Old Bailey Proceedings, 20th May 1801.
Reference Number: 18010520
Reference Number: f18010520-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 20th of MAY, 180l, and following Days, BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR WILLIAM STAINES , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY, AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors'-Commons.

1801.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, & c.

BEFORE Sir WILLIAM STAINES, KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; Sir NASH GROSE, Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's court of King's Bench; Sir JAMES GRAHAM, Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

James Fitch ,

John Breach ,

John White ,

William Tripp ,

Sampson Hacket ,

Robert Harder ,

William Moore ,

William Wilby ,

Archelaus Cruse ,

Joseph Bryans ,

Joseph Keate ,

George Brayne .

First Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Stevenson ,

Richard Thomas ,

Thomas Rowling ,

Isaac Kendall ,

John Green ,

Richard Chalmers ,

George Thompson ,

John Etherington ,

John Stevenfon ,

Henry Tatham ,

Charles Hill ,

John Prosser .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert Taylor ,

Robert Tate ,

Thomas Marston ,

Richard Williams ,

Richard-Rowley Watkins ,

Joseph Wilson ,

William Standfield ,

Isaac Brown ,

John Thompson ,

Giles Russell ,

Philip Coles ,

Robert Cannon .

Reference Number: t18010520-1

439. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of December , a mare, value 15l. the property of John Poole .

There being no evidence offered on the part of the prosecution, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-2

440. DAVID WHITE was indicted for that he, in a certain open place, near the King's highway, upon the Reverend Robert Hamilton , doctor in divinity, on the 10th of March , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a metal watch, value 28s. and twenty-eight shillings in monies, numbered , the property of the said Robert.

Rev. Dr. ROBERT HAMILTON sworn. - On Wednesday the 10th of March, about three o'clock, I was to the north of the Serpentine-river, in Kensington-gardens ; I saw the prisoner at the bar standing in one of the alcoves, or by one of the alcoves; I suspected an ill intention from some motions I saw about him, and I returned back by the way by which I came; the prisoner at the bar ran after me, upon which I stopped to receive him, and in a determined tone, asked him what I was to understand by that behaviour; he pleaded distress; after remonstrating with him some-time, upon the impropriety of his conduct, I gave him a trifle, as a relief from his distress, a sixpence, or a shilling, he looked at it a considerable time, and told me it would not do.

Q.Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. That is the man.

Q. Are you quite sure? - A. I am sorry to say I am certain; he then threatened my life, and demanded my money; he had a heavy stick in his hand, it had been torn off a tree, with the bark peeled off; I then gave him my money, to the amount of about 28 or 29s. in a guinea and silver; there was no person in sight, nor within a quarter of a mile.

Q.Was it a dull or a bright day? - A. A gloomy day; he then demanded my watch, which, after some pause and remonstrance, I gave him; he then ordered me to return the way I came; he said, if I turned round to look back, he should follow me, and would kill me; I then returned the same way without looking back; I immediately went to Mr. Forsyth, his Majesty's head gardener, with whom I am acquainted, and told him of it; he went with me to Bow-street, and gave information; I saw no more of the prisoner till the Monday following; he was apprehended nearly upon the same spot; I saw him in the guard house at Kensington, near the barracks, I am certain he is the same person; I knew him again immediately, I was looking at him for five minutes.

Q. I see, by your wearing spectacles, you are near-sighted? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you your spectacles on at this time? - A. Yes; I always wear them.

Q. Can you see distinctly with them? - A. Yes. WILLIAM ANTHONY sworn. - I am one of the officers of Bow-street: On Tuesday, the 10th of March, Dr. Hamilton lodged an information at our office; I made enquiry, but could not get any information of the prisoner till the Monday following; I went to Kensington, and found the prisoner in the guard-room as a deserter, in the custody of the serjeant of the guard; I apprehended him, and told him what for; he positively denied that he had committed the robbery; I took him to Bow-street, and Dr. Hamilton came and immediately pointed him out, and swore that he was the man; the prisoner said he had been at work by Bayswater at a cow-keeper's, and he could bring several people to prove where he was on that day.

Jury. Q. Did Dr. Hamilton immediately recognize the prisoner at the office? - A. Yes.

Dr. Hamilton. I had previously seen him in the guard-room, and then I went to Bow-street for the officer.

GEORGE WISE sworn. - I was in Kensington-gardens at the time of the robbery, I do not recollect what day it was: James Pearson told me the soldier was come into the gardens again that he had seen before; I had not seen him before; the prisoner is the man that he shewed me; I was attending the sheep in the gardens; all I know about it is, that I assisted in apprehending the prisoner.

JAMES PEARSON sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Thirteen; I saw the prisoner come into the gardens, and I told George Wife of it; I had seen him five days before.

Q. Do you remember seeing Dr. Hamilton that day in the gardens? - A. No; two gentlemen asked me if I had seen a soldier with a red jacket and blue collar; and afterwards, I said to him, how those two gentlemen looked at you; he said, if they had said any thing to him; he would have knocked them down with a stick; it was an elm stick, and was not quite dead; he fenced the stick about my head, and said it would fetch any body a good knock; he said, they would not tell of it in a hurry, and then he walked away.

ISAAC WATTS sworns. - I assisted in appre

hending the prisoner; we took him to the guard-house; I sent for Dr. Hamilton, and he said that was the man that robbed him; Dr. Hamilton then went for a Bow-street officer.

Q.(To Wafe) How came you to go in quest of this soldier? - A. I heard the robbery had been committed, and I told the little boy, if he saw him again, to let me know.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge.

GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the prosecutor, on account of his youth, his awkwardness in committing the offence, and his after contrition.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-3

441. DENNIS KENNEDY , WILLIAM M'CORMACK , and THOMAS JONES , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , four sheep, value 4l. the property of John Claridge .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney).

WILLIAM WHITSEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a constable of the parish of St. Pancras: On the 23d of April, about six in the morning, I stopped the prisoners Kennedy and M'Cormack at Kentish-town; M'Cormack had a bag, and Kennedy had a bit of a blue apron on; the bag appeared to be full, and so did the apron; I had a brother officer with me, and we stopped them; I asked them what they had got, and they said, a man had hired them beyond Highgate to carry them on the road to London, and he was to overtake them at Camden-town; in the bag we found two sheep cut asunder, and two quarters in the apron, there were altogether three whole sheep; we took them back towards Highgate; we took them into the Angel at Highgate, and there Kennedy voluntarily told us to go to a new house upon Finchley Common, beyond the Baldfaced Stag, and he said we should find a man in the house with one carcass of a sheep left behind; he said, they were killed in the night at the back of the house, but he did not say in doors or out; M'Cormack heard Kennedy say this, but did not speak a word; we then got the constable of Highgate, and went with him to the house that Kennedy had described, it was Jones's house; we searched it, and found four heads, four skins, and a carcass of a sheep under the bolster of the bed; the skins were in a bureau bedshead, in the same room where the prisoner Jones was sitting in the corner by the fire, and we brought him away. (Produces the skins).

WILLIAM BRASIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I was with Whitsey when he stopped the prisoners at Kentish Town; Kennedy told us if we went to Finchley Common to a house that he described, we should find a whole carcass; he said they had killed four altogether; I went to Jones's house, according to the description of Kennedy, and we found it exactly as he had said; there were four skins, four heads, and a carcass; we found Jones in the same room with the skins, there were three of us; I searched and found these things after the prisoner Jones was taken.

Prisoner Kennedy. Before I told him where the sheep were, he said he would procure me a pardon if I did.

Brasier. I told him he had better tell where they were.

Court. Q.Did you tell him you thought he might be forgiven? - A. I did.

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - I am the owner of the house in which these things were found. between the Baldfaced Stag and Brown's Well; I had been building two houses; Jones was a labouring man, he slept in the house to protect the premises; there was no other person in charge of the house but him.

JOHN CLARIDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a farmer at Finchley; I had sheep grazing upon Finchley Common: I missed four sheep on the morning of the 23d of April, I saw the skins again the same morning; I had seen the sheep the evening before.

Q.Look at these skins? - A.They are all marked F C, and F C upon the horns also; I am certain these are the skins and horns of my sheep.

Kennedy's defence. M'Cormack desired me to go with him to get some mutton; being hungry, I went with him to Jones's, and Jones gave us the mutton; I saw the skins upon the floor, and he told me it was his own property; as we were coming home, these constables took us, and I told them where I got it.

Jones's defence. These men called me up, and M'Cormack told me he would give me two shillings if I would kill four sheep for them, which I did; Kennedy brought them in with his own hands.

M'Cormack's defence. I am a plasterer by trade; Jones desired me to go down on Thursday morning to fetch some meat, and to bring another man with me, and I took this man; I told Jones that it was dangerous for us to carry them, if he was sure they were not his own, and he said they were his own.

The prisoner Kennedy called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Kennedy, GUILTY , Death , 'aged 24.

M'Cormack, GUILTY , Death , aged 44.

Jones, GUILTY , Death , aged, 30.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-4

442. RICHARD FRANCIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , an ounce and three quarters of gold, value 5l. the property of George Adams , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE ADAMS sworn. - I am a jeweller , and keep a house, No. 6, St. James's Place, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner was an assistant in the workshop : On Friday, the 27th of February, in consequence of suspicion and information that I received, I sent for an officer of the Police, who searched him, and on his person found a quantity of gold in pieces, in the state in which it used to be in the course of his working; he looked particularly confused, and said, he hoped I would be merciful to him.

Q. Had you made him any promise or threat before he said that? - A. No; he said he had taken it to get his clothes out of pawn at different times; it was in his left-hand breeches pocket, part loose, and part in paper; I cannot swear to the gold, but from general appearance it is worth about 5l.

Q. Is the shop detached from the house at all? - A. No; it is the attic story.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you any partner? - A. No.

Q. It was in his pocket in the work-shop, where, in the course of his business, he ought to be? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden: I searched the prisoner on Friday, and found this gold in his left-hand breeches pocket. (Produces it).

Q.(To Adams). Is there any piece of that that you think of the value of 40s? - A. No; it is exactly the nature of the work, but I cannot swear to it.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s. aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-5

443. WILLIAM BOWMAN was indicted for that he, on the 20th of March , 175lb. weight of lead, value, value 20s. belonging to John Gosrer , and John-rose Drew, fixed to a certain dwelling-house of theirs, did cut and rip with intent to steal .

Second Count. For stealing like lead.

And two other Counts, charging it to be the property of George Lord Kinnard , William Moreland , and Thomas Hammersley .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.) JOE PRIDEAUX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a carpenter, No. 19. Brompton Crescent ; I had the care of the house, No. 2l: On Thursday, the 19th of March, about four o'clock, I was all over the house with three ladies and a gentleman, every thing was safe then, and the windows nailed down; about four o'clock the next morning, I was alarmed by the watchman springing his rattle; I let the watchman through the house that I live in, that the thieves might not get away at the back part of the house, and called Stephen Story, who lives in the same house with me, I then put on my clothes, and went towards the house, and I met Storey and the watchman with the prisoner; I went into the house, and found a piece of lead upon the bench that was lest in the front parlour; a hand-saw and a piece of lead rolled up lying upon the floor along-side the bench; we then proceeded to the top of the house, and in the back garret we found a roll of lead, and another piece of lead that was not rolled up, and a stiff chisel; we then went to the top of the house, and missed the lead of the gutters from four houses; we took up the lead, and found it match exactly to Nos. 23 and 34; I had the care of those houses likewise.

Q. Whose property are they? - A.George Lord Kinnard, William Moreland , and Thomas Hammersley.

STEPHEN STOREY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I lodge in the house with Prideaux; he called me up, and I took a candle and lantern, and searched the area, and from thence into the front kitchen; I found the area-door broke open; I went into the back kitchen, and run a sword that I had in my hand into the lid of a hamper under the kitchen stairs; with the point of the sword I brought the hamper away, and then I saw the prisoner; he was sitting down, with the hamper-lid before his face; I took him to the watch-house, and a knife was found upon him.

JAMES COX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a constable: I took charge of the prisoner on the 20th of March; I searched him, a knife was found upon him by Hamilton; I am a plumber, I matched the lead, and it fitted.

JEREMIAH HAMILTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I found this knife in his right-hand coat pocket.

Mr. Gurney. (To Cox.) Q. Is that a fit instrument for cutting lead? - A.It is a very capital instrument for cutting lead.

Hamilton. I found this chisel in the garret.(Producing it.)

Prisoner's defence. I am a gardener; I was coming from Brensford to get work, and I met with a person that I drank with, and I got very drunk; I saw a man at the door, I asked him where I could lie down; the door was open, and he told me to go down and lie upon some shavings.

GUILTY , aged 44. - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-6

444. GEORGE BARRETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , a nightcap, value 1s. a neck handkerchief, value 3s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 2s. a pair of shoes, value 5s. two cotton stockings, value 2s. another

pair of shoes, value 5s. a pair of stockings, value 3s. another pair of cotton stockings, value 3s. two muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 6s. a pair of silk drawers, value 10s. another pair of cotton stockings, value 3s. a silk handkerchief, value 3s. a pair of silk stockings, value 10s. a pair of drawers, value 5s. another pair of cotton stockings, value 3s. a pair of silk stockings, value 10s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 3s. a muslin neck handkerchief, value 4s. another pair of silk drawers, value 10s. another muslin neck handkerchief, value 4s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 4s. two worsted socks, value 1s. a pocket handkerchief, value 6d. two other muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 6s. and a pair of nankeen pantaloons, value 10s. the property of Edward-Stephenson Dennison .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

EDWARD-STEPHENSON DENNISON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was purser of an Indiaman, and lived in St. Martin's-lane; the prisoner was my servant , and had the care of my linen: On Thursday, the 26th of March, I directed him to go to Enderby, in Leicestershire, with my horses.

Q. How many miles is that from London? - A. One hundred and two, I think, by the way of Leicester; he was to be there on Saturday night; he was to be at St. Alban's the first night, Northampton the next, and Enderby the third; I was to follow him with the mail; I arrived at Enderby on Saturday, about two in the afternoon; my servant did not make his appearance till the Tuesday; he brought one of the horses to the stable; I asked him what had become of the other horse, and what was the cause of his being so long absent; he informed me the horse was taken ill at St. Alban's, but that he had got him on as far as Market Harborough; he then appeared intoxicated; on the Wednesday morning I sent him back Market Harborough; for the purpose of bringing the horse, whenever he was fit, to Enderby; upon my leaving town on the Friday, I found a deficiency in my wearing apparel, I missed particularly two pair of white silk stockings, and six silk handkerchiefs; on the Monday after, when I was going to Market Harborough, Mr. Lorraine Smith's servant produced some clothes that the prisoner had put out to wash, among which I found a night-cap and a neck handkerchief belonging to me; upon my return from Market Harborough, I looked into his saddle-bags, and found another pair of cotton stockings, clean; on the Monday, in consequence of what I discovered, I told the prisoner to come to Enderby on the Tuesday, and I would discharge him, at the same time taking away the charge of the horse; he did not make his appearance till the Monday afterwards; Mr. Smith desired his servant to put his hand into his groom's coat pocket, which he did, and took out a quantity of duplicates, (produces them); Mr. Smith asked him if he had taken any thing from me; he did not make any answer for some time; at last, he said, he had, at the same time wishing to see the duplicates; he said, there were some in Jermyn street; others in a street he could not name; I asked him if it was Vine-street, and he said it was, I think; I said Vine-street, but it was Vigo-lane.

JOHN STUART sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I belong to the Duke of York's hand, (produces a pair of nankeen pantaloons); I received them from the prisoner at the bar, he gave them me as a present, but I cannot say when it was.

Q. Did he ever give you any thing else? - A. No.

Mr. Dennison. These are my pantaloons; I never gave them to the prisoner.

(Three other pawnbrokers produced the remainder of the property.) GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-7

445. JAMES DEARING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , a man's hat, value 9s. the property of Daniel Pedder .

DANIEL PEDDER sworn. - I am a hatter in Beech-street : On Monday, the 4th of May about half past two o'clock, I came into my shop, and missed a hat; I looked out at the door, but could see nobody: I was informed that Mr. Hearne had gone after the prisoner; I went out to the door again, and met Mr. Hearne and the prisoner coming back with the hat; I sent for a constable, and gave charge of him; the boy said he had had his own hat knocked off his head by somebody, and this put on; when he came back, he had his own hat on.

JAMES HEARNE sworn. - On the 4th of May, I was standing at my own door between two and three o'clock in the afternoon; about 150 yards from the prosecutor's house, I saw the prisoner come down Beech-street with a new hat in his hand, and the old one upon his head; he passed me a few yards, and then took his old hat off, and put a new one on his head, he carried the old one in his hand; I left my own door, and followed him into Golden-lane; he then turned back, and met me, I said hold of him, and he immediately knocked a new hat off his head; I asked him how he had come by it; he told me a man gave it him; I brought him down the lane, met the prosecutor, and delivered the prisoner to him.

( Richard Phillips , the constable, produced the hat, which was identified by the projecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I was going along, and a man knocked my hat off, and put this hat on; I picked up my own hat, and walked on; the man run away.

GUILTY , aged 13. - confined twelve-months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-8

446. JOHN LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , three silver tea-spoons, value 6s. and a silver salt-spoon, value 2s. the property of Richard Solly , Esq. (The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

The right Honorable the Earl of PORTSMOUTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am acquainted with Mr. Solly, Handyside, my servant, went with me to his house in York-place, Portman-square : On Friday the 1st of May, about half after one o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming up the area steps, and I saw him drop some spoons upon the steps; I did not see him pick them up again.

Court. Q. Did he walk away? - A. Yes, he walked away; I saw him brought back in about a quarter of an hour; I am sure the person that was brought back was the same man that dropped the spoons.

THOMAS HANDYSIDE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Lord Portsmouth: I was with his Lordship at Mr. Solly's: I saw the prisoner coming up the area, and drop something; I did not see what it was, I heard it rattle like spoons; there was an alarm of stop thief, and then the prisoner ran away; I saw the same man brought back.

Court. Q. Did he appear to be at all deranged? - A. I cannot say.

DORINDA MEGAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at Mr. Solly's: On Friday the 1st of May, I saw the prisoner come up the area stops, I had not seen him in the house, I was at the front-door; I asked him who he wanted; he said no one; I said, if he wanted no one, he must have something that was not his own; he made no answer, but ran away; I called out murder; it did not occur to me to say thief; he was brought back with three teaspoons and a salt-spoon, I know them to be Mr. Solly's spoons.

WILLIAM TURNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a plasterer: On Friday the 1st of May, I was in York-place, Portman-square; I heard an alarm, and pursued the prisoner, Goodman was with me; he was thrown down by a labouring man a few yards before we came up to him; when we came up, the prisoner put his hand to his right-hand pocket, I seized his hand in his pocket, and pulled his hand out with one of these spoons in it; I put my hand into his pocket and found another; upon which, Goodman searched his left-hand pocket, and found another tea-spoon, and a salt-spoon; we took him back to Mr. Solly's house, and searched him again, but found no more; then Lord Portsmouth sent for a coach, and he was taken to Bow-street.

Q. Did he at all appear to be out of his senses? - A. No. (The spoons produced).

Mrs. Megan. These are Mr. Solly's spoons, they have his crest upon them.

For the Prisoner. Doctor LEO sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bevil.

Q. You are a physician? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you known the prisoner during the last four or five months? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you able to speak to the state of his mind during that time? - A. At divers times I have been called in to him, and found him in a state of insanity.

Q. Have you found, that the general state of his mind was that of an insane man? - A. Yes; it is often the case, that persons in that situation have more scheme and artfulness than others.

Court. Q. And, perhaps, you have known them sometimes pretend to be mad when they are not so? - A. I did not know him before these four or five months; I attended him between three and four months.

Q. How often? - A. Seven or eight times.

Q. Was he-always mad? - A. He always appeared deranged.

Q. What acts did he commit? - A. He was deranged in his mind; every act that was confused and foolish.

Q. Was he fit to have the management of his own affairs? - A. He was not.

Q. When did you perceive he was not sit to have the management of his affairs; did you perceive that the first time? - A. I conceived so.

Q. During all the time you attended him, did you advise any of his friends to confine him? - A. Yes; I advised his wife to confine him.

Q. What business is he? - A. A pencil-maker.

Q. Of what persuasion is he? - A. A Jew.

Q.Did you ever know him, in these acts of infanity, steal any thing before? - A.No.

Q. Was his insanity of a sort that you thought led him to pick pockets, or steal spoons? - A. It seems to me so.

Q. Did you ever know him do it before? - A. No.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At Bevis-Marks, St. Mary-Axe.

Q. Where did he live? - A. I attended him; at one time, in Red Lion-street, Spitalfields.

Q. Why did not you insist upon his friends confining him? - A. I told his wife she should send him to a public place, or a private place.

Q. Had he no lucid intervals? - A. Very little or none at all.

Q. Are you particularly versed in this disorder of the human mind? - A. I am.

Q. Then you are what is called a mad doctor? - A. It is not my particular profession to attend persons under that complaint; I have attended them; we call it the mania.

Q. Did you recommend his relations to call in some person whose particular profession it was? - A. I cannot say that I did; I recommended them to send him to St. Luke's, or some private place.

Mr. Bevil. Q. A man who is deranged will sometimes act like a man in his senses? - A. Yes.

Q. And a man deranged, may be easily worked upon, by an artful person, to do any given act? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How lately had you attended him before he was taken us? - A. The 2d, 3d, or 4th of May.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You attended at Bow-street, did not you? - A.No; I came too late.

Q. Upon your oath, were you not present at Bow-street when the prisoner was under examination? - A. Upon my oath I was not there.

Q. Not you did not give the evidence that you have given to day before the Justice? - A. No; I was not before the Justice at all.

Q. Though you do not prosess this particular line, you have attended a great many under that complaint? - A. Yes.

Q. It has occurred to you then to bear of a lucid interval, has it not? - A. Yes; several that I have attended have.

Q. When they have these intervals, they have again the possession of their mind? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not see this man after the 4th of May? - A. I believe I saw him on the 5th.

Q. You have heard that this man dropped some spoons upon the area steps? - A. Yes.

Q. Has it often happened to you to hear of a madman stealing spoons? - A. No.

Q. It is more likely for a man to do it in a lucid interval than in a moment of insanity? - A. He could do it in the paroxysms of the mania.

Q. Have you ever given evidence here before? - A. I believe I have; is that any matter of consequence.

Q. Upon your oath, have you or not been examined as a witness here before? - A. I never took any notice.

Q. Have you not been here twice? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not been here more than three times? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Have you not been here before as a witness and a Jew physician, to give an account of a prisoner as a madman, to get him off, upon the ground of insanity? - A. I attended here once, but for what defence I have forgot; I do not think I was here more than once.

Mr. Bevil. Q. I believe you are a physician to a jew charity? - A. Yes; and the Societies at large.

HENRY MARKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bevil. I am a silversmith, in Hyde-street, Bloomsbury: I have known the prisoner a year and a half; about four or five months ago he came to my shop, and wanted to give me an order for some goods; he wanted so many dozen table-spoons and tea-spoons, and different articles; I asked him who he wanted them for; he said he wanted them to go abroad; I asked him how he came by these orders; and he made different excuses; I looked upon him to be out of his mind; then he wanted some embroidered clothes, which was out of my line of business, and I took no manner of notice of what he said; about three weeks, or a fortnight after, he came again; I asked him what his pleasure was; he said, be so good as lend me a shilling; I was quite surprized when he asked for a shilling, I gave him a shilling, and I waited in my shop I dare say four or five minutes before he took the shilling; he spoke several things, but I did not take any notice of it.

Q. Then his behaviour was evidently the behaviour of a man deranged? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-9

447. SAMUEL SPECIAL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 28th of March , two pigs, value 40s. the property of John Blacking and Richard Hawkins , where of John Allen, at the last Sessions, was convicted of stealing .(The record of the conviction of John Allen read).

JOHN BLACKLING sworn. - On the 28th of March I lost two pigs belonging to myself and Richard Hawkins; John Allen was convicted at the last Sessions of stealing them; I was present at the trial: On the 29th I went to Ducking-pond-lane, and looked through a hole into the stable, we saw the two pigs immediately; the stable belonged to the prisoner, as I understood; I knew them to be my pigs; I went off immediately to the Public-office, Lambeth-street, leaving two persons that were with me there; I thought two officers back with me, Nowland and Osmand; before I came back, Mr. Special had let these two persons in to see the pigs; the officers took the pigs into their care.

Q. Was there any difficulty in getting into the premises? - A. No.

GEORGE WATKINS sworn. - I live in New Gravel-lane; I saw Allen going up the lane with two pigs; I told him he had stole the pigs: Next morning, Sunday, the 29th, I went to Mr. Blackling, and asked him if he had lost them, and he said, yes; after dinner I went with him to Ducking-pond-lane, to Mr. Special's premises; there was a stable with a boarded partition, and there was a small hole about seven feet high that I could look over; I looked through the hole, and saw the same two pigs; Blackling then went for an officer; I staid by the premises walking backwards and for wards, and I saw Mr. Special throw up the window; I said, Mr. Special, you have got a couple of pigs upon your premises that are not your property; says he, how do you know they are not my property; says I, because I know the man that they

belong to, the pigs were stolen last night; well, says he, I don't know, I have got a couple of pigs in my stable, I don't know who they belong to, a man brought them here last night; but, says he, you may go and look at the pigs if you like; we walked down the yard, and they were locked up; Mr. Special called to the girl to bring the key, and he unlocked the door; he asked me if I knew the pigs; I told him, yes; Mr. Blackling's man said, they were his master's pigs, he would swear to them: he said a man had brought them there last night; says he, I think I know where to find him, we will go and take him; I said, Mr. Blackling is gone for an officer; he said, I am an officer myself; then the officers came, and we went and took Allen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do not you know what Special is himself an officer? - A.He is a headborough.

Q. Do not you know that he came before the Magistrate the next day, to give evidence against Allen? - A. I saw him there, I don't know how he got there.

Q. Did you take him into custody? - A. He promised the officer to appear the next day.

Q. Did not Special give the same account before the Magistrate that you-have given of what he said then? - A. He did.

Q. Do not you know that he has been out upon bail, and has surrendered to take his trial? - A. I believe he was.

Prisoner's defence. Allen brought two pigs to me on the Saturday night, and told me he had them from on board a ship, and said he should be very much obliged to me to let them stay upon my premises till be could build a stye for them, and being a neighbour, I let him.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN NOWLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was sent for to go to Mr. Special's.

Q. Did not he offer to take up Allen? - A. He had him in custody at the Weavers' Arms when I went to take him; I took his word to appear the next day before the Magistrate.

Q. Did he not tell the same story before the Justice that he told Mr. Blackling? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he not a man of character and respectability? - A. Yes; he is a horse slaughterer and a tanner likewise.

The prisoner called a great number of other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-10

448. JAMES BARNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a pound and a half of horse-hair, value 18d. the property of John Willan , Thomas Willan , and William Smith .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney).

GEORGE GOUGH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the servant of Mr. Thomas Willan; the owners of the horses are Thomas Willan, John Willan, and William Smith; Barney and Lediard were employed under me: On the 4th of May I found the prisoner holding a horse, while Lediard was cutting the hair off; I asked what they did it for, and they said, to make a fishing-line; I found eight horses served in the same way; I found a quantity of horse-hair upon Lediard, between his shirt and his skin, (produces it); there is better than a pound and a half of it; it is worth a shilling a pound; every one of the horses was disfigured a good deal.

Q. Has it lowered the value of the horses very much? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I had no concern in pulling it off, I only looked on; the horse had got a very thick mane, and he cut a little off, and took a few hairs out of the tail; it is very common in my country; I did not know any harm.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-11

449. JOHN MAPHAM and WILLIAM MAPHAM were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , thirty-six quires of demy paper, value 30s. the property of John Leonard .

SARAH LEONARD sworn. - I am the wife of John Leonard, stationer , in Chiswell-street : On the 12th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I took a bundle of demy paper to serve a customer a quire out of it, and being too heavy to lift up, I left it on the counter till my husband came in; I went into the parlour and fat down to my work; after some time; I observed something waver in my sight; I looked up, and saw a man in a blue coat going out of the shop; I got up, went into the shop, looked towards the window, and saw a man in a brown coat, with a bundle of paper in his arms, before him; I ran to the door, holloaed out, stop thief, two or three times; the man in a blue coat ran past me out of the shop, and said, softly, b - if you, run; I could but just hear it; we all got to the step of the door about together; the man in brown threw the paper away into the kennel; I turned round, and collared the man in blue, and said, you rascal, you are one of them; he immediately answered, you b - h, don't you say so again, for if you do, I'll cut your bl - y eyes out; I had him by the right arm, and he told me he would cut my bl - y life out if he could get at his knife; I held him till he attempted to put his hand into his pocket to get his knife, and then he threatened me so, that I was obliged to let him go; I never saw them afterwards till I saw the man in blue before the Magistrate the next day.

CHRISTOPHER HALL sworn. - I live opposite

Mrs. Leonard: On the 12th of May was writing at the desk near the window, and heard the cry of stop thief; I looked round, and saw Mrs. Leonard on the step of her door, and a person in a brown coat dropped bundle of paper, and made off towards Finsbury-square; I am almost positive the prisoner, William Mapham , is the person; I went over, and saw Mrs. Leonard, who had hold of the prisoner in blue; she said he was a party concerned, and then I heard him say he would cut her b - y- I could not hear the other words.

Q. Are you positive that the person who said that is the prisoner at the bar in blue? - A. I am positive of it.

JOHN RAY Sworn. - I am a Police-officer, belonging to Worship-street Office: On the 12th of May I was coming down Chiswell-street, I saw a great mob of people, I suppose to the amount of two hundred; two gentlemen had got hold of John Mapham ; I heard him call for knife, and say. he would cut her bl - y bowels out; he had resisted very much; one gentleman had got a cut over his eye; when he saw me, he said, Ray, I will go any where with you; I then desired the gentlemen to let him alone, and I took him to the office; another gentleman brought William Mapham to me, but he did not attend at the office; I found a knife in his pocket. (The paper was produced and deposed to by Mrs. Leonard).

John Mapham's defence. My brother I were going up chiswell-street, we heard the cry of stop thief, we ran with the rest, and the woman laid hold of me.

William Mapham's defence. I am quite innocent of the crime.

John Mapham , GUILTY , aged 22.

William Mapham , GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-12

450. WILLIAM DICKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , a China bowl, value 3s. a shirt, value 5s. a cravat, value 3s. two handkerchiefs, value 5s. four waistcoats, value 20s. a pair of knee-caps, value 3s. and a night-cap, value 15. the property of Henry Jackson .

HENRY JACKSON sworn. - I live at Beckenham, in the country of Kent; I saw the China bowl on Friday, the 1st of May, in the possession of the prisoner; I met him in Cloak-lane with it in his hand, in consequence of which I applied to the Lord-Mayor for a search-warrant; I challenged the bowl as mine; he said it was not, I was mistaken; I did not take him into custody, I took the bowl from him, and lodged it at a person's house, Mr. Schroeder's, upon College-hill; on Monday, the 4th of May, I went with a Marshalman and a search-warrant to the prisoner's lodgings, in Bow-lane, Cheapside.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner in those lodgings? - A. No; I found there a shirt, two neckcloths, a cravat, two handkerchiefs, four waistcoats, a pair of knee-caps, and a night-cap.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long is it since this man was in your service? - A. In December last.

Q. I suppose it is usual with you, when your servants leave you, that they should give an account of every article in their possession? - A. I did not look over his linen.

Q. Not his own linen, but you expected him to give an account of every thing that passes through his hands belonging to you? - A. Yes.

Q. You keep several servants? - A. Yes.

Q. Has it happened that other servants have been accused by you of similar transactions? - A. No.

Q. Do you know who lives with the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. You know there is a woman lives with him? A. I cannot say.

Q. The night-cap and the waistcoats, where did you find them? - A. The Marshalman found them in his boxes; the waistcoats I cannot swear to.

Q. Nor the bowl? - A. There is a certain chip in a very particular place that I can certainly venture to swear to.

Q. You have occasionally given this man some old clothes? - A. I have, but never linen.

THOMAS PARROTT sworn. - I am one of the Marshalmen: On the 4th of May I went with a search-warrant to No. 31, Bow-lane, a widow lady keeps the house; in the back room, at the up per part of the house, I found these things in a box. (Produces them).

ISAAC NEWSOP sworn. - I was with the last witness; I know no more of it than he does.

Q.(To Mr. Jackson. Q. When was it that you had the bowl from the prisoner? - A. Friday, the 1st of May; I took it from Mr. Schroeder's on Monday, the 4th.

Prisoner's defence. I had the bowl for six years; the person who saw me buy it is dead, and therefore I cannot bring him to prove it; when that bowl was cast. I should think more than that one would have been cast at the same time, and Mr. Jackson ought to be particularly careful before he takes an affidavit to it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him. a good character. GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-13

451. MARY M'LOCKLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , a clothes-brush, value 2s. 6d. the property of William Warner .

WILLIAM WARNER sworn. - I am a brushmaker , on Snow-hill; I did not see the property

taken; my son brought the prisoner back with the brush; I saw him take it from her.

JOHN WARNER sworn. - I am the son of the prosecutor: Between six and seven o'clock in the evening on the 22d of April, the prisoner at the bar came into our shop; there were several clothes-brushes lying upon the counter; I saw her take one of them, and put it into her apron, which hung over her arm; she then took up another, and after she had examined it a little while, she laid it down, and then walked out of the shop with the one she had in her apron; I followed her, brought her back, and took the brush out of her apron; I sent for a constable, and she was taken to the Compter; I know the brush to be my father's.

(The constable produced the brush, which was identified by the prosecutor).

Constable. The prisoner was very drunk, she could hardly get along; I asked her where she had been; she said that she had been with a sailor that had given her gin.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor, I thought I had paid for it; I recollect laying down sixpence; I am sure I should not steal it, for I could neither eat, drink, nor pawn it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-14

452. DANIEL McLEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , fourteen pounds of cotton, value 28s. the property of George Hawkes .

GEORGE HAWKES sworn. - I am an iron merchant ; the prisoner was sent to me as a confidential man, to sort some cotton that was consigned to me for sale: On Friday the 24th of April, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I was sitting under my hair-dresser's hands, in a situation where I could see the premises; I saw the prisoner going past my window, at the foot of Addle-hill , with a bundle; I ran out, and requested my footman to stop that man; he went after him and brought him back, he was never out of my fight but just the moment of turning the corner; I asked him what he had got there; he told me he had got some cloth that he had to mend the cotton bags; I went with him into the warehouse, where he laid it down, I opened it, and found it to contain cotton; I sent for a constable, and the cotton was delivered to him.

Q. Are you responsible for this property? - A. I conceive so, in some respects.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. You have partners, have you not? - A. Yes; but this is a consignment to me only.

Q. Have you the consignment here? - A. No.

Q. Is it not the duty of the prisoner to bring cloth for the purpose of mending the bags? - A. Yes.

Q. And if they find there is more cloth than is necessary for the business, they carry it back again? - A. Yes; or charge me with it.

Q. The prisoner came back very willingly, did he not? - A. Yes; he threw himself upon his knees, begged for mercy, and interceded as much as a man could do; I desired he would not make any consession to me with a view of mercy, for I should certainly prosecute him.(Charles Rowley, the constable, produced the property).

Mr. Hawkes. I cannot swear to the cotton, it is impossible, I saw him pass my window, coming from the premises; I did not see him come out of the door.

Jury. Q. What is the distance between that window and the premises? - A. Not more than twenty-five yards.

Prisoner's defence. I stand in a predicament I never was in in my life before; It is worse to me than death to think of it; twenty-two years I have served my King and Country, and been in ten actions; a thing of this kind has been always beneath me. GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-15

453. JAMES PURNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a watch, value 2l. 15s. the property of David Windsor , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM ANGUS sworn. - I am foreman to David Windsor, a pawnbroker at Aldgate : About eight o'clock in the evening of Friday, the 1st of May, the prisoner came into that part of the shop we call the boxes, and desired to look at some stout gold rings; I shewed him two quantities sewed on cards; he tried several of the rings, and observed at the same time he was not going to buy one for himself, it was an unthankful office to buy for another person, and, upon second consideration, he would not buy a ring, but said he wanted a good silver watch for himself; he said he was but an apprentice, not quite out of his time, and could not afford to go to a great deal of money; I asked him if he would go to three guineas, or three guineas and a half; and he said, thereabouts; he chose one that I asked him three pounds fifteen shillings for; the offered me three guineas, and I agreed to take it; he then wanted to look at some gold lockets; I desired a person to bring drawer, and show him some; they were brought to him, and after looking at several, he said as before of the rings, that it was for somebody else, and he would not buy one; he then took up the watch again, and looked at it very attentively; he then put his hand towards the door, held it ajar for a minute or two, and said, Jack, or Tom, or some familiar name, come in, but no one came in; he then made another step or two, and then went completely out of the box,

taking the watch with him; I went round the counter into the passage as fast as I could, but could see nothing of him; I saw no more of him, or the watch, till I saw him in Spital-fields watch-house that night about ten o'clock; I had sent round to all the shops in the neighbourhood, that if such a watch was offered, to stop it; it was stopped, and I saw it at the watch-house, in the possession of Mr. French.

CHARLES FRENCH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Richard Warren , White-row, Spital-fields: On the 1st of May, about half past eight o'clock in the evening, I received some information from Mr. Windsor, in consequence of which I stopped the watch; it was brought to me to pawn by a woman, about five minutes afterwards; she is not here; she is in the Compter for receiving it in the county. (Produces the watch.)

JOHN PETERS sworn. - I am an officer of Christchurch, Middlesex: On the 1st of May, about twenty minutes past nine, Mr. French came to me; I went with him, and apprehended the prisoner; I took him before the constable of the night, and the next day he was committed.

Angus. I know this watch to be Mr. Windsor's by the name, and the make of it; the prisoner is the same man.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s. aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-16

454. JOHN CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , seven feet of mahogany board, value 18s. the property of William Smee .

THOMAS STOCKS sworn. - I am a cabinetmaker, servant to William Smee : In the month of March, we lost a great quantity of plank and veneers, and in the snow we traced a foot-step into a stone-mason's yard; and last Wednesday, in consequence of information, I went to Worship-street office to look at a board, and finding it to be my master's property, I went the next day to see the prisoner; I know it to be my master's by the form of it; it has been cut in a particular manner, I cut it myself; the prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

GEORGE DANIELS sworn. - I am a cabinetmaker: About two months ago, the prisoner brought me this board; I had the board in my possession, but had not an opportunity of taking the prisoner till last Wednesday; the prisoner offered it for sale at my door for eight shillings; I immediately measured the board, and found it contained seven feet of mahogany, worth half-a-crown a foot; I asked the prisoner some questions, where he lived, and how he came by the board; he told me he lived in a court in the Minories; I told him to leave the board with me, and I would enquire and endeavour to learn whether he had obtained it honestly; I stopped the board, and made enquiries, but could hear nothing of him; the prisoner did not apply for the money till after I had given information at Worship-street; he applied for the money when I was in the country, and I had not an opportunity of taking him till the 13th of the present month; he asked me if I was the person belonging to the shop, I told him, yes; I knew him again immediately, and called down one of my men; the prisoner then said, what you mean to keep me then; he then went to the door, looked up, and said, it looks like rain; I told him he had better stop, and see if we could do any thing with the board; he immediately went out of the house, and into a public-house at the corner of the street where I lived; I followed him up Old-street, and pointed him out to the officer; it was with some difficulty that the officer secured him; the officer is not here; I saw him in about two minutes after he was secured; I am sure he is the same man.

SAMUEL MOORE sworn. - I am a headborough belonging to St. Luke's: On the 13th of this month I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner at the bar; I found him at Mr. Daniels's house, in Old-street-road. (The board was produced and identified by Stocks).

Prisoner's defence. It is eleven weeks ago since I carried the board to Mr. Daniels; I bought it of a carpenter and cabinet-maker; I did not immediately want it; I kept it some little time, and then I carried it to that gentleman to dispose of it.

GUILTY. - Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-17

455. WILLIAM SEXTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , half a yard of calico, value 6d. and two yards of cambric, value 3s. the property of John Reynolds and Charles Reynolds .

There being no evidence to prove the property in the possession of the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-18

456. SARAH GORDON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Leonard Tweed , about the hour of two in the night of the 27th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a pair of child's shoes, value 14d. the property of the said Leonard.

Second Count. For breaking and entering, with intent to steal.

LEONARD TWEED sworn. - I am a shoemaker , in Whitechapel High-street : On the 27th or 28th of April, about two o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by the watchman that my house

had been broke open; upon that I came down stairs, and found the shutter and a square of glass broke; the prisoner at the bar was brought into the shop by the officer; I looked at her, I knew her face, she had worked for me some years ago; her hands were bloody; I did not see any blood about the window; the watchman produced a pair of shoes, which I know to be my property.

Q.What is the value of them? - A.The full value of them is not more than 1s. or 1s. 2d.

CHARLES SHAVE sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Tweed; I fastened up the shop window on Wednesday, the 27th of April, in the evening, in the usual mode of fastening; my master was the last person up; I was called up by the watchman about two o'clock in the morning, and found the shutter, between the bar and the window, broke; the shutter was not forced at all; I saw the shoes in the watchman's hand; I only know them to be my master's by the look of them.

JOHN M'CARTY sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 28th of April, about two o'clock in the morning, I was sitting upon a butcher's stall, and heard some glass fall; I stood up, looked round me, and presently heard another piece fall; I looked across the way, and saw the prisoner standing at Mr. Tweed's window; I ran across, and when I was a most half way to the door, the shutter dropped down when the shutter dropped, she rather sell back from the window; I do not think she saw me till I laid hold of her, for I had no light; it was moon-light; she drew forward again towards the window before I laid hold of her; I laid hold of her, and seeing her hand all over blood, I said, good woman, you have been doing a nice job; she said, what did I mean, and asked me if that was Mr. Tweed's house; she said she knew Mr. Tweed very well; she asked me if I did not see three men pass by; I told her I did not; I called the patrol to my assistance, and we called Mr. Tweed up; when I took her to the watch-house, she was searched, and she dropped the bolt of the window,(produces it); there was nothing else found upon her; these shoes were found close to her upon the pavement, but I did not find them upon her, (produces them); here is her own handkerchief, (produces a pocket-handkerchief stained with blood); she pulled cut a shilling, or a sixpence, I cannot say which, and said, here is something for you to drink, and let me go about my business, but we detained her.

Tweed. I had a great number of little shoes in the window; I believe these to be mine; they have no mark upon them.

Prisoner's defence. Between twelve and one I was coming home from Stepney-green, and when I got to Mr. Tweed's window, there were three men standing; one of them struck me with the pin of the window, and my hand was very much bruised; I immediately called for the watchman, and then one of the men hit me immediately on the side of the head, and ran away; I took up the pin of the window, and offered to give it to the watchman, but he would not take it.

Q.(To M'Carty). Did she call out, watch? - A. No; no such thing.

Q. Did she make you any offer of the pin, and did you refuse it? - A. Not in the least; it drop ped from her at the watch-house.

GUILTY , Death .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-19

457. THOMAS HERBERT and SARAH SMITH were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 2d. of May , six shirts, value 3l. 3s. a night-cap, value 6d. three pocket-handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d. four neck-handkerchiefs, value 4s. four pair of cotton stockings, value 12s. two pair of silk stockings, value 16s. a pair of nankeen trowsers, value 16s. 6d. a pillow-case, value 1s. two pair of shoes, value 12s. and a hat, value 16s. the property of Richard Bourne , in the dwelling-house of Ann-Philip De Loyade , and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Ann-Philip De Loyade , in his dwelling-house.

ANN-PHILIP DE LOYADE sworn. - I keep a house of the military education of young gentlemen at Chelsea ; Mr. Richard, Bourne was a pupil of mine; he had all his apparel at my house, ready to go to India; the prisoner, Herbert, was my servant ; I had missed a great many articles a long while before, which induced me to suspect the prisoner: On the 1st of May I missed the key of my bureau, which was in my study; Mr. Bourne had a trunk and two boxes in the prisoner's room, ready to be sent off; in consequence of suspicion, I got a warrant to apprehend the prisoner, and desired the officer to watch where the prisoner was carrying the goods.

RICHARD BOURNE sworn. - I live in the house of Monsieur De Loyade; I was going out to India; I was a pupil of his, and had my boxes at his house; I missed a great number of articles out of my trunk; I had one in my own room, and one in the prisoner's.

Q. Did you miss them at different times? - A. No, I missed them all at one time; upon suspecting the prisoner, I brought the trunk up into my room, and missed the things; I told Mr. De Loyade of it, and he got two Bow-street officers.

JOHN DIXON sworn. - I am one of the officers of Bow-street: I went with my brother officer, who had the warrant, on the 2d. of May, and watched the prisoner to the lodgings of the woman prisoner; we took them both into the kitchen, and

searched them; I found the key of the room in which I found the things, in her pocket; she went up stairs, and gave me this bundle, (producing it), and said, that was all the property that Thomas had brought; in Herbert's pocket I found these keys, amongst which is a key of his master's bureau; none of the keys open the young gentleman's box; I found another key in his pocket that opened his master's bureau, besides the right one; I also found the key of his master's closet in her room.

Q. Did she say whether they were brought at different times, or at one time? - A. She did not say; I told her whatever there was she had better give me, and she brought me the bundle from behind the bed; in the same room I found some linen which he claimed.

WILLIAM ANTHONY sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street: On the 2d of May, Mr. De Loyade came to Bow-street, and got warrant to apprehend his servant, Thomas Herbert; I went with Dixon, and watched Herbert to the house where the woman lived, in New-street, there we apprehended them, and serched them; that is all I know of it; I staid below while Dixon went up with the woman.

Mr. Bourne. These things are marked with my name in permanent ink, it cannot be taken out; I cannot swear to the hat, nor the shoes; but the things that are marked I can.

Q. Is there any one article of the value of more that forty shillings? - A. I believe not.

Q.There were no key produced that will open your trunk? - A. No.

Mr. De Loyade. This key opened my bureau, and this key opened my closet.

Q.(To Dixon.) Did the prisoner Smith say that Thomas had brought these things in his hearing? - A. No; it was not.

The prisoner, Herbert, did not say any thing in his defence.

Smith's defence. I don't know any thing of them.

Herbert, GUILTY, aged 31,

Of stealing, goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Smith, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, befor Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-20

458. JOHN MARGETTS , RICHARD HALL , THOMAS BOWMAN , and REBECCA MARGETTS , were indicted, the first three for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Sylvester , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 7th of May , with intent to steal, and stealing one hundred and four blankets, value 40l. the property of the said John; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

Second Court. Charging them to be the property of William Sellman .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN SYLVESTAR sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at No. 9, Goswell-street: On the 7th of May, I had a quantity of blankets in my possession.

Q. Do you know Mr. William Sellman at Witney? - A. I know him very well, he lives at a little village near Witney; these blankets were in my warehouse.

Q. How is your warehouse connected with the dwelling-house? - A. The dwelling part of the house is over the warehouse: On the 7th of May, I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock; that part of the warehouse was perfectly secure at that time; I got up about a quarter before seven in the morning, and discovered that the second room was broke open; there are four rooms on the lower floor, all of which contained blankets the night before; it was a room next to Arthur-street, the window-frame seemed to be forced in, it laid upon a pile of blankets, about three yards distance.

Q. Was that a sash-window, that lifted up and down? - A. No; it was a fastened window, all the glass was broke.

Q. Was the wood-work broke also? - A. Yes; it was all forced in together.

Q. Did that make such a hole that any man could get in? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you miss the blankets? - A. I cannot say as to that; I don't know what quantity of blankets Mr. Sellman had.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Margetts.) Q. Is the rent of the warehouse paid by Mr. Sellman? - A. The rent is paid by the company, at Witney; it is the dwelling-house only of myself.

Q. The part of the house that you occupy you pay the rent for of course? - A. No; there is no separate rent paid.

Q. I wish to ascertain whether there is an internal communication from the warehouse up to the house, or only a communication to the street? - A.There is a door-way, or what you call a gate-way; there is a communication from the warehouse to the other part of the house.

THOMAS ROSE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Sylvester: On the 7th of May, I secured the warehouses about half past seven o'clock at night.

Q. What was in the warehouses at the time you secured them? - A.These blankets, which I saw at the prisoner's.

Q. Are you sure that these blankets you saw in Margett's house were in that warehouse over night? - A. They were; the next morning, about seven o'clock, I discovered that the warehouse had been broke open; I found all the shutters up secured as I had left them over night but one, which was unkeyed within-side, which surpized me; I went round the warehouse to let the shutters down, and as soon as I let the shutters down, I saw the win

dow bursted in, and the frame lying, I suppose, three yards from where it was bursted in, it laid upon a bundle of blankets; I informed my master of it, and he went to Worship-street; Armstrong, Ray, and two more officers came, and I went with them to a house No. 6, French-alley; between eighty and ninety yards, or thereabouts, there are some ruins at the back of the warehouse, and French-alley lies at the back across these ruins; the back of Margett's house looks into the ruins.

Q. Who lived in that house? - A. The prisoner, Margetts; we found ninety-eight blankets there, up one pair of stairs.

Q. What would be the value of those blankets? - A. Forty pounds; we found all the blankets in one room, but in different parts of the room. (The blankets produced).

Q. Look at those blankets, and tell us if you know them? - A. I am sure they are the same, they were in the house the night before; I have not doubt at all about it.

WILLIAM SELLMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a blanket weaver, at Witney: I saw these blanket in Mr. Sylvester's warehouse on the 7th of May, at night; I saw them again the next day at Margett's house, they were the same that were at Mr. Sylevester's the night before; and I have seen some of them to-day; they are the same, I am sure they are the same.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I understand you contribute towards the rent of this warehouse in town? - A. The master of the company pays it; we are a company of blanket-makers, sixty or more.

Q. These blankets are sent from the country to be disposed of? - A. Yes.

Q. Sylvester acts as an agent, or servant for you? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Sylvester is answerable to you for the deposit of these goods? - A. If they are lost I should think so.

Q. Niether you, nor any of the sixty that you speak of, ever slept in that house? - A.I never did.

WIILIAM HUMPHREYS sworn. - Q.Do you produce any thing? - A. There was a ticket I wrote put upon the blancket, and one of the officers shewed me the same ticket again at Margett's house; I shall know the ticket when it is produced, Masou has got it; I had seen the blankets over night in the warehouse, and I saw the same blankets again at Margett's.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: On Friday the 8th of May, I went to Margett's house, I believe it might be a quarter, or twenty minutes, after ten o'clock, I had before been at Mr. Sylvester's house and seen the window broke in; I then went to No. 6, French-alley, and knocked at the door, softly, the woman prisoner came and unlocked the door, and Ray and I got in; Mason and Vickery were gone round, Mason to the side, and Vickery to the back part of the house; she said, yes, he was; she then opened a side-door, there is a passage that leads into the lower room; I went in, and there was Hall and Bowman sitting on one side of the room.

Q. Did you know Hall before? - A. Yes, I did; and I have seen Bowman.

Q. Did you knwo Margett's? - A. I have seen him, but I don't know him so well as the others; Margett's was sitting in a chair the opposite side of the room; I then went up one pair of stairs, and on the tester of a bed laid this house-pistol. with the handle outside, I drew three slugs out of it, it was prined; in that room I found all the blankets that are now here; I then observed the prisoner, Bowman and Margetts, their clothes were all over covered with blanket-wool, as if they had been carrying blanckets; on Hall's coat there was not that appearance, but across his shoulders there was a parcel of white.

Hall. I was sitting against a white wall at the time.

Armstrong. It appeared to me as if he had been getting through a hole, or it might be sitting against a white wall; I then searched a cupboard in the room where the prisoners were, upon the ground-floor, where I found these three crows, and these three picklock keys, and two other pistols, loaded with ball, and primed, a dark-lantern, and a bottle of phosphorus; and in the same room a centre-bit. I then went up stairs into the garret, and in this bag were those twenty eight picklock-keys, and a ripping chisel, (producing them); the prisoners were then secured and brought to the office.

Q. Did any thing pass that was material? - A. Margetts said he had no lodgers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. (Counsel for Hall and Bowman.) Q. Hall and Bowman do not live in this house? - A. I do not know; I found them there, and the door locked.

Q. Margetts keeps the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Had these men's coats the appearance of any thing more than a poor man's coat would naturally have from laying it upon his coverlid? - A. No.

Q. Had you no conversation with Hall and Bowman? - A. I don't think I had.

Q. What did Hall say to you when you came into the house? - A. I believe Hall said, it was unlucky for him that he was there.

Q. Did you not go to Hall's lodgings afterwards? - A. Yes; I went to where he said he lodged, but I found nothing there.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was with Armstrong: I went up stairs after the prisoners were secured, and I saw the blankets in the room; then I went up stairs into the workshop, it appeared to have been a silversmith's shop;

I went to the fire-place, there was no grate fixed, but with a stick I tried the bricks, and found one of them move; I immediately took the brick out, and put in my arm as far as I could, and found this horse pistol, and a great number of keys, some of them picklock keys; and these picklock keys, in this bag, I found lying upon the work-bench; two of them appear to be quite new, just made.

Q. Do you recollect that either of the prisoners said any thing at the time they were apprehended? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Did you know either of them before? - A. Yes, I knew Hall very well; I did not know Margetts; I had seen Bowman; I afterwards went to Hall's lodgings, and found a jacket and a brush lying close by it; Margetts and Bowman's coats were very much covered with blanket wool; Hall's coat upon the shoulders was covered with white.

PETER MASON sworn. - I am one of the officers belonging to Worship-street; I went with Armstrong and Ray, to No. 6, French-alley; in the room below, where the prisoners were sitting, I found a bit of paper. (Produces it).

Humphreys. This is the paper that was put upon the blankets; it is my hand-writing.

Sellman. This is the paper that I put upon the blankets; the top of it is my writing, and the other is Humphreys's; he is my nephew.

Mason. Hall and Bowman's coats were covered with wool, the same as mine is now I have been carrying the blankets; the same day, I went with Vickery to Bowman's lodgings, and there I found a dark lantern, two centre bits, a small crow, several keys, two latch keys, a spike gimblet, a spring-saw, and a key that is partly manufactured into a skeleton key.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Do you not know that he is a carpenter or chair-maker? - A. I saw some chairs in the room.

Q. Are not these instruments necessary in the business of a carpenter or chair-maker? - A. I cannot say.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I know no more than the other witnesses; I saw these things sound.

THOMAS BARLOW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a hackney coachman: In the night of the 7th of May, I was in Goswell-street, about half past one in the morning, it was a very dark morning; I was going home, and met three men under the gateway, close to the back of Mr. Sylvester's warehouse, as I was going up the court; I do not know who they were.

Court. Q. Were the men standing still, or walking? - A. Two of them were walking, they passed me, as I passed them; the other was standing still a little further on, in the court, quite close to the warehouse.

Q. What is the name of the court? - A. New-court.

Q. Do you know whereabouts the window is that was broke open? - A. No; they were about as far off from the warehouse as I am from you.

ELIZABETH FRANKLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Arthur-street, about four yards from the warehouse, fronting the warehouse window: About ten minutes before two o'clock in the morning, it was very dark indeed, I heard a very great crashing at the window.

WILLIAM HEARNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a watchman in Arthur-street; I know the prisoner Hall perfectly well.PQ. Do you know Sylvester's house? - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner Hall in French-alley, about ten minutes or a quarter after two o'clock, somewhere thereabouts; he went down an alley towards Sylvester's house.

Q. Have you any doubt of that being the prisoner Hall? - A. I have no doubt of it, I have known the man so many years.

Mr. Gleed. Q. He was going home, was he not? - A. He could go that way.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was it his direct way? - A. No; but he could go that way; he lives in Turk's Head-court.

Court. (To Sylvester.) Q. The Company pay the rent of the warehouse, and you pay the rent of the dwelling-house? - A. No, I don't pay any rent; I act as the agent of the Company.

Mr. Alley contended that the indictment could not be maintained, inasmuch as it ought to have been charged to be the dwelling-house of the Company, and cited the case of Ann Hawkins from Mr. Justice Foster, as follows:

"At the Sessions at the Old-Bailey before Easter Term, 1704, Ann Hawkins was indicted for breaking the mansion-house of Samuel Story , in the night-time. It appeared on evidence that the house belonged to the African Company, that Story was an officer of the Company, and that he and many other persons, as officers of the Company, had separate apartments in the house in which they inhabited and lodged, and that the apartment of Story was broke open. It was holden by Holt Chief Justice, myself, and Baron Bury , that the apartment of Story could not be called his mansion-house, because he and the others inhabit in the house, merely as officers and servants of the Company, and thereupon the Jury was discharged of this indictment, and it was amended and laid to be the mansion-house of the Company."

Mr. Gleed followed on the same side.

Court. (To Sylvester.) Q. Are you a married man? - A. Yes, and have seven children.

Q. And a servant? - A. Yes.

Q. Do they all live in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. The lease of this house is in the Company? - A. Yes.

Q. They pay you a consideration for your agency? - A. Yes.

Q. And part of that consideration is the house you live in? - A. Undoubtedly.

Mr. Baron Graham. If hereafter any doubt should occur upon the reconsideration of this subject, the prisoners shall have the benefit of that doubt, but, at present, as far as my own judgment will guide me, I am clearly of opinion, for the purpose of sustaining such a prosecution as this, that this is certainly the dwelling house of Sylvester; for though true it is the rent is paid by this Company in the country, and though it is persently true they have a lease of this house, yet it would be quite perverting the use of common language, to say this is the dwelling-house of the Company, because, most evidently, the only use the Company make of this house is, for the purpose of furnishing a dwelling to their agent, and a warehouse for the commodities there deposited; that being the case, it strikes me as precisely the same thing, as if they paid Sylvester as much more as the rent of the house would amount to, and he, in point of fact, paid the rent; but the bargain happens to take another shape; they prefer paying the rent, and giving him and his family a dwelling towards that salary which he was to receive from them; it strikes me, therefore, that it is essentially and truly the dwelling-house of the person who, with his family, occupied the house, and that certainly comes within the law of burglary; for it would be absurd to suppose that that terror, which is of the essence of the crime, can be carried to Witney, in Oxfordshire; I shall, therefore, leave it to the Jury with this provision, that if my brothers should entertain any doubt about it, I will put it into a state of further adjudication.

Mr. Justice Grose I am of opinion, it is absolutely necessary to justice, that this house should be considered, in point of law, as the house of Sylvester, but if, for any reason hereafter, we should be induced to doubt, it will be perfectly right there should be another indictment, for the country are extremely interested in such a case as this being brought before a Jury. I wish to know whether it has not happened in this place that a prosecution has been commenced for a burglary, in breaking open some of the halls in this city, in which, undoubtedly, the Corporation do not live, but in which their clerks generally live.

Mr. Knapp. My father, as your Lordship knows, was clerk to the Haberdashers' Company, which was broke open, and there the Court held it to be for that purpose my father's house.

Margett's defence. I am innocent of the crime; a ledger, of the name of Joues, who had left my lodgings the night before, came to me, and said he was under disagreeable circumstances, he expected an execution in his house, and wished me to let him bring these things in; he left them between four and five in the morning, and said he would take them away at dusk, and while I was at breakfast, the officers came; I am a silversmith by trade.

Hall's defence. I am totally innocent of the robbery; I called for a box that he had to mend.

Bowman's defence. I went to Margetts's to fetch a table to mend, and while I was there, the officers came and took me.

Margetts called three, and Bowman four, witnesses, who gave them a good character.

John Margetts , GUILTY , Death , aged 29.

Richard Hall, GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

Thomas Bowman , GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

Rebecca Margetts, Not GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010520-21

459. ROBERT UNWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , a sack, value 2s. and four bushels of malt, value 2l. the property of James Whittinstall and William Whittinstall , in a barge upon the navigable river Lea .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Richard Meux , Henry Meux , Thomas Meux , Andrew Read , John Read , and Thomas Wingrove .

Third Count. Charging them to be the property of John Ayling .(The case was opened by Mr. Gleed.)

JOHN AYLING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am steersman to the prosecutors, James and William Whittinstall, mealmen and maltsters at Broxburn: On the 1st of May, I had 257 quarters of malt on board; on the 2d of May, I went on board the barge at High Bridge, Upper Clapton , about two in the morning, I had left it about seven; there was a man on board all night; when I went in the morning, I found the tarpaulin pulled over, and missed a sack of malt, and a sack of chaff put in its place.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you mean to say you had counted all these sacks? - A. No; but I am sure they were all there at seven o'clock the night before.

Q. But that sack of chaff might have been there then, for any thing you know? - A. The boy fed the horses after that.

Q. This was in the old river Lea? - A. Yes.

Q. There is not always water in the old river Lea? - A. No, there was not at this time.

Q. It was not afloat then? - A. No.

Q. Could any vessel have passed? - A. No.

JOHN GILLHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I slept on board the barge that night; I was not on shore till two or three in the morning; I saw the prisoner in the barge the over night.

Q. What business had he in the barge? - A. He

is a young man who used to be employed in that sort of business; I am very certain the sacks were very safe the night before.

HENRY CASINOVE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. On the 3d of May, I was going into the river Lea, I saw the prisoner behind a little shed of mine, about seven o'clock in the morning: In consequence of a suspicion that I entertained, I observed him, and as I was getting into a boat with Mr. Lomax, for the purpose of going to bathe, I saw the prisoner going across the field with a sack, I stopped him; in the mean time, Lomax had sent for a constable; I took him to Mr. Lomax's house; as he saw a constable coming down the hill, he attempted to run off; then the constable went after him, and took him; I saw him drop a sample bag from him, I picked it up? it contained some malt.

WILLIAM LOMAX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. On Saturday morning, the 2d of May, the prisoner asked me if I would buy some malt; I said I would have nothing to do with it; I asked him where he got it; he said it was left for him to sell; I asked him where it was; he said, it matters not, if you will buy it, you shall have it at your own price; on Sunday morning, in consequence of what I had heard, I sent for a constable, and I was with Mr. Casinove when he went and laid hold of him.

SAMUEL EAMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. The barge was loaded at Hertford, it belonged to James and William Whittinstall; this is one of the sacks that was on board the barge,(produces it); it is the prosecutor's sack, and it is very much like the malt.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It is a practice, I believe, to lend sacks upon the river? - A. No, it is not a common practice; they do borrow sometimes.

The prisoner left his defence of his Counsel.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s. aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-22

460. PETER COLLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , twelve willow sets, value 5s. the property of James Scott .

JAMES SCOTT sworn. - I live at Islington : I lost a number of willow sets from an orchard of mine, I think, on the 2d of April, 1799, I missed them about twelve at noon; it had been a frosty morning, and I traced two men out of the orchard, my boy followed one, and I the other; we followed over two fields till we came to a bank, and there we rested; then we went over Mr. Wilson's field, and found a quantity of sets in Mr. Wilson's fish-pond; he lives at Highbury; I then got upon a gate belonging to Mr. Wilson, and holloaed to his gardener; I told him I had lost a quantity of willows, and they were set in his master's pond; he said, the man that had the job of planting them, was then coming up the field; some of them had been planted, and some not planted; the prisoner then came up, and another with him; he asked me what I was making a noise about; I told him I had just reason to make a noise, I had lost all my willows, and that most of them were set reound Mr. Wilson's pond; he d - d me, and said they were not mine, that he had bought them of a man, and gave half-a-crown for them; I told him they were my property, and I would swear to them; I then sent my boy for a constable, and I sent the footman to Mr. Wilson; he said I must take the man, for he would not deliver up the willows; I detained the prisoner, and the other man walked away; the prisoner then said, that is the man I bought them of; says I, why did not you tell me that before, and I would have secured him; I said, there were two carried them away, for I had tracked them; he said he had come honestly by them, and bought them for half-a-crown; he said he would rather have given ten pounds out of his pocket, than Mr. Wilson should have known of it; I delivered him to the constable, and he was taken before the Magistrate at Hatton-garden; the Magistrate took two labouring men's bail for him.

Q. What Magistrate was it? - A. I do not know,(produces a paper); I understood he was a new Magistrate on the bench; they put the trail off from time to time, and I attended the Court here two Sessions; I saw him every time that I came here.

Q. When did you last apprehend him? - A. I think it was last Monday I got a warrant from Worship-street, and apprehended him.

Q. Could you swear to these sets? - A. Yes, I can swear to twelve of them; I have not seen them since.

Q. You have no doubt the prisoner is the man with whom you had that conversation? - A. None.

Q. Is the officer here? - A. No.

Prisoner. I bought them of the man that went away, and gave him half-a-crown for them; his name is Richard Lee , he is a labouring man.

JOSEPH WILSON sworn. - I employed the prisoner for a few days to clean the pond and enlarge it, and while he was cleaning it, he proposed planting some willows to shade the water in the summer; I directly replied, that I thought it might be useful, and that I supposed the best place to get them, was at the nurseryman's; he said he worked for several families where willows were growing, and he thought he could get me some cuttings; I agreed to his doing so; he afterwards told me they cost him half-a-crown, and my servant paid him for them.

JOHN COX sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Scott: About two years ago, Mr. Scott missed all the willows from the pond in the orchard; we traced

where they had been thrown over, and we went step for step with them all the way, there were two men's footship, we traced them to Mr. Wilson's pond; then we saw two men coming across the field, the prisoner was one of them; he said to Mr. Scott, what are you making a noise about; he said, I have good reason, these are my willows; I went for a constable.

Prisoner. After Mr. Scott had me in custody, they left me in the tap-room, and went into the parlour; I staid, and the constable said, Mr. Scott and I have fettled it, but you must give Mr. Scott half-a-guinea; I said I could not think of doing that, as I was innocent; then Mr. Scott said, if I would not give him the money, he would prosecute me; upon that I was taken before the Magistrate, and committed to Clerkenwell, where I was bailed out; Mr. Scott then wanted to make it up for five pounds, he would not take less than five pounds; and I have a witness here now, that carried all the money that I could raise, and he said that would not do; the Sunday following, there came a man from Mr. Scott to Thomas Frost's, the place appointed to know what I could raise; I told him I could not raise five pounds; Mr. Scott said, give me the money you have got, and I will go to Mr. Scott, and see if I cannot settle it without any further trouble, I think Mr. Scott will take it of me; he said he was obliged to pay the whole money when he stole a pig, and he would not take less than the whole of me.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS FROST sworn. - I keep a chandler's shop at Holloway.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; he was under a charge of stealing some willow sets.

Q. Have you seen him since? - A. Yes, I have accidentally seen him backwards and forwards, no more than that; I know nothing of the business; I was subpoenaed, but I don't know what for.

Q. Were you ever present at any conversation between Scott and the prisoner? - A. Yes; they were trying to make it up, and Mr. Scott did offer to make it up for five guineas.

Q. Where was that? - A. Upon my soul I cannot say, I believe it was at Mr. Scott's own house; I carried him four guineas, and he refused to take it; he said he would take five.

Q. (To Scott.) You have heard what the prisoner has said, and what this last witness has said? - A. I have; I never did, upon my oath; I have had many attempts made me, but I told them the law should take its course; he brought something in a paper, but what, I don't know; he said there was something for me; I told him I would not meddle with it, that the law should take its course; he said he could not help it, then he would carry it back again.

Q. You undertake positively to say, that you did not offer to take five guineas? - A. I did not, upon my oath; here is another man, of the name of Atfield, here, that has been with me trying to make it up.

WILLIAM ATFIELD sworn. - I am a shoe maker, at No. 3. Park-street, Islington: I heard Mr. Scott say, before they went to the Justice, that he would make it up for half-a-guinea, he did not want to hurt the man; that is all I know about it.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Q. (To Scott.) You have heard what this man, Atfield, has said? - A. Yes, it is false; and if I had known of any thing of this sort coming forward, I would have brought the constable with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-23

461. MARY LESLIE , alias DOVEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , a looking-glass, value 10s. two blankets, value 4s. a coverlid, value 1s. 6d. two pillows, value 7s. a bolster, value 6s. two pillow-cases, value 6d. a coffee-pot, value 6d. a pair of snuffers and stand, value 6d. two metal spoons, value 6d. and a brass candlestick, value 2s. the property of Richard Yeen , in a lodging-room .

RICHARD YEEN sworn. - I keep a lodging-house, in Old Round-court ; my wife let the lodgings.

CATHARINE YEEN sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I let the prisoner a ready-furnished room at 3s. 6d. a week, on the 15th; she went away on the 22d, she never paid any rent; she took the room in the name of Dovey, as a married woman; I heard that they had not been in their lodgings all night; she had a man with her that she called her husband.

Q. Who did you let the lodgings to? - A. To Mary Leslie ; I was told that she went out on the 22d with two bundles; I then took a person and examined the room, and missed the articles mentioned in the indictment; I have found some of them since.

ANN PRESTON sworn. - About five weeks ago, to the best of my recollection, the prisoner sold me two blankets, two pillows, a bolster, a coffee-pot, and two spoons; I am sure it was the prisoner.(Produces them).(They were identified by Mrs. Years).

Prisoner's defence. I did not leave the room, I had the key with me.

Mrs. Yeen. My husband apprehended her on the 27th of April.

Prisoner. My uncle offered to put every thing in its place again, and they would not have it.

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn. - I am an officer; I found this duplicate of a looking-glass in the

prisoner's last lodgings, at Mrs. Hannah's, in Angel-court.(The pawnbroker produced the glass, which was identified by Mrs. Yeen). GUILTY , aged 18.

Privately whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-24

462. JAMES LAVIS and WILLIAM SIMMONS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , two washing-tubs, value 10s. the property of Richard Spearing .

RICHARD SPEARING sworn. - I am a cooper : On the 22d of April I missed two washing-tubs out of my shop; I saw the prisoner, Simmons, three or four times walking by my kitchen, the tubs were then in the shop; I went out for a walk, and when I came back I missed the tubs; I saw Ray running, and he gave me information of them.

JOHN RAY sworn. - On Wednesday the 22d of April, I was standing at the Office door in Worship-street , about sixty yards from the prosecutor's house, I observed Lavis with two washing-tubs on his shoulder, and Simmons close to him; they turned down a gate-way very nearly opposite the Office; I saw the tall man, Simmons, come once or twice and peep out at the gate-way, and I suspected they were not honestly come by; I walked gently down to Mr. Spearing's shop, and he was just then coming by the door; I asked him if he had lost any thing; he told me he had lost two tubs; I then saw the men turn down Long-alley, and I immediately pursued them; they turned up a place called Devonshire-buildings, they were walkings as fast as they could walk; knowing the out-let of the court, I took down another court and met them, Lavis had then shifted them from his shoulder to Simmons's; I immediately collared Simmons, and he threw down the tubs; I went to lay hold of the other with my other hand, and he turned about and run down Long-alley; Armstrong then came up, and I delivered Simmons to him while I pursued Lavis; I followed him two or three hundred yards, and then I took him.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I had Simmons in custody from Ray; a boy picked up the tubs; and I made him carry them before me to the Office.

Ray. These are the same tubs.

Spearing. These are my tubs, I should know them from five hundred.

Lavis's defence. A man with a leather apron on asked me to carry these two tubs to No. 1, in Long-alley.

Simmons's defence. Lavis asked me to take them a bit, from his shoulder, when these gentlemen came up.

Lavis, GUILTY , aged 29.

Simmons, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010520-25

463. SUSANNAH NETTLEFOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , an iron fender, value 10s. the property of John Walker .

ELIZABETH WALKER sworn. - I am the wife of John Walker ; The fender was put out at my door at half past six o'clock, and about half past seven, the prisoner was brought back to my house with the fender, (the fender produced); I know it to be mine, it has my mark upon it.

THOMAS ATHERTON sworn. - On the 24th of April, I saw the fender in the possession of the prisoner in Holywell-lane, about a quarter past seven o'clock in the morning, she was offering it for sale to a broker; I asked if she was going to sell it, and she said, yes; she asked five shillings and sixpence for it; I told her I did not think it was honestly come by; she said, yes it was, a woman gave it her to tell; I had seen the prisoner before near Mr. Walker's house in the morning, and there was another woman with her; I saw both the women with a sender between them, I thought; I had not seen them with a fender before I went to Finsbury-square, and upon my return, I saw the prisoner offering it for sale; she was very much intoxicated; Mr. Walker's servant came and claimed it.

Prisoner's defence. A woman gave it to me to sell for her. GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-26

464. THOMAS PLUMB , alias PARKES , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , a copper tea-kettle, value 20s. the property of Samuel Hawkes .

SAMUEL HAWKES sworn. - I am an ironmonger and brazier : On the 20th of April, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop and agreed to purchase a copper tea-kettle, he agreed to give me twenty shillings, and desired it to be sent to the brewhouse, meaning Gassrd's brewhouse, he personated a brewer's clerk, with a white apron on; I asked him if it was to be sent to Mr. Delafield's house; he hesitated at first, and then said, no, but to the accompting-house; I said I would send it by-and by; he wished to have it sent directly; I then desired my young man in the shop, Samuel Cox, to take it directly; he desired to have a bill and receipt, which was made out in the name of Parkes; my shopman then took the tea kettle out of the shop, and I never saw any more of it.

SAMUEL COX sworn. - I am shopman to the prosecutor: On the 20th of April last, the prisoner came to my master's shop to buy a kettle, he agreed for one of twenty shillings, and I was desired to take it over to Mr. Gissard's brewhouse; I made a bill by the name of Parkes, and took the kettle, that was at the desire of the prisoner; I took the kettle and bill and delivered it in Mr. Gissard's

gate-way, just under the arch, into the hands of the prisoner; he told me to go and get a pint of beer, and he would bring me the money; I waited a quarter of an hour but no person came in; I inquired at the office of the brewhouse for such a person, but they did not know any thing of him.

Hawkes. I afterwards saw him at the Police-office; he was brought there for defrauding a tailor of a coat, and he was committed.

Prisoner's defence. I bought this tea-kettle, and was going to fetch the money for the gentleman, and there came an execution against me for debt, and I was stopped, and they took me to Hatton-garden.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-27

465. JOHN RUSSELL was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , four pounds of Prussian blue, value 20s. fourteen pounds of queen's blue, value 21s. 8d. four pounds of saltpetre, vlue 41s. 6d. and a basket, value 1s. the property of Thomas Paxton and Andrew Lawrie , upon a certain wharf called the Leith and Berwick wharf, adjacent to the navigable river Thames .

Second Count. Charging in to be the property of Charles Price the elder, Charles Price , the younger, and John Moss .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of certain person to the jurors unknown.(The cafe was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ROBERT MALCOLM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Lawrie, at the Leith and Berwick wharf in Lower East-Smithfield : On Wednesday the 29th of April, I saw the prisoner upon the wharf, about eight o'clock in the morning, going out the wharf-gate, he had a basket upon his shoulder; I asked him where he got it; and he told me on board a ship; he said a gentleman had ordered him to carry it to No. 15, Burr-street; I took the basket from him, it contained two parcels of blue, and one of salt-petre; I put it down upon the wharf, I don't know who took it up.

Q. Should you know the basket again? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes.

SAMUEL HOPEWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Messrs. Thomas Paxton and Andrew Lawrie , proprietors of the Leith and Berwick wharf; the basket that is here, I received from Mr. Alderman Price, for which I gave a receipt. (The basket produced).

Malcolm. This is the basket that I saw upon the prisoner's shoulder.

Hopewell. It was taken from the lower end of the wharf, close by the water-side, I had seen it there; it was directed to S. Wilson, Dunfermlin.

Q. What is the value of it? - A.The value to us is two pounds twelve shillings and sixpence.

JOHN-PANTON KEITH sworn. - Exmined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the surveyors of the Thames Police-office: I took the prisoner on the Lieth and Berwick wharf; I have had the basket ever since.

Prisoner's defence. I did not move it more than six or seven yards; I went to dress my wounds upon it, for I have got the scurvy broke out upon me.

Malcolm. He was walking away with it upon his shoulder. GUILTY, aged 85

Of stealing goods value 39s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-28

466. JOHN SIMMISTER , alias JAMESON , was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , two pair of boots, value 15s. the property of William Harris .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, and there being no other evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was

ACQUITED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-29

467. SAMUEL PARSONS was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , ninety-five pounds weight of beef, value 3l. 9s. the property of Margaret Yates .( The case was opened by Mr. Mantagur.)

FREDERICK LISTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Montague. I am errand-boy to Mrs.Yates, No.92, Fetter-lane: On Monday the 9th of March last, the prisoner came and took a rump and a loin of beef away; he said there was a mistake about that beef, he was to take it to Islington; he immediately put a cloth upon his shoulder, and put the beef upon the cloth; he said it was bought at Mr. Gordon's, in Newgate-market, and then went away with it; I went after him, and overtook him at the corner of Hatton-garden, he was walking as fast as he could, with the meat upon his shoulder; I asked him where he was going to take that bees to; he said to Islington; I immediately left him, and went to Mr. Gordon's; a day or two afterwards I saw him at Hatton-garden, and knew him again.

Q. Have you any doubt about his being the man?

- A. None; I told him he had taken the beef, but he did not say any thing to it.

Q. THOMAS STRICKLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Montague. I lodge in the house of Mrs. Yates, she is a widow woman, her name is Margaret; I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and overtook him in Hatton-garden; I passed him, and looked at him three several times full in the face; the prisoner said, what do you mean, or what do you want, I cannot exactly say which; I told him a piece of beef had been stolen from Mrs. Yates's in Fetter-

lane; he said he had bought the beef of Phil. Gordon; I think that was his expression; he said he would go there, or wherever I pleased; he was upon the run when I came up to him, as well as he could with so large a piece of beef upon his shoulder; I suffered him to proceed, not knowing what piece of beef it was that was lost; about three quarters of an hour afterwards, I went with the journeyman in search of the prisoner, and found him in Cow-cross; I then asked him to go to Islington, where he described that he was going; he went along with us a few yards, seemingly contented, and then several times attempted to make his escape; he got away, and I pursued him, and saw him taken by a constable, I never lost fight of him; the boy was shewn into two rooms, and very much cautioned, and then he came into a dark room, where the prisoner was, he immediately said, that is the man that stole the beef; the prisoner said he was not, and used very abusive language.

ALEXNDER GORDON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Montague. I am a butcher in Newgate-market; there is no other butcher in Newgate-market of the same name.

Q. Did you, on the 9th of March last, sell a rump and lion of beef, either to the prisoner or to Mrs. Yates? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you send the prisoner to Mrs. Yates for any beef? - A.No, I did not.

ANTHONY PAYNE sworn. - Examined by MR. Montague. I keep the Coach and Horses in Mutton-lane; On Monday morning. I cannot say what day of the month it was, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into my house, and put the beef down upon the table; he then had a glass of gin, and desired I would let him leave that a-while, till he fetched some more; the prisoner went out at my door, and I never saw him after; I am sure he is the same man; he had no coat on, and I could almost swear to that being the waistcoat he had on.

ISAAC KIMPTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Montague. I am journeyman to the prosecutrix: This rump and loin of beef was Mrs. Yates's; I heard of it, and went to Mr. Payne's, and knew it again immediately; I had bought it for Mrs. Yates on the Monday, I could swear to the beef; I apprehended the prisoner, he had no coat on at that time.

Q.(To Strickland.) Was the examination before Magistrate taken down in writing? - A. It was not; it was not the prisoner, that said his habitation was not at Islington, but, to the best of my recollection, he said he lived somewhere about Long-lane.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Transported of seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-30

468. SAMUEL DEARY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , three pair of breeches, value 24s. four waistcoats, value 15s. and a great coat, value 10s. the property of Samuel Lloyd , William Lloyd , the elder, William Lloyd ; and William Lloyd , the younger.

WILLIAM LLOYD; sen. sworn. - I am a slopseller , in partnership with Samuel Lloyd, William Lloyd , and William Lloyd the younger, in Lower Thames-street: The prisoner had been in our service about six months, as porter ; I know nothing of the loss, I can only prove the property; I saw it at the office in Worship-street.

GEORGE TITTERTON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, (produces a waistcoat); the prisoner at the bar brought it to pledge on Wednesday the 23d of April, he asked four shillings on it, and said he would take three; he told me he gave half-a-guinea for it; he said he bought it of a man in the street, about a fortnight before that; I asked him where he worked; and he said he worked at Mr. Lloyd's; I stopped him, and the waistcoat, and gave charge of him to the constable, and then I went to MR. Lloyd's.

Mr. Lloyd. It has our mark on it.

JAMES- WILLIAM TYLER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant,(produces pair of breeches); I took them in from two different women, they are not here.

- HALL Sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, (produces a waistcoat and a pair of breeches); I took them in of two women.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; On Wednesday the 22d of April, the prisoner was brought to the office by armstrong, I searched him, and found in his pocket a key, which he said belonged to the box where he lodged, at the George in Shoreditch; I went there, and found a pair of breeches in his box, and seven duplicates, (produces them); I went round to the pawnbrokers; the duplicates correspond with the articles the pawnbrokers have produced.

(The whole of the property was identified by Mr. Lloyd).

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner.

The prisoner lest his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-31

469. MARY KEEN and CATHERINE CLARKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , twenty-one yards of cotton, value 3l. 3s. the property of Thomas-Perry Tuther , privately in his shop .

JOHN HOLE sworn. - I am journeyman to Thomas-Perry Tuther, linen-draper , No.59, Hol

born-hill ; On Saturday the 25th of April, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the two prisoners at the bar came into our shop, and asked me for some printed cotton; Keen came in first, followed by Clarke; Keen asked to look at some printed cotton; I asked her what price she would go to; she said, half-a-crown; there was a piece of ell-wide print lying that she seemed to fancy, and asked the price; I told her four shillings a yard; she seemed to turn it over for some time, and after wards returned to the other, at two shillings and eight-pence; I asked her how much she might want in quantity; she said six yards; I told her I would measure the piece over, there were eleven yards of it; I told her if she liked I would put in up at half-a crown a yard; upon that, she returned to the other piece, at four shillings, she seemed to like that very much; the prisoner, Clarke, them persuaded her to have that at half-a-crown; and after her persuation she agreed to have the seven yards; I them observed their two cloaks entangled together; I asked her what fort of lining she would have; I went on the other side of the shop to get a lining for her, and upon that, I saw the prisoner, clarke, walking out at the door; I immediately jumped over the counter, and tapped her on the shoulder, and told her I had a word to speak to her; I walked her into the shop before me, I let go her arm, and from under her cloak she dropped a whole piece of ell-wide print, containing twenty-one yards; and she dropped, at the same time, eleven yards and three quarters of yard-wide; she had a long brown cloak on, the prisoners, Keen, then came towards where the print lay, and put it upon the counter, and said, what the devil would you have more of the women than your propery; I threw it down upon the floor again; the then took it up again; a person in the shop immediately threw it on the floor again; it was with difficulty that I secured the prisoners; the patrols were sent for, they have the property; I know it to be Mr. Tuther's property by the private mark, L.A.

Q. Did you see neither of the prisoners take it at all? - A. No; I had a suspicion from seeing then cloaks entangled.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney(Counsel for Keen.)

Q. Keen certainly only looked at two articles, neither of which you missed? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.(Counsel for Clarke.)

Q. Had Clarke a child with her at the time? - A. Yes.

Q. She put the child upon the counter, did not she? - A.No.

Q. Have you never said that she put the child upon the counter, and that was the way she drew the print off the counter? - A. No; she had the child in her arms.

Q. Then, if she had her arms occupied with the child, as she has now, how could she have taken it? - A.I cannot say how that was.

Q. How many persons were serving in the shop? - A. One, besides Mr. Tuther.

Q. And neither of them are here? - A. No.

Q. Have you never said, that you believed it was more from accident that design that these things tumbled upon the ground? - A. No, never.

THOMAS ROBSON sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Tuther; I saw Mr. Hole jump over the counter, and go out at the door and bring the prisoner, Clarke, in; he brought her a little way into the shop, and opposite where I stood she dropped two quantities of print.

JOHN LACEY sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to St. Andrew's. (Produces two pieces of printed cotton).

Hole. It is a whole piece, it is marked at the two ends, it has never been cut.

Keen's defence. The gentlemen took me by the breast, and used me with the greatest violence.

The prisoner, Clarke, left her defence to her Counsel.

The prisoner, Clarke, Called three, and Keen two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Keen, GUILTY, aged 32.

Clarke, GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-32

470. THOMAS THORPE was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , three printed bound books, value 8s. 6d. six printed books in boards, value 4l. 17s. 7d. and five hundred maps, value 8l. the property of George Robinson the elder, George Robinson the younger, and John Robinson .

There being no evidence to prove the property in the possession of the prisoner witness then the City of London, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr.Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-33

471. JOHN WALLER was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , thirteen ounces of tea, value 2s. 6d. the property of the the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WALTER CHERRITON sworn. - I am assistant commodore in the India war houses, in Cooper's box, St. Olave's ; the prisoner was a labourer ; in consequence of suspicion, I concealed myself in the warehouses; On Saturday, the 18th of April, I saw the prisoner go past me, he went down an alley formed of tea-chests; then I saw him put his right-hand into a chess, take out some tea, and put it into his right-hand pocket.

Q. Was that tea the property of the East-India Company? - A. Yes; he then did the same a second time; he went on further to another alley, and went to another chess, in the same warehouse, took some tea, and put that into his right-hand pocket also; he went into the further warehouse, and turned himself round, and then came back again, and turned to the left to another part of the warehouse, and then put his hand into another chess, and put some more tea into his pocket, that was the third chess; he was making his way out of the warehouse, I came from where I was concealed, and laid hold of him; he said, he did not know what possessed him to make him do so; I said he should have thought of that sooner, I must do my duty; you must go with me to the elder; I tool him to Mr. Nodderby, at the head warehouse in jewry-street, and there I saw Mr. Nodderby take the tea out of his righthand pocket.

THOMAS NODDERBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. KNapp. I am an elder; The Prisoner was brought to me by the last witness; I searched him, and found the tea in his right-hand pocket, it is the same sort of tea that was in the warehouse; he bagged for mercy, but I told him I must do my duty, as he was brought there, and I took him to the head accompting house.

JOHN LAWRENCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the King's locker; I took the tea out of the prisoner's right-hand pocket, there is about thirteen ounces of it; it is worth two shillings and sixpence. (Produces it).

Prisoner's defence. I was going to sweep up the the warehouse; I went into the further warehouse to look for a broom, and could not find one; I was not right in my head, I have a fracture; I had had a drop of liquor that morning, and did not know what I was doing; I fell down thirty-six yards perpendicular from Hackney-church steeple; my father was sexton, and I was going to wind up the clock; if I take a drop of liquor I don't know what I do.

GUILTY .

Confined one week in Newgate , and publicly whipped one hundred yards in Jewry-street .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-34

472. JAMES THATCHER was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , a sack, value 2s. and five bushels of flour, value 5l. the property of William Harvey , and William Napier .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Alexander Ingram .

There being no evidence to shew a conversion to his own his, the prisoner was AQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr.Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-35

473. JOHN WALKER was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , three metal candlesticks value 3s. the property of Samuel Bird .

SAMUEL BIRD sworn. - I keep the Three Johns, in Three John-street ; On Sunday, the 3d of May, in the afternoon, about six or seven o'clock, I lost three metal candlesticks, the prisoner belonged to a company that was always paid at my house; I missed them, and pursued the prisoner; I stopped him about a hundred yards from my house; I told him I suspected he had something belonging to me; he denied it, and struck at me; I fastened upon his collar with both hands, and he endeavoured to estricate himself, I found the candlesticks under his coat, they were lost form the back kitchen; I had seen him go backwards, and thought he was going into the yard,(produces them); I had seen them just before.

Prisoner's defence. A women asked me to take these candlesticks to No.5. Dartmouth-row, and she would give me a pint of beer.

GUILTY , aged 25. - Twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-36

474. ELIZABETH FLAY was indicted for the wilful murder of Eleanor Flay .

Mr. Thomas Souden , the surgeon, being of opinion that the cause of the death was a low nervous fever, and not produced by acts of violence, the prisoner was

AQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Groge.

Reference Number: t18010520-37

475. JOHN TOUCHFIELD was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , seventy pounds weight of lead, value 12s belonging to Harris Rees , fixed to a certain building of his .

Second Count. Charging it to be fixed to a certain building of his, called a house.

And two other Counts, charging it to be the

property of Martha Margaret , the wife of the said Rees Harris .

MARTHA-MARGARET HARRIS sworn. - I am the wife of Rees Harris; the lead was taken from some houses of mine.

Q. Is it an estate settled to your separate use? - A. Yes; but my husband has a life interest in it; I know nothing of the loss, but from information.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR sworn. - I lodge in Mr. Harris's house at Hoxton ; Another lodger, who lodges in the two pair of stairs front-room, came down to call me up between four and five, I got up, and went up stairs immediately; the first thing I saw, when I opened the garret window, was the lead gone; the shop is built out from the house, and the lead was taken from a gutter that runs between the shop and the house; one parcel of lead was taken away, and another parcel lay outside the door ready to be taken away.

- LILLYWHITE sworn. - I am headborough of Shoreditch; On Tuesday, the 5th of May, between two and three in the morning, I saw the

prisoner come out of Red Lion Passage, in Kingsland Road, with some lead, like a gutter; I put my hand upon it, and asked him what he had got there; he said, lead; I asked him how he came by it; he said he had picked it up in Red Lion Passage; I said hold of him, and then he threw down the lead, and said, he would not carry it any further; I searched him, and in his pocket I found a pair of pincers, three iron hold-fasts, and a bit of lead, there is the mark of the bite of the pincers upon the lead; the same morning I took him before the Magistrate at Worship-street, and he was committed till I could find out where the lead was stolen from; on the Wednesday, I heard that some lead had been lost from a shop in Hoxton town, and on the Saturday, Armstrong and I went to the house of Mrs. Taylor, and fitted the lead; there had been new lead put down, and I tried it over the new lead, it fitted as well as lead could possibly do; there was the marks upon the lead where the three hold-fasts had been.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I was ordered by the Magistrate to go with Lillywhite to sit the lead; I have no doubt it was the lead that came from that spot; there was the mark of the dripping eaves upon it.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent; I picked it up in Red Lion Passage.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-38

476. WILLIAM BURK and LYON LEVY were indicated for making an assault in the King's highway upon Cobby Salter , on the 3d of May, putting her in sear, and taking from her person a silver watch, value 4l. and a gold seal, value 1l. the property of James Fraser .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp)

COBBY SALTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I went with Mr. Fraser, on Saturday, the 2d of May, about eight in the evening, to a butcher's shop in Grazier's-alley, Wellclose-square; then we went to Mr. Marsh's, a public-house, in Wellclose square ; Levy was there, and Burk came in afterwards; we had a glass of gin at the bar; we were going away, and Levy directly calling me Mrs. Salter, said, he knew my husband working at a master carpenter's in Wapping.

Q. Did you know him? - A. No; he told me his name was Smith; then we set down, and had a pint of beer; Fraser took out his watch to see what o'clock it was, Levy then made a snatch at the watch; seeing that, I took Fraser's watch from him, to take care of it, and put it in my pocket.

Q. Was Fraser sober? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes; I very often had his watch, he is my nephew, we missed our piece of meat, and we stayed near about half an hour; Levy was in the house all that time; Fraser and I went out of the house together, and at the end of Wellclose-square, there is a lamp, where we fell in with Burk and Levy, that was about ten minutes after we came out; Levy clapped Fraser on the shoulder, and said, so you are going home; upon that, he said they were going our way, and they would see us part of the way home; then we all went together along Ratcliff-highway to the corner of St. John's-hill, where we were going to turn down; directly upon turning the hill, I had the watch in my hand in my pocket; it was wrenched out of my hand; I struggled as long as I could, and the glass was broke; it was either Burk or Levy, I do not know which; there was nobody else near; upon that I screamed, murder, saying, Fraser, your watch is lost; he was about three or four yards before me, he walked faster than me; upon that, they both stew, they were gone in a moment; I have never found the watch since; on Monday morning, between twelve and one, I went to the Magistrate, and the prisoners were apprehended.

Q. Have you any doubt at all that the two prisoners were the persons who were in the public-house, and were afterwards with you at the corner of the hill? - A. I am confident of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You went to this public-house, after having been at the butcher's, and had a glass at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. That was the first you had had that day? - A. I had had nothing before I went in, without it was a little porter in the course of the day.

Q. Had you no liquor in the course of that day?

- A. If I had been drunk. I should not have remembered these particulars.

Q. Then you were quite sober? - A. I was sober and sensible; I knew what I was about.

Q. At the public-house you had gin and beer?

- A. A glass of gin, and three pints of beer; and three or four drank of that.

Q. How long might you stop there? - A. About an hour, or an hour and a half; I had missed my meat.

Q. You were an orderly good kind of woman; were you not rather noisy? - A. I was merry.

Q. Did not you sing a song or two? - A. I might sing a few verses of a song.

Q. Were you not so noisy and drunk, that the landlord would not draw you any more? - A. He was going to shut up; it was twelve o'clock, or between twelve and one.

Q. Did you not say, if you will not, I will go to Johnny Clarke 's, he will draw me some? - A. I did say so.

Q. How far was this place, where Levy joined you, from Marsh's? - A. About fifteen yards.

Q. Then with great difficulty you got fifteen

yards in ten minutes? - A. It might be thereabouts.

Q. Who advised you to charge this man with a highway robbery? - A. Myself.

Q. You, yourself, employed an attorney? - A. Mr. Fraser did.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. There is an attorney employed.

Q. Will you swear that he is employed by either of you? - A. I suppose so.

Q. Upon your oath is he not employed by the Police officers to get the reward? - A. I suppose I must pay him.

Q. Will you venture to swear that Burk was present at the corner of the hill? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you swear before the Magistrate that he was one of the two persons at Marsh's? - A. I did.

Q. You swear it as positively as before?

Court. It is too bad, she swore before the Magistrate that she was not certain that Burk was one of the men in Wellclose-square; this is the way in which counties are endeavoured to be robbed of their money by rewards; there is no doubt but the attorney has been employed for the purpose of obtaining. 80l. reward. Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-39

447. WILLIAM REITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , seven iron hoops, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Phillips , Esq.

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of James Sleep .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES SLEEP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a cooper ; the property belongs to Mr. Philips; they were intrusted to my care; I can only identify the property.

THOMAS HAMPSHIRE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a special constable of St. Paul's, Shadwell: On Saturday evening, the 16th of May, I saw the prisoner between, eleven and twelve at night, in Gravel-lane , adjoining my house; he, with the assistance of another, drew some hoops through a gate belonging to Mr. Sleep's premises; I apprehended him, and took him to the watch-house; I delivered the hoops to the constable; there was another man in the yard, and he said, the man at the gate, and the man in the yard, had given them to him to hold, but when he had got them, he went very quick across the way with them.

Sleep. These are Mr. Philips's hoops; I have no doubt of it.

Prisoner's defence. A brewer's servant gave me these hoops to hold; he is one of Mr. Phillips's men, James Groves ; I was rather in liquor, and went across the way; Mr. Hampshire took me into custody; I looked for the other man, and he was gone.

Sleep. James Groves was a servant of Mr. Philips's; I don't know whether he was present at the delivery of them, but he knew they were there; he has totally absconded ever since. GUILTY . Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garham .

Reference Number: t18010520-40

478. JOHN SMITH was indicted for felolioniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a silk handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Thomas Wall , privily from his person .

THOMAS WALL sworn. - On Monday, the 11th of May, about half past three o'clock, I was going past Charing-Cross , putting a wafer in a letter in the street; I was going to put it in the Post-office; there was a great crowd; I had a silk handkerchief in my right hand pocket; about ten minutes after I missed my handkerchief: On Tuesday one of the Bow-street officers was in at the Hope public-house, at Charing-cross; I described my handkerchief to him; he said there was such a one, and if I would come on the next Monday morning I should have it; I went to Bow-street, and found my property; I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at Bow-street.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn - I am an officer at Bow-street: On Monday, the 11th of May, Samuel Thomas , belonging to the 19th light dragoons, brought the prisoner to me at Bow-street, about four o'clock in the afternoon; I searched him, and took this handkerchief out of his breeches,(produces it); I found these two handkerchiefs in the crown of his hat, (produces them); he confessed they were neither of them his own, except this one.

Wall. I know this to be my handkerchief, I have had it these two years, I generally wear it round my neck in a morning; we were pulling our house to pieces, and here is a mark of the lime and dirt in the creases now; I can positively swear it is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's defence. I picked them up in the street. GUILTY aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-41

479. SIMEON SHEARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , five pounds and a half of mutton, value 3s. the property of Henry Llewellyn .

JOHN HARRISON sworn. - I live within two doors of Mr. Lleweliyn, a butcher : On the 27th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, I observed a soldier, I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not, pass by my house, with a piece of mutton, endeavouring to conceal it under his coat; I said, holloa; I cried out, stop thief, and followed him nearly into a stable-yard; I saw him turn down into the yard; I saw some people pursuing

him the other way; I did not see him at the butcher's shop.

THOMAS TAGO sworn. - On the 27th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was going home, and heard the cry of stop thief; I saw a man running in soldier's clothes, I am positive it was the prisoner; I ran after him into a stable-yard, and as he was going up, he slung the mutton down in a gateway, it was a neck of mutton; the prisoner went about twenty-four yards after he had thrown it away, and then I took him easing himself; he made no resistance; he said it was not him, but another man.

ANN KENNETT sworn. - The prisoner at the bar threw the meat down by me inside the gateway, just by the wall in Black-house-yard, York-street, Westminster.

Q. Did you observe any other soldier near at the time? - A. There was no other person but me and him near when he threw it down.

THOMAS HARRIS sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. Llewelyn; I did not miss the neck of mutton till it was brought back; I went out about seven o'clock, and, returning about nine, I saw Tago, the witness, bring the prisoner out of the yard; he took him to Mr. Llewellyn's shop, and then I missed the neck of mutton, it was a very remarkable one, I hung it up myself; another neck and breast of the same sheep hung upon the same book; I found them thrown upon the ground, and the tenter-hook on which it was hung drawn out; it was very dry; it had bung from Saturday, this was Monday morning.

HENRY LLEWELLYN sworn. - This neck of mutton matched the other meat that was cut off the same sheep.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming up York-street, and I went into this yard to ease myself, and while I was there, somebody threw something in, I thought somebody had done it because I was easing myself in the yard, and they led me up by force to the shop; I have a wife and five children, she was brought to-bed not three weeks since of twins.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 37.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-42

480. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , a handsaw, value 5s. the property of John Davis .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM VINCENT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am carpenter to the London Company: On the 7th of May I was stationed at the office of works, in Russell's-bulldings, Wapping , to watch, on account of so many tools having been lost; I was concealed over head in the cieling-joists; I saw the prisoner come into the buildings, and take a hand-saw, put it under his coat, and go out with it; I went after him, and took him within ten yards from the door; I took the saw from under his coat, and brought him back.(Richard Perry, the officer, produced the saw, which was identified by Davis.)

Perry. The prisoner said, it was the first time he had ever been guilty of any thing, and begged for mercy.

Prisoner's defence. I was looking for a job; I saw this saw lying upon the buildings, and I took it up to look at it; I did not go away with it.

GUILTY , aged 24.

One month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-43

481. WILLIAM ROSEVEAR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , five half-quartern loaves of bread, value 4s. 31/4d. and four sixpenny loaves, value 2s. the property of George Ross .

GEORGE ROSS sworn. - I am a baker ; the prisoner lived servant with me nine weeks: On the 25th of April I suspected his robbing me; in the morning he brought up the bread into the shop, which is always locked down in the night; I attended him the whole of that day to serve him with bread for his walk; I would not suffer him to go down into the bake-house at all; after I had served him the last walk out, he was going about an hour or an hour and a half's walk, I went down to Marlborough-street, and got a search warrant; when he came back, I told him to let me book his bread; when I had booked about-three or four loaves, he started from the counter where I was booking, and ran down into the lake-house; I immediately ran after him, and he went towards the forge where we heat the oven, and pretended to make water; I said, William, why do not you come up, you are a good-for-nothing fellow, you make always some pretences to go away; I was very much afraid it was for the purpose of taking my property; the prisoner, in general, had a pistol loaded in the bake-house; he frequently went to Kensington, and he said he was afraid of being attacked; I sent my servant for a constable, an the prisoner and the constable both stopped while I booked his bread; when I had done, the prisoner again ran down into the bake-house; I followed him immediately with the constable; I laid hold of the pistol, and said, this is your property, William, I believe; he said, yes, master, it is, I then told the constable to take him into custody, which he did; the constable then searched his box, but before that he said he would tell us what was in it, if I would not open the box, and forgive him, and be merciful; I asked him what there was; he told me five half-quartern and four sixpenny loaves; the

constable then said, we must open it, because it must go before the Magistrate; the box was opened, and we found it just as he had said; when he asked for mercy, I told him he should have what mercy the law allowed; I can swear to the mark; her is my marker, which is an iron one; loaves are generally marked W; they are generally tin markers, and a tin marker will cut more than an iron one; besides, this was hot bread.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. All hot bread, marked with an iron W, would be the same as that? - A. Yes, but I never saw an iron marker before.

Q. But other bakers may have iron W's? - A. They may, but I never saw one.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: On the 25th of last month the prosecutor came to me; I went with him to his house: I went down into the cellar with the prisoner, I wanted to look into his box; he said, I should not; I told him I had got a search-warrant, and I would break it open; then he told Mr. Ross some of his property was in his box, an begged for mercy, for God's sake; he said, if he sent him to jail, he would transport him; Mr. Ross said, he was taking every step to get him into a jail, robbing him every day; then I again desired him to open his box; he took the key out of his pocket to try to open it, but he could not open it; I took the key from him, and I could not open it; Wright, the witness, got a picklock, and opened it; I found in it five half-quartern loaves, and four sixpenny loaves, all new bread, it was not warm, and seemed to me to have been baked the night before; this was about two o'clock in the afternoon.

Court. Q. Are you quite clear in your recollection that the bread was not warm? - A. I don't think it was warm, it might, because I only just handed it out of the box; I think it had been baked the night before; he said he was going to take it to his wife and family, because he was to leave his place that night; I then took him to the office, and he was committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The key produced by the prisoner did not open the box, but you were obliged to resort to a picklock? - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot say whether it was warm or not? - A. No.

Q. What did you mean by adding that it appeared to you to be baked the night before, it could not be warm then? - A. I mean that it might have been taken out of the oven about four o'clock in the morning.

Q. What time was it when you went to Ross's? - A. About two o'clock.

Q. That was time enough for it to have cooled? - A. Yes.

FRANCIS WRIGHT sworn. - On the 25th of April last Mr. Ross desired me to come to his house; I found a constable there; the prisoner was in the bake-house; I went down stairs, and I was desired to open the lock, which I did, with a picklock that we use in our business; I found in the trunk five half-quartern loaves and four cakes; Kennedy took out the loaves, and the prisoner was taken into custody.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent of the cause for which I stand here, as any body need to be; the Monday before my master and I had some words about a batch of bread, and he said, you villain, I will six you, you have got bread in your box, you carry bread out in your pockets; he said, you villain, I have put you in trust, and you are robbing me.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him an excellent character. GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-44

482. THOMAS KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , two glass tumblers, value 1s. and a tin waiter, value 6d. the property of David Thomas .

THOMAS BOTTERELL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Serjeant, next door to Mr. Thomas's; I sleep in the summer-house: I was alarmed between eleven and twelve o'clock at night on the 11th of May, I was half undressed, going to-bed, that there was somebody getting over the fence; I heard first of all a lock or a latch list up; then I went up to the fence, where I thought I heard it, and then I stopped about five minutes; it is a fence between the walk and Mr. Thomas's garden; I saw the prisoner get in at the window of the summer-house; as soon as he got in he struck a light, and brought a tumbler and teaboard, and put them over the pales, and then he got over the pales back again into the next garden, and then he got on the top of the fence to get over the walk back again, and then he saw me; he ran back again down the garden, and over a wall, into a place where there was no thoroughfare; I went round about sixty yards, and stopped him at the corner; I took him to the watch-house, and gave the property to the watchman.

Cross-examined by Mr. Cliston. Q. This was a very dark night, was it not? - A. No, it was a very light night; it was not moon-light, but it was star-light.

Q. How far was the summer-house from where you were standing? - A. Not more than a dozen yards.

Q. You were within a dozen yards of him, saw him go in at the window, and did not attempt to stop him? - A. No.

(Hawkins, the watchman, produced the property).

DAVID THOMAS sworn. - The tumblers have

no particular mark upon them; I had exactly such there, and I missed them the next morning; the waiter I know to be mine.

Prisoner's defence. It was a very dark night, and this gentleman took me half a mile from where he picked up the things; I was coming along the road, and was not near the place.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correcton .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-45

483. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a silk handkerchief, value 3s. six yards of cotton, value 12s. and two yards of woollen cloth, value 20s. the property of Gabriel Jacob .(The case was opened by Mr. Alley).

GABRIEL JACOB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a linen-draper , in Ratcliff-highway, the prisoner was my servant ; in consequence of a suspicion of his conduct, I got a warrant from the Police-office, on the 11th or 14th of May; Edward Smith , the officer, went with me to the public-house where the prisoner lodged, the Brown Bear, in Hooper's-square, Goodman's-fields; the officer and I went into the prisoner's apartment, up one pair of stairs; the publican, Minton, came up stairs, and I desired him to stop; the prisoner at the bar gave the keys of his boxes to the officer. and he opened them, but he first wanted him to shew his authority, and he shewed him the warrant; the officer then opened the boxes, and took out a piece of cotton, of which I had lost six yards, and some woolen cloth, of which I had lost two yards; I said, this is the way you have robbed me; how did you come by these things? he said, this piece of cotton I have tore off, and the remainder you have got at home; I asked him how he came by the cloth, and he said he tore that off for garters; then there was a quarrel began; Mrs. Minton went down stairs, and then she came up again with another woman; the officer then desired me to look about, if I could see any of my property; I looked about, and there was a coat hung behind the door, and in the pocket I found a blue paper, with a silk handkerchief in it; I opened it, and said, that was the way the silk handkerchiefs were gone; I made a great noise and a great quarrel, and a woman that came up with Mrs. Minton finding I made a great noise and a quarrel, said, what, did not you take that handkerchief out of your bosom?

Q. Who is that woman? - A. I do not know.

Q. Upon the solemn oath you have taken, did you take that handkerchief out of your bosom, and put it into the man's pocket? - A. No; I will be upon my solemn oath I took it out of the man's pocket; the officer has the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You charged this man with a felony before, did not you, for stealing two shillings out of your till? - A. I sent him away for that.

Did you follow up that accusation, by taking him up before any justice of the Peace? - A. No.

Q. How long after that charge was it before you made this charge, and got the present warrant? - A. That was on Monday, the 11th, and on the 14th I took him up.

Q. Then from the 11th to the 14th you did not make any complaint before any Justice? - A. No.

Q. Did you make this complaint till after he had, by his attorney, served you with a writ for defamation? - A. I did not mean to hurt him, because I could not swear to the money.

Q. Were you served with a writ, at the suit of the defendant, for defamation? - A. I was.

Q. Did you make any charge, before any Justice, till after that writ was served? - A. No.

Q. When you went with the search-warrant, who made the search of the boxes, you or Smith? - A. Smith.

Q. How large a piece of cotton is this that you have been speaking of? - A. It has my mark and my number.

Q. How large a piece was it? - A. I suppose a quarter of a yard; it is the last end of it.

Q. Upon your oath, is that or not a remnant, or a fag end? - A. No; there were six or eight yards lost.

Q. But you found no more than a quarter of a yard? - A. No. ( Edward Smith , the officer, produced it).

Q. Upon your oath, is not that a remnant, or a fag end? - A. No, it is not; it has my mark and my number upon it.

Q. Then that is the only part of the linen that would have such a mark upon it? - A. Yes.

Q. The next article, I think was something for garters? - A. Yes. (Smith produced a piece of list).

Q. What do you call that? - A. The first beginning of the cloth.

Q. Did you ever see that used for garters? - A. Yes; but this is - .

Q. Upon your oath, is not that in your trade considered as a perquisite? - A. No, it is not.

Q. You took none of the goods out of your shop, and put them into your bosom? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you take any thing when you went out of your shop with the officer? - A. No.

Court. Q. Who found that handkerchief? - A. I.

Q. Not Smith? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. At the time you took it out of the pocket, how was Smith engaged? - A. Smith was there searching his pockets.

Q. Had not you desired him to search the prisoner's person, while you searched the room? - A. No, I had not.

Court. Q. Smith was the person to search? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to search; what business had your hands in his coat pocket? - A. I never had any thing of the kind before, and I did not know that I should not.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I searched the prisoner's boxes; I found in one of the boxes this piece of cotton, (produces it); and this piece of list, (produces it); the prisoner came in while I was there, with the keys, and unlocked them himself.

Q. Then the prisoner did not hang back at all? - A. No.

Q. He did not shew any unwillingness? - A. Not the least; but said, you villain, I have none of your property, you may search.

Q. You did not find the handkerchief? - A. No.

Court. Q. Did you order the other witness to search his pockets? - A. Certainly not.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you observe him when he put his hands in his pocket? - A. After I had searched the room, he requested me to search the prisoner, which I did; while I was searching the prisoner, the prosecutor came with a coat which was hanging behind the door, he came with it upon his arm, and I heard him exclaim, you d - d villain, you have robbed me of my handkerchief; I immediately looked round, and saw the prosecutor's hand coming out of the pocket, with a bit of blue paper, and this handkerchief in it, folded up, I presume in so small a compass as this, (produces it); he desired I would take charge of him; I told him I had got charge of him, and I took him before the Magistrate; there was a woman standing in the room at the same time, her name is Ann Smith.

Court. As she was present, I shall call her as one of the witnesses for the prosecution.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did not Ann Smith charge the prosecutor with putting the handkerchief into the coat pocket of the prisoner? - A. yes; I heard her say, I saw you take that from your besom, and put it into the coat pocket.

Q. You have been ill, I understand? - A. Yes, I have for the last three weeks.

Q. Have you had any inducement held out to you, by the prosecutor, to appear here, and he would do any thing for you? - A. He desired me to attend here, and if I was not well, he would send me into the country; when the prosecutor said, there is a silk handkerchief, the prisoner said, then you villain, you must have put it there, for the coat has been hanging there for a month.

Court. Nothing is so improbable as that a man should steal that which is the only thing that could convince him.

Mr. Knapp. It is very important to the prisoner that his whole case should be heard.

Jury. We wish to have the woman examined.

ANN SMITH sworn, - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the officer coming to search his apartments? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prosecutor there? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us what you observed? - A. I went up when the prisoner went up; he took the keys out of his pocket and unlocked his boxes; the officer listed the lids of the boxes up; the officer then bid Mr. Jacob look and stand by him, and he came immediately and put his hands into the boxes and would search himself; there was nothing in that box; the next box he listed up the lid, and the officer said, do give me leave to excuse my duty myself; Mr. Jacob would not give the officer leave to execute his duty, but would do it for him, and be pulled out a bit of list, and a bit of fag end of cotton, and swore that was his property; there were two boxes in the room that belonged to the gentlewoman of the house, which had been left for rent; Mrs. Minton gave the officer leave to break them open, and told him he might search all her house without a search-warrant; the officer forced the boxes open, upon which Mr. Jacob took a pair of pantaloons from the back of the door, and searched them; then he took a great coat and searched it, and hung it up again; immediately the officer came and took hold of Price to search his pockets, which he had on his back; then Mr. Jacob took down this coat again, and put his hand to his bosom and took out something in a blue paper; he cried out, d-n your eyes you bl - y thief, here is my property, my handkerchief, before he opened the paper to see what was in it; upon that I called out immediately, you are putting that into the man's pocket you wicked man; upon which the officer turned round and all of them.

Q.(To Smith). Did you hear the woman? - A. I heard her say something of that sort.

Court. I think we have gone too far already.

Mr. Knapp. I wish to state, in the hearing of the Court, that I have persons of the greatest respectability in the trade, who would have told you that these are perquisites.

The Court, the Counsel on both sides, and the Jury, expressed their abhorrence of the prosecution, and stated that they were perfectly satisfied of the prisoner's innocence. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-46

484. JAMES STARKEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William-John Arabin , Esq. about the hour of ten, in the night of the 8th of May , with intent to steal, and burghriously stealing a pair of leather breeches, value 2l. 2s. the property of John Heath .

JOHN HEATH sworn. - I am coachman to Wil

liam. John Arabin , Esq. of George-street, Manchester-square ; I lost a pair of breeches from the stable; the lock of the stable door was picked a little after nine, in the evening of the 8th of May.

Q. Was the stable close to the house? - A. Yes; after I had put up my horses I went in to eat my supper, and did not go back any more that night; my fellow-servant, the groom, slept in the stable; the next morning I missed my trunk, containing my leather breeches and great coats; I found the leather breeches the next day at Marlborough-street.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I slept in the stable; while I was at supper in the house, a trunk, a great coat, and the breeches were taken away; I told him of it the next morning; I know nothing of the prisoner.

HENRY LOVETT sworn. - On the 8th of May, near upon ten o'clock, I was coming up Oxford-street, and met the prisoner at the bar with a bag, containing these breeches; I took him into custody; I knew him perfectly well, and have had him in custody before; I asked him what he had got; he said, if you must know, I have got a pair of breeches; the next morning me and my father searched the prisoner's lodgings, in Iver-street, St. Giles's, and in the room we found part of the box broke up, with the prosecutor's name upon it.

Heath. These are the breeches that I left in the stable; they have my name in them.

Prisoner's defence. Coming down Oxford-road, about ten o'clock, I met a man, and he asked me the way to Smithfield; I told him I was going that way, and would shew him; he went into a pastrycook's shop, and gave me the bag to hold; then Mr. Lovett came up and took me; I had a woman here yesterday as a witness, in whose room the box was found; but Lovett frightened her, and told her to go away; her name is Mary Walworth .

Q.(To Lovett.) Do you know the woman? - A. No; I saw a woman here yesterday.

Q. Did you frighten her, and tell her to go away? - A. No such thing.

GUILTY, of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-47

485. STEPHEN BEVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , a handsaw, value 5s. five chisels, value 1s. five gimblets, value 4d. a bevil, value 2d. a pair of compasses, value 2l. and a basket, value 2d: the property of John Tinker .

JOHN TINKER sworn. - I am a carpenter : On Monday, the 4th of May, I lost the tools mentioned in the indictment; I had left them safe on Saturday night in Mr. Johnson's shop, Artillery-place, Tothill-fields ; I saw them again on Monday, at the office in Queen-square; I knew them to be mine.

JONATHAN KENDALL sworn. - I am a carpenter: On Monday, the 4th of May, about six o'clock, I apprehended the prisoner in his own room, in Little George-street, Westminster; Bly, the constable, went with me; we found the tools; he said, we had no business with him, the tools were his own.

HENRY-BOLTON WIGLEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, (produces a saw); it was pledged by the prisoner; I believe he is the man, but I cannot sweat positively; I gave him a duplicate.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the property): On Monday, the 4th of May, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, in the morning; he was not at home; I found these tools there; when he came home I searched him, and found this duplicate of a saw upon him.

Wigley. This is the ticket I gave. (The whole of the property was identified by Ticker).

Prisoner's defence. It is the first offence I ever was guilty of: I did it through distress.

GUILTY , aged 40. - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-48

486. THOMAS COLLETT , alias PUTTY , HENRY HAYES , and MARY HAYES were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a trunk, value 3l. thirty-two yards, of cambric, value 20l. a gold seal, value 1l. 10s. a knife, value 1l. a gold snuff-box, set with diamonds, value 400l. a tortoise-shell snuff-box, set in gold, value 7l. a diamond necklace, value 200l. a diamond pin for the hair, value 250l. a diamond breast-pin, value 15l. another diamond pin, value 12l. a diamond cross, value 50l. another cross, set with diamonds and emeralds, value 30l. a pair of ear-rings, set with diamonds and pearls, value 50l. a pair of ear-rings, set with pearls, value 5l. a diamond ring, value 35l. another diamond ring, value 10l. a pearl necklace, value 12l. a pair of mother of pearl ear-rings, set with marquisites, value 8l. a breast-pin, set with pearls, value 5l. a pair of gold shoe-buckles, value 25l. a pair of gold kneebuckles, value 11l. a garnet necklace, value 5l. a fan, value 20l. another fan, value 3l. two pair of shoe-buckles, value 20l. six pearl pins, value 15l. a gold thimble, value 2l. a pair of gold sleeve buttons, value 2l. a miniature picture, set in gold, value 10l. a cocoa-nut milk-pot, inlaid and set with silver, value 10l. five silver tea-spoons, value 2l. a silver tea-strainer and tongs, value 1l: 5s. a silver tea-caddy-spoon. value 3s. two silver table spoons, value 1l. 10s. two paste pins, value 2l. a silk purse, value 2s. a piece of foreign gold coin, called a double Jouis d'or, value 2l. twenty-four pieces of fo

reign silver coin, value 2l. 10s. thirty-six napkins, value 18s. two pocket-books, value 5s. three shirts, value 2l. 10s. three shifts, value 2l. three petticoats, value 2l. two neck-handkerchiefs, value 10s. four pocket-handkerchiefs, value 10s. two lady's frills, value 30s. a green necklace and chain, value 5l. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 2l. and a pair of silk stocking-breeches, value 2l. 10s. the property of John-Christian Weppler , and the other two for receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Clifton, and the case by Mr. Raine.)

JOHN-CHRISTIAN WEPPLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. On Wednesday, the 29th of April, I believe you arrived at Billingsgate, from Gravesend? - A. Yes; about six o'clock in the evening I got a cart procured for me to carry my luggage and my trunks.

Q. Did you see the trunk in question put into the cart? - A. I did; it was put at the tail of the cart; I ordered the carman to proceed to the York Hotel, Blackfriars; I went up to the Monument with my wife, and a young lady under my protection, and procured them a coach; I went down with the cart to the York Hotel; the house was full, and I could not procure lodgings; I ordered them to go on to Adam-street, Adelphi; I was obliged to leave the cart to go after lodgings, and when I got into Covent-garden, where I got lodgings, I missed my trunk; I don't think I saw it after I left the Adelphi; it was then near eight o'clock.

Q. What kind of trunk was it? - A. A red leather trunk, under a black cover, marked J. C. Weppler; it was made in St. Paul's Church-yard; it had brass nails to it; the trunk contained all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Was there a gold snuff-box set with diamonds, value 400l.? - A. Yes; set with two rows of diamonds; a diamond necklace, value 200l. a diamond pin for the hair, value 250l. a cross set with emeralds, a garnet necklace, two pieces of cambric, thirty-six napkins, twenty-four pieces of foreign coin, in the best of my recollection it was Spanish coin, an American dollar, some Spanish pieces, and a double foreign louis d'or.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You are quite sure this trunk had your name at lenght, J. C. Weppler, upon it? - A. Yes.

Q. You described the loss of some cambric? - A. Yes.

Q. You advertised your loss, offering a reward, did you not? - A. Yes; one hundred pounds at first, and afterwards one hundred and fifty guineas.

Q. In any of your advertisements did you describe cambric? - A. No; it was omitted, and there are some articles omitted now.

Q. You are not certain that you saw the trunk after you left the York Hotel? - A. No.

Q. That is in the city of London? - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Did you, towards the latter end of April, leave the service of the two Hayes's? - A. I went to them the 3d of March, and came away the 4th of May.

Q. Do you remember, eight or ten days before you left Hayes's, seeing the soldier at the bar? - A. Yes; he came in on the Wednesday night, I left them on the Thursday in the week following; on the Wednesday night, about eight o'clock, he came in, and asked Mrs. Hayes to lend him a half-crown piece directly; he went out directly and came in again with a red leather trunk, with a brass plate at top; I saw J. C. and a W.; I did not see the other letters, for they were small; my mistress and the man then went up stairs directly; my master was not present; he might be up stairs, but I cannot say whether he was or not; there was company up stairs; I believe he was, but I cannot swear it; my mistress was up stairs with the man, ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; they came down stairs together and went into the bar; I heard him ask my mistress what she would give; my mistress offered him five pounds first, then he wanted more; then they bargained six guineas; the money was paid the next day; she said the mother of pearl was not of so much value as the gold and silver; I did not hear any more conversation; then I went into the tap-room, and he called for a pint of beer.

Court. Q. Was the bargain for six guineas made that night? - A. Yes; six guineas and a pound in halfpence, it was to be seven guineas all but one shilling; after he was gone, I went into the taproom, and saw some silver and other articles lying upon her lap; there was a diamond necklace and a pearl necklace, they were lapped in wool or fine cotton; I made the observation to my mistress when I was drawing the beer, I said, Lord, ma'm, what a handsome diamond necklace that is, and she bid me go into the tap-room, and mind my business; the child was looking over them while her mother was in the bar; when they came in again, the child had the pearl necklace in her hand, and a pair of ear-rings, a pair of pearl ear-rings and diamond drops; I saw no more that night; the next morning, about nine o'clock, Mrs. Hayes sent her child to Mrs. Hinton.

Q. Did you, that evening, observe the husband looking at any of the things? - A. No, I did not; the next morning, Mrs. Hayes sent the pearl earrings, and the pearl drops to Mrs. Hinton, which she returned again in a few minutes, saying, none of them would suit her; them Mrs. Hinton came to our house soon after, she was looking the goods over upon my mistress's knee, in the bar, but whether she said any thing, I do not know.

Q. What did you see? - A. A diamond necklace, and a gentleman's diamond pin, a shirt pin; I saw another in a kind of a rose, for the hair, in the shape of a half-moon; after Mrs. Hinton, the soldier came in.

Court. Q. Should you know him again? - A. Yes, that is him; I went to draw some more beer for the tap-room, and I heard her pay down the money.

Mr. Raine. Q. Where did you draw the beer? - A. My mistress said, come, Mr. Putty, you had better take your money, that was a nick-name that he had; I did not know his name was Collet, till he was taken up; my mistress gave him six guineas in gold and silver, and a pound in halfpence; he tied them up in a silk handkerchief; my mistress asked him if he would not have a bit of something to eat, he staid about half an hour after he had his money.

Q. During all this time your master never was present? - A. No, he was not.

Q. Was this on the Thursday? - A. Yes; on the Friday I saw some napkins on the table in the bar, my mistress was there, and Nathan the Jew, was there.

Q. Do you know a Jew of the name of Harris Henry? - A. Yes.

Q. You don't mean him, do you? - A. No.

Q. How many napkins were there? - A. I cannot say, there were a good many.

Q. Did Nathan take any away? - A. Not that I know.

Q. When did Harris Henry come? - A. On the Sunday evening; I heard him tell my mistress that he was engaged, and he went out, and my mistress asked him to come again about eight or nine o'clock, and he said he would, and he did, but he did not have any thing.

Q. Were you ever present when he had any thing? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. (Counsel for Collett.)

Q. You went into the service of Hayes, the 3d of March? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever in service before? - A. Not in London.

Q. Did you go with a character? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before you gave any account of this? - A. The first time I said any thing about it, was to a neighbour, a Mrs. King.

Q. How soon was this after? - A. On the Sunday night, it was in the newspaper.

Q. When did you leave your mistress? - A. On Thursday, the 4th of May.

Court. No, Thursday was the 7th.

Witness. My master gave me warning the very day that the trunk came in.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Warning was given before the trunk came in? - A. Yes.

Q. Had there not been some quarrel between you and your master, before you left the house? - A. All the quarrel my master and I ever had, was, that I put too many coals on the fire; he said, why did I not go and sift the cinders; he wanted me to go and do it after I was clean, and I said, if he would buy a riddle, I would do it every day, properly.

Q. And there was no other ground of quarrel but that? - A.No.

Q. How came you not to mention it before you told it to Mrs. King? - A. I should not have told her of it, if she had not mentioned it to me first.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. (Counsel for Hayes.) Q. You came to Mrs. Hayes from the country? - A. Yes.

Q. How old are you? - A. Twenty-one.

Q. Where did you lodge first when you came to London? - A. I lodged with the soldier.

Q. How long did you lodge with that soldier? - A. Five weeks.

Q. Were you ever out of England? - A. I did go with an officer and his family, from Sheffield.

Q. Did not you go with one of the soldiers upon the expedition? - A. No.

Q. Who did you come back with? - A. His wife, she and I went a great way with him, and came back to Liverpool.

Q. Did you go on shore any where out of England? - A. No.

Q. How have you lived since you came back from that expedition? - A. At Sheffield; I have worked at the scissars business, and the silk business, and the cotton business.

Q. Where have you lived since? - A. I staid at the soldier's a week, and then I have been at the Brown-bear, in Bow-street, ever since.

Q. That is opposite the Public-office? - A. Yes.

Q. Who pays for your board and lodging? - A. Mr. Weppler.

Court. That is very proper.

Q. Have you ever heard, that if you convict these parties, you shall have a good share of one hundred and fifty guineas? - A. No, I never did; I never heard of any reward; I have heard of a reward upon the goods, but I don't go upon that; it came out very seriously to the soldier, and he said, I will go and give information.

Mr. Raine. Q. What is the name of the soldier in whose house you have lodged? - A. John Day.

Q. Is he married? - A. Yes, he has a wife and five children with him.

Q. How long have you lived under the protection of this man and his wife and family? - A. I lived there from the night I came away from Hayes's, till the City-officers saw me ill used, and then they took me, yesterday was a fortnight, I went there to fetch me some clean clothes, about two o'clock in the day, and there came five women

that used to use Hayes's house, and ill used me and beat me.

Q. How long has Day been known to your friends? - A. Eighteen years; I lodged with his father and mother, at Sheffield.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This house where you lived is in White-cross-street? - A. It is situated in Red-lion-market.

Q. Do not you know that the house is part in London, and part in Middlesex? - A. Yes, I do know that, but I don't know which.

JOHN SAYERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I am a officer of Bow-street; on the 8th of May, I went, in consequence of a search-warrant, to the house of the prisoner Hayes, in company with two or three other officers; Mrs. Hayes was in the bar; I immediately desired her to walk out of the bar and go up stairs with me, which she did; I asked her to be so kind as to pull the things out of her pocket, and lay them upon the table, and either the prosecutor, or one of the officers, I am not certain which, pulled this handkerchief off the table; the prosecutor said, that is my handkerchief; I immedaitely desired him to put it down upon the table, and to middle with nothing there; upon going further I found this rose, wrapped up in a small bit of paper; afterwards we proceeded to search the house, and we found nothing else, but, at Bow-street, it struck me that the child, Mrs. Hayes's daughter, had not been searched, and upon her I found this little bit of money, which the prosecutor said he believed to be his; I also apprehended Collett, and afterwards searched his lodgings, before we went to Mrs. Hayes's; I went to Knight bridge barracks with his serjeant, where I apprehended him; he took me to his own lodgings, in company with Gibbs, one of the patroles; we searched the lodgings in company with the prosecuter, and found nothing but some money in box, which was brought away, I believe twenty-two or twenty-three guineas, or thereabouts; I afterwards took Mr. and Mrs. Hayes.

HARRIS HENRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I have known the prisoner, Hayes, two years, when they used to keep a shop to sell old clothes, I used to serve them, they now keep a public-house; on a Thursday, the latter end of April, Mrs. Hayes called me, and asked me if I wanted to buy any napkins, she produced thirty-three napkins, I was to look at them; she was called out, and desired me to take them home, and see if they would suit me; I was to have two dozen of the, and the other nine she said I must bring her back; I took nine back to her the next day; she asked me four shillings a piece, and took three shillings and six pence a piece.

Court. Q. What are they worth? - A. Four shillings and six-pence, or four shillings.

Q. Did you tell them for four shillings - A. I sold five of them at four shillings; I went on the Tuesday and paid her for them.

Mr. Raine. Q. Did you at any time see her husband? - A. No.

Q. You sold five? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of the remaining nineteen? - A. Mr. Miller, the officer, had them from me.( John Miller , the officer, produced nineteen napkins and a piece of cambric).

Henry. These are the napkins I bought of Mrs. Hayes; when I went to pay her for the napkins, the asked me if I wanted to buy a piece of cambric; I said, I shall see, if I can agree with you I will buy it; I went up stairs with her.

Q. Was her husband up stairs? - A. No; she called him up.

Q. Who measured the cambric? - A. I cannot recollect; she said, there were fifteen yards of it.

Q. Was the husband there when it was measured? - A. I cannot say; she asked me half-a-guinea a yard for the cambric, I bid her eight shillings, but I did not understand it myself; I paid her for it on the Tuesday following.

Q. What did you sell it for? - A. Nine shillings a yard; I afterwards bought thirteen yards more of her at eight shillings a yard, which Miller had from me; this is the same cambric that I had from Mrs. Hayes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a dealer in old clothes? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. Taken to Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were questioned about napkins? - A. I was.

Q. Then, at Bow-street, you told the story you have told now? - A. No.

Q. You produced the same napkins? - A. They sent for the napkins.

Q. Where did you deliver those napkins to Miller? - A. At Bow-street.

Q. You were taken up at your own house? - A. Yes; on the Sunday.

Q. How long had you been in custody when you delivered up those napkins? - A. Two days.

Q. You began to be a little alarmed? - A. No.

Q. Did you not tell them, over and over again, that you never did buy any napkins of Mrs. Hayes? - A. I did.

Mr. Weppler. This handkerchief has had my name marked in it, and it has been cut out; here is a hole that was in it when it was new, and is darned up; I know this garnet, there were twenty-seven of them in the trunk, loose in a paper, they formed a necklace, intermixed with rose diamonds, I putted it to pieces and took away the rose diamonds, I have not the smallest doubt of its being mine; this Spanish coin I believe to have been among mine, I had six or eight of them; there are more of the same sort but I believe it to be mine;

there is a hole through it, and I had one with a hole through it; I brought it with me from Jamaica, where I was an inhabitant nineteen years; the marks upon this piece of cambric have been torn off, but I can swear pretty certainly that it is my cambric, by the quality; it is not a piece such as are sold in the shops here, I bought it at Amsterdam; this is in the raw state as it came from the bleach; when it is done up, and calendered for the shops, it is put up in squarres; I have here the table-cloth that belongs to these napkins, I bought them together at Amsterdam.(Miss Mary Arnold also identified the handkerchief and the napkins).

THOMAS LAWRENCE sworn. - I am one of the marshalmen, I was with Sayer: I went, in consequence of a warrant from Bow-street, backed in the City, to Hayes's house; the back part of the house is in the City, the other part is in Middlesex; the bar is in the county of Middlesex.

Collett's defence. I am innocent of the charge laid to me; I leave the rest to my Counsel.

Collett called his serjeant, and one other witness who had known him eighteen years, and gave him a good character.

Collett, GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Mary Hayes , GUILTY .

Transported for fourteen years .

Henry Hayes , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-49

487. JOSEPH HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , fifteen ounces of hog's bristles, value 2s. the property of George Presbury .

GEORGE PRESBURY sworn. - I am a brushmaker : On the 7th of May I missed some hog's bristles; I was at work the evening before on the, bristles; the next morning, at seven o'clock, I went into the shop to go to work, and missed them, the prisoner was a journeyman to me; I came down stairs and sent for a constable; when I went up again, the prisoner was going away, he said he was going to breakfast; I told him I was robbed, and I must find the thief before any one went to breakfast; I desired the boy to call Mr. Dower down; I insisted upon the prisoner emptying his pockets, he said nothing for two minutes, or there abouts; he then said, it was very true, he had taken some, and said it was to buy him some breakfast; he said it was the first time, and hoped I would forgive him; he then produced about six ounces of bristles out of his pocket, (produces them); I knew them by being the outsides of a particular hair, named Archangel.

Q. Do you mean coming from Archangel? - A. Yes; the constable then came, and I gave charge of him; he was taken to Marlborough-street; and we then went to his lodgings, and found nine ounces more, which I knew to be mine, they were my own manufacture, and were a particular sort.

Prisoner's defence. I took them through downright distress. GUILTY , aged 49.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-50

488. SARAH HUGHES and SARAH CLARKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , three yards of printed cotton, value 4s. the property of Brooks Hinton .

JOHN TAYLOR sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Hinton, linen-draper , in Ship-alley, Wellclose-square : On the 24th of April, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner, Hughes, came in to purchase some calico, and went out of the shop without purchasing any thing; the other prisoner was standing at the door; I observed them both going away in a hurry, and I missed two pieces of cotton; I immediately went after them, and told them to stop, and they would not; then I laid hold of Clarke, and the other kept going on, I then went to Hughes and stopped her; while I was returning with her to the prisoner Clarke, I observed her throw the cottons from her, which she had taken from our door; I picked up the cotton, and took them both back to our shop; the officer has the cotton.( John Riley , the officer, produced the cotton).

Taylor. I know this to be Mr. Hinton's property: I had seen them about five minutes before Hughes came in.

Hughes's defence. I went in to purchase half a yard of calico, there was some in the window marked eleven-pence a yard; when I went in they said they had none under fourteen-pence a yard, and I came out again; I stopped to look at the window as any body else might, and then I went away; I know nothing about the cotton.

Clarke's defence. I know nothing of it; I picked up the cotton upon the kisb-stone, and went away about my business, I did not know who it belonged to; this girl is as innocent as the child unborn, I never saw-her before.

Taylor. I saw them both together about ten o'clock the same morning.

Hughes, GUILTY , aged 19.

Clarke, GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-51

489. MICHAEL STEWART , alias SEYMOUR, alias ROBERT STEWART , was indicted for forging and counterfeiting, on the 15th of April , a Bill of Exchange for 40l. with intention to defraud Thomas Boote .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing, as true, a like Bill of Exchange, with the like intention.

Third and Fourth Counts. Charging it to be with intention to defraud John Bond , Benjamin Bond , and Joseph Bond .

Fifth Count. For feloniously forging and counterfeiting an acceptance to a Bill of Exchange, in the name of John Bond , for himself and company, dated the 4th of April, 180l, with intention to defraud the said Thomas Boote.

Sixth Count. For uttering and publishing, as true, a like forged acceptance, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Seventh and Eighth Counts. For forging and uttering, and publishing as true, a like acceptance, with intention to defraud John Bond , Benjamin Bond, and Joseph Bond.

THOMAS BOOTE sworn. - I live in Piccedilly, I am a grocer .

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I do: On the 15th of April, he came to my shop to buy some ship's stores, he ordered some to the amount of twenty-seven or twenty-eight pounds; and in order to pay for the same he produced me a bill, purporting to be drawn upon John Bond , Esq. (Produces it); the acceptance is in red ink; I hesitated some time before I took it, at last I told the prisoner I had not the difference in cash, but I would send it to him the next morning; he said he must have it directly, for he was ordered away to Portsmouth, and must go away the next morning by four o'clock; I still hesitated, but at length I gave him six pounds in Bank-notes, and a check for six pounds three shillings and eight-pence, upon Sir Robert Herries, who is my banker; he then went away, but gave me a direction to No. 6, Cavendish-square; I sent my shopman, Nettleship, up to Cavendish-square the moment he was gone.

Q. Is he here? - A. No; the next morning I sent my son to Mr. Bond's, the bankers, he is not here; I called some time afterwards, I cannot say when, and they disavowed the acceptance, and refused to pay the bill.

Q. Had you endorsed it? - A. No.

Q. Where do Messrs. Bonds live? - A. In Change-alley, they are bankers.

Q. Do you know any other persons besides them under that firm? - A. I know of none.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I suppose you have taken no great pains to inquire whether there are any other persons of that firm? - A. I have looked at the list of bankers, and I have asked several people, but I have not heard of any others; I inquired of Mr. Pattisall, acting clerk in Messrs. Bond's house; I made great search after the prisoner, and he was apprehended about fourteen days ago, from information that I had received that he went into the Swan, in Paradise-row, Chelsea.

Court. Q. Did you take a constable with you? - A. No; I did not consider him as a felon, and therefore I thought it not necessary; I did not find him then; I gave information round Chelsea, being pretty well known there, and he was apprehended by a soldier.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Nettleship is not here? - A. No.

Q. Your son is not here? - A. No.

Q. Nor the person who apprehended him? - A.No.

Q. You yourself confined your inquiries to Messrs. Bond's house? - A. No; I asked several other persons.

Q. But you have not been round to the different banking-shops to inquire? - A. No.

Q. I see the bill is dated Portsmouth; have you any person from Portsmouth here? - A. No.

Q. It is drawn by a person of the name of John White? - A. Yes.

Have you no person here from Portsmouth to prove the non-existence of that John White ? - A. No.

STEPHEN PATTISALL sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. John Bond , Benjamin Bond , and Joseph Bond , bankers, in 'Change-alley, Cornhill.

Q. Are you their cashier? - A. Yes; I have been with them between seven and eight years.

Q. Do you know any other house of this firm, in the City of London? - A. I believe there are no bankers of that firm.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say there are no mercantile houses of that firm? - A. I never heard of any.

Q. Have you known the City of London long? - A.Near twenty years; and I have been in business the greatest part of that time.

Q. Look at that note, and particularly at the signature in red? - A. It is not the hand-writing of Mr. John Bond and sons, or of any of the partners.

Q. Nor of any of the clerks? - A. No.

Q. I suppose you have seen every one of them write frequently? - A. Frequently; I am perfectly convinced it is not the signature of either of them.

Q. Do they ever accept in that transverse way? - A. Never.

Q. Nor in red ink? - A. I do not recollect ever to have seen it; it is very unlike a banker's signature.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Messrs. Bond, and Company, compose three persons? - A. Yes.

Q. John Bond, Benjamin Bond, and Joseph bond? - A. Yes.

Q. Is Mr. John Bond here? - A No.

Q. Nor Mr. Joseph Bond ? - A. No.

Q. Nor Mr. Benjamin Bond? - A. No.

Q. It is the custom for the partners only, to accept? - A. Yes.

Court. If they were here, they could not prove that it was not their writing; because they would discharge themselves from the bill by so doing.

(The bill read).

£. 40."Portsmouth, April 2, 180l.

"Twenty days after date, pay to Captain Seymour, or order, the sum of forty pounds, for value received. JOHN WHITE .

"To John Bond, Esq. and Co. Bankers, London.

" John Bond , for Company, April 4, 1801."

Court. (To Boote.) Q.When the prisoner offered you this note, and directed you to Cavendish-square, what name did he give you? - A. Michael Seymour .

Q. Has he represented himself as in any situation? - A. Yes; as captain of a frigate; I think he called it the Prudentia.

Prisoner's defence. The bill was sent to me from Portsmouth, just as it is now, in a letter; the person that I received it from is gone to Minorca, he is an officer in the army.

Jury. (To Boote) Q. Did you consider the endorsement to be his endorsement? - A. Yes; he told me his name was captain Seymour, and that it was his endorsement.

GUILTY Death , aged 28.

Of uttering the acceptance knowing it to be forged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010520-52

490. RICHARD WRIGHT , JOHN SMITH , alias PARKER , and THOMAS JOHNSTONE , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Harvey , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 18th of March , with intent to steal, and stealing therein one hundred pounds weight of tea, value 26l. sixty pounds weight of sugar, value 3l. two pounds of nutmegs, value 2l. four pounds weight of chocolate, value 8s. and three pounds weight of cocoa, value 3s. the property of the said Richard, and a great coat, value 5s. the property of John Baynes .

RICHARD HARVEY sworn. - I am a grocer , and live at No. 1, Charles-street, Hatton-garden : On the 18th of March, I went to bed about eleven o'clock; John Baynes, my servant , was the last person up in the house, the house was compleatly fastened; about a quarter after six in the morning of the 19th, I called my servant, as I generally do, and in a few minutes he came up, requesting me to walk down stairs; I went down, and missed a quantity of articles more than are stated in the indictment; I missed tea to the value of twenty-six pounds, sugar to the value of three pounds.

Q. Did you lose in the whole goods to the value of ten pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you servant lose a great coat? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. You live in Charles-street, Hatton-garden; that is in the City of London, is it not? - A. A part of it is, and part of it is not; my house is in the county of Middlesex.

EDWARD COLEMAN sworn. -

Court. Q. It is known that you are an accomplice of the men at the bar; now, mind, I tell you, before you are examined as a witness, that it is your duty to speak the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; you must misrepresent nothing, and you must not either add or diminish, at all; tell us if you know the three prisoners at the bar? - A. I know them all three; on Thursday, the 18th of March, Richard Wright called me up.

Q. Where did he live? - A. He had no place of abode particularly.

Q. Where did Smith, otherwise Parker, live? - A. No. 4, in Newtoner's-lane.

Q.Where did Johnstone live? - A. That I cannot say; between one and two o'clock in the morning, they all three called me up, I live in Nag's Head-court; Wright proposed our going to Mr. Harvey's house, Wright and Parker had been there the day before; we went to the house, and broke open the cellar window, upon which I and Wright went down and opened two stair foot doors; they were bolted.

Q. How did you contrive to get in? - A. With a rook; then we got into the sliding passage, and there was a door, we broke that open, an there we staid for sometime, till there was an opportunity of letting Parker and Johnstone in; we let them in; we staid there for near an hour, on account of the watchman being on the opposite side of the way; the watchman went away, on account of a fire that was just broke out, and then we all went away; we took with us tea in canisters from out of the shop, lump sugar, nutmegs, and two great coats, I had one, and Johnstone the other; we were going to Parker's lodgings, and going along, the three prisoners saw the patrol; I did not see him, though I was close to him; I had a loaf of sugar, some nutmegs, and five pounds of sugar made up in papers; the patrol stopped me, and they three went away; the patrol took me to the watch-house, and searched me; he took this property from me, and from thence I was taken before Mr. Blamire; I had one of the great coats on; I don't know what became of the prisoners.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. How often have you appeared in this very honourable situation? - A. Never before.

Q. Have you never stood in any other situation in this Court? - A. No.

Q. What Court was it you were transported from? - A. None at all; I have been two voyages to Botany Bay; I went out as a sailor.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes.

Q. How many more men';s lives are depending upon your evidence, besides these three men? - A. Two more that I have been with.

Q. And you intend to swear these men's lives

away, to save your own neck? - A. No, it is not to swear away any body's life.

Q. You were well acquainted with these men? A. One of them I had never seen till that night.

Q. And you thought it prudent to commit a burglary with a man you never saw before? - A. He was recommended by them.

Q. Have you never said those three men were with you at the moment you were apprehended? - A. Yes; I was no above a yard before them.

Q. And they were not apprehended till after your confession? - A. No.

Court. (To Harvey.) Q. How do you suppose the persons got into your house? - A. The cellarflap was forced open; there are two stair foot doors, they were broke; the lock of the door in the passage was forced back.

WILLIAM HUNT sworn. - I am a patrol of St. Andrew's, Holborn: On the 19th of March last, about a quarter after three o'clock, I was coming down Middle-row, Holborn, and met Coleman in company with another man; when they saw me, the man turned back, and Coleman turned into Staple's Inn Buildings; I laid hold of him, and asked him what he had there; he said, what did I think it was; I felt it, and said, I thought it was sugar; I asked him where he got it from; he said, he brought it from Gravesend; I asked him where he was going to take it to; he said he was going to take it home; I told him, before he took it home, he should go to the watch-house with me, to see whether he had a title to it, or not; he said, it was very hard a man could not walk the streets with his own property, without being molested by patrols and watchmen; I took my cutlass from under my coat, and then he said he would go, but should carry the sugar; He carried it as far as Southampton-buildings, and there he threw it down; he said he would not carry it any further, I should carry it myself; then I gave it to another man, and I conveyed him to the watch-house; there was a loaf of sugar, five pounds of sugar, and a quantity of nutmegs, I cannot say how many, rightly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. There was only one person with Coleman? - A. No.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes, and he ran away.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden: On Thursday, the 19th of March, in the evening, I went with the rest of the officers to search the lodgings of Parker, alias Smith, No. 4, Newtoner's-lane, alias Charles-street; I found some sugar, some tea, and a dark lantern, in a band-box under the bed; the sugar was loose wrapped up in a cloth.

Harvey. This is the sort of sugar that I lost; I cannot swear to it.

Mr. Clifton. (To Chapman.) Q. This is a common lodging-house, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. The room door was open, any body might have gone in? - A. No, it was locked; I broke it open, there was nobody there; I apprehended him about three weeks afterwards, and found upon him eleven papers of tobacco, two nutmegs, and a small bag of coffee.

ROBERT BALLARD sworn. - I am a patrol of St. Andrew's: About three o'clock on the 19th of March, my partner, Hunt, and I, were going down Holborn, when a fire broke out in Baldwin's-place, Baldwin's-gardens; my partner was going on before to see where the fire was, when he sell in with Coleman, and I met him bringing Coleman back; I took the sugar, and carried it to the watch-house; that is all I know.

LEVI OBURN sworn. - I belong to Hatton-garden: I went with the other officers to Newtoner's-lane, and found some tea and sugar in a band-box under the bed; I know no more of it.(Produces it.)

JOHN BAYNES sworn. - The witness, Coleman, had my great coat on at the time he was taken, and there was a pocket handkerchief of mine in the coat pocket.

ARCHIBALD RUTHVEN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street: I apprehended Johnstone on the 30th of March, at a public-house; I apprehended him for breaking out of Tothill Fields Bridewell.

Mr. Alley. Q. As you have been so kind to tell us that, I suppose you know there are three forty pounds rewards, if these men are convicted? - A. Every officer must know that.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I belong to Hatton-garden: I went to fetch Johnstone after he was apprehended; he said, d-n him, he will swear to me, I am done; I heard him say that when he came into the room.

Q. Did he know what you came about? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Then he might allude to something else, for any thing you know? - A. It might: I apprehended Parker and Wright in a court facing Wellclose-square; I asked Parker what his name was; he said his name was Smith; I told him I believed his name was Parker, and he totally denied it.

Q. When was it you apprehended him? - A. I think it was the 15th of March, or April, I cannot say which, I believe it was April; we handcuffed him, and searched him; I found seven eggs in the crown of his hat, and several papers of tobacco; I told him I apprehended him for house-breaking in Leather-lane; Mr. Harvey's is a corner house; he denied knowing any thing at all about it; I apprehended Wright the same evening at the Hart in Lewker's-lane; I asked him if his name was Wright, and he said, no; he was pointed out to me, for he had been in the House of Correction before, and I knew him to be Wright.

Wright's defence. I have nothing to say; I am innocent of what I am here for.

Smith's defence. I know nothing at all about it; I know nothing of the man, nor yet of the robbery.

Johnstone left his defence to his Counsel.

Wright, GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Smith, GUILTY , Death , aged 25.

Johnstone, GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-53

491. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Myers , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 10th of May , and burglariously stealing a shawl, value 3s. a half-guinea, two seven-shilling pieces, a half-crown, and two shillings , the property of the said Michael.

MICHAEL MYERS sworn. - I am a fishmonger , I lodge in the house; there are other lodgers in the house, besides myself, and a common stair-case to all the apartments; my bed-room was broke open; I have all the ground-floor intitely; I went to bed from ten minutes to half an hour after ten; I awoke a little after twelve, I then found myself very much alarmed, seeing my light was out, which was not customary; I laid awake, and thought I heard somebody in the room; I heard a rustling upon the carpet; I called to know if any body was there; I hearkened, and heard somebody on a chair by my bed-side; I then conveyed my hand out of bed, and felt for my clothes where my money was kept, to go to market with the next morning; I put my hand out, and felt the prisoner at the bar with his knee upon the bed clothes, upon my breast, but not closely compressed; I then made the best resistance I could; I put one leg out of bed as gently as I could, and kept my hold of the man by his clothes, he did not feel me; I then put my other leg out of bed, and then I touched the ground with both my feet; I then jumped out of bed, and caught hold of him by the neckcloth; I then said, I have got you, you have got my money; I think he said, that is what I want; he then said, you b-r let loose, or else I'll cut your bowels out; I then said, you may cut my bowels out, I never shall leave you, for I am sure you have got my owner's money; I then found him cutting me; he immediately put a knife in me here, (describing it); I told him, for God's sake, don't murder me, for I have got a young family; he told me, he would soon do for my family, as well as for me; I then told him, you shall not do for my family, for you shall do for me alone; I immediately got into a scuffle with him, and struck him, and he struck me; at last he got me on the ground, after very hard blows both from him and me; I tried to break his breeches down behind, that he might not make his escape, but I could not do it; I then caught hold of his collar and the top of his waistcoat, that he might not get away from me while I recovered myself, and I tore half his waistcoat off in my hand, (produces it); he then wanted to make away to the window, I did not know then that he had got in at the window; I tried to get hold of his hair in front, and he had none; I then got hold of his haif behind, and his hair ribbon came off in my hand; he then had another scuffle with me about the room, and at last cut my legs with a knife that would not cut hardly at all; he told me he would ham-string me; then he got from me, and got to the window, and jumped out; then I jumped out after him; there was a little chaise, a single horse chaise, stood under the window; he was very powerful; he took up the chaise with one hand, and threw it down again upon my feet; then I crept under the chaise, and he ran between the wheel of the chaise and the gateway; then I ran after him about three yards, or two yards; he then came back to me, and said, you b-r, are you not satisfied now; I then told him I should not be satisfied till the watchman had got hold of him; he then struck me a blow across my shins very hard; then I halloed out, murder, I have been robbed; he ran away, and I ran after him; I never was three yards from him all the way, till the watchman had got him by the collar; I then ran home to see if there was any body else in the room, I was then almost naked, for my shirt had been cut to pieces; I looked for the coat that I had put my money in that I was to pay away the next morning.

Q. Was it your own money? - A. No.

Q. Were you liable to make it good? - A. Yes, every penny of it; I found it, where I left it, in my great coat pocket; I missed every shilling of my own money out of my waistcoat inside pocket; my waistcoat laid in the chair upon the coat; there was a half-guinea, two seven-shilling pieces, a half-crown, and two shillings; the half-crown and two shillings I described to the people at the watch-house.

Q. Do you know this man got in? - A. When I went to bed, I always made it a rule to feel the windows whether they were pinned down; I did that night, and looked under the bed likewise, the same as I do every night.

Q.Was there any appearance of violence? - A. The iron bolt of the window shutter was wrenched away, but I did not look to see till three hours after.

Q.Was any part of the window broke? - A. No.

Q. Did he open the window to jump out? - A. No, it was ready open.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You keep a fishmonger's shop, do not you? - A. No, I have no shop.

Q. You don't carry on your business in the place where you lodge? - A. I carry on a great deal of

wholesale business there; I am servant to James Collins, a fishmonger; I know that is what you wish to know of me.

Q. I believe there is a servant belonging to the proprietor of the house that sleeps there? - A. There is a servant belonging to the properietor of the house that looks after the horses, sleeps in the stable; his master locks him in every night, but the stable does not touch the house.

Q. Are these stables connected with the house by any wall? - A. There is a wall.

- ILBURY sworn. - I am a watchman: I tried Mr. Myers's shutters at eleven o'clock, and found them fast, as usual; I was calling the hour of half after twelve, when I heard the alarm of stop him, stop him, several times, and after that, stop thief; I ran out of my box, and saw the prisoner running without a hat as hard as he could run, and his waistcoat flying open; he ran from the gate-way that leads from Mr. Myers's house; the said, here, here, by which means he passed me; I ran after him, and brought him back to Mr. Myers, he gave me charge of him; I delivered him into the hands of the constable of the night, and left him; in returning back to my duty about a quarter of an hour after, looking with my lantern, Mrs. Myers and two other persons were with me, I observed, as I thought, a bit of brown paper exactly in the line where the prisoner had past, but, upon looking at it, it was a shawl, which Mrs. Myers said was her's; Mrs. Myers picked it up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. When you stopped him, how far was Myers off? - A. I don't know, I was looking after the prisoner.

JOHN BARBER sworn. - I am constable of Portfoken Ward: The prisoner was brought in by the watchman, I was constable of the night; I ordered him to be searched; I found a half-guinea, a seven-shilling piece, three sixpences, and one shilling, in his fob, inclosed in a bit of whitedbrown paper, and twelve shillings in silver, in a half-crown, shillings, and sixpences, about his breeches; here is a piece of a waistcoat that I took from the prisoner, the piece the prosecutor has produced, came off it, and here is a knife that I took out of his waistcoat pocket, (producing it;) here is a shawl that was brought to me by Mrs. Myers, (producing it); I also found a bill of parcels for some boots.

JOHN WATTS sworn. - I am a watchman; in the prisoner's waistcoat-pocket, I found the knife that has been produced by the last witness.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY sworn. - I am patrole of the Ward of Portsoken; I was present when the prisoner was searched; I afterwards found this hat in Myers's room, the prisoner said it was his.(Produces it.)

- ISAACS sworn. - I live in the same house with Mr. Myers; I heard a noise and I ran down stairs; I heard them say, we have got him; I saw the watchman had hold of him by the collar as he was going to the watch-house; I saw him take some money out of his mouth, and some out of his pocket, and put it inside of his breeches, the money dropped out of his knees; I then went away.

LEAH MYERS sworn. - I can swear to this handkerchief, there is not such another in London, it was given me by a gentleman, who is a printer, and it would not take the print, it is joined in several places; I am sure it is mine.

Prosecutor. This bill is for two pair of boots of mine that came home the morning before; here are two shillings and a half-crown that I can speak to; I am sure I had them in my pocket; the half-crown had been refused a great many times.

Prisoner's defence. When I was taken to the watch-house, the prosecutor said, I had got his money; he told the officer of the night I had cut his leg, and the officer looked at it, and said, it was no cut, it was a bruise; I said it was very improper that the prosecutor should see my money, but that he should describe the marks upon it, and the constable of the night directly shewed him my money, and then he swore to the marks.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-54

492. GEORGE CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , a saw, value 4s. the property of John Wood .

JOHN WOOD sworn. - On the 15th of May, I lost a saw from my master's workshop, No. 17, Little Moorfields ; I saw it again about an hour after I missed it, in my master's house.

- WESTON sworn. - I am a carpenter; the last witness worked for my father; the saw was lost from an open work-shop; I was coming down Moorfields, and saw the prisoner take the saw out of the shop, and come into the street, with the saw under his arm; I stopped him, and delivered him to the constable. (The constable produced the saw, which was identified by Mr. Wood.)

Prisoner's defence. I was reduced to the greatest distress, my landlord seized my tools for two shillings.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Three months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-55

493. CATHERINE FORBES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , eight shirts, value 2l. two jackets, value 15s. sixteen other jackets, value 4l. five waistcoats, value 15s. three

petticoats, value 10s. two sheets, value 3s. two other shirts, value 8s. six yards of linen cloth, value 6s. and three yards of woollen cloth, value 1l. 10s. the property of Richard Dixon , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD DIXON sworn. - I keep a house in Fenchurch-street , the corner of Philpot-lane; I am a slop-seller ; the prisoner was a weekly servant of mine: On Saturday, the 25th of April, about two o'clock, she brought in thirty seamen's jackets that she had made during the week, just at the time my servants were at dinner; I had suspected her some time, for we had missed a great many things, and I was determined to lie in wait, which I did; she always made a point of coming when my servants were at dinner, which made me suspect her; I saw her take two cloth jackets from off the counter, and put them into a bag with those she had brought in; she looked round to see if any body was watching her, and came to the same place again, I saw her take six fine calico check shirts from a puncheon that stood in the warehouse, which she put inside her bosom, and under her petticoats, and different places of concealment about her person; my servant then came down from dinner, and she went out, saying she wanted a little refreshment; she immediately went out to the door, and I watched her; when she had got out, she took to her heels as fast as she could run; I did not overtake her till she got to Cullum-street; she stopped at a door there and took out the shirts from under her petticoats, and was putting them into a canvass bag; I brought her back, took her to the counting-house, and sent for a constable; I took from her seven check shirts and two white ones; the two jackets she did not take out of the warehouse.

Q. What may be the value of the eight shirts? - A. Forty-shillings; I went to the Poultry Compter to her and begged of her to tell me where the other things were; I found nothing at her lodgings; I went again to her, and upon her person found seventy-one duplicates concealed between her stays and her body; I then went to ten different pawnbrokers; I delivered the duplicates to the constable; the pawnbrokers were all summoned before the Lord Mayor; but not one of them attended.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. How many times was she taking these things? - A. I saw her take the check shirts twice, and the white ones once.

Q. Why did not you interpose when you saw her take the two jackets? - A. I did not think it proper.

Q. Then you wished to wait till she should commit a capital offence, that you might hang this woman? - A. I wished to see that she was a thief.

Court. Q. Did she take these things one after another as fast as she could take them? - A. Yes; she was not ten minutes about it.

ROBERT DOWLING sworn. - I am headborough; eight shirts were delivered to me by Mr. Dixon. (Produces them).

JOHN SAUNDERS sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; I took her to the Compter, that is all I know of it.(The shirts were identified by Mr. Dixon).

Mr. Alley. Q. Has not your brother, upon Tower-hill, lately claimed a share in your business? - A. That business is now settled, he has not been a partner with me for two years.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-56

494. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , two shirts, value 6s. two handkerchiefs, value 3s. two waistcoats, value 10s. and seven yards of cloth, value 10s. the property of Michael Loney .

MICHAEL LONEY sworn. - I am a journeyman bricklayer , in Holliday-yard, Creed-lane : On Friday, the 24th of April, I missed my property from my box; I had seen them a day or two before; I went out a little before six, and before I went home an officer came to me; I went home between eleven and twelve o'clock, and found nothing of any value left in my box; the articles mentioned in the indictment were all taken out; the constable has the property; I believe the man was in very great distress.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am an assistant constable at the Police-office, Hatton-garden: On Friday, the 24th of April, between seven and eight in the morning, I passed the prisoner at the bar in Smithfield, about half a mile from the prosecutor's; I observed both his pockets full of something; while I was looking at him, a piece of new cloth dropped from under his coat upon the pavement, which gave me some suspicion that he had stole it; I followed him to Cow-cross, and took him into custody; I asked him if he had bought that cloth this morning; he told me had; I asked him where; and he said, at the Bee-hive, in Holborn; he told me he lived in Red-lion-street, Clerkenwell; in going towards the Bee-hive, he told me it was of no use to go there, for he had not bought them there; I took him then to the office and searched him; I found a red waistcoat upon him, a shirt, and a neckcloth; I then asked him where he lived, and he said in Holliday-yard, Creed-lane; I found he did live there, and the prosecutor likewise; I learned the prosecutor was at work upon Ludgate-hill, and I went there, and he came home with me and missed the property; the

prisoner told me he had broke the box open with a hammer.

LEVI OSBURNE sworn. - I know no more than Smith, except that I took from the man's back a shirt, a waistcoat, and a neck-handkerchief. (The property was produced, and identified by Loney.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been ill a long time; I got a job, and had not any money to get tools to finish my work; I lodge in the same house with the prosecutor; I thought I could take them to finish my work, and I could replace them again on Saturday; I had no intention to defraud him of them. GUILTY , aged 48.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-57

495. GEORGE REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , a black gelding, value 5l. the property of John Hanscom .

JOHN HANSCOM sworn. - I live at Hackeny: On Monday the 13th of April, I lost my horse, from No. 94, Wardour-street, Soho ; I went to see a customer, and left my horse at the door of Messrs. Fownes and Scott, with the saddle on; when I came out I missed my horse; that was about a quarter past two; I saw it again on Wednesday night, about nine o'clock, at Mr. Minton's, Tothill-fields; he is a horse slaughterer; he was tacked up in a stable, and served with hay; I knew the horse again immediately; it had a white spot between the knee and shoulder, the inner foot white behind, bald faced and had a nervous humour upon him; I have had the horse near two years; it was a black gelding; I took him home on the Thursday; I found my own bridle at Mr. Minton's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long did you stay in the house before you came out and missed your horse? - A. It might be an hour.

Q. Did you fasten your horse up? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you go out of the house yourself from the time you first went in till you came out and missed the horse? - A. Yes; I had been out about ten minutes before I missed him; a lady wanted me to unhang him, that she might pass, and I did not hang him again; I did not hang him at first, somebody else did; I never do myself.

Q. The horse was across the pavement, and incommoded the lady's passage? - A. Yes.

Q. After that you left him in a loose, unprotected state? - A. I threw my bridle over his neck and left him; he never left me before.

Q. How do you know the horse did not stray? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Wardour-street is not a very broad street? - A. No.

Q. Then two carriages coming together would very likely cause the horse to move? - A. It might.

Q. Upon your oath, was not the prisoner's defence, before the Magistrate, that the horse had strayed? - A. I do not remember any such thing; I believe he did say he had found the horse.

WILLIAM BARROW sworn. - I am a horse-slaughterer: On Monday, the 13th of April, the prisoner came to me to sell a horse, about four o'clock in the afternoon; he told me the horse was at the livery-stable, and if I would go with him he would sell it me for a guinea and a half; upon that I went with the man to the White Horse, in the Broad-way, Westminster; the horse was shewn me; upon looking at it, I thought the horse was too good for slaughter, and at too low a price; upon which I told him, if he would give an account where he got the horse, I would give him twice that money for him; he then told me he bought it of a man at Paddington; that he gave twenty-five shillings for it; upon which I had him taken into custody, and advertised the horse.

Q. What was the value of the horse? - A. About ten guineas; on Wednesday night the prosecutor owned the horse, and had it the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did he not say that he found the horse, that it was a strayed horse? - A. No; he told me that he had bought the horse.

THOMAS HARLEY sworn. - I am a constable; Mr. Minton sent for me to take the prisoner into custody; I searched him, and found some duplicates upon it; he was taken before the Magistrate and committed.

RICHARD MINTON sworn. - I am a horse-slaughterer, in Tothill-fields; Barrow is my servant; the prisoner came to my house, and said he had a horse to sell; Barrow and I both went to see the horse, at the White Horse, Broad-way, Westminster; he ordered the ostler to bring the horse out of the stable; he asked a guinea and a half for it; he was as well dressed as any trademan need to be; I asked him how he came by the horse; he said he bought it of a man at Paddington; I told him it was a stolen horse, and he should not take it away; I sent for a constable and had him detained; he gave the same account before the Magistrate, that he had bought the horse, but did not say where; the horse was a very useful horse, a very good tradesman's horse, about six years old.

Q. What might the value of it be? - A. The horse might be worth ten or twelve pounds.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-58

496. THOMAS GREEN and THOMAS HAINSON were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Matthew Burge , about the hour of six in the night of the 22d of Decem

ber , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing four metal candlesticks, value 4s. four brass candlesticks, value 3s. three mahogany barometer frames value 3l. four yards of calico, value 4s. a cloth coat, value 10s. three waistcoats, value 3s. six pocket-handkerchiefs, value 2s. four neck-handkerchiefs, value 2s. three sheets, value 10s. two table-cloths, value 5s. four round towels, value 2s. and six pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of the said Matthew.

MATTHEW BURGE sworn. - I live at No. 199, Piccadilly : On Monday, the 22d of December, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I came down stairs, and found the passage door leading to the street partly open; I went to the door, to see if any person was there; I saw a man standing by the shop window in the street, about fifteen feet from me; I did not see his face distinctly; when I went towards him, he stooped down, in the apparent action of buckling his shoe; I said nothing to him, but went up stairs into our workshops, and about ten minutes after I was sent for down, and informed that the kitchen door was broke open; I examined the door, and found that it had been forced open; the bolt was bent, and the staple forced off, which was screwed on; on examining the place, I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment, from the kitchen; one of the drawers was broke open; there was a person worked with us whom I suspected of being concerned, his name was Coleman.

Q. Did you see so much of the face of the person who was buckling his shoe, as to be able to know him again? - A. I am almost certain that the prisoner, Hainson, was the man; Coleman had left me about two months; he had never slept in the house, but has worked in the house, and knew more of the f stenings and method of the house than any of the forty I employ.

Q.Were you the last person that was up the night before this happened? - A. I am not able to recollect it, being six months since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you fasten up the house yourself? - A. I cannot at this time take upon myself to say.

Q. Coleman is admitted an evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. When you went out, you saw a person at the door? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you nearer to that person at any time than fifteen feet? - A. Yes, I was within ten feet, and then I saw his face distinctly.

PHILIP COLEMAN sworn. - Q. Are you the witness that was in the box yesterday? - A. Yes; I was originally a seafaring man: In the morning, about half past five o'clock, I cannot say what day of the month it was, nor the day of the week, it was in December, I met Green and Hainson at a public-house in Drury-lane, from thence we went to Mr. Ramiden's, in Piccadilly.

Q.(To Burge). Is your house Mr. Ramlden? - A. It was Mr. Ramlden's, it is now mine, he is dead.

Coleman. I worked for Mr. Ramsden two months; Burge carried on the business then; we did not get there till after six o'clock; the street door was always upon the latch for the workmen to go in; Green and I proceeded from thence through the passage into the kitchen, and left Hainson at the door; we broke open the kitchen door; there were two drawers in the dresser that we broke open.

Q. Was it light then? - A. No, it was dark; we took the sheeting and what linen and wearing apparel there was, some candlesticks, and three mahogany barometer frames; we put the things into a bag, and came to Hainson at the door, then we took them to Green's lodgings, and left them; from thence we went to refresh ourselves at a public-house in the Strand, near Southampton-street; I stopped at the door to make water, and Green and Hainson went in; while I was there, Green came out with a copper can in his hand, which might hold two gallons or more, and told me to come along; we left Hainson in a public-house; when I got a few yards from there, Mr. Pearce and Mr. Hill were close behind me, two gentlemen belonging to Mr. Burge's shop; Mr. Purce came up to me in Exeter-street, and spoke to me; Green went on, and left me; then Mr. Pearce went with me to my mother's; I told him I had slept there all night; he left me, and went home again; I went to my lodgings in Drury-lane, and Green and Hainson came to me, and told me they had sold the property to Mrs. Hayes, in Long-lane; they gave me thirteen or fourteen shillings, or some where thereabouts; some of the things are here.

Q. How came you to go to this house together? - A. We had been there several times before, but there was always somebody in the way till then.

Q. Then you told them where to go? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you were the first planner of this business? - A. No, I was not, because they wanted to know of me where I had worked.

Q. You did not tell them any thing about your master's house? - A. Yes, I told them how to get in.

Q. Have you ever been a voyage to Botany Bay? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Not as a convict, was it? - A. No, I went two voyages to Botany Bay as a sailor.

Q. You never were convicted? - A. No, I never was a convict.

Mr. Knapp. Q. But you gave them information how to rob your master's house, and you shared the plunder? - A. Yes.

SAMUEL PEARCE sworn. - After Mr. Burge found the house had been broke open and robbed, he desired me and John Hill to go in search, and in

the Strand we saw Coleman and another man coming from a public-house, I believe called the White Swan; they turned up Denmark-court.

Q. Should you know that man again? - A. I think I should.

Q. Look at the prisoners? - A. That is the man, Green; when they had got some little distance up the court, Coleman looked back, and then I went on; we followed them into Exeter-street, at a convenient distance behind them; then Coleman left Green, and returned back towards Denmark-court; consequently he met me, and the other man went on; I asked him where he was going, and then I left him, to find Mr. Hill, that we might go together to find out the person we were first sent to look for; then we returned home again.

JOHN HILL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Burge; I was with Pearce; we saw Coleman about eight o'clock, near the White Swan, in the Strand; Green, to the best of my knowledge, was with him; he came out with a copper can, and they went up a narrow passage in the street, that goes into Exeter-street; then Pearce went and spoke to Coleman, and the other man went on; I followed him as far as catherine-street, and left Pearce with Coleman.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, Hainson, in Holborn, at a shop where he worked; I took him to the office, and he was committed; I asked him if he knew Coleman, and he said, no, he did not know any thing of him; I had a search-warrant; on the Monday morning following I went with the procecutor to Mrs. Hayes's at the Bell, in Red Lion Market, Golden-lane; when we went into the tap-room, there were several candlesticks standing over the fire-place; the procecutor picked out two of them, and said they were his property; we found nothing else belonging to him; the prisoner, Green, was in the House of Correction; I searched him from there; he said he knew nothing of Coleman.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You found Hainson at work at his master's? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM ROSE sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden; I was with the last witness; we went to the Bell, in Red Lion Market; the prosecutor picked out these two candlesticks from the mantle-piece, from three or four more.(Produces them).

Coleman. There were four pair of candlesticks taken away, but I cannot swear to them.

Q. Did you know Mrs. Hayes? - A. I had been there before with Hainson; Hainson and Green both told me they had sold these things to Mrs. Hayes, in Long-lane; she talked at that time of removing to a public-house; when I was at Hayes's I was there with Green's wife and Hainson to procure money to pay Green's fees here at the Old-Bailey.

Burge. I know these candlesticks to be mine; one of them has been mended by a screw by one of our workmen fourteen years since; I can swear they are my property; I have been in the habit of seeing them more than thirty years.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Upon Mr. Ramsden's death, these things were appraised to you? - A. No; Captain Ramsden is on a voyage to China, and when he comes home it is to be settled.

Court. Q. Do you consider yourself answerable for them? - A. I do.

Q.What is the value of the three mahogany barometer frames? - A. They cost four pounds ten shillings, besides additional work, I paid for them; they are my own property.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

The prisoner Hainson called fourteen witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Green, GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

Hainson, GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-59

497. THOMAS MAY and HENRY MAY were indicted for ripping and cutting, on the 27th of April, thirty pounds weight of lead, value 2s. 6d. belonging to Richard Clifton , fixed to a certain building called a house, with intent to steal the same .

RICHARD CLIFFTON sworn. - I live at No. 2, King-street, Clerkenwell, and I have two houses in Bell-alley, Goswell-street , uninhabited: On the 27th of April, in the morning, I found the lead torn up from the gutter on one side, and turned up and trod down on the other; they had ripped one side of the gutter, and not the other.

Q. This gutter runs between the two houses? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bevil. Q. What number is this first house you speak of? - A. There is no number; the two houses are situated in a garden.

Q. There was a gutter fastened on one side to one set of rafters, and on the other to another set of rafters? - A. Yes.

Q. Then it was turned up on one side, and not on the other? - A. Yes.

Q. Then still the whole body of the lead was fastened to the house? - A. Yes.

ISAAC BISO sworn. - On the 27th of April last, in consequence of information, I went to Clifton's house a few minutes before eleven at night; I saw two men upon the house between the two roofs, they were stooping down, as if at work.

Q. What fort of a night was it? - A. I was a moonlight right.

Q. Look at the prisoners, were those the men? A. I cannot positively swear.

JOHN PRINCE sworn. - Q. Look at the prisoners, do you know their persons? - A. I do.

Q. Did you ever see them before the 27th of April? - A. Yes, I had seen them about on the 27th of April; I saw them upon the top of Mr. Clifton's house in the gutter; there are four ridges to the two houses; they were in that gutter that separated the two ridges of the furthermost house.

Q. What did you see them do? - A. I saw them break in the shutter of the first of the two houses, and go in; I am sure it was the prisoners at the bar, for I stopped and saw them get up at the top of the house, and then they climbed over from the first to the second; I saw them taking the tiles off, and placing them upon the roof; then I saw them fold the lead over from the side of the gutter; I then gave an alarm to Isaac Biso ; I was in Bellalley, right facing the house.

JOHN ELLIS sworn. - I am a watchman; the two last witnesses called me, and I went and saw the two prisoners upon the house; they were stooping down, and appeared to me to be wrenching the gutter up between the two ridges of the furthermost house; I told them to come down or I would fire at them, I had a pistol with me; the clock went eleven just as I received the information, it was a very light night indeed; the prisoner, Henry, came down first; they made a way through the roof, and came through the cieling of the first house; I had him in custody about ten minutes, and he said I might take him where I pleased, for there were more in the house; I said, I was confident there was, and then Thomas May came down, and with the assistance of John Prince I secured him; I left a person waiting at the house while I took them to the watch-house; upon my return, I went up, and found the gutter, between the two ridges of the first house, gone entirely, but that was gone two days before; I climbed over the roof to the second gutter, and there I found the lead wrenched up, and doubled over all along the ridge on one side.

Q. So that in order to take away the whole of the lead they must have ripped up the other side? - A. Yes; they had taken off the tiles and had begun that; I am sure the prisoners are the men.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave them a good character. Thomas May, GUILTY , aged 27.

Henry May, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010520-60

498. JOHN WHITTON and JOHN PAVELY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , three lambs, value 3l. the property of John Sargeant and John Basino .

JOHN SARGEANT sworn. - I am a farmer , at Hendon ; All my lambs were in the close on Saturday the 25th of April, there were twenty-four lambs, and twenty-four sheep; on Sunday the sheep were seen very uneasy, bleating about the field; and on Monday three lamb's skins were found at the distance of one close from mine, over the other hedge; and on Wednesday, Crocker, the officer, came over and counted my lambs and sheep, I was not at home; there were three lambs missing, and the lamb's skins that were found were about the size of my lambs that were missing, but they had no mark.

THOMAS LITTLEWOOD sworn. - I am a farmer. I live at Hendon: On Monday the 27th of April, as I was crossing a field belonging to Mr. Humphreys, a pointer dog, which was with me, found some sheep's entrails in a ditch; I looked in the ditch, and there I found three lamb's skins, about two hundred yards from Mr. Sargeant's field, they were quite fresh killed; on the Wednesday we heard of the carcasses of some lambs being stopped upon two men in St. Giles's; we went to Bow-street and compared the skins; the carcasses were one large one, and three smaller ones; the three small carcasses fitted the three skins that I found in the field, I saw them fitted; they appeared to me to belong to those carcasses.

Q. Did you observe any thing from which you concluded the skins came from Mr. Sargeant's field? - A. They appeared to come from that way, by the wool that had been dropped; upon examining the skins, we found they were one ewe lamb, and two wether lambs, and so were the carcasses also.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am one of the patrols belonging to Bow-street: On Sunday morning, the 26th of April, I observed the two prisoners at the bottom of Tottenham-court-road, they crossed over towards St. Giles's; I got before them, and they followed me past St. Giles's church, they had two sacks, one on each shoulder; I let them go on till I met two men coming, whom I got to assist me in securing them; I asked Whitton where he got the two sacks from; he said he found them; I took them to the watch-house, and on searching Whitton, in his left-hand coat-pocket I found this knife; and in his left-hand jacket pocket I found this rag-stone, and this piece of cord; he had a jacket under his coat; and in his right-hand coat-pocket I found this steel; upon Pavely I found three or four duplicates, and some money; on the Tuesday following I went into the Hay-market, with the two sacks, and there I heard that three lamb's skins had been found by Mr. Littlewood; the next day, Wednesday, I went to Hendon, and Mr. Littlewood came to town, and saw the three lamb's skins fitted to the three carcasses that I found in the sacks; the prisoners said, they had been out in the morning, and they had found them, but could not tell where, nor any place that it was nigh; I have found the owner of one of the sacks, Mr. Burgess, in Horley-down-lane; Mr. Burgess is not here.

Whitton. The whetstone was not in my pocket.

Pavely. It was in my pocket.

Crocker. It was in Whitton's inside jacket-pocket.

Court. (To Sargeant.) Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoners at the bar? - A. No.

Court. (To Littlewood.) Q.Did you ever see the prisoners before? - A. Never.

Whitton's defence. This young man and I were walking on Sunday morning, and picked up these sacks, which we intended to carry to the first public-house we came to, when Crocker stopped us.

Pavely's defence. I have nothing more to say.

Court. (To Sargeant.) Q. Do these lambs belong to you? - A. To me and my partner, John Basino . Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-61

499. JOHN WHITTON and JOHN PAVELY were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a lamb, value 30s. the property of Henry Nicholas .

HENRY NICHOLAS sworn. - On Saturday evening, the 25th of April, I lost a lamb; I had seen it on the Saturday, and William Geeves missed it on the Sunday; the skin was found two fields from where my lamb was, and about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Sargeant's; I saw the skin compared with the carcass, at Bow-street, on the Wednesday, and it fitted exactly, I have no doubt of its being mine; the lamb was got by a particularly large rain, very coarse wool, and the lamb took after the rain; we had not such another lamb in all our country.

Q. Was there any mark about the carcass that satisfied you of its being your's? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoners till you saw them at Bow-street? - A. Not to my knowledge.

WILLIAM BURNABY sworn. - I looked after the lambs sometimes; I cannot recollect how long before it was lost it was that I saw it.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoners before? - A. No; this is the skin to the best of my knowledge.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn- I saw this skin fitted to one of the carcasses that I found upon the prisoner, Whitton; when Burnaby came on the Monday to look at the skins, I put all the four skins upon the floor, and he picked this one out immediately.

Whitton's defence. I have nothing to say, except that I picked them up.

Pavely's defence. I have nothing more to say.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-62

500. HENRY HART was indicted for that he, on the 27th of January , had in his custody and possession a certain Bill of Exchange, as follows:

£27 10s."London, December 27, 1800.

"One month after date, pay to my order 27l. 10s. for value received. HENRY HART .

"To Mr. Robert Elvy , at Messrs. Moreau & Co. Barking Church-yard, Tower-street." And afterwards did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, an acceptance in writing, of the same Bill of Exchange , as follows:

"Accepted, ROBERT ELVY ."

With intention to defraud William Kirkby , John Olney Beckley , and David Kirkby .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to have been forged, with the like intention.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Raine, and the case opened by Mr. Knapp).

GEORGE MACKERETH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am clerk to Messrs. William Kirkby , John-Olney Beckley, and David Kirkby , silk manufacturers, in Foster-lane, Cheapside: On the 27th of January, the prisoner came in and produced a card of Mr. John-Olney Beckley's, which we cannot find any where; this is precisely the same card; Mr. Beckley then resided in Union-street.

Q. Mr. Beckley was recently come into this partnership? - A. Yes, a very short time before; Hart produced the card, and said he was recommended by Mr. John Beckley, to purchase of us silk handkerchiefs, Bandana silk handkerchiefs, and black Barcelonas; he looked out such as he liked.

Q. Was it to be a ready money bargain? - A. He said he wanted to pay ready money, and should be a good customer.

Q. In ready money contracts you deduct a discount? - A. Yes; we took him off two and a half per cent for ready money.

Q. After having deducted that discount, what was the amount of the goods that he chose? - A. Twenty-seven pounds nineteen shillings; when I told him the amount, he looked in his pocket-book, and said, he had but fifteen pounds in Bank-notes, and therefore he should be obliged to us to send these to No. 22, New-street, Bishopsgate-street, agreeable to a written direction which he gave me,(produces it); he desired them to be taken precisely at seven o'clock in the evening; I took them within a few minutes of the hour appointed; I found the prisoner there, and delivered the goods,

Q. Have you any doubt about his person? - A. I am certain of his person; I delivered the goods upon the table; I directly opened the parcel of goods, and desired him to see if they corresponded with the bill of parcels, which I presented him at the same time. (The bill of parcels produced by John Clarke the marshalman).

Mackereth. This is the bill of parcels, 27l. 19s. he just looked them carelessly over, and said, he had no doubt they were right; I told him I expected to be paid for them; he said, he had nothing to offer me in payment but a very good bill, which he presented me; it was noticed between us that it had only three days to run; I noticed to him that he had fifteen pounds in the morning; he said he had been induced to part with that fifteen pound

for other purchases, in the course of the day; I looked over the bill. (The bill produced by Mr. Beckley).

Mackereth. This is the bill; which I took; it is drawn for twenty-seven pounds ten shillings; he made up the difference, by giving me nine shillings in money; after some conversation, I asked him who Mr. Elvy was, that it appeared to be drawn upon; he told me he was clerk in the house of Moreau and Company, merchants in Barking church-yard; he gave me a great many assurances of the certainty of its being paid: under these circumstances I was induced to take it; I went home, I shewed the bill to Mr. Kirkby, and he was dissatisfied with the bill; in consequence of which, I was sent to make enquiries about Moreau and Company, and also Robert Elvy, whom it was drawn upon; I went into the neighbourhood of Barking church-yard, and Tower-street.

Q. How came you not to go to Barkin churchyard? - A. I looked round the church-yard, and found Maurier and Company.

Q. Did you find such a person as Robert Elvy at Moreau's? - A. No.

Q. Did you make diligent enquiries all over that neighbourhood? - A. I did; when the bill became due, I enquired of Henry Hart, No. 22, New-street; I went several times after the bill was presented, but he was always denied; I called, I dare say, twenty times, but could not find him; I left word that I had called, and my business.

Q.How and where did you at last find him? - A. I think the 24th of February, in a house with which the back-door of No 22 communicates.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. When you enquired at this house in Barking Church-yard, did you not hear of Mr. Robert Elvy coming there? - A. I never could find him.

Q. Did you never hear of such a person as Robert Elvy there? - A. I enquired of the servantmaid, and she said she believed there was such a person, but she had nothing to do in the accompting-house, there was no such person then in the way, but if I would call the next morning, I might be informed about it in the accomting-house.

Q. When you enquired at New-street for the prisoner, were you not told that he was upon his ordinary business at Gravesend? - A. Yes, or Chatham, or thereabouts.

Mr. Raine. Q. Did you call afterwards at the accompting-house, and did you then hear of such a person as Robert Elvy? - A. I never could find any body in the accompting-house.

JOHN-OLNEY BECKLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you know the prisoner before this transaction? - A. I never saw him in my life.

Q. I need hardly ask you if you ever gave him any of your cards? - A. Never.

Q. Look at this; did you ever present that bill for payment at Barking church-yard? - A. I presented it the day it was due, the 30th of January.

Q. At the house where it is directed? - A. No; at the house of Maurier and Company; when I enquired, they told me there was a man put in only to give answers; he told me if I would leave the address where it laid, it would be taken up.

Q. Did you ask of him if there was any house of Morean and Co. in that church-yard? - A. No.

Q. Did you make enquiries of any body else? - A. I made no such enquiries: Mr. Mackereth had been before me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When a bill is made payable to a particular place, and the person not at home, the usage is to leave the address where it lies, is not that the course of fair trade? - A. Yes.

MANNERS-BENSON COMBES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am clerk to Messrs. Kirkly and Beckley: On the 28th of January I went to enquire after this bill in Barking church-yard; I enquired for Mr. Robert Elvy at nearly one-fifth of the houses in Barking church-yard; I made diligent search, and could find no such house whatever as Moreau and Company, and no such person as Robert Elvy; the name of Maurier bearing some little similarity, I went to that house and enquired for Mr. Robert Elvy ; but was informed no such man ever had any connection with them, and no such person was ever heard of there.

Q. Did you enquire at New-street, for Hart? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you get either money or goods? - A. No; the reason assigned to me was, that he was gone to Gravesend the preceding night; I was once informed he was at Gravesend, another time at Chatham, and another time they believed he would come to town; but I never could find him.

JOHN HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Look at that bill, and tell us whether you presented that bill for payment? - A. Yes, I presented it at Barking church-yard, on the 30th of January, at Maurier and Company's.

Q. Was it paid? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you a Notary? - A. I live with a Notary.

Q. That memorandum pinned upon the bill is your's, is it not? - A.It is from my master's book; the answer the woman gave me was, not within - no orders.

Q. Was that memorandum written by you? - A.No.

Q. Was it written by your direction after you returned from Barking church-yard? - A. Yes.

ROBERT WORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am collector of the taxes for the parish, where Barking church-yard is situated.

Q. Have you been long acquainted with that parish and the inhabitants? - A. Thirty years.

Q. Tell us whether you have ever known such persons as Robert Elvy, or Moreau and Company, to have resided in Barking church-yard? - A. No.

Q. If such persons had resided there, as housekeepers, you must have known it? - A. I had heard there was such a person as Moreau lodged there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Many persons have accompting-houses who do not pay taxes to you? - A. Yes.

Q. And there are frequently several accompting-houses in one house? - A. Yes.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - After Sapwell had apprehended the prisoner, and we had taken him to the Compter, I searched him, and found this pocket-book; there are some bills and some receipts for his rent, and among them a letter containing a bill drawn upon Mr. Robert Elvy , stockbroker, at Messrs. Moreau and Company, merchants, Barking church-yard, Tower-street, signed Alexander Badden; accepted Robert Elvy : the letter is directed to Mr. Mullen, No. 82, Redcross-street, Borough, Southwark, signed by Hart.(The letter read).

"Sir, I should be glad you will get that accepted, and inclose it and send it by the Pennypost as soon as you can; as soon as it is done, may depend that all parties shall be satisfied. I am, Sir, your humble servant, HENRY HART .

"No 22, New-street, Bishopgate-street, Feb. 22d, 1801."(Another bill read).

"London, January 3, 1801.

"Six weeks after date, pay to me, or my order, 8l. 12s. 6d. for value received. ROBERT ELVY.

"Directed to Mr. John Lee, leather-stainer, No. 4, White-street, Borough, Southwark.

"Accepted, ROBERT ELVY.

"Indorsed, ROBERT ELVY, HENRY HART ."

Clarke. The bill of parcels that I produced before was in that book also.

THOMAS SAPEWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable of the city of London; I apprehened the prisoner at the back of the premises No. 22, New-street; I desired Clarke and Mackereth to go in the front, and I went round by Catherine-wheel-alley, and found him in a room of Mr. Gough's, a stationer; there is a back door which comes from his own house into Mr. Gough's back premises.

Mr. Raine. (To Mr. Mackereth). Q. Look at that signature of Henry Hart upon the bill, do you remember that being shewn the prisoner before the Lord Mayor? - A. Yes; he said it was his own hand-writing. (The bill read).

Prisoner's defence. I was in company one evening with two silk-weavers, at the Catherinewheel, in Bishopsgate-street; I mentioned that I wanted some articles of this sort; they said, if I would go to Mr. Beckley's, in Union-street, I should get some as reasonable as any where; I went and enquired for Mr. Beckley; he was not at home; the warehouseman desired to know my business; I told him my business, and he put the direction upon the back of the card; I went to Foster-lane, and I told them that I had been to Union-street; I told them I wanted some handkerchiefs to go into the country, and I looked out the goods, and they were to be delivered about seven in the evening; I did not intend to pay the bill away till it was due; I went in the mean time over the water to Mr. Elvy, to get some money of him on account; his house was at Walworth; he was not at home, and I was obliged to pay away the bill; I said, if your gentlemen have any objection to the bill, let me know to-night, for I am going off to Gravesend to-morrow morning with the goods; I heard nothing from them that night, and the next morning I went to Gravesend and Chatham; I was gone four days, I believe; when I came back nobody made any demand upon me for the bill till I was taken to the Mansion-house; there were large bills stuck about, which made these people go out of the way, or else I have no doubt but the bill would have been paid when it became due.

For the Prisoner.

MICHAEL PRICE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a broker of household furniture, I live in Long-lane, West Smithfield.

Q. Did you, in the course of last winter, know Mr. Hart, the prisoner at the bar? - A. I did.

Q. Did you know a person of the name of Robert Elvy ? - A. I did.

Q. What was he? - A.Clerk to a stock-broker, as I understood.

Q. Were you ever in company with Hart and Elvy together? - A. I was, at the George public-house, George-yard, Snow-hill.

Q. Did any conversation pass in your presence between Elvy, Hart, and you, about the drawing of a bill? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that bill, and say, whether that bill was drawn in your presence, and in the presence of Elvy? - A. Yes.

Q. Whose hand-writing is the body of that bill? - A. Mine.

Q. Whose is the signature of the drawer? - A. Henry Hart; it was written by him in my presence.

Q. Did Mr. Elvy write that acceptance in your presence? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Was it all done with the same pen and ink? - A. I cannot pretend to say, it was all done at one time, and in the same room.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you, a broker? - A. Yes.

Q. And a collector of debts? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known Hart? - A. Two or three years.

Q. What is he? - A. I understand he belongs to the Customs, I cannot immediately say.

Q. By that you mean he has a place in the Custom-house? - A. I cannot say of my own knowledge.

Q. You knew he had a place in the Customs? - A. I understood from him, and some of his friends, that he belonged to the Customs.

Court. Q. From which of his friends? - A. A Mr. Robertson and a Mr. Badden, and several others.

Q. Then you understood from him and his friends that he belonged to the Customs, but never learned what place? - A. No, never.

Q. Do you know where he lived? - A. Yes; in New-street, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. He is clerk to a stock-broker? - A. Yes

Q. Where does he live? - A. No. 7, Hampton-street, Walworth.

Q. Is that where Elvy lived, do you mean? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where the stock-broker lived who employed him? - A. No.

Q. You do not know where Elvy did his business? - A. Elvy transacted some business, I believe, but what business I cannot say, in Barking church yard; I have come over with him sometimes from Walworth to that house in Barking church-yard.

Q. You saw Elvy write the acceptance? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw him write the name of Moreau, too, did not you? - A. No.

Q. Who wrote the name of Moreau? - A. I wrote it, by Elvy's direction.

Court. Q. Write your own name now upon a piece of paper? - A. Never having been in a Court of Justice before, I am very much agitated.

Court. We will make allowance for that. (The witness wrote his name, which was handed to the Bench).

Mr. Raine. Now write - "To Mr. Robert Elvy , at Messrs. Moreau and Co's. merchant. in Barking church-yard, Tower-street." (The witness did it, and it was handed to Mr. Raine.)

Mr. Knapp. It is certainly the same handwriting. Gentleman, we will admit it.

Q. You attended before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell his Lordship what you have been telling us to-day? - A. Yes.

Q. That you mean to swear? - A. As near as I can recollect.

Q. It was taken down in writing, was it? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did not Mr. Newman take it down? - A. I don't know whether he did or not.

Q. When was it? - A. I cannot say the day nor the month.

Q. You can tell us the month? - A. I suppose about eight or ten weeks back, but I cannot take upon myself to say.

ALEXANDER BADDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I have been in the seasaring line; I came home just before Christmas.

Q. Do you know Hart, the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Elvy? - A. Perfectly.

Q. Were you ever in company with Elvy and Hart together last winter? - A. Yes, several nights.

Q. Did you ever see them together at the George. George-yard, Snow-hill? - A. Yes, and no where else.

Q. Do you remember any particular transaction that passed between them? - A. There was a bill drawn, which one Price drew the body of the bill.

Q. Where did Hart live? - A. No. 22, New-street.

Q. Did his family reside there with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Does his family continue to reside there? - A. They do.

Q. Did you see Elvy do any thing to that bill? - A. I saw him accept it.

Q. Look at that bill; have you a sufficient recollection of the bill to say if that is the bill? - A. That is the bill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Where does Elvy live? - A. I do not know where he lived, but the bill was addressed, Barking church-yard; I have endeavoured to find him out, but have not been able.

Q. You have been in the seafaring line, what are you now? - A. I live upon what I got when I was at sea, and I am looking out for a situation.

Q. What ship were you on board of? - A. I have been on board several; I came home last, just before Christmas.

Q. May I trouble you to tell me how you spell your name? - A. Baddan.

Q. Have you had any bill transactions with Mr. Hart? - A. I never had in my life-time.

Q. Of course, as you never had any dealings with Hart, you never gave him a bill? - A. I gave him a bill, for which I was to have stops, which this very Elvy accepted.

Court. Q. When was this? - A. It might be some time last January, I am not certain to a day or two.

Q. Have you sold Hart goods? - A. No; I sold him some Spanish dollars and foreign coin, making altogether 15l. 10s. 9d.; he agreed to give me 4s. 9d. a piece for the dollars.

Q. Was not the bill drawn for that amount? - A. I do not know certainly, but I believe about that sum; it was within less than a pound.

Court. I will trouble you to write your name.(The witness wrote his name, and it was handed to the Bench).

Mr. Raine. Q. It was drawn for more than 14l.? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. You told me you are sure it was within a pound? - A. I think it was.

Q. As you waver about it, are you sure it was within two pounds of 151. 10s. 9d.? - I cannot say.

Court. Q. How came you not to take the bill from him for the exact amount of the dollars? - A.Elvy told me to call upon him in Barking church-yard, and he would pay me for them the next day, at twelve o'clock; I called there, and he was there, but came with me out of the house, and said, I will meet you at the George, in George-yard, this evening, at nine o'clock, and I will pay you, or give you a bill, and when he came there, he gave me this bill.

Q. How came Hart to indorse it? - A. Hart was to give me slops for it.

Q. When did you get these slops? - A. I did not get them at all.

Q. When were you to have them? - A. As soon as he could go to market.

Q. Was there not a given time mentioned? - A. No, there was no limited time.

Q. How many months did you suffer to elapse before you called upon Hart to supply you with the slops? - A. Not one; he was in the Poultry Compter.

Q. Do you mean to say, that one month after the date of this bill, Hart was in confinement? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Might it not have been two months? - A. No, I do not think it was.

Q. Will you swear it was not more than three months after this bill was so drawn, that Hart was taken into custody? - A. Yes, I will.

Q. Price wrote the body of this bill, did he? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that bill? - A. This is the very bill.

Q. You said it was within a month? - A. I was not certain to the time.

Q. Is it your custom to pay for slops before you get them? - A. No; it is time enough to pay for them when you do get them.

Court. Q. Since you have returned the last time from on board ship, have you had any regular way of life? - A. I have not; because I had some money when I came from sea, and I have had enough, thank God, to support me since.

DUNCAN CAMPBELL sworn. - I am a painter and glazier, in the Borough of Southwark.

Q. In the course of last winter, did you know a person of the name of Robert Elvy? - A. Very well; I have known him nine or ten years.

Q. What has he been lately? - A. He pretended to me that he was a stock-broker, he lived either in Frances-street, or Hampton-street, in Walworth; I have been at his house several times, and have done work for him.

Q. Did you ever see him write? - A. Yes, often; I have seen a great deal of his writing; this appears to me to be like his writing; I don't mean to swear positively to his writing, but it is like it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did I understand you rightly, that he pretended to be a stockbroker? - A. I did not know him in any other business; whether he was or not, I cannot swear.

Q. Where is he now? - A. I saw him last Sunday was a week at the Elephant and Castle, at Newington.

Q. Have you seen him here to-day? - A. No.

Court. Q. Can you take upon yourself positively to swear, ther is such a person in existence as Elvy? - A. Yes.

Q. And you believe that acceptance to be writing? - A. I believe it is, I don't swear positively, but believe it to be so.

Court. Really, Gentleman, I could with great pleasure traverse the whole of this very long case, but it strikes me that I should be very much wasting your time, and the valuable time of this Court, which may be employed to other purposes, if we were to go on in this case. Observe how it stands. This is an indictment preferred against the prisoner for having uttered a Bill of Exchange, purportaing to have been accepted by a person of the name of Robert Elvy , knowing the same to have been forged: therefore, it is of the effence of this prosecution that you should be perfectly satisfied that the name of Robert Elvy is actually forged. I should have been perfectly prepared, as the evidence on the part of the prosecution stood, to state, that Robert Elvy was a man of straw, who never existed, and that the prisoner, or some person with his connivance, had put that name upon the bill. I should have been prepared to tell you, that that species of fraud did come within that higher species of offence, which constitutes forgery; but still, though this man has been in bad company, it appears that there is a man, perhaps, deeply particeps rimonis, a vagabond, that is at one moment at Walworth, and at another in Barking Church-yard, who has no visible place of abode; and this witness says, it is the hand-writing of Elvy, and he is corroborated by two other witnesses, that there is such a man in existence. Under these circumstances, I am quite satisfied that men of your understandings will not feel yourselves justified in saying that this is the forged acceptance of a person not existing, or of a person existing, whose name the prisoner has assumed without his consent.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-63

501. JOHN WILLIAMS and JOHN CARTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , a wether sheep, value 20s. the property of Joseph Snoxell .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-64

502. JOHN WILLIAMS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , a stitch of bacon, value 20s. the property of Charlotte Williams , widow .

The prosecutrix not being able to identify the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-65

503. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , a sow, value 2l. and five pigs, value 3l. the property of Mary Webb , widow .

MARY WEBB sworn. - I am a widow: On Tuesday, the 21st of April, I lost a sow and five pigs from Muswell-hill ; I came to London that day, and left my sow and pigs in my own yard at eight o'clock in the morning; I returned home between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and missed my sow and pigs; I heard that they had been stolen, and were at Adams's, at Highgate; I went there, and told him I could swear to them as well as I could the gown upon my back, for I had brought them up; the sow was all white, what they call a hall breed; the moment the sow heard my voice, she knew me; the same as a child would know its mother, and came to the door; there was no occasion to drive her home, she knew her way home.

Q. Could they get out of your yard? - A. I never knew them go one hundred yards in my life; I had them ringed the day before.

JOHN ADAMS sworn. - On Tuesday, the 21st of April, about half past twelve o'clock, I was coming from Muswell-hill to Highgate; I had been at work at the foot of the hill with a team of horses; I saw the prisoner coming towards Highgate with the sow and pigs; I halted, and he came up to me, and we had some conversation together; I said to him, you have got some very pretty pigs there; he said, yes; I said, a couple of the best of them would not be dear at a guinea; he said, no; I asked him if they were for sale; he said they were; I asked him how far he had drove them; he said, from the hill above, but he did not know the name of it; I came with him a considerable way; he did not go so fast as I did, and I passed by him; he said, you say you want a couple of pigs, you shall have a couple for a guinea, take one of the worst and one of the best; I said, no, my friend, you are too hard, I do not particularly want them; I left him upon Highgate-common; I halted again at the beginning of Highgate, and waited till the man came up again; I then seized him by the collar; says I, my friend, you are not going any further with these hogs, I shall stop you on suspicion of having stolen these hogs; he said, no, they are my own property, I have bought them and paid for them; I asked him where he bought them; he said, at a public-house at the hill, pointin to Muswell-hill; he said he bought them of a publican, but did not know his name; I told him that did not satisfy me, I should take him into custody on suspicion; he said he was afraid he should lose the hogs; I took him to the Castle inn, and left him in custody there while I went back again to Muswell-hill; I put the hogs into my own stye, at Highgate, till Mrs. Webb claimed them; she and I went to the Magistrate together.

Q. How far was it from Mrs. Webb's that you first saw the prisoner? - A. Not quite a quarter of a mile.

Prisoner's defence. I was looking after some work; I overtook a man with a sow and pigs; he asked me to take them for him towards Islington, and he would satisfy me. GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-66

504. CHARLOTTE OAKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , two silver tea-spoons, value 48. a silk handkerchief, value 1s. and a table-cloth, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Jones .

MARY JONES sworn. - I am the wife of William Jones , No. 40, Market-lane, St. James's ; the prisoner lodged in my two pair of stairs front room; on Monday, the 20th of April, about ten o'clock at night, I missed my tea-spoons from the two pair of stairs back room, which I kept as a store-room; the door was forced open; the spoons were pawned; the prisoner was taken on the Wednesday, and a table-cloth found upon her; she had mended her shift with it, and I found the remainder of it in the room; she was searched, and nothing else found upon her; she afterwards gave up four duplicates to me; I gave them to the constable.

GEORGE JONES sworn. - I am servant to a pawn-broker, (produces two silver tea-spoons); I took them in of the prisoner at the bar on the 20th of April, I think between one and two o'clock; I am certain the prisoner is the person.( James Kennedy , the officer, produced the duplicates).

JOHN PITT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, (produces a silk handkerchief).(The property was identified by Mrs. Jones).

Prisoner's defence. I did not break the door open, it stood open. GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-67

505. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for making an assault on the 14th of August , in the King's highway, upon Mary Cook , widow , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a box, value 7s. the property of the said Mary.

MARY COOK sworn. - I am a widow; at the time I was robbed I used to carry out meat; I am now in service at the Castle public-house, Saffronhill: On the 20th of October last I was robbed at the bottom of Chick-lane , between eight and nine o'clock at night; I was moving from Spitalfields to Saffron-hill, and I had a box under my arm.

Q. What house was it you lived at before you came to Saffron-hill? - A. A milk-house.

Q. How long had you lived there? - A. About three days.

Q. Was it dark at that time? - A. Yes: I was going into Union-court, at the bottom of Chick-lane.

Q. What size box was it? - A. A small size box.

Q. Had the box any thing in it? - A. Nothing at all.

Q. Was it corded outside? - A. No, it was quite plain outside; the prisoner took my box from me.

Q. Did you know the man before? - A. Yes, by eye-sight.

Q. Had you every spoke to him before? - A. Yes; in doors and out doors.

Q. Where? - A. About that quarter, in Chick-lane.

Q. Did you know what business he was? - A. He is a publican now at Reading; he came up to me at the bottom of Saffron-hill, and forced away the box from me.

Q. Did he say any thing to you? - A. I knew him very well; I lived in the house with him before.

Q. In whose house did you live with him? - A. I lodged in his house.

Q. Where was his house? - A. The corner of Union-street, Chick-lane.

Q. How long was that ago? - A. About five months.

Q. Did you make any resistance? - A. He knocked me down, and took the box from me.

Q. Did he knock you down before he took the box? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you fall quite down to the ground? - A. Yes, I did, and Peter Thomson , the witness followed him, but he is since dead.

Q. When was he taken up; you knew where he lived, how came you not to have him taken up immediately? - A. I had no money, I was so much distressed after my husband's death.

Q. Every one in this town must know, that a constable will take up a person without money; who paid for the bill? - A. A friend.

Q. How came you not to get your friend to take him up at once? - A. He was not in town at that time.

Q. Who was that friend? - A. I have a great many friends.

Q. What was the name of that friend that came to town? - A. Andrew Pullen .

Q. Have you ever found your box? - A. No.

Q. Have you any other witness? - A. No.

Door-keeper. Here is another witness, my Lord. (The witness called in.)

Q.(To Cook.) Did you know this witness before? - A. Yes; he spoke to me yesterday; I was talking about this, and he said he would go with me for charity's sake.

Q. Did the other witness come into the house where you lived? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever speak to this witness before yesterday? - A. Yes; I know him by eye sight, but I never saw him, nor know whether he knows any thing about it.

Q. Was he a friend or a stranger? - A. Quite a stranger.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How many months after you had been robbed was it before you went to the Grand Jury to find a bill? - A. It was between two and three months.

Q. Let me understand you correctly; might it have been more or less; was it four months? - A. No, it was not.

Q. I see the bill is found in December, and I know that the Sessions were on the 3d of December; if you were robbed between two and three months before December Sessions, how can you swear that you were robbed on the 29th of October? - A. I cannot exactly say.

Q. I suppose you know there is a 40l. reward if you and your helpmate can convict that honest man at the bar? - A. If I had had as much money as he, I dare say I should not have been asked so many cross questions.

Q. Do not you know you shall have 40l. if you can convict that honest man? - A. I do not want any thing but justice.

Q. Do not you know there will be a reward of 40l. if you can convict him? - A. No; I can get as good a character as any poor girl in England.

Q. Did you never hear that there was a reward of 40l.? - A. No, I never did.

Q. You know there is such a thing as an indictment for perjury, I suppose? - A. No.

Q. Do not you know that neither? - A. No.

Q. Have you never, in the course of your life, heard that there is a reward of 40l. for convicting a man of a highway robbery? - A. To the best of my opinion I never did.

Q. Are you not conscious that you have heard of such a thing as a reward of 40l.? - A. No.

Q. Have you never said, that it was in the month of August that you were robbed? - A. No.

Q. When was it you lived in Spitalfields, in what month? - A. The same month that that happened.

Q. What month was it you lived in Spitalfields, was it summer or winter? - A. Winter, the beginning of winter; I used to go backwards and forwards there.

Q. Did not I understand you to say, you lived servant to some milk people for three days? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that in summer or winter? - A. Winter.

Q. Where did you live after that? - A. I went to lodge in Union-court, and then I went to live in Field-lane.

Q. Where did you live before you went to Spitalfields? - A. At that man's house.

Q. Do not you know that he was a publican, and kept the house in which you lodged? - A. His wife used to keep the house.

Q. Do you mean, upon your oath, to swear, that you believe his wife kept the house? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Do not you know that the man himself kept the house? - A. I cannot tell whether he did or not.

Q. Do not you believe it; did you see any body else act as the master of the house? - A. Yes, a great many; it was very seldom I saw him in the house.

Q. You never saw him take money for beer in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever been in his house drinking since you were robbed? - A. No.

Q. Were you never at his house since October last? - A. Yes; since the bill was found against him, I went inside the door, and out again.

Q. Have you not been in and out repeatedly since the bill was found? - A. No, I have passed the house; I have never been in his house since the bill was found.

Court. Q. Yes, you have sworn just now, that you have been in the house - have you been in his house or not? - A. Not since the bill was found against him.

Q. Then you swear you have not been in the house since the bill was found against him? - A. No, I never was, but only at the door to call a man out.

Q. I will prove that you have been there more than once, twice, or thrice: now, upon your solemn oath, have you never been there but once to call the man out? - A. I do not recollect.

Court. Q. Do you think it worth while to go on, gentlemen?

One of the Jury. Certainly not, my Lord.

Mr. Alley. This is the foulest conspiracy that ever was witnessed.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-68

506. ROBERT MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , four pieces of Irish linen, value 19l. the property of William Olley , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM OLLEY sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in King-street, Covent-garden : On Thursday, the 7th of May, about ten in the morning, I was sitting at the top of the shop reading a newspaper, opposite the east door; I removed from that situation to the glass partition going into the front shop; I took a seat there, directly opposite the north door; I had scarcely sat down, when I saw a woman come into the shop at the north door; I heard the east door open; she asked me if I knew any thing of the man that was gone out with some Irish cloth; I told her, no; I went out of the shop immediately, and called, stop thief; I saw the prisoner, and caught him by the collar going up Rose-street, about eighteen yards from my house; he had upon him four pieces of Irish linen; with the assistance of Benjamin Levy , I took him back to my shop; one piece was dropped, and brought back by a little boy; I sent for a constable, and the cloth was taken to Bow-street.

Q. Did you look at the cloth when you took it back? - A. Yes; I know it to be mine by my hand-writing upon the end of each piece.

Q. Did you make such observation of it, as to be able to swear to it again? - A. I did.

Q. What was the value of it? - A. It cost me nineteen pounds ten shillings and fourpence.

Q. When had you seen that particular cloth in the shop? - A. I saw it upon the shelf, I believe I may say, within ten minutes.

Q. Did you miss it after you had brought the prisoner back? - A. Yes.

BENJAMIN LEVY sworn. - On Thursday, the 7th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw Mr. Olley stop the prisoner about eighteen yards from his own door; the prisoner was going up Rose-street; I heard the alarm of stop thief, and I ran out to his assistance; the prisoner had three pieces of Irish cloth under one arm, and the other he dropped upon the ground; I laid hold of him, and brought him back; a little boy, about eight or nine years old, brought in the other piece; the prosecutor said, he knew them to be his property by the private marks; I am sure the prisoner is the man, he was never out of my sight.

Prisoner. (To Mr. Olley). Q. Was I not standing in the middle of King-street when I was taken? - A. No.( Thomas Carpmeal , an officer of Bow-street, produced the property).

Mr. Olley. This is my cloth; it has my own hand-writing upon it, both with ink and pencil.

Q. This shop is where you live, is it not? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. This property was given to me by a person in the middle of the street to hold.

Court. (To Mr. Olley). Q. Did you see any other man? - A. No, I did not.

GUILTY , Death , aged 39.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-69

507. ANTHONY HOFFMAN THEIRERS was indicted for that he, on the 12th of May , a piece of base coin, resembling the current silver coin of this realm, called a shilling, feloniously, falsely, deceitfully, and traiterously did colour with materials producing the colour of silver .

Second Count. For colouring a round blank.

Third Count. For colouring a sixpence.(The indictment was opened by Mr. Gleed, and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN SAYERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am an officer of Bow-street: On the 12th of May, in consequence of information, I went with Ruthven, Bacon, and Gibbs, to the house of the prisoner, No. 11, Church-street, St. John's church, I think, about twelve o'clock in the forenoon; I directed Bacon to knock at the door, he knocked twice, I believe; it was sometime before the door was opened; it was opened by the prisoner; I went into the passage immediately, and desired the prisoner and Nixon to go up into the parlour.

Q. Nixon is the man who was afterwards discharged? - A. Yes; I immediately proceeded to search the house with Bacon, but smelling a great smell of sulphur, we went up stairs; seeing nothing in any of the rooms up stairs, we immediately came down into the kitchen, where we found these articles, (producing a basket full); upon the kitchen table were these two instruments, which are used in an engine for cutting blanks; upon the nob of the grate, by the side of the fire-place, I found this crucible; it was whole when I found it; I broke it to get the metal out.

Q. What is the crucible made of? - A. Earthenware; it was so hot, I could not take it in my hand.

Q. Was it in that sort of fluid state that you could have poured it out? - A. I cannot say; for while the door was opened, it might have cooled; upon the water cistern in the kitchen, in a bag, I found a great quantity of blanks for shillings and sixpences, some of the colour of copper, and others nearly of the colour of silver; close by the side of the grate I found this stick, which appeared to have been used, and this sand paper, these filings, this pot of blacking, and these tongs; I then went to the front parlour, where I had left the prisoner, and upon the table, when I first went in, I found some filings in this box; upon searching the bureau, I found this small crucible, this cecil, and these three pieces of composition, resembling money; one of them is the colour and size of a half-guinea; in the front garret I found this shovel, this ingot mould, and some files.

Q. How was the prisoner dress? - A. In a working dress; he had a drab-coloured jacket on; I believe this is it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Let me look at those cutters; I believe you know perfectly well these cannot be used without a fly? - A. No doubt of it.

Q. Therefore no blanks could have been cut out of this cecil without the assistance of a fly? - A. No.

Q. Therefore, with the implements you found, this cecil could not have been produced? - A. Certainly not.

Q. I believe they are both new, and appear never to have been used? - A. They appear to be new.

Q. You found no difficulty of access to the house? - A.Bacon knocked a second time, just as we were going to break open the window; when I got to the window; the door was immediately opened.

Q. You found no aquafortis? - A. None at all.

Q. The smell that you spoke of, was a sulphurous smell, and not at all like aquafortis? - A. It was not.

Q. You found no mould for the casting of blanks? - A. No.

Q. There was no instrument found, by which the shillings could have been either cast or stamped? - A. No.

Mr. Gleed. Q. A fly, I believe, is not necessary for the purpose of colouring base metal? - A. No.

ARCHIBALD RUTHVEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was with Sayers on the 12th of May: Bacon knocked at the door twice or thrice before it was opened, I am not certain which.

Court. Q. Did he knock pretty loud? - A. Yes; when the door was opened, I saw the prisoner in a working dress, he had on this jacket.(Producing it).

Q. Did you take any notice of his hands? - A. His hands seemed rather dirtyish, Nixon was there; I searched him, and found some money and Banknotes, all of which were good; I did not search the prisoner, it was either Bacon or Gibbs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are not so foolish, when you apprehend any body, to give intimation of your coming? - A. No.

Q. Therefore the prisoner had no intimation the Bow-street officers were about to apprehend him for high treason? - A. No.

Q. You found the jacket upon him? - A. Yes.

Q. This was about eleven o'clock? - A. It was in the forenoon.

Q. It is a very common thing for a man to wear a light jacket in the morning, before he dresses himself to go out? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear his hands were dirty in that sort of way that he had used these sort of metals necessary for coining? - A. I will swear they were in a dirtyish state.

Q. Did you not hear Carpmeal say at Bow-street, that his hands were clean, not dirty? - A. I did not hear him.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Carpmeal was not at the house, and therefore knew nothing about it? - A. Yes, he was.

WILLIAM BACON sworn. - I went to the prisoner's house.

Q. Did you observe his hands? - A. No; I went up to the door of the house with a book under my arm, and knocked three times at the door.

Q. What sort of knocks were they? - A. Pretty smart knocks, such as might be heard all over the house; after I had knocked three times, the prisoner at the bar opened the door, Nixon was in the passage, just behind him; I immediately went across the passage, and went up stairs to the front garret; we smelt a very nasty smell upon the staircase as we were going up, a kind of sulphurous smell; Sayers said, there is a furnace here somewhere; we then returned into the kitchen, and found two sieves, and a sand paper in one of them, this butter boat, with bread crumbs in them; there were several files, and a pair of pincers; I found this apron in the kitchen, it appears to be eat up almost with something; and here are a pair of thumb-stalls that I found upon the kitchen shelf.

SAMUEL MENCLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a monier of the Mint.

Q. Look at that paper? - A. It is base metal, shaped like shillings and sixpences.

Q. Are they in your judgment in a state fit for circulation? - A. They are.

Q. Look at these, and say what they are? - A. Some of them are shaped like shillings, but not coloured.

Q. Look at that bag? - A. They are pieces of metal resembling shillings and sixpences not compleat; they would require the process of colouring to make them fit for circulation.

Q. Look at these three pieces, one of them having the resemblance of a half-guinea, and the other a foreign coin, are they counterfeit? - A. The half-guinea is a counterfeit; as to the others, I cannot say.

Court. Q. How long have you been employed in this way? - A. Nine or ten years.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You served your apprenticeship to the moniers? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been a monier? - A. Three years.

Court. Q. How old are you now? - A. Twenty-four.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. These are the shillings and sixpences which, in your opinion, are fit for circulation? - A. Yes, they are.

Q. You think them fit for circulation? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you know what is requisite for the production of the appearance of silver? - A. Not of those pieces.

Q. Are they cast or stamped? - A. I cannot say.

CALEB- EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you have conducted these prosecutions for Mr. Vernon for a great number of years? - A. I have.

Q. Are you acquainted with the process by which this is to be attained? - A. I have seen the articles and the money, and I will state the process which I believe to have been made use of.

Court. Q. Did you ever see the manufacture compleated, or have you ever manufactured any yourself? - A. I have one in my pocket, that I have finished myself.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Look at these blanks? - A. These blanks have been cast in a mould; after they are cast, there is a considerable quantity of metal round the edge, which is called the spray, and the surfaces are extremely rough; therefore the first thing necessary with respect to the edge, is to clip the spray round with a pair of scissars; this pair of scissars, which have been produced, will answer the purpose; the next process will be to file the edges and the surface with files; here is a file, which is produced, which is the proper sort of file to be used on that occasion.

Court. Q. Are the files any other than common files? - A. No, they might be used for any other purpose; the next thing to be done would be to take the scratches out with sand-paper; some of this sand-paper appears to have been used, and some not; the chief part of the blanks in the bag appear to have undergone the process I have described; the next thing will be to colour them; those that I have now in my hand have been coloured, and are fit for circulation; the preparation for colouring them would be a solution of silver in aquafortis, made into a paste, with the addition of cream of tartar; that being applied upon the surface of the blank, and to the edges, the next thing would be to put them into a strong pickle of aquafortis alone, which would six the colour.

Q. Could that be done without a fire? - A. They might afterwards have the addition of fire and heat, but that is sometimes omitted; then they are put into water, with an equal quantity of salt and cream of tartar, boiled over the fire.

Q. In what kind of vessel? - A. Any kind of vessel, boiler, or pipkin; that brings the colour a great deal fresher; they might then he heated over

the fire in a shovel similar to this, this appears to have been much heated over the fire; they are then taken out, and scowered with fine powder of cream of tartar; they have then a bright silver colour, too bright for circulation; then the next thing is to apply what is called the blacking, which is a composition of mutton fat, bees wax, and lamp black, melted and incorporated together over the fire.

Q. Look at that blacking? - A. This appears to be the stuff that I am speaking of; this is the sort of thing that it is generally done in; rubbing the money with a piece of it, dulls the brightness, and makes it fit for circulation.

Q. Look at that butter boat, and tell us what it contains? - A. It contains butter crumbs of bread; I forgot to mention that after they are scowered with cream of tartar, they are thrown into cold water, and then, in order to dry them, they are often shook up in a cloth with burnt bran, or burnt crumbs of bread.

Q. You have told us, aquafortis was absolutely necessary for colouring? - A. Yes; it cannot be done without it; after they have been rubbed with the crumbs of bread, they are put into a sieve, to separate the bread from the coin; this sieve would answer that purpose.

Q. Look at that stick, at the end of the stick, and tell us whether there is any appearance upon the stick of its having being used with aquafortis? - A. I saw this stick on the evening of the day the prisoner was apprehended, at Bow-street, it then smelled very strong of aquafortis, the end of the stick was quite soft; such a stick as this, most probably, would be used in a process of this sort, it is for turning them round in the pickle after they have been washed with the solution of silver.

Q. Tell us if you can discover from the appearance of that apron as if there had been aquafortis upon it? - A. Aquafortis would have this effect upon it; here are a pair of pliers that would be necessary to hold the money during the process of filing and rubbing it with sand-paper, and it appears to have been very much used.

Q. You have in your left-hand some file-dust, is that file-dust of metal? - A. It is correspondent with the metal of which the blanks are made.

Q. Look at the contents of that basket? - A. Here is cecil, the refuse of the cuttings; and a crucible for melting metal; the metal is first melted in a crucible, then run into an ingot mould, and flatted in a mill, this mould would answer the purpose; here is a blank, which was delivered to me by one of the officers, upon which I tried the process that I have been describing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Though a very honest man, you have proved yourself a very good coiner, in theory and in practice; there are a great many things necessary that you have not enumerated to-day? - A. I don't know.

Q. In the commencement of the process, you told us it is necessary to use files? - A. Certainly.

Q. Is it not the most usual way not to use files, but to use bags, in which they are moved backwards and forwards? - A. I cannot say, I never heard of that; they are shook backwards and forwards after they are coloured with bran.

Q. You have stated aquafortis as necessary? - A. Certainly.

Q. A stick has been produced here which you suppose to have been used with aquafortis? - A. Yes.

Q. Where one of the component parts is silver, is not aquafortis used to throw the silver upon the surface? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that sixpence? - A. That appears to me to be cast metal.

Court. Q. Suppose there was, in that cast metal, any composition of silver, would aquafortis alone extract that silver upon the surface? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. You yourself procured elsewhere, and not at the prisoner's house, the ingredients with which you made the mixture, with which you tried this experiment? - A. Yes; the principal thing will be aquafortis.

Q. There was no aquafortis found, nor cream of tartar? - A. No.

Q. Was there any solution of silver found? - A. No.

Q. Your hands are very black, was that by the process upon that shilling? - A. Yes.

Q. And you cannot get it off? - A. I have not had an opportunity of using that that would be necessary for the purpose.

Q. If a man is taken in the act of colouring he cannot get rid of it? - A. No, certainly not.

Court. Q. What do you think would take it off? - A. A little salt and vinegar.

WILLIAM WALKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Church-street, Mill-bank-street, Westminster.

Q. Do you know No. 11, Church-street? - A. Yes; that is my house; the prisoner at the bar is my tenant; he has the whole house.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What other persons might frequent the house you cannot tell? - A. I cannot.

Jury. (To Sayers). Q. Did you find any utensils which had the appearance of having contained aquafortis? - A. No.

Q. Can you say from whence the stench that you have described proceeded? - A. I cannot.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows: - "My Lord, I stand here before your Lordship and a most respectable Jury, accused of a crime of the most heinous dye; my counsel have already urged in my behalf all that possibly could be said to prove that I am not guilty of

the crime imputed to me; but, nevertheless I have humbly to beg the indulgence to add a few words. My Lord, I am a foreigner, and as such, unacquainted with all the ways to extricate myself from this dreadful dilemma; therefore, my Lord, and respectable Jurors, I claim your protection, indulgence, and candour. My Lord, I came to England with the late Earl of Bute, and the character given me by his Lordship in his own handwriting, will, I hope, prove the disposition of my heart; this will appear by the annexed letters, which I crave may be read; I have since lived steward with several foreign Ambassadors, always acting, and always conducting myself with becoming rectitude. I am near sixty-six years of age; I have been near thirty-three years in England; I always maintained a spotless and unsullied character; I never before darkened a prison, or saw the face of a Judge. I was too old for service, and not having enough to live independent, I made use of my talents in refining silver and other metals; I got a living by it during four years; I never imagined my doings could be deemed unlawful. Mr. Sayer, the officer, who arrested me, will no doubt tell your Lordship, that I did not hesitate moment to admit him; he humanely told me, that as neither aqua fortis nor any colouring was found on my premises, I must account in the best manner I could for the other things found to my prejudice. I did, my Lord, at my examination at Bow-street, state how the cast things found came there, and had the officer given ear to my proposal, not to make so much noise in the house or neighbourhood, the owner, Jones, would in all probability have come to take them away the same evening. I have, since my confinement, sent different persons to Bayswater to find out his residence, but without the desired effect; besides, my Lord, there was neither furnace, or any other tool or apparatus whatever for casting found in my possession, without which it is impossible to counterfeit the coin of this or any other realm. This must appear no less mysterious to your Lordship and the respectable Jury than to myself and to the whole world that know any thing of casting. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have only to add, that although a foreigner, I rejected the offer to be tried by a mixed Jury of my countrymen, fully convinced and persuaded of your Lordship's impartiality, consummate wisdom, and justice, and also of the wisdom and probity of these respectable Jurors seated here to decide on my fate, fully persuaded that their decision will be favourable to me, and thereby convince the whole world that neither prejudice nor country can influence an English Jury to depart from the path of rectitude, justice, and feeling, or any indulgence that could be granted to an unfortunate prisoner. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I therefore humbly bow to the justice of your verdict."

Mr. Gurney. (To Sayer). Q. At the time you apprehended Mr. Theirars he made no sort of resistance? - A. No.

Q. Did he not tell you that the things belonged to a man of the name of Jones, and if you would wait quietly till the evening, probably he would come for them? - A. No, he did not; I heard him mention a Mr. Jones.

Court. Q. Do you know what is become of Nixon? - A. He was discharged in consequence of his hands being quite clean.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

One of the Jury. (To Mr. Powell). Q. Look at that blank, do you think that has ever received the white? - A. Certainly not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-70

508. SARAH BUSH and BENJAMIN WATERMAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , a silver pint mug, value 4l. 10s. a silver cream-jug, value 21s. a silver punch-ladle, value 7s. a pair of silver salts, value 5s. three silver cruet tops, value 7s. a counterpane, value 2l. seven pair of sheets, value 10l. 10s. seven table-cloths, value 7l. 7s. six towels, value 18s. three jack towels, value 4s. 6d. three wrapper-cloths, value 6s. three pair of pillow-cases, value 18s. two gowns, value 3l. 3s. two petticoats, value 28s. four shirts, value 2l. 2s. two yards of muslin, value 16s. a muslin apron, value 8s. a gown, value 2l. 2s. a bed-gown, value 6s. six pocket handkerchiefs, value 15s. a gold ring, value 10s. 6d. a japan coffee-pot, value 6s. four napkins, value 12s. another gown, value 15s. a quilt, value 31s. 6d. a counterpane value 10s. 6d. and a tin tea-kettle, value 5s. the property of Margaret James , in the dwelling house of Charles Regnart .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney).

MARGARET JAMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the sister of Mrs. Regnart; Mr. Regnart's name is Charles; he lives in Cleveland-street, Fitzroy-square ; I had three boxes, containing property of my own, at Mr. Regnart's; they contained the articles in the indictment; I lost a silver pint mug, two silver salt-sellers, a silver cream-jug, three silver creuet-tops, a silver punchladle, a white cotton counterpane, and several other articles; I had not seen any of them for two years before I saw them at Bow-street; I had been all that time out of town; I had left them safe nailed and corded two years ago; I saw a gown of mine upon the back of the prisoner Bush, at Bow-street.

CHARLES REGNART sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. The prisoner Bush lived in my service, I discharged her about the 11th of April; I had three

boxes belonging to Mrs. James in the front garret; the room was generally locked up; but when Mrs. Regnart gave her leave she had the key; after she had been gone about two days, I found that two of the boxes had been broke open; one of them was half empty.

JOHN WADMORE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Tottenham-court-road, (produces a counterpane, a silver mug, a punch-ladle, and a cream-jug); I received them from the prisoner Bush, in the name of Ann Waterman; they were brought to me separately; the counterpane, the 12th of February, 10s. 6d.; on the 9th of March, a silver mug, 1l. 5s.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. Above three pounds; on the 3d of March, a milk-pot, two salts, and three tops of castors.

Q. What are they worth? - A. About a guinea; on the 14th of April, the two prisoners came about seven o'clock in the evening, and Waterman asked me if I had any plate there in the name of Waterman; I replied, yes, I had; I asked him his reason for asking; he said, that Bush had lost the tickets of them; I asked them what they wanted to do with them; he said he wanted to have them altered into another name; I told them they could not have them altered into another name, without making an affidavit; I wrote out an affidavit, and gave it to them in the name of Bush; I asked Waterman whose plate it was; he said he had every reason to believe it was Sarah Bush 's; she came the next morning with an affidavit signed by a Justice, (produces it); when she first brought the counterpane, I asked her who it belonged to; she said, her uncle or her husband had given it her, and when she brought the salts and milk-pot, I asked her who she had them of, and she said, they belonged to her mother, that her mother lived at Walthamstow; she said, her mother had sent them up for her to make money of to pay her rent; when she pawned the other, she said her mother had sent those up likewise to make money of; when she came with the affidavit, she wanted more money upon it; I told her she must call again in the evening, and she said she would bring some person to indemnify me that they were her own, but she did not come again.

SAMUEL SHATFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I apprehended the prisoner, Bush; I told her I apprehended her for robbing her master, Mr. Regnart; I asked her if she knew Mr. Wadmore, and she said, yes.

Q. Did you make her any promises of favour if she confessed? - A.No.

Q. Nor threatened her if she did not? - A. No; it was near twelve o'clock at night, and I took her into a cook's-shop, which was the only house open; I asked her if she knew Waterman; she said, she wished she had never known him; we got a coach immediately, and I took her to Pancras watch-house; I searched her, but found nothing that led to the property; she told me she had pawned the plate, and the counterpane, and that Waterman and she went to the Northumberland arms, the corner of Grafton-street, burnt the duplicates, and spent part of the money; she said, they had burnt two of them, and destroyed the rest; I asked her what became of the rest of the things; she told me Waterman had taken them away, and pawned them, and what he had done with the duplicates she could not tell.

Mr. Alley. Q.Waterman was not present at this time? - A. No.

Court. Q.Did she tell you that she took the plate, and pawned it? - A. No; she said she pawned it.

Mr. Gurney. (To Regnart.) Q.Was Waterman in your service? - A. Yes, more than a twelve-month; I discharged him on the 13th of April, before all my men.

ESTHER REGNART sworn. - Court. Q.Had you the key of the room where these three boxes were? - A. It hung up in my bed-room; the prisoner, Bush, frequently had the key to go into the room to clean the room.

Q. You never gave the key to Waterman? - A. No; he was not in the house.

Mrs. James. These articles are all mine, they have my name upon them.

Bush's defence. It was never locked till a month before I left my place; the apprentice used to sleep there.

Mrs. Regnart. It might be open; but I never knew that it was not locked.

Bush. The things I confess I had, but they were delivered to me by Waterman on the 18th of January; I was a poor country girl, he came down into the kitchen, and gave me the plate to pawn for him; he said he had no wife, but two children, and he wanted to put them to school at Homerton; he was always soliciting and deluding me; I was very comfortable in my place till I knew him; he drew me aside, and told me he was not a married man when he was, and had two children; he told me he would take me away from my place, and marry me, and live with no other person; he had the money that the things were pledged for.

Bush, GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Waterman, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-71

509. BENJAMIN WATERMAN was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , nine steel tools, value 2s. the property of Charles Regnart .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

CHARLES REGNART sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a statuary : The prisoner was my foreman as a statuary mason, I discharged him on the 13th of April; a few days afterwards I searched his lodgings with a constable, and found nine steel tools.( Samuel Shatford , a constable, produced the property.)

Mr. Regnart. I know these to be mine, they have a private mark upon all of them; I had missed fifteen or sixteen dozen; there was one particularly I had questioned him about, and he said he knew nothing of it, and it was very unpleasant to him in his situation for any thing to be missing; they are worth 2s. 3d.

Q. Was the lodging in which you found them, a lodging in which his wife and family lived? - A. Yes; his wife was there, he was not, he was in custody; he told the patrol he had another lodging half a mile from Tottenham-court road, No. 4, Southampton-court, at the top of Tottenham-court-road.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I believe it is customary for the men to provide themselves with tools, and sometimes the masters find them? - A. There is a particular branch of the business in which I lend my tools, but they are never taken away.

Q. Is there not a paper stuck up in the shop, that if one man takes another's tools without leave, to be fined a pot of beer? - A. That was from my study, if they took any from my bench.

Q. The tools are so small, that they might be taken away innocently by a man as for his own tools? - A. I cannot conceive that.

Q. Are not tools, exactly like those, made for other persons besides you? - A. Yes; but these are for sculpture work, and he was never employed upon sculpture work by me.

STEPHEN SCANDRETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. The prisoner lodged at my house, No. 4, Southampton-court, Tottenham-court-road; I saw him there a night or two before he was taken up; his wife and children were there.

Prisoner's defence. These tools were lent me by Mr. Regnart to do a job for myself at home; I have a witness here to prove that Mr. Regnart always lent me tools to do all his best work for him that he did not do himself

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM ALLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a mason; I worked with the prisoner at the bar at Mr. Regnart's; in the business of a mason, a man generally finds his own tools; but when he is in the employ of a sculptor, it is generally the custom for the master to lend the necessary and useful tools to the men; during the time I was in Mr. Regnart's employ, I was principally engaged in knocking the rough part of stone off from figures; Mr. Regnart was in the constant practice of lending me tools and the prisoner at the bar; I have been in Mr. Regnart's employ nearly six months.

Q.Does it not often happen that there are innocent mistakes made? - A.Frequently tools are put promiseuously together; I have known the prisoner ten years, he has always borne the character of an honest and industrious man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Mr. Regnart lent the prisoner tools; did he ever give him permission to take tools home with him? - A. No.

Q. Nor you? - A. No.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Prisoner. Mr. Regnart told me I was a thief; i told him I was not, nor he could not prove me to be a thief; he has not paid me my wages yet; he said again I was a thief; I said I was not, but I could prove him as such, for he had taken some stone from Christ Church, and that has made him so spiteful against me.

Court. (To Regnart. Q. Did you ever lend him tools to take home? - A. No; he told me he had got a watch-case to do, and I told him he was very welcome to have my premises to execute it.

Q. Did you ever permit him to take tools to execute it at his own lodgings? - A.Never.

Q. Did you permit him to use your tools? - A. I did not, solemnly.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you or not paid him his wages? - A.There was thirteen shillings and ten-pence halfpenny, which I have paid his wife since; he has thrown an imputation on me, which I beg to explain, in October last I erected a monument to the memory of Mr. Southgate, a merchant in the City: this man was employed along with another; after he had taken up the old stones, he said to me, sir, these stones are your right and property; I said, I don't know that they are, I know not whether I have a right to them or not; I had never done any thing of the kind before, and therefore I said, as you have been in the customary method of being employed in this sort of work, you should know better than me, but do not send them home to me, if the churchwarden, or any body about the premises, hint that they have a right to them, do not send them home; when I found I was wrong, I returned them the next day, and when I discharged the prisoner, he threatened me with a prosecution in the Ecclesiastical Court.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-72

510. CHARLOTTE OAKES and HARRIOT MARTIN were indicted for making an assault in the King's highway upon William Robinson , on the 2d of April , putting him in fear,

and taking from his person a Bank-note, value 5l. the property of James Hawkins Whiteshead , Esq.

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of William Robinson .

WILLIAM ROBINSON sworn. - I am servant to James Hawkins Whiteshead, Esq. No. 15, Gloucester place: On Thursday night, the 2d of April, I was going to pay a bill at an oil-shop; I was going down Oxford-road, facing Geeves-court , the prisoner, Oakes, came up to me, and laid hold of my arm; then the other woman came up, and they both dragged me into the court, and took a 5l. Bank-note out of my rob-pocket.

Q. Are you sure they dragged you into the court? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not consent to go with them? - A. No.

Q. How old are you? - A. Going of seventeen; they both laid hold of my arms.

Q. Did they begin to rob you as soon as they had got into the court? - A. Yes, they did.

Q. Did they immediately go to your rob-pocket? - A. No; they looked at all my other pockets first.

Q. From whom did you receive that Bank-note? - A. The house-keeper.

Q. Did you look at it? - A. No; she said it was a 5l. note.

Q. Is she here? - A. No.

Q. Has it ever been found? - A. No.

Q. Then you don't know it was a 5l. note, but from what the housekeeper told you? - A. No.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-73

511. THOMAS GLENN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a cloth coat, value 5s. the property of John Edwards .

JOHN EDWARDS sworn. - I am butler to Mr. Rowe, Lower Berkeley-street, Portman-square ; I lost a coat on the 28th of April, but I was not at home at the time it was taken; I saw it about ten o'clock in the morning in the pantry; when I came home I found the prisoner in custody; I know the coat to be mine.

SAMUEL SLATER sworn. - I am footman to Mr. Rowe; I saw the prisoner come out of the pantry with the coat on his arm; the pantry is at the bottom of the area steps; I followed him up the area steps, and took him opposite the street-door; I brought him back into the pantry, and afterwards into the hall; then I sent for a constable, and he was taken to Marlborough-street. (Produces the coat).

Edwards. This is my coat.

Prisoner's defence. I purchased the coat of a Jew, in Baker-street, Portman-square, and was going home with it; I went down this area to enquire for a young man I wanted to see.

Q.(To Slater). Did you hear him make any enquiries there? - A. No; I had not left the pantry door one minute when I took the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-74

512. MARY-ANN BOYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , thirteen yards of Irish cloth, value 2l. 12s, a shawl, value 6d. a half shawl, value 6d. a pair of gloves, value 2d. and an apron, value 6d. the property of Peter Forbes , in his dwelling-house .

PETER FORBES sworn. - I am a victualler , and keep the White Horse, White-horse-alley, Cowcross ; the prisoner was my servant ; she came to me on the last day of April, and on the 1st of May I took her, with the articles named in the indictment upon her; they were taken out of the one pair of stairs bed-room; the piece of cloth was wrapped round her waist, under her gown; there were thirteen yards of Irish cloth; she had no business up stairs, and upon seeing her go up, I had a suspicion of her, and when she came down, I stopped her, and challenged her with having some of my property about her; she said, no, she had not; I took her into the kitchen, and insisted upon her sitting down till I got assistance; I had nobody in the house; I sent for a constable, and then she pulled the cloth from under her gown.

JOHN BERRY sworn. - I am headborough; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; when I went into the house, the cloth was lying on the floor; in consequence of Mrs. Forbes coming to me the next morning, I searched her, and found under her gown the other articles mentioned in the indictment. (Produces the property.)

Forbes. I know this to be my cloth, there is just the quantity that I lost; it was at first twenty-six yards; the half of it had been cut off, and it was cut uneven; I know all the other things, except the gloves.

Prisoner's defence. Distress made me take them.

GUILTY, of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-75

513. ELIZABETH PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , ten shawls, value 24s. 6d. the property of William West , privately in his shop .

REBECCA WEST sworns. - I am the wife of William West; I keep a haberdasher's shop, No. 68, New Compton street ; On Friday morning, the 15th of May, about ten o'clock, I was scowering the hearth in the parlour, I turned my head round, and saw a shadow; I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner ready to go out; she came back again when she saw me; she pointed

over the counter, and asked me what that drapery was a yard; I looked by the side of the counter, and saw a shawl thrown down upon the floor on the other side of the counter; I then looked at the prisoner, and asked her what she had in her apron, her apron was held up; she refused to let me see, but I did see ten shawls; she put her hands over them to conceal them; they had been lapped up, and laid on some drawers the other side of the counter; I laid hold of the prisoner, and a young woman came in, and I sent her for Mr. Cooper, a grocer, next door; she tried to throw them out of her apron, but whether I took them out, or she threw them out, I cannot say; I sent for a constable, and took her to Marlborough-street.

Q. You had not seen her take any thing? - A. No; I did not know that she had any thing till I saw the shawls in her lap; there were ten of them.

HANNAH BROWN sworn. - I am a shoe-binder; I went into Mrs. West's shop, and saw the prisoner with ten shawls in her apron; Mrs. West had hold of her; I went to call Mr. Cooper, and he came in, and a constable was sent for.

- COOPER sworn. - On the 15th of May I was sent for; I went in, and saw the prisoner standing close by the counter; she was in the act of throwing the shawls out of her lap on to the counter when I went in.

Q. Are you sure you saw them in her apron? - A. Part of them.( Henry Lovett , an officer, produced the property).

Mrs. West. These are my shawls.

Q. What are they worth? - A. Twenty-four shillings and sixpence.

Prisoner's defence. I went in to know what those shawls were a-piece, I did not know but what she saw me; I asked her what they were a-piece, and they fell down; I stooped to pick them up, and then the lady came out, and said, I wanted to thieve them. GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-76

514. MARY FARRAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , a muslin gown, value 7s. a bed-gown, value 4s. two shirts, value 5s. a petticoat, value 2s. a pocket-handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. a pair of stockings, value 2d. a pocket-handkerchief, value 1s. a veil, value 5s. a clout, value 4d. and ten guineas in monies, numbered, the property of John Cramer , in his dwelling-house .

Mrs. CRAMER sworn. - I am the wife of John Cramer, at Charing-cross ; the prisoner was my servant ; On Monday, the 18th of May, she left my service: she was to have left me the next day; I was not at home; when I came home, a little before twelve, at night, she was gone, and I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment; I left her in the house about eight o'clock; the ten guineas were taken out from a drawer in my bed-room; I was in a hurry when I went out, and I cannot say whether the drawer was locked or not; I put the money out of my pocket about ten minutes before I went out; I was going to a concert that evening.

JOHN HORWOOD sworn. - I am an officer,(produces the property): On Tuesday, the 19th of May, about eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner with a bundle; I had had a description of her from the prosecutor; I traced her to a lodging-house, in Dyot-street, St. Giles's.

(To Mrs. Cramer). Q. How long had the prisoner lived with you? - A.Four months.

Horwood. When I came up into the garret, I saw the prisoner sitting at the foot of the bed; there were two old women in the room; I told her she must go along with me; I asked her who that bundle belonged to at the foot of the bed, and she told me it was her's; I took her to St. Ann's watch-house; some of the things in the bundle were her own property; Mrs. Cramer came to the watch-house; I opened the bundle in her presence, and she claimed the articles that I now produce; the prisoner put her hand into her pocket and took out a box, which I took from her; it contained nine guineas in gold; I asked her whose money it was, and she told me it belonged to her mistress; Mrs. Cramer said she could not swear to the gold, but she had lost ten guineas; I searched her pocket at the watch-house, and in one of her pockets I found a veil, which Mrs. Cramer said was her's.

Mrs. Cramer. I know all the things; they are all marked.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-77

515. JOHN STEERS and RICHARD STEERS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a wooden cask, value 1s. and 27lb. of gun-powder, value 3l. 10s. the property of John Butts .

There being no evidence to identify the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-78

516. JOHN EVANS , JOHN WILLIAMS , and THOMAS HUGHES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , a pair of sheets, value 10s. the property of William Brasier .

MARY BRASIER sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Brasier, baker , at Kentish-town : On the 19th of May, about five minutes before I lost my property, the middle prisoner, Williams, came into my shop, and asked for a penny-worth of bread; I told him I had nothing smaller than a three-penny loaf; he went to the door, and I went

to the bake-house; in about five minutes an alarm was given that a boy had run out with the sheets; I went out, and saw the little boy, Evans, running across the street with the sheets on his arm; the witness pursued them, and brought them back,(the sheets produced); these are my sheets; I left them hanging in a little room at the back of the shop; I was in the bake-house, which is in the street, three steps down.

JOSEPH CLIPSON sworn. - I took Hughes and Williams on Tuesday, the 19th of May, upon the alarm that was made; Hughes was walking on the foot-path, towards Hampstead; I called to him to stop, he stopped; he asked me what I wanted with him, and I said, the baker wanted him at Kentish-town; he went back with me; at the same instant, several persons came up, and I walked behind the prisoner, and as I was going along, I saw the prisoner, Williams, concealed under a hedge; I got over the hedge, and secured him; I found the sheets about ten yards from where Williams laid; they were concealed in a hole, and covered with grass; I heard Evans say, that he came that way a bird's-nesting.

SUSANNAH ABBOTT sworn. - I had been of an errand for Mrs. Brasier, and as I came back, I saw the little boy, Evans, run out with the sheets upon his arm; I immediately told my mistress of it; he ran round the corner, where there were two ways to go, and I directly made after him, but I lost him.

Q. You did not see either of the other prisoners? - A. No, not till they were brought back.

HENRY ADDISON sworn. - On the 19th of May I saw the prisoner, Evans, threescore yards from Mrs. Brasier's door, running, with a pair of sheets upon his arm; about five minutes after that the alarm was given, I went after him; I did not see either of the other prisoners till they were bringing them back; I told them that they had not got the right people; just after, I saw the prisoner, Evans, concealed under a hedge; when we came up, I said, you are the lad that had the sheets; he abused me, and said, I blamed him wrongfully; when we got him to Mrs. Brasier's, he went upon his knees, and begged her pardon.

Mrs. Brasier. When he was brought back, he went down upon his knees, and said, pray, forgive me; and said, no, you must go to the Justice.

WILLIAM WEBB sworn. - About a quarter of an hour before the alarm was given of the robbery, the prisoner, Hughes, asked me the way to Hampstead, about three hundred yards from the prosecutor's, they were all three together; I directed them, and Hughes said to the others, come along; they walked on before me; I went the back way of Mrs. Brasier's house; I heard a noise in the street, I ran round again, and I said to Hughes, you are the very man that asked me the way to Hampstead; Evans said, he had never seen the others before; I said, you were all in discourse together when you asked me the way to Hampstead, and he said, they were; he said he was going to see a shipmate that lived at Hampstead.

Evans's defence. I met Williams in Oxford-road, and he asked me to go a bird's-nesting with him; I told him I would, and as we were going along, we saw this sailor man; he asked us the way to Hampstead, and we directed him as well as we could, and a little while after we met him going the wrong road; he was going towards Kentish-town; we told him he might walk with us, and we would shew him the way, and as we were going along, this man, Williams, said, he was very hungry, and he went into Mrs. Brasier's shop for a pennyworth of bread, and then we directed the sailor man to Hampstead; as soon as he was gone, Williams told me to go in and steal the sheets; I came out, and met Williams; I said to him, here are the sheets you told me to steal, and he took them of me, and hid them in the grass.

Williams's defence. I was very tired, and I got over the hedge to rest myself.

Hughes's defence. I know nothing about it, any farther than asking that gentleman the way to Hampstead.

For Evans.

JOHN DUDDERIDGE sworn. - I am a shoemaker, in Blue-hart-court, Little-Bell-alley, Coleman-street; I have known Evans from his infancy; he is about twelve years of age; he lives at Mary-le bonne; I was acquainted with his mother before he was born; his father was a bricklayer; I was going to take the boy apprentice to me, and I am ready to take him now; I have not known him all that time, for I have been serving his Majesty at sea; I have been home about four years.

Q. How often have you seen him in the course of that time? - A. Three or four times.

Q. Then you don't know much of him? - A. No.

Evans, GUILTY , aged 12.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

Williams, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Hughes, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18010520-79

517. MARTHA LITTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a shirt, value 10s. the property of William Gardiner .

There being no evidence of possession in the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-80

518. GEORGE MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , seventy-

two halfpence, value 3s. the property of John Pendergrass .

JOHN PENDERGRASS sworn. - I keep a greenstall at a public-house door in Whimfield-street ; I caught the prisoner's hand in my left-hand jacket pocket in the public-house, with a quantity of halfpence in his hand.

Q. Are you sure his hand was quite out of your pocket? - A. I caught his hand coming out of my pocket; I missed three shillings worth; he denied that they were mine; I laid hold of him, and the people in the box with him shoved him out of the box; I went for two officers, and had him taken; he staid in the public-house till the officers came; he was in liquor; the people in the room would not assist me.

Prisoner's defence. I had some beer in the public-house; when I had drank it, I was going away, when two officers laid hold of me; they asked me what money I had got; I did not know what they took me for.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-81

519. ELIZABETH MOLE , alias RIDE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , a shirt, value 5s. the property of Thomas Hanbury .

ELIZABETH HANBURY sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Hanbury, No. 3, Lamb's Conduitpassage : I had a shirt to wash, it was not my own; the prisoner was an acquaintance of mine; I left her in the room while I went of an errand, and when I came back, she was gone, and the shirt was gone; it was afterwards found at the pawnbroker's; I had the prisoner taken to Bow-street.( George Read , a pawnbroker's servant, produced the shirt, and deposed that he received it from the prisoner.)

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - On Friday, the 8th of May, the prisoner was brought to me, charged with stealing a shirt; I searched her, but could not find the duplicate of the shirt; she said, the shirt was at Mr. Mullett's.

Prisoner's defence. I had been drinking too much, and did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-82

520. MATTHEW NELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , eleven pair of stockings, value 11s. two odd stockings, value 1s. and a gown, value 5s. the property of Eusebius Eady .

ELIZABETH EADY sworn. - I am the wife of Eusebius Eady, No. 34, Leman-street, Goodman's-fields : On Friday, the 17th of April, between six and seven in the evening, I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment out of the yard; I afterwards found them at a public-house, in the possession of John Elder .

JOHN ELDER sworn. - I am a publican: On Friday, the 17th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house, and offered some things for sale in the tap-room; I asked him who they belonged to; he said, they were his own; there were eleven pair of stockings, two odd stockings, and a gown; I told him I did not believe they were his own, and I took him before the Magistrate; they were advertised, and Mrs. Eady claimed them.(The property was identified by Mrs. Eady).

Prisoner's defence. I bought them of a woman in Rosemary-lane; the landlord took me before a Justice, and I was sent to prison till the Tuesday following, and nobody owned them, and the Justice sent me to my regiment again; then they came to me again, and said they had found an owner, and I went before a Justice. GUILTY .

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-83

521. WILLIAM TARRATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a copper coal-scuttle, value 7s. the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

There being no evidence of the property having been stolen, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-84

522. CHARLES COULSON was indicted for that he, on the 30th of August , being servant to John Younger , a baker, did receive, on account of his said master, from Jane, the wife of William Hancock , 1l. 2s. 8d. and afterwards feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same .

Second Count. For a like offence, not stealing from whom he received it.

Third Count. For feloniously stealing 1l. 2s. 8d. the property of John Younger.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN YOUNGER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a baker in George-street, Manchester-square: The prisoner was my journeyman better than two years and a half; he left me on the 15th of December last.

Q. Did you put confidence in the prisoner to receive money for you for the bills owing to you from your customers? - A. I always did.

Q. Did you make out the bills yourself? - A. Sometimes myself, sometimes my wife, and sometimes my son.

Q. Tell us if you made out that bill? - A. This is my son's writing; I delivered it to the prisoner on Monday, the 18th of August.

Q. Look at the bottom of it, and tell me whose hand-writing that is? - A. I don't know whose hand-writing that is -" Received the contents,

Charles Coulson " - the amount of the bill is 1l. 2s. 8d. it is for several weeks bread.

Q. Had you a customer of the name of Hancock? - A. Yes, a coachman in Marybone Mews.

Q. As he received money for you, would he be to account to you for a receipt of that money? - A. Yes, of course.

Q. Did he ever account to you for that sum? - A. Never.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I take it, when any money is received by your servants, and they account to you, you enter it in your books? - A. I always do.

Q. This transaction took place so long ago as August? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it for granted you have no knowledge of this transaction, but from reference to your books? - A. No.

Q. You have not got your books here to-day? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. You have received the money from Mrs. Hancock? - A. Yes.

ALEXANDER YOUNGER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Look at that bill; whose handwriting is it? - A. It is mine.

Q. Do you see what is wrote at the bottom? - A. Yes.

Q. Whose hand-writing is that? - A. I don't know: On the 15th of December I went after the prisoner to call him back; he went past our house; I told him he must come back, he was wanted; he said, he was d-d if he came back, for he was found out; Mrs. Hancock was in the shop at the time; he was then three or four doors from my father's shop; then I came back, and told my father; I never saw him afterwards till he was apprehended.

Younger. On the 15th of December I saw Mrs. Hancock passing the shop; I beckoned to her, knowing there was a little bill standing; she came into the shop, the prisoner was then in the shop; he had told me she had been in the country; I told her, she looked very well since she came from the country; I had often asked the prisoner if the bill had been paid, and he always denied it; she said, she had not been in the country at all; I asked her then to come into the parlour, which she did.

Q. Did he remain in the shop when she went into the parlour? - A. No; he took his basket and bread out with him, and never returned any more; I sent my son to call him back, and he would not come back.

JANE HANCOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of William Hancock: I dealt with Mr. Younger in August last, the prisoner was his journeyman.

Q. Look at that bill, and tell us if you paid it in August last? - A. Yes, I did; the prisoner wrote at the bottom of it - "Received the contents, Charles Coulson " - I always paid the prisoner Mr. Younger's bills, and he always gave me receipts.

Q. When did you discontinue Mr. Younger as a baker? - A. At the time I paid that bill; I told the prisoner not to bring any more bread.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You, like all good wives, live at home with your husband? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley contended that the 2d and 3d Counts were inoperative, and that the first should have stated the money to have been received of the husband by the hands of the wife.

Court. As to the 1st Count, I am clearly of opinion that it is quite sufficient to state that the money was received on account of the master; as to the other two, the question is merely whether they are necessary or not; it has been said, the 2d Count is bad, because it does not state from whom it was received; but suppose a prisoner, charged with a crime of this sort, does not chuse to confess from whom he received it, although he confesses he has received a large sum of money on account of his master, I think it would be very good evidence against him, though the sum is not ascertained. Under all these circumstances I am of opinion that this indictment is good; as to the Common Law Count, I have always entertained an opinion that it was not good.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. For the Prisoner.

JOHN SHARPE sworn. - I have known the prisoner five years; he has always bore a good character.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Have you not been for the purpose of settling this with the prosecutor? - A.Not since he has been taken; I went at the desire of the young man; he said he owed Mr. Younger some money, and he wished to pay it in the couse of a month.

Q.When was that? - A. I cannot say, it was since he left Mr. Younger; Mr. Younger would have taken it, if I would have paid it down.

Mr. Alley. Q. This was before the man was indicted? - A. Yes.

Mr. Younger. Mr. Sharpe came two or three days after the prisoner left me, and told me he wanted his clothes; he said, the prisoner had given him an account of about five pounds that he had taken of my money, and he wished to pay it for the prisoner; I told him I would not take the money from him, for I should prosecute him; there was no money tendered, and I refused to take any.

Court. Q. Did you, or not, offer to take the money if it was paid down? - A. I did not; there was no money presented to me.

Q. Did you, or not, offer to take it if the money was paid down? - A.Not that I know of; we

never could agree about the sum, for he had more than ten pounds of my money.

Mr. Alley. Q. Upon the oath you have taken, would you not have received the money from the hands of Mr. Sharpe, if he had given it to you? - A. If he had paid me the whole sum, I might.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-85

523. PETER FOUSTRYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , seven pounds weight of iron nails, value 2s. and five iron bolts, value 3s. the property of Daniel Clowes .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

HENRY NICHOLLS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Clowes, a barge-builder , Cock-hill, Ratcliff : On Thursday, the 21st of May, about half past three in the morning, I was going down the yard to work, and saw the prisoner with five bolts in a bit of cloth in his hand; when he observed me, he laid them down on the side of the barge; I immediately asked him what his business was there; he told me, he had been sleeping on the saw-dust; he said, a boat-auger laid there, and he thought it was not a proper place for it; he had removed it; the auger is not in the indictment; the bolts were in a cloth, with a chalk-line tied round it; I went to the gun-whale of the barge, and looked to see what it was; there were five bolts; I took them in my hand, and followed him up the yard; I stopped him about five or ten yards from the yardgate, and called the watchman; I charged him with stealing the bolts; he told me to mind what I was at, for I had not caught him with the bolts in his hand; he had took them out of the barge that I was at work upon the night before; his jacket pockets appeared very full; upon being searched, they contained iron nails; they were Mr. Clowes's property; the bolts I can swear to; the nails I had left in the nail-box in the barge.

GABRIEL FERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the beadle of Ratcliff, (produces the property); I took all the nails from his pocket; the bolts were brought to the watch-house by the watchman.

JOHN ALDERMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a watchman: I received the bolts from Nicholls, and took them to Ferry, the beadle.

Ferry. I have had them ever since.(The bolts were identified by Nicholls).

DANIEL CLOWES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I cannot swear to the property; the nails are particularly made for our branch of business.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-86

524. EDWARD HURST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , a bushel and a half of oats, value 5s. the property of Christopher Hill .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-87

525. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , a shirt, value 2s. the property of William Seaward .

- SEAWARD sworn - I am the wife of William Seaward , No. 28, Queen-street, Seven Dials : I take in washing; I lost a shirt out of the yard; I hung it there between eleven and twelve o'clock on the 21st of May, and missed it between five and six in the evening; the prisoner was brought back with the shirt; I had a misfortune with it, and stained it; it turned yellow; I can swear to it by that stain.

MARY WINTER sworn. - I was looking out at the window, and saw the prisoner come out of a public-house door just by, I had lodged between four and five years in Mrs. Seaward's first floor; I went down stairs, and met the prisoner in the passage of our house coming in at the back door, and putting a shirt under his coat; I immediately called, stop thief; he was pursued and taken by Mr. Brown; I saw him throw the shirt away over the area.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I am a coachmaker: I heard a cry of stop thief, I was standing at the door of a house in the adjoining street; I stopped the prisoner with a shirt under his arm, which he threw over into our area; he disengaged himself from me, and ran on, and a man stopped him in the middle of the street, and threw him down; I never lost right of him; I picked up the shirt and delivered it to Mrs. Seaward.

Prisoner's defence. There was a crowd of people in Great St. Andrew's-street, and a farmering-looking man jostled against me; I asked him what that was for; and that young man immediately took me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 32.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-88

526. SARAH COCKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , five caps, value 5d. five cap borders, value 6d. a pair of mitts, value 2d. a waistcoat, value 2d. two handkerchiefs, value 1s. a shirt, value 6d. two bed curtains, value 1s. a sheet, value 1s. a gown, value 2s. a pair of pillow-cases, value 1s. a shawl, value 1s. and a pair of shoes, value 1s. the property of Francis Kerns .

CATHERINE KERNS sworn. - I am the wife of Francis Kerns , I keep a house in Wharton's-court,

Holborn : The prisoner lodged with me five months; some time ago the came to live with me again, eight days before the things were taken; I missed them on the 15th of April, from my own bed-room, and the bed-room where she laid; on the 14th, in the evening, I looked them up to wash the next day, she was to help me wash.

Q. Did she pay you for your lodging? - A. No; I let her be there till she got a situation; I saw part of the things the next day, at Deptford; the officer has the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Your husband's name is Francis? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he live with you? - A. No, he is at sea ; I have not seen him these five years.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Wharton's-court.

Q. A few doors on this side of Gray'-inn-lane? - A. Yes.

Q. That is in the City of London, is it not? - A. No.

Q. You live by yourself, a lone woman? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any lodgers? - A. I cannot keep a house without I have lodgers.

Q. Are they ladies or gentlemen? - A. One and the other.

Q. How do you get your living, may I ask you? - A. When I get any work to do I do it.

Q.Both ladies and gentlemen lodge in your house? - A. Working people, men and their wives.

Q.Upon your oath, do you mean to swear, that you let out every part of your house to persons who pay you half yearly, or quarterly? - A.They pay once a week, and sometimes twice a week.

Q. How many girls, of the same sort with the prisoner at the bar, out of charity, do you let live with you? - A.She slept there a week.

Q.How many other girls lodge in your house? - A. I cannot keep an account of all the lodgers I have.

Q. You came from your house this morning? - A. Yes.

Q. How many girls lodged in your house last night? - A.There were four women.

Q. All married? - A. Do you think they tell me whether they are married or not.

Q. Upon you oath, do not you keep a house to receive company? - A.They are all alike in the court.

Q. Do you never pay these girls money? - A.What for.

Q. I must not ask that - do not you pay these girls yourself? - A. No; they pay me.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know that you owe the girl at the bar money at this time? - A. I do not.

Q. Upon your oath? - A. No; upon my oath I do not.

GRORGE MOSS sworn. - I am a constable, (produces part of the property); I found them upon the prisoner, and a duplicate; I took her into custody in Downing-street, Deptford; the things were lying upon the table.

JOHN MACARTNEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, in Long-acre, (produces two curtains, a sheet, a gown, two pillow-cases and a shawl); they were all pledged at one time: I took them in of the prisoner.(The property produced by the pawnbroker, was identified by the prosecutrix).

Mr. Knapp. (To Kerns) Q.Do you never lend your things to your girls? - A.Never.

The prisoner put in a written defence as follows: I have lodged in the house of my prosecutrix some time, in the state of a prostitute, she always demanded what I got for board and lodging: the morning I left my prosecutrix's house, for I was tired of that way of life, I met Sarah Priest , one of the lodgers in the same house, she had some gentlemen with her, and she asked me to let her take one of them into my room; I gave her leave, and desired her to lock the door again; I went afterwards and drank with her, and she asked me to go with her to Deptford; she had the things with her, and said to me, you d-d fool, there is no to rob a bawdy house. GUILTY , aged 24.

Twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-89

527. JOHN CARPENTER, alias CARIER, alias CARR , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , a pair of saddle-bags, value 4s. a pair of boots, value 10s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of John Bowles .

JOHN BOWLES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Jones, in Dover-street: The boots and handkerchief were my own property, the saddle-bags were my master's property, but they were in my care, I was answerable for them; I lost them on the 15th of April, from my apartment at the White-hart, at Windsor ; I saw them again on the 18th of May, at the prisoner's lodgings, at the White-swan, at Charing-cross; I knew them again, I had had new straps put on to the saddle-bags, at Windsor, I have had the care of them nearly two years; the boots I know by the maker's name, and number; the officer has them; I met the prisoner on the other side of Westminster bridge, and he offered me money, and a gold seal, not to say any thing about it; I told him he was the person I wanted to see; I suspected he was the person that had taken them; he told me where he lodged, and that the saddlebag and boots were there.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him to confess it? - A. Yes.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: The prisoner was

in custody when I was sent for; I searched his lodgings, and found the saddle-bags in the garret, and the boots in the kitchen; I found a duplicate upon him which led to the handkerchief.

ROBERT BARBER sworn. - I am servent to a pawnbroker, (produces a handkerchief); I cannot take upon me say who it was that pledged it, but it was a man, and it was pledged in the name of Charles Parker .

Prisoner's defence. I went down to Windsor, and was with that young man some time, he told me any thing of his was at my service, I slept with him, and he lent me the things.

Q.(To Bowles.) Did you lend him any of these things? - A. Never.

Q. That you say upon your oath? - A. Yes, he left me the Friday before I was robbed.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-90

528. MARIA BARRELL , alias ADAIR , was indicted for uttering. on the 22d of April, to one Nicholas Becue , a counterfeit half-guinea, knowing it to be counterfeit; and the indictment further charged, that, at the same time, she had about her a counterfeit shilling .(The case was opened by Mr. Gleed.)

NICHOLAS BECUE sworn. - Examined by Mr Gleed. I keep a medicine Watchouse in Salisbury-court, Fleet-street : On Wednesday the 22d of April, the prisoner came to my house, and asked for a bottle of Daffy's Elixir, I produced it to her; she put her hand into her pocket, then took it out again, and produced some halfpence she then took out a Morocco purse, she shook it in her hand, and two thing like shillings came out of it.

Q. What was the price of the Elixir? - A. Five shillings; she then put her hand into her pocket, and produced half-a-guinea; I took the weights and seal's and weighed it, and told her it was a bad one; I said, I should keep the half-guinea, and detain her; she said, I had no right to detain her; I then sent for a constable, he took her into the back-parlour, and searched her, but found nothing upon her.

Q. Had you seen something like two shillings in her possession? - A. Yes.

Q. But nothing was found upon her? - A. No; but in searching about the shop my apprentice produced a glove, he is here

JOHN WHITEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am a constable: On Wednesday the 22d of April, I was sent for to Mr. Becue's house; I searched the prisoner, but found nothing upon her; Mr. Becue said, she has a private pocket, for she had two shillings and some halfpence; the apprentice afterwards picked up a glove, in which I found two shillings and some halfpence; I asked her where she took the half-guinea; she said, she she took it in the way of trade; I told her she must know where she took it; she said she did not know where she took it.

Court. Q.Did she say what trade? - A.A flower maker, she said.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I took it of a woman for getting some prize-money? - A.You said so before the Alderman, I believe.

Prisoner. Mr. Becue said it was found in a purse.

Mr. Becue. She shook them out of a little purse into her hand; the boy afterwards picked it up in a glove.

THOMAS MITCHELI sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am apprentice to Mr. Becue: On the 22d of April, the prisoner came to our house; I searched about the shop, and found a glove by the side of the mortar, about a yard from where the prisoner stood it contained two shillngs and some odd halfpence; I took it into the back-parlour where Whiteman was searching her.(Whitemand produced the money, which was proved by Mr. William Parker , to be counterfeit).

Jury. (To Whiteman.) Q.Did you find the fellow glove to it upon her? - A.No; she disowned it; but as we came from Guildhall, I asked her why she threw away the glave; she said, because the money was bad.

Q.Did you tell her it would be better for her to confess? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I had some business to transact for a widow, at Somerset-house, I had infinite trouble with it; she was to receive some prize-money, what prizemoney she received I don't know, and I accepted of that half-guinea from her, I did not examine the value, nor the quiality of it; I went to get a bottle of Dassy's Elixir for my daughter in America, I produced the half-guinea, which Mr. Becue said was a bad one; the two shillings I know nothing of; that I have suffered once before for a similar thing is certainly true, but I have lived a very honest I se for some time; I am a West-Indian by birth, I have no friends here; I throw myself upon the mercy of the Court.

For the Prisoner.

GRACE HARRINGTON sworn. - I have known the prisoner several years, she has always borne a good character

Q.Did you never hear any thing against her character in your life? - A. Never.

Q.Nothing at all against her honesty? - A. No.

Q.You have heard what she has said to-night? - A. Yes; but I have known nothing of her habits of life for the last two years. GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and find sureties for one year more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-91

529. ROBERT SMITH and JOSEPH PALLETT were indicted for a conspiracy .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the defendant, they were Both ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18010520-92

530. JOHN LEGGATT was indicted for receiving goods knowing them to have been stolen .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Raine, and the case opened by Mr. Knapp)

JOHN BEW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am porter to Charles Brooke , in Sambrook-court, Basinghall-street; the warehouse is in Three-crane-lane, Thames-street.

Q. What is Mr. Brooke? - A.A Spanish wool broker: On Monday the 16th of December, 1799, about half past four o'clock, I double-locked the door of the ware

house, every thing was safe then; there were ten packs of wool in the warehouse, there was one pack packed by itself, and pitched upon its end, it was going into the country the next morning, and had the country mark upon it; I weighed it myself, Mr. Pattridge took the weight; when I had double-locked the warehouse, I delivered the key to Henry Lemon , another porter to Mr. Brooke, at another warehouse of Mr. Brooke's, in St. Antholin's Church-yard, Watling-street.

Q. Was it Lemon's duty to take the key out of the house? - A. Yes; I went the next morning to receive the key again, I received it from Lemon, and went to the warehouse in Three-crane-lane, between six and seven o'clock; I found the door single-locked, there was no appearance of force; I found a great quantity of wool lying about the floor, the pack that I had set up on end was cut all the way, and the biggest part taken out; I then went up to the accompting-house, and gave information of it; I then returned, with Mr. Marsh, and weighed what remained, there was not more than half a hundred, I believe, left; there was about three parts out of four of the bag gone; they weigh about two hundred-weight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. What time was it when you locked the door? - A. About half past four o'clock.

Q.How do you know that? - A. I went to the public-house, Nathaniel Ward 's. to see what it was o'clock; we always went to see what it was o'clock, because we lock up in winter before it is dark.

Q. You saw nothing of Lemon again till next morning? - A.No.

HENRY LEMON sworn - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am porter to Mr. Brooke: In the afternoon of the 16th of December, I was at the warehouse in at Antholin's Church-yard, Watling-street, in my business; Bew brought the key of the Three-crane-lane warehouse, and gave it to me; I took it, with the other keys, to the accompting-house, in Sambrook-court, Basinghall-street, I put them all in an iron safe; and the next morning, between six and seven o'clock, I went to the warehouse in Watling-street, with the keys, and delivered the key of the Three-crane-lane warehouse to Bew; Bew came back to me, and I went to the warehouse, and saw the remains of the bag which had been plundred, and the greatest part of it gone; the package was cut from top to bottom.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Bew brought the key to you in the evening? - A. Yes.

Q.At what time? - A. A quarter past five o'clock, or it might be a little after.

Q.Was it earlier or later than half past five? - A. Earlier rather than later.

Q.And the next morning you gave the key back again to Bew? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you give it to any body? - A. No; I put it by itself in the iron safe.

- PARTRIDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of Mr. Brooke's clerks.

Q.In December, 1799, do you remember there be ing any Spanish wool in Mr. Brooke's warehouse in Three-crane lane? - A. Yes; I weighed the bag in question, in December, 1799, I took down the weight at the time it was weighed, it weighed two hundred and two pounds gross, or two hundred and twenty-six pounds; I saw the same pack the following day, it was afterwards weighed again; I did not take any notice of the deficiency, but Mr. Marsh did; there was a deficiency of about three-fourths I should imagine.

Q. Did you afterwards see any wool produced before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Yes; in Spanish wool bags there are four searns, and if any one of them is cut, they can take out the wool; it was cut with some sharp instrument.

Q. How long after was it that you saw any wool produced before the Lord Mayor? - A. I think within ten days after.

Q. Did you know that wool? - A. I did; it exactly resembled the wool that remained; it corresponded in quality exactly, I have no doubt but it is the wool that we lost from the warehouse; the remainder of the wool is here.

JOHN MARSH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp I am clerk to Mr. Brooke, he has a warehouse in Threecrane-lane, from whence this property was lost.

Q. Do you remember the particular pack of wool? - A. I do not.

Q. Do you remember a pack of wool of which there was a deficiency? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember weighing it, to see what the deficiency was? - A. Yes; I did not weigh it before, I only weighed the quantity that remained; I made a minute at the time; it weighed a quarter of a hundred and twenty-seven pounds.

Q.What is the general run of the weight of a pack of wool? - A.About two hundred pounds; the deficiency was one hundred weight, two quarters, and three pounds gross, or one hundred and seventy-one pounds.

Q.Have you seen any wool since you lost it from the warehouse? - A. Yes, before the Lord-Mayor; I saw some wool which corresponded in quality with that which I weighed, and also in quantity; in the warehouse where this wool was seized, I picked it from twenty sacks.

- GOWKETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am a warehouse man in Great Distaff-lane.

Q. Do you remember, on the 10th of December, 1799, any body coming to you with any package of wool? - A. Yes, about a quarter past five; I had locked up the front warehouse, as we generally do when it gets dark.

Q.Can you take upon you to say, that it was not later than that? - A. I am confident, for I had an engagement to go out.

Q.Who was it that brought it? - A. Mr. Leggatt's carman. Matthew Snow .

Q. What was the quantity of wool that he brought? - A. A hundred and a half, and fourteen pounds, that is, 182 pounds; the next day, Tuesday, Mr Leggatt came to our house between one and two o'clock, or rather later. Mr. Martin was with him; and he took a sample, and went over to the King and Queen, and returned again about five; Mr. Leggatt said it should be left to Mr. Martin, to be packed along with his, under his direction.

Q.Was he speaking of the wool that Snow brought? - A. Yes.

Q.Did he say to whose order it was to be delivered? - A. To Mr. Martin; nothing more passed; Mr. Martin came the next day, Wednesday, with a labouring man, and gave him directions to pack it.

Q. Was it packed in a different way to that in which it had been packed before? - A. Yes; it was put into three or four mats.

Q. The same that came by Snow? - A. I am no judge of wool.

Q. Do you know whether the packages that came from Mr. Leggatt remained in the same packages or no? - A. No, they were repacked; it was all taken away, except one package, which remained a good while; that was taken away by Mr. Miller and Mr. Marsh on the Friday in the same week.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You keep a public warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q.Mr. Leggatt has sent things to your house? - A. Yes; I have known him many years.

Q. Was there any other wool there belonging to other people? - A. Yes; all Spanish wool; I suppose there were four thousand pounds worth.

Q. Mr. Martin, perhaps, had some there himself? - A. He had.

Q. You were not present when it was packed? - A. I saw it afterwards in mats.

Q. You mean that you saw a package in mats? - A. Yes, I saw it emptied out.

Jury. Q. Is it usual for you to take such small packages of Spanish wool into your warehouse? - A. Yes, any quantity.

MATTHEW SNOW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Leggatt.

Q. Do you know Mr. Gowkett? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember taking any wool there, by the direction of your master? - A. I took three bags, but what was in them, I don't know.

Q. You never knew, nor ever said you knew? - A. No.

Q. When was it? - A. On Monday.

Q. What month? - A. I cannot rightly tell.

Q.Before Christmas, or after? - A.Before.

Q. Not long before Christmas, was it? - A. No; I took them to Mr. Gowkett; he was there, and took them into the warehouse out of the cart; I never saw them afterwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What time in the afternoon did you take it? - A. At five o'clock in the evening.

Q. How long had you had them in your custody? - A.Ever since three o'clock, when Mr. Leggatt put them into my hands.

Q. Three o'clock on the same day in which you delivered them? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did Mr. Leggatt deliver them into your custody? - A. In Tooley-street, just below Stoney-lane.

Q.How came you to be so long in getting to Mr. Gowkett's? - A. I met with an acquaintance, and we had three pots of beer.

Q.Were there any thing else to stop you? - A. Yes; upon Fish-street-hill there was a cart broke down.

Q. Are you sure then, you had these bags three hours in your possession, before you delivered them to Mr. Gowkett? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you sure, notwithstanding this accident, that the same bags that were put in the cart by your master's direction, were the same that you delivered to Mr. Gowkett? - A. Yes.

THOMAS MARTIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine Q. Do you remember going with the prisoner on the 17th of December to Mr. Gowkett's? - A. I did not go with him there; I was at the warehouse when Mr. Leggatt came.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner the day before, Monday? - A. No.

Q. When had you any conversation with him about Spanish wool? - A. Not till Tuesday, about two o'clock.

Q. How long before you went to Mr. Gowkett's had you any conversation with Mr. Leggatt? - A. I had no conversation with him at all before I went to Mr. Gowkett's; I met him there; he came into the warehouse about two o'clock, or a little after; he shewed me three bags of Spanish wool; Mr. Leggatt then said, Mr. Martin, I have got a gentleman to look at this wool to-morrow morning, and pointed to the three bags; Mr. Leggatt said, he wished to have it repacked; he said, it would be better to put it in one mat; I took an order from Mr. Leggatt to put the whole into one matpack, and I got it done by a man that was at work for me; I went away directly to the public-house; I know no more of it.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.(Produces a sample of wool.) Q. The bags of wool are at the door in a cart, are they not? - A. They are; we brought them from Mr. Brooke's warehouse, in Three Crane-lane; I took this sample out of the warehouse, in the presence of Mr. Marsh and Bew.

- CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I know no more than Mr. Miller; I was with him when he got the sample from Mr. Brooke's warehouse; I assisted in bringing the wool from Mr. Gowkett's on the 20th of December, 1799.

Mr. Knapp. (To Marsh.) Q. Is that a sample of the wool that remained in your warehouse of the pack that was cut? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been concerned in this trade? - A.About twelve years.

Q. At what age did you first begin? - A.About twelve.

Q. Have you had an opportunity of becoming well acquainted with Spanish wool? - A. I certainly have.

Q. Have you seen that wool, which is said to have been produced, from Mr. Gowkett's warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you compared it with the remainder of the bag that was left in Mr. Brooke's warehouse? - A. Yes; I entertain not the least doubt of its being the same; it is of a very singular quality, a wool that we seldom receive in the country; when we have it, it must be known from other wool.

Q. Have you any doubt that this wool, found in Mr. Gowkett's warehouse, is identically the same that was found in Mr. Brooke's warehouse? - A. I can undertake to swear to it.

Mr. Const. Q. You don't mean to say, that all the wool that comes to England, comes to your house? - A. This is an article that seldom comes to this market; it has been generally sent to Holland.

Q. Can you tell me what proportion of that, which comes to England, goes to your house? - A. I suppose one-fourth.

Q.Suppose you had seen such wool as that at Bristol. would you still say, you had no doubt of it? - A.Most assuredly, if it was the same poil, I should say it was the same, as far as my judgment goes.

Court. Q.What do you mean by poil; it is the French word for fleece, is it not? - A. Yes.

JAMES CHETHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine.

Q.Were you before the Lord Mayor when the prisoner was examined? - A. Yes, I was.

Q.Be so good as to state to the Court what he said-Mr. Const. It was taken in writing, I believe.

Chetham. No, it was not; being asked before the Lord-Mayor how he came in possession of the wool, he said; he had bought it of some Spanish sailors, who said, it came to England in their beds; the Lord-Mayor then put a question to him, whether it was a usual thing; upon which he said it was a very usual thing for their beds to be stuffed with Spanish wool.

Mr. Const then intersered, and the witness stopped, and said no more.

Mr. Const. Q. I believe you know that the prisoner has put off this trial upon an affidavit of the absence of those witnesses, and that he swore he had done all in his power to obtain them? - A. He has certainly put off his trial upon an affidavit that some sailors were material witnesses, who were gone in an English ship to the South Seas, and I think, named a witness of the name of Carbinell.(Mr. Const addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendant.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-93

531. JOHN CROWDER was indicted for a libel .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Harrison, and the case by Mr. Gurney.)

JAMES CHETHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Harrison. (Produces a copy of the record of acquittal of Charlotte, the wife of John Vigors ). Q. Do you know Mr. Vigurs? - A. Yes.

Q. He is a tailor, and a man of considerable property? - A. He is a man of considerable property.

Q. Was he so stated at the trial? - A. He was, on the trial, stated to be worth full 20,000 pounds, by Mr. Vaillant, the Counsel for the prosecution.

Q. Did you call at the office of the defendant? - A. On the Saturday, in consequence of the paragraph appearing in the Public Ledger, I, in company with Mr. Roberts, called at the office of Mr. Crowder, where the Public Ledger was printed and published, as we understood; upon our going into the office, we saw a clerk; we enquired for Mr. Crowder, and were informed that he was not at home; we left our names, and for what purpose we called.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Whose name did you leave? - A. I left my name, and Mr. Roberts's, who was attorney for the family, and a most intimate friend of the family; I had to defend the defendant in that case; he went with me as a friend, and not in the capacity of attorney; Mr. Roberts attended as the friend of Mrs. Vigurs with me, as the solicitor of Mrs. Vigurs: On the Monday following, Mr. Crowder sent me a paper, containing a paragraph contradicting the former one.

Q.Be so good as to read the offensive paragraph first? - A.(Beads)" A woman who keeps a lodging-house, and whose husband, a tailor, was stated to be worth 20,000 pounds, was tried for stealing three bushels of coals, the property of a gentleman who had apartments in her house; her maid-servant appeared as a witness against her, and she was found guilty."

Mr. Const. The indictment stated three pecks of coals; paragraph states three bushels of coals; and therefore I think this indictment impossible to be sustained.

Court. It will be for the Jury to decide whether this paragraph applies to the same transaction

Mr. Chetham. I was going to state, that on the Monday following, I received a paper, which I presume came from Mr. Crowder, with a paragraph contradicting the one that had been stated in the former paper, which I have here, (produces it;) it was directed to Mr. Chetham, solicitor, Falcon-square; in that newspaper is the paragraph, which I will read, if you think proper.

Mr. Const. If you please.

Mr. Chetham. (Read.)" In the account which we gave in our paper of Saturday, of a trial of a person charged with stealing the coals of a lodger, our reporter gave an erroneous statement of the result; the party accused was acquitted." It is under the title of Westminster Sessions.

Q.Have you not since had any other application from the solicitor of Mr. Crowder to make any satisfaction that you should think proper? - A. I will tell you the sort of manner in which that proposition was made.

Q. I do not want to go into any conversation; I want to know whether the name of Mr. Barry had not been given up to you as the author of that paragraph? - A. I do not know how to answer that; Mr. Shepherd certainly did name such a person, but not exactly as the author.

Mr. Harrison. Q. Were you present during the whole of the day of that trial? - A. I was.

Q. Was any other person tried for stealing coals? - A. No.

JOSEPH ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an attorney in Gloucester-street: On the 24th of October last, I was present at the trial of Mrs. Vigurs, at the Westmimster Sessions; the principal witness against her was Elizabeth Davis , who stated herself to have been the maid-servant of Mrs. Vigurs.

Q. Did you see the Public Ledger of the succeeding day? - A. I did; and saw the paragraph that has been read, which I understood to apply most completely to Mrs. Vigurs.

Q.What is her Christian name? - A.Charlotte; her husband's name is John; I went on the Saturday evening with Mr. Chetham, Mr. Crowder was not at home; we left a message respecting that paragraph; we likewise left out addresses in writing; on Monday, the 27th of October, I received this newspaper under cover; it is the same as that Mr. Chetham has produced.

Q. On the Tuesday, did you see Mr. Crowder in his office? - A. I did; I complained to him of the enormity of the paragraph; his answer was, did I not receive a paper on the preceding day, in which he said he had made an apology; I admitted that I had; Mr. Crowder added, and that is the only concession I can make; I then said, Mr. Crowder, this is not enough, I come here to request, and even to require, the author of it; Mr. Crowder made a pause; he hesitated, and said, that a Mr. Barry, an Irish barrister, who was occasionally

the reporter of the Sessions and Old-Bailey trials, had brought it to his office; I then required to see the manuscript of it, which he denied me, alledging that some correction or alteration, he believed, had been made, or might have been made, I cannot say which; and he would not shew it; I repeated my request again, and said, Mr. Crowder, I must request of you to give me up the author; he would not shew me the manuscript, nor give up any other author than he had given up, Mr. Barry; I told him, if he did not, Mr. Vigurs, who was three hundred miles from town, at Penzance, upon his return, would make him give an account of his conduct; he then said, I shall give you no farther information, you may do just as you please, or take what course you please, I conceive I know what course you can take, you can bring an action against me, and I shall suffer judgment to go by default; you can recover only trifling damages and your costs; I then bid him good morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp Q.Have you told us exactly every thing that passed at the time you went to Mr. Crowder's, and saw him? - A. I think I have, but it is impossible to recollect every word.

Q. He did give you the name of the author? - A.He did.

Q.Have you made any application to Mr. Barry, at all? - A. No.

Q.Did he not state to you, that he had looked for the manuscript, but could not find it? - A. No.

Q. Did he not say that he could not immediately find it, but if he could find it, he would new it you? - A. He did not; he positively refused.

Q. Don't you know that he has offered to shew it? - A. I do not know it; there was an application, I understand, made to Mr. Chetham the other day to settle it, but not in my presence.

Q.Did not Mr. Crowder offer to make any apology that you should require? - A.Never, to me.

Q. Do you not know of your own knowledge, that we were ready to make every apology beyond that of giving you the name of the author, that you should require? - A. I know nothing of it myself, but from Mr. Chetham.

Mr. Gorney. Q.Have you ever seen Mr. Crowder, but upon that occasion? - A. I do not know that I ever saw him, but upon that occasion

Q. Are you quite sure that Mr. Crowder did not offer you the paper that you required? - A. He positively denied it

Q. Did he tell you that it had been lost or destroyed? - A. I state most positively not.

JOHN VIGURS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Harrison.

Q. Did you know Mr. Henry Carr ? - A. Yes, he was a lodger in my house; I was not at home when he came to lodge with me, nor when he left it.(Mr. Lonnel Boath, from the Stamp-Office, was called, to prove that Mr. Crowder was publisher of the Public Ledger, which was immediately admitted.)(Mr. Const addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendant.)

For the Defendant.

Robert Barry , Esq, was called upon his subpoena, but did not appear.

WILLIAM POWALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q.I believe you are one of the Common-Council of the City of London? - A. I am.

Q.Is the defendant, Mr. Crowder, a member of the Common Council? - A. He is; I have known him full twenty years, and I believe a more honourable man never lived; I know the goodness of his heart, and I am sure his nature must be changed, if he suffered any thing to pass that would injure any man.

Mr. John Robinson , Mr. Joseph Johnson , Mr. Newman, and Mr. Smith, bore the like testimony to the defendant's character.

GUILTY . - Fined 30l.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010520-94

532. JOHN WELCH and EDWARD-KAYE EDWARDS were indicted for a conspiracy .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Reynolds, and the case by Mr. Watson).(Mr. Shelton produced the record of the conviction of Mary Johnson and Mary Robson , also the recognizance of George Alwright , as a witness against them).

WILLIAM RAMSBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. Q. Of what profession are you? - A. A short. hand-writer.

Q.Appointed by the city of London? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present at the trial of Mary Johnson and Mary Robson, in you official capacity? - A. I was.

Q. Did you take notes of the evidence of George Alwright ? - A. A part of it; I came into Court immediately after the witness had been sworn.

Q. Be so good as read so much as you have taken of the evidence of Alwright?

Mr. Alley. Q. Are the papers you have in your hand the original notes taken by you? - A. They are.

Court. What was Alwright's Christian name? - A. I cannot say; I was not in Court at the time he was sworn.

Mr. Alley. Then you cannot say that he was sworn? - A. I certainly cannot.

Mr. Knapp. You must prove that he was sworn.

BENJAMIN GILGRFST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I attended the trial of Mary Johnson and Mary Robson , in July sessions; I saw Alwright sworn; I was sitting behind the Sheriff.(Mr. Knapp admitted Alwright to have been a material witness upon the trial of Johnson and Robson).

GEORGE ALWRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. In July last I was shopman to Messrs. Wells and Gilgrest; I attended here on the 9th of July, as a witness against Mary Johnson and Mary Robson ; I lodged at that time at No. 6, Staple-inn-buildings, Holborn; the trial was put off till the next day, the 10th; I left my lodgings about a quarter after seven o'clock, to go to Wells and Co. my employers; when I got to the bottom of Castle-street, Holborn, turning into Cursitor-street, there was a hackney-coach standing with the door open; I passed it about ten yards, when a man came up to me in a tailor's dress; there came up immediately three or four more, who forced me into the coach; one of them said, d-n you, you are a deserter; I holloa'd murder, and made an alarm as loud as I could; Edwards was one who forced me into the coach; I think I recollect to have seen his face before; Edwards, and another in a tailor's dress, then got into the coach with me, and another on the outside; the coach drove immediately down Chancery-lane; I made seve

ral attempts to run my head through the window, upon which Edwards stuffed something into my mouth; they stopped at the Prince of Wales public-house, in St. Georges's-fields, when I observed another man behind, Harry Rounce, who called himself a press-master; I heard his name afterwards; Edwards and the other man said, their press master was without; when we got to the Prince of Wales, he got down and came to the coach window, and shewed me a copy of the information, which he said he had received, that I was a deserter; there they called for something to drink, and asked me to drink with them; I said, I hoped they were not going to hurt me; and the press-master and Edwards assured me they were not if I was quiet; I thought it was policy to be quiet, and I drank some gin and water with them; they then proceeded to Mill-stairs, Rotherhithe, and went into a public-house, the Prince of Orange; we went into a private room.

Q. When you were taken up in Castle-street, did you call murder loud enough for the coachman to hear you? - A. Yes; when we got to Rotherhithe, the coachman came into the room, and had a glass of spirits, which is the defendant in livery, John Welch; he stopped a considerable time in the room, and I told him where I lived, and asked the favour of him to let Wells and Co. know where I was confined; I told him I was a witness upon a trial, and I suspected that this was done to prevent my giving evidence; he gave me a blunt kind of answer, that he knew nothing about it, or something of that sort, and then went away; he was paid in the house. but I did not see him paid; the press-master, Edwards. and the other man in a tailor's dress, had some ham and bread, and some porter, and I had some with them; they begged I would have what I liked, for Government were at the expence of it; while we were eating and drinking, I reported to the press-master the particulars of the case; he said, from my hands and my appearance he did not believe I had ever been at sea; that was about eight o'clock; he said, if I would shew him a subpoena he would let me go without going to the regulating Captain; he remained about half an hour and then went away, saying he was going to the regulating Captain; Edwards also went away, and left me with one tailor; I forgot to mention that I said to Edwards I had seen him before, and believed I knew him; he said, I had not, for he had just come from sea; I saw no more of Edwards that day.

Q. You got home in the evening of that day? - A. I did; about three weeks after the women were tried, I saw Welch standing against a toy-shop, opposite St. Dunstan's church, with the coach door open, ready to take up a fare; I said, well coachy, how are you; he seemed very much confused, and said, I thought I recollected you; I forgot to mention, that after I had been two hours at Rotherhithe, there came into the room where I was, a distiller's clerk, who happened to know one of my brothers, and I conveyed a letter by him to my brother, to let him know where I was; when I saw Welch at the toy-shop, I said, I suppose you recollect taking me to Rotherhithe the other morning; he said, yes, I do; I then asked him if he knew of those fellows that were with me; he said he had never seen them before; he then took up his fare and drove away; about three weeks or a month after that, I was going to Somerset-house, and saw him again near the same place; I was talking with Mr. Canner, the City Marshal, about this business; I called to him, and said, how are you, coachman, and he nodded his head; Mr. Canner immediately followed him, stopped his coach, and took him to the Mansion-house; A considerable time after that, I saw Edwards sitting on the rails in Smithfield, with a parcel of drovers; when he saw me, he ran across Smithfield as hard as he could run; two officers pursued him, and caught him; I am sure he is the man; I could swear to him from a thousand people if it were necessary.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp (Counsel for Welch.)

Q.You did not see the coachman when you got into the coach? A. No.

Q. Nor till he came into the room at Rotherhithe? -No.

Q. And will you venture to swear that the defendant is the same man? - A. Yes, I will; they called him coachman, and he had a whip in his hand.

Q. Will you swear to that Jury that he was the man who drove all the way from Castle-street to Rotherhithe? - A. It is impossible that I can.

Q. Did he not always tell you, at the public-house, at the toy-shop, and again near the same place, that he knew nothing at all of the other persons? - A. I did not ask him the question at Rotherhithe.

Q.But upon both the other occasions he told you he did not know the men? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see or hear of the fare being paid? - A. The man in the tailor's dress said he had paid the coachman half-a-guinea.

Q. Mr. Gilgrest's shop is in Fleet street? - A. Yes.

Q. You told the coachman you belonged to that gentleman's shop? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. And yet the place that you afterwards saw him in was in Fleet-street, near your master's shop? - A. Yes.

Q. He is now in the service of Sir Richard Carr Glyn, who has served the office of Lord-Mayor of the City of London? - A. Yes, I have heard so.

Q. Do you not know that he lived in his service six of seven years before this, and that he has since taken him into his service again? - A. I have heard so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Edward.)

Q. When you met Edwards in Smithfield, it was after you had indicted him? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you not a witness for some forestallers, at Hicks's-Hall? - A. Yes; I was subpoenaed.

Q. He was the prosecutor of those forestallers? - A.He was.

Q. When did you first appear before the Magistrate? - A. Not till some time after.

Q. Do you not know there was a warrant out against Edwards, which prevented his attending there that day? - A. Yes.

Mr. Reynolds. Q.When you saw Welch in Fleet-street, did he acknowledge his being the man, or deny it? - A. He said he was the man.

Q. The coachman was paid half-a-guinea, was that the right fare? - A. I believe it was a great deal more than the fare.

Q.(To Mr. Gilgrest.) You were present at the trial of Mary Johnson and Mary Robson ? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect an application being made to put off the trial? -

Mr. Knapp. We will admit all that.

Q. Do you recollect when the trial did come on? - A. To the best of my recollection, it was Tuesday the 15th of July.

JOHN PITT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Q You are a turnkey of Newgate? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Mary Johnson and Mary Robson? Yes

Q. Did you know either of the defendants? - A. Yes; I know Edwards, and his father, well; they used to come frequently, with another man in a sea-faring dress, to see Johnson and Robson, the same week that the trials began.

Q. How many times? - A.Three or four times; but I have only that key every third day.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a City constable: Under the direction of the Lord-Mayor and City Marshals, I went with Mr. Alwright to Smithfield, where he pointed out the prisoner, Edwards; he immediately ran from where he sat on a rail in Smithfield, into St. John's-lane; I went after him and took him.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I apprehended a person of the name of Rounce, in Leadenhall-street, about one o'clock in the morning, Read and another person was with me; I took him before the Lord-Mayor, and he was admitted to bail.

Mr. Watson. (To Alwright.) Q. Did you see Rounce at the Mansion-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he or not one of the persons who were present when you were put into the coach? - A. He was; I have searched aifter him, but have not been able to find him.

Mr. Knapp addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant, Welch, and called four witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

Court. (To Alwright). Q. You have not yet told us how this business ended? - A.Edwards and the other went away between eleven and twelve o'clock, the man in the tailor's dress was left with me; he and I stopped in that room together till about one o'clock, it was a very fine day; we then took a walk to Bermondsey-street, and Five Foot-lane; I asked him to go into the Rose and Crown, and take a pint of beer, I knew the landlord; he suffered me to step on one side, and speak to the landlord it was then three or four o'clock; we then went to Mr. Baker's, a carpenter, in the same lane; I went into the house, and the man waited at the gate, while Mr. Baker was preparing himself to go with me to the Tender to get me off; when I came out, the tailor said he had seen Harry Rounce , the press-master, that he had been at the Admiralty, that my name was on the books, and he was sure I was a deserter, and I must go with him to the Tender; I then went with him to a public-house in Tooley-street, where he said Harry Rounce was waiting for him; after waiting there about an hour, and the evening coming on, I began to be very uneasy, it was then between five and six o'clock; the tailor then said, I should not go, he would spill every drop of blood he had before I should get away from him; about half an hour after that, there came in a number of tailors, who went backwards into another room, one of them said, don't be honest enough to run away while we are absent; some people in the tap-room said, d-n you, run, and I opened the door, and did run; that was about a quarter after six; I then went home.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of Edwards.

Edwards, GUILTY .

Confined two years in Newgate , and within the first two months to stand in the pillory in Holborn, opposite Castle-street .

Welch, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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