Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th September 1801.
Reference Number: 18010916
Reference Number: f18010916-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 16th of SEPTEMBER, 180l, and following Days, BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR WILLIAM STAINES , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors'-Commons.

1801.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE Sir WILLIAM STAINES , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir SIMON LE BLANC, Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Thomas Tyler ,

Thomas Mankin ,

Robert Burt ,

Henry Peart ,

William Parsons ,

Edward Kemp ,

Edward-London Witts ,

William Elliot ,

George Beauchamp ,

Joseph Hurcombe ,

Joseph Ridley ,

William Yateman .

First Middlesex Jury.

Henry Malpas ,

George Clarke ,

John Smith ,

Ralph Mills ,

Joseph Elwick ,

James Nicholas ,

William Hooton ,

John Mallard ,

Edward Southbrook ,

Thomas Sturt ,

John Nicholas ,

William Greenley .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Alexander Henderson ,

Philip Gosling ,

James Gaunt ,

Richard Davies ,

Joseph Ashley ,

George Eaves ,

John Hare ,

Thomas Havilly ,

George Henderson ,

James Woolley ,

William Smith ,

Richard Cox .

Reference Number: t18010916-1

628. JOHN FOSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a cloth coat, value 30s. two waistcoats, value 20s. a shirt, value 7s. three neck handkerchiefs, value 3s. a pocket handkerchief, value 6d. a silk handkerchief, value 5s. and a pair of stockings, value 3s. the property of Thomas Judge , in the dwelling-house of John Sweet .

THOMAS JUDGE sworn. - I live at No. 114, Fleet-street; I sent a boy for a box of mine, to Mr. Gibson's, in Well-street, Oxford-street, the boy's name is Thomas Sansum; I sent him on Saturday, the 8th of August, and he did not return till Sunday, when he told me they had been taken from him.

THOMAS SANSUM called. Q. How old are you? - A. Going of twelve.

Q. Do you know what an oath is? - A. No.

Q. Do you know the consequence of swearing falsely? - A. Yes.

Q.What is it? - A. I shall not go to God.(He is sworn.) I live with Mr. Judge: On the 8th of August, he sent me to Mr. Gibson's, in Wells-street, for some clothes; I left Mr. Gibson's about eight o'clock at night, with a box of clothes; when I got to the top of High-Holborn, I saw John Foster .

Q. Do you mean the prisoner; look at him?- A. I think it is.

Q. Have you any doubt about his being the man? - A. I think he is, he is in the same dress as when he met me, he had boots and a blue coat on; he asked me the way to Fleet-market; I told him I was going that way; he said he had come thirty miles, and he said he had come twelve miles without stockings; he asked me if I would go into a public-house to drink; I went with him into the Six Cans and Punch-Bowl; he took the box off my head, and put it on the table; he asked the publican for some beer, and pulled out sixpence, and sent me for some biscuits to eat with the beer, and when I came back, he was gone with the box; I searched after him for a few minutes, but could not find him; I staid all night in the street, because I was afraid to go home; I did not go home till three o'clock on Sunday; there was a bundle and an umbrella tied to the top of the box.

Q. Do you know what was in the box? - A. No.

JOHN SWEET sworn. - On the 8th of August, I saw the prisoner and the boy come in with the box; he ordered a pint of beer; the girl did not draw it so quick as I could wish, and I saw him go out; I said, don't go without your beer; he said, he should come in again immediately, and in a minute or two the boy came in, and said, he had lost his bundle; some people, who were in the house, went different ways in pursuit of him, but could not find him.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. How do you know it was the prisoner? - A. I am positive it was the prisoner.

RICHARD JONES sworn. - I saw the prisoner and the boy bring the box into Sweet's house, I saw him give the boy sixpence, and tell him to go for some cakes, and bring good change; he was going out after the boy, and the landlord brought a pint of beer, and asked him if he was going out without his beer; he said, he was only going without the door, and should return immediately.

ROBERT ALLEN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fleming; I received some things in pledge from a Mrs. Ann Huddy, on the 19th of August. (Produces a coat, waistcoat, a pair of stockings, a pair of gaters, three neck handkerchiefs and a stock.)

Judge. I know these things to be mine, they are most of them marked with my name.

Q.How came they at Mr. Gibson's? - A. I had been in the country, and when I came to town, I left them there, and sent for them the next day; the box was nailed down.

ANN HUDDY sworn. - Mr. Foster sent for me to pledge these things for him, I made no doubt but they were his own, and I did it for him.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - I searched the prisoner, and found upon him an amazing quantity of duplicates, which led to these things at Mr. Fleming's, and a great variety of other things; I took this shirt from him at the Compter.

Judge. This is my shirt; the umbrella and bundle that were tied upon the box, belonged to my brother, who came to town with me.

Prisoner's defence. They were sent to me from Bristol by a man who owed me some money.

GUILTY , Death , aged 31.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18010916-2

629. MAGNUS KERNER , alias JOHN BROWN , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Beeby , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 19th of June , with intent the goods therein being, burglariously to steal, and burglariously stealing six silver table spoons, value 2l. five silver desert spoons, value 1l. five silver tea spoons, value 5s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 5s. a silver wine strainer, value 1l. a

silver pepper-box, value 5s. and a silver gravy spoon, value 1l. the property of the said Robert.

ROBERT BEEBY sworn. - I live at Pimlico , I am not in trade: Early in the morning of the 20th of June, the robbery was discovered; I lost six table spoons, five desert spoons, a gravy spoon, a pair of sugar tongs, five tea-spoons, a wine-strainer, a pepper-box, and two salt-spoons, they were lost from the butler's pantry; I had used them the day before; I advertised them by hand-bills, which led to the property at the pawnbrokers, and from the description the pawnbroker gave of the person, I suspected the prisoner at the bar, he had quitted my service about a month or six weeks, he lived with me only three weeks.

WILLIAM FRENCH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Beeby; I put the plate in the drawer the night before, between eight and nine o'clock, on the 18th of June, and the next morning, about eight o'clock, I missed them.

EDWARD SWAINE sworn. - On the 20th of June, I received in pledge, six table spoons, and five desert from the prisoner at the bar; he pledged them in the name of John Brown, and said they were his own property; I did not know him before; I am positive he is the man; he made a very different appearance at that time, but I am certain he is the same man: On the 23d of June, I received a hand-bill from Bow-street; I took the property to Bow-street, and afterwards to Mr. Beeby.

ROBERT BARBER sworn. - On the 20th of June, I received a pair of sugar tongs, and two tea spoons,(producing them) in pledge from the prisoner at the bar, but his appearance at that time was much more respectable, I think his countenance is the same; I have a recollection of seeing his face at the shop, but I cannot swear he is the same man.

WILLIAM GOULDING sworn. - I received three tea spoons, (producing them) from John Brown, the prisoner at the bar, I am positive he is the man.

Mr. Beeby. I know these things to be mine.

French. I know these things to be my master's.

- PERRY sworn. - (Produces a wine-strainer and a gravy-spoon); I found upon the prisoner a duplicate, which led me to these things.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Bond, the Justice, compelled the pawnbrokers to swear; Mr. Beeby had a very good character with me.

Mr. Beeby. He lived with me but three weeks; I had a good character with him.

GUILTY, Death , aged 60,

Of stealing to the value of 40s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18010916-3

630. ANN SOUTHGATE was indicted for- feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , seven yards of printed cotton, value 14s. the property of Thomas Ball , privately in his shop .

THOMAS BALL sworn. - I keep a linen-draper's shop in the Strand : On the 23d of July, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop to look at some cotton for a gown; after looking at a variety, she fixed upon one which was cut off, and laid aside for her; she then purchased a shawl, which was also laid aside; the bill was made out, and she requested to wait a little while for her sister; she waited some time, and finding her sister did not come, she said she would go and look for her sister; she said, she lived at Charing-cross, and was surprised she did not come; she went to the door, I went after her, and desired her to stay till her sister came, she refused, which gave me suspicion, and then I insisted upon her going back into the shop, and I forced her into the shop; she said, if we would not let her go for her sister, she requested that a man, who was standing about one hundred yards from the house, on the other side of the way, might be sent for, and while the man was gone for her, she dropped seven yards of cotton from under her gown, I saw it fall immediately at her feet.

Q. When had you seen that piece of printed cotton? - A. I have no doubt, in my own mind, that I had seen it during the morning, but not to make any observation of it; I said, a constable must be sent for, and she said, what for; it was not in her possession, but she was at least ten yards from the place where the cottons were kept; I sent for the constable and took her and the man to Bow-street; the man was discharged.

Q. What is the value of that cotton? - A.Fourteen shillings.

Q. Who was in your shop at the time? - A. My young man was first serving her, he went away and then I took his place; he is not here.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-4

631. JOHN PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of June , a mare, value 40l. a gelding, value 20l. a chaise, value 20l. and two sets of harness, value 5l. the property of George-Chalkley Taylor .

GEORGE-CHALKLEY TAYLOR sworn. - I am not of any profession: On the 22d of June last, about eleven or twelve o'clock, I was in Fleet-street , with my chaise, and another gentleman was with me; I went into Mr. Mason's shop, in Fleet-street, and left the chaise at the door, there were two horses in the chaise, it was a curricle, one was a mare, and the other a gelding.

Q.Whereabout in Fleet-street was Mr. Mason's? - A. About the middle of Fleet-street, he is a seedsman.

Q. Did you leave any servant with the chaise?- A. No, I had no servants; Mr. Mason request

ed me to go up into the dining-room to take some bread and cheese and ale, which I did.

Q. Was there a window in the dining-room? - A. Yes.

Q. Could you see your chaise from the window?- A. The chaise was gone in a moment; I went down stairs, and the apprentice, John Banks , went down Fleet-street, and overtook the man with the chaise and horses.

Q. You have charged two sets of harness? - A.Yes, because I run double; there were two horses.

Q. When the chaise and horses were brought back, were they in the same state in which they were, when you lost them? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of the mare, as near as you can state? - A. As well as I can recollect, I put it at 40l. and the gelding at 20l.

Q. What did the prisoner say when he was brought back? - A. He said, that some person saw him at the door, and told him, if he would take that chaise and horses to Blackfriars-bridge, he would give him one shilling.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say you were the owner of this chaise and horses? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was it you left your chaise and horses standing? - A.At Mr. Mason's in Fleet-street.

Q. Where did you afterwards find them? - A. They were brought back to me at Mr. Mason's.

Q.Therefore you found it exactly where you left it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take the trouble of going to the window to see if there was any crowd? - A. No.

Q. Then you cannot tell whether there was a stoppage in the street at the time or not? - A. No.

JOHN BANKS sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Mason, a seedsman, in Fleet-street, on the right-hand side from here; I saw the prisoner get into the chaise, take the reins in his hands and drive off; I then asked the shopman, whether he was a servant of Mr. Taylor's, he said, he did not know; I then ran after him, went to the shafts of the chaise, and asked him where he was going with it.

Q. How far was he from the door, when you first saw him? - A. Six or seven doors to the best of my recollection; he told me, a gentleman came to him, and told him he would give him a shilling to drive it to Blackfriar's-bridge; I then told him to stop, and asked him who the gentleman was; he said, he did not know who the gentleman was, he supposed he was at the door where he took the chaise from; he would not stop, and I ran to the horses head and stopped them, he them jumped out of the chaise, and endeavoured to make his escape, I caught hold of him.

Q. Was he walking or running? - A.Running; he then began to hustle and push me about, and endeavoured to get away from me; my fellowservant, the shopman, then came to my assistance, and by that means he was secured.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This transaction happened in the morning? - A.Between twelve and one.

Q. The prisoner told you he had been desired by a gentleman to drive this chaise to blackfriar's-bridge? - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose you know it is a difficult thing to drive through Fleet-street in the middle of the day, and therefore not at all unnatural for a gentleman to ask him to drive so far for him? - A. I cannot say.

Q. The moment you stopped the horse, he desisted, and gave the chaise into your possession? - A. He got out of the chaise and I laid hold of him.

Q. He did not run away till after you had laid hold of him? - A. No.

Q. And then he was frightened, and attempted to get from you? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you see any gentleman near your door, at that time? - A. No.

WILLIAM BRUCE sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Mason, seedsman, in Fleet-street; I saw a man in the chaise drive away from the shop door towards Fleet-market; the boy ran out after the man, and stopped the chaise.

Q. At that time did you see any gentleman near him, or hear any gentleman give any orders? - A. No person whatever; I saw the boy stop the chaise, and I went up to his assistance; I saw a man scufiling with him, and trying to get away; I then laid hold of the prisoner's collar, and brought him back to my master's house; some other people brought the chaise back.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The shopdoor was open? - A. Yes.

Q. A man must have been mad to think of stealing a chaise in that situation, and you looking at him? - A. I don't know that.

Q. We all know that Fleet-street is a noisy place at noon-day? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore, a person might have said, take this chaise to Blackstiar's-bridge, and you not have heard it? - A. No; I work close to the door.

ALEXANDER AULD sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to take the prisoner in charge; I know nothing of the robbery.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Berkeley-square, and coming down Fleet-street, there was a a great crowd; a gentleman's phaeton stood by the side of the pavement; there was a stoppage, and the phaeton got across the road, and a gentleman's coachman that was coming could not get along, and he desired me to turn the horses round, and I did; I had no intention of stealing them.

Q.(To Banks.) Where did you find the prisoner and the chaise - was it by the kirb, or in the middle of the street? - A. He was driving nearer the middle of the street than the kirb.

Q.(To Mr. Taylor.) Did you leave your horses close to the kirb, or were they across the road? - A. No such thing as across the road, I left them close to the kirb where they ought to be.

Q.(To Bruce.) You saw the prisoner get into the chaise? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the chaise then standing near the kirb, or across the road? - A. As close to the kirb as it could. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-5

632. JOHN REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of July , a pair of breeches, value 5s. the property of John Harris .

JANE HARRIS sworn. - I am the widow of John Harris , No. 59, Wood-street, Cheapside : A pair of breeches were taken from the cellar, which is a work-shop, on the 1st of July.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Were they the property of your late husband? - A. No; they were intrusted to him to clean.

Q. Of course they are not property that you could possibly identify? - A. No.

ROBERT NEWMAN sworn. - I am a constable; Mr. Harris sent for me to take charge of the prisoner; Mr. Harris was alive at that time; the prisoner then had the breeches on; Mr. Harris said, in the presence of the prisoner, I will swear these are my breeches that he has now got on; I had them to clean; he said, Mr. Harris had given them to him.

Court. (To Mrs. Harris.) Q.Had you ever seen these breeches yourself, in the cellar? - A. I had, nearly three weeks before.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant in the house? - A. He was a weekly servant.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Were there any wages due to the prisoner at the time? - A. I don't exactly know; when he absconded from our service, I believe there was half-a-crown due to him,

Q. The breeches are worth, what? - A. I don't know the value of them.

Q. Mr. Harris had been in the habit of lending the prisoner a waistcoat or breeches? - A. I had once lent him a waistcoat and breeches of Mr. Harris's own wear, but never any thing of a customer's, and when I told Mr. Harris of it, he blamed me for it.

Q. I take it, there is no mark upon them by which any person here can identify them to be Mr. Harris's breeches? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I had been often disappointed of my wages of a Saturday night; I asked Mr. Harris the favour of this pair of breeches, to lend me them till I could get my own out of pledge, and he said, never mind it if it is for a fortnight.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-6

633. ANN GILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , thirty yards of cambric muslin, value 35s. eight shawls, value 29s. a half shawl, value 1s. 9d. and a pair of stockings, value 12d. the property of John George , privately in his shop .

EVAN GEORGE sworn. - My brother, John George, keeps a linen-draper's shop , No. 205, Piceadilly ; I assisted in the shop.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, she has been at the shop several times; on Wednesday morning, the 2d of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock she came in to look at some shawls; she purchased one and took it away with her, we did not miss any thing till the pawnbroker brought her to the shop, about three or four o'clock in the afternoon; Mr. Gordon is the pawnbroker; he brought her back with some shawls, the marks upon which were in my brother's hand-writing.

Q. At the time the prisoner was in your shop in the morning, who was in the shop? - A. My brother.

Q. Who else? - A. Mr. Thomas, a young man, who serves in the shop; he is not here.

WILLIAM GORDON sworn. - On the 2d of September, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner brought a shawl, and offered it to one of my young men; I suspected her and stopped her with the shawl; I thought her pocket appeared rather bulky, and insisted upon knowing the contents; upon which she pulled out five whole shawls, and one half, (produces them;) I then took her to Mr. George's, and the young man said they were their's; she at first said, she found them in Leicester-square, then, that she had purchased them at a house in Leicester-square.

George. These shawls are my brother's; this is the one that I had sold her in the morning.

Q. Had you sold her the other shawls? - A. I had not; I am sure I saw them all at the time she was in the shop, looking them over; they were all fastened, and she divided them, and took out the one that she chose.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-7

634. PETER BURN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , apair of stockings, value 2s. and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of John-Spicer Fisher .

JOHN-SPICER FISHER Sworn. - The prisoner was in my service as an errand-boy , I live at No. 3, Holborn-bridge : In consequence of suspicion of the prisoner robbing me, I sent for him up stairs, on the 12th of August last, between eight and nine in the evening, and searched him; I found a 1l. Bank of England note in his sob; I asked him where he got it, he said he took it out of my till.

Q. Did you make him any promise? - A. I told him, if he answered all the questions I put to him truly, I would forgive him.

Q. Then do not tell us any thing he said after that - do you know that note to be your's? - A. I looked at the note and found it to be a note that I had paid my man for his wages on the Saturday night before.

Q. Then it was your man's note? - A. No; on the Monday my man's wife came and bought a gown of me. (Produces the note).

Q. Look at the note, and tell me if you believe it to be the same note? - A. I believe it to be the very same note; I found a pair of stockings in his bed within an hour after I had found the note upon his person; he said he took them on the Monday; I cannot speak to the stockings.

Q.But you had told him you would forgive him? - A. I said, if he told me the truth, but he did not tell me the truth, he told me he had no money at all, that he had no breeches pockets.

JOHN LAMB sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fisher; on the 12th of last month, Susan Levitt paid me a one pound note, which I put into the till.

SUSAN LEVITT sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Levitt; on Wednesday the 12th of August, I took a one pound note from a drawer.

Q. Did you see your husband put it in the drawer? - A. No.

Q.Should you know it again? - A. NO.

Q.Was there more than one 1l. note in the drawer? - A. Yes, there were.

THOMAS LEVITT sworn. - On Saturday the 8th of August, I received a one pound note from Mr. Fisher, for wages, I brought it home and put it in the drawer.

Q. Did you write upon it? - A. I had wrote upon it before; I had received it for Mr. Fisher from a person at the other end of the town, what become of the note after I put it in the drawer, I cannot say.

Q.Look at that note? - A.This is the same note.

Q.(To Mrs. Levitt.) What did you do with the note that you took from the drawer? - A. I paid it into the hands of Mr. Lamb.

Lamb. I received a note from Susan Levitt, but I do not know that this is it.

Q. Were there other notes in the same place, at the same time? - A. I cannot say whether there were or not.

Mr. Fisher. I know this note to be the same that I received from Levitt, and that I paid him for his wages.

Prisoner's defence. On the 12th of August, I was behind my master counter, and saw this note lying upon the ground, not knowing it was my master's, I put it in my pocket, intending, if there was any mention made to give it back; I was sent out, and when I came back again, I forgot it; my master, in the evening, went to my mother's, and then searched me, and I being frightened, said, I had no pockets to my breeches, and then my master felt and found this note in my pocket.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 15.

Six months in Newgate and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-8

635. THOMAS SADLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , an umbrella, value 5s. the property of George Morris .

GEORGE MORRIS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker at No. 119, Minories : On the 29th of July, the umbrella was hanging at the door, and was missing; I was called into the shop, and I went in pursuit of the thief; I saw him running across Towerhil; I ran as fast as I could; the prisoner did not see me follow him; I followed him into Sweedland-court; when he saw me, he cried out, it is no thoroughfare I see; I said, no, my lad, it is not, I have got you; I then took this umbrella out of his hand, I have had it ever since. (Produces it).

JOHN MARTIN Sworn . - I live with my mother; I am out of place at present; I shall be fourteen years old next January: I saw the prisoner take the umbrella down from the door, he ran down Joh-street into America-square, and then I went and told the gentleman of it; I am sure that is the boy, I saw him brought back.

JOHN BAREER sworn. - I am constable of the ward of Portsoken: On the 29th of July I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I took him before the Lord-Mayor, and from thence to the Compter.

Prisoner's defence. A gentleman gave it me to carry it for him, and that gentleman came up and owned it. GUILTY , aged 17.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-9

636. HENRY PHELPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a handkerchief, value 6d. a silver watch, value 4l. 4s. a gilt chain, value 5s. and a seal, value 1s. the property of Edmund Brown , in his dwelling-house .

EDMUND BROWN sworn. - Q. Do you keep a

house? - A. No; I am in lodgings at St. Catherine's stairs .

Q. Does your landlord live in the same house?- A. Yes; I had lodged there about eleven weeks: On Friday, the 24th of July, I lost my watch about six o'clock in the morning; the prisoner lodged in the same room; he went to bed between nine and ten; I saw him go to bed; my watch was hung up over my head, in my trowsers fob; I had a gilt chain and seal to it; my handkerchief was in the adjoining room; and when I got up in the morning about six o'clock, I missed them; I found him on the Sunday week following in Ratcliffe-highway, and took him up; a black man told me where my watch was; I found it at Macdonald's, the Black Dog, in Denmark-street, on the Monday; I delivered it to the constable; the prisoner had the handkerchief round his neck.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see me at Wapping Old-stairs before you took me up? - A. Yes, I did, but I was not able to take him, because I had no officer with me.

Jury. Q. Had he your handkerchief round his neck when you first saw him? - A. Yes, he had.

JOSEPH STARK sworn. - I am a mariner; I slept in the same room: I got up on the Friday morning about half past five, the watch was there then; the prisoner got up before the rest of us, and went out; I saw him again the Sunday week following; there were seven or eight of us; we got a constable out of church to take him; he had Brown's handkerchief then round his neck.

Q. Did you afterwards see the watch again? - A. Yes, in the hands of the constable.

Q. Was it the same that you had seen in the room? - A. I believe it to be the same.

JOSEPH COOPER sworn. - I am an officer;(produces the property;) I was sent for from church to take charge of this man; I think it was on Sunday the 1st of August; I took possession of the handkerchief which he had round his neck; Mr. Macdonald delivered the watch to me before the Magistrate. (The handkerchief was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Thomas Macdonald was called upon his recognizance.

Prisoner's defence. I am an American born; I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge; I never was in the country before.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-10

637. GEORGE BEACH and JAMES PHILLIPS were indicted for making an assault in a certain field and en place near the King's highway upon Thomas herly, putting him in fear, and taking from person a red leather pocket-book, value 2s. 6d. property.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS OTHERLY sworn. - I am in the hoopbending line in Narrow-street, Limehouse: About a quarter before three in the morning of the 9th of June, I was coming through the fields in Stepney parish -

Q. Was it light or dark? - A. It was so light I could see four or five yards a-head of me; I could discover the person of a man perfectly; about a quarter before three, I was stopped by three men, who demanded my money.

Q. Do you recollect who demanded your money? - A. Yes, a person with a velveteen jacket on; I told them I had none; he then said, d-n the b-r's b-y eyes, we will have money, or somewhat else; I made answer to him, do as he pleased, and he knocked me down then; then he took a pocket-book out of my right-hand coat pocket.

Q. What did your pocket-book contain? - A. Nothing but a few memorandums, and two receipts for rent.

Q. Have you ever recovered your pocket-book again? - A. No, never.

Q. Are you sure it was the same person who demanded your money that knocked you down, and took your pocket-book? - A. I am perfectly sure of that; then the one that stood by -

Q. How was he drest? - A. In a brown coat, and a blue jacket underneath; he said, it is of no use to beat the b-r, he has got no more about him, and then I left them, and they left me; then I made the best of my way home.

Q. Do you know the person of the man who had the velveteen jacket on? - A. Yes, that man at the bar; the right-hand man.

Q.What is his name? - A.Beach.

Q. Do you know the man who stood by, and made use of the expressions you have mentioned?- A. Yes, the other man, Phillips

Q. Were you sober at this time? - A. Yes; perfectly sober, as I am now.

Q. Had you been drinking? - A. I had been drinking in the evening, but had quite recovered myself, for I had been asleep; I was as sober as I am now; I then met Haynes, the officer, as I was coming out of the fields into Ratcliff-highway; I told him I had been robbed; if he would go into the fields with me, I would go and help to attack them; then, he said he could not go, because he was going down to Doyer with a man that he had in charge; then he said, if you will relate it to my brother officers in the morning, they will do what they can for you to get them in custody; between seven and eight in the morning, I went to the White Lion, Shadwell, facing the office; I saw there Brown and Holebrooke; I told them I had been robbed, and described the persons.

Q.When you mentioned it to Haynes, did you describe their persons to him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you describe their persons both to Haines and to Brown in the manner you have been describing them to-day? - A. I did.

Q. Upon that, what did you do? - A.Nothing, till they were brought to the office.

Q. How long was it before they were apprehended, and brought to the office? - A. A month, or five weeks.

Q. Had you never seen the prisoners before? - A. No; not to know them.

Q.Knowing that the lives of the prisoners are at stake, look at them, and say whether they are the men? - A. They are.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are at present employed in the hoop-bending line? - A. Yes.

Q. In what way of life were you before? - A. A tobacconist.

Q. How long were you a tobacconist? - A. Seven years.

Q. Have you ever been in any other occupation?- A. Yes; I have been employed by Mr. Mellish to drive his cart.

Q.Were you never employed by the Police office? - A.Never.

Q. Have you never lodged any information against any body under penal statutes? - A. Never, in my life.

Q. Where might you have been spending your evening, previous to the time of the robbery? - A. At a public-house at Stepney.

Q. Did you know Mr. Caney? - A. No.

Q.Perhaps you did not fall in company with Mr. Caney the night before the robbery? - A. He might be there, but I did not know him.

Q. Did you usually stay out so late as three in the morning? - A.Sometimes I am kept to business till that time; we had been eight of us at business, and been dividing what money we had been earning.

Q. You had your share in your pocket? - A. I had four shillings and twopence in a pair of velveteen trowsers pocket.

Q. Had you happened to be in company with some bell-ringers the night before? - A. Yes.

Q. There was a feast, and two guineas were spent in consequence of a peal that had been rung in joy of a new sexton coming in? - A. No such thing.

Q. The bell-ringers had been ringing a peal, however? - A. Yes.

Q. Was not Caney one of the bell-ringers?- A. Not that I know of.

Q. Have you not seen a person at the door that you recollect? - A. No.

Q. Don't you know the peal was rung in joy of a new sexton being admitted into the church? - A. It was for no such thing.

Q. Was not two guineas spent that night? - A. No.

Q. How many of you were there? - A.Eight.

Q. Were there not eight or nine bell-ringers? - A. Yes.

Q. Had they not two guineas given them for their trouble in ringing? - A. Yes.

Q. It was given them to spend? - A. They did not spend it.

Q. Had you not been drinking? - A. Yes, I had.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I was not drunk when I was robbed.

Q.Were you not drunk that night? - A. No.

Q. Therefore, of course, it must be an untruth if any body says you were? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you happen to quarrel in your cups at the public-house? - A. No, not in malice.

Q. You did not fight then, of course? - A. No.

Q. I think you said you had had a sleep at the public-house? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you happen to meet with any of those persons with whom you had been drinking, the next morning? - A. Yes.

Q. You told them, I take it for granted, what had happened to you? - A. I had told the officers; I thought they were the most proper persons.

Q. So you never told your own companions any thing about it? - A. No; I saw them go past the window where. I was speaking to the officer.

Q. Did you ever happen to say that you were cut when you were knocked down? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, if you were cut, were you not cut by one of your own companions after you had got drunk at the public-house? - A. No, I was not.

Q. I take it for granted you know there is a reward in this case? - A. No.

Q. You have employed an attorney, and my learned friend - who pays the expences of this prosecution? - A.Myself.

Q. Upon your oath, are not the officers to contribute towards the expences? - A. The money that I contributed to employ that gentleman, I paid out of my own pocket.

Q. Upon your oath, are they not to contribute towards the expences of the prosecution? - A. No, they are not.

Q. How much have you paid? - A. I have paid three one-pound notes, a half-crown, and a sixpence.

Q. And you have never heard from the officers, or any body else, that there was a reward? - A.No,

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell: On the 9th of June I was applied to by Otherly, about three o'clock in the morning; I was going

to take a prisoner to Ramsgate; he said he had been robbed; he said one had a brown coat on, with a velveteen waistcoat under; another had a brown coat, with a blue waistcoat under; and the third, a blue coat outside; he wanted me to take them in custody, and I told him I could not, for I should not save the coach; as I went past Shadwell, the clock struck three; I desired him to speak to some of my brother officers in the morning.

Q. Were you present afterwards when they were before the Magistrate? - A. Yes; on the 9th of July, I sell in with Beach in Shadwell-market, and before the Magistrate Otherly pointed him out as one of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You know there is a reward in this case? - A.Certainly.

Q. When was it you told the prosecutor of the reward? - A. I never told him any thing of it.

Q. Who told him to employ an attorney? - A. He did every thing of that himself.

Q. You have been in conversation with the prosecutor at the Police office, and the public-house?- A. Not concerning the reward, I never do; he has used the house where I use for three years past.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Upon your oath, did you, or any body in your hearing, say any thing to the prosecutor respecting the reward? - A.Never.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office: About eight o'clock on the morning of the 9th of June, I went to the White Lion, the house we use; the prosecutor was there, and he was telling Mr. Cook that he had been robbed by three men; he said one was in a brown coat, and one in a velvet jacket under another coat; one was a tall man with dark hair, and the other a shorter man, with dark hair down his shoulders, and the other was a shorter man than him; I apprehended Phillips at a public-house in Fieldgate-street, Whitechapel.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes, I had seen him come backwards and forwards to people in custody; I searched him, but found nothing upon him; I took him before the Magistrate, and then he pointed out Beach and Philips as two out of the three men that had robbed him.

Q. When he applied to you, did he appear to be drunk or sober? - A. Perfectly sober.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. That was eight o'clock, five hours after he had been robbed? - A. Yes.

Q. The prosecutor frequents the house opposite the Police office? - A. I have seen him there.

Q.Have you had any conversation with him since this complaint? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it you talked about the reward?- A. Never, at all.

Q. It often happens that you do talk of the reward at the public-house opposite the Police office?- A. We never do in a public tap-room; if we say any thing it is in private.

- HOLEBROOKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I apprehended Beach in Ratcliff-Highway, near Gravel-lane, I found nothing upon him; I have known him six or seven years.

Q. You were present when the prosecutor spoke to the persons of the two prisoners? - A. Yes; he pointed out the two prisoners as the persons that had robbed him.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

For the Prisoners.

- MARRIOTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a carpenter.

Q. Do you know Otherly? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being in company with him on the 8th of June? - A. Yes, at the Ship public-house; he left the house about two o'clock on the morning of the 9th, to the best of my recollection.

Q. How was he occupied? - A.We had been occupied in ringing on account of the new Rector, and we employed Otherly to assist us as an extra hand, as we had but very short notice; we went to the Ship public-house about eight o'clock.

Q. What were you doing there? - A.Drinking, and making merry.

Q. How was Otherly when he went away? - A. Very much intoxicated.

Q. Then it cannot be true, as he has sworn, that he was not drunk at that time? - A. He must falseswear himself.

Q. Had you been altogether quite good humoured, or was there any altercation? - A. No; in the course of the evening, a little before twelve o'clock, a young man, a bricklayer, of the name of Caney, came in promiscuously, and knowing me, and others of the party, and knowing Otherly, he asked leave to spend an hour with us; a dispute arose between Otherly and him, which could chalk farthest on the floor for a wager, Caney beat Otherly, and he refused paying for it; a great many words arose, and Caney said, rather than have any words he would pay for it himself; and Otherly used very aggravating expressions, and Caney gave him a very severe blow; then Otherly threatened to take the law of him, he would not go to a common Justice, but take out a Judge's warrant; he then aggravated him to that degree that flesh and blood could not bear with it; I, and the rest of the company, told him Caney had served him just right, for aggravating the man as he had done.

Q. Had you ever seen Caney and Otherly in company together before that night? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Whether there was this quarrel in the public-house or not, you are quite sure Otherly went out of the public-house about two o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q.Where is this public-house? - A.The corner of Stepney Church-yard.

Q. How far from the field where the robbery was committed? - A. I suppose not half a quarter of a mile.

Q.And at two o'clock you are sure he left the public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. You were all very merry? - A. Yes; Otherly had drank a good deal more gin than we had.

Q. You drank no gin? - A. Not more than one glass.

Q. What else? - A.Porter.

Q. Then you were not drunk? - A. I was very sensible.

Q. You were not the worse for liquor at all, I dare say? - A. I was the worse for liquor.

Q. You did not take a sleep, did you? - A. No. I did not.

Q. Did not Mr. Otherly? - A.Not in my presence.

Q. You must have seen it if he had? - A. Yes; I must of course.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. I have known him ever since he was a boy in the charity-school, as much as twelve or fourteen years ago.

Q. You never were in company with him and Caney before this time? - A. No.

Q.But you may have been in the room where Caney and he have been together? - A.Not to my knowledge.

Q. You know them both; will you swear you have not been in the tap-room, at that public-house, when both of them have been there before? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Upon your oath, have not Otherly and Caney been in the same company, drinking with you, before? - A. Not as I can recollect.

Q. Try and recollect yourself? - A. I cannot pretend to say.

Q. Will you swear they have not been in company together, at that house, before? - A. I cannot.

Q. Will you swear they have not been in company together, at that house, before? - A. I cannot.

Q.Will you undertake to swear, they had not been drinking together, at that same public-house, upon another day? - A. They may, but I cannot say whether they had or not; I understood, from their discourse that night, that they had been in company together at the King and Queen, in Old Gravel-lane.

Q.Upon your oath, did you not understand that they had been together at that very public-house, the Ship, in company, on another day? - A. No.

Q. Do not you know, yourself, that they had?- A. I cannot pretend to say.

Q. Who applied to you to give your evidence here to-day? - A. I cannot say who it was; a gentleman called upon me on Monday evening.

Q. Have you been to the prisoners since they have been in custody? - A. I do not know the prisoners; I saw Otherly on the morning of the 9th of June, about nine o'clock; I asked him how he got home, and he said he got home very well, but by some means, being so very much intoxicated, he had fell in the fields, and very much bedaubed himself; he did not say a single syllable about being robbed.

SAMUEL THURLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a shoemaker by business, and a grave-digger, at Shadwell.

Q. Do you remember being at the sign of the Ship, on the 8th of June? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Caney? - A. I have seen him.

Q. Do you know Marriott, who has been just now in Court? - A. Yes; there were seven of us.

Q. Do you know Otherly? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him that day? - A. Yes; in the course of the day, and in the evening.

Q. What time did you leave the public-house?- A. Between eleven and twelve.

Q. How did you employ yourself? - A. In singing and smoking, and drinking.

Q. You were drinking merrily? - A. Some had drank more than others.

Q. How was Otherly? - A. He seemed to me to be in liquor; he wanted to quarrel with the company.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Caney was not there while you were there? - A. No.

MATTHEW PHILLIPS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am the father of the prisoner Phillips; my son was employed over the water at Mr. Tomlins's, a wheelwright; he got a fall on the 4th of June that he was obliged to come home; he was very bad the whole of the week following, almost continually in and out of bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He was always in and out of bed? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear, that on the 8th of June he was in bed all night? - A. I did not take down the day of the month, but he was very ill.

Q. You will not venture to swear where he was on the 9th of June at two o'clock in the morning?- A. Yes; I will swear that he was in bed at that time.

Q. Do you recollect seeing him that night? - A. Not particularly that night, I saw him every night.

Q. He did not go out in the course of the day, during that week? - A. I went out to work myself, so that I cannot say.

Court. Q. Could your son have been out of the house at two o'clock in the morning, any night during that week, without your knowing it? - A. I am sure he could not; he slept in the garret, and that is the room over where I sleep.

Court. Q. Had he any medical assistance? - A. My wife got him a bottle or two of stuff, and after that he was in the Dispensary.

MARY PHILLIPS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am the wife of the last witness: On the 5th of June, my son was brought home with a prolent blow, and was not able to go out of the house for four days after.

Q. Did you make any memorandum of the day?- A. Yes, it is put in his master's books; he was at home from his work six weeks, and not able to do any thing.

Q. Had he strength to walk to a considerable distance? - A. No; for the first three days he could not get up, but to have his bed made.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At Mile-end turnpike.

Q. How far from Stepney? - A. About a mile.

Court. Q. How long was it before he was able to get out of the house? - A. He was not able to walk out of the house for above a week.

Q. After the first three days or a week did you see him go to-bed? - A. He used to go and lay down several times in the day.

Q. Do you know what was the latest hour that he was out? - A. He never was out after eleven o'clock. Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-11

638. RICHARD LEONARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a book, value 2s. the property of James Angier .(The case was opened by Mr. Hart.)

JAMES ANGIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hart. I am a manufacturer at Norwich: On Monday the 7th of this month, about twelve o'clock in the day, as I was walking through Cheapside , I felt something drawn out of my pocket, I turned about and saw a boy running, I called out instantly, stop thief, and some persons pursued him; he was brought back, and the pocket-book delivered to the constable; then I went to the Mansion-house.

Q. Of what value is this pocket-book? - A. I cannot say.

Court. Q. Is it worth any thing - is it worth a penny or two pence? - A. It is worth sixpence.

THOMAS EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hart. I am a porter; I was coming down the Old-Jewry, about half-past eleven o'clock, and heard a cry of stop thief; I turned round and saw some people run; the prisoner ran by me; I followed him, and took him in Church-passage, by a spout, and the pocket-book was undermeath him as he stood against the spout; I did not see him drop any thing; I then took him to the Poultry-Compter.

Jury. Q.Were there any more boys in this passage, or near him? - A. No.

JOSEPH HORTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hart. On the 7th of the present month, I was going down the Poultry, and the prosecutor cried out, stop thief; I was then within twenty yards of him, or thereabouts; I saw the prisoner at the bar run from him very swiftly; I pursued him, and he ran down the Old-Jewry, through Frederick's-place, into Church-passage; he could not get any further without being stopped; he then stopped against a spout, put his hand behind him, and pulled out the pocket-book; I saw him do it; there was a holdfast against the spout, and he put the pocketbook behind him, and it rested upon the holdfast till he was removed from the spot, at which time it dropped down; he was then taken to the Poultry-Compter, and from thence to the Mansion-house; at the time the pocket-book was taken up, he said, he knew nothing of it.

EDWARD ALDERMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hart. I am a constable; the prisoner was brought to the Poultry-Compter, and the book delivered to me, that is all I know of it; I have had the pocket-book ever since. (Produces it; the book was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I heard this gentleman call stop thief, and going through Church-passage, I saw the book lying by a spout; I ran to pick it up, when the porter laid hold of me, and said, I had taken the gentleman's pocket-book.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-12

639. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a cask, value 4d. and 94lb. of butter, value 1l. 18s. the property of Francis Luman .

FRANCIS ENGLEHART sworn. - I am clerk to the wharfingers at Brewen's quay : On Tuesday evening, the 4th of August, between six and seven o'clock, I was returning to the wharf from tea, and in the gateway I met the prisoner at the bar with a cask of butter on his shoulder, judging that he had not come honestly by it; I did not stop him; he was going up the gateway towards the street, I was going down; I made enquiry of the Draper's porters if a man had been sent away with a single cask of butter; they told me, no; I said, a man was gone up the gateway with one, and we immediately pursued him to the top of the gateway; I saw the cask of butter standing there, and the prisoner in the street; I am positive it was the same cask of butter; I pointed out the man to the porter, and they immediately seized him; at the moment of their seizing him came up a coach, which he had called to convey away the cask; he was given into the charge of the constable.

Q. Do you know to whom this butter belonged?- A. It belonged to Mr. Francis Inman.

Q. How do you know that? - A. By the mark; the Lord Mayor ordered it to be delivered, it being a perishable commodity; the constable has the cask.

FRANCIS INMAN sworn. - I received twenty-

nine casks of butter in the country, when I ought to have received thirty.

JOSEPH BENNETT sworn. - I am a constable: I took charge of the prisoner; the cask was knocked to pieces by being thrown down; the prisoner told me a man had given him sixpence to carry the cask of butter up the quay.

Q.(To Inman.) Brewer's quay was where your butter was? - A. Yes, it was landed there.

Prisoner's defence. A man ordered me to take the firkin of butter to the top of the gateway, while he called a coach; I took it to the top of the gateway, and never saw the man afterwards, and this man laid hold of me; I know the wharfinger's clerk, and saw him pass me, and therefore it was not likely that I should stand at the top of the gateway after I had stole it.

Q.(To Englebart.) Did you see any gentleman near the prisoner? - A. No, I did not.

GUILTY , aged 28.

One month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-13

640. GEORGE BREWER , GEORGE BEACH , and STEPHEN EDLIN , were indicted for making an assault in the King's highway upon Richard Groom , on the 7th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 40s. the property of the said Richard.

There being no evidence to identify the persons of the prisoners, they were All Three ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-14

641. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , thirty-six yards of bed-tick, value 4l. the property of James Henley , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES HENLEY sworn. - I am a linen-draper in Whitecross-street, St. Luke's : On the 13th of July, in consequence of information, I ran out, and saw the prisoner at the bar running from a court into the middle of the street; I followed him, crying out, stop thief; I secured him, and took him to Worship-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. This article was standing at your door exposed for sale? - A. Yes, inside the door.

Q. I take it, your door is like every other; there is the door-fill, and then the door; will you venture to say that this was within the door, and not on the fill? - A. I cannot say whether it was the first or second roll.

WILLIAM BRITTEN called. - Q. How old are you? - A.Going of thirteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes; if I tell lies, I shall not go to God, (sworn). I live near Mr. Henley, in Whitecross-street; I saw the prisoner chuck this tick up Cooper's-court as I was looking out at the window; I did not see where he took it from; I saw him run past the court, and chuck it up the court; I came down stairs directly; Mr. Henley had then got him.

Q. What time of day was it? - A. About five o'clock.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q.What window were you looking from? - A. The second floor.

Q. The same side of the street, or the opposite side? - A. The same side of the street.

Q. Can you venture to swear the prisoner is the same person? - A. Yes, because I saw a speck upon his cheek.

Q. Go and look at him? (the witness went towards the bar) - A. It is not there now.

Q. Do you mean to swear that the person at the bar is the person that Mr. Henley took, or do you mean that he is the person that chucked the check up the gateway? - A. He is the same person that Mr. Henley took.

MARY WYCOMBE sworn. - I was coming up Whitecross-street about five o'clock in the afternoon; there were two lads standing near Mr. Henley's shop-door, and just before I got to the shopdoor, one of them took a piece of check from the door; I went in, and gave an alarm; one of them ran into a court that went into Bunhill-row; I cannot say which of them had the tick.

Q.Look at the prisoner? - A. That is the lad that Mr. Henley brought back.

Q. Can you undertake to say that that is one of the two lads that were standing at the door? - A. Yes, I am quite sure of that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q.Had you ever seen either of these lads before? - A. No.

Q. All this was done in a very short time? - A. Yes, it was all done in a few minutes.

Q. Have you never said you could not swear he was one of the boys? - A. No; I have said I could not swear he was the person that took the check; I said, I was sure he was one of the two lads that were standing about the door.

Henley. I know this tick to be my property; I had bought it that morning. GUILTY, aged 19, Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Six weeks in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hetham .

Reference Number: t18010916-15

642. JOHN WILLERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , in the dwelling-house of Charlotte Pugh , widow , a silver watch, value 14s. two seven-shilling, pieces, two half-crown pieces, four shillings, three Bank-notes, value 30l. three other Bank-notes, value 15l. and four other Bank-notes, value 4l. the property of the said Charlotte.

CHARLOTTE PUGH sworn. - I am a widow: I

live in Great Garden, Seven Step-alley, St. Catherine's ; the prisoner lodged in my house for four or five weeks: On the 24th of July, I lost my money and notes out of a drawer in the bureau; I saw them all at half past five o'clock that morning; there were three ten-pound notes, three five-pound notes, four one-pound notes, two seven-shilling pieces, two half-crowns, and four shillings, all my own money.

Q. What time did you discover you had been robbed? - A.Before eight o'clock I missed the pocket-book and the money; it was all in the pocket-book; I had left the key in the bureau, but not locked; I suspected the prisoner, because he was the only person in the house; he could not go down stairs to go out, without going through my bed-room.

Q. Had you seen him that morning? - A. Yes, I had seen him that morning, and drank with him, I was in bed; I asked him what he got up so soon for; he said he did not know, he could not sleep.

Q. Did he stop any time with you? - A. No, only drank with me in bed.

Q.What, at six in the morning? - A. Yes; he went down, and got up about eight in the morning; he fetched the liquor for me; he drank with me, and the man that gave me the money drank with me too.

Q.How long had that money been given you? The night before the 23d of July.

Q. Was it given you as a present, or to take care of? - A. It was a man just come from sea, that always gives me every thing, just as if he was my husband; the prisoner never came back to my lodging; he had lodged five weeks in my house, and never paid me any thing.

Q. Did he give you notice that he was going to quit your lodgings? A. No; I saw him again last Thursday, at Wapping, in custody.

Q. Did he appear to have any money when he was at your house? - A. No, not a shilling.

Prisoner. Q. Was there not a man and woman in bed, below stairs, at the same time? - A. No; no other person in the world.

JANE LUNDERGREEN sworn. - On the 23d of July, I called upon Charlotte Pugh, and there was this man who had come from sea, and I saw him give her the money the next morning; she came and told me she had lost it all; there was a great deal of foreign money, doubloons and dollars, and I recommended him to Mr. Morris's, in the Minories, he sold it there, it was changed into paper, and he gave it her, and told her to take it home, and put it in her drawer; this day week, I saw the prisoner as he was coming up to the Justice's; he was in the lock-up room; I spoke to him through the hole; I said, I was very sorry to see him there, and he said he was very sorry himself, but it could not be helped; I said, it was very cruel to serve her in that way, after he had taken away all her clothes but what she stood upright in to support him, and to take away a favourite watch that she had; he told me, if he was cleared, she should have the watch, and not cost her one farthing; I asked him where the watch was, and he said, if I would go to the second turning through Deptford turnpike, I should find the watch at one James Holland's, but he did not think they would give it to me without he was present, and he said he would give a note under his hand, if she would get somebody else to write it, that he would return what money she had lost, within a month; I went as he directed me, through Deptford-turnpike, but could not find any such person.

JOSEPH COOPER sworn. - I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner, that is all I know of it.

Q.(To Pugh.) You have never found your watch or your money? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. That woman is now a common prostitute upon the town, she keeps a common bawdy-house; I met with her in St. Catherine's; I agreed with her for seven shillings to sleep with her; I went with her, and slept with her constantly for two months, and from a sickness that she gave me, I was so ill, I could not get off the ground; and the day before I left her, she told me I should not stay any longer in the house; I was going down stairs in the morning, and she desired me to get half a pint of gin; she drank two glasses of gin, and the man in bed with her drank two glasses of gin, and I drank one; then I went down stairs, and wished her a good morning; I never was in the house since; as to the robbery, I am as innocent of it as any gentleman who stands here; the chest of drawers that she says was robbed, stood opposite the bed.

Q.(To Pugh.) Where is this man now? - A. He is gone up the East country.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-16

643. NICHOLAS WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , eight pounds of soap, value 5s. the property of William Whitwell , and James Taylor .

JAMES TAYLOR sworn. - I am in partnership with William Whitwell, soap manufacturers ; we have lost a considerable quantity of soap within the last four months: On the 25th of July, between nine and ten o'clock, I was standing at a neighbour's door, and observed the prisoner while coming towards me; I wished to ask him a question relative to the business, and called him; the prisoner was a servant of mine, in the capacity of a boiler; he took no notice of my calling him, but went on; I called him a second time, he turned round, and still took no notice of me, but kept on; I called him a third time, and as he seemed to

mend his pace, I followed him, and seized him; I asked him, why he did not attend before; he said, he did not know I wanted him; I asked him what he had under his arm, his answer was, beef, which I have just bought; I observed, I thought it a large size for his family; I then observed that he trembled; I asked him what was the matter with him, he said, nothing was the matter with him; I said, if nothing was the matter, he would have no objection to go into the house of a friend; I was endeavouring to force him into the shop of a grocer, but he struggled, got from me, and left the bag, containing soap, in my hand; he got clear away that evening, and the following day, Sunday, I took the officers of Lambeth-street to his apartments, in Tooley-street, and apprehended him.

(John Griffiths, an officer, produced the bag of soap.)

Q.(To Taylor.) Can you swear to that property? - A. I should not have sworn to the property if he had not confessed it at the public-house.

Q. Did you make him any promise of favour?- A. None at all; he said he had taken it from our manufactory, but it was given him by a man that worked with him, Owen Field .

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q.Field is not here to-day? - A. No; he was discharged before the Magistrate, but in consquence of suspicions, we discharged him from our service.

Q. Did you not threaten, before he told you how he came by the soap, that you would transport him for the lye he had told you? - A. No such thing.

Q. How long has he been in your service? - A. Nine months.

Prisoner's defence. I told Mr. Taylor I found it.

GUILTY , aged 40.

The above prisoner was too ill to be brought up to receive his sentence .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18010916-17

644. ABRAHAM PONTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , 6 damask napkins, value 15s. the property of Israel Israel .

Second Court. Charging it to be the property of Michael Palmer .

ISRAEL ISRAEL sworn. - I sent six damask napkins, with other goods, to a sale at Mr. Palmer's, near Manchester-square, on the 8th of July; on the 9th of July, I was informed they had been taken away, and that a man was in custody for stealing them; I went to the Police-office in Marlborough-street, where I saw them.

WILLIAM HOLDSGROVE sworn. - On the 9th of July, I was employed by Mr. Palmer, an auctioneer , as a porter at a sale, No. 22, Gloucester-place, Manchester-square ; after we had got the sale ready, I went to a public-house to get some refreshment; the prisoner came in and asked me how I did; I presented him a catalogue; he asked me if there was any thing that would suit him; I had known him two or three years, at different sales, he used to buy china; he said, he would look in presently; he came to the house where the sale was, and after he had been in about two or three minutes, he came down stairs as fast as he could; it struck me there was something not right; I was going up stairs, and my partner called out, that he had lost a lot of linen; I immediately pursued after the man; I turned into Dorset-street, and saw the prisoner crossing the street, into Spring-street, upon which I called to him, but he got out of my sight; I still followed him, and got sight of him again; I came up to him and brought him back; in Spring-street, a chairman asked if that was what I had lost, and gave the linen into my hands; I brought the man and the linen back to the house; I kept the linen till we took him to Marlborough-street.

Prisoner. Q. How long have you known me?- A. Three years to the best of my knowledge; I always had that opinion of him, that I could have trusted him as I would myself; I never had any suspicion of him.

JOHN JUPT sworn. - I am a chairman: On the 9th of July, I was at my own door, in Dorset-street, between ten and eleven in the morning; I saw the prisoner run by me, the porter was in pursuit of him; then he ran up Spring-street; I then saw him throw the linen over an area, and while the porter pursued him, I went and picked it up. (The napkins produced, and deposed to by Mr. Israel.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called eight respectable witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined three months in Newgate .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-18

645. CORNELIUS KENNARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , three pounds of soap, value 1s. 9d. the property of William Whitwell and James Taylor .

JAMES TAYLOR sworn. - I am in partnership with William Whitwell: The prisoner was apprehended in consequence of the apprehension of Nicholas White ; he was searched, but nothing found upon him; his lodgings were then searched, where some soap was found; he at first denied it, but when he learned that some soap had been found, he then confessed, without any promise or threat, that he had taken some from the warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Did the prisoner acknowledge that he had taken that identical soap? - A. No; he said he had taken about ten pounds; I asked, had he taken ten hundred weight

or ten pounds; and he said, it might be about ten pounds.

JOHN GRIFTITHS sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner: I went, with a search-warrant, to his lodgings, and found this small quantity of soap,(producing it); my brother officer, I believe, found some more; after we had got to the Flying-horse, Mr. Taylor asked him how many hundred weight he had robbed him of during the time he had lived with him; he said he had not taken one hundred weight, he believed he might have taken about ten pounds weight at different times; he said, he might have taken it either to wash his hands or his apron, I cannot say which.(Osman, the other officer, produced another quantity of soap).

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18010916-19

646. WILLIAM BERRY was indicted for making an assault upon Ann Holman , spinster , in the dwelling-house of him the said William Berry, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, on the 1st of September , 14s. in money, and a Banknote, value 2l. the property of the said Ann.

ANN HOLMAN (a black woman) sworn. - The prisoner lives in Hedge-lane , he keeps a common bawdy-house, where people go in and out as they like; I bring in gentlemen for the good of his house; On Tuesday, the 1st of September, between twelve o'clock at night and one in the morning, I brought in two men; I had been out in Pall-Mall, and a gentleman gave me a two pound note that evening, about half an hour before; I had, besides that, either thirteen or fourteen shillings in my hand; I took two gentlemen home, and they sent me to get some gin, and change for half-a, guinea; I told them I had got this money in my hand, the prisoner was listening on the stairs, and heard me tell them of it; I went to a public-house and brought back the gin and the change; when I was going out for the gin, Berry said to me, Mrs. Blacky, give me hold of that money you have got in your hand; I told him I would not, if he wanted money to go and look for it, as I did; he d-d me for a black negroing b-h, said I was not a native of this country, and he did not see why I should get money, and he would have it; he directly knocked me down upon the landing-place, he put his knee upon my stomach, and took the money out of my hand; I went out and fetched in the liquor; there was no fastening to the door, and I put in the poker; then he came up and rushed against the door, and insisted upon coming into the room; he said they were his customers, and I should not have them; he asked two shillings for the room, which I gave him; then he went down, and came up again, and swore he would see those gentlemen; then he went down and got two watchmen from the Mew's gate, and then the two men were afraid, and ran down stairs and left me; and then he knocked me down and beat me, and the watchmen beat me, so that I thought they would have taken my life away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How came your name to be Ann? - A. That is my christian name.

Q. Are you not known by the name of Black Esther? - A. Yes, but that is not my name.

Q.Where do you ply from ten o'clock at night, till two in the morning? - A. In the Hay-market, and St. James's.

Q. And you would have these honest gentlemen believe, that a gentleman gave you a two pound note? - A. Yes, that was no object.

Q. Where did you go for the gin? - A. To the corner of Prince's-court, Hedge-lane, the man's name is Dolan.

Q. Is he here? - A. No; they are all a combined set together.

Q. Did you tell any watchman that you had been robbed? - A. No; the watchmen were a party concerned.

Q. I see a gentleman's name upon the back of the bill, that I dare say will explain all this -How came you acquainted with Mr. William Kelly, has he not been acting as your solicitor, in concucting your prosecution? - A. Nobody has conducted my prosecution; I don't know that I ever saw Mr. Kelly till I took out the warrant at the office.

Q. You have heard that there is a reward of forty pounds if this man is convicted? - A. Yes; but I don't come here for that.

Q. You were not at Brentford when your friend Kelly stood in the pillory? - A. I am no person of that description.

Q. So you take two lovers at a time to these places? - A. It was only to have a bit of fun.

Q. Do you mean to say you gave any alarm at all? - A. This man keeps a house for all sorts of prostitution; a nasty, unfeeling, disagreeable rascal like that, what chance could I have with him; if I had said any thing, they would have killed me upon the spot; I thought it would be the best way to stop till the next day.

Q. Upon your oath, did not the man fetch two watchmen for the purpose of removing you and these two fellows from his house? - A. He had no business to remove us, we paid him for the use of his place, and were very quiet.

Q. Did he not give charge to the watchmen to remove you and the two men? - A. No, he did not.

Court. Q.This two pound note was not given you by the two men you brought into the house? - A. No.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q.How came you to say so before the Magistrate? - A. I said it was given me by a gentleman, in Pall-mall.

Q. Did you not say that one of the two men gare you half-a-guinea, and not content with that, you asked him for more, and then he gave you a two pound note? - A. No, I never said no such thing.

WILLIAM KELLY sworn. - On the 2d of this month, I was at a public-house, in Marlborough-street; I saw the prisoner at the bar there, in the custody of a constable; he told me he had sent home for forty shillings, and fourteen shillings in silver, to satisfy the black, infamous whore, who had charged him with the robbery; I told him, if he had not been conscious he had done wrong, he was to blame to send for the money to satisfy her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You know a little of Courts of Justice, I believe, Mr. Kelly - in the first place, I would ask you, if you know this woman? - A. I have seen her.

Q. She is, I believe, one of the most infamous prostitutes to be found in the night about the Hay-market? - A. I never spoke to her in my life, before I saw her at Marlborough-street; I have heard she is a very infamous woman.

Q. You, I believe, have lived by informing? - A. No, I do not.

Q. You never did live by informing? - A. No.

Q. Did not you stand in the pillory by informing? - A. I did not come here to answer that.

Court. He is certainly not compellible to answer that question.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You don't chuse to answer that question? - A. No.

Q. I am just as well content as if you did -Upon your oath, how many informations have you lodged in your life - I don't ask you within one hundred? - A. Never one hundred.

Q.Nor caused to be lodged? - A. No, nor yet fifty.

Q. Will you tell us how you get your livelihood? - A. As well as I can; I assist an attorney, and do a little conveyancing.

Q. I should be curious enough to know the attorney, who would wish Mr. Kelly's assistance?- A. Is it necessary that I should answer that question?

Court. I think it is.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Who is that attorney? - A. Mr. Howard, No. 16, Charles-street, Fitzroy-square.

Q. Does he pay you weekly? - A. No; if I serve a notice, he pays me, or if I serve a writ, he pays me.

Q.How often may he employ you? - A. Perhaps once or twice a week.

Q. And that is the only way you have of getting a living - what other honest way of getting a living? - (The witness gave no answer.)

Q. Mr. Howard, I believe, is a gentleman, who now and then puts an advertisement in the papers, he is a very generous man, and advertises to lend money? - A. You may know it, but I don't.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. I do.

Q.What other way have you of getting a living? - A. I do business for other gentlemen as well as Mr. Howard.

Q. Who are they? - A. Mr. Wilkinson, who lives near there.

Q. How often do you work for him? - A. Three or four times a week.

Q. And that is the only way you have of getting a living? - A. Yes.

Q. You know there is a reward of forty pounds, if this man is convicted? - A. Not to me; on the contrary, if I thought I was entitled to sorry shillings, I would really give it up.

Q. You know there is a reward of forty pounds?- A. No; I hope the man's life is not at stake.

Q. Do you really hope so upon your oath? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what he is charged with? - A. Robbing this woman of forty shillings.

Q.And that you did not know was a capital offence? - A. No.

Q.Will you swear that? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not been conducting this prosecution for this woman? - A. No; on the contrary, I am exceedingly sorry I have had to attend here.

WILLIAM PETHERICK sworn. - I heard the prisoner at the bar say, when he was in custody at the Marlborough-head, facing the office, he said he had sent out for two pounds to give her, rather than be troubled with going before a Magistrate.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How near was your friend Kelly at this time? - A. Not far.

Q. You did not hear any thing about the fourteen shillings? - A. No, I did not.

Q.What office do you attend at now? - A. No office.

Q.What are you now? - A. A constable of St. James's.

Q.Do you know that there is a reward of forty pounds in this case? - A. I hear you say so.

Q. How long have you been an officer? - A. Six years.

Q. And not know that there is a reward in this case, but from my telling you? - A. I know there is in highway robberies and burglaries, but I did not know there was in this case.

Q. How long have you known Kelly? - A. Ever since he came out of prison.

Q. Now I ask you, upon your oath, is he not a common informer? - A. I have heard so.

Q. Have you not known him about that bu

siness yourself? - A. I have seen him attending upon informations.

Q. Very many informations? - A. Several.

Q.Upon very many? - A. I cannot tell the number.

Q. But upon very many? - A.Above two, I believe, I cannot swear to the number.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I heard the prisoner say he had sent home for a two pound note to give to that black b-h, before he would be troubled to go before a Justice.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You did not hear him say any thing about fourteen shillings?- A. No.

Q.Kelly has done a great deal of business as an informer? - A. I have heard so, but I don't know it of my own knowledge.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

For the prisoner.

ROBERT EDWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a watchman, in Whitcomb-street.

Q. Do you know that black lady? - A. Yes, very well; the prisoner called me on the night of the 1st of September; he said, there were two men and a woman gone up into his apartments, and he did not know but they meant to rob him, and wished me to go and get them out; Mr. Gregor went with me.

Q. Did you find the lady and her two lovers? - A. Yes; when we got there, there was one man standing at the foot of the bed, and the other behind the curtains; they pulled their hats over their faces, and away they went down stairs; after that, there were some words between Berry and the lady; she said, d-n his old eyes, and called him a b-r, and said she had paid him one shilling for the bed.

Q. Did she pretend that she was robbed, or hurt by any body? - A.Not a word passed of any such thing.

Q.Upon your oath, while you were there, was there a blow struck? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know of a more infamous and dangerous whore in London, than she is? - A. No, not in England, she ought to have been hanged years ago.

- M'GREGOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a watchman in Cockspur-street; Berry called me in to remove a woman and two men from his house; I went to the house, and found a black woman and two men.

Q.How long have you known her? - A. Two years since I have been upon the watch; the men started down stairs, and pulled their hats over their eyes; she and Mr. Berry had some words, and then she walked down stairs.

Q. At the time you were there, did either you, or your partner, or Berry, strike or ill use this woman at all? - A. Neither of us ever put a hand nigh her at all.

Q. Did she complain to you of having been struck, or received any injury of any kind? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever meet to dangerous or infamous a prostitute as that woman who has accused this man? - A. I never heard of a worse in my life.

Q. Did she complain of the loss of any money?- A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-20

647. THOMAS DENNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a metal watch, value 10s. and a gold seal, value 5s. the property of Henry-Reynolds Hinde .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

HENRY-REYNOLDS HINDE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer in the first regiment of guards ; in January last, I had apartments in the Barracks, at Knightsbridge , the prisoner was my groom ; I had locked up my watch in a writing-desk; in consequence of some suspicion, the prisoner was apprehended, and upon him was found a duplicate of the watch, the officer has it.

WALTER MUNCASTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Mr. Rochfort, in Jermyn-street; on the 16th of January, I took in a watch from the prisoner, in the name of Polley; I lent him half-a-guinea upon it, (produces it;) an application was afterwards made by Blackman, the officer, for the watch.

Q. Did you give the prisoner a duplicate? - A. I did.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner; I searched him at the watch-house, at Covent Garden; I found a great number of duplicates, among which, was one of a watch; I took it to Mr. Rochfort's, and the young man produced that watch; when I found the duplicate, the prisoner said it was his master's watch.

Q. Had you said any thing, before that, to induce him to confess? - A. No, I did not. (The watch was deposed to by Mr. Hinde).

The prisoner put in a written paper, stating his contrition for the offence he had committed, that he was upon board wages, which he had not received for eight or nine weeks, having applied to his master for it in vain, till being almost in a state of starvation, he was tempted to pledge them till he could get the payment of his wages.

Mr. Hinde. I constantly paid him his wages before-hand, upon his application, before they were due; I had lost a great number of things at different times; he has been dabling in the lottery.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18010916-21

648. ROBERT GRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a silver watch, value 5l. a gold seal, value 25s. a steel chain, value 2s. 6d. the property of William Reading .

The principal witness being absent, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-22

649. JOSEPH HEDFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , a pocket-book, value 1s. 6d. a Bank-note, value 5l. and eleven other Bank-notes, value 11l. the property of Richard Hadril .

RICHARD HADRILL sworn. - I live at Canterbury, retired from business: On Thursday, the 20th of August, about two o'clock I was looking at a print-shop at the end of Cock-court, opposite the Old-Bailey , a number of Lascars were passing; I felt a brush at my left-hand pocket; I turned round, missed my pocket-book, and saw the prisoner with my pocket-book in his right hand; I said that was my pocket-book, I told him I would swear it was my pocket-book; there were above thirty, in all, about me; they were four or five deep before him; the prisoner said, he had it not; I said, if you have it not, you have smuggled it away among some of your companions; upon that, a man who is a constable of that same ward came up, and said, what is the matter here; said I, this man has picked my pocket, and I will swear it; he then took him by the left shoulder, and said then, come along with me; he led him along till he got to Giltspur-street Compter, and the person who keeps that prison was going to examine him; I said, it was hardly worth while, for he had shifted it; he was searched, but nothing found upon him.

Q. What was the colour of your pocket-book?- A. Red.

Q. What size was it? - A.One of Johnson's pocket-books.

Q. Did this pocket-book contain any thing? - A. Yes; there were some memorandums, and there were eleven one-pound Bank of England notes, and a five-pound Bank of England note.

Q. Have you ever seen any of those notes since?- A. No, not a bit of them, nor ever shall.

Q. Did you stop him immediately when you saw the book in his hand? - A.Immediately.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You saw the person that took the pocket-book put it in his pocket, did not you? - A. No, I did not.

Q. There was a pretty large croud collected? - A. There were thirty or forty, in my opinion.

Q. I believe, four or five deep? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know the number of the notes?- A. No.

Q. And your pocket-book was a common pocket-book? - A. Yes; there is a thing which I forgot to tell the Judge - my pocket-book was tied round with a black cotton string, and I saw that.

Q.Now, I understand you to say this, that your pocket-book was a common pocket-book, tied round with a black cotton string? - A. Yes.

Q.Did it ever happen to you in Kent to see a pocket-book tied round with a black cotton string?- A. Never, nor yet in London.

Q. There was nothing upon the outside of the pocket-book? - A. There was my name upon the outside.

Q. And that you saw when it was in the man's hand? - A. I do not think that I did.

Q. Upon your oath, did you or not observe your name upon it at the time it was in the man's hand? - A. I cannot say that I did.

Q. The only opportunity you had of seeing the pocket-book in the man's hand, was a very short time? - A. Yes, about fifteen seconds, or not so long.

Q. Will you take upon yourself to say, upon the casual view you had, surrounded by the number of people that you were, though you did not see the name upon it, that that was the same pocket-book?- A. I will, according to the best of my opinion, swear it.

Q. Will you swear it? - A. I will not.

Court. Q. What is your belief about it? - A. My positive belief is, that it was my pocket-book.

WILLIAM ROGERS sworn. - I am a plaisterer; I know nothing of the robbery; I saw Mr. Hadrill put eleven Bank-notes of one pound each into his pocket-book, and a five-pound note before he left my house in Gutter-lane, on the 20th of August.

Q. What was the colour of his pocket-book? - A. A red one, tied with a black string; he did not leave my house till after dinner; he was going to the west-end of the town.

ALEXANDER MILLER sworn. - I am a constable; I saw a croud of people upon Ludgate-hill; I enquired what was the matter; I observed the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner by the hand; he told me his pocket was picked, and he would give charge of the man; the prisoner then denied it, and said, I have not got your pocket-book, you must be a very bad man to say so; I then laid hold of him by the left side of his collar, and took him to Giltspur-street Compter; there we searched him, but found nothing upon him; he said he was ready to go any where.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He denied knowing any thing about it, but said, he was ready to go any where to be searched? - A. Yes.

Q. In point of fact, he was as ready as any person you ever took in custody to go with you? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I am a tallow-chandler; but since my brother left off business, I sell pens about the streets; I had been of an errand into Watling-

street, in comming back, I stopped at the printshop, I had not stopped there more than a minute, when this gentleman said I had picked his pocket; he said, I had put his pocket-book in my pocket; I told him I was innocent of it, and was willing to go to any shop with him; they took me to the Compter; I was very willing to be searched.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-23

650. ANN PICKERING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , a cloak, value 1l. a shawl, value 10s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of John Sullivan .

CATHERINE SULLIVAN sworn. - I am the wife of John Sullivan : Last Saturday three weeks I lost my property from No. 2, Queen's Arms-alley, Fleet-market , I had a room there; the prisoner lived next door but one to me; she had been in my room the day that I missed the things; she and another girl came at nine o'clock in the morning, and asked me to let them have a tea-pot of hot water, and they were in and out all day till four o'clock in the afternoon; I saw the property afterwards in the hands of the constable.

JOHN MERRIFIELD sworn. - I am constable of St. Bride's, (produces a cloak, shawl, and handkerchief); a seaman of the name of Coleman gave me charge of the prisoner; I went down to Deptford for him yesterday, and the captain would not let him come; I opened the prisoner's apron, and took these things out of her apron; I have had them ever since.(The property was identified by Mrs. Sullivan).

Prisoner's defence. I asked her to lend me the cloak and shawl; I told her I did not want them just then; she told me where they laid, that I might have them when I wanted them; I went in afterwards, and she was talking with another man, and I went in and took them.

Q.(To Mrs. Sullivan.) Did you ever, upon your oath, lend her these things? - A. No, never.

Q. You never gave her any authority to take them out of the house? - A. No, I never did.

Jury. Q. Did you ever at any time lend her any other articles? - A. Yes; I once lent her a linen apron; I never knew any harm of her before.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-24

651. JAMES SPENCER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a sow pig, value 15s. the property of Richard Alcock .

RICHARD ALCOCK sworn. - I am a butcher in Aldgate High-street: On Tuesday, the 1st of September, I lost a sow-pig from Narrow-alley, I missed it about ten o'clock in the morning; I was looking about two hours and a half for it, and then I learnt that it had got into Honey-lane Market; I went, and found it in the possession of Mr. Hardy, a potato-merchant; I know it to be my pig, it was a sleek-coated one, with a short tail, and long ears, black; I had only bought it the day before.

Q. Did you make observation enough of it to know whether it was your pig or not? - A. Yes; I am sure it was my pig; I know nothing of the prisoner.

- HARDY sworn. - I keep a potato-shop: The prisoner brought a pig into the market for sale, I bought it of him; Mr. Alcock came to me about twelve o'clock; the prisoner asked twelve shillings for it, I gave him eleven shillings; then Mr. Alcock came and claimed it; the next morning the prisoner was found, and I went before Alderman Perchard, and identified the prisoner.

Q.(To Alcock). When did you see the pig after you had lost it? - A. The Friday following.

Q. The pig might have been taken astray for any thing you know? - A. It might.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Billingsgate with some oysters, and in Fenchurch-street this pig was running along, and several people running to catch it; several people owned it; I said, nobody should have the pig, I would take care of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-25

652. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , three pounds eight ounces of coffee, value 6s. the property of Thomas Knight and James Andrews .

THOMAS KNIGHT sworn. - I am clerk to Thomas Knight and James Andrews, cloth-workers porters , upon Cox's quay : On Friday, the 3d of August, there were 271 bags of coffee upon the quay; in consequence of information, I turned round, and saw a quantity of coffee in the prisoner's hand, there was about three pounds of it; it is worth about eighteen pence a pound; Mr. Knight and Mr. Andrews had the charge of this coffee.

Q. How do you know that his was part of their coffee? - A. I saw the prisoner leaning on the bag, which was cut, and the hat, with the coffee in it, in his hand.

JOHN KEMT sworn. - I was coming upon Cox's quay between five and six o'clock, as near as I can recollect, on Monday the 3d of August; I saw the prisoner leaning upon the bag of coffee with one hand, and with the other hand he was in the act of putting coffee into his hat; I stepped up to him, and asked him what he was about; he said he was doing no more than what other men had been doing before him; upon that, Mr. Knight came up, and I gave charge of him to the constable.

Prisoner. The coffee lay about the ground.

Witness. The bag was cut at the top about nine inches; there was none lay about the ground.

THOMAS KNIGHT sworn. - I am in partnership with James Andrews; we are responsible for this coffee.(Joseph Hunter, a constable, produced the coffee).

Prisoner's defence. I saw the coffee running out of the bag into the water; I put my hat, and caught three quarters of a hat full; I thought I might as well have it as let it go into the water, and he lost. GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined one month in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-26

653. CHARLES DUBORDIEUX was indicted for that he, on the 13th of September, 1795, at the parish of Milton, next Gravesend, in the county of Kent, did marry one Esther Foster , spinster ; and afterwards, on the 25th of April , in the 41st year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of St. Mary Matselon , otherwise Whitechapel, feloniously did marry and take to wife Elizabeth Provost , spinster , the said Esther, his former wife, being then alive .(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

ABRAHAM PROVOST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. (Produces a certificate of the first marriage). I saw it written by the minister in his own house at Milton.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you compare it with the register? - A. I will not prosess to say I did; it was read over in the presence of the Minister.(Mr. Gurney contended that that was not sufficient).

Court. I cannot receive it.

EDMUND FOSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you a sister? - A. Yes; her name is Esther Foster ; I was present at the marriage at Milton, next Gravesend.

Q. To whom was she married? - A. Charles Dubordieux.

Q.Look round, and see if you can see him? - A. That is him. (Pointing to the prisoner).

Q. When was she married to him? - A.I think the 13th of September, about six years ago.

Q. Is she now alive? - A. I saw her alive about five days ago.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How old was the prisoner at that time - about eighteen, was not he? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What do you believe to have been his age - do you believe he was more than eighteen? - A. I should rather think he was above eighteen.

Q.Upon your oath, do not you believe he was under twenty? - A. I cannot positively say.

Q. I did not ask you positively? - A. I believe nothing about it.

Q. What was your sister at that time? - A.She was in a middling low way.

Q. It is a painful thing to ask you - you know what I mean? - A. I suppose, a virtuous girl.

Q. Did he live with her? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she live with you before she was married? - A. No; she lived in Gravesend.

Q. How long has she been separated from her husband? - A. I suppose that man has been away from her about a twelvemonth.

Q. Upon your oath, has he not been away from her several twelvemonths? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear he has not been from her three years? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear he has not been from her two years? - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH SIMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Be so good as look at the prisoner at the bar; do you know him? - A. I do.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with him? - A.About eight or nine months.

Q. Do you ever recollect seeing him at the house of your father and mother? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he in the habit of visiting you there? - A. Yes.

Q. By their permission, or privately? - A. By their permission.

Q. How did he represent himself to your family?- A. As a single man.

Q. Did he pay his addresses to you? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you ever married to him? - A. Yes.

Q.When? - A. On the 25th of April last, at Whitechapel Church.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How old are you? - A. Twenty-one next January.

Q. He continued to live with you till the time of his being taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he not extremely kind and affectionate to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any notice given to him, or you, of this charge being to be made against him? - A. Yes.

Q. How shortly before? - A. Two or three days before he was taken up.

Q. To whom? - A. To him; he told me of it.

Q.He still continued with you in the manner you have stated? - A. Yes.

STEPHEN PAYNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am constable of the Ward of Portsoken: I apprehended the prisoner on the morning of the 3d of July, at No. 3, little George-street, Minories.

Q.Is that in the City of London? - A. It is.

Mr. Gurney. (To Provost.) Q. In what situation of life are you? - A. A cooper.

Q. You are the father of the second wife? - A. Yes.

Q. Your daughter had no great fortune, I believe, and therefore he could not marry her for that?- A. No.

Q. None at all, I believe? - A. No.

Q.After the prisoner was taken up, did you not obtain from him an assignment of all his household furniture, and a bond of fifty pounds a year, for your daughter? - A. No.

Q. Did not your attorney, by your directions?- A. I cannot say he did.

Q. Then you mean to swear that he did not, I suppose? - A. No, not by my direction.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know it was done? - A. There was a kind of promise made.

Q. Upon your oath, have you not got them your self at this moment, upon condition that you would not prosecute him, and then you prosecuted him?- A. I had no concern in the matter.

Q. Was it not executed? - A. I was not present when it was done.

Q. Have you not seen the papers? - A. I have not.

Q. Have you not seen those instruments which I have described to you? - A. There were some kind of instruments shewn to me.

Q. By whom? - A. Mr. Pullen.

Q. Mr. Pullen is your attorney, is he not? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got them here? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. I have described them truly, have not I?

Mr. Alley. A. No doubt of it.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you any doubt of their having been executed? - A.They were executed without my consent.

Q. Were they not prepared by your attorney? -- A. They were.

Mr. Alley. Q.Whether you have seen the deeds or not, you know that such deeds were executed for the security of your daughter? - A. Mr. Pullen, in consideration of my daughter's unfortunate affiction, would wish every thing done to serve my daughter; I cannot say there were no such things done.

Q. You did not, yourself, desire any such thing to be done? - A. No.

JOHN PULLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Be so good as explain this transaction of which we have heard? - A. When the prisoner was apprehended for this offence, I waited upon him at the prison; he seemed very much disposed to make every attonement in his power; and I was equally induced to obviate the necessity of prosecution.

Court. Q. Are you an attorney? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that the offence, with which he was charged, was a selony; and that that was a composition of felony? - A. I was not fully aware of it; I drew up the memorandum, and put it into the form of a bond immediately afterwards; I was extremely anxious to prevent a prosecution.

Q. Do you see the situation in which you have placed yourself; you, a professional man, have been actually compounding felony; you could not appear in a situation less respectable.

Mr. Pullen. A.Being very little conversant with this sort of business, I acted more agreeable to my feelings than any thing else; that is the only extenuation I can offer for my conduct.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Who is this William Provost , that appears as a witness to both these instruments?- A. The son of Abraham Provost ; the prisoner said he had so great an affection for that last wife, that he should be very happy to make her every reparation he could possibly make.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

Mr. Gurney. I believe I can put an end to all this, which, in such a case, nobody will be very sorry for; I will shew that the first was not a legal marriage, he being a minor.

For the prisoner.

- COLLINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a brewer, at Richmond: I have known the prisoner these twelve years.

Q. Did you know him in 1795, at which time he is said to have married? - A. He was at that time but just come from abroad; I knew him in 1789, 1790, 1791, and 1792.

Q. Do you know what age he is now? - A. I cannot say, I think twenty-eight.

Q. Don't you know at all what age he is of now?- A. No.

Q. Is he not a young man of exceeding good character? - A. Yes; but he has been very easily persuaded to a great many things that he ought not have been. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-27

654. CHARLES MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , twelve ounces of tea, value 5s. the property of James Deakin and William Allanson .

WILLIAM ALLANSON sworn. - I am in partnership with James Deakin, the prisoner was our porter : On Tuesday morning, the 18th of August, a little before nine o'clock, I went down into the cellar, the prisoner then came and opened the cellar window; he then went to a large empty tea-chest, and put his hand into his pocket; I then heard the rattling of tea into a bag, or bags; after that, he went to some tea lead which laid close by the teachest, and after that he went up stairs; I then went to look at this tea-chest, and there I found two bags of tea, one of black, and one of green, the black bag had five pounds and a half in it; I then went to the tea lead, and there I found some paper and string, ready to pack it up, as I supposed; I then went up stairs; we suffered the prisoner to go out of the house, and had him brought back, and then we found the tea upon him, in his pocket, tied up in a blue paper; after that he begged for mercy not to prosecute.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Is this a light,

or a dark celiar? - A. It is rather dark; it is near twenty yards long, and only one window.

Q. You did not see him take any tea? - A. No; I only heard the rattling of tea.

Q. That was about nine o'clock in the morning?- A. Yes.

Q. What time was it when you stopped him at night? - A. A little before eight o'clock, the usual time of his going away home.

Q. You don't mean to swear to tea? - A. No.

Q. Had you missed any tea? - A. We cannot miss a small quantity, we deal so largely.

Q. It was such tea as is to he had in any shop in London? - A. Yes.

Q.How long has he lived with you? - A.Nine months.

Q. You had a good character with him? - A. A middling one.

- sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Deakin and Allanton: I was set to watch the prisoner; I saw him go to the tea-chest, where these two bags were, he turned it round to get at the bags, and then shut the window; I followed him up very shortly after; I could not see any thing he did, it was so dark; I gave information to Mr. Allanson that he had been at the tea-chest, and when he was going home they called him back, and asked him if he had not got some tea; he said he had not any; they insisted upon seeing what he had got, and then he said he had, and begged they would forgive him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner went down as usual to shut the window, before he went home? - A. Yes.

Q. In order to do which, he must go near this tea-chest? - A. Not very near; I saw him at the tea-chest, and saw him turn it round.(The tea produced).

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty of what I am charged with.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one week in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-28

655. MARGARET PETRIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , a yard and a half of linen cloth, value 2s. a dimity napkin, value 1s. a silk handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. and a linen handkerchief, value 6d. the property of George Spurgeon .

SUSANNAH SPURGEON sworn. - I am the wife of George Spurgeon; the prisoner lived servant with me between two and three months; I missed a piece of new cloth cut out for an apron, which I had begun making; I observed something stick out of her pocket; I examined, and found it was that; I also missed the other articles mentioned in the indictment.

JOHN MATTHEWS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(produces a napkin and a silk handkerchief); I took them in pledge, but have no recollection of the person; one is pledged in the name of Elizabeth Johnson, and the other, Margaret Johnson .

JOHN CLENCH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(produces a cotton handkerchief); it was brought to me by a woman, but I cannot say it was the prisoner; it was pledged in the name of Margaret Sykes .

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-29

656. THOMAS TOULMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , sixteen sheaves of beans, value 8s. the property of his Royal Highness William Henry, Duke of Clarence .(The case was opened by Mr. Raine).

JOHN LANGLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. On Thursday, the 27th of August, I was employed in a field belonging to the Duke of Clarence, where there were some Mazzaghan beans tied in sheaves with a pitched string; I left the field about six o'clock, they were then all right; I went again the next morning at six o'clock, and missed four shocks, containing sixteen sheaves.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You say they were all safe the night before - did you untie them to see if they were all safe? - A. No.

Q. It is not unusual to tie up sheaves with a string of that sort? - A. It is in that parish.

Q. Perhaps in the parish of Kingston, Sunbury, and round about there, you may have seen such a thing? - A. No; I have not.

ROBERT GODEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am a bailiff to his Royal Highness, William Henry, Duke of Clarence, he is Ranger of Bushy-park: On Friday the 28th of August, I got a warrant, and went with the constable, Mr. Scurr, about half-past four in the afternoon to the premises of the prisoner.

Q. How far from the bean-field? - A.About half a mile upon Hampton-Common; we searched all over the gardens and house, but could not find them; at last I saw some furze, and a great-coat over it; I pulled away part of the furze, and there were the beans; there was a hog-stye just by, the hogs were eating part of them; I found twelve sheaves and a half, and one loose; the prisoner was taken at Sunbury; I know them to be the same beans that were in his Highness's field, I know them by the soil; I asked the prisoner whose great-coat that was that I had found upon the furze, and he said it was his, he had bought it at Twickenham; two sheaves of the beans are here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you mean to swear to beans by the soil? - A. By the herbage; this was a bit of land that had not been ploughed

for three hundred years before; about four years ago, timber was growing upon it.

Mr. Raine. Q. You saw old grass at the roots of the beans? - A. Yes.

JOHN BENNETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I helped to pull these beans, I some tied them with pitched strings.

Q. Is that the usual way of tying beans in that neighbourhood? - A.Some do, and some tie with straw.

Q.Should you know your own knot? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of beans are they? - A.Mazzaghan.

Q. Do you know of any Mazzaghan beans being grown in fields thereabouts, besides your's? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You yourself have used pitched strings, many times? - A. Many years ago.

Q.Mazzaghan beans would grow in a garden as well as in a field, I suppose? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Do you know where the prisoner lives? - A. Yes; upon Hampton Common .

Q. Has he a garden? - A. I cannot say.

Court. (To Goden). Q. Do you know the premises of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of a garden has be? - A. He grows mostly potatoes and cabbages, no beans at all; there had been none grown there.

THOMAS WARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I helped to pull these beans and tie them,(produces a sheaf;) I am sure I had this very theaf; here is some loose stuff in the knot.

Q.(To Goden.) Is that one of the sheaves found upon the premises of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. These beans were never on my premises; I don't know where they came from; they were found twenty yards from my house, upon the Common.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18010916-30

657. JANE LESLIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , two bedcurtains, value 1l. a set of bed-valances, value 2s. a shirt, value 3s. a muslin gown, value 5s. and a silk handkerchief, value 1s. the property of Sarah Johnson .

SARAH JOHNSON sworn. - I did live at No. 179, Drury-lane ; the prisoner was a servant of mine: On the 13th of July I lost the property mentioned in the indictment; I left home about half past six, I saw all my things safe then, and the drawers locked; when I returned, about half past ten, I was obliged to break open the door of my room, and when I got in, I missed the property: On the Tuesday lastnight after, I went with Treadway and a search-warrant to Mr. Solomons's, No. 8, Blackmoor-street, Clare-market, where I found the bedcurtains and vallances; I found the gown at Mr. Lane's, in Holborn; and at Mr. Pritchett's, in Short's-gardens, I found a shirt; I had had the prisoner taken up before I got the search-warrant.

BENJAMIN SOLOMONS sworn. - I keep a saleshop in Blackmoor-street; I bought these bedcurtains of the prisoner at the bar; she said she was obliged to sell them to pay her rent; I am sure the prisoner is the woman; the constable has them.

EDWARD BAYLIS sworn. - (Produces a muslin gown). Some person pawned it with me on the 13th of July, but I cannot say who it was.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - I am an officer; I went to Solomons's house with a search-warrant, and found these curtains. (Producing them).

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn. - I am an officer: On the 21st of July I had charge of the prisoner; I searched her, and found upon her the key of this woman's room; after that I went to a lodging of her's in White-hart-yard, and there she gave me these duplicates from the mantle-piece, (produces them), which apply to the property that has been produced.

EDWARD PRITCHETT sworn. - (Produces a handkerchief and a shirt). I do not recollect the person that pledged them; they were pledged by a woman; the handkerchief in the name of Jane Moxam, and the shirt in the name of Jane Johnson.(The property was identified by Mrs. Johnson).

Prisoner's defence. Mrs. Johnson employed me to make away with these things to pay her rent.

Mrs. Johnson. I had told her in the course of the day that I should be obliged to make away with some things to pay a quarter's rent, but I did not tell her to do it, nor did not know that she had taken them. GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined three months in Newgate and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-31

658. ROBERT PEARCE alias ARNOLD , was indicted for being found at large before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys)(Richard Baker produced a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner, and his Majesty's pardon, upon condition of his being transported for life).

BENJAMIN PITT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was servant to Mr. Kuby, in February, 1792.

Q. Is the prisoner the man who was then in custody upon a charge of robbing Mr. Baker? - A. Yes; I was not present at his trial.

Q. Do you remember his being under sentence of death upon that charge? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you present in Court in the May Sessions following, when he received his Majesty's pardon? - A. I was.

Q.Were you in Court when he received the order of transportation? - A. Yes, I was; he left Newgate on the 13th of June, 1792, but I did not go with him.

Q. Did you ever see him at Woolwich? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You were neither present at the time of the trial, nor of the respite, nor of the delivery? - A. No.

- FITZGERALD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. In February, 1792, I was a watchman in Castle Baynard Ward; I apprehended the prisoner at that time; I know him perfectly well; I was present when he was tried for robbing Mr. Baker's house, that is the man.

Q. Did you see him after May, 1792? - A. No, I did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe the witnesses upon that occasion were ordered out of Court, and examined separately? - A. I believe they were.

Q. Therefore, you were not in Court during the whole of the trial? - A. I believe there might have been one, two, or three called, before I came in.

JOHN READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a City constable: I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday night, the 6th of this month, at the Bacchus and Tun public-house, in St. John-street.

Q. Was he free and at large, or was he in custody? - A. No, he was smoking his pipe.

Mr. JOHN HILL CAPPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the clerks in the Secretary of State's office.

Q. Has there been any further extension of his Majesty's mercy towards this man, beyond saving his life, on condition of transportation for life? - A. None.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you were not in the office at the time this man is said to have received his respite? - A. I was in the office, but not in that department.

Q. I believe as to any thing that takes place with respect to prisoners after they are tried here and convicted, it is always entered in books kept for that purpose? - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore all the information you derive respecting this man, has been from those books? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I told Governor Hunter that I had received his Majesty's pardon on condition of being transported for life; but Mr. Bleckstock, of the House of Lords, sent me a letter, informing me, he had got me a mitigation; Governor Hunter looked into the books there, and saw I was entered for seven years only, and thinking my time was out, I asked Governor Hunter to permit me to come over with him, and he brought me over.

For the Prisoner.

- HUNTER, Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Before you came into the office of Governor, I believe you know mistakes have often happened in the terms for which persons have been ordered to be transported, for seven or fourteen years, or for life? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. You were Governor of New South Wales?- A. Yes.

Q. You have but just returned? - A. I returned in January.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being sent over from this country as a transport? - A.Perfectly well.

Q. Do you recollect how long he had been there? - A. He lived a considerable time in the house with me as a servant.

Q. Did he, during that time, conduct himself to your satisfaction? - A. Perfectly so.

Q. Do you remember an application from him to come home with you in your ship? - A. He applied to me some time before I quitted the country, in consequence of his time being expired, upon which I desired him to bring me a note from the Secretary of State's office.

Q. Is your secretary's name, at Botany Bay, Foulkes? - A. He is one of the clerks in the office.

Q. Be so good as take that into your hand, and tell me if that is the hand-writing of Mr. Foulkes?- A. Yes, it is.

Q. Did the prisoner, in consequence of your desire, bring that to you? - A. He did.

Q. In consequence of his bringing that to you, what was your conduct? - A. I ordered the books to be brought to me, not chusing to give credit to any note, and when these books were produced to me, he appeared to stand on these books for seven years.

Q. In that part in which he appeared to be sent to Botany Bay for seven years, did there appear to be any erasure, or attempt at erasure? - A. Not that I observed; it was the original list that was sent from England that I examined.

Q. Do you know from whence that list comes?- A.From the Secretary of State's office.

Q. Were there other books in which this entry would find its way, besides the list you looked at?- A. The list that comes from England is what we always look at.

Q. Upon the faith of what you saw in that list, what did you do? - A. I gave him permission to go where he pleased.

Q. I believe you were not content with that general permission, but being satisfied with his conduct as a servant, did you not permit him to

come home with you in your ship? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you place him, in consequence of his conduct, in a situation of confidence in the course of his passage home? - A. He had the care of the live stock.

Q. Are not the lists kept with you, as the records of Botany Bay? - A. Yes, they are.

Q. Did you find, upon examining this with the original list which is kept as as a matter of record, that this was a correct copy? - A. Yes.(It was read as follows) - " Robert Pearce , otherwise Arnold, aged 40, London, 23d May, 1792. seven years. Extracted from the Ganges register, Francis Foulkes , Secretary's Office, Sydney Cove, 20th April, 1800."

Court. Q. You inspected that list yourself? - A. I did.

Q. And in the original, I think you said you did not observe any erasure or interlineation, or any thing of the kind? - A. In most of the lists there are a great many erasures, there are very few but what come with some.

Q. Is it the same sort of list that would have application to all the persons sent on board that vessel? - A. The same list.

Q. Would that be the authority to which you would look for the length of time for which persons are ordered to be transported? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. That book came from the Ganges East Indiaman, as a shipbook? - A. No, not as a ship-book, we have no other list.

Court. I will tell you fairly how I feel this case; it is certainly a very strong case for consideration elsewhere, but here I do not see how we can proceed as to the term for which he was ordered to be transported, but what appears upon the record: at the same time the account we have now heard is very fit for consideration heareafter.

GUILTY , Death , aged 57.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of the very strong representation of Governor Hunter.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18010916-32

659. WILLIAM HOLLOWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , seventeen pounds weight of indigo, value 4l. the property of Thomas-Downes Lamb and Robert Atkinson .

ROBERT ATKINSON sworn. - I am a dyer , in partnership with Thomas-Downes Lamb; the prisoner was my horse-keeper : On the morning of the 15th of July, in consequence of suspicion, I concealed myself in the cellar, I saw the prisoner come into the cellar, he stopped about a minute, he had a bag in his hand, he was going away with it, and when he had got a few yards past me, I fired a blunderbuss, and he stopped; he then came towards me, and said, he hoped I would forgive him; I went up stairs into the yard, and he came after me, without the bag; he then went into the stable, and I went down into the cellar, picked up a bag of indigo, and then sent for an officer.

Q. Had you indigo of that sort in your possession? - A. I had; there were seventeen pounds in the bag.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; he begged his master would forgive him, and said, it was the first time he had ever done any thing of the kind.(Produces the indigo).

Mr. Knapp. (To Mr. Atkinson). Q. How long has the prisoner lived with you? - A.Seven or eight years.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-33

660. JOHN GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , twelve wine-glasses, value 2s. twenty-nine tumblers, value 7s. 3d. twenty-four glass cracked decanters, value 12s. five jelly-glasses, value 15l. four lemonade glasses, value 6d. and a glass mug, value 6d. the property of Samuel Shepherd .(The case was opened by Mr. Sedgwick).

SAMUEL SHEPHERD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Sedgwick. I live in Cockspur-street: On the 4th of August I went to the house of Mrs. Kinsley, in the New Cut, Westminster-road, where I found the articles mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner was servant to me in the factory.

ANN KINSLEY sworn. - I keep a clothes-shop, and sell earthen-ware; I purchased these articles of the prisoner at the bar at different times; he said he had a large quantity that a man, who had gone into the country, had left for him to sell.

JOSEPH SHEPHERD sworn. - I went to the house of the last witness, and saw the articles mentioned in the indictment; I knew them to be my uncle's property. (The property was produced, and identified by the prosecutor).

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18010916-34

661. JOHN FRANKLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a silver table-spoon, value 10s. the property of Hugh M'Coy .

HUGH M'COY sworn. - I keep the Star and Garter, in St. Martin's-lane : On the 7th of July the prisoner came in for a glass of ale; there was a jar of sugar, with a table-spoon in it, upon a table

in the room where he was; my wife missed the spoon, and I went after the prisoner; I followed him into Taylor's buildings, and there I saw the spoon upon a step; he passed the stairs, and went into a back part of the house, where the necessary was; I took up the spoon, and followed him, I laid hold of him; he said, pray let me go, it was distress made me do it, (produces the spoon); it has my name upon it.

- GRIFFITH sworn. - I was in the prosecutor's house; I followed him in pursuit of the prisoner; I saw M'Coy pick up the spoon, and then he laid hold of the prisoner; he said, pray let me go, distress made me do it; we then took him to the watch-house.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence. GUILTY aged 32.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-35

662. SAMUEL, alias JOHN CROSS , and JOHN, alias EDWARD EDWARDS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , ten yards of kerseymere cloth, value 30s. the property of George William Goodey .

GEORGE WILLIAM GOODEY sworn. - I am a man's-mercer , No. 14, Bedford-court, Covent garden : On Friday, the 7th of August, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was called down stairs, and informed a piece of cloth had been stolen.

JAMES WIGHTMAN sworn. - On the 7th of last month I was passing through Bedford-court, about eight o'clock in the morning, I observed the prisoner, Cross; to the best of my remembrance, the prisoner, Edwards, but I do not mean to swear to him, and a third man; I saw Cross, and the man that I take to have been Edwards, go into the shop of the prosecutor; they staid about five minutes, during which time I was in the house of a young man, now in Court, nearly opposite; Cross came out with a roll of kerseymere, I immediately collared him, and he let the kerseymere drop; the person that I believe to be Edwards was with him; immediately upon my collaring Cross, the other two ran away; a scuffle ensued; he said, if I would let him go quietly back he would, and he did; he denied having had the kerseymere; two or three people came up, and he walked with me to the prosecutor's.(The property was produced and identified by Mr. Goodey).

RICHARD WILLIAMS sworn. - On Friday, the 7th of August, Mr. Wightman came in, and requested to sit upon the counter a few minutes, as he suspected three men were going to rob some of the opposite neighbours; after sitting a short time, I saw the prisoner, Cross, come out of Mr. Goodey's shop, and the prisoner, Edwards, with him; I took particular notice of both, and Edwards particularly.

WILLIAM- OAKLEY BUCK sworn. - I was in Mr. Goodey's shop alone; the two prisoners came into the shop about eight o'clock in the morning to buy some cotton; they staid in the shop about five minutes; this kersymere was upon the right hand counter; I was behind the left hand counter, when I was serving them with the cotton; Edwards threw down 1s. 6d. to pay for the cotton, and while I went into the passage to get change, Cross was gone away with the kerseymere, and I did not know any thing of it till I heard the cry of stop thief.

Q. How long were you gone? - A. About three minutes; when I came back, both the prisoners were gone.

Cross's defence. I have nothing to say, any more than I know nothing of the man that stands by the side of me.

Edwards's defence. I know nothing of this man; I was taken five weeks after the robbery was done. Cross, GUILTY , aged 25.

Edwards, GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18010916-36

663. CHARLES CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a Bank note, value 1l. the property of John Jordan .

JOHN JORDAN sworn. On the 18th of July I dined at an eating-house, No. 15, Chandos-street, Covent-garden , at which house the prisoner was a waiter ; after I had dined, I gave him a 20s. note to take to his master to change; he soon returned, and told me his master could not change it; he brought back the note, and I took it of him; after he had taken the note, he said, Sir, if you will give me the note, I will get it changed for you at our baker's; I gave him the note, and waited a considerable time in expectation of his returning with the change, but he did not return; I waited an hour; I did not see him again till the 20th of August; two boys who knew him had taken him up, and brought him to the same house, where I happened to be at dinner again; he then said he had lost the note; I took him to Bow-street, and he was committed.

JOHN BYWELL sworn. - I keep an eating-house, in Chandos-street; the prisoner lived servant with me: On the 18th of July he brought me down a 1l. note to change; he gave me to understand who it was for, and I knowing the gentleman, and having no change, desired him to pay the next time he came, and I sent him back the note; I soon after saw him again with the paper in his hand, and he said the gentleman desired him to get change; I bid him go, but never saw him again till

he was taken up; when he was brought back, he said he had lost the note.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-37

664. THOMAS BRUCE was indicted feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 6d. and six shillings in money , the property of Stephen Doyle .

STEPHEN DOYLE sworn. - I am a breechesmaker , in Denmark-street, St. George's in the East : On the 8th of July, about four in the morning, I found the prisoner in my room; I said, you villain, Bruce, what are you doing here, I will have you detected; he had been in trouble some time before, and when he came out, every body said, there goes Bruce, that was the way I came to know his name; he had the silk handkerchief that I now have round my neck, in his hand, which he dropped; I had six shillings in my waistcoat pocket over night, and that was gone; I had laid my waistcoat upon the table, under the handkerchief; I then called some of the neighbours up to my assistance; I charged him with having taken the six shillings, and he would not acknowledge to any of it; I got an officer, who searched him, and found six shillings in silver upon him, and no more.

ELIZABETH DOYLE sworn. - I am the daughter of the last witness, I sleep in my father's room; I saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief, by my father's bed-side.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I took him to a public-house, threw him down upon his back, and searched him; I found six shillings upon him, which was all the money he had.

Prisoner's defence. I went up stairs at this house to see Nance Angel , that lived in the garret, and I met this man upon the stairs; he charged me with taking his money and his handkerchief; I told him I knew nothing about it, and he sent for a runner; I had had some gin with another person, and had changed a seven-shilling piece; the six shillings that were found upon me was the change that I had received out of the seven-shilling-piece.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18010916-38

665. DANIEL ALCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a silver watch, value 1l. 11s. 6d. the property of William Messer .

WILLIAM MESSER sworn. - On the 26th of June last the prisoner and I were drinking together at a public-house, at Ealing .

Q. At what time of day or night? - A. I cannot say, I was very much intoxicated with liquor; I staid there all night, and did not miss my watch till the next morning; I afterwards saw him pull it out of his pocket on the 25th of August.

Q. Had you seen him between the 25th and 26th of August? - A. Yes, two or three times; he worked at East Acton and I at Ealing. On the 25th of August, I asked him about my watch, and he pulled out a watch that he said he gave a guinea for, and put it in the landlord's hands.

Q.Had you never asked him for it before? - A. Yes, I asked him for it the Sunday following, and he said he had seen it; I then had him taken.

THOMAS KENTISH, sworn. - I am a constable; I went to the prisoner and challenged him with having the prosecutor's watch; the prosecutor was with me; the prisoner said he had no watch at all; I put my hand against his sob, and there I felt a watch; I asked him to shew it to me, and he said he would not; I told him, then I would search him. The prisoner and the prosecutor then went into another room, and then the landlord brought out the watch and delivered it to me; his name is Higgins. (Produces it.) I have had it ever since.(The watch was deposed to by Messer.)

- HIGGINS, sworn - I keep the Horse and Groom at East Acton. On the 25th of August, the prosecutor, the prisoner, and Kentish were at my house; the prisoner is a gardener, and lodged at my house; I heard an alarm, that they were come to take the gardener; the first I heard him say was, that he had no watch but one, that he had given a guinea for; I found that the prisoner and the prosecutor were acquainted; I said they had better go into another room and settle it; they were in the room by themselves about a quarter of an hour; then they called me in, and the prisoner gave me the watch, saying, there was the watch, if it was Messer's he should have it; he would bring the man by to-morrow night that he bought it of for a guinea; Messer said, if he did give a guinea for it he should have it again; the prisoner desired I would take care of it till the next evening; the prisoner had been out in the course of the day as I understood to find the person he had bought the watch of; he came in the evening and said he could not find him, but he would not deliver up the watch without the guinea that he had paid for it, or go before a Magistrate; then they all went together to the Justice's, and he recommended them to Bow-street; we went to Bow-street, and the prisoner was committed; he lodged in my house ten or twelve weeks; he was a very sober, industrious man, and has done a great deal of work for me.

Prisoner's defence. I was in company with this young man; he and I were both very much intoxicated; I dropped asleep, and he went away and left me; the next time I saw him, he accused me

of taking his watch; about five weeks after that I went to London and bought a watch; I gave a guinea for it, after that Kentish and Messer came to Higgins's and challenged me with the watch; I said, if they would give me a guinea, they should have the watch, and I delivered it into the hands of the landlord.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-39

666. RICHARD BUTLER and JOHN BRIANT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , 12lb. of pewter, value 8s. the property of John Townsend and Thomas Compton .

- BALMER sworn. - I am servant to John Townsend and Thomas Compton , pewter-manufacturers ; they are Quakers ; I can only prove the property.

JOSEPH DEHAYNES sworn. - I am an apprentice to Messrs. Townsend and Compton. On the 22d of August, in consequence of a suspicion of the two prisoners, who are carpenters , I was ordered to conceal myself in the warehouse about five o'clock in the morning; they came in between five and six(before any of our manufacturers came to work) to grind their tools; they had not been grinding long before Butler crossed over to the other side of the shop; while he was gone, Briant kept turning the handle with the plane-iron upon the stone; he had his head towards the door, as if he was watching, and in about two minutes, or two minutes and a half, Butler came back with his hand to his jacket pocket, and then Briant went over, and in about two minutes returned with something in his jacket pocket, which he conveyed to his right hand breeches pocket; Briant took something out of his pocket and shewed it to Butler, then I saw it was metal; I followed Briant out of the gateway, and told him I wanted to speak to him; I brought him back to the accompting-house, and asked him if he had not got some of our metal; he said, what I have got is a mere trifle, not worth noticing; he drew some metal from his pockets; a constable was sent for, and he found some more in a leather sleeve that he had to work in; Briant was secured, and then the constable went over to the shop where Butler was at work, I followed him and found him taking some metal from him; after they were secured, the shop was searched where they had been at work, and I saw the fellow leather sleeve found tied up filled with metal.

- MARLIN, a constable, produced the metal found upon Butler, which was identified by D. haynes.

THOMAS LOWTHER produced the metal found upon Briant which was also identified by Dehaynes.

The Prisoners put in a written paper, stating that it was their first offence, and expressing great contrition on account of it.

Briant called three and Butler six witnesses who gave them a good character.

Butler, GUILTY , aged 51.

Briant, GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined three months in Newgate , fined 1s. and discharged.,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18010916-40

667. JAMES SHAWE was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 19th of May , 113 pieces of silk handkerchiefs, value 174l. the property of Thomas Butler , knowing them to have been stolen .

Second Count, laying them to be the property of Joseph Porter .

And a Third, to be the property of persons unknown.

There being no evidence the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-41

668. JOSEPH DAVIS , THOMAS HEAD , and ESTHER HEAD , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Crabb , about the hour of eight in the night of the 15th of August , with intent to steal, and feloniously stealing two coats, value 4l. three waistcoats, value 9s. a pair of breeches, value 10s. a silk gown and coat, value 20s. a bombasine gown and coat, value 16s. three muslin gowns, value 3l. 10s. a cotton gown, value 10s. a muslin petticoat, value 15s. two petticoats, value 10s. a shawl, value 2s. six neck-handkerchiefs, value 6s. two child's frocks, value 20s. three shirts, value 10s. a bedquilt, value 5s. a breakfast-cloth, value 6d. and a table-cloth, value 5s. the property of Samuel Chivers , in the said dwelling-house.

ANN CHIVERS sworn. - I live at Mr. Crabb's, No. 43, Old-street : The back-room door is in the passage, I locked it about eight o'clock in the evening, I was called into my shop and left the room safe; in five or six minutes after, a girl came in for change for a seven-shilling-piece, I gave it her, and after she was gone, I found it was a bad one; I was lamenting the loss, when Esther Head came in, and asked me what she owed me; I told her I could not tell, as I was in a flurry, having taken a bad seven-shilling piece; she asked me if I should know the girl, I said, I should; she asked me if I would go with her, and look for her; I went out of the door, when she took my hand, and hitched it upon her arm, and we went quite the contrary way to what the girl went; she said, there is a girl of your description, but it was not her; she led me down Bunhill row, and begged me to have something to drink; I said I could not, and must put up with the loss; upon which she seemed very much against my going back, but we went back, and I found my acquaintance I had left in the shop; Esther Head still pressed me to know what

was owing; I said I could not recollect, but still she kept me in discourse for sometime; I wanted something out of the back room, and directly she saw I was going there, she bade me good night, and went away; directly, a man came in, and asked me to let him look at a bad shilling; he stopped two or three minutes, then turned round, and said, it is a bad one; I immediately went into the back room, and found the things gone; I found the drawers open, and the counterpane off the bed; I lost the things in the indictment, and a great many more; I had a letter from some unknown person to take up Davis, which I did; the night before, Head and his wife were round my shop taking notice of it.

- THIMBLEBY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I produce a shirt which the prisoner, Davis, pawned on the 18th of August for five shillings; I knew him before. (The shirt was identified by Mrs. Chivers).

JOHN FARRER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, and took in this table-cloth on the 17th of August of Elizabeth Davis; I knew her before. (The table-cloth was deposed to by Mrs. Chivers).

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I, in company with Ray and others, apprehended the prisoner Head and his wife on the 18th of August, at a house in Price's-court, Old-street; and on Thursday, the 20th of August, in company with Vickery and Mason, and a woman of the name of Jenner, I went to No. 20, Hatfield Place, in the Surry road, and in the room of a woman of the name of Austin this box was produced to me from under the bed; in it was this piece of cloth, which Mrs. Chivers says is her's, and these bags full of picklock keys, a dark lantern, a phosphorus box, a candle, and a large ripping chisel. (Produces them).(The piece of cloth was identified by Mrs. Chivers.)

MARY AUSTIN sworn. - My sister, Mary Jenner, brought that box to my room, when I was out, on Tuesday night, and it was found on the Thursday following; she gave no reason for bringing it, nor did I know what was in it.

MARY JENNER sworn. - I took the box out of the room where I lived with Mr. Davis, in Liquor-pond-street; it was empty, and I carried it over to my sister's.

Q. What did you carry it there for? - A. For safety.

Q. Did you know what was in it? - A. No.

Q. Who desired you to take it over? - A. I took it over of my own head.

Q. You took this box out of your room to your sister's for safety? - A. Yes.

Q. Who desired you to carry it away? - A.Joseph Davis.

Q. Did he bring the box into the room? - A. No; it was in the room before; it had been there a good while.

Who brought it there first? - A. I don't know; there were two boxes in the room before I went to him.

Q. Did Davis put any thing into the box? - A. I did not see him.

Q. Was it Davis's room? - A. Yes; he paid for it.

Q. Did you ever see the box open? - A. No; I did not know what was in it till the officers came; I do not know Head, and never saw him with Davis.

Q.(To Armstrong). Did you find any thing upon Thomas Head ? - A. Nothing, or in his apartments.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I was in company with Vickery and Armstrong on the 18th and 20th, and apprehended Davis and this girl; they were in bed together; there was nothing found on Head.

Davis. (To Jenner). Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate that you received those things of Mrs. Head on the Wednesday after the robbery was committed? - A. Yes, I did, in Old-street, upon some logs.

Court. Q.How came you to say you received them of her? - A. I did receive them of her.

Davis. Wednesday was the day after the robbery; on the Tuesday this man and woman were for examination, therefore they could not give her those things on the Wednesday.

Court. Q. You said you received them of Mrs. Head on the Wednesday on some logs in Old-street- where did you get them? - A. In Old-street, on some logs.

Q. Who was with her? - A. Nobody, only me and herself.

Q. Was that on the Wednesday? - A. I don't know rightly what day it was she came to my place; I took them home.

Q. Did Davis ever see those things? - A. No; he was not at home.

Q. When he did come home, did you show him the box? - A. I took it over to my sister's; he was not at home.

Q. Did Davis never see the box? - A. It stood in the room empty, on the top of another box.

Head. Q. What things did my wife give you on the Wednesday? - A. The dark lantern and keys, and other things; they were not in the box, they were in my lap.

Court. Q.What were they given to you for? - A. To take home.

Q.For what purpose? - A. I was to take them home, and put them in the box; Joseph Davis did not see them; and I took them to my sister's.

Q. Who gave you the piece of cloth that was in the box? - A. It was in the room, and I put it in the box; I did not see who brought it into the room.

Davis's defence. On Thursday morning, Ray,

and three others, came to my apartments; I was not up; they said they had a warrant; I got up, and so did Mary Jenner; they looked every where, and found nothing but a horse-cloth, which they took, and said, I must go with them to the office with Mary Jenner ; I went, and left Jenner in company with Ray, Ferris, and another, to follow, on account of secresy; they came to the office, and we were both put at the bar together, but Armstrong came and took out Mary Jenner , and I was ordered to be put back; I saw no more of her till the second hearing; they produced a box, and Ray said, search him for the key, they did, but found done; I knew nothing of the box, I never was at her sister's, nor did I know where she lived; the shirt is my own, and if you will measure the wrist-bands, they will fit me, as I am a small man.

Head's defence. I live very near the prosecutor's house, and as to passing it, I am obliged to do so, as I have my beer from a house at the corner; my wife says, she knows nothing of it.

Jury. (To Jenner). Q. Did you know what was in the box when you took it out of Davis's room? - A. I took it out of Davis's room; there were two empty boxes.

Q. Did you know what was in it? - A. No, I did not; Davis was not at home.

Q. Did you ever see the piece of cloth before?- A. No.

Q. When you opened the box to put in the keys and the lantern, was there any cloth in it then? - A. Yes, I believe the cloth was in it.

Joseph Davis , GUILTY, Death , aged 36.

Of stealing in the dwelling, but not of the burglary .

Thomas Head , NOT GUILTY .

Esther Head, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18010916-42

669. JAMES AUSTIN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Wigginton , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 28th of July , with intent to steal, and feloniously stealing a half-tester bedfurniture, value 15s. and one bed-tick, value 5s. the property of the said Thomas Wigginton.

THOMAS WIGGINTON sworn. - I live at No. 110, Old street ; my house was robbed on the night of the 28th of July, I left all fast; the property stolen was in a small room over the wath-house, adjoining the dwelling-house; I suppose they were taken out of the window, as the doors were fast.

OSBORN KETTERING sworn. - I am a watchman; I went from my watch-box to get a dram a little after four o'clock on the 29th of July, in the morning; I saw a suspicious person whom I knew, under a gateway called George yard; I told him to go about his business; he went away as I thought; I looked up George yard, and there I saw the prisoner on the top of a wall; it was quite light; he had a bundle in his hand; when he saw me, he threw the bundle backwards, and jumped down; I catched hold of him, but there was a post in the way, which I hit my side against, so that I was obliged to let him go; they then pelted me with brick-bats and stones, and went away; I knew them both before; I knocked at the door till I found the owner of the things; a bed-tester, furniture, and a bed-tick.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner at the Merry Carpenters, in Old-street.

Prisoner's defence. I was in bed at the time this happened; if I had done it, it is not likely that I should have been in the neighbourhood. I have no witnesses. GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-43

670. JOSEPH HUFF and JOSEPH RODD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , one lamb, value 20s. the goods of Edward Kirby , the younger.

EDWARD KIRBY sworn. - I live in Aldgate High-street, and am a carcase butcher ; I was one lamb deficient on the 29th of July; they were in my drover's possession.

ROBERT MERRINGTON sworn. - I am drover to Mr. Kirby. I lost a lamb on the 29th of July in Whitechapel; I had been to Romford market, and had forty for Mr. Kirby; they were marked between the shoulders and down the face; when I got to the Infirmary, I met Joseph Huff and Mr. Glasseye, the butcher, running after some sheep and lambs; he asked me to let them drive among my drove, to prevent their running away. I said yes, and welcome; we drove them as far as Whitechapel-church, and there we saw Joseph Rodd with five more sheep and lambs belonging to Mr. Glasseye, which joined us, and we drove them to Glasseye's door; they drove them out from mine, and I drove my drove to my master's shed; I told them over, and missed one. I went to Glasseye's house directly, and asked him if he had a young lamb there; he said he had had one, but the drovers, Huff and Rodd, had taken it away, with its legs tied, towards Red Lion-street; and a little girl said she heard Rodd say he would meet Huff at Mrs. Wright's. I went to a public-house, where I saw Rodd the corner of Greenfield-street, in Fieldgate-street; I told him what I came for; he denied it, and said he knew nothing of it. While we was talking, in came Huff to fetch him out, upon which two officers took Huff into custody. He then said, if they would not use him ill, he would tell the whole of it; and that he had left the lamb in Charlotte-street, with the legs tied, and Joseph Rodd was the man who gave

him the string out of his pocket to tie the legs, Rodd heard what Huff was saying; Huff went with the officers to fetch the lamb, and I stopped with Rodd till it was brought back. I am sure it was my lamb.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. When Huff said Rodd had given him the string, he heard it? - A. Yes.

Q. How many people were in the room? - A. Rodd, Huff, Griffiths, and his brother, and myself; Rodd certainly must hear what Huff said.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - On Wednesday, the 29th of July, my brother and I went to Mrs. Wright's, where Rodd was sitting; we asked him if he knew any thing of the lamb that was stolen; he said, no. In the mean time, in came Huff; I took hold of him, and he said he would tell all. He said, he had carried it to the White Swan, Ratcliff highway, by order of Rodd, but he took us to the Queen's Head, Charlotte-street, where the lamb lay on the pavement, with its legs tied; I desired him to take it on his back, and carry it back again, which he did; I did not hear Rodd say any thing about the string.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS confirmed the last witness.

JOHN PATES sworn. - I was at Whitechapel when the lambs run away; but when we got them into Mr. Glasseye's, the boy said we had got a wrong lamb; we brought it into the street, and Rodd and Huff had a bit of talk together for a minute or two; after that, Huff came and asked me if I would earn a shilling; I said, yes; upon which I took the lamb, tied the legs, and put it on my shoulders; I tied the lamb myself, by his desire; he gave me the string, it was a hurdlestring; I don't know who gave him the string; I took it down Red Lion-street, and then I was ordered to carry it to Ratcliff-highway. Huff gave me the orders; we went and had a pint of beer at the Swan, facing Old Gravel-lane; Rodd was not with us; I never saw him after I had the lamb; when we came out, I brought it back to Charlotte-street, and Huff said he was going to see where Joseph Rodd was; and, when he came back again, Griffiths came with him.

Huff. Q. Who gave you the string? - A. You gave it me.

Huff's defence. That is false; I have been unfortunate, and been an evidence here before; but I left it off, and worked for my living; I was employed when those lambs run away to run after them; I asked Robert Merrington to let them go among his, and he said, yes; but I knew nothing of this lamb, except Mr. Rodd chucking me the string, and desiring me to tie the legs, which I did.

Huff, GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

Rodd, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18010916-44

671. NATHANIEL INCH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Dyke , about the hour of ten, in the night of the 11th of July , and stealing a cloth coat, value 30s. the property of the said John Dyke .

JOHN DYKE sworn. - I live at No. 19, Crown-street, Finsbury-square , and keep a cloaths-shop ; On the 11th of July last, I was not gone to bed, the shop was not shut up; I left the shop to deliver a parcel about four doors higher, between nine and ten; on my return, I found the prisoner inside the shop with the great-coat coming out; I asked him what he did with that; he made no reply, but dropped the coat and ran off; it was a coat I had made for a customer; I expected my wife was in the shop, but she was not; I have no knowledge whether the door was latched or not; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I gave the alarm, and he was taken in a few minutes.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I received the prisoner from Mr. Dyke in charge on the Monday, the coat was brought to the office by Mr. Dyke, and I have had it ever since. (The coat produced, and deposed to by Mr. Dyke).

Prisoner's defence. I am a watch-maker, and had been home with some work. I have no witnesses. GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing, but not burglariously .

Confined three months in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-45

672. JAMES SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , one pair of pearl bracelets, value 30s. one pair of diamond bracelets, value 21s. one topaz broach, value 10s. one gold locket, value 10s. the property of James Godwin , privately in his shop .

- ROSS sworn. - I live with Mr. Godwin, No. 304, Holborn ; the shop where this robbery was committed is No. 290: On the 1st of August, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in and enquired for a gold broach; I took the drawer out, and very soon after there came in another man to look at some silver knives; the prisoner said it was no consequence, he was in no hurry, and would wait; my sister being in the shop, I turned round to get the knives; he said they were too dear, and went away; the prisoner also looked at the broaches, made an apology for the trouble, and went away, Mrs. Ross came in a few minutes after, and asked if I had sold any thing out of that drawer; I said I had not; she had some suspicion some things were gone, as she had the setting that drawer out, which raised a suspicion in my mind; I said I would go and look for the man; I went down Holborn, and saw the prisoner talking with the man who came in about the knives, and a third came up to them; I went to the other side of the way and watched them, I saw

them consult together at the corner of Castle-street, and then go down; the prisoner went into the shop of Mr. Carding, a silversmith; I got a neighbour to sent for a constable, and I went in and secured him; he was searched, and the things in the indictment were found on him; they were in the drawer when I shewed it to him; I swear to the things, and they are of more value than they are laid at.

JAMES VAUGHAN sworn. - I am a constable; I took the prisoner into custody, searched him, and found the things produced, some concealed between his pantaloons and his stockings.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18010916-46

673. RICHARD EMMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Humphrey , widow , no person being therein, about the hour of four in the afternoon, upon the 25th of December , and stealing therein two waistcoats, value 10s. four shirts, value 16s. six pair of silk and cotton stockings, value 8s. one pair of cotton stockings, value 1s. four pair of worsted stockings, value 3s. two gold rings, value 5s. two silver studs, value 1s. one silver thimble, value 2s. one handkerchief, value 1s. one pair of nippers, value 6d. two shawls, value 6s. two pair of silk gloves, value 1s. one tallow splitter, value 1s. one silver watch, value 3l. one crown piece, a guinea, one half-guinea, and three seven-shilling pieces , the goods and monies of the said Mary Humphrey .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

MARY HUMPHREY sworn. - I am a widow and tallow-chandler , in the parish of Ratcliff ; I know the prisoner, he lodges in White Horse-street; I left my house on Christmas day about two o'clock in the afternoon; Cole, the apprentice, left it about one o'clock; the things I missed were safe in the drawers when I went out; I returned home about ten o'clock at night; I left no one in the house; when I returned I found I had been robbed of property much more than in the indictment; I was present when the prisoner was taken, and the things were at his lodgings; Mrs. Thompson went out with me to dine at my father's.

WILLIAM COLE sworn. - I was apprentice to Mrs. Humphrey when the house was broke open, and went out about one o'clock; I secured every part of the cellars; my mistress and the housekeeper were in the house; I returned about five o'clock in the afternoon, just about dusk; there was light enough to see any person, day-light was not quite gone; I went in by the street door and found nobody in the house; I went for the key where it was left; I found the tallow-splitter standing by a box by the kitchen door, which adjoins the shop; it was in the cellar before I went out; I got a candle and went to the back door of the cellar, which I observed to be open, it had two bolts on it; I went all over the cellar and down the garden, the gate was open, but I don't know whether that was secured; I staid at home till Mrs. Thompson and my mistress came home, when I told them of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.These cellar bolts appeared as if they had been opened by somebody inside? - A. Mrs. Thompson is not here to-day, whether she unfastened them I don't know; I did not hear the clock strike five, or do I know to a few minutes, it was not dark.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police-office at Shadwell; I apprehended the prisoner at his father's, at the work-house, he is master of it; I went to the prisoner's lodgings with him and desired him to go to his room, which he did, into a garret, and found the things I now produce; I searched him, and found this bunch of keys; he said one was the key of his chest; I found it opened the cellar door of Mrs. Humphrey; it is a padlock on the inside, and one of the keys unlocked the drawers, and another that unlocked a closet in the parlour; we could hardly get a word from him; but when he was before the Justice he gave an account, which was put into writing; nothing was said to induce him to say it.

Q.(To Mrs. Humphrey). Did you make any promise to induce the prisoner to confess? - A. No.

Q. Nor threaten him if he did not? - A. No.(Brown proved the hand-writing of the Magistrate, and saw the prisoner sign it.)

The confession read.

"I acknowledge the things sworn to by Mrs. Humphrey to be her property; I will not accuse any other person as being concerned with me; I sold the watch with the other articles to a man for twenty-nine shillings, I do not know him, he was a Jew; I sold him the watch in the street; I know a woman of the name of Sarah Gardiner , who went by the name of Miller; I took some money away out of the house of Mrs. Humphrey, but I can't say whether there was a crown piece or not; I know nothing of the three table-spoons; I got in at the cellar window in the street, and once by getting into the one pair of stairs window; there was a ladder by which I got in."(The property was deposed to by Mrs. Humphrey.)

The prisoner called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, Death .

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-47

674. ANN CROOKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , eight banknotes, value 8l. the property of James Pounceby .

JAMES POUNCEBY sworn. - I lost eight one-pound bank-notes out of my coat-pocket last Wednesday evening, about half past eleven o'clock; I had received them at the White Swan, in Shoe-lane; about three o'clock in the afternoon; I was going home about half past eleven.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. Yes.

Q. You were going home to your family? - A. Yes; when I got to Temple-bar, I met with the prisoner; she asked me to go home with her.

Q. That you refused of course? - A. No, I did not; I went with her to her lodgings up a court in Drury-lane .

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I was sober; I sent her out for something to drink, and while she was gone, I fell asleep, and did not wake till seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. Had you pulled off your clothes? - A. Yes, and gone to bed; I waked in the morning, and found myself alone; I looked for my coat, and missed my notes; I had wrapped them up in a piece of paper after I was in her room, and put them in my coat-pocket; I got up, and went to Bow-street, but we could not find the prisoner till the afternoon; we found her in an alley in Drury-lane, very drunk; I asked her where the notes were; she said she had no notes; she did not know me; the officer took her to the Brown Bear , and searched her; he found in her pocket three one-pound notes, three seven-shilling-pieces, and twenty-two shillings in silver. I knew the indorsement upon the notes.

JOSEPH TOWNSEND sworn. - I am one of the patrole belonging to Bow-street. On the 9th of this month, I went with the prosecutor to apprehend the prisoner; I searched her, and found upon her three one-pound notes, three seven-shilling-pieces, twenty-two shillings and six-pence in silver, and three shillings and nine-pence in halfpence.

Pounceby. These are my notes, I know them by the indorsement; they are indorsed Robin Hood ; I received them from one Mr. Edgar, and he wrote Robin Hood upon them; they did belong to a Society, and he was secretary to that Society.

Q. You were not the treasurer, I hope? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. This gentleman accosted me, and went home with me; he told me he liked my lodgings much; he said he had not been home for several days; he wished to make the week out, and he would stop with me, if I liked it; I told him I had no objection; he said, he had had eight one-pound notes, and had changed five of them; and the other three he gave me to get what might be wanted while he stopped with me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-48

675. THOMAS COOKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , a bird cage, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Pilton .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18010916-49

676. WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , forty pounds weight of beef, value 20s. the property of Thomas Pugh .

THOMAS PUGH sworn. - I am a butcher in Clare-street, Clare-market . On the 4th of August, about seven o'clock in the morning, I lost upwards of forty pounds of beef from the block at my door; I was gone to market at the time; it is what we call the fore-rib. I found it at a butcher's shop in Windmill-street, and knew it again immediately; I helped to kill the bullock, and to cut it up the next morning; it was an ox that appeared to have been very much over-drove; I had the fellowpiece at home.

WILLIAM JENNINGS sworn. - On the 4th of August, about twenty minutes after seven, I saw the prisoner with a large piece of beef upon his shoulder in Windmill street, near a butcher's shop; the butcher's name is Sharpe; I saw him go in; he did not come out again for a quarter of an hour; I watched him during that time, but did not see him come out.

THOMAS DENIGHT sworn. - I am a constable; I went to Sharpe's about half past eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner in the shop with Mr. Pugh; the prisoner said, be never saw the beef before in his life; Sharpe was not there; Mrs. Sharpe said, it was him that brought it, and he again said he knew nothing of it. I took him and Mrs. Sharpe before the Magistrate; at the corner of Marlborough-street, he made a violent blow at me, and we had several blows at each other; he got away from me, and I took him again in Poland-street. Sharpe is not here; he has been arrested.

HANNAH SHARPE sworn. - The prisoner brought a quantity of beef to our shop on the 4th of August. I asked him who sent it, and he said, master; my husband was just gone out; it is a common thing at every butcher's shop for porters to pitch their meat down; he did not stop two minutes.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes, I am positively sure of it.

Q. When did he come again? - A. Between eleven and twelve; he just came came up to the stall-board, and leaned over it, and the prosecutor took him; I had never seen him before to my knowledge; I paid him six-pence for porterage.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming up Drury-lane, and I met the woman's husband, and he asked me to

take it home for him, which I did, and she paid me six-pence. GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined one month in Newgate , publicly whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-50

677. WILLIAM CRANFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , a bag, value 6d. twelve pounds of tea, value 3l. three pounds of coffee, value 12s. and eight ounces of nutmegs, value 9s. the property of Rowland Heane .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

EDWARD DYSON sworn. - I am book-keeper to the Gloucester waggon; Mr. Rowland Heane is the proprietor of the waggon : The prisoner at the bar was my porter , at the King's-head in the Old Change; I had a bag delivered to me from Monument-yard, directed to James Jelp , Esq. Gloucester; I saw the prisoner weigh it, and put it in the waggon; he went away in the forenoon, about eleven o'clock, on Saturday the 22d of August; I discovered that the waggon had been robbed, about nine o'clock the same night; I never saw the bag again, but I saw a large paper parcel, at the Swan Inn, with tea and nutmegs, and a small parcel with coffee; the prisoner was apprehended the Wednesday following, at my Inn, he denied it; Mr. Rowland Heane , the master of the waggon, is answerable for the property put into the waggon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. What sort of a bag was this? - A. A coarse wrapper bag.

Q. Did you see it from the time it was put into the scale to the time it went out of the yard? - A. No.

Q. Had you any opportunity at all of knowing what the contents were? - A. No.

Q. After the waggon goes out of your yard it proceeds on to the Green Man and Still? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not accompany it? - A. No.

Q. Do you know in what part of the waggon it was placed when it left your yard? - A. It was put just in the middle of the front.

Q. Was any part of the sheet drawn over it? - A. No.

Q. You saw nothing of it after the waggon went from the yard? - A. No.

JOHN DOUGHTY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am shopman to Messrs. Stringer and Co. tea-dealers and spice merchants: Mr. Jelp is a customer with us; I made up a bag to go to Mr. Jelp, at Gloucester, it contained twelve pounds of tea, half a pound of nutmegs, and three pounds of coffee, it was first packed in paper, and then in a linen bag; the bill of parcels was put in, and it was directed to J. Jelp, Esq. Gloucester.(The bill of parcels was produced, and identified by the witness).

JOHN NORMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the waggnner belonging to the Herefort waggon: I know the prisoner at the bar; I saw him in Graston-street on Saturday the 22d of August, about one o'clock in the day, he was asleep in the tail of the Gloucester waggon; we drank together at the end of Graston-street; he had a sack of mine, and I asked him for it; he told me he had it at home, be appointed me to meet him at the Harrow, in Fleet-market; I met him at half past seven that evening; he gave me the sack, and then delivered this paper parcel, containing twelve pounds of tea, three pounds of coffee, and some nutmegs; I cannot speak to the colour of the paper; he told me to sell it; I did not see any writing upon it; I left it with Mr. Broughton, at Holborn-bridge; the prisoner told me to pay myself some money that he owed me and then return him the difference; I did not offer them for sale.

ROBERT BROUGHTON sworn. - I keep the Swan at Holborn-bridge; Norman came into my accompting-house to settle with me, and left a parcel, which I delivered to Mr. Dyson.

Dyson. I delivered it to the constable.( James Comley , a constable, produced the parcel, which was identified by Doughty.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-51

678. HENRY LAZARUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , privily from the person of John Stone , a pocket-book, value 6d. a Bank-note, value 500l. and another Bank-note, value 300l. the property of John Hill .(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

JOHN HILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a merchant , and reside at Rotherhithe: On the 17th of June I delivered to my clerk , John Stone , at Will's Coffee-house, a Bank-note of 300l. and a draft from the Bank for 500l. more; I sent him to the Bank with the draft, and he brought me a 500l. Bank-note; I then sent him home with the notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner was in custody a considerable time? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe he had promises from the Lord-Mayor, for I was present myself, that he should be admitted a witness for the Crown against Belasco?- A.Notwithstanding your being present, upon my oath I did not hear it; I never heard it, nor do I believe it.

Q. Who went with you into the Compter to the prisoner, after you had charged him with this robbery? - A. Mr. Holdsworth, the City Marshal, and Mr. Isaacs, an attorney.

Q. Is Mr. Isaacs now the attorney for the prosecution? - A. Yes.

Q. For what purpose did you go to the Compter? - A. For the purpose of recovering my notes.

Q. Did you not promise Lazarus that you would not prosecute him if he told you where your notes were? - A. I did not.

Q. Nor any one in your presence? - A. I again say, neither myself, nor any body in my presence, promised him any favour.

Q. How often did you go to the Compter? - A.Three times.

Q. When was he taken into custody? - A. I I think the 18th of June, the day after the robbery.

Q. When was he fully committed? - A. I should think it was at least a month.

Q. Was there any conversation between Mr. Isaacs and the prisoner in Hebrew? - A. He went into a private room with the prisoner, and what passed there I cannot say.

Mr. Alley. Q. I ask you, upon your solemn oath, did you go for the purpose of extorting from the prisoner a confession of his own guilt? - A. God forbid.

JOHN STONE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am clerk to Mr. Hill: On the 17th of June I received from Mr. Hill a Bank-note for 500l. and another for 300l.; I put them into a common black leather pocket-book, with a strap to it; it contained also 25l. in small notes of my own, some memorandums, and some patterns of Bath coating and kerseymere; I went from Will's Coffee-house to the Custom-house, it was as near twelve o'clock as could be; as I was going to the Custom-house, I saw the prisoner at the bar just by the Coal Exchange, as near as I can recollect.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Belasco, who was before my Lord-Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him? - A. I have no recollection of it; after I had been at the Custom-house, I went to London-bridge, and just by the church it struck me that I had put my pocket-book in my outside pocket; I put down my hand, and found it was gone; I have neither seen the pocket-book nor contents since.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a City officer; I know the prisoner, and I know Belasco; I saw them both in Thames-street, on the 17th of June, about five or ten minutes after twelve o'clock, as near as I can recollect; I apprehended the prisoner the next day, at his own house, in Petticoat-lane; I searched the room, but found nothing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you found the prisoner in a distressed condition? - A. Yes, with a child lying by him, quite naked; he had hardly any clothes to cover him.

Q. Did you know Belasco before? - A. Yes.

Q. You have apprehended him before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not understand that the Lord-Mayor gave Lazarus an intimation that he should be admitted an evidence against Belasco, when he should be taken, if he told all he knew upon the subject?- A. I believe the language of the Lord-Mayor was this, that he thought it would be best for him to tell every thing he knew, to the best of my recollection.

Mr. Alley. Q. You were not present at all the examinations? - A. No.

Q. Therefore you are not able to say under what circumstances the Lord-Mayor made that declaration to him? - A. I am not.

Court. (To Stone). Q. Was there any time at which you would conjecture you lost your pocket-book? - A. No.

DAVID BELASCO sworn. - Mr. Knapp. Q. You know the consequence of your being sworn is, that you are to speak the truth? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been in this Court before, have not you? - A. I have.

Q. What part of the Court have you been in?

Mr. Alley. I object to that.

Mr. Knapp. I will produce the record.(Mr. Fitzpatrick produced the record of conviction of David Belasco for stealing a pocket-book, for which he was sentenced to be confined twelve months in the House of Correction, in September Session. 1797).

Mr. ABRAHAM KEYS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know that person, David Belasco? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Were you present when he was convicted upon that indictment? - A. I was.

Mr. Knapp took an objection to the competence of the witness's testimony, which was over-ruled by the Court.

David Belasco. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me if you know him? - A. Perfectly well. On the 17th of June I met with him in Thames-street, and I went with him to his apartments, in Gravel-lane, Houndsditch, and directly as we got about twenty yards up Philpot-lane, or Orange-lane, he said, Davey, come along, I have got a pocketbook; I immediately went home with him, and he opened the pocket-book; it was a black leather pocket-book, to the best of my recollection, with a strap, and a name on it on one side; it contained a parcel of letters and a bit of kerseymere, a kind of a pepper and salt colour, for a waistcoat or breeches, it was a kind of a mixture to the best of my recollection, pepper and salt, I did not take much notice what the colour was, I looked at it in a hurry; the letters were then read, and there being no fire, his wife tore the letters, and struck a light and burnt them, with the kerseymere; there was a Bank-note of 300l. and another of 500l. and a kind of a draft, I cannot say what it was, I cannot read, that was burnt, and the pocket-book likewise.

Q.What became of the 500l. and the 300l.

notes? - A. He went out to sell the notes, and returned in about twenty minutes with them; his wife said, Davey, you had better go to one Mr. Farmer, in Woolpack-alley; he was not at home; his wife sent me to him, where he was, in Duke's-place, and I sold him the notes; he was to give me 400l. I am no scholar, and he counted down to me 400l. I gave the money to the prisoner, and told him it had been counted down to me 400l. but I was no scholar in reading the notes. I gave - Lazarus, the prisoner's wife, 112l. as well as I could count them; in counting that down, I reckoned I had given him upwards of 200l. or else Mr. Farmer must have cheated me of the difference; there was 30l. given by me, by the prisoner's order, to a young man of the name of Jacobs, who goes by the name of Light and Scabby Head, and the remaining part I had myself.

Q. How much was your share? - A. I have a bad memory, and can't recollect; he then told me, he would go down to Bristol; says I, I shall go and clean myself, and you come to me, and I will go with you; and, instead of doing that, he got drunk, and I went to Bristol without him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. So you thought it sitting to cut, and run to Bristol? - A. I did.

Q. Did you say one word of this story that you have been telling us so glibly, till you were taken up and charged with this offence yourself? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You were promised, by the Lord-Mayor, that, if you would turn stag, and tell all you knew about it, you should turn evidence? - A. I don't understand about stag.

Q. If you would be a witness against Lazarus, he would admit you an evidence for the Crown? - A. He did, and then I up and told all that really did pass.

Q. This kerseymere that you speak of, was a pepper-and-salt colour? - A. Yes.

Q. I think you say you cannot read? - A. No, except it is my own Hebrew language.

Q. Then be so good as tell me how you know a one from a five pound bank-note? - A. A one, two, or a five or so, I can tell; but, if it comes above that, I cannot say.

Q. You were the person who was tried here and convicted of stealing a pocket-book? - A. Yes.

Q. How many times have you been tried in this place? - A. Twice.

Q. What became of you the other time? - A. I was honourably acquitted by the laws of my country; that was a long time ago, but now I have come to know better.

Q. How many times have you been taken up by different constables? - A. No oftener than I have suffered for; and I don't think it right that you should tell me of what I have suffered for; I was one year in the House of Correction for what you are speaking of.

Q. Were you never taken up as a rogue and vagabond? - A. That is a libel to any man.

Q. You never was sent for six months to the House of Correction as a rogue and vagabond? - A. No, not for six months.

Q. How long then? - A. Four months.

Q. Were you never in the New Prison? - A. Yes, that was the time I was acquitted.

Q. At no other time? - A. No, only when there was a game of cards playing among neighbours.

Q. How long were you in custody, then? - A. Four days.

Mr. Alley. (To Stone.) Q. Was there more than one piece of cloth in your pocket-book? - A. One was buff-coloured kerseymere, and the other dark black and white mixture, what you may call a pepper-and-salt.

Mr. PHILIP HOLDSWORTH , (City Marshal,) sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you remember any conversation in the Poultry Compter between the prisoner and Mr. Isaacs? - A. Yes.

Q. Before that conversation, were there any promises of favour made to him by Mr. Isaacs or any body else? - A. I said, remember, Lazarus, there is no one present who can have any authority to make you a promise of favour, or tempt you to speak.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had not Lazarus been given to understand, before that, that he should be admitted an evidence against Belasco? - A. Not in my hearing.

Q. Was Mr. Isaacs there before you? - A. He was there the day before. On the 19th of June last, I think, he said he was inclined to tell all he knew; I told him, if he was induced to say what he was about to say from any promise, not to speak, for no promise would be made him; he said, that himself, Belasco, and a man they call Scabby Head, went out with an intent to pick pockets, and near the Custom House they saw Mr. Stone; they followed him; the prisoner was not on the same side of the way with Stone; he was opposite to him, and saw Belasco draw the book out of his pocket; he crossed over, and Belasco said, follow me; they went to Petticoat-lane; Belasco went out with the intention to dispose of the bank-notes. I then desired that Mr. Stone, who was below, might come up; I asked him if he knew the prisoner; and the prisoner said, that is the gentleman that was robbed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Mr. Isaacs had been to the prisoner in the Compter the day before? - A. He had.

Q. Was it not the Lord-Mayor's orders that the prisoner should see nobody but such persons as

you or Mr. Teague might approve? - A. Yes; Mr. Isaacs applied to me, and I mentioned it to the Lord-Mayor, who permitted him to see him.

Q. Mr. Isaacs was attorney for the prosecution, and the prisoner's own friends were refused? - A. I believe they were, but I am not certain.

Q. His own attorney was refused? - A. I recollect Mr. Isaacs had seen him two or three times before his own attorney saw him.

Q. Upon your oath, was not Lazarus given to understand, at the Mansion House, that he should be admitted an evidence against Belasco? - A. Not till after I had seen him, in the presence of Mr. Teague and Mr. Isaacs.

Q. Was that intimation given to him before the first, second, or third, examination? - A. I cannot tell, upon my oath; I believe it was after the conversation with Mr. Isaacs.

Q. And at a month's distance, he was committed to take his trial? - A. It was a long time after; it was more than a fortnight.

Q. Upon your oath, was it not in consequence of the story that Lazarus told to you, in the Poultry Compter, that the Lord-Mayor was induced to flatter him that he should be admitted a witness?- A.It was in consequence of that conversation; the Lord-Mayor said, remember, if you are admitted an evidence, you must state the whole; you must reserve nothing.

Q. And when Belasco was taken, Lazarus was committed for trial? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did my Lord-Mayor assign a reason why he was not admitted an evidence? - A. My Lord-Mayor said, it was because he was convinced he had told him a bundle of untruths.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-52

679. JOHN MULLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , a shawl, value 4s. the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

There being no evidence to shew that the shawl had been stolen, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-53

680. MARY BRIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , eighteen pieces of flannel, value 4s. 6d. and thirty yards of worsted binding, value 6d. the property of Thomas Brind .

THOMAS BRIND sworn. - I am a dyer : On the 10th of this month I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment, from the kitchen table; I saw them afterwards at the Police-office, in Worship-street; Mr. Robertson, who is here, saw the prisoner take them.

JOHN ROBERTSON sworn. - I am a mariner; I was at Mr. Brind's; I saw the prisoner look in at the window, then she came to the street door and enquired for one Mr. Smith, a shoemaker; I made no answer, and then she came in and took some pieces of flannel and worsted binding off the table; she was going out at the door with them and I stopped her and took them from her; she was attempting to put them in her apron when I stopped her.

ANN ROBERTSON sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I was in the yard; I came into the room and saw my husband have hold of the prisoner: I asked her if she was not a wicked woman to think of robbing such poor people, and she said yes. (The property was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-54

681. JAMES PRATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , a Bank-note, value 5l. another Bank-note, value 2l. and another Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Kenelm Digby , Esq.

KENELM DIGBY, Esq. sworn. - I live in Park-street, Grosvenor-square : In the month of June last I lost several Bank-notes from the drawer of a writing-table in my sitting-room; I hired the prisoner on the 7th of June as a lackey, merely to go behind my carriage, he was with me three weeks and three days; on the 4th of July he withdrew himself from my service; he told me he wanted to go directly, and upon looking in my pocket-book for money to pay him I missed the notes; I found the drawer locked as I had left it; I sent for a constable and charged him with having taken them, which he positively denied; he was taken to Marlborough-street and committed; a five pound, a two pound, and a one pound note were found upon him by the constable; I cannot swear to the notes.

WILLIAM CARTER sworn. - I am footman to Colonel Digby: On Monday, the 29th of June, the prisoner told me he was going to Vauxhall, and did not return till the next morning at ten o'clock; he pulled off his coat and waistcoat and put them in a room; he then went to cleaning knives; a fellow-servant, who was dusting the room, called to me and shewed me a case, such as usually contain dress buckles, which she said had fallen out of his coat pocket, I opened it, and it contained two two-pound notes; I put it into the pocket again; my fellow-servant is not here; nothing more passed till the 5th of July, when my master charged him with it, and he strictly denied it; I saw the constable take from him a five-pound, a two-pound, and a one-pound note.

HENRY LOVETT sworn. - On the 6th of July the prisoner was delivered into my custody, charged with stealing the notes; after he was locked up I searched him, and in the inside of the lining of his coat, which was cut, I found these notes, (produces them); after that I saw him writing something and requested him to let me look at it; it was a long time before he would give it me, I was under the necessity of unlocking the door and taking it out of his hand. (It was produced, and read as follows.)

"My dear Lady, I am very sorry for my misconduct, but it was distress that drove me to it; but my master lives at No. 54, Park-street; but if you will go there I know that a word of your's will go a great way; for, if you will say that I had some notes of you, that will clear me. My dear lady, if you go, do not - pray, go to my master not to appear against me; do not, pray, write to my father. Your humble servant, J. Pratt."

Prisoner's defence. I was so much intoxicated with liquor and vexation of mind, that I don't know any thing I did while I was at the office; I was told they would take all my money from me, that was my reason for concealing the notes; the five-pound note my father gave me just before; he is here.

For the prisoner.

PARKER-TURNER PRATT sworn. - Q. Have you lately sent the prisoner any money? - A. Within four or five months I have sent him up several sums of money.

Q. Do you remember a five-pound note shortly before the month of June? - A. Not particularly; but he is a favourite of my wife's, and she has frequently sent notes up to him and likewise cloaths; I have missed notes several times, and when I have enquired for them, I have been informed that she has sent them up to Jem, because he was in distress.

The prisoner called three other witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-55

682. RICHARD ALCORN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a gelding value 10l. the property of his Royal Highness William Henry Duke of Clarence .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of John May , Esq.

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of John Elphick .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Clifton, and the case by Mr. Raine.)

JOHN MAY , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I live at Twickenham: On the 9th of June last, I sent a horse to grass in Bushey Park; I saw it afterwards in the possession of a Mr. Custance, at the King's-Head, Twickenham; he had borrowed it for the day; that horse was my property; it was a brown bay, or a chesnut bay, a dark brown bay; it was my gelding; it was worth more than 10l.

JOHN ELPHICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am park-keeper to his Royal Highness William-Henry, Duke of Clarence.

Q. Do you take horses in to pasture, in Bushey Park ? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the profit your's? - A. No, his Royal Highness's; I took in a brown bay gelding on the 9th of June, of Mr. May's; I saw him there most days, till Mr. May sent for him on the 30th of June; when I went to look for him I could not find him, I had seen him there within a week; I did not see him again till he was rode down to Twickenham by a gentleman; on a Sunday I saw him at the King's Head, at Twickenham; I was sent for to see him; I knew the horse very well; I had had him several years at times.

THOMAS CUSTANCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. I am book-keeper to Messrs. Field, in Lawrence-lane: On the 2d of August last, I went to Twickenham on horseback; I hired the horse of Mr. Clarke, who keeps the George Inn, Aldermanbury.

Q. Did you see Elphick at Twickenham? - A. Yes, the horse was claimed by Mr. May's son about half an hour after I had arrived at Twickenham.

ROBERT CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I keep the George Inn, Aldermanbury. Mr. Custance hired a horse of me; I hired it for him from a Mr. Gregson; the horse stood with me from the 2d to the 6th of July.

ROBERT GREGSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. I live in Noble-street; I lent Mr. Clarke a horse which I purchased of Samuel Gray , on the 6th of July; I asked him the price of the horse, and he said twenty-two guineas. I told him, if I liked the horse I would give him twenty-two pounds; I gave him a trial, and paid him twenty-two pounds for him.

Q. Had Mr. Clarke leave to let him out? - A. Yes.

SAMUEL GRAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I keep the tap of the Bear and Ragged Staff in Smithfield: On Friday, the 26th of June, I came home from Fleet-market between four and five in the afternoon; I saw the prisoner in the yard, he was standing looking at a horse; while the ostler was saddling him he asked me if I would buy the horse of him; I told him I had no objection if we could agree for price; he asked me ten pounds for him; I bid him seven; I then asked him if the horse was his own property; he said he was; I asked him how long he had had him; he said he had had him eighteen months and upwards.

Q. Are you quite sure he said that? - A. Yes; I

asked him then if he would go in harness, and he said he was a very good horse in harness, he always knew him to be found, and he would warrant him as such; I asked him if he would take my money; he said no, he would take eight, and that should be the least farthing; he then got upon him, and rode into Smithfield; he then came back again, and said, he would split the difference, I should have it for 7l. 10s. and I told him I would give it him; he immediately took off the faddle and bridle, and put him in the stable; he then went into the house, and I brought him the money, and a book to put down his name and place of abode.

Q. Did you see him write it? - A. Yes. (It was produced and read as follows): "June 26, John Steers , Hampton-court, bay horse, warranted found, 7l. 10s."

Q. What colour was the horse? - A. A brown bay: On the Wednesday following I had occasion to go to Twickenham, and I went to Hampton; I made enquiry for John Steers , but could not find any such person; I put up at the Bell, and while I was standing at the bar, I saw the prisoner go past with a gentleman; I called to him, and he did not answer me; I tapped him on the shoulder, and said, how do you do; he said, I don't know you, sir; says I, don't you recollect selling me a horse last Friday, in Smithfield; oh, yes, he said, I do, but I did not recollect you at first; says he, I am busy now, if you will step into the Bell for half an hour, and call for what you like, I will come to you; I went to the Bell, and staid there three hours and a half, but he never came, and then I went away; I saw no more of him till he was apprehended; I sold the horse to Mr. Gregson the Monday week after I had bought it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You had the good luck to sell this horse, which you bought at 7l. for 22l. - A. Yes.

Q. You expressed a doubt, at the time you bought the horse, whether the horse was found? - A. Yes; and so did Mr. Gregson, when he bought it.

Q. And therefore I take it, it was for that reason you desired him to write his name in the book, in case it should turn out unfound, if any thing was the matter with it? - A. Yes.

Q. Your house, I believe, is in Smithfield Market? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not toll it? - A. No, it was not bought in the Market.

Q. This was on the Market-day? - A. Yes.

Q. The man at first did not agree with you, and he went out into the open Market with the horse?- A. Yes.

Q.So that any body might have observed him? - A. Yes.

Q. And was absent some little time, before he returned and agreed with you? - A. Yes.

Q. In the place where you saw him on the 2d of August, he was very well known? - A. Yes.

Q. When you mentioned to him that he was the person you bought a horse of, he did not attempt to deny it, but mentioned it in the presence of the gentleman he was with? - A. Yes.

Mr. Raine. (To Elphick). Q. Where does the prisoner live? - A.Just in Hampton, not above two hundred yards from my lodge.

Q. And his name is Richard Alcorn ? - A. Yes; he is a farrier.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. This man has borne a very respectable character in Hampton? - A. Yes; I never heard any thing against him till now.

Q. How long has he lived there? - A. About two years.

Prisoner's defence. It was on a Thursday that Mr. Gray came to Hampton, and not Wednesday; I know it was Thursday, because it was Mr. Towsley's feast.

For the Prisoner.

DANIEL IBBETSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at Hampton-court; I am a sadler, and also assist my mother, who keeps the King's Head, at Hampton; the prisoner lives at Hampton; he is a farrier.

Q. Do you recollect, whether on Friday, the 26th of June, he went to town from Hampton? - A. I cannot pretend to say.

Q. Did you, at any time, lend him a horse to go to town? - A. Yes, several times.

Q. Did you lend him a horse about that time?- A. Yes, to the best of my knowledge, on a Friday.

Q. At the time he was taken up, was he in his business? - A. Yes; there was not a day but I was over at his shop, filing screws, or something of that sort.

Q. What character does he bear? - A. An extraordinary good one.

Mr. Raine. Q. You will not venture to say it was Friday, the 26th? - A. No.

SIMON WORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am assistant to a Sheriff's officer; I was at Smithfield on a Friday, and I think it was the 26th of June, with a person of the name of Randall; I saw the prisoner, and another man, with a lame man, come into St. Bartholomew Coffee-house; the other man sold the prisoner a horse for six guineas and a half; I saw the money paid in Bank notes and money; they had agreed for the horse before they came in; I saw the horse afterwards; it was a dark brown gelding.

Q. To whom was the money paid? - A.It was not paid to the lame man, but the other man; after the man had paid for it, several people said it was lame, and the prisoner said, let him be lame or blind, I have paid for him, and I suppose I must have him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Do you know the name of that lame man? - A. No.

Q. I will help you to it - John Rowe? - A. I believe it was; I cannot say.

Q. He was before the Magistrate? - A. That I do not know, I was not.

WILLIAM RANDALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Chandos-street, Covent-Garden, I keep a cook's-shop; I was at Smithfield Market on Friday, the 26th of June, with Worth; we went into the Bartholomew's Coffee-house; I saw the prisoner, a man of the name of Rowe, that went limping, and another man that sold a horse to the prisoner; he gave him six guineas and a half for it, in money and Bank notes.

Q. Did you see the horse? - A. It was rather a dark brown horse, rather a lightish dark, a kind of a sorrel.

Q. Was it a mare or a gelding? - A. I did not take notice, it had a white face.

Court. Q. What time was this? - A. About two o'clock, as near as could be, within about a quarter of an hour one way or the other.

Jury. (To Elphick). Q. Had this horse a white face? - A. He had a star in his forehead, and a white slip on his nose.

The prisoner called ten other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his good character.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-56

682. MARY MOBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , a petticoat, value 12s. a gown, value 2l. two pair of cotton stockings, value 4s. five shillings in money, and four bank-notes, value 4l. the property of Sarah Appleyard , spinster .

There being no evidence to bring home the charge of felony, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18010916-57

683. JOHN NEWTON and ELIZABETH LOWTEN were indicted for making an assault, in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, upon Sarah Myers , on the 13th of August , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a man's coat, value 2s. a stuff petticoat, value 1s. a shift, value 2s. a muslin cap, value 6d. a linen handkerchief, value 6d. a woollen apron, value 6d. a pair of leather shoes, value 1s. a cotton bed-gown, value 6d. a tin snuff-box, value 1d. a half-crown-piece, and one shilling , the property of the said Sarah.

There being no evidence to identify either of the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-58

684. JOHN NOWLAND , RICHARD FREAKE , and WILLIAM WHITFIELD were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Bateson , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 18th of July , with intent to steal, and stealing a pair of gold sleeve-buttons, value 1l. 5s. a mourning ring, value 1l. a pair of silver spurs, value 1l. 10s. a silver pepper-box, value 1l. 5s. a pair of silver salts, value 2l. a pair of spectacles, value 1l. 10s. two silver tablespoons, value 1l. three silver tea-spoons, value 10s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 1l. 10s. a gold snuff-box, value 10l. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 15s. a bank-note, value 20l. a bank-note, value 5l. and two other bank-notes, value 2l. the property of Thomas Williams .

The indictment was stated by Mr. Clifton, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I lodge at Mr. James Bateson 's house, in Denmark-street, St. Giles's : On the 19th of July, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed with a noise which awoke me, and there was a little light; then I laid down again, and got up between three and four o'clock; I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment,(repeating them,) one of the one-pound notes I had from the Bank, and the other from Mr. Thomas Roberts , who receives money for me; I had seen them on the Saturday about dinner-time.

Q. The robbery was on the Saturday night? - A. Yes.

JAMES BATESON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I keep a house, No. 11, Denmark-street, St. Giles's: On Sunday morning, the 19th of July, about two o'clock, I was alarmed that the house had been broke open; I got up, but could not discover where they had got in; before I went to bed, I had tried the outer door, and found the spring lock fast.

Q. When you got up in the morning, was it light? - A. Not clearly; for there was a parcel in the passage, and it could not be distinguished what it was till a light was called for.

Q. When you were alarmed, how did you find your doors inside the house? - A. The parlour door had been forced; the brass box, which receives the lock, was pushed on one side the door of the front room on the first floor, appeared to have been forced by tools applied on the outside, for the whole of the pannel was split down; the papers in the desk were strewed about the parlour, the desk having been forced open; the two parlours had been robbed; the front room up one pair of stairs, which Mr. Williams occupied, and the front kitchen-door, was broke; but I don't know that any thing was taken out of it; Mr. Williams had a padlock upon the front kitchen-door.

Q. How long do you suppose the persons must

have been in the house? - A. If they had done it in the most expeditious manner, they could not have done it in less than an hour; it could not have been day-light when they got into the house; there were matches lying at my room door, which had the appearance of having been used.

JOHN NEWLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable of St. Ann's, Soho.

Q. Look at the three prisoners, and tell me whether, before the 19th of July, you were acquainted with their persons? - A. Yes, all three of them. On the 19th of July, at near half past two o'clock in the morning, going past the end of Denmark-street, in Crown-street, (Mr. Bateson's house is the third door from Crown-street,) I observed the prisoner Freake, Nowland, and another man, whom I believe to be Whitfield, but I cannot be certain, for, as he passed me, he huddled among the rest; there was also a butcher with them; there were four of them; Nowland was the last man; Freake and the butcher had a bundle huddled between them close to the wall. I saw them come from the porch-way of Mr. Bateson's door, from inside the railing, and they all turned into Freake's house, the corner of Dudley-court. I live right opposite Freake.

Q. Was it then day-light? - A. It was just break of day; just the twilight.

Q. Could there have been any break of day an hour before that? - A. No, nor half an hour. I could not get proper assistance till between six and seven; I alarmed Mr. Bateson about a quarter of an hour after I had first seen them; I went over the house.

Q. Do you think, from what had been done, that it could have been effected in an hour? - A. I don't think it could.

Q. Did you afterwards apprehend either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, Freake was the first; I apprehended him that very morning, about seven o'clock, near his own house; we searched him and his house, but found nothing; I was at the apprehending of Nowland; I went to search him, and he pulled a bundle of papers out of his pocket, and said, this is what you want, I suppose; which turned out to be bank-notes. Black has the notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know whether Freake has a brother or not? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe they are not very unlike one another? - A. There is a difference.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Slater? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not tell him that you had forgot what you had said at Bow-street, and wished him to remind you? - A. No such thing; he told me he had got a subpoena, and I said, all he had to do was to speak the truth, as to what I said when I called him off his beat.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are the two brothers so much alike, that you could mistake one for the other? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure it was this man, and not his brother? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BLACK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. I am a patrole of Bow-street; I was present at the apprehension of Nowland on Sunday, the 19th of July. I searched him, and found upon him twelve one-pound notes; I think he said, this is what you are looking for, or some such thing; I have had them ever since. (Produces them.)

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Milbank-street, Westminster; this bank-note is one of the four that I paid to Mr. Williams on the 12th of July. I had indorsed upon it the name of the person I took it of, Durant; I am certain it is the same.

Mr. Alley. Q. Is Mr. Durant here to-day? - A. No.

Mr. Williams. This is one of the notes I lost when the house was robbed.

Mr. WILLIAM ANSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the clerks of the Bank. Agreeable to the entry in the original book, which I hold in my hand, I find that I paid a twenty pound, a five pound, and two notes of one pound, to Mr. Williams, on the 14th of July, as a dividend; one of these bank-notes corresponds with the entry in the book, No. 1l,78l, dated 13th June, 1801.

Mr. Williams. I am sure this is one of the notes that I lost; I have found no more of the property.

Freake's defence. I am entirely innocent of what is alledged against me; I was in bed by eleven o'clock that night, and was in bed all night.

Nowland's defence. I am innocent of the charge.

For the Prisoner Freake.

THOMAS POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I keep the King's Head, in Crown-street. The prisoner Freake came into my house on the 18th of July, about ten o'clock at night, far in liquor; he staid till half past eleven or twelve o'clock.

Q. When he went away was he sober or still inebriated? - A. He was drunk.

CATHERINE NOTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What way of life are you in? - A. I go out to work; I have been at Mr. Freake's house these three months; he was taken up on Sunday, the 19th of July; the night before he had been at Mr. Powell's, and came home about half eleven, or near twelve o'clock; I was up ironing; he was very much in liquor, so much that he was brought home, and his wife put him to-bed.

Q. Is your room near his? - A. Yes, he has to go through my room to get into his; his wife called me up the next morning at five o'clock, and I then saw him in bed.

Q. Was it possible for him to have gone out

in the course of that night through your room without your knowing it, and return again? - A. No, it is impossible.

Q. Has he a brother? - A. Yes.

Q. Do they resemble each other? - A. Yes, they are very much like.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The poor man was terribly drunk? - A. Yes; a young man came home with him; the door was open.

Q. That young man was an intimate friend, was not he? - A. I do not know; he put him into the passage, and then called his wife.

Q. You asked her, perhaps, who it was that was so kind as to bring her husband home? - A. No, I never asked her any thing about it.

Q. How came the door to be left open at that time of night? - A. For the lodger to come home.

Q. Was he out? - A. No, he was at home; but his wife might not be at home.

Q. Was she out or not? - A. I don't know.

Q. Where does the prisoner sleep? - A. Down stairs.

Q. Have you made no inquiry after the young man who came home with him that night? - A. No.

Q. How late did you sit up that night? - A. Till near one.

Q. You were a good deal fatigued, perhaps, with your work? - A. No.

Q. If any people had come in at half past two or three in the morning, you must have heard them?- A. There was no such thing.

Q. Do you mean to swear positively there were not three or four people came into the house at that time? - A. Not into his apartments.

Q. Will you swear that three or four people did not come into the house at that time in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. You will swear that positively? - A. Yes.

Q. It has been positively sworn that three or four men went into Freake's house - will you swear that that is false? - A. Yes, that I will swear positively.

Q. Was the door open between two and three?- A. I don't know.

Q. Was the door shut or open when you went to-bed? - A. I shut it close too, but did not bolt it.

Q. Were you the last person up in the house?- A. For what I know, I was.

Q. You did not bolt it, and therefore people might come in without making much noise? - A. They might.

Q. Is that the usual way of leaving your door?- A. It is up a yard, and not like being in a public street.

Q. Is there a bolt to the door? - A. I don't know whether there is or not; I never take any other trouble than shutting the door to.

Q. How is it fastened? - A. Only with a latch; three or four people might come in and go up stairs without my knowing it, but not into his; he got up between six and seven o'clock, and washed himself at the pump.

Q. Did you hear the watch cry half past two?- A. No.

Q. Did the watchmen come there the next day?- A. No, they came to the shop; they did not come to his own house.

Q. What shop does he keep? - A. An iron shop.

Q.Were you there when they came? - A. Yes.

Q. What made you get up so early? - A. I went to the shop.

Q. What for? - A. Nothing particular; I heard that he was taken, and I naturally wanted to know what it was about.

Q. When were you applied to, to give evidence here? - A. I cannot say how long ago it is.

Q. Who applied to you? - A. His wife applied to me when the Sessions began.

Q. Do you know if any search has been made after the young man who came home with him? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. How do you get your livelihood?- A. I work for the Navy; I make beds for the sick and wounded; Botany-beds and mattress making.

Freake called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Nowland, GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

Freake, GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

Whitfield, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18010916-59

685. MATTHEW NELL and JAMES PHILLIPS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Bilton , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 25th of July , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing two cotton gowns, value 4s. 6d. a petticoat, value 4s. two children's frocks, value 1s. 6d. two pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d. a pair of pockets, value 1s. 6d. two pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d. a neck handkerchief, value 6d. a pocket handkerchief, value 3d. a petticoat, value 3d. a half shawl, value 6d. four night-caps, value 6d. a napkin, value 3d. a shawl, value 1s. a shirt, value 6d. a flannel petticoat, value 1s. 6d. two cotton bed-gowns, value 9d. five children's shirts, vaue 2s. two sheets, value 2s. two children's frocks, value 1s. 6d. two petticoats, value 1s. two aprons, value 1s. two children's pin-befores, value 6d. a pillow-case, value 6d. four cap-cauls, value 1s two children's tippets, value 3d. ten children's caps, value 2s. a muslin neck handkerchief, value 2s. three clouts, value 3d. a pair of leather gloves, value 3d. and a yard of flannel, value 6d , the property of Robert Clarke , in the dwelling-house of the said William.

CHRISTIANA CLARKE sworn. - I am the wife of Robert Clarke ; we lodged in the house of Wil

liam Bilton, New-way, Westminster . On Saturday night, the 25th of July, I went to bed about ten o'clock; my husband was sick in the Hospital at the time; I lived in the front parlour below, and Mr. Bilton in the one pair. I slept in the two pair of stairs room that night with a corporal's wife, that was not very well; I got up about seven o'clock in the morning, and came down stairs, and found the door of my own room a-jar; I had left it locked; I went into the room, and found the property gone out of my box; the door had been opened by a false key; the prisoner Nell was a soldier in the same company with my husband; I washed for him; he knew that my husband was ill in the Hospital; I saw my property again on the Monday, at Bow-street.

MARGARET ROSE sworn. - I lodge in the same house; I came in about half past one in the morning; I found the street-door a-jar; I shut it with the spring-lock; every thing was then fast, and I went to-bed.

WILLIAM OLD sworn. - I keep a public-house in Tothill-street, Westminster, about two hundred yards from Mr. Bilton's; the prisoner Nell came to my house with four more between seven and eight o'clock on Saturday, the 25th of July; they staid about an hour, paid a pint of porter a-piece, and went away; Phillips came in about ten o'clock, and had some bread and cheese, and a pint of porter; but I believe Nell was not in the house at the time he was.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am an officer: On Sunday morning, the 26th of July, about a quarter before four, Crocker and I saw the two prisoners coming down Oxford-street; Nell had this bundle under his arm, (producing it); it was then quite light; Phillips had two more bundles; I followed them into the Running Horse, at the bottom of Tottenham-court-road; I said to Nell, what have you got here; he knew me, and I knew him; I searched him, and found upon him the bundle and these two keys, (producing them); one of them I fitted to the woman's room door, and it opened it better than her own key; the other key I tried to the box, but it would not open it.

Q. How long had it been light before you first got fight of them? - A.Perhaps an hour and a half.( Edward Crocker produced the other two bundles, which he took from Phillips, the contents of which were identified by Mrs. Clarke.)

Crocker. As we were going to the office, Phillips told me he saw Nell come out with the things, and he asked him what he was going to do with them; he said he was going to a stage-coach to his sister, and asked him to help carry the bundles, for he said it looked aukward for a soldier to be carrying bundles at that time in the morning, and he told me he helped him to carry them on purpose to find out where he was going with them.

Nell's defence. I was drinking a pint of beer at Old's house with this young man, and we stopped till it was too late to get into our lodgings; we went up St. Martin's-lane, and there were two soldiers sitting upon a step with these bundles, and when we came up, they ran away, and left them; we took them up with an intention of going to Bow-street to find an owner for them.

Phillips's defence. What Crocker says is very false; I never said any such thing.

Nell, GUILTY, aged 28.

Phillips, GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing the goods, but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18010916-60

686. JOHN LAMB and WILLIAM SUTHERLAND were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Adams , and others, about the hour of one in the night of the 20th of August , with intent to steal .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of Patrick Pinches .

Third Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

Mr. Knapp, who was Counsel for the prosecution, offered no evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18010916-61

687. ROBERT MYERS and JOHN KENT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , thirty-three pounds of cocoa, value 1l. 13s. the property of Francis Blancheney , James Chauvet , and Charles-Henry Rigaud .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Henrietta Little , widow , John Little , and Samuel Little .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

JOHN YOUNG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Messrs. Francis Blancheney, James Chauvet , and Charles-Henry Rigaud; I got an order from the Custom-house for shipping ninety bags and two cases of cocoa.

Mr. Alley. Q. That order was in writing? - A. Yes; I gave it to Mr. Little, they were to go from Cox's-quay, to be shipped on board Mr. Little's lighter, which was lying in the river, bound for France.

WILLIAM RANSFORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman to Mr. Little; I received an order from Messrs. Blancheney and Co. in consequence of which I gave John Crouch an order to put them on board, and the prisoner, Kent, was to receive them; he was the only person I employed for that purpose; he was in the service of Mr. Little; Myers was a waterman; he used to wear such a jacket as I have seen since the prisoners

were apprehended; I saw the bags of cocoa upon the quay, apparently in a state of security.

Q. Did you observe any of the bags cut, before they were put on board the lighter? - A. I did not.

Q. It was your duty to examine it? - A. I had other business to attend to.

JOHN CROUCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to the tackle-porters belonging to the Clothworkers' Company; I was employed by the last witness to load ninety bags and two cases of cocoa; I loaded them into Messrs. Little's lug-boat, and delivered them to Kent; they all appeared to be in a state of security; Myers was lending Kent a hand to lift them up; he had a jacket on, I think a brown one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You delivered Kent the fair and honest possession of these goods, as a carrier, to convey from one place to another?- A. Yes.

Q. You delivered them to him, as the servant of Messrs. Little? - A. Yes.

JOHN LITTLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp I am a lighterman, in partnership with my mother, and my brother, Henrietta and Samuel Little; the prisoner, Kent, had been a servant of our's about eight months; Myers had left our service about six, or it might be twelve months; Last Tuesday morning I was on London Bridge, I observed a boat of mine going off from Cox's-quay, and had an opportunity of observing what passed; I saw Kent and Myers pulling out the boat from Cox's-quay, it was about ten or eleven tons, which rather surprised me, as one man was sufficient; I walked on to make enquiry about it, and when I had got towards the end of the Bridge, I missed Myers; I saw Kent pulling at both oars; I then observed him place the tarpaulin so as to hide Myers; it was a very fine morning, and unnecessary to have any tarpaulin at all; my suspicions were then roused; I went to Tower Wharf, and took a boat and rowed outside the ships off Tower stairs; I then came up to the log-boat; I told Kent to stop, for my brother had given him a wrong direction; he pulled his boat's head upon tide, and I jumped into it, immediately turned up the tarpaulin, and there I found Myers; I then observed a red jacket, and a hole in one of the bags of cocoa; the pocket of the jacket was placed to the hole in the bag, so that the cocoa was running from the one into the other; Myers's face was towards the bag, and when I turned up the tarpaulin, he jumped up; I immediately called him a scoundrel, and told he had been plundering the boat; I laid hold of him, and he desired me not to pull him about; the cocoa that was in the jacket has been since weighed, there were thirty-three pounds of it; Kent said, he did not know that Myers was there; I endeavoured to get Myers into the wherry that I had come in, which lay along-side, but he resisted, and attempted to throw the jacket overboard, which I prevented; I took him ashore at Custom-house-quay, and gave him and the jacket in custody to Harding, an officer; Kent was taken in the boat about three quarters of an hour afterwards; he said he knew nothing at all about it; the bag appeared to have been cut in the main stuff.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. In the course of three-quarters of an hour, Kent might have got away? - A.Most certainly he might.

Q. Did not Myers tell you, when you found him, that he had been at work all night upon the river, and had laid down to take his rest? - A. No, he did not.

RICHARD HARDING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. (Produces the jacket and the cocoa); I tried it upon Myers, and it fitted pretty well.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean to say that that jacket is not big enough for him and you too? - A. No, it is not.

Mr. Alley. (To Little). Q. From seeing it issue out of the bag, have you any doubt of its being your cocoa? - A. None at all.

- PIKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am warehouseman to Messrs. Keymer, M 'Taggart, and Co. I saw a bag of cocoa before it was put on board the lug-boat, which weighed 2cwt. 1qr. and 9lb.; I have seen the same bag since in Globe-yard, in the King's warehouse; there appeared to be a deficiency; but whether it had been cut in our warehouse, and the hole drawn up, I cannot say; we generally cut them for sale in the main stuff.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How many bags did you weigh? - A.Three hundred and seventy-four.

Q. Can you tell me what either of the other bags weighed? - A. No.

Q. Therefore you can only tell the weight from your books? - A. No.

Q. Are your books here? - A. No.

ROBERT SMITH sworn. - I am a merchant's agent: On Tuesday morning last I saw this bag weighed at Custom-house-quay; it weighed 4cwt. oqr. 4lb.

CHARLES BATTIN sworn. - I am a clerk in the accompting-house of Messrs. Blanchency and Co.; I have compared the cocoa in the jacket with that in the bag, and also with the sample from which we bought it; they appear to me to be exactly the same.

Myers's defence. I was at work for Mr. Henry Cooper, a lighterman, at Cox's-quay; my employer desired me to go and assist in getting a barge up against tide, and I asked Kent to give me a cast down; I had been very ill for a fortnight, and had been at work all night; I was very much jaded, and laid down; Mr. Little came on board, turned

up the tarpaulin, and said, what do you do here? I told him nothing, only that I was going down with Kent, who had agreed to give me a cast, and he immediately took me before the Lord-Mayor.

Kent's defence. There was a hole in one bag, which came down with a piece of cotton in it.

The prisoner Myers called five, and Kent six witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Myers, GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined three months in Newgate , and publicly whipped one hundred yards on Cox's-quay .

Kent, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-62

688. ELIZABETH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , fourteen sheets, value 35s. the property of the Mayor and Commonalry of the Citizens of the City of London, Governors of the House of the Poor , called St. Bartholomew's Hospital, near West-Smithfield, London , of the Foundation of King Henry the Eighth.

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Ann Hurst , widow.

Third Count. Charging them to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

RICHARD PAYTER sworn. - I belong to St. Bartholomew's Hospital; Mrs. Ann Hurst is responsible for the sheets used in the Hospital; the prisoner was a nurse there, and was discharged on the 14th of August. I was called upon to examine the number of sheets left in the ward, as is usual when any sister goes away; I missed seven pair; I then, according to the Treasurer's order, took the prisoner into custody; I went with her and the officer to the Compter; but, before that, I asked her what was become of the seven pair of sheets, and she said they were in her box.

Q. Had you made her any promise that you would not prosecute her if she confessed where they were? - A. I told her I had orders to take her to the Compter if she did not tell me where they were; I could not get any satisfactory answer, and I took her to the Compter; the next morning I went to the Compter, and she said she had pawned them, and would give me the duplicates if I could get her dismissed from the Compter.

Q. Did she say that of herself, without your saying any thing to her? - A. Yes; she then gave me the duplicates; in consequence of which I went to Mr. Briggs, Smithfield-bars, and there I found four pair of sheets pawned in her own name.

Q. Did you find the Hospital mark upon them?- A. The mark had been rubbed over with pipeclay, but there was sufficient remaining for me to see it; I then went to Mr. Watson's, in Watling-street, according to duplicates that she gave me; I saw two pair of sheets there pawned in the name of Hill; she was then committed.

JOHN BOTILLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Briggs, pawnbroker, Smithfield-bars. I remember the prisoner coming to our shop, and pledging the sheets that Mr. Payter claimed; the mark had been rubbed over with pipe-clay, or something white, so that when I held them up, I did not see it, or I should not have taken them in. (Seven sheets produced, and identified by Mr. Payter.)

ELEANOR HILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have known the prisoner many years; I pledged two sheets for her at Mr. Watson's; she told me they were her own; I never saw them unfolded.

- WATSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you remember taking in any sheets from the last witness? - A. I have no recollection of it; I don't know that I took them in; I delivered to Mr. Payter the sheets that he claimed.

Hill. There were a pair of sheets that I had redeemed at Mr. Watson's, and had not returned to the prisoner, which I delivered to Mr. Payter.(Payter produced them.)

Hill. These are the same that I received from Mrs. Davis; I particularly remarked the letter H at the corner.

Payter. These sheets belong to the Hospital.

Prisoner's defence. I had been in great distress before I got into the Hospital; I had been obliged to make away with a great deal of my wearing apparel; I made a very bad appearance; I thought these sheets would not be wanted, and I pledged them for the purpose of getting some of my clothes out to appear in. GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-63

689. THOMAS SINGLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , two clarinets, value 3l. 3s. the property of George Astor , George Horwood , and Benjamin Banks , in their dwelling-house .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of George Astor and George Horwood.

Third Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of George Horwood .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the Prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18010916-64

690. MICHAEL RYAN and SARAH BOLTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , thirty pounds weight of feathers, value 3l. the property of John Cummings , in his dwelling-house .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-65

691. MARY SHEE was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway upon Mary, the wife of Dennis Fognarty , on the 11th of July , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a silk handkerchief, value 2s. 6d. the property of the said Dennis.

The prosecutrix was called, but not appearing, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-66

692. JOSEPH ROGERS and REBECCA EAST were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Evans , clerk , no person being therein, about the hour of seven in the afternoon, of the 23d of August , with intent to steal, and stealing a silver medal of the Seven Bishops in the Tower, value 7s. a silver goblet, value 2l. two tea-spoons, value 3s. a hoop garnet ring, value 4s. two hoop rings, value 4s. a pair of paste hoop ruffets, value 10s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 10s. a watch, value 5l. 5s. twelve handkerchiefs, value 18s. four aprons, value 4s. two pair of velvet shoes, value 11s. two counterpanes, value 1l. three table-cloths, value 6s. a gown and coat, value 10s. a calico petticoat, value 2s. a satin gown, value 1l. two silk gowns, value 2l. another gown, value 10s. a satin petticoat, value 5s. a pair of jumps, value 5s. a muslin apron, value 2s. two pair of sheets, value 10s. ten yards of India satin, value 2l. a copper saucepan, value 1s. a fun dial, value 2s. and a plated candlestick, value 1s. the property of the said John Evans.

There being no evidence to bring home the charge to the prisoner's, without the testimony of an accomplice, who is under conviction of felony, and has not suffered the punishment of the law, they were

Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-67

693. WILLIAM GREENHARD and ISAAC BURN were indicted, the first for feloniously stealig, on the 23d of September , a black gelding, value 5l. the property of Elizabeth Priest ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

The prosecutrix and witnesses were called, but not appearing, the prisoners were

Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-68

694. JOHN PEAKE was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 30th of April , twenty diamonds, the property of John-Christian Weppler , whereof Thomas Collett has been convicted of stealing, knowing the same to have been stolen .

John Cockin, a Bow-street officer, being the only witness who attended, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-69

695. ANN BATEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , three muslin caps, value 3s. three ounces of cotton, value 1s. 6d. an ounce of thread, value 6d. and ten remnants of cotton, value 1s. the property of Dinah Brain .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

DINAH BRAIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On the 1st of August I went into the service of Mr. Walrond, in Grosvenor-place ; the prisoner was also in his service till the 28th. On Friday, the 7th, I missed several things, but had no suspicion of the prisoner till the Monday after she was gone away; I saw her in Grosvenor-place, and I went after her to tell her of a letter that was left at our house for her; and, when I came up to her, I observed a shawl handkerchief upon her neck of mine; I acquainted my master with it, and he got a search-warrant; I was not present when the prisoner was searched.

JOHN CREEDLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the officers of Queen-square, Westminster; I went with a search-warrant on the 2d of September to Graston-Mews, Fitzroy-square, to a room over some stables, belonging to a Mrs. Smith, where the prisoner slept; we took her when she came home at night to Bed; I found a number of things there which are the subject of another indictment.

JOHN HOBBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On Thursday, the 3d of September, I went with a search-warrant to Mr. Walrond's house; I found two boxes, the keys of which I had from the prisoner the night before; in the boxes I found the articles mentioned in this indictment. (Produces them.)

Brain. I know these things to be mine; the thread is my own making.

ISAAC BURROWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a servant in Mr. Walrond's family; I saw the boxes searched; they belonged to the prisoner at the bar.

Prisoner's defence. I bought them.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

The prisoner was again tried and convicted, but the evidence being the same, excepting that it applied to the articles found in Graston-Mews, it is unnecessary to repeat it.

Reference Number: t18010916-70

696. WILLIAM INGRAM , alias EAGLE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , a wooden tub, value 1s. and half a peck of oysters, value 2s. the property of Stephen Challin .

- CHALLIN sworn. - I am the wife of Stephen Challin; I keep a green-grocer's shop, and sell oysters: On the 31st of August I missed a tub of oysters, between ten and eleven o'clock at night; I went out to look after it, and caught the prisoner with a second tub of oysters in his hand; I called stop thief; the watchman came up, and he threw them down at his feet.

THOMAS DENIGHT sworn. - I am a constable; I was going along Little Pulteney-street; I heard the cry of stop thief; I pursued the prisoner, and saw him throw down a tub of oysters at the watchman's feet; I seized him, but he was so very resolute, that I was obliged to put a pistol to his head, and then he was quiet.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-71

697. MARY LEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , a silk gown, value 5s. and a sheet, value 4s. the property of William Patrick .

ANN PATRICK sworn. - I am the wife of William Patrick, a soldier : On the 21st or 22d of July the prisoner came to lodge with me; she slept with me one night; the next morning I went out, and when I came home, she was gone, and I missed my gown and sheet; she owned before the Justice that she had pledged them; I heard that she was taken up, and I went to the Justice's.

JOSEPH TURNER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 20, Westminster-bridge-road: On the 24th of July I took in a sheet and gown of a woman, whom I believe to be the prisoner at the bar, I never saw her before; the constable has them.

JOHN HOBBS sworn. - I am an officer; (produces the sheet and gown); the prisoner confessed she had pledged them at Mr. Turner's; she said she had lost the duplicate; I went to Mr. Turner's, and found them there.

Mrs. Patrick. These are my property.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-72

698. MARY PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , seven handkerchiefs, value 14s. and two shawls, value 6s. the property of Charles Holmes .

CHARLES HOLMES sworn. - I am a hosier and haberdasher , in Tothill-street, Westminster : On Monday, the 13th of July, about four o'clock, the prisoner, in company with another woman and a soldier, came in to purchase some stockings, and looked at various parcels, but could not agree; they then went away, and a woman came into the shop, and told me a woman had taken some goods off the counter; she pointed her out to me, and I went after her, and brought her back; I put my hand round her, but could feel nothing; some person then said, there are some handkerchiefs at her feet; I did not see her drop them; they could not have been dropped by any other person, because the other persons in the shop were at some distance.

ANN CLARKE sworn. - I was at Mr. Holmes's; I saw the prisoner with another woman and a soldier looking at some stockings; while they were looking at them, I saw the prisoner take two parcels, and put them under her gown; as soon as they were gone out, I told the gentleman of it.(The property was produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner put in a written paper, stating that it was her first offence, and begging for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-73

699. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , a pair of sheets, value 5s. a copper tea-kettle, value 3s. and a metal candlestick, value 1s. the property of Edward Robertson , in a lodging-room .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-74

700. THOMAS POLLARD and WILLIAM POLLARD were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , six japanned waiters, value 4s. 3d. the property of William Austin , the elder, William Austin , the younger, and George Austin ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were

Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-75

701. JOSEPH JOACHIM and ANN ADAMS were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , a watch, value 5l. the property of Charles Watherberg , and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

CHARLES WATHERBERG sworn. - I belong to a Swedish ship ; my watch hung over my hammock; the prisoner was sailor on board the same ship; I lost it on the 5th of September; the ship

lay at Blackwall-dock ; Joachim came on board, and went down below deck; he came up again directly, and went a-shore; then I went down below, and missed my watch; nobody else had been below; I had the watch in my hand not five minutes before he came on board; I never found it again.

CHARLES HOLROYD sworn. - I am an officer of Essex; I had an information, and apprehended the prisoner; he told me he had given the duplicate of the watch to the prisoner Adams.

Q. Had you said any thing to Joachim to induce him to confess? - A. No.

ROBERT STANTON sworn. - I am an officer of the county of Essex; I was with Holroyd; we apprehended the prisoner in Blackwall; he said he had given the watch to Adams; she said she had pawned it, but did not know that he had stole it.(Charles Williams, the pawnbroker, produced the watch, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

Joachim, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

Adams, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-76

702. JAMES JONES and JOHN SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , a marble slab, value 21s. the property of James Waddilove .

JAMES DALY sworn. - I am a watchman in Goodge-street, Tottenham-court-road: On the 6th of August, about two o'clock in the morning, I saw the two prisoners come down Tottenham-court-road; Smith had the slab upon his head in a cloth, like a working man's apron; there was a watch box on the other side of the way, where there was a light, and they crossed the way; I came out of my box, and pursued them; I laid hold of Smith, and asked him what he had there? he said, a marble slab; I asked him where he brought it from; and he said from Mr. Waddilove's, the stone-mason, who was his master; he said he was going to Eagle-street, Red-Lion-square, with it; I said it is a very unseasonable hour, and he immediately gave the slab to the other prisoner; upon that I sprung my rattle, and he ran down Store-street; I kept Smith in custody; Jones was brought back by another watchman; we took them to the watch-house; Jones then said they had picked it up at Mr. Moore's livery-stable gateway; after that he said they had picked it up in Howland-street, or Warren-street.

WILLIAM WEBSTER sworn. - I am a watchman; I assisted Daly in securing Smith; I am sure Jones is the same man that ran away; he was brought back in the course of three or four minutes.(Chinnery, an officer, produced the slab, which was identified by Mr. John Waddilove .)

Smith's defence. I picked up this slab in Tottenham-court-road, and the watchman laid hold of me.

Jones's defence. I was with this young man when he picked it up.

The prisoner Smith called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Jones, GUILTY , aged 21.

Smith, GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-77

703. JOHN GUEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , a seven-shilling-piece and a six-pence , the property of Henry Miller .

CATHERINE MILLER sworn. - I am the wife of Henry Miller, a currier , in Fitzroy-market; I keep a butcher's shop to assist in supporting my family: On the 23d of June, the prisoner bought a piece of veal of me; he desired it to be sent to No. 5, Polygon, Sommers-Town, with change for half-a-guinea; I sent Richard Hanks with it, and gave him a seven-shilling-piece and a six-pence, and presently the boy brought back the veal with no money; I had seen the prisoner once before.

RICHARD HANKS sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Going of fourteen; Mrs. Miller asked me to go with this piece of veal; I went with it, and got up behind a coach; when I had got about half way to Sommers-Town, the prisoner called me down, and said I should make his meat all over dust; he said I was going to No. 5, Polygon; I said I was; he desired me to give him the change, and ask for the half-guinea at the house; he told me the person's name was Allen; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I could not find any such person there. About three weeks after, I saw him again in Wells-street, picking his nails; I told him I wanted him; he said, what for; I said for the half-guinea; he said I was mistaken in the man, it was somebody else; I said, no, I was not, I could swear to him; then he said, come to my office, in Oxford-road, and I will give it you; then he took me down Berners-street, and said, d - n your young blood, come along with me to the woman, that was Mrs. Miller; and as we were going along, he gave me a blow in my side, and knocked me down close to an area; if I had been an inch farther, I should have gone down the area; then he ran away; I called out stop thief, and he was pursued and taken.

Prisoner's defence. I am a licensed hawker; I was at another place at the time selling my goods, which I shall be able to prove.

The prisoner's witnesses were called, but did not appear. GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-78

704. ANN ROGERS and ELIZABETH-ANN ROGERS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , twelve wads of peas, in the straw, value 5s. the property of William Lewis .

The principal witness being absent, the prisoners were BOTH ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-79

705. JOHN EALY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , three sheets, value 10s. 6d. the property of John Gwillim .

JOHN GWILLIM sworn. - I am a baker , in Drury-lane: On the 20th of August, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by Michael Cordy, who brought in the prisoner; I opened his apron, and took out three sheets of my property.

MARY GWILLIM sworn. - I saw my father take out of the prisoner's apron three sheets; I immediately knew them to be my father's.

MICHAEL CORDY sworn. - I am a coachwheeler: I was going with an acquaintance to have a pint of beer; I observed the prisoner and another man walking up and down Drury-lane; I had some suspicion of them; and in about five minutes I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Gwillim's shop, and come out again with something in his apron, which he had not when he went in. I went after him, and brought him back to Mr. Gwillim's shop; the other man ran away; he said he was in distress, and starving; I said, then why don't you go for a soldier or sailor, and not be guilty of such actions as these; I took him to Mr. Gwillim's, and they claimed the sheets.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am an officer; I searched the prisoner, and found upon him this knife, a seven-shilling-piece, and three shillings;(producing them.)

Miss Gwillim. I am sure they are my father's sheets; they are not marked, I know them by the mending; they were upon the table next the parlour door.

Prisoner's defence. I am totally ignorant of it; I never had the sheets in my possession.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-80

706. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , a watch, value 20s. and two sheets, value 5s. the property of Hannah Lucas , widow .

HANNAH LUCAS sworn. - I am a widow, No. 20, Quebec-street : On the 14th of August last, I lost a watch and a pair of sheets; the sheets are here.

JOHN HAYNES sworn. - I am a calico-glazer: On the 14th of August, a little after eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner coming out of the back window of Mrs. Lucas's house; when he got out, he went into the privy with a bundle; I went down stairs, and he was going along the passage into the street; as soon as he shut the door, I went out after him; I told him to lay down the bundle; he said he should not; and immediately ran away down North Portman-Mews into Baker's-Mews; I lost sight of him for about a minute; when I got sight of him, he was upon a dunghill, in the Mews; I made towards him, and he towards me; he asked me what was the matter; I immediately collared him, and told him he knew what was the matter; I held the prisoner, and saw a young man take the sheets out of the dunghill; I took him back to Mrs. Lucas's, and found that she had lost a watch; he said he would tell where the watch was if she would forgive him; upon that he was taken to the watch-house; he never told where the watch was.

- OSBORNE sworn. - I saw the prisoner with a bundle under his arm; I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw him taken.

JAMES CLARKE sworn. - I heard the prisoner say he would tell where the watch was if Mrs. Lucas would forgive him; I told her if she did, she would be as bad as him, for she would be compounding felony; we then took him to the watch-house.

JOHN LUCAS sworn. - I am the son of the prosecutrix; the prisoner told me if I and another lad of my size would go with him, he would shew us where the watch was.(Henry Betts, the officer, produced the sheets, which were identified by Mrs. Lucas.

The prisoner put in a written defence, declaring his innocence of the crime with which he was accused. GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-81

707. EDWARD MUNDAY and WILLIAM HUNT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , two pieces of Irish linen, value 7l. the property of Richard Cosington .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas Wyatt .

ELEANOR WYATT sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Wyatt, a soldier ; I worked for Mrs. Cosington, who keeps a linen-draper's shop, in Knightsbridge : On the 15th of August, between three and four in the afternoon, the prisoner Munday came into the shop, and ordered a piece of cloth, of seven or eight shillings a yard, to be sent to Mrs. Godwin's, a brandy-merchant, at Knights-bridge, for her to look at; Mrs. Cosington told him the had none above four shillings; he said she had better send two pieces of cloth for Mrs. Godwin to look at, one at four shillings, and the other at three shillings and six-pence, or three shillings

and three-pence; I went with him and the two pieces of cloth, and when we had got just beyond the Barracks, we met a gentleman in black; the prisoner then said, here comes young Mr. Godwin himself, that was the prisoner Hum; I looked very earnest at him to know him again; he said, well, you have brought the cloth; Munday said, yes, I have; Hunt said, go and shew it my mother, and let the woman step back and fetch some cambric; he said his mother was going out of town, and wanted some cambric to look at, as well as the cloth; I was to make haste back, and something checked me as I was going along, sure I had not given it to a thief; I turned round to watch whether they went to Mrs. Godwin's with it; I saw them go into Mr. Godwin's passage, and run out immediately with the cloth; I called out, stop thief immediately; and Munday was so closely pursued, that he threw the cloth away, and I picked it up; he was taken and brought back to the shop, I am sure he is the same man, though he is very much disguised; he got a cut upon his eye with being taken; Hunt got away; (produces the cloth); this is the cloth that was delivered to me, and that I delivered to Munday.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. (Counsel for Hunt.) Q. The person you suppose to be Hunt, was dressed in black at that time? - A. Yes; but I took particular notice of him.

Q. And you did not see him again for a fortnight afterwards? - A.No; he was taken up by the description I gave of him at the Office; they knew him from my description.

Court. Q.What is Mr. Cosington's name? - A.Richard.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. - I am a stonemason's labourer: On the 15th of August I was at work in Grosvenor-place; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner, Munday, running down from St. George's Hospital, with about forty or fifty people after him; he turned down the first turning to the back of a mews; I immediately went round Chapel-street to meet him, where he could not escape; the people were pursuing him, and he had this knife in his hand open, (produces it); I ran up to him, and took hold of him by the collar; he made a blow at me with the knife three times, and the fourth time he cut my sleeve; he told me he would run me through if I laid hold of him; the mob surrounded him, and he could not get away without getting over a wall; he got upon the wall, and then he was secured; he had a blue coat on, coloured waistcoat, nankeen pantaloons, and white stockings.(Another person was called, who corroborated the evidence of the last witness.)

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - Mrs. Wyatt gave me a description of Hunt on the 17th of August; she said she was sure she should know him again: we were after him till the 27th, and then we took him in Feathers-court, Holborn, from her description.

HENRY LOVETT sworn. - I was with Jackson; I know no more than he has related.

Munday's defence. I know no nothing of the man that stands by my side; a gentleman told me to go and order some linen to be sent to Mr. Godwin's, and I should be rewarded; I did so, and just before I got to Mr. Godwin's, the gentleman met us, and sent the woman back for some cambric; I went to Mr. Godwin's with the linen, and when we had got within the door, the gentleman said we had got to the wrong house; I immediately, upon coming out, heard a cry of stop thief; he ran away, and I was taken.

The prisoner, Hunt, left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Munday, GUILTY , aged 27.

Hunt, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-82

708. JEREMIAH PACK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , a pair of boots, value 5s. twelve pieces of leather, value 20s. a lid of a tea-kettle, value 6d. two pair of shoes, value 4s. a lamp, value 1s. two pair of pattens, value 1s. 6d. four knives, value 6d. four forks, value 6d. a bound book, value 2s. and two pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. the property of Charles Borham .

CHARLES BORHAM sworn. - I am a shoemaker , in High-street, Ratcliffe ; I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner worked for me; he used to go of errands, and clean knives and forks, and such things: On Monday, the 11th of August, I missed several things; I challenged the prisoner with it; he denied it; I then took a book out of my pocket, similar to one I had lost, and asked him if he knew that; he said, yes, he had taken it from behind the counter, and sold it in Hounsditch for one shilling.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him?- A. Yes, I did; I found none of the articles, except a pair of boots, in pledge at Davis's, in Bishopsgate-street.

OBADIAH COOPER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Davis, pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate-street,(produces a pair of boots); I took them in of the prisoner at the bar on the 13th of August, for 3s.

Borham. These are my boots.

Prisoner's defence. My master shewed me the duplicate of the boots, and asked me if I knew any thing about it, and I told him I did not.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined one month in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-83

709. ANN ARCHER, alias POWELL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , a sheet, value 5s. the property of Sarah Lane , widow , in a lodging room .

SARAH LANE sworn. - I am a widow, and live at No. 17, James-street, Golden-square ; I keep a lodging-house ; the prisoner came to lodge with me on the 24th of April, I put a pair of sheets to air, and gave them to her; she came in about six o'clock, and I never saw her afterwards till she was taken up for sobbing another lodging; she stripped the room of almost every thing.

THOMAS ENSOR sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(produces a sheet); I took it in of the prisoner on the 25th of April.(The sheet was identified by Mrs. Lane, and Sarah Baker, her daughter).

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely innocent of it.

GUILTY , aged 15. - Judgement repited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-84

710. JOHN BOWLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on 23d of July , an iron vice, value 12s. the property of Francis Styles .

ELIZABTH STYLES sworn. - I am the wife of Francis Styles, a broker , in Old-street : On the 23d of July the vice was standing at the door, fastened to another vice, for sale; I did not miss it till Mr. Turner brought the prisoner back with it.

WILLIAM TURNER sworn. - I keep an eating-house, in Old-street; after I had dined, I saw the prisoner take the vice; I stopped him with it at my door, he had it on his shoulder.(John Compton, the constable, produced the vice, which was indentified by Mrs. Styles.)

Prisoner's defence. The vice was standing up a gateway, by a gentleman's house, and I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined one month in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-85

711. BRYAN CARROLL , alias JOHN DOWNIE , alias JOHN NOWLAND , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , one hundred and sixty-one pounds weight of soap, value 1l. 5s. the property of James Nowland and John Nowland .

It appearing upon the evidence, that in point of law it was a fraud, and not a felony, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-86

712. SARAH GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , three pieces of leather, value 4s. the property of Margaret Hobson , widow .

WILLIAM WOOTTON sworn. - I am shopman to Mrs. Margaret Hobson, currier and leathercutter ; she is a widow, in White Lion-street, Norton Falgate ; the prisoner came to our shop on Wednesday, the 16th of September, to buy some leather, and as she went out I suspected she had got some under her cloak that she had not paid for; I went after her and took one piece from her: I brought her back, and she dropped two pieces more; they have our private mark upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I have four children and a husband sick of a fever; I took one piece by mistake, the other two I know nothing of.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-87

713. SARAH GLADMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , a silk cloak, value 15s. the property of Jonathan Baker .

JONATHAN BAKER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Brick-lane, Whitechapel ; the prisoner, on the 12th of September, with another woman, came into my shop and asked the prices of various articles, particularly of this cloak, which was hanging at the door; immediately upon their dispersing from the shop I missed the cloak; I went into the street and saw the prisoner go into a public-house; she called for a pint of beer; I desired her to let me see what she had under her cloak; I moved her cloak on one side, and there I found this cloak under her arm; she offered to pay me for it.

Prisoner's defence. I went with another woman; I came out of the shop because my child was crying; she came out and gave me the cloak, and told me she had bought it, and desired me to go into the public-house and call for a pint of beer.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-88

714. JOHN HARMONY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , twelve pieces of tortoise-shell, value 30s. the property of James Atty the elder, James Atty the younger, and James Dawson.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

RICHARD NORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a Police-officer: On the evening of the 6th of August, I was on duty on the river; a little after six o'clock I saw the prisoner and another man in a boat under the bows of the ship Alert, in Bell Wharf tier , on the Middlesex side of the river; I perceived that his sides were bulky; I ordered my men to pull, and upon seeing me coming up, he ran up one side of the ship Alert, and I ran up the other side, and found him in the act of recovering himself from stooping; at his feet I found a bag containing tortoise-shell; I then caught hold of him, and then a boy belonging to the ship, of the name of Gregg, came forward, and said, in his hearing, what has he dropped, Sir; I picked up the bag, which contained twelve pieces

of tortoise-shell, I have had them ever since; Mr. Ford, the mate, came on board the boat to know what he had taken; he asked the prisoner if he had been at work on board the Alert, he asked him several times before he would give him an answer, at last he said he had; just one of the lumpers; I then took him ashore and secured him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. Do you mean to swear that that is what he dropped? - A. I caught him in the act of righting himself.

GEORGE GREGG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a sailor on board the Alert; I was standing across the quarter-deck and saw the prisoner come up and throw down this tortoiseshell under the pig-styes in a bag, I ran forward to North and asked him what it was; he said he could not tell; he opened it, and it contained tortoiseshell.

HUMPHREY FORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the mate of the Alert; I was on board on the 6th of August; the Captain's name is James Macdonald; I saw the prisoner in custody, I asked him several times whether he had been at work on board the ship that day, and he for several times hesitated; I knew he had been at work as a lumper, but I was determined to get an answer from him; he at last said he had.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of it; there were fourteen men on board the ship as well as me.

For the Prisoner.

ALEXANDER BROOKFIELD sworn. - I was on board the Alert; I know the prisoner to be perfectly innocent.

Court. Q. Take care what you are saying? - A. What I am saying is the truth; he had not an opportunity of going down; he was never off the capstern of the vessel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you the gentleman that North saw with him in the boat? - A. No; I was upon deck, I was the foreman of this man.

Q. How came you not to say when he was taken this is an innocent man? - A. I did not know what it was till he was in the boat.

Q. You went before the Magistrate I take it?- A. No.

Q. You are sure he could not take the tortoiseshell? - A. I think not.

Q.(To North). Do you know that man? - A. This man I believe is the other man who was in the boat.

Q. Are you quite sure he is the man? - A. I am certain of it; they were both standing in the boat ready to shove off.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Alexander Brookfield was immediately committed to Newgate.

Reference Number: t18010916-89

715. THOMAS FITZROY , alias FITZWARTER , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Harris , Sophia Harris, his daughter, and others of his family being therein, about the hour of eight in the afternoon of the 5th of July , and stealing a counterpane, value 2s. a gown, value 1s. a sheet, value 5s. and a shirt, value 1s. the property of Robert Whitehead ; a basket, value 6d. a pair of sheets, value 10s. two dimity petticoats, value 5s. a stuff petticoat, value 4d. two gowns, value 5s. a towel, value 6d. a table-cloth, value 1s. 6d. a shirt, value 2s. 6d. five handkerchiefs, value 2s. three pair of stockings, value 1s. two frocks, value 1s. two night-gowns value 1s. and two aprons, value 1s. the property of Richard Vaughan .

SOPHIA HARRIS sworn. - I am the daughter of James Harris, No. 7, King's-head-court, Holborn ; my father keeps the house: On Sunday, the 5th of July, the house was broke open, between eight and nine in the evening, myself and my little brothers were at home.

Q. Was it day-light? - A. Yes, quite light.

Q. How was it broke open? - A.By a skeleton key; I came into the house at five o'clock, and shut the door after me, the house door has a spring lock; after that I was with my brothers in the parlour; between eight and nine o'clock I heard the door open, I thought it was one of our lodgers, I opened the door to see whether it was or not; I saw the prisoner going off the step of the door with two bundles; I asked him who he pleased to want, and he said he wanted my father, but he had seen my father; I told him he had not seen my father, for my father and mother were both gone out; I asked him what things he had there; he said they were his; I said I am sure they are not, I will follow you; then he went to a public-house, and dropped the basket in the passage, and the other bundle he took with him and went out at the other door; then I came home again and did not see any thing of the man afterwards; I saw the basket and the bundle the next day at Guildhall.

Q. Look round, and say if you can see the man?- A. Yes, that is the man.

Q. Are you perfectly sure he is the man? - A. Yes, I am.

Q.Have you any doubt at all about it? - A. No; I am sure he is the man.

Q.Where were all these things taken from? - A.From the lodgers; the basket belonged to Mr. Vaughan, and the bundle to Mr. Whitehead.

WILLIAM NIXON sworn. - I am a porter; at the time of the robbery I lodged at No. 15, Norwich-court; I was looking out of the window and saw this child and a man with two bundles before her, she was crying out and saying the bundle was not his.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. That is the man;

he was going up Norwich-court, till he came to the public-house, and then he put one of the bundles into the passage, and went out again at the other door; then I went after him, and brought him back again with the bundle; the other bundle the landlord had taken care of, and sent for a constable.

Q. Have you any doubt about his person? - A. None; I am sure he is the person.

GEORGE STREETIN sworn. - I am a constable: On Sunday evening, the 5th of July, I was sent for to the Castle, in Norwith-court, to take charge of the prisoner and these bundles, (produces the bundles and a basket); he said they did not belong to him, he had found them; the basket was lying upon the table; Mrs. Harris came into the room, and she wished the bundles to be opened, the prisoner was present; she said, the things were not her property, but there was a particular gown that she knew to be the property of Mrs. Vaughan; he then said, if the things belonged to the lady, she was very welcome to take them, for they did not belong to him; he said he was rather in a hurry, he would call again presently; I told him, no, he must not go yet, I wanted to speak with him; I observed his left hand go to his left hand pocket, and draw back again; I heard, or thought I heard something fall behind him on the bench where he sat; I then desired him to stand up, because there was something that I wanted, and immediately I found these three skeleton keys, (produces them); upon that I searched him, and found upon him these six small keys, which are common keys, a knife, two screw-drivers, not broke, and this very strong serew-drier, broke (produces them); I said, he had so many tools about him, I should not wonder if he had pistols; he said, no, he had not, but if he had, bl - y end to him if I should not have had it; after I had taken him to the Compter, I went to Mr. Harris's to examine the street door, and the one-pair of stairs room door; the large skelation key opened the street door with great ease, perhaps with mare ease than the right key would; the smaller skeletons would not go into the lock of the one-pair of stairs door, and that door had been forced open, I suspected, at the hinges, because the bolt of the lock was not shoved back; I then compared the broken screw-driver with the bruises upon the door, and found it correspond exactly.

Q. In the presence of the prisoner, did you hear how the basket came at the public-house? - A. Yes; two or three people said he had left it in the passage, and said he would call for it presently.

ROBERT WHITEHEAD sworn. - I lodge in the first floor of Mr. Harris's house; my wife can speak to the property.(Mrs. Whitehead identified her husband's part of the property).

Q. How did you find your room door? - A. I found it locked, and it has locked very well ever since; I can see no force that has been used to it.

JAMES HARRIS sworn. - I was the first that came home after the door was broke open; I came home between eight and nine o'clock; I went up stairs, and found the door open; I examined it, it appeared to have been done with something like a never; the bolt was shot out, and the door and bolt all went together; I heard that the prisoner was taken; I went and found him in custody; Mr. Whitehead had lost the key at his master's, Mr. Roberts's, in Fetter lane; I desired them to send one of their men with the key to lock the door, and they did send a man, who fastened the door.

HANNAH VAUGHAN sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Vaughan ; I had left the basket at Mr. Whitehead's packed up; I know it to be mine, the contents are the same as when I left it.

Mrs. Whitehead. I left this basket in the room when I went out.

Prisoner's defence. I saw these two parcels lying upon the step; I knocked at the door, and asked if the gentleman was at home; the little girl said, no, her father was out; and I took them to a public-house where I was known, that I might deliver them to the owner; I never had the keys in my possession.

GUILTY , Death , aged 32.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-90

716. JOHN KANALY and WILLIAM COOPER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , twenty-five yards of linen cloth, value 35s. the property of George Singleton , privately in his shop .

GEORGE SINGLETON sworn. - I keep a Manchester warehouse : On the 6th of August I was writing in the warehouse, the prisoner Cooper came in, and asked where Mr. Slack lived; I told him about forty yards up the street; he thanked me, and went out; in less than five minutes an officer brought in both the prisoners; I looked at a piece of linen he had in his hand, which I knew to be mine.

JAMES HALL sworn. - I am a marshalman: On Thursday, the 6th of August last, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I observed the two prisoners, and had some suspicion of them; I watched them till they came to Mr. Singleton's shop, at the corner of St. Paul's Church-yard and Watling-street; they made a full stop at the front of the warehouse-door; I then went into Mr. Wits's, a stationer, opposite Mr. Singleton's; I saw them looking in at the window; there was a man standing by a post, who sweeps the kennel; the prisoner Kanaly spoke to him, so that his back was turned upon the warehouse; Cooper then went in, and stopped about two minutes; I then took hold of Kanaly;

Cooper immediately came out with this parcel under his arm, (producing it:) I then laid hold of him, and took them both to Mr. Singleton's, and he cl ed the property.( George Welch , servant to Mr. Wits, corroborated the evidence of Hall.)(The property was identified by Mr. Singleton, having his private mark.)

Kanaiy's defence. I know nothing of it; I never saw this lad in my life before.

Coope's defence. I was going along St. Paul's Church-yard, and a gentleman asked me to carry that parcel for him, and he would give me sixpence; I took it, and before I had got four yards, the constable laid hold of me; I never saw this lad before in my life.

Kanaty called six and Cooper two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Cooper, GUILTY , Death , aged 12.

Kanaly, NOT GUILTY .

The prisoner Cooper was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his youth and good character.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-91

717. MARY CLARKE and FRANCES PHILLIPS were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a watch, value 40s. a chain, value 8s a key, value 2s. a seal, value 1s. a leather purse, value 2d. a half-crown, and two shillings , the property of Patrick Riley ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

PATRICK RILEY sworn. - I am a labourer in the Victualling-Office: On the 13th of July last, between three and four in the afternoon, I was going through Old-street with a friend of the name of Devynes; there were two women standing under a gateway, they called to my friend, and we both turned back; the two prisoners are the same women; it began to rain, and we all four went to the sign of the Rodney, and had a pot of ale; the rain continued, and we had four or five pots; we stopped till between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. Were you in liquor? - A. No, only merry; one of the prisoners asked my friend if he would see her safe home, and he said he would; we both went to the bottom of Golden-lane, and there I lost my friend and one of the women; the other told me they would come after us: I then went with Clarke up stairs into a house; she sat down upon the foot of the bed, and pulled me right over her; she then picked my pocket of my watch, a half-crown, and two shillings. I had seen my money and watch in the afternoon; as soon as she had robbed me, she ran down stairs; I followed her, and saw her a few minutes afterwards at the White-Hart, in Golden-lane; she ran through the tap-room, and I saw no more of her till the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Clarke.) Q. You were coming from work, I suppose? - A. No, I had been visiting a friend.

Q. You, of course, drank a little with your friend? - A. We had a pint of beer, and a glass of brandy a-piece; that is all.

Q. After you met with the ladies, you were drinking four or five hours with them? - A. Yes.

Q. You had no difficulty in finding the prisoner, Clarke, the next day? - A. No, I could not find her till Mr. Rittson, the publican, found her for me.

Q. Did you not tell Rittson that you had not money enough to give the ladies, and you gave her the watch to borrow some upon? - A. No, I did not.

Q. But you told her the next day you would forgive her if she found you the watch? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not say you had not money enough to pay her that compliment she was deserving of the night before, and you would give her five shillings more? - A. No, I told her I did not mind treating her with half-a-crown's-worth, if she would tell where it was.

PATRICK DEVYNES sworn. - I was with Riley at the Rodney's Head, drinking gin with these women, and then it was Riley's inclination to go along with them; we were all pretty well intoxicated; I parted with him and the women in Golden-lane.

Q. Did not he leave you with the other woman?- A. No.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. Yes, I went home; and between ten and eleven o'clock he came to me, and told me he had lost his watch; I live at No. 25, Clerkenwell-close; he stopped there all night, and the next morning I went with him to inquire for it; the landlord went with us to find her; there was a flogging-match in the street, and we lost Riley in the crowd; the landlord found Clarke; I asked her for the watch; she said she did not mean to keep it, but she did not like to deliver it to me before the officer: Riley came in, and told her if she would let him have his watch, he would forgive her, and spend something.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were all pretty drunk that night? - A. I believe we were.

Q. You left him with both the women? - A. Yes.

Q. You were not foolish enough to go with the other woman? - A. No, I have a wife and children of my own.

JOHN DAY sworn. - I am a shoe-maker: On Tuesday, the 14th of July, Mary Twigg brought me a watch, and desired to leave it for half an hour; that was about nine o'clock in the morning; I put it into an empty cage, and in the course of an hour she came for it again.

MARY TWIGG sworn. - I am a brush-maker; my husband is a farmer; the watch that I left at Day's I received from the prisoner Phillips, about nine o'clock in the morning of the 14th of July; I called for it again in an hour, and gave it to Mr. Gass.(John Gass, headborough of St. Luke's, produced the watch.)

JAMES GEARING sworn. - I am a constable of St. Luke's: I found Clarke in the custody of my brother-officer; Riley came in, and said, if you will tell me where the watch is, I will forgive you; I then went and apprehended Phillips.

John Rittson, the landlord of the public-house, corroborated the evidence of the former witnesses.

Clarke's defence. I don't know any thing at all about the watch.

Both NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-92

718. JOHN GOLLFRIED was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a blue cloth coat, value 2l. 2s. a waistcoat-piece, value 3s. two table cloths, value 7s. 6d. a shirt, value 5s. five waistcoats, value 1l. a pair of breeches, value 5s. a pair of shoes, value 5s. a linen handkerchief, value 1s. three neck handkerchiefs, value 3s. two shawls, value 5s. and two pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of Benjamin Lay , in his dwelling-house .

The prisoner being a foreigner, an interpreter was sworn.

BENJAMIN LAY sworn. - I am a turnpike-man at Smallbury-green ; I keep a house on the Green; On the 18th of July, in consequence of information I received from Elizabeth Taylor, I went after the prisoner, and took a bundle from his back; he then pulled out his passport, and gave into my hand; and, as well as I could make out his language, said, there were his things that he had got upon his shoulder; I took the bundle from him, containing articles mentioned in the indictment. (Produces them.)

Q. What is the value of them? - A.I here valued them at four pounds eighteen shillings; I gave two guineas and a half for the coat.

ELIZABETH LAY sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I can only prove the property; the table-cloths have my husband's name and mine upon them; I have no doubt but they are all my husband's: On the 18th of July, I went out between eight and nine in the morning, and left nobody in the house; when I came home, I found the house had been robbed; when I went out, I locked the door after me.

Q.(To Lay.) How far was the prisoner from the house when you took the property from him?- A. One hundred and fifty yards.

Q. Were there any marks of violence upon the house? - A. No, the back door was fastened by a chain, which chain was fastened by a pin dropping down; the pin had been worked out between the door-post and the door, either by his hand or a stick.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR sworn. - I live with my mother just by Mr. Lay's: On the 18th of July, I saw the prisoner go up to Mr. Lay's house, and he seemed to me as if he had a pipe in his hand; about half an hour after, I saw him come out of the house with a bundle in his hand; I then went down stairs, and told Mr. Lay, and he went after him and brought him back.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Portsmouth; I am by trade a smith; I was robbed by three men of all I had, and distress drove me to it.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-93

719. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a sheet, value 1s. a carpet, value 3s. a blanket, value 1s. a bolster, value 1s. and a pillow, value 1s. the property of Hannah Bryan .

HANNAH BRYAN sworn. - I live at No. 1, Church-street, St. Giles's : On Wednesday, the 1st of September, between four and five o'clock, I was in another room, I heard my door go, I came out, and saw the prisoner go down stairs with a bundle; I followed her, and took the things from her, (produces them;) I have no mark upon any of these things, but I know they are mine; I know the carpet by the pattern.

Prisoner's defence. I was going up St. Giles's to buy some salt beef, and this woman came and charged me with taking her things; I never saw any thing of her things; she came to me in prison yesterday, and told me she would not hurt me; she said, she was very sorry I had got a bad husband: I had no occasion to do any thing of this sort, I have a comfortable home and a good husband.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-94

720. WILLIAM BLACKGROVE and THOMAS CHILD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , four bushels of oats, value 10s. the property of John Rodbard .

JOHN RODBARD sworn. - I am a corn-merchant , Essex-Wharf, Strand : On Monday, the 14th of September, I lost four bushels of oats from my granary; the prisoner Child came in the morning for some wheat for Howard and Orton, of St. Alban's; I ordered my man to deliver it; I went in to breakfast; they were some time before they began to load the cart; I suspected all was not right; I counted the sacks into the cart, and after they had got the eight quarters of wheat in, I found another sack had been put in; I went out,

and asked Blackgrove, my foreman, how much he had got; he said eight quarters of wheat; I put my hand upon the last sack, and asked him what he had got there; he said, wheat; I felt it, and said it is not wheat; I pulled it out of the cart, untied it, and found it was a sack of oats; Child was the carter.

Q. It was Blackgrove's duty to count the sacks?- A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Blackgrove staid with you? - A. Yes.

Q. The man that put the sack in went away?- A. Yes.

Q. And you have not seen him since? - A. Yes, I took him up, but he was discharged; he was bound over as a witness here, but I have not seen him since.

Q. Blackgrove told you it was wheat? - A. Yes.

Q. But he was not the man that put it in? - A. No.

Q. The man who put it in has absconded? - A. Yes.

Q. The man who put the sack into the cart should have put only wheat there? - A. Certainly.

Q. Child was the man driving the cart? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH BRAMLEY sworn. - I live by driving the cart with Mr. Rodbard; I do not know what I am called here for; I was not present at the time.

William Fryer was called upon his recognizance.

Child's defence. I did not mean to steal the oats; I did not wish to have them without paying the full price for them.

The prisoner Child called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Blackgrove, GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped one hundred yards in Strand-lane .

Child, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-95

721. SAMUEL RICHARDSON was indicted, for that he, on the 5th of September , being employed as a servant to John Burrows , an upholsterer , did receive and take into his own possession, fifty pounds, for and on account of his said master, and did fraudulently embezzle and secrete the same .

Second Count. Charging him with stealing fifty pounds, the property of John Burrows.

JOHN BURROWS sworn. - I am an upholsterer and cabinet-maker at Kensington; the prisoner was my weekly servant, and kind of clerk , or any thing that I might happen to want: On Saturday, the 5th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I intrusted him with a fifty-pound Bank of England note, to go to London to take up a bill of twenty-eight pounds, which became due that day, made payable at Mr. Wright's, in Russel-street, Bloomsbury; he did not return on Sunday morning; I went to Mr. Wright to inquire if he had been there.

Q. Is Mr. Wright here? - A. No; I found he had been there, and had received instructions where the note lay; it lay at Mr. Hodsoll's, in the Strand: On Monday morning, as soon as the banking-house was open, I went to inquire if the bill had been taken up, and found it had not.

Q. Are they here? - A. No; from thence I went to the Bank, and put a stop upon the number of the note, thinking he might have fell into some bad bands; from there I went on board the receiving-ship at the Tower, to see if he had been impressed, but he was not there; I then thought, perhaps, he had got the note cashed at the Bank himself; I went to the Bank, and found it had come in on the Saturday; I then went to Bow-street, advertised him, and got a special warrant to apprehend him wherever I could find him; on Tuesday morning, in consequence of information, I gave the warrant to Mr. Belmaine, a constable, who took him at Gravesend.

Q. Where is you bill? - A.(Produces it.)

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever know any thing dishonest of me before? - A. I had no reason to suspect him of dishonesty; I had known him from a child; he has been in my service two years; I intrusted him commonly and frequently to take up this.

GEORGE BELMAINE sworn. - I am a whitesmith; I apprehended the prisoner at Gravesend; I took him to the City of Amsterdam, at Gravesend, and I found nothing upon him but a penny; he said all the rest he had lost at Bartholomew-Fair; I found, under where he had been sitting, a pocketbook, containing a one-pound bank-note and some other money.

JOHN JARVIS sworn. - I am a clerk in the Bank,(produces a fifty-pound note;) this note was paid at the Bank on Saturday afternoon, the 5th of September, about five o'clock; the number is 3524, dated the 8th of August, 1801, for fifty pounds. I paid it to the prisoner in fifty one-pound notes; I remember him very well; I am sure he is the man; the number of the one-pound notes that I gave him were from 9151 to 9200, both numbers included, dated the 5th of August, in the present year.

Q. Look at that note? - A. This appears to be one of them, by the number 9174.

Burrows. This is the fifty-pound note that I intrusted the prisoner with.

Prisoner's defence. I went to Mr. Wright's to take up this bill, and in going from Mr. Wright's, I met with a man that I knew, and he advised me to abscond; I unfortunately fell into bad company, and gambling with my fellow-workmen for seven

weeks, in consequence of which I got so much in debt, that it was impossible for me to pay it, and this man advised me to take the step that I did.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-96

722. MARY MARRS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , a pewter quart pot, value 1s. 3d. the property of Isaac Newton .

ISAAC NEWTON sworn. - I am a publican ; I keep the Jolly Sailor, in Back-lane, Shadwell : On Tuesday evening, the 7th of July, about half past six o'clock, the prisoner, in company with another woman, came into my house; I saw the prisoner take a quart pewter pot off the tap-room table, and wrap it up in her apron, then she sat down and called for a pint of beer, she drank the beer and paid me for it; I let her go out of doors, and then I followed and asked her what she had got; she said, nothing; I unwrapped her apron and found the quart pot; Rodgers has it; I am sure it is my pot, I saw her take it.(Edward Rodgers, the Officer, produced the pot, which was deposed to by Newton.)

Prisoner's defence. I went in for a pint of beer and asked him leave to take a pot to measure some gooseberries, and I understood that he gave me leave. GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-97

723. MARY MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , a silver watch, value 42s. three guineas, three half guineas, and six shillings , the property of Richard Boughton .(There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-98

724. NATHANIEL MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , nine pigs, value 36l. the property of Thomas Saunders .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

THOMAS WICKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Thomas Saunders, at Stanwell : On Thursday evening, between the 11th and 12th of June, I missed nine pigs out of my stye, I saw them at six o'clock in the evening and missed them before six next morning; they were worth about four pounds a piece; I found them the next day in a stable near the Elephant and Castle, at Newington.

Q. In what condition were they when you saw them over night? - A. Very clean and in good condition; when I saw them at Newington they were in a very dirty condition, and had lain very dirty in the stable; I am sure they were the same pigs; Mr. Saunders is a Quaker.

- SNOW sworn. - I am a constable of Newington, Surry: On the 12th of June, in the morning, I received information that there were some pigs in a stable near the Waggon and Horses, in the Newington road, in consequence of which I went to the stable, situate between the two roads, one leading to Newington and the other to Walworth; the stable belonging to a man of the name of Marsh; when I came to the stable, the door was locked, and a sack nailed up to make it dark; I pulled that down and went in; I made enquiry, and learnt that the man who had lodged the pigs there was at the Waggon and Horses; he had a horse and cart there also; I went to the Waggon and Horses, where the man was pointed out to me.

Q. Who did that man turn out to be? - A.John Smith, alias Henry Stiles; he had the key of the stable in his hand, and oats and beans in a handkerchief by the side of him, for the horse; I took him into custody and locked him up, I took the key from him and went to the stable, where I found the horse and nine pigs, and this pistol in the window loaded. (Produces a large horse pistol).

Q. Did you afterwards shew those same pigs to Mr. Wickins and Mr. Saunders? - A. Yes, and they claimed them; I took him to Union Hall, and he was committed; I then went to search his lodgings, and I found these two smock-frocks, in the same situation in which they are now, these two knives, and a steel.

Q. What is become of Stiles? - A. He is here, under sentence of death last sessions.

Q.Convicted of what offence? - A. For stealing that horse.

CATHERINE GOODWIN sworn. - Q. Do you you know the prisoner Miller? - A. I have seen him at my house, No. 11, Upper Webber-street, Westminster-road.

Q. What business do you follow? - A.Washing and mangling.

Q. Did you know Stiles, who was convicted here last sessions? - A. Yes; he lodged with me from Christmas till a few days before he was apprehended.

Q. Did Miller ever sleep at your house in the month of June? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he sleep there the night before Stiles was taken up? - A. He came either late at night or early on Thursday morning; he was there at breakfast time with Stiles; I went out and left them there.

Q. Had you often seen him before that time? - A. I had seen him four or five times before; I returned about three or four o'clock and they were gone.

Q. What business did Stiles follow, do you

know? - A.The business of a basket-maker; I understood the prisoner was a butcher.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I suppose Stiles had other o her acquaintance besides the prisoner?- A. Yes.

Q. And they went out with him when they called upon him perhaps? - A. Yes.

JOHN BAKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I drove the Salisbury mail coach in June last.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Miller? - A. Yes, I have known him four years.

Q. Did you know Stiles? - A. I did not: On Friday, the 12th of June, I met Miller, in Bedfont-lane, about two miles from Stanwell, it was then about half past three o'clock, there was another person with him that I did not know.

Q. Had you any conversation with Miller? - A. I said, how are you, Nat, or to that purpose.

Q. Did you take notice how he was dressed? - A. No, I did not; he looked red in the face, as if he had been walking hard.

Q. Should you know the person that was with him, if you were to see him? - A. I don't think I should, I have seen him several times.

Court. Q. Do you know what business he followed? - A. He did work as a butcher.

HENRY BOLTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the Angel and Crown, at Staines, which is about two miles from Stanwell.

Q. Do you know Miller? - A. Yes, very well.

Q. Do you know Mews? - A. Yes, I have seen him along with Miller before now.

Q. Do you remember hearing of some pigs being lost in June last? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner and him being at your house in June together? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you remember Ascot Races? - A. Yes.

Q. That is in June, is it not? - A. Yes; I remember Miller and Mews being at my house on Friday in the Races; the Races were about the 11th or 12th.

Q. Do you recollect Mews being there at that time? - A.No.

Q. But you had seen them together several times in the course of the summer at your house? - A. Yes; Miller and I went to the Races together.

Q. Had Miller a horse at your yard? - A. Yes; and it was taken out in the night unknown to me.

Court. Q. Who was of the party at the Races?- A.Miller and I went together.

Q. Was Mews at the Races? - A. Yes.

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. On Friday; he and I came from the Races between seven and eight o'clock at night.

Q. Did you see any thing of Mews that night?- A. No.

WILLIAM MEWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You have been admitted an evidence by the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q. Remember you are bound to speak the whole truth? - A. Yes: On the 11th of June Miller and I went from the Angel and Crown, at Staines, at eight o'clock at night; Miller asked me to go with him to Stanwell, but would not satisfy me what he was going for, till we met Stiles, and then Miller told me they were going to Saunders's, to take the pigs away, and I refused going, but Stiles presented a pistol at me, and said, if I refused going, he would blow my brains out; we all three of us went and broke down the pales, took the pigs, drove them very sharp to Hounslow Heath, and put them into a cart.

Q.Whose cart was it? - A. I don't know, Stiles brought it; the horse was a kind of a brownish colour.

Q. Have you seen the horse and cart since? - A. No; Miller and I parted with Stiles, and he went towards London, and we went towards Staines.

Q. Do you know Baker, the mail-coachman? - A. Yes; we met him the next morning, Friday, the 12th, between three and four o'clock, in Bedfont-lane.

Q. Did Baker speak to you? - A. He nodded his head, and said, how do you do, or something to that effect.

Q. You were afterwards taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. You drove these pigs pretty sharp? - A. Yes, and put them into the cart, as they knocked up one after another.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You would not have done this, if you had not been forced to do it?- A. No.

Q. And that you swear solemnly? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they hold the pistol at your head all the way you went? - A. No.

Q. Why did not you run away? - A. I was afraid they would fire after me.

Q. And, as you had been obliged to be concerned in this wicked transaction, of course you gave information to the Magistrate the next morning? - A. No, I did not.

Q. When did you give information of it? - A. When I was taken up.

Q. Have you been a witness here against a man for stealing a horse? - A. No, I have not.

Q. Did not you come here to be a witness against Stiles, for stealing a horse? - A. No, I was here in readiness.

Q. Then this is the first time you have been exhibited as a witness? - A. I was here to give evidence, if it had been required.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Grimshaw, or some such name? - A. No.

Q. Did you not say to him, you knew the prisoner was innocent, but you did not care for that,

you would swear any thing to save yourself? - A. No, I never did.

Q. Upon your oath, have you not said that you did not care what you swore against this man, if you could save yourself? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. (To Snow). Q. What was the colour of the horse that you found in the stable? - A. A brown mare.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all of what I am charged with.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN GRIMSHAW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q.What way of life are you in? - A. A shoemaker by trade.

Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 11, Webber-street, St. George's Fields.

Q. Do you know Mr. Mews, the witness here?- A. Yes.

Q. Have you had any conversation with him about this pig business? - A. No more than at the time of Stiles's trial.

Q. Where did you see him then? - A. In the bail-dock.

Q. What did he say? - A. I said it was a very bad job; he said, it was; he said he did not mean to know any thing about Stiles, but he was in trouble himself, and did not care what he said if he could get himself out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You lodged at No. 11, Webber-street? - A. Yes.

Q. The same house in which Stiles lodged? - A. Yes.

Q. You mean the man that was capitally convicted? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Miller before? - A. I have seen him there, I believe, once or twice; I saw him there the day before Stiles was taken.

Q. Did you see them at the time they went out of the house? - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 20

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-99

725. THOMAS GREENAWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , a sack, value 3s. 6d. and four bushels of oats, value 14s. the property of James Aslett .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS TURTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a barge-man; I work for Mr. James Aslett, of Isleworth: On the 6th of August I was at work unloading a tug that was loaded with oats, the prisoner was at work with me; I slept on board that night with my brother, a little boy, about eight years old; my brother waked me between ten and eleven o'clock; I got up, and saw a man taking a sack from off the wharf; I went up to that man, and asked him who he was; he made no reply, but knocked me down, and ran away; then I saw another man and he ran away, then I saw a third man, about as far from the oats as I am from you, I pursued him and asked him who he was; I knew him, it was Thomas Greenaway , the prisoner; he shuffled away from me and went through the water.

Q. How close were you to him, had you hold of him? - A. No, I touched him, and that was all; I am sure it was him, I saw him very clearly; he went across the water and up a little alley that goes the back way to his house, the water was about knee high; I then went and alarmed my master; I went to the prisoner's house and he was not at home; he was taken about half an hour after in Church-row, about a quarter of a mile off; my master asked him where he came from; he said he came from Brentford; my master asked him if he saw any body run by him; he said yes, two men, but he did not know who they were, he said he was looking after his son; upon that my master felt his legs and found him wet pretty near up to his knees; my master asked him how he came so wet, and he said getting out of the lug in the afternoon; he said she had a great deal of water in her.

Q. Was that true? - A. No; there was not more than an inch of water in the lug; the corn was in it at that time.

Court. Q.Was it light enough for you to know him? - A. Yes; I am sure he is the man.

Q. Where does this alley lead to? - A. Up to his house, and it leads into the town.

Q. What became of the oats? - A. They were dropped under the wharf.

Q. They were not taken out of the lug? - A. No; my master locked up the oats; they are in Court.

PHILLIS THOMAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live two doors from the prisoner; I saw him go into his own house between ten and eleven o'clock at night of the 6th of August, he came out again, in five minutes at the outside, and in about ten minutes after Turton and Mr. Aslett came to look for him.

JAMES ASLETT, Jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. This is the sack of oats that was upon the wharf the night before; it is my father's property, it had been removed about two yards.

Court. (To Turton). What was the man doing with the sack? - A. He had got it upon his back going to carry it away.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the job; I was not the man that did the piece of business; I do not deny but I was by there looking after my son, but I know nothing of this business.

Court. (To Aslett.) Q. How long had he been in your service? - A. We employed him by the day, as we wanted him, we only had him occasionally.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-100

726. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , a cloth cloak, value 3s. the property of Thomas Abbot .

There being no evidence of the property having been in the possession of the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-101

727. OWEN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , four glass bottles filled with white wine, value 7s. the property of Robert Kent .

The prosecutor was called upon his recognizance, but did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-102

728. OWEN FOY and SARAH EDWARDS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , a silver watch, value 3l. the property of Richard Jones .

RICHARD JONES sworn. - I am a sawyer , in John-street, Tottenham-court-road: On the 23d of August, I was coming home from a bean feast at Chapman's Tea-gardens, and as I was going up St. Martin's-lane, between four and five in the morning, two girls asked me to give them something to drink; I told them I could not get any thing, I had been very much intoxicated the night before, and had been at Chapman's Tea-gardens; I was very thirsty; the girls said they would take me where we could get something, and they took me to a house where we had some ale; I went into the yard to make water, and the prisoner Edwards followed me and slipped my watch out of my pocket and ran away through the tap-room; I went after her and caught her; then the man prisoner came up; I never saw him before; I told him that woman had got my watch, and I asked him to shew me the watch-house, and he said he would; he said, young man, have you got any money; I said I have got a shilling and three halfpence; he said give me a shilling, and I will get your watch; I gave him the shilling, and then he shoved the woman away from me, and she got away.

Q. The man was not there when the watch was stolen? - A. No.

Q.Are you sure she is the woman? - A. I am very sure of it.

Court. Q. What time did you dine? - A. About four o'clock.

Q. And then you got drunk? - A. Not very drunk.

Q.Are you sure you had not lost your watch before you came to this house? - A. Yes.

JOHN MARSDEN, sworn. - I apprehended Edwards, and found Foy in the same room.

Edwards's defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge. Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-103

729. MINDRED ROSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , two aprons, value 1s. a child's frock, value 6d. and a child's petticoat, value 6d. the property of James Blackwell .

JAMES BLACKWELL sworn. - On the 5th of this month the prisoner came to my house and asked if two corporals lived there; I gave her for answer, no, there were not; she then went into the next house to enquire, and about five minutes after, my wife missed the things out of the parlour; I learned that she lived three doors from me; I went there to look for her, she was not in her room; I came down stairs, and as I was coming down I saw her conceal the property in question behind the water-tub; I then suffered her to pass me and go up stairs; I went into the yard and saw the property; I then went up stairs to her and asked her what things she had taken from my house; she said she had not taken any thing; I then said, what did you conceal behind the water tub; and then she begged I would not hurt her.

Prisoner's defence. I found them by the watertub, and I put them there again.

GUILTY , aged 21. - Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-104

730. THOMAS GLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , two chaisecushions, value 18s. the property of Tho Coleman.

THOMAS COLEMAN sworn. - I keep a chandler shop in Westmoreland-street, Marybone; I hired a one-horse chaise for some people to go out in that were at my house; between five and six o'clock in the morning the chaise was brought to the door without the horse; it rained; the man told me I might have the horse; it rained; the man told me I might have the horse when I chose; I went into the street and looked at the chaise, and saw there were two cushions in it of a drab colour, trimmed with broad and narrow worsted lace of different colours; a little after six I went to look at the chaise and the cushions were gone.

WILLIAM OKEY sworn. - On the 6th of July I saw the prisoner standing with two cushions at the door of an old iron shop; some person let him in; I stood till I saw him come out again without the cushions; they were of a drab colour, the lace was broad and narrow of different colours.

WILLIAM-WALTER WALLIS sworn. - On Monday morning, the 6th of July, I saw the prisoner start with two cushions under his arm; knowing the prisoner by sight, I said to him, what is the matter with you, for he was in a stooping posture; he said I have got a bad pain in my back this morning; and while I spoke, Smith, who keeps an iron shop, opened the door to him; they were of a drab colour; the prisoner was taken before seven o'clock; but they were gone from Smith's.

THOMAS CHRISTIE sworn. - I am a painter and glazier; On the 6th of July I went in search of the prisoner, and happened to meet with him at the constable's door; I said, that is the man, and the constable laid hold of him immediately, and took him to the Three Compasses, and there he told me that he had taken the cushions out of the chaise, and sold them to Smith.

Q. What time might this be? - A.As near eight o'clock as possible.

Q. Had you made him any promises? - A. No.

Q.Nor threats? - A. No.

- PRIDDEY sworn. - I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner; he acknowledged that he had stole these cushions, and sold them to Smith.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all of the cushions. GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-105

731. ANN RANDALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , twenty-five yards of Irish linen, value 5l. the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

There being no evidence to shew that the property had been stolen, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-106

732. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , twenty-seven pounds weight of beef, value 10s. the property of John Sylvester .

JOHN SYLVESTER sworn. - I am a butcher , in Goswell-street ; I was not at home when the beef was stolen.

THOMAS WILLSDEN sworn. - I am a turner: On Tuesday, the 28th of July, between four and five o'clock, at the top of Wilderness-row, I met the prisoner with something in his apron; turning my head round, I saw it was a piece of beef; I went to the butcher's shop, and missed a piece of beef which I had seen there before; I immediately went after him, and asked him what he was going to do with that beef; he said, a man had given him six-pence to carry it into Wilderness-row; I brought him back to the shop; the beef was delivered to Littlewell.

JOHN LITTLEWELL sworn. - I am a butcher; I was killing some sheep at Mr. Sylvester's brother's shop; I heard that Mr. Sylvester's shop had been robbed; I ran up to the shop, and found him in custody; I weighed the beef, and it weighed twenty-seven pounds.

Sylvester. I was not at home at the time it was taken; I saw the beef the next morning; I am sure it is my property; I had no other ribs of beef.

Q.(To Willsten). Are you fine the piece of beef you took from the prisoner was the same that you shewed Sylvester? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to look for work, and a man in a smock-frock asked me to carry this beef into Wilderness-row, and he would give me sixpence. GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-107

733. MARTHA HARBOUR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September a metal watch, value 15s. the property of Edward King .

- EDWARD KING sworn. - I am a hair-dresser , in Holles-street, Clare-market; I had been with a friend into Drury-lane, and coming home through Clare-court , I stopped for a moment, and my watch fell from my fob upon the ground; the prisoner immediately snatched it up, and gave it to another woman, who ran off immediately; I seized the prisoner, and held her fast.

- PHILLIPS sworn. - I was standing at my own door to get in; I saw a woman run past as fast as she could run, with something huddled up in her hand.

Prisoner's defence. He was talking to another woman, before he spoke to me.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-108

734. JANE JUDD, alias CANNON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , an apron, value 2s. a napkin, value 2s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of Peter Dolan .

ANN DOLAN sworn. - I am the wife of Peter Dolan ; my husband works upon the water : On the 28th of August I came home about half past nine o'clock in the evening, and found the pannel of my door broke in; I lodged at No. 1, Francis-street, Whitechapel , in the front room, one pair; the pawnbroker has got the property; the prisoner lodged in the back room upon the same floor.

- PROBYN sworn. - I keep the house; the prisoner appeared to be in liquor, and asked me to make her some tea; I told her she had better lay down, and presently I heard a noise; I came out, and asked her if she was gone to lay down, and then I saw the door broke; I said, good God, Jenny, how came Mrs. Delan's door broke, and she said she did not know; she went out just after that.

JOHN LAWBEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(produces the property); I took them in of the prisoner the 28th of August, between nine and ten o'clock at night. The property was deposed to by Mrs. Dolan).

BENJAMIN CONSTABLE sworn. - I was constable of the night; the prisoner was brought to me, and I searched her, and found the duplicate of these things upon her.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating,

that it was a house of ill same; that herself and the prosecutrix lived in a state of prostitution, and used each other's apparel; that the prosecutrix had been to her several times, and offered to take nine shillings, and give up the prosecution.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-109

735. MARY SOWINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , a gown, value 4s. and a pair of stockings, value 1s. the property of William Coley .

MARGARET COLEY sworn. - I am the wife of William Coley , serjeant in the third regiment of foot guards ; the prisoner was taken in by my landlady out of charity, and I gave her a breakfast; afterwards I was going to enquire what was the price of the coach to Chelmsford; I went to put on another gown, and missed it; my chairwoman said immediately, every body should strip, and she began and stripped herself to her shift, and then the prisoner began to strip, and she pulled off her stays, and threw them upon the ground, and the chairwoman saw her doing something with her hand behind her, and she pulled her hand back, and there was the tail of the gown hanging out of her pocket.

CATHARINE GOMASTY sworn. - I was chairing for Mrs. Coley, when the gown was missing; I stripped myself, and then the prisoner stripped; I saw the tail of the gown hanging out of her pocket, and I said, what have you got here; she pulled it out, and said, there is your gown, what would you have more; she had also a pair of pockets.( Thomas Hatch , the constable, produced the property, which was deposed to by Mrs. Coley).

Prisoner's defence. She desired me to pawn them for her, and not let her landlady know it.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-110

736. WILLIAM MORGAN, alias JOHN DAVIS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , a cloth coat, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Innis .

JOHN INNIS sworn. - I am a labouring man , I work in the roads close to Bow-bridge: Last Friday was a week, on this side of Bow-bridge , I put my coat by the side of the road; I kept on work, till by and by I missed my coat; I went down the road, and got information of the man, in consequence of which I pursued the prisoner; I came up to him, told him I had lost my coat, and I believed he had got it there; I kept close after him, till I met two people that made him open him bundle, and there was my coat; now, gentlemen, says I, if it is my coat, there are four penny-worth of halfpence in the left-hand pocket, and a penknife, and there it was.

Prisoner. As soon as he asked for the coat, I gave it to him.

Q. Was the prisoner sober? - A. Yes, very sober, and tried very much to get away from me.

JOSEPH HUFF sworn. - Last Friday was a week the last witness asked me if I had seen a man with a coat; I told him I had seen a man tie up something blue in a handkerchief; I shewed him the prisoner, and he went after him.

THOMAS PRIDMORE sworn. - I am an officer,(produces the coat); I found four penny-worth of halfpence and a knife in the pocket as he had described.(The coat was deposed to by Innis).

Prisoner's defence. I found the coat in the road, I did not see any body near it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-111

737. HENRY LAZARUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , four handkerchiefs, value 13s. and a napkin, value 2s. the property of James Coe and James Brown , privately in their shop .

JAMES COE sworn. - I am a linen draper ; in August last I was in partnership with James Brown , No. 419, Oxford-street ; I was from home at the time the property was taken.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had Mr. Brown, in August last, an interest in the profits and loss of the business? - A. No.

Q. Did you enter into articles of partnership? - A. Yes.

Q. Are those articles cancelled? - A. No.

WILLIAM COE sworn. - I am shopman to my brother: On the 20th of August, about eleven o'clock at noon, I had occasion to go out of the shop into the back room; while I was there, I heard a foct come into the shop; I immediately went, and the prisoner seemed very much confused, as if he had put something in his pocket, but that I did not see; he immediately asked me if we sold ferret; I told him we did not; he then went out of the shop, and I missed the four handkerchiefs off the counter; I immediately went after him, tapped him on the shoulder, and said, young fellow, I think you have got something; he said, no, he had not, he should go back with me, and I should search him; he came back with me then, and wanted me to search him, but I refused; he then pulled a cotton towel out of his pocket, and threw it down by the side of a horse that we hang things on; a lad in the street hearing me say something, followed him back to the door, and stood at the door; he pointed out to me the cotton towel, to

shew me what he had thrown away, upon which I turned round, and picked it up; while I was doing that, the four handkerchiefs that I had missed were placed upon the counter: then I sent for an officer, and he was taken before the Magistrate; I am sure they were all my brother's property, they laid upon the counter when he came in.

Q. When you went out of the shop, did you leave any body in it? - A. No, I did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you say that the handkerchiefs were put upon the counter, was the prisoner near enough to reach them with his hand? - A. No, he was not.

ROBERT SANDERSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Jackson; as I was coming down Oxford-street, I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, and a young man after him; the young man laid of his coat, looked under it, and said something; he then took him back, and when he got back to the shop, I saw the prisoner put his hand to his coat pocket, pull out a towel, and throw it on the ground; I then beckoned the young man, and pointed to the towel.

WILLIAM PICKERING sworn. - I am a gaoler, at Bow-street, attending the different county gaols; I heard that a man was stopped in Oxford-road; I went to the shop, and had this property delivered into my hand, (produces it).

Cole. These are my handkerchiefs and napkin.

Prisoner's defence. What I am here for, I am as innocent as the child unborn.

Mr. Alley. Q. Will you undertake to swear that this is the property of Mr. Brown, as well as yourself? - A. He is entitled to pay the debts up to this time.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY,

Of stealing goods, value 4s. 9d.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-112

738. JAMES RAVEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , two hats, value 4s. the property of William Borrodaile ; Richardson Borrodaile , and John Atkinson .

NICHOLAS CROW sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. William Borrodaile , Richardson Borrodaile , and John Atkinson , in Fenchurch-street: On the 20th of July, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner mending the bottom of a box; he stooped down under a stool, and began to rummage among some papers; I was looking at him, and by the motion of his body, I thought I saw him put something into the box; I suspected he had taken something, and I watched him; when he was going away, I said, Raven, will you have some beer; he said, yes, go into the Red Lion, call for a pot, and I will come to you in a minute or two; I said, I will wait, I can go along with you; he said I am only going to the Ship to leave this; I said I will go with you; then we went on till we came into Lime-street; going along, I said, Raven, have you got a hat there; he said yes, I am only going to leave it for a gentleman, and I will go along with you; I said you must excuse me, for I must see that hat, I must see what sort of a one it is; he then broke the string that was round the box, and instantly pulled out these two hats; I said, are you not a pretty fellow for doing such tricks as these, and I instantly took him back to the warehouse; but neither of the firm being in town, nor the foreman in the way, I took him to the Compter.

Q. How do you know they were Mr. Borrodaile's hats? - A. By seeing him take them off the premises; they have no mark on them that I know them by.

Q. What did he say? - A. He said, you can take the hats back and let me go: I am a constable myself and I took him into custody.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was finisher at Mr. Borrodaile's house, that some time ago there were some old hat-boxes put aside to be burnt, that he put one of them aside to take home for his children's playthings, and that on the night he was taken he put two books into a box, not knowing there was any thing else in it; that he had a wife and two children, and she was eight months gone in pregnancy.

Q.(To Crow). Were there any books in the box? - A. No book at all.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. You recollect you are on your oath as an honest man sworn to speak the truth? - A. Yes; there was no book at all in the box, nothing but the two hats.

Prisoner. I told him I would not take the books that night, and I left them behind me.

The prisoner called one witness, who had known him for eight years, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined six months in Newgate , whipped in the jail , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-113

739. JOSEPH CROSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , a saw, value 6s. the property of James Pearce .

JAMES PEARCE sworn. - I am a carpenter , No. 3, Crown-court, Garlick-hill: I lost my saw from Mr. Black's shop, in Bow-lane , where I work; on the 16th of September, about a quarter after seven in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of the shop; I never knew him before; I asked him who he wanted; he seemed confused, and that gave me a supicion; I cried stop thief, and then he ran; I pursued him to the corner of Bow-church, and there caught him; I took him into a public-

house, and the landlord came to my assistance; I went and got a peace-officer; I saw him throw the saw between the shop and the corner of the church; I saw a little girl pick it up, and she brought it into the public-house directly; I knew the saw the moment he dropped it, there is one of the screws in the handle broke out, and I had used it; my name is stumped upon both sides of the handle; I have had it about a twelvemonth; I delivered it to the constable.

THOMAS RUTHERFORD sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the saw); I received it at the sign of the Bell, from Pearce.(The saw was identified by Pearce).

Prisoner's defence. As the gentleman swears so hard, I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

One witness was called, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-114

740. CATHERINE WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July a pewter pint pot, value 1s. the property of George Probert .

GEORGE PROBERT sworn. - I keep the Swan, in Leadenhall-street : On the 20th of July the prisoner came into my house between twelve and one o'clock; I had reason to suspect she had taken a pint pot, I followed her; I told her I wanted to speak to her; I then saw my pot in her hand under her cloak, I took it from her, sent for a constable, and gave charge of her.(Charles Buckley, a constable, produced the pol, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge; I never took a pot from him or any body else in my life. GUILTY , aged 42.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-115

741. ELEANOR GOFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a tin box, value 1s a handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. and three shillings in money , the property of William Stallard .

WILLIAM STALLARD sworn. - I am a painter and glazier in Cloth Fair: On Sunday, the 12th of Judy, I was coming home about twelve o'clock at night.

Q.Tell us honestly whether you were drunk or sober? - A. I was as sober as I am now.

Q. Had not you been into company? - A. Yes; but I had had but one pint of porter; I was coming down Long-lane , I met the prisoner and another woman; they asked me to go with them; I told them I could not, I was going home; one of them got before me and put her hands about my body; a gentleman going past said, don't go with that woman, if you do you will be robbed.

Q. Was that in the hearing of the woman? - A. Yes; I put my hand into my waistcoat pocket, and said to the gentleman I am robbed; he said, then the has got your money; he held her hand, I pushed my thumb into her hand and felt my money; I cannot say how much it was; I lost three shillings, and I believe that was the quantity of money in her hand, but it was night, and I could not see it; she made a noise, and then I loosed her and gave charge to the watch; I went to the watch-house and saw her searched, and my discharge-box was found upon her; I had been a soldier; there was a pocket-handkerchief taken from her with my name on it; the constable has the property.

SAMUEL CHALLONER sworn. - I am a constable belonging to St. Sepulchre's, (produces three shillings in silver, a tin box, and a pocket-handkerchief); the money and the tin box I found in her right hand pocket, the pocket handkerchief I received from the patrole.

JOHN POWELL sworn. - I am a patrole of St. Sepulchre's; I saw the property taken from the prisoner; I took the handkerchief from her bosom myself; I delivered it to the constable.(Stallard identified the handkerchief and tin box containing his discharge).

Prisoner's defence. The money is my own; he went with me under a gateway, and said if I would grant him that favour he would give me his handkerchief and tin box, and he would redeem it the next day; accordingly I granted him that favour, and then he wanted his things back again, and I would not let him have them without the money; he was to give me half-a-crown.

Q.(To Stallard). You have heard her story, is it true or false? - A.It is all false.

Q. You had not agreed to give her half-a-crown? - A. No. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-116

742. FRANCES CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , a pocketbook, value 8d. and a pocket-handkerchief, value 4d. the property of Joseph Horton .

JOSEPH HORTON sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Charles Horton, an attorney , in Chancery-lane: On Friday, the 24th of July, about half past three o'clock in the morning, I was going along Fleet-market.

Q. Had you been in company? - A. No, I had not; I had got up very early that morning; I was going along Fleet-market till I came to Eagle and Child-alley; I was met by the prisoner; she accosted me, and drew me up Eagle and Child-alley by one arm; after we had got four or five yards up the alley the watchman was coming his round;

during the time the watchman was coming up to us she was rumbling about my coat pockets with her hands; when the watchman came up she gave me a shove, and said here is the watchman; after so saying she ran off; I put my hands to my pocket and found that she had taken my pocket-handkerchief and my pocket-book; on finding that she had got my pocket-book I desired the watchman to follow me; I pursued her, and she was taken by the watchman and me in Shoe-lane; I did not lose sight of her at all; the watchman came up, and took the things from her, which she had in her hand.

Q. You had been in bed all night? - A. Yes.(Samuel Hutchins, the watchman, corroborated the testimony, of the prosecutor.)(John Mathews, the constable of the night, produced the property, which was deposed to by Mr. Horton.)

Prisoner's defence. I met the prosecutor, and he wanted to go home with me; I told him I had no place of residence; he said, could I not go up a court with him, which I agreed to, and he gave me three half-pence; I told him that would not get me a glass of liquor; he said, if I would oblige him, he would give me his handkerchief and his pocket-book; and, after I had obliged him, he charged me with stealing them.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-117

743. WILLIAM FICKENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , five pounds of coffee, value 10s. the property of Richard Pugh and William Pugh .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of James Harris .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

EDWARD JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am an Excise-locker; Richard and William Pugh are the proprietors of the warehouse where this coffee was deposited, on Dowgate-hill : On Tuesday, the 28th of July, the prisoner was employed there as a labourer ; I rubbed him down, and found something bulky under his apron, in his breeches; I detained him, and he then took a canvas bag, containing coffee, from under his apron, which he delivered to Charles Smith ; all the coffee in that warehouse is kept under the lock of the Excise.( Charles Smith , a servant to Messrs. Pugh, corroborated the evidence of Jones.)(John Wainewright, the officer, produced the coffee.)

JAMES HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am surveyor of the warehouses of Messrs. Pugh; this is the same kind of coffee that was deposited there.

Prisoner's defence. I found the bag of coffee in an empty hogshead in a passage in Thames-street.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one month in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-118

744. JOHN HOLLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , three pounds of coffee, value 6s. the property of the same persons stated in the last indictment.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

CHARLES SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am warehouseman to Messrs. Richard and William Pugh: On the 28th of July the prisoner was employed there; Mr. Jones rubbed him down at the bottom of the stairs; and, in consequence of suspicion, took him up stairs, and there he unbuttoned his breeches knees, and the coffee ran out upon the ground; it was loose; there were about three pounds of it.

Prisoner's defence. I did not take it from the warehouse, I found it in a little passage.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined one month in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-119

745. CORNELIUS ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , twelve pounds of lead, value 2s. belonging to Hannanel Mendez Da Costa .

HANNANEL MENDEZ DA COSTA sworn. - I lost some lead from my house, No. 2, Bury-street, St. Mary-Axe ; I live in the City-road; I left my house in Bury-street merely while it was repaired; upon information I went to the house, and missed some pipe.

BRYANT ANNESLEY sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Chapman, a carpenter, who was employed to repair the house: On Saturday the 1st of August, I went to look over the premises, and heard a noise in the cellar; I found the place where they shoot the coals down in the passage open; I looked down and saw some wet, which was not there the day before; upon looking further, I found the pipe was broke; I went down stairs, but could find no person there; I called down the prisoner's master, but we could not find the prisoner till eight o'clock, and then I found him concealed in a closet, lying down in the bottom of the closet; I kicked him, but he did not stir, till I threatened to throw bricks at him if he did not come out; he then got upon his legs, and I took him by the collar, and brought him out; he had the lead in the closet with him;

the closet is not more than two yards from where the lead was taken from; I fitted the lead, and it corresponded exactly; it was fixed to the dwelling-house.

Prisoner's defence. I did not cut the lead.

Annesley. It was broke off so that he could not stop the water; when I found him he was all over wet from head to foot. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-120

746. EDWARD GITTONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , three pounds of coffee, value 6s. the property of Richard Pugh and William Pugh .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of James Harris .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

EDWARD JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am an Excise-locker: On the 28th of July, I was stationed at Richard and William Pugh's warehouses, Dowgate-hill , in which were deposited raw coffee and cocoa.

Q. The coffee and cocoa kept there is the property of a great many different person? - A. Yes, different merchants; the prisoner was going away to dinner when I rubbed him down; he was upon the last stair, and I was upon the landing-place leading to the street; I felt something behind the knees of his breeches; I detained him, searched him, and found upon him a handkerchief containing coffee; it was concealed under his apron; I then took him into the warehouse, he unbuttoned his breeches knees, and a quantity of loose coffee ran out; there were about three pounds and a half of it.

CHARLES SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Messrs. Richard and William Pugh ; the prisoner was employed in their coffee-warehouses on the 28th of July; I employed him myself; Messrs. Pughs are answerable for any deficiency; I was present when the prisoner was rubbed down; I saw the coffee taken from him; we took him into the new warehouse, and there he unbuttoned his breeches knees, and a quantity of loose coffee ran upon the ground; I then sent for a constable, and gave charge of him.(John Wainewright, the constable, produced the property.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called his serjeant, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Confined one month in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-121

747. EDWARD STONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , three pounds of coffee, value 6s. the property of the persons stated in the last indictment.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

CHARLES SMITH sworn. - I am servant to William and Richard Pugh , who keep warehouses, at Dowgate-hill , for the reception of coffee; the prisoner was a labourer there on the 28th of July; I was present when Jones rubbed him down; we found upon him a bag containing three pounds of coffee; I charged him with having taken it out of his breeches; he said he did not take it from his breeches, for I did not see him take it; I said you have no other place to take it from.

Q. Was it concealed? - A. Yes, it was; I then took him up to No. 3, in the new warehouse, and found some loose coffee in his breeches; there was, I suppose, about three pounds and a half, or near four pounds, exclusive of the bag.

Q. I believe Messrs. Pughs are responsible for the coffee in that warehouse? - A. They are.(John Wainewright, the constable, produced the coffee.) GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined one month in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-122

748. THOMAS RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , a gallon of brandy, value 10s. twenty glass phials, value 10s. and a wooden box, value 6d. the property of our Lord the King .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of Joseph Chipperfield .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of John Chatfield and William Chatfield .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

JOHN HEARN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am an assistant employed in the Excise warehouse, at Porter's Quay , for receiving condemned goods: On the 27th of July last, Mr. Keylock left the warehouse for a few minutes; the door was chained within side when he and I were together; he went out, and the door was pulled to, only I did not follow him to fasten the door, as I expected him back every minute; after he was gone, I heard the door go all of a sudden against a cask; it was a noise I was not accustomed to hear; I turned round, and saw a man dressed in soldier's clothes go out of the warehouse with a box under his arm; I went after him, and he dropped the box, which split the bottom right in half; the box contained twenty samples of brandy, marked C in a diamond; they were in half-pint phials.

Q. What had the prisoner to do in the ware

house? - A. He had no sort of business there.

Q. Where was the box taken from? - A. From a bench about a yard and a half, or two yards, from the door.

Q. Do you know to whom it belonged? - A. Yes, Messrs. John and William Chatfield .

Mr. Knapp. Q.Was not the prisoner very drunk at the time? - A. He was.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor.

The prisoner called Mr. William Crowther, a goldsmith, in Bunhill-row, who had known him nine years, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one month in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-123

749. ROBERT M'CARTNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , three pounds of coffee, value 6s. the property of Samuel Teffies , the elder, Aaron Brandon , Moses Brandon , Isaac Brandon , and Samuel Teffies , the younger.

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of James Harris .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN ISHERWOOD sworn. - I am an Exciselocker: On the 27th of July, at nine in the morning, I was at the warehouse of Messrs. Brandons, in which are kept coffee and cocoa; the prisoner was at work there as a labourer ; when he came out of the warehouse I rubbed him down, as he was going to breakfast; I found a quantity of raw coffee concealed in a bag in his hat; there were three pounds and a half of it; I delivered it to the Customhouse-locker. (The coffee produced.)(Mr. Isaac Brandon proved the firm as stated in the indictment.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined one month in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-124

750. JOHN BLYTHE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , three pints of foreign wine, value 3s. and a pint of rum, value 6d. the property of the Commissioners of Excise .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JAMES- MATTHEW COKE sworn. - I am an inspector of the Excise watch: On the 19th of August, I was upon Cox's Quay , between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; the prisoner was there stationed as an Excise-watchman ; I found him upon his stand, and as soon as we came near him, he shunned us; we thought he had something about him that was improper, and we stopped him, and searched him; and, in his left-hand waistcoat-pocket, I found a gimlet; in his right-hand coat-pocket, I found a bladder, containing a pint of rum; in his left-hand coat-pocket, Mr. Robertson, who was in company with me, drew out a quart bottle of claret wine; I examined the casks of rum, and in one of them I found the spile open; it was leaking. I asked him if he took the rum from that cask, and he said he did; upon that Mr. Warriner came up, and upon the cask found a blue great-coat, which he took up, and the prisoner owned it; and, in my presence, Mr. Warriner took out a bladder, containing a pint of claret wine, which the prisoner told us he got from some casks that were in the charge of another watchman.

Court. Q. Did you make him any promise of favour? - A.None at all.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Do you know the names of the Commissioners of Excise? - A. Yes; (repeats them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Before he said where he got it, was there no conversation about another man? - A. Yes, that was Francis Lock .

Q. Did not somebody then say, if he did not tell where he was, d-n him they would do for him? - A. No, nothing of the kind.

Q. There were several of you - were there not?- A. There were three of us.

Q. And neither of you said any thing of the sort? - A. Neither.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-125

751. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for that he, on the 10th of August , being employed in the capacity of a servant to one Sarah Ball , did receive of and from Walter Smith , five shillings and seven-pence, then due and owing from the said Walter to the said Sarah, and afterwards feloniously did secrete and embezzle the same .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing five shillings and seven-pence, the property of the said Sarah.

It appearing in evidence that the prisoner was employed by the foreman of the prosecutrix, who deposed that she would not have hired him, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-126

752. JOHN M'GREGOR was indicted or that he, on the 18th of July , being clerk to George Shum , William Curtis , Costin Rhode , Major

Rhode , Edward-Gale Boldero , Hugh Hammersley , Abraham Brasbridge , Walter Brasbridge , George Godwin , John Hawes , John Brickwood , William Walker , John-Scott Whiting , and George Griffin Stonestreet , and employed by them in the capacity of such clerk, did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession the sum of 300l. for and on account of his said masters, and afterwards did fraudulently embezzle and secrete the said sum of 300l.

Second Count. For stealing 300l. the property of the same persons.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Gurney, and the case by Mr. Serjeant Best.)

EDWARD-GALE BOLDERO, Esq. sworn. -Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Are you one of the trustees of the Pelican Life Insurance Office ? - A. I am.

Q. Be so good as name your brother trustees? - A.(Repeats them).

Q. Are you fourteen gentlemen the managers of the funds of the Society? - A. We are.

Q. I believe you take it by turns to audit the payment of renewal premiums? - A. Not the fourteen, we are divided into committees for different purposes.

Q. Was it your turn to audit from the 10th to the 11th of July? - A. I did that week audit the payments; we do not take it in regular turns.

Q.Previous to this 10th of July, was the prisoner at the bar in the service of you gentlemen trustees?- A. Yes.

Q. In what capacity? - A. As accomptant.

Q.Was he a clerk? - A.Certainly; and had been so about two years, more or less, I am not certain.

Q.Was it the duty of the prisoner at the bar to receive the payments of renewal premiums for the Society? - A. It was his department.

Q. And endowment premiums also? - A. And endowment premiums generally.

Q. Be so good as look at the prisoner's account from the 10th to the 17th of July, and tell us if you know any thing of having audited that account? - A. I certainly do, for I put my name to it, and all the entries are in the prisoner's own hand-writing.(The account from the 10th to the 16th inclusive read).

Receipts by the prisoner of renewal premiums, amounting to 602l. 10s. 11d. and endowment premiums 23l. making in the whole, for the London renewals, 625l. 10s. 11d.

On the other side, July 14th:

By Robarts and Company - £.381 15 7 15th, by ditto - - 140 17 4 17th, by ditto - 102 18 0 Making, in the whole, 625 10 11

Q. Are Robarts, Curtis, and Company, the bankers of the Society? - A. They are.

Q.Before you examined and passed the accounts of the prisoner, was it your practice to examine the items contained in the banker's book? - A. It was.

Q. Did you do it in this case? - A. I am fully persuaded I did, before I put my name to the account.

Q. Did you ever, upon any occasion, sign such account, as audited by you, without finding the items agree? - A. Never, to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Court. Q. What is the name of that book? - A. This book we call the London renewal book.(The banker's book produced).

Q. Was that the book produced by the prisoner before you audited and passed this account on the 17th of July? - A. Yes, it was.

Q.Do the items in that book, as they stand now, correspond with the items in the other account? - A. They do not; it certainly is not in the same state, because I passed the full sum of 381l. 15s. 7d.

Q. At the time when you passed his account, was there any erasure before the 81? - A. I am confident there could not have been.

Q. Is there any erasure now? - A. There certainly apears to be one very strongly.

Q. Was it customary for the prisoner, at the time he passed his account, to produce a slip of paper, containing items which were severally ticked by you, item by item? - A. Yes.

Q.When was the prisoner dismissed from his employment? - A. I cannot tell; I do not think I was in town at the time.

Q.Was it after the 17th of July? - A.Undoubtedly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You have told us that book was produced by the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it not, and is it not frequently produced by Mr. Bowers, one of your clerks? - A. Mr. Bowers may have had it.

Q. There is no entry in that banker's book in the hand-writing of the prisoner? - A.Certainly not.

Q. That book is permitted to be in the hands of Mr. Bowers, and every Trustee? - A. It certainly is not locked up, but I do not know of its being in any body's hands, except the messenger's.

Q. All the Trustees have access to it? - A. That department is confined to four gentlemen, the two Mr. Rhodes, Mr. Godwin, and myself.

Q. But it is not locked up? - A. No.

Q. It is like any other voucher produced at the time, and not confined to his custody at all? - A. Not at all.

Q. I believe you have frequently known consisiderable mistakes in your banker's book, to the

amount of four or five hundred pounds? - A. I have never known of any.

WILLIAM THOMAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am cashier to Robarts, Curtis, and Company.

Q. Are the entries in that book of your handwriting? - A. They are.

Q. Look at July the 14th? - A.Cash eighty-one pounds, fifteen shillings, and seven pence, is my hand-writing.

Q. On whose account did you receive that? - A. On account of the Pelican Life Insurance Office.

Q. From whom did you receive it? - A. I do not know; I received it by a draft upon Weston and Company, bankers.

Q.By whom drawn? - A. I do not know; we never take an account of the drawer's name.

Q.When you made that entry, was there any erasure previous to the figure 8? - A. Not that I saw or knew of.

Q. Are you quite sure you did not, upon that day, receive three hundred and eighty-one pounds, fifteen shillings, and seven-pence? - A. I am quite sure I did not, corresponding with the book in which I entered it at the time I received it; that book is here: (refers to the book, reads,) Pelican Office, eighty-one pounds, fifteen shillings, and seven-pence, on Weston.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Mr. Boldero.) Q. Though you do not know of any mistakes that happen, do you mean to say this prisoner was at all deficient three hundred pounds in his account with the Society? - A. I am not prepared to answer that.

Q. You do not mean to pledge yourself there is any thing like that deficiency? - A. I do not mean to pledge myself at all, because we may not be able to ascertain the whole amount.

Mr. Knapp. (To Thomas.) Q. By whom the draft was drawn you do not know? - A. No.

THOMAS TIBBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am clerk to Messrs. Weston and Company, at the Borough Bank.

Q. Do you happen to know whether the prisoner kept cash at Messrs. Westons on the 14th of July last? - A. Yes, he did. (Produces his book.)

Q.Have you an entry of a draft of his there?- A. Yes; on the 14th of July I received a draft for eighty-one pounds, fifteen shillings, and seven pence, drawn upon our house by John M'Gregor; it came through the house of Robarts and Company; it was paid the same day, and carried to the prisoner's account.

ROBERT WARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. I am clerk in the Pelican Office; Mr. M'Gregor was a clerk there also; he was dismissed on Thursday, the 23d of July, to the best of my recollection.

Q. Do you recollect, after that period, his coming to the Office? - A.He came to the Office the next day, I was in the Office at the time, and two Directors; it was on a Friday, when the cash of the Office was to be settled; it was settled every Friday; there was an order that the Directors were to see him, and he was to be requested to give up his keys; he said, he thought he had sent his keys the day before by the messenger, Mason; Mason denied it; the prisoner gave Mason a note to go home to his house to fetch the keys. During Mason's absence, Mr. M'Gregor, having had an accident, complained he was thirsty, and was advised to drink spruce-beer for his complaint; he went out, and did not return that day; when Mason returned, he brought me a draft for six hundred pounds, upon Weston and Company, drawn by M'Gregor, and made payable to himself, with a message, saying, he was so unwell he could not attend himself; that he had sent it desiring me to give it to Mr. Bowers, for the renewals he had received that part of the week that he had attended.

Q. What is the custom in the Office with respect to the quantity of money the clerks may receive?- A.Every clerk, who has received one hundred pounds, should pay it into the Office that evening, and settle the accounts every Friday.

Q. Do you remember when he was before the Directors for the purpose of settling his account?- A. It was after he was discharged; he was discharged on one Thursday, and the Thursday following he was to make up his accounts to the Board.

Q. Is there any deficiency in his accounts to the Office at this time? - A. There is a deficiency of fifty pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I suppose you know that this injury he had received was occasioned by being thrown out of a carriage? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon application being made to him, he sent a draft for six hundred pounds - was not that more than sufficient to balance the account? - A. There is fifty pounds remaining.

Q. Do you not recollect something about a bill of fifty pounds, about which there was a mistake?- A. I do not; Mr. M'Gregor wrote me, after he was in the Compter, that he had paid in a bill of fifty pounds, which had not been presented for payment; but that bill I know nothing of.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Six hundred pounds was paid in? - A. Yes.

Q. And I believe some subsequent payments? - A. Yes, I think on the Thursday following, thirty-one pounds, nine shillings, and eleven pence, and he afterwards paid me a draft of sixty-seven pounds, ten shillings, on account of another insurance.

Q. Then at the time he left the Office there was a deficiency of seven hundred and fifty pounds?- A. There was a deficiency of more than that when he was dismissed.

Q. Look at this book, and see if you can find

any entries made of the sum of six hundred pounds and the other sums? -

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are the entries in that book the prisoner's writing? - A. No.

Q. Did he not attend on the day the Directors attended, and was taken ill? - A. He attended on the Thursday, and went away ill.

Q. I believe all the Directors have these keys? A. None of them.

Court. Q. Taking the whole together, there would be a deficiency of fifty pounds? - A. Yes, taking the bills and cash; some of the bills have been paid since.

JOSEPH MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am one of the messengers of the Pelican Office.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner saying any thing to you respecting the banker's book? - A. Yes, on the settling day; I did not know he had been dismissed; he called me on one side, and desired me to go for the banker's book.

Q. Did he speak to you so as to be heard by any body else? - A. I believe not.

Q. In what manner did he speak to you? - A. He said, Mason, go and get me the banker's book; I went and fetched it from Robarts, Curtis, and Company, in Change-alley, and delivered it to him.

Mr. Serjeant Best. (To Ward.) Q. Do you recollect, at any time, enquiring for a banker's book?- A. I enquired for it, I think, on the 31st of July; I sent for it.

Q. Did you get it? - A. No, I did not; I never saw it after till I saw it at the Mansion-House; Mr. Canner produced it.

- CARTWRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. I apprehended the prisoner.

Q. Did you get that book from him? - A. No, I went for it the next day, according to the Magistrate's direction, with a note from him, to a house in Shoreditch, and they delivered it to me; it was on the 4th of August, the day after he was apprehended.

Court. (To Mr. Boldero.) Q. Who are the persons who hire servants? - A. The Board of Directors.

Q. The fourteen that you here mentioned? - A. Yes.

Q.Those are the Board of Directors? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I only mean to state the reason of my absence from the Office, in consequence of an accident I had received on the 21st of July; I went to the White Hart Tavern to meet a few friends, and in coming home, a little before nine, I was overturned in a chaise, and so much hurt that I was taken up as nearly dead; I sent to Mr. Bowers, requesting him to make a few entries for me in my cast-books, which I had not made; it was my intention to have attended at the Office on the Wednesday, but was prevented; on the Thursday, being exceedingly bruised by the chaise going over my body, I could not make the entries; however I went with intent to go to the Office, but in the way was prevented by indisposition, from loss of blood. On the Tuesday night I sent a note to the Pelican Office, in which I said there were several entries not made, and I should be very much obliged to Mr. Bowers if he would enter them for me; I understood Mr. Stonestreet was very angry with me for having sent but one key, and I was that very day suspended from my employment; I came on the Friday, and was prevented from settling my accounts; I was desired not to touch the keys; Mr. Bowers has got a duplicate-key of those very drawers, and I have frequently found them open in the morning when I could have sworn I had locked them the night before; and sometimes I have found them opened with a chissel; Mr. Godwin desired me to make out the account, and give them the balance; Mr. Stonestreet said, recollect yourself on Thursday next, (which was Board day,) and, what you have to say, the Board will attend to; I had not the books at my command, and therefore I could not make out the account; I rather suspect there is a balance in my favour. The banker's book is frequently very erroneous, and Mr. Boldero has observed the slovenly way in which it has been done; there is an erasure in that very book of one hundred and forty-five pounds; the Policy Office, as well as the Pelican Office, have an account at the same bankers, and they had entered the one for the other; I am not indebted to the Office one single shilling; on the contrary, I conceive there is something owing to me; I had no intention of defrauding these gentlemen, it was the farthest from my heart.

For the Prisoner.

PETER BOWERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. Do you know of any mistakes in the banker's books?- A. I recollect an instance of one hundred and forty-five pounds being carried by the banker's to the Pelican account, which belonged to some other person.

The prisoner called sixteen witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 36.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Mr. KNOWLES, (in Arrest of Judgment).

My Lord,

It seems to me that I shall be able to shew your Lordship, that, in point of fact, the crime is not sufficiently averred upon this record. I take it, that this Act of Parliament creates no new felony, but refers the offence to the class of larcenies, and, therefore, every indictment upon this Act of Parliament must contain upon the face of it a good charge of larceny against the person accused. That the indictment should previously state, as this has done, the circumstances from which that inference is drawn. I do not quarrel with, but inasmuch as the Grand Jury have drawn the conclusion that this man has committed a larceny, it remains for us to contend that they have not drawn that conclusion rightly and according to law. I say, here is no charge of larceny against this person, though he is prosecuted for a larceny. Every charge of larceny must contain not only the charge of taking, stealing, and carrying away, but it must also charge the taking something which is the property either of some persons known or of some persons unknown; if the persons are known, it must aver that the thing alledged to have been stolen is the money,

goods, or chattels of that person, and must be described to have been stolen from him; if the persons are unknown, it must describe the money, goods, and chattels as being the property of persons unknown to the Jurors. So not only in cases of larceny, but in cases of highway robbery, to make out a highway robbery I must charge that the person has taken violently and feloniously from the person of the prosecutor, a gold watch, or ten pounds in money; and having so charged it, I must not stop short there, if I do, I do not present a proper record, but I must say he has taken violently and feloniously from the person of A. B. ten guineas, the monies of the said A. B. Now, my Lord, this is an indictment for stealing monies, but there is no person mentioned whose monies this person has stolen; it is alledged that he has feloniously stolen, taken, and carried away the said sum of money, which is said to be three hundred pounds; but it does not any where aver that that three hundred pounds so stolen is the monies of these gentlemen, or that it is the monies of any person whatever. I take it, therefore, that neither in the first or second count is there any averment of property in any person. Now, it is not sufficient that I should be told, "Can any body of common sense say that if it is taken from them it is not their money?" But we must read this record with the sense and understanding of lawyers, and I say, that in no construction can a lawyer find an allegation of property at all. Suppose an indictment for a highway robbery had alledged that the prisoner had at such a time violently and feloniously taken from the person of such an one ten guineas in money, and had stopped there, I take it that would not have been a sufficient description of a highway robbery, because it should aver that that money should belong to some person or other; but here it is no where alledged that this money, charged to have been stolen, is the money of any body. Now, this answer, I am sure, cannot be given, that the force of precedents will justify it; if it could, my answer would be this, that the Act of Parliament only passed in the year 1799, and there cannot be a sufficient number of precedents to say that shall bind us; but the force of precedents is the other way, for I will only recur to the indictment which immediately preceded this; if I had been put to defend that person I should have had no such ground to stand upon, for there the indictment charges that William Adams , being servant to Sarah Ball , did take into his possession the sum there charged, and that afterwards, on the day and in the year aforesaid, did fraudulently and feloniously embezzle and secrete the same, and so the Jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the said William Adams did then and there, in manner and form aforesaid, feloniously steal, take, and carry away from the said Sarah Ball , his said mistress and employer, the said sum of two shillings and two-pence; but it does not stop there, it adds these very words, which constitute the proper averment of felony, "the monies of the said Sarah Ball ." My Lord, there is an allegation of a theft committed, there is an allegation of the person upon whom it is committed, and then comes the material allegation, that it is the property of Sarah Ball , the prosecutrix; but here it is no where alledged that it is the money of the persons from whom it is alledged to have been stolen. My Lord, in Hawkins I find this passage: "It seems to be taken as a ground in many books, that regularly the persons offended as well as the defendant ought to be certainly described in every indictment, and agreeably hereto it hath been adjudged, that an indictment for stealing a certain piece of linen cloth of one J. S. without adding de bonis & catallis cujusdam. J. S. is insufficient, because it doth not expressly appear to whom the goods stolen did belong." You must, therefore, not only say he took it of such an one, but you must aver that it was his property, or that of some other person. I conceive, therefore, that this indictment is bad, and cannot be maintained.

Mr. Knapp and Mr. Alley followed on the same side, and requested if the Court entertained a doubt, that the point might be reserved.

Court. It has been requested that I should reserve this point, and I am the more inclined to do so because the bent of my opinion is against you, and being unwilling it should turn upon my single opinion, I shall reserve it for the opinion of the Twelve Judges .

Reference Number: t18010916-127

753. EVAN JONES and ROBERT COX were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , 9 cwt. of cotton, value 40l. the property of Jeremiah Ives the elder, Jeremiah Ives the younger, Joseph Echalaz , and John-Green Baseley , and the other for receiving 8 cwt. part of the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM BIRCHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a clerk to Messrs. Ives, Echalaz, and Bafeley, merchants; I have lived with them between two and three years.

Q. Do you know the persons at the bar? - A. Yes, the prisoner Jones was warehouseman to Messrs. Ives; Cox is a rag-merchant in Worcester-place, Thames-street; we dealt with Cox for rags to mend our cotton bags with.

Q.Cox knew in what situation of life you were? - A. Yes.

Q. He knew the situation of Jones, of course? - A. Yes.

Q. In the warehouse of these gentlemen, in Thames-street , was there any cotton? - A. A great deal.

Q. Do you know of any cotton that was taken from Messrs. Ives's to Cox's? - A. Yes, in January last.

Q. Do you know of any transaction in March last? - A. Yes, on the 17th of March, three parcels of cotton were sent to Cox, weighing about four hundred weight and a half.

Q. Who sent that? - A. Jones and I; Cox told us he could not pay us any money then, he would see us in the evening; and, in the evening, he gave a bill for twenty-nine pounds, odd shillings; Jones kept the bill; the day before it was due, Jones brought it to me to indorse it, as he would get it discounted by the publican, Philp; I indorsed it.

Q. Did you see Cox or Jones upon the subject of that bill? - A. Yes, Cox did not pay it.

Q. Who drew that bill? - A. It was drawn by Jones, and accepted by Cox; it was made payable to me; two days afterwards Cox paid fifteen pounds of it.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Were you present? - A. No, Cox

told me so, and so did Jones; Cox has paid two pounds since to me at two different times.

Court. Q. What became of the bill? - A. Jones and I made up the money, and he got the bill from Philp.

Mr. Knapp. Q.How do you know that? - A. Jones told me his aunt got it.

Q. Do you know what became of it after that? - A. No.

Q.Describe how you got the cotton? - A. The cotton is kept in the warehouse in bags, one upon another; we separated the contents of one bag into two parcels, and sent it to Cox.

Court. Q. What was he to give you a pound for it?- A. One shilling.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You think there is no great harm in robbing your master? - (No answer.)

Q. Where did you come from to-day; you did not come out of Newgate? - A. No.

Q. When did you first give the account you have been giving to-day? - A. I cannot answer as to the day.

Q. Did you give any account of it till after your master suspected you of the robbery? - A. No, I conceived I was suspected.

Q. You know that by giving evidence to-day, you save yourself from being prosecuted? - A. I do not know that the law prevents that.

Q. Do you think you shall be prosecuted after this?- A. I think not.

Q. Are you in your master's service now? - A. Yes, and have been ever since.

Q.Upon your oath, did you give your account till your master told you, if you did, you should be continued in his service? - A. He never made me any such promise.

Q. Do not you know that by giving evidence to day, he will continue you in his service? - A. No.

Q. But you expect to be continued in his service? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Then you expect to be dismissed? - A. No.

Q. Were you the person that went to Jones, and asked him to take a walk and see Newgate? - A. No.

Q. Not after he was discharged and acquitted at the last Sessions? - A. No.

Q. You did not ask Jones to take a walk and see Newgate? - A. No, but he asked me.

Q. You were to meet Sapwell on the road - were you not? - A. Yes, but that was not a plan of my own.

Q. And then, when you were taken before the Lord-Mayor, you told this story? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You never had any hope of advantage in giving evidence against these two men? - A. None.

Q. You did not hope to escape being prosecuted by accusing them? - A. No.

Q. Will you repeat that no, in the face of the Jury; are you bold enough to repeat it, having once sworn it?- A. I certainly had hope.

Q.Then what did you mean by swearing that you had no hope - do you not do it for the very purpose of getting your own neck out of the halter? - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. The prisoner Jones is my nephew.

Q. Had you ever any bill of his in your possession?- A.Never in my life.

PHILIP PHILIP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I kept the Green-Dragon, in Bishopsgate-street, in March last.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Jones? - A. I have known him about a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Cox? - A. I saw him the morning I presented the bill; in the month of March last, Jones applied to me, and asked me to do him the favour to discount him a bill at a short date, drawn by Mr. Cox to Mr. Bircham; I asked him for the bill; he said, he had not got it; he went away, and fetched it; I found it was not indorsed; I desired him to get it indorsed; he brought it back indorsed by Bircham and Jones; I gave him the money for the bill, twenty-nine pounds, nineteen shillings, and six-pence; Jones said, there is a week's score, you may take that out of the bill; he returned again in about half an hour, and said, I had reckoned the money six-pence short, and I gave him six-pennyworth of copper; I did not take a farthing for discount, I think it had two days to run. When it became due, I went to Mr. Cox, in Worcester-place, Thames-street, and presented the note; I saw him, he said he could not take up the note then, but he would take it up in the afternoon.

Q. He made no objection to the bill then? - A. No; the bill was not taken up, and I employed a notary; I do not recollect his name; he is here.

Q. How was that bill at last paid? - A. The money was brought me by Jones; I gave the bill to Jones.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did Jones tell you he had merely written the bill, or do you recollect that you saw the name of Jones on the bill, as the drawer? - A. I saw the name of Jones at the bottom of the bill.

Q. Did he not say, that that bill was drawn by him as he was directed by Bircham, the superior clerk; and did not he refuse to take from you the money for it till he should speak to Bircham? - A. He did; he said I must speak to Mr. Bircham first.

Q. And the prisoner was acting under his direction?- A. Yes.

Court. Q. Who was the drawer of the bill? - A. It was drawn from Mr. Cox to Mr. Bircham; I promise to pay, so many days after date, to Mr. Bircham.

Q. What business had Jones's name at the bottom of it? - A. I do not know.

SAMUEL CROPLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am clerk to Mr. Aughterlony, a notary.

Q. Do you remember at any time receiving a bill directed to Mr. Robert Cox , in Worcester-place? - A. I do; I received it from Philip Philp ; I sent it by our young man, Richard Pace , to be noted.

RICHARD PACE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am clerk to Mr. Aughterlony; I received a bill directed to Mr. Robert Cox , in Worcester-place; I went with it, and saw a person who answered to the name of Cox, but I cannot say whether the prisoner is the same man or not; he did not pay it; the answer he gave me was, I will pay this bill on Wednesday afternoon.

Q. Did you take a copy of the bill? - A. I did.

Q. Are you able to say that that is a true copy? - A. Yes, I am. (A copy of the bill drawn by Jones, in favour of Bircham, accepted by Cox, and indorsed by Jones, Pead.)

JOSEPH ECHALAZ sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Knowlys. I am in partnership with Jeremiah Ives , the elder, Jeremiah Ives , the younger, and John-Green Bazely.

Q.Were Bircham and Jones in your service? - A. They were.

Q. Do you know of having lost cotton yourself? - A. Yes, very large quantities.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Of your own knowledge, or do you speak from the information of others? - A. I know by the weights not corresponding.

Q. Did you take stock? - A. Yes, since this happened; we could not take stock before, the warehouses were so full; there were sixteen hundred bags of cotton in the warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You yourself had not taken an account to ascertain the loss? - A. No, I employed trusty people.

Q. Five or six I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. Are they all here? - A. No.

Court. Q. What was this cotton worth a pound? - A. Twenty pence; we found the packages deficient in weight, and some whole packages gone.

- WITHERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you, of your own knowledge, acquainted with the loss of any cotton? - A. Only from the report of others.

Q. Have you attended when any search has been made in the stock? - A. I was at the mending of several bags, and taking the number.

Q. What was the appearance of those bags which you saw there? - A. I was at the weighing of many of them.

Q. Had they the appearance of having been plundered? A. It is very difficult to say.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you ever heard Mr. Echalaz say he would spend twenty thousand pounds to convict the prisoners? - A. No.

Court. Q. When did you find any bags missing? - A. I do not know that there were any missing.

Jones's defence. It is a very malicious thing.

Cox left his defence to his Counsel.

The prisoner Jones called nine, and Cox fourteen witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010916-128

754. RICHARD MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , a cloth great coat, value 2l. and a thickset stock, value 10s. the property of Elizabeth Hilton .

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Elizabeth Hilton , Ironmonger-lane: On Wednesday night, the 22d of July, a little after nine o'clock, I left two coats in the stable, in Little Moorfields , a box-coat and a frock; I went the next morning, a little after six, and found they were gone; I saw the coats again at eleven o'clock at Guildhall, and swore to them.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. He worked upon the premises at the time.

JOHN CARLISLE sworn. - I am a constable; About half past three o'clock in the morning, the 23d of July, I was coming down West-street, West-Smithfield, I met the patrole; they had stopped the prisoner with the property just before I came up; the prisoner told me they were his own; he said, there were two side pockets in the great coat; that his father had it made for him to drive a waggon; I looked, and found there were no pockets; then I secured him, and took him to the Compter; I asked him where he lodged; he told me a number of different places; I went to a great number of places; at last I heard of Mr. Good's livery-stables, where the property was taken from, and there I found Mr. Wright.

THOMAS BOWMAN sworn. - On Thursday, the 23d of July, my partner and I stopped the prisoner about half past three o'clock in the morning at the end of West-street, with a bundle under his arm, containing a box-coat and a thickset frock; Carlisle then came up, I delivered the bundle to him, and we brought him to the watch-house.(The other patrole confirmed the evidence of the last witness.)

JOSEPH HARRINGTON sworn. - I am ostler to Mr. Good, I had the care of the stables; it was my business to see that the gates were fast; on the Wednesday night, and on Thursday morning, I found them open; I suspected there was something stole out of the yard; I looked round and missed the coachman's frock and greatcoat; when the coachman came, I informed him he had been robbed; I suspected the prisoner by his not coming to work the next morning; I did not see him again till after he was taken up. (The property was deposed to by Wright.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-129

755. JANE HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , four coats, value 3l. the property of Charles Clarke .

CHARLES CLARKE sworn. - I am a wine-merchant , No. 36, Crutched-friars : On the 21st of September, about half-past one, at noon, I saw the prisoner come up the gate-way, which is a considerable distance from the street; I saw her go into the house; I was writing in the accompting-house, which is on one side of my house; I saw her come out immediately after the clerk, who was writing in an adjoining accompting-house, and was just going out as the prisoner came out; he followed her down the gate-way; he brought her back, and we took the property from her; she begged I would let her go, but I refused; there was a driving coat and three other great coats; I sent for a constable, and delivered her and the property to him.

- HUNTER sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Danvers and Clarke, wine-merchants.

Q.(To Mr. Clarke.) Were these coats your sole property? - A. Yes, they were.

Hunter. On Monday the 21st of September, about half past one o'clock, I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Clarke's house; in a very short time she came out

again, apparently in very great haste, with a large bundle under her left arm; as I was going out at the door, I thought I saw the colour of one of Mr. Clarke's great-coats, accordingly I followed her out of the gateway, and overtook her at the corner of New London-street; I said to her, you have got some of Mr. Clarke's coats there; her answer was, I do not know Mr. Clarke, they are not his coats; I said, you shall go back again, and I will see whether they are Mr. Clarke's coats or no; I then took her back; Mr. Clarke met us in the yard, and then she dropped the coats; there were four of them; she then begged Mr. Clarke to forgive her, for they were his property; I immediately got a constable, and Mr. Clarke gave charge of her. (The constable produced the property, which was identified by Mr. Clarke).

Prisoner's defence. I was going down Crutched-sriars, and a man asked me, if I knew of a porter that would carry that parcel for him to Smithfield; I told him, I did not, I was a poor widow woman, and should be glad to earn a shilling myself if it was not too large, he gave me these coats to carry, he said he would be there as soon as me.

Guilty , aged 60.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-130

756. JOHN PRICE , JOHN BROWN , and ELIZABETH BROWN were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John White , about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 30th of July , and stealing two saddles, value 3l. two bridles, value 18s. two horse harnesses, value 12l. two breast-plates, value 5s. and another bridle, value 5s. the property of the said John, and a great coat, value 5s. the property of Robert Mills .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

ROBERT MILLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney I am servant to Mr. John White, who keeps a liverystable in Little Moorfields : On Wednesday night, the 29th of July, the stable-yard was broke open; on the morning of the 30th, I went into the stables, and missed the articels mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them;) the great coat was mine, and the other things were in Mr. White's care.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. When had you seen those things before you missed them? - A. The night before.

JAMES LONGMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I keep the One Tun, on Holborn-hill: On Friday the 31st of July last, the woman prisoner came into my house, in a hurry, with a bundle; I am not sure whether she had a bundle or not.

Q.Have you any doubt about it? - A. Yes; I was in a hurry, serving my customers, and I cannot swear whether she had a bundle or not.

Q. Did you see the men? - A. Not till after the officers came in.

Q. Did you see two officers come and accost those men?- A. Yes; they were then sitting in the same box with the woman.

Q. Did you see what was found in that box by the officers? - A. No.

CHARLES PARROTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am in the tripe business, at No. 6, Field-lane: I was at the One Tun, Holborn-bridge, on Friday the 31st of July, standing at the door, and smoking my pipe.

Q. What time was it? - A. As near as I can guess, between the hours of twelve and two; a coach came up, and there came two men and a woman out of it; the woman went into the public-house; then the men took the bags out of the coach and carried them into the public-house, and then they went up Field-lane.

Q. Do you know that woman? - A. I can't say I do; I never saw them before.

Q. Did you afterwards see those two men and the woman in custody of the officers? - A. I did, about an hour afterwards,

Q. Did you see them before the Lord-Mayor? - A. No; my master would not let me go, he was so busy.

Q. Did you see Graham and Dean, the officers, take away the parcels? - A. One of them.

Q. Did that parcel look like one of the parcels that you saw brought out of the coach? - A. It does.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. You don't know that the men you saw come out of the coach were the same you saw in the hands of the officers? - A. No, I do not.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Look at the two men and the woman at the bar, and tell me whether you do or not believe them to be the persons who came out of the coach? - A. I really don't think these are the people; I cannot take upon me to say either way.

SAMUEL BENJAMIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. On Friday the 31st of July, I was at the One Tun, Holborn-bridge, I was standing before the door, about two o'clock: I saw two men and a woman come out of a hackney-coach, they brougth two bundles with them out of the coach, the bundles were taken into the One Tun; one of them gave one bundle to the woman, and then the other went and fetched another bundle out of the coach; they both went into the public-house, and then one of them came out again, and went down Field-lane; he then came back to the public-house again.

Q. Were you there when the officers came in? - A. No; I did not see them again till the Monday following, at Guildhall.

Q. Look and see if the two men and the woman at the bar are the same persons? - A. I am sure they are the same persons; I sold a hat to one of them for two shillings.

Q.Which was that? - A. The tallest, Brown.

Q. And you are sure they are the two men and the woman that you saw come out of the coach? - A. Yes; I am sure of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. What are you? - A. I buy second-hand hats, and dress them.

Q. Nothing else? - A. No.

Q. Don't you deal in old clothes generally? - A. No.

Q. Was it not Price that you sold the hat to? - A. It was to one of them.

Q. Did you not sell a coat at the same time? - A. No.

Q. Have you ever been in a Court of Justice before?- A. I have been at Guildhall upon a summons.

Q. Upon your oath have you never been tried yourself? - A. Never in my life, upon my oath.

Q. Can't you tell which of them you sold the hat to?- A. I can't tell now by name.

Q. Go and touch the man? - A. That is the man I sold the hat to. (Pointing to Price).

Q. Did you not say, just now, you sold the hat to the tall one? - A. I can't be certain which I sold the hat for

Mr. Gurney. Q. Were they both together when you sold the hat? - A. No; one was in the house, and the other out.

DANIEL GRAHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a City constable: On Friday the 31st of July, I went to the One Tun, Holborn-bridge, to the best of my recollection, about four o'clock, or a little before four; I found Price, and Brown and his wife, in the tap-room, in a box adjoining the bar; there were two other men in the box, and at the farther end of the box, next to Price, I found this bag, (producing it); Price fat on the left-hand side of the box, all the rest were on the other side of the box; I took them all three into custody, and the bundle likewise; I asked Price if he knew any thing of the bundle; he said, he knew nothing at all about it; I asked Brown the same; he said, he knew nothing about it; I asked Mrs. Brown, and she said the same.

Q. Did you find any great coat upon Price? - A. Yes; that was taken off his back at the Compter. (Produces a great coat, and a bag, containing a bridle, saddle, and a martingal).

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. When you went in, what became of the other two men that were in the box?- A. They staid in the house.

Q. You found only one bundle? - A. No.

Q. Did you ask Price any questions about the coat?- A. He had not a word to say about the coat.

Q. Is it true, that he said he bought it of a Jew? - A. No; before the Alderman, he said he bought it in Monmouth-street.(The great coat, and the other articles, identified by Mills).

Price's defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge; the great coat I bought of a Jew in the street.

Brown's defence. I knew a young man that lived at this public-house, and my wife and I went in and had a pot of beer; there were six or seven people in the box; there was a Jew in the box that lately came from transportation, as I am informed, and he had his arm on this property when the officers came in; I did not know them to be officers; some of the people in the box jumped over the table, and went away; I was very willing to go with them.

Parrot. When they were taken, there was a great skirmish.

Mr. Gurney. Q. In that skirmish, who was it that drew a knife? - A.Nobody at all.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. (To Graham) Q. When you took these prisoners, did they resist? - A. Yes; Price drew a knife, and I prevented him from opening it; I had a great deal of difficulty in securing Price; Brown and his wife went peaceably along.

Brown called one witness, who gave him a good character. Price, GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing goods, value 15s.

Transported for seven years .

J. Brown, NOT GUILTY .

E. BROWN, NOT GUILTY .

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-131

757. JOHN PENBERTHY was indicted for uttering a counterfeit half-guinea, and having, at the same time, in his possession, another counterfeit half-guinea .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

SARAH RODWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the wife of Henry Rodwell, who keeps a chandler's shop, No. 46, London Wall: On Friday evening, the 4th of September, about eight o'clock, the prisoner and another man came into my shop; he asked me for a quarter of a pound of ham, a three-penny loaf, and some onions, which amounted altogether to ten-pence half-penny; he then threw down a crooked half-guinea for me to give him change; I looked at the half-guinea, and perceived it to be a good one; I sent the half-guinea by my daughter into the little room behind the shop, where a young woman was sitting of the name of Judith Pedley ; I thought it was a good one, but I sent it in for her opinion of it; she called out to me that it was a good half-guinea; I looked out the change, and was about to give it to the prisoner, when the prisoner said to the man that was with him, he would rather he would pay for it, for he did not wish to have change; I then called for the half-guinea back, and returned it to the prisoner; he put it in his pocket; the other man could not find money enough to pay, and the prisoner then said, he must change; I then looked out the change I was going to give him before, which I gave him, and then he gave me another crooked half-guinea, but much lighter than the other; I immediately perceived it to be a bad one, I am certain it was not the same half-guinea that he tendered me before; I immediately said to the prisoner, here is a bad half-guinea, and they both immediately went out of the shop as quick as they possibly could; I then called out to the young woman, Judy, here is a bad half-guinea; she immediately pursued them, and the prisoner was brought back with the change in his hand; I saw him searched, but cannot say what he had about him.

Q. What did you do with the second half-guinea - the bad one? - A. I gave it to Judith Pedley .

JUDITH PEDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I lived at Mrs. Rodwell's; I examined the half-guinea that Mrs. Rodwell sent in to me; I called out that it was a good one; just after that she called out to me, here is a bad one.

Q.Could you at all see the person of the prisoner? - A. Yes, but I did not take any particular notice; I threw down my work immediately, and ran after them; when I got out, I perceived the prisoner and another man running across the road; I ran after them, and cried, stop thief; Mr. Bond came up, and stopped him, after he had ran near a quarter of a mile from the house; I never lost fight of him, the other man got away; he was brought back, and a constable was sent for; Mrs. Rodwell gave me the bad half-guinea, and I delivered it up before the Lord-Mayor on the Monday following; Prior has got it.

THOMAS BOND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Princes-street, Finsbury-square; I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner running in the middle of the street, and I took him by the collar, and stopped him in Little Moorfields; I caught him by the collar, and held him till this young woman came up; she charged him with being the man that she pursued; as soon as I had stopped him, I heard something drop from him, which rattled like money; I did not pick it up, somebody picked it up, I cannot say who; it was brought back, and delivered to the constable.

Q. Is the person here who delivered it? - A. No.

THOMAS PRIOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable; I was sent for to Mr. Rodwell's, to take the prisoner in charge; before I got there, Mr. French, another constable, had been sent for, belonging to another ward; he searched him, but I was not by; he delivered over to me a quantity of bad half-guineas, and Mr French said, here is one I have taken out of his waistcoat pocket, the prisoner was then standing close by; I asked where the half-guinea was that Mrs. Rodwell had given change for; she said, I will take care of that myself; I said to the prisoner, have you any more about you; he said, no; I said, you are sure of that; he said, no; I then proceeded to take him to the Compter; there was such a croud round the door, I was obliged to take him to the watch-house, which was close by; I again asked him at the watch-house, have you any more about you; he said, no; I then proceeded to search him, and found two more half-guineas and three shillings; I also found a good crooked half-guinea in his coat-pocket; before the Lord-Mayor, I received from Judith Pedley the half-guinea that she had.(The witness then produced the various articles of money, which were all proved by Mr. Wm. Parker to be counterfeit, except the half-guinea first offered by the prisoner).

Prisoner's defence. I was going to the other end of the town to see if I could get a ship; I met an old shipmate of the name of William Spence , and we drank together very near the whole afternoon; I went with him to several houses, and I was very much intoxicated; we went to get something to eat, and Mrs. Rodwell said the half-guinea was a bad one, and then Spence ran away and left me behind, I was taken directly; I had sold him some sea-bedding, and other things, for which he gave me two pounds five shillings.

Q.(To Mrs. Rodwell.) Did he appear to be intoxicated? - A. He did not appear so to me. GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and find security for two years more .

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-132

758. JOHN SMITH was indicted for uttering to James Hoby a counterfeit shilling, and having, at the same time, in his possession, another counterfeit shilling .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JAMES HOBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a lace and trimming-manufacturer , in Bartholomew-close: On Thursday, the 2d of July, I saw the prisoner in Bell alley, Coleman-street, with a basket of strawberries; there was another person with him; I asked him the price, and he said, sixpence a pottle; I gave him sixpence, he put it in his mouth, turned round towards the wall, and said, it was a bad one; having been served so once before, I had a suspicion; I put my hand to my pocket, and gave him a shilling; it was a plain, good shilling; I gave it to the prisoner; he stooped down, put it to his mouth, and turned round in the same way towards the wall, and said, this is a bad one also, give me another; he immediately gave it me back.

Q. Was the shilling he gave you the same shilling that you had given him? - A. I am perfectly sure it was not; I put the shilling which he gave me into my right hand, and collared him with my left hand; I told him he was a villain, that he was ringing the chatter with me, and desired two gentlemen that were standing by to take notice; the prisoner said, what are you going to do you must not throttle me; I told him I was going to the Lord-Mayor.

Q. What became of the person who was with him?- A. We left him with the basket; I led him down Token-house-yard, and as I was crossing Lothburg I heard some money rattle; a person who was behind me said, here is the money in the gulley-hole; he is not here.

Q. Did the prisoner hear what he said? - A. Yes; I looked into the gulley-hole and saw both gold and silver; I then sent to the Manslon-house for two officers, and held the prisoner at the spot till Mr. Canner came, and Mr. Dover came up at the same time; I requested them not to leave the money till they saw it taken up, and I took the prisoner to the Mansion-house; I gave Mr. Canner a shilling I had from the prisoner, first having marked it; I then returned to the gulley-hole, the grating was taken up, and the money delivered to Mr. Canner.

WILLIAM CANNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am Under Marshal of the city of London: On Thursday, the 2d of July, near three o'clock, I was sent for by Mr. Hoby; I found him with the prisoner, near the gulley-hole, at the bottom of Princes-street; Mr. Hoby said, in the presence of the prisoner, here is bad money dropped in the gulley-hole, and requested that I would take charge of the money; I had the grating taken up and found in the gulley-hole in a paper, a guinea and three shillings; besides which, I found, dispersed by its having fallen upon the grating, a guinea, and half a guinea, and a seven-shilling piece. (Produces them).

Q.Have you a shilling that was produced before the Lord Mayor? - A. Yes; I received it from Mr. Hoby before the Lord Mayor; he marked it before he delivered it to me. (Produces it).

Mr. Hoby. This is the shilling I received from the prisoner.

GEORGE DOVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Bartholomew Close; I was going along behind the Bank, and I saw a number of people over a grating, nearly opposite the end of Princes-street; Mr. Hoby had hold of the prisoner; I asked him what was wrong; he said the man that he had hold of had been ringing the changes with bad money; he said he had thrown some down there; I saw the paper and some money lying about it, both gold and silver; I put my hand down the grating to endeavour to reach it, but I could not; I was not present when it was taken out; I remained there till Mr. Canner came; I stood over the gulley-hole and would not let any one come near it.(Mr. William Parker proved all the money to be counterfeit)

Prisoner's defence. I neither stooped nor turned round.

GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and find security for two years more .

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010916-133

759. JAMES HIGGS , HENRY HIGGS , ED

WARD HIGGS , and WILLIAM BRYCE , were indicted for receiving stolen goods from a certain ill-disposed person or persons, knowing the same to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ROBERT GROOM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a servant to Mr. Thomas Crawley , a currier, in Camomile-street: On Saturday, the 10th of January, between seven and eight o'clock, I left the premises; I returned on Monday morning, but did not observe any thing gone.

JOHN HUMPHREYS sworn. - Examined Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Thomas Crawley; I left the premises on Saturday between eight and nine in the evening, and returned about eight in the morning of Monday; I did not miss any thing till eleven o'clock, when my master came, and he missed about 3 cwt. of leather; I had seen it on the Saturday night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What you know of the loss is from what your master told you? - A. No, I saw the leather in the warehouse on the Saturday.

Q. Your master might have removed it for any thing you know? - A. I had the key; my master has the key of the gates to be sure.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Mr. Crawley is a Quaker I believe? - A. He is of that persuasion.

JOHN JAMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I left the shop about half past seven, on Saturday night; I returned on the Monday morning a little before eight; I stopped till Humphreys came to let me in; Mr. Crawley came from his country house between ten and eleven o'clock, and missed the property; there were goods missing to the amount of between 270 and 300l.

Mr. Alley. Q. Whether this leather was removed with the consent and knowledge of your master you cannot tell? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Does your master do business of a Sunday? - A. No.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer belonging to Whitechapel: In consequence of information I went to the premises of James Higgs , who keeps a farrier's shop in Upper Thames-street; he has three houses; I saw Bryee and James Higgs on the ground floor of one of them, not the one that he lives in; I told James Higgs I had an information that he had some leather that had been stolen from Mr. Crawley's Warehouse in Camomile-street; he said, no, he had not; he said, he had no objection to our going over his house, we were welcome to look all over it; I then went with James Higgs to his dwelling-house, leaving Nowland and Groom at that house; I could find nothing; I told him I had plenty of evidence to prove that the leather was in his house the night before, and now was the time for him to account for it; he said there was some leather brought there to be weighed the night before, but he did not see it weighed; I asked him if he had bought it; he said, no, he had not; he said, he did not like it should remain in his house, and he had removed it into a stable in the farrier's yard; I searched the stable, and found the leather covered over with straw; I took it out of the straw into the yard; I took Mr. Higgs into custody and told his servants I should take them all into custody, on suspicion of stealing this leather; Henry Higgs , his brother, was at work upon the premises; I took the leather away in a coach, with Mr. James Higgs , to the office; I then returned with Edward Smith , and took the brother and the servants; a little before eight o'clock in the evening, I went again, and apprehended young Mr. Higgs (Edward); I had apprehended Mr. Bryce about four o'clock at his house in East Smithfield, he is a fallow chandler; I had no warrant, but he gave me leave to search his house, but I found nothing; I then took him to the office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. (Counsel for Bryce).

Q. How long after you had seen Bryce with Higgs was it, that you apprehended him? - A. Three quarters of an hour.

Q. You went without a warrant - notwithstanding which, he had no objection to have his house searched?- A. No, he had not, and he went very readily with us.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Higgs.) Q.James Higgs is the owner of the house you first searched? - A. Yes; Henry is his brother, and Edward is the son of James Higgs.

Q. After you had searched his house, and found nothing, he himself told you the leather was in the stable?- A. Yes.

Q. Was the stable locked? - A. No.( John Nowland corroborated the testimony of Griffiths).

JOHN REDMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am journeyman to Mr. James Higgs : The day before the house was searched, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, a man of the name of Barnett came into the shop, and went to the loft-door, which is at the top of the stairs, and then he handed out the scales, and Bowyer and I put them up; Barnett then fetched in a sack full, it weighed a hundred weight; then he brought in another, and that weighed a hundred weight; then he went out, and fetched another, about three parts full, the whole together weighed about three hundred weight; I did not see what they contained; Henry and Edward Higgs were present when they were weighed; Barnett left one shilling for us to drink; he took them away again upon his shoulder, but where he took them, I do not know.

Court. Q. What was said between Barnett and the two Higgs's? - A. I was not nigh enough to hear what they said; it was about the scales not being right.

Q. Did you ever see Barnett there before? - A. No; the next morning, Henry and Edward Higgs brought some leather into the shop upon their shoulders, and chucked it into the stable; it was there about half an hour, and then Henry Higgs got a trufs of straw, and threw over it, so that nobody could see it; it remained there till the officers found it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Mr. Higgs keeps scales, I suppose, to weigh iron, and other articles? - A. Yes.

Q.Barnett was a man who lived in respectability in the neighbourhood? - A. He kept a chandler's shop.

Q. And your master, being a good-natured man, was willing to lend his scales to a neighbour? - A. Yes.

Q. And then Barnett took the sacks away again? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you see Bryce there that morning? - A. I did not see him that day; I was busy about my work.

( William Bowyer corroborated the testimony of Redman).

JOHN MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a shoemaker on Fish-street hill: On a Saturday morning, I cannot say the day of the month, a person of the name of Bedson came to my house, I was out; he waited till I came home, and while I was talking with him, Bryce came in; Bedson had brought me some leather, as a sample, which I was looking at; it was dressed leather; I told them it was leather that was stolen out of Leadenhalf-market, that had come from Bristol; Bedson told me that Bryce had shewn him a letter which had come from a person of the name of Higgs, and that it was honestly come by - that Mr. Higgs had advanced money upon it; I said, I was sure it came in such a channel, that it was stolen, and that if I bought it, I ought to be hanged that moment, for I had transported one of my men the night before.

Q. When was that? - A. In January Sessions, on a Friday; I advised Bedson to have nothing to do with it, but to return the sample to Bryce, whom he said he had it of; I said, if it was ever so honestly come by, it would not suit me to purchase it, because it came to a considerable sum; Bryce said, I might pay twenty pounds in money, and the rest in bills; Bryce then said to Bedson, I will take it back again to where I had it; I have known Bedson some years, he is a bricklayer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You never understood from Bryce that this was his own leather? - A. I understood he had it from another person to sell for him.

JAMES BEDSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a bricklayer; I have known Mr. Bryce six or seven years: On the 16th of January, Mr. Bryce came to the Blue Anchor in East Smithfield, opposite to where I live; he called me out of the kitchen into the tap-room, where we were by ourselves; he told me he had got a quantity of leather to sell, and as I knew Mr. Mason, if I would go and ask him if he would buy it; Mr. Bryce represented to me that he had it from Mr. James Higgs , whom I knew very well; Mr. Bryce said, he having been in the leather business before, Mr. Mason would not like to buy it of him, if it was ever so honestly come by - he had been taken up for some leather in the Borough, that was stolen sometime ago; I went to his house, and he took four skins out of a drawer in the counter, tied up in a handkerchief; I then went to Mr. Mason's with the skins; I waited till Mr. Mason came in, and he would not have any thing to do with them, and he advised me to have nothing to do with them; Mr. Bryce then came in; Mr. Mason told him he would not have any thing to do with them; and Mr. Bryce said he would not have any thing to do with them; the same evening, I saw Mr. Bryce standing at his door smoking his pipe; he called me over, and asked me if I know any body else; I mentioned Mr. Rowe to him, and he proposed my going to him; I went to Mr. Rowe on Sunday morning, about eight o'clock, without the sample; Mr. Bryce gave me the letter.(Mr. Knapp produced the letter, which was read, as follows;)

"Mr. Higgs's compliments to Mr. Bryce, if this article suits at per pound 2s. 9d. if you have any channel open, you may have some cordovans; but my friend has some good articles worth your notice. Please to send an answer; if you should not, I will send to-morrow morning.

15th Jan. 1801. J. HIGGS.

Addressed Mr. W. Bryce, East Smithfield."

Bedson. Mr. Bryce afterwards told me he had seen Mr. Rowe, and that he said he would buy it; I did not see him again till after he was taken up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You delivered the sample to Bryce, and he said he would not have any thing more to do with it? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you known Mr. Higgs before? - A. Yes; and always considered him a very respectable man.

Q. Was it not on account of the respectability of the Higgs's that you went both to Mason and Rowe? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.After you knew it had been stolen, you offered it to Rowe? - A. I knew if it was stolen, Mr. Rowe, being a currier, would know it.

Q. And you knew Bryce's character? - A. I understood from him, that Mr. Higgs had lent money upon this leather, and that the time was out; I knew him to be a pawnbroker about three years ago.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Griffiths.) Q. How much leather did you find at Higgs's? A. Three hundred and fourteen pounds weight. (Produces a part of it.)

Groom. These two skins of leather are of my own manufacture, and are Mr. Crawley's property.(Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendants, Higgs's, and called six witnesses, who gave them an excellent character.)

James Higgs, GUILTY ,

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 100l.

Henry Higgs , GUILTY ,

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 50l.

Edward Higgs, NOT GUILTY .

William Bryce , NOT GUILTY .

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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