Old Bailey Proceedings, 1st July 1801.
Reference Number: 18010701
Reference Number: f18010701-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 1st of JULY, 1801, and following Days, BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR WILLIAM STAINES , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors'-Commons.

1801.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE Sir WILLIAM STAINES , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common-Pleas; Sir SOULDEN LAWRENCE, Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Christmas Thomas ,

John Philpot ,

Thomas Bulls

James Cox ,

John Morrison ,

Edward Grant ,

Atchibald Arbuthnot ,

Swinisin Jervis ,

Thomas Creswick ,

Edward Roberts ,

William Cooke

David Evans .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Lodder ,

George Malpas ,

John Mitchell ,

James Whitehead ,

George Stevenson ,

William Say ,

George Brown ,

Joseph Beare ,

Richard Harrison ,

William Miller ,

Cleopher Cornber ,

William Hasker .

Second Middlesex Jury.

James Philpot ,

Thomas Hinde ,

Henry Hutchinson ,

Benjamin Yates ,

Richard Reynolds ,

John Hill ,

George Moore ,

John Beale ,

William Parker ,

John Christmas ,

Joshua Sturges ,

William Carr .

Reference Number: t18010701-1

533. THOMAS HOUGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a metal watch, value 3l. the property of George Laport , privily from his person .

GEORGE LAPORT sworn. - I live in Spitalfields-market: On the 11th of May I lost a metal watch at Hendon fair .

Q. How did you lose it? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What part of the day did you take any notice of it? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you observe it in the fair? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Had you missed your watch after you left home? - A. Yes; I missed it about five o'clock in the afternoon, in the fair; Mr. Gearish, the witness, told me to mind my watch; I put my hand to my sob, and it was gone.

Q. Did you feel it go from you? - A. No.

Q. Had you any reason to suppose your watch was missing, before Mr. Gearish spoke to you? - A. No; there was a great crowed about.

Q. Were you hustled or shoved about? - A. Yes; there was a great deal of bustling, crowding, and pushing.

Q. Did you see the prisoner before Mr. Gearish spoke? - A. I think I saw him about five minutes before, about one hundred yards from the place.

Q. Did you, at the time Gearish spoke to you, see the prisoner? - A. No; I saw my watch about ten minutes afterwards in Mr. Gearish's hand; the prisoner was then in custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. About five in the afternoon, at these fort of fairs, there is a very great crowd? - A. I cannot say, I never was there before.

Q. Whether your watch was taken from you, or you lost it, you cannot say? - A. I cannot.

Q. There was, in point of fact, a great crowd? - A. There was.

- GEARISH sworn. - On Monday, the 11th of May, I was walking with Laport in Hendon fair, about five o'clock in the afternoon; I saw the chain of his watch hanging out, I desired him to take care of his watch, there was a very great crowd pushing about; in about five minutes after he said to me, Gearish, I have lost my watch; I had observed the prisoner standing for five minutes next to Mr. Laport.

Q. Did you observe him next to Mr. Laport at the time you bid him take care of his watch? - A. He was.

Q. How long did you observe him stand next to Mr. Laport? - A. Till within two minutes of his missing his watch.

Q. Did the prisoner appear to be pushing? - A. I saw nothing particular at all; he was standing looking as well as we were; Mr. Laport and I then went among the mob, about one hundred yards, and I saw the prisoner with a stick in his hand, clearing the road for the girls to run for the smickets; I went up to him, and said, sir, you have got my friend's watch; he said, no, I have not, I am not the kind of person you take me to be; I said, I am positive you have the watch, you are the only person that was standing next to my friend when he missed his watch; I ordered a man of the name of Wicks, who ought to have been here, to collar him; he laid hold of one side, and I the other, and a man of the name of Bumby, a countryman, searched his pocket, and in his right hand coat pocket the watch was found; he forced himself to try to get away from us; I have had the watch ever since. (Produces it).

Laport. This is the watch that I lost; it is worth three guineas; it cost me about six guineas without the seal; I swapped it away for another in the Minories; I cannot say exactly what it cost me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Is Bumby here? - A. No.

Q. Nor Wicks? - A. No.

Q. What are you? - A. A fruit salesman, in Covent-garden.

Q. You have never been in any unfortunate predicament yourself - you never have had the misfortune to be charged with any thing? - A. Never.

Q. Do you know Mr. Dawkins? - A. No.

Q. Where is Wicks or Bumby? - A. I don't know.

Q. They were bound over, were they not? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. (To Laport.) Q. How do you know that is your watch? - A. I know it by the seal, and there is the name of Lawrence, and the letters C. P. upon the case.

Q. Do you know the number? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I went to the fair to see the country diversions; I was walking in the fair, and was accosted by Gearish, who said, I had got his friend's watch; I told him I was not a man of that description; a great mob came round, three or four hundred, I dare say, and a person outside of the crowd held up the watch; I am innocent of the charge, I know nothing of it.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Mr. Gurney. (To Gearish.) Q. Have you ever said that the prisoner was not the man that stole the watch? - A. I never have, because I am very certain I saw the watch taken out of his pocket.

Q.Have you not shewn it publicly at Carpenter's coffee-house? - A. Not out of my own hand.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not take the watch out of the hand of a countryman outside the mob? - A. I did not; I saw Bumby take it out of his pocket.

Prisoner. Here is a person who saw it taken from a countryman outside the mob.

HENRY LOVETT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street; I was at the fair, and took the prisoner into custody; I saw a countryman, who had searched his pocket, give it into the hand of Mr. Gearish.

GUILTY , Death . aged 33.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-2

534. HANNAH GILBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , three neck-handkerchiefs, value 1s. another handkerchief, value 2s. 6d. a Bank-note, value 20l. and another Bank-note, value 10l. the property of John Hughes .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-3

535. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , six yards of lace, value 5l. the property of Thomas Landsdale , privately in his shop .

THOMAS LANDSDALE sworn. - I am a linendraper and laceman , No. 12, Lower Brook-street ; I can only swear to the lace.

ROBERT MANSBRIDGE sworn. - I am a sprucebeer brewer, I live next door to Mr. Landsdale: On Saturday evening, the 20th of June, I had a great deal of beer going out, and I was going backwards and forwards, looking for my porter as I was to send out my goods; I saw the prisoner at the bar with two other boys, one shorter and the other taller than himself; the tallest boy had the appearance of a groom; I law them looking at one window and another; my truck was standing at the door, and they were playing round the truck several times; I went in again to my parlour window, and I saw them cross the way several times, and several times I saw them all three at my neighbour's shop window, which is a bow front; I saw Mr. Landsdale go out, and then two young ladies came to the door; the boys continued at the window, the prisoner was moving backwards and forwards. and then I saw something like a shade, of white fall from the side of the window; I immediately went out and saw the boys; the prisoner was the middle one of the three, they moved away immediately; I followed them, and finding they gained upon me, I ran and cried stop thief, the prisoner immediately took something from his bosom, and threw it away into the area, which leads to the King's-arms public-house; I followed him to the corner of Davies-street; I called to a man to stop him, but he let him pass him; he went into a mews in Davies-street, where there was a man with a dung-fork in his hand, and he stopped him; I asked him where his companions were, and he said he had none; he cried very much, I brought him back, and heard a voice say, that the lace was picked up; I think the person said, my waiter has got it; it was brought back, and Mrs. Landsdale missed the lace; a constable was sent for, and he was taken to Marlborough-street.

Q. How far is it from your house to Davies-street? - A. But a few houses.

Q. Did you know the voice you spoke of? - A. I rather think it was the master of the coffee-house, Mr. Southey.

DAVID HANMER sworn. - I live waiter, at Mr. Southey's coffee-house and tavern, in Lower Brook-street; I heard a cry of stop thief. I ran out immediately; a gentleman on houseback said, there was the property; I picked it up in the area, it was thrown over a water-butt, and laid partly upon the water-hut; and partly upon the area rails.

Q. Who has the lace? - A. Mr. Lansdale; I delivered it to my master.

Q. Is he here? - A. No.

Q.(To Mr. Lansdale.) What you produce here, you received from Mr. Southey? - A. Yes, (produces the lace;) it was drawn through a screw-hole of the window; it appeard to have been done by a wire; the card upon which it was, was left in the window; I am positive it is my lace.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming past, and saw two boys standing at the window; I saw them run; I heard a cry of stop thief; I ran after them; I saw one of them throw away the lace, and as I was running after them, there came a groom and stopped me.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately , aged 13.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-4

536. GEORGE BROWN and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , two pair of boots, value 20s. the property of William Martin .

JAMES JOHNSON sworn. - I live with Mr. Martin, in Davies-street, Berkeley-square; I was sent by the shopman with two pair of boots to Suffolk-street, Charing-cross , on the 25th of March; when I got there, and was taking a book out of one of the boots, the prisoner Brown knocked at the door, and asked who those boots were

for, and I told him for Mr. Mitchell, and he said he would take them; I gave him the two pair of shoes; I went two or three doors lower down, and saw him go in with the boots and shut the door; I then concluded he belonged to the house, and I went away home; Mr. Mitchell's servant then came to my master's, and said, the boots had never been left there; I went to the house to see if I could find the person I gave them to; I saw all the servants, but none of them was the person; I then went to Mr. Ford, in Swallow-street, Oxford-street, who deals in old boots, they were both pair old boots; he said, the person he bought them of was frequently coming there, and he would stop him the next time he came; the next day between two and three o'clock, Mr. Ford came to me, he had got the prisoner at Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I suppose the man was only a moment with you? - A. No.

Q. Are you certain the man you saw the next day, was the man you gave the boots to? - A. Yes.

BALTIS FORD sworn. - On Whitsun Monday, the 25th of May, the prisoner Jones brought me two pair of boots, I gave him twenty-two shillings for the two pair of boots; about four hours afterwards the last witness came to ask me if I had purchased any boots; I told him I had, I knew the persons and would stop them; he described the prisoner Brown as having a blue coat, striped waistcoat, and sandy hair; I knew him perfectly well with Jones; the next day, they both came to recommend a person to purchase a pair of sheets of me; I secured Jones, and my man secured Brown, and we took them to Marlborough-street. (The boot were produced and identified by Johnson.)

Mr. Alley. Q.Is Mitchell here to-day? - A. No.

The prisoner Brown left his defence to his Counsel.

Jones was not put upon his defence.

Brown, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

Jones, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-5

537. MARY HAYCOCK was indicted for that she, on the 1st of June , two pieces of false and counterfeit missed money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good seven-shilling piece, and six pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, the same not being cut in pieces, feloniously did put off to one John Dumphy, at a lower rate and value than the same, by their denomination did import, and were counterfeited for, that is to say for one good seven-shilling piece .

Second Count. For the like offence, varying the manner of charging it.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN DUMPHY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a private in the East London Miitia: On the 1st of June, about two o'clock, I went to the Castle and Falcon, in Holborn ; I had before that received some marked money, a seven-shilling piece, and three shillings and sixpence in silver; I had no other money about me; Neale, and the prisoner with him, came into the same box with me; Neale told her I was the person who wanted to buy the money of her; she then asked me what quantity I wanted; I told her I wanted but two seven-shilling pieces and six shillings at present; I asked her the price, and she told me she would sell me seven-shilling pieces for half-a-crown each, and the shillings for fourpence apiece; I bought of her two seven-shilling pieces and six shillings; I paid her a seven-shilling pieces, the marked one that I had received from Ray.

Q. Did you see any more seven-shilling pieces? - A. Yes; she had one in her hand besides the two that I bought of her; the silver she polled out from somewhere under her apron; I told her I had an inclination to go to Hounslow fair, and I should want some more; she asked me what she should have to drink; I said any thing she liked, and she called for some cherry brandy; I then gave the signal to Mrs. Sullivan, and she went out and fetched the officers in; Armstrong laid hold of her, and asked me what I had been doing; I told him I had been buying some bad money of that woman; she did not say any thing to that.

PATRICK M NEALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a private in the London Militia: On the 1st of June I brought the prisoner to the Cistle and Falcon, in Holborn; Dumphy was there, and I told him that was the woman that he was to buy the money of; she told him she would furnish him with any thing he wanted; accordingly he bought of her two seven-shilling pieces and six shillings in silver; he gave half-a-crown a piece for the two seven-shilling pieces, and fourpence a piece for the shillings; he gave her a marked seven-shilling piece for them.

JOHN ARMSTRONG , sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the officers of Worship-street: On the 1st of June last Ray gave Dumphy a marked seven-shilling piece, three shillings, and a sixpence; I then searched him; he had no other money about him; I waited at the Six Canns till Mrs. Sullivan gave us a signal, and we went into the Castle and Falcon; the prisoner was fitting in a box, Dumphy next to her, and Neale the other side of Dumphy; I moved the table and caught hold of her right hand; at that moment I saw her other hand moved from under her apron, and at that moment I heard something chink on me floor; that was picked up by Ray; I then conveyed the prisoner into a back parlour; Dumphy followed

us; I was then proceeding to search her, and I observed she had something in her mouth; I found her teeth close grasped; I called for a spoon to force her mouth open, but did not use it; I thought she would do herself some harm, and I was afraid to try it; she appeared to be trying to swallow something; she struggled very much against being searched; I then said to Domphy, what have you been doing with this woman; he said, buying some counterfeit money; he then delivered me this money, which he said he had bought of her for a seven-shilling piece, (produces it); I searched her, but found nothing upon her except a duplicate.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I delivered to Dumphy a seven shilling piece and three shillings and sixpence, marked money; I went with Armstrong to the Castle and Falcon; the prisoner was sitting in a box, and Neale and Dumphy with her; Armstrong laid hold of her right hand; I saw her left hand go under her apron; I immediately heard something chink; I that instant stooped down and picked up two seven-shilling-pieces and thirteen shillings, all counterfeit; I observed she had got something in her mouth, attempting to swallow for two or three minutes, till at last. she made a long neck, and something went down her throat; after that she did not speak for I suppose a minute; we searched her, but found nothing upon her; Armstrong asked Dumphy what he had been doing with that woman, and Dumphy said, he had been buying bad gold and silver, which he immediately produced to Armstrong; we then took her into custody. (Mr. William Parker proved all the money to be counterfeit).

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that her husband was a private in the Guards, upon foreign duty; that she works in the markets as a porter; that she met Neale, who asked her to drink; that she drank some porter with him and another man; that they had some cherry brandy; when two men came in and seized her and searched her, under pretence of finding a marked seven-shilling piece, which she never had.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined twelve months in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-6

538. JOHN RONALDSON and JAMES CARRUTHERS were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , three gallons of oil of turpentine, value 18s. the property of John Shuttleworth , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN SHUTTLEWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a manufacturer of oil of turpentine , in Sun Tavern-fields; the prisoner was in the service as a distiller ; I have discovered since his apprehension, that he has robbed me of nearly half a ton; in consequence of suspicion I apprehended him on the 6th of June, and took him before Mr. Rupert Clark , the Magistrate at Shadwell; I attended the examination, when his confession was taken in writing.

Q. Did you give him any reason to suppose he should have favour if he confessed the robberies upon you that he had been guilty of? - A. None whatever; but the contrary.

Q. Did the Magistrate give him any hopes of mercy to induce him to make that confession? - A. None whatever.

Q. Had you any knowledge, except from what you learned from Ronaldson, that a person of the name of Sevier had been concerned.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you not tell him if he confessed you would not hurt him? - A Upon my oath I did not; I will tell you what I did say; I told him the only recompence he could now make me, was to give up the person who had received it.

Q. Did you not follow that up by saying you would be lenient to him? - A. No; on the contrary, I assured him he had nothing to expect from me.

RUPERT CLARK , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were the Magistrate before whom the prisoner, Ronaldson, was examined? - A. I was.

Q. Is that your signature? - A. It is; it was read over to him, and he signed it.

Q. Did you make him any promise to induce him to make that confession? - A. NO. (It is read).

"The examination and voluntary confession of John Ronaldson, for felony, taken from the 6th of June, 1801, before me, Rupert Clark, Esq. - John Ronaldson, I am distiller to Mr. John Shuttleworth, turpentine-manufacturer, Sun Tavernfields, and have been about three years; I acknowledge having taken, at different times, from my master's manufactory, several quantities of oil of turpentine, which I employed a man of the name of William Sevier, a Bristol man, to take to Mr. King's, who keeps an oil and colour-shop in High-street, Shadwell, to receive the money; I have known Sevier about twelve months; he was a journeyman painter, and used the Artichoke, Artichoke-hill, Ratcliffe-highway; I have met him there, and talked about his taking oil of turpentine to sell; I always took the oil of turpentine, which I took from my master's house, in bladders, but Sevier was to take it to Mr. King's in bottles."

Q.(To Mr. Shuttleworth). Oil of turpentine is not a thing commonly used? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. A painter, I take it, would be in possession of oil of turpentine? - A. Certainly, in small quantities.

WILLIAM SEVIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a painter and glazier; I have

known Ronaldson ten or eleven months: On Sun. day I met him in Stepney-fields, in consequence of which he afterwards called at my house for me; I went with him to the Wheatsheaf, near the Spice Islands; he said, where he lived, he had but 16s. a week, and there were little perquisites allowed him by his master; he said they were oil of turpentine; he asked me if I would sell it for him, as I being in the line knew better where to dispose of it than he did; I told him I did not like to have any thing to do with it; after that he called upon me again, and asked me if I had seen any person about it; I told him I was afraid to have any hand in it at all; he said I need not be afraid, for it was safe enough, it was perquisites that his master allowed him; I told him if it was so, I would look out for a person, that was about ten months ago; I was recommended by a person of the name of Beare to Mr. Carruthers; about six or seven weeks before Christmas I went to Mr. Carruther's house, in Pitfield-street, Old-street-road, he is a plumber, painter, and glazier; I saw Mr. Carruthers, and I told him I came from William Beare, and he said he knew him very well; I said I came about some turpentine that Beare had been speaking to him about last club night; he said he understood I did; I asked him if he would have some spirits of turpentine; he said he would; he asked me if it was good; I told him it was very good, as far as I knew; he then asked me if it was safe; I told him it was not mine, but it was very safe, as far as I knew.

Q. What do you understand by safe? - A. I don't know what he meant.

Q. What did you mean when you told him it was safe? - A. I did not know but it was the man's perquisites; he asked me how much there was; I told him I could not rightly tell.

Q. Do you mean at this time to swear that you thought it was the man's perquisites, that he came honestly by it? - A. Yes; then Mr. Carruthers asked me when I would bring it, and how much it was a gallon; I told him it could not be dear at 4s. 6d. a gallon; he said that was too much, he would give me 4s. a gallon; I told him I would bring it in the course of a day or two; after I had done work, at six o'clock, I told Ronaldson what had passed; he said, we will take him some, and so be took one bottle, and I another, two days after; Ronaldson and I went together.

Q. How much do you think those two bottles contained? - A. The bottles contained about four or five gallons, but I cannot rightly say how much there was in each, we both went, I told him we had brought the spirits of turpentine; he said, very well, and took it; we told him what the bottles held; he said, are you sure of it; I said, there was full measure; I believe one bottle had three gallons, and the other two and a half; he paid us at a public-house the corner of Pitfield-street; he put the money upon the table, and I took it up; I gave the money to Ronaldson.

Q. Did he enquire, either of you or Ronaldson, who he was? - A. NO.

Q. Not how either of you came by it? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Were you afterwards taken before the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards go with any of the officers to Mr. Carruthers's house? - A. Yes; I rung him up, he opened the door; I said, how are you, and then Brown, the officer, went in.

Q. Who did you work for? - A. Mrs. Baker.

Q. How much turpentine do you use in the course of a year? - A.About six gallons, but we had hardly and business after my master died; we kept to plumbing and glazing.

Q. Did you know where the prisoner, Ronaldson, lived? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know his mother-in-law? - A. Yes, but not by name.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not know Carruthers before this time at all? - A. No.

Q.Beare you knew before? - A. Yes.

Q. What was Beare? - A. A plumber, glazier, and painter, in Long-lane.

Q. Then it was through the representation of Beare that you went to Carruthers? - A. Yes.

Q. When you went to Carruthers, and he said, is it safe, that was before any bargain was struck? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you understand by that, that he asked whether it was honestly come by or not? - A. I understood so, and I told him it was safe.

Q. What time of the day was it when you took it? - A.Between eight and nine in the evening.

Q.Before the shop was shut up? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not measure them, but relied upon the engagement he had made before? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the sort of oil, the quality of it? - A. It looked like any other.

Q. You don't know but it might be damaged? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you not say, before the Magistrate, it was damaged? - A. I related that to Beare beforehand; I told Beare it was damaged spirits of turpentine, that was allowed to a young man by his master for perquisites.

Q. He paid you in the public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. So that any person might see it? - A. yes.

Court. Q. The oil was not at the public-house? - A. No.

Q. Did he empty the oil out of the bottles that you carried it in? - A. Yes.

Q. Could he, in pouring it out, distinguish the quality? - A. He could see whether it was damaged or not.

ANN RUNSLEY sworn - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Ronaldson married my daughter; I

have lived with him a good many years as a servant.

Q. Was your son-in-law acquainted with Sevier? - A. Yes, he used to come.

Q. Do you know what he came about? - A. No; when he came, they used to go into the garden.

Q. Do you know any thing respecting any oil of turpentine? - A. No; only there was a bottle found in a bag in the back kitchen after it was found out.

ANN CULLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Sevier lodges in my house; the prisoner, Ronaldson, used to call at my house upon Savier; he generally had with him either a stone bottle, or a small flask in a basket.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I belong to Shadwell Police-office: On the 9th of June, about six in the morning, I went to execute a search-warrant at the house of Carruthers, with Mr. Hillery, a clerk of Mr. Shuttleworth's, Sevier, Holebrook, and Elby; Sevier pointed out the house to us; I sent Savier forward to get admittance; when he got admittance, I followed him in: I saw Carruthers without his coat, he was then speaking to Sevier; I told him I was come for some oil of turpentine; he said, he had none; I told him he had bought some of Sevier; Sevier was in the shop with me; I desired him to shew me where he kept his oil of turpentine; he took down a key, and went backwards into the yard; he unlocked a little place like a colour-shop in the shed in the yard; I searched, and found a carboy full of oil of turpentine; a carboy is a glass bottle fastened in a wicker basket; I made further search, and under the bench in the shop there was another carboy, which I examined, and found to be nearly three parts full of oil of turpentine; I then said to Carruthers, how could you tell me you had none; I asked him then again how he came by it; he told me he had it from the young man, pointing to Sevier, and another young man, that they had come together.

Q. What might this carboy hold? - A. I believe about seven or eight gallons, I am not certain; I then asked him how many times he had had of him; he told me from six to eight times; I asked him how much they brought at a time; he told me from six to seven gallons; he told me he did not always come with oil of turpentine, but sometimes for money, that they always came together; he said he had given after the rate of 4s. a gallon; I secured the property, and Mr. Carruthers was taken before the Magistrate; I was present when Mr. Hillery took samples of the oil; we have the car boys in Court.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What is the defendant's shop? - A. He carries on plumbing, painting, and glazing.

Q. Are you sure that he could hear the question that you put to him, whether he knew any thing of any oil of turpentine? - A. He was very close to me.

Q. Do you know whether, in point of fact, he is deaf or not? - A. I do not.

Q.However, he afterwards told you he had it from Sevier? - A. Yes.

Q. And he told you that four shillings was the price? - A. Yes.

GEORGE HILLERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk to Mr. Shuttleworth; I attended the search-warrant at Carruthers's house, and took samples of the oil found at his house.(Produces them).

Q. Has it the appearance of damaged, or good oil? - A. Good oil.

Mr. Shuttleworth. It is as good as ever was manufactured.

Q. Have you ever allowed any perquisites at all to your men of that article? - A. Never.

Mr. Knapp. Q. It is an article that is used by painters? - A. Yes, painters generally use it.

Q. Will you venture to swear to one bottle of oil of turpentine to distinguish it from another? - A. No.

JOHN CRUCHFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. In December last what was the price of oil of turpentine? - A. From six shilling and sixpence to seven shillings.

Q.Look at that oil, and see if it is good oil, and marketable? - A. They both appear to be very good.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

- BANKS sworn. - I told Mr. Carruthers some oil of turpentine last October, at six shillings a gallon: he generally had a gallon of turpentine and a gallon of linseed oil.

The prisoner Carruthers called five other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Ronaldson, GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

Carruthers, GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-7

539. JOHN RONALDSON and JOHN HILLIER were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , three gallons of oil of turpentine, value 4s. the property of John Shuttleworth , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN SHUTTLEWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a manufacturer of oil of turentine ; Ronaldson was my distiller ; I have, during the time he has been with me, missed a greatquantity of oil of turpentine, to the amount of nearly half a ten; in consequence of suspicion I took him upon a charge of robbing me.

Q. Was you present before the Magistrate when he gave the account that was taken in writing? - A. I was.

Q. Did you give him any reason to induce in him a hope of favour? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you ever permit him to take oil as perquisites? - A. No.

RUPERT CLARKE , Esq; sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys Q. Look at that, was it taken before you? - A.It was.

Q.Did the prisoner sign it? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any promise held out to induce him to make that confession, or any threat? - A. Not any, it was free and voluntary. (The confession read.)

Q. King was the only person you suspected to be a receiver? - A. Yes.

Q.Sevier was not known to you, but from the information of Ronaldson? - A. No.

WILLIAM SEVIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys Q. When did you first become acquainted with a person of the name of Ronaldson? - A About ten or eleven months ago; I am servant to Mr. Baker, a plumber, painter, and glazier, at Rotherhithe; about ten months ago, Ronaldson came to me, we went to a public-house to have some beer; he said, where he was, he got but sixteen shillings a week, but his master allowed him a little perquisite in damaged spirits of turpentine; he asked me to fell it for him, I told him I did not like to have any thing to do with it, I was afraid it was not come honestly by; he told me I need not be afraid, it was safe enough; I told him afterwards I would.

Q. When did you first see Hillier? - A. Just after Mr. Carruthers's business, I went to Mr. Hillier, and told him, I was going to dispose of it to another person, I did not tell him who that person was, nor he did not ask; he asked how much we had got, I told him, I did not rightly know; I told him, I thought there were tow gallons; he asked me the price, I told him four shillings; he said, that was too much money; he told me, that a very little while ago, he bought a carboy that he gave half-a-crown for; I told him he could not have it at that, it was too little, upon which he agreed to give me three shillings and sixpence, and Ronaldson desired me to take it; I took it in a stone bottle that held three gallons; he asked me if I was sure it held three gallons, and I told him I was sure of that.

Q. Was he content with your assurance, without measuring it? - A. Yes; and he neither asked, not I did not tell him how I came by it.

Q. Did you not tell him, when you went to him, that you had got some spirits of turpentine left from a ship's job? - A. No.

Q. That you swear? - A. Yes.

That you did not represent to him? - A. No.

Q. Did you tell him you had come honestly by it? - A. No; I told him it did not belong to me.

Q. Did you tell him you had stole it? - A. NO.

Q. Where do you come from here? - A.From Shadwell office.

Q. You was taken up for stealing it? - A. No; I was taken up for selling it.

Q. And you was kept in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. I dare say, you mentioned it openly among your acquaintance? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You kept it a secret? - A. Yes.

Q. Thinking it an honest transaction, you talked of it of course over your pot of beer at the alehouse? - A. I did not tell every one of it.

Q. Did you tell any human creature till after you was taken up? - A. I said, I received it from Ronaldson.

Q. Upon being taken up, you began to be afraid you should be transported or hanged? - A. No.

Q. You had no fear at all of being punished yourself? - A. No, I did not know but I was acting right.

Court. Q. You yourself are a painter? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever buy any yourself? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever know your mistress buy any? - A. Yes, she sent for it when she wanted.

Q. Did Ronaldson tell you how much you were to have? - A. There was no bargain made.

Q. If you were to have a certain part of it, it would have been an inducement to you to have sold it for as much as you could get? - A. Yes.

Q. How much did he give you of this half-guinea? - A.Three and sixpence; sometimes I did not have any.

Q. Was it not understood between you, that you were to have one-third of what you could sell this turpentine for? - A. No, it was not.

Q.What did you get for that you sold to Carruthers? - A. He did not pay us all at once.

Q.Had you not, for disposing of this turnpentine, one third of the rate at which you sold it? - A. No; sometimes I had half-a-crown, sometimes five shillings, and sometimes less.

ANN RUMSLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am mother-in-law to Ronaldson.

Q. You have seen sevier? - A. yes, he was acquainted with Ronaldson; he used to come to the house, and go into the garden together.

ANN CULLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Sevies lodged at my house; Ronaldson and he were acquainted, he used to call upon him at our house; he generally came in the evening, and brought something with him, either a stone bottle, or a small bottle in a slask.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Knowlys. I am an officer; I went with a search-warrant to the house of Hillier; Sevier shewed me the house; I went to the shop, and Mr. Hillier was not withim; I sent Elby, the other officer, and Sevier out, and in the course of a few minutes, they came back; I told Mr. Hillier I was come for some oil of Turpentine, which he had bought of Sevier; he said, he had not bought any of him; I told him he had, at four shillings a gallon; then he said, he had bought of him; he then acknowledged that he had bought of him twice; Sevier pointed to the carboy just within the door; Hillier said, it was there, and likewise some that he had bought from one Mr. Hill; I then secured him and took him to the office; Mr. Hillery took a sample.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It was almost immediately after that, he recollected himself, and said, yes, he had? - A. It was in the course of a minute or two.

GEORGE HILLERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk to Mr. Shuttleworth, the prosecutor; I took a sample of the oil of turpentine, found at Hillier's, (produces it;) it is very good turpentine.

Mr. Shuttleworth. This is very good turpentine.

JOHN CRUCHFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I believe you deal largely in the article of turpentine, and live on Holborn-hill? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that oil of turpentine? - A. It certainly appears to be good.

Q. In February and March, or April, what was the price of oil of turpentine? - A. It rose in January to seven shillings, or seven and sixpence; in February, it stood about the same price, till March, and then it rose again to eight and sixpence or nine shillings; in April it sell again.

Q. Could it have been bought for three shillings and sixpence? - A. Not since January; I never sold it for less than six shillings.

Court. Q. Is there any difference between oil of turpentine, and spirits of turpentine? - A. No; it is sometimes called one, and sometimes the other.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

For the Prisoner Hillier.

JAMES CROSSLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am book-keeper to the prisoner Hillier.

Q. Do you know the witness Sevier? - A. Yes, by sight; I saw him at my master's house three or four months ago; I saw him one evening, my master was leaning upon the painting bench, he said, how do you do, Mr. Hillier; I have a little turpentine, will you buy it? Mr. Hillier said, how did you come by it, did you get it honestly and fairly? Sevier said, yes, he did; Mr. Hillier asked him if it was good, yes, says he, pretty good; then says Mr. Hillier, bring it, that is all I know of it; he said, he and another had it left from a job.

Q. Did he say what job it was? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Your master is a painter, is not he? - A. Yes.

Q. When he sends out his journeymen, what quantity of turpentine does he send out? - A. I am only at Hillier's a little now and then, writing at over hours, as I can spare an hour or two.

Q. Can you tell us what price they bargained for? - A. No.

Q. Did not he say what price will you give? - A. Not in my hearing.

Q. Did you leave them there? - A. No.

Q.Therefore there was no talk about price or quantity? - A. No; only Mr. Hillier asked if it was good.

Q. You don't know whether Hillier ever bought any of him, or not? - A. No.

The prisoner called fifteen other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Ronaldon, GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Hillier, GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-8

540. EDWARD WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , an inkstand, value 5s. 6d. two glass bottles, value 6d. and fifty printed papers, value 1s. the property of William March , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM MARCH sworn. - I left my son in the shop while I went out, and when I returned, I found an ink-stand had been taken away, I know nothing of its being taken away.

JOHN MARCH sworn. - On Friday evening last, the prisoner came into my father's shop, about eight o'clock in the evening; he requested I would shew him a bible; I was obliged to go round the counter to the front window to get one to shew him; when I had got to the window, he said, I need not trouble myself to shew him one, but if I would tell him the price of them, it would be sufficient; he was gone out of the shop an hour before I missed the ink-stand; I heard that the ink-stand was stopped at Mr. Stennett's in Paternoster-row; I saw the ink-stand before the Magistrate, on Saturday, at Guildhall; there were two glasses in it, and fifty printed washing lists in the drawer of it, they were produced at Guildhall by the beadle; the price of the ink-stand was written in my father's handwriting, in the drawer of the ink-stand.

Q. Did you see him take it? - A. No.

Q. Did you see him near the ink-stand? - A. No.

Q. What is the value of the ink-stand? - A. Six shillings.

BENJAMIN STENNEIT sworn. - I am a chinaman, in Paternoster-row; the prisoner came into my shop on Friday evening, between eight and nine o'clock; he asked me the price of a jug; I

shewed him several, which he did not approve; upon turning round from the prisoner I saw his hand go towards he counter; I went round, and challenged him with having taken something; he had a bag under his arm; I said I should have him searched, and insisted upon knowing what he had got; he took a candlestick from under his arm, asked me what I asked for it, and put it down; I insisted upon seeing what he had got, and discovered an ink-stand and glasses; I sent for a constable, and the ink-stand was delivered to him.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the property); I received them from Mr. Stennert.

Mr. Stennett. These are the same that I took from the prisoner.

Mr. William March . It is my property; I know it by the price in my own hand-writing, and the washing-lists are different from any others, for they were for a lady, who had them cut till they were almost spoiled, in order to fit this drawer.

Prisoner's defence. I had no money to assist me, and I did not know what to do.

GUILTY, aged 76.

Of stealing goods value 4s. 10d.

Twelve months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-9

541. EVAN JONES and DENNIS WESTON were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June , 9lb. of indigo, value 3l. 12s. the property of Jeremiah Ives , the elder, Jeremiah Ives , the younger, Joseph Echalas , and John Green Beasley ; and the other for receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home, they were Both ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-10

542. MICHAEL O'NEAL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , a coat, value 20s. the property of William Edley .

WILLIAM ANDREWS sworn. - I am servant to William Edley, silversmith, pawnbroker, and salesman : On Thursday, the 4th of June, I lost a coat from the door, in Little Britain ; I missed it, and went in search of the prisoner; I found him up the next court, going to secrete it under his jacket; I asked him then what he was going to do with the coat; he said, what is that to you; upon receiving that answer I endeavoured to take the coat from him; he then attempted to strike me with a shovel that he had in his hand, and missed me; I then laid hold of the coat, and finding I was resolute, he dropped the coat, and likewise the shovel, which I immediately picked up, and pursued him; he then ran down the court into little Britain; I caught hold of him, and gave him in charge to Wilkins, and he was taken to the Compter.

- WILKINS sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the coat); I received it from William Andrews; he gave me charge of the prisoner.

Andrews. This coat has my hand-writing upon it.

Q. How far is this court from your house? - A. Not more than fifteen yards.

Prisoner's defence. I bought it of a man just at the prosecutor's door for five shillings.

GUILTY , aged 26.

One month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-11

543. NATHANIEL LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a box; value 3d. thirty flasks, value 3s. and four gallons of oil, value 36s. 9d. the property of George-Allen Aylwin , and Thomas Chapman .

GEORGE- ALLEN AYLWIN sworn. - I am a broker and agent , in partnership with Thomas Chapman; we have warehouses in Thames-street; I can only speak to the property.

THOMAS COOPER sworn. - I am a watchman upon the Quays: On the 26th of June, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the bar take away a box, containing flasks of oil; I have seen it opened since; I was employed by Messrs. Aylwin and Chapman to watch the goods; I saw the prisoner take the box, and I followed him up the gateway; I stopped him, with the box upon him, just before he got to the top; he struggled to get away, but I prevented him; he took the box back to the place from whence he took it, and I delivered him into the hands of a porter while I went to get a constable; the constable has the box.

Q. Was this one of the boxes you had the care of to watch for Messrs. Aylwin and Chapman? - A. Yes.

GEORGE HUGHES sworn. - I am porter to Aylwin and Chapman; I held the prisoner while Cooper went for a constable; the box was brought back and put near the pile where it was taken from; the prisoner is the man.

RICHARD HARVEY sworn. - I am one of the constables of the Quay; the property and the prisoner were delivered to me; I have had it ever since. (produces the box).

Mr. Aylwin. This is our property; we are answerable for it; it has the ship mark upon it by which it was imported, P. H. in one; I have not the least doubt of its being our property; it contains thirty flasks of olive oil.

Prisoner's defence. I was looking for work upon the Quays, and a man employed me to carry it; when I was detected the man was gone; my regiment is abroad, and my officers.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped one hundred yards on Young's Qaay .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-12

544. JOHN PAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June , two pounds four ounces of pewter, value 2s. the property of James Brown and Thomas Compton .

THOMAS APPLETON sworn. - I am apprentice to James Brown and Thomas Compton , wormmakers ; the prisoner was a labourer : On Tuesday, the 2d of June, about three in the afternoon, I observed the prisoner melting some pewter, which he had no business with; he put the metal that he had been melting into an iron pit by the fire; it is what we use for burning dirt in; he then went into a charcoal lost to fetch some charcoal; while he was gone, I examined the metal, and about four o'clock he took the seats of the chaise, which were on the pit, and took the metal out of the pit and went away to the stables; as soon as he was gone to the stable, I searched the pit for the metal, and it was gone; I acquainted William Appleton of it, and we went after him to the stable; I then came back, and fetched Mr. Brown; I then charged him with having taken the metal; he denied it; then Mr. Brown threatened to search the stable; I described the metal that he had taken, and then he confessed that he had taken it.

Q.Was there any offer of favour made him? - A. None, that I know of; Mr. Brown asked him where it was; he said, in the lost; we went up into the lost, and found that piece, and some more.

Q. Did you see that piece sufficiently, to be sure it was the same piece? - A. I have no doubt at all about it.

Q. You don't know where he got the pewter from? - A. No.

WILLIAM APPLETON sworn. - I am brother to the last witness; I am journeyman to Messrs. Brown and Compton: In consequence of information from my brother, I went into the stable; when I got there, the prisoner was going up into the lost; I sent for Brown; when he came, I went up into the lost, and saw the prisoner find these pieces of pewter, (producing them); besides the piece that the last witness speaks to, there are eleven pieces that I can swear to as being of my own manufactory; they were all found together.

Thomas Appleton . This large piece I can speak to; when I saw it, it was warm, just come out of the ladle.

Prisoner's defence. This metal had been in the stable two months before I came there.

GUILTY .

Confined one week in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-13

545. JAMES BROADERS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Sex and Mary Yare , widow , about the hour of one in the night of the 7th of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a chaile-harness, value 5l. two bridles, value 1l. two saddle cloths, value 2s. and a horse-sheet, value 5s. the property of the said George Sex and Mary Yare; and two cloth coats, value 4l. a pair of leather breeches, value 10s. and a pair of leather boots, value 6s. the property of Patrick Hannah .

Second Count. Laying it to be the dwelling-house of Mary Yare only.

PATRICK HANNAH sworn. - I live in Hog-lane , in Mrs. Yare's house; George Sex is in partnership with Mary Yare .

Q. Are either of them here? - A. No.

Q. Then you cannot know the nature of the partnership between them? - A. No; they carry on the livery-stable business ; the property was taken from the stable, which is all under one roof with the house, on Sunday morning, the 7th of June.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant, or a stranger? - A. He rode in the yard some time back; the stable was shut up about twelve o'clock on the Saturday night; the articles mentioned in the indictment were in the stable; I was alarmed by the watchman about one o'clock in the morning; I saw part of the property in Spitalfields watch-house about ten o'clock the next day.

JOHN ADDIS sworn. - I am a watchman: About three o'clock in the morning I met the prisoner in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields, with a bundle upon his shoulder, containing a chaise-harness, a horsesheet, and two bridles; I asked him what he had got there; he said, d - n my blood, what was that to me; then he said it was his own property; then he dropped the things, and called to his partner; he knocked me down, and they fell upon me and beat me terribly; there were five of them, and then they all ran away.

Q. Did you pursue them till they were taken? - A. No.

Q.Had the prisoner a round hat on? - A. Yes; I did not see him till the Monday morning, about ten o'clock.

Q. How did you know him again? - A. I took very particular notice of his face and his dress; he was in the same dress.

Q. Knowing this man's life to be at stake can you take upon yourself positively to say that he is the man? - A. I am confident of it. (Produces the property).

JOHN RAY sworn. - On Sunday, the 7th, Patrick Hannah came to my house; I heard that some harness had been stopped; I was in the neighbourhood of Petticoat-lane, I met the prisoner, I knew that he had worked on the premises; I said, James, I want to speak to you; I told him his old mistress's premises were broke open; that five of them had knocked the watchman down, and got away, and, from the description, he was one of the five;

he then immediately owned that he was the man who knocked the watchman down.

Q. You had not told him it would be better for him to confess? - A. I had not in the least; Addis, the watchman, was sent for to the watch-house, and he picked him out; the man seemed very much bruised and beat about the head.(Hannah identified the articles produced by Addis.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-14

545. JOHN RONALDSON and THOMAS KING were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , five gallons of oil of turpentine, value 35s. the property of John Shuttleworth , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

JOHN SHUTTLEWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a manufacturer of the oil of turpentine , in Sun Tavern Fields ; the prisoner, Ronaldson, was my distiller in that manufactory; I had lost near half a ton weight while Ronaldson was in my service.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, King? - A. I think he has dealt with me once or twice.

Q. Is seven pounds the weight of a gallon? - A. Yes; we sell it by weight: On the 6th of June last, in consequence of suspicion, I apprehended Ronaldson; I was attending his examination before the Magistrate, when the account he gave of it was reduced into writing.

Q. Were any promises of savour made to him to induce him to give that account? - A. No.

Q. Nor any threats of prosecution if he did not? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. When did the price of oil of turpentine rise? - A. It gradually rose from October till March; before October it was about 5s.

Q. The prisoner does not keep an oil shop, but a large chandler's shop? - A. I cannot say, I never was at the shop.

Q. A person in that trade could not have so large a consumption as a painter? - A. No.

Q.And therefore using it in small quantities, might not be so conversant with the rise of price as you were? - A.Certainly not.(Mr. Rupert Clarke , the Magistrate, proved the confession of Ronaldson to be a voluntary one, which was read).

WILLIAM SEVIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner, Ronaldson? - A. About ten or eleven months; he came to my house, and we went from there to a public-house; he said he had but 16s. a week, besides some oil of turpentine that was perquisites allowed him from his master, and he wished me to dispose of it for him; I told him I did not like to have any hand in it; he said he was doing right, and swore to it; I told him I did not like to have any thing to do with it; we drank up the beer, and went away; two nights afterwards he came again, and I agreed to look out for a person to buy it.

Q. Did you know the prisoner King? - A.Between three and four months ago, Ronaldson came to my house, and wanted me to go to Mr. King.

Q. What is King? - A. There is written over the door, Thomas King, oil and colourman, about half a dozen doors from the Police-office, Shadwell; I went into the shop, and saw Mr. and Mrs. King; I had on a brown velvet jacket, leather breeches, and an apron.

Q. Had you any trowsers on? - A. Not then; I had when I took it; I asked King if he would like to take it; I told him it was not my own, but belonged to another person.

Q. Did he make any enquiry who that other person was? - A. No, he did not, nor I did not tell him; he asked me if it was good, and if it was safe; I said, it was safe enough, he need not to be afraid; he asked me what it was a gallon; I told him it could not be dear at 4s. 6d.; he said, that was rather too much; I told him it was very good, would he like to see it first; he said, yes; I then went to Ronaldson, and told him what had passed, and he gave me some in a small phial, which I took to Mr. King; he smelled it, and said it had not the smell that his had; then he said he liked it very well, and would give me 4s. 6d. a gallon; either the next day, or the day following, I took some to Mr. King in two bottles, one at a time; the same day King was not in the way, and I called again the second time, and saw Mr. King; he weighed them out, and Mrs. King put down the weight; I don't remember what the weight was, but they took seven pounds and a half to the gallon; then he paid for them at the rate of 4s. 6d. a gallon; then he asked me if there was any more; I told him there would be in a few days; he desired me to bring it.

Q. Do you recollect how much he paid you? - A. No.

Q. When you received the money, how were you dressed? - A. In trowsers.

Q. Do you work in trowsers? - A. Yes.

Q. What business are you? - A. A painter and glazier; I have worked for Mrs. Baker, at Rotherhithe, these four years.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You are a painter and glazier? - A. Yes.

Q.And you had no doubt that what you were doing was fair and honest? - A. Yes.

Q. And King was induced by you to believe he was doing that that was fair and honest? - A. Yes.

Q. You brought them in open noon day, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. How far was this from the Police-office? - A. Six doors.

Q.Under the nose of the Police-officers? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How much had you for this job? - A. About five shillings or five shillings and sixpence; I received from King a one-pound note, a guinea, and two or three shillings.

Q. You had been disposing of a great deal before this? - A. Yes.

Q.Will you swear that then you thought it was a fair and honest transaction? - A. Yes.

Q.After having dealt in this way for eight months? - A. Yes.

ANN RUNSLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Your daughter married Ronaldson? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Sevier acquainted with Ronaldson? - A. Yes, he has come to the house several times.

Q. Did you hear their conversation together? - A. No; they always went into the yard to talk together.

ANN CULLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know Sevier? - A. Yes; he lodged at my house; Ronaldson was acquainted with him and used to call upon him; I have let him in several times; he generally called between six and seven in the evening.

Q. Did he bring any thing with him? - A. Sometimes; generally a stone bottle and flask bottle confined in a basket.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the officers attending the Police-office, Shadwell; I went with a search-warrant to the premises of King, on Saturday, the 6th of June, in the morning; I told Mr. King I had a search-warrant to search his house for some oil of turpentine that had been stolen from Mr. Shuttleworth; he told me to go down in the kitchen; I went down, and he shewed me some in the kitchen; it was like a warehouse; he said he had bought it of a sailor that said he came from Liverpool; he said he had given four shillings and sixpence a gallon for it.

Q.What was the quantity you found? - A. A carboy full; he said he had bought some of Mr. Shuttleworth, and he had put it altogether; Mr. Shuttleworth's clerk was with me and Elby, the officer; a sample of it was taken by Mr. Shuttleworth and his clerk; we then secured him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. - Q. King's shop is within a few doors of the office? - A. Yes.

Q. Could any man answer you more readily and more fairly every question you put to him? - A. He behaved as an honest man; he shewed us every place about.

Q. And told you part he had bought of Mr. Shuttleworth and part of a sailor-looking man? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. (To Shuttleworth). Q. Look at that signature, (shewing him a bill and receipt)? - A. That is my clerk's hand-writing.

Q. That is dated October, and it was then five shillings a gallon? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you ever allow perquisites? - A. Never.

GEORGE HILLERY sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Shuttleworth; I took a sample of the oil found in King's house, (produces it); it is very good oil.

JOHN CRUCHFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an oil and colourman, at Holborn-bridge.

Q. Three or four months ago, what was the price of oil turpentine? - A.The lowest price in April was about seven or seven shillings and sixpence.

Q.From thence back as far Christmas, would it be lower than that? - A. Not lower than that.

Q. Then, from April up to the beginning of June, what would it be? - A. Rather less.

Mr. Alley. Q.This is an article varying like other commodities? - A. Yes.

Q. And of course it is only known to the wholesale dealer in general whether it has varied or not? - A.They must know, of course.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Is the man who sells it by retail likely to know as well as the wholesale dealer? - A. I believe every man that deals in oil of turpentine knows the price.

Court. (To Haynes). Q. What sort of a shop is this, a small or a large shop? - A. A small shop, like a chandler's shop; I saw some maps, some brooms, sand, and things of that sort, like a chandler's-shop.

Q. How long has he been in business? - A. About two years; I never saw any thing bad of him; I have lived close by him all that time.PRonaldson's defence. I have been led away by Sevier; three parts out of four that he has said is false.

King's defence. The last I bought of Mr. Shuttleworth I did not give any more money than I did to this man; I did not know there had been any alteration in the price.

Court. (To Sevier). Q. Did you say any thing to King about Liverpool? - A. No.

The prisoner King called eighteen witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

Ronaldson, GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

King. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-15

546. JOHN RONALDSON was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , nine gallons of oil of turpentine, value 3l. 3s. the property of John Shuttleworth .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

(Mr. Rupert Clark , the Magistrate, proved the confession of Ronaldson to be voluntary, which was read).

WILLIAM SEVIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. The prisoner employed me to take oil of turpentine to a person of the name of Tubb.

Q. How much? - A. I cannot say; I went six or eight times.

Q. Did you take as much as nine gallons in the whole? - A. Yes.

Q. How long ago is it since you took the oil to Tubb? - A. Eight months ago; the last time was the latter end of May.

JOHN SHUTTLEWORTH sworn. - I lost a great quantity of oil of turpentine while Ronaldson was in my service, nearly to the amount of half a ton.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-16

547. JOHN JONES , alias WIGNELL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a pair of silver salts, value 30s. two saltspoons, value 2s. a cloth coat, value 40s. a pair of breeches, value 12s. a pair of overalls, value 6s. a silk handkerchief, value 6d. and a lady's skirt, value 30s. the property of Simon Winter , in his dwelling-house .

SIMON WINTER sworn. - I am a tailor ; I keep a house in Bury-street, St. James's : On the 16th of June the prisoner came to my house; he said he wanted lodgings for a friend of his coming from the country, and that the maid had shewn them to him; he wished to have a card of my address, as he expected his friend the day after.

JANE JONES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Winter: On the 16th of June the prisoner came for lodgings; I shewed him the first floor; he seemed to think the first floor would not do, and I shewed him the second floor; he wanted a card, and I sent the porter to call my master to give him his card; I went away and left him with my master.

ANN DAVIS sworn. - On the 17th of June, about ten in the evening, I was at Mr. Winter's; the prisoner at the bar knocked at the door, and asked if I was the servant of the house; I told him I was not; he asked me where the maid-servant was; I said she was gone out; he said he was the gentleman that had taken the lodgings for a friend of his; he told me to go to fetch the maid of the house; I left him in the front parlour; I came back in three minutes; the maid had left me to take care of the house while she was gone out; when I came back I found the door shut; I went away, leaving the maid at the door.

Jones. I returned with Davis, and found the door shut; I got a porter to get over the area into the house, and he opened the door to me; the prisoner was gone.

Q. Did you know what you had left in the room? - A. I had observed two silver salt-sellers and spoons when I went out, and I missed them when I came back.

WILLIAM HICKIN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in St. Martin's-lane, (produces a pair of salts and spoons): On the 18th of June I stopped them upon the prisoner; he offered them to pledge; I asked him how he came by them, (having previous notice that they were stolen); he made no answer; I(moving towards the door to keep him in as long as I could) went to weigh them, and as soon as I had got out of the front shop he turned gently out of the box; I, hearing the door go, looked at the box to see if he was there; upon finding him gone, I jumped over the counter and pursued him; I saw him running down Taylor's-buildings, and I had him secured.

Q. Can you say the value of them? - A. It is impossible to ascertain exactly what they are worth without taking the lead from the bottoms, which is put in to keep them steady.

Jones. These are the salt-sellers and spoons that I left in the room when I went out.

JAMES ALDOUS sworn. I am a pawnbroker, in Berwick-street: On the 18th of June the prisoner brought a coat, a pair of breeches, and a pair of overalls to pledge, (produces them); I lent him two guineas upon them.

DAVID GASS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in St. Martin's-lane: On the morning of the 18th of June, the prisoner came into the shop and offered to pledge the skirt of a lady's riding-habit; I lent him one pound upon it; the skirt is complete, but the jacket is wanting.

Winter. These are the salts and spoons that I lost; I do not know the value of them, but they cost me three guineas and a half; this skirt of a lady's riding-habit is mine, it laid in the back parlour, tied up in a silk handkerchief; the salts were in the front parlour; there is a door opens from one to the other; this coat is mine, that was in the front parlour; the breeches and overalls were in the same place; the overalls I cannot speak particularly to; I lost a pair of that sort, but I cannot swear to them; the other things have particular marks.

Q. What is the value of the skirt? - A. The value of the cloth is two pounds at least, the value of the coat is about two guineas and a half, they would stand me in that; the breeches stand me in about twenty shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I have no defence to make; I throw myself upon the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-17

548. WILLIAM LYON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , on hundred and thirty-seven yards of corded dimity, value 16l. 3s. 6d. two hundred and eighteen yards of muslinet, value 27l. 1s. 8d. and two yards of wrapper, value 2s. the property of Jasper Capper and John Wilson , in their dwelling-house .

Second Count. Laying it to be the dwelling-house of Jasper Capper only.(The case was opened by Mr. Gleed).

THOMAS GODDARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I live with Jasper Capper and John Wilson: On the 23d of June, about twenty minutes before nine o'clock in the evening, I crossed over from No. 42 to 44, Tavistock-street , just opposite, and in going over to the other side, I turned about to watch the door, and saw the prisoner coming out with the goods now to be produced, under his arm; he went with them towards York-street; I followed him and seized him by the collar, asking him, at the same time, what he was going to do with those goods; he answered me, that they were his, and asked me what business I had with them; he stood with them under his arm I suppose about two minutes, and, on letting them fall, Robert Mills , who is present, came up; and laid hold of him on the other side; I sent for a constable, and detained him; I have had the property every since, (produces it); here is a piece of dimity that I can swear to, it has the mark of the house upon it.

Q. What is it worth? - A. Two pounds.

Q. Look at another piece? - A.Here is a piece worth about 1l. 4s.; here is another piece worth about 15s.; here is another piece worth about 3l. 8s.

Q. You found them all together under the prisoner's arm? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Q.Will you swear you saw me come out of the house? - A. I saw him come out of the house.

Court. Q.Across the way is a very short distance? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you leave any body in the shop? - A. Yes; a nephew of Mr. Capper's, about fourteen years of age.

ROBERT MILLS sworn. - On the 18th of June I assisted Mr. Goddard in Securing the prisoner, in York-street, with the property under his arm.

Prisoner's defence. This gentleman was wrestling with another man with the property; I came up to his assistance; the other man ran away, and he immediately laid hold of me.

GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-18

549. RICHARD ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , three hats, value 1l. 10s. twenty seven pieces of silk cap crown, value 2s. four pieces of silk hat binding, value 4s. three silk hat linings, value 1s. a leather hat lining, value 6d two piece of leather, value 6d. and seventeen hat bands, value 2s. the property of George Dunnage and Thomas Larkin .(The case was opened by Mr. Clifton.)

THOMAS LARRIN sworn. - I am in partnership with George Dunnage, patentees of the silk hat manufactory , in the Strand ; the prisoner was a servant of ours: On the 27th of May I took particular notice of a hat standing upon the shelf on the 29th I had occasion to send him into the City, he went up stairs, and came down with this hat up on his head; I knew it immediately by the broad velvet band upon it; he went out to the shop door, I asked him what hat he had got there; he said it was an old hat he had been repairing.

Q. Was it an old hat? - A. It was a new hat; I saw it before it was finished.

Q. Do you ever suffer any servants of your's to repair hats in your manufactory? - A.Never, (produces the hat); here is a white mark in the front of the crown, and the same again behind; I had observed it on the 27th, and I put a mark of T. L. in the inside, which I have no doubt, if the hat is taken to pieces, will be seen; I put it between the brim and the crown.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where you saw this hat first, was upon the bench in the shop? A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that the prisoner brought the hat into the shop for the purpose of being repaired? - No.

There is a sister of the prisoner's who works in the same shop? - A. In the same house, but not in the same shop.

Q. Did you not permit your men to sell hats upon their own account, and have let them have them at the wholesale price? - A. Yes, if they go below, and give their orders.

Q.Will you undertake to swear that that very hat was not sold at your shop to the prisoner? - A. I will.

Q. It he has a hat to alter, he carries it into the manufactory? - A. No; he must bring it into the shop, the same as body else.

Q. Do they not alter hats for themselves in the manufactory? - A. Not to my knowledge, we never permit it; this hat has not yet had the least finish on the surface.

Court. Q. You told me you put T. L. upon the hat; do you put that mark upon every other hat? - A.No; it is a mark that I put upon this particular hat, in consequence of suspicion; I put it on a piece of paper, and, with the point of my

pen-knife, forced it up between the brim and the crown.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

For the prisoner.

LESTOCK PEACOCK, jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live with my father, a carpenter and joiner.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever purchase any thing of him? - A. Yes, a hat, somewhere about September or August.

Q.Did you return it to him? - A. Yes, to be repaired; I had my hair cut, and it was rather too big for me, I could not tie it in, it was so stiff, I gave it him to make it smaller, and put a leather in behind.

Q. When was it you returned it him for this purpose? - A. It was on a Thursday in June, I think the beginning, it was about six weeks.

Court. Q.Then it could not have been it June? - A. I cannot exactly say when it was, it must be six weeks.

Q. This day six weeks then you think, do you? - A. I think it was.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you ever had the hat again? - A. NO.

Q. Look at that hat? - A. This is the band; I am sure it is the same buckle and band.

Court. Q.How do you know it is the same buckle and band? - A. To be sure there a great many alike, but it is exactly like it.

Mr. Clifton. Q. Then all you mean to say, is, that you delivered a hat with such a band to the prisoner at the bar to repair? - A. Yes.

LESTOCK PEACOCK, sen. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a carpenter.

Q.Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he has been in my service.

Q. Did you ever buy any thing of him? - A. Yes; I bought a hat of him for my son, I think in September last.

Court. (To peacock, jun.) Q.How often had you worn your hat? - A. Not more than a dozen times.(Mr. Larkin cut the lining of the hat, and produced the paper with the mark T. L.)

Larkin. The hat had never been lined at all when I put the paper in.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Jury (To Larkin). Q. Did the prisoner leave his own hat in the manufactory? - A. He did, and it is here. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-19

550. WILLIAM BURK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , a silver watch, value 5l. a guinea, a seven-shilling piece, and 4s. the property of Thomas Kelly , in the dwelling-house of Richard Burk .

THOMAS KELLY sworn. - I lodge in Calmel-buildings , at the house of Richard Burk ; last Saturday night I slept in the same room with the prisoner, in a separate bed; it was past twelve o'clock when we went to bed; we were to take a swim the next morning in the river, or pond, or wherever it is; at four o'clock I looked at my watch, I thought it too early to get up; I always kept it under my pillow, for fear my head should hurt the watch; the prisonr's bed-fellow went out at the time I looked at my watch; I had no bedfellow.

Q. Did you say any thing to him? - A. No; I then settled myself, but did not go to sleep; then the prisoner got up and dressed himself in his working cloaths, with his apron on; it was then about five o'clock; my face was to the wall, and my back to him; he pulled my breeches from under my head; I at first thought he might have been getting something of his own that he had left there the day before, but I turned round, and saw him putting my watch and money in his jacket pocket; he then threw the breeches in my face, slapped to the door, and ran down stairs; I laid without a shirt; I got up and run to the head of the stairs.

Q. How long has he slept in the room with you? - A.About a month; I was ashamed to run naked after him in the street; I came back and put my cloaths on, and run after him; I pursued up and down, but could not find him, till by and by I met him with two brothers-in-law and his fellow-lodger coming out of the Mews, going out of Duke-street and Orchard-street; it was about two hours afterwards; I demanded my property of him, and he began to make game of me and hum-bug me.

Q. Did he give you all your property back? - A. Not a halfpenny-worth; I asked him for my watch, and he said if I waited till he gave me one I should go without; I asked him what he took it for, and a pressed him, but it was all in vain; I ran to the watch-house for a constable, and while I was gone for a constable he parted from his company and went off.

Q. Did you tell him you were going for a constable? - A. I did; then the constable would not wait about looking for him, and I was left alone, having no friend with me, till at last I found him and Richard Burk with a pint of ale before them at a public-house; the watch house keeper desired me to get Richard Burk to assist me, as he was a watchman in the parish, and he would not assist me, but took him away from that house up to St. Mary-le-bonne; at two o'clock I went home to get a bit of meat, and saw William Burk and Richard Burk come in staggering drunk; I came out again, and said nothing, but went to the

watch-house for assistance; I got the watchmen to take him, and Richard Burk gave me a beating.

Q. Is Richard Burk a relation of the prisoner? - A. Yes, by all account; then the watchmen came to my assistance, and he gave him a beating, and he made it up with him yesterday at Marlborough-street, and paid him the expences.

Q.When did you take him up? - A.Between one and two o'clock on Monday morning.

Q. Who took him up? - A. Two parish watchmen; they found him in my bed, he was very drunk; he had got into my bed instead of his own, with his piece up by his side.

Q. What do you mean by his piece? - A.His gun, a thing which he never did before: he belongs to the city militia; we took him to the watch-house.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes, I have been sober since I came to London? - A.Are the watchmen here? - A. No.

Q. Have you got your watch or your money again? - A.Neither.

Q. What are you? - A. A labourer.

Q. How came you to have so much money? - A. I have always lived sober and regular; and I have got to be a supernumerary in Marybone parish, and have not lost a day's work, nor a night's work, for ten weeks; and I bought my watch with the money that I saved; here are people here, coming against me, that know nothing at all about it.

Prisoner's defence. I came in before Kelly; I went to bed, and he came home in the morning part; he was so drunk, that he pushed in the door, and broke it open, and threw himself on the bed; he had his clothes on when my partner and I walked out, and that my witnesses can swear to.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN CLARK sworn. - I slept in the same bed with the prisoner, on Saturday night last; Kelly slept in the same room.

Q. How long had you and the prisoner slept in the same room? - A. I have been in the lodgings about half a year. Kelly had lodged there a fortnight or three weeks.

Q. Did any body else sleep in the room, besides you and the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Who came into the room first, that night? - Prisoner. I did.

Clark. He did; Kelly and I came in together, we had been drinking at a public-house.

Q. Did you drink much? - A. We did not drink much; but I think he was in liquor, I never saw him drink much before.

Q.How did he behave when he came into the room? - A. He went out again.

Q. Do you remember his going to bed? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Were you sober yourself - A. Yes.

Q. Did he go to bed? - A. I don't think he did, he wanted to smoke his pipe, he had a light up two pair to stairs, from a woman.

Q. What is that woman's name? - A.Mrs. Jordan.

Q. Did he go up to Mrs. Jordan? - A. I do not know, he said he was going to smoke his pipe.

Q. Do you know when he came into the room? - A.No.

Q. Do you know whether he came into the room at all? - A. Yes; he was in the room, when I got up, he was in bed with his clothes on; the prisoner and I came out together, a little before six o'clock.

Q. Did you see his watch? - A. No; Kelly was stretched upon the bed, and his hat on at the same time.

Q. Which way was his head turned; towards the door or from the door? - A.He seemed upon his back, and his hat upon him, with his clothes on.

Q.Who then went out first; the door is not big enough for two to got out together? - A. Yes, the door is big enough, we went out together; I can not swear to which was first.

Q. Did he call after you? - A. No, he did not say any thing; we went to a gin shop together, and had a glass of gin; then we went to clean some horses,and give them some hay.

Q.Did you see Kelly in the morning? - A.Not till I came back; between eight and nine o'clock in the morning; he came to our lodgings, and he told my landlord he was robbed, he said he had lost a watch, a guinea, a seven-shilling piece, and four shillings.

Q. Was the prisoner with you again in the course of the morning? - A. No.

Q. Did he go with you to clean the horses? - A. Yes, he came home with me.

Q. Did he hear Kelly say he had been robbed? - A. The landlord told him so, but Kelly was not there; then Kelly came in, and went up stairs.

Q. Did the prisoner stay at home after that? - A. He did, and the prisoner went out, and I did not see him again till the afternoon, about five o'clock; Kelly was not at home then.

Q. Did you sleep in the room with the prisoner that night? - A. Yes, I slept in my own bed; and he slept in the bed, that Kelly slept in the night before; and then Kelly came home and took him up.

Q. Was he sober then? - A. Yes, very sober.

RICHARD BURK sworn. - I rent the house that this happened in.

Q. What relation are you to the prisoner? - A. Only the name; we married two sisters.

Q. Do you remember Kelly coming home on the Saturday night? - A. I was out upon the watch; I came home about half past five.

Q.Were Clark, and William Burk at home. when you came home? - A. Yes, Burk and Clark

came down together; and Jordan, who lives in the one pair of stairs, and my wife, and they, all stood at the door together; Clark and Burk went out together, and Jordan went with them.

Q. Do you remember Kelly charging Burk with having robbed him? - A.Kelly did not get up till eight or nine o'clock.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. When he got up, did he say any thing to you? - A. He met me at my own door; he said, Burk, I am robbed; I have lost my watch, and money; how have you lost it; I do not know; were you drunk last night; no; who do you accuse; Clark, Jordan, and Burk; he said he was sure they had taken it from him, and he would swear it against them; and he said he was naked in bed when Burk snatched the watch from him.

Kelly. He says, I did not get up till between eight and nine o'clock; I was at the watch-house before it was six o'clock; Clarke was stupidly drunk, and has been every Sunday since I came to London.

Q. Was Jordan with them in the house? - A. No.

ELEANOR BURK sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Burk; last Saturday night, Clark and William Burk came home about nine o'clock.

Q. What time did Kelly come home? - A. I cannot say; I went to bed at half past one, and he was not in bed then.

Q. Was he at home at half past one? - A. No.

Q. Do you know what time he did come home? - A. No, I cannot tell.

Q. Who got up first in the morning? - A.Bill Burk, and Clark got up at a quarter before six, exactly.

Q. What led you to observe that? - A. I carried them their shirts up.

Q.Have you any watch or clock in the house? - A. Yes, we have a clock; I looked at the clock, and it was a quarter before six, when I came down from carrying them their shirts.

Q. Did any body come down besides Clark and Burk? - A.No.

Q. And it was a quarter before six, was it? - A.Exactly.

Q. Do you remember Kelly saying, he had been robbed? - A Yes, but not in the morning, till after I came home; I went out with Clark and Burk.

Q. You are sure they are the only two that went out with you? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you return again? - A. We had a glass of rum I believe.

Q. Who had the glass of rum? - A.Burk and Clark, and the man in the one pair of stairs, Jordan.

Q. Why did you say, that only these two men came down together? - A. They came down from the garret together; Jordan is obliged to go out every morning before six.

Q. Did he go out at the same time with them? - A. They both had been down at the door together, a quarter before six.

Q. What time did you come back again? - A. between eight and nine o'clock; then I saw Kelly.

Q. Do you know what time he got up? - A. No, he was in bed when we went away; between eight and nine o'clock, he came to me, and told me he had been robbed.

WILLIAM JORDAN sworn. - I am carman to a master bricklayer; I lodge in this house; last Saturday night, Kelly was very drunk, I met him with two women.

Court. There being but one witness, it is too much to convict the prisoner under these circumstances.

Jury. We are satisfied, my Lord. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rook.

Reference Number: t18010701-20

551. EDWARD MALPAS and JOHN OLD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th June , a gold watch, value 6l. the property of Francis Welch , in his dwelling-house .

ANN WELCH sworn. - I am the wife of Francis Welch , who keeps the Queen's-head, Hoxton-town ; on Friday, the 19th of June, a few minutes after eleven o'clock at night, the two prisoners came in, and called for a pint of beer; I refused drawing it, because it was after eleven; and they told me they would drink it standing.

Q. Did you know them before? - A.Malpas lives in the parish; I never saw Old before to my knowledge; I got up with a view to draw them a pint of beer; my husband had occasion to go into the yard, and he left his watch upon the table; it was a small gold watch, it was a French watch; I had got out at the tap-roomdoor, and I went back again to take up the watch, and saw Malpas taking it from the table; I told him he had got my husband's watch; he did not say any thing; I immediately run to the door, to stop his going out; Old got me fast round the neck, and held me, to prevent my going out after him; they then both made their escape; the door falls to with a weight; and as soon as I got the door open, I followed them, and cried stop thief; I saw them running in the street, but could get no person to stop them.

Q. Did you ever see your watch again? - A. No; on Sunday morning Malpas was taken up.

Q. How came he not to be taken up on Saturday? - A. He was not to be found; we applied immediately for them to be taken up; Old was taken up on Monday.

Q. What is the value of the watch? - A. It cost my husband 6l.

Q. How do you know that? - A. He told me so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q.This was all momentary; they did not stop in your house at all? - A. No.

Q. When you saw Old again, you saw him in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know him again directly? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you never said you did not? - A. No.

PETER MASON sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I apprehended the prisoner Malpas at his father's house at Hoxton, on the Sunday morning; and as I was taking him in the coach, he told me to go and look after Old, the soldier, and I should find the watch; I asked him where he was to be found, and he said at his father's, who keeps a chandler's-shop; at the back of Islington-church; he said he had met him at Cow-cross on Saturday night; and he told him he had not parted with the watch, for it was not worth 10s; I went to his father's house, but could not find him, I took him on the Monday morning, in the field; he belonged to the Tower Hamlets; and coming along, he stopped at a house, and changed his regimentals, and put on a blue great coat, which he has on now; he denied every knowledge of Malpas; when we got to the office, we took Malpas out of the lockup house, and asked him if there was any body there he knew; he said, yes, that was the man that had the watch; I asked Mrs. Welch to look into the room, and she said she did not think she should know him in reigimentals; but when she saw him, she said that was him.

The prisoner Malpas called one, and Old seven witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Malpas, GUILTY, aged 24.

Old, GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-21

552. MARY PIGGOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a silver watch, value 40s. two shirts, value 10s. and three muslin handkerchiefs, value 3s. the property of Thomas Roussell , in his dwelling-house .

ANN ROUSSELL sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Roussell , and keep a house in St. John's-court, East Smithfield ; on Saturday, the 23d of May, between eleven and twelve in the forenoon, the prisoner came to me, and asked me if I could recommend her to a bed; she said she was very much fatigued, if she could get but half a bed, she should be very glad, for she had come a long way; I asked her where she had come from, and she said from Totness, in Devonshire; she said she expected her husband every hour from sea; she said he was a cooper, I think, on board the Letter of Marque India man; she asked me if I could let her have some boiling water, she had got some tea and sugar in her bundle; a person, who came with the prisoner, went out, and was gone near two hours, and being a stranger, I thought she might have lost herself; I went to look after her, and when I came back in half an hour, the prisoner was gone; I missed my husband's watch, two shirts, and five handkerchiefs, that I had to wash; I went round to the different pawnbrokers, and in Whitechapel, at Mr. Windsor's, I found my husband's watch; I found three of the handkerchiefs at Mr. Sowerby's, in Cable-street, and the shirts at Mr. Willett's; she told me of them since she has been in confinement; I did not have her taken up; the other two handkerchiefs she said she had not; but they were altogether; she said she was very sorry for what she had done.

Q. Did she say whether she had taken the watch? - A. She owned it to the gentleman she pledged it with, and told me she was very sorry; I took out the watch at Mr. Windsor's, and paid one pound fifteen-shillings for it; they would not let me have it without. (Produces the watch.)

THOMAS FRENCH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Windsor; this is the watch that I took in from the prisoner at the bar, on the 23d of May, for thirty-five shillings.

Q. Why did you not let the woman have it without paying the money? - A. The prisoner was not found.

Q.What is it worth, do you think? - A.Forty shillings.

Court. It would be very adviseable for your master to return that money, every farthing of it.

THOMAS SOWERRY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; there were three handkerchiefs pledged at my shop, but I know nothing of it; I did not take in the things.

Q.Where is the servant that took them in? - A. I received a subpoena only last night at seven o'clock; it was directed to me, and I thought my attendance would be sufficient.

Court. Q. Are you so extremely dull as not to know that the person who took in the article was the person to come here; you must send for him; did you never receive a subpoena before? - A.Never in my life.

Mrs. Roussell. I was obliged to pay this gentleman four shillings for the handkerchiefs before he would let me have them.

Court. You must return the four shillings immediately.

THOMAS WILLETT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 95, Rosemary-lane: The prisoner pledged two shirts with me on the 23d of May last; I lent her twelve shillings upon the two, I should suppose them to be worth fifteen shillings a shirt; I am sure she is the woman.

Roussell. These are the shirts that I lost; they have the gentleman's name that they belonged to; here are two that are the fellows to them.

Prisoner's defence. I went out of this woman's house, and as I came to the top of the court, I picked this bundle up; I was very much distrest

for want of money, and I parted with these things at the pawnbroker's; she came to me while I was in Newgate, and said, she would not hurt me by any means whatever, if I would pay for them; but this woman is jealous of me, and her husband, because her husband, as soon as he saw me, said he would not hurt me.

GUILTY , Death , aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-22

553. ELIZABETH SHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , thirty yards of calimanco, value 21s. the property of James Willymott .

MARY FLETCHER sworn. - I am a shop woman to Mr. James Willymott ; he is a linen-draper , No. 95, East Smithfield : On the 12th of June, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for some check; I went to shew her some, I suspected she meant to take something; she took the calimanco into her hand, it laid upon the counter; she did not know that I saw her take it, but I was looking at her at the time she went out of the shop, and I went after her, and called for assistance; I told her she had got some calimanco; she denied it twice, and when I insisted upon it that she had, she threw it down upon the shop floor, (produces it); I am sure it is Mr. Willymott's.

Prisoner's defence. I had been drinking a little; I sell fish in the street; it is the first thing I ever did. GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-23

554. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , five pewter plates, value 4s. the property of John Townsend and Thomas Compton .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM BALMER sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. John Townsend and Thomas Compton , pewter manufactures in Booth-street, Spitalfields , the prisoner was their servant : Thomas Handley brought the prisoner back, and I saw five plates produced in the accompting-house, they laid upon the desk; on the 20th of May, the officer came in, and took charge of him.

Q.Whose property were they? - A. My master's; I know them by a mark which I put upon them for the purpose of detection.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. How many did you mark? - A.Ten dozen.

Q.Had any of the plates that were so marked been sold? - A.No.

THOMAS HANDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. By the direction of my mistress, I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday evening the 20th of May, going away, about two hundred yards from the warehouse; I told him my master wanted him in the accompting-house; he came back to the accompting-house where Mr. Compton was; I searched his coat, and nothing was found there; I found concealed in his breeches five pewter plates; accordingly, the runner came in a few minutes afterwards, and took him into custody; he desired to be let go, and he would go away, and not come back any more; he said, it was the first offence in this country, or any other; my master said he should prosecute him; the plates were delivered to Vickery, the officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q.Did you hear him say how he came by them? - A.No.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am an officer, (produces the plates): He told me these plates were the first he had ever taken from the manufactury; I have had them ever since.

Balmer. I can swear these to be the plates that I marked, and that they are my master's property.

Prisoner's defence. I was taking a walk, and met with a woman that wanted to sell these plates, and I bought them of her; I gave her two shillings for them. GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-24

555. RICHARD BURROWS (a deaf and dumb man ) was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , a pair of men's shoes, value 6s. the property of Richard Tulford and Benjamin Hanbury .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-25

556. JOHN CONNOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , a dimity petticoat, value 5s. a sheet, value 5s. two pocket handkerchiefs, value 1s. and a child's cloth, value 6d. the property of Edmund Barnes , Esq.

RICHARD GINGER sworn. - I am servant to the prosecutor, Mr. Edmund Barnes , at Hendon : On the 23d of June, about two o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner go away from the hedge of Mr. Barnes's field with a bundle; I followed him, and asked him what he had got there; he said, nothing; I said, my master has got a great deal of linen hanging upon yonder hedge, and therefore I wish to look at your bundle, immediately, upon that, he laid down his bundle, and untied it; the first thing that I saw, was a white petticoat, and I told him to tie it up again, and take it to the house; I went along with him, and my mistress examined the things, and claimed them. (Produces the property.)

HANNAH BARNES sworn. - I am the wife of

Mr. Edmund Barnes: I know these things to be my property; they had been placed upon the hedge to dry.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to your Lordship and the Jury. GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-26

557. WILLIAM CONSTABLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , three pair of unfinished gloves, value 4s. and three pair of unfinished mits, value 4s. the property of John Brooks .

JOHN BROOKS sworn. - I am a glover , No. 69. Red Lion-street, Holborn : On Monday, the 15th of June, between eight and nine in the evening, I went down into the kitchen, and left the care of the shop to my son, between ten and eleven years old; he was to ring the bell if we were wanted; in a few minutes after, the bell rung, I went up, and found the prisoner in the shop; when we came into the shop, I asked him what he wanted, and he said, a pair of gloves; he drew one on his left hand, and said, what is the price; my wife answered, half-a-crown; I said directly, as he looked like a poorish man, let him have them for two shillings and three-pence; he then said, I will give you twenty-pence for them; he went out of the shop, and said, if I cannot get them any cheaper, I will come back again; he then went away, and I saw no more of him that night; the next morning, between eight and nine, Mr. Bell, the high constable, came to me, in consequence of which, I immediately missed six pair of gloves and mits, unfinished, three pair of each; there were nine pair left; there were fifteen in the whole; I described the man to Mr. Bell, and I went over to the watch-house, where I found the prisoner and the property in possession of Romley, the watch-house-keeper, which I know to be my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. It was about dusk, was it not? - A. It wanted about a quarter of nine.

Q.Is your's a dark or a light shop? - A. A very light shop, it is all window in front; I am sure the prisoner is the person.

JOHN WYGATE sworn. - At half past ten o'clock at night, on Monday, the 15th of June, the prisoner was brought into the watch-house; I was constable of the night; these gloves were given to me by Stephen Wilson .

STEPHEN WILSON sworn. - I was in the watch-house; I found the bundle of gloves upon the floor, who put it there, I cannot tell; the prisoner was then in the watch-house; I found it about half an hour after he had been brought in.

Mr. Gurney. Q. That parcel has not been in your custody ever since that night; it was delivered by you to the constable of the night? - A. Yes.

Q.There were a great many people in the watch-house? - A. Yes.

NICHOLAS PRICE sworn. - I went with the prisoner to the watch-house upon another charge; I saw that bundle taken from his person by a person in the watch-house, who searched him, and put on the table; it was one of the Bow-street officers that searched him.(Mr. Brooks identified the gloves.)

Prisoner's defence. I do not know that man's house; I was never there in my life; I am but just come from Bengal.

Brooks. I am positive that is the man; I could swear to him from ten thousand.

Prisoner. I was drinking with a ship-mate, and a young man and woman asked me to lend them some money upon these gloves, and I lent them four shillings upon them. GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-27

558. DAVID JACOBS , alias BARNET, alias CHURCH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , eight pieces of silk ribbon, containing, together, in length, two hundred and eighty-eight yards, value 4l. the property of Joseph Holland , privately in his warehouse .

JOSEPH HOLLAND sworn. - I am a haberdasher in Wood-street, Cheapside ; I can only prove the property.

JOHN- FRANCIS TUNSTALL sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Joseph Holland , of Wood-street: On the 20th of June, we lost a quantity of ribbon out of the drawer in the warehouse; the prisoner came in about half past seven o'clock in the morning, and asked if Mr. Holland was at home; I told him, no; he then asked for some fourteen-penny satin; I opened the drawer where there were about thirty pieces, I cannot say exactly; I told him they were fifteen shillings and sixpence; he told me the price would not do for him; he shewed me three or four guineas, and told me he wanted to pay ready money; I told him I could not take less; he said that would not do for him; he haggled very much, and went away; he then came back again, and asked for some twelve-penny figured satins; he asked me the price of them; I told him fifteen shillings and sixpence; he offered me something less; I told him I could not take it, and then he went off; I missed some ribbons out of the drawer, and I went out, locked the door, and followed him directly; and when I got to the top of Wood-street, I looked round, but could see no such person; I then went back again, and went about my business till breakfast-time, and while I was at breakfast the prisoner came back again; I was called, and I knew that was the man that had been there before, and that I suspected; he went to the drawer, and looked at two pieces, and asked me the price; he haggled

a good deal, and then told me they would not do; by that time the young man of the warehouse came in, and he asked him the price of the twelve-penny figured satins; the young man asked me what I had asked him, and I told him; the young man said to him, that was the lowest; the prisoner said the price would not do for him, and he was going out; I then asked the young man how many pieces of fourteen-penny ribbon there were in the drawer; the prisoner upon that began to run out; I then, without my hat or neckcloth, ran after him, and never lost sight of him till he got to Little St. Thomas Apostle , where there was a young man going past, and I asked him to give me assistance, for he had robbed me; the young man desired him to give me up the ribbons; he said he had got no ribbons with him; upon looking about him, I thought I perceived a piece in his small clothes; the young man then felt in his breeches, and found one piece of fourteen-penny satin, mazarine blue, containing thirty-six yards; the young man insisted upon it he had more, and drew him up to some steps by a gentleman's house, and I told him I would fetch a constable, which I did; we then conveyed him to the Poultry Compter; there were eight pieces found in all, there were four pieces found in the inside of his hat.

- WICKSTEED sworn. - On Saturday, the 20th of June, about half past eight o'clock in the morning, or rather better, I was going to my breakfast, in Little St. Thomas Apostle, I saw a young lad following the prisoner; he desired me to stop him, that he had stole some pieces of ribbon from his warehouse; I asked the prisoner if he had any thing belonging to the lad; he told me, no, he had not; upon the lad persisting that he had, I took hold of his arm and requested to search his pockets; he told me I was welcome to feel in his pockets, and turned up his coat; he told me there was nothing in his pockets but two loaves of bread and an orange; the young lad then turned him about, and said, there is a piece in his breeches; I said, how could you say you had none, when there is a piece in your breeches; I took it from him; the young lad said, before I took it out, it was a piece of mazarine blue, which it was; I detained him, and sent the lad for an officer; I saw him very busy with his hands, I looked, and observed him very busy with a piece of white ribbon in his hat; and, in the false crown, there were four pieces more; we took him to the Compter, and there, with a deal of difficulty, we searched him; I found one piece of blue, and the Compter-keeper pulled out two pieces; he was taken before the Lord-Mayor.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.You had never seen this man before? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see a more extraordinary looking creature in your life? - A. I cannot say I ever did.

GEORGE GONGER sworn. - I am a ribbon manufacturer: Among the goods I saw before the Lord-Mayor, I had reason to believe there are some that I sold to Mr. Holland.

WILLIAM WALLER sworn. - (Produces the property). I received them at the Compter from Wicksteed.

Wicksteed. These are the same that I delivered to Mr. Waller.

Gonger. Here is a piece that I believe to be Mr. Holland's, I sold it to him about three weeks before they were lost; it is a peculiar one; there is a hole cut at the end of it, and there is my weaver's name upon it; I know nothing of the other pieces.

Tunstall. This piece of fourteen-penny, we had had a great many weeks, and have the fellow piece to it at home.

Q.(To Holland.) What is the value of them? - A.About five pounds.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN COLLIER sworn. - I now live independent at Hoxton; I was a jeweller, in Wood-street, Cheapside; I used to deal with the Jews, the prisoner is a Jew; I have known him seven or eight years; I always looked upon him to be insane; I always thought him touched in his mind.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. When did you converse with him last? - A. Two or three months back.

Q.Where did you see him? - A. In Ebenezer-square.

Q. What were you talking about? - A. I was smoking my pipe, and he was talking about politics.

Q. A great many people may talk about politics, that are not mad? - A.He fluctuated very much; he talked very sensibly sometimes, and at other times ran quite the reverse.

Q.Tell us any thing that was said that was a little queer? - A. I could tell you a great many things; when we have been talking of serious affairs, he has run into other things, and deviated from what he has been talking about, just as I have seen people in Bedlam.

Q.Was the prisoner ever confined? - A. I advised his sons two or three years back to confine him.

JOHN PARR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I did keep the Duke's Head, in Phoenix-alley, Long-acre, I am now out of business, in lodgings, till I can get another house; I have known the prisoner about the streets for three or four years; about ten months ago he came by my window, with one hundred boys and girls after him, and he knocked his hands through my window.

Q.The boys and girls hooting at him for a madman? - A. Yes; and he had got a parcel of ribbons in his hat, and round about his hands; I took him into the house, and would have had him to Bow-street, if it had not been for a man coming and giving me a direction to his sons.

THOMAS CARTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Upper Rathhone-place; I am in the habit of drawing leases and assignments; I have known the prisoner six or seven years; I have been in the habit of calling at Tom's Coffee-house, Duke's-place, to pay rent for my mother, and have frequently seen him; about six months ago I saw him at the King and Queen, in Queen-Ann street, East; he claimed acquaintance with me, and wished me to make his will; he talked very incoherently; I wished to get rid of him, and gave him my address, the next day he came there very unexpectedly, and I began taking instructions; he said he would leave Mr. Goldsmid, the Jew, 50,000l.; considering the man to be out of his mind, I wished to get rid of him; but I remember one thing; he wished to disinherit his sons, they had offended him, and he should leave all his money to Mr. Goldsmid, to lay out in charities; he took up a bason of tea, and let it fall, and broke it; my family were very much alarmed, and I took him down to a public-house, at the corner of the street; I ordered a pint of porter, and he ordered a crown bowl of punch.

Q. Did he behave, upon the whole, like a reasonable man, or a madman? - A.Like a madman, in every respect.

HENRY JACOBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The man at the bar is your father? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, for some years back has your father been a man in his senses or not? - A. No, he has not.

Q.Have you done all in your power to keep him out of mischief, and in confinement? - A. Yes, I have; but having a great family, and being obliged to mind my business, he takes the opportunity to slip out.

Q. What age is he? - A.Seventy-five.

Q.What length of time has he had the misfortune to be deranged in his intellects? - A. I suppose ten or twelve years now.

Court. Q. What is your business? - A. A glass cutter and engraver, No. 102, Petticoat-lane.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q.Was your father ever put under any person's care as a madman? - A. We keep him confined ourselves as much as we can.

Q. Was he ever put under the care of any person for madness? - A. No, we never put him into the mad-house.

Q. Has he ever been under the hands of a physician? - A. Yes, my own physician, that belongs to my club.

Q. What is his name? - A.Dr. Leo.

Q.What has he done, that makes you suppose him to be a lunatic? - A. He is in my own trade, and he will come in sometimes and break a quantity of glass.

Q. Has he done any thing of that sort lately? - A. Yes, about two months ago.

PHILIP JACOBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have the misfortune to have the prisoner for your father? - A. Yes.

Q. What has been the state of his mind? - A. He has been deranged upwards of thirteen or fourteen years.

Q. Has he continued so up to a late period? - A. Yes; he was at my house about six weeks ago; and began a noise, and wanted to break all the goods that stood upon the counter; and I went and laid hold of him, and called in a person, and sent him to my brother; we have done all we could in our power; he has been with me a year and a half.

Q. Has he had any medical advice? - A. Yes; he has taken things for it.

Q.Upon your oath, do you believe him to be a man that is deranged, or a man having his sound senses? - A. No, he has not his senses.

Court. Q. Did he live with you, or your brother, at the time he was taken up? - A. With my brother.

Henry Jacobs . He is not in my house; I have taken a room for him just by; I saw him the day before he was taken up.

Q. How did he behave for the last two months? - A. The same as before, out of his mind.

GUILTY, aged 75.

Of stealing, but not privately in the warehouse .

Confined twelve months in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-28

559. GEORGE LEIGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , privately from the person of Wm. Thompson, a pocket-book, value 6d. a bank-note, value 5l. and another banknote, value 1l. the property of the said William.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp)

WILLIAM THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you are captain of the Atlantic, merchant ship , belonging to Portsmouth, a North American? - A. I am: Upon the 26th of June, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking in Thames-street, near Billingsgate ; I had my pocket-book in my left hand coat pocket, containing a one pound bank-note, a five pound bank-note, and a ship's register; it was a red leather pocket-book; I had the precaution of keeping my hand upon my left hand coat pocket for fear I should lose my pocketbook; I had been walking very brisk and was in a perspiration; I took my left hand from my coat to take off my hat to wipe the sweat off my face; I wiped my face, put my hat on, and then returned my hand to my left hand pocket, and missed my pocket-book; I immediately, in surprise, cried out, I have lost my pocket book; I turned round and saw a man passing behind me at a little distance.

Q. Who was that person? - A. The prisoner at the bar, George Leighton .

Q.Look at him? - A. That is the man; he was passing a little behind me, and when he heard me say I had lost my pocket-book, he turned about and ran; I then cried out, stop thief; the prisoner continued running, and I pursued him; George Bean joined in the pursuit, and Thomas Moore stopped him; Allden assisted in stopping him, I never lost sight of him till he was stopped; he ran up a lane that leads from Thames-street; I don't know the name of it.

Q.While he was running did you see him do any thing? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you afterwards see your pocket-book and notes? - A. I did.

Q. Are you sure the pocket-book that you afterwards saw is your pocket-book? - A. Yes; George Bean shewed it me; Moore and Allden were by at the time; the prisoner was then secured.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q.There were a great many people in the street at that time of day? - A. Not a great many; there were other people in the street.

Q.Did you see Mr. Bean in the street at that time? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Do you mean at the moment of your missing the pocket-book? - A.Within half a minute.

Mr. Alley. Q. Who is Mr. Bean? - A. He is here.

Q. Who is he, and what is he? - A. He is a waterman I am told.

Q. Bean was a witness before the Lord Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to call him as a witness today? - A. Yes.

Q. He is attending here to be a witness for you? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Mr. Moore before the Lord Mayor? -- A. No.

Q. Was Mr. Allden before the Lord Mayor? - A. No.

Q. They are both respectable men, are they not? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How many other witnesses have you got today that were not before the Lord Mayor? - A. Two women.

Q. The prisoner, I believe, was only committed on suspicion of stealing the pocket-book? - A. On suspicion, I believe.

Q.Upon your oath, was he not committed upon suspicion? - A. He was committed on suspicion.

Q. When Bean was before the Lord Mayor, did the Lord Mayor threaten to commit him as the person having committed the felony? - A. The Lord Mayor did say like that.

Q. Did not the Lord Mayor threaten to commit him as the person who stole the pocket-book? - A. He threatened to commit him for fear he was considerate with him.

Q. Do you mean to swear that the Lord Mayor did not threaten to commit him for prevarication and equivocation? - A. He did.

Q. Was not Bean the first person who charged the prisoner, produced the book, and said he found it by the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.When was it you found the four additional witnesses? - A.Yesterday morning.

Q. Who directed you to those other four witnesses? - A.Mr. Lewis, the constable, who took the man in custody.

Q. Mr. Lewis and Mr. Bean you know have had conversation together upon this business? - A.I don't know.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You were not fortunate enough to get the evidence of Moore, Allden, and Mrs. Kalland at the time you went before the Lord Mayor? - A. I was not.

Q.But through the diligence of the constable you have been able to get them since? - A. Yes.

Q.Bean was before the Lord Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. He equivocated before the Lord Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. And the Lord Mayor said he believed him to be a confederate? - A. Yes.

THOMAS MOORE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am apprentice to Mr. William Webb , wine-merchant, in Miles's lane.

Q. Before the 26th of June did you know any thing of the prosecutor? - A.Nothing; I don't know that I ever saw him.

Q. Or of the prisoner? - A. Never, to my knowledge.

Q. In consequence of any alarm of stop thief, was your attention directed to any thing, and what? - A. On the 26th of June, while I was standing at the door with Allden -

Q. What time of the day was it? - A.It was after five, I think it was not six, I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner followed by two or three persons, not more.

Q.Amongst those two or three did you observe Bean? - A. I did observe a man who is to be a witness here, I don't know his name; the prisoner was a little way before them, running up the lane; me and the other witness, Allden, immediately followed after the other two or three; and before I got up to the prisoner, within about six or seven yards, I saw the prisoner take from his pocket a pocket-book, and throw it down in or near a baker's shop, not more than fifteen yards from where I had originally stood.

Q.During the time of your pursuit did you or any body else cry out stop thief? - A.Almost immediately that I pursued from the door the thief

was caught, and therefore it was unnecessary; stop thief had been cried before.

Q. Did you make such observation of the pocket-book, as to be able to tell the colour of it? - A. It was a red pocket-book, with a strap.

Q. Have you any doubt it was the prisoner at the bar who threw down that pocket-book? - A. I have no doubt of his person, though he is not dressed the same.

Court. Q. Did you lose sight of him at all before he was taken? - A. Not more than a moment.

Q. Did you lose sight of the man after he had thrown away the pocket-pocket? - A. No.

Q. And are you sure that that man is the prisoner? - A. I am.

Q. Did you observe who picked up the pocketbook? - A. No; there became a crowd immediately, and I could not discern who picked it up.

Q. Have you seen the pocket-book since? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. At half past five you heard a cry of stop thief? - A. I think so, as near as I can tell, between five and six.

Q. You can tell whether you had had your dinner? I suppose you had been taking your wine after dinner? - A.That is as it happens.

Q. If the prosecutor has spoke to a transaction between two and three o'clock, it cannot be the same transaction? - A. I cannot say, I think it was about that time.

Q.Upon your oath, will you swear that you saw the prisoner that day? - A. I will.

Q.When were you first brought into this business as a witness? - A. It was after his commitment.

Q. You did not offer to be a witness before the Lord. Mayor? - A. I was not asked.

Q. Who asked you to attend here to-day? - A. I received a subpoena.

Q. With whom had you any conversation, before you had your subpoena? - A. The constable; his name is Lewis.

Q.How came he to find you out? - A. He lived in the lane; he gave me the subpoena before any any conversation took place; he knew that I had seen the transaction.

Q. You saw a man they called a waterman? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you happen to see him pick up a pocketbook? - A. I did not.

Q. You have said, you never lost sight of the prisoner from the time you first saw him, till he was taken, and yet you cannot tell who picked up the pocket-book? - A. I cannot tell, but from hearsay.

Q. And yet you never lost sight of him? - A.No.

Q.Perhaps it was only hearsay, that he threw it away? - A. No; that is a fact I have sworn to.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, if you will venture to swear that the waterman did nor throw away that book? - A. I do swear that the waterman did not throw it away.

Q. Do you mean to say you could distinguish the hand that threw it away? - A. I do.

Q. Why did not you tell the prosecutor that you had seen it? - A. It was an unpleasant business, and there were other persons saw it as well as myself.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You dine between two and three, and then drink your wine after? - A.Occasionally.

Q. I ask you, were you drunk or sober, because we have had that insinuated? - A. I was perfectly sober.

Mr. Alley. I only meant it to shew the difference as to time, between the prosecutor's account and his.

JOHN ALLDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the son of Joseph Allden , brandy-merchant, in Three Tun-court, Miles's-lane: On the 26th of June I was with Moore, at Mr. Webb's door.

Q.Look round, and tell us if you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I am certain of him, I saw him in Miles's-lane that day; I did not hear any alarm, but I saw the prisoner running up Miles's-lane, and there apperared to be two pursuing him; I joined in the pursuit, and Mr. Moore followed me; I came up with the prisoner in Miles's-lane.

Q.Before you came up with the prisoner, did you observe him do any thing; I saw him throw a pocket-book down in Miles's-lane, by a baker's shop.

Q.What was the colour of the pocket-book? - A. It was all green inside, I did not see the outside; I did not see it after it was thrown away till after it was in the captain's hands; the prisoner was then taken into custody; when I first saw him, he seemed not to be going very fast; after that I heard a cry of stop thief, and he began to run immediately.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner at the bar? - A. I am positive of it.

Q. In what situation are you with your father? - A. As a clerk.

Q. How long have you been in that situation with him? - A. About six years

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not see him run before you heard the cry of stop thief? - A. No.

Q. There were a great many other people running? - A. I believe but two, there might be three.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him at all? - A. Not till he was taken into custody.

SARAH KALLARD sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at No. 7, Miles's-lane: On the

26th of June, I was standing at the door with my two children, at needle-work; my little boy had pinched his finger, and Mrs. Massey came to the door with some brandy; I was rubbing my little boy's fingers, when I felt something thrown in my face, and it fell on my left side; I looked down and saw that it was a red pocket-book.

Q. What part of the day was it? - A.Half past six in the evening, as near as I can guess.

Q. Did you see from whence it came? - A. No.

Court. Q.It was half past six? - A.As near as I can guess; I have no watch or clock.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you see him there? - A. Yes; after the pocket-book was thrown away, he was going to run into our house; I saw him on the threshold of the door; the waterman immediately laid hold of the pocket-book.

Q. How far is your door from Mr. Webb's door? - A.About ten or a dozen doors.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner who was attempting to get into your house? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q. So this was between six and seven o'clock? - A. I cannot be certain; it was before seven o'clock.

Q.You were not before the Lord Mayor? - A. No.

Q.Have you seen him since he was taken till now? - A. No.

Q.Was the prisoner in the lane before; and the book was thrown away? - A. Yes, I picked up the book, and the waterman snatched it up before I could cleverly get it up, and then the captain came up.

Q.Had you been acquainted with the waterman? - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q.The waterman was close to you, ready to pick up the book? - A. Yes.

Q. Then the waterman was the nearest man to you? - A. Yes.

Q. I should be glad to know who it was told you that the prisoner at the bar was the man that you were to come to swear that I picked up the pocket-book; he said the man that they had taken was in prison.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you speak to the prisoner from a knowledge of his person, or from what the constable has told you? - A. I speak from having seen him; I pitted him very much at the time.

Q. Did you see Bean give the pocket-book to the prosecutor? - A. I did not; I was too much frightened.

Q.Was the pocket-book that you picked up, the same in appearance, with the one you afterwards saw in the prosecutor's hand? - A. Yes.

MARIA MASSEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. - I was standing with Mrs. Kallard, at her door in Miles's-lane, on the 26th of June.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at the bar, on that day, in Miles's-lane? - A. Yes, he was trying to get in at the door of the house; I prevented him from getting in; I did not see him, till he got to the door; a man having the appearance of a waterman, then stopped him, and took him; I saw a red pocket-book in Mrs. Kallard's hand; the waterman snatched it our of Mrs. Kallard's hand, and saw him give it the Captain; the waterman caught him, and he was secured.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q. What time was this? - A. It was after tea; I cannot say what time it was exactly, it was in the evening.

GEORGE BEAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a waterman and lighterman.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor, Captain Thompson? - A. Yes, I saw him on Friday last, in Thames-street.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Kallard? - A.Not by name.

Q. Look at that lady? - A. I saw her along with the constable.

Q. Do you remember taking any pockot-book out of her hand? - A. I stooped down and picked up a pocket book; a woman and I stooped at the same time; but I do not know whether this is the woman or not; I took up the pocket-book and gave it to Captain Thompson.

Q. What was the colour? - A. To the best of my knowledge, I believe it was red.

Q.However, the same pocket-book you picked up, you gave to Captain Thompson? - A. I did.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I know him since I have been in the habit of appearing against him.

Q. Did you see him on that Friday? - A. Yes, in Thames-street.

Q. Did you see him in Miles's-lane? - A. Yes, he ran, and I ran after him.

Q. Did you hear the cry of stop thief? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did he run at the cry of stop thief? - A. Yes, he was running at the time when I ran after him to take him.

Q. Were you by at the time he was taken? - A. Yes.

Q. And assisted in taking him? - A. Yes.

Q. And you are sure the pocket-book you picked up at the time the woman was stooping down, was the same you gave to Captain Thompson? - A. To be sure; I did not change it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q. I will not ask you whether you stole it; because that is not a fair question; but if any body has said you took it out of a woman's hand, that is not true? - A. No, we both stooped together; I made a snatch at it from her hand; the woman might have hold of one end of it, for any thing I know; it is very probable she might.

Q.Had not you the pocket-book in your hand, before the woman ever saw it at all; I am not now asking whether you stole it? - A.Upon my oath I cannot say; I believe the woman might have hold of it before me.

Q. I ask you again; had not you it in your hand, before the woman ever saw it? - A. I really positively cannot swear that.

Q. Were you the gentleman that the Lord Mayor threatened to commit? - A. I never was so flusterated in my life; he thought I was concerned, or said something similar to it.

EDWARD LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable, (produces the pocket-book) I took the prisoner into custody, last Friday, in Miles's-lane, Crooked-lane.

Q. Who gave him you in charge? - A.The Captain, Moore and Allden helped to secure him; I took him to the Compter, and going along, he said he picked up the book; that he was a fool for doing it; that it had brought him into this trouble.

Q. What was the charge upon which you took him? - A.For stealing the pocket-book.

Thompson. This is my pocket-book, the inside is green; it contained the ship's register; but the Lord Mayor desired me to take the register out, which I did; there is a 5l. note, and a 1l. Bank note in it.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty of the crime, with which I am charged; upon hearing a cry of stop thief; I ran as another person might, and they seized me, and said I was the prisoner; I know nothing at all of it.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character. GUILTY , Death , aged 25.

The Prisoner was recommended by the Jury, to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his youth, and the probability that he was not an old offender.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-29

560. EDWARD DOMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a cap, value 6d. a snuff-box, value 2d. a shilling, and a sixpence , the property of Elizabeth Osborn , widow .

ELIZABETH OSBORN sworn. - I am a widow, at Hoxton: On Saturday last I lost a snuff-box, an old night-cap, and one shilling and sixpence; I left the snuff-box upon the bench in the public-house, and a night-cap, with one shilling and sixpence wrapped up in it; I did not see the prisoner take them, but he gave me back the snuff-box and the night-cap; I did not know him before I saw him in the public-house; the landlady called out, stop thief, and he was immediately taken up; she is not here.

- HOUGHTON sworn. - I am a carpenter, in William-street, Curtain-road; about a quarter of a mile from the public-house I heared the cry of stop thief, and being an officer, I took charge of the prisoner; I asked him what was the matter; he said he had only picked up a snuff-box and an old night-cap; the old woman came up, and told me, in the hearing of the prisoner, that she had lost these things from the Hare, at Hoxton; she said he had also taken from her some duplicates, and one shilling and sixpence; he acknowledged he had taken the box and the night-cap, which, he said, he had given her back, but the one shilling and sixpence and duplicates he said he never had seen; they have never been found.

(To Osborn.) Q. How came you to leave the things upon the bench? - A. I put my hand in my pocket for some halfpence to pay for my beer, and put these things upon the bench at the same time, and went away and forgot them.

Prisoner's defence. I was in the public-house, and saw the rag and the snuff-box, and the old woman said she had lost them, and I gave them her; there was no money in it. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-30

561. JAMES CONNOP was indicted for the wilful murder of James Lewis .

JAMES SELLERS sworn. - On the 6th of June, from eight o'clock till ten I was at the Crown public-house, in Grey Eagle-street, Spital fields ; I did not see the prisoner till I came out, at ten o'clock; I was going out home; I saw him in the yard, and the deceased was in the yard with his coat and hat off; I then heard there was going to be a fight, and I saw the prisoner pull his coat off; he then asked if Lewis, the deceased, was in earnest; he said, d-n you, yes I am; he then came close to the prisoner and struck at him; then they fought; there were two blows given, nothing material happened with those two blows; they parted and went at it again, and after a change of two or three blows, the prisoner struck the deceased upon the left side of the head and he fell, he got up in a very great passion, and swore d-n my eyes clear the way, for I'll lick him in one minute, I want but one minute to lick him in, and lick him in one minute I will; then they came to it again, and the first material blow that I saw was a blow the prisoner gave the deceased upon the left side of the body, he fell with that blow, and I never heard him speak after.

Q. Were the deceased and the prisoner acquainted before this? - A.Quite so.

Q. Had they been good friends before? - A. Always good friends; I was surprised to see two people such good friends as they were going to fight.

THOMAS WEBB sworn. - I went to the Crown public-house about nine o'clock; the prisoner and the deceased were sitting together in a box when I went in, they afterwards came and sat down in the box by me; I saw the deceased throw down five shillings to fight the prisoner.

Q. What conversation took place before that? - A. Not any thing that I heard.

Q. Was nothing said by the one to the other before the five shillings were thrown down? - A.Nothing that I attended to.

Q.How long had they been sitting down by you before he threw down the five shillings? - A.About five or ten minutes; he threw down the five shillings, and challenged to fight him; upon which, the prisoner repeatedly asked him if he was in earnest; he said, he was; upon that, the prisoner put five shillings upon the table, after great hesitation, and they both went out together; I did not follow them out immediately; I went out just at the finishing of the fight; I got round, and picked up the deceased; he was lying upon the ground when I got into the yard; he was quite motionless; I carried him, and put him upon the bench that is in the yard; Mr. Wood, the landlord of the house, came and took him from me, and I went home, and saw no more of him.

Q.Had there been any quarreling between them in the box? - A. I heard no more than the prisoner hesitating, and asking him if he was in earnest; the deceased kept urging him to fight him.

Q. It is very extraordinary that these two good friends should think of fighting, without any angry words? - A. I heard none that I recollect.

Q. What was your conversation during the ten times that you speak of? - A. All the discourse was about fighting.

Q. What was said before the five shillings were thrown down? - A.Nothing particular, that I know of; I did not interfere.

Q. This is a very extraordinary story; you were sitting in the same box with them, you might hear what passed without interfering; who else was there? - A. A relation of mine, Robert Webb , was in the same box.

Q. Where is he? - A. He is not here.

Prisoner. The quarrel began about which was the finest county. Worcester or Herefordshire: I said, Worcestershire was the finest county, and he immediately jumped up in a great passion.

EDWARD FARMER sworn. - I went into the Crown between the hours of nine and ten; I happened to sit down at the same table where the deceased and the prisoner were sitting; I was an entire stranger in the house; the prisoner and the deceased were laying a wager how many beans made five; they produced five beans, two white beans, two black, and one red one, and that won the wager.

Q. What do you mean by how many beans made five? - A. I do not know; I have very often heard it expressed, but don't know what it means; after the wager was settled, the prisoner was smoking his pipe, and the deceased began to aggravate him to fight him; he kept continually aggravating him to fight; he wanted to fight with him for any money, he would fight him for a guinea, or five shillings; the prisoner laughed it off, and would not take any offence from him; then the deceased got up, and stood in the middle of the tap-room, and swore he would lick the prisoner, whether or no; then the prisoner said, laughing, if he gave him a good hiding, he thought it might be of service to him; then, after that, the deceased turned to beat him, and the prisoner asked him if he was in earnest; he told the prisoner he was, and that he would give him a d-d good hiding; then the deceased deposited five shillings in a man's hand; the prisoner was very loth to put down five shillings; he put his five shillings down, six or seven minutes afterwards, quite in a flurry; the deceased asked the prisoner it he was ready; the prisoner said, he did not want to fight with him, and asked him again, was he in earnest; then the deceased pulled off his coat, and hung it upon the bannisters of the box where we were sitting; I did not go out to see them fight; the prisoner went out so good humoured, I did not think he would fight with him; in about ten minutes, the prisoner returned with his shirt torn to pieces, and his face besineared with dirt; I said, what have you been fighting; he said, yes, I have, and have conquered him; after that he sat down, and called for some porter to drink, and began to smoke a pipe, when the news came into the tap-room that the man was dead; when the information came in that the man was dead, the prisoner's countenance changed immediately; he seemed very much concerned indeed, and surrendered himself up to go any where with any body that pleased to take him, and he waited in the house till an officer came.

Q.Was the deceased sober, or how do you account for this strange behaviour of the deceased? - A. I don't know whether he was drunk or sober; I never saw either of them before, to my knowledge; he seemed to know what he was doing.

WILLIAM BALMER sworn. - I was going to the Crown about ten o'clock at night, and saw the prisoner and the deceased coming into the yard to fight; Connop twice asked the deceased whether he was in earnest; he said he was, and then went a step or two further, and had a round, but there was no blow struck there to hurt; I then went up to Connop, and said, surely you are not a earnest to fight; he said, yes, he was; I then went to the deceased, and said to him, Lewis, do not you fight; he said, ah, Mr. Balmer, if I had fair play, I should beat him, by g-d; he was struck upon the left side, he then fell, he afterwards got up, and had another round; he was struck then upon his left side again; he fell, and was picked up by Webb; when I looked at him, I saw he was incapable of standing; I went up to the prisoner, and said, Connop, do not fight any more, the man

came to me, as if he could not stand; well, says he, I do not care, but I will have the five shillings for the tearing of my shirt; after that, I stopped in the ground a little while to see how the deceased was.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the deceased strike me twice before I struck at him? - A. I saw the deceased strike at him once; I cannot say whether he struck at him more than once, or not.

GEORGE KENT sworn. - I am a surgeon: I examined the body of the deceased on Saturday night, the 8th of June; at first, I observed no appearance whatever of external violence; I opened him, but could find nothing internal that could lead to the cause of the man's death; I could find nothing internal nor external that I could account for his death; I have no doubt he died in consequence of the injury he had received; it is impossible to say whether it was from the blows or the fall.

Q. If the man died in consequence of injuries received in a battle of this sort, how could that be without some appearance of injury? - A. There was none, either external or internal.

Q. How can you suppose that his death might be occasioned without any appearance of violence; was there no rupture of the vessels? - A. No.

Q. Did you open the head, so as to examine the brain? - A. No.

Q. If there had been any rupture upon the brain, you could not see that through the skull, I suppose? - A.Certainly not, but there is generally an hemorrhage.

Q. How do you account for the man's death, then? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. From what you say, we should be disposed to think the man would have died, if he had not been fighting; can you say that his death was occasioned by that which happened in the fight? - A. I could find nothing; there was no fracture nor rupture.

Q. If you had heard nothing about the fight, but had been sent for to examine that man, what would have been your opinion; that he died a natural death? - A.Undoubtedly.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, It seems to me to be unnecessary to sum up the evidence, because it is not proved that this man died of the injury received in the fight; in order to six upon him either murder or manslaughter, you must be satisfied the cause of the death was some injury received in the course of the battle; now, the surgeon says, there was no external or internal appearance of violence, and if he had not heard of the fight, he should have supposed he had died a natural death; he does not give you any reason to suppose he died in consequence of any injury he received in the battle; as there is no proof of that kind, I think he must be acquitted. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-31

562. JAMES JOHNS and EDMUND STEPHENS were indicted, the first for feloniously and sacrilegiously stealing, on the 18th of June , three brass chandelier ornaments, value 10s. the property of Nicholas Garling , and Peter-Raymond Poland , then churchwardens of the German Lutheran chapel in the Savoy, and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoners were BOTH ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

N. B. The prisoners were detained, and another indictment preferred.

Reference Number: t18010701-32

563. ANDREW LOCKIE was indicted for that he, on the 25th of May , being servant to Robert Wright , did receive and take into his possession the sum of 16s. 10d. of and from Thomas Ryan, on account of his said master; and having so received the said sum, feloniously and fraudulently did embezzle and secrete the same, and feloniously did steal, take, and carry away from his said master, the said sum of 16s. 10d. on whose account the same was delivered and taken into his possession, being the servant of the said Robert Wright .

There were two other Counts in the indictment, varying the manner of charging the offence.

ROBERT WRIGHT sworn. - I am a baker in Ryder's-court, St. Ann's, Soho; the prisoner came into my service on the 18th of May, as a journeyman : On Monday, the 25th May, as he was settling his accounts between two and three in the afternoon, in calling over the books, he came to Mr. Ryan's name; I asked him if Mr. Ryan had paid him to-day, knowing that Mr. Ryan never owed more than a week, or a fortnight, at most; he said, no, he paid me all that he had received, except Mr. Ryan's; Mr. Ryan's bill was sixteen shillings and ten-pence; the next day, Tuesday, he carried out his bread, as usual, but did not return to settle with me; he did not come home till the next morning at two o'clock, very much intoxicated; he helped me in with the bread, and I desired him to draw it, when baked; when I got up in the morning, he was gone; he did not return to his work; in the course of the day I went to look for him, and found him at another baker's; I asked him to come and settle his account; what account, he said; why, said I, of the bread you carried out yesterday; I asked him where the money for Mr. Ryan's bill was; he said, what bill; I said, he had received the money for it; he said it was a b-y lie, he had not received it; he then got into Marybone-street to run away; I pursued him, and caught him; he struck me several times, in order to make his escape; he beat me several times; I could not get a constable; I got hold of his arm, and twisted it for about twenty minutes before I got

a constable, then I took him to the watch-house; when he was at the watch-house, he wanted to pay me the sixteen shillings and ten-pence, and the other bread that he took for me on the Tuesday.

THOMAS RYAN sworn. Q. Are you a customer of Mr. Wright's? - A. Yes: On the 25th of May, my wife, in my presence, paid the prisoner sixteen shillings and ten-pence; here is a receipt for it, which I saw him write. (Produces it).

The prisoner put in a written defence, as follows:

My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, It is customary, in the baking business, for the master to make out the weekly bills; on Monday, the 25th of May, I carried out bills, and received money to the amount of near four pounds, but having the misfortune to lose two seven-shilling pieces through a hole in my pocket, and ashamed to tell my master I had lost them, I meant to conceal it from my master till I received my wages; on Tuesday, through the vexation of losing the two seven-shilling pieces, I went out, and got intoxicated; the next morning, going out to have a pint of beer, being at work without my clothes, meaning to come back immediately, but seeing two persons in the house who knew me, and being a country person, and easily persuaded, I got drinking with them till between eleven and twelve; I left the house very much intoxicated, and went to a neighbour's house, and laid down to sleep, but my master got intelligence where I was, and came to me, and through teasing me to wake, I rose and struck my master, which I am very sorry for, having lost my senses; I told my master I had received the money, but had lost it through a hole in my poc ket; at that time, my master held eleven shillings in his hand, wages due to me; and my friend would have paid him the rest, but my master is determined to prosecute me, because I struck him; I hope it will appear that I did not mean to wrong my master, or I should have kept the whole I received that day.

Q.(To Wright). Were there any wages due to him? - A. There were seven or ten shillings, I cannot exactly say.

Q. Did he offer to let you take that as part of the money? - A. Not till he was in custody.

Q. Did he tell you at any time that he had lost the money through a hole in his pocket? - A. He never mentioned that till he came up for re-examination at the office, and the Magistrate asked him if he had learned that since he had been in Bridewell. GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-33

564. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Lord Mulgrave , about the hour of eleven in the night of the 6th of June , and feloniously stealing two cloth coats, value 30s. a great coat, value 10s. a pair of breeches, value 1s. a pair of feather breeches, value 5s. a waistcoat, value 1s. four shirts, value 10s. and nine pair of stockings, value 9s. the property of John Doling .

JOHN DOLING sworn. - I am groom to Lord Mulgrave, the prisoner had been a fellow-servant with me in another place; he came to see me on the 6th of June, in Harley Mews , I sleep over the stable: About half past nine in the evening, I went up stairs, and there was a box which I had not locked; I was going to do it, and the prisoner said, you will have plenty of time in the morning to do it; his Lordship was going out of town the next morning; then he and I went out of the stable together, I locked the door after me; we went into Oxford-street together, and then I went to St. James's-square to see some old fellow-servants; I staid about an hour and a half, and when I came back, the lock was hampered; I called to the watchman, took his lantern, and opened the door; I went up stairs, and missed the trunk, containing three cloth coats, two pair of breeches, four shirts, a waistcoat, and nine pair of stockings; I then went into the coach-house with the watchman, and found the doors all fast, and the windows had iron bars across.

THOMASON KENDREW sworn. - I am a soldier's wife: On Saturday night, the 6th of June, a little before nine, the prisoner came to our house, No. 4, Dorset Mews; I have watched for him between five and six months; he asked me to let him leave a trunk which he expected out of the country, and I gave him leave; and rather before eleven o'clock, he brought it; I told him to put it in the front room, and he refused, and said, he would take it any where backwards; I told him it would not be safe in the back yard, and he took it down in the cellar, and left it; on Sunday morning he came, and said, he wanted some things out of his box; he went down, and staid almost half an hour in the cellar, with the box; and when he came up, he took nothing with him but a key and a little bit of paper in his hand. and went away; I heard that the runners were after him on Sunday night, and on Monday morning my husband took the box to Marlborough-street.

AGNES LITTLE sworn. - On Saturday the 6th of June, at near half past ten o'clock at night, I saw such a man as the prisoner go down the Mews with a trunk upon his shoulder; I live in Harleymews; I cannot say that it was the prisoner, he had such a coat on as he has now.

JAMES KENDREW sworn. - I belong to the Lifeguards: About nine o'clock on Saturday night, the 6th of June, the prisoner came and asked if he could leave a box for the night; I said, yes; the next day I heard that he had been taken up on suspicion,

and I went to Marlborough-street Mr. Jackson the officer, came back with me for the box.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street, (produces the trunk); I got it from Kendrew's.

Mrs. Kendrew. This is the same box.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday the 7th, upon suspicion; I know nothing more.

Doling. These are my shirts, they are marked J. D; these stockings are mine; the coats, and all the things are mine.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the trunk.

Q.(To Doling.) How near to Lord Mulgrave's are the stables? - A. It joins; the laundry of the house joins the stables.

Q. What is the value of your things? - A.Four pounds. GUILTY, Death ,

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-34

565. JOHN LEYCETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , twenty-four pair of men's silk gloves, value 4l. the property of James Hamond , and John Hepwood .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN HOPWOOD sworn. - I am in partnership with James Hamond , No. 47, Cheapside; the prisoner was in our service as porter at the time he was taken up: On Thursday the 11th of June, in consequence of information that I had received, I went with a search-warrant, and two officers, to the lodgings of Mary and Elizabeth Adams, No. 85. Leather-lane, where I found twenty-four pair of gloves, the subject of this indictment, they were produced to me by Elizabeth Adams .

MARY ADAMS sworn. - I lodge at No. 85, Leather-lane, Elizabeth Adams is my sister: I have known the prisoner almost four months.

Q. Did he at all visit you, or your sister? - A. He came to see my sister.

Q. Did he, at any time, bring any men's gloves to you? - A. Yes, on the 5th of June, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Were these the gloves that you gave to Mr. Hopwood? - A. He found them there.

Q. Did he tell you how he came by these things? - A. Yes; he told us he had got money, his father had sent him up fifty pounds to buy goods with; and then he afterwards brought them; he said, he had bought them of a man whom his master bought gloves of; he said, it was a man that came to his master's every day, and what his master did not buy, he bought; my sister and I put them in a drawer; he asked us to let him leave them in our room.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-Garden; I went to the lodging of the last witness. (Produces the property.)

Mr. Hopwood. Here is my shopman's hand writing, and the private mark upon the paper; I have not the least doubt of their being our property, there are no marks upon the gloves.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you buy these gloves of the manufacturer? - A. Of different manufacturers.

Q. In London? - A.Some of them live in London, and some do not.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence. GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-35

566. ELIZABETH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , an iron digester, value 12s. the property of John Lardner .

JOHN LARDNER sworn. - I am an ironmonger in Oxford-street, the corner of Berner-street; I know nothing of the loss.

DENNIS DOLAN sworn. - I am not in business; I formerly kept the shop Mr. Lardner now keeps; I was passing by Wardour-street, a French gentleman had given Mr. Lardner's shopman some information; and knowing that I spoke French, he requested me to ask the French gentleman what be mean.

Mr. DANTONVILLE, being a foreigner, an interpreter was sworn. I stopped facing the shop of Mr. Lardner, in Oxford-street ; I saw a woman take an iron vase; she crossed Oxford-street, into Wardour-street; I thought to have seen the persons of the shop come out; after which I pursued the woman; she went into a little street on the right hand; having lost sight of her, and returning, I met with this gentleman.

Mr. Dolan. This French gentleman, when I came up, told me a woman had taken what he called a stew-pan; and was gone down Noel-street; upon enquiry, I found her taking a pint of porter in a public-house; upon searching her, I found the digester under her petticoats; Mr. Dantonville told me she had two black eyes, by which I knew her to be the person.(Mr. Lardner identified the property.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined three months in Newgate and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-36

567. THOMAS THOMAS and MARGARET THOMAS were indicated for forging and counterfeiting, on the 11th of May , a Bank-note, for the payment of 5l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For disposing of, and putting away

a forged Bank-note, for the payment of 5l. knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third Count. For forging and counterfeiting a like note, calling it a promissory note, for the payment of money, with the like intention.

Fourth Count. Uttering and publishing as true, a forged promissory note, for the payment of money, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

There were four other Counts for a like offence, with intention to defraud Robert Lasscock .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Giles, and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

JOHN MURRAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am the nephew of Mr. Robert Lasscock ; he keeps a shop near Hampton-court-green, within one hundred yards of the Toy.

Q. Look at the woman at the bar, do you know her? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see her at your uncle's shop at any time? - A. Yes, and another woman with her, of the name of Miriam; they asked me how I sold sugar by the loaf; I told them the same by the loaf, that I did by the pound.

Q. Which of them was it that asked the first question, Mrs. Thomas or the other? - A. Mrs. Thomas; she said, she would take a loaf at seventeen pence a pound, which came to eleven-shillings and a penny; and a pound of eight-shilling tea; the whole sum was nineteen shillings and a penny; that penny she asked to be abated; I told her I could not abate; then my aunt came in; I made out the bill, and Mrs. Thomas gave my aunt a 5l. note; my aunt told her she did not think it was a good one; Mrs. Thomas said, oh it is; my aunt said, she could not give her change; I took the note, and went out to Mrs. Hipperson's to get change; she keeps the King's-arms-inn; she changed the note, and I carried back the change to my aunt; Mrs. Thomas took the sugar, and the other woman took the tea.

Q. Have you any doubt at all of the person of Mrs. Thomas? - A. No.

HANNAH LASSCOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. - My husband keeps a grocer's shop at Hampton-court: On the 11th of May, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner was in my shop, in company with another young woman.

Q.Should you know that young woman again if you were to see her? - A. Yes; she went by the name of Miriam; they came in for tea and sugar; John Murray served them; and I came in and took a 5l. note from Mrs. Thomas; they were to pay me nineteen-shillings and a penny; they paid me nineteen-shillings; I took the note, and I thought it not a good one; Mrs. Thomas said she did not know but it was a good one; I told them I could not change it, but the little boy should go out and get it changed; he went out and brought five one pound notes; I took one, and gave them the others, and one-shilling; Mrs. Thomas took the loaf of sugar, and the other young woman took the tea.

Q. How long after this, was it, that Mr. Lasscock came home? - A. I sent for him, but he did not come home till near twelve o'clock at night; I sent the note to my husband by Murray, and I never saw it afterwards, till I saw it the other day.

ELIZABETH HIPPERSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Do you recollect John Murray coming to your house on the 11th of May? - A. Yes, he brought me a 5l. note; I gave him change in five one pound notes; I put the 5l. note into a purse in my pocket; I had no other 5l. note in that pocket; I was applied to again for that note in less than half an hour.

Q.By whom? - A. This little boy, Murray.

Q. Did you return to him the same note that he had given to you? - A. Yes, I am certain of it.

Q.(To Murray.) Did you receive back a note from Mrs. Hippersun? - A. Yes, I did; I took it down to my uncle.

Q. Did you put any mark upon it? - A. Not till I came to Bow street.

Q.Did you give the same note to your uncle, that you received from Mrs. Hipperson? - A. Yes.

ROBERT LASSCOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q.Do you remember Murray giving you a 5l. note? - A.Yes, about nine o'clock in the evening, of the 11th of May; this is the same note; I marked it before it went out of my possession.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. - Q. How long had you the note in your possession before you parted from it? - A. I think on the Wednesday, I marked it at Mr. Carter's, the attorney, at Kingston, to give information at the Bank.

Q. How did you keep it? - A. In my pocketbook.

Mr. Giles. Q.Are you quite sure it is the same note? - A. Yes.

THOMAS WALKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a waiter at Mrs. Hipperson's: On the evening of Monday, the 11th of May, the prisoner Thomas Thomas , with two women, in a little cart, were at our house.

Q.What time in the evening? - A. I cannot justly say; about seven o'clock, or it might be a little after.

Q. Was Mrs. Thomas one of the women? - A. I cannot say; the man is the same; I drank six-penny worth of rum and water with him; the two women got out of the cart, and went down the walk, and did not come into the house at all.

Q. Does that walk lead to Lasscock's-shop? - A. Yes; the prisoner had boots on, and a brown coat.

Q.How long did you remain with Thomas? - A.It might be ten minutes, if not more.

Q. Did you see any thing more of the women? - A. No, I did not.

Q.When did they come back? - A. I cannot justly say; it might be an hour; I saw two women pass on the other side of the way.

Q. Did you see the cart go off? - A. Yes, Thomas Thomas took the cart away from our door by himself.

Q.Can you say whether the two women, that you saw, were the same that got out of the cart? - A. I cannot swear to them; but I conceive them to be the same women.

Q. Which way did he drive the cart? - A. The same way the women were gone, towards Kingston.

Court. Q. How long was the cart at your door? - A.Three quarters of an hour, or more.

Q.How far is that from Lasscock's? - A.About one hundred and fifty yards, or it might be one hundred and twenty.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Do you know one Pepperday? - A. Yes.

Q. How far from Pepperday's? - A.About a mile and a quarter; that is at Hampton-town.

ELIZABETH PEPPERDAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. My husband, Thomas Pepperday , keeps a linen-draper's shop, at Hampton-town.

Q. Look round, and see if you know the woman at the bar? - A. I do; she came to my house, on the 11th of May, about six in the evening, and another woman with her.

Q. Who was that? - A. Her name is Miriam; she is attending here; they bought some goods to the amount of two pounds seven-shillings.

Q. Which of them bought the goods? - A. They were both in company; Mrs. Thomas paid for them; she gave me a five-pound note, and I gave her two-pounds thirteen shilling; I was to put the goods up in a box, and send them to London the next morning.

Q.Had you any other five-pound note? - A. No, I never changed one in my life before; I marked the note with my own name, at the time I parted with it, by the desire of the person I gave it to.

Q. Look at that note, and see if it has your mark upon it? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you deliver it to? - A. To Mr. Carter, the atorney, at Kingston.

JANE PEARMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I keep the White-house at Hampton-town.

Q. How far is your house from Mrs. Pepperday's? - A.Fifty or sixty yards, or thereabouts.

Q.Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes, I know them both: On the 11th of May, about half past four, or near five in the afternoon; the prisoner Thomas Thomas came to my door with a little cart and a poney, by himself, and asked me to take his horse in; I told him I had no man at home; as my husband was at Staine's-fair, and I did not know what horses he might bring home; he ordered a glass of ale, which he drank; he said he wanted to wait a little for his wife; he drank his glass of ale, and went down the town in the cart; he returned again, as near as I can tell, about six; I cannot tell the exact time; and then he and his wife, and another woman, came up to the door, and got into the cart; I have seen the other woman here this morning, her name is Miriam; they had some ale and went away.

Q. Are you quite sure the two prisoners, and the woman you have seen here to day, were the three persons? - A. Yes.

Q.Her name is Miriam Egginton , is it not? - A. I believe it is.( Miriam Egginton called into Court.)

Pepperday. That is the other person that was with Mrs. Thomas.

Q.(To Murray) Is this the person that you called Miriam? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Mrs. Lasscock.) Is that the young woman who carried away the tea with Mrs. Thomas? - A. Yes, it is the very same.

THOMAS GROVES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am al bouring man, at Hampton-court: On Monday, the 11th of May, in consequence of information, I went in pursuit of two women, and a man in a cart; I first went the London road, and after some information, I took the lewerl road; I was on horseback; in about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, I overtook the horse and cart, with two women and a man in it.

Q. What sort of a horse was it? - A. A little bay poney; I rode on the off side of them, and asked how far they were going; the man told me to Ewell.

Q. How did you address them, as one traveller may ask another? - A. Yes.

Q. Not so as to excite any alarm? - A. No; I then said, you are the people that have just changed a note at Hampton-court, and you must return back along with me; then one of them, I cannot tell which, said, I do not know that we have been at Hampton-court; I told them they had bought a loaf of sugar, and so much tea; then one of them, but I cannot say which, said, if we did change a note, they should have looked to it at the time; we had nothing to do with it; I laid hold of the horse, and turned him round.

Q.Recollect if any thing occurs to you, that the man said particularly? - A. I don't recollect any thing particular; I turned the horse round, and brought them back, as nigh as I can guess, one hundred yards, all three of them in the cart; then the man said, I will not go any further, you have nothing to do with me; then I said, I will go to Ewell, and fetch a chaise, and bring you

backs, upon that, the man returned his horse; the women got out, and he went on towards Ewell, and offered to give me change for the note; that was before the horse was turned round.

Q. Do you recollect which of them spoke, and what was said? - A. I cannot say which of them it was; but one of them said, we will give you change for the note, what more do you require of us; I told them I had nothing to do with their note or their money, they should go back with me; and then I turned the horse; the first time after the man was gone, the women came back with me almost to the Red-lion, walking alongside.

Q. How far is that Red-lion from Hampton-court? - A. About four miles.

Q.What time was it? - A.About ten o'clock, or it might be a little after, it was very dark; they went with me as far as the orchard hedge; one of the women, Mrs. Thomas, put her gown tail over her head, and jumped over the ditch, on to the common; I could not get the horse over; I got off and followed, but she was out of my sight in an instant, being so dark; and while I was pursuing her; I lost the other.

Q. Have you since seen the person who is called Miriam? - A. Yes.

Q. Is she the person who was with the two prisoners? - A. Yes; she was the other person; she was then in black.

Q.Who was the man that you saw in the cart? - A.That is the man.

Q. Are you sure that the two persons at the bar, and Miriam, were the three persons, who were in the cart; - A. Yes.

HANNAH HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the sister of Miriam Egginton .

Q.Where did you and your sister live, when you became acquainted with Thomas? - A. We lived with our father, George Felton , in Water-street, Birmingham.

Q. With whom did you come up from Birmingham to Epsom, and at what time? - A. The 2d of May, with Thomas Thomas , and my sister, Miriam Egginton .

Q.Did Thomas live at Epsom at that time? - A.Very near.

Q. Did his wife live with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that his wife at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Was she down at Birmingham? - A. I never saw her there.

Q. Did you find her at home at Epsom, upon your arriving there? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you and your sister live in the house with them after you arrived at Epsom? - A. I used to board with them, and slept out.

Q. Do you remember Thomas going out on the 11th of May? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did he take with him? - A. My sister and Mrs. Thomas.

Q.How did they go out? - A.In a chaise-cart

Q.Did Thomas, or his wife, tell you which way they were going? - A. No.

Q. At what time did Thomas return home that night? - A.Somewhere about ten at night; my sister came home about an hour, or an hour and a half after.

Q.And how long after did Mrs. Thomas come home? - A. I cannot tell; it might be an hour, or an hour and a half after my sister.

Q.When did they leave the house at Epsom? - A. On the Tuesday morning, the next day.

Q.Who left it? - A. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, and my sister.

Q.Did you ever see them again? - A. Not till they were in custody.

Q. When were you taken into custody yourself? - A. Upon the Tuesday in the afternoon of the day that they went away.

Q. What time did they leave the house on the Tuesday? - A.About four or five o'clock in the morning, or somewhere thereabout; I cannot be certain.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of William Ledgerwood , a butcher? - A. I have seen him; the first time I ever saw him was at Mr. Thomas's house, at Epsom; he came there upon some business to the prisoner Thomas.

Q. How often did you see him there upon business to Thomas? - A. To the best of my knowledge, twice.

Q. He was a butcher, at Epsom, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give information that Ledgerwood was acquainted with Thomas, when you were taken up? - A. No, I did not.

Q. How long after was it that Ledgerwood was taken up? - A. The same day.

Q.When was it that you saw your sister and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas again? - A. The Wednesday week after.

MIRIAM EGGINGTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q.Where were you born and educated? - A. At Bridgnorth.

Q. Have you resided lately at Birmingham? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. With which of them were you first acquainted? - A.With the man, Thomas Thomas ; he sold a horse to my husband, at Birmingham, was the cause of our first acquaintance.

Q. What is your husband's name? - A. John Eggington .

Q.When did this acquaintance commence? - A.Rather better than three quarters of a year from this time, or it might be rather more.

Q. Did this selling a horse to your husband cause any application from him to procure any thing for him? - A. Yes, some time afterwards.

Q.What application did he make to you? - A.He came to me on a Friday night, a little time after Christmas; he asked me if I could get him such articles as these forged notes; I told him I would try what I could do in the morning, and in the morning he came to our house, and I went with him up into Kenyon-street, and there I left him while I went to Cartwright's, in Livery-street; he gave me two notes to purchase them with.

Q.What notes did he give you? - A. They were Bank of England notes, I believe; they were lapped up, and I did not open them: I received from Cartwright a small parcel of notes, but did not open them.

Q.Could you see that they were papers which purported to be notes? - A. Yes; Thomas looked at them.

Q. Were those blank, or filled up? - A. Those were filled up.

Q.After you had delivered them to him, what became of the prisoner? - A. He went away, and I saw no more of him at that time: he said he should be in town again soon, and should call upon me.

Q.When he said in town, you understood him Birmingham? - A. Yes.

Q.How soon after this did the prisoner make you another visit? - A. It might be three weeks, or it might be more, I cannot say justly to the time; he came to our house again on the Sunday night, and asked me if I could get him any more notes; he said, he wished to have them got without being filled up, for the writing part to be filled up afterwards; he gave me a guinea, and I went on the Sunday night to one Beat, and got some.

Q.How many did you get? - A. I cannot justly tell the number; a woman, who is the wife of Beat, told me to take them, and see if they were approved of; I brought them down to my house, where he was sitting waiting for my return; I did not shew them to him at that time, because there was a stranger in my house; he asked me if we would go, and see him set off, where his wife was, at the public-house.

Q.Was that in the presence of the stranger? - A.The stranger did not hear it. I went, and they were going to tea, I drank tea with them.

Q.Did you see his wife? - A. Yes.

Q.Was that the person at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q.What did you do with the notes? - A.I gave them to him in my own house, but not before the stranger; he went away by the stage, and asked me to procure him some more, for he should soon be down again; I understood from him that he lived at Hounslow-heath at that time.

Q.How soon afterwards did you see him again? - A. I do not think I saw him again till this last time.

Q.When was that? - A.On the 2d of May; he wrote a note at Birmingham for me to go to him at Edgbaston, I went to him with the person that he sent; he asked me if I would have any thing to drink, and the person with me; the note directed me to pay the bearer a shilling, which I did not do, but when I went to him be paid the man a shilling; he told me he was come down again, and wanted some more notes; I told him they were ready for him.

Q.Were those blank, or filled up? - A.Blank he asked me to stay and dine with him, but I declined, and told him I should go and dine at my mother's, for my sister and myself had made up our minds to come to London.

Q.Who was your sister? - A.Hannah Hall; then he said he would go with me, and he and I went to my mother's; my youngest sister was gone to get some dinner, and I went to Mrs. Beat's and got the notes.

Q.What did you get at Beat's? - A.Forty notes of one pound, and fourteen notes of five pounds each, to the best of my recollection.

Q.What was the price of those at Birmingham at that time? - A. I did not pay for them; for he had but a guinea; he disired I would see what I could l do for him, for he had no more.

Q. You were to obtain them upon credit? - A. Yes; and if he sold his horse, or his cart, he would pay for them; he then sent for some paper, and wrote a letter; I gave him the notes in the bundle as I had received them from Mrs. Beat; after he had had them a short time, he took out, as he said afterwards. two of them, out of the bundle, to inclose in the letter.

Q.What did he do with the remainder of the bundle, after taking out two? - A. He gave them to me again.

Q. Did you see him inclose them in the letter? - A. I did not; but he said he did.

Q.Did he do any thing to the notes before he inclosed them? - A.Not that I saw; my little girl put the letter in the post for him; he said, my sister and me might as well come as far as we could with him, and save the fire of the coach; after we had inded, wand prepared ourselves, my sister and I went to the sign of the Fighting-cocks, where the chaisecart was.

Q What sort of a horse was it? - A.little poney.

Q.Was any observation made upon it? - A.He said it was very small, and we said, if the horse was not able to carry us we could walk a stage, and then go on with the coach.

Q.Did you set out together upon this plan? - A. Yes.

Q.Where were the bundle of notes at this time? - A.In my pocket.

Q.Where did you arrive at the end of your journey? - A.At the Bull's-head, at Ewell.

Q.When was it? - A.On the Tuesday night.

Q.The Tuesday preceding the 12th of May? - A. Yes; the next day the prisoner took me and my sister to his house, at Ewell, and there we saw his wife.

Court. Q.Do you mean the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Q.What did the family consist of? - A. A little boy, about two years old, and he, and his wife.

Q.When you arrived at his house, what did you do with the bundle of notes? - A. I kept them in my pocket till the next day; he asked me for them.

Q.They were still, as to the writing part, in blank? - A. Yes.

Q.Did he put them in any place of privacy? - A.He hid them in some private place of his own, I never knew where they were; he fetched them out on the Friday, and took them into the parlour and unlapped them; he got a pea and ink and began to write upon them.

Q.Was there any paper of any sort upon which he could write but the blank notes? - A.Only the paper they were lapped in.

Q.Did you, in point of fact, see him writing upon the notes? - A.I did; I saw him filling them up.

Q.How many did he fill up? - A. I think two.

Q.Ones or fives? - A.To the best of my recollection, some of both.

Q.What did he do with them? - A.He put the rest away, and gave those that were filled up to his wife; she went up stairs with them, to clean her self, and make ready to go; he got the chaise ready, and the prisoner and his wife, and I, went out, leaving my sister at home with the child.

Q.It is not material to pursue the transactions of this Friday - now go on to Monday the 11th, the day you went to Hampton-Court; between the Friday and the Monday did you again see any of the notes? - A. I don't recollect.

Q.Were you at the prisoners's house on Monday the 11th? - A. Yes.

Q.You slept at some lodgings furnished by him? - A. Yes; on Monday the 11th, we got our dinner in very good time, and after dinner, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, and myself, went out in the chaise.

Q.What preparations had been made? - A.Nothing particular, more than to take a ride out.

Q.Upon Monday did you see any of the notes before you went out? - A. I saw one of one pound, and two of five pounds, in the possession of Thomas Thomas , first.

Q.They were at first blank were they; then filled up? - A. I think they were filled up on the Friday.

Q.You saw them first in the man's possession; what did he do with them? - A.He gave them to his wife; she went up stairs to clean herself, and came down again, and then we all went out together in the chaise.

Q.The same chaise cart and horse that you had seen at Birmingham? - A. Yes.

Q.Who drove you? - A. Thomas Thomas .

Q.Where did you go to? - A. To a public-house near to Hampton Court.

Q.Should you know the sign? - A. I am not positive, but I believe it was the Toy, near to the Place-gate; there was something called for to drink by Thomas Thomas ; Mrs. Thomas and I got out of the chaise, and went to a toy-shop, we left Thomas waiting at the door of the public-house, with his horse and cart.

Q.Had Mrs. Thomas any others money abnout her that you knew of, besides these three notes? - A. Not that I saw; we went to a toy-shop, and Mrs. Thomas purchased a pound of hair-powder, and a child's drum; she paid a one pound note for them.

Q.The one pound note that had been given to her by her husband, do you mean? - A. I believe it was.

Q. Did he send his wife to that shop? - A. Yes; he said, there is a shop where you may go and buy some articles; then she and I went to a grocer's-shop, lower down, where she bought some tea and sugar.

Q.Of whom did she cheapen the articles of grocery? - A.I believe the man and woman were both present.

Q.A boy or a man? - A. A man and a woman; she bought three ounces of tea, and a pound of sugar.

Q. That was not Mrs. Laffecock's? - A. No; she there offered a one pound note.

Q. Was it taken? - A. No; she asked me if I had any change, and I sent her half a-guinea.

Q.Where did you got from that first gorcer's? - A.To where the cart was, Mr. Thomas was waiting for us to come to him.

Q.What past then? - A.Nothing particular, except paying for what we had drank.

Q.And then you two got into the cart? - A. Yes; then we went to Mr. Pepperday's, a linendraper.

Q.How far is that from Hampton-court? - A.Some little distance, I cannot say what; he drove very fast, I think he drove beyond Mr. Pepperdays's.

Q.Did he stop at any public house? - A.No, I think not, nor near a public-house; Mrs. Thomas and I got out and went to Mr. Pepperday's shop, Mrs. Thomas purchase some dark cottons and a small quantity of cambric mussins; she paid a 5l. note.

Q.Was that one of those that had been given her by her husband, and that you had proceured from Beat? - A. I should suspect it was.

Q. Do you really believe it to be one of the same? - A.I do.

Q.What became of you after that? - A. We returned to him, we found him near his cart.

Q.At the place where you left him? - A. Yes; then we went, I believe, back again to Hampton-court, but I am not acquainted sufficiently with the place to say; we drove past Mrs. Lasscock's door; and Mr. Thomas said, there was a shop, or something of that sort, I cannot say exactly.

Q.How far did you go past? - A. Not far; for while I was in Mr. Laffcock's shop waiting for the boy coming back with the change, I saw him standing at the head of his horse.

Q.Do you think it was more than the length of this Court? - A. Yes, it might be rather more than twice the length of this Court.

Q.Who did Mrs. Thomas bargain with at Laffcock's? - A. A little boy I think was in the shop at first, and then Mrs. Laffcock came in.

Q. What articles did she purchase there? - A.Some tea and some loaf sugar, which she paid for with the 5l. note.

Q.Do you believe that to be the same that he had given to his wife? - A. Yes.

Q.And that you had brought from Birmingham? - A. Yes; the boy went out to the public-house where the cart was-standing for change, the change was delivered to Mrs. Thomas, and then she and I went away, I believe I carried the tea, I am positive I carried one of the two; when he saw us coming, he went on with the cart for us to follow a little way; he went on one side of the road and we on the other.

Q. How far might you go before he took you up into the chaise? - A.Not far.

Q.What became of the articles that you bought? - A.He put them into the cart.

Q. And then you proceeded on your way home? - A. Yes.

Q.How far had you proceeded before any thing happened to you? - A. It was getting dusk when the constable came up.

Q.You mean a man of the name of Groves? - A. Yes; he came up on horseback, and asked, how far are you going this road; Mrs. Thomas made answer, and said, they were going to Ewell; he said they must stop and go back; Mr. Thomas asked what for; he said they must go back in consequence of a 5l. bank-note, which had been paid to a grocer, at Hampton-court; Mr. Thomas said, I will not go back; he said he could have no charge of him, he had done nothing; there were some words passed about the note; he said, addressing himself to his wife, my dear, you know where we took it, and he offered the man the money; he said you can go and settle it yourself, take the money and you can go and take up the note yourself; the man said he could not do any such thing, those who had paid it must go back with him; then the man endeavoured to stop the horse; Mr. Thomas turned the cart round and would not let him; he said, if she had paid it, she must go back and settle it herself; she said we might as well go together, and I said I had no objection; he said he would go to Ewell and get a chaise; we got out; Thomas turned his horse, and appeared to me to drive on as hard as he could.

Q.Do you remember any observation being made about what the people of the shop should have done is it had been offered? - A. I don't recollect.

Q. You and Mrs. Thomas then continued to walk with Groves? - A. Yes; we had not gone far before she flarterd, and left him and me together.

Q.What became of her? - A.I do not know; it was so sudden, and so dark, I could not see; he wanted his horse to go after her, and the horse refused; and then he got off his horse, and left me.

Q.And you had not the complaisance to wait for his return? - A. No, I walked straight on home, as they told me.

Q.You did not know the way, and you enquired for Epsom? - A. Yes.

Q.What time did you arrive at the prisoner's houte? - A.About eleven o'clock.

Q.Who did you find at home? - A.Thomas and my sitter.

Q. What did Thomas say to you when you got home? - A.He asked where his wife was; I told him I could not tell, for she had run away; and about an hour after, on it might be more; she came home; I then went to lay down upon Thomas's bed, with his wife.

Q. What became of the man prisoner? - A. I don't know.

Q. Was there any other bed that he could have retired to? - A.Not in our house.

Q.Were you disturbed early in the morning by anybody? - A. Yes; the wife waked me to get up and go.

Q.What time did you leave the prisoner's house? - A.It might be about six, it was very early, there was no clock; people were begning to be stirring about.

Q.How did you leave the house? - A. I left my sister and no one else; his wife and I walked over the common while he made the cart ready and overtook us.

Q.Had there been any talk of leaving home before, or was it a sudden thing? - A.It was sudden, in consequence of what had passed the night before. Q.Where did he drive you to? - A. I am a stranger to that part; we did not go a straight road any way.

Q.And you continued wandering about till you were apprehended at Gravesend, on the 18th? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you all together? - A. His wife and I were in the house, he was at the water-side; he said he would go and see what time the ferry-boat would take the horse and cart over to the Essex fine of the water.

Q.Did any thing pass about the state of things at home? - A.His wife was very anxious about the child, and he went twice; the first time he gave us very little information, and the second time he told us my sister Hannah was in confinement, and the butcher, Ledgerwood.

Q.What did he say respecting the butcher? - A.He said it was the worst thing that could have befallen him.

Q.Befallen who? - A.Him, Thomas.

Q.Had you seen Ledgerwood at Thomas's house? - A. Yes, he came and drank tea there.

Q.So that you know who be meant when he spoke of the butcher? - A. Yes; on the Sunday before we had been with him on a journey of pleasure to see the gypsies at Norwood.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You have been acquanted with the prisoner three quarters of a year? - A. Yes.

Q.I suppose, at Birmingham, it is thought no harm to deal in Bank notes? - A. I got none for any but him.

Q.But you thought no harm in getting them for him? - A. It was for want of thought, I did not think there was any harm in it, or I would not have got them for him.

Q.When did you first tell this story that you have been, upon the examination of my friend, repeating so amazingly well? - A.Before the Magistrate, Mr. Ford.

Q.Not till after you were taken up? - A.No.

Q.When you were taken up, you were afraid of being ried, were not you? - A.When I was apprehended, I expected to be tried.

Q.And then it was you told the Justice this story? - A. Yes.

Q.It was to avoid being tried? - A.No, it was not.

Q.Why then did you tell the story, if it was not to avoid being tried? - A. I was asked to tell the truth, and I did.

Q.Then, upon your oath, that was the only person that induced you to tell the Justice any thing about it? - A. Yes.

Q.Then you had no hope or any idea of saving yourself, by giving that account? - A. I knew I had not committed forgery.

Q. I ask you, whether you did not entertain hopes of saving yourself, by giving that account to the Justice? - A. To be sure I did.

Q.Was it at the first or second examination that took place before the Justice, that you gave this account? - A.I am not positive which.

Q.This happened above a month ago; upon your oath, does not your memory serve you, whether it was the first or second time that you gave the account? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q.Upon your oath, do not you believe it was the second examination? - A.No.

Q.Upon your oath, were not there several examinations before you gave the account of it to the Justice? - A. I do not know as to the Justice, it was before the gentlemen of the Bank.

Q. Were you not several times before the gentlemen of the Bank, and the Justice; before you gave the account that you have given to-day? - A. Yes.

Q.Then if you were several times before you gave this account, how happened it that you did not tell the truth at the first examination? - A.I cannot give any reason for it, I had no particular reason, I had not a mind to tell it.

Mr. Garrow. Q.Is the account you have been giving to-day the truth, and the whole truth? - A. To the best of my recollection.

Q.Have you stated any thing that you know to be untrue? - A. No.

Court. Q. Where is your husband now, is he at Stafford? - A. Yes.

MARY REDFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. I am a butcher at Epsom.

Q. You have a person in your service of the name of William Ledgerwood ? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect any time in the month of May sending Ledgerwood to Mr. Ladbroke's for the amount of a bill that was owing to you? - A.About the 10th or 11th, it was 13l. odd.

Q. What did he bring you back as from M Ladbroke? - A. Two 5l. notes.

Q. Cast your eye upon that, and see if that is one of the notes he gave to you upon that occasion? - A. This is one of them; I marked it R. Ladbroke, Esq. this was on the Monday; he was taken up on the Wednesday.

WILLIAM LEDGERWOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am a journeyman butcher, servant to Mrs. Redford, she served Mr. Ladbroke with meat.

Q. Did you, at any time, receive the amount of a bill from Mr. Ladbroke's housekeeper, for her? - A. I did.

Q.In what shape did you receive it? - A.In two 5l. Bank notes.

Q.Did you give to Mrs. Redford the same two 5l. notes? - A. No; one of them I had from Thomas Thomas .

Q.Do you mean the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at this, and see if it is one of the notes that you received from Mr. Ladbroke's housekeeper? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. That you had in your custody when you were apprehended? - A. Yes.

Q.Instead of delivering to your mistress that

one which was found in your custody, you delivered her another? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that? - A.This is the one that I delivered to my mistress, I saw her mark it.

Q. When did you receive it from Thomas? - A.Four days before; I did not know it was a bad one, but I gave him something for it.

Q.What did you give him for it? - A.To the value of near 3l. he never told me they were had ones.

Q.Upon what terms did you have them from him? - A. I gave him at the rate of ten or eleven shillings a piece for twenty shillings.

Q.Do you know from the prisoner, Thomas Thomas , whether he has lately been at Birmingham? - A. I do; I received a letter from him when he was there.

Q.Was any thing inclosed in that letter? - A. Yes, a 1l. note.

Q.Have you got the letter here? - A. No.

Q.What have you done with it? - A. I destroyed it.

Q.Did you know from him, after he came home, that he had written that letter? - A. Yes.

Q.What did that letter contain? - A.He says, William, I have sent you up a 1l. note, hardly any thing else.

Q.What else? - A.It was, William, I have sent you up a 1l. note for you, till I come up.

Q.Did he say any thing about it before he went? - A.He said he should send me up one.

Q.What were you to give him for it? - A.To the amount of ten shillings.

Q.Upon his return, was there any increase in his family? - A. Yes, two young women, Miriam Egginton and Hannah Hall.

Q.You went with them upon a Sunday's excur sion, to see the gypsies at Norwood? - A. Yes.

Q.Was it after this young woman came to town, that you substituted that note of your mistress's? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you remember Thomas absconding? - A. Yes.

Q.When was Hannah Hall taken up? - A.The same day.

Q.Did he ever tell you what part of the country he had these notes from? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ever tell him where you had them from? - A. No.

Q.You had the misfortune to be taken up? - A. Yes.

Q.You came from Newgate now? - A. Yes.

Q.You were taken up upon a charge of kluttering counterseit Banks notes? - A.Only this five-pound note.

Q.And have been kept in custody from that time to this? - A. Yes. You began to think you selt in a perilous situation? - A. No.

Q.Upon your oath, you did not begin to think yourself in some danger of being hanged? - A.I did not know but what I was doing wrong.

Q.Do you mean to say it was at all matter of doubt with you, whether it was right? - A.I never knew whether they were good notes or bad ones.

Q. I did not ask you that? - A. I knew it was a wrong thing.

Q.When you were taken up upon a charge of uttering a forged Bank note to your misetess, did you not then think you might come to be hanged? - A.I thought then it was very wrong.

Q. I ask you, did you not begin to fear that you might be hanged? - A. I did not think I should be hanged.

Q.Will you swear you had no fear at all of being punished for what you had done? - A. I did not know it was a forged note.

Q.At the time you were taken up and charged, were you not apprehensive of being punished? - A. I thought I should go to jail for it.

Q.When did you first tell this story, you have told us to-day, of having these notes from Thomas? - A. I told the Justice of it, Mr. Shaw.

After you were in custody? - A. Yes.

Q.And then, to throw it off your own shoulders, you said you had it from Thomas, in order to save yourself? - A. I could not do any otherwise than tell who I had it of.

Q.You never told any body you had it from him, till you yourself were charged with the crime of having put it off? - A. No.

GARNET TERRY Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q.You are engraver of bank-notes for the Bank of England? - A. yes.

Q.Look at that, and tell me if that has been engraved from a plate of the Bank of England? - A.It has not, I am certain of it; neither the paper, engraving, or ink; it is altogether a forgery.

Q.There is some of your own work, is there not, in every bank-note? - A.There is.

Q.And you are able to speak with absolute certainly? - A. I am.

Q. Now look at that (Pepperday)? - A.This is a forgery of the same kind.

Q.Now look at that (Mrs. Redford)? - A.This is just the same.

Q.Now take the three, compare them, and tell me, from your skill in engraving, whether they are struck from the same plate? - A. They are all from one plate.

Q.Have you any doubt of it? - A. I have none; there have been some little alterations upon the state, but they are from the same plate.

Q.I do not know whether you have addicted yourself to comparing hard-writings; there are two notes of the same date, 15th of December (Pepperday's and Laffcock's), are you able to saw whe

ther they appear to you to be the hand-writing of the same person? - A.They appear to me so.

Q.The numbers are composed of nearly the same figures? - A. Yes, particularly 15th of December; the two oughts in the 1800 appear to be of the same writing, and the ink appears to be the same.

- GLOVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are inspector of bank-notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that note, and see what name is signed to it? - A. A. Hooper.

Q. Is there a person of that name authorized by the Bank of England to sign notes? - A.Not five pound notes; there is a person of that name authorized to sign smaller notes.

Q.There is no person authorized to sign five pound notes who is not a cashier? - A. No.

Q.Do you know the hand-writing of Mr. Hopper? - A. I do.

Q.Is that his writing? - A.It is not like his writing.

Q.Look at that (Pepperday's), whose signature does that appear to you to be? - A. W. Caulier, but the r appears to be torn off.

Q. Is Mr. Caulier a cashier, authorized to sign five pound notes? - A. Only one and two pound notes.

Q.Is that his writing? - A.It is not.

Q. Now look at the one Mrs. Redford has identified, whose signature is that? - A.It is meant for J Longman.

Q.Is there a person of that name who signs five pound notes? - A. No, only ones and twos.

Q.Is it his hand-writing? - A.It is not.(The three notes read.)

NATHANIEL LOARING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am clerk to the Solicitor of the Bank; I was present at the apprehension of the two prisoners and Miriam Eggington, at Gravesend; Mrs. Thomas and Mrs. Eggington were apprehended in the same room, and he was apprehended within two minutes after.

Q.You had been for some days pursuing them by such information as you had an opportunity of getting? - A.Two nights and a day.

Q.Had they pursued a regular and natural course? - A.No, they had gone in a zig-zag manner throughout Surrey.

Thomas Thomas 's defence. I have nothing to say, I leave it to the mercy of the Gentlemen of the Jury.

Margaret Thomas 's defence. I have nothing to say.

Thomas Thomas , GUILTY , Death , aged 32.

Margaret Thomas , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-37

568. ISAAC WISE was indicted for that he, on the 28th of May , two pieces of false and counterfeit milled money made and counterfeited to the likeness of half-a-guinea, and two pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, and counterfeited to the likeness of a seven-shilling piece, not being cut in pieces, did put off to one John Dumphy, at a lower rate and value than the same by the denomination imported to be, and were counterfeited for, that is to say, for ten shillings in monies numbered .

Second Count. For a like offence, varying the manner of charging it.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN DUMPHY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a private in the London Militia; I know the prisoner; I did not know him till the day he was taken up; I met him on the 28th of May, at the Three Mariners, in fore street.

Q.Had you before that acquainted any persons with your expectation of meeting this man? - A. I did; Armstrong, Ray, Clarke, and Vickery.

Q.Did you see Mr. Powell before you went? - A. Yes, I was authorized by him to go there; Mr. Powell gave me a half-guinea, a seven shilling-piece, two half-crowns, a shillings, and a sixpence, which he marked, on the 27th; I saw him mark them.

Q. Do you know Patrick Macneal? - A. Yes, he introduced me to the house; I went in about two o'clock; after I had been there a little while, Macneal came in and sat down in the box where I was; then he called the prisoner out from the back parlour, and then Macneal called me out into the yard, where he was; Macneal told the prisoner I was the man that wanted to buy the money; Macneal said, he thinks I impose upon him in the price.

Q.Had you and Macneal any conversation as to the price which those things might be purchased? - A. No; Macneal said to the prisoner he had told me of the price of the half-guineas and seven shilling-pieces; the prisoner then said, how much did you tell him; Macneal said, three shillings for each of the half-guineas, and two shillings each for the seven shilling-pieces; then the prisoner said I should have them for that; I pulled out my pocketbook and gave him a seven shilling-piece, a half-crown, and a sixpence, for which I received two half-guineas and two seven shilling-pieces.

Q. Was that the same money that Mr. Powell had furnished you with? - A. Yes; then the prisoner and I returned back into the tap-room; the prisoner was going towards the parlour, and Macneal called for a quartern of rum; I called for half-a-pint; a woman in the tap-room had a signal when I called for the rum to go and fetch the officers; the officers then came in and laid hold of the prisoner; Mr. Armstrong asked me, in the presence of the prisoner, what I had been doing; I told him I had been buying bad gold from the

prisoner; he asked me how much was it, and I told him I had bought two half-guineas and two seven shilling-pieces; Mr. Armstrong asked me to produce the money, I produced it in the presence of the prisoner, and gave it to Armstrong.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q.I think you said your name was Dumphy? - A. Yes.

Q.You have been a soldier? - A. Yes, and have been nearly five years.

Q.What regiment has the good luck to have you in it? - A. The East London.

Q. You do not wish to get out of it? - A.No.

Q. You never made any application to get out of it? - A. I have made application to get out of it to save my life.

Q. I hope all cowards will do the same that are to fight the foe - how long have you been known by the name of Dumphy, is it a nick-name, or your own name? - A. My own name.

Q.Have they nick-named you then? - A. It is no nick-name; when I told my serjeant my name, he could not spell it, and he put it down Dumphy.

Q.How long have you known this gentleman, Mr. Powell? - A.For a twelvemonth past; I know nothing that is bad of him.

Q.Nor I believe any body else? - A. No.

Q.In how many cases have you been a witness for him? - A.In two.

Q. That is all he has employed you in? - A.Before a Jury.

Q. I did not ask you that? - A. I have been in all four times.

Q. May I ask you what you pay is as a soldier, I know you have not much more than nine-pence or ten-pence a day, what have you from Mr. Powell as a volunteer? - A. I was paid for my time.

Q.How much are you paid? - A. Five shillings a day.

Q.Do you mean to swear that is all you receive? - A. I have five shillings a day for my expences.

Q.Have you never received two guineas after a conviction in addition to the five shillings? - A.I do not understand you.

Q.After you have been here as a witness have you never received two guineas from Mr. Powell besides five shillings a day? - A. No.

Q.How much have you received besides? - A. I do not understand you.

Q.Do you mean to say that you have never received from Mr. Powell for being a witness more than five shillings a day - is that the whole amount of your profits? - A. That is all I expect.

Q.I ask you is five shillings a day all that you have received as a reward for your services? - A. I have never received more than five shillings a day.

Q.Upon your oath, do not you charge a bill of expences? - A. I did not know what to ask him,

Q.How long have you known Macneal? - A. It is near half a year.

Q.Is Macneal here to-day? - A. Yes.

Q.He and the prisoner you know had been acquainted? - A.That do not know.

Q.His macneal never told you he was acquainted with the prisoner? - A. Yes; but I cannot say whether he was acquainted with him or not.

Q. Do you mean to say, upon your oath, you do not know whether he is or not? - A.Macneal told me he was, I cannot say.

Q.During the time you have known Macneal has he never been taken up for finashing? - A.Not that I know of; I heard somebody say so since I have been in custody, but I don't know whether it is true.

Q.Have you not heard, and do you not believe, that Macneal has been confined for finashing? - A. I heard so two days ago.

Q.What are you in custody for? - A.Against Mr. Wise.

Q. Do they keep you in custody, and pay you too? - A. I am in confinement by the regiment.

Q. I suppose you know your own hand-writing, if you see it? - A. Yes; I was forced to do it; every thing that they told me to do I did, to save my life; I know what you are going to ask me very well.

Q. Are these papers your hand-writing? - A. Yes. (A paper read.) "Mr. Wise, if you like that, I and James Mohony will go to the corporal, and purchase my discharge, which will be no great deal of expence, and that you will satisfy me, I will go to Ireland myself and my family directly." -(Another paper read)."Mr. Wise, if you like to pay for my discharge, which you will get for 2l. 2s. I have but four months to serve, I shall go cut of the country. John Dumphy ."

Q.Do you know a man of the name of Brown? - A. I Know a great many of the name of Brown.

Q. Do you know a gentleman who was tried here of the name of Brown, for felony, last Sessions? - A.I do not know.

Q.Perhaps I am not accurate, it might have been the sessions before? - A.I do not know.

Q.Do you remember a publican who lived upon Saffron-hill who was charged with felony? - A. I know one Brown upon Saffron hill, I lodged there once.

Q. Are you acquainted with any of the lodgers that are there now? - A. I do not know.

Q.Do you know Mary Cook ? - A.No.

Q.Do not you know that Brown was tried here for a felony last sessions? - A.No.

Q.Do you know a publican of the name of Gibbons? - A. I know his house, but I do not know the man.

Q.Where does he live? - A.Upon saffron-hill.

Q.Macneal, you know, was acquainted with Brown; has he never told you that? - A. No.

Q. Has Macneal never told you that he knew of a prosecution against Brown, and that he was assisting to conduct that prosecution? - A. He never told me any thing at all about it.

Q. Do not you know that he was a witness here last Sessions? - A. He never told me any thing about it.

Q. Did you never hear that Brown was prosecuted? - A.No.

Q.How often have you been at Gibbons's house; have you been there lately? - A. No.

Q.Have you been in the habit of going frequently there? - A. No.

Q.Have you never had any conversation with Gibbons? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Mr. Taylor? - A.No.

Q. Do you know Mr. O'Brian? - A. I know him now, I did not then.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, did you mean to say you did not know O'Brian? - A. No.

Q.Upon your oath, have you not indicted that very man for a conspiracy? - A. I did.

Q. Have you ever had any conversation with Mahony? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you seen him often since? - A. Yes, at the Bell, upon Clerkenwell-green.

Q. Have you indicted him too? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with him? - A.Twelve years.

Q. When did you indict him and O'Brian for a conspiracy? - A. I do not know what an indictment is property, only let me explain it in my own way; I went before the Grand Jury yesterday, and told the truth, and that is all I know of it.

Q.Perhaps you did not know that both these persons that you indicted were to be witnesses for this man at the bar? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not? - A. I did not know it.

Q.Did you not see them taken into custody here last night? - A. Yes; I was told last night that they were to be witnesses, but I did not know it before; I was in custody, and not permitted to speak to any body.

Q. Do you mean to say you never were told by any body before you went before the Grand Jury, that what you went before them for was to prove a conspiracy? - A. I went to tell the truth.

Q.Did you ever read the indictment? - A.The Gentlemen of the Jury read it.

Q.Was that the first time you heard the bill read? - A.Yes; Mr. Powell wrote it down, and read it to me, and afterwards I heard it read before the Grand Jury.

Q.Did you not know what that indictment was for when you went before the Grand Jury? - A. Yes; Mr. Powell told me it was to indict these people.

Q.For a conspiracy? - A. I do not know what.

Q. What day was it you went to the Three Mariners, as you tell us? - A. The 28th of May.

Q. You cannot tell whether you recollect these people being in the tap-room or not? - A. No.

Q.Upon the oath you have taken, did you ever go into the yard of that public-house? - A. I went into the yard, when Macneal called the prisoner out.

Q. I shell call witnesses to prove you did not, therefore be contious; will you persist in swearing you went into the yard to speak to the prisoner at the bar? - A. I did.

Q. I suppose you know that Macneal owed the prisoner some money? - A. I do not know whether he did or not.

Q. Did you never hear Macneal say so? - A. No.

Q.Nor you have never said you heard Macneal say so? - A.No.

Q. I understand you were searched before you went into the public-house? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. And you had no other money about you? - A. No.

Q.Was Macneal searched? - A. I cannot say whether he was or not.

Q. Did he not go with you for the purpose of acting in the apprehension of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. And you do not know whether he was searched or not, though you both went upon the same scheme? - A. I do not.

Q. You were before the Magistrate, before you went before the Grand Jury? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not say there, that Macneal had not been searched; have you never said, that you knew Macneal was not searched? - A. I cannot say that I did, but I never saw him searched.

Q. Have you never said, that Macneal was not searched? - A. I don't know whether I did or not.

Q. Will you swear you did not? - A. I don't know whether I did or not.

Q.Did you not hear, before the Magistrate, hat he was not searched? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q.Macneal was examined before the Magistrate? - A. No, he was not.

Q.Armstorng was examined before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Mr. knowlys. What Armstrong said, cannot be evidence.

Mr. Alley. I contend, upon cross-examination, it is.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was it not taken in writing? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q.Have you never said, that you knew Macneal was not searched? - A. I cannot say whether I did or not; but what I say, I will say truly and honestly from my heart.

Q. Do not you know that Macneal had money in his pocket when he went into the public-house? - A. I dare say he had.

Q. Do not you know he told you he had? - A. To be sure he told me that he had money.

Q.Did not he tell you he owed the prisoner three shillings, that you should give him the marked money in payment of his debt? - A. No.

Q.Upon your oath, did you not give Macneal three shillings of the marked money, to give it to the prisoner at the bar? - A. I did not.

Q. Do you mean to swear you went into the yard of the public-house, and it was there the transaction took place between you and the prisoner? - A. Yes, it was.

Q.You have been at Newgate lately? - A. I went there with his friends.

Q.Have you never been there alone? - A. Yes; and every thing they asked me to do since I was in that public-house, I have done it.

Q.Have you not frequently wrote, and been to his friends for money? - A. No.

Q.Have you not sent his wife, to say you would quit the country for fifteen guineas? - A.Suppose I did say that, I would not leave the country upon any account; they told me they would give me fifteen guineas if I would go to Bristol, and go on board a ship.

Q. Who told you that? - A.Mahony, Conder, O'Brian, and Blake.

Q. Did the prisoner ever offer to give you fifteen guineas himself? - A. Yes, he did.

Q.Upon your oath, did you not go to Newgate, and tell him, if he would give you fifteen guineas, you would leave the country? - A. I was forced to do it.

Court. Q.What do you mean by being forced to do it? - A. I did any thing that they told me to do.

Q.Who do you mean by they? - A. Wife's friends; they sent me word, that if they caught me out late at night, they would run me through if I did not agree to their terms.

Mr. Alley. Q.Did the prisoner ever say so to you? - A. No.

Q.Did not the prisoner refuse to give you fifteen guineas when you demanded it? - A. I cannot recollect: they made me drunk several times in the prison.

Q. You must know whether you asked him for fifteen guineas or not? - A. I cannot say; they made me drunk with wine.

Q. I ask, upon your oath, have you never gone to the prison when you were sober? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever get drunk in the prison? - A. Yes, I was made drunk there.

Q.Did you never ask the prisoner at the bar, when you were sober, if he would give you fifteen guineas, and you would leave the country? - A. He never refused me any thing.

Q. Did not you, at one time, ask me for five guineas, and when he refused it, you offered to take a guinea in part? - A. That was the night I was drunk.

Q. Do you know Mr. Burke, a soldier? - A. Yes.

Q.Has he not gone to the prison with you? - A. Yes.

Q. He was not an acquaintance of Wife's? - A. No.

Q.He is your own comrade? - A. Yes.

Q.Will you say you did not, in the presence or Burke, when sober, ask him for fifteen guineas? - I might, to be sure.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Upon the oath you have taken, what was the first cause of your going into Newgate? - A. On account of one Brown.

Q. Was that Brown an acquaintance of the prisoner's? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know, from the prisoner, that Brown was an acquaintance of his? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q.You told me you were made drunk; what were you made drunk with? - A. I had gin, and beer, and wine, in the wine-room.

Q. Will you say you had a drop of gin in the wine room? - A. No.

Q. Did you say to this moment? - A. I was in and out.

Q. Will you dare to swear you got drunk with liquor there? - A. Yes.

Q.When you got drunk with wine, what quantity had you? - A. I cannot swear.

Q.Will you swear you had more than one bottle of wine among five? - A. I cannot say what I had.

Q. Did you not go into the wine-room, before you went into the prison? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Were you sober when you went into the prison? - A. Yes.

Q. Is this wine-room within the walls of the prison? - A. Yes.

Q.Who first introduced you to the prison? - A.Briony took me to Mahony's house.

Q.Did you ever see the prisoner and Mahony together? - A. Yes; Mahony said, he had known me a great while, and he was authorised by Mr. Wife to give me any money.

Q. Did Mahony explain for what he was to give you that money? - A. To keep away from the Sessions.

Mr. Alley. Q.Had you not left the prison when his conversation took place? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Then it cannot be evidence.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.It is misunderstood, I will set it right; did you converse with Wife after you went into the prison upon the subject of the con

versation that you had previously had with Mahony? - A. Yes.

Court Unless you can prove Mahony an agent that won't do.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Who introduced you to Wife when you first went to the prisoner? - A. Mr. Mahony.

Q. Did Mahony and Wife appear to be the friends of each other? - A. Yes; they went and had a bottle of wine in the wine-room.

Q. Did you tell him what Mahony and you had been talking about? - A. Yes; I told Wife that Mahony was making it up with me, and striving to get me out of the way.

Q.Did Mahony and Wife at that time know you were to be a witness against Wife upon this trial? - A. Yes; then Wife put his hand in his pocket, took out five guineas, and gave it to Mahony.

Q.Did he tell Mahony for what purpose he gave him these five guineas? - A.Not in my presence.

Q. Did Mahony afterwards tell you for what purpose Wife gave you these five guineas? - A.Not in my presence.

Q.When you told Wife that his friend Mahony had been talking to you about getting out of the way, what did Wife say? - A. He said he did not mind any money if he could depend upon my being out of the way.

Q.When Mahony left the gaol did he tell you what he had received these five guineas for? - A. Yes; he told me they were given me to support me in any thing that I wanted.

Q.Did you afterwards apply to get discharged from the regiment? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.Was it in consequence of those promises that no money would be spared? - A. Yes; he wanted me to go away, and I told him I would not go to be a deserter, unless he would purchase my discharge; Wife said he was very agreeable to purchase my discharge.

Q. Is it for your wishing to get out of the way that you are now in custody of your officers? - A. Yes.

Q.And you have been kept under a military guard ever since? - A. Yes.

Q.Who were the persons who used these threats to you? - A. O'Brien.

Q. Is he a friend of the prisoner's? - A. Yes, I have seen them together.

Q. Is he one of the persons that you indicted for this conspiracy with Mahony? - A. Yes, he is.

Q.Did you do this of your own accord, or by the direction of this gentleman who is conducting the affairs of the Mint? - A. By the direction of Mr. Powell.

Court. Q.Were these two letters of your's sent before or after this transaction with Wife? - A.After.

PATRICK MACNEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a private in the East London Militia; I have known the prisoner about three months, as near as I can guess; Dumphy is in the same Militia as I am: On the 28th of May I saw Dumphy and the prisoner at the Three Mariners; I saw Dumphy go out backwards with Wife, but what passed between them I don't know.

Q. Is there any yard belonging to the house? - A. Yes, there is a small place backwards.

Q. Is that the place to which they went? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know of any intention in Wife to come to the Three Mariners before you went there? - A. Yes, I did; he was to come about letting Dumphy have some gold.

Q.Was it bad gold or good gold? - A. I cannot say, they did not shew it to me.

Q.Did you know what price Dumphy was to have them at? - A. No; I was there when the officers came in and apprehended Wife; Wife and Dumphy stood at the bar when the officers came in having half-a-pint of rum.

Q. How came Wife and Dumphy to join company? - A. I introduced Dumphy to wife; I told him Dumphy was the man who wanted some of his stuff; Wife told me he would give Dumphy whatever he wanted; that was before I introduced Dumphy to him; then they went together into the yard, and in about five minutes after the officers came in.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Who went in first, you or Dumphy? - A.Dumphy.

Q. Where was Dumphy when you came into the public-house? - A. He was drinking a pint of beer.

Q.Not in conversation with the prisoner? - A. No.

Q.Dumphy and you had not settled the price you were to give for this had money? - A. No.

Q. Then if he has sworn that you told him the half-guineas were three shillings a piece, and the seven shilling-pieces two shillings, that is not true? - A.Not that day I did not; I told him two or three days before.

Q. Did not you say this moment that you did not tell Dumphy what he was to pay for them? - A. Not this day; I told him about a week before that.

Q. Where were you at the time you told him what the price was to be? - A. I was coming to Mr. Powell's chambers.

Q.What, had you done business with Mr. Powell in this way before? - A. No.

Q.What are you? - A. A private in the East London.

Q. I suppose you do not get any thing for coming here to-day? - A. I do not know that; it is

too bad to make me throw away my time for nothing.

Q. Upon your oath, do you not know that you are to have five shillings a day? - A. No.

Q.Has not Dumphy told you so? - A. He has, but I cannot certify it.

Q.That depends upon your success when the trial is over? - A. No, nor then.

Q.You have told me you never had any deal. ings with Mr. Powell before, were you not a witness here yesterday? - A. No.

Q.Were you ever in prison yourself? - A. Yes.

Q.For what? - A. For being in company with sailors that offered a bad half-guinea.

Q.Have you ever received any money from Mr. Powell? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not tell me you did not know whether you were to have any thing? - A. I do not know now; I don't know what I am to have, or whether I am to have any thing.

Q.Did not Mr. Powell tell you so? - A. No.

Q.Nor Mr. Armstrong? - A. No; I cannot recollect that he ever did.

Q.Which of the officers was it? - A.None of them that I can recollect.

Q.So you considered yourself as acting merely for the good of you country? - A. I don't know as I would willingly do that neither.

Q. Then you mean to swear that you have never received any money on account of this case? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, have you not received a two pound note? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.For what did you receive that two pound note? - A. For this business of Mr. Wife's.

Q.For what? - A. For part of my trouble in this business, or the whole of my trouble, or something, I cannot tell what it was for.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a Police-officer belonging to Worship-street: On the 27th of May I was at Mr. Powell's chambers, and saw a half-guinea, a seven shilling-piece, two half-crowns, and a sixpence delivered to him.

Q. Did you see the money marked? - A. I do not think I did: On the 28th I went to the Three Mariners with Clarke, the Marshalman, Ray, and Mason; we waited at the Golden Lion, and Mrs. Sullivan was to bring us a signal; before Dumphy went I searched him, and found upon him the money I have mentioned, but I cannot say whether it was marked or not; upon the signal being given I went into the public-house; I saw Dumphy and Wife at the bar; I caught hold of Wife by the collar on one side, and Clarke on the other; we then got Wife into a passage that leads to a parlour, his back was then against a partition, and I observed a motion of his hand, upon which I immediately said there is something gone; I then gave him into the hands of Clark and Ray, and went towards the cellar stairs; we were close by a door that went into the cellar, and I called for a candle, and at the bottom of the cellar stairs, I found this paper, containing four half-guineas, eight seven-shilling pieces, and two shillings, all counterfeit, (produces them;) I brought that up, and then we took him into another parlour, and in that room, Dumphy produced two half-guineas, and two seven-shilling pieces, which he said he had bought of Wife, and which Wise denied, Wife said, he had sold him nothing; I went again to the stairs, and on the third stair I found a good seven-shilling piece, which I believe to be one of the same that I saw in Dumphy's possession, before he went there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not search Macneal? - A. No.

Q. Did you never hear Macneal say, he was indebted to the prisoner three shillings? - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Did you ever tell them; that they were to receive five shillings a day? - A.Never.

Mr. Alley Q.There was no bad money found upon the prisoner? - A. No.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the offices of Worship-street; I was with Armstrong, on the 28th of May; I saw Dumphy at the Golden-lion; before we went to the Three-Mariners, I searched him, and he had no money about him but what Armstrong then gave him, a seven-shilling-piece, a half-crown, and a sixpence; I am not positive exactly what it was; his shoes were pulled off, and every part of him searched; we went to the Three-Mariners; Mr. Armstrong and Clarke laid hold of Wife, and a scuffle ensued; I observed a motion of the prisoner's arm when he was close to the cellar-stairs; Armstrong immediately said, there is something gone, and called for a light: I took the prisoner into the kitchen, we proceeded to search him, and Mr. Clarke took some money from him, which he will speak to; we then took him into a back parlour; Armstrong asked Dumphy what he had been about, and he said, in the presence of the prisoner, that he had been buying bad money of him; to the best of my knowledge, the prisoner said, he had bought none of him.

Q. Did you see the seven-shilling piece that Armstrong found, produced? - A. I took no particular notice of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Macneal and Dumphy were in the house before you? - A. Yes.

Q.And therefore, whether either of them had been in the cellar, or near the cellar door, you don't know? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was Dumphy or the sailor

near the door at the time you laid hold of Wife? - A. No.

Q.Did you see Dumphy make use of any motion with his arm? - A. No.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the City Marshalmen; I saw Dumphy on the 27th and the 28th; he was searched in my presence, at the Golden Lion, in Fore-street; I cannot say particularly the money that he had; I have a half-crown that I found upon the prisoner; among the money that Dumphy had, I observed two half-crown pieces that were marked; I went to the Three Mariners, and assisted in the apprehension of the prisoner.

Q.Did he submit quietly to be apprehended? - A. No, he behaved rather obstreporous to Armstrong and myself; I had hold of his other arm, when he threw something down the cellar stairs; Armstrong immediately said, there goes something; the prisoner did not say any thing to that; I took him into another room, with Ray; we searched him in the back parlour, and I found upon him a half-crown and a sixpence marked; they were marked in the same way with those that I saw given to Dumphy, at the Golden Lion, we secured him, and took him into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had no hand in the marking of this money? - A. No.

Q.Had you seen the money before it was given by Armstrong to Dumphy, after it was marked? - A. I do not think I had.

Q.Then you only mean to say it was money that appeared to be marked, but whether it was the same money or not, you cannot tell? - A. It is the same money that I saw at the Golden Lion.

(Mr. William Packer proved the money found upon Dumphy, and that found upon the stairs, to be all counterfeit, except the seven-shilling piece).

Mr. CALEB-EDWARD POWELL sworn - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk in the office of Mr. Vernon, Solicitor for the Mint; the whole concerns of the Mint are conducted by me.

Q. How long have you been in that office? - A.Eleven or twelve years: On the 27th of May I sent for Ray and Armstrong; they met Dumphy; the money was marked by me, given to Armstrong, and delivered by him to Dumphy.

Q.Look at this halt crown and sixpence, produced by Clarke? - A.This is one of the marked half-crowns that I gave to Armstrong the day before, and this is the sixpence.

Q.Look at that seven-shilling-piece, the one found on the stairs? - A.This is the same that I delivered to Armstrong, and which he delivered to Dumphy.

Q. Did Macneal receive a 2l. note from you? - A. He did.

Q. For what? - A. I gave it him on account or some general informations that were then going on.

Q.Were those informations relative to the coin of the country? - A. They were; and among when the present was one.

Q. We have heard of two persons, O'Brian and Mahony, being indicted for a conspiracy, and Dumphy being a witness against them? - A. Yes.

Q. By whole direction and advice was that indictment for a conspiracy preserred? - A. By the direction of myself.

Q. What sanction had you for preferring that indictment? - A. It was not under any body's particular sanction; I thought it necessary, and I conferred with those whom I thought proper; if it had been a felony, I should have consulted the Attorney-General.

Q.Was it done at the desire of Dumphy? - A. No; we do not consult witnesses.

Q.At the time that indictment was prepared, was it then known that either of them was to be a witness for Wife? - A.Certainly; I did not know till last night that Mahony was to be a witness.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean, upon your oath, to swear you did not know till last night that O'Brian and Mahony were to be witness for this man? - A. I did not.

Q.Perhaps you had not an intuitive knowledge, but had you not been told so? - A. No, I had not.

Q. Has there been any certiorari lodged in this case? - A. There has.

Q.Upon an indictment for a conspiracy? - A. Yes.

Q.When was that done? - A. To-day.

Q. That was to remove it into the King's Bench, after you knew that these people were to be witnesses? - A. Yes.

Q.You know, that in that case these men cannot be bailed before a common Magistrate? - A.Certainly they cannot.

Q.Therefore the effect of lodging the certiorari to-day, has prevented their getting bailed to come here as witnesses? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. As we are now upon law, I would ask, does it prevent a babeas corpus being obtained? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. I wish to ask, whether you, acting as Solicitor for the Mint, employ men, and pay them to hunt out informations in this sort of way against your fellow-subjects?

Mr. Knowlys objected to the question.

Court. Mr. Powell's answer certainly calls upon him to explain it.

Mr. Alley. Q.Are you, acting for the Solicitor of the Mint, in the habit of employing that man, Macneal, and paying him, for the purpose of hunting out felonies against your fellow-subjects? - A.Whenever he has had any informations, which he has been put to any expence in obtaining, I have given him money to reimburse those expences; at I never gave any thing to any purpose, with a view of inducing them to do that which is wrong.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury - Painful as it is for me to stand in my present embarrassed situation, it is equally as painful to me to delay the time of this Honourable Court, by entering so minutely as I shall into my defence; but I trust I shall be excused for so doing, when it is considered that not only my liberty is at stake, but that by developing the diabolical plan that has been entered into to deprive me of my liberty, the public may be upon its guard against similar attempts; for, Gentlemen, if this plan succeeds against me, not even you are sale, for the instant you may offend persons of as bad a description as those who have combined against me, you will be indicted for any crime they may choose to forge against you, and your lives or liberties endangered. Gentlemen, the present is not the first attempt of those persons to whom I allude; at the very last sessions they prosecuted one Thomas Brown for a capital offence, and it is merely because I frustrated them in that prosecution, and prevented an innocent man whom becoming a victim to their infamous machinations, that I am now the marked object of their resentment.

Gentlemen, this Brown, to whom I allude, having offended the very people who have conspired against me, was indicted last October, by one Mary Cook, for a street robbery, and not having been taken before a Justice, he had no idea such a charge was exhibited against him until the latter end of April last, when I informed him; and as I had learnt, that the man who had prevailed on this Mary Cook to prefer the indictment against Brown, intended to obtain a certificate of the indictment, and take him into custody upon a Judge's warrant the day after the present session, and thereby keep him confined during the long vacation, I advised him (to prevent such a proceeding) to surrender and take his trial, which he did, and the Court and Jury saw so clearly through the persidy of the prosecution, and that the whole was a fabrication, that they would not permit the prosecutrix to go through her evidence, and recommended that she and her accomplices should be indicted for a conspiracy.

Gentlemen, No sooner did the man, who advised Mary Cook, through the whole of her infamous prosecution, learn, that it was I who had prevented him from carrying his designs into execution against Brown, than he instantly swore he would, by some stratagem, revenge himself on me.

Gentlemen, The man who furthered the above prosecution against Brown, and who vowed revenge against me, is one Patrick Gibbons , a publican, on Saffron-hill, and so determined was he to carry his malignant purpose into execution, that, in the presence of his wife, and a person whom I shall call as a witness, he deliberetely rose from his seat, went on his knees, and after blessing himself, according to Catholic custom, took an oath that he would put a plan, which he had formed, into execution against me; and his wife, in the same manner, swore to assist him.

The plan was the present prosecution, which has hither to been successful; but I hope I shall be able to explain to your satisfaction, the circumstances which have been given in evidence against me, by the police-officers, and to shew that the testimony of Dumphy is (as to the material parts of it) a fabrication, that he is the engine of Gibbons, hired by him to give evidence against me, and that he is the instrument by which Gibbons hopes to inflict that revenge he has sworn to obtain.

Gentlemen, I shall now briefly relate the means adopted by Gibbons to give a colour to this prosecution, which were as follows: He prevailed upon one Macneal to assist him in his project, who came to me, and requested me to lend him three shillings for a sew days; this I was easily prevailed upon to do, as I had known him for some time, and been frequently in his company, and having no suspicion of any design upon me; when they had proceeded thus far, Macneal being a soldier, obtained the witness, Dumphy, who is also a soldier, to join them, and they immediately went to the solicitor for the Mint, and informed him they knew where they could purchase had money. In consequence of which, a half-guinea, a seven-shilling piece, a half-crown, and a sixpence were marked, and given by Mr. Powell and the officers to Dumphy to make the purchase with, and in the forenoon of the 28th of May last, Macneal and Dumphy came to the Three Mariners in Fore-Street; I was in the kitchen, Macneal opened the kitchen door and called me into the tap-room, and said, he was come to pay me the three shillings he had borrowed, and gave me a half-crown and a sixpence, which I put into my waistcoat-pocket, and was about to return into the kitchen, when Macneal asked me if I would not drink with him, I answered no, for I had not dined; and the first time I ever saw Dumphy, was at this moment, who rose from one of the tap-room boxes, and called for a quartern of rum, saying, don't Jet the gentleman go till he drinks with us; at this instant, the officers came in, Mr. Armstrong and Mr. Clark, seized my arms, and Ray my collar, and in that position I was forced into the kitchen, where I was handcuffed and searched, and amongst my silver was found the half-crown and sixpence Macneal had paid me, and which turned out to be a part of the marked money which had been given to Dumphy to purchase bad money with; Mr. Armstrong then asked Dumphy what brought him there? he answered, to buybise money for me; I then, for the first time, had an insight into the plot laid against me; Mr. Arm

strong, on going into the cellar, found a paper containing a quantity of bad money; and some time after; on a second search, found a seven-shilling piece which was marked, and had also been given to Dumphy, but neither of these were ever in my possession, they must have been placed (where they were found) by Macneal, for how could it be prossible for me, seized as I was, without the least previous intimation, to have put my hands in my pocket, and to have thrown to the bottom of a winding staircase the counterfeit-money found there by the officers, and which being wrapped in a white paper, would have been very easily perceived if it had come from me, but the officers candidly stated on my examination, that they saw nothing go from my hands, though they saw my arm go as if something did; but, - Gentlemen, does it appear at all reasonable, that being firmly held by four persons, I could get my hands near my pockets, or throw any thing away from me, particularly without their seeing it. I was taken to the Compter, and closely confined till the next day, when, on my examination, Dumphy swore that he purchased from me two counterfeit half-guineas, and two counter. seit seven shilling-pieces for ten shillings, and that he paid me for them by giving me the half-crown and the sixpence (which I had received as beforementioned from Macneal), and the seven shilling-piece which was found on the cellar stairs.

Gentlemen, I understand Dumphy was searched by the officers, previous to his coming into the Three Mariners public-house, to see that he had no base money about him, or any thing but the marked money; but was the same precaution used with respect to Munceal, who accompanied him? I am certain it was not, for if it had, I should not have been here before you taking my trial, for on him would have been found the base money pretended to have been purchased by Dumphy from me, and also that found in the cellar by the officers,

Gentlemen, Gibbons furnished Macneal with this base coin, according to the plan they had agreed upon, and that Gibbons was in a way to obtain it no doubt can be entertained, as his house has for some time past been the haunt of the utterers of base money, insomuch that it has become a common nuisance, and is now indicted as such, and there is scarcely a lodger in his house who has not been convicted of selling or utterring bad money.

Gentlemen, if my case rested here I should feel myself confident of having your verdict of acquittal; but I have still stronger facts, the declarations of Dumphy, who, either from remorse, or from not being satisfied by those who employed him, has been frequently with me, acknowledged his villainy, and wished me to furnish him with money that he might leave me countly, and not be under the necessity either of publicly confessing the infamy of his conduct, or of abiding by his former false story to avoid punishment.

Gentlemen, Dumphy has confessed that Gibbons is the contriver of the plan against me, that Macneal acknowledged to him that Gibbons gave him the bad money found in the cellar, and also that stated to have been purchased from me; and that he, Dumphy, directly he came into the Three Mariners with Macneal, gave him the seven shilling-piece and the half-crown and sixpence which he had received from the officers, and that it was previously agreed upon between them that Macneal should pay me the three shillings he had borrowed, with a part of the marked money, and likewise that I never was in the yard with him.

Gentlemen, I must again apologize for the great portion of your time I have occupied, but I hope my former apology will be a sufficient excuse, as I am not a great deal more interested than yourselves in the verdict which you shall pass upon this occasion; but if, unfortunately, you should pass a verdict of guilty, I should thereby be prevented the possibility of endeavouring honestly to maintain a virtuous wife and three small children, which I have hitherto done by industriously working at my trade of a shoe-maker, and was never before a Judge or Jury in my life until the present occasion.

Gentlemen, I am extremely sorry to be under the necessity of stating, that two persons were yesterday taken into custody, while attending at this place under their supoenas to give evidence on my behalf, upon a bill of indictment preferred against them for a conspiracy on the prosecution of Dumphy; and the prosecutors having obtained an order of Court to receive forty-eight hours notice of bail, I cannot now have the benefit of their testimony, which Dumphy well knew would satisfy the Court and Jury of my innocence and expose his villainy, as they would have proved his acknowledgement to them that he had false sworn himself at Guildhall, that he was sorry for it, and that he had done it at the instance of Macneal and Gibbons. Gentlemen, Mr. Powell, the Solicitor for the prosecution, on those witnesses being taken into custody, observed, that if I wanted their evidence I might get it how I could; but he well knew I could not obtain their attendance, as they must remain in custody for forty-eight hours after their being taken up.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-38

569. WILLIAM INGLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a pocketbook, value 1s. a pair of breeches, value 15s. a waistcoat, value 8s. a handkerchief, value 1s. a

shirt, value 1s. a knife, value 1d. forty-four penny-pieces, and Thirty-two halfpence , the property of John Hughes .

JOHN HUGHES sworn. - I am labourer to a soap-boiler in Charlotte-street, Wapping: On Saturday night, the 20th of June, between nine and ten in the evening, I met the prisoner in the New Cut, crying; I asked him what was the matter; he said he had no money and no lodging, and was unacquainted with London; I took compassion upon him, and took him home to my lodging, No. 1, Old Gravel lane , between ten and eleven o'clock; the landlord let us both in and we went to bed; I awoke between five and six in the morning, and the prisoner was gone; I looked about my room and found my box broke open; I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and found him in Cannon-street, not a quarter, of a mile from my lodgings; when he saw me, he ran to make his escape along Pennington-street, and up St. John's-hill; I then cried stop thief; he was stopped; I took him to the Thames Police-office, and they would not take him in; I met with an officer in Church-lane, and gave charge of him; we took him to the Horse and Groom, in Church-lane, and the officer took all the property from him.

JAMES COLTON sworn - On the 20th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock, Hughes brought the prisoner to my house; I am sure he is the same man a black man in a sailor's dress, and about half past five in the morning I got up, and found the prisoner at the door; he asked me what o'clock it was; I told him it was half past five, and then I let him out, and as soon as he had gone out Hughes came down, and said, it serves me right, he has robbed me; he went in pursuit of him, and in the course of half an hour brought him back; we took him to the Police-office, and they would not take him in charge; then we took him to Whitechapel, and there the constable found every article mentioned in the indictment upon him.(Richard Osman, the officer, produced the property, which was identified by Hughes.)

Prisoner's defence. I was very much intoxicated, and in the morning, being very dry, I went to a public-house to get a pint of beer; I put on his clothes by mistake, and he came after me and said I had robbed him. GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-39

570. ANDREW KERBEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of June , a saw, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Barnes .

There not being sufficient evidence to identify the saw, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-40

571. ANDREW KERBEY was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of June , an iron rack, value 1s. 6d. and five chissels, value 4s. the property of Robert Woodward .

ROBERT WOODWARD sworn. - On Saturday, the 6th or June, I locked up the shed about seven o'clock, and on Monday morning, about half past five, I found the property mentioned in the indictment gone; I am certain they were there on Saturday night; I found the rack and part of the chissels at Stanton's, a coal, shed and iron-shop, on the 22d.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q.When had you been using these tools? - A. That very day.

JOSEPH STANTON sworn. - I keep an ironshop; I bought these articles of the prisoner at the bar on Saturday, the 6th of June, about dusk; on the 22d, I delivered the rack to the officer; I put the chissels out for sale on the Monday, and sold them in a young man, whom I afterward saw with Woodward; I saw him deliver them to Woodward, and knew them to be the same; I gave a penny a pound for them.( Richard Osman , the officer, produced the tools.)

Woodward. These chissels are stamped with my initials.

Prisoner's defence. I never took them.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-41

572. JOHN MAHANY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , two half-crown pieces, value 5s. the property of Amos Stevenson .

AMOS STEVENSON sworn. - On Sunday, the 7th of June, I was robbed, about a quarter before nine in the morning, at a public-house, in Tottenham-court-road ; I was going to pay for a pint of ale; I put two half-crown pieces under my left hand while I was feeling in my right-hand pocket for a sixpence, which I knew I had, and the prisoner knocked my hand away and ran away with the two half-crowns; I went out to the door, but I could not find him; I saw him the next day smoaking a pipe at a window in St. Giles's; says he, carpenter, by J-s I believe you are the man that I took the money from; says I, I am sure of it; he said, go with me to the Running Horse and I will give it you again; I did not take him up then, for I wanted to stick to my work to get some money; he was afterwards taken up for an assault, and I went to the watch-house and made my charge.

Prisoner's defence. This man and another laid a wager of half-a-crown, and they put the two half-crowns into my hand for the wager; it was about which was the best workman. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-42

573. MARY PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , a silver tablespoon, value 10s. the property of William Bullock .

MARY ANN BULLOCK sworn. - I am the wife of William Bullock, a publican , in Exeter-street, Strand ; the prisoner came to live with me as a servant on the 25th of May, and on the 1st of June a gown was brought to me by Hobbs, the Policeofficer; she had left my service that day of her own accord, unknown to me.

SAMUEL CHARINEUX sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in the Great Sanctuary, Westminster: On Monday evening, the 1st of June, the prisoner brought a broken spoon to me, to know if I purchased old silver; the spoon was broke in this state, (producing it), with the cypher endeavoured to be erased; I asked her whose property it was; she said it was her own, that having broke it by an accident, her mistress charged her five shillings for it; I told her it was worth double that money, but I should wish to know whether her mistress had sold it her, if so, I had no objection to purchase it; she told me her mistress kept a house in Drury. lane; she told me the sign, but I have forgot it; I told her I would send to her mistress to know in it was a true story; she objected to that, and said, she had left her mistress's service, and wanted to have no more to say to her; I told her I should send to know; she then told me she did not live in that house, but near there, in White-horse-yard; I then sent for Hobbs, the officer; he took her into custody; she had a gown in her apron, which she did not offer to dispose of; I detained the spoon.

WILLIAM HOBBS sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody; she said the lived at the White Hard, in Drury-lane; I went as far as Long-acre with her, and then she told me I need not go any farther with her, for she never did live at the White Hart, she lived with Mrs. Bullock, at the Boar's Head, in Exeter-street, in the Strand; I took her to the office; she had a gown in her apron, which I took from her. (The spoon and gown were identified by Mrs. Bullock).

Q.(To Mrs. Bullock). She says she had an accident with the spoon, and you charged her five shillings for it? - A.No; it was perfectly found at dinner time. GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-43

574. THOMAS RANGER and DANIEL GWYNN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , seven mahogany boards, value 10l. the property of Thomas Holmes , the elder, and Thomas Holmes , the younger.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS HOLMES, jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partnership with Thomas Holmes, sen. in the coach-markers lane, in Longacre: the prisoner, Ranger, had been in my service, and was acquainted with my premises, both in Long-acre and Hog-lane; he left me on the 25th of June last year.

Q.On the 25th of June, did you give him directions to go to Mr. Hedge for mahogany boards? - A. I did not; they large boards for pannels.

CHARLES HEDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a builder, and reside in Crown-street, or Hog-lane; Messrs. Holmes occupy a shed of mine in which these boards were deposited: On the 25th of June last, I saw the prisoner, Gwynn, go past my window; I never saw him before or after; in consequence of information from my man, which I communicated to Mr. Holmes, I watched at home; the prisoner, Ranger, met me as I was coming out of my yard; a person of the name of Jones was with him, who has escaped; he presented to me a note, saying, it was an order from Mr. Davies, Messrs. Holmes foreman; I refused taking it; he said, he was come for some mahogany boards; I ordered him to go to my foreman, Russell; I then saw Ranger take the boards out of the lost, and put them upon the ground to Jones, who took them, and set them by the side of him; Jones took the first four out of the yard; then Ranger came down from the lost, and took the remaining three out of the yard; I did not see Gwynn at that time; I ordered Russell and Smith to follow Jones, and I, with Robertson, followed Ranger; he put the boards down to rest; he then saw me looking, and immediately turned to the right, left the boards, and went away; I had waved my hand to my man Robertson to apprehend him; he stopped him, and took him directly to Mr. Holmes's, with the boards; Mr Holmes, in the presence of the prisoner, denied the order.

- ROBERTSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Hedge; I went in pursuit of the prisoner, Ranger; I saw him put down the boards and walk away; Mr. Hedge was a little behind, and put his hand out for me to lay hold of him, which I did; he asked me what I laid hold of him for; I told him it was not the way to Mr. Holmes's; I brought him to the boards, till Mr. Hedge came; he wanted to get away, and said, if I did not let him go, he would beat me.

- RUSSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was employed by Mr. Hedge: On the 25th of June the prisoner, Ranger, came to me, between two and three o'clock, and said, he had an order from Mr. Holmes's people for some mahogany boards; I did not see the order; he said he was ordered by Mr. Holmes's foreman, Mr. Davies, to come for the pannel-boards that had been stopped; I told him I could not let them go by any means without Mr. Davies came; he asked me if I should be satisfied if he went back and got a written order; I told him I should not; he said he

would go back and get a written order at any rate; he went away, and before he came back, Mr. Hedge ordered me to let him have them upon a written order, and to watch him, (produces the written order; reads it). -" Deliver the bearer, Thomas Ranger , five leaves of pannel-boards, which I sent for, as were stopped. William Davies, for Messrs. Holmes." I said, if that came from Davies, he might take the boards; he then gave a signal to a person of the name of Jones, and he delivered seven boards to Jones from the lost; I then went in to put on my coat to watch them, but I did not see either of them go out; I saw Jones with the boards in Moor-street, in Earl-street; I saw Gwynn walk by the side of Jones as far as the corner of Tower-street, and he put down the boards, and the prisoner, Gwynn, then took the four boards, and proceeded towards St. Martin's-lane.

HENRY DAVIES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Messrs. Holmes.

Q. Look at that order, and tell me if any part of that is your hand-writing? - A. It is not.

Q.Did you give any directions on the 25th of June for Ranger to go to Mr. Hedge's for some of your master's boards? - A. No.

Ranger's defence. I met Jones, and he said he would give me a job; he sent me to Mr. Hedge's for the boards, and they told me they were stopped; I said, I supposed I must have an order; then I went back to Jones; he said, he would go to Davies and get an order, and he brought me an order; I went for the boards, and they delivered them to me; I went with them into West-street, and stopped to rest against the chapel; I put down the boards, and was going across the way to speak to a fish-woman that I knew, and just before I got to her, she took up her basket and went away, and I was going to return to the boards when they laid hold of me. Ranger, GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

Gwynn, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-44

575. SARAH SANDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a cotton frock, value 2s. a flannel petticoat, value 2s. and a dimity stay, value 1s. the property of Thomas Worster .

MARY PENN sworn. - On Saturday, the 20th of June, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. May's passage, a public-house, the corner of Fashion-street, Spitalfields, with something in her apron; about five minutes after she came out, I heard a child cry, I was cleaning Mrs. May's window, I do not know whose child it was; I opened the passage door, and saw the child stripped; Mr. Shearman, our lodger, went to the pawnbroker's to see if he could find her, and he brought her back; I am fire it was the prisoner; I had seen her before sitting on the stairs in the passage out of the wet, a week or two before.

SAMUEL SHEARMAN sworn. - I live at Mr. May's: On the 20th of June, between six and seven in the evening, I was looking out at the window, and saw the prisoner come in with a child in her arms; I had no suspicion, and about five minutes after that I saw her go out without the child, and something in her lap, and in about five minutes after that the last witness came up, and asked me if one of my children was crying; I came down, and saw the child stripped, except its shirt, bonnet, and shoes; I then went to the first pawnbroker's I came to at the corner of Wood-street, from whence, according to the description I had of her, she had been gune about two minutes; I then went in search of the parents in Bishopsgate-street, I heard that a child had been lost; I found the nurse crying; I took her with me, and she claimed the child; I am sure it was the prisoner that came in with the child.

SARAH TRITTON sworn. - I nursed Mrs. Worster's child at my own house, No. 2, Sweedland-court, Bishopsgate-street; it is two years and a half old: On the 20th of June, after tea, the child was playing in the court with two or three more, we missed her on a sudden, and I met Shearman; I went with him and found the child; the child knew me, and was very much frightened; it had its bonnet on, its shift, and its shoes, and nothing else; it had lost a flowered cotton frock, a white dimity petticoat, a flannel petticoat, and a dimity stay; I found the clothes at the pawnbroker's.

GEORGE BOYSE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(produces the property); I took them in on Saturday, the 20th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening, of a woman, but I cannot swear to the woman, it was a person of the stature of the prisoner, but having a shop full of people, and it being just before candle-light, I cannot speak to her person.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - I am an officer; I took charge of the prisoner.

Mrs. Tritton. These are the things the child had on.

Q. What is the father's name? - A. I believe Thomas, but am not sure.

Q.(To Shearman). Do you know what his christian name is? - A.Thomas; he keeps a coalshed and chandler's-shop.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

My Lord. As your prisoner has been drawn away from her parents by a wicked and base woman, and as your unfortunate prisoner has not arrived at the age of fifteen, and not knowing the consequences of so diabolical a deed, not having the fear of God before her eyes, and not having sufficiently withstood the devices of that wicked being, hope your Lordship will commiserate your

prisoner in mollifying her offence, as your petitioner has become sensible of her horrid crime, and truly penitent, and your petitioner hopes to be a comfort to her parent, and an ornament to society in future.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-45

576. ANN PARKER and MARY FERROLL were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , a silk cloak, value 10s. 6d. three aprons, value 2s. 6d. four caps, value 2s. a shift, value 1s. and a shawl, value 1s. the property of Catherine Martin , widow , and the other for receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

CATHERINE MARTIN sworn. - I am a widow; I live in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane ; the prisoner, Ann Parker, lodged with me; she paid me two-pence a night for her lodging: On the 27th of May I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment; they were found the same evening in Mary Ferroll 's mother's room; Mr. Bassett, the officer, found them there; when I missed the things, I asked Ann Parker if she knew any thing of them; she told me Ferroll had got them to pawn; she slept in the garret, and these things were in a band-box in my lower room.

JOHN BASSETT sworn. - I am a constable; I found these things, (producing them), at Mary Ferroll's mother's, in Nicholas-court, on the 27th of May; I found Mary Ferroll upon her belly under the bed; Ferroll said, you have brought me into this mess, and she seemed to laugh and make a jeer of it; Parker said, they were going the next day to Bow-fair with the things; Ferroll begged for God's sake I would let her go.(The property was identified by Mrs. Martin.)

Parker's defence. We were going past this woman's house, and she asked us if we went into company; I asked her what she meant by company, and she said, men's company, and she got us to come and lodge there, and lent us things to put on; we were to call the men in, and she took all the money we got.

Q.(To Martin). Did you ever take advantage of any money that she earned? - A. No.

The prisoner Ferroll did not say any thing in her defence, but called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Parker, GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for seven years .

Ferroll, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-46

577. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , four fowls, value 8s. the property of William Amor .

WILLIAM AMOR sworn. - On the 24th of May, in the morning, one of our beadles of the parish of Hackney came to inform me there was a man in the cage for stealing fowls; I had not then missed my fowls; about two or three hours after I missed three hens and a cock, I had seen them the day before; I went to the guard-house, and knew the fowls to be mine; I kept them in a sort of hen-house, about fifty yards from my dwelling-house.

JOHN RUDLEY sworn. - I am a patrol of Hackney: On the 24th of May, about four o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner with a bundle under his arm in the fields, about half a mile from Mr. Amor's; I saw one of the fowl's necks out of the handkerchief; he said he bought them at Mr. Allen's, a tailor, at Homerton; he said he kept them there, and they used to run in the road; we took him to the guard-house, and I enquired after Allen, but could find no such person.

Prisoner's defence. I had been bathing in the river Lea; I met a man with these sowls, and I bought them of him; I never resisted, but went very quietly to the watch-house.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-47

578. ELIAS TINKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , a wooden puncheon, value 4s. and ten hundred weight of molasses, value 20l. the property of John Walker .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney).

WILLIAM WALKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the son of John Walker; the prisoner was my father's warehouseman : On Saturday, the 13th of June, I received information from Gandon, in consequence of which I gave him direction: On the Monday morning I went to Mr. Gandon's and found a cask of molasses there, but I cannot say whether it is our's or not, the cooper can speak to that; I examined the warehouse on Sunday, and missed one puncheon of molasses.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long has the prisoner been with your father? - A.Five or six years.

Q.Gandon coopered the hogsheads when they wanted repair? - A. Yes.

Q. And it must have been pretty well known that Gandon maintained an honest, good character? - A. I believe so.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Suppose you had wanted Gandon to cooper a cask, should you have sent for him to your house, or sent the cask to him? - A. We always send for him.

- GANDON sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Gurney. On Saturday, the 13th of June, the prisoner came to me between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and asked me if I could send three puncheons; I told him, yes, or three dozen, or some such thing; I serve all the puncheons; the prisoner followed me, and said, I am going to send some molasses to your house on Monday morning; I said, yes, as much as you like; I am in the habit of housing sugars for Mr. Walker, but not molasses; he said he should send one puncheon; I informed Mr. Walker of this conversation; on Sunday morning he called at my house, and said, I am going to send out some sugars to-morrow morning, I shall send you the molasses at the same time; I said I should be up at five o'clock, and he said he should send off the sugars at half past five; they accordingly came by Jewell, a carman, about six o'clock, under the crane.

Q. Do you know whose cask that is? - A.That is a cask I had supplied Mr. Walker with; I believe it was one that went in on Saturday, but am not quite sure.

Q.Are you quite sure it was one that you had supplied Mr. Walker with? - A. Yes, I am; it contained about ten hundred weight of molasses, it might be more or less.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.This was a full cask? - A. Yes

Q. The prisoner knew that you got a good deal of your bread by working for Mr. Walker? - A. Yes.

Q.He knew that you had always bore the character of an honest man? - A. Yes.

Q.Did he make any other application to you, but to leave it at your house? - A. No.

Q. You took it in as you would any other goods of Mr. Walker's? - A. Yes.

Q. If he had asked you to assist him in disposing of it, you would have taken him for a thief? - A. I certainly should have had nothing to do with it.

Q. You had housed molasses for Mr. Walker before? - A. I had six or seven years ago, and about two years ago, but they did not come from the sugar-house.

Q.If he had desired you to conceal it from his master, you would have said he was wrong in supposing you would do it? - A.Something of that sort I should; I thought it was rather odd in Mr. Walker to send a single puncheon.

Q.The prisoner has borne a good character up to this time? - A. As good a character as any man.

JOSEPH JEWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a carman: On the morning of the 15th of June I took a puncheon of molasses to Mr. Gandon; the prisoner was in the warehouse, and ordered me to take it.

Q. In whose warehouse? - A.Mr. Walker's.

Q.(To Mr. Walker.) Had you given the prisoner any order to take a cask or molasses to Gandon? - A.No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Your father is not here? - A. No.

Q. Are you in partnership with him? - A. No.

Q.Your father might have given him an order? - A. No; my father never gives any orders.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-48

579. JOHN VERCO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , two banknotes, each of the value of 2l. the property of Bernard Witte .

The only material witness not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrance.

Reference Number: t18010701-49

580. LOUISA TRUNDALL was indicted for that she, in the King's highway, upon Edward Gillham the younger, did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person two shillings , the property of Edward Gillham the elder.(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.) ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrance.

Reference Number: t18010701-50

581. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Gibbs , on the 15th of June , a bank-note, value 2l. and another bank-note, value 1l. the property of the said Thomas.

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Robert Gibbs .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

ROBERT GIBBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am brother to Thomas Gibbs , we live at the corner of Half Moon-street, Piccadilly ; the prisoner was porter and shopman . On the 15th of June I put some bank-notes into my desk, behind the shop; among them was a bank-note of one pound, and another of two pounds, that had been marked in my presence by a friend of mine, in consequence of having missed money several times; I placed myself in a small room adjoining, and bored a hole where I could command a view of the desk; my brothers left the house, and I saw the prisoner go to the desk and take four wires from his pocket; he tried the hinge, which was rather loose, he then put some wires into the desk, some shorter and some longer, and some crooked at the end; after attempting it about half an hour or more, he pulled out one bank note, and in about five or ten minutes he came again. took the same course, and pulled out another; I then sent for Carpmeal, the officer, who found the notes upon him.( Thomas Carpmeal produced the notes.)

Mr. Gibbs. These are the same notes that I had seen marked.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Was this your own money, or the money of the trade? - A. I should suppose the money of the trade.

Q.Who has the trade? - A. My brother Thomas, he keeps the house, and my younger brother sleeps in the house,

Court. Q.Does your brother Thomas pay the rent and taxes? - A. Yes.

Q.Whose furniture was it? - A. My brother Thomas's; he has lived at Brompton those fourteen months on account of his health; he has a nursery there.

Carpmeal. I searched the prisoner, and found these notes in the sob of his breeches; I asked him for his master's notes, and he said he would give them to me, one is a one pound note, and the other a two pound note.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY,

Of stealing the notes, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-51

582. DANIEL DRURY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , privily from the person of Benjamin Sutton , a pocket-book, value 6d. three guineas, and a bank-note, value 1l. the pro perty of the said Benjamin.

BENJAMIN SUTTON sworn. - The first time I saw the prisoner was on the 8th of June, at the Queen's Head, at College-hill; he went with me on board a ship to get a birth.

Q. What did he go with you for? - A. To shew me the way; we came back again at four o'clock in the evening, and then we took a walk to St. Paul's church; then we came back again to the Queen's Head, and then went to his mother's, on College-hill, and slept there all night; the next morning one of my ship-mates that came from American called for me to go to see the boatswain of the ship that we came up in; we went to the Gun, at Wapping , and asked for the boatswain; they desired us to sit down and he would be in presently; the prisoner sat down with me, and then we went out and came in again, and called for a pot of beer; the prisoner sat on my right hand side, and I pulled out my pocket-book and took out a 1l. bank-note, and had it changed to pay for the pot of beer; the landlady sent out a young woman for change; I went to feel for my pocket-book where I ahd put it, in my right hand pocket, to put the two seven shilling-pieces that I had in change into it, and it was gone.

Q. On which side of you was the prisoner sitting? - A.Close to me on my right hand; I asked him if he had got it, and he said no, a young woman had taken it out of my pocket.

Q.Was there any young woman in the house? - A. Yes, the one that changed the note for me.

Q. A servant in the house? - A. No.

Q. Was she sitting by you? - A. No; she was at the end of the table.

Q. Did you give the young woman the one pound note? - A. No; I gave it to the lady of the house.

Q. How long after you received the change was it that you missed your pocket-book? - A.About four minutes.

Q.Who gave you the change, the young woman or the mistress of the house? - A.The mistress of the house.

Q.Had the young woman come to the box to you before you got your change? - A. No.

Q. Was she near you after she came, and before you missed your book? - A. No; then the mistress; came out and said, no one shall go out of the taproom till they have a search; the lady of the house asked the young woman if she would go into a private room with her and the maids, and she said she would not go into a private room, but stripped in the tap-room; there was nothing found upon her; they examined me next, thinking I might have misplaced it; then they searched the prisoner at the bar; the mistress of the house desired him to empty his pockets, and he pulled out two books that I had bought, a song-book, and Robinson Crusoe , and my protection box.

Q.How came he by these things? - A. He took them up College-hill to bring down for me to the Gun; the mistress of the house then put her hand into his right hand waistcoat pocket and took out the pocket-book; there was in it three guineas and a one pound note.

Q. Had not you felt any thing about your pocket? - A. No.

Q. Had not you felt any body's hand in your pocket? - A. No.

Q.Had you no reason to thing it was gone out of your pocket till you missed it? - A.No.

Q. Had you given him the pocket-book to carry for you? - A. No.

HANNAH BREESE sworn. - I keep the Gun public-house, Wapping; on Tuesday, the 9th of June, the prisoner and the last witness came to my house together; Sutton gave me a one pound note to get change, and I gave it to a woman who was a customer to get it changed for me, because I had not enough in the house; Drury sat next the window and Sutton next to him, and nobody else at that box, except the woman at the end of the box.

Q.Was that woman so near as to take any thing out of Sutton's pocket? - A. No, it was impossible; I returned the change, and in a short time he missed his pocket-book; I immediately insisted that

no person should go out till they were searched; I asked Drury if he was certain Sutton had brought the pocket-book into the house; he said he was sure he had, and he was sure he was robbed in my house; he was sure the woman who had gone out for the change had stole it out of his pocket; I immediately insisted upon her going into a private room with my servants, as there were men in the tap-room, but she would not, but stripped to her shift in the tap-room; I searched her, and all she had was three farthings; I then went to Sutton; I thought he might have put it somewhere and forgot it; I felt all about him, but could find nothing; I had asked the prisoner if he had got any thing belonging to Sutton; he said yes, he had got Robinson Crusoe, a song-book, and his protection-box; I asked him if that was all he had belonging to Sutton; he told me yes; I put my hand into his left hand pocket and found nothing but a knife, I put my hand into his right hand pocket and found a pocket-book containing what Sutton had described, three guineas and a one pound note; I then asked him why he suffered the woman to strip to her shirt when he had got the pocket-book; he said Sutton owed his mother a great deal of money, and he had procured the pocket-book to pay his mother; I sent to the Thames Police-office, and kept the prisoner till the officer came, and I gave charge of the prisoner and the pocket-book.

- WARNER sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Thames Police-office: On the 9th of June, I took charge of the prisoner from Mrs. Breese; she gave me a pocket-book containing three guineas and a one pound note. (Produces it.)

Sutton. This is my pocket-book, it has my name in it and the money that I lost.

Q.Did you owe this man's mother any money? - A. I owed her, I believe, three shillings, for washing some clothes.

Q. You said you had never seen him till the day before? - A. No.

Q. Did you know his mother before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you owe her any thing for lodging? - A. No; I lodged with a young fellow that paid her.

Prisoner's defence. I was in this young man's company at the Queen's Head, on College-hill; he came in and asked me if I could get him a lodging; I told him I could; I walked about with him all day of the Monday; on Tuesday morning he asked me to boil some milk for him and his shipmates, and then we went to Wapping; we had been both of us drinking, and he gave me the things to take care of while he went out with a bad woman, and while he was gone I laid down upon the table to sleep.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010701-52

583. WILLIAM BRODIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May , a hat, value 21s a neck handkerchief, value 2s. a pocket-handkerchief, value 1s. a cloth coat, value 2l 2s. a waistcoat, value 12s. a pair of pantaloons, value 18s. a pair of shoes, value 5s. and a Bank-note, value 2l. the property of Eleazar Wilkinson and Alexander Sibbald .

ALEXANDER SIBBALD sworn. - I am a slopseller , No. 58. Watling-street , in partnership with Eleazar Wilkinson: On the 8th or 9th of May, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked if a gentleman lived there who had a Scotch wife; I said there was; he said, I knew there was, but the shop is so much altered, I scarcely knew it, but I dealt in the shop five years ago; says he, I have just come up in a vessel from the Firth, my name is Brodie, I dare say you may recollect me; he said, your wife will recollect me; I called her down, but she did not know him at all; I found he knew all my friends, and we asked him up to tea; he said it was a common thing for him to go out of town on the Saturday, and return on the Monday afternoon; he said he wanted money, as I know captains of ships often do when they come ashore, and I let him have a 2l. note.

Q. Did you let him have them voluntarily? - A. Yes; he said he should -

Court. This may be a fraud, but it cannot be a felony. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-53

584. HARRIET MILLS and ANN WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , two table cloths, value 15s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. and a waistcoat-border, value 2d. the property of Duncan Macdougal .

DUNCAN MACDOUGAL sworn. - I live at No. 21, Villier's-street, Strand ; I am an army commissioned half-pay agent : On the 22d of April I went out with my wife to spend the evening with a friend; the prisoner, Mills, was my servant ; we left her in the house with the care of two children; I told her, in case any body should want me, I should be found at No. 34, St. Martin's-lane; she came a few minutes before nine o'clock, with an alarm that the house had been robbed; I came home, and found the drawer of the bureau open, and every thing taken out of it but a shift and a pair of dove-coloured silk stockings; the other drawers had been tried, but could not be got open; I lost a great quantity of things; I asked Harriet Mills where she was when the bureau was broke open,

and she said she was to much afraid that they would come in and kill her and the children, that she locked herself into the room; she said she had knocked several times as hard as she could to alarm the people below in the parlour; she was taken before the Magistrate, at Queen-square, upon suspicion, and on Monday, the 11th of June, I found two table-cloths at Mr. Salkeld's, the corner of Bedford-street; she went with me to Mr. Salkeld's, she said she had pawned all the things there.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her to confess? - A. She was going away on Saturday, the 6th of June, Mrs. Machdougal had given her warning to be gone in a week, she was going away that night, and would not stay the week, and I was sent for; when I came back, a coach was at the door to take her things away; I went up to the room that she slept in, and there were two tablecloths and some other things lying upon the floor.

Q. Is your wife here? - A. No.

Q. Did she then tell you of the table-cloths? - A. She did, and said there were other things pawned there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney, (Counsel for Mills).

Q. I am told you are an army commissioned halfpay agent? - A. Yes.

Q.How many of these things have you got back, or the money for them? - A. A black silk cloak.

Q.How much money have you got back? - A.There were about six pounds got, I think, about the 11th; I was unwell, and a man of the name of Saunders, and the mother of the prisoner, came to our house; the man said, he came at the request of the prisoner's mother to pay for the things that were not come back; he asked Mrs. Macdougal what they came to, and she said they came to about six pounds; I sent word down that I would not take the money till I knew whether it was legal or not, as I took it for things that were not forthcoming; I was told there was no harm in taking the money, and then returning it to the Magistrate.

Q. You took six pounds, then, upon condition that you would not prosecute her? - A. My wife took it.

Q. In your presence? - A. Yes.

Q. You have got the six pounds, have you not? - A. Yes.

Q. And have had it ever since? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.Was that six pounds for all the things? - A. No; it was only for the things that were pawned, and had been taken out.

Q.Not for the table-cloths? - A. No.

JOHN ACKLEM sworn. - I live with Mr. Salkeld; I took in two table-cloths on the 22d of April of the prisoner, Mills; I know nothing of the other prisoner.

Macdougal. I believe these to be my table-cloths; they had no particular mark but the pattern, and it is stained with port.

- PILGRIM sworn. - I am a constable of St. Martin's; the prisoner Mills was brought to me in the watch-house; I took charge of her, and during the time she was in the watch-house, she said she had pledged the things she had taken from Mr. Macdougal's at Mr. Salkeld's.

Mr. Gurney. Q.What was said to her to induce her to say that? - A. I asked her questions.

Q. You told her it would be better for her? - A. Yes; she said she had burnt the tickets; on Monday morning we went to Mr. Salkeld's and got the table-cloths; here are a pair of stockings. and a waistcoat border, which I found in her box.

Macdougal. I know these stockings and under waistcoat border to be mine.

The prisoner Mills did not say any thing in her defence.

The prisoner Williams was not put upon her defence.

Mills, GUILTY .

Williams, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18010701-54

585. NATHANIEL INCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , twenty blankets, value 50s. and a coverlid, value 4s. the property of Samuel Hill .(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated).

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-55

586. CHARLES MEYRICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , ten quires of paper, value 20s. the property of Samuel Gardiner and William Tomlins .

SAMUEL GARDINER sworn. - I am a stationer in Bishopsgate-street , in partnership with William Tomlins : On Friday, the 19th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I was coming from the back part of the shop, I saw the prisoner crossing the street with a bundle of our paper under his arm; I immediately called to out lad; he instantly ran after him, and stopped him just before he got to the pavement on the opposite side of the street; I attempted to take it from him, but the prisoner let the paper fall upon the ground and ran away; our lad took up the paper and brought it to me; I was standing just outside the shop door; our lad then instantly pursued the prisoner, not losing sight of him, down Threadneedle-street; the lad came back with the prisoner, followed by a crowd of people; seeing a crowd of people assembled before the door, a constable came into the shop, and and I gave charge of him, and he took him before the Lord Mayor.

WILLIAM WOOLLARD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Gardiner: on Friday the 19th of June, my master called me to go after the prisoner; I saw him going across the way, he dropped the paper from under his arm; I was close to him when he dropped it, my master was standing just by the door upon the pavement; I picked up the paper, and gave it to my master; I then went after the prisoner, down Threadneedle-street; I kept pursuing him, and holloaing out, stop him; he was stopped about the middle of Threadneedle-street; I never lost sight of him after he dropped the paper; I laid hold of him, and brought him back to the shop; a constable came past, and he was given in charge, and taken before the Lord Mayor; the paper was tied up in a bundle, and put by itself.

Q. What sort of paper was it? - A.Demy marble; I know it to be my master's paper, I could distinguish it from twenty more, it was so remarkable.

Gardiner. If it had been tied up in a bundle, as paper commonly is, I dare say I should have suffered him to pass; but it being such remarkable paper, I knew it immediately to be mine. (Francis Bailey, the officer, produced the property, which was identified by Mr. Gardiner.)

Prisoner's defence. This gentleman first said, I was not the person, and told me to go about my business; he asked me my name, and where I lived and he took it down; he told me he would call upon me, and then the constable came in.

Q.Did you take down his name, and place of abode? - A. I did.

Q. Did you mean to let him go? - A. I cannot say I had quite made up my mind whether to let him go or not; he begged very hard, and said he was very sorry for what he had done.

Q.Have you any doubt of his being the man? - A.None upon earth.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Twelve months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-56

587. ANN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , three pieces of linen cloth, value 2s. the property of Mary Shaw , widow ; a child's jacket, value 1s. and a child's shirt, value 1s. the property of James Shaw .

MARY SHAW sworn. - I am a widow in Fetter-lane, Holborn ; I live in the one pair of stairs back room; James Shaw is my son, he is about four years old: On the 21st of May, a little after ten o'clock at night, I went into Mrs. Goodluck's room, and as I was going back again, I saw the prisoner coming out of my room; I asked her what she wanted, she made me no answer, she went down stairs, and I followed her into the street; I told a gentleman she had taken something from me, and he brought her back again with the property upon her, wrapped up in the tail of her gown; I know them to be mine, the constable has got them; she said she would not do it any more.

HANNAH GOODLUCK sworn. - I lodge in the same house with Mrs. Shaw; I followed the prisoner down stairs; I did not see her in the room; I followed her into the street, and saw her brought back into the house, with the property in the tail of her gown. (George Stratton, the constable, produced the property, which was identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she went to enquire for a person who lodged in the house, and that she had found the things on the stairs.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in the Jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-57

588. SARAH PERRING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , a pewter quart pot, value 10d. the property of John Appleton .

JOHN APPLETON sworn. - I keep the Whitehart in Fetter-lane , I lost a quart pot; I did not see the prisoner take it, I can only prove the property.

MRS. APPLETON sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: On the 24th of April, the prisoner came into the house about eleven in the morning; her daughter did live servant with us; she came to the side of the bar; I saw her take the pot; I watched her, for I had a suspicion of her; I called to Mr. Appleton, and he went after her, and brought her back, she had the quart pot under her cloak.

Prosecutor. I went after the prisoner, in consequence of the information of my wife; I came up with her opposite the White-horse yard, and brought her back with the pot; I delivered it to the constable.

(The constable produced the pot which was identified by Mr. Appleton.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she was taken up in the middle of April last, and no bill being found was discharged by proclamation, and returned her prosecutor thanks accordingly; but that as she was taking leave of her daughter, who was going to a creditable place, the was again taken up by the prosecutor.

To the Prosecutor. Q. How came you not to follow up this prosecution in April last? - A. I came to Mr. Shelton's Office to give instroctions for a bill, and I was informed that it I came on Friday morning, I should be in time; and when I came, the Grand Jury were discharged; I applied to Mr. Humphrey's the attorney, and he advised me to come to the court, and make an affidavit of it.

Mr. Fitzpatrick. They were about to move the

court upon affidavit, and I think I myself suggested gested that they must take her up again, and prefer a bill. GUILTY , aged 46.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-58

589. ROBERT AUSTIN and MARY DENHAM were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , two ivory combs, value 1s. 6d. four squares of soap, value 3s. a gold soap, value 2s. and a gold bracelet buckle, value 4s. the property of William Dewdney .

WILLIAM DEWDNEY sworn. - I am a perfumer , No. 55, Fleet-street ; the prisoner Denham was my servant , Austin used to come backwards and forwards as her brother; I had frequently lost things out of the house: On a Sunday I was always in the country with my wife and children, where the has been constantly for a series of years, for a complaint on her lungs; I conceived the prisoner to be trust worthy, and she had the whole and sole management of the house in my absence; but in consequence of not discovering any thing transfactory respectin the things I had lost, I gave her warning, and on Friday the 22d of May, I sent for the beadle to search her box, we found nothing very material in her box; I then got a warrant to search Austin's apartments, in Cow-cross.

Q. How did you know it was Austin's apartments? - A. He was sent for from work in the neighbourhood, and he came to these apartments; he was pretent when his box was searched, but nothing particular was found in it, except some combs, and some soap of my own manufacturing.

Q.How recently had you seen the prisoner Austin upon your premises? - A. A few days before I gave her warning, he came in and asked for Mary; I told him she was up stairs in the kitchen, and he went up.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Public-office, Hatton-garden: on Friday, the 22d of May, the prosecutor applied to our office for a search warrant, to search the apartments of Austin, No. 69. Cow-cross, where I found in a box, four pieces of soap, and a number of other thing, which the prosecutor cannot swear to. (Produces the soap.)

LEVI OBURN sworn. - I went with Chapman to the apartments of Austin, Austin produced a key to open the box; then Chapman searched the box, and found these things; I then went with Austin over to Lambeth, where we took the prisoner Denham; then the took us to her lodgings, and we searched her, but I found nothing upon her,

JOHN READ sworn. - I am an officer; in consequence of a warrant, I went to search Denham's box; but found nothing; we than got a warrant to search Austin's box; there I found these two ivory combs, (producing them) after that, we went with Austin, and apprehended Denham, over the water; I searched her, and in her pocket I found a gold bracelet buckle, and a gold soap.(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

Denham's defence. Mr. Dewdney neither allows victuals enough, nor any thing else in the house, to supply a servant; I never made away with any thing in my life; I have been obliged to buy victuals for myself, and likewise for his youngest son, about thirteen years of age; young Mr. Dewdney gave me the combs; the apprentice has frequently brought soap up to wash his hands, and knowing Mr. Dewdney would not suffer them to use it in the kitchen, I have frequently bought soap, and I thought I had a right to them in return; their general character is, that of scarcity and starving, he has had three or four servants in a month; Mr. Dewdney has a son, that has a great deal of company, and takes things away unknown to Mr. Dewdney.

Austin's defence. I went to see this young woman on Sunday, and I stopped to tea; she said she was coming away the next day; and as I was coming away, she gave me a little bag to take care of, till the next day; I had no thought to ask what was in it; and about five days after that; I was taken up.

Austin, NOT GUILTY .

Denham, GUILTY , aged 25.

Twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-59

590. JOSEPH JAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a watch, value 20s. a watch-chain, value 20s. and a watch-key, value 1d. the property of Thomas Himton .

THOMAS HINTON sworn. - I am a greengrocer , in Little Moorfields; the prisoner is a lad that I employ to run of errands: On Monday morning, the 23d of June, the boy came as usual, about six o'clock, but did not come to market; I came home about seven o'clock and could not hear of him; about seven o'clock in the evening of the same day, an officer came to me from Barking, in Essex, and asked if we knew any thing about a watch; I then missed the watch, it hung in the back-room, where we sat, it had a chain and a key belonging to it.

Q.Are you sure your house is in the city of London? - A. Yes; I was ordered to attend at the Justice's the next morning, Tuesday, and there I saw the prisoner and the watch; Pearson the constable has the watch.

JOHN SACKETT sworn. - I am bailiff to the she off of Essex; I was going down the road between llford and Rumford, and saw the prisoner upon his knees, looking at a watch; I asked him what he had there, he said, a watch that he had found in the bridge, near I sord; I then asked him

what he would have for it, his answer was, what will you give me for it; I asked him then to let me look at the watch; when I had got it in my possession, I said, my lad, I am afraid you came dishonestly by this; he said, no, indeed, he found it upon the bridge, beyond Ilford; I then sent for a constable, and gave charge of him; I took the watch before the Magistrate, at Barking, and then delivered it to the constable.

THOMAS PEARSON sworn. - I am constable of Ilford; I received this watch from Sackett. (Produces it.)

Sackett. This is the same watch.

Hinton. This is my watch, there is my wife's name on the front of it.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

Prosecutor. The boy had been with me five weeks; I had trusted him to serve in the shop, he has taken a great deal of money for me, and I always found him honest.

GUILTY, aged 13. - Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-60

591. JOSEPH EMANUEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , five shirts, value 15s. four check shirts, value 10s. two jackets, value 10s. a waistcoat, value 10s. a pair trowsers, value 5s. three handkerchiefs, value 3s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 2s. and a rug, value 1s. the property of Joseph Francisco .

There being a defect in the evidence, the Prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-61

592. JULIET DOVERAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , twelve yards of printed calico, value 30s. the property of Robert Harvey , privately in his shop .

JAMES DAVIES sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Robert Harvey, linen draper , in Oxford road : On the 29th of May, the prisoner and another woman came in to look at some handkerchief; I was busy serving in the shop; she then stopped by the side of the counter till I had done, and I shewed her some handkerchiefs; I asked her three shillings and six-pence for one of them; the other said, three shillings was the full value of it; after a word or two, I consented to let her have it at three shillings; I then had a suspicion of the prisoner at the bar, from the appearance of her cloak; one hand was under her cloak, as if she was holding something there; I suspected that she had taken something belonging to my employer; she bought a handkerchief, and while I was putting it up in a paper, I observed her walking off towards the door; I crossed the counter, and before she got to the door, I told her I wanted to speak to her, and took her into the back shop; I told her, she had something belonging to me under her cloak; she said, no, she had nothing belonging to me: I sent to Marlborough-street for an officer; we took her up stairs, and the officer took from her a piece of printed calico, containing twelve yards, I think he found it in her pocket; I had given a lady a pattern of it about a minute before the prisoner came in.( Henry Lovett , the officer, produced the property.)

Prisoner's defence. I am a servant to General Knox , in Fitzroy-square; I bought a piece of calico in Oxford-street, and I shewed it the housekeeper; I said, I should like to buy another, and she said, I had better not, as the summer was almost over; she went with me one evening to buy some handkerchiefs, and I bought this piece of calico, and I put it in my pocket for fear she should be angry with me.

GUILTY, aged 60.

Of stealing the goods, but not privately, in the shop .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-62

593. THOMAS GLASS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , three pounds weight of hog's bristles, value 8s. the property of John Allen .

JOHN ALLEN sworn. - I am a brush-maker : On Wednesday, the 10th of June, in consequence of suspicion, I had the prisoner taken into custody; I saw the bristles taken out of a waste bag, in the shop, it was brought out of the cellar; I have a witness who saw him take them.

WILLIAM DUNN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Allen; on Wednesday the 10th of June, the prisoner came to our shop for the waste; I went down into the cellar to hold the bag; he filled first the soft waste hair, and then the hard waste; I heard a quarrel between Mr. Allen's apprentice, and the pot-boy, next door; I stepped from one cellar to the other, and when I returned, I observed the prisoner coming from the hair binn, with a bundle of hair, endeavouring to put it into the bag, but I was too quick upon him, and the bundle broke, part of it went into the bag, and part into the waste binn; they are hogs' bristles; he picked up some of it, and threw the rest into the waste hole; I took no notice then, but asked him what those hairs were upon the ground; he said, he did not know how they came there; he then tied that bag up, and began filling the second, and the second or third handfull that he pulled out was all hair, part of which he threw in; I then said, it was very extraordinary I could not turn my back, but he must be taking the hair out of the binn, and immediately fetched Mr. Allen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You are servant to the prosecutor? - A. Yes.

Q.What is Mr. Allen's partner's name? - A. He has no partner.

Q.The prisoner has been in the habit of coming to your house for waste hair? - A. Yes.

Q. The hair that you charged him with stealing was in the bag? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of a cellar is it, light or dark? - A. It is a light cellar.

Q. He never came out of the cellar while you were below? - A. No.

Q. You had your eyes upon him; he could have done nothing without your knowledge? - A. He did it while I had turned my back.

Q.Will you swear that it was not done by mistake? - A. It could not have been done by mistake, because the two bins were not in the same cellar.

ALEXANDER - sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. Allen; I saw the bristles taken out of the bag; I took part of them out myself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Did not the prisoner say, at the time, it was done by accident? - A.He said he did not know how it came there.

WILLIAM DOVE sworn. - I work for Mr. Allen; I went down to look at the bin, and missed a bundle of hair.

Mr. Allen. I believe these bristles to be mine; they are a very peculiar article; they cost me two shillings and nine-pence three farthings a pound, and he was taking away this at a penny.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-63

594. JOHN JARRATT , otherwise JOHN-MARTIN JARRATT , was indicted, for that he, on the 31st of August, in the 35th year of his Majestly's reign, at St. James, Clerkenwell, did marry and take to wise one Harriet Snowden ; and that he afterwards, to wit, on the 31st of August last, at St. George, Bloomsbury, feloniously did marry and take to wife one Elizabeth Rayer , the said Harriet, his former wife, being then alive .

REBECCA LAWRENCE sworn. - My husband is a pen-cutter; I was present at the marriage of the prisoner to my sister Harriet Snowden, on the 31st of August, 1795, at St. James, Clerkenwell; I am sure the prisoner is the person.

Q. Is your sister alive? - A. I believe so.

Q.When did you see her? - A. Last Wednesday was a week she went away from home.

Q. How long did he live with your sister? - A.Within two days of three years.

Q.What is he? - A. A journeyman painter and glazier .

Q.Have they any family? - A. No, they have had two children, but they are both dead.

Q.Were they married by banns or by liconce? - A. By banns.

JOHN GARTH sworn. - (Produces the register). It is read -

"John Jarratt, of this parish, and Harriet Snowden , of the same, were married in this church by banns the 31st day of August, 1795, by me Robert - , curate. This marriage was solemnized between us John Jarratt and Harriet Snowden , in the presence of George Pedder and Rebecca Snowden .

JOSHUA RAYER sworn. I am a printer, brother to Elizabeth Rayer ; I have known the prisoner a little better than twelve months.

Q. How long has he known your sister? - A.About a month before I knew him, or thereabouts.

MARY RAYER sworn. - I was present at the marriage of my sister, Elizabeth Rayer, to John- Martin Jarratt , at St. George's, Bloomsbury, on the 31st of August.

Q.Look at the prisoner; is that the man? - A. I am sure he is the man.

Mr. Gurney. Q.Are you sure he was married by the name of John- Martin Jarratt ? - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-64

595. JOHN SMITH , alias HENRY STILES , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , a brown mare, value 6l. the property of Thomas Ashby and Joseph Ashby .

CALEB HUMPHREYS sworn. - I am carter to Thomas and Joseph Ashby, mealmen ; they are quakers , and live at Staines; we lost a mare from Staines Moor on the 4th or 5th of June; I saw it on the Sunday before; we found her again at Newington, near the Elephant and Castle, on the 12th of June, in the possession of Mr. Snow; I know the mare to be Mr. Ashby's.

THOMAS SNOW sworn. - I am a constable, at Newington Butts: On Friday, the 12th of June, about seven o'clock in the morning, a person called at my house, and told me there was a man at the Waggon and Horses, who appeared to be a very suspicious character, with a mare, a cart, and nine pigs; I went there, and saw him in the tap-room, with a handkerchief of oats and beans for the mare, and the key of the stable in his hand; I examined the stable, and found the mare and nine pigs, the cart was at the door; I found the pistol in the window, loaded with powder and ball; I took him to Union Hall; I told him I apprehended him for stealing the pigs; he said he had come that morning from Hampton Wick, where he had bought the pigs; in consequence of information, Humphreys was sent to my house, and he knew the mare.

WILLIAM PUGH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Reynolds, calico-printer, at Staines.

Q. What do you know about this mare? - A.Nothing at all.

Q. You know nothing at all about it? - A. No.

Q. That you swear? - A. Yes.

Q. I give you warning, if you have said otherwise before the Magistrate you are liable to be indicted for perjury? - A. I know that.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the mare on the 10th of June, of Nathaniel Miller ; he is out of the way. GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-65

596. JOHN ATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , two guineas and five shillings, the property of Peter Kelly , privily from his person .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-66

597. ELIZABETH, alias SARAH CLARKE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a bed, value 12s, a bolster, value 3s. a pillow, value 1s. 6d. a pillow-case, value 6d. a pair of sheets, value 6s. two blankets, value 6s. a rug, value 2s. a counterpane, value 3s. a walnuttree chair, value 2s. 6d. a looking-glass, value 3s. a washing-pan, value 2s. 8d. an iron pot, value 2s. a pair of bellows, value 2s. a brass candlestick, value 1s. an iron stand, value 6d. a knife and fork, value 6d. and a shovel, value 4d. the property of Elizabeth Wise , widow , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH WISE sworn. - I am a widow, No. 105, Great Saffron-hill ; I have the first floor, and I left the back room furnished; the prisoner had it a week and two days; I left it at three shillings a week; on the Friday night I missed her, and on the Sunday morning I went into the room and missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q.Did you ever see any other person in the room? - A. Only once I saw an old woman in the room.

SARAH LAWRENCE sworn. - I lodge with Mrs. Wife, I sleep with her; I know that the goods were in the room; I missed them on the Sunday morning.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-67

598. JAMES WALTON was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling-house of Daniel Conley , on the 21st of May , a bank-note, value 40l. and another bank-note, value 10l. the property of the said Daniel.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM COTTEREL sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a rigger, in Maria-place, Wapping: On the 2d of May I received a forty-pound note from Willis and Company, which I paid the same day to Mrs. Conley; I should not know it again.

MARY CONLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of Daniel Conley: On the 2d of May, I received a forty pound note from Mr. Cotterell; I kept it till the 20th, when I delivered it to my husband, and on the 21st it was missing.

LAWRENCE SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Willis and Company, bankers: On the 2d of May I paid William Cotterell a bank-note of forty pounds, No. 4347, dated the 23d of April; I have seen the note since, it corresponds in number and date.

WILLIAM RIDING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a soldier in the Coldstream regiment of Guards, and so is the prisoner: On the 21st of May, coming off guard from the Tower, I saw the prisoner; he said, what is the matter you look so sackless this morning; why, says he, I have had a poor guard, without any money in my pocket; he told me to go to a public-house and order a pot of beer, and he would come to me; he came to me, and then we both went to a public-house in St. Catherine's; he said, landlord, can you give me change for a ten pound Bank-note; he replied he could; then the prisoner pulled out two notes and gave them to me to look at, because he said he could not read them; he said one was a ten and the other a forty pound note; I went to the bar and got change for the ten pound; I think there were about five guineas in cash and the rest in notes; he desired me to take those notes that I had from the landlord and put them in my pocket-book; when we were coming away he said, I wish you would take this forty pound and get change for me; he said I want to buy a new suit of cloaths, and I cannot read, I may take bad notes; I put it into my pocket-book, and the next morning I went to the Blue Anchor, in East Smithfield, and there I met with a sailor, we were drinking together; I said I wished to buy a coat; I said I had got a forty pound note, and I wished to get it changed; the sailor went with me to a cloaths shop upon Tower-hill; I bought a coat for fifteen shillings, and I gave the man the forty pound note to get change; the master of the shop went out to get it changed, and he was so long that I began to be uneasy, as it was not my own note; the sailor then said, I need not be uneasy; for he knew the man, and he was sure he would come back; he said, if I would give him a trifle he would give me change for it; he said, if I would give him a guinea he would do it; I said I had better lose a gui

nea than the whole, and he gave me four ten pound notes; I was in liquor, and I thought I would go to the Tower and lie down; I went to lie down, and in about three quarters of an hour, the sailor and Levy came to me and told me the note was stopped at the Bank, they thought it was too much for a soldier to have; I said I will go with you down to the Bank, and so I went with Levy, and I met the prisoner somewhere about the Tower; I told him what had passed, I hoped he had come honestly by it, I was afraid he would bring me into a hobble; he said, yes, I came honestly by the notes, I found them; I said I should go to the Bank, and he might as well go too, and accordingly he did, but he did not go in, he stopped at the door; I told him I had got the four ten pound notes, and I gave them back to the sailor before we went to the Bank; the sailor did not go to the Bank; I then received the change in a ten, a twenty, and the remainder in twos and ones.

Q. Did you tell them at the Bank where you got it? - A. No; then Walton and I went to a public-house, and I gave Walton the change upon the table; I was taken up on the Wednesday night following, and the next day I gave an account of it to the Magistrate.

Court. Q. You asked him if he had come honestly by it, did you suspect him? - A. Yes, I was afraid.

Q.Did you tell them so at the Bank? - A. No.

Q.Did they not ask you if it was your own note? - A. Yes.

Q.And you told them it was? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. That was not true then? - A. No.

Q.Were you quartered at the same house? - A. No; I have been three times in the house.

Q.Were you there on the 21st? - A.No.

ISRAEL ISRAEL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live with Philip Levy, upon Towerhill: On the 21st of May, Riding came to the shop, with a sailor, to buy a coat, and then he gave me a forty pound note, which I gave to Mr. Levy.

PHILIP LEVY sworn. - On Friday morning Israel gave me a forty pound note; I took it to the Bank to know whether it was a good or a bad note; they told me it was a very good one; I told them how I received it, and they stopped it till Riding came, and then they gave him change, a twenty, a ten, and the rest in small notes.

FRANCIS SALKELLD sworn. - I am a clerk in the Bank, (Produces a forty pound Bank-note, No. 4347, dated 23d April, 1801); it has upon it William Riding.

(To Levy). Q.Did you see him write that? - A. Yes.

Salkeld. He had in change a twenty pound, No. 9010, dated the 11th May, a 10l. No. 7837, dated the 13th May, and ten 1l. notes, which are promiscuous numbers, not following.

Smith. This is the note that I paid to Mr. Cotterell.

Q.You bankers never put down the year when it is the current year? - A.No.

Riding. This is the same note, it has my writing upon it.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner in East-lane, Greenwich, on the 27th of May; I took him to a public-house, the sign of the Red Lion, we had something to drink at the bar; I then took him into a back room, and told him I supposed he knew what Conley and I were come about, Conley was with me; he said, no, he did not; I told him we were come about a 40l. note that Conley had lost; I told him I was an officer, and I must see what money he had got about him; he then turned out of his right hand waistcoat pocket four half-guineas, three seven-shilling pieces, eleven shillings and sixpence in silver, and some halfpence; I then searched him, and in a purse I found three 2l. notes and six 1l. notes; I asked him how he came by them; he said he would tell me, but he did not tell me; we got into a boat, and when we had got about half a mile on the River, he said he had it in change of a 20l. note at the Red Lion, the house we had just come from; we went back to the Red Lion, and found that to be true; the mistress of the house said she had got change for him at a baker's; we sent for the baker, who produced it; we landed at the Isle of Dogs, and going along, he said he had received the 20l. and the 1l. from Riding, and I took him into custody.

Q.Before the prisoner said any thing, did you make him any promises, or hold out any threat? - A. I did not; he told me the 20l. and the 1l. was part of the change of the 40l. that had been stopped at the Bank.

ROBERT WALTER sworn. - I am a baker, at Greenwich, (produces a 20l. note); I received it from Mrs. Everis, No. 9010, 11th of May.

Mrs. EVERIS sworn. - I cannot say whether this is the same note or not; but the note that I received from the prisoner I gave to Mr. Walter.

BENJAMIN DAVIES sworn. - This is one of the notes that Mr. Salkeld gave to Riding.

Mr. Salkeld. This is one of the notes.

DANIEL CONLEY sworn. - On the 20th of May I put a 40l. note and a 1l. note which I had received from my wife into a drawer, and on the 21st I missed it; it had no mark upon it: it is the only 40l. note I ever had in my possession; there had been several attempts to break the door with tongs and poker, and so on, and the prisoner told me he was dubious of another soldier, and I turned him away; he said a man must be a fool that did any thing of that sort; if he wanted to get in at a

door, he would get hold of the key, and put it on a piece of putty, or whiting, or tallow, and get a key made to it.

(Mr. William Telkampff produced the examination of the prisoner, signed by himself, and the Magistrate, which was read as follows):

"James Walton - I am a private in the Coldstream Guards, and I have since last Monday been quartered at the Sun public-house, in Drury-lane; I had been previously quartered at Mr. Conley's, the White Swan, near Execution Dock: On Wednesday, the 20th instant, I came home about seven o'clock; I went up to my room to put on some things, and on the stairs met his female servant, called Kitty, who desired me to take two notes, which she gave me, and desired me to say nothing about them; I put them in my pocket, and kept them till the next day; I gave them to Riding to say what they were, as I could not read, who informed me one was 40l. and the other 10l. the 10l. was changed at a public-house, at St. Catherine's, and the 40l. I left with Riding, to get it changed.

The mark X of James Walton.

Signed, Rupert Clarke ."

CATHERINE GRAYGOOSE sworn. - I am niece to Mr. Conley.

Q. On the 20th or 21st of May did you give the Prisoner any notes? - A.No.

Q. Did you ever see any notes given to the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Is there any other servant there of the name of Kitty? - A. No.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

"My Lord, and the worthy Gentlemen of the Jury. James Walton, having a wife and two children, one of them near four years old, which I pay 2s. 6d. a week for, and have been a soldier thirteen years and upwards, and never had a stain in my character before this, and I now declare I know nothing of the robbery laid to my charge. The landlord says, he was robbed between twelve o'clock on the 20th of May, and twelve o'clock on the 21st of the same month, I was at an hospital; at five o'clock on the 20th of May, I went to my quarters, stopped there half an hour; I went out, came back at eleven, and went to bed; a great many lodgers go in and come out at all times; the next morning I got my breakfast, and went out at eight o'clock, the mistress was then in bed in the same room they state to be robbed; about a fortnight before this they lost a large kettle, which they laid to my charge, and abused me very much for, and afterwards found it upon another man who worked in the house. My father was in the Lancashire militia 26 years; my four brothers are all in the army; and the one that has been in the shortest time has been seven years.

For the prisoner.

GEORGE HEWLETT sworn. - I am a corporal in the 2d regiment; I come to witness the taking of the prisoner out of the hospital at five o'clock on the 20th of May; I then took him to the orderly-room, but orders being over, I dismissed him; he is a stranger, I never saw him before to the best of my knowledge.

The prisoner also called a corporal of his own company, who had known him from October last, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 38.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-68

599. ROBERT CROSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , three silver forks, value 3l. the property of Henry Buckley , Esq.

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas Hack .

THOMAS HACK sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Buckley, at South Lambeth Lawn ; the prisoner has been a servant, and is out of place; he called to see me on the 13th of July last, and I took him down into the pantry, and asked him to eat and drink; he came just before twelve, and stopped till a quarter before two; I shewed him to the door, and while I went down stairs to get my hat, he was gone; I was obliged to leave him in the pantry by himself three or four times when the bell rung: when he had been gone about half an hour, I found there were three silver forks, with four prongs, missing, the crest, an ox's head; I never saw him again till about a month ago, when I had him taken up; he said he had not got the forks, and never saw the forks; I asked him for the duplicates; he said he had no duplicates for forks, he had for clothes; he said he would give me those duplicates.

Q. When did you tell your master of it? - A. I have not told my master of it now, I replaced the forks.

Q. Are you sure no other person had been in the pantry? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH FELLOWS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Prince's-street, Soho: On the 14th of July I bought three four-pronged forks, but I have no recollection of the man at all; there was no crest upon them, nor had any appearance of being defaced.

Q.(To Hack). Are you sure the forks were in the pantry before he came in? - A. I am.

Prisoner's defence. I called upon Thomas Hack , and he went to the cellar with me and the two maids; he took out several bottles of brandy and rum, and made us all drunk.

Q.(To Hack). Is that true? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-69

600. MARGARET GILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a pair of

sheets, value 10s. a blanket, value 2s. a bolster, value 5s. a pillow, value 1s. and a pillow-case, value 1s. the property of George Cruslac , in a lodging-room .

GEORGE CRUSLAC sworn. - I keep the Duke's Head, in Monmouth-court : On the 20th of June I let a lodging to the prisoner, at 7s. a week; she came in the Saturday following, the 23d, and staid a short time, till I missed her and the property, and on the Monday following I took her in Bennett's-court, Drury-lane, in a lodging of 9s. a week; I took her to Marlborough-street, and found upon her one duplicate of a pair of stockings; I have never found any of the things since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is there not an opening by the side of the door through which any person might put their hand, and push the lock back? - A.No.

Q. Had you not a character with her from a person of the name of Patterson? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.Did she tell you she was going to quit her lodging? - A. No.

Q.What way of life was she in? - A. When she first came, she said she had a husband who would come home once a week; but afterwards she had men come to her, five or six in a day.

MARY DRING sworn. - I saw the things in the room the day she went away.

CHRISTOPHER COOPER sworn. - I am a grocer; I apprehended the prisoner in Bennett's-court, Drury-lane.

Prisoner's defence. I never took any thing out of the house; I left every thing as I found it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-70

601. JOHN READ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June , five glass quart bottles filled with ale, value 5s. the property of Walter Miller .

THOMAS IVERS sworn. - I am a sea-faring man ; I live in Church-lane, St. George's in the East: On the 2d of June, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw a drunken man, in a soldier's dress, cross the road with some bottles, I never saw his face; he went up George-yard, Great Towerhill, that is all that I know; he was very much in liquor.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - In consequence of information I received on Tuesday, the 2d of June, I went to a house in St. Catherine's-street, to the lodging of a soldier of the name of Robert Goose , where I found five bottles of ale; I apprehended Goose on duty in St. James's Park; I told him a gentleman's cellar had been broke open upon Tower-hill, and I had found part of the property in his room; he said he would shew me the man that brought them there; he pointed out the prisoner; Goose seemed very much slurried, and the prisoner told him in the coach to make himself quite easy, for he knew nothing about it, he should take it all upon himself. (Produces the property).

ROBERT GOOSE sworn. - A little before six in the morning I was going upon duty, and met the prisoner with five bottles of ale; he said he had found them, and begged I would let him leave them in my place, and I gave him leave.

WALTER MILLER sworn. - I keep cellars for beer; we missed two or three dozen bottles of ale; I know these five bottles to be my property, they have my mark upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I was going upon duty, and found these bottles upon Tower-hill.

Q.(To Goose). Did he appear to be sober when you met him? - A. I did not see that he was in liquor.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who had known him seven years, and gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-71

602. ELIZABETH UPHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , two gowns, value 20s. the property of William Ramsden .

MARTHA RAMSDEN sworn. - I am the wife of William Ramsden ; I lodged in York-street, Westminster , at the time I was robbed; the prisoner lodged in the same house; we both worked at gaiter-making; I left her in my room about a quarter of an hour, and when I returned I found my box broke open, and all my clothes gone; I have since found two gowns; one she had on when she was taken, and the other was in pawn, but the pawnbroker would not swear to the woman.

WILLIAM MESSENGER sworn. - I am a constable belonging to Queen-square; I found this gown on the prisoner's back. (Produces it.)

Mrs. Ramsden. I am sure this is my gown.

Prisoner's defence. The gown that is now produced she lent me to go into the country in, and because I did not come back so soon as I had promised, she charged me with the felony.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-72

603. THOMAS YATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , a shirt, value 2s. the property of Henry Smart .

HENRY SMART sworn. - I am a carpenter : On the 27th of May, a house adjoining my own caught fire; I was obliged to move all my property, and in moving it back again, about half past ten in the morning, I heard a cry of stop thief; I

ran up Dorser Mews, and met the prisoner between two of the Marybone Volunteers; the shirt was brought back, with him, by Carey; it is marked H. S.

WILLIAM CAREY sworn. - I am a fireman belonging to the Sun Fire Office; I was upon duty at the fire, and heard the cry of stop thief; I turned round and looked; seeing a genteel man running, I did not think he was the thief, till I saw something fall from his right hand pocket, and then I pursued him; a person had stopped him before I came up; the prisoner said, he was assisting in moving the goods, and seeing that shirt, he had put it in his pocket till he found the owner of it. (Produces the shirt.)

Q. Had things been tumbled about in the street? - A. Yes; there was a great deal of confusion.

- COLEMAN sworn. - I stopped the prisoner, and held him till the fireman came; the shirt was hanging out of his pocket; he yielded himself up to me immediately.

Smart. This is my shirt.

The prisoner called two witness, who gave him an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-73

604. JOHN FELTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , four pewter pint pots, value 2s. and a pewter quart pot, value 1s. the property of Thomas Fort .

THOMAS FORT sworn. - I keep the Bull and Gate, at Kentish-town ; Crocker told me I must attend at Bow-street, there was a man in custody for stealing my pots.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - On Sunday morning, the 31st of May, about six o'clock, I and two more were at the Running Horse, in Tottenham-court-road; we saw the prisoner, and followed him into a house in Bainbridge-street; he had a basket on his shoulder, and some pieces of wood at the top; when he got into the room, I laid hold of the basket, and asked him what he had in it; he said he had been cutting some wood for a fire; I pulled up a cloth that was under the wood, and there were some other things; he then told me he had found it all by St. John Wood Farm; I found a Dutch grate, a lamp-iron, a spade, six pint pots, four quart pots, some rags, and a small bundle of asparagus in his hand, with part of another quart pot belonging to Hampstead. (Produces the property).

Fort. Here are four pints and a quart pot of mine; they have my name-upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I found these things above two miles from the place where they say they lost the pots from. GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-74

605. WILLIAM LEFEVRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , a cloth great coat, value 10s. the property of Thomas Cokeham .

THOMAS COKEHAM sworn. - On the 28th of May I came to Whitechapel-market with a load of hay; I left my team to ask the saleman where he would have it pitched, and while I was speaking to him, a man snatched my great coat off the shaft, and ran away with it; i pursued him, and brought him back with the coat; it is my coat.

BENJAMIN CONSTABLE sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. There were a great many people running besides me; I never saw the coat till I saw it before the Magistrate.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped in Whitechapel-market on a market day .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-75

606. JOHN LEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , a copperpot, value 6s. the property of George Branburg .

WILLIAM LEE sworn. - I am a watchman, near the Thatched-house, Islington: On the 24th of May, about ten o'clock at night, I observed two men standing under a high garden fence, where there were a great many nettles; I stopped with my lanthorn, and one of them pretended to stoop down to ease himself, and the other stood by; I met my brother watchman, I told him to go round the other side of the row, and I would meet him, and see what they were doing; then they went away. About half past three o'clock in the morning, I saw two men; one of them took a copperpot from out of the nettles, and put it upon his shoulder; they went towards the Rosemary Branch; I desired a young man to watch them, and I would go round another way; I went to my partner, and we pulled our coats off, and went after them; we overtook them about thirty or forty yards from the Rosemary Branch ; they carried it about a quarter of a mile, and then dropped it; I cannot say which of them had the pot; I took hold of the prisoner three or four yards from the pot; the prisoner said to the other with an oath, why don't you pull out a knife and stab them; the other turned round, and seeing that we had hold of the prisoner, he made his escape, and left his hat and a little bag behind him; we took him to Mr. Branburg, and he owned the pot; the prisoner offered me a guinea to let him go, but I told him I would not.

Prisoner. It was himself that proposed that question to me, he said he would let me go it I would give him a guinea.

- SOUTHERN sworn. - I am a watchman; I

was with the last witness; I cannot say which of the two had the pot; we took him to the office, he would not go without a coach; we put him into a coach, and going along he pleaded very innocent, and I said, if you are innocent, why did you offer my partner a guinea; he said he did that for his character's sake; I then said, what did you talk of slabbing him for, that could not touch you character, and then he offered me a watch out of his pocket to say nothing about the knife.

JOHN FRANKLING sworn. - I was constable of the night; the two watchman brought me this copper pot, (producing it); I went with them in the coach, and was present when the prisoner offered his watch to the watchman not to say any thing about the knife.

GEORGE BRANBURG sworn. - I believe this to be my pot, but I have no mark upon it; it had been used that very day, I have no doubt of its being mine; it was taken from a back kitchen adjoining the house; the yard door, from the neglect of the servant, had been left open that night.

Prisoner's defence. I had been ill a considerable time, and the doctor ordered me to bathe early in the morning, and as I was going home from the New River, these men attacked me.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-76

607. GEORGE M'PHERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , 18lb. weight of sugar, value 4s. the property of James Gascoigne , Thomas Dawson , and James Dixon .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

RICHARD KNIGHT sworn. - I am a gangsman; James Gaseoigne , Thomas Dawson, and James Dixon , are the proprietors of the wharf ; the prisoner was employed by me on the 3d of June last; I saw the prisoner on the wharf that day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Do you not know that Mr. Dixon and his brother are partners? - A. I cannot say.

JOHN FOX sworn. - I am an officer of the Thames Police: On the 3d of June last I was on the quays, and saw the prisoner; I stopped him, and searched him, and found about him, in five different places, quantities of sugar; the wharf fronts Bear-quay .

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Who was it that got a guinea to come here to be a witness? - No one, that I know.

Q. Do you know Mr. Watson? - A. No.

Q. Do you know any body to whom Watson has given a guinea to be witness against this soldier? - A. No; I apprehended Watson for stealing sugar, and he was convicted, and paid a fine of 40s. under the bumboat act.

Q. Did not Watson apply to you to be a witness against the prisoner? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Do you know Mr. Knight? - A. Yes, very well.

Q. Don't you know a man to whom a guinea was given? - A. No.

Q. Don't you know a man that has had the promise of a guinea? - A. No.

Q. Have not you yourself been promised a guinea? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, do you not expect a guinea if this man is convicted? - A. I do not.

Q. Have you ever been speaking to the prisoner's wife upon the subject of this trial? - A. No.

Q. Is Mr. Dixon, or any of his partner's here, to prove the firm of the house? - A. I believe not.

Court. (To Mr. Knight). Q. Is that the fort of sugar that was upon the wharf? - A. It is.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up in the gateway.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him an excellent character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-77

608. CATHERINE FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , a two-guinea piece, nine guineas, ten half guineas, and a purse, value 1s. the property of Peter-Everitt Mestaers , Esq. in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

PETER-EVERITT MESTAERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On Wednesday, the 24th of June, I came home in consequence of information of this transaction; about half after ten at night the prisoner was brought to me in custody of the constable; the constable produced a purse, containing, among other money, a two-guinea piece.

Q.Was that two-guinea piece your's? - A. I think it was, but there being no mark upon it, I cannot swear to it.

Mrs. CATHERINE MESTAERS sworn. - On Wednesday, the 24th of June, I had occasion to go to my escrutoire, about six in the afternoon, and found it broke open and very much damaged.

Court Q.Where was this escrutoire kept? - A. In my bed-room; I had seen the purse and the money that morning; I put into it, previous to going to dinner, four guineas and a half, or five guineas, but I think it was five guineas; there were in all nine guineas, ten half-guineas, and a two-guinea piece.( John Francis , the officer, produced the prose.)

Mr. Mestaers. This is my purse, the two-guinea piece was George the Second's, 1740; I believe this to be the same, I have had it above a twelvemonth, and one of the half-guineas was a crooked one; upon perceiving that the escrutoire broke open I made enquiry among the servants.

RICHARD CLUTTERBUCK sworn. - I am one

of the servants in Mr. Mestaers's family; my mistress gave an alarm among the servants by ringing the bell, in consequence of which Elizabeth Burgress and I went to search the house; I could not find any thing for some time, at last, in the front garret, I found the prisoner lying between the bed and the mattress, where nobody could see her, with one hand under her face and the other over, to keep the bed from smothering her; I took the prisoner out of the bed, and almost under her, by the side of her, I found a purse; I found also a broken carving-knife, which was under my care; she spoke to me and gave me the purse before I said a word to her.

Q. Are you sure neither you or Burgess had said any thing to her? - A.Not a word; she said she was the wicked thief that had taken the purse.

Q.Did you observe the escrutoire? - A. Yes; it had every appearance of being cut with a knife; the constable was sent for, and, by my mistress's direction, I placed the purse exactly where I had found it, that it might remain there till the constable came.

ELIZABETH BURGESS sworn. - I went to search with Clutterbuck, and in the front garret we began to move the things off the bed, and I saw something move in the bed; we found the woman at the bar lying between the bed and the mattress, entirely concealed; there was a purse and a broken knife lying near her; she said she was the wicked thief, and the constable was sent for.

Court. Q.Was the prisoner a stranger to you? - A.She had lived in the family, and had left it about five weeks.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. What was her appearance at that time? - A. She appeared to be in great distress.

JOHN FRANCIS sworn. - The prisoner herself delivered this purse to me; I have had it ever since.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , Death , aged 18.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy on account of her youth, and the probability of it being her first offence; the prosecutor also joined in the recommendation.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-78

609. JOHN DODSON was indicted for feloliously stealing, on the 12th of June , a pocketbook, value 2s. the property of Thomas Comber , privily from his person .

THOMAS COMBER sworn. - I am a farmer at Crowhurst, in Surrey: On Friday, the 12th of June, between one and two o'clock, as I was going along Fish-street-hill , I felt something, I thought I had hit my coat against the house, and that led me to examine my pocket, and then I missed my pocket-book; I looked round on my left hand and I saw the prisoner now at the bar, he passed directly before me; I said to him, my friend, I have lost my pocket-book; he immedaitely said, he had not got it; I got up with him then, and saw the pocket-book under his coat; I said that was the pocket-book, and I would swear to it; then he ran across the street to White-hart-court; I called out stop thief; he dropped the pocketbook in White-hart-court; I saw him in the course of a few minutes in Lombard-street; I am sure the prisoner is the same man, he had a brown furtout coat on.

- BELL sworn. - I am a merchant; I was standing in White-hart-court, I heard a man run very fast up the court, and he dropped the pocketbook about two yards from my feet; I observed a gentleman stoop to pick the book up at the moment, which determined me to pursue the man, and I took him at the end of Lombard-street; I never lost fight of him; the prisoner is the man.

Comber. I know the pocket-book by the receipts that are in it.

Prisoner's defence. This gentleman knocked his pocket against the wall, the pocket-book jumped out, and I kicked it before me; there were a great many people passing at the same time.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing the property, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-79

610 THOMAS SAYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , sixteen yards of lace, value 1l. 10s. the property of Joseph Coles .

JOSEPH COLES sworn. - I am a haberdasher in West Smithfield : On Wednesday the 24th of June, I had occasion to go up stairs; I heard the cry of thieves; I went behind the counter and discovered that I had lost a card of black lace; I went immediately to the door to see for the lad, whom I left in the shop; I went into the street, and in about ten minutes there came several persons; a man produced a card of lace, asking me if it was my property; I told him it was, and desired him to write his name upon it, which he did, his name is Halesworth; there are sixteen yards of it.

JESSE COLES called. - Q. How old are you? - A. Fourteen.

Q. Did you ever take an oath before? - A. Yes, at Guildhall.

Q. Do you know what will become of bad boys that tell lies and swear that which is false? - A. Yes.

Q. What will become of such persons? - A. Go to hell. (Sworn.) - On Midsummer-day, between

two and three o'clock, I had just taken in the beer, was putting it down upon the stairs, when I heard the glass case knock on the counter, I turned round and saw the prisoner in the shop; the case was locked and the key was out; he then took a card of lace and put it under his coat; he was going out of the shop, I holloaed after him, and he came back and said, what have I got; I said you have got something of mine; he then ran off, and I ran after him, and called out stop thief; I did not see him stopped; he was brought back almost directly.

JOSEPH ABBOT sworn. - I am a cloth-worker; I was coming along Little Britain and heard the cry of stop thief, and at the corner of Bartholomew-close I observed the prisoner at the bar running with an open knife in his hand, I followed, and he ran up Half-moon-passage into Aldersgate-street, the next witness, Egglington, came up and stopped him, and I came up immediately after; I saw him searched in the prosecutor's house, but there was nothing found upon him.

- EGGLINGTON sworn. - I stopped the prisoner; he threatened to stab me with a knife that he had in his hand, and a young man came up immediately and caught hold of him; we took him back to Mr. Cloes's shop.

Prisoner. Q.Had not you a knife in your hand when you came up to me? - A.No.

ALEXANDER STEVENS sworn. - I am a constable, (produces a card of lace); I received it from Mr. Coles.

Coles. This is my lace, there are three marks upon it all of my own writing; there were two other cards of lace left behind, this was the outer one; I had seen them all three within a quarter of an hour.

Prisoner's defence. I went in to ask for a pair of doe-skin gloves, a man came out as I went in, and the boy said, I have lost something; and I then went out and made my best endeavour to go after him. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-80

611. WILLIAM SMITHERS and BARNABY POTTER were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , 25lb. of hay, value 2s. the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown, and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-81

612. JOHN PARTINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of July , a saw, value 5s. and two planes, value 5s. the property of Joseph Badger .

JOSEPH BADGER sworn. - I am a carpenter : Between the 30th of June and the 1st of July I lost two planes and a saw; I had left them in a new building in Keppel-street , leading to Russell-square, on the Tuesday night, and on the Wednesday morning they were gone; I saw them about eight o'clock the same morning at the watch-house.

JAMES WHITE sworn. - I am a watchman in Upper Gower-street: Last Wednesday morning about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing against the pales in the field, and when he saw me he threw himself into a ditch and covered himself over with rubbish; I asked him what he was about there; he said he wanted a pint of beer; I told him there was no beer to be got there; he was sitting upon the tools all the time; I asked him what he was going to do with those tools; he said he was going to work; I asked him where; he said at Hampstead; I asked him where he came from; he said from Paddington; says I, you have taken a long round, I will take care of the tools, and I took the tools and the prisoner to the watch-house.

PETER WILTSHIRE sworn. - I am a watchman of Pancras: About three o'clock on Wednesday morning the last witness brought the prisoner to my box, he had left the tools, in his watch-box; I detained the man and sent him back for the tools.(Produces them).

Badger. These are my tools, they have my name upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to work at Hampstead and saw these tools lie in the hedge; I picked them up.

To Badger. Q.Was the house locked up when you left it? - A.I left the door on the spring lock, and found it open in the morning.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-82

613. CHARLOTTE WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , a pair of sheets, value 8s. two cloths, value 2s. a towel, value 6d. and a petticoat, value 2s. the property of Thomas Digby .

ELIZABETH DIGBY sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Digby; I keep a house in Middlesex-court, Drury-lane ; On Friday evening, the 5th of June, I heard a foot creep through the passage; then I heard a heavier foot; the things were hanging up in the yard to dry; I then went out, but saw nobody; the next morning I saw the property in the possession of the watchman.

- HEBDY sworn. - I am a watchman: On Friday evening, the 5th of June, about a quarter past ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner come along Broad-street with a bundle; I was standing at the corner of Plumbtree-street; about one hundred yards before she came to me she crossed over into

Lascelles-court; I followed her, and asked her where she was going; she gave me no account at all where she was going; I asked her where she brought the property from; she told me she got it in Drury-lane; I detained the prisoner, and found Mrs. Digby out in the morning; she claimed the property.

Mrs. Digby. I know this to be my property; one of the sheets is marked with my own name.

Prisoner's defence I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-83

614. JAMES JOHNS and EDMUND STEPHENS were indicted, the first for feloniously and sacrilegiously stealing, on the 18th of June , three brass chandelier ornaments, value 10s. the property of the churchwardens of the German Lutheran chapel in the Savoy , and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Gleed).

NICHOLAS GARLING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. What are you? - A. One of the wardens of the German Lutheran chapel, in the Savoy; there are twelve of us, (repeats their names).

Q.Do you know of any thing being lost from that church? - A. Yes; brass hat-pins, and ornaments from brass chandeliers; I saw them afterwards at Bow-steet, I believe about a fortnight ago, it was Monday the 21st.

Q. When was the robbery committed? - A. Between the 14th and the 19th.

Q. Were you present at the examination of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.Was any thing said to induce the boy to confess, either by threats or promises? - A. No.

Q.Did you see the prisoner sign that (shewing him the examination)? - A. I did; and I saw the Magistrate sign it. (It is read).

"The voluntary confession of James Johns , who says that he is apprentice to John Harvey , slater, in Guildford-street, near the Foundling Hospital, and has been employed by his said master in repairing the flating of the said church for about a week; that he has at three different times stolen from the said church a number of the brass ornaments belonging to the chadeliers, three candlesticks, and also some brass hat-pins; and on Thursday last, he stole from the said church the several brass ornaments belonging to chadneliers and chandlesticks now produced by James Limbrick , which he afterwards took the same night to the shop of the person now present, who calls himself Edmund Stephens, who keeps a broker's-shop in Grosvenor-market, and deals in iron and lead; that when he got to the shop Stephens was standing at the door, and examinant went into the shop without asking any questions, where he saw a man, who asked him what he had got to sell, and he told him some brass; that said man asked him no further questions, but told him to put the brass which he had got in his hand in a cloth into the scale, which he did; that said man weighed them; that after weighing them he shewed them to a woman, apparently the mistress of the shop, to see if they were brass, and she scraped them with a knife, and then Stephens came from the door, who disputed that they were brass, and put one of the pieces in a vice and broke it, and said it was solid brass; that he asked examinant no questions how he came by the brass, but offered him sixpence a pound; that Stephens paid him four shillings and sixpence for nine pounds, after which examinant left the shop; and the piece of brass ornaments now produced are the same that he so sold to the said Stephens."

PETER RAYMOND POLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. - I am also one of the wardens of the German Lutbern Chapel; I know no more than Mr. Garling knows.

JOHN HARVEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I live in Little Guildford-street, near the Foundling Hospital; I am a slater; the prisoner was employed by me at the Lutheran Chapel, from the 14th to the 20th of June, or thereabouts; he is my apprentice, he has served almost a twelve-month.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q.You went, I believe, to Stephens's house with the officer? - A. I did.

Q. You enquired after these things, did not you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not he tell you at once, that he had some? - A. No.

Q. When was it? - A. On Monday, the 21st, I went into the shop with the boy, and asked him if he had bought any brass, he said, yes; he asked where it was, and he told the officer it was in such a drawer, (pointing to it); Limbrick took the brass out of the drawer, and said to Stephens, I believe you must go with us; then we took his to Bow-street.

Q. Did he tell you what he gave for it? - A. Yes, he said four-shillings and six-pence.

Q. Do you know the value of old brass? - A. No.

JOHN LIMBRICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I went to the house of stephens, with the boy and his master; I asked Stephens if he belonged to the house, he told me he did; I then asked him if he recollected buying any brass of the boy two or three days ago; he said he had; I asked him if he had got it by him; he told me had; I then asked him to set me look at it, upon which he went to the drawer in the shop, and pulled it

Mr. Alexander; I know the hand writing of this bill of parcels, it is the hand writing of Thomas out; he then told me that was the brass that he had bought, upon which I took the brass, and brought it with him to Bow-street.

Q.What shop is it? - A. It appeared to be a broker's shop. No. 32, Lower Grosvenor-market.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You have been an officer of Bow-street some time? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you ever apprehend a receiver before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever apprehend a person who was more ready to give an answer to any question that was put to him? - A. No.

Q. You know, I believe, that he surrendered himself to take his trial? - A. Yes.

Q.And you know that he surrendered once before, during this Sessions? - A. Yes.

Q. And that the learned Judge upon the Bench did that, which they very seldom do, suffered him to go out again upon his former bail? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garling. These are part of the ornaments belonging to the wardens of the Lutheran church.

Court. Q.Have you a licence for your chapel? - A. We have a grant from the King.

Q.Have you got the grant here? - A. No.

The prisoner Johns did not say any thing in his defence.

Stephens's defence. I was standing at the door, engaged with a customer, when the lad came; he went in, and my wife called to me to know what the brass was worth; I told her to pay sixpence a pound for it; I told her I thought it was about the price of cock-metal, and then returned to the customer at the door.

Evidence for Stephens.

- PHILKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. - I am servant to Mr. Stephens; I was present when the boy came with the brass; my master was standing at the door, talking with a customer; I weighed the brass, and my mistress cut a bit off with a knife, to see if it was brass; she called to my master, and he looked at it, and said it was worth about the same as cock metal, and desired my mistress to give him sixpence a pound; and he returned to the customer at the door.

ANN KEITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was present when the boy came with the brass; I was purchasing a bedstead, he was with me at the door; the boy went past me into the shop to Mrs. Stephens; what he carried in, I do not know; but his wife came and asked him what she should give for it, and he told her sixpence a pound.

- HUDSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman to his Majesty's upholsterer; I was present when the officers came into Mr. Stephens's house, and asked Mr. Stephens for something; I did not hear what, and he took the brass out of a drawer immediately; I have known him twelve years, and always found him an honest industrious man.

- sworn. - This is not brass, it is a mixture of lead, it is cast and filled up; sixpence a pound is more than I would give for it.

Court. Q.Supposing it had been brass, what would you have given? - A. Not more than seven-pence halfpenny or eight-pence.

ROBERT HARDCASTLE sworn. - I am an engine maker to the Board of Ordinance; I have known him six or seven years, I always found him an honest man; I have looked at the metal, it is a composition, the weight of it is sufficient without any thing else; I think sixpence sufficient, I would not give more.

The prisoner Johns called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Johns, GUILTY , aged 15.

Of stealing, but not sacrilegiously, confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Stephens, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-84

615. JOHN SIMMISTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , twenty-eight pounds of rice, value 8s. the property of George-Jacob Jordan .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Thomas Alexander .

GEORGE JACOB JORDAN sworn. - I am a carrier , from the George, Snow-hill, to Sunbury; On Saturday, the 30th of May, I received a parcel from Mr. Alexander's man, it was directed to R. Evans, Hampton-court; I went on to Leicester-square, and there I stopped near St. Martin's-street, about two minutes; I then got up, and drove to the Black bear, Piccadilly; I then missed the parcel, but I thought it might have go down behind the other things, till I got to Hampton-court, and then I was sure it was lost; I then drove home to Sunbury.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am a constable: On the 30th of May, going along Hemmings's-row, I met the prisoner with two other men; and knowing the prisoner to be a man of bad character, and a thief, and seeing him with a bundle upon his shoulder, I stopped him; I laid hold of him by the collar; I said, I have got you now, Jack; we had a struggle, and he got away from me; with the assistance of another man, I took him into a public-house, and there tied his hands; I then took him to Bow-street; we found a bill of parcels, which led to a discovery of who it belonged to.

JOSEPH TOWNSEND sworn. - I am a patrole belonging to Bow-street; the prisoner was brought to Bow-street, by Donaldson; I opened the parcel and found this bill of parcels. (Produces it).

WILLIAM GROOM sworn. - I am a servant to

Hadge, a servant of Mr. Alexander; it is dated the 27th of May; it is directed to Mr. Evans, Hampton Court.

Q.Where is Hedge? - A. In Wales.

Jordan. - This is the parcel I received from Mr. Alexander.

- DAVIES sworn. - I was going through Hemmings's-row and the constable and the prisoner were scuffling; the constable charged me to aid and assist in the King's name; I had a load, I took my load into the White Lion, and came out to assist the constable; we took him into the house.

Prisoner's defence. - I know nothing at all of it; I had not the bundle; I made no resistance.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-85

616. JOSEPH HARRIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Fell , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 4th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing seventy-one pairs of leather bootlegs, value 7l. 2s. and two graining boards, value 2s. the property of the said William.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM FELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a currier , No. 1l, Chapel-street, Westminster .

Q. Is your shop and premises under the same roof? - A. Yes; on the 4th of April, the premises were safe at nine o'clock at night; I was up that night till twelve; the next morning, Easter Sunday, about nine o'clock, I perceived the lead-work of two windows cut; they were half-circle windows, to let light into the warehouse; it was perfectly safe the night before; it was so conspicuous a part of the shop, that if it had been broke before I must have seen it.

Q.Were the rest of your premises safe? - A. Yes; I then examined the warehouse, and found all the goods taken from the window; the whole window was cleared; there were between nine and ten dozen of boot-legs, I cannot speak to the quantity exactly, but I think thereabout, and some calves-skins, and sheep-skins, and two graining boards.

Q.What is the use of a graining board? - A. It is to raise a false grain in the leather before it is dry.

Q.What was the amount of your loss? - A. It was under 20l. I think.

Q.Would it amount to 10l? - A. Yes, and upwards; I received no information till the 18th of May, I then received information; in consequence of which I took out a search warrant, and went with the officers Marsden , Creedland and Messenger to a house the corner of Bull's-Head-Court, Peter-street, Westminster; the prisoner is a shoemaker, and, in the back garret of that house, I found seventy pair of boot legs, and I think on the ground floor two graining boards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Your house was broke open on the 4th of April? - A. Yes.

Q.And you found this property as long after as the 18th of May? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner is a shoemaker ? - A. Yes, he has been in my shop several times, and bought leather.

Q.What did the prisoner say about it? - A. He said he met a person near Whitechapel, and asked him if he wanted to buy some leather; that he asked him, what leather it was, and he told him boot legs; he asked him how much he wanted for them, he said 15l. for the lot; he said he would have them at that, that he had not money enough in his pocket; if he would call on him he would pay him what he could; the person called on him, and he paid him 5l. or five guineas and a-half, I cannot say exactly, and the prisoner brought a man forward to prove that he saw him pay the money, and produced the receipt.

Court. Q. A shoemaker and a boot-maker are two distinct businesses? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MESSENGER sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Queen-square, Westminster; I went with Mr. Fell to the prisoner's lodgings, where I found seventy-one pair of boot legs at the top of the house in the back garret, and five pair in a cupboard in the same room; I did not find the graining boards; I have had them ever since. (Produces the property.)

Q.Did you afterwards apprehend a person of the name of Beetle? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you any note in your possession? - A. No; Marlden has it; I saw it delivered to Beetle at the office by a woman, and by the desire of the Magistrate I went after the woman, and I was obliged to bring her back by force; I took her to Tothil-fields Bridewell and shewed Harris to her, and she said he was the man that desired her to deliver the note to Beetle. Harris at first said, he did not; she said, do not deny it, for he had got it; I held it up in my hand, and then he said he did.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing respecting these things? - A. Yes; he said he could bring a person forward that could speak concerning purchasing these things in Whitechapel; I did not know he was a shoemaker; I know the man very well, he used to go about with a horse and cart selling potatoes and such things.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. I believe he not only said that he had bought them in Whitechapel, but produced a person to prove it? - A. There was a person there, but I did not hear him examined.

JOHN MARSDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Knowlys. - I am a police-officer; I went to the prisoner's lodgings; I was at the apprehension of Beesle.

Q. Did you see any thing of any note? - A. Yes; in consequence of what Messenger told me, I took this note from Beetle.

Q. Was that before he was examined? - A. I believe it was the prisoner owned it to be his writing (it is read) "You know nothing, for nothing has been said about you."

Q.(To Mr. Fell.) Look at these things, do you know that any of them are your property? - A. Yes, they are all mine; the sheep-skins have had the mark cut off; here is one of these boot-legs that I can speak positively to; it is my man's dressing, and has his mark upon it; I have no doubt, from their appearance, of their all being mine; the growning boards I buy of a person of the name of White, and his name is upon the side of them; Martin Bignell is the man's name who dressed this skin.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Did you manufacture these bootlegs yourself? - A. I did; part of these I had bought of a shoemaker, and part I manufactured; my man was a young beginner, and spoiled best part of them; this is one that I gave him to try.

Q.Did you ever sell any boot-legs of his dressing? - A. Yes.

Q. And they were sold with the mark on? - A. Yes.

Q. This graining board is just the same as every other graining board that any other currier might have? - A. Yes.

Q.Every graining board made by White would have his name upon it? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. A graining board is an instrument used in your business as a currier? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that an instrument made use of by shoemakers? - A. No; they cannot use them.

Q.Are you sure that the night of this robbery you lost two graining boards of that description? - A. I cannot say that I did, for there were more in the window.

MARTIN BIGNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a journeyman to Mr. Fell; this boot-leg I know to be Mr. Fell's; it has my own mark upon it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you make any more at the same time? - A. Yes.

Q. A dozen or more? - A. Yes, about a dozen.

Q. Do you know what became of them? - A. I do not know.

THOMAS BIDDLE, sworn. - I am workman to Mr. Fell.

Q.Look at these boot-legs. and tell me if they are your master's? - A. Yes, I believe them all to be my master's.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Your master is in a good line of business? - A. Yes; he is in a capital line of business.

Q. And makes a great many of them? - A. Yes.

Q.Will you swear that a great many more bootlegs like them have not been sent out and sold within these two years? - A. No; these are what are called Basil legs.

Q.Have you never sold any since Christmas? - A. I cannot say; Basil legs are very uncommon; I never saw any Basil legs in any other currier's shop in my life but Mr. Fell's.

Court. Q.Do you mean to say the whole seventy-one are your master's? - A. I really believe they are.

Court (To Fell.) Q.How do you deal in these things? - A.These Basil legs are what I bought of a shoemaker; he bought them at a sale, thinking he was buying a bargain, and was taken in, and I meant to cut them up as useless things; they are cut out of sheep-skins, and, upon my oath, I never sold a pair in my life.

Q. Do you ever sell to shoemakers? - A. Yes, I have sold twenty dozen at a time.

ROBERT DAVIES sworn. - I am a journeyman to Mr. Fell.

Q.Look at these boot-legs? - A. I believe them to be my master's; I have worked for Mr. Fell two years.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Are you a journeyman in the retail way? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. About the beginning of March, I was going through Whitechapel, with half-a-dozen pair of men's shoes to Mr. Philips's; a little below Whitechapel-church, on the opposite side going down Whitechapel, I met with Mr. Philips, who returned back with me, on account of saying me for the shoes; Mr Philips stopped to make water, I stood on the pavement, a man came up and pitched a bundle of leather on the pitching-block that stood there; seeing me with shoes in my hand, he says, Well, Mr. Shoemaker, how goes trade? my answer was, middling; he then asked me, if I was a master or a journeyman; I told him I was a master; he asked me what I gave a pound for cordovan; I said it was according to the quality of it; he said he could tell what he had for more money than I said; he then asked what I gave for wax-leather bellies; I told him I very seldom used any thing of the kind; he then asked me if I would buy some calf-skins, he said he had got a dozen and a-half of small ones; I told him I should like to see them, if they would come reasonable; he said they would; I then proposed to go back to his shop or house to look at them; he said, they would be ready for sale in a day's time and I might call and see them if I would give him my address, and that he would go back with me then, but the load he had was heavy, and he was going home with it to a man that had bought it at his shop; I then gave him my address and he called; when he called at my house, I agreed with him for the skins,

and paid him part of the money; he called in a few weeks after that for the remainder, and then said he had got several pairs of boot-legs to sell, if I would like to see them; I told him if he would let me see them, if I liked them I would buy them; I told him I had been spoke to by several of my masters to make them boots; it is a common thing were a shoemaker keeps a shop, for masters like me to serve them with both shoes and boots; after this he came according to his promise with the boot-legs; that was on Friday the 10th of April, he brought the boot-legs, and I bought them of him, and paid him 5l. in part of the money; I bought them at 3s. a pair; there were eighty pair of them; I do not immediately recollect what they came to; it is in my pocket-book, but my pocket-book is not here; he called afterwards, and I paid him 5l. more, and after that he called again, and I paid him the remainder, but I do not recollect how much it was; the officers took my pocket-book while I was not at home, and they looked over the things in it, and I suppose the receipt was rather torn, but I found afterwards but one receipt and half another; the one that was ripped in two was the first; they took away some duplicates too from my pocket-book; I was not at home when the officer came; when I came home, I saw two men on the stairs loaded with leather; I might have made my escape if I chose; when I came in, Mr. Marsden said, well Mr. Harris, we are come to borrow some leather, I told him, if they had more right to it than I had, they were welcome; as to these graining boards, I was at one time intending to get up my own leather; I dare say Mr. Fell knows I had a convenience for currying my own leather by one man.

Court. (To Mr. Fell.) Q.Was there any appearance of currying going on? - A.No.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see a currier's beam? - A. Yes.

Q.And two knives? - A. Yes, but the knives had not been sharpened for the purpose, and had never been used.

Court. (To Messenger.) Q.What sort of a shop does this man keep? - A. He has had several apprentices; he gets apprentices, and after he has had them sometime he sends them off for sailors and soldiers.(For the Prisoner.)

WILLIAM GARRELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a shoemaker, No. 12, Snow's Rents, Westminster.

Q.Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.Look at that receipt, and tell me if you know that receipt? - A. I saw a paper like that wrote on the 10th of April by a person who sold some leather to Mr. Harris, some boot-legs, and some Basils, in Bull's-Head-court, Peter-street, Westminster.

Q.Who was present? - A. The man that sold the leather, Mr. Harris, and myself.

Q. Did you see the money paid? - A. Yes, four guineas and a half, and some silver.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. When was this? - A. On the 10th of April last.

Q.What day of the week was it? - A.Friday in the afternoon.

Q. Who was the man that wrote it? - A.The person that sold the leather to Mr. Harris.

Q. Did you see the leather? - A. Yes, I carried in my work to Mr. Harris; I work for him.

Q. Is he a great boot-maker? - A.He has made a good many boots.

Q. He does a great deal of business at his shop; does not he? - A. Yes.

Q. He has a plentiful stock of shoes and boots there? - A. He keeps nine or ten hands at work, for shoe warehouses.

Q.Then there is the appearance of a great deal of business in his shop, is not there? - A.Not in work, in leather there is; but as fast as he has his shoes made, he sells them to the shoe warehouses.

Q. Are there any potatoes in his shop? - A. I never saw any.

Q.Nor greens, nor any thing of that sort? - A. No.

Q.Does he keep a horse and cart? - A.Not that I know of.

Q. You never knew him to deal in potatoes? - A. No, only in shoemaking for the shops.

Q.How many pair of shoes do you think it would be likely to see in his shop? - A. As fast as ever they came in, he took them out to the shoe warehouses.

Q. Do you know what shoemakers be dealt with? - A. Yes, several; he serves Mr. Evans near Westminster-bridge, a boot warehouse.

Q.Does he deal largely with him? - A. Yes, he always made them according to his order.

Q. Is there any body else that he deals with? - A. A gentleman in Tottenham-court-road; but I don't know his name; and there is one Mr. Martin, up in Holborn, he keeps a shop for both boots and shoes.

Q.What part of Holborn? - A. The first turning beyond Shoe-lane, going into the city.

Q.This you know of yourself? - A. Yes.

Q.What work did you take him home that day? - A.Nine pair of men's shoes, at one shilling and six-pence a pair, four pair of men's shoes, at one shilling and two-pence a pair, and two pair of boy's work, from ones to fours, at one shilling and a penny a pair, and a pair of child's pumps; I had the bill in my pocket, but he could not discharge it, on account of paying this money to the currier.

Q.Where does the currier live? - A. I do not know.

Q.Nor his name? - A. Mr. Harris called him Mr. Reeves; on some such name.

Q. Has that ever been paid? - A. No, I have

got the bill in my pocket, (produces it;) I got six shillings of him, before he was in trouble.

Court. Q.Where does Martinlive, the first turning in Shoe-lane, going into the City; what is the name of the place? - A. I am a man of no scholarship.

Prisoner. He has made a mistake, it is Miller, in Fetter-lane.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. This man was a currier; did you hear any conversation between them? - A. No.

Q. You were before the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner never desired you to find out this Mr. Reeves? - A.No.

Q.Did you ever ask him where Reeves lived? - A. No, they appeared to me to be two strangers.

Q.How came Mr. Reeves to write, Joseph Harris, bought of Reeves? - A.Because Mr. Harris insisted upon a receipt for the money he paid.

Q.When was that receipt written? - A.Tenth of April.

Q. Are you sure of the day? - A. Yes.

Q.You never saw him before? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see Harris write? - A. Yes.

Q. He can write? - A. Yes.

Q.Does he write well? - A.No.

Q.Was not Harris writing a part of that paper? - A. No, no part of it.

Q.Did not Mr. Harris write part of it? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes; there was one pot of beer had in, which Mr. Reeves paid for.

Q.Who went for the beer? - A. A boy; Mr. Harris called in a boy.

Q.Whose boy was it? - A. I believe his mother lives in Harris's house; Harris called him down, and sent him for the beer.

Court. Q. You can write? - A. Yes.

Q. You wrote your own bill, did not you? - A. Yes.

Q. Then be so kind as just to write Joseph Harris . (The witness wrote it.)

Q. Now write Joseph Reeves. (The witness wrote it.) - A.When I came in, he said, gad, shopmate, you are just wrong; why, says I master, I think I am just right, for here is plenty of leather about; ah, says he, but there is not money.

Q.What sort of a man is this Reeves? - A. A tall stout man; I do not recollect particularly how he was dressed.

Q.Did he wear his own hair, or a wig? - A.Apparently his own hair.

Q.Harris, you say, made a great many boots? - A. He keeps a boot club.

Q.Did you make a great many boots for him after this? - A.None.

Q.Then from the 10th of April, to the time of his being in trouble, he did not employ you to make any boots for him? - A. No; I work chiesly upon men's work.

Q.When he said, gad shopmate, you are just wrong; what did Mrs. Harris say to it? - A.She was not there at the time.

Q.How soon was it before she came in? - A. To the best of my knowledge, I don't know that she was there during that time, but once; she might come in again, but I do not know whether she did or not.

Q.How long was it before you had that pot of beer, after you went in? - A. It was not four minutes.

Q.How long did you stop there? - A.Perhaps fifteen minutes.

Q.Did you go to Harris when he was under confinement? - A. Yes; I have worked for him since.

Court. Q. Look at that receipt, that was written by a man you never saw before in your life? - A. Yes.

Q.You were not at school with him? - A. No.

Q.This is you hand writing? - A. Yes.

Q. You seem to have learned of the same master, and learned to spell the same way; shew it the Jury, upon your oath, did you not write both these papers? - A. No, I did not.

Q.How soon did you hear he was taken up? - A. I was in Pimlico Hospital at that time.

Q. You say he keeps nine or ten hands at work, where do they work? - A. I cannot say where they work; some are soldiers, some are one thing, and some another.

Q.Had he a single man that worked at his house? - A. Not to my knowledge, he had an apprentice.

Q. Is it customary for men who take piece work, to put the work out to other piece workers? - A. Mr. Harris used to put out half a dozen pair of shoes to each of his workmen; he buys the leather, makes up the shoes, and sells them to a wholesale shop.

Q.Then the shops employ a man to find leather; who is to find other men to do the work? - A. Yes, he goes to the shops, and gets orders, and then buys the leather, and gets them made up.

(The bill read,) "April 10th 1801, Joseph Harris, bought of Joseph Reeves , eighty pair of boot legs, at 3s. a pair, received in part 5l. Joseph Reeves ."

ELIZABETH FLINN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Look at that receipt, do you know it?

- A. No; I am a lodger in Mr. Harris's house; Mr. Harris moved into our house on the 10th of April; and as he was moving in, a man came in with some things in bags, slung across his shoulder: On the 23d, Harris called me to assist him with a little silver; I lent him half a crown; there was the same man there; then he said he wanted to make up a little money, for some leather that he had bought of this man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.About what time of the day did he come into the house? - A. About three in the afternoon.

Q. Did Mrs. Harris come into the house with him? - A. Yes; I sat at the street door with my little girl in my arms.

Q.How long did you sit at the door? - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you see at all what was passing? - A. No.

Court. Q. How many were there in the shop? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Cannot you tell whether there were two or three? - A. I only went to the bottom of the stairs, and there was nobody then in the room, but Mr. Harris and the other man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Look at that man Garrell; did you see him there? - A. No.

Q. What kind of man was this? - A. A tall stout man, dress in a blue coat, and blue apron; I should know the man again.

Q. Do you know whether he wore a wig, or his own hair? - A. His own hair.

Q. Have you seen Harris since he has been in trouble? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he never request you to go to Whitechapel to enquire for Reeves? - A. No.

Q. Have you any family? - A. Yes, I have one in place, a little boy of seven years old, and another sucking at the breast.

Q. You did not send your little boy, on the 10th of April, for a pot of beer? - A. No.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-86

617. JOHN PASS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , two lambs, value 4l. the property of Robert Curtis .

The indictment was opened by Mr. Watson, and the case by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN BURBIDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a drover out of the country; on Sunday night, the 14th of June, I drove 298 sheep and lambs into Smithfield market ; I counted them at Holloway gate; they were put into the pens, and about one o'clock I missed one of them, and just before two I missed another; one was marked R. G. upon the ribs, and tarred under the near cheek; the other was ochered across the loin and down the rump; I went all over the market enquiring after them; they belonged to Mr. Robert Curtis .

Q. In the course of that enquiry did you see the prisoner? - A. I saw him between five and six o'clock; he is a pen-man; I asked him three times and he denied knowing any thing at all of them; Mr. Key came to the market about a quarter before eight on Monday morning, and I told him of it; then in consequence of information that I received, I went to the Golden Horse in Goswell-street, where I found them shut up in a coach-house; they were the same lambs that I had lost, with the marks altered; there was another mark down the neck of each.

Q. Were there such marks remaining upon these two lambs as to enable you to swear they were the same two lambs that you lost? - A. Yes, there are marks on them that I can swear to.

Court. Q. Then the marks are not altered, but added to? - A. Yes; I then went to the market and the prisoner was taken up.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Parker? - A. Yes; Parker was present when the prisoner was apprehended.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. When you say you asked the prisoner, and he said he did not know any thing of them, did you tell him the marks as you have now? - A. Yes.

Q. And the prisoner said he had not seen lambs with these marks? - A. He knew the lambs as well as I did.

JEREMIAH PIGEON sworn. - I am a coachman, and live with Mr. Davis in Golden-Horse-yard, Aldersgate-street; my coach stands in that yard; on Monday morning, the 15th of June, about a quarter before four in the morning I saw the prisoner coming down; I am sure he is the same man; I was washing my coach; he came down and said he had got some sheep there, and he would thank me if I would give an eye to them, and he would give me sixpence; I said I will, how long will you be gone? he said about half an hour; in about half an hour Parker came, then I saw the prisoner coming down the yard; I said to Parker, this is the person that left the lambs; they were all in the yard together, all laying down but one sheep; when Parker came, nobody went near them or disturbed them from the time the man left them, till he returned back.

Q. Upon your oath, were there not some lambs, in some other place? - A. There were no lambs in no other place that had been sorted from the sheep, till that man that left them came back again; he said I should like to leave two lambs here; Parker then said here are two halters, I will lend you; he said it will not do so well to have halters, it will hurt their horns, or they might get loose; Parker looked about, and saw Mr. Key's place open; I said they would do in there, there are doors to it, which shut and lock up; he put them in there, and then Parker said, I shall have a nice jaunt back to Bow with these two lambs; I went about my business, and he took them away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did he not say they were lambs that had strayed to his flock,

and therefore would not take them to market? - A. I did not hear him say so.

Q. He said, tying them by the horns would do them a mischief? - A. Yes.

Q. And you considered this as a fair transaction? - A. Yes; I did not imagine there was any thing wrong.

Court. Q. Do you know what the man brought them there for? - A. No.

Q. Were the doors shut? - A. Yes.

Q. And when these doors were shut, you could not see? - A. No.

- PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I came down the yard, and saw the sheep in the stable; I was talking to Pigeon, and in the mean time the prisoner came; he said, I will give you a shilling if you will lock them up for me; I said, we have no room for them, but I can get a couple of halters, and you can tie them under that coach, they will be safe there; he said, no, the children might play tricks with them; then I put them into Mr. Key's place; he gave me a shilling, and said, don't you think I shall have a fine piece of work to take these two down to Bow; I said, I think so, and he went away; four or five hours afterwards I went with Mr. Key and another man to Smithfield, there I saw the prisoner, and he said, did not I give you a shilling to take care of them till I came to fetch them at twelve o'clock to have them down to Bow.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The story that he told you relative to these lambs, he repeated again? - A. Yes.

Q.Did he, at the time you desired him to halter them, or at any other time claim them as his own? - A.No.

A.What are you? - A. A horsekeeper.

Q.Do you live near Smithfield? - A. I live in Little Sutton-street.

Q. Do not you know, that when sheep are driving, they will sometimes stray? - A. Yes; I afterwards shewed them to Burbidge.

Q.(To Burbidge). Were the lambs that this witness shewed you, the same that you had lost? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Parker). What was the conduct of the prisoner? - A. He made a great difficulty in being taken; he said he knew nothing about the lambs, he did not know whose they were; I then went home and went to work; I heard Mr. Billings say, Jack, I do think you stole these lambs, and he said he did not.

NAAMAN KEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Did you see any lambs upon your premises? - A. Yes, I saw them; I then went to Smithfield, and made some enquiries, Burbidge went with me, and owned the lambs; after that two officers came to me, my man went with them, and the prisoner was apprehended.

JOHN BILLINGS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am servant to Mr. Curtis; I saw the sheep and lambs at Holloway.

Q. Were the two sheep that you saw at Mr. Key's, two of the sheep that you had seen at Holloway? - A. They were.

Q. When they were sorted in Smithfield, there were two missing? - A. Yes.

JOHN BUTTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am drover to Mr. Billings; about half past eleven at night, I saw the prisoner; I did not see him again till half past four o'clock on the Monday morning.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

"My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. The drover drove the sheep and lambs, 206 in number; he told me that he believed I should find some strange sheep, and when I parted my sheep and lambs in the last lot, I found, instead of 33, there were 35, upon which I conjectured that my man had brought them from Mr. Porter's field, from which place he had brought six wrong sheep the Friday before, which I returned to Mr. Elliott; Mr. Burbidge asked me if I had seen two lambs, upon which I asked him how they were marked; he told me, one white lamb, branded on the the near side, and the other was marked loin and rump; I told him I had none of that kind, they not answering the marks which Burbidge describes, so that I left Burbidge, and went about my business.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN ADAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am drover to the prisoner; I drove 206 sheep and lambs from Mile-end to Smithfield; I came by Church-street and Bishopsgate-street, up Aldersgate-street, where the whole broke away, and went up Aldersgate-street; I headed them, and turned them back again.

Q. Is it an uncustomary thing in driving all at one time, for the sheep to get into a wrong drove? - A.Very frequently.

Q. Do you remember whether that happened to your master lately, and whether any sheep were returned in consequence of it? - A. I don't know.

Q.However, it is not uncommon? - A. It very frequently happens; I said to the prisoner when I got to Smithfield, that I really thought there were some strange ones among them, by their fighting and not agreeing, and that I had six from Mr. Elliott the Friday before, I thought they might belong to him, they had been returned the Friday before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q.You drove them to Smithfield-market? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take the trouble of looking when you got there? - A. No; I told my master.

Court. Q. The first thing you do when you

get to Smithfield is to put them into the pens? - A. Yes.

Q. And then you separate them and look them over? - A. Yes.

Q. Who generally does that? - A. I do, only I did not stop that night, because there were but few, and therefore my master did it himself.

Q. What time was it when you got to Smithfield market that night? - A.Near eleven.

- SHARPE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk of Smithfield-market; the prisoner has been my servant these seven years, I have always found him honest and a most upright man in whatever he has done with me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you mean to say that that has been his uniform general character? - A. As far as I have had any dealings with him.

Court. Q. What is his duty? - A. I depend upon him for the account of the number of sheep in the pens; I have never found him any way deficient; if there is a shilling to be got, at all times he always brought it.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You are called here to speak to his general character, do you mean, that uniformly and without exception, he has borne an honest character? - A. I cannot say so much to his general character.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the Jury on account of his good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 50.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-87

618. MARY PALMER and JANE RHYND were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , fourteen yards of printed calico, value 35s. the property of Oliver Oxley .

ROBERT MORRIS sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Oliver Oxley, linen-draper , No. 273, Holborn ; the two prisoners at the bar came into our shop about eleven in the morning of Friday last, and asked for some Irish linen at sixteen-pence a yard; having none at that price, I shewed them some at eighteen-pence, and while I went down to the bottom of the shop they took the calico.

Q. Did you see them take it? - A. No.

THOMAS WHEELER sworn. - I am a silversmith and jeweller in Holborn: On Friday, the 3d instant, as I stood at the door the two prisoners at the bar went past the door; in consequence of suspicions that had been communicated to me, I watched the prisoners, and saw Palmer take the calico off the counter and put it under her cloak; she came out, and dropped the calico in the street within two doors; I had seen them together before; they had both gone into a shop below before; the man who picked it up is now in Court, his name is Sharpe.

GEORGE SHARPE sworn. - I am a caner for chairs and whiskeys; I live Newton-street, Holborn; I saw the prisoner Palmer drop the piece of calico; I picked it up and gave it to a gentleman in doors.

JOHN BETTS sworn. I am a haberdasher: On Friday, the 3d of July, I saw the two prisoners looking at some goods in my shop; when they went away I watched them into Mr. Oxley's shop, and when they came out I laid hold of Palmer, and said they had got something; upon which Palmer dropped the calico, and Sharpe picked it up.(Bacon, the officer, produced the property, which was identified by Morris.)

Palmer's defence. I have nothing to say.

Rhynd's defence. I know nothing of it.

Palmer, GUILTY , aged 19.

Rhynd, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-88

619. GEORGE LEWIS was indicted, for that he on the 6th of March , being a servant to one George Bayley , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession from one Thomas Cock, the sum of 2l. 11s. for and on account of the said George Bayley, his master, and afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and make away with the same; so that in manner and form aforesaid, he did steal, take, and carry away from the said George Bayley , the said sum of 2l. 11s. on whose account it was taken into his possession .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing 2l. 11s. the property of the said George.

GEORGE BAYLEY sworn. - I carry on the business of a wheelwright in Doctors Commons; the prisoner was a journeyman to me; I discharged him on Saturday, the 16th of May, for getting drunk and neglecting his business: prior to that I discovered that he had received money from customers and not accounted for it; soon after I had discharged him I went out collecting myself.

Q. Had you any demand upon Mr. Cock? - A. Yes; the whole bill was 2l. 17s. 11d. for wheelwright's work; here is a bill and receipt in his own hand-writing - "Settled, G. Lewis."

Court. That you may put in your pocket, for it is a fraud upon the revenue, I shall not hear any thing of that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were not brought up to the business of a wheelwright? - A. No.

Q. I believe the business was conducted by the prisoner? - A. He was my foreman; I succeeded Mr. Webb in the business.

Q. Do you know how long the prisoner was in the service of Mr. Webb? - A. Ten years and more.

Q.And when did you come into the business? - A. In 1792, with my late partner, Mr. Roake.

Q.During all which time he has been employed in your service? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you were so well satisfied with him that you held out to him expectations of a partnership? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you heard before you took him up of his intention of going into business apart from you? - A. No; I heard of it after I discharged him; I did not know a word of it till after I took him before the Alderman; I did not commence the prosecution till I came here; I heard he had been round to some of my customers to solicit their favours.

Q. You had heard that he intended to commence business on his own account, and had been soliciting custom? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you take him up? - A. I think it is three weeks ago yesterday; it may be a month ago yesterday.

Q. You say you turned him away on the 16th of May; upon your oath, did he not come to you on the 27th of May or thereabouts to desire to settle accounts with you? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Nor at any time before you took him up? - A. He came to Mrs. Bayley, he was very drunk then, and told her, he was come to square the yards with his master.

Q. That was intending to settle accounts? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not understand from your wife that he came to your house for the purpose of settling accounts? - A. Yes.

Q. And that was some days before you took him up? - Yes; I did not then know that he had taken any money on my account.

Q. Upon your oath, were you not in the habit of settling accounts from time to time? - A. On a Saturday I used to give him a list of a few bills for him to collect, and when he brought me the money I scratched it out in the book.

Q. Had you paid him his wages at that time? - A. Yes; and he owes me 9l. 2s. 9d. now; he was always in my debt.

Q. Have you ever met to balance the account? - A. No.

Q.Therefore it still remains open? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Can you make it appear that he is indebted to you upon the account? - A. Yes.

Q. In whose hand-writing is that account? - A. It is all my own hand-writing?

Q. Has he acknowledged that account by signing it or any thing? - A. No.

Q. Did he not call upon you after you had discharged him to settle accounts with you? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did he call upon you? - A. Yes; but he was so drunk I could not understand him.

Q. What did he say? - A.He was in such a state of intoxication I could not tell what he said.

Q. Was that before or after he had called upon your wife to settle the account? - A.Before.

Q. Did you not know where he was gone to live after he had left you? - A. No.

Q. Did you never hear that it was in Stamford-street, Blackfriars-road? - A. No.

Q. Did not Tilley your foreman tell you that he had taken a piece of ground for the purpose of carrying on the business? - A. Yes, he told me he had taken a piece of ground, but I did not know where.

Q. Was that before or after you discharged him? A. After I discharged him.

Q. Before you took him up or after? - A.Before.

Q. How came you to tell me just now that you did not know of his going into business till after you took him up? - A. He told me both before and after I heard of his taking a bit of ground.

Q. How came you to tell that Jury that you did not receive that information till after he was taken up? - A. That has nothing to do with what I charge him with.

Q. Yes it has a great deal; upon your oath do you not believe he would have obtained a great deal of business; is he not a very clever workman? - A. No, there are better workmen.

Q. And you kept him ten years? - A. Yes.

Q. And Mr. Webb kept him ten years before you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not Tilley tell you that he was going to join him? - A. No.

Q. Is the article, that you charge him with, the last that he received for you? - A. No, he has received some since from other people and paid me.

Q. Did you not a few minutes ago swear directly the reverse? - A.He was in my service some time after.

Q. Did you not say but two questions before that he had not paid you money since Mr. Cock's demand? - A. Not that I know of.

THOMAS COCK sworn. - I am a carpenter; I I was indebted to Mr. Bayley in the sum of 2l. 17s. 11d. the prisoner brought me in the bill (produces it) I found fault with the charge, and told him I should not pay the bill till I saw his master; some time after that, I think about the 5th or 6th of March last, the prisoner came and asked me for payment of the bill; I asked him if he was fully authorized to settle the bill with me, he told me he was; I asked him how much he was to take off the bill? he said a few shillings; I told him by taking off 6s. 11d. it would reduce it to 2l. 11s. which I paid him with my own hands.

CHARLES ROWLEY sworn. - I am a constable, I know nothing but the apprehension of the man; he said he was very sorry for what he had done.

Prisoner's defence. When I received this money,

it was late on the Saturday night; when I came home, I did not settle with Mr. Bayley; I was to have taken but half a crown off the bill, and I went to Mr. Cock's house, to return the money that he had paid me; and I saw Mr. Cock's son.

Q.(To Bayley.) Had you any conversation with the prisoner, about deducting any thing from the bill? - A. Yes; I told him to deduct two or three shillings.

For the Prisoner.

RICHARD TILLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You now live in the employment of Mr. Bayley? A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner having taken premises to set up for himself? - A. Yes, on the 25th of May.

Q. Was it before he left Mr. Bayley's service? - A. No, after.

Q. Who was to be in partnership with him? - A. I was.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Bayley of this? - A. No.

Q. You did not hear Mr. Bayley give evidence? - A. No.

Q. Now, try your recollection, - did you never tell Mr. Bayley of it? - A. Not till after I came to work again.

Q. Was it before this man was taken up? - A. Yes, it was.

Q.How did Mr. Bayley take it; was he pleased, or displeased with it? - A. Not very well pleased, I dare say.

Q.You continue working with Mr. Bayley now, I suppose? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called three other witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-89

620. JOHN FALKNER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 30th of April , a gold snuff box, set with diamonds, value 400l. a diamond necklace, value 200l. a pair of shoe buckles, value 20l. a pair of gold knee buckles, value 11l. two silver table spoons, value 1l. 10s. and five silver tea spoons, value 2l. being part, and parcel of the goods and chattels, stolen by Thomas Collett , otherwise Putty, and whereof he was convicted at the last sessions; he the said John knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN- CHRISTIAN WEPPLER sworn. - I am a planter in Jamaias: On the 29th of April, I landed at Billingsgate, I put my luggage into a cart, which consisted of trunks and boxes, and ordered the carman to go to the York Hotel, Black-Friars; I could not get any lodging there, and I ordered the carman to Adam-street, Adelphi; I could not get any lodging there; and from there, I went to Southampton-street; that was full, and I was obliged to proceed to King-street, Covent-garden, where I got lodgings; I ordered the carman to unload my packages, and then I missed a valuable trunk; it alarmed me very greatly, and I went to Bow-street immediately, and gave information; it was about nine o'clock in the evening; hand-bills were printed in the morning, by order of the magistrates at Bow-street; I waited till two days after, and not hearing any thing of it, I advertised it myself, and offered 100l. reward; a few days afterwards, when I did not hear any thing of it, I offered 150 guineas reward; and in about a week, one Elizabeth Smith came, and gave information; in consequence of which, Thomas Collett , a soldier, and Hayes and his wife, were taken up, and a warrant granted immediately against Falkner; Collett was a soldier belonging to the third Regiment of Guards; Mr. and Mrs. Hayes were taken up the same day; Falkner immediately absconded; Collett was tried and convicted, and Mrs. Hayes; Mr. Hayes was acquitted.

Q. Was any of your property found in the possession of the prisoner? - A. The Bow-street officers found nothing in his possession; his house has not been searched.

Q. Do you of your own knowledge know any thing against the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Did you lose a gold snuff box set with diamonds? - A. Yes; a diamond necklace, two pair of shoe buckles, a pair of gold knee buckles, two silver table spoons, and five silver tea spoons.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Hayes, the person who is a witness to day, was at this bar tried for receiving? - A. Yes, and acquitted.

Q. He was taken up, and his wife? - A. Yes.

Q. How often have you been in Newgate, since the last session, to see Mrs. Hayes? - A. I have been with Mr. Kirby.

Q. Have not you been in Newgate, to Mrs. Hayes, more than once? - A. I have.

Q. Have you not promised Mrs Hayes, that if Mr. Hayes would be a witness, you would apply to the Duke of Portland for a pardon for Mrs. Hayes? - A. I do not think that is a proper question.

Court. Q. Did you or not? - A. I said, with the proviso, that if they would restore my property, I would make interest for her.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Upon your oath, have you not promised, that if Hayes would appear to give evidence against Falkner, you would make interest for his wife? - A. If he would come forward upon this trial; nothing like that, because he was compelled by a summons from Bow-street.

Q.How many times have you been in Newgate with Mrs. Hayes? - A. I do not recollect

Q.Four or five times? - A. It may be more or less.

Q. Upon your oath, during the conversation you have had with Mrs. Hayes, was it not for the purpose of getting Mrs. Hayes to persuade her husband to become a witness against Falkner? - A. Mrs. Hayes sent her brother, and told me, she was ready to deliver up some of the articles, with a proviso, that I would come forward in getting her pardon; I told her, the small articles she had got were of very little consequence, my loss was so great, but if she would bring forward all my property, I would use interest for her.

Court. Q. Did you say any thing to her, that you would get mercy shewn to her, upon condition that the husband would be a witness here to day? - A. No, not upon that condition.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Upon your oath, was the only purpose for which you went there, the getting your pro

perty restored? - A. I never had any private conversation with her, but in the presence of Mr. Kirby, or Mr. Reeves; she sent to me, and accordingly I went.

Q. Was that the only reason for which you went? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What was the amount of your loss? - A.Between 1300l, and 1400l.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Upon your oath, is it not upon your application to Hayes, that Hayes comes forward to be a witness? - A.There was a fummons out from Bow-street.

Q.Did you not apply to him, to become a witness, before that summons was issued? - A. I did.(The record of the conviction of Collett read.)

Court. Q. Are the things mentioned in this indictment, part of the things mentioned in the former indictment? - A. Yes.

Q.How much did you recover of this property? - A.Nineteen napkins, and twelve yards of cambric.

ELIZABETH SMITH sworn. - I am a servant; I am not in place at present; I was servant to Mr. Hayes, who kept the Bell, in Red-lion market, Whitecross-street; I went there, on the 3d of March, and came away the 4th of May; I did not know any thing of the prisoner, except being a customer at the house; I believe he is a refiner, he lived in Whitecross-street, near Cripplegate.

Q. How long before your master and mistress were taken up? - A. It might be a fortnight or more.

Q. How long was it before you came away? - A. It might be a week or ten days.

Q.Recollect yourself? - A. I cannot exactly say.

Q. You left them on the Thursday, did not you? - A.It was on a Thursday, that my master and I had the words; I was there nine weeks all but a day; it was on a Wednesday evening that the box came in.

Q.Was that in April? - A. Yes, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; Thomas Collett , the man who was tried last Sessions, came in, and borrowed half a crown of Mrs. Hayes. for coach hire; she gave it him, and he went out, and came in again in about ten minutes with a box.

Q.What kind of a box? - A. A red leather trunk, with a brass plate upon it; I observed upon it, the letters J. C. W. there were other letters, but I did not see what they were; then the soldier and Mrs. Hayes went up stairs, and stopped about ten minutes; then they came down into the bar, and I saw Mrs. Hayes with a diamond necklace, and a pearl necklace upon her lap. a pair of pearl ear rings, and large drops; I made an observation, and said, what a handsome necklace that was, and she told me to mind my own business, and go into the tap-room, and see if any thing was wanted; when I went back again, I saw several other articles; there was a comb for the hair, cut out in the shape of a star, set in diamonds; I believe in the shape of a star, or a half moon; and a gentleman's breast pin, that was not set in diamonds; I did not observe any thing more that night; there was a large supper that night; the next day, Mrs. Hayes sent the child down to a public-house, in Golden-lane, to Mrs. Hinton; she sent a pearl necklace, and likewise the pearl ear rings, to Mrs. Hinton, to ask if any of them would suit her; the child returned back again, and said none of them would suit her; and afterwards Mrs. Hinton came up, and examined the rest of the articles upon Mrs. Hayes's knees; but whether she took any thing away, I do not know; then between ten and eleven o'clock, on the Thursday, the soldier came; Mrs. Hayes said, come, Putty, take your money; they agreed that night for the things, and she gave him six guineas in gold, and one pound in half-pence; he had something to eat and drink, and I saw no more of him till eleven or twelve o'clock that day; then Mrs. Hayes called me to the bar, and told me to go to the prisoner's house.

Q. What passed between the soldier and her that night? - A. After he brought the box, he had something to eat and drink, and then joined the company that he used to be with; between eleven and twelve, my mistress desired me to go to the prisoner'house, and tell him he was wanted to go out with Mr. Hayes; I went, but he was not at home; I delivered the message to his wife; he came about one o'clock, but I saw nothing pass more than usual; he went into the parlour, and had a pint of beer, and then went away; but whether Hayes went with him or not, I cannot answer; I saw no more of Falkner till nine or ten o'clock in the evening; he came as usual to have his refreshment at night; that is all I know of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q.Hayes is a publican? - A. Yes.

Q. And as great a sinner as ever lived? - A. It may be so.

Q. He has been often charged with things of this sort? - A. I have heard so.

Q.His wife was convicted last Sessions? - A. Yes.

Q.You never saw, or heard, any conversation between the prisoner and Collett? - A. No.

Court. (To Mr. Weppler.) Q. What kind of trunk was it you lost? - A. A red leather trunk, brass mounted, with a brass plate upon the top, J. C. Weppler.

Q. What did it contain? - A. It contained all the articles in the indictment, a gold snuff box set in diamonds, a diamond necklace, and a pearl necklace.

Q.Any other articles of dress for women? - A.There was a diamond pin in the shape of a half moon, a lady's pin for the hair, there were two diamond breast pins, there were diamond ear rings, and pearl ear rings.

Q. How were the pearl ear-rings, had they large drops? - A. Yes.

Q.And a great many other articles of jewellery, I suppose? - A. Yes.

HENRY HAYES sworn. - I did live at the Bell, in Red-lion market, near Whitecross-street: On the 30th of April, or 1st of May, I am not certain which, Putty, or Collett, came to my house, about five o'clock in the afternoon, as near as I can guess; he asked me, where Mr. Falkner lived; I told him he lived in Whitecross-street, and in about half an hour, Falkner came to our house; he said, he could not stay now, he had got somewhere else to go, and he would call again; he called again in about three quarters of an hour, or an hour, he came in, and was speaking to Putty about some things that he had wrapped round him in an old coarse apron.

Q. Who had the things tied round him? - A. Putty; then they had a glass of gin a piece; I was at the door; and Putty said, will you go along with me down to Falkner's, and Falkner said, will you go with me and

Putty; I went with them to Mr. Falkner's house, in Whitecross-street.

Q.What is Falkner? - A.Something in the melting of gold and silver, melting gold and silver off buttons.

Q. He keeps a melting pot? - A. Yes, that is his business, what they call a white-washer, and sweeper; I believe, when we got there, Putty untied his apron, and put all the things upon the counter, gold and silver, and what things there were.

Q.Describe what things there were? - A. Mr. Falkner said, must I light a fire, a fire was lit in the furnace, and then he came in doors; the first thing that I saw, was a large gold snuff box, full of stones, set round in a row or two, they glistened very much; but I did not know they were diamonds, nor Putty neither; Putty asked for a hammer, but could not break it; there was a diamond necklace, with a pair of black strings at the end of it, two pair of silver buckles set with stones, one pair of women's buckles, and one pair of men's buckles; he hammered them a little, and got some of the stones out; one was an oval pair, I did not take much notice of the other; there was a pair of men's gold buckles, and a large gold fan; Putty gave Falkner two pearl pins for Mrs. Falkner, with a kind of a rose at the top; there were several other articles, that I did not take particular notice of; after that, all the silver things were put into the pot, stones and all, and I saw it all melted; and after it was all melted, he took a pair of tongs, and poured it all into a thing, just the same as they pour lead in, about two inches and a half wides and about ten inches long, as near as I can guess; after that, the gold was put in; the snuff box and stones, and altogether; Falkner took hold of the fan, her, says he, this will soon be disfigured; the fan was rather damaged on one side, rather cracked, it was set with gold, and pictures, that was all melted, and then poured out the same as the silver was; then they put it into water to cool it as quick as they could; after that, Putty and Falkner were dealing for the silver, and Falkner asked him if he could give him change for a 20l. note, Putty could not, and then we all three came up to our house; Mr. Falkner came into the bar, and asked my wife to give him change for a 20l. note, and she could not give him change; then he borrowed 2l. 16s. or 4l. I am not sure, of my wife; then he came into the parlour, and paid 4l. 10s. to Putty, for this silver; then they began dealing for the gold, Putty asked him 50s. an ounce, and Falkner would not give him but 2l. an ounce; then he said, he would not let him have it, and I do not think he bought the gold at all, for he did not deal for it in my presence; Putty told me, he had sold the gold for twenty-one guineas and a half.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you then, that you went with Falkner and Putty from your own house, to Falkner's house? - A. Yes.

Q. You know the girl that has been examined, Elizabeth Smith ? - A. Yes.

Q. Was she at home when you went? - A. I cannot say whether she was or not.

Q. Had you not seen her lately, before you went out? - A. I do not take any notice of my servant girl.

Q. How far is the door from the bar? - A.About two yards.

Q. Near the parlour too? - A. It is all joining in one.

Q.She was your pot-girl? - A. Yes.

Q.Then it was her business to draw beer? - A. No; my wife never suffered the servant in the bar; myself, my wife, and my daughter, always draw the beer.

Q. Did you or not observe the girl when you came back? - A. I do not take such particular notice of the servant-girls, she might be or not.

Q. You were tried here, you know, the last Sessions, and acquitted? - A. I was.

Q. Your wife was acquitted? - A. No, convicted.

Q. Of course you have been backwards and forwards to her since the last Sessions? - A. That is natural.

Q.Of course you expect she is to get a pardon, by giving your evidence to day? - A. No.

Q.Nor have ever been given to understand so? - A.No.

Q.Neither by the prosecutor, nor any body else? - A. No; that I will swear.

Q. Did you go before the Magistrates, and give information of what you have been telling us to-day? - A.Not till I was obligated.

Q. What, were you taken up? - A. I was taken up along with my wife.

Q. Did you, at the time of that examination, say one word of what you have been telling the Jury now? - A. No; they did not ask me any questions about it.

Q.Then you did not give any account of this transaction till after your wife was convicted? - A.No; nor should not now if I had not been forced.

Q. How many times have you been in this Court before? - A. I have been here a great many times, backwards and forwards.

Q.How many times have you been at the bar? - A.Never but this once at the last Sessions.

Q. How often have you been taken up? - A. Once before.

Q. What was that for something of the same kind? - A. No; it was for - I almost forget what it was for now.

Q. Rub up your memory? - A.Perhaps you may think of it better than me.

Q. Were you taken up, and afterwards did you turn stag, and give evidence against others? - A. I was admitted as an evidence.

Q.What was the man tried for that you gave evidence against before? - A. It is out of my memory at this present moment.

Court. Q. It cannot be out of your memory? - A. It was about some property that was found in my house.

Q. Was that the only time you have been taken up? - A. Yes, it was the only time that I ever was taken up.

Q. The only time you ever were in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. You say that positively; was that the only time your house has been searched for stolen things? - A.Twice.

Q.And found? - A. No, only once found - Oh! I can tell you what it was now, it has just come in my memory; it was some beds that were found in my wife's possession, and I was found paying for them.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Green, and another of the name of Hainson? - A. No.

Q. Was you house searched about some candlesticks? - A. Not that I know of, I heard so, but I and my wife were both here at the time; the candlesticks my

wife bought at a broker's; I thought all this did not concern this man's affair.

WILLIAM ANTHONY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; all that I know of it is, that I I had a warrant against Falkner, the prisoner at the bar: On the 8th of May I went to his house a number of times, but never could meet with him at home; I afterwards met with Armstrong, and told him I had a warrant against him and he apprehended him.

JONATHAN DENIGHT sworn. - I am a carpenter, in Dickson's-court, Mary-le-bonne-street, Golden-square: On Friday, the 1st of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, I went to the house of Mr. Hayes, I had a pint of beer, and staid there about three quarters of an hour, when Hayes, Falkner, and Putty came in together; sat down in the bar; Putty sat down; he had the appearance of a glazier; he took from his apron two pieces of metal, gold and silver, about eight inches in length, as near as I can guess, about an inch and a quarter wide, and about the thickness of two-pennyworth of half-pence; the gold was of the same dimensions, except it run irregualar; one end was very thick, and the other end very thin indeed, it ran quite to a feather edge; Putty said to Falkner, you shall not have this under 50s. and he said he would not give it, but he would see whether it was worth it or not; he took the gold bar, and bit a piece off the end, and was going to bite another, but he said he had not enough; he returned the gold bar to Putty, and took the piece that he had bit, put it into a paper, and put it into his pocket; Falkner took the silver bar himself; he wanted change for a note, I cannot say how much; then he wanted to borrow some money to pay for the silver, but how much I cannot say; I heard something about four pounds; he said that was not enough, or something of that sort; Mrs. Hayes's back was towards me, and I could not see what money passed; then Falkner went into the parlour with the silver bar, and Putty with the gold one; I know no more of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This was bargained for in your presence? - A. I heard him ask 50s.

Q. But the silver was bargained for in your presence? - A. No; I suppose they bargained coming along.

Q.Hayes was by at the time? - A. Yes.

Q.And the money was paid on account of the silver, in Hayes's house? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. yes.

Q.Were you at Bow-street? - A. yes.

Q. Were you sworn at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. You told the Magistrate at Bow-street what you have been telling the Jury to-day? - A. I did not.

Q. How came that? - A. I told them then I knew nothing but by hearsay.

Q.Upon your oath, did you say at Bow-street that you knew nothing about it? - A. I did not; I said I knew nothing but by hearsay.

Q. What relation are you to Mr. Hayes? - A. I am brother to Mrs. Hayes.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, Mr. Hayes has sworn very falsely againes me; I know nothing at all of the transaction; he, I understand, stood in the situation I now do last sessions; I know nothing at all of the business; he is now come forward under a promise of getting his wife's pardon if he will appear against me.

The prisoner called twelve witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for fourteen years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-90

621. WILLIAM POCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , one pound weight of tea, value 2s. 6d. the property of the United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East Indies .

Second Court. For stealing like tea, the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined two years in Newgate , and fined one shilling .

Reference Number: t18010701-91

622. JAMES LOFT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , two deal boards, value 1s. three pieces of wainscot, value 1s. 6d. and a piece of oak timber, value 6d. the property of George Mutter .

GEORGE MUTTER sworn. - I am out of business; I live at Stanmore , in Middlesex; I know nothing of the loss.

- NEALE sworn. - I work for Mr. Mutter, at Stanmore; he is building a new house there; we lost some timber from the barn: On the 19th of June, I found the prisoner between eleven and twelve at night, in the barn, going to take a twelve-foot two and a half deal, but I came in too soon upon him, he had not lifted it from the ground; we then got a search warrant and went to the prisoner's house, and found several pieces of waistcoat architraves and mouldings, two pieces of new deal, about eight feet long each; he said he was a poor man, and went there to sleep; he made his escape from me, and went home to sleep.(John Tomlins, a constable at Little Stanmore, produced the property, which was deposed to by Neale.

Prisoner's defence. I am quite innocent of the affair that I am suffering for. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-92

623. WILLIAM BURROWS (a deaf and dumb man ), was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , a silver watch, value, 12s. the property of John Beckham .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-93

624. CHARLES OVER and WILLIAM MITCHEL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , 447lb. of nutmegs, value 300l. 152lb. of cloves, value 26l. and 25lb. of cinnamon, value 5l. the property of Thomas Butler , in the ship Hannah, lying upon the navigable River of Thames .

Second Count. For stealing like goods, the property of Charles Meyrick .

Third Count. For stealing like goods, the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, except that of an accomplice, who prevaricated in his testimony, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-94

MISDEMEANORS

625. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for obtaining, under false pretences, a leg of mutton, value 9s. the property of John Claxon .

JOHN CLAXON sworn - I am a butcher : On Thursday, the 28th of May, about seven or eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house, saying he came from Mr. Dean. at the Bull's Head, Smithfield.

Q. What is Mr. Dean's name? - A.Robert; he is a customer of mine; he said he came from Mr. Dean's for a leg of mutton for a few friends' supper; I weighed the leg of mutton, and he desired me to put a note on the leg of mutton; I delivered the leg of mutton to him, and when he had left me about two minutes, I thought I had done wrong; I was writing in the shop, and I took my hat and endeavoured to overtake him; I overtook him going down Long-lane, by Charterhouse-street; he went through Charterhouse-square, the contrary way to Mr. Dean's; he went up to two men, who seemed to be waiting for him, and gave the leg of mutton to one of his companions; the man who took the leg of mutton went a contrary way from that which he had been; I followed the man with the leg of mutton till he came to Red Lion-street; I stopped him there, and brought him back to Mr. Dean's; I found the prisoner the same night between nine and ten, on Clerkenwell-green, at a public-house; upon seeing me and the officer, he got up to go away; upon that I stopped him and gave charge; I am sure he is the man.

ROBERT DEAN sworn. - I keep the Bull's Head, West Smithfield.

Q. Did you ever send the prisoner for a leg of mutton from Mr. Claxon's? - A. Never.

Q. Do you deal with Claxon? - A. Yes.

SAMUEL CHALONER sworn. - I am constable of St. Sepulchre's parish; I went with Mr. Claxon and apprehended the prisoner at a public-house upon Clerkenwellgreen.

Prisoner's defence. As I was going home from work, I met a man who asked me to go of an errand for him to Mr. Claxon's, and order a leg of mutton of nine pound or nine pound and a half, and I carried it to this man, and I went home to supper, and after supper I went to the Three Kings public-house, and this gentleman came and took me.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined six months in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010701-95

626. JOHN WILLIAN BISHOP was indicted for taking a false oath, in order to obtain a licence for marriage .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Cliston, and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

SAMUEL ARNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston.

Q.I am the parish-clerk of St. Matthew, Bethnal-Green. (Produces the Register, it is sea.) "John Willian Bishop, batchelor, of the parish of St. Alban's Wood-street, London, and Ann Rance of this parish, spinster, were married in this church by licence, the 20th day of March, in the year 1800, in the presence of John Rance , and Sarah Bolton ."

JOHN RANCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I am the father of Ann Rance; I was present at the marriage of the prisoner with my daughter.

Q. Is your daughter now alive? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any child by that marriage? - A. Yes, there is a child living; they lived together as man and wife within a day or two of eleven months.

Court. Q.They had never parted at the time of the second marriage? - A. No.

Q. What is he? - A. A journeyman tailor; they lodged in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell; I furnished the lodgings.

Q. Does your daughter live there now? - A.She does.

Q. Do you know what is become of the furniture of those lodgings? - A. There is some of it still remaining; it has been part of it pawned for his support since he has been in prison; he had about 120l. of me, during the eleven months; two days before the second marriage he borrowed 10l. of me, with which he bought a licence and got married to the other woman.

THOMAS CHARLTON , jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. Q. I am clerk to Mr. Moore, of Doctor's Commons. (Produces the affidavit and the bond upon which the licence was granted.)

Q. Is that the affidavit of the prisoner? - A. I was not present.

Q. Where do you bring it from? - A.From the office of the Vicar General. Sir William Scott , Doctor of Laws.

Q. Are all the affidavits for obtaining licences lodged in the Vicar General's office? - A. No, some are lodged in the Faculty office, and some in the Bishop of London's office.

Q.Is Dr. Parsons a Surrogate? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. That is not the way of proving him a Surrogate.

Court. Q.Does he act as a Surrogate? - A. Yes.

Mr. Cliston. Q. Is that Dr. Parson's hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ever see him write? - A. Yes, many times.

JEREMIAH BIRKWOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I filled up this affidavit; it is an affidavit that some person made in the name of the prisoner; but it is impossible for me to identify the person.

Mr. Knapp (To Rance.) Q. Do you know the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. I believe it to be his hand-writing; I have seen his writing, but I never saw him write.

Q.Have you received letters from him, which by any act that he has done, he has acknowledged it to be his

hand-writing? - A. I had forgot, I have seen him write; I saw him write when he took out the licence for his first marriage, and I saw him write at the church.

Mr. Gurney. Q.You have seen him twice write John-Willian Bishop? - A. Yes.

Q.You are not to take other things into your consideration; do you mean to say, that from the knowledge you derived from seeing him write the words John-Willian Bishop twice, that that is his hand-writing? - A. I should be very sorry to swear that it is his writing, but I think I may venture to say it is his writing.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Have you had any applications from the prisoner for money by writing, and you have lent him money in consequence of it? - A.Not in writing.

Q.Have you any doubt that that is his signature? - A. No; I have no doubt at all.

Q.Look at the signature to that bond, is that his hand-writing? - A. I think it is. (The affidavit and the bond read.)

Mr. Knapp. (To Rance.) Q.Where did Bishop live? - A. In Red-Lion-street.

Q. Is that in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell? - A. Yes it is.

Mr. Gurney. (To Birkwood.) When an oath of this sort is administered, where is it administered? - A. Sometimes at the Surrogate's Chambers, and sometimes in the Common Hall or the Dining Room.

Q. And sometimes in the Proctor's house? - A. No; unless people are infirm, and then the Surrogate attends out.

Q. Do you mean to say that the oath is never taken but in the presence of the Surrogate? - A. The Surrogate always administers the oath himself.

THOMAS CRANER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. Q. I am the parish-clerk of St. Luke's, Middlesex.(Produces the licence.)

Court. Q. Did the prisoner at the bar claim to be married under that licence? - A. He did.

Q. Did he himself produce it? - A. He did.

Court. (To Birkwood.) Q. Could that licence be obtained without an oath being taken? - A. No. (The licence read.)

Mr. Clifton. (To Craner.) Q. Were the parties married under that licence? - A. They were.

RICHARD WILCOX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the house in Red-Lion-street, Clerkenwell, where Bishop and his first wife lived; he came to me on the 8th of January, and continued living with his wife till the 21st of February; in the evening about eight o'clock he went away.

Q. Do you know when the second marriage took place? - A. No.

THOMAS REVELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I live in Hollywell-street, Shoreditch; I am the guardian of Miss James; she has got 500l. of her own in the Reduced Stock that we transferred; there is a great deal depending upon the will under which I act, she will be entitled to between ten and 20,000l. upon the death of an elderly lady and her daughter.

Q. Do you know any thing of this man? - A. I cannot say I do.

Q. Did you see the prisoner and Miss James on the 21st of February? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Miss James's name? - A. Joyce-Mary James.(Mr. Gurney addressed the Jury on behalf of the Defendant.)

GUILTY .

Confined two years in Newgate , and within one month to stand in the pillory at the west end of Cheapside for one hour between the hours of twelve and two .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010701-96

627. HARRIS THOMPSON was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

(The record of the conviction of Richard Harnell , alias Little Dick, was produced and read, when there appearing to be a variance between the record and the present indictment, the Defendant was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


View as XML