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - I know nothing of the loss; I had an alarm; I went after the prisoner, and took him.

MARY ROBERTS sworn. - On the 3d of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in, and took a cloak from a round table where I was sitting; I immediately collared him, but he got away from me; I called my husband, and he went after him; I am sure he is the lad, for I never lost sight of him; but what he did with the cloak I cannot tell, for I never found it; but I am sure he is the person, for I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's defence. I went in to inquire for a person of the name of Brown; and, when I came out, this woman called out stop thief.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-98

363. JOHN BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a ham, value 20s. the property of Francis Searle .

CHARLES ROSE sworn. - I am servant to Francis Searle , in Oxford-street : On Thursday, the 11th of March, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I was returning home from the city, I saw the prisoner and another lad standing at Mr. Searle's private door, in Charlotte-street; they had a bundle; I had information that one of those lads had stole a ham, and Mr. Black was bringing the prisoner over to me; I sent for a constable, and had him taken into custody; it was taken from the prisoner in our shop; it has my mark upon it.

Q. Did you miss such a ham? - A. No; there might be eight or nine of them hanging at the door; I could not tell how many.

JOHN BLACK sworn. - I am a baker: On the evening of Thursday, the 11th of March, about five o'clock, as I was putting the bread out of the window, for the servant to clean the shop, I saw two boys throw something from the cheesemonger's window upon the step of the door: then they lay down upon it; then the prisoner took it up in his arms, and carried it across the street; I stopped him, and asked him where he was going with it; I told him it was not his ham, and he must go back; he said he would go back with me any where; I took him into the cheesemonger's shop, and left him there.( Charles Shears , a constable, produced the ham, which was identified by Rose.)

Prisoner's defence. Two men were standing at the private door with this ham, and told me they would give me one shilling to carry it for them; I told them I would; and when I got to this baker's door, I was stopped.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-99

364. SARAH HYDE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a pocketbook, value 6d. a bank-note, value 5l. and another bank-note, value 1l. the property of John Proctor .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-100

365. THOMAS BYALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , a hod, value 3s. and a shovel, value 2s. the property of William Parrott .

WILLIAM PARROTT sworn. - I am a bricklayer's labourer : Last Saturday was a week, I went to pay-table; about half-past nine o'clock the prisoner went away from us; and about a quarter of an hour after ten, John Woolsgrove brought him in, with my shovel and hod in his hand.

JOHN WOOLSGROVE sworn. - I live servant with Messrs. Isherwood, at Highgate: On Saturday night, the 24th of April, about a quarter past ten at night, I went into the coach-yard, and found the door, leading into the coach-yard, open; I saw the prisoner put a shovel and a hod over a wall above eight feet high; I called out to him; he made no answer, but got over the wall, by means of a pile of horse-dung; I unlocked the yard-door; he was picking up the hod and shovel, and setting off with them; I immediately attacked him; he said they belonged to his countryman, that he had sent him after them; he said he was at the Rose and Crown; I took him to the Rose and Crown, there was no countryman of his there; Parrott then said, that is my hod and shovel, and he was secured.(The property was produced, and identified by Parrott.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined one month in Newgate , publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-101

366. ANN FORREST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of Charles Edwards .

CHARLES EDWARDS sworn. - I am a blacksmith : On Easter Monday, about eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner sitting upon the step of a door, in Smithfield, very much in liquor; I was sober; I advised her not to sit there; that it was dangerous; she got up, and we walked about Smithfield for some time; then we went up an alley, in Chick-lane , into an out house; after being there some time, she left me, and ran; I immediately missed my watch; I followed her, and caught her, within a few yards of the end of the alley; there was another woman by the side of her; I charged her with having taken my watch; she denied it; I called the watchman, and gave charge of her; I had seen it a few minutes before I met with her.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner; I found nothing upon her.

Prisoner's defence. I was in liquor; the first thing I recollect, was being in a dark alley with this man; I never saw his watch. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-102

367. HENRY REDDICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , four glass cruets, value 7s. four glass stoppers, value 1s. and a morocco frame, value 1s. the property of Anthony Horden .

ANTHONY HORDEN sworn. - I keep a glass and earthen-ware shop , No. 1, Houghton-street, Clarke-Market ; I know nothing of the loss myself.

ANN HORDEN sworn. - On the 23d of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in the room behind the shop, in the dark; the prisoner came in, and pushed the door open, and took these things, (producing them) out of the shop; I gave an alarm, and called out stop thief; a Mr. Tyler brought the prisoner back, with the property in his hand.

JOHN TYLER sworn. - I was going through Houghton-street, Clare-Market; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner cross the way; I pursued him into Holles-street, and brought him back, with the property in his hand; Mrs. Horden claimed them.( Thomas Mitchell , an officer, produced the property, which was identified by Mrs. Horden.)

Prisoner's defence. A man pushed me into the shop, and told me, if I did not bring these things out, he would do me a mischief.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-103

368. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , 28.b. weight of iron, value 4s. 6d. the property of Richard Crawthay , William Crawshay , and William Savary .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM SAVARY sworn. - The firm of our house is, Richard Crawshay, William Crawshay, and William Savary .

JOHN GOODRICH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am servant to the prosecutors: On Saturday, the 27th of February, I saw the prisoner, above an hour, walking backwards and forwards by the gate, under which there were such bars as this now produced; I lost sight of him; but afterwards saw him brought back with this bar, which, I have no doubt, is one that lay under the gate.

THOMAS NEGUS sworn. - I work in the yard, and was coming up it with some iron, when I saw the prisoner draw the bar out of the yard, and run off with it, drawing it after him; I had some bars on my shoulder, and could not follow him; but I gave the alarm to Williams and Brown, upon which he was brought back in a few minutes; I am sure the prisoner is the man who took the bar.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn. - I am servant to the prosecutors, and heard the alarm given by Negus; upon which I pursued the prisoner, and took him between three and four hundred yards, with a bar of iron on his shoulder; he begged I would let him go, and said he did it for real want.

Prisoner. I took it, I confess, and bare necessity prompted me to do it, for the present support of my family, a wife, and three small children.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped 100 yards in Thames-street, near Paul's-wharf .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-104

369. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Alexander-George Mackay , Esq. on the 14th of April , a wooden table, value 5s. a gold watch, value 5l. four guineas, a bank-note, value 5l. and three other bank-notes, of the value of 2l. each , the property of Alexander- George Mackay , Esq.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

HANNAH LAKING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you housekeeper to the prosecutor? - A. Yes; he lives at No. 11, Great Cumberland-place ; the prisoner at the bar was a footman in his service: On Monday, before the prisoner was taken up, Mr. and Mrs. Mackay went out of town, leaving me, two women servants, a boy, and the prisoner, at home: On Tuesday, about twelve o'clock, I was alarmed by a noise in the lower part of the house; I got up, and looked down the well stair-case; I saw a light, and a person pass from the room-door to the butler's-pantry; I went down, and saw the prisoner breaking open a bureau; he forced the lock off in my presence, before I could speak to him; it was the lock of a drawer in my mistress's writing-desk; I went up to him, and said, Thomas, I am very sorry to find you here; is it possible; can it be you, that I see in the very act of robbing your master: He had got a key out of the drawer, which he delivered up to me; and dropped the chissel into the drawer from which he had forced the lock; the key would have opened places where property was; I begged him to go to bed; but first I went with him to the butler's-pantry, to see whether he had any body to assist him; he used to sleep in the pantry; and I looked round, and saw the prisoner had not been in bed; I saw there was a green cloth rolled up, which, I thought, was man, till I rubbed my elbow against it, and found it was no living thing, but that it covered some hard substance; I took the key out of the front door, and went up stairs, where I stood within sight of the pantry door, as I dare not go to bed: At half-past four the same morning, I saw the prisoner coming out of the pantry with a writing-table of my mistress's in his hands, in which she kept cash and bank-notes, she used to pay my weekly bills from, which the prisoner

frequently saw her pay while he attended at breakfast, and has seen my mistress take notes and money from it: He had nothing on but a shirt, and a linen gown thrown over it; I did not know it was him at first; but he acknowledged he was Thomas, and was in my power; I demanded of him what he was going to do with my mistress's table; he gave me no answer, but continued coming up with the table; he took it into the morning drawing-room, where it usually stood; the key being outside the door, I locked him in, and run to another door, out of which he could get, and turned the key on him; he said he was in my power, and begged I would forgive him; I said it was my master's property he was injuring, and he must sue to him for mercy: About six o'clock I sent for a constable, and my master's brother; we went into the pantry; the table was gone, and the cloth lay on the floor.

Prisoner. Q.Was the table, in question, under the green cloth at all? - A. I did not put the cloth aside to see, but a hard substance was there, which was gone in the morning; I saw you bring the table out of the pantry at half-past four o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did my mistress ever pay you the bills when I was present? - A. When taking away the breakfast things; I have lived in Mr. Mackay's service four years, and the prisoner three months.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was you sent for to the house of Mr. Mackay? - A. I was, and found the prisoner in the drawing-room asleep, on a sofa; he had a gown over his shirt, and something tied round his head, but nothing else on: I was shewn a drawer which was broke open, and this turnscrew fits the place; I saw a green cloth on the ground, in the pantry, thrown down in a heap; there was a false key in the lock, which could not be got out; I waked the prisoner, and told him to dress himself, and go along with me; he wanted to know what was the matter; I told him he was best able to judge, and took him to the watch-house; the housekeeper had told me the story in his presence; but he did not deny it, or say any thing.

Mr. ALEXANDER- GEORGE MACKAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You live in Great Cumberland-street? - A. I do: I went out of town the 12th of April, and left particular directions with the prisoner, not to be absent from the house after ten o'clock, and to sleep in the butler's-pantry for safety; I returned to town on the 18th, and was told this story by the housekeeper; I opened the table, and there were one five pound note, four two pound notes, and two one pound notes, five guineas and a half in gold, nine shillings in silver, a watch and gold seals, and a pocket-book, with gold instruments; this key was in the lock, and this is a key which Mrs. Mackay had inadvertently left in the drawer; it belongs to some drawers where there is great property; I will not be positive, but I think it possible, and believe the prisoner has been present, when Mrs. Mackay has paid her weekly bills.

Prisoner's defence. The morning Mr. and Mrs. Mackay left town, I went up into the drawing-room, to take the breakfast things away; I put them on the tray, and, turning myself round, I hit the tray against the table, and struck a small part of the inlaid work off; the day following I had a few jobs to do, and did not wish any-body to know I had broke it; therefore I took it down into the pantry, with intent to fasten on the work; I went out to spend the evening; I left it in the pantry; when I came home, I went to bed, and seeing the table, I got out of bed to take it up stairs, that they should not suspect I meant to do any thing with it; the housekeeper has said, I delivered a key into her possession; and my master says he took it out of the lock himself; therefore, what key I could deliver to her, I don't know; I have a wife and three helpless children, entirely depending on me for support, and are the principal sufferers; if I am excused for my first error, I shall be extremely cautious of my future conduct.

Jury. (To Mrs. Laking.) Q. Was the table broke? - A. Not that I saw; I never examined it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of it being the prisoner's first offence, and his wife and family.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18020428-105

370. FRANCIS EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , sixty yards of calico, value 9l. the property of William Bedford the elder, and William Bedford the younger, in their dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

Mr. WILLIAM BEDFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a warehouseman in Friday-street ? - A. Yes; my son, William Bedford, is my partner: On the 29th of March, I was sitting in the accompting-house; there is a glazed partition between the warehouse and the accompting-house; and, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw a man go past the door, and Hayman, my porter, who has absconded, go hastily, and speak to him for a short time; then the prisoner came in, and put a sheet, or wrapper, which he had under his arm, upon the corner of the counter; and Hayman came hastily to about the middle of the warehouse, and caught up two pieces of calico from a pile; then he came a little further, and took another piece; he doubled them all together, and

gave them to the prisoner, who helped to put them in the wrapper, and went out, taking them with him; I pursued him; and, before he got to Cheapside, I got sight of him; he turned towards St. Paul's; I followed him, for he was walking gently, and took him by the arm, saying, where are you going; he said, to the New Inn, in the Old Bailey; I asked him where he got those goods; he said, he got them from a person in a street near; I told him they were my property, and he must go back with me, which he did; and, when I got back, I found my warehouse open, and Hayman gone; I asked the prisoner who he was, and where he lived; he said he was a jobbing-porter; a ticketporter came by, who knew him, and said he believed he lived with Mr. Mawson, which he did; I examined the property, and found it to be three pieces of printed calico, consisting of twenty-four yards each piece; there is our private mark, and they cost us more than nine pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not know the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Your servants knew your accompting-house had that commanding view? - A. I don't think Hayman knew I was there; the light is such, that two or three people might be sitting in the accompting-house, without the people in the warehouse seeing them.

Q. It was by invitation from Hayman, your servant, that the prisoner came into the shop? - A. Yes, I should imagine it must be from what he said to him.

Q. When he came in, every thing that was done was by your servant, who has absconded? -- A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner being a porter to Mr. Mawson, it was nothing uncommon for him to have a wrapper? - A. No.

Q. He told you first he was a jobbing-porter, and you have found out that he had been but very little time in that service? - A. Yes, and he came back directly, and gave up the property; he said he was going to the New Inn, where, he supposed, somebody would be to take them from him; I asked him who; he said he did not know; perhaps it might be my porter.

JAMES GENT sworn. - I am a constable, and was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, and the calico.(Produces three pieces, which were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I lived with Mr. Mawson, and had been out with a load; as I was going down Friday-street, somebody called; I turned round, and that gentleman's servant asked me, if I would take some goods for him to the Old Bailey, and he would pay me for my trouble; as I have a wife and family, I thought sixpence would be of service to me, and I took them; when I was stopped by Mr. Bedford.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-106

371. WILLIAM COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , one pound and eight ounces of indigo, value 7s. the property of the East-India Company .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of some persons unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

EPHRAIM SHILLITO sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you, and what do you know of this business? - A. I am an assistant elder of the Company's warehouse, in Seething-lane, Tower-street , and the prisoner was a labourer , employed there: On the 9th of April, when the prisoner was going to dinner, I rubbed him down, about ten minutes before three; he had an apron on, which I made him pull off, and observed he had something bulky in his breeches; I desired a man to unbutton them, which he did, and I then saw some indigo down his thighs; I told him it did not belong to him, and he gave it me, lump by lump; after I had got eight squares, I turned my back to lay it down, and he run out of the accompting-house into the warehouse; I pursued him, and, as he run, he kept dropping more; I desired the gates to be shut, and nobody to go out; he made an attempt to jump into the yard, which was prevented, and he was secured. (The indigo produced).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Does any body else rub them down, besides you? - A. Yes; I first, the King's officer, and the gate-keeper.

Q.It happens, that when a cask is opened, and new hooped, that some drops out? - A. It is in chests, and sometimes it gets out.

Q. It is considered as no crime, in the warehouse, for a man to take up a bit, and carry it away with him? - A. I never knew a man do it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. He knew it was not his property? - A.Most assuredly.

Prisoner's defence. I leave my defence to my Counsel. GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined a fortnight in Newgate , and whipped 100 yards in Seething-lane .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-107

372. HENRY GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , sixteen deal-boards, value 1l. 10s. the property of John Teasdale , and Mary Mossatt .

JOHN TEASDALE sworn. - I am a carpenter , in Paternoster-row; Mary Mossatt, a widow , is my partner: I received a letter from a gentleman, in consequence of which I waited upon him, and

he came with me to my shop, and pointed the prisoner out as having robbed me; I got a search-warrant, and, at No. 30. King's-head-passage, Paternoster-row, we found sixteen deal-boards; the prisoner said, he knew nothing of them; I can swear to two of them; the knots shew they are fellows, and I have the end of one; the prisoner bore a good character.

- KIRBY sworn. - Standing at my window, I observed a carpenter run up King's-head-passage with deals on his shoulder, and put them down a cellar-window; his haste made me take notice, knowing no work was going on in the premises: On the 10th, I saw the prisoner come with four boards; I saw his face; he put them up against the premises first, and then put them down the cellar; I watched him, and saw him go up to Mrs. Mossatt's shop; I wrote a note to her, her son came to me, and I shewed him the premises, and pointed the man out.

THOMAS PARROTT sworn. - I found the boards in the cellar of the house where the prisoner lodged. (The two boards were identified by the prosecutor.) NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-108

373. JOHN ISAACS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a silver watch, value 15s. a gold chain, value 10s. and a gold seal, value 10s. the property of Joseph Hall ; a jacket, value 2s. and a pair of trowsers, value 1s. the property of John Turner ; and a silk hand kerchief, value 6d. the property of James Macpherson .

JOSEPH HALL sworn. - On Wednesday night, or Thursday morning last, I was robbed of the watch, chain, and seal; I was on board a ship laying at the Leith and Berwick wharf ; I went to bed in my cabin about ten o'clock, and the watch hung up over my head; when I got up, I missed it; about eleven o'clock, I was shewn the watch, I am sure it is mine; the prisoner was then in custody.

JOHN TURNER sworn. - I am a foremast man, and was on board the vessel, called the Commercial Treaty, on Wednesday last; I lost a jacket, and a pair of trowsers, which hung upon a nail beside the bed; I know them to be mine; I never saw the prisoner on board.

JAMES MACKINTOSH sworn. - I am servant to the captain, and was on board the 29th: I missed a silk handkerchief, and several other things, out of the bag where my cloaths were, hanging up above the bed; I had never seen the prisoner before.

ROBERT BROWNE sworn. - I belong to the Police-office, Shadwell, and produce the things in the indictment; about ten o'clock, I was sent for by Mr. Hosbridge, who keeps a sale-shop in Ratcliffe-highway, the prisoner stood crying by the counter; I asked him how he came by the watch; he said he had won it at a rastle, at the hog-yard, Limehouse, for two shillings; I asked him how many members there were; he said, about twenty; I told him the chain was worth more money than the twenty members', at two shillings a-piece; I searched him further, and found another watch on him; he had the trowsers on, and the jacket, and his own trowsers in a bundle; I then found the captain out, and shewed him the watch, which he owned; the prisoner told me there was another boy with him, that he was asleep behind the copper of one of the vessels, till they had an opportunity of robbing the vessels that lay near, of different property; he said, a watchman's boy gave him the watch to sell; that they took a large bundle away, and cut a boat adrith, and came on shore; that he was to sell the watch, and meet the boy on the following evening. (The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not take them; a boy gave me the things to sell, and I was to meet him again that night. GUILTY , aged 13.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-109

374. DANIEL TRINDER was indicted for that he, on the 20th of April , being employed in the capacity of clerk to William Sansom , William Blake , and Thomas Postlethwaite , of the City of London, bankers , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession, for and on account of his said employers, a promissery note for five guineas, value 5l. 5s. bearing date the 16th October, 1800, and afterwards did feloniously embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

Second Count. For stealing the same generally.

There being no evidence to shew the prisoner had possession of the note, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-110

375. ROBERT BAKEWELL was indicted for that he, on the 26th of March, in the 41st year of his Majesty's reign , being an officer and servant of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England ; as such officer and servant, was entrusted by the said Governor and Company with a certain note belonging to the said Governor and Company, the tenor of which was as follows, viz."No. 6528. Bank, 16th January, 1801. I promise to pay to Mr. Abraham Newland , or bearer, on demand, the sum of fifty pounds. London, 16th January, 1801. For the Governor and Company of the Bank of England. S. Underhill. Entered C. Clarke." And that he, being such officer and servant, and so entrusted, on the same day feloniously did secrete, embezzle, and run away with the same .

Second Count. Charging that he, being an officer

and servant of the said Governor and Company, was entrusted with certain effects belonging to the Governor and Company, that is to say: a certain paid note belonging to them (setting it forth as before), and that he, being such officer and servant, and so entrusted, did feloniously secrete, embezzle, and run away with the said paid note.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Giles, and the case opened by Mr. Garrow.)

EDWARD BENTLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are the chief clerk in the Accomptant-General's office, in the Bank? - A. I was; I know the prisoner; he first came into the Bank employ on the 1st of January, 1799, and was employed in the Bank on the 26th of March, 1801, to post into the ledgers, or to read from the cash-book, Bank-notes paid on the 24th of March, of certain denominations, of 100l, 200l. and up to a 1000l. it appears he read from the cash-book that day, for I know his hand-writing, and he had access to the file on which the notes were placed on that day: On the 24th of March, 1801, No. 6528, for 50l. came in; the 25th being a holiday, the notes paid on the 24th were posted on the 26th, and he put it on the file; the entry is made from the folio of the cash-book, previous to its coming to our department, and a clerk calls over from the cash-book, who, on this day, appears to have been the prisoner.

Q. Explain slowly and shortly what is done with a Bank-note that comes into the Bank for payment, as to its stages, and its cancelling? - A. It is cancelled by being punched; the cashier's name is taken off by the inspector before it comes to us; it then goes to the entering clerk, who enters it into the cash-book, and then punches it; after the balance of the evening is made, the files are locked up in Mr. Newland's strong room, and delivered out to the Accomptant's office the next day; when the note is so punched, it is our evidence that the note has been paid, and the entry in the cash-book corresponding with it.

MANOA SIBLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. I am clerk in the Bank: On the 24th of March last, there was a Bank-note of 50l. No. 6528, entered by me in the cash-book, (looks at the cash-book); the whole page is my writing; after I enter the notes, I punch them; this number was punched, and put upon the file.

Q. Look at that note - do you recollect it? - A. No otherwise, than by knowing there was such a number, and such a date, (looks at several notes); with respect to these notes, they appear to be entered before they were cancelled, which sometimes is the case in the hurry of business; the name of the cashier has not been torn off this note, yet it is punched.

Court. Q. Can you explain how it happens that it is punched through the white part, instead of the proper part? - A. We punch a quantity at a time, and if one happens to be reversed, the punch goes through the wrong part; after the notes are punched, they are put on a file, and taken to the Treasury.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. You are the person who punched this very note? - A. Yes; those punch them who enter them.

Q. And it was put on the file on which cancelled notes are? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Though you have not struck the puch through the proper place, do you consider it a cancelled note? - A.Certainly.

ALEXANDER HOLLOWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Are you a clerk in the Bank? - A. Yes; in the Accomptant's office; it was my duty to read the file to my partner.

Q. You did not name any note that did not appear on the file? - A. No; at the end of the day's work we sign the book.

JOHN THEOBALDS sworn. - It was my duty to look at the cash-book, while my partner calls over the file, to see they correspond with the entries.

LOUIS VELLETTE sworn. - I am clerk in the Accomptant's office: On the 26th of March, it was my duty to post notes of certain sums, and certain dates.

Q. Did you post the ledger from the cash-book? - A. I did on the 26th of March.

Q.Look at the cash-book for a 50l. note, No. 6528 - is that with the other entries? - A. It is, and polled on the 26th.

Q.Look to the ledger, and see if you posted it on the 26th of March? - A. That article is erased, but from posting the article preceding, and those immediately following, I have no doubt it was posted.

Cross-examined. Q. Your only reason for saying you know it was entered, is because of the entry before and after? - A. It is, and no other.

Q. You see here (shewing one of the books) there is no entry, and yet, one before, and another after? - A. Yes.

Q. This book is kept in the Accomptant's office? - A. Yes.

Q. How many clerks are there? - A. A vast number, all of whom have access to the books.

JOHN WINTER, Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are solicitor to the Bank? - A. Yes: On the 11th of February, I attended a committee at the Bank; the prisoner was in an adjoining room; I went to him, and questioned him, without making any promise whatever, as to his connection with Hayley, who, he admitted, he had known sometime, but denied having any money transactions with him, except as to a sum of two pounds; I then stated to the committee what

the prisoner said, as to his connection with Hayley; I had been in the committee-room but a short time, when the prisoner was admitted, and he suggested to the Gentlemen present, that he wished to explain himself; I then took a minute of what he said, which was this - "That in March or April last, 1801, some notes were taken from the file, with a view to shew they might be re-issued; I did not attempt to pass any till I became acquainted with Hayley; I took them off the file; the whole which have not been passed, are in my possession; 750l. have been passed; the notes (meaning those which had not been passed) are at No. 18, Bride-lane, at the house of Mr. Browne, an attorney; I erased the Ledger, no person was privy to it; I have 400l. in cash, Mr. Hayley has a further sum." I then accompanied the prisoner towards Bride-lane, and in the way he suggested that the notes were not in Bride-lane, but in a house in Salisbury-court; we went to a house in Salisbury-court, where he delivered a packet to me, which contained the whole of the notes, taken off the file, which had not been issued; I then accompanied him to the house of Mr. Browne, in Bride-lane, and he there delivered to me a tin box, containing good Banknotes and post-bills to the amount of 370l. he said there was 400l. but that he had taken out 30l. the day before; in a pocket-book, which he gave me, there was a paper containing several receipts, signed by William Hayley . In the receipt, dated the 24th of January, 1802, the note, the subject of this indictment, is there stated as received by Hayley from the prisoner on that day; there was also an agreement signed by the prisoner and William Hayley , and an anonymous letter was addressed to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, which he admitted himself to be the author of.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. The prisoner told you where the notes were? - A. Yes.

Q.But for his information you could not have found them? - A. No.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow Q. What are you? - A. I was servant to Mr. Bakewell.

Q. Look at the name of William Taylor - is that your writing? - A. Yes; I saw it signed by Bakewell and Hayley, and I witnessed it, but I did not know what the contents were. (Paper read to the following effect: signed Robert Bakewell , and William Hayley , dated the 30th of December, 1801.)

Memorandum.

"Whereas, Robert Blakewell , clerk of the Bank of England, has possessed himself of sundry Banknotes, not with an intention to defraud the Bank, but for the purpose of proving to the Bank the liability they are under to have their notes re-issued, as well as in the hopes of communicating such information as will entitle him to obtain a reward, and for the more clearly proving the same, has thought it necessary to negociate some of the said notes, yet, as it might be possible, notwithstanding all his care in the negociation of them, that they might be traced back to him; the consequences of which, notwithstanding his present intentions might be very serious, he has communicated his plan to his friend Mr. William Hayley , who, in consideration of his honest intentions, and one-fifth share of the reward, for pointing out to the Bank the fraud that has been attempted upon them, has engaged to undertake to negociate the said notes; it is further understood, that, prior to his receiving any reward, he shall be allowed all reasonable expences, upon an exact account that shall be made out in negociating the said notes; it is further intended, that as soon as one of them are negociated and paid by the Bank a second time, that then a letter shall be written to the Governor and Directors of the Bank, informing them what has been done, offering to divulge the secret upon their giving a stipulated reward, and upon condition of granting a free pardon to Robert Bakewell and William Hayley , and promising not to prosecute them for what they have done, so that the character of the said Robert Bakewell shall stand fair and unimpeached from any dishonest intention. - As witness our hands, Robert Bakewell, and William Hayley, in the presence of William Taylor .(Paper read, signed William Hayley ,)

24th January, 1802.

"Received of Robert Bakewell , 350l. in notes, as stated below, for the purposes mentioned in the agreement entered into between him and myself."

No. 463. 14th March, 1801. 300l.

No. 6528. 16th January, 1801. 50l.

£.350(Anonymous letter read, signed C. T. dated the 8th of February, 1802, addressed to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.)

"Gentlemen,

"From the present mode of conducting your great and momentous concerns, it is in the power of your servants to injure you to a very considerable and serious amount, without your being able to discover the delinquents; this is a fact which can be proved to your entire satisfaction, as the thing has been already done to the amount of some hundreds of pounds, but without the smallest intention to defraud. It has been for some time observed, the very serious consequences which might ensue to you, in case your servants should be inclined to take the advantage in their power; and the great importance it would be of to you to-have this defect remedied, which, although it could not be done, but at the hazard of all that is dear, and at the hazard of being detected, yet has there been one, who, from a desire to convince you of the truth of it, to find out a plan to prevent it, and

doubtless with a view to benefit himself, has conceived he would be intitled to a handsome remuneration, and has been bold enough to hazard the event, which of course he must abide, not doubting, but when you are convinced of the truth, you will think him fairly entitled to the reward he asks for his upright intention, and for the perilous situation he has put himself into in case of discovery; but, Gentlemen, it has never been the intention of the writer to wrong you of a single shilling; neither will he, for in case you shall not accede to his proposal, he will return you the money, and you shall not be able to know from whence it comes; on the contrary, should you agree, he will make it clearly appear to you the amount of the property he has taken. If the person alluded to does make the discovery, and likewise points out a plan, which will, in future, render the same attempt vain, and sure of detection, he previously claims for himself, and all concerned, a free pardon, and promise not to be in the least molested, and also 5000l. and an annuity of 500l. per annum during life, or 10,000l. without an annuity. Your answer, through the medium of the Morning-Post, is desired; and if the requests of this letter are complied with, the party will come forward and give every explanation; should it be the wish of the Governor and Co. to see the party, the following from is humbly submitted. The G. and D. of the B. have received C. T's letter, and according to his proposal, and granting all his requests, desire to see him upon day, at hour. (Here Hayley was brought into Court.)

BENJAMIN BEDFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. What are you? - A. I am a linendraper, at No. 147, Aldersgate-street.

Q. Do you know that man? - A. I am satisfied he, Hayley, is the person I received the fifty pound note of, on the 26th of January, 1802, (looking at the note;) I believe this to be the note.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You cannot swear to it positively? - A. Not positively, because I received another of Hayley.

Q. At the same time? - A. No, on the 31st of December; I really believe it to be.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Did the person who offered it write any thing on it? - A. He wrote William Harrison on it, which is on this note.

Q.Do you see two large letters, B. and C. on the patch? - A. I do, and believe it to be the note I received.

- WILLIAMS sworn. - I am one of the outtellers of the Bank; I received this note, No. 6528, from Messrs. Robarts and Co. and paid it into the Bank on the 18th of February, it was never out of my possession. (The note read.)

THOMAS BLISS sworn. - Q.What are you? - A. I am one of the inspectors of Bank-notes at the Bank.

Q.Look at that note, and tell us whether it was a genuine Bank of England note? - A.It certainly was.

Mr. Garrow. My Lord, that is the case for the prosecution.

Mr. Serjeant Best. I submit to your Lordship there is no evidence in this case to affect the prisoner; this is a prosecution grounded upon the Act of the 15th of George II . which says, "That if any officer, or servant of the said Company being entrusted with any bill, dividend-warrant, bond, deed, or any security, money, or other effects, belonging to the said Company, or having any bill dividend-warrant, bond, deed, or any security, or effects of any other person or persons, lodged or deposited with the said Company, or with him, as an officer or servant of the said Company, shall secrete, embezzle, or run away with any such note, bill, dividend-warrant, bond, deed, security, money, or effects, or any part of them, every officer or servant so offending, and being thereof convicted in due form of law, shall be deemed guilty of felony, and shall suffer death as a felon, without benefit of clergy." - My Lord, I submit in the first place, that the prisoner at the bar was not entrusted with the possession of this note; your Lordship will see what this note is - it is a Bank-note of 50l. that is the Bank-note he is charged with embezzling; and an embezzlement, within the act, must be of something of which the person was in custody - if you will look at the evidence of the first witness, you will find the prisoner never was entrusted with it; on the contrary you will find, that the only notes with which he was entrusted were notes from 100l. up to 1000l. that being the case, I submit, upon the evidence for the prosecution, that this note of 50l. was not such a note as the prisoner was ever entrusted with, and that therefore the allegation in this indictment, to being it within the Act of Parliament, cannot be proved; on the contrary, it must be negatived, for, in order to be within the Act of Parliament, it must be a Bank-note with which he was entrusted, which, in this case, it appears he never was.

My Lord, I submit also, that this is not any one of the things described by this Act of Parliament; the words of the Act are "any bill, dividend-warrant, bond, deed, or any security, money, or other effects." I submit that this is neither of those things; it is, as the last witness has said, that which was once a Bank-note. I submit to your Lordship, it ceased to be a Bank-note. I submit to your the embezzlement was made; and in order to support the indictment, it is necessary it should have been a Bank-note. I submit, it ceases to be a Banknote the moment it is paid into the Bank. It is admitted, by Mr. Garrow, that it was a paid and cancelled note. I do not know what is meant by a

cancelled note, except it is that which was once a note, but by the act of cancelling, ceased to be a note - it cannot come within either of the words mentioned in the act - the meaning is, a note of value, whereas, this was of no value to any person; it had performed its office, and was by them deposited upon the file, from which it was never again to be issued to the world; it was compleat wastepaper.

My Lord, I am aware that you will find, at the end of the clause, the words "or other effects;" I conceive the meaning of this is, other effects, which we enumerated before; it will be therefore to say, when it has complemed its office, and has returned again, whether it is one of those other effects. I will trouble you with no further observation at present; but as there is no decision on this Act of Parliament, and Mr. Garrow has stated that it is a most important question, not only to the unfortunate man at the bar, but to the public at large, I humbly hope your Lordship will respite the judgment till it has been considered.

Mr.Garrow. My Lord, I entirely agree with the concluding observation of my learned Friend, that this is a most important Act of Parliament; and I agree there has, fortunately for the public, been no case that has called for a decision on this point; but I should be extremely sorry it should pass, as admitted by me, that there is any thing in the objection, because it might produce serious inconvenience; therefore, I think it my duty to give the answer that occurs to me to the objection, feeling by no means any inclination to press your Lordship to a decision of the case, it there is any doubt which may make it a fit subject for further consideration.

Court. Looking through the Act, I think it is proper, as there has been no decision, to get the opinion of the twelve Judges. I think it ought to be considered, as there has been no decision upon it, though I have very little doubt on the subject.

Mr. Garrow. I am perfectly satisfied, and have no with to answer the objection; but it does appear to me, that the answer is so obvious, it might be more convenient that I should do it, than that it should be supposed there is more in it than appears upon the face of it. I have no wish to argue the point, but if your Lordship will permit me, it will be more satisfactory to say a word or two.

My Lord. with regard to the first objection, a fact is proved in the case, which does not warrant my learned Friend in his objection; for he supposes that the prisoner, in the course of his duty, as clerk at the Bank, had no trust with regard to the fifty pound Bank-note; but there he misconceives the evidence; the evidence is, that he had the duty of entering the notes in a book, and that they are all put on a file, and being bound to take the file into his possession, he is necessarily entrusted with the file that contains them. That objection has nothing in it, for I state this difficulty, and it is sitting it should be understood, that every person employed in and about the Bank of England, are, for the purposes of a criminal prosecution, liable to the extent of answering, with their lives, if they embezzle or secrete any thing which, in the discharge of their duty, comes to their hands; that is a distinct proposition, which I will state once more, for the purpose of being corrected in it if I am mistaken; having considered it with more able persons than myself, that every person, as an officer or servant in the Bank of England, who, in the course of his duty, has the means of obtaining any Banknote, bill, deed, or other thing, or which may be entrusted with him, is for the purpose of criminal prosecution, liable to suffer death, if he embezzles or secretes any part thereof.

My Lord, to bring this to the business of common life, I will suppose it to become a question, whether a gentleman's under servant has stolen a silver tankard, and is liable to punishment. - No, because he is not entrusted with it, but the butler is entrusted with it, according to my learned Friend's argument, and therefore, he cannot be found guilty. Put, I say, if this man is entrusted with a file of cancelled notes, which having performed their duty, are filed, and he takes a 50l. Bank-note off that file, I say he is guilty of a breach of duty, and of embezzling and running away with effects, within the meaning of the Act of Parliament. Your Lordship will take the cause, which I think extremely proper, but it does not appear to me, that there is a great deal in the objection. My learned Friend should be apprized of what are the Counts of this Indictment. The second Count states it to be a paid note, that is to say, that the prisoner, being an officer and servant of the Bank, and so entrusted, with force and arms, did secrete and embezzle the said paid note. Are these words in this Act of Parliament, which can embrace a paid or a cancelled note? I don't insist upon the first Count, that this is a Bank-note, but I certainly, by the bye shall say, as against the prisoner, it is out of his power to say it is not a Bank-note, when he puts it out again. The Legislature meant to do something more than to protect the then-existing Bank notes; all their deeds, and all their bills, demandable, supposing them to be notes which might be embezzled, and all the effects of the Bank of England. Is it not a part of the effects of the Bank of England? Is it of no value? Is it not of importance to the Bank of England? I stated, in my opening, that these notes are not put into the fire when they are brought in, which would be a ready receipt to prevent offences of this fort, because it cannot be done as long as the commerce of this country is so extensive, for there

may be a thousand instances occur, in which some particular note may be to be resorted to for the interest of the public. It is a part of the effects of the Bank of England, for the purpose of being evidence of it having been paid, and to trace it through the different hands, if it should be necessary to be inquired into. I submit it is a part of the effects of the Bank of England, of the description of a paid note; but as this is to be the subject of further inquiry, I shall not waste any more time. I thought it my duty to say thus much, as it might be an inconvenience to the public, that the objection should be thought to stand unanswered.

Court. He is charged with secreting and embezzling a certain paid note, which certainly comes within the meaning of the Act of Parliament; the servants of the Bank are so very numerous, it would hardly be able to reach them if it was not so; however, the case shall be reserved.

Prisoner. I beg to leave my defence to my Counsel.

Q.(To Mr. Bentley.) You told us the cancelled notes are put upon a file? - A.They are put on a file promiscuously, without distinguishing fifty-pound notes from those of a larger denomination; they are intermixed as they are paid; a five-pound note may be next to a thousand-pound note, and a fifty-pound to a hundred-pound, and so on; there were fifty-pound notes, and notes of every description on the file.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q.Several people had access to the file? - A. Yes, twenty different people, whose duty it is. GUILTY, Death .

Judgment respited for the opinion of the Twelve Judges .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-111

376. SOPHIA GROUNDHIE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Ames , the said Benjamin, Mary his wife, and others of his family, being therein, about the hour of ten in the forenoon, of the 23d of February , and stealing a child's frock, value 1s. two aprons, value 5s. a coat, value 20s. a waistcoat, value 10s. a pair of breeches, value 10s. a gown, value 8s. two pillow-cases, value 2s. two children's petticoats, value 3s. and a shirt, value 3s. the property of the said Benjamin.

MARY AMES sworn. - I live in Spicer-street, Mile-End : On Tuesday forenoon, the 23d of February, between nine and twelve, my husband, two children, and myself, were at home; we went up stairs to work, and I locked the chamber door, and took the key out; about half past eleven I came down, and found the door locked, as I had left it; I went to the drawers for a gown, which I wanted to put on, but it was gone, with articles in the indictment, which were in different drawers; I have known the prisoner, by living in the neighbourhood, some years; no damage was done to the lock, which must have been opened with a false key, I saw one of my aprons on the prisoner, in Brick-lane, and the child's frock, in her sister's drawer.

HOPWOOD sworn. - I live in Spicer-street, opposite the prosecutor's: On Tuesday, the 23d of February, I saw the prisoner go up Mrs. Ames's stairs, the street-door being open, about ten o'clock, and come down, with holding up her apron full of things, so that I could not see what was in it; I saw her afterwards, about four or five o'clock the same day, in Wheeler-street, about a quarter of a mile distant; Mrs. Ames told me she was robbed between eleven and twelve, upon which I told her, I had seen the prisoner come out with her apron full of things; she was followed, and taken up, but she did not say any thing.

SUSANNA BROCKETT sworn. - I am the prisoner's sister; and, as I had mended a few things, she gave me this little frock, which I put into my drawer, thinking she had bought it, but the officers came to my house when I was out, and took it away. (Identifies the frock.)

PETER MASON sworn. - I belong to Worship-street; I went with Vickery to the house of Ames with a bunch of keys, and the first key I tried unlocked the door; it is a very common lock.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - (Produces an apron and child's frock.) I am an officer: On the 23d of February, I was applied to by Mrs. Ames, and went to the house of Mrs. Parker, No. 9, Fleet-street, Bethnal-green, and, in the garret, I found the prisoner blowing the fire; there were a number of pieces of cloth laying about, and a great smell; I searched the ashes, and found several pieces of linen, which had been burning, but nothing else; I was coming out of the room, and, on the stair-case even with the room, was a window which had been boarded up, but a board was taken down to admit fight, and, between the window and the lead-work, were the keys, and this apron; I asked the prisoner if she knew it; she said, no, it don't belong to me; Mrs. Ames owned the apron; then we went to Mrs. Brockett's, and there we found the child's frock.

(The frock and apron identified by Mrs. Ames.)

Prisoner's defence. I went home on Monday night, and found a young woman sitting on the steps, crying; she said, she had no home, and I took her up stairs, and she slept with me; about half past ten o'clock the next day, she brought me the apron and frock for letting her sleep there.

Mrs. Ames. She said before, that she bought it, and gave half-a-crown for it.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing, to the value of 1s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-112

377. JOHN GORDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , twelve wrappers, containing in length one hundred and twelve yards, value 5l. 12s. the property of Joseph-Blakey Spencer .

It appearing the prosecutor had a partner, whose name was omitted in the indictment, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-113

378. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a shoe, value 2s. the property of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , and live in the Broadway, Blackstairs : On the 26th of April, about five o'clock, I went out, and put the padlock on my bulk, and returned about seven, when I found the padlock broke off, and the prisoner standing at the door; he walked away, and I went in; in about twenty minutes he returned to the place, put his hand in, and I collared him; he had got the shoe in his hand, which had been upon a shelf.

(The shoe produced, and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been up into Cheapside, and, coming back, I stumbled, and went directly into the place; that gentleman immediately seized me, and said, I wanted to rob the place; I never took, or offered to take any thing.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-114

379. EDWARD MAY and JOHN HUNT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , a box, value 1s. and fifty pounds weight of sugar-candy, value 2l. 10s. the property of John Campion , the elder, and John Campion , the younger.

JOHN CAMPION , sen. sworn. - I am a grocer on Snow hill; my partner is John Campion , jun.

RALPH FLANDERS sworn. - I am carman to Messrs Campion: On the 21st of April, in the evening, about seven o'clock, I received a box into the cart from the shop, to go to the Blossom's Inn, I was got to the inn, and missed it in a moment; a woman in the yard asked me if I had not lost something out of the art; I said, yes; and several people went out, and brought the prisoners and box back.

JOHN GREENWOOD sworn. - I am book-keeper at the Blossom's Inn: On the 21st of April, in the evening, Mr. Campion's cart came to our yard, and hearing he had lost a box, I run down the gateway, and saw two men turn up Castle-court with a box; I cannot say which of them had it, but I defined one of them to put it down, which he did, and began to cover it over with a black apron; I took hold of them, and asked them where they brought the box from; one said, he did not bring it from any where, but they were going through the passage, and saw the box standing there, and was going to see what it was; I said, I should not let them go, and one of them bit my hand very much; I called out for help, and assistance came; then they were sent to the Compter.

May. Q.Did you not say before the Magistrate that there was another person in the cart to mind the property? - A. Yes, there were two in the cart.

Q.Did you see either of us with the box? - A. Yes.

Q.Which of us? - A.I cannot say which; you were both close together.

(The box produced, and identified.)

May's defence. We had been into Cannon-street to see a cousin of this young man's, and, coming home, we turned down Milk-street; I said, stop, I want to make water; I went up the court, and that gentleman came up, and said, you have stole this box; I said, what box? and he took us.

Hunt's defence. I was waiting at the corner of the court for him, when that gentleman came up, and laid hold of me; I said, I would go where he liked, for I was innocent.

May, GUILTY , aged 21.

Hunt, GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-115

380. HUGH CHARLES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Solomon Hougham , about the hour of three in the night of the 23d of February , and burglariously stealing twelve ounces of silver shilings; value 3l. the property of the said Solomon Hougham .

There being no evidence to shew that the property was ever in the possession of the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-116

381. JOSEPH TOLLANER and HENRY MITCHELL were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of Thomas Glover ; and the latter, for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

THOMAS GLOVER sworn. - I live in Bishopsgate-street: On Thursday, the 10th of April, I had been to Whitechapel Hay-market; going along, I felt something tug at my pocket; I turned round very quick, put my hand to it, and missed my handkerchief; I saw the two boys about the distance they are now from me; I went to one, and said, I think I have got you, young gentleman, and seized Tollaner by the collar; then he gave something to the other, which I took from under his coat, and it was my handkerchief. (Produces it.)

RICHARD CHANDLER sworn. - I live at No. 10, Goldsmith street, and am in the silk and ribbon manufactory; I saw the prisoner, Joseph Tollaner , take the handkerchief, and give it to the other, who was close by him, the moment he took it; Mitchell was going to pass the prosecutor with the handkerchief under his coat, when he was taken.

Mr. Glover. I seized one, and dragged him to the other; the big boy gave the handkerchief to the little one, and the little one said, I don't know the big boy, he has given me this to get it out of his possession.

Tollaner's defence. Mr. West, the grocer, at whitechapel, sent me of an errand, and, going along, the gentleman caught hold of me, and said, you are one; I never touched a thing, but am as innocent as the child unborn; it is false what that gentleman said, and the boy 100.

Tollaner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Tollaner, GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for seven years .

Mitchell, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-117

382. CHARLES GAIMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , three yards of wrapper, value 2s. and two yards of calico, value 1s. 6d. the property of Thomas Rhodes , James Hartwell , and William Beaumont

There being no evidence to shew the property was ever in possession of the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before, Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-118

383. JOHN CLARIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , three tumblers, value 1s. five glass quart decanters, value 5s. five glass stoppers, value 3s. four glass tumblers, value 1s. 6d. a glass water bottle, value 1s. 6d. sixty-one glass drops, value 1s. three knives, value 1s. a fork, value 2d. and a basket, value 2d. the property of George Carter .

(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

GEORGE CARTER sworn. - I live in Great Maryle Bonne-street , and am a glass seller ; the prisoner was my porter , and, in consequence of suspicion, I marked some glass tumblers, in the back warehouse; On the 12th of March, about half past seven, he went to the back warehouse, without orders, or having any business there; when he came out, I thought he had been robbing me, and had him searched; I found three numbers, which he endeavoured to break; one of them was marked by me, and was broke in taking out of his pocket; he was then taken before the Magistrate, and, having obtained a warrant, we went to his apartment, where we found a basket with my name on, the decanters, and every thing in the indictment.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. - Q. How long had he been in your house? - A. He had been out about half-an-hour before that.

Q.The things fell from him, you say? - A.He let them fall; whether by accident or not, I cannot say.

Q.And yet you swear positively he endeavoured to break them? - A. I said, I believe it, and I do now; I have the marked tumbler here.

Q.At the time you stopped, him, did he not tell you he was going to have then cut for a pattern? - A.No.

JOHN WARDER sworn. - I saw the prisoner searched, which he, at first, objected to; then he took the tumblers out of his pocket, and dropped them down by his side, designedly, as I believe.

JOHN PEARCE sworn. - I was also present; I have had the numblers ever since.

(Produces them, and the broken one identified by the prosecutor.)

Mr. Knowlys. (To Mr. Carter.) Q. The basket was for the purpose of carrying the things in? - A. Yes, and he might have left it at home; the value of the three tumblers is about five-pence.

Prisoner's defence. The night on which this happened, Mr. Carter sent me to the warehouse to look out different patterns, and to take them to Harley-street; I did so; and before I had time to put down the different patterns, when I came in, he asked me for them, which I gave him, without any hestitation, not knowing he meant to charge me with felony.

Mr. Carter. The story, with regard to the patterns, is true; but, with regard to taking the tumblers, it was an hour after; I gave him no orders to take them whatever.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing the three tumblers .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-119

384. HANNAN HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March, a muslin cravat, value 1s. and a common prayer-book, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Vanses .

WILLIAM VANSES sworn. - I live at No. 6, John's-place, John's-row, St. Luke's, Old-street , and am a watch-maker : On the 11th of March, about ten o'clock, my daughter, who is about thirteen years old, gave me a clean cravat, and I left the dirty one on the table; I went out and left the house in her care; when I went back, about half-past eleven, I found a gentleman there, but my daughter was gone out; he said, a young woman had called, and they were gone out together; we went together to see if she was playing in the street, but could not find her; about a quarter past twelve I found her at home.

ELIZABETH VANSES sworn. - I am daughter to the prosecutor; about five or ten minutes after he went out, on the 11th of March, a knock came to the door, which I opened, and the prisoner came in, she said, give us a piece of bread and butter, I said, in that chest; she then said, who has got the key? I said, my father; she said, there are more keys than one? I said, yes, but I must not try to open it; she said, where does your father keep his watches? I said, up stairs, and he had the key; she said, can't you frisk a watch? I said, no; then she said, she would learn me her trade, and we should go to St. Catherine's lane together; just as she said, that, a gentleman came for his watch; he said, he felt himself indisposed, and begged I would get him a little liquor; the prisoner, before I could get up, took hold of the bottle and the sixpence, which he gave her, and we fetched the liquor, but she would have the common liquor instead of the best, and kept the difference; we came back, and the gentleman offered her a glass, which she took, and beckoned me out: I was afraid she would try to get something if she staid, and I went with her; I wanted to get away from her, but she would not quit our house, without I went with her; we went down Goded-lane, and as I was going along, I saw the end of my father's neckcloth hang out of her pocket; I said, that is my father's; she said, you lie; I put my hand to her pocket, and felt something like a book; then we went home, and parted between Henry-street, and New-street; I looked for the prayer-book and neckcloth directly, but could not find them.

Q.Did you know the prisoner before? - A. I knew her four or five weeks.

Q.What was she? - A.She stiles herself a frisker; I did not know what it meant, till they explained it to be a bad girl; she said, first, would I frisk a watch; but when I said I did not know what she meant, she said, would I thieve a watch.

Q. Where have you seen her? - A.When I came out with work, she and others always used to surround me, when I used to come out with two or three hundred pounds worth of value of my father's master's, wanting to get the property from me; she lived in Henry-street, near Old-street-square, where her companions live, they call her the queen of the square; since she has been in prison, she has sent her gang, who said, they would murder me if I appeared against her.

Q.Did you know the person who came for the watch? - A. Yes; I was afraid my father would lick me, if he found her there; I am sure the neckcloth was on the table, and the prayer-book laying by it, which I had just laid out of my hand; they were found upon her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The reason you went out, was, to get rid of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. The gentleman sent you for some gin? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you drink any? - A. I did not taste it, I am not suffered.

Q.Did he know the prisoner? - A. No.

Q.Before he came, had you threatened to hang yourself? - A. No.

Q.The gentleman dropped half-a-crown, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q.Which you said you would keep for his sake; did not you? - A.No.

Q. Did you not take it with you out of the house? - A.No.

Q. Did you not take your own handkerchief off and put it on her neck? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you ever been at Dr. Latham's? - A. Yes, I have.

- LUCAS sworn. - The prisoner was described to me, and I took her; I searched her, and found a neck-cloth and book; she denied it at first, but when I found them, she acknowledged taking them.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses to her character. GUILTY , aged 17.

The Court immediately pronounced sentence of

Transportation for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-120

385. OWEN JUDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , one half-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, a Bank-note, value 10l. and four other Bank-notes, value 1l. each , the property of Robert Russell .

Owing to the absence of a material witness, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-121

386. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , a copper lid, value 20s. the property of Jacob-Israel Brumell .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of persons unknown.

There being no evidence who the copper was made for, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-122

387. THOMAS HANMER was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 26th of March , a certain receipt for money , as follows:

"Received of Mr. Meredith, the sum of two guineas, for surveying a building, in part, agreeable to Act of Parliament, for Mr. William Plumridge . - Henry Skinner, 2l. 2s. March 26th, 1802," with intent to defraud George Gray .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the like forged receipt for money, knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

Third and Fourth Counts. For forging and uttering, and publishing as true, a like forged receipt, with intent to defraud, John Meredith .

Fifth and Sixth Counts. For forging and uttering, and publishing as true, the like forged receipt, with intent to defraud James Plumridge .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-123

388. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , a knifecase, value 10s. the property of James Huggins .

JAMES HUGGINS sworn. - I live in Portugal-street, Lincoln's-inn , and am a turner and upholsterer ; returning into my shop, on Thursday morning the 15th of April, about nine o'clock, I met the prisoner coming out with this case, (produces it;) in his hand, he passed me, and knowing it to be mine, I followed him, and brought him back with it; a constable was sent for, who took the prisoner into custody; I observed the prisoner, and a man, at the shop-window, conversing, and I am inclined to think he has been led away by the man.

Prisoner's defence. I was going by, and a man asked me to carry it into Holborn.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-124

389. ANN DUFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , a petticoat, value 5s. the property of William Fisher .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-125

390. MARY HOBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a pair of shoes, value 7s. the property of Richard Perry .

RICHARD PERRY sworn. - I live at No. 17, Pest-house-row, near Old-street : On the 7th of March, I was laying on the bed, my wife was in the room also; I heard the window go up, and my wife said, Mrs. Hobbs had taken a pair of shoes out, and made off; I said, never mind, she has only taken them out of a joke; I went in and asked her for them, she said, you ling villian, if you ask me for the shoes I'll run this knife through you; she had a long knife in her hand.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You was in bed? - A. Yes, with part of my clothes off.

Q. What time was there, between your wife looking out of the window and the window being shut? - A. Not a minute; my wife told me, and I got up.

Q. Your wife was the person who saw her first? - A. Yes, and I saw the prisoner myself; she was taken up the next day; because she had two children, the officer took her word.

SARAH PERRY sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Perry : On the 7th of March, I was in the back-room, the door of which fronts the window; I was naked at the time; I heard the window go up; I opened the door, and there was the prisoner at the bar, taking a new pair of shoes out of the front-room window; I alarmed my husband, and told him, it was the woman who lived at next door, and who I had known for above six months; I went without shoe or stocking to her, and asked her for the shoes; she said, she would have me taken up, and swear I was mad, for coming in that situation to her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You saw her very plain? - A. Yes.

Q.You cannot be mistaken? - A. No.

Q.Are you always in your senses? - A. I am never out.

Q.You did not charge any body else with stealing them? - A. No.

Q.Did you not charge Ann Lewington? - A. No.

Q. That you swear positively? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you not say, you did not see the prisoner take them? - A. I never did.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I never was drunk in my life.

- GUEST sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, but did not find the shoes; I searched the place, to which the prisoner made not refusal.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

For the Prisoner.

ANN LEWINGTON sworn. - I live in Old-street, close by the prosecutor: On the 7th of March, about half-past four, I was sitting by the madhouse, with some fruit, when Mrs. Perry came up to me almost naked, with neither shoes or stockings on, and her hair all over her face, and said, where are my shoes? I said, what shoes? she said, my shoes; then she went away and came back again; a pair of man's shoes, she said, made out of boottops; I asked her where she was when she was robbed? she said, on the bed; I asked her if she could tell who took them; she said, she knew it was a woman by the dress; I did not know Mrs. Hobbs before.

Court. (To Mrs. Perry.) Q.Is there any truth in this? - A.Indeed there is not.

Q.(To Lewington.) She charged you with having them trust? - A. Yes, she did; and I'll maintain it is true.

DANIEL PORTER sworn. - I am shopman to a hatter, in Fleet-street; I called at the prisoner's house, the evening of Sunday the 7th of March, between five and six, and found her crying; I had some conversation with Mrs. Perry, who said, she saw the prisoner pulling the window down; I asked her, whether she saw the shoes in her hand, or saw her take them; she said, no, but saw her pull the window down.

JOHN EDWARDS sworn. - I am a watch-maker, and live near the prosecutor and prisoner: On the 7th of March, I was going by the prosecutor's door, about five minutes before the shoes were lost, and saw a woman stand at the window, which was wide open; I am positive it was not Mrs. Hobbs, who I have known about a year and a half; on my return, about four minutes after, I heard the alarm, and saw Mrs. Perry standing at her own door.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-126

391. WILLIAM-THOMAS STOCKER was indicted for that he, on the 20th of January , feloniously, knowingly, wittingly, and without lawful excuse, had, in his custody and possession, divers forged and counterfeited Bank-notes for the payment of five pounds each, he well knowing them to be forged and counterfeited .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18020428-127

392. EDWARD WALSH was indicted for that he, on the 4th of March , feloniously, knowingly, wittingly, and without lawful excuse, had, in his custody and possession, divers forged and counterfeited Bank-notes for the payment of five pounds each, he well knowing them to be forged and counterfeited .

The Prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-128

393. WILLIAM WAKEFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , one shirt, value 1s. and nine guineas, the property of William Rooke , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Millward .

WILLIAM ROOKE sworn. - I work at Gysford's brewhouse, and the prisoner also; we had lodged together before, and removed to Mr. Millward's, a cooper, in King-street, Seven Dials , where we slept together in a one pair of stairs front room, in one bed; I had a box in the room, which held my clothes, and I always kept locked; I did not miss the money before Sunday, the 28th of March, when I went to put my things on; on the 22d of March, I missed my shirt out of the window, which I had put there on the Saturday night; the prisoner did not come home to sleep either the Saturday, Sunday, or Monday nights, but I had no suspicion of him, and did not want any thing out of my box till Sunday the 28th, when I missed my money, which I kept in a purse in the box, and kept the key in my pocket; I had not looked at my money for three weeks before; the box had a hasp nailed at the top; I found the nail-heads knocked off, and the hasp back, but not off; the last time I had seen the box, the nail-heads were on; I missed nine guineas in gold that were in my purse; I always counted them when I put any in; there were eleven guineas in the purse, but he took nine out of the eleven, and the purse was remaining just the same as it was; I kept my clothes in the box, and my money under them; upon missing my money, I went to Mrs. Martin's, over Westminster-bridge, but did not find him; I found him on the 29th of March, in a brickfield, at Hammersmith; the constable of Hammersmith, who was with me, said, he durst not take him without a warrant; I got a warrant at Bow-street, and, the next morning, I found him at the Angel at Hammersmith; I went into the house, and the officer with me; I clapped my hand upon my sword, and said to the officer, this is the man that broke my box open, and stole nine guineas, and a shirt; he said he had not the money, but he did bring the shirt away; then we went to Bow-street, and before we went before the Magistrate, I heard him tell the officer he had my money, and had spent every farthing of it.

Q.How long had you been acquainted? - A. About three months; I have never seen my shirt or money since.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not two other men who used to go through our room? - A. They used to go through our room to their lodgings, and who ever went down last, used to carry the key.

Q.Did we not always go out first, and leave them in bed till ten or eleven o'clock? - A.Sometimes they went out first, and sometimes we went out first.

ANN MILLWARD sworn. - I am the wife of Joseph Millward, and live in King-street, Seven-Dials; the prisoner, and the last witness, came to lodge with us about seven or eight weeks ago; they had the one pair of stairs front-room; there were two other lodgers, single men, who used to go through their room; the prisoner was on duty at the brewhouse on the Friday night, and came home on the Saturday morning; I saw no more of him till Monday about twelve o'clock; I gave him the key; he was up stairs about half an hour, and then brought the key down again, and said, he was going to work at a brewhouse over Westminster-bridge; he paid me one shilling and six-

pence for his share of the rent; he went away, and I saw no more of him.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am one of the constables of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields; I went with the prosecutor to the Angel at Hammersmith; we found the prisoner with a good many brick-makers, dancing; the prosecutor pointed him out to me; I told him I had a warrant to apprehend him, for robbing his bed-fellow of nine guineas, and a shirt.

Q. Before he said any thing, had you said any thing to him that could induce him to make a confession? - A. No; I took him out of the taproom into the bar, and he said, I took the shirt away, but as for the nine guineas, I never took them; I brought him to town, and took him to the office; going through the passage, I said to him, what have you done with this poor fellow's money; he then said, the money is all spent, I should not have taken it, if I had not been very drunk.

Prisoner's defence. I am quite innocent of the affair; when I was brought to the office, the officer told me to say, yes, right or wrong, and, being in liquor, I did not know what I said; he told me I should be cleared if I said, yes.

Donaldson. He was perfectly sober; it was about three or four o'clock in the afternoon.

GUILTY. - Of stealing to the value of 1s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18020428-129

394. MATHEW HAYLETT was indicted for making an assault in the dwelling-house of a person unknown, on the 3d of March , upon Elizabeth Moysey , spinster , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, against her will, eight guineas, and two one-pound Bank-notes, value two pounds , the property of the said Elizabeth Moysey .

ELIZABETH MOYSEY sworn. - I live in Northrow, Upper Park-street, and am a servant out of place: On the 3d of March, a little after eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to me at my lodgings, with another man, and told me, he was taken, and that was one of the Bow-street officers, for me, with a warrant; I asked him for what; he said, for taking linen out of a public-house where I had lived; I said, I did not take any, for it was out to wash, and was my own, and had paid for it; he took me to a public-house, and told me I had better make it up with the Bow-street runner; I told him I had nothing to make up; he said, I had better offer the man some money; I asked him what he wanted; he told me he could not take less than ten pounds, that he had been after me three days, and there were ten of them, and they must have a pound a-piece; the prisoner had lodged with me when I kept a public-house; he took me about from one public-house to another, till I did not know what I was about, and till I was unsensed; I had ten pounds in my pocket, which I threw on the table; there was eight guineas in gold, and two one-pound notes, out of which I had eight shillings.

Court. Q. Were you perfectly sober? - A. Yes; but I was unsensed, because I was frightened, as he said I should be imprisoned six months, and afterwards, transported for seven years; I think, the public-house was in King-street, the sign of the Grapes, just at the end of Shepherd's-mews; when we came out of the public-house, he told me I must get out of town by four o'clock the next day; I told him I could not till five; then he said, I must go to the City in the morning; next morning, he came to help me to the coach with my boxes, or else, he said, they would be after me again; I then suspected him, and told him he was a rogue; I then went to Bow-street, and inquired whether there was a warrant out against me; they said, no, and I took a warrant out against him; I never saw the other man before; we drank at every public-house, first, ale, and then, gin and water, but I drank very little; I don't know who kept the house; the prisoner was a job-tailor.

JOHN JACKSON sworn. - I took the sign of the Castle after this woman left it, and the prisoner lodged with me, in the three pair of stairs: On the 3d of March, he went out with me; I left him at a public-house in Davis-street, and went home; he returned between nine and ten, and wanted change for a guinea; I would not give it him, as he was very much in liquor; in the course of the evening, he gave his daughter seven guineas, and two one-pound notes, to take care of for him; in the morning, he gave her a pound note for herself, took the seven guineas, and the other note, and went away, and I did not see him afterwards; I asked him before he went, where he got it; he said he won it, by tossing up for a guinea at a time; I said, suppose you had lost; O, says he, I had a friend by me, who would have paid for me.

WILLIAM HEWITT sworn. - The prisoner was delivered into my custody at Bow-street; I searched him, and found five guineas, a one-pound note, half-a-guinea, two seven-shilling pieces, two sixpences, and some halfpence.

Moysey. This note I can swear to, having put a mark on it, though I cannot read or write.

Prisoner's defence. On that night, a person came, and apprehended me, who said, he was a Bow-street officer, and asked me where Mrs. Moysey was; I told him, and we went to her; it was for taking things out of the house where she lived with a man as his wife; I was left in execution, and was given to understand she certainly had got many things off, such as sheets, and so on; as to

the money found upon me, I took it of three different people; she once charged a man with a rape without any cause.

Court. (To Moysey.) Q.Did you ever accuse a man of having committed a rape upon you? - A. Yes, I did; the prisoner persuaded me to do it; he did commit it, and the prisoner went with me to Marlborough-street.

Kennedy. I am an officer, and the prosecutrix employed me to take a man from a public-house for committing a rape upon her, which I did, and took him before Mr. Conant, who saw through the business, and discharged the man; the story was - she lent some money to the man to go into a public-house, and she was to be his house-keeper; he left the house, and she was turned out.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 37.

Of stealing, but not violently .

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-130

395. JOHN JONES and RICHARD JOHNSON (two blacks) were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon George Errington , the younger, in a certain field, or open place, near the King's highway, on the 25th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a muslin cap, value 3s. the property of George Errington , the elder; and a silk handkerchief, value 6d. the property of John English .

The property not being identified, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-131

396. ARCHIBALD RIDDELL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Farrell M'Quin , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 25th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a great coat, value 18s. and a flannel shirt, value 2s. the property of Farrell M'Quin.

FARRELL M'QUIN sworn. - John Shergold, the prisoner, and myself, are watchmen , and all lodged together in a front kitchen, at No. 23, Market-lane, St. James's : On the 25th of February, I was the last who went out; I locked the door, and put the key in my pocket; on my return home in the morning, I found the door open, and missed the things; I went to the watch-house, and got the key of the prisoner's watch-box; one of the patrols went with me; the hasp of the lock was put on, but not locked, and I found the flannel shirt under the seat; I have never seen the coat since.

OWEN DURFY sworn. - I am a patrol, and was with M'Quin when he searched the box; the prisoner denied knowing any thing of the coat.

(The flannel shirt identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing about it; I have nothing to say. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-132

397. JOHN REED was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , a silver watch, value 38s. the property of William Glover , privily from his person .

WILLIAM GLOVER sworn. - I am a journeyman painter : On the 6th of March, between five and six o'clock, as I was standing making water in Tottenham-court-road , my watch was taken from me; I did not know it was gone for an hour, or more, after; I had seen it a little time before.

JOHN MOORE sworn. - I live at the Blue Posts, in Tottenham-court-road; I was standing at the door when Glover was making water, and saw the prisoner take his silver watch out of his fob, and walk away; I was called in to my business, and, in about ten minutes, the prisoner came in again; the prisoner, the prosecutor, and others, had been drinking together; the people said, what a d - d villain he was, to take the watch from the man, and the next day he was taken up.

- KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: On the 15th of March, the prosecutor came to me, and said, he was robbed; we went together to the barracks, and he pointed out the prisoner; I asked him what he had done with the watch; he said he took it, but had lost it entirely, for that it was not pawned; it has never been recovered.

Q.(To Glover.) Were you drunk or sober? - A.I was merry.

Prisoner's defence. I was in the house with that man, and had been drinking with him for eight hours; we were both in liquor, but I never saw any thing of the watch. GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-133

398. ISRAEL LANGAY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 4th of March , fifty pounds weight of whalebone, value 25s. he well knowing it to have been stolen .

No evidence being offered, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-134

399. JOHN CARSON was indicted for that he, on the 25th of March , unlawfully, knowingly, and designedly, did pretend to Susanna, the wife of Thomas Rogers , that he had left Michael, meaning Michael Laslett, in pawn, at the agent's, and wanted a sum of money to pay the poundage, viz. 35s. - 5s. for the clerk, and 2s. 6d. for a coach; by means of which false pretence, he did knowingly obtain of the said Susanna, the sum of

2l.. 2s. 6d. the money of the said Thomas, with intent to cheat and defraud him thereof .

Second Count. Varying the manner of charging.(The case was opened by Mr. Vaillant.)

SUSANN ROGERS sworn. - I live with my brother, Michael Laslett , who keeps the Swan and Horse-shoe, in Little-Britain; my husband's name is Thomas; whether he is living or dead, I don't know, as he has been absent from me nine years: On the 25th of March, the prisoner came to our house about two o'clock at noon, and asked me for a two pound note and half-a-crown, saying, my brother was at the agent's, in Silver-street, Golden-square, in pawn for thirty-five shillings, five shillings for the clerk, and half-a-crown for coachhire; it was an agent's for paying soldiers, where my brother had been with him several times to receive thirty-five pounds, which he said was due to him; I gave him two one pound notes, and half-a-crown for the coach; he came in, the coachman and he had a glass of gin each, and went away; the next day he was taken up.

MICHAEL LASLETT sworn. - The prisoner first came to our house the latter end of January, and staid seven weeks; he represented himself to be a soldier, belonging to the 27th Light Dragoons; he run up a score of upwards of eight pounds, which I asked him to pay; he pretended to go to the office to get the prize-money he had to receive, and he would pay; on the 24th of March, he took me to Mr. Crosdale's officer, who, he said, was the agent belonging to the regiment; I waited for him just by, and he returned to me, saying, Mr. Crosdale was not at home, but that the clerk said, if he called at five o'clock, he would receive his money; when we went at five o'clock, the officer was shut; he said, he knocked at the door, and spoke to Mr. Crosdale, who told him to be there the next morning at ten o'clock, but then it was past office-hours; I went with him next morning to the same place; he came, and told me, Mr. Crosdale was not at home, but that he was to call at half past twelve, which he did; I was in a public-house, almost opposite; then, he said, he must wait a little longer, the course of half an hour, or so, when he went again, and brought back a loose paper in his hand, and said, I must go to Mr. Davison's, in Millbank-street, Westminster, which I did, at No. 21, and Mr. Davison told me to get a few lines to certify that Mr. Crosdale had drawn the money, and crossed the books; the prisoner was to wait till I went back; on my return to the public-house, he was gone; I did not wait long, but went to Mr. Crosdale's office to enquire after him, when I found he was an impostor; the next day, he was taken; I did not authorize him to go to my sister for money on any account, nor did I pass my word for any sum whatever, or remain at any place as security for any sum.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not give you a note to go to Mr. Davison's to receive prize-money, when I was sick - did you not write a note, and I sign it? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you not convinced at that time I had money coming to me? - A. They told me, if you had a proper certificate from the regiment, they would pay, if you had any money due.

Q.Did not Mr. Young, the lawyer, go down to Milbank-street, and tell you there was money coming to me? - A.He said, he had been to seek after it, and he understood there was prize-money to receive for the Cape of Good-Hope.

Q.Did I not give you a note to go to the India-House? - A. Yes, and they said they knew nothing of the note or him who wrote it, but if there was any money due to him, he must get a proper certificate.

Q.Did not Mr. Young write a letter to get a certificate? - A. He did, and I received an answer from Lieutenant Hughes.

Prisoner's defence. I had money coming to me, sufficient to pay the debt; I own to the debt, but not to receiving the money under false pretences.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one year in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-135

400. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 15th of March , upon George Gregory , the younger, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silver watch, value four guineas, and a steel chain, value 1s. the property of the said George.

GEORGE GREGORY sworn. - I live with my father, who is a potato-merchant, in Spital-fields-market: On Monday evening, the 15th of March, about half-past six, I was walking down a narrow passage, leading to petticoat-lane; I heard a great noise, I looked behind me, and saw a great mob, driving a bullock; the prisoner was walking quick behind me; I turned round, and went towards Houndsditch ; directly after, the prisoner came running past, and snatched the watch out of my pocket, so quick that I could make no resistance; I followed him instantly, and saw him put the watch in by his side, his waistcoat and jacket were loose open; when I followed him, he made a great noise, and about twenty men and boys came running up with sticks, and hit me about the head and hands, so that I was obliged to let him go; I went home, and in about an hour my brother and I went to several pawnbroker's shops, in one of which we found the prisoner; I told my brother he had stole

my watch, and we took him; he said, he knew nothing of it; I knew his cace, having seen him several times before, and it being quite-light, I could see very well.

SAMUEL GREGORY sworn. - I went with my brother, and met the prisoner at the pawnbroker's; my brother said, this is one of them; I asked him if it was the man who took the watch, he said, it was; the prisoner denied it, and the pawnbroker said, he came to take a coat out of pawn.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of so I never saw him before it was in the pawnbroker's shop.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-136

401. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , two silver table-spoons, value 21s. a silver skewer, value 2s. and two four pronged silver forks, value 17s. the property of Thomas-Orbey Hunter , Esq ; in his dwelling house .

JOHN HARRISON sworn. - I am butler to Thomas-Orbey Hunter, Esq; No. 16, Manchester-square , and can swear to the plate.

JOHN BROCKHURST sworn. - I am under butler, the plate was brought to me about the 20th of March, by Mr. Lowe, the pawnbroker.

JAMES LOWE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; on the 20th of March, the prisoner pledged a tablespoon with me; I asked him where he got it, and he gave me a direction, No. 16, Barrert's-court; I asked him whose it was; he said, he had been a servant, that his master was dead, and had left him those things; in the evening, I made enquiry, but could not find him out; on Monday evening, he brought a silver skewer, which I took in, on purpose to find out where he lived, when he gave me the same address, and the same name; on Thursday the 26th of March, he brought me two silver four prolonged forks and offered me; I told him, he had twice given me a false direction, and I would detain them and him; he said, they belonged to Mr. Byrne; I said, I would go and see if he lived there; going through Manchester-square, I saw the buttler going into Mr. Hunter's with some beer; I went there, and they owned the things.(The property identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I pawned the spoons with an intention of taking them out; I pawned the skewer for two shillings, and intended to do so by that, if the apprehension had not taken place.

GUILTY, aged 38, of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-137

402. CATHERINE BURN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , ten yards of printed cotton, value 20s. the property of Jacob Bailey , privately in his shop .

JACOB BAILEY sworn. - I keep a shop on Holborn-hill : On Tuesday the 23d of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop, with two other women, and another man came in soon after; I was engaged, and my young man waited on her; I observed her very troublesome, and very difficult to be suited; I heard her ask my young man for a bill of what she had bought, which he refused, but marked it on the paper with the things; after talking some time, he crossed the shop to make a bill, and as the prisoner crossed after him, I saw a small part of the printed cotton hang just below her cloak; I went up to her, and took it from her; she said nothing; my young man said, he suspected her of having a piece of Irish cloth, upon which she was searched, but no Irish was found, though I lost a piece that day, which cost me four pounds, thirteen shillings, and seven-pence.

GRANT HEWITT sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Bailey, the prisoner asked me to shew her some printed cotton, and said, she wanted nine yards of one to make a gown; I asked her two shillings and four-pence per yard for it, she bid me sixteen-pence; I told her to get out of the shop, or I would have her turned out, she being in liquor; she asked me to shew her some stanner; I shewed her some, and sold her three yards, at a shilling per yard, which she paid for; she then asked for some muslin, which I sold her a small quantity of; she wanted a bill very much; I suspected her, and was rather dubious of leaving the counter, but I did, and as she was crossing the shop, the print was discovered; I did not see her take it, there were two or three other customers in the shop. (The pieces of printed cotton produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I went into this gentleman's house, and bought four yards of flannel; I was very heavy in liquor, and went to put the slannel under my cloak, and whether the piece of print stuck to it I don't know; I have only been three weeks in this country.

Mr. Bailey. The flannel was laying on the counter.

GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-138

403. MICHAEL SENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , one hundred and twenty pieces of soap, value 3l. fourteen pounds weight of other soap, value 14s. and five rolls of pomatum, value 5s. the property of Samuel Berry , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL BERRY sworn. - I am a perfumer , in Greek-street, Soho ; the prisoner was a weekly servant , and had lived with me about three months

upon information I received, I searched his lodgings, by his own consent, and found a considerable quantity of soap, which I believe to be mine, by comparing it with what I have at my warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q.You had a good character? - A. Yes.

Q.You had a man in your service, named Marshall, who has absconded? - A. Yes, but I have not sought alter him; he came through the prisoner's recomendation, and was with me four or five weeks.

WILLIAM THOMAS sworn. - I am a perfumer, in Gracechurch-street: by desire of Mr. Pope, on the 23d of last month, I went to his house, to examine same soap, and from the price for which it was offered. I thought it was stolen.

JACOB POPE sworn. - I am a glazier; on the 23d of last month, a servant, who had lived with me, brought some soap, for which she asked ten-pence per pound; I detained it, and desired to know where she got it, she refused to tell me, and said, she lived at the other end of the town; then I sent for Mr. Thomas, who thought it was stolen; it was two days at my house.

SUSANNA TAYLOR sworn. - I carried some soap to Mr. Pope's, on the 23d of April, and asked ten-pence per pound, Mrs. Sennett brought it to me, and I had it in my custody from Friday to Wednesday, when it was stopped; I never received any soap from Mr. Sennett, or had any conversation with him about any, or paid him any money. (The soap produced.)

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-139

404. JAMES NOONHAM was insisted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , fourteen silk handkerchiefs, value 3l. the property of James Janaway , and Thomas Brooks , in their dwelling-house .

Not being able to identify the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020428-140

405. GEORGE-BENTLEY HARVEY was indicted for that he, on the 21st of April , about the hour of eight in the night, being in the dwelling-house of John Blair , feloniously did steal a silver pint mug, value 2l. a silver pap-boat, value 10s. even silver tea-spoons, value 7s. and various other articles, the property of Elizabeth Ann Stewart ; and that he, being in the said dwelling house afterwards, about the hour of eight in the night, of one said 21st of April, feloniously and burglariously did break and get out of the same .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of Robert Adams . And

Third Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of Henry Mears .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

Mrs. ELIZABETH- ANN STEWART sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Do you live in Russell-street? - A. I am a widow , and live at No. 62, Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury ; I pay my brother for the use of apartments in his house; I had a servant of the name of Elizabeth Harvey , and the prisoner used to visit her as her brother, with my consent: On the 23d of April, a little after seven o'clock, I left my apartments, in which there was a press, which I left locked; I returned a little after eight, and, soon after nine, I observed a man, from the drawing-room window, going out at the door; I did not know any man was in the house at that time.

Q.Had Elizabeth Harvey returned before you saw the man go out? - A. No, she had not; a short time afterwards, Mr. Blair sent his compliments, and informed me I was robbed; and that, if he could be of any service, he would; I went to my press, which stood in my bed-room, and found it broke open; I missed twelve silver tea-spoons, a pap-boat, a pair of silver candlesticks, a dressing-case, a silver pint pot, and a black cloak, trimmed with lace; there were things to a considerable amount in the dressing-case, but I recovered all the articles back.

Court. Q.Do you know whether the housedoor was fastened? - A. I do not; but am positive the press-door was locked.

ANN- MARIA JONES sworn. - Q.Are you servant to Mr. Adams? - A. I am: I saw the prisoner at the house, on the 21st of April, about eight o'clock, before Mrs. Steward came back; I left him in, and thought he was Mrs. Harvey's brother; he went down into the kitchen, and asked me where his sister was; I said, she was out; then he went into a passion; I told him she was gone to shew her little brother the way home, and he immediately went out of the house; I saw him in the house again about twenty minutes after, which was before Mrs. Stewart came in; I left him in the house while I went to Mr. Blair's, about five or six doors off; Mr. Adams and his father were in the house; while I was at Mr. Blair's, which might be a quartar of an hour, there was a cry of stop thief, and I heard the rattles spring; when I let the prisoner in, he had on a brown coat, for I was particular in looking at him while he was cleaning the knives, and I observed a large hole under his arm, and a button-hole torn quite out; I have seen the coat since, and am sure it is the same.

GEORGE POLLARD sworn. - On the 21st of April, I let the prisoner in, about half past eight, about twenty minutes before the alarm of the robbery, and I have seen the coat, and am sure it was the same he had on.

WILLIAM DOLLMAN sworn. - I am a shoemaker, and live at No. 16, Colville-court, Rathbone-place: On the 21st of April, about a quarter before nine, I was going home through Great Russell-street, and heard the watchman spring his rattle, and call stop thief; I could not discern the prisoner, but I run into the middle of the street, and he run towards me; he had something with him, upon which I attempted to stop him, he struck at me, and knocked me down; on recovering the blow, I run after him again, as I had not lost sight of him, and I saw him throw from him a silk cloak, a silver pap-boat, and a crape cap, which I picked up, not two yards from the place where he threw them away, I did not see him throw any thing else away; he had no coat or shoes on when he came up to me; Ryley and I secured him, and, when we got him as far as Hart-street, he drew a knife upon us, which the watchman knocked out of his hand; after the charge was given, I picked up four silver tea-spoons in Russell-street, which I suppose he had dropped in running; I gave the things I picked up to the constable, and know them to be the same.

LAWRENCE RYLEY sworn. - I am a watchman, and stand in Little Russell-street: On the 21st of April, about nine at night, I heard the cry of stop thief.

Q.Who raised the cry? - A. Elizabeth Harvey , the prisoner's wife; I saw a man run across, and four or five running after him; the man was in a singular dress; he was without a shirt; and dropped his shoes in one place, and his stockings in another; and, a little distance from me, after he passed me, I found a coat, which I have kept ever since; I searched the pockets at the watch-house, and there was a silver pint pot, silver tea-spoons, a tinder-box, steel, and matches; I followed him, and found him in the hands of Dollman, and another; I asked him if that was his coat, and he denied it; Elizabeth Harvey , his wife, came to the watch-house with an apron full of things, which she found in a coach-yard in Russell-street, which was no thoroughfare; she told us this in his hearing, but he said nothing.

(The coat and the different articles produced, all of which were identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I went on the evening of the 21st, to see my wife, and she was not at home; I went out, and endeavoured to meet her, but could not; I returned again, and cleaned the knives; I then thought it time for me to go, and, just as I got to the corner of the streets, I observed my wife talking with a man; I crossed the way, and think she saw me; I asked her what she was doing there; she said, what's that to you; I was so enraged, that I gave her a slap of the face; the man run away, and I followed him up towards Bloomsbury-square; when that man stopped me, I took him to be the person I saw with my wife, and struck him; in the scuffle I fell myself, and by that means was taken. My wife had the things; I know nothing of them; there was nothing found upon me.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

The Court immediately pronounced sentence of Transportation for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-141

406. MARY HENNEGAN , the elder, MARY HENNEGAN , the younger, and WILLIAM APPLETON , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Taylor , about the hour of eight in the night of the 2d of March , and burglariously stealing eight yards of ribbon, value 4s. the property of the said William.

There being no evidence to effect the prisoners, they were all three. ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-142

407. MATHEW NELSON and WILLIAM HUNT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , six silk handkerchiefs, value 36s. the property of George Oliver , privately in his shop .

The prisoners not being proved to have possession of the goods, were Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-143

408. MATTHEW NELSON was again indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, upon John Howard , on the 7th of April , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, against his will, five silver boxes for watches, value 2l. the property of James Hallam .

JOHN HOWARD sworn. - I am eleven years of age, and know the nature of an oath; my master, James Hallam, is a springer and liner of watches : On the 7th of April, I was going to Mr. Palmer's, and Mr. Wood's, with some silver boxes for watches, and met one Pollard, by the Jolly Coopers, in Short's-buildings, Clerkenwell, who asked me where I was going; we went on till we came to Aylesbury-street, and he asked me if I was going up Compton-street; I said, no; then he went up Compton-street; and I went down St. John's-street; as I was going up Sutton-street, I met Nelson, the prisoner, who said, Mr. Palmer was his master, and I had the wrong box for him, and told me to give him my bag, but I would not; then he told me to run, which I did; he told me not to run quite so fast, and, when we came to Aylesbury-street , he hit me a blow in the mouth, which made it bleed, put his hand in the bag, and took five boxes out, and run down Woodbridge-street; I went home to my master, and told him.

Q.Are you sure he struck you a violent blow when he took them? - A. Yes, while he was

taking them; I never saw them again, I am sure the prisoner is the lad; Pollard was with him, but was discharged.

JAMES HALLAM sworn. - I am master of the boy, and, on the 7th of April, he came home with his mouth bleeding, and had lost five cases; he had eleven, but brought back only six.

WILLIAM POWELL sworn. - I saw the prisoner going along with John Howard; and Mr. Howe, the corner of Jarusalem-court, sent me to tell John Howard to come back, because he knew the prisoner before.

EDWARD PEMBERTON sworn. - I am twelve years of age, and know the nature of an oath; I saw Nelson go over the way to John Howare , and tell him to come back, for they were the wrong boxes, at the corner of Sutton-street; I am sure that is the boy.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody for the handkerchiefs, but nothing was found on him.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the boy at all; I was going to my aunt's the same day.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Of the larceny.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-144

409. MARY WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , in the dwelling-house of Charles M'Carthy , one guinea, half-a-guinea, three shillings, a bank-note, value 2l. an six one-pound bank-notes , the property of Nathaniel Eames .

There being no evidence to effect the prisoner, she was AQUITTED

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-145

410. SARAH HICKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , two pair of woman's slippers, value 6s. 6d. and paid of shoes, value 1s. 9d. the property of John Smith .

The Court recommended the prisoner. (twelve years, of age,) to be sent to the Philanthropic Society .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-146

411. JAMES TURNER was indicted for feloniously, stealing, on the 20th of April , a hat, value 5s. a watch, value 40s. and two pounds twelve shillings in money, the property of John Catchpole , in the dwelling-house of William Crowe .

The prisoner not being proved to have possession of any part of the property, was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-147

412. MARY DRAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , two curtains, value 10s. four silver table-spoons, value 40s. four desert-spoons, value 30s. and a silver marrowspoon, value 5s. the property of William Garnier , Esq.

WILLIAM GARNIER , Esq. sworn. - I live at No. 9, Conway-street, Fitzroy-square ; the prisoner was my cook ; she came the 13th of February, and left my service the 1st of November; before I went out of town, on the 11th of June, I sent my plate-chest to Mr. Stewart's, in Bond-street, and had it home on my return, and found all the plate safe; when the prisoner absconded, and I discovered the cruet-stand gone, it led me to inspect the platechest, which stood under the bed in the room I sleep; I missed a vast number of articles, besides those in the indictment; I gave notice at Marlborough-street of the robbery, but heard nothing of her. On the 2d of March, I met the prisoner in Fleet-street, and took her to Bow-street; in consequence of hand-bills, Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker, appeared with part of the property, which I identified; she was searched, but nothing found belonging to me.

JOHN SHEPHERD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker, No. 15, Norfolk-street, Middlesex-hospital; the prisoner, on the 15th of October last, pledged two curtains, and three tablespoons, for two pounds, in the name of Price; on the same day, she pledged a table-spoon, a desert, and a marrow spoon, for one guinea. (The articles produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY, aged 39.

Of stealing, to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-148

413. WILLIAM FINCH was indicted for that he, on the 6th of February , being employed in the service of Rudolph Akerman , Baptist Suardi , and Co. did receive, and take into his possession, the sum of 4s. 6d. for and on account of his said employees, and did feloniously embezzle and secrete the same, and did steal, take, and carry it away .

It not being proved that the prisoner had not accounted for the money, he was.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-149

414. WILLIAM FINCH was indicted upon two other Indictments, for receiving the sums of 4s. 6d. and 19s. 6d. and embezzling the same .

It not being proved he had not accounted for the several sums, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-150

415. WILLIAM BURVILL JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a large leather hose, value 20s. a small leather nose, value 20s. and a stand-cock, com

plete, value 20s. the property of the inhabitants of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of the Church-wardens of the said parish .

(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

CLAUDIUS HERAUD sworn. - I am beadle and engineer of the parish of Bethnal-green: On Tuesday, the 23d of March, the prisoner beckoned to me, and said, how do you do? I come with Mr. Bristow's compliments, and to say, they are making a new set of hose for the next parish, and wishes to make them upon a plan, that the screws of your's and those should answer, so that you may lend your hose to one another; I went back to my house, where he got the key; being in a hurry, I left him, and, when I went to the engine-house, on the 25th, the hose and the stand-cock were gone.

MARY HERAUD sworn. - On the 24th, the prisoner came and asked me for the key of the engine-house, to measure the screw; I told him the watchman of the night had it, in case of fire; he went to him and got it, which he returned in the afternoon; he returned to my house for the key, and said Mr. Bristow was very sorry they could not send the hose sooner; I gave him the key a second time, and he returned it in the space of a quarter of an hour.

JOHN DUPRE sworn. - I am a watchman; I gave the key to the prisoner on the 24th, and I had it again at night.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You set up all night in the engine-house? - A. Yes.

Q. How many people were there beside you? - A.Eight beside me, in and out.

Q.Are they here? - A. No.

JAMES BRISTOW sworn. - I am an engine maker, but never sent the prisoner to Mr. Heraud with any message; I never saw him before.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge; I leave myself to the mercy of the Court and Jury.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-151

416. JAMES SIMMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , a metal watch, value 20s. the property of Catherine Kinlow .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-152

417. SIMON DOYLE and EPHRAIM JACOBS were indicted for putting off, on the 9th of April, six pieces of milled money and coin, each counterfeited to the likeness of a guinea; and twelve pieces of milled money, each counterfeited to the likeness of a 7s. piece, to one Daniel Holland , at a lower rate and value than the same, by their denomination, imported to be worth, that is to say, for 21s.

No evidence being offered on the part of the Crown, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020428-153

418. DANIEL MOORE was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences .

JAMES ALDWINKLE sworn. - I am apprentice to Henry-William Looker , cutler , in Leadenhall-street: On the morning of the 6th of March, the prisoner came to me, and said Mr. Cockran wanted a knife with three or four blades; I shewed him the one which I have in my hand, and asked him if that would do; he said he would take it to Mr. Cockran, and if it would not do, he would bring it back again; Mr. Cockran is a customer of our's, he has frequently sent for articles of cutlery; I gave him a knife with two blades and several instruments, supposing it to be for Mr. Cockran.

- COCKRAN sworn. - The prisoner was once in my service, but I never saw him in the deplorable situation he appears to be in now; I never was so shocked in my life.

Q.Did you send him to Mr. Looker for a knife, on the 6th of March? - A. No; I had not seen him for six months.

Q. Then the pretence that the knife was for you was false? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BRISCOE sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner on another charge; understanding that he had been to Mr. Looker, I took him to Mr. Looker.

(The knife was identified by Aldwinkle.)

Prisoner. I hope your Lordship will be as favourable as possible; I have a wife and four children. GUILTY .

One year in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: o18020428-1

MR. BARON THOMPSON delivered the OPINION of the JUDGES, on the CASE of JOHN MACGREGOR , as follows:

The prisoner at the bar, John Macgregor , was tried at the last September Sessions, upon an indictment, which stated, that he being a Clerk to George Shum , and others named in the indictment, and employed by them in the capacity of such Clerk, did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession a large sum of money, to wit, the sum of three hundred pounds, for and on the account of the said George Shum and others, the said masters and employers of him, the prisoner; and that he afterwards fraudulently

and feloniously did embezzle and secrete the said sum of three hundred pounds, against the form of the statute; and so the Jurors say, that the said John Macgregor , with force and arms, feloniously did steal, take, and carry away the said sum of three hundred pounds, from the said masters and employers of him, the said John, upon whose account the said sum of three hundred pounds was so taken into the possession of him, the said John Macgregor, being such Clerk so employed, and by virture of such employment, as aforesaid, against the form of the statute. There was a second, Count, which differed from the first, only varying in the prisoner's employment; the indictement is grounded upon the statute of the 39th of George III . chap. 85. which recites, "Whereas, bankers, merchants, and others, are, in the course of their dealings and transactions, frequently obliged to entrust their servants, clerks, and persons employed by them, in the like capacity, with receiving, paying, negociating, exchanging, or transeferring money, goods, bonds, bills, notes, banker's-drafts, and other valuable effects and securities; and, whereas, doubts have been entertained whether the embezzling of the same, by such servants, clerks, and others, so employed by their masters, amounts to felony by the Law of England; and it is expedient that such offences should be punished in the same manner in born parts of the united kingdoms. Be it enacted and declared, by the King's Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, that if any servant or clerk, or any person employed for the purpose, in the capacity of servant or clerk, to any person or persons whomsoever, or to any body corporate or politic, shall, by virtue of such employment, receive, or take into his possession, any money, goods, bond, bill, note, banker's draft, or other valuable security of effects, for, or in the name, or on the account of his master or masters, or employer or employers, and shall fraudulently embezzle, secrete, or make away with the same, or any part thereof, every such offender shall be deemed to have feloniously stolen the same from his master or masters, employer or employers, for whose use, or in whose name or names, or on whose account the same was or were delivered to, or taken into the possession of such servant, clerk, or other person so employed, although such money, goods, bond, bill, note, banker's-draft, or other valuable security, was, or were no otherwise received into the possession of his or their servant, clerk, or other person so employed; and every such offender, his adviser, procurer, aider, and abettor, being thereof lawfully convicted or attainted, shall be liable to be transported to such parts, beyond the seas, as his Majesty, by and with the advice of his Privy Council, shall appoint, for any term not exceeding 14 years, in the discretion of the Court, before whom such offender shall be convicted and adjudged."

The prisoner was found guilty upon this indictment, but a motion having been made in arrest of judgment, Mr. Common Serjeant, who tried the prisoner, thought proper to refer the case to the consideration of the Judges, and it was accordingly argued before them, by Counsel on both sides, in Hilary term last; it was objected, on the part of the prisoner, that the statute, upon which the indictment was founded, has not created the embezzling by clerks and servants, do nomine a substantive felony; but having enacted and declared, that, under such circumstances, the offender shall be deemed to have felonioulsy stolen the same, from his master or employer: the statute has made the offence larceny, and, consequently, that an indictment, grounded upon this statute, must have the requisites of an indictment for larceny, at the Common Law; but here money is alledged to have been feloniously stolen, taken, and carried away, and is not expresly averred to be the money of any person whatever, and therefore it is the opinion of a majority of the Judges, that the objection taken to this indictment is well founded, and consequently judgment, upon this indictment, must be arrested.


View as XML