Old Bailey Proceedings, 28th October 1801.
Reference Number: 18011028
Reference Number: f18011028-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO. The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 28th of OCTOBER, 1801, and following Days, BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR WILLIAM STAINES , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors'-Commons.

1801.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, & c.

BEFORE Sir WILLIAM STAINES , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR of the City of LONDON; JOHN HEATH , Esq. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Benjamin Johnson ,

John Yarly ,

John Duncan ,

Charles Saunders ,

William Reynolds ,

Joseph Scott ,

William Tomlinson ,

James Green ,

Stanley Howard ,

Henry-Bate Smith ,

Richard Phillips ,

Charles Gwelch .

First Middlesex Jury.

Ralph Morris ,

Benjamin Walker ,

John Skirvin ,

William Edridge ,

John Mashiter ,

Thomas Gibb ,

Joseph Saunders ,

Thomas Smith ,

Edward Smith ,

Lewis Leplistre ,

Charles Hedges ,

William Gray .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Higginbottom ,

Richard Davis ,

Charles Ashby ,

John Parker ,

William Massar ,

James Trigg ,

Peter Nairne ,

James Brown ,

Thomas Ferguson ,

John Lloyd ,

Isaac Bristow ,

William Major .

Reference Number: t18011028-1

760 JOHN LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , eight pounds of coffee, value 8s. the property of Edward Hanson , John Pearson , Thomas Styles , William Pearson , Daniel Gossett , and William Pearson , the younger .

DANIEL GOSSETT sworn. - I am a bull-porter , in partnership with Edward Hanson, John Pearson, Thomas Styles , William Pearson , myself, and William Pearson, the younger; the prisoner was employed in our warehouses; I know nothing of the transaction.

RALPH WATTS sworn. - I am an Excise-locker: On Thursday, the 24th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was in the warehouses at Paul's Wharf; the prisoner came down with the rest of the men to the lower room, I rubbed him down, and heard something rattle, which was the coffee running down through his breeches knees; I then called my partner to my assistance, and we secured him; we took nine pounds and a half of coffee out of his breeches; we got a constable, and took him before the Lord-Mayor.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have generally a bye word for a man that goes out of the warehouse? - A. No, we rub them down.

Q. Had not you a bye word, get on as fast as you can; walk away? - A. No.

Q. Have not you a bye word without which persons cannot get in and out? - A. No.

Q. What is the reward upon the conviction of a man for robbing the warehouse? - A. I never made any enquiry.

Q. Have you never heard what the reward is? - A. I did not know till I made enquiry.

Q. What did you mean by telling me you had not enquired what was the reward? - A. A guinea.

Q. You did not search the men when they came into the warehouse? - A. No.

Q.Therefore a man might bring coffee into the warehouse if he pleased? - A. We have nothing to do with that.

Q. But you expect a guinea if this man is convicted? - A. No, I don't care a halfpenny for the guinea.

Q. You did not tell this man he might have the sweepings? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Brady? - A. Yes, he is the Custom-house-locker.

Q. What conversation had you with Brady before you rubbed him down? - A. None at all.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. I had no conversation with him.

Q. Who stopped him first? - A. I did.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes.(James Brady and one other witness corroborated the testimony of Watts.)(John Wainewright, the constable, produced, the property.)

Mr. Gossett. This is the same sort of coffee that we had in the warehouse.

Prisoner's defence. I had been a very little while in the coffee business, and Brady and Watts told me I might make a shilling or two, and he made motions with his hands to his breeches, and seemed very much surprised that I did not understand his motions; and he said, why don't you go; I told him I did not know where to go; and then I took the coffee; and when they rubbed me down, I was surprised at their taking me into custody; this was sweepings; it was impossible any man could attempt to go out of this door, when he was sure to be searched, without it was with the approbation of these officers; it is they that commit the depredations.

Court. Q.(To Gossett.) Are sweeping allowed as a perquisite? - A. No.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Whipped one hundred yards on Paul's Wharf .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-2

761. THOMAS CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , a handkerchief, value 10d. the property of James Brown .

JAMES BROWN sworn. - On the 11th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing by the Mansion-House , reading the papers that were stuck up there; I felt something against my side, which caused me to feel in my pocket; I missed my handkerchief; the prisoner was pointed out to me, and I asked him for my handkerchief; he said, he had not got it; I examined his pockets, but it was not there; I then examined his bosom, where I found it; in consequence of which I took him to the Poultry Compter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Smith. Q. Have you examined into the character of this man? - A. I have been at a great deal of trouble to enquire into his character, and I have found, that, till this time, he has always borne the best of character; he is in the watch-making line.

( Edward Alderman , an officer, produced the handkerchief, which was identified by Brown.)

- sworn. - I saw the prisoner behind the prosecutor with a silk handkerchief in his hand, which he was endeavouring to conceal; he then ran down the south side of the Mansron-House, and going out at the back part of it; I observed the prosecutor looking for his handkerchief, and asked him whether he had lost his handkerchief; upon which he said he had, and I shewed him the prisoner; he then went after him; I saw the handkerchief taken from his bosom.

Mr. Smith. (To Brown.) Q. Have you not said, within forty-eight hours, before the Grand Jury, that you could not swear to the handkerchief? - A. I recollect saying before the Grand Jury, there were a great number of handkerchiefs of the same kind, and if it was among a hundred I might not be able to pick it out; but if it was produced to me, I should know it.

Prisoner's defence. The handkerchief was my own; I had holes in my pocket, and I put it in my bosom for fear I should lose it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-3

762. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a box, value 10d. and twenty-four shirts, value 12l. 12s. the property of Anthony Mangin , Esq. in his dwelling-house .

ANTHONY MANGIN, Esq. sworn. - I am a Genoese , a merchant , in Sun-court, Cornhill : On the 20th of October, I lost a box from the one pair of stairs, containing twenty-four shirts; they cost me sixteen guineas; I was going to send them abroad to a friend; the house is my dwelling-house; I know nothing of the things myself.

Q. Are you naturalized? - A. I am not.

THOMAS MUNTIN sworn. - I packed six paper parcels in a box, but what they contained I do not know.

THOMAS TAYLOR sworn. - I live with Mr. Horton, hosier, in Newgate-street: On the 20th of October, I delivered two dozen of fleecy hosiery shirts; I delivered them to a gentleman in the accompting-house at Mr. Mangin's; he is not here; I packed them up in six paper parcels.

Muntin. Yesterday was a week I had been into the accompting-house, and when I came out I saw the prisoner carrying the box down stairs; he had the box before him; I said, my friend, what have you got there; he made me no answer, but kept on; I then cried, stop thief; he dropped the box on the outside of the door, and ran away; I brought in the box myself; a constable was sent for, and the prisoner and the box were delivered to him; I am sure the prisoner, who was brought back, was the same man that I saw with the box; when he came back, he owned to it; I did not see his face; I saw him through a glass-door; he had his back to me all the while, but I am sure he is the same man.( Thomas Terry , the constable, produced the box.)

Muntin. These are the same papers that I put into the box.

Taylor. There is no mark upon the shirts; they were of this sort; I delivered them on the 2d of October.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it; I was three hundred yards from the house when they took me. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-4

763. WILLIAM KEEP was indicted for that he, being a person employed in certain business relating to the Post-Office, in sorting letters and packets put into the General Post-Office , in London, to be sent by the Post on the 29th of August, in the 41st year of his Majesty's reign, at and in the said General Post-Office, a certain letter then lately before put into and received at the said General Post-Office, to be sent by the Post, to wit, by the Post from London, for and to be delivered to a certain person at Flamstead, near Market-street, in the county of Herts, that is to say, one Thomas Gregory , and containing therein two bank-notes, one for the payment of fifteen pounds, and anouther for the payment of two pounds, came to his hands and possession, he being such person so employed as aforesaid; and that he afterwards, to wit, on the 29th of August , being such person so employed, and having the said letter containing the said bank-notes in his hands and possession, feloniously did secrete the said letter containing the said bank-notes, the said bank-notes then being the property of Edward Stimson , and the monies secured by the same then due and unsatisfied to him .

Second Count. Instead of a letter, charging it to be a packet.

Third and Fourth Counts. Instead of secreting, for feloniously stealing from and out of the said letter or packet, like bank-notes, And

Four other Counts. Charging the bank-notes to be the property of Thomas Gregory , instead of Edward Stimson.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Myers, and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

EDWARD STIMSON sworn. - I am a stockbroker : On Saturday, the 29th of August, I put a letter into the General Post-Office, directed for Mr. Thomas Gregory , of Flamstead, near Market-street, Hertfordshire; I put it in myself; it contained a fifteen-pound bank-note, a two-pound bank-note, a half-guinea, and a seven-shilling-

piece; the fifteen-pound note was No. 2843, dated the 21st of March, 1801.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. When did you make that memorandum? - A. At the time I entered it, immediately before I put it in the letter; I had not had it ten minutes.

THOMAS GREGORY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodfall. I live at Flamslead.

Q. Do you recollect the latter end of August or beginning of September, receiving any letter from Mr. Stimson? - A. No.

Q. Had you an expectation of receiving any? - A. I had.

SAMUEL BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am vice-president of the Inland Department at the General Post-Office; On Saturday, the 29th of August, I was there upon duty; the prisoner was a sorter in the Inland Department, and was there that afternoon.

Q.Might the letter put into the Post-Office that afternoon come into the hands of the prisoner to be sorted? - A. It might.

Q. How long had this young man been in the Post-Office? - A. A short time; I believe not a year, or about that time; I am not quite certain.

HUGH OWEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am shopman to Messrs. Blatchford, woollendrapers, in Change-alley: On the 2d of September, a young man came in, and asked for cloth for pantaloons, a coat, and two white waistcoats.

Q. Was the colour of the cloth mentioned? - A. Yes, blue.

Q. How was he drest? - A. He was drest in a blue coat, leather breeches, white stockings, and had an apron on; I asked him if he was not in the grocery line; he said he was not, but belonged to the Post-Office; he tendered me a fifteen-pound Bank of England note, but I could not change it; he came again the next morning, and I took the note to the Bank to get change; I wrote upon it D. and R. Blatchford, Change-alley; I received at the Bank a ten-pound note and five one-pound notes; I gave the prisoner a ten-pound note, a one-pound note, and two shillings.

Q. Did that person enquire of you about a tailor? - A. Yes, and I recommended him to a Mr. Atkins, in Founder's-court, Lothbury.

Q. Look at the prisoner - is that the person that came for those articles? - A. I believe so; I cannot swear positively.

- BLATCHFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I recollect a person coming on the 3d of September, which I believe to be the prisoner, but am not certain; he came for some cloth he had bought the day before; he gave me a fifteen-pound note, and I sent Owen to the Bank to get it changed; while Owen was gone, I asked him what trade he was; he said he belonged to the Post-Office; I asked him what country he was of, and he said he came from Staffordshire.

Mr. Const. Q. He did not leave the note the first day? - A. No, the prisoner asked us to recommend him to a tailor, and we recommended a person of the name of Atkins.

THOMAS HUDSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. I am a tailor, Journeyman to Mr. Atkins, No. 3. Founder's-court, Lothbury.

Q. Do you recollect seeing that boy any where? - A. I think I do.

Court. Q. Are you sure of it? - A. I am sure.

Q.Have you any doubt about it? - A. No, I I have no doubt at all: on the 3d of September I saw him at Mr. Atkins's; he enquired for Mr. Atkins, and said he wanted some clothes made; a blue coat, and pantaloons of the same sort.

WILLIAM ATKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Look at the lad at the bar - do you remember seeing him at any time? - A. Yes, on Friday, the 4th of September.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - A. Yes, I saw him again on the Saturday; he came for his clothes.

Q. Who recommended him to you? - A. Mr. Blatchford, I understood.

Q.From whom? - A.From the shopman.

Q.Have you any doubt of his being the person? - A. No.

JOHN SPARKES sworn. - I am a constable:(produces the bundle,) I got these clothes from the prisoner's lodgings; here is a coat, two waistcoats, and a pair of pantaloons.

Atkins. These appear to be the same clothes.

Hudson. I made this coat myself, and this waistcoats I made myself.

Mr. Const. Q.(To Sparkes.) How did you know the lodgings? - A. The City-Marshal took me, and the prisoner came there to the house.

Q.(To Owen.) Is that the sort of article that you sold the prisoner? - A. Yes.

JOHN MOSS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a clerk in the Bank, (produces a fifteen-pound Bank-note, No. 2843, dated the 21st of March, 1801;) it was paid into the Bank.

Q.(To Owen.) Be so good as look at that note? - A.There is my hand-writting upon the back of it; it is the same that I took from the prisoner.(the note read.)

Q.(To Moss.) Does it ever happen that two bank-notes are issued from the Bank of the same date and the same number? - A.If it does it must be a very great error.

ANTHONY PARKIN , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am solicitor of the Post-Office: On the 11th of September I was sent for to the Post-Office, in consequence of a discovery that had taken place; I asked him where he had that bank

note from; he said he had it from his brother, John Keep, one of the letter-carriers in the Office; that he had given it to him to purchase clothes; I asked him what became of the change he had received for the fifteen-pound note; he said he gave the ten-pound note to his brother again; he said he had carried the cloth to a tailor's near the Bank, to make into clothes; he was then ordered into custody, to be carried before the Magistrate, and his brother John was fought after, and taken into custody. The next morning, before he was before the Lord-Mayor, I saw him again, and then he said, that what he had said respecting his brother John, and obtaining the note from him, was untrue; he acknowledge having taken the letter containing the note.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY, Death , aged 14.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-5

764. JOHN PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , twenty-five waistcoats, value 6l. 5s. the property of John Tine , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN TINE sworn. - I am a tailor ; I keep a house , No. 14, Queen-street, Tower-hill : On Monday, the 28th of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, I went to a neighbour's house for a pail of water; I left those waistcoats upon the counter; I received information from a witness, who is here; I immediately came out, and pursued the prisoner; when I got into the Minories, I saw the prisoner with the waistcoats under his arm; I tapped him on the shoulder, and asked where he was going with those waistcoats; he gave a sudden twist from my hand, and dropped them; I took them up, and called out stop thief; he ran down Swan-street, about twenty yards from where he dropped them, and then he was stopped; I have kept them ever since.

SARAH USHER sworn. - On the 28th of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner go up to Mr. Tine's shop-door; there was nobody in the shop; he then went into the shop, and came out with the waistcoats; I went and told Mr. Tine of it.

Q. Did you see him when he was brought back? - A. No, I saw him about eleven o'clock, when he was going to the Justices. (The property produced.)

Q.(To Tine.) What would you give for these waistcoats? - A. Five shillings and six-pence a-piece; I know them to be my property.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

confined two months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-6

765. MICHAEL WAYLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , seven pounds and a half of loaf-sugar, value 5s. the property of Robert Dewes , George Ansell , and Christopher Dewes .

CHRISTOPHER DEWES sworn. - I am a sugar refiner , in partnership with Robert Dewes and George Anfell, in Osborn-street, Whitechapel ; the prisoner was a servant of our's: On Wednesday . the 14th of October, I was sitting up stairs in my dwelling-house, and heard a ringing at the bell; I came down stairs, and saw a number of people, amongst whom was the prisoner; William Miller said he had taken some sugar.

Q. Was that in the prisoner's hearing? - A. Yes; I then sent for an officer, and he was taken to the Office; I know the sugar to be our's, by a mark No. 39 and two strokes underneath.

WILLIAM MILLER sworn. - I am foreman to the prosecutors: On Tuesday, the 13th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going past a door that leads into the coal-cellar, I heard a rattling among the coals; I asked who is there? the prisoner answered, me; I did not see him; I knew his voice; I then suspected him; a little while afterwards I got a light, and went into the coal-cellar, and saw a loaf of sugar upon the coals, near a hole that goes into the yard; I put out the candle, and placed myself in a corner of the manufactory, to see if any person would come to take this loaf away; a few minutes after, the prisoner at the bar came down with a light, but he did not go to the place; the next evening, about six o'clock, I watched about five or six yards from the hole, the prisoner came down. and stooped towards the hole; I saw him put something under his coat, and go out at the gate; I immediately followed him, and took him in the middle of the street with the loaf upon him; upon which we had an officer called, and he was taken to the Justices.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 28.

confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-7

766. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , three pounds weight of coffee, value 9s. the property of Sir Francis Baring , Bart. Charles Wall , and Thomas Baring .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of our Lord the King .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOSIAH-WILLIAM WHITE sworn. - Examined

by Mr. Knowlys. I am an Excise-watchman: On Sunday, the 27th of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was watching upon Fresh-Wharf ; there were a great many bags of coffee upon the Wharf, under the care of the Commissioners of Excise; I saw the prisoner cut a bag of coffee, and hold his hat under, and it run into his hat; I was under one of the cranes up above the coffee; I then immediately got down, and called my partner, Timms; he came round after me, and we seized hold of the man; he denied having any thing about him, till we took him to where the bag was, and then Timms collared him, and said he would search him; the prisoner then took his hat off his head, and the coffee run about; there were about three pounds of it.( John Timms corroborated the evidence of White.)(John-Manby Cooke proved the names of the Commissioners of Excise, as stated in the indictment.)(William Green, the constable, produced the coffee.)

Prisoner's defence. The Lord-Mayor fined me forty shillings, and sent me to jail a month; but I could not pay forty shillings, and then the gentlemen spoke to the Lord-Mayor, and he committed me. GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined two months in Newgate , and whipped one hundred yards on Fresh-Wharf .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-8

767. ELIZABETH HARVEY was indicted for the wilful murder of her female bastard child .(The case was opened by Mr. Const).

ELIZABETH KING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a widow, and live at Tottenham; I worked with the prisoner at the bar for ten weeks in the last summer, and slept with her at the Red Lion, at Tottenham; during that time I suspected that she was with child.

Q. Had you any particular reason for suspecting that? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with her upon the subject? - A. Yes, several times.

Q. Of what nature were these conversations? - A. I often asked her whether she was with child or no, and she always denied it; but I had no doubt that she was with child notwithstanding her denial; she left me, and went to lodge with Mrs. English.

Court. Q. From what time to what time? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You were no relation of her's? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Have you had children? - A. Two.

SARAH ENGLISH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I live at Tottenham; I am the wife of Joseph English .

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, she came to lodge with me one night from the Red Lion.

Q. When was it? - A. I cannot say.

Q.Did you happen to sleep with her that night? - A. Yes, I did; she went from me to lodge with Mary Moss.

Q. Did you make any observation upon her situation? - A. I did not notice her that night; the next morning I took notice she looked very bulky.

Q. Had you any conversation with her upon it? - A. Not then.

Q. When had you any conversation with her? - A. The same afternoon that she went away; I told her I had heard she was with child, and she denied it; I had no farther conversation with her, and she went away to Mrs. Moss's.

Court. Q. Were you any relation of her's? - A. No.

Q. Nor had any acquaintance with her but coming to lodge at your house? - A. No.

MARY MOSS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I live at Tottenham; I am a widow.

Q. Have you ever had any children? - A. I have.

Q. Do you know the last witness that was examined? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I know no further than her coming to lodge with me; I was a lone woman, and she came for a lodging; my room was in Mary Willis's house; she was to sleep with me.

Q. Who slept in the next room to you? - A. A man and his wife.

Q. What family has Mrs. Willis? - A. They have got two children in the house; one is a niece, five or six years old, and a boy older than that.

Q. Can you tell us what day of the month it was? - A. She came to me on the Thursday night; it was the Wednesday night after that this affair happened; I cannot say the day of the month; she came from Mrs. English to me.

Q. Did you know her before that? - A. I never saw her but once in my life before she came for the lodging; but I knew where she came from; in about a couple of days after she came to me, I told her my neighbours said she was with child, and she was very angry, denied it, and asked me if I was not with child; I told her of it again, and told her to provide herself with a lodging; she continued with me till the Wednesday night, and on the Wednesday night I went to bed, and went to sleep, and the cry of a young child, three hearty squalls, waked me; I went to bed about nine o'clock, and waked about eleven; the prisoner went to bed first; I was greatly surprised, and said, I heard the the cry of a child; and she said, no, there was no such thing; I said, then did you cry; she said, what for; I said, I am sure there was a cry, and I will get up; she said, what should you get up for, lie still; she said, she did not all any thing; I got up between six and seven o'clock, I cannot say exactly, and left her in bed; it might be half past six;

I went to fetch some milk; when I came back, I met Mrs. Rowland; she went with me; the prisoner went down stairs as we went up; she had her clothes on just the same as any other time; a black bonnet on, a black gown, a black silk handkerchief; Mrs. Rowland waited half an hour for her, and went away; in consequence of suspicion, I looked all over the room as close as I could, to see if I could find any thing; but I did not find any thing but the state of a lying-in woman upon my bed, and all over my room, and that; I was sure there must have been a child or a miscarriage.

Q. What was that appearance? - A. Every thing was very bad, very bloody, just as if it was dipped into a blood-tub; the bed, blankets, and sheets, all through; and there were a great many spots of blood about the room, as if it was wiped or smeared about.

Q. Was there any appearance of that sort about the room the night before? - A. No, in no part of it; when the prisoner came back, I asked how she could make the woman wait so long for her; she said, I have been a good way to the shop to fetch some tea, and I will follow her; I said, no, you must not follow her, you are not fit to go; the prisoner said, I am; I said, no, you are not; then she said, yes, I am, I all nothing; and she went after her, and did her day's work.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular about her dress? - A.Nothing particular.

Examined by the Court. Q. Where was the prisoner when you heard the crying you speak of? - A.In the bed by me.

Q. You heard no more cries than that? - A. No.

Q. And you heard that so distinctly, that you heard three cries? - A. Yes, I waked with it.

Q.How many days did she continue to lodge with you? - A.She went away from me on the Monday following; I turned her out.

HANNAH ROWLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I have been married near fourteen years, but my husband is not with me; I worked with the prisoner last September; in the month of August I worked first with her, at the Bull, for three days: On the Thursday morning, I think, the 27th of August, I met Mary Moss in the street, as I was going to my day's work; I went home with her, and the prisoner was up in the room; when I went into it, Betty was very near the door.

Q. Do you mean the prisoner? - A. Yes, she said to me, Mrs. Rowland, are you going to work so soon, it is not seven o'clock? I told her it was seven, but it was not eight; and she pressed me to stay for her, as she was going out for butter; she went away that instant, and I staid about half an hour; I looked round the room, and saw small clots of blood and trickles all about the room.

Q. Did it appear to be fresh? - A. It looked very fresh.

Q. Were you present with Mrs. Moss when she looked at the bed? - A. No, about ten o'clock she came into the field to me.

Q. Was there any thing particular in her appearance when she came to the field? - A. She looked very ill; her petticoats were very much soiled, and her stockings; and we persuaded her to pin her petticoats up, and gave her pins to do it; and we advised her to drop her gown down, for fear the men should observe her; she told me she was taken very ill in the night, so much so, that she thought she must have died; she told me the bed was in such a situation with her illness, that, if I had seen it, it would have frightened me; I said, was it; she said, it was through every thing.

MARY WILLIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Mrs. Moss lodged in my house; the prisoner lodged with Mrs. Moss; she came on the 20th of August, and went away the 31st; Mrs. Moss lives there still.

Q. Did you yourself observe the situation of the prisoner? - A. I did not.

Q. On Wednesday night, the 27th, had you any infant children in your house? - A. No, the youngest child in my house was turned of five years old.

Q.You do not yourself know any thing of this transaction? - A. No.

JOSEPH BLISS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a labourer, I live at Tottenham: On Thursday, the 27th of August, I was at work in a field, called Twelve Acres, near Tottenham, about half a mile from Mrs. Willis's.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have seen her twice; I saw her early in the morning, between six and seven o'clock; she had a darkish coloured own,a black cloak, and a close bonnet; she went down a little field, called the Slipe; it is a grass field, and a pound in it.

Q. Are you certain the prisoner is the same person? - A. Yes, I am certain it was the same person.

Q. Did you ever see her before? - A. Never before that time.

Court. Q. She had a close bonnet on - you did not see her face? - A. Yes, I could see her face, but not so very particular as to discern her features; she had a bundle under her arm about the length of my arm; I did not see her return; I saw her again about a week afterwards when she was brought to Tottenham to be examined.

Mr. Const. Q. You heard that the woman, who was in custody, had put a child into the pond? - A. Yes.

Q. And then, when you saw her, she was under examination? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. In your examination before the Coroner, did you say it was the prisoner that you saw in the field, and then that it was a woman? - A.

When I was examined before the Coroner the first time, I had not seen the prisoner.

Court. You say it was yesterday fortnight, which, from the date of the examination, would bring it to the 2d of September.

CHARLES MACLEOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a labouring man in the parish of Tottenham; I was at work in a field, called Twelve Acres, in the last September.

Q. Before that did you know the prisoner? - A. No, I never saw her before.

Q. Did you see her at any time so as to know her? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes, the first time I saw her was going through Twelve-Acre Field.

Q. You mean to say that you saw a woman go down the field? - A. Yes; she had on a dark gown, a dinsey-coloured cloak, and a close bonnet.

Q. How far was she from you? - A. One hundred and fifty yards ; or more; she went across Twelve Acres to a little field, called the Slipe; she had a bundle under her arm; I observed to Bliss what that woman could do down the field at that time in the morning.

Jury. Q. Was it a foot-path field? - A. No; we lost her nigh this pond a considerable time.

Mr. Const. Q. You lost sight of her? - A. Yes, we both looked a considerable time to see which way she went, but we could see no more of her.

Q. Do you remember what day you were examined before the Coroner? - A. No.

Q. How long was it before you were examined before the Coroner? - A. I cannot say; I did not recollect the woman going down the field till after I heard that the child was found.

JOHN RIDGWAY called. - Q. How old are you? - A. Thirteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what will become of you if you do not speak the truth, upon your oath? - A. I cannot justly say.

Q. What do you suppose will be your punishment if you do not speak the truth? - A. When I die I shall go to Hell. (He is sworn.) I am the son of Mary Ridgway .

Q. Do you recollect going out for your mother? - A. Yes, on the Monday afternoon, I don't know the day of the month; my mother sent me out to gather sticks in the Slipe; I was going by the pond, I think, between three and four o'clock, I saw something stuck down with a stick; the stick was not stuck down on both sides of it; I pulled the stick up, and put it under it, and then the legs came out of the water; I then left it, and went and told my mother; I went with her, and shewed it her; my mother staid with it, and sent me to acquaint the beadle of it; I went back to my mother; I did not see it taken away.

MARY RIDGWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I live at Tottenham; the last witness is my son.

Q. Do you remember his informing you of any thing he had seen in the pond? - A. Yes, I think on the 7th of September; it was on a Monday; I went to the pond, and found a female child lying upon its belly in the water; I took a stick, and turned it up to the side of the bank; it looked very fresh in the face; I then sent for the beadle; two men took the child to Mr. Bartlett's, the first public-house.

JAMES SHEFFIELD sworn. - I am assistant to Mr. Holt, surgeon, at Tottenham; I was called in to examine the child; I looked over the body; I found it in a very putrid state, insomuch that I could not discover any marks of violence whatever about the child; I examined the navel-cord, and found it lascerated; that it had not been properly attended to by a surgeon or midwife; and, from its appearance, I think it was a full-time child.

Court. Q. Then, finding the child in this state, you can form no judgment how it came by its death? - A. By no means.

Q. Might not the navel-cord, not being properly attended to, of itself occasion the death of the child? - A. It would undoubtedly.

Q. I believe it is a very frequent thing for the child to die in the birth in the very act of delivery? - A. Most assuredly.

Q. Even where a skilful practitioner attends the birth? - A. Yes.

Q. It is the more likely when an ignorant woman delivers herself? - A. Yes.

Q. And you yourself can form no judgment how the child came by its death? - A. No.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-9

768. ABRAHAM CHAMPION was indicted for feloniously stealing a cloth great-coat, value 16s. the property of Joseph Rich .

JOSEPH RICH sworn. - I live at No. 9, Little Drury-lane ; I lost a great-coat on the 24th of September; it was tied to the knocker of the door for sale; I missed it a little after two o'clock; I had seen it just before; I saw it again in a quarter of an hour after I had missed it; it had been taken from there.

WILLIAM WHEELER sworn. - I am a tailor; I went to sit an hour or two in the afternoon with Mr. Rich; I had not been there ten minutes before there was an alarm that the coat was gone; I went out, and the prosecutor with me, in pursuit of the man; I saw the prisoner coming out of Craven-buildings with the coat upon his arm; I asked

him where he got that coat; he said, what business was it of mine; he threw down the coat, and made a blow at me; he got from me, and ran across the street into White-Hart-yard, where he was taken; he was never out of my sight; I took up the coat, and have had it ever since. (Produces it.)

Rich. I know this to be my coat.

Prisoner's defence. A man told me he would give me six-pence to carry the coat for him, and as I was going along with it, a man came up to me and laid hold of me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 20.

confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-10

769. MARY COCKBURN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , a shift, value 4s. and two aprons, value 2s. the property of Henry Avis .

HANNAH AVIS sworn. - I am the wife of Henry Avis ; I live in Tower-street, Seven Dials ; I take in washing; I had looked these things out to be washed; they were in the tub in the kitchen; I was sitting mending stockings; I thought I heard somebody upon the stairs; I got up to see if my things were safe; I went, and found some of them were gone; I ran up stairs, and saw the prisoner; I followed her, and took the things upon her; she had them in her apron; a constable was sent for, and she was taken to Bow-street; the shift was dry, and the aprons wet.

(- Gilbert, a constable, produced the property, which was identified by Mrs. Avis.)

Prisoner's defence. I was poverty-struck; it was the first time I was ever guilty of any such thing.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-11

770. JOHN PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , twenty-five pounds of leaden-pipe, value 2s. the property of Samuel Whitbread , Timothy Brown , Jacob Yallowley , Robert Sanxay , Benjamin Hobhouse , Jacob Whitbread , and Joseph Goodman , fixed to a certain building of theirs .

Second Count. For a like offence not charging it to be fixed.(The case was opened by Mr. Scott.)

THOMAS ALLEN sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Whitbread and Co. On Saturday, the 17th of October, the prisoner was employed in making a pipe good which communicates with the liquorback, and from the reservoir to the copper in the brewery; about twenty minutes before one, I went into the room where the prisoner was at work; he seemed to be very much flurried, and buttoning his jacket up in great haste; I asked him how he was going on in his business; he turned round towards me, and I saw that he was a little more reconciled; he answered, that he was going on very well; there was a pipe in that hop-lost that the cock was foldered to; I then saw him walk away very much on one side.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This man was employed by a master-plumber upon these premises? - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore as much work as he had done, Messrs. Whitbread's were to pay for? - A. Yes.

Q. Then if any lead was lost, the plumber must stand to the loss? - A. No, Messrs. Whitbread must stand to the loss; when lead comes to our house, if it is a whole sheet of lead, or whatever quantity comes in, I put it into a book, and that lead is paid for by Messrs. Whitbread.

THOMAS MINTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Scott. On the 17th of October, I was standing at Mr. Whitbread's gate, in Chiswell-street, I saw the prisoner come out apparently very much swelled in the sides; I laid hold of him, and felt something underneath his waistcoat, and found some lead; I then took him into the accompting-house, I put my hand under his jacket, and found two pieces of pipe; he said it was the first time he had ever done any thing of the kind; I delivered the lead to the officers.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street, (produces the lead;) I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner; I took charge of the prisoner, and Mr. Minton brought the lead to the Office, and delivered it to me; the next day I compared it with the pipe from which it was cut off.

Q. Was that pipe fixed to the building? - A. It had been; it was cut from another piece of lead that was lying in the store-room.

Q. Was that piece from which it was cut fixed to the premises? - A. No, it was loose, but it was a very large piece.

Court. Q. Is that in the same shape with the piece that you fitted it to? - A. No, this piece is split; it had been cut off with a faw; the faws exactly corresponded.

Mr. Allen. I went with Ray to compare the lead with the pipe that he was at work upon.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, upon the Second Count, of stealing to the value of 10d.

confined two months in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-12

771. THOMAS HEWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , three pounds of hard soap, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Barnfield .

WILLIAM BARNFIELD sworn - I am an oilman , in Bishopsgate-street : Yesterday morning, between eight and nine o'clock, I was called down stairs; I went down stairs immediately, and found the prisoner standing in the shop with the porter, and the soap; I asked him where the property was, and my porter produced it to me; the prisoner confessed he had taken it.

Q. Did you make him any promise whatever? - A. No, on the contrary I told him I should not forgive him; I sent for a constable, and he was taken into custody; the property was delivered to the constable.

TIMOTHY SULLIVAN sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Barnfield: Yesterday morning the prisoner came to my master's shop with a load of salt; I went into the warehouse, and brought out some hard soap; I put four cakes of soap down; and when the prisoner had done unloading his salt, he asked me to let him go to our back place; and while he was gone, I called the shopman down stairs to give him the money; he was paid, and went away; I missed the soap; I went after him, and charged him with taking a cake of soap of my master's; he asked me how I came to think of that; he came back with me to my master's door, and then he said he would give me the soap if I would not say any thing to my master about it; he then put his hand under his apron, and took out a cake of soap in two halves; I delivered it to the constable.(Thomas Sapwell, the constable, produced the soap.)

Sullivan. By the appearance of the soap, this is the same that I missed.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up in the street when I went out.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined two months in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-13

772. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , seven guineas and two shillings, the property of Manuel Jose , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Holman.

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Manuel Jose , in the said dwelling-house.

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of Manuel Jose, in the dwelling-house of Ann Cornet .

Fourth Count. Laying it to be the property of Manuel Jose , in the dwelling-house of the said Ann Cornet .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

MANUEL JOSE, being a foreigner, an interpreter was sworn: On the 10th of October, the night of the illuminations, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I met with the prisoner, and she took me to a house with her; we went into a bed-room together; when I went into the room, I had in my jacket-pocket seven guineas and two shillings; I sent for some beer, and put my hand into my jacket-pocket to pay for it, and then I saw the money; there was no other person there; we both undrest, and went to bed.

Q. Was she entirely undrest? - A. Yes, I put my jacket under my head with the money in it.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I was quite sober, I slept for an hour; I then awoke, and the woman was gone; I found the jacket on the floor, and the money gone; I then applied to the master of the house, and told him my money was gone.

JAMES PHILLIPS sworn. - I am waiter at the Salisbury Coffee-house, Chancery-lane, nearly opposite Serjeant's-Inn; the prisoner brought a foreign sailor to our house, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, on the 10th of October, the first night of the illuminations; the woman asked for a room; the sailor could not speak English; they were shewn into a bed-room; the prisoner asked him to pay for the room, which he did; I fetched a pot of porter for them, and left them; the woman came out first, about twelve o'clock; she told me the man was going to sleep by himself, and that he was very agreeable to her going; she went away, and in about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes afterwards, I saw the man; he came down crying and wringing his hands; I could understand that he said guineas, and he counted seven of his fingers; I went to the Cheshire-Cheese, in Fleurde-Luce-court, and in about ten minutes found her; I charged the watch with her, and took her to the watch-house; I gave charge of her to the constable; I was in the room when he searched her.

Q. Who is it that keeps this house? - A. Elizabeth Holman ; it is her dwelling-house; she pays the rent of it.

Q. Was the sailor drunk or sober? - A. He appeared to be quite sober.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not call you up several times, and tell you I would not stay with him? - A. She called me up once, and told me to get another shilling for the room, for they were going to stay all night; I received two shillings of him altogether, and six-pence for the porter.

ALEXANDER AULD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was constable of the night; after I had received charge of the prisoner, I asked her what property she had; she told me she had no property, but a few halfpence; I searched her, and found upon her a knife, three pennyworth of halfpence, a farthing, and three guineas; I then asked her how she came to say she had no property about her; she said, it was illumination night, and she thought to have left it at home, but she had forgot to leave it at home.

Prisoner's defence. It is my own money; I sit

in Fleet-market, and I thought I had left my money at home.

GUILTY, of stealing money, value 23s.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-14

773. FRANCIS GRANTHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , a pound weight of cocoa-nuts, value 3s. the property of John Keymer , John M'Taggart , and Benjamin Gray .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of James Harris .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

CHARLES BRASSETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am foreman to Messrs. Keymer and Co. brokers and warehousemen , in Bush-lane; their names are John Keymer , John M'Taggart, and Benjamin Gray ; the warehouses contain coffee, cocoa, ginger, and other articles; the prisoner is a Custom-house-officer : On the 19th of September, about six o'clock in the evening, I suspected him; I saw him stop against a rail across Checquer-yard, nearly facing our door; Mr. Major, the Excise-locker, stood on his left hand; I called Mr. Major to me, and told him, in the presence of the prisoner, that I had reason to suspect he had taken something; he said, he had not; he then took out of his pocket a parcel of our catalogues, and said, that is all I have got; I still persisted he had something in his pocket that he ought not to have; he then took out of his pocket, on the other side, a bundle of rods, and said, that was all he had; I still persisted he had something, and sent for a constable; while Mr. Major was gone to call one of our men to go for a constable, the prisoner whipped up tow or three stairs; I endeavoured to prevent him; Mr. Major came down, and then the prisoner took from his pocket a bundle of cocoa in part of a silk stocking; he then said, that was all he had.

Q. Was it manufactured or cocoa-nuts? - A.Cocoa-nuts; there was no manufactured article in the warehouse; it weighed a pound and two ounces; the prisoner asked me to let it pass over; I told him I could not, for I had been made very unhappy for months on his account; I said I would take him down to the accompting-house, and if the gentlemen chose to let him go, it was very well; before we took him to the accompting-house, I discovered another bundle of cocoa upon a little ledge close by him; as we were taking him to the accompting-house, he desired that that bundle might go into his pocket; I said it was of no consequence, it might remain under his arm, where it was; after we had got to the accompting-house, before the constable came, he ran out of the accompting-house; he had the bundle with him at that time; I cried stop thief, and he was stopped in Scott's-yard, by a gentleman who is here; the cocoa then sell about him; he was brought up to the accompting-house by Mr. Reeves.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Major is an officer of Excise? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he present when you say he produced this in the stocking? - A. Yes, he was.

Q. Major saw it all? - A. He took the stocking out of Grantham's hand.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are these gentlemen responsible to the merchants for these goods? - A. They are.

HENRY MAJOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an Excise-locker; the prisoner was a custom-house officer at Messrs. Keymer and M'Taggart's warehouse: On the evening of the 19th of September, Mr. Brassett charged the prisoner with having something; he denied it, and then Mr. Brassett desired me to go up stairs, and send one of the men for a constable; I went up stairs, and came down with John Hunt; and, upon the stairs, I met the prisoner and Mr. Brassett; he said, Mr. Major, I have taken a little for my own use, and produced part of a silk stocking, containing cocoa in the nut, as it is imported; he begged to be forgiven, and Mr. Brassett said, no, he would not let that pass; I then saw Mr. Brassett with a parcel in his hand, which turned out to be more cocoa; the prisoner put it under his coat, and in that situation took it to the accompting-house; a constable was sent for; the cocoa in the silk stocking was delivered to the constable.

JOSEPH REEVES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a coachman: On the 19th of September, I heard the cry of stop thief in Scott's-yard; I saw the prisoner running; I ran up to him, and laid hold of him; he had a handkerchief with cocoa-nuts in it; and, as soon as I laid hold of him, he threw it away.( William Richards , the constable, produced the property.)

BENJAMIN GRAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.What is the value of a pound of cocoa-nuts? - A.From eleven-pence to one shilling; I don't know what the duty is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.This is the cocoa from which chocolate is made? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say these are cocoa-nut. - A. Yes, they are; when it is ground, it is called cocoa; in its present state, it is cocoa-nut.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined two years in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-15

774. HENRY ELLIS and JAMES PRICE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , two geldings, value 18l. the property of William Townsend .(The case was opened by Mr. Clifton.)

JAMES REEVES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I live at the George, at Riverhead: I saw the prisoners there on the 1st of September, about eight o'clock in the evening; they staid till ten.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoners before? - A. One of them only.

WILLIAM TOWNSEND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I am a tanner : I live at Tauntongreen, about a mile from Riverhead; my land is within a quarter of a mile; I had some horses turned out at seven o'clock in the evening, on the 1st of September; in the morning, I went there, and missed two geldings, a black and a bay; on the 3d, I came up to London, and went forward to Barnet, it was fair-day; I saw those young men go to a stable at Mrs. Neale's; I went there, and saw my little black horse, and a horse I could not swear to, but I thought it belonged to a neighbour of mine, Mr. Staples, at Riverhead.

Q. Was the black one the horse you missed from the pasture? - A. It was.

Q. What were the two prisoners doing in the stable when you went there? - A. I did not see them do any thing there; I went into the town, and afterwards saw them; they were a very little distance apart; Ellis mounted Mr. Staples's horse, and tried to ride away, then I seized Price, and said, he was my prisoner for stealing horses.

Q. Was that in Ellis's hearing? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. What did Ellis do? - A. He tried to ride away, and rode over a Welch runt; the horse knocked the runt down, and fell over it, and threw the man off; this was not above two or three rods from Mrs. Neale's; I found the other bay horse at Whetstone, at Mr. Freeman's, which I had lost from the pasture.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were those horses turned out by you? - A. By my servant.

Q. Were you with your servant? - A. No; but I was in the yard when they came from the stable.

Q. Is your servant here? - A. No.

Q. I understood you, that what you communinicated to Price, you don't know whether Ellis heard? - A. No.

Q. Or whether he saw that you were taking Price at the time? - A. No.

Q. The horse Elis was upon, was not your horse? - A. No.

Q. When you found the horse at Whetstone, Ellis was not by? - A. No.

Q. Or near there? - A. No.

MARY NEALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I keep the Waggon and Horses at Barnet: On the 3d of September, which is the day before the fair, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoners came to my house, each leading a horse, they were not mounted; the horses were put into my stable; in the course of about a couple of hours afterwards, Mr. Townsend came, and saw them, and said, they were his property.

Q. Were the horses, Townsend said were his, the same the prisoners brought to the yard? - A. Yes; Mr. Townsend claimed them as his property, and asked me to get a constable.

BENJAMIN FREEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I keep the Anchor at Whetstone: The prisoner, Price, came to my house on the 2d of September last, and wanted my meadow to put three horses in; the other prisoner came afterwards, and they had a bit of dinner, and went away together, and left the horses in the meadow near my house.

Q. Did Townsend come next day? - A. Yes; and he saw the horses, and claimed one.

Q. Are you sure that the horse you shewed him, and that he claimed, was the same that was left by Price the day before? - A. I am sure that was the horse that he put into the field.

Q. Did they say where they were going when they left your house? - A. Towards Barnet.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Then it was Price that gave you the horses, and you did not see Ellis for sometime? - A. No.

Prisoner (Price.) Q. By what means did I come to your house - by myself? - A. I was busy in the house, and don't know.

Ellis's defence. I am an innocent man, and leave it all to my Counsel.

Price's defence. I have nothing to say; I leave it to my Counsel.

Evidence for the prisoner Ellis.

THOMAS HANKIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a cordwainer, and live in Pomona-place, Lisson-green, Paddington: I know the prisoner Ellis, because he lived at my house on the 1st of September last; I recollect, on the evening of the 1st of September, he was in my house at four o'clock in the afternoon, and did not go out again that day, or till the next morning at half past six, when he told me he was going to Barnet fair.

Cross-examined by Mr. Cliston. Q. How long have you been acquainted with Ellis? - A. Upwards of eight years.

Q. How long has he lodged at your house? - A. Between four and five months.

Q. What trade is he? - A. He gains his livelihood by carrying bowls and dishes, commonly called hardware.

Q. Where? - A. In all parts of the country.

Q. How long before this time had he employed

himself in carrying bowls and dishes? - A. I suppose, four or five years.

Q. Do you mean to say he had not carried it on for the last four or five years? - A. I should think not.

Q. What trade has he carried on in that time? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. For the last five months, you don't know, perhaps? - A. I know so far as the time he lodged with me, and for the other time, to the best of my knowledge, he carried on that, and nothing else.

Q. What business has he followed during the last five months? - A. He followed that business.

Q. During that five months, he was out a good deal? - A. Yes, up and down the country.

Q. Then he was not constantly at your house? - A. He was not.

Q. How can you pretend to say, that on the 1st of September, he was at your house? - A. He was, I can safely say.

Q. How do you know it? - A.Because, if I must speak the truth, I lent him a couple of guineas.

Q. How are you so sure? - A.Because, in the morning, at half past six, he got up, and said, will you get me some breakfast; I said, I would; he said, have you got the trisle of money by you of two guineas; I said, I have; says he, I will be much obliged to you, if you will lend it to me, and I will pay you when I come back; I said, if you will promise to pay me, I will, and I lent it him on the 1st of September.

Q. He was going a journey, and would pay you when he came back? - A. Yes.

Q. He set off on his journey? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he say where he was going? - A. To Barnet fair.

Mr. Clifton. My Lord, I will now call Stevens, the coachman of the Riverhead coach, to prove he took the prisoners down by the coach.

- STEVENS sworn. - Q. Did you drive the prisoners any where? - A. I took them up at Lewisham, and drove them to Collier's, the White Hart, at Riverhead, on the 1st of September.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoners before? - A. I never saw them, to my knowledge, before.

Q. Were they inside or outside? - A. Outside.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, never having seen the men before, whether they are the men you took up at Lewisham? - A. That man in the jacket is one (Price.)

Q. Upon your oath, will you swear that the other is one? - A. In regard to that, I cannot say; his dress is different; it is something like the man.

THOMAS WALTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I was with the prisoners on the top of the coach, and know them; I had a deal of conversation with him in the blue coat (Ellis.)

Ellis, GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Price, GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-16

775. THOMAS SMITH , otherwise THOMAS SCOTT SMITH , was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 2d of September , a certain order for payment of money, as follows: "30th Aug. 1801. Messrs. Smith, Payne, and Smith, pay Rev. Mr. Thomas Smith , or bearer, 10l. Robert Smith," with intention to defraud Thomas Capper .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing as true the said forged order, knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud the said Thomas Capper .

And two other Counts. Charging him with the like offence, with intention to defraud Samuel Smith , George Smith , and John Smith .

BENJAMIN CAPPER sworn. - I keep the Hungerford Coffee-house in the Strand; I know the prisoner: On the 2d of September he dined at my house; he sent a note to me by the waiter, John Roy , I have it in my hand; I told him I had not so much in my pocket, only a 5l. note, which I sent by the waiter, and desired him to say, he might have the remainder to-morrow, or any other time; he had been several times at my house, when he was officiating at the church of the parish of St. Martin; he dined one Sunday in his black gown, and went away in the evening; it was on the Wednesday morning I received the draft for change, and on Saturday I took it to Smith, Payne, and Smith's, to get cash for it, when they told me it was a forgery.

Q. Did you see the prisoner again, after you had been informed it was a forgery, before he was taken up? - A. Yes, I saw him that evening, and informed him of it; he told me he had it from his father, inclosed in a letter from Weymouth; I asked him for his father's address, which he said was Robert Smith, Esq. Terrace, Weymouth, Dorset, and that his own address was Thomas-Scott Smith, No. 25, Frederick-place, Hampstead-road; he said, if I would go with him to his lodgings, he would convince me that he came honestly by the bill, by shewing me the letter he had from his father; I went with him, and he shewed me a letter, of which he read part; I was not satisfied with it, because he would not let me see that part of the letter that related to the draft; for, he said, there were family affairs in it, and he would not let me see it.

Q. What steps did you take? - A. He said, if I would let it remain till Monday, he would then call upon me, and go with me to the bankers to convince me it was all right; on Monday, he sent for me to the sexton's room in St. Martin's Church-yard; I went, and he told me he had been disap

pointed in hearing from his father, but if I would let it remain till Wednesday, he would give me satisfaction, and I should lose nothing by it; I wrote to his father by Monday night's post, as I supposed, at Weymouth, but received no answer whatever; on the Friday, I went to Bow-street to ask Mr. Bond what I had best do about it, and then he was apprehended.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. This transaction first took place on a Wednesday? - A. Yes.

Q. When the waiter brought you the bill, you gave him five pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. On Saturday was the first application you made to the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. He gave you his father's address, and his own? - A. Yes.

Q. And you went to his own lodgings? - A. Yes.

Q. You went again on the Monday? - A. Yes.

Q. You met him again on the Wednesday? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Then you saw him on the Friday? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. That was Friday week after the transaction first took place? - A. Yes.

Q. He might have gone away in that time? - A. No doubt of it.

Q. You always found him agreeable to where you expected? - A. Yes.

- sworn. - I am clerk in the house of Wilkinson, Bloxham, and Co. bankers; I have known the prisoner some years before this transaction; he was in the house of his father, who is in the leather line in Crooked-lane, in the city of London; the business was carried on there.

Q. Do you know of his father ever living at Weymouth? - A. I do not.

Q. What is his father's name? - A. Richard Smith .

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner at the bar was in Holy Orders? - A. Not that I know of; he was employed by his father.

Q. Did he appear as a person in trade? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever know he was at the University, or acted as a clergyman? - A. No, not at all.

Q. Do you know the father's hand-writing? - A. I do; I have seen him write, (the draft shewn the witness); I do not believe this to be his handwriting.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. The father's name is Richard? - A. Yes.

Q. The son frequently transacted business for the father? - A. Yes.

Q. The father kept cash with you, I believe? - A. Yes.

Mr. Robert Smith. I am clerk in the house of Smith, Payne, and Smith; that draft was presented to me; we have no connection with any person of the name of Robert Smith .

JOHN STANLEY sworn. - I am waiter to Mr. Capper, at the Hungerford coffee-house; I gave the prisoner the five-pound note my master gave me.

JOHN ROY sworn. - I am waiter to Mr. Capper; the prisoner gave the note to me, and desired me to get cash for it; I took it to my master; when the prisoner gave it me, he said, it was a check upon Messrs. Smith and Payne.

- - sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Stephen- James Smith , the brother of the prisoner; the prisoner was with him but a very little time; when I was there, he acted as a rider to the house; the father's name is Richard Smith, he is a wholesale leather-seller, and the business is carried on in Crooked-lane; I don't know of his living at Weymouth, but he had business all over the country.

HENRY CROCKER sworn. - On the 11th of September, I apprehended the prisoner in his room, No. 25, Frederick-place, Hampstead-road; he seemed very much alarmed; I found two letters there. (Produces them).

Q.(To Mr. Capper). Should you know the letter that was read to you? - A. No; as he was reading it, and refused to shew it, I said, good God, is there any similarity between the hand-writing of the draft, and that letter.

Q.(Shewing him a letter). Can you say whether that was the letter? - A. I did not see the inside of the letter he read from.

Prisoner's defence. May it please your Lordships, Gentlemen of the Jury, I only have to say, that I received the note in question from my father; and as for any intention to defraud Mr. Capper, I am sure I had none; there was not a meeting that he fat, at which I was not regular to the time, and I leave it to your Lordship's consideration, and that of the Gentlemen of the Jury, whether it would not have been in my power to have got out of the way, if I knew I was in danger, after he gave me a week or ten days; instead of that, I kept in the way, and told him, I should be able to settle it with him, but he took me up without giving me the least notice; indeed, when I gave the draft in question, Mr. Capper was very much intoxicated, and did not know what he was about, and if I had asked the witnesses, they would have said the same.

Court. (To Capper.) Q. Were you in liquor, or not? - A. I was not so bad but I recollect every thing that passed; I remember receiving the draft, putting it in the till, and locking it up.

Prisoner. Q. I believe you will recollect, that before the Magistrate, you said, the first waiter that came, gave you the draft? - A. I don't recollect which waiter I fixed on at that time, but one of them brought it, and I asked him who the change was for; he said, for Mr. Smith, the clergyman; then I called the other waiter, and gave him the 5l. note to take to him.

(Draft read.)

"30th August, 1801. Messrs. Smith, Payne, and Smith, pay Rev. Mr. Thomas Smith , or bearer, ten pounds.

No. 527. ROB. SMITH."

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-17

776. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , one shirt, value 2s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2s. and two pair of stockings, value 6d. the property of John Oddy .

There being a defect in the evidence, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18011028-18

777. JOHN MANBY the elder , and JOHN MANBY the younger , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , a mare, value 5l. the property of John Lewis .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a watch-gilder at Clerkenwell: Between the 20th and 23d of October, 1800, my mare was turned out upon Streatham Common, adjoining Norwood Common ; I bred her; she was five years old last April.

Q. What coloured mare is she? - A. A duncoloured mare: On the 18th of April, she was missed, and I heard of it about the 26th.

Q. When did you see her again? - A. On the 23d of July, to the best of my knowledge, I saw her in possession of the younger Manby, in Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross; he was up stairs, and the officers desired to see a mare he had got, and he came down, and shewed it him; as soon as I saw it, I said, it was my mare; I am sure it was the same mare.

Q. What were her marks? - A. A mark that she had in foaling; she was hurt in foaling; a twist upon the off leg, a star upon her forehead, a mark down the back, and a mark over the off knee; she had been thrown down, being rusty, and a mark over the off eye, which she got at the same time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The young man came before the Magistrate, upon being desired by the officer, without being taken into custody? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe, he there told you his father had bought the mare in Smithfield? - A. He did.

Q. The Magistrate thought it was only a case of misdemcanor, and they were both bailed? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. When did he say he bought it? - A. On the 10th of October, 1800.

RICHARD EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I have had the mare ever since she was before the Magistrate; she is over the way.

Q. How long have you known it? - A. I bred her, and broke her into harness.

Q. Were there any accidental marks about her? - A.She rather treads outward her off leg, and a star in her forehead.

Q. Had she any mark of having received any injury about her body? - A. None particular; there was a mark where she had had the stranguary, but that was hardly visible.

Q. Can you swear that the mare you got from the Magistrate's, was the same mare? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you do any farriery to her? - A. On the 15th of October, 1800.

Q. When was the last time you saw her? - A. The latter end of October.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You spoke to her by the natural marks, and by the twist in the hind leg? - A. No, she got that in foaling.

Court. Q. How are her knees? - A. You can hardly discern it now.

Q.Discern what? - A. They have been broke, or a little scratched over the off knee, and there was a little bit of a cut over her eye, but very triftling; it is pretty well grown out now.

STEPHEN WATTS sworn. - I live at the Greyhound at Streatham: Towards the latter end of October, 1800, I turned Mr. Lewis's mare out upon the common.

Q. Did you see her after that? - A. Yes, at different times, up to the 18th of April; I gave a man two shillings a week in Norwood to keep it.

Q. Have you been thewn the mare since? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that the mare you have seen since, is Mr. Lewis's mare? - A. I have no doubt it is the same mare.

JOHN TOOLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at Streatham: In the autumn of 1800, I saw Mr. Lewis's mare, at the Grey-hound; the last time I saw her, was on the 17th, opposite the Greyhound, upon Streatham-common; I did not see her again till I saw her in Mr. Lewis's possession; I have no doubt it is the same mare.

GEORGE GIBSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys Q. Did you know this mare when she was a foal? - A. Yes, I bred her: she was in my possession from a foal.

Court. Q. Did it belong to Mr. Lewis? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know that mare? - A. Yes.

Q. Had she any accidental mark? - A. She had a cast in her leg, which might come through my rubbing her, and she throws wide.

Q. From that circumstance, do you think you should know her again? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen the mare since, at the Magistrates? - A. Yes, it is the same.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long was it before you saw her at the Magistrate's, that you had seen her perhaps three or four years? - A. She was away from me two years.

Q. You don't mean to swear to the mare? - A. Yes, I do, by the shape, colour, and leg, and she stood low upon the shoulder.

JOHN CARLESS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Hooper-street, Clerkenwell; I know this mare, she met with an accident in the hind off leg when she was foaling, which caused a twist in the leg.

Q. Have you seen her since? - A. Yes; I went to take it out of the possession of the prisoner.

Q. Can you say whether that was Mr. Lewis's mare, or not? - A. I am positive of that.

THOMAS GIBSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at Tottenham, I am a shoe-maker; I know Mr. Lewis's mare from a foal; I frequently went with her to the close night and morning; she foaled at Tottenham.

Q. Did she meet with any accident in foaling? - A. Yes; as she grew up, her off hind leg went outward.

Q. Did you see her when the Manbys were taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that Mr. Lewis's mare? - A.Positively it is the same mare.

Q. You have no doubt? - A. No doubt at all.

EDWARD ASTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at No. 11, Great Sutton-street, Clerkenwell; I know Mr. Lewis's mare; she was about three years old then, she had met with an accident in her off eye, and her knee, they had been cut by a tumble.

Q. Did you observe her hind leg? - A. No.

Q. Have you seen her since? - A. Yes; I saw her about six months ago in the possession of the younger prisoner, and I informed Mr. Lewis I had seen his mare; I am sure it is the same.

SAMUEL EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are the son of the farrier that has been examined here? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any marks of accident about this mare? - A. Yes, on her off knee, from a fall, and upon her off eye.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Are those marks very visible now? - A. Yes; you cannot see it so well now, because the hair is grown over it.

Manby, the younger's defence. My father bought the horse in Smithfield, in October last year.

For the Prisoner.

- CHAPMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am clerk of the market, in Smithfield,(produces a book;) be so good as read an entry of a mare purchased by Mr. Manby the prisoner; (reads)"October 1800, Thomas Williams, of Old Brentford, costermonger, sells George James , of Bethnal-green, Middlesex, costermonger; voucher, John Manby , of Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross, butcher, buyer; a dun mare, twelve hands and a half high, the price seven pounds."

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know which of the Manbys it was? - A. The elder.

Court. (To Richard Evans .) Q. You are conversant with horses, and you know the value of them - about what was the value of the prosecutor's mare? - A. I think she might be worth about ten pounds.

Q. How high is she? - A.Thirteen hands, within about half an inch, or three quarters of an inch.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn. - I live in Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross, I am a horse-slaughterer.

Q. Have you seen this mare since she has been taken from the Manbys? - A. No.

Q. Before July last had you seen a small dun mare in the possession of Manby? - A. Yes, and for ten months before; she passed my door two or three times a day, she could not go to work without passing my door; she was a dun mare, all duns have a mark down the back, and I believe, a speck upon the knee; there was a small star upon the forehead, and she walks wide; the witness went to look at the mare in the yard.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Chapman.) Q. Do you know James, the voucher? - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q. Is it a practice to take the voucher of a person you don't know? - A. Yes, we could not do business without.

JAMES MUTLOW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a butcher in St. John's-street.

Q. Do you know a dun mare of Manby's? - A. Yes; I borrowed her of him in October, 1800; I cannot say the day, but it was in October, I am sure; she passed my door two or three times a day; it is a dun mare, a very remarkable one; a black streak down the rump.

Q. Is there any thing respecting her hind leg remarkable; I did not take any particular notice.

Q. Have you any doubt it is the same mare? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know whether she had ever broke her knee? - A. No; I did not observe.

Q. Do you recollect a cut over the eye? - A. Yes, I remember there was a cut.

Q. Was it ever visible? - A. It was plain enough to be seen, but it was not a very deep cut.

Q. How long ago was this? - A. Some time in the summer.

Q. Are you a horse slaughterer? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. (To Parker.) Q. Have you looked at the horse now? - A. Yes, I am sure it is the same mare; she is about five years old.

Court. Q. Did the prisoner ever fell you any horses to slaughter? - A. Never; I offered him eleven guineas for a black mare, that he has got now, but I never bought any of him.

JAMES BUNNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Gurney. I am a butcher, in Sharp's-alley, next door to Mr. Manby.

Q.Had you seen the mare in the yard? - A. Yes; I saw the same mare this time twelve month; Mr. Mutlow borrowed it for me to go to Southall; Manby and I were at variance, and I did not like to ask him myself; it has never been out of my sight, I am positive, for one day, from that time to the time it was taken away.

Q. Was there any cut about the face? - A. Not that I remembered.

Q. Was there any thing about the legs? - A.She had all black legs.

Q. Are you sure that mare in the yard is the same mare? - A. I am.

Q. You observed no cut in the face? - A. No.

JAMES STEDMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a watch jeweller, in Red-lion-street; I know Mr. Lewis's mare, it was a darker mare than this.

Q. Do you know Mr. Lewis? - A. I know him personally; I know the mare which he had.

Q. Have you seen this mare that is here today? - A. I have two or three times.

Q. And the mare he had you think was darker? - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

Cross-examined by Knowlys. Q. How often have you seen the mare? - A. Four or five times.

Q. You think perhaps you know better than the person who bred her? - A. No, that is impossible.

Q.Perhaps you know it better than Mr. Lewis himself? - A. No, that is impossible.

RICHARD ROWLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a baker.

Q. Have you seen the mare in the yard? - A. Yes; I hired the same mare of Manby, on the 26th of November last to go four or five miles.

Q. Did you frequently see it in his possession? - A. Yes, she went past my door every day.

Q. Have you any doubt of the mare in the yard being the same mare? - A. None.

Q. Did you observe any cut at all? - A. No.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular, respecting her hind leg? - A. No.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a milkman, at Cow-cross; I have seen this mare in Manby's possession from December last; his cart broke down upon Ludgate-hill, and he came to me to borrow my cart, with his horse and harness; I never knew her to be out of his employ till she was taken from him.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular about her? - A. No; but I really believe it to be the same mare. Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-19

778. JOSEPH JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , three pair of women's those, value 17s 6d. the property of Robert Gascoigne .

LYDIA GASCOIGNE called. Q.How old are you? - A. Ten years old next January.

Q. Do you know what will become of you if you swear that which is not true? - A. I shall go to the naughty man, (sworn); my father is a shoemaker , in the City-road: On Thursday or Friday, I do not know which, the week before last, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop; there was nobody in the shop but me; he had a piece of list with him, and asked if we had a pair of women's shoes of that length; then I rang the bell and my mother came down; she opened the door, and took a pair of shoes out of the glass case; he said, they were to go to No. 25, Tahernacle-walk, and desired me to go with him; I took three pair in my pinafore, for fear that pair should not fit; I went with him, and when we got into Castle-street, he said, it would save him a great deal of anger, if I would go back and fetch him a pair of purple shoes, and desired me to go and fetch them, and gave me half-a-guinea; he said, take this half-guinea, and give me the shoes; I took the half-guinea and gave him the shoes; he told me to bring them to No. 25, Tabernacle-walk; in about five minutes time, I returned again to the place where I left him, but he was not there; I went to No. 25, Tabernacle-walk, but he had not been there; I then went home crying, and gave the half-guinea to my mother; I did not give it to her when I went back for the purple shoes.

Q. What was the price of the shoes? - A. Two pair, at six and sixpence a pair, and one pair four and sixpence; my mother looked at the half-guinea, and said it was a bad one; my mother saw him again the next day, and had him taken up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You never saw the person before that evening that he came for the shoes? - A. No.

Q. When you saw the prisoner the next day, he was in custody upon this charge? - A. Yes.

Q. It was dark in the evening, was it not? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know it was the same man till after you were told that was the thief? - A. I was sure that was the man.

Q. You were before the Justice twice? - A. Yes.

Q. The first time you were there, you were not quite certain that he was the man? - A. No, I was not.

Q. After than, you were told that he was the man; and then you became certain of it? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How came you to be more certain the second time you saw him, than you were the first time? - A.Because he was so very dirty.

Q. Was he cleaner the next time you saw him? - A. No.

Q.Then how came you to know him the second time and not the first? - A. I don't know.

MARY GASCOIGNE sworn. - Last Thursday week, in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop; the candles were lit; my daughter called me down.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and say if you are certain he is the man? - A. I am certain of it; I have no hesitation in saying he is the man; he produced a measure, and asked for a pair of women's shoes of that size; he put his hand into a pair of shoes that I gave him, and he said they were not big enough; then I went to the glass case and got a larger pair; he said, they were to go to Mr. Brandon's, in Tabernacle-walk, a family that had dealt with us a good while; I said, I did not like to send the shoes by him, but I would send my litle girl with them, and I sent her with three pair of shoes; she came back again, I am sure it was not five minutes after; I gave her the purple shoes, and she took them; the child came back direcly afterwards, crying very much indeed, said, mother, the man has run away with the shoes that you gave me, and here is half-a-guinea he has given me; I looked at the half-guinea and saw it was a pocket-piece, (produces it;) the next morning I saw him again at the corner of Union-street, Bishopsgate-street, with a barrow of apples; I did not say any thing to him, but went home and fetched my husband; he went with me; I said to him, did not you rob me last night of three pair of shoes, and he said, go along, woman, I never saw you to my life.

Q. Do you mean to say, you are certain the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes, I am very sure of it, by his hair, and being marked with the small-pox; I am very sure he is the man; he is a great deal cleaner than he was then, and he has a different coat and waistcoat on.

Q.Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The man was a stranger to you? - A. Yes.

Q. The person that came to you, told you he came from Mr. Brandon? - A. No, he did not say he came from Mr. Brandon, he said they were to go to No. 25.

Q. Did he mention Mr. Bardon's name? - A. Yes.

Q. How many candles had you? - A. Only one.

Jury. Q. Had the prisoner the same clothes on the next morning that he had the night bfore? - A. Yes, he had, or else I should not have known him quite so well.(Mr. Sheriff Cox proved that the half-guinea was counterfeit.)

ROBERT GASCOIGNE sworn. - On Friday the 23d of October, I went with my wife to the corner of Union-street, Bishopgate-street; I apprehended the prisoner; my wife and daughter were with me; my wife said, she was sure that was the man; my daughter said, she was almost sure that was the man; then she said she was sure, and then she doubted again.

Q.(To Mrs. Goscoigne.) How long was he in the shop? - A. About ten minutes.

Q. What time was it? - A. About seven o'clock, as near as can be.

Mr. Hart. Q. How far is your house from Whitechapel? - A. I should rather think it is better than a mile.

For the Prisoner.

MOSES LEVY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hart. I live in Flower and Bean-street; I am a dealer in clothes; I have known the prisoner three or four years.

Q. Do you remember the day when he was taken up? - A. Yes, last Friday week; I was with Mr. Joseph, the prisoner's father, the evening before, at his apartments, in Rose-lane; the prisoner, was there from half-after five till half-after nine.

Court. Q. Were you there all that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he not absent all that time? - A. Only while he went ot fetch fruit from his place below.

Q. How long might he be absent? - A. He might be four or five minutes.

Q. Did he go out of his father's room, unless people came to him for fruit? - A. No other time.

Q. What were you doing? - A. I was playing at cards with his father.

Q. Did the prisoner play? - A. No.

Q. What makes you know it was Thursday evening? - A. The next day after two men came to me.

Q. Do you recollect any person that was in the apartment besides? - A. Yes, Mr. Samuel; there was no other man there.

Q. Did any woman come in? - A. Yes, them that bought fruit of him sometimes.

Q. Was Judith Samuel there that night? - A. Yes, she came in for some fruit.

Court. Q. How came you to go there? - A. I often spend the evening there, being a neighbour.

Q. What time was it when you went there? - A. At half-past five.

Q. Who did you find there? - A. The prisoner at the bar, his mother and his father.

Q. Who played at cards? - A. The prisoner's father and me.

Q. Did no body else play? - A. No.

Q. What did you play at? - A. A foreign game, I don't understand what.

Q. Which won? - A. We did not play for any money, only for amusement.

Q. What was the prisoner doing? - A.booking at us at play.

Q.Leaving his fruit to watch your play? - A. Yes.

Q.Where are his apartments? - A. Up two pair of stairs.

Q. Does he sell his fruit up two pair of stairs? - A. He keeps it there, and if any body wants it, he brings it down.

Q.During all this time, had you any thing to eat or drink? - A. Yes, I supped with his father, about eight o'clock.

Q. Who supped with you? - A. Nobody but Mr. Joseph, and his wife and I.

Q. Then the prisoner did not sup with you? - A. Not at the same time, he was serving fruit, his supper was set by the fire.

Q. What time did he come to his supper? - A. A little after eight.

Q. What had you for supper? - A. Some stew.

Q. What was the stew made of? - A. Light and liver, something of that kind.

Q. Had you any thing else but this stew? - A. No.

Q. Was there any thing else upon the table but this stew? - A. No, nothing.

Q. Who drest the supper? - A. Mrs. Joseph, his mother.

Q. In the same room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to cards again after supper? - A. Yes, till half-past nine.

Q. When you went away, who did you leave there? - A. I left the prisoner and his mother, and another man.

Q. Who was that other man? - A. I do not know.

Q. What time did he come in? - A. About half-past seven.

Q. Did that man eat any supper with you? - A. No.

Q. Did he stay while you had your supper? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any thing to drink while you were playing at cards before supper? - A. No.

Q. How far is this from where you live? - A.Just opposite.

SAMUEL JOSEPH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hart. I live in Rose-lane, the prisoner is my son.

Q. Do you remember the day that he was taken up? - A. Yes, last Friday was len night.

Q. Where was he the preceding evening? - A.At home in my own house; he kept fruit at home, in case any of the neighbours came for any.

Q. Were you at home when he came home that evening? - A. I never was out; there had been a shower of rain, and he came home with his barrow between one and two o'clock, to the best of my knowledge, in the afternoon; his mother sent me for some meat that she had bought in the morning.

Q. Was Moses Levy in your house that evening? - A. He was there from half past five, to the best of my knowledge, to half past nine.

Q. How was he employed that evening? - A. We were playing cards for partime; he is a neighbour of mine.

Q. Who was playing? - A. I and Mr. Levy.

Q. Did any body else play at cards? - A. Not till after Levy went away; then my son took a hand at all fours.

Q. What game did you play at? - A. A foreign game that Mr. Levy taught me a few evenings before.

Q. Was there any body at supper? - A. Yes, Mr. Levy, and my son, and my wife.

Q. Was your son at home when Mr. Levy came? - A. He was at home all the evening, only while I sent him for an ounce of tabacco.

Q. Was he in your apartment all that time? - A. He went up stairs to fetch his fruit when a customer came in.

Q. How long was he out of your apartment that evening? - A. Not five minutes.

Q. Who was there besides? - A. Judith Samuel, she lives over the way; her husbabd is an optician; she came about six, or half past six o'clock; I did not take particular notice, because I did not think of any thing of this; she staid about an hour and a half.

Q. How far is your house from the City-road? - A. A mile and a half.

Q. How long was he gone for the tobacco? - A. Not five minutes.

Q. And, excepting that, he was not out of your house? - A. No.

Q. Who else was there? - A. A great many people came in and out for fruit; Levy and I were at play from dusk to supper-time, and, after supper-time, we played again till half past nine o'clock.

Court. Q. Who won the game, you or Levy? - A. I believe I lost them both.

Q. How many games did you play? - A. I do not believe we played before supper above two or three games; we lost nothing nor won nothing.

Q. Who sat down to supper? - A. I, Mr. Levy, my wife, and my son.

Q. Did you sit down altogether? - A. Altogether; my son was down stairs, and I called him up to supper.

Q. Was it before you had sat down to supper yourself? - A. Yes; while it was getting ready we all sat down together and supped together.

Q. You are sure your son sat down at the same time? - A. I am very positive of that.

Q. Was there any supper set by for any body? - A. I cannot tell what my wife set by; I never took notice.

Q. You are sure your wife and your son all sat down together? - A. Yes.

Q. What was your supper? - A.Pluck; it was

what they call lights; it was a hash; I am a very great lover of it.

Q. Who drest it? - A. My. wife.

Q. In the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Who fetched the liquor you had? - A. We had none.

Q. Had you any beer? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure this was the night before he was taken up? - A. Yes.

JUDITH SAMUEL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I have know the prisoner from his infancy.

Q. Do you recollect the day he was taken up? - A. Yes, Friday; I live just facing him; on the Thursday evening I went over to his father's, a little after six o'clock, and staid there about an hour and a half; the prisoner was there all that time; he only went up stairs to get some fruit.

Q. Had he had time to have gone to any distance during the time you were there? - A. No.

Court. Q. Can you be sure of the time you went there? - A. Yes, a little after six; I cannot say exactly.

Q. What was he doing? - A.Sitting by the side-side.

Q. Who else was there? - A. Mr. Levy; he was at supper there.

Q. Was there any playing at cards before supper? - A. No; I was not there till supper.

Q. Then you were not there till eight o'clock, perhaps? - A. Yes, a quarter after six.

Q. Did they sup at a quarter after six o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. They were at supper then when you went in? - A. Yes.

Q. How do you know it was six o'clock? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was a little after.

Q. It could not be so late as seven o'clock that they supped then? - A. No.

Q. You did not sup with them? - A. No, I got a little at home.

Q. What made you stay there? - A.Neighbour-like, talking and chattering.

Q. What time was it when you went away? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was almost eight.

Q. Who fetched the beer that they had? - A. They had no beer; poor people cannot afford it.

Q. What other liquor had they? - A. None that I saw.

Q. Who sat down to cards after supper? - A. Levy said to the prisoner and his father, I will learn you to play cards; but he did not play while I was there.

Q. Was he not out of the room all the time you were there? - A. Only about ten minutes while he went up stairs to fetch some fruit for me.

Q. Who sat down to supper? - A. Mr. Levy, Mr. Joseph, and Mrs. Joseph; the prisoner sat down at the fire-side; his father asked him to sit down to supper, and he would not.

Q. Did he give any reason why he would not sup? - A. No; he said he was not hungry; at the same time he said, put it to the fire-side; his mother put it in the plate, and put it by for him.

Q. What was in it? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was stewed lights.

Q. What became of Mr. Levy? - A. I left him in the room playing at cards when I went away.

Q. You went in while supper was upon table? - A. Yes.

Q. And you are sure it could not be seven o'clock? - A. No.

ELEANOR COPELAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hart. I am a washer-woman; I called at Mr. Joseph's between five and six o'clock, and the prisoner was there wiping some apples; I called again a little after eight, the bell had just rung, and saw him again; he was then sitting down by the fire; Mr. Levy was there playing at cards with old Mr. Joseph; Mrs. Samuel was there.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-20

779. WILLIAM ROLLS and ABRAHAM-JOSEPH HAMMERTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a hempen sack, value 1s. 6d. and four bushels of barley, value 22s. the property of John Cook .

Second Count. For stealing like goods, the property of William Fielder .

JOHN COOK sworn. - I live at Twickenham; I am a common brewer and maltster ; the two prisoners were hired as porters to unload the barley: On Monday, the 12th of October, I had on board a barge belonging to William Fielder , twenty-nine quarters of barley, which I bought of Giles and Farringdon, on the 7th, at Bear-Key market.

WILLIAM FIELDER sworn. - I am a lighterman ; I know nothing of the loss myself, I was in town.

MARY ORCHARD sworn. - On the 12th of October, I saw the prisoners take a full sack, but what was in it I did not know; they put it in the head of the barge, and I acquainted Mr. Cook with it.

Cook. In consequence of this woman's information, I went on board the lighter, and found a sack or barley concealed under the sore-sheets of the barge, covered with a rope, two bundles of empty sacks, and two hurdles; Rolls denied it stoutly; Hammerton, I can scarcely say, did deny it; he was very modest about it.

Q. Did he say any thing about it? - A. No, he did not.

Mr. Knapp. The sack, containing the barley, was never moved out of the barge? - A.No.

Q.Did you take up these men? - A. Yes; they absconded upon my taking out a warrant.

Q. Upon your oath, did they not come voluntarily to the Magistrate, and surrender themselves? - A. I cannot speak to that fact; I believe they did not.

Q. Don't you know that they came without any constable? - A. I know that they did not; I charged a constable, and the constable came with them.

Court. Q.(To Fielder.) Had you any other barley besides Mr. Cook's? - A. No.

Q.Whose sacks were they? - A. Mine.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fielder; I was at the loading; there were twenty-eight quarters and six bushels of barley.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Rolls called one, and Hammerton two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Rolls, GUILTY , aged 23.

Hammerton, GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-21

780. JOHN WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , three pounds weight of pewter, value 2s. the property of John Townsend and Thomas Compton .

WILLIAM BALMER sworn. - I am clerk to John Townsend and Thomas Compton, pewter manufacturers , in Booth-street, Spital-fields ; the prisoner was a workman employed by them, and had been better than a twelvemonth: On the 26th of last month, about six o'clock in the afternoon, he was taken into the accompting-house, and my master told him he had reason to believe he had taken some metal, and would have him searched; a constable was sent for; I saw him searched; the constable found in his waistcoat and breeches pockets seven pieces of pewter belonging to my master; they weighed three pounds and upwards; he begged his master would forgive him, saying, it was the first time he had ever taken any; I know them to be my master's property by the shape of the mould.(The officer produced the pewter, which was identified by Balmer.)

Prisoner's defence. I had no breeches on.

Constable. He had pantaloons on, and I took them out of the pockets.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-22

781. ELIZABETH ARNOLD was indicted for that she, on the 21st of September , being then married and the wife of John Arnold , of the parish of St. John, Hackney, feloniously did marry and take to husband Thomas Wagstaffe , she said John Arnold , her former husband, being then alive .

HENRY ARNOLD sworn. - I am the brother of John Arnold ; the prisoner was married to my brother on the 27th of November, 1792, at St. Michael's church, in the city of Coventry.

Q. Is your brother alive? - A. He is here.

Q. How long did they live together? - A. Till within these two or three months.

Q. Do you know how she came to leave her husband? - A. I believe a few words occurred between them.

THOMAS WAGSTAFFE sworn. - I have been married to the prisoner about five weeks; I was married to her at Hackney church.

Q. How long had you been acquainted with her? - A. About a month.

Q. Are you of age? - A. I am between sixteen and seventeen.

Q. Were you married by licence or by banns? - A. By banns.

Q. Did she tell you she was a single woman? - A. No, she always told me she was not his lawful wife.

Q. You knew she lived with him then? - A. Yes.

- SEEDSMAN sworn. - I was present at the marriage of the prisoner to Wagstaffe.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that she had lived with Arnold nine years; that he had communicated to her a dangerous disease four different times, by which disease she lost one child, and that two others were not suffered to see the light from the same cause; that he had added insult to injury, by bringing home the most profligate of women, who assisted him in turning her into the street; that she was afterwards separated from him before a Magistrate, and conceived she was justified in marrying again; and that, after having sent her to prison, Arnold had come to her, caressed her, shewed her much affection, and gave her money.

Henry Arnold . Wagstaffe was servant to my brother, and lived with him and his wife ever since they have been in town.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-23

782. THOMAS CROSS and JOSEPH ROSE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , two hundred stone weight of fat, value 40l. twenty sets of bullock's guts, value 10s. and twenty bunches of bullock's lights, value 10s. the property of James Brown .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were BOTH ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-24

783. DENNIS MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , thirty-four yards of flannel, value 30s. the property of Nathaniel Ackland .

NATHANIEL ACKLAND sworn. - I am a haberdasher in Brick-lane, Spital-fields ; I know nothing of the loss.

WILLIAM WHITE sworn. - I am a butcher; I was standing opposite Mr. Ackland's shop, I saw the prisoner go in; Mrs. Ackland was serving a man with some stockings; I saw the prisoner take the flannel from a box on one side the door, and come out with it under his arm; I went after him, and took him.(The constable produced the property, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 11.

Judgment repited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-25

784. RICHARD MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , two shirts, value 5s. and a pair of breeches, value 5s. the property of George Taylor .

The prosecutor being abroad, and there being no evidence that the articles were his property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18011028-26

785. ANN MILLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , seven half-crowns , the property of Isabella Chesterman , widow .

The prosecutrix being called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-27

786. THOMAS GOUT was indicted for making an assault, on the 1st of October , upon Samuel Biggs , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a seven-shilling piece and four shillings , the property of the said Samuel.

SAMUEL BIGGS sworn. - At the time this happened, I lodged in my master's warehouse, Mr. Gray, an auctioneer, in Roll's-buildings, Bond's-stables; I lodge now at the Bird-in-Hand public-house, in Long-Acre: On the 30th of September, I had been at work for my master all day, and I had drank a good deal in my work; in the evening I went to the Elephant and Castle, in Holborn.

Q. Do you know at all how you got home that night? - A. I don't; I found myself in bed in the morning at home; I waked about seven o'clock in the morning, and found the prisoner in bed with me.

Q. Have you any recollection whether you had seen him over night? - A. Not to my knowledge; I cannot say.

Q. Do you recollect whether, upon any occasion, you had ever seen him before? - A. Never in my life.

Q. Upon finding a man in bed with you that you knew nothing of, what did you say? - A. I asked him how he came there.

Q. Was he undrest? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you so too? - A. Yes; he said I had attempted to commit an unnatural crime, and he would not leave me till I gave him two guineas; I told him it was not in my power to give him two guineas, for I had not two guineas; he said, as I was a poor man, he would let me off for a guinea and a half; he said, if I did not give him that, he would report me; then I gave him a one-pound note, a seven-shilling piece, and four shillings in silver; it was money that I had taken belonging to my master.

Q. What was it that induced you to give him this money and this note? - A. From the threats that he gave me.

Q. The threats of doing what? - A.Accusing me of an unnatural crime; he said, he would report me, and turn me out of my bread.

Q. Was it from the fear of that accusation that you parted with the money? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did he stay with you after this? - A. We parted directly.

Q. He did not say where it was he would accuse you of having committed this crime? - A. No.

Q. What time in the morning was it you parted? - A. About seven o'clock; he left me as soon as he had got the money.

Q. This was only a ware-room? - A. No, an auction-room.

Q. You had the key of the room? - A. I had.

Q. And nobody else was there? - A. No.

Q. Then you must have let yourself into the room? - A. I cannot tell how I got home; I found the key in the inside of the door when I let him out in the morning.

Q. Cannot you tell whether you let yourself in or not? - A. No.

Q. Did you not enquire how he came to be in bed with you? - A. I was so terrified, I did not.

Q. Will you swear you did not know that he was in bed with you till you waked in the morning in the way you have described? - A. I did not.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Do not you know you took me yourself to those premises that night? - A. I do not know; I was so intoxicated.

Q. Did you not, after you had got into bed, say that my head was too low; and did not you go and get a bolster to raise my head higher? - A. I did not to my knowledge.

Q. In the morning did I tell you I wished to see Mr. Gray? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did you not tell me you would certainly be a friend to me? - A. No; he said he was going of a furlough, and if I would give him that, I should never see his face any more.

Q. Did you not beg of me not to go away while the men were cleaning the carriages in the yard? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you not then go down stairs, and lock me in? - A. When he told me he would take a guinea and a half, I had a two-pound note of my master's, and I went out to get the note changed, because I would not give him any more than a guinea and a half.

Court. Q.Did you lock him in? - A. Yes, for fear he should take something out of my warehouse, and be off; I was absent about five minutes; I got it changed at Mr. Hall's gin-shop.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me there would be a sale on the Wednesday, and if I would come, you would buy me a bed, if I would be honest and fair with you? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did not you say it should be paid for at seven shillings a month, if I liked it? - A. I did not; that you will hear of hereafter.

Q. Did you not look out at the window, and then call to me, and say, come down, now the men are gone? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you not walk with me into Chancery-lane? - A. I turned him out of the room, and locked the door; I was obliged to go my master's, in Drury-lane, and as soon as the prisoner was gone, I went there.

Court. Q. How near to him did you walk? - A. Not very near.

Q. How long did you walk in sight of him? - A. Not many minutes; he went down Chancery-lane, and I turned across for Drury-lane.

Q. Had you any conversation with him after you came out? - A. No.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not take hold of my hand at parting, and tell me to come on the Thursday to the Yorkshire Grey, and call for a pint of porter? - A. No such thing ever was mentioned.

Court. Q. Did you take hold of his hand? - A. No, I did not.

Q. When was it you first mentioned it to any body? - A. Above a week after; he had plagued me at different times afterwards, and then I mentioned it to a friend of mine, who is here, Mr. M'Kinnon.

Q. When was the prisoner apprehended? - A. On Monday, the 12th.

JOHN CUDD sworn. - I am a baker: On the 30th of September, about half past seven o'clock in the evening, the prosecutor came into the Elephant and Castle, in Holborn.

Q. Did he use to frequent the Elephant and Castle? - A. Yes; he called for four-penny worth of gin and water, and while the landlord was making it, he was so much intoxicated, that he fell down on the bench; I took him up, and carried him across Holborn into Chancery-lane; upon going down Chancery-lane, he said, you shall not go any further, go back to your company.

Q. What time was that? - A. About eight o'clock.

Q. Then he was capable of holding conversation with you at that time? - A. Yes, then knowing he was very near home, and had no coach turning to pass, I left him; I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at Marlborough-street Office.

JOHN M'KINNON sworn. - I am a cabinetmaker and upholder: On Monday, the 12th of October, the prosecutor came to me; he seemed to be under a great depression of spirits; he told me the story, and then I advised him to take the prisoner into custody.

Q.(To Biggs.) How came you to learn who the prisoner was, so as to apprehend him? - A. No more than his coming backwards and forwards to me in the same way.

Q. Where was it you apprehended him? - A. In Roll's-buildings.

HART KEELEY sworn. - I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of October; Mr. M'Kinnon applied to me to be in waiting, and I went with him; I understood the prisoner was to meet the old man to have three pounds of him, and the old man brought him to the spot where he had been advised, and I took him into custody.

Prisoner. (To Biggs.) Q. Did you not tell me when I was apprehended, that you were very sorry for it, and that you were forced to it? - A. No.

Prisoner. He had appointed me to meet him there to bid me good bye, because I was going out of town the next morning, and he gave me some gin and water.

Court. Prisoner, what have you to say in your defence.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing more to say than I have said; I know myself to be very innocent; I leave it to you, my Lord, as my friend, I have no other friend.

GUILTY , Death , aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-28

787. HENRY ABRAHAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , a cover made of wood and glass, used as a cover to a salmon-kitt, value 2s. the property of Mary Taylor .

Second Count. Describing it as a cover made of wood and glass, without charging it to belong to a salmon-kitt.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

CATHERINE TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Faillant. I live with my mother, No. 6, Fen

church-buildings ; she keeps a green-grocer's shop , she did sell salmon: On Friday the 31st of July, I put a kitt of salmon at the door, between six and seven in the morning, and missed it between seven and eight.

Q. Was that kitt of salmon covered or open? - A. There was a glass cover over it, set in a circular wooden frame.

Q. Had you had that cover any time in the shop? - A. Yes, ever since my mother first came to the shop; she took it with the shop, it was very old glass, and cracked in two or three places.

Q. How soon did you see it again after it was missing? - A. On the Monday, the 3d of August, my mother brought it home.

Q. Do you know it to be the same cover? - A. It is a very remarkable one, it is very old and cracked; I can assign no other reason, I should know it from five hundred.

MARY TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I did keep a green-grocer's shop, in Fenchurch-buildings: On the 12th of July, about eight o'clock in the morning, my daughter informed me the kitt of salmon was gone; in consequence of information, on the Monday following I went to the prisoner's house in Petticoat-lane.

Q. How far is his house from your's? - A. About a quarter of a mile; Mrs. Beattie went with me; I saw, on the outside of his window, some thin salmon in a kitt, and on the window board, inside, I saw another kitt, the top of which, I believed to be mine; I went in to look at it, and asked the prisoner if he had no salmon thicker than that out of doors; I don't know that he gave me any answer; I lifted up the lid and saw some thick salmon under it; I knew the lid to be mine, it was a very remarkable one; I believe the salmon kitt and all to be mine, but that I do not swear to; I said to my lodger, good God, this is my lid; I was rather flurried, and I begged to sit down a moment; I then turned round to the prisoner, and said, good man, how came you by this lid of the kitt of salmon? it was stolen from my door last Friday morning, by seven o'clock; I said, I would not swear to the salmon, nor to the kitt, but if I were on my dying pillow, or in the East-Indies, I would swear to the lid; he made no reply; he then called a boy from some part of his house into the shop; he said to the boy, take this lid over to Issac's, the owner of it, of whom I borrowed it; I said, the lid was my property, and should not go out of his shop; the boy then got the lid out of the shop, and I was going to run after him; the prisoner laid hold of my arm to prevent my going after him, and said, go to hell and be d-d; I followed the boy across Petticoat-lane, and up an alley, nearly opposite the house; I followed him to the end of the alley, which brought me into the broad-way, then I lost sight of him; I was frightened, and could not run any farther; I was then surrounded by a very large concourse of Jews, three of them had the civility to take me into their house, and in about a minute or two, a number of Jews brought the lid to me.

Q. How long have you had that lid? - A. About fifteen months; I have no doubt of its being mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You lost it on the Friday? - A. Yes.

Q. And you found it on the Monday? - A. Yes.

Q.Therefore, there was all day Friday, Saturday, and Sunday for him to have purchased that lid of any body else? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was admitted to bail for this offence? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that he has surrendered here within this half-hour to meet his trial? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the Lord-Mayor commit him to take his trial? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do not you know, upon your oath, he was admitted to bail by the Lord-Mayor? - A. I suppose so; I have received four notices of bail.

Q. Do not you know that he was indicted at the September Sessions for a misdemeanor, only for receiving this cover, when the City chose to indict him for felony? - A. I suppose so, I don't understand it.

Q. You have had this cover fifteen months - be so good as tell the Jury the marks upon that cover? I can only describe it as an old cover, as being cracked in a great many places; there is no particular mark upon it, there is a little brass knob at the top of it; I used to wipe it myself, for fear my daughter should break it, it was so much cracked; it is not like the modern lids, they make the glass clear, but this is a much thicker glass.

Q. Did you never see a salmon kitt with a thick glass cover before? - A. I never saw such a one as that before.

SARAH BEATTIE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I lodged at Mrs. Taylor's house, in the month of July; on Monday the 3d of August, I went to the prisoner's house with her; Mrs. Taylor went in, and asked him whether he had got any other salmon than what he had there? I believe he said, he had not, when looking at the lid, she said, that was her's, she could take her oath it was her lid; she insisted upon having the lid, he took it from her, and said, is this her's and be d-d to her; here, boy, go and take this lid to Mr. Isaac's, where it belongs; I said, Mrs. Taylor, you ought not to let the lid go; he then put his hand out to prevent her going out; the boy then ran up the alley, opposite Mr. Abrahams's house; I lost sight of the boy, but saw the lid a few mi

nutes after, at the top of the alley; several people gathered round, and some Jews asked us to walk in, which we did; the lid was brought to us after we were there, but by whom I do not know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This cover was lost on the Friday morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Was not the prisoner admitted to bail by the Lord-Mayor? - A. I believe he was.

Q. Was he not committed for receiving, and is now indicted for a felony.

Mr. Knowlys. She cannot know that, we will admit that he was committed as a receiver, and he is now indicted as a principal.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the Marshalmen of the City of London; I received this lid at the Mansion-house, (produces it;) I have had it ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I dare say you know the prisoner has surrendered here to-day, to take his trial? - A. I have heard so.

Q. You know he was admitted to bail? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell us what the charge before the Lord-Mayor was, whether it was a charge of stealing or receiving? - A. I do not know.

Q. Look at that (the Warrant of commitment;) and tell us if it is the hand-writing of the Lord-Mayor? - A. I do not think it is.

Q. You went to apprehend the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take him into custody, or take his word for his appearance? - A. I took the word of a person that I thought I could depend upon; he came to the Mansion-house.

Mrs. Taylor. I am positive this is the lid that I lost

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it, any more than the child unborn.

The prisoner called James King , the nephew of the prosecutrix, and one other witness, who gave him a good character.

JOHN MAKEWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I know nothing of the prisoner; Mrs. Taylor came to me, and told me she had lost a salmon kitt, and that it was at Mr. Abrahams's; I went to him, and told him, if he let her have the salmon cover back again, the woman would not do any thing more in it, she desired me to tell him so; he said, the boy had come in with a lid of a salmon kitt, and as soon as Mrs. Taylor came in, the boy ran away with it.

SARAH COSTA sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Horshoe-alley, Petticoat-lane; I saw Mrs. Taylor on the Monday, she seemed very much flurried; I asked her to come into my house, and sit down; she said she had been robbed; the salmon litt lid was produced, and they went away; then Mrs. Taylor came back and said, she had lost a kitt of salmon; I then told her, that on the Friday, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw a number of boys in the Broad-way, with a kitt of Salmon, they were sitting round it and eating it; she said, that, where the kitt was found, she should have the money for her salmon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know a Mr. Isaacs in the neighbourhood? - A. No.

Q. Do you know the boy who served in Mr. Abrahams's shop? - A. No.

GUILTY, aged 37.

Of stealing goods to the value of 10d.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-29

788. GEORGE EASY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , five pints of foreign spirituous liquors, called brandy, value 6s. the property of our Lord the King .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown.

There being no evidence to prove that any property was lost, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-30

789. JOHN KENNEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , six pounds of sugar, value 5s. the property of James Robinson .

ANDREW TURNBULL sworn. - Q. Do you know James Robinson? - A. Yes, he is a master carman , I am one of the Draper's porters at the water-side: On Friday the 2d of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going along Custom-house-quay, and saw the prisoner go from the till of Robinson's cart, with a blue paper; there is a dust-bin in the middle of the gate-way, and he put it down there; I then saw him endeavour so put it under his coat, and I went up to him, and laid hold of him; I then took him by the collar, and said, you rascal, what have you got here, you have got something you should not have; I then called out, carman; carman, the carman came up, and the prisoner had the sugar under his arm at that time; it was a loaf of sugar.

JAMES THOMPSON sworn. - I am a journeyman carman, servant to Mr. Robinson.

Q. Is he answerable for any goods in his cart? - A. Yes; I left the cart upon Custom-house-quay for a few minutes, and then I heard the last witness call out carman; I came up, he had hold of the prisoner by the collar, and delivered him into my hands, he had the loaf of sugar under his arm.

Q. Are you sure it was sugar that was in your cart? - A. Yes, there is a person here that can speak to the mark; I delivered the prisoner and the sugar to Mr. Merriman, the street-keeper.

RICHARD HUDSON sworn. - I am a warehouseman: On the 2d of October, I sent this sugar from Watts and Jackson's warehouse, between three and four o'clock in the day; I was sent for; I went down to Custom-house Quay, where the cart was, and I missed one loaf of sugar; I saw the loaf afterwards, and I knew it again.(Thomas Merriman, the street-keeper, produced the sugar, which was identified by Hudson.)

Prisoner's defence. I was at work rolling up wines all day, and after I had had bit of dinner, a man came down the gateway, and offered me six-pence to carry it to Tower-street for him; I took it from him, and that gentleman stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-31

790. INNIS LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , two cloth coats, value 21s. a pair of pantaloons, value 5s. a cotton sheet, value 2s. three pair of trowsers, value 3s. four waistcoats, value 12s. a jacket, value 3s. a flannel shirt, value 1S. two shirts, value 8s. a neck handkerchief, value 1s. three pair of stockings, value 3s. a handkerchief, value 4d. a pair of slings, value 1s. 6d. a pair of gloves, value 1s. a Pocket-book, value 6d. and a gold watch, value 5l. the property of Benjamin Darrell .(The prisoner, being a foreigner , a Jury of half foreigners were sworn.)

BENJAMIN DARRELL sworn. - I lost my property from on board the Lady Nelson, lying at Iron-gate-stairs ; I am mate of her; On Thursday, the 15th of October, between twelve and one o'clock, I missed my property; the police-officer waked me about that time, and shewed me a pair of stockings and the watch; he told me the rest of the things were safe; I saw them on board at nine o'clock in a trunk in the cabin; it was not locked.

JOHN GOTTY sworn. - I am surveyor of the Thames-police: Early in the morning of Friday, the 16th of October, immediately after twelve at night of the Thursday, I saw the prisoner sculling a ship's boat on shore to Iron-gate-stairs; and, putting alongside the boat, I discovered a bundle liying in the bow of the boat; I stepped into the boat in which the prisoner was, and feeling the bundle, I found it was clothes; I put my hand in, and took out a pair of stockings, which, from their apearance, I supposed not to be his; upon which I said, these are not your clothes, where did you bring them from? he told me from an American ship, pointing to Iron-gate tier; on further enquiry, he told me they were the captain's; I asked him if the captain was on board, and he replied, no; but that he was going to take them on shore; I then took him into my boat, and desired him to point out to me the ship; he pointed out to me a ship, but not the one from which the things came; I called up the steward of that ship, and informed him what I had met with; he said, they were not his; but a boy, who was on board, was sent by the steward across the tier, and he brought back the owner of the property, Darrell; I shewed him a pair of stockings, and he told me they were his; a person, that is here, then searched his waistcoat, and out of the waistcoat-pocket took a gold watch; the prosecutor, Mr. Darrell, immediately said that was his watch; I took him before the Magistrate, and he was committed.

Court. Q. Is the Lady Nelson an American ship? - A. No, an English ship.

JOHN WALKER sworn. - I was in the boat with Mr. Gotty; I know no more than he has said; I took the watch from the prisoner.(The property was produced, and identified by Darrell.)

Prisoner's defence. I went on board of that gentleman's ship to know if they wanted any hands; he said, no, the ship was to be sold, he wanted nobody; then I went on board an American ship, and was on board till twelve at night; the steward told me to wait to help him with some ladies that were coming on board the next day, and he would give me a supper on board; then they desired me to go on shore, and I passed over this gentleman's ship, and asked if they wanted any errands on shore, and there was a man on board gave me the watch and bundle to bring on shore.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for seven years .

Tried before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-32

791. CHRISTIAN FREDERICKSON was indicted for making an assault in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, upon Sophia Price , spinster , on the 25th of October , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a silk cloak, value 2s. the property of the said Sophia.

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Daniel Price .

There being no evidence to identify the prisoner, be was ACQUITTED .

Tried by a Jury of half foreigners, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-33

792. RICHARD GROVER was indicted for making an assault in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, upon Sophia Price , Spinster , on the 25th of October , putting her in fear and taking from her person a silk cloak, value 2s. the property of the said Sophia.

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Daniel Price .

SOPHIA PRICE sworn. - I am the daughter of Daniel Price : On sunday, the 25th of October,

about a quarter past seven in the evening, I was going into the Mile-End-road from the Ben Jonson's Head; it was moon-light; two men came up to me; there were three of them in company; the two men passed us; William Newman was in company with me; one of the men said to William Newman, how do you do? he answered them, how do you do? they said they must trouble him for his money; Newman said, he had none for them, and ran away; they turned to me directly, and said, they must have my cloak then, and they took the cloak, and left the ribbon that tied it round my waist.

Q. Is the cloak here? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. He is about the heighth; I cannot say more.

JANE SWFFT sworn. - I live servant at the Catherine-Wheel, in Effex-street, Whitechapel; the prisoner Grover used our house: On Sunday, the 25th of October, the prisoner, the man that was tried this morning, and two others, came into our house, and left our house about a quarter before six.

Q. How far is your house from where the robbery was committed? - A. About a mile and a quarter.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer of Lambeth-street: On Sunday evening, in consequence of hearing of this robbery, I went with Coomes to Whitechapel; we waited a little while in the street, when the prisoner, in company with a sailor that has been tried, past us, and walked as far as the Hat and Plough; then a third man came up, and spoke to them, about the heighth of the prisoner; they stopped together about a minute, and then went into the Plough; we followed them in, and the moment we went in, one man slipped out at the side-door. On the Monday I heard some conversation -

Mr. Bevill. Q. Before he said any thing, did you tell him it would be better for him to confess? - A. No.

Q. Nor threatened him? - A. No; I asked him how he came to be so foolish as to go with these men to commit this robbery; he said, it was the first time, and if he got over this, he would not do it any more; he said, they went from the Catherine-Wheel, in Catherine-Wheel-alley, about six o'clock, and going down Mile-End-road, towards Stepney-fields, he said they had neither of them, any money, and they agreed to stop the first person they met, and a young man and woman met them, and they agreed to stop them; they asked the young man for his money, but he got away from them, and then they took the young woman's cloak from her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevill. Q. At first two persons passed you? - A. Yes.

Q. And after that you saw them go into a public-house? - A. Yes; after a third person had come up to them.

Q. And that person was about the size of the prisoner? - A. He was.

JOHN COOMES sworn. - Q. Did you take the cloak from the prisoner? - A. I did, (produces it;) I have had it over since; I found it upon him at the Hat and Plough public-house.

Sophia Price . This is my cloak; here is the place where the ribbon was fastened.

Mr. Bevill. Q. Old cloaks are very much alike? - A. I know this cloak by the tuck behind it.

Prisoner's defence. I was going along Whitechapel, and this man asked me to have something to drink; he put the cloak into my pocket, and the runners came in and took me, and let the other man go away.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good charcter.

GUILTY, Death , aged 18.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his youth, good character, and first offence .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-34

793. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , four sacks, value 4s. the property of George Aylin .

THOMAS LAMBERT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. George Aylin , a barge-owner , at Ware.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Aylin's barge being moored to Mr. Trappitt's wharf , a coal-merchant, at Shadwell ? - A. Yes, there were sixty floursacks on board; I put them on board about five in the afternoon, and covered them over with a tarpaulin; I slept on board the barge, but heard no disturbance in the night; I missed four sacks about four o'clock in the morning; I found the string of the tarpaulin cut, and the sacks gone; they belonged to Mr. Williamson, at Baldock, in Hertfordshire; Mr. Aylin had the carriage of them; I afterwards saw them in the possession of the watchman.

THOMAS WRIGHT sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 23d of September, about half an hour after twelve o'clock, I was in my watch-box, about twenty yards from where the sacks were taken from, I saw the prisoner, whom I knew very well before, go on board the barge about half past eleven o'clock.

Q. Had he any thing to do with this barge? - A. No, nothing at all; I saw him come a-shore with the sacks under his arm, and I stopped him; he jumped off the stairs into a ditch, and went along the ditch till he came out at Mr. Trappitt's whars, and then I took to him again till I secured him; I have had the sacks ever since.

Lambert. I know these to be Mr. Williamson's sacks, they are marked W. W. they had brought

flour up; I counted the sacks, and found there were but fifty-six. GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18011028-35

794. MARY EDDIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , a silver watch, value 35s. the property of Isaac Silverstrum .(The prosecutor being a foreigner, an interpreter was sworn.)

ISAAC SILVERSTRUM sworn. - Q. What countryman are you? - A. A Swede .

Q. How do you get your living? - A. I am a sailor .

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know her? - A. Yes, about five weeks ago I met with her, about nine o'clock at night; she asked me to go and look at the house where she lived.

Q. Had you your watch when you went into the house? - A. Yes, I went into the house, and pulled my clothes off; I was going to get into bed, and the girl blew out the candle, and ran away with the watch; it was hung upon a nail; two days after I saw her again; I asked her where the watch was; she said, she did not take the watch.

Q. Was there not another girl in the room when the prisoner took the watch? - A. No, only an old woman that lit her up stairs.

Q. Are you quite sure that that is the gid that took your watch? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you quite sure that the old woman, who went up with a light to light the girl, was gone out of the room? - A.After the girl was gone away, the old woman came up with a light, and then I missed the watch.

JOSEPH DELANY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(Produces the watch;) this watch was pledged with me in the name of Elizabeth Patterson , by a woman in company with the prisoner at the bar; I lent her one pound five shillings upon it; Elizabeth Patterson said it was her watch.(The watch was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. On the 16th of September, at night, I met with this good man; he went home with me, and agreed to stop all night with me; then he said he had got no money, but in the morning he would call and pay me; I again asked him for money, and he pointed to the watch; I understood him, as well as I could understand him, that he meant I should make money of it.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-36

795. ANN CASTLEDINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , a silver pen, value 1s. a pair of nut-crackers, value 6d. a brass ink-case, value 1s. and a seven-shilling piece, the property of William Mann , privily from his person .

WILLIAM MANN sworn. - I live at No. 130, Goswell-street: On the 27th of October, I was coming home from Islington, about seven o'clock in the evening.

Q.Had you been drinking at all? - A. No, I was coming home by Islington-fields , I met with the prisoner near Sadler's-Wells ; I passed by her; she then followed me, and laid hold of me, and I went into the fields with her, and had connection with her; and, after being with her a few minutes, I missed the property.

Q. Where had you parted with her? - A. In the fields; I went towards the Wells, I missed it before I got more than two or three yards from her; I missed a seven-shilling piece, a silver pen, a pencase, and a pair of nut-crackers; they were all in my jacket-pocket; I then laid hold of her; I told her she had got my property; she said, she knew nothing of it; she found I would not let go of her, and called another woman to her, pretending to give the woman a penny to setch a penny candle; I did not see what she gave her, but I suspected she handed my property to her; I gave charge of her to the patrole, and took her to Pentonville watch-house; the other woman got away; the prisoner was searched, but nothing found.

Q. Do you usually carry seven-shilling pieces in your jacket-pocket? - A. I had put it in my pencase to prevent my losing it.

JAMES PARTRIDGE sworn. - I am patrole of the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell, that part of the parish called Petonville; the prisoner was brought to me by another patrole; I took her and the prosecutor both to the watch-house; I asked him what he had to alledge against her; he told me, he had been connected with her in the fields at the back of Sadler's-Wells, and she had robbed him of a seven-shilling piece, a silver pen, a brass ink-stand, and iron nut-crackers; I searched her, but found nothing upon but a bad seven-shilling piece, that she said she had had ever since the 24th of June.

Q.(To Mann.) The seven-shilling piece that you lost was a good one? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming past the Woolpack, when that chap, and five or six more young lads, laid hold of my cloak, and said, I was the woman that robbed him; I am perfectly innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-37

796. CHARLES EVERITT , alias EVERARD , and JAMES EVERITT , alias EVERARD , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Maze , about the hour of one in the night, of the 15th of August , and

burglariously stealing nine seven-shilling pieces, twelve shillings, a bank-note, value 50l. another bank-note, value 30l. another bank-note, value 20l. another bank-note, value 10l. three other banknotes, each of the value of 5l. three other banknotes, each of the value of 2l. twelve other banknotes, each of the value of 1l. a bill of exchange, value 40l. another bill of exchange, value 6l. 11s. another bill of exchange, value 14l. 14s. and an order for the payment of money, value 92l. 13s. the property of the said James.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

JAMES MAZE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. My dwelling-house is in Cousin's-lane, Dowgate Iron-wharf, in the parish of Allhallows the Great .

Q. Does your accompting-house look upon the water? - A. Not directly upon the river, but upon the dock at the back of it.

Q. You are the only proprietor of that dwelling-house? - A. I am; I was in the country at the time of the robbery; my clerk discovered it.

JOHN DUNMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you clerk to Mr. Maze on Saturday, the 15th of August? - A. I was; I was the last person in the accompting-house that night; I locked my own desk, and put the key in my pocket, about nine o'clock.

Q. Is the accompting-house a part of the dwelling-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell us what notes, bills, and money, you left in the accompting-house? - A. Nine seven-shilling pieces, a bank-note of fifty pounds, a bank-note of thirty pounds, another of twenty pounds.

Q. What was the number of the bank-note of fifty pounds? - A.9307, dated the 27th of July, 1801; the twenty-pound was number 4172, dated the 27th of July, 1801.

Q. What other bank-note did you lock up? - A. A bank-note of ten pounds, three bank-notes of five pounds, three bank-notes of two pounds, and ten or twelve of one pound.

Q. Had either the bank-notes the name of"Hume, 14s. 8d." endorsed upon it? - A. Yes, a one pound note; I received five from Mr. Moore.

Q. Do you know whether you received that from Mr. Moore or not? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you secure in your desk any bills of exchange? - A. Yes, five; three of them were taken away; one for 40l. another for 61. 11s. and another for 14l. 14s. drawn by William and George North, of Brecon, in Wales, on John North, Caroline-street, Bedford-square.

Q. Did you secure any thing else? - A. No, nothing else was taken away.

Q. Did you sleep in the house that night? - A. I slept in the house adjoining to it; I rent a part of the house of Mr. Maze.

Q. What fastening is there to the windows? - A. Brass fastenings.

Q. Were you the last in the house on the Saturday evening? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it dark when you left the house? - A. It was too dark to see to do any thing.

Q. Was there day-light enough to discern the features of a man? - A. Yes, there was; on the Sunday morning I was alarmed by the warehouseman; I went to the accompting-house, and found the slaps of the desks all thrown up; the locks had been forced by violence.

Q. How did you find the window of the accompting-house? - A. A square of glass in the window that looks over the dock had been broke, the fastenings undone, and the fash thrown down.

Q. Were the desks fixed to the wall, or were they loose? - A. They were fixed desks, one end fixed to the wall.

Q. Had the entry been made by means of getting down the upper sash, and getting in there? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you made observation enough to say whether that window was whole the night before? - A. It was.

Q. You can speak to that with certainly? - A. Yes, I can.

Q. Was you desk one of those that had been forced open? - A. Yes; the papers in the desk were tumbled all over.

Q. They were not in the state in which you left them over night? - A. No.

Q. The bank-notes and the bills that you have mentioned were missing in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon after did you apprehend any of the parties? - A. On the Tuesday morning following Lovell was apprehended.

Q. When were the two prisoners apprehended? - A.Monday, the 19th of October.

Q. What was Lovell, the accomplice? - A.Turncock to the London-Bridge water-works.

Q. Had he ever been at the accompting-house? - A. Yes, he had.

Q. How could that window have been got at? - A. Only by a ladder.

Q. Were there any harges lying under the accompting-house in the dock? - A. There was one barge right under the window.

Q. Was it in such a situation, that a ladder, placed in the barge, might reach to that window? - A. Yes.

Q. Where were the prisoners apprehended? - A. At the Swan and Pike, Enfield-Wash; it is called the Lock-house; it is kept by one Cole.

Q. Have you seen the fifty-pound bank-note since? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen the bill for fourteen guineas? - A. No.

Q. Did any thing pass when the prisoners were

apprehended? - A. No, except when the handcuffs were produced at the Rose and Crown, Enfield-Highway, where we took them, one of them advised the other not to say any thing; I cannot say which of them it was.(Mr. Maze produced the fifty-pound note.)

Q.(To the Witness.) Have you any remembrance of that note? - A. No, I have not; I received it from the clerk of Messrs. Willis, Wood, and Company.

Q. Who is that person? - A. I cannot say.

ALEXANDER DRUMMOND sworn. - I keep a lottery-office in Fleet-street, the corner of the Bolt and Tun.

Q. Have you seen a person of the name of Joel Lovell ? - A. Yes, he came to my office on Monday, the 17th of August; there were two or three persons apparently with him, outside the window, but only one came into the office with him, that was the prisoner, Charles Everitt; they bought three shares, for which they paid me by a twenty-pound bank-note.

Q. What was the amount of their purchase of you? - A. Six pounds, four shillings; I gave them in change two five-pound bank-notes, and two-pound bank, and the rest in money.

Q. Can you tell us the numbers of the five-pound bank-notes? - A. One of them was No. 1679, dated the 11th of July, in the present year.

Q. To whom did you pass the twenty-pound note that you received in purchase of these tickets? - A. Snow and Denne, the bankers, in the Strand; I sent it to them for change, that I might get time to mark the notes that I gave to them in change.

Q. To whom did you give the change? - A. Lovell took the note from me, and wrote upon the back of it John Williams , No. 12, Bow-lane; the change was bought back while Lovell and Charles Everitt remained in the shop.

Q. What time of the day was this? - A.Between eleven and twelve, as near as I can guess.

Q. How long were they in your office? - A. Very near a quarter of an hour.

JAMES NOWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk in the house of Snow and Denne.

Q.Have you your book in which there is an entry of a bank-note of twenty-pounds? - A. It is in this book, (produces the book,) in the handwriting of one of our clerks; it is not my writing.

Mr. Knowlys. You must go for that clerk.

DAVID JONES sworn. - I am turncock to the London-Bridge water-works; I live at No. 26, Bread-street-hill.

Q. Do you know Joel Lovell ? - A. Yes, he is a supernumerary turncock; on Monday, the 17th of August, I received a five-pound note from him.(Produces it.)

Mr. Drummond. This is one of the five-pound notes that I gave to Lovell.

Q. Was that five-pound note one of the notes that you received from Denne's? - A. No, that is a note that I had by me, which I marked while I sent for change.

JOHN CARROLL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. My son keeps a lottery-office, in Oxford-street; I was there when Robert Spratt , a porter, came for some shares that had been purchased.

Q. Were you present when the persons who purchased the shares came to the office? - A. I was there when one man came.

Q. Look at the prisoners? - A. I do not think either of them is the man; the porter came with a fourteen-guinea bill, which was not indorsed; I took it down with the change and the porter to the man who had purchased the shares.

Q. Have you a bill? - A. Yes, (produces it;) I found the man waiting at a public-house at Charing-cross.

Q. When was it? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How long before you went to the Mansion-House? - A. I cannot tell, for I did not take any notice of it.

Q. What was the name indorsed upon it? - A. James Watts.

Q. Do you know who that person was? - A. It was neither of the prisoners; I have looked at them several times; I cannot recollect that either of them are the men.

Q. Are you certain it was not either of the prisoners? - A. No, I cannot say either way, but I should rather think it was not.

Q. Did Spratt see the indorsement made? - A. No.

Q. Was he within fight of the person who made the indorsement? - A. He was close by me.

ROBERT SPRATT sworn. - Q. Did you see this indorsement made? - A. I was at the elbow of the person who indorsed the bill.

Q. Look at the prisoners, and tell me whether either of them was the man who made that indorsement? - A. I cannot be certain.

AQUILA COLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you keep the Swan and Pike at Enfield Marsh? - A. I do.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had they lodged at your house before they were taken up? - A. About five or six weeks.

Q. When were they apprehended? - A. On Monday, the 19th of October.

Q.Whilst they were there, was there any transaction respecting a fifty-pound bank-note? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had they lodged at your house before they made any application to you about a

fifty pound Bank-note? - A. About a month, they were both in the parlour; James Everitt gave me a fifty pound note, and asked me to take what they owed me, and give him change for that note; I told him I could not, I was going to make a payment, and I would get change for it there; we took it to Mr. Naylor's, of Ponder's End.

Q. Was that the only fifty pound note you had? - A. Yes; Mr. Naylor changed it for me; I returned them forty pounds - A twenty, and two tens.

Q. The same notes that you received from Mr. Naylor, did you give to the prisoners? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM-BAKER NAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. In what business are you? - A. In the wine trade.

Q. Do you know the last witness who keeps the Swan and Pike at Enfield Marsh? - A. I do; I think it was the 5th of October I gave him change for a fifty pound note; I paid it to Gordon in Goswell-street. (Mr. Maze produced the note.)

Mr. Naylor. This is the Bank-note I received from the last witness; I put Mr. Cole's name upon it immediately upon my receiving it, and the date, October 5th.

Q. Have you the least doubt that that is the fifty pound note you received from Cole? - A. None.

Q.(To Dunman.) Look at that fifty pound note? - A. I do not know it myself; I received it from a person in the house of Willis and Company.

Q. Had you any other fifty pound note? - A. No.

SAMUEL TOMKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a clerk in the banking-house of Willis and Wood? - A. I am a partner in the house.

Q. Do you know any thing of a fifty pound note being paid to Mr. Maze's clerk? - A. I do (refers to his book) on the 15th of August last, No. 9307, dated 27th of July, 1801.

RICHARD MORLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk to Mr. Drummond: On Monday, the 17th of August, I took a twenty pound note from Mr. Drummond to get change at Snow and Denne's; I gave change for it in finall notes.

HENRY GUBBINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk to Messrs. Snow and Company.

Q. Did you receive a note from Mr. Drummond of twenty pounds on the 17th of August? - A. I received a twenty pound note from Mr. Morley, his clerk, on that day.

Q.Favour us with the number and date? - A. I did not take down the date; I took down the number only, No. 4172.

Q. Did you observe any memorandum or mark upon that Bank-note? - A. No, I did not.

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was at work upon the dunghill opposite Mr. Maze's till dusk on Saturday night that the house was broke open.

Q. What is there between this dunghill and the accompting-house? - A. There is a little dock, just room for a barge to go up.

Q. Do you know Joel Lovell ? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him while you were at work that day upon the dunghill? - A. Not that day; I saw the two prisoners there about sun-set walking about, looking at the dock, and at the water-side; I did not observe them do any thing.

Q. How long did they quit the place before you quitted it? - A. A good while; there was a ladder that I had at work, which I locked up with the chain round one of the rounds of the ladder; the next morning, about nine o'clock, the ladder had been taken away, and set down into the barge.

Q. How near was the barge to the window of Mr. Maze's accompting-house? - A. Some part of the barge right under it.

Q. If you were in the barge, would that ladder enable you to reach that accompting-house window? - A. Yes; the step of the ladder round which the chain went, had been cut through, to get it free from the lock.

Prisoner, James Everitt. Q. Was the ladder long enough to reach that window? - A. When the water was high, it was.

Q. How was the water that night? - A. I cannot say.

JOEL LOVELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an extra turncock to the London-bridge water-works.

Q. Do you know the accompting-house of Mr. Maze? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever been in that accompting-house before it was robbed? - A. Yes, on the 14th of August.

Q. When was the accompting-house robbed? - A. On Saturday the 15th, between one and two in the night.

Q. Who were the persons concerned in that robbery? - A. Charles Everitt and James Everitt.

Q. Who else was concerned in it? - A. Nobody.

Q. How came you to know about it? - A. And myself.

Q.Tell us how you all three went about it? - A. We met about eleven o'clock at night at Queenhithe; we went from Queenhithe to Dowgatedock-hill, and there was a ladder.

Q.Loose or fastened? - A.Fastened.

Q. What was done with the ladder? - A. One of the rounds of the ladder was cut off, because it was chained.

Q. Who cut it off? - A. One of the prisoners, I cannot say which.

Q. When you had got the ladder, what was done with it? - A. It was put into the barge lying

in the dock; one of the two prisoners got into the barge, and then I left them for some time.

Q. Where was Mr. Maze's premises, with respect to the barge? - A. I believe the barge was under the window of Mr. Maze's premises.

Q. What were you to do while they were in the barge? - A. I was to look out to see that nobody was coming; when I returned back again, I could not see or hear them, and I went away again.

Q. Did you see where the ladder was? - A. No, it was so dark, I could not; then I went round by Thames-street, and came down the back way to Dowgate to look for them; I thought they had gone away by that time; when I returned back again the second time, I found them upon the Dock-hill; they said they had got some money, and then we agreed to go to Darkhouse-lane.

Q. Did they tell you where they had got the money from then? - A. No, they did not.

Q. How long do you think it was after they had put the ladder down into the barge, before they got back upon the hill? - A. It might take up about half an hour.

Q. You say, you met at eleven o'clock; for what purpose did you meet? - A. With intention to get into Mr. Maze's accompting-house.

Q. Did you hear any thing while you were upon the watch? - A. I heard a window crack.

Q. Where was the barge and the ladder at that time? - A. In the dock.

Q. Where were the prisoners? - A. I could not see them, it was so dark.

Q. Did the noise come from the dock? - A. Yes, as I thought.

Q. Where did Mr. Maze's accompting-house window look into? - A.Into the dock.

Q. Where did you go after that? - A. To Darkhouse-lane.

Q. What was done there? - A.What money they had, was divided.

Q. What money they had got, you could not know, but from what they told you? - A. No.

Q. How much did they give you for your share? - A. Twelve pounds; and I was to have the rest of my share when the twenty pound note was changed.

Q. Did you afterwards change the twenty pound note? - A. Yes, at Mr. Drummond's, in Fleet-street, the following Monday, the 17th of August; Charles Everitt went with me.

Q. About what time in the day, as near as you can guess? - A. Between twelve and one, as near as I can guess; we bought two sixteenths and a quarter of the present English lottery that is to be drawn; I gave the twenty pound note to get change; Charles Everitt gave it to me; and I paid it.

Q. Did Charles Everitt give it you in the shop, or before? - A. I believe he gave it to me before.

Q. Did you receive any change out of the twenty pound note from Mr. Drummond? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how much you received? - A. I do not know rightly.

Q. Do you know any part of the change that you received? - A. Yes; I received two five-pound notes, a one, and a two-pound note, I think, and the rest in cash; I am not quite certain.

Q. Did you afterwards part with either of these five-pound notes to any other person? - A. I changed a five-pound note with David Jones , but I cannot say whether that was one of the notes that came from Mr. Drummond's, or not.

Q. Had you any other five-pound notes about you, besides those you received from Mr. Drummond? - A. Yes, I had.

Q. When did you change that five pound with Jones? - A.Between one and two, on the Monday.

Q. The same day that you bought this share at Mr. Drummond's? - A. The same day.

Q. Do you know what became of the shares of the lottery tickets? - A. Yes; one sixteenth Charles Everitt had, and I had the others; I had a quarter, and a sixteenth.

Q. Do you know where the Everitts went to, after you had shared the money between you? - A. No; I was taken up the next morning.

Charles Everitt 's defence. On Monday morning I met Lovett at Queenhithe; he said he was going to buy some shares in the lottery; he asked me to go with him, I went with him to Mr. Drummond's; he was going to buy a quarter and a sixteenth; I told him, if he would buy a quarter, and two sixteenths, I would take one of them, and pay him for it in the afternoon; then we came back again, and I left him at the top of Bull-whars-lane, and agreed to meet him in Bishopsgate-street at three o'clock; he took me up a passage, and told me he had picked a gentleman's pocket of a fifty pound note, and some bills of exchange; there was to be a fight upon Wirtibledon-common, and I lent him four pounds near a twelvemonth ago, and he had not the opportunity of paying me; he gave me the fifty pound note, and told me to get it changed for him, and I was to pay myself the four pounds that he owed, and he was to give me six pounds more for getting it changed; I was to have ten pounds out of the fifty pounds; I thought I should not have got my money, unless I took the fifty pound note to get it changed, and I kept the whole of it; Lovell is swearing our lives away to save himself.

James Everitt 's defence. I know nothing at all about it; my brother handed me a note to give to Mr. Cole to get change for him.

Charles Everitt, GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

James Everitt , GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-38

797. JOHN POTTER was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil, on the 19th of September , in and upon Mary-Ann Parey , spinster , an infant of the age of eight years and upwards , in the peace of God, did make an assault upon the said Mary-Ann, and her, the said Mary-Ann, did carnally know and abuse .

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-39

798. JAMES LEGG was indicted for the wilful murder of William Lambe .(The case was opened by Mr. Attorney-General.)

JOHN FORSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are, I believe, a pensioner in Chelsea-hospital? - A. Yes.

Q. You are a captain, I believe? - A. I am in that stile called a captain.

Q. Do you know the unhappy man at the bar? - A. Yes, and have some years.

Q. On the morning of the 2d of this month, did you go into the apartment of Lamb and the prisoner? - A. Yes, between seven and eight in the morning.

Q. What was it that particularly called you into the room in the morning? - A. As I was coming down stairs in the morning, I heard a noise; I stopped upon the landing of the passage, and heard a pistol discharged; I then went into the room, and saw the dead man laying on his back along-side of his bed, and saw the blood running through his shirt; I stood in amaze, and did not know what to say; the prisoner was then in his own bedchamber, but he came out of it, and said, I have done it.

Q. Before those words were made use of by him, had you addressed any thing to him, or said any thing about what you had seen or saw? - A. No; he said, it is I that have done it, twice over.

Q. Did he come forth from his bed-chamber at that time? - A. Yes, when he said that.

Q. What had he about him at that time? - A. I took a pistol from him at that time.

Q. Did you examine that pistol, whether it was loaded or not, or whether it had been discharged? - A. It was a discharged pistol, with the cock down.

Q. Was there a smell of powder in the room? - A.Surely there must be.

Q. What further passed? - A. A little after, I found a broken pistol laying upon a chest of drawers; Charles Coates, the Governor's servant, was in the room just before me; I kept the pistol I took from the prisoner; the serjeant-major came, and ordered Charles Coates and me to stay, and take care of the prisoner, while he went to fetch somebody; Coates said to me, perhaps that pistol will shoot somebody; I took it up to see if there was any priming in it; there was some, which might have been in sometime, but am not sure; I took the ramrod, and put it in, and said, there is not much in here; then I turned the screw-end down, and drew out a little bit of white paper, and took out a ball, which I have got here; I then put the ramrod down again, and felt no powder in the barrel.

Q. During this time, did any thing pass between you and the prisoner? - A. He demanded the pistols of me, and said, he would lock them up in his drawers, and that he had bought them; there was no more conversation.

Q. Had you known them both for sometime? - A. Six or seven years, but knew nothing of their affairs.

Q. Did you know of any existing quarrel? - A. No; I know nothing of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You said, this broken pistol had the appearance of having been loaded sometime? - A. From the pan, it seemed as if it had; if you understand the nature of powder, after it has been put in sometime, it will grow soft.

- LAMB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding.

Q. You are the wife of the deceased; tell the story of the melancholy event that took place on the 2d of October? - A. I got up in the morning a little before seven; Mr. Legg was walking about the common room, swearing, and quite in an ill humour, I thought; I asked him what was the matter, when he began to swear the more, and said, I will turn you out of the room, if you speak another work; my husband was then in bed and asleep; I thought I heard him stirring, and opened the door to see; he had just got out of the bed, when the prisoner rushed past me, and put a pistol into his hand; he took it, turned it about, and looked at it, and said, what is this for; the room was dark, and then he threw it into the common room; my husband had just put on a little flannel waistcoat, and stood up against the door; the prisoner then, after my husband had thrown the pistol away, rushed up immediately, and fired at him, as he saw him through the glass door; when he had done so, he looked at me, and said, I have done it; I saw the blood coming out of his breast, and I cried out, murder; he fell directly; and expired; he endeavoured to call my name, but could not.

Q. You had known this unhappy man for sometime? - A. Yes, some years.

Q. How long had you lived with your husband, while the prisoner was in this common room? - A. All the while the prisoner was there, and sometime before.

Q. Was there any ill-will between your husband and this man? - A. God knows what ill-will he had, but my husband had none towards him; I took him to be a very solid man, for he washed

his own linen, cooked his own victuals, and took the sacrament regularly, so I thought he was a man rather better than what he has turned out.

CHARLES COATES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Be so good as to tell us what you know of this affair? - A. I went into the deceased's room in the morning of the 2d of October, and found him laying quite dead on his back; I never perceived him move hand or foot; after I looked at the body, I was turning round, and the prisoner came towards the bed-room; he began to say, spreading his hands, I am the person; I immediately said, what, did you shoot him; and he said, I did, or to that effect; I understood him plainly that he had done it.

Q. Did he give you any reason why he had done it? - A. I said, good God, why you have killed him, he is quite dead, how could you do so; he paused, and said, I gave him a pistol in his hand, to come out and fight me like a man, he would not, but threw it down, then I tired.

Q. Did he make any further observation? - A. When he first told me, he was very little agitated; I could almost have said, you are joking, but did not; afterwards, he walked up and down the room, and grew more agitated; he said a great deal more, but I cannot take upon myself to repeat exactly; he said, it is done, and so on; I overheard him say, I am satisfied it is done; that was some time after, or to that effect.

WILLIAM NORTH sworn. - I am the surgeon of Chelsea-hospital: I saw the deceased lying by the bed-side, and found the mark of a ball, which had penetrated on the right side, and satisfied me it must have killed him; I afterwards examined the body, and found the ball went in between the fifth and sixth ribs through the lungs, and through the large veins of the heart, and made its way under the shoulder on the opposite side, which was immediate death; the fifth rib was broke.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A.Perfectly well.

Q. Had you ever observed in his conduct any thing to induce you to believe he was deranged? - A. He never had the least appearance of it, in my opinion.

Q. How long have you known him? - A.Ever since he has been in the hospital.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord - After repeated insults, I prepared a case of pistols, according to what I had mentioned to my adversary, that I would prepare for him at any time he chose, to make a decision of the quarrels that had been between us from time to time; in the morning, he came out to me in a tyrannical manner; I told him I was prepared with a case of pistols, and would give him his choice; I went to my drawer, took them out, held them at arm's length, and said, take your choice, which he did, by violently snatching it from me, and throwing it with violence towards me, on which I cocked my pistol, fired, and shot him; had he done as a soldier should do - have taken a pistol moderately, and made an agreement to go to a proper distance, requiring or agreeing which should give the word to fire, then it would have been done after another manner; he was a tyrannical tempered man, and not easy to deal with; from time to time he aggravated me so, and harrassed my life so much, that I was driven to silence or moderate him; there was not one person but the deceased's wife present.

For the prisoner.

JOSEPH RYLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Where do you live? - A.At Chelsea, and am a tobacconist; I have known the prisoner ten years, to the time of his being apprehended.

Q. Have you observed lately any thing in his deportment to lead you to conclude he is not in his right senses? - A. Yes.

Q. How long before the 2d of October? - A. This year past, he used to buy tobacco of me; one day, about half a year ago, he talked very wild, and said he was going to have a company, and be in commission afresh, under Lord Cornwallis in Ireland.

Q. Did he appear to be intoxicated? - A. Not the least.

Q. Did he say any thing more? - A. He asked what was the best way to destroy a man.

Q. Was that at the same time? - A. No, about seven o'clock in the morning; I told him, I thought shooting was the best, but if it was me, I should drown myself; I understood it, as applied to himself; I never saw him again till he was in Clerkenwell, when he asked me to bring him pistols, and I told him I dared not.

Court. Q. Has any thing else occurred to induce you to keep that opinion? - A. I always looked upon him to be insane, but I remember nothing particular after that, or before it; he was always alone, never with any body, and I don't suppose that he would take any notice of the Governor of the College; he was always wild.

Cross-examined by Mr. Attorney General. Q. He expressed a desire to have a commission under Lord Cornwallis? - A. Yes.

Q. He is a captain now? - A. He is called a captain, but is only a serjeant.

Q. I believe several of the invalids have been sent to Ireland during the late war? - A. I believe they have.

Q. And he is of that country? - A. Yes; he said he should like to be in actual service again.

Q. Was there any instance of a serjeant going out with a commission? - A.Never.

Q. He expressed a wish to be in actual service

again? - A. Yes, and I looked upon that to be great insanity; and wishing to have a company.

Q. You say he talked about the most expeditious way of killing a man? - A. He asked which was the best way to destroy a man, and I took it to be himself; he did not say whether it was to destory himself or others.

Q. Did those things impress your mind - have you mentioned it to any body in the house to take care of him? - A. I did not mention it to hardly any body at all, not thinking any thing would happen from the poor man.

Q. If the derangement had appeared to be considerable, should you not have thought it your duty to have communicated it to some person in the house? - A. I thought it would go off again; he always walked in this manner, (with his arms across.)

ANN GRANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. About nine years; I am nurse in the Old Infirmary, at Chelsea; the prisoner was in the hospital, under my care, from the beginning of the year to the 10th or 11th of May; and, during that time, I saw a very great change in him, which I never saw before; a lowness, a melancholy and deranged state; knowing him so long, I took the opportunity of asking him what was the matter with him, and the reason of his melancholy; he told me his mind was confused; that he had no rest night or day; that he was hurried from place to place, and could not tell what he was doing; and I really was afraid he would make away with himself; I was always unhappy when he was out of my sight, for fear he should do himself an injury; I never mentioned it to the doctor, because he was harmless; after he left the Infirmary, I often met him in that melancholy state, and sometimes when I spoke to him, he would start like a person surprized out of a sleep; sometimes he would give me an answer, and sometimes only just a bow; I still observed that lowness and melancholy, and that his head was always confused down to the time of this unfortunate event.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. He was visited by the medical gentlemen? - A. Yes.

Q. They had just the same means of observing his conduct as you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you mention it to them? - A. No; I did not like to do it, because I knew it would hurt his feelings.

MARY- ANN BARCLAY sworn. - I am partner with Mrs. Grant in the Infirmary, and have known the prisoner some years; I observed his drooping and melancholy, but can say no more than Mrs. Grant has; I have sometimes met him after he left the Infirmary, and spoke to him, when he has started as if he was suddenly waked.

JOHN ADCOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known Legg, the prisoner? - A. Very near two years; we were in one room together.

Q. Have you observed any thing in his conduct to induce you to think he was not in his right mind? - A. Not at all; I am both blind and deaf.

GUILTY , Death .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-40

799. RICHARD STARK was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary , his wife , on the 17th of October .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

SARAH PASKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Where do you live? - A. No. 1, the bottom of Clement's-lane , in the two pair of stairs right-hand room; the prisoner and his wife lodged in the three pair of stairs left-hand room.

Q. Do you remember on Saturday, the 17th of October, the deceased being at home? - A. I came home about a quarter before eight at night, and just after Mrs. Stark came into me.

Q. Was she sober? - A. For what I know; she came in and out as usual; she did not appear to be drunk.

Q. In what state of health was she? - A. She said something laid very heavy on her; she was very low in spirits.

Q. For what you know she was very well in health? - A. Yes, for what I know; the afterwards went up stairs.

Q. How soon did the prisoner come home? - A. I believe about twelve o'clock at night.

Q. When he came home, what was his appearance? - A. He was very sober.

Q. Had the deceased any child? - A. Yes, she was laying upon the bed with the child at half past eleven o'clock, when I went to hang up a frock and other things.

Q. Had she her clothes on? - A. Yes, she was laying outside of the bed next the door, and her child by her.

Q. Was she asleep? - A. Yes, she was found asleep, and her child too.

Q. Tell us all that passed when Stark came home? - A. Mr. Stark went up stairs, and saw no light; he came and asked me for a bit of candle; I gave it him, and he went up stairs to his own room; in a short time after I heard the child and she cry out; the child is about sixteen months old; it was nothing new to me, as I heard them cry very often; I continued at my work, but hearing it for some minutes, I went up stairs to ask what was the matter.

Q. What sort of noise was it? - A. She was crying out not to be beat so; he was beating her; the door was shut too; I asked him to open it.

Q.Recollect what you heard the prisoner or deceased say? - A.Only his swearing at her; I cannot tell the precise words; I told him to open

the door, which he did directly; I went in, and begged him not to beat his wife so; after he opened the door, he was at her again.

Q. At the time you went into the room, was he beating her? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you see him beating her? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was she? - A. In the room, but I don't know whether she was sitting on the bed or not, I was so frightened.

Q. How was he beating her? - A. With his hands, but I cannot say whether open or shut; I asked him what was the matter? and he said,"she has pawned my breeches, Mrs. Paskins;" she begged him not to beat her, and she would talk to him in the morning; and I told him to look over it; I asked her to come down stairs with me, which she did, and he came after us directly; she just entered my room, when he knocked her down with his fist on her head; I said, for God's sake! don't beat your wife in my place, for I won't have it done; then he told me to turn her out; when she was down, he began kicking her; I took her up by the two shoulders, as well as I could, but she went on in so shocking a manner, making faces, that it shocked me very much; and I begged of him to take her up stairs; she had a curly head, and no cap on, and he came directly, and took hold by the hair, and dashed her out upon her head, very badly indeed.

Q. Did he do that more than once? - A. Once or twice by the hair of the head, and kicked her very much on the floor; I begged her to go up stairs; she got up by some means or other, but I don't know how; I called for assistance, but nobody came; she got up stairs some how or other, and I went up after, and the prisoner too; when I got her up stairs, I put her on the bed; she fell rather heavy, and the child cried; I beaved her legs on the bed, and covered her up; I begged the prisoner not to strike her any more, for that I would not come up any more, but would call the watch; I then came down, as I heard no more at that time, and I went to washing again; the child cried, but I imagined it wanted the breast.

Q.When did you see the prisoner again? - A. I saw him in the morning; I went to bed about two or three o'clock for an hour, and was ironing when he came down, a quarter before six, or a quarter after; he passed my door, and said, "Good morning." About half past seven o'clock, I sent my little girl, about eleven or twelve years old, to ask Mrs. Stark for six-pence.

Q. In consequence of what she told you, what did you do? - A. I went up to the door, and called twice, but nobody answered me; the door was open, and I thought she might be asleep; I looked in, and saw her on the bed; it is a large room; I came down to Mrs. Terry's room, who lodges on the same floor with me, under Stark's room; I did not see the deceased again till she was dead, and the surgeon had been there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You are a lone woman? - A. Yes, my husband is in the army, and has been gone from me a great while.

Q. You are in a state of voluntary separation? - A. Yes.

Q. How many lodgers are there in the house? - A. There is myself, Mrs. Terry, and a man lodger underneath.

Q. You said, when you saw her about eight o'clock, you cannot say whether she was sober? - A. I being in a hurry did not take much notice of her.

Q. You did not see her again till half past eleven? - A. No.

Q. In the interim there was abundance of opportunity for her going in and out? - A. Yes.

Q. Was she in the habit of drinking? - A. I cannot say any thing about it.

Q. How long have you lived in the house? - A. Four or five months.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, do you not know she was in the habit of drinking? - A. I suppose sometimes she would have a drop.

Q. Do you not know she was frequently and continually in the habit of getting drunk? - A. I cannot say any such thing, because I don't think she had money to do it, and I am out a great deal.

Q. Have you not seen her repeatedly drunk? - A. No, I cannot say that.

Q. What did you mean by saying she had a drop or so? - A. She might; I cannot say, I am not much at home.

Q. Was she laying on the bed as a sober woman would? - A. She was laying on the side of the bed with the child.

Q. Not laying across the bed? - A. No.

Q. Have you never said, that when you went up, before the husband returned, that, from the posture in which she lay, she appeared to be drunk? - A. No, I never said so.

Q. Do you know Mr. Barlett? - A. I know nothing more than his coming to my master's.

Q. Had you any conversation with him about this business? - A. No.

Q.Recollect yourself whether you had not? - A. No, because he was no acquaintance of mine; he was talking at my landlord's.

Q. Have you not said, you were confident of your husband's return, and if you did not prosecute this man, husbands would treat their wives in any manner they pleased? - A. No, never; my husband never treated me ill.

Q. Have you told us all that passed when he came down? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you never said, that she came into

your room, and tumbled against your bedstead? - A. No; her husband said so.

Q. Have you never said, she threw herself with violence upon it, and hurt her side? - A. No, I never did.

Q. After the deceased was gone up stairs, did not you and the prisoner drink together? - A. The prisoner says so.

Q. Had you been drinking? - A. Only a pint of porter with my supper and children before they went to bed.

Q. Had you not drank some gin with the prisoner after all this business? - A. I don't know that I did.

Q. Do you drink gin and not know it? - A. I don't know that I did.

Q. Did you not yourself give him some money, and send him for gin; and did not you and he drink it? - A. I don't know as I did; I said,"you have frightened me almost to death."

Q. You cannot tell whether you sent money for gin? - A. I don't know; but I know very well there was a bottle on my table.

Q. Had not that had gin in? - A. I really don't know; for when she was taken in that manner, I scarce could stand.

Q. Do you mean to swear, although you say you were sober, that you don't know whether you put your hand in your pocket for money for the gin? - A. If I was to swear to it, I should swear that I did not; but I said, I wish to God I had something, for you really frighten me to death.

Q. In consequence of that, did you not desire him to go for the gin? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Who brought the gin? - A. I cannot tell, I was so bad; I set on my low chair, and was ready to drop; it was my bottle.

Q. Where do you usually keep that bottle? - A. Not in any place in particular; it is the bottle my boy carries his tea in to school in the morning.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Does your want of recollection, whether you gave money for gin or drinking gin, arise from being drunk or from a confused situation? - A.From confusion.

Q. Did that arise from what you had witnessed between that man and his wife? - A. Yes.

Q. You say there was a man lodger in the lower part of the house during the time you were in the room up stairs, in the deceased's room, in your own room, or when she was dragged into the passage, did you see that man? - A. No, he is a clerk, and goes out, and we hardly ever see him.

Court. Q.What part of the transaction was it you said you wished to God you had something, for he had frightened you to death? - A. I don't know whether it was when she was so violently ill in my room or afterwards.

Q. Can you swear you were perfectly sober? - A. Yes, I can with a clear and safe conscience.

MARY TERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Did you lodge in the same house with the prisoner on the 17th of October? - A. Yes, on the floor underneath.

Q. Did you see the deceased on that night? - A. Yes, in the evening at six o'clock, she drank tea with me after she had been out at a day's work in Newcastle-court.

Q. Did you observe whether she was sober? - A. She was very sober.

Q. Did you see her again? - A. At a quarter before ten she came into my room, and I lent her one shilling and six-pence; she was very sober then; she went up stairs, and I never saw her again till she was dead; I went to market, and returned about eleven o'clock; the prisoner came home at twelve o'clock exactly, but I did not see him; I heard him say very bad words; I knew him by his loud voice, but could not hear what he said; I heard, by the sound of the room, that he was beating and dragging her off the bed; I heard Mrs. Paskins go up, and say, what are you doing, Stark, but did not hear the reply; I then heard the deceased and Mrs. Paskins go down together, and the husband follow them; he began beating her again very much in the passage, and I heard him repeat very bad words; whether he pushed or beat her I don't know, but he knocked her against my door so, that I thought it would burst open; I did not hear her speak, but the same noise continued of his still beating or kicking her; then they all went up stairs together, Mrs. Paskins shut the door, and came down; and then I heard, by the sound, that Stark was beating his wife again; I heard her say,"Stark, beat me no more to-night, for God's sake! if I have done a fault, I will own it to-morrow." I heard no more, and thought they went to bed; between five and six, I heard him walking about in the room, for he gets up at that time to go blacking shoes, in Holborn, and I heard him go down a quarter before seven; in consequence of what I heard, I went into the room at ten o'clock, and saw her with one hand over her head, and the other under it, rather on her left side, and the child sucking the left breast, with a bit of bread and cheese in its hand; it was speaking to its mother; I put my hand to her cheek, and found she was dead and cold; I went down stairs, and the surgeon was sent for; she had her gown, petticoat, and stays on, but no cap, handkerchief, shoes, or stockings; she was on the bed covered over with a blanket; I afterwards saw the state of her body; there appeared to be a kick with the edge of a shoe on the side of her temple the length of my finger almost; her right foot was marked very much, very black all over; her left knee was black all over, and both of her shins had the skin kicked off; the tip of her nose was almost bit off, and there was the mark of two teeth on each side

of it; her arms, legs, face, and neck, and where I saw, was bruised; her arms were bruised all over, so that there was not a place so big as the palm of my hand without.

Q. Upon your oath, was she at six o'clock or half past ten, sober? - A. She was to my knowledge.

Q. Did any thing lead you to believe she was not? - A. No, she was at work all day; she asked me at twelve o'clock if I would lend her a farthing, for she had only a penny to get her a half pint of beer.

Q. Was Mrs. Paskins drunk? - A. No, for she had been at work at the cook's shop all day.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. I am.

Q. Were you perfectly sober? - A. I was, for I had neither victuals nor money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had neither victuals nor money, and yet you lent her one shilling and six pence? - A. That was as soon as I got my husband's wages.

Mr. CROWTHER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a surgeon, and was called in to the unfortunate woman on Sunday morning; I saw her with her arms up, and with many bruises about the head and face; I went again on the Monday to inspect the body, and Mr. Andre helped me; on opening the belly, I observed a great quantity of blood had been shed into that cavity, and on removing which blood, which in quantity exceeded above two quarts, we found the spleen had been ruptured in two places, and that the external bruises corresponded with the injury done to the spleen; we opened the head and chest also, and, excepting some external bruises, the contents of both those cavities were in their natural healthy state.

Q. From those bruises about the head and face, you are not of opinion those could cause death? - A.Certainly not.

Q. We come now then to the spleen and the outside bruises - are you of opinion that those bruises, externally corresponding with the injury of the spleen, occasioned death? - A.Clearly so; I do not know what caused the rupture of the spleen, but the injury done to the spleen was the cause of shedding so much blood.

Q.Supposing that external injury, which corresponded with the rupture of the spleen internally, should have been occasioned by kicking or dragging about the floor, would they have those appearances? - A. If done with sufficient violence to produce the effect.

Mr. ANDRE sworn. - I was with Mr. Crowther, and concur in what he has said.

JAMES SHARPE sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday morning, and asked him how he came to use his wife in that violent manner; he said, he did not intend to kill her, but did not deny kicking or beating her.

Prisoner's defence. On Saturday, when I went home to dinner, my wife desired me to pull off my breeches and stockings, and she would wash them for me against Sunday morning, to put on; I accordingly did so, and went to my work as usual, till near twelve o'clock at night; when I came home, I found my bed-room in darkness; I went to Mrs. Paskins for a light, which she lent me, and I found my wife laying across the side of the bed asleep; I waked her, and she got up, and went to the other side of the room; I asked her why she did not wash the few things, as she told me she would, ready to put on; she says,"Stark, make up the bed." I accordingly did, and set the child on the floor, who was crying; on my making it up, I found my breeches and stockings gone; I asked her again; she said, "Stark, I have pawned your clothes, and spent the money." I put the child on the bed, and said, Mary, you cannot bide any longer with me, for I cannot support your pawning my clothes, and spending all my money as you do; I saw she was much in liquor; I goes to her to take her by the shoulders to turn her out of the room, and did not strike her, but she fell against the post of the door; she got up very fast, as soon as possible, and run into Mrs. Paskins's room, and fell across the side of the bed, and broke it; Mrs. Paskins then called to me, "Stark, come down, and pull your wife off, for she will kill herself, for she has broke down the side of the bed to the floor." I then came down to pull her up; I am not sure which way I pulled her out, whether by the hair, shoulders, clothes, or how, but I got her out, and I believe I struck her, but with no bad intention or design, for I had no malice; I took her in my arms, but was not able to carry her up, and she fell out of my arms on the floor in the passage. Mrs. Paskins there said, don't beat her any more, here go and get a quartern of gin for you and me; I did, and I took the bottle, and went and got a quartern of gin at that time; when I went out, my wife was laying on the floor where I let her fall, but when I came back, she was gone up stairs; I cannot tell whether Mrs. Paskins had helped her or not; I brought the gin home, and Mrs. Paskins and I drank it ourselves; I set down on the chair, and put the bottle on the table; I then went up stairs, and my wife said, "Stark, don't kill me!" says I, I will not; and I went to bed, with my baby crying, and then I went to sleep; what time my wife came to bed, I don't know; but at five o'clock she got out of bed, and then got in again, and took the child to give it suck; I said by her side till half past six; then I got up, the child was awake, and I gave it a bit of bread and cheese, and laid another bit on the table for the child, as it could get it itself; I put the child into bed, and she turned from her

right side to her left, and gave the child suck; then, at half past six, I said to her, Mary, where is the little stool I sit on; she said, look on the other side of the room, and there I found it, and went and took it up; then she was suckling the child, and turned round again from her left side to her right; I went away when it wanted a quarter of seven, and did not see her after.

GUILTY , Death .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18011028-41

800. JOHN SALMUN was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 7th of November , in the King's highway, upon John Spencer , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, twenty pieces of gold coin, called guineas , the property of the said John Spencer .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN SPENCER sworn. I keep the Hoop and Grapes in Cross-street, Hatton-Garden: On the 7th of November last, I was coming from Park-lane, down Oxford-street, about ten o'clock at night; I turned under a gateway to make water, when the prisoner collared me, and said, I was a d-d sodomite; I had never seen him before to my knowledge; he let me go, but came out, and threatened me all down Oxford-street; he told me first of all he was a Bow-street officer, and his name was Thompson, that he lived at No. 6, Bull-inn-court, in the Strand; that he had orders to take up every body of that description from the Magistrates, and that he would take me to Bow-street, and confine me all night, or to that purpose; he wanted me to turn down with him to the right hand, towards Bow-street, several times, and to have my hearing next day, for he had orders to do it, and any body would take his word before mine, as he was a Bow-street officer; I kept on till I got to Drury-lane, when he wanted me to turn down towards Bow-street; I said, I would not; he then said, it would be the ruin of my character, if he testified it, and of my trade and connections, but if I would give him twenty guineas, he would let me go; I argued upon the impropriety of his conduct, but he would have it, or I should go with him; I might then hint that he should have it; we went up Leather-lane home, and he kept close by me, talking in a low voice; my house is two doors from the corner of Cross-street, and I left him at the corner while I went into my house, and got the money of my wife; I was not absent three minutes before I brought out twenty guineas, and gave the prisoner; I gave them him, because I thought it would be such a stain upon my character to have such things said of me; he then left me.

Q. Did you afterwards see him in the month of September last? - A. I did, on Friday, the 18th of September; I made an appointment, and told him I should be out on Saturday and Sunday, but would meet him on Monday by the side of the dead wall in Lincoln's-inn-fields; I communicated it to my friends, and Mr. John Parr , and Mr. Joseph Cooke, went with me; the prisoner was there, but was taken in Holborn.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You had this money from your wife? - A. I asked my wife for the keys, and she took a bag with some gold in it, and told twenty guineas out.

Q. Have you brought her here? - A. Yes.

Q. This happened as long ago as the 7th of November last? - A. It did.

Q. Had you never seen this man before the 7th of November? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Were you never in his company before? - A. I never was in his company in my life till this happened.

Q. How early after the 7th of November, did you give any information to any body? - A. I did not give any information till he was taken up.

Q. How early did you give information to any body whatever after the 7th of November? - A. I did not give any information of that particular business to any individual, till I was near going before the Magistrate.

Q. Did you, before that man was taken up, say any thing to any body about the business of the 7th of November? - A. No; I told them about something else.

Q. Did you tell them he had extorted twenty guineas from you before he was taken up? - A. No.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with Mr. Parr? - A.About ten years.

Q. Have you known him intimately? - A. Yes.

Q. He was a friend of your's, and was to accompany you? - A. He was; Mr. Parr advised me to take my nephew with me.

Q. You passed, of course, at that time of night, a good many watch boxes, and gave no alarm to any body? - A. I did not.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You say you did not communicate this particular transaction to any person, before the prisoner was taken up? - A. I did not.

Court. Q. Did you communicate generally, that an exorbitant demand had been made upon you? - A. No, I did not in those terms; I told Mr. Parr about the rum and brandy; I said, a man had come, and got a gallon of rum, and a gallon of brandy, from me, and said, his name was Thompson.

Q. Did you tell him how he got it? - A. I did; he came one morning with two stone bottles, and said, he must have a gallon of rum, and a gallon of brandy.

Q. Why did you give it? - A.Because I was alarmed.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Though you told Mr. Parr

about a particular transaction about rum and brandy, you never told him that he had extorted twenty guineas from you last November? - A. I did not; I told him I had something else to bring forward, could I see the prisoner again.

JOHN PARR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I kept a public-house, called the Dake's Head, in Phoenix-alley, Long-acre.

Q. Did the prosecutor make any communication to you in September? - A. He did in January.

Q. Did you go to Lincoln's-inn-fields in September last? - A. I did, in consequence of his calling on me the day before.

Q. At what time in the morning did you go? - A. About eight o'clock; I saw the prisoner there at half past eight, under the dead wall, at the fourth post from the watch-box; he stood up for some little time with his arms across, looking backwards and forwards; I was sitting in the Star public-house, waiting for Mr. Spencer and his nephew to come; I saw him there till the clock struck nine; then he pulled his watch out of his pocket, got up, and went through Great Turnstile, into Holborn; I followed him, and met Mr. Spencer and his nephew.

Q. Did you, in consequence of any thing that had passed between you and him, apprehend the prisoner? - A. We met him plump, and took him by the collar in Holborn, opposite Mr. Corbyn's, the chemist's shop; we took him to the Star public-house, and from thence to Bow-street.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him to say any thing to you? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you tell him it would be worse for him? - A. No; he asked liberty to go to a place to evacuate; I told him if he did, I would go with him; I got a candle, and went down with him; says he, I wish you would take me to any place than to Bow-street, and I will give you forty guineas, if you won't take me to Bow-street; do you want to get me hanged instead of you, says I, what do you mean by offering me forty pounds, I will do no such thing; he said, that is more than I have had of Mr. Spencer; I did not know, says I, that you had had any money; he said, I had better let him go, why should I be so anxious to take his life away, that I must look very sharp to get the blood money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You and Mr. Spencer have been old acquaintances? - A. About ten years.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. I have seen him five or six years back frequently; he was a soldier when I first saw him.

Q. He was intimate with the prosecutor, was not he? - A. Not that I know of; I have seen the prisoner several times, but the last time I saw him before I took him into custody was, as they were going up Holborn, in January; I did not see him with Mr. Spencer but that time.

Q. How often, in the course of the year, had you seen Mr. Spencer and the prisoner together? -- A. Never, but in January, when I saw them going up Holborn together; that was the only time till I took him.

Q. Are you sure you had not seen them together before that? - A. I had not.

Q. This conversation about the forty guineas, somebody else heard, I suppose? - A. I don't know, it was in the cellar; there was nobody there but the prisoner and me.

Q. The prisoner said, he would give you forty guineas, if you would not take him to Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not practised as an attorney once on a time? - A.Never.

Q. They tell me, you are a bit of a lawyer? - A. They tell you wrong then.

Q. Did you not know Leycester, the lawyer, who was struck off the roll? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Have you never practised as clerk to a lawyer? - A.Never.

Q. Were you never committed by the Court of King's-Bench for having practised as a lawyer? - A. Never.

Q. Do you recollect being in this Court in January 1799? - A.Perfectly well.

Q. Did you know Mr. Leycester at all? - A. No.

Q. Nor Mr. Best? - A.Never.

Q. Was there no complaint made to the Court of King's-Bench against you? - A.Never, to my knowledge.

Q. You recollect being here in January 1799? - A.Perfectly.

Q. What brought you here in January 1799? - did you come as a Juryman, or only through curiosity, perhaps? - A. Not by compulsion; I don't recollect whether it was January, or what month, but I never acted as an attorney.

Q. Did you not come as a witness? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear you were not examined as a witness where you now stand? - A. What, in January 1799?

Q. Were you not examined in that place as a witness? - A. Not to my recollection.

Q. Have you ever been examined before as a witness? - A. I have been examined here several times as a witness, but not at that time.

Q. Did you not know a man of the name of Miller? - A. I did not.

Q. Upon your oath? - A. Upon my oath, I did not.

Q. Do you recollect a soldier who lodged at your house? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever come here as a witness for any lodgers? - A. Not to my knowledge; I have been

subpoenaed here three or four times, when I have been present where an affray has happened.

Q. Were you never at any time here as a witness for a man of the name of Miller? - A. Never, to my knowledge, on any occasion whatever.

Q. Do you mean to say you never gave evidence here for a man charged with felony? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Do you mean to say whether you were or not examined for a man charged with felony? - A. I don't know whether it was of the name of Miller, or not.

Q. Do you recollect ever giving a character to a man here? - A. I believe I did.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, was it not on the trial of a man of the name of Miller? - A. Upon my oath, I don't know that it was.

Q. What was the name? - A.Isaacs; it was a man that was tried here three or four Sessions ago, an old man, that broke my windows, when I lived in Phoenix-alley.

Q. Do you mean to say that was the only thing? - A. The man subpoenaed me, and I came.

Q. What was his name? - A. I think it was Isaacs; I knew the man by seeing him a dozen years before.

Q. You had no acquaintance with him? - A. There is one half of the people I have dealt with, that I never knew their names.

Q. You swear, you did not come to give a man of the name of Miller a character? - A. Never, to my recollection, I never did.

Q. Do you recollect the Judge saying any thing to you on the occasion? - A. No, I do not; if I did, I would speak it.

Q. What way of life have you been in? - A. I have been in the public line till with in about two months.

Q. Did you never keep a public-house in Birmingham? - A. Never; I never was in Birmingham in my life.

Q. What way of life have you been in since? - A. I lodge now at No. 37, New Compton-street, and am not in business.

Q. I ask you again, did or not the Court, when you came to give a character, reprimand you for having come here? - A. No.

Q. That you mean to swear? - A. I mean to swear I never recollect being upon the trial of Miller.

Q. And the Court did not tell you, you ought not to come to give a character to a man you knew nothing about? - A. No, I never was here, on any account whatever, to give any false character.

JOSEPH COOKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I keep the Horse and Groom in Leather-lane; Mr. Spencer is my uncle; In the month of September last, I went with him to apprehend the prisoner, and we took him to the Brown Bear in Bow-street.

Q. While he was there, did any conversation take place? - A. Not till he got over to the office, before we were heard by the Magistrates.

Q. Did you hold out any encouragement to him? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you threaten him? - A. No; he asked me if Mr. Spencer was not my uncle; I told him he was; he told me to ask my uncle to be as merciful as he could, for his life was in his hands.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was there any body by? - A. No; he catched hold of my arm, and begged and prayed of me.

Q. You went with your uncle to apprehend this man? - A. Yes.

Q. For something he told you of? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he ever give you any information respecting the 7th of November? - A. No, only concerning the liquor; I served the prisoner myself; I never heard of it till I was at the Brown Bear .

Mr. Gurney. Q. Then he did tell you before he went over to the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. Every word Mr. Parr has said, is false; I never mentioned a word, that he has mentioned, to him, either in the cellar, or any where else; when he said, I was his prisoner, I asked him by what authority; I said, I was not afraid to go, for I was innocent of what was laid to my charge; he went with me into the cellar, and asked me whether I had not better go away; I said, I would not, for I was innocent; I have a wife and family, who, I hope, you will think of; the Bow-street officers, after I was in custody, went and took fifteen guineas out of my box, and a watch, with a gold chain and seal, which I bought in Oxford-street.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Parr.) Q. I believe I have got the name now - did you not appear as a witness to the character of John Mailles ? - A. No, I did not.

Q. That you swear positively? - A. I did not.

Q. Can you tell us the names? - A. I knew Miller who belonged to the Tower Hamlet militia, and he was transported for robbing a man of something.

Q. You never gave him a character? - A. I positively swear I never did on any account.

For the Prisoner.

ELIZABETH PRESTON sworn. - I have known the prisoner seven or eight years; he is a very honest man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe he belonged to the army? - A. He has left it about two years and an half back.

Q. Where has he lived since? - A. He has kept a farm in the country, I believe.

Q.Don't you know? - A. I know he has a little farm.

Q.Where is it? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. How far? - A. About fifty miles.

Q. North, south, west, or east? - A.West; in Hampshire.

Q.Whereabouts? - A. I know it is somewhere in Hampshire.

Q. He has lived there constantly? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been there? - A. No; but I know he has a house there.

Q. If he has lived there, and has been there constantly, how could you know him during that time? - A. I say, between seven and eight years.

Q. Have you seen him within the last two years? - A. Only once.

Q. Was that in Hampshire or London? - A. In London; he comes sometimes, and I wash for him.

Q. All the rest of the time he is in Hampshire? - A. Yes.

CASTLE MELLISH sworn. - I live at No. 17, Porter-street, St. Ann's, Soho; I belong to the East-India Company's service; I knew the prisoner above two years ago in the Company's service; he then bore a very honest character.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.How long was he in the Company's service? - A. About nine months.

Q. When did he leave it? - A. About two years ago.

Q. How came he to leave it? - A. Of his own accord.

Q. Do you know how he has lived since? - A. No.

Q. Have you seen him since? - A. About six or seven months ago.

Q. Do you know where he has lived since? - A. I don't know; I heard he was down in Hampshire.

Q. You never asked him how he lived? - A. No.

Court. Q. Is not the East-India Company's service a profitable employ? - A. Yes.

Q. How much a day? - A.About two shillings and sixpence or three shillings a day.

ROBERT HOOKER sworn. - I live in Castleyard, Westminster; I am a grocer and cheesemonger; I have known the prisoner about ten years, he lodged with me soon after he was married; I heard say, he lived in the country, but know no further; he bore a good character.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know how he has lived for the last two years? - A. I do not.

MARY JORDAN sworn. - I am a widow, and live in Snow's Rents; I have known the prisoner nine or ten years; he has been a very honest, hardworking, industrious, sober man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where has he lived for the last two years? - A. In Wiltshire, or Hampshire.

Q. What business did he follow? - A. Something of a sort of farmer or higler there.

Q. How often have you seen him in the last two years? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you think you have seen him twice? - A. I think I have.

Q. More than twice? - A. I don't know that I have.

Q. Where have you seen him, in Hampshire, or London? - A. In London.

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-42

801. MARY PLUMMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , half-a-guinea, and two seven-shilling pieces , the property of John Gibbons .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, she was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-43

802. EDWARD JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , a man's coat, value 2s. a waistcoat, value 1s. two pair of breeches, value 2s. a handkerchief, value 6d. a fret, value 6d. a comb, value 1d. a key, value 1d. and a ball of twine, value 1d. the property of John Bouden .

JOHN BOUDEN sworn. - I am a sugar-cooper , No. 17, Harp-lane, Tower-street, the prisoner was my porter ; I did not know that I was robbed till I found the property at the lodgings of the prisoner, on Tuesday, the 22d of September, at his father's house; he said, I had lent him the clothes.

Q. Had you ever lent him any clothes? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Do not you know, that a short time before these clothes were missing, he had the misfortune to loose a very near relation, an uncle, I believe? - A. Not that I ever heard.

Q. Did you never hear of it? - A.Never.

Q.Some short time before this, was any application made to you at a time when you were going out to dinner in a considerable hurry? - A. No, I do not recollect any such thing; I am perfectly sure no such thing ever transpired.

Q. Are you quite sure you never said to any body, that you lent him a pair of shoes? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Ann Mantle? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of John Davis? - A. No, I do not recollect any such person.

Q. Have you never said to any body, that you did lend him a suit of clothes? - A. I am perfectly sure I never did.

Q. Do you or not know, that a short time before this, he did go to attend the funeral of a relation? - A. No.

ROBERT COOMES sworn. - I am an officer of

Whitechapel: On Tuesday, the 22d of September, Mr. Bouden applied at our office for two search-warrants; I went to his mother's lodgings, Greenyard, East Smithfield, and searched his box, in which I found a suit of black clothes.

Q. How do you know it was his box? - A. The prisoner told me so, and he told me his master had lent him that suit of black clothes, and that the handkerchief, and some other little articles, were in the coat pocket; as to the fret, he said, he took that home, and forgot to take it back again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. He told you he understood he had his master's permission to wear these clothes? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not tell you that he had them of his master, to attend the funeral of an uncle? - A. He did.

RICHARD OSMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street; I was with Coomes; I know no more than he does.(The property was identified by the prosecutor).

For the Prisoner.

JOHN DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know if he had the misfortune to lose a near relation? - A. An uncle, about a fortnight before he was apprehended; I attended the funeral, and the prisoner was there, drest in mourning.

Q. Do you know where he got that suit? - A. From his master; I said to Mr. Bouden, I understand you lent these clothes to Jones, to go to his uncle's funeral, and Mr. Bouden said that he did lend them to him.

Q. Where was his master? - A.In my house, No. 3, Green-yard, East Smithfield.

Court. Q. When was this? - A. The day that the clothes were found.

Q. Before or after they were found? - A. At the same time.

Mr. Raine. Q. What time of the day was it? - A. Between twelve and one, as high as I can recollect; I am the father-in-law of the prisoner.

Court. Q. What business are you? - A. A shoe-maker.

Q.(To Bouden.) You have told me, upon your oath, that you have not told any body that you lent him these clothes; this man has sworn, in plain terms, that you told him so; is what he says, true or false? - A. It is not true; this man is rather deaf; the two officers were close by at the time; they must have heard it, if I had said so.

Q. Upon your oath, did you ever say such a thing? - A. Upon my oath, I did not.

Q.(To Coomes.) Did you hear Mr. Bouden state to that witness, that he had lent the clothes to the prisoner? - A. I did not.

Q. Were you in a situation to have heard it, if he had? - A. I was.

Osman. I never heard him say any such thing.

Mr. Raine. (To Coomes.) Q. Were you by all the time that the clothes were found? - A. I was in the room all the time.

Q. Will you undertake to swear that you heard every thing Mr. Bouden said? - A. No.

Q.(To Osman.) Will you swear you heard every thing he said? - A. He talked very loud, and I did not hear him say so; I heard him swear he did not lend him the clothes.

Court. (To Davis.) Q. It has been sworn by three witnesses, that Mr. Bouden said he did not lend him the clothes? - A. I said to Mr. Bouden, I have been informed that you lent him these clothes, and Mr. Bouden directly said, I did.

Q. Will you still persist, upon your oath, that Mr. Bouden said he lent him the clothes? - A. Yes.

ANN MANTLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Were you present when Mr. Bouden came to the house where the prisoner's boxes were? - A. Yes; and I heard Mr. Bouden say he lent him the clothes.

Q. Are you sure he said so? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How came you in this house? - A. My father lodges in the house.

Q. Are you any relation at all to the prisoner? - A. None.

Q. Do you mean to insist upon it, that Mr. Bouden said, he had lent him the clothes? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you quite sure of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Three people have sworn Mr. Bouden said he did not lend him the clothes; now will you swear that Mr. Bouden said he did? - A. Mr. Bouden put his hand upon the coat, and made answer, the coat was his, and the breeches were his; and his mother made answer, my son told me, you gave him these things, and Mr. Bouden said, I did not give him the things, I only lent him them.

Q.(To Mr. Bouden.) This girl has sworn, that, upon the mother interfering, you said, you only lent him them? - A. No such thing ever transpired.

Q.(To Coomes.) What do you say to that? - A. I heard no such thing.

Osman. In answer to what the mother said, Mr. Bouden swore he had not lent them.

Q.(To Mantle.) After what you have heard, will you persist in what you have sworn? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called three other witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 23.

confined two years in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-44

803. MARY HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , five guineas , the property of John Martin .

JOHN MARTIN sworn. - I am a labourer : On the 19th of October, I was going up Back-lane, Rosemary-lane, about two o'clock in the day; I met with a friend, and got a little too much; I

was returning home, and met with the prisoner in Wellclose-square; I went home with her; she asked me what I would give her for a bed that night.

Q. What time was it? - A. I cannot exactly tell; I agreed to give her two shillings; we slept together till between five and six in the morning; I had my breeches under my head, and in them a purse, containing five guineas; when I waked in the morning, between five and six, I searched, and found my money safe; I got up to evacuate, and while I was doing that, she got the money from me; I saw her take the money out of my breeches; I then laid hold of her, and had a struggle with her, to get the money back again, and she cried out, and a man came into the room with a knife in his hand, and swore, if I did not stand back, he would run the knife into my heart; I still kept in contention with her, and then a woman, that he called his wife, came up with a pair of tongs, and hit me with the tongs on my back; I took the tongs from her, and then the man said, if I did not lay down the tongs, he would surely run the knife through my heart; I was afraid of being murdered, and I put on my breeches, my waistcoat, and my jacket, and there came a black man behind me, he struck me upon my back, and I made resistance till I got out into the street; then the people gathered about, and they threw my shoes and stockings out at window, and I put them on; I then went to Lambeth-street, and got an officer.

RICHARD OSMAN sworn. - I am an officer of Lambeth-street, Whitechapel: On Tuesday, the 20th of October, the prosecutor came to me, and said, he was robbed of five guineas; that he had been used very ill, and asked me to go with him to apprehend the man that had robbed him; he said, he saw the girl with the money in her hand; I went, and apprehended her; I searched her, and found upon her one shilling, and some halfpence; she said, she knew nothing about it, she had no other money; he told me, there was an old man drew a knife upon him.

Q. Who is that man? - A. It turned out to be a man of the name of Stinson; he saw him in the House of Correction; he told me exactly the same story before I apprehended the girl, that he has now told your Lordship.

Q. I suppose he was quite sober at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. How came Stinson not to be committed? - A. Before the girl had her last examination, he was taken in execution, and sent to the House of Correction.

Prisoner's defence. The man came into the room to my assistance, with his breakfast in his hand.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-45

804. JOHN MANBY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Bateman , spinster, about the hour of eight in the night of the 26th of September , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing six sheets, value 40s. a set of bed-furniture, value 5l. a set of window-curtains, value 3l. 10s. two counterpanes, value 2l. two dresses, value 21s. and three table cloths, value 20s. the property of the said Ann.

ANN BATEMAN sworn. - I was out of town at the time of the robberys when I came to town, I found the house had been broke open, and my drawers broke open.

ANN DUNNING sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Eighteen; I am servant to Miss Bateman; she was out of town; she lives in the Edgeware-road ; the house was robbed the very night she was coming home; the prisoner called upon me several times; he said he lived with his father and mother in the City; he said his name was William Jenkins, that he was a clerk.

Q. How did you become acquainted with him? - A. I met him one night coming from my mistress's sister's; going up Holborn, he said, shall I walk with you? I told him, no, I should walk by myself; he said, I am going up Holborn, it would be company for you; he walked all the way with me to the Edgware-road, to the house; going along, he asked me if my mistress had left any body in the house besides me.

Q. How long was this before the 26th of September? - A.About a fortnight.

Q. Did you see him often in that time? - A. Yes, I saw him three or four times in the fortnight; on the 26th of September, in the evening, about eight o'clock, he asked me if my mistress was come home; I told him, no; says be, will you go and take a walk with me? I said, my mistress would come home; he said, no, she would not; he was going out of town the next morning early, to see an uncle that was dying, at Reading, and he should not have an opportunity of seeing me again for a week or a fortnight; then I went and fetched my bonnet, and went with him; he went into a ham-shop, in Oxford-street, and bought half a pound of ham; then we turned up some street in Oxford-street, and had two pints of alc.

Q. How long did he keep you out? - A. Two hours.

Q. Are you quite sure it was eight o'clock when you went out? - A. Yes.

Q. And it was ten when you came home? - A. I left him at ten; it was half-past ten when I got home; I double locked the door when I went out, and he wanted me to take the dog with me, but I would not.

Q. Are you sure you double-locked the door? - A. Yes; when I returned, I found the street-door

shut; I went into the parlour first, and missed a time-piece; then I went up into the first-floor, it was all safe there; then I went up into the bed-room, and found all the drawers broke open, and the things taken out; then I went up into the gar ret, and all the bed furniture, and window-curtains were gone out of a basket.

Q. Are you sure these things were in the house safe when you went out? - A. Every thing was very safe.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You met with the prisoner in Holborn? - A. Yes.

Q. He wanted to have you alone, and he was lucky enough to find you alone? - A. Yes.

Q. How long before this had you seen the things that you afterwards missed? - A. The same day.

Q. At what time? - A. I cannot swear what time; they were all safe when I went out; there had been no body in the place, I was up in the bed-room at six o'clock.

Q. It was not dark then? - A. No.

SARAH SMITH sworn. - I live at No. 21, Laystall-street; I am sister to the prosecutrix: On the 26th of September, in the evening, I went to my sister's in the Edgware Road; when I got there, I found the street-door wide open, and nobody in the house; I took a man in with me from the public-house next door, and went up stairs; I found the drawers broke open with a chisel, and all the things taken out; I was very much frightened; I left the landlord of the public-house in the room, and I went and fetched my husband, who slept there all night.

Q. Did you return before the young woman come back? - A. Yes; I went up into the garret, and missed the bed furniture out of a basket; I had washed it myself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You are married? - A. Yes.

Q. Is your sister married? - A. No.

Q. When did you see the things safe? - A. They were all safe on the Friday night.

Q. Where was your sister at this time? - A. At Gosport.

Q. How long had she been absent? - A. Six weeks, I believe.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am an officer of the Thames Police: On the 18th of last month, I apprehended the prisoner a little before one o'clock in the morning, in Chick-lane, very near his own home; I knew him, and took him to prison; I lived close by him seven or eight years; before I got to the prison, I told him, if he meant any good for himself, now was his time; I told him, I knew what he had got, and then he gave me this dark lantern, and this crow. (Producing them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. As you have lived near him so long, you know that he works with his father? - A. Yes, I believe he does; I have often seen him going backwards and forwards to the market with a horse and cart, carrying meat.

THOMAS CLARK sworn. - I keep a bit of a green-grocer's shop, and go out with a horse and cart, and do jobs; I live at Cow-cross; Mr. Barnet came to my place, and asked me to do a job for him.

Q. When was that? - A. Five weeks ago last Sunday, between eleven and twelve o'clock; I told him I could not do it that day, because it was Sunday; I told him I would do it to-morrow morning; he said, if I could not do it before, that must do; he said, he had got a parcel just by, and asked me to put it in my place till to-morrow; I said, yes; he said, he had more to put to it, and they might be moved altogether; he said, will you come with me and fetch it; I said, yes; he took me down Sharp's-alley, across the sewer, near Chick-lane; he told me to stop a bit; I did stop a bit; he told the prisoner at the bar to bring a sack, which he did, and delivered it to me; then I took it home, and put it down in the shop just by the dresser; Barnet came to me a few minutes afterwards, and asked where I had put the sack, and I told him; he said, it would get wet there, and desired me to put it in my back room, which I did.

Q. When was it found? - A. The officer, Inwards, found it about two hours, or two hours and a half, afterwards.

Q. Are you sure that the same bundle that was found in your back room, was delivered to you by the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was present when you received the bundle? - A. Nobody but Mr. Barnet, the prisoner, and me; there was another young fellow came, but I did not see him speak to them; he had a brown coat on, and a light waistcoat; he had a bag with something in it; he carried it straight on by my door; I did not see them speak together.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You do not know that that man was employed by Barnet? - A. No.

Q. How soon after was it that these things were found? - A. Two hours and a half.

Q. Barnet told you that he had employed the prisoner to bring this sack, and he told the prisoner to put it down? - A. He told him to give it me, and he did give it me.

Q. Where is Barnet gone? - A. I have been looking after him ever since by the orders of the Justice.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-Garden: On the 27th of September, I received an information that some property was taken to Thomas Clark 's, at Cow-cross; I went in company with some more officers; I searched the house, and found bed-linen, tablecloths, and different things in a sack, which we

brought away; Levy Oburne has the sack; he was with me.

LEVY OBURNE sworn. - (Produces the property.) I was with Inwards; I know no more of it than he does.

Miss Bateman. These sheets and the other things are all mine.

Mr. Raine. Q. Is this your house? - A. Yes.

Q. What parish is it in? - A.Marybone.

Court. Q.(To Dunning.) Were these things in your house when you went out? - A. Yes.

Q. How was the prisoner drest? - A. A brown coat, white waistcoat, and boots, with dark tops to them.

Prisoner's defence. On the 27th of September, I was cleaning my father's horses, a lusty man pitched a sack at the corner of our alley, and told me he would give me a pint of beer to carry it up the alley for him, which I did; I have not seen him since.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-46

805. JOHN CONNOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , four fowls, value 4s. the property of Benjamin-Hanson Inglish .

BENJAMIN-HANSON INGLISH sworn. - I live at Hampstead ; the fowls were stopped by the patrol.

BENJAMIN BILBO sworn. - I am a patrol at Hampstead: On the 7th of October, about half past seven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner with four fowls tied by the legs; I stopped him, and asked him where he got them; he said, he bought them; I asked him how far off; he said, eighteen or twenty miles; I put my hand to them, and found them hot and bleeding.

Q. How far was this from Mr. Inglish's? - A. I don't suppose it is a quarter of a mile.

Mr. Inglish. I have seen the fowls, and I have no doubt they were mine; one of them was without a head, and the head was found in my yard; one of them was a bantum cock; two or three of them were rather remarkable.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-47

806. MARY PUNCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , a leather pocket-book, value 1s. and seven guineas , the property of Gerard Watson .

GERARD WATSON sworn. - On the 16th of September, I was going through Gravel-lane, I fell in with the prisoner; she asked me to go home with her; she lived in New Gravel-lane; we went to bed; I did not put my clothes off; I had been in bed about an hour, when I felt her hand in my breeches pocket; she took out my pocket-book, containing seven guineas in gold; she then called several more to her assistance, and they took me by the arms and legs, and carried me out into the street, and they threw my shoes and stockings out at the window at me; I waited in the street till the morning, and then the neighbours directed me where to get an officer; but I could not find the prisoner.

Q. Were they men or women that carried you out? - A. I cannot say; it was in the dark.

Q. You had been drinking? - A. No, I had not.

Q. Are you sure you were sober? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner; she had absconded for a month; I apprehended her on the 23d of October.

Q.(To Watson.) Are you sure she is the woman? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the man in all my life till I saw him at the Justice's.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-48

807. WILLIAM POTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , a gold chain and locket, value 20s. and a miniature picture set in gold, value 21s. the property of Susannah Clarke , spinster .

There being no evidence of property in possession of the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-49

808. THOMAS RUGGLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , two smock-frocks, value 4s. a whip, value 2s. and a pair of wooden shoes, value 1s. the property of William Hughes .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-50

809. CHARLES SEBLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , forty-five pounds of iron nails, value 4s. the property of John Perry , the elder , John Perry , the younger , and Philip Perry .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of John Perry , the younger.

Third Count. Charging them to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS TEMPEST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am foreman to messrs. Perry, in the

ship-yard, at Blackwall, in the smith's department.

Q. What is the firm of the copperas manufactory ? - A. John Perry, senior, John Perry , junior, and Philip Perry.

Q. Did you miss any nails? - A. No, it is impossible.

Q. What nails were these? - A. They were Dutch filling nails, made in Holland; they are made into copperas; they are stripped from the bottoms of Dutch-Indiamen; I went with the officer, Brown, to the house of Henderson, on the 11th of September, with a search-warrant; his house is at Poplar, about half a mile from the copperas manufactory; we found two bags of nails, and a quantity lying on the floor loose in the back room.

Q. How long after that search was the prisoner apprehended? - A. Not more than three hours, I imagine.

Q. Was he the servant of Messrs. Perry? - A. Yes, the nails in the manufactory were under his care.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I went with a search-warrant on the 11th of September to the apartments of Henderson; in the back room I found a quantity of filling nails in a basket; and, when I came to empty the basket, I found two parcels tied up; after these nails had been found, Sebley was brought to the office by Mr. Dalton.

Q. Did you see him at the Lebeck's Head before he went to the office? - A. I did.

Q. Was he made acquainted with what had been found? - A. Yes, I brought the parcels, and put them down on the table before his face.

Q. Did any person make use of any promise of favour, or any threat, to induce him to give an account of those parcels? - A. No; he said the parcels then on the table were in the same state in which he had sold them to Henderson, and in the same manner in which he had brought them from Mr. Perry's premises; he told me he had sold more at different times; and we found a great many more.(The examination of the prisoner produced.)

Q. Is that the Magistrate's hand-writing? - A. Yes, and I saw the prisoner sign it.

Q. Was any promise or threat made to induce him to confess? - A. None.

Mr. Alley. I should wish Mr. Dalton to be called before the examination is read.

THOMAS DALTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner.

Q. Before he said any thing respecting these parcels, had you made him any promise of favour or threat? - A. No; neither myself, or any body else; as we were coming towards the office, I told him, having received so many favours from Mr. Perry, I was very sorry; and I told him, if he knew any thing of his guilt, to mention it before the Magistrate.

Q. Did you not assign as a reason that that might be the means of punishing Henderson, and he might receive favour? - A. No, I did not.

The examination read as follows:

" Charles Sebley - I am a labouring man, in the service of Mr. Perry; I work for him in his copperas premises; I have worked in those premises these seven years; the two parcels of old filling nails, now produced, were taken by me from my master's premises three weeks ago; they were loose, I tied them up as they are now; I took them to the shop of Henderson, a blacksmith, in Poplar, to whom I sold them; he weighed them, and paid me three farthings per pound; I had taken to the shop of the said Henderson, several parcels of the same kind of nails before; he never enquired where I brought them from; he always took me into a back room, where he weighed them, and paid me; I can't say what the weight was; I always took it from him."(The nails produced.)

Tempest. These are Dutch filling nails.

Prisoner's defence. They frightened me so, that I did not know what I said; Mr. Dalton said, if I would impeach Henderson, I should get clear myself.

Q.(To Dalton.) Did you say so? - A. I did not.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-51

810. RICHARD CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , twenty pounds of sugar, value 10s. the property of William-Walter Viney .

WILLIAM-WALTER VINEY sworn. - I am a wharfinger ; the prisoner was in my service; I had a cargo of sugar from Surinam; I saw the prisoner's partner in the lower premises in the act of hoisting him out at the door; I immediately went up the gateway, and found him leaving the premises, about half way between the loop-hole and the gateway, with a bag of sugar in his hand; I stopped him, and insisted upon seeing what he had got there, and I found it full of sugar.(The constable produced it.)

Prisoner's defence. One of the men handed me that bag, but I did not know there was any sugar in it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-52

811. JOHN HANKIN was indicted for fe

loniously stealing, on the 28th of August , forty pounds weight of copper, value 40s. belonging to Thomas Bolt , fixed to a certain building of his .

Second Count. Charging it to be fixed to a certain building.

THOMAS BARTON sworn. - I am a bricklayer, employed by Mr. Bolt, in taking some copper from a gutter fixed upon a store-cellar, near Mr. Cator's brewhouse, as it was formerly; I had information that some copper had been stopped, and carried to the Justice's office; I went to the office, and saw it; I then took it to the place, and it fitted exactly; I missed it the 28th of August; I saw it the same day at the office.

JAMES FITZGERALD sworn. - I am a watchman of the parish of St. Luke's: On the 28th of August, a little after two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner turn up Hartshorn-court with a bundle; I instantly ran up Cowheel-alley, and met him at the top of the court; he had hid himself behind a piece of marble that stood at a stonemason's door; he drew back, and ran; I followed him; I got very close to him, when he turned about, and threw a piece of copper at me, which knocked me down, and prevented my taking him; I took the copper to the watch-house; he was not taken till the 23d of October; I am sure he is the same man, I knew him before. (Produces the copper.)

Barton. This is Mr. Bolt's copper.( John Ellis corroborated the testimony of Fitzgerald.)

Prisoner. He has drank with me several times since, and always said I was not the man.

Q.(To Fitzgerald.) Is that true? - A. No, it is not; when my partner and I met him on the 23d of October, he stopped us, and asked us to drink with him, and we would not; we knew we were not strong enough to take him.

Q. Not two of you? - A. No, it was more than six could do to take him.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent as the child yet unborn. GUILTY , aged 53.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-53

812. CHARLES HILLIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , twenty yards of lace, value 3l. the property of our Lord the king .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Christopher Stott .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

CHRISTOPHER STOTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am quarter-master of the regiment of Life-Guards ; I had the hats and other things in the store-room, under my charge.

- COFELAND sworn. - I am a corporal of the Life-Guards: In going past the store-room door at the Barracks, I went in, and saw a number of hats belonging to the Life-Guards stripped of their lace; on going into an inner room, I saw the keys belonging to the room that I had seen the hats in, and another key belonging to the troop store-room; I reported it to the corporal of the stable-guard, and likewise to the quartermaster, Stott.

WILLIAM SHUTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a Life-Guard's-man; I lodged in the same room with the prisoner: On the morning that the hats were discovered, he went to give me a bit of paper out of his waistcoat-pocket, and a thread of lace stuck to the paper, and he gave it me with the paper; at night I looked into his jacket-pocket, and found several threads of gold lace, and I reported it to corporal Easterby, and he had him confined upon suspicion.

JOHN NICHOLSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a private in the same regiment; I found, on the Thursday morning, this gold lace under the prisoner's horse's manger, (produces it;) there was no other horse in that stall; it was covered with dirt.

JAMES REEVES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am chief clerk at Bow-street; I was present when the prisoner was examined; he made a confession, which was taken down in writing; it was perfectly voluntary.

Q. Look at that? - A. That has the Magistrate's signature, my own, and the prisoner's.

The confession read:

"Examinant says, that one night last week he was at the stables belonging to the said regiment, in King-street, Portman-square, about twelve o'clock at night; he was in the room for keeping the regimental stores; he got into the room by the keys being left in the lock; that upon the floor he found divers regimental hats, and stripped the lace off fifteen of them with a knife; and, having so done, took the lace, and hid it under the manager where his horse stands, intending to sell it to some old Jew; he did not break open any drawers to get at the keys, but found the same in the door."

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-54

813. ROBERT THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , privily from the person of William Felton , a leather pocket-book, value 6d. a bank-note, value 1l. a promissory note for the payment of money, value 20l. and a bill of exchange. value 5l. the property of the said William.

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-55

814. THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway upon Frederick Swynard , on the 29th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 3l. a steel chain, value 3s. and a brass watch-key, value 2d. the property of the said Frederick.

FREDERICK SWYNARD sworn. - I am a surgeon : On the 29th of October, about half past three in the afternoon, I attempted to get through Storey's-gate; I found I could not, and I made an attempt to get back again; in that attempt I lost my feet; I was thrown off my feet, as it appeared to me, by the crowd that was coming to make an attempt to get through the gate.

Q. Were you taken off your feet by accident or design? - A. It appeared to me to be by accident, the crowd was very great; when I got my liberty, two men were fighting; I then got away, intending to go another road, but felt for my watch, and found it was gone; I returned to where the two men were, and saw my watch in the hands of a man; I challenged it, and said it was mine; he said, he knew it was, and desired I would follow them; he was a police-officer.

Q. Were you at all alarmed? - A. Not for my person.

Q. There was nothing to alarm your person at all? - A. No.

WILLIAM HEWITT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; I saw the prisoner at the bar, in company with another, endeavouring to crowd people about; they went towards Storey's-gate, and attempted to pick a gentleman's pocket, but they were felt; then they got to Storey's-gate, and were joined by four more; they shoved Mr. Swynard very much about, and I saw the prisoner put his hand down, and endeavour to get Mr. Swynard's watch, which he did, and I immediately secured him; he dropped this watch, and I picked it up. (Produces it.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What time of the day was this? - A.About half past three.

Q. How long have you been an officer of Bow-street? - A. Three weeks.

Q. What were you before that? - A. A chairmaker.

Q. Do you know William Chandler ? - A. I do not.

Q. Don't you know Raspberry? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Upon your oath, have you never heard of such persons being tried in Surrey? - A. I have heard of Raspherry, because he lived close by me, and I went to school with him.

Q. Do you remember his being tried? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Then you cannot be the William Hewitt that we heard of upon that occasion? - A. I never was with him in my life.

Q. However, upon this occasion, you were sent to watch? - A. Yes.

Q. How came it, that, when you had secured him, you did not apprise this gentleman of it? - A. He was hustled about by his confederates.

Q. What do you mean by confederates? - A. They hit me about the head very much; the gentleman had not gone away at all; it was momentary.

RICHARD BOSEDEN sworn. - On the 29th of October, I saw a scuffle between the prisoner and Hewitt; there were several people round him endeavouring to get the prisoner away; and I, knowing him to be an officer, assisted in securing him.

Prisoner's defence. I was going through the gate, and this gentleman laid hold of me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-56

815. GEORGE BLUNDELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , a waistcoat, value 4s. the property of John Croker .

JOHN CROKER sworn. - I am a tailor , in East-Smithfield: Last Wednesday evening I went into a public-house, in Whitechapel , with some waistcoats, and asked if any body would buy any; several people said, yes, yes, yes; but seeing the tap-room full of prostitutes and different kind of people, I did not think myself safe, but was coming away again; then the prisoner got between me and the door, and said, he would buy one of me; I told him I would not sell any to him; upon that he laid hold of one of the waistcoats, and said, G -ds bl-d, are you afraid they will be taken from you? then he got the waistcoat out of my hand, and a sailor came behind me, and took another off my arm; the prisoner was then taking his coat off, and putting the waistcoat on over the waistcoat that he had on before; the other man put the waistcoat on over his jacket; he was in a sailor's jacket and trowsers; then I heard a third person say, be off; I then saw the sailor endeavour to go backwards; I followed him, seized him in a dark passage, and took the waistcoat from him; I then returned to look for the prisoner, but he was gone with the waistcoat, which I have never seen since; I applied to the landlord; the landlord said, you did not give it to me, I know nothing about it.

Q. How many people were there in the room? - A. The tap-room was nearly full; I suppose there were fourteen or fifteen.

Q. All in high spirits? - A. Yes, but they were connected with one another; I waited some time, and Blundell came in again; I asked him for my

waistcoat; he said, he knew nothing of any waistcoat; I applied to the landlord again to get it back for me; he took me by the shoulders, and turned me into the street; I was going to Lambeth-street, I met an officer; I took him to the public-house, and he seemed to know two of the men, and they talked together, and he sat down and drank with them, and liberated him.

JOSEPH ASHED sworn. - I met the prosecutor, and he asked me if I was an officer of the peace; I told him, yes; I went with him to the public-house; I took an officer to assist me; with much ado we got him into the watch-house, and he began to swear, d-n your eyes, what authority have you to take me into custody? I immediately took out my little staff, and said, this is my authority; he gave me a blow upon the breast; several watchmen were in the tap-room sitting down, and did not attempt to assist me; he then got bold, and said, d-n your eyes, I will score some of you, and made a blow with a knife at my arm; I did not know I was wounded till I felt the blood run.

Mr. Alley. Q.(To Croker.) Did you not bring two officers to take the prisoner? - A. Not at first.

Q. Do you mean to swear there is one of the waistcoats missing? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not accuse the landlord of stealing the waistcoat? - A. No, I told him I was robbed in his house, and I looked upon him to be accountable.

Q. What way of life are you in - do you get your bread by hawking waistcoats about? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you come from? - A. From Dublin.

Q. Did you never say it was a sailor that took the waistcoat that you left? - A. No, I never did.

Prisoner's defence. I had a pint of beer in the house, that is all I know about it.

For the prisoner.

JANE HEARN sworn. - I fell oysters at the door of this public-house; I saw the prisoner that night, but I never saw him before in my life; while he was eating some oysters, the prosecutor came out, and looked at this man, and said, he had got his waistcoat; the young man said, I got your waistcoat! and then he looked another man in the face, drest like a sailor, and he said, he had got it.

Q. Did he charge them both with it? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What public-house is this? - A. The Tewkesbury Church.

Q. What sort of company resort to the house? - A. I do not know.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-57

816. GEORGE BURTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , two pair of shoes, value 18s. and a pair of boots, value 30s. the property of Robert Bunyard .

ROBERT BUNYARD sworn. - On the 28th of October, I lost two pair of shoes and a pair of boots from my lower room in Sermon-lane, Doctors' Commons; the prisoner lodges in my house; I am street-keeper ; I went to put my coat on, and left the shoes upon the cutting-board, and the boots upon the dresser; when I came back, they were gone; and the prisoner having gone but in the mean time, I suspected him; I could not find him all day; he came home at night, and went to bed; I sent for an officer, and went up stairs with him; I waked the prisoner, and told him I had lost two pair of shoes and a pair of boots, and I suspected him; he said, he knew nothing about them; I ordered the officer to search his clothes, and in searching him, he found a duplicate in his waistcoat-pocket of one pair of shoes being pawned in Tottenham-court-road; then I gave charge of him, and he was taken to the Compter; the same evening I went to Tottenham-court-road, where the shoes were, at Mr. Harrison's, and found the shoes; then we called at several pawnbrokers, and at Mr. Dalby's we found another pair of shoes; but the boots I have never found.

JAMES MAGUIRE sworn. - I am an officer; I found the duplicate upon the prisoner; the pawnbroker has it.

THOMAS CHAPMAN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Harrison, in Tottenham-court-road: On Wednesday morning, the 28th of October, I took in a pair of shoes of a man, whom I believe to be the prisoner, but I cannot swear to him. (Produces the shoes, which were identified by the prosecutor.)

FREDERICK AUSTIN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dalby, pawnbroker, in Holborn: On the 28th of October, between nine and ten in the evening, I took in this pair of shoes from the prisoner at the bar, (producing them;) I am positive that is the man. (The shoes were identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the duplicate.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18011028-58

817. WILLIAM COOKE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Muston , the said William and others of his family being therein, about the hour of six in the afternoon of the 16th of October , and stealing a piece of woollen cloth, containing in length seventeen yards, value 12l. 12s. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM MUSTON sworn. - I am a woollendraper , in Cloth-Fair ; I keep a house there; and

in consequence of having been robbed, and discovering the manner in which one was committed, I determined to give them an opportunity of committing a third; therefore, on the 16th of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, myself and Richard Rigden placed ourselves in such a situation where we could distinctly see the window through which the goods were taken; it is a moving sash; I kept my hand upon the bolt of the door which opens within half a yard of the window, while Mr. Rigden attentively watched the transaction; and, upon his making a signal that was agreed upon, I instantly opened the door, and the prisoner at the bar was taken upon the spot; I did not see him take the cloth, nor did not see it when the prisoner was taken.

Q. Was the window broke? - A. No, it was done by shoving up the window.

Q. What was the value of this cloth? - A. Full twelve guineas; I saw the cloth immediately before; it has never been found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You had stationed yourself at the door for the purpose of detecting any person? - A. Yes, we were there expecting such a transaction.

Q. Your main attention, therefore, was towords something outside of your house? - A. Undoubtedly.

Q. You say this property of your's was taken from an outer window? - A. It was.

Q. I dare say you had not applied your attenteion to see whether it might not be half an inch or a quarter of an inch wanting to be closed? - A. No, it was a sash without weights, and therefore it was quite down.

Q. You had lighted candles, I believe? - A. We had.

Q. Had you lighted candles a quarter of an hour before that? - A. I doubt whether it was so much, for we did not expect them quite so soon; our place is very noisy, and when it is so dark, we cannot see to do our business; we are obliged to light candles, it was not dark out of doors.

Court. Q. Was there light enough to see the features of a man out of doors? - A. Yes, perfectly.

Q. Was any of your family at home at that time? - A. Yes; myself, my wife, my children, and my shopman.

RICHARD RIGDEN sworn. - I am a tailor, in Holborn; I was requested by Mr. Muston to assist him in watching; we placed ourselves in a passage leading into a court; there was a window looked into that court; Mr. Muston stood behind the door, and I stood where I could see the window.

Q. Was it day-light outside? - A. It was about six o'clock; I saw a man come to the window as though he belonged to the place.

Q. What man do you mean? - A. The prisoner at the bar; he came up to the window, and, I think, said, here, Tom, take this cloth; nearly as loud as I speak now; he then lifted up the sash.

Q. Was the window quite close? - A. Yes, I looked at it before I stood in the passage; the prisoner at the bar pushed up the window very deliberately, as thought he had belonged to the house; I said to Mr. Muston, here are the men, do not be in a hurry, I will give you the word; there were three pieces of cloth, and he took out the middle, which was a superfine; he gave it to the other man he had called to, and said, go along; I instantly jumped by Mr. Muston, and laid hold of the prisoner; when I first ran up to him, the other man had got the cloth, and be tried to cover him; I laid hold of him; he tried to get away from me, and I tore his coat; I am postive he is the man; I saw his face when he took the cloth; he was some minutes at the window before he opened it; I delivered the prisoner to Mr. Muston's shopman; a constable was sent for, and he was taken to the Compter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had been upon the watch with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.These things were placed there for the purpose of giving persons an opportunity of taking them? - A. They were generally there; it is a counter that runs along.

Q. This is a private passage? - A. When the shop is shut it is.

Q. It is a public court? - A. Yes, the court is a public way.

Q. The man that went away you did not see his face at all? - A. No.

ANN BROUGH sworn. - I live facing Mr. Muston's: On Friday, the 16th of October, a little before six o'clock in the evening -

Q. Was it dark? - A. It was light enough to see the features of the prisoner; I was standing within my own door, I saw the prisoner go to Mr. Muston's window, and lift it up.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and say if you are certain? - A. I am very certain he is the same person; I turned round to call to my father, who was up stairs, and at that time I heard the cloth was missing, but I did not see it taken; I immediately turned round from calling my father, which was not a mintue, and saw Mr. Rigden take him; he was taken into the parlour.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were there any lights in Mr. Muston's shop? - A. I believe there were.

Q. How long had they been lit? - A. They might have been lit a quarter of an hour, I cannot say.

Prisoner's defence. I was going through the court, just as I came up the this window, I was

laid hold of, but not one of these gentlemen touched me; it was a man shorter than either of them; I am totally innocent of the robbery.

The prisoner called four witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 20.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his good character .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-59

818. ROBERT LUCAS and RICHARD HANSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , privily from the person of John Clay , a bank-note, value 2l. and two other bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of the said John.

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-60

819. ELIZABETH PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , a silver watch, value 5l. the property of Robert Hunter .

ROBERT HUNTER sworn. - I am a shipwright : Last Monday was a week, the 26th of October, I lost my watch.

Q. Are you a married or a single man? - A. A single man .

Q. Were you groggy? - A. Yes; I met with the prisoner, and went to a public-house in East-Smithfield; she asked me to go home with her, and accordingly I did; there was a woman there, who keeps the house, and I gave her money to get some liquor, and then we both went to bed.

Q. Did you both undress? - A. Yes, entirely; I laid my clothes down upon the chair, and put my watch under the pillow; after we had laid awhile, we got up, and drest ourselves; she drest herself quicker than I did, and the old woman came up into the room, and kept me in talk while she went away with the watch; I saw the watch in her hand; it was a silver watch; I got up, and went after her as quick as I could, but she was gone in an instant; I could not find her till the next day.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Not till the night before I slept with the whole night; the officer has got the watch; the seal is a naked woman.

GEORGE TOULMIN sworn. - I am a publican in East-Smithfield; the prisoner, in company with two other women and a sailor, came into my house on Monday, the 26th of October, about nine o'clock in the evening; each of them had a glass of rum at the bar; after they had drank their rum, they had no money to pay for it; the sailor presented me a watch, and said, you must buy this watch, for I mean to rig out this girl, and pay for her room; I told him I never bought any thing on the kind, he had better go and pawn it; he said, no, he would be d-d if he would pawn it; he wanted to rig his girl out, and he would fell it; I asked him if it was his own watch; he said, yes, it was; and the prisoner confirmed it as well as the two other women in company; I asked him what he asked for it; he said, four guineas; I looked at the watch, and told him, I would give him three for it, provided he would fetch it away another day; he said, he would come and give me the money for it again, and bring his brother with him; I then gave him a two-pound note, a one-pound note, and three shillings; one of the three shillings they paid for the liquor they had; the prisoner then asked him what he was going to give her to rig herself out; he then gave her one of the notes, and told her to go and buy herself some things; she went out, and he instantly followed her; I then saw no more of them till about ten o'clock the next morning; the sailor came in with the prisoner; he said, good mornning to you, I hope you will stick to your word, and let me have the watch again,as you promised last night; he made me renew my promise, and desired me to shake hands with him to bind it; he then had a glass of rum, and pulled out some halfpence, saying, that was all he had got left out of the three guineas, for he had spent it; he was to come again in the afternoon with his brother, and pay me three guineas and a half; immediately after they were gone, the police-officer came in, and asked for the watch, which I delivered to him.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Whitechapel: On Tuesday morning, the 27th of October, about ten o'clock, in consequence of information,I went with John Nowlan to a house in Henderson's-court, East-Smithfield, where we found the prosecutor keeping in the prisoner and another woman, who keeps the house, whom he charged with having robbed him of his watch; I asked the prisoner what she had done with the man's watch; she said, she knew nothing of it, she had not seen it; the prisoner said, it is of no use to deny it, I took the watch from the man, and I gave it to you, and you gave it to a sailor, and you went with me and the sailor to the Bunch of Grapes, where the sailor sold the watch; I then went to Toulmin's, and demanded the watch, which he gave me; I shewed it to the prosecutor, and he claimed it.(The watch produced, and identified by Hunter.)

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutor came to me

twice yesterday, and treated me, and told me he would not hurt me.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-61

820. MARY REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a guinea, two half-guineas, three seven-shilling pieces, fourteen shillings, and a bank-note, value 2l. the property of Thomas Harris .

THOMAS HARRIS sworn. - I am a carpenter .

Q. Are you a married or a single man? - A. A single man ; on Sunday night, the 25th of October, I went to lodge at a house, No. 4, Church-lane, St. Giles's , for the night.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes, I had some acquaintance with her.

Q. What sort of a house is this? - A. It is a house of ill fame, and sometimes lodgings for single men without any women; the prisoner happened to be there, and I got into company with her.

Q. When did you feel your money last before you got into the house? - A. I felt it in my fob after I was in the house; the fourteen shillings were in my left-hand breeches-pocket, all the rest was in my fob; we went to bed together; she did not pull off all her clothes, I pulled off all mine; I put my breeches under my head; I awoke in two hours, and found she was gone; I missed all the money mentioned in the indictment; every individual farthing was gone, and the breeches lying upon the floor; I found the prisoner about three hours afterwards concealed in a closet.

Q. Had you been drinking that day? - A. Very little, not above three or four pots of porter among two or three of us.

ROGER KELLY sworn. - I am a watchman; I searched for the prisoner and found her, but found none of the money. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-62

821. MARY MAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , a feather bed, value 50s. a bolster, value 2s. two blankets, value 4s. two sheets, value 4s. and a quilt, value 6d. the property of Richard Torrey , in a lodging-room .

RICHARD TORREY sworn. - I keep a house , No. 20, Market-row, Oxford-market : On Friday, the 18th of September, I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment; they were let with the lodgings to the prisoner about nine days before, at three shillings and sixpence a week; about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the shop, and thought I saw the shadow of a man in the passage; I looked, and saw the prisoner standing at a pulley-door, by the staircase, with a candle in her hand, and the door propped wide open; I said, Mrs. May, is there not something going pase, and she said, no; I said, I was sure there was; I said, I saw something white, and she said, she saw nothing at all; I then ran into the street, and saw the porter with a bed on his back; he had got about thirty yards; I went up to him, and told him it was my property; he said, did I know the consequence of stopping him in the high road with it; a mob collected, and I got assistance, and brought the bed back; when I came back, my wife and I went into the prisoner's room, and there was nothing there but the bedstead; I sent for an officer to Marlborough street.

Q. What was the first you saw of the porter? - A. He was going out of the passage; she was in the passage with a light; the prisoner came to me first, as a single woman, but I never saw any man after her.

ANN TORREY sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I let the prisoner lodgings in out house on a Thurday, I do not know what day of the month, at three shillings and sixpence a week; I let it to her alone; I did not know that she had any husband; on the 18th of September, about half past eight o'clock in the evening, I heard the foot of a man coming down stairs; I did not hear him go up; the prisoner let him out, and then she came into the back parlour to me with a candle in her hand, and at that instant my husband came, and told me the bed was gone; I went up stairs with her, and the bedding was all gone; I came down again, and locked her into the back parlour, while the bed was brought in; I know the bed to be mine, I spun the tick and the blanket my self.

ELIZABETH M'ARTHUR sworn. - I was present when the prisoner hired the porter in my shop in Chancery-lane; I sell tobacco and haberdashery; she asked him if he could move a bed for an old lady that she attended; he said, he would; she appointed him to come at seven o'clock in the evening to Market-row, Oxford market; she said, she would meet him at a public-house opposite, No. 20.

LYDIA WILLIAMS sworn. - I lodge in Mr. Torrey's house; I was in the passage when the porter brought the bed back, and put it in the passage.

WILLIAM TORREY sworn. - I am son of the prosecutor; I went out, and saw the porter come back with the bed on his back; I went for the constable.

- WARREN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlboroguh-street; I had charge of the bed three days, and then it was given up to the prosecutor. (The property was produced, and identified by Mrs. Torrey.)

JOHN LOOM sworn. - I am a porter: I was employed by the prisoner on Friday, the 18th of September, to fetch a bed from Oxford-market;

I was to meet her at a public-house at seven o'clock in the evening, but I did not get there till eight; she said she had been in two or three times for me; I went with her over the way, I went up stairs into a back room, and there was a bed tied up, upon the bedstead; she helped me up, and I went down stairs with it; she told me to go down, and she would follow me with it; when I had got about two doors from the house, the prosecutor came after me, and said that was his bed; the prisoner lit me down stairs with it.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the things going out of the house; they were taken away while I was gone for some tea and sugar.

GUILTY , aged 38. - confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-63

822. BERNARD COILE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , ten ounces of coffee, value 1s. 6d. the property of Samuel Corteses the elder , Samuel Corteses the younger , Isaac Brandon , Moses Brandon , and Aaron Brandon .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of James Harris .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

MAJOR PRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Messrs. Brandon and Company, at Hoxton town, (proves the firm); they are answerable for any thing that is missing from the warehouses.

JOHN RIVER'S sworn. - I am an Excise locker; On the 13th of October, the prisoner was employed in Messrs. Brandon's warehouses at Hoxton; I was stationed there; the men were rubbed down between five and six o'clock; I rubbed the prisoner down with the others, when I saw him come out of the warehouse; in putting my hand round his breeches, I found something that I thought was not right, and I gave him over to Mr. Govett.

Prisoner. Q. Were they not sweepings -

Court. Q. Have you any such thing as sweepings? - A. Yes; sweepings are dust and dirt, and nails and coffee, altogether.

Q. What was it that this was taken from? - A.Sweepings.

Q. What is done with those sweepings? - A. It is cleaned, and the coffee taken away from the rubbish.

Q. Have they any allowance of sweepings? - A. No; there is not allowance of any thing, not a grain; when the sweepings are cleaned, they are sold on account of the owners, the same as the rest of the coffee.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Pratt.) Q. Do you allow the labourers to take away any coffee of the description of sweepings? - A. No; the owners have them, they are not given to any body.

ELIAS GOVETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I received the prisoner from Rivers; I took him into the accompting-house; I saw him searched; he mbuttoned the flap of his breeches, and there was a quantity of coffee tied up in his shirt in his breeches; it was tied round with a string, and he took it off himself; it was coffee dirt, and nails.

JOSEPH HANCOCK sworn. - I am an Excise locker; I searched the prisoner, and took this from out of the tail of is shirt. (Producing it.)

Q. What do you suppose is the value of it? - A. About sixpence; it is the same kind of coffee that we had in the warehouses.

Q.(To Pratt.) Do you know how long the prisoner had been employed in the warehouses? - A. About three days.

Prisoner's defence. I had no bag, or any thing, to put it in; it was mere sweepings that I took for my wife to pick out for my breakfast and my children's. GUILTY , aged 34.

confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-64

823. JAMES DENNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a pocketbook, value 6d. and two Bank-notes, value 2l. the property of Robert Glendining .

ROBERT GLENDINING sworn. - I am master of small vessel ; I was robbed on the 6th of October; I lost a pocket-book and notes about eight o'clock in the evening; I was going into the Royalty Theatre; the prisoner was close to me; it was in my coat pocket; I missed it directly, I felt him take it, and caught hold of him directly; I saw it in his hand, and detained him; I have not seen the book since; I saw somebody take it from him; there were two one-pound Bank-notes in it.

JOHN HOLMAN sworn. - I went to examine the prisoner, I was desired by the captain; he told me he had given the book to a boy of the name of Fyson.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent, and know nothing of it. GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-65

824. ELIJAH COLLINS and JOHN GRIFFITHS were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , 100 pounds weight of hemp , the property of John Allanson , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .(The case was opended by Mr. Knapp).

JOHN ALLANSON sworn. - I am a rope-maker ,

and my manufactory is in Kingsland Road; Livingstone, my servant , has absconded, and also Blinkhorne, whom I have indicted: On the 2d of September, I had given directions to Livingstone to receive from Brown's quay, Wapping, a quantity of hemp which I had purchased; I had trusted Livingstone for years before; Mr. Nesbitt is a master carman, and generally brings my goods from the wharf: on the 3d of September, I was by at the time, Collins, who is driver to Mr. Nesbitt, was delivering the hemp; I then received some information, in consequence of which I called my foreman on one side, and found a deficiency of hemp, by weighing it, of above one hundred pounds; I went for an officer, and took Collins up.

Q. Was Collins gone before you weighed any part of the hemp that was brought by him in the waggon to your premises? - A. Yes, and the waggon gone away; but Armstrong and Ray went after him, and took him on the road; I went with the officers to Griffiths's house on the Saturday following, in consequence of information, and saw some hemp in his dwelling-house, and some in the adjoining house in the garret, which appeared to be of the same quality with the hemp I had lost; Griffiths was asked by the officer, whether he had a bill of parcels from where the hemp came; there was a file with bills of parcels; I looked over them, but there was nothing relative to my business, and he pretended he did not know the person who brought it to him; I was not present when the hemp was weighed into the waggon; Livingstone was the man who superinteded the loading, I trusted him with that business; I suppose the waggoner was to obey his orders; Livingstone has absconded; Griffiths is a twine-spinner.

DAVID NAYLOR sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Atkinson and Co. wharfingers and hemp merchants: I delivered hemp to be conveyed to Mr. Allanson on Wednesday, the 2d of September, to the waggon of Nesbitt's; there was sixty-seven hundred weight, three quarters, and sixteen pounds; I put this down before it went into the waggon; Nesbitt was there at the time; I saw it set off, and Collins with it, towards Mr. Allanson's; there was a foreman of Mr. Allanson's who gave directions.

GEORGE NESBITT sworn. - I am proprietor of a waggon; it was engaged by Mr. Allanson to take hemp to his house from Hermitage-street; I loaded it myself, while Collins got the horses; I went with it near to Burr-street, East-Smithfield; in the way to Allanson's, I asked the men if they would give directions; there was Mr. Allanson's foreman, and another, and they said there was no occasion, as they were going with them; I desired them to stop at the farmer's; I saw it in Bishopsgate-street, and Livingstone with it; when I left it in Worship-street, every thing was safe.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Livingstone was the person who said he would give all the directions? - A.Certainly; I asked for a direction, and he said he was going with it; Collins has served us about eighteen months, at different times; I never saw any thing dishonest in him, I believed him to be honest, or should not have trusted him.

RICHARD FORBTER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Allanson, and helped to unload the waggon that was drove by Collins to my master's; I was present during the time it was put into the warehouse; Collins asked me if I knew the price of hemp, and whether 100 pounds would fetch a guinea; I said it would fetch more; he said, two men had two bags full; one had a blue coat, and one had a white one; I am quite a stranger to him; he said, the two men had two bags out of the load, as it was bringing along; he did not keep it a secret; I informed the foreman of it; Livingstone and Blinkhorne did not appear afterwards.

CHRISTOPHER BURTON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Allanson, and remember the hemp brought by Collins; I was present when it was weighed; it was deficient about 116 pounds.

SAMUEL BAKER sworn. - I am a corporal in the 2d Tower Hamlet Militia, and know Collins; I was in Shoreditch on Wednesday, the 2d of September, and saw him driving a waggon load of hemp; he stopped it, and got to the top with two matted bags; then, by main strength, he began to pull the hemp out of the bales, and stuff it into the bags till they were full; he left the bags at top, and drew on to Shoreditch Church, I went on towards Shoreditch turnpike; on my return, I met two men with the same bags, to appearance; they turned down Cock-lane; I don't recollect the colour of their cloaths; I afterwards saw the waggon stop at Mr. Allanson's, and Collins began to unload; I told Mr. Allanson what I had seen, and I afterwards saw them apprehended; I don't know the men that took the bags away.

THOMAS PIKE sworn. - I am a carpenter by trade, and a porter, or what I can get to do: On Wednesday, the 2d of September, I was passing by Shoreditch church about three o'clock, and a man was trying to get a load on his back, but he could not, he was so much in liquor; there were two men, but I did not know either; the drunken man said, he would give me a shilling, if I would carry it into Cock-lane; there were two loads done up in mans, one of which I was to carry; we went up Church-street, and he could not find his home; he then said, it was in High-street, Mile-end New-Town; I carried one bundle there, and it was lodged at Griffiths's the prisoner; nothing passed between Griffiths and me, and help me to take the other bundle, which was left under a window in Cock-lane; we went back, and took it to Griffiths's; we left it in a room where they were drink

ing tea; I left them there, and the man paid me.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I belong to Worship-street, and apprehended Griffiths on the 5th of September; I informed him I had a warrant to search his house for hemp; he went with me to his dwelling-house, and said, he kept none there, but in the next house; we went to the garret of the next house, where he dressed hemp, and we found a quantity which Mr. Allanson believed to be his, and we brought it away; he shewed me the place; there was some matting in the room.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am a Police officer, and was with Ray; Griffiths, me, and his wife, were in their house, when Pike came in, and said, it was here that I left the hemp; the wife then said, it was not you that brought it, it was a drunken man; and Griffiths said to his wife, you say nothing at all; there was a quantity of hemp in a bag in the other house; it is what twine-spinners use.(The hemp produced).

Q.(To Burton.) Was the hemp you saw at Griffiths's, in a dressed state? - A. It was just ruffed over a tool; that in the waggon was tied up in large heads, and this had been cut open, worked into handfuls, and laid down, but I take it to be of the same quality.

Q. Do you know the business of a twine-spinner? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the hemp, at the time it came to your master's, in a state fit for the twine-spinner? - A. After being dressed; this is not in a state for use; a dresser does that, but some twine-spinners can dress.

Mr. Allanson. I believe this to be of the same quality that I lost.

Collins's defence. I can say no more, than I delivered it to Mr. Allanson's foreman; I had no note to go with it; I delivered those two mats to the foreman, and when I came to the warehouse, I unloaded about half the waggon; I said, I had delivered two mats of hemp, and the foreman said, who to; I told him directly, to the foreman that came with me to see it delivered safe; when I got it unloaded, I was going to get a pot of beer, when the officers came, and took me; I said, I had delivered it to two men, but they took me up.

Griffiths's defence. I bought the hemp of a person over the water, who is come forward to swear to the bill of parcels.

For the prisoner, Griffiths.

THOMAS ALLINS sworn. - I am a hemp-dresser, No. 10, Kent-street, and have known Griffiths near twelve months; I have served him with hemp and flax; I saw some hemp the 21st or 22d of August, at his house, which I sold him, (the bill of parcels produced); this is my hand-writing; the hemp was sold by me, and delivered by my own horse and cart, dated the 18th of August; this is of the same quality that is not dressed, but I cannot speak to the other, it is of quite a different quality; I have sold him forty pounds worth of goods at a time, and he always paid me; he bore a good character.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. That which is worked up you don't mean to speak to? - A. I speak to the quality of this in my hand; I don't think this is of the same quality as the other.

Q. That you had last in your hand appears to be dressed? - A. It is worked merely; but hemp is so much alike nobody can swear to it.

Griffiths called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-66

825. HENRY CUNNINGHAM and MARY CUNNINGHAM were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , in the dwelling-house of the said Henry, a half-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, two shillings, and three Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am a sailor ; Mary Smith is my wife, and has been twenty-three years: I gave her the money about half past eight o'clock on the Tuesday; I am not positive of the day of the month, it was last Tuesday week; four pounds in four Bank-notes; when I parted from her in Gravel-lane, I was a little in the head, and I gave it her for safety.

MARY SMITH sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: I received the money of him about seven o'clock, on the Tuesday evening; I went and paid a trifle I owed, and met with Henry Currningham and his wife, in Church-lane, Whitechapel, I had known them a great many years; they asked me to go and take a bit of supper, and I went with them to their own room, which is the whole of the dwelling, it is a single room; I eat my supper, and gave a twenty shilling note to the wife to get a pot of porter for supper; she went for it, and brought half-a-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, and two shillings in silver.

Q. Had you drank any thing before you went there? - A. Yes; I had been with my husband, and had a glass of rum; my husband was paid off; I was not intoxicated, for I had but one glass of cold rum; I tied the change, with the notes, in the corner of the handkerchief that was round my neck, the prisoners saw me put it there, and they had my notes in their hands.

Q. Did you not say, before the Justice, you were not in liquor? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you now to swear you were not? - A. I had only a glass of rum, and a pot of porter; I was tired with walking about all day, and I

laid down on their bed to rest myself, they laid alongside of me, and I went to sleep; then this woman came to take my money out of the handkerchief, I felt her, and saw her, the candle was not then burnt out; she took the money, and run away down stairs, and I followed her, the husband went with her; they went into a strange room I did not know, and then I began to cry will you give me my money; she said she had planted it, called me a very wicked name, and said she would never give it me; then we went into the room again, and I said I must never face my husband, or go home; when I cried and begged for the money, says the man, I will cut your b-y brains out if you say a word; I staid there till about seven o'clock in the morning for fear of going home, and then he gave me one shilling; they went away and left me, but I saw them in less than ten minutes, facing a public-house door, where I asked them to give me my money; says he, bring your husband to me; says I, will you be so good as give me the money if I bring my husband; no, says he, I have got no money to give him, but I will give you a shilling, and he gave me, a shilling; I got no more back.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer: I had information, and went to the prisoner's house, I found them in bed; I searched every part of their clothes, bed clothes, and every thing, but I found only one shilling in the man's pocket.

MARGARET MEAD sworn. - This poor woman came crying to me in the morning, and we went to Cunningham's room, but found nobody in it, we afterwards saw them at a public-house; Mrs. Smith asked the woman to be so good as give her one guinea out of her money; she said she might be d-d for b-h, for she had planted her money, and she might go and look for it.

Henry Cunningham 's defence. I was not there when she speaks to, I had just come from work; they had a quartern and a half or rum, and a pot of beer, and I drank with them; that is all I know of it.

Mary Cunningham's defence. She gave me a one pound note to get changed, I brought it her, and gave it into her hand; she said she was going home, and went down stairs, but came up again, about eleven or twelve o'clock, and said she had lost her money, and must not go home; she laid down, and in the morning I gave her a bundle she had left behind; she asked me if she had dropped any money on the bed, she searched every where; then she went away, and I saw no more of her till she brought the officer.

Court. (To Mrs. Smith.) Q. Did you go away and return, saying you had lost your money? - A. No.

Henry Cunningham, NOT GUILTY .

Mary Cunningham GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-67

826. MICHAEL DARCEY and DENNIS HURLEY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Corker , about the hour of eight in the night of the 27th of September , and feloniously stealing an iron poker, value 2s. an iron shovel, value 2s. a pair of iron tongs, value 2s. a cotton handkerchief, value 3d. and two aprons, value 2s. the property of the said John Corker.

MARY CORKER sworn. - My husband is a seafaring man , we live in Penton-street : On the 27th of September, between seven and eight o'clock, I went out, locked the door, and put the key in my pocket; I returned in about a quarter of an hour at farthest, and found the door open, and Darcey in the room, I sainted away with the fright; when I recovered I went to the door, and he gave me a kick on the side, and breast; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Don't you know Darcey lives in the street? - A. Yes; and his wife has been with me to pay for the things, but I could not take it; his brother lives opposite to me.

Q. Who was it took the poker from him when he was laying about you so lustily? - A. It was not me.

Q. Did you not say, if they would give you four pounds you would not come against them? - A. I never said such a word; there is only three rooms in the house, I have no sailors or ladies live there, only my husband; I expect to get nothing by a conviction but my things back; I never heard of any reward; the poker was taken from Eleanor Randall, who was with me.

ELEANOR RANDALL sworn. - I live in the house with my father, who is a waterman: I went with Mrs. Corker to Deptford, to see her husband; we returned to her house, and went to get a pint of beer for supper, she locked the door; we went back again, and I had got the pint of beer in my hand; the door was open, and I went in first, and there was Darcey in the room, standing before the table; Mrs. Corker fell on the bed in a saint; he had the two aprons in his bosom, between his coat; I said, what business have you here; the words he said are not fit for me to make use of; he had the tongs and shovel, I got hold of the poker, and he endeavoured to pull it from me; I held it till he got outside of the door, when his wife and brother-in-law, Hurley, assisted him; he came and laid hold of the poker, and struck me under the side, I let go and called out murder.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Did you see him put the aprons in his bosom? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew him? - A. Yes; he lived in the street.

Q. Did not the wife come up to assist her husband, who was drunk, under the idea he would be killed? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did not you strike him with the poker? - A. No, I did not; he was pulling the poker, and got it out of the house; and whether to say he was drunk or not I cannot.

Q. Did not the wife come to assist her husband? - A. No; she was at the door, and helped him to pull the poker from us.

Q. Will you swear Hurley was there? - A. I will; I took notice of him.

Q. Upon your oath, will you swear he was on the spot at the time it took place? - A. He hit me under the side.

JOHN WILLIAMSON sworn. - I was at my lodging, and heard a great noise in the street; I went out, and saw the women fighting with the young man; and the old man, who had a poker, and a pocket handkerchief, he was struggling with Mrs. Corker, and struck her twice over the shoulder; I heard Eleanor Randall cry out murder, and went over to assist her, when Darcey struck me with the poker; I saw Hurley, and he said he did not care for any one in the street, for he would wallop them all; I did not see any thing pass between him and Eleanor Randall; Darcey was not to be called sober, I took the handkerchief from him.

JOSEPH CLARKE sworn. - I am headborough: I apprehended the prisoners the same night, about a quarter before eight o'clock; Hurley was with Darcey; I took Hurley to the watch-house, he said he knew nothing of it; I got another headborough and returned back, and found the door fast; I knocked, and was answered by Darcey's wife that he was not there; I then broke the door open, I searched the room, and found him under the bed in one corner, with the bed-clothes over him, he was rather in a slate of intoxication, I took him to the watch-house.(Robert Brown confirmed the evidence of the last witness.)

Darcey's defence. I was drunk on Sunday afternoon; I was going home and met these two women, and they began to abuse me; I was going over to strike them, that is the truth, and I fell into the kennel; they went in to get the poker, and I followed; that is all the harm I did.

Hurley's defence. I was at home eating my supper, I heard a wrangle in the street, but never went near the door.

For the Prisoners.

WILLIAM HART sworn. - I was near Mrs. Corker's house on Sunday evening, when the noise was, it was about dusk; I heard Darcey coming down the street, in liquor; I was right opposite the door, and I turned into the door for fear he should see me; there were a good many people in the street; he went to his brother Riley's house, just opposite Corker's door, and Mrs. Corker came out and said, you nastly Irish b-r, what business have you there; he went into the middle of the street, and said, he never offended the woman; she said, you lie, you Irish b-r, you did; she run into the door, he was going to take up some mud to throw at her, but fell into the mud; she fetched out a poker; then his wife came out, and sung out, murder; and another woman assisted her, and they forced the poker away from Mrs. Corker; I did not see the other lad concerned in it; that is all I saw. I work on board a ship, and was applied to when I came home from work; I am not related at all to the prisoners.

MARY HART sworn. - I saw Mrs. Corker go in and bring out the poker, and say, she would split his skull; then Mrs. Darcey called for assistance, and Mrs. M'Carthy came to her; they took the poker away, and carried it home.

MARGARET M'CARTHY sworn. - I saw Darcey coming down in liquor, and his wife after him; he is almost cracked when he is drunk; he went to his brother's door, opposite the bawdy-house, which is Mrs. Corker's, as they call her; she said to him, what do you make such a noise for. (Repeats the evidence of William Hart .)

MARY COOKE sworn. - Hurley was up stairs in his own room at Darcey's, when the noise began, and I told him to mind my child while I went for some bread; he did so, and never went out.

Q.(To Clarke). Does Corker keep a house of good reputation? - A. To the best of my knowledge, I know but little of them, I never saw them half a dozen times before this, I live about twenty-three doors from them; if they kept a bad house, I think I should hear of it; I don't know a soul in the house; it is possible girls of the town might live there, but I don't know it; they have been there but a very little while.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I have known Mrs. Corker between five and six years; I understand she is a married woman; I never heard of her keeping a bad house, any more than sailors may lodge there.

Q. Is it possible a girl of the town may be there, and you not know it? - A. Certainly.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-68

827. ELIZABETH MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a straw bonnet, value 21s. the property of James Maine and Henrietta Wooster , privately in their shop .

ELIZABETH MILLER sworn. - I attend in Mr. Maine's shop, in Middle-row : On the 7th of September, between five and six o'clock, it being light, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for a yard of twist, which I served her, it was 3d. a yard; she laid a shilling down, and said, she was going further, and would return in a minute or two, that was while I was measuring it; she re

turned in a minute or two, and I gave her the change and the twist, and she went away; in about a minute or two afterwards Mr. Maine came in and missed a bonnet from the corner of the window; it was a very fine straw bonnet, I saw it not long before; there was more than one bonnet, and I missed it because there was the place where it had lain; no other person had been in the shop to my knowledge; we did not see the bonnet again till she came by with it on her head; she never came to the shop afterwards.

JAMES MAINE sworn. - I put the bonnet in the window about ten o'clock, and there were others in the window of the same shape; I have know the prisoner near twelve months, she used to come for yards of twist; the shilling was brought up to me to give change; I was informed of the robbery, and ran into the street, but saw nothing of her: On the 26th of September I was standing in the shop, and saw her go by with the bonnet on her head; I ran out, and tapped her on the shoulder; I asked her to come back, she said she would bye and bye, for she was going further; I said, a person wished to speak with her, and she must come back; at last I got her back; Mrs. Wooster asked her where she got the bonnet; she said she bought it and paid for it of a person standing in the Borough, but had had it turned, I sent for an officer, and took her to Hatton Garden; I know the bonnet, because we had half a dozen of the same sort, shape, and make, but the rest we sold.

Inward. I apprehended the prisoner, and found the bonnet on her head. (The bonnet was identified).

Prisoner's defence. I went into the Borough, and bought it of a Jew woman I met, she had three or four bonnets to sell; I asked her the price; she asked thirteen shillings; I offered ten shillings; she took it, and it was then as it is now. I was passing the shop, and was stopped; but Mr. Maine said, if I would give him a guinea, he would let me go; I said, I had not got one, and he bid me pawn my cloak.

Maine. I never said so, I should be ashamed of it GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing goods, value 4s. 9d.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-69

828. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , one pound weight of coffee, value 1s. the property of Edward Hanson , John Pearson , Thomas Styles , Daniel Gossettt , and William Pearson the younger .

DANIEL GOSSETT sworn. - I am a public warehouse-keeper , in partnership with the other persons named in the indictment, commonly called bullporters ; the prisoner was one of my labourers at Paul's Wharf, in the coffee warehouse.

- FOX sworn. - I am an Excise locker; I detected the prisoner with the coffee on Saturday, the 26th of April, at one o'clock; I searched him, and found it loose in his breeches pocket, in the warehouse; he said, he only took it for his private use; the prosecutors are responsible for it; I delivered it to the constable.

JAMES BRADY sworn. - I am a Custom-house locker; I took the coffee from the prisoner, I cannot say whose it is; it is raw coffee; he was inside of the warehouse.

JOHN WAINWRIGHT sworn. - I am a constable, and received this coffee of Fox.

Prisoner's defence. At eleven o'clock, I went out to buy a halfpennyworth of apples of an old woman, who asked me if I would buy any coffee, which she had picked up under a warehouse; I gave her sixpence for it, and they took it from me.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Publicly whipped 100 yards on Paul's Wharf .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-70

829. EVAN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , two hundred pounds weight of sugar, value 5l. the property of Jeremiah Ives the elder , Jeremiah Ives the younger , Joseph Echalaz , and John Green Bazely .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

THOMAS HARRIS sworn. - I live in Featherstone-street, am a dealer in slates, and know the prisoner; he called upon me in May, I believe, and said, I have bought a lot of sugar, being just married, I thought to go into business, but I should be glad now to dispose of it, for I have altered my mind, and will thank you to take a few loaves of sugar of me; I am not sure whether he mentioned the number or not; I said, a few loaves were no object, as he had them upon hand, he might send a few; he said I should have them at a fair market price, but no price was mentioned; about a week after, when I went home, there was the sugar in a bag; there were ten loaves of sugar, my wife paid for it, and I shall know the receipts.(The receipts and bill produced.)

Q. Are those the receipts and list you saw? - A. I cannot swear to the hand-writing; I believe this list is the same.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you to say, that the sugars were to be sold to you at a fair market price? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not sell them like a thief? - A. By no means.

Q. You know he is a respectable young man? - A. I understood he lived with a merchant, but did not know where; I considered him as a respectable young man.

Q. When he said he would let you have them at a fair market price, your ideas of his respectability did not vanish? - A. By no means.

Q. You will not take upon yourself to say you

know any thing about the receipts? - A. I don't know that I saw them.

Q. Do you know the signature? - A. I do not.

Q. Have you spoken to this list from belief, or from certainty? - A. Only so far, that when I went home there were some numbers and the list, the numbers and the list tallied; I believe it to be the list of the sugar I saw in the house, but have no other opportunity of knowing it, as I did not tally it with the weight.

CHARLES WIDDER sworn. - The firm of the house is Jeremiah Ives the elder, Jeremiah Ives the younger, Joseph Echalaz, and John Green Bazeley; I am clerk in the house, and know the prisoner, he was a porter; I know his handwriting, having seen him often write; I have no doubt this list is his writing. (The list read as follows):

Weight of 12 Loaves of Sugar.

No. 1 - 8 1/2 lb.

2 - 9 1/2

3 - 10

4 - 9 1/2 Jones.

5 - 9 1/2

6 - 9

7 - 10 Jones.

8 - 10

9 - 8 1/2

10 - 10

11 - 10

12 - 10 1/2

116 1/2

At 1s. - 5l. 16s. 3d.

The list itself is Jones's hand-writing, but as to the name against several items I cannot be so positive; I believe the receipts also to be his writing, I have no doubt of it; my masters deal in loaf sugar, and the prisoner attended at their warehouse, in Thames-street.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I produce the sugar found at Mr. Harris's.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you cannot identify the sugar?

Mr. Const. A. No, I cannot.

SARAH HARRIS sworn. - I am the wife of Mr. Harris, and know the prisoner Jones: I received some small loaves from a porter, and the prisoner came some night after and weighed them; he reckoned how much they came to at his own price upon paper, which Mr. Echalaz has got, (the list produced): this is the list he made, and I paid him about a fortnight after, according to his calculation, 5l. 16s. it was rather late, and I thought he wanted the money; so he wrote receipts on four pieces of paper as we could not get a stamp; the list was made out the same night the sale was made, I believe it was in April; we used several of the loaves, the rest were taken away; they were the same we bought of the prisoner.

WILLIAM BIRCHAM sworn. - I lived servant with Messrs. Ives and Echalaz last April with the prisoner; I was clerk, and he was warehouseman; sugars were deposited in the warehouse in Thames-street; on the 24th of April Jones opened two hogsheads and took out thirteen loaves of sugar, without authority, belonging to Messrs. Ives, and sent them by Job Dawson, a porter, to the house of Harris, in Featherstone-street: Jones told me they were paid for, and gave me 3l. for my share: in about two months I was accused with it; in order to hide the deficiency in weight we put in a pavement stone and some bricks. and the hogiheads were sent to Hambro'.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The prosecutors have the good fortune to have you as a principal clerk in their business? - A. I am one of them.

Q. It was your duty to superintend and watch over the conduct of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. The story you have told to-day you have told at two different times in this Court before, have you not? - A. No.

Q.Whether you have not, upon two different trials, given evidence against the prisoner, and he has been acquitted? - A. I have not only once.

Q. And then the Jury acquitted Jones? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give your evidence before the Grand Jury? - A. Yes.

Q. Was not the bill thrown out? - A. I don't know.

Q. I understood that you said not a word of this till you were accused of the felony yourself? - A. I was accused.

Q. Upon your oath, did you say a word about this business until you and the prisoner were accused of stealing the sugar? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You have received the money however? - A. Yes.

Q. There was no harm in that I suppose? - A. Yes there was.

Q. And yet you pocketed the affront and the money, and thought no harm in putting pavement stones and bricks into your masters' hogsheads that were to be sent abroad? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. You did think it harm, but you did it, and played a fraud on those who were to receive it abroad, yet never mentioned it till you were charged with it? - A. No.

Q. Are you still clerk in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. I give them joy of you. -(Job Dawson was called upon his recognizance.)

Prisoner's defence. I will not trespass long upon the time of the Court. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I stand here the object of most inveterate malice, grounded by the means of Bircham, who, to avoid the arm of justice himself, has taken

advantage of my unfortunate situation, and has endeavoured to saddle me with his guilt; the malice is evident, from the proceedings of the prosecutors last Sessions, who brought forward that young man to swear that two bags of cotton were missing from their warehouses; when, upon a question being put by my learned and able Counsel, Mr. Knapp, he confessed he knew nothing of it, but that his masters told him to swear so; it is clearly malice; also Mr. Echalaz deliberately and coolly told me, Jones, I'll hang you, if it costs me twenty thousand pounds; if there is any greater instance of malice, I don't know what it is; and if this don't do, says he, I will find a method that shall; those were his own words, confessed before every Gentleman on the Bench; I humbly submit, therefore, in consideration of the length of time I have been in trouble, having a pregnant wife, and being myself reduced to the last extremity, from the stigma brought on me, that you will be convinced and satisfied I am not the person they wish to represent me; notwithstanding Bircham has confessed to his robbing them to such an extent, still they retain him in their service, and I, who am innocent of every charge, am become the object of prosecution.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-71

830. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , one hat, value 5s. the property of James Armstrong .

JAMES ARMSTRONG sworn. - I live in the house of Dickson and Ramsey, No. 9, St. Mary Hill: On the 9th of this month, there came a person into the warehouse, and asked for a letter to the hospital; we answered, there were none of the gentlemen in the way, and he said, God bless you, whether you do or not; I had occasion to go out a few minutes after, and missed my hat, and an old hat was left in the room of it, on the nail where mine hung; I touched the hat left, and found it warm, and suspicion fell on the person who had been in; I called to a young gentleman to go and see after the person; we went, but could not find him; on the day following, I was told of my hat; I went to Worship-street, and had him secured, with my hat on his head; he was at the end of Worship-street; I kicked his hat out of the warehouse; I had been out but a very little while before, and hung it up there; the value is five shillings.

JOHN KINGHORN sworn. - I am clerk in the house of Dickson and Ramsey: On the 10th of October, the prisoner came in with something under his arm; he went away; Mr. Armstrong went to take his hat, but found a very old one; it was not worth sixpence; on the day following, I saw a man and woman fighting; I saw it was the prisoner with Mr. Armstrong's hat on, as I thought; I told Mr. Armstrong of it, and we both came down together, and found the prisoner near the same spot; he said, he had bought it for two shillings of a man in Westminster.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer; this is the hat. (The hat was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I went to the house for a letter; I had a drop of drink; I put my own hat down, and made a mistake to take his; I could not find the house again; I am a poor man, with a bad rupture and legs.

Armstrong. The peg where it hung is above six feet from the ground. GUILTY, aged 59.

Of stealing to the value of 10d.

Two months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-72

831. JOHN WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , one counterpane, value 3s. the property of Edward Edwards .

EDWARD EDWARDS sworn. - I am a broker and auctioneer ; I advertized a sale on the 25th of September, at Holborn-hill, and I was informed a counterpane was stolen, which I am answerable for.

- sworn. - I went to the attic story to get the sale ready, and saw the prisoner in a disagreeable situation; I thought he had taken something, and followed him down, and took him at the bottom of the house, with the counterpane in his breeches.

Mrs. LLOYD sworn. - I know it to be the counterpane that covered the children's bed.( James Coleman produced a bunch of keys, and the counterpane, which were identified by Mrs. Lloyd.)

Prisoner's defence. I'll thank your Lordship to shew me mercy.

GUILTY, aged 66.

Of stealing to the value of 10d.

Confined two months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-73

832. CATHERINE BRANNON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , one cotton gown, value 5s. one body of a gown, value 2d. a pair of stockings, value 2d. a pair of mits, value 1d. a handkerchief, value 2d. and a cap, value 1d. the property of Thomas Dovran .

CATHERINE DOVRAN sworn. - My husband is at sea; I live at No. 1, Orange-court, Drury-lane : I was robbed on the 23d of this month, out of the room where the prisoner slept, out of my box; she slept in that room; on Friday, I heard the door was opened; I went to my box, and apparently the lock had been forced open; I left it locked; I missed the things in the indictment; the prisoner was not in the room at that time; I last saw the prisoner in the room the day before; I saw

the things before the Justice; I did not see her again till she was apprehended.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me you would lend me your gown - you said, yes, and said, it was up stairs? - A. No.

Q. Did I not tell you I would bring it home on Saturday night? - A. No.

Court. Q. Upon your oath, did you lend her your gown? - A. No.

Q. Did she ask you? - A. No.

WILLIAM BLACKMOOR sworn. - I am a constable, and produce the things; I found them on her; she denied every thing.

WILLIAM MORRIS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, and produce a gown the prisoner pledged; I have seen her before; she told me it was her daughter's gown.(The property was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I was distressed, and she said she would lend me a gown. GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-74

833. WILLIAM LEFEVRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , nine pounds of beef, value 4s. 6d. and a leg of lamb, value 3s. the property of James Wilson .

JAMES WILSON sworn. - I am a butcher ; I live at No. 127, Whitechapel-road side : On Monday, the 12th of October, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I lost the articles; I did not see him take them; I was called out, and told I was robbed; I went to the door, and the prisoner was there, with the meat in his hand: I believe I said, what do you mean by stealing the meat; he said, he was going to shew it his brother; the nine pounds of beef, and leg of lamb, were both in his hands, I took it from him into the shop; he said, let us make it up, and have something to drink, and I will pay you for it, but I took him to the office; I value it at nine shillings.

ROBERT PORTER sworn. - I am a butcher; I saw the prisoner come out of the shop with the meat; he kept walking on; my brother caught hold of him, and told me to call Mr. Wilson out; he got about five steps, and my brother caught hold of him, and told me to call Mr. Wilson out; he got about five steps, and my brother brought him back.

Prisoner's defence. I never was from the door; my brother and I were going to a supper, and I was to buy the meat; I took it to show my brother, who was buying some apples just by; I told Mr. Wilson I should buy one or the other.

GUILTY , aged 26. - Confined two months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-75

834. ELEANOR RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , twelve pounds of bacon, value 6s. the property of John Hudson .

JOHN HUDSON sworn. - I live in Poplar , and am a publican : On Sunday, the 11th of October, about five o'clock, missing a piece of bacon, I suspected the prisoner, she slept in a little hovel near to the side of the New Dock; on searching there, we found the bacon hid under some straw; I had bought it a few days before; she gave me the key of her hovel; there was another woman there when I gave charge of the prisoner.

ROBERT SLORTER sworn. - I am headborough of Poplar; Mr. Hudson sent for me; the woman was in custody at his house; there were two women, and I took charge of both at first: the prisoner said the other was not concerned at all with the bacon, but that she was in liquor, and did take it. (The bacon produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was in liquor; they have bought things of me which I took out of the brickfield at their desire; as to the bacon, I know I am guilty of taking it. GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-76

835. BRIDGET JOYCE and MARY JOYCE were indicted, for that they, on the 29th of August , five pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, of the likeness of good shillings, the same not being cut in pieces, did put off to Judith Smith at a lower rate than they did import, that is to say, for 2s. in monies numbered .

The evidence not being sufficient to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-77

836. BRIDGET JOYCE , and MARY JOYCE , were again indicted for that they, on the 29th day of August , one piece of counterfeit and milled money, of the likeness of a good half-guinea, the same not being cut in pieces, did put off to Ann Gordon at a lower rate than it did import, that is to say, for 3s. in monies numbered .

ANN GORDON sworn. - The prisoners lived in Field-lane, Holborn : On Saturday, the 29th of August, Mrs. Smith and I went to their house to buy bad money; Mrs. Smith asked them if they had any, and the mother said, yes; then the daughter produced half-a-guinea, and gave it to me; she went out of doors for it, by the mother's desire; I gave the daughter three shillings for it, which was the price agreed on, and she put it into her pocket; we also bought a seven-shilling piece.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was not you who were to purchase the half-guinea, but Mrs. Smith? - A. It was me she made the bargain for both.

Q. It was to be purchased by you and her together? - A. No, by myself.

Q. Do you mean to say the half-guinea was purchased by yourself only? - A. Yes; Mrs. Smith said, I was to give three shillings for it.

Q. Did you not once say, you did not hear what Mrs. Smith said? - A. There were many words passed; I heard her ask how much I was to give for it, and the daughter said, three shillings.

Q. What way of life are you in? - A. I am Mr. Smith's house-keeper, who is a waterman and lighterman, and lives in Warwick Place, Stepney; I do this for the public good only; Mrs. Smith has not told me I am to have any thing; I don't know there is a farthing; I have not been told I shall be paid by any body, I give my time for nothing; Mrs. Smith applied to me, not I to her.

JUDITH SMITH sworn. - I went with Gordon to Joyee's in Field-lane, on Saturday, the 29th of August, about eleven o'clock, and saw the mother, daughter, and two other women, in a lower room, in Field-lane, Holborn; we went to buy bad money; Ann Gordon bought half-a-guinea for three shillings; the mother said, she had but one, and Gordon should have that; the daughter went out of doors, by direction of the mother, and brought it in, and gave it to Gordon, and three shillings were given to the daughter; I asked for some bad silver, and if they had any seven-shilling pieces; they said, they had none then, but I could have them in two or three days.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How do you know this was on the 29th of August? - A. I kept an account of it; I did not say it was the 21st.

Q. Did you not first say that it was the 21st, and were you not afterwards told, it was wrong, and was it not altered? - A.Never, to my knowledge.

Q. Who told Ann Gordon it was the 29th? - A. I knew the day of the month, and I wrote it down.

Q. Then it was you who told Gordon it was the 29th? - A. No, she knew it as well as me.

Q.She knew what you went for? - A. It was no secret.

Q. Every thing you said, was heard by every body there? - A. Yes.

Q. And Gordon must have heard what you said? - A. Yes.

Q.She said nothing, did she? - A. Not particularly; she asked for the half-guinea, and made the bargain for it, and not me; I first asked for it, and she was to have it; an application was made to me by a woman of Bermondsey about bad money, and I understood the prisoner went about with bad money, so I was willing to see into it, and asked Gordon to go with me on Saturday; I mentioned it to Mr. Rogers, and he said, I had better go, and make a purchase; I never told Gordon she was to get any thing by it, I never expect a farthing, or she either.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I am a Policeofficer; Judith Smith gave information, and a warrant was granted to apprehend the prisoners; their house is in Field-lane, Holborn, in the liberty of Saffron-hill, Ely-Rents, and Hatton-Garden, in the county of Middlesex - it is called Union-court; I went there on Tuesday, the 1st of September, but understood they had absconded; however, I laid watch, and on the 1st of October, I went, and saw Mrs. Joyce, and the young one, and the husband; I instantly laid hold of Bridget Joyce 's pockets, and, in a struggle to get them off, some silver fell on the floor; I held them tight, and took them to the public-house, where I opened them; in one, were these twelve counterfeit shillings, and some good money, part in paper by themselves, and part loose; I gave the good money to the prisoner, and kept the bad; I did not search the daughter.

JOHN RILEY sworn. - I am an officer, and was with Rogers; three shillings fell out of Bridget Joyce's pockets, which I picked up; they are bad.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am a waterman, and was with Rogers and Bailey; I searched the daughter, and took two bad sixpences from her. (Produces them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you the man Gordon lives with? - A. No.

Q. How happened it, you assisted? - A. I often go on board ship with them, and they asked me if I would go.

SAMUEL MENCILIN sworn. - I am one of the moniers of the Mint; this is a counterfeit half-guinea, and these shillings and sixpences are counterfeit.( Bridget Joyce gave in a written defence to the following purpose:)

That the prosecutors had endeavoured to force the child into a course of prostitution, but that, because she would not consent her daughter should live such an abandoned life, they made this charge against her; that they had endeavoured to persuade the child to quit her father's house, and they would give her money and cloaths, and did give her money to the amount of fifteen shillings, which she brought home, and which proved to be all bad, but which she put in her pocket, where it was found, and praying to be restored to her disconsolate husband, and tender family.

Bridget Joyce, GUILTY , aged 45.

Mary Joyce , GUILTY , aged 12.

confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18011028-78

837. THOMAS HOLLIS and WILLIAM SKINNER were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October, five business of horse provender, consisting of horse-beans, bran, and cut hay, mixed together, value 6s. and a hempen sack, value 4s. the property of William

Bough and John Holmes ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Gleed.)

JOHN NORTON sworn. - I am servant to the prosecutors, and know Thomas Hollis ; I saw him on Saturday night, the 10th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock, coming from my master's yard with a sack on his back; I followed him down the street, when I lost him; but saw him again the next morning, about eight o'clock, in my master's yard; I attacked him with stealing corn, but he denied it; but he afterwards owned it; I told him it lay with my master to deal with him as he liked; he cried, and said, he took the provender out of the stable at night, and he gave it to a man, near the Green Dragon, at Poplar, with a horse and cart; and that it was put into the cart; and the man offered to give him potatoes or onions, or what he wanted; I took him into custody, and Brown, the constable, was sent for; and we went to the house of Skinner, but he was not at home; we found him at a public-house, and he was asked where his stable was; he said, he had not any; Brown went to find it, and left me to take care of him; Brown searched him, and found a key of the stable in his pocket; when Skinner was left with me, he wanted to get away, and collared me; but Brown returned in about a minute, and handcuffed him, and took him to the stable, and searched it, and found a sack full of horse provender, composed of bran, beans, and hay; I knew the sack.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. When Hollis confessed, was he drunk or sober? - A.Sober; I sent for the constable in about a quarter of an hour; he was a little intoxicated at the office, but sober when he confessed; we missed the sack the next day.

- BROWN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell-office; I was sent for to Mr. Bough's, at Poplar; I went and found Hollis a prisoner in the watch-house; I asked him where the person lived who received it; he said, a little above No. 40, in Rosemary-lane; that he kept a little house, and went about selling greens; I went to the house of Skinner, but he was not at home; then I went to the King's-arms, in Blue Anchoryard, Bough's servant was with me; as soon as Skinner saw me, he held his head down on the table; I took hold of him, and said, it is you I want, you must go with me; he pretended to be much in liquor; I took him to the Windmill public-house, and left him with Norton while I found the stable, which I did, and found the door locked; I went back to the Windmill, and searched Skinner, and found this key, (produces it;) I was going along the passage, and heard a cry out; I went back, and found he had got Norton against the door, and had almost throttled him; the publican stood at the door to keep the people off, and we were five or six minutes before we could handcuff him; I went to the stable which he said was his, and found the sack and provender; I locked it up, being Sunday, and on Monday morning went with Mr. Bough to Skinner in the watch-house, and then he said he bought it of a man facing the Green Dragon, Poplar, between ten and eleven o'clock at night; and they confessed it before the Magistrates.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. In what state were they? - A. Hollis appeared to be sick from liquor in the outer office, but he was very well when he went into the Magistrates; I cannot say whether he was sober or drunk; he answered every question put to him very well.

WILLIAM BOUGH sworn. - I am one of the contractors for digging the docks at Blackwall; John Holmes is my partner; Hollis was my horsekeeper, and had free access to the provender to feed the horses; I believe nobody fed their horses as we did in that neighbourhood.(Confession of Thomas Hollis read:)

"I have lived in the service of Bough and Holmes about four months; the sack, containing horse provender, I took from my master's yard in Poplar on Saturday evening, and the same evening I gave the said horse provender to the prisoner, William Skinner , who has frequently asked me to procure horse provender for him."(Confession of William Skinner read:)

"I live in Windmill-court, Rosemary-lane; I have a horse and cart, with which I convey vegetables about; on Saturday last I was in Poplar, at the Green Dragon public-house, the prisoner applied to me, saying, he had some victuals for my horse; I asked him how much it was; he said, two shillings; I offered him one shilling and six-pence, which I gave him."

Thomas Hollis . I was intoxicated I know nothing about it.

William Skinner. I know nothing of it; I can neither read or write.

The prisoner Skinner called six witnesses to his character. Hollis, GUILTY , aged 28.

confined six months in the House of Correction .

Skinner, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-79

838. ANTHONY KIDMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , a seven-shilling piece, half-a-crown, one shilling, a bank-note, value 10l. and two other bank-notes, value 5l. each, the property of Timothy Martin .

TIMOTHY MARTIN sworn. - I am a shipwright , and live at No. 28, in Hillier's-court,

Old Gravel-lane; I have known the prisoner three years and upwards; he is an anchor-smith by trade: On Saturday, the 10th of October, about eleven o'clock, I received a twenty-five-pound note of Mr. Faith, a merchant; the prisoner waited for me, and we had a pot of beer at Smith's; from there we went to Fairclough's, who keeps a public-house; I changed the note at Smith's, and paid one pound which I owed a ship-mate; I received three five-pound notes, and a ten-pound note; one five-pound note I changed to pay the one-pound note and the reckoning, and then I had two five-pound notes, a ten-pound note, a two-pound note, two seven-shilling pieces, half-a-crown, and a shilling; the prisoner went with me to Fairclough's, and I gave him a seven-shilling piece to get some beef-steaks with, about one o'clock in the afternoon, and staid there till about six; we had porter, gin, and brandy and water; I was not sober; when I came out, the prisoner came with me, and wanted me to have more drink; I was going home, which was about a quarter of a mile; I said, I would have no more; then he laid hold of me, and put his hand into my pocket; I knew I had put my money and bank-notes there, because I felt for them before; I felt him take every thing out, money and notes, upon my oath; I laid hold of his hand, but could not hold him, and he was off as quick as thought; I had given Fairclough a two-pound note to pay for what I had, and he did not think it prudent to let me have the change, and the prisoner wanted it, but he would not give it, as he said I knew where to find him when I was sober; I don't know the number of the notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Did you drink any thing at Smith's before you went to Fairclough's? - A. Yes, a pot of beer; then we went to Fairclough's, and had two or three pots of beer, and a couple of glasses of gin; I don't know whether the prisoner was drunk, but I was; Fairclough said, I was groggy, and had better call for the change.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner that you would come and live with him when you were not at sea? - A. I don't know that he had a house.

Q. Where about in the street was it that he took the money out of your pocket? - A. Near to Mr. Philips's brewhouse-gate, a couple of hundred yards from Fairclough's; I saw the money not half an hour before; I was afraid to cry out, thinking, if I did something, worse might happen; it is a public street, but I saw nobody; I never said I gave it him, upon my oath; I then went home; I did not go to Smith's again that night, but, on Sunday, I did, and asked him if I had left my money there.

Q. If you knew the prisoner had taken it all from you, how came you to go there? - A. I did not thoroughly recollect.

Q. Perhaps you don't recollect now? - A. Yes, I do, and am very sorry I do.

THOMAS DAVIS sworn. - I am a waterman and lighterman, and know the prosecutor: On Saturday I saw him at Mr. Faith's; Smith's is opposite to Mr. Faith's; I went to Mr. Smith's, and got the note changed; that Smith's is a liquor-shop; there are two Smith's; I took one pound four shillings for one of his ship-mates, who lodges with me; I left him at Smith's, the liquor-shop, nobody was with him then; about ten minutes after, I saw him at Smith's, the public-house; I don't know the numbers of the notes; the prisoner was there; I left them together.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. The prisoner was not by when the prosecutor received the change? - A. No, he was at the other Smith's; the prosecutor called on me on Sunday morning, before I was up, and asked me if I had any money; I said, I had; says he, I want a little; I asked him what he had done with all his money; he said, he had lost it; I asked him where he parted with the prisoner; he did not say where, but said, he had been drinking at Fairclough's and Smith's, and two or three more houses; we then went about to enquire after it; I asked what time he had been at Smith's, the liquor-shop, on Saturday night; he said, he had been there sometime at night, and had something to drink, but he had no money; I then went to Smith, the publican, and asked when the prosecutor went from his house; I heard they both went away together; we then went to Mr. Donnell's, the Black Bull, New Gravel-lane, to enquire after the prisoner, where we heard the prisoner had wanted change for a ten-pound note; then the prosecutor said, "Anthony had his money."

WILLIAM FAIRCLOUGH sworn. - I keep the Swan and Lamb, and know the prosecutor and prisoner; they came to my house about ten o'clock on Saturday; they were rather fresh in liquor; they had some beer, and Martin sent for steaks; after dinner, he called for the reckoning; they had two pots of beer, two half pints of gin, and four or five half pints of rum; they gave some of it away; he gave me a two-pound note, and Kidman asked me for the change; I told him Martin gave me the note, and I should give him the change; I saw Martin was so much in liquor, and that he had a seven-shilling piece and half-a-crown, I thought it was money enough, and told him to call to-morrow for the change; I saw no more of them that day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. The prisoner was not so drunk as Martin? - A. I have known the prisoner some years; he is very well when solid and sober, but, when drunk, he is like a mad fellow.

PETER DONNELL sworn. - I keep the Black-Bull, in New Gravel-lane; I saw the prisoner on Saturday, between eight and nine o'clock in my house; he had a pot of beer, and offered me a ten-pound note to change; I said, I had not change; my house is close to Fairclough's; it was changed in my house.

- WATES sworn. - I am an anchor-smith; I was at Donnell's house on Saturday night paying my men; the prisoner tendered a ten-pound note to Donnell for change; he could not, and I gave him two five-pound notes for it; he asked me to take care of one for him, for he should lose or spend it; but his wife took it; he took it from her, and brought me both of them to keep for him, for fear he should spend or lose them; I put them in my pocket book, and have them now.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. I have known him eleven years; he has worked under me when I was journeyman to Mr. Perry; I have trusted him with above a thousand pounds of stock around him, and always found him honest; when drunk, he collects the boys together, and exercises them.

JOHN RYLEY sworn. - I and Davis apprehended the prisoner at the Rising Sun, in Sir William Warren Square; I told him I wanted him on suspicion of robbing a man; he said, he would not go with a dozen such as me; then he would not be searched; and I drew a pistol out, and told him, if he made any resistance, he should have the contents; then he submitted to be searched, and I found two half-guineas, three seven-shilling pieces, and one pound fourteen shillings and six-pence, in silver, on him.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

For the prisoner.

- SMITH sworn. - I keep the liquor-shop; Martin and Davis came to me on Saturday for change for a twenty-five pound note, which I gave him in the evening, between four and five o'clock; Martin came in again with two women, who had a glass of Hollands each, and he had one; he was quite intoxicated; he said, he left the money at Smith's, the public-house; he had no money, and went away.

ANTHONY BURTON sworn. - I keep the Ship, at Blackwall; I asked Martin how he came to lose his money; he said, he had treated the prisoner with beef steaks, and they got in liquor together; and he did not know whether he did not give him the notes to take care of for him; when he spoke of the prisoner, he called him mad Anthony; I have known the prisoner twelve or fourteen years; he is a hard-working man, and is considered as an honest man.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18011028-80

839. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , five shirts, value 10s. five napkins, value 5s. one table cloth, value 1s. and a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. the property of Ann Adams .

ANN ADAMS sworn. - I live at No. 46, Broad-street, Carnaby-market; I am a widow , and take in washing and mangling ; I had the things to mangle, and am responsible for them: On the 18th of September, about a quarter after six o'clock, I put them up in a bundle, and put them on the child's head, and bid him take them to No. 6, Norfolk-street, Middlesex-Hospital, and deliver them to Mrs. Saville; about a quarter before seven, he returned without them; they were brought to me next day, by four o'clock in the afternoon.

ROBERT ADAMS sworn. - (After being examined as to the nature of an oath,) - I received the things from my mother, tied up in a coarse cloth; I put them on my head, and going along, I saw the prisoner at the corner of Wells-street, Oxford-street, opposite Berwick-street; I first met a tall man, who asked me what my name was, I said, Bob Adams ; says he, where are you going with those things; I told him, and he said, that's a good boy, make fraste; in about two minutes after, I met this man, says he, Bob, an't you coming along with those things? - I said, yes; says he, how much do they come to? I told him, three-pence; says he, have you got change? I said, no; then, says he, here is two-pence, and I will pay the penny another time, and he took them off my head, and put them under his arm, and walked away; I ran after him, and he took hold of my hand till he got to Berner's-street, and then he let go my hand, and said, he was going right with the things; I went home and told my mother.

Cross-examined by Mr. Agar. Q. You never saw that man before? - A. No, nor till many weeks after; I let him take the things which were brought back the next day.

JOHN ASHTON sworn. - (After being examined as to the nature of an oath.) - I live within a few doors of Bob Adams, and went with him to take the things; there was a tall man came up to Bob, in Poland-street, and asked him his name; he said, Bob Adams ; in about two minutes after, that man met him at the corner of Wells-street, and said, Bob, an't you coming with those things, and whether he had change, he gave him two-pence, and afterwards took them off Bob's head, and put them under his arm; Bob ran after him, and asked him if his name was Saville, and he said, yes.

HENRY LOVETT sworn. - I belong to Bow-street; I went after the prisoner immediately, on information on the 18th, but we could not find him; on the 23d of this month, I took him in company with Miller. (The things produced and identified by Mrs. Saville.)

MARY HIBBERT sworn. - The things were brought to me by Miller, who desired me to take them to No. 40, in Broad-street, he said there was something missing; I did so, I went back, and we received two shirts from Miller the same day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Agar. Q.These things Miller gave you, that belonged to Mrs. Adams, except two shirts, which he said he would bring? - A. Yes; and I took them all to her, and I was afterwards taken into custody.

GEORGE SAVILLE sworn. - I did not see either of the boys in the street, nor did I give authority to any person to take them.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to my counsel.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-81

840. JOHN WHITE, otherwise REYNOLDS, otherwise WILSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , two blankets, value 10s. two sheets, value 2s. and a quilt, value 2s. the property of John Horton .

JOHN HORTON sworn. - I am a silk and tabinet manufacturer , at No. 8, Henrietia-street, Covent-Garden : On the 14th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I heard a scream on the stairs; I went into the hall, and saw my wife very much confused, crying out, "the man, the cloaths, a thief;" I ran to the hall door, and thought I heard a man's foot, I did not see him.

RICHARD HORTON sworn. - I am the son of the prosecutor, and pursued the thief; I took him in Bedford-street, he was running but had nothing with him; he said, he had seen the man, that he was a tall man, and was running on before; another person came up and said, he was the man, and that he saw him throw the things away.

JAMES COOPER sworn. - I caught hold of the prisoner's coat, he dragged me along; I asked him if he had taken the things; he described another man to me, and said it was a tall man in a blue coat, without a hat.

- sworn. - I live in Feather's-court, Drury-lane; as I was walking along, the prisoner shoved me on the side with his elbow, with the property in his hand; he turned into Bedford-street, and I said to him, heave it higher, for it drags on the stones, he said, d-n me, I will, and he threw it up as high as his head, and is dropped in the street; I said to the person who followed him, there is the person, and I stopped by the things.

JOHN HARDWICK sworn. - I took the property to Mr. Horton's, it has been in my possession ever since. (The property identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it, I was not in Henrietta-street; I never saw the things till they were brought to Mr. Horton's; I ran as other people ran. GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-82

841. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , a silver watch, value 1l. 11s. 6d. the property of Alexander Weston .

ELIZABETH WESTON sworn. - I live at Wapping-wall , my husband is at sea, I lodge there; the prisoner I wash for, he is a sailor : On Saturday I was cleaning the stairs, he came to see me as an acquaintance; I desired him to go up, he did, but he came down before I had done; he said he was going home to his lodgings; he had been up stairs about ten minutes; it was a one pair of stairs room; when I went up, I missed the watch, it had hung up by the side of the room; I had seen it a few minutes before, and looked at it to see what time I should be done cleaning; I saw it again on Monday.(John Kent produced the watch, but refused to be sworn, being a quaker).

JOHN RILEY sworn. - On Sunday the 11th, the prisoner was brought to me by one Williams; I took him into custody; I went on Monday with the prosecutor to Mr. Kent, and Mr. Kent produced a watch.

Mrs. Weston. The prisoner said he took the watch and sold it, and told me where he had sold it; I did not promise favour.

Prisoner's defence. I took this watch, but not with intention of making away with it.

Mrs. Weston. I told him what anger I should have from my husband, and then he told me where it was; I have known him about two years, and never heard any thing against him before. (The watch was identified).

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-83

842. THOMAS SMITH and JOHN HUMPHRIES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , two plated tankards, value 1l. 11s. 6d. the property of John Cadell and Thomas Perring , Esqrs.

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of John Sanderson .

Third Count. Laying them to be the property of John-Hill Bennett .

As the property could not be identified, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-84

843. WILLIAM TARRATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , three dozen of worsted socks, value 20s. and five

pair of cotton stockings, value 10s. the property of Jane Clarke .

JANE CLARKE sworn. - I live in Great Mary-le-bonne-street , and am a haberdasher ; I missed the things immediately, they were in two separate bundles, and he knocked something down in taking them.

JAMES MASON sworn. - I am a waterman to hackney-coaches in Great Mary-le-bonne-street; last Monday was a week I was at the first coach, within twenty yards of Miss Clarke's shop, near eight o'clock, and I saw the prisoner come along with two other lads; I had a suspicion of them, and they went and looked through Miss Clarke's shop window, in which there were candles; he went into the shop and came out again very quick with a bundle under his arm; he ran across the street and I after him; I gave the alarm, and he was pursued directly; I saw him in about a minute and a half in Trigg's custody; I am sure he is the person, I knew him by fight before; the bundle was brought back.

WILLIAM TRIGG sworn. - I am a chairman, and was coming down Mary-le-bonne-street, I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner coming with a bundle running very fast towards me; he turned off the flag stones into the middle of the street; another person made a grab at him, and then he dropped the bundles, he had two, I picked them up, pursued him, and took him; he said he was not the person. (The property was identified.) GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18011028-85

844. JAMES WESTBROOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , one pig, value 380. the property of William Appleby .

WILLIAM APPLEBY sworn. - I live at Harrow , and am a farmer's servant , and keep a pig; I lost it out of my mistress's farm-yard; it was my own; it was lost between the 22d and 23d of September; I saw the pig the 24th at Kentish-Town, it was a spotted cow, about nine months old.

JOHN REED sworn. - I am son to Mrs. Reed, and know Appleby's pig, I saw it at Kentish-Town, I dare say he had it between two and three months; I had seen the prisoner in the neighbourhood before.

WILLIAM UPCHURCH sworn. - I live in Hampstead-road: On the 23d of September I had information and went in pursuit of two men under suspicion of stealing pigs; I took the prisoner, with the pigs; the other is not in custody; I asked whether they were going to Chalk Farm or not; they said what was that to me; I took Westbrook, and the other ran away; Reed and Appleby saw the pigs, and Appleby's among them.

Prisoner's defence. Cooper agreed with me to help drive them to Kentish-Town.

NICHOLAS PORTER sworn. - On the 23d of September one of the men asked me to buy; Westbrook never offered them to me; the other offered me them at six guineas.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18011028-86

845. BENJAMIN WOLFE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , seven pieces of cloth, containing in length one hundred yards, value 80l. twelve pieces of toilinet, containing in length seventy yards, value 30l. three pieces of kerseymere, containing in length thirty yards, value 5l. the property of Matthew Appleby and Thomas Arlington .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

MATTHEW APPLEBY sworn. - I am partner with Thomas Arlington, and our shop is No. 90, in Cornhill ; but we have no residence there, as it is under the Royal Exchange: On the 7th of October I saw the prisoner, about ten minutes after six, opposite the shop door; it was dusk; after I had locked the door I asked him what he wanted, for he was looking at me as I was locking the door; I suspected him and did not like the looks of him, as he had been past two or three times before; he made no reply, but went away; it might be five or six minutes between his passing the door and my speaking to him; but I have no doubt he is the person; I went to the shop next morning about a quarter before nine, and I saw a large stick laying on the floor; I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth above tool.; I saw a piece of blue cloth on Friday morning at Worship-street I know I lost from my shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Don't you know the prisoner came and surrendered himself? - A. I know they went to his house and he was not at home; I heard them say so.

Q. Have you always told the same story? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not say you were not certain whether that was the person? - A. I never said so.

Q. Did you not say when he came in, you were not certain? - A. I did for five minutes.

Q. Did not Armstrong say I thought you would have known the man directly? - A. No; I did not hear him.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you take five minutes to be sure that the prisoner was the man? - A. No, I suppose not so long; I knew it was the man as soon as I saw him, and I am sure of it.

HENRY MARTIN sworn. - I am shopman to Messrs. Appleby and Arlington: On the morning after the robbery I was the first person that opened

the shop, and I found this stick reared up against one of the windows. (Produces the stick).

JOHN RAY sworn. - I belong to Worship-street, and know the prisoner very well; I executed a search-warrant at No. 14, Union-street, Kingsland-road, where Wolfe occupied a first floor; his wife was at home and he was in custody; I was going to read my warrant, when Mrs. Wolse said, Oh Ray, you need not read your warrant; I proceeded to search, and observed her putting her hand very sharply into her pocket, I took hold of it and took out of it this duplicate, (produces it); it is for woollen cloth pawned for 1l. 1s. in the name of Wolfe, in Brick-lane, Spitalfields; I went there and found some cloth, and desired the pawnbroker to attend with it, which he did; I took the woman into custody, but did not find any thing of the prosecutor's but the duplicate; Wolfe owned he pledged the cloth.

JOHN VICKERY , sworn. - I belong to Worship-street, and went with Ray and Mason to the house of Wolfe, and found this dark lantern and chiffel; after the prisoner was committed I heard a conversation between Wolfe and his wife; Wolfe said to her, "this is a pretty job I have got into now, I should not have been here had it not been for you;" she said, "never mind, you'll get safe through it."

PETER MASON sworn. - I was with the two last witnesses; I went to desire Wolfe to come and speak to Mr. Armstrong, and tell him that another gentleman desired to see him at the Office about some business that might be of service to him and the public too; he was not at home, so I left the message, and he did come.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I went to look at the nature of the robbery, and after what Mr. Appleby told me, I desired him to be at the Office at eleven o'clock; I sent to Wolfe's house a message that there was a gentleman wanted to communicate something to him, and he came.

JOHN RICHARDS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, and know the prisoner perfectly well; he came to our house on Thursday morning before ten o'clock to pledge two yards three quarters of blue superfine woollen cloth; this is the duplicate I gave him.(The cloth produced).

Mr. Appleby. I have no doubt of it being my cloth; there is a selvage, and a very remarkable one; I have not the least doubt of it, but don't wish to swear positively to it.

- ANTHONY sworn. - I am a tailor, and purchased some blue cloth of Mr. Appleby, and this appears to be off the same piece; there was a remarkable selvage; I have some of the list of the cloth which I bought of Mr. Appleby. (Compares the list with the cloth produced). It is the same; I have no doubt of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say the piece of cloth you bought, and that was produced, are off the same piece? - A. I say so from the list.

Q. You took your's home, and left the rest behind? - A. Yes.

Q. How can you tell what became of it? - A. I cannot tell, I never saw such list before, and I believe it to be part of the cloth.

Prisoner's defence. This cloth is mine, I bought it; and if the prosecutor never had such cloth to sell before, what does he keep a shop for.

For the Prisoner.

CATHARINE BAINBRIDGE sworn. - I live at No. 14, Union-street; the prisoner lived in my front room, and generally came home about nine or ten o'clock; on the 7th of October he was at home at nine, and in the morning when I got up; I always see all safe at ten o'clock; but if my lodgers go out after, I cannot say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where the prisoner was on the 7th of October, at half past six, seven, eight, or half past eight, you don't know? - A. No.

Q. At seven o'clock in the morning you saw him? - A. Yes.

Q. But not afterwards? - A. No.

Q. Whether he was at the pawnbroker's or not, you don't know? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Did you ever see that stick in your house? - A. No.

ESTHER ROBERDIEN sworn. - I know the prisoner, and was in company with him and his wife at their lodgings on the 7th of October; I went in between eight and nine o'clock, and staid there till about time, when we supped together; I left them between nine and ten o'clock.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Where he was between seven and eight, you don't know? - A. No.

PASCO AARONSON sworn. - I know the prisoner, and am a traveller in the country: On the 7th of October I was coming along Shoreditch, about five o'clock, and I met the prisoner, and asked him if he had got any thing in my way; I staid about five minutes with him in the street, and then I went home with him, as he said he had something to shew me, and I staid with him till half past seven, or a quarter before eight, and he was not out of my company.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Have you had much dealing with the prisoner before? - A. Yes, I bought of him several times.

Q. Cloth, I suppose? - A. Sometimes cloth, if I can get it cheap; I have not bought any thing lately.

Q. How many times have you dealt with him? - A. Perhaps half a dozen times, and bought pieces of linen and cotton; I cannot say when I last bought; I have bought nothing of him these six months; I remember the 7th of October, because I bought two dozen pair of stockings, and because I paid my rent on the Monday before.

Q. Where he went from between the hours of seven and eight, till between eight and nine, you cannot say? - A. No. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-87

846. FRANCIS COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , forty pounds of raw sugar, value 20s. the property of Thomas Bolt .

JOHN STURGES sworn. - I am a constable of the Thames Police-office: On the 26th of September, between seven and eight o'clock, I was with my boat near Dice-quay, and I saw the prisoner come with a bag of sugar under his arm from the lighter called the Hardcastle; laying alongside, he stepped into my boat with it, and I kept him in custody till my officer came; I saw him go into the lighter and come out of it, he was not three minutes in it; there was no other person there.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see a man give me that parcel? - A. No.

Q. Did I not say it was nothing but scrapings? - A. No.

GEORGE COHEN sworn. - I am a Thames Police-surveyor; I was absent for a few minutes, and when I returned, I found the prisoner and a bag of sugar in the boat; I was told where he came from; I went on board the lighter, and there were two casks that had lost I dare say about ten or twelve hundred weight; there was another bag full which weighed twenty-eight pounds; I was surprised to find the lighter unprotected, but so it was; the hogsheads that were plundered were marked H R 51, and 55; I compared the sugar, and it corresponded with No. 51. (The sugar produced).

- ROBINSON sworn. - The lighter is Mr. Bolt's, who is responsible for it as lighterman.

Prisoner's defence. I was employed by a man to carry these bags of scrapings on shore.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined two months in Newgate , and publicly whipped 100 yards on Dice-quay .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-88

847. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , a pocket-book, value 5s. and a silver pencil case, value 3s. the property of Solomon Arden , privily from his person .

SOLOMON ARDEN sworn. - I am a baker , and live in Redcross-street: On Monday, the 28th of September, coming down Barbican, some person touched my pocket; I turned sharp round, and saw the prisoner turn back, and look it to a shopwindow; I felt in my pocket, and found every thing safe; I walked on till I came to Redcross-street, and crossed over to my own door; I then saw the prisoner on the other side of the way, walking down quite fast; I immediately felt in my pocket, and found I had lost my pocket-book and silver pencil-case, value eight shillings; I followed the prisoner, and saw him luck something under the left side of his coat, and button it up; there was the print of a book; I immediately cried, stop thief, when he set off, and run two or three yards; he then put his hand to his left side, and threw the book upon the ground; I ran after him, secured him, and brought him to my house, and sent for a constable; Clifton picked up the book, and brought it into the shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I understood you to say, you suspected somebody was about your pocket? - A. I did; but I was not certain whether he run against it; I felt something hit my pocket, whether it was an attempt to take it out, I cannot say, but the book was safe.

WILLIAM CLIFTON sworn. - I am a brewer's servant; I saw nothing of it, I only picked up the book. (The book produced and identified).(The prisoner's defence was read to the following purport;)

That he was innocent of the charge; that he was not on that side of the way, which he should have been able to prove, if the trial had been postponed; that, as he was walking along, he observed two men cross from the opposite side of the way, and, upon the cry of stop thief, one dropped the book, and walked off; that he always had maintained a good character, and been entrusted with great property; that he was of respectable family, and had no occasion to have recourse to such means to gratify any wish he might form.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing goods to the value of 10d.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18011028-89

848. JOHN BUTLER , alias WILLIAMS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , a pair of breeches, value 11s. a pair of shoes, value 7s. and a shirt, value 2s. 6d. the property of Joseph Grace .

JOSEPH GRACE sworn. - I lived in Ironmonger-row , in the house of Thomas Reed, and am a dyer ; the prisoner lodged in the same room with me; I went to bed about half past nine, but he went before; I got up first, and left the things at the side of the bed, in a chair, and never saw them again; there were more lodgers in the house.

ANN REED sworn. - I let the prisoner the lodging on the 29th, in the same room with the prosecutor; he went to bed, but asked how we opened the door, if we were not up; my husband shewed him; I did not see him again till the Thursday afterwards, when I charged him with the robbery; he said, he did not know me; I asked him if he

remembered sleeping in Ironmonger-row; he said, he knew he had slept there; I asked him how he could rob me; he said, he had not robbed me; I said it was the same thing; then he gave me a push to get by me, and he run along a passage to a yard, and he got over into the next yard; I followed him into the passage, and went into the next yard, and found him in a wash-house; the house belonged to an officer, and he was secured.

JOHN NOYS sworn. - I am a millwright, and live next door to Reed's; as I came out of my door in the morning of the 30th of September, I saw the prisoner in Reed's passage, about ten minutes after six, with a basket under his arm, full, and there was something laid white at the top of it; when he saw me, he turned round, and went towards the stairs; I did not see him come out.

Prisoner's defence. I never took any of the things; there were other lodgers in the house to take them, as well as me. GUILTY , aged 64.

Transported for seven years .


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