Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th February 1802.
Reference Number: 18020217
Reference Number: f18020217-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, ON WEDNESDAY, the 17th of FEBRUARY, 1802, and following Days, BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1802.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir SIMON LE BLANC , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majestys's Court of King's Bench; Sir ALLAN CHAMBRE , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir WATKIN LEWES , Knight, THOMAS SKINNER , Esq. and Sir RICHARD CARR GLYN , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; Sir WILLIAM HERNE , Knight, PETER PERCHARD , Esq. and JOHN ANSLEY , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY OF LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

Robert Chisley ,

William Woolcott ,

Isaac Venes ,

James Finden ,

Henry Buller ,

William Cummin ,

Thomas Edwards ,

Richard Cloves ,

Joseph Christain ,

Joshua Brown ,

Robert Beck ,

Thomas Moore ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Foster ,

George Richardson ,

Thomas Baldwin ,

Stephen Hoole ,

Joseph Moore ,

Samuel Bishop ,

Samuel Snape ,

Michael Taylor ,

Thomas Boston ,

Samuel Savage

William Ropier ,

James Williams ,

London Jury.

Emanual Crow ,

Peter Leonard ,

Edward Gibson ,

Samuel Grimsdale ,

James Old ,

Charles Heath ,

John Norfolk ,

Thomas Dyer ,

William Allen ,

Robert Lawson ,

Daniel Skinner ,

William Kinnersley .

Reference Number: t18020217-1

174. WILLIAM HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , four guineas and a thirty-pound banknote, the property of Cuthbert Kitchen , in the dwelling-house of William Lonsdale .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020217-2

175. JONATHAN DENIGHT was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 1st of May , a pair of diamond ear-rings, value 50l. a pair of pearl ear-rings, value 5l. a diamond pin, value 10l. a cornelian stone, value 5s. a pearl necklace, value 12l. a green necklace, value 4l. part of a garnet necklace, value 2l. two garnets, value 5s. a breastpin set with pearls, value 5l. and a pearl pin, value 50s. the property of John-Christian Weppler , whereof Thomas Colley , otherwise Putty, was convicted of feloniously stealing, he well knowing them to be so stolen .

JOHN CHRISTIAN WEPPLER sworn. - On the 29th of April last, I lost the articles in the indictment, which were in a trunk, and stolen out of a cart in Fleet-street; the Bow-street officers have found some of them in different places, and some were found on the prisoner; he came to my house, and told me his sister, who was convicted, knew where some of the property could be found; and if I would intercede for her, she would deliver up the different articles I am now in possession of; I said, that was not sufficient, but, provided she would come forward with more property, I would; he came at different times, and always told the same story; I was not with the officer when they were found, but I have them here, and know them to be mine. (Produces the articles.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Mrs. Hayes, the prisoner's sister, has been convicted on your prosecution? - A. Yes, for receiving this very property.

Q. And a person of the name of Faulkner was also convicted of receiving those things? - A. Yes.

Q. A person of the name of Hayes was also tried? - A. Yes, he was tried, but acquitted.

Q. And one Peake? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of him? - A. I don't know; he got clear some how or other.

Q. The prisoner was admitted to bail by the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q. And he has now surrendered to take his trial? - A. Yes.

Q. Don't you know that the prisoner at the bar had nothing to do originally with receiving these goods, but that they were delivered to him by Mrs. Hayes? - A. He never told me of it.

Q. Don't you know Mrs. Hayes brought those things to him? - A. No.

Q. Or ever heard any thing of it? - A. No, the things were found upon him.

Q. The prisoner gave you information where the things might be found? - A. Yes; after she was convicted, his sister said, she knew where the things could be purchased.

Q. Did you not know they were in the prisoner's possession? - A. No.

Q. Or heard of it? - A. No, not till they were found.

Q. You never learnt from him that she brought the things to him as a deposit? - A. No.

PETER PERRY sworn. - I am an officer: On the 31st of July, I went with a search-warrant to the prisoner's house, No. 2, Gibson's-court, St. James's, about one o'clock; he was not at home, but he came immediately; I asked him if his name was Denight; he said, it was; I said, I suppose you know what I am come for; he said, no; I said, I have a search-warrant; he said, for what; I told him for a pair of diamond ear-rings and other articles; he said, they were not in his house, but that he could get them; and, if I would give time, he would bring them to the office; I said, I was sure they were in the house, and I must search it; he said, he would not pretend to say he knew nothing about them, but, if I would give him time, he would bring them down; I said, I must search the house; well then, said he, come up stairs; I went up one pair of stairs to the front room; he returned down again, and went into the cellar; I followed him, and asked him what he wanted; he said, he wanted something to open the place where the diamonds were; he put his hand on a carpenter's bench, took up a piece of wood, and laid it down again; then we went up stairs again, but I did not see he had any tool with him; he put his hand to the book-case, pulled out two or three books, and then pulled out a paper containing the things Mr. Weppler has produced; I took him, and he said Mr. Weppler knew he had them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know the prisoner is the brother of Mrs. Hayes? - A. I know it now.

Q. Don't you know that it was in consequence of the prisoner's information, after Mrs. Hayes was

convicted, that led to his house? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Don't you know he said he had the things delivered to him by Mrs. Hayes merely for being taken care of? - A. He said so when I took him.

Q. Did he not always say they were the property of Mrs. Hayes, and placed with him as a deposit? - A. Yes, I believe he did.

Q. Was it not understood so by you and the Justice at the time of examination? - A. Yes, and I think so still; I think he only kept them on condition of getting his sister a pardon.

Q. Did you know, from any thing that passed from the prisoner, that he really had the custody of those things by direction of Mrs. Hayes? - A. I cannot say that; my opinion is, from what he said, that he had them as a deposit till Mr. Weppler got a pardon for his sister.

Q. Did you understand from him that Mr. Weppler had promised a pardon? - A. I don't know.

Q. From what passed, have you any doubt about the truth of his story that he kept this as a deposit? - A. I don't think he meant to sell the things; he only held them as a deposit, and merely to get a pardon for his sister, not to make any property of them for his own use.(The record of the conviction of Thomas Colley, otherwise Thomas Putty, read.)

The prisoner delivered a written defence, which was read, as follows:

"On the 24th of April last, Mr. Weppler lost the box; Colley, a glazier, said, he found it in the Strand, and carried it to the Bell, in Red-Lion market, kept by a person of the name of Hayes; that he opened it, and wanted Mr. Hayes to buy it of him, but he would not, as he thought he had better wait for the advertisement; he went home, and the next day brought the box, but he did not know the value of the contents; for the beads, as he called them, proved to be pearls; he threw a number of loose ones behind the fire, and somebody said they would have them, and picked them up; other little things he gave to children, and the other things he sold to be melted for the gold and silver, not knowing the value of them; about three days afterwards he went to Mr. Hayes, and said, would they buy some napkins; he had got three dozen, and they bought them; Mrs. Hayes suffered by false swearing that she bought the box and contents for seven pounds; but it happened in this way: the servant had warning, and she, not being pleased with going, and having some words, got with a soldier in the neighbourhood, and he, with others, persuaded her she would get one hundred and fifty pounds reward, if she informed, which she did by the description Putty gave of the box; Mrs. Hayes, her child, and all were taken, and Mrs. Hayes was convicted by the girl's false swearing; when Putty found what state he was in,(for what reason I cannot say,) he sent a statement how he disposed of the things; Mrs. Weppler went to the house of Mrs. Hinton, and said she much wished to see Mrs. Hayes, and wished Mrs. Hinton to present her to her; but, searing a sudden visit might hurt her; begged her to acquaint Mrs. Hayes that Mrs. Weppler would see her to-morrow. Mr. and Mrs. Weppler, with Mrs. Hinton, and myself, went the next day to Newgate in a coach, and Mrs. Weppler staid in it while we went in; Mrs. Weppler said, she was sorry for her unfortunate situation, and was come to give her all the comfort in her power; but, as she was well assured she was not guilty, she was sorry steps so rash had been taken by Mr. Weppler, as she thought it would be the best way to hear of the property, and secure the great expence they had been at; and the more so, as they had not got any of the things again but trifles; however they could not prevail on him, and she was now come to acquaint her that she would obtain her pardon if she would restore the things not destroyed by the melter; she said, that a pair of diamond earrings and the picture of her former husband were of more value to her than all the rest, and gave the word of honour of a lady that she would perform her promise; I was appointed by my sister, as being the only friend she had to do any thing for her; Mrs. Weppler gave me her address, in her own handwriting, and left the place with a seeming affection for Mrs. Hayes; they did not wait my going the day after, but sent Miller, the Bow-street officer; Mrs. Hayes gave a list of what she had; Mr. Weppler then went himself, and Mrs. Hayes was called to Mr. Kirby's office; Mrs. Hayes said, she had the promise of them, but it would be some days first; and, according to Mr. Weppler's promise, she could not think of delivering them till her pardon was produced; Mrs. Weppler had said she would pay any thing in reason, but Mr. Weppler made a demand of a sum of money; and Mrs. Hayes thanked him for letting her know in time, as she had something to go with. The next day they visited her again, and, instead of performing the promise, said, the articles should all be delivered; a week passed, and, after different appointments, I went to inform them that Mrs. Hayes had got these things in her own hands, and was ready to deliver them on the pardon being produced; Mr. Weppler told me he was about the business, and promised me he would do as was said, but told me I must get a petition made out, and it should be signed; I promised I would do any thing that was right, and as much as I could for the recovery, to convince them my sister had been wronged; I went with the petition the next day to Mrs. Weppler, and I saw Mr. Weppler the next day; he said it was wrong, because it said Mrs. Hayes never had

the property in her possession; he said, I must leave it, but it would not be right to do any thing more about it at present, because Mr. Hayes was an evidence against Faulkner, and it would be said Hayes had done it for his wife's pardon; Mr. Weppler promised he would not go further if Faulkner would give up the diamonds he had; I went to him in prison, and he said Mr. Weppler might be d - d; I went to him till I was in danger from the prisoners, as Faulkner said he was no friend of his; I was with Mr. Weppler ten times, and in that time they promised a great many times that she and Faulkner should have their liberty if they would send word where the things were.

"After Faulkner was convicted, they hoped the things they had would be put into such hands that they might be got; I promised I would answer for them; and, if they thought proper, would appoint a time; I would be imprisoned till they were brought forward; they said, they did not doubt I would; Mrs. Weppler afterwards said the loss had been so great, that Mr. Weppler would not accept the things without money beside, he having had one hundred and fifty pieces of cambric seized by the Custom-house officers in the morning, and at night be lost his box; that they had run also great danger in bringing the diamonds over, as they were obliged to bring them concealed about the most secret parts of them; they shewed me a box, like that which was lost, except the colour; it would be impossible to speak to all the promises made to me, being sometimes two hours in discourse; my sister afterwards begged I would take the things in my care, as she feared necessity might make her part with them, and she knew she could trust to me to bring them when wanted; I had no reason to think I was doing any thing but what was legal and right, and I thought they might as well attempt to take any thing else out of my house as to take them; and I complied with her desire, and kept the things; I called at Mrs. Weppler's, and she said I must call again tomorrow, for Mr. Weppler was on the carter's trial; and, if he gained it, it would be better for Mrs. Hayes, as she was convinced he would not sign a petition without a sum of money as well as the things; next morning Mrs. Hayes wrote a letter, containing a list of the things I had got, and I went and saw Mr. Weppler, who said, the legal expences were very great, and he had not yet recovered; he wished he had never heard of the box, and gave me a bill, which he had of Mr. Reeves, of Bow-street, of twenty pounds; I said, I had got the things, and would be answerable for them, as I had before said; he said, the things were trivial, and he was determined not to sign it without a handsome sum of money; I said, it was impossible to do so, as she had distressed herself to buy the things. This was the cause of my distress, and I have lost a place of work I was in many years; I had nothing but hard labour to provide for myself and family, and it was not in my power to do any thing for her, and I said I wished he would make up his mind what to do; Mrs. Weppler said, she would, by that day week, send word by letter what they would do for her; the time came, but no letter. About a fortnight after, the Bow-street officers came, and said they had a warrant to search my house, and that I knew what they wanted, and that I had better give them up; I said, Mr. Weppler had got a list of what I had, and hoped they would not take them, for what would become of Mrs. Hayes; however they would have them, and I gave them solded up in silver paper; they then made a prisoner of me; Mr. Bond understood Mr. Weppler knew something of the things, otherwise I should not have been on bail."

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-3

176. ANN PRITCHARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , a piece of printed calico, about twenty-eight yards, value 2l. 6s. the property of Simeon Bond , in his dwelling-house .

SIMEON BOND sworn. - I live in Stanhope-street, Clare-market , and missed a piece of printed calico on Tuesday, the 19th of January; I was undressing my window, and, looking towards the door, I saw the prisoner standing; I kept my eye on her, and soon afterwards saw her take up the piece of printed calico that lay on the counter, and go out of the door; I followed her, and found the piece of print on the payement, though I did not see her drop it; I have it in Court, and know it by the private mark, (produces it;) it is worth two pounds, six shillings, and eight pence; I took her back, and, on entering the shop, she asked for a quarter of an ounce of thread.

GEORGE THOMAS sworn. - I was shutting up Mr. Bond's shop, and saw the prisoner come out and drop the piece of print; she was stopped directly.

Prisoner's defence. I told Mr. Bond that the person who took the property went across the road; I am not guilty; I am not the person he believes, for he found no property on me.

GUILTY, aged 60.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-4

177. JOSEPH RAWLINS and JOHN ROUTLEDGE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , a gold watch,

value 15l. 15s. the property of James Graham , privately in his shop .

JAMES GRAHAM sworn. - I am a watch-maker , No. 85, Piccadilly : On the 20th of January, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I hung up a gold watch, in a small glass case, behind my counter; I went out for half an hour, leaving my wife in the shop; I returned in about three quarters of an hour, and immediately missed the watch; I went to Bow-street, and described the persons from the information of my wife; on the 28th, as I was passing through Russel-street, Covent-garden, I saw two fellows going to Bow-street for examination, one of them was the prisoner Routledge; I fetched Mrs. Graham to see if the knew them.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again? - A. No; it was worth fifteen guineas.

JANE GRAHAM sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: On the 20th of January, the two prisoners came in to ask the price of some watch-chains, I am sure they are the same persons; Rawlins, the big one, went out to point out a chain through the glass, which laid down in the window; the little one staid in the shop; the big one pointed to one and to another, to take my attention, and I had my child in my arms; he then came in and asked me to give him change for a guinea; I told him to go to the linen-draper's, and tell them who he came from, and he would get change, and they both went away, and never returned; I did not see him do any thing, he must have come behind me, behind the counter to have taken it out.

Q. Did you see him behind the counter? - A. No.

Q. Did you see him do any thing? - A. No.

Q. From the time your husband went out, till he returned, were there any other persons in the shop besides the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in the shop the whole time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the watch at all? - A. Yes.

ARCHIBALD RUTHVEN sworn. - I am one of the leaders of the patrol of Bow-street; I was sent to Tothill-fields Bridewell to fetch the prisoner Rawlins, and he was identified by Mrs. Graham.

WILLIAM POTTER sworn. - I apprehended the prisoners on suspicion they were thieves; I found upon them a thing for picking locks, and a mask.

Rawlins's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

Routledge's defence. This man is as innocent as the child unbarn; the man that was with me at the time, went down into the country as soon as he heard I was taken. Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-5

178. DANIEL M'ALENAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , a mare, value 18l. a saddle, value 14s. a bridle, value 5s. and a bit, value 1s. the property of Joseph Pring .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN SPOONER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are ostler to Mr. Pring, who keeps livery-stable in Coleman-street? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the young man at the bar? - A. Yes, perfectly well: On the 13th of August, the prisoner at the bar hired a black mare of me to go to Dartford, it was Mr. Pring's mare, bridle and saddle, he was to return the next day; I delivered the mare to him at Moorgate Coffee-house; I continued in Mr. Pring's service thirteen days after, but he did not return during that time.

Q. What age was this mare? - A. Four years old; I saw the same mare to-day, at the Crosskeys, Wood-street, in the care of Mr. Fairer, she appeared to have been very ill used; she was worth seventeen or eighteen guineas, I believe, when he hired her of me.

THOMAS PLANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You live at the King's-arms, at Liverpool? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the young man at the bar? - A. Yes; I saw him at Liverpool; on Wednesday the 19th of August, he came to the King's-arms, on horseback, it was a black mare; she appeared to have been rode very hard, and very ill spurred in the sides; he rode out chiefly every morning till the Monday morning after, and then he went out upon her, and did not return; the bill of the house being not paid, I was sent to see if I could find her, I found her in Mr. Fairer's stables, in Derby-street, Liverpool; I went back and told them the mare was there, and my master sent me to fetch her back, and the next day the prisoner came and gave me an order upon Mr. Fairer to receive three guineas. (Produces it.)(It is read.)

"King's-arms, 25th August, 1801.

"Sir,

"Please to pay the bearer for Captain Lynn, the"sum of three guineas, when he delivers you my"horse - Given. CAPTAIN LYNN."

Q. What name did the prisoner go by at that time? - A. Captain Lynn.

Q. What was the amount of his bill? - A. Three pounds nine shillings and nine-pence; in consequence of that, Mr. Fairer paid me the three guineas, and I delivered the house to Mr. Fairer; he paid the rest of the monacy to the waiter.

Q. Where is the mare now? - A. I saw her today, at the Cross-keys.

Q. Was that the same black mare? - A. It was.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Spooner.) Q. By what name did he hire the horse? - A. Daniel M'Alenan.

RICHARD FAIRER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You live in Derby-street, Liverpool? - A. I do.

Q. Look at the prisoner - Did you ever see him at Liverpool? - A. I cannot say that that is the same man, it was a young person about his size that came to me between the 20th and 24th of August last.

Q. Look at him again? - A. I think I have seen him before, I believe he is the same man, but I am not quite positive; he came, and said, he was recommended by a gentleman, in Castle-street, Liverpool, to have his horse kept at my stables, while he went to the lsle of Man; he did not know the gentleman's name, but I have seen him since; his name is Swist, he told me his own name was Captain Lynn.

Q. Did you take in the mare? - A. Yes, it was a black mare, I brought her up to town with me; Spooner and Plant have seen her at the Cross-keys, she is now in the yard.

Q. What became of the mare afterwards? - A I let him have four guineas upon the mare, and then Plant came and paid me the seven guineas that I had advanced, and took her away; I saw nothing of the prisoner afterwards.

Prisoner. (To Spooner.) Q. Did you ever know of my hiring horses of Mr. Pring before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did I ever run a bill without its being discharged? - A. No.

Q. Did I not send the horses home without riding them myself? - A. Yes, once or twice.

JOSEPH PRING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you are the owner of the mare which Spooner let to the prisoner? - A. Yes; I saw her to-day in the possession of Mr. Fairer; I saw nothing of the prisoner till I saw him in custody at Lambeth-street Office, about two months ago; I was sent for by the Magistrates.

Q. From the 13th of August, till you saw him in custody, had he ever been with you to explain what was become of the mare? - A. No.

Q. Was the mare such a mare as you would have lent to go such a journey as Liverpool? - A. Certainly not.

Q. Was she able to go so long a journey? - A. No, by no means, her age would not have permitted it.(James Lynn was called upon his subpoena, but did not appear.)

Prisoner's defence. On Thursday the 13th of August, I sent the waiter of the Moorgate Coffee-house to Mr. Pring's, to know if I could have a horse to go to Dartford, in Kent; Mr. Pring's man brought a black mare, which I mounted; I told him I was going to Dartford, I told him I should return probably to-morrow evening; I went to Dartford in expectation of returning next day; when I got to Dartford, I had the misfortune to meet with a brother of mine, who was a lieutenant on board his Majesty's ship, Charlotte; he told me, he heard that the ship I belonged to, the Charger, was going to sail; I desired him to ride the mare to town, supposing I could put confidence in my brother, and told him to return the horse to Mr. Pring; I gave him a guinea to pay for it; I always paid Mr. Pring half-a-guinea a day; I rested satisfied that the horse was returned, and went off the next morning with the coach for Plymouth; I understood afterwards, that my brother had gone to Liverpool, and sold the mare there; I have since learnt, that, at that time, he had lost his commistion, but I did not then know it; I heard, about a fortnight ago, that he is in America.

Mr. Knowlys. My Lord, I understand, Mr. Lynn is come now.

JAMES LYNN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I have seen him before.

Q. You know him well? - A. No, I don't.

Q. Don't you know him well? - A. I have seen him.

Q. Why, is he not a relation of your's? - A. I don't know that that is a proper question.

Q. Yes it is? - A. I have known him since he came to town, he said he was related to me.

Q. Has he not lived with you? - A. He lived with me eighteen months.

Q. Do you know his hand-writing? - A. No.

Q. Did you never see him write? - A. I never observed him write, he wrote a very bad hand when he was with me.

Q. Do you know his hand-writing when you see it? - A. No. I do not.

Court. (To Plant.) Q. Look at the prisoner - is he the man who came to your house at Liverpool? - A. He is like the man.

Q. Have you any doubt of his being the man? - A. No, I have not.

The Jury having retired upwards of five hours, returned with a verdict of NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-6

179. JOHN JOSEPH, otherwise GEORGE BROWN , (a black man ) was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a silver watch, value 3l. 3s. 6d. two gold rings, value 10s. and a guinea and a half , the property of John White .(The prisoner being a Frenchman from Guadaloupe , an interpreter was sworn.)

JOHN WHITE sworn. - I am a shipwright : On Monday the 4th of January, I met the prisoner in St. George's-highway; I had known him before; he asked me to give him something to drink; we went to the Three Swedish Crowns, and after some time, I fell asleep, with my elbow on the table, and my head upon my hand.

Q. Were you in liquor? - A. I was intoxicated; I am troubled with epileptic fits, and I was not my own master; I had not drank above a third part of

a shilling sworth of spirits before I came into the man's company, and I drank with him a share of half-a-pint of brandy; I looked at my watch while I was in the house, to see what it was o'clock, and I pulled out my pocket-book to pay the reckoning, in which I had two rings, and a guinea and a half; I do not recollect how much I paid; the prisoner waked me, and came out of the house with me; I went to my lodgings, and he left me; when I got to my lodgings, I missed my property.

Q. Where were your lodgings? - A. In Wellallev, Wapping.

Q. Does the prisoner speak English? - A. Yes; but at that time he spoke broken French, which I had learned while I was in a French prison.

RICHARD CRISPO sworn. - I am a ship-rigger; I know the prisoner perfectly well, and I know White is a ship-carpenter: On the 4th of January, I was at the Three Swedish Crowns, in Old Gravel-lane; I saw White asleep, he was a little in liquor; when he came into the house, he had a glass of brandy, and then fell asleep; after he had been asleep some time, the prisoner pulled him up, but he made no answer; the prisoner then put his hand into White's Waistcoat-pocket, and pulled out a shilling and a half-crown; he then took out a silver handled pen-knife; he put his hand into White's coat-pocket, and took out a black pocket-book, he held it under the table, and opened it; I saw a guinea and a-half, and two rings in it; the prisoner said, "De people in dis"country take money never to return it again;"Massa White tinks he loses his money; poor"George Brown, as soon as he go aboard de brig,"give him his money again to-morrow;" upon that I asked him, if he belonged to John White, he told me, yes, he was cook of the brig that White belonged to; he desired me to come on board the brig the next morning, and bring another rigger with me; accordingly I went on board the brig the next morning with another rigger; I enquired for George Brown, the black cook, but I could not find either him or John White; coming home again, I fell in with White, upon which he told me the black man had robbed him; I then told him all I knew; about two days after, another black man was taken into custody, and kept for ten days till the prisoner was taken; I apprehended him myself in Denmark-street, Ratcliss-highway; he swore I had never seen him, and tried to get away.

Q. Can you swear the prisoner is the same man? - A. I can, with a clear conscience.

Q. (To White.) What ship did you belong to? - A. The Race-horse.

Q. (To Crispo.) Was the Race-horse the brig the prisoner sent you on board of? - A. No, to the best of my knowledge it was the Quaker.

White. I had been on board the same ship with the prisoner, about two years and a half before.

Q. Do you know any think of the brig called the Quaker? - A. Yes, I was in her last summer.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY .

(Sick,) Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-7

180. BLAISE CHIRLOSKY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , an iron crow, value 2s. a pick-axe, value 1s. and twenty pounds weight of iron, value 10d. the property of Henry Green .(The prisoner being a German , an interpreter was sworn.)

HENRY GREEN sworn. - I live at Old-Ford : Last Saturday four weeks, I lost an iron crow, a pick-axe, and sundry iron, out of my yard; the prisoner was stopped by the patrol with the property.

JOHN MURPHY sworn. - I am a patrol: On Saturday night, the 23d of January, I met the prisoner, with some iron on his shoulder, between ten and eleven o'clock at night; he had also a crow and a pick-axe; I met him just by the weigh-bridge, in Mile-end-road; I asked him what he had got upon his shoulder, he said, he had got some old iron that he had collected from different places, and he told me he had been breaking up some old shipping, at Blackwall; that was about a mile from Mr. Green's premises. (Produces the property.)

Green. I know these to be my property; they are certainly mine.

PETER CARTY sworn. - I was at the stopping of the prisoner; these are the things that we found upon him.

Prisoner's defence. I found them in the road, God is my witness.

Q. (To Green.) When did you miss these things? - A. The same night. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020217-8

181. WILLIAM KEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 7s the property of John Riley .

JOHN RILEY sworn. - I live in Cary-lane, Cheapside : On Friday, the 15th of January, a pair of silver sugar-tongs weresent to me to be mended, and on Tuesday morning the 19th, when they were sent for, they were missing; I was responsible for them; the prisoner was my journeyman , he was not at home at the time they were missing; I was under the necessity of going to the West-end of the town; I went out a little before eleven o'clock in the forenoon; upon my return, about two o'clock, I heard that they were at Messrs. Cox and Merle's, I went there, and saw them.

HENRY HAWKINS sworn. - I am an apprentice

to Mr. Riley; a pair of sugar-tongs were brought to be repaired, and when the man came to enquire for them, they were missing; after that, I went to Messrs. Cox and Merle's, in Little-Britain; I saw them, and knew them to be the same.

NATHANIEL PHILLIPS sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Riley; I know the tongs to be the same that I mended on the Saturday.

JOSEPH BENNETT sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Cox and Merle's, refiners, in Little-Britain: On the 19th of January, the prisoner brought me a pair of silver sugar-tongs to sell as old silver; I supposed him to have come by them regularly; I had known him many years, he kept a silversmith's shop, in Barbican, and I did not know but he was a master at that time; about half an hour after I had purchased them, a servant of Mr. Riley's came to me, to know if I had bought a pair of old fashioned tea tongs that morning; I told him, I had, and shewed them to him; I have had them ever since. (The witness produced the tongs, which were identified by all the other witnesses.)

Prisoner's defence. I have only to say, that of late years my mental faculties have been much impaired, but I hope the evidence that will appear to my character, will operate in my favour.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-9

182. JOHN HANSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a deal box, value 6d. a coat, value 15s. a waistcoat, value 1s. two half handkerchiefs, value 1s 6d. a pair of stockings, value 1s. a shirt, value 3s. two boxes, value 1s. and a crape batband, value 6d. the property of James Carpenter .

JAMES CARPENTER sworn. - I am a bricklayer , and lodge in Lawrence-lane, High-street, Bloomsbury : On Saturday the 23d of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, John Hanson called upon me, my wife told him I was at work; about half-past ten, my wife came to me, where I was at work, and told me she was robbed; I immediately left my work, and went home with my wife, and found it was so; I missed-my-coat, my hat, my waistcoat, and a deal box which contained the other things; I went to search after him and could not find him; I left my work on purpose to find him; on Sunday I went to look for him, and could not find him; on Monday I found him on one side of Gray's-inn-lane, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; he ran away from me; I ran after him, and took him; I took him with my coat, shirt, waistcoat, and the handkerchief, boxes, and stockings about him; the coat was upon him, and the shirt, the waistcoat, and the other things in his pocket; I took him to the watch-house, and the watch-house-keeper kept him; the watch-housekeeper had the care of the property.

Q. Are you able to swear to it if it is produced? - A. Yes; I have found none of the other articles; the coat, in the right-hand pocket, is stained with tobacco; he said, if I would go with him by myself, he would get me every thing again; I was loath to go with him for fear he should get away.

Prisoner. Q. Are there any particular marks to those things? - A. Yes, the right-hand pocket is stained with tobacco; I chew tobacco, and put it into my coat-pocket; I am perfectly sure it is my own; the waistcoat was one my uncle gave me, very much darned, the pockets are sewed up; there is a mother of pearl button on the left-hand side, and two upon the right; the shirt is tied with a piece of bobbin, it is very much torn with stooping.

RACHAEL CARPENTER sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; the prisoner at the bar was a flight acquaintance of my husband's; he frequently used to call upon us; he eat and drank with us part of what we had, when he came up; he called on Friday afternoon, the 22d of January; he had tea with us in the evening; he told us he had got a job of work to go to, on the Monday; he went about eight o'clock in the evening; he returned again about the 23d in the morning, between the hours of nine and ten o'clock, my husband was gone to his work; he sat down for some time; he asked me if I would drink any thing: I thanked him, I had just had my breakfast; he asked me, if I would fetch him a pint of two penny, and half an ounce of tobacco; I told him yes; I put on my bonnet and cloak, and went down stairs; the public-house was opposite; I ordered a pint of two penny to be got ready; I went for the tobacco, when I came back, the pint of twopenny was on the bar, waiting for me; I was gone five or six minutes at the farthest; I went up stairs, and immediately found my door was wide open; the prisoner at the bar was gone; I missed a box and tea-chest from off the table, and a deal box, containing a coat, waistcoat, two half-handkerchiefs, a pair of stockings, a shirt, and a hat-band; I know those articles were in the box; this is my husband's property, and my box stood upon this; the articles in the indictment were in my husband's box; he did not take that away.

Q. Did he put them into your box? - A. I don't know, that box was left empty behind; he took two boxes, and left one empty behind him; I have seen the property that was taken from him; my husband's coat and waistcoat, a shirt, and a pair of stockings, were in the coat-pocket; they were taken from him when he was taken to the watch-house; I was at the watch-house, and was with my hus

band at the taking of him; I know these articles to be my husband's property, the name R. P. is on the stockings; they were kept in the box that was empty.

JOHN HARWOOD sworn. - I am inspector of the watch and lamps of St. Andrew's, Holborn; I saw the prisoner taken; the man and his wife brought the prisoner in, and another man with them; he said, he had been robbed, I searched him, and there were two small boxes, one tortoise-shell, the other brass, and cut in the form of a shoe; the small box was in his coat-pocket; when he was before the Alderman, he was stripped of the coat, waistcoat, and shirt, I have kept them ever since.(Produces them.)

Carpenter. They are my boxes; a tortoise-shell box, with a looking-glass, one is a wooden shoe, with an oval on it; the cloaths are my property.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, these things, as I was coming down St. Giles's, I picked up, tied up in a bundle, I put them upon my back; going up St. Giles's, this man came past me; soon after, I went past him, and this man followed me, overtook me, and swore they were his property, before I ever saw him; I am entirely a stranger.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-10

183. THOMAS DUNGWORTH, alias POWELL , and WILLIAM THOMPSON, alias WILLIAMS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a deal box, value 1s. a waistcoat, value 3s. two coats, value 12s. a pair of breeches, value 5s. a pair of shoes, value 4s. a night shirt, value 1s. five books, value 8s. five shirts, value 8s. seven pair of stockings, value 7s. two cloths, value 1s. 6d. three night caps, value 6d. and three handkerchiefs, value 6d. the property of Richard Snell .

RICHARD SNELL sworn. - I am a corn-chandler , in Portman-Mews, Orchard-street, Portman-square: On the 18th of January, between the hours of eleven and twelve in the morning, I lost a box from behind a one-horse chaise, going down Oxford-street; I missed it in Broad St. Giles's; I told a little boy to look and see if the box was safe; he said, it was gone; the box contained the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Did you, at any time, see the box safe upon the chaise? - A. Not after I left my home; I put it on the chaise about two minutes before I got into the chaise; I did not think of looking for it afterwards, till I bid the boy look round to see if it was safe.

Q. Have you ever found any of your things? - A. Yes, by advertisement in the paper, from Bow-street; I attended, seeing that a box was taken from a one-horse chaise, with the name of Snell on it; it is my property; I think it was the following Thursday that I saw my box.

Q. Was any of your property in it? - A. Yes, all that was in the box.

Q. Have you the box here? - A. Yes.

- HURLE sworn. - (Produces the box:)

Q. When was that box delivered to you? - A. I observed the two men go from the chaise with this box in their possession, in Oxford-street, the lower end, near St. Giles's; I saw the prisoners running in Oxford-street, and the chaise was in the middle; they were on the pavement; they were going the same way as the chaise; it was about half past eleven in the morning, and a good many people about; I had some property with me, I suspected them, and left my property in a shop, and went and followed them; when I came out of the shop, they were going from the chaise with the box in their possession.

Q. Was the chaise going fast or slow? - A. Middling, not particularly fast.

Q. Did you observe how the box was fastened to the chaise? - A. No.

Q. Which of them did you see carrying it? - A. The prisoner Dungworth.

Q. How far from the chaise were they then? - A. About the space of two or three yards.

Q. Was there any fastening about the trunk, or cord? - A. A cord; one end was broke or cut, I do not know which; I cannot say whether it was broke or cut; I followed Dungworth up a court; I took him up the court, and took him by the collar, and said, he had stole the box from the back of the chaise; they made some resistance, and were assisted; they got away from me, and took the box with them; I followed them again into the Mews, near Bedford-square, (Carlisle-Mews.)

Q. Did you ever lose sight of them? - A. Yes, while they went round the corner of Russell-street into the Mews, a minute or two; there I got Dungworth again, and he let the box fall, and went on.

Q. Dungworth still had it? - A. I cannot say which had it then.

Q. They let it drop, in order to get away? - A. I was going to let them go away, but I wasadvised not, and I followed them again, and endeavoured to take them a third time, near Bedford-square; and this man, Bowles, assisted me, and took them.

Q. All the time you followed them, did not you give alarm? - A. Yes, but no person gave any assistance; I called out stop thief; I saw the box drop from one of them; I do not know which.

Q. How long might this be after you saw them come from the chaise? - A. All in the course of six or seven minutes.

Q. Is that the box? - A. Yes, it is the same;

I took the prisoner Dungworth and the box in a coach, and went to Bow-street immediately.

Q. Have you had it in your custody ever since? - A. No, it was at Bow-street, and Mr. Snell had it again.

Q. (To Mr. Snell.) How was your box fastened? - A. Only by a cord, no straps.

Hurle. - Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The box has been at Bow-street ever since, neither in your care nor Mr. Snell's? - A. No.

Q. Is the person here who had the care of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to state, that, though you kept raising an alarm, nobody assisted you in midday? - A. Yes; I can declare the several neighbours never gave any assistance at the top of the court; I asked people to assist me, and nobody would.

Q. You brought a great crowd, possibly, with all this, and yet nobody assisted you? - A. No, nobody, until at last these men assisted me.

Q. Where did these men assist you, near Bedford-square? - A. Yes.

Q. Nobody assisted you while the prisoner had the box? - A. None.

Q. Is there any person here besides yourself that ever saw either of the prisoners in possession of that box? - A. I do not know that there is.

Q. How far was it from the place where the box was left to the place where the prisoners were taken? - A. I suppose about fifty yards.

Q. Was the box in sight then? - A. No.

Q. What are you? - A. I am in the cabinet way.

Q. A master or journeyman? - A. A sort of master in the small way.

Q. How long have you been so? - A. Since the failure of my brother.

Q. Have you ever had the misfortune to be accused of any thing? - A. No, never.

Q. Are you quite sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you never in any prison? - A. Only in prison in the House of Correction, when an apprentice, by my master, for three days, for getting in liquor.

Q. Were you never accused of any thing else? - A. No.

Q. Is there any body here that knows you? - A. Mr. Snell knows me.

Q. No one individual would assist you, and there is nobody to confirm that part of your story? - A. No, there is not.

Q. At the time that you took Thompson first of all to Bow-street? - A. I did not take him; somebody else took him.

Q. Did you charge Thompson with any thing more than an attempt to rescue Dungworth - that was the charge you first made? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make any other charge at first than an attempt to rescue Dungworth? - A. No, I did not.

Court. Q. Do you know any thing that affects Thompson more than an endeavour to rescue Dungworth? - A. No; Thompson had not the box in his possession.

- BOWLES sworn. - Q. Where did you first see the last witness? - A. In Carlisle-Mews; I saw the young man, and his breast was all open, and a great many people about him; he asked me to assist him.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners there? - A. Yes, one; (Dungworth.)

Q. What was Dungworth doing at that time? - A. This man had hold of him, and his bosom open; he got away from him; he went up, and I followed him up the Mews; we came up with him, after going out of the Mews, at the end of the Square; a good many people followed him; when he was crossing the Square, this man made an attempt to catch him; he made a blow at him, and took hold of him, and stopped him.

Q. Did you see the other prisoner? - A. No, not till we brought this man to Bow-street.

Q. You saw Dungworth in the Mews where the box was? - A. Yes, he was as near to the box as I am now; (about a yard.)

Q. Who seized Thompson? - A. I don't know. Harle. The parties are not here that took him.

Q. (To Richard Snell.) Look at the property in that box - can you swear to the box being your's? - A. That I can do.

Q. Whose books are they? - A. They are mine.

Prisoner Dungworth. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

Prisoner Thompson. I know nothing of it more has being a spectator of the business; there was a mob of people; I never touched the box, nor never saw it.

Dungworth, GUILTY , aged 27.

Thompson, GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020217-11

184. OWEN ROOKE was indicted for that he, on the 21st of April, 1795 , upon Charles Wakelin , an officer of Excise , being on shore in the due execution of his duty, in seizing and securing, for the use of our sovereign Lord the King, five hundred pounds weight of soap, which soap was liable to be seized by the said Charles, unlawfully and violently did make an assault, and him the said Charles, being so on shore in the execution of his duty, did hinder, oppose, and obstruct .

Second Count. For the like offence omitting the seizure.

Third Count. For unlawfully hindering, opposing, and obstructing, the said Charles, not charging the assault.

(The case was opened by Mr. Fielding, and the indictment stated by Mr. Jackson.)

CHARLES WAKELIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer of Excise: On the 20th of April, 1795, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the evening, I went with Thomas Wright , an officer, to the premises where Mr. Riley carried on his soap manufactory, at Collier's-row, about two miles from Rumford; I went with Mr. Wright in consequence of something he had said; the manufactory was carried on in a barn; we could discover very distinctly, from the outside of the barn, what was going on; at that time they were cleansing soap.

Q. By cleansing soap, you mean emptying it from the copper, in which it was boiled, into the frames that receive it? - A. Yes; they were emptying it into boxes placed in a cart.

Q. The proper things they ought to have been emptied into were frames, not boxes? - A. Yes.

Q. That was an improper thing to empty it into? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Why improper? - A. Not being entered utenfils.

Q. Who were the persons engaged in doing this? - A. One Riley, who was the master, and Owen Rooke .

Q. Who is he? - A. The man at the bar; he was employed as a workman.

Q. Who else? - A. John Keirnan , and Nicholas Brady ; and one Thomas Keirnan , son to John Keirnan. I requested Mr. Wright to call for more assistance, as we were not force enough to go into the house; I continued watching when Wright went off for assistance; Wright, in going for assistance, disturbed a dog in the soap-house.

Q. Did you see what became of the cart? - A. No, I did not; I was obliged to quit the barn for my personal safety. The dog being disturbed came down and made a great noise, when Keirnan came out of the soap-house, called to the dog, and bid him be quiet.

Q. John Keirnan was convicted here? - A. Yes; he bid the dog be quiet, and I left the barn for fear they should discover me, and went to another part of the soap-house. On the 21st, between the hours of four and five o'clock in the morning, I went towards the barn again, not hearing any body at work; on looking into the barn, I saw no person but the prisoner at the bar, on which I went in, and made a survey, examined the premises, and found a box of soap, which had been newly cleansed, concealed under two other boxes.

Court. Q. A box which the liquid had been poured into? - A. Yes; when taken from the copper; the prisoner at the bar informed me that was the whole that had been cleansed that night.

Q. Was that true or not? - A. Not true; I saw a greater quantity cleansed; I then quitted the soap-house, and went towards Riley's house, or Keirnan's house, with whom he lived, about one eighth or a mile across a couple of fields; I met Wright previously to my arriving there. I went into Keirnan's premises, and saw an empty cart, Keirnan asked me what business I had there; I told him I had come for a quantity of soap which was brought there, Wright saw it; he informed me that it was false, that there had not been any soap brought there, and ordered me to quit the premises, at the same time, taking up a pitch-fork, he threatened my destruction unless I quitted the premises.

Q. Did he know who you were? - A. He did; I had surveyed the house many times.

Q. Afterwards, you quitted the premises? - A. I did; Wright was with me, I sent him to call for more assistance. After Wright left me, I began to reason with Keirnan on the impropriety of his conduct, when he request me to walk in, and see if we could not accommodate the matter; to settle the matter, and make it up between us, he thought I was a different sort of person; I told him I came there to do my duty, and would do my duty, and and refused to go in with him; Keirnan's son went out on the common and caught a horse, which horse he brought into Keirnan's yard; Keirnan harnessed it, and put it in the cart; he took a key from his pocket, and placed four boxes of soap in this cart, and John Keirnan drove it out on the common; Nicholas Brady , Owen Rooke , the prisoner at the bar, and Thomas Keirnan , were with him. Upon seeing the cart move, Nicholas Brady jumped at me, wrested a large stick out of my hand, and struck me several brows.

Q. While the others were with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you done any thing to prevent the cart going out? - A. I was walking towards the gate to prevent it; I then closed with him, when we both fell to the ground; when I regained my legs, I was joined by two soldiers with their side-arms, William Fisher, and William Pearman . The prisoner at the bar had a large garden hoe in his hand, Keirnan had a pitch-fork. When I regained my legs, the prisoner at the bar brandished the hoe at me two or three different times; they threatened to strike me unless I desisted from following the cart; the cart being got some distance on the common, I was attacked again, by Nicholas Brady , I was making towards the cart at that time; when I closed with him, and we both fell again to the ground; Brady then sat on my breast, he got uppermost, and put his fingers under my neckcloth, and turned it once or twice.

Q. Was it very tight? - A. It had a pad within, he could not bring it close.

Q. In what manner did he pull your neckcloth? - A. Attempting to tighten it; that was Nicholas Brady .

Q. While he was in that situation, tightening

the neckcloth, did you see any thing more? - A. The prisoner at the bar, with the hoe in his hand, came and said, lay him out, and I will finish him; after that, he struck me two or three blows on the head with the hoe, the blunt part; but having my high-crowned hat on, with a handkerchief inside, it did not materially injure me; I then requested them to consider what they were at, and not for one crime they had committed, add one of a more atrocious nature.

Q. What did you expect they would do to you? - A. Treat me ill; when I regained my legs, they told me, unless I desisted from pursuing the cart, they would put an end to me, or be my destruction; I still followed the cart, and the prisoner at the bar, and Brady, both aimed blows at me, which I avoided by putting my head forward.

Q. Had the prisoner at the bar the same weapon with him? - A. He had; I put my hand into my inside pocket, and took out a pistol, and turning round towards them, I threatened to fire if either of them struck me another blow. The cart being now got a great way on the common, I made away after it, they still followed; one of the soldiers had been wounded, and was gone for assistance, he had been wounded in the sleshy part of his arm; the other was attacked by the prisoner at the bar; John Keirnan told the soldiers that I was no officer but a highwayman; I still kept following the cart, when I was again interrupted by Keirnan, who threatened to run me through with a pitch-fork; and, when he found I was going on, he reversed the pitch-fork, and hit me on the arm; the blow was aimed at my head; I then told him, if he struck me another blow, I should fire at him; and one of the soldiers told me more assistance was coming; he had been for assistance, and was returning with two others; I passed-Keirnan, and came up with the cart with one of the soldiers, and I received two or three blows from the lad who was driving the cart; I jumped up in the cart, and took off the cover of the boxes, and saw the soap in a fluid state, and made my seizure.

Q. About what quantity of soap, in this fluid state, was there in the cart? - A. About seven hundred weight.

Q. You seized it, and it was afterwards condemned? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner, Rooke, know you before this time? - A. He had seen me several times at the soap-house; he knew me as an officer of Excise when I surveyed the house, and the other officer had been ill.

Q. Though so many times assaulted, or beaten, by these people, did you fire your pistol at all? - A. No, I did not.

Q. How long did you feel the effect of the blows you received? - A. My arms were black for a fortnight afterwards. The handkerchief in my hat prevented the mischief to my head.

Mr. Knowles. Q. The boxes you found in the cart were full of soap, not in the regular frames which soap-makers put them into? - A. Yes, they were improper boxes, and unentered untensils.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. If I understand you rightly, you mean to say, this injury you sustained was from the other man, and not much from the prisoner at the bar? - A. Principally from Brady and Keirnan.

Q. Though these men struck you, the blows did not injure you? - A. No, they did not.

Q. You were not the regular officer surveying the premises belonging to his master? - A. No.

Q. He had not an opportunity of knowing you were an Excise-officer? - A. I had frequently surveyed the premises while the officer was ill.

Q. But was the prisoner at the bar there? - A. Yes, always.

Q. You had not warrant on this occasion? - A. No.

Q. Had you your deputation about you, to shew you were an officer? - A. I cannot recollect that I had.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. The injury was prevented by your hat being stuffed with a handkerchief? - A. Yes.

Q. You acted with the other officer? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley said, the facts against the defendant being clearly proved, he should not take up the time of the Court, in addressing the Jury, but hoped, that in consideration of his family, which would become a burden on the parish to which he belonged, and the punishment he had already suffered by being obliged to absent himself from his home for seven years; and also the irreproachable character he had sustained, he trusted the Court would see fit to mitigate his punishment, upon which the Court directed the Jury to find the defendant GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-12

185. WILLIAM WHITTICK and SOPHIA BENNET were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , two gowns, value 15s. two shirts, value 10s. an apron, value 6d. a a waistcoat, value 2s. a shift, value 6d. and a handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Mary Southall , spinster .

MARY SOUTHALL sworn. - I am a single woman: On Monday the 25th of January, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, from my lodgings, at the Coal-hole Tavern, in the Strand; they were in my bed-room, in a large chest; I missed them on Wednesday the 27th, I put them in the chest on the 25th; I saw one of my gowns on Wednesday, at a pawnbroker's in the Strand;

I went there because I thought they might be pledged.

Q. Do you know the prisoners or either of them? - A. Yes; I had seen them about the house, I saw them at the house together once; I found a shirt the same day in a box, in the prisoner's apartment, No. 10, Marygold-court, in the Strand; the prisoners were both at home; I went with the officers who had a search-warrant.

Q. How do you know when the things were lost? - A. I put them in the chest after six o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You never found more than two of these articles, a gown and a shirt? - A. No.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am a patrol and constable; I have a shirt which I found, at No. 10, Marygold-court; I had a search-warrant and forced the door open.

Q. Do you know in whose apartments you found it? - A. The prisoners; they cohabited together two or three years; they were in the room at the time I went to execute the search-warrant; I came to a box, and asked whose it was, the prisoner Whittick said, it is mine; I asked whose cloaths they were in the box, he said, they are mine; I asked whose shirt it was, he said, it is mine; there was a coat, waistcoat and breeches, his wearing apparel, in the box, this shirt was along with them; I took the shirt out and shewed the prosecutrix; she said, it was her property; I asked Bennet where the duplicate of the gown was, and she told me it was under the leas of the cardtable, between the green baize, which I took, (produces it;) there were three or four more duplicates with it; I went there and found it; I kept the duplicate, I have it now.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. She shewed the duplicates readily? - A. She was at the Brownbear.

Q. You did not find it yourself; she told you where it was? - A. She did, before the Magistrate.

Q. Do you mean to say she said so, when she had the duplicate, or before the Magistrate? - A. Before I had the duplicate.

Q. There was no concealment at all? - A. No.

Q. There was no difficulty in finding her; the pawnbroker knew her? - A. Yes. (Produces the shirt.)

JAMES COOK sworn. - I keep the Coal-hole in the Strand: Mary Southall lodged at my house; the prisoner Whittick was at my house on the 25th, of January, in the evening, at the club; the clubroom has a small room detached off, where there is a large chest; he was there sometime among the rest of his acquaintance and companions.

Q. They were all members of a club at your house? - A. Yes; he stopped there about an hour and a half; they went away two or three at a time: On Wednesday morning, the prosecutrix, who kept her things unlocked in that chest, went to the chest, and missed them; on the lid of this large chest I put a bedstead, and a mahogany side-board upon that, for the purpose of securing the property, because I had no lock on the chest; it must be a strong arm to list the lid up, and take away the things; after the company was gone, the prosecutrix slept in that small room that night: On Tuesday morning, the door was locked, and kept locked the whole of that day; on Tuesday night she slept there; on Wednesday morning she missed these things, and made enquiry of the pawnbrokers; I was present when she found it at the pawnbroker's.

Q. Is the pawnbroker's man here? - A. Yes; Bennet told the Magistrate at Bow-street she had the gown and shirt given to her by a man at the top of Fountain-court; the shirt Whittick claimed as his, at their lodgings in Marygold-court, I was present.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you invited this man to come to your club that night? - A. No.

Q. Did you not give him some tickets to distribute? - A. I do not think I did.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not give him tickets to distribute, and bring persons to your club? - A. I am not certain; I think I did not for that night.

Q. Did you not frequently? - A. No; I have never seen him above three or four times at furthest.

Q. You had given him tickets to distribute? - A. Yes; I did it when I was a little acquainted with him.

Q. You will not swear you did not give him tickets that night? - A. I did not that night.

Q. Will you swear it? - A. I don't think I did; I cannot be positive.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, Mr. Salkeld, 423, Strand: I have the gown, (producing it), it was pledged by the prisoner, Sophia Bennet, on the 26th of January, about ten in the morning; she gave in her name and place of abode, No. 10, Marygold-court, I knew her before for some time; I lent her eight shillings upon it; she had been in the habit of pledging things at our shop for a considerable time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You have known this woman some time as a person who pledged things? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any reason to suspect her as to honesty? - A. I never heard any thing dishonest of her.

Q. This she did in her own name and place of abode? - A. Yes.

Q. You gave some information about her lodgings? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Do you know the man she lived with? - A. No.(The property was identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner, Whittick, left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner, Bennet, was not put upon her defence. Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-13

186. JOHN STEDMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , three shirts, value 3s. a pair of stockings, value 5s. a pair of drawers, value 6s. two waistcoats, value 8s. three handkerchiefs, value 6s. two stocks, value 6d. and a night-cap, value 1s. the property of James Patterson ; four shirts, value 2s. 6d. three pair of stockings, value 4s. two waistcoats, value 22s. four handkerchiefs, value 5s. a night-shirt, value 5s. and a cap, value 6d. the property of Walter Ewer .

Second Count. Laying the property to belong to Thomas Clowes .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-14

187. EDWARD KEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a mahogany stool, value 30s. the property of James Bennett .

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I am patrol for St. Andrew, Holborn, above the Bars; the prosecutor lives in Holborn : I observed the prisoner and another, on the 23d of January, standing at the window looking at some goods which were outside, and I watched them, it was about half past four, and quite light; I saw the prisoner take the stool; it was standing the outside of the window for sale.

Q. What is the prosecutor's business? - A. A salesman and broker . It was a mahogany music stool, with a screw to rise to any height; I pursued him about four doors, he dropped it, turned into Gray's Inn, and ran away and left it; I took him about ten yards after he got into Gray's Inn, and carried him back to the prosecutor's shop; from thence I took him to Hatton-garden; I don't know who took the stool up; I followed the prisoner.

MICHAEL ALCOTH sworn. - I am an apprentice to the prosecutor: On the 23d of January, between four and five, I was getting my master goods in that had stood out upon the shew-board for sale; I saw the prisoner and another man with a brown great coat on, torn at the elbows; I went to the door with my fellow-apprentice for a few books to take into the shop; I returned almost immediately after, and the prisoner and the other man was gone, and the stool likewise; I turned my head round to see if I could see any thing of them; an old lady said, the two men were gone with the stool; I pursued with the patrol, and saw the prisoner at the bar put the stool down, about four doors from our house; he turned down Gray's Inn, we took him about ten yards off, and brought him back to the shop.(The stool produced by William Dale.)

Q. Is that the stool? - A. Yes, it has a private mark underneath, which we always put on our goods.

WILLIAM DALE sworn. - I have had the stool in my possession; it was taken from the other apprentice of Mr. Bennett's, and I was to take care of it.

Prisoner's defence. I was at the window talking with another man, who was standing there; after asking me several questions about the things in the shop, and the different prices, he asked me which way I was going; I told him up Holborn; he asked me to carry this stool for him; I took it up, and carried it for him, and then the people took me into custody.

The prisoner called Mr. James Brodie , a carpenter and builder, in Swallow-street, who said he had known him from a child, and gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-15

188. GEORGE OSWALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , four pair of boot legs, value 18s. and another boot leg, value 2s. the property of Samuel Ware and Richard-Cumberledge Ware .(The case was opened by Mr. Bolland.)

EVAN ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. I live with Mr. Ware: On the 9th of January, between six and seven, or near seven o'clock, I went to the lower old shed; I found four pair and a half of boot legs concealed under a beam; I took them out to see who they were dressed by; they were dressed by a person in the manufactory, whose work I knew; a person shewed me where they were; I went to the upper old shed, and concealed myself under the stiffing board; I had a perfect view of the lower old shed; there was no flooring to the upper old shed; in the course of half an hour, this George Oswald came up with a candle from the working shop to the lower old shed, which is above the warehouse, but there is room between that and the warehouse; he came with a candle, and went to the spot where the legs were, at the further end of the lower old shed, and then he seemed to handle some leather; he returned back, and went with the candle to the suffing table; he left the candle at the top of the stair-case, and then went back to the place where the legs were, and took the legs away; I could but just discern him between the darkness and the

light; he put them under his waistcoat, and drew them up; and, in the act of drawing them up, his apron-string broke, and fell down, and he had some difficulty in fastening the apron up; he went to the work-shop; as soon as I went down, and passed him, when he was in the work-shop, I said it was very hot with the stove, which was the case; I went to Mr. Ware, and said what I had seen, and desired them to follow; while I was telling him, the prisoner came through the accompting-house; he was going out, I followed him, and gave Denham charge to follow me and Mr. Webb; he went into the street; we followed him, and laid hold of him by the collar; he asked if I wanted to speak to him; I said, yes, and the rest laid hold of him, and brought him into the accompting-house; we sent for a person from Hatton-garden; he was searched, and the legs found upon him; I have them here; they were marked; every one of them put their names on them. (The boot legs produced.) They are the same.

Q. What value are they? - A. About seven shillings a pair to the trade; there are four pair and a half.

Q. What are you master's names? - A. Richard Cumberledge Ware and Samuel Ware.

- WEBB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. I am foreman to Mr. Ware.

Q. What are the names of the two Mr. Wares? - A. Samuel Ware and Richard-Cumberledge Ware: Having received information that some boot legs had been secreted with a design to be carried away, and put into an improper place, Roberts was appointed by Mr. Ware himself to watch who should take those legs away; Roberts went from the accompting-house with that design; he came down, and said George Oswald had secreted the legs; in consequence of that, we begged he would watch him out; and as soon as I saw him pass through the accompting-house to the shop, at that time Roberts was at the door, I laid hold of his coat, and said, he must come back to the accompting-house, and must unbutton and take those things out; he unbuttoned his waistcoat, and we took the legs from him.

Q. Were the legs marked? - A. Yes, I marked them myself; they are the same.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

"My Lord, intruding on your time and the patience of the Court, in addressing your Lordship, I wish not to vindicate my conduct, but, on the contrary, acknowledge the justness of the prosecution against me; but I wish, at the same time, to lay before your Lordship the true circumstances relating to my fate: - having been desired by one of my shop-mates to take the property mentioned in the indictment, concealed by him for that purpose, I went, and was carrying it away, during which time a watch was set for the purpose of discovering the person; the goods having been found by a man, after they had been concealed, previous to my taking them away, I was followed, taken back, and the property found on me; I was committed to prison, and, with the advice of my prosecutors, who promised they would shew lenity, I made a full confession of the affair; but to no purpose, as information was given to the receivers, who, in consequence of the notice, left their habitation, and have not since been apprehended. I therefore place myself on the mercy of the Court, hoping you Lordship and the Gentlemen of the Jury will consider these facts in my favour; I hope it may be the means of extending mercy to your unhappy prisoner, having a disconsolate wife and two helpless children entirely destitute of support, and wanting a friend to give them assistance: and, in addition to this, I have to state, that I labour under a dreadful complaint, which renders me incapable of hard labour, the testimonials of which the surgeon can produce, as also Mr. Kirby, who afforded me the earliest relief, and treated me with the greatest humanity. Hoping this defence from your unhappy prisoner will operate on my behalf, I place myself on the humanity and mercy of this honourable Court, to the sense of which I bow with submission."

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020217-16

189. MICHAEL DUMFEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , an oak plank, value 10s. the property of Henry Fletcher and Joseph Fletcher .

THOMAS PYBUS sworn. - On Saturday afternoon last, between two and three o'clock, I had a call to go to the river side to look after some people I had at work carrying deals; I am foreman to Messrs. Henry and Joseph Fletcher ; they are in partnership; the prisoner at the bar then stood along-side a pile of planks, twenty-nine in number; I saw him standing there.

Q. He was not employed then? - A. Not then; I had employed him; I went away, and returned again in about three or four minutes after; I was informed by a man who met me, that a man had taken a plank from the pile; I asked in what direction he went; he told me; I pursued him, and desired the man to follow me; about one hundred and fifty yards from the place, in an alley, called Green-Dragon-alley, I saw the prisoner standing with the plank, one end on the ground, the other against the wall, in the alley, about three yards from the top; he was bending below the plank to ake it on his shoulder; he listed himself from underneath the plank; I took hold of him; when he

saw me, he came from underneath, and I seized him by the collar; the plank was between us; he catched hold of the slap of his breeches; he told me two men had left it there while he was making water; he entreated me much to let him go, and said he was distressed; I kept hold of him; I did not wish to leave him; in the course of two minutes, the people gathered round, and a Marine-Police officer took him in custody; we took the plank and the prisoner to the office, as such I was bound over to prosecute him.

Q. Do you know the plank? - A. Yes; there is a mark in chalk across the middle with a figure, signifying the length; that figure is made before they come to us, to shew the measurement.

Q. Did you count the number of planks when you came back? - A. Yes, there were two missing.

Q. How long was it before that you counted them, and knew the number there? - A. It might be two days.

JAMES LESTER sworn. - I was by the waterside on this Saturday afternoon; I saw the prisoner bring a plank away; he first knocked a plank off the pile on the ground, and then he took it on his back, and walked away with it from Mr. Fletcher's premises; he went to the corner of a little alley; I gave information of it to Mr. Pybus in two or three minutes.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man you saw take it? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it day-light? - A. Yes, about three o'clock; I followed with Mr. Pybus in pursuit of him; he sent me for assistance; I got three men, and then he got an officer to take him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it from the place? - A. Yes, I did; I was in a barge.

RICHARD PERRY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Thames-Police Office; he was delivered to me, and taken to the Office by Mr. Pybus.

Prisoner's defence. I was looking for employ, and a man told me if I would take this plank over to Green's, he would give me something to drink; I leave it to the mercy of the Court and Jury.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-17

190. WILLIAM HORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , thirty-three yards of velvet, value 33s. the property of Francis Stubbs .

FRANCIS STUBBS sworn. - I am a coachmaker , in Long-acre : The prisoner at the bar has been my apprentice four years and a half, he has two years and a half to serve; I can only prove the property.

JONATHAN MACARTNEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Long-acre; (produces the velvet;) I believe the prisoner at the bar brought it to me on the 21st of January, between eight and nine in the morning to pawn; he had one pound fourteen shillings advanced upon it; he said it was his own property; On the 21st of January, he came and had four yards of it away, he had two pounds first, and it was afterwards reduced to one pound fourteen shillings; Mr. Stubbs came on the 21st and claimed it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He pawned this in his own name? - A. Yes; John Hotton.

Q. He told you he should take it out again soon? - A. Before the 16th of January, we had that piece of velvet in and out, he redeemed it frequently; I believe it to be the same velvet.

Court. Q. Are you sure the name he assumed, when he came to you, was John, and not William Horton? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Mr. Stubbs.) Look at the velvet - do you know it by any particular marks? - A. Yes, by this piece being cut off the end; I have no doubt at all of that being my property; it was left in a large store-room, where there are a vast number of valuable things; there are eight or ten dozen of skins in my house; I do not deliver them to my workmen, but through means of an under clerk, sometimes by my foreman, and the young man, but it is in my dwelling-house, detached from the work-shop.

Q. How came you to miss it? - A. Four yards of velvet were wanted on the 21st, and the prisoner, William Horton, was applied to for that purpose.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you apply to him? - A. No.

Q. Who was the person that did? - A. I believe Horton produced the four yards, but I did not see it then.

Q. Were not you present yourself at the time when he produced it? - A. No; but the four yards cut off this are still in my possession at home.

Q. Did you measure it? - A. No, the person did, whom it was given to; I have no doubt at all of the identity of that property; I went to the pawnbroker's, and told him not to part with the property, that it was mine; the prisoner confessed that he had taken it.

Q. Is that confession here? - A. No; I have a note from him to one of my men to take it out, and he would give him the money again; I know the hand-writing.

Q. What is the young man's name? - A. William Horton , not John Horton.

Q. Is Webber here? - A. He is not.

Q. As to what the prisoner said before the Magistrate, it was taken down in writing? - A. Yes.

Q. If it had been the prisoner's design to prevent it coming into your possession again, he might have so altered it, that it should never be known again? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe he had been spoken to by the clerk, and he was going to get it out of pawn? - A. I do not know that; he was in possession of an officer for sleeping out of my house, when he wrote this note.

Q. Before you charged him, he had sent this note to get it out of pawn? - A. He had not sent it, he had written it to send, and was enclosing the duplicate to get it out of pawn, and promising to pay as soon as he was released.

Court. Q. Who did you receive that paper from? - A. I took it from the prisoner myself by violence; I saw it in his hand when the Bow-street officer took him.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-18

191. RICHARD MAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a pair of shoes, value 4s. the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , I live at No. 97, White-cross-street, St. Luke's : On Wednesday the 13th of January I lost a pair of shoes.

Q. Had you seen the shoes that day? - A. I hung them on the window myself; they were men's shoes; I hung them there about nine o'clock in the morning, and missed them at one o'clock the same day; I was informed by a person that I had been robbed; these are the shoes, (produces them;) I am quite confident they are my shoes; I bought them among a lot; I had not such another pair of shoes in the shop.

Cross-examination. - Q. What is there remarkable in the shoes? - A. They are very badly made and closed; they are bad altogether.

Q. You would not swear there are not many others made like them? - A. No.

- MOREY sworn. - About one o'clock, while I was standing at my own shop, nearly opposite to the prosecutor's, I saw the prisoner at the bar standing at the corner of his window.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes; he stood there under the appearance of making water; he had his head fixed in Mr. Smith's window; I saw him snatch, or cut the shoes from the window, put them under his coat and run away; he was perceived by me and another man, the other man followed him closer than I did; he threw the shoes away, the other man picked them up; I pursued him, but I did not take him till two nights following, Friday the 15th.

Q. Where the shoes picked up when he threw them away? - A. Yes, immediately.

Q. Do you know whether these are the shoes? - A. Yes, I marked them myself; I am sure these are the shoes.

Cross-examination. - Q. You say, he was not taken till Friday the 15th? - A. No.

Q. Had you seen him between Wednesday and Friday the 15th? - A. I had not.

Q. Where was he taken? - A. The corner of Whitecross-street; Smith and I took him ourselves at the King's-arms public-house.

Q. That is in the neighbourhood? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you known him before - what is he? - A. I understand he is a carpenter, he said he lived somewhere about Old-street.

Court. Q. You have no doubt about the person of the man? - A. None at all.

Prisoner's-defence. I wish my witnesses to be called.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020217-19

192. JOHN-HENRY CASHMAN was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 18th of December , a certain order for the payment of money, in words and figures following:- That is to say, No. 77, Lombard-street. Messrs. Vere, Lucadou, Troughton and Co. pay to Self or Bearer, four pounds. John Windus, with intent to defraud James Vere , Peter Vere , John-Daniel Lucadou , Bryant Troughton , James-Lewis Lucadou , and William Smart .

Second Count. Charging him with feloniously uttering and publishing the same as true, with the like intent.

Third and Fourth Counts. Charging him with feloniously forging, uttering, and publishing the same, with intent to defraud John Windus .

JOHN HAWKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are clerk in the house of Messrs. Vere and Co.? - A. I am.

Q. Who compose the firm of that house? - A. James Vere , Peter Vere, John-Daniel Lucadou, Bryant Troughton , James Lewis Lucadou, and William Smart .

Q. Is Mr. Windus a customer of your's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar, as being a servant of his? - A. Yes, to the best of my belief, I cannot swear positively to that.

Q. As his clerk ? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his coming to your house with checks from Mr. Windus? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got a draft in your pocket? - A. Yes, I have, for four pounds.

Q. Look at that check, did the prisoner bring it? - A. I believe so, I cannot swear positively.

Q. Did you pay the person who brought that check? - A. I did.

Q. Do you recollect what passed between you at

the time the check was produced? - A. I do not recollect that any thing particular passed.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of Mr. Windus? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that signature of John Windus his own writing? - A. I believe it is not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where is Messrs. Vere's banking-house? - A. In Lombard-street.

Q. You were the person that paid the check? - A. Yes.

Q. You say that is not the hand-writing of Mr. Windus, do you form your judgment from a comparison of this note with any thing else, or from your knowledge of his hand-writing? - A. By comparing it with a paper that was left at our house.

Q. Did you suppose it was not Mr. Windus's writing at the time you paid it? - A. Certainly not.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you had frequent opportunities of seeing the hand-writing of Mr. Windus? - A. I have seen it, it may be five or six times. I cannot be certain.

Q. Have you any doubt whether that is Mr. Windus's hand-writing; I certainly think it is not since I have compared it.

Court. Q. Do you mean that you had seen him write five or six times? - A. No; I have seen drafts of his five or six times.

Q. Whether those drafts were written by him, you cannot say? - A. No.

JOHN WINDUS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. (Produces a release.) Q. You are an attorney? - A. I am.

Q. Living where? - A. In Old Broad-street.

Q. Was the prisoner in your service? - A. Yes.

Q. How long? - A. He was with me two months previous to the 8th of January last.

Q. He was two months with you before he absconded? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he in the habit of taking checks to your banker's? - A. Small ones of four or five pounds.

Q. Look at that four pound note - did you give him, on the 18th of December, a check for four pounds upon your banker? - A. I never gave him this check on my banker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. Yes, he used to write in my office.

Q. Are you able, from seeing him write in your office, to say whether that is his hand-writing or not? - A. To the best of my knowledge and belief it is his hand-writing.

Q. Have you any doubt about it? - A. None occurs to my mind whatever.

Q. Had you occasion to speak to him about taking your book to your bankers? - A. Yes; I think it was the day before he absconded, I said, I intended to take it to my banker's for it to be made up, or to that effect.

Q. Did he make any reply to that? - A. None.

Q. Did he keep your book? - A. No; but I frequently used, when I went out, to tell him where I was going.

Q. Did you see him after that? - A. Yes, I am sure I saw him after that; I am not sure whether he absconded that day or the next, I cannot be positive; it was the 8th of January that he absconded; he was at the office till about twelve or one o'clock; I am positive I did not see him after three.

Q. In consequence of you missing him, and making this discovery, did you apply to the Lord-Mayor for a warrant? - A. No; I delivered up the checks to the bankers, leaving it to them to act as they thought proper.

Q. When did you afterwards see the prisoner? - A. The first time I saw him, since he absconded, was on Tuesday last, at the Poultry-Compter.

Q. Had you any conversation with him at the Poultry-Compter? - A. I asked him what could induce him to do any thing of this sort, was it any unkindness on my part.

Q. Did you hold out to him any promise of favour, or use any threat, before he said what you are going to state? - A. None, whatever.

Q. What did he say? - A. He said, he did not know that he had done any harm; I asked him to what extent he had injured me, and he said he had drawn the drafts, and received the money.

Q. Did he say any thing else? - A. I don't recollect any thing else.

Q. Had you ever any other conversation at any other time? - A. Only at the Mansion-house the next day.

Q. What passed there was taken in writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, or any body else, in your presence, ask him what he had done with the money? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that what the prisoner said, was taken down in writing? - A. I believe, what the prisoner said, was not taken down; I did not see it taken down.

Q. What was said in your presence by the prisoner before the Lord-Mayor? - A. He was asked if he had a father living; he said, no; he had a mother, who obtained her livelhood by keeping pigs; he was asked what he had done with the money that he had received for the drafts, and he said, he had spent some of it in tarts, and that he had given some to another lad in an adjacent office, who recommended him to my office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I take it for granted you cannot undertake to say, whether that writing was made in the County of Middlesex, or the City of London.? - A. Certainly, I did not see him write it.

Q. Is your release subscribed by all the parties? - A. Yes, except one, and he has subscribed it by a power of attorney.

Mr. Knapp. We have the power of attorney here, and the subscribing witness.

WILLIAM CANNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are the Under-Marshal of the City of London? - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of directions you received from the Lord-Mayor, did you go down to Bristol for the purpose of apprehending the prisoner? - A. I did.

Q. Did you apprehend him, and where? - A. I did, at a Mr. Long's, in Newton's-court, Broad-street, Bristol, on Sunday morning, the 7th of this month.

Q. At the time of his apprehension, did any thing particular pass? - A. No, I brought him to London, I had no particular conversation with him till I got into Piccadilly; I then related to him -

Q. Did you make him any promise? - A. No.

Q. Did you frighten him into saying any thing? - A. Nothing at all; when I came to Piccadilly, I related to him that I had a warrant upon suspicion of forgery, upon which he coloured very much; I asked him how many drafts he had drawn forgeries of Mr. Windus's name; he said, he could not directly say how many; I then asked him if he could recollect whether there were four, or five, or half a dozen, or what number, and to what amount; he could not recollect for some little time; but, upon his recollection, he said, he thought it was about three or four, for three pounds each; I then asked him if he recollected one of the amount of six pounds; he said, yes, he did; I recommended him then to recollect himself, and say how many he had really forged; he said, it might be four, or it might be half a dozen, he really could not say; about twelve o'clock I took him before the Lord-Mayor, and he was remanded till the next day.

Q. Did any conversation take place the next day? - A. I asked him, in the presence of Mr. Windus, how many he had forged; he said, he could not exactly recollect how many; I asked him how he had laid out the money; he said, he laid out some in tarts, some he had given to a lad in another office, and he had bought a watch in Holborn for a guinea and a half.

Q. Were the drafts shewn to him? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you sure you made him no promise of favour? - A. I am sorry you should ask me that question.

Q. It is my duty to ask you? - A. I did not say any thing to him of that kind.

The check read:

"Pay to Self or Bearer, the sum of four pounds.

John Windus ."

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 14.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury and the prosecutor to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his youth .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-20

193. SAMUEL SMITH and THOMAS BROWN were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Garrick , Esq. about the hour of nine in the night of the 25th of January , with intent the goods therein being to steal .

WILLIAM CHANNON sworn. - Q. Do you live with Mr. George Garrick ? - A. I do.

Q. Where does he live? - A. No. 22, Upper Seymour-street, Portman-square .

Q. Did you live with him during the month of January? - A. Yes.

Q. What can you say about this matter? - A. On the 25th of January, I was returning from Crayford, in Kent, and returning to the house, No. 22, Seymout-street, I put in the key to unlock the door, and it would not open.

Q. What time of the day was this? - A. About half past eight at night; I found the door was bolted inside.

Q. Were any of the family inside that you know of? - A. I am certain there were none of the family inside; we were obliged to have the door broke open.

Q. Was any body with you? - A. Yes, James Curtis, the witness that is here.

Q. Had he come with you from Crayford? - A. No, he came to the door while the door was breaking open.

Q. Could you see, after it was broke open, that it was bolted? - A. Yes; when the door was opened, we found Thomas Brown , the prisoner at the bar, behind the door inside; about a foot from the door, by his feet, was a bundle of matches and a wax taper.

Q. Was the taper lighted? - A. No, it was out; then I had him secured by two watchmen; after we secured him, we found the parlour door bolted within side; we broke open the parlour door, and found Samuel Smith lying on his belly.

Q. Had you known Smith before? - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q. Was it either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, we had him secured.

Q. Did you examine the doors and windows? - A. Yes, Mr. Brown, the constable, searched the house, and found a key.

Q. Did you see him find it? - A. No.

Q. Had the house been secured before that? - A. Yes, I secured it myself before I went to Crayford, in Kent.

Q. When had you gone to Crayford? - A. The Thursday before.

Q. What day of the week was this? - A. Monday-

Q. You left no person in the house at all? - A. No.

Q. Did you observe any thing about the house? - A. The loop of the curtains of the sofa-bed was unloosened, and there was the mark of a foot on the head of the bed, and a large brush that we wipe our feet upon in the hall stood up an end.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your master was at Crayford, in Kent? - A. Yes.

Q. His house had been new furnished? - A. Yes.

Q. The key had been given to the upholsterer in town? - A. No, I had the key myself.

Q. Had the upholsterer completely furnished the house? - A. No, but they were never to come unless me or Mr. Garrick were in town; I am sure they had no key.

Q. Do you mean to say that none of the upholsterer's men had been there? - A. Yes.

Q. This was a new house that your master had hired, he had never slept in it? - A. Yes, he had, for two or three years.

Q. You found one man behind the door? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say he did not come to the door to open it? - A. We were at the door, I dare say, a quarter of an hour knocking.

Q. Is there no yard to the house? - A. No, the back part of the house goes to the stables.

Q. Have you access from the house to the stables? - A. No, we have not.

Q. Was the back door locked? - A. No, there is no back door.

Q. The man you found in the parlour was asleep - was he not? - A. He pretended to be asleep.

JAMES CURTIS sworn. - Q. What do you know of this transaction? - A. As I was coming by the door of this house, about a quarter before nine, an alarm was made that people had broke into Mr. Garrick's house; there was no attempt made to open the door, and they were a considerable while about it; they could not break it open at the upper part of the door; I said to the smith, give me the bar, and I will try at the bottom part; I put the bar to the bottom part, got it under the door, and wrenched it open; we were the best part of a quarter of an hour; when the door was opened, I plunged into the house, and found the prisoner, Thomas Brown , behind the door; he attempted to come out with the mob.

Q. Look at the two prisoners, and tell me which of them it was? - A. The tall one; we secured him, and gave him into the watchman's hands; after that, upon breaking open the parlour door, I thought I saw somebody go up the chimney; I made towards the chimney, and, in the mean while, Mr. Barr, the witness, picked Samuel Smith off the floor; he was lying upon his belly; he pretended to be asleep, and begged, when we picked him up, that we would use him civil; I used him with the greatest civility, and took him to the watch-house, and left him in the keeper's hands.

Q. You did not find any keys, did you? - A. No.

Q. Did you examine the rest of the house to see that all was fast? - A. Yes; we examined every part of the house, and found it barred and safe.

RICHARD BARR sworn. - Q. What stage of the transaction did you see? - A. I was standing at my door, about a quarter before nine o'clock, and heard the rattles spring; I ran immediately, and they had just got the door open; I went into the passage, and found the parlour door fast; the last witness broke it open; when I went in, I found the prisoner Smith lying flat upon his face on the carpet; he pretended to be asleep, and wanted to know where he was; he said, he thought it was a public-house, and came in there to have something to drink; I took him to the watch-house, and there searched-him; we found nothing upon him but some cords, and the other prisoner, Brown, a screw-driver.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The men were not sober, were they? - A. I did not see that they were otherwise than sober.

Q. Perhaps you did not observe whether they were or not? - A. I observed them as much as any body, for I had them in my custody till they got to the watch-house.

JONATHAN BROWN sworn. - Q. What do you know of the matter? - A. All that I know is, that I was returning from work about a quarter before nine -

Q. What is your employment? - A. A carpenter; I heard the watchman's rattle, and I went immediately to the house of Mr. Garrick, and saw the two prisoners in custody; after they were taken to the watch-house, I searched the house.

Q. Was any body with you when you made that search? - A. There was a chairman with me; I found this key, (producing a skeleton key,) in the bason of the water-closet upon the basement story.

Q. Did you try that key? - A. Yes, and it opened the door, as it would half the doors in the parish.

Q. This water-closet was on the basement story? - A. In the kitchen below, at the bottom of the house.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - Q. What do you know of this matter? - A. I heard the alarm a little before nine o'clock; I proceeded towards the house, No. 22, Upper Seymour-street, and met two watchmen with the prisoner Brown; I went to see him to the watch-house; I did not go to the house till afterwards.

Mr. Alley. Q. (To Channer.) Was there not a quantity of plate on the side-board in the parlour which might have been easily conveyed away if these persons had meant to commit a felony? - A. Yes, it might.

Court. Q. What place was there? - A. Half a dozen table-spoons, half a dozen desert-spoons, a gravy-spoon, a silver cheese-knife, a pair of salts, and a pair of plated candlesticks.

Q. In what situation was this plate? - A. The spoons were in the knife-cases upon the sideheard.

Q. Were the knife-cases open? - A. No, they were locked.

Q. Where were the other articles? - A. The fans were in the drawers of the side-board.

Q. Were the drawers locked? - A. Yes, I had the keys in my pocket.

Q. Was any of it lying open on the side-board? - A. No, it was all locked up.

Smith's defence. We had been to Paddington, and made rather too free with drink; when we came to this house, Brown fell down; I got him up, and observed to him that the door was open, and we went in to lie down, to get the better of the drink; we did not go in for the purpose of plundering the house, and I hope the respectable witnesses your Lordship will hear presently will do away that prejudice.

Brown's defence. I can say no more; that is exactly the truth; the witnesses have said that the matches were found at my feet, but they were not found till after I was taken to the watch-house.

Court. The matches were taken to the watch-house with him.

Chanson. I found the matches immediately, while the watchman had him by the collar; I took up the matches and the wax taper, and put them in my pocket.

The prisoners called three witnesses each, who gave them a good character.

Smith, GUILTY , Death , aged 44.

Brown, GUILTY , Death , aged 38.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-21

194. WALTER DUGGAN JAMES CONDON , and WILLIAM OGLE , were indicted for making an assault, in the King's highway, on the 7th of February , upon John Wood , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 5l. two seven-shilling-pieces, two shillings, and a six-pence , the property of the said John.

JOHN WOOD sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. Agent to the Harefield Lime-Company .

Q. Were you robbed on the 7th of this month? - A. Yes.

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. Sunday.

Q. Where were you going? - A. I was going home to Southall.

Q. At what time? - A. Between six and seven o'clock.

Q. Were you alone? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you on horseback? - A. Yes.

Q. How far had you got on the road before any thing happened? - A. I was going down the other side of Notting-Green-hill, near Kensington Gravel-Pits, upon the Uxbridge road ; I was riding along the foot-path, just at the top of the hill, when I saw a man; I turned off; then the prisoner Condon laid hold of the horse's bridle.

Q. Where was he? - A. He was in the high road; the other two came up, one on the right hand, and the other on the left hand, and took me up upon the foot-path; I asked them what they wanted of me.

Q. They had not spoke to you? - A. I don't recollect that they had; Condon pulled a pistol out, held it up to me, and said, he wanted my money; he was distressed for money, and money he must have; I said, he should have what little money I had, and welcome; I then put my hand into my pocket to take out what I had, while Condon put his hand over the horse's neck, and felt the watch-chain; the seal was tucked in my pocket; there was only a link or so out; he rugged two or three times, and broke the chain, and put that in his waistcoat-pocket; one of them then desired me to pull the watch our myself, I cannot say which of them it was; I had some difficulty in getting the watch out of a long sob, and Duggan said, shoot, d - n you, shoot; I got the watch out, and gave it to Condon; I dropped my glove; I said to them, be so kind as pick my glove up; Condon picked it up, and gave it to me; as I turned off the foot-path into the road to go away, a fourth person then, whom I had not seen before, stood by, and said, is it done? Duggan said, yes, or something to that purpose, and then I left them; he was at about thirty yards distance.

Q. Then you saw no more of them? - A. No.

Q. You have spoke to Condon being the principal person concerned, and you have spoke to Duggan telling him to shoot - what did Ogle do? - A. He assisted in bringing me up upon the footpath.

Q. Have you any thing else to say? - A. I met with a person who sent the patrol after them; Duggan had something in his hand, I thought it was a cane or a sword, I cannot say; I was minding the pistol that was against my breast.

Q. Was the night dark, or how? - A. It was very light, moonlight.

Q. How long might this take up? - A. Three or four minutes.

Q. Do you recollect how they were dressed? - A. Yes; Ogle stood at the right hand of me

with a light-coloured coat on, and the other two had dark coats.

Q. Had they hats on their heals? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of hats? - A. I did not take particular notice what sort of hats.

Q. Common round hats, or slapped over their faces? - A. I did not see any thing particular, they were common round hats.

Q. Did the moon shine towards you, in your face, or on your back? - A. The moon shone upon my back.

Q. Then you had an opportunity of seeing their faces distinctly? - A. Yes, I saw them very plain.

Q. How far were you from them when you first discovered them? - A. I was but just got out of Kensington Gravel-pits, I suppose nothing near one hundred yards from the last house.

Q. Do you mean positively to say, that you had so fair a view of them as to enable you to speak positively to their persons? - A. Yes, I think I had without a doubt; Condon and Ogle I have not the least doubt of; and Duggan I think I have no doubt of; the fourth person was shorter than either of these.

Q. When did you see them afterwards? - A. On the Thursday following, at Bow-street.

Q. Do you know whether they were taken up upon your information? - A. I heard they were, which made me come to Bow-street.

Q. Who did you give information to? - A. To one Carter, who keeps a cow-yard at Tyburn-gate; I told him if he went any further he would be robbed, he rode very fast, and I believe was afraid of me; I told him I was a friend, and he went back with me to Shepherd's-bush; he said the patrol could not be far off, and he would send them after the men; he rode home before the coach.

Q. Did you know them immediately, when you saw them at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any other persons with them when you saw them at Bow-street, or were they brought up by themselves? - A. There was nobody else.

Q. Had they the same clothes on that they had when they robbed you? - A. It appeared so to me; one had a light-coloured coat, and the other two, dark ones.

Q. Were they in great coats, or common coats? - A. Common coats.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. (Counsel for Duggan and Condon.) Q. Had you never seen any of these persons before? - A. No.

Q. Not before this transaction that you have been speaking of? - A. No.

Q. There were three persons, and another person coming up afterwards, attacking you, I should think you must have been a little agitated? - A. It was very little indeed.

Q. This was between six and seven o'clock in the evening? - A. Yes.

Q. There was nobody by? - A. No.

Q. Nobody passing along the road? - A. No.

Q. And yet you were very little agitated when three or four persons were attacking you in this way? - A. Very little.

Q. One person having a pistol at your breast, and another desiring that person to shoot, and yet you were very little agitated? - A. Very little indeed.

Q. You have no doubt at all of the persons of these men? - A. I have not.

Q. Did I understand you right, when my Lord put the question to you, that you did not know what was in the hand of the other person? - A. I saw something in his hand that looked like a sword.

Q. Though you are able to speak to the persons of these men, you cannot say what that was? - A. It was either a stick, a cane, or a sword.

Q. Did you not say you did not look particularly, because the pistol was at your breast? - A. I did not particularly.

Q. Had they round hats on? - A. I did not take particular notice of their hats.

Q. Do try and recollect? - A. I make no doubt but they had, I cannot say.

Q. Whether they had round hats on or not, you cannot say; but as to their faces under round hats, you have no doubt of? - A. No.

Q. You went to Bow-street with the expectation of seeing the persons who had robbed you? - A. Certainly I did.

Q. When you went into the room at Bow-street, were they not pointed out to you as the persons who had committed the robbery? - A. They were not pointed out.

Q. Were you not told those were the persons who were charged to have robbed you? - A. Yes.

Q. They were not mixed with others for you to pick them out? - Q. No; they were brought out and I identified them immediately.

Q. You know, I dare say, or have heard since this business, that there are three forty pounds reward, that is one hundred and twenty pounds, if these men are convicted? - A. I have never heard it, no body has said any thing to me.

Q. Have you never heard that there is a forty pounds reward upon the conviction of a highwayman? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you not expect to have a share of these rewards? - A. I never understood that, I understood those who took them would have it; I never heard of any thing of the kind in my life.

Q. Where have you lived all your life then? - A. I have lived in Warwick, and in Gloucestershire.

Q. And near town? - A. Not long.

Q. How long have you lived at Southall? - A. Six months.

Q. Have you not been in company with the Bow-street officers? - A. Yes; but I never heard any thing about a reward from them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Ogle.)

Q. Have you never said, Ogle was the man who kept at a distance? - A. No, I never did; Ogle was the man who stood at the right-hand of me.

Q. Have you never heard it said, by the officers, that Ogle must have been the man? - A. No; no such thing was ever mentioned.

Court. Q. Did you ever get your watch again? - A. No.

CHRISTOPHER CRIDLAND sworn. - Q. What do you know of this? - A. I am one of the patrols of Bow-street: On Sunday evening, the 7th of this month, I heard there were three or four footpads on the Uxbridge-road; I went with three others of our people, Barrett, Barker, and Griffiths, and as we were going into the country, we met with the three men at the bar, near Bayswater.

Q. Do you mean to say you had heard of this robbery that night? - A. Yes; just before I met the prisoners; I laid hold of Duggan, and on the right-hand side, inside his coat, I found this pistol,(produces it); upon further searching him, in his pockets I found two seven-shilling-pieces, two sixpences, and one halfpenny; then I took him to the watch-house.

Q. How were they dressed? - A. I believe two of them were in blue, but the middleman, Condon, had a light-coloured coat on, they had round hats.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Round slapped hats? - A. Common round hats.

Q. There was other money found I suppose? - A. Yes; three guineas, and two half guineas, in a little purse.

Q. This was about eight o'clock? - A. Between seven and eight.

Q. Some distance from Notting-green? - A. I suppose about a mile, or a mile and a quarter.

Q. The pistol was not loaded? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. You found nothing upon Ogle but four shillings? - A. No.

Q. You are sure it was Condon that had the light-coloured coat on, and not Ogle? - A. Yes.

Q. That is an old pistol with the handle knocked off? - A. Yes.

Court. (To Wood.) Q. I forgot to ask you what you were robbed of besides the watch? - A. Two seven-shilling-pieces, and about half-a-crown.

Q. I suppose you cannot swear to any of the money? - A. No.

THOMAS BARRETT sworn. - Q. You were with Cridland? - A. Yes; I searched Condon, and found upon him a watch chain, a seven-shilling-piece, a shilling, a handkerchief, and a pair of gloves. (Produces them.)

Q. Is the watch-chain broke? - A. The gentleman said it was.

Q. Does it appear to be broke? - A. There is no part of it broke that I can see.

SAMUEL BARKER sworn. - Q. Who did you search? - A. Condon; I found upon him three guineas, and two half-guineas, in gold, in a purse.

Q. Not upon Condon? - A. Yes; after he had been searched by Barrett; I also found upon him this cane. (Produces a cane with a leaden-bead.)

DANIEL GRIFFITHS sworn. - Q. Who did you search? - A. Ogle.

Q. What did you find? - A. One half-crown, a shilling, a sixpence, and sixpence halfpenny in halfpence.

Court. (To Wood.) Q. Is that your chain? - A. Yes; this is the chain that I lost.

Q. It does not appear to me to be broke? - A. The ring is broke from the watch, I cannot tell how many links there were.

Mr. Knapp. Q. There is no appearance of any one of the links being broke? - A. I will swear that is my chain.

Q. It is a very common chain? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you positive Ogle had a light-coloured coat on? - A. Yes.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Condon called three, and Duggan and Ogle four witnesses each, who gave them a good character.

Condon, GUILTY, Death , aged 30.

Duggan, GUILTY, Death , aged 20.

Ogle, GUILTY, Death , aged 30.

The prisoners were recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of their having used no personal violence, and the pistol not being loaded .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020217-22

195. JAMES BYRNE , otherwise JOHN BYRNE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a pocket-book, value 6d. two seven-shilling pieces, and two shillings , the property of John Lawson .

JOHN LAWSON sworn. - I am a Chelsea pensioner ; I never saw the prisoner till in a private house in Tothill street, Westminster: On Saturday, the 9th of January, about eight o'clock at night, I went into the Wheatsheaf with another person; I staid there sometime, and asked for a bed, but they had none; a woman said, she would get me one, and took me to a house where I was robbed; she left me there along with Byrne in a bed-room where he was sitting; he asked me whether I was going to sleep in that room or not; I said, yes; he said, I should be served in the same manner a man was the night before, for I should be beat and turned out in the middle of the night, on which I declined going to bed; I asked him if he would procure me a bed; he said, he would endeavour; I sent down for some porter and supper to treat him; he then agreed with a woman who lived with him to go out, provided I would give her money to pay for a bed; I gave him sixpence, and her a shilling; I had two seven-shilling pieces,

and two shillings in silver, and a black pocketbook, in my jacket pocket; I put my great coat and close coat over the bed as the cloaths were thin; the prisoner and his woman left me about ten o'clock, and I went to bed; I went to sleep, there was only a latch to the door, and did not see Byrne till about seven o'clock next morning; I heard him coming in, and found my breeches gone, and the pocket-book out of my coat; I told him the situation I was in; he looked about, and found my breeches underneath an arm-chair; he then took up a cane of mine, and said he would pursue the woman who he thought had taken it; he returned in a few minutes after with a pot of beer, and then retired with the stick which I told him to lay down two or three times, but he would not, swearing vengeance, and that he would murder the woman for taking it; I then dressed myself, and went to the office in Queen-square, and the officers apprehended the woman who lived with him; I never saw my pocket-book or money again; he complained that he had lost his instructions from Chelsea, his papers, and money; I had let him read my instructions, and afterwards tied up my book, and put it in my coat pocket, my money was in my breeches pocket; upon my oath, the instructions were put into my pocket-book.

JAMES THOMAS sworn. - I keep the Bricklayers Arms, in Strutton Ground, Westminster: On Sunday, the 10th of January, in the morning, a little after six o'clock, the prisoner, a patrol, and some other man, came into my house, and called for half a pint of gin, which the prisoner paid for; they drank it, and had a pot of purl and gin, which the patrol paid for; the patrol had been to Bridewell with a charge which the prisoner had sent; they had many words; I saw the prisoner pull out a small black pocket-book and papers out of it, saying, this will shew who I am; he said to the other man, if you will return me the seven-shilling piece your wife has robbed me of, I will not appear against you at Queen-square on Monday; the patrol and him then began fighting; I don't know whose book it was, I have not seen it since; I saw some papers, but touched none; I think the book has no strap to it.

WILLIAM DAY sworn. - I am a smith; I saw the prisoner with a pocket book two or three times on the Sunday morning; I picked up a paper after they were gone out from the place where the prisoner sat; there were several papers in the pocketbook, but I did not see him take any out.

ELIZABETH THORNE sworn. - On Saturday, the 9th of January, in the evening, coming down Tothill-street, I went into the Wheatsheaf, and saw the prisoner; he asked my friend to drink; I lodge at No. 27, in the Great Almonry; my friend asked the prisoner to eat a bit of supper with him, being a countryman; he came in about an hour and a half after, I was going to bed, and refused to let him in, but my friend insisted on it; he came up stairs, and sent for something to drink; he took out a seven-shilling piece, and five shillings in silver; he then took some papers out of his pocket, and said, he had been to the War-office, or Somerset house, since he saw me; it was a quarter before twelve when we left the public-house, and half past one when he came home; I slightly saw the papers, but no more.

Prosecutor. She has not told you she was sent to prison for robbing him of a seven-shilling piece.

Witness. He said he had lost a seven-shilling piece; he pulled out his money several times, and at last got up angry, and said, I had stolen it; he gave charge of me, and I went to the watch-house, but was released on Monday at Queen-square; I don't know that he ever found it again.

LYDIA MOODY sworn. - I lived with James Byrne, and saw Lawson at the prisoner's lodgings; I never saw him with a pocket-book; I saw him with two seven-shilling pieces, and one shilling in silver; I know James Byrne had no money that night; I left the room for him to sleep there, and I went to sleep at another person's house, and Byrne went to the public-house; Byrne had a paper of his own, but he never had a black leather pocketbook while I lived with him.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER sworn. - I saw the black leather pocket-book and some papers on the 10th of January, in the morning, between six and seven o'clock, at the Bricklayers Arms, in the possession of Byrne; it was the same book I had seen at the watch-house; some of the papers were written, and one was partly printed, like an instruction paper; he said, he had property in the pocketbook, of money he had to receive, but did not say what.

BENJAMIN THOMAS sworn. - I am son of James Thomas: I saw the prisoner with a small black pocket-book, and some writings, on Sunday morning, the 10th of January, between six and seven o'clock; I saw the instructions with some red writing on it.

Prisoner's defence. On Saturday night, the prosecutor and a woman came up stairs, and wanted to sleep there; he was half drunk, and sent for four shillings worth of gin hot, and for some victuals; we agreed to let them sleep there, he gave Moody some money, and we went away; I went to him in the morning, and he said, that d - d wh - e has robbed me, for I cannot find my breeches; I looked about, and found them; I went to look after the woman, which he knows to be true.

Q. (To Lawson.) Did you sleep with a woman that night? - A. No, I did not.

Q. (To Moody.) Did he sleep with you? - A. No, he did not. GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing the book .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-23

196. JOHN SCRUTINEY , otherwise SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , a silk handkerchief, value 3s. a coat, value 30s. a waistcoat, value 15s. and a pair of breeches, value 15s. the property of John Hooper , in the dwelling-house of George Davidson .

JOHN HOOPER sworn. - I am a tailor , and live in Denmark-street, St. Giles's: On the 14th of last month, I stopped at an alamode beef-shop in Holborn ; I went into the parlour, where there was the prisoner alone; I put the bundle on a chair between my back and the door; the prisoner went away, and presently the landlord came in, and asked me whether I had not a bundle when I came in; I said, yes; Mr. Richardson came in about five minutes before the prisoner went away, but nobody else; I looked round, and my bundle was gone; he told me, the man who sat opposite to me, had run away with it; we then pursued him, and he threw the bundle away; he was taken, and carried before a Magistrate.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON sworn. - I went into the room where the prosecutor was dining, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was standing by the door looking at his change; the waiter came in to serve me, and, going out, asked the prisoner if his change was not good; he said, yes, but still kept looking at it; when the waite left the room, the prisoner took the bundle under his arm, and went out; it was a bundle in a silk handkerchief laying on a chair next the door; Mr. Hooper was reading the paper with his back to the prisoner; the landlord came in, and asked him if he brought a bundle in; he said, he did; then he told him it was gone, and they pursued the prisoner.

GEORGE DAVIDSON sworn. - I keep an alamode beef shop in Holborn: On the 14th of January, the prisoner came to dine; I attended him myself, and just as he was going, Mr. Hooper came in; the waiter served him, and nobody else was in the room at that time; Mr. Richardson came in just before the prisoner left the room, and I saw him looking at his change a long time; I recollected Mr. Hooper came in with a bundle, but did not remember the prisoner had any; I saw the bundle in a chair before the prisoner went away; while I was getting Mr. Richardson's dinner ready, the prisoner came out of the parlour; I turned round to thank him, and saw the bundle under his arm, which immediately struck me; I went and asked Mr. Hooper about it; we then pursued the prisoner, and took him in a house in Short's Gardens, Drury-lane, in a back yard, in a kind of lumber place, quite dark.

PETER PLATTEN sworn. - I am waiter at Mr. Davidson's; I had given the prisoner change, which he looked at a long time; I went to order Mr. Richardson's beer, and the prisoner was coming out with a bundle under his arm as I went back; as I did not know but it might be his, I said nothing; upon learning he had stole it, we pursued him, and my brother-in-law, Davidson, called out, stop that man with the bundle, upon which I saw him throw it away, I was not twenty yards from him, and picked it up; Mr. Hooper took it from me, and I followed the prisoner, who I found in a back place, with his face to the wall. (The property was identified by William Hooper.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-24

197. BENJAMIN MOODY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , a pocket-book, value 6d. a Bank-note, value 100l. and four other Bank-notes value 1l. each, the property of Laughlin Richie , privily from his person .

LAUGHLIN RICHIE sworn. - I live at No. 16, South-street, Manchester-square: On the 21st of November, I was in the parlour at the Bedford arms, in South-street, between five and six o'clock; the prisoner came in a little after me, who I did not know, and several neighbours came in soon after, who use the room; the landlord paid me a one pound note and half-a-guinea, which he owed me, and presently the prisoner changed his place, and came and sat next to me on my right-hand; he saw the landlord pay me, and saw me put the note in my pocket-book, and put my book in my left-hand waistcoat pocket, which is very deep; about an hour after, I wanted to go home, I got up, and left Moody sitting; I was in the center of the room, and began feeling for the half-guinea to pay the reckoning; I did not know which pocket I had put it into, but I took the book out, and searched that pocket, I could not find it in either; I then said to the company, I had lost half-a-guinea, upon which Moody got up to me, and said, do you think I have robbed you? I said, I did not say you did; he came up and felt round me, saying, if you will pay half a gallon of ale, I will find it for you; I made no reply to that; he asked again about the ale, and felt round my pocket, and in an instant plunged two fingers in, and then held his hand as high as his head, saying, there is the half-guinea for you; he gave me the half-guinea, which I changed, and paid my reckoning; Moody asked me, if I was going home, and if he should go with me;

I told him, I only lived next door but one, and I did not want company; he asked me several times, I told him to keep his own company, for I had nothing to say to him, but nevertheless he forced his conversation; I went out, and he followed me close; there is a middle door that goes with a pulley, he came up close to me, and pushed me against the door; I opened it, and walked out first; he walked behind me till I got to the stone, where men generally stop, at the extremity of the house, and while I was making water, he turned his back to me for a few minutes; as I was coming away from the stone, he suddenly darted his hand into my waistcoat-pocket; I seized him, and told him, he must go back with me; I had not time to look after my book, but when I got him in the house, I searched, and finding I had it, I did not take much more notice of him; I went into the parlour and told the company how he had served me; I pulled the book out, and was going to open it before some master tradesmen; but some of them, out of friendship, advised me not, but to put it in my pocket and take care of it; I staid some time longer, and then went straight home; I got home about ten o'clock, and opened the book, when I missed the notes, all but the ragged pound note, the landlord gave me; next morning, I went to Bow-street, and enquired for an officer; I got one, and we went to the prisoner's mother's, but could not find him; but the officer knowing him, and where to find him, took me to some court in Drury-lane, and we did not find him or the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long afterwards was it you took him? - A. About nine weeks.

Court. Q. Have you got the notes again? - A. No.

Q. Were you sober that night? - A. I was capable of knowing what I was about; I had had a few glasses of ale, but was quite sensible of what passed.

Q. I don't know how long the sense of a drunken man lasts - were you so drunk that you did not know what you were doing? - A. I was not.

Q. You were not sober? - A. I had very little to make me unsober.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You will not swear you were sober? - A. I don't know what you call sober.

Q. Were you sober, or any thing like it? - A. I was quite sensible.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I don't understand what you mean by sober.

Q. You really don't? - A. No, I tell you I was sensible.

Q. How long were you in the house? - A. I went in at near six o'clock, and came out at near ten.

Q. You did not make any display of the 100l. note, I dare say? - A. No, not in that room.

Q. In what room was it? - A. I did not in any room; I might mention it as Mr. Walker was joking me, and saying will you lend me one hundred pounds, I said, I suppose you think I am not worth one.

Q. When you went out, were you asked, are your notes safe? - A. I might; I thought them safe myself.

Q. Did you not put your hand to your pocket, and say, O yes, all's safe? - A. I don't know that I did; I cannot say whether I did or not; I thought the book safe enough.

Q. When had you seen the note last? - A. I had seen it when I put the pound note in; it was in the book then; there was nobody but the prisoner and Mr. Hooley there.

Q. You are quite sure that you then saw the one hundred pound note, that you tied a string round your pocket-book, and put it in your pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. When you went home, you found you had lost it, and went back, no doubt? - A. No; I knew the prisoner was gone; I did not go back, because he might be alarmed, I might have seen him before, nor did I know he was the son of my opposite neighbour, but I heard he was after he was gone.

ROBERT HOOLEY sworn. - I went into the room between seven and eight o'clock; I set on Mr. Richie's right-hand, and the prisoner on his left; Mr. Richie said, he had lost half-a-guinea, the prisoner started up, and said, he suspected him; Mr. Richie said, no; he did not; the prisoner then felt on the outside of his pockets, and said, no, you have not got it, sure enough; he then put his finger and thumb in, and said, here is the half-guinea; the note I know nothing about; they went out, and I stopped till they came back, when the prosecutor related what he has here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You did not go in till about eight o'clock? - A. It might be seven or eight.

Q. Did you stay till the prosecutor went home? - A. I did not.

Q. What state was he in? - A. He appeared to be very merry.

Q. Did you see the 100l. note at all? - A. No, I did not stay above an hour.

Prisoner's defence. I saw him take the one-pound note out of his pocket to light his pipe with, and heard the half-guinea jink on the table; about half an hour after, he said he had lost it; I put my finger into a corner of his pocket, and took it out, and the gentlemen said he ought to forfeit half-a-crown bowl of punch for taking away a young mans character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020217-25

198. FINNEY SIRDEFIELD was indicted

for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , a bank-note, value 2l. and six other bank-notes, value 1l. each, the property of William Drake , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM DRAKE sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in Ratcliff-highway ; the prisoner was my shopman : On the 25th of January, after the hurry of business, I counted the money I had taken; and, while I was about it, the servant told me dinner was ready; I went away in a hurry, and left the notes on the counter; I was not absent above ten or twelve minutes; when I went down to the door, a person asked me to give him change for a ten-pound note; I felt for my notes, and missed them; I was in a sturry, knowing I had not been out of the shop; as I had washed my hands after dinner, I thought I might have left them up stairs; I searched every where, but could not find them; I suspected the prisoner, and asked him if he had been out of the shop that day; I asked all the shopman the same; the prisoner said he had not, though I asked him two or three times; I then went for Rodgers, the officer; I told them all I had suspicions, and intended to have them searched; upon which the prisoner said, begin with me first. Rodgers asked him three several times, Sir, be positive, I have a reason for asking; have you been out of the house to-day or not? no, I have not, he said three different times; I said, Mr. Sirdefield, I know you have been out to-day; O yes, I recollect, said he, I did go to your other shop, next door but one; yes, said I, you have been to the doctor's too; O yes, says he, I have, but they both slipped my memory; he was then examined, but nothing found on him; the officer has two of the notes which I have seen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. When had you taken those notes? - A. In the course of the morning, but had not put my name on them; the prisoner had no reason to suppose I should be angry at his leaving the shop; I had given no orders the shopmen should not.

JOHN VINE sworn. - I was shopman to Mr. Drake: On the 25th of January, while Mr. Drake was at dinner, the prisoner complained of the piles, which he had done for some time, and asked me what was good for them; I told him to get some cooling ointment; he said he would go then before he came down, but I advised him twice not to go; he went before Mr. Drake came down, and I heard him ask him whether he had been out; he said, he had not; I had informed Mr. Drake, because he appeared to be very uneasy about the notes; then I told him positively he had been out.

Mr. Gurney. Q. It was by your advice he got some cooling ointment? - A. Yes, and he shewed me the box.

LUCY WEEKS sworn. - I live at No. 38, Catherine-street, about three minutes walk from Mr. Drake's; the prisoner lodged with me about a week before he went to Mr. Drake's, and left some things in a box; on the day he was taken up, he came to me, about two o'clock, and asked me to get some things out of pawn for him; he gave me six one-pound and one two-pound Bank of England notes; I went to Mr. Byrne's, in Wood-street, Cheapside; the things came to three pounds nine shillings, or three pounds ten shillings, which I paid by a two-pound note and two ones; as I was going along, I bought some tea and sugar for myself, and changed one of the notes; I took two home, which the officer has; I put the things into the prisoner's box, but when the officer came, he took them out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. - Q. When Rodgers came, did you give him the notes directly? - A. No; just at that time I was very frightened, and threw them into the garden, but I fetched them to him; I was taken into custody, and have been so ever since.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Byrne; I remember the last witness coming on Monday, the 25th of January, to redeem a quantity of goods, for which she paid three pounds eight shillings and nine-pence halfpenny, by two one-pound notes and a two-pound note, which we paid away; she took the things away, which were principally wearing-apparel.

EDWARD RODGERS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office, and was applied to by Mr. Drake to apprehend the prisoner on the 25th of January; I asked the prisoner if he had been out in the course of the evening, as I had received information that he had; he said, he was not; I asked him two or three times to be sure, as I should tell the Magistrates what he said; he still said he was not out; Mr. Drake said something to him, but I don't know what; he then said, that he recollected that he had been at the other shop, and also at the doctor's for some ointment; I told them to look about the shop, as perhaps they were mislaid; not finding the notes, I said I was under the necessity of searching him, which I did, but found nothing; I went to Mrs. Weeks's the same afternoon, and was a considerable time with her before she acknowledged; then she went to the back place behind the house, and picked from some dust a morocco pocket-book, with two notes in it, which I have kept ever since; she also shewed me a quantity of things, which she said she had got out of pawn; I took them out of the box, and have them here; she told me the box was his, and he said me cloathing she had given me was his property, and he said that no blame was due to her, for that he had employed her to go to the pawnbroker's for him; I never threatened or promised him any thing if he would confess.

(The things were produced, and identified by Weeks, Smith, and Rodgers.)(Two one-pound notes produced, and shewn to Mr. Drake.)

Mr. Drake. This note I can positively swear to, and this I believe to be the other, because it was found with it; I recollect taking this of a person, and seeing the name of Smith on it; I am in the habit of taking a great number of notes of a Mr. Smith, but it is not the same Mr. Smith, because I have compared the writing; I live at No. 118, in Ratcliff-highway, with my family, and had not been out of the house above a yard or two.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the notes; I never saw them.

The prisoner called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 25.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-26

199. MARK DENHAM and JOHN HEALS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , a bay mare, value 3l. the property of William Loosely .

GEORGE CLARKE sworn. - Q. Were you in the neighbourhood of Harrow this month? - A. I live at Harrow.

Q. Did you see the prisoner the beginning of this month? - A. I saw them on the 4th of this month at the Police-Office; William Loosely, the owner of the mare, had taken his passage to go to the West-Indies, and he could not carry on the prosecution on that account; the Magistrates at Bow-street desired to know if any person there could prove the mare to be the property of William Loosely .

Q. Do you know that William Loosely had a bay mare? - A. Yes, it used to be turned on to the common.

Q. Had Loosely had the mare some time? - A. Not long; perhaps six weeks or two months, I cannot say exactly; I live next door to Mr. Loosely.

Q. When was the last time you saw it on the common? - A. I had been about buying it, and I had had her upon trial, which made me more particular in taking notice of her; it was a bay cropped mare.

Q. Did you see the mare at the Police-Office? - A. Yes, and I knew it to be the same mare; it was shewn to me by James Martin.

JAMES MARTIN sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At Harrow.

Q. Did you, at any time, see either of the prisoners there? - A. On the 3d of this month, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I met the two prisoners on the road.

Q. Were they both together? - A. Both together.

Q. Near Harrow? - A. Within about two miles of Harrow; they were going towards Harrow; I had a search-warrant, going to search a house at Harrow for stolen goods; I had a suspicion they were going on the common, as I had seen them before about Smithfield.

Q. Did you watch them? - A. Yes; they did not go into Harrow, but went within one or two hundred yards of the town; they stopped there about ten minutes, and then came back upon the common.

Q. Did you follow them at any distance? - A. Yes, about two or three hundred yards.

Q. Did you see them do any thing? - A. Yes, I saw them drive the mare off the common.

Q. Did you know the mare? - A. Yes, very well, it was Mr. Loosely's mare; I saw them drive the mare into a lane; it was then rather after five o'clock; I went and got two men to assist me, John Martin and Richard Ginger .

Q. How long were you gone? - A. I might be gone about ten minutes; when we came back, we found the same two men surrounding three horses, and trying to catch one of them, but they could not; and when they found they could not, they returned to the lane, and put the bridle on the other horse, and was riding off with it.

Q. Was it dark or light at that time? - A. It was rather dark.

Q. Did you see which put the bridle on? - A. They were both together; Denham put the bridle on, and Heals put a spur upon his own heel, Denham lifted him up, and away he went off with the mare; Denham walked by the side; Heals had got about one hundred yards down Greenford-lane before I stopped them; I told them the first man that ran away I would shoot him; one rode off, and the other ran away; the first man I caught I knocked down with the butt-end of my pistol, that was Heals; I called for assistance; two young men came up, and I desired them to hold Heals while I went after the other.

Q. Did you catch him? - A. Yes, after he had run about two hundred yards.

Q. Had you any conversation with them at that time? - A. We carried them to the cage; Denham had got about four guineas in his pocket, which he said he would give us if we would let him go; I kept one of them in the cage, and the other I slept with all night at my own house; the next day I took them before a Magistrate, and they were committed; I found that Heals lived at Harrow some years ago, but I did not know him then.

JOHN BLISS sworn. - I attended on behalf of Mr. Loosely at Bow-street; that is all I know of it.

DANIEL MARTIN sworn. - Q. You were called to assist James Martin? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you watch any men upon the common? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the men do any thing? - A. Yes, I saw them put the bridle on.

Q. Do you know who the men were? - A. Yes, Denham put the bridle on, and the other got up upon her.

Q. What did they do afterwards? - A. They went away with her; when Martin called out, we came up to assist him, and they were secured.

RICHARD GINGER sworn. - Q. Did you assist the two Martins in securing the two men? - A. Yes.

Q. Are the prisoners the same men? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see one of the men put the bridle on the mare, and the other get upon her? - A. No, I did not; I was about one hundred yards off; I afterwards assisted in securing them.

Denham's defence. I went with this man to look after an ass and soal; we were informed it went towards Harrow; the mare had belonged to this young man before it belonged to that gentleman; we heard in Covent-garden market that it was stolen or strayed, and we found it upon the common; we meant to take it home; we did not mean to make a property of it.

Q. (To Martin.) Do you know who Loosely bought this mare of? - A. No.

Q. (To Clarke.) Do you know who he bought her of? - A. No, I heard him say he bought her in Smithfield.

The prisoner, Denham, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Heal's defence. The mare was mine; I sold her at Langhorn's to this gentleman, and we heard in Covent-garden that it was stolen or strayed; and, seeing her upon this common, while I was looking after my own property, we meant to take it to the man that owned it.

Denham, GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

Heals, GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-27

200. JAMES WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , half-a-guinea, a seven-shilling piece, two half-crowns, and two shillings and six-pence, the property of John Naylor , privately from the person of Ann, his wife .

ANN NAYLOR sworn. - I am the wife of John Naylor: On Monday last I was going to the play-house in Well-street, about six o'clock in the evening, Charles Allen was with me; I had a child in my arms, and felt something at my pocket; as soon as I could get out of the mob, I felt for my money, and it was all gone; I had a half-guinea, a seven-shilling piece, two half-crowns, and two shilling and six-pence in silver; I immediately called out that I was robbed; the prisoner was behind me; I turned round, and pulled my gown over.

Q. Have you seen your money since? - A. No, I found half-a-crown upon the stairs.

Q. Near where you stood when you felt something at your pocket? - A. Yes.

CHARLES ALLEN sworn. - I was with Mrs. Naylor; I had my hand upon her shoulder to keep the mob off from her child; she cried out that she was robbed; I immediately went down stairs; I laid hold of the prisoner, and charged him with having robbed her; I had observed him having hold of her clothes near the pocket-hole.

Q. When you observed that, why did you wait till she called out? - A. The mob made a push all at once; and when she said she was robbed, she said that was the man making down stairs; immediately upon her calling out, the prisoner made down stairs, and had got about as far as I am from your Lordship; I held him till the constable came; I was present when he was searched at the watch-house; there was a seven-shilling piece and a knife found upon him.

JOHN TALBOT sworn. - I am a constable: On Monday night, between five and six o'clock, I was sent for to take charge of a man; it was between light and dark; I cannot say whether the prisoner is the man.

Q. (To Allen.) Do you believe the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt of it? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to the theatre, and I might be behind the lady, I cannot say; all of a sudden, she said she was robbed, and, in turning round sharp, several people fell backwards on the stairs; I was one, and then they laid hold of me. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-28

201. CHARLES HUSSEY was indicted for making an assault, on the 6th of February , in the King's highway, upon Sarah Schalok , the younger , putting her in fear, and taking from her person three petticoats, value 9s. two pair of stockings, value 2s. a pair of pockets, value 6d. two caps, value 2s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 1s. and four other handkerchiefs, value 1s. the property of Sarah Schalok , the elder .

SARAH SCHALOK, the younger, sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Fourteen: My mother lives in the Strand, she takes in washing : On the 6th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was carrying home a bundle of linen to a lady of the name of Seymour; and, as I was going through Swallow-street , a man snatched the bundle from me.

Q. Do you see him in Court? - A. Yes, that is

him, (pointing to the prisoner); I had it on my left arm, he snatched it from me, and ran away.

Q. Did you see him before he snatched it? - A. No; I had him in sight all the time till he was brought back; I did not see the bundle again till a quarter of an hour after he was taken.

ROGER ROOME sworn. - On the 6th of February, I was in Conduit-street; the girl passed me and ran very fast; I saw a man run down the middle of the street, he was stopped by Mr. Lees; I did not see any thing about him, I saw the bundle found about twenty or thirty yards from Swallow-street, it was given to the girl; I went with her to Marlborough-street, where the bundle was delivered to the officer.

ROBERT LEES sworn. - On Saturday the 6th of this month, I stopped the prisoner in Conduit-street; he was among the foremost of several people who were running towards me; I did not see the bundle till afterwards; I saw it picked up.

RICHARD LOVITT sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner at the office.

ABRAHAM BARRIER sworn. - I received the bundle from the girl, at the office. (Produces it.)

SARAH SCHALOK , the elder, sworn. - I am the mother of the first witness; I know these to be the same things that I sent by my daughter.

Sarah Schalock , the younger. I know this to be the same bundle.

Q. Did you take particular notice of the man who snatched the bundle from you? - A. I observed nothing but his coat; I kept my eyes upon him from that time till he was stopped; I never lost sight of him.

Q. What sort of a night was it? - A. It was not very light.

Prisoner's defence. The charge that is laid against me is false.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-29

202. THOMAS DALY was indicted for making an assault, in the King's highway, upon Henry Schroder , on the 16th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 3l. the property of the said Henry.

HENRY SCHRODER sworn. - I live at No. 180, in Thames-street: On Saturday night, the 16th of January, between nine and ten o'clock, I was going to a German public-house, to see some of my countrymen, I am a German ; I was going through Black-lion-yard, Whitechapel , when three men came up against me, I thought they were drunk; I stood on one side to let them pass, and when they came up to me they fell against me, and one of them snatched my watch out of my pocket.

Q. You don't know that the prisoner was the person who snatched it? - A. I cannot say, he was in the middle.

Q. They did not use any violence? - A. No; I immediately laid hold of the prisoner, and another struck me on the head with a stick; the man who took my watch was standing it to the prisoner; then the prisoner got away from me, and I followed him across Whitechapel-road into Fieldgate-street, and there the watchman took him and brought him to the watch-house; I never lost fight of him; I have never seen my watch since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. How are you sure the prisoner was one of the men? - A. Because I never lost fight of him.

Q. I believe there was a watch found upon the prisoner? - A. Yes; but that was not mine.

Q. Was this a dark night? - A. Rather so.

BENJAMIN CONSTABLE sworn. - I was constable of the night; The prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house by the prosecutor; there was a watch found upon him, which proved to be his own property.

Prisoner's defence. I was going for a pound of sausages for my supper, and as I was going down Black-lion-yard, a man came up and shoved against me, and then four or five more came up, and began to hustle me; I found they were trying to get at my watch, and I pulled it out into my hand, one of them struck a blow at my head with a stick, and then I got away from them.

For the Prisoner.

ANN CORFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hart. Q. What are you? - A. A tailoress: Last Saturday night was four weeks, the prisoner was coming through Black-lion-yard, with some meat in his hand, he was before me, whistling and singing; when I came to the corner of the yard, there seemed, as I thought, as fight; the prisoner said, please to clear the way; then a man came up and struck him on the head with a stick, which knocked his hat off, and then he ran away; this man in blue, the prosecutor, then came up and laid hold of him; he said he would have him right or wrong; he said he would have his life; that is all I know.

Court. Q. Was there any body in company with the prisoner? - A. Not a soul, only me behind him, it appeared to be a fight; I did not know the young man before.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-30

203. ANN WATSON and ELIZABETH WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a leather purse, value 1d. a seven-shilling-piece, and two sixpences, the property of John Simmons , privily from his person .

JOHN SIMMONS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A porter at Bernard's Hotel, Leicester-fields: On the 29th of January, about four o'clock in the morning, I went to take a parcel for a gentleman

to go by the Portsmouth coach from the Angel Inn in the Strand, near Temple-bar; I staid there three or four minutes with the gentleman.

Q. Had you your money when you were at the Angel Inn? - A. Yes; I had my money in my pocket when I left the Angel Inn; I came home to the Hotel, and rang the bell twice, the man did not hear me; I staid about ten minutes at the door; and then walked round the square, and met with these two women at the further side of the square; they asked me to treat them with a glass of gin; I said, I had no objection if they could find a public-house open; one of them said she knew a place that was open; we went there, that was in Chandos-street, I went into the tap-room with both the women, they called for half a pint of rum; I asked the landlord how much it was; he said a shilling; I took my pouch from my pocket, and gave him a shilling; one of the women put some liquor into a glass and drank first, then she gave the other a glass, then she gave a glass to the watchman, and then she poured me out a glass; I said I wanted some water and some sugar, I was not going to drink liquor in that way, then the women went away; and because it was too early for me to get in I had four pennyworth of gin and water; and after I had drank it, I put my hand into my pocket to pay for it, and my purse was gone.

Q. How long were you in the house with these women? - A. About twenty minutes altogether.

Q. When was the last time you had seen your purse before that? - A. In the house.

Q. Did you feel either of the women with their hands in your pockets? - A. No; I thought I was in good company.

Q. What was contained in your purse? - A. A seven-shilling piece and two sixpences.

Q. Did you stay in the room all the while with them? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not go into any other room? - A. No; we did not leave the table.

Q. After all this, you could not be very sober? - A. I was sober enough to know what I did; I called the watchman, and described them to him; then they were apprehended.

- MACDONALD sworn. - I am a watchman: Going along St. Martin's-lane, I saw these girls, and, soon after, I heard this man say, I am robbed by two women, and if I saw them, I should know them very well; I took him into the gin-shop at the corner of New-street, where they were; he put his hand on Watson's left shoulder, and said, this is the woman that robbed me; they were both together at that time.

Q. Did the prosecutor speak of them both? - A. He said, this is the woman that was in my company, and this is the woman that robbed me; he swore to one more than the other, he swore most to Watson; I put my hand on her left shoulder, and told her, she must got with me; when she moved, I saw this purse (producing it) lying on her right toe in the wine vaults; that was about ten minutes before six o'clock.

Q. Was there any thing in the purse? - A. No.

Simmons. I know this purse to be mine, because it is broke on one side; I bought it in Brook-street about three months ago.

Q. (To Macdonald.) Was there any body else in the wine-vaults? - A. No, only Paterson, the master, as we were going along, Williams said, before I go to prison, the best way is to tell the truth; you know you have the money, give it up; she said, she had the money either in her cloaths, or in her mouth; I took her to the constable of the night, and he searched her in my presence, but found nothing but brass.

SIMON PATERSON sworn. - I keep the winevaults: The two prisoners came to my house about six o'clock in the morning; one asked for a glass of rum, and the other for a glass of gin; Watson gave me a seven-shilling piece, I gave her six shillings, and the rest of her change in halfpence; they did not stay three minutes; the watchman and the prosecutor came in; I heard the prosecutor say to Watson, she had robbed him, and she denied it; they began to search her, and the watchman picked up the purse at her feet; I was lighting my fire when they came in.

PHILIP TRIMBY sworn. - I was constable of the night, I took charge of the prisoners; I searched them both, but only found some halfpence.

Watson's defence. I met this young woman; she asked me if I would have any thing to drink; we had some purl and gin, and then we met the prosecutor; he asked us to have something to drink; we went to a public-house, and he called for a pint of rum; then he called for some water; we staid about ten minutes, it was then near six o'clock; we went away, and in St. Martin's-lane this young woman met a man she knew, and we went to have something to drink; then the prosecutor came in, and said, we had robbed him, and they took us to the watch-house.

Williams's defence. I have nothing further to say; I saw no money found; I neither saw the prosecutor or the woman pay for any thing.

Watson, GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

Williams, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020217-31

204. MARGARET KENNEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a pewter quart-pot, value 1s. 6d. and a pewter pint-pot, value 1s. the property of John Sutton .

JOHN SUTTON sworn. - I am a publican in Old Quebec-street : On the 29th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, in consequence of

information, I followed the prisoner, and stopped her with a quart and a pint-pot under her apron; they have my name upon them. (Produces them.)

HENRY BETTS sworn. - I belong to Mary-le-bone watch-house; the prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020217-32

205. WILLIAM RICHARDSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James James , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 9th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a canvas bag, value 1d. sixteen pounds in monies numbered, three banknotes for the payment of 2l. each, and eight other bank-notes for the payment of 1l. each , the property of the said James James.

JAMES JAMES sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Princes-street, Westminster, near Storey's gate .

Q. What business are you? - A. A vinter .

Q. Did the prisoner lodge with you? - A. Yes.

Q. For what time? - A. Between three and four months.

Q. Did he lodge with you on the 9th of February? - A. No, he did not.

Q. When did he quit his lodging? - A. He did not quit it at all: On Friday, the 5th, I went up stairs into my club-room, and found him sitting there with the door shut; I asked him what business he had there, that was not his place, that his place was up stairs, in his own apartment, in the room where he lodged; he was counting some half-pence and penny-pieces, but what quantity I don't know, or whose they were I don't know; he went up to his own room, and I imagine he staid there a quarter of an hour, when he came into the taproom, and went out, and I never saw him till he was apprehended for the robbery.

Q. What day did you apprehend him? - A. The 9th, the Tuesday morning; when I came down stairs at seven o'clock that morning to open my house, I went to open the back window, and found some papers lying on the ground that had not a right to be there; I then looked into a cupboard where there was a bag with between thirty and forty pounds.

Q. In what room was it you saw the papers on the ground? - A. In the bar; I observed the cupboard forced open by the tongs, which lay on the floor, much bent, and a broken knife.

Q. Was it from the appearance of the tongs that you judged they had been used? - A. They lay on the floor, and there was a broken knife and another knife lying altogether.

Q. How did you observe the cupboard to the broke open? - A. Forced open at the bottom.

Q. What did you miss? - A. I missed the bag, which was of old canvas, in which the property was put the night before.

Q. Had you seen it? - A. I had given change the night before; I put it in, and locked it up, and had the keys in my pocket the night before.

Q. What did you put into it? - A. I cannot swear to a guinea or two; there were bank-notes of one or two pounds, half-guineas, seven-shilling pieces, guineas, half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences; I cannot describe them particularly, but altogether to the amount of thirty pounds.

Q. Was the bag left or taken away? - A. They were all taken.

Q. What did you do then? - A. I looked at the back part of the bar, and found a pane of glass broke, where the prisoner had entered into the bar; the leaden casement window was unbolted, and opened.

Q. Suppose the casement open, was there room for a man to get in? - A. Plenty of room; I went up to my wife, and told her, and in the course of the morning I went up to the office, and inquired of the officers; they came with me, and saw the situation of the place; they then went to apprehend the prisoner; we found him at the Marquis of Granby, in the Almonry, Westminster.

Q. When did you find him there? - A. About the hour of twelve o'clock, it might be a quarter or twenty minutes after; I cannot say to five minutes.

Q. Were you present when he was searched? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you find? - A. There were two half-guineas, two seven-shilling pieces, two half-crowns, five shillings, seven six-pences, three pennyworth of halfpence, a silver watch, and the canvas bag, which I have sworn to.

Q. Were there any bank-notes? - A. There were three two-pound notes, a one-pound note, and six guineas, lodged in the hands of the landlady of the house where he was drinking; she delivered them up to the officer.

Q. You cannot swear to any of the money? - A. I cannot say; I can only speak to the crooked half-guinea, I think I can swear to that.

Q. What time did you go to bed? - A. At twelve o'clock; I was up last.

Q. Was all fastened? - A. Yes, it was all fastened; and, when I went to bed, the pane of glass was safe, the window bolted, and the cupboard locked up, with the keys in my pocket.

Mrs. JAMES sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing about the robbery? - A. I know the bag was my property before I was married.

Q. How do you know it to be your bag? - A. Because I cut the bottom out, turned it up, and darned it with red thread.

JAMES BLY sworn. - Q. Have you got the canvas bag? - A. Yes. (Produces it.)

Q. Where did you get it? - A. I found it in the jacket pocket that he wore under his great-coat.

Q. What else? - A. Two half-guineas, two seven-shilling-pieces, two half-crowns, five shillings, seven sixpences, and three-pence-halfpenny in copper, a silver watch in his sob-pocket, but the bag was in his jacket-pocket.

Q. (To Mrs. James) Look at that bag? - A. I mended it myself, and darned it with red thread.

Q. (To James James ) Is that the bag you put the money in the night before? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Bly.) Tell us what you know more? - A. After I took the prisoner into custody, the landlady said, she wanted to speak to me, upon which she put in my possession three two pound notes, a one pound note and six guineas, which she said she had from the prisoner.

ELIZABETH WARD sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At the Marquis of Granby, in the Almonry, at Westminster.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. He came to my house at nine o'clock in the morning of the 9th.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. He had been several times there.

Q. How far is that from his own lodgings? - A. A little way, a street or two off.

Q. What did he come to you for? - A. He came and asked me to let him have some tea, which I did; after that, he followed me to the bar, and put his hand to his right-hand pocket, and said, take care of these for me.

Q. What did he take out of his pocket? - A. Three two pound notes, a one pound note, and six guineas in gold.

Q. Is he a private? - A. I don't know, I only know him by his coming once or twice.

Q. Is he a serjeant, or a corporal? - A. I don't know.

James. He is a private in the 3d Regiment.

Q. (To Ward.) Did you take those things from him? - A. Yes; he gave them to me; I counted them, and kept them; when they took him up, I gave them to the constable, as I supposed he did not come honestly by them.

EDWARD BRAMBLE sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am shopman to Mr. Wright, a pawnbroker, in the Almonry.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I remember his purchasing this watch of me on the morning of the robbery.

Q. Did you take sufficient notice of him to recollect him again? - A. I only swear to his voice; I cannot swear to his person.

Q. You do not mean to swear positively because you recollect his voice? - A. No, I do not mean to do that.

Q. What did he come to you for? - A. To purchase a watch.

Q. When did he come to you? - A. On Tuesday morning the 9th.

Q. At what time? - A. Rather before nine.

Q. (To Ward.) Did he give you the watch? - A. No; when he came, there was a quarrel, and he gave me the bag and all to take care of, as he was going to fight, but in a very few minutes he asked me to give him the bag again.

Q. Did you see the watch at that time? - A. Yes; he said he gave three pounds for it that morning; it was silver watch with a steel chain.

Q. You did not take so much notice of it as to know it again? - A. No; he only pulled it out, and said he had given three pounds for it at Mr. Wright's; the one pound note, the three two pound notes, and the six guineas, I wrapped up directly and put in a bag with my own money, but so that it should not mix.

Q. What was in the bag? - A. I did not examine his bag; I don't know what was in it.

Q. (To Bramble.) Did you sell him a watch? - A. Yes.

Q. What did he give for it? - A. Three single pound notes.

- DUNCAN sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am in the third regiment.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Richardson? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he in your company? - A. Yes.

Q. What have you to say? - A. I have nothing to say against him at all in the least; I saw no more harm than I was drinking with him on the Monday night the 8th.

Q. The night before the robbery? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you drink together? - A. The first place I lit on him was, at the Marquis of Granby.

Q. What time did you stay? - A. Till about six o'clock.

Q. Where did you go then? - A. After that we went to the Wheatsheaf, in New Tothill-street.

Q. How long did you stay there? - A. I suppose till near ten at night.

Q. Where then? - A. From there we came back to the Marquis of Granby again.

Q. How late did you stay there? - A. We stopped there till near twelve o'clock, from there the prisoner asked us to go with him for a shirt to the girl that washed for him.

Q. Who was with you? - A. James Barlow, and the prisoner.

Q. Did you go with them? - A. Yes, we did.

Q. What time was that? - A. That was when we left the Marquis of Granby, not above twenty or thirty yards; he went up stairs, and we stopped at the door; from there we went to a house, I

don't know the sign; we drank there till two or three o'clock in the morning.

Q. Was he very drunk? - A. I cannot say what he was, I had been drinking all that time.

Q. Did he treat you with any of the liquor? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Do you happen to know whether he had any money? - A. I don't know, any more than he paid his reckoning.

Q. What is the usual day for receiving your pay? - A. On Saturday I drew his pay myself for doing his duty.

Q. How much was it? - A. Four shillings and nine-pence; I had three and sixpence to take out of it, and the remainder I did not give to him, we all paid our own shot.

THOMAS HATCH sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am an officer: The landlord came and begged Bailey and me to go and apprehend some people, on the Tuesday morning about twelve o'clock.

Q. Was the prisoner drunk or sober? - A. He appeared to be drunk; we took him into the little parlour and searched him, and took the property from him.

Q. (To James.) How was the window fastened? - A. It was fastened when I went to bed.

Q. How high was it from the ground? - A. Four or five feet, I cannot say exactly, because I never measured it.

Q. Could any person who was drunk have got in there? - A. Yes; because there is a small ledge under the window, and feats round the bar, where we usually sit.

Q. How can a man get up four or five feet into this window who is drunk? - A. There is a ledge, and some tiles under the window.

Q. Then you suppose, that by stepping on those tiles, a man might get into the window? - A Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I beg to have the watch, and my own property; the purse I found at the end of Great Tothil-street.

Bly. When I asked the prisoner how he came by the purse, he said he had had it above two years; I asked him when I searched him, and on the examination he was still in the same story.

GUILTY , Death , aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020217-33

206. LEVI COHEN and EPHRAIM JACOBS were indicted for feloniously forging, disposing of, and putting away, on the 13th of January , a Bank of England note, for the payment of 5l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For disposing of, and putting away, a like forged note knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

Third and Fourth Counts. For uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

And in Four other Counts. For the like offences, charging it to be with intention to defraud James Ogden .(The case was opened by Mr. Fielding.)

JOHN JACOBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where did you live in the month of January last? - A. Near the Three Composses, in Harry-alley, Houndsditch.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes I do, exceedingly well, I have a right to know them; they came to me on the 13th of January, just as I was going to breakfast, there was nobody in the house but myself, my wife, Lydia Jacobs, and three small children; they asked me if I knew James Ogden , and Ikey Bull, -

Q. Is Ikey Bull's name Isaac Simmons ? - A. Yes; I told them I did, they were in Newgate; Levi Cohen then took out a red pocket-book, and a silver pencil, and asked me if Jemmy Ogden and Ikey Bull had got any money.

Q. Look at that, and tell me if that is the book Cohen produced? - A. It is the very same; I took particular notice of the pencil when they gave it me.

Q. What followed then - what did you tell them when they asked you whether they had any money? - A. I told them they always had money when I was there; I was confined there a twelvemonth myself; Levy Cohen then took out the notes, and said, here are six fives, and five twos.

Q. What sort of notes did they appear to be? - A. I cannot read or write, but they appeared to me to look like Bank notes; Levi Cohen said, do you think they will buy them; I said, I dare say they would, and gave Cohen the pocket-book again in his hand; they asked me when I would go to Jemmy Ogden and Ikey Bull, they told me to ask them twenty-five pounds for the notes, and to take no less; I told them I would go towards the evening, and towards the evening I went to the Blue Anchor in Petticoat-lane, and there I saw Cohen and Jacobs; then we all three went together as far as Newgate-street, and at the corner of Newgate-street I left them; Levi Cohen gave me the pocketbook, and said, mind, take no less than twenty-five pounds for the forty pound's worth of notes; then I went into Newgate, and saw James Ogden, I sold him the pocket-book for twenty-five pounds, he gave me three five pound notes, and the rest in cash.

Q. Was any body else present when you sold them to Ogden? - A. Yes, Ikey Bull, and Martha Graves .

Q. Had Ogden all the money to pay for them? - A. He had not, Ikey Bull furnished something, but how much I cannot tell; when I came away, I saw Cohen and Jacobs in the road, by the coach rank, in the Old-Bailey, I told them I had sold the

notes, and gave them the money; they called for a coach directly, and Ephraim Jacobs said, you have no occasion to get into the coach, you must get somebody to go and let them know they are forged notes; I said, do you mean forged notes; says Ephraim Jacobs , never you mind, there is nothing to hurt you.

Q. Had you any knowledge they were forged notes before they told you so? - A. No, I had not; they told the coachman to drive to Whitechapel, and desired me to call at the Blue Anchor in Petticoat-lane; I afterwards went to the Blue Anchor, and told them I met a girl in Cheapside, and sent her to tell them; and that Jemmy Ogden had told her I might go to hell, and she along with me; Ephraim Jacobs said, never mind, so long as you have sent them word, that will do; they asked me if I would have any thing to drink; I said, yes; and they called for a pot of egg hot, and after that, a shillingsworth of rum and water; Levy Cohen took out his pocket-book, and gave me a five pound note, five shillings, and two guineas, and asked me if I was satisfied; I said, yes; I went home, and gave my wife the five pound note that I had received of them.

Q. Do you know any thing more about it? - A. Yes; I went along with the thieving boy who lives with Cohen; Cohen asked him if he knew a good sence, Jacobs was present.

Q. What is a sence? - A. A receiver of stolen goods; they would not trust the boy to go alone, and desired me to go with him; I went with him, and took a pocket-book with forty pound's worth of notes in it, to one Jacobs, a glass-flowerer, in Petticoat-lane, the boy gave Mr. Jacobs the notes; Jacobs took the notes in his hand, but refused to keep them, because, he said, they were all forged; I went back with the boy, and told them what he said; the pocket-book and notes were returned to the prisoners; and that is all I know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. (Counsel for Cohen.) Q. You told us you were confined in Newgate for twelve months? - A. Yes.

Q. What for? - A. For a barrel of raisins.

Q. Which you had stole? - A. No, I had not.

Q. The Jury found you guilty of it? - A. Yes.

Q. And there you got acquainted with these two persons? - A. Yes.

Q. And Martha Graves? - A. Yes.

Q. She was an acquaintance of your's too? - A. Only by being there.

Q. You were taken up for this yourself? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. And your wife? - A. No.

Q. You are in custody now? - A. Yes.

Q. And you come here to give evidence now you are in custody? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Have you always given the same account you have given to day? - A. To the best of my knowledge.

Q. You have always given the same account exactly, as to the place where the money was paid? - A. I have.

Q. That the money was paid at the Blue Anchor, for instance? - A. I paid them in the road, and they paid me in the Blue Anchor.

Q. You sold these notes to Ogden and Ikey Bull, as forged notes? - A. No, they did not tell me that then; I sold them as stolen notes.

Q. You told them you had picked a man's pocket of them, did you not? - A. Yes.

Q. And they gave you twenty-five pounds for the notes, because they thought they were stolen? - A. Yes.

Q. What way of life are you now in? - A. I go out sometimes with oranges, and sometimes I carry loads.

Q. Where did you go with the thieving boy? - A. Into Petticoat-lane.

Q. You knew him to be a thieving boy? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. He is no relation of your's? - A. None at all.

Q. What is his name? - A. Marks, I believe.

Q. How long had you known him to be a thief? - A. A good while; I have known him to go about with hats, he is a batter by trade.

Q. How long have you known him to be a thief? - A. A short time.

Q. When did you know him first? - A. About two years ago.

Q. Have you known him longer than two years? - A. No.

Q. He has been a thief ever since you have known him? - A. Yes.

Q. These two men knew Ikey Bull, and the other man, as well as you did? - A. Yes.

Q. You were sent to Newgate? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. You knew the way? - A. Yes; I was consined there a twelvemonth.

Q. Were you never confined more than once? - A. No, never; only that once.

Q. Who lived at the Blue Anchor at this time? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Who else were there? - A. There were several people, they were all Jews.

Q. Did you see the master there that night? - A. Yes, he was there, but they were all very busy.

Q. Does he know you? - A. Yes, he does, very well.

Q. Did he see you? - A. He did.

Q. He knew you perfectly well? - A. Yes.

Q. There were twenty people there, were there not? - A. Yes; there were a number.

Q. Can you name one? - A. Yes; my father-in-law, Hyam Moses.

Q. In what way of business is he? - A. He sells fish.

Q. What is his Hebrew name? - A. It signifies a thief.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. (Counsel for Jacobs.) Q. Did you always give the same account you have given to-day? - A. Not all, till the third examination.

Q. Did you say a word at the first or second examination? - A. I cannot exactly tell, I was so confused; I have said nothing but the truth.

Q. You knew these were forged notes before you took the money? - A. No, I did not.

Q. What did you take the seven guineas for? - A. For selling the notes.

Q. When you went to sell the second parcel of notes, you knew then that they were forged? - A. Yes, when Jacobs told me.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Then your knowledge arose from Jacobs telling you so? - A. Yes.

Q. Who told you to say you had stolen them? - A. They were both together and told me so; Cohen told me three or four days before this, that something was coming to London, from the country, and that he would put a trifle in my pocket.

Q. Did he tell you from what part of the country? - A. No.

JAMES OGDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You are now in Newgate, and act as the turnkey of the inner ward? - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember Jacobs coming to you? - A. Yes, it was on a Wednesday or Thursday in January.

Q. Did he bring you any thing? - A. Yes, Forty pounds worth of notes in a pocket-book,(produces it;) it has my name in it; there were six of five pounds, and five of two pounds.

Q. What notes were they? - A. They were Bank-notes.

Q. What did Jacobs say to you? - A. He told me he had just picked a man's pocket of it, that he called a lagger, that means a sailor; he asked me to buy them; I looked at them, I gave him twenty-five pounds for them; I paid him three five pound notes, and the rest in cash.

Q. What did you buy them as - what did you consider them as? - A. As stolen notes.

Q. Who was present? - A. A man of the name of Simmons.

Q. Has he any other name? - A. He goes by the name of Ikey Bull, and the woman he calls his wife.

Q. What is her name? - A. Martha Graves.

Q. Had you all the money yourself? - A. No; I borrowed twenty pounds of Simmons, and I paid him the money I borrowed of him, with four of the five pound notes that were in this pocketbook.

Q. Did you give up any notes after that? - A. Yes; I delivered up a five pound note to Mr. Kirby, and two I sent to the Bank.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Simmons was by the whole time? - A. Part of the time; he saw the money paid.

Q. For the twenty pounds that you borrowed of Simmons, he took four of these very notes, which he understood had been stolen? - A. Yes.

Q. You bought them as stolen notes? - A. Yes.

Q. You were told they were stolen from a lagger? - A. Yes.

Q. Which slang you understand to mean a sailor? - A. Yes.

Q. You thought it right to buy notes which you supposed to have been stolen? - A. Yes.

Q. You thought there was no harm in getting fifteen pounds worth of property that was stolen from a sailor just before? - A. Yes.

Q. He told you he had stole it at the door of Newgate? - A. Close by.

Q. And you thought there were no dishonesty in getting this fifteen pounds in the way which you have stated? - A. No.

Q. You are in Newgate for an assault? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of an assault - were you not attempting to rob a cart at the time? - A. No.

Q. Was it not an assault upon the constable who prevented you from robbing the cart? - A. It was not; it was committed through somebody else that attempted to rob a cart.

Q. And you were sent to Newgate for five years for it? - A. Yes.

Q. You were indicted and convicted of an assault, and rescuing a person who had committed a robbery? - A. Who had attempted to rob a cart.

Q. When did you give that note to Mr. Kirby? - A. I cannot say the day; Mr. Kirby can prove it.

Q. Had you bought any more notes about that time? - A. No.

Q. How many days was it before you gave the note? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Were you ever in custody before? - A. Oh, yes.

Q. How many times before? - A. Once or twice.

Q. You don't recollect whether once or twice? - A. Yes, twice.

Q. Perhaps three times? - A. No.

Q. What were you charged with? - A. I was charged with an assault.

Q. An assault and rescue? - A. No, quite a different thing.

Q. What sort of an assault was it? - A. An affair that was committed upon Saffron-hill.

Q. Was there any body killed? - A. Yes.

Q. There was a little murder connected with it - how many were killed? - A. Only one.

Q. A constable, was he not? - A. No, a labouring man.

Q. What was the other thing that you were taken up for - was that an assault? - A. No.

Q. What then? - A. On suspicion of robbing a waggon.

Q. Were you never in custody for robbing before? - A. No.

Q. How long were you in custody for robbing the waggon? - A. Fourteen weeks.

Q. How long were you in for the little assault upon Saffron-hill, where the man was killed? - A. Five years.

Q. And you are now in for five years more - what age are you? - A. Twenty-nine.

Q. And going on for ten years of your life in a jail? - A. Yes.

Q. You have told us you are a turnkey - they don't trust you at any of the outside doors, do they? - A. No.

Mr. JOHN KIRBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Look at that note, and tell me if you have seen it before? - A. Yes, I had it from Ogden on the 22d of January.

Q. Had there been any inquiry about any forged bank-notes of that date? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you think it necessary to speak to Ogden upon that occasion? - A. I did; I spoke to both.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Has it been in your custody ever since? - A. I marked it, and gave it to Mr. Kay's clerk.

Mr. Fielding. Q. I have known you a long time, and know you to be a valuable public officer, how long has Ogden been in that place where you have intrusted him? - A. I believe four years.

(The bank-note read.)

THOMAS BLISS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. I am an Inspector of notes of the Bank of England.

Q. Look at that note, and see whether it is a genuine bank-note or a forgery? - A. The whole of this is a forgery; it is neither our paper, our engraving, nor our water-mark; it is altogether a forgery.

MARTHA GRAVES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you lived in the prison with Simmons, or Ikey Bull? - A. Yes, I have been living with him these three years.

Q. Do you know Ogden? - A. Yes, perfectly well.

Q. Do you know Jacobs? - A. They called him Yackey while he was in Newgate; he was consined for twelve months.

Q. Did you see him at any time last month in company with Ogden in Newgate? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. At that time was Simmons there? - A. No.

Q. What time was that? - A. The 13th of January.

Q. What passed between them? - A. Yackey came in.

Q. Who else were present? - A. Only me and a little boy, and Yackey and Ogden; Yackey came into the chandler's shop where Ogden was; Ogden keeps a chandler's shop in the prisons they stood under the window where the coals were, behind the door, and then Yackey pulled a red pocketbook out of his pocket, and asked Ogden to buy the notes.

Q. Did Ogden buy them? - A. He did.

Q. For how much? - A. For twenty-five pounds, to the best of my recollection; Yackey shewed the notes to Ogden this way, (holding them up,) against the window.

Q. Had he money enough to pay for them? - A. No; while he was looking at these notes, I went out to the door to Simmons.

Q. Did you return alone? - A. No, I did not; I sat down on the bench with a little boy, and I heard Yackey say he would have twenty-five pounds for them.

Q. How did he get the money to pay for them? - A. Then Ogden called in Simmons.

Q. What did Simmons do? - A. He lent Ogden twenty pounds towards it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Simmons and Ogden keep a chandler's shop? - A. In a little way.

Q. They carry on a considerable trade in receiving? - A. I don't know any thing about receiving.

Q. Your name is Simmons? - A. No, my name is Martha Graves .

Q. You go by the name of Simmons? - A. They call me Simmons.

Q. What name did you go by before? - A. Graves.

Q. What is become of poor Graves? - A. I am ready to answer you any question.

Q. He was hanged, was he not? - A. Yes.

Q. You lived with him? - A. He married me at fifteen years old.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you never live with a man of the name of Ward? - A. No.

Q. Every thing you have said is as true as that? - A. Yes.

Q. What is become of him? - A. I don't know.

Q. Do not you know he has been transported? - A. I never heard that he was.

Q. You have lived a good deal in Newgate? - A. Never till since I was acquainted with Simmons.

Q. Were you never taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. What for? - A. Disorderly; as an unfortunate woman.

Q. What became of you? - A. I was acquitted.

Q. Were you never taken up for any thing else? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. Were you never taken up for picking pockets? - A. I was charged with it, but was discharged before the Alderman.

Q. I did not ask you if you were guilty, but

if you were charged with picking pockets? - A. Yes.

Q. More than once? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear you were never charged with it at any other time? - A. Yes, only when I was charged as an unfortunate woman.

Q. How much of your time have you passed in Newgate? - A. Ever since I have been acquainted with Simmons.

Q. That is three years? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you first acquainted with him? - A. By washing for him.

Q. Graves married you at fifteen - when did you first commence your acquaintance with Newgate? - A. Not till Graves was there, and that was a great many years after.

LYDIA JACOBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am the wife of John Jacobs .

Q. Look at the two prisoners - do you know them? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see them at your house with your husband in January? - A. Yes.

Q. At what time of the day was it? - A. It might have been between nine and ten, or it might have been ten, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. What first passed when you saw them? - A. They came into the room, and asked my husband if he knew James Ogden and Ikey Bull; and he told them, yes; they asked him if he was a man worth money; and he said, he always had a guinea or two; he said, he had some notes, and if he would sell them for twenty-five pounds, he would make it well worth his while, and pay him for his trouble; my husband took the notes in his hand; he then gave him the notes back, and what became of them afterwards I don't know; my husband went out with them, but whether he went to sell the notes or not I cannot say.

Q. When was it you heard of your husband being apprehended? - A. The officers took him in my room, while I was at supper.

Q. When was the first time you saw Rebecca Levy? - A. On Saturday night; I went to her house.

Q. Did you go with her to any place? - A. Cohen told me he could better afford to keep her than I could.

Q. Did this girl afterwards go to the lodgings or to the house of Cohen? - A. Yes.

Q. Whereabouts was this place where the girl went to, as Cohen's place of abode? - A. It is going to Whitechapel, but I cannot recollect the name of the street; I believe it is Mansell-street.

REBECCA LEVY sworn - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know John Jacobs? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he send you of any message to Newgate to any person? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the person that he sent you to? - A. To Ikey Bull, the turnkey.

Q. When was that? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How long before you were taken up? - A. I was not taken up at all; it is about three weeks back.

Q. What message did he send by you? - A. He told me to tell Ikey Bull that what he had bought was link.

Q. What did he mean by the word link? - A. I do not know; that was the message he sent me with.

Q. Did you deliver the message to Bull? - A. I did.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see either of the two prisoners at the bar? - A. I saw Cohen about a fortnight or three weeks after, I cannot rightly tell.

Q. Who took you to Cohen's house? - A. Lydia Jacobs ; I went there as a servant.

Q. Were you in his house when the officers took him up? - A. I was just lighting the fire.

Q. How long had you been there? - A. Three or four days.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. You went to live with Cohen? - A. Yes, as a servant, to go with his wife about the country with muslins and linens.

Q. Were you ever in Newgate before? - A. No.

Q. You did not know the meaning of the word? - A. No.

Q. Nor do not know it now? - A. No.

Mr. Fielding. Q. (To John Jacobs .) Explain to my Lord and the Jury what is the meaning of the word link? - A. I did not tell her it was link; I told her to say they were linked notes, that is, forged notes.

Q. (To Levy.) Did he tell you they were notes, or say any thing about notes? - A. No, he did not.

PHILIP MARKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Do you know John Jacobs? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go with him at any time with a pocket-book? - A. Yes, I was standing at Mr. Cox's door, where there was a person selling fish, and he said, master -

Mr. Serjeant Best. We must not hear what he said.

Mr. Giles. Q. Did you, in point of fact, go to Jacobs? - A. I took it to Mr. Jacobs's, the glass flowerer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. The pocket-book, I should think, stuck to your fingers? - A. No.

Q. Are you the boy that Jacobs calls a little thieving boy? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you carried on that trade? - A. To my misfortune, I have carried it on some time, but I am going to leave it off now.

Q. How old are you? - A. Fourteen.

Q. How many of the fourteen years have you been in prison? - A. Six weeks for stealing two half-crown papers of halfpence.

Q. Were you never taken up for picking pockets? - A. I have been taken up to Lambeth-street, and from there to Hicks's-hall.

Q. When were you discharged from there? - A. Last Saturday.

Q. How long ago is it since you were taken up on the charge of picking pockets? - A. A month to-day.

Q. Have you ever been slogged? - A. Yes.

Q. What were you slogged for? - A. About the halfpence.

Q. What were you done with for picking pockets? - A. I was cleared.

Q. Have you seen Lydia Jacobs pretty often? - A. She came to me in Clerkenwell, and brought me nine-pence and six pounds of potatoes.

Q. Then it was she told you to recollect about this pocket-book? - A. Yes.

Q. Her husband was then in trouble? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she promise any thing more? - A. Then I was taken to Lambeth-street for another hearing, and she came again and gave me a shilling, and the officer, Read, gave me three-pence.

Q. Did she not tell you to recollect things, and she would come to you again with something more? - A. No.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Who do you live with now? - A. My mother.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. How long ago is it since you went with this pocket-book? - A. Six or seven weeks.

Q. You have been in jail a month? - A. Yes.

Q. It must have been before that? - A. Yes; I don't know rightly when it was.

PHILIP JACOBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a glass-flowerer? - A. No, I keep a glass warehouse, No. 25, Sandy-row, Spital-fields.

Q. Do you know Philip Marks? - A. Yes.

Q. What business did he come to you upon? - A. It was this boy, and that man, John Jacobs, came with him.

Q. What did he bring to you? - A. He brought a pocket-book.

Q. What did that contain? - A. It contained notes.

Q. What sort of notes? - A. They did not appear to me to be good; he asked me if I would buy them.

Q. Did you buy them, or refuse it? - A. I refused it.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. When was this? - A. The beginning of January, or somewhere thereabouts.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Then you have no doubt these were the two people? - A. No.

HYAM MOSES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles Q. Were you at the Blue Anchor on the 13th of January? - A. I am every night at the Blue Anchor, for these fourteen or fifteen years.

Q. Look at the prisoners? - A. I know them.

Q. Do you remember seeing them at the Blue Anchor on the 13th of January? - A. I see one of the prisoners every night and every day at the Blue Anchor.

JOHN READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner Cohen? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find Rebecca Levy there? - A. Yes, she was there as his servant.

Cohen's defence. I know nothing of the man that has sworn against me in the least.

Jacobs's defence. I am innocent of the charge laid against me.

For the Prisoners.

Mr. EDWARD KIRBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are nephew to the keeper of Newgate? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Martha Graves? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you known her any length of time? - A. I believe five or six years.

Q. Did you know of her coming backwards and forwards to Graves, who was hanged? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Ward? - A. Yes, I believe he was transported.

Q. Do you remember her coming backwards and forwards to him? - A. I believe so, but I cannot be positive.

Mr. Fielding. We will admit that this woman is more wicked than all the rest.

Both NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020217-34

207. ANN BOND was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 14th of January , a certain banknote, as follows, viz. - 1802, No. 965, 30th of July, 1801. I promise to pay to Mr. Abraham Newland , or Bearer, on demand, the sum of two pounds, London, 30th of July, 1801, for the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, W. Collier, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. Charging her with disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank-note, as and for a true one, knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, with the like intent.

Third Count. Charging her with forging and counterfeiting a like promissory note for the payment of money, with the same intent.

There being no evidence on the part of the prosecution, the prisoner was. ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-35

208. JAMES BRIDPORT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , three

shirts, value 15s. the property of John Barrett ; a shirt, value 5s. a pair of stockings, value 2s. and a pair of shoes, value 6s. the property of John Ellams ; and a pocket-book, value 1s. 6d. the property of Owen Williams .

JOHN BARRETT sworn. - I am a private in the first regiment of foot-guards : On the 23d of January, I lost three shirts from the sign of the Strip, in Cannon-row; the prisoner and I slept in the same bed; the shirts were tied up in a handkerchief, in a box.

Q. Did you ever see the shirts again? - A. Yes; John Ellams took him on Wednesday the 27th, and brought him back to the Ship, with one of my shirts upon him; I found the other two shirts at a place where he had sold them.

JOHN ELLAMS sworn. - I lost a shirt, a pair of stockings, and a pair of shoes, at the same time that the last witness lost his shirts, they were tied up in a bundle in the same box; I took him myself four days after, in Palace-yard; a woman, who is here, bought the things of the prisoner.

ROBERT LYONS sworn. - I keep the Ship, in Cannon-row, where these witnesses were quartered; I let the prisoner the lodging on the 21st of January, and he went away on the 23d, on the 27th of January, I went with John Ellams and another, and apprehended the prisoner; I took him to my house, and sent for a Police-officer; he was searched, and a shirt found upon him belonging to John Barrett; the others I found at a shop where he had sold them.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am a constable belonging to Queen-square office, Westminster; I was sent for to the Ship in Cannon-row; I searched the prisoner, and upon searching him, I found this pocket-book which he said was his own, he confessed where he had sold these things, but the publican, I understand, had offered him favour, wishing to get rid of it; by the prisoner's direction, I went to a clothes-shop, in Chandos-street, where I found three shirts, and a pair of stockings, which the woman of the shop acknowledged in the presence of the prisoner she had bought of him; I brought them away, and have had them ever since.(Produces them.)

SARAH M'RODITH sworn. - I keep a clothesshop, in Chandos-street; I bought three shirts and a pair of stockings of the prisoner, on Saturday, the 23d of January, about nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes, I gave him seven shillings for them; the officer brought the prisoner to me afterwards, and I delivered them to him.

OWEN WILLIAMS (being a Welchman, and not understanding English, an interpreter was sworn.) I am a soldier in the first regiment of guards; I lost a pocket-book from a room in which I slept, from out of my breeches-pocket, I had hung my breeches on a nail by the bed.

Q. How long ago? - A. A month last Friday.

Q. When did you miss it? - A. The same hour almost; I saw it again afterwards in the hands of the constable, I immediately knew it to be mine.

(The property was identified by the different prosecutors.) The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 16.

(Sick,) Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-36

209. MARY BOWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , a shirt, value 3s. a sheet, value 2s. a child's frock, value 1s. a towel, value 6d. a handkerchief, value 6d. a tablecloth and two neck handkerchiefs, value 1s. the property of Henry Willes .

HENRY WILLES sworn. - I keep a coal-shed and potato-warehouse , in York-street, Westminster ; I was not at home at the time the things were taken.

MARY WILLES sworn. - I am the wife of Henry Willes ; on Saturday the 30th of January, I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment; I was busy, and the washer-woman brought home my things, and put them behind me, upon a potatobin; I saw the bundle after the washer-woman was gone; the prisoner was waiting for some coals, and wanted to pay for them before they were delivered; the insisted upon paying for them directly, and I went round the counter to take the money; she would not give me money enough for the coals, and then she went away; after she was gone, I went round the counter, and missed the bundle; the things have never been found.

HANNAH WILLES called. - Q. How old are you? - A. Eleven.

Q. Were you ever at school? - A. Yes, my Lord, I have been taught at school.

Q. Have you ever been told, if you tell a lie, or a story, how you will be punished - were you ever taught your catechism? - A. Yes, my Lord.

Q. How are naughty girls punished that tell lies, or tell stories - have you never been taught that? - A. No, my Lord.

Q. Have not you been told that you will be whipped if you tell stories? - A. Yes, my Lord.

Q. Have you never been told in what way you will be punished if you tell lies? - A. Yes, my Lord, I shall go to a wicked place, (sworn;) I saw the prisoner come in on the Saturday night, between nine and ten o'clock, she was standing behind the counter; I saw her take the bundle from the potato-bin.

Q. Did you attempt to stop her? - A. No, I did not know but it was her own bundle; when

my mother asked me, I told her I saw a woman take a bundle up, and go out with it.

Q. Did you see the prisoner before? - A. Yes; she came once before, when my mother was up stairs.

The WASHER WOMAN sworn. - On Saturday, the 30th of January, I carried home these things to Mrs. Willes, about half-past nine o'clock, they were wrapped up in a coarse cloth, I put them down near where Mrs. Willes stood.

THOMAS HATCH sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Queen-square; I took charge of the prisoner at the watch-house; she was brought there by the prosecutor.

Willes. When I came home, my wife informed me what had happened; she shewed me the prisoner, nearly opposite my house, and I took her the same evening.

Prisoner's defence. I went to order half a sack of coals, and desired them to be sent only across the way, where I was at work, and finding they did not come, I went over again, and then Mr. Willes laid hold of me, and challenged me with taking the bundle.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-37

210. ROBERT RAYMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a wooden box, value 6d. a gold watch-case, value 3l. 10s. three pieces of gold coin, called doubloons, value 7l. ten pieces of other gold coin, called joes, value 15l. and ten small pieces of gold, value 50s. the property of John Poston , George Copeland , and a great number of other persons.

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of James Spencer .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of Charles Smith , and

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN CRAIG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On Saturday the 30th of January, I put into a wooden box, among other things, the articlesmentioned in the indictment; I directed the articles to Mr. Charles Smith , No. 118, Bunhillrow, London; I made up the box in the shop of Mr James Williams, watch-maker, at Bath, and delivered it at the coach-office of the Castle and Boar inn, at Bath.

Q. By what day's coach was it to go? - A. The next morning, Sunday morning's coach, to the Bolt-in-Tun, Fleet-street.

Q. Have you ever seen any of the articles contained in that box since? - A. Yes, on Saturday the 6th of February; I arrived in London, on Tuesday, the 2d of February, and went to Mr. Smith's; I found the parcel had not arrived, and on the Saturday following, I saw, at the house of James M'Coull, in Clifford's-inn-passage, a gold watchcase, and other articles, but not the box; they are in the possession of the officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are not the owner of the box in question? - A. No.

Q. Did you pack it up yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. For whom? - A. Mr. Charles Smith .

Q. What is the name of Mr. Smith's partner? - A. He has no partner.

Q. You have never seen the box since? - A. No.

Q. What part of the property have you seen since? - A. I have seen a watch case, and the pieces of gold coin.

Q. You did not find any property in the possession of the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. M'Coull has absconded? - A. Yes.

EDWARD PAGUE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the book-keeper at the Bolt-in-Tun, Fleet-street.

Q. Does the coach which inns at the Castle and Boar, at Bath, come to your house? - A. Yes, it first of all staris from the White-hart, Broad-street, Bristol.

Q. Setting out on Sunday morning, the 31st of January, when would it arrive at the Bolt-in-Tun? - A. About twelve o'clock the same night, or it might be near one the next morning.

Q. By the coach that came in on the night of the 31st of January - did you receive any box directed for Mr. Charles Smith , of Bunhill-row? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. How do you know that; from your book, or your own knowledge? - A. I know it both from the book, and my own knowledge; that box, on its arrival, was checked off in the book, and was left in the warehouse till the Monday morning, which is usual; the next morning, the Bath articles were called over to me by one of our porters, and this box was put into what we term Mattocks's bin; Mattocks is the porter, who works into the city.

Q. Do you know if he is ever assisted in delivering parcels, by a person of the name of Spencer? - A. Frequently.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I take it to be impossible for you to recollect the directions of parcels but from your book? - A. Of course I have an account in my book that I can rely on.

Q. When was your recollection first called to this box? - A. On the Tuesday afternoon.

Q. To whom did you deliver that box to be delivered to Mr. Smith? - A. I cannot say, it is called off "a box, Smith, Bunhill-row;" there are two porters, and I cannot say which of them it was.

Q. That box you have not seen since? - A. No.

WILLIAM MATTOCKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a porter at the Bolt-in-Tun inn; I take charge of the city parcels.

Q. Do you recollect a parcel directed to Mr. Charles Smith, No. 118, Bunhill-row? - A. I do; I took it in a cart as far as St. Paul's Church-yard, and then I delivered it with other parcels to a boy of the name of James Spencer .

JAMES SPENCER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you recollect having any parcel from Mattocks, directed for Mr. Charles Smith, of Bunhill-row? - A. Yes, a little deal box; I took it till I got just beyond Whitebread's brewhouse, the prisoner at the bar came up to me -

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. Between twelve and one, he asked me whether I was going to Mr. Smith's -

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. On the Tuesday; I told him; he said, you young dog, why did you not bring it before; I told him I could not conveniently bring it before, for it came in but last night; he said, I know better than that, for it came in yesterday; says he, I have not money enough now, you must bring it here; going along Bunhill-row, he said, I have got money enough now, and gave me two shillings, I gave him four pennyworth of halfpence in change; he then went as far as the first pair of gates up Bunhill-row, on the left-hand side of the way; there was a parcel of women, he talked to them upwards of a minute, and as I had been served such a trick when I was a school-boy, I followed him up as far as Mr. Smith's court; I crossed over to the court, and saw the gate shut too after him; then I thought I had delivered it right; I charged one shilling and eightpence for the carriage, but it was not the proper charge; I got as far as the India-house, and then I found I was wrong; I went back to Mr. Smith's to rectify the mistake, and they told me no parcel had been there; I saw the prisoner again on the Friday following, at the office in Hatton-garden; there were thirteen or fourteen together, and I picked out the prisoner; I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long is it that you have been quite sure the prisoner is the man? - A. When I saw him at Hatton-garden.

Q. No, you were not, I was there, you know? - A. I did not know him when I first went in, till they desired him to stand up.

Q. Did you not say, at the last examination, that you were not quite certain, but you believed he was the man? - A. I did not say so, I was always sure he was the man.

Q. Your master, I believe, has threatened to dismiss you, if the prisoner is not convicted? - A. No, he has not; he was angry with me for giving him so much trouble.

Q. What time of the day was this? - A. Between twelve and one.

Q. There is no thorough fare to this court? - A. There is a thorough fare through the court, but none through the yard.

Q. Can you read and write? - A. Yes; I was in St. Bride's charity-school.

Q. To whom was the box directed? - A. To Mr. Charles Smith .

Q. When the man came up to you, he had not had time to read the direction? - A. No; he came up, and asked me if I was going to Mr. Smith's; I had four other parcels beside Mr. Smith's, that I brought from the yard, and he might have seen the directions when I was untying the parcels at a door.

Q. Has it happened that you have been in Newgate yourself? - A. No, never; I was locked up three hours in Worship-street, because they said I was connected with the man.

Q. Was not your father taken up by a warrant? - A. No; he heard of my being taken up, and he came to me, but he never was detained.

Q. Did you give a description of the person who took the box from you? - A. Yes.

Q. You had been walking about two or three days to find him out? - A. No; I went one day through all the little courts and alleys to see if I could find him.

Q. When you went to Hatton-garden, did not the officers tell you the prisoner was the man? - A. No; they turned me into the room, and I picked him out.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are one of the officers belonging to Hatton-garden? - A. I am; I apprehended the prisoner on the 5th of February, in bed; I then fetched the lad, and he fixed upon the prisoner; I told him to be very cautious and particular; there was nothing to mark him, he had no iron on any more than the rest.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I don't know any more than Inwards has stated.

HENRY CROCKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are an officer of Bow-street? - A. Yes; I went to the house of James M'Coul, in Clifford's-Inn-passage, on the 6th of February, where I found the articles mentioned in the indictment; Limbrick has them.( Richard Limbrick produced the property, which was identified by Mr. Craig.)

CHARLES SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did this box, directed to you by your agent, reach you? - A. No; I received advice of it, but it never arrived.(Mr. Thomas Simcock proved the names of the proprietors of the coach.)

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the boy till I saw him at Hatton-garden.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-38

211. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , a pair of boots, value 21s. the property of Samuel Monk .

SAMUEL EMLIN sworn. - I live at No. 6, in Leman-street, near Mr. Monk's: On the 11th of February, I was coming from White Lion-street, and as I was passing Mr. Monk shop, I observed the prisoner take one of the boots that were hanging outside Mr. Monk's shop.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - A. I am; after I had passed him, I stood to observe how he would act; after a few minutes, he took down the other boot, and then went away immediately, he went down a court that was even with Mr. Monk's house; I then rang at Mr. Monk's door, and informed his son of it; his son and I pursued him down there, and took him with the boots in his hand; I brought him back into Mr. Monk's shop, and from thence we took him to the public-office, Lambeth-street; the prosecutor's son took the boots to the office; I wrote my name in the boots before they were returned to the prosecutor.

SAMUEL MONK sworn. - I am a boot and shoemaker , (produces the boots); I am perfectly satisfied they are my boots, we always know our own manufacture.

Emlin. These are the boots that the prisoner took, and that I marked.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-39

212. ANN, the wife of JOSEPH SPOONER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , a pewter quart pot, value 1s. and a pewter pint pot, value 8d. the property of Richard Everitt .

RICHARD EVERITT sworn. - I keep the Red Lion in Portland-street, Soho ; I can only swear to the property.

ANN IVES sworn. - On Saturday, the 6th of this month, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner at the bar was sent to fetch some pots to scour; I live in the house in which my aunt lives, who employs the prisoner; she was sent to Mr. Everitt's, and, on her return, about half past nine o'clock, I saw her come on tip-toe, into the passage of the house where my aunt lives; she took the basket from off her head, and placed it on the bannisters of the one pair of stairs; from there she placed it in the passage against the back parlour door; she took either a pint or a quart pot out of the basket, but her hand concealing a part of it, I could not tell which, and put it into her pocket; after that she went down stairs, and, on my going down, I met her coming up stairs again to fetch some more pots from another house to be cleaned; she took down the remainder of the pots, and brought up an empty basket to fetch another load; upon her return back with that load, it was not then ten o'clock, I said to her, Mrs. Spooner, you must now deliver to me the property that you have in your pocket belonging to Mr. Everitt; upon that she refused, and very stoutly resisted; I then said, I saw her put pots in her pocket; she then pulled out a small pocket; I said, upon my soul, that will not do, I saw you put pots in your pocket; I then shook her by the side, and, to my great surprise, these two pots sell out of her pocket; I did not expect to find more than one; I, not knowing the law, was afraid to take them, and made her return them to the; she gave me a pint first, and then a quart; when she had given them, she said, there, now you have got them, you can neither prove me a thief, nor yet transport me. (The pots were produced, and identified by Everitt.)

Prisoner's defence. I went to Mr. Everitt's, the basket would not hold all the pots, and I put these into my pocket; I did not take them out of the house; but when Mrs. Ives charged me with it, I gave her them directly; I had worked a year and a half for her aunt; she said she would transport me, and if she could not Mr. Everitt should.

WILLIAM CARTER sworn. - I found this piece of pewter in the prisoner's pocket, warm, it appeared to have been just melted; I took her to the Marlborough-street-office; I then went with the officer to her lodgings, she gave me the key, and we found this shovel, in which pewter appeared to have been melted, (produces it); there are the remains of pewter in the shovel.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18020217-40

213. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , twenty-four yards of ribbon, value 10s. the property of Susannah Hocknell .

BERNARD GLEED sworn. - On Thursday the 28th of January, I was going to the Public-office, Worship-street, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner, and another, standing with their backs towards the next shop to Mrs. Hocknell's, in Shoreditch ; I saw the prisoner draw this piece of ribbon through the screw hole of the window, I did not see what he did it with; the boy that was with him had a hook, but I did not see it; the prisoner ran across the road with it, and in running away with it he fell down in the road; I crossed, picked him up, and brought him into the shop, with the ribbons upon him. (Produces them).

SUSANNAH HOCKNELL sworn. - I know these ribbons to be my property, I have no particular mark upon them; I am positive I put such ribbons in the window in the morning, I had left the shop

about five minutes before, and had removed these ribbons about an inch from the screw hole.

Prisoner's defence. I work in the brick-fields; I was going along, and met another boy, and while I was speaking to him this gentleman came up, and said I had stole the ribbon.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character for industry since he had been able to do any thing. GUILTY , aged 11.

Sent to the Philanthropic Society .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-41

214. THOMAS COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , two loaves of bread, value 2s. the property of Edward Osman .

EDWARD OSMAN sworn. - I am a baker , and live in Church-street, Hackney: On the 16th of January, I went in to serve the White Horse, in the Grove, Hackney ; I left my basket upon a large block of stone in a stone-mason's yard, as high as my head; before the people of the house had time to pay me, I heard an alarm; I went out, and saw the prisoner, and a man with him, running as fast as they could, the prisoner had a loaf under each arm; I kept sight of him till I caught him, before I overtook him he dropped the bread; I stopped and looked at the bread, and found it was mine; I brought him back, and took him to Worship-street; I mark my bread with a particular large W, different from all other bakers in London.

Mrs. TITCOMBE sworn. - I live next door to the White Horse: On the 16th of January, I saw the prisoner, with two other boys, and a man, lurking about in the neighbourhood; the prisoner and the man went into the stone-mason's yard, the man put his hand into the baker's basket, took out a quartern loaf, and give it to the prisoner; I then saw the man put his hand in again, but did not see whether he took out another loaf or not; I then told the baker what I had seen, he immediately went after them, and I saw the prisoner brought back in the custody of the baker.

Prisoner's defence. I was almost starving, and seeing this bread, I took it. GUILTY , aged 14.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-42

215. THOMAS PORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a game cock, value 1s. 6d. the property of Peter Ward .

PETER WARD sworn. - On the 23d of January, between two and three o'clock, I lost a game cock, from Sloane-street , it was on the outside of the door among other fowls, I saw it again about an hour afterwards; the prisoner came past, and in consequence of my wife's suspicion I pursued him down Sloane-street, he took to his heels; when he got to the corner of the first turning, I saw him chuck away something in a bag, over the rails; I stopped him, and he asked me what I wanted with him; I I told him he must come back; he got away from me, nobody would come to my assistance; I went after him again, and caught him again; as I was bringing him back, a boy brought me a bag with my sowl in it.

Q. Is that boy here? - A. No, I have not seen him since; I took the prisoner before Mr. Bond, who was sitting at the Prince of Wales's, and there another bag was found upon him, but nothing in it.

Q. Was the sowl dead, or alive? - A. Alive.

SARAH WARD sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I saw a man, whom I believe to be the prisoner, just before the sowl was missing, but I cannot swear he is the same man.

Q. Prisoner's defence. I was going to work at Mr. Benwell's, in Sloane-street, all night; I was running pretty fast down Sloane-street, when this man came up, and said I had stole his sowl; it is a very likely story that I should steal his sowl, and come past the door again within an hour after.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-43

216. JAMES DISGRANGES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , fifteen pounds weight of cheese, value 10s. the property of John Goodman .

There being no evidence to shew that the property was ever in the possession of the prisoner he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-44

217. WILLIAM WHITTEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , twenty-three pounds weight of iron, value 3s. the property of Thomas Russell .

THOMAS RUSSELL sworn. - I am a smith , and live at No. 10, Coleman-street ; The prisoner was my journeyman ; I missed a quantity of iron, and in consequence of suspicion, on Saturday the 6th of February, when I had paid him his wages, I followed him out of the shop, and having an officer ready, I charged him with having my property upon him; he was immediately brought into the shop, and four pieces of iron were found upon him, they weighed twenty-three pounds; they were concealed inside of his waistcoat.

JAMES MACLAURIN sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Russell: The prisoner went down into the cellar to look out some iron for some work that he was about, I afterwards went down, and saw that some iron had been removed to the edge of the privy-door, and I informed my master of it; I saw it there again at three o'clock, the prisoner went down again between four and five; after he was gone, I went down and missed it; I then informed my master of it, and he was stopped.

( John Fenner , the constable, produced the iron, which he found upon the prisoner, and which was identified by the prosecutor, and his foreman.)

Prisoner's defence. My wife and I had had a fit of sickness, and we were in very great distress.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-45

218. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , a platform, and leather cover, value 5l. the property of Thomas Holmes the elder , and Thomas Holmes the younger .

THOMAS HOLMES , jun. sworn. - I am a coachmaker in Long-acre, in partnership with Thomas Holmes, my father; I know nothing of the loss.

CHARLES WHITE sworn. - I made a leather cover, and covered a platform for Mr. Holmes the cover is to keep the platform from the rain, they are used together, and united by buckles and straps; I packed them up on the 9th of February, at Mr. Holmes's, in Long-acre, and delivered it to Richard King , about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, to take it to the Castle and Falcon in Aldersgate-street; I saw him go with it, I wrote Col. Broughton upon the inside of the leather, with green copperas, and some part of the direction; I saw it again at the Mansion-house the following day, and knew it to be my work.

RICHARD KING sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Holmes: On the 9th of this month, I went with a post-chaise, and this platform, to the Castle and Falcon in Aldersgate-street, I had a single horse; I got there nearly upon five o'clock, as near as I can guess, the porters told me where to put the postchaise to keep it dry, and then I went to the lower accompting-house to book it; then I took my horse off and unstrapped the platform, the post-chaise was for Lord Kirkwall, and the platform for Sir Thomas Broughton; when I had unstrapped them, one of the men took the platform and cover, and set it down by the place where it was to be booked, and when I came to book the chaise, I could neither find the platform and cover, nor the man that took them; I cannot say whether the prisoner is the same man or not; I ran about the streets a good deal, but could not see any thing of him; I saw the platform again the next day, and knew it again immediately.

JOSEPH DODDS sworn. - On Tuesday the 9th of this month, I was passing along, and observed a man run out of the Castle and Falcon yard with a parcel upon his shoulder, he was going with a degree of violence that excited my suspicion; I followed him up St. Ann's-lane, through Maiden-lane, and Lad-lane, and when he came to St. Lawtences's Church, there was resting-place for porters, he there stopped for the space of half a minute; he then went forward through Throg morton-street into Bartholomew-lane, he stopped by the side of the Bank, took a knife out of his pocket, and cut off the direction; he then proceeded up Cornhill, and Leadenhall-street, down Billiter-lane, across Fenchurch-street, into Church-passage, where the India warehouses are; when he got there, he threw away the direction, which I picked up, that circumstance confirmed my suspicions; I followed him into Seething-lane, I mentioned my suspicions to one of the porters of the India-house, requesting that he would go with me; we followed him to the steps leading from Tower-street to Tower-hill, he there pitched the parcel down upon the steps; the man who was with me accosted him - you seem to have got a heavy load, my friend; - no, not very heavy, was his reply; - have you got far to carry it; - not very far. I then asked him where he had brought it from; he said from Billingsgate, from on board a Gravesend-boat; I told him, I apprehended he had made a mistake, he had not been to Billingsgate lately, and I must beg leave to send for a constable, which I did, (produces the direction); I had never lost fight of the prisoner; his face came almost in contact with mine at first coming out of the gateway; I am sure he is the man.

Q. Are you a private gentleman? - A. I am a goldsmith.(The property was produced by Richard Harding , a constable, and identified by White.)

Prisoner's defence. I am a porter at Billingsgate: I took a box, and a hammock, to the White Bear in Basinghall-street, and coming back, a gentleman's servant employed me to carry this platform to the Dundee-arms, to go on board one of the Margate boys; he went into a shop in Tower-street, and told me to wait at the top of the steps, and this gentleman stopped me. GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-46

219. JOHN GLOVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , two sheets, value 4s. two blankets, value 4s. 6d. and two flat-irons, value 2s. the property of James Vint , in a lodging-room .

JAMES VINT sworn. - I keep a lodging-house , No. 91, Grub-street : On Tuesday the 5th of January, I let a lodging to the prisoner, at half-a-crown a week; the articles mentioned in the indictment were let to him with the lodging; when he had had the lodging five weeks and two days, I found that he cohabited with a bad woman; I got admission into the room, and missed the property; he said, the woman had pawned them, but meant to redeem them; he delivered me the duplicates of the sheets and blankets, they were pawned in the name of Smith; I sent for an officer, gave charge of him, and took him before the Alderman at Guildhall.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you I would pay you as soon as I got into work? - A. Yes.

SUSANNAH VINT sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I was not present when the lodging was let to the prisoner, but I delivered him the sheets, the other things were in the room; I can swear to the property; that is all I know.

THOMAS-HENRY TIBBET sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Needham, a pawnbroker, in Whitecross-street: I don't know the prisoner; I took in a blanket, on the 26th of January, from a woman, I gave her a duplicate.

ANN NEEDHAM sworn. - My husband is a pawnbroker, in Whitecross-street: The prisoner never pawned any thing with me; I received two sheets, and a blanket, from a woman, one on the 7th, one on the 8th, and one on the 19th of January, in the names of Martha Smith and Sarah Smith .( William Field , a constable, produced the duplicates, which were proved by the pawnbrokers to be the same that had been delivered upon the receipt of the articles.)(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not intend to steal the things.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-47

220. THOMAS SPENCER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , thirty-six pounds weight of mutton, value 1l. the property of James Boot .

JAMES BOOT sworn. - I am a carcass-butcher , No. 44, Aldgate High-street: I can only swear to the property.

EDWARD FRENCH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Boot: On Friday the 29th of January, in the morning, I went to call one of my fellow-servants, and as I was coming back, I saw the prisoner coming from our house with the meat upon his shoulder; I stopped him, and asked him where he was going with it; he said, he was going to take it to Mr. Squires's, that is a carcass-butcher at the top of the street; I took it from him, told him it was my master's property, and I would swear to it; I kept him till my fellow-servant came up, and then we took him to the watch-house; the meat consisted of the two hind quarters of a sheep, the two fore quarters had been sold to the Jews; I knew it by a score that we make when we dress it; I went home immediately and missed it.

Q. Suppose you had seen it at York, would you have sworn to it? - A. No; but I saw the prisoner come from our shop with it.

Boot. We mark all the quarters differently; I kill a great many sheep for graziers, and we are obliged to mark them differently that we may know them one from another.

Q. If you had seen it at York, could you have sworn to it? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. When they are cut for the Jews, they only mark the sides, and, I believe, there are people in Court, that can testify they never saw a pair of hind quarters marked.

GUILTY , aged 30. - confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-48

221. SUSANNAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , a sheet, value 7s. and a blanket, value 4s. the property of Thomas Brereton .

SARAH BRERETON sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Brereton , who keeps a house in Rose and Crown-court, Shoe-lane : On Friday, the 22d of January, about six o'clock, I was called out into the court, and met them bringing the prisoner back, she was a stranger to me; the things were brought back by Catharina Rowley .

CATHARINA ROWLEY sworn. - I am a neighbour of Mrs. Brereton's; I had been out, and coming home, in consequence of what Mrs. Young told me, I took the prisoner by the shoulder, and took from her a blanket and sheet, which I gave to Mrs. Brereton; it was pinned round her waist under a great long red cloak; she d - d me for a b - h, and told me she had got none but her own property.

ELIZABETH YOUNG sworn. - I lodge in Mr. Brereron's house: On Friday, the 22d of January, I met the prisoner about half past five in the afternoon, in Shoe-lane, I was going home; she said she had been in sits, and asked me to be so kind as to give her a drop of water; I took her to the door, and she said she was so saint, she could not stand, and followed me up stairs, and said, nothing would bring her too, unless it was a raw pickled herring, or a cucumber; I told her I was a stranger, and did not know where they told them, and I gave her some porter that stood upon the table; then she said nothing would do but cold water; I told her I had none in the house, I would go down in the kitchen, and get her some; when I had got down stairs, I perceived her running out at the street-door; I had some mistrust, and I ran out after her, and stopped her, then she d - d me, called me a b - h, and said, if I did not leave her alone, she would murder me; then I called out for assistance, and Catharina Rowley came up, and took the sheet and blanket from her.

Mrs. Brereton. These are my property; they were in Elizabeth Young's room; it is a readyfurnished room.

Young. I turned up the bed with these things upon it, while she was in the room.

Prisoner's defence. I had been after a place; I was taken violently ill, and this woman pressed me

very hard to go home with her, which I accordingly did; I asked her if she would have any thing to drink; she said she did not care if she did; I gave her a shilling, and she fetched a pot of porter; I was there three quarters of an hour, and she pressed me to come and see her the next Sunday; I asked her to see me part of my way home, and when we had got down the stairs, she said she must go back again, and she came out again with something in her hand; I did not see what it was; and when she had got into the court, she fell a screaming, and said, I had robbed her.

Q. (To Young.) Did she give you a shilling? - A. No.

Q. That you say, upon your oath? - A. Yes; and she had no porter, except some that my husband had left at dinner.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-49

222. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a wrap per, value 1s. and thirty-four yards and three quarters of woollen cloth, value 30l. the property of Benjamin Groberty , in his dwelling house .

BENJAMIN GROBERTY sworn. - I am book keeper at the Swan Inn-yard, Holborn Bridge ; this property was taken from the warehouse under the dwelling-house; I live over the warehouse.

Q. Is that warehouse and the dwelling-house one building? - A. Yes: On Tuesday last, the 16th of this month, I went into the warehouse about a quarter past eight o'clock in the morning; I went backwards into the dwelling-house, and then I came back into the yard again, and saw the prisoner in the yard with a porter standing by him, the porter's name is John Eyles; the truss of woollen cloth was lying down between them with a direction on the outside; I asked what was the matter; William Brown, my servant, said, in the hearing of the prisoner, that the prisoner had stole that truss; he did not say any thing to that; I had the prisoner detained, and have kept the truss ever since.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I am assistant to Mr. Groberty: On Tuesday morning last, about a quarter past eight in the morning, I saw the prisoner take a truss from the pile, and drag it to the threshold of the door; I was in the accompting-house, which is in the warehouse; I asked him what he was going to do with it.

Q. How far did he drag it? - A. About three yards. He made me no answer, but immediately slung the truss upon his shoulder; I ran out after him, and told him to stop, but he would not stop till I got up to him, and asked him what he was going to do with the truss; I overtook him in the yard; he said he thought it was his; I then called for assistance, and John Eyles came up, and laid hold of him; I brought the truss back into the warehouse again, it was to have been sent to Bradford; it was directed to Jones, Hart, Jones, and Company, near Bradford, Wilts.

Q. Had it been booked? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you received the money for the booking? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got the book here? - A. No.

JOHN EYLES sworn. - I am a porter; I was going down the yard, and saw the prisoner come out of the warehouse with a truss upon his shoulder; William Brown said, stop, where are you going with that truss; he said so three or four times; the prisoner seemed to be deaf, and could not hear; Brown said he had stole it out of the warehouse; I then collared him, and said, you shall not go any further with that truss; I stopped him, and sent for a constable.

Q. (To Groberty.) Were you answerable for this property? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are perfectly sure of? - A. Yes; I received the booking for it; it was to go by the waggon to Bradford.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. Thirty pounds, and upwards.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-50

223. MARY LUCAS was indicted for the wilful murder of her male bastard-child .

The surgeon not being able to prove that the child was born above, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020217-51

224. JAMES MACKENOUGH was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon Thomas Prudence , on the 10th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a great coat, value 7s. and six shillings in silver , the property of the said Thomas.

THOMAS PRUDENCE sworn. - I live at Palmer's Green, near the hand posts: On the 10th of January, a niece came to see me, with Joseph Johnson, who is my nephew; about half past eleven o'clock at night, as nigh as I could guess, I had been to take Johnson's two sisters home to London, and when we got into the Green-lane, as you go from Ball's-Pond turnpike, on the other side of the Jolly Butchers, near the Five Elms , Joseph Johnson was leading the horse, it was a blind horse, and I was running behind the cart, with my right-hand on the tail-board; I holloaed out to my kinsman, can't you see, for I found the horse was turned out of the road, and immediately a man came up to me with a pistol in his hand.

Q. What sort of a night was it? - A. The

moon had been down about twenty minutes or more; a man came up to me with a pistol in his hand, and said, stop and deliver your money, or I will blow your brains out; I then saw three other men; I made answer to him, are you going to spill the blood of a man that never hurt you in his life? I told him I earned but nine shillings a week, and hardly that, how could he think of robbing such poor people as us; he then told us to go along; then I saw one of the men in the cart; there was nothing in the cart but two old chairs, an old sack, and a nose-bag, that I had to give my horse some corn; then I saw my kinsman knocked down, and a short man in a smock-frock came from the off side with a pistol in his hand, and ran it into my eye; I could not see for some time; I rubbed my eye, and he then shoved the pistol into my throat; I still kept following him up, and then there came another behind me with a pistol and a stick, and he kept paying me as hard as he could upon my head with the stick and pistol; he cut my head on both sides; I tacked about to the man behind me, and the other man with the pistol came up and payed me over the head and back with his pistol again; that was the short man; I begged for mercy, but I had none, and so it was of no use to ask for it; they gave me a number of blows after I begged for mercy, and then they took my great coat from me; the blood was pouring down from my head in streams.

Q. Was it the great coat you wore? - A. Yes; the collar was all over blood, and my shirt was as if it was dipped in a blood-tub, all about the neck and shoulders; I lost six shillings, but I don't think they took it out of my pocket; I might have lost it in the skirmish; I cannot swear to either of the men; I think I could have sworn to the short man in the smock-frock.

JOSEPH JOHNSON sworn. - I am the nephew of the last witness; on the 10th of January, I had two sisters come from town, and a brother-in-law, and another acquaintance, to see me; my uncle said, if you will stop a little later at night, I will borrow a horse and cart; we came to town, and going back as far as Kingstand, we stopped and had something to drink; then we came on to the Jolly Butcher's-hill, I walked, and my uncle said he was very cold, and would walk up the hill too; I was whipping the horse along, and my uncle was behind, with his hand upon the tail-board, and going by Ball's-pond, a man came up in a smock-frock, and said, d - n your eyes, stop, I said, stop, for what, and before I could well say a word, I had a blow on the side of my head; they very much beat my uncle, and took his great-coat from him; it was a great-coat with brass metal buttons.

Q. Could you distinguish the persons of any of them? - A. There were five of them altogether, two in smock-frocks, and three in long coats; when they bid us go away, there were only four, but neither of those four had our clothes, but from what I saw of them, by the light, I have no doubt the prisoner was one of the party.

Q. It was a dark night? - A. The moon had been gone down about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, and the stars were all gone in; it was quite cloudy, but the snow on the ground gave rather a light.

Q. Repeat what you said about the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have no doubt at all he is one of the company that stopped us; I cannot right down swear, but I can swear to the best of my knowledge, that he is the man.

Mr. Alley. Q. It was a full month after the robbery before the prisoner was apprehended? - A. A month and two days.

ANDREW CAMFIELD sworn. - I am a blacksmith, at Winchmore-hill, Edmonton; on the 8th or 9th of January, the prisoner and two or three more came to me, and asked me if I had an old musket, or pistol, or any thing of that sort to sell, I told them I had not, if I had, I should not have sold it them.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes.

THOMAS MAYHEW sworn. - I am one of the patrol belonging to Bow-street: Last Tuesday week, the 9th of this month, I went with four men to Palmer's-green; I told them to go into the Fox public-house, and call for a pot of beer, whilst I went to the house of Johnson; while I was there, a man came and said the Irishmen were all run out of the public-house; I went out at the door, and saw the prisoner at the bar going pretty fast away from the house down the lane towards Edmonton; he was neither walking not running, but between both, shuffling along; I ran after him, took him by the collar, and brought him back to Johnson's; I then took him to the office.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I went into the Fox public-house at Palmer's-green, with three more of my comrades; the prisoner was there, and four or five more Irishmen; they seemed very much confused when we went in; they were in the taproom sitting on the table singing; the prisoner was smoaking a short pipe; I said to my comrades, let us go into the parlour, and then I called for a pot of beer, and in about ten minutes after Mr. Mayhew brought the prisoner into the parlour to us; Johnson came in, and said, that was one of the party, to the best of his knowledge.

Q. You did not see them leave the house? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I have witnesses here to prove that I was in the house all night.

For the Prisoner.

PATRICK NOWLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. In what way of life are you? - A.

A day-labouring man, and keep a little house at Totelham; the prisoner is a day-labouring man, and lodged with me, from eight days before Christmas till ten days before he was taken up, Mary Murray lived with us to help to take care of my children in a fever.

Q. Do you recollect, in the month of January last, any funeral of an Irishman taking place? - A. Yes, on the 10th of January, just about sun-set; I was at the funeral, but the prisoner had a very bad cold, and could not come out.

Q. Did you remain at home the remainder of the evening? - A. I did.

Q. Where were your coals kept? - A. In a little back place where the prisoner slept; I saw him at home when I returned from the funeral, and he was at home all the evening, barring the time he went out to water, and came back again; my wife was in and out of his room all night for coals; I did not go to bed all night, my children were so ill.

Court. Q. What was the latest time that evening that you saw the prisoner? - A. I saw him at six o'clock, and every hour from that time till he went to bed at nine o'clock.

Mary Nowland, the wife of the last witness, and Mary Murray, corroborated his testimony.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-52

225. JAMES PARSEY and JOSEPH GILL were indicted, the first for that he, on the 15th of January , being in the dwelling-house of Thomas Bish , without breaking the same, feloniously did enter, and a silver tea-pot, value 8l. a silver teapot stand, value 2l. three silver waiters, value 4l. two silver butter boats, value 30s. thirty-three silver spoons, value 14l. a silver fish slice, value 20s. a silver wine strainer, value 10s. a silver milk-pot, value 10s. and two silver salt sellers, value 1l. the property of the said Thomas Bish, and a great coat, value 20s. the property of John Yorrick Brookes , in the said dwelling-house feloniously did steal, take, and carry away; and that he afterwards, about the hour of four in the night, feloniously and burglariously did break to get out of the same ; and the other for that he, well knowing the said James Parsey to have committed the said felony and burglary, feloniously did receive, harbour, and maintain the said James .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS BISH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a lottery-office keeper , at No. 4, Cornhill ? - A. Yes; and there are two back doors in Lombard-street, No. 88. and 89: On Tuesday, the 5th of January, I went out to dinner in Grosvenor-place with my wife and family; we returned about three o'clock in the morning; we went into the drawing-room, and saw the sideboard in the dining room, with the different articles of plate that were in daily use upon it; we went to bed about a quarter or half past three; I got up about half past eight; I found that the house had been broke open; I went down to the driling-room, and missed all the plate that usually stood upon the side-board, excepting a mustard pot; I missed a silver tea-pot, &c. (repeating the articles mentioned in the indictment.)

Q. Who is Mr. Brookes? - A. My nephew, living in my house; he came home with me in the coach with his great coat on; he hung his great coat upon a deg in the passage of the dining-room, and that was missing; I then made some enqulty among the servants; I went down stairs, and viewed the door of the house leading into Lombard-street; the house extends from Cornhill to Lombard-street; it was evident the lock had been taken off on the inside, because the heads of the bolts which fastened it on, were on the outside in the street, and screwed with nuts on the inside, and the bolt of the door shoots into the door-post, so that the door being double locked, it was impossible to get the door open without taking the lock off; I found the lock lying inside of the house, close to the door; there were appearances, as if something had been used to wrench the lock off; the door was bruised; the bottom hinge of the door that leads to the cellar, was wrenched off, and the bolt that fastened it, had a variety of seratches; apparently in endeavouring to put it back.

Q. Had there been any shavings in that cellar? - A. In the cellar of that house there were a great many shavings, because there had been men at work in the house; I then went to the Mansion-house; and got Mr. Canner, the under marshal, to come and view the place; Mr. Canner came with Cartwright and Read.

Q. When was the prisoner, Parsey, taken up? - A. Three or four days after; I had seen him in my house glazing and cleaning the windows; he was journeyman to the glazier that I employed, who lives in Queen-street, Cheapside, and has a shop in Grocer's-alley; the prisoner lived in Chimney Sweepers'-court, Wood-street.

JOHN HILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. A baker, No. 5, Newcourt, Great Bell-alley.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Parsey? - A. Yes; the first time I ever saw him was on the 8th of November last, at a house in Gloucester-court, Whitecross street; there were James Parsey, James Ricketts, Richard White, and two young women; the prisoner said he had been cleaning windows at Mr. Bish's, in Cornhill, that day, and he had got something out of the house that day to the amount of five or six shillings; he made use of many bad expressions, and said, he saw more things in the house, and he would be d - d if he would not have

some more before it was long: On Wednesday morning, the 6th of January, about eleven o'clock, I was going up Cornhill; there were some men sticking up bills, by which bills I saw that Mr. Bish's house had been robbed, and it struck me directly that Parsey was the man who had robbed the house; I then went in pursuit of Persey to different places, but did not find him till the Friday; I came up with Parsey, Gill, Raymond, and a person of the name of Holloway, in Barbican; I followed them along Barbican sometime; I heard them talking to each other; Parsey said he had hid two large silver table spoons, half a dozen small spoons, and four guineas, in the cellar of the house in which he lived, in Chimney Sweepers'-court; I followed them a little farther, and Gill wanted to know what I was following them for; he said he was sure I had no business to follow them; I then crossed over the way, and left them.

Q. Was Mr. Bish's name made use of in that conversation? - A. Parsey said he had been in a good thing in Cornill, at Mr. Bish's house, he had got all the plate out of the house that he saw; he said he was in the house from half past four o'clock in the afternoon, till three in the morning: On the Monday following, I was at a house in Golden-lane; I saw Raymond, Holloway, and Gill, they were angry with each other, that they had not had more of the money that Parsey sold the plate for; Holloway said, if he had known he was to have no more, sooner than he would have taken that, he would have cut his throat; Raymond said, they should have had more, if there had been no noise about the plate that was stolen, and then it was mentioned that Parsey had hid these things in the cellar; then I went to Mr. Bish's, and gave him information of what I had heard.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was an acquaintance of your's who kept the house where you first saw the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. How did you creep into the house? - A. I did not creep into it, I walked into it.

Q. Was the man who kept it, a stranger? - A. No.

Q. You say he was not an acquaintance? - A. There was no man kept the house.

Q. Who did keep it? - A. young woman.

Q. Were you acquainted with her? - A. No.

Q. What brought you to the house then? - A. I went to see another young woman who lodged in the house.

Q. Are you a married man, pray? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that lady an acquaintance of your wife's? - A. No.

Q. You did not know the prisoner before? - A. No; they all three came in together while I was there.

Q. Did you know White and Rickerts before? - A. No.

Q. How came you to recollect their names? - A. I have been in their company since.

Q. Do you know where they are now? - A. I do not.

Q. Did the prisoner come to visit either of those ladies? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. At the time you were in her company? - A. Yes.

Q. You heard him say something about what he had got at Mr. Bish's house? - A. Yes.

Q. You must have thought him a foot or a madman to tell such a story before a stranger? - A. I thought he was not very wise.

Q. Are those ladies here to-day? - A. No

Q. Then those two ladies who could support your evidence, if it was true, are not here? - A. They were not in the house at the time I heard these words.

Q. Do you mean to say these men entered into a conversation with you, a total staranger, and confessed to you the crimes they had committed? - A. Yes, I do; the first of the business was, they would loss me for some gin and some beer, but with all their tossing and gambling, they could not beat me out of any liquor; one of the women was sent out for gin, and the other for beer.

Q. Of course, the next morning you went befor the Lord-Mayor, and informed him of this confession? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You read the hand-bill? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see such a thing as a reward of fifty pounds? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. How long were you in company with the prisoner and these ladies? - A. From nine till after twelve.

Q. When you saw them again on the Friday, what distance did you keep from them? - A. About as far as I am from you.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. Twelve o'clock at night.

Q. Did you call any watchman to assist you in taking them into custody? - A. No, I did not.

Q. How far had you followed them when they suspected, you, and you crossed over the way? - A. I followed them from Golden-lane to within a few yards of Smithfield, I suppose, a quarter of a mile or more.

Q. YOu had been three hours in their company before, and yet you would have us understand they, did not know you? - A. They did not; Gill was not here when I saw them in the house.

Q. Parsey was in your company three hours, and yet he did not know you on this night? - A. He did not say he did, and perhaps he did not know me.

Q. Did you go before the Lord-Mayor the next

day? - A. No, I did not; I gave information to Mr. Bish.

Q. What time did you meet them on the Monday? - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Bad hours - are you often out late at night? - A. When other people go to bed, it is my business to go to work.

Q. I believe it is? - A. It was my business to go from my own house to my master's house.

Q. Where did your master live? - A. I was out of place at that time.

JOHN FITCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Parsey? - A. I have known him about seven or eight months.

Q. Has he any other name? - A. He has a bye-name; they call him Putty; he is a glazier.

Q. Where did you live on the 6th of January? - A. At that time I kept the Black Horse, in Aldersgate-street; the prisoner frequented my house: On the 6th of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, he came to my house, and brought a wrapper under his arm; I said to him, Parsey, for God's sake, what have you got there? Parsey said, what I have got I deserve; I said, in the name of fortune, what is that; he said, it is plate; I said, for God's sake, where did you get it? Parsey replied, no person knows, nor ever shall know; I said to him, are they all spoons? he said, no, I have a salt; he shewed me the salt; it was an old-fashioned one, with three feet to it; to the best of my knowledge there was T.B. upon the feet; he told me he had got into the house about four o'clock in the afternoon; I never saw any other plate but the falt; he said, he had got in at the back door in Lombard-street, and from there he proceeded to a lower apartment, and got under some shavings; during the time he was there, the maid came into the place, and said, I have got some wood somewhere here, but I cannot find it; some man that was there, replied, perhaps it is among the shavings; and the maid said, I am sure it is not there; hesaid, he then concealed himself there till about half past three the next morning; that he then pulled a hinge off the door, by doing which it gave him liberty to go where the property was; that when he got to the plate, he thought he must have left it behind him, by reason he had so much trouble to get the lock off the door; he said, the door was double-locked, and he was obligated to take it off; he said, with a deal of difficulty he did do it, and got safe away with the plate; after he had been at my house some time, the prisoner Gill came in; they consulted together a little while, and then they went away with the property, under Parsey's arm; when they had been gone about an hour and a half, they returned without the property; then they had some sheep's hearts; they stopped about an hour, and then went out again together; I went out, and returned between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and, to my surprise, there were people fighting in the house.

Q. Who were they? - A. Parsey and Gill; I said to them, for God's sake, what is all this noise about? if you are not quiet, and disperse the house, I will send for an officer to take you all up; then Gill said, Parsey owes me a guinea; I said to Parsey, if you owe the man a guinea, give it him; upon that parsey went into my parlour, and pulled out of his pocket ten guineas and four half-guineas; then he put a guineas into my hand to give to Gill, which I did; then he took the remainder of the money, put it in his pocket, and left my house; Gill went away before him; Parsey said, he would give the rest of his money to John Horsley, the only friend he had; Horsley lives next door to my house; Horsley was not there at that time; I was sent for before the Lord-Mayor, and told him what I knew.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not go before the Lord-Mayor till you were sent for? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Don't you think it would have been the duty of an honest man to have gone to the Lord-Mayor, and told him what you had heard? - A. It might have been.

Q. Would it not? - A. I hope I am an honest man.

Q. Don't you think, as an honest man, it was your duty to have gone to the Lord-Mayor, without waiting to have been sent for? - A. The reason I did not go was, I did not understand it, I had not been long in London; I came from Essex.

Q. Is it not a crime to steal in Essex? - A. Yes.

Q. You know there is a reward of fifty pounds- you have seen the hand-bills? - A. I don't look forward for that.

Q. I did not ask you that - I ask you if you have seen it? - A. Yes, I have seen it.

Q. Were you a bosom-friend, to whom he communicated this secret? - A. No, he was only a customer.

Q. And yet you would have us understand he told you this story about the plate? - A. Yes, by reason of my asking him what he had got there.

Q. Do you know where he lives? - A. No.

Q. He told you he left the house at half past three in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. And thought four hours had elapsed from the time of the robbery till he came to your house, he came with the things in his hand, when he might have taken them home or elsewhere, if he had pleased? - A. He might.

Q. This man had the nick-name of Putty? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you never know a glazier nick-named Putty before? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before you heard of Mr. Bish's robbery? - A. The next day.

Q. And be told you the back door of the house he had been at was in Lombard-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not know that the back part of Mr. Bish's house came into Lombard-street? - A. No, I did not know what part of London it was.

Q. Not know where Lombard-street is? - A. I had never been in that part of the town; if I had, I did not know it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long have you been in London? - A. Eight months.

Q. And though you knew of the reward, you did not go to claim any part of it till you were sent for? - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did not you know the Post Office was in Lombard-street? - A. No.

LUCY FITCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes, both of them: On the 6th of January, I saw them both at our house, about eight o'clock in the morning; I did not hear any conversation between them; after they had been in some time, they went away together; I did not see them come in, nor I did not see any thing they had; they came in again in the forenoon, stopped a little while, and then went out again; in the afternoon they came in again, when my husband was not at home; they went out backwards to speak to each other; and, after they had spoke to each other, they began to fight, and I was very much frightened; I desired one or two persons that I knew, to prevent their fighting, as I was alone, and in a few minutes my husband came in; I thought they were picking a pocket, and I called to my husband to go and part them, and so he did, and they went out almost directly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. That was a queer suspicion - you don't have pockets picked, I hope? - A. I should be very sorry if I had.

Q. If they had a bundle, I take it you must have seen it? - A. I did not see it.

THOMAS ARMFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner, Gill? - A. Yes: On Wednesday, the 6th of January, in the evening, I was at the Black Horse, in Aldersgate-street; Gill asked me to pawn a great coat for him; he said, it had been given to him, and it was too little; I pawned it for four shillings in Aldersgate-street, and he gave me the duplicate for my trouble; after that I wore the coat near three weeks, and then gave it to a woman, of the name of Daly, to pawn it for me for four shillings; I should know it again by a particular mark in the right skirt.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What was the coat worth? - A. It might be worth half-a-guinea.

Q. And this gentleman was generous enough to give you a ticket worth six shillings and six-pence? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not think fit to pawn the coat yourself, though you did for your friend? - A. I thought as I had worn it, Mrs. Daly might get as much for it as I did before.

Q. You did not think if you pawned it your self, it might be the more easily traced to you? - A. No, if I had thought the coat had been stolen, I should not have worn it three weeks publicly in the street.

Q. Where have you lived lately? - A. I have lodged at my father's.

Q. Are you in any way of living - an honest one, I mean? - A. Ever since this affair happened, I have been with the officers at Hatton-garden.

Q. In their custody? - A. No.

Q. Under their pupilage and instruction? - A. No, no instruction.

Q. Would they have let you go away from them? - A. I might have run away from them if I had liked, for I have gone home to my father's every night this week.

Q. Have you ever been in custody yourself? - A. Yes, nine or ten years ago, for playing with some girls in Leicester-fields.

Q. That was in Tothill-fields bridewell? - A. Yes, I was sent there for a day, and no longer.

Q. You have been a sword-cutler, and worked for Mr. Allen? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect ever being charged by Mr. Allen with any felony? - A. I never was charged by him; he charged another man with it.

Q. Did he not charge you with stealing a saucepan? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did you not hear him charge you with it, in your presence, to-day? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Have you ever been to sea? - A. Yes.

Q. What sent you to sea? - A. Like many other foolish chaps, I was fond of going to sea.

Q. Did you not go upon condition of Mr. Allen letting you off? - A. No.

Q. Did you not hear him say so to-day? - A. I did not.

Q. How came you to leave him? - A. About my wages.

Q. Was it not because you had taken a pocket handkerchief from his wife? - A. No.

Q. Did you not hear Mr. Allen say so to-day? - A. No, I did not; I was at the other end of the Court.

Q. Were you never charged with melting his good gold, and putting base alloy into it? - A. No, he has told other people so.

Q. Has he never charged you with stealing any combs? - A. No, not in my hearing.

Q. Have you never been here as a witness, having turned King's evidence? - A. Yes, I was to-day

Q. You know you broke open the box, and stole the contents? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was it you robbed the boy of the box? - A. In Holborn.

JAMES COURTNEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. Shopman to Mr. George Lane, a pawnbroker; a woman, of the name of Charlotte Daly , pledged a great coat with me on the 26th of January, for four shillings; the officers of Hatton-garden came and took it out.

(Edward Cartwright produced the lock of Mr. Bish's door, which he deposed to have found upon the workmen's bench, close to the door, and that it fitted exactly.)

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer of Hatton-garden? - A. I am: I apprehended Gill at the Crown, in Weston's-park, Lincoln's-Inn-fields; he made his escape, and we took him again, and brought him to the office; I found this great coat at Mr. Lane's, the pawnbroker's, in Holborn. (Produces it.)

Courtney. This is the same great coat that Charlotte Daly pledged with me.

Armfield. This is the same great coat.

Mr. Bish. I know this great coat to be my nephew's; his name is in the sleeve.

Q. Had you a falt with three legs, and your initial? - A. Two of the salts that were stolen were of that description; I had often seen the great coat, but did not observe the name in the sleeve before the robbery.

Q. What is the value of the salts? - A. About a guinea.

NICHOLAS COOPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. A bricklayer: I went to Mr. Bish's house on the 6th of January, a little after seven in the morning, it was then getting towards light; the door was not quite close; I put my hand against it, and went in; I then saw my iron crow, which my people had been at work with the day before, standing close to the left side of the door post; I looked behind the door, and found the lock off; I picked it up, and put it on the cupboard; by the window, where the crow stood.

Court. Q. At the time you went into the house, was there light enough to see a man's face? - A. Yes, there was.

THOMAS JOHNSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. A carpenter: I went to Mr. Bish's house about half past six o'clock in the morning on the 6th of January; it was then light enough to see a man's face if he had been close to me; I did not observe any thing respecting the door till half past seven; I found the lock off when I went down, to let the bricklayers in; I then went down, and saw the cellar door, which appeared to have been forced by some iron instrument.

Court. Q. (To Fitch.) What time did the prisoner come to your house? - A. About seven o'clock.

Q. Was it light then? - A. I had a candle.

Q. Could you see the features of a man without? - A. I think I could.

Parsey's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

The prisoner, Gill, was not put upon his defence.

Mr. Brookes. This is my great coat, it was in Mr. Bish's house the night of the robbery.

Parsey, GUILTY , Death .

Gill, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-53

226. JANE GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , three blankets, value 6s. one bolster, value 2s. two sheets, value 2s. a rug, value 1s. a pair of bellows, value 2s. a flat iron, value 9d. a tin kettle, value 6d. and a tin boiler, value 6d. the property of William Bradley , in a lodging-room , let by him to the said Jane Green.

WILLIAM BRADLEY sworn. - I live in Old-street-road , and keep a house there; the prisoner took a lodging of me the 16th of last month, ready furnished; she took possession, and left it the same day; the articles stated in the indictment were there; the next day I found some of them at Mr. Sherwood's, in Smith's-buildings, Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street; and some I found at a pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM SHERWOOD sworn. - I have known the prisoner some time; she came in the afternoon of Saturday, the 16th of January, and asked me if she might leave some things at my house; I consented, and in the evening, after dark, she brought a bolster, two blankets, and a sheet; on the Wednesday following, the prosecutor came, and I shewed them to him. (The articles produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

RICHARD LILLYWHITE sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, and found the things produced at Sherwood's.

Prisoner's defence. I did not mean to wrong these people, I had lived with them five months before, and he never found me dishonest; the week was not up till the Wednesday.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Privately whipped , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-54

227. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , a cheese, value 16s. the property of Hugh Jones .

EDWARD HOLCROFT sworn. - I live at No. 69, Chiswell-street : On the 13th of February, we lost a cheese; the prisoner ran up Bunhill-row, and I pursued him into Checquer-ailey, and took him; he threw the cheese down, which I picked up; the cheese had been in the window; I knew it by the dairy; we had many like it.

(The cheese produced, and identified.)

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - I pursued the prisoner with the last witness; he threw the cheese down, and tried to make his escape; I know the cheese, because I weighed the dairy; he begged me to let him go.

Prisoner's defence. I was going up Bunhill-row, I met a man with the cheese, who asked me to carry it to Blue-Anchor-alley, and gave me two-pence; I was going along, and these gentlemen took me. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-55

228. RICHARD MEREDEW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , a sheet, value 4s. a shift, value 4s. an apron, value 1s. and a pair of cuffs, value 6d. the property of Frances Wright .

FRANCES WRIGHT sworn. - I lost the things out of my room; I saw the prisoner take them out of my drawer, about nine o'clock at night, on the 5th of February; I was stooping down at the fire, I turned about, and saw him, but was very frightened, so that I could not stir or speak; when he was gone, I recovered myself, and called out thieves; I cannot swear to him.

CHARLOTTE ATKINS sworn. - I live in the house, and heard Wright call out thieves; upon which I run to the passage door, and saw the prisoner with the things in his arms; I caught him by the collar, and held him till assistance came.

JOHN DAY sworn. - (Produces the things.) I was constable; the prisoner and the things were brought to the watch-house, and I took charge of him.

Prisoner's defence. I was going through the passage, and heard the cry of thieves; I fell over the bundle in the passage; when I was stopped, I had not the things in my hands, as is sworn to; the prosecutrix said before the Justice, she thought it was the cat pulling the things out of the drawer, and she did not see any body.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18020217-56

229. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , fourteen pieces of linen cloth, value 20l. the property of Thomas Caw and James Steel , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Caw .

THOMAS CAW sworn. - My house is in Queen-street, Cheapside, and my partner's name is James Steel; we lost fourteen pieces of linen, which I can identify.

JOHN COX sworn. - I am warehouse porter to Messrs. Caw and Steel: On Friday, the 12th of February, I was at work in an under warehouse, at No. 78, Queen-street, Cheapside ; hearing a foot-step over my head; I went to a part of the warehouse where I could see out into our yard; I saw the prisoner run down with a bag on his back; I run after him, and asked him what he had in his bag, he said, what was that to me; I laid hold of him, and then he let go the bag; a person came up, and we took the prisoner and the bag to my master's house, and examined it, and found it contained fourteen pieces of linen cloth, which lay on the counter, in our warehouse, when I went down stairs; I can swear to them, because I marked them myself.

JAMES HALL sworn. - I am one of the City Marshal-men, and took the prisoner into custody about ten o'clock on Friday.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, I beg for mercy of your Lordship and the Court.

GUILTY , Death , aged 66.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-57

230. MARY WARD and MARY MOORE were indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, on the 15th of February , upon Robert Staggels , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a purse, value 1d. a seven-shilling-piece, a piece of foreign silver coin, value 2s. 3d. and a sixpence , the property of the said Robert.

ROBERT STAGGELS sworn. - I am a postchaise driver , and a married man : On the 15th of February, I was sober, and going along Newgate-street , about a quarter before eleven at night, with a bundle under my arm, the two prisoners took hold of me, and wanted me to go with them; I am sure they are the women; I found Mary Ward endeavouring to take my purse out of my right-hand breeches-pocket, and I said, don't go to do me in this kind of way; then Moore kept hold of me, and Ward went into Horseshoe-passage; I felt the purse go out of my pocket; I went into the passage and halloaed after her, upon which a gentleman came out with a candle, and then the purse was dropped; it contained a seven-shilling-piece, a French half-crown, and a sixpence, all of which I had seen in the Borough not long before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are sure you felt the purse go from you? - A. Yes, I had no power to help myself.

Q. You had not been drinking? - A. I had had a little beer; I had been at home all day, except going to the Borough to pay my club, and returned to the Old-Jewry, where I had a little beer, and something to eat, but nothing else.

Q. Had you any conversation with these women? - A. No, I had never seen them before to my knowledge.

Q. It was dark, was it not? - A. It was moonlight.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. I will not swear it.

Q. If it had been moon-light, you were so sober you must have observed it? - A. I did not mind about the moon.

Q. I think it must be pretty dark? - A. Neither light nor dark.

Q. Do you know that you have indicted these women for a highway-robbery? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been a post-boy? - A. Eight or nine years.

Q. Have you not heard of forty pounds reward upon each, if you convict them? - A. I did not think any thing about that; I have heard of it, but did not think about it.

Q. You say, you lost a seven-shilling-piece, a French half-crown, a sixpence, and your purse? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear you lost it? - A. I have not got it.

Q. Don't you know it is to be produced? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Ward run up the court, was she stopped at the time? - A. Yes; the watchman met her.

Q. Where was the other woman? - A. She kept hold of me.

JOHN PLUSH sworn. - I keep an oyster warehouse in Horsethoe-passage, Newgate-street; I heard the prosecutor hallon out, and say, she was robbed of his purse; I took a candle and run out; then I saw the two women and he together; I called the watchman down, and told him to take hold of one, and I would lay hold of the other; I went to take hold of Ward's hand, and the purse fell out of her right-hand; I picked it up, and they were taken to the watch-house; the prosecutor said, there was a seven-shilling-piece, a French half-crown, and sixpence in it, which I found when I opened it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. These were women of the town? - A. Certainly.

Q. What had passed between them and that man, you don't know? - A. No.

Q. Or whether any money had been given to them? - A. No.

Q. Was the prisoner agitated when you first saw him? - A. Yes, he seemed to be so.

Q. Did he appear to be in liquor? - A. No, but in a slurry.

HENRY BERRY sworn. - I am a watchman; last Monday night, about a quarter before eleven, I went down Horseshoe-passage, and found the prosecutor, the two prisoners, and Mr. Plush together; he said, there is the watchman, and bid me take them to the watch-house, and be careful they did not drop any thing; I took Moore, who went very quietly; he was going to take Ward, and I saw, at her feet, the prosecutor's purse.

JAMES PEDDER sworn. - I am a constable; the charge was brought against these two girls for picking a pocket of a seven-shilling-piece, a French half-crown, and a sixpence; Plush gave me the purse. (Produces it.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The charge was made for picking a pocket? - A. It was against his inclination.

Q. That he said, did he? - A. He told me so.

Q. Did you not say it was for picking his pocket? - A. I did say so.

Court. Q. (To Staggels.) Has your money got any mark on it? - A. The half-crown has a notch on it, and I am sure this is my book.

Ward's defence. I leave my case to my Counsel.

Moore's defence. I know nothing about it, I am innocent.

Mary Ward , GUILTY, aged 25.

Mary Moore , GUILTY, aged 35.

Guilty of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-58

231. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September, 1799 , a pair of breeches, value 18s. two shirts, value 12s. and two pair of stockings, value 4s. the property of Alexander Cameron , and a great-coat, value 9s. 6d. the property of James M'Laren , in the dwelling-house of the said James .

There being no evidence to effect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-59

232. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , five petticoats, value 5s. a waistcoat, value 1s. and a pair of drawers, value 1s. the property of Butler-William Mountain ; and one petticoat, value 1s. the property of Elizabeth Charlesworth .

BUTLER-WILLIAM MOUNTAIN sworn. - I live at the Saracen's-head, Snow-hill , and have apartments in the yard: On Thursday evening, the 28th of January, some stannel wearing-apparel was taken from me, which was hanging up to dry in the gallery; advertisements from the Public-office, mentioned a person being stopped with such articles; I applied there and saw my waistcoat and drawers.

ELIZABETH CHARLESWORTH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Mountain; I saw the things in the gallery a quarter before nine in the evening, of the 28th of January, and a quarter after nine I missed them; I know them to be my master's property.

JOHN HOBBS sworn. - I belong to the Police-office, at Westminster; on the 29th of January, in the morning, the prisoner was hawking clothes about to sell; I took her into custody, and asked

her where she got them; she said, she came from the Isle of Wight, and brought them with her.

Prisoner's defence. I came from the Isle of Wight, with three small children, and another woman, in the waggon; she had the care of both her bundle and mine; she left me, and was to meet me near the Abbey; I wanted victuals for my children, and went to sell what I thought was my own, but instead of leaving me my bundle, she left me her's, with these things in it.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-60

233. GEORGE KEMP and JOHN HARRIS were indicted for feloniously making an assault in a certain open place, called a field, near the King's highway, upon Charles Hurd , on the 13th of February , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a handkerchief, value 6d. a coat, value 1l. two pair of pantaloons, value 2l. a pair of breeches, value 1l. and a waistcoat, value 10s. the property of Richard Wild .

CHARLES HURD sworn. - I am errand-boy to Mr. Wild, who is a tailor , at No. 29, Charing-cross: On Saturday evening last, about a quarter past eleven, the 13th of February, I had been to George-street, Minories, and went up Houndsditch to go to Aldersgate-street, I saw these men standing at the corner of Bishopsgate Church-yard, and asked them if that took me to Aldersgate-street, they said, yes, I must go strait on; I went on to Bethlem-wall, they followed me, and said, if I went by the side of that wall, it would take me to Aldersgate-street; I went on, and they still followed me till I came to the middle of the wall; then Harris came before me, and asked me where I was going, I told him to Aldersgate-street; while Harris spoke to me, Kemp came up, and snatched the bundle away, which had the things in; they run away, and I run after them, calling, murder; I never lost sight of Kemp; he saw the watchman coming up the quarters of Moorfields, and threw the bundle over; the other was taken about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour after; I am sure they are the men, it was a moon-light night; when they were taken, I got over the rails and got the bundle.

Harris Q. Did I stop you? - A. Yes, you did.

Court. Q. Did he stop you? - A. Yes, he put his hand on my bundle.

Q. He did not desire you to stop? - A. No.

Q. Nor did he lay his hand on it, so as to stop you? - A. No, he only laid his hand on the bundle.

RICHARD WILD sworn. - I am a tailor, and sent Hurd with the things named in the indictment, which were left at the watch-house, and he came home with a note to me from the constable.

Q. (To Hurd.) Who came up first to you, when you cried out, murder? - A. The watchman.

WILLIAM JAMES sworn. - I am a watchman, and heard the cry of murder, about a quarter before twelve, near Bethlem-wall; I went out, and saw this boy, who said, two men had robbed him of his bundle and threw it over the rails; he got over after it, and gave it to me, the men were stopped by other people.

JAMES COHEN sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Coleman-street ward, and hearing the cry of stop thief, in Moorfields, I stopped Harris as he was running, at the corner of Coleman-street, and took him to the watch-house.(The property produced and identified by Hurd and the prosecutor.)

Kemp's defence. Coming from Bank-side, through Bishopsgate church-yard, I heard a terrible noise; I run till I lit of this man, (Harris) and asked him what it was, he said, somebody had robbed a boy of a bundle; a gentleman came up and took me while we were talking together; I know no more of it than the man in the moon.

Harris's defence. I was coming from Wappingnew-dock, and going along London-wall, I heard the cry of murder, and went to see what it was; I know no more of it than Adam.

Kemp called two witnesses to his character.

Kemp, Guilty, aged 18.

Harris, Guilty, aged 28.

Of stealing, but not violently .

Confined one month in Newgate , publicly whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-61

234. DANIEL M'ALENAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , a silver butter-boat, value 30s. and a table-spoon, value 16s. the property of Christopher Ibbetson , in his dwelling-house .

CHRISTOPHER IBBETSON sworn. - I live at the George and Blue-boar, Holborn : On Sunday the 29th of November, I was robbed, but did not see the prisoner; I have not seen the property since.

FRANCIS MOODY sworn. - I am waiter at the George and Blue-boar, and know the prisoner; he came out of the yard into the coffee-room, on the 29th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and ordered some smelts and flounders for dinner, which were got ready, the butter was taken to him in a silver butter-boat; he asked twice for a table-spoon, which raised a suspicion, as I thought he had no need of a spoon, having no gravy; however, I got him one, and staid by for some time, watching him; having occasion to go out, I left him eating his dinner, but watched the

passage to see that no one left the coffee-room; when I returned with what I went for, the prisoner was going out of the door into the street, and seemed much confused; a gentleman in the room, said, that man has run away with something; I missed the things, and pursued him into the street, but could not see him; I next saw him at the Police-Office.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect to have ever seen me before that evening? - A. Not that I recollect.

Q. Are you positive I am the person? - A. I am.

Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate that you were not? - A. No.

Q. Was there any person who went into the room from the time I ordered the dinner, as you say, till I went away? - A. No.

Q. You say you met me - did you miss the things before you met me? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any thing on me? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I am sorry to say, that the gentleman I was in company with on the 29th of November, from one o'clock to seven, is ill, and cannot come, or I could satisfy you I am not the person; he lives at No. 15, Prince's-street, Prince's-square, St. George's in the East.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-62

235. JANE MOIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a silk cloak, value 10s. a gown, value 10s. and a petticoat, value 10s. the property of Ann Butcher , spinster .

ANN BUTCHER sworn. - On the 23d of January, I lost a cloak, gown, and petticoat, from my room; the prisoner lodged in the same house; I missed them between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, and she was taken up with the cloak on her back; the petticoat and gown were pawned, and the tickets found in her pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What do you do for a living? - A. I go to service.

Q. How long have you been in town? - A. I came on the 9th of October.

Q. Have you been in service yet? - A. No, I have been nursing a woman.

Q. Do you never pledge your articles yourself? - A. No.

Q. Or desired any body else to do it? - A. No, I had no occasion.

ROBERT SIMPSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Bridges-street, Covent-garden, about five minutes walk from where the prosecutrix lives; I produce a gown and petticoat pledged by the prisoner, about six o'clock in the evening of the 23d of January, for half a guinea.

GLORGE SULLEN sworn. - I am a constable; the prisoner was brought to the watch house a little before twelve by the prosecutrix and watchmen; I searched her, and found his cloak on her back, and the duplicates of the gown and petticoat in her pocket; there was also a few halfpence; I asked her what she had done with the money; she said she had spent it.(The articles produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one month in Newgate , and privately whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-63

236. JOHN PATMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , two pecks of flour, value 6s. the property of John Surrey and James Surrey .

WILLIAM SWANSDON sworn. - I am a patrol of Clapton, and heard the watchman talking to the prisoner; he said to me, this man has got some flour; I asked him how he came by it; and he said his master allowed it him, and that foreman Frost had tied it up for him in the handkerchief.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am a constable; I asked the prisoner how he came by the flour; he said, it was given him by his master, and that the foreman had tied it up for him; I don't know where the mills are; I have kept the flour ever since. (Produces it.)

THOMAS THOROGOOD sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner at five o'clock in the morning, going along with the flour, which he said was his own, and had been tied up for him by foreman Frost.

THOMAS FROST sworn. - I am foreman to the prosecutors, and the prisoner worked in the mill; our hours are from nine to nine; he should have staid till nine next morning, but he had ground all his wheat out; the mill stopped about four o'clock in the morning; I sleep in the mill-house, and left the mill in his care; he locked the door, and took the key with him; there is sometimes an allowance made if a bargain is made for it, but I don't know whether there was any or not made to him; I had not given him any.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. This man had a good character? - A. Yes, very good.

Q. And did his business very well? - A. Yes, he suited our purpose very well indeed; I did not give him any flour, nor did I miss any.

JAMES SURREY sworn. - The mill belongs to my brother John and myself; I gave the prisoner eighteen shillings a week, and nothing else; we never do, except to the foreman, for his puddings; I had a very good opinion of the prisoner, and would have trusted him with the mill for a week together; I cannot swear to the flour.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 28.

Privately whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-64

237. HENRIETTA STOCKHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , six brass candlesticks, value 10s. the property of Mark Cherrell .

MARK CHERRELL sworn. - I keep the house called the Newcastle-upon-Tyne , in Broad-street, Carnaby-market : On the 5th of February, the company staid till three o'clock in the morning, and, when they were gone, I put the candlesticks on the shelf, locked the door, and went to-bed; the next evening, at six o'clock, they were missed; having a suspicion of the prisoner, who used to come to the house, I charged her with it, and sent for a constable, who took her to the pawnbroker's where they were produced.

JOHN MURRELL sworn. - I am servant to the prosecutor, and having been out with my porter, I was going home, and met the prisoner coming out of my master's house, very much in liquor, and with a quantity of things, but I did not see what they were; and, about half an hour afterwards, the candlesticks were missed.

HUNTER DEWER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Windmill-street, Golden-square, and know the prisoner very well, I took in four brass candlesticks on the 6th of February, which she brought to pledge, at nine o'clock at night. (Produces them.)

Prisoner's defence. They were brought to me by a person who lives in their house, and asked me to pledge them; I never was in the house, for I gave the person the money at the door.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and privately whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18020217-65

238. BARTHOLOMEW RICHIE , DANIEL RICHARDS , and GEORGE GREEN , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Blessed , about the hour of seven at night, on the 15th of February , and feloniously stealing eleven pockets, value 8s. and two shifts, value 7s. the property of the said Mary.

BARNARD GLEED sworn. - I am an officer of the Police: On Monday evening, about seven o'clock, it being just dusk, I was going down Brick-lane , and saw the prisoners and two more with them standing under a grocer's shop-window; I thought they were about robbing some shop; Ellis and I watched them, and saw Richie go into the passage of Blessed's shop, and at last he came out with the things in his arm; Richards had Richie's hat in his hand; then they crossed the way, and I stopped them; upon which they dropped the property, and Ellis picked it up; I never saw them before, but we watched them above half an hour, and was not more than twenty yards from them.( John Ellis corroborated the testimony of the last witness.)

MARY BLESSED sworn. - My father keeps the house, No. 123, in Brick-lane, but I keep a haberdasher's shop, and inhabit the lower part of the house; I was not at home at the time, and can only say the things are mine; I left them in the window.

Richie called one witness, Richards called three, and Green called one, who gave them good characters.

Richie, GUILTY, aged 11.

Richards, GUILTY, aged 12.

Green, GUILTY, aged 15.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18020217-66

239. THOMAS REDDEFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a hat, value 7s. the property of William Ayres the elder .

The principal witness not knowing the nature of an oath, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-67

240. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a cheese, value 10s. the property of Fulcher Holyland .

THOMAS HICKS sworn. - I am carman to Mr. Holyland: On the 27th of January, about half past six in the evening, I had delivered a small cargo of cheese in Tower-street; I went in to get my note signed, and when I came out, I saw the prisoner jump off the shafts of the cart with a cheese under his arm; I pursued him, and saw him drop it; he was taken, and the cheese brought back; I had sixty of the same sort.

- TYLER sworn. - I took the prisoner on the 7th of January, at half past six, in Little Tower-street, in Idol-lane; I saw him throw the cheese away. (The cheese produced by the constable).

Prisoner's defence. As I was going along, three men came along with two cheeses, and one was thrown down as I passed by them, and they ran across the way. GUILTY , aged 22.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-68

241. ZACHARIAH LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a male ass, value 10s. the property of Samuel Wicks .

SAMUEL WICKS sworn. - I live at Malyn: As

I was going home on the 17th of February, between ten and eleven at night, I saw a man driving an ass; I looked at it, as I thought it was mine; I did not say any thing, but went home to see if mine was safe; I found it was not there, and I called up my next door neighbours, and we pursued the man and ass, we overtook them near Sunbury; William Fishwater took him by the collar; the prisoner said, you had better let me alone, or it will be worse for you; then I went up, and left James Reason in care of the ass; we took him to the Magistrate on Thursday, and he was committed; I knew the ass well, having had it six or seven years.

JAMES REASON sworn. - I am a labouring man, and went with the prosecutor to apprehend the prisoner; we overtook him at Sunbury with the ass, which I know to belong to Mr. Wicks.

WILLIAM FISHWATER sworn. - I went with the other two witnesses, and found the prisoner going along the road to Kingston driving the ass, with the foot-sack and cloths upon it; he said it was his, and if I would not leave him alone, it should be the worse for me; I took hold of him, and upon the others coming up, we took him to the Magistrate.

Prisoner's defence. I did not take the ass; another man brought it to me, and then run away and left me. GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-69

242. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a silver watch, value 35s. the property of William Gilbert .

WILLIAM GILBERT sworn. - I am coachman to Lady Perth , and was robbed of a silver watch on the 15th of February; the prisoner I knew, and he told me he would stay in the stable till I came in with the carriage, but he was gone when I came back.

Mrs. GILBERT sworn. - We live in a room over the stable, where the watch hung up; the prisoner came to our room about half past five in the evening, and staid there till my husband went out with the carriage, about half past nine; they had lived servants together; as soon as my husband left us, the prisoner went to the stable to clean it, and asked me to assist him; as soon as I went down stairs, he told me he wanted to go out, but had left his hat up stairs; he went up for it, and said he would return again in a few minutes, but desired me not to leave the stable before he came back; I waited above five or six minutes, and went up stairs, when I immediately missed the watch, which I am positive was hanging up over the fire-place; I was very much frightened, and as soon as I recovered, I alarmed a coachman in the Mews; the prisoner was taken into custody the next day.

JOHN BOOTHBY sworn. - I am ostler at the Red-Lion, Cockspur-street: On Tuesday, the prosecutor came to me, and said he had lost his watch, and begged me to stop the prisoner if I saw him On Wednesday morning, about nine o'clock, the prisoner came, and offered me the duplicate of a watch for sale for half-a-crown; I said, before I bought it, I must go and look at the watch; he went with me to No. 123, in the Strand, and saw it; upon which I said it was a stolen watch, and the prisoner was taken to Marlborough-street.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 16th of February, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought a watch, and pledged it; I gave twenty-five shillings on it; this is the duplicate which I wrote.(The watch produced, and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I can sleep better on the hard boards than that woman can on a feather-bed; she is the person who sent me to pawn it, and no other.

Q. (To Mrs. Gilbert.) Did you give him this watch to pawn? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you let him have the watch for any purpose? - A. No, I knew nothing of it.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-70

243. WILLIAM BEAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Troughton and Edward Troughton , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 9th of February , and stealing one sextant, value 8l. 8s. a pair of eliptical compasses, value 3l. 3s. one turn bench, value 4l. and the brass work of a reflecting telescope, value 3l. the property of the said John and Edward.

EDWARD TROUGHTON sworn. - I am a mathematical-instrument-maker , No. 136, Fleet-street; my brother John and I sleep and live there, but we have another house in Peterborough-court , which is only for work-shops and ware-rooms, and an errand-boy only sleeps there for the purpose of letting the men in; it was broke open on Tuesday, the 9th of this month, between twelve and one; my niece being wakeful, told me there were men walking about the rooms with a light, and that the street door was open; I put on my coat, took a bayonet in my hand, and went down; I then called a watchman, and we went up the court to the door; one of the men rushed out, and I believe that is the man, but am not certain, as the man sheweda disposition to hide his face; I told him he must not pass till he gave me an account of what he had been doing; he struck me in the face, and I returned it by a push with the bayonet, but do not

think that I wounded him; he pushed past me, and made to the gate at the end of the court, and at that instant two other men came rushing down the court, in a direction from the house, but I did not see them come out of it; the first man got out of the gate, and drew it after him, in consequence of which the other two and myself were shut in; they were on the opening side of the gate, and had the power of opening it, which, I endeavoured to prevent, but could not; I stabbed at them, as I did at the first, with the bayonet, but I am afraid with as little effect; the watchman then sprung his rattle, and the men were pursued by the watchmen; I went back to the house, and found a pair of eliptical compasses at the door, the box open, and the instruments scattered about on the inside of the door; we then picked up one of the men's coats, and a large turn bench, an Hadley's sextant, and upon the stairs was the brass work of a reflecting telescope. In the shop there is but one drawer kept locked, in which I generally keep small valuable articles, and which had been wrenched from the bench; about this time they brought the prisoner to ask if I knew him; I found the watchman pushing up his face forcibly for me to see it; I called him inadvertently by a wrong name, but finding I knew him, he went down upon his knees, and begged I would forgive him; I would not hear him, but ordered them to carry him to the watch-house; he had been in my service five or six months, and had quitted it about a month or five weeks; he knew the house near as well as I did; I cannot swear positively he is the man that first passed me, but I believe he is; the boy, who slept there, will stare how the house was shut up; they must have got in at an aperture to the cellar, to which there is only a slap; we placed our confidence in a strong door at the top of the cellar stairs, which they had opened with a crow, of which I saw the marks; and the strong staples fixed in the wood were drawn out; that door gave them the power of the whole house; I searched the the prisoner's lodgings the next day, but found nothing of our's; his wife attended us, and shewed us every part of the rooms with the greatest readiness, and I believe knew nothing of the matter.

JOHN BUFFLER sworn. - I was errand-boy to Mr. Troughton, and slept in the house in Peterborough-court, which was broke open on Tuesday night; I went to bed a little after ten, and when all the men went at nine o'clock, I shut up the house, and fastened all the doors and windows; I fastened the door at the top of the cellar stairs with two bolts and a catch; the cellar window was put down, the fastening of which was broke off; I was not disturbed that night till my master disturbed me, therefore I know nothing about the robbery or the men; I saw the property safe the night before, and when I went into the shop in the mornning, I found the things displaced, and some gone.

JOSIAH RUSHWORTH sworn. - I am a watchman: About a quarter before one, a gentleman came to me with a drawn bayonet, and told me his house was broke open, and wished me to go along with him; we went up the court towards his cellar window, where there stood a lusty man in a light-coloured great coat; the gentleman stopped, and asked him where he had been; he said, up the court; he asked him what he had been doing; he said, it was nothing to him. Mr. Troughton desired him to stop, and was going to take hold of him, but he rushed from him, and struck him in the face; I made a blow at him, but missed him, and then I sprung my rattle; the prisoner is not the man who first came down the court; I pursued the first man, and as we went down to the gate, two other men came upon the back of us, but I did not see where they came from; they must have been in the court before us, as it is no thoroughfare; those men and Mr. Troughton had a sort of skirmish together by the gate, but they forced it open, and run away; I pursued them, and was told one of them had run up Wine-Office-court; we went up, and, after looking about some time, a gentleman got up, and looked over a gate into a garden or yard, and there was the prisoner stuck up in a corner close to the wall. I laid hold of him, but cannot say whether he is one of the three; I am sure he is not the first man; when we took him, he desired us to let him stop to look for one of his stockings that he had lost; I then observed he was without a shoe and stocking; I found one of his shoes in Wine-Office-court; we then took him to Mr. Troughton, who said, how came you to use me so? and the prisoner directly put his hands together, and asked for pardon, saying, he would never be guilty of the like again; then he was taken to the watch-house.

WILLIAM CHANDLER sworn. - I am a watchman, and hearing the rattle, I ran into Fleet-street, where I saw the prisoner turn up Wine-office-court; we pursued him, and he got into a gentleman's yard, where we took him.

Q. Whether the man you took in the court, was the man you saw run up the court? - A. I cannot swear it is, but I believe it is; we took him to Mr. Troughton, who knew him.

JOHN NASH sworn. - I am a tailor and constable: Going along Fleet-street, I saw the watchmen with the prisoner in custody; Mr. Troughton said he was his man, and then the prisoner dropped on his knees, and begged pardon, and hoped he would forgive him. (The sextant and compasses produced and identified by Mr. Troughton).

Prisoner's defence. I had been out to spend the evening, and as I was returning home, a man accosted me, and charged me with the robbery; I

told him I knew nothing of it, but would go with him any where; they took me to Mr. Troughton's, a master I had worked with, and I asked him if I had done any thing, whether he would forgive me, upon which he told them to take me down to the watch-house.

Q. (To Nash.) Was any promise made the prisoner? - A. No; there was no priviso at all; he was very much agitated; I heard him say, he hoped he would forgive him.

Rushworth. He asked directly for forgiveness, and said he would never do so any more.

GUILTY, Death , aged 28.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-71

244. ELIZABETH WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , two bottles of elder wine, value 2s. a windowcurtain, value 2s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. a towel, value 6d. a brush, value 2d. and a ribbon, value 1d. the property of James Browne .

MARGARET BROWNE sworn. - My husband is a pot-ash manufacturer , and lives at the Mill Wall, Isle of Dogs ; the prisoner lived servant to me a fortnight and three or four days; the things stated in the indictment were found in the box of the prisoner; she went away on the Wednesday, and left her box behind, which was unlocked by the officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe the prisoner and you had words? - A. Yes.

Q. Possibly you lifted your foot? - A. Yes.

Q. And possibly there might be a patten on that foot? - A. Yes, I gave her a slight tap.

Q. She had you taken to the Police-office, upon the charge of assaulting her? - A. Yes; her box was sent for, searched, and the things were found.

JAMES BROWNE sworn. - I asked the prisoner what induced her to take the things, and she begged for mercy, saying, she believed the devil had tempted her. I asked her again how she thought to get them out of the house; she said, that like many others she thought she might get them away unseen; she fell on her knees again, and begged for mercy; I said nothing, but told the officer the things should be taken to the Magistrate; she said she took them, but did not mention any thing in particular.

- ELBY sworn. - I am an officer, and the prisoner came to the Office on the 21st of January, with her mother, for a warrant against Mrs. Browne, for an assault, which was granted, and I went to execute it; the Magistrate desired Mr. Browne to pay the prisoner her wages and for the warrant, which was done; Mr. Story told me to go with the girl, and see the things safe delivered; I did, and Mrs. Browne asked her to undo the box; she had the key, but could not open it, she said, I wonder who the devil has been at my lock; I said, give me the key, and let me see if I can open it; it being an old lock, it would not easily unlock, but I opened it, and Mrs. Browne searched the box, and found these things. (Produces the articles, which were identified by Mrs. Browne).

Prisoner's defence. She had used me very ill, and I gave her warning; she called me a strumpet and wh - e, and so forth, so that I was determined not to stay; she would not let me go, but confined me; she kicked me several times, which made me get a warrant for her; then she said she missed several things, which amazed me, because just before I I left her, I saw her put her linen into her drawers, and she never said she had missed any; I first asked her if she would search my box; she said, by all means; I suppose the lock had been picked, for when the box was open, there were the articles, but I don't know how they came there.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-72

245. RICHARD CROUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , a pocket-book, value 2d. a handkerchief, value 4d. four papers of garnets and studs, value 1s. and four pawnbroker's duplicates, value 1d. the property of Isaac Carcass , privily from his person .

ISAAC CARCASS sworn. - I am a lapidary , and live in Suffolk-street: On the 8th of February, between eleven and twelve at night, I was standing in the crowd at the Pantheon door, to see the people go to the masquerade, when I had my pocket picked; I did not feel any body do it, but found it turned inside out; in about five minutes after that the prisoner was taken and carried to the watch-house; I followed to see if he had my property; when he was searched, they found it on him.

JOSEPH GREGORY sworn. - I am a constable, and was at the Pantheon, on the 8th of February; I did not know the prisoner, but saw him getting behind a hackney-coach, and several people trying to get hold of him, saying, he was a pick pocket; I immediately catched hold of him, and pulled him down, upon which he struggled and fought very much: an officer belonging to Marlborough street came up; and as we were dragging him out of the kennel, we saw this pocket book drop from him, which the officer picked up; we then took him into the Pantheon, and searched his coat pocket; I took four handkerchiefs out, and some pieces of cotton; the officer took some out of another, and then we took him to the watch-house; going along the prisoner threw himself down, d - d his eyes, and said he would go no farther; we expected he would be rescued, his companions were so numerous; at last we charged a soldier to assist us, who fixed his bayonet, or else we should not have secured the prisoner; when we got him to the watch-

house, the prosecutor said he had lost his book, which he described, and which was the same as dropped from the prisoner.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I belong to Marlborough-street: On the 8th of February, it being Masquerade night, I went to the Pantheon, about a quarter past eleven; I saw the prisoner endeavouring to escape, and helped to apprehend him, as Mr. Gregory has said. (The articles produced and sworn to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going out of the mob between two hackney-coaches, when somebody laid hold of me, and said, I was a pickpocket; they took me into the Pantheon, where I was searched, but nothing found; those things were brought in afterwards. GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not privily .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-73

246. MARIA ELLIOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , two sheets, value 6s. a quilt, value 2s. and a tablecloth, value 3s. the property of John Thornton .

JOHN THORNTON sworn. - I am a nightman , and live at Whitechapel ; the prisoner was a servant of mine, and I had great reason to suspect her honesty, as my clerk had lost his pocket-book; on the Sunday following she asked me to go out, which I granted; when she was gone, my clerk and I broke open her room, and the first thing we saw was his pocket-book, which she had declared she knew nothing of; I also found a pocket-book belonging to her, which contained a great number of duplicates, and which I examined; I suspected some sheets were gone, and searched the bed; I discovered they were gone, and the quilt and table-cloth also, which, she said, were gone to the mangler's; when she came home, I gave charge of her; the officer asked her what she did it for, and she said, she never could get her wages of me, but it was no such thing; I was to give her eight pounds a year; she had lived with me exactly six months, and I had paid her three guineas; I went to the pawnbroker's, and found the things.

THOMAS DEXTER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, and produce two sheets, a table-cloth, and a counterpane, which were pawned by the prisoner at the bar. (The property produced and sworn to).

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that had she been inclined, she could have disposed of a great part of the prosecutor's property undiscovered, as she had the care of it, but that she had pawned her own clothes, in consequence of not receiving her wages. GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-74

247. WILLIAM-GEORGE HARRISON, otherwise WILLIAM KENTISH , PETER DEALY , JAMES JONES , ISRAEL DAVIS , and JANE BULLOCK , were indcted, the two first for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a wooden box, value 10s. a hat-box, value 6s. a miniature painting, value 10l. a gown, value 10l. two gold crosses, value 25s. a pair of ear-rings, value 3s. a shift, value 5s. a pair of shoes, value 3s. a necklace, value 10s. two petticoats, value 10s. a shirt, value 12s. three yards of gold lace, value 10s. two petticoats, value 30s. a yard of muslin, value 5s. a pair of breeches, value 10s. four neck handkerchiefs, value 4s. four pocket-handkerchiefs, value 8s. two pair of gloves, value 5s. four pair of silk stockings, value 50s. a pair of knee-buckles, value 5s. a turban and feather, value 5l. a pair of bracelets, value 2l. and two yards of ribbon, value 1s. 6d. the property of Thomas Browne ; and the other three for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS BROWNE sworn. - I am a Captain in the Navy ; On Monday, the 18th of January, I hired a porter to carry two boxes from the west end of the town into Coleman-street; on one of the boxes there was my name, and I gave a card to the porter, with my name on one side, and the directions on the other, to Capt. Hepworth, No. 44, Coleman-street; the boxes contained the articles stated in the indictment, (repeating them); there were some few cards of ribbon, but I cannot say how many; I could swear to all the things if I saw them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Montague. Q. Do I understand you right, that you could swear to all the articles, except the ribbon? - A. Yes, all, except the ribbon.

THOMAS CARPENTER sworn. - I am a greengrocer, and go on jobs; I received a couple of little boxes from Capt. Browne, on the 18th of January, with a card of directions to Coleman-street; I took them home, and was taken very ill, with a coughing and bleeding at the nose, which compelled me to employ Samuel Butler, a boy, to take them for me.

SAMUEL BUTLER sworn. - I am rather above thirteen years old; On the 18th of January I received two boxes from Carpenter, and a card with them, which I was to carry to No. 44, Coleman-street, Old Jewry; about a quarter past twelve o'clock in the day, when I got down to Drury-lane, I was asking my way, when Armfield, whom I did not know, came up to me, and asked me where I was going; I shewed him the card, as I cannot read; he asked me what I was to have; I told him, a shilling; he walked with me a smartish distance, and told me to keep strait down to the bottom of Holborn, and then ask again; I went on till I came facing Great Turnstile, when Harrison came up to me, and said, is not that Captain

Browne's box; yes, I said, it is; he said he was waiting for it, and was scolding like any thing and asked me where I had been so long, and whether I was not to have a shilling for my trouble; I told him I was, which he gave me, and I gave him the boxes; then Dealy came up, and said, which is the way to St. Giles's; I said, straight on; says he, if you will shew me which is St. Giles's church I will give you sixpence; I walked a good way with him towards St. Giles's, but before we came there he turned up a street, looked up to some windows, and said to me, stop here, I shall be back in a minute or two; I staid about three minutes, and finding he did not come back I went home, and told Carpenter I had met the man who was coming for the boxes, and delivered them to him. I am sure Harrison is the man I delivered the boxes to; and that Dealy took me up towards St. Giles's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Montague. Q. What day was this? - A. On a Monday.

Q. When did you see Armfield afterwards? - A. Almost a fortnight after, at Hatton-Garden; I did not know him at first, I was there three times, the last time I knew him; nor could I swear to Harrison at first, but I know he is the man I delivered the boxes to; I am quite sure of them both.

THOMAS ARMFIELD sworn. I am a swordcutler, and steel-worker, by trade: I have known Harrision about nine or ten months, he is a beadblower by trade, and I have known Dealy about a year and a half, or better, and, as far as I know, he is a painter and glazier: On Sunday the 17th of January, we met, and made an appointment to meet on Monday, at the Pea-hen in Gray's-Inn-lane, the corner of Baldwin's-gardens, facing Gray's-Inngate, to go out thieving; we went from there about half past eleven o'clock, and at the top of Holborn we saw this boy, with a mahogany box and a hatbox in his hand; Dealy told me to go over the way and see where he was going; I went over to him, and he was inquiring his way to some place, I asked him what place he wanted; he said he wanted the Old-Jewry; I walked down a little way with him, and said, what place in the Old-Jewry do you want; he pulled a card out, and on it was written Captain Hepworth, No. 44, Coleman-street, Old-Jewry; and on the other side was Captain Browne ; he told me he had come from Captain Browne's, near Fitzroy-market, and he as to have a shilling for carrying the boxes; I went with him as far as Southampton-street, and told him to keep on, and to ask again; then I went over from Southampton-street, and saw Harrison and Dealy; it was agreed Harrison should go to the boy and give him a shilling, and get the boxes, but he said he had not got a shilling; upon which I gave him one, and he run down Holborn till he came about a hundred yards below Great Turnstile, then he crossed over, and met the boy at the corner of Featherstone-buildings, where he accosted the boy, and gave him something, but what it was I cannot say, and the boy gave him the boxes directly; then Dealy went up to the boy, spoke to him, and went up Holborn with him; Harrison went to his lodgings, in Baldwin's-gardens, with the boxes, and the course of a quarter of an hour, Dealy, Harrison, and I, met together at his lodgings; Jane Bullock , who lives with Harrison, was present when we opened the boxes, and took out the articles; there was miniature picture, a pair of gold bracelets, two gold crosses, a gold pin, and some gold lace, and other articles, which we took down to Jones, who is a jeweller, and lived in New-street, Shoe-lane, and asked him if he would buy them; he said, he could not, any otherwise than as old gold; I asked him where he would meet us; he said, at the Three Kings, on Clerkenwell-green; we met, and there the miniature was broke up to see what gold it was set in, the picture was burnt, and he allowed us twenty-eight shillings for the whole of them; after we got the money, we went to Harrison's lodgings, and were informed by Bullock that Davis was to be there soon; he came in about an hour and a half, and we shewed him the property; there was muslin gown trimmed with lace, a turban trimmed with lace, and a white feather, and many other things which I cannot remember now; we asked ten guineas for them; he offered four pounds, which we agreed to take, and he sent for something to drink; he put them in his old clothes bag, and we all went with him to his lodgings in Rosemary-lane; his wife was not at home, and he said he never did any thing without her; at last she came, and then he said he had over bid himself, for he could not afford to give above three pounds, but we would not take it; then he gave me three one pound notes, half-a-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, and half-a-crown's-worth of halfpence; we went then to the Pea-hen, and shared the money; there were a few ribbons left, which, I believe, Jane Bullock ahd, but she did not purchase them; Dealy had the box.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley Q. What trade are you? - A. A sword-cutler, but I did not then follow it; I have not worked at it these three years.

Q. Do you know Mr. Allen, of Long-lane? - A. Yes, I worked with him.

Q. Has he never charged you with stealing a gold watch from him? - A. No, he never did.

Q. Did he not turn you from his service on that account? - A. No.

Q. What did he accuse you so stealing? - A. I never knew him accuse me of stealing any thing.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember living over the water some time ago, in furnished lodgings? - A. Yes, with my father.

Q. No where else except at your father's? - A. Yes; I lived in Lambeth-walk.

Q. Do you recollect being accused of robbing your lodging? - A. Yes; the person I lodged with there, was a woman of the town.

Q. What trade have you been, beside a sword cutler? - A. I work at coach smith's work.

Q. Have you ever been abroad? - A. Yes, I have been to sea.

Q. What induced you to go? - A. To serve the King, and nothing else, I swear.

Q. Did you not go to Mr. Tatham's at Charing-cross, and steal a pair of pistols? - A. No, he is here, and will not say so.

Q. How long were you at sea? - A. Three years ago; I was prossed.

Q. When did you go to serve the King first? - A. Six or seven years ago.

Q. Mr. Tatham never accused you? - A. No.

Q. Did you live with him as a servant? - A. No, I worked with him.

Q. What did you leave him for? - A. Like other young men; I left my work.

Q. Do you know Tothill Fields? - A. Yes.

Q. I ask you, on your oath, have you never been confined in Tothill-fields Bridewell? - A. I was one day, for playing with the girls in Leicesterfields, and we were taken up a disorderly, that is eight or nine years ago; I never was there for any felony, or such things.

Cross-examined by Mr. Montague. Q. You know Mr. Allen? - A. Yes.

Q. Has he never accused you? - A. He has, when I was there, lost property, but never accused me of taking it; he told other people it was me, but never accused me.

Q. On your oath, did he never accuse you of taking combs? - A. Yes.

Q. This is the only theft you have been concerned in? - A. Yes.

Q. That you swear? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever been at these Sessions before? - A. No; I am to appear in another trial; I am come to speak the truth.

Q. You are not subpeoned, but attend voluntarily? - A. I do.

Q. Who was apprehended first for this? - A. Harrison was, on the 4th of February.

Q. By whose information? - A. By mine; I went before Mr. Baker; Inward took me before him, but I was not kept in custody; they promised me nothing; the advantage to myself is, to get out of that kind of company.

Q. Were there ever found in the house in which you resided, implements for coming? - A. No.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton Garden: In consequence of information I received from Armfield, on the 4th of February, I went to Dealy's apartments in Newton-street, Holborn, and found this box, a dark lantern, a number of picklock keys, a small crow, and a pocket-book. (Producing them.)

Prisoner (Dealy.) It is not my room.

Inwards. They told me it was, and his wife was in it, he was not at home.

Prisoner (Dealy.) It is not mine.

Inwards. Smith and I went then to Harrison's in Baldwin's Gardens, where we found him in bed with Bullock, but we found no part of the property; Dealy hearing we had been after him, sent for me, and surrendered; I found the ribbon on Bullock's head; Davis's lodgings were searched, and only a gold epaulet found; I went to Jones's, but found nothing there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Montague Q. Where was Armfield when you went to Harrison - was he in custody? - A. He never was kept in custody; the story he told the Magistrate was satisfactory, and he took my word for his appearance.

Q. In consequence of his information, did you go to Harrison's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he apply to you voluntarily? - A. Yes, he did. (The box identified.)

Harrison's defence. I leave my case to my Counsel.

Dealy's defence. The box was not found in my room.

Davis's defence. I never saw the evidence in all the days of my life.

Jones's defence. I never had any dealings with the evidence at all, in any form whatever.

Harrison called three, Dealy two, Jones six, and Davis one, witness, who gave them good characters.

For the prisoner, Harrison.

WILLIAM ALLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live in Long-lane, and am a steel-worker, and make fancy ornaments; Armfield and Harrison have worked for me, and Armfield often persuaded Harrison to go ut at nights with him, and leave his work; I suspected that Armfield had robbed me, which I told him, and he left his work in consequence of it, for fear I should prosecute him; he did not come for three months after; he sent persons to me to beg me to take him in again, as he was leading a bad course of life.

Court. Q. What did you accuse him with taking of? - A. Combs, and different things; he came to me again, in consequence of his friends saying they would be bound for him, and was with me about three months, during which time I gave him some little gold to melt, but when it came to be worked, it turned black, as though he had put brass in it; and I had bought a handkerchief, which he wished to have, and said, he would pay me for it; I said, no, but he went down stairs, and told my wife that I said he might have it, and took it away; he worked for me sixteen months in the whole, but I never knew of his being examined

before a Magistrate; I have heard him talk about stealing dead bodies, and selling them for two guineas a-piece, and that it was better to do that than any thing else.

Q. From your knowledge of him, is he a man you would believe on his oath? - A. No, he is not.

Harrison, GUILTY , aged 18.

Dealy, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Davis, GUILTY , aged 42.

Jones, GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for fourteen years .

Bullock, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-75

248. JAMES HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a basket, value 1s. and six loaves of bread, value 6s. the property of William Shrimpton .

JOHN SHRIMPTON sworn. - My father is a baker , at No. 62, Berner's-street: On the 4th of February, about twelve o'clock, I put my basket down at the corner of Wells-street , while I went to serve a customer, and on my return I saw the prisoner go down a passage with it on his back; I ran after him, and asked him what business he had with it; he told me it was not mine; I said, there was WS on it; then he put it down, and took two loaves out of it, which he said were his; I then collared him, and said he should go with me to my father; I asked a woman to mind the basket; he ran away, but I caught him in Windmill-street; he begged for mercy, and said he would never do the like again; then he got from me again, but I caught him at the top of Blenheim steps, and he gave me a push down them; a young man then stopped him, and he was taken into custody; we found out afterwards that the two loaves did not belong to my father, but that he had taken them out of another basket.

Prisoner's defence. I am a poor man, and was out of work; I took the bread on purpose to carry home to my wife and four small children.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-76

249. WILLIAM POTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a cotton gown, value 10s. the property of Ann Cockens .

ANN COCKENS sworn. - I am a servant : On the 20th of January, I lost my gown from the Green Man at Paddington ; the duplicate of it was found on the prisoner, who was porter there; the gown was in my box on the landing-place.

GEORGE WARREN sworn. - I searched the prisoner, and found the duplicate; he confessed he had opened the box, and taken the gown out, that he was very sorry, and would take me to the place where it was, which he did, and that he did it through distress.

GEORGE SAY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, and produce the gown which I had from the prisoner on the 10th of January. (The gown produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I met a Jew who was disposing of some cloaths, and I gave him ten shillings for the gown; when I went home, I had no supper to eat, and having no money, I pawned it for seven shillings and sixpence. GUILTY , aged 23.

confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-77

250. JOSEPH ROSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , twelve pair of shoes, value 24s. and three pair of boots, value 12s. the property of William Piper .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-78

251. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , two pails, value 6s. the property of Joseph Joseph .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Hannah Michael .

HANNAH MICHAEL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Joseph in Goodman's-fields : It being a hard forst, the prisoner took up the pails which were in a yard, and asked me if he should fill them with water; I said, no, and bid him put them down, but he would not; at last, I told him to make haste, and bring it; he went away, and I never saw him till a fortnight after, when I met him, and asked him if he recollected me; he said, no; I asked him if he recollected the pails; he d - d my eyes, and said, no; I called for assistance, but he said, if I dared to call out, he would stick me with a knife, which he drew out of his pocket; then he said if I would go with him to a public-house, he would give me the pails; I went, and he bid me wait at the door, but I would not; he then run through the house, out at the back door; the landlady told me where he lived, and I had him taken up the same day.

Prisoner's defence. I went to fill the pails, and going along I met a ship-mate, who said to me, you are loaded with cold water, will you have some hot purl; I went into a public-house with him, and left the pails at the door; when I came out again, they were gone.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-79

252. THOMAS HARDWICKE , otherwise HARVEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , ninety-two ounces of silver, value 35l. six ounces of fine gold, value 27l. and seven ounces of common gold, value 9l. the property of Wm. Curtis .

The principal witness having materially contradicted the account he first gave of the transaction, the prosecution was abandoned. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-80

253. JOHN-BENJAMIN FELL was indicted for that he, on the 24th of February , being employed in the capacity of clerk to Robert Peddir and John-Henry Bluhm , of Gould-square, in the City of London, merchants and ship-brokers , did, by virtue of such employment, take into his possession of and from Messrs. Newman, Everitt, and Drummond, of London, bankers and partners, a Bank note, value 20l. another Bank note, value 1l. and 12s. 9d. in monies numbered, for and on account of the said Robert Peddir and John-

Henry Bluhm, his said masters and employers, and afterwards, to wit, on the same day, fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and make away with, a certain part of the said notes and monies, to the value of 10l. 16s. 5d. the property of the said Robert Peddir and John-Henry Bluhm .

Three other Counts. For the like offence, varying the manner of charging it.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ROBERT PEDDIR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. What is your partner's name? - A. My partner's name is John-Henry Bluhm; we are ship brokers and ship owners in Crotched Friars: The prisoner was in our employ on the 24th of February, as collecting clerk, and had been so for ten years; there was freight due from Mr. Lee on the Robert and Sarah, and the Hebe Smith, from Hambro's, to the amount of 21l. 12s. 9d. I have his book in which he kept his accounts (produces it), and on the 9th of March, 1801, he gives credit by the Hebe Smith - Received of Mr. Lee 10l. 16s. 4d. -Every thing he received was entered into this book, and paid over to our cash clerk; there is no other entry of money received on that day, and on the 24th of February, no credit is given for any sum; no other sum was due from Mr. Lee, except what I have stated.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long did you say the prisoner had lived with you? - A. Ten years; he served seven years to us; if I had not thought him honest, I should not have kept him.

MIDDLETON WITHERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Lee? - A. I am, and was on the 24th of February; this freightnote was brought to me but I cannot say what day; these sort of notes are generally left a week or two, to see whether the freight is correct; sometime after it was left, I made payment for it by a draft on Newnham, Everett, and Drummond, of 21l. 12s. 9d. (Produces the draft.)

Q Do you know whether you paid it to the prisoner, or not? - A. I cannot say.

Q Did the person who come put his name on the back? - A. He did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you remember the person who put his name on it? - A. No; and the reason why I am so certain the person put his name to it is, that I always draw up the drafts, and see the persons who take them put their names on the backs of them.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Mr Peddr, shewing him the draft.)

Q Whose writing is that on the back? - A. The prisoner's.

Q. Whose writing is that? (shewing the freight note) - A. The prisoner's.

GEORGE COTTRELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Newnham, Everett, and Co.? - A. Yes; in February 1801, I paid a check of Mr. James Lee 's for 21l. 12s. 9d. by a Bank note of 20l. a 1l. note, and 12s. 9d. in money; this is the draft, but I do not recollect who I paid it to.

LOUIS MICHAEL SIMON sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Peddir and Bluhm, and have the manifest book, and the prisoner's cash book. in which I find an entry of 10l. 16s. 4d. only, as received of Mr. Lee for freight the 24th of February.

Q. Was any such sum as 10l. 16s. 4d. due from Mr. Lee? - A. I really don't know what was due; because it is out of my department.

Prisoner's defence. It was never my intention to defraud Mr. Peddif; I leave it to my Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-81

254. ANN LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , four pounds of soap, value 2s. four pounds of candles, value 3s. a snufferstand, value 1s. two linen cloths, value 1s. and a corkscrew, value 1s. the property of Thomas Bish .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS BISH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Cornhill ; the prisoner was my servant ; In consequence of my house being broke open, on the 6th of January, her box was searched, and several pieces of soap and a great many candles were found in it; the cork-screw was found in her pocket, and several other things between her bed and mattrass.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You don't mean to swear to the soap and candles? - A. No; the corkscrew had been missing for two or three months, and another had been bought in its place.

JOHN REED sworn. - I am a constable, and was sent for on the 6th of January; I searched the prisoner's box in the presence of Mr. and Mrs. Bish, and the prisoner; a great quantity of soap and candles were in it, and the cork-screw was in her pocket. (Produces them.)

Mr. Bish. I know it to be my property; I thought the officers had the snuffer-stand; if they have not, I don't know where it is. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-82

255. THOMAS FITZGERALD was indicted for that he, on the 17th of October , being employed by George Oakley , Thomas Shackleton , and John Evans , in the capacity of clerk and servant , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession of and from William Fraser, Esq. a banker's draft, dated 17th October, 1801, of his, the said William Fraser 's, proper hand-writing, whereby he did require certain persons in the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, viz. Messrs. Drummond and Co. to pay the sum of 85l. 4s. 6d. whereof he, the said Thomas Fitzgerald, fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and make away with, 5l. 4s. 6d. part of the said sum, and that he did steal, take, and carry away, the same .

Second Count. Varying the manner of charging it.(The case was opened by Mr. Jackson.)

JOHN EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In St. Paul's Church-yard: I am in partnership with George Oakley and Thomas Shackleton; the prisoner was clerk to us, and had been so about eight months; we had a customer of the name of Fraser, who was indebted to us 85l. 4s. 6d. in October last.

JOHN WILLIS sworn. - I live servant with Mr. Fraser: The prisoner applied to me for 85l. 4s. 6d. on account of Oakley, Shackleton, and Evans, in October last; I received a draft from my master on Messrs. Drummonds, which I paid to the prisoner; this is my master's writing.

WILLIAM HALE sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Drummond and Co. and paid this check of 85l. 4s. 6d. but I neither know how I paid it, or to whom.

Mr. Jackson. Q. (To Mr. Evans.) Did the prisoner render any accounts on the 17th of October of the receipts of the day? - A. Yes, he stated he received of Mr. William Fraser eighty pounds on our account, which I entered in our book, (produces the book, and refers to the entry;) he gave me the sum as all he had received of Mr. Fraser, but never accounted for the other 5l. 4s. 6d. After he was committed at the Mansion-house, he said, if I would stop the prosecution, he and his brother would transport themselves to any part of the world we pleased, which I refused; we paid him forty-five pounds a year, and his board and lodging, but did not allow him any thing else; he entered, in his own hand-writing, "Received of Mr. Fraser, eighty pounds;" and, in another book, "By allowance for ornaments and abatements, 3l. 6s. 6d." We never gave leave to make abatements without a note from us.

Mr. GEORGE OAKLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. Has he ever accounted with you for the remainder of the 85l. 4s. 6d? - A. No, he has not.

Mr. THOMAS SHACKLBTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you ever received the five pounds balance? - A. Never. GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-83

256. JOHN FITZGERALD was indicted for that he, on the 21st of February , being employed by George Oakley , Thomas Shackleton , and John Evans , in the capacity of clerk and servant , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession of and from Joseph Davidson, a servant of the said George Oakley, Thomas Shackleton , and John Evans, the sum of 4l. 18s. in monies numbered, for and on account of his said employers, and that he fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and make away with the same .

It appearing in evidence that the prisoner was an apprentice , and not a clerk, the Court were of opinion the indictment could not be sustained; the prisoner was accordingly. ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-84

257. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of John James .

JOHN JAMES sworn. - I am an attorney , and live at No. 63. Shoreditch; I was robbed of my handkerchief in Fleet-street on the 19th of February, between the hours of three and four; I turned round, and saw the prisoner putting something in his trowsers; I collared him, and said he had picked my pocket; he denied it, but I insisted on his being searched, and took him into a hair-dresser's shop in Bride-lane; he took his coat and waistcoat off, but it was not found; I then insisted on his pulling off his trowsers, which he did, and I thought he had not got it; but the master of the shop, going on the other side of the chair, saw it laying up in a corner of the shop, where he must have thrown it.

- NASH sworn. - I am a constable of St. Bride's, and took charge of the prisoner and handkerchief.(Produces it, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

WILLIAM HILL sworn. - I was in the room when the prisoner was searched; the handkerchief could not be found for some time; I looked up in a corner of the shop, and found it; he said, if we would suffer him to go, he would down on his knees, and we should never hear of any other complaint against him.

Prisoner's defence. I never said such words, nor had I the handkerchief in my possession.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-85

258. FRANCIS SHIPMAN was indicted for that he, on the 22d of September , being employed in the capacity of clerk , by Frances Sills , Joseph Sills , and Jonathan Sills , for the purpose of receiving money, did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession of and from Samuel Kenyon , a warrant for the payment of 5l. 7s. for and on account of his said employers, and that he did fraudulently and feloniously embezzle, secrete, and make away with the said warrant, and feloniously steal the same .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

The Court being of opinion that the charge made in the indictment did not come within the meaning of the Act of Parliament, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-86

259. FRANCIS SHIPMAN was again indicted for that he, being employed in the capacity of clerk , on the 17th of December , by Joseph Sills and Jonathan Sills , for the purpose of receiving money on their account, did, by virtue of such employment, take and receive into his possession of and from John Goodman, the sum of 14s. 8d. for and on account of his said employers, and that he did fraudulently and feloniously embezzle, secrete, and make away with the same, and did steal the same .

JOSEPH SILLS sworn. - The prisoner was servant to us, but no entry is made in his book of the sum of 14s. 8d. received of Mr. Goodman, which he ought to have entered, Mr. Goodman having paid him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He had to receive large sums of money, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. I will ask you, whether a person, in collecting other sums, might not forget fourteen shillings and eight-pence? - A. I think not.

JOHN GOODMAN sworn. - I was applied to on the 17th of December by the prisoner for fourteen shillings and eight-pence, due to Messrs. Sills, which I paid him, and he gave me this receipt, (produces it,) which he wrote.

Prisoner. I leave it to my Counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-87

260. FRANCIS SHIPMAN was again indicted for that he, on the 21st of November , being employed in the capacity of clerk , by Frances Sills , Joseph Sills , and Jonathan Sills , for the purpose of receiving money, did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession of and from George Willett, the sum of 1l. 11s. for and on account of his said employers, and that he did fraudulently and feloniously embezzle, se

crete, and make away with the same, and did feloniously steal the same .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOSEPH SILLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. Be so good as state the particulars of this transaction, and who were your partners? - A. On the 21st of November, our firm was Frances, Joseph, and Jonathan Sills; the prisoner was our clerk, and employed in receiving money on our account, which he settled every day. I have his book, and, on the 21st of November, 1801, there are four articles entered, but not the sum of one pound eleven shillings received of Mr. Willett.

Q. Has that sum ever been accounted for? - A. Never. Mr. Gurney. Q. That article is entirely omitted? - A. Yes.

GEORGE WILLETT sworn. - I live in Aldersgate-street: On the 21st of November, application was made to me, on the part of Messrs. Sills, for the payment of one pound eleven shillings and seven-pence. I paid one pound eleven shillings, and the person to whom I paid it gave me a receipt, (produces it;) but I cannot say whether it was the prisoner.

JOHN-WINTER PIDGEON sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Sills, and know the prisoner's hand-writing. This is his writing, (looking at the receipt.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18020217-88

261. SARAH PETTIT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , eighty pounds weight of paper, value 20s. three numbers of a periodical publication, called Dr. Wright's Family Bible, value 1s. two other numbers of a periodical publication, called The Naval Magazine, or Maritime Miscellany, value 1s. 6d. and one other number of a periodical publication, called The Ladies Pocket-Magazine, value 4d. the property of Alexander Hogg .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of George Pettit .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

ALEXANDER HOGG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You are a bookseller and publisher in Paternoster-row? - A. Yes: I had employed a person of the name of Mary Pettit, to few up publications for many years past; she has sewed many thousands of Dr. Wright's Family Bible, which were delivered to her in quires; but I never sold any in quires. In consequence of information I received, I went to Mr. Davis, a cheesemonger, on the 14th of last month, about nine o'clock in the evening, with Mr. Gill; we found, on examination, one hundred and twenty-four pounds weight of paper, which I got back again, and paid him at the rate of three-pence per pound Eighty-two pounds were mine, enough to render three or four hundred pounds worth of books imperfect; there were three numbers of the Bible also, and two numbers of the Lady's Magazine; I have no doubt they all belonged to me; I saw the prisoner the day after, about four o'clock in the afternoon; I made her no promise or threat, but I asked her several questions about the paper, and she told me she stole them by degrees from Mrs. Pettit's house, and tied them up in a parcel, which she took in her apron, and carried to some receptacle, where she kept them till they accumulated to a large quantity, and had done so for years.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner was not employed by you? - A. No, by her sister, as a chair-woman.

Q. Other persons serve in your shop? - A. Yes, Mr. Kelly, my clerk, is here.

Q. Can you say, upon your oath, that they have not sold these articles? - A. Certainly it is impossible.

Q. There is a perquisite of waste paper in the trade, is not there? - A. No, I never heard of it; I know thee is no such custom.

Q. Did you not make a promise, or tell her it would be better for her? - A. No, I never heard it said; I believe none was ever made.

MARY PETTIT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Angel-street, Butcherhall-hall, St. Martin's-le-Grand, and was employed by Mr. Hogg to stitch books for him; the prisoner is my husband's sister, and has assisted me in the household work, but I had never missed any of the books he trusted to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know any thing of those numbers charged in the indictment, of how they came into possession of the prisoner? - A. Not at all; I know nothing about it; I gave her leave to take waste paper from my house, but, as to numbers, I cannot conceive how they could come among waste paper; neither numbers or quires are waste paper.

RICHARD DAVIS sworn. - I am a cheesemonger, in Lincoln's-Inn-fields: I bought one hundred and seventy-four pounds weight of paper of the prisoner, for three-pence per pound, and delivered to Mr. Hogg one hundred and twenty-four pounds; I had used the other; that which Mr. Hogg received had remained on the shelf from the time I bought it; I did not notice that it was in quires; it was not in the same state that it is now, because it was tied up in a rough manner, with paper of different sorts, what I call waste.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You cannot venture to swear to it? - A. No.

Court. Q. Did you enquire who she was? - A. I understood, when I bought it, that she had sold to the man who kept the shop before me; she said, she had friends in that way; I bought it was waste paper.( James Peddir , the constable, produced the paper, which was identified by Thomas Kelly .)

Q. (To Peddir.) As you were taking the prisoner to the Compter, did she say any thing to you? - A. Yes; she said, she did not mind it had nobody known of it but herself; I asked her if Mrs. Pettit partook of any of the money; she said, no, and as for her brother, he was as innocent as the child unborn.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM BOLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a bookbinder.

Q. Are there any perquisites allowed of waste paper? - A. There is in our trade, as a bookbinder, and I suppose it goes to a greater degree with the stitchers.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Is that waste paper? (Pointing to the paper produced.) - A. No; I don't think this is; waste paper is that which accumulates about the shop, rumpled and dirty.

- MYNETT sworn. - I went to look at the paper, and it appeared to me to be a parcel of rubbish.

Court. Q. Take care what you say - look at that paper, upon your oath do you mean to say that is rubbish? - A. I did not see this paper; I saw four or five bundles, but only the outside, as they would not let me open it.

JOHN ANDERSON sworn. - I am a bookbinder, and it is a rule with some people to give the damaged sheets to the boys.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Is that waste paper, or any thing like it? - A. I cannot say; it would be of no other use to me. GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-89

262. MICHAEL MICHAEL was indicted for that he, being the person, who, at the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace, holden at Guildford, in the County of Surrey, on Thursday, the 15th of July, in the 40th year of his Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer, and was adjudged by the Court to be imprisoned for one year, and until he found sureties for two years more, and that he, after being so convicted as a common utterer of false and counterfeit money to wit, on the 14th Day of January last, a piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a seven-shilling-piece, as and for a good seven-shilling-piece, unlawfully did utter to John Lucas , knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

Second Count. For the like offence, varying the manner of charging it.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)(The record of the conviction of Michael Michael, at the Surry Session, read.)

CALEB-EDWARD POWEL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. I am clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint, and was at the Sessions, at Surrey, when the prisoner was tried; I have no doubt he is the man.

JOHN SHUTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. What are you? - A. I am servant to the keeper of the County Gaol, of Surrey, and know the prisoner; I conveyed him to the Sessions at Guildford to be tried, and brought him back after he was tried, he continued in Gaol twelve months.

JOHN LUCAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. Do you live in the Country of Essex? - A. Yes; I am master of a coasting vessel.

Q. Tell us all that you know about the prisoner, and the putting off of bad money? - A. On the 14th of January, about five or six o'clock in the evening, James Sexton and I were looking at some watches in a window, in the Minories, when the prisoner came up and asked me, if I wanted to buy a watch, I said, I did not; he said, he had got a very good one to sell, better than either of those in the window; I told him, I did not think so; he said, he was in distress, and had not a farthing to help himself with, and would sell it cheap; says he, look at it, there is no harm: I made answer, what do you ask for it? he said, two guineas and an half; I told him, I had only fourteen shillings? he asked me if I had two seven shilling-pieces; I said, yes; then, says he, I'll take your money; I told him, I would not give it him before I examined the watch; we then went up Hanover-court, in the Minories, I looked at the watch, and consented to give him the two seven-shilling-pieces for it, which I did, and put the watch into my waistcoat-pocket; he then wanted twenty-four shillings for it; I told him, I had not got so much, but that I had two shillings and sixpence in silver, which I would give him; he said, he would take no less, and began to make a bobbery about it, wanting the watch again; I said, you have no occasion to make any words, return me my money, and you may have your watch; one of the seven-shilling-pieces which I had given him was bent, and the other flat; I then gave him the watch again, and he gave me these two counterfeits which I have here, (produces them;) I put them in my left-hand pocket, and he and Sexton immediately left me; I had no suspicion that he had given me bad money, but when I got out of the court, I looked at them by a light in a window, and afterwards founded them on the stones; Sexton and he were gone on, and when I observed they were both flat, I went after him, and called out, James Sexton , have you seen any thing of that man? he said, yes, here he is; says I, he has given me two bad seven-shilling-pieces, upon which the prisoner run off immediately; I pursued him, I suppose, for a quarter of a mile; when I came up with him, he asked me if I wanted his life; I said, no, I wanted my good money; he said, he did not know any thing about it; I said, I'll be upon my oath you offered to sell me the watch; he denied it, and said, I know nothing about it, I have not got a watch; then another man came up, and touched him on the elbow, upon which he resigned him a small purse, or bag, and something like a watch; I saw the chain, which was the same, I had had in my hand; Sexton said to me, hold him fast, that is the man who has got the watch, the man immediately set off, and Sexton after him, but came back without him; as I lost sight of him, the prisoner was given in charge of a constable, and searched; there was found on him, two guineas, four half-guineas, and four seven-shilling-pieces; before they searched him, I said, depend upon it, you will find a bent seven-shilling-piece in his pocket, which they did, and it is bent exactly like mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you try your seven-shilling-pieces on the stones in the course of the day before this happened? - A. Yes, when I went to find my ship agent, at the Bull-head in St. Catherine's, where I took them.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before that? - A. No.

Q. How near was this to Tower-hill? - A. Two hundred yards or more, I cannot say exactly.

Q. How do you get your livelihood? - A. In the sea-faring line, which I have been in sixteen or seventeen years, and am master of a vessel, now called the Speedwell, which failed last Saturday week without me, on account of this business.

Q. You have seen a bent seven-shilling-piece before in your life? - A. Yes.

Q. There was no particular marks on that you gave him? - A. No, only bent.

Q. The watch would have been a good purchase for two good seven-shilling-pieces? - A. I did not want it, only he told me he was in distress.

Q. When you were going after the prisoner the first time, you had not discovered they were bad - you want

ed him again in order to purchase the watch? - A. After he was gone off, Sexton agreed to lend me more money, and went after him, but he knew nothing how I was let in with the money, nor had I discovered it was bad.

Q. Was there any chain to the watch? - A. Yes, a copper one.

Q. It was not a string, you are sure? - A. No.

Q. Or a piece of leather? - A. No, it was not.

Q. You had not above five minutes to look at the watch in? - A. No; but I know it was a chain for I saw it in the man's hand.

Q. Had you the chain in your hand? - A. Yes.

Q. How long? - A. Five minutes, I suppose, but Sexton had it in his hand afterwards.

Q. Did you show the money to any body in the public-house? - A. Yes, to as many as liked to see it, but it was never out of my sight, and I shewed it to Mr. Norman, at the Bull, and the ship agent, they both said they were bad.

Q. Did all the people who saw them, say they were bad, or did some say they were bad, and some say they were good? - A. Yes, all of them said they were bad.

Q. Had you been drinking that day? - A. No.

Q. Was the prisoner drunk or sober? - A. He was sober enough, he appeared to be so.

Court. Q Are you sure that is the man? - A. Yes, I am.(The two seven-shilling-pieces produced, which were proved to be bad by Mr. Nichal, one of the moniers of the Mint.)

JAMES SEXTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. You are a sailor? - A. Yes

Q. Were you with Lucas when this adventure took place respecting the money? - A. I was.

Q. Tell us how it happened? - A. Lucas and I stopped, as he has stated, and up came Michael Michael astern of us; the prisoner is the man; he said, he could sell a better watch than any there, and cheaper; but, says he, come a little lower down, for I dare not be seen selling a watch opposite a watchmaker's-shop; we went into a court, and shewed Lucas the watch, he said Lucas should have it for fourteen shillings; then, says Lucas, I cannot be cheated of above thirteen and sixpence, let it be as it will; another man was walking in our stern while Lucas and I were bargaining for the watch; Lucas pulled his purse out, and took out two seven shilling-pieces, and the prisoner kept looking into the purse to see what he had; Lucas took the two seven-shilling-pieces out, one of which was bent, and gave them to the Jew, and put the watch into his waistcoat-pocket; the Jew turned round to look at the two seven-shilling-pieces, and then turned about to Captain Lucas, and said, I made the agreement with you for twenty-four shillings; Lucas said, my friend, if you repent your bargain, return me my two seven shilling-pieces again, and you shall have your watch; which he did, and took the watch; the Jew then left us, and went down the Minories; Captain Lucas was desirous of purchasing the watch in about ten minutes after, and we went after the Jew, having no suspicion that he had cheated him; I was first, and overtook him at the top of the Minories, I tapped him on the shoulder, and said, my friend, I am come to purchase the watch you offered for sale in the court; he said, I never saw you before in my life; I looked at him very hard, and said, I'll lay you a guinea that you are the person that offered the watch in the court, for twenty-four shillings; I am sure he is the man; Lucas being a long way aftern, having his great coat on, I left the Jew, and met Lucas, who said, that refeal has done me of my two seven-shilling-pieces; upon which the prisoner turned round, and ran as hard as he could; I pursued him, and brought him up just athwart the Bull-Inn, Whitechapel; a man came and touched him on the elbow, and took something out of his hand like a purse.

Q. Had you observed that man before? - A. It was the man that had been walking under out stern in the court; I said, Lucas, you stop the Jew, and I think I can catch the other; I ran after him, but lost him; when I came back, I found the prisoner at the Bull-Inn, where he was searched, but I cannot say what was found upon him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You never saw him before? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Had you and Lucas been drinking grog together? - A. Not a drop.

Q. Did the prisoner seem to be drunk or sober? - A. He seemed to be rather intoxicated.

Q. Whatever it was that was given away, were you the first person that saw it? - A. I was the nearest.

Q. If any body could have seen what it was, could you if the light would have permitted you? - A. Yes; but it was done in an instant.

DANIEL KEMP sworn. - I am one of the City constables; Hanover-court, in the Minories, is in the City of London: I was sent for on the 14th of January, and took the prisoner into custody, Lucas charged him with giving him two bad seven-shilling-pieces; I don't exactly know how much gold there was found on him, because I gave it him back again; to the best of my knowledge there were four seven-shilling-pieces, and amongst them a crooked one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you find any watch on him? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. My Lord, this is an indictment for an offence under the 15th George II, which says, That if any person whatsoever shall, after the said 29th day of September, offer, or tender in payment, any false or counterfeit money, knowing the same to be false and counterfeit, to any person or persons, and shall, either within the same day, or within the space of ten days then next, utter, or tender in payment, any more, or other false or counterfeit money, knowing the same to be false or counterfiet, to the same person or persons, or shall, at the time of uttering or tendering, have about him or her, or in his or her custody, one or more piece or pieces of counterfeit money beside what was so uttered, or tendered, then such person, so uttering and tendering the same, shall be deemed and taken to be a common utterer of false money, and being convicted thereof, shall suffer a year's imprisonment, and shall find sureties for his or her good behaviour for two years more, to be computed from the end of the said year; and if any person, having been once so convicted as a common utterer of false money, shall afterwards again utter, or tender in payment, any false or counterfeit money, to any person or persons, knowing the same to be false or counterfeit, then such person, being thereof convicted, shall, for such offence, be, an is hereby adjudged to be, guilty of felony with

out benefit of clergy. My Lord, I apprehend, that this indictment does not sufficiently state that the prisoner has been found guilty, in the Court below, of that offence, which, in the terms of the Act of Parliament, are necessary to make him a common utterer; and for want of that statement, though he is represented to have received the punishment of a common utterer, I contend, that the indictment is not sufficient. In the Court below, there is no occasion to state more than they have, namely, that he did utter, and that he had about him other bad money, but that does not meet this objection, which is, that having been so convicted as a common utterer, (that is by inference), it should have stated he was found guilty of being a common utterer, and had the punishment of a common utterer; the original indictment, or the judgment proceeding on it, have neither stated that he was a common utterer; and, I submit, I have a right to argue, because it is stated as part of the record, that if it did not appear, the Court acted on the offence, and adjudged him to the punishment; it wanting that averment, it is bad; it appears to me, the averment should be found on the face of this record, that the Jury found him guilty of being a common utterer, the charge being that he was a common utterer. That is the form of the objection; and, I confess, I have very considerable doubts whether it ought not to be stated.

Court. I wish you would advert to the first clause, which says, And whereas the uttering of false money knowing it to be false, is a crime frequently committed all over the kingdom, and the offenders therein are not deterred, by reason of it being only a misdemeanor, and the punishment very often but small, though there be great reason to believe, that the common utterers of such false money are either themselves the coiners, or in confederacy with the coiners thereof; for preventing whereof, be it hereby further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That if any person whatsoever, shall, after the 29th day of September, utter, or tender in payment, any false or counterfeit money, knowing the same to be false or counterfeit, to any person or persons, and shall be thereof convicted, such person, so offending, shall suffer six months imprisonment, and find sureties for his or her good behaviour for six months more, to be computed from the end of the said first six months; and if the same person shall afterwards be convicted a second time of the like offence of uttering, or tendering in payment, any false or counterfeit money, knowing the same to be so, such person shall, for such second offence, suffer two years imprisonment, and find sureties for his or her good behaviour for two years more, to be computed from the end of the said first two years; and if the same person shall afterwards offend a third time, in uttering, or tendering in payment, any false or counterfeit money, knowing the same to be so, and shall be convicted of such third offence, he or she shall be, and is hereby adjadged to be, guilty of felony without benefit of clergy.

Mr. Knapp. My Lord, In addition to this, I will observe, the words are, that when such facts are proved, the person charged shall be taken to be a common utterer; I submit, that you cannot, in this case, where you are to collect the facts of what passed before another jurisdiction, from the record which brings them before you,(for you cannot get at the parole testimony) unless you can see on the face of the record that he was a common utterer; then I say it is not complied with, and, therefore, this indictment is not good. I don't say it would be necessary to be charged if we were sitting in Surry, but I contend, upon the face of the record sent here, supposed to contain every thing that it should be charged, and that you cannot say, proceeding on these facts, (for nothing is to be intended against a man's life) that he was convicted of being a common utterer, when only from the facts which are stated you can infer he was a common utterer. Your Lordship is called upon to say, that the Court below had deemed that man a common utterer, the consequence of which will be, that if he commits another offence he must answer it with his life. I say it does not appear, except by inference, from any thing the Court below has stated, and for want of that averment in this record, it appears to me, this indictment is bad in that particular; and, from the humanity you have already expressed to-day, I am sure you will not bereave the prisoner of the advantage arising from, or, if your Lordship thinks it is fit, for the opinion of the Judges. I will state the precise objection I take:

My Lord, I have been submitting, that I consider it necessary for the Court to see, on the face of this record, that, by the judgment of the Court of Quarter-Sessions, they acted on the conviction that he was a common utterer, and therefore they punished him according to the Act of Parliament. I apprehend it should be, that he was considered and adjudged, by the Court of Sessions, to be a common utterer, and that therefore he be imprisoned one year, and at the end and expiration of that time, to find sureties for two years, to be computed from the end of the said year. In the case of the King and Smith, it was held, that it need not be because it was a conclusion of law; but here it is a conclusion of law and fact; the judgment of the Court acting on a question of law; therefore, I do apprehend there is a great distinction between the case of the King and Smith and this; and trust that my client at the bar will have the benefit of the objection.

Court. I do not feel the force of the objection; the very argument is against itself; - you say, it is not necessary, in any other Court, to state that he is a common utterer, because that is a conclusion of law; if it is not necessary, it cannot be necessary in the judgment, because, when you look into the record, it states the fact of this man having been tried for uttering, and that at the time of so uttering, he had one other piece of counterfeit money. You say, here it is necessary to state he is an utterer, and so they should in their judgment; when I look to the judgment, I see it is as upon a common utterer; the record states this, whereupon it was considered by the Court - what was considered? - All these facts, and the conclusion of law is, he is a common utterer; and having considered this, that he should be imprisoned in the common goal of the county aforesaid; then the Court has taken into consideration the offence as proved from the conclusion of law, and they put the punishment on him as a common utterer; it cannot be necessary for the Justices to give reasons why they passed the sentence, they are, by the Act of Parliament, to see whether it is the case of a common utterer, and if once they establish that, it is not necessary to charge a man below with being a common utterer. If, after the Jury have given their verdict, you chose to have the case reserved, I will do it, as I will never stand between the prisoner and any advantage that may possibly be derived

from it; sitting here singly, I confess I have not a shadow of a doubt that the indictment is well laid; if you think otherwise, I will respite the judgment.

GUILTY Death , aged 26.

Judgment respited for the opinion of the Judges.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-90

263. ROBERT CLARKE was indicted for feloniously receiving sixty-four yards of cotton, knowing it to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM DRAKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. I am a linen-draper, in Ratcliff-highway: On the 16th of December last, I lost several pieces of striped cotton out of my shop, which I had seen eight or nine minutes before. On the 2d of January, I discovered a part at the shop of Mr Curling, a stop-seller, in Old Gravel-lane, the pieces had my mark, which I put on myself; in consequence of what he told me, he and I went to the shop of Mr. Clarke, where the defendant was introduced to me as the master; Rodgers, the officer, was waiting over the way, I asked the defendant to let me look at some ready made shirts; I found fault with all I saw, and told him I wanted a very narrow stripe; I pressed very hard, and at last the man brought me out a piece of narrow striped cotton not made into shirts; I examined it, and saw my own private mark, the defendant was not then present, but I sent Curling out to bring Rodgers; when he came, I told the shopman I wanted to see Mr. Clarke; he said, my master is below; when I saw him, I said he had got some of my striped cotton, and hoped he would tell me how he came by it; he said he did not know; I asked him what he gave per yard; he hesitated a little while, and said, I believe sixteen-pence, or sixteen-pence halfpenny; I asked him to recollect who he bought them of; he smiled, and said, I must confess I bought them of a Jew; we found several quantities out; the little narrow-stripe cost me two shillings, the others cost me one-and-twenty-pence, or one and twenty-pence-halfpenny; I asked him how they came to be cut into remnants; he said, for the convenience of his customers.

WILLIAM CURLING sworn. - I keep a stop shop in Old Gravel-lane, and purchased some striped cotton of the defendant, the 31st of December, I cannot say the quantity, but it is in the bill of parcels; Mr. Drake asked me where I got them, I shewed him the bill of parcels, and went with him to Mr. Clarke's, where what he has related took place.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The name of the master of the shop was John Clarke ? - A. Yes.

Q. He was ill then? - A. Yes, and is dead since; during his illness, the defendant managed the business, it is a wholesale warehouse for all sorts of things in a a very large way; I did not know a shop of more respectability.

Q. When Mr. Drake asked for the cotton, did not the young man shew it him as ready as could be? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Without nesitation? - A. He said, he could not tell exactly how he got it; he rather hesitated at first, but afterwards he said, he believed he bought them of a Jew.

Q. Do shops of respectability buy pieces of striped cotton of people who go about the street? - A. A shop of this description, I believe, does not, they buy them wholesale, by pieces. I was rather surprised he bought them, and did not know who he bought them of.( Edward Rodgers being sworn, corroborated the testimoney of the foregoing witnesses.)(The examination of Robert Clarke read as follows:)

I, Robert Clarke , am brother to John Clarke , wholesale saleman, No. 3, Union-row, Rosemary-lane, and conduct his business; we do not enter any thing we buy in the books, but do of what we fell; the whole of the pieces of cotton were bought by me, of a Jew, who he is, I don't know, or where he lives, but should know him again if I saw him; I do not recollect when I bought them, or what I paid for them, it was between nine and one in the sore part of the day; I had offered money before, which he refused, and took the cotton away, but returned with the cotton between one and three, when they were measured, and he was paid for them by my sister-in-law, Elizabeth Clarke , or her assistant; I don't recollect how much was paid; part of the cotton was sold by the man in the warehouse, to Mr. Curling.

ROBERT CLARKE .(The cotton produced and identified by Mr. Drake.)

Mr. Gurney addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant.

ELIZABETH DRAKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. Q. I believe you are the widow of the late Mr. John Clarke ? - A. Yes; he was alive at the time of this transaction, but so ill that he could not attend the shop; we are in an extensive concern, and had four men besides my brother; these articles were brought by a man whom we knew to be a dealer, but did not know his name, or his place of abode; my brother bought them, but was not acquainted with the article, having never bought any before; they were not in such small remnants as they are now; we cut them for the convenience of the customers, and we do not pretend to deal in new articles; I do not recollect the piece given, but I measured them, and the shop-woman paid for them with the money which belonged to my husband; the defendant had no interest whatever in it; sometimes we buy of a hundred people in a day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long has your brother acted in the shop? - A. Some few months while my husband was ill; he has been warehouseman some few years; if new articles happen to come in other lots, we buy them, but don't go to warehouses; these were in remnants; I don't think it is ever the case in our trade to ask where they come from; I have not seen the man since, nor have I given any directions to find him; I was obliged to leave Mrs. Loman at home to mind the business.

WILLIAM RIDGWAY sworn. - I live at Sparrow-corner, and am a salesman; I buy piece-goods very frequently, and most of us do.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you buy sixty yards at a time of a man you know nothing of? - A. No, not of people we know nothing of, but we buy pieces let them be of what length they will; I would buy a thousand pieces if I thought they were honestly come by; I should not like to buy them with the ends off; I generally buy my things ready made; I deal in stops and clothes.

The defendant called four witnesses, who gave him a good character, GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 100l.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-91

264. PETER TUFFS was indicted for feloniously receiving nine yards of toilenett, six yards of swansdown, and fifty yards of cotton cloth, called nankeen, knowing them to have been stolen .

In consequence of the absence of the principal witness, the defendant was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18020217-92

265. JOHN PARKER was indicted for feloniously receiving goods knowing them to have been stolen .

No evidence being offered against the defendant, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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