Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th January 1801.
Reference Number: 18010114
Reference Number: f18010114-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 14th of JANUARY, 1801, and following Days, BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR WILLIAM STAINES , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSER , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors'-Commons.

1801.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE Sir WILLIAM STAINES , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir SOULDEN LAWRENCE , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir JAMES GRAHAM , Knight; one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury

John Clarke ,

George Yeomans ,

James Bergie ,

James Smith ,

Thomas Sedgwick ,

James Waylett ,

Edward Wilkinson ,

Richard Atkinson ,

William Snoxell ,

Thomas Lamb

Thomas Garlick ,

Charles Cooke .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Fryer ,

James Hamerton ,

Alexander Aughterlony ,

James Richardson ,

William Hughes ,

William Smith ,

Charles Kelly ,

William Williams ,

William Stebbing ,

William Phillips

James Lockitt ,

Robert Pickitt .

Second Middlesex Jury.

James Maitland ,

John Thompson ,

James Bevan ,

John Copeland ,

John Gwillim ,

William Phillips ,

William Beilby ,

John Carver ,

Alexander Robertson ,

James Norris ,

Richard Hatch ,

John Rift .

Reference Number: t18010114-1

95. SARAH BIRD and MARY ELIZABETH HAMMOND were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth-Mary Ellis , widow , four shifts, value 10s. four caps, value 2s. a piece of Windsor soap, value 6d. two rows of beads, value 6d. three pillow-cases, value 2s. two guineas in money, a Bank-note, value 5l. and a Bank-note, value 21. the property of the said Elizabeth-Mary Ellis , and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the principal, except that of her own confession, which was not a voluntary one, the prisoners were

Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-2

96. WILLIAM CROSS was indicted for that he, on the 9th of December , in the King's highway, in and upon William-Allen Thackthwaite , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a metal watch, value 40s. a steel chain, value 1s. a metal key, value 2d. a guinea, a half-guinea, and a seven shilling piece, the property of the said William .

WILLIAM-ALLEN THACKTHWAITE sworn. - On the 9th of December I was in company with Mr. Lifford, in a single horse chaise, near the three mile stone, on the Uxbridge-road , about six o'clock in the evening, it was quite dark; we were stopped by a single highwayman, on horseback; he presented a pistol at Mr. Lifford, and demanded his money, he was driving; he galloped past the chaise first, and halloaed out, stop; we did stop, and he laid hold of the reins, because we did not pull up quick enough; he then said to Mr. Lifford, give me your money.

Q. Did he present any thing? - A. Yes; he presented a pistol to my friend's breast, it appeared to be a short thick pistol, but being dark, I cannot be particular.

Q. Neither of you were armed? - A. We had a gun in the chaise, but we made no resistance; Mr. Lifford gave him two half-guineas, and a guinea, I believe, I did not see the money; he did not seem satisfied with that, and I gave him a purse, containing a guinea, one or two half-guineas, I am not certain which, a seven shilling piece in gold, and some silver; he then demanded our pocket-books, we told him we had none; he pressed us very hard, and I said, d-n you, cannot you believe us, we told you before, we had not; he then demanded our watches; he took from me a double case metal watch, a steel chain and a metal key, there was no seal to it; I had had it twelve or fourteen years; I described it at Bow-street, before I saw the watch; he then took my friend by the hand, and said, God bless you, I have got a wife and family, and then rode off towards Acton; we were not more than forty yards from the White-horse inn, we intended to drink tea there, and we told them we had been robbed.

Q. Whereabout was it that you were stopped? - A. Near the three mile stone.

Q. Did he ride off pretty quick? - A. Yes; the man that keeps the White-horse, said, the Bow-street officers had been there the night before, and he expected them there again; they came in the course of a quarter of an hour or ten minutes afterwards, they separated and went away; I told them the maker's name on the watch was Watson; this was on the Tuesday; on the Saturday following, I went to Bow-street, I described the watch, and then it was produced to me, and I swore to it, it had the chain and the key exactly as I lost it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not describe the man as riding upon a dark horse? - A. Yes; I said, I believed it was a dark coloured horse, but it was impossible to see the colour of the horse it was so dark.

Q. Did you not say that you thought the man was a bigger man than me? - A. No, I did not say so; I said, I could not swear to the man, neither can I now.

WILLIAM LIFFORD sworn. - I was with the last witness on the 9th of December last, in a one horse chaise; we were stopped about six o'clock in the evening, a little beyond the three mile stone, by a single highwayman; I drove, and he came on my side, he called stop, and demanded our money; I immediately pulled in the horse as quick as I could, and gave him two half-guineas, and one or two sixpences, but it was so dark I could not distinguish the person of the man; he then demanded our pocket-books, I told him I had not one; Mr. Thackthwaite said the same; he then demanded our watches; Mr. Thackthwaite gave him his watch, I did not give him mine; he then shook hands with me, and said, God bless you, I have a wife and family, I will be d-d if I can stand it any longer; he then rode off a sort of a hand gallop, but not very fast; then we went to the Whitehorse, where we went to drink tea; we told them that we had been robbed, and we were told that the Bow-street officers had been there the night be

fore, and were expected again; they soon came in, and we told them what had happened, and they went in pursuit.

Prisoner. 2. Did not you say, at Bow-street, that you were robbed of two guineas and a half, and a seven shilling piece? - A. No, I did not.

DANIEL GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am one of the Bow-street patrol, I went to the White-horse-inn, Acton-road, with four others; Mr. Thackthwaite and Mr. Lifford were there, they said they had been robbed by a single highwayman, very near where they had put up.

Q. Did they give you any particular account of the robbery? - A. Only the watch; Mr. Thackthwaite described it; he said, there was the name of Watson on the watch, the number he could no tell, but there was a small dent at the bottom; he said, it was a metal watch with a steel chain; the conductor of the patrole, Creedland, sent me and another man away to Hammersmith turnpike-gate; we got there something before seven o'clock, and remained there till twelve; I was then in the toll-house, and my comrade was looking out.

Court. (To Lifford.) Q. Had you an opportunity of observing what kind of a pistol it was? - A. It was a short thick pistol, but it was quite dark, it appeared to me shorter than usual.

Jury. Q. Do you recollect any thing about his voice being particular? - A. No.

Griffiths. My comrade called me out of the toll-house, and said, here is a man coming, have a look at him, he was going towards town; I demanded the toll of him, he asked me how much it was, and I really could not tell him; then I asked him how far he had been, he said, what was that to me; I then whipped under the horse's neck, got on the other side, put my hand upon his great-coat pocket, and felt a pistol; I then took him by the collar, and hauled him off the horse immediately, and, with the assistance of my comrade, I took him into the toll-house, and took the pistol out of his pocket; I then put my hand in his waistcoat-pocket, and took out a watch, and from his own fob I pulled out another watch, and in his breeches pocket I found fifteen pounds twelve shillings and sixpence, consisting of nine guineas, six half-guineas, three seven-shilling pieces, a one pound Banknote, and nineteen and sixpence in silver.

Q. Was it a metal watch? - A. Yes, (produces it;) and here is the pistol, (produces it;) it was loaded with powder and ball, (produces the loading and priming;) we then took him to Bow-street.

SAMUEL BARKER sworn. - I was at the turnpike, at near twelve o'clock at night, on the 9th of December; I assisted in taking him, and bringing him to Bow-street.

CHARLES LAVEL sworn. - I was turnpikeman; I saw the prisoner apprehended, and saw the things taken from him.

Mr. Thackthwaite. This is the identical watch that I lost, and the seal and the key is in the same state in which I lost it.

Prisoner's defence. I heard of a place at Hounslow, at the Rose and Crown; I borrowed a horse and went there, and having occasion to go to the necessary, I picked up the watch and the pistol in the necessary, tied up in a handkerchief; I made mention of it to one of my fellow-servants, at Hounslow; he said, I had better throw it away, and have nothing to do with it; I being very much in liquor, said, I would not throw it away, I would keep it to see if it was advertised; the man that I shewed it to is here.

For the prisoner.

JOHN MOODY sworn. - I saw the prisoner at Hounslow, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening of the 9th of December; I met him leading his horse, and he asked me if I would have part of a pot of beer, which I agreed to, and we went to the Crown and Cushion, and drank together; he said, he had found something in the necessary, tied up in a handkerchief; I asked him what it was, and he said, a pistol, and a watch; I desired him to throw it away, and have no concern in it; I said, it must be laid there to lead somebody into a snare, but he said, he would take it, and see if he could make any thing of it.

Q. Did you see them? - A. Yes, I saw the end of the pistol, and the metal watch; I have never seen him since, till I saw him here; he was very much intoxicated with liquor.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-3

97. JOSEPH MILES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Davis , about the hour of one in the night of the 20th of December , and stealing fifteen table-cloths, value 4l. four towels, value 6s. four shirts, value 4s. six pillows-cases, value 6s. a sheet, value 5s. four napkins, value 2s. seven handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d. a neckcloth, value 6d. a gown, value 2s. the body of a shift, value 2s. four stockings, value 9d. and one looking-glass, value 2s. the property of the said John .

ELIZABETH DAVIS sworn. - I am the wife of John Davis, who keeps a house in Pump-court, Moor-lane : On the 20th of December, in the night, my house was broke open, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I was in bed, but I heard nothing of it, till the watchman alarmed me; I got up immediately, and so did my husband, and he went to the watch-house; there was a pane of glass taken out of the window of the bottom room, and the shutters burst open; I missed all the linen that I had washed the day before; I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them;) I saw them again on the same day, at the

constable's house, in Half-moon-alley, Whitecross-street, between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. Who was the last up in the house the night before? - A. I was; I fastened up the place as usual, it was all very safe when I left it; I was up first in the morning; the prisoner was taken to the watch-house before I was alarmed; my husband saw the prisoner at the watch-house.

Q. Is he here? - A. No.

Q. Why is not he here? - A. He did not know that the trial would come on to night; I saw some of the things at the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How many lodgers have you got in your house? - A. Only one party.

Q. Is that party here? - A. No.

Q. You do not know whether your lodgers went down stairs in the night? - A. No.

Q. What is your husband? - A. He works at a wholesale grocer's , in Bread-street.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before this? - A. Yes, he lived next door but one to me.

Q. You had had no dispute, I dare day, with the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Nor his father? - A. I never had a word with the prisoner.

Q. But with the prisoner's father? - A. We had some words about a year ago, because he sold milk, and so did I, and he wanted my landlord not to let me have the house I now live in.

Q. You have heard that the prisoner stands here to answer with his life for the charge? - A. Yes.

Q. I dare say, you know there is such a thing as a forty pound reward? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Have you never heard, that if a person is convicted of breaking open a house in the night, the party prosecuting is entitled to a forty pound reward? - A. I don't know any thing about the law.

Q. Will you swear you never heard it? - A. I might have heard it, but I gave no ear to it.

THOMAS HOGUE sworn. - I am a watchman; as I was going down Grub-street, calling half-past one o'clock, going past Chimney-sweeper's-alley, I heard a bustle, as if they were confused; one said, where is Tom Hogue, and another looked, but did not see me, and he said, oh, he is safe enough; there might be four or five of them; I then went down the court, and called half-past one, and then the watchman at the other end of the court called out, stop them; the lamp being out, I did not see them till they were near upon me, then they knocked me down; I found I was going, I said, d-n me, I will have some of you, and as I was falling, I caught hold of two of them, and pulled them down with me, and another fell over me as I laid upon my back; I had one by the leg for some time, but he kicked so violently, that he got away, and left his shoe in my hand; I then said, well, I will keep you, however, that was the prisoner at the bar; he said, let me go, Tom, it is Joe Miles ; I said, I don't care who it is, I will keep you now I have got you; let me go, says he, and I will be the making of you and of your family; I said, d-n your making; he said, let me go, and I will give you five guineas; he said, if I would not, I should be twisted; I took him down to where the property was, in Honeysuckle-court; there were three parcels, part in a sack, and part in table-cloths; I delivered the prisoner to my brother watchman; Thomas Etherton took three bundles to the watch-house and delivered them to William Forsee , the constable of the night.

Q. What distance is this court from Pump-court? - A. It is right opposite, it is only Moor-lane that parts them.

Q. Could you see in what direction he came, when you first saw him? - A. No, it was so dark.

Q. Can you say, with certainty, that these men came in a direction from where you found this bundle? - A. They ran from the bundle when they knocked me down.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How far was the property from where you took the prisoner? - A. Seven or eight yards.

Q. The court was very dark? - A. It certainly was very dark.

Q. And though they knocked you down, you caught hold of two of them? - A. Yes; I saw five of them.

Q. You were very much alarmed? - A. No, I was not alarmed, because I knew the gang well.

Q. I should like to know, as you are upon your oath, how far does Honeysuckle court reach? - A. It might be twenty-five yards.

Q. Do you think you could see, so as to be able to distinguish persons in that court, without a light? - A. I had a right to catch hold of them when they knocked me down.

Q. I ask you if there was light enough in the court to distinguish the person of a man? - A. Not at all, till they were close upon me.

Q. When they were close upon you, could you, without a light? - A. I could see that they were men.

Q. Could you see a person's face, so as to know him again? - A. No; but I never lost him.

Q. Perhaps you know that there is a forty pound reward? - A. I do not know any thing about it.

Q. You never heard that there was a forty pound reward upon the conviction of a house-breaker? - A. I have heard that there is a forty pound reward, but I did not consider any thing of that sort.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know that there is a forty pound reward if this person is convicted? - A. Yes, there is.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you expect a part of it? - A. I do not expect any of it.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you expect a share of the forty pound reward? - A. There is five guineas reward from the parish, and I shall expect a part of it.

Q. Do not you know, that if this man is convicted, besides your share of five guineas, you will be entitled to a share of forty pounds, which will be distributed by the Judge? - A. I shall make no application about that.

Q. You will generously give that to the poor of the parish in these calamitous times? - A. I know nothing about it.

THOMAS ETHERTON sworn. - I am a watchman, at the bottom of Moor-lane; I was in my box, about half past one o'clock, on Saturday morning, the 20th of last month; a man came by, and crossed over the way, and then came back again, and went opposite Pump-court, and gave a whistle; I got out of the box directly, he heard me coming across the lane, into Pump-court, and he crossed right before me into Honeysuckle-court; I could not see how many there were; I went up Honeysuckle-court after them, and found a sack; there were three or four, or there might be five of them, I cannot say; I called out to Hougue to stop them, which he did, and then he delivered up the prisoner to me, and he took the sack; I delivered the prisoner to the constable, and the property; I asked him where they came from.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him to confess? - A. Yes, I did.

Court. Q. Then we must not hear it? - A. I then went to Davis's house, in Pump-court, and found the window-shutters forced open, and a pane of glass taken out; they were inside shutters.

Q. How far might this be from where you found the property? - A. About fifteen yards, for any thing I know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. All the lamps were out? - A. No, there was one alight in Moor-lane.

WILLIAM FORSEE sworn. - I was the officer of the night, (produces the property;) the prisoner desired, at the watch-house, that his father might be sent for, and that Mrs. Davis might be informed that she was robbed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner was searched? - A. Yes.

Q. And no implement of house-breaking found upon him? - A. Nothing at all.

DANIEL TUBB sworn. - The prisoner desired I would fetch his father before I took him to the Compter, and to call upon the person that was robbed, Mrs. Davis; he said, she lived in the same court, right opposite his father, he said, it was a corner house, by the tree; I told her she was robbed, and called her up.

Mrs. Davis. I can swear to these things; they have the marks of Mr. Griffiths and Mr. Hollist upon them.

Q. Can you speak to the looking-glass? - A. Yes, it is my own; I know them all to be the things that I lost.

Q. All the separate articles are valued at upwards of five pounds, did you value them? - A. No, the constable gave in the value.

Q. But you must know something of the value of linen? - A. They may be valued for less or more; these table-cloths are very large, they are under-valued at four pounds.

Q. Can you undertake to say, that the whole are worth upwards of forty shillings? - A. Yes, I can.

Mr. Knapp. (To Forsee.) Q. Have you heard what this washerwoman has said of the value - what are you besides a constable? - A. A painter.

Q. And therefore well acquainted with the value of linen? - A. I can tell whether a table-cloth is worth ten shillings or half-a-crown; any person may be a competent judge of such table-cloths as these.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-4

98. SARAH THOMPSON and HENRY SIMPSON were indicted, the first, for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Aaron Solomon and Raphael Solomon , about the hour of eight in the night of the 7th of December , with intent to steal, and stealing twenty-one waistcoats, value 3l. and eleven pair of breeches, value 2l. the property of the said Aaron Solomon , and Raphael Solomon , and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the principal, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-5

99. JOHN HANNAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , fourteen pounds of orris powder, value 1s. 9d. twenty pounds of soap, value 26s. six swansdown puffs, value 2s. one hundred and thirty-two pounds of starch, value 5l. 15s. forty pounds of Windsor soap, value 35s. nine bottles of essence, value 3s. 6d. three hundred paper labels, value 1s. 6d. four pounds of hair-powder, value 3s. 4d. a hair brush, value 2d. ten tin pomatum moulds, value 6d. seven wooden boxes, value 7s. two hundred pounds weight of yellow soap, value 6l. 17s. seventy-five pounds of wash-balls, value 4l. 4s. one hundred and thirty pounds of Windsor soap, value 5l. 10s. six shaving cakes, value 2s. four rolls of pomatum, value 6d. four other wash-balls, value 8d. and an

engine for polishing wash-bulls, value 6d. the property of Richard Jones .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

RICHARD JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a manufacturer of soap and perfumery ; at Shoreditch ; the prisoner was my foreman , he had lived with me six months, I discharged him the beginning of November, and in consequence of a suspicion, on the 28th of November, I searched his house, at No. 3, New-inn-yard; Harper was with me; the prisoner asked me for a search-warrant, I told him we had no search-warrant; he said, we should not enter the house without a search-warrant; I left Harper there, and went to the Magistrate's for one; we found a number of the articles mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them,) they were all in his bed-room; when I came back, there was a sheet lying on the bed, with hair-powder, and starch packed up in it, and we found a blanket containing starch and hair-powder, in the cellar; I asked the prisoner how he came by these things; he said, he bought them of one Bishop, a smuggler; I then saw Harper take some keys out of his pocket; Harper asked him where these keys belonged to, and he refused to tell him; the next day I went with Harper to a house in Risdon's-buildings, we opened the door with one of these keys, and one of them opened the door of a room in the house, where I found a one hundred pound weight box empty; then Mr. Harper opened the garret, and found two hundred weight of yellow soa, seventy-five pounds of wash-bulls, almost all unfinished, one hundred weight of oil soap, one hundred and thirty pounds of Windsor soap, three papers of starch, and six wooden boxes, all one hundred weight boxes; I believe them all to be my property, except a few pieces of yellow soap that I cannot swear to; I have lost a great deal more of the same sort of goods from the manufactory than we found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The prisoner said, he had got part of the things from one Bishop? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not say, Bishop Hill? - A. No, he said, one Bishop.

Q. Had you, at that time, found all these things, or only part of them? - A. Only part of them.

Q. When the prisoner left your service, you had not missed your soap? - A. Yes, I had missed a great number of things; I missed soap daily.

Q. Did you or not, before he left you, miss any yellow soap? - A. I did.

Q. Did you, before he left you, ever accuse him of it to his face? - A. I did, when I turned him away.

Q. I believe you prosecuted one of your servants last sessions, and he was acquitted? - A. Yes.

Q. For stealing other articles of your manufactory? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not Mr. Filton claim a part of this soap? - A. No, he did not.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I went with Jones to search the prisoner's house in New-inn-yard, on Friday the 28th of November; I went up two pair of stairs, the prisoner was there, he seemed rather frightened, and Mr. Jones told him we came there to search his lodgings; he said, we should not search the lodgings, without a search-warrant; and I stopped there; while he was gone, the prisoner was very busy in the back-room; I was in the front-room, and he was in the back-room, shut in; I heard him throwing the things about; I called to him, and begged he would not spoil any thing; I looked through the key-hole, and saw him very busy, his body was partly out at the window, and he threw something out; when Mr. Jones came back, I went into the room, and found in his pocket some shaving cakes, and two or three wash-balls, and these keys; the next day, I went to a house, in Risdon's-buildings, one of these keys opened the street-door, and another the two pair of stairs room door, where we found a great quantity of property, which is here; I went into the kitchen of the house, in New-innyard, and in a little place, parted off from the kitchen, I found a blanket, containing a quantity of starch, hair-powder, and other things; we took the prisoner and the goods to the office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did not he tell you he had got some things in the garret, which you did not know of? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did not he send his wife up for them? - A. No.

Q. Do you know if a man of the name of Bishop Hill lived in that house, in Risdon's-buildings? - A. No; when I went there first, there was nobody there.

JOSEPH RISDON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. My brother is the proprietor of Risdon's-buildings, I collect his rents; the prisoner at the bar took a house there, in the month of October, it was a new house, not quite finished; when he took it, it had never been inhabited; he spoke to me several times about a window being put in backwards, he had the key about the 12th or 13th of November.

Mr. Gurney. (To Jones.) Q. Look at those shaving cakes? - A. These are my property, they have my stamp upon them.

Q. Did you ever sell any of those articles to the prisoner? - A. No; these wash-balls are finished, but they are of my manufacture; some of these puffs have my private mark, in my wife's handwriting; and these bottles of essence are tied together, by my niece, with one piece of leather, and comes from my shop; this starch has no mark, but it corresponds with the sample that I have got;

here are seventy-five pounds weight of wash-balls, almost all unfinished, they are of my manufacture; almost every manufacturer weighs the soap of a different weight, and they are cut differently; I have cut one of them, and from the inside I am able to swear that they are of my manufactory.

Q. Did you ever sell to the prisoner any unfinished wash-balls? - A. I never in my life sold any unfinished wash-balls; there is one ball among them, that we never sold a dozen of; these tin pomatum moulds I know particularly by the sizes, they are made on purpose for me; the size of every manufacturer differs a little, so that we may know them; this engine for polishing wash-balls, I can swear to, it is tipped round with brass, by particular direction, it was made on purpose for me, they are generally tipped with iron; here is a mark upon one of the boxes, in the hand-writing of one of my servants, it is the tare of it.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. These cakes, you say, are of your manufactory? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner works in your manufactory, and therefore knew how to manufacture like you? - A. He never manufactured any of these articles to my knowledge; he was a foreman in making hard soap.

Q. As to this box, might it not have been sent out with goods? - A. No, I have made enquiry.

Q. Being in your manufactory, he must have had the opportunity of seeing how these things were manufactured? - A. By chance, but it was in a different room.

Mr. Gurney. Q. These shaving cakes had your stamp? - A. Yes.

Q. He had nothing to do with the persumery part of your business? - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

For the Prisoner.

ELIZABETH SPARKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the landlady of the house where the prisoner lodged.

Q. Do you know in what way he was employed? - A. Yes, I have seen him in his own apartments, making wash-balls and pomatum.

Q. Was he making little or much? - A. It was in a pan.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Was he making or finishing wash-balls? - A. He was making them, rolling bits of soap in his hand.

Q. How long was this before your house was searched? - A. It might be two or three weeks, for he gave me a little bit of pomatum.

Q. What size was the pan? - A. It might hold two or three quarts; I did not take any particular notice, I was not long in the room.

Q. Had he any other materials besides this pan? - A. I did not take notice.

Q. Do you know where he got the materials from? - A. No.

Q. Were you in the house when Mr. Jones and the officer came? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was it that took the blanket into the cellar? - A. Mrs. Hannam herself; it fell out at the window, I believe, but I did not see it.

Q. This was when the officer was in the house? - A. Yes.

Jury. Did you see him bring in any quantity of these things? - A. No; I keep a school, and my door is always open.

Mr. Gurney. (To Jones.) Q. Did you find, in the prisoner's lodgings, any instrument for finishing or polishing wash-balls, except that instrument of your own? - A. None.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-6

100. JOSEPH PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , a gold watch, value 30l. the property of George Welch , Esq .

(The Case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE WELCH , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in the army: On the 2d of December I had been at Drury-lane Theatre; when I got into Brydges-street , and was getting into a coach, the prisoner brushed between me and the coach, and I immediately felt my watch go out of my fob; I instantly seized the prisoner, and accused him of having taken my watch; I kept him locked fast in my arm; he said he was a gentleman, begged that I would not hurt him, and I should find that I was mistaken; I then delivered him over to the constable; I saw nothing of the watch afterwards.

Court. Q. Was it taken from you before he came up to you, or was it during the time of his passing you? - A. While he was passing me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were coming out of the theatre? - A. Yes.

Q. And, as usual upon these occasions, the street was pretty much crowded? - A. No, it was not; there was no person in a situation to rob me, but the prisoner.

Q. Was the prisoner in company with a lady at that time? - A. No; I had a lady with me.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was it a gold watch? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. He was searched, and the watch was not found? - A. No.

Q. And you seized him the instant you missed it? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH GARROL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a link-boy attending Drury-lane Theatre: On the 2d of December, at night, I saw the prisoner throw the watch out of his hand, at the corner of Brydges-street; there was another link-boy before Mr. Welch, to get a coach for

him, and I saw this man take the watch out of Mr. Welch's fob; Mr. Welch immediately laid hold of him, and I saw him drop it; I picked up the watch-case, which had fell off, and immediately it was snatched out of my hand; I cannot say by whom.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long have you been a link-boy? - A. A twelvemonth.

Q. Have you any other occupation? - A. No; only doing any thing I can do.

Q. I take it, you went before the Magistrate the next day? - A. No, I did not know till the officers came to my lodgings at eleven o'clock at night; I did not know that it was necessary.

Q. Nor you did not go across to the watch-house? - A. No.

Q. Have you had any conversation with any of the officers about this transaction? - A. No.

Q. Were you ever told that this was an offence which might be a highway robbery, and there would be a reward of forty pounds? - A. No; I know nothing of it.

Q. Did you never hear of such a thing? - A. I heard it was a highway robbery.

Q. Did you not hear that there was a reward of forty pounds, upon conviction? - A. I cannot say that I never heard of it.

Q. Do you mean to swear you never heard of a reward of forty pounds upon conviction? - A. I may have heard of it, but I cannot swear it.

Q. Have you been in custody yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. You were committed, and have been kept in custody ever since? - A. No; I was in custody last Sessions for three days, but not since.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You were in custody three days to give evidence; you were not charged with this offence? - A. No; to give evidence.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Covent-garden Theatre; it broke up about half past eleven; in my way home, I came down Russel-street, Covent-garden; there was a very great throng of coaches, and gentlemen and ladies; I crossed over to the corner of Brydges-street and Russel-street; the moment I crossed over there, Captain Welch, as he described himself, came up, and clasped me round, and said, I had got his watch; I said, recollect yourself, Sir, search me, and see if I have got it about me; a gentleman of Bow-street came up, and took me in charge; they took my watch and my purse from me; there was nothing found upon me; Thompson, the Bow-street man, said, I heard a link-boy say that he picked up a watchcase; the next day I was taken to Bow-street, and Mr. Ford said he would not send it to a Jury without this link-boy was found; he was brought on the Thursday, and then he never said one word about seeing me take the watch; but he has been well tutored by the Bow-street people; I am innocent of the charge. GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-7

101. MARTIN BRYANT and GEORGE LOWE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , a pair of breeches, value 12s. and a frock, value 3s. the property of John Francis , the younger.

ANN FRANCIS sworn. - I am the wife of John Francis , No. 58, Old Gravel-lane ; I keep a slopshop; I know the prisoners: On the 25th of October, between seven and eight in the evening, the prisoner Bryant came in to buy a frock; I shewed him some; he asked me if I had no others; I told him, no; he said, he wanted one with exactly a dozen stripes down it; I told him I never saw such a thing; he said, he should want some more things, and would call again; I had not set down, when the prisoner Lowe came in, and asked for some knives; he asked if I had no smaller; I told him, no, I never sold them smaller to sailors, then he went away; as soon as he was gone, I saw there was something gone out of the window, but I did not know what till my husband came home.

JOHN FRANCIS sworn. - I am a slop-seller, in Old Gravel-lane: On the 25th of October I came home about eight in the evening, and missed a pair of velveteen breeches which hung next the door; I did not miss the frock till the Monday morning; I gave no information to the Magistrate, nor thought any more of it till Tuesday; I went out, and was fetched home by one of my lads; when I came home, I found one of the officers from Lambeth-street; I went with him to the Flying-horse, in Lambeth-street; I gave a description of the breeches, and then they produced them to me; they did not shew me the frock till the day of the examination, which was two or three days afterwards.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am one of the officers of Lambeth-street, Whitechapel: On Saturday, the 28th of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, we went to apprehend the prisoners for another offence; we found them at the Maxworth-arms, in White-horse-lane, St. George's; we took them into the parlour, and searched them; upon Bryant I found a watch and a Guernsey frock, which he said was his own; I made enquiry, and found that the prosecutor had lost these things, and he came forward and swore to them.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I was with my brother on the 25th of October, we apprehended the prisoners at the Maxworth-arms; I searched Lowe, and found upon him a pair of breeches, buttoned under his coat; he said he had bought them, and that they were his own. (Produces them)

Prisoner Lowe. (To Francis.) Q. How do you know that frock is your's? - A. There was a flaw in it, and I gave it to my mother to draw up, I knew it by that.

Q. How do you know the breeches? - A. I have had them in my possession some time; being lined with leather, they did not sell so well; the shop mark has been taken off; here is the thread where it was sewed on.

Bryant's defence. I bought the Guernsey frock of a Jew in Rosemary-lane for four shillings and sixpence.

Lowe's defence. I bought the breeches of a Jew upon Tower-hill, I gave fourteen shillings for them. Bryant, GUILTY , aged 20.

Lowe, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-8

102. PHILIP GOODENOUGH, alias PHILIP-GREEN GOODENOUGH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , four bushels of wheat, value 30s . the property of Joseph Hoare .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of George Watkins .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

GEORGE WATKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a barge-master : On the 14th of December the prisoner was in my service; he had in his barge on that day eighty-one quarters of wheat for Mr. Hoare.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The corn had never been in your possession? - A. No.

Q. Where was it received from? - A. Bridge-yard.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. The barge was your's? - A. Yes.

JAMES MARCHANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was in the employment of the prisoner, on board the barge; after we had got through Chertsey-bridge, the prisoner filled a spare sack from Mr. Hoare's sacks.

Q. Was there enough taken out to fill the spare sack? - A. Yes, out of different sacks; when we got to Southall , which is about five miles from Brentford; while the barge was in the canal, a man came, I do not know who it was, and the prisoner assisted him in carrying it off, that was on the 14th of December, and as soon as we got to Wendover, I gave Mr. Hoare information of it, and he was taken up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you an apprentice to the prisoner? - A. No; I have been at work for him about five months.

Q. You do not know whether Southhall is in the county of Middlesex? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. What length of time had elapsed from the time the corn was stolen, and before you gave information of it, was it not three weeks? - A. No, it was a week afterwards; the barge came back to Whitefriars, and then I gave information to Mr. Watkins; I did not give information to Mr. Hoare.

Q. Then you were not correct when you said so just now? - A. No.

Q. Had you and the prisoner a quarrel after you came to town? - A. Yes; but we were very good friends after that.

Q. It was after that, that you gave the information? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you not to tell the gentleman in the country? - A. I had no business with the gentleman, I never saw him; I told my master as soon as I came to town.

Q. Who do you mean by your master? - A. Mr. Watkins.

Q. Was there any body else in the barge at the time? - A. Yes, there was a woman on board.

Q. Is that woman here? - A. No.

Q. Did you say any thing about a woman before the Magistrate? - A. No, I was not asked.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. This woman was the prisoner's friend and companion? - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore he knows where to find her? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM FUNDALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Mr. Hoare; a quantity of wheat came by the barge, we found a deficiency of six bushels, I measured twelve sacks.

Q. How many bushels does a sack hold? - A. Four.

Q. How many bushels were there when you measured them? - A. I cannot say.

JOSEPH HOARE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. This wheat was consigned to me, I was in the mill when it arrived; I immediately observed a deficiency in several sacks; the quantity that should have come down, was eighty-one quarters; I then ordered my servants to measure it, there were only the twelve sacks measured, which appeared to be deficient, there were six bushels wanting.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Eighty-one quarters is about one hundred and sixty sacks? - A. Yes.

Q. Is not the deficiency of one sack sometimes made up in another? - A. No, never.

GUILTY , aged 25. - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-9

103. WILLIAM COUSENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , a silver watch, value 20s. a steel chain, value 1d. a metal key, value 1d. and a metal seal, value 1d. the property of John Edmonds .

JOHN EDMONDS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Tate, No. 18, Salisbury-street, in the Strand , I

live in his house: On Saturday the 27th of December last, I went to Clare-market, and bought some beef, the butcher sent it home; previous to that, my watch was over the fire-place, I saw it there at half-past eleven; after I came home from market, I missed it, about twelve, or half-past twelve; I found the prisoner about two o'clock in the market; I challenged him with it, he said first, it was at his lodgings, then he said he would give no trouble, and immediately produced it from his breeches pocket; the constable has the watch.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He never denied his having possession of it? - A. No.

Q. Did you make him no promise of favour? - A. No, I did not.

WILLIAM POTTER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Tate; on the 27th of December, I let the prisoner in with some meat, I shewed him into the kitchen, I believe Mrs. Edmonds was in the kitchen, I am not sure, I did not go into the kitchen, I only shewed him the way.(Edward Treadway, the officer, produced the watch, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Edmonds said, if I returned the watch, he would let me go.

Edmonds. I said no such thing till afterwards; I was inclined to let him go, but he was then in the hands of the officer, and I could not; I do not think he is a reputed thief, for he had been shewing it about for two hours in the market.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-10

104. WILLIAM PRICE and RICHARD RIGGINS were indicted, for that they, on the 1st of December , in the King's highway, in and upon Joseph De Sylva , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, four guineas and a sixpence, his property .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOSEPH DE SYLVA sworn. - I am a native of India; I went to Mr. Hackett and company's in Nicholas-lane, Lombard-street , to receive some money; I received four guineas and a sixpence, I had the same jacket on then that I have now, I put it in my right-hand jacket pocket; I was going to the shop to buy some things, and I put my money in a piece of paper, in my pocket; these two men came up to me, I did not know what the name of the place was, and one of them came up, and laid hold of my arm, so that I could not stir it.

Q. Which of them was that? - A. That is him,(pointing to Price;) after that, the other man took hold of me, on the other side, and then Price put his hand into my pocket, I was very weak and sick at that time; then they both ran away down the street; I told two gentlemen of it, and they stopped them; one of the gentlemen took the money out of the man's coat pocket.

Q. In whose coat pocket was it found? - A. Price's, wrapped up in the same way as when I lost it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You lost four guineas and sixpence? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it between the time that you received it, and the time you lost it? - A. About two minutes, I believe.

Q. You never saw that money before you received it from Mr. Hackett? - A. No.

Q. You were sick and weak? - A. I was very sick.

Q. There are two ways of being sick, one is from ill health, and the other from drinking too much? - A. I had not been drinking.

Q. Not at all? - A. No.

Q. But you had been at the public-house drinking? - A. No, I had not; if I had been drinking, I could not know the man that robbed me.

Q. But you had been drinking, had not you, at some public-house? - A. No, I had not been drinking at all.

Q. At no house at all? - A. No; I can drink at my own house; I went out from the ship to receive the money.

Q. Where was the ship lying? - A. At Deptsord.

Q. What time did you leave your ship? - A. At eleven or twelve o'clock.

Q. What time did you take your money? - A. At two o'clock.

Q. And you had not drank any thing at all? - A. No; I took breakfast on board my ship, I had nothing afterwards.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you had drank nothing from the time you had left your ship? - A. No.

Q. You know Mr. Anthony, who came to be your interpreter? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that you are giving evidence against a man for an offence, for which, if you are believed, he may be hanged? - A. Yes.

Q. And perhaps you know that there is a reward of forty pounds for each of these men, if they are convicted? - A. Yes.

Q. Anthony told you so, did not he? - A. No, I do not know any thing about it.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know that you will, by giving your evidence to day, if you are believed, entitle yourself to eighty pounds for your four guineas and sixpence? - A. I do not know the custom.

Q. Then do not you expect to have a share, a part of the eighty pounds rewards, that there is upon this conviction? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see these men before in your life? - A. No.

Q. How long were they with you at the time the robbery was committing? - A. I believe, about two minutes.

Q. After knowing what the reward is, will you venture to swear to the persons of men that you had no opportunity of seeing but for two minutes? - A. They are the men.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. These men ran away? - A. Yes.

Q. And the money that you had was found in the pocket of one of them? - A. Yes.

JOHN WALKER sworn. - I am a merchant: On Monday about three o'clock, the 1st of December, I was coming out of my banker's, Sir Richard-Carr Glynn 's, in Birchin-lane. I turned my eye towards the corner of Birchin-lane, which goes into Lombard street, and saw the black with the two prisoners; I had my banker's book in my hand, just going to look at it, and, in a moment, the two prisoners came running past me, and turned me round; the prisoners are the same men; at the same time, the black called out, stop thief, stop thief, white man rob; they turned into Change-alley; I put my book in my pocket and followed them; I never had my eye off from them; in running down Change-alley, they ran against two or three gentlemen, which rather impeded them; they ran past Garraway's Coffee-house, into Cornhill; they ran across Cornhill, and down Castle-alley, opposite the Bank; they made a turn on the left-hand; I came up with Price first, and took him by the collar, the other was close to him, and I likewise took hold of him immediately; upon my securing them, several people collected round; the prisoner asked me what I meant by using them in that sort of way, they were gentlemen, and they would make me pay for taking that liberty with them; Riggins then said to Price, I do not know that young man, do I, young man; I told them I cared very little about that, I should not let them go till I had seen the black man, and found out what they had done; I brought them back as far as Wills's Coffee-house, and the black came up; and immediately upon the black coming up, I asked him, if he had lost any thing, he said, yes, they had robbed him of four guineas and sixpence; immediately upon that, the prisoner Price made an effort to put his hand towards his right hand coat-pocket, which I prevented, and I immediately saw Mr. Bland of the India-house, whom I knew, and I called him to me; he came, and I told him to put his hand into Price's right-hand pocket, expecting that something was there; he put his hand into his coat pocket, and pulled out four guineas, and sixpence.

Q. Were they loose, or in paper? - A. They were loose when he pulled them out; I asked him if it was customary with him to carry gold in his coat pocket, and he said, he frequently did; a constable then came up, and I delivered him into his hands; I called a porter whom I saw, and, with the constable, we lodged them in the Poultry Compter.

Q. Had this poor black the appearance of being intoxicated? - A. Not at all; he was perfectly collected and perfectly soher.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did it not take up a considerable time in the pursuit? - A. I should suppose about three minutes, in the way that I have described.

Q. Therefore, of course, during that time, you must have lost sight of them? - A. I never lost sight of them one moment.

Q. As to the foreigner being drunk, did you look at him for the purpose of ascertaining whether he was or not? - A. He did not speak such good English as he does now; he seemed to me to understand but little of the English language; he seemed to me to give a very lame account in point of language; the interpreter was sworn before the Lord-Mayor, and he gave the account.

Q. You have been in Court, and, I sure say, was a little surprised at his giving his account so well? - A. I was.

Q. Was Riggins at liberty at all? - A. Yes, he was at liberty in the crowd for two or three moments; the person who had hold of him let him go.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you any doubt that Riggins is the same man? - A. I am perfectly satisfied that he is the same man; I begged that he might not be let go, and he was not out of the crowd.

Prisoner Price. Q. Was not the money taken out of my pocket before the black said what he had lost, and then he said that is my money? - A. No, he said he had lost four guineas and a sixpence, before it was found in his pocket.

JOHN BLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I belong to the India-house: On the 1st of December I came up and saw Mr. Walker, who had hold of the prisoner Price by his left arm; Price was endeavouring to get his right hand into his right hand pocket; Mr. Walker called to me to come on that side and put my hand in his pocket; I put my hand in his pocket, and felt the money, which was entangled with some soft substance; I disengaged it, and brought out four guineas and a sixpence; before that, the black man said, this man has robbed me of four guineas and a sixpence.

Q. You say it was entangled in some soft substance; had you the curiosity to enquire what it was? - A. The constable searched, but I saw nothing found, except a pocket handkerchief.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This money was taken out of his pocket loose? - A. Yes.

Q. And this soft substance was a pocket-handkerchief? - A. The constable has several things that he took out of his pocket; he can speak best to that; I did not see any thing else.

THOMAS WARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable; I searched both the prisoners at the Compter; I found upon Price this pocket-handkerchief.

Q. Did you find any thing else upon him that is material? - A. No; I received the money from Mr. Bland. (Produces it.)

Mr. Knapp. Q. You found no brown paper? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. (To De Sylva). Q. You lost four guineas and a sixpence; did you take any notice of it to know that it was the same that you lost? - A. No, gold is the same.

Court. Q. You said, when it was taken out of the prisoner's pocket, it was wrapped up in the same paper in which you used it? - A. Yes, the same paper.

Q. Was it in a paper when the gentleman took it out of his pocket? - A. Yes.

The prisoner Price left his defence to his Counsel.

Riggins's defence. I was at liberty, I suppose, three or four minutes, and might have run away; I was coming past the corner of Birchin-lane, and there were seven or eight black men together, all very much intoxicated, and one of them was using another very ill; and I saw the prisoner leading that black man along; he was either very ill, or else his feet very sore; I went on about my business, and Mr. Walker followed me; I never saw Price before in my life.

The prisoner Price called one, and Riggins three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Price, GUILTY of stealing, but not violently , aged 28. - Transported for seven years .

Riggins, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-11

105. JOHN BRAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , sixty three pounds weight of potatoes, value 5s. and a hempen sack, value 6d. the property of John Gregory .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN GREGORY sworn. - Examined by Mr. knapp. I am a potato-merchant in Crispin-street, Spital fields ; I have a warehouse next door to a basket-maker's shop, which has a communication with my yard: On Saturday, the 20th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, as I was going by my own warehouse, I observed the door of the basket-maker's shop open, and the prisoner at the bar coming out with a sack on his shoulder, and something in it, which afterwards turned out to be potatoes; he was my servant at the time; I turned round with surprize, and cried holloa; he immediately receded into the passage, and shut the door in my face; I immediately pushed the door open, and saw him throw the bag from his shoulder upon the ground behind the door; upon that I caught hold of him, and asked him what he was going to do; he replied that he had left them there, and was going back to take them out, according to order; he said he had received that order himself from a person whom he did not name, to whom he was going to take them.

Q. Do you give him authority to take out potatoes upon the orders of persons, without mentioning it to you? - A. No; I told him that was an old story, and that I was convinced I was a very great sufferer by the depredations that have been committed upon me by my servants; I told him, he might depend upon it, I would punish him; he then put his hand together, and said, he hoped I would pass it over; I sent for a constable, and gave charge of him, but previous to this, the potatoes were taken to my dwelling-house, and weighed; there were sixty-three pounds weight of them; the sack had my own name upon it; when the constable came, the prisoner dropped upon his knees, and begged that I would not take any further notice of it, and he would take care that nothing of the sort should ever happen again.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you they were for my own family's use, that I had a wife and four children? - A. He said no such thing; he said he was going to take them out, according to order.( John Whisker , the constable, produced the sack, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have a large family, and every necessary of life is excessively dear; and it is in the habit of the trade to allow men potatoes for their family's use; I was taking these home for that purpose.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you ever authorize the prisoner to take home potatoes for his family? - A. Never, unless he asked for them; I paid him sixteen shillings and sixpence a week, besides potatoes for his family's use, when ever he asked for them.

Court. Q. Is it usual for your servants to carry out potatoes through that passage? - A. No.

GUILTY - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s. .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-12

106. EDWARD BROOKS and JOHN-MARTIN RAMSHIRE were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , three hogs, value 12l. the property of William Hanson , and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

WILLIAM HANSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a shopkeeper at Bow : On Friday, the 12th of December, I had nine pigs; I went into the yard that evening about four o'clock, to feed them; they were all safe then; six in one sty, and three in the other; about eight o'clock the next morning, when I went into the yard, three of

the pigs were gone; the gate was not locked; I had left it locked the night before: On the Sunday morning, I saw them again at the Flying-horse in Lambeth-street; the heads were not scalded, but the bodies had been.

Q. Was there no particular mark about the heads? - A. Yes; all the three were black about the eyes, and so were those I have at home.

Q. Are you able to say from that circumstance, that they were your pigs? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You never saw any pigs that were black about the eyes before? - A. I cannot say that.

Court. Q. What was the colour of their bodies before they were scalded? - A. White.

Q. Can you venture, after their bodies had been scalded, to swear that they were your pigs? - A. Yes.

Q. If you had not missed them, and had seen them by accident, should you have known them? - A. I think, I should.

Q. Is there any thing particular in pigs being black about the eyes? - A. I never saw any so curiously marked.

JOHN HANSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am brother of the last witness: I was with my brother when he bought these pigs at Rumford, and have seen them many times since; in consequence of information, I went to Lambeth-street Police-office, and got a warrant; I went with Smith, and the two Griffiths's, to Ramshire's house, the sign of the Children in the Wood, in Whitechapel-road; as soon as we went into the kitchen, we saw the three pigs hang up in the coal-hole; the door was open; I have no doubt but they were my brother's pigs; I have seen them a number of times; the officers then sent for Ramshire, and he came down stairs; Smith and Griffiths told him they had had information of three pigs, which they believed were the same that hung up there, and they wished him to produce them the men, or tell where they could find them; he told them he was not there; he had been gone out some time, but as soon as he came in, he would shew them the man; I then told him, that from the information I had had not ten minutes before, the man was in the house; he said he was not, and he did not know what time he would come in; the officers, Smith and Griffiths, then told him they should keep him till such time as he found the man; we sat down in the kitchen, all three of us together, and in a little time the bell rung, and he wanted to go up stairs to his customers; the officers told him he could not go, he must send somebody else; he ordered his wife to go; in the mean time there came a person to the bar for some gin; the bar was adjoining the kitchen; he went into the bar to serve the gin, and I went and looked at the pigs; I took off the sheets, and found that the heads were not scalded; there were all the black hairs round the eyes, some as broad as your hand, and some half as broad, which was very remarkable; while I was in the coal-hole, I heard somebody coming down stairs; I came out, and saw some men coming down stairs; Griffiths, who stood by the bar where Ramshire was, said, are any of those he; he made no reply, till all the men were gone; there were six of them; he said one of them was the man; one of the officers went out directly, but it was so excessively dark, that he returned again; he asked Ramshire if he could tell him what the man's name was, that he might apprehend him; he said, he did not know what his name was; he had been backwards and forwards there for a fortnight; nothing more past; I went and got a coach, and put the pigs in.

Q. Have you any doubt upon earth that these were your brother's pigs? - A. None.

Court. Q. From the appearance of the pigs, without any other circumstance? - A. From the marks.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This coal-cellar, as you call it, was not it a wash-house, with a few coals deposited? - A. I dare say there were ten childrons of coals there, and butts of beer on each side.

Q. Was it not a room, through which there was a passage, with windows in it? - A. I cannot say, it was dark then.

Q. They had had full time and opportunity to have scalded the heads, as well as the bodies? - A. Yes, they might.

Q. As soon as you got into the house, you saw the pigs? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean, as soon as you got into the house, or as soon as you got into the kitchen? - A. As soon as I got into the kitchen; as soon as you go in at the door, there is the kitchen.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street; I went in company with Smith and Hanson to the Children in the Wood, which is Ramshire's house; we went into the house, and there was the kitchen, and when we went into the kitchen, there was a place with a quantity of coals in, and in that room were three pigs hanging with cloths over them; we sent for Ramshire; he came down stairs; we then took him backwards, and shewed him the hogs; I asked him if he knew any thing of these hogs coming there, as they had been stolen; he said, a man had brought them there; we desired him to point out the man, if the man was in the house; he said the man had been there, but was gone out; I asked him how long he thought it would be before he came in, and we would wait; he said, it might be late before he came in, or it might be the morning; soon after, he went into the bar to serve a glass of gin; there were five or

six men came down the stairs which he had come down before; we asked him then if either of there was the man; he made no answer to that, but as the prisoner Brookes had the door in his hand, going out of the passage, I pressed him again, and asked if that was the man; he nodded his head to me, and spoke slowly that that was the man; I immediately followed him out into the passage, but it was so dark, I could not find him.

Q. If he had told you at once that that was the man, should you have had any difficulty in apprehending him? - A. None at all; I was close by him; I then returned in doors, told him he had behaved very ill, and we should take him into custody; Smith tied his hands; Mr. Hanson looked at the pigs, and said they were his brother's; he put them into a coach, and took them to Lambeth-street: On Sunday the 14th, the next day, in company with Smith, we apprehended Brookes in Darkhouse-lane, Billingsgate; I asked him how he came by those hogs that were at Ramshire's; he told me he had bought them of a man at Bow-bridge on the Saturday morning about four o'clock; I asked him if he knew the man; he said, no; I asked him what he was to give for the three hogs; he said he was to give three guineas and a half for each hog, that was ten guineas and a half.

Q. Did he say he was to give that, or had given it? - A. Yes, was to give.

Q. And that, after he had said he did not know the man? - A. Yes; I asked him, did he pay for them; he said no, he had not, that the man was to come up on Sunday evening for his money, when he had sold them; I then asked him if Ramshire was to have the three hogs; he said no, he was to have one of them for some money that he owed him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you told my Lord and the Jury all that passed? - A. All that I recollect.

Q. Perhaps I may remind you; how did you get to apprehend Brookes? - A. Smith can tell you that; I cannot.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street; I was with Griffith at Ramshire's; when we went into the kitchen, there was a door open, where I saw the three pigs; I asked Ramshire who brought the pigs there that were stolen; he told me he did not know that they were stolen pigs, but that a man brought them there in the morning, and said he had them from a brother of his in the country, and was to fetch them away at night; he said he did not know his name, or where he lived; he said they were not killed there, but only brought there to be scalded, for which he was to give the maid a shilling for heating the water on the Sunday morning; after I had put him in the watch-house, I asked him how he could act so extremely foolish as to let the man go out of his own house last night, when we might have had him, and if he would give me any information where to go to apprehend him; he said he was very sorry that he did not tell us sooner, so that we might have had the man last night; he told me his name was Edward Brookes , that he had formerly lived at the public-house between Whitechapel and Bow, and desired I would go to his wife, and use all possible endeavours to get the man; I received an information that he was at a public-house in Darkhouse-lane, where we apprehended him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was not that information sent you by the prisoner Ramshire? - A. I do not know that it was.

Q. Did not the persons, who gave you information, tell you that they came either from the prisoner or his wife? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You mean Newton and Hart? - A. I do not know their names.

SARAH HILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I lived servant with Mr. Ramshire.

Q. Do you know the other prisoner? - A. Yes, I have seen him several times at my master's house.

Q. Do you remember the day the officers were there? - A. Yes, they were there on the Saturday night; Brookes had been there on the morning part of Friday, about the middle of the day.

Q. Did you not see him any other time but the morning of the Friday? - A. He was there backwards and forwards all the day.

Q. At the time you went to bed, was he in the house then? - A. I had not seen him for a great while before I went to bed.

Q. Recollect you have given evidence before the Magistrate; do you mean to swear that you did not see him at the time you went to bed? - A. I did not.

Q. Had you seen him within two hours before that? - A. No, I had not seen him for hours before I went to bed.

Q. Perhaps you have continued to live in Ramshire's service up to the present time? - A. No, I have not been there since last Friday.

Q. Now, take a little caution, and remember from me, if you speak any thing but the truth, you will commit perjury, and will be prosecuted; and though you are speaking against your master, you are bound to speak the truth; do you mean to swear that you had not seen Brookes on Friday, at the time you went to bed? - A. I had not seen him for many hours before I went to bed.

Q. Remember, what you said before the Magistrate was taken down? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not put your name, or your mark, to what was so taken down? - A. Yes.

Q. Then, now I ask you whether you did not see him on the Friday evening? - A. Not that I saw.

Q. Where you in the house yourself all the evening? - A. Yes, I was waiting upon the company.

Q. Now, from five or six in the afternoon, till the time you went to bed, do you mean to swear you never saw Brookes in the house? - A. I did not see him from six or seven o'clock in the evening; I wont say justly as to the hour.

Q. Might it not be eight or nine in the evening? - A. No.

Q. Did you see him between six and seven in the evening? - A. It might be between six and seven.

Q. Had you any conversation with him? - A. No more than that he told me if I would get up in the morning, he would give me a shilling.

Q. What was he to give you a shilling for? - A. To heat him a copper of water.

Q. Did he tell you for what use? - A. He said he had got some pigs, and he wanted to kill them.

Q. Did he tell you where he was to get the pigs? - A. No.

Q. Did he tell you how many pigs he was to have? - A. Yes, he said he was to have three pigs.

Q. Did he tell you at what time in the morning he was to have the pigs? - A. No.

Q. Did you see him on the Saturday morning? - A. I got up about six o'clock in the morning, and lit the fire in the copper; I made the water hot, and the prisoner Brookes came in about seven o'clock by himself.

Q. Had he any thing with him at that time? - A. I did not see any thing at all.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, did he bring any thing along with him? - A. I did not see any thing at all.

Q. Your master has a skittle-ground to his house, has not he? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner Brookes at any time in that skittle-ground? - A. Yes, about eight o'clock; he brought the pigs.

Q. Were they the pigs that were afterwards discovered by the officer? - A. Yes, they were the pigs that he brought in; he scalded them in the wash-house.

Q. Do you know who killed them? - A. No.

Q. Were they alive or dead when you first saw them? - A. They were dead.

Q. Did you see them first in the skittle-ground, or in the cellar? - A. I saw them in the place where they were hung up.

Q. Were they large pigs? - A. Yes.

Q. Who assisted him in carrying the pigs into the wash-house? - A. I did not see any body; I did not see them carry them in; I was very busy in the tap-room.

Q. Did any body assist him in scalding them? - A. I did not see him do it.

Q. What was your master doing after he was up? - A. Waiting upon his customers.

Q. There were not a great many customers at that time in the morning? - A. No.

Q. Did your master come into the wash-house, while the prisoner Brookes was there? - A. I did not see him.

Q. The tap-room, we understand, communicates with the kitchen, and with the cellar, so that you can see from the tap-room to the cellar? - A. Yes.

Q. Your master was serving his customers in the tap-room? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it possible for your master not to have observed what Brookes was doing? - A. When the door was shut, he could not see.

Q. Must not the man pass through the tap-room to get into that place? - A. He came in the back way.

Q. Was your master present when you were desired to warm the water? - A. Yes.

Q. Did your master know what you were warming? - A. Yes; he told me if I had a mind to heat water, I might get a shilling.

Court. Q. When was that? - A. Over night, when Brookes was telling me to do it.

Q. In the course of the Saturday, did you see Brookes at your master's after the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he there in the evening? - A. Yes, he was there in the after part of the day.

Q. Do you remember when the officers came, about nine in the evening? - A. Yes.

Q. There were some customers up stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. How many were there, seven or eight? - A. I suppose there were.

Q. Were either, or both of the prisoners of that company? - A. I cannot say; I did not go up stairs, only to carry up the supper.

Q. Were the prisoners there when you carried up the supper? - A. I saw my master there, and I saw Brookes there.

Q. What had they for supper that night? - A. Two legs of mutton.

Q. Was there nothing else? - A. Only garden stuff.

Q. Do you know if there was any of the pig's fry? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Any of the customers in the tap-room could see just as well as your master what was passing in this room? - A. Yes.

Q. Do your master's customers come in the back way through the skittle-ground? - A. They go through that way to do their business.

Q. It was market morning, was not it? - A. It was Saturday morning.

Q. You have a water-tub in the wash-house, have you not? - A. We have a water-tub backwards.

Q. Are not your neighbours in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to beg water? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that tub where the pigs were? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of any information given by your master or his wife to the officers, for the purpose of finding out Brookes? - A. I do not know.

Court. Q. When these pigs were brought, they were dead? - A. Yes.

Q. Were the intrails taken out? - A. No.

Q. Did he bring all the three pigs himself? - A. I cannot say, I did not see him bring them; I did not see them till they were in the wash-house.

Q. Who scalded the pigs? - A. Brookes scalded them.

ANTHONY PRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am collector of the toll at Mile-end-turnpike: On Saturday morning the 13th of December, between three and five in the morning; I cannot speak to the hour; I saw three whitish hogs come through the gate, towards London, there was only one person with them; he paid the toll, but who that person was, I do not know.

Griffiths. I asked Brookes what time he came through the gate, he answered, about five in the morning.

Q. How far is this turnpike from Bow? - A. Two miles.

Q. How far is it from Ramshire's? - A. About four hundred yards.

Q. (To Hill.) Did you see any blood about the cellar or place? - A. No.

Q. Did you hear any noise of the hogs? -- A. No.

Q. You saw no signs of their having been killed there? - A. No.

Q. (To Hanson.) What observation did you make upon the manner in which they were killed? - A. They were killed in a very bad way, they had knocked them on the head, and stuck them in several places.

Q. What makes you suppose they were knocked on the head? - A. Because, when the head was opened, the blood was settled.

Q. Is it usual to kill them by knocking them on the head? - A. Not pigs of that size.

Brookes's defence. This man is innocent of the crime, I have nothing to say for myself.

Ramshire's defence. I wish to have my witnesses called. For the Prisoner.

JAMES CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a weaver.

Q. Do you remember Ramshire telling you he had got some pigs from the country? - A. No; I saw the pigs on the Saturday evening, at his house, I called with a friend of mine, promiscuously.

Q. Were they in a place of concealment? - A. Any person going to the bar might have seen one of them, as the door opened, they could not see them all.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you go into the cellar? - A. Yes.

Q. What induced you to go in? - A. My friend saw one of them, and Ramshire asked him what he had got there, and he said, three fine pigs.

Q. Were they covered with any thing? - A. They had a white cloth round them, it might be a sheet, my friend seemed to signify, that he should like a quarter of one of them, but he said they were not his, and he could not sell them.

Q. What is your friend's name? - A. Daniel Bishop ; he went to Richmond yesterday, and I did not receive any subpoena myself till ten o'clock at night.

The prisoner, Ramshire, called twelve witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Q. (To Hill.) Where did the sheets come from that the pigs were covered with? - A. They were lying in the wash-house for the purpose of being washed. Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-13

107. ELIZABETH GIBBS, alias GIGNELL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , a coat, value 2l. 10s. three waistcoats, value 1l. 10s. a pair of breeches, value 15s. and a pair of silver buckles, value 1l. 5s. the property of James Rowland , in the dwelling-house of Ann Mason .

ANN ROWLAND sworn. - I am the wife of James Rowland , we lodge in the house of Mrs. Mason, on Saffron-hill , I believe her name is Mary, I am not sure: Last Thursday, I went out exactly at twelve o'clock, I was going to Mr. Powell's, the lawyer, in Furnival's-inn, to washing, and left the key with Ann Bromwich , who lodges in the parlour upon the ground floor; we lodge in the first floor, and desired her to give it my husband, when he came home at one o'clock to his dinner; the prisoner was an acquaintance of mine, and came down stairs with me, she saw me deliver the key to Ann Bromwich , she lives with her mother upon Eyre-street-hill; I left a box locked, and the keys in my pocket; my husband came to me, at Mr. Powell's, to inform me of the robbery.

ANN BROMWICH sworn. - I lodge in the same house with Ann Rowland; she went out last Thursday, about twelve o'clock, and left the key of her room-door with me, the prisoner was with her, they both went out at the street door together; Elizabeth Gibbs came back in less than an hour, and asked me to deliver the key of the room, for she was going to see how the fire was; I gave her the key, and she delivered it to me again, she might be in the room about ten minutes, then she went away; she came again a little after four in the afternoon, I was at tea, and she asked me for the key again, and the child I have in my arms delivered her the key; she went up stairs, and was there above a quarter of an hour; she came down, and asked me whether she should leave the key in the back room, and

I said; no, leave it in the front-room, because I was going to work there all the evening; she then had a quantity of things in her apron, which I observed as she went out; she had on a great brown cloak; she had nothing in her apron when she asked me for the key, that I could perceive, as she stood with the door in her hand; she dropped something as she went past, but I could not see what it was; I was mangling at the time, and she said it was needlework.

BILLY PAGE sworn. - I am servant to John Edwards , pawnbroker, in Portpool-lane: On Thursday last, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner came to our shop, I never saw her before to my knowledge; I am certain it is the prisoner, (produces a coat, two waistcoats, a pair of breeches and a pair of silver buckles;) I took them in of the prisoner, I lent one pound eleven shillings upon them.

Q. What would they be worth to sell? - A. Two guineas.

JAMES ROWLAND sworn. - I came home on Thursday last, about half-past seven in the evening, I got the key from Mrs. Bromwich; I went up stairs, and saw that the box was pulled out from under the bed, and the lock broke open, the staple in which the bolt shuts was forced off, and all the things gone out of it, except one shirt, a neckcloth, and a pocket-book; there were three waistcoats in the box, but only two were found. (The property was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. This woman's name is Nancy Wilson , she is not that man's wife, we had been together for seven years, and she said, any thing that was in her room I was welcome to; she told me, that the keys of his box he had taken from her, on the Tuesday morning.

Q. (To Ann Rowland .) Did you ever give her authority to take any thing out of your room? - A. Never in my life; I had the keys of the box in my pocket with me.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s. aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-14

180. PHILIP RABY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , forty-five yards of cotton and linen cloth, mixed, value 2l. 10s. the property of Richard Dixon , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD DIXON sworn. - I keep a house in Fenchurch-street : On the 4th of September, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I lost the property mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner was my servant, a journeyman cutter in the warehouse, he was stopped at the door, with a piece of check under his arm; I was called down from breakfast, and before I could well get down, the prisoner had ran away; I employed a constable in our ward to find him, and it was the 6th of December before he was taken; Mr. Pike delivered me the property at the time, and I put my mark upon it, it is marked P. it is a piece of check cotton and linen, mixed; I might not have seen it, perhaps, for a week before he was stopped with it.

HENRY NORMAN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Richard Dixon , the prisoner was his servant: On the 4th of September, between eight and nine in the morning, I stopped the prisoner with a piece of check upon him; Pike called to him, and desired me to stop him; I stopped him, and desired him to bring it back to the counter, and untie it; he had it tied in an apron that he usually wore, he was going out to breakfast, and was withing two feet of the door.

Q. Was it a common thing for the men to go out with their aprons tied up? - A. No; Mr. Pike desired him to untie it, and told him, he believed he had got something that did not belong to him; he had got a piece of cloth containing thirty-six ells; Pike asked him how he came to do such a thing, and then he begged for God's sake we would say nothing to Mr. Dixon about it, he was only going to take it home to have some shirts cut out for his son, and he would have brought the remainder of the piece back again; he requested we would say nothing about it, and we let him go home to his breakfast; then we called Mr. Dixon from his breakfast, and Joseph Pike and I shewed Mr. Dixon the cloth; it has been kept in his accompting-house ever since, separate from any other, till it was delivered to the constable, by Mr. Dixon; I know it to be his property, by the private mark upon it, I had put it myself in Mr. Dixon's cellar, about a week before; I know it by a mark in my own hand-writing, which I put upon it April 14, 1800.

PETER PERRY sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the property;) I received it from Mr. Dixon, and have had it ever since, (it was deposed to by Mr. Dixon and his servant.)

Norman. His great-coat was tied up in the same paper, I had seen him tie up the great-coat with it, while I was at breakfast, which gave me the first suspicion; he was then eight or ten yards from the door; he had enquired of every one for a bundle handkerchief, and no one would lend it him; then he took his apron, and took this piece of cotton, and tied it up with the great-coat in the apron.

Q. Why did not you speak to him then, at that time? - A. Because I was not justified.

Q. Why were not you justified? - A. Because a man might have a piece of cloth to carry forward, but he could not have it for his work, for five hours from that time, at least, for he had ten pieces of Irish linen then open before him, to cut into shirts.

Prisoner's defence. I never in my life, directly, or indirectly took any thing from Mr. Dixon's

shop, with intention to defraud him; Mr. Dixon has told me, I might, it any time, have any goods that I wanted, and pay him as I could; I took this piece, meaning to put it down on the other side, for Mr. Dixon's inspection, against I came back from breakfast; Mr. Pike called me back, and I stopped directly and put it down.

Q. (To Dixon.) Did you ever authorise this man to take any goods for you to price them afterwards? - A. Never; if they want a coat or a shirt, or any thing I deal in, that they want, I let them have it at what it cost me.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s. aged 43.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-15

109. ANN SILVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December, two handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Thomas Green .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-16

110. PHILIP BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , two pair of stockings, value 7s. the property of Joseph Knott . privately in his shop .

JOSEPH KNOTT sworn. - On the 20th of December, about half past eight or nine in the morning, the prisoner, with another boy , came into the shop to look at some stockings, my wife, at that time, was in the shop alone.

Mrs. KNOTT sworn. - I was in the shop when the prisoner and another boy came in, and asked for some worsted stockings, and I shewed them some; I went to the door to call the shopman, in so doing, I partly turned my back to the prisoner, then my husband came into the shop, and I know no more of the transaction; I am sure the prisoner was one of the two boys.

Prosecutor. When I went into the shop, I was in the kitchen; I went to the side of the counter where the boys were, they wanted to look at some different from what they had seen; I cast my eye upon the window, and perceived some stockings missing; I then suspected the boys had taken some, the other boy immediately slipped out of the shop; I placed myself in the door-way, that the other should not pass me; I asked my wife if she had not; I then turned round to the prisoner, and told him, I was afraid he had taken some stockings; I then perceived that he had thrown a pair of stockings on the ground, they laid about three yards from him; I did not see him throw them down, but he immediately gave me another pair into my hand; I think he took them from his pocket, I am not certain; I then told him I must take him into custody; I know them to be my stockings, they have my private mark upon them, they were missing from the window.

John Mills , a constable, produced the stockings. which were deposed to by Mr. Knott.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 3s. 6d, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-17

111. GEORGE MELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , three pounds thirteen ounces of indigo, value 20s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Court. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

JOHN SINGLETON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an assistant elder in the East-India Company's private trade warehouses in Billiter-lane : On Monday, the 15th of December, the prisoner was attending as a labourer , and had been for thirteen years; it was his duty to look after the indigo that was upon show that day; when the men come from work, it is my duty to rub them down; I came out of the office into the yard for that purpose; I rubbed the prisoner down; I belong to that warehouse where there is nothing but indigo; when I rubbed him down, I thought he appeared very large about his body: I searched him, and found some indigo concealed round his body, between his skin and shirt, and also in his breeches and in his hat; it was the same sort of indigo that was in the warehouse; I put it all together in a piece of paper, and delivered it to the constable; I asked the prisoner what he had got about him, and he said, he had nothing of any consequence; that was while I was rubbing him down, before I had found any thing; I did not hear him say any thing else; I then delivered him to the constable.( Perry Whitney , the constable, produced the indigo).

Prisoner's defence. I have been thirteen years in the warehouse; I never was guilty of any thing before this time; I beg for the mercy of the Court; I have had a sick wife for above a year and a half, and I was not able to get on in life.

GUILTY , aged 37. - Six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped 100 yards in Billiter-lane .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-18

112. RICHARD CAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , three pecks of coals, value 1s. 2d. the property of James Randall the elder, John Randall , James Randall the younger, and William Randall .

(Mr. James Randall , jun. proved the firm, as stated in the indictment.)

JAMES COMLEY sworn. - I am Queenhithe ward-beadle: Going round Queenhithe on Thursday morning last, about a quarter before eight in the morning of the 8th of January, I saw the prisoner on Mr. Randall's craft; I had a strong suspicion of him; I saw him go into the Randall barge, 435, the number of her, and saw him take the coals up and put in the bag; he came on shore with them, and I took him in custody; there were about three pecks of coals in the bag; he was excessively abusive, and used me very ill; I should blush to mention the language he made use of; he struck at me, and we both tumbled together; two men came up and assisted me, and he was taken to the Compter; he is very strong, though a cripple.

Q. Was he a stranger to you? - A. No; I know him perfectly well.

Q. (To James Randall .) Is the barge, No. 435, lying at Queenhithe, your's? - A. It is, and the coals belong to the firm of the house.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 50. - Confined twelve months in Newgate , and whipped 100 yards from Queenhithe to Queen-street .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-19

113. THOMAS WHITEBREAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , thirty pounds of butter, value 25s. and a wooden cask, value 6d. the property of Godfrey Feise .

CHRISTOPHER-HERMAN WEINEUGH sworn. I am clerk to Mr. Feise, a German; he is a merchant ; I was not present when the cask was found upon the man; I can only prove the property.

JAMES IRVIN sworn. - I am acting man for Mr. Thomas Payne , the goldsmith's porter, at Galley-Quay: In consequence of information, I pursued the prisoner into Thames-street; I did not see him till I got into Thames-street; he was walking towards the Tower from Galley-quay; I went up to him, and told him, you have got one of our casks of butter, you must come back with me; I gave charge of him to the officer, till we counted what quantity of casks we had upon the Quay, and we found two desicient; I gave the cask into the possession of the officer; I shewed it to Mr. Weineugh, and he claimed it for Mr. Feise.(The constable produced the cask.)

JOHN BUTCHER sworn. - I was on Galley-quay on the 19th of December, loading the casks of butter into a cart, and I saw the prisoner with one of the tubs upon his thigh, putting his apron over it, or a cloth, or something of that kind, and he went up the gate-way with it; I called out to James Harvey , and told him to go after him, which he did, and brought him back again.

Q. (To Weineugh). Look at that tub of butter; where did it come from? - A. Embden; I saw it before the Lord-Mayor; Irvin shewed it me; I was landing this butter on Mr. Feise's account; it is his property.

Prisoner's defence. I was looking for a job on the quays, and a gentleman said, soldier , do you want a job; I said, yes, and he told me to take that tub of butter to Tower-hill for him, and this gentleman followed me and took me, and then the man ran away.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who had known him twelve months, and who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 27. - Confined one week in Newgate, and delivered to his serjeant .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-20

114. JOHN GOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , a press brace, value 8s. a steel screw plate and tap, value 8s. and six iron tools, value 6s. the property of William Coslett .

WILLIAM COSLETT sworn. - I live in Great Garden-street, Whitechapel ; the articles in the indictment were used in my manufactory in grinding of sugar, and making molasses: About the 11th of December, I think on Thursday, in consequence of information, I went to Mr. Cohen's shop, and found a press brace, drill, and screw plate and tap; and I think on the Saturday after, I went to Longland's, the smith, and found the six iron tools mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner had worked upon my premises some time before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is your son here to-day? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he a witness for you? - A. No.

Q. He is a witness against you; is he not? - A. I do not know.

Q. Has it happened to you, I do not impute it to you as a crime, we are all unfortunate at times, but has it happened to you to be a bankrupt? - A. Yes.

Q. And your property assigned over to assigness? A. Yes.

Q. Has any dividend been made? - A. Yes, two.

Q. Have you got your certificate yet? - A. It is not quite ready, yet it is very near; but there was a sale of my goods, at which they permitted me to re-purchase these, and other articles.

Q. The prisoner sometimes worked for you, and sometimes for Longland? - A. He worked for Longland previous to his working for me, when my work became slack; he rented a forge in the neighbourhood.

Q. Has he not done some small jobs for you on his own account? - A. Yes.

Q. You have always considered him, till this, as a very honest man? - A. I had a very high opinion of him.

Q. You did not think fit to charge him with this, till Master Longland came, and found fault

with his setting up for himself? - A. I did not charge him with taking my things till then.

Q. Have you lent him tools, in the course of your business? - A. I have.

Q. Do not you know these things were taken in execution by the sheriff? - A. No; he sold them after the sale.

Q. Do you not know that there was an execution in his house? - A. I have known it since.

Q. Have you been much upon your premises since your bankruptcy? - A. Yes; I have lived there ever since.

Q. Have you not lent this man the very tools in question? - A. I have, but they were brought back and used; I have taken great pleasure in assisting the man, and am sorry to be under the necessity of appearing against him.

Q. Did you not give him a general permission, if he wanted any tool, and you were not in the way, that he might take it? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of James Powell , or David Powell? - A. No, I do not know any man by that name.(Powell called into Court).

Prosecutor. I know the boy very well; I did not know his name.

Q. Then you mean to swear you never lent him these tools? - A. Not since I had them back from him.

WILLIAM LONGLANDS sworn. - I am a smith in Rose-lane, Spital-fields; I went to Mr. Cohen's to buy some tools, and there I saw this property belonging to Mr. Coslett.

BARNETT COHEN sworn. - I am a broker; I bought several lots of smith's tools of the prisoner, on the 6th of December, and put them to the door for sale; Mr. Longlands came and bought some tools of me, and the next day Mr. Coslett came, and claimed these tools, and desired me not to sell them; I told him he might take them when I got the order to deliver them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This poor man, at the time you purchased, had an execution in his house? - A. Yes; I told him not to sell his goods, for I would take every thing in his inventory; I have known him some years; he has always bore a very good character.( Richard Osman , the officer, produced the property.)

Coslett. The press brace, and the screw plate and tap, I can swear to.

Prisoner's defence. I have borrowed these things repeatedly of Mr. Coslett, and the press brace he lent me to do his own work, and told me I might have them at any time.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I know Mr. Coslett; he gave Gower permission to have any tools when ever he asked for them, and he never refused him.

DAVID COSLETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Has not your father given permission to this man to use his tools, upon condition of his returning them? - A. I don't recollect that he has.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-21

115. JOHN GOWERS was a second time indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , a pair of stell stocks and taps, with shifting dies, value 36s. the property of William Longlands .

WILLIAM LONGLANDS sworn. - I am a smith : On the 11th of December, I went to Mr. Cohen's to buy some tools, and there I saw a pair of steel stocks and taps, with shifting dies; I had lent them to Mr. Coslett some time in August; I had lent them to him several times.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner worked with you some time as a journeyman? - A. Yes.

Q. After that, he began to work for himself? - A. I did not know it; he worked for Mr. Coslett.

Q. It happened from some misfortune that you got into debt, and was in the Fleet-prison? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not, while you were there, tell the prisoner, that if he wanted any tools, he might make use of them in his own work? - A. I did not.

Q. Do you know Joseph Stinton? - A. I do.

Q. Have you not, in his presence, told him that the prisoner was welcome to use your tools at any time? - A. No.

BARNETT COHEN sworn. - I bought this tool of Mr. Gowers' on the 6th of December, with other tools; there was an execution came to his house, and I bought them at his house after the execution was over; I gave him sixteen shillings for them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You considered it as a fair, honest transfaction? - A. Yes.( Richard Osman , an officer, produced the property).

WILLIAM COSLETT sworn. - Longlands lent me those tools; I used them in my own work; the prisoner occasionally worked on my premises, till the tools were discovered at Cohen's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you ever lend the prisoner this tool? - A. No.

Q. Did you not give him authority to take it, whenever he wanted it? - A. No.

Coslett. This is the tool that I borrowed from Longlands; I know this to be mine; I have had it twenty-six years.

Prisoner's defence. I borrowed this tool of Mr. Bradshaw; Longlands was in the Fleet-prison, and there was an execution in the house, and Mr. Bradshaw bought his things.

Q. (To Longlands.) did you lend this tool to

Coslett before or after the execution in your house? - A. After; that tool was never sold at all.

FRANCIS BRADSHAW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a tallow-chandler; I bought this tool when Longland's goods were sold; Powell, the boy, came to me to borrow it for the prisoner.

Court. Q. Who did you buy it from? - A. They were lest left in the house, and I was to take them, if he did not pay me.

Q. Who did you pay for them? - A. The sheriff.

Q. Did they ever go back to Longlands? - A. No.

Q. How came you to buy these things? - A. I did it to serve Longlands.

Longlands. He never did it by my order.

Bradshaw. I did it by his wife's order.

For the Prosecution.

ANN LONGLANDS sworn. - I am the wife of William Longlands: I lent this tool of my husband's to one of Mr. Coslett's men on the 20th, or 21st of September last.

Q. Did you ever fell that to Mr. Bradshaw? - No.

Q. you never bargained with him for it? - A. No.

Q. And it remained there after the execution was over? - A. Yes; the execution is nearly a twelvemonth ago.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you remember the time your husband's goods were sold by auction? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know all the things were sold? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that that tool was not sold? - A. Yes, I do.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES POWELL sworn. - I am an apprentice to Gowers; I was apprentice to Longlands, and was discharged from him before a Justice; I borrowed this tool from Mr. Bradshaw for John Gowers . NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-22

116. JAMES RILEY and ROBERT NUTTS were indicted, for that they, in the King's highway, upon Andrew-Dennis O'Kelly , Esq . did make an assault, on the 3d of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person three seven-shilling pieces, a half-guinea, a half-crown, and three shillings, the property of the said Andrew .

(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

ANDREW-DENNIS O'KELLY , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. On the evening of the 3d of December, between the hours of eight and nine, in the road to West Wickham Park, near Hayes , I heard a voice cry stop, or I will blow your brains out; upon looking through the front glass, I saw a man come up to the post-boy, and present a pistol, as it appeared to me, at his head, at the same time pulling the reins of the postboy's horse; the chaise stopped, when the door on the right hand was instantly opened by a man, who, putting a pistol towards my breast, demanded my money.

Q. Are you able to say what man that was? - A. That man was the prisoner Riley; he then appeared very differently to what he does now, he was dirty, and had a very different appearance.

Court. Q. But notwithstanding the difference, are you able to say that he is the man? - A. I am sure that Riley opened the door first; before I had time to make any answer, the other door was opened by another man, which was this unfortunate man, Nutts.

Mr. Const. Q. You are equally sure that it was Nutts who opened the second door? - A. Yes; the prisoner at the bar, Nutts, who also presented a pistol, he had a light-coloured great coat on.

Court. Q. What sort of light was it? - A. I should suppose it to be a very short time before the rising of the moon, which enabled me to see them so distinctly; Nutts was the man who came up first to the horses' heads; he then came and opened the other door of the chaise, as I have described: finding myself in this unpleasant situation, and having no weapon of defence, I thought it prudent to comply with their demands; I said, have patience, do not ill-treat or abuse me, and I will give you what money I have; I immediately put my hand to my pocket, and gave him my loose money, which was three seven-shilling pieces, a half guinea, a half-crown, and some silver, I cannot say how much; among the silver I gave him a shilling, upon which were letters stamped, which I had previously by accident taken notice of, I gave it to the prisoner Riley, who was on my right hand; Riley then demanded my pocket-book, I told him I had none; Nutts said, your Bank-notes; I answered, I had none; then putting his hand upon my thigh, and feeling some papers in my pocket, he said, what is this; I answered, only papers, of no consequence to you; he said, I must see, and, taking hold of the skirt of my coat, he said, turn round, I cannot get at your pocket, at the same time making use of some vulgar expressions, which are unnecessary to state; I said, stop, sir, let me out, and then I will give you leave to search me; at the same instant Riley demanded my watch; on refusing to give it to him, he immediately jumped into the chaise; Nutts got closer to me, and began to rifle my pockets, each of them were rifling my pockets at the same time, but Riley was entirely in the chaise; the third man at this time came to the door behind Riley, he having got into the chaise, and took out a bundle of wearing-apparel that I had on the chaise-seat by my side; Riley might have taken it out, I will not swear, but it was

at that time taken out; Riley then cried out, take care of the post-boy; this third man, I believe, put his hand into my right hand breeches pocket, and took out several Bank-notes previous to his leaving the chaise.

Q. Do you think you should know that man again? - A. No; being so occupied with Nutts and Riley, I should not know the other man, and he being behind Riley, I again desired they would let me out; one of them said, no, where is your pocket-book, and your watch; I told them I had neither one nor the other; they, however, continued searching me; I told them they had got every thing I had, and as they had got all my money, to go about their business quietly, and, after searching round the inside of the chaise, they got out; upon the first alarm, I had availed myself of that opportunity of taking out my watch, which I had an intention of concealing, together with the notes, which I had in my other pocket; but before I had time to do either, the doors were opened as I have described; I kept the watch in my hand the whole time; my watch, therefore was saved; when Nutts had got off the step, I observed a letter which he had taken out of my coat pocket; I recollected that, besides the money it contained, it was of the utmost importance, in my opinion, to be delivered to the person, a friend of mine, to whom it was addressed; I pressed him very much to return it to me; I assured him it was of no sort of consequence to him, but that it was very material to the nobleman to whom it was addressed, to have it that night by the mail, desiring, if he doubted what I said, he had only to look to the superscription of the letter, or open it, if he pleased, that he would then be convinced; he pulled it out of his bosom, drew back a little from the door of the chaise, and held it up, and, after satisfying himself, he returned it; I immediately turned round to the other two men, who, with the notes, had taken several papers out of my pocket, and having made much the same observations with respect to those papers, that they were of no use to them, and if they did not return them, they would probably suffer severely for it, one of them immediately came to the chaise, and, putting his hand under the seat, said, where is your portmanteau; I told him I had none; he then began to feel about the cushion, I pushed his hand away, and said, you have got my money, you have got all that I have, be gone about your business, unfortunate men, I do not with to hurt you, or to that effect; they then retired, and I went back to the Adam and Eve public-house, at Hayes.

Q. How long might this transaction have consumed? - A. I should think not less than ten minutes, perhaps more.

Q. Did they make any attempt at all to conceal their faces? - A. No, they had handkerchiefs on, which were up to their chins, but Nutts, holding up the letter to look at it, I discovered his countenance perfectly.

Q. How far was it from the Adam and Eve that you were robbed? - A. From what I saw after, it must be but a very short distance, I did not notice the public-house as I passed it before, I endeavoured to get assistance; I got to the public-house within a quarter of an hour, and offered twenty guineas to persons that were there, to assist in apprehending the men; some little time passed in that way, and I went on to Uxbridge; some time elapsed there also with the same endeavours, in vain; I left Uxbridge about a mile and a half, when a boy came after me, in consequence of which I returned to the public-house, where I met a person of the name of Nibbs; the constable of the place; he took me into the tap-room, which at that time was very full; I asked were the robbers were; not being answered, I turned round, and looked at some persons that were sitting upon the circular bench near the fire; I looked round, and examined their countenances very minutely, and, fixing my eyes upon the prisoner Nutts, I said, as nearly as I can recollect, well, sir, what have you to say for yourself?

Q. Did you at that time recognize having seen him before? - A. I certainly did, as being one who stopped the carriage; he replied, say, sir, I did not speak; I said, no, sir, but I shall speak to you, you are the man who stopped the chaise, and came to me; immediately after he denied my ever having seen him before; I told him it was in vain for him to deny it, for I knew him perfectly, or words to that effect; Riley, I believe, had been smoking, or had a pipe in his hand at the time, and sat nearer the fire; he asked me if I knew him; I do not recollect that I had at that time spoke to him; I told him I knew him very well; he said, you are mistaken, sir, you never saw me in your life before, nor I never saw you; I then, to the best of my recollection, asked them what they had done with my notes and my money; they very resolutely denied knowing any thing about either one or the other, and said, they did not know what I meant; I was then brought into the adjoining room, I think, by the constable, who produced what had been taken from them, the pistols and money, and I recollected the shilling particularly; I said, this is the money I gave; I returned to the tap-room with the constable, after examining the pistols, the money, and the other things, and finding the constable had not possession of the notes, I asked the prisoners what they had done with the notes; I said, it is in vain for you to deny the charge, because I not only know you, but I can swear to the money, and the best thing you can do is to confess, and enable me to pursue the man that has got the Bank-notes, it being the only chance you can possibly have of being safe; they still denied knowing

any thing of the matter; I then pulled out the letter, and held it over to Nutts, and desired him to read the superscription of that letter, and said, now, sir, are you satisfied that I know you perfectly; I think he said he could not read, or he had never learned to read, or something of that sort; I then said, I am sorry you are so obstinate, and I left the room with the constable.

Q. When you were shewn into the tap-room, were they sitting amongst the rest of the company without any thing that could lead you to suppose they were prisoners? - A. Without any thing that could possibly lead me to suppose they were prisoners; I should add, that during the time they were round the chaise, they neither behaved violently, nor ill-treated me.

Mr. Alley. Q. I shall ask you but one question, and that is, how you spell your name, whether it is O'Kelly, or O'Kelly? - A. O'Kelly.

- NIBBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const.

I am a constable at Hayes: on the 3d of December, about eight o'clock, I left a friend's house, near the Adam and Eve, with intent to go on the road about three quarters of a mile towards Uxbridge; just as I stepped out of my friend's house, a chaise and pair were going past on the road for Uxbridge; I was going likewise the same way; it was moon-light, but rather dull; the road happened to be very free from any body going backwards and forwards at that time, but in walking after the chaise, I could observe some people on the foot-path; I could not distinguish how many; I could hear the grinding of the wheels very distinctly, and all at once I found that to cease; I looked up, and saw it standing still, and some people about it; I heard the expression, I will blow your brains out; I supposed it to be a robbery committed, and it struck me, that with help, it might be in my power to apprehend them; I immediately ran back to the Adam and Eve public-house, where there were a number of people assembled; I told them what had happened, and asked for assistance; four immediately ran out, and some others, whom I begged to assist, but they stood inactive; I then followed the four that were gone, as fast as I could; in running after them, to my surprize, I found the four men pursuing the robbers, and running towards me; I could not cleverly distinguish one from the other, but the leading man had got a bundle under his left arm; there is a lane that leads from that road to a field, called the Adam and Eve field, close by the public-house; they took down that lane; when I got into the field, they were at the small distance of about twenty yards; I saw two distinct slashes from, as I supposed, two pistols; I still kept running down to them, and found Nutts in the custody of two of the four persons that went out in pursuit; Riley, the others had just pulled down, and they were struggling with him upon the ground; I begged of them to hold his arms close, to get his pistols from him; while struggling, they took a pistol from him, and that pistol, with another, was given to me; we then took them to the Adam and Eve public-house; there I searched them, and found two pounds upon Riley, in gold and silver, and upon Nutts, three pounds and sixpence; I then handcuffed them together, and lest them in charge with a young man, and got a man to go with a horse after the colonel; I thought he might stop at the White Horse at Uxbridge, and therefore I sent there; after I got into the house, there was another brace of pistols delivered to me by one of the people, I cannot say which, (produces the money and the pistols;) the money taken from Riley, consists of a half-guinea, three seven-shilling pieces, a half-crown, five shillings, and two sixpences; the other is two guineas, on half-guinea, two half-crowns, one shillings, and two sixpences.

Col. O'Kelly. This is the shilling that I spoke of.

Court. Q. Do you recollect whether this shilling was marked on one side, or both? - A. I observed but one side; I took it in change for a Banknote.

Nibbs. I saw one of the pistols taken from Riley.

Q. Thought Col. O'Kelly did not see it, they were handcuffed at the time that he came in? - A. They were.

Mr. Alley. Q. That shilling has a mark upon it, that is very common? - A. Yes.

JOHN GEORGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a hair-dresser at Hayes: I was at the Adam and Eve, when there was an alarm given of robbers being on the road; three or four of us immeediately went out, William Pierton , Thomas Furnell, Richard Walker , and myself, went altogether; we went down the road some distance, and met three men coming; after we met them, we let them pass us, and then they immediately began to run; we turned back, and run after them; nothing had been said; after we came by the Adam and Eve, at the corner of the road, they turned down the road which leads to the common field; and when they had turned down there, I heard one say, shoot; upon which one of them snicked his pistol; I saw no fire; upon which, following further down the field, one young man who is here, Pierton, was very close to the prisoner Nutts; upon which, Nutts snapped his pistol, I cannot say at his head, but I saw it flash in the pan, and Pierton, and the prisoner Nutts were in a scuffle immediately; upon which, I directly came up, and took one pistol out of Nutts's hand, and put it in my pocket; upon which we searched if he had got another, but we found no other upon him; then, upon which, we secured lum, and carried him to the Adam and Eve.

WILLIAM PIERTON sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Const. I am a gardener at Hayes: I was at the Adam and Eve with George; upon the alarm being given, I went out with him; we were going on to where Nibbs said the robbery was committed, and there we passed by them; as soon as we past by them, they set off, and run; the first of them had a bundle under his left arm; it was neither of the prisoners; then they turned down into the field by the Adam and Eve, and there we followed them; just as we overlook them, one said to the other, shoot, but I cannot say which; it was upon that the pistol nick'd; then seeing the prisoner Nutts running down by the hedge in the common field, I ran after him; I was within about five yards of him, when he turned round, and nick'd his pistol.

Q. Did he present the pistol at you? - A. Yes; I still made up to him, and just as I got close to him, he presented it again, and it slashed in the pan, close at my head; then I collared him; he struck me with a pistol below the eye; George then came up, and took the pistol out of his hand; then we securd him, and took him to the Adam and Eve.

THOMAS FURNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a butcher, servant to Mr. Nibbs: I went out with the rest; I saw the three men come down the path; the first of them had a bundle under his lest arm; I went by them quite quick; after I had got by them, I turned round, and then I saw them all three take to a run; before they came to the Adam and Eve, they turned down the turning which takes you into the common field; when they got into the common field, they turned round, and snick'd their pistols, but I connot say which of them it was; while they were taking Nutts, Riley was running very fast away; I ran after him, and caught him by the coat, and down I pulled him, and as he was struggling to get up, two of them came up directly, and assisted me; upon which, there was a pistol taken from Riley out of his breeches pocket, by Richard Walker; we then brought him up to the Adam and Eve.

Q. Do you know where they got the other pistols? - A. One was picked up by a man of the name of Hinson.

Q. Do you know where the other came from? - A. No.

RICHARD WALKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I went out after these men; I saw the prisoners coming; we passed them, and then they took to a run, and we followed them; they ran towards the Adam and Eve; one of them said to the other, get on; then they turned down to the left-hand into the common field; we followed them through the gate, and then we were very close together; Nutts, turned round, and said I will shoot you, and the pistol snick'd, I received no fire from it.

Q. Did you see how he held it? - A. No; I did not then; I saw the pistol of Nutts fired by him, which flashed in the pan; I then rung the pistol out of his hand, and seeing him secure, and seeing the butcher running, I thought I should stand a good chance of getting the other, Riley, and I ran after him; the butcher had got hold of the lappet of his coat, pulling him down; I joined and helped to secure him; I took one pistol out of Riley's left-hand bhreeches pocket; I gave both the pistols to Mr. Nibbs; they were taken to the Adam and Eve; they were handcuffed, one's right arm to the other's left; they sat next to each other upon the settle, when the colonel saw them.

- HINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a sawyer at Hayes: I heard an alarm; I was at home; I went out afterwards, and saw two flashes from the pistols in the common field; I was not so near as the others were; Nutts was then taken, and they were struggling with Riley; I saw a pistol drop from Riley; I picked it up, and gave it to Mr. Nibbs; I did not see the other pistol taken from Riley.

Riley's defence. I was not sworn to before the Justice at all.

Col. O'Kelly. Certainly, before the Magistrate, I began with believing, but knowing I must speak the whole truth, I swore positively to both of them.

Riley, GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

Nutts, GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-23

117. JOSEPH ROBERTS was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, upon Thomas Milsum did make an assault on the 12th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person three shillings and twenty halfpence, the property of the said Thomas .

THOMAS MILSUM sworn. - On the 12th of December, about a quarter before five, I was coming past Potter's bar in a cart, and the prisoner came up to me, and told me to stop; I observed him crossing over to me from the foot-path, about fifteen yards from me.

Q. What sort of light was it? - A. It was rather getting dark; he had the same coat on that he has on now; he told me to deliver my money, and presented a pistol at my breast; he was so near me, that I could have touched him; I put my hand in my breeches pocket, and gave him all the silver I had, which was three shillings; he told me that was not enough, and in case I did not give him more, he would fire at me; I told him it was of no use to fire, or ill use me, I had no more but two or three halfpence, and if he chose to have them, he might have them, and I put my hand in my pocket, and gave him a handful of them; he directly turned round to a poor woman that I had in the carts and told her, if she did not deliver her mo

ney, he would fire at her; the poor woman begged for mercy, and told him she was but a poor beggar woman, if he wanted any thing of her, he must take her matches, and that was all that I saw of him that night.

Q. How long might this take up? - A. I dare say, five or six minutes, I cannot say particularly, I had never seen him before: On the 16th of December, I saw him go by my window, at Barnet, and I watched him up and down the town, he had a woman with him, they went into several shops; I spoke to William Wright , and he went with me; we went-after him, and when we came to him, he was easing himself in a field, and when he saw us coming towards him, he took up his breeches by the waistband, and ran in that manner, jumping over hedges and ditches, for near two miles before we overtook him, then we got hold of him, and secured him.

Jury. Q. Was it light enough to distinguish the prisoner's countenance? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. Yes; I knew him again the moment I saw him go past the window, it was not dark.

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. - Milsum applied to me to assist him in taking the prisoner, on the 16th of December; we found him over a hedge, easing himself, and as soon as he saw us come up to the gate, he ran away, with his breeches in his hand, he ran almost two miles before we could take him; when we took him, he asked us to let him button up his breeches, which we did, and then I searched him, and found in his pocket, a razor and a knife, and a few other small articles.

Prisoner's defence. I was at home at my lodgings, at the time the robbery was committed, near Watford turnpike.

For the Prisoner.

ELEANOR NORRIS sworn. - I live near Chalk-hill, Watford; the prisoner lodged at my house; I keep a lodging-house, he was at home all that blessed day, and all that evening.

Q. What is the prisoner; - A. A hard working man.

Q. In what way? - A. What he can get, farming work .

Q. What day was this? - A. The 12th of December.

Q. How came he to be at home all that day? - A. He was not very well, and therefore I am sure he was at home all that blessed evening.

Q. Was he in bed all day? - A. No; he got up about ten o'clock, he was in the kitchen where he used to sit by the fire, from the time he got up till he went to bed at eight in the evening.

Q. Then, from ten in the morning, till eight at night, he was never out of your kitchen? - A. No, he was not.

Q. Who was in the house besides? - A. Sarah Neal ; I cannot recollect the other, she is only an acquaintance, her name is Jenny.

Q. Jenny what? - A. Jenny.

Q. What is her surname? - A. I cannot recollect.

Prisoner. Her name is Charlotte Payne .

Court. Q. Recollect what the other name was - A. Her christian name was Charlotte, but I do not know her surname.

Q. What time did Neal come into your house? - A. She lodged in the house.

Q. What time did the other woman come in? - A. About twelve o'clock in the day.

Q. What time did she go away? - A. She staid all night.

Q. In what room does Sarah Neal lodge? - A. She lives above.

Q. What business is she? - A. She works at the silk business with me, and we were at work at home that day.

Q. What sort of work is it that you do with the silk? - A. We call it thrumming, we do it with a wheel; we have it from the rookery, one Mr. Fournier's.

Q. In what room in this house do you work? - A. In the kitchen.

Q. Where did she work? - A. In the kitchen, just by me.

Q. What time did you begin your work in the course of that day? - A. We began on that day as soon as we could see, and worked till nine.

Q. And neither of you, from the time that you were able to see in the morning, till nine o'clock, ever went out of the kitchen? - A. No.

Q. What was Charlotte doing all this time? - A. She was out of place, and came to see us.

Q. How did she employ herself? - A. She came to see me that day, she came about twelve o'clock, and staid all night.

Q. When did she go away? - A. She went after dinner, and staid about two or three hours; we dined about one o'clock, she went out about two.

Q. Was it light or dark when she came in? - A. It was just dusk; we were just going to light our candles to begin our work.

Q. Had you lit them? - A. No, we were just going to light them; we left off work to have our tea, or what us poor people can get, and then lit up candles to go to work again.

Q. Did she come in before tea? - A. No; Charlotte had tea with us;

Q. What had you for dinner? - A. We had tea for dinner, and tea for supper; we work hard for our living, and cannot earn much.

Q. Who dined with you? - A. We three dined together, Sarah Neal and Charlotte and I.

Q. Where did the prisoner dine? - A. He dined by himself at one o'clock; he had a little bit of mutton for his dinner.

Q. Who procured him this bit of mutton? - A. He bought it in the town.

Q. What time did he go out to buy it? - A. I did not take particular notice of that.

Q. How long was he out in buying the mutton? - A. He did not buy the mutton that day, he bought it of the Saturday night, he buys a bit to last him a week.

Q. What day was this, the 6th of December.

Q. That was the day that the man was ill, and that Charlotte came in the way you have described, and dined together and had tea? - A. Yes.

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. I am no scholar, I believe it was a Tuesday, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Are you sure of the day of the month? - A. Yes, I am sure of the day.

Q. Why are you sure it, was the sixth? - A. I am no scholar.

Q. But you six upon a particular day when this man was ill, and Charlotte came in and dined with you? - A. It was on the Tuesday, I know.

Q. Are you sure it was the 6th? - A. It was the 12th of December.

Q. You told me the 6th this moment? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You told me the 6th? - A. I was hurried and did not know what I said; I know it was Tuesday.

Q. Just now, you were not sure as to the day of the month, are you sure as to the day of the week? - A. To the best of my knowledge, it was the Tuesday.

Q. What for a day was it? - A. It rained a little.

Q. What, all day long? - A. No, in the forepart of the day.

Q. How was it in the evening? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Who dressed this man's dinner? - A. I dressed it.

Q. Were these other two women in the kitchen when you dressed it? - A. Yes.

Q. What makes you say it was the 12th, more than any other day? - A. I heard a person reading the newspaper.

Q. How did reading the newspaper make you know it? - A. I mean an almanack, not a newspaper.

Q. Who was reading the almanack? - A. Mrs. Carey, at the Wheat-sheaf.

Q. When was it that Mrs. Carey read the almanack? - A. About twelve o'clock that very day.

Q. Where was Mrs. Carey when she read the almanack? - A. In her own house, in the tap-room.

Q. How came Mrs. Carey to read the almanack? - A. She was reading it, looking over it, to see what day of the month it was.

Q. How came you to know, from looking at the almanack, that it was the 12th of December? - A. I kept it in my head, she did not read it to me particularly.

Q. How did she read it? - A. I cannot say how she read it.

Q. What did she read? - A. I cannot say more than the truth.

Q. How far is the Wheat-sheaf from your house? - A. Not more than a stone's throw.

Q. How long were you there? - A. Not long, I only went for a pint of ale.

Q. She looked in the almanack, and said, this is the 12th of December? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she read it out loud? - A. Yes.

Q. And for what purpose you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. Where was Charlotte when you went for this pint of beer? - A. She was left in the house, they were both of them in my house.

Q. What did you do with the pint of beer? - A. We had it between us.

Q. Between whom? - A. Us three girls.

Q. At your own house? - A. Yes.

Q. Was this before dinner, or after? - A. Before dinner.

Q. Whose money was it? - A. It was my money, I paid for it.

Q. Did the others contribute to it? - A. No; I paid for it myself.

Q. How did you dress this man's dinner? - A. I boiled it in a kettle.

Q. What part of mutton was it? - A. A part of the breast.

Q. What other occasions had you to go out that day? - A. I was not out all day, but fetching the pint of beer.

Q. How long was she reading the almanack while you were in the house? - A. It might be five minutes.

Q. Was she five minutes reading? - A. I cannot say how long, I did not take particular notice.

Q. If you took notice of her reading, you must have taken notice how long she was reading? - A. I did not take particular notice, only of the day of the month, she was looking the day of the month for some man.

Q. What sort of an almanack was it? - A. Almost like a news-paper, it was stuck up against the wall.

Q. What was the matter with him, that he could not go out that day? - A. He had bad shoes, and got cold in his feet, he could not go out that day.

Q. Were you the woman that was with him the day he was taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you go into various shops with him, in Barnet? - A. Yes.

SARAH NEALE sworn. - Q. What is your business? - A. I work at the silk mills, I lodge at Mrs. Norris's.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner be

ing at home the day that this robbery is said to have been committed? - A. He was at home on the 12th of December.

Q. What reason have you for fixing on that day? - A. Because I was at home myself.

Q. What was the particularity of that? - A. I used to work in the shop, at Mr. Fournier's; I did not go on the Monday to work, and he would not take me in.

Q. What Monday was that? - A. Five weeks ago last Monday,

Q. From that time, where did you work? - A. I did not get any work till the Wednesday.

Q. Where did you work on the Wednesday? - A. At one Mr. Topping's.

Q. How many days did you work at home? - A. Three days.

Q. And where did you work after that? - A. I did none on the Saturday, there was none.

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. It was the 12th of December.

Q. You told us, you knew it from the particularity of your working at home; now, you have spoke of three days that you were at home at work, which of the three days was it that he was home? - A. The third day.

Q. What day did you begin working at home? - A. Wednesday.

Q. What time did you begin working in the morning? - A. Between eight and nine in the morning, the day that he was at home.

Q. What room did you work in? - A. In the lower room.

Q. What sort of a room is it? - A. The front-room.

Q. Is that a kitchen? - A. There is only one room below.

Q. Was nobody at work with you? - A. No, only the mistress of the house.

Q. What does she work at? - A. The same work.

Q. How long did you continue in the house that day? - A. Till half past twelve at night, and then we went to-bed.

Q. Was the mistress of the house out part of the day? - A. No.

Q. Not at all? - A. No.

Q. Were you in the room with her the whole day? - A. Yes.

Q. And are you sure she was not out? - A. Yes.

Q. What had you for dinner? - A. Some boiled potatoes.

Q. Any thing else? - A. No.

Q. Did you drink any tea that day? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you drink tea? - A. At five o'clock.

Q. What time had you the potatoes for dinner? - A. One o'clock.

Q. What had you for breakfast? - A. Tea.

Q. Had you any tea between breakfast and five o'clock? - A. No.

Q. You are sure you dined upon potatoes? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any tea for dinner? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure you had no tea for dinner? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any thing to drink in the couse of the day? - A. No.

Q. No beer for dinner? - A. No.

Q. In no part of the day? - A. None.

Q. Not even a pint among you? - A. The landlady had a pint at night about nine o'clock.

Q. Had she any beer in the course of the morning? - A. No.

Q. Did she bring any beer that day, except at nine o'clock at night? - A. No.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Who brought it in at night? - A. She fetched it.

Q. Who dressed these potatoes? - A. The landlady.

Q. What had the prisoner? did he dine with you? - A. He had the same.

Q. He dined with you? - A. Yes, upon potatoes.

Q. Had he nothing but potatoes for dinner? - A. No.

Q. No beef nor mutton? - A. No meat at all.

Q. No boiled mutton? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure he dined with you? - A. Yes.

Q. And are you sure he dined upon potatoes? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any breast of mutton, or part of a breast of mutton? - A. No.

Q. Did the landlady boil no mutton? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. There was another girl, called Charlotte, with you? - A. Yes.

Q. What is her name? - A. Charlotte Parry .

Q. What time did she come? - A. She did not come till night.

Q. Did the not dine with you? - A. No.

Q. Did no other person dine with you but the landlady and the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. What time of night was it when Charlotte Parry came? - A. Between six and seven.

Q. Did she drink tea with you? - A. No; she came after we had drank tea.

Q. Had you lit candles before, or after you drank tea? - A. We drank tea before the candles were lit.

Q. When Charlotte Parry came in, were the candles lighted? - A. Yes.

Q. Then she had not been in the house that day till after candle-light? - A. NO.

Q. You say, the prisoner was not out of the house that day, what prevented his going out? - A. He was not very well.

Q. What was the matter? - A. I cannot say particularly.

Q. Did he walk about the house? - A. Yes, he walked about the house; he had a violent cold.

Q. You were not out of the room the whole day? - A. No.

Q. Was the prisoner out of the room at all? - A. No, no farther than just outside of the door.

Q. What part of the day was it that he was outside of the door? - A. He was out once or twice in the day; he went out in the morning, and again in the afternoon.

Q. Was he out afterwards? - A. No, not at all.

CHARLOTTE PARRY sworn. - Q. What is your business? - A. I lodged in this person's house, in the country.

Q. What is your employ in life? - A. In service.

Q. Where did you lodge? - A. At Mrs. Norris's, at Watford.

Q. When did you lodge at Mrs. Norris's? - A. The 12th day of December.

Q. How long did you lodge there? - A. I left my place, and lodged there three nights.

Q. What day was it you first went there? - A. It must be the 9th, I lodged there three nights.

Q. The first night you lodged there, was the 9th? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you lodged there the 9th, 10th, and 11th? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning of the 12th? - A. About six.

Q. What did you do with yourself? - A. I stopped there all the day in Mrs. Norris's house.

Q. Were not you out all day? - A. No.

Q. I am talking about the 12th of December? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you not to go out that day? - A. I had not any particular reason to go out that day.

Q. Were you out in no part of that day? - A. No.

Q. In what room did you stop during that day? - A. The upper room.

Q. Who was in the room with you? - A. Mrs. Neal.

Q. Were you up there all day? - A. No, I was up the best part of the day, but she was not out, she was in the kitchen.

Q. How many rooms were there below stairs? - A. Three.

Q. What do you call them? - A. One is a parlour, another a kitchen, and the other a room.

Q. All upon the ground-floor? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you dine with that day? - A. By myself.

Q. Where? - A. Up stairs.

Q. What had you for dinner that day? - A. I had not any thing, I believe, but a bit of bread and cheese, that day.

Q. What time was that? - A. About one o'clock.

Q. Who brought it up to you? - A. I went out to some shop to buy it.

Q. Did you drink tea that day? - A. No, I did not; I had some tea in the morning, but I had none in the afternoon.

Q. Who breakfasted with you? - A. I breakfasted by myself.

Q. Where did you get the hot water? - A. I fetched it out of the kitchen.

Q. You did not dine upon tea? - A. No.

Q. Are you quite sure of that? - A. Yes, I had bread and cheese, and a pint of porter.

Q. Where did you get the porter? - A. At the public-house.

Q. Who fetched it? - A. I fetched it myself.

Q. Did you go through the kitchen to go up into the room where you dined? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you see in the kitchen as you passed through? - A. Mrs. Neal and Mrs. Norris.

Q. What time was it? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Had you any conversation at all? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you talk to them both? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time you took the porter up stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you stop talking with them? - A. Not a great while, five minutes or so.

Q. Did you sleep in the same room with this Mrs. Neal? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you breakfast with her? - A. No, I breakfasted by myself.

Q. You did not observe any dinner as you passed through? - A. I cannot say whether there was or not; I was at home all the afternoon.

Q. Where? - A. Up stairs.

Q. Did you come down stairs, after you had carried up your porter, to dinner? - A. Yes, I was down to and fro, backwards and forwards.

Q. What part of the day were you to and fro? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you sit down, or remain in the kitchen any. part of that day? - A. I might, about three or four o'clock.

Q. How long did you stop there? - A. Two or three hours.

Q. Did you say you come down between two and three, or between three and four? - A. Between two and three.

Q. It was light then? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was there at that time? - A. Mrs. Norris, and Mrs. Neal, and the prisoner.

Q. Had you any conversation with Mrs. Norris, or Mrs. Neal, during these two or three hours? - A. I had some.

Q. Did you speak to Mrs. Neal? - A. Yes.

Q. And she to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you down stairs when the candles were

lit? - A. I was in the kitchen, that was about half past five.

Q. Then you staid in the kitchen from between two and three, till after they had lit the candles? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they drink tea while you were by? - A. I believe they did, but I am not certain; I had no tea with them.

Q. Where was the prisoner all the time? - A. He was there.

Q. Did he go out? - A. No, he was there all the evening,

Q. What time did you go up stairs? - A. At twelve o'clock.

GUILTY Death , aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-24

118. ROWLAND HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , four cotton gowns, value 50s. a pair of leather shoes, value 3s. a dimity petticoat, value 5s. a a stuff petticoat, value 5s. a black silk cloak, value 20s. a printed cotton apron, value 1s. three check aprons, value 3s. a pair of women's silk gloves, value 1s. five muslin caps and three borders, value 2s. two muslin aprons, value 2s. three printed muslin shawls, value 3s. two half Norwich shawls, value 1s. seven muslin neck half handkerchiefs, value 3s. two muslin neckcloths, value 2s. and a wooden trunk, covered with leather, value 1s. the property of Alexander Duncan , in his dwelling-house .(The cafe was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

- DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a grocer, No. 138, Wapping ,; I am a constable of that parish: On the 13th of December, a fire happened in Wapping, which communicated to the dwelling-house of Mr. Alex. Duncan , who is a victualler ; between seven and eight in the morning of that day, I saw the prisoner at the bar coming up the street with a trunk upon his shoulder; I had just before heard the cry of fire.

Q. How near was he to Mr. Duncan's house? - A. It might be five hundred yards from it, he was going from Mr. Duncan's house; I conceived him to be a suspicious man, and as I had suffered much by fire two days before, I asked him where he was going with that property; he told me, he was going with it to a public-house; I asked him the name of the person who keeps the public-house, he answered me, he could not tell; I asked him the sign, and that he could not tell me; I asked him where he brought it from, he said, from a friend of his in King Edward-street, that was where the fire was; I asked him what his friend's name was, and he could not tell me, he said, he worked in the coal trade; I then told him, as he could not give me a better account, I should take him into custody and the property; I then took hold of him by his coat, and he very willingly went with me; I then took him to Mr. Bell's a publican, the Royal-oak, in Wapping; I then called Mr. Bell, and told him, there was a trunk with property, that I had a suspicion this man had not honestly come by; the prisoner said, he would fetch the owner; I did not conceive it necessary to detain the prisoner, I put the trunk in the possession of Mr. Bell, and requested him not to deliver it without my being present.

Q. Was the trunk you afterwards saw at the Magistrate's, the same that you left with Bell? A. It was; I went away, and returned to Mr. Bell's again in the evening, about half past five; Mr. Duncan had been with me in the intermediate time, and informed me that he had lost a trunk of that description; I felt sorry that I had not detained the prisoner, but Mr. Duncan and I had not been at Mr. Bell's above five minutes, when the prisoner came into the tap-room; he was brought into the parlour by Mrs. Bell, and I took him into custody; he applied to know if the trunk was taken away; he said, if he should have it, he would take it to the owner; he was then taken before a justice.

JOHN BELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the Royal-oak, Wapping; the last witness delivered me a trunk, and came again in the evening with Mr. Duncan; I had it left in my charge in the morning; the prisoner came about an hour after it was left with me, he asked me for the trunk, I told him he should not have it without Mr. Davis was present; he came again in the evening, and then he was stopped; I delivered the trunk to Richard Perry.

RICHARD PERRY sworn - I am one of the officers belonging to the Thames Police-office; I received this trunk from Davis, and have had it ever since. (Produces it.)

Davis. This is the same trunk that I delivered to Perry, and the same that I took from the prisoner.

ALEXANDER DUNCAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep a public-house, at Wapping; I had a fire at my house, on Saturday morning, about twenty minutes before seven o'clock; this is my trunk, I lost it from a room adjoining the room in which my sister sleeps, up one pair of stairs.

Q. It is your dwelling-house, is it not? - A. Yes; the last time I saw this trunk, it came out of the country about two months before, and was deposited in that room, where it always stood, since the death of my wife; this was my wife's wearing-apparel.

ELEANOR MALONEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the sister of the last witness; I had this very trunk in my arms the morning of the fire; I put these things into it myself, with my own hands, about a fortnight before.

Court. (To Bell.) Q. Do you know if the

trunk, when it was deposited with you, contained those articles? - A. No, I did not see it opened.

Davis. It was opened at Bell's house that day, and Mr. Duncan saw the contents; it was shut up again, and Perry kept the key.

Perry. I have had the key ever since.

Mrs. Maloney. I kept the key of the trunk, and it was not opened from the time that I locked it, till it was opened at Mr. Bell's; Mr. Duncan and my husband took the key for that purpose; I am certain all these things were my sister's.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to work by the fire; I stood there about ten minutes; a man gave the trunk to me out at the one pair of stairs window, and begged some one to take it of him; it was put through the window, and I took it; he told me to take it to the first public-house in the first turning at the bottom of Gravel-lane, and I delivered it there, it is Mr. Bell's house; when I came back, the man asked me what I had done with it, and I told him I had taken it to where he ordered me, and he told me to go and bring it back again; I went, and then they would not let me have it, and then I went to work on board a ship till night, and when I went to Mr. Bell's at night, they stopped me.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who had known him seven years, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s. aged 43. Six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-25

119. JOHN SHORE stood charged upon the Coroner's inquisition with the wilful murder of Mary. his wife .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Alley.)

Mr. Knapp. May it please your Lordship, Gentlemen of the Jury. It becomes my painful duty to solicit your attention to the facts that will be laid before you in evidence, in order to bring your minds to the conclusion of the guilt or innocence of the unfortunate prisoner at the bar. The crime imputed to him is as high a crime as any almost that is known to the laws of the land; indeed I might have been correct in stating it to be as high a crime as any that is spoken of by any laws human or divine, and it is aggravated in this instance (if the facts are made out), by the person committing the murder charged upon this inquisition, inasmuch as it hath been committed by him upon the person of his wife. Gentlemen, I beg not to be understood in my address to you to be attempting to lead your minds from the fair judgment that you ought to form upon the facts that will be laid before you; it only belongs to my situation to point out the magnitude of the offence, and lay those facts before you, and when that is done, sure I am the public and the prisoner will be equally satisfied with your determination.

Gentlemen, It becomes the more painful to me when I look at the person who is the object of accusation, that he is a person in an advanced period of life, and who has lived in the world in such a manner as never before to have a stain fall upon his character; and still more so when I reflect that a Grand Inquest of the country have passed in judgment upon the circumstances that will be laid before you, and have thought that this was not a charge sit to be submitted to your consideration; but, Gentlemen, it is my duty to inform you, that by the law of this country, wherever a death, accidental or by violence, hath happened, an inquisition is directed to be taken before the Coroner, and in this case the Coroner's Jury having thought fit to find that which is charged upon this inquisition to be "Wilful Murder," the prisoner must be amenable to your enquiry.

Gentlemen, Having said so much, I again particularly desire you not to take any of those topics that I have been urging against the prisoner, but judge only by the evidence which will be adduced before you. I shall now state the facts, and I am sure you will draw that conclusion, which, as honest and experienced men, you ought to do.

Gentlemen, The prosecutors of this indictment are the parish officers of that parish where the death has happened; and, I think I may state, subject to the correction of the Bench, that they have done no more than their duty (upon a death having happened in their parish), in submitting it to your consideration.

Gentlemen, The prisoner is a man of repute and of character, and has lived to an advanced period of life; he is a farmer of opulence and of respectability. On the day laid in the indictment, and previously to it, unfortunately for the prisoner, the woman, charged to have lost her life by his means, had been in the fatal practice of drinking, which had, I believe, considerably embittered the comforts that would otherwise have proceeded from such a commission. On the day laid in the indictment, he had been at some distance from home upon business, and did not return home, I think, till nine o'clock in the evening, and, upon his return home, he found his wife in that situation in which he had repeatedly found her, (I believe almost daily); that prepossession in favour of liquor having encreased upon her, he immediately enquired where she was; he was told what her situation was; she went up stairs, and the servant will tell you, that immediately upon her going up stairs into her room, the prisoner followed her; that a considerable scuffle and violence was heard; I don't know whether I am over-stating the facts, but if I am, you will correct me hereafter by your verdict; I understand violent blows were heard, and a violent resistance of the deceased in going from one bed-room to the other, in which bed-room she had been always placed by her husband when she was in that state. Nothing more passed till about one o'clock in the morning, and at that early hour the prisoner was heard to come down stairs, and was asked why he came down; he said, he came down to drink something; he appeared extremely agitated, and very much unnerved: However, nothing transpired till about five o'clock in the morning, when the prisoner came down and desired the maid to go for a Mrs. Holdship, the sister of the deceased; and upon being asked what was the matter, he said, oh Lord, and expressed himself in excessive agitation; he seemed considerably hurt from some transaction that had taken place; he said, go for her sister; and then said, she is no more. Upon this taking place, the sister came, went up stairs, and found her in the situation I am going to describe;

she found her resting upon her arm, quite speechless and motionless; she appeared a little warm under the arm upon which she was resting; she then used all the application which a person so nearly and so dearly connected with the deceased as she was, might be naturally expected to use; she immediately made use of blankets, and all means of recovery that could be applied, but without effect; she then observed bruises upon various parts of the body; but as I wish to state every thing for as well as against the prisoner, I understand the witness will not be able to state whether they were recent bruises or bruises that had been created by former violence. There was the appearance of frothy, bloody water, running out of her mouth, and there was also the same appearance upon the floor by the bed-side.

Gentlemen, These are all the circumstances with which I am furnished, from whence you are to draw the conclusion, whether such a degree of violence has been used,(and that by the prisoner), as to impute the crime of murder to him, as is charged by this inquisition.

Gentlemen, You will require to be told whether any medical advice was called for, in order to see what was the nature of her complaint, and what was the result of their opinion, whether the immediate cause of her death was attributable to the bruises she had received, or any thing that could have proceeded from the scuffle I have slated. It so happens, that in this case there are three medical gentlemen of integrity and skill, one of whom had been in the habit of attending her before; they opened the body, and they will give their account of the situation in which they found it; their opinion I shall forbear to state to you; it will, perhaps, be stated in that correct and technical manner by them, which cannot fail of being more satisfactory to your minds than by any statement of mine, from whence you will draw your conclusion, whether the prisoner is guilty of the murder imputed to him or not.

Gentlemen, Thus far I ought to state, because I owe it to the prisoner, that from the result of the opinions of these medical gentlemen, it seems to be uncertain whether the death be attributable to those means which the inquisition ascribes, or whether it might not have arisen from intoxication; but it would not be sufficient for parish officers, nor for me, who am conducting the prosecution, under the direction of the learned Judges, nor you, to take it upon what I am told will be their opinion; and I should be wanting in my duty to the public, if I did not call the witnesses to give their evidence, and then it will be for you to draw the conclusion between the public and the prisoner.

Gentlemen, I hope I have not said any thing that can induce any inflammation in your minds; the issues of life and death are in your hands; you have to discharge an important duty to youselves, to the public, and to the prisoner; and I am sure that duty will be performed by you conscienciously and honourably; I shall call the witnesses, and when I have so done, your verdict, I am sure, will be satisfactory evidence.

Evidence for the Crown.

ELIZABETH TURNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I lived as a servant to the prisoner in the life-time of his wife, at Hanworth : On the 5th of January last, my master left his house in the morning, and did not return till the evening.

Q. How was she employed in his absence that day? - A. Preparing for Old Christmas Day.

Q. Had she any drink? - A. During the afternoon she had three quarterns of gin; I did not see her have any other drink.

Q. Was she intoxicated? - A. She was far from being intoxicated, she knew what she was about; she was in the kitchen when he came home.

Q. Did she remain in the kitchen till he came into the house, or did she go up into her own room? - A. She went up into her own room; he came in and very much abused me.

Q. Did nothing pass before he abused you? - A. He said, that he was informed at Sunbury, at three o'clock, that my mistress was drunk.

Q. Was it in consequence of that that he abused you? - A. Yes; he then went up stairs to my mistress.

Q. Did you say any thing to your master about it? - A. I said she was not drunk at that time; he then went up stairs, I heard him call her a drunken b-h.

Q. How high up stairs? - A. One pair; after that I heard a great piece of work, a noise, and lumbering of feet.

Q. Was there any body else that could have occasioned the lumbering of seet, except you master and mistress? - A. No; after that I heard my mistress cry out, oh Lord! and desired a little girl, who was up stairs in the room with them, to call Betty to help her.

Q. Did you go up stairs in consequence of this desire of your mistrss? - A. I did not.

Q. What was the reason you did not go up stairs? - A. I was afraid, he had abused me so much below; he came down stairs in a few minutes for something to fasten the door; he asked me first, if I knew where the staple was that I had drawn before; she had been fastened into that room before.

Q. Is that the room in which your master sleeps? - A. No, the room where she used to sleep by herself.

Q. When you say the staple was drawn, what do you mean? - A. I drew it.

Q. Upon what occasion did it used to be applied? - A. He used to fasten her in when she was in liquor.

Q. Did you give him the staple? - A. I told him I did not know where it was, and he did not find it.

Q. Did he look for any thing else? - A. Yes, he looked for a brass screw, and said, he would fix me from going in to her; I was just out at the shop door, and he banged the door to, and told me I might go to h-ll if I liked it.

Q. Did you get in soon after this? - A. Yes, I believe, in about a quarter of an hour the little girl came crying out.

Q. When you got in, how did you observe things in the house? - A. I did not see him any more till the next morning, about five o'clock, I was in the wash-house, he came out and called me.

Q. Had he his clothes on at that time? - A. He was dressed.

Q. When he called to you, what did he say? - A. He desired me to go and call Jenny Blowham up, that was my mistress's sister, he meant Mrs. Holdship; I heard him say that he had been down stairs about one o'clock after drink.

Q. Did you usually leave water in your master's bed-room? - A. No; I heard him then go in and say, oh Lord, several times; I went to call Mrs. Holdship; I returned, and asked him what was the matter, and he said, she was no more.

Q. In what way did he express himself, like a man very much agitated and in grief? - A. He seemed to be very full of grief; it might be half an hour before she came, and I returned again and told her.

Q. Was it by the desire of the prisoner that you went the second time? - A. No.

Q. Did you go up into the room where your mistress was, before Mrs. Blowham came? - A. No, I could not go into the room when I heard that she was dead.

Q. Did you afterwards go into the room with that lady? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You were the person that used to get the drink which your mistress took? - A. Yes.

Q. Was she in the habit of drinking gin in quantities? - A. Yes.

Q. You have seen her many times extremely drunk, have not you? - A. Yes, I have seen her during the time I have lived with her very drunk.

Q. Upon these occasions you were the person that generally got the liquor for her? - A. Sometimes.

Q. Who else might get it? - A. There was a neighbour that sometimes got it.

Q. How much liquor had you got for her in the morning of that day upon which your master went out to Sunbury? - A. I got none in the morning.

Q. You got the liquor at separate times, first one quartern of gin? - A. Yes.

Q. Then a second? - A. Yes.

Q. And then a third? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you endeavour to dissuade her from taking it? - A. She was not very drunk, she got up stairs without help.

Q. That is what you call not being completely drunk; she went up stairs upon your informing her that your master was coming home? - A. Yes.

Q. Your master told you that he had heard that she was drunk at three o'clock, at Sunbury? - A. Yes.

Q. And blamed you for getting the liquor with which she had been getting drunk? - A. Yes.

Q. He was extremely angry at that? - A. Yes, and abused me very much.

Q. Was it you or the little girl that he desired to tell her she should lie in the room where she generally did when she was drunk? - A. No, I did not hear that.

Q. But it was customary? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon those occasions he used to put a hasp upon the door to keep you from getting to her? - A. Yes.

Q. Now tell these gentlemen how came you to take the hasp off that door which your master had so frequently made use of to keep you from getting to her; what did you do with it? - A. I put it away.

Q. You would not let him have it? - A. I could not be in the kitchen, he was in such a passion, I could not recollect just then where I had put it.

Q. This room, in which this poor unhappy woman was, she had frequently been put into by her husband when she was drunk? - A. Yes.

Q. When he went up stairs, a little girl was in the room with her? - A. Yes.

Q. You were left below? - A. Yes.

Q. And you heard your mistress desire the little girl to call you, and you did not go? - A. No, I did not.

Q. How long was this before Mr. Shore went into his own room to bed? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Had he undressed himself in part below? - A. Yes, he had pulled off his garters as usual.

Q. Your mistress, when she went up stairs, went in her usual dress? - A. Just as she had on all day.

Q. You heard no more, nor saw any more of Mr. Shore till five o'clock in the morning? - A. No.

Q. And then he himself told you that he had come down stairs about one o'clock for drink? - A. Yes.

Q. Soon after that he went up stairs, and then it was that he told you to go for Jenny Blowham ? - A. At five o'clock.

Q. And at that time he was in great agitation, in great grief, and uttered the words, oh Lord? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you lived in this service? - A. Turned of three years.

Q. Did your mistress use to go to market? - A. Yes, she has been to market.

Q. Did Mr. Shore go with her? - A. I have known them go together.

Q. It was no uncommon thing for them to go out together? - A. No, they went to Barnet-fair together, and to Guildford fair.

Q. What neighbour was this that used to get gin for her as well as yourself? - A. She lived next door to her.

JANE HOLDSHIP sworn. - I am sister to the

deceased, I was called up; I went to my sister's house, I saw Mr. Shore, and said, oh, John, what is the matter; he told me to go up stairs, and he followed me; I went up into the little back room, and saw my sister lying upon the carpet by the bedside; she laid as if somebody had laid her there; she lay with her head upon her arm upon her right side.

Q. What did you observe about her person? - A. Some bloody froth water like running from her mouth upon the side that she lay on; I helped to undress her.

Q. Who helped to undress her with you? - A. Her husband.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular about her person? - A. I saw a great many bruises upon all the upper parts of her body, and about her face.

Q. Had you seen her that afternoon before? - A. Yes.

Q. Had she the appearance of those bruises when you parted with her in the afternoon? - A. Yes, in her face; I cannot say whether the others were or not, because she had got her clothes on; her husband and I laid her upon the bed, I rubbed her body, and wiped her mouth, and warmed her bed; I did every thing that I could do.

Q. How did the prisoner appear at that time? - A. Very much loaded with sorrow and trouble.

Q. Did not he give you every assistance in his power? - A. He did, and helped to undress her.

Q. Could any person appear more sorrowful for what had happened than he appeared to be? - A. No, nobody could be more sorrowful than he was; he sent for Mr. Hardiman, the publican, and told his mind to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You say you observed this poor creature had some bloody froth in her mouth? - A. Yes.

Q. There had been nothing discharged from her stomach? - A. Yes, there was some upon the floor and the carpet.

Q. But that was bloody froth? - A. Yes.

JOHN JACOBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. About ten o'clock at night of the 5th of December I was in my own yard, and heard Mr. Shore abusing his maid, I afterwards heard Mrs. Shore say, what was the matter.

Q. Did you hear in the house any noise? - A. Yes, I heard a noise up stairs, like as if one person might be thrown down by another, and I heard a hammering, like fastening the door.

WILLIAM-JOHN GRIFFINHOOFE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a surgeon, living at Hampton; I was sent to upon this occasion; I went up stairs to the deceased's room.

Q. Did the prisoner give you any information at all? - A. The only question he put to me was, whether I would like to go up and see the corpse; said, if he pleased; I went up into the room, and saw the corpse.

Q. What were the observations that you made upon the corpse? - A. There were some external marks and bruises, one upon her thigh.

Q. Was it a considerable bruise upon her arm, upon her side, and on her face.

Q. Were those bruises such as would have the effect of producing serious consequences? - A. I think not.

Q. Did you make any other observations at that time? - A. I did not; I afterwards with Mr. Boone and Mr. Jones opened the body, that was the next day; immediately upon dividing what we call the internal integuments of the abdomen, there was a considerable effusion of blood, and conceiving that to be the cause of her death, I thought it proper to find the source of that effusion; after removing the abdomenal viscera, I dissected from the heart downwards, and perceived a rupture of the internal iliac artery; I thought it would be likewise satisfactory to open the head, and found the vessels very turgid, and a disposition to inflammation.

Q. As you had attended the deceased before, were you acquainted with that disposition that she had to drink strong liquors? - A. I have heard it commonly reported.

Q. You did not observe it yourself? - A. Not particularly.

Q. Supposing her to have had this failing, having opened the body and the head, can you tell us, from one cause or the other, to what is to be attributed her death? - A. The death of the deceased is to be attributed to the rupture of the blood vessel certainly.

Q. Can you, attributing the death to the rupture of the blood vessel, venture to state upon your oath, from your skill in your profession, that the death was occasioned by any external violence used to the body, or a suffocation, procured in consequence of liquor? - A. I conceive it to be from external violence.

Q. Supposing the deceased to have been thrown down upon the ground, might a rupture or not have taken place in consequence of a fall of that sort? - A. Most certainly.

Q. Have you been in Court during the time the other witnesses have been examined? - A. I have.

Q. Have you heard them state their evidence? - A. I have.

Q. I would ask you whether this death might have been occasioned by the means that they have stated? - A. The rupture might be given by external force; how it was given, it is impossible for me to say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You did

not happen to see this poor creature till she had been laid upon the bed? - A. No; the body was stripped, and lying upon the bed.

Q. If you had seen this poor creature lying upon the floor, in her clothes, near the bed, and you had observed this froth that arose from her mouth, would you not have deemed it extremely probable, that, with some little bruise, the suffocation had increased the liability of breaking the blood vessel? - A. I conceive as to that froth, that she was in the act of dying, in consequence of the rupture: it is not at all improbable that the loss of blood from the ruptured vessel to the abdomen would produce sickness, and that sickness, from a particular position of body, suffocation.

Q. You know Mr. Shore? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he not a man of a fair reputation? - A. I always heard him spoken of as an industrious, sober man.

Court. Q. You said that this rupture might be attributed to external violence? - A. Yes.

Q. And that it might have taken place in consequence of being thrown upon the ground? - A. Yes.

Q. I would ask you whether the same rupture might not have taken place in consequence of her falling from the bed? - A. Most undoubtedly.

Q. And might not such a rupture also have taken place in consequence of any struggle that might have been used between her and any other person, in endeavouring to get her into that bed-room? - A. I conceive it possible.

THOMAS BOONE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I attended with the last witness at the opening of the body of the deceased; I observed an effusion of blood in the abdomen, which proceeded from a rupture in the internal iliac artery, I have no doubt of it.

Q. Are you able to form an opinion, whether the rupture in the internal iliac artery rose from an internal natural cause, or from violence? - A. Certainly it did not appear to arise from any internal cause, but evidently either from a violent effort in the individual herself, or violence from some other person; had it risen from any internal disease, the artery would not have been found, which the coats of the artery were.

Q. Did you, on examining the body, observe any external marks? - A. Many, but none that could apparently have been the cause of her death; there was a great deal of external bruises or extravasation on the right side between the ribs.

Q. Do you suppose all those marks of violence could be occasioned by a single fall from the bed? - A. No. impossible; and I think it impossible to say exactly whether some part of these might not be simple extravasations, because I mean to say that this poor woman had been dead three or four days previous to our seeing her.

Q. How high was the bed upon which she laid, from the ground? - A. It was but low.

Q. Do you think it possible, that merely from falling off the bed, the strain of the body would occasion a rupture in the iliac artery? - A. It is a very hard question to answer, for the coats of the iliac artery are very strong, and great violence must have been used.

MAURICE JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a surgeon, at Hampton; I was present at the inspection of the body.

Q. Do you concur in the testimony that these gentlemen have given? - A. Certainly, I do.

Court. Q. Did you observe these extravasations? - A. Yes.

Q. It was some time after the death before you saw the body? - A. Yes.

Q. Does it not frequently happen a few days after death? - A. Yes; but in tracing these bruises inwards, from without, the appearance of violence ceased; within a very small distance from the surface, the artery is guarded by a vast number of very strong muscles and bones.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, it will be for you to say, whether under this evidence, you are perfectly satisfied that the deceased came by her death, by means of the prisoner throwing her down upon the floor; it seems to be left upon this evidence, in an extremely doubtful state, nor is there any person who has seen a single blow given; there has been a noise like forcing her into this room, which really seemed to be the proper place for a woman in her situation, and her resistance, as the surgeon has said, might have caused, by a violent effort or exertion, this rupture of the blood-vessel, it will be for you to say whether you see it necessary to go any further or not.

The Jury were of opinion it was unneccessary to go on, and found a verdict of NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-26

120 ELIZABETH GILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , fourteen ounces of Bengal silk, value 18s. and thirteen ounces of China silk, value 19s. the property of Lany Smith .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

RICHARD TAPLIN sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Lany Smith , who has a crape manufactory at Hackney Wick ; I employ a great many young females, of whom the prisoner had the care: On the 6th of December, I delivered her thirty pounds weight of silk to untwist and tie up in bundles, which was returned to me in about an hour and a half afterwards, by Ann Childs .

Q. Was that done for which she had it to be done? - A. Yes; it was tied up in bundles; I then weighed it again, and it wanted fourteen ounces of weight; I immediately went to the prisoner, and

found her at the Old Mermaid, in Church-street, Hackney; I told her there was some property missing, and I was pretty sure she had got it; she said, if there was any missing, she was sure she knew nothing at all of it.

Q. What passed after that? - A. I told her, I was positive she had got it in her possession, and that there was an officer at hand ready to be called for to search the place; she made hesitation, and then said there was a woman up stairs, Mrs. Whitely; and I went up stairs with her to Mrs. Whitely, and the prisoner opened a box, and gave me out the Bengal silk that was missing; there were fourteen ounces, which exactly made up the deficiency.

Q. Was it, as far as you can guess, from colour and sample, the same silk? - A. There was not the least difference; she begged for mercy, and hoped her master would not prosecute her; I sent for an officer, he came, and took her into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long had this woman been in your service? - A. I suppose, ten years.

ANN CHILDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am employed in Mr. Smith's manufactory: On the 6th of December, Mrs. Giles gave me some silk to carry to Mrs. Taplin, I had helped her to untwist it.

Q. Did you give all the silk to Taplin that she gave to you? - A. Yes.

LANY SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the proprietor of this manufactory, the prisoner was my servant ; in consequence of a solicitation of hers, on the Sunday morning, I went to the watch-house where she was, she begged for mercy, and hoped I would not prosecute her; I told her, the law must take its course, but there was a duty which I thought she owed to me; that I thought there was an accomplice, and she gave me a long account of what had been taken by her, and a confidential servant of mine, of the name of Bayliss.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you any partner? - A. None.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-27

121. JOHN HANSON and SAMUEL BAKER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , two bee-hives, value 4s. and twenty pounds weight of honey, value 16s. the property of John Brockbank .

JOHN BROCKBANK sworn. - I live in Cooper's-court, Cornhill, and also have a house at Enfield: On the 13th of December I was going down to Enfield , I was informed two persons had been taken up for robbing bee-hives, I believe it was about seven or eight o'clock, a very rainy night; the next morning, Sunday, I went early into my garden, where the bees were usually kept, and I found the hives taken away, and the house placed there again, as if nothing had happened; one of the hives was made of a China tea-chest, with glass doors of our own putting in, that we might see them at work; and, on my way to London on Monday morning, I went to the coffee-house in Worship-street, where I saw my property.

PETER MASON sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: On Saturday morning, the 13th of December, Lyon Solomon , a hatter, in Old-street-road, came to my house, and told me there were two men at his house, offering two beehives and the honey for sale; I then called upon Armstrong, and went with him to Solomon's house, where the two prisoners were; Hanson, the youngest of the two, was leaning over the counter, the other prisoner, Baker, was in a little room by the side of the shop by the fire; there we found two beehives and a sack; the one was a common straw hive, and the other made out of a tea-chest, with glass windows, and a trap-door; we then asked Solomon what this man had brought for sale; he said, some honey, which he shewed to us, and the hives: the prisoners both acknowledged that they did bring it there for sale; I asked them how they came by it; Hanson said, he bought it in the country, that it was his property, and Baker was with him at the time that he bought it; and Baker said, he was by when he bought it, and saw him pay for it; we left Baker at the watch-house, at Shoreditch, locked up; and, going along, I asked Hanson who he bought it of, and he said, he could send for the person he bought it of; he said, before the Magistrate, that he had it from his father in Northamptonshire. (Produces the property).

Prosecutor. I know this to be my hive, the wooden one it is impossible for me to be mistaken in, and the other I am sure is mine also.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I was with Mason; I know no more than he has said.

LYON SOLOMON sworn. - I am a hatter; the two prisoners came to me on Saturday morning, the 13th of December, between eight and nine; they brought me this honey to fell; I told them I would go and get a pair of frillyards to weigh it, but instead of that I went to Mr. Mason's and informed him of it; he came with Mr. Armstrong, and took them.

Hanson's defence. I know nothing at all about the property; I had a hat at Solomon's, I went in to ask if it was done, and waited till he came home, and these gentlemen took me.

Solomon. I had a hat of his to do, which I suspected to be stolen.

Baker's defence. I went along with Hanson to Solomon's; I know nothing about the hives, nor the honey. Hanson, GUILTY , aged 28.

Baker, GUILTY , aged 55.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-28

122. ELIZABETH KEEF and JAMES KELLY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , fifteen yards of bombazet, value 1l. 3s. the property of Edward Buttenshaw , privately in his shop .

ANN BUTTENSHAW sworn. - I am the wife of Edward Buttenshaw, haberdasher and hosier , in the Minories ; the two prisoners came into our shop between six and seven in the evening, and asked to look at some stockings in the window; I shewed them some, the man said, they were not the sort he wanted; he went out, and pointed to some in the window; I took them out, and he said, they were not what he wanted; he went out a second time, he came in again, the woman said they were too dear, and instantly went out, the man remained in the shop; he asked to look at some lower priced ones, when the patrol brought the woman back, and said, she had stole a piece of goods off the counter, he held her for some time, and I called Mr. Buttenshaw.

Q. They came in together? - A. Yes, they were talking together at the window for some time before they came in.

Q. That you do not know? - A. I saw them.

JOHN FORRESTER sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Portsoken ward, Aldgate; I saw the two prisoners look into Mr. Buttenshaw's shop, on the 6th of January, between six and seven in the evening; I saw them advance to the window, where there was a quantity of stockings exposed for sale, they kept pointing at the stockings as if there was a particular pair that would suit them; then I saw the two prisoners go into the shop, I saw the prisoner Kelly point at some stockings for Mrs. Buttenshaw to take out of the window; in the intrim, I saw Mrs. Keef pull at some shawls upon the counter, but they would not come, which gave me a suspicion that they meant to rob the shop; then the man came out a second time to point at some stockings in the window, and he went in again, and Mrs. Buttenshaw was reaching the stockings; I saw Keef take the bombazet off the counter, she put it either under her cloak, or between her legs, or somewhere; she came out with it; I desired her to deliver up the property that she had got, and she said she had none at all; I then took her into the shop, and when I came to the shop door, she dropped it, and I took it up and gave it to Mrs. Buttenshaw; I took them to the watch-house, and one shilling and two or three halfpence were found upon them; Kelly had the shilling, I believe.

Richard Nibley , the constable, produced the property, wich was deposed to by Mrs. Buttenshaw.

Q. (To Buttenshaw.) Where was this bombazet when these people came in? - A. Upon the counter.

Kelly's defence. I was going through the Minories, I stopped at this window to look at the stockings, and this woman asked me how much those stockings were, I said, three shillings and sixpence, they were marked, and then this woman went in, and asked to look at a pair of stockings, but not the stockings that I had been looking at; I went into the shop, and asked to look at a pair of stockings, and as soon as I went in, the woman went out, and the patrol came back with her.

Keef's defence. I was looking at this window, I asked this man to tell me the price of a pair of stockings in the window, I went in and they did not suit me; I then asked for some flannel, I came out and the patrol stopped me, and brought me back, and said I had got something; I know nothing at all about it, they picked it up on the ground, and said I had dropped it.

Q. (To Buttenshaw.) Did the woman ask you for any flannel? - A. No.

The prisoner Kelly called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Keef, GUILTY of stealing, not privately , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

Kelly, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-29

123. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , two hundred and forty-eight awl blades, value 2s. 6d. four ounces of hemp, value 4d. four pair of springs for clogs, value 6d. six pair of shoe-strings, value 3d. a lead weight, value 4d. three pair of boot-strops, value 4d. a key, value 2d. ten pieces of lead, value 2s. and last, value 4d. the property of John Mason .(The Case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

JOHN MASON sworn. - I am a cordwainer ; I took the prisoner into my house as a journeyman , about five months ago, he lived in the house; I had two apprentices at work for me at the same time, one of the name of Skelton, who is attending here as a witness; I had been, during that time, repeatedly losing property to the amount of above two hundred pounds; I lost upwards of nine dozen pair of shoes in one month; in consequence of information, I went to the house of a woman of the name of Mary Deacon , in Adam-street, Rotherhithe, with a search-warrant; the first thing I discovered was a last with a customer's name upon it; I also found coloured leather, that I had myself tied up; there were awl blades, at least two gross

of them, I had bought them at a sale, and had never untied them, I found them in the same state; a ball of hemp, which I had from Tottenham-workhouse, they bind it in a particular way; previous to that, I had searched the prisoner's box, which was in my house, I found in it a lead weight that we lay upon leather when we cut it out, and some other things that I cannot positively swear to.

MARY DEACON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No.45, in Adam-street, Rotherhithe; the prisoner came to my house to pay his addresses to my daughter, he used to come frequently on the Sabbath-day, and he brought some coloured pieces of leather, tied up in a bundle, and said them upon the table, and he brought a last, and said it upon the table, and desired I would take care of it, for he had bought it; I found some pieces of leather loose about my room, some black, and some like the soles of shoes, and there was a bunch of pieces upon a string, and some awl blades, and a ball of hemp; the awl blades were tied up in a brown paper, Mr. Mason came to my house, and had the things away in the same state in which I had them from the prisoner; they were the same things that the prisoner brought to my house.

JOHN HULLAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a private gentleman; Mr. Mason and I searched the prisoner's box the day that he was examined before the Magistrate, I cannot say what day it was; we found two instep leathers, a key, a quantity of awl blades tied in a bundle, several pieces of leather loose, some boot-strops and some shoestrings; they are in the possession of the constable; the property was produced in Court.

Mason. This is the last that was found at Deacon's; I have no doubt of it's being mine. (Most of the property was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. They are all my own property, I bought them of a journeyman, I don't know who he is.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-30

124. GEORGE SHIRLEY and JANE EWEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , one hundred and thirty-two light grain dressed calf-skin shoulders, value 10l. and five tanned sheep-skin basils, value 3s. the property of Edward Beale .

(The Case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

EDWARD BEALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Kennington-lane, Lambeth, and I have a warehouse for leather , in Leadenhall-market: On the 22d of December, we had three bundles consigned to Mr. Undershall, whose goods, as a warehouseman, I take in, the three bundles came under my care, in Leadenhall-market , on Monday the 22d of December; on the Tuesday morning, I saw them early, and about nine o'clock I missed one of the three bundles.

RICHARD TWISDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman to Mr. Daniel Higgs , carrier, at Sodbury, in Gloucesterihire; on the 15th of December last, I sent off three bundles, directed for Mr. John Undershall , leather-factor, in Leadenhall-market, I sent them by the carrier to Bristol; one of the bundles contained one hundred and thirty-two light grain dressed calf-skin shoulders, and five tanned sheep-skin basils; I afterwards saw them in the possession of the officer, and identified them positively.

THOMAS STRUTFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Mr. Undershall; we received two bundles of leather only from Gloucestershire.

GEORGE PROCTOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am porter at the White-bear-inn, Basinghall-street; I received from Parsons's waggon, three bundles of leather, on the 22d of December; I delivered them to Samuel Stanton , Mr. Beale's porter, they came by the waggon from Bristol,(produces the way-bill;) they were directed to Mr. Undershall, in Leadenhall-market.

SAMUEL STANTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On the 22d of December, I received three bundles of leather from the last witness, in Leadenhall-market, they were directed to Mr. Undershall, and I put them in the warehouse; on the 23d I missed one of them.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I, in company with Ray, apprehended the two prisoners, between seven and eight at night, on Friday the 26th of December, in Crown and Shire-place, at the house of a Mrs. Levy, that goes out of the Minories, into Rag-fair; just as they were entering the door, Ray and I went in after them, and laid hold of them; Ray caught hold of the woman, and as I laid hold of the man, I saw this bundle of leather close to his feet; he said, he knew nothing about them, and she said she found them; I found a key in his pocket, with which I went to a house in Hackney-road, where this key unlocked the door, and in the box in the bed-room, I found three skins, which are here; and under the bed, between the bed and the sacking, I found these skins, which they call basils, I took them to the office, and they were advertised. (Produces them.)

Court. Q. Do you know any thing of this Mrs. Levy? - A. If we had not been time enough, she might have bought them, she is now very near being delivered, or I would have brought her.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was with Armstrong; the woman had got these skins in her lap, (produces them:) there are five or six dozen of them; I saw the man drop those that

Armstrong picked up; we apprehended them both; the two prisoners were locked up in different lockup houses, at Worship-street; the man at the bar desired the woman to tell the Magistrate that she found them under a gate-way, covered over with some straw in Leadenhall-street, she said she would stick to that, and when they were examined, I informed the Magistrate of it.

PETER MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I went with the woman to the house in Hackney-road, there was a pair of blue pantaloons, which the man said was his, and a gown, which the woman said was her's (A part of each parcel of the property was deposed to by Twisden.)

HENRY HYAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On the 26th of December, I was at Mrs. Levy's house, in a court in Rosemary-lane, when the officers came in; the prisoner Shirley came in first, with a bundle tied in a blue apron, and then the woman came in; he put his on the counter, at the right-hand side as he came in at the door; when the woman came in, she bolted the top bolt of the street-door, with her left-hand, she had a bundle underneath her brown cloak, and then Shirley took the bundle off the counter, and came into the back-room; then there was a knock at the door, and an old gentleman opened it, and the officers came in; then he dropped the bundle immediately, and the woman slipped a parcel of leather from under her cloak.

Shirley's defence. I work at the water-side, and this woman brought these things home, she picked them up; I was very uneasy about their being in the place, and I did not go home all that night, or the next day, I did not like to come home; we live in Hackney-road, and I went with her to Mrs. Levy's house, for she said she could leave them there, and then I could come home.

Ewen's defence. I had occasion to go out of the road a little, and trod upon this parcel; I picked it up and brought it home, and when my companion came home, he was very angry, he went away, and would not come back till it was gone, he was afraid, and we took them to leave them at Mrs. Levy's house, that my husband might come home again, and when we got into the house, this gentleman laid hold of us.

Court. Q. Are you are a married woman? - A. No. Shirley, GUILTY , aged 33.

Ewen, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-31

125. FRANCIS WOOLDRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , a gelding, value 5l. the property of John Liversuch .

JOHN LIVERSUCH sworn. - I am a butcher ; On Friday the 19th of December, I lost a gelding, I left him at my door in Warwick-lane, Newgate-street ; when I came out of doors, the horse was gone, I advertised him, but did not hear of him till the 29th of December; he was advertised on the same day, by the Police-office, Whitechapel; I saw him at the Flying-horse, in Lambeth-street, on the Monday week following, after he was lost; I knew it to be my gelding, it was an iron grey poney, his ears and his tail hung down; I had no particular mark upon it; I am sure it is my horse, I have not the least doubt of it; I lost a saddle, a bridle, and a rug with him, and the same bridle and saddle I found with him, the saddle was broke under the pummel and in the back; I know it by those marks, there are two buckles, one at each end of the bridle; I have had them near upon twelve months, I can swear to them very safely.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am one of the officers of Lambeth-street: On Saturday the 20th of December, I apprehended the prisoner, with another, at the Old Windsor-castle, Bloomsbury, for another offence.

JOHN HOWLAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street; I was with Griffiths when he apprehended the prisoner; and on Sunday the 21st of December, in consequence of information, I went to the Angel-inn, St. Giles's, and found an iron-grey poney there; I took a description of the poney, and had him advertised on the 26th, and fetched him to the public-house adjoining the office, on the 29th, where the prosecutor saw him and claimed him, as well as the bridle and saddle.

MATTHEW ASDEN sworn. - I am ostler at the Angel-inn, St. Giles: On the 19th of December, between eight and nine in the evening, the prisoner brought the horse to our stables, he desired me to give him a quartern of oats, and he should call for him in the morning; he was there about six or seven minutes, he went away, and I saw no more of him till after Nowlan the officer came for the horse; he came on Sunday to look at him, and ordered him not to be taken away till he came again; on the Saturday he came again, and took him away; the same horse that I took in from the prisoner, I delivered to Nowlan.

Q. (To Liversuch.) What may be the value of this gelding? - A. About five pounds; I gave eight guineas for him, and can have eight guineas again, if I wanted to sell him.

Prisoner's defence. I found this horse astray in Holborn, with the bridle under his feet, and I laid hold of the bridle, and put him up at the Angel, it was the first inn I came to; I told the ostler I should have him advertised, and the next morning the officers came and took me out of bed.

The prisoner called one witness, who had known him about forty years, and gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-32

126. WILLIAM, alias DUCK WYATT , was indicted, for that he, on the 4th of February , certain cattle, to wit, one cow, value 10l. the property of Francis Radford , unlawfully, wilfully, maliciously, and feloniously did kill , against the form of the statute.

There being no evidence against the prisoner, except that of his own confession, when in a state of extreme intoxication, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-33

127. WILLIAM, alias DUCK WYATT , was again indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert, Earl Ferrers , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 2d of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing three feather-beds, value 6l. six blankets, value 30s. two pillows, value 2s. and a coverlid, value 2s. the property of the said Earl .

This case being under the same circumstances, no evidence was offered. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-34

128. JOSEPH BRADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , a black gelding, value 8l. the property of Thomas Sprigmore .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-35

129. JOSEPH BRADLEY was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , a cart, value 10l. the property of Thomas Sprigmore .

THOMAS SPRIGMORE sworn. - I am a carman ; the prisoner at the bar came to me, on the 6th of December, for a horse and cart, which I let him have, and sent my servant, Benjamin Headley , with him.

BENJAMIN HEADLEY sworn - I went with the prisoner with a horse and cart to Little Howland-street ; he shewed me the stable door, where there was some things to be taken up; he then sent me to Mr. M'Ewen's, in Charlotte-street, for the keys; when I went there, they said there was no such thing, and when I came back the prisoner was gone, and the horse and cart too.

ISAAC CRANE sworn. - On the 6th of December the prisoner applied to me to sell me a pair of cart wheels, and then he said he had got a cart to sell; I would not buy it of him, but lent him two guineas and a half on it, and he was to redeem it on the Monday, but he did not come, and last Monday Mr. Sprigmore came and had the cart from me.

Sprigmore. The cart that I had from the last witness, was the same that I sent my servant with.

Prisoner's defence. I hired it for Mr. Crane, he employed me to remove some things, and he sent me away, and he has been convicted of receiving stolen hay.

Court. (To Crane.) Q. Did you employ this man? - A. I never saw him in my life till he came to sell me the wheels. GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-36

130. ANDREW BRANNING was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Dane , about the hour of seven in the night of the 23d of December , and stealing a silver desert spoon, value 8s. the property of the said Sarah .

EDWARD WHEATLEY sworn. - I live with Mrs. Dane, No. 133, Oxford-street , she is a silversmith and watch-maker : On the 23d of December, about half past five, I observed three boys loitering about the window, it was then dark, I was sitting in the kitchen at tea, and about half past six I received information that the boys were there again, and I came up and took my situation at the work-board; upon looking through the door, I observed the three boy s at the next door, which is a medicine warehouse; there are three squares of glass through which I can see down the road, our shop projecting; the boys were about the window till a quarter or half past six, when the prisoner came and stood at the middle window where I was at work, he had left the other two boys at the medicine shop; I looked the other two boys full in the face, and while I was looking at them, I heard the spoons jingle; I desired my little boy to pull back the sliding sash, and I observed that the window was broke, the wind came in, and the glass was thrown to the other side of the spoons; I went out of doors immediately, about one hundred yards down Oxford-street, and not finding them, I walked on the other side of the way; I had not proceeded far, before I met the three boys that I had seen before, I am positive to their persons, being so long about the house; then I took the prisoner into custody, the other two ran away; he scuffled very much, and I was obliged to call for assistance, for fear of the others coming up to rescue him; when we had got him a yard or two, he dropped a hat, which we perceived, from under his coat, and in endeavouring to secure his hands, I saw a desert spoon drop from some part of his breeches or trowsers; I know it to be my mistress's spoon, I gave orders for the making of it, and I have got the fellow to it, which is marked, this is not; he scuffled very much, and broke a pane of glass in getting him into the shop; he said, he saw

two boys break the window, and take out a spoon; that they then threw it away, and he had picked it up, but he was afraid to come to tell us of it; we took him to the watch-house; when he was before the Magistrate, he said he had not seen the spoon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I see this is charged in the indictment as a capital offence for a burglary? - A. I do not know.

Q. Does your mistress carry on business in partnership with any body? - A. No.

Q. Was it the window at which you saw the two boys stand that was broke? - A. No, it was our window that was broke, we have but one window.

Q. Are you sure it was so late as half past six? - A. Yes.

Q. The place where you apprehended the prisoner, was some distance from your house? - A. About a hundred yards.

Q. Had not that square been broke before, so that a gust of wind might have blown it in? - A. No, it is impossible, there was only a little crack at one corner, it could not have been broke without a blow.

SARAH DANE sworn. - I keep a silversmith and watch-maker's shop, No. 133, Oxford-street; I had the alarm given me, I came up stairs, and saw the window broke.( Richard Moay , the watch-house keeper, produced the spoon).

Mrs. Dane. I know this to be my spoon, the man that made it is here; the prisoner made a considerable resistance; when he was brought back, he fell down upon his knees, and begged pardon if he had offended me, saying, he had not a farthing in the world to buy him a bit of bread.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The other spoon is marked, but this is not? - A. We put them in pairs, and put a private mark upon them; the other has the private mark, this has not.

GEORGE THORNTON sworn. - I was called to assist in taking the prisoner; I saw him drop the hat from under his coat; he had a hat upon his head at the same time; and while I had hold of him, he pulled out a silver spoon from his breeches, and dropped it between his legs, then we took him back to Mrs. Dane's.

Prisoner's defence. I was on board the Boddam East - Indiaman, and had been at Gravesend three weeks; I came on shore, and going along Oxford-road, I saw two boys break a window, and take a spoon and run away, and it was all laid to me, and that gentleman took me to his shop, and searched me, and then took me to the watch-house; I never had the spoon at all.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 13.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his youth .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-37

131. BENJAMIN BOLTON and JOSEPH MALONE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , thirty-five yards of brown Holland cloth, value 30s. the property of Susannah Gillham , privately in her shop .

(Mrs. Gillham, being one of the people called Quakers, refused to be sworn).

MARY LAWRENCE sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Susannah Gillham , linen-draper , at Tottenham : On Saturday night, between six and seven o'clock, I cannot justly say when -

Q. Was it before Christmas? - A. I cannot justly tell.

Q. Do you remember what day of the week it was that you went before the Justice? - A. Monday.

Q. Was it the Saturday before that? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Mr. Kirby). What is the date of the committal? - A. The 22d of December.

Q. (To Lawrence.) Do you serve in the shop? A. No; Mrs. Gillham and her daughter serve in the shop; it was after candle-light, I had been out, and when I went in at the shop door, I saw these two soldiers; one of them, Malone, was in the shop, and Mrs. Gillham with him, he was standing by the counter, I did not observe whether he was looking at any goods or not; then I went away, and when I came into the shop again, he was looking at some stockings; I then saw a piece of brown Holland between Malone's feet, it stood on the ground, and leaned against the counter; then I went out of an errand, and went up the town, and when I came away, Malone pulled the door as I was going to shut it, and would not let me shut it; then I stooped, and saw Bolton go up to the door, put his hands in, and take a piece of brown Holland from within the door, Malone was within-side of the shop; Bolton then went up the town with the cloth; then I saw Bolton go over the road, and lay it down behind a tree.

Q. Was it light enough for you to see them do that? - A. Yes, it was a moon-light night; then I went on about my business, I was going up the town of an errand for another person, I did not see any thing more of Malone that night.

Q. Then you did not see Malone have the cloth, you only saw it lying upon the floor? - A. Yes; I saw Bolton again the same night, and Malone on Monday.

Q. What opportunity had you of seeing their countenances, you only passed through the shop, you made no stop? - A. No.

Q. Were they dressed in soldiers' clothes? - A. Yes; I knew them both again as soon as I saw them

JOSEPH PYPER sworn. - I am a watchman, at Tottenham: I was on duty between five and six o'clock, as near as I can tell, I cannot rightly say; I saw the prisoner, Bolton, cross the road, I saw the last witness near the spot where Bolton crossed oyer, I did not see him come out of the shop, he came in a direction from the shop; I saw him lay something down, and he came back and passed me, and wished me a good night; he had then two others with him, Malone was one, it was a moonlight night; I crossed over the road and went to see what he had laid down, and waited to see who would fetch it; I found it to be a piece of cloth in a bag; I then sent a person that was going by to fetch another watchman.

Q. Did you see either of these other two men at the tree? - A. No; they were all three soldiers; one of them had on a foraging cap, and the other a cocked-up hat, and feather in it; in about six or seven minutes one of them returned to where the bag was, he is not here.

Q. Did he pick it up? - A. No; he came up to the place, but seeing me he would not meddle with it; he was neither of the three that I had seen before, he was out of regimentals; I took him into custody, but he was discharged; I took the bundle and the man before the Magistrate; I then went to the public-house, where I found the two prisoners; Malone was set at liberty, and sent to the cage on the Monday following; I apprehended Malone again in the ranks. (Produces the property).

Q. (To Lawrence.) Do you know whose property that is? - A. I had seen such a piece of Holland as that upon the counter in the course of the day.

Bolton's defence. I don't know any thing about the cloth, I never saw it.

Malone's defence. I never saw the cloth, or ever touched any thing of the kind.

Bolton, GUILTY, aged 19.

Malone, GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing the goods, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-38

132. RICHARD BRISTOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , a brown gelding, value 10l. the property of John Cooper .

JOHN COOPER sworn. - I live at Lingfield, in Surrey : On the 17th of December, I lost two horses from my stable, I missed them about five o'clock in the morning, they were tied up in the stable fast the night before; the Friday following I found one in Smithfield-market, and the other at Kentish-town, they were both in the possession of Mr. Wyber; one of them was worth ten pounds, and the other nine pounds: I had given fifteen pounds for one of them about three quarters of a year before, but he has gone blind since, and so I valued it at ten pounds; I had given nine pounds for the other not above six days before; I am sure they were both my horses.

- WYBER sworn. - I am a stageman, and keep the Kentish-town stages: I had two horses in my possession which Cooper said were his, I bought them of a man of the name of Martin, who brought them to Mr. Hall's stable at the Assembly-house, at Kentish-town, my stables adjoin them; it was on the 17th of December; I had known Martin a twelvemonth, he has been in the habit of bringing horses to Kentish-town, he has sold several there; he has got a daughter that is married there; he has been there a week or a fortnight together; he is in confinement at Lewes; about two hours after I had bought the horses, Bristow and Martin both went to town on the stage with me.

Q. What did you pay for the horses? - A. Four guineas; and when I got them to Smithfield, I could not get two guineas for the best of them.

Court. What! two horses that, not three quarters of a year before, had cost twenty-four guineas; I would advise you to take care how you buy such bargains again.

- HALL sworn. - I keep the Assembly-house at Kentish-town: On the 17th of December, about half past four o'clock in the morning. I heard somebody call, holloa; I got up and opened my bed-room window, and asked who was there; a man said, I wish you would let your ostler come down and take in two horses; I knew the man's voice to be Richard Martin , it was so dark I could not see him; I ordered the ostler to go and take them in, which he did; between six and seven o'clock I went down myself.

Q. Was there anybody with him? - A. It was so dark I could not see him; when I came down, I went into the kitchen, and there sat Martin, and the prisoner at the bar with him, they asked for some warm ale; while they were drinking their ale, I said, well, Martin, what horses have you got here; he said he had got two very good ones in the stable; I asked him how he came up at that time; he said he had come up with goods; he has always before passed with us as a smuggler; that his cart was broke down in Grays-inn-lane, with eighteen tubs of Hollands in it; he asked me if I wanted to buy the horses; I told him I did not know; he said, well, come and look at them, I think they will suit you; I will sell you one, or both; upon which we took a candle and lantern, and went into the stable, the prisoner at the bar, Martin, myself, and the ostler; I took notice of the horses, but I told him they were not the kind of horses that I wanted; they were low half-bred cart horses, one four years old, and the other an aged horse, pretty near blind; then I went into the house, and so did the prisoner, and Martin; they said they must go to Grays-inn-lane,

to get a new wheel for their cart; the prisoner said if his hand had been well, he would have made one himself; his hand was tied up; they went away, and came back again, but they were not gone long enough to have gone to Gray's-inn-lane; Wyber is a tenant of mine, and, in the evening, Martin offered him the horses for sale; the prisoner was by, but I do not think Wyber saw him; I saw Martin receive the money.

Q. Did Bristow take any part in the transatcion? - A. Nothing more that shewing me in the morning the horses that were for sale.

JAMES CHAPMAN sworn. - I was with Cooper when he found both his horses at Smithfield, and at Kentish-town.

Q. How far is Lingfield from Kentish-town? - A. Thirty miles.

Court. (To Hall.) Q. You say you heard Martin's voice; did you hear the voice of another person? - A. Yes; Martin came again the next day, and I took him into custody.

Q. At the time Martin talked about the cart breaking down, did the prisoner say any thing? - A. Yes; he said to Martin, I hope you have taken care of our tubs; the prisoner said, yes, they are all safe; in the evening, after they had sold their horses, I asked them how they would get their cart home, and they said, they had got one big enough for that.

Prisoner's defence. About a quarter past eight in the evening, between Godstone and Croydon, I met with a man, whose name I found was Martin; he had got a led horse, and was riding another; he asked me if I would have a ride; I told him I was going to look for a job of work, I did not care if I did; we went to Croydon, and drank together; he said he was going through London, towards Finchley, and I might hear of a job that way; I said I did not care, and I went with him to Mr. Hall's, and the same evening we returned to London, and slept there, and the next evening I parted with him at Croydon; I went to enquire for him at Mr. Hall's, and he took me into custody.

Court. (To Cooper). Q. What colour was your horse? - A. Brown. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence

Reference Number: t18010114-39

133. ANN ELY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , a silver watch, value 50s. the property of William Gorman , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM GORMAN sworn. - I work in the lace-manufactory in Goswell-street; I live at No. 41, Golden-lane, in the parish of St. Luke's : On the 9th of January, I went out to work at ten o'clock at night; I always work all night for twelve hours, and return at ten in the morning; I left my wife at home, and a servant girl; I left my watch hanging' by the fire-place; I wound it up just before I went out; it was a silver watch, worth about fifty shillings; it cost me four guineas and a half, but I had had it a considerable time; when I came home the next morning, it was missing.

Q. Is the servant girl here? - A. No; I saw my watch again at the office at Hatton-garden.

MARY GORMAN sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: My husband went out at ten at night, on the 6th of January; the watch then hung at the fire-side up stairs, in my house; I saw the watch there at nine o'clock, or between nine and ten; the next morning, when the prisoner came in to ask what was o'clock, I told her to look at the watch; she went away, and I did not miss it till after my husband came home; there had been nobody else in the room till my husband came home, and then he missed it; I was wasting.

Q. In the bed-room? - A. Yes; I saw her look at the watch; she stayed in the room about a quarter of an hour; my husband thought I had got the watch, and did not say any thing about it till the afternoon, when I asked him what it was o'clock; and he said, I had got the watch; then I said, she must have got it; I went up stairs to her apartment, and she was gone out; then my husband went to enquire after her; she came home at night, and my husband asked her if she had got it, and she said, no, and in about an hour after, she denied it, he sent for the officer, and they found the duplicate of the watch about her.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the public office, Hatton-garden: On the 7th of January, I was sent for to search the prisoner, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; I took her up into her own room and searched her in the presence of Mrs. Gorman; the first thing I found upon her was two seven-shilling pieces in her shoe, sixpence, one halfpenny, and a farthing, and this pocket-book, with four duplicates, which was in her hair, under her cap; after that, I found the duplicate of the watch inside the lining of her stays, in the bosom; the next morning I went to a pawnbroker's in the Borough, and gave them notice to attend on the Saturday; the 7th was Wednesday; I received the watch from the pawnbroker, (produces it); the pawnbroker said the watch was pawned by a man, and as he could not identify the prisoner, he did not come.

Gorman. I can swear to this as being the watch that was hanging up at my fire-side; the maker's name is Davison; when I used it, there was a bit of red ribbon to it, which it has not now.

Prisoner's defence. The watch was taken more out of frolic than theft; my landlady and I were very intimate, and after they made a piece of work about it, I made away with it.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s. - Confined six months in the House of Correction ; fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-40

134. JOHN NEVITT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Rayner , about the hour of eleven in the night of the 4th of December , with intent to steal the goods therein being .

THOMAS FLOYD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Rayner, who keeps the King's-head, Monmouth-street : On the 4th of December, at night, I saw the prisoner at our house; he was in the tap-room; he came there alone about a quarter past seven; I never saw him before; he had two or three pints of beer at first, and then two girls of the town, that were in the tap-room, drank with him, and they had two pints of twopenny; then he had three pints of ale, and left part of the last pint upon the table; it was about a quarter before eleven; he asked a man in the tap-room, that uses our house, which was the way into the yard; I heard him ask him; he told him to turn to the right-hand, and he went towards the yard, but nobody went with him.

Q. Did he pay for what he had drank before he went out? - A. Yes; and about a quarter after eleven o'clock, the maid gave the alarm; I was going to bed, and she had gone up before me; and had come down, and met me as I was going up; in consequence of what she said, we both came down stairs, and my master went up, and me and the maid went up stairs, and we found the bottom fath of the garret window taken out, and put on the staircase, that is, a window that lights the staircase; half of it goes into the maid's room, and lights that; there are three panes in the top-sash, and three in the bottom.

Q. What size panes are they? - A. Small ones; when we went up, the door was locked; my master unlocked the door, and we saw a man's feet under the bed; my master came out of the room, and locked the door again; he sent me down to get the watchman, and the watchman went up and pulled the prisoner from under the bed; he did not say any thing till he came down stairs, and then he said he was in liquor.

Q. Was he so? - A. No, or he could not have got into the room.

MARY GIBBS sworn. - I live at Mr. Rayner's in Monmouth-street; I never saw the prisoner till two nights before this happened; he was warming a black pudding before the fire; on the 4th of December, I saw him again in the tap-room, between ten and eleven o'clock; he went out; I never had any conversation with him in my life; some time after, I went up stairs to bed; I sleep in the three pair of stairs back-room; the room-door was double locked; I had the key; when I went up, I saw the sash out upon the landing-place, and heard a noise in the room; I came down stairs again, and met the boy; the fath is half in my room, and half on the staircase; it was a push-up fath; the bed was pulled down, and the line cut, and laid by the side of the window; I had left all safe, when I made the beds, at twelve o'clock; I was very much alarmed, and came down stairs, and met the boy; then my master and the boy, and I, all went up stairs; my master put the sash in first, and then he took the key and the candle out of my hand, and unlocked the door; the upper part of the fath was left in, but the lower part was gone.

Q. What size was this window; was there room enough for a man to get in? - A. I should think he could not get in that way, because he might have fell over into the yard, and dashed himself to pieces; he must have got half his body in first, and so hung by his hands; my master unlocked the door, and I saw his feet; my master then said, it is all nonsense, there is nobody here, and then he locked the door again, and gave the boy a hint to fetch the watchman, and he did; the watchman came up, and pulled him from under the bed, and brought him down stairs; he said, he thought it was his quarters; he was very much in liquor; when I went to go to bed, my box was turned topsey-survey, and another box displaced that belonged to my master; there was nothing gone from the room.

Q. Was he excessively in liquor? - A. He was not in liquor at all, though he pretended to be so.

Q. He had had a good deal of liquor? - A. I drew him two pints of ale, and he drank one of them, and part of the other, but I am sure he was not in liquor.

THOMAS RAYNER sworn. - I keep the King's-head; I saw nothing of the prisoner in the house till after the alarm was given; I went up stairs with the maid and the boy; I immediately said, if there is any body, be still; I went up, and found the window out, which looks into two rooms, the maid's room, and the staircase; the lower fath was taken out; there is a partition divides the staircase from the room; the partition does not go quite close; there is room to put two hands between; I secured the window first, and then I unlocked the door, and saw the prisoner; the girl said there is somebody under the bed; I said, do not talk such nonsense, there is nobody, for I was afraid, having nothing in my hand; I locked the door again, and made a motion to the boy to fetch the watchman; the watchman came up; I opened the door, and he took him from under the bed; his shoes were off, and laid under the bed where his head laid; we tied his hands, and put his shoes on, and took him down into the tap-room; he was searched at the watch-house, but he had nothing found about him.

Q. In what way could he have got into that room, the door being locked? - A. The only method he could have got in, was by getting out of the sash when it was open, and so hanging by his hands, and crawling to the other window, for there was no hole, either for his feet or knees.

Q. Was there space enough for him to get out? - A. Not without contracting himself, there is a pane and a half in each, about ten inches by eight.

Q. In what state did he appear? - A. He was as sober as I am this moment, as sober as can be; he pretended to be drunk at first, but afterwards he went to the watch-house as well as any person could do; he said, he thought he was at his quarters, and I told him it must be strange quarters to get in at the window in that manner.

Floyd. I saw the window in at nine o'clock, I went to fetch a pint pot that the lodger had had, which stood in that staircase window.

Prisoner's defence. I was quite in liquor, I thought I had been at home at my quarters; I went up stairs and found the window open, I went in, and was so full of liquor, that I tumbled off the bed.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-41

135. JOHN GARDNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , a sack, value 1s. and four bushels of oats, value 20s. the property of John Watkins , Joseph Wright , and John Eversfield .

JOHN WATKINS sworn. - I am in partnership with Joseph Wright and John Eversfield, coal and corn merchant s: On Saturday, the 6th of Decembear, a quantity of oats came to our wharf, in Milbank-street , in the evening, in a barge, and laid there till Monday; when we loaded the waggon, we missed a sack, and in consequence of information, the prisoner was apprehended on the Tuesday, and brought to the wharf by a carman of the name of William Thatcher ; we took him to Bow-street, we got a search-warrant to search the stables of a man of the name of Lock, where we found a sack of oats; he has absconded.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You do not mean to swear to oats of course? - A. That is impossible.

Q. And the sacks are very often borrowed and lent in the trade? - A. I don't know that they are, the lightermen find the sacks.

Q. Then the sack is not your's? - A. No.

WILLIAM TATE sworn. - I am a lighterman; on Sunday the 7th of December, about half-past ten in the forenoon, I was near Mr. Watkins's wharf; I saw the prisoner come in a boat and take a sack of grain out of a barge, which lay at Mr. Watkins's wharf. put it into the boat, and rowed up the river with it; I know his person perfectly well, having frequently seen him working on the river.

Q. Did not you attempt to stop him? - A. No, I had no suspicion at the time, knowing the man; I thought the grain might belong to his employer, and that he might have orders to take it.

Q. You do not know what is in the sack? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This was done in open day-light? - A. Yes.

Q. You know that he is an apprentice to a Mr. Yatton, and bears an excellent character? - A. I have heard so.

WILLIAM HUNTLEY sworn. - I am a waterman; I work at the Horse-ferry, Milbank; on Sunday the 7th of December, the prisoner Gardner told me he had a sack of something to fetch; he asked me to lend him my boat, I told him I could not, I would go with him if he had any thing to bring ashore; I went with him to Mr. Watkins's wharf, he brought a sack out of the barge, at Mr. Watkins's wharf.

Q. Could you judge, from the appearance of the sack, what it contained? - A. No; I rowed him up to Westminster Horse-ferry, gave him a lift up with the sack, and he went up the causeway.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not know what the sack contained? - A. No; it was marked B. P. and Co.

Q. What was the mark of the sack found at Lock's? - A. I did not see that.

Mr. Knapp. (To Watkins.) Q. B. P. and Co. is not the mark upon your sacks? - A. No.

JOHN THATCHER sworn. I am a carman; on Sunday morning the 7th of December, the prisoner asked me, if I knew any body that let horses and carts, I told him there were several in the neighbourhood; I asked him what he might want, he said, he had got a sack of oats in the barge, that he would sell for ten or twelve shillings, and the full value of it was twenty-two shillings; being Sunday, he said, he did not know how he should get it up the yard; he asked me if I would carry it up the yard for him, to which I made answer, I would have nothing to do with it; that is all I know.

WILLIAM KELLY sworn. - I am a lighterman; on Saturday evening, the 6th of December, I brought a barge up to Mr. Watkins's wharf, with two hundred and fifty sacks of oats.

Q. Did it contain any other grain besides oats? - A. Not that I know of, there were some sacks in the barge, having the same mark with that which was afterwards found at Lock's, they are hired sacks, and many other people have sacks besides us.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am constable of St. Martin's in the fields, (produces a sack of oats;) on Tuesday the 9th of December, I went to the stables of a man of the name of James Lock, with Mr. Watkins, where I found the property I have now produced; I have not been able to find Lock.

Court. (To Kelly) Q. Can you say if that sack

was in your barge on the Saturday night? - A. I cannot; we had some sacks in the barge marked the same as these, but I cannot say that this is one of them.

Q. Did all the property in that barge belong to Messrs. Warkins and company? - A. It did.

Q. (To Watkins.) What did you miss? - A. Only one sack from that barge; we missed two sacks from the waggon, which came out of another barge.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What is the mark of that sack that has been produced? - A. I. B. and Co.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex, Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-42

136. JOHN KNOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , a tin cannister, value 10d. and three pounds of coffee, value 6s. the property of William Messenger .

WILLIAM MESSENGER sworn - I am a shopkeeper , at Henley : On Saturday the 13th of December, I lost some coffee; on the Sunday morning the 14th, the constable came to know if I had lost any, I looked, and missed some coffee, and a cannister; I had seen it on the Saturday in the shopwindow; he shewed me the cannister, I knew it again immediately, it has my own mark in the inside, 1. 11. which means one pound eleven ounces.

THOMAS BARKER sworn. - I am an officer; I took the prisoner in custody for Airs, with these articles, which I have to produce, (produces them;) I received them on Saturday night the 13th.

AVIS sworn. - I am a shoemaker, and keep a chandler's-shop; on Saturday night, the 13th of December, I had shut up my shop, I went into my room and found the door open, I looked round and missed a cheese from the counter, I cannot say that the door was latched, I live just out of the town; I looked out and saw a man coming from the town way, with a lanthorn, I took the lanthorn and went the common way, and overtook the prisoner with my cheese upon his head, and a large basket, with a cannister of coffee; I told him he had got my property, and must go back with me; then we had a scuffle, and he got away; I followed him close till he got near my own house, for he ran back again, and then I took him and detained him; I delivered the property to Barker. (The cannister was deposed to by Messenger.)

Prisoner's defence. I found it by the side of the road. GUILTY , aged 25,

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-43

137. GEORGE DUNCAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , two quarts of oats, value 6d. the property of Simeon Thompson .

(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

MARMADUKE THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am brother to Mr. Simeon Thompson , who is a coal-merchant , at Red-cross wharf ; the prisoner was employed by my brother as a watchman : On Tuesday the 13th of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, I observed something bulky in his great-coat pocket, which he had flung over his shoulder; he was then on the wharf, going home from his duty, but upon seeing that, I sent him into the accompting-house to light a fire, because I had a suspicion that there were coals and corn in the great-coat; I examined the pockets, and found in one pocket, coals, and in the other, a bag containing black and white oats, mixed; I took no notice of it to the prisoner, he went to the place where he had left his coat, but he did not take his coat; I watched him, and he went away without.

Q. Had he an opportunity of getting at the place where the corn was kept for the horses? - A. He had, he came back the next evening as usual.

Court. Q. Do you mean to swear these oats to be your's? - A. No; they were mixed in the way our's are.

SIMEON THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am owner of Red-cross wharf; the prisoner had been a watchman in my service, about eight years.

Q. You appointed him to watch over the other servants? - A. Most certainly I did.

Court. Q. He came to you at night to watch the premises? - A. Undoubtedly.

Q. He was no domestic servant? - A. No.

Q. He had no command over your servants? - A. Only to see that I was not robbed.

Mr. Alley. Q. You were not present at the time of this discovery? - A. No, I was at home; the next evening, Tuesday, when he returned to his duty, I charged him with having robbed me of corn and coals, and produced the coat and the bag which contained the corn; he told me he had swept the corn out of the corn-barge.

Q. Did you make him any promise, or use any threat to induce him to say how he came by it? - A. I advised him to tell the truth.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him if he told the truth? - A. No, I did not; I advised him to tell the truth, without any condition; he said he had swept it out of a corn barge, but being closely pressed, he acknowledged he had received it from Nery, the horse-keeper; they are mixed oats, and the same that I feed my horses with; the prisoner had access to the keys in the accompting-house, that he might have helped himself if she had pleased.

( Richard Hazard the constable, produced the oats and the coat.)

Prosecutor. They are the kind of oats to which the prisoner had access.

Prisoner's defence. It is all spite from the clerk, because I would not clean his shoes for him; I have been obliged to go from craft to craft, for twenty craft may be, in the course of the night, and been in danger of my life many times, and the clerk would not allow me a candle.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-44

138. JOHN AKERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , six pounds of moist sugar, value 4s. and seven pounds of other sugar, value 8s. the property of John Roebuck , George Roebuck , Charles Stowe , and Thomas Kay .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On Monday, the 5th of January, about half past seven, Read and I, and a Mr. Shilleto, were watching for a person in Eastcheap, about thirty yards from the prosecutors, who live at St. Mary Hill , I saw the prisoner at the bar walking rather sharply, with something in an apron, he had not the apron on; I stopped him, and asked him what he had got; he answered, what was that to me; I then told him I was an officer, and had a suspicion that he had that which he had no right to have; Read then came up directly; I asked him again what he had got; he said, it was nothing to me what he had got; I asked Read what he thought it was and he said, it was sugar, he had then got hold of it, he had taken it from under the prisoner's arm; Mr. Shilletto then came up; the prisoner made some little resistance, I told him it was a fully for him to resist, I took him to to the Compter; I told him I suspected he had been robbing his employers, and as we took him to the Compter, he begged that we would forgive him: Mr. Shilletto went with me to the Compter, and when we came there to the light, he said, he believed he knew where he lived, accordingly we went to his master; Read has the contents of the apron.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you know this is a young man of respectable connections? - A. I believe he is.

Q. When he said, what was that to you, it was before you told him you were an officer? - A. Yes.

JOHN READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I assisted Tipper in apprehending the prisoner; as soon as I came up; Tiper asked me what it was; I felt the apron, and said, it was sugar, he had it in an apron under his arm; the prisoner said, he had bought it; I asked him, where; he said, what was that to us; we told him we were officers; we then asked him again where he had bought it; he again said, what was that to us; Mr. Shilletto came up, and heard the conversation likewise, then we took him to the Compter; when he found we were going to take him to the Compter, he begged that we would forgive him; it contained a loaf of refined sugar, and a bag of moist sugar. (Produces them.)

THOMAS KAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What constitutes the firm of your house? - A. John Roebuck, George Roebuck , Charles Stowe , and myself, wholesale grocer s; our premises go from St. Mary-at-Hill to Love-lane; the prisoner had been in my service between a year and a half and two years as a porter in the warehouse : On Monday, the 5th of January, two officers came to me, upon which I went to the Poultry Compter, where I found the prisoner in custody; nothing material passed between us; the next morning the officer brought me the property, and I examined it; this loaf of sugar has the refiner's mark, No. 30, at the bottom; I compared the stock with the stock-book, which is here; we had a small quantity left of this parcel of goods, with the remainder of which this mark corresponds; the whole of that quantity was marked the same; upon examining the stock I found two deficient of what it contained in the stock-book; there should have been thirty-one, we found but twenty-nine: it is the same mark and the same quality, and the same sized loaf; I will not swear that that loaf was taken out of my warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is Mr. George Roebuck of age? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you take stock? - A. About the beginning of May, 1800.

Q. How long had you had that stock of sugar? - A. They were bought in 1799.

Q. Like goods, of like quality and like mark, might be found in other shops? - A. There might, from our warehouse.

Q. A considerable number of loaves, marked in the same way, have got into circulation in the trade? - A. Certainly, previous to my taking stock, but not since.

Q. Can you venture to swear that indentical loaf was not sold previous to May, 1800? - A. I have no doubt in my own mind, I will not swear it.

Q. Is he not a young man of good character? A. We know nothing of his connections, but previous to this transaction we had a very good opinion of him, or we should not have continued him in our service so long.

WILLIAM BUCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk to the prosecutors; the prisoner was their porter: On the night of the 5th of January, I went into the lamp-room, about half past seven; I was there about twenty minutes, or a quarter of an hour, and the prisoner was there

during the whole of that time, from half past seven till about ten minutes before eight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He being a porter, had as much right to be upon that part of the premises as any other? - A. Certainly.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called his master, Mr. John Roebuck, and three other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-45

139. JOHN KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a shirt, value 5s. a pair of stockings, value 3s. the property of John Brewer the elder; a shirt, value 5s. the property of John Brewer the younger; another shirt, value 5s. and a neckcloth, value 1s. the property of Philip Brewer .

JOHN BREWER , jun. sworn. - I am a man's mercer , I live with my father, John Brewer, and Philip Brewer is my brother, at No. 3, Ludgate-hill : the prisoner was a pot-boy at a public-house.

WILLIAM KIMBER sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the property): On Tuesday, the 13th of January, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; the things were lying in the room up one pair of stairs at the Cock public-house, Ludgatehill; the prisoner said they were his property, that he purchased them of a dustman for three shillings; the two Mr. Brewers were there, and the prisoner.

PHILIP BREWER sworn. - I am a tailor , I live with my father and brother; there were some things lying in the room.

Q. Did you see them in the prisoner's possession? - A. No.

Kimber. He said they were his own property.

Prisoner. Q. Did I say a dustman, or a scavenger, or a person that swept the street? - A. To the best of my knowledge he said a person that swept the street.

Philip Brewer . This shirt and neckcloth are mine, I know them by the mark P B. I had not missed them, nor have not examined my linen since, but I know them to be mine by the mark; the prisoner had been at our house that evening that he was taken, to collect the pots from the men, about seven o'clock; the linen is kept in my mother's room; I never saw him in any room except the shop and the cutting room, which are both up stairs.

John Brewer. I know this to be my shirt by the mark upon it, which I made myself with permanent ink; it is the only one I ever marked in that way, and I had missed it; I can swear to my father's shirt by the size and the mark, and my mother's stockings.

Prisoner's defence. On Wednesday morning I was going for orders for tea as usual, at Mr. Brewer's, and there was a man sweeping Mr. Brewer's door, who asked me if I would buy these things of him; I did buy them of him, I gave him three shillings which I had for my boxing-money; I went up stairs, and got orders for the tea, with a bundle in my hand; I went home, and told the orders that I received, and I went in the evening to the same house after I had cleaned myself, with the stockings on, and one of the shirts, I did not take any notice of the marks; and one day as I was coming down stairs, the maid asked me where I got these stockings from; I said, they were not her's; she said, I must come to her mistress; I went, and Mrs. Brewer told me they were her's, and I must pull them off; I told Mrs. Brewer if these stockings were her's, I had got more things that were marked the same; she said, yes, there were some shirts, she believed; I said, yes, there were, and they took me up.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-46

140. JOHN LAZONCH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Pinney , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 22d of December , and burglariously stealing six printed bound books, value 24s. five other printed bound books, value 20s. four other printed bound books, value 8s. two other printed bound books, value 9s. two other printed bound books, value 12s. three other printed bound books, value 30s. one other printed bound book, value 6s. and a two foot rule, value 6d. the property of the said Francis Pinney .

(The prisoner being a foreigner, a Jury of half foreigners and half Englishmen were sworn).

George Fryer,

James Hamerton ,

Alexander Aughterlony ,

James Richardson ,

William Smith ,

Charles Kelly ,

Michael Thiell ,

John Schnieder ,

Christopher Melanschez ,

Peter Poland ,

Henry Roemer ,

Charles Vyrasset .

FRANCIS PINNY sworn. - I am a carpenter , at Pimlico : On Monday night, the 22d of December, my house was broke open; I know the prisoner by going through the yard often; I went to bed a little before twelve, and saw every thing fast then; I got up between five and six in the morning, it was not light then; I found the back-parlour window open on the ground-floor.

Q. Was any violence done to this window, or was it merely thrown up? - A. Thrown up, there was nothing broke about it; I am perfectly sure it was down over-night; I was the first person who went into the parlour. I missed my books and a two foot rule off the table; there were eleven volume of a Biographical Dictionary, the Theological Miscellany, Salmon's Grammar, Delaranville's Dictionary, Culpepper's Herbal, and Her

very's Meditations; I saw them two days after, at the mansion-house; I saw the prisoner in the yard the evening before, and I saw the books and the rule on the table the evening before.

JOHN JONES sworn. - I am a salesman, in Spurcorner, Minories: On Tuesday, the 21st of December, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner brought some books to sell at my shop, I did not look at them, and as I do not buy books, I took him to a bookseller's close by, but he did not buy them; I suspected they were stolen, and I sent for an officer, and gave charge of him.

JOHN FOX sworn. - I am a Police officer, (produces the property;) I received these books at Mr. Steele's, a bookseller, upon Tower-hill, with the prisoner; I found this rule in his pocket.

Prosecutor. I know Hervey's Meditations to be mine, by it's wanting four leaves; I know Salmon's Grammer, by it's being bound in two volumes, it is generally bound in one; I have no doubt but they are all mine; I know the rule to be mine, I made a hole through it, and put in a river.

Prisoner's defence. I had been in the hospital, and when I came out, I had nothing to live upon but what I could get in the streets GUILTY , aged 32.

Of stealing goods, value 39s. but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-47

141. ELIZABETH NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a gown, value 98. two sheets, value 5s. two sheets, value 4s. and a blanket, value 2s. 6d. the property of James Coleman .

ANN COLEMAN sworn. - I am the wife of James Coleman , No. 10, Field-lane, Holborn , the prisoner was a weekly servant to me, and slept in the house: On the first day of this month, New-year's day, I went into the room and missed a blanket, and upon looking farther, I missed the other things mentioned in the indictment.

MARY FORSYTH sworn. - I live opposite Mrs. Coleman, I keep a cloaths-shop; on New-year's-day, I went over to Mrs. Coleman's; I asked the prisoner what could induce her to rob her mistress, and she said she did it to insure in the lottery; I had said nothing to her to induce her to confess; she gave me some duplicates, which I delivered to Mrs. Coleman, and she delivered them to the constable.( John Kennedy and William Rose , officers, produced the duplicates.)(The property was produced by Mary White , John Merritt , and Philip Page , pawnbroker, and deposed to by Mrs Coleman.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-48

142. JAMES WOOLDRIDGE was indicted for forging and counterfeiting, on the 29th of November , a Bank-note for the payment of 1l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. Stating it to be a promissory note, with the like intent.

Third Count. For disposing of, and putting away a like promissory note, with the like intention.

Fourth Count. For uttering and publishing as true, a like forged promissory note, with the like intention; and four other Counts, charging the intention to be to defraud Abraham Roderiques .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Giles, and the case opened by Mr. Garrow.)

ISAAC RODERIQUES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. My father keeps a butcher's shop in Whitechapel-road ; about eight weeks ago, to the best of my knowledge, a man came into my father's shop and asked the price of an haunch-bone of beef, and agreed to give sixpence a pound for it, the weight was eleven pounds and three quarters, which came to five shillings and ten-pence half-penny; the person gave my mother a two pound note, which she refused, the print appearing imperfect; he then pulled out of his pocket a parcel of notes, from the appearance of the bulk, there might have been fifteen in number.

Q. You only guess the number? - A. No; from which parcel he gave me a one pound note, which was readily taken; I asked him his name, he said it was James Edmonds; where do you live, asked I, at No. 9, King-street, answered he; what King-street? King-street, Mile-end, New-town, answered he, which name and place of abode I put upon the back of the said note.

Q. Look at that note? - A. That is the note.

Q. Was your mother present during the whole of this time? - A. She was.

Q. While this was passing, had you sufficient opportunity of observing the person with whom you were dealing? - A. The case was this; it was about eleven o'clock in the evening, my father went out, and I was left in his place to serve the customers.

Q. What sort of light was there in your shop? - A. About twelve candles.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. To the best of my knowledge, he appears to be the same man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. This was on the Saturday night? - A. It was.

Q. Saturday night, at eleven o'clock, is generally

a very busy time? - A. Sometimes it is, and sometimes it is not.

Q. How did it happen to be that night? - A. There were, I think, five customers in the shop.

Q. And who were in the shop to serve them? - A. Myself, my mother, and a servant.

Q. How soon after you sold this beef was it, that you saw the prisoner in custody? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Four or five weeks, was not it? - A. It might be.

Q. When you first saw him before the Magistrate, I believe you did not speak to his person? - A. I was not requested to speak to him.

Q. When you first saw him, did you know him again? - A. From the impression it made on my mind at the time he bought the beef, to the best of my knowledge I believed him to be the man.

Q. Before you could say so much as that you believed him to be the man, was he not dressed up in three or four different ways by the order of the officers? - A. He had.

Q. Can you give any reason upon earth why that was done? - A. I cannot.

Mr. Fielding. Q. What is the first name of your father? - A. Abraham.

DEBORAH RODERIQUES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. My husband keeps a butcher's shop in Whitechapel; about eleven o'clock on Saturday night, a man came to our shop, and purchased an haunch-bone of beef, my son agreed for the price; I was there to take the money, the man gave me a two pound note, which I refused; my son then asked him for a one pound note; he had a bundle of Bank-notes in his hand, out of which he gave me a one pound; my son then asked him what his name was; he said his name was James Edmonds; he asked him where he lived, he said, at No. 29, King-street; he asked him, what King-street, he answered, King-street, Mile-end New-town; I gave him the change, the haunch-bone of beef came to five shillings and ten-pence halfpenny; I gave him two seven shilling pieces and one penny halfpenny; then I went in and the man went away; my son wrote upon the back of the note, the man's name, and where he lived.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, is he the man who came to purchase the haunch-bone of beef? - A. Apparently, to the best of my knowledge, he is the man.

Q. How soon after did you see the prisoner again? - A. The first time, was the Saturday after Christmas-day, at the office.

Q. When was it the beef was bought? - A. I cannot justly say, but it was in November, and it was on a Saturday night.

Q. When you saw him at the office, what was your opinion of the man? - A. To the best of my knowledge, it was the same man that gave me the note.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was four or five weeks between the time when the beef was sold, and the time when you saw the man at the office? - A. Yes.

Q. You had several examinations, had you not? - A. Only two.

Q. In consequence of the manner in which you expressed yourself concerning your knowledge of the prisoner at the bar, at the next examination was not his dress changed? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Was not that done for the purpose of removing the difficulties you had upon your mind with respect to the person? - A. The first sight I had of the man, it appeared to be the same man that gave me the note, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Was it not in consequence of the doubtful manner in which you had expressed yourself, that this man's dress was changed - Was not the motive for so doing that you might be better able to speak to his being the man? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you give any directions, or express any with that any alterations should be made? - A. No, I never saw any body to say so.

Q. Was he at any time produced at the office dressed in pantaloons? - A. Yes, he had grey pantaloons on when he was in our shop.

Q. What were the colour of the pantaloons that he had on at the office? - A. They were grey.

Q. Did they appear to be the same sort of pantaloons? - A. I cannot say; there are many grey pantaloons, but they were of the same sort.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. I am servant to Mr. Roderiques: On Saturday evening, the latter end of November, a person came into our shop, and asked the price of an haunch-bone of beef; he offered to pay for it with a two pound note, which my mistress refused, she asked for a one pound note, upon which the man pulled out a number of Bank-notes; he gave my young master a one pound note, which he took readily; my young master wrote the man's name upon it, he said his name was James Edmonds .

Q. It was on a Saturday night? - A. Yes, I cannot say what day of the month.

Q. Was there plenty of light in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did this person remain in your shop? - A. I suppose a quarter of an hour.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing his person? - A. Yes, I looked at him.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. I really believe, to the best of my knowledge, that to be the same man.

Q. How soon after did you see the man again? - A. About five weeks after, at the office; the

same evening myself and another servant went to enquire after him, because my misterss had some suspicions.

Q. Did you find any person of that name and address, or did you find any such number? - A. No, there was no such number as 9 in that street.

Q. Nor any person of that name to be found? - A. No.

Q. When you saw the prisoner at the office, what was the impression upon your mind concerning him? - A. I took particular notice of him when he was in our shop, and I looked at him when I was at the office, and I believed him to be the same man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you think before you went that you should know the man? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did not you say the contrary - Did not you tell some person that it was not worth while your going, for you should not know him? - A. No.

Q. Did you attend at the first examination? - A. Not at the first examination.

Q. There were five or six customers in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was employed in serving them? - A. My young master.

Q. Did he serve them all? - A. They did not all boy meat at one time.

Q. Who was attending to them while this was passing about a Bank-note? - A. There was nobody served at that time.

Q. They all stood still? - A. Yes.

Q. No attention was paid at all to the other customers? - A. Only to see that nothing was taken away.

Q. Who was upon the look-out? - A. Me and another servant, and a lad besides.

Mr. Giles. Q. Now, looking at the prisoner at the bar, have you any doubt that he is the same man who was in you shop that evening? - A. I have no doubt but what he is the same man.

THOMAS BLISS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am inspector of Bank-notes, (the note in question shewn to him); this is forged note without the least doubt whatever. (The note read.)

BENJAMIN PRITCHARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am a patten-iron maker, No. 8, King-street, Mile-End New-Town; I have known the prisoner at the bar nine or ten years; he was an anvil-marker, at Wolverhampton; the prisoner was at my house the latter end of October last.

Q. How soon after you had first seen him there, did he make any application to you respecting Bank-notes? - A. In about five or six days the prisoner calld upon me again; there was nothing then passed about Bank-notes that I can particularly tell.

Q. Did he at any time make any application to you with respect to a five pound Bank-note? - A. Yes, about ten days after he first called; he then asked me if I could let him have a five pound note for small notes, I think they were all one pound notes, but I am not certain, there might be one of two pound, and three of one pound.

Q. Did you, in the course of you business, attempt to pay away those notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any difficulty with respect to any one of them? - A. One was refused.

Q. Did you communicate that circumstance to the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with it? - A. I gave it to him again, and he gave me another for it.

Q. Where was this? - A. In my own house.

Q. Did you, at that time, see any others in his possession? - A. No.

Q. Did you see him after that with any number of Bank-notes in his possession? - A. Yes.

Q. How long after? - A. A short time after, I cannot say exactly, it was in November.

Q. As near as you can tell, how many were there? - A. There might be as many as eight or ten, I cannot tell; he said he was going to buy some things to send into the country to his wife; I asked him if they were good notes, and he said there were some good and some bad.

Q. Did you tell him your reason for asking him that question? - A. Yes, I did, because I had had a note refused that I had taken from him; he said, if he could pay one away a week, it would be a great thing for him, he said, he was going into business.

Q. At the time you gave him the note back that had been refused, did he make any difficulty in changing it for you? - A. No, he said he was soon going into the country; I saw him again after he returned from the country, which was nine or ten days after the conversation.

Q. Do you remember his coming to your house, and bringing a joint of meat? - A. Yes, on a Saturday night, I cannot say when.

Q. Was it in the month of November? - A. It was late in the month of November; he brought home a haunch-bone of beef, he put it down, and said, that would do for dinner to-morrow.

Q. What time of night was it? - A. Between ten and eleven, I believe it was nearer eleven than ten; I saw no more of him that night; he dined with me on the Sunday.

Q. Do you recollect a person, who was bricklayer, calling upon the prisoner? - A. Yes, twice; he called once, and the prisoner was not at home.

Q. It was after the haunch-bone of beef was brought? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you inform the Court, how soon after he brought the beef it was that the bricklayer called the first time? - A. On the Sunday; the

next day he called again, on the Monday, in the evening.

Q. Did he see the prisoner then? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they leave your house together? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner return to his lodgings that might? - A. Not at all that night.

Q. When you saw him again, did he tell you any thing that the bricklayer had communicated to him? - A. Yes; he said the bricklayer had told him there had been some people enquiring for him at the shop, and that one was an officer; he said he should not stop with me, he should go out of town.

Q. Upon his telling you this, what did you say? - A. I told him I supposed they wanted to arrest him; and he said, they did.

Q. To arrest him for what? - A. For debt.

Q. Did you mention any other reason for which they might want him? - A. Yes, I told him I supposed they wanted him for what they had him before at the Whitechapel-office.

Q. What was that about? - A. He told me he had a kinsman in troubel about a note, and he told him he would go in the morning, and then he was liberated; that was Francis Wooldridge ; he said it was about a bad note.

Q. I am asking you about the conversation that you had with him about the bricklayer? - A. He said he should not stop in town.

Q. Do you recollect what he said would be the consequence if he did not go out of town? - A. No; he said they had been seeking after him several times at the shop.

Q. From that time did he ever return to your house? - A. No.

Q. Did his clothes continue there? - A. Yes; on Friday evening, teh 19th of December, he came to me, and told me he was going into the country, and desired me to bring or send his clothes to the Windsor Castle, in Holborn; he came into my shop; and there I left him for a short time.

Q. The smith's shop, where the forge was? - A. Yes; I had been absent four or five minutes; when I returned, he was burning something on the fire.

Q. Do you know of your own observation, or from what he told you, what that something was? A. I suspected it to be notes, they appeared to be papers of the size of Bank-notes.

Q. Had he the poker in his hand? - A. He took tip the poker and laid it upon the bundle of papers to press them down.

Q. Have you any doubt that there were papers resembling Bank-notes? - A. None; he said he could not stop a moment; he said, I have seen the bricklayer, and the bricklayer tells me that the same people have been seeking for me at the shop, and I cannot stop a minute, he went away directly, and did not stop half a minute.

Q. Did he take his clothes with him? - A. No.

Q. Were they of a size that he could conveniently have taken them if he had had time to stop for them? - A. He might have taken them himself if they had been collected together; I carried them myself to the Windsor Castle, in Holborn; where I saw him; he said, I shall go into the country on the coach to-morrow.

Q. Do you know butcher of the name of Roderiques? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever buy meat there? - A. Yes. they call him Saul.

Q. Did the prisoner know that you dealt for meat there? - A. He has been with me there to buy meat once, or it may be more, I cannot say.

Q. He boarded as well as lodged with you? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. Do you live in King-street? - A. Yes.

Q. From the last question and answer, I should suppose you are a family man, and have a wife and servants? - A. Yes.

Q. Are any of them here? - A. No.

Q. They must have known of these circumstances as well as you? - A. Yes.

Q. And they partook of this haunch-bone of beef perhaps? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet they are not here? - A. No.

Q. Where was it that he asked you to give him a five pound note for small notes? - A. At my own house.

Q. Have you ever been taken up yourself for forgery? - A. They fetched me from my house.

Q. Were you not taken up and accused of being yourself guilty of forgery? - A. When they took me they said nothing at all to me; they sent me to Cold-bath fields person.

Q. Did they not tell you why they sent you to Cold bath-fields? - A. Mr. Bliss found in my pocket three notes, which I had had from Wooldridge, and which he said Wooldridge had in his pocket when he was at the office before.

Q. Do you mean, upon your oath, to say you did not know that you were charged yourself with a forgery at the time you were sent to Cold-bathfields prison? - A. They said nothing to me about forgery.

Q. I ask you again, did you or not know that you were charged with a forgery? - A. I heard nothing about forgery at the time.

Q. How many examinations might you have attended before the Magistrates at Lambeth-street? - A. I was down three times, but was never called for but twice.

Q. Were you examined before you were sent to Cold-bath-fields? - A. They asked me no questions at all.

Q. Do you mean to say, the Magistrates sent you to Cold-bath-fields before they examined you? - A. Yes; I never was examined at all.

Q. Do you mean to say, that you were sent to prison without calling upon you for a defence against the charge? - A. I have told you it was for three 1l. notes that were found in my pocket.

Q. Have you always told the truth before the Magistrate when you were called upon? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, at the first examination, say that the notes found upon you were given you by the prisoner for a five pound note? - A. I did.

Q. Did you not, when called upon by the Magistrate, say that you received them from the prisoner for a debt of four pounds twelve shillings? - A. I said no such thing; for the Magistrate even asked me where I got my five pound note.

Q. Then I am to understand you that you said no such thing? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a Mr. Tilsey? - A. Yes, a cheesemonger, at Whitechapel.

Q. The one pound note that you returned to the prisoner; and which he changed, you had offered to Mr. Tilsey, in Whitechapel? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not say to Tilsey when you offered it to him, that you had received it from a different quarter? - A. Yes; I told him I believed I had received it that morning in Leadenhall-market in change for a five pound note.

Q. And you now think fit to say you had it from the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; when I came home I recollected that I had it from the prisoner. I had changed a five pound note and received three one pound notes that morning in Leadenhall-market; but when I came home I recollected that I had wrapped up three one pound notes together, and the other was by itself: after Tilsey had refused that note, I unwrapped the others, and I thought it must be that single note, by its being wrapped up by itself: it was in the morning I had been in Leadenhall-market, and in the evening I was at Mr. Tilsey's.

Q. Did you mention this at the Magistrate's at Whitechapel? - A. Yes; they asked me, and I told them so.

Q. You said you did not know of your having been commited for a forgery? when were you first applied to to be a witness on this occasion? - A. Last Friday but one, at the last examination.

Q. Were you not told that you would be yourself prosecuted if you did not become a witness against the prisoner? - A. Nobody told me so.

Q. Did it happen that you employed an attorney to defend you? - A. I did not employ one; but there was one employed for me unknown to me; that was at the third examination.

Q. Do you not know that you were charged with forgery, and did he not recommend it to you to turn King's evidence? - A. No; he said my brother had employed him, and he was to ask me such questions as he thought proper.

Q. Did you not, from his representations, know and believe that you would be prosecuted if you did not turn evidence? - A. He told me nothing about evidence; he said he was to attend upon me at Whitechapel office.

Q. I ask you were not you taken from the office into a private room, and was it not some time after you had been shut up with your attorney before you agreed to become a witness? - A. No; they said nothing to me about witness.

Q. Do you mean to say you were not threatened to be prosecuted if you did not turn King's evidence? - A. Nobody threatened me.

Q. Did it happen that you were in irons at all? - A. Yes.

Q. When were they taken off? - A. At the third examination.

Q. Were your irons taken off till after you had had this conversation with your attorney? - A. I had no private conversation, it was all public, and they said nothing at all about evidence; they proposed to bail me, that was what they took me out for.

Q. And you have not been bailed yet? - A. No.

Q. You came in custody here? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever in custody before? - A. Yes, in Staffordfhire.

Q. What were you in custody for? - A. An assault; I never was found guilty in any Court of Justice at all.

Q. Do you mean to swear you were in custody at that time for nothing but an assault? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say you were not in custody and tried for house-breaking, or any felony? - A. No.

Q. Have you ever been tried at Coventry? - A. Yes; that was on suspicion of robbery, and there I was honourably acquitted.

Q. Have you never been in custody for any other offence? - A. No.

Q. Have you never been in custody for a highway robbery? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hugh Moore? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did he never charge you with a highway robbery? - A. No, never.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you were never charged by Mr. Hugh Moore with any felony or theft upon his property? - A. No.

Q. Were you ever charged by Mr. Moore with any offence? - A. None at all.

Mr. Garrow: Q. When you first went to the office you had three Bank-notes in your possession, I understand? - A. Yes.

Q. Were they examined by Mr. Bliss? - A. Yes.

Q. From whom had you received them? - A. I received them from James Wooldridge.

Q. Have these notes since been returned to you? - A. No; Mr. Bliss told me they were good notes.

Q. Had you, upon your oath, any thing to do with the forging, or the uttering of the note now in question? - A. No.

Mr. Garrow. (To Mr. Bliss.) Q. Do you know any thing of three Bank-notes that were found upon the witness at the office? - A. Yes; which three notes were found upon this prisoner on the 27th of November, when he appeared for his kinsman Francis, and which were good notes; we took copies of them each time; I told Pritchard that these notes had been produced by Wooldridge.

Mr. Alley. Q. When Pritchard was first examined before the Magistrate, was what he said taken down in writing? - A. I really do not know.

THOMAS FERRIDAY sworn. Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am a smith; I live in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane; I know the prisoner at the bar, James Wooldridge : I saw Francis Wooldridge on Thursday, 18th December, at a public-house in Holborn, and after I had been there about five hours the prisoner came in.

Q. Do you recollect the sign of the house? - A. No.

Q. Should you know it if you heard it? - A. I think I should.

Q. Was it any Castle? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it the Windsor-Castle? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go there by appointment? - A. I went with Francis Wooldridge on purpose to meet James Wooldridge.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner respecting any forged Bank-notes, and of his know ledge of their having been forged?

Mr. Alley took an objection to the question, which, having been argued on both sides, Mr. Baron Thompson proceeded as follows: -

The question proposed to be put to the witness seems to me to inquire after a conversation which the witness is supossed to have had with the prisoner at the bar, on the 18th of December, at the distance of about-three, weeks from the day when the note in question was uttered to Roderiques; and the effect of that conversation is something from which a knowledge of the forgery may be inferred as to the goodness or badness of certain notes then in his possession. It is supposed further, that an inference may be drawn of his knowledge and skill in discovering good notes from bad notes antecedent to the time; but it seems to me, unless the conversation goes so far as to affect the prisoner with the general knowledge of good notes and bad notes antecedent to that time, so as to connect it with the time when he really uttered this note, his then knowledge of a good note from a forged note, will not of itself be sufficient to afford the inference that at the time he uttered the note in question he necessarily knew that note to be forged, because he is speaking only of the knowledge of specific note in his possession, and the knowledge that he has of good notes from forged notes; but if the conversation goes further than that, and has any relation to notes that he has before issued, and to his knowledge of the goodness or badness of such notes before that time, in that case only, I think, is that conversation admissible.

Mr. Garrow (To Ferriday). Q. Upon your meeting with the prisoner at the bar at the Windsor Castle upon the 18th of December, did he say any thing to you with respect to forged Bank-notes? - A. After I had been some time in his company, he said his relation Frank had been taken up for a had Bank-note, and had been tried for it at the office; he said he looked so foolish with respect to Bank-notes he did not know any thing about it; that he told the Magistrate he had it of his master, and that he, Francis, had called James for ward, and that he owned to it that he had given that note to him; he said Frank was always getting into some foolish scrape or another; he said he himself had given the officer a card of his place and shop where he lived, in Nightingale-lane; he said he had had a quantity of bad Bank-notes; I asked him what he had done with them; he told me he had passed them over Blackfriars-bridge and Westminster-bridge, and round the Borough; the next day I was to see some of them; I was to meet him at six o'clock at night.

Q. Were these notes that you were to see forged or good Bank-notes? - A. He said they were bad; he said they were at Mr. Pritchard's house.

Q. Did you know Pritchard? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know he lodged there? - A. Yes.

Q. What was he going to do with them? - A. He said he was then going to pass them.

Q. Did you tell any body of this meeting that you had had with him? - A. Yes; I told Mr. Rogers, a Police officer, of on the 19th; I happened to meet him again at eight o'clock at night, and I went and found the prisoner there; he asked why I stopped so long; I told him I could not conveniently come sooner; I went there alone; he and I went together to Pritchard's; I went in without him; I did not get any thing, and I returned to the prisoner and told him Mrs. Pritchard was coming; she came, and then I left them together; the next morning he was apprehended, in consequence of the information I had given to Rogeres.

Q. Do you know what is become of Mrs. Pritchard? - A. No.

Cross-Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What is your name? - A. Ferriday.

Q. Have you always gone by that name? - A. I have had a nick-name, they have called me Baker sometimes.

Q. You never called yourself Baker? - A. No;

my mother's maiden name and my uncle's name was Baker, and I was always called Baker.

Q. In what art of the Country was that name given you? - A. At Dudley.

Q. And perhaps the nick-name travelled with you to London? - A. Yes.

Q. You never called yourself by the name of Banker? - A. Yes; I answer to the one as well as to the other.

Q. Were you ever at Wolverhampton? - A. Hundreds of times.

Q. Were you ever there in an inconvenient situation? - A. Yes; it was seven years back.

Q. What sort of a situation was it? - A. Some years ago I had bought a piece of bacon; it was not bacon, not it was not pork, it had been just in the pickle, and after that I understood it was stolen, and they came and took my own property from me, and swore to it plumply.

Q. But had you the ill luck to get into jail for it? - A. Yes; I was put into the whipping-house.

Q. Was that the only time you ever was in custody? - A. The only time I was ever taken prisoner.

Q. Were you never at Marlborough-street? - A. Never.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes, I am honestly sure of it.

Q. Never in custody in London? - A. Never.

Q. You were never charged at Marlborough-street for coining? - A. No.

Q. Not having had money in your possession? - A. I offered myself a prisoner at Shadwell office, but it was not bad money.

Q. Have you ever seen a note with the name of Baker? - A. Yes.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office; I received information from Ferriday, on the 19th of December in the forenoon, in consequence of which I apprehended him the next morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When did you take this man? - A. On the 20th.

Q. You searched him? - A. Yes.

Q. You found some good notes in his possession? - A. I did, and some money.

Q. You found no forged notes upon him? - A. No.

JOHN THOMPSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am clerk to the Magistrates at Lambeth-street office.

Q. Were you there when Francis Wooldridge was in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember this prisoner attending upon that occasion? - A. He did.

Q. Look at that card, and tell us whether upon that occasion he left that card as an account of his place of abode? - A. Yes, he did; he left several of them.

Q. You attended like wife when the prisoner was accused upon this charge? - A. Yes.

Q. Was his examination taken down in writing? A. No.

Q. What did he say about his having been or not having been at the shop of Roderiques, the butcher? - A. He said he had been there in company with Pritchard; that he had purchased some beef there, which he had taken to Pritchard's; when he was asked as to the note, he said he had no bad note when he went there, nor did he ever offer a bad note there.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about any bad notes, and to what I rechard says, it is all false.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES ROUND sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at Tipton, five miles from Wolverhampton; I am wood-screw maker and farmer.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Pritchard? - A. I have seen him once, and I have seen him here to-day.

Q. Is the character of that man such, that you would or would not believe him upon his oath? - A. I would not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Are you engaged to give evidence in any other trials? - A. No.

Q. You would be a very useful man, I think; you come, upon your oath, to say of a man that you never saw but once, that you would not believe him upon his oath? - A. Yes.

Q. How long is it since that once that you saw him? - A. Nine or ten years.

Q. If it is not an impertinent curiosity, what may your situation in life be? - A. A Wood-screw marker, at Tipton, near Wolverhampton.

Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Bennett, of Wolverhampton? - A. No.

Q. Mr. Baker, of Wolverhampton? - A. I know several Bakers; there is one a wood-screw maker; the same as myself.

Q. What Pritchard has been doing for the last ten years, you do not know? - A. No.

Q. When were you first applied to be a witness? - A. Since I have been in town.

Q. As I had not the honour of travelling with you, I don't know when that was? - A. Last Wednesday morning.

Q. Then, for the first time, you were asked what you knew about Pritchard? - A. I was asked since that.

Q. When, for the first time, were you applied to, to know what you could say respecting the character of Pritchard? - A. I think it was Thursday.

Q. You came up upon your own concerns? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not know that the prisoner was in custody? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. But you came up purely upon your own concerns? - A. I was to see the prisoner, and to detain a Counsel on his behalf.

Q. Are you the same man that told me you came to town purely upon your own concerns; name any one transaction of your own that you came to town about? - A. To receive money, and transact business.

Q. Name any one person? - A. Mr. Skidmore, in Holborn.

Q. Was not the business that you came upon to attend to and manage this man's defence? - A. It was a part of my business, I had my own business to do.

Q. Did you ever know Pritchard examined as a witness? - A. Not till to-day.

Q. Have you any reason to suppose he had ever been sworn? - A. No.

Q. And yet you come to tell us you would not believe him upon his oath? - A. Yes; he bore a very good character before he left the country.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ever know a man bear so bad a character? - A. No.

Mr. Garrow. Q. I should like to know the measure of your conscience, what sort of a bad character? - A. Pick-lock keys, and opening doors; he was taken before the Magistrate.

Q. And discharged? - A. Yes, I believe he was.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , Death , aged 38.

Of uttering, knowing it to be forged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-49

143. JAMES ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , four leather braces, value 10s. the property of Robert Parnther , Francis Froome , and William Crowther .

ROBERT PARNTHER sworn. - I am in partner ship with Francis Froome and William Crowther : On the 7th of December, about half past seven, a very moon-shining night, I met the prisoner at the bar in Titchfield-street ; I did not observe that it was my man till he was close by the side of me; he hung down his head, and I observed he had some leather in his apron; I stopped, and went round to look at him, and he immediately ran; I pursued him, and he threw the four leather braces on the iron rails of the area, which laid flat; I then called two or three times, Jem, Jem; when he found he could not get away, he stopped; when I came up to him, I laid hold of him by the collar, and asked him where he was going; he said, a little way; I asked him how he came not to be at work to-night; he said he had been at work, and was just come from the yard; I asked him what he had done with the things he had in his apron; he said he had not had any thing in his apron; I took him back, and just before I got up quite to where he had thrown them down, he struggled and got away from me; I cried out, stop thief, and he was stopped in the course of about twenty yards; I took up the braces, and took the prisoner to Marlborough-street.(William Jackson, the officer, produced the braces, which were deposed to by Mr. Parnther.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all of them, I had not them at all. GUILTY , aged 26.

Publicly , whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-50

144. JOSEPH COATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a watch, value 1l. a chain, value 2d. a seal, value 2d. and a key, value 1d. the property of Joseph Stevens .

JOSEPH STEVENS sworn. - On Monday, the 5th of January, about eleven o'clock at night, I lost my watch.

Q. Were you sober? - A. No, I was not sober, I had been drinking at the Bell public-house, I was coming through Aldgate High-street when the prisoner met me, and took the watch out of my fob; I immediately made after him, and called out, stop thief; whether he turned down Houndsditch or not, I cannot tell, but I lost him; I went on towards Whitechapel, but not seeing him, I returned back to Aldgate watch-house, and there I saw the prisoner in custody; I knew him again perfectly from the singularity of his dress; he had a white jacket on, with dark under clothes; I gave charge of him to the constable of the night; I saw his face, but not to be able to swear to it, I believe his face to be the same, and from the correspondence of his face and person, I have no doubt of him; the watch was brought in in the course of ten minutes by one of the watchmen; I know the watch again, I am not certain of the number, but I think it is 3003; it was a silver watch, with a yellow chain, the seal I should have known, but the stone is entirely broke to pieces, and gone.

Q. Was there any lamp near you? - A. It was very near under a lamp.

- ADAMS sworn. - I am a watchman; when I was in my watch-box, I heard a cry of stop thief; I directly started from my box, and saw the prisoner running very fast, and the prosecutor in pursuit of him, and before I could get sufficiently far enough across the road, the prisoner passed me; I pursued him very closely, and called to my partner to stop him; as soon as I could stop him, the prisoner turned to the right into Church-row; I followed him through Church-row; I then called out, stop him; the prisoner then made away for Leadenhall-street or the Minories, he saw several people in front of us, and immediately started back again, he crossed backwards and forwards in the

road till he passed me again; I came up to him, and laid hold of him; he asked what he had done; I said I did not know what he had done, but should insist upon his going with me; I then took him to the watch-house, and as soon as I had got him to the watch-house, the prosecutor came in, and said, that was the man that had robbed him of his watch; the prisoner said he had no watch about him; he was searched, but we found none; I took my lanthorn, and went to search, and between where I took him and the watch-house, I found the watch about ten yards from the watch-house door, it appeared to have been run over by a carriage.

Q. Are you sure it was exactly in a line in which the prisoner had passed? - A. It was exactly in the line; I then took the prisoner to the watch-house, and the prosecutor claimed the watch.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY sworn. - I am a patrol of the Ward of Portsoken; I heard a cry of stop thief, I ran out of the watch-house, and saw the prisoner run down Houndsditch, I saw nothing more of him till he was in custody of the watchman; I sent the watchman out to look for the watch; he brought in the body of the watch, and immediately after a gentleman brought in the case, he is not here; the prosecutor said he could swear to the prisoner's person.

JOHN WATTS sworn. - I am a watchman, in Aldgate High-street; I did not see the prisoner till he was in custody of Adams, at the watch-house; the prosecutor then came in, and said that was the man that had robbed him, for which he would give charge.

ABRAHAM SIMMONS sworn. - I am ward officer of the ward of Portfoken; I was sitting in the watch-house, and heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner was brought into the watch-house, and I searched him, but could not find the watch; the prosecutor came in, and gave charge of him; I had the watch from Kinnersley, (produces it); I have had it ever since.

Kinnersley. I received the watch from the watchman who brought it in.

Stevens. I can perfectly swear to the watch, I have had it two years, and the person who gave it me is in Court, my father-in-law.

Prisoner's defence. I am not the person that the prosecutor takes me to be; I have no friends, I have no father, and my mother is in bed with two twins. GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-51

145. THOMAS COFFEE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Maurice Hickie , about the hour of eight in the night of 14th of December , and burglariously stealing a calice sheet, value 7s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 12s. a purse, value 1d. twenty-three guineas, four seven-shilling-pieces, a Bank-note, value 30l. a Bank-note, value 2l. and nine Banknotes, each of the value of 1l. the property of the said Maurice .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.

MAURICE HICKIE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Bowling-alley, Whitecross-street , there are but three rooms in the house, I occupy the middle room, my mother-in-law occupies the upper room, and the prisoner the other room; I have known the prisoner about ten years; on Sunday the 14th of December, about eight o'clock at night, I went out, I locked the chest which contained my money and notes, I locked the room door, and put the key in my pocket; I rent the house of a Mr. Atkinson; when I had locked the door, I raised the latch to try whether it was locked or not, my wife went with me, I never left the court; I was absent about twenty minutes, I am certain I was not gone half an hour; when I went out, I saw the prisoner sitting upon his bed, which was directly within his room door; I was not more than a dozen yards from home in the same court; I went home alone, and saw a light in the house; I came home, and found it was a light in my room; the house is so low, that you may almost reach the casement with your hand from the pavement; I saw the prisoner in the room moving about; I endeavoured to get in, but the street-door was fast; I was not more than a minute at the door, before I saw the prisoner through the key-hole, coming down stairs with a light in his hand; I saw him go into his own room, and put the light out, he was not in quite a minute, when he opened the street door, and walked out; he did not say any thing to me, or I to him; I did not conceive he could have broke open the chest, for it had three locks to it; I then went in immediately, I found the room door wide open.

Q. How did it appear to have been opened? - A. The staple that the lock shut into was wrenched back, as it were with a chissel, or something of that sort; I missed a purse out of the chest, containing twenty-three guineas, four seven-shilling pieces, nine one pound notes, a two pound note, and a thirty pound note, a pair of silver shoebuckles, and a calico sheet; I did not get a warrant till Thursday following, I did not know how to go about the affair; on Wednesday I went to Guildhall, and could not get in, there were so many people there.

Q. You are a captain's servant , are you not? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know who you received the thirty pound note from? - A. I do not recollect his name, he is here; on the Thursday night I went to the prisoner's apartments with Tipper and Cartwright, he was not at home at first; I went about

to several public-houses to find him, but could not; he came home very soon, and we began to search; we found him sitting in his own room by the fire; we all went into his room, and I told the officers that was the man; they then searched him and the room, and found a purse, which was one of my own making at Calcutta, which contained the money and notes that I had lost, they found two guineas in his wife's petticoat.

Q. Did he say any thing? - A. He called me some name, I don't know what, and then the officers took him into custody.

Q. Have you any doubt of it's being your purse? - A. No; if there is such another in England, I will suffer being put in his place.

Q. Had you given permission that evening to any person to go into your room? - A. No.

Q. Had the prisoner and you been upon terms of intimacy? - A. No, I have not spoke to him since I came home from the East-Indies; I knew him before I went, his wife had been several times in my room before this.

Q. During the times that she had been in your room, do you know whether the chest had been opened? - A. Yes, several times.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your name is Hickie? - A. Yes.

Q. The name of the landlord of the house is Atkinson? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know his christian name? - A. I do not.

Q. Are you acquainted with a man of the name of Cockran, alias Curran? - A. I know him, but I have no acquaintance with him.

Q. What trade does he carry on? - A. I do not know any more than you; as far as I have heard, he keeps a bit of an old iron shop.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with Curran? - A. I never had any acquaintance with him, further than meeting him and speaking to him in the street.

Q. Did you ever drink with him? - A. On Tuesday after this happened, I was unwell in bed, and he came and sent one shilling out for something to drink.

Q. Do you know what has become of Curran? - A. No; he has absconded.

Q. Did you ever charge Curran with committing the robbery? - A. No; he has been changing some of the notes.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, have you never charged Curran with robbing you? - A. No; I asked him if he had been changing the notes for Coffee.

Q. Upon your oath, did you never charge Cockran with robbing you? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you happen to see him at your house on the Sunday night? - A. No.

Q. Did you go to any public-house, during the twenty minutes that you were absent that evening. - A. I was not; I was in company with my wife at a house in the same court; my wife returned home in a few minutes after.

Q. Did you find your room door broke open? - A. I found the lock had been wrenched, as if with a chissel.

Q. Was it the bolt or the staple that had been forced? - A. It was the staple that was forced back, what the bolt goes into.

Q. Was it an open staple or a covered one? - A. A covered one.

Q. Do you mean to swear that it was the covered staple and not the bolt that was pushed back? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Was it fastened with screws or nails? - A. I never looked.

Q. You found the room door open? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, have you always told the same story? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not, before the Magistrate, say you found the door shut? - A. I did not say any such thing.

Q. Did you know Harry Murray ? - A. Yes; he was a witness for this man at Guildhall, that is all I know of him.

Q. Did you never charge Harry Murray as a man that assisted Curran in stealing this money from you? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, have you never charged Murray with assisting Cochran, otherwise Curran, in stealing your money? - A. I never did in my life.

Q. How much money did you lose in all? - A. Sixty-six pounds in all, besides the silver buckles.

Q. Before you lost the thirty pound note had you got the number? - A. No, I had not.

Q. Therefore I take it for granted, if, without enquiries, you had seen that thirty pound note at a distant day you would not have known it? - A. No.

Q. If you had a suspicion of the prisoner, how came you not take him up sooner? - A. I was unwell.

Q. You had your wife with you? - A. Yes; and my mother.

Q. Why did not you send them to a Magistrate to get an officer? - A. They were both as dull of apprehension as I am.

Q. I think you said you saw him in your room as you came across the court? - A. Yes, I saw him very plain.

Q. Then, if you saw him in the room, upon the oath you have taken, why did you not take him up immediately? - A. I was not able to go in search of him, I was so unwell.

Q. Do you mean to swear, that having lost this large sum of money, and immediately going into the room and missing it, you took no steps to apprehend him till the Thursday after? - A. I did

not know whether I could have taken him with out a warrant or not.

Q. You took him at his own house four days after? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of such a thing as a reward of forty pounds in case you convict him? - A. No; I never in my life heard of such a thing.

Q. Do you mean, upon your oath, to say that you never heard till now that there was a reward of forty pounds if you convicted this man? - A. No; I know nothing at all about any law affairs.

Q. Have you been in Court during this sessions? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear, that you had never, till this moment, heard that if you can convict a man of a burglary you will be entitled to a reward of forty pounds? - A. No.

Q. You have employed an attorney in this case; upon your oath, do you pay the expences of this prosecution? - A. I have paid all hitherto.

Q. Upon your oath, did not your attorney tell you of the reward? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, have not the officers agreed to contribute towards your expences? - A. No, nor any other person; I have been obliged to sell some of my things to pay for the indictment.

Q. The window was very low, you say? - A. Yes, a person might have jumped in.

Q. Had you been up stairs in the house opposite you? - A. No.

Q. Have you any window curtains? - A. No.

Q. Where is your bed? - A. The chest is under the window, and the bed is by the side of it; I was confined to my bed, and made several attempts to dress my self on the Monday and the Tuesday.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Welch? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you never told her that either Curran or Murray must have been the persons that robbed you? - A. No; I will suffer hanging if ever I did.

Q. Do you or not mean to swear, that you told Mrs. Welch that either Cochran or Murray were the persons that robbed you? - A. Never in my life.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What do you know, first of all, of Cochran? - A. I only know him as living in the neighbourhood.

Q. He was before the Justice? - A. Yes; and Murray and Mrs. Welch were all there.

Q. You say you have been obliged to sell your cloaths to carry on this prosecution? - A. Yes.

JOHN READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable of the city of London; on Thursday the 15th of December, I went to the prisoner's apartments with Tipper, Cartwright, and the prosecutor; the prisoner was not at home the first time I went; he came in in about three quarters of an hour; when we went into the room, there was his wife and child asleep in the bed; we all went in; Hickie, the prosecutor, said, that is your prisoner; I said, my friend, I have got a warrant to apprehend you for a felony; I shewed him the warrant: I searched him, but could find nothing about him; we searched, and finding nothing, we desired him to take his wife and children off the bed, which he did; I then took the bed off from the bedstead, and between the bed and the sacking of the bedstead I found these new things not made up, and between the bedstead and the wall, I found a purse, (produces it); when I pulled the bedstead a way it fell upon the ground; Hickie saw it, and said immediately this is my purse; I asked him what he knew it by before I let him see it, he said there was a hole at each end that a half guinea or a seven-shilling piece would tumble through; he said he made it himself on board a ship at sea, and that it was a worsted purse; I looked at it, and found it so; the prisoner said his child had had it for two or three days throwing about the room: I don't recollect that he said any thing else; we then took him to the Compter, and I went back again and searched her, and in her petticoat, in the plait sewed up in the back part, I found two guineas.

Q. You are a witness upon this indictment, and a constable? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you contribute towards the expences of this prosecution? - A. The prosecutor has got some money owing to him, he could not raise money enough, Tipper laid down some money for him.

Q. Has the prosecutor ever since that repaid the money that was paid down? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever tell the prosecutor, or any body in your presence, that there was a forty pound reward? - A. I never did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What part of the money did you lay down? - A. Fifteen shillings.

Q. How much did the other constable lay down? - A. The same; and Tipper laid down the same; he got all he could himself.

Q. How much did he bring? - A. He brought a guinea, and some shillings afterwards.

Q. If it has been said that he advanced all the money for the prosecution, that is not true? - A. It is not true.

Q. Have you never heard any of the officers hint to him any thing about a reward of 40l.? - A. Never.

Q. You and he were old acquaintance, I suppose? - A. No.

Q. And yet you were kind enough to advance this money to a stranger, merely upon the strength of his word? - A. We made up what money was to pay to carry on the prosecution; we knew he had that five pounds owing to him on board the ship, and he bears a very good character at the India-house.

Q. When you found this purse, the prisoner said his child had been suffing it about the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not add, that Cochran had given it to the child to throw about? - A. No, he did not.

Q. And that you swear? - A. Yes.

Q. There were holes in the purse? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore a very likely place for a man to put seven-shilling pieces in? - A. His money was in a bag.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Before you laid down this money, you enquired what was his character at the India-house? - A. Yes; Tipper was there two or three times.

Court. Q. Did you contribute towards the expences of this prosecution, or lend him money? - A. I lent him the money; if he got the five pounds before he went to sea, he was to return it to us; if he did not, we were to stand to the loss of it.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - I know no more than Read.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you acquainted with the prisoner before you took him in custody? - A. No, quite a stranger.

Q. Nor the prosecutor? - A. No.

Q. You took the prisoner into custody at his own house? - A. Yes.

Q. I understand you have contributed a certain share towards the expences of this prosecution? - A. I contributed none; the man was in distress; he told me he was making away with his things, and they gave me an extraordinary good character of him, and I assisted him with money.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You went, I believe, with the prosecutor, to the India-house? - A. Yes; I traced a 30l. note into the possession of a person of the name of Bobbet.

Mr. Alley. Q. The prosecutor was a stranger? - A. Yes.

Q. And from a love of public justice alone, you lent him money to carry on this prosecution? - A. In consequence of the 5l. note being owing him by the third mate, and I saw the man was very much distressed.

Q. He told you he was likely to go to sea shortly? - A. A gentleman at the India-house told me he would not go for a month or five weeks.

Q. You had not a note deposited with you as security? - A. No.

Q. Did not you and your brother officers know how much this man contributed? - A. He contributed a guinea.

Q. And no more? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. You did not lend him two guineas? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you tell him there was a forty pounds reward, out of which you would be paid? - A. No; I never told him a word of it; the man was very much distressed.

WILLIAM GUNSTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you belong to the India-House? A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect paying that man a thirty pound note? - A. I do not recollect it; but I made an entry in this book.

Q. Did you make the entry at the time you paid the money? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. Is that the original entry? - A. Yes it is, (reads) 29th of November, the number of the note is No. 182, a thirty pound Bank of England note, 31l. 15s. 6d. paid to Hickie.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Look at the prosecutor; is that the person to whom you paid it? - A. It is impossible for me to say; it appears to be paid to Hickie.

Q. Does it appear what ship? - A. Yes, the Afia.

Q. (To Hickie) On the 29th of November did you receive a thirty pound Bank-note from that young gentleman? - A. Yes; and when I came home I put it in the purse in the chest.

Mr. Alley. (To Gunston). Did you enter the dates as well as the numbers of the notes? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not usually enter the Christian name of the person? - A. No.

Q. If a man tells you his name is so and so, according to the warrant you put it down? - A. Yes.

Q. And at a future time you cannot undertake to say, whether that is the person or not? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. (To Hickie.) Q. You belong to the ship Asia? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any other person of the name of Hickie belonging to the ship Asia? - A. No, not a man.

MARTHA BOBBET sworn. - I keep a public-house, the Throwster's Arms, in Essex-street, Whitechapel.

Q. Do you remember changing a note with any body? - A. Yes.

Q. What number was it? - A. I cannot say.

Q. In what month? - A. In December, I think towards the beginning; I received it from a man who brought another with him.

Q. Did you observe if there were any names at the back of the note? - A. No.

Q. Did the person, who asked you to change the note, put any name upon it by your desire? - A. Yes; but I cannot recollect what the name was; I paid it to my brewer.

Q. Look at the prisoner, did you ever see him before? - A. Never, to my knowledge, in my life.

Q. Do you think you should know it again if you see it? - A. I think so.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Curran? - A. Coffee, or Curran.

Q. Was he the man that changed the note? - A. Yes.

Q. And he has absconded? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. There were two persons? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. But you never saw the prisoner before? - A. Never till now.

JOSEPH BOBBETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the husband of the last witness, I changed a thirty pound note for Mr. Curran.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I never saw him before to my knowledge.

JOHN MOSS sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk in the Bank. (Produces a note, one of the indorsements upon which is the name of Coffee.)

Court. You must prove it to be his handwriting.

Mrs. Bobbett. This is the note that I changed.

Mr. Alley. Q. There is no such name as Curran upon it? - A. No.

Q. Therefore he has forged another man's name? - A. I cannot say. (The purse deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Mr. Alley. (To Hickie). Q. How was the outside door situated? - A. It stood open always in the day time.

Q. Then other persons had access to the house as well as you? - A. Yes.

- CARTWRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was present when the purse was found between the bed and the sacking.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Upon your oath, was it found between the bed's head and the wall? - A. No; it was under the bed.

Q. If any body has said it was found between the bed's-head and sacking, they have said that which was not true? - A. It was found between the bed and the sacking.

Q. You know of a reward of forty pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. And you told the prosecutor so, did not you? - A. No, I did not tell him any such thing.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

For the Prisoner.

MARY WELCH sworn. Q. Do you know the prisoner and the prosecutor? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever had any conversation with the prosecutor about this affair? - A. Yes; I was outside my door and at the window, and he went past; I said, Hickie, I am told you have been after Harry Murray, and threatening him? no, says he, Mrs. Welch, I have not; I know very well who has my property, he said, he knew it was Curran, but he would be d-d if he did not hang Coffee; I said, how can you be so cruel as to take away a man's life, innocent, when you acknowledge that it is Curran that had the property; he said he would have satisfaction, or money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He might have said he would have satisfaction and his money? - A. I am not sure.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. A long time; he has dealt with me; and I have known the prosecutor eight years.

Q. How often have you been in jail to the prisoner since he has been in custody? - A. I have been, I believe, once to him.

Q. No more than once? - A. No; before he left the Compter.

Q. You have not been in Newgate then? - A. No; I never set my feet within the gates of Newgate; he told me that he had not a halfpenny of it; I asked him about it, and he denied it; he said, he had neither hand, act, or part in it.

Q. Hickie charged Curran with having his property? - A. He said, he knew very well who had it, it was Curran.

Q. Did he ever tell you who took the money? - A. He told me he did not know any thing about it, nor did not know about the money at all.

Q. Did not Hickie tell you who he supposed had taken the money? - A. No, he did not.

Q. What business are you in? - A. A greengrocer and fruiterer, in Whitecross-street.

Q. Did not you hear the witness for the prosecution desired to go out of Court? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you, as a witness for the prisoner, knowing there had been such an order, remained in Court? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called three other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-52

146. PHILIP ISAACS was indicted for feloniously receiving two cloth coats, value fourteen shillings, the property of Henry Henderson , whereof William Joy was found guilty of stealing, the said Philip knowing the same to be stolen .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be eftreated .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-53

147. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , four pair of pattens, value 3s. 6d. the property of George Paulling .

GEORGE PAULLING sworn. I keep a clothes shop , No. 78, Whitecross-street ; on the 19th of December I was in the parlour, and heard the patten rings rattle; I stepped out of the door, and overtook the prisoner about four doors off, with the pattens upon her; I told her she had got something of my property; she said that she had not; she was rather in liquor, and behaved insolent; I sent for an officer, and gave charge of her.

(The constable produced the pattens, which were deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I hope you will he as favourable as you can. GUILTY , aged 32.

One month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-54

148. JOHN CHRISTOPHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , a brown mare, value 3l. 3s. the property of Edward Johnson .

EDWARD JOHNSON sworn. - I am a coachman , I live at Putney : On Wednesday evening, the 29th of October, I saw my mare in the field, and on Thursday morning, about six o'clock, I missed it; about three or four o'clock in the afternoon the same day, I went to Mr. Barrow's, a horse-boiler, Tothill-fields, and he would not let me see her, but about three weeks afterwards, he sent me word, and I went and saw one of the legs, and I knew it immediately, it had a quitter in the leg, a bar shoe, and white hair, the leg was cut off a little above the hock, it was a hind leg.

Q. From those marks, do you think you can safely swear that to be a part of your horse? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Did you see the skin? - A. No, I did not.

Q. What might be the value of it? - A. I had given three guineas for it just before.

Q. You never saw the mate in the possession of the prisoner? - A. No.

Prisoner. Q. Was it not a black horse that you lost? - A. A brown mare, the leg was black, it was a brown muzzled mare.

WILLIAM BARROW sworn. - I am a licensed horse-boiler: On the 30th of October last, a brown mare was brought to me by the prisoner at the bar, between seven and eight in the morning, it was a brown muzzled mare, and black in the body; I never saw the prisoner before, but I knew him again immediately; he told me his name was Edwards, that he lived at Fulham, and kept an errandcart; he said, she was a kicker, and of no use but to be knocked on the head; I enquired several things of him, and, from his answers, I thought he was an honest man; I gave him a guinea for her; I did not see him again for a fortnight or three weeks, when he brought me another horse; Johnson had given me a description of his horse, and when he came again, I stopped him.

Q. You saw the prosecutor on the 30th? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not he give you a description of the brown mare that he lost? - A. Yes; but I did not take particular notice of the mare as to know her again from his description.

Q. It is rather a singular thing. I think, that you should not? - A. I did not know the mare from his description till I examined the skin and the foot, and then I preserved it till the man came again.

Q. Did not you examine the skin and the foot that day? - A. Yes, almost directly, but he was gone.

Jury. Q. But you had Johnson's address? - A. Yes; he told me he lived at Putney.

Court. Q. What sort of a mare was it? - A. It answered his description, I don't know that it is his mare now.

Q. When you found it was his mare, why did you kill her? - A. I had killed her before Johnson came.

Q. When you did find that was his mare, why did you not send him word? - A. I thought it was of no use when the mare was dead.

Q. Do you recollect what sort of a mare it was? - A. It was a brown crop mare; the leg of it was white, and the remainder black; it had a quitter, a thing that comes just in the hoof, and a bar shoe on.

THOMAS KEMP sworn. - I am a journeyman smith and farrier, at Hammersmith; I cannot recollect the time, it might be two months ago when Johnson brought the horse's foot to me; I know it by having a quitter and a bar shoe, I fitted the shoe myself, (produces the hoof and the shoe); there is no mark to the shoe; I had not a bar shoe in the shop, and I took a common shoe and brought the heel round, and that took out the mark; when I shoed her, she was in Mr. Harwood's possession; she was a dark brown mare.

Prisoner. Q. Did you never make any bar shoe for any body else? - A. Oh yes, but I know the shoe, it is my own make; I altered it, and put fresh nail-holes in.

Prisoner. Q. If you had seen the shoe, without the hoof, would you have sworn to it? - A. I would not with to have done that, because the shoe is partly worn out.

Court. (To Johnson.) Q. How long had you had that mare? - A. Eight or ten days; I bought her of Mr. Harwood, at Hammersmith.

THOMAS HATCH sworn - I am an officer belonging to the Public-office, Queen-square, I took the prisoner into custody, that is all I know about it.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I am as innocent as the child unborn; I bought the horse of a man of the name of Roberts; he said he lived at Fulham; and since I have been in custody, my friends have enquired, but have not been able to find him. To my God, and to you Gentlemen of the Jury, I must trust my cause.

GUILTY , Death , aged 36.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-55

149. BENJAMIN POOLEY was indicted,

for that he, being a person employed in the Post-office on the 6th of June, feloniously did steal a letter addressed to one Archibald Thomson .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Myers, and the case opened by Mr. Fielding.)

DAVID THOMSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodfall. Q. You reside near Maidstone, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect, on the 5th of June last, having written any letters to town? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that draft? - A. On the 5th of June I inclosed it in a letter directed to Archibald Thomson , nurseryman , Mile-end, near London.

Q. Do you remember the purport of that letter? - A. I wrote, dear brother, I have inclosed a check, which I have given you information of, for 200l. signed David Thomson, and dated 5th of June.

Mr. Knowlys. They must at least prove that the letter is not in existence.

Mr. Fielding. We will prove, by Hill, that it was destroyed.

Mr. Thomson. On the 5th of June last I delivered that letter to Mr. Poole, the post-master.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where did you reside at the time you wrote this letter? - A. At Diston, near Maidstone.

Q. How many miles from London? - A. Thirty-two.

Q. Thirty miles from the place where the persons live upon whom it was drawn? - A. Yes.

Q. More than ten miles at any rate from London? - A. Yes.

THOMAS POOLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodfall. I am post-master, at Maidstone.

Q. Do you recollect, on the 5th of June last, receiving any letters from Mr. Thomson? - A. I do, several, which I put into the box, and they were forwarded in the usual and customary mode the same night; I was present at the making up of the bag that day.

ISAAC HANSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a sorter in the General Post-office.

Q. Were you on duty in the General Post-office on the 6th of June last? - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember the Maidstone bag arriving on that morning? - A. Yes, it came in the usual course to table E.

Court. Q. And opened there? - A. Yes.

Mr. Abbott. Q. When the bag was opened at table E, would it be the regular course that the letters to be delivered by the Penny-post should be separated from the letters which were to be delivered by the General-post carriers? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What are the letters that are delivered by the Penny-post - are they those that lie at a greater distance from the Post-office? - A. Yes; all that are directed out of the town delivery, and within the circuit of the Penny-post.

Q. Is Mile-end in the delivery, or within the circuit of the Penny-post? - A. The Penny-post.

Q. Were the letters that morning separated in the usual way? - A. Yes, they were.

Court. Q. Were you at table E then? - A. Yes.

Q. Was William Chalfont a sorter at that table that morning? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This table E is an office in which the prisoner is not present? - A. Yes.

Q. He has no connection with that table? - A. No.

Court. Q. On the 6th of June, was the prisoner employed in the Post-office? - A. In the Pennypost department, but not in the General-post.

Q. Then, before any letters get to the Pennypost department, they are first of all dealt with at letter E? - A. Yes, they are.

Q. Do all the letters that come by the Generalpost come into that office in which table E is situated? - A. Yes, they do.

Q. At which office Pooley has no duty or empolyment? - A. None at all.

Q. Does it not often happen, that, by mistake, letters that should be delivered over to the Penny Post-office, get into the delivery of the General-post carriers? - A. Yes, it does frequently happen.

Q. Therefore it might have happened with this letter, as it has with others, that it might have got there by mistake? - A. No, it would have got delivered by the carrier to the Penny Post-office.

Q. That is to say, if the General-post carrier is honest, and discovers the mistake in time, he will return it? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Not to give it back to the General Post-office , but put it in himself at the Penny-post? - A. No, he would give it to the clerk in the General Post-office, who would forward it to the Penny-post.

WILLIAM CHALFONT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a letter-sorter in the General Post-office, and was so on the 6th of June.

Q. At what table were you upon duty there on that morning? - A. Table E.

Q. Do you remember the Maidstone bag coming to that table that morning? - A. No, I have nothing to do with the bags.

Q. Were you employed that morning in sorting at that table the letters that were for the Pennypost delivery, from those that were for the town delivery? - A. Yes; we separate them in fourteen divisions.

Q. Was that separation made in the usual course that day? - A. It was.

Court Q. What do you mean by fourteen divisions? - A. Tweleve town deliveries, one delivery to the merchants that are called for, and the other division is for the Penny-post.

Q. Do you know whole duty it would be to

take away that morning the letters that were ready for the Penny-post delivery? - A. When they are told up, they are carried away by a messenger.

Court. Q. What do you mean by told up? - A. The amount of the money is told up.

Mr. Abbott Q. Who tells them up? - A. Mr. Hanson and Mr. Godby.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Being sorted into so many divisions, mistakes frequently take place? - A. Certainly.

AUGUSTUS GODBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott Q. Did you tell up the charges on the 6th of June? - A. Not all of them, some of them I did.

Q. Who told up the others? - A. Mr. Hanson. Court. Q. What charges? - A. Of the Pennypost.

Mr. Abbott. Q. Did you tell up the charges of the Penny-post? - A. Part of Them.

Court. Q. Do you mean the postage of those letters that are to go by the Penny-post? - A. Yes.

Q. And Mr. Hanson told up the remaining part - was that your presence? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. There is nothing in the performance of yur duty, I suppose, that leads you to know that any particular letters gets into the Penny Post-office, you only know that the letters in general go there? - A. Yes.

Q. A letter intended for the Penny-post delivery might have got into the town? - A. yes, it might be mis-sorted.

Mr. Abbott. (To(Hanson). Q. Did you assist in telling up the charges of the Penny-post letters that morning? - A. Yes.

Q. You, and the last witness, Godby, told up the whole? - A. Yes, we did.

Q. The next process is to be delivered to the messenger to be taken over? - A. Yes.

GEORGE BOWNS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Were you at the Post-office on the 6th of June last? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you fetch any letters from the table E? - A. I believe I did all of them.

Q. What lettes - did you fetch the Penny-post letters that morning? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Do you mean all the Penny-post letters? - A. Yes; after the letters for the Pennypost were told up, I took the charges to their respective places.

Mr. Abbott. Q. Did you take the Penny-post letters, as well as the charges? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What do you mean by taking the charges? - A. The amount of the charges put upon a paper, and I delivered it over to another person, who took the charge of the Penny-post; there they are told over again, and he checks it.

Q. Who is that person? - A. Mr. Webster.

Q. To whom did you deliver the Penny-post letters? - A. A person that comes for them.

Q. Is that Mr. Hazard? - I believe it is.( John Hazard was called, but did not appear).

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. To what department of the Post-office do you belong? - A. To the Penny-post.

Q. Did you, on the morning of the 6th of June, receive the Penny-post letters that had come by the General-post? - A. I did.

Q. In what manner are they brought to you? - A. In a locked box.

Q. YOu have the key of that box, I believe? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Is thre an account of the charges also brought to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you count the letters over to see that they agree with the charges? - A. After they are stamped, the box is opened in my presence; they are delivered to the stamper and counted.

Q. Did they agree that morning with the charges? - A. They did.

Q. The delivery of the Penny-post is divided into several districts? - A. Yes.

Q. One of which is called the Eastern district? - A. Yes.

Q. Into how many walks in the Eastern district divided? - A. Four.

Q. Be so good as name them? - A. Whitechapel, Wapping, Limehouse, and Goodman's-fields.

Q. Was the prisoner, Pooley, employed on the 6th of June in any situation relative to these letters? - A. As charge taker in the Eastern district.

Q. What is his duty as charge taker? - A. To receive the letters from the sorting office, and divide them into four walks.

Q. Who were the four persons who were to deliver in the four walks? - A. Pooley was one, for Limehouse walk.

Court. Besides being charger, he was carrier? - A. Yes.

Mr. Abbott. Q. Is Mile-end in the Lime-house walk? - A. No.

Q. Philip Absolem was another, I believe? - A. He was; his walk was Goodman's-fields.

Q. William Lloyd? - A. Wapping walk. Q. William Godwin ? - A. The Whitechapel walk.

Q. Is Mile-end in the Whitechapel walk? - A. Yes.

Q. About what time in the morning would Penny-post letters be dispatched at that time of the year? - A. From the arrival of the mails till half past nine or ten o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I do not know whether the place where you fit and do your business is the same office where the prisoner is engaged? - A. No; the first part of his duty is there, but he divides them down in another office.

Q. The office in which he sits, I believe, has a

great number of clerks in it, has it not? - A. No clerks at all; it is for letter carriers only.

Q. There are a great number of them? - A. Yes. Q. How many of them do you think? - A. Forty or fifty at that hour.

Q. All of whom have access to the letters, and are engaged in sorting? - A. Yes; and the letters are delivered to the care of five charge takers.

Q. The Penny-post letters come under the care of forty or fifty letter carriers? - A. Most assuredly, they are in the same room, and assist in sorting.

Court. Q. There are five charge takers, and these persons sub-divide them? - A. No; the charge takers divide them, the letter carriers may assist; they do in the penny-post business; I have seen them; but I am not in that office.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Therefore that would put it in the hands of a great number? - A. No.

Q. The Penny-post letters frequently get into wrong divisions, don't they? - A. - Yes.

Q. Therefore taking all the divisions together may have access to them? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Charles Hill? - A. I do.

Q. Was he engaged in the employment of the Post-office? - A. Not at that time; he had been discharged.

Q. Upon suspicion of improper conduct? - A. He was.

Q. During the time that this business is going on strangers to the office do get into the office? - A. Sometimes.

Q. Do not you know that Hill, since the time of his being discharged, has been in that office? - A. Yes, I have seen him there once or twice.

Q. I speak of this Charles Hill who is, I believe, here to-day? - A. Yes.

Mr. Abbott. Q. You have seen him once or twice, how long might it be before the 6th of June, a short time was it not? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM GWYNNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. I am a letter carrier for the Whitechapel division, the Eastern division.

Q. Is Mile-end in that division? - A. It is.

Q. Do you know the house of a Mr. Archibald Thomson at Mile-end? - A. Yes, very well

Q. Did you deliver all the letters that you received in the manner that they were directed on that day? - A. I did.

Q. Who delivered the lettrs to you that morning? - A. The prisoner at the bar.

ARCHIBALD THOMSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. Q. Did you receive a letter from your brother on the 6th of June last? - A. I did not. Court. Q. Your brother is Mr. David Thomson, the witness who was here some time back? - A. Yes.

Mr. Myers. Q. Not at any time dated the 5th of June? - A. No.

Q. Look at bill, did it ever come into your hands? - A. No, it did not.

CHARLES HILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. We understand you have been formerly employed in the Post-office? - A. Yes, I have been between four and five years.

Q. How long is it since you have been out of that employ? - A. It might be about two years; it must be two or more.

Q. What was your employ in June last? - A. In the Excise.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I know him extremely well.

Q. Were you particularly intimate with him? - A. Yes, particular friends during the time I was in the Post-office, and since that we have been upon terms of friendship.

Q. How came you to be dismissed from the Post-office? - A. There was a little misunderstanding between the Gentlemen of the office, there was something lost as I understand, and they went to my house to search it, and at that time thre were half a dozen spoons, and they took them away.

Court Q. A misunderstanding about what? - A. About a note that was lost from some letter in my walk, I believe. and on account my not giving them that answer which they wished, which was to know where I got the spoons from.

Court. Q. Who do you mean by they? - A. The officers; I sent them there of my own will, there was no warrant.

Mr. Fielding. Q. In consequence of that you were dismissed from your employ? - A. I was suspended till I gave a satisfactory account.

Court. Q. A satisfactory account of what? - A. Where the spoons came from.

Q. Did you give that satisfactory account? - A. I told the Comptroller I had no objection to inform him in private, but the officers should lnot be so far satisfied.

Q. And you were discharged? - A. No; I was suspended, not discharged, as Mr. Harris can prove.

Q. Do you remember the 6th of June last? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner that morning? - A. Yes, at the Dolphin public-house, the corner of Cannon-street, near the new road, St. George's in the East.

Q. What time in the morning? - A. To the best of my recollection, between tell and eleven o'clock; but I am sure it must be half after ten.

Q. What passed between you and the prisoner at that time? - A. I called in, not by appointment,

but by accident; the prisoner was there; he informed me that he had got something of value.

Q. Was it in the house, or when you came out of the house? - A. When we came out of the house together, I asked him what it was, and he produced me a check, after we had walked, I may say, the fourth part of a mile down the road.

Q. Look at this check?

Mr. Knowlys. I object to the production of this piece of paper as not being stamped.

Mr. Fielding. With respect to that, it might avail my friend, if it was produced as a note, but as a mere piece of paper to be identified as a thing shewn to the witness I contend it will not; if I were calling upon the witness to look at it as a note it might be a different thing; but I only offer this in order to connect it with the letter containing that piece of paper.

Mr. Woodfall. I will not detain your Lordship a minute, only to suppose a case; a man is indicted for stealing a letter, containing a half-guinea, and that which was supposed to be half-a-guinea, proved to be a piece of lead, of course that indictment could not be sustained; then, suppose a fresh indictment is preferred for stealing the letter, and that dump were to be produced as evidence of that letter having been stolen, no reference could possibly be had to the original indictment for stealing the half-guinea, but I contend it would be good evidence of a fact to trace the allegation of the letter having been in possession of the parry who clearly had that dump in his possession. That is a case perfectly analagous to this; it is to be considered as a piece of blank paper with marks upon it, sufficient to bring it to the recollection of the witness.

Mr. Abbott. My Lord, I am very well aware of the extensive words of the Stamp-act, but we contend-that the words are no more than this; that a paper requiring a stamp, shall not be given in evidence as a good and valid instrument. My Lord, it is perfectly clear, notwithstanding the very large and extensive words of the statute, that such a piece of paper may be given in evidence for some purposes, because it may be produced in evidence, to convict the party drawing it, which, if the words of the statute were to be taken literally, could not be done. It is perfectly clear from several decided authorities, that such a piece of paper may be given in evidence in a criminal prosecution for forgery, and I apprehend it is upon this principle, that it is the nature of the crime of forgery, that the instrument should be false and counterfeit. My Lord, we do not offer this in evidence, as a good and valid draft, but one of the witnesses having informed your Lordship that he put that piece of paper into a letter; we now offer it to prove, that that piece of paper was taken out of the letter by the prisoner himself, and for that purpose, as it seems to me, it is of no sort of consequence whether this be a valid stamp or no, we only shew that this bit of paper was put into the letter, and we offer it in evidence as a medium to shew, that that letter was in his possession.

Mr. Myers followed on the same side, and contended that it ought to be admitted as evidence, to prove, that as it was in the possession of the prisoner, he must also have been in possession of the letter which contained it.

Mr. Knowlys. My Lord, my objection is, that that paper-being produced, however they may with to call it waste-paper, is a thing bearing definition, that the law forbids to be given in evidence. There was one answer to this objection, which I with to get rid of immediately; that, supposing a half-guinea to be contained in a letter, and the party is indicted for stealing a letter, containing a half-guinea, which should turn out afterwards to be a mere dump, or false coin; it is said, that that piece of false coin may be produced in evidence. - To be sure it may, but it is begging the question to assume that in argument, because that dump is a thing which no law of the land forbids you to produce in evidence, that is therefore a plain begging of the question, because a dump is a thing which they might legally produce, and which it would be extremely important to produce in evidence. The witness calls this piece of paper a check, I say, they cannot produce that, unless it is legalized by having received the proper stamp which a check ought to have, and if this be the check, the witness has himself proved to your Lordships, that that is a thing not to be received in evidence, it is a thing that cannot be produced in evidence, because the law says it shall not be produced in evidence, not shall it be pleaded, nor of any avail in any Court of Justice whatever.

My Lord, it has been said, that there have been decided cases in which this point has been ruled, but I rather think those cases that have been alluded to, of Hawkeswood, and other cases, were put upon the instrument itself, that it was not a valid instrument, and therefore not capable of having the effect of availing the party in law to obtain the money which the forgery was intended to defraud the party of, which, therefore, cannot be the subject of an indictment for forgery; but I don't think that any of those determinations have gone upon the question, is this admissible or not? - I am informed there was a case in the Court of Exchequer, at nist prias, where an instrument was produced, merely in order to enable the party to ascertain the fact of another transaction having taken place, and not as an acquittance for money, and there my Lord Chief Baron Eyre refused to receive it in evidence, because the law had said it shall not be offered in evidence. My learned friend, Mr. Gurney, has furnished me with the case, he was present when it was so determined, and therefore I contend, with considerable confidence, that it will not be decided against me ultimately, and perhaps your Lordships may think that there is room for after-consideration.

Mr. Baron Graham. Are you quite sure that those are the words of the statute.

Mr. Knowlys. The words of the Statute, 3l. Geo. III. ch. 25. sec. 13. are not that it shall not be pleaded, or given in evidence in any Court to enable the party to recover it; but that it shall not be pleaded or given in evidence in any Court, and then comes a subsequent clause, which says it shall not be good, useful, or available in law or equity. Upon these grounds I contend before your Lordships, that this statute prohibits it's being given in evidence for any purpose whatever.

Mr. Justice Lawrence. The question, how far a

note unstamped may be given in evidence, has been under the consideration of all the Judges in the case of Moreton, which ruled the case of Cotin Reculist. The Judges were of opinion, and it was expressly so stated by Mr. Justice Grose in delivering the opinion of the Judges upon that case, that the note ought not to be received in any way to make it a valid instrument, but that it was evidence for collateral purposes. Now, the answer given by Mr. Knowlys, to the argument of Mr. Abbott, with respect to the penalty, I think does not hold, because it is to be construed in the most extensive way. - Look at the object of this Act of Parliament, it was a revenue law to lay a duty by means of these stamps, but not to enable persons to commit larcenies, and all sorts of crimes with impunity, that was not the object. We are of opinion that the evidence should be received; if between this and the first day of the term, any doubt should strike our minds, we will certainly take the opinion of the Judges, but at present we have no doubt.

Mr. Fielding. (To Hill.) Q. He gave you that check? - A. I do not know that this was the check, it is impossible for me to swear that, I wrote nothing upon it, it was for the same sum, it answers the description; a few minutes afterwards, a letter was shown to me by the prisoner, but what became of it I do not know; I saw the prisoner tear the letter, but I cannot be certain whether it was that or not.

Q. Had you a memory of what was written upon the paper which he produced to you? - A. To the best of my recollection, it is a long time since, it was from one brother to another, with an enclosure of 200l. it began, dear brother; I do not know the date, I know it was signed Thomson, but I cannot recollect the christian name; it was directed to Mr. Thomson at Mile-end.

Q. How long did you continue together then? - A. If I staid ten minutes, it was the outside.

Q. For what purpose did he put that first piece of paper into your hand? - A. To get it changed; the next day I went with it to Stratford- place, to the banker's shop.

Q. Did you tender that piece of paper at the banker's? - A. Yes; I received a 100l. a 40l. and a 50l. Bank of England notes, and 10l. in cash.

Q. Did any thing pass at the banker's shop? - A. Yes; he asked me if I received it for Mr. Thomson, and I told him, yes.

Q. When you had got these notes, where did you go? - A. To the Bank of England to change those for small notes.

Q. When change did you get from the Bank - was it the same day? - A. Yes, to the best of my recollection; I got, I think, forty-five 2l. notes, and four 25l. notes.

Q. Were you desired at the Bank to write your name upon any one of the notes? - A. Yes, upon one.

Q. What did you put upon it? - A. Welch, Kensington-grove.

Q. Did you put any letters denoting a christian name? - A. Yes, J. or P. or something of that sort.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner after this? - A. At the Black-horse, Fieldgate-street, Whitechapel, about seven o'clock in the evening; I told him I had changed the notes, and he wanted some of the money, but I would not give him any that night, except four or five guineas; on the Sunday morning, I called upon him at his lodgings, and gave him ten 2l. notes.

Q. How many notes did you give him, either that or the next day? - A. On Tuesday morning, I gave him ten 2l. notes.

Q. How many notes did you give him either that or the next day? - A. On the Tuesday morning, I gave him ten more 2l. notes.

Q. In what way did you dispose of the other notes? - A. I exchanged them at different shops.

Q. For the purpose of getting rid of them? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how much the prisoner had of notes and cash? - A. Ninety pounds exactly.

Q. How long was it before you knew the prisoner was apprehended? - A. I cannot be certain, but I think it was the Wednesday fen'night after.

Q. Did you pay him a visit in the Computer? - A. I called and intended to pay him a visit, but I could not see him.

Q. How soon after was it that you heard of yourself being enquired after? - A. I knew it the next day, I think it was; I went away on the Saturday morning, and therefore it must have been two days afterwards.

Q. How long were you from town, before you were apprehended? - A. Five weeks, or more.

Q. Part of these notes were exchanged by you, were any exchanged by any other person? - A. Yes; some by Mrs. Sturgess, but she was perfectly ignorant of it.

Q. Do you recollect how you passed the 6th and 7th of June? - A. On the 6th, I was to attend the surveyor at the chamber.

Q. Did you see the surveyor of excise, Mr. Hindes, in company with the prisoner, any time that day? - A. Yes, at Hackney.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to the surveyor of excise, for you? - A. I sent him with a message to beg him to assist me in my duty, for I had particular business that morning, and would come to him as soon as I could.

Q. What particular business was this? - A. To get the money, but I did not go that morning.

Court. Q. Did you send the prisoner from the Dolphin, down to Hackney? - A. I did; upon looking at the note, I discovered that it was the 6th day of the month, the note was dated the 7th; I never looked at the month, I discovered that the note was dated wrong, it was dated the 7th; I

thought it was the 7th of June, instead of that, it was over due a month.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I like to have people's own words in their accounts of transactions - while you were in the employ of the Post-office, there was what you call a little misunderstanding? - A. Yes.

Q. Now, that little misunderstanding was merely telling you that you were suspected of having stolen a ten pound note out of some letter? - A. No, it was not.

Q. What then? - A. It was a 100l. note.

Q. Had your superior in office, in this little misunderstanding, told you there was some suspicion of a one hundred pound note being missing? - A. It was a misunderstanding, I am certain.

Q. This little misunderstanding produced some officers to search your house? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were desired to account for the possession of some silver spoons? - A. Yes.

Q. And you tell us, you were suspended but not discharged, till you could account satisfactorily to your superiers? - A. That is exactly the case.

Q. You were suspended but not discharged? - A. I was not discharged.

Q. How came it that you were not discharged? - A. The case was, that I got a better situation.

Q. That is to say, you resigned? - A. Yes.

Q. Before they could determine whether they would turn you out of place or not, you resigned? - A. I never went into the employment afterwards.

Q. You were in the Excise-office, were you not? - A. I was.

Q. You have not appeared to attend in your duty there since? - A. I have been in confinement ever since.

Q. Do you come from prison here? - A. I do.

Q. You have at least made use of 100l. out of this 200l.? - A. Yes, and it cost me above 100l. more.

Q. Running from justice, you know, is an expensive thing? - A. I should never have gone from the place, but by the persuasion of my friends; I positively meant to surrender to the Lord-Mayor.

Q. Did you do it? - A. I did not.

Q. Then, instead of surrendering to give information, you absconded, and was pursued from place to place, for about six weeks; I dare say it was.

Q. As you were called to account about this business of the Post-office, I will ask you, though you left your employment there, have you not been frequently in the Penny-post Letter-office? - A. I have been twice.

Q. You had no business there? - A. No business whatever.

Q. Were you ever turned out of that place? - A. Never, I was ordered to go out; I was desired by Mr. Harris to walk out.

Q. You were not turned out, that is, not laid hold of by the collar, and kicked out, but you were desired to go out? - A. I was.

Q. Those who are in that office can reach the table of course? - A. It is impossible without the notice of letter-carriers.

Q. Things are to be done sometimes, unobserved? - A. It is impossible.

Q. Do you not know, that by giving evidence against this man now at the bar, you exempt yourself from all prosecution? - A. I received a letter at the time I was taken; signifying the same.

Q. And not till then did you come forward? - A. No, nor would not; then they over persuaded me in protecting a woman that knew nothing of it; the first word Mr. Parkin said to me, when I was apprehended, was, to save myself, and become an evidence.

JOHN CUELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am clerk to the London and Middlesex Bank in Stratford-place.

Q. Does Mr. David Thomson, of Maidstone, keep an account at your house? - A. He does.

Q. You have your book there I see, turn to the 7th of June, was any draft of Mr. Thomson brought to your house on the 7th of June for 200l.? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any other sum of Mr. Thomson's, besides that, presented on that day? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Look at the draft? - A. This is the draft; it appears to be paid to a Mr. Thomson.

Q. What are the notes you paid? - A. A Banknote for 100l. No. 1724, dated the 22d of May, a 50l. No. 702, dated the 6th of May, the 40l. is No. 8398, dated the 26th of May, and 10l. in cash.

Q. Have you any memory of the person who received this? - A. None at all.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Some person received it in the name of Thomson? - A. I asked him if he received it for Mr. Thomson, and he said, yes.

JOHN PENN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Wood. fall. Q. What are you? - A. Bank-note pay clerk belonging to the Bank of England.

Q. You have some notes in your possession, I believe? - A. Yes, (produces them), one 100l. one 50l. one 40l. and one 2l.; the 100l. is No. 1724, dated the 22d of May, the 50l. is No. 702, dated the 6th of May, the 40l. No. 8398, dated the 26th of May, and the 2l. is No. 2108, dated the 15th of May, all in the year 1800.

Q. Were those large notes exchanged in the month of June? - A. Yes; the 100l. the 40l. and the 50l. were brought and exchanged for twenty notes of 5l. each, and forty-five of 2l. each; the numbers of the 2l. notes were from 2066 to 2110; the indorsement on the 100l. note is " T. Welsh, Kensington-grove, June 7, 1800.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Then you

delivered in all sixty-five pieces of Bank paper? - A. Yes.

ROBERT RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I was shopman to Mrs. Nutterell, No. 31, Houndsditch.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar? - A. I know him by sight; he formerly lived nearly opposite.

Q. Do you remember him coming to your Mistress's shop at any time in June last? - A. Yes, June the 9th.

Q. What did he buy? - A. Two yards and a half of buff cord, for breeches.

Q. In what way did he pay you? - A. With a 2l. note, for which I gave him change; I desired him to write his name and residence upon the note.

Q. Do you recollect what he wrote? - A. He wrote Johnson, Whitechapel.

Q. Did you know his name before? - A. No.

Q. What did you do with that note? - A. I gave it to my mistress.

Q. (To Penn). Be so good as to shew the 2l. note to this witness.

Ray. I believe this to be the same note, but I do not recollect the 7th of June upon it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. It is very usual for persons to write upon Bank-notes the names of the persons from whom they receives them? - A. Yes, it is.

Mr. Abbott. Q. You desired him to write his own name? - A. Yes; if I know the person, I put their name upon it myself.

WILLIAM BRAY WEDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. (Produces a pair of breeches). Q. Where did you get these breeches? - A. From the prisoner's lodgings, after the prisoner was in custody.

Q. How do you know it was the prisoner's lodgings? - A. He informed Mr. Parkin and myself where his lodgings were, and he delivered the key.

Q. (To Ray). Is that the same sort of stuff that you sold to the prisoner? - A. Yes; it is impossible to say positively, but it is like it.

Mr. Knowlys. To Wedley). Q. I believe he admitted that he bought these breeches of Mrs. Nutterell? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not say that he put down the name of Johnson upon it because he had received it from a person of that name in Whitechapel? - A. He hesitated at first, and said he was not prepared for an answer, and about an hour after he said he took it of a person of the name of Johnson, in Whitechapel.

Mr. Abbott. Q. It was in consequence of this 2l. note that he was apprehended? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You found these breeches at his lodgings? - A. Yes, and I brought them to Mr. Parkin's office, and put my own seal upon them to identify them; I asked him whether he had not purchased a breeches piece of Mrs. Nutterell, in Houndsditch; he said, yes; I then asked him whether he had not paid for it with a 2l. Bank of England note: he admitted that he had, after that the lodging was searched and the breeches found; Mr. parkin delivered them to me, and I have had them ever since.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did not you find some pawn-brokers' duplicates? - A. There were some duplicates.

Q. Did you find any Bank paper? - A. No.

Q. Though there were sixty-five pieces issued? - A. Yes.

HENRY HYDE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Do you know Hill? - A. Yes.

Q. You are a Supervisor of the Excise? - A. Yes; Hill was an Excise officer in my division; he had been under me six months and upwards.

Q. Do you remember, on the 6th of June, seeing Hill and the prisoner at the bar together? - A. I do.

Q. Did the prisoner make any application to you on account of Hill? - A. Yes; on the 5th of June, Hill requested leave of absence the next morning, the 6th. till ten o'clock; I left word at the chamber that I was going to Mr. Wright's, a wine and brandy merchant, at Hackney, with his books on survey, and he was to meet me when I had got to Church-street; I met with the prisoner between ten and eleven, and he said, Mr. Hyde, I have come from Mr. Hill to ask your leave of absence till noon, past twelve o'clock, this day; I granted the same, and I went on to Mr. Wright's, and Mr. Pooley went in along with me to the said house; I began to take the brandy stock, and in about five minutes in came Mr. Hill; I said to him, Mr. Hill, your friend has been here to ask leave of absence for you till past twelve; Mr. Pooley was close by me at the time; I proceeded on my business, and Mr. Pooley and my officer withdrew into the yard, and I went into the cellar to take the wine stock; they were both talking together; they followed me into the cellar; I proceeded on my business there, and Mr. Hill and Mr. Pooley drank a glass of white wine together; a very few minutes afterwards, he said good day to Mr. Hill, and good day to me, and went away; I saw him no more that day; the next day, on the 7th of June, at evening, past five o'clock, I saw them both together at the Black Horse Fieldgate-street, very near Whitechapel church.

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE sworn. - Q. You keep a lodging-house, I believe? - A. I let apartments.

Q. Where? - A. In Whire-horse-street, St. George's in the East; I know the prisoner per

fectly well, he lodged with me between four and five years.

Q. Did he lodge with you in June last? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Do you know Hill? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. The man who was a witness here this morning? - A. Yes, I saw him; Hill called on the 9th of June upon Mr. Pooley; I was absent from home when he came, but he was there when I came home.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called eight witnesses, who gave him an excellent character. GUILTY , Death , aged 34.

Case reserved for the opinion of the twelve Judges .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-56

150. FRANCIS WOOLDRIDGE was indicted for forging and counterfeiting, on the 26th of November , a Bank-note, for the payment of 1l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. Stating it to be a promissory note, with the like intention.

Third Count. For feloniously disposing of and putting away a forged Bank-note, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Fourth Count. For uttering and publishing as true, a forged promissory note, with the like intention.

And four other Counts, charging it to be with intention to defraud Marks Israel and Isaac Israel .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knowlys, and the case by Mr. Garrow).

MARKS ISRAEL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I keep a clothes-shop , in Lower East Smithfield : To-morrow will be eight weeks, the prisoner came to my shop in the afternoon, between three and four o'clock, and bought a jacket of me for six shillings and sixpence, he gave me a 1l. note for me to give him the change, he was very much in a hurry for me to give him the change; I held up the note against the light, and could not discover any impression in the note.

Q. You mean, that you could not discover the water-mark? - A. No, I could not; he said he had it from his master; I told him then I should like to see his master, and I sent for the beadle of the parish to take him in charge, I gave the note to the beadle; we then went to the Magistrates' office, at Lambeth-street, and he gave the charge over to Griffiths, the officer.

Q. Look at the note, and see if it is the same? - A. It is the same, I put a Hebrew mark upon it.

Q. Who is your partner? - A. My brother, Isaac Israel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. He was taken before the Magistrate, and the Magistrate discharged him? - A. Yes.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. The prisoner was brought to the office upon the charge of uttering a forged note, I am sure he is the same man. (The note read).

THOMAS FERRIDAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I live at No. 5, White's-yard, Rosemary-lane.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; he called upon me on the 18th of December, at twelve o'clock, and asked me if I could procure him some had money, I told him I would if I could.

Q. Did you go any where with him? - A. I went with him at that time to the Windsor Castle, Holborn; and going along, I said I should be hungry before I came back; to which the prisoner answered, I have got some pork chops in my pocket, for which I passed a bad note last night; I went with him to the Windsor Castle.

Q. Upon your oath, did the prisoner say any thing more to you upon the subject of bad notes? - A. He was telling me that he had passed a good many.

Q. Did he name any place where he had passed them? - A. No, he did not.

Q. When you came to the Windsor Castle, did you see any body? - A. After I had been there in company with him about five hours in the taproom, James Wooldridge, who was tried yesterday, came in, and we three went together into the parlour.

Q. That was a private room? - A. Yes; there were only our three selves; James Wooldridge said to me, our foolish Frank has been taken up to Whitechapel-office for a bad Bank-note.

Q. In the presence of Francis? - A. Yes; he said he looked so much of an innocent, countrified fellow, that they asked him where he had got the note, and he said he had had it of his master, and he, James Wooldridge , came forward, and owned to having given it to him, and gave them a card of his address, and they had acquitted him.

Q. What more passed? - A. Nothing more passed about it.

Q. Was any appointment made, in the presence of Francis, for another meeting? - A. Yes, the next day, at six o'clock.

Q. What was stated in the presence of Francis Wooldridge , respecting the object of that meeting? A. James, and Francis, and I, were to go out, one was to carry them, and the other two to go into the shops and pass them, that if the person that went in with one should be stopped, there should be no more found upon him; I agreed to come to them.

Q. Did you, after making that agreement and appointment, communicate these facts to any officer of the police? - A. I did; the next morning I went to Mr. Rogers, and told him the whole of it, the same as I tell now.

Q. Then there was a plan laid for apprehending him? - A. Yes.

Q. You were to meet at six? - A. Yes, I was too late, it was almost eight o'clock; I went before the Justice, and they kept me till it was too late.

Q. Did you communicate to the Justice every thing that you have now told? - A. Yes.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, did you go for the purpose of going in this fraudulent scheme, or was it for the purpose of bringing them to justice? A. It was my intention, if I had gone out with them, to have marked all the doors where we had passed them.

Q. Who did you find there at eight o'clock? - A. I found James Wooldridge there, Francis was was gone out; James then went with me to Pritchard's.

Q. Did you see Francis again in the course of that evening? - A. Yes, that night I saw him again.

Q. At what time? - A. It was ten o'clock when I saw him.

Q. Where? - A. At the Windsor Castle; I came back again with James; I told Francis that the notes were all burnt.

Q. Had any thing passed at Pritchard's that induced you to tell him so? - A. I was told so; I told the prisoner that Mrs. Pritchard had told me they were all burnt; he d-d Pritchard, and said, that he wanted to make a property of them.

Q. Where did you leave the prisoner that night? - A. At the Windsor Castle, with the other prisoner, James.

Q. How soon after was this prisoner apprehended? - A. Between nine and ten o'clock the next morning.

Q. In consequence of your information? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to you about the note for which he had been taken up? - A. He said he had passed it, that was all.

Q. Where was that? - A. On the 18th, when I was sitting at the public-house with him in the taproom.

Q. What did he say about it? - A. He said he had passed a bad note, and was taken to the office; he said he had it from James, and that he had passed many for him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Remember you were examined here yesterday? - A. Yes.

Q. What time do you recollect was it that you had this conversation with the prisoner? - A. The 18th of December.

Q. That conversation was considerably after the time that this man was supposed to have uttered this note? - A. It was after the time.

Q. When this conversation took place, there was nobody present but the prisoner and you? - A. No.

Q. Therefore there could be nobody to contradict you? - A. There was nobody else by.

Q. Is Mrs. Pritchard here? - A. I do not know.

Q. She told you that the notes were burnt? - A. Yes.

Q. And she is not here to prove that fact? - A. I cannot say.

Q. It was the 19th that you met with James? - A. Yes.

Q. And you and he and James were to go out to negociate some notes? - A. We were, but I was too late.

Q. And I understand you to say, that the manner in which it was to be done, was for persons to go into the shop, carrying but a single note? - A. Yes.

Q. You know you were sworn to tell the truth, and the whole truth? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you say one syllable of this yesterday? - A. I was not asked.

Court. The witness speaks the whole truth, when he answers all the questions put to him by the Counsel who has the conduct of the cause.

Mr. Alley. Q. Who employed you in this business? - A. Nobody.

Q. Do you mean to say you are not to be paid for it? - A. I never asked for any thing.

Q. Do you expect it or not, aye or no? - A. I do not look for it.

Q. Do you not expect it? - A. No; if there is any thing given me, I will accept it.

Q. What way of life are you in? - A. A smith.

Q. Have you worked at it lately? - A. Yes, every day, and I work very hard.

Q. Did it ever happen to you to be a witness here before? - A. No.

Q. Has it happened to you to be accused for any felony yourself? - A. No, nor tried.

Q. What were you tried for in the country? - A. I was not tried at all.

Q. Were you not sent to Bridewell, in the country? - A. That was about some pork; they swore to that property which I had bought and sold again three days before they came after it; they swore to my own property.

Q. How long were you in prison? - A. A month; I offered five guineas to take up the man that had sold it to me.

Q. Were you discharged out of prison? - A. There was a man in prison, and he opened the place, and both came out together.

Q. Did it ever happen to you that you were accused of any offence in town, of coining, or any thing of that sort? - A. There was a press and tools taken from me, but they were a press and tools that were not mine, they belonged to an engraver, and it was used in cutting buttons.

Mr. Garrow. Q. You never were prosecuted? - A. No.

Q. And these insinuations of coining, housebreaking, highway robberies, and those offences that were alluded to yesterday are gross calumnies? - A. Yes, and the people that mention these things are ten times worse than ever I was.

THOMAS BLISS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am an inspector of Bank-notes.

Q. Look at that note, and tell us if it is a genuine note of the Bank of England or a forged one? - A. The whole of this is a forgery.

Q. Were you at the office when this man was examined the first time? - A. I was.

Q. Do you recollect James Wooldridge attending there? - A. Yes, and produced a card which was annexed to this note, and delivered to our solicitor.

Mr. Alley. Q. There is no day of the month there? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I went to my master and told him I wanted a jacket to work in, and about three o'clock that day he gave me a note; I went to a cook-shop to get me something to eat, and coming back I saw some jackets hang up at that gentleman's door; I went in, and he asked me nine shillings for the jacket; we agreed for the jacket at five shillings and six-pence, and I offered him a note, and he said he could not give me change, and he sent the boy out to get the note changed, and he came back and said he could not get it changed, and then the gentleman sent him out again, and he came back with a man who said it was a bad note; and they asked me who I had it from, I said I had it from my master, James Wooldridge , he and I are brothers children; they asked me where he quartered, and I told them he quartered at one Mr. Pritchard's, at Mile-end; they took me in a coach to Lambeth-street, and put me in the care of Mr. Griffiths; he asked me if I had got any more money about me, and I said I had only a shilling; they asked me if I had any more notes, I said I had not, and they searched me, and the next morning took me before a Magistrate, and then they sent for my master, and my master came down and told them he had given me the note, but he did not know whether it was good or bad; I never knew this Ferriday; I did not know that his name was Ferriday; he went by the name of Thomas Baker.

Mr. Garrow. (To Ferriday). Q. Have you been known by the name of Baker? - A. Yes; my uncle's name was Baker; my father died when I was very young, and I was along with my uncle, and called more by the name of Baker than any other name.

The prisoner called Samuel Westwood, who had known him nearly forty years, and gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-57

151. JOHN SPERINCK was indicted, for that he, on the 27th of November , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Thomas Fagg and William Pratt , did, by virtue of such employment, take into his possession the sum of 9s. of and from one George Ballisett , for and on account of his said masters, and afterwards fraudulently did embezzle and secrete the same .

Second Count. Varying the manner of charging it, and

Third Count. For feloniously stealing 9s. the property of the said Thomas Fagg and William Pratt .

(The Case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS FAGG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the properietors of the Banbury coach , Mr. William Pratt , of Banbury, is the other proprietor, he and I are the sole proprietors; the prisoner was our coachman , he drove the Banbury coach from the Bell and Crown Inn, in Holborn , to Aylesbury, in Berkshire, and back again; it was his business to receive all the fares that were taken up after the coach left the Bell and Crown Inn, and till it returned again, and to pay the money at the coach-office at the Bell and Crown Inn, in the city of London: he came into my employ first in March, 1800.

Q. During the course of that employment were you led to any suspicion of him? - A. I certainly was.

Q. In consequence of these suspicion were you induced to question him particularly respecting the receipts of the 27th of November? - A. Particularly so; I particularly cautioned him to account for all the monies he had received on that day and previous to that day.

Q. When was it that you so questioned him? - A. On the night of the 28th of November.

Q. Was their any mention of the receipt of a fare of nine shillings? - A. No; I did not ask him particularly as to every fare; I said, Sperinck, have you put all your parcels and passengers upon this bill; he said they were all put down.

Q. Did he produce to you a way-bill of the 27th of November? - A. He was about to settle the way-bill with the book-keeper, who always settles it with him; the way-bill of the 27th and 28th are upon one sheet of paper, and settled at one and the same time; (Produces the way-bill), this is the way-bill settled.

Q. Are they kept distinct? - A. Although they are on one sheet of paper they are kept separate, one is the down bill of the 27th, and the other the up bill of the 28th.

Q. Did you see such a fare in that way-bill as nine shillings paid by one George Ballisett ? - A. No such fare is accounted for.

Q. Did you particularly caution and desire him to be particular as to that way-bill? - A. Particulary so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Are Mr. Pratt and you joint partners all the way? - A. No; I am the proprietor of the coach from London to Buckingham, and Mr. Pratt from Buckingham to Banbury; the distance between London and Banbury is agreed between me and my partner to be seventy-seven miles, my share is sixty-one miles.

Q. Your share of what? - A. Of what the coach earns; suppose the coach earns seventy-seven pounds in a week, in four weeks, after the duty, the expences of the tolls, and the use of the coach are deducted from it, I should take sixty-one pounds and my partner would take sixteen pounds.

Court. Q. Do you take the whole earnings of the coach? - A. The whole earnings of the coach are calculated upon.

Q. Instead of proportioning upon miles, you have a certain share upon the whole earnings? - A. Yes; I have sixty-one shares out of seventy-seven.

Q. In the same proportion you are answerable for loss as well as profit? - A. Yes.

Mr. Const. Q. Your business, like any other business, is divided into seventy-seven shares, of which you have sixty-one? - A. On that coach.

Q. You, however, having so many shares, have the sixty-one miles nearest your own dwelling? - A. Yes.

Q. All the expence of the first sixty-one miles is borne by you? - A. No; the horses have nothing to do with the nature of a stage-coach account, each person upon the ground that he horses a coach finds his own horses; the duty, the tolls, and other incidental expences are borne in an equal proportion according to the number of miles. I will state to your Lordship the manner in which we settle stage-coach accounts; we settle every four weeks, the nett is then divided by the number of miles that the coach goes.

Q. Then you both contribute towards the expences? - A. Exactly so.

Mr. Const. Q. Who hired the prisoner, you or Mr. Pratt? - A. I hired him.

Q. Had you the sole controul over him? - A I had the greatest controul over him.

Q. He did not go so far as Mr. Pratt's dwelling? - A. Not as my servant; I believe he has gone the whole way; I hired both the coachmen, and they were paid out of the joint earnings of the coach.

Q. Have you no other partner in your share? - A. No.

Q. Has Mr. Pratt any body concerned with him in his share? - A. No.

WILLIAM PRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at Banbury; I am in partnership with Mr. Fagg in the Banbury coach.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have seen him as coachman, as coming with the other coachman from Aylesbury; I do not think he ever had the care of driving from Aylessbury to Banbury.

Q. The coachman driving from London to Aylesbury would not come to you with money? - A. No.

Q. Did he ever account to you for any fares between London and Aylesbury on the 27th of November? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. - Q. Is the account at Banbury settled with you? - A. No; there is no account at all settled at Banbury, it is all settled in London.

Q. The coachman was Mr. Fagg's servant, and not your's? - A. Both jointly.

Q. Did you consider yourself as having a power to dismiss him? - A. Whenever I pleased.

GEORGE BALLISSETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On the 27th of November last I was a passenger in the Banbury coach driven by the prisoner.

Q. Did the prisoner know of your intention of being a passenger that day? - A. Yes; he had been made acquainted with it; the coach took me up at the Green Man and Still, in Oxford-street; he carried me to the sign of the Peacock, in Chalfont St. Peter's, Buckinghamshire.

Q. Who was the driver of the coach that day? - A. The prisoner at the bar; he told me the fare was nine shillings, and I paid him nine shillings, by getting change of him for a two pound Bank of England note, giving one shilling for himself; I had been travelling by the same coach before, with the same coachman.

Court. Q. That nine shillings you paid for the fare of the coach? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Did Mr. Fagg know of your intention? - A. Yes, he did over night.

Q. You went, I suppose, for the purpose of detecting him? - A. Yes; he had a suspicion of him.

Q. You are sure you paid it him? - A. Yes.

Q. Of what profession are you? - A. A gentleman; I was brought up to the profession of the law, I was last with Mr. Johnson, NO. 4, Southampton-court, Queen-square, Bloomsbury.

Q. And you are an attorney? - A. I do not act as such; but I do business in the conveyancing way.

Q. You are not teh person then that we have seen in the Hay and Scraw Committee? - A. Yes; I belong to that committee.

Q. No part of this transaction took place in the city of London? - A. No.

Q. You paid your money in Chalsont St. Peter's, and commenced your journey in Oxford-street? - A. Yes.

Q. The money that you paid, was it your own or Mr. Fagg's? - A. It was my own.

Mr. Knowlys, Q. You took this journey upon Mr. Fagg's suspicions, to try whether the coachman would be honest enough to give his master the money? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Have you received that money back again? - A. No.

Q. Is there any understanding between you, that you are to have it returned? - A. No, there was not, upon my oath.

Q. Do you now expect the money to be returned? - A. I certainly expect that I shall not be out of pocket by it; I have left that entirely to Mr. Fagg.

Q. Was there nothing said between you about it at the time? - A. No.

Q. But you do not expect to be out of pocket? - A. I certainly do not expect to be any thing out of pocket.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am book-keeper to Messrs. Fagg and Pratt's Banbury coach.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner being called upon to account for the monies received on the 27th of November? - A. I do.

Q. He accounts by a way-bill? - A. He does, I settled it with him myself.

Q. Was he more than ordinarily cautioned that evening? - A. No; upon every bill he was requested to be correct.

Q. Was he requested to be correct and sure in his account of that way-bill? - A. He was.

Q. Look at the way-bill; is there any fare accounted for as 9s. from London to Chalfont St. Peter's? - A. No, there is not.

Q. Was it his duty to make up his accounts at your coach-office every time that he returned to London? - A. Yes; every other day for the downbill, and the up-bill also.

Q. The 27th was the bill from London to Aylesbury? - A. Yes, it was.

Prisoner's defence. I don't recollect any thing of that man's going down with me; I don't recollect ever seeing him before.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-58

152. JOHN SPERINCK was again indicted, for that he, on the 30th of November , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Thomas Fagg and William Pratt , did, by virtue of such employment, take into his possession the sum of 8s. of and from one George Ballissett , for and on account of his said masters, and afterwards fraudulently did embezzle and secrete the same .

Second Count. For stealing 9s. the property of the said Thomas Fagg and William Pratt .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS FAGG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partnership with William Pratt, in the Banbury coach, the prisoner was our coachman on the 30th of November, employed by me, on the account of both me and my partner ; he drove the coach to Aylesbury on the 30th of November; upon his return with his way-bill, I asked him particularly if he had put down all his passengers and parcels; he said he had put them all down; I then said, why, then you had but one inside; the answer he made me was, that he had but one inside; he said that no one asked him to ride all the way, (produces the way-bill); I was present when the bill was settled; there is only one inside accounted for, and eight outsides.

Court. Q. Are you sure there were eight outsides? - A. Yes, by the way-bill.

Q. Does there appear, as an inside, the name of Ballissett? - A. There is no such name; there is one inside from Wendover only; the fare is eleven Shillings.

WILLIAM PRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partnership with the last witness; the prisoner never accounted with me.

GEORGE BALLISSETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was a passenger in the Banbury coach on the 30th of November; I came from Chalfont St. Peter's, but was taken up two miles nearer town; I came to the Green Man and Still, in Oxford-street; there were five inside passengers besides myslef.

Q. The coach was full then? - A. Yes; one of them was a Mr. Bailey, a Quaker, that lives at Cheshunt, he lest the coach at Uxbridge; I left the coach before any of the other four passengers, I left them in the coach; when I got out, I paid eight shillings for my fare, and one shilling I gave the coachman, the prisoner is the man; I gave him half-a-guinea, and had one shilling and sixpence out of it.

Q. How soon after this did you acquaint Mr. Fagg with it? - A. On the Tuesday following; it was on Sunday, the 30th, that I came up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Was this the same journey? - A. No; I went down by the Uxbridge coach.

Q. As there were five gentlemen in the coach, I suppose they are here to confirm you? - A. There was only one that I knew, and he was a Quaker.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. It was not your duty or business to procure witnesses? - A. No.

Q. You are not the solicitor for this prosecution? - A. No.

Court. Q. Did you go down with the knowledge of the prosecutor? - A. No; I went down that time unknown to him.

Q. Did you come home at his desire in his coach? - A. Not at his desire; I went to meet a person at Chalfont, to meet a person upon business at the Greyhound, at Chalfont.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am book-keeper to the Banbury coach; the prisoner drove that coach from London to Aylesbury on the 30th of November; it is his business to account for his money at the coach-office of the Bell and Crown, which is in the City of London; the account is always settled there.

Q. Did you see the way-bill of the 30th of November? - A. Yes; I settled it with the coachman.

Q. Is there any account of inside fares in that bill; from Chalfont to London? - A. There is not; there is only one inside sare, that is, from Wendover to London.

Q. What is the fare from Wendover to London? - A. Eleven shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I don't recollect any thing about that man, I don't recollect his ever riding with me in his life; I do not think he ever did.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-59

153. JOHN SPERINCK was again indicted, for that he, on the 5th of December , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Thomas Fagg and William Pratt , did, by virtue of such employment, take into his possession the sum of 4s. 6d. of and from one John Little, for and on account of his said masters, and afterwards fraudulently did embezzle and secrete the same .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing 4s. 6d. the property of Thomas Fagg and William Pratt.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS FAGG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the Bell and Crown, Holborn, in the City of London , in partnership with William Pratt; the prisoner was employed to drive the Banbury coach to Aylesbury; he was paid out of the joint concern; on the 5th of December I was ill in bed, when he delivered his way-bill.

WILLIAM PRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partnership with Thomas Fagg ; the prisoner was a coachman in the joint concern.

JOHN LITTLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a Custom-house officer, in the port of London, and also have a place in the East-India Company's service; I live at No. 11, Jewry-street, Crutched-fiars.

Q. Were you at the Pheasants Inn, Chalfont St. Peter's Buckinghamshire, on the 5th of December? - A. I was; I came to town on the outside of the Banbury coach, the prisoner at the bar was the driver; I left the coach at the corner of North Audley-street, Oxford-street , at the King's Arms; I asked him what the fare was, and he said, four shillings and sixpence, which I gave him, and one shilling for himself; the inside was full, and I was obliged to come up outside; I wanted an inside place, but was unable to get it.

Q. When did you give any information to the proprietors of the coach of this transaction? - A. The next day; I know Mr. Fagg; Mr. Pratt I do not know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a Custom-house officer? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of office, comptroller, treasurer, or what? - A. An established watchman, appointed by the Treasury.

Q. What situation have you in the India-house? - A. A commodore.

Q. You were sent down by Mr. Fagg on purpose? - A. I went down at his request, in order to know whether his coachman was an honest man or not.

Q. Mr. Fagg told you he should pay you for your time, did not he? - A. He said I should not lose any thing.

Q. Did he give you the money? - A. He gave me two guineas.

Q. That did not satisfy you, I suppose, for your expences? - A. That would not satisfy me for my loss of time.

Q. Pray what have you as a watchman? - A. Half-a-crown for six hours.

Q. And what as commodore? - A. Three shillings a day.

Q. And you had only two guineas for this job? - A. No.

Court. Q. How many were there in the inside? - A. Seven inside and four outside, besides myself; when we got to Shepherd's-bush, he took up another.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am book-keeper to Mr. Fagg; I settled the way-bill of the 5th of December with the prisoner.

Q. Do you find any outside fare accounted for from Chalfont St. Peter's, of four shillings and sixpence? - A. No, there is not; there are four outsides accounted for, and six insides, but no person from Chalfont.

Q. It was in the coach-office, in Holborn, that he presented you with the way-bill? - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-60

154. JOHN SPERINCK was again indicted, foa that he, on the 6th of December , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Thomas Fagg and William Pratt , did, by virtue of such employment, take into his possession the sum of 5s. of and from one Joseph Fallows , for and on account of his said masters, and afterwards fraudulently did embezzle and secrete the same .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing 5s. the Property of the said Thomas Fagg and William Pratt .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM PRATT sworn: - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am part proprietor of the Banbury coach with Mr. Fagg.

Q. Did the prisoner give any account to you of monies received on the 6th of December? - A. No.

THOMAS PRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partner ship with Mr. Pratt; I received the way-bill of the 6th and 7th of December, on the 7th, in the evening, from the prisoner, at the Bell and Crown Inn, Holborn.

Q. Is there any fare in that bill from the Green Man and Still, in Oxford-street, to Uxbridge? - A. No, there is not.

Q. What would be the fare for that distance? - A. Six shillings; there is no account of either five or six shillings in this way-bill, nor any passenger to Uxbridge whatever; on the 7th of December, upon his return, I asked him particularly whether he had put down all his passengers and parcels in the way-bill, and he told me had.(Produces the way-bill).

JOSEPH FALLOWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk to Messrs. Price and Aubrey, of Salisbury-square, Fleet-street, attornies: On the 6th of December I went by the Banbury coach from the Green Man and Still, to Uxbridge; I never saw Mr. Fagg till the 6th of December, nor Mr. Pratt till a day or two ago; when I saw Mr. Fagg, it was after I had been to Uxbridge and back again.

Q. Had you made Mr. Fagg acquainted with your intention of going to Uxbridge, before you set out for Uxbridge? - A. Certainly not; I had never seen them before; the prisoner at the bar drove the coach; I got down at the White Horse, at Uxbridge, from inside the coach; the prisoner charged me five shillings, which I paid him.

Q. Did you acquaint Mr. Fagg, upon your return on the 6th, that you had been a passenger, and what you had paid? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a limb of the law - you are to be an attorney? - A. I believe I shall very shortly.

Q. You are what is called a fagging clerk? - A. No, I do not fag much.

Q. How long have you been in their employ? - A. Six weeks; before that I was with Mr. Edmonds, of the Exchequer office of Pleas, for more than twelve months.

Q. Who sent you to Uxbridge? - A. Mr. Dixon, of the One Bell, in the Strand.

Q. A friend of Mr. fagg's? - A. Yes.

Q. And did not he give you money too? - A. Yes, he gave me a guinea.

Q. You expended five shillings going out, and five shillings coming home, and the rest was for your dinner? - A. Yes, and my breakfast.

Q. This was from a pure love of the public; you did not wish to have any reward for it? - A. No, I did not know what I was to go for; I was to take notice of what passed on the road.

Court. Q. Who gave you the guinea? - A. Mr. Dixon.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Who was there going down? - A. A lady and her son, going to Buckingham, and a gentleman, I do not know where he was going.

Q. You have brought them all here, have not you? - A. No, I have not.

Q. How many outsides? - A. Six.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are neither the solicitor, nor the clerk to the solicitor, for this prosecution? - A. No.

Q. And therefore it was no part of your duty to collect witnesses? - A. No.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. (Produces the way-bill.) Q. Is there any sure accounted for in that way-bill from London to Uxbridge, on the 6th of December? - A. No; neither inside nor out.

Prisoner's defence. I never took so little as five shillings for any Uxbridge passenger since I have drove the coach. GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-61

155. JOHN WARING was indicted for that he, on the 18th of December , being employed in the capacity of a servant to John Willan , did, by virtue of such employment, take into his possession, the sum of 6s. 5d. of and from one Peter Westall , then being clerk to John Lee , for and on account of his said master, and afterwards fraudulently did embezzle and secrete the same .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-62

156. MARY SCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , a stuff petticoat, value 1s. a pair of flannel drawers, value 6d. a cap, value 2s. a piece of black silk, value 6d. and a linen wrapper, value 4d. the property of Ann Harley , widow .

ANN HARLEY sworn. - I am a widow, I live at No. 12, Bolsover-street, Oxford-street , it is a public-house, I lodge at the top of the house; On Monday the 29th of December, about half past four o'clock, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of my drawers; I met the prisoner coming down stairs with them, tied up in a silk handkerchief; I had been out about a quarter of an hour; I left my child, about eight years old, in the room; the prisoner passed me on the stairs, and called to a man in the tap-room, of the name of Joe, but there was no such man there; she was then going out at the door, I asked her where the bundle was that she had brought down stairs with

her; she said, she had none; I said, yes, you have a bundle; I turned round, and the bundle sell from under her petticoats; I picked it up, and took her into another room, and searched her; she told me it was not her that had robbed me, there was somebody more up stairs; I called the landlord to go up, but he found nobody; Sarah Baldwin lodges in the same room with me; she came in, and I delivered the prisoner up to her; the officer has the property.( William Jackson , the officer, produced the property, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been drinking in the house for three quarters of an hour; when I was coming away, these things were lying at the bottom of the box, and I kicked them before me.

GUILTY , aged 29. - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-63

157. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of July , two sheets, value 16s. the property of Tycho Thomas .

(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

Mrs. UNTHANK sworn. - I keep a public-house, in King-street, Westminster; Ann Weston brought a pair of sheets to my house to sell; it was some time in July, but I cannot recollect when; I bought the sheets of Mrs. Watson, and desired her to send the person to whom they belonged for the money, and the prisoner came and had the money from me, I paid her sixteen shillings; I afterwards delivered them to Jane Bladon , Mr. Thomas's servant.

JANE BLADON sworn. - (Produces the sheets.) I am servant to Mr. Thomas, who keeps an hotel in Berkeley-square ; I received these sheets from the last witness, I am sure they are Mr. Thomas's, there is a mark still very plain to be seen, though it has been picked out, and here is another that I have brought with me that is exactly like them; I am sure they are Mr. Thomas's sheets, the cloth is the same width.

Court. Q. Did you ever miss them? - A. No, we have so much linen in use, that it is impossible ever to miss it; they were marked J. P. J. with black silk; one of them was marked No. 21; I never saw the prisoner before.

ANN WESTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I live at No. 36, Vine-street, the prisoner lodged in my house; she brought me a pair of sheets to sell, and said that they belonged to a woman that was down-lying, and she wanted to sell them to buy child-bed linen; she asked me sixteen shillings for them; I told her I could not buy them; she asked me if I could not get her a customer, and I took them to Mrs. Unthank, who had a great many children and beds, and might want them; Mrs. Unthank bought them, and I sent the prisoner to her for the money.

MARY SMITH sworn. I am the wife of Joseph Smith ; I am servant to Mr. Thomas. Sometime in the month of July I saw the prisoner twice within a fortnight at Mr. Thomas's; it was about the middle of July, about half past six in the morning; she had nothing with her when she came in; she carried out a considerable bundle; she was there between twenty minutes and half an hour; I was doing my work; I did not know what she had come for; she had a considerable large bundle wrapped up in a coloured apron, which she put under a red cloak; I had lived there but about a week: the second time that I saw her she came in between six and seven in the morning, and brought in a little bundle with her; after staying about twenty minutes, she went away with a large bundle; I am sure she is the same person; there was a piece of work in the house about things being lost, and seeing her come backwards and forwards gave me cause of suspicion.

TYCHO THOMAS sworn. I can only speak to the general loss; I cannot speak to these sheets, they are in the care of Jane Bladon .

Prisoner's defence. They are my own sheets; I brought them from Shrewsbury; they were given to my husband at the election. Marry Smith has been a prisoner here several times; she is a prisoner here, and told me, since I have been here, that she should expect an ample satisfaction from Mr. Thomas. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-64

158. ANDREW THOMPSON was indicted for forging and counterfeiting, on the 5th of December , a certain receipt and acquittance for 16s. with intent to defraud Bartholomew Ruspini , Thomas Hawkes and others, the subscribers to an institution then called "The British National Endeavour."

There were eleven other counts in the indictment.

It appearing that the words of the receipt charged in the indictment were "Settled, J. M." the Court were of opinion that it was not a receipt and acquittal for money. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18010114-65

159. ANN SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , a wooden toilette box, value 1s. a wooden waiter, value 6d. the cover of a toilette box, value 6d. two bird-cages, value 6d. four pieces of pipe lead, value 1s. a brass rod, value 6d. and two yards of damask, value 1s. the property of Ephraim-Baron D'Aquilar .

EPHRAIM-BARON D'AQUILAR sworn. - I know nothing of the transaction myself.

JOHN BLAND sworn. - I am servant to Mr. D'Aquilar; I had the care of his house at Beth

nal-green ; the Baron did not live in the house; we have missed a great many things.

EDWARD EAGLES sworn. - I am a constable;(produces the property); - I found the toilette boxes, the bird-cages, the damask, and a parchment lease at the prisoner's apartments; I found three pieces of lead at Mr. Whitfield's, in Kingsland-road.(The bird-cages, the lead, and the toilette box were deposed to by Bland.)

ELIZABETH SAWSER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Whitfield, an exciseman, who keeps a saleshop, No. 30, Kingsland-road; on the 5th of December, the prisoner's two children came with three pieces of lead; I sent the children to fetch their mother; I did not like to buy it of them, and the prisoner came in about five minutes, and said that I need not be afraid of buying it, for her brother gave it her, who kept the Horns public-house, at Hackney; in consequence of that I bought the lead, and gave her five farthings a pound; it came to eighteen pence; I had bought before some pieces of lead of the mother, but that was not found, we had sold it all; we bought this of the children and not of the mother; this piece of lead, which Bland has sworn to, was not bought either of the prisoner or the children, but of another person:

ELIZABETH HOPKINS sworn. - On Friday, the 5th of December, two children, a boy and a girl, came to my shop in Kingsland-road, and brought me some brass to sell, and part of this was brought on that Friday, and the Monday following there was some more brought; I think the whole parcel in the two days was four shillings and four-pence halfpenny.

Q. What age were these children? - A. About ten or eleven; on the Tuesday following I was informed of the prisoner's being taken up, and her daughter with her, and in consequence of information, I went to Mr. Armstrong, and told him I had bought this brass; I attended at the office, and was asked if I knew the girl that was then with the prisoner; I knew it was the girl that I had bought these things of.

Prisoner's defence. The things were given me three weeks before I was taken up; I was sitting selling matches, and I gave a woman three halfpenny worth of matches for the silk.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-66

160. WILLIAM STUBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , 200lb. of lead, value 25s. and 4lb. of lead pipe, value 8d. the property of John Gamson , and fixed to his house .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-67

161. GABRIEL HUGHES and JOHN JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , a wether sheep, value 40s. the property of William Tuck .

Second Count. - For that they, on the same day, a wether sheep, value 40s. the property of William Tuck, wilfully and feloniously did kill, with a felonious intent to steal the whole carcase.

It appearing in evidence that the sheep stolen was the property of a Mr.Wright, and not of the prosecutor, the prisoners were both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-68

162. JOSEPH KEMP , ROBERT BURGESS , and JOHN HALE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , a wether sheep, value 40s. the property of Robert Hulme .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

JOHN PARSONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Robert Hulme, who lives at Ponder's-end, in the parish of Edmonton ; on the 7th of October there were sixty-four sheep in the field, the next morning there was one missing; there was a gap in the hedge, through which it must have been taken away; in the fourth field I found the skin lying in a ditch by the side of a hedge.

Q. Was that the skin of one of the sheep that had been in your master's field the night before? - A. Yes, it was a wether sheep.

Q. What is become of the carcase? - A. That was taken away.

Q. Was there any pond in the field where you found the skin? - A. There was a little pond at the corner.

Court. Q. How was the skin marked? - A. With the letter S.

Q. There was no mark of Mr. Hulme's upon them? - A. No; he bought them with the letter S. upon them, and they remained with that mark.

Q. Were they all marked S.? - A. No.

Court. Did you see any signs of blood? - A. Yes, in the pond; it is a small pond, the water was tinged with blood.

Q. Were there any intrails left? - A. They were wrapped up in the skin.

Q. Was it a field of Mr. Hulme's where you found the skin? - A. No.

JOHN JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live servant with Mr. Peverell, who keeps the King's Head, at Winchmore-hill.

Q. Do you know the prisoners? - A. Yes, I know them all three perfectly well; Hale and Burgess were quartered there in October.

Q. Do you know whether, in the month of October, they had either of them any meat in their possession? - A. Yes; about the middle of October, but I cannot be particular to the time, not thinking any thing would come of it; in a chest

in the room where Hale and Burgess slept, there was a fore quarter of mutton, a hind quarter, a leg, part of the loin, and some sat in the box.

Court. Q. Inside sat? - A. Yes, and a shoulder wrapped up in a coverlid under the bed; the day before that they dressed a neck, a breast, and a loin.

Q. How do you know that? - A. I saw Hale and Kemp dressing it; they cut up part of the neck into steaks, and the breast they boiled afterwards for their dinners, which gave me a suspicion there was more meat in the house.

Q. Did you look at the meat in the chest? - A. Yes, I took it all out; my mistress had a suspicion that there was more meat in the house, because they had such a plenty.

Q. Did you observe it so as to say whether it had the appearance of being cut up by a butcher? -

A. No; it was mangled very much.

Q. JOHN HOLMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable at Tottenham; the prisoner Kemp was apprehended and put into the guard-house, and I fetched him out next morning by order of the Magistrates; I took him before Mr. Mores.

Q. Were you present when Kemp signed any paper? - A. Yes; he made a mark; I witnessed the mark.

Q. What had you said to Kemp before you took him before the Magistrate? - A. I did not ask him any questions.

Court. Q. Did any body, in your hearing, tell him it would be any use to him to make a confession? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Or that it would be worse for him if he did not? - A. No.

Q. You told him, I suppose, that you were going to take him before the Magistrate? - A. I do not know that I did.

Q. Did you say nothing to him about his confessing? - A. Not a word.

Q. Did any body say any thing to him before the Magistrate about confessing? - A. No.

Q. Was there any thing said about his being made a witness? - A. I believe there was something of that sort.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Before the confession or after? - A. After.

Court. Q. Was there any assurance given him that he should be a witness if he would be examined? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was there any body with you when you took him before the Magistrate? - A. Yes, Bryers, the constable, was with me.

JAMES BRYERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you say any thing to the prisoner to induce him to confess? - A. Not a word, I walked behind him.

Q. Did any body else say any thingto him about making a confession? - A. I do not recollect it.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Holmes). Q. What did he say as you were conveying him to Mr. More's? - A. Yes, he told me that he, Hale, and Burgess had stole a sheep of Mr. Hulme's.

Q. Did he begin telling you so of his own accord? - A. Yes; he said it was done a little way off Mr. Hulme's house, and that he threw the skin into a little pond at the bottom of the field.

EDWARD-ROWE MORES, Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are the Magistrate who took this examination? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any thing said, in your hearing, to induce Kemp to confess? - A. No.

Q. Did you see the prisoner put his mark to it? - A. I did. (The examination read.)

"The voluntary examination and confession of Joseph Kemp, taken before me, this 31st of December, 1800, who faith, that between six weeks and two months ago, this examinant was in company with Robert Burgess and John Hale, at the sign of the Three Tuns, Edmonton; that the said John Hale asked examinant if he would go with him and Robert Burgess to Mr. Hulme's farm, at Ponder's-end; that examinant, after a little hesitatation, consented; that they all three went together, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, to Mr. Hulme's farm, adjoining Ponder's-end, in the parish of Edmonton; that Hale shewed them where the sheep were; that they all three drove them up into one corner, and afterwards Hale made a gap in the hedge at the corner of the field, and that examinant caught one sheep which Hale would not have; but Hale caught one himself and tied its legs with a string which Hale took from his pocket, and they drove the sheep across the first field, and then Hale carried it over another field; that he left examinant and Burgess to drive it while he went to look out for a place, as he said to kill it; that he came back to them in the course of two or three minutes, and said, that was a nice place by the pond; they took it there, and examinant killed it with Hale's knife; that Hale and Burgess took the skin, rolled it up, and threw it, close by the pond, into a ditch; that Hale and examinant quartered it, and cut it up, and put it into two lacks, which Hale and Burgess had provided; that they took the bags out and concealed them in some hay in a barn near Winchmore-hill, where they left it till the following evening; that Hale and Burgess got a part of the sheep and dressed it at Hale's quarters, the King's Head, Winchmore-hill, and the next night all three of them got the remainder of it from the barn, and took it to Hale's quarters aforesaid, and had some of it dressed; that the remainder of it was found as this exaninant believes, by preverell's man, at the King's Head.

"The mark of X Joseph Kemp .

"Witness John Holmes ."

Mr. Knowlys. (To Hulme). Q. When did

you apprehend Burgess? - A. The same evening that he was examined; Bryers was with me.

Q. Did he say any thing to you that is material? - A. No.

Mr. Mores. The prisoner Burgess was brought before me on the 28th of December.

Q. Was Kemp present when Burgess was examined? - A. No.

Q. Was any promise held out to him with respect to this sheep of Mr. Hulme's? - A. None.

The Court were of opinion that the examination of Burgess was much too general.

Q. (To Holmes). Did you apprehend Hale? - A. Yes; on the Monday after I had taken Burgess.

Q. Did he say any thing? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. I cannot carry the case against Burgess or Hale any further than I have done.

Kemp's defence. Holmes told me, when he first took me up, it would be much better to turn King's evidence.

Burgess's defence. Holmes told me it would be better for me to turn evidence.

All Three NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18010114-69

163. THOMAS PEVETT and JOSEPH KEMP were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , a ewe sheep, value 21s. the property of John Whitebread .

Second Count. For killing a ewe sheep the property of the said John, with the felonious intent to steal the carcase of it.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

JOHN WHITEBREAD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at Edmonton : On the 13th of December I missed one of my sheep; I had seen it in the course of two or three days before in the field adjoining my farm yard, what we call the Stack-yard field; the skin was found the next day; I saw it two days after; the skin is here; there is a particular mark upon it which it had when I bought it.( John Holmes , the constable, produced the skin).

Whitebread. This is my skin, I can swear to it from a mark on the shoulder.

Jury. Q. Had you ever sold any sheep with that mark? - A. Never; I had twenty-four of them marked in the same manner.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS called. - Court. Q How old are you? - A. Between eleven and twelve.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. Would you take a false oath to take away the life of a man? - A. No.

Q. Then you are perfectly aware of the mischief you would be doing if you were to swear falsely? - A. Yes.

Q. You know that taking an oath is calling God to witness the truth of what you say? - A. Yes.(Sworn).

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know the prisoners? - A. Yes, they lodged at my mother's house; Thomas Pevett and Joseph Kemp called me up to know if I would go for a bit of meat, about half past eleven o'clock; - I went with them to Mr. Whitebread's field, close by the farm-house; then they went and got one sheep, and killed it, and brought it down to a field next to a turaip-field; they then put it into a sack, and threw the skin into a ditch; then they carried the meat into their room at my mother's.

Q. Did any body live-in that room besides themeslves at that time? - A. Not in that room; Mrs. Buck let that room to these soldiers, my mother had two rooms, and Suke Buck had two.

Q. What time was it when you got home, as near as you can guess? - A. About one, I believe.

Q. Did any body in the house see you when you got home? - A. No.

Q. Did any body in any part of that house see you that evening? - A. No.

Q. What was become of Mrs. Buck? - A. She was at home.

Q. Did not she see you? - A. Yes; she saw me and the prisoners when we came back.

Q. How were Pevett and Kemp dressed that evening? - A. Joseph Kemp in soldier's clothes, and Pevett had a smock-frock over his soldier's clothes.

Q. What became of this mutton afterwards? - A. They cut it up.

Q. Did you partake of it at all? - A. No.

Q. Where did they cut it up? - A. In the garret.

SUSANNAH BUCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Mrs. Clements's-house, at Tottenham Terrace; I have the upper part of the house, and Mrs. Clements the lower part.

Q. Do you know both the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes; they went out on the 13th of December, at half after eleven o'clock at night, and returned between one and two in the morning; when they returned, Joseph Kemp and Thomas Pevett went to bed; their room was one pair of stairs above mine; I stepped up in the morning between eight and nine o'clock, and I saw them cutting up a whole sheep.

Q. Both the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes; I told them I did not like to have such doings in my room, and they answered, that they paid me rent, and therefore they would do as they liked in their own room; I heard them say, Mr. Whitebread, you are rich, and I am poor, when this is gone I'll come for more.

Q. Who said that? - A. Thomas Pevett, and Joseph Kemp.

Q. Which of them said it? - A. Both of them.

JOHN HOLMES sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Knowlys. I am a constable at Edmonton; I took Kemp from the guard-house, at Edmonton, the Saturday after Christmas-day; I took Pevett at the Magistrate's, he was brought there by young Mr. Tuck; then I went to the lodgings of the prisoners, and found some meat outside the door, before I got up stairs.

Court. - That cannot be the same.

Holmes. I found a smock-frock in the room.(Produces it.)

Mrs. Buck. That is Mr. Clements's smocksrock; Mrs. Clements lent it to Pevett to put it over his soldier's clothes, that they might not get bloody and greasy.

Kemp's defence. I know nothing of the woman nor of the boy.

Pevett's defence. I know nothing of the woman, any farther than paying her rent; she has asked me to do things, but I never did.

Pevett, GUILTY , Death , aged 18.

Kemp, GUILTY , Death , aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18010114-70

164. JOSEPH HERROD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a wooden cask, value 4d. and three hundred cod founds, value 1l. 16s. the property of James-Ebenezer Saunders and Nathaniel Saunders .

JAMES-EBENEZER SAUNDERS sworn. - I am in partnership with Nathaniel Saunders , fish-factors , Upper Thames-street ; I know nothing of the loss of the property.

- AMOS sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Saunders: On Thursday evening, the 15th of January, I saw the prisoner take a cask off the lead in my master's shop; it contains three hundred cod founds; I pursued him, and in about five minutes I came up with him; he was stopped in a court in Miles's-lane; I picked up the barrel in the court; it might be 160 yards from the prisoner.

Q. Did you lose sight of him at all? - A. Yes, I first lost sight of him in the turning going up Miles's-lane, he had a comrade with him; as soon as I came out of the shop, I saw two soldiers; the cask was carried home, and I put a mark upon it; I am sure it is the cask that was stolen. (The cask was produced and deposed to.)

Q. Can you swear to the face of the prisoner? - A. No, he was too quick for me.

Q. If there were two soldiers, how can you swear to this man? - A. I cannot swear to the man; here is a witness that never lost sight of him.

JEREMIAH SHAW sworn. - I am a porter; I was going past Mr. Saunders's shop last Thursday night, I saw a soldier go to the place, and take the cask in his hands; I called out to the foreman of the shop that the cask was gone.

Q. Can you swear that the prisoner is the soldier that took the cask? - A. No.

Q. Did you see two soldiers? - A. Yes; they both ran together till they came to the first coach-turning in Miles's-lane; I holloaed out, stop thief, all the way that I went; the prisoner at the bar turned into a court, he had the cask then; I laid hold of his coat behind, and he dropped the cask; then he turned round, and struck at me; he slipped out of my hand, and got away, and the other soldier swore he would knock my head against the wall; I called out to the foreman of the shop, and told him to take care of the cask, for it was there, and he was taken immediately, and delivered to the officer: when he got away from me, before he could get up, another man came up and boned him again; then the officer came up and took him.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him? - A. No.

JOHN HORNE sworn. - I am one of the constables of Bridge Ward; I took the prisoner in Three Tun-court; I live in the court; he was very obstreporous.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 27. - Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-71

165. ANN GEORGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , two white dimity waistcoats, value 10s. a pair of nankeen breeches, value 12s. two muslin cravats, value 5s. and a pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of Hugh Rose , Esq .

HUGH ROSE , Esq. sworn. - I am a private gentleman, in Norfolk-street ; the prisoner was my father's servant , and had the care of my wearing-apparel: On Friday, the 9th of January, in consequence of information, I applied to Bow-street; I had the servants boxes searched, and in the prisoner's box I found two white dimity waistcoats, a pair of nankeen breeches, and a muslin cravat; and in her pocket, upon her person, was found a muslin cravat and a pair of stockings; I examined them, and knew them to be mine; my father had a very good character with her.( Edward Treadway , the officer, produced the property, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I am very sorry for what I have done; I have to beg Mr. Rose's mercy; I had no intention to defraud Mr. Rose; in every other respect I have done Mr. Rose complete justice; and why I put these things in my pocket, I don't know.

Mr. Rose. Her husband is now in confinement at Colchester for having in his possession three of my shirts; he is a dragoon.

Q. Had he access to your house? - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 40. - Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-72

166. THOMAS RICHARDSON was indict

ed for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , forty-eight pounds weight of lead, value 8s. the property of Sarah Trimmer , fixed to her dwelling-house .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of John Tunstall , Esq . fixed to a house of his.(The case was opened by Mr. Raine.)

JOHN PLASTINE sworn. - I am a watchman, at Old Brentford: On Thursday morning, the 1st of January, about a quarter past one, I saw a man coming up the street, with something upon his shoulder, which I thought was not lawful; I followed him up Drum-lane, into the Back-lane, for nearly two hundred yards.

Q. Who was that man? - A. The prisoner at the bar; I asked him what he had got there; he said he had nothing but his own property; I asked him to let me see it, and then he threw it off his shoulder; his great coat was off, and the lead was wrapped up in it; then I asked him how he came by it, and he said he found it; at last he said, I will tell you the truth, I got it while I was doing a job at Kew.

Q. Did you say any thing to induce him to confess? - A. No, I did not; then I asked him whether the people where he was doing a job knew of his taking it, or whether it was his own property to take; he said, no, it was not his own, they did not know of his taking it, and he wished he had never seen it; I took him down to what we call our cage, at Brentford, and put him in, he carred the lead; I then took the lead to the beadle's house, his name is Robert Waters .

ROBERT WATERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am parish-beadle of Brentford: On Thursday morning, the 1st of January, the last witness called me up for the key of the cage, and left some lead with me.

WILLIAM POLICUTT sworn. - I am a shoemaker, at Brentford: On Thursday the 1st of this month, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went to the beadle's house for the lead.

Plastine. I had the lead from the beadle's in the morning, I delivered it to Polycutt.

Polycutt. I had the lead from the watchman, and carried it to Mrs. Trimmer's, in Old Brentford; I observed the appearance of the lead having been taken from the ridge of the house, it was rolled up, and I unrolled it as flat as I could, and fitted it; it appeared to fit as nearly as it could, but could not make it exactly flat, as it was so wrinkled.

Q. Have you any doubt that that lead had been taken from the ridge? - A. No; I weighed the lead, there were forty-eight pounds and a quarter of it; I have had the lead ever since. (Produces it.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had you been acquainted with the house and the manner in which it was leaded? - A. No.

Q. The officer gave you every thing that was found upon the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not give you any cutting knife? - A. No.

Q. You do not mean to swear that that lead came from Mrs. Trimmer's house? - my coat may fit many a man that it was not made for? - A. It is the same sort of lead, I cannot swear that it is the same.

Mr. Raine. Q. Having smoothed it as well as you could, have you any doubt that that is the lead which came from that house? - A. No.

Court. Q. Did you compare the nail holes? - A. Yes, and they corresponded as near as they could.

JAMES-RUSTED TRIMMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. My mother's name is Sarah; the house from which the lead was taken was her house; I was present when the last witness fitted the lead to the ridge, it had not been cut but ripped and tore away; just at the corner of the ridge, there was a little nail-hole, which is unusual, which tallied exactly, that part was not bent out of it's proper form, the rest was.

Q. From your examination of the place, and of the lead, have you any doubt that that is the lead taken from your mother's house? - A. No.

Q. Was that lead safe the night before? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How soon before had you seen it - A. I cannot say.

Court. Q. Was this one whole piece? - A. Yes; there was more lead loose, but not taken away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. That lead might have been loosened a month before for any thing you know? - A. I cannot say.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-73

167. JOHN TINSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , fifty-six pounds of beef, value 35s. the property of William Warren .

The only material witness being called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-74

168. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Morris , about the hour of eleven in the night, of the 8th of January , and burglariously stealing a feather-bed, value 3l. a bolster, value 3s. a pair of blankets, value 10s. and a quilt, value 7s. the property of the said Jane .

JANE MORRIS sworn. - I live at No. 18, Denmark-street, Ratcliff-highway .

Q. Who is the landlord of the house? - A. His name is Dempsey, he lives in the same street; I have the back-room on the ground-floor, a young woman, who is here, lodges in the front-room, the house is let out in tenements; I go out a washing, and take in washing; I went out about nine o'clock on the 8th of January, and left my door padlocked; I came home about eleven o'clock, and found the door locked as I left it, and the prisoner sitting upon the bed-side; the window-shutters were broke open, I suppose he got in that way, the window must have been shoved up, it is an inside shutter; there is a long passage from the street-door, and my room window looks into the backyard.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No; I might have seen him, but I was not acquainted with him; the bed and bed clothes were entirely gone; I asked him how he came there, and he said, as he came through the yard, he thought it was some little out-house, where he could be till the morning, as he had no place to be in; I then called for assistance, but he got away, I did not see him again till the next night, between six and seven o'clock; I saw him just go by the door, and then I had him detained, while I sent for Rogers and Riley, two officers belonging to Shadwell-office.

Q. What kind of light had you in the room? - A. There was no light at all, the fire was gone out.

Q. How could you know the man then? - A. Because, when I opened the door, I had got a light from the young woman in the front room.

Q. How many minutes were you in the room with him? - A. Ten minutes or not so much.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing his person? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure he is the man you saw that that night? - A. Yes, I am certain of it.

Q. Did you ever find your things? - A. No, I cannot hear any thing of them.

Q. It must have been dark when you saw him the night after? - A. Yes; but I knew him by his dress.

Q. How was he dressed? - A. In a blue jacket and trowsers.

Q. That is not an uncommon dress in your part of the town? - A. No.

Q. Is there any body else here who saw him the first night? - A. Yes; Ruth Morris .

Q. Is she any relation of your's? - A. No.

RUTH MORRIS sworn. - I live at No. 18, Denmark-street; I saw the prisoner in the young woman's room when she opened the door.

Q. Look at him? - A. I am sure he is the same young man.

Q. Are you quite sure of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. I had seen him pass by the door before.

Q. Had you an opportunity to see his person? - A. Yes.

Q. What light had you? - A. I gave the young woman a candle to light her to open the door.

Q. How long had you an opportunity of observing him? - A. I dare say, twenty minutes, for she asked him what business he had there, and he said, he thought it was an out-house, where he could sleep all night; the bed, blankets and bolsters were all gone.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - On the 9th instant, Riley and I were sent for to take the prisoner into custody; I asked him how he came there, and he said he had strayed there; I examined the place, I found that the fastening of the shutter had been broke open.

Q. What kind of a house is this? - A. It is a house let out in tenements.

Court. Q. Has it the appearance of an out-house at all? - A. No more than any other dwelling-house.

Prisoner's defence. I did not take the things; I don't know any more about them than the child unborn; I am a poor fellow and have no friends, nor money to get me a lodging; there are plenty of people of colour in the house besides me; I had been in the house often to see them.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-75

169. JOHN HESS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , a pair of steel knee-buckles, value 2s. a steel verge for a watch, value 6d. a brass movement for a time-piece, value 4s. and a pair of gold ear-rings, value 3s. the property of John Philip .

No evidence being offered on the part of the prosecutor, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-76

170. ISAAC RIGUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , two coats, value 25s. two waistcoats, value 12s. a pair of breeches, value 10s. and a pair of silver sleeve-buttons, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Lake , in the dwelling-house of Benjamin Phillips .

MARY LAKE sworn. - I live at No. 17, Great Saffron-hill ; William Lake is my son, he is a shoemaker ; the articles in the indictment were in my drawers; I live in the back garret, Mr. Benjamin Philips keeps the house, I am a shoe-binder, I went out a little before ten in the morning, I returned about two, and found the room had been robbed; I had locked the door with a spring-lock, which was picked, and the door burst open.

MABLE HOLWOOD sworn. - I live at No. 17, Great-Saffron-hill, on the second-floor; the apartment under Mrs. Lake: On the 16th of January I thought I heard a noise in her apartments, and knowing that she was out, I went out to the stairs, and saw the prisoner coming down the stairs, and I stopped the prisoner at the foot of the stairs, I said, my friend, where have you been, and he said, to see my friend; I told him he had no friend there; he said he had; I asked him what he had in his apron, he said, nothing of mine; I told him it was not his, for he had stole it; upon that he got away from me, and got down stairs; I called stop thief, and the landlord stopped him at the door, he dropped the property in the passage at the door; I then went up stairs and found the door open.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS sworn. I am the landlord of the house in which the prosecutor lives; I had been out, and just as I had got to my own door and scraping my shoes, I heard an uncommon noise up stairs; I immediately looked and saw the prisoner coming down stairs with a bundle; I seized the prisoner in the passage; I asked him who he was, what he had got, and where he was going; he told me that he was going upon his business, and desired me to let him go; I told him he should not; and when he found I was resolute in detaining him, he dropped the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Did you know any thing of him before? - A. I never saw him before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peatt. Q. Do you know if the prosecutor and the prisoner were not very intimate? - A. I cannot answer that question.(The constable produced the property.)

WILLIAM LAKE sworn. - These things are all my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peatt. Q. What do you think they may be worth? - A. I have stated them under the value.

Q. What do you think they may be worth? - A. They may be worth about 2l. 10s.

Q. Do you think an old clothes-man would give you more than 10s.? - A. I never asked him, and therefore I cannot say.

Court. Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. I never saw him till I saw him running, and heard the cry of stop thief.

Prisoner. (To Phillips). Q. Am I the man you stopped? - A. I am sure he is the same man; he got away from me, but I did not lose sight of him more than half a minute.

- BRASIER sworn. - I am an officer; I saw the prisoner running, and a great mob following him, crying, stop thief; he held this knife in his hand, open, and made a cut at me with it; I followed him till he got to the corner of Blackboy-alley, there he stumbled, and I threw myself upon him, and took him into custody.

The prisoner called William Lee, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing goods, value 39s .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-77

171. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , four pewter quart ports, value 4s. and two pewter pints, value 1s. the property of Thomas Henderson .

THOMAS HENDERSON sworn. - I keep the Griffin, in Villiers-street, York-buildings : On the 20th of December, a few minutes before five, I heard an alarm; I went out through a court opposite to me, where I saw my boy with six pots, and he called out to me, master, that is the woman, lay hold of her; I immediately took hold of her, and carried her back to my own house.

PETER ROACH sworn. - (Produces four quart pots, and two pint pots). I went after the prisoner into Charles-court; she had got something in her apron; I stopped her, and said, she had got my pots; she said, here, hush, and gave them to me, and then she went away, and a man stopped me from going after her.

- sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Thirteen.

Q. Is it a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. A bad thing; I put down the pots at the door of No. 19, Buckingham-street, I went up stairs after my pots, and I heard the pots rattle; I came down, and saw nobody in the street but a man and the prisoner; I went after the woman, and the man stopped me; I went home and called Roach, and he went after her and took the pots from her.(The property was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but beg for mercy. GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-78

172. SAMUEL WOODLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a silver table-spoon, value 4s. the property of John Duckless .

ANN DUCKLESS sworn. - I am the wife of John Duckless , a publican , at Edmonton ; the prisoner belongs to the Tower-hamlets militia ; I know nothing of the taking of the spoon; I missed it on the 5th of January; the prisoner was quartered at our house, and had been going on of three months.

JUDAH HART sworn. - I live at Tottenhamhigh-cross, about three miles from Mr. Duckless; the prisoner came to my house on the 5th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner offered me a table-spoon for sale; I asked

him how he came by it; he said it was his own, and I said, I doubt you stole the spoon; I asked him where he was quartered; he told me at the Cock, at Hounsfield; that is the name of the place where the prosecutor lives; Mr. Duckless keeps it; then I said, I will stop you and the spoon both; I went across the high-road for the constable, and left him in my shop, it was only just across the road, and when I had got the constable we saw him, and I gave charge of him.(The officer produced the spoon in two pieces.)

Prisoner. I told him I had bought it of a travelling man on the road, and gave 6s. for it.

Hart. He said so before the Magistrate, but he said no such thing to me.(The spoon deposed to by Mrs. Duckless.)

Prisoner's defence. She would not swear to the spoon before the Magistrate, till the Magistrate said he would send her to the cage if she did not, and rather than leave her children she swore to it.

Court. (To the prosecutrix.) Q. Had you any doubt about the spoon. - A. None.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-79

173. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , 45lb. of beef, value 24s. the property of Samuel Thomas .

SAMUEL THOMAS sworn. - I am a butcher , in Lisle-street, Leicester-fields : On Saturday, the 10th of January, I lost a piece of beef from my shop; I did not see it taken; my meat was brought back with the prisoner.

- SUGAR sworn - I am servant to Mr. Thomas: On Saturday, the 10th of January, a person came and told me a man was gone off with some beef; my master ordered me to follow him; I pursued the prisoner; he crossed over in a dark part of Leicester-street to prevent my seeing him; I came up to him, and saw some grease upon the side of his coat, and charged him with having the beef; at that time a gentleman said, here is the beef; we did not then take him into custody; it laid down by the side of him; I picked up the beef, and he ran across the road, and that gentleman followed him; I took the beef on my shoulder, and called out, stop thief, and he was stopped; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I never lost sight of him.

Q. Are you able to swear it is your master's beef? - A. Yes; a buttock and a haunch-bone.

- TASKERVILLE sworn. - I am an artificial feather maker; I was coming through Lisle-street; I saw the prisoner with the beef under his arm; Sugar said, that is the man who stole my master's meat; the prisoner then stopped down and dropped the meat; I said to Sugar, there is the meat, and the prisoner instantly fell down right across the road; he got up, and ran down Leicester-street; before he got to Sidney's-alley, I holloaed out, stop thief; he fell down and was taken.

JOSEPH GORING sworn. - I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner coming with great force; I caught him by the collar; his coming with such force knocked me down, but I never let go my hold till he was secured.

Prisoner's defence. I do not know any thing of it; I was going home when I was apprehended; I never had it in my possession. GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-80

174. MARY PRETTYMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , a metal watch, value 20s. a coat, value 21s. a waistcoat, value 10s. 6d. and eighteen shillings , the property of George Gutridge .

It appearing in evidence that the prosecutor was in a state of extreme intoxication, and the property never having been found, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-81

175. WILLIAM SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , two pigs, value 3l. 13s. 6d. the property of Israel Andrews .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-82

176. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a she ass, value 10s. and a foal, value 5s. the property of John Upton .

JOHN UPTON sworn. - I am a farmer , at Highgate, in the parish of Hornsey : On the 5th of January, I lost a she ass and a foal, from Highgate-common; I received information of it about a quarter after eight in the morning; I pursued, and overtook the prisoner in Colney-hatch-lane; he was leading the mother by a halter, and the colt following; I told him he had taken it off Highgate-common, and he said he had not; I told him it belonged to me, and he must go back with me; I brought him back to Highgate, took him before Mr. Bennett, and he was committed; I bought it three or four months ago; I knew nothing of the prisoner before; I am sure it was my ass.

JOHN BUXEY sworn. - I work on the road for the Whetstone Turnpike Trust; I saw the prisoner take the ass off the common, and I went and informed Mr. Upton of it; I knew it was Mr. Upton's ass.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-83

177. WILLIAM DORSETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of December , a wooden barrel, value 1s. and a quantity of oysters, value 4s. the property of Elizabeth Dunn , widow .

ELIZABETH DUNN sworn. - I live at No. 22, Long-acre ; I am a widow; I keep an oyster ware-house ; the prisoner was my servant , he came to live with me on the 7th of August; on the 10th of December I sent him to Billingsgate for a bushel of the best oysters and a bushel of common ones, and some muscles; the best oysters were for barrelling for the country; at half past one o'clock he went to Charing-cross with one barrel, at three o'clock he had to go into the city with four, and between seven and eight o'clock he sent word that he should not come home that night, he was too poorly; I told my daughter and the chairwoman they must setch up oysters for the night's use out of the cellar, and my daughter found a barrel of oysters in the cellar secreted in a large tub, and directed to a friend of his; it had a paper direction instead of a card; the prisoner did not come home that night; he came in the morning before I was up; he went away and came back in an hour, and then I saw him, and he said, a man in the street had met him, given him a barrel, and told him to carry it to Charing-cross; I asked him why he did not take it when he took my barrel, at three o'clock; he said he had forgot it; I told him I could swear to the barrel; he said it they were even my oysters, he had not taken them off the premises, and I could not hurt him; I know it is my barrel; I have them made at Marsey I stand, because they bear carriage so much better than town made ones.

Q. Do you keep barrelled oysters in your cellar? - A. No, they are always kept in the shop; they must have been taken from the cellar where the oysters are washed, and then packed and secreted; the oysters that I had in the morning were Whitstable Natives; I am sure it is my barrel; I have not opened the barrel, and the direction upon it I believe to be his own hand-writing, (opens the barrel); these are Whitstable Natives.

Q. Are those the best sort of oysters? - A. Yes; they have been packed ever since the 10th of last month.

FRANCES DUNN sworn. - I am the daughter of the last witness; I found this barrel of oysters secreted in a tub.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of what I am accused of. GUILTY , aged 29.

Six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-84

178. JAMES LEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a coat, value 10s. two waistcoats, value 10s. a pair of breeches, value 10s. a smock-frock, value 5s. a hat, value 5s. one shilling, and three sixpences , the property of Luke Castle .

LUKE CASTLE sworn. - I am a farmer's servant at Hadley ; I work for Mr. Dalton; the prisoner was my fellow-servant ; I kept my things in the bed-room in a box; the prisoner slept in the same room; I do not know how he took them; I know they are my things; I was come to town with a load of hay.

WILLIAM DALTON sworn. - I am the master of the boy and of the prisoner; I am a farmer at Hadley; Castle has been with me three years and upwards, and Leach since Michaelmas last; on Sunday morning, the 14th of December, I got up early in the morning, about six o'clock, and missed the prisoner; after making some search and enquiry after him, I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment from the box; I immediately called up my next neighbour, and we went in search of him; he was overtaken at Colney, in the road to St. Alban's, with the property upon him, which property was brought back with him, and has been in the care of the constable till now.

Q. What did he say for himself? - A. He made very little excuse, scarce any; he had nothing to say against me as a matter; I met with him in the Isle of Sheppy in the greatest distress, and I took him and cloathed him; his father had deferted him, and he was without money and without friends. (James Cox, the constable, produced the property, which was deposed is by Castle.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence GUILTY , aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-85

179. HENRY LASSUM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , three shillings and two sixpences , the property of Samuel Culver .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middllesex Jury, before Mr. Cammon Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-86

180. CHARES NASH and JOHN NASH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , eight quartern loaves of bread, value 12s. the property to Thomas Clarke .

JOSEPH SMITH sworn. - I am a baker, servant to Thomas Clarke, in Great Ormond-street, Queen-square: On the 5th of December I had taken out some loaves in one basket and set them down in Guildford-street , the corner of Guildford-place, while I went to serve the customers with another basket; the basket had thirteen loaves in it when I left it, and when I came back there were only five; I had seen the prisoner just before.

- WALDRON sworn. - I am a journeyman baker; I was serving bread in Guildford-street, on the 5th of December, a butterman came to me

and told me he had seen two suspicious men with some loaves; I went with him after them; he cried out stop thief, and they dropped the loaves at the corner of Denmark-street and ran; I pursued them as far as Bernard-street, and took them into custody; the loaves were picked up and taken to Hatton-garden; the same loaves were shewn to Smith.

Smith. The loaves that were shewn to me were my master's.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I was in Ormond-street on the 5th of December; I saw a mob, and the prisoners were delivered to me in Mr. Clarke's shop; they said they had stole eight loaves out of the servant's basket; I tied them together, and then searched them; Smith said they were his master's property. Charles Nash , GUILTY , aged 36.

John Nash, GUILTY , aged 28.

Six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-87

181. JOHN TURNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , three yards and a half of linen cloth, value 10s. the property of Henry Mills , Thomas Halliwell , and John Edwards .

JAMES HITCHON sworn. - I am a haberdasher, in Newcastle-street, Strand; the prisoner at the bar lived servant with us, he came to us in the early part of 1799, and left us about the 19th of April last, to live with Mr. Mills; he continued with him till the 25th or 26th of August, and then we took him back again, and he continued with us till he was taken up, on Wednesday the 17th of December: on Saturday I was going to pack up two small parcels to send into the country, which were looked out and put into a recess; when we came to pack them there were two articles missing; I charged the shopman with neglect; he persisted that he had looked out the goods; two or three hours before there was a pound of thread missing, and afterwards a number of other things; I then suspected the prisoner; I got a constable, and his box was searched, but I was not present at the search.

JOHN RUSSELL sworn. - I had a search warrant; on the 17th of December I went to Mr. Hitchon's, in Newcastle-street; the prisoner was not in the shop when I went in, and Mr. Hitchon called him down stars; I told him I had got a search warrant, and I must go up stairs and see what he had in his box; I went up, his box was locked, he opened it himself, but nothing was found but what belonged to himself; then I asked for his pocket-book, and we found some duplicates in it, but they did not lead to the discovery of any thing that belonged to Mr. Hitchon; I kept the duplicates, and I asked he prisoner where he lived last, and he said with Mr. Mills, in Coventry-street; I went there, and took the duplicates with me; I shewed them to Mr. Mills, and he went with me to several pawnbrokers, but could not find any thing that Mr. Mills could swear to till we got to Mr. Harrison's, in Tottenham-court-road, and there Mr. Mills found a piece of linen, three yards and a half, with his private mark upon it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You would not have known that the prisoner lived with Mr. Mills at all, but from the information of the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner give you the duplicates, or did you take them from him? - A. He gave them to me, they were in his pocket-book.

THOMAS CHIFFAGE sworn. - I conduct the business of Mr. Harrison; I know nothing of the prisoner; the linen was pledged by a woman on the 16th of August. (The duplicate and the counterpart were handed to the Court.)

ANN THOMAS sworn. - I pledged this cloth; I had it from the young man at the bar.

Q. How came you to pledge it in the name of Lloyd? - A. I did not pledge it in that name.

Court. Q. Where do you live? - a servant in Newgate-street.

Q. What have you to do with the prisoner? - A. I kept company with him.

Q. When did you pawn the linen? - A. I cannot tell, it was in the summer, but I cannont tell in what month.

Q. Are you a servant in place? - A. I am, with Mr. Baker, he keeps a hat-warehouse in Newgate-street.

Mr. Mills. This woman lived servant with Mr. Hitchon at the time that the prisoner did; this piece of cloth has my private mark upon it; I missed a quantity of goods of this description.

Q. Can you venture to swear that you had never sold that piece? - A. I am convinced in my own mind I never did, I am sure it was never sold to him; he told me that all he had taken from me I had got the duplicates of.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What did you say to him? - A. Nothing to induce him to confess, I was perfectly aware of that; he said, he had never taken any thing but what he had got duplicates for.

Q. What are the names of your partners? - A. Thomas Halliwell and John Edwards .

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-88

182. SUSANNAH YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , a silver watch, value 20s. and a metal seal, value 1d. the property of Alexander Frazer .

ALEXANDER FRAZER sworn. - I am one of his Majesty's weighers in the port of London : On the 23d of December, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was going through Wellclose-square, the prisoner at the bar was in the square; she said, is that you; I said, yes, you have got the advantage of me, I do not know you; she said, do not you remember me at the Alderman Parsons's Head; says she, I am very cold, I wish you would give me a glass of gin; I said, I do not care, suppose I do, and she and I went to the White Swan, in Upper East Smithfield, about 150 yards from Wellclose-square, or not so much; we had a quartern of gin in the tap-room, and then another quartern of gin; I took out half-a-guinea to get change, and when I came out of the house, I went towards the Square; she followed me, and said, will not you go home with me; I refused, and then she used bad words, and left me, and as I turned towards Grazier's-alley , I put my hand to my breeches for my watch, and I had not got my watch; I then put my hand in my waistcoat pocket, and missed my purse; I went back into the Square, but could not see her; I went home, and said nothing to any body that night; the next day I went to the public-house in Rosemary-lane, I described her person to the landlord, and the landlord told me where she lived; he went with me to the door, No. 13, Saltpetre-bank; the door was left open, and I knocked at the door; I asked the landlady of the house whether Susannah Young lived there, I knew her name when she lived servant at the public-house ; I went up one pair of stairs, and found her lying on the bed, and, on another bed, a woman and two children; I said to her, Susan, Susan, I want to speak to you; I told her, if she would return me my watch, two half-guineas, and my two pound notes, I would treat her with the silver; don't bother me, says she, I have not got any thing belonging to you; I then told her to let me have my watch, and notes, I would give her the half-guinea; I then went for the headborough, and could not find her for five or six days; I found her at her old lodgings, dancing without shoes or stockings; I am certain I had the watch when I was with her at the public-house, I had seen the watch just before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You drank part of two quarterns of gin? - A. Yes.

Q. You were as sober as a judge? - A. I did not drink any thing to hurt me.

Q. you did not go into a private room with her? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, have you not said you gave her the watch? - A. She said, so, but I never said so.

Q. How drunk were you? - A. I drank but part of two pots of beer in the course of the day.

Q. And yet you were sober? - A. Yes, to do any busines.

Q. Upon your oath, did she not say, before the justice, that you gave her the watch? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to offer her first the silver, and then the half guinea? - A. I had rather give her that than expose myself.

Q. What is the number of your watch? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. What is the maker's name? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How long have you had the watch? - A. Two years last August, it was made in the country.

Q. Upon your oath, at the second examination; did you not swear to the maker's name? - A. I did not, I never swore to the maker's name.

Q. Do you know Griffiths, the constable? - A. Yes.

Q. Since you have been attending here, have you not been applying to Griffiths to know the number and the maker's name? - A. I did.

Q. Why? - A. Because I thought I should be asked the question.

Q. Was not that for the purpose of being able to swear to it before this Jury? - A. I don't say but it might.

Q. Did you ever go by the name of Pepper? - A. No.

Q. How much gin did you give her when you took her? - A. A quartern of gin among four.

Q. How much had you when the officers took her? - A. Three quarterns amongst us.

ALICE SMITH sworn. - I live in the same room with the prisoner: On Tuesday, the 23d of December, between ten and eleven o'clock, she came home to me, and asked me if I would go with her to sell a watch; she told me a man gave it into her hand at the White Swan, and she said, if I would go with her, she would give me one shilling for my trouble; upon that I went with her up Crown and Shear-court, Rosemary-lane; it is a house about the middle of the court, as night as I can recollect, it is Mr. Levy's house, I believe, it is a private house; she sold the watch there for twelve shillings, and we returned home agina; I saw a watch at the Justice's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. She always said that this watch was given to her? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he perfectly sober? - A. No, he was about half and half.

Q. Were you yourself taken up? - A. Yes.

JOHN BASSETT sworn. - I am a constable; the prosecutor came to me, and told me he had been robbed by a girl that lived at Saltpetre-bank; I went with him; we found her, and he told her if she would produce his notes and his watch, he would forgive her, and she should keep the half-guinea and the silver to herself; she said she knew

nothing about it; then she told me that the man gave her the watch, and she went to Mr. Levy's with me; he was not at home, and he afterwards came to me and told me he had got the watch, and he would bring it up to Lambeth-street, which he did.

Q. What business is Levy? - A. Not any that I know of, I believe he lived private.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When you apprehended her, she told you that a man gave it her? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk or sober? - A. He was middling.

Q. You drank gin after that with him? - A. Yes.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - Levy brought the watch to the office; he has been in custody, but I believe was discharged by proclamation. (Produces the watch.)

Frazer. I am sure this is my watch, the seal and the key are both gone.

The prisoner put in a written defence, at follows:

My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. I am an unfortunate girl; I had been acquainted with the prosecutor a long time; he met me in Rosemary-lane, and called to me by the name of Young; he agreed to go home with me; he did so, but we did not stop long at home, we had some gin together; we went to Mr. Copeland's, and had two pots of beer; he first gave me his watch, as he had promised, for me to go and get a few shillings upon, and the next morning he came to me, and insisted upon his having his watch; we had gin together afterwards, and then I was taken into custody; I throw myself upon the mercy of the Court.

For the Prisoner.

SARAH HESELTINE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant at the White Swan, East Smithfield; the prisoner at the bar and the prosecutor came to our house, and had a pot of five-penny, and some gin: I saw the gentleman take the watch out of his pocket, and give it to the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Were they drunk that night? - A. The prosecutor was rather the worse for liquor, the prisoner was very sober.

Q. Whereabouts is the White Swan? - A. Almost facing Saltpetre-bank.

Q. Did you see them again together at your house? - A. Not till the next morning, Mr. Bassett brought him, and they had gin together; the prosecutor then would persuade the girl to have a glass, and it was a good while before she would drink with him.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. How long have you known this young woman? - A. Not long; I used to carry beer backwards and forwards to her when she lived on the Bank; that is all I know of her.

Q. The next morning she was in custody, was not the? - A. Yes.

Q. They were going before the Justice, were not they? - A. I do not know.

Q. You must have heard that? - A. No, I did not know any thing about it.

Q. You knew Mr. Bassett was a constable? - A. I did not know it before I heard then say so; they took the girl out of the house, and I saw no more of it, I went backwards to do my work.

Q. Susannah Young saw you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go the Justice's to prove this? - A. No, I never was nigh the Justice's.

Q. Who told you to say that he gave her the watch? - A. Nobody; that gentleman that sits there came to me with a subpoena.

Q. Did not he tell you to say so? - A. No, he told me to tell the truth, that was all; I told him I saw him give it to her.

Q. Are you the only person taking care of that house? - A. No; my mistress takes care of the house.

Q. What time did they come in? - A. About nine o'clock, or it may be a little before nine.

Q. She went away about nine? - A. Yes; and he staid till about half past nine.

ELIZABETH COPELAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. My husband keeps the White Swan, East Smithfield.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor and the prisoner? - A. Yes: On the 23d of Dec. In the evening, the prosecutor and the prisoner came to my house, and called for a quartern of gin, I came to the bar and served it; not long after my servant came and told me there was another quartern of gin wanted; in the course of half an hour after the girl was gone out, the prosecutor asked for a pint of five-penny.

Court. Q. Did you see him at that time? - A. Yes, I was sitting in the parlour; he asked for change for a 2l. note, and put down a piece of paper; I told him I could not change it, and I dare say he had smaller change; he then gave me a half guinea, I founded it upon the table, and gave him change, with some halfpence; he then said, I won't take them, I have got halfpence in my pocket; I took my halfpence and change back, I told him to take care of his money, and put it into his pocket before I took the light away.

Q. What made you give him that caution? - A. Because he laid down his note on the table, and he appeared to be in liquor; I saw no more of him till the next morning, they both came with a constable, he was in liquor then; he called for a quartern of gin, and I served it him; he asked the prisoner, will you drink with me, and the poor girl was crying, and refused a great many times to drink; he said, drink with me, and I won't hurt you; upon that I said the man speaks very good,

drink a little, may be he won't hurt you; they stood talking some time, and then he promised her, with very sacred oaths, that if she would confess, he would not hurt her; she cried very much, and said very little, and seemed very much affected; then after that he turned upon his heel, and said to the officer, take her away, hang her; I said, I hope not.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. Your husband keeps this White Swan? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they go into a room? - A. No, they sat in the tap-room.

Q. Did you see him give her watch? - A. No.

Court. (To Frazer). Q. Did you stay there after the girl was gone? - A. No.

Q. Did you offer to change your note? - A. Before I offered half a guinea I did.

(To Bassett). Q. Did you hear this man, with sacred oaths, promise he would not hurt her? - A. Yes he did, provided she gave the watch and the note back.

Q. Did he say afterwards that he would hang her? - A. Not in my hearing.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-89

183. JOHN HUGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , two hempen sacks, value 2s. the property of William Humphreys .

WILLIAM HUMPHREYS sworn. - I am a lighterman ; I know these sacks to be mine, that is all I know of it.

WILLIAM HODGES sworn. - On the 4th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I met with two men with each a sack of corn upon his back; one of them said they were ordered to carry them to Hungerford; I said they should not go to Hungerford, they should go to the watch-house; the other man immediately threw down the sack and ran away; I laid hold of the prisoner and detained him; he was in my employ at the time; I I never heard any thing amiss of him till this.(Produces the sacks).

Humphreys. These are my sacks.

Prisoner's defence. A lighterman employed me to carry this sack of corn.

Hodges. I understand that the prisoner was employed by a lighterman who was tried the other day for stealing a sack of corn, and I really believe he had been imposed upon by him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-90

184. SUSANNAH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , four pair of gold ear-rings, value 12s, a neck-handkerchief, value 6d. a pocket-handkerchief, value 2s. a pair of stockings, value 5s. a child's shirt, value 2s. a child's pinafore, value 1s. and a napkin, value 6d. the property of John Elliott .

JOHN ELLIOTT sworn. - I am a jeweller , in Wilderness-row, Goswell-street ; the prisoner was my servant ; my work-shop is at the back of the shop; it is usual for the apprentice to bring all the gold that is in work into the accompting-house, he leaves it there for the night, and takes it away in the morning; on the 10th of January we missed two pair or ear-rings, and on Sunday morning, the 11th, I missed one pair; havng another servant, I did not know which to suspect, I was convinced it was one of them; I sent for Chapman, an officer, from Hatton-garden; I took him down into the kitchen, and told him I had been robbed of some ear-rings, and one of these two girls must be the person; he then searched the prisoner and found a little box containing four pair of earrings, which was concealed in the upper part of her dress, near her shoulder; there was a neck-handkerchief found in her pocket, a pocket handkerchief, and a duplicate, in which the other articles in the indictment were contained; she was taken to Hatton-garden, and committed the next day.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden: On Sunday, the 11th of January, I was sent for; I searched the prisoner, and in her pockets I found a duplicate of a neckhandkerchief and pocket-handkerchief, and a box containing four pair of ear-ring under her arm, in her under garment, (the property produced and deposed to by Mr. Elliott).

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, I leave it to the mercy of the Jury.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-91

185. ROBERT HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , a pewter-pint pot, value 14d. the property of John Pillar .

JOHN PILLAR sworn. - I keep the King of Denmark's Head, Wapping : On the 15th of December, in the morning, the prisoner had a pennyworth of purl in a pint pot; he staid behind the rest of the men, who were gone to work, which made me suspect him; they are labourers that use my house; I watched him out, and when he had got out he ran up a small passage by my house, I pursued him, and when he found that, he dropped my pint pot in the passage; the pot has not my name upon it, but the name of the man who kept the house before me, Scott; the pint pot was picked up and given to me on the spot where he dropped it.

( Edward Ragers , the officer, produced the pot, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I never had the pot in my possession. GUILTY

Confined six months in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-92

186. JOHN M'INTIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , three pewter quart pots, value 1s. 6d. and three pewter pint pots, value 1s. the property of James Hanniford .

JAMES HANNIFORD sworn. - I keep the Barley Mow, in Dorset-street, Manchester-square : On the 5th of January I was sent for by Mr. Baler, tinman, in South-street, who informed me that the prisoner had six of my pots, and I saw them at his house, they have my name upon them; I had not missed them.

MARTIN BALER sworn. - I am a tinman: On the 5th of January the prisoner brought me two pints and one quart pot; my wife gave him 1s. 10d. for them, and in the evening he brought two quarts and one pint pot, and I stopped him; he ran out of the shop, I ran after him and laid hold of him; he said, if I would let him go he would come again; but I said no, he should not, till the landlord came; I am sure the prisoner is the same person.(Richard Maay, the constable, produced the pots).

Hanniford. These are my pots, but they have been bruised together at the edges.

Baler. These are the same pots; the boy used to live with a nightman; I told him these looked as if they had been squeezed together with the hand, and he said he had done it against the ladder as he came out of the little-house.

Prisoner's defence. I found them lying on a dunghill. GUILTY , aged 18.

Two months in Newgate and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-93

187. BENJAMIN PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a peck of linseed, value 1s. an iron keep of a mill, value 1s. an iron hoop, value 1s. 6d. and eight new spikes, value 8d. the property of George Shepley , Richard Shepley , and Michael Shepley .

MICHAEL SHEPLEY sworn. - I am an oil-presser , and live at Carshalton, in Surrey , in partnership with George Shepley and Richard Shepley .

SAMUEL SIMS sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to St. John's, Hackney: About twenty minutes after four in the morning of Sunday, the 4th of this month, I met the prisoner at Clapton, with this bag under his arm; I asked him what he had got there, he said a little feed for his birds; I asked him where he got it, he said he got it from the mills; he told me he worked there; he did not mention what mills; I told him he must go with me to the watch-house; he said he hoped not, there was no harm in it; when we had got about one hundred yards he slipped from me and threw the bag away; I examined it, and found it contained linseed and some iron work belonging to the mill; I found him again at his lodgings, at Newington, the same afternoon; I took him into custody, and he was committed: Gray, one of the witnesses, proved it to be Mr. Shepley's property: Mr. Shepley's manufactory is at Walthamstow, about two miles from where I met him; Griffiths had the property part of a day.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer; I received the bag from Sims, and returned the same bag to him again.

JOHN GRAY sworn. I am millwright to Mr. Shepley; the prisoner at the bar worked at the mill, he was at work at one of the presses in the mill on the Saturday night till nine o'clock in the evening; I can speak positively to this iron keep, but to the rest I cannot swear to; I have no doubt they are ours; I know the keep by having chopped a little off the flaunches, in consequence of an accident, that I might get the mill going as quick as I could, and it is not done in a workman-like manner; it was lying in the cake warehouse on the Saturday night; I have got the fellow to it. (Produces it).

Prisoner's defence. I found them in the road.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Three months in Newgate and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-94

188. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , two cotton counterpanes, value 20s. the property of William Wykes .

WILLIAM WYKES sworn. - I keep the Windmill inn, St. John's-street : On the 6th of December, while I was at dinner. I was alarmed by the cry of stop thief, I knew it was the voice of my lad; I ran immediately out of the kitchen down the gateway into the street, I saw a number of people running towards Smithfield; I ran the same way about thirty or forty yards, and met my bookkeeper, Tibbett, bringing the prisoner back by the collar; we brought him back into the kitchen; he said, he hoped I would not prosecute him; but I told him I certainly would; the bundle was found by my kitchen door.

JOHN ROGERS sworn. - I am book-keeper to Mr. Wykes; the prisoner at the bar came to enquire for the Northampton coach, he was directed to the Ram inn, in Smithfield, or the Ball and Mouth; he was going out, and I could perceive that he had a parcel in his hand, I called out stop thief, and he immediately dropped the bundle at the door, and ran away; the other witness, William Tibbett , can after him and brought him back;

I am sure it was the same boy and the same parcel(produces it); it contains two cotton counterpanes; Mr. Wykes is answerable for all the goods that are left.

WILLIAM TIBBETT sworn. - I am book-keeper to Mr. Wykes: On the 6th December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to enquire for the Northampton coach: as soon as he was gone, Rogers missed the parcel; I called out to him, holloa, where are you going with that parcel; he dropped the parcel immediately, and ran down the gateway, I followed him, and brought him back; there is a direction upon the parcel, and it was booked in our accompting-house not half an hour before.(Willam Chapman, an officer, belonging to Hatton Garden, produced the property)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence. GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined twelve months in th House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-95

189. JAMES STYLES was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , three pounds weight of mutton, value 1s. and a linen cloth, value 1s. the property of George Guerier .

GEORGE GUERIER sworn. - I am a butcher , in Ratcliff-highway : On the 6th of December he was given in charge to Mr. Dunbar, the beadle, upon another charge; Dunbar searched him at my request, and he found upon him a loin of mutton, and a cloth, which was my property, I had not missed it; I always dress my own sheep; there was a scar on this that I can swear to; there were three cuts on the loin, I have no doubt of its being mine; the cloth has my mark upon it, the letter G.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You keep a dog, don't you? - A. Yes.

Q. It happens now and then that the dog gets hold of a bit of meat? - A. Never, but when it is given him.

Q. Did he not tell you it was a bit of meat that the dog had gnawed, and was not sit to expose for sale to a customer? - A. He did; but this was a dog that we kept in the shop to protect the meat from cats and dogs, because she would not meddle with it.

Q. Do not you allow the man in the shop to use these sort of cloths? - A. For nothing else but to lay the meat on.

Q. And therefore you give him the use and possession of it? - A. Undoubtedly.

Q. Was there ever any little jealousies between you and him about a girl that was a customer? - A. No.

Q. Was it not that that induced you to prosecute him for stealing this mutton? - A. It was not.

JOHN DUNBAR sworn. - I am one of the beadles of St. George's, Middlesex; I had charge of the prisoner for another offence, and I found in his coat pocket a loin of mutton, and this cloth, which the prisoner said was his. (Produces the cloth.)

Prosecutor. This is my cloth; it has the letter G, and a figure of 8 upon it.

Prisoner's defence. I went to unkennel the dog, and she had got a piece of meat, and I took it from her, it was gnawed all round, and I did not like to take it in to my master.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex, Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-96

190. JOHN BROOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a yard of woollen cloth, value 5s. the property of John Pearce , Nicholas Pearce , and Bryce Pearce .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

NICHOLAS PEARCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an army-clothier , in partnership with John Pearce and Bryce Pearce; the prisoner was employed as a cutter ; he had been with us about a week; we gave him 25s. a week; we had a very large quantity of woollen cloth in the ware-house at that time; in consequence of information I received from Roberts, a piece of cloth was produced to me as taken from the prisoner; I have no doubt of its being mine.

EDWARD ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Messrs. Pearce; the prisoner was employed as a cutter in the warehouses; On the 6th of December I went into the room, and observed that he had something concealed behind his coat; I charged him with having something about him; he seemed confused, and made no reply; I charged him a second time, and he produced the blue cloth from under his coat and waistcoat; he begged forgiveness, and said it was a bit of blue cloth that he had taken, and that it was his first offence, (produces it); the prisoner was cutting the same coloured cloth at the same time; to the best of my knowledge it is the property of Mr. Pearce.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I did not mean to take that cloth to sell it, to make a property of it, I meant to have made me a waistcoat, and got a coat out of pledge, because I thought my garb was so mean, that it kept me out of employ; I have a wife and four children, I have been been out of employ for four months; I hope you will consider me an object of pity more than any thing else.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him an excellent character. GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined three months in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-97

191. ROBERT HOARE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , an eighth

of a yard of woollen cloth, value 1s. the property of John Pearce , Nicholas Pearce , and Bryce Pearce .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN STALKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Messrs. Pearce; I saw the prisoner in the cutting-room, with a piece of scarlet cloth in his hand, which he put into his right hand pocket; I then gave information to Mr. Roberts, and that is all I know of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This was done openly, so that you could see it? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any other men there? - A. The shop was full.

Q. Your father is a tailor? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was one of those honest men that did not strike their work? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Your father did strike? - A. Yes.

Q. Your father is employed instead of the prisoner? - A. Not instead of the prisoner, he is there.

Q. There has been a little bit of a war between these honest men who have discharged their duty; they have been set upon by such men as your father, who have thought sit to strike? - A. I do not know any thing about that.

Q. Do not you know that it is a general rule amongst those that strike, to ill treat those who do not strike upon every occasion? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Do not you know there is such a thing in the trade as cabbage? - A. Yes; I have heard of such a thing as a bit of thread, or any thing of that sort.

Q. The garment is to be cut out from a piece of cloth, and if a man can cut it to so much advantage as to save a little, and put it in his pocket, the master is no loser? - A. I know nothing of that.

Q. You know there is a description of men in the trade called dunge, and they cannot cut out with so much advantage as those that are more skilful? - A. I don't know any thing of that.

Mr. Knapp. Q. When cabbage comes to be explained, it is stealing, is it not? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was it ever understood that the cutters had a right to cabbage cloth? - A. No.

EDWARD ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Messrs. Pearce: In consequence of information from Stalker, Hoare was called out, and I charged him upon suspicion of having cloth in his pocket; he was very much struck, and searched his pockets willingly himself, and then produced this remnant of scarlet cloth; he said, he hoped it would be overlooked, being a trifling matter; I told him it could not be overlooked; I told him to go into the room again, and instead of that, he went away without his hat, and did not return again, (produces the cloth); it is of the same quality with the cloth we had, and he had been cutting the same kind of cloth that day; I have no doubt of its being my master's property; I did not see the prisoner again till I saw him at the office about two days after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. If you cut out a coat from cloth that I give you, and you had such a piece as this left, would you return it to me? - A. I am no tailor.

Q. Is it ever returned to the customer? - A. This is a very different business; every cutter is to cut the cloth to the best advantage; I know nothing at all about the tailoring trade.

Q. You never employed a tailor yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever had any returned? - A. Yes.

Q. What is that man's name, for I should like to employ such a tailor? - A. He is gone to sea, his name was Matthews; a man is to make as many garments as he can out of a piece of cloth, and what is left is to be used up.

EDWARD STROVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman to Messrs. Pearce; I received that piece of cloth from the prisoner, and gave it to Roberts; he said he saw it lying there, thought it was of no consequence, and put it in his pocket.

Q. When there were such pieces left, was that considered as a perquisite to the person who cut out the garment? - A. Not at all.

Q. In your line of business that is never permitted? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Court. The cloth is to be worked up as much as in can; are they allowed to take the remnants? - A. Not at Mr. Pearce's; they make a return of it in their accounts, and then it goes towards another sized garment.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you bred a tailor? - A. Yes.

Q. You have never known this done at Mr. Pearce's? - A. No.

Q. But have you not known it done by tailors? - A. Yes.

Q. Very common, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. Don't you know that there has been a new rule, that the masters are to have the cabbage and the men are not to have any? - A. I don't know any thing of it; I did not understand my employers to be tailors, but army clothiers.(Nicholas Pearce proved the firm as stated in the indictment).

Prisoner's defence. On the 13th of January I received an order to cut several coats from five foot six to six foot; I went to Strover for a piece of cloth, the length of it twenty-three yards and three quarters; there was a number of pieces for breast, facings, and different things, and that very boy, Stalker, was picking them out, and an old man said,

he would have a bit to mend his waistcoat; I said I should want them myself, most likely, and if, when I had got to the end, there was a bit left, I would give it him, and I put this in my pocket.

GEORGE FOX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. When you give a man a quantity of cloth to cut out a coat, if he cuts it out well, do you expect him to return you the rest? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. I will admit to you, that in the tailoring line, cabbage is univertally allowed, but not in the army clothing line.

The prisoner called six other witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 28.

Six months in the House of Correction ; fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-98

192. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a flock-bed, value 7s. a blanket and rug, value 1s. and a pillow, value 1s. the property of William Wakelin .

The goods not having been actually removed from the bedstead, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-99

193. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , a Cheshire cheese, value 25s. the property of George Fryer .

GEORGE FRYER sworn. - I am a grocer and cheesemonger , No. 1, Providence-row, Finsbury-square : I had just turned my back to stir the fire, and when I turned round, I saw the prisoner going out of the shop with the cheese; I called out stop him; he ran about ten yards, and then dropped the cheese; I pursued him, and he ran down Providence-row; I only lost sight of him as he turned the corner; he was not then in regimentals; he had a light coat on, and a white waistcoat; he had got three or four hundred yards before I took him; his coat I could swear to; I had just lit candles in the shop; I am sure he is the man.

JAMES PENN sworn. - I am a chair and cabinetmaker; I picked up the cheese at the corner of Windmill-street; I saw the prosecutor and another man running; I cannot say that the prisoner was the man that I saw running, I was twenty yards distant from him; I did not observe his dress till he was taken.

GREGORY ARNOLD sworn. - I am a greengrocer; I live opposite the prosecutor; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw a man take the cheese up out of the kennel, I cannot say who it was.( Samuel Vernor , the constable, produced the cheese, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. At I was passing the prosecutor's house, I heard a bustle, and perceived a man run out before me; I then heard a cry of stop him; the man that I saw before me had a cheese in his hand, and threw it down; I pursued him to the corner of Hill-street, and there, a man in endeavouring to stop him, he threw his arm back, and knocked the man down; I fell over him, and then the prosecutor laid hold of me, and said I was the man.

The prisoner called two serjeants, and two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27. - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-100

194. REBECCA LEAVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , three yards and three quarters of brown cloth, value 2s. the property of the Right Reverend Henry Reginald Courtney , Lord Bishop of Exeter, and other persons, the Governors and Directors of the Poor of the parish of St. George, Hanover-square .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of John-Jones Evans .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

JOHN-JONES EVANS sworn. - I am manager of the workhouse of St. George's, Hanover-square ; I know nothing of the loss.

Q. Are you responsible for this cloth; - A. I give security to make this property good; I have the act of parliament in my pocket which vests it in the governors and directors of the poor.

Prisoner. Q. For the six years that you have been master of that workhouse, did you ever know me do any thing amiss in your life? - A. Never.

- MORRISON sworn. - I am a tailor; I belong to the same workhouse; There was a piece of brown cloth stolen from my room, and the prisoner worked in the same room; she pulled cotton for the tallow-chandlers; I missed the cloth, that is all I know.

Prisoner. Q. Could I take any cloth out without your seeing it? - A. I cannot tell.

WILLIAM CLAXTON sworn. - I am a tailor: I work in St. George's workhouse: I came to speak to the cloth.

WILLIAM PERRYMAN sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Berry and Patmore, in St. Martin's-lane: On the 30th of December, the prisoner came and offered a piece of cloth to pledge, and from her conduct at the time, I suspected she had stolen it; I took her into custody; she would not tell me where she lived, but upon enquiry I found that she belonged to St. George's workhouse, (produces the cloth); she said at first that she was pledging it for a man of the name of Jones, who lived at No. 3, in George-court; I was going to send there, and then she said, no, he did not live there, he lived at Kensington; I asked her where at Kensington, and she then declined answering any thing further; she tried very much to get away, and wanted me to let her go.

Claxton. I cannot swear to this cloth, it is the same colour and width.

Prisoner's defence. It was given to me for my son, who is just twenty years of age; I met a person who had promised it to me, he lives in Oxford street, and I took it to pledge. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-101

195. SIMON JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , a shirt, value 19s the property of William Jarman .

ELIZABETH JARMAN sworn. - I am the wife of William Jarman , a paper-stainer , at Knights-bridge , I take in families washing: On Wednesday the 3d of December, about half after five in the afternoon, I lost a shirt, it was hanging, with other linen, to dry in the parlour; the shirt was missing, and I heard nothing of it till the next morning, Crocker came to me, and asked if I had lost a shirt.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street: I was going down Sloane-street, about half past four o'clock, on the 3d of December, and I observed the prisoner cross from North-street, Sloane-street, he had a blue apron on, and I saw him rolling something up in his apron before him; I asked him what he had got there; he said a shirt; there was another with him; I then called to Blackburn to secure him; I asked the prisoner where the first came from; and he said he brought it from Chelsea; we took him to a public-house, and from thence to the office.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. He had been at our office before.

Q. Was the shirt wet or dry? - A. It was wet.(Produces the shirt).

Mrs. Jarman. This is the shirt I had missed.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. What street did you live in? - A. North-street.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up on the bridge at Chelsea.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-102

196. RICHARD LANDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , four pounds weight of tobacco, value 6s. the property of Thomas Pearson .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas Booth , Welbore-Ellis Agar , Sir Alexander Munro , Knt . Richard Frewin , William Stiles , Francis-Fownes Luttrell , John Buller , and Gloucester Wilson .

Third Count. Laying it to be he property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp)

JOHN MILLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the gate-keepers of the King's tobacco warehouse : I stopped the prisoner at the bar, he was a cooper employed in the warehouses; I rubbed him down, and found this tobacco between two stockings on his legs under a pair of trowsers; he wished me to let him go; I told him I could not; I sent for an officer, and gave charge of him.

Q. Was there such leaf-tobacco in the ware-house? - A. Yes.

Q. It belongs to the Commissioners of Customs? - A. Yes; Mr. Pearson, the keeper of the ware-house, is answerable.

Court. Q. What was the prisoner coopering? - A. Tobacco casks.

THOMAS PEARSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am warehouse-keeper : I had the charge of this tobacco, I saw nothing of the transaction; we had a great quantity of leaf tobacco in the ware-house like this.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had ever borne an irreproachable character; he had a wife and four small children, with an aged mother, whose sole support depended on him, and therefore throwing himself upon the humanity of the Court.

The Prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-103

197. JOHN PEARSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , a linen sheet, value 2s. the property of Isaac Fox , in a lodging room .

There being an error in the indictment the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-104

198. WILLIAM POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of January , fourteen fathom of rope, value 2s. the property of Gilbert Fox .

GILBERT FOX sworn. - I know nothing of the loss.

WILLIAM THOMAS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fox, mast-maker , at Shadwell : I was using this rope on Friday the 2d of January, there were fourteen fathom of it, getting some timber up; when we had done with it, I placed it in the tool-house; about four or five o'clock in the evening, I locked the tool-house, and left all safe, and on Sunday morning we missed it; I found the staple drawn, and the rope missing.

JANE MILL S sworn. - I keep an old iron-shop, in Gravel-lane.

Q. You buy rope, and iron, and any thing that is brought to you? - A. Yes; the prisoner at the

bar brought a bit of rope to sell on the 3d of January.

Q. Where is this bit of rope, as you call it? - A. Here it is; (producing it); I did not weigh it, I gave him a shilling for it; he came again the next day, but I told him, and I gave him another halfpenny; if it had weighed a quarter of a hundred it would only have come to fifteen-pence, for old junk.

Q. Perhaps not for old junk? - A. It is no better, it is only paper stuff.

JOHN COOK sworn. - I am an officer at Shadwell-office: I apprehened the prisoner at a public-house at New-crane, Shadwell; the prisoner told me he had sold it to Mrs. Mills, and took me there.

Mr. Fox. I know this to be my rope, I knew it instantly that I saw it; it is very remarkable by two knots and a splice.

Q. What may be the value of it? - A. I have valued it at two shillings; it was a rope we kept for the purpose of saving a better rope.

Prisoner's defence. I found it under the mast-house as I was going to work. GUILTY , aged 21.

One week in Newgate , and publicly whipped one hundred yards near New-Crane .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-105

199. ANN DUDLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , a cloak, value 5s. two aprons, value 3s. and a shirt, value 3s. the property of Sarah Green .

SARAH GREEN sworn. - I make children's dresses , and so does the prisoner; I live in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane : On the 4th of December, between 11 and 12 o'clock, I went out, and when I came back, the prisoner was gone, and the articles mentioned in the indictment; she was not taken up till the 13th of January; Nowland took her, and the apron was found upon her; she used sometimes to come to work for me; I went out to fetch some water for my mother, and when I came back, she was gone.

JOHN NOWLAND sworn. - On the 13th of January, I took charge of the prisoner in George-yard, Whitechapel; she had this apron on, (producing it); I searched her pocket, and found a duplicate of a Bath cloak pawned for 4s. on the 4th of December, at Bow, in the name of Ann Dudley.

STEPHEN GEORGE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker at St. Mary Stratford, Bow: On the 4th of December last, about seven o'clock in the evening. I received a cloak in pawn from a person, whom I believe to be the prisoner at the bar. (Produces the cloak).

Green. This is my cloak; I know it by the strings; it was love ribbon, instead of strings, and here is one of them on nova; I know the apron by the broad binding.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say; I leave it to the mercy of the Court and Jury. GUILTY , aged 32. - Two months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-106

200. SARAH CANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , eight earthen ware plates, value 14d. two knives, value 6d. two forks, value 6d. and a japan shuffer tray, value 2d. the property of John Keppel .

ANN KEPPEL sworn. - I am the wife of John Keppel, upholsterer , in Wigmore-street : The prisoner had been my servant about three weeks; I had a suspicion of her in the course of a week, I disapproved of her conduct, and had given her warning, but in consequence of finding some articles of provision secreted in the kitchen, I insisted upon seeing her box in her bed-room, in which I found the articles mentioned in the indictment; the box was locked, and she opened it herself; I sent, for an officer, and had her detained; I had missed the plates and other trifling articles every day; one of the plates is very remarkable, I can swear to it; I believe them all to be mine.

Prisoner's defence. My master and mistress used me very ill, and did not allow me victuals enough; my master kicked me about the room, and tied my hands behind me, while they unlocked my box; I had these things before I went to live there.

Mrs. Keppell. I never made any restriction whatever, or turned the key in the pantry-door in my life; I have seen things destroyed more than I liked, and I have spoke of it, and desired her to be careful of the bread, that is the only restriction I ever made.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY .

Twelve months in the House of Cor . and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-107

201. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a barometer, value 10s. the property of John Ponsioni , John Colombo , and Abondio Ponsioni .

JOHN COLOMBO sworn. - Q. What countryman are you? - A. A Swiss.

Q. What are your partners' names? - A. John Ponsioni and Abondio Ponsioni, weather-glass maker s; they are father and son, No. 180, High Holborn : On the 15th of this month, between five and six in the evening, I was in the parlour; a boy opened the door, and came in, and gave a barometer to another boy, which was the prisoner at the bar, and then he took an optic, and gave it to the boy, who ran away, and dropped it at the door; there were several of them; and then he ran away; he was pursued, and was not taken; my partner had hold of him; they came round, and beat my partner, and he was obliged to let him go;

then he cried out stop thief, and two officers belonging to Marlborough-street seeing the boy run with the barometer in his hand, they stopped him, and brought him back.

Q. How many boys were there round your shop? - A. To my knowledge there were five; There was one as large as me.

HENRY LOVETT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: On Thursday the 15th, in returning from this Court, in company with Jackson, going up Holborn, I saw two thieves stand just on this side of Newton-street; I said to Jackson, if you will stop a minute, you will see some others come to them; I had hardly said it a minute, when I saw the prisoner at the bar come to them with something under his coat; I laid hold of him, took him to a public-house, and searched him; as we were going along, there were two of them on the other side of the way; one of them crossed part of the way over towards us; I then told Jackson to keep back a little, for there were some more coming after us; he did so; I searched the prisoner, and found upon him two plated decanter stands.

Court. Q. What name do you give to those who stand about in that way? - A. Stallers off.

( William Jackson , the officer, confirmed the evidence of Lovett, and produced the barometer, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. A man gave me threepence to carry them as far as Gray's-inn-lane.

GUILTY , aged 15. - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-108

202. CHARLES HOUGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , a coat, value 5s. two waistcoats, value 5s. a shirt, value 2s. a stock, value 6d. and a silver stock buckle, value 5s. the property of John Hampson .

JOHN HAMPSON sworn. - I am a press and mangle-maker in Broad-street, Bloomsbury : Last Monday five weeks, about half past eight o'clock in the morning, the things in the indictment were put upon the mangle; I put them upon the mangle while the chimney-sweepers were sweeping the parlour chimney; I do not know any thing of the boy of my own knowledge.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I was coming down PLumbtree-street a little before nine, on Monday the 8th of December; I observed the prisoner coming towards me, and two other boys, the prisoner had these things upon his arm in this manner, (describing it); I passed them; I turned my head round, and saw them looking at me; one of them immediately left him; they turned down Castle-street, and I went after them; the other one went up immediately to him, and nudged him; I went up to him; says I, my little man, what have you got here; he said a man gave them him to carry; I asked him, who is that man; he said he did not know, the man had just given them him to carry; I took him to the Brown Bear, and in the pocket of one of the coats, I found the prosecutor's direction.

Hampson. I can speak to all these things but the stock; there is no mark upon it, but I believe it to be mine.

Prisoner's defence. A gentlemen asked me if I wanted a job, and I asked him what it was, and he said it was only to carry these things a little way.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 12.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-109

203. ANN BANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , two sheets, value 6s. a blanket, value 2s. a looking-glass, value 3s. a flat iron, value 6d. and a bedquilt, value 1s. the property of William Markwell , in a lodging-room .

MARY PINCHBECK sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Markwell; her husband is a serjeant in the guards ; she lives at No. 1, Arthur-place, Drury-lane ; she lets furnished lodgings: Sometime in November, I cannot recollect the day, the prisoner came and asked me if there was a room to let, and I said, yes; she approved of the room, and said she would come; in a little while afterwards, she paid one shilling earnest, she was to pay five shillings a week, it was a furnished lodging, and she came in about an hour; I asked her if she had any character; she said I might go to St. George's Fields after her character, but my mistress being rather poorly, she could not spare me to go.

Q. What other lodgers were in the house? - A. A young woman lodged in the front room on the first floor; I don't know whether she is married or not; and a man and his wife lived in the back-room; the articles mentioned in the indictment were all let to her with the lodging; she continued there, to the best of my knowledge, between five and six weeks; she paid her rent every week; she used to pay me at the door.

Jury. Q. Was she an unfortunate girl that walked the streets? - A. If I must tell the truth, I believe she did.

Q. Had not you other lodgers in the house of the same description? - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose you took them all without character? - A. I cannot say; there are two working people live in the garret.

- MARKWELL sworn. - Q. We have heard what sort of a house you keep? - A. This girl, I believe, did walk the street.

Q. Do not you know that your other lodgers get

their bread by prostitution? - A. I believe there is one.

Q. Do you know what time she came to the room? - A. No; she went away the 29th of November, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did she go away with the key? - A. Yes; she fastened the door with a fork on the outside.

Q. Then any body could have gone into the lodgings after she was gone? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you the first person that found this out? - A. No.

Q. Have you found any of your things? - A. Only what was found at the pawnbroker's.

ROBERT HALE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fleming, pawnbroker, in Drury-lane; I asked her if they were her own property; she said they were; I am certain the prisoner is the person that pledged these articles at different times, from the 15th to the 28th of November; I am certain of her person. (Produces a bed quilt, two sheets, a flat iron, a looking-glass, and a blanket).

Q. (To Markwell). Do the sheets go to your other lodgers, as well as to her, after they are changed? - A. I cannot say, for I was at Colchester three weeks of the time; I know the sheets by the make of them; the iron I know by the handle being broke, and the quilt I know; it has got a part of two old gowns of mine in it.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody on Saturday, the 6th of December, and on Monday, I went to the pawnbroker's, where the things were found.

Prisoner's defence. I paid her for her lodgings as well as I could; at last, I owed her eleven shillings, and I pawned the things, one at a time, to pay the rent; I came home one morning, and found the door broke open, and the bed and bedding all gone; I meant to have taken the things out of pledge as soon as I could. GUILTY .

Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18010114-110

204. ABRAHAM LEVY was indicted for uttering, on the 28th of December , to one Jacob-George Wrench , a counterfeit half-guinea, knowing it to be counterfeit; and also for having about him, and in his possession, a counterfeit guinea, knowing it to be counterfeit .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gleed.)

JACOB-GEORGE WRENCH sworn. - Examined Mr. Gleed. I live in Lower Thames-street : I hired the prisoner, who is a coachman , on Sunday the 28th of December, in Gracechurch-street, to go to Guildford-street and back, for which I was to give him five shillings, it was about one o'clock at noon; upon my return at my own door, I gave him a guinea, which he put into his sob immediately; I perceived something like a piece of gold between his thumb and finger, which awaked my suspicion; it appeared to me to be a guinea; indeed, I saw it so clear, that I was satisfied it was counterfeit; he was sometime giving me the change, and then drew this half guinea from his breeches pocket,(producing a half-guinea); he asked me what change I was to have; I told him five shillings and sixpence; he gave me two half-crown pieces and a half-guinea; I then asked him what he meant by offering me such a coin as this; he told me he would give me another; upon which I told him, he certainly should, and he did; he then wanted his half-guinea back; I told him, he should not only not have it back, but I would have the guinea that he had then in his hand; he said he had no such thing, and some altercation ensued, till I thought it necessary to call my servant down, and send for a constable, which I did.

Q. Did he attempt to get away at all? - A. No, he did not: he persisted in it that he had not a guinea; the constable came, and upon my telling him that the prisoner had a guinea in his hand, he gave it him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you did not, in point of fact, take him into custody, then? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You exhibited your complaint before the Lord-Mayor the next day? - A. Yes. Q. And he surrendered himself up? - A. Yes; he begged very hard that I would let him at liberty; and I said, if the master would answer for his appearance the next day, and he would drive the constable home in his coach, I should have no objection; I understand himself the next day.

Q. Did he say any thing about this half-guinea? - A. He said he had taken it on Christmas-day, as a fate.

Mr. Gleed. Q. As to the guinea, you are sure he denied having it in his hand? - A. Yes; he insisted upon it, that he had none in his hand.

Court. Q. If I understand you right, you have got the half-guinea and the guinea, and your change, besides? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did he account how he came by the guinea? - A. He said he found it in the bottom of his coach, with a thimble.

Q. Was a thimble produced before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Yes.

RICHARD HAZARD sworn. - I am a constable: I took this guinea out of his hand. (Producing it).

ROBERT BEVERLEY sworn. - I am a constable: I went home with the prisoner, to his master's, on the 28th of December, to know whether he would pass his word for his appearance the next day, and he was dismissed upon his master's word.

WILLIAM CANNER sworn. - I am the undermarshal of this City: On Monday, the 29th of December, I searched the lodgings of the prisoner; there are but two rooms; in the lower room I found a half-guinea in a tea-cup. (Produces it).

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did the prisoner, or any of his friends, account for this half-guinea being found? - A. The instant I found the half-guinea in the tea-cup, a little girl, about 12 years old, challenged it as her pocket-piece.

Q. The prisoner was not present? - A. No.

Q. Has it the appearance of being fit for circulation at all? - A. I have taken some worse, in appearance; it has been very much wore.

(Mr. Parker proved the guinea and two half-guineas to be copper, gilt).

(Mr. Knapp addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant). NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-111

205. MARY VALLENCE and MATTHEW SWIFT were indicted for uttering, on the 5th of January , a counterfeit sixpence, to one Rebecca Wendy , knowing it to be counterfeit; and also for uttering to one William Beardon , a piece of false and counterfeited coin, resembling a French sixpence, knowing it to be counterfeit .

The Court being of opinion that the evidence did not bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were

BOTH ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-112

206. MATTHEW SWIFT was again indicted for uttering, on the 4th of January , to one Rebecca Wendy , a counterfeit sixpence, knowing it to be counterfeit .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.) REBECCA WENDY sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Wendy , who keeps the King's-Arms, Philip-lane, Aldermanbury : On Sunday morning, the 4th of January, about ten o'clock, the prisoner came in for a pennyworth of gin, which I served him with; he gave me a sixpence with two letters upon it, W M, I gave him change for it, and put it into the till; he came in again, in about half an hour, for a pennyworth of beer, and sent my servant out of the tap-room to me with a sixpence, I saw him give it to her; she brought it to me, and I saw it was a bad one; I returned it back again, and he gave me a penny, that made me suspect the first he had given me; I immediately looked into my till, and found the sixpence that he had given me; I found it to be a bad one, and I took it out of the till, and kept it by itself, because I would not pass it; and, on the Monday night, my husband brought in the prisoner, having been in search for the woman prisoner, who was tried last night, I immediately said that was the man that had given me a bad sixpence; he then denied ever having been in the house in his life before; I gave the sixpence to the constable, Newman; the prisoner was searched, but nothing found upon him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask Newman, the constable, what the letters were upon the sixpence, after he had them, upon your oath? - A. I believe I did ask him what one of them was, I know there was a W. but I had forgot what the other letter was.

THOMAS WENDY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the husband of the last witness; the woman, that was acquitted last night, came into my house, and when she went away, I went out after her, and seeing this prisoner talking to her, I took him upon suspicion; I wanted to search him at the Dr. Butler's-head, in Rose-court, Coleman-street; I found it was not convenient to search him there, and I took him back to my own house, but before I got to my own house, within a few yards, he dropped a sixpence, I then picked it up, and told him it was his sixpence, and he denied it.

Q. How did he drop it? - A. He had got his hand to his breeches pocket, and he slipped it down the thigh; I stooped-down to pick it up, and he attempred to get away from me, but I would not let him; I led him immediately into my own house, the King's-arms.

Q. Did you see what was found upon him? - A. A great many halfpence; I cannot say how many, they apeared to me to be all good.

SAMUEL PRESTOW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at No. 22, Addle-street, three doors from Mr. Wendy's house; I was present when Mr. Wendy brought the prisoner into his own house; Wendy said, here is a sixpence that this man has dropped close by your door, meaning my door; the prisoner denied ever dropping the sixpence at all; Mr. Wendy then gave me the sixpence, and when the constable came, I delivered it to him; when he came in first, Mrs. Wendy said, that is the man that gave me the sixpence; on the

Sunday morning he denied ever having been in the house; the constable, Fletcher, then searched him, and then Newman searched him, there was nothing found upon him but some halfpence, about two shillingsworth, I should suppose, in halfpence and penny-pieces.

Prisoner. Q. Did not Mr. Wendy produce a quantity of silver, and say, I have no doubt but I have taken it of you, or such as you? - A. There was no such thing.

ROBERT NEWMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable: On Monday the 5th of January, about five in the afternoon, I was called upon to apprehend the prisoner, at Mr. Wendy's house; I found upon him a quantity of halfpence and penny pieces, and some duplicates.

Q. Whereabout might the number of halfpence be? - A. I cannot say, there were a good many of them, Prestow delivered me three sixpences. (Produces them.).

Q. (To Mr. Wendy.) Look at those sixpences? - A. This is the sixpence that I took out of the till, which I had taken of the prisoner on the Sunday morning, it has the letters, W. M. upon it; I gave it to Mr. Prestow, upon the Monday, and he delivered it to Newman; I cannot distinguish which is the one that dropped from the prisoner.

Wendy. This is the sixpence that dropped from the prisoner; Mr. Prestow delivered it to me, I put the letter P. upon it with a pair of snuffers.(Mr. William Parker proved the two sixpences to be counterfeit, by breaking them in Court.)

Prisoner's defence. I never was in the house on Sunday, nor in my life, till I was taken there by Mr. Wendy.

GUILTY . - Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for six months more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-113

207. JOHN KEMBLE was indicted for uttering on the 12th of January , to one William Shrubsole , a counterfeit shilling, knowing the same to be counterfeit .

(The case was opened by Mr. Vialiant.)

WILLIAM SHRUBSOLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I live at Feversham, I am an oyster salesman , I attend Billingsgate market every day: On Monday, the 12th of January, between the hours of nine and ten, the prisoner at the bar came down to buy half a bushel of oysters, the oysters were at eighteen shillings a bushel.

Q. Was that known to be the market price on that day? - A. Yes; he gave me nine shillings for half a bushel; when he put them into my hand, I gave them to Thomas Parrett , he tried one of them upon the shovel that we measure the oysters with; upon rubbing them, one or two of them was found to be bad; the prisoner begged me not to rub any more of them, but he would change them; the man in the hold still kept rubbing them to see it they were all bad, they proved to be all bad; a mob arose on board of the boat, and they insisted upon my sending for a constable; a constable was sent for, and I gave charge of him to Bolland; he had made two or three attempts to get out of the boat, but the people would not let him; he then said, his master had given them to him; I did not ask him who his master was, he was not searched on board the boat.

THOMAS PARRETT Junr. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am an oyster-meter; on the 12th of January, the prisoner came on board the boat, the oysters were eighteen shillings a bushel; the prisoner gave Mr. Shrubsole nine shillings, he looked at them, and said; I think there is a rig here; he took hold of the nine shillings, handed them to me; when I looked at them, I found they were all one make; I began to rub one of them upon the oyster shovel, the prisoner said, don't rub them, give me them again, which made me more eager to rub them; I rubbed them all, and found them all to be bad; I asked him where he got them, he said, from his master.

Q. Did he, in your hearing, say any thing about a hackney coachman? - A. No; he sadly wanted to go away; he told me, if I did not let him go, it would be worse for me; a constable was then sent for, and he was given charge of.

GEORGE BOLLAND sworn. - I was sent for as constable to take charge of the prisoner; I searched him, and found upon him a good half-guinea and four shillings, he got away from me a little way, but I got him again; I asked him where he got the money, and he said, he took them in change of a coachman; he offered me half-a-guinea to let him go as I went along. (Mr. William Parker proved the money to be bad.)

Prisoner's defence. There was another man held his hand to put some money into the prosecutor's hand at the same money into the prosecutor's hand at the same time, as my money was in his hand.

Q. (To Shrubsole.) Q. Had you any other money in your hand at the time? - A. No, I had not, there was not another customer in the boat but him. a good character.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for six months more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-114

208. ABRAHAM MARKER was indicted for receiving, on the 26th of November , eighty pounds weight of annatto, value 281. the property of Richard Jackson and Matthew Fulwood , stolen by a certain ill-disposed person, he knowing the same to have been stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

RICHARD JACKSON sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Knowlys. I am in partnership with Matthew Fulwood, druggist , No. 16. Walbrook; we had lost a great quantity of annatto.

Q. That is a drug that is used, I believe, in colouring and dying? - A. Yes, it is used but very little in London; we have sold it at seven shillings a pound to the trade; be the quantity what it will, that has been the price these two years.

Q. Had you a servant in your employ, of the name of Darbyshire? - A. We had.

Q. In consequence of any information you received from Darbyshire, did you go to the house of Marker, the defendant? - A. I did, with two constables, Wainwright and Hall, we had a search-warrant with us, on Wednesday evening the 26th of November last.

Q. What business does he appear to carry on? - A. It has the appearance of a druggist's shop, there are bottles in the window, situated in Petticoat-lane, in the city of London; we went about three o'clock, Mr. Fullwood went with us.

Q. Was the defendant a customer of yours? - A. No; I did not know there was such a person existing before.

Q. Is it usually sold wholesale or retail? - A. What we sell to people who sell by retail, is three or four pounds at a time, and very small quantities, but what we principally sell in London is for shipping; Marker was in a littleroom adjoining the shop, he asked the officers what they wanted, and they said, to look over his house; he said, what do you want, the officers said, annatto; he said, do you want to buy any; I am not sure, but I think he said, I make it; I said, we want it, and we must see whether you have got any or not, and made towards the counter in the shop; they said, we must see what you have got in the drawers in your counter; he opened two drawers which contained nothing of that sort, they were the upper drawers of the counter; the officers said, we must see the lower drawers, he got his back against them, and was very much averse to opening them; they said, they must see into them; then, with a great deal of reluctance, he opened one a little way, and shut it up again immediately; we found a quantity of annatto in the counter, in these drawers; the officers then examined the drawers, and found a quantity of annatto in those drawers, there is about eighty pounds weight of it found in two large drawers, and some little in another place; upon looking at that, we believed it to be our property, some of it has got our original mark, we found it exactly according to the information we had from Darbyshire.

Q. Does he continue in your service? - A. Yes, and we mean to continue him; the annatto is all marked when we manufacture it; but there is a great deal of it defaced, some totally, and some but little.

Q. Besides these marks, have you any other reasons to know it to be your's? - A. Yes, the composition is such as I never saw it equalled by any body in the consistence of the colour and the quality of it; it is a particular article that I never saw made by any body; he said, as he said before, that he made annatto; we then took him before the Magistrate, and he was committed, and afterwards bailed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You first said, you believed the articles to be your's? - A. Yes.

Q. You believe also that you are the sole manufacturer of it? - A. Yes, of this quality.

Q. Do not you know any body else in the city of London, or its environs, that manufactures annatto of the same quality? - A. I do not.

Q. Do you mean to swear that annatto of the same quality is not manufactured in the city of London, or it's environs? - A. Not to my knowledge, I never saw any.

Q. He said at first when he came into the shop, that he made annatto? - A. Not at first.

Q. How long might if be after? - A. In answer to the third question.

Q. Did not he, after the annatto was put into the drawer, say, he made annatto? - A. He only said so once, I did not hear him say so a second time.

Court. Q. I take it for granted, Marker said, as he said before, that he made annatto? - A. I stand corrected, I believe I did say so.

Q. When you went to the house, did you make it known to him that you had a search-warrant? - A. They told him they must look all over his house, for they had an authority.

Q. Darbyshire, upon whose information all this case depends, you found had robbed you to a considerable degree? - A. I cannot say to what amount.

Q. Has he not robbed you to the amount of five pounds? - A. God knows what amount, I dare say a great many pounds.

Q. Had he not been in the habit of robbing you for a considerable length of time? - A. I dare say he had.

Q. How great a length of time did you learn, from his information, that he had been a thief to you, instead of a servant? - A. There was another man that lived with us that robbed us.

Q. I ask you, how long Darbyshire stated to you that he had been robbing you? - A. It is impossible for me to say; he had been with me about two years.

Q. How much of that time had he been robbing you? - A. I don't suppose he robbed us at all, till that other man came into our employ, he was an extra man.

Q. When was that? - A. In March last.

Q. Soon after March, I suppose then, he commenced thief? - A. Soon after, I suppose.

Q. Did he tell you any thing about the other man having robbed you, before you caught him? - A. No, he did not.

Q. As to this extra man, as you call him, this extra thief, he never told you of it till he was detected? - A. Certainly not.

Q. Did you ever sell annatto by retail? - A. When people bring money, we never turn them away, but we are very seldom enquired of for it.

Q. To oblige a customer, sometimes, you sell small quantities? - A. Any quantity they chuse.

Q. You have a pretty good trade, I suppose? - A. Pretty well, but not so good as your's.

Q. I wish you could make that out-my friend stated in his opening, that it is used for colouring cheese? - A. Yes; what is used of it in London is for making picture-frames; cheese is coloured in the country.

Q. Cheese may be coloured with it in London? - A. Cheese is not made in London.

Q. Oh yes, it is; I have eat very good cheese made in London-will not annatto in travelling easily lose its marks? - A. It may.

MATTHEW FULLWOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am in partnership with Mr. Jackson; I went with him and the officers to Marker's house, but my attention was principally paid to the drawers where the annatto was locked up; I called in the constables, and pointed to the drawers, according to the description that Darbyshire had given; Marker first of all said, he did not belong to the house; I immediately pointed to the drawers; Hall, the constable, said, he must look into those drawers; then immediately Abraham Marker came, as though he belonged to the house; there are two counters; these were the drawers in the left hand counter; Marker put himself against the drawers, and was averse to opening them; at last, with much ado, he opened two or three drawers, I cannot say how many, and there was no annatto there; Hall, the constable, insisted upon seeing the other drawers opened, he opened one of them a little way, and said, there is annatto, and shut it again immediately, and so he did several times; Hall, the constable, insisted upon having these drawers opened wide, that he might see; I desired it might be taken to the light, that I might see if it was our annatto, as I know the article so well, and I found that it was.

Q. About what quantity was there? - A. About eighty pounds; as soon as ever it came to the light I knew it to have gone from our house, to be ours; he was then apprehended and carried before a Magistrate.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was Mr. Jackson by at the time that you heard Marker say he did not belong to the house? - A. He was in a little room, but whether he might hear that or not, I cannot say, I rather think he did.

Q. Now and then, to oblige customers, you let small quantities go out of your house? - A. Very few want small quantities; it runs generally seven or fourteen pounds at a time, sometimes more and sometimes less.

Q. I take it when they do go out in that way, they go out with other marks upon them? - A. They do; they make it a rule not to order it till it is wanted, because we can keep it better than they.

JAMES HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the Marshalmen of the city of London; I went with a search warrant to the house of the defendant with Wainwright and the prosecutor; the defendant's house is in the city of London; on the 26th of November last, we went through the shop into a back room, where the prisoner was then sitting with his wife; I enquired of the prisoner whether he was the master of the house; he replied what do you want; I then said again, do you belong to, or are you master of this house; he said, no; whether you are or not, says I, I am going to search the house; why, what do you want, says he, I am the master then; I told him we had come to look for some annatto; he said he had annatto, what did I want with it; I told him we must look at what he had got; he then said he made it; we then went into the room where Jackson's partner was, and I told the prisoner we must look in those drawers that were under the counter; the prisoner then opened some drawers at the top of the counter which did not contain annatto; I told him I must see the whole of the drawers opened; he then opened the drawers, and Mr. Jackson's partner said that was annatto; the prisoner said, you will spoil my goods, you will spoil my goods, and then went to shut the drawer again; I told him we must see the drawer out, which he was very loth to do; he then said it was not as he made it; Mr. Jackson and Mr. Fullwood claimed it; then we opened some more drawers, and we found some more; we did not take the whole of it away; Mr. Fullwood and Wainwright took it; we did not get the whole that is here till the next day; Marker said, I might go up stairs and see the stuff, and where it was worked; we went into his work-shop, and there was a tub with some stuff in it, that they told me was annatto; the prisoner desired us particularly to go up there.

Cross-examined Mr. Knapp. - Q. Did you go in your present dress? - A. Yes; and Mr. Marker knew me, for he asked me how one of my partners did, that he had known many years.

THOMAS DARBYSHIRE sworn. - I have been in the service of Messrs. Jackson and Fullwood two years in April.

Q. You are now with them? - A. Yes.

Q. During the time you have lived there has Marker been a customer at your master's shop? - A. No.

Q. Did you know of his having any annatto of your master's? - A. Yes; a fellow-servant of mine, of the name of Thomas, I think, Thomas Walton, I am not sure, had been with some annatto to Marker, and he persuaded me to go with him.

Q. How long ago is that since you were persuaded to go with Thomas to Marker's? - A. I think the latter end of June or beginning of July; I am not positive; we both took some annatto.

Mr. Knapp. The indictment charges the 20th of November.

Court. I think you must confine yourself to some one time.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. When was the last time you carried any annatto to Marker's? - A. I think Thursday, the 20th of November.

Q. About what quantity did you take him then? - A. I think about four pounds.

Q. Was it your master's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Marker know who you were? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he know who you lived with? - A. Yes.

Q. What did he give you for that quantity? - A. One shilling a pound; he put it into a drawer under the counter.

Q. How long after was it that your masters detected you in taking their goods away? - A. The Tuesday following.

Q. Did you then give them any information of what you had been doing with this annatto? - A. Yes; I told them they would find it in the drawers under Mr. Marker's counter.

Q. How long had he known whose servant you were? - A. Ever since July.

Q. Did you ever tell him how you came by the annatto? - A. Yes; I told him it was my masters' property; it was the annatto that we worked, and I told him that he knew how we came by it, and he said, very well, he would take it then.

Q. Did he ever say any thing to you about coming in company or alone? - A. Yes; when we both came together, he desired us not to come together again, because people would take notice of us.

Q. Was he perfectly acquainted that you came dishonestly by it? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. On the 20th of November was Walton with you? - A. No.

Q. That was a little private transaction of your own? - A. Yes.

Q. You know you are saving yourself from prosecution by giving evidence to-day? - A. I don't know that.

Q. Then I tell you that you do; you have had no promise from your master to remain in his service? - A. No.

Q. And you do not understand now that you are to continue in his service? - A. I do not know but what I must be turned out.

Q. You gave no account of this till your master detected you? - A. No.

Q. Therefore, whatever Walton told you, you prosited by? - A. Yes, I followed it up, but I never profited much.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Edward Able ? - A. No, I do not.

Q. You have never sent any body to the desendant since the prosecution has been begun? - A. I never sent any body at all.

Q. Then you don't know that by giving evidence to-day, you save yourself? - A. No.

Q. You thought this a very honest thing, I suppose? - A. No, I did not.

Q. However, the beaten track that was marked out for you, you followed? - A. Yes, I had been several times.

Q. And you did not say one word about it till you were found out? - A. No.(Wainwright produced the property.)

Q. (To Mr. Fullwood). Q. Point out the mark? - A. I know it as well by the quality as the mark quite; I never saw any like it before; ours are all marked with a P; most of these are obliterated; there are several with his name at one end, and my P at the other end; here is one that has A M at the one end, and my P obliterated at the other end; I have some with me that I have brought from home. (Produces them.)

Q. Have you also your marking-iron? - A. Yes. (Produces it.)

Q. Independent of that mark, is there any composition sufficient for you to swear to? - A. I would swear to it sooner from the quality than from the marks; I never saw any of such quality; besides, I know it by the peculiar smell, and the composition that keeps it from getting mouldy, and is very different in its flavour; I have tried the colours in water, and they exactly resemble one another both as to the quality of the colour, and as to the colour itself.

Q. Have you tried any other experiment - there are some with only A M upon them; have you tried any of them? - A. Yes, and they correspond exactly.

A. Did you go up stairs into Marker's house, where the tub was? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the contents of that tub appear to be annatto? - A. Yes; it appeared to be our annatto mixed, there were two sorts in the tub; it had got hard, and that was to soften it.

Q. Did you employ a person of the name of Weedon in your manufactory? - A. Yes; he has been eight years.

Mr. Knapp. Q. The marking-iron, with a P at the end of it, would be a very remarkable thing?

- A. There might be a P, but I don't think any body can resemble the quality.

WILLIAM WEEDON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I have been in the manufacture of annatto eight years.

Q. From the quality of that annatto, do you believe that to be your master's property? - A. I have no doubt at all but it has been his property.

Mr. Knapp addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-115

209. ANN POWELL was indicted for uttering, on the 3d of December , a counterfeit shilling, to one Thomas Deering , knowing it to be counterfeit .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS DEERING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at the Cross Keys Inn, Wood-street ; Some time in the month of December, a boy, of the name of Nevin, who is now in Court, came to my house towards the evening, about dusk, I was in the bar; he asked for half a quartern of rum, for which he tendered me a bad shilling; I immediately suspected it was bad; I kept the shilling, and did not let him have the rum, but sent for an officer; Fenner came, and I delivered the boy into his custody; Fenner has the shilling.

THOMAS NEVIN . - Q. How old are you? - A. Going on eleven.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. No; I never took an oath in my life.

Q. Have you ever learned your catechism? - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether it is a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. It is a bad thing.

Q. Do you know where wicked boys that tell lies go to? - A. To the wicked man. (He is sworn.) On the 3d of December last I went to Mr. Deering's, about four o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner sent me for half a quartern of rum, and gave me a shilling; she said she would wait at the corner of Wood-street till I came back with it; I left her at the corner of Wood-street, in Cheapside; I went to the Cross Keys, and saw Mr. Deering; she told me to go down that street, and turn up the yard; there is a yard goes up to the house; she stood at the corner of the street, and pointed out to me the yard; I asked the gentleman for half a quartern of rum, and he asked me who I came from; I told him I was come from a woman waiting at the bottom of the street; I paid him a shilling that I had received from the prisoner, I had no other shilling, and then he sent for a constable; the constable asked me where I lived, and where I came from, and I told him; then he brought me into the street to look for the woman, but the woman was not there; then the constable took me to the Poultry Compter; I afterwards went with the constable to Cock-court, Snow-hill, No. 12, the prisoner lodged there; I told the constable that that was the woman; then I saw her put three bad sixpences under a black silk cloak that laid upon a trunk in the room where she lodged.

Q. Did you tell Fenner that you had seen her put three sixpences under the cloak? - A. I did; Fenner shook the trunk that was in the room, and afterwards opened it, and there was bad halfpence in it; she and I were both taken before the Aldenman; I was admitted an evidence, and she was committed.

Prisoner. Q. Was it not your own mother that sent you? - A. No.

Court. Q. Upon your oath, was it that woman or your mother that sent you? - A. That woman.

Q. Does your mother live in the same house that that woman does? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Is your own mother living? - A. She is dying now.

Court. Q. Were you ever in this Court before? - A. No.

Q. You come in custody now? - A. Yes.

Q. You never were in this Court before? - A. No.

Q. Were you ever in the Philanthropic Society? - A. Yes; I was there three years and a half.

Q. Did they not bind you out as an apprentice? - A. No.

Q. How came that? - A. I was not old enough, and my friends took me out.

Q. Upon your oath, do you mean to say that your friends took you out? - A. Yes.

Q. Who are your friends that took you out - are they able to support you? - A. They were when they took me out, but they are not now.

Q. Who are those friends? - A. Mrs. Nevin and Thomas Conolly .

Q. Did you not run away? - A. I did all the same, because my friends took me away along with them.

Q. Did the Society know of your coming away - had you their consent? - A. No.

Q. Then you did run away? - A. Yes.

Q. Your mother is dead now, is not she? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not said to any body that she is? - A. No.

Q. Have not you told any body so within these few days? - A. No.

Q. It is your mother-in-law that is now dying? A. No, my own mother.

Q. I have been told that your mother has been

dead some time, and that your mother-in-law is now dying? - A. No, it is my own mother; she married again after my father was dead.

Q. How do you get your livelihood now? - A. My friends support me as well as they can, and I work at a letter founder's.

Deering. When this boy first came to me, he said it was his mother that sent him.

Court. After that I think Mr. Knapp will not press it, after this boy has laid it upon the prisoner to screen his mother: you see all the circumstances that he states would be right beyond the possibility of detection; and if it had not been for this declaration of his, what in justice might have been done. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18010114-116

210. JAMES DEAN was indicted for a fraud .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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