Old Bailey Proceedings, 2nd December 1801.
Reference Number: 18011202
Reference Number: f18011202-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 2d of DECEMBER, 1801, and following Days, BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD,

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1801.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE Sir JOHN EAMER , KNIGHT, LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Right Hon. RICHARD LORD ALVANLEY , Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir NASH GROSE , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ROBERT GRAHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; Sir WILLIAM STAINES , Knight, Alderman; Alderman BOYDELL; Alderman WATSON; Alderman NEWMAN; Alderman PERRING; Alderman SHAW; and Alderman CLARK; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Thomas Atkinson ,

John Freeman ,

William Tomlinson ,

Thomas Purvis ,

James Abbiss ,

Joseph Ashton ,

Joseph Scott ,

Thomas Wilkinson ,

Samuel Conder ,

John Waugh ,

John Thornton ,

William Ewster .

First Middlesex Jury.

Stephen Jarvis ,

Richard Franks ,

James Stevens ,

William Kendal ,

John Thomas ,

Ivey Hares ,

Richard Johnston ,

Horatio Robson ,

William Stewart ,

Ebenezar Wood ,

John Knight ,

James Leucharz .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Nimmo ,

John Christie ,

John Beard ,

Joseph Seyeane ,

Matthew Betts ,

Thomas Nash ,

Richard Brooks ,

Patrick Hendry ,

William Farmer ,

Robert Clarke ,

Richard Stiles ,

Matthew Smith .

Reference Number: t18011202-1

1 JOHN-WEBB ELKINGTON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 31st of August , a certain bill of exchange to the tenor and effect following, that is to say.

No. 1364. £23 Oct. 11th.

Birmingham, August 8th, 1801.

Two months after date pay to Mr. Joseph Brown, or Order, twenty-three pounds, value received, which place to account, as advised by Spooner, Attwood, and Co.

Thomas Davis and Co.

Sir James Esdaile , Esdaile, 1324 c.

Hammet, Esdaile, and Hammet,

Bankers, London.

with intention to defraud William Molloy .

Second Count. With uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third and Fourth Counts. With feloniously forging and uttering as true, knowing it to be forged, an acceptance of the like bill of exchange, as follows: Accepted for Sir James Esdaile, Hammet, Esdaile, and Hammet. J.B. With the like intention.

Fifth and Sixth Counts. With forging and uttering as true, knowing it to be forged, an indorsement on the like bill of exchange, of the name of Joseph Brown , with the like intention.

WILLIAM MOLLOY sworn. - I am a shoemaker , and live at No. 16, High-street, St. Giles's: On Thursday, the 10th of September, the prisoner came to my shop to purchase three dozen pair of shoes of the same sort as he had purchased on the 31st of August, which was the first time I saw him; I looked them out, and he approved of them; they came to nine pounds six shillings, and he gave me a bill for twenty-three pounds upon Sir James Esdaile , Hammet, and Esdaile, to change.(Produces the bill.) I took it to Mr. Lee, a currier, and the prisoner remained in the shop; I got change there, and gave the prisoner the difference; I think it was twelve pounds odd shillings; I asked him where I should send the shoes; he said, he would send word by the gentleman who was with him, of the name of John Nabbs, whom I knew to be a Manchester gentleman, a friend of mine having empowered me to settle a debt of three hundred pounds with him, and seeing the prisoner with him, I did not inquire about him; when I had given the change, they went away; the shoes lay in my shop for some days, when he sent a written direction by this gentleman to send the shoes to the Angel Inn, Angel-street, St. Martin's-le-Grand, to be left at the bar for Mr. John-Webb Elkington. I did not send them for two days after, and, in the mean time, he sent a porter for them, who took them away, but brought them back on Saturday, and said, he had taken the shoes to the Black-Dog, Mile-End-turnpike, but the landlord would not pay him; I thanked him, and paid him; the prisoner, in about two days after, called; and said, he was very sorry I had the trouble, but he would pay all the expence of carriage, which he did, and took the shoes; this was about seven days after his first purchasing them. On the 10th of September, he came to me a second time to purchase the same quantity of shoes for one Captain Williams , a relation of his, who was going to America; they were to be at the Dundee Arms by twelve o'clock; he presented a bill for fifteen pounds; I said, I had no change; he said, he was going to an acquaintance where he could get cash for the note, and he would call and pay me in cash; he went away, and came again about four or five o'clock in the afternoon; he said, he was disappointed, as his friend was out, and had I not got so much change in the house; I said, I had not; he went away, and called a third time, about seven o'clock; I told him, if he would leave the bill, I would get the cash, but I could not do it sooner than the morning. O surely, says he, you are very welcome, and he indorsed it immediately in his own name; he called upon me about eight o'clock the next morning; I said, I had not got the change, but to call a little after nine; he called at ten, when I was out; I went into the City to inquire about the bill, and found it was a bad one; he called again at eleven, and I asked him how he could be so cruel as to come to me a second time with a bad bill; he said, a bad bill! that cannot be, I am not afraid of it, I am certain it is good, and I will make it good to you; I told him, I hoped he would do so; the second parcel of shoes were in the shop; he wrote a note to some friend of his in Rosemary-lane, a Mr. Postlethwaite, at Mr. Beaumont's, but he never came; the prisoner was taken into custody on the 11th, and on the 18th he was fully committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When this man first came to your shop, he came with Mr. Nabbs, whom you knew? - A. Yes, or I should not have given him credit.

Q. Upon all the inquiry you made afterwards, did you not discover the account he gave of himself was true? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did he not tell you he had the bill from a person of the name of Carter? - A. He said, a man owed him near fifty pounds, but I cannot recollect the name; I did not see any body but the prisoner and Mr. Nabbs.

Mr. JOHN HORNIDGE sworn. - I am clerk to Esdaile and Co. (Looks at the bill.) This is not the acceptance of Esdaile and Co. I accept alone for that house; the partners accept, but no clerk but myself; I write only John Hornidge; the partners accept for Esdaile and Co. This is not their hand-writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know whether the partners have or not given authority to some other person to accept as well as yourself? - A. I never understood they had; none of the partners are here.

Q. The bill is indorsed in his own name? - A. Yes.(The bill read.)

Prisoner's defence. I received those bills at Birmingham of one Carter, who is a carpenter and joiner; I don't know his Christian name; he owed me a little money when I was with my father, in October last, but I cannot say justly the sum; he gave me those bills for that money, and I advanced eight guineas on them; when I came to London, I took one of them to Mr. Williams. who is a distant relation of mine, and he wanted three dozen of shoes to take to Africa with him; that he said he should not received any money till he got into the Downs, and could not pay for them; I told him I would advance it till them, which I did; he wanted some stop things, which I also ordered for him but, when I found the bills were not good, I ordered the shoes back again; the stop things I never had.

Court. Q. (To Molloy.) Did you get the shoes back again? - A. Yes, all but one pair.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Brown Graham .

Reference Number: t18011202-2

2. JOHN WEBB ELKINGTON was again indicted for feloniously forging, on the 10th of September , a certain bill of excange to the tenor and effect following, that is to say,

No. 3131. Litchfield, August 1st, 1801.

Two months after date pay Mr. Thomas Brown, or Order, the sum of fifteen pounds, value received, which place to account, as advised, Addressed to Messrs. Samuel Yates and Co. signed J.B. with intentioin to defraud William Molloy .

Second Count. With uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third and Fourth Counts. With feloniously forging and uttering as true, knowing it to be forged, an acceptance of the like bill of excnage, as follows: Accepted, Yates and Co. signed J.B. and with feloniously forging and uttering as true, an indorsement on the like bill of exchange, of the name of Thomas Brown, with an intention to defraud the said Thomas Brown .

There being no additional evidence, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron. Graham.

Reference Number: t18011202-3

3. JOHN WEBB ELKINGTON was again indicted for feloniously forging, on the 9th of September, a bill of exchange , to the tenor and effect following, that is to say,

No. 836. £16 Oct. 25th.

Aug 22d. 1801, Soho, near Birmingham.

Two months after date pay to Mr. Joseph Brown, or Order, sexteen pounds, value received, which place to account as advised.

Matthew Bolton.

Sir James Esdaile, Esdaile,

Hammet, Esdaile, and Hamment,

Bankers London.

with intention to defraud James Firth .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third and Fourth Counts. For forging an acceptance to the said bill, which is as follows: Accepted for Sir James Esdaile and Co. James Barnet, with the like intention.

Fifth and Sixth Counts. For uttering and publishing as true the same acceptance knowing it to be forged, with intentioin to defraud Peter Esdaile , William Esdaile , and James Hammet .

JAMES FIRTH sworn. - I am a slopseller , at No. 98, Minories; the prisoner came to my house on Wednesday, the 9th of September, about five o'clock, and said he wanted some clothes for the mate of a ship going to Africa, of the name of Williams, and told me to make the bill out in that name; he said, he should want about ten pounds worth; that he had not small change enough to pay for them, but had a very good bill, which he shewed me, and said was as good as the Bank; I looked at it, and gave it him again, saying, we would look out the goods, which we did; after that, he told me to make out the bill, which I did according to his directions; he then asked me if I could give him change for it; I said, I could not; he said, he had received it of their brokers, Messrs. Hopkins and Gray, in Change-alley; I said, he was stranger to me and I to him, but that it was customary, when people looked out goods, if they did not pay for them, to leave some deposit, and asked him if he would leave me a guinea; he said, he had no objection, and felt in his pocket, but said he had not got any small change; and at last concluded that he would leave me this bill, which he did, and I took care of it form that time to this; he was to call again, but I did not see

him till about ten days after at Bow-street, when I was bound over to prosecute.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What business do you carry on? - A. A slopseller.

Q. What is your partner's name? - A. I have none.

Q. What did the goods come to? - A. Nine pounds eight shillings.

Q. He produced you a bill? - A. Yes.

Q. This is not-the bill? - A. Yes, it is; he gave me a bill, which I returned, and he put it in his pocket.

Q. Whether that he took out the second time is the same bill which he took out at first, you cannot undertake to say? - A. I cannot.

Q. When he produced a bill the second time, that he deposited with you? - A. Yes.

Q. And he left that with you for the purpose of enquiring as to the validity of it? - A. No, he did not.

Q. You did not give him any thing for it? - A. No; he said he would leave it with me while he went and got change.

Q. Until he went and got change to pay for the goods? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it he proposed to return with the money? - A. That evening, or the next day.

Q. He was taken the next day, I believe? - A. That was the 9th; he was taken the 11th.

Q. Did he not tell you to make every enquiry whether it was good or not? - A. No, I don't recollect that.

Q. Did the bill purport to be endorsed? - A. Yes.

Q. Among the rest I see the names of Hopkins and Gray? - A. Yes, but they are not here.

Court. Q. Did he shew you this bill the first time? - A. To the best of my knowledge, but I cannot say; it was addressed to Sir James Esdaile that I saw.

Q. Did you mark any thing on it? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Whether the bill you saw the first time was of the same amount as the second? - A. I believe it was, but I cannot take upon myself to swear it; I understood it to be the same.

JOHN HORNIDGE sworn. - I am accepting-clerk to Sir James Esdaile and Co. (The bill shewn him.) This is not my acceptance.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Suppose you accept a bill by mistake, are you not liable, and would it not fall on yourself instead of the house? - A. No.

Q. Would they not look upon you as responsible? - A. No, certainly not.

Q. Are you the only acceptor? - A. Yes.

Q. Are there any partners of the house here to-day? - A. No.

Q. Is that the hand-writing of either of the partners? - A. No.

Q. The partners, who gave you the authority to accept, can give it to others? - A. Certainly.

Q. Whether or not they have given authority to others you cannot say, except what they have told you? - A. Certainly not.

Court. (To Firth.) Q. You say, you did not undertake to deliver these goods without the money, or were they to be delivered without? - A. No, they were not.

Q. You conceived the guinea as a deposit to bind the bargain? - A. First, I asked him for a guinea; he felt in his pocket, and had not got any.

Q. Suppose he had given the guinea, you did not agree to part with the goods? - A. He was not to have them without ready money.

Jury. We are not satisfied it is the same bill, and we understood he only left the bill till he went to fetch the money.

Court. If you have made up your minds upon that, it seems unnecessary to go any further.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-4

4. WILLIAM TRINGFIELD was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 10th of May , a certain bill of exchange , to the tenor and effect following, that is to say,

£24 10s. Manchester, May 7th, 1801.

Two months after date pay to me, or order, the sum of twenty-four pounds ten shillings, and place the same to account, for value received.

Jonathan Lees.

To Mr. John Ruggles,

Army-Broker, No. 9, Downing-street.

Accepted, John Ruggles.

with intention to defraud James Coe and James Brown .

Second Count. With uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

Third and Fourth Counts. With forging an indorsement, and uttering it as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

Fifth Count. With uttering and publishing as true the like forged bill of exchange, knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud Jonathan Lees .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JAMES COE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partnership with James Brown ; we are linen-drapers , and live in Oxford-street: The prisoner came to us on the 10th of May last, and said he wanted a quantity of goods, if I would take a bill on a respectable person; I said, I would make inquiry, and he left me the bill; he said Ruggles, the acceptor, was an army-agent, and had a country-house at Walworth, and he gave me a bill of the office, in Downing-street; I said, if I found it regular, I would take it; I went to

Downing-street to know if it was a good acceptance; it appeared to be a house of business; I saw several people there, one of whom, who is here, told me it was the acceptance of Mr. Ruggles, which induced me to take the bill; I saw the prisoner again on the 13th, when he looked out goods to the amount of twenty-seven pounds, which I took home with him to his house in Titchborne-street; they were looked at by his wife, and left there; he paid me the difference; the bill was returned from the banker's, when due, unpaid; I had paid it to Cass and Brown, in the Poultry; I immediately went to Ruggles's house, but he was not at home; and one of the clerks, named Kelly, said, Mr. Ruggles had been defrauded out of a considerable sum of money; I then went to the prisoner's lodgings, where I took the things, but he was gone; I met him accidentally about a fortnight after in Great Russel-street, Bloomsbury; I told him the bill was returned unpaid, and that he had presented it for no other purpose than to defraud me; I had a friend with me, and he led us round about St. Giles's and the town till he got to Queenhithe, where he escaped from us in a boat; about a fortnight afterwards I met him again in Great Russel-street, near the same spot, when I had him taken to Bow-street; he said, he thought the bill was paid, and that he had taken it of his friend, Lees; that it was not then in his power to give me the money; I said, if he would take me to any respectable person that would say he was an honest man, he might pay me at his leisure; my brother was then with me; he endeavoured to get away several times.(The bill of exchange read.)

WILLIAM MINCHIN sworn. - I know a person of the name of John Ruggles, at No.9, Downing-street; he calls himself an army-agent or broker; I was a sort of porter, who opened the door and took messages; the prisoner was at the house several times; he used to come for money that Ruggles owed him, as I understood. (The bill shewn him,) This is the same bill I saw at Hatton-garden; the prisoner brought it to Mr. Ruggles for acceptance; he at first objected to accept it, saying, he had no correspondence at Manchester; the prisoner said, he was a very good man, a respectable man, a responsible man, at Manchester; and, at last, Mr. Ruggles accepted it; I verify believe it to be his writing; this must be about May or June; Mr. Ruggles has lodgings at South-Lambeth; Downing-street was the Agency-Office. Agency-Office was on the brass plate on the door; only the lower part of the house was furnished; there were some officers came at first to buy and sell; Mr. Ruggles continued there till the bills became due, and then he kept away from the house, and got another person to come there in his stead, of the name of Kelly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you first went there, there was some agency business? - A. Yes, there were some officers who called; there was a person employed there as clerk, I don't know his name; there were two rooms, an antichamber and office; the bill was accepted in the office; I opened the door as porter, but was sometimes called into the office; I will swear, upon my oath, I was in the office when the bill was brought in for acceptance; I was not in when it was accepted, but it is his hand-writing.

JONATHAN LEES sworn. - I have a release from the prosecutors; I have resided at Manchester upwards of ten years, and am a silk and cotton manufacturer, and cotton spinner; I am well known there, and am in partnership with my brother, John Lees; I never saw the prisoner at the bar, or heard of John Ruggles , till this transaction; this bill is not of my drawing, or handwriting, or do I know any thing further of it than this transaction; I know a person of the name of Jonathan Lees, at Manchester, who is a journeyman hatter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Lees is a very common name in that country, I believe? - A. Lees is a very common name, but Jonathan is not; I was brought up within a quarter of a mile of where he lived; he is not a respectable man; I have not seen him for two years, but I made inquiry prior to my coming up, and found he still lives in the same place, and follows the same occupation; I never saw him write.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

For the prisoner.

CHARLES HYNDES sworn. - I am a Serjeant at Mace, and know a person of the name of Jonathan Lees . (The bill shewn the witness.) I believe this to be his hand-writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where have you lived for the last twelve months? - A. I have lived between four and five years at the Pitt's-head, in the Old-Bailey, No. 53; formerly Jonathan Lees used to go with me as my follower; I parted with him about six years ago, but he lodged at the same house I did about two years ago, and was in the leather fancy dying way; it is out of my power to say where he dealt for it; he used to live over the water; I have seen him within these three or four months; I met him over in Blacksriars-road, but cannot tell where he lived; he had some leather under his arm, and seemed very poor; I did not know Mr. Tringfield till last Sessions, but I knew Mr. Ruggles when he was in the recruiting line in Westminster; I know Lees was a Manchester man, and have seen him among a great number of his countrymen; his name was Jonathan Lees ; I know his Christian name, because he has witnessed many bail-bonds, and served

copies of writs for me; he used to sign his name generally John, with a dot.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-5

5. ELIZABETH AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , sixty-three yards of ribbon, value 32s. the property of Eloisa Wickins .

ELOISA WICKINS sworn. - I am a haberdasher , and live in St. Clement's Church-yard : On the 3d of October, the prisoner came into my shop, about two o'clock, to buy a piece of twopenny black ribbon and one yard of pink ribbon; while I was serving her, I saw her take two rolls out of the drawer; another person, like a servant, came in, and asked for some white ribbon; I detected the prisoner with another roll of white in her hand; she put the two first in her pocket; I had not sold them to her; I fastened the door, and called for assistance; then she threw down three rolls, and I sent for the constable, who found another roll in her pocket; she was not there more than five minutes; she had taken five rolls in all; she had been in the habit of coming often to buy ribbon, and my losing so much, made me suspect her. (The ribbon produced, and sworn to.)

JOHN GLASS sworn. - I happened to be in the house, and being called, I immediately went into the shop; I saw the prisoner with a large cloak on, and a child sitting on the counter; Miss Wickings said, here is a woman who has been stealing ribbons; I saw the counter clear, and saw several pieces of ribbon dropping from under the prisoner's cloak to the floor; I then called a constable, who searched her, and found a piece of black ribbon.

JAMES THOMAS sworn. - I took the prisoner, and found this ribbon in her pocket. (The ribbon identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court. GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-6

6. WILLIAM FLINT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , nine ounces nine pennyweights of gold, value 23l. the property of Charles Aldridge .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of James Richards .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JAMES RICHARDS sworn. - On Thursday, the 12th of November, I sent to Mr. Aldridge, by William Edwards, an ingot of gold, which weighed nine ounces nine pennyweights; the proportion of fine gold to alloy was fourteen ounces three quarters to nine ounces and a quarter of alloy.

WILLIAM EDWARDS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Richards; and on the 12th of November last I took an ingot of gold from him to Mr. Aldridge's, in Falcon-square, Aldersgate-street, to be flatted; and, while I was there, it was lost.

Mr. CHARLES ALDRIDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 12th of last month, was an ingot of gold brought you by the last witness? - A. Yes, which was lost; I did not see it, but I found it was booked.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know, in point of fact, that any such ingot ever came? - A. No, not as seeing it.

Q. You carry on your business by the servants that are in the mill? - A. Sometimes; I cannot always be there.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. (To Edwards.) You took the ingot which your master gave you? - A. Yes, and delivered it to Mr. Aldridge's son; he is not here now; I had it again when it was flattened; on the 12th of November, I first went to Goldsmith's-hall, near five o'clock, and after I got the work, I called at Mr. Aldridge's with the gold to be flatted, and some silver; when it was flatted, I put it into a bag, made it secure, and came down stairs with the gold in one hand and the silver in the other; I met young Mr. Aldridge, who took my hat off my head, and run into the mill with it; I went after him, and there is a bench a little way in on which I placed both bags; I followed him to the further end of the mill for my hat, and when I came back for my work, I saw but one bag; I called out there was but one bag, and young Aldridge seemed very much struck; the bag contained sixty-four ounces sixteen pennyweights of silver beside.

Q. How long were you kept without your hat? - A. About four minutes.

Q. The gold was flatted? - A. Yes, not in an ingot; it might be about the eighth of an inch thick.

GEORGE CLAYTON sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Cowie, in Falcon-square: On Friday, the 13th of November, the prisoner came to offer an ingot of gold for sale; the Tuesday before I bought some silver of him, when he said his name was Lee, therefore I did not ask his name again; he said he lived in Shoe-lane; he asked me for twenty pounds in advance on the gold, but I said it would be of no great consequence to him, and I had rather-not do it till the assay was made, as it was impossible to know the value, and it would be the same to him if he had the money next day; he saw Mr. Aldridge's bills on the counter, and made an observation that he saw by them that Mr. Aldridge's flatting-mills had been robbed; he left it with me; it weighed nine ounces four pennyweights; I assayed it, and found it was seven carats and one grain worse than standard; twenty-two parts of fine gold and two of alloy make the stan

dard; I soon after made Mr. Aldridge acquainted with it; I was present when the prisoner was taken; Mr. Aldridge asked him how he came by it; he said, he melted it from buckles, rings, and other gold; it is impossible to say with certainly whether they would produce gold of this quality; but, in my opinion, they would not; for there are rings of different descriptions; it is impossible to say what it would lose in remelting; there is no general allowance; for sometimes there is a grain or two left in the crucible.

Court. Q. Is there always a loss in remelting? - A. A trifling loss; but it is impossible to say what.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Is an ingot of gold of nine ounces four pennyweights, the same ingot? - A. It may be the same gold, making an allowance for melting; there is nothing in the look of gold by which I can tell whether it has been melted once or twice, or five hundred times.

Q. Is there any thing by the view of this ingot which the prisoner brought to you, from which you could tell it had ever been of nine ounces nine pennyweights? - A. No.

Q. Half a grain would make a difference between two ingots? - A. Certainly.

Q. Can you tell by this, that it was ever melted from any other ingot? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Then there is nothing by which you can contradict the account that it had been melted from buckles, rings, and other gold? - A. No.

Q. Will gold alter in its quality by repeated melting? - A. Yes, get better.

Q. I should be glad to know what was the thickness of this ingot the prisoner brought to you? - A. I don't know; I have it here. (Produces it.)

Q. That which was lost from Mr. Aldridge's was about the eighth of an inch thick - therefore there is no similarity between that lost by Mr. Aldridge and this? - A. No.

Q. Is there any thing in the appearance of this by which you can ascertain that it was ever an ingot of a greater size? - A. It is impossible.

Q. At the time he came, the bill of Mr. Aldridge's loss lay on the counter? - A. Yes.

Q. How far is Mr. Aldridge's flatting-mills from your house? - A. Next door but one.

Q. He wanted twenty pounds? - A. Yes, but he asked for twenty pounds before he saw the bill.

Q. He left the gold with you after seeing the bill? - A. Yes.

Q. He had full notice of the robbery, and it was the subject of conversation? - A. Yes, the bills were laying there.

Q. It was advertised with a reward, and still he left it with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he call, agreeably to his appointment, next day? - A. Yes.

Q. You had the same week before this transaction paid him for some metal? - A. Yes, for some silver, and that was the only time I had seen him.

Q. The prisoner was very lame, was not he? - A. Yes.

Q. And not likely to whip off with a thing in a minute? - A. No; he sent his son, but I refused to settle with him, and said the prisoner must come himself, which he did.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (To Richards.) Supposing the gold to be remelted, what, in your opinion, would be the deficiency arising from it? - A. I should think it very well melted if it was not more than three pennyweights, or should I be dissatisfied if it had been five pennyweights.

Q. Are you enabled to say, from any belief you have, whether it is or not the same gold you lost? - A. I am satisfied it is the same gold, from the quantity and quality, which I made known to Mr. Aldridge prior to the assay being made.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Look at that ingot, and answer upon your oath - will you swear that has been melted more than once? - A. I think I may say it has; because gold, in its pure state, must be melted more than once to be of this quality.

Q. Do you swear it has been melted from one ingot into another? - A. I may venture to swear it is the same ingot.

Q. Will you venture to swear it has been melted from one ingot into another? - A. Certainly not; no man can.

Q. Then you cannot swear this was ever your ingot? - A. I certainly cannot, but I verify believe it is; it is impossible to swear it was another ingot.

Q. The ingot you lost was about the eighth of an inch thick? - A. Certainly.

Q. Your ingot, if ever it was melted again, might have been either nine ounces three pennyweights or three ounces five pennyweights, might it not? - A. We could not tell to a pennyweight what it would turn out.

Q. Therefore your ingot, if ever it was lost from Mr. Aldridge's, might be of the weight of nine ounces three pennyweights, four pennyweights, five pennyweights, or any other? - A. I should have thought it might be very slovenly melted at nine ounces three pennyweights.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, might not your ingot, if ever it was remelted, have been only nine ounces three pennyweights? - A. I can only say it would be slovenly melted if it was no more; they might lose half of it by carelessness; I should think it a great deficiency; if I had melted it myself, I should have expected it to have been nine ounces five pennyweights, or six pennyweights.

Q. Even then you, with the greatest care, might remelt it at nine ounces five pennyweights, or six pennyweights? - A. Just so; more or less might

adhere to the melting-pot; I should have thought it a great deficiency if it was less, and should have been dissatisfied.

Q. Even your ingot in re-melting might have varied a penny-weight if it was done by a skilful man? - A. It certainly might.

Q. Then how can you swear it is your ingot? - A. I do not swear from the quantity but the quality: I think that five thousand quantities of gold might have been made that would not turn out that precise quality.

Q. But in your re-melting it might vary a pennyweight? - A. Certainly.

Q. Suppose I gave you two bars of gold of 90z. 9 pennyweights each, one might come out 90z. 5 and the other 90z. 6 pennyweights? - A. They might, but I should find it in the ingot; I admit they might vary, but I say I should find it within a very few grains.

Q. A. few grains make the difference between two different ingots? - A. Certainly; but I do not admit that one ingot put into the pot lighter than another would turn out the lightest, for it might turn out the heaviest; what is lost in the ingot may be in the pot.

Q. It is impossible to tell what will be the precise weight? - A. Certainly it is impossible.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You do not speak to the ingot by the quantity but by the quality? - A. By the quality.

(To Mr. Aldridge.) Q. From the quality stated, as a person conversant with gold, can you form any believe as to that being the gold stolen? - A. I cannot have a doubt in my own mind, though the shape is altered, that it is Mr. Richard's gold, from the quality of it.

Q. You were informed of the quality of it before this was assayed? - A. Yes, and it turned out the same in quality.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did the quantity turn out the same? - A. No, it did not.

Q. Tell me how many times that has been melted? - A. It may have been melted many times.

Q. And from buckles and rings? - A. No, it is not of that quality, it is almost impossible.

Q. Is it impossible? - A. It is not impossible.

Q. From a variety of gold, some of one alloy and some of another, may it not produce that? - A. I am sure any body who knows any thing of metal would not have an idea of it.

Q. Can any body say that this has been in the shape of an ingot one-eighth of an inch thick, skilled or not? - A. Surely not; I cannot by looking at it.

Q. Can you by quality or weight ascertain that has ever been an ingot of one eighth of an inch thick? - A. Certainly not; to say that upon oath is impossible.

Q. In melting the same ingot might it not produce, under different melters, different weights? - A. Yes.

ROBERT ALBION COX, Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Speaking as a man conversant with the quality and nature of gold, is a person able to speak from resemblance to the quality of gold? - A. To quality I think he is, but with regard to the shape, I don't see how it can be identified.

Q. In re-melting a piece of gold, weighing nine ounces nine penny-weights, how many pennyweights would it lose? - A. I should conceive from two to three penny-weights; the melting may vary from the different heat you give it, and some of the grains may remain in the crucible.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. There is nothing about this from which you can say it ever was an eighth of an inch thick? - A. Certainly not; it may have been in a hundred shapes.

Q. Or can you say whether it is the produce of buckles or rings mixed with other gold? - A. It is impossible to say; if I had seen the gold before, I could tell tolerably well.

Q. An ingot of nine ounces nine penny-weights, might, by one melter, produce nine ounces seven penny-weights; and, by another, only nine ounces five penny-weights? - A. Certainly.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE, Jun. sworn. - On Thursday, the 12th of November, I received an ingot of gold from Mr. Richards's servant, flatted it in the mill, and delivered it back.

JOHN REED sworn. - I am an officer of the City; I searched the prisoner's house, in Plumbtree-court, Shoe-lane, on the 14th, and found some crucibles, charcoal, a ladle, in which both gold and silver had been melted, and some dross of silver in a tea-chest; the prisoner's name is Flint, I never knew him by the name of Lee.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (To Mr. Richards.) Are those the sort of things used in melting? - A. Yes, I use them myself.

Mr. Aldridge. There is the appearance of nothing but lead in the ladle.

Prisoner's defence. I am a goldsmith and jeweller by trade, and in the course of my business buy and exchange old gold and silver; the gold now produced I melted myself; I received it from a gentleman at Portsmouth, with one hundred and fifty-one ounces of silver, which I melted the day before I left it at Mrs. Cowie's, and for which she gave me thirty-five pounds, and paid me the remainder the next day; on the Friday following, I left nine ounces four penny-weights of gold with Mr. Clayton, to be assayed, and the next day I sent my boy for the money; on which Mr. Clayton said, he had better send his master; in about an hour after, I called myself, and, when I went, they took the liberty of saying it was the gold that was lost;

it is very unlikely that I should go to the next door to sell gold I had stolen; you may be assured, I received it it in a fair way; when Mr. Aldridge was before the Lord-Mayor, he swore that gold had been melted in the ladle, though no such thing could be done; if you attempted to melt nine ounces five penny-weights in a ladle, you would lose three parts. I hope, Gentlemen, you will take my case into consideration, as I am not guilty.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-7

7. MICHAEL GAVIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , eleven muslin handkerchiefs, value 11s. three towels, value 3s. a shirt, value 2s. a Bank-note, value 10l. two Bank-notes, value 5l. each, two Bank-notes, value 2l. each, and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of John Lord De Blaquire .

JOHN LORD DE BLAQUIRE sworn. - The prisoner has lived with me six or eight years; for some little time past I have missed money and linen, but I certainly had no suspicion of him at first; I have been pretty correct in my family accounts and money matters, and have been long in the habit, when I have had money from the bankers, of putting it into a box or drawer; very lately I had occasion to suspect I was robbed; I missed, among other things, some trisling articles of linen, particularly within this week or ten days, a parcel of neck-cloths, which could not be taken without something like infatuation on the part of the prisoner, for there were twelve brought home only within the week, and he took eleven; I missed also some Bank notes which I had marked; having this suspicion and missing them, on the Wednesday morning I went to the Magistrates, who sent an officer to apprehend the prisoner: I think it proper to say, that though I did not think myself at liberty to pardon this man, yet till this happened I have found him one of the most honest and most diligent I ever knew in my life; during our troubles in Ireland, and the discussion of the Union, I am sure my property and my life have been in his power, and I believe I owe it to him that I enjoy my life.

- HAMILTON sworn. - I belong to Marlborough-street office, and apprehended the prisoner; I searched him and found a one pound note and a key of his trunk, which I took to the office, and in it were three notes and the other articles mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner voluntarily selected these and a variety of other valuable articles belonging to his Lordship, saying he had stolen them from his Lordship, and wished they might be returned.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say but that I am extremely sorry I have been guilty of such behaviour to so worthy and so good a master.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-8

8. GEORGE SPIKES and JOHN DOE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Gooding , about the hour of eight in the night, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a metal watch, value 2l. 2s. the property of the said William Gooding .

MARY GOODING sworn. - I live at No. 1, Charlton-street, Upper Mary-le-bonne ; I know the person of John Doe ; my husband is a plumber and glazier : On the 9th of November, a few minutes before eight I was in the parlour, and saw Doe, and another person, who has much the appearance of Spikes, open the shop door and come in; I went out into the shop, and they asked me to sell them a pot of paint; I told them we never sold paint; they got me up in a corner of the shop out of sight of the parlour door, while a third man went in and took the watch from over the fire-place, but I don't know who he was; I left the watch in the parlour; the person who was with Doe gave me a push on the shoulder that caused me to fall, and said to the others, d-n your eyes run, and they immediately ran away; I looked for the watch but it was gone, and have not seen it since; I looked after them, and saw them turn the corner of Mary-le-bonne-street; I noticed Doe particularly; the other asked for the paint, and Doe said he did not care what he paid for it; I took a light with me into the shop by which I saw him; there was nobody there but myself and them, and my child asleep; I was with the officer on the 10th, when he took them in Dyot-street, St. Giles's; they were coming out of a public-house, and I immediately pointed out Doe, and Spikes I thought had the appearance of the other man.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - I apprehended the prisoners on the 10th of last month, in Dyot-street, just as they came out of the Turk's Head public-house; the prosecutrix said she was very certain Doe was one; but could not be so clear as to Spikes; I found no watch.

Doe's defence. I am innocent as the child unborn; I had witnesses here yesterday to prove I was elsewhere at the time; but they are not here to-day.

Spikes's defence. I know nothing about it; I never saw the place.

John Doe , GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

George Spikes, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18011202-9

9. JAMES NAILL was indicted for making an assault on the King's high-way, upon William Smith , on the 17th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person one guinea and one half-guinea , the property of the said William.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - The prisoner was in company with me at the Unicorn, in New Gravel-lane; I wanted a place to sleep, and he said I should sleep with him; I went to the house with him and gave him a shilling to get a pot of beer, which he brought, but no change; we went out to get some supper and I heard a bad character of the house; going up the lane, he wanted to borrow a shilling of me, but I would not lend it; he had seen my money, and he followed me, and knocked me down; I got up again, and he knocked me down again, and put his foot on my bowels, and I felt him put his hand in my jacket pocket; I holloaed; murder, after he had taken a glove with a guinea and a half in it, and the women came out and holloaed, murder and robbery, for the prisoner kept kicking and jumping on me all the time; the watchman came up, and just as he turned the corner, the prisoner jumped on my loins, and ran away; he was apprehended soon after; I was not in liquor.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you change any gold at the public-house? - A. Yes, a seven-shilling piece.

Q. How much money might you have in the morning? - A. I had ten shillings in the morning, and in the evening I had two guineas; I had a guinea and a half in gold, and a seven-shilling piece, which I changed; I cannot say what the reckoning came to, we had a good deal to drink, but I was quite sober; I paid half-a-crown where I slept after, for I had half-a-crown and some halfpence left; I had sold my watch, made me have the money; I had bought a pair of second-hand shoes out of it, but never said I had bought two pair of new shoes; I know Mr. Anthony, but I never said to him that I had no more than two shillings in my pocket, and was angry because I accused him of robbing me, but I had done it for the reward; I never said so to any body.

ROBERT WRIGHT sworn. - I am a watchman, at St. Paul's, Shadwell: Going my rounds between twelve and one, I heard the cry of murder, and a person say, for God's sake, watchman, come and relieve me, or else I shall be murdered; I found the prosecutor on his elbows and knees, and as soon as the prisoner saw me, he jumped on the prosecutor's loins, and ran away; I followed him half down the lane, and overtook him, with a stick in his hand, (produces it), which he knocked me down with; when I recovered myself, I followed him again, but he got into a house, and bolted the door against me, and made his escape out of the back door into the fields; the officer of the night apprehended him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you came up, the prosecutor was on his knees? - A. Yes.

Q. You say he jumped on his loins; I should think he might jump upon his legs very well, but not his loins? - A. The prosecutor, when he jumped, was then flat; it was quite moonlight; there were two or three girls, but I cannot say whether they were in company of the prisoner: I have had no conversation with the prosecutor about this trial or the reward, or do I know of a reward.

JOHN WOODROOFE sworn. - I am the beadle, and about the hour of twelve, on the 17th of November, I took a walk, and heard there was a disturbance; when I got there, they described the prisoner; I searched a house there, but could not find him; I was informed he had a stick in his hand, without a hat; long hair, and jacket and trowsers: returning to the watch-house again, I met him in Shadwell High-street, with this stick in his hand, down by his side, (produces it); I took him by the collar, and asked him what he had got there; I took it from him, and took him to the watch-house, where I searched him, and found five penny pieces and some halfpence, but no purse, or other money.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

For the Prisoner.

MORRIS ANTHONY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, the lodged at my house, and I know the prosecutor.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prosecutor about the robbery? - A. Yes; he said he was to have board and lodging from the watchman till the trial came on, if he would prosecute the prisoner; the prosecutor came with James Naill to my house to look for a lodging; they were both much in liquor; Smith wanted to go out again, Naill advised him not, and said, he wanted to go among the girls, but that he himself wanted to go to bed.

JAMES HENRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a sailor; I had some conversation with the prosecutor; he told me he had pledged his watch in the morning for a guinea and a half; he said he had lent the boatswain of the ship that he came over in half a guinea, and bought two pair of shoes; he paid the reckoning 1s. 6d. for which he changed half a guinea in my company.

Q. Are you sure it was a half-guinea? - A. Yes; he had a seven-shilling-piece in change; the boatswain asked him to lend him half-a-guinea more; he said, no, I lent you two shillings, I have nine shillings left, and you may have that.

Q. (To Wordrooffe). Is Wright your servant? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. Ever since I have been beadle, which was in May last.

Q. Does he ever attend the Public-office? - A. Yes, if he has a charge.

Q. I suppose you know there is a reward of 40l. in case of conviction? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you think Wright knew that? - A. I think every watchman of his description must know it. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-10

10. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , a tablecloth, value 10s, a napkin, value 1s. six silver table-spoons, value 3l. three silver desert-spoons, value 6s. and eight silver prong forks, value 12s. the property of James-Murray Hadden , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS CUMMINGS sworn. - I am footman to Col. James-Murray Hadden, in Cleveland-street, St. James's .

Q. Had you the care of the plate? - A. Yes, it was kept in my bed-room, except the plate in use, which was kept in the closet in the dining-room; I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment from the closet (repeats them); I had taken away one spoon about five minutes before they were missing; I missed them between nine and ten o'clock in the morning of Friday, the 6th of November.

THOMAS WILSON sworn. - I am coachman to Col. Hadden: On the 6th of November last I saw the prisoner at the bar in the dining-parlour of my master's house; the street-door was open; I was coming up stairs from the kitchen, and saw him coming out with something before him; I called up Cummings, and he missed these things; I then went after the prisoner, and caught him in Pall-Mall; I found this napkin and table-cloth upon him, tied in this dirty apron, (produces them); he dropped them as soon as I laid hold of him; the person that picked them up is here; his name is Edward Cork .

EDWARD CORK sworn. - I was coming through Pall-Mall, and saw the last witness in pursuit of the prisoner, he was walking gently on; I saw him lay hold of the prisoner, and he immediately threw an apron, table-cloth, and napkin, behind him; I immediately picked them up; I went back with the prisoner and Wilson to Mr. Hadden's.

Q. You saw nothing of any knives and forks, or spoons? - A. No.

Q. (To Wilson). When you were pursuing this man, did you see any thing of the knives and forks, or spoons? - A. No, we have never found them since.

Cummings. I know this napkin and table-cloth perfectly well by the mark and the number, they had been used that very day; they are my master's property.

Prisoner's defence. They took me up by the Prince of Wales's, and brought me here, that is all I know about it. GUILTY, aged 38. Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18011202-11

11. MARY CHURCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a gold chain, value 130l. a French gold watch, value 20l. a brilliant diamond ring, value 63l. two gold watches, value 21l. two gold buckles for bracelets, value 25l. two silver watches, value 10l. ten pieces of Spanish gold coin, called doubloons, value 18l. several other pieces of foreign coin, value 3l. a French crown, value 4s. four other pieces, value 4s. and nine guineas, the property of Isaac Bensammon , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Harper .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

ISAAC BENSAMMON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you came over with the Ambassador. sent by the Dey of Algiers? - A. I did; I had been the English Pro-Consul at Algiers for many years.

Q. When was it the prisoner came into your service? - A. On Saturday, the 25th of July.

Q. Had you a character of her, and from whom? - A. Yes; the man I lived with took me to the house of her mistress, Mrs. Vandercomb, and I took her into my service.

Q. Had you any acquaintacce with her before the 25th of July? - A. I never saw her before.

Q. Where did you live then? - A. At Mr. Curry's, No. 9, Moorfields, but now I live at Mr. Harper's, in Little Suffolk-street, Charing-Cross, within three houses of the Ambassador: On Friday, the 4th of September, the Ambassador sent for me, and I left my home about eight or nine o'clock.

Q. Where did you keep the articles you afterwards lost? - A. I had a bureau, and I gave her a chest of drawers to put her clothes in, and I had four trunks also; I left them all locked.

Q. Was the property you charge this woman with stealing, in your bureau or trunks? - A. The bureau had only the nine guineas.

Q. The chain and watches were all in the trunks? - A. The chain was in the large trunk.

Q. How long before you left the house in the morning, had you seen the gold chain? - A. I did not see it that day.

Q. How long before? - A. About six or seven days.

Q. Who kept the key of the trunk? - A. I did; I kept all the keys.

Q. Had you not gold watches with Turkish characters? - A. Yes, they were kept in the large trunk; the ring was kept in another trunk, because I separated them; the chain weighed 33oz. I gave in gold the weight of thirty-three doubloons

for the gold, beside the manufacture; the brilliant ring cost me in English money about sixty-three, sixty-four, or sixty-five guineas; one of the watches was given to me to have a case made for it; the other I bought in Algiers, it cost me about 10l.; I had also silver watches, but only two were missing, one with horses that run about, and the other with ships, of about five guineas and an half each; I always kept them under lock and key, except my clothes; they were all safe the 4th of September, in the morning; I returned from the Ambassador's about eleven or twelve o'clock in the morning, and when I got home I asked for the prisoner; they told me she was gone to the mantuamaker's.

Q. Had she given you any intimation of leaving your service? - A. No, I never thought of it; she seemed very contented.

Q. In what state did you find the trunks and bureau? - A. The bureau was in the front room, and the trunks in the bed-room; I went into the bed-room, and found my servant's clothes removed, and the trunks broke open; I cried out, I'm robbed, I'm robbed, but called up the people before I examined the trunks; the lock of the great trunk was not broke open; I don't know how it had been opened, but it was open, and could not be shut again, because the clothes were so high.

Q. Did you see your servant again? - A. No; they took me to Bow-street; but at last I found her in Durham gaol.

Q. Have you since seen any of the articles stolen? - A. Only a watch I found in Durham.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You hired this girl the 25th of July? - A. Yes.

Q. And lived at a different house from that in which you were robbed? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you continue to live with that servant? - A. From the 25th, till she run away.

Q. How long, during that time, did she live with you as a servant? - A. I don't know; she lived with me, that is all.

Q. Did she not keep the keys of the house? - A. No.

Q. She did not live in the kitchen? - A. No.

Q. Servants in this country generally live in the kitchen? - A. She did not.

Q. What part of the house did she live? - A. In the apartments where I live.

Q. What part of the house did she sleep in? - A. In the very same room where I slept.

Q. You say you never saw any of the property again that was lost, except the watch? - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect taking the prisoner to the Haymarket Theatre, to the play? - A. I went once to the play with her.

Q. On the solemn oath you have taken, did you not give her the watch, and did she not wear it? - A. No, I never did.

Q. Did she not wear that watch in your presence at the Theatre? - A. No.

Q. That you swear? - A. Yes; I never gave or or lent it to her.

Court. Q. Or ever saw her wear it? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you never said to any body, that you saw her with it at the Theatre? - A. No.

Q. Do you remember when she was in the Poultry Compter? - A. I did not see her.

Q. What was the reason of that - you applied to see her, and she would not see you? - A. I did not go in.

Q. You went for the purpose of seeing her? - A. No; I am a foreigner, and go through the City from curiosity.

Q. Had your curiosity ever induced you to go there before? - A. I did not go in.

Q. You say it was mere curiosity, how long have you been in this country? - A. Near twelve months.

Q. And no curiosity ever induced you to go to the Poultry Compter before? - A. I go to see all the places; I never went to that before.

Q. Did you not go there for the express purpose of seeing the prisoner? - A. No; there was some people going there, and I went there for a walk.

Q. Did not an old woman go with you to see the prisoner? - A. She did go to see her, and I went with her for a walk.

Q. Where did you go from? - A. From my own house.

Q. Had you never agreed with the old woman to go there? - A. They were going, and I went with them.

Q. How came you to say it was mere curiosity that induced you to walk through the city - Have you never made an application to this girl to live again with her, and if she would do so, you would forgive her all that has passed? - A. No such thing; I never dreamt of such a thing; I am not such a fool.

Q. Had you any intimation previous to her leaving the house? - A. No.

Q. Had you not intimation from herself? - A. No; because she was so much contented.

Q. Was there a difference between you and her two or three days before this in consequence of her having said she was with-child? - A. No; there was no dispute.

Q. There was an examination at Bow-street, was not there? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect at Bow-street having said that a charge of that sort was made by her against you? - A. I was there with Mr. Bond, but do not recollect.

Q. Before she left your house she never told you she would not stay with you? - A. Never.

Q. I understand, in your religion, there is a sort of ceremony performed on women - did you apply to the prisoner, and did she refuse to comply with that ceremony? - A. I don't know any thing about it; I never had any dispute till she went away.

Q. Did you ask her to comply with any form? - A. No.

Q. Do the principles of your religion or not, forbid a Jew man cohabiting with a Christian woman? - A. I don't know.

Q. Is it or not the principles of your religion? A. No; we may do as we please; I can keep a Jew woman or any thing in my service.

Q. Have you ever told the landlord or landlady of the house that this woman had threatened to leave you? - A. No, never.

Q. Did you bring the property into this country? - A. The chain I brought into this country, it was Mrs. Bensammon's, and is the fashion of the country for ladies.

Q. You had not seen this property for some time before? - A. No.

Q. Or have seen any thing but the watch since? - A. No.

Q. Do you persist in saying you never made her a present of the watch? - A. Never; they were all under my care.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you keep the house in which Mr. Bensammon lodged? - A. Yes; and he lodges with me still.

Q. Do you remember the young woman at the bar being in his service? - A. Yes I do.

Q. On the 4th of September were you alarmed by any cry of his? - A. Yes; he was out that morning, and the girl remained at home; when he returned, he said his bureau was open and had been robbed of nine guineas.

Q. Was the girl at home when he returned? - A. She had been out about five minutes.

Q. Did she say where she was going? - A. No.

Q. Did she ever return to her place again? - A. No, she did not.

Q. Had you any expectation that she was going to leave her place? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you ever heard him say any thing about any other girl having robbed him? - A. No; and this girl always behaved herself very well as far as I saw.(MOSES MAGERE being a foreigner, an interpreter was sworn.)

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On the 4th of September I was at the Ambassador's house, where I found Mr. Bensammon; he went away, and after being gone about five minutes he returned, and said he was robbed of nine guineas; I told him to go back again and see if he had lost any thing else; I went with him, and we found all the trunks open and the cloaths quite in a state of confusion.

ANN HARPER sworn. - I lived at my father's house on the 4th of September, and saw the prisoner that morning; I did not see her at the time she left the house, I only heard the door shut; I have heard her say she was not very happy; but she did not say she should leave the house that day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have heard her say she was not very happy? - A. Yes.

Q. And not that she was very contented? - A. No.

Q. She is with-child? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she ever say she must be under the necessity of leaving the prosecutor? - A. She might have said so to my mother, but she is not here.

ANTHONY STAFFORD: sworn. - I am a constable at Sunderland, in the county of Durham, and took the prisoner up on the 3d of October; I searched her but found nothing, on her; I asked her if there was any thing at the house where I took her; she said there was a watch belonging to her, and directed me to go to a person in the kitchen for it; I examined her, but she denied, she had it; I then took the prisoner over to my own house, and about one o'clock in the morning the person I had examined brought the watch to me, but I would not take it; she delivered it to one of the overseers, at his house.

Q. Did you see the watch when the woman brought it to your house, though you declined receiving it? - A. I did; I went to the Magistrate, and told him where the watch was; he told me to demand it, which I did, and got it; this is the watch. (Produces it).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not know there was a watch, till she told you? - A. No.

Q. And that it was her own? - A. Yes.

Q. There were a great many hand-bills circulated over the country? - A. Yes.

Q. You never discovered, with all your diligence, a parcel of doubloons, a gold chain, or any thing of that sort? - A. No.

Mr. Bensammon. This is my watch, this case was made in London, and was in one of the trunks; I saw it about four or five days before; in the whole I lost about five hundred pounds.

GUILTY, Death , aged 17.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the familiarity between her and the prosecutor .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18011202-12

12. MARY-ANN BRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , two calico shifts, trimmed with lace, value 10s. one petticoat, value 10s. a silver tea-spoon, value 2s. a towel, value 6d. four handkerchiefs, value 4s. a pair of silk hose, value 5s. a handkerchief, value

5s. and a napkin, value 6d. the property of Ann Lanchester .

ANN LANCHESTER sworn. - I am a single woman , and live at No. 37, Sackville-street ; the prisoner was my servant ; I first employed her as a washer-woman fifteen months ago; during the whole time she has been about the house, I have lost wearing-apparel; I took her up on the 19th of November; I lost the things in the indictment, and a great deal more.

JOSIAH HYAM sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Turner, a pawnbroker, No. 31, Lower John-street, Golden-square; I don't know the prisoner, or whether a man or woman pledged the things I have, except from the duplicate.

- CRABB sworn. - I produce a shift trimmed with lace, and a half handkerchief trimmed with lace, pawned for ten shillings and seven pence, on the 16th of October.

JOHN HARRISON sworn. - I am apprentice to a pawnbroker, and produce four handkerchiefs, a tea-spoon, and a white petticoat, pledged on the 18th of July and 24th of October, 1801; the handkerchief was pawned the 22d of September, for two shillings and six-pence; another, in conjunction with the napkin, on the 26th of September, for three shillings; the other, the 5th of November, for three shillings; part was brought by the prisoner, and part by her sister; I cannot identify which the prisoner pawned, they are pledged in the name of Jane Brice.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer, and found one duplicate on the prisoner; there was a warrant granted against her and her mother; the prisoner said, her mother knew nothing of the robbery, and that she pledged the things herself; she was then speaking of the handkerchief and shift.(The property was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. My mistress told me if I would own to the things, and fetch them out, she would not prosecute me; she knew I had done it for a sick family I had; and, when I told her where they were, she sent for two constables, and detained me.

Court. Q. (To Mrs. Lanchester.) Did you discover all the things by the means of her confession? - A. No; I did promise not to prosecute her if she would tell me the whole; she did make a confession of the shift and handkerchief, but of nothing else; nothing else was found by her direction. GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-13

13. GEORGE WATSON and RICHARD WATSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , thirty bottles filled with Port wine, value 30s. the property of William Rawlins and Robert-Albion Cox , Esquires .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Henry Beaumont and David Simpson .

HENRY BEAUMONT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Sheriff of Middlesex ; George Watson was put into possession of the goods of John Pickering , in Eaton-street, Pimlico, on the 29th of September.

DAVID SIMPSON sworn. - On the 12th of November last, by virtue of a warrant from the Sheriffs, I called at the house, No. 20 Eaton-street, and lost the warrant with George Watson, who was in possession; I searched the premises, and found a quantity of wine, which I left him in charge of; I understood the wine to be the property of one Redhead, but seized under an extent from the Crown; I was sent for to Bow-street, in consequence of some wine being missed from the premises.

THOMAS JONES sworn. - On the 17th of November, about a quarter before twelve at night, I met Richard Watson and Smith, in Lower Grosyenor-place; I asked Watson what he had got there; he said, some bottles; I asked him whether they were empty or full; he said, full; I asked what was in them; he said, wine; I asked where he got them; he said, it was given him; I asked him who gave them him; he told me his brother, who lived in Eaton-street, Pimlico, and was in possession of a house there; he said, he lived in North-street, near Knightsbridge; there were thirteen or fourteen bottles; I put him in the watch-house, and went the next morning to his house, and searched it, but did not find any thing; after that, I went to the house in Pimlico, where his brother was in possession; I knocked at the door, and asked him if his name was Watson; he said, yes; I informed him his brother was in custody; he said, he was very sorry, for he did not know any thing about it; every question I put to Richard Watson , he immediately answered.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I have worked for Richard Watson off and on for three years; he is a whitesmith: On the 17th of November, about ten o'clock at night, he called on me, and told me he wanted me to take a walk with him to see his brother; we went to Eaton-street, and, after staying there a little time, George asked me if I would be so good as help his brother to carry a few bottles home to his house; it was a house George Watson was in possession of; I, through ignorance, complied, and took as much as eight or nine bottles, I believe; after we went out, we were stopped by these men; Watson had a bag with the bottles in; George Watson said he was in possession of the house for the Sheriff, and that it was his own wine; I drank two glasses there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand

you to say, that he told you he was in possession of the house? - A. Yes, and that it was his own wine.

Q. The sack it was contained in, was filled before you came there? - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore you did not see what it contained till you were stopped? - A. No.

Court. Q. You say George desired you to carry this to Richard's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did George give you the wine? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure George gave Richard any bottles? - A. Yes, I saw the bottles he put into his pocket, but not those in the bag.

JOSEPH CREEDLAND sworn. - I was in company with Jones on the 17th of November, and found nine bottles of wine on Smith. (The wine produced.)

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

The prisoners called fourteen witnesses, who gave them excellent characters.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

Reference Number: t18011202-14

14. JOSEPH FERNANDEZ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , one hundred pounds weight of gum, value 8l. the property of John Perkins , on board a schooner, called the Bilboa, of Philadelphia, on the navigable river of Thames .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Samuel Murgatroyd .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN PERKINS sworn. - I am captain of the Bilboa schooner , and was so on the 30th of October last; she arrived at St. Catherine's on the 19th of October, laden with gum from Senegal; the prisoner was a seaman , and the gum was stolen from the forecastle, where he slept; when I went on board, on the 30th of October, I heard there was something improper; I went down to the forecastle, and discovered a parcel of gum in two bags, which appeared to be of the same quality with the ship's cargo; I searched the prisoner's bed, and found some; I opened his chest, and found some more, which he confessed he had taken, and said there were more concerned with him; I asked him if he had not stolen more; he said, yes, he had taken two bags the night before; the value of the gum in the bags is about eight pounds; it was brought up in their pockets in small quantities from the bulk; it might be about two of three shilling's worth at a time; I am part-owner of the ship.

WILLIAM FORSTER sworn. - I was on board the schooner on the 30th of October, and found some gum in the prisoner's chest and bed; I informed the captain.

RICHARD PERRY sworn. - I got this gum on board the Bilboa; it was delivered to me by Forster.(Produces it.)

Mr. Perkins. This is the same sort of gum as was on board my ship.

Prisoner's defence. I do not know who took it, or can I be accountable for it; I am totally unacquainted with any person in England.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 3s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-15

15. JAMES CANNON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a man's coat, value 5s. the property of Jonathan Trott .

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I keep a public-house , in Whitechapel: On the 15th of November, a little after ten o'clock, the prisoner came to my house with four others; they might stay about twenty minutes, and were shewn into a little room, where a coat hung; I was informed a man was gone out of the back door, with a coat hid under his great coat; I then looked behind the door, and missed the coat; there used to be a back way from the house, but it is now stopped up; the prisoner was in the yard, coming back to the house very fast; I immediately collared him, and said, you have my coat; he said, yes, I have; he immediately unbuttoned his great coat, and said, no, where is it? I then unbuttoned his close coat, put my hand behind his back, and pulled my coat out.(The coat produced.) I took him into the room to the others; they were all Irish, and began to talk in the Irish language, which I said was not behaving like gentlemen; he struggled very much to get away, till I called assistance.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifford. Q. Did you serve them with any thing? - A. Half a pint of gin; there were no other people in the room but them; I know one of them to be a master tailor.

Q. Was there not some dispute about a five-pound note? - A. He sent his friend to get change while he stole the coat, I think.

Q. Had he got his change back when he took the coat? - A. He had the change, but he said he had not the four one-pound notes; he found a half-guinea, silver, and halfpence, and then he said he had given the notes to his friend; I gave the change to his friend, and did not know it was the prisoner's.

MARTIN BREUNAGIS sworn. - I lodge with Mr. Trott: On the 15th of November, I saw the prisoner come to the house with some others; I met the prisoner in the passage; he said, holloa! to me, as he passed me; I saw the steeve of a coat hang down behind; I went to Mr. Trott, and asked him if he had lost a coat; when he looked, he said he had, and went backwards to see where the man was; he met him, and took the coat from him; the prisoner said, he thought it was like a

coat he lost some time before, and he took it to look at it.

Prisoner's defence. Is it likely I would go away with that or any other coat not worth over three shillings, and leave my 5l. note in his hands; I had lost a coat some time before that, and I took that coat to look at; he met me, and asked me whether it was not his coat; I said, I had taken it to look at, but it was not mine.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18011202-16

16. LYDIA MOLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , six printed books, value 3s. the property of John Hicks .

JOHN HICKS sworn. - I am a bookseller , and live in Old-street: On the 11th of November I went out, and found the prisoner and my wife having a scuffle together; my wife took a book from her, and, I believe, struck her with it; the prisoner said, she would make her pay for striking her; as I was taking her in doors, the books fell out of her pocket.

ELIZABETH HICKS sworn. - On the 11th of November the prisoner came about half past eleven, and stood looking at some books out at the door, and went away; as soon as she was gone; I missed some books, and in a quarter of an hour after she came back again; I watched her, and saw her take a book, and put it into her apron; I went out to take it from her, when she said she had nothing of mine; I said she had, and pulled her on one side; she fell down on her knees, and let the book fall; then she got up, and I stooped to pick it up, when she struck me twice; I gave her a pat on the shoulder with the book, and said it was mine; she said it was not; I got her in doors, upon which she said, if I did not let her go, she would pull all the stall down, which she did; she was searched, and three books found in her pocket, and one in her hand. (The books produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. When she got me on the floor, she beat me most horrioly, and I said she should not.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Confined one month in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

Reference Number: t18011202-17

17. WILLIAM PAINTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , two saws, value 5s. the property of William Garratty .

WILLIAM GARRATTY sworn. - I lost two saws on the 21st of November, and was present when the prisoner was taken into custody; I asked him about them; he said he knew nothing of them; I saw them in the constable's hand.

JOHN GUEST sworn. - I am a constable; I got the saws from one of the witnesses.

MARY PALMER sworn. - I know the prisoner, and fetched the saws from his mother's house by my mistress's direction.

JOSEPH - sworn. - I was informed on the 21st of November, my men had lost their three saws; a person came and told me he saw the prisoner put two saws under his coat; he took me to his mother's house; I asked her where her son was; she asked which son; I said, him with a long great coat on, that had got the saws; she said, she would endeavour to get them from him; in the mean time the prisoner came in; I said hold of him, and he asked me whether I said he stole the saws; he said, if I have got them, my mother shall pay you for them; he made his escape from me, but he was taken; he said, if I would take him into the public-house, he would tell the mistress where they were; I did so, and he had some conversation with her, and the saws were produced.

JOHN HAMMERTON sworn. - I saw the prisoner near the buildings, in the City-road, with two saws; I went and informed the men of it.

Prisoner's defence. It was some dirty linen I fetched to wash that he took to be saws; I know nothing about them at all; a person came into my mother's shop for a pound of potatoes, and left the saws there till he came back.

GUILTY , aged 11.

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-18

18. JOHN RUDD and ANN ROCKALL were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November ; two yards of carpet, value 10s. the property of Richard Hudson and William Corney ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM CORNEY sworn. - My partner's name is Richard Hudson; the prisoner, Rudd, was in our employ as a weekly porter ; we have two shops in Broad-street, Carnaby-market, No. 4, and No. 13: In consequence of suspicions, on the 14th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, as he was going out in a great hurry, I asked him where; he said, to the other shop, to put down a carpet; instead of going there, he went across the street to New-street; I followed him without his perceiving me, and overtook him in Green's-court; I saw him go into the house of Rockall, who keeps an old iron shop, and I saw him deliver a piece of carpet to Mrs. Rockall; I went in when she was unrolling it to look at it; I said, John, I have catched you at last; he made no answer; the woman is hard of hearing, but when

she perceived me, she took the carpet, and hid it behind her underneath a table; I took it up, and said, this is my property; I took it away, and had the prisoner apprehended; Mr. Rockall was not at home. (The carpet was produced, and identified by Mr. Corney).

WILLIAM PATRICK sworn. - I am a constable: on Saturday, the 14th of November, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I asked him what could induce him to be guilty of such an action; he said he had been playing at dominos, and had lost 1s. 6d. or 2s. and took this carpet to sell to make up the money, that his wife might not miss it out of his wages: on the Monday I went with a search-warrant to Rockall's, who lives about three or four hundred yards from Mr. Corney's, but found no property that was identified. I took her into custody, and, going to the Magistrate's, she said she knew nothing about it, for she did not buy the carpet.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you not go there to summons her to be a witness against the other? - A. I went with a search-warrant; Mr. Conant desired me to go, and if she would not come, to take her, but she came very quietly.

Rudd's defence. It was not my intention to steal the carpet; I took it there to see if I could get two or three shillings on it, and to take it back again; it was not my intention to rob my master.

For the prisoner Rockall.

ANN ROCKALL sworn. - I am daughter to Mrs. Rockall: On the 14th of November I was scouring the parlour at the further end of the shop; when I got up, I saw John Rudd , who was an entire stranger to me, at the door, which he opened, and put in the piece of carpet; Mr. Corney, who was also a stranger to me, followed him; my mother, being very deaf, did not hear what he said; he asked me to give him the piece of carpet which lay on the floor; I did so; my mother never saw him till such time as he was going out with the carpet; when he was going out, he said, John, I have long had a suspicion of you, and now I have found you; then he turned round to me, and said, you, madam, shall be looked into; I made answer, that I never knew the man, or had any dealings with him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How old are you? - A. Near eighteen.

Q. How long had you left boarding-school? - A. I have not been there since eleven years.

Q. Your father and mother keep an old iron shop? - A. They deal in brokery and other things.

Q. The prisoner is a stranger to you? - A. Yes, and to my mother, I believe.

Q. Is it a frequent thing for persons to come in to the parlour without knocking? - A. People very frequently come in when I am in the next room, because my mother is deaf; I was scouring the room, and did not hear; not seeing any body come to him, I suppose he opened the door.

Q. Does that frequently happen? - A. It does.

Q. Recollect the oath you have taken, and tell us, how the carpet came on the floor? - A. The man put it there, it never was on the counter; he had it in his hand in a roll when I got up, then he laid it on the floor, it was not open at all.

Q. You swear it never was open while in your room? - A. No, it was not.

Q. Was there any table? - A. There was a table at the lower end of the room, and another under a sash window.

Q. Did he stoop, or throw it down? - A. He threw it down, to the best of my recollection.

Q. Is that the way goods are usually thrown into that room - you know the business of the shop? - A. No, it is not.

Q. Did you ask what he wanted? - A. The man had no time to speak, because Mr. Corney followed him in immediately.

Q. Did you not see your mother, when Mr. Corney came in, lay hold of the carpet, and throw it down? - A. No, Mr. Corney has made a mistake; it was me who gave him the piece of carpet off the floor, my mother was at the other end of the room, washing the tea-things.

Q. Then it is a mistake if any body has said it was thrown off a table? - A. I never did.

Q. Who did? - A. Nobody that I know of.

Q. Mr. Corney could not see the man throw it down? - The man threw it down.

Q. Perhaps it is a mistake that he said to his man, I have caught you? - A. He did say so.

Q. Did he say that when he came in? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to say just now, it was not till after you delivered the carpet? - A. That was when he was going out; he said, John, I have had a long suspicion, and now I have found you out.

Q. Were you at home when the officers took your mother? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell the Justice all this? - A. I never was at the Justice's; the officers said, she was wanted at Marlborough-street, to speak whether the man said any thing when he came in or not, and she went.

Q. You knew your mother was going to the office, and you could have told all this? - A. Yes.

Q. How much carpeting had you in the house at this time? - A. We had none but some old pieces.

Q. How long have you assisted your father and mother in the shop? - A. I am not always at home, and am not very fond of the business; I have been to a day school part of the time; I served sometimes, but very seldom.

Q. How long? - A. I cannot tell; I went out to learn the business of making straw bonnets for

two or three months, and I have been at work in Wardour-street, and have been at an aunt's in the Borough.

WILLIAM HORLEM sworn. - I am a carpenter, and was standing at the end of the counter in Rockall's shop, about nine o'clock, when Mr. Hudson asked Rudd if he had ever been in that shop before, or sold any thing in it; Rudd said, no, he had never been in the shop, or sold any thing there.

Jury. Q. (To Corney). Did you see the carpet in Rockall's hand? - A. Yes, I did.

.Q Did you see her throw it behind her? - A. Yes, for I remained a little while at the window before I went in.

Rockall called one witness, who admitted she did not bear a general good character in the neighbourhood. John Rudd , GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Ann Rockall , GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18011202-19

19. CHARLES REID was indicted for that he being a servant to John Aris , on the 30th of October , as a journeyman-baker , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession, from Ann Raby , the sum of twenty-one shillings, for and on account of the said John Aris , and that he did frauduiently embezzle and secrete the same .

Second Count. Charging him with embezzling a guinea.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

JOHN ARIS sworn. - I am a baker in Compton-street, Clerkenwell , the prisoner was my servant as a journeyman baker: I had a customer named Burbridge, from whom there was due 4l. 9s. 2 1/2d. the prisoner was entrulled by me to receive money on bills: On the 30th of October he went out as usual with his bread and to receive money, but did not account to me for any money due from Mr. Burbridge.

Q. Did he account for any other money on that day? - A. Yes.

Q. To what amount? - A. Between twenty and thirty shillings.

Q. How soon did you discover Burbridge had paid any money? - A. The next day, one guinea; on the discovery, the prisoner absconded that day; he took his bread out that day and never gave an account of any money or any bread; he has written on the back of the bill. (Produces it).

"30th Oct. Mr. Burbridge - received 1l. 1s.

(Signed) Charles Reid .

We had some conversation before the Magistrates, and he acknowledged to that and several others; that he had been gambling, but meant to make it good.

ANN RABY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Burbridge, No. 7, Little Bath-street, Cold Bath Fields, and a customer to Mr. Aris; I know the prisoner was his journeyman, and on the 30th of October I paid him a guinea for Mr. Aris; this is the bill, and he made a memorandum, received one pound one shilling.

(To Mr. Aris). Q. What did the prisoner say? - A. He said he had received this and several other sums and had gambled it away, but as soon as he had received his bounty, as he had enlisted as an East India soldier, he would pay me; I have found upwards of nine pounds deficient.

Prisoner's defence. I lost some out of my pocket and some at gambling; I never intended to defraud any person, and was afraid to go home to my master, so I went and enlisted in the 77th regiment, and meant to pay him every farthing.

(Mr. Aris's book produced, in which no entry appeared of the receipt of the guinea of Mr. Burbridge.)

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

Reference Number: t18011202-20

20. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , a plank, value 2s. the property of Thomas Richardson and James Richardson .

JAMES RICHARDSON sworn. - My father's name is Thomas, we are chair-makers , and live on Mount Pleasant: On the 14th of November, about two o'clock, as I was going to the shop, I saw a plank standing by a public-house at the corner of Eyre-street-hill, which I thought was our's, because there was A. R. on it, as the name of the person who served us with beech; I ran to the shop and asked whether any had been sold; I found there had not, I ran back, and before I got to the place where it stood I saw the prisoner take it on his shoulder; I asked him where he was going with it; he said he was going to take it home, and he found it in the street; I asked him where; he said in a street by Mount Pleasant; I am positive it was our plank, because we had several out of the same tree, and it is an inch and quarter plank, which we gave a particular order for, and I rather suppose there is no such thing in London beside.

Prisoner's defence. Coming across Mount Pleasant I saw it laying on the ground, and I picked it up. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-21

21. WILLIAM TWEEDE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a pair of boots, value 21s. the property of Joseph Williams .

LUCY BLUNDELL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Williams: On the 20th of October last I saw the prisoner come to my master's shop, about half past seven or eight in the morning, and said, if you

please, Mr. Williams sent me back for two pair of boots; my master was not at home, and I said I did not know which they were; he said, let me come in, I know which they are; he came in and took them down off the brass hooks from the glass door; a pair of brown tops and a pair of black tops with tassels; he took them and ran away; I did not think he was a thief at first.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long was the prisoner in the shop? - A. He was hardly two minutes in the shop; I had never seen him before.

Q. Were you much alarmed? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you swear positively to the person of a man you never saw before, and then only for a few minutes? - A. I am sure it is the same.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a shoemaker, and live at No. 19, Grace's-alley, Wellclose-square: On Tuesday morning, about half past seven on the 20th of October, a man, who had the appearance of a porter, called, and said Mr. Williams, will you go down to measure a Captain for a pair of boots, and two pair of shoes, at the George, in Ratcliff-high-way, right facing; I cleaned myself and went there immediately, but did not find the Captain; I returned and found the boots gone; I have got the pair of brown topped boots here, (produces them): about three weeks and three days after, as I was going along Whitechapel, I saw this pair of boots hanging up at a shoemaker's shop; I got an officer and got my boots.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The person who came and desired you to go was not the prisoner? - A. I cannot say it was.

Q. When you saw the boots again they were in possession of a shoemaker who is not here? - A. No.

Q. They were openly exposed to sale? - A. Yes.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - On Thursday, the 12th of November, I went with the prosecutor to take these boots, they were hanging up at the prisoner's father's door; I took the boots in my possession, and took Mr. Tweede, the father, as a prisoner, till he accounted how he came by them; we accompanied him to his son's house, in the neighbourhood, when he said to his son, the boots I have purchased of you are stolen boots; the son appeared confused, and said is it so; the father asked him where the gentleman was he said he purchased them of; he said he did not know where he was; I went to Mr. Williams's house and got his servant; she thought he was the man; I took him to the office and he was committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You told the prisoner you were an officer? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not the father desire the son to tell the truth and it would be better for him? - A. He did so.

Q. Did he say it would be better for him? - A. I don't recollect those words, only for God's sake to tell the truth.

Q. Did that prevail on him to tell the truth? - A. Most assuredly.

Q. Do you believe he would have said so much without that being said? - A. I don't believe he might.

Jury. (To Blundell.) Q. Did you give the prisoner one pair of the boots? - A. I did not give him either.

Q. When he went out did you see him run? - A. He run out of the alley.

Q. Did you ask any body to follow him? - A. No. GUILTY , aged 21.

Twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18011202-22

22. SOPHIA WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , eighteen silver handled knives, value 9s. and eighteen silver handled forks, value 6s. the property of Frances Dougan .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

FRANCES DOUGAN sworn. - I am a widow , and live with my brother, Mr. Le Grange, in Marsham-street, Westminster ; the prisoner was in my service rather better than two years; I was in possession of silver handled knives and forks, and missed some; I had seen them used during the time the prisoner was in our service.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Part was your property and part your sister's? - A. Yes; we missed two dozen out of the different cases; one was my own dozen which is stole, the other dozen is between my sister and me.

Q. You had a suspicion of another servant as well, the footman? - A. Yes; but he was discharged by the Magistrates.

SAMUEL- WILLIAM CHERANEAU sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Broad Sanctuary, Westminster; I have eighteen silver handled knives and forks; the prisoner pawned some of them with me; I don't know that I had seen her before; she said they were her own property, and I advanced thirteen and six-pence on the whole.

(The property was identified by Mrs. Dougan.

JAMES-BRAZIER LE GRANGE sworn. - I went to Mr. Cheraneau's, and found the knives and forks wrapped up in four different parcels; the wrapper struck me to be very like a gown I had seen the prisoner wear; here is a piece the same as the wrapper; I immediately knew the plate.

Prisoner's defence. The footman gave them to me to pledge as his property.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutrix . Confined twelve months in the House of Correction and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-23

23. SAMUEL CARR , otherwise KERR , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , five ounces and a half of silver, value 28s. the property of Daniel Pontifex .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

DANIEL PONTIFEX sworn. - I am a silversmith , in St. John's-square, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner was a journeyman of mine, and has been so five years next Christmas; his wages were twenty-six shillings per week; I have missed silver for near three years, and endeavoured to find out the thief: On the 7th of November, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner had two silver sauce-boat covers weighed to him, and when he left work in the evening, between five and six, they were weighed again, and there was a deficiency of near an ounce; on Monday morning they were weighed again, and at one o'clock, when he went to dinner, when there was a deficiency of one ounce three pennyweights; that being the case, on Tuesday morning I gave him a coffee-pot body; I weighed it to him, and two tea-pot spouts; Mr. Atkins was present; they weighed nineteen ounces four pennyweights, and were given to the prisoner by my errand-boy; we then went to Hatton-garden, and got an officer and search-warrant; when the prisoner went to dinner, I immediately took up his work, followed him down stairs, and put it into the scale, and there was a deficiency of one ounce ten pennyweights; I run into the square, and called the prisoner back; he returned, and went into the accompting-house; Mr. Atkins was there; I said to the prisoner I have been a long time robbed, and I have frequently told you so; and, as it happens, the suspicion falls upon you; he said, he knew nothing about it; the officer was called in, and he was searched; in his right-hand waistcoat-pocket he took out one ounce ten pennyweights of silver, and six pennyweights of silver folder; the prisoner said, he was very sorry for it; we then took him to Hatton-garden; I can swear positively the silver in his pocket is my property; I never gave permission to workmen to take silver home, nor is there any profit arising from the scrapings, filings, or cuttings; silver at that time was six shillings and two-pence per ounce.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Beside examining the prisoner's pocket, did you examine the bag into which the filings had been put? - A. Not particularly, but I took out the cuttings of the coffee-pot; I took out all he had left; he could not have filed any large quantity.

Q. Therefore you did not put that in the pocket and that in the bag into the scale together? - A. The silver in the bag would not come off the pot in that stage of it; there were no scrapings came off.

Q. Whether the prisoner worked at home you cannot speak to? - A. He had no tools.

Q. Did you see the boy deliver these things? - A. I did not; but it was impossible he could take any out.

( Michael Atkins confirmed the last witness.)

PATRICK DIVINE sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody. (Produces the silver, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have very little to say in my own defence; I have been in the habit of being an employed master myself, and was going to do a small job; I had silver of my own, and only wanted to take a piece of folder, and meant to put a piece of silver in the place of it; I have served Mr. Pontifex faithfully and honestly, and he has been a good master to me; but I wish I had served my God as well as I served Mr. Pontifex, I should have nothing now to lament.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-24

24. THOMAS LINTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , one thousand bricks, value 20s. the property of Thomas Hobson .

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Hobson, who lives at Stamford-hill; On the 9th of April, 1800, I received an order from Mr. Peat, of Clerkenwell, to send him a thousand of place bricks that afternoon; I gave directions to the prisoner to load them, which he did; I gave him his ticket and his turnpike-money, and he went away with the bricks; the next morning Mr. Peat sent for the bricks; I told him by whom I sent them, and recollected the prisoner was in the field loading another load; he said, he had set them down against the gateway adjoining Mr. Peat's building; the bricklayer, trusting to what he said, returned to see; as soon as we were gone, the prisoner absconded, and we have not seen him again till last Thursday was a week, when I overtook him in Cock-lane, Whitechapel, and took him into custody; he said, he sold the bricks for ten shillings; the fair price was twenty-seven shillings; but he did not know the person's name. Philip Franklin was with him when I gave him directions where to go with them.

NICHOLAS CARR sworn. - I went to give the order for a thousand bricks; they did not come.

Prisoner's defence. I sent Philip Franklin with the load of bricks; where he went to, I cannot tell; I was taken very ill; I wish him to be called.

PHILIP FRANKLIN sworn. - Q. Do you remember going on the 9th of April with the prisoner? - A. Yes, we took the bricks to Wilmot-street, Bethnal-green; when we came to the building, while I unloaded them, he disposed of them;

coming back he told me he received half-a-guinea for them. GUILTY , aged 30.

Three months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18011202-25

25. JOHN WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , two sheets, value 6s. two blankets, value 6s. and two flat irons, value 6d. in a lodging-room , the property of Edward Brewster .

EDWARD BREWSTER sworn. - I keep the Old Bell , in Princes-street, Westminster ; the prisoner came to my house on the 5th of November, and wanted lodgings; he had lodgings for the night, and next morning he took the room at four shillings per week, ready-furnished; between two or three o'clock, on the 6th of November, he went up stairs, took the things and absconded.

GEORGE - sworn. - I am a soldier, and was quartered at the Old Bell; I saw the prisoner there on the 6th of November, and go up stairs to write; in about ten minutes, the landlady came down, and asked where the man was, and said he had robbed her; next day I saw him coming down the Park; he spoke to me, and said, he was coming up to our house immediately; I said, I was obligated to follow him; he turned back, and wanted to leave me; upon which I took hold of his coat; he begged I would go over the way with him, as he wanted to speak privately to me; I refused, telling him, he was my prisoner for robbing his lodgings, and I took him into custody.

Jury. Q. (To Brewster,) Was it prssible for people to go up stairs without your seeing them? - A. No, my wife was in the next room; no other person had been in the room.

Prisoner's defence. I lately came to town from Portsmouth, and met with an acquaintance at Westminster; we went into this house, and set down gambling for a shillingsworth of spirits; I slept there all night, but I never took the lodgings or the things. GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-26

26. CATHARINE MURPHY and LUCY WARD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , silver watch, value 29s. a metal chain, value 6d, a seal, value 4d. a gown, value 1s. and an apron, value 6d. the property of William Busby .

JAMES ALDUS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 21st of November, the prisoner Murphy, in company with the other, brought a watch, which the said was her husband's, who was a painter and glazier, and wanted twenty-five shillings; that he lodged in Sr. Ann's-court; I asked her if her husband was at home; she said, no; but that the man where she lodged would say it was her husband's watch; I went and asked him; he said, her husband went to sea, and was killed; I was not satisfied; I took her to Marlborough-street; the other woman said, she might have it back again, for she knew it was her husband's watch.

WILLIAM BUSBY sworn. - I know this watch; it hung just under the mantle-piece at No. 21, Princes-street, Drury-lane , where I live, when I went out to market; and, about a quarter before eight, a young woman came, and told me my door was open; I saw my watch again at Marlborough-street the same day, and the gown and apron on Lucy Ward 's back; they had hung up in the bed-room; she burst out crying, but did not say where she got them.(The property produced, and identified.)

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I took the gown off Ward's back, and have kept it ever since; she had another gown on besides.

HANNAH DOBNEY sworn. - I live in the same house with the prosecutor, and came out of my room about eight o'clock and saw his door open; I saw it had been broke open, and went and informed Busby.

Mr. Aldus. When they were before the Magistrate, Ward said the other woman had nothing to do with stealing the watch; and she was to give her a pair of shoes for helping to dispose of it.

Murphy's defence. This young woman, about half past eight, met me, and asked me where I used to pawn, as she had got a watch, and would give me a pair of shoes if I would pawn it for her, as she was not known; I always used Mr. Aldus's shop, and took it to him.

Ward's defence. I wish to say that this woman knows nothing of the watch; I will take it all upon myself; I had the gown and apron on me, and I gave the watch to her to pledge; she knew nothing of it,

Lucy Ward, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Catherine Murphy, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

Reference Number: t18011202-27

27. BENJAMIN WOLFE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , a mahogany dressing-case, value 20s. the property of Robert Clements .

ROBERT CLEMENTS sworn. - I am a looking-glass frame-maker , and live in the Old Artillery-ground ; I lost this box out of my parlour-window, about six o'clock in the evening, on the 16th of January; I brought it down to shew a customer, and left it on the table between the two windows; Robert Brathwaite had it sent to him to finish, and having heard I had lost a dressing-box about ten months since, he asked me to come and look at it; I knew it to be mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. You did not know the prisoner? - A. I did not.

Q. Did he never tell you how he came by it? - A. He said he bought it at some house in Rosemary-lane.

WILLIAM WAKEFIELD sworn. - I am foreman to Timothy Honot , a wholesale clothes-dealer, at the top of Rosemary-lane; I know the prisoner very well: On the 17th of January, he offered me this box for sale, but I refused it; Mrs. Honor was standing behind me, and said, if I could purchase it worth the money, she should like it for her own use; I asked him the price of it; he said, fifteen shillings; I said, I would give him half-a-guinea, which he readily took; he used to cry old clothes about, and attend sales, and such like; most of the Jews buy any thing that comes in their way; I asked him how he came to offer it to me on Saturday morning, being the Jew's sabbath; he said, he was naturalized; the box has continued ever since in Mrs. Honor's possession, till within these three weeks, when she gave it to Mr. Ellis to finish; the prosecutor asked me if I knew who I bought it of; I told him I did, and could produce the man; I saw him sometime afterwards, and called him in; I asked him if he remembered selling the box; he denied ever selling such a thing at first, but, after expostulating with him, he acknowledged he did, but that he got but six-pence by it; I detained him; he has been at out house ten times, I suppose, since selling the box.

WILLIAM ELLIS sworn. - This box was left at my house to be finished; I was to put a frame and glass to it, and I took it to Mr. Brathwaite's.

ROBERT BRATHWAITE sworn. - This box was brought to me on the 14th of November last, by Mr. Ellis; I had heard Mr. Clements had lost such a one, and let him see it.

Prisoner's defence. I have witnesses here to prove they were present when I bought the box at the Blue Boar.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS PATERSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, I know him by dealing in the lane; he used to deal in clothes, or any thing that is offered to be sold.

Q. Look at that box, do you know it? - A. I think I have seen this box before; I am positive I have; it was about the middle of last January; when I was sitting in the Blue Boar, in Rosemary-lane, a stranger came into the room with this box; first he came up to me, and looked at several articles I had got to sell, but nothing would suit him; he went from me to the next box, where the prisoner set with his clothes; he looked at several articles, and at last had a waistcoat, which Wolfe valued at five shillings and six-pence, and he paid him down six shillings and six-pence besides; they valued the box at twelve shillings.

Court. Q. You never had seen the person who brought the box in? - A. Never.

Q. What sort of a man was he? - A. A man about half a head taller than I, or thereabouts; I cannot justly recollect, it is so long ago; he might be five feet four or five inches.

Q. Was he an old or young man? - A. A middle-aged man, as near as I can recollect.

Q. How was he dress? - A. I declare I cannot recollect; there are so many people coming backwards and forwards, it is impossible to recollect every thing.

Q. Can you recollect the colour of his clothes? - A. I cannot.

Q. Do you recollect whether he had a great coat or a common coat? - A. I cannot say.

Q. This man went to the other box? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to be attending to the other box? - A. As he left me I had nobody standing with me; I did not follow him, I only looked round to see whether they dealt or no.

Q. About what time of the day was it? - A. About half past two o'clock, as near as I can recollect.

Q. Who were there beside you and those two? - A. I suppose there might be a dozen people, and strangers; I don't know any body in particular.

Q. Don't you know one of them by name? - A. I don't recollect just now any one. (The Court had ordered the other witnesses out of Court.) I have seen the man out of Court, but have no acquaintance with him.

Q. Do you know whether he was there? - A. Yes, I saw him.

Q. You told me just now you did not know any one? - A. No particular person; I did not know any one by name.

Q. You don't know his name? - A. No.

Q. What is the name of the landlord? - A. I cannot recollect, though I have been in the house hundreds of times, and have heard it many times.

Q. Were neither landlord or landlady present? - A. No, not at that time.

Q. Or any servants of the house? - A. Not at that time, to my knowledge.

Q. Are you a Jew? - A. No.( Samuel Arrowsmith corroborated the evidence of the last witness.)

Court. Q. (To Wakefield.) What time in the morning was it you bought this box? - A. I am sure it was not later than eleven o'clock, because we always lunch at eleven, and I am sure it was before that.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18011202-28

28. JOHN WHITEHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of November, a boat, value 51. the property of our Lord the King .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Right Hon. the Commissioners of his Majesty's Customs .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

There being no evidence against the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18011202-29

29. SARAH SOLOMONS was indicted for feloniously forging, uttering, and publishing as true, on the 29th of August , a certain promissory note for the payment of money , as follows:

No. 4874. No. 4874.

I promise to pay to Peter Donaldson, Esq. or bearer, on demand, twenty pounds, here, or on Sir James Esdaile , Esdaile, Wright, Hammet, and Co. bankers, London.

For Sparkes, Hughes, & Sparkes.

Sparkes & Co.

Guildford, 4th day of August, 1799. with intention to defraud John Sparkes , Richard Sparkes , and George Sparkes , knowing the same to be forged.

Second Count. For uttering the same, knowing it to be forged, with intention to defraud Robert Hazard , Thomas Burne , Edward Warner , and Thomas Burne the younger .

Third Count. For uttering the same, knowing it to be forged, with intention to defraud Peter Esdaile , William Esdaile , and John Hammet .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

SIMEON SMITH sworn. - I am clerk at Messrs. Hazard's, in Cornhill; their names are Robert Hazard, Thomas Burne, sen. Edward Warner, and Thomas Burne , Jun.; the prisoner came to their shop on the 29th of October, about six o'clock, to buy an eighth same of an Irish lottery ticket; I shewed her some, and after chusing one, she presented me a 20l. note for payment, (the note produced); this is the note she presented; it appears to be a Guildford bank-note, there is no stamp on it; upon taking it into my hand, I thought it was not regularly signed, from it being signed Sparkers and Co. by only one of the partners.

Q. Were you acquainted with the signature of the Guildford bank-notes, and did that give you suspicion? - A. Not particularly that, but it is quite irregular to sign notes so; I did not say any thing to her, but shewed it to Mr. Alder, and said, I should take it over to Messrs. Esdailes' the bankers, to inquire whether it was good; I said that in the presence of Mrs. Solomons; she said, very anxiously, she would not trouble us to take it over, for she had got a smaller note, which would do as well, and she seemed to wish to have that back; I went over to the banker's, and shewed it to one of the clerks, who immediately discovered it to be a forgery; I went back and asked her where she lived; she said in Houndsditch, and kept a shop; I asked where she took the note; she said it was impossible to tell, as she had dealings at different parts of the country; after that I asked her again if she could possibly tell, and, after some hesitation, she said, she had taken it of a man whom she had sold some cloth to; Mr. Messenger came over, and put the same questions to her, and she returned the same answers she had done to me; I gave the note to Mr. Alder; he went over to Esdailes' house, and she went with them.

JOSEPH ALDER sworn. - I am clerk in Hazard's office; this is the note I received from the last witness and gave to Mr. Messenger.

HUMPHREY MESSENGER sworn. - I belong to Messrs. Esdailes, and was there when Mr. Smith came over, the 29th of October; this is the note he brought; all the Guildford bank-notes are payable at Sparkes's or our house; I am well acquainted with the mode in which the Guildford bank-notes are drawn; the printed part of this note is the same, but not the part which is filled up with writing; this is not similar to any I have seen, not is the signature at the bottom in the way in which they draw their notes; they are invariably signed Richard Sparkes .

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand writing of Messrs. Sparkes, of all of them? - A. I have seen all the signatures; this is not the ordinary signature.

Q. Were you desired by Smith to go over to Messrs. Hazards? - A. Yes; when I went over I saw Mrs. Solomons, and asked her if she had given a consideration for the note; she said she had; I asked her what; she said she had given two pieces of Irish linen and the difference in money; I asked her if she knew to whom; she said no, that in the course of her dealings she often sold goods to people she knew nothing of; I told her I was sorry to inform her it was a forgery, and asked her where she lived; she said in Houndsidtch; I told her I must trouble her to go over to Sir James Esdaile and Co.'s with me; she said she was a mother of children and did not like to walk the streets for fear of catching cold, and, as a lady, some of our gentlemen ought to have gone over to her; at last she agreed to go, and the note was shewn to the principal clerk in our house in her presence; then a constable was sent for and she was sent to the Compter.

JOHN SPARKES, jun. sworn. - I am not a partner in the Guildford bank, but am acquainted with the hand writings of all the Sparkes's; this is not either of their writing; my uncle signs them all Richard Sparkes; their names are John, Richard, and George Sparkes.

FRANCIS SMITH sworn. - I am clerk at Es

dailes, and am well acquainted with the Guildford bank-notes; this is quite different, nor is it Mr. Richard Sparkes 's writing.

For the prisoner.

WILLIAM BLAKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 9, Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street; I attended before the Grand Jury on this indictment. (The note shewn to the witness.)

Q. You know it is said the prisoner had that note from you - was it ever in your possession shortly before the 29th of October last? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. How long was it in your possession? - A. From the 26th to the 28th of October.

Q. I have no right to ask you whether you offered that note to the prisoner; but I ask you did you not purchase two pieces of cloth of her? - A. No, I did not.

Q. It went out of your hands on the 28th of October? - A. Yes.

Q. What are you? - A. I buy clothes, and keep a little shop, and have near seven years.

Q. Has any misfortune happened to you in that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell me, within half a dozen, how many times you have been in custody in the course of that time? - A. It is a question I don't think proper to answer.

Q. Have you any objection to tell how many times you have had the good fortune to be admitted King's evidence? - A. I believe I can recollect once.

Q. Will you say you cannot recollect more than once? - A. I will.

Q. You do not like to tell me how many times you have been in custody charged with felony of different sorts? - A. No, I don't think proper.

Q. In consequence of the prisoner being taken to the Mansion-house, I believe you were lent for before the Lord-Mayor? - A. I was.

Q. How long was it after you had been brought before the Lord-Mayor at first, that you found yourself at liberty? - A. The Wednesday following, as I was taken on the Friday.

Q. Upon the subject of this very note? - A. Upon this note, and another one.

Q. You then contrived to get you yourself at liberty, and get the prisoner committed? - A. I did not contrive it, because the late Lord-Mayor saw my life, by a conspiracy, was to be sworn away, and admitted me to bail.

Q. May I take the liberty of asking where you got that note? - A. Yes, of a young man, who calls himself Flinc.

Q. Is that the same Mr. Flint who was tried here the other evening? - A. No, a son of his; he calls himself so.

Q. Mr. Flint, of Shoe-lane? - A. Yes.

Q. That young man has absconded since? - A. He has.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, that man came to me, and bought two pieces of Irish, and gave me the note; I did not think any thing of the note being bad; I did not know his character at that time, or else I would not have taken it; but, since that, I have heard a very bad character, and am very sorry that ever I took the note of a person of that description; I am innocent, and it is that only which supports me to speak; I sold him two pieces of Irish linen, of twenty-five yards each, at three shillings and two-pence per yard; and I gave him a ten-pound note, a two-pound note, to the best of my recollection, and, I believe, one shilling and eight pence, or one shilling and four pence, I will not be sure which.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18011202-30

30. MARY EDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , a Bath stove, value 2s. the property of Abraham Wright .

JANE WRIGHT sworn. - I live at No. 4, Old Fish-street-hill, Upper Thames-street ; the stove stood at the top of the two-pair of stairs landing-place, about three o'clock; I saw the prisoner go up stairs to some of the lodgers, as I thought, for I did not follow her, but went into my landlady's room; the blacksmith's boy came for the stove to mend, for a bar was out, but it was gone; I saw it again in the prisoner's room, at No. 17, Lambethhill; I desired her to bring it back to where she took it from; she said, she never saw me before; I found the stove there, and it is now here.

- HUGHES sworn. - I am a constable; I took the prisoner into custody; she took me to a two-pair of stairs room, No. 17, Lambeth-hill; I looked about, but could not see any thing, till I unsolded a screen, behind which I found the stove; she said, she had bought it of a man, and gave seven shillings for it, and he was to call for two shillings more; I asked who the man was, but she could not tell me; I took her to the Compter, and then she confessed she had taken it.(The stove produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I have no defence, I leave it to the Gentlemen of the Jury.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-31

31. WILLIAM JOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , a saw, value 3s. the property of Andrew Davidson .

ANDREW DAVIDSON sworn. - I lost my saw from Chicken-yard, Aldgate , on the 23d of November, on Monday morning; I saw it on Saturday night; on the Wednesday I saw it at the pawnbroker's; I knew it again by a piece being broke off near the handle, and the maker's name.

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. Windsor, of the Minories, pawnbroker, and produce the saw which the prisoner pawned on the 21st of November, in the evening, near eleven o'clock; I had never seen him before; he was dressed the same as he is now; I asked him if it was his; he said, it was his father's. (Produces the saw.)

Mr. Davidson. I left work about six o'clock on Saturday; this is my saw; I had used it four months constantly, and can swear to it; I traced it to the prisoner, and he said he had pawned it.

Prisoner's defence. I went down a gateway to case myself, and a man run away; I felt something touch my hand, and it was the sleeve of a great coat, with four saws in it.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-32

32. SHADRACH HUTCHINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a china bowl, value 10s. the property of James Bennett .

JOHN PIPER sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Bennett, No. 12, Holborn-bars ; the bowl was taken from the door; I missed it on the 16th from the door, about half past four o'clock; I was getting the goods in from the door, and, among them, was this bowl; coming out again, I instantly missed it; seeing the prisoner about the door, I suspected him; I looked about, and saw him with it in his hands; I pursued him, upon which he threw it down; I took him in Southampton-buildings; I have kept the pieces ever since. (Produces them.)

GEORGE LONGDEN sworn. - I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-33

33. CHRISTOPHER THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , two sheets, value 7s. 6d. the property of Sir George Cornwall , Bart.

PRUDENCE OTHEN sworn. - I am servant to Sir George Cornwall , in Stanhope-street, May-Fair : On Tuesday, the 17th of November, between two and three o'clock, I saw the prisoner come into the house from the area; he went up stairs, but I did not speak to him, as the house was under repair, and there were quantities of workmen, and I thought he was some person inspecting them; half an hour after I saw him go out of the servant's hall door, and observed that he seemed to be a stranger; I offered to open the door for him, when he seemed alarmed; I then thought he had got something under his coat, and said, I am afraid you have got something that is not your own; I then put my hand inside his coat, and pulled out a sheet, which he got from off a bed; I called Edward Bishop to my assistance; this is the sheet I took from him; (produces it;) after I took it, he ran away.

EDWARD BISHOP sworn. - According to what the last witness informed me, I run up the steps into the streer, and saw the prisoner about seventy yards from me; I followed, and brought him back, and took the other sheet from him, which he said he had taken from off a bed up stairs.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-34

34. JOSEPH HARRISON was indicted for making an assault, on the 29th of November , in the King's highway, upon Henry Cornelius , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 7l. 7s. his property.

HENRY CORNELIUS sworn. - I am a sailor , and a Prussian , from Embden: Last Sunday week, between seven and eight o'clock, I was robbed in St. Catherine's-lane ; a young man, an Englishman, was with me; we were sober, as we had but one glass of rum a-piece; we had been to Deptford, and when we got to St. Catherine's-lane, the prisoner laid hold of me at my breast, and said, stop never mind, I know who has got the watch, or, I know them all that has got your watch; he did not say any more, or ask me for any money.

Q. Did you miss any thing? - A. Yes, my watch.

Q. Was there another with him? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Who took the watch? - A. The other; this man held me; the other took the watch, and away he ran.

Q. Did the prisoner stop you from going after him? - A. Yes, and then they both ran away; I went into the public-house again about ten minutes after he had robbed me, and found him at the bar of the White-Lion, St. Catherine's-lane; I am sure he is the same man; I have never seen the other man, or the watch again; the young man with me said he was the same man, and he was taken into custody; mine was a silver watch and chain; I felt it go out of my pocket; I had seen it but a few minutes before in the public-house; I had got but two or three yards from the door before they came up to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Do you mean to swear, that, during all the day, you had no liquor except this glass of rum? - A. In the morning I had a glass, a pint of beer to my dinner, and, at seven o'clock, another glass.

Q. What had you had with your girls? - A. I had no girls; I saw some to be sure; there were plenty in the house, in another room; we were in the bar.

Q. Do you mean to say you were not near any of the girls? - A. Yes, I do; I had nothing to do with them; they were in another room.

Q. This was very dark? - A. It was dark, but I could see the men very well; there was a light through the window and door; it was before the door was shut; I could see that man as plainly as I see any body here; I don't know the other; this man laid hold of me, and the other pulled the watch away.

Q. You are a foreigner, and perhaps your English friend told you about a reward? - A. Nobody told me about any thing.

Q. You have never heard of forty pounds reward? - A. Never before now; nobody told me.

Q. Have you not said, if you could get a sum of money, you would swear against no man? - A. I never said so.

Q. Do you know the Flying-Horse public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you never say so there? - A. No; the prisoner's father said, he would pay for the watch, and all expences, and offered me ten pounds; and he paid me ten pounds down, which I gave to Mr. Griffiths, the officer.

Q. What else have you got? - A. Nothing else; there were some notes, some guineas, and some half-guineas; I believe I gave the officer six-pence more than I got from his father.

CHRISTOPHER FIELD sworn. - I am a sailor, and belong to the same ship with the last witness; I was with him when he was robbed in St. Catherine's-lane; we were both sober; it was about half past seven in the evening; we went to the White-Lion about seven, to see Mr. Gibson, the landlord, who is an acquaintance of the prosecutor's, and we had one glass of rum a-piece; there were women in the house, but we were with the landlord; they were in one room, and we in another.

Q. What happened after you had the rum? - A. Three men went out just before us; they came out of the same house; I was the last out; they had not been in our company, but was in company with the women; I saw the prisoner go out before me, and he laid hold of the prosecutor by the breast, and the other took his watch; I did not see the watch.

Q. How do you know he took it? - A. I saw them just run from him; the third man, I suppose, stood to receive the watch; the other two ran away as soon as they had got the watch, and then the prisoner let him go, and ran after them; I am sure he is the man; I saw his face, which made me know him, for there were then three standing before us drinking at the bar, with one girl with them, and the prisoner was in the middle.

Q. How far had the prosecutor got out of the house? - A. He might be about three yards from the door; there was a light in the bar-window, right facing where he was robbed.

Q. Did you see his face in the street? - A. No.

Q. Had he a hat on? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they go up the moment they got out of the house, before the door was shut? - A. Yes, before the door was shut, they had hold of him.

Q. If you did not see his face in the street, how could you know him again? - A. I saw him in the room, and saw the brown coat he had on.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come out of the house? - A. Yes; he went directly up to the prosecutor.

Q. Tell me, correctly, how you all went out? A. I asked this young man what o'clock it was, and if it was time to go a-board; he looked at his watch, and said, let us go; the three men were then just before the bar; then we were bidding the landlord good night, and these men went out; the Prussian followed them, and I followed him; I had just got upon the step when they laid hold of him.

Q. By the time you got out, were they walking on, or in waiting? - A. They were waiting for us.

Q. As soon as the Prussian got out, did you see them stop him? - A. Yes, upon the opening of the door, as they went out, we went out one after the other; there were other people passing and repassing, but not near us; I never lost sight of the prisoner from the time he left the house till he run away, after holding the prosecutor; I swear he is the man, I know him by his face.

Q. You say you did not see his face in the street? - A. I know him again by the size of him.

Q. How soon did you find him afterwards? - A. We went about ten minutes after to the house again, and found the prisoner standing before the fire; I had asked the prosecutor if he would go back, and see if the landlord knew the man; I was asking the landlord, and the prisoner stood there, and spoke to me; he was holding his head down at first, and I did not see his face, but I asked the landlord if he knew the young men that were there, because they had picked this young man's pocket; then the prisoner asked me who was the man that had lost the watch; I told him, he was the man who took it; he said, he was not; I asked the landlord if he knew him; he said, he did not; the landlord is not here; we then sent for an officer, and the prisoner told the officer he knew the men who had the watch;

the officer told him, if he did not find the men who took the watch, he would take him; the prisoner then took us to some place, in Whitechapel, I think, about three miles, to a house, and said the man lived there who had the watch; he enquired for a man who was not at home; then we took him to the watch-house; he said he knew the gang that went every Sunday night stealing watches and what they could.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. When the prisoner said he would endeavour to find the man, he was in the officer's care? - A. Yes.

Q. What liquor had you got? - A. I had had a glass of rum in the morning, and one in the evening, I had nothing at my dinner.

Q. Who was it told you about a reward? - A. Nobody; I never had such a job as this in my life.

Q. If any body has said that the door of the public-house was shut before the Prussian was held, that is not true, is it? - A. No; the door was not shut.

Q. You never had seen this young man before? - A. Never.

Q. When you went back to the public-house, why did not you know the prisoner again? - A. I did not see him at first.

Q. There were people passing and re-passing? - A. Yes, on the other side; there might be three or four.

Q. The moment the two other men run away, the man that held the Prussian let him go? - A. Yes, and went after them.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer; the prisoner was brought to Lambeth-street office on Monday, and committed for examination on the Wednesday following; I know nothing against the prisoner, except that the prosecutor gave me this paper, (produces it), saying, he had it from his father; I had six guineas, five half-guineas, a shilling, a one pound Bank of England note, in all amounting to ten pounds and sixpence.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-35

35. DANIEL CRAWLEY was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting a certain promissory note for the payment of money , as follows;

£. 27 4s. 6d. Chelsea, Nov. 21, 1801.

Two months after date, I promise to pay to Mr. James Jones , or order, the sum of twenty-seven pounds four shillings, for value received.

To Mr. Wm. Nash, Accepted

Brewer-street, London. W. Nash.

And that he did assist in felouiously forging and counterfeiting an indorsement to the said promissory note, as follows:

James Jones X his mark.

Witness, Timothy Birchmore .

with intention to defraud Thomas Rayner .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing as true the said note, knowing it to be forged.

Third and Fourth Counts. With uttering and publishing as true the said indorsement, with intention to defraud James Jones .

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, I have been looking at the record, and I am satisfied if we were to go into this case, you could not find the prisoner guilty, therefore you will acquit him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-36

36. ABRAHAM BENEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , a box, value 1d. one half-guinea, three seven shilling-pieces, twelve shillings, and a 2l. Bank-note, the property of Thomas Tuck , in his dwelling-house .

ANN TUCK sworn. - I live in Church-street, Bethnal-green ; my husband is a baker : On the 24th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, Mrs. Dyster came to settle an account with me; I was going to pay her the difference which was about 1l. 10s. and had told out a dozen shillingsworth of halfpence, which were on the counter, and I took out a two-penny screw box from my pocket, containing about four pounds, to give the remainder of the balance, when a person came in for a loaf; I set the box on the counter to get the loaf, and the spring of the lock being bad, the door would not catch, upon which this lad rushed in, and said, I want a quartern loaf; he immediately knocked the lady on one side, and run away with my box in an instant; I know it contained a 2l. Bank-note, three seven-shilling-pieces, half-a-guinea, and some silver, because I had just taken it; Mrs. Dyster got up again, and cried out, stop thief, he has robbed the woman; upon which a gentleman caught him, and brought him back; I am sure that is the boy, because he was right before my face; the box was never found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. It was very dark, and this happened momentary? - A. Yes.

Q. You never had seen the person who took the box before? - A. No; but his clothes were particular.

Q. Had you any occasion to send any part of the 4l. away you had received? - A. No, I am certain of it, because I had been sending 16l. away out of my box before I received the 4l. that was in it.

MARY DYSTER sworn. - My husband is a butcher, No. 165, Church-street, Bethnal-green:

I was at at Mrs. Tuck's, between the hours of seven and eight on the 24th of November, and I know all she as said to be true; I saw the person who took the boy going out, apparently that is the same lad, but I cannot swear to him; I only saw the back going out at the door.

- MALLOWELL sworn. - I am a weaver, in King-street, Spitalfields; I was opposite to Tuck's shop, and heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner, with one or two persons behind him, as he was crossing to run down Old Nichol-street; I caught him by the collar, and another man immediately got hold of his collar, and begged me to let him go, for that he had him in custody; I said I should not, for I did not know what was the matter; he kept hold of his collar a little way, but I missed him soon; I did not first see the prisoner till he was about thirty yards off Tuck's shop; I believe he fell down, for I heard a splashing, and when I laid hold of him, he was all over mud; I took him back, and he was taken into custody; he made no resistance.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. There were several people running? - A. There were three or four behind, he was the first about four or five yards.

Q. That was the first time you saw the young man you caught, and that was thirty yards from the shop? - A. Yes.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I belong to Worship-street; I was sent for to take the prisoner; Mrs. Tuck said, he was the lad; I searched him, and found in his pocket this piece of crape, a glove, a knife, and a penny piece.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-37

37. EDWARD BULLOCK , JOHN SCULLY , and JOHN RIMES , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Leman , widow , no person being therein, about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 9th of November , and stealing therein two gowns, value 22s. a sheet, value 3s. a shift, value 1s. 6d. a boy's dress, value 3s. a ring, value 5s. an apron, value 6d. two shawls, value 4s. a half handkerchief, value 6d. four caps, value 2s. six pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d. two pair of pockets, value 6d, two pocket-handkerchiefs, value 1s. and a tea-chest, value 6d. the property of the said Ann Leman .

ANN LEMAN sworn. - I was a widow when this happened, but am married since; I kept the lower part of the house, No. 1, Little Gray's-Inn-lane : On the 9th of November I went out a little before two, and left nobody there; I locked the door when I went out, and returned between four and five, when I found I was robbed; I am sure I turned the key as I went out, but did not try the door; there had been no violence used to it, but I think it was opened by a picklock key; I went into the back room, and saw the bed-clothes tossed up together, and the top sheet drawn off; I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment; the ring was in a drawer, and the lock was forced open; all the other articles were not locked up; I saw one gown at the pawnbroker's, and upon Bullock was found a pocket-handkerchief in his breeches, and at his house there was a shawl.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I was told you were married again before the day this offence was committed? - A. I was married on the 18th of November, and the robbery was on the 9th.

Q. Rimes and you were very good friends until the time of this robbery? - A. No more than if he passed by, we used to drink together.

Q. He had been to see you a little time before this? - A. Yes, the same day.

Q. And a relation of your's lived servant with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his calling to enquire after the girl? - A. Yes.

Q. How many quarterns of gin had you? - A. I believe we drank but one.

Q. I am told you had seven or eight? - A. Only one; we parted good friends.

Q. You think the door was locked? - A. Yes.

Q. When you were examined before the Magistrate, did you not say you did not know whether it was locked or no? - A. No; I said I locked it as I usually did, but I did not put my hand to try it.

Q. It often happens that it don't lock? - A. It might so, I cannot say whether it was locked or not, I locked it as I usually did.

Q. Rimes's place was searched, but nothing found? - A. No.

Court. Q. Where were you drinking that day? - A. He sent for me to the corner of the street, it might be about ten minutes before two.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. Salkeld, No. 423, Strand, (produces a gown and shawl); they were pawned between five and seven, on the 9th of November, for ten shillings, by Scully, in the name of Edward Smith, No. 1, Bull-inn-court, Strand: On the 10th the prosecutrix came, and I shewed her the things, which she claimed; she went and got an officer and we took Sculty; nobody persuaded me to swear to him; he is the man to the best of my knowledge; but I was extremely busy at the time.

Q. Have you any doubt about it? - A. I have some little doubt.

JOHN LIMERICK sworn. - I am one of the

Bow-street patrole; Crocker, the prosecutrix, and I went to Rimes's house, No. 1, Queen's-head-court, Strand; we did not find him then, but we saw Bullock and him arm in arm in the street; the woman said, pointing to Rimes, that is the man I have a suspicion has robbed me; I took him and Crocker stopped Bullock; we took them to Rimes's house and searched him (Rimes), but did not find any thing; Crocker was searching Bullock, but he would not let him do it quietly; I went to his assistance, but before I got to him he whipped this ticket into his mouth, (produces a duplicate); I tied his hands and untied his leather apron, and in his breeches there was this old pocket-handkerchief; we took them to Bow-street; I went to Bullock's lodgings in Marigold-court, and found some other property.

- CROCKER sworn. - I went with Limerick to the house of Rimes, and found this bunch of small keys, some have been filed; one of them opens the lock of the prosecutrix's drawers; I afterwards met Scully and searched him, and in his right hand breeches pocket I found two skeleton keys, one of which undoes her parlour door. (Produces the keys).(The prosecutrix identified the shawls, gowns, and handkerchief).

Bullock's defence. About eight o'clock in the evening, on the 9th of November, as I was coming from work I kicked something before me, which I picked up, and it was a few old rags, two pocket-handkerchiefs, and a duplicate; I carried them home, but did not then know what they were; that is all I know about it.

Scully and Rimes were not put on their defence.

Leman. I would give a guinea for the gown, half-a-crown for this shawl, and one shilling for the blue shawl.

Edward Bullock, GUILTY, aged 63.

Of stealing goods, value 4s. 9s.

Transported for seven years .

Scully, NOT GUILTY .

Rimes, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-38

38. ROBERT SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , fifty-six yards of calico, value 46s. the property of Jonathan Watson , in his dwelling-house .

- BUREIDGE sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Watson, in Oxford-street : On the 7th of November, I was with my back to the door in the shop, and as I turned round I saw the prisoner take two pieces of calico and run off; they stood in a box about five feet from the door inside the shop; I followed him and took him in Swallow-street, having never lost sight of him; I asked him what he was going to do with them; he said he had taken them from a shop in Oxford-street; I desired he would walk back with me; when he came back we sent for a constable and took him to Marlborough-street. (The calico produced and identified).

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-39

39. MARK CONNER and DIANA DENCH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , three yards of cotton, value 10s. eleven brass handles, value 2s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 10s. two pair of silver knee-buckles, value 5s. a silk gown, value 20s. two other gowns, value 10s. a gold ring, value 10s. three pair of silk stockings, value 8s. four shirts, value 10s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 2s. three pair of silk breeches, value 7s. three waistcoats, value 6s. the property of John Robins , in his dwelling-house .

Second Count. Charged them with stealing three yards of cotton, value 10s. a curtain-rod, value 2s. the property of the said John Robins, and the other articles as being the property of David Stevenson , Esq. in the dwelling-house of John Robins.

JOHN ROBINS sworn. - I am an upholsterer and cabinet-maker, in Warwick-street, Golden-square; Mark Conner I employed, but don't know any thing of the woman; she passed for his wife, but she is not; I have been frequently robbed of whole pieces of cotton and other things; the brass handles found at the prisoners I believe to mine; the wearing apparel belongs to Mr. Stevenson, who is in Wales, and his trunks were left in my warehouse till he came to town; they have been unlocked and things taken out to a large amount, both men's and women's; I don't know when they were taken, but Mr. Stevenson had occasion to go to his trunks and missed them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How is your warehouse situated? - A. It is all covered in with one roof with the house.

Q. The woman never had access to your house? - A. Not that I know of.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street; on searching the prisoner's lodgings I found a great many duplicates of various articles, silk breeches, and stockings, indeed all that is in the indictment; I found also a brass curtain-rod in four or five pieces, and three pair of silk breeches and two silk waistcoats; in the prisoner's box I found the duplicate of a piece of cotton, for four shillings, and of a gold ring; the prisoners were both at home.

WILLIAM PETHERICK sworn - I was with the last witness, and found the things as he has described; The woman had the duplicates and was

going to destroy them, but I took them from her.(Produces the property).

- WEIR sworn. - I am cabinet foreman to Mr. Robins, and I believe the brass rod and handles to be his property; such handles are not to be bought at any shop. (The cotton identified).

- DERVAN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, and took in this gown of the woman prisoner in the name of Ann Conner ; I have got two shirts also, taken in on the 21st of January of Diana Conner , a shirt and pair of stockings, a shirt and apron for four shillings, a pair of silk stockings for four shillings, a silk cloak and handkerchief for half-a-crown, all pawned by her; the cloak I believe to be her's; I have known her three years.

JOSEPH AVERY sworn. - I live at Mr. Freer's, and produce the rings pawned at his shop by the woman.

Conner's defence. I leave it to my Counsel; at the time these things were lost I was out; I have been out for Mr. Robins six months at a time.

The prisoners called four witnesses, who gave them good characters;

Mark Conner , GUILTY, aged 45.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Diana Dench , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-40

40. THOMAS BLAKE, alias EVANS , and ROBERT WALSH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a satin cloak, value 5s. a petticoat, value 3s. a parasol, value 5s. and a gown, value 6s. the property of Robert Thompson .

MARY THOMPSON sworn. - My husband is a sailor ; at the time of this robbery I kept the Plough , in Rochester-row, Tothill-street ; I wished to left it, and the first man that came after it was Blake; that was about the 22d of October, and he came no more till the night he robbed me, in company with Walsh, in a coach; Blake asked to go up ftairs into the dining-room, which he did, and called for a shillings-worth of brandy and water; he called himself captain Evans, and said the mate of his ship was at the door in a coach; I told him to go up; when he came up stairs he introduced him as the mate of a ship; then he said he had taken a house at Bristol, and had given five hundred pounds for the lease of it, and proposed, if I would go to take care of it, he would give me two hundred pounds to pay my expences, which I refused, as I told him I was a married woman, and had a family; he then said to Walsh, write this letter immediately to Bristol, and after looking at it, he said to me, look at this; said I, this is a two-penny stamp; he said, it was a two hundred pound check, and would take me to Bristol; a letter was also wrote, which I took in my hand, but never looked at it; I then went to fetch another shillingsworth of brandy and water; when I took it up, he said, his friend could not drink brandy and water, but would have a pint of porter; I went down, and was absent about eight or nine minutes; my bed-room door was locked, and I had the key in my pocket; but when I went up stairs with the beer, these two men were coming out of my bed-room; the first was Blake; I saw two strings hanging dwon from his coat, which was buttoned over the petticoat; I said, what have you been doing there; he said, nothing but curoisity; I took hold of him, and said, I insist upon seeing what you have got, and took the petticoat out of his bosom; I said, you have something else in your pocket; then he pulled out the cloak and parasol from his pocket; and threw them down in a chair in the dining-room; I called to the maid, but she did not come, but ran for a constable; Blake never was out of my sight; Walsh did get away, and the gown was found upon him five or six days after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp, (Counsel for Walsh).

Q. Your husband's name is Robert? - A. Yes.

Q. How long is it fince you saw him? - A. I suppose a year and a half; he has followed the sea fourteen years; he never was sent abroad near Botany Bay; he is now on board the Kent, of 74 guns; I never saw Blake till he came after the house in October, when he came with another person, but I am sure he did not stop all night: on the night of the robbery there were plenty of people in the house, and I called loudly, but they did not come.

Q. Was the dining-room over the tap-room? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any men in the house? - A. I dare say a dozen below.

Q. Not one of whom came up? - A. No; I stopped Blake, Walsh run away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart, (Counsel for Blake). Q. You say you never saw Blake till the 22d of October? - A. I never saw him but three times before in my life.

Q. When he came in the coach, who went out to him? - A. The coachman came, and asked for a quartern of gin, and said, a gentleman wanted to speak to the mistress of the house; I went out, and Blake said, don't you know me, my name is Evans; then I said, oh then, Mr. Evans, you mean to have the house; then he told me to take the reckoning out of that piece of paper, or to take it out of that which was in the paper. (Produces a gilt ring).

Q. Did you and he go up stairs, without Walsh? - A. Yes; but I was not above two minutes up stairs.

Q. How came you to let a man go up stairs, that offered you a two-penny ring at the door? - A. It was a drinking-room for any body.

Q. Did you never meet Blake by agreement? - A. Never, any where.

Q. Did he ever pay his addresses to you? - A. Never; all he said, was, if I would go to Bristol, and take care of the house till he was married to a woman of property, which he was about to be, he would give me two hundred pounds, which I refused.

Q. Then it is not a fact that he thought of marrying you? - A. Never.

Q. Blake came out of your bed-room first? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, had Blake ever been in that room before, to your knowledge? - A. Never to my knowledge, I do swear.

Q. Have you been to see Blake since in prison?-A. His wife has been to me to offer twenty pounds, thirty pounds, or any money to go out of the way, and not appear against him, and I went to him in prison two or three times, for the poor woman came and cried, and said, she was with-child, and had three children.

Q. Did you never offer that you would not prosecute, if they would give you fifty pounds? - A. No; I said, the truth I would stand to the longest day I lived.

Q. What prison did you go to? - A. I never went without the woman; I went twice to Tothillfields, and no more, and once to Newgate, when they begged me to keep away, but I said, I would take no bribery; I did not eat or drink with him.

Q. Do you know any thing of these notes? -(Produces several letters). - A. No; I can neither read or write.

Q. Did you order any body to write them? - A. No. nor any body, to my knowledge.

EDMUND WADE sworn. - I am a draper: On the 4th of November last I was at the Plough, with a few friends; I saw the prisoner, Blake, go out of doors, and Mrs. Thompson after him, calling for assistance, as she had been robbed; I ran out, and seized Blake, and brought him back, and detained him till the patroles came; he made a great to do to get away; I went up stairs to look at the door; it seemed as if it had been forced, for one of the screws was started three parts out.

Court. Q. Did you see Blake come into the house? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before the other came in? - A. No great time, but I cannot say.

Q. Did you hear any noise up stairs? - A. I did, but could not presume what noise it was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I take it for granted, when a woman cried out, murder, or that she was robbed, in your hearing, you would give your assistance? - A. Yes.

Q. I thought so, you appear like a man of gallantry - now, did you hear any thing like that at this house? - A. I heard a noise of Mrs. Thompson singing out for assistance, for that she had been robbed.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes, as she was going out of the door.

Q. Did you hear a noise over head? - A. I heard a noise over head, but I could not say what it was, I was busy with my company; there might be between twenty and thirty.

Q. Did you see Walsh? - A. Yes; he was in the tap-room once.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. When you saw Walsh in the tap-room, where was Blake? - A. Up stairs.

Q. Where was the landlady? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was the lock of the bed-room inside the door? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you write any notes for Mrs. Thompson? - A. I did not write any, but there was a note or two wrote by a young man, an attorney, I cannot say who employed him; I heard them say they would give Mrs. Thompson money to make it up; but she said, she would tell nothing but the truth.

THOMAS NELSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fleming, pawnbroker, in Fetter-lane; this gown was pledged with me on the 10th of November last, I believe by Robert Walsh , but I cannot swear to his person; it is pawned in the name of John Walsh, and the counterpart of the duplicate was found in his possession.

HENRY THOMPSON sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Fleming, and wrote these tickets; I think it was Walsh, I have not much doubt about it.

- BLY sworn. - I am a constable, and apprehended Walsh on the 11th of November; I searched him, and found this duplicate, (produces it); the Magistrates desired me to take care of this letter, directed to the worshipful Magistrates at Queen's-square, (produces it); Walsh acknowledged it to be his writing.(The property was produced, and identified by the prosecutrix).

Blake's defence. Wanting to take a public-house, I went to the Plough, and asked that woman the terms; we could not agree about it then, and on the 22d of October I took a friend with me to see whether he liked it; I had 98 guineas in my pocket, which I took for to pay in case we agreed; she took us into a back parlour, and brought in a bottle of brandy, of which we all drank; I went to pay, but she said, she had no change, and I had better look over the house; she then took me up stairs, and at last shewed me into her bed-room, where she kept me for about two hours, and there said, meet me at 4 o'clock to-morrow, at the Crown and Thistle; in the Haymarket, which I did; she kept me out drinking till between eight and nine o'clock and then she told me to call myself Evans, as she knew a captain of that name; we went home in a coach, and she took me up stairs, and locked

me into her bed-room; by and by she came up, and stripped off, and made me go to bed with her; she had brought up a bottle of brandy, and she and I had three glasses a-piece; in the morning I asked her for change, she said she had not got any, but, says she, here are three rings, and I will meet you between ten and eleven o'clock, at Westminster-bridge; she gave me the three rings, two of which I sold and gave her back the other, on which I had had my name and her's engraved by her desire: On the 4th of November, when I got to the door, I told the coachman to call for a quartern of gin, and desire the mistress to come to me, she did, and I said, here is the ring and the money I borrowed of you, I cannot stop now; but she took hold of me, made me get out and go to her bed-chamber; then she ran down stairs, brought up the brandy bottle, and she and I drank about six glasses a-piece; she then said, there is a man of the name of Wade, who is a young man, and lodges in the house; I will leave him and go with you; you can tell the maid the person in the coach is your mate, and he can draw up a letter to shew to Wade, and I will go along with you this night; I told her that would not suit me, but I would think of it, and as I was dry, would have a pint of beer; she run down stairs for it, and when she came up, she took up this parasol, and said, I will go with you, and will throw these things to your friend in the coach; I opposed her doing it, and said, I would not agree to it; upon which she charged me with robbing her; I thought she was joking, till this very man, Wade, came up, and knocked me down, saying, you rascal, I will get forty pounds for swearing your life away; they then sent for a patrole and took me away; while I was in Tothil-fields, she said, if I would give her fifty pounds, she would forgive me.

Walsh's defence. My Lord, on the day this circumstance happened, I met with Blake, who asked me to go to the Plough with him; I agreed, and we took a coach at Charing-cross; he desired the coachman, when at the Plough, to tell the woman of the house she was wanted she came, and Blake took something out of his pocket, desiring her to take charge of it, she then began exclaiming, "my dear husband, where have you been so long from me?" and so on, and made him get out of the coach; after I had sat a considerable time in the coach, near to falling asleep, I heard a tapping at the coach door, and Mrs. Thompson said, she wished me to walk up stairs; on coming into the room, "is this the mate of your vessel," said she? "yes," says he; we sat down and had some brandy and water; what passed between them, upon my word I am ashamed to relate, it was so bad; I was obliged to go down stairs, where I saw Wade; the way they went on, forced me to come down; soon after, the maid called out, saying, her mistress wanted me up stairs; I went up, and she said,"Mr. Walsh, see how your friend has robbed me, all these things I have taken from his person;" "I don't think," said I, "that he would be guilty of it, if I thought so, I would give him up;" yes, says she, he has, and you must go to prison with him; as to the duplicate I never saw it till at the Magistrate's; the officer picked the ticket off the ground, for Mrs. Thompson came up to me and laid hold of me in a very violent manner; she certainly put it under my coat; it was not pledged till six days after, and it is very unlikely that I should keep it in my possession so long, if I had stole it.

Bly. When we searched him, he made a slip, which I suppose was intentionally done, and the papers fell on the ground; the woman was against the door, she could not possibly do it.

Blake. I wish to call Elizabeth Lamb.

ELIZABETH LAMB sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Thompson; I know Blake; he has been at her house two or three time, he never slept there to my knowledge, on my oath; on the 4th of November, I saw the prisoners there, and the house was very full.

Court. Q. What passed - Did you go out for any body after the robbery? - A. I went up stairs, when my mistress called; she called out that Mr. Blake was a thief, and she wanted a constable; she had got him by the collar, holding him fast; I went and got the patrole.

The prisoners called nine witnesses, who gave them good characters.

Thomas Blake, GUILTY , aged 53.

Robert Walsh, GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-41

41. JAMES BARRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , three hundred weight of lead, value 3l. the property of James Donaldson , and Daniel Davis .

JAMES DONALDSON, sworn. - I am a surveyor and builder : On Saturday the 14th of November, I was at a building at Stoke, near Cobham, in Surry, which I am repairing by contract, in conjunction with Mr. Daniel Davis; on information I received, I went into the stable, where the prisoner had the care of the horses; I looked under the manger, and saw a quantity of old lead, and some small cuttings from the new lead; there were three pieces that were heavy, which, from the shape and quantity, appeared to have been taken from a gutter recently pulled up; I supposed it was going to London, and did not take any other steps then; On Monday the 16th, I was there again, and the lead was in the same place; I had ordered the prisoner to go to London with a cart, on Tuesday the

17th, and to call at my house as usual to take any small parcel to town; he called there between nine and ten; I contrived an errand for him, and while he was away, I got into the cart, and discovered a quantity of lead in two bags; I let him proceed on to London, following him at a distance; when he came near Vauxhall turnpike, he went so fast, I lost him; but, about five o'clock, I saw him at a house in Crown-street, St. Giles's, in a one pair of stairs, where there was Bridget Reading ; one of the bags of lead was on the floor; the prisoner, when he saw me, fell on his knees, and said,"Master, have mercy on me!" I said, it was too late; the other bag of lead was still in the cart; we then went to Bow-street. There was a gutter stripped by my order, and that the lead under the manger was such as came off the building, was evident, from the size and weight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe this house belonged to Mr. Hugh Smith ? - A. Yes, we were repairing it for him, and were to give new lead for the old; I have nobody here who saw the lead taken from the house; the prisoner was the foreman of the labourers, and ought to have taken it to the store-house.( Daniel Davis corroborated the evidence of the last witness.)(The lead produced, and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. It was more than I knew that it was my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-42

42. JOHN BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a coach hammer-cloth, value 18s. the property of Joseph Aldridge .

WILLIAM HYNE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Aldridge, at the Repository, Little St. Martin's-lane: On Sunday, the 15th of November, betweeen one and two o'clock in the day, my son informed me that he saw the prisoner take the hammercloth; it is my master's property.

WILLIAM HYNE, Jun. sworn. - My father is servant to Mr. Aldridge, and the prisoner was servant to Mr. Aldridge; I saw him bring it out of the yard on Sunday the 15th, and I told my father.

JOSEPH DART sworn. - I am a stable-keeper in Cattle-street, Long-Acre; I believe the prisoner assisted at Aldridge's; he brought the hammercloth on Sunday, about two o'clock; I was at dinner; he said, master, I have got a good hammer-cloth to sell; I asked for how much; he said, fourteen shillings, and that it was a man's who was ill; I gave him seven shillings, and he said he got as much as he expected for it, but that he wanted a shilling or two for himself.(The cloth produced, and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-43

43. WILLIAM NICHOLLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , twelve knives, value 15s. twelve forks, value 15s. and a leather pouch, value 4s. the property of William Gaimes .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

HENRY SIMMONDS sworn. - I live in Paternoster row: On the 9th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was on the top of the houses looking into St. Paul's Church-yard when the procession went by, and I found between the ridges of the houses, in a gutter, a small mahogany box; it was between the house of Mrs. Nicholls and my uncle's; the backs of the houses adjoin; the box was not near any window; there are two ridges that go with a descent, and between them I found the box in a gutter; from the top of Mrs. Nicholls's house there is a descent, which goes upon the leads, and on the leads there is a parapet wall and a ladder; when I was up there, I saw the gentleman at the bar and two or three others there; the box contained a paper, which was folded up; I opened it, and in it was about a dozen duplicates, which I took to my uncle; the box, when I took it up, fell to pieces in my hand, but I took the pieces and the duplicates to Mr. Gaimes the next morning, in the state I found them, as near as I could, and I left them with him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You went up there to see Lord-Mayor's Shew? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw the prisoner, and two or three more, on the top of Mrs. Nicholls's house? -

Q. That is some distance from the place where you found the box? - A. Yes.

Q. How many houses are there from which persons might arrive at that gutter? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Might they from half-a-dozen? - A. Yes, one way.

WILLIAM GAIMES sworn. - I am the proprietor of three shops, in St. Paul's Church-yard; I carry on the jewellery business at No. 54, the cabinet business at No. 53, and at No. 51 principally cutlery; at No. 51 I occupy the ground-floor only; the house is Mrs. Nicholls's, and I rent the lower part; at present a brother-in-law of mine manages the business in it; and when the box was found, Benjamin Collins managed it; Peregrine Parry always sleeps there; I know the prisoner, he lived with his mother, at No. 51; the front windows are secured by shutters, which are

fastened on the inside, but cannot be opened on the outside; on the 10th of November Simmonds came to me, and brought me a number of duplicates, some of which had my name on them; I went to the pawnbroker's with those which had my name, and after I had made enquiries, I gave them all to Kimber, the constable; in consequence of his going to Fleming's, the pawnbroker, Fleming's man produced twelve knives, thirteen forks, and the pouch; before the Lord-Mayor I swore to the knives and forks, by their having a mark and my name on them, and to the pouch, by my private shop-mark: upon resorting to my shop, at No. 51, I discovered they were missing; I have some of the same sort left that I had at the same time from Salt and Co. of Sheffreld; I had either two or three dozen of deserts, and the same of table; those produced were never accounted for to me, nor had I ever sold them to Mrs. Nicholls or the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You have three shops, Nos. 54, 53, and 51, in St. Paul's Church yard? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you the whole houses, Nos. 54 and 53? - A. I have.

Q. Which house has your personal attendance? - A. Nos. 54 and 53.

Q. Then as to the sale or disposal of the effects in No. 51, you leave to some other person? - A. I am often there myself, perhaps a dozen times a day; I attend very little behind the counter in either of the shops, but I think less at No. 51 than either; I did the careful part of it:

Q. Who had you there in February? - A. George Young , who is here.

Q. You have another shop in Cornhill, have not you? - A. Yes, and another at Bath.

Q. Mr. Campbell, who is now dead, had a share in your business, I believe? - A. He never had; I am the sole proprietor.

Q. How long ago did it happen that Mrs. Nicholls had occasion to distrain for rent? - A. Last quarter but one; Mr. Campbell hired the shop, and I paid him again; I did not know it had happened till he told me; they were not there ten minutes, for I gave a check on my banker the moment I heard of it; it was thirty-seven pounds ten shillings, for a quarter, at one hundred and fifty pounds a year.

Q. Nos. 53 and 54 have access to the tops of the houses, have they not? - A. Yes, at 53, but there are no leads at 54.

Q. Do you recollect being called upon to make good damage done by your servants for getting over the tops of the houses? - A. I never heard of such a thing.

Q. Is the sale of your curlery confined to No. 51? - A. No, there is as much sold at the other shops; though I say the shops are divided, there may be as many desks sold at 51 as 53 or 54, and so with cutlery at the others.

Q. You say the knives had your name on - is not the name of Gaimes generally put? - A. No. only on the very best.

Q. I will ask you, upon your oath, will you swear that those knives or forks were not sold at 53 or 54? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not said that you could not tell that they had not been sold? - A. Yes, but I have never been accounted to for them.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Explain that? - A. When before Mr. Alderman Combe, I was asked to swear positively whether those were the articles I had been robbed of; I said, I could not; but, since then, I have examined my books, and from my own servants I am enabled to say they are; for table-knives and forks we have no room in either of the shops, than in No. 51, they never were placed in any other.

WILLIAM KIMBER sworn. - I am a constable, and produce some duplicates which I received of Mr. Gaimes; I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of November, about half past eleven at night, at No. 51, St. Paul's Church-yard; he did not say any thing; I searched for a person of the name of Hunt, in White Rose-court, Basinghall-street, but could not find him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were sent by Mr. Gaimes in the evening to apprehend this young man? - A. Yes.

Q. A good humane thing to apprehend a boy at midnight? - A. He desired me to take him up when I saw him.

HENRY BATT sworn. - I was employed by Mr. Fleming, in February last, as his shopman, in Newgate-street. (The duplicates shown the witness.) This is my hand-writing, dated the 12th of February; I know the prisoner, and I received the pledge of him; I have no doubt of his person, as I have seen him more than once as pledging and redeeming things at our house. (The articles produced.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This transaction was as far back as February? - A. Yes.

Q. This is a growing young man? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you now come from Mr. Fleming's? - A. No; I have left him six or seven months.

Q. Mr. Fleming's shop has a deal of business, and is darkened by clothes, is it not? - A. Yes, round the door, but it is not a dark shop.

Q. You speak from recollection of a person ten months back? - A. Yes.

Q. This is a young lad, growing, and features of lads of that age alter considerably within six or seven months? - A. Yes, they do.

Q. There is a possibility of a person being deceived as to a growing lad? - A. It is possible, but I have no doubt in my own mind. (The property was identified by Mr. Gaimes.)

Mr. Knowlys. (To Gaimes). Q. Do you mean to swear that they have never been sold from your shop, No. 51? - A. I cannot say that it is impossible.

Q. Not only every servant you may have, but have had, and every visitor, must pass through your shop at No. 51? - A. Yes.

GEORGE YOUNG sworn. - I was servant to Mr. Gaimes, at No. 51, in February last; I know these knives and forks, having cleaned them, but I never sold a table-knife or fork, or desert knife or fork, all the time I was in the shop, or ever missed any.

Q. When did you leave them? - A. In September; I did not look to see whether they were there or not; I was there in January, and saw them afterwards; I cleaned them all as soon as I got to the shop, but cannot say the last time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What time was it in January you went to Gaimes's? - A. The 20th of December I went there.

Q. How often was it customary to clean them? - A. When we saw them dirty; sometimes in the course of a month or two.

Q. Suppose you had heard nothing about the 12th of February, and I had said, when did you clean them, what whoul you have said? - A. I do not remeber cleaning them but two or three times at first; I am sure I had not cleaned them for more than the last two or three months; Mr. Wenman used to serve as well as me about a month or two before I left.

Q. Did Mr. Campbell sell any thing there? - A. He has once or twice in the present year; but he never sold any knives or forks as I know of.

Prisoner's defence. I have twice found things hid in our cellar; a thread-case, a pair of razors, and a desk, which I informed that young man of, as I thought it was proper Mr. Gaimes should know it.

For the Prisoner.

AUGUSTINE RAYMER sworn. - I live at No. 2, Prospect-place, Newington Butts, and knew the prisoner about eight years ago; I had not seen him for several years, and he is so much altered, I should hardly have known him had I not seen him at his mother's; Mr. Gaimes succeeded me in that shop.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I was in the house when two of Mr. Gaimes's shopmen rung at the bell, and the prisoner let them in; they said they had been ringing at the other bell, and could not get in, and they went up to the top of No. 51 to get to their own chambers.

The prisoner called seventeen witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined one year in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-44

44. JOHN GUIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , a stew pan, value 3s. the property of Edward Robinson .

MARY ROBINSON sworn. - I live at No. 9, Great Earl-street, Seven-Dials ; I saw the prisoner take this stew-pan on the 20th of November; it hung up at the door between three and four o'clock; I holloaed, and called stop thief, and he run with it; he threw it down on the pavement, and they took him.

WILLIAM HALLARDINE sworn. - I took the prisoner, he dropped this stew-pan opposite my window; (produces it;) I pursued him; I did not see him drop it, but as soon as I heard it drop, I saw him run; he begged of me to let him go, but I took him to Bow-street.

Prisoner's defence. I had been of an errand for my mother, and I heard the cry of stop thief, and I run as well as the other people; I am not guilty.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-45

45. WILLIAM CHITTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , four quartern loaves of bread, value 4s. the property of John Brown .

The principal witness being absent, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-46

46. MARY PARROT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , nine pounds of pork, value 4s. the property of John Drew .

JOHN DREW sworn. - I am a cheesemonger , and live in Whitechapel ; I saw the prisoner take nine pounds of pork on the 13th of November; it lay on a bench in the shop; she first came and asked for two ounces of butter, which she paid for, and went away; I returned to the other end of the shop, and in a few minutes she came in again without speaking to any person; she took up the pork, and went out; I followed her out, and took the pork from under her cloak.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I throw myself on the mercy of the Court; I have three small children, and am very poor.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-47

47. JOHN BIGGS, otherwise SWAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a pair of men's shoes, value 5s. the property of Mark Yelf .

MARK YELF sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , and

was robbed of a pair of men's shoes on the 4th of November; I was in the back shop serving a lady when the prisoner came in and asked to look at some shoes; my shopman was there; we have a reflecting looking-glass, in which I could see the prisoner put his hand into the front shop window, and take these shoes, (produces them;) he pretended to look at them, and slipped them under his coat in an instant; he had a basket under his coat, in which the shoes were put, and had another pair in his hand; I told the man he had some shoes, upon which he took him by the coat, opened the basket, and there were the shoes.

Prisoner's defence. I went to this shop for a pair of shoes; I was shewn a pair of big shoes; he said, if I would wait, he would shew me some others; while I was waiting, I saw this pair, which I thought would suit; I took them down to look at, and placed them on the basket near me; they said I stole them, and took me.

GUILTY, aged 75.

Publicly whipped, and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-48

48. PETER COCHRAN was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, on the 16th of October , on Mary Dye , putting her in fear and danger of her life, and taking from her person and against her will, a silver watch, value 4l. 4s. a silk cloak, value 5s. a silver pencilcase, value 1s. and a handkerchief, value 6d. the property of the said Mary.

MARY DYE sworn. - On the 16th of October last, between nine and ten, this man met me promiseuously in the Strand, and asked me if I would have any thing to drink, which I did; he then took me to a house called the Ship and Horseshoe, East Smithfield, and called for a quartern of gin; he said, he had no money; I presented a seven-shilling piece, which proved to be bad; I gave another, which proved bad also, innocent of me; the landlord then called in two watchmen to know how much more money of that kind I had about me; I had no more of any kind; I then presented my silver watch for payment, but the landlord would not take it; after that, the prisoner called for another quartern of gin; I did not like the appearance of the man, so I took the watch, and put it into my bosom; when the gin was drank, we went out; he led me up a yard, and drew the watch from my bosom; I said, where is the watch; upon which he knocked me down, and I was left insensible on the ground; the watchman found me, and took me to the watch-house; I challenged the prisoner on Tuesday following at Somerset-house, upon which he run away.

Court. Q. How long were you in company at this house? - A. About three quarters of an hour; I can swear he is the same man who drew the watch from my bosom; I lost also a cloak, a silver pencil, and a pocket handkerchief; my pocket was turned inside out when I came to myself.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes, I was, but stagnated by the blow.

Q. Who paid for the gin? - A. He, after he saw the watch, paid for both; I never recovered any of the things.

THOMAS ETHERINGTON sworn. - I am a publican, and keep the Ship and Horseshoe; I remember the prisoner and prosecutrix coming to my house on the 16th of October, between eleven and twelve at night; I am sure they are the persons; he knocked at the door, I said it was too late; my wife said, it is Cochran, he wants his crutch, which he has left at our house; he had been away fourteen or fifteen months, but had just come back again; I served them with the gin, and the girl offered me a seven-shilling piece to change; I said it was a bad one; she then tendered me another, which was bad; upon that, I snatched both up, and said I must have her searched, and called in the watchman; no other money was found, except one farthing; she tendered me a silver watch for payment; I refused it; then he said, bring us another quartern, which I did; says he, don't take and lend the poor girl away, I believe she is very innocent, though I never saw her in my life before; says I, my dear, are you an unfortunate girl; she said, she was; and as such I let her go; he said, he believed she was innocent again, and paid for the gin; they then went out of the house, and bid me good night; it was between eleven and twelve when they came, and about twelve when they went away; I could not see that she was any way in liquor; they had three quarterns of gin, or two, I cannot tell which; about three o'clock the headborough rung, and asked me if a man and woman had been there; I said, yes; he asked me if I knew where they lived; I said, I did not; he said, the woman had been robbed by the man who had been drinking with her, in Black-Horseyard; about two or three days after, the prisoner came back to the house, and said to me, have you heard any thing about this piece of work? I said, what; he said, about this girl; I said, yes; he alied for half a pint of gin, and said, is there any danger in my being here; I said, I don't know; that was all he said; I believe he is a sea-faring man.

JOSEPH RAWLINSON sworn. - I am headborough; just before three o'clock on the 17th of October, alarm was given of the robbery; I saw the woman about five o'clock, and she appeared as sober as she is now; I went to Etherington's, who described him to me, and his name, by which I knew him; I went to search for him, but could not find him, and I gave informa

tion to the officers; Black-Horse-yard is a very bye-place.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - On the 18th of October, I received information of this young woman being robbed; I desired Nowlan to go with me; a day or two after, I had two warrants against the prisoner for beating two women; I carried one to the Thames-Police, and we were informed he was in custody for robbing a ship, but we were told there was reason to suppose he would be discharged; and we attended again, when he was delivered over to us; Nowlan had a warrant to serve elsewhere, and the prisoner and I went together to the Ship and Horseshoe, the corner of Nightingale-lane; I saw the landlady, and asked her if that was the man along with the young woman; she said, it was; going along, I asked him how he came to rob her; he made very little answer to that, but said, he did not hurt her; says I, you knocked her down in the passage going to Black-Horse-yard, and robbed her of her watch; he replied again, he did not hurt her, and hoped he should not be hanged for it; I said, I hoped not; says I, the young woman saw you at Somerset-house, going there to receive your pay; he made but little answer to that, but, going along, he said, if I could only be transported for it, I should be glad to take that now for my chance; I then took him to the Office.

Prisoner's defence. It is not in my power to say any thing after what they have said, for they have said that which is most false; I leave it to God and the world to judge of my innocence; I left the woman sitting on the steps; as soon as I came out, I said, my good girl, I will leave you here, I don't think proper to go any further with you, as you had liked to have got me into trouble about the bad money; I then left her sitting on the steps, for she was so drunk, she could hardly stand; indeed we were both drunk together. If I had been guilty, I should have gone away, but I never slept one night out of the parish; I was not one night out of Rosemary-lane; I left her on the steps, and never walked with her after; my crutch I had left off but two days, after having used it for nine months, with a bad leg, with sixty holes in it, which I got by a wound on board a ship.

GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-49

49. WALTER COGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a pocket lantern, value 2s. two brass candlesticks, value 2s. two flat irons, value 1s. a box iron and stand, value 9d. an iron shovel, value 6d. a piece of mahogany, value 1s. and a pot of paint, value 1s. the property of George Holywell and Joseph Holywell .

GEORGE HOLYWELL sworn. - My brother and I are ironmongers , at Wapping; the prisoner was our porter ; in consequence of information, I got a search-warrant, and found these articles in his lodgings; I can swear to the lantern. (The lantern produced.)

JOSEPH HOLYWELL sworn. - I can swear to this piece of mahogany; our house was pulled down by the Dock-Company, but this wood belonged to us.

- HUMPHREYS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Holywell; I can swear to this pot of paint and the lantern.

JOHN COX sworn. - I am an officer; I searched the prisoner's room, and found all these things, and I found the prisoner among some pockets of hops, at a hop-factor's, in the Borough.

- sworn. - I was servant to Mr. Holywell; when we were removing, about five or six months ago, the goods stood in baskets open in the shop; I saw the prisoner mix the paint, and take it away; one time I saw him put two Prince's metal candlesticks in his pocket; another time take out a box iron; another day a cinder shovel; and, another day, another pair of candlesticks.

Q. How came you not to tell? - A. That is what I was taken into custody for.

Q. Are you sure you speak the truth? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any profit? - A. He gave me sixpence, and halfpence, and once he gave me a bad shilling, which I threw away; he gave them to me not to tell. GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-50

50. WILLIAM BARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , twenty-five canvas wrappers, value 2l. and one other wrapper, value 5s. the property of John-Edward Holmes and William Hall .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

RICHARD PETTIT sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Holmes and Hall, merchants and packers , in Bishopsgate-street; the prisoner was our porter ; in consequence of information, I watched him and Wilding going down to our bottom warehouse, and Wilding let the prisoner out; I said, I wanted the prisoner; he appeared confused; I afterwards went to a public-house kept by one Bowness, in Houndsditch, where I saw the prisoner, Wilding, and the wrappers; the canvas here was found at Horne's warehouse, at the back of the public-house.

JOHN HORNE sworn. - I am a sack-maker, No. 70, Houndsditch, behind the public-house; I saw some canvas, which he said was their's; I did not buy it; the prisoner brought it to me to sell on the Tuesday or Wednesday night; I have seen the prisoner three or four times. (The wrappers produced.)

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I went with Pettit to Horne's; he came in just after, and we found the wrappers; I took the prisoner the same morning at his master's house; I searched his lodging, and found a blanket wrapper; Mr. Hall said, it was their property.

Mr. Alley. (To Pettit.) Q. Do you or not know that that wrapper was lent to the prisoner? - A. They gave him leave to take two or three to cover some furniture; I believe that wrapper he could have no intention of keeping.

Q. Are you sure the others were not sent out with goods? - A. I don't believe they were; we use them for packing goods for exportation.

JOHN-EDWARD HOLMES sworn. - I will not swear to these wrappers any further than there are marks that come from the different manufacturers, who, I will not pretend to say, have not sent goods to other houses; we never sell canvas or cloth but wholesale.

Prisoner's defence. I was never in Mr. Bowness's house in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-51

51. NICHOLAS PIRIOLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , ten pounds weight of preserved apricots, value 50s. one hundred pounds weight of carraways, value 30s. two pounds weight of apple jelly, value 8s. twelve pound of sugar, value 6s. a wooden box, value 1s. twelve sheets of coil, value 6s. twelve jars, value 12d. and twelve gall hots, value 6d. the property of Martha Hoffman , widow , Charles-Godfrey Hoffman , and James-Rix Hoffman .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JAMES RIX HOFFMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. What is the firm of your house? - A. Martha Hoffman , widow, Charles-Godfrey Hoffman, and myself; we are confectioners , in Bishopsgate-street ; the prisoner was our servant : About three days before the 29th of October, I missed some preserved apricots from two pans; we suspected the prisoner, and had master-keys made to his boxes; on the evening of the 27th, I examined the boxes, and found two bladders containing preserved apricots.

Q. Are bladders the common mode of keeping them? - A. No; about a quarter past eight in the evening, I concealed myself; we had placed Mr. Holdsworth outside the door, where he was to wait for a signal, when he was to stop the prisoner; I saw the prisoner take the bladders one by one out of the box, and put them in his pocket; after that, I saw him return them into the box again; I should suppose they were too large for his pockets; the next day, about twelve o'clock, I examined his boxes, and found the bladders reduced in size, and, in the corner of the same box, I found a brown paper containing preserved apricots; in the evening I concealed myself as before, and saw the prisoner take the bladders out of the box, and put them in his pockets; Mr. Holdsworth was outside the door; my brother gave him the signal, and he brought the prisoner in, and searched him; he fell on his knees, and begged for God's sake we would save his life, and he would confess his guilt; upon his finding, that would not do, he fell flat upon his face, kissed our feet, and begged we would save his life, and he would confess every thing; I made answer, that his conduct had been too infamous for him to expect any mercy; there were two bladders containing preserved apricots found upon him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I presume the skill that he had used in your house would have enabled him to make up goods of this fort at his own lodgings? - A. I don't know that he did.

Q. Of course you don't mean to swear to preserved apricots? - A. No.(Mr. Charles- Godfrey Hoffman and Mr. Philip Holdsworth corroborated the testimony of the last witness.)(The prisoner, being a Frenchman, made his defence by means of an interpreter, as follows:)

I bought these apricots of a person at different times; his name is Joseph Fondiere , he lives in the Little Minories; he had been to my house in Lemon-street, Tabernacle-walk, several times, particularly one evening, when I bought twelve pounds of apricots of him, which he was to bring me the next morning; and, as I was going to my work the next morning, I met him in Bishopsgate Churchyard with the apricots in two bladders; he said, he was in a hurry, and could not carry them to my house; he gave them to me, and I took them to Mr. Hoffman's, and put them in my box, not thinking there was any danger in it; I intended to take them all home in the evening, but meeting with a friend in the day, with whom I was to go and sup, I only took a part of them; and, that I might not give my master any room to suspect, I took them out of the bladder, and put them into a brown paper; and on the 29th of October I took the rest away, thinking there was no harm in so doing; Mr. Charles Hoffman came into the shop, and asked me some questions about some ornaments for the Lord-Mayor's day; and, upon quitting the house, I was stopped by the City-Marshal, and brought back; and when I was brought back, I was very much frightened, and did not know what I said.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-52

52. THOMAS MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , six quarts of foreign brandy, value 12s. the property of Thomas Harrison .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of our Lord the King .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS WARRINER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are an Excise officer? - A. I am inspector of the Excise watch: On Friday morning, the 13th of November, between twelve and one'clock, just after midnight, I was upon the quays; I saw the prisoner come on shore from the craft, his employment was to watch from six o'clock till twelve, when his partner was to relieve him; there were thirty-three casks of Spanish brandy in the craft just off Custom-house-quay, within five yards of the shore; I saw the prisoner come out of the craft when his partner came to relieve him; I took hold of him and rubbed him down, when I found a bladder in his coat pocket; he said, what do you mean by that; I told him he must go with me to the office; he went with me to the office door and then he got away; he ran up St. Dunstan's-hill as fast as he could; I cried out stop him, and he was stopped by two men in Cross-lane; I was very near him; I took hold of him again, and a watchman took hold of him on the other side and we brought him to the watch-house; I there searched him again, and found on the other side another bladder, the two bladders contained seven quarts of Spanish brandy; he then pulled out a gimblet and a tin tube, and said he supposed that was what I was looking for.

Q. Was that tube a perfect one? - A. No, it was a piece of one; the watchman afterwards produced another piece, which made it perfect; the next day I saw the casks gauged, and found six gallons deficient in one cask, we took off one of the hoops that we had a suspicion of, and found a large deal spile; the casks belonged to Mr. William Harrison , and were under the care of the Excise.

Q. Do you know the names of the Commissioners? - A. Yes. (Repeats them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I think you said the prisoner was relieved by another man? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say you saw the prisoner come out of the craft? - A. I saw him come up the steps.

Q. You found a gimblet upon him? - A. Yes.

Q. That is a tool used by carpenters and others? - A. Yes.

Q. And a tube would be used for drawing off ale? - A. I believe not.

Q. You don't mean to swear to the brandy of course? - A. There was no other Spanish brandy but in that craft, and that in the bladders was Spanish brandy.

Q. You did taste it then? - A. Yes.( Francis Rhodes , an Excise watchman corraborated the evidence of the last witness.)(William Green, the officer, produced the brandy, the tube, the gimblet, and the bladders.)

Prisoner's defence. When I went on board the craft I found my partner very much in liquor and three other men with him; when I came they went away; he was so much in liquor that I was obliged to assist him up the ladder; I found several spiles in the casks: he went away, and I walked about the lighters till after ten o'clock; I then had my supper and smoaked my pipe, and as I was putting my pipe down at the head of the barge I found these bladders; I put them in my pockets with intention to take them to the Surveyor's office; about ten minutes after twelve my partner called to me from shore, and I went on shore, and as I was crossing Porter's quay Mr. Warriner laid hold of me and said he should rub me down; I told him I had got nothing but what I had found; he then threatened to send me to prison, and put me in a very great terror, which made me try to get away; they had my name and place of abode registered in their books.

Jury. (To Warriner.) Q. Did the prisoner say he had found them? - A. No.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 45.

One year in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-53

53. WILLIAM DEACON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , fifteen yards and three quarters of kerseymere, value 6l. 10s. the property of John Maitland , Robert Maitland the younger , Henry Sterry , and John Nettleship .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN WOOTTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What is the firm of the Messrs. Maitlands? - A. John Maithland, Robert Maitland the younger, Henry Sterry, and John Nettleship; I am their warehouseman; they live in Balinghall-street; the prisoner was employed by his father in the looking-over room; his father had been employed many years in that house: On Saturday, the 31st of October, between four and five in the afternoon, I observed the prisoner coming down stairs into the warehouse; I observed something stick out behind him under his cloaths; he went down the yard into Mason's-alley, which is opposite the warehouse gate; I went after him, clapped my hand upon his back, and said, Deacon, what have you got here; he said a bit of kerseymere,

for God's sake forgive me and don't tell my father; I told him I could not forgive him; I took him into the drawing-room, and, from under his waistcoat, I took four yards of drab-coloured doublemilled kerseymere; he said, he got it out of the superfine warehouse; I desired him to go with me, and shew me where he had it from; William Elton and I went with him; I missed a piece from a pile that he shewed me; we went up stairs again into the looking over room, and, in his right-hand coat-pocket I found two yards of the same; in his left-hand coat-pocket two yards more; and the rest I found in a drawer, of which he gave me the key; I found in all thirteen yards and three-quarters, (produces it); and the constable found two yards more in his hat, which made exactly the quantity in the piece that I missed; I asked him where the end of the piece was with the manufacturer's mark, and he took it out of his breeches-pocket; it is marked Stephens and Co. with the number; they are our manufacturers.(William Elton corroborated the testimony of Wootton.)(James Prior, the constable, produced two yards of cloth, found in the prisoner's hat.)

Prisoner's defence. I leave my defence to your Lordship and the Jury.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-54

54. JOHN WHITEHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of November , seventy pounds weight of hemp, value 30s. the property of William Hobart , Esq.

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Matthias Lucas .

Third Count Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a waterman, employed by the Thames Police Office? - A. I am: In the night of the 18th of November, about a quarter before three in the morning, I saw the prisoner taking some hemp out of the lighter belonging to Mr. Lucas; there was another man with him; he put it into a boat that was lying along-side; I had seen the prisoner before that, a little after two in the morning; they saw the Police-boat coming, and they ran across the boats to the shore; we pursued them, and overtook them; we brought them back to the boat they had left, and found in it seventy pounds weight of hemp; I knew the prisoner before, I am sure he was one of the men.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. At what distance were you from the wherry at the time you suppose you saw him? - A. About six or seven yards.

Q. I take it for granted you told the men with you who the man was? - A. I told the man that sat next to me that there was Whitehead stealing hemp from the boat.

Q. How came you not to tell all the men that that was Whitehead; I thought it was sufficient to tell the man next me.

GEORGE COWEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the Thames Police surveyor? - A. I am; I was with the last witness; I saw the prisoner between two and three in the morning; we looked into his boat, but he had nothing in it, and I let him go: about a quarter before three, near the Hermitage-stairs, Rogers called out, there they are stealing hemp, and then said, there is Jack Whitehead; I saw two men run from a wherry, in which there was a quantity of hemp in a mat; the boat laid along-side Mr. Lucas's lighter; the prisoner was apprehended the next day at the Waterman's Arms; he had sent word by Mr. Isaacs, an attorney, that he should attend at the Office; he did not deny my having seen him the first time, but denied that he was the person that I afterwards saw.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You don't know that the man you afterwards saw was the prisoner? - A. I took notice of his dress; he had a blue jacket on, with white buttons, and the man with him had a brown jacket, a pair of thickset breeches, and white stockings; I did not see their faces.

Mr. Knapp. Have you any doubt of their being the same persons? - A. I have not.

ROBERT WARWICK corroborated the evidence of Rogers and Cohen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley Q. Have you always gone by the name of Warwick? - A. My name is Warwick; I am called by several names; I have been a seafaring man.

Q. Were you ever known by the name of Harris? - A. Yes; and fifty people call me Harris now; there was an old man on board a ship who was a boatswain's yeoman, of the name of Harris, and I used to cook for him, and after that I was always called young Harris.

Q. Have you ever yourself been tried by the name of Harris? - A. No.

Q. By what name were you tried? - A. I was tried for an assault.

Q. Never for a felony? - A. Never.

- FOSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know to whom the hemp belonged that was in Mr. Lucas's lighter? - A. Yes; to Mr. William Hobart.

Court. It is sufficient for the purpose of this indictment, that it was in Mr. Lucas's lighter.

Foster. I examined the lighter the next day,

and found one of the bundles of hemp plundered; there were about seventy pounds deficient; Mr. Lucas was employed by Mr. Hobart.

MATTHIAS LUCAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a lighterman? - A. I am I had several lighters lying off Brown's-quay; this lighter was one of them; it had Mr. Hobart's property on board.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing about the hemp; I went to carry a sailor's chest and bedding on board the Aurora, which was under sailing orders, and, coming back, I saw these men, and I came ashore: the next morning my wife told me the Police-officers had been to search my house, and I immediately went to Mr. Isaacs, an attorney, and desired he would go to the Office, and say, I would surrender.

For the Prisoner.

RICHARD TOZER sworn. - I have known the prisoner seven years and upwards; he always bore a good character for honesty.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He was always at work, was he? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you never known him to be in custody before? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Upon your oath, don't you know that he has been tried before? - A. I cannot say. I am sure.

Q. Did you never hear of it? - A. No.

Q. Not he has never been missing for seven years? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did you never hear that he was tried at the Assizes for the County of Surrey? - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

Reference Number: t18011202-55

55. MARGARET WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , three sheets, value 3s. two table-cloths, value 2l. 2s. and shirt, value 2s. the property of Thomas Tidd .

THOMAS TIDD sworn. - I lodge at No. 57, Barbican ; the prisoner lodged in the same house with me; I saw a pair of sheets at Guildhall, on Friday, the 30th of October, which I knew to be my property.

EDWARD CARTER sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, in Redcross-street: On Friday, the 30th of October, I took in a table-cloth for 8s. 6d. which I took in from the prisoner; she was a customer of our's; I did not take in any thing else.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I am an officer of the City of London: On the 2d of November Mr. Tidd gave me the prisoner in charge at his own house, and, upon searching her, I found these duplicates, (produce; them); one is for a table-cloth, on the 30th of October; there are six of them in all.

Q. (To Carter). Are these your duplicates? - A. Yes.

Q. Why is not the man here that took them in? - A. There were two or three took them in, and we could not spare them all.

Court. Q. You are bound to bring all three; you are liable to be indicted for receiving stolen goods.(The property was identified by the prosecutor).

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-56

56. JAMES NIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , ten pounds of spermaceti, value 25s. the property of Charles Enderby , Samuel Enderby , and George Enderby .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a City constable? - A. I am: On the 6th of November, I, in company with Read and other officers, met the prisoner in Upper Thames-street, about six o'clock in the evening, with this basket, containing two pieces of spermaceti, (produces them); I asked him what he had there; he said, spermaceti; he said he brought it from one Weston's, in Bridgwater-gardens, of whom he had bought it; we were not satisfied with that, and took him to the Poultry Compter.

Q. Did you afterwards see Weston before the Lord-Mayor? - A. I did.

Q. Did you fit that spermaceti with any block that you afterwards found at Messrs. Enderby's? - A. Yes, and it fitted the block exactly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner did not conceal it at all, but told you readily it was spermaceti? - A. Yes.

JOHN EARDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are servent to Messrs. Enderby? - A. I am their foreman: On the 7th of November, Read brought some spermaceti to our warehouse; I saw the officers fit it to the block,(produces the block); about three or four days before that I had seen the block whole.

Q. Do you sell it cut, or broke? - A. Sometimes cut, and sometimes broke.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. During those three or four days, did you see whether that block was broke or not? - A. I did not, till the officers cames.

Q. Will yo venture to swear, that, during that time, this spermaceti might not have been sold in that state? - A. I cannot say we did; I cannot say one way or the other.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I do.

Q. Did you see him on the night of the 6th of November? - A. No; I saw him at our warehouse

about a twelvemonth ago; he used to come after out cook.

SAMUEL ENDEREY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you remember the officers bringing you any spermaceti? - A. Yes, two pieces; I fitted them to the block, and found that one of them exactly corresponded; the other I cannot swear to it; it is not usual to sell spermaceti but in whole blocks, or cut into small shreds for the candle-makers or the druggists; I have done it, but it is not usual; I have ho doubt that that piece was stolen from our warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You know nothing of the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. He had no access to your house? - A. Not to out knowledge.

Q. (To Cartwright:) Where is Mr. Enderby's warehouse? - A. At Paul's-wharf.

Prisoner's defence. I bought it of Weston and pain the full value for it; he said he bought it of Mr. Enderby, and he came forward before the Lord Mayor and said that I bought it of him; I have seen Weston but once since, and I cannot find him now.

Mr. Gurney. I think it necessary to inform your Lordship that I understand Weston is now in Court.

Read. I saw him in Court just before Nixon came to the bar.

Q. Is he in Court now? - A. I do not see him.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-57

57. JOHN MUZZERED was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , 29lb. of beef, value 16s. the property of William Barnard the younger .

WILLIAM BARNARD, jun. sworn. - I am a butcher in Shoreditch; I do the principal part of my business in Leadenhall market : On the 24th of October, in the morning, I was there selling my beef; my young man, Daniel Thomas , gave me information there was some beef gone; I had seen the beef altogether a very little time before in the tray, I think not more than five minutes; I sent my young man to see if he could make any discovery; he returned in about ten minutes, saying that he had taken two pieces of beef from the prisoner; I know them to be mine by the cut, and the fellow pieces corresponding with it; I did not see any thing of the prisoner for more than a month afterwards, I saw him at the office in Worship-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do'nt you know that the prisoner came of himself to Worship-street to answer this charge, without being apprehended or taken there by an officer? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you cut your beef different from all other butchers? - A. I cut off the fore rib different from any other butcher, I think, except one.

Q. That one butcher, perhaps, lives in Lezdenhall-market? - A. His stand is next to mine.

Q. Then will you venture to swear that that cut is different from his? - A. I know it by the cut and the corresponding pieces.

Q. Do you mean to say, that if your neighbour has beef of the same cut and the same quality, that you can distinguish one from the other? - A. I have no doubt it is my beef; I admit it is a possible case; but my neighhour did not lose any that morning.

Court. Q. Are beasts so much alike that a piece of one beast will correspond with a piede of another beast, though cut alike? - A. They will not in every particular.

DANIEL THOMAS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Barnard: On Saturday, the 24th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I missed two pieces of beef from a tray; I went into the hide-market to look after it, and saw the prisoner and Sparrowhawk very busy just by a truck; I saw the prisoner help Sparrowhawk up with the beef in a tray; I stopped him and asked him where he was going with it, and he said it was Mizzered's; I desired him to carry it back; and the prisoner said, d-n my eyes, is it your master's; says I, yes it is; he said, oh, I thought it belonged to that sat b-r over the water, or else I would not have taken it; I took it back and gave it to my master.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Sparrowhawk was taken before the Magistrate, was not he? - A. No; he came to our house, and when she prisoner was found he went before the Magistrate.

Q. When you stopped Sparrowhawk the prisoner did not run away? - A. No.

THOMAS SPARROWHAWK sworn. - I am a butcher's porter in Leadenhall-market: On the 24th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner standing in the Hide-market behind a truck; he asked me if I wanted a job; I said, yes; he said here are two bits of beef, leave them for me at Mr. Draper's; I took them up, and just as I turned the corner of the Hide-market Mr. Barnard's lad stopped me, and I brought the beef back; I said, Mr. Muzzered you have brought me into a nice predicament, I shall acquaint Mr. Barnard how I came by them; he said to the boy, d-n my eyes, do they belong to your master, I did not know that, or else I would not have took them, I thought they belonged to that fat b-r over the water; I then went away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know

by the story you have now told you save yourself from being prosecuted? - A. That is more than I know.

Q. Why, do you expect to be prosecuted now; - A. No.

Q. If you had not found some person to have laid it upon you would have been liable to answer for this charge? - A. If had done the fact I must have abided by it; I am not a person of that description if you enquire my character.

Prisoner's defence. I was ill in bed at the time, and as soon as I was able to get out I went to the office and surrendered myself; I wish to call Mr. Neville.

For the prisoner.

GERMAINE NEVILLE sworn. - I am a butcher in Leadenball-market; I have known the prisoner eighteen or nineteen years.

Q. What has been his general character? - A. I would not wish to say. GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-58

58. ELIZABETH GRAVES , alias FRENCH , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Josiah Bowring , about the hour of one in the night of the 29th of May , and burglariously stealing three silver tea-spoons, value 7s. two table-cloths, value 5s. three frocks, value 7s. a petticoat, value 2s. two pin-cloths, value 4s. two pair of stockings, value 1s. and two handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d. the property of the said Josiah, and a shawl, value 2s. an apron, value 1s. and a pair of pattons, value 1s. 6d. the property of Margaret Harris , spinster .

JOSIAH BOWRING sworn. - I keep a house in Dove-court Pavement, Moorfields ; my house was broke open on the night of Friday, the 29th of May last; my servant called me up a little before six the next morning.

Q. Was it light then? - A. It was; about five minutes after she came to my room door again and said she had lost her apron; I went down and found that a lead light had been taken out of the cellar window; two small iron bars were wrenched from their place inside the window.

Q. Would it not have required some strength to have done that? - A. A boy of ten years old might have done it if he knew how to pull out the nails; it required no effort of strength; the kitchen door was left a jar, by which door I imagine the person had gone out; I then missed the articles mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); the prisoner had left my service about sixteen months; on the Tuesday following I found the tea-spoons at Mr. Crouch's, a pawnbroker, in Fore-street, and on Sunday, the 7th of June, I found at the prisoner's lodgings a blue apron.

MARGARET HARRIS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Bowring: On Saturday morning, the 29th of May, I got up a little after six o'clock and called my master; I went down stairs and found the light of the cellar window taken out and the iron bars wrenched off; I missed an apron, a pair of pattens, and a shawl belonging to me.

WILLIAM TUPP sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Crouch, a pawnbroker in Fore-street, (produces three tea-spoons); I took them in of the prisoner on Tuesday the 3d of June; I had seen her several times before.

Bowring. One of these spoons I know to be mine by the letter B. the other two have no marks, but I believe them to be my property.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-59

59. AMY STAPLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , six silver table-spoons, value 3l. and a silver nutmeg-grater, value 2s. the property of Susannah Penfold , in her dwelling-house .

SUSANNAH PENFOLD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a widow , and live in Howland-street ? - A. I am; the prisoner had been in my service between four and five months; near five months.

Q. Who first gave you any alarm that your house had been robbed on the 12th of November? - A. The prisoner, between seven and eight in the morning she came up, and said, Ma'am, you are ruined intirely, for your desk is broke open, and all your money gone; one of the closets is broke open in which the plate was, and that the plate was gone. The plate was kept in two closets, one in the from parlour, and the other in the back parlour; she begged I would not go down, for it would frighten me very much, and desired I would let her go for my son; I told her to go to Upper Berkeley-street for him; when she was gone, I dressed myself, and went below stairs; I found the plate-cupboard open, the key of which was in my pocket.

Q. Do you know who had locked the cupboard the night before? - A. I had double-locked it the night before, and she stood by me.

Q. Did the lock appear to have been picked or forced? - A. There were no marks of violence at all.

Q. What quantity of plate did you miss from there? - A. A large quantity.

Q. Among the rest there were six silver tablespoons? - A. Yes, which I have seen since.

Q. In consequence of what you observed, did you send for Mr. Meller? - A. Yes, and by his advive I sent for Crocker, an officer, from Bow-street.

Q. Did Crocker come before the prisoner came back? - A. Yes; when she came home, she looked

about, and said, every thing is gone; she went down to shew Crocker the place where she thought the thieves had got in; after they had been gone down a little while, Crocker called out that he could not hold her, and I must come and assist him; I went down, and found the prisoner on the floor, and Crocker had hold of her; Mr. Meller then came down; they took off her pockets; and opened them in my presence; a silver nulmeggrater and half a dozen silver table-spoons were found upon her, with my name upon them, H. S. P. my late husband's name was Hugh; they had been osually kept in the closet in the parlour, which had been broke open; I had seen them a day or two before.

JAMES MELLER sworn - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you are the King's Bench officer of Customs? - A. I am, and live in Howland-street.

Q. What was the first thing you observed when you went to Mrs. Penford's? - A. I found Crocker laying upon the prisoner on the floor; he asked me for God's sake to lay hold of her arm; I did, and desired she might be searched; she said, she had nothing at all about her; I pulled her up by the arm, and said, if you have nothing about you, you need not be afraid of being searched; Crocker by that time had got at her pockets, and took out of her pocket six silver table-spoons.

Q. When they were found, did she say any thing? - A. Not a word.

Q. Do you know the value of those spoons? - A. I should suppose they cost about five pounds.

Court. Q. Are they worth three pounds? - A. Yes, they certainly are.

HENRY CROCKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are an officer belonging to Bow-street? - A. I am one of the conductors of the patrole: On Thursday, the 12th of November, I was sent for to Mrs. Penfold's house; the prisoner told me she had been robbed, and likewise her mistress; she said, she had been robbed of a two-pound note and her cloak. I looked at the premises, and observing something suspicious, I asked her where she had lost her cloak from; she shewed a drawer; I then asked her where she had lost the note from; she shewed me a place in the kitchen drawer; she said, she had lost it out of a letter; I then suspected her, and said, my girl, perhaps in your sturry, you have put the two-pound note in your pocket; she said, no, she had not; I desired her to be sure, and search; she put her hand in her pocket, and was unwilling to pull any thing out, which strenghtened my suspicion very much, and I said, stop a minute, and let your mistress search you; there were two other maidservants by; I went to lay hold of her, and she immediately resisted; in the struggle, she and I fell together, I sent one of the servants to fetch some gentleman to my assistance, and I kept her hunds fast, that she should not throw any thing away; Mr. Moller then came, and held her hands; I got at her pocket, and took six silver table-spoons out, which I have had ever since. (Produces them.)

Q. (To Mrs. Penfold.) Look at those spoons? - A. Those are the spoons I lost from my cupboard:

Q. (To Crocker.) Did the prisoner say any thing? - A. Yes, she said she had picked them up on the stairs, and had put them in her pocket.

Q. Did it appear to you that the house had been broke into from the outside? - A. People might have got in the way she shewed me, but it was the most unaccountable robbery that ever was committed if they did; there was a ladder in the yard, and there were such very small marks of violence, I suspected very much some person in the house.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-60

60. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , three pounds of Spanish wool, value 7s. the property of John Maitland , Henry Sterry , and John Nettleship .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Thomas Paine and Richard-Tillier Blunt .

JOHN THOMAS sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Blunt and Paine, Goldsmiths' porters ; the merchants ' names are John Maitland, Henry Srerry, and John Nettleship; the wool belonged to the merchants on Bear-Quay; I did not see the prisoner take it.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. - (Produces the property.) I am a constable, appointed by the Commissioners of the Customs, to attend the quays: About half past four o'clock on Thursday, the 19th of November, I was going down Bear-Quay, I saw the prisoner go to a bag of wool, and take out this quantity, put it in his apron, and run across the quay; I pursued him, and stopped him with the wool under his apron; the bag was close to a cart that was then loading, I believe it touched the wheels; the bag was very much torn.

Prisoner's defence. I was destiture, and thought it would pay me for a lodging at night; if I had known the value of it, I should not have meddled with it.

Thomas. It was a bag that was going to the merchants' warehouse; it came from Bilboa, in Spain. GUILTY , aged 56.

Whipped one hundred yards on Bear-Quay .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-61

61. JOHN GANN and JOHN HAYWOOD were indicted for making an assault on the King's highway upon Mary Dyer , spinster , on the 27th

of October , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a gown, value 1s. a shift, value 1s. 6d. an apron, value 1s. two handkerchiefs, value 9d. two caps, value 1s. and four shillings, in monies numbered , the property of the said Mary.

MARY DYER sworn. - On the 27th of October I had left my place, and was going to Westminster, about eight o'clock in the evening, it being star-light; I had a bundle, containing the articles mentioned in the indictment; as I was going through the Park, a soldier came up to me, that is the man (pointing to Gann;) and laid hold of me, and asked me where I was going? I begged him to let me go my way; he would not, but held me by the arm; then another soldier came up, which is Haywood; he wanted to catch hold of me, but the other would not let him; then the other prisoner gave him a wink.

Q. Upon your oath, did you see him wink? - A. Yes; then Haywood went behind, and snatched the bundle from under my arm, and run away; I squalled out stop thief! Gann held me while he went to a distance, a quarter of an hour or more, and told me to hold my tongue.

Q. He did not threaten to do you a mischief, did he? - A. No.

Q. You were not afraid of their using you ill? - A. No.

Q. What became of the man that held you? - A. He run away towards Knightsbridge barracks, and I walked after him as fast as I could; a corporal then came up to my assistance, who is not here, and we went after them to the Barracks; I kept them in sight all through the Green Park.

Q. How could that be, if you walked and they run? - A. No, I did not keep them in fight the whole way; I did not see them go into the Barracks, but I found Haywood there, and the other came in about ten minutes after; the serjeant searched for the bundle, and found it in another man's knapsack; the soldier that owned the knapsack, said Gann had put it there; Gann only said, I was mistaken in the person.

JAMES BASHFORD sworn. - On the 27th of October I was on duty at the Barracks when the prisoner Haywood came in with a bundle; the serjeant was calling the roll, and at that time Haywood asked me to let him put a thing or two into my knapsack; accordingly I gave him leave, not knowing what it was, and I hung the knapsack up again.(John Marsden, and officer, produced the bundle.)

Dyer. The things in this bundle are mine; the money was taken away from me.

JAMES CLARKE sworn. - I was at the Barracks when Mary Dyer came in; before she came, I had been informed she had been robbed by a man with a white hat on; I knew that Haywood had gone out in the morning with a white hat; I secured him before the woman came, but, in about five minutes, Dyer came in, and pointed to Haywood, saying, he was the man who had taken her bundle; I asked him what he had done with the things; he made a frivolous answer that I could not understand; I desired Bashford to take down his knapsack, and in it was apparently a bundle, which was untied, and which Mary Dyer swore to.

Gann's defence. About half past eight o'clock on the 27th of October, I was going through the Park, and met with this woman; she enquired for a serjeant in our regiment; I told her I was going to the Barracks, and would send him out to her; she walked with me arm in arm from the Queen's palace to very near the Park gate, when she said a man had taken a bundle away from her; I did not see any bundle she had, but I quitted her arm to go after the man, and I got over the pallisadoes, and hunted among the fir-trees, but could not find it.

Haywood's defence. About half past eight o'clock, on the 27th of October, as I was coming by Piceadilly turnpike, I picked up this bundle, and took it to the barracks; I could not find my own knapsack, having come from Chelmsford the day before, so I asked Bashford to let me put it into his, and he did; I wish to call Serjeant Clarke to my character.

Clarke. I have known the prisoners four or five years; they were very good soldiers on the Continent, both in Holland and in France too; but, except as soldiers, I cannot say any thing about them. Gann, GUILTY.

Haywood, GUILTY.

Of stealing, but not violently .

confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Groban.

Reference Number: t18011202-62

62. THOMAS DUNGWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a cask, value 1s. and five gallons of brandy, value 4l. the property of Richard Simmons , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD SIMMONS sworn. - I keep a liquor-shop , in Great Wild-street: Last Wednesday evening, about a quarter before twelve o'clock, the prisoner, and three others, came into my shop, and had each a glass of liquor, which the prisoner paid for; there was a bill upon a cask at the end of the counter, with cherry beer printed on it; one of them entered into a conversation about who was the inventor of it, and prisoner called for a pot of it; I went into the parlour to heat it, and while I was preparing it, I heard a bit of a bustle in the shop; I looked out, and saw one of the men where I left them, and immediately heard one of them say, slow it; upon that I thought something was going on improperly; I went out at the parlour door, and missed a new cask that I had seen about an hour before; the prisoner was gone, and the other three

left; I went out at the door, and looked both ways, but could not see the prisoner; on turning in again, the other three men came to the door, and all three ran up the steert as heard as they could run; I then called the watchman, who sits two or three doors below our house, and when he came, I looked across the way, and saw the prisoner crossing over towards my house, but instead of coming in, he went past; I got before him, the watchman came up, and I gave charge of him; I returned back with the watchman, and went into a paved court opposite my house, and at the second door, on the right hand, I found the tub of brandy; the tub was new, and had T. Smith burnt on it.(Jeremiah Linch, the watchman, corroborated the evidence of the prosecutor, as to finding the cask).

Prisoner's defence. I live within five doors of the prosecutor, and was going home; I was taken with a pain in my bowels, went in for a glass of gin, and was going home to-bed, when he charged the watch with me.

Q. (To Simmons.) Had you known the prisoner before? - A. No; I understood by the neighbours that he lived seven doors from me; the other men were all strangers. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-63

63. THOMAS DUFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , three pounds of sugar, value 1s. 6d. the property of George Jacobs , William Brewer , John Bood , John Likely , John Twallin , William Murray , James Blackett , and William Wakes .

GEORGE STILWELL sworn. - I work for the prosecutors, who are gangsmen in the warehouses upon Ralph's and Young's Quays ; I was called out by John Franklin, and saw the prisoner coming from a tub that was broke open, with a hat full of sugar under his arm; upon our approaching him, he strove to makes his escape; we pursued him, and brought him back; I never lost sight of him; the top of the hogshead was broke open.( John Franklin corroborated the evidence of Stilwell).

WILLIAM WAKES sworn. - (Proved the firm of the partnership.) We are answerable to the merchants for the goods on the quays; after the prisoner was stopped, I compared the sugar with the sugar in the hogshead; it was the same fort of sugar, and of the same grain.(William Green, a constable, produced the sugar in the hat, and also a sample of sugar from the hogshead).

Prisoner's defence. There was a great deal of sugar lying between the hogsheads and the wall; several men filled their hats, and I filled mine. GUILTY , aged 14.

Whipped one hundred yards on Ralph's-quay .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-64

64. WILLIAM UPSHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , six ounces of tea, value 1s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS TIDEMORE sworn. - I am a labourer belonging to the East-India Company, and employed in their warehouses in Crutched-friars : On the 19th of November, between nine and ten, I was set to watch the prisoner, who was also a labourer, but not employed in that part of the warehouse where it was taken from him; I staid till the breakfast half hour, from ten till half past, and I saw the prisoner come down the alley; I then heard his hand in the chest, as I heard the tea rattle; on his returning from the alley, I saw him putting his shoes on; I followed him to the place he worked in, the floor underneath; I had acquainted Mr. Barbes, the elder, and he ordered him down to the accompting-house; he came down, and took the tea out of his breeches pocket; he said, he had got some tea, and if they would give him leave, he would put it out himself, and begged for mercy.(William Barber, one of the elders, corrobordated the evidence of Thomas Tidemore , and stated, that the prisoner had been a labourer in the warehouses five months).

(Robert cutler, the King's locker, produced the tea, which he deposed was taken out of prisoner's pocket in his presence)

Prisoner's defence. I did not take any tea out of the chest, it was laying loose on the floor; I went to the warehouse to look for my slippers, but could not find them; I did not mean to take the tea away.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 24.

Publicly whipped 100 yards near the warehouses in Crutched-friars .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-65

65. JAMES DOWSING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a wrapper, value 1s. and thirty-five yards of woollen cloth, value 11l. 4s. the property of William Sutton .

WILLIAM SUTTON sworn. - I keep the Salisbury Arms , in Cow-lane, Smithfield: On Tuesday, the 3d of November, I sent a truss of goods to Chester's-quay, by William Woodlands, directed to Henry Braden , of Canterbury.

WILLIAM WOODLANDS sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Sutton: On the 3d of November, as I was coming into the Old Jewry, I missed a trufs of goods out of the cart; I was in the cart, driving with a rein, when I missed the good; I turned my

horse round to go towards Coleman-street, and saw a man on the other side of the way, with a truss of goods on his shoulder; I met him coming towards me with it; I cried out, stop thief, turned my cart round again, and soon overtook him; he was was in custody of an officer when I came up.

Q. When you say you met a man with a truss of goods on his shoulder do you mean the prisoner? - A. No, it was an officer.

Prisoner. Q. Was it an open cart, or had it a tail-board? - A. It was open.

Q. Was there any thing to prevent the truss falling out? - A. It was impossible, because I had put it so far in the cart; I had another large truss behind it.

JOHN FENNER sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Cheap Ward; Alderman and I were in company together on the 3d of November, crossing, about six o'clock in the evening, Cateaton-street, we observed a man running with a truss on his back.

Q. Was that the prisoner? - A. Yes, and two others with him, one of whom we knew to be a thief; we immediately pursued him to the corner, of King's Arms-yard, Coleman-street, and there stopped him; I had never lost fight of him; he had the goods on his shoulder when I collared him; I asked him where he got the property, and he said a man gave him a pot of porter to carry it for him.

(John Alderman corroborated the evidence of Fenrler).

Sutton. This is the parcel I delivered to Woodlands; here is the bill of parcels I sent with it. -(Produces it.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been to Chater's, the watchmaker, in Cornhill, and going down Coleman-street, I picked up this parcel; there was another man with me, and he said, he would take it home to his house and advertise it.

Jury. (To Fenner.) Q. Is the truss clean ordirty? - A. Clean.

Q. What sort of night was it? - A. A very dark and dirty night. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-66

66. JAMES HAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a barrel, value 2d. and 90lb. of raisins, value 30s. the property of George-Allen Aylwin and Thomas Chapman .

GEORGE-ALLEN AYLWIN sworn. - I am a warehouseman , in partnership with Thomas Chapman ; the goods in question were under my care; the prisoner was employed in removing them from the quays to the warehouse.

WILLIAM EVERITT sworn. - I am warehouseman to Messrs. Aylwin and Chapman: On Tuesday, the 3d of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I employed six men with knots to remove this fruit to No. 90, Lower Thames-street; the prisoner was one; we numbered the knots, and No. 5, did not come in; I went out and met No. 6; I had information that No. 5 was gone up St. Mary-hill; I went up St. Mary-hill into Gracechurch street, but could not see any thing of him; I then returned home and found the prisoner it our house; he had been stopped; it was a barrel containing raisins, weighing 100 cwt. and 4lb.; the prisoner said a woman desired him to carry it to No. 54, Milford-lane; the cask is marked F. P. L. and the other barrels that were landed that day had the same mark; my master is liable for the goods as soon as we take them up from the quays.

WILLIAM BATT sworn. - I am clerk with Messrs. Clarke and Anstey, fruit-brokers, Philpot-lane; I met the prisoner on the 3d of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, in Philpot-lane, which is about half a mile from the quay; he had a cask of raisins on his back, which I knew by the mark to belong to a parcel then laying at Ralph's quay, which were to be warehoused at Messrs. Aylwin and Chapman's, from which I suspected he was not in the right road; I asked him where he was going with it; he told me to No. 54, Milford-lane; I asked him where that was; he said through Temple-bar; I asked him to whom there; he could not tell me; I then took him to Mr. Aylwin's, and left the cask at No. 40, Philpot-lane; I left him in custody, and the constable fetched the barrel. (Lindsey, a constable, produced the property).

Everitt. I desired him to bring the barrel to No. 90, Thames-street.

Prisoner's defence. I was employed by that man as he says, and the knots were all numbered; there was another man with me, and we had forgot the name of the place we were to take them to; I was going back with the barrel when this gentleman stopped me; he helped me with it off my shoulder, and we both went together.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-67

67. ANN LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , a silver pint mug, value 5l. the property of Lewis Peacock , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD PEACOCK sworn. - My father keeps a house in Chancery-lane : On Saturday, the 21st of November, between eight and nine in the evening, being informed the mug was missing from the side-board, and the prisoner being suspected, who lived at No. 20, Ship-yard, we got a constable and went to her apartment; the constable went up first and called Mrs. Long, but she did not answer; then we went into her room, were we found her; she seemed agitated; she was searched,

but no trace of the mug could we find till I saw it in the possession of Mr. Fleming.

JAMES ROSS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Peacook, law-stationer, in Chancery-lane: On the 21st of November, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came with some apples, and said she brought them from Mrs. Roache's; I left her within the passage door and went up stairs with the apples, I brought down one shilling and six-pence, which I gave her, and she went away; when I came down I found her where I left her; sometime after I went to clean the plate and missed the pint mug, which I had seen on the side-board in the dining-parlour at three o'clock; the parlour door opened into the passage, and was open while the prisoner was in the passage; I did not see the mug again till I saw it at Bow-street on the Monday.

ROBERT HALE sworn. - (Produces the silver pint mug). I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned this mug in the name of Keys, on the 21st of November, about half past six; I know her to be the woman, as she had been a customer to the shop; she said it belonged to Mr. Keys, of the Temple. (The mug identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I took the apples to the house, but am innocent of the crime.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-68

68. WILLIAM MELVIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , forty-seven yards of dowlas, value 50s. the property of Ellis-Thomas Rodwell .

ELLIS- THOMAS RODWELL sworn. - I live at No. 61, Shoreditch : On Wednesday, the 4th of November, I went from the front shop to the parlour, and had not been gone five minutes when the prisoner was brought back with the dowlas, which I saw at the door when I went to dinner; I know this to be the same by the mark on it. (The dowlas produced.)

JOHN BOON sworn. - I am a weaver; I saw that lad run by with the goods, and thought he had stole it, so I ran after him; he sell down and I caught hold of him; he said, if you will let me go I will take it back to where I got it; I took him to the prosecutor's and left him and the dowlas in charge.

Prisoner's defence. There was a man with me of the name of Hodges; he bid me take it; but I don't know where he is.

GUILTY, aged 12.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-69

69. SAMUEL TALLARD was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 6th of November , in the King's highway, upon John Harris , putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person a canvas bag, value 1d. and seven pounds in monies, numbered , the property of the said John.

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I was going to London on Friday three weeks, about twelve at night; I called at the Sun public-house at Mill-hill; near Hendon, where the prisoner was with another man; they saw me take out my money to pay: they asked me how far I was going; I said to the Plough; the prisoner said he would go with me; we went, but the house was shut up; the prisoner asked me to lie down in the stable, which I refused, and we walked on; we had not gone far when he knocked me up against a house, and took my purse away and ran off with it; there were about seven pounds in it; I took him up the next morning; he was with two other men eating eggs and bacon.

JOHN TOMLINS sworn. - I am a constable: On Saturday, about eleven o'clock, Harris informed me the prisoner had robbed him, upon which I took him in custody; going along to the Justice he said he would put two guineas into my pocket I asked him for what; he said he was a deserter from the Guards; I searched him, and found 3l. 15s. 11 1/2d. in a purse, a new shirt, an old one, and a pair of stockings. (Produces the money and the purse).

Q. (To Harris). Is that your bag? - A. No; but the money he took from me was gold and silver.

Prisoner. Q. Were you never in my company before? - A. No, not till that night.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-70

70. CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , two sails, value 10l. the property of George Wright .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Joseph Bulmer , Richard Bulmer , and Timothy Bulmer .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ISAAC CLEMENT sworn. - I am a sailor boy on board the Britannia, the Captain's name is George Wright ; the ship belongs to Messrs. Bulmer; the prisoner sent me ashore to get some beer; I was gone about a quarter of an hour; when I came back the prisoner was gone; he came on board again that night and was taken; the Captain and I overhauled the sails, and missed two.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is not the prisoner very deaf? - A. Yes, he is deaf a little.

Q. Did not he say he had misunderstood the

Captain, that he thought the Captain ordered him to carry them ashore? - A. No.

STEPHEN THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Knapp. Q. You are an officer belonging to his Majesty's revenue? - A. I am: On the 11th of November, between three and four in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner on board the Britannia; I was on board the Rocksea; I saw him go down into the cabin; I then saw another man go to the cabin door where the prisoner was; then I saw the end of a sail launched by the prisoner to the other man; as soon as this man had got half the sail upon deck he went away and left it; he took hold of the other end and laid it down by the companion; he directly went down into the cabin and put his coat on; he came up again with his coat on, and he went to the head of the ship and looked round, and then to the stern; I then went on board the Britannia, seeing him rather confused, I said hold of the end of the sail and asked him what he was going to do with it; he said his master had ordered him to take the sail on shore to be aftered; I looked outside the ship and saw a boat with a sail in it; I then went into my own ship, and in a few minutes saw Johnson take the sail and put it over into the same boat where the other was; Johnson then got into the boat and went away towards Rotherhithe; the ship laid at Limehousehole; when the Captain came on board I acquainted him with it.

Q. How far is the companion from the cabin? - A. It is what leads into the cabin.

GEORGE WRIGHT sworn. - I am Captain of the Britannia: On Wednesday evening, the 11th of November, in consequence of the information I received from the last witness, I stopped the prisoner on board my ship; the Custom-house officer said he was the very man he would give his oath; the prisoner at first denied it; I told him it was of no use to deny it; he then admitted that he had taken the sails; I said, what in the name of fortune possessed you to do it; his reply was, the devil got into my head, but can't we, master, make this matter up between ourselves, without its going any further; I said that is impossible; I asked where he had taken the sails to, and he said he did not recollect; he afterwards said he had taken them to a house on the other side of the water, nearly opposite the ship, which was Mr. Winter's, the sign of the Horns, near Cuckold's Point; (The fails produced and identified by Captain Wright.)

Mr.Alley. Q. Had you given him any order to take them to be repaired? - A. No.

THOMAS WINTER sworn. - I keep the Horns, at Cuckold's Point; the prisoner brought these sails some time in November, and put them down upon the timber by the side of the house; it is a saw-pit.

Prisoner's defence. I did not go to steal the sails: the Captain had engaged me as mate of the ship; I was in liquor and being hard of hearing, I thought he ordered me to take them to be mended; I put them into a boat, and when I came ashore the waterman disagreed with me about his fare, and he threw them up against Mr. Winter's house; I asked Mr. Winter to take care of them, and I went back to the ship; the Captain behaved like a gentleman to me, and always did; understood him worng. GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011202-71

71. WILLIAM BOWERS and FRANCIS SERJEANT were indicted for making an assault upon John Gale, on the 10th of November , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Snosell , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 5l. the property of the said John.

JOHN GALE sworn. - On the 10th of November I came to London to receive my wages at Somerset-house; my father lives at Finchley; I received my wages, and was going home down Gray's-Inn-lane, when I met a boy, who asked me what ship I belonged to; I told him none; he asked me what ship I was last on board of; I told him the Irresistible; he asked me where I was going; I told him to Finchley; he said, he was going my way, and would walk part of the way with me; going past the Pea-hen, he asked me to go in several times to drink; I had never been there before; at last I did go in, and then came in the prisoner Bowers and a parcel more people with him.

Q. Which is Bowers? - A. The further one; and as soon as I went in, the boy rose up from the box I was sitting in, and said he has got a watch; he has got a watch; he said that to the peopel that came in; with that they all sat down, and Bowers next to me, and Serjeant next to him; they asked me several questions what ship I belonged to, and I told them; they said, they knew the ship very well; I had never seen any of them before to my knowledge; I saw Serjeant's left hand coming round Bowers, and as soon as he saw that I saw his hand, he snatched his hand away; I thought he intended to rob me; I afterward, found I was mistaken; I rose up then, and bid them all good bye; I told them I lived at Finchley, that I had a great way to go, and bid them good bye; Bowers said, what hurty are you in? I was getting out of the box across the vaule, and directly I rose up, Bowers made a snatch at the watch-chain; he could not get it out; it was quite tight in; he could not get it out the first pull, nor the second; then he dragged me out of the box; I kept fast hold with my left hand of his

collar, and with my right hand I took the banknotes I had received out of my waistcoat-pocket, and put them in my bosom; then he got the watch in his hand, and the chain was hanging down; he dragged it out, and got it from me; I made a snatch at the chain, and, after some trying to get it, the chain broke from the watch, and fell upon the ground; I immediately sung out, he has got my watch, he has got my watch; he then ran out, and three or four people absconded the house; one of them had the watch; I have never seen my watch since; it was worth five pounds.

Q. Did you see the watch in Bowers's hand? - A. No, Bowers said, ding it, ding it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Serjeant.) Q. Have you not said, that Serjeant's putting his hand round Bowers, was to give him an intimation to put him upon his guard? - A. I thogut so.

Court. Q. Why did not you tell me so at first? - A. At first I thought it was to rob me, but afterwards I found otherwise; he did not assist at all.

THOMAS SNOSELL sworn. - I keep the Pea-hen , in Gray's-Inn-Lane: On the 10th of November I saw the last witness come in in the morning with another young lad; they seemed very intimately acquainted, and another young lad followed them.

Q. Was that either of the prisoner? - A. No; soon after that there came in several more, they sat down in the box on the right hand side; Gale came into the box first, and they sat down to the right hand in the same box.

Q. Were they close to him? - A. No, they were two or three off him; Bowers was next to him; Serjeant sat next but one to Bowers.

Q. Next to Bowers? - A. No, they did not sit on the same side of the prosecutor.

Q. (To Gale.) Did you not tell me Bowers sat next to Serjeant? - A. Yes, I was very right; this man is wrong.

Snosell. If you refer to the first examination before the Justice, you will find what I say to be true.

Court. Q. Indeed, Sir, you are mistaken, I have the information, and the information is exactly as that boy has now represented it? - A. It was so, my Lord.

Court. I should rather believe him than yougo on, Sir.

Snosell. Then one of them called for a pot of purl; they drank part of it, and I then went towards the bar; one of them holloaed out they wanted a quartern of gin put into it and a pennyworth of sugar; I put a quartern of gin and a pennyworth of sugar into it; I asked them who was to pay me for it; Serjeant paid a pot towards the reckoning.

Q. Did you know Serjeant before? - A. Yes, and another paid a pot.

Q. Who was that other? - A. I don't know; it was ne'er a one that is here present; then I asked them who was to pay the other pint; at first there was no answer; then one of them made answer, and said, the sailor was to pay the pint; I asked him for it, and he said he did not see what business he had to pay; then I said, I suppose I shall have it of some of you; upon saying that, Gale started up to go away; he said he had got to go as far as Finchley, and he could not stop; what is your hurry, says Bowers.

Q. Did you ever see Bowers before? - A. I had seen him once before that morning, but never before; Bowers said, what is your hurry? clapped his hand to his breast, and pushed him down in the box again; he statred up again, and said, he must go, he had so far to go, he got up to attempt to get over the table; Bowers rose up, and laid Hold of his watch-chain, and, I believe, with the hustle and his getting out of the box over the table, the watch came out of his pocket.

Q. Who got over the table? - A. Gale; the prisoner Bowers then had it in his hand; I laid hold of him with both my hands, and collared him, and said, give the young man his watch again; he made me no reply; I kept him in hold, and one side of his waistcoat gave way; I then took the opposite side, and tried to get the watch out of his hand; he then stretched his hand out rather farther than my reach was, and he gave it to some one behind, and two or three then ran out at the door together; I then still held him in custody; upon that, there was a person lodged in our house, who had been a publican, came in; I commanded him to aid and assist; he then laid hold of him from me; I then told him to hold him while I went for an officer; I ran out directly to look for an officer, and I met one coming down Tash-street, William Day ; I took him to my house; I shewed him Bowers, and told him that was his prisoner; I then accompanied him to Hatton-garden; Serjeant was in the was in the house before any of the fray happened.

Q. He was not connected with Bowers then? - A. I did not see any transaction happen of the kind.

WILLIAM DAY sworn. - I am an officer; Mr. Snofell fetched me, and gave me charge of the prisoner for robbing Gale of his watch; I immediately searched him, but found nothing upon him; Bowers immediately said, I am a dead man.

Q. (To Snofell.) How long was Serjeant there before Bowers came in? - A. He might be there a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you ever see Serjeant and Bowers together before? - A. No.

Serjeant defence. I went into the house to

front putty a square of glass that I had put in a few days before.

Snosell. Serjeant is a glazier; he had put in a square of glass at my house, which he had not finished; he left his tools, and on that day he called and finished it, and had a pint of beer before these people came in.

Q. You know him to be a glazier, and living in that neighbourhood? - A. I know him to be a glazier, and to live in Brook's-market.

The prisoner Serjeant called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Bowers's defence. I was sitting in a box by myself drinking some beer, and I was called over by two or three; the house was quite full of people; I was asked to drink, and they put me next to that young man; I had not been in long before the prosecutor sung out to me to help him; I saw his watch going, and I got hold of the chain, which broke in my hand, and in the scuffle they got it away from me, and all ran out.

Q. (To Gale.) Did you desire Bowers to help you? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did he come in with the rest, or was he in the house before? - A. He came in with the rest.

Bowers, GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

Serjeant, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-72

72. SARAH LESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 40s. the property of John Ivory , privately in his shop .

JOHN IVORY sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in the Broadway, Westminster : On the 10th of November, between one o'clock and three, I lost a piece of printed calico, containing twenty eight yards; I had seen it about one o'clock; I perfectly recollect the prisoner having been in the shop in the course of that time.

Q. Who serves in the shop besides yourself? - A. My wife; there are two counters, and she was backwards and forwards behind one, and I behind the other; she is not here.

( William Bennett , a pawnbroker's servant, produced the property, which he deposed to having received from the prisoner, and which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. A woman gave it me to pledge for her.

GUILTY.

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18011202-73

73. JOSHUA THATCHER and JAMES HARFIELD we e indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , a pig, value 15s. the property of Thomas May .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS MAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are a publican and shopkeeper , at Shepperton? - A. I am: On Sunday, the 1st of November, about half past twelve o'clock at night, I was waked; I got up, went down stairs, and found Thatcher in custody.

Mrs. MAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Are you the wife of the last witness? - A. Yes: On Sunday, the 1st of November, I was alarmed by a noise in the pig-sty; I looked out at the window, and saw the sow in the yard, without any pigs; I saw four pigs after dusk in the evening; I heard somebody in the hog-sty, I then got out of bed, and called Pearce and Butcher; I desired them to get up; they got up immediately, and took their guns; the prisoner had been in our house that evening; they left the house about eleven o'clock, with two more; one of my pigs was brought to me by a neighbour or Sunday morning, stuck in two places; I knew it to be mine.

JOHN PEARCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You lodged at Mr. May's? - A. Yes; she called Butcher and me up; we took a gun a-piece, and went down stairs; I saw Thatcher come out of the sty; he made away to the other side of the yard, and my partner met him and pushed him down with the but-end of the gun, and then I came in upon him and assisted to secure him; Harfield then ran out of the sty; Thatcher had a drawn knife in his hand, with which he attempted to stab me in the throat; his hand was coming so, (describing it), when I seized his wrist, and saved the blow; we then got him in doors; Harfield made his escape; he was taken about three weeks afterwards; I knew them both before.

(Jesse Butcher carroborated the evidence of the last witness.)

THOMAS HALLIDAY sworn. - I apprehended Harfield, Mr. May was with me; he said to Mr. May, take care you are not tiled in.

May. I was with Halliday; he said to Harfield, you are a pretty fellow, we have got you now; Harfield said, d - n me, if I don't do for you; when I brought Thatcher in doors, I said, you are a blackguard and a scoundrel to use me in this manner, when I have been a friend to you divers times; he said, you may be d - d; d - n my eyes if I live to come back, if I don't do you; and if I do not, there shall be somebody left behind that shall.

Thatcher's defence. I went to lie down in the harn, but as to the pigs, I know nothing about them; I was very much in liquor.

Harfield's defence. I was very much in liquor,

and when I left Mr. May's house, I went home to my lodging.

Thatcher, GUILTY , aged 30.

Harfield, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-74

74. PETER COCKRAN and ALEXANDER WILSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , a pair of breeches, value 2s. a coat, value 4s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. two handkerchiefs, value 1s. a pair of mittens, value 1s. a waistcoat, value 1s. 6d. a pair of silver knee buckles, value 2s. and a seven-shilling-piece , the property of Thomas Read .

THOMAS READ sworn. - I am Captain of the Elizabeth ; in October last she was lying at King Edward Stairs, Wapping : On Thursday, the 29th of October, I went to-bed a little after ten o'clock on board the ship; the next morning I missed my clothes; the mate was on board, and slept with me; I did not hear any body on board in the night.

JOHN STEVENSON sworn. - I was on board the Elizabeth; I did not hear any thing in the night.

WILLIAM HURGROVE sworn. - On Friday morning, the 30th of October, about two o'clock, I was on the Thames, nealy a breast of King Edward Stairs, I saw a boat pulling across the river, with two men in her; I pulled after them, and found it to be the two prisoners; I asked them what they hod got there; Wilson said, he had got nothing but clothes; he said, he had brought them from Rosemary-lane, and was going on board the Flora, Captain Harvey; one of my men then looked in the boat, and asked Cockran how he came by that boat, and he said the had brought it from the road's end, where the watermen make fast their boats, in order to put Wilson across, who had given him a shilling; we suspected the clothes were stolen, and we took them to the Thames Poilce Office. (Produces the property).

JAMES GOULDING sworn. - I was with the last witness; I know no more than he does, except that I found upon Cockran this long knife. (Producing it).

(Captain Read identified the property).

Cockran's defence. Wilson gave me a shilling to put him over; I never saw these things in the boat till these people came up to us.

Wilson's defence. I belong to the Flora, Captain Harvey, lying at Deptford; I was going to Deptford, and gave this man one shilling to put me over; I am as innocent at the child unborn.

Q. (To Hargrove.) How far was this boat from the Elizabeth? - A. About two hundred yards, not more. Cockran, GUILTY , aged 30.

Wilson, GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-75

75. ELIZABETH WHIRLIGS and MARY COCKSELL were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Bryning , about the hour of eight in the night of the 18th of November, and burglariously stealing nineteen pair of gold ear-rings, value 3l. 16s. three other gold ear-rings, value 6s. and a metal locket, value 2s. the property of the said William.

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, except the confession of Cocksell, exported under a promise that it would be better for her, they were. Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18011202-76

76. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , forty-two yards of linen cloth, value 21s. the property of William Evans and John Lewis .

JOHN LEWIS sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in Oxford-street , in partnership with William Evans; On the 30th of October, we lost a piece of cloth; we did not miss it till it was brought back about five o'clock in the evening.

GEORGE LEONARD sworn. - On Friday night, the 30th of October, I was coming from work in Newman-street, I saw the prisoner running; it was between light and dark; I saw a piece of cloth drop from him; I did not pick it up; saw such a piece of cloth afterwards in the possession of Mr. Pearch.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. It was between light and dark; how far was the person from you when you saw the cloth fall? - A. It might be twenty or thirty yards.

Q. When you were pursuing, had not a corner or two been turned? - A. No; he was stopped at the corner of Berner's-street.

Court. Q. Is he the person you saw run? - A. I believe he is, I am not sure, there was nobody else running.

- PEACH sworn. - On the first of October I was going up Oxford-road, and saw the prisoner, as I believe him to be, at the prosecutor's door; he took a piece of cloth from the door, and ran past me; he turned up Newman-street; I saw him drop the cloth, which turned out to be sheeting.

Q. Are you sure you saw him drop it? - A. Yes, the lamps were lit; I never lost sight of him till after he dropped it; I knew him the moment he was brought back; I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Court. Q. Have you any doubt the prisoner is the man you saw? - A. I have none.(The cloth was identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18011202-77

77. JOHN PETERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , a man's boot, value 10s. 6d. the property of John Thomas .

JOHN THOMAS sworn. - I am a shoemaker , in Swallow-street : On the 24th of November last, about six o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop; he tried to take a boot off that was hanging up inside the door; he missed it the first time, but the second time he took it; I was sitting in a little room behind the shop, facing the window; I got up as fast as I could, but before I could get the door open, he was gone off; I aimed to catch hold of him at the door, but missed him; I called out, shop thief; he ran away as fast as he could, and I followed him; he ran five or six doors from my door, and then ran across to Maddox-street; he was stopped at the corner of Maddox-street; an officer came up to my assistance, who happened to he in the street, and heard me call out.

Q. Did you find your boot upon him? - A. No; when he was taken, he said he would make me any satisfaction for the loss of my goods; first he offered 1s. 2s. 3s. 4s. 5s. and then 10s.; I said I did not want any of his money, but I wanted my goods; at last he offered me a guinea; the constable said, you have not got a guinea; have not I, says he, and immediately pulled out a guinea, and clapped it down upon the shoes and boots in my shop; the officer desired me to take care of the guinea; he marked it, and I put it in my pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were in a little room behind the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. It was dark, and the candles lit? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was a stranger to you? - A. Yes.

Q. The boot you have never found? - A. No.

Q. Therefore, do you mean to say, it being dark, though the candles were lit, that the prisoner was the man? - A. Yes, I do; I never lost fight of him.

Q. There were a great many people running? - A. Yes, but I never lost fight of him.

Q. If you never lost fight of him, how came you not to observe what he did with the boot? - A. The man took my attention, and not what he had about him; he might have dropped it, or handed it to any body else.

Q. Did either you or the constable promise to let the prisoner go, if he gave you a guinea? - A. Neither.

DANIEL GRIFFITHS sworn. - On the 24th of November I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw some people gathered together at the corner of Maddox-street; I went up, and found the prosecutor accusing the prisoner of stealing a boot; he said, he had seen him take it, and had never lost sight of him; I then said, I belonged to the Public Office, Bow-street, and he must go with me; the man very readily came with me; he said it was very hard he should be accused of stealing a boot that he was innocent of; the prosecutor said, he lived over the way; I took the man there, and the prosecutor searched to see whether he had lost a boot or no, and he said he had, but the prisoner had no boot upon him, or any thing of the sort; while the prosecutor was looking outside to see the situation of his boots, the prisoner talked about his family, and I said, perhaps the man might accommodate his temper bye and bye, and he might make it up; I called the prosecutor in from the door, and put the prisoner into a little shop that the prosecutor had, and left him there with the prosecutor and his man; I heard him offer something or other on account of his family, and he would not take it; the prisoner said, if he would make the other boot, he would leave a guinea till it was done; I said, my friend, I don't think you have got a guinea, you had better go before the Magistrate; he said, yes, he had got a guinea, and he threw it down upon the boots that were there; then I picked up the guinea, and said, I don't know what to make of the business; I desired the prosecutor to take the guinea, after I had marked it, which he did, and then I took the prisoner into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When the prosecutor came back to the shop, he searched to see whether he had lost a boot or not? - A. Yes.

Q. Then he was not certain whether he had lost a boot or not, till he had examined? - A. I cannot say as to that`.

Prisoner's defence. This gentleman charged me with stealing a boot; I told him if I had stolen a boot, I must certainly have it about me; I know no more of it than the child unborn.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18011202-78

78. WILLIAM HENDERSON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 20th of August , forty-five pounds weight of iron nails, value 4s. the property of John Perry the elder , John Perry the younger , and Philip Perry , whereof Charles Sebly was convicted last sessions of stealing, he knowing them to have been so stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

(The conviction of Charles Sebly read.)

THOMAS TEMPEST sworn. - I am manager of the smith department to Messrs. Perry; Sebly was in the copperas manufactory, near the prisoner's house, which was in Poplar; Messrs. Perry had about thirteen or fourteen tons of Dutch filling nails, which they used in making copperas; I believe they had sold part of them, but I cannot say particularly: On the 11th of September, about seven o'clock in the morning, I went to Henderson's premises, with the officer, and saw him go out when I was within about one hundred yards from him; he is smith by trade; I saw two bags of filling nails brought out of his house, and were produced at Sebly's trial, and they are of the same kind as Messrs. Perrys'; I saw them in the back parlour, and believe them to be part of the stock; I understand the prisoner absconded, nor did I see him since the 11th.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Will you swear he has absconded? - A. No, I cannot; I don't know whether there were scales where the nails were or not, there might he; there were two parcels in bags laying on the floor unconcealed; I should not have known any of the nails had been lost, except these had been found; when they break up a Dutch ship a great many of the nails fall out as they strip the bottom.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer, and searched the prisoner's premises on the 11th of September; I was told Mr. Henderson was just gone out; in the middle room, called the back room, I found a large quantity of filling nails, I suppose four or five hundred weight, tied up in bags, and a quantity loose; we brought them away as they were, and they were produced on the trial of Sebly; I had been at Henderson's on the 7th, and I think I saw them then; I made search for the prisoner, but never could find him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hatt. Q. Will you swear he absconded? - A. He was not to be found when I went to his house.

THOMAS DALTON sworn. - I am a constable, and apprehended Sebly; I have searched for the prisoner and never saw him till he surrendered.

JOHN COOKE sworn. - I am an officer, and have been twice down to High Wycombe after the prisoner; he was not there then; I have no doubt but he kept out of the way.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you not learn that he was come to town to surrender? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he a house there? - A. Yes, he had the Woolpack.

JOHN ENFRY sworn. - I am an auctioneer, and sold the prisoner's goods at Blackwall; on the 13th of November the son gave me orders, and I paid him the money as attorney for the father; I never saw the prisoner, or knew of his intention to quit before November.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the prisoner.

For the prisoner.

WILLIAM TELLKAMFF sworn. - I am clerk to the Magistrates of the Shadwell Police-office, and solicitor to this prosecution; I don't know what intimation the prisoner had of the indictment, he had none from me; he gave notice a day or two after the last sessions that he would surrender the first day of this; but after that notice I sent to apprehend him because he was under no recognizance; it was my duty, and I would do it again; search was made after him, but he could not be found; the charge existed before October, and he might have surrendered the last sessions.

ANN WHEELER sworn. - The prisoner is my father; I have seen such nails as these at his house; I remember some for years in a basket in a room where he kept old iron behind the shop, not applied

to any other purpose: On the 5th of September Mr. Wheeler and I only were in the house, a man came with a quantity of nails in parcels in his apron; he said he had some old iron to sell; I said my father was in Buckinghamshire, where he was gone to settle about his house; my father went away on the 12th, and a little while after the officers came; I knew my father intended to leave off business, as his brother had died and left him the house in the country; he desired me to take no orders or buy old iron; and when I told him the man left the nails he was very angry, and if the man called again he was to take them back, as he should have nothing to do with them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What kind of man was this? - A. An oldish man; he said he should leave them.

(Samuel Wheeler corroborated the testimony of the last witness).

RICHARD GOVY sworn. - I have had concern with Dutch ships, and these nails are of the kind that come off Dutch bottoms; some are frequently lost in breaking up in the mud on the wharfs; I have known Mr. Henderson ten years, and never heard any thing against him before.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011202-79

79. JOHN HAWKE was indicted for that he, together with Henry May and others, on the 12th of September, with force and arms, upon William Sanders , Thomas-Frederick Share , and Michael Milner , officers of Excise , did make an assault, hinder, oppose, and obstruct, being on shore, in the due execution of their duty .

(The case was opened by Mr. Fielding.)

WILLIAM SANDERS sworn. - On the 11th of September last I was an officer of Excise at Yarmouth, and went to St. Olave's Bridge, in the county of Suffolk , expecting some smuggled goods; Milner and Share went with me; they are both Excise officers; we got there about eleven at night, and about one we met two carts; the first I stopped; it was loaded with fifty tubs, or half ankers, of geneva, and drawn by two horses; when I stopped the horses, with intention of turning the cart round, Jonas Bensted was at the head of the horses, with a large stick or bludgeon in his hand; I went to the cart, looked into it, laid my hand on it, and seized it for the King and ourselves; there were about six people with the carts; we were only three officers; five I can swear there were; when I went to the horses head to turn him round, Bensted swore he would lose his life before we should have the goods; I had a drawn hanger in my hand, and I told him I would cut his head off, or something to that effect, if he did not take himself off; I did nothing more than threaten him; he then went round the cart, came behind me, and struck me a violent blow upon the head with his bludgeon, which cut my head open, and made a large wound about an inch and a half in length, and half an inch in breadth; I turned round, and cut at him with my hanger, and he fell; I believe I wounded him slightly; I afterwards heard he had only a slight scratch; when he was down, another of the smugglers came up; I struck at him, and wounded him in one or two places; he likewise fell on the ground; upon that, the prisoner at the bar came up, I did not know him before, he had either a stick or a whip in his hand; he came walking up from the goods, and immediately I had knocked the second man down, not doubting his intention to obstruct me, I struck at him, and wounded him with my hanger; supposing I should have a deal of trouble with them, I took out a pistol, and cocked it, thinking it would intimidate them; after I had cocked it, I held it down in my left hand, and it accidentally went off, but did no hurt to any one; I went from Hawke towards the goods, he did not run away, for he very soon after came up again, in the course of three or four minutes; he took no active part, only hovering about. I suppose the pistol inlimidated them, as they seemed more peaceable afterwards. I went to the goods, and they all kept hovering round us; the prisoner was one. It was so light, that, before we stooped the goods, we could see them before we came up to them, being piled up very high; when we examined the harness, it was so cut that we saw there would be a difficulty in getting the goods to Yarmouth; it was cut, no doubt, by the smugglers, for if it had been cut before, the horses could not have travelled; the collar the shaft-horse was nearly cut away; seeing that, I called Mr. Milner on one side, and said, I was afraid we should have a difficulty in getting them to Yarmounth, and we had better put them in one cart; seeing a parcel of dry goods in one cart, and that they were light, I threw them upon the tubs of geneva; we took out three bales, which proved afterwards to be tobacco, of eighty-four pounds weight, which we put upon the cart that had two horses, and endeavoured to go on; we left the small cart, because we were afraid they would obstruct us in going up a very steep hill that we had to surmount; we were close by a public-house, and would have put the goods in there, if the people would have got up, but they would not; we drove about half a mile from the place, leaving the one-horse cart behind, and about eight or ten casks in it; when we had got about half a mile, we were stopped, on account of the harness, and the little horse being wounded; we en

deavoured to push it up the hill, but finding the shaft-horse hurt, and would not draw, we unloaded twenty of the casks and the tobacco, to lighten the load; finding we could not get up the hill after that, we dispatched Mr. Share for assistance to the next country village upon the wounded horse; he came with two men and a fresh horse, with a spare collar; we then reloaded these goods, and proceeded for Yarmouth. The small cart we left in the place; we don't know what became of it; they did not go away when we did; I did not know Bensted or May before; I saw Hawke afterwards before the Magistrate at Beccles, where he was summoned as one of the smugglers, about a month after the seizure, and I had a full opportunity of seeing him, and he acknowledged he was there.

Jury. Q. Did he say any thing when he came up to the Court? - A. No, he did not; before the Magistrate he first pleaded not guilty, but he afterwards said the goods did not belong to him, but that he was hired as a labourer by those smuggers to carry the goods home, and he said he only did it by way of getting a few shillings towards his support. After I knocked down the second man, Hawke came up with a stick or whip in his hand, that was the first of my seeing him, and, supposing he came to obstruct me, I struck at him before he ever offered to molest me; he did not say or do any thing but come from the goods up to the scussle.(Thomas-Frederick Share and Michael Milner corroborated the evidence of the last witness.)

Mr. Raine addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant.

NOT GUILTY .


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