Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd December 1800.
Reference Number: 18001203
Reference Number: f18001203-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 3d of DECEMBER, 1800, and following Days, BRING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR WILLIAM STAINES , KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY, AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors'-Commons.

1800.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, & c.

BEFORE Sir WILLIAM STAINES, KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; NASH GROSE, Knight, one of the justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Caleb Moore ,

Thomas Finlayson ,

Alexis-John Strickland ,

Robert Miller ,

Dominick French ,

John Payne ,

Thomas Baxter ,

Charles Puckeridge ,

Richard Arnold ,

Roger Lee ,

Christian-Thomas Morgan ,

Richard Inwood .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Dalby ,

Francis Perigal ,

Edward Ball ,

John Fisher ,

Robert Fogg ,

Charles Willis ,

Charles Lambert ,

Charles Ward ,

John Hurley ,

Robert Butler ,

Henry Humphreys ,

William Martin .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Samuel Sly ,

Matthew Cooke ,

Benjamin Whippey ,

William Britten ,

John Hall ,

Joseph Gibbons ,

Robert Sparrow ,

George Bernard ,

William Ashton ,

William Pritchard ,

William King ,

George Cheshire .

Reference Number: t18001203-1

1. RICHARD LANDSMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , a basket, value 1s, and seven ducks, value 7s. the property of James Smith .

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am a higler : On Friday the 25th of September, I lost my property in Whitechapel ; I brought seven ducks to town, tied under my cart; I saw them safe when I was at Whitechapel-church; I did not miss them till the prisoner and the property was brought back to me at the corner of Red-lion-street; I know the basket to be mine; it was a wicket-basket that I had made for me. (Produces it).

WILLIAM DOUGLAS sworn. - I saw the prisoner take the basket of ducks upon his shoulder, near Essex-street, Whitechapel; I went in pursuit of him, and then he dropped it; he was stopped at the corner of Red-lion-street; I believe the prisoner is the same man; the prosecutor claimed them; I had the care of the basket till the next day.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the basket in Whitechapel, and this man came and knocked it off my shoulder; I have a witness here that saw me pick it up.

For the prisoner.

WILLIAM WHITING sworn. - I am a soldier belonging to the West London militia; I have been in the regiment six years; I saw a basket like this lying in the road, as I was coming along Whitechapel High-street; it stood upon its bottom; I looked at it for the space of two minutes, I suppose; I looked to see where it came from, but I could see nothing; I then saw the prisoner pick it up, and the patrol ran after him, and called out stop thief, and then I found myself very comfortable that I had not meddled with it.

Q. Did you know any thing of the prisoner before? - A. No farther than being children together; I never knew the lad so as to be in any correspondence with him. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-2

2. JOHN DRISCOLL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , a pair of boots, value 42s. the property of James Fozard , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES FOZARD sworn. - I am a stable-keeper , and live in Park-lane : I had been out on the 30th of October about half an hour; when I went out, I left a pair of new boots hanging in the back parlour; on my coming into the house at the back door, and proceeding towards the back parlour, I heard some person; upon which, I went suddenly in, and found the prisoner in the act of putting the boots between two chairs: I asked him what he wanted; he said he wanted to speak with Mr. Fozard, and after particular enquiries, he said he wanted a letter for the hospital, as he had a bad leg, and had cut his-finger; I asked him what he was doing with the boots; he said, he had not seen or touched them; I asked him if he knew Mr. Fozard; he said, yes, perfectly, very intimately, that he was a little, short, thick, fat man, which is a description I don't answer; I thought he was a thief, and therefore took him up; I paid two guineas for the boots.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the house to ask for a letter for the hospital; I told him, I hoped he would excuse the liberty I took of coming into the house; he d-d me, and said I came to steal something; I said, I had not, but for a letter which I had had before; he took me up for stealing his boots, which I had not seen; I have failed in the four quarters of the world with Lord Howe, Lord St. Vincent, and Lord Duncan, and never was charged with any offence before.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s. aged 50.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-3

3. RICHARD EADES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , a sack, value 3s. and a bushel of beans, value 7s. the property of John Shore ; and which William Morris was convicted of stealing at the last Sessions.

There being no evidence to shew that the prisoner received the property from Morris, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-4

4. JOHN AUSTIN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Gayner , about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 16th of November , with intent to steal, and stealing a bed, value 35s. a bolster, value 2s. and a pair of blankets, value 5s. the property of the said Thomas.

CHRISTIAN GAYNER sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Gayner ; my husband lives in Drury-lane . On Sunday night, the 16th of November, I saw the bed; the prisoner lodged in the house; the things were not taken from the room that he lodged in; on Monday morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I missed them; the watchman took him with the bed upon him.

DANIEL DUNA sworn. - On Sunday night, the 16th of November, I apprehended the prisoner coming up Drury-lane, with a bed on his shoulder,

and a blanket and bolster; I asked him where he was going with that bed; he told me he had brought them from his lodgings; I asked him how he came to bring them away at that time of night; he said, because he could not pay his lodgings; I suspected that the bed was stolen; I sprung my rattle, and he slung the bed off his shoulder, and ran down one of the courts in Drury-lane; by some accident he tripped himself up, and I came a top of him; Lynch and another watchman came up, and assisted me, and we took the bed, blankets, and bolster, to the watch-house; the next morning Mrs. Gayner claimed the property at the watch-house. (Produces the property.)

Mrs. Gayner. This is the bed, blanket, and bolster, that I lost.

Q.Which room were these things in? - A. On the ground-floor; he lodged up one pair of stairs; the house is let to lodgers; the door was locked, here is the key that I had in my pocket, and here is the key it was opened with, which I found in the lock; it was let to a lodger that was to have come on the Monday following; the next morning I found the room-door half open.

Q. What are the value of these things? - A.Thirty-five shillings for the bed, half-a-crown for the bolster, and half-a-crown a piece for the blankets; I saw the door locked at eleven at night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.This bed had been let to some person that was to come into the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you delivered the key? - A. No.

Q. That person who was to come, was to have the use of the bed, and the other furniture? - A. Yes.

Q. Your husband has two houses, I believe; they were originally two houses, but are now formed into one? - A. No; it was always one house.

Q.There is an open passage common to all the inhabitants of your house? - A. Yes.

Q.Does your husband live in the house? - A. Yes.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street; the magistrates desired me to go and see the situation of the house, to see whether it was a burglary or not; I found a common door to the house; Mr. and Mrs. Gayner lived in it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is not that a common door communicating to the lodgings, and is there not a separate door communicating to that part which is occupied by the landlord? - A. Yes; there are two doors to one house.

Court. Q.Though there are two doors, it is all one house? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I was going home, and a man offered me one shilling to carry this bed for him; that was at the corner of Queen-street; and as soon as I had got it upon my back, the watchman stopped me and the man run away.

For the Prisoner.

JOSEPH AUSTIN sworn. - I am uncle to the prisoner; I never knew that the prisoner lodged in Mrs. Gayner's house; I understand he has been there with bad women, the house is full of them; I never heard any thing against his character before, he is a shoe-maker.

Court. (To Mrs. Gayner.) Q.Are there any women that live in your house? - A. Yes, three; the woman that he lived with came along with him.

Q. Did the prisoner pay you any rent? - A. No, he was not a lodger.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-5

5. RALPH WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , an umbrella, value 5s. the property of William Seabrook .

WILLIAM SEABROOK sworn. - I can only swear to the property.

THOMAS LAWLEY sworn. - I am a butcher: On Wednesday the 24th of September, I saw the prisoner, and two other men, one of them gave an umbrella to the prisoner, and he walked on, the other two stopped behind, and as I was passing those two to go after him, the other two pushed me about, and told me he was gone down a court, till I made an alarm, and then they let me go by them; I went after the prisoner and took the umbrella away from him; he would not let me have it at first, but I told him my master was coming, and then he let me have the umbrella; I took the umbrella, and just as I left him, I met my master, and went back with my master to the man, and he took him.

Mrs. SEABROOK sworn. - My husband is a butcher, No. 13, Duke-street; I had just left the shop, with the umbrella in it; I saw the prisoner come out with the umbrella, I sent the boy after him; Mr. Seabrook came up, I sent him after him, and he brought back the prisoner, but he is not the man that took it out of the shop.

Seabrook. I took the prisoner and the umbrella, which I delivered to Hall, the marshalman.(James Hall, the marshalman, produced the umbrella, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. A man gave it me to hold a minute, while he went into a house to ask for some money. GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-6

6. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a silver outmeg grate, value 10s. the property of Gabriel Aughtie , privately in his shop .

GABRIEL AUGHTIE sworn. - I am a comb-maker , in Cheapside , and deal in a variety of silver and gold articles: On Monday, the 3d of November, about half past six in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked to see some silver nutmeg-graters; I was then in the parlour; I came out and shewed him some; he asked the price of one, which I asked him twenty-five shillings for; he said, he would give me seventeen shillings; I looked very sledfastly at him, for I was rather suspicious from his offer, that he did not want to buy, and he withdrew from the shop immediately; when he went out, he turned to the right-hand, which brought his left-hand to the light of the window; I kept my eye on him, and could see that he had something in his left hand, but I did not at that time miss any thing from the shop; I ran after him, and took him near the corner of Lawrence-lane, on the other side of the way; I laid hold of him, and said, you scoundrel, give me the silver grater you have got, for I suspected he had one; I put my right-hand to his left, and he dropped it; he said, what, do you accuse me of stealing your grater, for you brought it yourself and dropped it; I picked it up, and held him by the coat while I picked it up; I told him, he should go back with me; he desired that I would treat him like a gentleman, and not hold him by the collar; I told him, I should not let go his collar till I got him home; I took him home, and then he wanted to pay for the grater; Hall, the marshalman, came past, and I gave him charge of him.

Q.Who was in the shop at the time the prisoner was there, besides yourself? - A. My wife and the grand boy.

Q. Who did he ask for the nutmeg-grater? - A. The errand-boy.

Q. Is he here? - A. No, he is under age, he is about eleven years of age; I did not think it necessary to bring him.

Prisoner. Q. In what state did I appear when I went into your shop? - A. He appeared to me in the same state that he does now, tipsey.

Court. Q. It cannot be supposed that he is now in that state, just coming from the prison? - A.Certainly not.

Q.Did he appear to be sober? - A. I thought he was tipsey, but after that, I had no reason to think so.

Q. Did you observe what he had in his hand before he went out of the shop? - A. No.

Q. You certainly said before the Magistrate, that you saw the grater in his hand? - A. I saw that he had something in his hand, but I had not missed any thing.(James Hall, the marshalman, produced the grater, which was deposed to by Mr. Aughtie.)

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, it was not my intention, originally, to have given the Court any trouble; the next morning after it happened, I had not the smallest recollection of the situation I had been in the night before; Mr. Aughtie said, that he knew perfectly well, that I was intoxicated the night before, and he offered me to go on board a man of war. GUILTY, aged 49.

Of stealing the goods, but not privately .

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-7

7. LEVY SAMUEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of John Ramsden , privily from his person .

JOHN RAMSDEN sworn. - I am a merchant , and contractor with government: On Tuesday the 25th of November, from twelve to one in the middle of the day, I was in the long room, at the Custom-house, making an entry, in the mean time, a person touched me on the right arm, and informed me that a man in a brown coat had picked my pocket; I put my hand into my great-coat pocket, being a wet day, I then put my hands under my great-coat into my other coat pocket, that I might be certain my handkerchief was gone; I missed it from my right-hand great-coat pocket; I then called out, stop that man in the brown coat, who was making his way to the door in the long room; I pursued him, and there were two or three more; he got out at the door, and upon the second step, he dropped it; I saw him drop it, I picked it up; I know it to be my handkerchief, there is a little R in the corner.

- DYER sworn. - I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the pocket of Mr. Ramsden.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I acknowledge that I have been guilty; I was a distressed man, with seven children, and no wife to take care of them; I hope, my Lord, that you will shew me mercy.

Dyer. He has been detected before in the long room, I have seen him myself.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately , aged 56.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-8

8. JAMES QUIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of Novemb. four pounds weight of sugar, value 2s. 6d. and two paper bags, value one farthing , the property of Thomas Cobb .

THOMAS COBB sworn. - I am a grocer , in Newgate-street, the prisoner was my porter : Last Monday week, between eleven and twelve o'clock, or thereabouts, I passed by the prisoner, in a hurry, he was weighing paper; I felt something in his pocket, that I was convinced was sugar, from the feel; he had been at work in the warehouse that morning, beating over sugar; I desired my young man to endeavour to feel it in the same way, and he did all he could to avoid it, for he turned him

self on one side when any body passed him; I sent for a constable, and desired him to follow him when he went to dinner; the constable brought him back with the sugar upon him, it was the identical kind of sugar that he had been beating over in the morning; I had often suspected him, but never detected him before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Have you any partner in your business? - A. No.

Q. How long has this man lived with you? - A. I think he came the 1st of September.

Q. You had a very good character with him? - A. Yes.

Q.You do not mean to say, that this sugar is not to be had at every grocer's shop in London? - A. It is a very difficult matter to get it exactly the same.

Q. You can make a great number of samples out of one hogshead? - A. Yes; but this was a particular kind of sugar, it is Surinam sugar.

Q. Had you a great many hogsheads of the same sort? - A. Yes.

Q. A vast quantity of course would come from the same country as well as that which you had? - A.Certainly.

Q. The bags, I presume, you cannot swear to? - A. No, they have no marks upon them.

JOHN PLUSH sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for by Mr. Cobb to watch the prisoner; I followed him down Ivy-lane, and almost at the bottom, I stopped him; I asked him if he was not a smuggler; he said, no, he was not; then I told him he had something in his pocket that was not his own; then I went to the Crown public-house, in Cannon-alley, St. Paul's Church-yard; he went to the necessary, and took this paper of sugar out of his pocket, and threw it down; I got it up again with a scraper; then I searched his right-hand pocket, and took this paper of sugar out; after that, we took him back to Mr. Cobb's, and he gave charge of him.

Q. What business had you to take him to the public-house? - A. He would go in there.

JAMES WOODMAN sworn. - I am an officer; I was with Plush, I know no more than he has said.

Court. (To Cobb.) Q. Is that Surinam sugar? - A. It is, it exactly matched with the sugar that he had been beating over.

Q. He told you he had bought the sugar? - A. He did not at first, he did afterwards; he at first said, he had never taken any before, and it was only a little for his own use.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS TWINCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a porter; I know the prisoner very well: Last Monday was a week, I met him in Watling-street, very near the Old-change, and a man that I never saw before, came up to him with some sugar in his apron, and asked him to buy it of him, and he asked me, I told him, I did not know what to do with it.

Q. Should you know it again? - A. Yes, I think I should.

Q.Look at those parcels? - A. They were both in the same coloured bag at that time; this one I can swear to.

Court. (To Plush.) Q. Is that parcel in the same coloured paper that it was when you took it from the prisoner? - A. No; the paper underneath is the same colour as the other.

Court. Q.Who are you porter to? - A. I live at No. 42, Basinghall-street.

Q.Who are you servant to? - A. I am out of place, and I was asking the prisoner if he knew of a situation for me; I had been out of place near a month.

Q. You met him just passing by the Old-change? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it? - A. Last Monday week.

Q. At what hour of the day? - A.Somewhere about nine or ten o'clock.

Q. He seemed to know the man very well, did not he? - A. No, he did not seem to know any thing of him, he was a stranger to him.

Q. How came he to address you? - A. I do not know, he said he was in distress.

Q. You will swear to that parcel? - A. Yes.

Q. What will you swear to it by? - A. By the size of it, and the colour of the paper.

Q. That is the only reason? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you will venture to swear positively to it? - A. I think I can swear positively to it.

Q. Though you do not know the contents? - A. I knew it was sugar.

Q.What did he give him for it? - A. Two shillings and some halfpence.

Q. What did he ask for it? - A. He wanted half a crown.

Q. Did not he tell you how much there was? - A. He said, there was about four pounds of it.

Q.How long have you known the prisoner? - A. This twelvemonth.

Q.Longer than that, sure? - A. Not personally, I knew him by fight before.

Q. How long have you known him by fight? - A. As a porter I may have known him two or three years.

Q.Intimate with him about a twelvemonth? - A. I had not been particularly acquainted with him, only having a pint of beer with him.

Q. Who did he work with? - A. Mr. Cobb, in Newgate-street.

Q. You know that? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did he live with, before he lived at Mr. Cobb's? - A. I do not know.

Q. How long has he lived at Mr. Cobb's? - A. I do not know.

Q. Who did you live with? - A. Messrs. Carrick and Macneal, in Basinghall-street, till the last month or six weeks.

Q. Where have you been during the last six weeks? - A.Sometimes at one place, and sometimes at another.

Q. How long did you live with them? - A. A quarter of a year.

Q. Where did you live before that? - A. In Cornhill.

Q. So a strange man came up, and asked if you would buy any sugar? - A. Yes; he said it was good sugar he would warrant, and he supposed about four pounds of it.

Q. It was not opened? - A. I do not know that it was; I did not see it opened.

Q.Then how can you venture to swear that it was sugar? - A. It was sugar.

Court. How can you think to impose upon the Court for one moment, by the story you have now told. GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-9

9. JOHN KENYON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , one pound four ounces of hair, value 10d. the property of Caleb-Welch Collins .

CALEB-WELCH COLLINS sworn. - I am a horse hair manufacturer , No. 119, Fleet-street : On Tuesday the 4th of November, I lost some hair; I can only speak from the information of my foreman; about a quarter after eight in the evening, when the prisoner left off work, I was sent for; the property had been taken from the prisoner, I can not swear to the hair.

JAMES BRITTLE sworn. - I am a horse-hair manufacturer, servant to Mr. Collins; I saw the prisoner take the hair, and put it in his hat: On Tuesday, the 4th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, he took it from under the bed in Mr. Collins's passage; it was loose; the prisoner put it in the crown of his hat, and was going out with it on his head; I stopped him, and told him to go to the counting-house, which he did; the hair was taken from him, and given to the constable.

Q. How much is there of it? - A. A pound and four ounces; it is worth ten-pence.

GEORGE BROWN sworn. - I am warehouseman to Mr. Collins, in Fleet-street; the prisoner was employed as a mill-man, in milling of hair: On the 4th of November, about eight o'clock, the prisoner was going out, and he was called back by the last witness; he asked him if he had not some of his master's property; he denied it; he then took his hat from off his head, and it was full of hair; he was then desired to go into the counting-house, and I was sent for a constable.(John Foster, the constable, produced the hair).

Prisoner's defence. There was none of it Mr. Collins's; I had it to mill for another person.

The prisoner called his sister, and one other witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35. - Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-10

10. FRANCIS TREBILCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , a yard and a half of silk, value 10s. and a shawl, value 2s. the property of Samuel Sampson .

SAMUEL SAMPSON sworn. - I am a mercer in Bread-street : The prisoner was recommended to me by a country correspondent to get him into a situation, and from the extraordinary character that I had of him, I was induced to take him to feed at my table; he has been with me about three weeks; I did not see him take the property; but in consequence of some suspicions and information from my servants, on Saturday the 22d of this month, I challenged him directly with having robbed me of a yard and a half of florentine silk; upon my charging him with it, he denied it, but I persisted in it, and made use of some threats.

Court. Q.You must not tell us any thing that he said after that? - A. I saw the property at the pawnbroker's afterwards.

CALEB WATSON sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker in Watling-street; here is a shawl that I took in of the prisoner on the 18th of November, and a yard and a half of silk, (produces them); he told me he had bought the silk to make him a waistcoat.

Q. Are you sure of the prisoner'sperson? - A. Yes. Mr. Sampson. The shawl I cannot attempt to swear to; it is an article that no man can swear to; the piece of silk would be in that situation, but unfortunately for the prisoner, it is cut away, and the piece that is at home corresponds exactly with this.

Q. Did you miss a shawl? - A. It would have been impossible for me to have missed twenty dozen if they had been gone; it is of the same resemblance and make with other goods that I have in the house.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, if gentlemen of respectability to speak in my behalf, could be of service to me, I could have had them to-morrow, but to day they are not here; every person with whom I have had dealings would give me the most irreproachable character; and if other pieces of silk were cut away, they might tally with Mr. Sampson's, as well as this; my friends are three hundred miles from town, and are, I am proud to say, of the, first respectability in their neighbourhood; I served my time regularly in the county of Cornwall, and had a liberal education. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-11

11. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Eleanor Turner , widow , about the hour of seven in the night, of the 30th of October , with intent to steal, and stealing a gown and coat, value 20s. three gowns, value 25s. three cloacks, value 20s. and a bonnet, value 2s. the property of the said Eleanor.

ELEANOR TURNER sworn. - I am a widow; I live at No.12, Robinson's-lane, Great Chelsea ; I take in washing and mangling : On Friday night, the 31st of October, about a quarter before seven -

Q.Was it light or dark? - A. It was quite moonlight; I was sitting in the kitchen ironing, with a candle lighted; I heard one of the bed-room doors creek upon the hinges; I immediately ran up; I knew nobody had business in that room, but myself; I immediately went up, and saw the room-door open; I had left the room about ten minutes before; I locked the door, but left the key in; I did not go into the room; I saw the bonnet-box turned on one side; before that, I heard a man's foot in the passage, a heavy lumping foot; I immediately ran up stairs, and saw the prisoner at the street-door running out; I had about eight stairs to come up; as I was going up stairs, I saw the man run.

Q. Did you know the man? - A. I know him perfectly well; that is the man; I am certain it was the prisoner.

Q. Had you known him before? - A. No; he was running along the passage; I ran after him.

Q.Had not you been before that to see the bonnet box? - A. I saw it as I passed it; I did not go into the room; I called out murder, thieves, fire, every thing that my fright could dictate; there were two men running in the street; I saw but one in the house, but the prisoner is the man that I took notice of; Stephen Hale , my neighbour, brought him back; he had got about twenty or thirty yards; he turned out to be lame; I came back to my own house to see what I had lost, and then he was brought back; there was no other man, besides themselves, in the lane; they were running, and the more I cried stop thief, the faster they ran; the lane runs down to the water-side from the King's-road, and is rather a lonesome lane; I missed a flowered gown and petticoat of my own, two white gowns of one of my daughters, one black silk cloak of my daughter's, one white bonnet of my own, a linen gown, and a black silk cloak of my youngest daughter's, which laid at the top of the bed.

Q. What is the value of them? - A.About three pounds five shillings altogether.

Q. Are your daughters of age? - A. Yes; one is eighteen, and the other is turned twenty.

Prisoner. Q.Have you always said that I was the man that run out of your house? - A. Yes, always.

STEPHEN HALE sworn. - I am a carpenter at Chelsea; I live next door to Mrs. Turner: On Friday, the 30th of October -

Q. Are you sure it was Friday? - A. Yes; Friday evening I heard a cry of stop thief; I ran after the prisoner and another man; I overtook him in Robinson's-lane, he was a little lame, neither walking nor running, but a sort of a shuffle; I asked the prisoner if he had seen any men pass him; he said, what odds is that to you; I said, it was odds to me, for there was something lost; he said, you find it then; I passed him, and ran across to the King's-road; I looked right and left, to see if I could see any body running, but there was nobody; I then got into the hedge, to wait till the prisoner came up, and when he came to the corner, he looked right and left; when he saw the coast clear, as he thought, he then set off running towards London; I overtook him in about ten yards, and said to him, my friend, you must not go any further this road without you tell me where you have been, and where you are going; he said he was come from Mr. Scott's, and I desired him to go with me to Mr. Scott's, it was but just by; and then he said, no, it was not that Mr. Scott, but Mr. Scott at Fulham, that he had been to; I asked him if he had seen Mr. Scott; he said, no; I asked him if he had seen Mrs. Scott; he said, no; I asked him if he had seen any of the children; he said, no, he had seen only one James, a carter; I enquired, but there was no such man lived there; then he turned back with me, and said, he had worked for Mr. Scott, and earned five shillings a day at digging the ground; afterwards, he said he was a carpenter.

Q.What is Mr. Scott? - A. A gardener; I asked him who he worked for as a carpenter; he said, he worked for Mr. Long at Chelsea, and had worked for him five months; I asked him Mr. Long's foreman's name, and he could not tell me; I had worked for Mr. Long myself for five years.

Q. Had you an opportunity of knowing whether he had worked for Mr. Long? - A. I know that he had not.

MATTHEW DANIEL sworn. - I am a glazier and painter, No. 14, Robinson's-lane: On the 30th of October, about a quarter before seven in the evening -

Q. What day of the week was it? - A.Friday.

Q. You are sure it was Friday? - A. Yes; I saw a man in a sailor's dress loitering about Mrs. Turner's door; I thought it had been a young man of the name of Holdall that was going out to sea; I went up to him, and saw that it was not him; the door was a-jar; then I went about my business; the next morning, Saturday, as I was going past the watch-house, I saw the prisoner with his arms over the top of the watch-house door; I said, what are there two men in the cage; he said, no; why, says I, the man that was put in here

was handcuffed; yes, says he, but I have broke the b-y things; painter, can you tell me where to sell them for a glass of gin; I told him they had got his mate; he said, have they by G-d; had I known what would have transpired, I would have done that fluttering fellow's business; Hale has got a little impediment in his speech.

Prisoner. He asked me if I was the prisoner; I said, yes; he said the sailor was taken; and I said, I was very glad of it, if they had got the right man that took the things.

Court. Q.Did he say so? - A. He did not.

JOHN ARNOLD sworn. - I work at the paper-manufactory in the King's-road, and lodge in Robinson's-lane: On Friday, the 30th of October, near seven o'clock in the evening, I was coming down the lane; I met a man running towards me, with a bundle, dressed in sailor's clothes and trowsers, with a round hat; he ran by me very smartly; I heard no alarm, but about twenty or thirty yards further, I met the prisoner at the bar walking after the other.

Q. Are you sure of the prisoner? - A. Yes; I am sure he is the same man; he was taken in about a quarter of an hour afterwards, and I saw him again; I met him about the middle of the lane, where there are no house; the things have never been found.

Prisoner's defence. I had been to see an acquaintance, and as I was going home through this lane, they stopped me; I never saw any other man.

Q.(To Mrs. Turner). Where were your daughters? - A.Sitting with me.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s. aged 33.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-12

12. SARAH BONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , a sheet, value 6s. the property of Thomas Kepple , in a lodging-room, let by contract by him to the prisoner .

It appearing in evidence that the contract was not made with the prisoner alone, but with her and anothere woman, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-13

13. JUDAH ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , six yards of printed cotton, value 9s. the property of Charles Ravenhill and William Ravenhill .

CHARLES RAVENHILL sworn. - I am in partnership with my brother, William Ravenhill; I can only prove the property.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - I was going through Whitechapel on Saturday evening, the 1st of November, about twenty minutes after five; I was passing by Mr. Ravenhill's; I saw the prisoner and another with him; I heard the prisoner say to the other, cut upon that; I stopped, and then I heard him say, he could not get at it; the prisoner at the bar then said, snatch it; he then snatched some printed cotton; I pursued him, and took him with the property upon him; I delivered it to Mr. Ravenhill. (Mr. Ravenhill produced, and deposed to the property).

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Miller ordered me to take it home to his house, and he would buy it of me.

Q.(To Miller). Is that true? - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 11.

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-14

14. MARTHA BULLOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a pewter quart pot, value 1s. 2d. and a pewter pint pot, value 4d. the property of John Field .

- FIELD sworn. - I am the wife of John Field ; I keep the Marquis of Granby, Castle-street, Oxford-market; the prisoner was taken, with my pots, in the street.

JAMES ROBERTS sworn. - On the 5th of November, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner come down Winslow-street, and take the pots from the top of a rail at Mrs. Williams's, No. 2, in Winslow-street , she put them in her apron; I crossed over from my master's warehouse-door, and told her she had not got her own property; I then took her to the Marquis of Granby, and delivered the pots to Mrs. Field; her servant had hung them upon the rail. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Field).

Prisoner's defence. I acknowledge I took them, but I did not mean to take them. GUILTY , aged 48.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18001203-15

15. JOSEPH FARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , a carcase of a sheep, value 21. 5s. the property of Thomas Balch .

THOMAS BALCH sworn. - I am a butcher , at Hoxton: On Thursday evening, the 20th of November, about six o'clock, I was standing at the door of the Duke of Clarence public-house, in Hackney-road, waiting for a stage to take my father into the country; while I was there, there came a man along, with a carcase of mutton upon his shoulder, the prisoner is the man; the thought struck my mind what he could be going to do with that carcase upon his shoulder, at that time in the evening; I ran after him, and looked at the sheep, and found it to be a carcase of mutton which my man had killed, of my own, which I could swear to by the dressing; I then went before the prisoner and looked him in the face, he threw the carcase of mutton into the road and ran; I ran after him, calling stop thief, but as I was sure of the prisoner, having seen him for years about the neighbourhood, I thought I

would leave him and go and look after my carcase of mutton; I took the mutton to the Duke of Clarence's, where my father was; then I went home, and missed the carcase of mutton that had been hung up; I then went to Worship-street, and laid an information against the prisoner, and they took him the same evening; they came to my house and fetched me to the watch-house; I said, you are the man that had the carcase of mutton; he made no answer till he came to the watch-house, and then he said, you may be b-gg-d.

HENRY TUCK sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Balch: I know the carcase of mutton by the dressing of it.

Balch. It was hot.

Tuck. It was the last that I had killed but one; I hung it at the father corner; I did not miss it till my master came back.

Q. How far is the Duke of Clarence's from your master's? - A.About a mile; I fetched it from the Duke of Clarence's; I know perfectly well that that was the sheep I had dressed.

WILLIAM SIMPSON called. - How old are you? - A.Fourteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes; if I tell a lie I shall go to hell; (he is sworn); On the 20th of November, about half after six, I was going down the Hackney-road, and saw the prisoner with a sheep upon his shoulder, about half a mile from Mr. Balch's house.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes; he is a bricklayer's labourer, I believe; I saw Mr. Balch come up and look him in the face, and then he chucked the sheep down, and ran away, and Mr. Balch after him.

PETER MASON sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: I went with Clarke and Armstrong and apprehended the prisoner in bed; we took him to the watch-house, and there Mr. Balch said, that was the man that had stole his sheep; and he said, you may be b-gg-d, there is nothing found, and I shall get through this.

Prisoner's defence. When I had done my work, I went home to bed, and these men came and took me. GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-16

16. JAMES GREW and ANN GREW were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a bath stove, value 3s. a chair, value 1s. two saws, value 1s. 6d. a mallet, value 6d. two chissels, value 8d. a hammer, value 6d. a tool-box, value 6d. and a steel chopper, value 6d. the property of James Dimsdale .

JAMES DEMSDALS sworn. - I live at No. 14, Brown's-lane; I hold three pieces of land in Bethnal-green-road; My next door neighbour gave me information that my gate was burst open; I found the gate, of the stable burst open; I went into the summer-house in the garden, and found I was robbed of the articles mentioned in the indictment; I went to a Jew broker's, in Hind-street, Spitalfields, and there I found two saws; she told me she bought them at No. 1, in Booth-court; I went there, and found the woman prisoner sitting at breakfast with three children; I did not tell her any thing about it; I then went to the office, got a warrant, and went to the house, about one o'clock; there I found a chair, two chissels, a chopper, a large hammer, a mallet, and a nail-box; the officers took possession of them.

HANNAH HYAMS sworn. - I was called by the prisoner to buy some goods, the Monday before she was taken up, and I went to her house, and bought two chairs and a table.

PETER MASON sworn. - I am an officer; I went with Mr. Dimsdale, and two other gentlemen that had lost things from their gardens, to the prisoner's house, the woman was in the lower room with her children, and there we found a number of articles; we had been to Mrs. Hyams's and found two saws.

Hyams. I forgot to mention the saws; I bought them of the woman at the bar. (The property was deposed to by Dimsdale).

Mason. We went up stairs afterwards to search for other things, and there we found the man, and I asked him whether he had stole the things or the woman; he said he had stole them himself, that his wife had nothing to do with it, that he had taken them through distress.

James Grew 's defence. I did it through distress.

James Grew, GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of correction .

Ann Grew, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-17

17. JAMES GREW and ANN GREW were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a table, value 2s. a stool. value 1s. and a pair of bellows, value 6d. the property of Francis Martin .

FRANCIS MARTIN sworn. - I lost a table, a stool, and a pair of bellows, from the gardens, which I found at the prisoner's house.

Court. Gentlemen, you see it is the same story, there is no occasion's to go through it again.

Jas. Grew, GUILTY . Ann Grew , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-18

18. WILLIAM HAMMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , twenty-seven, pounds weight of sugar, value 27s. the property of William Giles .

WILLIAM GILES sworn. - I am a grocer , in Wardour-street, Soho : On the 12th of November last, about seven o'clock in the evening, or a little after, I was sitting in a little parlour, I heard a cry

of stop thief; I went out, and saw a man with a loaf of sugar under his arm, who said he had taken itup in the street, just below my shop, I told him it was mine; to a few minutes the prisoner was brought back, by a person who is here; I told the prisoner he must go with me to Marlborough-street; he said he would not without a warrant, or a constable; I took him by the collar, and told him he should; I took him to the office.

MATTHEW WORSDALE sworn. - I am a haberdasher, in Pall-mall: I was going along Wardour-street, and saw the prisoner with a loss of sugar; I took him to be a porter when I first saw him; it was between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the alarm was given; he put down the sugar close by me, and ran away; I ran after him, and stopped him; he gave me a little abuse, and said he did not know any thing about it; I brought him back to Mr. Giles's.

Q.Are your sure that the prisoner is the man who dropped the sugar? - A. Yes.

MARY ROSETTE sworn. - My husband is a brass-turner, in Wardour-street, a few doors lower than Mr. Giles's, on the opposite side of the way: On the evening of the 12th of November, I saw a man come out of Mr. Giles's shop, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, with a loss of sugar in his hands.

Q. Did you know that man? - A. No; I then gave the alarm.

Q. How came you to do that? - A.Because the loaf came out uncovered; I saw him put the sugar down and run away.

Q.Are you sure that the man who came out was the same that put the sugar down? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any body in the shop? - A. I believe not.

Q.(To Giles.) Was there any body in the shop? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I saw several people running, and I ran with them; I know nothing of the sugar.

GUILTY , aged 21. - Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-19

19 MARY MEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on 27th of June , a guinea , the property of James Miller .

JAMES MILLER sworn. - I am a grocer in Redlion-street, in the parish of Christ-Church : On Friday the 27th of June, I was standing behind the counter, the prisoner came into the shop and asked for a quarter of a pound of chocolate; I served her with the chocolate, and she laid me down a guinea to pay for it; I took up the guinea and gave her change, I took eighteen-pence for a quarter of a pound of chocolate, and the change I gave her was two seven-shilling-pieces, some silver, and some halfpence, to make up the difference, there might be sixpennyworth, I cannot say how many; after the change was given, she refused one seven-shilling-piece, I changed that for another; then she refused the other; and likewise said that that was bad; I changed that also.

Q. Where was the guinea? - A. I had it in my till; after I had changed the gold she began to look at the silver, she first said three shillings were bad; in fact, she said the whole was bad; I felt myself very much irritated, and I insisted upon the change back, and looking at it, threw down the guinea that I had received of her, and she put it in her pocket; she made a great deal of hesitation, and refused to return the change; she then said, if I would give the change that I had given her upon my word, she would take it; I told her I certainly would, that it was good; she then took the change and went out of the shop with the guinea.

Court. Gentlemen, you see it was taken with his consent by the woman. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-20

20. WILLIAM MAPHAM , and JOHN MAPHAM , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , a petticoat, value 5s. a waistcoat, value 7s. a muslin frock, value 5s. and a dimity skirt, value 2s. the property of James Frost .

JAMES FROST sworn. - I am a labourer in Goswell-place : On Sunday, the 12th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I went up stairs, changed my cloathing, and shut the door after me, as I came out; it is a room that we use only to put the clothes in; I had no further occasion for them till the Sunday following; when I went up stairs the Sunday following, I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment; I saw them again four or five weeks afterwards; I know noting of the prisoners.

SAMUEL STANLEY sworn. - I am a calico-glazer: On the 14th of October, John Mapham and William Mapham , and John Gray and I, went to this gentleman's house; Gray went up stairs, and broke the door open.

Q. Where is Gray? - A. He is in Newgate, cast for transportation; I waited outside, and then they went to Moses Davis 's to sell the things.

Q. Did you go with them? - A. No; they told me they went there; then we all shared the money.

Q. How much had you? - A. I had one shilling.

Q. Where did you come from now? - A. From New Prison.

MOSES DAVIS sworn. - I keep a clothes shop in Gray's-inn-lane; William Mapham , and another with him; I cannot say whether it was the other prisoner or not, but him I am certain of; they brought some things, and I laid out fifteen shillings with them; I bought two petticoats, an old man's coat, an old pair of breeches, two old waitcoats, and child's frock.

Q. Did you ask them how they came by them? - A. I keep an open shop, and they brought them between nine and ten in the morning; they told me they were given to them from a friend; I sold some of the things, and those that I have told to people that I know, I got back again.

PETER MASON sworn. - I am an officer: On Wednesday the 26th of November, we went to Davis's, but we found none of the things, he brought these things to us afterwards. (Producing them, they were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

William Mapham 's defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn, I am a hard-working lad.

John Mapham's defence. Stanley would not mind swearing any body's life away to save himself; the man that did the robbery is now in prison, convicted.

The prisoners called one witness, who gave them a good character, but had not known any thing of them for the last twelve months.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-21

21. ELIZABETH DEERING, alias MURRAY , was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon David English , on the 16th of November , putting him in fear and taking from his person a silver watch, value 2l. 2s. the property of the said David.

DAVID ENGLISH sworn. - I am a watch-maker, I live at my brother's, the sign of the Dolphin, in Long-alley, Moorfields: On Sunday night, the 16th of November, about half past ten o'clock, two men, with the prisoner, pushed me up against the wall; the men held my hands while the woman took my watch by force; I had seen them in the public-house before, I was waiting for a young man, I had had three pints of beer; they were sitting in one part of the box, and I in another.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Did they come out before you? - A. No, they followed me out.

Q. Where is this public-house? - A. The Oxford-arms, in Whitecross-street .

Q. How far from where you lived? - A. About half a mile; I never saw them in my life before.

Q. Had you any conversation with them? - A. Yes, the men directed their discourse to me; one of the men held my arms behind me, the other shoved me up against the wall, and the woman put her arm round my neck, and took my watch from me; I took both the men the same evening, but they were acquitted at Worship-street, and while I was giving charge of them, the prisoner came in, as she said, to look for her husband; one of the men came to the watch-house after I had taken the other, and I then gave charge of him; then, after that, the woman came in, and said, she had been looking after her husband, that there were some of the lamps out, he is a lamp-lighter; the man that she called her husband, was the man that held me up against the side of the house.

Court. Q.It is a very extraordinary thing, that the two men should be acquitted at Worship-street; did you give the same account then, that you have now given? - A. Yes, just the same.

LUKE CARLISLE sworn. - I am an officer of St. Luke's, Middlesex: On the 16th of November, about half past eleven o'clock, the prosecutor brought a man of the name of Owen Chantrill, to the watch-house, charging him with assisting this woman in stealing his watch.

Court. (To English.) Q.Did not your foot slip as you were going out of the public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you come down? - A. Yes, upon one knee.

Q. And then it was that they came out, and served you as you have stated? - A. No, I got up again before I was pinned against the wall.

Carlisle. A man of the name of Deering, that this woman lived with, followed Chantril, as a spectator, and afterwards the prisoner came in; I asked her what she had done with the watch, she declared positively, she knew nothing of it; Jane Druit said, that was the woman that took the watch, but she has absconded; I repeatedly asked him, if he was sure it was she who had taken his watch, and he said he was; she said, she wished she might never see her four children that she had got at home, if she knew any thing of it; I kept her till three o'clock in the morning; she then enquired of me, whether, if she could bring the watch forward, she should be hurt; I told her, I could say nothing to that; she said, would I go with her, if she took me to the place where she put the watch, or would I send the patrol with her, and the watch should be forth coming; I sent a watchman and a patrol with her, they were gone about twenty minutes; when they came back, the patrol produced this watch, saying, that the prisoner went up stairs, knocked at the door, and said, Suke, give me that watch, and the woman gave it her; the prisoner did not deny it.

English. I know this to be my watch.(Jane Druitt was called, but not appearing, her recognizance was ordered to be esreated.)

- LONG sworn. - I am a patrol; I went with the prisoner to Susannah Hillsworth , in Pepper-alley, she knocked at the door and asked for a watch, which was delivered to her, it was wrapped up in a night cap; I brought the watch to the watch-house, and gave it to the officer.

Prisoner's defence. I was in at the Oxford-arms, David English was there, and when the landlady would draw him no more beer, he had three or four half pints of gin with some other people; he was very much intoxicated; I picked up this watch in the passage; I did not know that he had a watch in

his possession; he was drinking from nine till past eleven.

GUILTY , Death , aged 31.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-22

22. JOHN EAST was indicted for making an assault in a certain field, and open place, near the King's highway, upon Richard Brooke , on the 20th of November , putting him in fear and taking from his person, a silk purse, value 4d. a half-guinea, a half crown, and two shillings , the property of the said Richard.

RICHARD BROOKE sworn. - I am an engraver , in the Strand; On Thursday morning, the 20th of November, about eight o'clock, I had come from Finchley; as I was coming across a field, from Kentish-town to the Veterinary-college, there is a bridge; the prisoner came up to me there, presented a pistol at me, and demanded my money, or he would blow my brains out immediately; I looked at him very hard; I took my purse out of my pocket, and gave it to him, which contained a half-guinea, a half-crown, and two shillings; he walked away, and said he was very much distressed; I wished him a good morning; I walked about a minute, and recollecting myself, I thought it was too bad to be robbed in the open day; I turned round, and saw the prisoner walking along very contented; I had a stick in my hand, which I held up, and called to him, and he turned back and looked; I told him, I would be d-d if I would not catch him; upon that, he ran across the fields as hard as he could, and I after him; when he found that I was getting near to him, he turned upon me, and I ran away then to keep out of the length of pistol shot, and he pursued me, and kept crying, stop thief, all the time; when he found that I gained ground, he turned back to run away again, and I pursued him again, and when he found I was getting near to him again, he turned upon me again, and stood still; then I saw a young man come running across the fields, who is here; I immediately went up and seized the prisoner by the collar, the young man laid hold of him on the other side; I asked him what he had done with my purse, he said, he had thrown it into a ditch, we began searching him then, and two more men came up, one of whom helped us to search him, and found my purse in one of his coat pockets; he asked me, if that was my purse, I told him it was; I then asked the prisoner where the pistol was, he said he would give it to me, for it could not do me any hurt; he put his hand into his pocket, and gave me the pistol out himself, there was nothing in it, and if there had, I do not think it could have done any hurt, the pistol is here; he said, he was distressed, and he knew he should be hanged for it; I told him, I hoped he would not be hanged, and the young man and myself took him to Bow-street; and left him in charge of the two officers, who are here.

Prisoner, Q. Did I behave with any violence to you? - A. No, he behaved quite to the contrary.

JOHN COUSINS sworn. - I was ditching at the top of the field, and I heard the gentleman call stop thief; I ran to assist him; when I came up, I saw the prisoner at the bar; the gentleman had got hold of his collar; he begged for mercy, and said he was sure to be hung, but he was in distress; in the mean time, two gentlemen came up, and searched him; one of them pulled a purse out of his coat-pocket; he took the pistol out of his pocket himself.

- WILLIAMS sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner and this pistol; in searching him, I found this knife in his waistcoat pocket; I asked him what he did with it, and he said, he kept it to cut his corns with.

THOMAS EDWARDS sworn. - The purse was delivered to me by the prosecutor. (Produces it).

Prosecutor. I delivered the purse to Edwards; this is the same purse that the prisoner took from me; it contains just the money that I was robbed of.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Kentish-town, and I met that gentleman upon the bridge; I told him I was very much distrest, and asked him to give me a trisle; he said he had no halfpence, and then I stopped him; he cried out stop thief, and that young man came up; I went very quietly with him, and never offered to meddle with his watch; I had just burried my wife, and got two children; I was very much distrest; the spring of the pistol is broke; I had it to mount; I little thought of doing such a thing as I have done.

GUILTY , Death , aged 50.

The prisoner was recommended by the prosecutor to his Majesty's mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-23

23. DANIEL LAWLER was indicted for that he, on the 16th of November , being in the dwelling-house of Thomas Noble , feloniously did steal two linen sheets, value 6s. a linen pillow-case, value 1s. and a cotton counterpane, value 3s. the property of the said Thomas, in a lodging-room let by contract by him to the said Daniel, and after having committed the said felony, about the hour of four in the night of the same day, the said dwelling-house burglariously did break, to get out of the same .

ISABELLA NOBLE sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Noble; I live in Three Cups-alley, in the parish of Shadwell ; my husband is a tailor ; the prisoner lodged in the two pair of stairs room; he had a room to himself; he took possession of it on the 16th of November, in the afternoon, and came again at nine o'clock in the evening; I went up stairs, put the sheets upon the bed, and left Mrs.

Macdonald in bed in the room, where he sat down; I put a pair of sheets, a linen pillow-case, and a cotton counterpane on the bed; when I came down stairs from sheeting the bed, he asked me what bolts I had to the door; I told him I had two bolts, and a spring-lock; I lit him up stairs to bed, and fastened the bolts, and locked the door; the next morning, between four and five, I heard him go out at the street-door; I immediately got up, and went up stairs, and missed the sheets, the pillow-case, and th counterpane; the blankers were left: on the Sunday week following, I saw the prisoner again at a cook's shop, at the end of the alley where I live; I went in, and charged him with stealing the things; he gave me a great shove in the breast, and ran away; a labouring man that lives close by, stopped him; I fetched an officer, and gave charge of him; my husband is at Memel.

ELIZABETH MACDONALD sworn. - I was in bed when the prisoner came in; Mrs. Noble told him the door had two bolts and a spring-lock; that is all I know of it.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I am an officer of the Police-office, Shadwell; Riley, and I, took charge of the prisoner on the 24th of last month; Mrs. Noble identified him among thirty people; the property has not been found; I found upon him five shillings, and a duplicate for a coat and waistcoat.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all of it.

Q.(To Mrs. Noble). How long had the prisoner lodged with you? - A.Only that night.

GUILTY , Death , aged 45. First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-24

24. JOHN PEAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , two miniature pictures, value 40s. five other miniature pictures, value 4l. four spangle frames, value 20s. and a miniature picture-case, value 2s. the property of Charles Sharpley , in his dwelling-house .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Walter-Stevens Lethbridge , in the dwelling-house of Charles Sharpley .

MARY SHARPLEY sworn. - I am the wife of Charles Sharpley, perfumer , in Holborn ; these miniature pictures were in a glass case on the counter; there were the pictures of myself and my husband; the rest belonged to a miniature-painter, who valued them at two guineas; the one was a two-guinea size, and the other a one-guinea size.

Q. Who is that miniature-painter ? - A. Walter Stevens Lethbridge; there were four frames, but one of them had two pictures in it; the last time that I saw them, as near as I can recollect, was on the 29th of June, but I cannot say to the day; I had seen them the day that I missed them.

Q.Have you ever seen the pictures since? - A. Yes; at Shadwell-office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What cases were these pictures in? - A. Since it has been taken away, my husband has been set, and worn by a lady; they were put there merely for the painter to get business.

Q. It was not a saleable thing? - A. No; but I would not take five guineas for it, because I dare say my husband would not sit for another.

Q. Mr. Mudd is in partnership with your husband? - A. Yes; in the business.

Q. Does he not live in the house? - A. No; he does not.

Q. Does not he contribute towards the expences of the house? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Is the rent and taxes paid jointly? - A. Yes; by both.

Q. It is your dwelling-house; you live in the house? - A. Yes; nobody else lives in the house, except one family, as lodgers.

WALTER-STEVENS LETHBRIDGE sworn. - Q. Had you any pictures in the possession of Mr. Sharpley? - A. Yes. five.

Q. You do not know what became of them? - A.No.

Q. What was the value of them.? - A.Four pounds.

Q. Have you seen them since they were taken? - A. Yes; I saw them at Shadwell; they are in Court.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I was in company with Cook and two others; we went to the house of Mr. Peake; he keeps the sign of the Bird-cage, in Bird-cage-walk, Bethnal-green.

Q. How far is that from Mr. Sharpley's? - A. It may be two miles; I found these pictures there on the 23d of October, about eight in the morning,(produces them); I found them in the one pair of stairs bed-room; they were hanging up over the chimney-piece; we had a search-warrant to search for other property; we did not search for these; I asked him and his wife how they came by these pictures; the lady told me her brother was a miniature picture painter; I told her, we were not satisfied, and we should take them away with us.

Q. When did you find an owner for them? - A. On Wednesday, the 27th of October, I went to No. 6r, Red-lion-passage, which I saw written on the back of one of the pictures; and in consequence of what passed there, I went to Mrs. Sharpley's; she described the pictures, and I shewed them to her; she attended at the office on the Saturday following.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You went there in consequence of some information respecting some pistols? - A. Yes.

Q. And which it was alledged that he had bought? - A. Yes.

Q. The only person to give an account of the pictures, was the wife? - A. Yes; and another lady.

Q. The prisoner gave no account of it? - A. No.

Q.The pictures were lost, we understand, upon the 29th of June? - A. I am given to understand so.

Q. The apprehension of the prisoner did not happen till the 23d of October? - A.No.

Q. Four months had elapsed between? - A. Yes.

Q. In public houses, I believe it is customary of a Sunday, when they are full, to put there company into every room in the house? - A.Not a bad room, I believe.

Court. (To Mrs. Sharpley). Q. Is the prisoner's wife related to you? - A. No.

Q.(To Lethbridge). Are you related to the prisoner or his wife? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I had lately taken a public-house, and I understand, from all the enquiry that I can make, that my wife has been imposed upon by some person who has called at our house with these things, and produced, as I understand, a very high miniature, being a striking resemblance of a boy of mine, about four years old; she was imposed upon to receive them, and she lent a guinea upon the whole of them; I learned that my wife was imposed upon, from observing that the locket was not gold; she had been told it was; Brown has said, that my wife told him, her brother was a miniature-painter, and had delivered them; I did not here her say so; I was in another room with Cook. My Lord and Gentlemen, I rest myself, under these circumstances, satisfied that you will do me justice. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-25

25. JOHN REYNOLDS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Harvey , about the hour of four in the night of the 8th of November , with intent to steal the goods therein being .

WILLIAM HARVEY sworn. - I am a publican in Clement's-lane, Clare-market ; I had been frequently robbed, and at last I found that a hole had been made in the party-wall between the next cellar and mine, that was on the Sunday; on the Monday, the 3d of November, I sent for a bricklayer, and had the hole stopped; on the Saturday following. I perceived that the bricklayer's work had been removed, which gave me a suspicion that the thieves were coming again; here are two witnesses in Court that sat up that night. About a quarter before five in the morning, I was called down, and saw the prisoner in the tap-room in their custody; I questioned him about the property I had lost, but he said he did not know any thing of it; I asked him how he came there, but he did not give any account of himself.

THOMAS SHEPCUTT sworn. - I set up at Mr. Harvey's to watch; about three o'clock in the morning, I thought I heard a noise in the cellar, I went to look, and the hole was stopped up.

Q.(To Harvey.) Had you had it stopped again? - A. No; I discovered that it had been broke, and the bricks put in again loose, without any mortar.

Shepoutt. I saw the bricks in the hole; and about half past four, I heard them, as I thought, coming into the cellar; I listened attentively till I was convinced there was somebody in the cellar; I then advanced with a cutlass, and there I perceived the prisoner about two yards within the cellar; I thought I heard two voices in the cellar as I advanced; with that, I made a stroke with my cutlass, but missed my stroke; Parsley then came with a light, and the prisoner was then making his escape, and had got partly through the hole, and with great difficulty Parsley and I got him back again.

Q. Are you positive it was this boy that was in the cellar? - A. Yes; he had a black coat on, or a dark coloured coat.

OBADIAH PARSLEY sworn. - About a quarter before five in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Mr. Harvey's cellar, about two yards in; when I came up to assist the man, the boy was making his escape out at the hole; I asked him what he came there for; he said, the other boy had shown him the hole to sleep there; we secured him, took him up into the tap-room, and called Mr. Harvey down.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a bricklayer: Mr. Harvey sent for me to repair the hole; I made a found job of it, and it was broke in afterwards, again.

Prisoner's defence. A little boy called me up to go a mushrooming; it was a very wet morning; my father said, if I went out of the house, he would give me a lathering, and when I came out, I thought my father was after me, and I ran down there; I had no intent to steal.

GUILTY , Death , aged 13.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-26

26. JOHN WALKER was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway upon Henry Roberts , on the 29th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 40s. the property of the said Henry.

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-27

27. MARGARET MILLER was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, on the 15th of November , upon Edward Gifford , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 30s. the property of the said Edward.

EDWARD GIFFORD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Gibson, linen-draper, in St. Martin's-lane.

Q. How old are you? - A. Fifteen; I was sent

of an errand to Red-lion-street, Holborn, on Saturday, the 15th of November, between ten and eleven in the evening: upon my return home, I had to call in Plumbtree-street; I came home through Dyot-street , where I was met by two girls; they stopped me, shoved me up against the wall, and the prisoner snatched the watch out of my pocket, and gave it to the other; I immediately got hold of her, and told her I insisted upon having the watch.

Q. Did the other hold you at all? - A. Yes; she said; she had not got the watch, nor did not know any thing about it; I told her she had it, and if she would not give it me, I would charge the watch with her; I then called the watchman, and he came and took her; I have never found my watch again.

Q. Did you speak to these girls first, or did they speak to you first? - A. No, they spoke to me; they wanted me to go a little way with them, for they wanted to speak to me, and,upon my refusing to go, they shoved me up against the wall immediately.

ARTHUR O'LEARY sworn. - I am a watchman: Just after I had cried the hour of ten o'clock, I heard the cry of watchman; I took charge of the prisoner, and took her to the watch-house, that is all I know of it.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; there was another woman with him before I came up.

For the Prisoner.

ANTHONY WALKER sworn. - I am a tailor, I have known the prisoner from a child, her father died about six months ago; he knew she was a girl that had not acted circumspect, and he made over his property to a younger daughter, and this girl was left unprovided for; I took her into my house, and she might have defrauded me if she had chose so to do; I always found her honest.

GUILTY Death , aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-28

28. WILLIAM MOORHOUSE was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon Benjamin Berry , on the 13th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 3l. a silver watch-chain, value 1s. a silver seal, value 1s. and a silver watch-key, value 1d. the property of the said Benjamin.

BENJAMIN BERRY sworn. - I live at Mrs. Wilson's, in Half-moon-court, Wapping: Last Sunday I was coming from the Ship and Star about twelve o'clock at night, or half an hour after, I met two men dressed in sailor's clothes, one confined my arms, and the other took the watch out of my pocket.

Q. Did you struggle? - A. No, I was too helpless to struggle, I was rather in liquor, I sung out watch, three or four times; when the watchman came, I told him I was robbed, and shewed him which way they went; the next day I went to every pawnbroker's shop in London, to the best of my knowledge, for them to stop the watch; one of the runners came to me at the Ship and Star, and told me my watch was found; it had my name round the dial plate instead of figures.

Q. Do you know who the persons were that laid hold of you? - A. No, only that they were dressed in sailor's clothes.

Q. Is the prisoner one of them? - A. I cannot safely say that; the prisoner was stopped with the watch.

CHARLES WILLIAMS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, pawnbroker, the corner of Millyard: On Monday morning a man came to our shop, in order to have his watch stopped; he said, the name of Benjamin Berry was round the dialplate, that the number of it was 99, the maker's name he did not recollect, but it was at Chelsea; in the afternoon of the same day the prisoner tendered the watch to pledge, and seeing the name round the dial-plate, Mr. Sowerby jumped over the counter, and told the prisoner that he was detained; Mr. Sowerby enquired of him where he got the watch; he said he found it at the landing-place at Union-stairs, to the best of my recollection he said that morning; my master sent for an officer, who took the prisoner into custody. (Produces the watch.)

Berry. I am sure this is my watch, I had it made on purpose for me, it cost me five guineas and a half.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I was sent for to Mr. Sowerby's, to take the prisoner into custody; we took him in custody; I asked him how he came by that watch; he said, he found it at Unionstairs, about six in the morning; the prisoner was dressed as he is now, in a blue jacket; I asked him who was present with him when he found the watch; he said, a brother of his, I do not recollect whether he said a brother or a boy; we sent for the prosecutor, and he immediately said, you are the man that robbed me, and we were obliged to put him cut of the room, or else I believe he would have struck him.

Q.(To Berry.) Did either of them strike you? - A. I had a blow from somebody, but I cannot say from whom.

Prisoner's defence. I belong to the Venus brig, I am cook of her; I came on shore on Sunday evening, just about dusk; I have got a witness here who saw me find the watch at Union-stairs.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS ROBINSON sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I have seen him at my house three or four times in Church-lane, Whitechapel, I am a gun-maker; about one o'clock on Sunday morning he went out, and I saw no more of him, till I saw him here.

EDWARD WOOLRIDGE sworn. - The prisoner is a ship-mate of mine; I was with him on the Sunday night when he came on shore, till he went on board again on the Monday morning, about six o'clock.

Q. Did you see any thing of a watch? - A. Yes; I saw the watch first, it was lying down by Unionstairs, about three or four feet off the stairs.

Q. Look at that watch, and tell me if that is the watch? - A. Yes, this is the same watch, I know it by the letters; I spoke to him, and told him there was a watch lying there, and he took it up, and put it in his pocket; then we went on board, and staid on board till night, we came on shore about six o'clock.

Q.What were you on board the ship? - A. I am before the mast; then we went to pawn the watch to divide the money, as it was found between him and me.

Q. Did you go into the shop with him? - A. Yes, and he was stopped with it.

Q.(To Williams.) Look at that lad, did he come with the prisoner? - A. Yes; I did not mention it, because I thought it was not material.

Q.(To Berry.) Can you tell the size of the men that robbed you? - A. No, they came upon me flyly, and were gone in an instant. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-29

29. MARY OAKES was indicted for making an assault in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, upon John-Prade Halliday , on the 1st of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 2l. 2s. the property of the said John.

JOHN-PRADE HALLIDAY sworn. - I am servant to Parson Argoyne, in Portman-square; I was out upon duty for my master, and I went up by a fence near Paddington to do my occasions, and before I came away, while I was putting up my small clothes, I saw a woman coming up to me, and I said, what damage; she made lamentations that she was starving; I gave her a penny and a farthing; then she began to talk nonsense, such as girls of the town do; I told her I had got no money; she then made a blow at me, and my foot slipped, and then she ran and struck me in the stomach, and I fell down; when I was on the ground she hold a knife over me, and said, you black devil, if you don't give me that watch, I will run you through; it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening on the 1st of November, I had some letters in my hat, with money in them, for my master; so I gave her the watch on account of the knife; I came and told the watch and patrol of it.

Q. Did she run away, or walk away? - A. She walked away pretty fast, she was in liquor; the watchman and patrol made themselves very easy about it, and I went on my journey; and delivered my letters, and then I took a fellow-servant with me, and went to enquire after the woman; I met a watchman, and asked him if he had seen a woman of the description I gave, but I could not hear any thing of her; then I enquired for a pawnbroker's; I went to the pawnbroker's in Nottingham-street, she was not there; then I went to another pawnbroker's in South-street, I described the watch, and they said a woman had pawned it, and had not been gone out three minutes; I got her direction from the pawnbroker, and I found her at No. 15, in York-court, East-street, up in a garret, I took her into custody directly, I had a constable with me; they were going to search her, and she began to kick up a row, and when the watchman came, she said the knew what it was about, it was the black's watch.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in South-street, Manchester-square; the prisoner at the bar was a customer of mine, she pledged the watch with me, (produces it), about seven o'clock in the evening; she pledged it as her husband's property, and in her husband's name, Daniel Oakes .

Holliday. This is my watch, it has my name in it.

TIMOTHY CORBETT sworn. - I am a watchman of St. Mary-le-bonne; I took the prisoner into custody, on the 1st of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the black came to me with the woman's direction; I went to the house where she lived; there was half a gallon of beer upon the table, some beaf-steaks, and some oysters; I told her I wanted her; she immediately said, do you want the black b-r's watch; she said, she had pawned it for a guinea, and there was some beef-steaks and oysters, and desired me to sit down and eat some, and let the black b-r go to hell; I told her she was the very girl I wanted, and I took her to the watch-house.

Q.(To Holliday) What time was it when you took her into custody? - A.About an hour and a quarter after.

Prisoner's defence. I kicked the watch before me, and I carried it to my own pawnbroker's, where I was known, and pledged it for a guinea, and paid for things that I owed with it, all but 2s. 4d.

GUILTY Death , aged 37.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-30

30. ALEXANDER CASEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , six pounds of sugar, value 3s. 6d. the property of John Cookson , James Brook , and Henry Cooke .

JOHN COOKSON sworn. - I am a merchant ; my partners in this concern are James Brook and Henry Cooke; the sugar was lost from the warehouse that we are the proprietors of, that is all I know of it; it is called the Union-warehouse, in Thames-street .

JONATHAN MORRIS sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Cookson: On Monday the 21st of November, the prisoner took an opportunity of going into the cellar under the warehouse, and plundering a hogshead; as I knew he had no business there, for I had not put him on to work, when he came out of the cellar, I asked him what business he had there; he had worked there two days before; he told me he was put on, but he could not tell by whom; I told him to put out the property that he had got about him; he said, he would not; he abused me very much, and said, neither I nor anybody else should take it from him; I sent for Mr. Cookson, and he gave charge of him to the constable; I saw a stocking taken from him, containing a quantity of sugar; it was under his waistcoat, next to his shirt.

Q. Are Messrs. Cookson and Company responsible for the sugars in their warehouses? - A. They are for all losses; the sugar appears to be of the same quality with that in the cellar; there appeared to be about the quantity missing that he had in the stocking; the head had felf in by pirching the hogshead; it was there for the cooper to repair.

THOMAS BROWN sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the sugar); 1 was sent for, and I took the sugar from the prisoner in the leg of a stocking, wrapped round his body; there is about six pounds of it.

Prisoner's defence. I found this sugar coming down Thames-street about six o'clock in the morning; I belong to the Coldstream regiment of guards; my serjeant has been waiting here all day, but is gone. GUILTY , aged 25. - Confined three months in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

London jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-31

31. MARY WELCH , alias MURPHY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , a silver watch, value 30s. a silver watch-chain, value 5s. a silver seal, value 1s. a silver watch-key, value 6d. a silver watch, gilt, value 15s. a silver thimble, value 6d. a pair of silk gloves, value 6d. a towel, value 2d. a silk handkerchief, value 4d. a pocket handkerchief, value 3d. and a neck handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Joseph Bodman , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH BODMAN sworn. - I keep the White Swan at Wapping-wall : On Thursday morning, the 6th of November, about ten o'clock, I went up stairs to my chamber to go to my drawers, to get some India bonds; when I opened the drawer, I missed two watches out of four; the drawer was not locked.

Q. Do you keep India bonds in a drawer, not locked? - A. They were absent ones, such as sailors give for wages; I missed two watches, and the other articles in the indictment, (repeating them); the prisoner had been servant in the house about four weeks; I sent for a constable, and had her apprehended; I had a very good character with her; the officer searched her, and found all the articles upon her; I can swear to them; my wife's is a French watch; silver gilt; I know it by the chain; the silver watch belongs to a man that is gone to sea; and the silk handkerchief, and the neck handkerchief, belong to Captain Arthur; his daughter is here to prove them.

JOHN RILEY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police-office, Shadwell: On the 6th of November, Mr. Bodman sent for me, to take his servant into custody; I searched her box, and found a silk handkerchief, a pocket handkerchief, a neck hankerchief, a towel, and a pair of silk gloves; I sent her to look for her pockets, but did not let her go out of my sight; I thought I saw her attempting to secrete something; I immediately laid hold of her, and took two watches out of her right-hand, (produces them); I then took her before the Magistrate.(The property was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. The things that were in the box, my mistress made me a present of; the officer searched my pockets, and found nothing there; my mistress told me my pockets were very dirty; she lent me her pockets, and the thimble was in that; when I was looking for the pocket where the dirty clothes were, I saw these watches; I took them up in my hand, and one of the officers laid hold of me directly, and took them out of my hand; it was an open house for every one.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s. aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-32

32. WILLIAM BARNES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Banks , about the hour of two in the night of the 14th of August , with intent to steal, and stealing a venetian window-blind, value 1s. 6d. the property of the said Thomas.

THOMAS BANKS sworn. - I am a statuary ; I live at No. 5, Newman-street : On the morning of the 15th of August, between two and three o'clock, my house was broke open; I cannot say who was up last; I believe I was myself, I am not certain; I was called up between two and three in the morning; I got lights, and went into the parlour, where I found that the parlour-window was broke, and the blind taken away; the shutter was forced open from the top hinge, and hung by the bottom hinge half-way down, and in that situation I understood the prisoner was detected; he was taken a few minutes after; and about three days after, the blind was sent back, and left with the servant.

ELIZABETH BRYAN sworn. - I lived with Mr. Banks in August last; I fastened the window on the over night; I was alarmed between two and three

by one of the servants that slept in the front room; when I came down, I saw the shutter had been forced open; I am sure I had fastened it the night before.

BENJAMIN FRANKS sworn. - I live in Newman-street; On the 15th of August, between two and three in the morning, I saw two men standing, one in the window-fill of Mr. Bank's house, and the other on the iron rails; I heard a crash, and I heard something fall, which was the window-blind; I then heard another crash, which was the windowshutter being forced from the hinges; I saw the prisoner at the bar give it one wrench with a kind of an instrument, but I cannot exactly say what; I then called out, and asked them what they were doing there; upon which, the man upon the rails jumped down, and said to the other, as he jumped down, d-n my eyes, we are seen; upon which he went up Newman-street; the prisoner was then standing upon the window-fill, with his arm inside the window-shutter.

Q. How do you know it was the prisoner? - A. I am positive of it; he met me more than half way as I was crossing over the road.

Q. Was that after he had left the window? - A. Yes; as he came up to me, he said, d-n your eyes you b-r, what do you want here; I asked him what he was doing there, and he directly turned round to get from me; I made a catch at the skirt of his coat, but missed it; he then ran away; I followed him, crying stop thief; the watchman sprung his rattle; I pursued him into Chapel-street; I saw him throw something away, which I heard chink upon some brick-bats; it appeared to me to be some kind of iron or steel; I kept following, but there were two watchmen before me; he was, directly afterwards, taken in Hollen-street, and brought back to Mr. Banks's house; when we got to the door of the house, one of the watchmen slackened his hand a little from his collar, and the prisoner twisted his head under the other watchman's arm, and made his escape.

Q. Look at the prisoner; are you quite sure that that is the man you saw with his arm inside the shutter? - A. I am very sure of it.

Q. How long after that was it, that he was apprehended? - A. It might be as much as ten minutes, as nigh as I can guess.

Q. You have no sort of doubt of his being the person? - A. No.

JOHN SMITHERS sworn. - I am a watchman: I was calling the hour of two o'clock on the 15th of August; I heard a cry of stop thief; I ran directly for assistance, and just as I got to the end of the pavement, the prisoner got to the corner of the street; he ran across Oxford-road, into Chapel-street; the St. Ann's watchman followed him into Hollen-street; when I came up, a nightman and the watchman had got hold of him, and the nightman said to me, watchman, take hold of him, and we both of us led him up to Mr. Banks's house; the nightman is not here; then he snatched himself away from us, ran down Newman-street, across Oxford-road, into Dean-street, and turned into Soho-square; he was stopped there again, and brought to Marybone watch-house.

Q.Look at the man; are you perfectly sure he is the man? - A. I am.

Q. Was it light enough to see the man, so as to know him again? - A. Yes.

JOHN SOLOMONS sworn. - I am a patrol of St. Ann's, Soho: I saw the prisoner in custody in Soho-square; I enquired what was the matter; and I was told to go into Chapel-street, and look upon the rubbish, that he had thrown something away; I went there, and found this iron crow upon the rubbish by Mr. Preston's brewhouse, (produces it); it was quite new then; but Mr. Banks said he should not prosecute him, and I made a poker of it.

Q.(To Franks). Whereabouts was it you saw the prisoner throw something away? - A. At the corner of Chapel-street, by the brewhouse.

WILLIAM HAWTHORN sworn. - Between two and three o'clock on the 15th of August, I heard the alarm of stop thief in Newman-street; I ran across Oxford-road, and saw the prisoner making his way down Newman-street; I up with my stick, and struck him; he got past me into Chapel-street; I perceived that he have something away upon some rubbish that laid there; he was stopped in Hollen-street, and taken back to Mr. Banks's, and there he slipped from under our arms, and got away; he was pursued and taken again, and carried to Marybone watch-house; and through the neglect of the Magistrate, he was committed for a misdemeanor only, and was out upon bail.

HENRY BATES sworn. - Q. Look at that crow? - A. I received this crow at Marybone watch-house from Solomons; I went down to the prosecutor's house, and found the window broke; I fitted the crow to it, and it fitted exactly.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say that the window must have been broke open by that, or such like crow? - A. I am certain of it.

HENRY LOVELL sworn. - On the 18th of November, I know the prisoner at the bar stood indicted for a burglary; Jackson and I, and Kennedy, apprehended him in a public-house in Hog-lane; that is all I know of it.

Prisoner's defence. I was first of all committed for a misdemeanor, and was out upon bail from August till November; I had been at work till half past one o'clock, and was going home to my lodgings; I expected my trial was put off till the next Sessions, and I have no friends here.

GUILTY , Death , aged 35.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-33

33. FRANCIS PIPER and EDWARD PIPER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , eight hundred pounds weight of flax, value 35l. the property of Hugh Atkins .(The Case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

FRANCIS RUSTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was captain of the Minerva in October last; part of the cargo was flax.

Q. Do you know that Mr. Atkins was consignee of some flax in the Minerva? - A. I understand so.

Q. Did you give notice to Mr. Atkins that the ship was arrived? - A. Yes; I waited upon Mr. Atkins, in consequence of which a person was sent to the ship by Mr. Atkins; he sent his lighterman with the craft, and we put some flax into it: how much, I cannot say; my mate can tell you; his name is William Bennett .

WILLIAM BENNETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am mate of the Minerva, Captain Ruston : I delivered the flax into the craft that was sent by Mr. Atkins.

Q. How long did the delivery take up? - A. I began on Tuesday the 4th of November; on Wednesday the 5th, another parcel; and Friday the 7th, another.

Court. Q. The parcels that you put in were never unladen? - A. No; they were in the same bulk that we received them at Petersburgh; there were four hundred and fifty-six bobbins, that is, flax done up at both ends; part of them contained nine heads, and part twelve; after I had delivered them all into the craft, the lightermen, Arthur and Williams, took it away.

Q. Where was the Minerva at that time? - A. In Cherry-garden tier, on the Surry-side of the water; the craft lay close along-side.

Q. All the flax then was safely delivered into the craft? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that it is Mr. Atkins's property? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How do you know it is Mr. Atkins's property? - A. By the bill of lading.

Q. Is the bill of lading here? - A. I cannot tell that.

Mr. Knapp. (To Captain Ruston ). Q. Did you see the flax on board? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the flax afterwards at Worship-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Had it the same appearance with the flax you had lost? - A. One bottom of flax is like another; but there was just the quantity that we had lost.

Court. Q. Lost from where? - A. Either from the lighter or the shore.

JOHN ARTHUR, jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. My father is a lighterman; he was employed by Mr. Atkins: I went down in the craft, in November last, for the bobbins of flax for Mr. Atkins, from the Minerva; she was lying off Wapping Old Stairs.

Q. Did you receive any bobbins at all? - A. No.

Q. Was any flax put into the craft? - A. Yes, by the people belonging to the Minerva; I was not in the craft at the time.

Q. Did you see any in the craft? - A. Yes, apparently a large quantity; I was to have delivered them at Davis's wharf, upon Mr. Atkins's account; I went to Davis's wharf, and then I went and fetched the watchman of Davis's wharf, Crawley; I saw the barge fastened, and I left it in the care of Crawley.

Q. Where is Davis's wharf? - A. Just below Battle-bridge, on the other side of the water; after I had seen the barge fast, I went home, that was on the 7th of November.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How many days were you receiving the flax from the Minerva? - A. Three or four days.

Q. Did you yourself receive any orders from Mr. Atkins? - A. No.

Q. Were you by when any orders were given by Mr. Atkins? - A. No; I saw a letter.

Q. Excepting from the letter, you did not know on whose account you went? - A. No.

Q. Do you know how many bobbins of flax you received? - A. The account that was given to me, was four hundred and fifty-six, I did not count them myself.

Q. You did not know of any deficiency, when you delivered them at Davis's wharf? - A. No.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was employed by Mr. Arthur, the lighterman, to go to the Minerva with the craft, for flax, for Mr. Atkins.

Court. Q.When was this? - A. I think on a Monday, in November; I went down the next day, Tuesday, and saw part of the flax then in the craft, it remained on board the craft all night along side the ship; on the Wednesday I went, and it was not all in; my orders were, not to take it till it was all in the craft; it was not all delivered to one craft; what was delivered, I went to Davis's wharf with; I fastened the craft to a ring belonging to the wharf; I waited about a quarter of an hour while the Custom-house officer went on shore to deliver the charge, then I went away and left the craft.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ever see Atkins about this? - A. No.

Q. Therefore, whether you were sent by Atkins or not, you only know from Arthur? - A. Yes, I had a letter from Mr. Arthur.

Q. There were several hundred heads of flax on board the craft? - A. Yes.

Q. Several of them were broken, were they not? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when they were counted out? - A. No.

HUGH ATKINS. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you send down to the Minerva for the purpose of delivering some flax from Russia? - A. Yes; I employed Mr. Arthur by letter to go to the ship Minerva, to take lighters to recieve the flax.

Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, what quantity of flax was to be delivered? - A. Five hundred bobbins; when I heard it was landed, I went to Daivs's wharf to see it, that was, I suppose, about a week after; I had given the order to Arthur.

Q. That flax you considered as your's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any missing? - A. Yes, nine bobbins; they weigh about one hundred weight a-piece.

Q. Have you seen any flax since, at the Justice's office? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the quantity that you saw at Davis's wharf, and those that you saw at the office, appear of a like quality? - A. They did.

Q. Did the quantity that you saw at the office, make up the deficiency at Davis's wharf? - A. Within a few heads.

Q. You are a flax broker? - A. I am.

Q. Are you sufficiently acquainted with the article to know whether it was Russian flax? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the flax you saw at Davis's wharf, and the flax that you saw at the office, Russian flax? - A. Yes; they were of the same quality.

Q. What quantity did you see at Worship-street? - A.Eight bobbins and a few loose heads.

Q. What is it worth? - A. About thirty-five pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You did not see Arthur yourself? - A. No.

Q. And you gave him no order, except by letter? - A. By letter, and I sent a porter likewise.

Q. Is that porter here? - A. I should not know him if he was; I am in the habit of employing a great many, I took him from the 'Change.

Q. Did you find five hundred bobbins at Davis's wharf? - A. Yes, four hundred and ninety-one.

JOHN BELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

I am clerk at Davis's wharf, kept by David Butt and company; we received four hundred and sixty bobbins of flax; the craft was fastened to the ring of the wharf; I took the weight of them, but I cannot recollect what it was.

Q. Did you find any deficiency? - A. Yes, there was a deficiency of twenty bobbins by the lighten bill, which expressed four hundred and fifty-six.

MICHAEL CHAWLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am watchman at Davis's wharf; I had the care of the lighter from Mr. Arthur's son, while the goods were in the lighter.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You would not let any body steal the flax while you had the care of the lighter. I suppose? - A. No.

JOHN GAMSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a hemp and flax manufacturer, in Kingsland-road; I know the prisoner in the brown coat, Francis Piper , I do not know the other; about the 12th or 13th of November, I believe the prisoner at the bar, Francis Piper , came to our counting-house, and asked me if I would buy any flax, and pulled out a small sample of a pound weight out of his pocket, he assured me, that it was all like the sample; I enquired the quantity and the price; he said, the quantity, he supposed, might be from nine to ten hundred weight, and the price fifty-seven shillings a hundred.

Q. Was that a fair price or not? - A. From sixty-seven to sixty-eight shillings, was the market price at that time; I told him I could not purchase by that sample, I wished to see the bulk about the middle of the day; he came again, and brought a head of flax in a handkerchief, with the headband of the flax cut: I then told him, that I should rather see the bulk; I asked him again the price, and he was still in the same story; he said, he had lent a man fifty-five shillings a hundred weight upon it, he wanted money, and he must sell the flax; I told him it was not customary to sell flax by sample, could I see the bulk; I told him, I would send my brother to see it, and if he approved of it, he might bring the flax and have his money; he objected to my brother going to see the flax, by saying, the people of the house would not shew the flax without he was present, but he would bring the bulk for me to look at; he said, his horses and carts were then out, that he could not bring it before nine o'clock; I told him it was an odd time to look at flax, but that he might bring it; I immediately gave notice at Worship-street office.

Q. Did you see the other prisoner at all? - A. No, I did not see him till I saw him in custody at the Cherry-tree, opposite our house.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. In consequence of the information of Mr. Gamson, on Monday the 17th of November, by orders from the office, between eight and nine at night, in company with my brother officers, I went into Kingsland-road; coming near to Mr. Gamson's door, I observed a cart standing, apparently to me full; I then saw the two prisoners, as if going to say something, or had been saying something to one abother, I do not know which; the prisoner, Francis, went a little from the other, and I caught hold of him; the other prisoner I saw instantly in custody of the other officers; I then said to the prisoner, Francis, the other prisoner being close by, what is that cart loaded with, he said, go see, it is a hired cart, the contents are mine; I then said, sir, you have some bill of parcels, or some

thing to shew; we then took both the prisoners to a public-house, had the cart secured at the door, and went into a little back room, I did not know then what it contained; I then addressed Francis, will you now tell me who you are, and where you live? I and the rest are constables; he did not, nor would not give his name, nor any residence, but after a little time, said, the contents came from a wharf over the water; I then said to the other prisoner, Edward, what is your name? he gave me his name directly, Edward Piper ; I had some occasion to speak to Francis again, and he said it was sold to Mr. Gamson; I went to Mr. Gamson's, and as I crossed, I saw the flax in the cart; Mr. Gamson came with me to where the prisoners were, and I turned Edward round, and said, sir, I will look at your coat, and upon his hat and great coat, there appeared to be dust, and on the coat little strings of flax; I told him, I should keep him, and he then informed me, that he was only asking the other prisoner the way to Hackney, and they never saw each other in their lives before; I found upon Edward two day rules of the Fleet, for the 7th and 10th of November; I then said, pray sir, where is there one for to-day, that was the 17th, his answer was, he had none; they were kept that night, and committed the next day.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the officers belonging to Worship-street; I was with Armstrong and Mason; I apprehended Edward Piper; after they were brought into the office, they were put into separate rooms, where they could talk to and hear each other, there was nobody else; I was placed in a situation, in a necessary, close by, I heard Francis Piper-say, some time after they were locked up, where did you tell them you had been to? Edward Piper said, at Hackney; Francis Piper then said, how came you to let them take hold of you; he made answer, they had hold of me as soon as they had hold of you; Francis Piper then said, why did not you run away; the other made no answer at all to that; then Francis Piper again said, what shall I tell them my name is, to that Edward Piper made no answer; the next morning, I went to take Francis out of the watch-house, to take him before the Magistrate, and as I was bringing him along, I said to him, the man will think he has lost his horse and cart; he then said, d-n the horse and cart, he wished he had never seen the horse and cart, nor the stuff neither.

WILLIAM TENNANT sworn. - I am a hawker and pedlar; I keep a horse and cart, in partnership with Edward Piper .

Q. He was a prisoner in the Fleet, was he not? - A. Yes.

Q. You were in partnership with him, when he was a prisoner in the Fleet? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Francis Piper ? - A. Yes; he is the brother of the other prisoner; Francis Piper applied to me for my horse and cart last Monday week; he said he wanted to do a job for the value of an hour and a half, or two hours; they were to go from Fleet-lane to the Curtain-road; I did not see the horse and cart again till the Thursday following; I saw it at Worship-street.

SAMUEL WALKER , jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a flax-dealer in Mark-lane: I saw the flax that was produced at Worship-street, and I saw the bulk at Davis's Wharf.

Q. Are you acquainted with the different sorts of flax? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the flax, that you saw at the one place and the other, appear to be of the same quality? - A. Yes; they resembled each other so nearly, that I should think they are the same; I have not the least doubt but they are the same parcel of flax; it was Petersburgh flax.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe most of the flax that comes into this country, it Russian flax? - A. Yes.

Q. A very large quantity of Russian flax, of the same quality, comes into this country? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not mean to swear to it? - A. No; but from certain appearances which can only be known to the trade, I judged that they must be the same parcel.

- PIKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a dealer in flax in the City-road.

Q. Have you heard Mr. Walker examined? - A. Yes.

Q. Having seen both these quantities, do you confirm him in opinion that they are of the same quality? - A. As to resemblance, I am of the same opinion with Mr. Walker. (Mr. Atkins produced the bill of loding, the indorsement of which is, "deliver the within contents to Mr. Hugh Atkins ."

Court. Q. Do you receive this with the goods? - A. No; not before they arrive; the goods are mine at this moment.

Court. (To Captain Ruston ). Q.Look at that bill of lading? - A. This is the bill of lading that came with the goods.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence, but called five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Francis Piper, GUILTY , aged 30.

Edward Piper , GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-34

34. NICHOLAS FEATHERSTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a pair of linen sheets, value 12s. the property of Lord Le Despencer .

- FIELD sworn. - I am butler to Lord Le Despencer; I know the sheets produced are his Lordship's property, that is all I know.

GEORGE WATTS sworn. - I am butler to Dr. Robert Willis; On the 4th of November last about a quarter after twelve, or thereabouts, I was in my master's bed-room, fronting the street, nearly opposite to Lord Le Despencer's, and I saw the prisoner at the bar come out of a two-pair of stairs window upon a new piece of building that was building up; there was a door way cut through the wall that communicated into the attics of the dwelling-house; I saw the prisoner trying to conceal something under his great coat, on the left side; he then crossed the new building, and got upon the scaffolding, and, on my going down stairs, the servant-maid of Dr. Willis called to me, and said, she believed there was a man robbing Lord Le Despencer's house; I then went to the landing-place of the first stair-case, and I saw the prisoner upon the scaffold, putting the sheets into a mason's lime-basket; when he had so done, he picked up bricks and rubbish, and put over the sheets; I went down stairs to the street door, and called to him; he stood up very unconcerned; I said, you rascal, if you don't come down, I will fetch you down, I will throw you down and break your neck; the prisoner then left the basket, and threw himself astride the ladder, and slid down; when he came at the bottom, I laid hold of him by the collar, and told him he had been a thief, that he had done something wrong; he said, he had not, and begged I would let him go; he broke away from me, and ran across Hanover-square, but I took him in Oxford-road, and brought him back to the place where I first saw him; in the interval of time Lord Le Despencer's servants had been informed of it, and I saw the basket in the manner I have described; we then took him to Marlborough-street, and he was committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What time of day did you see this? - A. A quarter after twelve.

Q. That was the time the other workmen were at work? - A. No, they were gone.

Q. Do you know enough of the prisoner, to say he was the man? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM PALFRY sworn. - I am a bricklayer, I left the basket in the room where the sheets were, at twelve o'clock, when I went to dinner.

Field, (The sheets produced.) These are Lord Le Despencer's property; there is L. D. and the coronet upon them.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I am a bricklayer by trade; I went up this ladder with an expectation of getting a job, I had worked for the same master before, and they asked me what I wanted; and I said, I only wanted to see my master; they used me very ill, and therefore I made my escape.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY , aged 24. - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-35

35. LODUWICK DICKMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , one linen shirt, value 8s. the property of Juliana Fennell , privately in her shop .(The prisoner being a foreigner, a Jury of half foreigners and half Englishmen were sworn).

John Dalby , John-George Brawn , Francis Perrygall , C. M. Lanchsey , John Fisher , Peter Poland , Charles Willis , John Nader Beather , Charles Lambert , Robert Thong , John Wilkie , Vincent Bernardy .

MARY SMITH sworn. - I live in the family of Juliana Fennell : I am a servant of all work: My mistress keeps a shop of ready-made linen, and all kinds of linen-drapery , at No. 55, Shoreditch ; the prisoner at the bar came into the shop, and said he wanted half a dozen shirts; I went out of the shop into a little room that was adjoining, and my mistress put several shirts on the counter, but I cannot tell the number; I could not see any thing pass more than my mistress serving the shirts; my mistress is a Quaker; I saw the prisoner going out of the door, and my mistress called to me; I went into the shop immediately, and as he was getting on the step of the door, my mistress said to him, stop neighbour, let me see what thee has got under thy coat; he turned back, and knocked his hands upon the counter with great violence, and he swore that he would punish her for accusing him with being a thief; he went out of the shop, and when he had got about twenty yards from the door, I followed him, and said to him, be so kind as to step back, for my mistress insists upon knowing what you have got under your coat, and he lifted up his hand to strike me; I stooped, and his hand passed over my head; it was with his clenched hand; I thought I would follow him till I came to No. 38, where my mistress's brother lived, to get assistance; the prisoner ran up Badger-court, and my mistress's brother's journeyman and myself went up the court in search of him, but could not find him; we went to two different houses, and could not find him; and we said we would get a search-warrant; a woman looked out of a window, and said, you are welcome to come in without any search-warrant, and we found the prisoner upon the stair-case up two pair of stairs; he came down stairs, and George Ashington and myself detained him till a headborough came; and as he was standing at the door in the passage, he pulled the cellar-door close to, and slipped the bolt; when the headborough came, he pulled off the prisoner's coat, and felt in his pockets, but there was nothing found upon him; I then told the headborough he must take him back to my mistress; it was supposed that he threw the property down this cellar; the headborough did not go into the cellar.

Q. What did your mistress do? - A. My mis

tress told the headborough, as there was nothing found upon him, to let him go, and he was let go in the evening there was a report that a man had been taken out of this cellar in Badger-court, and taken to the office in Worship-street; I said, I would go and see if it was the man that had stolen the shirt; when I went in, the officers asked me if I could swear to my mistress's property, if I saw it; I told them, if I saw my mistress's mark upon it, I would swear to it; John Ray said that he had found a shirt on him; it was a new-made shirt, quite new.

Court. Q.Was there any mark upon it? - A. Yes; it was No. 8; the selling price was eight shillings, which was put upon it, that I might know what to sell it for when my mistress was out of the way; I swore to the property, and that was all I did.

SARAH SMITH sworn. - Upon the 21st of November, on a Friday, between eleven and twelve at noon, I heard the alarm of stop thief up the court I lived in, and they said they would search my house; I opened my door to come down stairs to see what was the matter, and the prisoner was upon the stairs; he seemed to be very much frightened, indeed, and he offered me a shilling to let him come into my room; I went out to him, and said, I suppose you are the man that the alarm of stop thief is about, and he said, he was; I went down stairs to tell them where the man was, and the headborough took him down stairs; that is all I have got to say.

Court. Q. Did you see him near a cellar any where? - A. No; there is a cellar-door in the passage.

Q. Were you there in the evening when the shirt was found in the cellar? - A. No; I was not.

GEORGE ASHINGTON sworn. - I work at the Quaker's brother's: I was called out by Maria Smith , who gave the alarm; I found the prisoner at No. 3, in Badger-court; I kept him there till the officer came.

Q. Was there a cellar-door in the passage? - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner bolting the cellar-door; the officer took him to the person's house to whom the property belonged; I went with him, and there he was discharged.

JOHN HARROW sworn. - I am a carter; I was the man that took the prisoner out of the cellar at No. 3, Badger-court; I lodge in the cellar; I was just stripping to put some dry things on, when I heard a rumbling on the cellar stairs; I immediately got up, and opened the cellar-door, and saw the prisoner; I said, what business have you here, and he said, d-n your eyes, what is that to you; he stuck me several times; I immediately collared him, but I missed my hold, and let him go; I followed him to Shoreditch, and immediately a person came up, and said, he was the man who had stolen the shirt.

Court. Q. Did you see the shirt at the time? - No; I did not see the shirt till I took him to the office.

JOHN RAY sworn - (Produces the shirt) I belong to Worship-street office; Upon Friday, the 21st of November, about six in the evening, the prisoner was brought to the office, and given into my custody, on suspicion of stealing a new shirt; I asked them if they had searched the prisoner; they said no, they had not; I began to search him in the office, and he seemed to be rather unwilling, and got his back up against the wall; I rubbed him down, and I found something very bulky behind; he said he had got nothing, he was a Dutchman, and wore large breeches; I unbuttoned his breeches, and took this shirt out, (produces it); it has never been washed; there is a figure of eight upon it; on searching him in a different places, I found a watch that had been concealed. (Produces the watch).

Maria Smith . I know this to be my mistress's shirt by the mark.

Prisoner's defence, (by interpretation). That he had purchased the shirt. GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-36

36. JAMES BARRASS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , three glass bottles, filled with brandy, value 10s. the property of Robert Roberts .

ROBERT ROBERTS sworn. - I am a publican , I live in Castle-street, Oxford-market ; the prisoner at the bar came to my house about ten o'clock in the evening of the 15th of November; he went into the parlour, where there were more company, and called for four-pennyworth of gin and water, and after that he had another four-penny worth, that was all he had; the company which were in the parlour withdrew about eleven, and he staid there till near twelve, or quite twelve, by himself; by and by my wife heard a noise in the parlour, and she called to me, and I directly went in and found the cupboard door had been broke open; the prisoner was hurrying out, and endeavouring to put the candle out; I looked into the cupboard, and I missed three bottles off a shelf; I then hurried out into the passage, where I took him by the collar, and then said to him, you villain, you have broke open my cupboard door, and stolen some bottles from me, my property; he stood with his right hand under his coat in this form, (describing it), and he out with his right hand and said, here, takes your bottle; he gave me the bottle which he had in his hand, and then I felt and found there was one bottle in his left pocket, and another in his right, and the watchman and myself, and another young man, took them from him, (the bottles produced);

here is likewise the lock of the door which he broke, it was forced with a screw-driver, I believe; I found a screw-driver and three knives upon him; these are my bottles; I had fifteen bottles, and when I went I found only twelve.

Court. Q. Was the man sober? - A. I cannot say he was altogether sober, but he made himself worse after he was taken into custody.

Prisoner's defence. I was so much in liquor I did not know any thing of the transaction till the Sunday morning. GUILTY , aged 49 - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-37

37. JAMES ATWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , two iron pans, value 2d. two tin pans, value 2d. and three pans of nails , the property of Benjamin Hill .

MARY HILL Sworn. - I am the wife of Benjamin Hill, my husband is a collector of rags , he lives at No. 63, Golden-lane : On the 1st of November, the prisoner at the bar passed by my door, and he stole some nails; I keep an old Iron shop; I did not see him take them, a child saw him take them, I don't know the child; I immediately pursued him, and brought the nails back, then I let him go; when I returned, I missed some more, and, with assistance, we searched his apartment in Broadyard, Golden-lane, and found three pans of nails.

Court. Q. How do you know those nails? - A. Only that I know he took them from my door; he was carrying them openly in his hand.

Court. Q. What does he deal in? - A. He is a smith by trade; he came in and asked me if I had got any small wire; I said, no; then he came back a second time, and asked for some small rivers; and then he came back the third time, and asked me if I had got any small nails that would make rivets.(The nails produced that were found in the prisoner's apartment.)

Court. Q. You do not know those to be your nails? - A. I did not see him take them, but there is my mark upon the pans.

JOHN ELLIS sworn. - I live just by Mrs. Hill, she keeps an old iron shop; I am a journeyman watchmaker; I was standing at the door, and Mrs. Hill asked me if I would fetch Mr. Jones, the officer, and I did, and we found these three pans of nails in the prisoner's room.

THOMAS WALKER sworn. - I am a paperstainer, I lodge with Mrs. Hill; I went into the shop, and this man was sitting in a chair, and several persons and Mrs. Hill were asking him to confess where the nails were; at last he did, and we found these three pans of nails in one corner of the cellar where he lived; I know the pans, for I frequently helped Mrs. Hill in with them; that is all I know about it.

Prisoner's defence. I am a smith and a nailmaker by trade, I called to look at some nails for a sample; I have got plenty of nails myself in my shop.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a very good character. GUILTY , aged 26.

One week in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-38

38. DAVID ALMOND , WILLIAM PRICE , and PETER CORSBLE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , four pen-knives, value 2s. the property of Joseph Woodcock .

JOSEPH WOODCOCK sworn. - I am a cutler , I live at No. 31, Drury-lane : About a quarter before one, upon the first of this month, the prisoner, Almond, came into the shop, and two others with him; I was in the back parlour at dinner, I immediately got up and went into the shop, and Almond asked for a sixpenny bread and cheese knife; I told him I had not any thing folow as sixpence; I took out half a dozen, and I told him they were fourteen pence a-piece, and that they were the lowest I had; as I was shewing them, a gentlewoman came in, and asked for a spring for a pair of polished snuffers, and for two pair of scissers which she left that wanted repairing, and what they all came to; I told her so much; and whilst I was looking at the money, I observed Almond's hand in the shew-glass, and he took up a knife, and asked the price of it; I told him two shillings; I was coming round to put the sash to, and a person said, he saw the boy Price put something into his pocket; I said my hand upon his shoulder, and said, I am afraid you have got more than belongs to you; he said something, but I could not understand what he said; I told him I would send for an officer to have him searched; he seemed to cry, and he put two knives into my hand; Crosble seemed to take no notice, he stood like a post; I said, fetch an officer; then Almond put another knife into my hand; when the officer came, he searched Price; I don't know that any thing was found upon him; upon searching Almond, he found a knife upon him, which a gentlewoman had left to he ground, there was no mark upon it; I wrote her name upon the counter, and when I had dined, I should have marked it directly; there was nothing found upon Crobie; that is all I know about it.

WILLIAM BLACKTON sworn. - I am a Bow-street officer, I was sent for, I searched these boys, and I found an old knife upon Almond; these three other knives were given me by Mr. Woodcock.

Woodcock. I know this knife by the blade, it was brought by a gentlewoman to grind, it was a knife belonging a particular family, and she desired me to be careful of it.

The prisoners made no defence.

The prisoner Almond's father, and Price's father, were called to their characters.

All Three NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-39

39. WILLIAM SINCLAIR was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Aaron Brooks , about the hour of eight in the night of the 6th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing one pair of leather shoes, value 5s. the property of Aaron Brooks.

AARON BROOKS sworn. - I live in High-street, Shadwell , I am a shoe-maker , I keep the house, I have no partner: On the 6th of November, between seven and eight o'clock at night, my window was broken, and a pair of men's shoes taken out.

Court. Q. How was the window broke? - A. There was a small hole which I had broken myself, and mended it with a small piece of strong paper; and secured it by wafers four days before; that paper was pushed on one side, and the hole made bigger; the shoes I never heard of till the officers brought them to me, and asked me whether they were my shoes; I told him I had no doubt of it in the least, by the two letters of the man's name I bought the shoes of; I was not present when the shoes were taken out.

Court. Q. Therefore you don't know whether they were taken out that instant? - A. I know that the shoes were there ten minutes before I missed them.

TIMOTHY JAQUES sworn. - I am a baker, I live in Essex-street, Whitechapel; John States and William Sinclair came to me on Thursday, the 6th of November; they had a pair of shoes, and they asked me whether I would buy them; I don't know which it was that offered them me; they asked me three shillings and sixpence, and I gave them three shillings and sixpence because they fitted me; I threw the money upon the table, but who took it up I cannot tell.

Court. Q. What did you do with the shoes? - A. I wore them till the prisoners were taken; and Mr. Haynes, the officer, hearing I had a pair of shoes, he applied to me, and I gave them to him.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell High-street: On Thursday last; the 4th of December, I received these shoes from Mr. Jaques, (produces them); I asked him how he came by them; he told me he had bought them of the accomplice, States, and the prisoner at the bar, and that he had given three shillings and sixpence for them; I asked him when he bought them, and he said, on the 6th of November, about eight o'clock at night; I went to the shoe-maker with the shoes, and he said, he had lost such a pair of shoes marked J. K.

Brooks. I have no doubt but these are the same shoes, there is J. K. upon them; it is the man's mark I bought them of.

- WOODROOFE sworn - I am a hairdresser, I live at No. 25, Shadwell High street, next door to Mr. Brook's: On the 6th of November, between seven and eight o'clock, I went to my own shop door, and looking towards Mr. Brooks's shop, I saw the prisoner at the bar, and this man. States, at the window; I could see the face of States, but not the face of Sinclair; I passed by them, and I thought I saw a piece of paper move; then I crossed the way; suspecting they meant to rob the shop, I stood opposite, and I thought I saw the prisoner Sinclair's arm move, and drawing a pair of shoes out of the window, and giving them to States, who then moved away.

Q. What became of Sinclair? - A. They both walked away from the window, I then went to Mr. Brooks's, and asked him if he had lost any thing; he told me, a pair of shoes.

Q. You are sure you saw States there? - A. Yes.

Q. And you believe the other boy was there likewise? - A. I believe he was, but I did not see his face clearly.

Q.(To Jaques.) Are you sure that States was one of the boys that sold you the shoes? - A. I am positive of it.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer, I apprehended States in the morning of the 16th of November; and, about four o'clock on the same day, Jaques came and informed me that Sinclair was at his house with a watch, which he did not think Sinclair came honestly by.

JOHN STATES sworn. - I work with my father at the water-side; I have known Sinclair about a twelvemonth: On the 6th of November, between seven and eight o'clock, I and Sinclair were going down High-street, Shadwell, and we saw this shoe shop, and seeing nobody in it, William Sinclair shoved his hand through the window, and took out a pair of shoes, and he gave them to me; I walked away, and put them into my pocket; we were coming back to get some more, and we saw a gentleman standing on the other side of the way, with a light coloured coat on; we thought this gentleman was looking at us, and we made the best of our way off; we went into Catherine-wheelalley, and sold them to Timothy Jaques for 3s. 6d. that is all I know.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, I only want the things that the officer took from me.

GUILTY, aged 13, of stealing, but not of the burglary . - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-40

40. CHARLES COLTON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 13th of November , one bag, value 1s. and two pecks of hemp seed,

value 4s. stolen by William Partridge , of which he stands convicted, knowing them to be stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)(Mr. Fitzpatrick produced the record of the conviction of William Partridge , dated the 3d of December, 1800).

FRANCES LUTFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a servant to Messrs. Wrench, and was so upon the 13th of November; I know the prisoner, Partridge, he was a carman to Messrs. Wrench.

Q. Did you see the prisoner, Partridge, at your master's warehouse? - A. Yes, upon the 13th of November I saw the prisoner, Partridge, go to the door in the warehouse where my master usually keeps his empty bags; I was at that time in a private place; I did not know any thing about it, but he could not see me; he took up an empty bag, he turned his back upon me, and went and filled it about half full of seed; I could not see the place from whence he took it from, but he passed by me with the bag half full of seed; I followed him immediately, but I could not see where he went to, whether into the yard of stable; I went and made it known to the foreman, and he followed him; his name is John Wood .

Cross examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.You did not see where he went? - A.No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. At the time you told the foreman, was Mr. John Wrench by? - A. No, he was not.

JOHN WRENCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. In the first place, what are your partners names? - A. Jacob Wrench , and Jacob- George Wrench .

Q. Partridge was a carman in your employ? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You three are partners? - A. Yes, we are: In consequence of having information, I followed the cart from our door to Piccadilly, Partridge drove the cart; he there delivered a load of mats; he then went to Rupert-street, to the prisoner's house, the sign of the White Horse; I saw him draw up his cart, and take out my bag, and carry it into the house, upon which I ordered the constable that attended me to go into the house and see what passed; after which the constable and myself went to Marlborough street, and got a search warrant; when we returned to the prisoner's house, we told the wife we were come with a search warrant for some seeds.

Q. Was the prisoner by? - A. I rather think he was by, I don't know whether he was or not; up on which the wife said, a man had brought some seed, but he had taken it away with him; at this instant I saw the husband -

Q. Then he was not present? - A. I don't say he was not; at this instant I saw the husband, who said, the man had not taken it away, that he had got the seed, and he would go up stairs and fetch the seed directly; upon this we went up stairs with the prisoner, through two or three small rooms; the prisoner unlocked the door, and, looking round to the left, he took down the bag of seed, and two others.

Q. Upon looking at the bag of seed, did you believe it to be your's? - A. I did.

Q. Tell the Gentlemen of the Jury why you knew it to be your's? - A. Because of the mark I had made.

Q. When did you make a mark upon it? - A. In the morning, at the door, before the cart went away from it.

Q. Then before the cart had set off, loaded with mats, while at the door you had marked the sack? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner go away with the cart, with the sack in it? - A. I did.

Q. Was that the same sack which you afterwards found in the closet? - A. It was the same, I have no doubt about it.

Q. Was the door in the closet open or not? - A. It was locked, the prisoner unlocked it.

Q. You saw there were two other bags, did they contain seed? - A. Yes, both of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys; Q. Did you happen to observe, when you were in the house, that the prisoner kept birds? - A. Yes, I think I saw a bird at the door.

Q.You know it was the bag that you marked in the cart at your door, but you never saw that bag in your premises? - A. Most likely I have.

Q. Have you ever seen it upon your premises? - A. I don't know.

Q. The wife stated, that the person who brought the seed had taken it away? - A. Yes.

Q. But the prisoner corrected her, and said, he would thew you where it was? - A. He did.

Q. And took you immediately to the place? - A. Yes.

Q. Before you did this you went very properly to the office, to get a search-warrant? - A. Yes.

Q. You found the prisoner at home, and ready to give you an account of the transaction? - A. He was at home, certainly.

Q. Whereabouts was the quantity? - A. About half a bushel.

Q. You did not observe how many birds the man kept? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Do you know whether ever this servant of your's had brought you a dog, and made you a present of it, for the purpose of protecting the house? - A. He did bring a puppy dog.

Q. Did he give it to you? - A. He left it in the stable; a puppy dog is not much protection to a house.

Q. Do you know whether he was desired by your father, or any body else, to get a dog? -

A. I don't know that he was nor I don't know that he was not.

Q. Do you recollect the man saying, that Partridge had given him this seed in return for his giving him this dog" A. The prisoner said, that Partridge had given him this quantity of seed for having made him a present of this dog.

Q. In London, dogs sell for something pretty considerable; whereabouts was the value of this dog? - A. I am no judge of the value.

ROBERT BEVERLEY sworn. - I am a constable of Bridge-ward; I went with Mr. Wrench to the house of the prisoner; I produce these three bags; I have had them in my custody ever since; I found them up one pair of stairs in a closet in a back room, locked up.

Q. Do you recollect what the prisoner said? - A. He said he had given the carman the puppy, and he promised to give him some seed in return; he did not deny the seed being there.

Q. Did you hear what the wife said about it? - A. Yes; she said the carman had taken the bag away with him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The wife having given a false account of the transaction, he corrected her? - A. Yes; he wanted to go up stairs by himself.

Q. And you went up with him? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. You know, in public-houses, they are obliged to keep their doors all locked? - A. I have nothing to do with that.

HENRY LOVET sworn. - I am one of the officers belonging to Marlborough-street: I went to the prisoner's house; I don't recollect the seed being in a closet, it hung by the corner of the bed, upon a nail.

Court. Q. It was not concealed? - A. No.

Q.(To Wrench). Be so good as to look at that bag; is that the bag you marked? - A. Yes, it is marked W; I put that mark upon it, before it went from my house.

Court. (To Beverley). Q. What was the conversation when you went in? - A. Only asking how the dog did.

Q. Then the story of the dog was not an afterthought, because they suspected you? - A. No; they were talking about the dog when we went in

Mr. Knowlys. The dog was in the cart, and the prisoner at the bar went and fetched it out of the cart.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was this a great full-grown dog? - A. I don't know; it was not above six months old.

Mr. Knowlys. It was then used for the purpose of watching the property in the cart.

Prisoner's defence. I have only this to say, that I did give him the dog, and he did promise me some seeds in return.

The prisoner called eleven witnesses, who gave him a very good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-41

41. JAMES COWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , two oxen, value 20l. the property of Philip Dehaney , Esq. (The case was opened by Mr. Gurney).

PHILIP DEHANEY , Esq. sworn - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at Hayes-place, in Kent : On Sunday, the 23d of November, at four in the afternoon, I saw the two oxen in my field; the field was fenced all round; it was impossible for cattle to have escaped: On the Monday morning they were missed, and I sent to Smithfield, and on the Wednesday they were shewn to me at the Ram-inn, Smithfield, by Nicholls, one of the witnesses; I am sure they are my oxen; I saw them again yesterday; they were both black; one of the Scotch breed, and the other Welch; the Scotch ox has white across the back, near the rump; the Scotch ox I have had about fourteen months; the other, I bought at the last Barnet fair; I have no doubt but I could pick them out from all the beasts in Smithfield market.

JOSEPH NICHOLLS sworn. - I am a drover in Smithfield-market, to Mr. Earle the salesman: On Monday the 24th of November, I saw the prisoner just within the hospital-gate in Smithfield, about three o'clock in the morning; he had a Scotch bullock and a Welch bullock; he called me, and asked me if I would take and tie those two beasts up; I said, yes, bring them on, and I will tie them up for you; my man tied them up, while I stood by; he said my master was to sell them; I had seen the prisoner before, and knew him again; I am sure he is the same man; he pulled out a pocket handkerchief, and offered it for sale for one shilling; he sold his handkerchief to a little boy that worked for me, and then we went into a public-house together; we stopped there till about half past five; I spoke to my master, and then my master and I went into the house, and took him into custody; the prisoner was sent to the Compter, and the oxen were locked up at the Ram-inn, in Smithfield; Mr. Dehaney and Cooper have since seen them.

Q.What sort of oxen are they? - A. One is a pole Scot, with white along the back; they were both black cattle; the other was horned Welch one.

EDWARD COOPER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dehaney: On Monday morning the 24th of November, I missed the two oxen from the field; I found the gate taken off the hinges; I came to Smithfield to look for them, and found them at the Ram-inn; Nicholls shewed them to me; it was about half past two in the afternoon; I am sure they were my master's cattle.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Wickham; I was out of place; I met with a man that said, he would give me a job, if I would meet him on the other side of South-end, on the Sunday night, he would give me these beasts to drive to Smithfield; he said, he wanted to go to Deptford to do a little job, and he thought he should be in Smithfield as soon as I was, but be never came, and they charged me with them.

Jury. (To Mr. Debaney.) Q.What is the distance from your field to Smithfield? - A. About fifteen miles, Wickham is about two miles from me.

Jury. (To Nicholls.) Q. Did you observe these cattle, so as to be able to: swear to them? - A. Yes, I could pick them out from among a thousand; I can safely take my oath to them.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-42

42. CHARLES DEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , fifteen pounds of beef, value 8s. and two loaves of bread, value 2s. the property of Lewis Griffulke .

JACOB TRAVETT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lewis Griffulke , merchant, No. 4, Crescent, blackfriars-bridge: On Sunday morning, the 2d of November, about half past six o'clock in the morning, as I was opening the shutters, I saw the prisoner endeavouring to get over the area; I ran into the back yard, called the groom, and we went round to the front door and took him; we found nothing upon him; when we got round, he was not quite out of the area; there was a bundle lying in the area, I let it lie there till the constable had charge of the prisoner; the bundle contained fifteen pounds of beef, and two quartern loaves; I missed them from the larder in the area; the cook was taking the bone out of the beef the night before, when I went to bed.

Q. Is the cook here? - A. No.

Q. Did you see it put in the larder? - A. No.

Q. Do you know if the loaves were there overnight? - A. No, I cannot say.

Q. Then you cannot say that any loaves were missing? - A. No; the bundle was tied up in an apron, such as glaziers generally wear.

ISAAC WRIGHT sworn. - I am groom to Mr. Griffulke; I was called by the last witness; I went round with him and took the prisoner as he was getting out of the area; I said to him, you shall not get away this time, so easy as you did before, and we secured him; he was taken before the Alderman and committed; there was a bundle lying in the area, with some beef and bread in it; I had seen the beef in the larder the night before, I did not take any notice of the bread.

Q. Was any thing done to the larder? - A. Yes, the padlock was broke off; I saw the cook lock it up the night before, and the beef in it; there was another lock to it, besides the padlock, which must have been picked, because we found it locked.

SARAH GRAY sworn. - I am a nurse in the family of Mr. Griffulke: I saw the beef and bread in the larder about half past eleven on Saturday night; the bone was taken out; it was made on purpose for bouillie beef; there were six loaves in the safe; two were taken away; the next morning I heard a noise, I looked out at window, and saw my two fellow-servants; they had hold of the prisoner; I came down stairs, and saw the padlock broke off, and the other lock was locked; I saw the bundle in the area, and a long string to it, which went up to the top of the area; when the constable came, I saw a key taken from the prisoner, which unlocked the safe, and locked it again; he was taken into custody immediately. (The constable produced the padlock and two keys, which he had taken from the prisoner, one of which opened the larder).

Prisoner's defence. On Sunday morning, the 2d of November, I was coming along Bridge-street, and these two gentlemen came out, and laid hold of me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-43

43. WILLIAM PARTRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a bag, value 1s. and two pecks of hemp-seed, value 4s. the property of Jacob Wrench , Jacob-George Wrench , and John Wrench .

JOHN WRENCH sworn. - I am a seedsman , in partnership with Jacob Wrench and Jacob- George Wrench ; the prisoner was our carter : In consequence of information that I received, suspicion fell upon the prisoner; I followed him with his cart as far as Piccadilly, where I saw him deliver his load; after that, I followed him to Rupert-street; he stopped at the further end of Rupert-street, and took out a bag, which bag I saw him take into a public-house there, the White-horse; I had two constables with me, one of whom went to the house likewise, but could not hear any thing that transpired; I then went to Marlborough-street with the constable, and got a search-warrant; we searched the house, the sign of the White-horse, and found three bags, containing seed, one of which he had taken from our house, and which I had marked; upon finding the bags, we took the master of the public-house to Marlborough-street; the Magistrate thought proper that he should be brought into the City, which he was, and lodged in the Compter; the next morning, he was brought before the Lord Mayor with the prisoner, the pri

soner being taken up that afternoon, and they were committed.

Q. The other two bags you know nothing of? - A. I should not chuse to swear to them, but I have no doubt they came out of our house; the one that I can swear to, contained hemp-seed; the others were different forts of seeds, and different size bags; we had not missed them; it is impossible to miss them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The prisoner told you that the hemp-seed he had bought, and that he had borrowed a bag to convey it? - A. Before the Lord-Mayor, he said he had bought the seed, but I do not recollect his saying he had borrowed the bag.

Q. If he had bought seed, you would not, perhaps, have refused him the use of the bag, to convey it from one place to another? - A. Probably not.

FRANCES LUTFORD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Wrench: On the 13th of last month, I believe on Thursday, I had occasion to go to a private place, and I saw the prisoner go to the drawer in the warehouse, where my master keeps his empty bags, and he took a bag out, and filled it about half full of seed; he came by the place where I was, with it; I followed him as far as I could, and then I gave information to the foreman, but whether he went into the yard, or into the stable, I cannot say; the passage leads to both.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You know the day he was taken before the Lord Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. And you went before the Lord Mayor, and told this story? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you? - A. I did; I was sent for.

ROBERT BEVERLEY sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the property); I was desired to follow the cart, upon suspicion that something had been stolen; I followed the cart to Piccadilly; when the prisoner had unloaded his cart there, he turned back towards the City; in going along Piccadilly, he pulled a bag out of the fore part of the cart, and put it into the body of the cart; he drove from thence to a public-house in Rupert-street, and there he stopped; then we got a search-warrant, went back, searched the house, and found these three bags; one of them has a mark of W upon it; I have had them ever since.

RICHARD TAYLOR sworn. - I am a constable: I was called on the 13th of November to follow the cart; I was with the last witness; I remained in the house while he and Mr. Wrench went to Marlborough-street for the search-warrant, till the cart drove away; the prisoner drove the cart up Compton-street, and through Holborn; he delivered a bag at Sable, Pilbrow, and Stable's, druggifts, in Holborn; I followed him till he got home, and then I took him into custody; the next morning he was examined at the Mansion-house, and committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Can you say that the bag found in Rupert-street, was never in that cart? - A. I cannot.

Q. A carman stopping with his cart at a public-house, is no very exrtaordinary thing, is it? - A. No.

HENRY LOVET sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: On the 13th of November, I went to execute a search-warrant, at the White-horse, in Rupert-street; I found a bag containing hemp-seed up in the landlord's bed-room, with a W. upon it.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. How it came there, you do not know? - A. No.

Mr. Wrench. I marked the bag in the cart.

Mr. Knowlys. You did not see who conveyed that bag into the cart? - A. No.

Court. Q. Can you swear, that the bag you marked in your cart, was your bag? - A.No; I cannot.

Q. Was the bag quite new? - A. No.

Q. Did you give him any orders, or authority, to take a bag that day? - A. No.

Q. Was the bag that was left at the druggist's left by your order? - A. Yes.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-44

44. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , a basket, value 4s. a cloth, value 18d. and forty-eight pounds of butter, value 2l. 8s. the property of William Markham .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Robert Mousley .

JOHN STRICKLAND sworn. - Q. Do you know Mr. Mousley? - A. Yes; he is book-keeper , at the Oxford arms, in Warwick-lane: On Wednesday, the 26th of November, I lost a flat of butter from Newgate-market ; I had observed the prisoner for about two hours the day that I lost my butter, and on the Saturday following, I saw him again, and upon seeing me, he went away; I followed him, he went into the Oxford-arms yard; I saw him take a basket of butter and put it upon his shoulder; a porter, belonging to the yard, standing by, asked him what he was going to do with that butter, he said, he came from one Dean; the porter called the master of the waggon that brought it to London; he asked him, in the hearing of the prisoner, if it was right in being delivered to a person of the name of Dean, and he said, no, it was dictected to a Mr. Casey, cheesemonger, in St. Giles's; there were four flats standing one on the other, in the yard; Mousley sent for a constable, and he was taken to the Compter.

ROBERT MOUSLEY sworn. - I am book-keeper, at the Oxford-arms; the prisoner was in custody when I came into the yard; William Markham is the carrier, and I am the book-keeper for him.

Q. You are responsible to him, are you not? - A. I never had a right understanding about that till last Saturday.

Q. Was there any contract made with you when you became book-keeper, that you should be responsible for any thing that was lost? - A. No.

Q. But Markham is answerable, and is paid for the carriage? - A. Yes.

Q. Is Markham here? - A. No, he is in the country.

Q. Do you know that that butter came in Markham's waggon? - A. I am certain of it; the prisoner said he came from one Dean; I asked him where Dean lived, and he made me no reply; he afterwards said, in St. Giles's.

Q. You, as book-keeper, must acknowledge whether this butter was for Dean or not? - A. I was for Mr. Casey, in St. Giles's; Woodman the officer has got the flat and the cloth; there was a direction, which is on the basket now.

ISAAC CROCKER sworn. - I am porter, at the Oxford-arms; I saw the prisoner with the flat of butter upon his shoulder, I asked him what he was going to do with it, he said, he wanted a flat of butter for one Dean; Mr. Markham was just gone into the house, and I called to him to know if it was right; the prisoner then let it off his shoulder, Mr. Strickland came up, and he was secured.( James Woodman , the officer, produced the flat and the cloth, which was deposed to by Mousley).

Prisoner's defence. I was in liquor, when I went down, I did not know I was in the yard, till after I had been in the Compter two or three hours; I did not know what I was about.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-45

45. JOHN MILKY , alias SPENCE, alias ROBERT BAYNTON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , a silver watch, value 4l. 14s. 6d. another silver watch, value 5l. 5s. another silver watch, value 4l. 4s. another silver watch, value 5l. 5s. and another silver watch, value 7l. 7s. the property of Thomas Rogers .

THOMAS ROGERS sworn. - I am a watchmaker , at Horselydown: On Friday the 14th of November, about half past eleven, the prisoner came to my house, with four sailors, they were all strangers to me, they bargained for four watches; the prisoner at the bar said, he was the landlord of the house, that those watches were to be delivered at his house, and on delivery I was to be paid for them.

Q. Did they make that bargain with you, that you were to be paid on delivery? - A. They bargained for four watches the first time, they were for the four sailors, and he undertook to pay for them on delivery, at his house, the Ship, at Wapping, that is about two miles from my house; they went away about half past four o'clock; he came again with one of the sailors, who called himself the carpenter of the ship; he then bargained for another watch, which made five, that, was to be sent with the rest to his house; he told me to bring that home at the same time; he went away, saying; he should be there as soon as me, and left the carpenter of the ship at my house; I packed them up, and took them with me, the carpenter went with me, and conducted me to the house; I went into the tap-room with the carpenter, and saw the prisoner who called himself the landlord; he took me into a private room, he brought two candles and a piece of paper, he desired me to take down every man's name, which I accordingly did; he then looked at the watches, and each man took one; he said; you would wish to have your money; I said, I should; he said, I will give it you by and by; he went down stairs, and came up again, and said his wife was not in the way, she would be in recently he said, he had nothing but a one hundred pound note, and he would step down and get change; he went down stairs with all the watches, I staid about half an hour, he did not come; I went down stairs and saw a woman that I took to be the landlady; she said, the landlord would be in by and by. I went up stairs again; I was then under no alarm of being robbed of my property; I waited about half an hour longer, and made enquiry again, but I never saw him again till the Monday following, when he was taken up; the prisoner turned out not to be the landlord; there was no landlord to the house; the officer has got one of the watches, which he found on the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This man told you he lived at this public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not appear as the deputy landlord? - A. Yes, or I would not have trusted him with the money.

Q. Do you not know, as well as from what he told you, that he acted as deputy landlord? - A. No.

Q. He came with four sailors? - A. Yes.

Q. He brought them to buy these watches? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it, you gave every sailor a watch, the prisoner had not possession of all the watches? - A. I cannot say whether every man took his watch, or whether I laid them down on the board, he was to pay for them; I delivered one of the watches

to the prisoner, and he changed with one of the sailors.

Q. The other four watches you gave into the possession of the sailors? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner offered you a one hundred pound note? - A. He said he had no small change, but he would get change for a one hundred pound note, but I never saw any note.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q. The prisoner was committed by the Magistrate for conspiracy? - A. Yes.

Q. Who desired you to indict him for a selony? - A. The Magistrate did that business.

RICHARD PERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to the Thames Police-office; I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday the 16th of November, in the evening, at the public-house, in Old Gravel-lane, I knew him before; I did not search him at the time I apprehended him; I secured him after a great deal of trouble.

Court. Q. Is he the landlord of the Ship public-house? - A. Not to my knowledge: the landlord of that house is a man of the name of Baynton, who is in the King's-bench now; I searched him at the office, and found this watch in his fob; he told me that was one of the watches that he had from Mr. Rogers. (Produces it).

Rogers. This is one of the watches that these men had, I am sure it is my property.

Mr. Alley. (To Perry.) Q. Do not you know, that in the absence of Baynton, the prisoner officiated as landlord? - A. No, I never heard of it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you know Baynton to have been an acquaintance of the prisoner's? - A. Yes, it has been the alarm of the neighbourhood.

Prisoner's defence. At the time Baynton was arrested, he authorized me to do every thing in this house for him, and for a dozen or twenty days, I did business in the house, and was answerable for every thing, and these sailors asked me to go with them to buy some watches, and they were to give me a one hundred pound note, and I told this gentleman I would be answerable for the watches; when he came in, I was drawing off a bottle of gin in the cellar, and when I came up they had all got their watches; I never saw them before, they were strangers to me, and when I was taken up, I was endeavouring to find them.

GUILTY . aged 28 - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-46

46. ANN SHELLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , 4s. the property of Isaac Clemmitt .

ISAAC CLEMMITT sworn. - I keep the Whitebear, Piccadilly , the prisoner was in my service, and had been about five or six months: On Saturday, the 8th of November, I missed two shillings out of the till; on the Sunday, I missed another shilling; and in consequence of that, I marked some silver in the till; I marked 2l. 13s. in shillings, and two half-crowns; I put them into the till again; on Monday I examined, and they were all safe; I put them in again on Monday evening; I found them right again on Tuesday morning; on Tuesday, about eleven or twelve o'clock, I put them in again; on the Wednesday morning between nine and ten, I took them out and counted them, and found five shillings deficient; I sent to Bow-street for an officer; Mr. Miller came, and searched first the waiter, there was nothing found on him; he then searched the prisoner, and out of the money that was found upon her, I picked out four of the shillings that I had marked, they are marked upon the edge, with the top part of the letter R. I have no doubt of their being mine; Miller also found upon her a key, which opened the till and locked it again; and when I had locked it with that key, I found it exactly in the same way that I had found it after I had been robbed, for the right key required to be turned again before it would open; it is the key of her box.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street: On Wednesday, the 12th of November, I apprehended the prisoner, she turned out the contents of her pocket, and out of the silver, Mr. Clemmitt picked out the four shillings that he has produced; I tried a key that I found upon her, which unlocked the till in the way that he has described.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but to claim the mercy of the Court.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who had known her from her infancy, and gave her a good character. GUILTY , aged 27. - Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-47

47. ELIZABETH MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , a black silk cloak, value 10s. the property of Henry Cox .

ANN Cox sworn. - I am the wife of Henry Cox: I rent a room at a hair-dresser's shop, Greenbank, Wapping , my husband is at sea ; I went with my husband to Gravesend, and the prisoner was in a house there, and seeming a decent woman, she asked me to let her lodge with me, and I said she might; she lodged with me seven weeks, I was not to have any thing for it; as soon as she was gone away, I looked in my box, and missed my, cloak, it was found upon her the same night, the officer found it pinned inside of her top petticoat.

JOHN Fox sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Thames Police-office: On Wednesday the 19th of November, I was sent for to search the prisoner,

she requested that I would let the women that were present, search her, and they searched her, and found this cloak upon her, pinned to her petticoat.(Produces it.)

Mrs Cox. This is my cloak.

Prisoner's defence. I borrowed her cloak to go out, as I had often done before, I did not mean to steal it; I thought to have slipped it into the box again without her knowing it.

GUILTY , aged 39. - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-48

48. EDMUND WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , five pounds of yellow soap, value 2s. five pieces of other soap, value 1s. four ounces of hair-powder, value 3d. four ounces of starch, value 3d. two wash-balls, value 4d. and a cake of soap, value 3d. the property of Richard Jones .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

RICHARD JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a soap manufacturer and perfumer , No. 179. Shoreditch, the prisoner was my servant ; in consequence of some information that I received on Friday last, the 28th of November, I went to the apartments of the prisoner, in Petty's-court, Holywell-lane, about four hundred yards from my house; I found these two cakes of yellow soap, a piece of violet soap, a little bag of hair-powder, some starch, and five other small pieces of soap; Harper the officer was with me.

Q. Do you believe these articles to be your property? - A. I do.

Q. Was the prisoner in your service on that day? - A. Yes he was, and had been at work in the morning; when I come back, I found him in the manufactory up stairs, in the powder-room, and gave charge of him to Mr. Harper; I told him, I gave him in charge because of the soap that I had found in his apartment; in his way to Worship-street, he said, the soap that I found in his apartments was given him.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I went with Mr. Jones to search the prisoner's apartments, last Friday, (produces the property;) I found it upon a shelf in the cupboard; I then went to the manufactory, and took charge of the prisoner.

THOMAS ROLLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Recollect, that you are sworn to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth- you were the apprentice of Mr. Jones, were you not? - A. Yes, the prisoner worked for Mr. Jones.

Q. Do you know any thing of his having taken any soap, hair powder, or starch? - A. No.

Q. You are now in the care of a person from the house of correction? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been taken into Newgate to see either this prisoner, or any other prisoner, against whom you are intended to give evidence, since you have been in custody? - A. No, I have not seen either of them, or spoke to them.

Mr. Gurney. (To Jones). Q. Look at that soap? - A. This yellow soap is of my manufacture; I can only speak of it by the quality; one boiling of soap differs very much from another; I have made but four boilings since last March, and if I was to see any of either of the boilings, I could pick them out separately; this cake of violet-soap was manufactured in my house, and never was sold, to the best of my knowledge.

Court. Q. Will you swear it was never sold? - A. I cannot say, we sell so many things.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you never sell any of that soap to the prisoner at the bar? - A. No; here is a wash-ball which is unfinished, and is of my manufacture, that never was sold, I can swear it was made in my house.

Prisoner's defence. Last Monday was a week, Thomas Rolls brought eight cakes of soap, and wanted me to take it away, and I said I would not have it, for I did not know what to do with it.

Court. (To Rolls). Q. You hear what the prisoner says? - A. It is all false; I brought out four cakes that he and his brother asked me for, and his brother took it away.

Q. Look at the wash-ball; did you take that and deliver either to the prisoner or his brother? - A. No, I did not; I took these two cakes of yellow soap from the cutting-room, and delivered them to his brother; the prisoner was in the cutting-room at the time I took them out; he told me his brother was over in the vat-room; he saw me take it out.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you not to take them out? - A. No, you did not.

Prisoner. I desired Rolls not to take the soap out; he said his mistress had been terrifying him, and said he was as bad as the man; he said his master was better, and had offered him a guinea, if he could defect any of the men.

Q.(To Rolls). Is that true? - A. No, it is all false. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-49

49. GEORGE MEARES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , two linen sheets, value 1l. 5s. the property of William Wright , in a lodging-room in his dwelling-house .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November, two linen sheets, value 1l. 5s. and a counterpane, value 5s. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. - I keep the King's Arms Inn, Leadenhall-street : On Friday the 14th of November last, I was called up early in the

morning, and informed, that the stranger that I had taken in over night, had robbed my house; when I came down, I found the prisoner in the custody of the constable, with a pair of sheets in a bundle, in the possession of my servant, who has them here.

ELIZABETH MARTIN sworn. - I attended in the chamber-maid's place: On Thursday night the 13th of November, I lighted the prisoner to bed; I am sure he is the man; I never saw him before, to my knowledge; he had no bundle when he went to bed; I was going up to bed at half past seven in the morning, and saw him with a bundle; I immediately went to look at the bed that I had made up for him, and missed the sheets; I then called to the ostler to stop him, which he did; he had the sheets, one in each pocket, and the counterpane in a bundle; the counterpane was taken off another bed in the same room; I know them to be my master's property; one of the sheets was marked with a single W, and the other with WW and an E.

THOMAS LOVE sworn. - I am ostler at the King's Arms, Leadenhall-street: The last witness called to me; I immediately followed the prisoner, and stopped him, and brought him back; I took him into the tap-room, and there I took the sheets, one out of each pocket, and a counterpane tied up in a handkerchief in his hand; I fetched a constable, and he was secured. (The property was produced and deposed to by Elizabeth Martin ).

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; I have no friends. GUILTY , aged 24. - Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-50

50. SAMUEL GRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , three pounds weight of coffee, value 1s. the property of a certain person or persons to the Jurors unknown.

Anthony Brown, the principal witness, not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-51

51. MARY-ANN BELLOWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , two jackets, value 2l. the property of Richard Rigden , privately in his shop .

There being no evidence to shew that the property had ever been in the possession of the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-52

52. MARY-ANN BELLOWS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a jacket, value 9s. two great coats, value 10s. two pair of drawers, value 5s. four waistcoats, value 1l. 11s. 6d. a pair of trowsers, value 8s. and a waistcoat piece, value 2s. 6d. the property of Richard Rigden , privately in his shop .

RICHARD RIGDEN sworn - On the 5th of November, the prisoner came to my shop for work; I was at home at tea; I was called down, and in consequence of what the shopman told me, I desired him to go after the prisoner, which he did, and brought her back; he had given her some work, which she had tied up in a bundle; I then listed up her cloak, and saw a blue jacket under her arm; I then took her to the office in Hatton-garden, and from there to her father's house; though he says it is not his child, he always passed for her father; I asked him if he had any objection to our looking round the place; he said he had none; we went into a back room, where he worked; the officer opened one of the drawers, and there found upwards of forty duplicates; we took him into custody, and he is now in prison.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden: On the 5th of November, the prosecutor brought this girl to our office; I took her into custody; I then went with Mr. Rigden to the girl's father, Mr. Poynder, in Portpool-lane; I went into the back room where he was at work; I said, is your name Poynder; he said, yes; I asked him if he was the landlord of the house; he said, yes, he was; I asked him if he had any objection to my looking over it; he said, no; I went into his work-shop, and looked in some drawers, and found a great number of duplicates, (produces them); some of them relate to the other things in this indictment.

JOHN EDWARDS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Portpool-lane, (produces a waistcoat); I received a waistcoat on the 2d of May from a man; it was pledged in the name of Thomas Jenkins .

Jury. Q. Did you ever see the child at the bar, in your shop? - A. No.

JAMES MARLOW sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, No. 38, Baldwin's-gardens.

Q. Look at these duplicates? - A. There are four of them mine; the 31st of July, a waistcoat-piece and a pair of trowsers; the 1st of August, a waistcoat-piece; the 15th of August, a waistcoat-piece; and on the 6th of September, another waistcoat-piece; they were all pledged by a woman of the name of Mary Jones; I know her as a person using the shop.

- WALKER sworn. - I am servant to John Hewitt , pawnbroker, Eyre-street-hill.

Q. Look at these duplicates? - A. Here is one of ours, dated the 26th of April, of a waistcoat, and two pair of drawers; they were pledged by a child about twelve years of age.

Q. Was it the prisoner? - A. No, it was not.(Produces them).

- MACARTNEY sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker.

Q. Look at these duplicates? - A. Here is one

of ours, dated the 7th of October, for two coats; they were pledged by a man.

BENJAMIN GREEN sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Rigden: On the evening of the 5th of November, about six o'clock, the prisoner at the bar came to our shop, and brought home a waistcoat that her father had made; I gave her another for her father to make; she tied it in a handkerchief; while I was entering it in the book, and was going out of the door, I stepped into the cutting-room adjoining the shop, to speak to the foreman; in coming back, I saw the child at the end of the shop, where she had no business; she then went out at the door, and I perceived, as she stooped to open the door, that she had something under her cloak; I sent for my master, and he ordered me to fetch her back, which I did; I told her we had something else to make, and brought her back with me; I gave her another waistcoat, which she tied up in her bundle; Mr. Regden then went round the counter, and lifted up her cloak, and took from under her arm a blue cloth jacket; he then took her to the Police-office.

Q. What is the value of that? - A. About nine shillings.

Q. Would you give nine shillings for it? - A. Yes; more than that. (Produces it).

Q. Was the foreman in a situation to see what passed in the shop? - A. No, he could not; there was nobody in the shop but me and her, till after I fetched her back.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing when you took it from her? - A. She did not speak for a few minutes, and then began to beg for mercy; she said it was the first time, and she would do so no more.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

For the Prisoner.

MARY WEGLER sworn. - The prisoner is a daughter of my husband's sister; she is not the daughter of Poynder; her mother left her husband some years ago, and went to cohabit with Poynder, and she lived with them.

Q. How old is she? - A. Eleven years and a fortnight.

Q. Do you know much of her conduct in that family? - A. No. GUILTY of stealing goods, value 4s. aged 11. - Fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-53

53. MOSES CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , a silver box, value 39s. the property of Joseph Barnes .

JOSEPH BARNES sworn. - I keep a tavern , in Water-lane, Tower-street : On Saturday, the 29th of November, I saw the box in the evening in the coffee-room, it was a box for snuff and tobacco, for the use of the gentlemen in the room; by eleven o'clock I went to bed, and left my servant and the box in the room; on the Sunday morning, upon counting up my plate, I missed the box, and on Monday afternoon the constable came to me with the box, his name is Wightman, he has had it ever since, it has my name upon it, and the words, Water-lane, Tower-street. (The box produced.)

JAMES BRUCE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Wynne, silversmith, No. 135, Fleet-street: On Monday, the 1st of December, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner at the bar came into Mr. Wynne's shop; he asked me what I gave an ounce for plate; I told him I could not tell till I saw the articles; he immediately produced the bottom of this box; I asked him what it was, and he said, I knew what it was, and that was all the answer that I could get from him; I acquainted Mr. Wynne, and he detained him while I sent for an officer.

Q. How did you find out to whom it belonged? - A. I went to Guildhall with the officer and the prisoner, and there I saw him searched, and the top of the box was found in his breeches, which had the name of the prosecutor upon it, Joseph Barnes , and the words, Water-lane, Tower-street.

Q. What is the value of it? - From four to five pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not know the prisoner at the bar before, I believe? - A. No.

Q. Was he perfectly in his senses at the time he came to you? - A. He appeared to me to be very much intoxicated in liquor, I could not get a direct answer from him.

Q. He was so much intoxicated that he could not give you an answer? - A. No; I think he was capable of giving an answer.

JOHN WIGHTMAN sworn. - I am a constable of St. Bride's; I was sent for to Mr. Wynne's to take charge of the prisoner, he was sitting in the shop, I had charge of him for offering a silver box for sale.

Q. Did he say any thing to that? - A. Not a word.

Q. Was he drunk or sober? - A. Very much in liquor, I could hardly get him before the Alderman; I searched him there, and found the remainder of the property upon him.

Q. What did he say upon that? - A. I could not get any thing out of him, he was so much intoxicated.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you ever take up a more drunken man since you have been in the office of constable? - A. I cannot say that I have.

Q. You took him before the Alderman that day? - A. Yes.

Q. What Alderman was it? - A. Brook Watson.

Q. And he would not hear the charge that day,

because he was so intolerably drunk that he could not answer a question? - A. He sent him back as soon as ever he saw him.

Q. Do you think he was in such a situation, that he was able to account for his conduct? - A. I cannot think that he was.

Q. He was sitting in a chair? - A. Yes.

Q. It was very convenient that he should sit? - A. Yes.

Q. He could not very conveniently stand? - A. No.

Q. He was so drunk, that the Alderman would not do any thing in the business till the next day? - A. Yes. (The box was deposed to by Mr. Barnes.)

Court. (To Barnes.) Q. Did you see the prisoner about your premises at all? - A. Yes, I saw him in the coffee-room on the Saturday night.

Q. And you missed it the next morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. I had seen him before.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was there a gentleman of the name of Calvert in your house that evening? - A. Yes, I understand so.

Q. It sometimes happens that persons get a little too much liquor? - A. Yes, I do myself very frequently.

Q. Did they stay a considerable time? - A. Till two o'clock.

Q. You went to bed at eleven o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. Is your waiter here? - A. Yes.

JOHN WOOD sworn. - I am waiter to Mr. Barnes; I was in the coffee-room on Saturday night, the 29th of November; the prisoner was in the coffee-room that night.

Q. Was that silver box in the coffee-room that night? - A. Yes.

Q. Till what time did you see the box there? - A. At two o'clock, the prisoner was the last man in the house; I was out on the Sunday, and I did not miss the box till the Sunday evening.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man you saw in the room? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand the landlord went to bed at eleven o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. And at two o'clock you saw this box in the room? - A. Yes.

Q. How many did the company consist of? - A. There were but seven at two o'clock

Q. Did they join companies? - A. No.

Q. Was a Mr. Calven there? - A. Yes.

Q. They drank pretty freely, did they not? - A. No, they did not.

Q. There were none of them half-and-half by two o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the prisoner drinking? - A.Bottle porter.

Q. That would not get into a man's head at all? - A. Yes, in time.

Q. In a short time, would it not? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Calvert drink porter? - A. No.

Q. What did he drink? - A. Hollands and water.

Q. Had he drank enough to have made him drunk? - A. No.

Q. I am told, drunken men play frolics with each other, now and then? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any frolics that night, such as putting things into other men's pockets? - A. No.

Q. Who was the most drunk in the room? - A. I cannot be able to say; they were nearly all alike.

Q. Did you see them out of the room? - A. Yes, every one of them.

Q. Was the last person more drunk than the others? - A. He was tipsey, but not very drunk; he could walk very well, and he could recollect and talk very well.

Q. There were no tricks at all, then, such as handkerchiefs being put into each others pockets? - A. Not to my knowledge; I never heard of such a thing.

Q. Then they were just tipsey enough to know how to walk out of the room, and not run against a post? - A.They were sober enough to know what they were about.

Q. How long had they been drinking? - A.Some of them came in at nine o'clock.

Q. What time did the prisoner come? - A. At twelve o;clock; he had been drinking below.

Q.And kept drinking till two o'clock? - A. Four of them drank four bottles of porter.

Prisoner's defence. An that I can recollect of the circumstance is, that late at night, or early in the morning, I left the company in a quarrelsome state; it might be between two and three o'clock, as high as I can recollect; the next day, failing into company with people of the same capacity as myself, at the water-side, I was drinking again, and I knew nothing of this box being in my pocket, till the latter part of the day; and how I came by it, or how I got it, I cannot tell; I had been drinking all night, and was still insensibly drunk; I was afterwards informed that I had called at Mr. Barnes's that Monday morning, and I was totally insensible till I was in the Compter.

Q.(To Barnes). Do you happen to know that the prisoner called at your house on Monday morning? - A. My brother-in-law can tell you.

BENJAMIN EGG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are brother-in-law to prosecutor? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know if the prisoner called at Mr. Barnes's house on Monday morning? - A. He did.

Q. Was he drunk at that time? - A. No; he was sober.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months in Newgate , publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-54

54. WILLIAM GRANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , a hat, value 1l. and a bonnet, value 7s. the property of John Churchill .

SARAH CHURCHILL sworn. - I am the wife of John Churchill; I live at No. 4, Goodman's-yard, in the Minories : On Wednesday, the 26th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went up stairs into my children's bed-room, up two pair of stairs, and found the prisoner behind the door; I saw him putting a bundle behind a box; I asked him what business he had there, and he said he came to enquire for James Gregory; there was no such person lived in the house; I asked him what he had put behind the box, and he said nothing.

Q. Did he attempt to go away? - A. No.

Q. Was there any body there besides yourself? - A. No; I untied the bundle, and found my husband's hat and my bonnet tied up in a handkerchief, that was not mine; I told him he had taken them out of the box; he said he had not; the bonnet was in the box, wrapped up in a handkerchief, and the hat was hanging in the room; he had taken the bonnet out of my handkerchief, and wrapped it up in his own; I know the bonnet to be mine.

Q. How did you get him secured? - A. He ran down stairs, and got away; as I was by myself, I was afraid to do any thing to him: on the Saturday after, my little boy saw him go into the Black-horse rendezvous, and by that means he was apprehended on the Sunday; I am positive the prisoner is the man.

JOHN CHURCHILL sworn. - I know this hat to be mine by the lining.

JOHN KNOX sworn. - I keep a green-grocer's shop in King-street, Tower-hill; Churchill called upon me to assist him in apprehending the prisoner; I went with him, and brought the prisoner before the Magistrate.

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I belong to the Marine office; I assisted in apprehending the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I went up stairs to enquire for one James Gregory; a boy that stood at the door told me to go up there; I did not meddle with the things. GUILTY , aged 67. - Confined twelve months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-55

55. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Catling , about the hour of eight in the night of the 24th of November , and stealing nine pounds of sugar, value 10s. the property of the said Joseph.

JOSEPH CATLING sworn - I am a grocer ; I live at No. 21, Cow-cross : On the 24th of November, I was sitting in my back room; I heard the shop-door go ajar; I leaned back in my chair, but could see nobody; presently, I saw a man slide out with something under his arm; I pursued him, and took him in Peter's-lane, about a hundred yards from the house; I brought him back to the shop; it was the prisoner at the bar; when I came into the shop, my wife had missed a loaf of sugar; a poor woman had brought the sugar in, broke in half, which she had found in the dirt; I kept it till the next morning, and then I delivered it to Lammas. ( Edward Lammas produced the sugar).

Catling. I saw him drop something, but I did not see what it was; I had the fellow loaf in the shop; I had seen them both not a minute before.

Q. How was your door fastened? - A. By a latch; I had shut it but the minute before, and in opening the latch, it gave the window a jar where I was sitting; I immediately looked round, and saw the prisoner; I never lost sight of him till I took him.

JANE MORGAN sworn. - On the 24th of November, a man past me, about fifty yards from Mr. Catling's, and dropped a loaf of sugar.

Catling. When I took him, he said he only came into the shop for half an ounce of tobacco.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the shop for some tobacco; there was nobody there, and I came out again; I ran, because it rained hard; I am as innocent as a child unborn. GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house . - Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-56

56. WILLIAM WHITAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , an iron grate, value 2s. belonging to John Drake , fixed to his dwelling-house .

JOHN DRAKE sworn. - I am a brazier ; I live in Oxford-street : On the 2d of November, I lost an iron grate from outside my house; it was over my cellar, in the street, fixed in a wooden frame: on the 3d of November, in the morning, the watchman missed it, and took the prisoner.

JOHN BANKER sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 3d of November, at five o'clock in the morning, I was calling the hour in Southmolton-street; I saw the prisoner crossing the road with something weighty upon his back; I put my candle and lantern down, and pursued him; I saw him standing by the Globe-passage; I went over to him, and asked him what he had on his back; he said nothing, but a dirty shirt; I looked down behind me, and there was a dirty shirt round the iron; then he took the dirty shirt off the iron, and ran away as hard as he could run; I sprung my rattle, and cried stop thief; I caught the prisoner myself, and took him to the watch-house; I took the shirt out of his pocket; then he said, watchman, take care of that shirt, for it is my regimental shirt; I went back to the iron in about ten minutes; I found

it where I left it; I tried the iron at Mr. Drake's, and it fits exactly. (The property produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. On the 3d of November, I was in Portland barracks; I was making the best of my way home; I stopped to make water at Southmolton-street; the watchman came up, and swore by his Maker, he would fix me; I thought he was going to strike me, and I made the best of my way from him, till I was took by another man.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-57

57. MARY SWAINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of George Smith .

GEORGE SMITH sworn. - I am a soldier in the first regiment of guards : On the 16th of November, between nine and ten o'clock, the prisoner and another woman called for a quartern of gin at Mr. Cope's house, where I was quartered; I went out to the door to cafe myself, and they came out at the same time; the prisoner at the bar stopped, and caught hold of my watch-chain, and said, my dear, will you go along with me; I made answer, no, I will not; she snatched the watch out of my pocket immediately, and put it into her left hand pocket; she went home immediately, and I followed her to where she lodged, in a parlour below stairs; it was not far off; I asked her for my watch.

Q. How do you know it was her lodging? - A. I had been with her about six weeks before.

Q. What is she? - A. A girl of the town; she would not give me the watch again; I would not go out till I had got it; she said she would not give it me, unless I would give her seven shillings; I staid there all night.

Q. How came that? - A. She had locked the door.

Q. Did you set up all night? - A. No, I went to bed.

Q. With her? - A. Yes.

Court. Pho!' It is too bad.

Jury. We are quite satisfied, my Lord.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-58

58. SAMUEL BOWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , thirty-five pounds weight of lead, value 4s. affixed to the dwelling-house of William Green .

Second Count. Charging him with stealing the same lead, as belonging to James Adams , being affixed to his house.

JAMES ADAMS sworn. - I am a pavier's labourer : On the 14th of November, I went out to clean the gutter of the house that I rent of Mr. Green, No. 1, Grotto-place, near Parrington-street ; I missed some lead, and I came in and mentioned it to a man that lodged with me in the front room, who told me, there was a man taken up, and sent to the watch-house, with some lead; I went to the watch-house, and made a report I had lost some lead, and Belts, the officer, went and sitted it in my absence; it was fastened with a hold-fast, and it was cut.

JEREMIAH HOSE sworn. - I am a watchman: About three o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner at the bar with a load of lead on his shoulder; I asked him what he had got; he said, nothing but a stick; I looked, and I saw something, and I collared him; I then sprung my rattle, and he threw the lead down, and wanted to get off; I threatened to knock him down if he offered to go; then a watchman came up to my assistance, and we took him and the lead to the watch-house; that is all I know about it.

HENRY BATES sworn. - I belong to Marybone watch-house: The prisoner at the bar was brought in with the lead, and I went and fitted the piece to the building, and it exactly fitted.

Prisoner's defence. I will take my oath I never was at the top of the house; I had been out that night watching my master's garden, and as I was coming home, I picked it up.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 38. - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-59

59. LAWRENCE CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , one silk cloak, value 20s. the property of Jane Cathery .

JANE CATHERY sworn. - My husband is a seafaring man and a carpenter: Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, on last Wednesday, at the White Hart, in Parson's-street , I lost a clock; I happened to meet with a Mrs. Coggin, an acquaintance, and we were both hungry, and we bought half-a-pound of pork-chops, and went in to broil them; I put my cloak on the settle next to the window; when I got up, I turned myself round, and the cloak was gone; who took it, I cannot tell.

ROBERT COLLIER sworn. - I was sitting in the White Hart, having a pint of beer; these two women came in with a steak; Mrs. Cathery hung her cloak on the settle, and Mrs. Coggin hung her's there also; soon afterwards, a fidler came in, and I saw the prisoner shove the cloaks through the window to somebody; I am sure I saw the prisoner take the cloaks.

Q.(To Cathery). Do you know any thing of this person? - A. I don't know any thing about the man.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from work that night; I went in to get a pint of beer, and there

was a fiddler came in, and these two women, and some sailors began dancing, and during the time they were dancing, the cloaks were taken out of the house; they sent immediately for the officer, and gave charge of me; I am seafaring man; I have no witnesses. GUILTY , aged 33. - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-60

60. CHRISTOPHER FORESHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , fourteen pounds weight of sheet copper, value 12s. the property of John Perry .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS DALTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowleys. Q. I believe you are a person employed by Messrs. Perry in their dock-yard? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar at this time in your service? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had he to serve? - A. According to his indentures, he was out of his time last May, but having a few words, he left me, and in consequence of which, he was serving his lost time; he was employed in the dock-yard of Messrs. Perry; on the 31st of October last, we had docked a ship in the afternoon; I am a corker, I ordered him, with the rest of the servants, to be down by six o'clock, for the purpose of shutting the gates upon the ship in the dock; on going from my own house to the yard, I sat down at the yard gate, and between six and seven in the evening, I saw a person come out with a great coat, trailing upon the ground, and I told the watchman to stop him; the watchman told me it was my own servant; on the watchman saying that, I called him by name, three times, he did not answer me; he attempted to run. I immediately ran after him, and took him with the copper wrapped in the inside of the coat.

Q. What kind of copper was it? - A. Sheet copper, such as is used for sheething the ships; I brought it back to the watch-house, at the yard gate; I charged him with the coat being another person's, in the yard, he positively denied it.

Court. Q. What did he say about the copper? - A. He told me he had taken it from the Albion's dock, an East-India ship. (The copper produced.)

Witness. That is the sheet I took from him.

JOHN GILBERT sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Perry, their firm is John Perry, senior, and John Perry , younger.

Q. Had you such a ship as the Albion under repair, at your docks? - A. Yes; I delivered out thirty-one sheets, one of them was missing, and another was obliged to be put in it's place.

Q. Look at that copper, and tell me whether it is that kind of copper used in sheathing ships? - A. Yes; it is what we call eight and twenty ounce; a thinner sort is sixteen ounce; that is five foot by twenty, and this is four foot two.

GUILTY , aged 21. - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-61

61. GEORGE SHIRLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , two pounds weight of flour, value 10d. three loaves of bread, value 3d. the property of Richard May .

RICHARD MAY sworn. - I am a baker , I live in St. Ann's-lane, the prisoner was a servant of mine: having suspicion that he had frequently taken things out in his pocket and hat, on the 16th of November, on a Sunday, between the hours of nine and ten o'clock, I waited his going; as soon as he got out of the door, I called him back, he refused to come back, and said, he would come presently; I went and brought him back, and I sent for a constable and searched him, and took two pounds and a half of flour out of the lining of his hat, and three threepenny loaves out of his pockets.

Court. Q. Had you a character with him when he came to you? - A. No, I had not; I was not well, and that was the reason.

- GODDARD sworn. - I am an officer; I took the things from him, the flour out of his hat, and the three loaves out of his pockets.

Prisoner's defence. The flour was not his, it was in my hat on the Saturday night.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-62

62. WILLIAM HARDING and THOMAS FOTHERGILL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , twenty-eight ounces of paint, value 15s. and a wooden cask, value 12d. the property of the United Company of Merchants of England, trading to the East-Indies .(The Case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS REED sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Mangle, ship-chandler, Wapping.

Q. Did you carry any paint on the 20th of November? - A. Yes; eighty-one kegs of ground colours, four casks of dry lamb-black, and six bundles of spunged slaves, each of those kegs weighed twenty eight pounds; I branded them all with the Company's mark upon them.

Q. Did you see them put into the cart? - A. I did.

Q. Who drove the cart away? - A. Thomas Benwell, the master of the cart.

THOMAS BENWELL sworn - I am a carman, I had goods put into my cart for the purpose of taking them to Summers's-quay, on the 20th of November; I drove the cart myself; there were eighty-one kegs of paint, four casks of lamb-black, and six bundles of spunged staves.

Q. Who did they appear to belong to? - A.

They were marked with the East-India Company's mark.

- STEVENSON sworn. - I am a rummager belonging to the East-India Company; I recollect the last witness coming with a cart to Summer's-quay, with some kegs of paint, they were unloaded in my presence; I saw the kegs upon the quay, and it was my duty to take care of them, and see there was nothing plundered; they were to be carried on board the Carnatic; I missed a keg of paint, and a person upon the quay said, the persons that took it are gone into the Queen's-head, the corner of Darkhouse-lane; I went in at one door, and they out of the other, and on searching the tap-room, I found the keg I had lost; I got assistance and took them to prison.

MOSES DAVIS sworn. - I was employed in the East-India Company's warehouse, to mark the chests of tea, on the 20th of November, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at Summer's-quay? - A.Fothergill was at work with us that day; he was employed to help the carman to unload, Harding came up to him, and spoke to him, what he said, I cannot tell; Fothergill got out of the cart, and stood along-side of the kegs; Harding took one of the kegs and rolled it up in his apron, and took it way to the public-house.

Q. Where was Fothergill at the time? - A. He was standing along-side the kegs with his face towards us, and his back to the kegs, he was standing before the other prisoner; I told him of it, but he did not take any notice of what I said; I was sent to call Mr. Lovell the foreman.

Q. Before that time, what became of Fothergill? - A. Fothergill had got into the cart again to his labour; I saw them say something to one another, and then Harding run away, and a man standing along-side, pursued him and brought him back.

Court. Q. If I understand you right, Fothergill was in the cart assisting the carman to unload, and Harding came up? - A. Yes; and Fothergill stood with his back to the kegs, and his face to us; it struck me he did it for a screen, that we might not see, and I saw the other man take up the keg, roll it up in his apron, and run away with it into the public-house.

Prisoner Harding. I really never was near the place.

Witness. I am sure he was the man, I have seen him upon the quay before.

PETER LOVELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you employed to put on board the Carnatic any goods? - A. I shipped ninety parcels.

Harding's defence. A man came and laid hold of me, and said, what have you done with the keg of of paint? I said, I had not seen any thing of the kind, I never was near the place.

Forthgill's defence. I was unloading the cart, and I got out of it to go up the gate-way to call another down.

Harding, GUILTY , aged 32.

Foghergill, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-63

63. THOMAS BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , four bushels of oats, value 20s. the property of Dexter Roberts .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

DEXTER ROBERTS sworn. - I am a cornchandler , I live in Fenchurch-street ; I ordered five quarters of oats which were contained in ten sacks; and a sack of bran to be taken to Mr. Maitland, at Woodford ; they were delivered into the care of Thomas Bell , he was my carman at that time: he set off with the load, for the purpose of delivering it to Mr. Maitland; I went before the Magistrate, at Whitechapel, and the prisoner was apprehended; I have a book of the prisoner's hand-writing, which contains an account of all his days works, and upon that day, he has charged Mr. Maitland with the whole quantity."4th of August. To Mr. Maitland, five quarters of oats, and a sack of bran."

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you present when the delivery was made in the cart? - A. I was not.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Whether you were or not, that was the prisoner's employ on that day? - A. It was.

JAMES ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you any relation to Mr. Dexter Roberts ? - A. I am his father; I got up on the 4th of August, and delivered to the prisoner ten sacks of oats and one of bran.

Q. How many quarters did these sacks contain? - A. Five quarters.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you actually present when they were delivered into the cart? - A. I was.

WILLIAM WILLOUGHBY sworn. - I am coachman to Mr. Maitland; I know the prisoner at the bar; he brought me down five quarters of oats, on the 4th of August last, and one sack of bran; there should have been ten sacks, but there were but nine.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you mean to say that there wanted another sack to make the five quarters? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon delivery of the oats, what passed between you and the prisoner at the bar? - A. I got on the cart to put the oats back, and I discovered there were only nine sacks of oats; he said he knew there was not; that he had let a person have one upon the road, but he would give me another the next time; I told him, I thought that was very wrong; he said, he would be sure to bring another; that he had let his master's customer have a sack; in consequence of that, I did not tell my master;

upon the 29th of the same month, he brought me some more oats down to Woodford-hall - five quarters more; I stood at the stable-door, and he said, coachman, I have not got the sack of oats now; I asked him why; he said, he had not brought it, and hoped I would not tell his master, as he had not done any such thing before, and that he was sorry for it.

Q. From the 4th of August, to the 29th, you never saw any thing more of the prisoner? - A.No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowys. Q. When did you inform his master of this deficiency of one sack of oats? - A. I think it was in September, when I went to claim it.

Q. The man was not charged at all till November by his own master, therefore it could not be in September? - A. I cannot charge my memory with it.

Q. Perhaps you can recollect this, that the man had the misfortune to get drunk, and had lost it, and would make it good the next time? -

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you give your information to Mr. Roberts, who had sent your corn? - A. I gave the information to Mr. Roberts the first time I came to town.

Mr. Knowlys. I submit this case is not made out at all.

Court. There are three places in which the crime may have been committed, either in the city of London, the county of Middlesex, or the county of Essex; in which place the crime has been committed, there certainly is no evidence; if you take the whole of this man's evidence together, it precludes pretty nearly the city of London; for, he says, the prisoner told him he let a friend have the oats upon the road, and therefore he leaves it completely open; if the offence was committed in Essex, we are trying a fact of which we have no jurisdiction. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-64

64. TIMTOHY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , one China plate, value 1s. 6d. a milk-pot, value 1s. a tea pot, value 1s. a tea-pot stand, value 6d. another milk-pot, value 9d. an earthen ware jug, value 1s. 6d. a glass cruet, value 1s. a glass bottle, value 1s. a glass stopper, value 1s. and two brass nossels for candlesticks, value 6d. the property of George Vandernuneberg , Andrew-John Nash , and George-Augustus Nash .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

GEORGE- AUGUSTUS NASH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Will you favour us with your firm? - A. George-Augustas Nash, George Vandernuneberg , and Andrew John Nash ; we have a shop in Cornhill; some of my warehouses are in Finch-lane.

Q. At the time you charged the prisoner with this offence, was he in your service? - A. Yes, as porter ; he had lived with me about five or six months.

Q. Had you, before this offence, missed any of your property? - A. Yes, we suspected the prisoner.

In consequence of that suspicion, what did you do? - A. The prisoner, upon the Tuesday evening, was in the act of shutting up the shop; and as we were determined, in consequence of lo sing several articles, to watch him, he did not come in so readily as I could wish, and I went out and brought him in with me, and I asked him what he had got in his pockets; I put my hand upon the outside of his pocket, and I felt something like a bread and butter plate; I then pushed him forwards towards the desk, and he took out of his pocket a China bread and butter plate, and a black milk-pot; I then asked him where he got them; he told me, in the warehouse, and that they were our property; I neither threatened him, or made any promises; we then sent for a constable, and went and searched his lodgings, and we found the other articles stated in the indictment.

Q. Were those such articles as you dealt in? - A. Yes, they were; I believe them all to be my property.

Q. Were there any particular marks about the plate you took out of his pocket? - A. It was a very remarkable one; we had had it in the house man years; it was a very old-fashioned pattern.

Cross-examined by Mr. Agar. Q. You dealt in those articles, but you cannot swear to them? - A. I am positive they are my property.

ANDREW- JOHN NASH sworn. I was present when the property was taken from the prisoner.(The property was produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 23.

One week in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-65

65. EDWARD TYLER and WILLIAM STEVENSON were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , thirty-eight pounds of iron, value 5s. the property of Aaron Hale , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

AARON HALE sworn. - I am a blacksmith , in St. Andrew by the Wardrobe Church-yard ; I know nothing of this transaction but from information.

CHARLES DANIEL sworn. - I am a smith, servant to Mr. Hale: On Tuesday morning, the 4th of November, I observed some iron behind the belows, which was an unusual place for it; on Wednesday morning it was gone, and some more placed in nearly the same spot; I informed Mr.

Hale of what I had seen, and the same evening that iron was taken out of the shop by the prisoner, Tyler.

Q. How do you know that? - A. I found the iron was gone, and James Hale and I followed him to Grub-street; when he had got into St. Paul's Church-yard, I saw him take the iron from his side, and put it upon his shoulder, and carried it along Cheapside, and when he got into Wood-street, he took it from his shoulder, and carried it in his hand; I saw him go into a house in Grub- street; he staid in the house about a minute; it appeared to be an old iron shop; the instant he came out of the shop, James Hale and I went into the shop, I demanded the iron that the man had just sold with a hairy cap on; he asked me what iron it was, and told me there had been no person there selling iron lately; I told him there had, for I had watched him in, and watched him from the shop that he had taken it from; I desired him to go after the man; he told me, he would not, I might go after him myself; I told him I would have the iron before I went out of the shop; he then went round the counter, and gave me up one piece of iron; he asked me if I could swear to it; I told him I could; I went round the counter, and there I saw the rest that had been taken from my master's shop; I told him it was my master's property; I asked him what he had given for it; he said, never mind that, you are welcome to it; I desired him to weigh it, which he did, it weighed thirty-eight pounds; I told him if he would call upon Aaron Hale , Addle-hill, Doctors'-Commons, he should be paid for it, but he never called to my knowledge; James Hale brought it away, and shewed it to Mr. Hale; he desired me to take care of it till the morning, and on Thursday morning Tyler was taken into custody, and Stevenson was taken up the day after that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. I take it you have given a very correct account of every thing that happened? - A. To the best of my knowledge.

Q. I have heard a proverb, that those that hide can find; you have heard that proverb before? - A. I have.

Q. This iron was hid behind the bellows? - A. It was placed behind the bellows.

Q.Stevenson was taken up two days after? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether he was taken up at his own house? - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of that time he might have got away if he had chose? - A. I should think so.

Q. At the time you went into the shop, was he in the shop? - A. He was in a little room behind the shop.

Q.How quick were you in pursuit of the prisoner? - A. We watched him to Stevenson's house the moment he came out of the house.

Q. You went into the shop immediately after Tyler came out? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not find him in the shop, behind the counter? - A. No, in the parlour, there-were two women there, the door was wide open.

Q. There was hardly any time for any length of conversation to take place between Tyler and Stevenson? - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect his telling you he knew nothing at all of any thing being there? - A. He did, and that there was no man there that had sold any iron lately.

Q. Did he tell you that he knew nothing of any iron being placed where you found it? - A. He could not, for he was not in the shop at the time it was stole.

Q. I understand you to say, that you believed he did not know where the iron was that Tyler had brought in? - A. No, I did not say so, I meant that I supposed the man that bought the iron did not know where it was stolen from.

Q. How many minutes might pass from the time Tyler came out till the time you went in? - A.Not a moment.

Q.And when you did go in after that moment, you found Stevenson not in the shop, but in the parlour, with two women? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there not a man in the room besides? - A. I did not see any man.

Q. Was there any thing particular that struck you in the parlour? - A. No.

Q. Did you hear any music? - A. No, he had a violin in his hand when he was taken up.

JAMES HALE sworn. - I am brother to Aaron Hale; Edward Tyler came out of my brother's shop; I followed him to Grub-street, and as he was going down Wood-street, I saw the iron upon his shoulder, and when he came into Grub-street, he went into Stevenson's house; Daniel and I stood opposite the place till he came out again, and when he came out, we entered immediately, and asked for the iron that the man had brought in; Stevenson made answer, what man? I said, the man with the hairy cap, you must know who it was; then he said, do you want this iron; I said, yes, for a particular use; Stevenson immediately went behind the the counter, and put the iron upon the counter; we desired him to weigh it, it weighed thirty-eight pounds; we told him to come to Aaron Hale the next morning, upon Addle-hill, and he should have his money for it; he said, you are welcome to take it; then I took up the iron, and brought it to Mr. Hale's house, and he desired me to keep it till the next morning, which I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.How long might it be before you went into Stevenson's after Tyler came out? - A.Not a moment.

Q.Was Stevenson in the shop when you went in? - A. Yes, at the farther part of the shop.

Q. Was he in the shop? - A. Yes; Daniel went in first.

Q. Then Daniel had called him out of the parlour before you came in? - A. I was close to him.

Q.When he was told it was your brother's property, he made no difficulty in weighing it? - A. No.

Q. And told you you were welcome to it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not say that he knew nothing about it? - A. I cannot say, he might.

Q. Did he not say, if any man had brought it into the shop, it was without his knowledge? - A. I do not know that he did mention that.

Q. Will you swear he did not? - A. I cannot say whether he did or not.

Q. He was not taken up till two days after? - A. No.

Q. And there he was found at his own house? - A. Yes.

ROBERT BUNYARD sworn. - I am constable of the Ward of Castlebaynard; I apprehended the prisoner, Tyler, on the 6th of November; I afterwards went on the 7th with Hall, the Marshalman, to take Stevenson; we took him in his own shop, in Grub-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp Q. You had a fine hunt after Stevenson all over London? - A. No, he was at home.

Q.Bless me, did you find him behind his counter? - A. Yes, (produces the iron); I received it from Mr. Aaron Hale . (The iron was deposed to by Daniel and Hale.)

Tyler's defence. I was never in an old iron shop in all my days.

Stevenson's defence. I am quite innocent of this charge; I had some friends in my parlour, and I had a siddle in my hand, and a man that I understood had been pursued came into my house, and said, oh, I see you are busy, and went out again immediately, I never got off my seat; and then two men came in immediately, and said, that iron was their master's property; they said, if I would call at their master's, he would pay me for it; I said, no, I had not bought it, and did not desire any money.

For the Prisoner Stevenson.

MARY HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of James Harris ; I was at Stevenson's house on the 5th of November; two persons came in while I was there, to enquire for some iron, I should not know them again if I was to see them, I was in the parlour adjoining the shop, sitting next to my husband, who was instructing Stevenson upon the violin.

Q.How long had you been in the parlour with Stevenson at that time? - A. As nigh as I can recollect about two hours and a half.

Q. Had Mr. Stevenson been out of that parlour within ten minutes, half an hour, or an hour? - A. He had not been out of the parlour from the time we went in till the two men came in.

Q. Must you have known it if he had been in the shop? - A. Yes; the parlour adjoins to the shop.

Q. Was the door open or shut? - A. Open.

Q. Did Mr. Stevenson go out to put any iron behind the counter, that you saw? - A. No.

Q. Did he pay for any iron that night? - A. No, not to any person, to my knowledge.

Q. Must you not have seen it, if it had taken place? - A. I must.

Q. Was there any bargain between Stevenson, and any body else, for any iron? - A.No.

Q. If there had been any bargain between the prisoner, Stevenson, and either man or woman, must you not have heard it? - A. Yes; my husband is a cabinet-maker, at No. 2, Salmon and Ball-court, I have known the prisoner, Stevenson, ever since I can remember; I never knew any thing in his character but what was right and just.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. Was there any other woman there besides yourself? - A. None but the prisoner's wife.

Q. Did any man come into the shop with any thing at all? - A. Not that I saw.

Q. Is there not glass between the shop and the parlour? - A.There is a glass sash at the door, but I do not recollect any more glass.

Q. Did you hear any body come in? - A.There was a man came in before the two men, that I did not see: he called out, holloa, governor, where are you; Stevenson replied, here I am; he then said, I see you are busy, I will leave it, and call again.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did Mr. Stevenson get off his chair, or go into the shop? - A. No. he did not, till the two men came in to demand it.

JAMES HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a cabinet-maker, No. 2, Salmon and Ball-court, Bunhill-row: On the 5th of November I was at Stevenson's house, my wife was with me, we were in the parlour adjoining the shop, when a man came in, and called out, holloa, governor, where are you?

Q. Who was there at that time? - A.Mrs. Stevenson, Mr. Stevenson, and my wife; I was teaching him the violin as far as my abilities were able; it was about a quarter past nine in the evening when the man came in; he said, holloa, governor, where are you? Stevenson said, as he sat by the fire-side, here I am, what did you want; the man said, never mind, I see you are busy now, I will leave it, and call again.

Q. Did you, or your wife, Stevenson, or his wife, go out into the shop to see what it was? - A.Not a soul, till the men came in afterwards, Ste

vensonn ever went out, nor put the violin out of his hand.

Q. Did you see what it was the man brought in, or know what it was that he said he bad put down? - A. No, I did not.

Q. What time might elapse from the time the one man went out of the shop, before the other two men came in? - A. About two minutes, as near as I can guess.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner, Stevenson? - A.Fourteen years; he has always been an honest, hard-working, industrious man.

The prisoner, Stevenson, called fourteen other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

Tyler called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. Tyler, GUILTY .

Six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Stevenson, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-66

66. ANN METCALF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , four linen sheets, value 4l. four table-cloths, value 40s. five pillow-cases, value 10s. two towels, value 5s. four napkins, value 8s. a pair of stockings, value 2s. another table-cloth, value 10s. a wooden box, value 6d. fix pounds of tobacco, value 15s. an ounce of tea, value 6d. two pounds of coffee, value 2s. three pounds of sugar, value 2s. a quart of geneva, value 2s. three pounds of tamarinds, value 7s. and fifty shillings in money, the property of John Healy , in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN HEALEY sworn. - I am a tobacconist in Bishopsgate-street; the prisoner was my servant , and had been about twelve months; David Pritchard was my errand-boy, he is about twelve or thirteen years of age; and Margaret Grant , who looked after a child of mine, is about fifteen; in consequence of information that I received, I missed the property mentioned in the indictment, (repeating it); I had the prisoner apprehended on Friday, the 31st of October; I had Pritchard and Grant taken up; we found upon the prisoner a key that opened the store-room, which was mine, also a key that opened the wardrobe where I kept my linen and clothes, and a key that opened the beanset in the dining room.

Q. Have you seen any sheets and other things since? - A. Yes, they were my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. She has lived with you about a twelvemonth? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe she had lived with your wife before you were married to her? - A. Yes, about two years, I believe.

THOMAS SARWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the constables of the City of London; I went to the house of Ann Driver, on the first of November, No. 4, Still-alley, Bishopsgate-street Without, where I found this box, (producing it;) on the 2d of November I went to one Mrs. Bowles's, No. 2, Bevis Marks, where I found this parcel of tobacco, and this box, (producing it); I apprehended the prisoner on the 31st of October; I found upon her some keys, one of which opened the box that I found at Mrs. Driver's; this key opened the store-room up two-pair of stairs, at Mr. Healey's house; and this key opened the chest of drawers in Mr. Healey's bed-room; and this opened the closet in the dining-room.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. These are very common keys? - A. Yes.

Q.And each of them will open fifty different locks? - A. Yes, I dare say they will.

ANN DRIVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Still-alley, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Pritchard and Grant? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that box; do you know that? - A. Yes; Pritchard brought it to me, I dare say, two months before the officer came to my house; the prisoner came in immediately after him; she desired I would take care of that box for her; it was a young man's things just come from Woolwich.

Q. Was it in the same state when Sapwell, the officer, took it away, that it was when you received it? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you know where this young woman lived? - A. Yes; as a neighbour.

Q. Did you ask her any questions about this box? - A.No.

Q.There it lay for two months without this young man from Woolwich coming for it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you send any message to her, or say any thing to her about the box? - A. No, I never mentioned it.

ELIZABETH BOWLES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at No. 2, Bevis Marks.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; and I know Pritchard and Grant.

Q. Look at that box; do you know that? - A. Yes; this parcel was tied to it; the boy, Pritchard, came to my house on the 28th of October, and left them with me.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar that day? - A.No.

Q. Is that the same box, and the same tobacco, that Sapwell afterwards took from your house? - A. I believe it is.

CAROLINE TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Christopher's-alley, Moorfields.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; about two or three months ago she brought me some small pieces of tobacco.

Q. Did you see any box, or lock? - A. I saw a

lock about two months ago, I believe I had it from Mr. Healey's house, I had it from the prisoner; I am not sure whether I had it from her at-Mr. Healey's house, or at my own house.

Q. What was the lock brought for? - A. To get a key to her box.

DAVID PRITCHARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How old are you? - A.Between twelve and thirteen.

Q.Have you ever learnt your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you read and write? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. I cannot say I perfectly do.

Q. Do you know if it is a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. It is a bad thing.

Q. Do you know what becomes of people after death, who do not speak the truth? - A.They go to hell. (Sworn.)

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; she lived with Mr. Healey, and I lived with Mr. Healey, and so did Margaret Grant; she and I together used to get tobacco out of the shop, and she used to send it to a young man, at Woolwich; I used to direct it for her, and carry it to Bell-yard, Gracechurch street, to go by the errand-cart, it was directed for Thomas Whalley , King's-head, Woolwich.

Q. What else? - A. We used to take money out of the till; she and I used to raise the top of the counter up, and when we had done, we put it down again.

Q. How much money do you think you took out? - A.We used to go every night constantly, and take a shilling or two; sometimes the till would be very short of money, and then we could take but little.

Q.Look at that box? - A. I carried it to Mrs. Driver some time last summer; I believe that is the box; all that she let me know about what was in it, was a pair of breeches, and two or three things of his.

Q. Who did you receive the box from? - A. From the Flower-pot, in Bishopsgate-street; I paid two pence for the warehouse-room, it had been brought from Woolwich.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Bowles? - A. Yes; I carried this small box and this parcel to Beale's-whars, for Ann Metcalt , we had got them overnight from the shop; the paper contains tobacco, what is in the box belongs to the prisoner; I had not money enough to pay at the wharf, I came back and asked Mrs. Bowles if she would let me leave them there.

Q. Do you know any thing of any sheets or table-cloths belonging to the prosecutor? - A. No.

Q.Two towels? - A. No.

Q.Stockings? - A.I have had an old pair of stockings of my master's, which the prisoner gave to me.

Q. Do you know any thing of any tea or coffee? - A. No.

Q. Any gin? - A. No.

Q.Did you carry this box out of your master's house yourself? - A. No; she carried the box as far as the top of Old Bedlam, and then I took it, and carried it down to Beale's-wharf; I carried out the tobacco under my coat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The large box never came from your master's house, but came from Woolwich to the Flower-pot? - A. Yes, from the young man that she was acquainted with.

Q. And you conveyed it from the Flower-pot to Mrs. Driver's? - A. Yes.

Q. And the small box contains of her own? - A. Yes.

Q. With respect to the tobacco you had an opportunity of taking it from the shop yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore you, having been a bad boy, we are obliged to take it upon your word, that she was concerned with you? - A. Yes.

MARGARET GRANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Healey; Pritchard and the prisoner had been down stairs to draw some beer, and I watched them, and saw them take money out of the till, they listed up the counter, and took it out.

Q. What money was it? - A. I do not think it was any thing but copper; sometimes the prisoner has been by herself, and sometimes the boy has been by himself; I had seen the prisoner taking tobacco out of the casks, and putting it into her pocket, loose, and sometimes putting it into her apron loose, and carrying paper bags from behind the counter, rolling them up, and putting them in her pocket.

Q. When did you see her take the tobacco? - A. She has had it several times; she took some the night before the boy and she went out.

Q. Do you know what she did with the tobacco? - A. She took it up into the nursery, it was shag-tobacco, and she parcelled it up; the next morning she took it down in the kitchen, and called the boy up, and she took the box; he refused to take it, because, he said, the shopman will know the box; she then said, she would take the box to the top of Old Bedlam, and he should take the tobacco; they both went down stairs together, and when she came back, she said, she had taken the box to the top of Old-Bedlam.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. As to the tobacco, when she took it, it was leaf tobacco, without any covering? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you cannot swear that any tobacco that may be produced, is the same that was taken from your master? - A. No.

Q.How old are you? - A.Fourteen.

Q.Have you learnt your catechism? - A. It is a long time ago.

Q. Do you remember the eighth commandment, thou shalt not steal? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew it was a very bad thing to steal? - A. Yes.

Q.Then you told your master of it the next day? - A. No, I did not; my master went to York, and was there three months.

Q. Did you ever tell of it before you were taken up? - A. No, I intended all along to tell my master of it.

Q.When you were taken up, you told this story about the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Mr. Healey. I know this to be my box; the tobacco I can speak to, I had such tobacco in my shop; the direction upon this parcel of tobacco I know to be the boy's hand-writing.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. It was in the power of the boy to have taken that tobacco, without any other person being concerned with him? - A.Certainly it was.

ROBERT GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman to Mr. Healey; I know this box to be his property, this direction is Prichard's hand-writing.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.That being the boy's handwriting, does not shew that any body was concerned with him? - A. No.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave her a very good character. GUILTY, aged 27, of stealing goods, to the value 39s. - Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-67

67. JOHN ROBINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , eight pigs, value 30l. the property of John Watkins

JOHN WATKINS sworn. - I live at Hounslow : On Saturday morning, the 18th of November, my man went down the yard, and found the back gates thrown off the hinges, and eight of the largest hogs gone; I sent a boy and horse to the turnpike, to hear something of them, and at Notting-hill, he heard they were gone through; I saw them on the Friday evening, and after they were missed, I saw them on Saturday evening, between nine and ten, at the Black-lion, at Bayswater; I knew them to be my pigs, there were no particular marks, they were the Berkshire breed; I gave twenty guineas for them, when poor; I had them in seed six weeks, or two months; I swear they were my pigs to the best of my knowledge; I sent them to the pork-butcher, in London, to be killed, I would not take them back again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. When you saw the prisoner, he told you how he came by them, did not he? - A. He said something.

Q. He always persevered in the same story? - A. I never heard him deviate.

Q. Did he not tell you that he had bargained for them on the road, of a person, who said he was going to London, and if he would conduct the pigs to Paddington, he would settle with him? - A. Yes he did, and that he had given him two guineas in part, and agreed to give him two guineas and a half a-piece.

Q. Did he say at what place the man had given him the pigs? - A. About half a mile back; he told us, this man, whom he had bargained with, was to meet him at the Red-lion, at Paddington, but that he was stopped, and prevented from going any further.

Q. Did he ever deviate from that story? - A. No; I asked him two or three times over, and he always told me the same story.

Court. Q. Did you go to the Red-lion at Paddington? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Don't you know that the prisoner deals in greens, poultry, and pigs? - A. I have heard of it since. I never saw him deal.

Q. I believe you said to the prisoner, it was impossible for him to have done it himself? - A. I am sure he himself never could throw the gates off the hinges, I wanted to know who they were that assisted him; I cannot think any one man could do it, and get eight such pigs out, dark as it was.

Q. Did he give you his address? - A. He mentioned it, I think, to be in Red-lion-passage; he said, he kept a green-stall and sold pigs, and collected them about the country; I never have asked about it, but I have been told of it since, that he had lived there as much as ten or eleven years.

THOMAS PEEL sworn. - I keep the Black-lion, at Bayswater; on the 15th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner asked me the way to the Edgware-road, which I directed him to; in about three quarters of an hour, this little boy asked me if I had seen eight pigs pass; the prisoner had eight pigs before him, and was leading a little poney with the bridle on his arm; the pigs were spotted; my house is ten or eleven miles from Hounslow, he was coming in a direction from Hounslow to London, many droves come that way; when the boy asked me about the pigs, I told him I had seen them about three quarters of an hour before, and asked him whether he should know them again, he said, yes; I had my horse brought out as the boy wanted some assistance, and I went with him myself; we rode about a mile from my house, where we got in sight of the pigs; I asked him, "are you sure you are right?" - yes, says the boy, they are my master's pigs; I got off my horse, and gave it the boy to hold; I then walked up the foot-path after the prisoner, and asked him where he was going with the pigs, and if they belonged to him; he told me they did not,

that he was hired by a person to drive them; I asked him if he knew the person, he told me he never saw him in his life before; I said, I was very sorry for him then, and that if he pleased, he must turn back to my house with the pigs, and I would send for the master; he behaved very civil and polite, and said, he would go any where with me, we then returned to my house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He asked you the way to the Edgware-road? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. You said, when you found the pigs in his possession, you told him you were very sorry for him? - A. I did.

Q. And though you told him you were sorry for him, he said, he was ready to go with you anywhere? - A. Yes, he did; he told me they were not his property.

Q. Have you made any enquiry about the prisoner since? - A. I have made some enquiry of the gentleman who live near him, and find he has lived in the place he described, for ten or eleven years; I never heard a disrespectful word against the prisoner.

WILLIAM MORTON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Watkins; I saw the pigs about eight o'clock on Friday night, and missed them about six o'clock in the morning; I told my master, and he sent me to enquire after them; I went and found the pigs about eight o'clock, in the Harrow-road, the prisoner was driving them; Mr. Peel took him, and I drove the pigs to his house; I sed them about two months, and there was one very remarkable, that had got no tail; they were large, fat, spotted pigs, and one was a white spotted pig, with his tail cut off.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the country last Wednesday was three weeks, to Guildford, Farnham, and round that part; there was a fair on the Thursday, so I staid there all night; I stopped along with my friend at Blackwater, till it was late in the evening, I cannot say what time it was, as I had been drinking freely; he wanted me to stop all Friday night, but I returned home from Blackwater upon a very small horse, and before I had rode eight miles, I was obliged to get down and walk, which I did, to Egham; I then fed him; and when I came on again, I met a person on horseback, and asked him what road he was going; he said, he was going near to the Magpres, on Hounslow-heath; I told him if he would not go too fast, I should be glad to accompany him; I came along with him till within two miles of the Uxbridge road, when I got off again, and led my poney; a person in a market cart overtook me, and I got into conversation with him, and as we were going along, we overtook a man with these pigs on the foot-road; I says, farmer; firs I, what have you got there; he replied, I have got a few hogs; I asked him where he was going with them; he said, I am going towards town; I asked him if they were for sale, and where he brought them from; he said, from Uxbridge; I asked him whether he was going to take them to any body particular, and he said, no; I told him if he would bring them to my house, as I dealt a little in the pig way, I would buy them, and I gave him my address; he told me he could not bring them into town, for that he was going to lodge them at the Red Lion, at Paddington; I asked him the price of them; he said, three guineas and a half a-piece; I said, I could buy good pigs for about two guineas; in the dark they appeared small; the person who was along with me held my horse, and I felt them; I told the man I would meet him at the Red Lion, at Paddington, and try if I could buy them; he said, he would as lief fell them to me there, as to meet me at the Red Lion; I agreed with him that two guineas and a half a-piece, by what I could see of them, was a very fair price; I gave him two guineas earnest, and kept helping to drive the pigs till within a mile of Bayswater, when he said he wanted to step into town, and if you will continue driving the pigs to the Red Lion, I will meet you there; I continued driving them till I came to the corner of the Black Lion, when I said, does this take me to the Edgware-road, and some person said, yes, that is the Edgware-road; I drove the pigs on as gently as foot could fall, till I was just got up to Paddington, when Mr. Peele came up to me, and said, I want you; I answered, I will go back with you, or you may go along with me; he said, no, you must come back with me; says I, I am going to lodge these pigs at the Red-lion, at Paddington, and if you will go with me you may see the man I had them of; but he said no, and we walked together to the Blacklion, at Bayswater; and when the owner of the pigs came, I gave him my address, and told him in what manner I came by them; that is all I have to say.

The prisoner called fourteen witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

Court. (To Peel.) Q. Did I understand you right, that the prisoner told you he was hired to drive them by a person? - A. Yes, my Lord, he said he was hired to drive them.

GUILTY , aged 36. - Transported for seven years .

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, on account of his good character.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-68

68. THOMAS DAWES was indicted for the wilful murder of Richard Meeking .

MATTHEW CRIPPS sworn. - On Tuesday morning, about half past ten o'clock, Meeking came with his tools to work in our shop, and about half past eleven, Mr. Dawes and another young man came into the shop; there was John Cripps (my

son) and his wife; it was a regular rule to pay a gallon of beer, for what we call stool pots, upon a new workman coming to the manufactory; Richard Meeking , John Cripps, and his wife, were new people, and when we were all together, they thought proper to have it in; I was going home to dinner, and I ordered it; when I went back, it was gone, and we had more to the amount of fourteen pots. About half past eight at night, I went to Mr. Mills's, the sign of the China ship, with my son; I saw Mr. Mills, and he said, you have got a very quarrelsome man, I think, coming to work with you, meaning Mecking, the deceased; I placed myself in the opposite side of the room, with my son, in the box; there was Mr. Dawes, Meeking, Mr. James Tyne, and Edward Jackson, all shop-mates; at this time, Meeking was challenging Edward Jackson to fight; they were all intoxicated; I heard Dawes say to Meeking, it is very odd you cannot be in company without being so quarrelsome, and always fighting; he immediately turned the discourse from Jackson to Dawes, and told Mr. Dawes that if he said any thing more, he would whip his a-e; there were a few more words passed, and they went out of doors to fight; who gave the challenge, I cannot tell; they had fought ten minutes before I went out; some people came into the room, and said, come out, and part these two men, they are all in the mud; I went out; they were both in the dark; I got a light, and the first man I saw, was Meeking; he was naked; Dawes had his cloaths on; says I, for God's sake, leave off fighting, and go in; the answer Meeking made, was, d-n my eyes, I will fight till I die; they then had three or four falls together; I did not see which struck the other; the last fall, Meeking fell backwards along with Dawes; they both fell together; when the people came to lift him up, some person called out, he has given it in, he will have no more; he was lifted upon his backside, and he was a corpse; he was carried into the house, and Mr. Dawes immediately desired a doctor might be sent for, who came in about five minutes time, and bled him, but he was dead; Dawes then said to the landlord, Mr. Mills, I deliver myself up to you, you are a headborough; before the scuffle, the prisoner behaved very quietly; I have known him eighteen years, and never saw him strike a blow in my life, and have been in his company a hundred different times, both boy and man. The whole of this quarrel was owing to the deceased, that is as true as God is in heaven, for a quarrelsome man he was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The deceased had been quarrelling with Jackson? - A. Yes.

Q. Was not the first interference of the prisoner, to prevent his beating Jackson? - A. Yes, he did every thing to avoid a quarrel.

JAMES FYNE sworn. - After having our stoolpots, we went to Mr. Mills's, the public-house, and had some beer there; Richard Meeking , the deceased, began quarrelling with me, and challenged me to fight; I told him I would not; he squared at me all the time; I then called for a pint of beer to myself, and he picked up a quarrel with Edward Jackson , and challenged him; then Mr. Mills, the publican, came, and said, if you don't be quiet, I will turn you out of doors; I persuaded Meeking, all I could, to be quiet; he went out of the box about five minutes after that, and what arose between the prisoner and him, I cannot say, but they went out of doors; I set with my back towards the door; in about ten minutes after, a man came into the house, and said, there were two shopmates fighting; I went out, and they were in the dark, both in the mud; there was nobody by to pick either up; I went and assisted Dawes, who was uppermost; being a little intoxicated, I and Dawes fell down together; a person says, pipe-maker, you are not capable of picking the man up, let me do it; I staid by near a quarter of an hour, and I saw them have several heavy falls; the deceased was stronger than the prisoner; I heard it said that the deceased would not fight any more, and Dawes went into the house; I followed him, and about three minutes after that, the deceased was brought in, and I heard the words said, they thought he was no more; immediately Dawes said, for God's sake send for a surgeon; he was sent for, and came in about five minutes; he endeavoured to bleed him, but no blood would come; I have known the prisoner these twenty four years; and from a boy to a man, I have never seen him wranglesome, fighting, or quarrelling, but always a civil young man; the deceased, whenever he had a drop of liquor, was always quarrelsome and fighting.

Court. Q. You say he squared at you? - A. Yes, he did.

CHARLES HEBRON sworn. - I am surgeon, and attended the deceased at Mr. Mills's house; I considered him to be dead; upon examining him, I found seven bruises on the chest, but one in particular on the back part of the head; a concussion from the blow on the back part of the head, I think was the cause of his death; I opened his chest, and examined it to see if he was hurt inwardly by the bruises, but he was not.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I declare I never in my life had the least malice or intention to injure the man, but always would have done any thing to serve him, as, I believe, he would me; the accident has hurt me so much, that I have been very unhappy, and can say no more.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-69

69. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for felo

niously stealing, on the 24th of November , one chest of tea, containing fifty-two pounds weight, value 20l. the property of Thomas Bryan and William Bryan .

WILLIAM BRYAN sworn. - I am a tea-dealer ; my partner is Thomas Bryan; and we live in Oxford-street, the corner of North Audley-street: On the 18th of November, we sent to the East-India warehouse for fifteen chests of tea, and when the cart came back, there were but fourteen.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD sworn. - I was sent for some tea to the East-India warehouse, and brought the load as far as Board St. Giles's, when a man said, young man, there is one of your boxes sell out of the cart; I went back to the box, and the prisoner was there with a knot on his shoulder; he helped the chest into the cart, and I wished him a good night; he went towards Holborn; I went about a hundred yards further, just opposite to St. Giles's Church, where I heard a man say, one of your boxes is fell down; I went back to the place to replace the box, and the prisoner was there again with the intention to bring it to me; he listed it up on my shoulder, and he went up into the cart to take the large chest off me, the small one did not fall out; I waited for him to take it in; I bore it almost as long as I could; there was a good-looking woman coming by, and she says, young man, you are very much put upon; yes, ma'am, says I, I be; I shall be glad if you will speak to the man to take in the chest as soon as possible, for I can hardly bear it; she said, there is no person in the cart, or near it; it was just before seven o'clock in the evening; a soldier came by, belonging to the guards, who helped me up with it, and when I got up, I found the prisoner gone, and the small chest of tea, of a particular sort, taken from between four more; the prisoner at the bar never appeared afterwards; I went home with the remainder, and my master and me examined the rope, which appeared to be cut; we never had the tea since; I went to Marlborough-street for the runners, and we went out at night to watch for him, but we never heard any thing of him there; I gave a description of the prisoner and his dress, and on Friday night he was taken up by some watchmen, and he had a drawn sword.

Prisoner's defence. All I have to say is, I am innocent of what is laid to my charge.

GUILTY , aged 26. - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-70

70. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a steel square, value i5. three pieces of iron bar, value i5. a pair of compasses, value 4d. elven screws and nuts, value 6d. a poker, value 6d. a pair of tongs, value i5. thirteen files, value 5s. an iron leaver, value 4d. a pair of hand vices, value i5. 2d. a pair of steel stocks, value 2s. four steel burnishers, value 3s. a pair of stove cheeks, value 1s.. a hammer, value 6d. a pair of steel dies, value 6d. six steel taps, value 1s. six punches, value 6d. a pair of nippers, value 6d. a pair of plyers, value 6d. three screw drivers, value 1s, ten pieces of iron wire, value 1s. thirty pounds weight of iron, value 2s. and thirty pounds weight of steel, value 2s. the property of William Bound and John Clarkson .

WILLIAM BOUND sworn. - I am a smith and iron-founder ; John Clarkson is my partner; the prisoner was in my service about two years; On the 8th of November, about nine o'clock, as the men were going to breakfast, I had information that he had some of my property concealed about him; I waited in the accompting-house, and when I saw the prisoner going out, I called to him twice; the second time he came back; I told him I suspected he had some of my property about him, and that he had been robbing me; he said he had not; I insisted upon searching him, and the constable I had provided, and myself, felt in his pocket, and found the articles in this paper, (producing it), a pair of compasses, three pieces of iron, and some nuts and screws; a steel square I found concealed in his breeches; I cannot speak to these positively, but I suppose them to be my property; we found in his lodgings the other articles; this poker is mine, and these tongs; they were made up on purpose for the use of the shop; this file I know, because it has my own private mark upon it. (Produces them).

RICHARD PEARSON sworn. - I have worked for Mr. Bound for about ten years; this hand-vice is Mr. Bound's; I know it by having frequently used it; and these stocks also. (Produces them).

GEORGE TRUSLER sworn. - I am an officer: I found the articles in the prisoner's lodgings.

Prisoner's defence. Those tools I bought of a man named John Powell; he died about four years ago.(The property was deposed to by the prosecutor).

GUILTY , aged 26. - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-71

71. ELIZABETH CHURCHILL , WINIFRED WEBLEY , and SARAH SPENCER , were indicted, the two first for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a Scotch carpet, value 12s. the property of John How , in his dwelling-house, being a lodging let by him to them , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

The prosecutor not being able to prove to whom he let the lodgings, the prisoners were All Three ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-72

72. THOMAS KAVANAGH was indicted

for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a cloth coat, value 5s. a waistcoat, value 3s. 6d. a pair of breeches, value 4s. and a pair of shoes, value 2s. the property of Robert Gibbons .

ROBERT GIBBONS sworn. - I am a coachman : On Sunday evening, I saw the prisoner coming out of the coach-house, and go behind the door; I asked him what he did there all that time; he said, he got there, that the head ostler should not see him going to sleep in one of the losts; I locked up the coach-house door, and put my coat in; I put the light out, and felt in my pocket, when I missed my handkerchief, gloves, and tobacco box; I then got a light, and went to the stable again, when I found a coat, waistcoat, a pair of breeches, a pair of overalls, and a pair of shoes, gone; it was not above half an hour after I had hung them up in the stable; I found the shoes upon him, and the handkerchief wrapped round his foot, on the Monday.(The things produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, necessity and starvation compelled me to do it; I was brought from Ireland by an American gentleman, and have no friends in this country.

GUILTY , aged 16. - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-73

73. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a cloth wrapper, value 2s. a piece of brown Irish cloth, value 2l. 18s. and a piece of printed cotton, value 1l. 5s. the property of William Sutton .

WILLIAM SUTTON sworn. - I am a carrier , and live near Biggleswade: On Saturday the 8th of November, about twelve o'clock, a young lad came and hinted to me there was such a sort of lad about, and asked me if I saw him; he desired me to be careful of the waggon, I was so, and I saw him walking down St. John's-street, and making the best of his way from the waggon, he seemed to have something concealed under his coat, I catched him, and this dropped from him, I know it to be mine.

JAMES KNAPP sworn. - I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down St. John's-street, and saw that lay at the side of the pavement. GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-74

74. JOSEPH SAVILLE , alias SACKVILLE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a pair of boots, value 35s. the property of Edward Rymer .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-75

75. CHARLES LINWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , a wicker basket, value 2s. four quartern loaves, value 6s. and two threepenny loaves, value 6d. the property of David Todd .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-76

76. THOMAS WATTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , twenty yards of swansdown cloth, value 2l. 7s. the property of William Hart .

The SHOPMAN sworn. - Mr. Hart lives at the corner of Clare-court , he is a linen-draper , and I am his shopman: On Tuesday, the 18th of November, I was standing behind the counter, a little after four o'clock, serving a customer, and a person came to the door, and said, there is a man run away with a piece of goods from the door; I jumped over the counter, and run down Drury-lane; I saw a man go into White-hart-yard; I pursued him down Swan-yard, and perceived he had something under his arm; I followed him into the Strand, and called stop thief; he turned up Catherine-street, and about the middle I overtook him with the goods under his arm; these are the goods, I know them by my own mark.

Prisoner. At the corner of Catherine-street, I saw a man running with this piece of goods, a man called stop thief, he dropped it, and I picked it up. GUILTY , aged 33. - Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-77

77. THOMAS LALLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , twenty-one pounds of rice, value 7s. the property of Robert Brown , William Cass , and George Whitfield , privately in their warehouse .(The case was opened by Mr. Pooley.)

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am a wharfinger, William Cass , and George Whitfield are my partners, our warehouse is in Wapping ; I had some rice there, and the day I was informed of the robbery, there appeared to be some missing, the quantity taken seemed to be about twenty-one, twenty-two, or twenty-three pounds, value about seven shillings.

SAMUEL WOODLEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Brown: On Monday morning, about ten o'clock, of the 17th of November, I saw the prisoner coming out of our warehouse, with a parcel of rice in a piece of hammock, and I saw him conceal it in a parcel of hemp, which was in Mr. Elliott's warehouse; it was necessary to pass through Elliott's warehouse to get to Brown's; I asked him what he had got there, he said, I have got nothing; I turned the hemp over, and found the rice, the

same as he had; I took it away in his presence, and asked him how he could be guilty of such an action; he said, what; why, says I, stealing the rice; I then went over to the warehouse opposite; I was walking underneath in the warehouse, and heard the rice rattle on the floor, and upon going up I discovered the prisoner; I then went and informed Mr. Brown; I examined the casks, and found a cask had been broke open; it was the same sort, as near as I can guess.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Was there any body in the warehouse at the time you supposed the rice to be stealing? A. NO.

Q.Does not Mr. Ellioft deal in rice? - A. I have known him have a very small quantity of East India rice, but this was Carolina rice.

Q.When was the prisoner taken into custody? - A. On Friday the 21st.

Q.How came you not to take him into custody on the spot, when you detected him? - A. I was not going to take the law in my own hands.

Q.Did he not continue in his place, and not abscond? - A. Yes; I did not see him the next day, but the day after I did, and Wednesday and Thursday, and took him up on Friday.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime charged to me.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS ELLIOTT sworn. - I have known the prisoner several years, I never heard any thing amiss of him till now.

Mr. Pooley. Q.Did you ever see rice hid under Mr. Elliott's hemp? - A.Sometimes in small quantities, but that I know very little about; Mr. Brown's people make use of most part of our warehouse; they cannot get to theirs without going through ours; I have mentioned seeing rice laying there to the apprentice.

Court (To Brown.) Q.What is Elliott's warehouse for? - A. Hemp, flax, and cordage.

Q. Mr. Elliott don't keep it for the purpose of putting rice into it? - A.Sometimes there are several casks of rice there. (The rice produced).

GUILTY, aged 34, of stealing to the value of 4s. 10d. only . - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-78

78. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , twenty-eight yards of printed calico, value 50s. the property of Joseph Jolley and Charles Lacey .

JOHN NOKES sworn. - I live with Joseph Jolley and Charles Lacey, No. 301, Holborn , they are linen-drapers : Last Friday, about half past four. I stood with my back to the door, and there were two chairs, with pieces of print on them, two or three paces in the shop; I accidentally turned my head, and saw the prisoner had them grasped in his hand, and skulking out of the shop door; I called, holloa, and he dropped the prints, and ran away, and I after him; he had got them off, and then dropped them; I pursued him, he run about ten or a dozen yard's, and then dropped into a walk; I took him back, and am confident he is the same man.

Prisoner. He took hold of me, there were two men running, and, says he to me, I believe you are one; no, says I, I am not of that description, I am a seasaring man; says he, I shall take care of you.

GEORGE LONGDEN sworn. - I took him into custody; I have seen him before; he is in the habit of being in very bad company.

GUILTY, aged 33, of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-79

79. JOHN WILLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , twenty-six yards of woollen cloth, value 11l. 1s. the property of John Talbot , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN TALBOT sworn. - I live at No. 84, Edgware-road , and am a tailor , I keep a quantity of cloth by me: On the 27th of November, about half past six, my wife told me there was somebody taking something off my cutting-board; I ran out at the door, and collared the prisoner, I saw him drop the cloth as he was running; there are twenty-six yards and a half of it, and it is worth 11l. 1s. it lay close by the door upon a board where I cut out; I left the door open to take off the smoke of the candles; when I took the prisoner, he said he was following the person who took the cloth, and that he was not guilty.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you never said, that you never saw the prisoner drop it, but somebody else near the place? - A. No.

GEORGE WRIGHT sworn. - I cannot swear to the prisoner being the man who took the cloth, but on Thursday, the 27th of November, between six and seven o'clock, I was sitting in my own shop. being a shoe-maker, and a person stopped at my door, and took hold of the latch; there was no light but what I was working by; the man could not see me in the manner I sat, till hearing the door move, I held up my head; and the person ran away, who, I supposed, was a thief; I got up, and looked through the glass, and saw another man in company, I looked as long as I could see the man; the prosecutor having nobody except himself and wife in his house, I went out of doors and looked towards his house, and saw two men at his shop door in the passage; I thought they were talking to him, which made me not pursue them close; I then saw them take this piece of cloth, and run from the door, upon which I called, stop thief, and I saw Talbot run after them; I ran after him, and overtook him, but did not go

far, because I left my own shop; I pursued them till they had dropped the cloth, which I picked up, and returned to his wife; whether Mr. Talbot took the person that took the cloth, I don't know, I cannot swear to him.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge.

Court. (To Talbot). Q. Are you sure that cloth was laying on the table? - A. I will take my oath it was; there is a private mark at the other end of it. GUILTY , Death .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-80

80. JANE CAMM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , a five-guinea piece, a two-guinea piece, two five-and-threepenny pieces, and ten guineas, the monies of Thomas Greenwood , in his dwelling-house .

Mrs. GREENWOOD sworn. - My husband and I live at Kentish Town , the prisoner was our servant of all work; I missed the property on Tuesday, the 2d of December, I saw the guineas on the Saturday before; the prisoner wished to be discharged from my service abruptly, on Tuesday, the 2d; I paid her, and she took an old leather purse from her pocket, and dropped half-a-guinea into it, and by dropping it, it seemed to drop among other gold; I had no reason to suppose that she was possessed of a great deal, and as she seemed to be in a very great hurry to get out of the house, I went up stairs into my bed-room, and opened a drawer, to see whether my money was safe; I found a number of guineas gone from the bag; the drawer was always kept locked, and I had the key in my pocket, with which I opened the drawer, and which opened as easy as ever; on taking the drawer down, I missed a number of guineas and the five-guinea-piece; I did not wait to examine any other property, but immediately set off to town after the prisoner; in James-street2, Covent-garden, I found the coachman who drove her, and he told me she took a coach and went to the Golden-cross; I went there and heard of her, that she had taken a place to go off by the Birmingham coach at seven o'clock the next morning; I went the next morning, and was sitting in a coach in the street, when she was taken up at the Golden-cross, Charing-cross; she was taken to a public-house and searched; I saw her trunk and her person searched the same day, there was nothing in the trunk belonging to me; I was desired by the officer to take her into a back room, to search her myself; I caused her to take her clothes off, and I found a bag, containing the five-guinea piece, two-guinea piece, the two five-and-threepences, two guineas and a half in gold, a half-crown piece, and a silver threepence; I cannot swear to the guineas, the five-guinea piece I can, and I think I can to the two-guinea piece and the five-and-threepences; I cannot swear to the guineas or silver.

HENRY CROCKER sworn. - I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody.

Court. (To Mrs. Greenwood.) Q.How did she carry this bag; was it sewn to her stays, or how? - A. It was not sewed at all; it dropped from her person or clothes. (The money produced).

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY Death . aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-81

81. JOHN SAVEALL, alias PALMER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , 2400 pounds of potatoes, value 7l. 4s. and twelve hempen sacks, value 12s. the property of Charles Tuck .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ROBERT OSBORN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am apprentice to Mr. Charles Tuck , at Tottenham High Cross; the prisoner was his his carter ; he is a carpenter and farmer .

Q. Does he raise vegetables for the London market? - A. Yes: On Tuesday, the 28th of October, about ten minutes before two o'clock in the morning, I delivered to the prisoner a team of three black horses, with twelve sacks of potatoes; I gave him a note for Mr. Robert Coleman, potato-salesman, in Covent-garden market, and two half-crowns to bear his expences on the road.

Court. Q. Could he read? - A. I do not know, he had been there before with notes.

Q. Mr. Coleman is your master's salesman? - A. Yes; he went away immediately in a direction for London.

Q. Did you ever know this man by the name of Palmer? - A. No.

ROBERT COLEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a factor, in Covent-garden market; I know the prisoner, he was in Mr. Charles Tuck's service.

Q. Did the prisoner, on the 28th of October, bring you any potatoes from Mr. Tuck? - A. No, I expected a load; I received a load on the 29th, with a letter.

Q. Did the load you expected on the 28th ever come to you at any time since? - A. It did not.

Q. Did you see the prisoner that day? - A. I did not.

CHARLES TUCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at Tottenham; the prisoner lived with me in the name of John Saveall.

Q. Did you ever know him by the name of Palmer? - A. Not till I apprehended him: On the 28th of October I sent twelve sacks of potatoes to London, for Mr. Robert Coleman to sell for me; in consequence of information that I received, I sent after the prisoner that day; I traced him as far as Old Ford, I could not trace him any further, it is a direct contrary road from that to Covent-garden market; I saw the cart and horses the next

day in the possession of the officers of Lambeth-street; I heard nothing of the potatoes till the 21st of November; I had information that the prisoner was at chatham barracks; I found him there as a marine, in the name of John Palmer: my brother, Thomas Tuck, was with me; when he was brought into the Serjeant-major's office, he said, he did not know any thing of me, he never saw me in his life, and he was sure I must be mistaken in the name; I told him, I hoped he would come to his recollection before morning.

Q. Did you make him any promise of favour if he would confess, or threaten him if he did not? - A. I promised him all the favour the law would give him; he told me in the morning tht he had sold the potatoes to three ostlers at Mile-end, Richard Butler , Thomas Case, and Thomas welch; I secured him, and brought him to town.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but I sold them to these three persons. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-82

82. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , eighty-four pounds of lead, value 15s. the property of Thomas Light , fixed to his dwelling house .

THOMAS LIGHT, (a blind man), sworn. - I have two houses at Paddington ; I lost a considerable quantity of lead from one of them, in which Mr. Amery, my foreman, lived; I live at Brompton, a mile off.

Q. Then it is not your dwelling-house? - A. No; Mr. John Amery lives in it with his wife and family.

JOHN AMERY sworn. - I live in this house, to superintend the repairs, it is a very large house.

Q. It was nobody's dwelling-house, then, at the time the lead was lost? - A. No; the house was repairing, for the purpose of being let out or sold.

Q. How long have you been in it? - A. Six or seven months.

Q. Whole furniture was in the house? - A. My furniture.

Q. Were there any grates in the house? - A. Yes, in almost all the rooms.

Q. Did you sleep in the house at the time the lead was stolen? - A. Yes; my wife waked me, and I heard a noise in the house; I went down without my shoes, and a sword in my hand; I called to a Mr. Garrart to come to the front part of the house; I heard three, if not more, in the house; Mr. Garrart had by that time got to the west end of the house; the prisoner, Smith, was then coming out of a window in the front of the house, the breakfast parlour window, which is about nine feet high from the ground; I holloaed to him, and told him I would blow his brains out if he stirred an inch further; then he tried to run away; Garrart was at the other end of the house behind him, I ran the other way and met him; he gave himself up, and said; there were more people in the house, that he had gone into sleep; we took him to the toll-house, where the weigh-bridge 1s, in custody, but we were so long getting him there, that when we got back the others were gone; we found the lead in a bag, and also a billhook and a saw; upon examining the house in the morning, we went to the top of the house, and saw this lead gutter taken up, it was fixed behind the chimney on the roof, the nail-holes agree exactly.(The lead and the bill-book produced.)

- GARRATT sworn. - I was called up by Mr. Emery; as soon as I came down, I saw the prisoner about half way out of the house; I went to the west end of the house, and Mr. Amery to the north end, been in to sleep, and there were people in the house, he did not know who they were, he had done no harm; we took him to the toll-house, I saw the lead sitted.

Prisoner. Q.Did I not give myself up? - A. Yes, he gave himself up; he said, he had heard some voices in the house.

Court. (To Amery.) Q.What way could he conveniently get into the house? - A. He told me he got in the way he came out; there were no sash frames in, but the shutters were nailed, and had been force; the fill of the window was much above my reach; he said, the shutters were not fastened, and he got in very easily; he said, he went to sleep in the place where the caprenters work, under the grindstone, that was the laundry, over the coach-house and stables, where we had had about three hundred weight of lead taken away the day before; I said, you know that place well, no stranger could find it out, or expect a room there; he had to go up one stairs, and down another; I found the plaisterer's ladder against the well-hole of the stair-case and out at the window.

Q.Must it have been done by more than one of them? - A. I am convinced there were more than one; the moment I gave the alarm, the prisoner came down from the two-pair of stairs where I found the lead.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the place to sleep, I did not do any harm to nobody, I am a labouring man, and was never in any trouble in my life before; I work at farmering work.

One of the Jury. (To Amery.) Q. Is it not the house where they are getting gravel? - A. Yes.

One of the Jury. I know the house perfectly well; I have rode past night and morning, and thought it was very easy for any person to get in either by pushing a board or not pushing a board.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice-Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-83

83. JAMES MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20 of December , two shillings , the property of Charles Poole .

CHARLES POOLE sworn. - The prisoner was my domestic servant , and having frequently missed money out of my waistcoat pocket between the hours of going to bed and getting up in the morning, I marked eleven pieces of silver, nine shillings, a half-crown, and a sixpence on Monday night, the first of December; on Tuesday morning I counted the money, and found but nine pieces, there were two shillings missing.

Q. Where was the waistcoat? - A. With the coat in a room adjoining the room where I slept, the door being open: I then called up the prisoner, together with John Spencer, my groom, and Mr. John Sandys, one of the surveyors; and as I could not suspect any body but the prisoner, I ordered them to search his pocket, and two shillings that I had marked were found in his waistcoat pocket; he denied they were mine; Mr. Sandys has the money.

JOHN SANDYS sworn. - I am one of the surveyors at the Hawkers and Pedlars'-office; I was called up, and saw Spencer find two shillings upon the prisoner, which Mr. Poole claimed. (Produces them.)

JOHN SPENCER sworn. - I am groom to Mr. Poole; I searched the prisoner by my master's order; I found upon him several pieces of silver, and among them, two shillings in his left hand waistcoat pocket, which Mr. Poole claimed; I delivered them to Macmanus, the officer. he delivered them to Mr. Ford, and Mr. Ford delivered them to Mr. Sandys.

Mr. Poole. These are two of the shillings that I marked.

Prisoner's defence. I hope the Court will be merciful to me. GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-84

84. JAMES LOWE and EDWARD STEVENSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , thirty pounds of lead, value 3s. belonging to Mary Exeter , fixed to her dwelling-house .

Second Count. For stealing the same lead, charging it to belong to Joseph Brown , fixed to his dwelling-house.

JOSEPH BROWN sworn. - Q. Do you know this house? - A. Yes, I rent the house of Mrs. Exeter: On Tuesday, the 18th of November, a little after eight in the morning, I received information that some man had been cutting some lead from the top of my house, and sold it at a shop opposite to me; I was close to the old iron shop door; I went in, and told them I insisted upon seeing some lead that they had just bought, and the man in the shop denied having bought any; he asked his wife it the had any, and the said, no; I told him that would not do, I would not go till I saw the lead; he then took me into a little room, where his wife was at breakfast, and said, there is the lead; he told me I might take the lead, but I told him there was an officer coming; I sent for the Police officers, and they apprehended the two prisoners as they were going up to work after breakfast; and the man belonging to the iron shop ran away, and has not since been heard of; I saw the lead fitted, and it corresponded exactly.

- TAYLOR sworn. - I was at work facing Mr. Brown's, at Mr. Flood's house: On the 18th of November, about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner, Lowe, with some lead in his arms, on Mr. Fane's house, next door to Mr. Brown's, and when they came to the party-wall, Stevenson laid hold of one end, and Lowe the other, and took it to the top of the next house and doubled it up, and put it into his apron; Lowe brought it down, and carried it over to the iron shop; Lowe went in, and Stevenson staid at the door; I went and informed Mr. Brown of it; he got an officer, and they were apprehended when they came back from breakfast; the two prisoners are the same men.

The two prisoner denied knowing any thing of it. Lowe, GUILTY , aged 32.

Stevenson, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-85

85. JAMES KITCHENER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , an umbrella, value 5s. the property of John Coventry .

JOHN COVENTRY sworn. - I am an umbrella-maker , in Oxford-street: About half past five o'clock at night of Saturday, the 15th of November, I lost an umbrella, I had it in my hand about five minutes before.

SAMUEL SHEPHERD sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Thirteen last Wednesday; I am servant to Mr. Coventry; I saw the prisoner come in and take the umbrella out of the shop; I stood in a corner, near the street door, I ran out after him, and another man knocked me down; I got up again, and holloaed out, stop thief, and this young man stopped him and brought him back to the door, his name is North.

Q.Are you sure the prisoner is the person? - A. Yes.

THOMAS NORTH sworn. - I belong to the 1st regiment of foot guards: On the 15th of November, coming down Oxford-street, I met the prisoner with the umbrella; I heard a live and cry, and I saw this little boy knocked down by another boy; the prisoner had the umbrella under his coat; I pursued him; he then unbuttoned his great coat, and slung the umbrella away towards an area; I pursued him, laid hold of him, and brought him back to Mr. Coventry's shop, and then he was

taken to the watch-house; I did not know who picked up the umbrella.

SAMUEL GLADE sworn - I live at No. 180, Oxford-road; my little girl picked up this umbrella in the area of my house, and brought it to me, she is not here; she brought it to me about half past five o'clock. (The umbrella produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY , aged 14. - Confined one year in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-86

86. EDWARD BRANNON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , a pair of worsted stockings, value 2s. the property of Stephen Neve .

ANN NEVE sworn. - I am the wife of Stephen Neve, I keep a hosier's shop: Last Wednesday, the prisoner, and another boy came in to ask for gloves and stocking; I told them, I had not any that would suit them, but I shewed them some; they would not do; the prisoner said, he would call again in a day or two; as they went out, I missed a pair of stocking; I went to the door, and called out to stop this boy, and this young man brought the prisoner back, and the stockings.

MURRELL sworn. - I saw the prisoner and another boy come out of Mrs. Neve's shop, and I stopped them; I ran after them, and just before I came up to the prisoner, I picked up a pair of stockings in the dirt; I don't know who dropped them, the other boy took another way; I found the stockings the way that the prisoner took, and I delivered them to Mrs. Neve.(The stockings produced, and deposed to by Mrs. Neve.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at al about the stockings. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18001203-87

87. JOHN FISHER and DANIEL GRANT , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , eight hundred weight of sugar, value 20l. the property of Robert Brown , William Cass , and George Whitfield , upon a certain wharf, called Dundee wharf , adjacent to the navigable River Thames , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to stolen .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Lewis Griffulke , and John Grant Griffulke .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of Solomon De Mendez .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of Abraham De Mendez .

Fifth Count. Charging it to be the property of William Lee , and Charles Banks .

Sixth Count. Charging it to be the property of John-Henry-powell Schneider .

Seventh count. Charging it to be the property of a certain person or persons to the Jurors unknown.

The indictment was stated by Mr. Watson, and the case opened by Mr. Gurney.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a Carolina merchant and wharfinger, at the Dundee wharf, Whapping, situated by the side of the River Thames, in partnership with William Cass , and George Whitfield; we had some rice and sugars on the wharf at the time of the robbery.

Q.What description of sugars had you there? - A.Havannah sugars packed in chests.

Q. Was the sugar all of one colour? - A. No; some was white, and some brown; they were both packed in chests of the same description; some people call the brown yellow.

Q. On the morning of the 17th of September, was any thing missed from your wharf? - A Yes; the whole contents of the two chests of the Havannah sugar; there might be some pounds left; in consequence of that, I got a search-warrant, to search a house that I had often heard of as a noted receiving house.

Q. Whose house was that? - A. Grant's he had two houses; I had a search-warrant for each.

Q.Where were these two houses situated? - A. In Little Hermitage-street; the outlet of Dundee-wharf is into wapping High-street; opposite that there is a narrow covered passage, leading into Hermitge-street.

Q. Is that the regular course to Little Hermitage-street? - A. No; we searched both the houses of Grant; Mr. Woodwell, the officer, with two assistants, a Mr. Hatchman, and Mr. Cooper, the King's locker; we searched e very part of the house above and below, and we were, I believe, almost coming away; the shop appeared to have been nearly clean swept, except just behind the door where the broom had escaped; I observed a few grains of sand, as I thought; I put my finger down, and perceived it to he sugar; I think I then said, it is not far off; I then discovered a hogshead of sugar, but that was of a very different sort from from what we had lost; I put my hand into it, and found some paper, we-tore the paper, and found under it, white sugar, it could no be more than a yard, or a yard and a half, from where I saw the sand, as I thought.

Q.What sugar was that? - A.As near as I could discover, the same as that which we had lost.

Q.Was it or not Havannah Sugar? - A. I cannot swear to that, it is what we call Havannah sugar; it is that kind of article that no one can swear to in my opinion; the cask was then bored, and we found another sort of sugar under the white, resembling the other sort of sugar that was lost.

Q.About what quantity was there of it? - A. I did not weigh it, nor was I present when it was weighed.

Q. With respect to that sugar, had there been any dealing for it? - A. Yes, I have paid for it since; one of them was of my own importaion, the other I had in charge for a friend, since which, I have paid for them both, twenty-five pounds and a few pence; my friend's name was Willaim Lee, and his partner, Charles Banks.

Q. Whose sugar was it before you sold it? - A. I had sold mine; it had gone though several hands, and Mr. Lee's had done the same, as I understand, and as I had received the money, I was obliged to pay it back.

Q.How much had you paid for each? - A.Thirteen pounds, thirteen shillings and fourpence for the other; I think those were the sums.

Q. The white was then dearest of course? - A. Yes; he discount and all was taken off.

Q.What is the white worth? - A.About eight-pence halfpenny.

Q. And what the yellow? - A.About six-pence half-penny, or near to seven-pence; if I had sold ten thousand pounds worth, I should not have sold it for a less price; I beg leave to correct myself, I said one of them was my own importation, I rather think it was not, for I had bought some.

Q. Do you mean that the sugar was worth that without the duty? - A. The short price without the duty.

Q.Whereabouts is the duty? - A.About four pence, as near as can be.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You stated very fairly, that it had the appearance of what you had lost, but you cannot swear to it? - A.No.

Q.And that is an article, that, in your opinion, no man can swear to the identity of? - A. Yes.

Mr. Watson. Q.Though it is impossible for any body to swear to the identity of sugar, two sorts of sugar, white and yellow were found in this hogshead? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they correspond with that which was remaining in the warehouse? - A. Yes, as well as I was able to judge.

SAMUEL WOODLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am in the service of Brown and company, at the Dundee-wharf: on the 16th of September last, I saw two chests of sugar upon the wharf that I saw the next morning plundered.

Q. Had you seen the contents before the 16th? - A. I had.

Q.Had you seen these two chests coopered? - A. I was present when they were coopered.

Q.Does the coopering of chests enable you to see the contents? - A. No, the drawing does.

Q. Did you see them drawn? - A. Yes.

Q. What sugar was it? - A. To the best of my knowledge, Havannah.

Q.Are you conversant with sugars? - A. No.

Q. Do you see a great deal? - A. Yes; I locked the warehouse on the wharf, the evening before, at six o'clock, and so did Thomas Heath , the king's locker; the chest was on the wharf, lower down, in order for shipping; the King's lock was on the outside of the wharf.

Court. Q.They were in sheds upon the wharf? - A. Yes.

Q.The sheds were not locked? - A. Yes, they were.

Q. You mean the outside gates were locked? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q.When did you go again to the wharf? - A. The next morning, about six o'clock; I missed nearly the contents of the two chests of sugar; there was a very small quantity of the yellow left, and rather more of the white.

Q. Did you endeavour to trace the sugar from the wharf to any other place? - A. Yes, I traced it up a passage that goes from facing of our wharf to Great Hermitage-street; there was sugar scattered all the way along to the end of Great Hermitage-street; I traced it quite to the corner of Little Hermitage-street, but did not trace it any further.

Q. How near was the end of that trace to the house of Grant? - A.Within five or six doors.

Q.Were you with your master and the officer when the house was searched? - A. No.

Q. Did you find any thing near the chests, from which the sugar had been missed? - A. Yes, a crow which had been left in the warehouse, in the first story, and I found a bag just within the door, on the righthand side, near the street; that bag was, the night before, at the further end of the warehouse, full of sweepings of rice; I looked at the inside of it, and found sugar in it.

Q.Was there sugar enough left for you to observe the colour of it? - A. Yes, it was whited brown, such as had been taken from the chests.

Q.Was it like the finest or the coarleft of the two? - A.Like the coarleft, or the yellow, as they call it; there was a hole in the bottom of the bag, that had Straw or hay in it to stop the hole.

Q.After your master had searched Grant's house, did you go there? - A. I did, I took the weight myself, it was seven hundred weight and ten pounds nett before, and we found it weigh twenty-four or twenty-six pounds less afterwards.

Q. How did you know what it weighed before? - A. By dedecting the tare.

Q. How did you ascertain the weight before? - A. By the King's number.

Q.Was the quantity at Grants' such as if it had been restored, would have filled, or nearly filled these two chests? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you compare those two sorts of sugar that you brought from Grant's, with the two chests that were left? - A. Yes, and they were as much alike as possible; I have not the least doubt but they were the same.

THOMAS HEATH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a King's-officer, a revenue-officer; I had the sugar under the King's lock, at the Dundee-wharf; On the 16th of September last, I left the wharf about six o'clock, at the usual hour of locking up; I locked up in company with Woodley; I saw the wharf again the next morning about six o'clock; the evening before, there was a quantity of sugars ready for shipping, on the wharf, which is covered over, the same as a warehouse; the next morning, I observed two chests, with their heads nealy beat in, they appeared to have been beat in with some instrument, a hammer, or some such thing; there was a very small quantity left in them.

Q.Did you endeavour to trace any sugar? - A. No, I did not.

Q.Did you know the weight of these two boxes the night before? - A. No, I do not take the weights, I only attend the shipping of them.

Mr. Gurney. (To Woodley.) Q.Had a person of the name of John Green been at your wharf the day before? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen him since the 17th of September? - A. Yes; I believe I saw him till the 19th, but not since to my knowledge.

Q.Was he dismissed then? - A. No, he left the wharf upon his own account.

Q.(To Brown.) Have you seen Green since the 19th of September? - A. I think the 18th was the last time I saw him; I had some suspicions, and I mentioned this robbery to him, and he ran away.

ANDREW READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I keep a public-house, opposite the Dundee-wharf; a person of the name of John Green, lodged at my house; on the 16th of September, I went to bed about half past ten o'clock, I had not seen Green that night, I was in bed when he came home.

Q.Look at the bar, and see if you know the prisoner, Fisher? - A. I have seen him; I saw him that night, just as I was going out at the bar to bed; he wished me a good night, I wished him the same; he had a glass of grog, or something of that sort; on the morning of the 17th, I went over to the wharf, and after that I traced the sugar through the passage to Hermitage-street.

Court. Q.Did you ever see Green in company with Fisher before? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How near to Grant's house did you trace it? - A.Within five doors.

Q. Did you go into the house with Mr. Brown? - A. No.

JOSEPH WOODWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am headborough of the parish of St. Paul's Shadwell; on the 17th of September, I went with Mr. Brown, with a search warrent, to search Grant's premises; in searching the premises, as we were coming out almost, in consequence of a suspicion of something that laid behind the door, I observed a hogshead with something white on the outside, it was nearly full of sugar, very brown; I put my hand down and found a paper; I removed the sugar on one side, and found the other sugar covered all over with paper, and under that was the sugar that Mr. Brown said, he believed was it; I think Grant said, what is that? I said, it is what we have been looking for; how did you come by it? he said, he knew nothing about, it was in the house before he came; Grant's wife wanted us to bore the hogshead at the bottom, to try the sample that way, but we bored it in the middle, and found it to be sugar of the quality that Mr. Brown had described; the top was white, and about the middle yellow sugar; we bored the bottom of the hogshead, and found that ot be a different sort of sugar, much coarser; I headed the hogshead up, put it in a cart, and took it to the office; it has been in the care of the locker ever since; the sugar is in the yard, here are the samples in Court. (Produces the samples of all the diffferent sorts that they found.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You went to two different houses of Grant's? - A. Yes.

Q.Which did you go to first, the grocer's shop? - A. Yes, where it was found.

Q. The other is an oil-shop? - A. Yes.

Q.Do not you know that the oil-shop was his own? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you happen to know that he married the widow at that grover's shop, about three weeks before? - A. I understood so.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Who has the samples of that which remained in the chests?

Woodley. I have. (Produces them)

Q.(To Brown.) The Havannah sugars are pretty much of these two qualities, the yellow and the white? - A. There are as many desecriptions as can be.

Q.These samples would, correspond with a great deal of the same fleet in which you made your importaion? - A.Certainly.

JOHN-JAMES BARTLETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.How old are you? - A.Sixteen, the 29th of last May; I was apprentice to Mrs, Price when she was a widow; she is now Mrs. Grant.

Q.Where did Mrs. Price live before she married Grant? - A. At No. 11, Little Hermitage-street; she carried on the business of a grocer.

Q.Where did Grant live before he married her? - A.At No. 14, in the same street; he carried on the business of an oilman and mustard-maker.

Q. When did Grant marry Mrs. Price? - A.On the 28th of August.

Q. After that, which house did he mostly reside in? - A. No. 11, Mrs. Price's; and about a fortnight before the sugar was brought, Green came down, and asked Mr. Grant what he would give for some sugar; Mr. or Mrs. Grant, I cannot say which, but Mr. Grant was by, desired me to get a scoop full of sugar, and he shewed it to Green, and said, is it as good as this; he said, yes, better; Mrs. Grant then said to Mr. Grant, we can give sixpence for it; Mr. Grant then said to Green, yes, we can give sixpence for it; Green said, very well, was that the most; he said he was in expectation of getting some, and then he would pay the money he owed in the book. On the 16th of September, I saw Green again, about seven o'clock in the evening; he came in, and told me, you will have the sugar this evening; Mr. Grant was in the parlour, and I went and told him what Green had said; he then went away; Mr. Grant then said, I think, to Mrs. Grant, he hoped it was safe; she said, she dare say it was.

Q. Was any sugar brought that night? - A. Yes, at a little past ten.

Q. Did you see any body besides Green, before it came, respecting it? - A. No.

Q. Who brought it? - A. Mr. Fisher (the prisoner) and another man, came with it; Fisher came first by himself; that was about ten minutes after ten.

Court. Q. How came you to know the time so exactly? - A. It was the time of our generally going to bed.

Q. Do you know what night of the week it was? - A. I do not know whether it was Monday, or Tuesday, or Wednesday.

Mr. Gurney. Q.What did Fisher bring it in? - A. In a bag; it was put into a hogshead in the shop.

Q.Did any conversation pass between Fisher and Grant the first time that he came? - A. Not that I heard.

Q. Did you see the hogshead that was searched by the officers? - A. Yes.

Q.Was that the hogshead? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Grant see the sugar when Fisher brought it? - A. Yes; Mr. Grant helped to put it in; he set down the weight of it before it was put into the hogshead; I weighed it in the presence of Mr. and Mrs. Grant, and Fisher.

Q. After Fisher delivered the first parcel, what did he do? - A. He went away, and came again in about a quarter of an hour; he came eight or nine times; I cannot say how many exactly; he came with a bag containing sugar each time; the other men did not bring any sugar but the last time; Green and Fisher, and two other men, came altogether.

Q.Was all the sugar that was brought. brought in bags? - A. Yes; it was not all broght in one bag.

Q. Did you take any notice of the bag? - A. Yes;

one time that Mr. Fisher came, Mr. Grant told him there was a hole in the bag, and to mind not to pull the straw out.

Court. Q.What time of his coming was that? - A.About the middle of the night, I should think; all the sugar that was brought, was put into that hogshead.

Q. How much did Grant make them amount to? - A.Five hundred weight and odd; the money came to thirteen pounds eight shillings; but Fisher had four shillings for the watchmen from Mr. Grant.

Q.When was that? - A. The second, third, or fourth time of his coming.

Q.Was there any other deduction? - A. He would not pay him the odd four shillings; he would only pay him thirteen pounds, which he gave to Fisher.

Q.How much was it a pound? - A.Sixpence a pound; then they left the house.

Q. Was Green present when the money was paid? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the Dundee Wharf before that time? - A. Yes.

Q.What time was the business finished? - A.Between twelve and one, or one and two; I do not know which it was.

Q. Do you know where Green worked? - A. Yes; at the Dundee Wharf.

Q. Did Grant know it? - A. I am not certain.

Q. In the morning before the officers came, did Grant give you any directions as to the hogshead? - A.He gave me directions that same night; he told me to put some sugar out of the drawer in at the top of it, in the hogshead, and the next morning, when he was going out, he said, put some paper betwen; he saw it afterwards, and said it would do.

Q. Was any thing said to the maid-servent the night before? - A.She was gone to the other house with a supper for Miss Grant, which is Mr. Grant's sister; Fisher was then in the shop with the sugar, the first time, and Mr. Grant desired me to call the servent, and tell her to go to bed.

Q. Was Grant taken up that day? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you stay at home that night? - A. Yes; I staid at home till Friday.

Q.Where did you go on Friday? - A. I went to Sydenham, and came home the Friday following.

Q. Did you go to Sydenham of your own accord, or by the direction of any body -

Mr. Garrow. I object to that; certainly you may ask if he was desired to go.

Witness. I was desired by Mrs. Grant.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q.You are sixteen years of age? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was Mrs. Price a widow before she married Mr. Grant? - A. It was in March, I think, that Mr. Price died; it was fifteen of sixteen months.

Q. You have lived at Mr. price's in his life-time? - A. Yes.

Q. How long ago is it since you went there first? - A. On the 17th of February.

Q. In what year? - A.1797, I believe.

Q. It was a considerable time before his death that you had gone there first? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time of his death, you did not live in the family? - A.No.

Q.How long had you lived in the family before she married Grant? - A. I was there about a month; just before Mr. Price died.

Q.And you were her apprentice? - A. Yes.

Q. Who had she to conduct her grocery business? - A.Nobody in the shop besides me; she had a partner.

Q.For how long? - A.About three months.

Q. Can you inform my Lord and the Jury, how that partnership came to be dissolved, and what brought about that dissolution? - A. I do not know what it was about.

Q. Try and recollect yourself? - A. I believe Mrs. Price's objection was, that the business would not keep two families; I do not recollect any thing else.

Q. Was there no disagreement betweeen them, in consequence of any false reports of any body from the one partner to the other? - A. No, I do not think there was.

Q. Was there never any thing of the sort suggested? - A. I do not think there was.

Q.Have you had any dealings for your mistress with Green, before she married Grant? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, as the manager of the business, transact it? - A. Mrs. Grant paid him for it, or else ordered me to pay for it.

Q. Grant had carried on the business of an oilman, and mustard manufacturer? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not understand the grocery business at all? - A. Yes; he sold most of the articles in the grocery business.

Q. That is, he had those articles marked which he was able to sell? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon Green coming and talking about selling sugar, Mrs. Grant said she could give sixpence a pound, and he repeated the observation you have stated? - A. Yes.

Q. You and Mr. Price, and Mrs. Price and Grant, were all very good friends; there was no quarrelling amongst you? - A. No; Mr. Price and Mrs. Price used to quarrel sometimes.

Q. I did not ask you any family secret of that sort; I asked you if there was any quarrel at all between them and you? - A.Not as I know of.

Q. what was the name of the first maid-servant that lived there, when you were sent about your business, in Mr. Price's life-time? - A. I do not know her name.

Q. Do you mean now to repeat it, and put your credit upon it, that Mr. Price and his wife had never had any disagreement with you, or found fault, for any real or supposed misconduct? - A. No, not as I know of; Mr. Price, when I have done some little thing or other, has spoke to me in his life-time.

Q.Nothing more than that of staying of your errands, or any thing of that sort? - A.No.

Q.Such as not getting up in a morning, or not sweeping the shop? - A. Yes.

Q.But nothing more than that? - A.Nothing of any consequence.

Q. Who was it that he turned away about the time that you left his service, for getting to bed to the maid? - A. Some young woman; I do not know her name.

Q. That is impossible; what male-servent was turned away; it could not be you, because you never had any disagreement with him of any consequence; but what male-servent did he turn away in disgrace, for getting to bed to the maid? - A.Not any body that I know of.

Q. Do you mean to give deliberately that answer? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. There was no complaint of that sort at all? - A. Yes, there was.

Q. Who was it? - A. It was me, but he did not turn any body away.

Q. I asked you just now, if any fault was found by Price and his wife with you for any greater offence than not sweeping the shop, or not getting up early enough, or staying of your errands, and you said, no; were you not reprimanded yourself, and the servant sent away, that you might not have any further connexion with her? - A.She was sent away.

Q.And you severely reprimanded? - A. I was spoke to about it.

Q.How long before this story of the sugar, was this reprimand? - A I suppose about three or four months, or four or five months, before Mrs. Price was married.

Q. Now having had time to recollect yourself, earlier in Mr. Price's life-time, was there no higher fault than staying of an errand, or not sweeping the shop; was there any female child in the family? - A.There were four children.

Q.Was there any female child? - A.One boy and three girls.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, in Mr. Price's lifetime, were you not severely reprimanded, and made the subject of great displeasure and great disagreement between you; were you not supposed to have been guilty of some misconduct towards one of these children; was not such a crime imputed to you? - A. Yes; but that was the greatest falsiry as could be.

Q.Was it a child of Mr. Price's, with whom this was supposed to have taken place? - A. Yes.

Q. A child living in his family as one of his insants? - A. Yes.

Q. Of what age might that child be? - A.Three or four.

Q. Now answer me before God and this Court, and that Jury, upon your oath did they not severely reprimand you? - A. No, it was only the servant maid told him of it, and he did not believe it, because he did not think I should be guilty of such thing.

Q. How long did you continue there after that? - A.Six or seven months, I suppose.

Q.And how came he, at last, to turn you away? - A. I went away.

Q. Of your own accord? - A. Yes.

Q.Where is that young woman, that you have been speaking of, now? - A. I do not know.

Q.Had you quite forgot the circumstance that you had ever received any reprimand, or had any disagreement, about going to bed to this maid servant? - A. You asked me if any body was turned away.

Q. You could not be turned away, because you were an apprentice, you know? - A. I was.

Q.Where have you been since you left Mrs. Grant's; you have been at Mr. Browns, have not you? - A. Yes.

Q. How often have you been examined upon this subject? - A.Twice.

Q.Twice at the office? - A. Yes.

JAMES HATCHMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a cooper: I was at the Dundee Wharf on the 17th of September; I was present at the search of Grant's house.

Q.Are you able to say what these sort of sugars were? - A. I have no doubt but they are Havannah sugars.

Q. Have you, in the course of your work at Dundee Wharf, seen such sugars? - A.Many times.

Q. Have you any reason to believe you had seen these indentical sugars before? - A. I had seen the packages, but not the contents.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a Police officer of Whitechapel: I apprehended Fisher on the 6th of November, on board a bring lying off St. Catherine's stairs.

Fisher's defence. I am quite innocent of it; I never saw Grant in my life, till I saw him in custody at Shadwell.

Grant defence. I know nothing about the concern; the hogshead was in the house before I came to it.

For Grant.

THOMAS TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am by trade a smith: I live in Church-lane.

Q.Did you at any time after the death of Price, enter into partnership with his widow? - A. Yes; an apprentice of the name of John Bartlett managed her business, before I came into partnership.

Q.How long did you continue in partnership? - A. Ten weeks, as near as I can tell.

Q. You had an opportunity at that time of observing his conduct, and forming an opinion of his character? - A. Yes; when I first entered the partnership, I found this lad had the sole management of the business, which he had had, I understood, from the time of his commencing apprentice, till that time.

Court. Q.When did you enter into partnership? - A. It was in the month of November, 1799; when I came to the place, and he found I was to be his master, he positively declared to me, he was an apprentice to Mrs. Price, and such he would remain, for he never would have a master to rule over him in those premises; I told him he must be an apprentice, that I came there to be his master; but he said, he would not be mastered by me, that he would see me out of that business by some means or other.

Mr. Garrow. Q.Are you positive that, besides these expressions, he used the other, that he would never have any master over him in those premises? - A. Yes.

Q. He has been asked here to day, upon his oath, whether he could tell how the partnership between you and his mistress came to be dissolved, and what was the cause of briging about that dissolution; he has told my Lord, and the Jury, that it was, because the business was not sufficient to support two families? - A. That has been an observation that he has often made; and he would, in a whispering way, tell me, when I have come home, that Mrs. Price had taken money out of the till, which was not accounted for, and which, I believe, not to be true.

Q.From all you have known of him, from the opportunities you have had of seeing his conduct, I ask you, whether you think he is a person, where a man's life is at stake, who may safely be believed upon his oath? - A. No.

Q. If you were a juryman, would you think yourself safe in finding a verdict upon his evidence? - A. Certainly not.

Q.Do you think him more addicted to falsehood than to truth? - A. In many respects; I cannot say in all.

Q.Do you believe you could have continued in the partnership, while he was in the house? - A. We could not agree together; for there was mischief laid between us by this boy.

Q. Was that the cause of your dissolution? - A. Yes.

Q.And must he have known it? - A. He must have known it, because, I believe, he planned it he would be master of the premises himself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Let us know a little about you: What are you by trade? - A. A smith; my father was a smith, and I was afterwards a servant to a grocer.

Q.Now you have returned to your business, as a smith, again? - A. I came from the country between sixteen and seventeen, and served my uncle fifteen months, who is a grocer, another time seven months, and another time five months.

Q. Did you return to your old business of a smith, after that? - A. Yes, in Rosemary-lane.

Q. How long were you there? - A.Two months.

Q. Do you keep a house? - A. Yes.

Q.And shop? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you sell in that shop? - A.Patten rings; that is my business principally, as a smith, and tools for patten makers.

Q. Do you deal in old iron? - A. No; no old iron at all.

Q.When you were in partnership with Mrs. Price, did you live in the house with her? - A. I did.

Q.Entirely? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there a back yard to that house? - A. Yes.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, if you ever received any sugar through that back yard? - A. I believe I have in small quantities, but not of any consequence.

Q.What sort of dealers were those who came through the back yard? - A.There has been men come with small quantities of sugar for sale.

Q.Men that are known by the name of lumpers? - A. I do not recollect any such people; to say what they were, I do not positively know.

Q. Were they sugar mechants? - A. I cannot say what they were; I believe they might be seafaring men or sailors; they might bring about a dozen or fifteen pounds; being upon my oath, I am bound to tell the truth; during the ten weeks I was there, it might happen twice or three times.

Q. You had bills of parcels with those goods, I suppose? - A. No.

Q.Does that back way lead from the river? - A.It leads into the street, not far from Hermitage-stairs.

Q. It is not fifty yards from the stairs? - A.No.

Q.How did you purchase rice? - A. I recollect purchasing some at Gravesend, and Hall's, in Mark-lane.

Q.Had you none brought to you to purchase? - A. I do not recollect that there was any.

Mr. Garrow. Q. It has been more than insinuated, that you have kept an old iron shop, and been a notorious receiver of stolen goods; I ask you, upon your oath, is that true? - A. It is not.

FRANCIS HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am a stock-jobber: I lodged in the house of Mrs. Price last March.

Q. Did you know this boy, Bartlett? - A. Yes.

Q. He has been asked here, upon his oath, whether his mistress ever reprimanded him, or found fault with him? - A. She had a just reason; I wanted him to be turned away about his business, but she did not know where to get another person to carry on the business.

Q.What was the offence? - A.Getting to bed to the servant girl, who had not been a fortnight in the house; I believe, not a week.

Q. What age was the girl? - A.About 16 or 17.

Q. I ask you whether, if you were called upon to find a verdict, as Juryman, which was to depend upon his oath, should you think it safe to trust him? - A. Certainly not.

Q.Then I need hardly ask you, in a case which affects a man's life, you would believe him? - A. No, I would not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q.Did you ever know him examined before in a Court of Justice? - A. No.

Court. Q.What is your reason for saying, you would not believe him? - A. I think him a very bad boy for getting to bed to the girl in that way.

Fisher, GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Grant, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18001203-88

88. THOMAS MARTIN was indicted for felonioulsly stealing, on the 21st of September , a plow-plane and seven bits, value 13s. a stock and thiry-two bits, value I1. 7s. five other planes, value 9s. and a square, value 2s. the property of David Duckitt .

DAVID DUCKITT sworn. - I am a carpenter ; I was at work at Woolwich ; the prisoner worked for the same master that I did: On Sunday night, the 21st of September, I believe, my tools were stolen; I saw them on Saturday night, the 20th, and on Monday, the 22d, they were gone; the prisoner did not come to work for my master after that night; I found the tools at different pawnbrokers' shops; the pawnbrokers are here; they were pledged in my name.

JOSEPH GRIFFIN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, (produces a plow-plane, a stock and a saw): there are thirty-two bits to the stock, and eight irons belonging to the plow; I cannot swear to the prisoner; they were pledged for fourteen shillings.

JOHN GUEST sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, (produces five planes and a square); they were pledged for two shillings and sixpence; I have no knowledge of the person that pledged them.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: I took charge of the prisoner; I searched his box, where he directed me, at the Baptisthead public-house, in Holborn; he was charged at the office with another offence; he told me it was his box, and gave me the key of it, but it had no key, nor any lock; in his waistcoat pocket I found two duplicates; he told me he had bought the duplicates of another person; they correspond with the duplicates now produced.

CHARLES CARPENTER swarn. - I keep the Baptisthead public-house in Holborn; Kennedy came to my house, and I saw two duplicates found; I cannot swear that these are the same; the prisoner lodged with me.

Prisoner. Q.Was I not at my lodgings the night the things were lost? - A. I cannot swear to it, but I believe he was; he came about that time; I have known him

for a great while, and always truste m as one of my own family. (The property was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought these duplicates of a person in the trade.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

London Jury, before Mr. Reco der.

Reference Number: t18001203-89

89. JOHN TURNER and THOMAS DUNN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the the 25th of October , a coat, value 15s. the property of John Wilkinson .

JOHN WILKINSON sworn. - I am a hackney coachman : On Saturday, the 25th of October, between five and six in the evening, my coach was in the rank, facing Furnival's-inn; I got off my box to go home to get a cup of tea, and put my box-coat into the coach, and drew the glasses half-way up, and when I returned, in a quarter of an hour, my box-coat was gone; I have never seen it since.

JOSEPH PHILLIPS sworn. - I am a groom to Mr. Welborn in Fetter-lane: I saw the two prisoners on the 25th of October; I saw the tallest of them, Turner, go up to the coach, and then come back to the other upon the pavement; he went round again, and took the boxcoat out of the coach, and gave it to Dunn, and he went up Leather-lane with it; I saw no more of them; I had seen them about several times before; I am sure they are the men.

Q. Was it moon-light, or lamp light, or what? - A. It was lamp-light; there was a lamp very near them; I saw their faces as they passed by me; Turner was in a blue coat, and the other in a dark brown.

Q. How long might they be taking this coat? - A. Half an hour, taking it, looking at the coach, and talking together, and one thing or other.

Q.When you saw the prisoner with the coat, why did you not lay hold of him? - A. Because I was afraid of the other that was with him.

Jury. Q. Did this transaction take half an hour? - A. Yes.

JOHN COCKBURN sworn. - I am an officer: the prisoners were delivered to me on the Tuesday following.

GEORGE TUCKER sworn. - I am an officer: I was with Cockburn.

Turner's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

Dunn's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn; this robbery was on the Saturday, and we were not taken fill the Tuesday. Both Not GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-90

90. CHARLES-HENRY BONNEIN was indicted for seditious words .

The words proved in evidence not agreeing with the words charged on the record, the defendant was ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18001203-91

91. JOHN DUNN was indicted for unlawfully receiving, on the 25th of October , a wooden chest, value 15. and eighty-six pounds weight or tea, value 20l. the property of William Basire and William Haydon , stolen by some ill-disposed person, he knowing them to have been stolen .

The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

MATTHEW DALTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an excise officer: On the 24th of October, I surveyed the stock of Messrs. Basire and Haydon, and found a deficiency of 181 pounds of black tea.

Q. How many chests would that amount to? - A. About a couple of chests; they run-about ninety pounds each.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You only know from your book? - A. Yes; I know from my memory.

Q. You do not know from memory what there was when you surveyed before? - A. No.

Q. Is your book here? - A.No.

HUGH HUGHES sworn. - I am servant to William Basire and William Haydon: I took stock on the 9th of October; there was not then any deficiency; we had a porter of the name of William Brady; he was discharged on Saturday previous to the 24th of October; there was no stock taken between the 9th and 24th; there was then deficient one chest of congou tea, and one chest of fouchong tea. On Monday, the 27th of October, I saw a chest of tea at the Mansion-house, the property of Messrs. Basire and Haydon.

Q. Can you say that it was in your warehouse on the 9th of October? - A. No, I cannot, but there was no deficiency upon that day, (the chest produced); here is a mark of my making with a marking-brush, "13," on the 26th or 27th of March last, that signifies the 13th break.

Q. Can you say whether any of that break was sold by your master? - A. Not one single chest; we have made all the enquiries we could after Brady, but have not been able to find him.

Cross-examined by Mr Alley. Q.I suppose you know what the stock is, from what the surveyor tells you? - A. I always take stock with the surveyor.

Q. I take it, when the surveyor came, you did not know the exact number of chests then in the warehouse? A. No.

Q.Your master has sold a great number of chests since the month of March last? - A. Yes, but not of that break.

Q. Is it not by comparing the entries on time with abother, that you find there is any tea missing? - A. I could not ascertain that any tea was missing till I took the stock.

Q. Then it is by comparison with the book? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Then I trust your Lordship will strike this evidence out, as not being the best that the nature of the case affords.

Court. Certainly not.

Court. Q.Are you sure, without examining any books, that there was any tea missing? - A. Yes.

THOMAS PARSONS sworn. - Examined by Mr Knowlys. I keep the Rummer on Old Fish-street-hill: On the Sunday before the loss of the tea was discovered, the prisoner came to my house, and desired me, if any person should call to enquire for a man of the name of Brady, who had come to my house that morning before - he had hurt his leg, and was brought to my house in a coach - to send him over to his house, No. 9, Labour-in-vain-court; in the afternoon I saw the prisoner go out in a coach; on Monday and Tuesday I met them again walking together; at that time I did not know that he was discharged from Mr. Haydon's service.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.All that you know is, that the prisoner desired you, if any body came to enquire for Brady, to send them to his house? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM CANNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowly. I am under-marshal of the City of London: On Friday the 25th of October, in consequence of an anonymous letter that I received, I made search after a man of the name of Brady, but have not been able to find him; on Saturday the 25th of October, a little before one, I went to the prisoner's house, No. I, Labour-in-vain-court, Old Fish-street-hill; I knocked at the door, and the prisoner came himself, and I asked him if his name was Dunn, which he denied, but finding a change in his countenance, I pushed him into the room on the ground-floor, and again challenged him, he acknowledged his name was Dunn; I then told him I had received information that morning, that he was a common receiver of stolen goods, and that I was come to search his lodgings, he has the apartment on the ground-floor, he said he had no other; the landlady came down and in his presence acknowledged the same; there was no appearance of any business; he prosessed to be a working plumber and glazier; I had Read the officer with me, we found this chest of tea under the head of the bed; I asked him how he came by it, and where was the permit for it; he said, he had no permit, he bought it of a stranger by Queenhithe; I asked him who the man was; he said, he knew nothing of him; the chest is full of tea, the head of the chest I found at the fire side, to burn; I then took the tea in a coach to the Mansion-house, and he was examined and committed.

Q.(To Hughes.) Q. What is the weight? - A. One hundred and eleven pounds weight gross, the care is twenty-four pounds.

Q. Do you believe that to be the tea of that break? - A. I believe it is.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean to say that there is no other tea like that furnished to your master? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear to tea? - A. I believe it to be the same.

Ove of the Jury. Q. The exciseman takes stock every fourteen days? - A. Yes.

Q. The officer may make a mistake in taking the stock? - A. Yes.

Q. And, if there is a decrease, they cut off your credit? - A. It is deducted.

Q. Do you take stock with the officer? - A. Yes.

Q.What do you do with those chests after the tea is taken out? - A.We pack the chests up and send goods into the country.

Q. Do you never sell them? - A. Yes.

Q. Does it appear to be packed as originally it was packed in China? - A I believe it is.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY . Confined one year in Newgate , and publicly whipped on Queenhither .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-92

92. WINIFRED BRYAN, alias DUNN , was indicted for conveying into the prison of the Poultry Compter, a rope and a spring saw, for the purpose of effecting the escape of John Dunn .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Vaillant, and the tase by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN TEAGUE sworn - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am keeper of the Poultry Compter , (Produces the warrant of commitment of John Dunn ;) it is the handwriting of the late Lord Mayor, Harvey-Christian Combe; I received John Dunn , on the 7th of November, under this warrant.

Mr. Alley. Q.Have you got your appointment? - A. No, I was appointed by an order of Common-council.(Mr. Alley contended that it was necessary he should prodace his appointment, which was over-ruled by the Court.)(The warrant read.)

Teague. On the 2st of November, in consequence of information, I gave directions, that every body who came to enquire after Dunn, should be searched, I was called down into the office to see the prisoner searched; Baldwin, Lee, and Alderman were present; there was a man who came along with her, he was searched, he had nothing about him. but upon her was sound a small coil of rope, and a spring saw, (produces them;) she was asked about them, but would not say who they were for; she said, she was ordered to bring them there, but denied who they were for; a Bank-note of thirty pounds, and a sixpence, were also found upon her; she said her name was Winisred Bryan, and she was servant to Mr. Dunn.

Q. Would such a rope as that facilitate the escape of a person out of prison? - A Certainly it would.

Gross-examined by Mr. Alley. As to this prison, I do not know the situation of it, these things did not find their way into the prison, but into the lobby? - A. No, they never went inside the prison at all; she was stopped in the lobby.

Q. Before the got into the house at all? - A. Yes, in the passage, just within the first door.

Mr. Vaillant. Q. When you go out from the Poultry, you go through some gates to a passage? - A. Yes.

Q. Before you get to the absolute gate of extreme consinement, there is another gate? - A. Yes.

A little further is the lobby, within the second, and then there is a third? - A. Yes.

Q. At night the lobby is inclosed within the general sence of the prison? - A. Yes.

Court. The lobby is a part of the jail.

SAMUEL LEE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the under keepers of the Poultry-Compter; on the 21st of November; I saw the prisoner walk up the court to come to the prison, she came to see her husband, the man who was tried last; she said, she wanted to go to her husband, Dunn; just as she was coming into the lobby, I stopped her there, and told her, my master wanted to speak to her, and I sent for my master.

Q. Did you know of her bringing any instruments, or give her leave to do so? - A.No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley, Q. This lobby is before you come to the jail? - A Yes.

Q. You stopped her before she got to the prison? - A. Yes.

REUBEN BALDWIN sworn, - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am head under keeper of the Poultry Compter; on Friday the 21st of November, I received some information, which I communicated to the keeper, in consequence of which, he gave directions that if any person came to the gate to enquire for Dunn, to stop them, and

call them in; I was called out at the gate, and saw the prisoner and a man standing by the side of her; I asked her if she wanted Dunn, she said, she did; I desired her to walk into the lobby with me, which she did, and the man followed her; I asked her if she had any thing about her, she said, no, she had not; I desired her to take off her cloak, that I might search her; she then turned from me, and went to the other gate, but it was shut; I desired her to come into the lobby again, which she did, and pulled off her cloak; I searched her, and in her left-hand pocket, I found this coil of rope, it is more than eighteen yards, and in her right-hand pocket, I found this spring saw; I asked her how she, came by them, and, to the best of my recollection, she said, Dunn ordered her to bring them to him; she did not say for what purpose; I asked her, if she was the wife of Dunn she said, no, she was only his maid; while I was speaking to her, I saw her put her hand into her bosom, I supposed she had some other instrument about her, but there was not; she was then sent to Giltspur-street Compter.

Q. Look at that saw, and tell me what use that may be put to? - A. I think this saw sufficient to cut any bar that we had asunder, in a very short time; this rope would be sufficient to let any one down from any part of our prison to the ground.

Q. Were these things brought to the jail with your consent and permission? - A. No; the next day she came before the Lord Mayor, and said her name was Winifred Bryan , and was not the wife of Dunn.

EDWARD ALDERMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I saw these things found.

Q. Did you give the prisoner any permission to bring these things in? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. A ley. Q. Is young Mr. Teague here? - A. No; the prison would have been left alone else.

Mr. Know'ys. Q. Is he one of the under keeper? - A. No.

Q.(To Teague.) Is your son an under keeper? - A. No.

(Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant.)

GUILTY . confined one week in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-93

93. ISRAEL SAUNDERS was indicted for unlawfully entering the dwelling-house of Nathan Nelson , about the hour of three, in the night of the 5th of October , with intent to steal .

The Prosecutor not appearing, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18001203-94

94. JESSE HILLIAR was indicted for seditious words .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Vaillant, and the case Fy Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN TANNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant I keep the Golden-lion in Fore-street, Cripplegate : On the 17th of October , the prisoner and Bonnein, and Pearson, were all at my house together, about eight o'clock in the morning; the conversation turned upon the Aldermen and Common Counsel presenting a petition to his Majesty; Bonnein, who was acquitted last night, d- d the Lord-Mayor, Alderman, and Common Council, and the King and Parliament; to which Hillier said, so say I, d-n the King and, the Parliament; at which Pearson, asked Bonnein, if a foreign enemy were to land in the country whether he would join them; Bonnein's reply was, d-n his eyes and limbs if he would no; Hilliar seemed rather shocked at that, and said, no, he would not do that; Bonnein was, very drunk, Hilliar had been one of the watchmen, that had had Bonnein in costody over night for a riot in the street, and Pearson, was on of the watchmen.

Court. Q.what kind of a man is he? - A. I do not know.

SAMUEL PEARSON sworn. - I know no more than what Tanner has said; Hillair said he would not join a foreign enemy; I did not perceive that he was very much intoxicated, but I have heard since that he was for he had been drinking gin, and I cannot tell what.

GEORGE BROOKES sworn. - I was sent for to Mr. Tanner's and there was Bonnein and Hilliar there: Tanner gave me charge of them; they were both in as great a state of intoxication as ever I saw men.

Court. Gentlement of the Jury, intoxication is certainly no defence; but if you think that this was a drunken conversation, they not knowing what they said, you will acquit the defendant; but if you think this man was of a wicked disposition, and wishing to overturn the Government, to be sure you will find him guilty.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury before, Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: o18001203-1

Mr. JUSTICE GROSE delivered the OPINION of the JUDGES, on the CASE of GEORGE THOMAS , as follows:

This prisoner was tried in September Sessions on an indictment, charging him, in the first Count, with uttering and publishing as true, certain, false, forged and counterfeited acquittances for many, (fating them), with intent to defraud our Lord the King, the said George Thomas well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterseit. The second Count charged the prisoner with uttering one of the said acquittances with the same intention; and the third, with forging the same, with the like intention.

The prisoner's Counsel applied to the Court, that the Counsel for the prosecution should state on which Count of the indictment he would proceed, and that he might be restricted from going upon any other, that the prisoner might not be put to answer several distinct offences; but the Court refused the application, as the indictment charged the uttering of all the receipts. The trial accordingly proceeded, and it was proved by very clear and satisfactory evidence, that the prisoner had uttered all the receipts at one and the same time, by delivering them to the solicitor for the Navy Board, as vouchers, to verify the accounts of one Collinridge, who was then deceased, which the prisoner had undertaken to settle. Upon this objection, I think the learned Judge acted rightly in resufing the application - of that opinion are the other Judges; in truth, the evidence justified what the learned Judge supposed would necessarily follow.

It was also objected on the part of the prisoner, that forging, or uttering, knowing to be forged, the receipts

in question, was not under the circumstances of this case, an offence within the true meaning of 2 Geo II. chap. 25. sect. I. inasmuch as the acquittances for money purported to be receipts given to Mr. Collinridge, by workmen employed under him for the Navy Board, for work done, and materials found about that business; and it was urged that the Navy Board had not any concern with the workmen employed under them It is material, in considering this objection, to read the words of the statute, 2 Geo. II . chap. 25. sect. I."If any person shall falsely make, forge, or counterfeit, or cause or procure to be falsely made, forged, or counterfeited, or willingly act or assist in the false making, forging, or counterfeiting any deed, will, testament, bond, writing, obligatory bill of exchange, or promissory note for payment of money, endorsement, or assignment of any bill of exchange or promissory note for payment of money, or any acquittance or receipt, either for money or goods, with intention to defraud any person whatsoever; or shall utter or publish, as true, any false, forged, or counterfeited deed, will, testament, bond, writing, obligatory bill of exchange, promissory note for payment of money, acquittance or receipt, either for money or goods, with intention to defraud any person, knowing the same to be false, forged, or counterfeited, then every such person being thereof lawfully convicted, according to the due course of law, shall be deemed guilty of felony, and suffer death, as a felon, without Benefit of Clergy." A subsequent statute, 31 Geo. II . chap. 22. sect. 17, extends the punishment to the same offences, with intention to defraud any Corporation. The facts, in the case, prove the forgery of receipts, supposed to be given for money for work done for the Commissioners of the Navy Board, that is, for the King, by persons employed by one Collinridge, and for which these would have been vouchers, and would have entitled him to an acquittance from the Navy Board, because the money had not been paid by Mr. Collinridge, and was not, therefore, due from the King to his representatives. These, then, are forged acquittances, published to defraud the King, and the facts prove, and the Jury have found the prisoner guilty of uttering them, knowing them to be forged; the Judges are, therefore, of opinion, that the indictment states, and the facts prove the case as charged, founded upon that statute.


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