Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th September 1800.
Reference Number: 18000917
Reference Number: f18000917-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 17th of SEPTEMBER, 1800, and following Days, BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , ESQ. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons. 1800.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM, Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir SIMON LE BLANC, Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of of King's Bench; Sir ALLEN CHAMBRE , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common-Pleas; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Robert Finch ,

Thomas Baldwin ,

Thomas Harding ,

Benjamin Farrow ,

Daniel Russell ,

James Bird ,

William Bulle ,

Thomas Neighbour ,

Thomas Brown ,

John Pendered ,

William Marks ,

William Briggs .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Fisher ,

Thomas Williment ,

Thomas Clarke ,

John Fisher ,

John Barton ,

George Morse ,

William Stevens ,

John Cook ,

Samuel Cliffe ,

Richard Garrett ,

Tycho Thomas ,

William Senior .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Jonathan Horton ,

Thomas Shingler ,

William Dickins ,

Thomas Hearn ,

William Rothwell ,

James Rose ,

John Rhodes ,

John Morris ,

Henry Slack ,

Henry Cooper ,

Richard Cropland ,

James Milne ,

Richard Peachey .

Reference Number: t18000917-1

588. PHOEBE TUNSTALL was indicted for that she, on the 26th of July , one piece of base coin, resembling the current coin of this realm, called a shilling, did falsely and traiterously colour with materials producing the colour of silver .

Second Count. For that she, on the same day, one round blank of base metal, of a fit size and figure to be counterfeited into good and current milled money resembling a shilling, falsely and traiterously did colour with materials producing the colour of silver.

And in two other Counts, for colouring a sixpence.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Poaley, and the case opened by Mr. Fielding).

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. On Monday the 28th of July, about twelve o'clock at noon, I went, in company with Ray, Ferris, and a woman of the name of Lack, to No. 2, Ebenezer-court, Cherry-tree-alley, in the parish of St. Luke's ; the door was open, the prisoner was sitting in the lower room feeding her child; I acquainted her that I had a warrant to search the house, and she and I, and Ray, went up into the one pair of stairs, leaving Ferris below.

Q. Did Lack make her appearance when you first went into the house? - A. Yes; but, I believe, not so soon as I did; up one pair of stairs hung this bed-gown, with this dirty appearance that it has now, (producing it ); in the chimney corner, where there was no stove, lay this piece of linen, it was then very wet, and the liquid had drained upon the hearth, it appeared to have been used with aqua-fortis, or nitre-fortis and salt; Ray then being in the room with Mrs. Tunstall, I desired him to search her person; I heard Ray say, have you any thing about you; nothing, she said; she was searched, and I saw, I think, twenty-six counterfeit shillings, and eighteen counterfeit sixpences, taken from her, they were in a bag; I was then called down by Ferris, I went down, and some counterfeit blanks, not finished, were produced to me by Ferris, which he has got; I was then called into the room over the one pair of stairs, which had a sky-light, which went out of the bed-chamber, and there I saw a bench, (producing the top of it), and a box containing other things, which Ray has got; then we brought her and the things away; we had Lack with us.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not find any thing but what you have produced? - A. No.

Q. There was no aqua-fortis found? - A. No.

Q. Neither by you or any of the other officers? - A. No.

Q. This place, where you found the gown, was in a room where Lack had access? - A. Yes; She said she and the prisoner laid together.

Q. Do you know what Lack's father is? - A. A porter.

Q. Was he ever taken up? - A. Yes, for having bad money upon him; but was discharged.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I was with Armstrong and Ferris; we left Ferris at the bottom of the house, and I went up stairs with Armstrong; I asked Mrs. Tunstall if she had got any thing about her; she said, no, she had not; she was very willing to let me search one pocket, and then she turned her side to the wall, and said there was nothing in that pocket; I then put my hand into her pocket and pulled out this bag, containing twenty-six shillings and eighteen sixpences, (produces a paper bag); they were then in a sit state for circulation; I then went up into the two pair of stairs room, above the sleeping room, where I found this bench, and this box, containing corks, scowering-paper, and files; on the bench laid this file, and this cork, and a pair of pliers.

Q. Are those ingredients necessary to carry on this business? - A. I have not a doubt of it; these two punches I found, which correspond with the impression upon the shillings. (Produces them).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you say you found every thing necessary to carry on the business, you do not mean to say that without the assistance of aqua-fortis? - A. No.

Q. Did you find any bottle of aqua-fortis? - A. No; we found a bottle that seemed to have had some in it.

RICHARD FERRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I was with Armstrong and Ray: Mrs. Tunstall was sitting in the room below; I found, in a place behind where she sat, one hundred and ten blanks, of composition-metal, of the size of shillings, and one hundred and twenty of the size of sixpences, some file-dust, bran, raspings of bread, which are used for finishing, and a pair of pliers; and in the cupboard was this pot of blacking.

Q. Did you find any vial? - A. There was a vial in the cupboard, but it had nothing in it.

JANE LACK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. The prisoner at the bar was my mistress, I lived with her seven weeks; when I first went to live with her she lived in a lodging in Lamb's-buildings, near Blackfriars-bridge.

Q. Be sure you speak nothing but the truth; what was her conduct in the house? - A. After she had moved into the house, on the Thursday, she went to work in the top lost.

Q. What sort of work? - A. The round blanks that she had from the mill, with a file, a pair of pincers, a pair of nippers, corks, scowering-paper, and a pair of scissars.

Q. Did you see her frequently at work? - A. Yes; three times a week, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, and always of a Saturday; on the Sunday she went to see her child at Wimbledon, and I went with her to carry the child, and she paid the coachman all in bad money.

Q. Have you and the prisoner had any quarrel? - A. Yes; she turned me out at twelve o'clock at night; I told her it would be the worst day's work she ever did; I was sent out to get some nitre-fortis, and broke the bottle over my hands, I had my hands in a terrible condition with it; I was turned out of doors on Sunday night, and I gave information the next day.

Q.(To Ray.) Did you find the things correspondent with what the girl had told you? - A. Yes.

Lack. - Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where did you live before you came to live with the prisoner? - A. I had been six months in the hospital.

Q. You don't mean the House of Correction? - A. No, Bartholomew's Hospital.

Q. I suppose you never was in the House of Correction? - A. I was three weeks in the House of Correction, concerning having a child.

Q. Do you mean to say you have never been sent to prison for any offence in your life? - A. Never in my life.

Q. Nor before a Justice? - A. No; never but when I went to swear my child.

Q. You went occasionally to visit your father and mother? - A. Yes; when I went out of an errand.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, did you not give this parcel to the prisoner, and beg her to keep it for you till you had an opportunity of carrying it to your father? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Your father was himself taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. How long is it since you had a sight of your father's house? - A. Seven or eight weeks since.

Q. Did you not live at your father's house immediately preceding the time of your going to the prisoner's? - A. No; I went to my sister's on the Monday, and staid till the Saturday, and then I went to live with the prisoner.

Q. The prisoner then went to Wimbledon? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your return, did it happen to you to ask her for a new gown? - A. No.

Q. You have told us that she passed bad money to the coachman? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were honest enough, knowing it to be bad, to let her defraud the poor coachman? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not go to the Magistrate to give him information of it before you found it was high treason? - A. I never had an opportunity.

Q. You don't mean to swear that - did you never go out? - A. I went out for the stuff.

Q. Had you never been to your father's? - A. Yes; but that was at a distance from Worship-street.

Q. Upon your oath, do you not know that there is a reward of forty pounds upon the conviction of that woman for high treason? - A. I did not know it.

Q. Nor do you now know it? - A. Now you tell me I do.

Q. Not before? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Esther Granger? - A. No.

Q. Have you never said to any person that you would do for the prisoner if it was only for the reward? - A. I can safely swear I never did say any such thing.

RICHARD FRANKLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am one of the moniers of the Mint.

Q. Look at those shillings and sixpences? - A. They are all counterfeit.

Q. Are they in a state now fit for circulation? - A. Undoubtedly.

Prisoner's defence. What I had in my house Mr. Lack left with me, and told me he expected the officers to search his house, and he would fetch them away again on the Monday.

GUILTY DEATH . (Aged 35.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-2

589. CORNELIUS-FREDERICK HOLT was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 5th of April , a Bank-note for the payment of 10l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For that he, having in his custody a like Bank-note for the payment of 10l. did dispose of the same as and for a good Bank-note, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third and Fourth Counts. For forging and uttering as true, knowing it to be forged, a promissory-note for the payment of 10l. with the like intention.

And in four other Counts, for feloniously forging and uttering, knowing to be forged, a like note, with intention to defraud William Packer .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Giles, and the case opened by Mr. Garrow).

WILLIAM PACKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a tailor , in Chambers-street, Goodmans-fields : On the 28th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought me a ten-pound note; I received of him five pounds one

shilling, I gave him four pounds nineteen shillings, I think, in half-guineas, and seven-shillings-pieces; it was a running account between us, he paid for his clothes by instalments; he tendered me the note in a back room, in the presence of my wife, and my niece, Elizabeth Elliott ; as he went out, I held the note in my right-hand, and delivered it to my niece; I did not take any particular notice of it so as to know it again, but the note I received from him I gave to my niece.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you always been of that opinion with respect to the nature of the transaction? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure you never put it into the drawer? - A. No; I never parted with it out of my hand till I gave it my niece.

Q. Had you no suspicion of it at the time? - A. No.

Q. Nor would not know the note again? - A.No.

ELIZABETH ELLIOTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the niece of the last witness: On the 28th of March, the prisoner came to my uncle's house, I did not know him before; I received a ten-pound Bank-note from my uncle, and took it to Mr. Crutchley's, a draper; I left in Mr. Crutchley's hands.

- CRUTCHLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Do you remember the last witness bringing a Bank-note to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that note? - A. This is the same; I put Mr. Packer's name upon it; I can positively swear that it is the same. (The note read).

NATHANIEL LOARING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am clerk to the Solicitor for the Bank: In consequence of information, on the 4th of April, I apprehended the prisoner at a house in Bowling-green-lane, Clerkenwell; a young woman was apprehended with him with whom he lived, and who passed by his name.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner as to the place of his residence before that time? - A. I had.

Q. Did he inform you that he had any residence in White Lion-street? - A. He certainly did not; he mentioned several other places but not that.

Q. Did you take him into custody at that time? - A. I did not.

Q. Upon what condition did you suffer the prisoner to go at large? - A. Upon condition that he would be at his lodging in Bowling-green-lane at nine o'clock, when I was to call to make some inquiries; I went at the time appointed, but he was out.

Q. Did you, after that, use any means to find the prisoner at the bar before he was apprehended? - A. I did; dilligent means were made use of.

Q. How long was it before the prisoner was again apprehended? - A. On the 28th of April, I was present; he was found in a back room, a bedroom, at the house of a person of the name of Gibbs, in Banner-street.

Q. Did you, at any time, go to the house of a Mrs. Painter, in White Lion-street? - A. Yes, on the 5th of April, where I found this, (producing a pot containing a composition); it produces exactly the same appearance as the water-mark upon a Banknote; and here are some papers upon which it was tried in my presence, (produces them); the ingredient is warmed over a candle in order to produce the appearance, I have also tried it myself.

Q. You are quite certain the prisoner had not communicated to you any thing respecting the house in White Lion-street? - A. Certainly not, for I found it out by accident the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner upon the 5th of April - Did any conversation take place with respect to the note offered to Mr. Packer? - A.Certainly not.

Q. Therefore the conversation was not at all upon the subject of this indictment? - A. Certainly not.

Mr. Garrow. Q. But the inquiry was directed as to where his residence had been, and was at that time? - A. Yes.

THOMAS BLISS sworn. - I am an Inspector of Bank-notes. I have been many years in the habit of examining Bank-notes to see if they were forged.

Q. Look at that note? - A. This is a forged note, clearly so, as to the paper, and manner of the imitation of the engraving, and the imitation of the cashier's name; it is in every respect a forgery.

Q. Is that the genuine water-mark? - A. It is not.

ANN PAINTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I live at No. 92, White Lion-street, Pentonville: I know that the prisoner at the bar, he took two rooms, up two pair of stairs, in my house; to the best of my recollection, he had them eight or nine weeks.

Q. Did he live there constantly? - A. He did not; he used to come now and then, I do not think he slept there more than three or four nights; he used sometimes to come and run up stairs, and frequently run down again, without stopping; at other times he would come and stop a little, sometimes half a day together.

Q. On working days? - A. Yes.

Q. About what time of the day? - A. Generally about ten or eleven o'clock in the forenoon; and he has told the boy if anybody wanted him, so say that he was not at home, but that was on a Sunday; I do not recollect that he was there of the Sunday but once the whole day.

Q. Did you make any, observation with respect to the bed in his room, whether it had been used? - A. Not in the day I had not; when he continued all night it appeared to have been slept in.

Q. Do you remember an application made to you by Mr. Loaring? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the room you shewed Mr. Loaring the same room that the prisoner occupied? - A. It was.

Q. You saw the cup found? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you keep an oil and colour shop? - A. Yes; a person called, and asked for Mr. Holt; I told him he was at home; he picked out a few camel's hair pencils; Mr. Holt said, Mrs. Painter, I did not know that you told them, I use a great a many in my business; I showed him some, and he bought two or three, and a little gum.

Q. Do you recollect the conversation about the gum? - A. Yes; he asked me if I sold white varnish; I told him I had none, but I could tell him where he could get some; he said he had tried a great many varnishes but they all turned yellow, he wanted to varnish a drawing of nice white satin; I told him I had none, but I gave him a little drop of fine white gum, and a little turpentine, and I never saw him after that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know what business the prisoner followed? - A. Yes; a japanner, and a landscape painter.

Q. Would these things, my learned Friend has alluded to, be used by him in his business? - A. Certainly.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Did he carry on any branch of business in that room do you know? - A. No.

Q. Had any other person access to this room but him? - A. No.

RICHARD MARTIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am a watchman, employed at the House of Correction, in Coldbath fields.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being in custody there? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Did he, at any time, make any proposal to you? - A. Yes; he did.

Q. How long had he been in custody? - A. I cannot say; he made applications several times; he wished, first of all, to have a hook made, to throw over the wall to pull himself up by; I told him I could not; I said, if you want to get out, there are plenty of ropes about; he said, he wanted a friend on the outside to assist him, at some certain time, if I would keep out of the way; I did not see that he had any friend, nor nothing at all about it.

Q. Did you communicate this conversation to Mr. Aris, the Governor of the prison? - A. I did; the prisoner afterwards employed me to carry a letter to a gentleman on Clerkenwell-green; I received the letter from him, and gave it to Mr. Aris first, and then Mr. Aris sent it to Mr. Valentine, by me; I gave it to Mrs. Valentine, her husband was not at home.

Q. Are you sure the letter that you received from the prisoner, was the same letter that you gave to Mr. Valentine? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that letter? - A. That is the letter. Jury. Q. Are you quite sure that is the letter? - A. Yes, it was never out of my sight. (The letter read.)(See page 471, last sessions.)

Cross-Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you watchman now to the House of Correction? - A. No; I have been very ill.

Q.How long had you been watchman to the House of Correction? - A. It was about a fortnight after Christmas when I first went there.

Q. How soon were you discharged from the situation of watchman? - A. I was not discharged, I went away of my own accord, through illness.

Q. You will, of course, then, return to your situation? - A. No; I do not chuse to go again.

Q. You were not before the Justice? - A. No.

WILLIAM GIBBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I keep a house, at No. 46, Fenchurch-street.

Q. Have you a lodger of the name of Gibbs? - A. Yes, Richard Gibbs; his family consists of himself and his wife.

Q. The prisoner was apprehended in that lodging? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know that such a person was in your house? - A. I did not know that there was any body in the house but Gibbs and his wife.

Q.Nor had any reason to suspect it? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I am but little calculated to make a defence, much less when I consider that every eye is upon me, and every ear open to the words I utter; I am but little skilled in logic, but considering the situation I am in, I feel it necessary to exert every nerve. First of all, let us take a slight view of the solicitor for the prosecution, Mr. Loaring, he has been telling you, that I had a lodging in such a place, after that, in such a place, and after that in such a place. Can he prove to you that I bore a bad character at either of those places? Can he prove to you that I defrauded him or any other person, at either of those places? Can he prove to you that I have committed forgeries, or that I have circulated bad notes at either of those places? If he cannot prove that, where is the utility of his speaking? He might as well have told you that I was born in Birmingham, and after having been at school, was apprenticed, and at the expiration of that apprentiship, became a journeyman; it would have been as fully applicable, or he might as well have told you, that Paris was the metropolis of France, or that the Old Bailey did not stand upon

London-Bridge. He did not tell you that I was a clerk in the Bank; he did not tell you that I was employed to go about searching every place to discover forged notes; no, he did not tell you that, because it would have militated against himself; but I leave it for you to draw the inference upon his character, while I attempt to proceed a little farther. I will now take a view of the Counsel for the prosecution, and in doing this, I cannot but feel myself astonished to see a man stand up in this Court with all his strength, with all his might, with all his logic, attempting a stab a fellow-creature to the heart; he has been traducing, vilifying me, stating that he has not the least doubt of proving my guilt by such and such a circumstance, by such and such evidence; and he has not least doubt, that the facts will be proved; forgery cannot be proved against me, but he hopes to cast me upon circumstances. Gentlemen, be careful, consider the situation you are in, consider the eye of God is upon you, and likewise consider that you have this day taken your oath to do me justice. Has the prosecutor proved to you, that I committed the forgery? Has any evidence proved that I circulated it, knowing it to be forged? Have they proved the least appearance of what I now stand charged with? Gentlemen, your reason must tell you, no; no man's life ought to be taken without the clearest proofs, particularly for forgery, for as soon as a man is cast for forgery, you may as well shoot him dead at the bar, for there is no respite, all is then over; suppose either of you had a son, most likely some of you have; suppose it to happened that your son had taken a Bank-note, and he pays it to his tailor or his doctor; it turns out to be a forged one; it is traced to his possession, he is taken, doubled ironed, and tried for the forgery; what would be your feelings, as fathers, upon that occasion? Would it not be your prayer to Almighty God, that his innocence might appear; would you not sympathize with his situation, would you not feel for him? Certainly you would, and what would be your opinion of that Jury, who should find a verdict against him for nothing at all? should you not think it head that your son should lose his life for nothing? Can any reason upon earth be brought forward to justify such a verdict? No, Gentlemen, your reason will tell you, no, it is impossible. Gentlemen, be careful, let me exhort you to bring your understandings to the test of truth. Has the prosecutor believed to you, that I am guilty of the circulation of the notes of which he wishes to convict me upon circumstances where the evidence is not clear? If you think as I do, and as every body must do, that the Counsel for the prosecution has not proved the least appearance of guilt, you cannot, consistent with your oaths, this day, find me guilty; you cannot, consistent with the principles of justice and humanity; you cannot, consistent with the duty of Christians this day take away my life. Gentlemen, I have oftentimes heard, that men have lost their lives upon circumstances. This, in my opinion, is extremely cruel, because, if circumstances are ever so pointed, if they are ever so obvious, if they are ever so clear. they only amount to probability, and probability implies at least a kind of uncertainty, and where there is no proof, gentlemen, you ought to be very careful; but even supposing a man ought to lose his life upon circumstances, here there are no direct circumstances at all; for if I am to lose my life because I pay away a note, you, and every person present, might stand at this bar for the offence - offence I cannot call it, but you are as liable, gentlemen, to take a bad note as I am, and if that is the law of this country, don't let England set herself up as an examples to other countries. The Bank would with to convict me upon slight circumstances. With respect to the letter,they would wish to urge it as an evidence of conscious guilt, nothing can be more ridiculous, in my opinion, than this. When I was first taken into custody, I was taken to the House of Correction, and there the Governor (you have most likely heard talk of him) took me into the kitchen, and desired all the turnkeys to watch me closely; no person was suffered to speak to me; my sister came twelve miles from the country to see me, but was not permitted; she went to the justice, and he did not think fit to give an order; I have a brother, who came one hundred miles, and he, with difficulty, got admittance; after I had been there some time, the Governor took me into his private closet, as he calls it, and said, Mr. Holt, you are in a serious situation, depend upon it you will lose your life; you had better tell me all, and you shall have an attorney and counsel, and the best advice, for, says he, the Bank-directors are so severe, that they will. prosecute a person for only having about him a forged note; I told him I had nothing to fear, and therefore as to discovering any thing to him, I could not; I was informed they meant to do all they could to convict me; this induce me to write this letter, in order to make my escape, though I was innocent, knowing I had such a body to contend against, and having heard that men had been executed upon such circumstances, I began to be alarmed, which was the cause of my writing that letter, but after that, I had several opportunities of getting away; I was placed in the kitchen where the keys were kept, and I could have let myself out, as well as all the prisoners confined in the prison, if I had pleased, but I was determined I would trust to Providence and take my trail. It is very true, that I lived with a female, and in order to get rid ofher, I took this other lodging. As to the materials that have been produced, they are such as I use in my business as a varnisher. Gentlemen, whatever may be your verdict, it will not make me unhappy, as I am conscious of my own innocence. I do not conceive it to be necessary to say any more upon the subject.

For the Prisoner.

- DIMSDALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a japanner, in Aldersgate-street: I have known the prisoner four years, he worked journey-work, as a japanner, where I served my time; his character has been that of a very honest industrious man; he has worked for me, and a very industrious man I found him.

Q. Is it customary to use camel's hair pencils, and varnish, in your business? - A. Yes, certainly,

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a japanner, I have known the prisoner five years, his character has always been that of an honest man.

Q. Is it customary in your business to use camel's hair and varnish? - A. Certainly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Look at that composition, and tell me if it is used in your business? - A. Altogether, I cannot say what it is.

Q. How many years have you been a japanner? - A. Eleven years and upwards.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You don't make varnish, you buy it ready made? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Is that a varnish in your business? - A. I cannot say.

Q.Warm it. (The witness warms it over a candle.) - A. I cannot say any thing about it. The prisoner called two other witness who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t18000917-3

590. CORNELIUS-FREDERICK HOLT was again indicted for forging and uttering, knowing it to be forged, a Bank-note, for the payment of 5l. with the like intention .

Mr. Garrow. Gentlemen of the Jury. You are now charged a second time to enquire of the guilt or innocence of the prisoner at the bar, on another capital charge. Gentlemen, I have many years been acquainted with the practice of the administration of justice in this country, and in no instance was the purity and the mildness of that administration more conspicuous than in the late case. Gentlemen, I have not been in the habit of taking notice of any thing that an accused person may say, with respect to myself, but I cannot suffer it to go out into the world for a single moment, that any body stands here to enjoy the pleasure of plunging a dagger into the heart of that young man. No, Gentlemen, the Bank of England never, never prosecute with such views, to them it is a most painful task, which is imperatively imposed upon them, and I have the good fortune to day to give a practical illustration of what I have just said. I have the honour here to represent the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, who have an opportunity once more to put him in hazard of his life, once more to impress upon you the circumstances whence to infer his guilt, once more to put you upon your oaths to deliver him, and to run all the hazards that belong to that consideration; it is in their power again to call a witness who has given evidence upon a former occasion, but whom they did not call because he had disgraced himself; nay, it is in their power now to apply to the Court to put off the trial until next Sessions, in order to obtain the evidence of another most important witness; but, Gentlemen, they do not delight in blood; and I hope this will be a serious warning to the young man at the bar. Be it remembered, however, that this is the fourth forged note that has been traced into the possession of that prisoner, who complains of the harshness of his prosecutors. Need I then ask if the Bank would have done their duty, if they had not brought forward these cases, and submitted them to the consideration of Juries of the country? - Gentlemen, unless the Court command us to go on, we now consent to take a verdict of acquittal.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t18000917-4

591. WILLIAM GORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , three pounds of wax candles, value 5s. the property of Benjamin Brecknell .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t18000917-5

592. JOSEPH, alias WILLIAM PENN , and JAMES SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , a ewe sheep, value 42s. the property of Thomas Worcester .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS WORCESTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a butcher , at Wherstone; the two prisoners are labouring men . I saw the sheep on Thursday evening the 24th of July; the next morning. I missed the sheep, I searched the field all round, and found some blood in one corner; the belly was cut open, and the entrails let out into the ditch, the caul fat was taken away; I then went home; on Saturday night I searched again, and found some

more blood in another field, adjoining to the prisoner Smith's garden; about one hundred yard from my field, at a stile within twenty yards of the garden, I found the appearance of the sheep having been hung across the stile, for it was bloody, and there was about half a pint of blood lying at the bottom of the stile, which had dropped down the bars of the stile, it was not a common foot-path; on the Sunday morning I went to the prisoner's house with a search-warrant; upon searching, we found two shoulders of mutton, two legs, and part of two necks, part of the scrag was cut off, and one loin felted in a pickling pan up stairs; and I found a quantity of fat melted; the prisoners were both at home at that time, they said they had nothing of mine; Penn said he had bought it in London on the Tuesday; he said he had bought it of a man with a horse and cart coming up Snow-hill; he said he sent it down by a country waggon, but did not know whose waggon it was, nor the man; Smith said he did not know any thing about it; the sheep was dead when he came into the house.

Q.Are you able to tell, from the mutton, whether it was ewe mutton or whether? - A. They were little sat ewes; the mutton had the dug on, the weight tallies with the sheep that I lost; it had not been killed by a butcher, it was cut and mangled sadly; they were of the Bakewell breed, there was no other mutton of that breed in the neighbourhood.

Cross-examined by Mr. Beville. Q. You are very well acquainted with Smithfield? - A. Yes.

Q. You often buy sheep there? - A. I have within these few months.

Q. Do you mean to swear, that this sheep is so different from others of the Bakewell breed that you are sure it is the same? - A. If I had not bought the sheep myself, and handled it, I should not have known.

Court. Q.Whose house do you say this is? - A. It is Smith's house, Penn lodges in the house with him.

RICHARD BARNEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a constable: I went with Mr. Worcester with a search-warrant; Penn lives with his father-in-law, Smith; Penn said he bought it, but but I do not recollect his saying where he bought it; he said he bought it on the Tuesday before.

Penn's defence. I bought the sheep.

Smith's defence. I know nothing of it.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-6

593. JOHN MASON was indicted for making an assault, on the 13th of August , in the King's highway, upon Thomas Lycett , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silk watch ribband, value 1d. a seal, value 7s. and a watch key, value 1d. the property of the said Thomas.

THOMAS LYCETT sworn. - I am an engraver : On the 13th of August, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was robbed in St. John's-street ; there were some volunteers coming past, and a great mob, when the prisoner at the bar and four or five more, hustled me, and made a snatch at my watch; the ribband, seal, and key of which he took; he was the person who snatched it; I had never seen him before I saw him do it; he then put his hand behind him, and gave it to one of his companions; I am positively sure he is the person; I endeavoured to lay hold of him, and another struck me; he was taken on Snow-hill about ten minutes after in consequence of pursuit; I endeavoured to get a constable, but could not; I saw him facing the Compter before he got to Snow-hill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You had never seen the person before? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. The street was pretty full of people? - A. Yes.

Q. You have no other witness but yourself? - A. No.

Q. Do you know that you are prosecuting this man for an offence which will affect his life? - A. I hope not.

Q. But you are though - do you know that there is a reward of forty pounds if he is convicted, of which you will have the whole? - A. No.

Q. You would not take it, perhaps? - A. I would not.

Q. And knowing that, will you venture to swear to his person? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I was at work for Mr. Skidmore that day till seven o'clock; I was coming down Snow-hill with the volunteers, and this gentleman laid hold of me, and said, I had robbed him.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN HALLPIKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman to Mr. Skidmore, stovegrate maker to his Majesty's board of ordnance; the prisoner was at work for Mr. Skidmore, and worked that evening till seven o'clock; I have known him about two years, and his father ten, he has worked for Mr. Skidmore about ten months; I never heard any thing dishonest respecting him.

The prisoner called three other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-7

594. MARY RAGAN , alias DONOHOUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of

June , a handkerchief, value 4s. the property of William Wynne , privately from his person .(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be esreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-8

595. MARY ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a basket, value 2s. 6d. and three pecks of peas, value 2s. the property of Thomas Abrahams .

PHOEBE ABRAHAMS sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Abrahams. On Thursday morning, the 10th of July, a little before eight o'clock, I went to Fleet-market, and bought three pecks of peas, I borrowed the basket to take them home; I set them down by the side of the cart, and saw the woman take them up; I turned my head to speak to a neighbour, and lost sight of the woman.

Q. How far was she from you when you saw her take them? - A. Not a yard.

Q. Are you perfectly sure she is the woman? - A. Yes; I saw her again on Saturday morning, and then I took her; I accused her with taking my peas on the Thursday; she said she never saw me in her life; she was drest the same on Saturday that she was on Thursday.

Prisoner's defence. So help me God, I know no more about the peas than any of the Gentlemen of the Jury.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr.RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-9

596. ABRAHAM BONE and THOMAS STEVENS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Collier , about the hour of eight in the night of the 6th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, two looking-glasses, value 9s. the property of the said Elizabeth.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ELIZABETH COLLIER sworn. - I keep a house in Sun-yard, Nightingale-lane : On the 6th of December, 1799, my house was broke open; I went out a little before eight in the evening, I fastened the door, it was upon the latch, I tried it to see if it was fast; I returned in about a quarter of an hour, I found the door latched, and I went in and missed a large looking-glass from against the wall, and a standing swing-glass from under it; I saw the property afterwards in the possession of Cook, the officer.

JOSEPH HUFF sworn. - I know the prisoner Bone; I, and Bone, and Stevens, and Morrison, who is since dead, went to Mrs. Collier's house, between seven and eight o'clock at night, it was dark; we went to the door, and felt about, and pushed it; then the man that is dead, lifted up the latch; Bone went in, and pulled down a great looking glass from the side of the wall, in the lower room; Bone brought it out and gave it to Morrison; Bone then went in again, and brought out a smaller glass that stood upon the drawers under the other; we immediately took the glasses to Mrs. Levy, in St. Catherine's, and sold them to her for five shillings, then we divided it between us, fifteen pence a piece.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell, (produces a swing glass;) I received it from Rebecca Levy , on the 16th of September; I have had it ever since; I apprehended Bone on the 8th of May.

REBECCA LEVY sworn. - I know the prisoner Bone, and I know Huff; they came to my house the Friday fortnight before Christmas, nearly about eight o'clock at night, there were four of them; Huff asked me seven shillings for them, I gave them five shillings, and they went away directly; I am sure Bone was one of them; the officers came to my house afterwards, and I took the glass to Shadwell office; I had sold the other; it is the same glass that I bought of these four men.

Court. Q. What is your business? - A. I keep a private house; at that time I kept a sale shop.

Bone's defence. She speaks what is very false, for I was never near her house at all.

Q.(To Mrs. Levy.) Had you seen Bone before? - A. Never, but I know him perfectly.(Stevens was not put upon his defence.)

Bone, GUILTY DEATH . (Aged 19.)

Stevens, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t18000917-10

597. THOMAS STEVENS and CHRISTIAN STIRNBACK were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Matthews , about the hour of nine in the night, of the 26th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, two blankets, value 7s. two sheets, value 1s. 6d. and a bed quilt, value 1s. the property of the said Mary.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ELIZABETH SKELTON sworn. - I live in the house of Mary Matthews ; upon the 26th of January last, Mrs. Matthews was not at home; I had shut the window down in the front of the street, up one pair of stairs, it was about seven o'clock, it was quite dark then; about nine, I heard a foot over head as I was sitting by the fire; I went up stairs directly, I opened the door and went in, and saw the window up, and the bed stripped; I

missed two blankets, two sheets, and a bed quilt; I had made the bed that evening; I screamed out thieves, fire, and murder at the window, and down the stairs too; I did not see any body there at all; I saw these things again three or four months after, upon the bed of a woman of the name of Sleep; I know them to be Mrs. Matthews's.

JOSEPH HUFF sworn. - On the 26th of January, I went with Stirnback to the house of Mrs. Matthews, about nine o'clock at night; I lifted up Stevens upon my shoulder, and he shoved up the sash of the one pair of stairs window fronting the street; there was a woman coming by, and I put him down from my shoulder; then I put him up again, and he got in at the window; he was in about five minutes, and then called for Stirnback, he was standing at the Barley-mow, close by Stevens, then he brought out two blankets, two sheets, and a bed quilt, and gave them to Stirnback; then Stevens came out at the window, and left it open; then we all went across the rope walk, into Back-lane, St. George's, to Mrs. Sleep's; we asked her if she would buy some things we had brought from on board a ship; she looked at them, and we asked her eight shillings for them; she said she would give seven shillings and half a pint of gin; I told her she must give sixpence more, and she put the sixpence into my hand; we drank the gin together, and came away, and shared the money at the White-Swan.

ANN SLEEP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Huff and Stirnback came to my house on the 26th of January last, rather before nine in the evening; I asked them how they came by them, and they said they brought them from on board a ship; I bought them, and gave seven shillings and sixpence and half a pint of gin; there was only one sheet, two blankets and a coverlid; the officers had them away.

Court. Q. What business do you follow? - A. I make children's dresses, and deal in apparel; I have lived there these twenty years.( Robert Brown produced two blankets, a sheet, and a bed quilt.)

Mrs. Skelton. I know this blanket by its being moth-eaten, and dirty at the corner, and the other I know by its being marked, J. D. and a hole in the corner and dirty; the sheet is remarkably coarse, there is no mark upon it, any farther than where it is sewed up in three seams; I know this bed quilt, there were several pieces of Mrs. Matthews's gown upon it, they are all her property.

MARY MATTHEWS sworn. - These are all my property.(Stirnback did not say any thing in his defence.)(Stevens was not put upon his defence.)

Stevens, NOT GUILTY .

Stirnback, GUILTY Death . (Aged 17.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-11

598. BENJAMIN POOLEY was indicted for feloniously secreting and stealing, on the 6th of June , a certain letter or packet, containing a draft or bill of exchange, the property of Archibald Thomson , he being a person employed in the Post-office .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Myers, and the case by Mr. Attorney General.)

DAVID THOMSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I live at Diston, near Maidstone; my brother, Archibald Thomson , lives near Mile-End: On the 5th of June last, I sent a letter directed to Mr. Archibald Thomson, nursery-man, Mile-End, inclosing a draft for two hundred pounds; I delivered it; to Mr. Poole, the post-master, himself.

THOMAS POOLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am post-master at Maidstone: On the 5th of June Mr. David Thomson brought me four or five letters, which I put into the box, and they were forwarded on the evening of that day.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you present when the bag was made up? - A. Yes.

- WRIGHTSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a sorter in the Inland Office at the General Post-office.

Q. Did the Maidstone bag come to your hand in the usual way on the 6th of June? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go through your regular duty, and dispose of the letters according to that duty? - A. I did.

Q. Into whose hands would these letters go, after they had gone through your hands? - A.They would go to the clerk of the table who examines the letters, to see that they are charged properly.

Q.Those letters which are within the delivery of the General Post, do they form one delivery? - A. There are two letter-carriers from the Post-office to sort the town letters; from the clerk they are given to the stamper, who stamps them.

Q. Two of the carriers are for that purpose denominated sorters? - A. Yes.

Q. Who is the immediate officer after you have done with your part of the duty, that takes up the letters? - A. According who is on duty.

Q. Were Mr. Godby and Mr. Calthrop on duty? - A. Mr. Calthrop was.

Q. What was Mr. Godby at that time? - A. He was assistant at the table.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. There were several persons besides Mr. Godby employed? - A. Yes, three or four.

Q. And before they came into the office in which this young man was? - A. Yes, it would go through seven different hands before it would come to the clerks of the Penny Post-office.

Q.Therefore it might be in the power of any of those seven persons to do any thing with these letters if they had been so inclined? - A. No doubt of it.

Q. You cannot say therefore of your own knowledge that this letter came into the Penny Post-office? - A. No.

AUGUSTUS GODBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am teller at the table E. I collect the amount of the postage; then they are sent by the messenger, Mr. Bowns, to the clerks of the Penny Post.

Q. Do you remember, on the morning of the 6th, the Maidstone bag arriving, and telling the letters? - A. I do not recollect telling the Maidstone letters in particular.

Q. Do you know Mr. Chalfont? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect whether he was upon duty or not? - A. To the best of my recollection he was.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You cannot say of your own knowledge, that this letter ever reached the office in which the prisoner is? - A. No.

WILLIAM CHALFONT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a sorter in the Post-office.

Q. What was it your duty to do on the morning of the 6th of June? - A. To divide the town letters into fourteen divisions.

Q. Would the Maidstone bag come to you in the course of your employment? - A. I do not open the bag; I do not know; if the letters came to me I sent them with other letters.

Q. Those divisions that belong to the reach of the Penny Post-office, where are they put? - A. The Penny Post is called one division, No. 14, and the letters are put to that number.

Q. Did you employ yourself in that way on the morning of the 6th? - A. I did; they are taken from me to the teller, to be told.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have seen him in the office.

Q. Do you know whether he was employed in the office on the 6th of June? - A. I do not.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.All letters would go, whether Maidstone, York, or Lincoln, they would all find their way to the Penny Post-office on that day? - A. Yes.

Q. There are several sorters in the office with you? - A.Not at the table E.; only myself and Stephen Burgess .

STEPHEN BURGESS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I was at the same table with Mr. Chalfont.

Q. Did you go through your duty as usual on that day? - A. I did.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Do you sit in the same office with the prisoner? - A. I had nothing to do with that office.

Q. Then your's is an office before the letters come to the prisoner's hands? - A. Yes.

GEORGE BOWNS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. It is my duty to carry letters to the Penny Post clerk; I carried the letters as usual on the 6th of June.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand there is a regularity observed with respect to the different divisions? - A. Yes.

Q. But notwithstanding that regularity does it not sometimes happen that mistakes take place, the letters get into the wrong division? - A.They might be put in the wrong place by mistake.

Q. Therefore if a mistake took place, and it gets by mistake to a wrong division, would it not be given to a wrong deliverer? - A. It might.

JOHN HAZARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. On the morning of the 6th of June I received the letters in my division; I told them, and locked them up in a box, which is carried to the Penny Post-office by a person of the name of Scriveas.

Q.Those within the distribution of the Penny Post-office; you received no others? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Now and then a mistake happens, that a letter which should get into the Penny Post-office division sometimes gets into a letter-carrier's division? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM SCRIVENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I belong to the Penny Post-office.

Q. Do you remember the box of letters on the 6th of June being carried to the Penny Post-office? - A. Yes; to the best of my remembrance I carried it myself, and the box was opened at the Penny Post-office.

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a principal officer in the Penny Post-office: I was in my employ on the 6th of June; the box was brought to me in the usual way; the letters are brought in a locked box from the Inland office into the Penny Post-office, and the box is unlocked by me; then they are stamped, and after they are stamped they are given back into my custody; I then tell the amount of postage, and see that it corresponds with the amount sent from the Inland office; they are then delivered over to the sorting-table, and are there divided into their respective divisions.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, he was one of the sorters in the letter-carriers' office.

Q. How was he employed that morning? - A. As charge-taker for the Eastern division, second class, and letter-carrier to the Limehouse walk; after the letters are sorted in the sorting-office to the five town districts, the bell is rung, and the five charge-takers are called to receive their charges; the prisoner was one of the charge-takers, who subsort the letters into different walks belonging to the Eastern division; that division consists of White

chapel, Goodman's-fields, Wapping, and Lime-house.

Q. Then the letters of the Whitechapel division would come through his hands? - A. Yes.

Q. Mile-End belongs to Whitechapel division? - A. Yes.

Q. You say he is also a letter-carrier? - A. Yes.

Q. In what district? - A. The Limehouse.

Q. Not the Mile-End division? - A. No.

Q. What was the name of the person who was letter-carrier in the Mile-End division? - A.Wynne.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Your's is an office different from where this man was employed? - A. Yes.

Q. A great many clerks are employed, I take it for granted? - A. Not a great many.

Q. Have you any doubt, that where the prisoner does his business a number of people come in who are not belonging to that office? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect a man of the name of Charles Hill? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he ever in the employ of the Post-office? - A. He was.

Q. I believe he was discharged upon some conduct not satisfactory to the gentlemen who had the management of that office? - A. He was.

Q. He therefore might get access to that office? - A. He has been there since he has been discharged.

Q. A person acquainted with the office would know better how to do any thing improper than a person not acquainted with the office? - A.Certainly.

GEORGE ELPHINSTONE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodfall. I am a stamper in the Post-office; all letters that come to the General Post-office for the Penny Post division come through my hands.

Q.Amongst those, do the Eastern letters come through your hands? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect any thing particular respecting the dispatching of those letters that morning? - I gave them to a person to be counted.

Q. Do you recollect at what hour they were dispatched? - A. The letters were generally out of the office by half past nine, or a quarter before ten, for the Penny Post letter-carriers in London.

JOHN TYRRELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a sub-sorter in the Penny Post-office.

Q. What letters do you receive to sub-sort? - A. The General Post letters come from the Inland-office to our office to sub-sort into eight divisions, one of them is called the Eastern division, Mile-end is in that division; on the 6th of June, I was discharging my duty, all the letters delivered to me were sorted that day in the ordinary course.

PHILIP ABSOLOM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a letter-carrier of Penny Post letters in the Eastern division, my walk is in Goodman's-fields.

Q. Who else was employed in the same division on the 6th of June? - A.Lloyd, Wynne, and the prisoner.

Q. Are you all employed in sub-sorting letters to your different walks; or is it done by one of you? - A. Only one of us; it was done that morning by the prisoner.

Q. Did you receive from him the letters that you were to deliver in your walk? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How many clerks are there that superintend these fourteen divisions? - A. There are four to each division, but there is only one sorter to each division.

WILLIAM LLOYD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a letter-carrier of Penny Post letters that come by the General Post; I am employed in the East division, the Wapping walk: I was on duty on the 6th of June; I received the letters for my walk from the prisoner that morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you all of you in your turns are frequently obliged to give change for the payment of your letters? - A. It does sometimes happen.

WILLIAM GWYNNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am letter-carrier in the Whitechapel walk, and Mile-end, in the Eastern division: On the 6th of June I was upon duty; I received the letters for my walk from the prisoner.

Q. Did you, among those, receive a letter to be delivered to Mr. Archibald Thomson ? - A. Not to my knowledge.

ARCHIBALD THOMSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am the brother of David Thomson; I live at Mile-end.

Q. Did you receive a letter from your brother on the 6th of June? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you at any time receive a letter from your brother, covering a draft of two hundred pounds? - A. No; at no time.

CHARLES HILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Pooley? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in any employ belonging to the Post-office on the 6th of June last? - A. No.

Q. Do you remember whether, on the 6th of June, you saw Pooley, the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, at the Dolphin public-house, St. George's in the East; we came out of the house together, and he intimated to me that he had something of value; I asked him what it was, and he produced a check.

Q. Did he produce any thing else? - A. Not at that time.

Q. Do you recollect in what name that check was drawn? - A.Thomson.

Court. Q. Do you recollect the Christian name? - A. No, I cannot.

Mr. Abbott. Q. Do you recollect the name of the person to whom it was payable? - A. Two hundred pounds.

Q.Drawn upon whom? - A. The Stratford-place Bank.

Q.Did he shew you any thing else? - A. He shewed me a letter, and I afterwards saw him tear a letter to pieces; but I cannot say that it was the same letter.

Q. To whom was that letter directed? - A. Mr. Thomson, Mile-end.

Q. What was the purpose of the contents of that letter? - A.Signifying that a two hundred pound check was inclosed.

Q. Do you recollect how the letter began? - A. As from brother to brother; it mentioned, dear brother, I enclose you a check of two hundred pounds.

Q. Do you recollect from what place it was dated? - A. I do not.

Q. Do you recollect what name was signed to it? - A. J. Thomson; he employed me to go and receive the money for him.

Q. What were you at that time? - A. In the Excise.

Q. At what hour of the morning was it? - A.Between ten and eleven.

Q. Where were you going? - A. To the Chamber of Excise that I belong to at Mile-end.

Q. What is the name of the Surveyor there? - A.Hindes.

Q. Was any thing said between you and the prisoner as to the time it would take you from your duty? - A. My duty was at Hackney, and I desired. Pooley to go to Hindes, and tell him I could not come, as I had business of importance.

Q. Did you receive it that morning? - A. No; I found it was dated the 7th, and conceiving it to be the 7th of June, I went to Hackney to Mr. Wright's, a wine-merchant, where I found Pooley in company with Mr. Hindes; I informed him it was not due till the 7th, and we both looked at it, and found it was not due till the 7th, but neither of us observed that it was the 7th of May; I went with it; I received a 100l. Bank-note, a 40l. Banknote, a 50l. Bank-note, and 10l. in cash; I immediately went to the Bank with them to change them.

Q. Were you desired to write any thing upon the back of those notes that you wanted to get changed? - A. Yes; I wrote the name of Walsh, Kensington-Grove.

Q. Did you at that time live at Kensington-Grove? - A. No.

Q. What did you receive in change at the Bank? - A. Four 25l. notes, and I think forty-five 2l. notes; I met the prisoner again the same evening, at the Black Horse in Fieldgate-street, by appointment; Mr. Hindes was there, and Mr. Thorn; I informed the prisoner that I had changed the notes, and I gave him four or five guineas; he wanted me to give him the notes, but at that time I would not; this was Saturday evening; on Sunday morning I called at his lodgings in White-horse-street, at the house of a person of the name of Lawrence; the prisoner was in bed; he got up, and we went out; I then gave him ten 2l. notes, which I had received at the Bank; I met him again by appointment on Monday evening I think, at the Bell in Thames-street; he informed me that he had changed those notes; I saw him the next morning again at his own place, and then I gave him ten more of the 2l. notes that I had received at the Bank; that was Tuesday the 10th.

Q. Do you recollect being with him at the Fox? - A. Yes; he then informed me he had got rid of all those; I then gave him the remainder of ninety pounds, chiefly in one and two-pound notes.

Q. Did you at any time after that go to the Poultry Compter to see him? - A. I did; but I was not allowed to see him.

Q. You said you had passed away some of those notes; do you know a woman of the name of Bridget Sturgess or Bridget Sleath ? - A. Her name is Bridget Sturgess.

Q. Did you deliver to her any of these notes? - A. Yes; I delivered her first, I think, two of the two-pound notes; I afterwards delivered her a five-pound note to take a watch out of pledge, somewhere by Snow-hill, Mr. Cotterell's, I think.

Q. Who had pledged the watch? - A. I think I had, but I cannot say.

Q. Did you at any time pledge any spoons? - A. No; I took several out of pledge.

Q. Do you know a pawnbroker of the name of Cordy? - A. I do not recollect the name.

Q. Do you know a pawnboker on Snow-hill? - A. I cannot recollect the name, but I think that was where the watch was pledge; I redeemed it with a five-pound note.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Ellitt, a linen-draper in Fore-street? - A. No.

Q. Did you and Sleath go to any linen-daper's, at any time, for any purpose? - A. Yes; but I cannot recollect the day, to purchase a piece for a gown; that was paid for by one of the five-pound notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I have not seen you blush yet; have you been in one or more places of public trust? - A. I do not understand you.

Q. Have you not been in the Excise-office? - A. Yes.

Q. That is a place of public trust, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever been in the Post-office? - A. Yes.

Q. That is another place of public trust? - A. Yes; I did not understand you rightly at first.

Q. You converted one half of this money to your own use? - A. No; Pooley owed me ten pounds.

Q. You seem a distressed man at this time? - A. No.

Q. You pawned your spoons, did not you? - A. I might want a little money at that time.

Q. Have you not pawned your watch? - A.Many times.

Q. Was it your own watch? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath was it your's? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath was it not your dear friend Mrs. Sturgess's? - A. No, I have had it eight years in my possession.

Q. She has gone by the name of Sleath? - A. That was her maiden name; she has been deserted by her husband.

Q. Can you tell us any other name that she has gone by? - A. Her name has been Robinson.

That was not her husband who deserted her? - A. No.

Q. What other name? - A. She might have gone by many, for any thing I know.

Q. Upon your oath has she not? - A. Yes, she has.

Q. You thought this transaction of the draft a very honest transaction? - A. I certainly could not think it honest.

Q. Then of course you told of it; you informed those that were injured immediately? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You have been in the Post-office? - A. I have.

Q. Were you turned out? - A. No, I turned myself out.

Q. That is exactly as other great men do, they resign because they cannot keep their situations any longer; remember you are upon your oath, do you mean to say you were not turned out upon suspicion of having been concerned in taking a one hundred pound note? - A. No.

Q. Nor had any such thing hinted to you? - A. Yes, I had; and I resigned immediately.

Q. So you were the man that changed this draft at the banker's? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it before or after you had been at the Post-office that you happened to serve a Mr. Dowse? - A. Before.

Q. Did you turn yourself out from his service? - A. I was brought here as a felon at that bar, on his account.

Q. Did you turn yourself out of the Excise? - A. It is evident now that I did, because I cannot recover it; but I would not accept it now, if they were to offer it.

Q. Upon your oath were you not advertised with a reward for apprehending you? - A. I was so; the first that I saw of it was at Teignmouth.

Q. Did your good friend Sleath, alias Robinson, alias Sturgess, go with you? - A. Yes; she had embarked on board a Newcastle sailer before we had seen the advertisement.

Q. Did she not know of your both being advertised? - A. Not at the time that we embarked from London.

Q. Who took you? - A. The post-master, at Shields.

Q. You have been, perhaps, in confinement ever since? - A. I have.

Q. Your business did not call you at Hackney till eleven o'clock - now I ask you, whether long before eleven o'clock, the letters are not sorted at the Post-office? - A. At this time of the year in general they are.

Q. Therefore, it was in your power, were you so disposed to go there? - A. I might go in as well as any body else.

Q. You might go in and see the letters? - A. I might go in, but I could not get near them; the gentlemen would not suffer me to stop there.

Q. But a great deal of effectual business may be done, before a man can get out of a room? - A. I was not there.

Q. How often have you been there? - A. Twice.

Q. How many times have you been turned out? - A. Never.

Q. You said the gentlemen would not let you stop? - A. When they demanded me to go, I went.

Q. Did you go for any purpose but for looking after what you could get? - A. I might have called there once, but not more.

Q. You know, that for the taking this draft, you were liable to be prosecuted? - A. I am very well convinced of it.

Q. You are equally well convinced of another thing, that by attributing the crime to this man, you save yourself? - A. So Mr. Parkin informed me.

Q. Have you therefore any doubt of it? - A. Mr. Parkin told me, if I spoke the truth, I should be admitted an evidence, and that was on account of an innocent woman who knew nothing of it, or else I would not have come forward.

HENRY HINDES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a Surveyor in the excise of wine and brandy; the last witness was my officer for five or six months.

Q. Was he your officer on the 6th of June last? - A. Yes.

Q. What book is that you have in your hand? - A. A journal of daily transactions: On the 6th of June, I went to Mr. Wright's, wine and brandy-merchant, at Hackney, to survey by myself; I saw the prisoner on that day, in Church-Street, Hackney; I went by myself, on account of Mr. Hill's begging leave till after twelve o'clock on that day; I said I would grant it; the prisoner came with him to me, at Mr. Wright's, within five or six minutes after I got there; I said to Mr. Hill, why, Pooley has been to me to ask leave of absence till past twelve o'clock; he said something to this effect, I have got my business done sooner than I expected, and I must do the rest to-morrow; then Hill retired from me, and went and spoke to Pooley in the yard; I had very soon done taking the brandy stock; I then saw them in the yard in conversation; I proceeded to the wine-cellar, they followed me, and drank a glass or two of wine, and after that, Pooley hid Hill and me a good morning; I saw the prisoner again the next day, at the Black-horse in Fieldgate-Street; Hill went with me from my office to there; Thomas Thorn was with me, he was one of my said officers, the same as Hill was.

Q.Did you all go away together? - A. We parted with each other at the said house.

Q. On Saturday morning, was Hill at his business? - A. He came between the hours of seven and eight in the morning.

Court. Q. Are the entries made by Hill himself? - A. Yes.

Mr. Attorney General. It certainly does not prove that he was on his duty.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Which would you pay most credit to, what he tells you, or what he writes? - A.What he writes.

JOHN CUELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Miers. I am clerk in the London and Middlesex Bank, in Stratford-place, (produces the check;) it was presented to me for payment, on the 7th of June, I do not know the person who presented it; I asked him if he received it in the name of Thomson, he said, yes; I paid him a 100l. Bank note, a 40l. note, a 50l. note, and 10l. in money, making in all, 200l. I have the book here, in which I made the original entry at the time, (refers to it;) reads a 100l. note, No. 1724, dated the 22d of May; a 50l. note, No. 1702, dated the 6th of May; a 40l. note, No. 8398, dated the 26th of May.

Mr. Miers. (To David Thomson.) Q. Look at that draft? - A. This is the draft I sent to my brother. (It is read;)

Stratford-place, 7th of May, 1800.

No. 5, London,

Messrs. Edwards, Bethner, Middleton, Johnson, and Ellwood, London and Middlesex Bank.

Pay to Mr. Archibald Thomson or bearer, 200l. for D. Thomson.

Mr. Knowlys. There is no stamp upon it.

Cuell. It is not required in a draft, payable to bearer.

JOHN PENN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Miers. I am Bank-note pay clerk, in the Bank. (Produces his books, and refers to Saturday the 7th of June).

Q. Do you perceive from that minute, that you exchanged a Bank-note for 100l.? - A. Yes; the 22d of May, 1800, No. 1724; I received a 50l. also, No. 1702, the 6th of May; and a 40l. No. 8398, dated the 26th of May; I gave in change, twenty 5l. Bank-notes, and forty-five 2l.; the 5l. notes were No. 1510, to No. 1529, inclusive, all dated the 24th of May; the 2l. notes began No. 2066, and ended at 2110, they are dated the 15th of May, (produces the Bank-notes received by the witness;) the person wrote the name and residence, P. Walsh, Kensington-grove, but whether it was wrote upon it before I exchanged them, or at the time, I cannot say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. It is common for persons to put down, not their own names, but the persons from whom they receive them? - A. Yes.

Mr. Miers. (To Cuell.) Q. Look at these three notes? - A.They appear from the entry to be the same that I paid for the check.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Cuell.) Q. You are clerk to a considerable Banking-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it not a very frequent practice for bankers clerks, and other people to write upon the back of notes, the names of places, where they are taken? - A.Those clerks that receive notes out of doors always do.

Q. It is common with merchants clerks? - A. Yes.

ROBERT RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Miers. I am shopman to Mrs. Nutterell; I have seen the prisoner at the bar several times.

Q. Did you see him on the 9th of June? - A. Yes; he came to our house and purchased two yards of buff cord for breeches; he gave me a 2l. note for it, but I cannot recollect the number; I requested him to put his name and place of abode upon the back of the note; he wrote upon it, Johnson, Whitechapel; I afterwards gave the note to my mistress, and gave him the change.

Q. Do you know what was his employ? - A. I always thought it was in the Post-office; he formerly lived nearly opposite our shop, at a confectioner's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. He was very well known at your shop? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was he not very well known to your mistress? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Is it not the more general way for persons to write upon the note, the name of

the person they receive it from, than their own? - A. Yes; but if it is a person I do not know, I desire them to put their name.

Q.What was it you required the prisoner to write? - A.His name and place of abode.

MARGARET- LUCY NUTTERELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Miers. The last witness was my shopman, he serves the goods and I take the money; if I am backwards he brings it to me, or if I am up stairs he brings it to me; I am not always in the same part of the house.

Q. Do you recollect receiving from him a 2l. note on the 7th of June? - A. Yes, and I paid to Mr. Skerrick, in Milk-Street, Cheapside, 128l. 10s. on the 13th of June.

JOHN JARVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am pay clerk to the Bank of England, (produces a Bank-note of 2l. No. 2108.) it was brought into the Bank on the 13th of June, by a person of the name Bethery, of Milk-Street.

JOHN BETHERY sworn. - I live with Mr. Skerrick, of Milk-Street: On the 13th of June I made a payment to the Bank, but I cannot say whether this was one of them or not.

Jarvis. It was brought in with thirty-two more.

Q.(To Ray.) Look at the words on the back of that note? - A. I do not recollect the 9th of June, but to the best of my knowledge those are the words that were upon it; I believe it to be same handwriting.

Mr. Penn. This is one that I delivered out in change.

Jarvis. I do not mean to swear that this is the exact identical note; I do not mean to swear point blank, because it came in with a large parcel, and that note might have got mixed with it; but I have hardly a doubt about it.

WILLIAM-GRAY WEDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am clerk to Mr. Parkin, Solicitor for the Post-office: On the 11th of June, I went to Kensington, to inquire for a place called Kensington-grove, but I could find no such place; the prisoner was apprehended on the 18th of June, I saw him on that day; I asked him whether he had not purchased some buff-coloured cord of Mrs. Nutterell; he replied, yes; he admitted that he had paid a two-pound note; Mr. Parkin asked the prisoner how he came to write the name of Johnson, Whitechapel, instead of Pooley; he said he was not prepared for an answer; and about an hour afterwards, he said that he received it in Whitechapel, of a person of the name of Johnson; I afterwards found a pair of breeches at his lodgings, No. 7, White-horse-lane, St. George's in the East, the name of the person that keeps the house is Lawrence, (produces the breeches; the prisoner admitted that he had purchased the stuff of Mrs. Nutterell, in Hound ditch.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.You are clerk to Mr. Parkin, the gentleman who conducts this prosecution for the Post-office? - A. Yes.

Q. This man saw Mr. Parkin, who made some inquiries of him? - A. Yes.

Q. He never denied having bought them of Mrs. Nutterell? - A. No.

Q.Nor did he attempt to conceal that he had paid for them by means of a 2l. Bank-note? - A. No.

Q. He did not tell you, at first, how that writing came upon it; but afterwards, did he not tell you he had given change for it to a person who was called Johnson, at a fish-stall, in Whitechapel? - A. He said something to that purport.

Q. And that before he was examined before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. You found that all that he said, with respect to Mrs. Nutterell, was true? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Hill tell you the truth when he gave his name, Walsh, Kensington-grove? - A. No.

Q. There were sixty-five pieces of Bank paper? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you found any one of these pieces, besides the one that he told you how he came by, when you asked him? - A. Yes.

BRIDGET STURGESS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. Q. Do you know a person of the name of Charles Hill? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; I had received many Bank-notes from Mr. Hill, but I cannot tell when; I received one or two five-pound notes; in the month of June he delivered me one, in order to redeem a watch that was in pledge in Shoe-lane; he gave me another to redeem a silver table-spoon, and half-a-dozen silver teaspoons, from a pawnbroker's on Snow-hill, they were in for a pound, or a guinea, I cannot say which, I think it was a pound; the watch was in for a guinea, I had put it in the day before, by Mr. Hill's desire.

Q. Did you receive change in cash or notes? - A.Both.

Q. Do you remember going with Hill to buy a gown? - A. Yes, in Fore-Street; I do not know the person's name.

Q. Who paid for the gown? - A.Hill paid for the gown with a five-pound note; the price of the gown was a guinea, I think, or twenty-four shillings, I cannot say which.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at any time in the month of June? - A. Not that I recollect.

JOHN RANSBURY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodsall. I am a tailor, No. 7, Ely-place, Whitehorse-lane: On the 9th of June, the prisoner brought me some stuff to make a pair of breeches, it was buff-coloured.

Q. Look at those breeches? - A.These are the same; I also made a coat and waistcoat for him;

he paid me two one-pound notes, and one shilling for it.

JOHN COPELAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodsall. I am a dealer in wines and spirits, No. 41, Aldgate High-Street: On the 16th of June, the prisoner ordered a dozen of wine of me, for which he paid me a two-pound note; I should not know the note again.

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodsall. The prisoner lodged at my house: I saw the prisoner and Hill, they went out together on the 9th of June.

Prisoner's defence. The evidence given by Hill is totally false; any thing further I leave to my Counsel.

Mr. Knowlys contended, that the draft in question could by no means be the subject of larceny, in as-much as it was not stamped, and was drawn at the distance of more than twelve miles, and therefore not a valid instrument.

The Court consented, as it was a new case, to reserve it for the opinion of all the Judges.

The prisoner called fifteen witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY Death .

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his good character, and upon a supposition that he was seduced by Hill.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t18000917-12

599. THOMAS PEARCE was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, on the 14th of July , in and upon Frances Maguire , Spinster , did make an assault, putting her in fear, and taking from her person one shilling, and a sixpence , the property of the said Frances.

FRANCES MAGUIRE sworn. - I am a single woman: I was robbed on the 14th of July, in the afternoon, I cannot say what time, in a common path, near Turnham-green ; I was coming from Turnham-green, and going home to Acton, my sister was with me; we met the prisoner, he passed us, and at a short distance he called to us to stop; we did not stop, and he called to us again; on his first calling to us we hastened our pace from him, and when he called a second time we hastened again, but he gained upon us very much, and got before us; he then put his hand into his bosom and desired us to give him our money, or he would blow our brains out; I gave him what money I had, which was a shilling and a sixpence; he asked me if I had any more; I told him I had not; he then asked my sister if she had any; she said she had not; he asked her, was she sure she had none; she said she had not; then he said, God bless you, and turned off.

Q.When he put his hand to his bosom, did he produce any thing that caused an alarm in you? - A. No; I thought he had something, but he did not pull it out; he was dressed in a light coloured coat, a stone colour, or something of that sort; he had a round hat on, a blue waistcoat, and a plaid handkerchief about his neck.

Q. Had the man a wig? - A. I cannot say; but it seemed to me to be his own hair hanging about his face; he had the appearance of a countryman.

Q. What time might this take up? - A. I cannot say to the time.

Q. Can you swear positively that the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any crape, or any thing to hide his face? - A. No; I found him at the watch-house at Acton.

Q. How far is that from the place where you were robbed? - A. Not half a mile.

Q. Try and recollect what time of the day it was? - A. I believe it might have been between four and five, or it might have been between two and three; he was taken to the watch-house, there was my father and brother there, I believe, and a great number of people.

Q. Was he pointed out to you as the man that robbed you, or did you pick him out? - A. He was not pointed out to me, I pointed him out to my father as the person that robbed me.

Q. How do you know he was the man? - A.From the impression his face made upon me.

Q. Was the man at the watch-house in the same dress as the man who robbed you? - A.Exactly.

Q.Was your money such that you could have sworn to it? - A. No; he had some money when he was carried before the Magistrate the next day, but I could not say it was mine; there were two persons that I met with just after I parted with the prisoner, I told them I was robbed, and asked them if they knew any thing of the man, for he had robbed me; and they said, yes; he had been sitting with them on the grass all day, and they could not get rid of him; but they have disappeared.

LUTHANIA MAGUIRE sworn. - I am sister to the last witness: I was with her when she was robbed, on Monday the 14th of July, in the afternoon, I cannot say exactly as to the time; the prisoner passed us, and called out after us to stop, or he would follow us; we went on, and he called after us again; he put his right-hand to his bosom, and desired us to deliver our money, or he would blow our brains out; my sister then gave him a shilling and a sixpence, I saw her give it to him; he asked her if she had any more money; she said, no, she had not; then he asked me if I had any; I told him I had none; he asked me again, was I sure I had none; I told him I had not; he then said, God bless you, and went away towards Turnham-green; I did not

see him again till the Friday afterwards, when I saw him at Bow-Street; I saw him in the passage going into the office, and at the bar.

Q. Did you at that time know that he was the man charged with robbing your sister? - A. I heard him ordered to the bar; I knew him as soon as I saw him.

Q. Was he pointed out to you as the man? - A. No; I made the observation first, and told Mr. Bond that he was the man; he had on the same coat that he had on when he robbed my sister.

Q. What was it that struck you the most forcibly about him? - A. His features; he wore his own hair, and had the appearance of a countryman.

Q. Did you take any notice of his voice? - A. I knew his voice again immediately.

Q. Under all the circumstances, do you believe the man you saw at Bow-Street was the same man? - A. I do.

Q. Have you any doubt upon your mind? - A.None.

Q. Do you know how he came to be taken up? - A. We described him so particularly to our brothers that they made inquiries after him, and traced him to Turnham-green.

WILLIAM MACGUIRE sworn. - I am the father of the prosecutrix: I took the prisoner into custody at an alehouse on Turnham-green, I think they call it the Barley-mow, about six o'clock; I saw him in a country club-room, there were a great many people in the room; I took him into custody, and brought him to the constable's house, at Acton; he was taken to the watch-house, and there my eldest daughter saw him, and said he was the man; I do not recollect that the prisoner said any thing at that time; he went very quietly with me.

Q. Are you in any business? - A. No; I have been in the army, but am a private gentleman, and live at Acton.

Q.(To Frances Macguire.) It never happened to you to be robbed before, I suppose? - A. Never.

Q. Were you under any alarm at the time? - A. I certainly felt an alarm.

Q.(To Mr. Macguire.) What passed when you went into the room, did you charge him with robbing your daughter? - A. Yes; but he was silent, I thought rather stupid, he was leaning down; a woman that was with me pointed him out to me; I don't recollect that he said any thing.

Prisoner's defence. I went to my club on the 14th of July, I was there by twenty minutes after one o'clock, and I was not out of the room till I was taken out by that gentleman; as soon as the gentleman came in, he said, do not be alarmed, for there is a person in the room that has committed a robbery, then the girl pointed me out, and he said, I must go with him; I was smoking my pipe; I begged of him to let me drink a glass of punch before I went, which he did, and then he took me to Acton, to the constable's, and then I was taken to the watch-house.

Court. (To Frances Macguire.) I wish, if you could at all recollect, the time with more certainly? - A. I can only fix it by this, that a good while after I had been home the clock struck three.

Q. Where did you last come from? - A.From Turnham-green; I had been to the Post-office at Hammersmith, and was very much tired, and when I came from the Post-office I sat down upon a stile for some time, I cannot exactly say the time.

Q.(To Luthania Macguire.) Can you say, with more certainty than your sister, what time it was? - A.No, I cannot; but I think it must have been near two.

Q. You sat upon the stile some time? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that before or after you were robbed? - A. Before we were robbed.

For the Prisoner.

RICHARD AUSTIN sworn. - I am a journeyman carpenter.

Q. Did you belong to the club? - A. Yes, at Chiswick; it was held at the sign of the Barleymow, upon Turnham-green; at the time the prisoner was taken up he was a member of it, he is a labourer; there were twenty members.

Q. Were you licenced by the Magistrate? - A. No.

Q. What sort of club was it? - A. A benefit club; the prisoner had been a member six years.

Q. What time did you see him the day he was taken up? - A. I saw him at twenty minutes before two o' clock, I looked at my watch when I came upon the Green, and he was the first man that I saw upon the Green, standing under a tree, looking at two other members playing at quoits; I always regarded him as a very honest man, and a very good member.

GEORGE CLACK sworn. - I am a labourer, I was a member of the club: I saw the prisoner about twenty minutes after one o'clock that day, and he was never away from us till the time he was taken up.

Q. What business does he follow? - A. I cannot tell, but I believe any thing that he can get to do; he is a labouring man, I have known him three or four years, I never heard any thing against him, he always sent his money like an honest man.

JOHN DAVIS sworn. - I am a labourer; I was at the club the whole day; I was one of the Stewards; I went there about eight o'clock in the morning; the prisoner came about twenty minutes after one; I saw him stand under a tree a great while before the clock struck two, and when the clock struck two, I called him and the rest of the men up, to take their half-crowns for dinner.

The prisoner called his master, and one other witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-13

600. JOHN WALL , STEPHEN NEATT , and ROBERT BARRETT , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , thirty-six pounds of bacon, value 27s. the property of George Milward .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

GEORGE MILWARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a wholesale dealer in bacon , in Goswell-Street : the three prisoners were in my service.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Coles? - A. Yes, he is a constable; I set him to watch the prisoners, in the salting-room, where the bacon was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you any partner? - A. No.

WILLIAM COLES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. On the 17th of July I was concealed in the salting-room, in one corner of Mr. Milward's premises; about nine o'clock in the morning the prisoners, Wall and Neatt, came in; I heard part of their conversation, they said they had but five shillings and sixpence per stone, and if it had not been for the b-y old b-h they should have had six shillings; they remained about three quarters of an hour, when the prisoner, Barrett, came in; I heard them say, before he came in, that he was ill; one of them said to the other, you stupid b - r, this is the side we must have, the rind of it is no thicker than a sixpence; upon that the stitch was thrown aside under the wrapper; Stephen Neatt said, we have got a piece boiling, we will have some peas, or cauliflowers, I cannot say which; then they went into the yard to drink some beer, and stopped near a quarter of an hour, and then they all three came back; but before they came, Mr. William Milward had been in; Wall and Neatt came in first, and one of them said, I cannot say which, he has been in, but d-n his eyes he is not up to us yet; then Barrett came in, and one of them said, you go and keep George washing the wrappers, and to look out for our master, for we are going to toss for a pot of beer.

Q. Who was George? - A. An old man that works there; upon that being said, Barrett went out; when he came in again, they took the side of bacon from under the wrapper and cut it through the middle; then they sent Barrett back again to tell him they were going to toss for another, Barrett then went back again; Wall then said to Neatt, here, take your whack, meaning his share, and he took one half under his smock frock; Wall put the other half under his, Neatt went foremost, and Barrett said to Neatt, how does your score stand now.

Q. What did that mean? - A. About what they were tossing for; Penn was within hearing; I then jumped out, and ran before them, says I, I will tell, you how your score stands, if you do not put down the bacon I will score your head, I had a cutlass in my hand; Neatt was very civil, and laid it down before my feet, from under his smock frock; Wall put his down from under his smock frock, upon the wrapper from which he had taken it, and said, this is the first time, I am not off the premises, and you shall not hurt me now; Barrett came towards the door, I shoved him in; says I, you are all concerned, if you attempt to get away I will blow your brains out; I then sent for Mr. Milward, and they were taken before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Barrett was ill? - A. So they said.

Q. When he did come into the warehouse, the conversation he had was about chalking? - A. That was while the bacon was cut.

Mr. Gurney. Q.Was Barrett there when the bacon was removed? - A. I fancy not.

Q. Was he at the door looking at them when they were cutting the bacon up? - A. He was.

WILLIAM MILWARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the brother of the prosecutor: On the morning of the 17th of July, I was sent for, and saw the prisoners, and the side of bacon cut in two.

Q. Was it any part of their duty to cut up the bacon? - A. No; their employ was to dry this bacon; it is the same sort of bacon that my brother had in his warehouse.

GEORGE PAYNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am employed by Mr. Milward: I was at the further end of the yard, when Barrett came and told me they were tossing up for a pot of beer; and in a few minutes after I heard the voice of a strange man; I turned about and went to the salting-house door, and saw the witness, Coles, with a cutlass in his hand, and the prisoners with the bacon at their feet.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel; Barrett called two witnesses, and Neatt one, who gave them a good character.

Wall, GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Neatt, GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Barrett, GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t18000917-14

601. FRANCIS GORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , five

feet of iron chain, with two can-hooks, value 15s. the property of James Gascoigne , Thomas Dawson , and James Dixon .

DENNIS CHAPMAN sworn. - I manage the business for James Gascoigne, Thomas Dawson, and James Dixon , the proprietors of Porters-Quay , they are the lessees of the wharf: On the 28th of August. I was in the accompting-house, I heard an alarm, I went down upon the Quay, and found one of our gangsman with the prisoner in custody; at the time that I saw him, he had five feet of iron chain, with two can-hooks, upon him, belonging to Messers. Gascoigne, Dawson, and Dixon; I know them by the mark, and by the make of them, they were marked P K for Porters Key; I can swear positively to them.

JOHN ASHTON sworn. - I am a gangsman at Porters-Quay: On the 28th of August, I saw the prisoner come out of the warehouse, I thought he had something upon him; he walked a little way with something under his jacket; I went up to him and asked him what he had got there; he said, nothing; I told him I would see what he had got; he was very loth to me, but I opened his jacket, and there I found the chain; I then took him to Mr. Lacey, the constable, and gave charge of him; I delivered the chain with him.( John Lacey , the constable produced the property, which was deposed to by Chapman).

Prisoner's defence. A man engaged four of us to go to a job, and sent me back for a pair of canhooks; I saw them lying at the warehouse door, I took them up, and put them under my arm, and this gentleman laid hold of me; I had no intention of stealing them.

GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Publicly whipped up and down Porters-Quay .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-15

602. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , forty pounds weight of bar iron, value 6s. the property of Jonathan Sparrow .

THOMAS WRIGHT sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Jonathan Sparrow , ironmonger , in West Smithfield : On Tuesday the 12th of August last, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was brought into our house, by our porter, with the property upon him; I know the iron to be Mr. Sparrow's property by the mark at the end of it; the smith that made it for us, about a week ago, out it too short, and was obliged to weld it; I can positively swear to it.

JAMES GODWIN sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Sparrow: I was coming home, about one hundred yards from the warehouse, when I met the prisoner turning up Charterhouse-lane with a bar upon his shoulder; I asked him where he was going with it; he said he bought it at an ironmongers, but he could not shew me where; a constable was sent for, and he was delivered to him. (The constable produced the property, which was deposed to by Wright).

Prisoner's defence I had been three days without victuals, I could get no work to do; I have no friends, I come from Dartmouth.

Q.(To Wright.) Where was it left? - A.Close by the warehouse-door, where he could easily put his hand in and take it out.

GUILTY (Aged 15.)

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-16

603. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of August , thirty yards of cotton, value 2l. 10s. the property of Robert Sowerby , privately in his shop .

JOHN RUTLEDGE sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Robert Sowerby, who keeps a shop-warehouse in Fenchurch-street : On the 22nd of August, a little before eight o'clock, the prisoner came to take out the dust; after he had taken the dust out of the cellar, about five minutes after eight, the porter came up with a candle in his hand, and seeing the closet-door open, asked me if I had missed any thing.

Q. Where was this closet? - A.Just going down the cellar stairs; the porter is not here; I missed fourteen cotton shirts not made up, they were cut out, and laid there to be put out to be made, there were about thirty-four yards of it; the dust-cart was gone, I went through several streets and could not see it; they were brought to me afterwards by a constable; I know them again by the mark, and the pattern of the cotton; the closet-door was shut when they went down; when the constable brought them back I opened them.

LEVY OWEN sworn. - I am a constable: I saw the prisoner in Petticoat-lane, on Friday morning the 22nd of August, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, with this basket of shirts, (producing it); I asked him what he had got there; he did not know I was an officer; he said he had got a few shirts, he said he was going to sell them; I told him I should take him into custody; he wanted me to let him go, and he would bring the person that had stole them, but I would not let him go; he afterwards told me he took them from Mr. Sowerby's, in Fenchurch-street.

Q.Did you make him any promise, or tell him it would be better for him? - A. No, I did not; he told me they were put into a basket, and covered with the dust; I looked after the other but could not

find him; I have kept the property ever since(The property was deposed to by Rutledge).

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

Jury. Q. Was the prisoner one of the men that attended the cart? - A. Yes; he was one of the men that carried the basket backwards and forwards.

Court. (To Rutledge.) Q. Is this closet any part of the warehouse where bargains were made? - A. No.

Q. Is it a separate room? - A. Yes.

GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-17

604. ANN PURCELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , two sheets, value 15s. a pillow-case, value 2s. and a counterpane, value 10s. the property of Robert Gray , in a lodging-room .

Second Count. For the same offence, not laying it to be in a lodging-room.

ROBERT GRAY sworn. - I keep the Bell-savage, Ludgate-hill : On Saturday evening, the 30th of August, the prisoner applied to me for a bed; the chamberlain, who detected her with the property upon her, is here.

JAMES SHAW sworn. - I am chamberlain at the Bell-savage: The prisoner came on Saturday the 30th of August, in company with a person that she said was her brother, and applied for two beds, stating, that they were going by the Salisubry coach the next day at four o'clock, they sat at the head of the stairs and had two pints of wine, which they paid for, and went to bad about eight o'clock, in separate rooms, they were to pay one shiling each bed; on Sunday morning, the 31st, about ten minutes past five, as I sat at the bottom of the stairs, the prisoner came down stairs, and delivered the key of her room into my hand, informing me to desire her brother, when he came down, which she supposed would be in an hour, to wait till she returned; her bundle appearing to be rather-large, I was suspicious there was more in it than she ought to have; I immediately went up stairs, and found two sheets, a pillow-case and a counterpane, missing; I went in pursuit of her as quick as possible; when I came to the end of the gate-way, I perceived her going up Ludgate-hill, near the Old-Bailey; I sent a man after her, desiring him to bring her back, and the man brought her back; she said, at first, she had not got them; she afterwards said she had them, and begged I would take the property and release her; I sent to St. Bride's watch-house but there was no constable attending; I took her to the Compter, and had her searched by the constable there; the counterpans was tied up in a black handkerchief, which she had under her cloak, the sheets were under her petticoats tied round her, and out of her bosom was taken the pillow-case; they are Mr. Gray's property, and the pillow-case is marked R S G.( William Periam , the constable, produced the property, which was deposed to by Shaw).

Court. (To Shaw.) Q. What was your bargain for the bad? - A. I told them they could have two beds for one shilling each.

Prisoner's defence. My brother made me drunk with wine, and I was guilty of the error; he enticed me to commit this cruel fact.

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-18

605. GEORGE TODD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , a silver table-spoon, value 7s. a silver salt-spoon, value 2s. 6d. and a silver top of pepper-box, value 6d. the property of John Leach .

WILLIAM HOWES sworn. - I am a waiter at the London Coffee-house ; it is kept by Mr. John Leach : On Wednesday the 3d of September the prisoner came in and asked for a bason of soup, which he had and paid for in the coffee-room; a little while after he left the coffee-room I missed a table-spoon; I immediately went after him and caught him in Stationers-court; he begged pardon, he put his hand in his pocket and gave me one spoon; he then put his hand in his pocket again, and gave me another spoon; that was a salt-spoon; I asked him why he did it; he said, from distress; he came back with me very quitely; when he was brought back to the coffee-room he was searched by the constable, and the top of a pepper-box found upon him.

WILLIAM KIMBER sworn. - I am a constable;(produces the property;) I took the pepper-box top from the prisoner; the spoons I had from Howes; when I had him in Mr. Leach's private room he held up his hand and was going to give me a blow on the head.(The property was deposed to by Howes.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; I expected Mr. Hodgson, of Symond's Inn; but he is not here to-day.

GUILTY , (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years ,

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-19

606. EDWARD THOMPSON and GEORGE WARD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on

the 5th of September , ten china cups, value 4s. and a tea-pot, value 1s. the property of Benjamin Powers .

CATHERINE POWERS sworn. - I am the wife of Benjamin Powers ; we keep the Portland Arms : On the 5th of September, about twelve at noon, the two prisoners came into our house together; they went into the parlour and called for a pint of ale; I heard a noise in the parlour, I thought it might be the elbow of one of them touching the cupboard-door; I waited, and heard it a second time; I then went into the parlour, and saw the prisoner Ward just turning from the cupboard; I said they had been at the cupboard; they said they had not; I cannot say whether they both spoke; I looked in the cupboard and missed ten cups; my husband then went for a constable, and while he was gone, I saw Ward pull them out of his pocket with the tea-pot; I had put them in a cupboard the evening before, myself; I know them again by the patterns; he put them on the table and begged for mercy.

ISBELLA GARRETT sworn. - I lived with Mr. Powers: I waited on two prisoners with a pint of ale; they did not pay for it; I saw the prisoner Ward give up the china; they were kept till the officer came.(John Halesworth, the officer, produced the property, which was deposed to by Mrs. Powers.) Ward did not say any thing in his defence.

Thompson's defence. It was Bartholomew-fair time, I was rather forward in liquor and I was asleep for about ten or twelve minutes; I was waked by the lady about the robbery; I have not been able to prepare for my trial on account of the trouble of my family; my wife laid-in of twins last Saturday week; the prosectuor has seen my wife and one of the twins.

Thompson, NOT GUILTY .

Ward, GUILTY . (Aged 41.)

Transported for seven years

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-20

607. JAMES CAMERON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , two Half-crowns, a sixpence, eight halfpence, and one farthing , the property of James Clements .

JAMES CLEMENTS sworn. - I am a baker , in Great Russel-street : On Friday, the 11th of July, about four in the afternoon, I went into a room behind the shop, and when I went into a shop again, I saw the prisoner lying across the counter; he had got the till drawn out to the utmost extent, and the money in his hand; he had got his hand in the part where the silver was; I ran round the counter as quick as possible; I pursued him; he ran down a passage till he got near Mr. Griffith's brewhouse, where he was stopped by a witness that is here; I never lost sight of him; we brought him back to our shop, and there he begged for mercy, and said he would give up what he had taken if I would let him go; upon which be produced one half brown and four-pence farthing; he said he had done it through distress, that he had got a wife and one child; and in our way to Bow-street he begged we would let him go, and he would confess all he had taken; then he told us he had taken two half-crowns, one sixpence and four-pence farthing; then when we got to the office the other half-crown and sixpence, were found upon him: he told us in the room where he was in custody that he intended to have it all if he had not been detected; he could not get the till out, he was prevented by a screw that goes through the counter to stop it; I took him to Bow-street, and he was commited; I cannot swear to any of the money.

WILLIAM COLLINS sworn. - I am a carver and gilder: About four o'clock in the afternoon of Friday the 11th of July, I heard the cry of stop thief; I turned round and saw the prisoner running, and Clements following him very close; he ran down Earl's-court. where the houses were pulling down; I ran round and met him; I put up my hands and stopped him; Clements immediately came up, and we took him back to the shop, and there he begged for mercy, that he was a man in distress; he produced a half-crown and four-pence farthing, which he said was all he had taken; we took him to Bow-street, and in the way to Bow-street, he said he had done it all through distress; if we would let him go he would confes all; he then produced another half-crown and sixpence, and said if he had not been detected, he meant to have had all.( William Pickering , the officer, produced the half-crown and sixpence, and the prosecutor produced the other half-crown and four-pence farthing.)

Prisoner's defence. I sent to Pickering, when I was in Tothill-fields, for the three shillings, and he sent me word he would keep it till the sessions, on purpose to do me; I wish you would look into it, for it is made up among them.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before. Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-21

608. JOHN BICKERSTAFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , four pounds of tea, value 12s. the property of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ROBERT JUDD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a labourer in the East-India Company's warehouses in Haydon-square ; the prisoner was a labourer and worked in the same floor, we had worked together for some time; I have been in the service of the Company about twenty years, and as a labourer about two months: On Saturday the 23rd of August, between eleven and twelve in the forenoon, I saw Bickerstaff take some tea out of one of the Company's chests, and put it into his greatcoat pocket; these chests were open for the inspection of the trade, previous to sale; he walked away into another room, I communicated it to a commodore, Evan Jones , who acquainted Mr. Joyce, the elder.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Part of these warehouses are in the city of London? - A. Yes.

Q. Is not this part of the warehouses in the city of London? - A. I believe not; I cannot say with certainty.

WILLIAM - PALMER BOOTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a King's Officer in the India-Company's warehoueses, in Haydon-square.

Q. Do you know whether that part of the warehouses, from which the tea was taken, is in the City or in the County? - A. I do not.

THOMAS JOYCE sworn. - I am an elder of the Company's warehoueses; this part of the warehouses is in the County of Middlesex, I am certain of it.

Booth. I searched the prisoner in the elder's accompting-house; I found three bags, and a paper parcel, the paper parcel and one of the bags, I found in the waistband of his breeches, another bag was in the breeches, behind, in the seat, and the other bag was in the crown of his hat; I asked him how he came by them, and he said he had picked them up as he came out of the warehouses, and then he said it was but the first time.

Q.(To Joyce.) Is that tea of the same sort with the tea in the company's warehouse? - A. Yes, it is the same fort that was in the chests for sale.

The prisoner left his defence to his councel, and called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Whipped one hundred yards in Haydon-square, near the India Company's Warehouses ,

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-22

609. RICHARD CHAPMAN and RACHEL ROCOE were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , eight remnants of linen check cloth containing sixteen yards, value 16s. the property of Edmund Darby , and Henry Knott , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were BOTH ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-23

610. RICHARD CHAPMAN was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , thirteen remnants of linen check cloth, containing twenty-six yards, value 26s. the property of Edmund Darby and Henry Knott .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

EDMUND DARBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a shop-seller , in partnership with Henry Knott ; the prisoner was employed by us in cutting out linen check shirts: On the 30th of July, in consequence of information that I received, I went over to Union-hall and got a search-warrant; the prisoner usually left his work at one to go to dinner, he lives over the water; I placed myself at Mr. Bull's door, who is a linen-draper, a few yards from my house, on the same side of the way, and in about three minutes I saw the prisoner come out; I kept him in conversation going down the street, till we got to Globe-court; I desired him to step up the court with me; I had something for him to do there; when we came to the end of the court, the constable opened the door, and we both walked in; my partner, Mr. Knott, and Mr. Riley were behind me; I told the constable he had some of my property about him; he then put his hand into one pocket, and pulled out a remnant of two yards; then he put his hand into the other pocket and did the same; I then told him he had more of my property about him, which he denied; I then desired the constable to strip him, upon which Chapman said, he would not give him the trouble to do that; he then unbuttoned his waistcoat, and from his left side took a remnant of two yards, and from the other side he took two more, making four in all.

Q. Is that the quantity you usually allow for making a check shirt? - A. No, not the proper quantity at all.

Q. Were those which were taken from him at all marked? - A. They were; I marked them, my partner marked them, and Mr. Railey marked them, that we might know them again.

Q. Were they marked when you found them upon him? - A. Yes; they were marked with the letter K. and another letter that my marking clerk will give you a better account of.

Court. Q. Are they your property? - A. Yes; I know them by the marks.

Q. Did you miss any of them? - A. Yes.

Q. Have not other shops the same pattern? - A. The shops very seldom have any such.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. This check is for sailor shirts? - A. Yes.

Q. And your checks for sailors shirts are quite different from every body elses? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not mean that any body else has checks like your's? - A. No.

Q. Have you no other partner in the trade besides Mr. Knott? - A. No.

Q. Is there no confidential clerk who has a proportinate share in the business? - A. None.

Q. Do you never suffer any work to be done by your servant at his own house? - A. No; if they do, it is stolen.

Q. But, suppose they bring it back compleatly made? - A. No such thing is ever done at our house.

Q. How many persons may you employ? - A.From one thousand to twelve hundred a week, every day.

Q. And all of them working upon your premises? - A. No; the cutters work in our house, but the other people do not; the prisoner was a cutter.

Q. Have you no persons that work upon the premises besides cutters? - A. No, only the porters.

Q. How long did this man live with you? - A.Seven years; I always had a very good opinion of him, and was sorry to find that this had happened; I gave him good wages, thirty shillings a week, and ten guineas at Christmas.

HENRY KNOTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the partner of Mr. Darby: Immediately after the prisoner had left his work on the 30th of July, I went into the place and missed three remnants of check that I had marked the same morning; Mr. Riley had marked them with the letter J.; I put my own mark immediately under, a small k.; I then immediately went to Mr. Darby, who was at Mr. Bull's door, and gave him information; the prisoner walked down towards London-bridge, which was in his way home; Mr. Darby also walked by the side of him; Mr. Riley and myself followed close behind; when we all came to the end of Globe-court, Mr. Darby desired the prisoner to go up the court with him; Mr. Riley and I still followed close behind; they went into the house of Gill, a constable, and we followed close behind; Mr. Darby desired the constable to search him, for he suspected he had some of our property about him; at first he said he had nothing, but almost immediately after he said he had nothing but two remnants of check; he put his hand into one of his coat-pocket, and took out a remnant of linen check; he then took one out of his other coat-pocket; Mr. Darby still charged him with having more, and ordered the constable to search him; he said he would not give him the trouble, but slackened his apron, and from under his waistcoat took a remnant about the same size, and then another; before I looked at them I told him they were marked, and I immediately opened them and shewed the marks upon them; they were deliverd into the charge of the constable.

Jury. Q. How many hands do you employ? -

A. It is impossible to guess, I could not state the number within five hundred; we employ a great number of parishes, and how many of the poor are employed upon our work it is impossible for me to tell.

HENRY GILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable in Globe-court: The prisoner was brought to my house by Mr. Darby; he desired me to search him, but he would not be searched; he himself took out of his coat-pockets two remnants of linen check; Mr. Darby then said there was some more; he said there was no more; then Mr. Darby desired me to search him, but rather than let me search him he took the two remnants out from under his waistcoat himself, and I secured him; I have had them ever since. (Produces them.)(The three remnants were deposed to by Mr. Knott.)

GEORGE RILEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am in the employ of Messrs. Darby and Knott; the prisoner was my fellow-servant: On Wednesday the 30th of July, the day on which he was apprehended, I put the letter R. on four remnants of checks; three of these are my marking, I saw them taken from the prisoner; Mr. Knott marked them at the same time, here is his mark; the prisoner was employed as a cutter.

ROBERT COOPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the police-officers in the Borough: In consequence of a search-warrant I went to the lodgings of the prisoner, in Townsend-court, Queen-street, in the Borough; I found his wife and daughter there; I found nine remnants of check, eight of them are marked.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Did you happen to be acquainted with this man's wife before? - A. No.

Q. Then you of your own knowledge do not know that this was the house of the prisoner? - A. No; only from the information of one of Mr. Darby's gentlemen who went with me.

Q. Is that gentlemen here? - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called nine witnesses, who gave him an excellent character. GUILTY . (Aged 48.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-24

611. WILLIAM STEWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a

gown, value 30s. seven yards and a quarter of muslin, value 16s. a muslin handkerchief, value 2s. a cap, value 1s. 3d. and a silk handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Patrick M'Dermott .

MARY M'DERMOTT sworn. - I am the wife of Patrick M'Dermott: I came from Chatham and went to dine with Mrs. Kelly in Seacoal-lane ; I had the property in a bundle in a handkerchief; the prisoner, who was a dustman , came to the door to ask for some beer; the landlady of the house was lying down upon the bed; and I put the bundle down upon the sideboard, in the room below stairs, close to the street, while I called the woman to give him some beer; there were two of them, the prisoner was outside; the window was open; the landlady of the house was lying upon the bed in the same room; I saw the prisoner take away the bundle, and run up the street with it; I went out, but could not get a sight of him, and then the other man drove the cart away; the bundle contained a gown, seven yards and a half of muslin, a muslin handkerchief, a cap, and a silk handkerchief; I went to enquire after the man, and I found them both together, and the cart empty; but I never found my bundle again.

Q. Did you never see them before? - A. No; I charged a constable with the prisoner.

PATRICK M'DERMOTT sworn. - I am a private in the 14th regiment of foot: I was not in London at the time of the robbery; my wife brought away from Chatham the things mentioned in the indictment.

Prisoner's defence. I know no more of it than the child unborn.

For the Prisoner.

JOSEPH CHALKEY sworn. - I was with the prisoner in Seacoal-lane; I went into the cellar with him, and when we had got our load, I asked the gentlewoman for some beer; she said when we came back for the remainder we should have some; when we came back she said she had lost her bundle.

Q. Was the window open at all? - A. Yes, the farther window was open, and she was at the window.

Q. Then you never heard any thing at all about the bundle? - A. No; she found us as we were coming back for the remainder of the dust, as she had promised to give us some beer; she said she had lost her bundle, and that my fellow-servant had put it up into the cart; I said, if it is so, ma'am, if you will go back you will see the load is but just shot

Q. How long has the prisoner worked with your master? - A. About three or four months.

ESTHER ROBINS sworn. - I am not in any business; I live next door to Mrs. Kelly; I saw the cart go away, but I saw no bundle.

MARY MUTLOW sworn. - I was at the door at the same time that the cart was filling; I live at the next house; I did not see any bundle.

ELIZABETH PEARCE sworn. - I saw the cart go by; I heard a noise; I enquired what was the matter, and this good woman told me she had lost her bundle, and asked me if I knew which way the dustmen went; I told her I did not know; she said that dustman were very bad men, and must have taken it; then she went away, and she came back and said she had seen the dust, but could not find the things.

Q.(To Mrs. M'Dermott.) Did you make use of this expression-dustmen are very bad men, and they must have taken the bundle? - A. No, I did not; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I saw him take the bundle, and before I could get round the corner he was gone; I could see the cart and the other man; but I had lost sight of him.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-25

612. HENRY BEECH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of April , a gold watch, value 5l. and 32l. 18s. 6d. in money , the property of John Anderson .

It appearing in evidence that the prosecutor was excessively drunk, and that the watch and money had been lost at the game of Putt, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-26

613. BARNEY KEENAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , one hundred pounds weight of lead, value 20s. the property of Thomas White , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - I keep a house in Whitecross-street : On the 13th of this month, about half past three, I was alarmed by a watchman's rattle; I threw up the window, and learned that there were people at the top of the house; I went down and found the watchman and constable of the night at the door, with the lead, which belonged to my trap-door, at the back part of the top of my house; it was almost new lead, it had not been on five years; I went up about two or three hours after and compared it; part of it was cut with a knife, the nail-holes corresponded exactly; the prisoner was brought out from the next house but one, in about five minutes after the alarm was given; I did not see any thing taken from him.

BENJAMIN CASE sworn. - I am a watchman: on the 13th of this month, a little before four, I was sitting in my box, and heard something fall in Mr. White's house; I listened again, and and something else fall; I immediately crossed to the opposite side of the way, and saw a piece of lead come down from the top of Mr. White's house; I looked up and saw a man there; I asked him what he did there, he made no answer, and I sprung my rattle; after we had secured the lead we found the prisoner lying upon his back in a yard next door out one to Mr. White's; it was so dark I could not see the person of the man who was at the top of the house; we thought the man was dead at first; we took him to the watch-house, but found nothing about him.

MICHAEL MINDER sworn. - On Saturday morning, a little before four, (I was the officer of the night,) I heard the rattles go, and I went over to the watchman; the neighbours got up, and I went into the next house but one, and found the prisoner lying upon his back; I thought he was dead; he could not speak; his head was cut in two places; he had fell from the back part of the house, I heard him fall; there were some slanting tiles that came down from Mr. White's house to a chimney-pot, from which he fell; the chimney-pot and the tiles both fell with him; he was taken to the watch-house.

Case. I saw the lead compared with the trap-door, and every thing answered.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence. GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-27

614. CORNELIUS SAMUELSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , four pieces of calico, value 5l. the property of Thomas Moberly , in a certain ship called the Fanny, upon the navigable river Thames .

There were several other counts, laying them to be the property of various persons.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS MOBERLY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am part owner of the ship Fanny, William Moberly was the master on the 6th of September; the ship was laden principally with East-India calicoes; they were in bales; the prisoner was a seaman on board the Fanny, and had been for about eighteen months: I received information, last Sunday was se'ennight, that some calico was missing, and I went on board the vessel; the carpenter brought a piece of calico to me, which appeared to be a part of the cargo of the ship.

Q.How many pieces were there in a bale? - A.Sixty-nine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say there were sixty-nine pieces in that bale; I suppose you only collect that from some book or other? - A.From the invoice, which is here.

JOHN ALDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the Cock and Lion at Alderman Parsons's Stairs, at Wapping.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; on Saturday the 6th of September, about eleven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought two pieces of calico, wrapped up in a black handkerchief, to my house; he offered them to me for sale, at 2s. per yard.

Q.That is a pretty cheap bargain? - A. I believe not; it was more than they were worth; I gave him sixteen-pence, which is as near what they were worth as could be; they contained eighteen yards each; he told me he had brought them from abroad, and that he was going out immediately.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell Office: On Sunday morning, the 7th of September, I went on board the ship Fanny, lying off St. Catherine's ; the prisoner was between decks, at breakfast; I apprehended him and took him into the cabin, Mr. Moberly's brother was present, he is gone aboard; I secured the prisoner, he asked me the reason why; I told him, I had reason to believe he had broke open a bale the night before, and stole four pieces of calico, which he utterly denied for some time; I told him, I thought it was useless for him to deny it, for we had some proof of it; and he said, go on shore with me; he then expressed a desire to speak to the captain privately, and desired us to go upon deck; we shut the cabin-door upon him and the captain, but did not go upon the deck, we stood in the passage; after some time we were desired to come in; when we got in I went on shore with the prisoner and the captain, and as we were going along I asked him where we were going, and he told me he was going to the Cock and Lion; that he had not broke the bale himself, but that it was tore in coming on board; I went to Alder's, and he immediately delivered the calico; I have had it ever since. (Produces it.)

Alder. I did not mark the calico, but the same that I received from the prisoner I gave to Rogers.

Rogers. I after that went to the house of a person of the name of Ann Lawson , in Queen-street, St. George's; where the prisoner asked for the key of a chest that was above stairs; he went up stairs, I went with him; he opened the chest; I asked him if it was his own chest, he said it was; and there I found this piece of calico. (Produces it.)

ANN LAWSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

I live in Queen-street, St. George's: On Sunday, the 8th of September, between seven and eight in the morning, the prisoner came into my house with a piece of cotton; I asked him what he had got there, he said, cotton; he threw it down upon the chair, and went away directly; he desired it to be put into the chest; my husband took it up stairs, and about ten o'clock he came again with the officer, and they took away that piece of cotton.

BENJAMIN JAMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I packed this bale of goods in the East India Company's warehouses, the Bengal warehouses I think; No. 578; there were sixty-nine pieces of calico in it; I trucked it and wheeled it to the further end of the room, and there pitched it to be marked.

- FELSTEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a teller in the warehouses; it is my duty to tell all the goods in the room where I am; the packer tells it first, and then I tell them again before they are packed; I told for Mr. Ripley some of the calicoes; Mr. Ripley is a merchant.

Q. Do you know if those calicoes were sent on board the Fanny? - A. I do not know what ship they went on board of.

HENRY TILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Messrs. Ripley, Riviere, and Co. I counted one of the bales, and found it to contain sixty-five pieces; the bale appeared to have been slipped with a knife; it was calico of the same quality with this.

Prisoner's defence. I was promised forgiveness from my master; I was very much in liquor, and am very sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 30s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t18000917-28

615. WILLIAM PRATT was indicted for that he, on the 12th of August , in the King's highway, in and upon George Perkins did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a metal watch, value 10s. 6d. the property of the said George.

GEORGE PERKINS sworn. - I live with Mr. Hodgson, tailor, in King-street, Kensington: I went out about a quarter before four, on the 12th of August, to Kelson-green, on the road to Harrow , about two miles from Kensington ; I had got about a mile and a quarter or a mile and a half when I overtook the prisoner; I had never seen him before to my knowledge; he asked me what o'clock it was, I told him about twenty minutes after four; then after walking a few yards by the side of me, I was in the road and he in the foot-path, he asked me if that was the Harrow road; I told him, yes strait on; he walked on till we came to the gate and there he put his hand upon my two shoulders and said, your money or your life; I gave him my watch, and said to him, here is my watch, I have no money; have not you got any, says he, and felt the outside of my pockets all round; I had a half-guinea in my pocket, but I told him I had not any, and he did not feel it; he then got over the gate, doubled his fist at me, and said something which I cannot recollect; then he went away.

Q. Had he any weapon? - A. I did not see any.

Q. How long might he be with you? - A. A very short time in the whole.

Q. Have you ever seen your watch again? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you see him again? - A. I was robbed on the Tuesday, and I saw him again on the Saturday.

JOHN FULLER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker:(produces the watch); it was pledged by a person in the name of Susan Taylor , on the 12th of August; but who pledged it I cannot say: I do not know whether I took it in or my young man.

Perkins. This is my watch, I have had it about half a year; I have no doubt at all of its being my watch.

SUSANNAH TAYLOR sworn. - The prisoner brought a watch to me, and I pledged it for him; I had lived with him about three months.

Q. Did he tell you how he came by it? - A. No; I pledged it at Mr. Fuller's.

DANIEL GRIFFITHS sworn. - On the 16th of August, about eight at night, I apprehended the prisoner, near the Swan at Bayswater.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. I had seen him at different times; I found nothing upon him but a gardener's knife, a glove, and one farthing.

JOHN BAKER sworn. - On the Sunday following the apprehension of the prisoner, I went to him and asked him what he had done with the duplicate of the watch, and he said he had left it at the house of Susan Taylor , at Turnham-green; I went there, she gave me the ticket.

Prisoner's defence. I asked the gentleman for his watch, and he gave it me directly.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 21.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000917-29

616. WILLIAM RAYNER and CHARLES MOREN were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Anthony , about the hour of ten in the night of the 10th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a cloth coat, value 20s. a pair of pantaloons; value 2s. a pocket handkerchief, value 6d. and a leather pocket-

book, value 2d. the property of the said John; a coat, value 14s. and a pair of trowsers, value 1s. the property of Abraham Gole ; and a coat, value 14s. the property of a Chinese man called Awing .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

- AWING being a foreigner, an interpreter was sworn. I am a Chinese man; I live in the house of Mr. Anthony, No. 4, Angel-gardens, Ratcliff-highway : The house was broke open on the 10th of April; I went to bed about nine o'clock, and got up about eleven o'clock to smoke a pipe, which I always do every night; I had locked the street-door and the parlour-door; I found the things gone.

Q. How did the doors appear to have been opened? - A. The lock had been forced; I missed two water great coats, such as we wear on the water, a pair of pantaloons, a coat, a pocket handkerchief, a leather pocket-book belonging to Mr. Anthony, a pair of trowsers belonging to Abraham Gole, and a coat of mine.

JOHN ANTHONY sworn. - I am employed by the India Company to take care of the lascars who come over here; I rent this house and employ Awing to take care of the house and of the men; he came to me about eleven o'clock on the 10th of April, and gave me the information; I have since seen a coat belonging to my brother-in-law.

JOHN COOK sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office: In consequence of information I went to the house of Solomon Jacobs , where I found this great coat. (Produces it.)

SOLOMON JACOBS sworn. - In April last I lived in Fisher-alley, Petticoat-lane; I am a dealer in cloaths: The two prisoners, with Huff, the accomplice, and Soloman Robus, came to me on the 10th of April, about eleven at night, with three coats, and a pair of striped pantaloons, a pair of cotton trowsers, a white handkerchief, and a blue jacket; they asked me two guineas for them; I bought them for a guinea and a half; they were not all present, for when I came out to get change, I saw Rayner standing outside the door; I told him to go in, which he did, and when I came back he was in the shop; I put down the money upon the counter, I cannot say which took it up; the officers afterwards came to me, I recollected that I had sold one coat to a young man at Brentford, who was gone to Windsor; and I went to Windsor after it, and got it, and delivered it to the officers; this is the coat that I received from the prisoners.

ABRAHAM GOLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I know this to be my coat by a mark in the sleeve and in the side, which I believe to be a scratch; I have no doubt of its being mine; I left it upon the bed in my brother-in-law's house, No. 4, Angel-gardens; the house is inhabited by Awing.

Awing. This is one of the coats that was lost from my house that night; it belongs to Abraham Gole .

Anthony. I know this coat perfectly well; I am sure it is my brother-in-law's coat.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I apprehended Rayner and Huff.

JOSEPH HUFF sworn. - I know the prisoners, I have been acquainted with them two or three years: On the 10th of April, about ten o'clock, we went to this house and pushed against the door, and the street-door came open; we all four of us pushed against it with our shoulders; then Rayner went into the entry and lifted up the latch of the outer door; Rayner then brought out a lappelled coat, two great coats, a pair of blue striped trowsers, and a pair of pantaloons; in one of the coat-pockets there was a pocket-book, which we threw into a ditch in the New Road; we took the things to Solomon Jacobs, and asked him two guineas for them, Robus and I and Moren went in, Rayner staid at the door; Jacobs gave us a guinea and a half for them; when the money was paid Rayner was in too, and we shared the money between us.

Rayner's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

Moren's defence. Huff was tried at this bar in last-May sessions; and I have received a conditional pardon.

Court. If that is so, the better way will be to take a verdict of acquittal with respect to Moren.

Mr. Kirby. That certainly is so.

Rayner, GUILTY Death . (Aged 27.)

Moren, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-30

617. JOHN DOUGLAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , a ream of paper, value 20s. and twenty quires of paper, value 20s. the property of our Sovereign Lord the King .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of William Harris .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am yeoman-usher of the Exchequer ; I have had the care of the store-house there for thirty years; the key of the store-house was missing three months before I detected the prisoner, I made enquiry of all the men who came there, and the prisoner himself; the prisoner was a book-binder , employed by Mr. Palmer; Mr. Palmer is a master book-binder, employed by Messrs. Mount and Page, who supply the Exchequer with all necessaries: On Saturday the 26th of July, I saw a ream of paper lying loose upon the table, three reams had

been tied up in bundles; I never delivered out any but in bundles to the printer; two of the bundles had been taken away, and one was lying upon the table loose, I was very much alarmed; on the Monday, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was going into the room to speak to a gentleman that I had desired to let me know if he saw any body go in, when I saw the prisoner take this key out of his pocket, and put it into the door; this was the key that I had lost, (producing it;) I kept watching, and saw the prisoner coming out with a ream of paper in his hand; I asked him what he was going to do with that; he said, he was going to bind a book for Mr. Fisher; I said, did Mr. Fisher send for you; he said, yes; by that time he had put the paper upon the shelf that he had taken it from, and was endeavouring to come out of the office; I asked him where he was going; he said, he was going to Mr. Fisher; I then got hold of the door, and said no, you shall not go to Mr. Fisher, for I will take care of you; he then struggled to get past me, I made an alarm, and a gentleman that was close by in another office, came to my assistance, and he was searched.

Q. Is it a particular kind of paper? - A. Yes, here is a sheet of it, (producing it;) you will see the word "Exchequer" in the water-mark; the expence of it, to his Majesty, is about four or five pounds a ream.

BRACKLEY KENNET sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On the Monday, Mr. Harris and I were talking together, I saw the prisoner go in, I told him of it, and he went to the door; I heard a great noise in a few minutes, and Mr. Harris called to me for assistance; I went, and saw the prisoner struggling with him, and I held him while Mr. Harris went for a constable.

WILLIAM PALMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a book-binder, employed by Mr. Davison, a stationer, who contracts with Messrs. Mount and Page; the prisoner had been a servant of mine, but I had discharged him three weeks before this.

Q. Had he at that time any authority from you to fetch books to bind for his Majesty, or for the office? - A. By no means.

Prisoner's defence. I have a large family of five children, who are motherless, I hope the Court will in judgement, remember mercy.

GUILTY . (Aged 50.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000917-31

618. MARY CANNON was indicted for that she, on the 23d of August , in and upon Edward Murphy , did make an assault in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silver watch, value 40s. a ribbon, value 1d. and a metal watch key, value 1d. the property of the said Edward.

EDWARD MURPHY sworn. - I am a labouring man : On the 23d of last month, about eleven o'clock at night, I was robbed in Cross-lane, Newtoner's-lane, Holborn ; I went to the house of Daniel Kenzie to pay my rent, I could not go sooner, because my master had put just paid me my wages; when I came out, I saw this woman and a man standing at the corner of the court; I knew the woman perfectly well, she had lived in the same court with me five or six months; she came up to me, and asked me what o'clock it was, I had a child in my arms at the time; I put down my child, I pulled my watch out of my sob, and told her it was twenty minutes past eleven o'clock; I put my watch in my sob, and took up the child again, and she snatched the watch out of my sob; I laid hold of her and she struggled away from me: a man came up to me, and said, you bl-dy eyed thief, what do you want with the woman, and he upt with his fist and knocked me down while the woman ran away with the watch; this was on Saturday night, and the next morning I took her into custody; I have never seen any more of the man since; here is the woman here that found the watch the same night.

JULIA MURPHY sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; my husband had sent me for a candle, I had the candle in my hand, and I saw my husband upon the ground; I saw him get up, and the man ran away, that is all that I saw of it.

CATHERINE DUFFEY sworn. - Last Sunday was three weeks, about twelve o'clock, as I was going for a pail of water, I found the watch about four yards from where this man lived; I gave the watch to my husband, and he sold it, I live next door but one to Murphy.

JOHN DUFFEY sworn. - I received the watch from my wife, and sold it to a young fellow that is here, I did not know whose it was.

Murphy. He lives but next door but one to me, and could not be off knowing it.

Duffey. I did not hear any thing of it.

Q. What regiment do you belong to? - A. The East-London; I sold it two or three days after.

THOMAS RAWDON sworn. - I am a cooper, I live at Deptford; I was in a public-house where the soldier was shewing this watch about in the taproom, on the Monday; I gave him a guinea for it.(Produces it.)

Murphy. I am sure this is my watch.

Prisoner's defence. I was in Cross-lane, drinking a pint of beer with another young woman, and a

young man, Murphy and his wife, and some more of his country people were on the opposite side of the way, and they began quarrelling; I said to the young woman, we had better go, for they would use us all alike in the quarrel; the next day I heard that he had lost his watch, that he had said, I had taken it; I directly went down to Cross-lane, from the Seven-dials, to his wife, and asked her what demands he had of me, and she said, demands enough; I asked her where her husband was, and she said, he was gone to look for me, and I said I would wait till he came home, and I did, I waited above an hour; and when he came in he laid hold of me, and used me very ill, I had not a rag upon my back but what was torn to pieces.

Q.(To Murphy.) Was it a dark night? - A. Yes; but I knew her voice, and her person, perfectly well.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t18000917-32

619. JOHN MOUNT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Harris , about the hour of eight in the night, of the 29th of August , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, a pair of sheets, value 4s. a blanket, value 3s; a counterpane, value 2s. and a gold watch, value 5l. the property of the said Richard Harris .

JOHN HESTER sworn. - I live with Mr. Richard Harris, in Symond's-inn : On Friday the 29th of August, his chambers were broke open; I went out and left Mr. Harris in the chambers; I returned a little before nine, the laundress came out as I went in; I almost immediately after heard a noise in the bed-room; I went into the bed-room to see what it was; I looked under the bed and round the room, but could see nothing; then I heard the venetian blinds in the bed-room shake; I went to the window, moved the blind, and found the window open, which I knew had not been open all day; under this window were some leads of a few yards width, and upon looking out at the window, I saw a man making his escape from the staircase window, without a hat; Mr. Harris's window is two stories high, and this staircase window is between one and two story; I saw the bed-clothes lying upon the leads, under the window; I pursued down stairs, and saw the man running without his bat, in the inn, there was no other man near; I held him some few minutes till somebody came to my assistance, we found nothing upon him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you lose sight of the object you were in pursuit of? - A. I did for a few minutes; when I first saw him, he turned towards the back gate, but that being fastened, he turned back again.

WILLIAM WHITTON sworn. - I heard of Mr. Harris being robbed, and after the prisoner was taken, I found a watch close by where he had like to have got away from Mr. Hester; Mr. Harris has got the watch.

JOHN BARTON sworn. - In consequence of the alarm, I went upon the leads, and found a hat upon the leads, which I delivered over to the constable; I took it to the watch-house, and in consequence of his saying he had lost it in a particular place in the scuffle with Hester, I stated to have found it there, he said it was like the hat, but he did not believe it to be his; I examined the place, and found that a hole had been cut in the plaister wall, between the leads and the window for a foot-step, and it occurred to me, that he must have whitened his shoes; I then went back to the watch-house to look at his shoes, and found that the inside of the left shoe had scraped against the wall.

JOHN BLUNDELL sworn. - I am a constable: I know nothing of the robbery; I received the man into custody, and the property. (Produces it; as also the hat and shoes).

RICHARD HARRIS sworn. - I know nothing of the robbery myself, I was so lame as not to be able to get off my chair; the sheets have my own name upon them, the gold watch is mine; I know them all to be mine.

Q. Can you positively say whether the window had been open that day or not? - A. No; I was extremely ill, and occasionally obliged to lie down, and in that situation I should not have suffered the window to be open.

Q.(To Hester.) Was the man without a hat when you first saw him? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it dark? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I was going past, I heard the cry of stop thief; there was a man and two women before me, and this gentleman came up and laid hold of me; the bat is not mine, the shoes are mine; I am a shoemaker, and every shoemaker whets his knife upon his shoe, and using a white stone it makes the shoe white.

GUILTY of stealing the gown, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t18000917-33

620. WILLIAM MANN , JOHN CORBY , and JOHN CHAPMAN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , a chaldron of coals, value 50s. the property of William Thrappit , in a barge upon the navigable river Lea .

Second Count. For stealing the same goods in a barge lying and being in a certain creek belonging to the navigable river Lea.

Third Count. For stealing the same goods, the

property of Esther Ellis , and Edward Ellis , in a barge upon the navigable river Lea.

Fourth Count. For stealing the same goods in a barge lying and being in a certain creek belonging to the said navigable river.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

EDWARD ELLIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partnership with my mother, Esther Ellis, timber and coal dealers , at Hertford; we had a servant of the name of Page in our service, he went to London somewhere about the 1st of August, loaded with timber, and he was to load back with coals, or at least I was to let him know; I afterwards met him at Mr. Thrappit's, at Shadwell; I gave Mr. Harper, his clerk, an order for a barge load, which is twenty-two chaldrons and three quarters; I did not see the barge loaded, I received a bill of lading.

EDMUND BRAIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a lighterman, employed by Mr. Thrappit, coal-merchant, at Lower Shadwell: In consequence of directions from Mr. Thrappit, I gave an order to the meter, to load twenty-two chaldron; I saw the barge in the morning with Page in it.

Q. Did you know it was Mr. Ellis's barge? - A. Yes.

GEORGE OSBORN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a coal-meter: On the 8th of August, I received an order from the last witness to put twenty-two chaldron and three quarters on board; I cannot positively say it was Mr. Ellis's barge, because I did not look at the name on the barge.

Court. Q. Was it the same barge that Brain directed you to put them on board of? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You did not see Brain on board? - A. No.

JOHN AUSTIN sworn. - On the 9th of August, I was in the meadows, near the river Lea, measuring Edmonton-marsh to and fro all day; when the coals were taken away, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was about sixty yards from the river, I saw the barge marked Edward Ellis, and also marked upon the barge, Page, steersman; I saw Page on board, I never saw him before in my life; I saw the prisoner, Mann's cart coming down, and backed to where the barge was, in a creek before you come to the river Lea; I saw him in the barge with four or five other men, Corby and Mann were among them; I knew Mann very well; two of them were shovelling coals into the sacks, and two holding them up.

Q. Did you see Chapman? - A.Yes; he was assisting them in filling the sacks; they shot the coals out of the sacks loose into the cart, there were about six or seven sacks, Mann and Corby went away with her cart; Chapman and Page then went and borrowed a cart of one Carpenter, in the Marsh, and in about ten minutes after they loaded that likewise; they had no horses, they drew the cart themselves, and placed it to the barge as the others had done, and loaded the cart with coals; I cannot say what the quantity was, I was not so near them then.

Q. How long were they about it? - A.About twenty-five minutes; Chapman drove the cart away, and Page remained in the barge; as Mann passed me, I said, Mann, I think you buy coals at a cheap rate, don't you; he made me no answer.

Q. Have you any doubt of the three prisoners? - A. I have no doubt at all about it; Chapman I never saw before, but I have no doubt he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. You say there was another name upon the barge besides the prosecutor's? - A. Yes, James Page , Steersman.

Q. Mann's cart is a common carrier, I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. Carries goods of all descriptions? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. About four o'clock.

Q. You don't know that the barge that you saw was the same barge that was said to be loaded in the Thames with these coals? - A. The barge that I saw had the steersman name, James Page .

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What business are you? - A. A baker.

Q. And measuring land? - A. Yes; because I was out of place.

Q. How long had you been out of place? - A.Two or three months; I had been ill.

Q. That was the reason of your being out of place? - A.No, it was not.

Q. Do you know where Mr. Jackson, the Magistrate, lives? - A. Yes.

Q. How far from Edmonton? - A. About a mile and a quarter.

Q. Where was your lodging? - A. I am a housekeeper, at Edmonton.

Q. How far from Mr. Jackson's office? - A. About a mile and a half from where I am; there are two Edmontons.

Q. Did you, in any of your leisure walks, go to Mr. Jackson the Justice, and tell him there were four men robbing an honest man? - A.I went to Mr. Wright, the high-constable, that same evening.

Q. Did you give him information of the parties concerned? - A. I did.

Q. That you swear? - A. Yes, of Mann.

Q. That was the only person you acquainted him with? - A. I might have acquainted him with more.

Q.Did you acquaint him with the names of Chapman and Page? - A. Yes.

Q.You know the name of Palmer's green, do you not? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you never said, upon any occasion, that Chapman never did any thing, but being asked by some of them to fasten the cart to the horse, and that that was all that he did? - A. I never said any such thing.

Q. Never? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. But you must know whether you did or not; did you never say that that was all the share he took in the transaction? - A. I never did.

Q. Do you know any body at Palmer's-green? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever borrow a horse of any body there? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. That is a very odd kind of answer; you must know; did you ever sell a horse? - A. Yes; I have sold one.

Q. Did you never sell a horse that you had borrowed of a neighbour? - A. No.

Q. You never gave information of these coals to any body but Mr. Wright? - A. No.

SMITHSON DAWSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a land-surveyor: The last witness was with me, on the 9th of August, measuring the Marsh; I saw some persons in a barge, but I cannot swear to any of them; there were two carts, and five persons engaged in loading them out of the barge; they shot them into the carts loose, when one cart was full the other was fetched; two of them went away with the first cart, and then two of the other five went for the other cart, and loaded that from the said barge; there was the name of Ellis on the barge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were at work on the same spot with Osborn? - A. Yes; at the same distance.

Mr. Knapp. (To Mr. Ellis.) Q. How many barges have you? - A. Two.

Q. Was there more than one barge upon the river that day? - A. I believe the other was in the Thames, but I am not sure, I think it was, loaded with timber, going to Blackwall; I am sure she was not loaded with coals.

Q. Had Page authority from you, or your mother, to sell coals for you? - A. Never; nor or did I ever sell a coal in my life to any body at Edmonton, or between London and Heriford.

Mr. Peat. Q. Page might have given directions to persons to unload a quantity of coals from that barge? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Is it not possible? - A. Yes.

Court. He was in the barge himself, loading these coals; that is more than giving directions.

GEORGE CARPENTER sworn. - I live in the parish of Chinkford, in the county of Essex

Q. Do you know Page, a servant to Mr. Ellis? - A. I have seen the man; I saw him on the 9th of August, in Edmonton parish; there was another man with him, at a distance, that man in blue is the man, Chapman, he might be ten or twenty yards from him; Page asked me to lend him a cart.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was Chapman near enough to hear what he said? - A. I do not think he was,

Jury. (To Dawson.) Q. Was this a usual landing-place for goods? - A. I do not know that I ever saw any landed there before; the barge had been lying there for two hours before this transaction.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner, Mann? - A. Yes; I am a wheelwright, within a few doors of him, in Upper Edmonton; he came to me on the 9th of August, about five o'clock in the afternoon; he came and asked me if I wanted to buy a small quantity of coals; he said he had got a few that he had bought, that he wanted to part with; I did not answer him the first time; and as he was going out at the door, he says, will you have them or not; I said, Will, you know it is Saturday, and I run short of money; he made answer, if you cannot pay me to-day you can to-morrow; he then said, if you like to have them, say so; he owed me a little bill; I said, if he would give me half money and half coals I would have them; he then went to his own yard, where the coals were; he was to bring me six sacks, but I did not see them measured; he brought them in the cart, and my smith helped to unload the cart; to the best of my knowledge they were in sacks; I paid him a guinea and a seven-shilling-piece.

Q. Did you outset the debt? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What is Mann? - A. He keeps a horse and cart to carry any thing on the road.

Q.(To Mr. Ellis.) Did you examine your barge when it came home? - A. I could hardly miss a chaldron of coals out of a barge of coals.

Q. Is your steersman's name upon your barge? - A. Yes; James Page .

Q. What is the steersman name of your other barge? - A. John Constable.

Corbyn's defence. James Page employed me to put so many coals into this man's cart.

Mr. Knapp. (To Mr. Ellis.) Q. Did you not promise Corbyn that he should be a witness for the Crown if he told who the other persons were? - A. I did.

The other two prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

The prisoner, Mann, called three, and Chapman six witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Mann, GUILTY. (Aged 40.)

Corbyn, GUILTY. (Aged 40.)

Chapman, GUILTY. (Aged 41.)

Of Stealing goods, value 28s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-34

621. RICHARD HOLMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a bag, value 1s. 6d. and twenty-one pounds weight of sugar, value 1l. 5s. the property of William Phoene , and William Reeves .(The case was opened by Mr. Jackson.)

WILLIAM PHOENE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a confectioner , No. 38, Watling-Street , in partnership with William Reeves , the prisoner was our porter : On Friday the 1st of August, I missed the sugar mentioned in the indictment; the sugar was made up into loaves weighing seven pounds each, twelve of them weighing eighty-four pounds, it was fine sugar; there was the mark of 7 with a stroke upon the sugar itself, and 7 on the paper, the sugar was in a place adjoining the work-shop, the prisoner was employed in the workshop; which is on the same floor, the prisoner was employed principally in breaking down the sugar.

Q. Did you ever sell any sugar; or did you use it all in your trade? - A. I never sold any, we always use it up in our trade; the prisoner boarded and slept out of the house; I missed a bag on the 1st of August, marked with the letter S, No. 85.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a Police-officer: On Monday the 8th of September, I searched the premises of John Roberts , a cow-farmer, in Hoxton-fields; on the 3d of September, I found two whole loaves of sugar in chests, and a quantity of sugar besides in a basket; I saw Mrs. Roberts.

Q. Did you get immediate access to those chests? - A. No; we asked for the keys, and she said she had not got them; my brother officer searched her, and found in her pocket the key of one of the chests; we took the sugar to the office, (produces it); I found part of it under the bed, and the remainder part was found in the back-kitchen, in a chest; the two loaves of sugar were in the papers that they are now in; the next day, I searched the house of a man of the name of Nealey, he and his wife were at home, they live in Playhouse-yard, Golden-lane, there I found in several bags, (produces them); here are two more loaves of sugar, that I found in the parlour at Robert's, in paper; on the Tuesday, the same day, I searched the house of Mary Knotman , in an alley in Grub-street; there I found two pieces of sugar, (produces them); I have had them ever since.

Q. Have you, at any time, had any conversation with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Before the prisoner said any thing to you, what did you say to him; did not you tell him it would be better for him to confess? - A. No, I was aware of that; I took him to his own house, and told him there was a charge against him for stealing some sugar from his master; I and my brother officer asked him if he had got any in his house; he said he had got none.

Court. Q. Was this after you had been to Mrs. Knotman's? - A. No, before; I staid with the prisoner below stairs, while my brother officer searched and found a piece of sugar, which he has here; after that, he begged very hard to let him go, on account of his family; and she went down upon her knees to let him go, he had five children; we then told him we could not, we were officers of Justice; and we then took him to the office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The piece of sugar found at the prisoner's house is a very considerable quantity I see? - A. Here is all there was.

Q. Is there any mark upon it? - A. Here is part of a mark.

Q. What sort of a mark is it? - A. I believe it is a dent in the sugar in the baking.

Q. Roberts is a cow-keeper? - A. Yes.

Q. And deals in sugar? - A. I should think so, or we should not have found it there.

Q. A cow-keeper a dealer in sugar? - A. We found some other things there besides; we found some linen, some liquorice, and some handkerchiefs.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you believe all those things were stolen? - A. No, I do not believe they were; there was a tin pot that was owned.

Q. This man, Roberts, gave you a great deal of information, I suppose, before you went to the house? - A. No, he knew nothing about it.

Q. Nor Mrs. Roberts? - A. No.

Q. Did you make known to him that you were officers of Justice? - A. To Mrs. Roberts I did.

Q. And though you told her you were officers of Justice, she refused to tell you there was any sugar in the house, and refused you the keys? - A. Yes; and she refused us other keys besides that.

Q. Was good Mr. Roberts at home, the cowkeeper? - A. No, he was not.

Q. Some sugar was found under the bed, in a place of concealment? - A. I cannot say.

Q. It is precisely a kind of place in which a cowkeeper and a grocer would keep it? - A. I cannot say as to that.

Q. You found some in the back-kitchen, in a chest? - A. Yes; it was standing by the fire-place, locked up with a key that we found in Mrs. Robert's pocket; there was a towel found there, with the mark picked out.

Q. At Mr. Nealey's you found some bags? - A. Yes; and some pepper, in the chest in Nealey's bedroom; he was at home, and his wife too.

Q. You told them you were officers of Justice? - A. Yes.

Q. And they shewed you directly where the things were? - A. No, they did not; they said we were welcome to search.

Q.Did they tell you the property was to be found in the chest? - A. No.

Q. Nor Mrs. Knotman, I suppose? - A. She gave it up directly.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a Police-officer, I was with Vickery: I found the things he has produced at Mr. Roberts's; I went in company with Vickery to apprehend the prisoner, on Tuesday the 9th, to Watling-street, at his master's.

Q. Was it in consequence of any thing that passed at Roberts's that you apprehended the prisoner? - A. It was; we desired him to go with us to his house, in a court in Hill-street, Holywell-mount; I asked him if he knew a person of the name of Nealey; he told me he did; I asked him if he had let him have any sugar at any time; he refused to tell me whether he had or had not; I then proceeded to search, and asked him if he had got any sugar in his house; he said, no, he had not; I found a great deal of sugar broke up in lumps, fit to put into tea; I found this lump, (The lump produced by Vickery), wrapped up, in a closet; it appearing to be of the same quality with that that was found at Roberts's house I took it before the Magistrate; he seemed very much alarmed, and begged we would not take him before the Magistrate, but let him go; that he was very sorry for what he had done, and would never do so again; his wife went down upon her knees, and cried; I asked him if he could inform me where he bought the sugar, if he bought it at any shop in the neighbourhood; he told me he could not.

Q. Did you search any where else? - A. Yes; from the information that I received from Robert's wife I searched Nealey's house, and there I found three bags, and a quantity of papers; there were some small pieces which corresponded with the fine sugar but we did not bring it away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You said, upon my learned Friend's examination, he refused to tell you; did he say he would not tell you? - A. No; but he did not tell me.

Q. The small piece was all you found there? - A. Yes.

Q. What would it weigh? - A. I suppose a pound, for hardly so much.

THOMAS NEALEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a shoe-maker: About a fortnight before Christmas, Holman met me in the street, and gave me a sample of sugar, and said, if I could sell that for him he would be obliged to me; my wife sold it, and I had no more of him for some time; six or seven weeks after that; sometimes he would bring me some twice a week, and sometimes he would not bring any for two or three weeks, I cannot fix any particular time.

Q. I wish you to state, as near as you can recollect, how long before the 1st of August you received any sugar? - A. I cannot tell any date at all.

Q. Did you receive any sugars of him before the 1st of August? - A. Yes.

Q. As near as you can tell, how short a time before? - A. It is impossible for me to tell.

Q. What did you do with the sugar that you did sell? - A. I sold two whole loaves to Mrs. Knotman.

Q. What did you sell it for? - A. I cannot say; I did not receive the money, my wife received it.

Q. Do you know any thing about the weight of the loaves? - A. No.

Q. Did you observe any marks upon them? - A. No; I did not take any notice of it.

Q. Who did you pay the money to that was paid to you? - A. Mr. Holman; I cannot recollect how much it was.

Q. Do these two loaves look like them? - A. They are the same size.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a shoemaker, are not you? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you no other trade? - A. No.

Q. Do you deal in sugar? - A. No; it was brought to me.

Q. You got nothing by it? - A. No.

Q. Not a sixpence? - A. Oh, yes, many a sixpence; but it was entirely his own generosity.

Q. Does your wife keep a shop? - A. No.

Q. You thought it a very honest thing to be dealing in sugar, as a shoe-maker? - A. I had no suspicion at all.

Q. There were some bags found at your house; look at these bags? - A. I do not doubt but they are the same; here is one marked S, I received it from the prisoner.

CATHERINE NEALEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you recollect receiving any sugar at any time before August? - A. Yes; the prisoner brought them to me in papers.

Q. Do you recollect the size of them? - A. No.

Q. Were they marked? - A. I do not know.

Q. What did he desire you to do with them? - A. To sell them for him; I sold some to Mrs. Knotman for eleven-pence a pound; I carried the money to Holman, at a public-house in Whitecross-street, where there is a club held.

Q. Did you give all the money that you received to Holman? - A. I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You got nothing by it neither? - A. No.

Q. Your husband is a shoe-maker? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not keep any shop for the sale of sugar? - A. No.

Q. You thought it a very honest thing, no doubt, to be selling sugar? - A. I thought no harm in it.

Q.Upon your oath, did you make no part of this story known till the officers came to your house? - A. No; I did not know that there was any harm in it.

Q. So you derived no emolument from it? - A. Only a little beer now and then.

Q. Did your husband receive nothing? - A. Now and then he might give him a sixpence, or a shilling.

Q. How often might he give him a sixpence, or a shilling? - A. I cannot say; it was when they were out together.

Q. What became of you after the officers came to your house? - A. I was sent to Bridewell.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know that you are swearing to save yourself from being prosecuted? - A. I do not know that I am.

Q. Do not you know, that by giving evidence to-day, you yourself will not be prosecuted? -

Court. Q. Was your husband in Bridewell? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the sugar that was found at Mrs. Knotman's, and tell us if you can, whether it is a part of what you sold to Mrs. Knotman? - A. I believe it to be the same that I received from Holman.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you mean to swear to these two pieces of sugar? - A. No; only I believe them to be the same.

MARY KNOTMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I bought some sugar of Mrs. Nealey last Monday three weeks, and I bought some about five weeks ago; the last that I bought of her was two small pieces, which Mr. Vickery took away.

Q. Look at that sugar, is that the same? - A. I cannot say whether it is or not.

Q. Do you believe it to be the same? - A. I do; they are two bottom pieces.

Q.Suppose I were to shew you two pieces from another shop, of the same size, should you know the difference? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you come from jail now? - A. No; I was in jail one night, with Mrs. Nealey and Mrs. Roberts.

Q. And the next day you found bail? - A. Yes.

Q. You told the officers all you knew about the sugar before they came to your house? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Then, to save yourself, you told what you knew about it? - A. I don't understand you.

Q. Do you think, after giving your evidence today, that you shall be prosecuted? - A. I do not know.

Mr. Jackson. (To Phone.) Q. Look at these two pieces of sugar. (The sugar found at Mrs. Knotman's? - A. I can swear that this mark was on the sugar that is lost; it was marked 7, and a stroke on the bottom of the loaf, and the quality is the same; I believe it to have been my property.

Q. Look at that bag. (The bag found at Nealey's)? - A. This is my bag, I know it by the number, the letter S, and figure 85.

Q. Now look at the sugar found at the prisoner's? - A. It is the same quality.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Is that mark 7, and a stroke, your own making? - A. It is not.

Q. Is there any other mark about it? - A. There is not.

Q.Will you then undertake to swear merely from the circumstance of quality that is your property; would not any confectioner have sugar of that quality? - A. Certainly.

Q. Would not they also have sugar with the mark of the manufacturer? - A. No doubt of it.

Q. The sugar found at the prisoner's? - A. That I cannot swear to at all.

Q. Now as to the bag, you know that by the number? - A. Yes.

Q. Does it ever happen to you, as it does to other tradesman, that sacks are lent? - A. I never lent a sack in my life.

Q. How many servants do you keep? - A. Four.

Q. When you send out goods, do your servants use bags to carry them out in? - A. They do.

Q. Are your other servants here? - A. No.

Q. Will you swear, that on the 1st of August, that bag was not out, carried out by some one of your servants? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Might not they be in the custody of your servants to bring home your goods, without your knowledge? - A. They might.

Jury. Q. Is the mark that is upon it your own mark? - A. No; it was a mark that I bought with it.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw that sugar till it was laid before me at the office.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-35

622. WILLIAM PHILIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , ten pounds weight of sugar, value 5s. the property of a certain person, or persons, to the jurors unknown.

RICHARD DAVEY sworn. - I am a marine Police-officer: On Saturday the 9th of August, in the afternoon, I saw some sugar running out of a hogshead into a man's apron, upon Botolph-wharf's ; another officer told me the prisoner was the man and assisted me in taking him into custody.

Q. Who does the sugar belong to? - A.I do not know.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a constable: On the 9th of August I was upon duty on the quays; I say

the prisoner and several more suspicious persons about the quays; I watched the prisoner, I saw him and another put their backs against the warehouse, and their feet against the hogshead of sugar, and shove it in with their feet; I saw them haul the cross-bar, which secures the head of the hogshead, away, I cannot say which of them it was; I then saw the prisoner step on one side for a few seconds, and he then brought an apron and spread it down by the hogshead, and began to scrape the sugar out with his left-hand as he leaned over the hogshead, to prevent any body seeing what he was about; I then thought proper to take him into custody; when I was coming towards him, he had quitted the hogshead and was coming towards me, I laid hold of him, and he attempted to rescue himself from me, by which means I tore his shirt and smock frock, which he had on at the time; I then took him into the warehouse, tied his hands, and took him to the Compter; I desired Davey to take the apron up, which he did, and came to my assistance.

Q. Do you know whose sugar it was? - A. No.

Q. It could not be easily ascertained, I suppose? - A. No; there were a number of hogsheads about at the same time.

Prisoner's defence. I was going along Freshwharf, and the officer laid hold of me, tied my hands and took me to the Compter, they searched me, but I had no sugar upon me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-36

623. WILLIAM COBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , twenty pounds weight of yarn, value 8s , the property of Thomas Bolt .

- WILSON sworn. - I am clerk to Thomas Bolt, wharfinger ; I know nothing of the transaction.

JOHN ASBURY sworn. - I am clerk to the wharfinger, at Cox's Quay: On the 24th of July last, I was going out of our own accompting-house, I observed a cask of yarn upon Fresh-wharf , I saw some of it lying upon the wharf; I then saw a man, who was at work for Mr. Bolt, take it up, and carry it a different way from what he ought to have carried it; Mr. Wegener then came up, followed him, and took hold of him; I followed Mr. Wegener, and he had then partly got it into his trowsers; I called one of the city constables, and gave charge of him.

Q. The cask was broke, and the yarn lying about in different places? - A. Yes.

Q. The bundle that he took up was at a considerable distance from the cask? - A. Yes.

- WEGENER sworn. - I am a gangsman, at Cox's Quay; on the 24th of July, I was upon the quay, adjoining Fresh-wharf, which is Mr. Bolt's wharf; I saw a cask of yarn broke, and some pieces of yarn lying about, the prisoner was near the cask; I looked over the hurdle and saw a piece of yarn; he took up a piece of yarn and ran the contrary way, he put part of it into his trowsers, and the other part in his apron, and went over the hurdles; I asked him what he had got there, he said, nothing, he then pulled it out from under his apron, and out of his trowsers, and put it down; Mr. Asbury came back with a city constable, and Mr. Wilson gave him in charge.

Q. The hogshead was broke? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not belong to Mr. Bolt's wharf? - A. No.

JOHN CARLISLE sworn. - I am an officer, (produces the property;) I received it in charge from Mr. Wegener.

Wilson. I landed this yarn about an hour before; there was a broken vat of yarn; I was up at dinner, and was sent for by Asbury, and I gave charge of him.

Q. How do you know that to be your yarn? - A. The quality is nearly equal, and in counting the number of heads there were two deficient, there should have been three hundred and forty skains in that vat, and there were but three hundred and thirty-eight, this one makes three hundred and thirty-nine.

Q. Did you give the prisoner authority to remove any? - A. No, I did not.

Jury. Q. Nor to repack it? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn; I saw a man take a piece, and I took it from him to take care of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 49.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-37

624. CHARLES SILK was indicted, for that he, on the 15th of August , in a certain field, and open place, near the King's highway, in and upon Jane Jackson , spinster , did make an assault, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, a silk purse, value 1d. a sixpence, and eight halfpence , the property of the said Jane.

JANE JACKSON sworn. - I am a single woman, I live at Newington-green: On Friday the 15th of August, I was robbed I was walking from the

New River towards Newington green ; I had a little girl with me, about seven years of age; the prisoner at the bar came behind me, and demanded my money; I told him I had no money.

Q. What did he say to you? - A. He said, give me your money, I want your money; I told him I had none; he then said, I must have your money.

Q. Did he stop you? - A. He gave me a push first, and said, give me your money; I gave him some halfpence, I think fourpence and a sixpence, and told him that was all that I had; he then demanded my purse; he then produced a stick with a hook at the end of it, and said, he would knock my eyes out, unless I gave him my purse; I said I would give him my purse as soon as I could find it, I gave him my purse, and then he went away.

Q. What sort of purse was it? - A. A small silk purse.

Q. Had he a round hat? - A. I think it was.

Q. Has any of your property been found since? - A.Not that I know of.

Q. Had you ever been robbed before? - A. No.

Q. Then you were under considerable alarm, I suppose? - A. I was.

Q. What time might this robbery be? - A. About eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. How do you know it was about eight o'clock in the evening? - A. The light was rather declining.

Q. Look at his person, and say if you are certain he is the man? - A. I am.

Q. How was he dressed? - A. He had on a blue jacket, and a red waistcoat.

Q. Did you see his face? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you say how long this robbery might take up? - A. About five or six minutes.

Q. How soon after did you see the prisoner? - A. In less than five minutes; I saw a gentleman coming out of a gate, I told him what had happened, and he went after him; the gentleman returned in two minutes, he was taken and brought back by a gentleman who saw the transaction; I stopped within a few yards of the place where I had been robbed.

Q. Are you certain, that the man that was brought back, was the man who robbed you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you live with your father and mother? A. No; I live with a lady who keeps a lady's boarding-school, at Newington-green.

HENRY SMITH sworn. - I am a coal-merchant: On the 15th of August, in the evening, I was coming from Newington-green, in company with two ladies; in getting over a bank into the field, where Miss. Jackson was robbed, I observed the prisoner coming down within one hundred yards of me; he came from a quickset hedge to the place where we were, in a beaten footpath; he came close behind us, got over the bank, and went to some paling, along which was a footpath, over which Miss Jackson had to go; the paling was made of ship-timber, and there was a part of the ribs; he hid himself behind one of them; he came out again, and passed her; he then turned round and passed her a second time, and then turned about and stopped her; I saw her deliver something, first with one hand, and then the other, at different times; he then set off that way, the way that she was going, but hearing people in the lane, he turned out and came towards me; I made a cry of stop thief, and saw him taken immediately; I never lost sight of him for a minute, or a sixtieth part of a minute; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I took him down to Miss Jackson, and asked her if that was the man, she said it was; he did not say a syllable; we took him to a public-house, on Newington-green, and searched him; we found upon him about five pennyworth of halfpence; Miss Jackson described that there were some new halfpence amongst them, and there were some new ones amongst those that he had, and a tin box, containing his discharge from the barracks at Chatham, on account of his bad sight.

JACOB JEFFERY sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, (produces the tin box, containing the prisoner's discharge;) he had about five pennyworth of halfpence but as Miss Jackson would not swear to them, and he having no more money, I gave them back to him.

- JONES sworn. - I heard the cry of stop thief; I went to stop the prisoner, when he threw away this stick, (producing it); he was taken not one hundred yards from where Miss Jackson was robbed; Miss Jackson said that was the same stick that the prisoner had presented to her.

Prisoner's defence. When I was brought back, Mrs. Jackson was asked if I was the person, and she said she could not tell; then they took me to Newington-green; the constable asked her, and she said she not say that I was the man, and then a gentleman came and said, he would swear he saw me take the purse out of the lady's hand.

Q.(To Miss Jackson.) Did you ever say to any one, that you did not know whether he was the man or not? - A. I never did.

Q. The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 21.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-38

625. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , a pound weight of cotton, value 1s. the property of a certain person or persons to the Jurors unknown.

JOHN TODD sworn. - I am a preferable watchman belonging to his Majesty's Board of Customs: On the 19th of August I was upon duty at Freshwharf ; between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, John Worsham , a watchman belonging to the India Company, called to me, and in consequence of his information, I went and took the prisoner; I found him sitting upon a bag of cotton; I brought him forward, and a police-officer was sent for, and he took a quantity of cotton out of his breeches.

Q. Whose was it? - A. The merchant is unknown; I had it in charge; it belonged to different merchants.

JOHN WORSHAM sworn. - I am a labourer belonging to the India Company: On Tuesday, the 19th of August, about half past seven, I saw the prisoner taking the cotton out of a bag upon Freshwharf, and putting it in his breeches; I called to the watchman, Todd, and he came and took hold of him; I charged him with it, and he said he had got none about him, till he was searched, and part of it taken out, and then he denied that he had any more; we found a quantity more upon him, and then he was secured, and taken to the Compter.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I am a constable:(Produces the cotton.)

Prisoner's defence. I was starving, and very much distrest; I never did such a thing before; I have not a farthing in the world; I did not know what to do with it when I had got it.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Whipped 100 yards upon Fresh-wharf .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-39

626. THOMAS ELLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , four pounds of coffee, value 2s. the property of a certain person or persons to the jurors unknown.

FRANCIS HUNTER sworn. - I am a merchant's watchman upon the Quays: On Saturday, the 2d of August, I saw the prisoner at work in a lighter at Wiggins's-quay ; I saw him take some coffee out of the cask and put it into a small bag, and put it into his pocket; I went up to him and asked him what he had got about him; he said, nothing; I searched him and found this coffee upon him, in a small bag; there is about three or four pounds of it; I do not know whose coffee it is; I could not find out; I sent for the constable, and he was secured.

Thomas Hunter , the constable, produced the coffee.

Prisoner's defence. I was at work in a lighter, and after she was worked out, I found this coffee spilt about, and it would have been trod upon and spoiled if I had not picked it up; I did not know that I was doing any harm.

Q.(To Hunter.) Did he take it out of the cask, or off the floor of the lighter? - A.Out of the cask,

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 36.)

Whipped 100 yards on Wiggins's-quay .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-40

627. JOHN YOUD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , seven pounds of copper, value 7s. the property of Thomson Warner , John Warner , and Robert Warner .

WILLIAM FAIRCLOUGH sworn. - I am a labourer to Messers. Thomson Warner, John Warner , and Robert Warner , brass-founders : On Wednesday, the 6th of August, I saw the prisoner deliver two pieces of copper into the hands of a witness that is here; the prisoner was porter to Messers-Warners.

JOSEPH ABNEY sworn. - I am a labourer to Messrs. Warners: On the 6th of August I was at work in the shop about eight o'clock in the evening, when the prisoner went through the shop soon afterwards, and Mr. Robert Warner called out for me; I went, and he gave me two pieces of copper into my hand, which he said he had taken out of the prisoner's pocket; the prisoner was present, but did not make any reply; Messrs. Warners are all Quakers: a constable was sent for, and he asked the prisoner if that was all; he then put his hand into his pocket and gave me two more pieces out of his left-hand pocket; they were delivered to the constable; I marked them in the presence of Fairclough and Mr. Robert Warner .(The constable produced the property.)

Fairclough. I cannot swear to the property.

Prisoner. I have not any body to speak for me.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-41

628. MARY M'LOCKLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , a pair of women's shoes, value 3s. 6d. and three shoes, value 3s. 6d. the property of James Coleman .

JAMES COLEMAN sworn. - I live in Fleet-market : On the 18th of August, about half past five in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop and asked if I had a pair of shoes to fit her; I shewed her two or three pair, and she said there was nothing to suit her, and she went about her business; I missed two odd shoes in about two minutes after she was gone; she came back again in about half an hour, to look at a pair of shoes that she had seen before.

Q. Were they women's shoes? - A. Yes; she then took a pair and two odd ones, and under pre

tence of trying them on, put them between her shift and petticoat; I saw her do it; she only tried one on; she pulled it off again, and left it upon the floor; she said they would not suit her, and was going away again; I stopped her and shook her petticoat, and the three shoes sell from under her petticoat.

One of the Jury. Q. We understood you to say she came to your shop in Fleet-market; have you a shop in Fleet-market, or is it in Field-lane? - A. No, Field-lane, Fleet-market; (produces the shoes;) I have had them ever since.

DAVID TYLER sworn. - I am journeyman to the prosecutor: I went into the shop when the prisoner was trying on the shoes; I saw her stuffing something under her petticoat; she said there were none that would fit her, and she was going out of the shop; my master stopped her, and said, you have got some of my property about you; she made answer, that she had not; he immediately began to search her, and three shoes tumbled from under her petticoats upon the ground; he took them up, and took her and the shoes to the Compter.

Prisoner's defence. He told me at the Compter, if I would pay for the shoes he would let me go; I told him I should not pay for what I knew nothing about; he knocked me down in his shop, and used me very ill.

Court. Q.(To Coleman.) Did you offer to let her go if she would pay for the shoes? - A. No, I did not. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-42

629. WILLIAM STOREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , two tea urns, value 5l. 5s. the property of John Tyler , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM- FREDERICK ROOME sworn. - I live in Cripplegate-buildings, nearly opposite Mr. Tyler's: On the 15th of July, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Tyler's shop with a tea-urn under each arm, and Mr. Tyler's son running after him; upon that he put down the tea-urns, and endeavoured to run away; and seeing that I went up; Mr. Tyler's son laid hold of him, and there was a scuffle; I heard the cry of stop thief; I caught hold of him by the collar, and took him back to Mr. Tyler's; the teaurns were taken in.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know who the tea-urns were delivered to? - A. I believe they were delivered to young Mr. Tyler.

SAMUEL DAVEY sworn. - I am a brazier: I was at work in the back shop; I was called out; I saw the prisoner and the tea-urns in the front shop.

Q. He had not the tea-urns upon him at that time? - A. No, they were standing upon the sideboard; it is not a counter.

GEORGE CALLOW sworn. - I am a brazier; I work for Mr. Tyler: I was going through the shop on Tuesday, the 15th of July, and saw two teaurns standing upon the sideboard of that pattern; I saw them both coming and going back, I was out but a few minutes; soon after that I was called out, the prisoner was then in the shop, within hearing; Mr. Tyler's son desired me to go for a constable; the prisoner did not say any thing; the urns were delivered to the constable.

HENRY TYLER , being one of the people called Quaker's, refused to be sworn.

ROBERT NEWMAN sworn. - I am a constable:(produced the property.) I received them from Mr. Tyler's son, after the prisoner was in custody.

Q.(To Callow.) Whose urns are these? - A. I believe them to be Mr. Tyler's; I have no doubt of it; his name is at the bottom of them, in the cast work; they are the same pattern that I saw in passing through the shop, and they are my own finishing.

Mr. Gurney. Q. When Mr. Tyler sells tea-urns do you take out his name? - A. No; it must be scraped out, or field out.

Q.Whether young Mr. Tyler had sold these urns or not, after you first saw them, you cannot tell? - A. No; I was in the back shop.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY (Aged 20.)

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-43

630. HENRY COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a silver watch, value 5l. 5s. the property of George Hands ; and that he afterwards, about the hour of two in the night of the said day, burglariously did break the dwelling-house of Thomas Frost to get out of the same .

GEORGE HANDS sworn. - I am a labourer ; I lodge in the house of Mr. Frost, at Holloway , below Islington: On the eighth of June, either Sunday night or Monday morning, I lost my watch; the prisoner slept in the same bed with me, he is a brick-maker; I got up at four o'clock, and the prisoner was gone; I missed my watch from the window where I had laid it on the over-night; I got up, and started after the prisoner; I followed him about two hundred miles; there was nobody else slept in the room; I found him, I think, on the Saturday following, at Newport Pagnel; Mr

Gregory was with me; we searched him and found the watch upon him; I know it to be my watch, I can swear to it.

Q. Did the prisoner and you go to bed at the same time? - A. Yes, the room door was open.

Q. You were not the last up in the house? - A. No.

THOMAS FROST sworn. - I live at Holloway, I keep a private house; I cannot recollect the day of the month, but it was between the Sunday night and the Monday morning, these two men lodged in my house; On Monday morning, about four o'clock, I was waked and informed, that there had been a robbery done, the prisoner was then gone; I was the last person up in the house the night before; I am certain the doors and windows were fast.

Q. Were you the first up in the morning? - A. No, there were several people up before me, I was waked by the disturbance.

AMOS GREGORY sworn. - I am a constable of Newport Pagnal; I apprehended the prisoner, and took a watch from him, which the prosecutor said was his; he had described it as a silver stop watch; I have had it ever since. (Produces it.)

Prosecutor. This is my watch, it has the name of Charles Wright locksmith, Wolverhampton, on the inside; this chain and seal were to it when I lost it.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the watch of George Hands , I gave him half-a-guinea, I was to give him so much a week for it.

Q.(To Hands) How long had you lodged in that house? - A. Four or five nights; the prisoner was there before me.

Q. Were you acquainted with him before that? - A. I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Q. Upon the oath you had taken, is it true that you sold him the watch? - A. No.

Q. Did you never offer to sell him the watch? - A. No.

Q.(To Frost.) Did the prisoner leave any of his clothes, or any thing behind him? - A. No.

Q.(To Hands.) What is the value of the watch? - A. It cost me five guineas about two years and a half ago.

GUILTY of stealing, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-44

631. THOMAS-DOUGLAS NEWMAN , and ANDREW WILKIE ,were indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , a brown gelding, value 121. the property of George Arnold .

GEORGE ARNOLD sworn. - I lost a brown gelding from my farm, near Bath ; I missed it on the 14th of August, I had seen it on the 11th or 12th, in the stable, my servant had turned it out; I saw it again on Monday the 25th of August, in Worship-street; I am sure it was my horse; I had had him about a year and a half; I do not know either of the prisoners.

WILLIAM LLOYD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Arnold; I turned this horse into the field on Wednesday the 13th of August; on the 14th, about eleven in the forenoon, I went to take the horse out, and missed it, it was a post-horse; I had seen it at four o'clock the day before, I found the gate fastened just as I had left it.

Q. Did you find any gap in the fence? - A. No, the other horses were all safe; I saw the same horse at Worship-street, with my master, I am sure it was the same horse; I know nothing of the prisoners.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - On Sunday the 17th of August, between eight and nine in the morning, I, in company with Ray and Mason, two officers, apprehended the prisoner Newman, at Mr. Hall's stables, Hamilton-street, near Hyde-park-corner; the prisoner Wilkie was standing at the stable door, Newman was coming out of the stable with the horse, and this saddle and bridle, and this great coat, (producing them;) the great-coat was strapped upon the saddle, and he was leading the horse out; I asked whose horse that was, Newman made answer, mine; I asked him how long he had had it, he said, two months; I asked him how he came by it, he said he chopped another gelding for it, with a smuggler whom he did not know; I told him I was a constable, and should take him into custody; Wilkie was taken into custody at the same time; he did not say any thing in going along; Newman said, Wilkie knew nothing about it; the horse was secured, I had the custody of it; we distributed hand-bills, which we sent down by the different mail-coaches; Mr. Arnold's servant came up first, and saw the horse, and afterwards Mr. Arnold; the horse that I shewed them was the same that I found in the possession of the prisoner; the horse was returned to Mr. Arnold, and I kept the saddle, bridle, and great coat; Newman asked me to let him have his coat, but I have kept it till now; going along, Newman wished to have a pint of porter, which he had, and I then said, now you have come quite to yourself, where has this horse been? he said he had had it about a fortnight, that it had stood at Fareham, in Hampshire, where he lived.

GEORGE SMITH sworn. - I live at Mr. Hall's livery-stables, in Hamilton-street: I took the horse in on the 15th of August, at near ten o'clock at night; the prisoner Newman brought it, he rode it into the yard, and I put him up for the night;

gave his name, Newman, there was nobody with him, this was on Friday night; he went away, and did not return again till Sunday morning; I got the horse ready for him, he paid for him, and while I was getting him ready, Wilkie came into the stable.

Q. Did he say or do any thing? - A. No, he did not; Newman brought this great-coat with him, and put it on the saddle.

Prisoner Newman. Q. What do you think the horse was worth? - A. I do not suppose he would fetch above four or five pounds, to look at the horse.

Newman's defence. I was coming from Fareham, and met with one John Jones , who had this horse, and I chopped for it; there is many a man that chops for a horse in Smithfield-market, and because he has no witness, may stand in the same predicament that I do now; I am perfectly innocent of it.(The prisoner Wilkie was not put upon his defence.)

Newman, GUILTY Death . (Aged 30.)

Wilkie, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-45

632. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , a Bank-note, value 501. the property of Henry Drake , privily from his person .

HENRY DRAKE sworn. - I am a baker , No. 1, New Compton-street: On the 7th of July, as I was coming from Westminster, up St. Martin's-lane, two girls met me, and wanted me to go home with them, the prisoner was one of them; I went home with her to a house in a court, in Whitcomb-street .

Q. What time of the night was it? - A. About one o'clock in the morning.

Q. Were you in liquor, or sober? - A. I had been drinking a little, but was not insensible; I was neither drunk nor sober.

Q. How long did you stay there? - A. It might be a quarter of an hour, or half an hour; while I was in the room, I missed a fifty pound Bank-note that I had in my pocket, I thought of it while I was there; I took it out of my pocket, and looked at it in the room.

Q. Did the woman see it? - A. I dare say she might see me take out a paper, and put it up again, I put it into my breeches pocket.

Q. Did you perceive her take it? - A. No, I did not see her hand in my pocket, but presently after I found my pocket inside out.

Q. Had you no suspicion at all at any time? - A. Yes, at one time I thought I felt her hand about my thigh.

Q. How soon after that was it you perceived your pocket turned inside out? - A. A very few minutes.

Q. How came you not to withdraw when you had those suspicious? - A. I thought I was as mindful as I possibly could; when I found my pocket inside out, I accused her of having taken the note; she said she had not got the note; I told her, if she did not give it to me, I would charge the watch with her; I then went down stairs with her, and waited till the watchman came; I never left her till she got to the watch-house; she was searched at the watch-house, but no note was found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Are you a married man? - A. My wife is dead.

Q. Have you any children living with you at home? - A.One.

Q. A boy or a girl? - A. A girl.

Q. How much had you been drinking that night? - A. I cannot justly say.

Q. How long you might be at the lodgings of this woman, you do not know? - A. It might be half an hour.

Q. It might be an hour? - A. Not so long.

Q. How long had you had this fifty pound note? - A. I had taken it the same day.

Q. What had you been drinking? - A. I had been drinking some beer, and some gin and water.

Q. How long had you been drinking? - A. Two or three hours, I suppose, chattering and talking.

Q. Upon your oath, were you drunk or sober? - A. I was not drunk, I was not incapable of business.

Q. What else had you in your breeches pocket - no other money? - A. No.

Q. The Bank-note you never found again? - A. No.

Q.Was the note put up in a bit of paper? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Are you sure the note was inside the paper at the time you looked at it? - A. Yes; I did not take the note out, but I saw it inside the paper.

JAMES MACNALLY sworn. - I am one of the patrols of St. Martin's; on the 7th of July, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, by Kilpatrick, a watchman; I went with the constable of the night to search the house; I had never seen the prisoner before to my knowledge.

Q. Was Drake with you? - A. No.

Q.How did you know where her apartments were? - A. She told us at the watch-house; I found this bit of paper at the foot of the bed, on the floor, it was up one pair of stairs, I cannot say whether it was the back-room or the front-room, the bed did not appear to have been disturbed.

Drake. This is the paper the note was wrapped up in; here is some of my own scribbling upon it.

Neale. (To Macnally.) Q. What was the state of Drake at that time? - A. He was drunk.

Q.Very drunk? - A. He did not appear to be sensible.

Q. The woman herself told you where her lodgings were? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I went into a watering-house, and saw this man and another girl drinking together, and I came away; after that, I saw him again by himself, very much intoxicated, and he wanted me to take him home with me, I took him to a house in a court in Whitcomb-street, and he made me a small compliment, and then wanted it back again; and because I would not give it him back again, he said I had robbed him; and as we came down the stairs he turned his breeches-pockets inside out, and they were full of holes.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000917-46

633. THOMAS CHALFONT was indicted for that he, being a person employed in the General Post-office , on the 18th of April , feloniously did secrete a letter, or packet, directed to Messrs. Bedwells, St. John's-street, and stealing thereout a Banbury Bank-note, value 1ol. the property of Bernard Bedwell , John Yates , Bernard Bedwell , jun. and Philip Bedwell .(This indictment was stated by Mr. Myers, and the case by Mr. Fielding).

RICHARD DEVONSHIR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a shop-keeper at Byfield, near Banbury: On the 17th of April, I sent a letter directed to Messrs. Bedwell.

Q.Shall you know the cover if you see it again?(Shewing him the cover of a letter.) - A. This is my own hand-writing.

Q. Is it in the same state now that it was when you sent it? - A. No; it differs in the word two, and the word twenty; the word two was three, and the word twenty was thirty.

Q. What Bank-notes did it contain? - A. I took down the numbers at the time; I sent No. 3194, 3195, and 3196, for 1ol. each, they were Banbury Bank-notes, all dated the 24th of February; I put it into the letter-box myself, at the Post-office at Banbury, on the evening of the 17th of April, between three and four o'clock; the Post do not pack the letters till an hour after that.

JOSEPH WYATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am an assistant in the Post-office at Banbury.

Q. Do you remember the mail being dispatched from Banbury on the 17th of April? - A. Yes; it was dispatched in the usual way, at the usual hour of five o'clock.

Q. That mail should have arrived in London on the morning of the 18th? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM KENT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am in the General Post-office.

Q. Do you remember the Banbury bags arriving the morning of the 18th of April, at the General Post-office, in the usual way? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon their arrival, what was then done with them? - A. Delivered to one of the clerks in the customary way.

HOGH FERGUSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am clerk in the General Post-office.

Q. What was the situation of the prisoner on the morning of the 18th of April? - A.Sorter, and charge-teller, at the letter E.

Q. Would the letter E be the particular division to which letters from Banbury would come? - A. I understand so.

Q. Do you know it? - A. It is so.

Q. Explain to us what the business of a charge-teller is? - A. To tell up the amount of the letters for letter E.

Q. After he has gone through that business of charge-telling, would it be his business to sort the letters? - A. Yes, it would.

Q. Would it be in his power, therefore, in forting letters for letter E, to take any of those letters away? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he continue in the same situation the following morning, the 19th? - A. Yes.

Q. Then he would have equally a control over the letters that came there on the 18th, and on the 19th? - A. Yes.

Q. He might either take away or put in any letter?. - A. Yes.

Q. As charge-teller he would have to make the charge of the whole on the 18th, and he would have equally to make the charge on the 19th? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you mean to say he was the only person engaged in sorting those letters that morning? - A. He was the only person appointed that morning.

Q. Do not all the men who have the delivery of the letters assist in sorting the letters? - A. Yes; he was appointed the principal at the table E, and he is to direct the sorting before they are given to his partners.

Q. Beckett, for assistance? - A. He had an opportunity of sorting any letters that were wrong sorted to the letter E.

Q. Had Beckett the delivery of the letters for the St. John's-street division? - A. He had.

Q. Therefore, Beckett, in the usual course of business, would have charge of this letter which was directed to St. John's-street? - A. He ought.

Jury. Q. Do you mean, after the prisoner at the bar had been sorting them? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you mean to say, that he could not have had them before the prisoner had done sorting? - A. He had that opportunity undoubtedly.

Q. With several other persons? - A. Yes, seven more.

Q. Beckett is employed in the Post-office now, is he not? - A. No.

Q. What is become of him? - A. He has resigned.

Q.Resigned you call it; do you believe it was a voluntary thing in himself? - A. I was informed, that while I was in the country he had resigned.

Q. Do not you know that he was suspended? - A. I understood he had been suspended.

Q. And then he gave in his resignation? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. Q. However many there might be who might come to this table E, it was the principal duty of the prisoner to take the charges there, and fort the letters? - A. Yes.

Q. Then Beckett would get letters that had been charged, and forted by the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Beckett was the deliverer in St. John's-street? - A. Yes.

JOHN BECKETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding - Q. On the 18th of April, were you letter-carrier for the divison of St. John's-street? - A. I was.

Q. Did you, on the morning of the 18th, deliver any letter to Messrs. Bedwells? - A. I have no doubt but I did; they generally had seven, eight, or a dozen, every day.

Q. Did you deliver all the letters that you received from the Post-office that were directed to their house? - A. I did.

Q. I understand you are not at present concerned in the Post-office? - A. I am not.

Q. What was the reason of your not continuing in their employ? - A. It was the post-master's with that I should resign.

Q. Was it in consequence of this being discovered? - A. I cannot tell any thing about it; I never could learn.

Q. Had you heard of any letter being wrong? - A. It was in consequence of taking a note from the prisoner; it was supposed there was an intimacy between us.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were requested to resign, I understand? - A. It was the Post-master's wish.

Q.You have been requested, perhaps, to return to the situation again? - A. Not at present.

Q. I understand you, that in the delivery of St. John's-street, you deliver a number of letters almost every day at that house? - A. Yes.

Q. What letters you delivered particularly on that day it is impossible for you to know? - A. It is impossible.

BARNARD BEDWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Be so good as state the firm of your house? - A. Barnard Bedwell , John Yates , Barnard Bedwell, jun. and Philip Bedwell .

Q. Mr. Devonshire, of Byfield, near Banbury, is a correspondent of your's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive any letter from him on the 19th of April? - A. I did.

Q. I believe you are the person who opened the letter? - A. I opened the letter.

Q. Look at that, is that the letter that you opened? - A. It is, it contained two notes, No. 3195, and 3196.

Q. Did any thing strike you particularly at that time, so as to lead you to examine the letter more closely? - A. No; the letter laid by for two or three days; we did not examine it minutely till after I had received another letter from Mr. Devonshire; there appears an alteration in the word two, and in the word twenty.

Q. Did you examine the outside of the letter? - A. Yes; we examined the place where the wafer was; there appeared to be two wafers, not exactly one upon the other, but partly so, it appeared to have been opened and sealed up again; I examined the post-mark, and it appeared to me to be a little defaced; Mr. Yates made application to Mr. Robarts's Bank.

Q. Look at these two Bank-notes? - A.These were in the letter that I received on the 19th; they were paid into Bobarts's, with other notes, and some cash.

Q. I observe the letter E is visible in that post-mark? - A. Yes; when I came to examine it more minutely; and it is now in the state in which I delivered it up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You have known this young man, I believe, ever since he was an instant? - A.I have known the family, as neighbours living within a few doors; I always thought him a steady and an industrious young man; they are a very industrious family.

Mr. Fielding. (To Ferguson.) Q. What does the letter E import? - A. It shews that it was stamped at the table E, and the day of the month.

Q. The table where the prisoner was? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. That stamp, letter E, is only in the Inland-office? - A. Yes.

Q. The letter E is in a different office from that where he was? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. Q. And it came from there to him? - A. Yes.

GEORGE TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a clerk in the banking-house of Robarts and Company. The house at which Banbury Bank-notes are payable. (Produces his book).

Q. Turn to your account of the 18th of April last, does it appear by your book whether you paid a Bank of England note, No. 2186? - A. Yes; it is dated that 21st of February, 1800, the entry is in my own hand-writting; I paid it for a Banbury Bank-note of 10l.

Q. At what time of the day was that payment made? - A. I cannot say; I have two waste-books, and this is the last entry but one in one of them, I should therefore, suppose in to be late in the day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are all the entries of cash, paid for Banbury Bank-notes, in that book? - A. I paid two.

Q. Were there no other Banbury Bank-notes for ten pounds changed at your house that day? - A. Yes; I believe five.

TIMOTHY PINTO sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a clerk in the house of Mess. Robarts and Co.

Q. Does it appear by your book, whether or no your yourself, on the 18th of April, paid a Banbury Bank-note, value ten pounds, No. 3194? - A. It does.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you make the entry yourself? - A I did.

Mr. Abbott. Q. Was that note paid in company with any other, or by itself? - A. By itself, singly.

Q. Is it an early entry of that day? - A. It is the last of that day.

Q. Have you on that day entered the payment of any other Banbury Bank-notes? - A. Yes, six more, that morning, paid at the counter, all six together.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you present at the time of payment? - A. No.

GEORGE PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a clerk in the house of Mess. Roberts and Co.

Q. What book is that you have in your hand? - A. The pay-book.

Q. Are the entries there made by you? - A.They are.

Q. Turn to the 18th of April, and tell me if you have an entry of the payment of a Banbury Bank-note of 10l. singly? - A. I have.

Q. Is it an early or a late entry? - A. A late entry.

Q. Have you any entry of any other Banbury Bank-notes paid that day? - A. Yes, six, about one o'clock.

Q. Were those six paid singly, or together? - A.Together.

Q. Your book does not contain the numbers of the notes? - A. No.

JOHN MOSS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. I am a clerk in the Bank of England: (produces a Bank of England note for 1ol.); it came into the Bank on the 3d of May; No. 2186; it has been altered to 2486, dated 24th of February; that is a different date from what it was when it was issued; it was brought into the Bank by Mr. Dickinson, one of our tellers.

Q. Was there any Bank of England note corresponding in number and date with that, in the state in which it is produced? - A. I have examined, and found there was not.

Q. Did the Bank of England ever issue a note for No. 2186? - A. Yes, they did; dated the 21st of February.

Q. Have you any doubt that the note you now hold in your hand is that note? - A. Not the least in the world.

WILLIAM DICKINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. I am an out-teller of the Bank of England.

Q. Look at that Bank-note; do you ever recollect having seen that Bank-note before? - A. Yes,

Q. What was the number and the date at the time you brought it in? - A. I cannot say; it is not my department to take notice of the numbers, only the sums; I received it from Mainwaring, Chatteris, and Co. bankers, in Cornhill, upon the 3d of May.

THOMAS CHATTERIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. I am a partner in the house of Messrs. Mainwaring, Chatteris, and Co.

Q. Be so good as look at your book of the 3d of May; did you pay a Bank-note, No. 2486, to the Bank out-teller? - A. I have not the number as paid to the Bank, but I have the number and date when it was brought in to us.

Q. And the next day you paid the same notes to the Bank out-teller? - A. There were some notes paid to the Bank out-teller, but we have not got the numbers.

THOMAS HAYMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. On the 2d of May I paid several Bank-notes to Messrs. Mainwaring and Co.

Q. Do you recollect that you received any Banknotes from a Mr. Ross, of the General Post-Office? - A. On the 1st of May I received forty pounds of him, in Bank-notes, at Lloyd's Coffee-house; I took no notice of the number or sums; and on the 2d of May, twenty pounds more, in Cornhill; all which, except ten pounds, I paid to Messrs. Mainwarning and Co. on the 2d of May.

THOMAS ROSS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodsall. I belong to the General Post-office: On the 23d of April, I received some money from the Receiver-General's office; among which was one or more ten-pound Bank-notes, which I paid to Mr. Hayman; Mr. Gibbons brought them to me from the Receiver-General.

JOHN GIBBONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodsall. About the 23d of April I received some

notes from the Receiver-General's office, which I gave to Mr. Ross; I don't recollect what the notes were.

JAMES COCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am clerk to the Receiver-General in the Post-office.

Q. Look at that note: (shewing him the Bank of England note;) was that note ever in your hands? - A. I believe it was.

Q. From whom did you receive it? - A. From Thomas Chalfont , I believe, on the 23d of April.

Q. Upon what account did he pay that note to you? - A. On account of his revenue as a letter-carrier.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of the prisoner? - A. I have seen his writing very frequently.

Q. Are you, from having frequently seen his writing, able to speak to the character of his hand? - A. I cannot swear to it.

Q. What do you believe, with respect to that endorsement upon the back of the note, "Thomas Chalfont, April 23, 1800"? - A. I believe it is his hand-writing.

Q. Is there upon that note the words "D. Syer"? - A. There is.

Q. Is it in such a state as to enable you to say who is the person by whom it is written, or any part of it? - A. I cannot say; I do not know the hand.

Q. There are also the letters, great D and little d, and the word "Jones" following it? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you say, as to your belief, whose handwriting that is? - A. I do not believe it is the handwriting of Jones, the letter-carrier; I have seen his writing frequently.

Q. Have you any belief as to the person by whom that endorsement was made? - A. No; I cannot say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Did the prisoner at the bar ever make any secret of having endorsed that with his own name? - A. No; it is customary to endorse their names.

Q. Therefore he knew he would be expected to endorse his name upon that note? - A. Certainly.

Q.And he paid it in, I think you say, on the 23d of April? - A. Yes.

Q. And he has written 23d of April upon it? - A. Yes.

Q. Those people do not receive as much as ten pounds for any one letter? - A. I cannot speak to that.

Q. You do not know of any such instance? - A. I do not.

Q. When letter-carriers borrow I do not know whether you know that they write upon them the name of the person from whom they have received them? - A. I have heard that they are directed to do so.

Mr. Moss called again. - Examined by Mr. Abbott.

Q. You have two other Bank of England notes? - A. Yes, 1299, 1st of March, 1800, for ten pounds; endorsed, B. Syer, D. Jones, J. Beckett, T. Chalfont; at the other end of the note, Mr. White to Thos. Chalfont, April 22, 1800; the other is No. 9435, dated 22d March, 1800, for ten-pounds; endorsed, B. Syer, D. Jones.

RICHARD KENTISH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am clerk to Williams and Co.

Q. Mr. James Mitchell keeps cash at your house? - A. Yes; on the 18th of April I paid James Mitchell himself one hundred pounds; sundry notes to the amount of ninety pounds, and ten pounds in cash.

Q. Among those notes are there any Bank-notes of the value of ten pounds? - A. Yes, five.

Q. Is one of them numbered 1299, dated 1st of March, 1800? - A. I have the number and the date, but not the year.

Q. Have you another, No. 9435? - A. Yes, I have, dated 22d of March; I paid that also to Mr. Mitchell.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You paid them with three others of the same value? - A. Yes.

JAMES MITCHELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. On the 18th of April I received from my banker one hundred pounds; ninety pounds in Banknotes, and ten pounds in cash; I took these notes for the purpose of paying my people the following morning; I gave either the whole or a greater part of them to my son, James Mitchell , to pay Mrs. Syer, for the purpose of paying my workmen.

JAMES MITCHELL , Jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. On the 19th of April I received a sum of money from my father to give to Mrs. Syer, in Bank-notes, to the amount of ninety pounds; I paid the whole to Mrs. Syer the same day, Saturday the 19th.

Mrs. MARY SYER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I live at Limehouse: On the 19th of April I received from Mr. Mitchell, the last witness, ninety pounds.

Q. Do you know David Jones of the Post-office? - A. Yes, he married my niece.

Q. I need hardly ask you if he is acquainted with your Christian name? - A. Oh, yes.

Q. Had you occasion to send to him any of the notes you had so received from Mr. Mitchell? - A. Twenty pounds, in two tens.

Q. On what day did you send those two notes to Mr. Jones? - A. On the 20th; I sent them by Charles Walters, to get twenty pounds worth of silver; he was in the habit of procuring me silver for notes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. It is a very common thing for all the post-men to give change for notes? - A. I do not know; I only know that my nephew did it.

CHARLES WALTERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am nephew to the last witness: On the 20th of April I received from her two ten-pound Bank-notes, which I took to David Jones.

DAVID JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott.

Q.You were some time ago a letter-carrier in the Post-office? - A.And sub-sorter.

Q.At what table were you employed on the 18th and 19th of April? - A. At G. table, and had been three or four years; I have been employed in the Post-office between twelve and thirteen years.

Q. I believe you have since been suspended? - A. I have; and the Hon. the Post-master General has since re-instated me.

Q. In consequence of a suspicion respecting a ten-pound Banbury note? - A. No, a Bank of England note.

Q. Are you acquainted with Mary Syer ? - A. Yes, and have been between twelve and thirteen years; I married her niece. On the 20th of April I received from Charles Walters two Bank of England notes for ten pounds each.

Q. Look at these two notes? - A. These notes have been both in my possession; I cannot swear to the numbers.

Q.First of all, be so good as take into your hand No. 1299; upon that there is endorsed, B. Syer? - A. Yes, and D. Jones; the word Syer is my writing, and D. Jones is my own hand-writing; but not the B, nor the small d.

Q. Were you at that time acquainted with the Christian name of Mrs. Syer? - A. Yes, her Christian name is Mary.

Q. Now be so good as look at the other note, No. 9435; there is endorsed upon that the words Syer, and D. Jones? - A. Yes; the whole of that endorsement is my writing.

Q. Are you able to say in what manner you disposed of these notes, so as to distinguish one from the other? - A. I cannot; I disposed of one to Mr. Shakel, of the General Post-office; and the other I paid in myself at the General Post-office, on the 23d of April; I paid the other to Shakel on Monday the 21st.

Q. Now look at the other Bank-note, No. 2186; upon the back of it are the words, B. Syer, and D. Jones? - A. It looks so; it is rather blotted.

Q. Is D. Jones perfectly legible? - A. Jones is.

Q. Is any part of that endorsement your handwriting? - A.Not at all.

Q. You have told us just now, that you had the misfortune to be suspended, on account of a suspicion that attached to you upon this transaction? - A. Yes.

Q.Be so good as look at that paper; (showing him a printed hand-bill, offering 100l. reward for discovering the offender)? - A. That was done by my direction.

Mr. Knowlys. That is only wasting time; nobody has impeached him yet, that I have heard.

Mr. Cock called again. - Examined by Mr. Abbott.

Q. Be so good as look at the Bank-note, No. 1299? - A. I believe it has been in my possession; I received it from a letter-carrier of the name of Beckett; but it does not appear on what day.

Q. Upon that note are the words, B. Syer, and D. Jones? - A. There are; I think Jones is the writing of David Jones ; but the other I cannot speak to.

Q. Now take the note, No. 9435; do you know whether you yourself received that of any body? - A. I believe I did, of David Jones .

Q. Do you know whose hand-writing the endorsement, Syer, and D. Jones, is, upon that note? - A. I believe the whole of it is David Jones 's.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. When you speak of No. 1299, you speak of the Bank of England note, and not a Banbury note? - A. No; a Bank of England note.

Q. And the precise time you received it you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. What did you do with those notes? - A.They. were either paid to the Receiver-General's banker, or to some person in the office.

CHANDOS HOSKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodsall. I am clerk to Messrs. Esdaile.

Q. Look at your book of the date of the 23d of April; did you receive on that day any 10l. note? - A. Yes, we received two; one is 9435, dated the 22d of March, and 1299, dated the 1st of March, from the Receiver-General's office at the Post-office.

Q. Were these notes taken about that time to the Bank? - A. They were taken to the Bank on the 24th.

JOHN BECKETT called again. - Examined by Mr. Myers. Q. Look at that Bank of England note, No. 1299; did you ever see that note before? - A.Yes, I paid it at the Receiver-General's; I received it from the prisoner; I believe the same day, I cannot be certain.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Might you not have received it over-night? - A. I thought possibly I might; but it is almost impossible that I should.

Q. Was there a time when you underwent serious questions at the Post-office? - A. Yes.

Q. You were desired to give an account in writing at the Post-office? - A. I did, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Then you thought over and over again, where you had received it? - A. I did not recollect that I had received a ten-pound note at all from him till I saw my hand-writing upon it.

Q.Did you not write to the gentlemen that you received it either the 22d or 23d? - A. Yes; and I was asked which I thought was the most likely; and I said the 23d was the most likely; what I stated was to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Then you wrote down that you thought you must have received it on the over-night? - A. I did.

EDWARD SHAKEL sworn. - I am a letter-carrier in the General Post-office.

Q. Do you know David Jones ? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time receive a ten-pound note from him? - A. Yes, on Wednesday morning, the 23d of April; I never received any other ten-pound note of him in my life; I have been in the habit of collecting silver for David Jones ; I carried him six pounds in silver, and asked him to let me have the use of two pounds, to make my payments good at the Treasury; upon that he shewed me a ten-pound note; I gave him the silver into his hands, and went again to my seat and threw off a few letters, and went back again and received a ten-pound note from Jones; I saw him write something upon it, it appeared to me to be his own name; I did not observe any thing else wrote upon it; I immediately delivered it to the prisoner at the bar; he was counting up his money, and I asked him for change, that I might send the exact sum that I owed; I gave him the note, and received the change; at the conclusion of his telling up his money for the Treasury, he said, Mr. Shakel, you have not put your name to it; I said, no, I have not; I have just received it from David Jones; he might put my name upon it if he would; what he wrote upon it I do not know, for I did not see it afterwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This note was No. 1299? - A. I did not look at the number.

Q. You said you had received it of Jones? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner desired you to put your name upon it, and you told him he might? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt that he wrote your name? - A. I saw him put his pen to it, but what he wrote I cannot say.

Q.Look at that note, No. 2186? - A. This has some part of my name.

Mr. Abbott. Q. Are you sure you had it upon the 23d of April, from Jones? - A. Yes.

Q. You never had but one from Jones? - A. No.

Q. Did you make any payment on the Monday? A. Yes; three or four pounds.

Mr. Knapp. Q. And on the Wednesday how much? - A. About eight pounds.

Mr. Abbott. (To Mr. Fergussion.) Q. You were at the table E. on the 18th and 19th of April? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Jones at that table on either of those mornings? - A.No; his employment was at table G.

Q.Had he the opportunity of obtaining any letter that came from table E.? - A. Not coming in its regular course.

Prisoner's defence. I declare that I received two notes, one from Mr. Shakel, and the other from White, of Fleet-street, as I have endorsed it, which it was my duty to do; the rest of my defence I leave to my counsel.

EDWARD COOPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a person employed by Mr. White, a bookseller, in Fleet-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he used to deliver letters to us; I have several times given him a Bank-note for change.

Q. Do you keep any account of the Bank-notes that pass through your hands? - A. No.

Q. Mr. White is I believe in a large way of business? - A. Yes, he is.

The prisoner called six other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 17.)

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his tender age, and good character.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000917-47

644. JAMES GARDNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , forty yards of flannel, value 44s. the property of William Towns , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM TOWNS sworn. - I keep a hosier's shop , in Oxford-street : On Saturday the 30th of August, between eight and nine in the evening, I lost a whole piece of flannel from my shop, I had seen it not five minutes before I missed it; we were very busy, as we generally are on a Saturday; myself, my wife and servant were in the shop at the time; I was serving some stockings, and Mrs. Towns was serving some stockings; the moment I missed the flannel, I jumped over the counter, ran right across the other side of the street, and saw the prisoner; I caught hold of him about fifty or sixty yards from my own door, with the flannel in his arms; I brought him back with the property, and from there took him to the watch-house, and gave charge of him to the watch-house keeper; it cost me one shilling and ten-pence a yard, it is a whole piece; they generally are from forty to forty-seven yards, but sometimes they run short; I value it at one shilling a yard; I am sure it is my flannel.

Prisoner's defence. A woman told me, if I would carry that to the stage, at Swallow-street, she would give me sixpence, and I had not carried it far, before the gentleman laid hold of me.

GUILTY of stealing goods, to the value of 39s .

Judgement respited .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-48

635. CHARLOTTE OAKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , nineteen guineas, a half guinea, three shillings and one sixpence, the property of Thomas Gardner , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Duggan .

THOMAS GARDNER sworn. - I live with Mr. Thomas, a hackney-man, in Park-street, I work in the stable; on the 6th of July, I was going down Oxford-road, and met the prisoner at the bar about nine o'clock at night; she very much intreated me to go along with her, which I did, to her room in Gee's-court ; we laid down upon the bed, and while I was upon the bed with her, I found her picking my pocket.

Q. What had you in your pocket? - A. Nineteen guineas and a half and some silver; I immediately jumped off the bed, and laid hold of her, upon which she screamed out murder; I told her she had got my money, and then a person burst into the room and laid hold of me, her name is Susannah Rossiter ; she pulled me from her, and she got away.

Q. When had you seen the money? - A. I pulled it out in the room to give her what she asked.

Q. How came you to have so much money about you? - A. I have been industrious as a gentleman's servant.

Q. Did you carry it about you always? - A. I had it at that time; she got away, and I heard no more of her till she was taken about six weeks after.

Q. What money had you given her? - A. One shilling.

Q. Were you in liquor at this time? - A. No, very sober.

SUSANNAH ROSSITER sworn. - I live in James-street, Manchester-square; on the 6th of July, I lived at No. 4, Gee's-court: On Sunday the 6th of July, about eleven o'clock, I had been out for some beer, and as I came past No. 13, I heard the prisoner cry out murder, violently; the woman of the shop was busy and could not go up, I went up to see what was the matter.

Q. Who owns the house? - A. Thomes Duggan; when I got up stairs, I saw the prosecutor using very great violence, he had his knee upon the pit of her stomach, and his hand up to her neck; he repeatedly said, she had got his money; I said, if she has robbed you, why don't you charge the watch with her, do not choak her; he then got up, the woman pushed me against him, and away she ran down stairs; the next morning the officer came to apprehend her, and she had absconded; she lodged in the house, and then they took me into custody, and Mr. Conant let me go upon promising to find her; I found her at Charing-cross, and took her to the watch-house myself; she said, she was very glad of it, and wished she had such another opportunity.

Q.(To Gardiner.) Did you find any of your property again? - A. No.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, in which she denied the charge.)

For the Prisoner.

MARY PARKER sworn. - I found this girl when she was about three years and a half old; I gave her a little education, and brought her up as well as I could, and she lived with me till she went to service; she is now about nineteen, she was between twelve and thirteen when she went to service; she has been in several places, and always bore a good character.

WILLIAM OAKES sworn. - The unfortunate prisoner is my sister; though I am a young man, I am in business; I have been married six years, and she has lived servant with me four years; at the end of that time she was seduced from me, by a person that I do not know; I have not looked upon her since; till that time, she always conducted herself with propriety and honesty; she and I were both left fatherless and motherless.

NOT GUILTY .

The prisoner's brother promised the Court, that he would again take her under his care.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBER.

Reference Number: t18000917-49

636. JAMES BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , an iron stove, value 10s. eight iron skewers, value 1s. 6d. a japan candlestick lamp, value 1s. 9d. a tin oil bottle, value 1s. a set of fire-irons, value 1l. 4s. seven locks and seven keys, value 1l. two other keys, value 1s. two saws, value 5s. 6d. a pruning knife, value 1s. two watering-pots, value 3s. a wooden washing-tub, value 5s. thirty-nine paving tiles, value 8s. a blunderbuss, value 5s. three candlesticks, value 8s. a wooden basket, value 6d. a Pantheon-stove, value 15s. another I'antheon stove, value 15s. a steel stove-grate, value 10s. a top of a mahogany table, value 2s. 6d. a steel sender, value 7s. an iron shovel, value 2s. a pair of tongs, value 2s. a vertical jack, value 16s. a steel dog, value 7s. one hundred and fifty wooden boards, value 5l. fifty pieces of wood, value 10s. a pound and a half of plated wire, value 5s. a yard and three quarters of wove iron wire-work, value 7s. a tinder-box, value 5d. a tin saucepan, value 2s. a tin saucepan cover, value 6d. two brass bolts, value 3s. a brass padlock, value 1s. and two tons of lead, value 32l. the property of Robert Jackson , and John Moser , in their dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM HAYWOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I lodge in the same house with the prisoner; I hired the upper part of the house from Mrs. Egerton, the woman with whom he lived, at No. II, Temple-street, St. George's-fields; on the Ist of July, I saw the prisoner come to Mrs. Egerton's house with a cart and horse loaded with a quantity of boards, three Bath-stoves, and one steel stove, thirty-nine tiles, the top of a mahogany table, two oil cans, a garden spade, or shovel, fire-irons, a musket, or blunderbuss, and a great number of other things; they were brought in the prosecutor's cart, and I followed the man one morning to his master's door.

Court. Q. When did you give your information? - A. This was on the Tuesday, I gave information on the Sabbath-day following; they were bringing things every night from the Tuesday to the Saturday.

Court. Q. Who attended the cart? - A. James Baker only.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On Monday the 8th of September, I went to No. 38, Prince's-street, Soho, with a search-warrant; I searched the front-room up one pair of stairs, but found nothing; I searched the back-garret, and found a tinder-box, this screwdriver, and some plated wire, (producing them;) I then proceeded to a house, No. 7, Prospect-row, St. George's-fields.

Q.(To Haywood.) Whose house is that? - A. Mrs. Egerton's, the front of it is called Prospect-place.

Carpmeal. We found a quantity of things which we have here; I left them locked up in the care of Mr. John Moser.

Q. Was the prisoner present when you found those things? - A. I cannot say, I do not think he was.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. I am a Bow-street Officer; I was with Carpmeal, at Prince's-street; I found a tinder-box, a screwdriver, and some wire; I also went to No. 7. Temple-street, Prospect-place, where I found this vertical jack, eight skewers, a brass padlock, two brass bolts, a steel dog, a prunning knife, three keys, and a saucepan and cover.

JOHN SPARKES sworn. - I live at No. 38, Prince's-street, Soho, my father is the landlord, but he lives at No. 32; the prisoner rented from my father the first floor, back garret, and the use of a kitchen, and cellar.

JOHN MOSER sworn. - I am in partnership with Robert Jackson, in the ironmongery business.

Q. Whose dwelling-house is this? - A. It is more properly warehouses.

Q. Does any one sleep in the place where these things were taken from? - A. No.

Q. None of your servants? - A. No.

Q. How long had the prisoner been in your service? - A. From October, 1795; he was employed to load, unload, and had the keys of several places, and nobody else; in consequence of information I received, I went on Friday, the 8th of September, to see the execution of a search-warrant; I went with Carpmeal and Miller to both houses; I saw the things found in Prince's-street; the tinder-box has our mark upon it; as to the plated wire, we had such, but never made use of it; I was present also, when the things were found at Temple street; this pruning-knife has our shop-mark, these fireirons are extraordinary good, case hardened, and such as we had in our shop; but in our warehouses it is impossible to miss them; here are thirty-nine tiles that corresponds exactly with what we lost; they were brought for the purpose of making an oven for Government, and there are several pieces of wood that have our marks upon them; here is a washing-tub, with our shop-mark to it; I saw the prisoner at Mr. Carpmeal's house, and informed him we had found these things; he told me, that I had told him he might take what he pleased.

Q. Did you ever tell him so? - A. I never did.

Q. Mr. Jackson has retired from business, has he not? - A. No.

Q. Do you not allow him an annuity? - A. No.

Q. Do you not allow him a certain stipulated sum every year? - A. Yes.

Q. Whether you get three thousand or three hundred a year, he has exactly the same sum? - A. Yes; but if I become a bankrupt, every shilling of his must come forward, and he acts in the business every day, from five in the morning, till eight at night.

Q. Whatever losses are sustained in the trade, fall upon you intirely? - A. Yes.

ROGER MOSER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I attended the search-warrant at Prince's street.

Q. Are there any of the articles found that you can speak to, as being yours? - A. A screw-driver, a tinder-box, and we had plated wire, about this quantity, and very much like it; I was also at Mrs. Egerton's; this watering-pot has our mark upon it, and this saucepan cover; these skewers I can speak positively to, they were marked for Lord Camelford, L D C, and the pruning-knife; two brass bolts, and several pieces of timber, that I know to be ours; in all, there are two hundred and thirty-nine pieces; the stoves I cannot swear to; here is a washing-tub, a blunderbuss, and several other things that I believe to be ours.

CHARLES HORTON sworn. - I know this to be Mr. Moser's blunderbuss, I have known it for several years, it was used by a watchman of my master's, that he kept in doors.

Mr. Moser. It belongs to the partnership.

For the Prisoner.

SAMUEL ROOKE sworn. - I lived in the house before the prisoner: I left two vertical jacks in the house, two blunderbusses, one a short, and the other a long one, a watering-pot, and a great number of boards; this watering-pot, I think, was one article, and several of these boards.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know those Skewers; were they made for Lord Camelford? - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called five other witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY. (Aged 40.)

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-50

637. JOHN WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , two pounds eight ounces of leaf tobacco, value 1s. the property of Thomas-Sheare Croft , John Ratcliff , Thomas Morgan , John Wheeler , John Radnor , John Hendon , and Fabian Phillips .

FABIAN PHILLIPS sworn. - I am a gangsman at Cox's Quay; I have eight partners, (names them); I saw the prisoner take a quantity of leaf tobacco out of a hogshead from the gateway in Cox's Quay , and put it into the waistband of his breeches; I stopped him, and took him into custody.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Customs: I took the tobacco from the prisoner; it was part concealed in the waistband of his breeches, and the remainder part in the crown of his hat. (Produces it).

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up under the gateway; there is short straw and filth among it.

Q.(To Phillips.) Are you sure you saw him take it out of the cask? - A. He took it out with his left-hand. GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Whipped one hundred yards on Cox's Quay .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-51

638. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a bridle, value 5s. the property of Robert Clarke , and George Clarke .

ROBERT CLARKE sworn. - I am a stable-keeper , in partnership with George Clarke , at Cripplegate : I can only prove the property.

- WILKES sworn. - I am a coachman: I cannot say what day it was, but I stopped the prisoner coming out of the yard, with the bridle; in consequence of information I received from a lad who is here, I stopped him, and took the bridle out of his breeches; I delivered the man and the bridle to the constable.

WILLIAM THOMPSON called. - Q. What age are you? - A. Going of eleven.

Q. Do you know what will become of you if you tell a lie, or swear that which is false? - A. I shall go to hell. (He is sworn).

I look after chaises and horses for Mr. Clarke: Sometime at the end of last month, I saw the prisoner take the bridle off the nail in the stable, lap it up, and put it into his breeches; he followed me up the stable, saw me speak to the coachman, and then he went out towards the street; he had not got quite out of the yard when the coachman laid hold of him, and took the bridle from him; it was Mr. Clarke's bridle; the prisoner and the bridle were delivered to the constable.

HENRY CLARKE sworn. - I am ostler to Mr. Clarke's livery stables: I know the bridle to be Mr. Clarke's. (The constable produced the bridle, which was deposed to by the prosecutor and the ostler).

Prisoner's defence. I was very much fuddled; I do not know any thing of the bridle.

GUILTY . (Aged 60.)

Whipped one hundred yards in Cripplegate Parish, opposite Mr. Clarke's livery stables .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-52

639. THOMAS THORPE was indicted for that he, on the 6th of August , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Daniel Allen , did, by virtue of such employment, take into his possession, from Thomas Wood, three shillings and sixpence, for and on account of the said Daniel, his master, and afterwards did embezzle and secrete the said sum of three shillings and sixpence, the monies of the said Daniel, for whose use it was so taken into his possession .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August, three shillings and sixpence, the property of the said Daniel.

DANIEL ALLEN sworn. - I am a carman : On Wednesday the 6th of August, the prisoner worked a cart for me; he did a load of wine from Towerdock to Cornhill, as I was informed by a witness in Court, and he never gave me any account of it; I did not discover it till, I think it was, Saturday the 23d; when the prisoner came home on the Wednesday night, the 6th, I discharged him, because I accused him of having done more than he had given me an account of; he told me, if I would tell him what it was he would give me the money, but if I could not he would not; he gave me an account that day of four loads paid for, and two half loads paid for; and two loads that were not paid for, which I have received the money for since.

Q. Are you sure that none of those loads include this load of wine? - A. No; it is not in the book;

I have received all the money that is in the book; he has entered in the book every place that the loads went to but not this.

THOMAS WOOD sworn. - I am a master carman: The prisoner and I went with two loads of wine, and he unloaded first, in Cornhill, at Tarle and Harper's; he drove Mr. Allen's cart, his name was upon it; he went up to receive his money and be could not give change, and he asked me to take his money; I received seven shillings; and I saw him afterwards in Thames-street, and gave him three shillings and sixpence, his share, for Mr. Allen his master.

GEORGE DUDLEY sworn. - I am a constable: I know nothing more than apprehending the prisoner.

Allen. The prisoner did not come to work the remainder of the week, and the Tuesday after he summoned me for his money.

Prisoner's defence. I received three shillings and sixpence of that gentleman, and when I came home my master was not at home, and I gave my mistress the money; I gave her seventeen shillings and four-pence in all.

HANNAH ALLEN sworn. - Court. Q. Is it true that the prisoner paid you seventeen shillings and fourpence upon this Wednesday, the 6th of August? - A. No; I did not settle with him at all that night

Q. Did he at any time afterwards? - A. No; he always settled with my husband.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-53

640. JOHN PRICE , JOHN ROBINSON , alias ROGERSON, alias ROBOTHAM , EDWARD RAINBOW , and WILLIAM THOMAS RAINBOW , were indicted, the two first for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Lambe , Edward Haycock , and Thomas Lambe , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 10th of July , and burglariously stealing thirty pounds five ounces of silk, value 27l. 8s. nineteen pounds two ounces of silk, value 24l. 4s. one hundred and twenty pounds ten ounces of other silk, value 208l. 1s. one hundred and seveteen pounds three ounces of other silk, value 202l. 3s. one hundred and eleven pounds three ounces of other silk, value 183l. 9s. fourty-six pounds seven ounces of other silk, value 51l. 2s. and five hempen bags, value 5s. the property of the said John Lambe, Edward Haycock , and Thomas Lambe .

Second Count. Laying it to be the dwelling-house of John Lambe and Thomas Lambe.

The other two prisoners were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 11th of July , ninety-one pounds of silk, value 150l. 3s. fifty pounds of other silk, value 86l. 5s. twenty-six pounds of other silk, value 31l. 8s. seven pounds eight ounces of other silk, value 121. 18s one pound of other silk, value 18s. eleven pounds of other silk, value 9l. 18s. twenty-four pounds eight ounces of other silk, value 29l. 12s. eight pounds of other silk, value 10l. 2s. forty-three pounds of other silk, value 48l. 7s. and ten pounds of other silk, value 12l. 13s. being part of the before-mentioned goods, they knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Serjeant Best.)

THOMAS LAMBE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Be so good as tell as first the firm of your house? - A. John Lambe, Edward Haycock , and Thomas Lambe .

Q. Your house is in Foster-lane ? - A. Yes, the house door is in Bell-alley , and there is a door which opens into Foster-lane: On Friday morning, the 11th of July, about ten minutes after six o'clock, a young man who lives with us alarmed me; I came down stairs, and, on the first floor, there is a window was forced down; I saw that window fast the night before, and a screw in the shutter; I went to the ground floor, and found the door that leads into Bell-alley open, the lock had been violently forced off, and the chain taken off; the cellar-door was also unbolted where we kept our silk; I went down into the cellar, and found we had been robbed of the property mentioned in the indictment, to the amount of 752l. 11s.

Q. In how many packages was that silk? - A. In five hempen bags, about a yard square, and a yard and a half deep; there were no marks upon it, except a ticket, when we buy a bale of silk, we mark it 142, 143, and so on; it is written with a pen upon a piece of parchment or cartidge paper; there were loose tickets, and also marks upon the bags, the East-India marks, but I cannot tell what the exact marks were.

Court. Q. Whereabouts did you sleep? - A. In the front, and these goods were backwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Who are your partners? - A. John Lambe and Edward Haycock.

Q. Have you no others? - A. None whatever,

Q. It was past six when you first discovered this? - A. Ten minutes or a quarter past six.

Q. Can you say what time the sun rose at that time? - A. No.

Q.Long before you rose? - A. Yes.

THOMAS SAWYER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am shopman to Messers. Lambe and Haycock: On the 11th of July I was alarmed by the maid-servant; I went down stairs, and saw the window by the sky-light open.

Q. How was that window secured? - A. By a screw in the shutter; the window and the shutter were both down when I saw them in the morning.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular about the sky-light? - A. Nothing, till about eleven o'clock in the morning; when the officers came, I observed seventeen or eighteen drops of tallow, and the lead over the pannel of the door had been cut, which leads into the kitchen.

JANE SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. I fastened the door and the window on the night of the 10th; I put up the shutter, and put in a screw; I got up about ten minutes past six, and found the shutter gone; I did not take particular notice of the sky-light; upon the ledges of the window there was some dust, and apparently some marks of men's feet.

JOHN TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a green-grocer, in Noble-street, about 50 yards from the prosecutors: On the morning of the 11th of July, between four and five o'clock, I saw a cart.

Q. Was it quite light at that time? - A. It was; I saw a green cart, a little country cart, exactly opposite to Bell-alley; I saw a man fitting in the cart; he sat there a minute or two, and another man came to him in a blue coat; he went away, and then the man in the cart, who had a light-coloured coat on, went away with the cart, and came back again in a few minutes.

Q. Was the cart then driven by the same man? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing his person? - A. No, I had not, I only saw his back, I was going to market; I did not see any thing particular, except the cart standing there; I left it there.

Q. When you saw the prisoner before the Lord-Mayor, what was your opinion then? - A. I was not near enough to make any observation of them; Price had the same coloured coat on.

Q. Which was it that had a light-coloured coat on when you saw him before the Lord-Maylor? - A.Price; and the prisoner, Robinson, had a brown coat on before the Lord-Mayor.

FREDERICK WHEATLEY sworn. - I am a gold seal-marker and jeweller; I live at No. 27, Tash-street, Gray's-inn-lane; the prisoner, Price, lives in Little Tash-street.

Q. Does your house command a view of his? - A.Yes: On the 11th of July, Friday morning, I was up about five o`clock at business, with the window open, and I saw Price and another man come to the door; they stood at the door some time.

Q. Is the other man here? - A. No; he goes by the name of Bob, I do not know his sirname; after they had stood at the door some little time, they went in again, and left the door ajar; then they came out again and I saw a tall man come in a chaise-cart, or a country-cart, like a higler's cart.

Q. Did you observe the colour of that cart? - A. It was green.

Q. Do you know the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he here? - A. Yes, that is him, next to Price, his name is Robinson, he had five bags in the body of cart; he tumbled them out as quick as he could, and they fell soft upon the ground; when Price, and the other man that came to the door before he came up, took them in as fast as ever they could; when Robinson had chucked the last bag out, when there were about two to get into the house, he drove off; then Price and the other man took the remainder in.

Q. You say the bags fell soft, explain that? - A. As if they contained linen, or something soft in them; in the course of the day I saw Price very busy running backwards and forwards.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular towards the afternoon of that day? - A. Yes; about four o'clock I observed Price go out with a white apron on, like a porter, and Robinson, and this other man, Bob, in their shirt sleeves, each of them with one of those bags upon their shoulders; they went down Tash-street.

Q. Did you observe any body at Price's house in the course of the day? - A. I saw a genteel man in black, with his hair powdered, go backwards and forwards two or three times in the afternoon before the first bag went away; I did not know who that was.

Q. Do you know a girl of the name of Sarah King? - A. Yes; I know her about the neighbourhood.

Q. Do you know if she was at Price's house that day? - A. Yes, she was; she went out of Price's house either before or immediately after the bags went out, but I cannot exactly say which.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You did not know the prisoner Robinson's name? - A. No.

Q. Where were you at this time? - A. Up two pair of stairs, the front room.

Q. Where you engaged at your business at the time? - A. Yes; but seeing this transaction, engaged my attention.

Q. For the whole day? - A.No, I did not see all that they did, but most of what they did that day.( Sarah King , thirteen years of age, was called, but not knowing the nature of an oath, was not sworn.)

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. I am an officer: On Saturday, the 12th of July, in the evening, I went to the house of the prisoner Price, in Little Tash-street, with Sapwell, Read, and a Mr. Osborne, clerk to Mr. Lambe; we found Mrs. Price, Mr. Price was not at home; we searched the house, and upon searching the house, below stairs in the kitchen, I found some pieces of wrappers, which were wet; I called Mr. Osborne to look at them, which he did; upon searching further, Sapwell found, in my presence, a centrebit, some knives and forks, and table-cloths; I went away, and left my brother officers there; when I returned, I brought Price in with me, I found him within nine or ten yards of his house, Mr. Sawyer was with me; I said, Johnny, I am glad to see you, you are the man I have been looking for; he said, very well; and I immediately took him into his own house; I searched him, I observed his left-hand come quick from his pocket; I immediately seized his hand, and found it clenched very tight, I got his hand open; says I, Jack, what have you got in your hand, I must see; upon that I opened it by main strength; and in his hand I found a Banknote of fifty pounds.

Q. Did you observe any writing upon that Banknote? - A. Not then; I believe it was on Sunday, the next day; I then saw some writing, but I cannot say what it was; I have kept the note in my custody, (produces it); it has Walpole and Co. upon the front of it; on the Monday morning I went to Messrs. Walpole and Company's.

Q. Did you afterwards go to the house of the Rainbows? - A. Yes; in company with Sapwell and Mr. Osborne; we went first to the father's house, Edward Rainbow , in Queen-street, Cheapside.

Q. Before you went to Rainbow's, had you seen young Mr. Frith? - A. I had; Mr. Rainbow was not at home; I afterwards found young Mr. Rainbow at home; I asked him if he knew any thing of a fifty pound note having been in his possession within a few days; I did not shew him the note; he strictly denied knowing anything of it.

Q. Did you say any thing to him about any silk? - A. I cannot recollect that I did; at that time, he said, his father would be at home in a very little while, in the course of half an hour; I told him I must request of him to be so obliging as to stop with me till his father came home; I shut the door, and was in a little bit of a warehouse, with young Mr. Rainbow; during that time, somebody knocked at the door, which was Mr. Rainbow's porter; I thought it my duty to stop him, which I did, and desired him to go into the kitchen, his name was Wright; young Mr. Rainbow then went to the door, and said, here is my father coming; and he then came in; that might be in about half an hour; I asked Mr. Rainbow, sen. if he knew any thing of a 50l. note having been in his possession within the course of a few days, or whether he had paid a 50l. note away; he hesitated a great deal, and said he knew nothing of any such note; I told him a 50l. note was a heavyish one, it was not like a one or a two-pound note; it was very odd he did not recollect it; I then asked him if he knew Mr. Frith; he said he did; I asked him if he had not received a 50l. note of Mr. Frith, in part of 200l.; he then recollected something of it, and explained to me what he had received that 50l. part of the 200l. for; he told me that a person had been with him with a sample of silk.

Q. Had you then asked him whether he had purchased any silk? - A. Not till after this; he said a person had offered him a sample of silk, and he had purchased it, and given 200l. for it; I then asked him if he knew the person; he said he did; I asked him his name; he said his name was Burdett; I asked him where the silk was; he said he had purchased it, but he had not received it yet; I told him I thought it a little mysterious that a man like Mr. Rainbow should pay 200l. without seeing the quantity of silk or the quality; he said so it was, he had done it; I told him I could not be satisfied that he could give 200l. without receiving the silk; he strictly denied, upon his honour, that he had received the silk; I asked him how he could put that confidence in Mr. Burdett; he said it was through a Mr. Sansum; that through his acquaintance with Mr. Sansum he became acquainted with Burdett.

Q. Did he say any thing about being recommended by Sansum? - A. No, I cannot recollect any thing about recommendation; I then heard a knock at the door, I went to the door and it was Sapwell; we had some conversation, and then I sent him away; I told both Mr. Rainbows that I expected Mr. Lambe; they then seemed to be agitated; Mr. Rainbow, the father, informed me that it was something singular that he had not received the silk, for he had been that morning up to Mr. Burdett's.

Q. Was that after you had mentioned the name of Mr. Lambe? - A. No, before; then Mr. Lambe came in with Mr. Osborne; they had not been in long, before Mr. Rainbow, sen. acknowledged his having the silk.

Q. What did he say? - A. He said that he had the silk; and added, my son shall go over with you, it is at his house; his son took down the key, and I went with him to No. 24, College-hill; when I came there the door was a little way upon the jar, with the chain upon it; it was an empty house; young Mr. Rainbow knocked at the door, and a kind of chair-woman came and opened it; upon that young Mr. Rainbow went up stairs, and Sap

well and I followed him into the one pair of stairs, and at the further end of the room young Mr. Rainbow opened a cupboard, and there we found five bags of silk; it has been locked up in the Marshal's office ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You are a City officer, and have been many years? - A. Yes.

Q. You are well known to be a City officer? - A. Yes.

Q.When you apprehend persons you always take what property they have upon them? - A. Yes.

Q.You sometimes find people very unwilling to part with property which afterwards turns out to be their own? - A. Sometimes we do.

Q. When you went to Price's house you found some pieces of wrapping in the kitchen? - A. Yes, wet. Q. Was it canvas? - A. It was something of that sort.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Your conversation with young Rainbow was confined to his having had in his possession a 50l. note? - A. Yes.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I went with Tipper on the Saturday night, to Price's house; he was not at home; I staid in the house while Tipper went out; he brought in Price with him, and I saw Tipper take something out of his hand, which I believe was a 50l. note; I found a centre-bit, a saw, and a steel.

Q. Did you find any keys? - A. No, I did not; Tipper then secured him and took him to the Poultry Compter; he returned about half past twelve; I took Mrs. Price up stairs to search her, and while I was up stairs with her, I heard Tipper call, Tom, Tom, come down! I went down and there was Tipper and Read had got Robinson in custody; I searched him, and in his job I found 65l. in notes; I asked him how he came by them; he told me he took them in trade; I asked him what trade he was, and he said, a private soap-maker; then he was taken to the Poultry Compter.

Q. What became of the notes? - A.They are in my possession; (produces them;) two of 20l. two of 10l. and a 5l. On the Monday morning, about nine o'clock, I went with Tipper and Mr. Osborne to Mr. Walpole's, a banker, in Lombard-street, to enquire about a 50l. note; then we went to the house of Mr. Rainbow, the elder; Mr. Rainbow was out; I went to the Lord-Mayor to get a search-warrant; I then returned to Mr. Rainbow's; I knocked at the door, and Tipper opened it; I went in, and found Tipper and the two Mr. Rainbows; I did not hear any thing that passed, because I went into the kitchen to apprehend the porter; I then went with young Mr. Rainbow and Tipper and Mr. Osborne, to a house, No. 24, College-hill, where young Mr. Rainbow took out the key of a closet, and shewed us the five bags; I took them to the Mansion-house, and there they have remained, in the Marshal's office, under our seals ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Robinson told you he was a soap-maker? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not that turn out to be true? - A. I do not know; I have not heard.

Q. Have you enquired? - A. Yes; but every body told me, no.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When you went to the house on College-hill, with young Mr. Rainbow, you went by the direction of his father? - A. We did.

- OSBORNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am book-keeper to the prosecutors.

Q. Did you go, and when was it, to the house of the Rainbows? - A. It was on Monday morning the 14th of July, about ten o'clock; I found Tipper and both the Mr. Rainbows together; immediately that I entered, old Mr. Rainbow asked me how I did, and acknowledged he had bought the silk; I asked him who he had bought it of; he said he had bought it of a man of the name of Burdett; but that he had not yet got the silk; he said that Burdett had asked him two hundred pounds for it; he said his reply was, that he had not the money by him, but he would procure it; and that he had borrowed two hundred pounds, by which he had paid for the silk; the officers interrogated him very much to let them know where the silk was; after much interrogation, he said it was at his son's house; his son was by at the time; and immediately that he had made that reply, the officers desired young Mr. Rainbow to walk out with them; while the officers were gone out with young Mr. Rainbow, I asked old Mr. Rainbow who this Burdett was; he told me he knew but little of him, that he had seen him two or three times before; I then asked him if there was any Book China, which was a particular article among the rest that we lost two bales of; he told me he could not tell, for he had not seen it; I then asked him what weight it was; he said he did not know, perhaps 200lb., perhaps 300lb. and perhaps more I told him it was very odd that he should trust a man with two hundred pounds, and buy such a quantity of silk, that he knew nothing about; he said it was so. and that he trusted this man through the recommendation of a person of the the name of Sansum; immediately after that almost, the officers returned.

Q. Did you accompany Tipper and Sapwell, or either of them, to trace these notes? - A. Yes; I went with them, to Walpole and Co.'s, in Lombard-street, whole name was written upon the 50l. note, that was on the Monday morning about nine

o'clock; we afterwards went to the Bank to trace the other notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The conversation which passed from the officers was with Mr. Rainbow, senior? - A. And junior, both.

Q. Young Mr . Rainbow was there; but the conversation was with Mr. Rainbow, senior? - A. Yes.

Q.The house at College-hill, which the officers went to, your understood had been taken by him for his son, who was just married? - A. Yes; he acknowledged that he had taken that house.

Q. And that he had not yet gone to reside? - A. Yes.

THOMAS TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. I live at No. 31, Queen-street, Cheapside, next door to Mr. Rainbow.

Q. Do you know William- Thomas Rainbow ? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you known him long? - A. I have known him by sight these twelve months.

Q. Did you see him on the 11th of July? - A. Yes, I saw him in a hackney-coach pass my door; as he passed me he put the window half way up; the coach stopped at his door; I did not see any body in the coach but him; I saw him push a bale out before him; then I took no further notice.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. I take it that whenever you have given an account of this business you have always given the same account? - A. Yes.

Q.If any body supposed you had said that you saw young. Mr. Rainbow with three people in the coach, and the coach full of goods, they must have very wool-gatherings heads? - A. I think so.

Q.However, the occurrence that you saw, was putting up the window, stopping at his father's door, and putting out a bale of goods? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that young Mr. Rainbow is a servant to his father? - A. I do not.

Q. You don't know much of the family, perhaps? - A. No.

GEORGE WRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am porter to Mr. Rainbow: On Monday the 12th July. I carried four bundles from Mr. Rainbow's, different sorts of bundles; some bigger and some less; I carried them to the corner of Cloak-lane, College-hill.

Q.What number? - A. I do not know; there are no inhabitants in the house.

Q. By whose direction did you take them there? - A. The Mr. Rainbows were both together.

Q. When, were they brought into the house? - A. I do not know.

Q. What part of the house did you take them from? - A. I took them from the door up one pair of stairs at the other house.

Q.Where did they come from before you took them from the door? - A.I saw them tumbled down stairs by young Mr. Rainbow.

Q.It was an empty house? - A. Yes.

Q. Where is the warehouse in wich goods are generally put? - A. In the front of the house; the ground floor.

Cross-examined by Mr Knapp. Q. Old Mr. Rainbow was your master? - A. Yes.

Q. Young Mr . Rainbow never did any thing but by the direction of his father? - A. I never saw any otherwise.

Q. If You had been desired to tumble them down stairs, you would have done it? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH FRITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a school-master, and live in Thames-street.

Q. Do you know old Mr. Rainbow? - A. Yes. and the young one: On the 11th of July I lent Mr. Rainbow two hundred pounds; I paid it him in a 100l. note, a 50l. a 30l. and the rest smaller notes.

Q. Where did you get those Bank-notes? - A. I received them at Walpole and Co.'s, bankers, in Lombard-street.

Q. Before you parted with them had you written any thing upon them? - A. Yes, I wrote Walpole and Co. upon the front of the notes.

Q. Look at that 50l? - A. That is my handwriting.

Q. That was one of the notes that you advanced to Mr. Rainbow? - A. I presume it must be; I got them from Messrs. Walpole's in change for a draft or 180l. of Bruckshaw and Co.'s stock-brokers, at the Royal Exchage.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q.If you had not the highest opinion of Mr. Rainbow's integrity you would not have lent him the money? - A.Certainly not; I have known him fourteen years; I should as soon suspect-you now to be guilty of the foul crime of murder, as Mr. Rainbow be guilty of any thing dishonourable.

Jury. Q. Had you received any other 50l. Banknotes of Walpole and Co. recently before that? - A.No, I cannot say that I had.

Q. Was young Mr. Rainbow in partnership with his father? - A. I do not know any thing of their concerns in business.

Mr. Garrow. (To Wright.) Q. You were asked about these things being up stars: the warehouse was rather small, was it not? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it not common for goods to be kept up stairs when the warehouse was full? - A. I never saw any thing of the kind.

Q. The prisoner desires me to ask of you this question, whether, while you were his porter, you do not know that he kept goods that came into his shop in the fair way of his trade, up stairs? - A. I never knew any thing of the kind.

DAVID PRICE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Serjeant

Best. I am a clerk in the Bank. (Produces a one hundred pound note.)

Q. Do you know by whom that was brought to the Bank? - A. No; the person who brought it, wrote the name, John Rogers , No. 6, King-street, Holborn.

Q.Look round, and see if you can see the person? - A.No; I should not know the person if I was to see him. (The note read, with Walpole and Co. written upon the face of it.)

Frith. This my hand-writing, and I believe it to be the note that I sent to Mr. Rainbow.

Q.(To Price.) What change did you give for that 100l. note? - A.Three twenties, two tens and four fives; I cannot tell the numbers without the book.

WILLIAM SEABROOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. I am a clerk in the Bank. (Produces the Bank-book).

Mr. Raine. Q. Who made that entry? - A. I did.

Q. From what? - A.From the note.

Q. Who gave you the note? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You had not the note from Mr. Price then? - A. No; I had it usually from the person who brings it.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Be so good as tell us the numbers and sum of the notes which you gave in exchange for the 100l.? - A.Three twenties, two tens, and four fives; the three twenties were No. 8729 to 8731, dated the 27th of June; the tens were No. 6588, 6589, dated the 28th of June; the four fives were No. 1156, 1157, 1158, 1159, dated the 30th of June, all of them of the present year. (Mr. Shelton read three of the notes taken from the prisoners, No. 8730, 8731, and 6589.)

Q. Look round, and see if you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. It is impossible to say that, so many persons as we see.

Mr. Serjeant Best. (To Tipper.) Q. Did you go to No. 6, King-street, Halborn? - A. I Did; I enquired for person of the name of Rogerson, but no such person lived there; in the lower part of the house there were a few mattrasses, and there were lodgers in the upper part.

JOHN TOM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk in the house of Walpole and company: On the 11th July, I paid a draft of one hundred and eighty pounds to Mr. Joseph Firth , (produces his book;) It was draft of Bruckshaw and Company; I paid him a 100l. note, No. 1215, dated the 9th of July, 1800; the 5ol. was No. 2625, dated the 10th of July 1800.

Mr. Shelton. They correspond.

- SANSUM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Serjeant Best Q. Do you know Mr. Rainbow the elder? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Burdett? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever recommend him to Mr. Rainbow? - A. I never did.

Q.You are sure of that? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You do know Burdett? - A. I dined with him once in company with Mr. Rainbow, in Thames-street.

Q. Then If he has said he became acquainted with Burdett in your comapny, it was strictly true? - A. Yes.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q.What is Burdett - do you know? - A. A Sheriff's-officer.

Mr. Garrow. Q. And I belive you know that he has absconded? - A. I have heard so. (One bag of silk produced.)

Mr. Fielding. (To Lambe.) Q. Be so good as look at that silk - are you able to say that that is a parcel of the silk taken from your house? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. From experience in business, it is an easy matter upon the inspection of such an article as that, to be able to say? - A. I took very particular fabric, and if differed very materially from the fabric that I have had before, and I sent for our broker; I firmly believe it is the identical silk; I saw the other bags at the Mansion house, but I cannot speak to them so positively as I can to this.

Jury. Q. Had this bag the tickets on them that you mentioned? - A. No; these are not our bags, they have been changed.

Mr. Fielding. Q. What was the value of the silk? - A. Four hundred pounds.

Q. With the duty upon it? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value without the duty? - A. I do not exactly know what duty it pays.

Q. There were different denominations of silk lost from your house? - A. Yes, ninety-three pounds eight ounces of Friuli silk; the quantity of Friuli silk that we lost, and the quantity found, corresponded, as near as possible; and the China silk, I believe, will agree to an ounce.

- BANBURY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a silk broker, and have been many years.

Q. Do you remember examining a quantity of silk with Mr. Lambe, that you had bought for him? - A. Yes; I recollect this silk perfectly, it is a very peculiar silk.

Q. But, in general, in the examination of an article, is it of a nature for you to say upon, being produced, whether that is the article or not? - A. In some kind of silks there is a difficulty, particularly in China; but I never-saw a bale like this in my life before, either in size, quality, or throw; I am almost positive it is the same.

Q.Whereabouts is the value of four hundred

pounds worth of silk, without the duty? - A. About three hundred pounds.

EDWARD HAYCOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are one of the partners in this house? - A. Yes.

Q. You take the department of manufacturing the silk chiefly? - A. Yes; part of this bale was sent to me to Coventry, and I afterwards saw it at the Mansion-house; I am positive it is the same silk.

JOHN LAMBE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are a partner in this house? - A. Yes.

Q.Look at that silk - is there about that any mark by which you can say that that is a parcel lost from your house? - A. I believe it from the colour, and from the completion of the silk, it is out on condition, it is unlike most other silk that comes under our examination.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. From what cause do you suppose it came out of condition; from the long voyage, I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. Any other silk being out of condition from the same cause, would have the same appearance? - A. Yes.

Edward Rainbow 's defence. My Lord, and Gentleman of the Jury, it has already been related to you with respect to Burdett coming to me and telling me that it was smuggled from on board a ship belonging to a person that he was intimately acquainted with; I told him I could not speak to him them, for my wife had been run over the day before, and the surgeon was then up stairs; he called again in about an hour and a half, and I bought the silk of him, for which I paid him 348l. I borrowed 200l. of it my friend, Mr. Frith; I never had the smallest suspicion of its having been stolen; I never had my name called in question before.

William-Thomas Rainbow's defence. My Lord, and Gentleman of the Jury. My feelings this day you will better conceive than I can express: I served my time to my father, and have been servant to him ever since; I could not conceive, nor do I believe that my father was a person who could do that which was wrong, or which could implicate him, who must be the dearest to him, his son. My Lord and Gentleman, I have been married three months last Monday; my father took this house at College-Hill for me; I was only his servant, and acted under my father's direction; I believe solemnly, as I stand at this bar, and as I believe that I shall stand before the bar of the Almighty, that my father had no idea of this transaction being illegal.

For the Prisoner.

- TATLOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I have been engaged in the silk trade twenty years, as a silk broker.

Q. It is your business, I take it, to attend to the quality and nature of different sorts of silk? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that silk; from your judgement, and skill in the trade, I desire you to tell my Lord, and the Jury, whether that silk, having been in your possession yesterday, or the day before, without any ticket upon it, or any distinguishing mark, do you think you could, conscientiously, swear to its being the same silk, from its colour, from its texture, or any thing else intrinsic in the silk? - A. The fabricator of this silk sends a great quantity to market; we call these Burgams, but it being out of condition, I should thing it impossible for any person to swear to it on that account.

Q. Suppose a large quantity manufactured by the same manufacturer, would not long package have the same effect? - A. No; frequently same parts will be out of condition, and other parts not; but this silk is finer than this fabricator generally sends to market.

Q. Supposing I was to take this silk, and lock it up for a week, could you, at the end of that time, be able to swear to it? - A. Certainly not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. You say this silk is finer than the fabricator usually sends to market? - A. Yes; it is smarter in the throw, it has had more work in the mill.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Do you know Mr. Rainbow? - A. Yes; I have known him some years; his transactions with me always marked the character of an honest man.

The prisoners, Rainbows, called twenty-four other witnesses, who gave them an excellent character.

Mr. Garrow. stated, that he had a list of one hundred and eighty witnesses, who were attending to speak to their character.

For the prisoner Robinson.

- LAMB sworn. - I am a tallow-chandler, at Dock-head: I have known Robinson three years; he always bore a good character.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. How long have you known him? - A.Three years.

Q.Has he been at home during all that time? - A.I never knew where he lived; being a private soap-boiler, I never wished to inquire; he used to come to my shop.

Did he come regularly, week by week? - A. Sometimes he would not come for a fortnight, when he was afraid of being found out.

Court. Q. I wish to know what a private soapboiler is? - A.That is boiling the soap without paying the duty.

HENRY ORGER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine.

I am a tallow-chandler, in the Borough: I have known Robinson two years, he was always very honest; I have sold him stuff, and he always paid me for what he had.

Q. Do you know where he lives? - A. No.

Court. Q. Do you know that you come here, in the face of your country, to speak to the character of a man for honesty, whom you know to have been in the habit of defrauding the country, and the fair trader? - A. He always paid me very honestly.

Court. It is most abominably impudent.

The Jury having retired about half an hour,returned with the following verdict:

Price, GUILTY Death . (Aged 32.)

Robinson, GUILTY Death . (Aged 28.)

E. Rainbow, GUILTY . (Aged 55.)

Transported for fourteen years .

W. T. Rainbow, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t18000917-54

641. JOHN SAWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , two sheets, value 25s. the property of William Mountain , from a lodging-room .

Second Count. Laying it not to be a lodging-room.

WILLIAM MOUNTAIN sworn. - I keep the White-horse-inn, in Friday-street : On Wednesday the 23d of July, the prisoner came to my house, ordered a supper, and a bottle of port; he asked for a bed, and came down in the morning about half past nine o'clock.

Q.Did he pay for his bed? - A. He did, one shilling; he said, he wished the bed to be kept for him, for he should be back that night; he then went away, and in about twenty minutes the sheets were missing; I saw the sheets again at Guildhall on the 25th, and I saw the prisoner the same day, before I saw the sheets; they had my mark upon them.

THOMAS NELSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, (produces a pair of sheets); I took them in of the prisoner at the bar, on the 24th of July last; I knew him by sight some years ago.

WILLIAM KIMBER sworn. - I am a constable: I apprehended the prisoner on the 25th upon another charge; when I searched him, I found in his breeches four duplicates, one of which applied to this property.

Prosecutor. those are my sheets, they have my mark upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY (Aged 28.)

On the Second Count.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-55

642. JOHN SAWYER was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , two curtains, value 10s. the property of James Brewer .

JAMES BREWER sworn. - I keep the Swan with Two Necks, in Lad-lane : I can only swear to the property.

JAMES SILSOE sworn. - I am chamberlain to Mr. Brewer: On the 22d of July, the prisoner came in about twelve o'clock at night, and asked for a bed; I lighted him to bed, and he paid me for it, one shilling and sixpence; when he was gone, we missed the curtains; there had been nobody in the room besides myself, it was a double bedded room; there was one curtain gone from each bed; I saw them again on the 25th, at Guildhall.

JOHN BERRY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Brewer: I can only prove the property.

THOMAS NELSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, (produces the curtains); I cannot say who pledged them; the person that took them in is not here, he was not before the Alderman.( William Kimber , the constable, produced the duplicate, which he deposed to have found on the prisoner; and the property was deposed to by the prosecutor, and Berry.)

Prisoner's defence. I never was in the house in my life. GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-56

643. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , fifteen yards of lace, value 37s. 6d. the property of William Williams .

SARAH WILLIAMS sworn. - I am the wife of William Williams ; I keep a haberdasher's shop, No. 10, Finsbury-place : On Wednesday, the 6th of August, about nine o'clock in the morning, I lost fifteen yards of lace; the prisoner came in for a yard of hair-ribbon; my little girl was in the shop; I came into the shop, and saw the prisoner take the lace out of the window, it was upon a card; I went towards him to ask him to give it me, and he put it under his coat and ran out of the shop; I ran after him, and called out to stop him; a gentleman that is here immediately stopped him, and I never lost sight of him; he was brought back, and I sent for a constable; the constable has got the lace.

JAMES JONES sworn. - I am a dealer in quills; I was coming from my house at Newington-green, and in Rope-maker's-street I heard a cry of stop thief; I took no notice of it till I heard it again; I turned round, and the prisoner passed me, and went up a court that was arched over; at the end of the arch-way I saw him throw something into a dust hole; he ran into the court, and finding it was no throughfare, he turned upon me; I held up a stick which I had put in my hand, and took him by the

collar; I secured him, and delivered him and the lace to the constable.( William Waters , the constable, produced the lace, which was deposed to by Mrs. Williams.)

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-57

644. THOMAS MABLY was indicted for felonionsly stealing, on the 30th of July , twenty square yards of tarpualin cloth, valur 10s. five hens, value 5s. and one cock, value 1s. the property of his Grace George Duke of Marlborough .

There being non evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-58

645. JOSEPH, alias WILLIAM PENN , and JAMES SMITH were indicted for feloniously sealing, on the 25th of July , a lamb, value 21s. the property of Henry Bott .

THOMAS HEALTH sworn. - I am shepherd to Mr. Bott: We had some sheep in the lower fields at Whetstone , in the parish of Totteridge; there were thirty-five of them; I missed three lambs, the last I missed was on the 1st of June, another within a fortnight, and the other I cannot tell how long; I found the skin in the possession of the constable, some time in August; the constable's name is Barney; there was no mark upon it, but by the appearance of the skin of the head, and the wool, I verily believe it was my master's for nobody else had got any such round about there.

Q. What sort of sheep was it? - A. New Leicester.

Cross-examined. by Mr. Alley. Q. You lost this lamb at Totteridge, which is in Hertfordshire? - A. Yes.

Q. And not in Middlesex? - A. No; we found the skin in Middlesex.

RICHARD BARNEY sworn. - I am a constable of the perish of Friern Barnet: On Monday, the 28th of July, I shewed Heath a lamb-skin, which I found in the house of the prisoner Smith on the 27th, under the bed in a sack; the prisoner Penn lived is the same house; I had taken them into custody in the morning.

Q. Where is Smith's House? - A.Next door to the Blue Anchor in the parish of Friern Barnet, in the county of Middlesex.

Prisoner's defence. We picked the skin up in a sack in the road as we were going to work.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before

Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-59

646. ANN PRICE and MARY JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of August , three pair of leather shoes, value 10s. the property of Frederick Price , privately in his shop .

FREDERICK PRICE sworn. - I keep a shoe-warehouse , in Crown-Street;, Finsbury-square : About the beginning of August last, the prisoner Jones came and asked for a pair of shoes; she had a pair without heels; she did not take the shoes, but put down one shilling; some time after that the called again, and said, she had brought another customer; she wanted a pair of pumps; I fitted her on a pair; she paid me sixpence more for the other shoes; and on Saturday, the 23d of August, about three in the afternoon, they came again, both of them, and she said she was coming for her shoes; I said, very well; she said, her husband was damning and swearing that she must have a heel; she said, could not I fit her with a low heel; she tried several pairs; we agreed at last for the first pair; she pulled out half-a-crown and sixpence, and one shilling and sixpence I had before made four shillings and sixpence, that was the money that was due: about two hours after they were gone, Bulmer, Dupont, and Winder, came to my shop, and brought the shoes back with them that I had sold to Mary Jones , and three other pair.

FRANCIS JOHN DUPONT sworn. - I live in the City-road: On the 23d of August, about three in the afternoon, the prisoners at the bar came into my shop, I was in the yard, my wife was in the shop; I was called, and before I came in Price had absconded; I went to the door and saw the constable; I gave charge of Jones immediately; she protested innocence; the constable searched her. and, among other things, found three pair of women's shoes; we took her to the watch-house; she said, the other woman's name was Price, and that her husband lived at No. 47, Ironmonger-row; I went to Ironmonger-row with Bulmer, the constable, and called for another constable, Winder, on the way; the constable examined the apartments, and found a similar pair of shoes to the other three, they both lodged there; the prisoner, Price, came in, and I have charge of her; we then took her to Worship-street; it was from her that we got a knowledge where the shoes came from; she said, she had bought them there.

JOHN BULMER sworn. - I was sent for to Mr. Dupont's, on the 23d of August, about half past three o'clock; I found the prisoner Jones there; I searched her, and found upon her these three pair of shoes; I also went to the lodgings of the other prisoner, and found this pair of shoes, (producing them); Price said, she had bought them at Mr. Price's, near Finsbury-square; I took the shoes to Mr.

Price's, and he went with us to Worship-street; Price and Jones both admitted that they had been out all day together.

Q.(To Price.) Look at those shoes, (the shoes found at Price's)? - A. I did not sell these shoes to any body, they only came in the night before they were taken away; they are all my shoes; they have my mark within side of them in my wife's writing; this is a pair I sold to Mary Jones ; I wrote her name upon the bottom, "paid 1s. 6d."

Q. Look at the other two pair? - A. One of them is marked, the other is not; this is the pair that she tried on; here is one pair of my marking and two of my wife's; I had them all in the shop when they were there.

BENJAMIN DIXON sworn. - I work for Mr. Price: I made these Spanish leather shoes for Mr. Price, as near as I can guess the 6th of August; I carried them home about the 8th, and my brother made the other three pair; I am sure they are my brother's work: nobody else works for Mr. Price.

Jones's defence. The prosecutor said he would not prosecute us, for he could not swear to the shoes.

Price. I said no such thing; I said upon my oath I did not know that any shoes were stole from me till they were brought to me; I was certain they were mine directly.

Price's defence. He said over and over again that he did not want to prosecute us.

Q.(To Price.) Was your wife in the shop at the time? - A. Yes.

Q. Is she here? - A. No.

Jones, GUILTY (Aged 43.)

Price, GUILTY (Aged 46.)

Of stealing goods, value 4s. 10d.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t18000917-60

647. THOMAS HOPKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , a pound weight of nutmegs, value 2s. the property of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

HENRY PETTIT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a commodore in the India Company's warehouses; the prisoner was also a commodore in the warehouses at St. Helen's ; I was employed there from the 18th to the 23d: On the 23d I was in the cellar, and in consequence of information, I went down a dark alley in the warehouse, put my hand behind an opium chest, and there I found a bag of nutmegs; I shewed it to a person in the cellar; I saw the nutmegs in the bag; the man that was with me put his hand further in, and produced another bag containing nutmegs; I kept them in my hand till the elder came; I put them back again, by his order, into the same place that I had taken them from; the elder and I went to the other end of the warehouse, when the prisoner came down and went into the dark alley, where I had seen him several times before; I then went towards the alley, and met the prisoner coming out, he went up the steps into the yard, and I followed him; then he went towards the privy, and just as he was going into the privy, I clapped my hand upon his shoulder, and said, Tom, you must not go in there, I am sorry for you; says he, I have got none; the elder came, and said, Tom, I am sorry for you, I thought I could have trusted my life in your hands, as far as honesty; he said, so you may, for I am as trustworthy as ever I was; the elder said, I am afraid you have got something about you that you should not have; he then said to the elder, come here, I want to speak to you; the elder told him, he could not come there, and desired him to come into the watch-house, in the yard; I went with the elder and the prisoner to the watch-house door, and saw the nutmegs taken from him; I heard the elder ask the prisoner what he had got; he said, he had nothing, and then the elder felt his pockets, and took a bag of nutmegs out of each pocket; I then went with him before the Lord-Mayor, and he was committed.

Q. Are you able to say, whether the bags that were taken from the prisoner, were the same that you found behind the chest? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This man is not a commodore yet? - A. He is acting commodore, though he does not receive the pay, he does duty.

Q. For the good natured purpose, trying whether your messmates would commit a felony or not, you put them back into that place? - A.I was ordered so to do.

Q. I believe, before he would be suffered to go out at the gate, he would have been pretty closely rubbed down? - A. He would have been rubbed down.

Q. The prisoner has, himself, been the means of detecting persons who have been committing those fort of depredations? - A. Yes, it was his duty so to do.

Q. Did not you know that the nutmegs in that warehouse, belonged to the merchants who had purchased them, and not to the India-Company? - A. The nutmegs were in the warehouse.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do I understand you rightly, that he had denied having any thing? - A. He did.

Q. When they are sold in the sales, do they not remain afterwards under the care of the Company?

A. Yes.

WILLIAM STINTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an assistant elder in the India Company's warehouses; I took the prisoner to the watch-house belonging to the warehouses; I said to him, Tom, I am very sorry for you, I thought I could have trusted you, but you have got something in your pocket that you should not have; he immediately replied to me, I have not; after which, he seemed to wish to speak to me out of the watch-house: I told him, no, Tom, I must not do that, I must see what you have got about you; I said, come, it does not signify talking, you have got them; upon that I put my hand into his pocket, and pulled a bag of nutmegs out of each pocket; he was taken before the Lord-Mayor and committed.

Q. Were there such nutmegs in the warehouses at the time? - A. We had such. (Produces them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have been a long time in this warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. And so has the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; he is a man that I always thought a very honest man.

Q. I believe he has been the means of detecting some persons who have been committing depredations? - A. One person he has.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Stinton, the elder, told me, if I found any thing concealed, to let him know, and I should be promoted in the warehouse, and as he was not much liked in the warehouse for fear of a trap being laid for him, three years ago, I stopped a man with nutmegs, and it was dropped; I could not walk the streets safely after it, I was so ill used, and that was the reason why I took them to him in that private manner; I have been thirteen years in the warehouse.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Whipped one hundred yards, in Bishopsgate-street, near St. Helen's

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-61

648. HANNAH CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , a bag, value 3d. twelve silver knife handles, value 3l. and half an ounce of silver filings, value 2s. 6d. the property of Charles Higgins .

CHARLES HIGGINS sworn. - I am a journeyman silversmith , I work for Mr. Brent; I keep a house, No. 66, John-street, Blackfriars-road, the property was taken from my little girl.

FANNY HIGGINS . Q. How old are you? - A.Eight years of age.

Q. Do you know how you shall be punished if you swear that which is false? - A. Yes, in a place of torment.

Q. Is that a place where had people go that swear that which is false? - A. Yes. (Sworn.)

Q.Is the last witness your father? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you ever robbed at any time? - A. Yes; on a Friday about twelve o'clock, I was going to Mr. Brent's, in Little-Britain, with some silver knife handles, a book, and a bag of silver filings; the handles and the filings were in a bag; when I got to the end of Bridge-street , the girl pulled my hand away from my frock.

Q. Look round and see if you can see the girl? - A. That is her, (pointing to the prisoner;) then she took the bag out of my lap, and ran away towards Fleet-market; then I ran home and told my father.

Q. Did the girl say any thing at the time? - A. No.

Q. Had you ever seen her before? - A. Yes.

Q. And she knew you? - A. I do not know, I am sure.

Q. Where had you seen her before? - A. In Lombard-street, at the City-arms.

Q. How came you to see her there? - A. Mr. Peatt took me in.

Q. Was that before or after you were robbed? A. After; I had never seen her before.

Q. Look at the girl again, tell me if you are sure she is the same girl? - A. Yes.

- PEATT sworn. - I am a constable: On Tuesday the 29th of July, the prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house, at near twelve o'clock at night; I asked her if she had got the handles, she said, no, she had sold them.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her to confess? - A. I did.

Q. Then you must not tell us a word she said? A. I searched her, but found nothing upon her.

- STIRLING sworn. - I live within three doors of the prisoner; on Sunday, the prisoner told me she had found some handles; the woman that she lodged with was with her; I heard of the child being robbed, I took her into custody upon suspicion, and delivered her into the hands of Mr. Peatt.

MARIA PEARCE sworn. - I took the prisoner in out of charity, she used to lie about upon the stairs, or anywhere; I sent her to her sister's, and when she came back, she said she had found some silver handles, and that she had been to try to sell one of them at a silversmith's shop, the corner of Houndsditch; I went to the gentleman's shop, and told him, she was going to a place that night, and a little something would be of great use to her, and she was to go again in the evening; when I came home, she told me she had got more, and that she had put them in my drawers; I told her she had done a wrong thing; I sent them back to her, in St. Clement's church-yard, by a person of the name of Catherine Blasden .

Q. Did you not look into the bag? - A. No.

THOMAS DEAN sworn. - I live at No. 18, Minories, near Tower-hill; Catherine Blasden , against whom the Grand Jury have thrown out the bill, came to me on the 25th of July, between four and five, and offered for sale this knife handle; I stopped it, and Blasden came in the evening and brought the prisoner with her; the prisoner then had, in her possession, this bag and book, (producing them;) she told me -

Q. Did you tell her, it would be better for her to confess? - A. I did.

Court. Then you must not tell us what she said.

ELIZABETH LEE sworn. - I keep a silversmith's shop in Shoreditch; on Saturday the 26th of July, the prisoner, with another woman, came into the shop, and asked me if I bought old silver, it was some time in the afternoon, but I cannot say the hour; I told her, I did; she then shewed me part of three knife handles; I asked her how she came by them, and she, and the other woman that was with her, said, they had found them, and that her mother had sent her to sell them; I weighed them, they weighed fourteen penny-weight, I gave her 4s. 3d. for them, which is 5s. an ounce.

Q. Have you brought it here? - A. No; the old silver that we buy in the course of the week, we always pay away on the Monday morning to different workmen.

JOHN DAVIS sworn. - I am a licensed hawker; I know nothing of the prisoner; all I know is against Catherine Blasden.

- KATESON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant; on the 25th of July, the prisoner came to my master's shop, No. 2, Gracechurch-street, at near one o'clock, and offered me two silver knife handles; I asked her where she got them, she told me, her mistress sent her with them; I asked her where her mistress lived, and she said, No. 2, in Thames-street; she said her mistress had given them her in a hurry; I sent her to fetch her mistress, and she came back again, and brought ten more; there, says she, now you see my mistress has sent me, sore here is the whole dozen, they had M. B. upon them; I would not take them in; I told her, I should stop her, but by some means or other, her talking to me for half an hour, I let her have them again.

WILLIAM ALLEN sworn. - I am a perfumer and hardware-man; I have got two handles that I bought of two girls, but I cannot say that the prisoner was one of them. (The property was deposed to by Higgins.)

Prisoner's defence. I found them in a bag, at the corner of Gracechurch-street.

GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and privately whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-62

649. THOMAS BYAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , thirty-eight yards of canvas, value 38s. the property of John-Robert Anderson .

DAVID BOYD sworn. - I am warehouseman to Mr. John-Robert Anderson, a Scotch factor , in Throgmorton-street : On the 25th, or 26th of July, I cannot say which, I was informed that a person had run away with a piece of canvas; the prisoner was brought back with the property.

- CHAMBERS sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Anderson; I saw the prisoner come in at the gate, he went behind a pile of canvas, and stopped there a few minutes; I saw him look round, and then take a piece and go away with it; I ran after him, and he threw it down in the middle of the road; he ran up Black-swan-court, which is no thoroughfare, and we took him in the court as he came down; Gray Rhodes laid hold of him first; I took him back to the premises, and Rhodes picked up the canvas.

GRAY RHODES sworn. - I saw the prisoner take the canvas off the pile, I went after him, and stopped him in the court; I am sure he is the same man; I brought the canvas back, and delivered it to the constable.

PETER RICHARDS sworn. - (Produces the canvas.) I received it from Mr. Nunn, the constable, he is very ill.

Rhodes. This is the same canvas, I know it by the stamp.

Chambers. This is the same canvas.

Boyd. I know this canvas, it is stamped Alexander Lewell, Montrose; it is the manufacturer's mark, and no other person whatever has any of his manufacture, but Mr. Anderson alone.

Prisoner's defence. I am quite innocent of what I am charged with; I went up the court, and had some beer, and I dare say it was the space of ten minutes before I came down the court again.

GUILTY (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-63

650. THOMAS BRADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , seven yards of cotton, value 1l. 6s. 10d. and ten shawls, value 3l. 11s. the property of Richard Bell .

RICHARD BELL sworn. - I drive an errand-cart : On Saturday the 26th of July last, as my cart was standing in Paternoster-row , a little after three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw a man come up and take a parcel out of the cart, and go up Paternoster-row; I followed him, and took him, I never lost sight of him; he threw the parcel down before I came up to him, I took him in Lovell-court; he

made a desperate resistance before the constable came, he kicked me several times while I had hold of him; he threw the parcel down as he turned the corner of Lovell-court; I took it up immediately and followed him, I gave it to the constable, I do not know what it contains.

- WOODMAN sworn. - I am an officer, I took charge of the prisoner and the property; I received it from Mr. Bell, and have had it ever since. (Produces it.)

THOMAS FOIL sworn. - I am shopman to a linen-draper; I delivered this parcel to Mr. Bell's errand-cart myself, on Saturday, the 26th of July, it contains seven yards of cotton, and ten shawls; I directed the parcel myself to William Archbutt , at Brentford.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-64

651. ROBERT DOWNBROUGH and HENRY GUNNELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , four pounds of brimstone, value 1s. the property of George-Allen Aylwin , and Thomas Chapman .

GEORGE- ROBERT THOMAS sworn. - I am a merchant's watchman; I had some brimstone belonging to George- Allen Aylwin and Thomas Chapman , some upon Ralph's quay, some upon Young's quay, and I believe one chest upon Wiggins's quay; they all belong to one proprietor; Messres. Aylwin and Chapman were my employers.

THOMAS PRIDMORE sworn. - I am a warehouseman to Messrs. Aylwin and Chapman; I had information that the prisoner had been robbing my master; I saw Downbrough going off up Wiggirls's quay gateway; I went and stopped him, and Grimes the officer came up to my assistance, searched him, and took the property from him; there were four pounds of roll-brimstone, he had some in his breeches, and some in his pocket; in consequence of the prisoner saying, that Gunnell gave it to him, he was taken up, but we found nothing upon him.

HENRY WOOD sworn. - I am an oil-labourer; I saw both the prisoners take the brimstone out of the basket; Downbrough first took some out, and put into his breeches, and when he went away, Gunnell went to the basket, and put some into his pocket; I told Pridmore of it, and I saw no more.

THOMAS GRIMES sworn. - I am a constable on the quays, under the direction of the City-Marshalls; I was on duty, and saw Pridmore run and catch hold of the prisoner Downbrough; I immediately called my partner, and ran up to the assistance of Pridmore; when I went up, I asked him what he stopped the man for, and he said he had been stealing some brimstone; I immediately took him under the gateway, and searched him; I found this brimstone upon him. (Producing it.)

JOSEPH DAVIS sworn. - I am a constable on the quays, under the direction of the City-Marshall; I saw the prisoner Downbrough searched, there was some brimstone taken out of his breeches, some out of his pockets and some out of his hat.

Downbrough's defence. I went upon the quays to look for a job, I saw a piece of brimstone lying, and I put it in my hat; that gentleman came up to me, and asked me if I had any brimstone about me, I said, yes, I had, and then the constables came up to his assistance, and I was taken into custody.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who deposed that he was a very good soldier abroad, but always in trouble at home.

Downbrough, GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Confined two weeks in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

Gunnell, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-65

652. ANN ENGLISH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , two shirts, value 8s. the property of Joseph Layman .

JOSEPH LAYMAN sworn. - I keep a pamphlet-shop , just by St. Luke's Hospital ; the prisoner came in to ask for the history of George Barnwell , and while I was looking for it, she asked me to let her tie her garter up, and I let her go into the back-room, there were two shirts lying in the chair, and when she came out of the room again, I missed my two shirts; seeing a bundle in her apron, I asked her what she had got there, she said, nothing of mine; I told her, I missed a couple of shirts, and I would see what she had in her apron; I pulled her apron open, and saw the tail of the shirt; I asked her what she called that, she said it was a sheet; I told her, I insisted upon seeing it, and she said, it was not decent for me to see it; she said, she would shew it to a woman in the street, and there was a woman sitting upon the boundary stone, she beckoned to her, she passed the woman and got quick round the corner of the alley; a gentleman called after her, I believe, twice, and she came back and threw the shirts on the floor, just where she took them from.

LUKE HODGSON sworn. - I was passing accidentally, when I saw the woman come out of Layman's house, she passed me to turn down the alley, I asked her what she had got there, she made me no answer, at last she turned back and went towards the house, I followed her; I then stopped her till

the old man came back; I asked him if those were his shirts, he said, yes, they were; the woman begged I would not be cruel; an officer came, and she was taken into custody. (The constable produced the property, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I had a dirty sheet in my apron, I did not touch the shirts, they were lying upon the floor.

GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-66

653. JAMES SUMMERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , two iron screw taps, value 5s. the property of William Pike .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM PIKE sworn. - I am a coach-maker , in Bridge-road, Lambeth; the prisoner was a smith , employed by me, he worked half a day one day, and a quarter of a day the next day, I never saw him after; I missed two iron screw taps a few days after, which I found again in about six weeks, or two months, at Mr. Tweedie's shop, Coy's-gardens, Tottenham. court-road; Tweedie asked for the stocks to match the taps to, and then he produced them; we took the stocks with us, and they fitted exactly. (Produces them.)

Q. They will not answer the purpose of any other stocks? - A. No; the taps are for the axletrees, and the stocks are to screw the nuts on; it is a thing I never suffered to go out of my shop, it is a right-hand and a left-hand stock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You missed these some days after the prisoner had left you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say you had them in your possession while he was with you? - A. I saw them every day.

Q. Then how came you not to miss them for several days? - A.Because we did not want to use them.

Q. Will not that tap fit a die from one inch even to two? - A. We can screw them up to four or five inches.

Q. Then it will sit a die, from one inch to two? - A. No, it will not sit; the nuts will be of no use, when the work is done, it will not cut a clean thread, unless they are made for each other.

Q. Have you knowledge enough of the subject to say whether these taps are finished by a right or a left-handed man? - A. The taps are one righthand, and the other left-hand, there must be two men employed to use it.

JOHN KELLY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Pike; the prisoner was at work for my master, three quarters of a day, I saw no more of him till he was apprehended; these are the taps that were in my master's possession when the prisoner came into his employment; I missed these taps two or three days after he was gone, I had occasion to use them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Can you tell me whether these taps are made by a right-handed or a left-handed man? - A. A right-handed man may make both.

Q. Are they filed by a right-handed or a left-handed man? - A. I know a right-handed man can file them both, I cannot distinguish any difference.

Q. Were you the first that told Mr. Pike they were missing? - A. I believe I was.

Q. Had your master discharged any workmen about that time? - A. No.

WILLIAM TWEEDIE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a smith, in Tottenham-court. road; I know the prisoner at the bar, he worked for me about six weeks.

Q. Do you remember buying any taps of him? A. Yes, somewhere about the middle of July.

Q. Look at these taps? - A. I am not so well acquainted with them as the man that works with me; I believe these are the same, I gave five shillings for them.

Pike. They cost me twenty-five shillings new, and they are the better for being old, because they are seasoned.

Q. Did you ever buy any taps of the prisoner before? - A. No; the taps laid in my shop, I suppose, three weeks before I paid for them; I had them valued by a screw-maker, at four shillings.

Jury. Q. Had you any stocks to those taps? A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are not certain that these are the very screws that you bought of the prisoner? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did I understand you rightly, that in the begining of your evidence, you said you had no doubt they were the same? - A. I have not much doubt.

Court. Q. Had you any other taps in your house about this time? - A. No.

Q. Did any other man bring you any taps? - A. No; when I bought them, they were very much out of repair, my man was a day and a half repairing them.

Prisoner's defence. I bought these taps of a young man that was going Armourer's mate on board an Indiaman.

For the Prisoner.

RICHARD GANDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a coach tire-smith, in all its branches, in Ogle-court, Great Marybone-street;

the prisoner worked for me at the time that he was taken up; he worked for me, from the 6th of June, to the 26th of July; from me he went to Mr. Tweedie's, and then came to work for me again; I always found him a very honest man.

Q. Do you think any man is able to swear to taps? - A.It is impossible, unless he has a private mark.

Jury. Q.Suppose they fit the stocks? - A.There are so many, it is impossible to swear to them; I have two pair with me, the same tap may fit different stocks.

Court. Q. Mr. Pike has said, that it will not answer the purpose, though it is of the same size? - A. It certainly will answer the purpose.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do not you think a man could swear to a pair of taps if he had no other in his house? - A. I think he could not.

Q. Had you employed Tweedie to procure you a pair of taps? - A. No, I had not. The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-67

654. CHARLOTTE, alias CATHERINE VIGNETTE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , six silver spoons, value 38s. five silver forks, value 2l. a silver soup ladle, value 4l. 10s. eight silver spoons, value 30s. a silver cream-pot, value 20s. a silver marrow-spoon, value 3s. twelve silver forks, value 8l. 10s. a gravy-spoon, value 31s. three silver spoons, value 21s. a silver tea pot, value 3l. 3s. a silver table-spoon, value 30s. two silver forks, value 20s. a silver salt, value 8s. a silver pepper-castor, value 10s. a silver salt frame, value 10s. a silver tea-caddie, value 2l. 2s. a silver table-spoon, value 10s. two table-cloths, value 15s. a silver bottle-stand, value 9s. two table-cloths, value 17s. 6d. four pair of silk hose, value 20s. a silver bottle-stand, value 1l. 10s. a silver waiter, value 1l. 6s. a silver porringer, value 8l. two silver desert spoons, value 12s. twelve silver handled knives, value 8l. 4s. twelve silver forks, value 8l. 4s. a silver dish, value 4l. 4s. and a silver dish cover and stand, value 7l. 7s. the property of John March , in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN MARCH sworn. - The prisoner came to live with me in March 1799; she said, that she understood I wanted some person to take care of my house; I asked her what wages, she said, she did not want wages, she wanted peace and quiteness, she referred to a M. Le Marchand, a counsellor of the Parliament of Rouen; he came with her, and said she was a very proper person.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At Knightsbridge ; I was robbed in August last.

Q. Was any application made to you by Mr. Winden, to settle an account for bread? - A. No, nor did I know that such a man did exist, till I was arrested.

Q. Did you furnish the prisoner, from time to time, with money to pay for the articles of housekeeping? - A. Yes, regularly every day, constantly

Q. On the 25th of August, was there any dispute between you and her, with respect to accounts? - A. I was arrested upon a note which I never gave; I sent for Mr. Winden.

Q. Did she, during the explanation, stay in your house, or did she run away? - A. She left the house; I then examined my plate, and, instead of finding it, I found but three silver knives.

Q. Who had the care of the place where the plate was deposited? - A. She had, and went away with the keys.

Q. Did you at any time give her authority to pawn any of your plate? - A. Never; I called at Bow-street, when I left the spunging-house, and got a search-warrant; I was present when the house was searched; I found this pocket-book full of duplicates, and in searching the drawers, they found other tickets.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You had no dispute with the prisoner till the 25th of August last? - A. Never.

Q. Have you lived in perfect harmony with her? - A. Yes, as much as a master can do with a servant.

Q. You thought it extremely odd that you should be arrested, and she be the means of it? - A. Yes.

Q. Then the dispute arose? - A. I had no dispute.

Q.You were a little angry at her being the means of your being arrested? - A. Certainly I was.

Q. Did not you prefer a bill of indictment to the Grand Jury at this sessions, for forging that note upon which you were arrested? - A. I did

Q. And the Grand Jury threw out that bill, did not they? - A. That I do not know.

Q. How long after this note, and this dispute, did she remain in your house? - A. She went away directly, I never saw her again till I saw her at the bar at Bow-street.

Q. That was the next day? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that she went to Mr. De Clerville's, and that he came with her the next day to Bow-street? - A. I did not think Mr. De Clerville capable of so base an action, after he had eaten and drank, and been cloathed in my house for five years, and after I had begged for him -

Q. Do you mean to say, upon your oath, that you yourself never pawned any of the articles belonging to yourself? - A. Two or three years before, I had pawned almost all the plate that I had.

Q. In December last, did you pawn any thing, and what? - A. I never have since the prisoner has been in my house.

Q. Upon your oath, did you never redeem any property which was pawned in December last by the prisoner at the bar? - A. I did.

Q. That was in December last? - A. I cannot positively say.

Q. What were those things that you redeemed? - A. A gold watch and a diamond ring, and to the best of my recollection I never redeemed any thing else.

Q. How long did the prisoner live with you after that? - A. I cannot say.

Q. A month? - A. More than that.

Q. I understood you to say, that you never gave her authority to pledge any thing? - A. I never did.

Q. There was that ring, you know? - A. I pledged it by some person.

Q. Did you not send it by the prisoner? - A. To the best of my recollection, I did not.

Q. Was not that ring pawned for 10l. during the time that the prisoner lived with you? - A. I cannot recollect; I gave her a watch to pledge for me that I had redeemed.

Q. You gave her no wages at all? - A. I gave her a present now and then.

Q. She was not in the character of a servant to you? - A. I never took her in any other shape.

Q. Then she did not dine with you, and sit at table? - A. Yes, she did; she prepared the dinner, and dined with me.

Q. Do you mean to say you never gave authority to the prisoner to pledge any of the articles, except the watch? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. You have been in the habit of pawning your plate for some time? - A. When I wanted money, I thought it was better to go to the pawnbroker's, than to go for the bills that were owing to me; I have done so for fourteen or fifteen years.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you ever given the prisoner authority to pledge any one of those articles for which the is now indicted? - A. Never.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable: I had a search-warrant to execute in the house of one Mrs. Martin in Brompton-row; I received a quantity of duplicates from Mr. March; one duplicate I found in a woman's pocket, in a drawer, in Mr. March's house; I found a silver spoon in her pocket; I apprehended her at Mrs. Martin's; she was washing a child when I went in, in the apartments of a Frenchman, of the name of De Clerville.

Q.(To March). Whose drawers were those in which the pocket was found? - A.The drawers in her room, under her lock.

Mr. Knowlys. It does not relate to any thing in this indictment.

Q.Look at that spoon? - A. This is my spoon.

MARY PLUMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I lived with Mr. March about two months before Mrs. Vignette left him, and live with him now.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. March supplied her with money for the house-keeping accounts? A. Yes, I do; I was present when the drawers were searched; they were in Mrs. Vignette's use; the drawers were locked, and I got Mr. March a couple of knives to open them; there were several duplicates and a pocket found.

March. The things were partly pawned in my name, and partly in her own.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Was the prisoner at the bar the servant of Mr. March? - A. She was house-keeper.

Q. She always dined with him? - A. Yes.

Q. You looked upon her as much your mistress, as Mr. March was your master? - A. I used to call her my mistress.

Q. We have heard of a Mr. De Clerville, do you know him? - A. He came to the house but little after I came.

Q. I believe your master was not quite pleased with that gentleman coming backwards and forwards? - A. I cannot say for that; I never saw any thing pass between Mr. March and Mrs. Vignette in my life.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Upon the solemn oath you have taken, from any thing you have ever seen or even can guess at, do you believe that any thing improper took place between Mr. March and Mrs. Vignette? - A. Never, in all my life.

Mr. Knowlys. (To March). Q. I am going to put a serious question to you; upon your oath was there ever any improper familiarity took place between you and Mrs. Vignette? - A. Upon my oath there never was.

Q. Did you keep her as an upper servant, or as a mistress? - A. Upon my oath, only as my servant.

Q. You are 81 years of age, I believe? - A. I am, and am a married man.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you live with your wife? A. No, I do not.

Q. Upon your oath, have you not given that woman leave to use your name? - A. I never have.

Q. Have you any children? - A. I have three.

Q. Was there a house-keeper lived with you, to whom you gave a licence to use your name? - A.I never did authorize any body to use my name.

Q. Did you, or did you not know, that without

your authority, she did use your name? - A. No, nor I never heard of it.

Q. Did you never call that person who lived with you, previous to the prisoner, Mrs. March, upon your solemn oath? - A. Never.

LUCY GEORGY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know her while she was housekeeper to Mr. March? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you visit her? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you consider her merely as the housekeeper of Mr. March, or had you the smallest idea of any immoral connection between them? - A. Never.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do not you know that he always celebrated her birth-day? - A. No.

Q. Did you never hear of it? - A. I have heard that Mrs. Vignette kept her birth-day.

- ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was chair-woman to Mr. March, near seven months.

Q. Did you know that Mr. March furnished the prisoner with money for the use of the house? A. Indeed, I do.

Q.During the time you were in the house, have you any reason to believe that she was in any other situation than as house-keeper, or did you believe that any thing immoral was going on? - A. I have never had the least reason to suspect any thing of the kind.

WILLIAM LAMB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was a workman to Mr. March all the time that Mrs. Vignette lived with him; I worked for him in the coach line.

Q. Were you much in the house? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. You considered her as the mistress of the house? - A. No; I did not.

Q.(To Treadway). Did you receive any duplicates from Mr. March? - A. I did. (Produces them).

ROBERT BARBER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Cordy, a pawnbroker, (produces a soup-ladle and eight spoons): I received them from the prisoner at the bar; I lent her six pounds on them, they are pledged in the name of Vignette, on the 29th of October; a silver lamp and candlestick for seven pounds, on the 28th; and on the 29th of August, four silver spoons and five silver forks; I received them from the prisoner.

Mr. Knapp. We will admit that all the property was pawned by her.

- WARRE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Turner, pawnbroker, in Panton-street, Hay-market, (produces six silver forks); they were pledged on the 4th of July, 1799; I took them in from the prisoner at the bar, I lent her four pounds ten shillings upon them; on the 21st of December, 1799, a silver waiter and a silver sugar-dish, for two pounds ten shillings; I received them from the prisoner; and a silver tea-pot for three guineas on the 28th of December.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you acquainted with the prisoner before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Mr. March? - A. Not myself.

Mr. Knowlys. I shall not call any more of the pawnbrokers.

Mr. Knapp. Then we shall.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. March gave me orders to pawn these things; he was short of money very often, and bid me go and get some money; I was Mr. March's friend, and he wanted money when nobody knew it but myself; he very often had not money to buy a dinner. For the Prisoner.

- BURKETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are bound over to give evidence for the prosecution? - A. Yes; I am a pawnbroker in Princes-street: I know the prisoner, and I know Mr. March, and have done these ten years.

Q. Has Mr. March been in the habit of pawning plate? - A. Yes, certainly; and sending it.

Q. Have you any articles of his, now in your house, unredeemed? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect a watch pledged by the prisoner, and Mr. March redeeming it? - A. I cannot take upon me to say that the prisoner pledged it.

Q. Was there a ring? - A. Yes, pledged by the prisoner and redeemed by Mr. March; the ring was pledged at the same time that this gold necklace was; - (producing it); which I understood to be a present from Mr. March to the prisoner; Mr. March acknowledged it at Bow-street.

Q. What is the value of this necklace? - A. Four or five guineas; there were two diamond rings pledged for ten pounds by the prisoner at the bar, which were redeemed with two other pledges, by Mr. March, the same day; I think it was on the 30th of April last.

Court. Q. Do you recollect when they were pledged? - A. The watch on the 5th of December, 1799; on the 30th of October, a ring, 10l.

Q.At the time he came to redeem these articles, was there any complaint of Mrs. Vignette pledging them? - A. No.

Q.Here is a long string of duplicates which I am furnished with by my friend, be so good as look at them, and say in what name the articles are pledged? - A.In the name of Mrs. March.

Q. Had you any idea that she was not Mrs. March? - A. No, I conceived that she was Mrs. March; I knew that she lived with him.

Q.In what name were those articles which Mr.

March himself redeemed? - A. In the name of Mrs. March.

Q.How many articles of plate have been pledged by Mr. March himself? - A. Many of them have been pledged over and over again, and some have been two years.

Q. The prisoner came to live with Mr. March, in March, 1799; has Mr. March been pledging articles since? - A. I cannot take upon me to say that he has.

Q. There were several things that remained over the time? - A.Yes; she paid the interest at the twelve months end.

Q. He was in the constant habit of pledging articles before that time? - A. Yes, and before Mrs. Vignette came to live with him, the person that lived with him before pledged articles in the same way, in the name of Mrs. March.

Q. And to his knowledge? - A. I have no doubt of it; he has redeemed articles pledged in that name by her.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you ever see Mr. March with the prisoner at any time when she pledged articles in the name of Mrs. March? - A. Never.

Q. Did you ever visit at Mr. March's? - A. No, I was never at the house; but I conceived her to be his wife; she was always dressed in the most elegant stile.

Q. Have you ever made any enquiry of any of the servants, upon what terms Mrs. Vignette lived with him? - A. No, I never did.

Q. Did you ever hear Mr. March acknowledge that any of the plate was pledged with his knowledge? - A. No.

Q. Did he ever apply to redeem any one of those articles of plate now in your possession? - A. No.

Q. Did he ever pay any interest upon them? A. No.

Q. The necklace she said he made her a present of? - A. Yes; she said she had ordered it, and he had paid for it.

FRANCIS LE MARCHAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I have known the prisoner at the bar five years; I have known Mr. March about one year.

Q. Have you ever visited at his house? - A. Yes.

Q. In what situation did you conceive Mrs. Vignette in his house? - A. As his friend; they ate and drank together; she had the best place near the fire, and Mr. March played with her with great familiarity.

Q. Have you heard any particular conversation pass between them? - A. No.

Q. Have you ever heard Mr. March give any directions to the prisoner in case he happened to die while she lived with him; did you ever hear him say to whom his property was to go after his death? - A. I do not understand you.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you recommend this woman, and give her a character, to Mr. March? - A. No.

MARGARET BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was a servant to Mr. March for eight months and eight days, while Mrs. Vignette was there.

Q. Was she in the capacity of a servant to Mr. March? - A. By no means.

Q. Did you look up to her as the mistress of the house? - A. Yes, when I was first hired I took her to be Mr. March's daughter; she hired me.

Q. I suppose you were not a great while before you found out your mistake, that she was not the daughter? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you know Mr. March pretty well during that eight months? - A. Yes, better than I wished a great deal.

Q. Who did the money all come from? - A. That I do not know; he told me, when the creditors came with the bills, to tell them, my mistress was not at home, and that when she came home the bills would be paid.

Q. Did you or not, during that time, call the prisoner Mrs. March? - A. She was frequently called so.

Q. Was she ever called Mrs. March in the presence of the prosecutor? - A.He might have heard it, for it was in his bed-room that she was called so.

Q. Did she in all her conduct appear to be the house-keeper, conducting the affairs of the house as such servant; or did she appear to be the mistress of the house? - A. She appeared to me to be the mistress of the house; and on her birthday, he had two large tables spread with plate; and one night I was gone to bed with a very violent sore throat, and he rung the bell, and desired me to get up, and come to him; she said I was very ill; and he immediately said, she shall not stay here if you are to turn maid; let her go away to-morrow; he made her a present of a gold necklace and a locket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You know more of Mr. March than you wish to know? - A. Yes, I should have wished to have left him long before, if it had not been for the lady.

Q. For a lady that was living with Mr. March as a concubine, not married? - A. I did not know it.

Q. Were you turned off, or did you go away voluntarily? - A.Voluntarily.

Q. Upon your oath, did you ever see her in your master's bed-room in your life, while he was there? - A. A thousand times; she sat on the bed-side, never any further.

Q. Upon your oath, how often have you been with this woman since her confinement? - A.Twice in Tothil-fields, and four times to-day.

Q. Upon your oath, did she not promise to give

you a character if you would swear that she was living with Mr. March in this manner? - A. I do not want one; I am in place.

Q. According to your account, she was a very bad woman? - A. I never saw her in bed with Mr. March; about three weeks before I left I heard her in the bed-room, but I do not know what passed; I always went to bed at nine o'clock.

Q. Upon your oath, did you ever suspect any thing improper? - A. I suspected it, certainly.

Q. And though you had this opinion of her, you go to visit her in prison? - A. I would go a hundred miles to see her.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You have been asked how you could live with a person under the circumstances that my learned friend has stated; did not you understand that he had a wife and children? - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t18000917-68

655. JAMES MACKINTOSH was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 30th of July , a certain order for the payment of money , to the tenor following, that is to say:

"Petersfield, August 6, 1799.

Sir, Please to pay on demand, to Mr. Hugh Young , or order, all my proportion of prize-money, due to me for my services on board his Majesty's ship Leander, for which this shall be your authority.

Witness my hand, John Johnson, X his mark.

To Alexander Davidson, Esq. No. 21, Millbank-street, Westminister,

London. Signed before us, Walter Noble , Minister, John Williams , Francis Gibbons , Church-wardens."

With intention to defraud John Johnson .

Second Count. For uttering the same knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

Two other Counts, for the same offences, with intent to defraud Alexander Davidson , Esq.

And in two other Counts, charging it to be a Bill of Exchange instead of an order for the payment of money.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Routh, and the case opened by Mr. Raine.)

HENRY CUTLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Routh. I am agent to Mr. Alexander Davidson; I was appointed to transact business at the office in Millbank-street, for the payment of prize-money: On the 30th of July, an order for the payment of money, which I hold in my hand, was brought to me by the prisoner at the bar, (produces it); I inquired in what situation John Johnson was on board the Leander; he said, he was a petty officer; upon reffering to the prize list, I found two John Johnsons on board the Leander; upon my remarking to him the circumstance of their being two, he said, it was John Johnson , a pretty officer, whose prize-money he came for; after a short conversation, he told me he was sure it was Johnson the pretty officer, and if I tendered him the proporotion of a common seaman he would not receive it.

Q. Did he produce any thing else besides the order? - A. I have a faint recollection that he produced a letter; but I cannot charge my memory positively with it.

Q. Did you, in consequence of this bill being presented, pay any money? - A. After he had said he would not receive the proportion of a common man, I gave him a draft upon Mr. Davidson's banker, for fourteen pounds ten shillings and sixpence, which was the proportion coming to a petty officer.

Q. Who were Mr. Davidson's bankers? - A.Vere, Luccadou, and Company, in Lombard-street; he then left the office immediately, having first signed the regular receipt.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you told us all the conversation as near as you can recollect? - A. I cannot charge my memory with any thing else.

Q. Do you recollect the terms in which the receipt is conducted? - A.It is in the book which I have here.

Court. Q. How long have you had the office in Millbank-street? - A. Mr. Davidson has had an office in Millbank-street two or three years, but not for this purpose; for conducting another branch of his business, in the barrack department.(The order read.)

Mr. Knapp. Q. Is there a receipt at the back of the hill?

Mr. Fitzpatrick. Yes; (Reads.)"Pay to J. Mackintosh, or order. H. Young." And underneath it is "Received, Jas. Mackintosh."

JOHN HAWKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Routh. I am a clerk in the banking-house of Vere, Luccadou, and Company: On the 30th of July, I paid a draft of Mr. Davidson's, for fourteen pounds ten shillings and sixpence, (produces it); it was paid in the name of Johnson; but I cannot say who presented it.

Cutler. This is the draft I gave to the prisoner at the bar.

JOHN JOHNSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine.

Q. Did you serve on board the Leander at the battle of the Nile? - A. Yes; as quarter-master, and rated midshipman upon the books; I was taken ill in the Mediterranean, Admiral Nelson invalided us all home, and I was discharged from the Leander in October, 1799.

Q.To whom did you give authority to receive your prize-money? - A. Mr. Alexander, navy agent, at Porsmouth; I gave him a power of attorney to receive it, and remit the money to me whenever I was, in any port of Britain; I received twenty-six pounds ten shillings and sixpence the first payment; I received it from Mr. Hunt, who was employed by Mr. Alexander; I afterwards applied to Mr. Hunt for a second-payment, and I was told my money was taken; and then I went to Mr. Davidson's, but did not get my money; I then went to my lodging in Wapping, and Mackintosh was sent for over; I said, Mr. Mackintosh, I understand you have drawn my prize-money without any liberty from me; yes, says he, I have drawn your money; here is a letter, says he, that I have received from one John Johnson , at Petersfield, to receive it; and he shewed me a letter with John Johnson 's mark; says I, Mr. Mackintosh, I have no call to put a mark to my name, I can write it.

Q. Was that you mark? - A. No; I then went out, fetched a constable, and took him up.

Q. Do you know Petersfield? - A. No.

Q. Nor any body lives there? - A. No.

Q. Was that letter that Mackintosh shewed you, of your writing? - A. No.

Q. Have you received the money? - A. Yes; and I signed the books.

Q. Look at the order? - A. That is neither my mark, nor my name.

Q. Did you ever authorize Hugh Young to receive any of your prize-money? - A. No; I never saw the man till I saw him before the Magistrate; nor any body else but Mr. Alexander, at Portsmouth.

Q. Look at the back of the order; do you know any thing about that? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you told us all the conversation that you had with the prisoner when you sent for him from his lodgings? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Young there at that time? - A. No; my landlord was there, George Kilgour, and the constable.

Q. What was the other person's name on board the Leander? - A. John Johnson .

Q. Have you no other name than John Johnson ? - A. No.

Q. Did you never go by any other name? - A. No.

Q. Never by the name of Brown? - A. Never in my life.

Q. Did not the prisoner say, he was desired by a Mr. Young to receive it, that he might transmit it to Johnson of Petersfield? - A. Yes.

RICHARD OSMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Routh. I am an officer belonging to Whitechapel,(produces a letter); I received it from Mackintosh; before I took him into custody, he said, that was from the person for whom he was employed to draw the money.

Q. Have you had it ever since? - A. No; the next morning it was delivered into the hands of the clerk at the office, Mr. Smith; it was delivered to me again when he was fully committed.

Q. Do you believe that to be the same letter? - A. I do.

Q.(To Cutler.) Look at that letter; is that the letter that was produced to you by the prisoner, when he produced the order for which you gave him a draft? - A. I am not certain that it is.

Q.(To Osman.) Is Mr. Smith here? - A. No.

Q. Can you say that it is the same letter that you received from Mackintosh? - A. I did not make any mark upon it, but I believe it to be the same from the direction.

(The Court were of opinion, that the letter was not sufficiently identified).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner told you he was employed by Mr. Young? - A. Yes; and rather dared me to detain him.

Q. He told you where Young lived? - A. Yes; but not till the next morning, when I fetched him from the watch-house.

Q. Did you ask him the day before where Young lived? - A. Yes; and he would not tell me.

Q. This letter, of itself, tells you where he lived? - A. Yes; Mr. Young came forward.

Q. You took him into custody, and he has been in custody ever since? - A. Yes; the prisoner said he had delivered the money to Young.

Q. The prisoner was discharged, was he not? - Yes.

Mr. Raine. Q. And taken up again? - A. Yes.

SARAH YOUNG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine.

Q. Do you remember, in the month of August, last year, a letter coming, directed to your husband, from Petersfield? - A. Yes; I received it in August, 1799; I cannot say the day.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar in your house at the time? - A. Not that I recollect; I opened the letter by my husband's direction, and when I opened it, I found it was a blank paper, there was nothing contained in it at all.

Q. When you opened it, and found it to be a blank, was Mackintosh present? - A. I cannot recollect; Mr. Young was very ill.

Q. To whom did you deliver it? - A. It laid about for two or three months afterwards, for any thing I know.

Q. Do you know whether the blank letter that you received was at any time in the possession of the prisoner? - A. I cannot positively say.

Q. Is your husband's name Hugh? - A. Yes.

Q.Can he read or write? - A. He cannot.

GEORGE M'CARTY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Routh. I am a victualler; I keep the Bee-hive, in Nightingale-lane, East Smithfield: I have seen the prisoner at the bar several times.

Q. You have a paper to produce, I believe? - A. No, Mr. Dawson has it. On the 30th of July, I found a small parcel lying on the table in my kitchen, tied up in a brown paper with a bit of string; it was a kind of a book, tied up in the same form that I found it; I put it by in the kitchen drawer till the Friday evening, and then I gave it to Dawson, and he read it.

DOROTHY M'CARTY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Do you remember any parcel being left at your house? - A. Yes, the end of July, I think the 30th; the prisoner had some rum and water in the kitchen; he called for a pen and ink, and I saw no more of him; I went about my business, and when I came back into the kitchen I saw a kind of pocket-book or a memorandum-book lying upon the table; I supposed it to be his, and let it lie for some time, thinking he would send for it; I left it on the table, and did not meddle with it; there was a string round it; when Mr. M'Carty came home, he took it off the table, and put into a drawer.

Q.(To M'Carty.) The parcel that you put into the drawer, was it the same parcel that you delivered to Dawson? - A. Yes, three days after.

Mrs. M'Carty cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This kitchen is a room appropriated for all guests that come? - A.House-keepers come in.

Q. There were several persons drinking in that kitchen? - A.There might be in the sore part of the day; but not at that time.

Q. How many in the sore part of the day? - A. I cannot say.

Court. Q. How long was it from the time you left him writing at the table, till the time you came back again? - A. It might be a quarter of an hour; there had not been any body else in to my knowledge.

ROBERT DAWSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. (Produces a memorandum-book and paper.) I received them from Mr. M'Carty.

Q.How long have you known the prisoner? - A.From fifteen to eighteen years.

Q. Are you acquainted with his hand-writing? - A. I have seen him write many times.

Q. Can you speak to his hand-writing? - A. As far as one man can speak to another's.

Q.Look at that paper? - A.That I believe to be his hand-writing; (it is read;) written upon the back of a blank petition."Sir,

"August 24, 1799.

"The last time I was at your house in London, with Mr. Doyle, I informed you that being then invalided from his Majesty's ship Eanqder, I wished you to see after my prize-money; and being now settled here, under my poor pension, I send you herewith authority to draw my prize-money, and whatever it amounts to give me advice, and I will draw on you for the same, only deduct your expence and trouble; your early attention to this business will much oblige your humble servant," John Johnson , X his mark.

"Direct for me, Market-street, Petersfield. For four days past I have been so ill of a paralytic stroke that I can scarce make my mark, much less write my name."

Under the above was written,"Sir, Please to pay Hugh Young , or order, all my proportion of prize-money, due to me for my services on board his Majesty's ship Leander, for which this shall be your authority. Witness my hand, " John Johnson , X his mark.

"Signed before us," Walter Noble , Minister," John Williams ," Francis Gibbons , Church-wardens.

"To Alexander Davidson , Esq. Millbank-street, Westminster."

Q. Look at that letter? - A. This I have no doubt is all his hand-writing except the direction.(The letter read, dated Petersfield, 24th Aug. 1799).

"Mr. Young, the last time I was at your house in London, with Mr. Doyle, I mentioned to you, that I was invalided from his Majesty ship Leander; I wished you to see after my prize-money; and being now settled here under my poor pension, I then sent you an order to draw the same, and whatever it amounts to, give me advice, and I will draw on you for the same, only deduct your expence and trouble. Your early attention to this business, will much oblige your humble servant, John Johnson , X his mark.

Direct for me, Market-street, Petersfield.

For four days past, I have been so ill of a paralytic stroke, that I can scarce make my mark, much less write my own name:"

Q. Look at that order? - A. The body, I think, is not his hand-writing, but the signature, John Johnson, and the names of the subscribing witnesses, I think, are his hand-writing; Walter Noble , minister, John Williams , Francis Gibbons ; church-wardens, I think the whole of that is his handwriting.

Q. Now look at the back? - A. I believe all the back to be his writing; "Pay Mr. Mackintosh, or his order, H. Young; received, James Mackintosh ."

JOHN HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. On Tuesday, the 16th instant, I went down to Petersfield, to make enquiry respecting the minister and church-wardens.

Q. Did you learn that a person of the name of

Walter Noble was minister? - A. No; no such person had ever existed there; I made enquiry of the present church-wardens and the minister, and found that no such persons within their memory had ever lived in the parish; I also searched the books but could not learn any thing of them; the way that the direction, Market-street; I also enquired, but could find no such place as Market-street to Petersfield.

Prisoner. Dawson never saw me write a line in his life.

Mr. Knapp. (To Dawson). Q. Upon your oath, did you ever see him write? - A. I have seen him write more than twenty times.

Q. In what situation are you now? - A. An officer belonging to the Marshalsea.

Q. I think we have seen you here in another character? - A. I was a Police officer, but I have resigned; I kept a public-house, and the magistrate would not suffer me to keep a public-house, and be a Police officer at the same time.

Q.Do you keep a public-house now? - A. No, I have no occasion for one.

Q. Upon your oath, was not your licence taken away? - A. No, it was not stopped; I let it to a man who lost it afterwards.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 46.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-69

656. JOHN BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a saddle, value 10s. the property of Henry Carr , privately in his stable .

THOMAS BARNES sworn. - I am ostler to Henry Carr , who keeps livery-stables , the prisoner was servant to Mr. Carr five or six years back: On Saturday, the 13th of September, about two o'clock, the prisoner came into the yard, and asked me for work, I told him I had no employment for him; he stopped in the yard for an hour, or more than that; he went into a six-stall stable, facing the front gates; he was in these while I was harnessing a horse; my little boy, about 11 years old, was in the stable with me, his name is William; I saw the saddle that was lost, while I was harnessing the house after he was gone, I missed the saddle; I looked about for him, but I could not find him; the saddle belonged to a gentleman that had a horse standing as livery there; I saw it again the next day at the salder's, Charles Roberts's.

CHARLES ROBERTS sworn. - I am a sadler: The prisoner brought a saddle to me last Saturday week, No. 33, Portland-street, Wardour-street, about five o'clock; he said it belonged to a friend of his; he left it; I was not at home when the saddle was taken away by the officers.

HENRY LOVETT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: On Sunday, the 14th, the prosecutor Barnes, informed me he had lost a saddle, in consequence of which, I went and apprehended the prisoner in St. Giles's; we found him lying upon the bed with his clothes on, by the side of a woman; he told me where the saddle was; I went to Roberts's, where I found the saddle.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You do not find that sort of open conduct in old offenders? - A. No.

Barnes. I am certain it is the same saddle.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 29.)

Of stealing, but not privately in the stable .

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-70

657. JOHN ROBERTS , alias ROBINS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a bay mare, value 15l. 15s. the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t18000917-71

658. JOHN ROBERTS , alias ROBINS , was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a cart, value 10l. the property of John Bull .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t18000917-72

659. JAMES MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , four sheets, value 3l. a counterpane value 38s. two towels, value 2s. and two nigh-caps, value 2s. the property of Samuel Freeman , in his dwelling-house .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing two sheets, value 1l. 10s. the property of the said Samuel, in a lodging-room.

ANN PLUMMER sworn. - I am chamber-maid at the Saracen's Head, Aldgate , kept by Samuel Freeman ; the prisoner came to our house on Thursday morning, the 8th of August; he asked for a bed, and said he was going with the Yarmouth coach; he said he came up in the morning with the Yarmouth stage; he said he was a gentleman's gardener, and that he came up to buy seeds

for his master, after that, he said he was afraid they would not take the weight of the seeds that he had down; he paid me one shilling for the bed, in the bar, some hours before he went to bed; I in him to bed; I went into the room in the morning, and missed four sheets, a counterpane, two towels, and two night-caps, he desired to be called at six o'clock; I went into the room at six, and he was a bed; about twenty minutes after six, I went into the room again, and the prisoner was gone; my mistress demanded five guineas of me for them.

Q. Who provides them? - A. My mistress, and they are all delivered into my care; they have never been found since; we described him to the different inn-keepers; I saw him about a week after, at the White-hart, in the Borough; I knew him again immediately; I was in conversation with him some time, and I am very sure he is the same man; my mistress was with me when I apprehended him, and when he saw me, he put his handkerchief before his face, and blinded his eyes; he had a blue apron on like a gardener, when he came to our house, and there was such an apron found upon him when he was taken.

Prisoner's defence. When I went away, this young woman was in the yard, and I said, good morning to her; I had no bundle nor any thing with me; there was a deal more people slept upon the same gallery that I did.

Plummer. I never saw him after I called him at six o'clock.

GUILTY. (Aged 52.)

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-73

660. ALEXANDER BROMLEY and JAMES VAUX were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of William Dewell , privily from his person .

WILLIAM DEWELL sworn. - I am a plumber : On Sunday the 17th of August, about one o'clock, I had my pocket picked in Cheapside ; I had been to Wapping, and was returning home to Chancery-lane; there were a parcel of people had stopped, and I waited to see what had happened, the prisoner Vaux was near me; there had been some fastenings twisted off from the shutters; before I got four paces, I put my hand in my pocket and missed my pocket handkerchief; I turned round and saw a person have hold of Bromley, that person pointed out the other, and I went and laid hold of him; the constable had got the handkerchief.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long might you have stopped? - A. About three minutes.

Q. How long before had you felt your handkerchief? - A.Just by the Mansion-house.

Q.Upon your solemn oath, you mean to swear you did not drop your handkerchief instead of putting it in your pocket? - A.I cannot.

Q.Do you know that these men are trying for an offence for which they must be hanged, if they are convicted? - A.I did not know that.

Court. Q. How came you to put your hand in your pocket? - A. I don't know why; I did it.

Court. Q. Had you no suspicion at all? - A. No, I had no suspicion of the kind.

CHARLES ALDERMAN sworn. - I was with my brother, who is an officer: On Sunday the 17th of August we saw a number of people stopping in Cheapside, we went over to see what was the matter, I saw the two prisoner very active in the crowd; in a very short time, I saw them both put their hands into the prosecutor's pocket, and take out a handkerchief, both of them had, hold of it, the biggest, Vaux, let it to go immediately.

Q. Are you sure you saw both of them with their hands in his pocket? - A. Yes; It was a cross-barred cotton handkerchief.

Q. Did you ever see two men put their hands into another man's pocket at once before? - A. No.

Q. Which of them took out the handkerchief? - A. They both had hold of it.

Q. You went before the Lord-Mayor and gave notice of this, did not you? - A. No, my brother went, and I thought that was sufficient.

Q. You did not go before the Grand Jury neither? - A. No.

Q. Were it you that advised them to be indicted for a capital offence, the prosecutor has told us he did not? - A. I did not know it was a capital offence.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you advise with your brother to make it a capital offence, in order to have two rewards? - A.Upon my oath I did not.

EDWARD ALDERMAN sworn. - I was with my brother; I saw the prisoner Bromely put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket.

Mr. Alley. Q. You are sure it was Bromely? - A. Yes, I am sure of it, and took his handkerchief out of his pocket; Vaux then caught hold of it, I seized hold of Bromely, and Vaux let go immediately; I immediately apprehended Bromely( produces the handkerchief;) I took them both to the Compter; upon searching them, I found two pocket-books, and some other handkerchiefs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know that you are sworn? - A. Yes.

Q. They did not both put their hands in his pocket? - A. No.

Q. Then if you brother has sworn that they

did he has told a lie? - A. That he certainly has.

Dawell. I believe this is my handkerchief, it is the same pattern, there is no mark upon it

The prisoner left their defence to their Counsel.

Bromley called six witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

Bromley, GUILTY. (Aged 20.)

Vaux, GUILTY. (Aged 16.)

Of stealing the goods value 11d.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-74

661 ESTHER LAWRENCE and CHARLOTTE SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of August , a watch value 3l. a watch chain, value 1s. 6d. a seal, value 2s a watch key value 6d. one handkerchief value 1s.6d. a half-guinea, seven and sixpence in money, and a Bank-note, value 5l. the property of William Jeary .

WILLIAM JEARY sworn. - I am a chair-maker by trade, but have now a situation in the Customs on the 25th of August, in going home about eleven o'clock, I met with the prisoner in Bishopsgate-street, and they intreated me to walk home with them; they then asked me to treat them with a glass of liquor, and I went with them into the Marquis of Granby in Bishopsgate-street; we had some liquor for which I paid two shilling, and had fourpence halfpenny back in change, which I put into my coat pocket; when we came out the prisoner said they were going my way, and they walked with me, and going along, I was taken exceedingly sick with the liquor.

Q. Upon your oath, were you drunk or sober? - A. I was not insensible; I had only drank one glass of brandy and water before I met with the prisoners, and I had two glasses of brandy with them; I was very ill and asked for some water; The prisoners said, they lived close by, and persuaded me to go with them, and they would get me some; I went with them to a house in Angel-court, Bishopsgate-street ; I was very sick in the room and they got me some water I then sat down and fell asleep upon a chair; when I waked, I found the prisoner Lawrence on the right-side of me, very busy about my person, unbuttoning my waistcoat; after I came to myself, I heard the gentleman go past one; I told them I had no idea it was so late, and should go home.

Q. What time did you go into the public-house? - A. A little after eleven; they then both said, they would come down stairs with me, but being very dark, they went up the court with me, instead of going into Bishopsgate-street; we passed a house, where there was a door standing open, the prisoners went with me into this house, and as soon as I had got in the prisoners pulled the door upon me, and ran away; the passage being to very dark, I could not find the door, I made a noise, and a woman brought a candle; I examined my pockets, and missed my watch, a five-pound note, and seventeen shillings and sixpence; I came out of the house, and called the watchman, and went with him to the constable of at night; he told me, I could do nothing till the next day, and must get a search-warrant; the next night, about ten o'clock, I came past the same court and saw the prisoners standing at the corner of the court, I went up to them and told them, I wanted to speak with them a moment; I asked them if they did not recollect drinking liquor with me the night before, and they both denied it; I told them I was perfectly satisfied they were the persons, when Lawrence immediately said, she would be damn'd if she would deny but what, she did drink some liquor with me; I told her, I had lost my watch and I was determined to have it back; they both denied it, and said they never saw any thing of the kind, while I was speaking to them, the watchman came past, his name is Barlett; I told him those were the two women I was in company with the night before; he told me, he was on duty, but if I would wait till he came over, he would take them into custody; in the mean time, a person of the name of Wright, a constable, came up, and told me not to have any thing more to do with it yet, he would call upon me in the morning, at my lodgings, which he did and told me the prisoners were in custody and my watch and handkerchief found upon them; I went before the Lord-Mayor, and saw my watch and handkerchief, I knew them to be mine; I am certain the two prisoners are the same women; the watch had a silver hoop round the works, instead of a cap.

Prisoner Smith. Q. Did you not take up another women, before you took us up? - A. No, I took up no other woman.

SAMUEL BARTLETT sworn. - I am a watchman: On Tuesday morning, the 26th of August, as I was calling the hour of two, I heard somebody call watchman; I found the prisoner in Slade's buildings, adjoining to Angel-court, he went with me to the watch-house; we agreed to meet the next evening; the next evening I saw him at the corner of Angel-court with the prisoners; they first denied that they had seen me, and afterwards owned it.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am a constable of the ward of Bishopsgate: On the 26th of August, I received information, in consequence of which, I went to the house of Esther Lawrence,

where I found her, and the other prisoner with her; I asked Lawrence if she knew any thing about a watch and a bank-note, she said, no; I asked the other likewise, and she said, no; I searched them both, and found nothing upon them; I searched the bed, and under the bottom I found this handkerchief, and in the handkerchief, I found the watch, chain, seal and key, (produces them); I asked them both if this watch belonged to them, they told me, no; I then secured them both, and took them to the Poultry Compter; about ten o'clock on the Wednesday morning, the prosecutor, and a man of the name of Wright, met me the corner of Furrer's rents, Bishopsgate-Street, where I live, and I gave him information of his property.(The property was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Lawrence's defence. The gentleman was so much in liquor, that he said this young woman was his sister; he did not give us any thing, he had not a farthing in the world, and left the watch with this young woman for three shillings and sixpence, and we kept it for him, without even pledging it; he was to come for it the next evening, or else in the morning.

Smith's defence. He left the watch for three shillings and sixpence.

For the Prisoners.

ANN HUGHES sworn. - I am a tayloress, I make suits of clothes: That gentleman was very much in liquor, and got into the passage where I live; he made a terrible noise, and went and fetched the watchman Bartlett, and said he was robbed of his watch, and a twenty-pound note; the watchman would not take charge of me, knowing me to be a hard-working woman; he came again the next day, and excused himself; he said he was very much intoxicated the night before, that he had lost no money than a five-pound note, and his watch; the prosecutor told me, he would satisfy me for behaving so insolent to me, but he never did.

EDWARD RENTON sworn. - I heard that the prisoners were taken up; I went to the Mansion-house, and in my way home, I met with the prosecutor, and we got into conversation; he told me, he was so drunk, that he did not know what he said, nor where he was.

Lawrence, GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Smith, GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-75

662. PHILIP MARKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , two hundred and thirty halfpence , the property of George Turner .

GEORGE TURNER sworn. - I am a baker : On Saturday evening, the 13th of September, I went out a little before nine o'clock, and returned about twenty minutes afterwards; when I returned, I was informed I had been robbed, and on Monday I went to the Mansion-house, and identified the property.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am a constable of Bishopsgate ward: Last Saturday week, about nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner, and another lad, lurking about, and looking into a number of shops; I watched then till I came to Mr. Turner's shop; I observed the prisoner look about the window and the door several times; I saw Mrs. Turner open a door, and go into the parlour, I then saw the prisoner go in double, upon his hands and knees, and go round the counter; I then watched for his coming out, he came out, and made a run, I never lost sight of him; I caught hold of him, and from under his left arm he dropped this hat, which, I believe, was his own hat; I opened it, and there were ten shillings worth of halfpence in papers, but they were broke in the fall; he then begged very hard for mercy, I took him back to Mr. Turner's; Mrs. Turner did not know that she had lost any thing, she looked, and missed two five-shilling papers of halfpence; I secured the prisoner, and took him to the Compter,(produces the halfpence); Mrs. Turner said, in the hearing of the prisoner, that they had been lying upon a shelf behind the counter.

Turner. The halfpence were rolled up in papers ready for tying, but not tied; when I heard of the robbery, I went to the place where these halfpence were, and missed them immediately, all but three-pence halfpenny, which he had left behind; I have no doubt but they are the same that I lost.

Prisoner's defence. I was going along Bishopsgate-Street , and a boy came running out of the shop, and said, will you hold these; I said, what are they; he said, never mind, I will give you a penny, and he put them into my hand, and ran away; I ran after him, and this gentleman laid hold of me.

The prisoner called his father and mother, and four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Q.(To Sapwell). Did you see any other boy near at the time? - A. No.

GUILTY . (Aged 13.)

Confined six weeks in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-76

663. JOHN ELDERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , thirteen half joes, value 23l. 8s. a rial, value 7s. seven dollars, value 28s. two quarter-dollars, value 2s. two gilders, value 3s. 4d. seventeen foreign shillings,

value 2s. 10d. five stivers, value 5d. a half-stiver, value a halfpenny; thirteen pieces of other foreign coin, value 4d. twenty-four doits, value 2d. a piece of St. Kitt's coin, value 1d. four half-guineas, two half-crowns, six shillings and one sixpence , the goods and monies of Henry Fong .

The prisoner being indicted in the county of Middlesex, and it appearing in evidence that the property was lost from on board the Haven, on the Kent side of the River Thames, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-77

664. WILLIAM ALLRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , eighteen silver table spoons, value 9l. and a variety of other articles , the property of -

No evidence being offered on the part of the prosecution, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-78

665. THOMAS PURVITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a goose, value 2s. the property of Daniel Rogers .(The case was opened by Mr. Raine).

DANIEL ROGERS sworn. - I live at Forty-hill, Enfield: On the 6th of July, I bought a goose, which I marked in the wing with a pair of scissars; I cut the feathers close to his body; I lost it on the 15th of July, I saw it about seven o'clock, and missed it about ten on the common; and about half past three, I saw the prisoner at the bar with a bag under his arm, and his jacket over it, I observed some blood upon the bag; I got Poole, the constable, and went with him to the prisoner's lodging, about four o'clock, and in the corner of the room, we found a goose, and a blanket laid over it; I found another goose in a bag, which was mine, it had been killed; I directly shewed the mark to the constable; the prisoner said he did not know any thing about it.

Prisoner's defence. There are five of my comrades that are quartered with me, and this was a bag, belonging to the regiment, that I always fetched our meat in; how the goose came there, I do not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000917-79

666. WILLIAM TARRATT , THOMAS SPIKES , and PRISCILLA WILLIS , were indicted, the first two for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , a man's hat, value 10s. the property of Patrick Fallon , privately in his shop ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

PATRICK FALLON sworn. - I keep a hatter's shop , Edward-Street, Postman-Square : On the 16th of July, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner, Spikes, with a hat in his hand, within a few yards of my door; I had been out, and was coming home; when I went in, I found Tarratt in the shop, and a maid-servant of mine, her name is Judith Magrath ; upon my going into the shop, I asked Tarratt who was with him; to the best of my belief, he said nobody; I said I was sure he had accomplices, and I would detain him; he denied it; and afterwards, he said, if I would let him go, he would fetch the hat; I asked him who was his father, and he told me; I sent for his father; he told his father that Spikes was with him, and that he had the hat; the father went out, and brought Spikes with him into the shop.

Q. Did you say any thing at all to encourage them to say what they had done with the hat? - A. I did not; Spikes said he had given the hat to one Slack; Slack was sent for, and acknowledged that he received the hat from Spikes, and said that he had left it at Willis's; I went with Spikes and Tarratt to Marylebone watch-house, and when I returned home, Slack came back with the hat; the officer has had the hat ever since; to the best of my knowledge, it is my hat; I had finished it but half an hour before I went out.

HENRY LOVITT sworn. - I am an officer: Slack, and the hat, were delivered into my custody at Mr. Fallon's house; I received this hat (producing it) from Tarratt's father.

Fallon. To the best of my belief and knowledge, this is my hat; there is F marked in the inside; it is the manufacturer's mark; I missed the hat.

Q. What is the value of that hat? - A.Ten shillings.

Q. Is that what you would charge to a customer for it? - A. It is worth more than that to a customer.

Tarratt. The prosecutor promised, if we would bring forward the hat, he would forgive us.

Fallon. To the best of my recollection, I did not, I believe; Mrs. Fallon said they should be forgiven.

Q. At what time was that? - A. Before the hat was brought back; it was after Tarratt acknowledged that the hat was gone.

Q. Was that after he had said who had taken it? - A. I cannot charge my memory with that.

JUDITH MAGRATH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fallon: On the 16th of July, I was in the shop serving; there was nobody else in the shop; Tarratt, Spikes, and Slack, all three came into the shop between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, and asked if there was any body that would take dimensions for a hat; I told them there was not, that my master was not at home; I told them, if

they waited, my master would come home, and they stand about half of penny locking at hats; one of them, said my master was to have had a hat finished for them; while I was talking to Tarratt, the other two went out; Tarratt stood talking to me, till my master came in.

Q.Did you see any of them take the hat? - A.I did not.

Q.Was there any body in the shop during that half hour, but these boys? - A. No; nobody at all.

WILLIAM SLACK sworn. - Q.How old are you? - A.Fourteen.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes, except the woman; I do not know much of her: I went with Tarratt and Spikes, on the 16th of July, to Mr. Fallon's; I went to St. Giles's to see for them; I heard that they were there; I found them coming out of a house in Dyot-Street; then we went to a house in Warwick-Street, to have a pot of beer; and then to Mr. Fallon's; Tarratt said, let us go into this shop; I went to buy a hat.

Q.Had nothing else been said about going into the shop? - A. No; then we all went in; Tarratt asked for a hat; he looked at two or three hats; I staid a quarter of an hour there; I came out first, I thought they were all coming out, and then Spikes came out with a hat in his hand; Spikes gave it to me, and told me to take it to Mrs. Willis's, in Bird-Street, and leave it till he called for it.

Q. Did not you enquire whether he had bought the hat, and paid for it? - A. No, I did not ask any questions at all; I gave Mrs. Willis the hat, and desired her to take care of it till Spikes called for it.

Q. Did you know her before? - A. No.

Q. Nor the shop? - A. No; Spikes directed me to it; it is an old iron shop.

Q. Did she ask you any questions about it? - A. No; I left it, and went home directly.

Q. Do you mean to say that you knew of no intention they had in going into this shop? - A. No; Tarratt said he wanted to buy a hat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Willis.)

Q. You did not think he had stole this hat? - A. I did not see him take it.

Q. Had you any notion that he had stolen it? - A. No.

Q. Are you a witness against any body else, this Sessions? - A. No, I was not called up.

Q. Do you know Allridge? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you accused of stealing any thing with him? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of you afterwards? - A. My father was sent for, and he took me to Mr. Fallon's shop, and from there I went to Mrs. Willis's, and asked for the hat that I had left, and Mr. Willis gave it me directly.

Q. You did not see the husband when you left it? - A. No.

Tarratt's defence. I know nothing of it.

Spikes's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

Willis left her defence to her Counsel.

The prisoner Willis called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Tarratt, NOT GUILTY .

Willis, NOT GUILTY .

Spikes, GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Of Stealing goods, value 4s. 10d.

Judgment respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-80

667. WILLIAM MARTINDALE , alias COSTER , was indicted for that he, on the King's highway, on the 6th of May, upon Elizabeth, the wife of Thomas Nelson , did make an assault, putting her in fear, and taking from her person a sixpence , the money of the said Thomas.

ELIZABETH NELSON sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Nelson ; I live at Stanmore: I knew nothing of the prisoner till I met him on the 6th of May, 1798, on the common at Rislip ; I was walking on the side of the high road, about eleven o'clock in the morning; I was alone; the prisoner called to me and told me to stop; I hastened on as fast as I could, to get away from him, as he was very badly dressed, and an ill-looking young man; he ran after me, and caught hold of my arm; I asked him what he wanted; he told me he would shew me; I struggled to get away from him, but he took me by the throat with one hand, put his foot behind mine, and threw me down on the ground backwards; I begged him to let me go; I told him I had got sixpence in my pocket, and that was all the money I had; he said he did not want money, he wanted something else; he began pulling me about very much, and used me very ill; we struggled a great deal together, and he would not let me get up for a good while; he behaved very indecent; when he had kept me upon the ground as long as he had a mind, he let me get up; he told me to give him sixpence; I told him I thought he had used me ill enough without taking that from me; but he said he wanted it: then he doubled his fist in my face, and demanded it immediately, and I gave it him through fear; I went on my way towards Norwood, and he went over the common the other way.

Q. Did you meet any body in your way? - A. Yes, I met some people, but I did not know the first that I met; there were two men; I told them what had happened; I believe they went after him, but they did not come back again.

Q. Was the man in sight then? - A. He was in sight, he was just going over the hill; I went home and told my mother of it; my father came in just after, and I told him of it, and he went out in

persuit of him immediately on her horseback; I saw the prisoner again the next day at the Crown Inn at Stanmore; my father had taken him; I knew him perfectly; I went to the Magistrate, we could not prevail upon him to act, and he got away; the Magistrate said, the constable was gone into another parish about some other business, and the Magistrate's brother was lately dead; I saw no more of the prisoner till he was taken last Friday week; I am sure he is the same man.

THOMAS NELSON sworn. - I am the husband of the last witness; I am a school-master: On the 6th of May my wife went to see her father and mother at Rislip; she came home in the evening, and told me what had happened to her.

Q. You know nothing of the man? - A. No.

EDWARD DELAMORE sworn. - I am the father of the prosecutrix; I live at Norwood, about two miles from Rislip: On the 6th of May she informed me what had happened to her, and I set out on horseback in pursuit of the man; I found him the next morning, Monday, at his master's house, a neighbouring farmer, John Joel ; I took him into custody and brought him to Stanmore; I asked him if he was not the young man that used the woman ill upon the common; and he denied it; I told him, by the description my daughter had given me, I was sure he was the person; both he and his master refused that I should have him; I told his master I would satisfy him for his man's day's work, and then I took him; he was not very willing to go, but he did not make much resistance; I took him to the Crown at Stanmore, and when my daughter came, she said he was the man; I sent my daughter to Mr. Chauvel, the Magistrate; I could not get a constable, and I was obliged to keep him in hold for six hours, till a great number of people assembled and got him away from me; they were mostly labouring people, but the waiter at the Crown was the most active, and he got away; he never came back to his master afterwards; I never saw him again till he was apprehended.

Q. Did you make any enquiry after him? - A. No; I was glad he was gone.

MATTHEW BUNCE sworn. - I am a constable of Harrow Weald: I apprehended the prisoner last Friday was a week, Thomas Nelson gave me charge of him; he was at work in the Marquis of Abercorn's field, against his great pond, about a mile from Nelson's house.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the woman in my life before. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000917-81

668. WILLIAM GRAY and NATHANIEL INCH were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Cox , about the hour of two in the night of the 6th of September , with inent the goods there in being burglariously to steal .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-82

669. WILLIAM HATTON was indicted for unlawfully and maliciously shooting at Daniel Duna , on the 30th of July .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN DEVERE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a watchman of St. Clement Danes: On the morning of the 30th of July, I had just done crying the hour of three; it was just break of day; coming out of Bear-yard I heard a noise like a shutter or a door moving; I stepped forward and saw three men standing with their backs against a public-house shutter, the sign of the Lamb; I stepped towards them, and as they saw me coming towards them they walked on; I followed them, and found a shutter that I had seen last at one o'clock, broke open; I had tried it with my hand, and found it safe; I then left the shutter as it was, and pursued them; I called out, stop these three men with great coats on! and I sprung my rattle; they turned round the corner of Vere-Street, towards either Princes-Street or Wild-Street, and I lost sight of them.

Q. When you saw the prisoner at the watch-house, was he dressed like one of the three men? - A. Yes; but I cannot swear to his being the man.

JOHN RAGAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a watchman, in Drury-lane: On the 30th of July, I heard the rattles spring, a little after three; I saw three men running as fast as they could from Princes-Street.

Q. Is Princes-Street the way from Vere-Street? - A.Yes; they had every one of them outside coats on; I went before them with my staff, and told them if they would not stand I would knock them down; two of them ran down Steward's-rents, the third drew a pistol and presented it at me; he snapped it up against me; I could not get away, or else I would; it missed fire; then he ran down Steward's-rents, which goes into Wild-Street; I pursued him, springing my rattle all the way after him; I was almost nigh enough to him to strike him with my stick; I pursued him down into Wild-Street , and there my partner, Daniel Duna , was coming up towards them, and one of them fired a pistol at him; I still followed, and never lost sight of the prisoner till he was taken, from the time that he snapped the pistol at me; I am sure he is the same man; I did not find any thing upon him but a knife in his pocket; another watchman found something else upon him.

DANIEL DUNA sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a watchman of foursmiles's parish; my box was in Great Wild-Street: On the 30th of July, about a quarter past three, I heard the rattles spring, somewhere near Clare-market; a little time after I heard a rattle in Drury-lane; I then ran to the corner of Steward's-rents, and two men came down from Drury-lane; they ran right against me; and the watchman from Drury-lane after them, springing a rattle.

Q.Was that Ragan? - A. Yes; one of them said, I think it was the prisoner, I am not sure, but one of them said, d-n his eyes, we will do this fellow; and the prisoner then immediately fired at me, and I received the contents in my neck; I have got here part of the shot that was in the handkerchief round my neck.

Q. How near was he when he fired? - A. At the distance of six or eight yards; he immediately made his escape up Wild-Street towards Queen-Street; I pursued him as near as I possibly could, kept the rattle springing, and crying stop thief; I never lost sight of him till he was taken; I threw a stick at him, which made him stumble, but he did not fall, he recovered himself; two watchmen, and part of the hand of the Duke of York were at the corner; when he came very near them he took a turn, and squatted down underneath a shutter; he was doing so when the two watchmen came up; I told them to take care, for he had a pistol; upon taking him up the pistols lay underneath him.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him after he had fired the pistol at you? - A. No, I never had.

Q. No shot lodged in your face? - A. No.

CALLAGHAN M'CARTY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a watchman in Great Queen-Street, Lincoln's-inn-fields; my box is close at the top of Wild-Street: About twenty minutes past three I heard the rattles; I went to Wild-Street, and saw the prisoner running up Wild-Street, and the watchman after him, springing his rattle; then I and another watchman came almost up to him; he sat down under the window of Mr. Nunn, the bookseller, close by the shutters, and put the pistols under him; I laid hold of him, and saw the pistols found under where he sat down; I saw the pistols examined, but I do not know whether they were loaded or not.

GEORGE RUSSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I was constable of the night on the 30th of July, in St. Giles's parish: The prisoner was brought to the watch-house by five watchmen, Duna was the man that had hold of him; the pistols were brought in by a black belonging to the Duke of York's hand, he did not leave his name; I examined the pistols, and found one of them loaded with some shot, and the other cocked.

Q.Did you see the handkerchief of Duna? - A. Yes; I took one small shot out of it.

JAMES MORGAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am round-house keeper of St. Giles's in; the Fields, (produces the pistols); they were delivered to the officer of the night, in the presence of the prisoner; (produces Duna's handkerchief); I saw one shot taken out of it; this knife I took from the prisoner myself; the prisoner said, he never had a pistol, and did not know how to fire one off if he had.

Prisoner's defence. When I was at Marlborough-Street this man swore that I had a blue coat on; the round-house keeper proved that I had not a blue coat on; and Ragan, the watchman, said, he was not sure whether it was a blue coat or not.

Q.(To Devere.) Did you say the prisoner had a blue coat on? - A. I could not discern at a distance whether it was a blue coat or not.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 20.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t18000917-83

670. ROBERT WAPLES and ABRAHAM BONE were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Judith Anthony , about the hour of seven in the night of the 3d of December , with intent the goods therein being burglariously to steal, and stealing a mahogany tea-chest, value 2s. a looking-glass and frame, value 2s. and a mahogany tea-board, value 1s. the property of the said Judith.

JUDITH ANTHONY sworn. - I live at No. 3, Sun-yard, in the parish of Aldgate : My house was broke open and robbed six or seven months ago, I believe it was a little while after Christmas, but I cannot say; I went out first about five, and shut my door, which goes upon a spring lock; I left the window pinned in and screwed down; when I came home I found I had shut myself out; I broke a square of glass to unpin the window, and I got in at the window; when I went out the second time it was duskish; I left the door a-jar, not fastened; and the window was pulled down, but not screwed; I returned about seven o'clock, it had been a great while dark then; I did not miss any thing till half an hour after I had been in the house; I missed the looking-glass and a tea-chest; it was an old tea-chest and a broken looking-glass; they were not of any great value; I know nothing of the prisoners.

Q. Did you keep the house? - A. Yes; I have two men lodge in the house.

JOSEPH HUFF sworn. - On Tuesday, the 3d of December, Bone, Stevens, I, and Waples went to a house in Sun-yard, I do not know whose house it was, it was the second house in Sun-yard; Stevens and Bone and I lodged together; Stevens lifted up the window; he opened the back door and went into the yard; I could see something hanging white in the

yard; he returned out of the yard, and said it was nothing but a parcel of old rags; he then took down an old looking-glass facing the window, and gave it to Waples out at the window; there was a tea-chest standing on the window, and he gave that out to Bone; he opened all the drawers but the bottom drawer, and took out a great many bits of gowns and rags, and gave them to Abraham Bone ; we went home, and put them down the necessary, then we all went to Mrs. Johnson's, at Salt-petre Bank, and sold her a looking-glass for two shillings; the tea-chest we burnt.

Q. What time was this, was it light or dark? - A. It was dark.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you ever been a witness before? - A. No, never only this Sessions.

Q. Who were you a witness against this Sessions? - A. Abraham Bone , Thomas Stevens, and William Rayner.

Q. Were you ever in this Court before this Sessions, yourself? - A. Yes, I was here about some blankets.

Q. That is for stealing some blankets? - A. Yes, but I did not know any thing of it.

Q. Was that the only time you have been tried here? - A. I was tried once besides.

Q. Did you know a man of the name of Kendrick? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of him? - A. He was fined.

Q. Were you not a witness against him? - A. No, I was not.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you have never been a witness before this Sessions? - A. Yes.

Prisoner Bone. Q. Were you not a witness against Kendrick? - A. No, I was tried with him.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I am a constable belonging to the Police-office, Shadwell: In consequence of the information of Huff, I went to the prosecutrix; I apprehended the prisoners.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. After Waples was taken, how often was he examined? - A. I believe twice, I cannot say.

Q. Was he not examined five times? - A. He might, I cannot say.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Waples called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-84

671. GEORGE FREAK and WILLIAM SAMUEL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , a silver watch, value 3l. a pair of gloves, value 1s. and a silk handkerchief, value 1s. the property of James Kelly , privily from his person .

JAMES KELLY sworn. - I am a waiter out of place: On the 21st of August, I had been spending the evening out, and I came on till I got into Broad-street, St. Giles's , and I was taken very sick and lost my senses entirely, I fell down.

Q. You were so drunk? - A. I cannot say that I was; I had been drinking, but whether it was the liquor or not, I cannot say; my acquaintance say, that I was very well when I left the house; I had my watch and my gloves, and a silk handkerchief, but when I waked, I had lost them all; Cornelius Rearden , and John Brannon were with me, one of them is a milkman, the other is a labourer; I have seen the gloves since, but nothing else.

CORNELIUS REARDON sworn. - I am a milkman; I spent the evening with Kelly and another man, at a friend's house.

Q. You had been drinking with them? - A. Yes.

Q. How were you? - A. As well as I am now, to do any business that I wanted to do, I could walk home very well; when Kelly got into Broad-Street, Bloomsbury, he was taken very ill, and fell down, and I desired his partner Brannon to help him up against the wall, and I would call for a coach; there was no coach upon the stand, and I did not go three yards from him, I just turned round to call a coach, and that was all; I turned back, and then three men came up, one of them was pretending to help him up, and I observed him very busy about his thighs, that was Freak; I then called to Brannon, to take care of Kelly's watch; upon that he put his hand to his watch, and said, that he had no watch; the watchman was coming across towards us, when I took hold of the prisoner, Freak, and gave charge of him; then one of them immediately ran away, and Samuel did not stir, he stood by looking on; a proposal was made to search them, upon that, Freak handed a pair of gloves to Samuel; I really think that Samuel was innocent of it.

Q. Did you know the gloves? - A.No.

Prisoner Samuel. Q. Did I not assist in carrying Kelly to the watch-house? - A. I have heard so, I did not see it, I had him upon my back, and carried him to the watch-house; it was mentioned at the watch-house, that he had hold of his legs as I carried him on my back.

JOHN BRANNON sworn. - I had been with Kelly and Reardon, spending the evening; coming through Broad-street, Kelly was taken ill, whether through liquor I cannot say.

Q. You had drank liquor enough to satisfy you? - A. Yes; Reardon called a coach; he then called out, take care of Kelly's watch; I directly put my hand down and missed his watch; I had seen his watch in the course of the evening, it was a silver watch, with a steel chain; Reardon then gave

charge of the prisoners, and we went to the watch-house, and put Kelly to bed; Freak then handed over a pair of gloves to Samuel, the watchman has the gloves.

SAMUEL HEEDITCH sworn. - On the 21st of August, I saw Reardon and his company coming up Broad-Street, very drunk; Kelly fell down, very drunk; there were two or three more that passed them backwards and forwards, I cannot say who they were; the others were a little disguised in liquor, but not so much as Kelly was; I turned round, and saw Kelly taken up by Reardon, I had seen the watch in Kelly's pocket, not a minute before; I saw his hands several times about his thighs; one of his companions says to the other, take care of his watch, upon that the watch was missed; when Kelly got to the watch-house, he was so disguised in liquor, that he could not stand; I desired the constable to search Freak; when he found he was going to be searched, he took out a pair of gloves, and pushed them into Samuel's hands; I took them out of his hands, and found they were gloves; he said nothing in his defence before the Magistrate.

Kelly. I know these to be my gloves, by a small hole at the top, and another part that is mended; I am sure I had them in my pocket when I came out.

Freak. Hebditch took up another man, after he had took us up.

Hebditch. I took up a man upon the information of a girl of the town, who was drunk; she gave me information of a man that knew where the watch was, and when she came before the Magistrate, the next morning, when she was sober, she denied all that she had owned to me the night before.

Freak's defence. Mr. Kelly was very bad; I was coming down through Broad-Street, St. Giles's, and saw him against the wall, with his head bleeding; there were, I dare say, ten people round him, besides us.

Samuel's defence. I was coming through St. Giles's, I had been spending the evening at Mr. Davis's in Broad-Street.

For the prisoner Samuel.

- DAVIS sworn. - Samuel left my house alone, at past twelve o'clock at night.

Freak, GUILTY. (Aged 26.)

Of Stealing, to the value of 10d.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Samuel, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t18000917-85

672. JANE PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , fourteen sheets, value 3l. 10s. the property of the Mayor, Commonalty, and Citizens of the City of London, and Governors of the House of the Poor, called St. Bartholomew's Hospital, of the foundation of King Henry VIII .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Mary Norris , widow .

MARY NORRIS sworn. - I am a widow, and one of the sisters in St. Bartholomew's-Hospital ; this day three weeks, I missed the sheets, the prisoner was a nurse in the hospital; I missed seven pair, there was nobody else in the ward but her and me; I have found some of them since, at the pawnbroker's.

Q. Are you responsible for these sheets? - A. Yes; I must pay for them if I lose them.

- WEATHERBY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Roberts, in Long-lane, (produces three pair of sheets;) I took them in of the prisoner, I know her person; on the 3d. of August, one sheet for 3s. on the 4th of September, two sheets for 4s. on the 16th of August, two sheets for 5s. and on the 14th of July, another sheet for 3s.

- HALESWORTH sworn. - I know no more than apprehending the prisoner.

Norris. These are hospital sheets, they have the hospital mark.

Q.(To Weatherby.) Did you take in these sheets? - A. I took in three of them.

Q. How came you to take in sheets with the hospital mark upon them? - A.They were taken in by candle-light, and she said they were her own, that she lived at No. 3, White-hart-court.

SAMUEL RICHARDSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Cotterell, No. 5, Aldersgate-Street, (produces three sheets;) they were pledged on the 14th of August, I took them in of the prisoner.

Norris. These have the hospital mark upon them.

Q.(To Richardson.) How came you to take in these sheets? - A. She asked me but 4s. upon them, and therefore we did not look much at them; the marks are in the middle of the sheets, and we generally look for them at the corners; she said, they were her property.

Prisoner's defence. The beadle of the hospital came to me, and told me, if I would acknowledge the articles, I should be safe, which I did, his name is Richard Payter.

RICHARD PAYTER sworn. - Q. Did you tell the prisoner, that if she would acknowledge the articles, she would be safe? - A. No, I did not; we had got some of the sheets, and I said, if she would acknowledge where the rest were, it might be better for her; I did it in order to get at the rest of the property. GUILTY .

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-86

673. JOSEPH THOMAS , and THOMAS CHRISTMAS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a wether-sheep, value 40s. the property of John Ireson .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS SCULTHORPE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a country drover, I drive for Mr. Ireson: On Sunday, the 7th of September, I was in Smithfield-market , in the evening; Mr. Ireson had some sheep there.

Q. Was there any particular pen to which your attention was drawn? - A. Yes; a pen with fifteen sheep in it; there were amongst them three polewethers; they were marked with a dot on each hip, and a dot between the shoulders; they were ruddle marks; I saw them all in the pen between eleven and twelve on the Sunday night; I then saw Joseph Thomas bring some sheep down towards the next pen to that in which the fifteen were; I saw him open our pen-gate, and turn a sheep out of the pen; it was one of the three pole-wethers that I have mentioned; he put it amongst the others that he had brought down, and then he drove all the sheep back towards one of the empty pens, near St. Bartholomew's-hospital.

Q.Was he driving them down in a direction from your pen? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner, Christmas, at all? - A. Yes; when Thomas drove the stock towards the other pen, Christmas followed him, and assisted in driving them.

Q. What became of that stock, after your polewether had got into it? - A. The two prisoners drove them away; they both helped to drive them right across the market, from Long-lane to Cowlane.

Q. At what time of night was it, when you last saw the two prisoners in that act? - A. Better than half past eleven o'clock.

Q. How far had you got with that stock, in which your pole-wether was? - A. About fourteen or fifteen yards from our pen.

Q. Had you many other sheep to attend to that night? - A. Yes; about four hundred.

Q. When did you next see your master? - A. Not till about five o'clock on the Monday morning.

Q. In consequence of any information that was given to your master, was any thing done? - A. I shewed my master the remaining two pole-wether sheep that were in the pen, and then I told my master how it was; I took him to the pen where the sheep was, that had been lost; it was Curtis's pen.

Q. Did you know the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes; they used to work with Curtis, and did then; they are what we call London drovers; they drive for Curtis to the market, and from the market.

Q.At five in the morning, you took your master to a stock of sheep? - A. Yes.

Q. In that stock, was there or not, the wether sheep that you had lost? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you able to say, that you are sure that sheep was the same that you had lost? - A. Yes, I am sure of it; it was a pole-wether sheep.

Q.Had the mark of which you speak, been altered or not? - A.It had; it was ruddled right across the dots; right across the loins, from hip to hip.

Q.Notwithstanding that alteration of mark, are you able, upon your solemn oath, to say, that that was the same sheep that you lost from your pen? - A. The very same sheep; I have been in the habit of looking after sheep these twenty years.

Q. I will put it to you again; are you, upon the solemn oath you have taken, certain that it was the same identical sheep? - A.It was the same.

Court. Q. In what pen was it that you saw this sheep, when you shewed it to your master? - A.Seven or eight pens further from our pen, than the stock were, before they drove them towards our pen.

Mr. Watson. Q. What was done with the sheep that was so pointed out? - A. My master took the sheep out, and had it locked up at the Bear and Ragged Staff; that was between seven and eight in the morning, and it is there now.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have had the care of four hundred sheep? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you drove them from the country? - A. Yes.

Q. You are not a shepherd, but a drover? - A. Yes.

Q. We know that a shepherd knows the face of every sheep as well as a man knows his wife's face; but you, as a drover; cannot know the laces of the sheep? - A. No.

Q. It is the occupation of the prisoners to remove sheep that have strayed from one pen to another? - Yes.

Q. You found it in the possession of the prisoners in Curtis's pen? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Curtis attending there? - A. No; his salesman was.

Q. He was there before you took this sheep away? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not tell the prisoners that they were doing wrong? - A. No.

Q. If you had supposed they were stealing it, you would have stopped them? - A. I knew they were doing wrong; I followed them, and saw the sheep safe.

Q. Therefore, in point of fact, you had never lost the sheep at all, you always knew where to find it? - A. They might have taken it away.

Q.But it was not taken away it remained in Curtis's pen till you found it? - A. I found it there in the morning.

Q. You wished to have an opportunity of letting this sheep go astray, that you might have an opportunity of prosecuting these men? - A. I saw them drive it away.

Q. But, you know, you might have saved the sheep, and saved this prosecution, if you had told them they were doing wrong? - A. I followed them to see where they went.

Q.There were no other pole sheep in the market but your master's? - A. Yes, there were.

Q.Upon your oath, don't you know there is a reward for sheep-stealing? - A. I have heard of it.

Q. So this sheep was never lost at all; and you came here to prosecute, in order to get a share of the reward? - A. It was drove away.

Mr. Watson. Q. You do not know the countenances of the sheep? - A. No.

Q. But I suppose you are pretty well acquainted with the marks of sheep? - A. Yes.

Q.Can you at all account for that cross-line from hip to hip? - A. It was put to blind the mark, I should suppose.

Q.Upon your oath, did it or not resemble the mark of any other sheep in that pen where you found this sheep? - A. No, it did not.

Q. When the gate of the pen, where the fifteen were, was opened, was Mr. Curtis present? - A. No, he was not.

Q. The prisoners were? - A. Yes.

Q.Nobody else? - A. Yes; there was another man just by.

JOHN IRESON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a salesman in Smithfield market: On the 7th of this month, the last witness, Sculthorpe, was in my service, he was employed by me to watch my sheep; I had amongst them three pole wethers, in a pen of fifteen; I came into the market on the Monday morning about five o'clock, when I received some information from Sculthorpe.

Q. In consequence of that information, did you go with him to another pen? - A. I did; and found one of my pole wether sheep; the country mark, before I lost it, was a dot upon the shoulders, and a dot upon each hip; when I found it, it had a fresh ruddle across the loins from the one dot to the other; it appeared so fresh, that it must have been done since the first mark.

Q. At what time does the market commence? - A. About five o'clock in the morning.

Q. Could there be any transaction of sale, or delivery, at eleven or twelve o'clock at night? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did these sheep belong to you, or were you only the agent to sell them? - A.Only the agent.

Q.Who did they belong to? - A. Mrs. Gilbert.

Q.Perhaps you never saw this sheep at all till you found it in Curtis's pen? - A. No, I had not.

Q. Though the market does not begin till five, any person might have drove the sheep out of the market between twelve and five? - A. Not unless they give a good account of them, there are so many constables about.

Q. Do you belong to this prosecuting society? - A. I do.

Mr. Gurney. Q. If a man is seen driving a sheep out of the market before market hours, he would have a good chance of being stopped by the constables? - A. Yes.

Q. You are answerable for these sheep; and if they are lost, you must pay for them? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Were there any sheep in Curtis's pen that were marked in the same way that this was? - A. I do not know of any.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

The Jury having retired about half an hour, returned with a verdict, Thomas, GUILTY Death . (Aged 23.)

Christmas, GUILTY Death . (Aged 28.)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-87

674. JOHN FLOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , an iron plate, value 1s. and six pounds weight of iron, value 1s. the property of the Mayor, Commonalty, and Citizens, of the City of London .

The Court being of opinion that the property was not well laid, but ought to have been laid as being fixed to the freehold, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-88

675. JAMES SMITH , and ELIZABETH WARD , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Shackle , no person being therein, about the hour of twelve at noon, of the 8th of August , and stealing a cloth cloak, value 5s. a pocket-handkerchief, value 2d. a penknife, value 6d. a pair of scissars, value 6d. and a pound of cheese, value 6d. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM SHACKLE sworn. - I live in the parish of Northall : My house was broke open on the 8th of August; I went out as usual to my labour, reaping, very early in the morning; I left my wife at home.

MARY SHACKLE sworn. - On the 8th of August I went out about seven o'clock in the morning, I left nobody in the house, I fastened all the doors and windows; I returned again about the middle of

the day, between twelve and one, as nigh as I can guess, and I found the lock of the door burst open; I went in, I did not find any body there, but missed a cloth cloak, a penknife, a pair of scissars, some bread and cheese, I suppose about a pound of cheese, and a pocket-handkerchief; I had seen them all in the morning, in the kitchen.

Q. What might that cloth cloak be worth? - A. Five shillings; the other things were not worth much: about two hours after, the prisoners were brought back with the property upon them; the cloth cloak, the handkerchief, and the cheese, were in the man's bag; and in the woman's pocket, was a penknife, and a pair of scissars; I did not know any thing of them before.

JOHN WEBB sworn. - I live within about two hundred yards of Shackle: I knew nothing of this till I was alarmed; I saw the two prisoners, and a boy, pass my house towards Shackle's house, the man was first, the woman followed the man, and the boy afterwards, that was about twelve o'clock on the day of the robbery; the boy had a little bit of a black brush, and a shovel, and a cloth round him, in the description of a chimney-sweeper; some time after that, I heard an alarm, in consequence of which, I went up to the garden of Shackle's house, and from the information I received, I saddled my horse, and went after the prisoners, and in about four or five miles I overtook them; I asked the man what he had got in his bag; he said, what is that to you; and the woman said, directly, what business have you with us; I desired to see the contents of the bag, and he did not seem to be willing I should; I then jumped off my horse, and he opened his bag, and turned out the things; the first thing I saw was a cloth cloak, the next was a silk handkerchief, and two pieces of cheese; the man was putting the things into the bag, when the woman said, give me my cloak and my handkerchief; I told him to put all the things in; she said, she would not go with her breasts open, for it being a hot day, her breasts were quite open; I told her, as she had gone so all day for her own pleasure, she should go so now for mine; the man then went down on his knees, and said, as that was his first offence, he hoped I would let him go; I told him I could not do that.

Q. Did you make use of any promises, or threats, to him? - A. No, I did not; we could not find the boy, we brought them back to Shackle's; when we got into the village, I said to the man, were you ever in this place before; he said, yes; we went a little further, now, says I, shew me the house; he said, that house down the lane, the furthermost house of the two; then I gave them into the constable's possession, and the bag was opened at Shackle's house, and his wife owned the things; they were taken to the Justice's, and committed; the scissars and the penknife the woman pulled out of her pocket before the Justice, she pulled them out herself. (Produces the property).

Mrs. Shackle. This is my cloak, I know it by a mark upon it; and I know the other things, but there are no marks upon them.

Smith's defence. I was never near the house.

Ward's defence. The scissars and the penknife were given to me by the boy; I am innocent of it.

Smith, GUILTY. (Aged 28.)

Ward, GUILTY. (Aged 21.)

Of Stealing to the value of 4s. 10d.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000917-89

676. JOHN CAYHILL was indicted for, that he, on the king's highway, upon John Hodgkinson , on the 14th of September , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a cloth coat, value 31s. 6d. a waistcoat, value 10s. 6d. a pair of breeches, value 11s. 6d. and a silk handkerchief, value 1s. the property of the said John.

JOHN HODGKINSON sworn. - I live at No. 42, Wych-Street: I am a tailor ; I had a suit of cloaths to make, and it was very late on Saturday night before I finished them; I was afraid the person might want them early on Sunday morning; I took them home, but he was gone to bed; I called in, and had part of sixpennyworth of gin and water, and going along Butcher-row on Sunday morning, about three o'clock, with the bundle containing the cloaths, near St. Clement's Church-yard , I saw a dozen men, or more, in the road; I kept the path, and saw four or five of them single themselves out to meet me, which they did, on the kirb; one struck me down, and the others fell to kicking me as hard as they could, in such a manner, that I was hardly able to get up; I kept hold of the bundle as long as I could, till one got it, and then they all run away; I don't know who it was that took it; it was one of the four or five that took it; I called the watchman, and told him I had been robbed, and that, to the best of my knowledge, one had one up a court; he directly got another watchman, and they went up the court, and found the bundle, I did not go with them; I found that young man pretending to be asleep in the necessary; it is called Star-court, just by Temple-bar, where there is no thoroughfare; he was then taken to the watch-house, nobody else was found in the court, but him, and the bundle; I cannot say who knocked me down, and robbed me, they did it in a moment; the watchman has the bundle.

SAMUEL HATHAWAY sworn. - I am a watchman of St. Clement's Danes: Between three and

four o'clock, last Sunday morning, I heard the prosecutor calling out, watch; I immediately crossed the street, and asked him what was the matter; he said he had been knocked down and robbed, and he believed one of them had ran up Star-court, and, I said, if so, he was safe, as there was no thoroughfare; we got a light, and I went up the court, and picked up a bundle, the other watchman followed me; it could not be more than two or three minutes after, I heard the prosecutor call out; after finding the bundle, I went forward, and examined every door, to see if they were open; there was none open, and I proceeded till I came to the necessary, at the end, on the left-hand side, where I found the prisoner, laying at full length, pretending to be asleep; the door was ajar; I told him to get up, which he did; I asked him what brought him there; he said he had been at work for a gentleman, near Spring-gardens, and had finished it that day; that the gentleman had given them a supper, and he had drank rather too much, and had got up there and laid down to sleep; he appeared to me perfectly sober; I have had the bundle ever since.

(The cloaths produced, and identified by the prosecutor; and Peter Livery confirmed the deposition of Hathaway).

Prisoner's defence. I was at work at Spring-gardens; we had finished the house of a gentleman, and he gave the tradesman a supper; about half past ten, it was brought on the table; from that time we were drinking till twelve, or thereabouts; I made too free, and, in going along Fleet-street, I went up this court, and laid down to sleep at three or four o'clock; the watchman came and took me up, and told me the same he has here; my master is a plaisterer, in Gutter-lane, Cheapside; I saw him yesterday afternoon, and he said he would attend to-day to my character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000917-90

677. THOMAS COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , a pair of shoes, value 2s. a pair of stockings, value 2s. a pair of trowsers, value 5s. a shirt, value 8s. and a jacket, value 5s. the property of Francis Drewee .

FRANCIS DREWEE sworn. - I am a sailor : I was robbed on Sunday last of the articles mentioned in the indictment; I went from Mr. Levy's house, No. 85, Little Tower-hill , to take a walk; I came back in the afternoon, about one o'clock, and missed my property from the bed-room; the prisoner lodged in the same room; the next day, as I was going to take a walk, I met the prisoner at no great distance from the Tower; I went up to him; and told him, he was the man I wanted, and found my shoes on his feet; I took him to Mr. Levy's house; he acknowledged he had pawned or sold the trowsers, and the shirt; I told him, I would not hurt him, if he would tell me where the things were, but he would not.

PHILIP LEVY sworn. - Drewee lodged with me, he is a Switzerland man; the prisoner lodged with me two or three months before Drewee, I always found him a very honest man; on Sunday morning, I saw the prisoner in the shop; about twelve o'clock, he had not slept at home on the Saturday night; I had several times given him leave to wear my shoes and boots; on Sunday morning, I saw him with a large pair of shoes on, and a pair of stockings; I asked him how he came by those shoes; he said Drewee had lent them to him, and he went out; when Drewee came back, he missed the property in the indictment; I saw no more of him till Drewee brought him into my house, about ten or eleven o'clock on Monday morning; I don't think he would have done it, but he was in liquor, and he wanted to go to see his sweetheart on Sunday, which made him put these things on; he was so very much in liquor, that he could not tell what he had done with the things.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor on the Saturday night, and I asked Drewee to lend me some clean things to go out with; he said, he would; I went up into the room, but could not find him, and I took them; I went out, and spent the day with my friend that I had got intoxicated with, and, as I was coming home on the Sunday evening, I met with a girl that asked me to go home and sleep with her, which I did, and when I got up in the morning, I had got nothing left but the shoes; I told Drewee that I would make him any recompence in my power. (The shoes were produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

GUILTY (Aged 29.)

Judgement respited .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-91

678. JACOB SOLOMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , two opera-glasses, value 5s. the property of William Arnold .

WILLIAM ARNOLD sworn. - I am an optician : On the afternoon of Thursday, the 14th of August, about four o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop, No. 29, Essex-street, Whitechapel ; I can only speak to the property.

THOMAS COLLINSON sworn. - I am a glazier and painter: On Thursday, the 14th of August, I was at work near the prosecutor's house; I saw

the prisoner at the bar, in company with another boy, go into the prosecutor's shop; I saw the prisoner go to the window, and lift the curtain up; I saw that he had taken something from the window; the two boys came out together, and turned to the left-hand; I then walked towards them, and beckoned to the prosecutor to come down stairs; I followed the boys into a little alley, behind the houses where I was at work; I then laid hold of the prisoner, the other made his escape; he then threw the two opera-glasses from under his waistcoat, and, with a shut of his mouth, threw them down in the mud; the son of the prosecutor picked them up, he is here; I took the boy back to Arnold's house, a constable was sent for, and he was given in charge.

JAMES ARNOLD sworn. - I am the son of the prosecutor; I picked up the opera-glasses which were delivered to the constable.

CHARLES DICKINS sworn. - I am a constable,(produced the property); I know these-opera-glasses; they are marked T. Collinson.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. That mark was put upon them after they were picked up? - A. Yes.

Q. They have no shop-mark? - A. No; one of them is a very particular one; the object is let in different to what they generally are, and the eyeglass is larger than it ought to be; I have no doubt of their being mine.

Prisoner's defence. A boy gave me these glasses to have a glass put in; and when I went into the shop, I could not find any body, and I came out again, and then that gentleman laid hold of me.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 14.)

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-92

679. ELIZABETH REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , a pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d. the property of David Evans .

DAVID EVANS sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in Glazier's-alley, Wellclose-square : On the 22d of August, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked to look at some stockings, I shewed her several pair, but none would suit her; I thought I perceived her putting something in her apron; after I had shewed her a great many, she said, they were not for herself; she would go and fetch her brother; as she was going out, I followed her, and took the stockings out of her apron; I sent for a constable, and gave charges of her; she seems to be a very poor girl, I have no doubt but she has done it from poverty.(The constable produced the stockings, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY (Aged 13.)

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-93

680. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a bearskin hammer cloth, value 10l. the property of Thomas Holmes , the elder, and Thomas Holmes , the younger.

JOHN JEFFERIES sworn. - I am foreman to Messers. Holmes: I can only prove the property.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a labourer to Messers. Holmes, No. 109, Long-acre : The prisoner was a stranger to me; I saw the prisoner in the shop with his hand upon the hammer-cloth, he begged my pardon, and went out again; in the course of ten minutes I saw the prisoner return again; he saw me in the shop, and made a short return back; in the course of five minutes I saw him come again into the shop, take the hammer-cloth upon his shoulders, and go away with it; I saw him go across into James-street, and I took him with it upon his shoulder. (Produces it).

Mr. Jefferies. This is Mr. Holmes's property.

Prisoner's defence. I am an old man; I was totally in distress, and had not had a mouthful for two days preceding, nor my wife, nor children; if your Lordship will shew me a little lenity, and give me an opportunity of returning to the paths of virtue and honestly, I will ever pray.

GUILTY . (Aged 54.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-94

681. WILLIAM GAWDRY was indicted for that he, on the 21st of June , being a servant to Stephen Kendrick , Richard Parker , and Charles Barker , and being employed by them as such servant, did receive and take into his possession, from John Hodsoll and Walter Stirling , several sums of money, amounting to 80l. for the use of his said masters; and afterwards did fraudulently embezzle part of the said sum, amounting to 4l.

It appearing in evidence, that the name of Mr. Stirling's partner was Matilda Hodsoll , and not John, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-95

682. THOMAS ALLISTON , and ELIZABETH NEWMAN , were indicted, the first for

feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , a yard of printed calico, value 5s. the property of William Addison , Mary Gould , John Wilson , Charles-Augustus Edwards , James Gould , William West , and the said Charles-Augustus Edwards; and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

Second Count. Laying the property to be in the same persons, excepting William West.

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

There were three other indictments against the principal , but the evidence being of the same nature, he was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18000917-96

683. RODERICK RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , twelve pounds weight of bar-iron, value 2s. 6d. the property of John-Pascal Larkins , William-Jonathan Eade , and William Ewsters .

(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-97

684. THOMAS UPCOTT , and WILLIAM DREW , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , nine shirts, value 36s. two petticoats, value 10s. two waistcoats, value 5s. two pair of stockings, value 2s. and a table-cloth, value 5s. the property of Sarah Jackson , widow .

SARAH JACKSON sworn. - I am a widow; I live at the bottom of Kingsland-green : On Thursday the 17th of July, at nine o'clock at night, I put out the articles in the indictment to dry; I have always left the cloaths out all night for twelve years; I got up, between four and five in the morning, to go to mangling, and they were gone; my place is so secure, that I thought there was no danger; they must have come through an empty house, and over a wall, to get at my yard; I saw the things again, the next day, at Hatton-garden Office.

THOMAS SIMS sworn. - I am a labouring man, and live in Park-street, Islington: I was cutting some rye; I had information that there were three men gathering beans in the next field; I went to prevent them, and found the two prisoners, and a man that got away, a little before eleven o'clock in the morning; I asked one of them, Drew, how they came there; he told me, he did not know; I turned myself round, and saw the linen lay within two yards of them; I asked them if that was theirs, and they said, no; I turned round, called to my partner, and, in the mean time, the two prisoners put the things into a bag, and threw them over the hedge; then one of them said, d-n your eyes, make your escape; my partner got over the hedge after the bag; then they jumped over, and all the three men ran away, I pursued them, and took Drew; my partner took Upcott; the other man got away; we took them to Islington, and delivered them up to the constable; when I took hold of Drew, he said, d-n my eyes, I am done; I did not hear what the other man said.

JOHN SCOTT sworn. - I was at work with Sims; we had information, that there were three men gathering beans; when I came up to them, they had got all the clothes in the bag but the two shirts; Drew threw the bag over the hedge, and said d-n your eyes, make your escape; they then all three jumped over the hedge and ran away, we pursued them; Upcott did not say any thing; coming through Duval's-lane, Drew said to Sims, you may give us a start if you like.

LEVI OBURNE sworn. - The two prisoners were given in charge to me; I searched them, and in the crown of Drew's hat, I found this shirt wet. (Produces it.)

Philip Conduit , a constable at Islington, produced the property, which was deposed to by Mrs. Jackson.

Drew's defence. This young man knows nothing at all about it, I never saw him in my life, till I saw him in the field; I was very much in liquor, and I laid down in the field to sleep, the things were not there when I laid down.

Upcott's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

Upcott, GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Drew, GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Confined two months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-98

685. WILLIAM MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September, a trunk, value 21s. the property of Henry Baker .

HENRY BAKER sworn. - I am a trunk-maker , in Long-acre : On the 11th of September, I lost a trunk between five and six in the afternoon, from off the railing at the street-door, I was not at home at the time.

- GOODSPEED sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Baker; I was coming up Mercer-street, Long-acre, on Thursday, the 11th of September, about half past five o'clock, when I saw the prisoner going up Banbury-court, with a trunk in his hand; I knew the trunk to be my master's; I went home and enquired if the trunk had been sold; my fellow-apprentice missed the trunk, and went and pursued him with me; my fellow-apprentice

stopped him in Hart-street; he asked him what he was going to do with the trunk, he said, he had bought it of a groom three hours ago; the prisoner was then secured.

SAMUEL BROMFIELD sworn. - I saw the prisoner with the trunk in his hand, in Hart-street; I stopped him, and asked him how he came by the trunk; he said, what is that to you; I told him it was my master's trunk; then he said, he bought it about three hours ago, and gave a guinea for it; he said, the man was something like a groom; I asked him if he could produce that man to me; he told me it was all a matter of moon-shine to do that; he went into the house and would have a glass of gin, and would not come out without I would drink, I did drink; then he came out and wanted to go up the acre, but I told him he should not go anywhere till he had been with me to the shop; I had seen it at the door not twenty minutes before; I had repaired it the night before, and put it out to day; I am sure it is my master's trunk.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through Longacre, and a person accosted me at the corner of the court, and asked me if I wanted to buy a trunk, he said I should have it a bargain; he asked me a guinea and a half, and I gave him a guinea for it; I purchased the trunk for the son of the Reverend Mr. Lindsey, at Charlton.

For the Prisoner.

ABRAHAM GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a cabinet-maker, I work with Mr. Platt, No. 29, Greenhill's-rents, I have worked for him five years.

Q. Are you are acquainted with the prisoner at the bar? - A. No.

Q.How came you to appear as a witness for him? - A. I saw an advertisement in the paper, on Saturday the 13th. (Mr. Knowlys produced the Morning Herald of that day, the witness read the advertisement.

Q. Did you, in consequence of that advertisement, attend on Monday, at Bow-street? - A. I did; I was passing by this gateway on the Thursday afternoon, to the best of my recollection, it was about five o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another man.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was one of the persons? - A. To the best of my recollection he is the man; I heard the man say a guinea and a half; the prisoner shook his head, and said, it was too much; and that was all I saw or heard of it; I attended at Bow-street, and the Magistrate said it was of no use to give that evidence there, whatever it might do here.

Q.Have you ever been in the habits of intimacy with the prisoner? - A.Never.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q.Where had you been that day? - A.To Piccadilly, upon business for my master, I was going home to the shop in Greenhill's-rents.

Q.You were walking out upon your business? - A. Yes.

Q. You never saw the prisoner before? - A.Never.

Q.What gateway was this? - A. It was the right-hand side coming up from Piccadilly.

Q. How came you to take notice of him? - A. His dress was remarkable, he had a black waistcoat, and breeches, and stockings, and a light coloured coat, with a velvet collar.

Q. What was there extraordinary in that? - A. His face was remarkable too.

Q. You did not stop at all? - A. I did not stop above half a minute.

Q. What did you stop at all for? - A.Seeing two men with a trunk, excited my curiosity.

Q. What excited your curiosity? - A. The two men with a trunk.

Q. Does your master take in this paper? - A. No; I saw the paper at the Castle, in Greenhill's-rents.

Q. Not knowing this man before, and having nothing to excite your attention, you just stopped long enough to hear one may say a guinea and a half, and the other, that it was too much? - A. That was all.

Q. How was the other man dress? - A. In a dark-coloured coat.

Q. How far was it from the trunk-maker's? - A. I do not know the trunk-maker's.

Q. How do you know that that is the same man? - A. To the best of my recollection he is the same man.

RICHARD SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I have been in the mercantile line, I am now retired from business; he has lived with me two years, and was in my service at the time of his apprehension; I had every reason to believe him to be an honest man, he left my house about one o'clock.

The prisoner called three other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-99

686. SARAH THOMAS , alias SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , seven muslin shawls, value 1l. 8s. 6d. and a yard of muslin, value 1s. 6d. the property of Robert Grant .

ROBERT GRANT sworn. - I am an attorney ; my wife is a worker of muslin shawls, at Hoxton ; the prisoner was a work-woman employed in our house; on the 30th of July, we missed several shawls, and several squares of muslin; in conse

quence of missing them, I got a search-warrant, and went with Ray to her lodgings; she was not there, we found her in the lodgings of another woman, who worked for us, in Badger-court, Shoreditch; they searched her, and found upon her several pawnbroker's duplicates, and some afterwards in a piece of check that was taken out of her pocket.

JOHN RAY sworn. - (Produces three duplicates;) I took them from the prisoner.

SUSANNAH NEVILLE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, these are my duplicates, (produces three shawls); I believe I took them in of the prisoner, but am not certain.

BENJAMIN ADDIS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Kingsland-road, (produces a shawl); I cannot recollect who pledged it with me; it was pledged on the 23d of June, in the name of Mary Thomas .

JAMES WILLIAMSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dexter, Whitechapel-road, (produces three shawls, and a yard of muslin); I cannot say who it was that I took them in of; the prisoner used frequently to come to the shop.

Q. Look at the duplicates produced by Ray, and say if they are your's? - A. They are.(The property was deposed to by Mrs. Grant).

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-100

687. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , two cotton gowns, value 38s. a cloth great coat, value 20s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of Thomas Garrett .

The prosecutor being drunk and asleep, when he lost the property, and there being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-101

688. ANN GWYNNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a tin milk-pail, value 9s. the property of John Baker .

JOHN BAKER sworn. - I am a tin-plate worker , in Hog-lane, Shoreditch : On the 13th of this month, in consequence of information, I missed a milk-pail from my door, it wanted about a quarter of two o'clock; I followed the woman, and overtook the prisoner with a milk-pail; I took her into custody, and delivered her to Mr. Harper.

THOMAS BRIGGS sworn. - On the 13th instant, I met a woman with a single milk-pail; I was coming to work from dinner, and I told my master of it; he missed one, and he went after her; he found her with it, and delivered it to the constable.( Samuel Harper , the officer, produced the pail, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I saw a woman with a child in her arms, with this pail, and the child was crying; I asked her if I should hold the pail for her, and then this gentleman came up, and I saw no more of her.

GUILTY . (Aged 50.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-102

689. WILLIAM JOY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , four shirts, value 8s. a waistcoat, value 2s. and a cotton handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Henry Henderson .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

HENRY HENDERSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I keep a house for lodging sailors , in Wapping Dock-street: I laid hold of the prisoner on the 7th of July, and took him to Shadwell-office.

Q. Before he said any thing about this property, did you tell him it should be better for him to give an account of it? - A. No; he said, if I would not use him ill, he would tell me where the things were; I told him, I would not use him ill, but the law should take its course; Mr. M'Gill wrote down what he said; I saw him write it, and the prisoner put his hand to it, (it is read); "A correct list of articles stole from Mr. Henderson, in Wapping Dock-street , by William Joy , and sold to Abraham Isaacs , in Wentworth-street; a jacket, trowsers, three long coats, a nankeen jacket, four shirts, and a handkerchief, signed by me, William Joy ." - I went with the officer to Isaacs's, and found these coats, (producing them); one of them has got my name wrote in it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long have you been in the habit of dictating to the prisoners what they shall say, and then make them sign it? - A. I never was there before.

Q. My learned friend says, you keep a house for the lodgings of sailors; why, you are a crimp, are you not? - A. I do not know what you mean.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. I have not done with him; look at that letter? - A. This is a letter written by the prisoner at the bar; it is his hand writing, (it is read); addressed "for Mrs. Henderson, No. 11, Wapping Dock-street; signed William Joy ; dated July 20, 1800."-" Dear Mrs. Henderson, I write these few lines, hoping you will take pity on me this once, and forgive me, and I will never be guilty of the same, never no more, for I am almost starved to death with hunger, and if you will be so good as to send Mat. to me, for I want to tell you some

thing particular; and if you can come to-morrow, if you please, to let him come to me, for I know I am guilty of the crime; but I hope you and God will forgive me, and pity my hard fortune, for I have lost my best friend, now I have lost you; but I hope you will look upon me this once; don't let me starve to death, for I am almost; so no more from your prisoner - William Joy ."

Mr. Alley. Q. I will read to you this list:

"A correct list of articles stole from Mr. Henderson, in Wapping Dock-street, by William Joy ; - that is what he told the person to write? - A. He wrote it down, as he acknowledged it.

Q. You do not know what a crimp is? - A. No.

Q. How long have you lived at Wapping? - A.I have always got my bread by the sweat of my brow.

Q. How long have you lived by the water-side? - A. I have been nigh four years in Wapping Dock-street.

Q. And you do not know what a crimp is? - A.I know what it means in Holland.

Q. Have you never heard what a crimp means? A. I never wrote it down.

Q. Upon your oath, have you never heard what a crimp means? - A. I do not know what you mean by it.

Q.You never heard what a crimp means? - A.I have heard that it is a kidnapper.

THOMAS M'GILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you write down this list? - A. Yes.

Q. Who mentioned to you these articles that you have written down? - A. The prisoner, William Joy .

Q. Did you say any thing to him, to induce him to tell? - A. No.

Q.Did you see him sign it? - A. Yes.

GUILTY . (Aged 14.)

confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-103

690. CATHERINE ROBERTS , and JOHN ROBERTS , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August, a quart tin-mug, value 1s. a pint tin mug, value 6d. a glass tumbler, value 4d. and a towel, value 4d. the property of Thomas Herbert ; and the order for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-104

691. THOMAS SCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , a silver watch, value 20s. and a gold seal, value 5s. the property of Mary Duffey , spinster .

MARY DUFFEY sworn. - I live at No. 27, Leicester-square , I am a single woman; I was a servant there: On the 29th of August, the prisoner came to see a fellow-servant of mine; my watch was in my box, in a room in the kitchen; I was at my box, when my mistress called me up stairs; I went up stairs, and left my box open; when I came down, my watch was gone; I left Scott in the kitchen alone; when I missed my watch, I went in search of the prisoner, and found him at the Robin Hood , St. James's; I asked him what he had done with my watch, and he said, I was a fool; I told him, if he did not give it me, I would charge the watch with him; then, he said, he had only meant to frighten me; afterwards, he said, he had pawned it, that he did not think I would have followed him for two or three days; that I should know it was him that took it, and he meant to bring it back; he gave me the duplicate; I went to the pawnbroker's, and found the watch, but the seal was taken off; I immediately went back to his lodgings, and he said, he sent another man to pawn it for him, and it must be that man that took it off.

Q. Were you intimate with this man? - A. No; he had come there for three weeks to see a gentleman's servant that lodged in the house; my mistress lets lodgings.

DAVID GORDON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in St. Martin's-lane, (produces a watch); I took it in of a genteel looking man, in a blue coat, in the name of John Doyle; it was not the prisoner; It had no seal to it.

Prosecutrix. This is my watch; I gave him a fortnight to find the man; I have never seen the seal since.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY (Aged 45.)

Confined two months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-105

692. ANN ARROLL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , a cloth apron, value is 6d. a napkin, value 6d. two a waistcoats, value 1s. six caps, value 9d. and a silk bonnet, value 2s. the property of James Moss .

MARTHA MOSS sworn. - I am the wife of James Moss , my husband is a watchman , a labourer at Hackney : On the 6th of August, I had laid in a fortnight; the prisoner came into the room; I awoke, and thought it was my husband come home from duty; I saw the prisoner lying upon a suit of cloaths of my husband's, that she had taken from the drawers; I called my child out of bed, to go to the guard-house for a patrole, the patrole came,

and took her at Homorton Terrace, just by where I live, I saw her going out of the room with the things, and I had hold of her, but she got away from me; I had left the door upon the latch for my husband to come in; the prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

WILLIAM SWANBOURNE sworn. - Young James Moss came to me at the watch-house; in consequence of which I went after the prisoner, and found her at Homerton Terrace, with these things upon her. (producing them).

Mrs. Moss. These are my property.

Prisoner's defence. I had had nothing to eat for some days, and had a drop of drink, and how I came into the house, I do not know; I don't remember any thing about it.

GUILTY . (Aged 47.)

Transported for seven years

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-106

693. MARY BUSH , SARAH CLARKE , and ELIZABETH SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a cotton handkerchief, value 6d. and thirteen Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of Peter Francis .

PETER FRANCIS (being a Chinese man, an interpreter was sworn). - I am a sailor ; I lost thirteen Bank-notes of 1l. each; I went to the Bull public-house at Shadwell ; my money was tied up in the corner of my handkerchief, in my jacket-pocket; I was sitting down on a stool, and Polly Bull took the handkerchief out of my pocket, and handed it over to Sally Clarke , and then to the other girl; they handed it from one to another, and then they began to quarrel with one another, and the landlord of the house turned all the people out of the room.

JOHN ANTHONY sworn. - I paid Francis thirteen pounds eight shillings and fourpence that day; that is all I know of it; the money has never been found.

Q.(To Francis). Did you tell the landlord you had lost your money? - A. Yes.

Q.Did not he stop the girls? - A. No; he turned all the people out.

Q.How many people were there in the house at the time? - A.There were only the three girls, and myself, in the room.

Q.What language did you speak to the girls? - A. The Lascar language.

Q.Is the landlord here? - A. No.

Bush's defence. He went to a fortune-teller, and gave three shillings to look in a glass, and then he came to me the next morning, and said the fortuneteller told him it was me.

All three NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-107

694. JOHN FALKNER and JACOB WOODWARD were indicted the first for feloniously cutting up, stealing, and carrying away, on the 23d of July , eleven hundred cabbage-plam, value 12s. the property of Robert Mills , in a certain garden-ground, therein, growing and being , and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-108

995. THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , twelve hen fowls, value 20s. the property of Robert Howard .

JAMES TERRY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Robert Howard , at Stamford-hill : On the 30th of August, I found the hen-house broke open, and a dozen of fowls missing; I missed them before seven o'clock in the morning, there were two of them found in a tub in the house where this man lodged.

WILLIAM LAYTHORP sworn. - I am a labouring man, and live at Newington; I found these two fowls in a water-tub, where the prisoner slept, he said, he had put them there for his own use, and the remainder of the fowls he had thrown away; because lie would not to be taken with them upon him.

Terry. I am sure these are Mr. Howard's fowls.

Prisoner's defence. I have got two witnesses to prove that Laythorp offered to lay a wager that he would transport me, or hang me.

Court. His laying that wager will not make you innocent.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-109

696. CHIRSTOPHER FURMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , twenty-one pounds of sugar, value 10s. the property of James Wild , John Watts , and John Boddy .

JOHN BODDY sworn. - I am a wholesale grocer and tea-dealer , in Upper Thames-street : On Thursday the 18th of the present month, a little before eight o'clock in the evening; the prisoner at the bar was the going home he was brought back, and I saw the sugar taken from him in the cellar, upon the premises, from whence it was taken, he took it out of his stockings himself; his stockings were full of sugar, and a loose pair of trowsers let down over all; upon comparing the sugar, it was impossible to discover any difference.

FRANCIS BROADHURST sworn. - I am clerk in

the house of Wild and company, the firm is James Wild , John Watts , and John Boddy : On the 18th of the present month, I went into that part of the cellar, in which we had formed a stove for drying sugar; I there observed a tub full of raw sugar, covered with a sheer of brown paper; knowing it to be an improper situation for the sugar, I knew there was something wrong, it was a sort of sugar that we do not use for drying; after I came up, I observed the prisoner go there almost instantly, he continued there for half an hour; when he came up again, he was sent into the lamp-room to paper a few loaves; I then went down a second time, and observed, that a considerable quantity of sugar had been taken out of that tub; he was then going home, and had got several yards from our premises, when the other witness and I secured him and brought him back; we took him into the place from whence he had taken the sugar; he denied having any knowledge of the sugar that was missing, till it was felt through the trowsers; I then went for the constable; I felt the sugar under his stockings myself; I am certain, that which remained in the tub, and that which was found upon him, was exactly the same sugar.

Cross-Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long have you lived with Messrs. Wild and company? - A.Seven or eight months.

Q. The prisoner lived there before that? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you weigh the sugar afterwards? - A. No.

JOSEPH WILD sworn. - I am an apprentice to the firm of James Wild , John Watts , and John Boddy : On Thursday the 18th of the present month, between seven and eight o'clock, in consequence of suspicions that had been entertained, I stopped him about eight or nine yards from our door; I brought him back, he denied having taken the sugar, and denied having any till it was found upon him; I saw it found, there were twenty-one pounds taken from him; I compared the sugars, and they were exactly alike; from the appearance of it I believe it to be our sugar, but I cannot swear to it; I asked the prisoner if that was the way he served his masters every evening; he said, no, he did not do it above twice a week, sometimes he did not do it above once a fortnight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Before he told you that, of course you told him, if he would tell the truth, you would forgive him? - A. No, I did not.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-110

697. HENRIETTA STEWART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a gown, value 6s. a coat, value 8s. a red clock, value 5s. a waistcoat, value 10s. 6d. a shirt, value 3s. and a night cap, value 1s. the property of Thomas Sayer .

THOMAS SAYER sworn. - I look after cows ; the prisoner lodged in my house, the corner of Hog's-alley, Liquorpond-street, Gray's-inn-lane ; the property was found at the pawnbroker's.

SARAH SAYER sworn. - Last Wednesday was a week, I went in to the country; I returned on the Saturday following, and on the Sunday I missed the things; the prisoner had left the house on the Friday, there were five weeks rent due; the property was found at the pawnbroker's.

DAVID LAMB sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, (produces a gown, a coat, and a red cloak;) they were brought to me by the prisoner at the bar; the cloak on the 8th of September, and the coat and the gown on the 12th of September; I know her person perfectly well; we detained her at our shop. (The property was deposed to by Mr. Sayer.)

CHARLES DELAFONS sworn. - I am a constable; I took the prisoner to the Compter, and searched her, I found a pocket-book, with twenty-two duplicates upon her.

Prisoner's defence. My husband went away and left me in great distress, I was in hopes of being able to replace it.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-111

698. DAVID CLARKE was indicted for that he, on the 19th of August , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Samuel Day , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession, the sum of 7s. for, and on account of the said Samuel Day , his master and employer, the sum of 3s. part thereof, of and from one William Gould , 1s. 6d. other part thereof, of and from one Sandford Fox, and the sum of 2s. 6d. the remaining part thereof, of and from one William Stanton , and that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle and secrete 4s. part of the said sum of 7s. so received and taken into his possession in manner aforesaid, for the use and on the account of the said Samuel Day .

Second Count. For stealing the said sum of 4s. the property of the said Samuel.

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-112

699. JOHN CLIFFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a blanket, value 4s. a sheet, value 3s. and a counterpane, value 5s. the property of George Austin , in a lodging-room .

GEORGE AUSTIN sworn. - I let lodgings: Six months ago, last Monday, I let the prisoner an apartment at five shillings per week; he told me he was a married man, and last Monday morning, between five and six o'clock, I saw him going down stairs with a flannel bag before him, and his wife creeping softly after him; as I heard him unbolting the street-door, I went out to him; I asked him where they were going at that time in the morning; he said, he was going to have his wife churched, she said laid in; I asked him what he had in his bag, and he said, his working tools; I told him to stop a minute, while I went up to see if he had left my apartments safe; I went up, and missed a cotton counterpane, a blanket, and a sheet; I told him, I believed, he had my property in his bag; he turned out some things, among which, was a small box; he said, I have made use of your property, but here are the duplicates, I hope you will not hurt me; I then datained him, and sent for a constable.

Q. Were they things that you had let with the lodging? - A. Yes.

GEORGE LOWTHER sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker: I took in a counterpane,a blanket, and a sheet, at different times, from the prisoner at the bar. (The constable produced the property, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I was very much distrest, and meant to have replaced them, when I got work.

The prisoner called his master, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-113

700. JAMES SEYMOUR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a pair of stirrups, value 8s. the property of Thomas Pickford , and Richard Milson .(The case was opened by Mr.Gurney.)

WILLIAM PICKFORD sworn. - I am the son of Thomas Pickford : Last Saturday fe'nnight, between. six and seven in the morning, I was placed in a closet, commanding a view of the place where the stirrups were.

Q. Where does your father live? - A. In Martin's-lane, Cannon-street ; he is a sadler's ironmonger , in partnership with Richard Milson : the men came to work at seven o'clock; the prisoner was the first that came, and he unlocked the counting-house door, and went up to a place where the stirrups were, but his back being turned towards me, I could not see him take the stirrups, but I saw him stop; and as he was going out of the counting-house, I saw him put the stirrups under his jacket; I heard him go into the cellar; my father was out; as soon as he came home, I told him of it; when the prisoner came up out of the cellar, I jumped out of the closet, went into the warehouse, and charged him with taking a pair of stirrups; he, at first, denied it, and, after some hesitation, he owned it; when my father came home, I told him of it in the prisoner's presence; he said, it was the first pair he had taken; he had never taken any thing else, and hoped my father would forgive him; I went for a constable; when he came, the constable and I, and my father and the prisoner, all went down into the cellar; the prisoner put his hand behind a chest, took out a pair of stirrups, and gave them to the constable; they were the same stirrups that I had seen him take out of the counting-house; for my father and I had counted the stirrups, and taken down the marks, and when we counted them again, we found a pair of stirrups gone, marked S.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How many partners has your father? - A. Only one, Richard Milson .

Q. You were in ambush, ready to receive the enemy? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not put him in mind of the eighth commandment, before he took the stirrups? - A. No; I did not know that he was going to take any thing, till I saw him do it.

Q. You do not mean to call these stirrups, but stirrup-irons? - A.They are stirrups, and stirrup-irons.

Q. Do you mean to say, they are stirrups without leather? - A. Yes.

JOHN WEBSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a constable: I was sent for by Mr. Pickford to apprehend the prisoner; the prisoner owned that he had taken a pair of stirrups; he went down into the kitchen with a light, and took the stirrups out from behind a chest; I have had them ever since. (Produces them).

THOMAS PICKFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garney. Q. What do you call these things? - A.Stirrups, and stirrup-iron; they are as often called by one name as the other.

Mr. Alley. Q. What would you call them with the leathers? - A.Stirrups and leathers.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-114

701. JOHN BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , a great coat, value 1l. the property of John Reynolds .

WILLIAM FALKNER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fournier, in Cheapside: A great coat was lost from behind a one-horse chaise, last Tuesday was a week, I was in the chaise; I drove the chaise from Staines, part of the way, and my master drove it part of the way; my master got out opposite Somerset-house; I did not miss the coat till I got to Cheapside; we left Staines about five o'clock, and got to Cheapside about half past eight; there were three great coats, in all, hanging over the back of the chaise; I got out of the chaise in St. Paul's Church-yard, to take in a dog; the great coat that was lost, belonged to Mr. Reynolds, a very intimate friend of my master's; I saw the coat, on the Saturday following, at Guildhall, in the possession of the constable, I knew it again immediately; I have had it to my hand so often, that I am quite sure of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You saw the coat at Staines? - A. Yes; and I saw it when my master got out at Somerset-house.

Q. When was it, that you can positively speak to having last seen three great coats? - A. At the watering house at Turnham-green.

Q. Upon your oath, do you recollect that, on this side of Temple-bar, you had the three great coats? - A. I cannot positively swear that I had them.

RICHARD FITZGERALD sworn. - I am a patrole and an extra constable of Castle-Baynard ward: As I was going towards Paul's Chain, I observed three men with a parcel; I followed them to the corner of Carter-lane, and there they stopped to examine it; I put my hand upon my sword, and said, don't stir, for if you do, I will cut you down; they then threw down the great coat, and all ran away; I called out, stop thief, and he was taken by a gentleman; I came up, and took him to the watch-house; I am sure the prisoner was one of them, I saw them distinctly when they were examining the coat; they all three had the coat between them, facing the Horn Tavern; Mr. Reynolds is out of town.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When a man draws a sword upon an unarmed man, is it unnatural that he should run away? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How long had you an opportunity of observing his face? - A. Half a minute; I was in a great flurry.

Q. And yet you mean to swear positively to the prisoner? - A. That is the man, I am positive; I had the lamp over me; he was dressed in a blue coat, a striped waistcoat, a round that hat, and a dark-coloured apron.

Q. Then, in half a minute, you being flurried, and with a sword in your hand, mean to swear, that that is the man? - A. That is the man, I was close to them when they dropped the coat; I saw the chaise come past, and I saw them coming from the Chaise.

Jury. Q. Did you observe the dress of the other two? - A. Yes; there was one, with his back towards me, wore a long brown surtout coat; I did not see his waistcoat, nor his face, expect the moment that I came up, and then he turned his face away.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Could you swear to his face, do you think? - A. Yes, I could; the other man was dressed in a blue surtout coat.

Q. Did you see his face too? - A. Yes, I saw all three of their faces; I should know them all, if I saw them.

- HATERD sworn. - I am a constable of Castle Baynard ward, (produces the coat); I received it from Mr. Copper's maid; she is not here.

Fitzgerald. This is the same coat.

Mr. Knapp. It is a common driving great coat; is it not? - A. Yes.

Falkner. This is the same coat, I know it by the straps, the buttons, and the collar; and I have had it in my hands so often.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Is it not a common drab-coloured great coat? - A. Yes.

Q. Are there not two Mr. Reynolds's acquaintances of your master's? - A. Yes; they are brothers.

Q. Upon your oath, did you never see the other Mr. Reynolds in a drab great coat? - A. No, I never did.

Prisoner's defence. Going along Carter-lane, I heard some men talking very loud, and I stopped, out of curiosity, to hear what they were talking about, and the patrole came up, and said, he would knock them down, if they attempted to run away; they directly ran away, and a gentleman caught hold of me, instead of one of those men.

For the Prisoner.

- DEWELL sworn. - I am a painter in William-street, Bridwell Precinct: The prisoner left his work on the Tuesday night, between six and seven o'clock; he has worked for me three months, and always conducted himself with honestly, as far as I know.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-115

702. JAMES ELLIS , and ROBERT FOGHARTY , were indicted, the first for feloniously

stealing, on the 7th of June , a pair of gold earrings, value 3s. 6d. the property of John Elliot ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN ELLIOT sworn. - I am a gold-worker in Wilderness-row, Goswell-street ; the prisoner, Ellis, is my apprentice ; another boy, of the name of Edward Fogharty , worked with me, and was taken into custody on another charge, and committed to Cold Bath Fields prison, in consequence of which, the apartments of the prisoner, Fogharty, were searched, in my presence, by Ray, the officer; and, in his apartments, was found the duplicate of a pair of ear-rings.

JAMES MARLOW sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, (produces a pair of gold ear-rings); I received them from the prisoner Fogharty's daughter.

Q. How old was she? - A. About fifteen or sixteen, I know her very well.

Mr. Elliot. Ray, the officer, has the duplicate.

EDWARD FOGHARTY sworn. - I am a polisher to Mr. Elliot: After I had been at Mr. Elliot's, a month or six weeks, I bought a pair of ear-rings of the prisoner, Ellis, for three shillings, and I took them home, and gave them to my mother.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney, Counsel for Ellis.

Q. Look at these ear-rings that Marlow has produced? - A. These are the ear-rings I bought of Ellis.

Q. How do you know them? - A. By the pattern.

Q. Nothing else but the pattern? - A. No.

Q. Were you not examined by the Magistrate, upon suspicion of you yourself having stole some of Mr. Elliot's property? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not confess that you had stolen part of your master's property? - A. I don't recollect.

Q. Upon your oath, you do not recollect? - A.I do not.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not confess before the Magistrate, that you had robbed your master, and then laid it upon Ellis? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. It were you that took these ear-rings out of the shop? - A. Yes; but I had them from Ellis.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not confess before the Magistrate, that you took these things belonging to your master? - A. I do not know.

Q. You know these ear-rings to be your master's? - A. I did not know but Ellis had bought them of my master.

Q. Were you not, yourself, committed to prison? - A. Yes.

Q. What were you committed to prison for? - A. Because they thought I could tell more about Ellis.

Q. Were you not called upon to account for how you came to take your master's property to your father's house? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. I ask you again, whether you did not confess, before the Magistrate, that you had taken various articles out of your master's shop? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. Have you not been in prison ever since? A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, were you not charged with stealing part of your master's property? - A. I was put into prison to give evidence.

Q. Were you not put into prison to give evidence with respect to this charge? - A. I do not know; I was committed to give evidence against Ellis.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not swear that Ellis had sold you these ear-rings in order to save yourself from being prosecuted? - A. No.

Q. Did you not confess, before the Magistrate, that you had robbed your master? - A. I do not know.

GUSTAVUS M'KILLIGAN sworn. - I am errand boy to Mr. Elliot: I saw this pair of ear-rings in Ellis's drawer, and I heard Edward Fogharty say to Ellis that he would buy them of him; these are the same ear-rings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How do you know them? - A. By the pattern.

Q. How many thousands are there of the same pattern? - A.I cannot say.

Q. Were you one of the pretty lads that were taken up? - A. I was taken up to give evidence.

Q. But you had the good luck to escape being committed? - A. I had done nothing to be committed for.

Q. How long was this before Ellis was taken up? - A. About a fortnight.

Q. You were quite shocked at hearing this wicked boy, Ellis, talk of felling his master's property, and Fogharty offering to buy it? - A. No.

Q. Did you think it an honest or a dishonest thing? - A. A dishonest thing.

Q. You would have been shocked at doing such a thing yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. And, therefore, like a good honest boy, you went and told your master directly? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You kept it quite snug, a close secret? - A. I did not thing any thing at all of it.

Q. Did you ever tell your master of it till Fogharty and Ellis were taken up? - A. No.

Q. You expected then, that you and Fogharty should get clear if you swore against Ellis, did not you? - A. No.

Q. How long did you keep this secret? - A.About a fortnight.

Q. Did not you confess, before the Magistrate, that you had taken some of your master's property? - A. I did not.

Q.(To Elliot.) Look at these ear-rings? - A.

These are such ear-rings as we make, they are of our manufactory.

Mr. Gurney. Q.How many have you made of that pattern? - A. It is impossible to say.

Q.Many hundreds, perhaps? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any thing about them by which you can distinguish these rings from the thousands that you have made? - A. No.

JOHN RAY sworn. - (Produces a duplicate.) I found this duplicate in the prisoner, Fogharty's, apartment.

Marlow. This is our duplicate, it corresponds exactly.

The prisoner, Ellis, left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Fogharty was not put upon his defence. Both, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-116

703. JAMES ELLIS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , five tops of gold ear-rings, value 2s. 4d. two gold links for chains, value 6d. a gold shirt-pin, value 1s. 6d. three steel punches, value 3s. and ten pennyweight of gold wire, value 16s. the property of John Elliot .

JOHN ELLIOTT sworn. - I am a jeweller and gold worker , in Wildnerness-row, Goswell-street ; the prisoner is my apprentice : On the 16th of July I went into the shop, about three o'clock in the afternoon, when a person of the name of Thorold, who works for me, told me that there was some gold at the further end of the shop; Ellis was within hearing; I was surprized, for our's is a very long shop, and this was at the end of the shop, where we never put any gold, it is where the apprentice' boxes are kept; I went immediately to the place, and found a quantity of cuttings of gold, pieces of wire, and some links for chains; I immediately inquired if any body knew of that gold; no one answered for some time; but having looked round twice or thrice, particularly at the apprentices, Ellis said he had picked it up; I asked him where, and he pointed to that end of the shop where I had taken it from; I said, you know no gold could come there, you must give me a further account of it; I then looked it over, and found some tops of earrings, struck with a different punch from any of my own; I remarked it immediately, and said, who knows any thing of these ear-rings of this pattern; several came to look, and among the rest, a boy of the name of M'Killigan looked, and said, I fetched four pair of ear-rings of that pattern for James Ellis , from the cutter; I then asked Ellis what he said to that; he said they were for William Moore , who was another apprentice of mine; I then went for an officer; I desired my foreman not to suffer any one to go out of the shop till my return; when I came back, the officer searched Ellis's box, but found nothing, except a small article, the subject of another indictment; the officer then searched the necessary, and found three steel punches, a gold pin, and the front of an ear-ring; Ellis then owned that he had thrown them down.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did not you make him a promise, that it should be better for him if he confessed it? - A. No.

Q. Nor that it would be worse for him if he did not? - A. No.

WILLIAM ROSE sworn. - I am an officer: I was sent for, and took James Ellis into custody; I searched him, and then I searched the necessary, and found the gold pin, three punches, and the front of an ear-ring. (Produces them).

Elliott. This pin I cannot swear to; the spangles are the same that I use; these punches I believe to be mine, but they have been altered in the cutting part.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Of these spangles there are many thousands of course? - A. Yes.

Q. Are there no marks upon the punches? - A. There are such marks as we know them by.

Q. Are they not different from any punches that you have? - A. The cutting of two of them are different, the other is very nearly like it.

Q. Have not many other persons punches like them? - A. They vary as much as possible; this front of an ear-ring has been made from one of these punches.

WILIAM THOROLD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Elliott, (produces a quantity of gold, consisting of ends of wire, and other things); it is what we call waste, to be melted over again; here are two links of chains, and some tops of ear-rings, I found them near the prisoner's box; I have no doubt of its being the prosecutor's from the pattern of the links.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. There were other boxes near there, were there not? - A. No; I beleive there was no other box.

THOMAS SHELDON sworn. - On the 16th of July, about three o'clock, Mr. Thorold told Mr. Elliott of the gold, James Ellis was present; Mr. Elliott made inquiry, and at last, Ellis said he had picked it up under the place at the bottom of the shop; Mr. Elliott desired me to watch them all, I had a pot of gold on the fire which I was obliged to look after, and the prisoner followed me, and ran to the necessary, I saw him go in; I took the gold off, and went after him, and brought him out.

Mr. Elliott. Here is the top of an ear-ring that corresponds with one of the punches found in the necessary, and two tops of ear-rings besides; I have no doubt of their being my property.

Prisoner's defence. I received the gold from William Moore , who is just out of his time; I believed

it to be his own at that time; he asked me to make him a dozen pair of ear-rings, and I was to have two-pence a pair for making them.

GUILTY (Aged 15.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-117

704. WILLIAM MOORE , and ROBERT FOGHARTY , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , a pair of gold ear-rings, value 6s. the property of John Elliott , and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN ELLIOTT sworn. - The prisoner, Moore, was my apprentice ; he was just out of his time when this happened; he was not really out of his time, for I had made a mistake of a month, and gave him up his indentures on the 18th of June, instead of the 18th of July; in consequence of some information, I went to a woman, of the name of Frances Sutton , from whom I got this pair of ear-rings, (producing them); I have no doubt, from the appearance of them, that they are mine; I know the stud, in the centre, to be mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp, Counsel for Moore.

Q. Are those ear-rings finished? - A.Yes; they have been worn.

Q. Whose work is this? - A. I believe it is the prisoner, Moore's, work.

Q. Of course, he made a great many of that pattern in the course of seven years? - A. Yes.

Q. Do apprentices never work out of doors; it is a very wrong thing, certainly; but have you not heard of it? - A. It was never done to my knowledge; he never worked for me out of doors.

EDWARD FOGHARTY sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Elliott; I bought these ear-rings of William Moore , and sold them to Frances Sutton ; I gave six shillings for them, and sold them for seven shillings.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You come here, in custody, to give evidence? - A. Yes.

FRANCES SUTTON sworn. - I am a worker of muslin shawls; The ear-rings that I bought of Edward Fogharty , I gave to Mr. Elliott; I believe these to be the same.

THOMAS ALLAN sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Elliott: I remember seeing the prisoner, Moore, making a pair of ear-rings, exactly of that pattern; he said he was going to take them home the next morning, the first of June, to Fogharty's house; I understood him, that they were for Fogharty's daughter.

The prisoner, Moore, left his defence to his Counsel.

Fogharty was not put upon his defence.

For the prisoner, Moore.

MRS. SALT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have kept one house twenty years; I sold the prisoner, Moore, three gold ear-rings, and three gold seals; he has had money in considerable sums from me, during his apprenticeship, to buy gold, and other things, that he wanted to work up; I have known him from his infancy; he has always borne the best of character.

Court. Q. You knew he was in the service of Mr. Elliott? - A. Yes.

Q. What are you? - A. A widow; my husband was coachman to Mr. Sheriff Higgins; he lived in the family many years, and had something very handsome left him at his death.

ELIZABETH COATES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have known the prisoner many years; he was always a very good lad; Mr. Elliott always told me he was a very good boy.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have known the prisoner twelve months; I have had some conversation with Mr. Elliott; he said, as to those little things that apprentices make for their own wear, he thought very little of; he was talking about this transaction -

Court. Q. Did you ever hear of apprentices wearing ear-rings? - A. No; he had a pin, and a ring on his finger.

Mr. Elliott. I deny that I ever said any such thing.

- SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Harper-street, Red Lion-square; I have known the prisoner from his infancy, he always bore a good character; I have had some conversation with Mr. Elliott; he said, he felt himself rather disappointed that the prisoner did not ask him to continue him in his service, when he delivered him his indentures.

Court. Q. Do you mean to say, upon your oath, that you believe this prosecution is instituted from malice? - A. No; he said he felt himself disappointed.

Mr. Elliott. I always thought him very honest, till I made this discovery.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-118

705. WILLIAM MOORE , and WILLIAM PYBUS , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , three pairs of joints of gold ear-rings, value 3s. a pair of tops of gold earrings, value 1s. eight heads of gold pins, value 4s. four fronts of gold pins, value 3s. three other pieces of gold, value 1s. eight pair of gold ear-rings, value 32s. a

gold shirt-pin, value 4s. a gold ring, value 2s. and a gold setting of a cornelian seal key, value 8s. the property of John Elliott ; and the other for feloniously receiving part of the above goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN ELLIOTT sworn. - On the 17th of July, I went with the officer, to search the apartments of William Moore , in Goswell-street; he lodged in the same apartment with William Pybus , their boxes were both in one room; Pybus's box was locked; I am not certain whether the other was, or not; we found in Moore's box, three pair of joints of ear-rings, a pair of tops of ear-rings, two heads of gold pins, four front parts of pins, two pieces of gold wire, and some other bits of gold; in Pybus's box was found, a seal-key; in consequence of information that I received, I then went to the house of William Cuff , at Smithfield-bars, and there we found ten or eleven pair of gold ear-rings; on the person of Moore was found a gold ring; he was taken to the Magistrate's, and committed; we apprehended Pybus the same evening; I asked him if he knew of any transactions of Moore; he denied all knowledge of any transactions of Moore; Pybus had formely worked for me; I asked him, if he knew any thing of that seal-key that was in his box; he denied that he had ever had any such thing in his possession; he was taken before the Magistrate, and examined.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Moore was not with you when you searched the box that you say was his? - A. No.

Q. Do you happen to know if there were not other persons lodged in the same house? - A. I do not know.

Q. Pybus's box was forced open? - A. Yes; Moore's box was open, whether the officer had broke it open or not, I cannot say.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden: On the 17th of July, I went to a house in Goswell street, to search the apartments of Moore, and in his box I found a quantity of jewellery, gold, and different articles, tops of ear-rings, and pieces of gold wire; in Pybus's box I found a seal-key, and two duplicates.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know it other persons lodged in the same house? - A. I do not know.

WILLIAM ROSE sworn. - I am an officer; I went to Mr. Cuff's, a sale-shop, at Smithfield-bars, where I found five pair of ear-rings, and a gold pin. (Produces them).

THOMAS ALLEN sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Elliott; these tops and joints of ear-rings are all struck with Mr. Elliott's punches; I know that the prisoner Moore was making this seal-key while he was an apprentice, in a private way; I have frequantly seen him working privately.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.In case of an apprentice working privately for himself, he would use the punch of his master? - A. Yes, of course.

Q. You don't know from whence he got the gold? - A.No, it is impossible; I never saw him take any thing, but two or three days before he was out of his time, he took a piece of gold wire to make joints for ear-rings.

WILLIAM CUFF sworn. - I keep a sale-shop, No. 12, Smithfield-bars: On Saturday the 28th of June, I bought of the prisoner, Moore, eight pair of ear-rings, for which I gave him one pound eight; there are two more that I cannot be certain whether I received them from Moore or not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This was after he was out of his time? - A. I did not know till now, that he was out of his time; he said, he was a master jeweller, No. 3, East-street, Red-lion-square.

Q. Do you happen to know, that that is where his mother lives? - A. No.

GUSTAVUS M'KILLIGAN sworn. - I am errand-boy to Mr. Elliott; I saw Moore making this sealkey six or eight months ago, I fetched him a steel pipe for it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you not know, that Moore worked for himself privately? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever been employed to buy gold for him? - A. Yes; I bought two penny-weights, fourteen grains for him, which came to five shillings and two-pences.

DAVID LAMB sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker, in Fetter-lane, (produces three gold pins;) I took them in of the prisoner, Pybus, on Saturday the 5th of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon.

PHILIP PACE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hoby, pawnbroker, in Holborn; here is a pin, that it is said I bought of Moore, but I do not recollect whether I bought it of him or a woman.

Q.(To Mr. Elliott.) Look first at the articles found in Moore's box? - A.This pair of tops of ear-rings, the prisoner Moore had in his custody, from me, to repair the other parts of ear-rings; the two fronts of pins, and the heads of pins are all struck from punches of mine, and such as he used in working for me; here is the ring found on his person; the front of this ring is struck from a punch that was never in the possession of the prisoner, but has always been in my custody, he could not get at it without opening a place that he had no right to do, because it was in a locked up place in the shop.

Q. Look at the articles found at Cuff's? - A. One pair of ear-rings is struck with a punch of mine, and the others are struck from the punches that were found in the necessary; the seal-key I

cannot say any thing to; these three pins are struck from punches in my possession.

Q.Had Pybus access to you at that time at all? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Except that article of which you say you kept the punch locked up, all the rest might have been manufactured for his own private use, and with his own gold? - A. Yes.

Q. Could you distinguish articles so made from those which he made for you? - A. No.

Prisoner. (To Mr. Elliott.) Q. Have I not sold you gold during my apprenticeship, which I have purchased of my friends? - A. I believe once; he applied to me to make a ring for his uncle, and I cannot say but I might, in return for making that ring; I do not recollect that I ever did.

The prisoner Moore left his defence to his Counsel.

Pybus's defence. Moore I understood to be a young man of good connections, and had one hundred pounds in the funds; he took a room upon the same floor where I lived, and asked me to let him work with my things; the stones of the three pins I bought of Mr. Mosely, in Albermarle-street, and the wire I bought at Mr. Cheesman's, in Racquet-court, and the flatted gold likewife.

For the prisoner Pybus.

PETER USHER sworn. - I am a goldsmith and jeweller, in Jewin-court, Jewin-street; I have known Pybus thirty years, we worked journey-work together; his general character is that of a simple honest man, and I wish I could say as much of all the other journeymen.

Pybus called three other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Moore, GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Pybus, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-119

706. WILLIAM-CLEVELAND WATSON , and MARGARET TOMS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a table, value 4s. a Bath-stove, value 12s. an ironing-board, value 1s. two saucepans, value 1s. two tea-kettles, value 3s. five candlesticks, value 1s. a frying-pans, value 6d. four flat-irons, value 1s. a set of fireirons, value 2s. four feather-beds, value 81s. a half-tester bedstead and curtains, value 10s. five pair of blankets, value 3s. three quilts, value 4s. and six chairs, value 6s. the property of George Read .

ANN READ sworn. - I am the wife of George Read , I live at No. 3, Plumber's-row, Whitechapel; my husband was a captain of a ship , but through infirmity he cannot go out now; I lived in Shakespear's-walk , and was going to remove to Plumber's-row; Mr. Watson took upon him to assist me in moving; I had bought a mangle, and he told me I must go up to Plumber's-row, for the workmen had left the house, that the door was locked, and they could not get the mangle in, and he would come with the other goods in the cart, and see them safe up, and would be there as soon as me; I went up, and waited from half-past one, till eight at night, and he never came; I then enquired in the neighbourhood about the goods, and was told they had been gone ever since two o'clock; I went to Holborn to enquire after the cart, because the same cart that brought my mangle, was to bring the furniture; I got some information from the carman's wife; in consequence of which, I went up to Thornhaugh-street, Bloomsbury, to a public-house, and the prisoner Watson came in, and was going to sell the goods; there was a paper made out, owing to my being in trouble, and he persisted in selling my goods, for they were his property.

Q. Had you made them over to him? - A. No, to another gentleman; it was a bill of sale to Mr. Palmer for fifteen pounds, but I never received any money.

Q. Who is Mr. Palmer? - A. I don't know, he is a lawyer, I believe, and as soon as the paper was made out, I was to have it.

Q. Where does he live? - A. I don't know, Mr. Watson knows, they both pretented to be my friends.

Q. When was the bill of sale dated, the 21st or 22d of July, I lost my goods upon the 24th.

Q. What has the woman prisoner to do with it? - A. The woman him upon the road, and assisted in moving the goods.

Q. ARE you sure you never made a bill of sale to this man? - A. No.

Q. Were they to be sold? - A. No. Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where is your husband? - A. In Guy's-hospital.

Q. Your poor husband don't know anything of this prosecution? - A. No.

Q. He was in Sunderland? - A. No, he came home that day.

Q. You had sent your poor husband down to Sunderland for the benefit of his health? - A. Yes.

Q. And in your husband's absence, you thought proper to make a bill of sale of your goods to Palmer, the broker, and the prisoner? - A. I did not know any thing of his being a broker.

Q. Did he not take that house for you in Plumber's row? - A. No, he did not.

Q. I think you told my Lord you did not know where the prisoner lived? - A. Yes; nor did I.

Q. Upon your oath was he not to have lived with you in that house in Plumber's-row, I will not ask you how? - A. No, upon my oath he was not.

Q. Upon your oath, did you never ask Palmer in

what way your husband might be arrested for debt? - A. No, I did not; he proposed it himself.

Q.You helped to pack up these goods for him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not desire the prisoner to take the goods to Wellclose-Square, in order that it might not be discovered where you were going; and from there to the West end of the town, and from thence to Plumber's-row? - A. No.

Q. Did you never apply to get any body pressed? - A.Never.

Q. You have never applied to get your husband pressed? - A.No; I was advised to get him to sea, to try if it would do him any good; he was out of his element when he was at home.

Q. Has not the prisoner spent almost all his time with you, in the absence of your husband? - A. No, he has not.

Q.When the prisoner was taken up, you found him in company with the other woman? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were very angry? - A. No; why should I be angry.

Q. Did not you say you would prosecute both him and his Scotch bitch? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did not you offer that if he would leave that woman and come to you, there should be nothing more said about it? - A. No.

EDWARD WELLS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Baynes, upholsterer and auctioneer, Great Queen-Street: The prisoner, Watson, applied to me to know if I could get him a horse and cart and a porter for the day, to move some goods; he did not say where the goods were to be removed from; I got him a carman and a porter, and they made their bargain, and went with him; I am certain he is the man; on the following morning Mrs. Read came to Mr. Baynes's, and said she had lost her goods; I went with her and found the goods and the prisoner at a public house in Vine-Street; I then loaded the goods again in the same cart, and took them home to Plumber's-row, Whitechapel, for her.

Q. Did the prisoner object to it? - A. Yes, but I do not know that he said any thing particular.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The man was very drunk at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear any Quarrel between Mrs. Read and the prisoner? - A. Yes, before the Justice; but I do not remember what it was.

RICHARD PIERREPOINT sworn. - I am a carman: Dennis the porter and I went with my horse and cart to Shakespear's-walk, and loaded some goods; the prisoner went with us; we took up the goods and we came to Cannon-Street, and then he said he had taken a fresh thought, and desired me to take them to a public-house in Goodman's fields; I delivered the goods there; the next day I took the same goods to Plumber's-row, from out of Vine-Street, St. Giles's.

Q. Do you know any thing of Toms? - A. Yes; I saw her at the public-house in Goodman's Fields, and afterwards at the public-house in St. Giles's.

ANDREW DENNIS sworn. - I am a porter: I took the mangle to Plumber's-row; after that I went to Shakespear's-walk with Mr. Watson; we loaded the cart with goods; he said they belonged to a lady, and they were to be moved where we carried the mangle to; when we got to Cannon-Street, he said, I think we will take them somewhere else, for somebody may follow them for the taxes; and we took them to a public-house, the sign of the Standard, in Well-street, Wellclose-square; the prisoner Toms was there, up one pair of stairs; she did not say any thing that I heard; I understood that they had sent for somebody about taxes, and then he said, if this is the case, they are my goods, and I will do as I like with them.

JOSEPH WINCH sworn. - I keep a public-house in Vine-street: On the 25th of July I got up about five o'clock in the morning, and saw a great number of goods in the yard; I thought there had been a fire, and I came down stairs, and saw the prisoner Toms apparently very much distress; she said her husband was just come from sea, that he had taken a house for her; and she had lost him somehow, and could not find him, and did not know where to take the goods to; she said she had been seeking all night for her husband; I took the things in; she went out to seek for her husband, and she came back and could not find him; by and by in came the prisoner Watson, and said, that is my picture, how came you by it; why, says I, if that is your's, I have got other things of your's; I shewed them to him and his wife too; they seemed very much pleased at meeting with each other, and they both went out; and while they went out Mrs. Read came in, and seeing the picture, she said, that is my picture; bless me, thought I, I wonder whose picture it will be next; and she told me she had been robbed of them; I put her up stairs into the dining-room till they came, and when they came I beckoned Mrs. Read down, and she said they were her's; Watson then said he had a bill of sale on them, and would sell them; she said it was no such thing; I then said the picture was mine, and all the things were mine, and I would send to Bow-Street for two officers to determine whose they were, which I did; and then Watson wanted to go away, but I would not let him; they were both taken into custody.

FRANCIS BIDDO sworn. - I am a broker and appraiser, in Bow-Street, Bloomsbury: The two prisoners came to my house about ten o'clock on the 25th of July, to know if I would buy some goods; I told them I was busy, but I would come as soon as I could; I went in about half an hour, and the prisoner Watson told me had settled his affairs; I told

him, I was very glad of it, and came away; I never saw the goods.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - I am an officer: On Friday, the 25th of July, I searched the prisoner, Watson, and found a receipt, and an inventory of the goods that were taken.

Watson's defence. I was employed by Mr. Palmer to remove the goods, and had an authority from him so to do. Mrs. Read has got the paper.

Mrs. Read. (Produces it.) I had this from Mr. Watson. - (It is read.)

"Mr. Watson. Having purchased the goods of"Mrs. Read, beg the favour of you to see them"removed to No. 14, Plumber's-row."

Mr. Alley. That is an authority for him to remove them.

Court. It is no such thing; it is a fraud throughout.

The prisoner Toms was not put upon her defence.

The prisoner Watson called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Toms, NOT GUILTY .

Watson, GUILTY . (Aged 55.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-120

707. JOHN COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , four pounds weight of pepper, value 10s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

JAMES TIMBRELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am chief mate of the Albion East-India-man: On the 22d of August she lay off Blackwall ; the prisoner was a lumper on board the ship: Between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the custody of Blancarn, with a quantity of pepper of the same quality with that which was on board the Albion.

JOHN BLANCARN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a tide-surveyor: On the 22d of August, between six and seven in the morning, the prisoner came on board the ship from shore, went forward into the galley, came out again with a cleaver in his hand, and said he was going to grind it for the steward of the ship, and he was to have a bottle of arrack for so doing; he got into a lighter; I asked him what he had got before him; he said, nothing at all, only the cleaver; I insisted on his coming on board again, to let me see: when he came on board I was endeavouring to feel what he had before him, and he resisted my searching him; however I did search him, and found a bag of pepper under his frock, at his left-hand side; I delivered him to Mr. Timbrell, the commanding officer; and the pepper, to the officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When he was on board, the hatchways were all shut down? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it for granted, you never stopped a man smuggling goods on shore, who has told you that he had nothing? - A. It is a common thing, he said, he had it from a black man; the blacks were all called upon deck, and he was desired to pick him out, but he did not chuse it.(John Shrimpton, the officer, produced the pepper).

Prisoner's defence. It was impossible for me to have stolen any pepper; I gave a black man some tobacco for it; I thought it was his own property.

For the prisoner.

BENJAMIN BROWNING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I was on board the Albion from the 5th of May; the prisoner was employed by me, and was never suffered to go where the cargo was.

Court. (To Timbrell.) Q. Was there any private trade of pepper on board that ship? - A. Not at that time.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-121

708. JANE TOTHILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , a cotton apron, value 6d. two pair of cotton hose, value 3s. a shirt, value 4s. two table-cloths, value 5s. two sheets, value 5s. four pillow-cases, value 2s. and a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. the property of Abraham Mottier .

ELIZABETH MOTTIER sworn. - I am the wife of Abraham Mottier : I keep a public-house in Brewer-Street, Golden Square ; I employed the prisoner at the bar, as a chairwoman , for about nine months, and, at different times, missed a great quantity of wearing apparel, and household linen; I had not the least suspicion of the prisoner; I discharged two maids, not telling them what I discharged them for, in order to find out the thief; on the 11th of September, I accused the prisoner with taking my property, and on her person I found, in her pocket, tea, sugar, salt, and an apron; I immediately sent to Marlborough-Street, for an officer; I gave charge of her, and went with the officer to her lodgings, where I found a pair of stockings with my mark upon them, that she had taken away the day before, they were wet, a clout, three knives and three forks, and seventy-nine duplicates, which led to the discovery of the property in the indictment; the pawnbrokers delivered me a great quantity of things at Marlborough-Street, that are not in the indictment.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This poor woman, I believe, up to this time, has maintained a very good character? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM- HENRY WARRE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Turner, in Panton-Street, (produces a table-cloth and a shirt); I took them in of the prisoner at the bar: I have known her pledging and redeeming things for twelve years; I never heard any thing amiss of her before.

JOHN KENNETT sworn. - I live with Mr. Charino, pawnbroker, Broad Sanctuary, (produces two sheets, a table-cloth, four pillow cases, and a handkerchief); I took them in of the prisoner.

Mrs. Mottier. They are all marked with my own name.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called James Kennedy , an officer of Marlborough-Street, who had known her fourteen or fifteen years, and gave her a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 47.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-122

709. MARY LONEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of John Richie .

( Catherine Richie , and Margaret Sweatman , were called upon their recognizances, but did not appear).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-123

710. SAMUEL JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , a pair of leather shoes, value 2s. 10d. the property of Ann Maddocks .

ANN MADDOCKS sworn. - I keep a shoe shop upon Tower-hill : On the 8th of this month, about half past seven in the evening, I saw the prisoner knock my sister down, and go out of the shop with the shoes, but I did not see his face; he was secured in a few minutes after; I dare say, within three minutes.

ELIZABETH ADDERLEY sworn. - I am sister to the last witness: I went into the shop to snuff the candles, and, in leaning over the counter, I saw the prisoner lying along, inside the counter; I gave him the meeting at the end of the counter, to stop him, and he laid hold of me, and dragged me till he got me outside the door, and then he knocked me down, and ran away; I called stop thief, and he was stopped by George Gray .

GEORGE GRAY sworn. - I saw the prisoner knock down Mrs. Adderley, and I followed him; I saw him drop the shoes, and I laid hold of him directly; I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-124

711. RICHARD JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , two brass buckles, value 6d. and two pieces of leather braces, value 1s. the property of George Fletcher .

GEORGE FLETCHER sworn. - I am a coach-master , at the Rose and Crown-yard, Knights-bridge: On Friday, the 15th of August, I missed a pair of braces and buckles; I found them in the hands of the watchmen.

JOHN ELLIOT sworn. - I am a watchman belonging to St. George's, Hanover-Square: On the 14th of August, about twenty minutes before eleven, I was walking along the road, and saw a man cutting the braces of a coach; I called to the coachman, but he did not hear me; I stopped him, and he asked me what I wanted with him; I told him, I would let him know, and, if he resisted, I would shoot him, for I had arms about me; he endeavoured to get from me, but I secured him, and took him to the watch-house; he had as many braces and buckles as he could carry, almost, in a bag, and in his pockets; I found this knife open in his pocket. (Produces it).

Fletcher. These are my buckles.

Prisoner's defence. I found them near the Barracks, at Knightsbridge.

GUILTY (Aged 43.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-125

712. SARAH GARDNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , two silver tea-spoons, value 2s. a yard of muslin, value 1s. and a yard of furniture binding, value 2d. the property of James Street .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-126

713. THOMAS RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , a snuff-box, value 6d. a tobacco-stopper, value 4d. a counterfeit half-crown, value 2d. a counterfeit shilling, value 4d. and four counterfeit sixpences, value 4d. the property of William Hodge .

WILLIAM HODGE sworn. - I live in the City-road ; the prisoner was my errand-boy : On the 16th of July, I had my warehouse broke open, and robbed of the articles mentioned in the indictment;

they were taken out of my desk, and found upon the prisoner, when he was apprehended.

THOMAS DICKINSON sworn. - I am a messenger belonging to the Police-office, Worship-Street: I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of July; I met the prisoner in Norton-Salgate; I asked him if he knew Mr. Hodge, he said, he did not; while I was talking to him, I observed this pistol in his pocket; I took him into a shop, and searched him; I found upon him some counterfeit money, a tobacco-stopper, and a snuff-box.

Hodge. I lost a pair of pistols, but I cannot say that this is one of them; the snuff-box, I know to be mine, I have had it ten years; it is mended with a piece of putty at the top.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-127

714. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , a cheese, value 16s. the property of James Jackson .

PETER PERRY sworn. - I am one of the patrole belonging to Bow-Street: On the 16th of July, I stopped the prisoner at Kensington-turnpike, a little after ten o'clock; I asked him what he had got in his bag, he told me a cheese; I asked him where he got it, and he said, where it was to be got; I told him, that would not do for me; he then said, he had brought it from Chiswick; I was not satisfied with the answers he gave, and I took him into custody.

JAMES JACKSON sworn. - I keep a chandler's shop at Hammersmith: On the 16th of July, at half past nine in the evening, I lost a cheese; I had it in my hand at nine o'clock; I am sure this is my cheese.

Prisoner's defence. I found it in the road; I meant to bring it to town, and have it advertized.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-128

715. WILLIAM SHATTOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , a pair of stockings, value 2s. 6d. the property of Walter Fitzgerald .

WALTER FITZGERALD sworn. - On the 26th of August, I heard a noise in the shop; I looked and missed a pair of stockings; the prisoner was brought back with them.

- COLLINGWOOD sworn. - On the 26th of August, I was passing up Piccadilly; I saw the prosecutor run across the road; I pursued two boys(the prisoner was one) into Marlborough-Street; I took the prisoner to the public-house, opposite the office, searched him, and found this pair of stockings in his breeches.

Fitzgerald. These are my stockings.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the stockings on the ground, in Piccadilly; I am an American; the ship went away without me; I have been twice sick in St. Giles's workhouse.

GUILTY . (Aged 14.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-129

716. JAMES DUFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , four quartern loaves of bread, value 5s. the property of David Pitcairn .

JAMES HUNTER sworn. - I am servant to David Pitcairn , baker , in Guildford-Street, Foundling-hospital: On the 9th of this month, I put down my basket, and went a little distance to deliver a loaf; when I came back, the prisoner was brought to me with four loaves of bread.

CHARLES DOUGLAS sworn. - I am a baker: On the 9th of September, I saw the prisoner run across Guildford-Street, with four loaves from a basket; I put my basket down, and ran after him; I told him to put the bread back to where he took it from; he said, he would, if I would not meddle with him; he then said, he would not carry them at all, and he threw them down.

Hunter. The loaves that were shewn me, were my master's property; they had his name upon them, D. P.

GEORGE LONGDEN sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I saw these four loaves standing upon a step, and I took them; Mr. Longden can give me a character.

Longden. I have had him seven times in the House of Correction for running away from his master. GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-130

717. WILLIAM PORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , a pewter pint pot, value 13d. the property of Thomas Tart .

WILLIAM MORTIMER sworn. - I am a currier and leather-cutter, No. 10, Clerkenwell-close: I was in Tart's house about three weeks or a month ago; the prisoner came in for a pint of porter; Mrs. Tart went down to draw the beer, and he put a pint pot in his pocket; I laid hold of him, and told him, he had got something that did not belong to him; he said, he had, and desired me to

let him go; I took it from him; Mrs. Tart came up, and she wished him to be detained; Longden, the officer, was sent for.

Mr. Vaillant. Q. He did his business in a clumsy manner, as if he had not been used to it? - A. Yes.

( George Longden , the officer, produced the pot, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

GUILTY (Aged 42.)

Of stealing to the value of 10d.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-131

718. ELIZABETH INGRAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a feather-bed, value 5s. a bolster, value 2d. a pillow, value 1d. and a sheet, value 2d. the property of Elizabeth Grotage .

ELIZABETH GROTAGE sworn. - I live in Denmark-Street, St. George's : I was not at home when I lost my things; the prisoner lodged in my room two nights; on the 4th of August I went out, and when; returned, the prisoner and the property was gone.

ROBERT HOUSHOLD sworn. - I am a broker, at No. 27, New Road, St. George's in the East: On the 4th of August the prisoner came to me, and wanted me to purchase a bed, and a pillow; she took me to a room in Denmark-Street, and I bought them; the next morning Mrs. Grotage came to me, and I shewed her the things that I had bought of the prisoner. (The property was produced, and deposed to by Mrs. Grotage).

- DUNBAR sworn. - I am a constable: I took the prisoner, she was very much in liquor.

FRANCIS PATTISON sworn. - I went to fetch the bed, and paid half-a-guinea for it; that is all that I know.

The prisoner put in a written defence to the following effect:

My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. My husband has left me with two helpless infants, I believe he is pressed into the King's service, I have not heard of him since he has been gone. In order to support my children, I went to live as a servant in Cnarlotte-Street, Fitzroy-Square; after that, I went to live in the family of a Jew; their method I found would not suit me, and I quitted that situation in the first week, and the day I quitted, I saw the prosecutor selling greens at the corner of Denmark-Street; I enquired if she could inform me where I could get a lodging; she said, she would accommodate me with half of her bed; I slept with her that night; she had but one room, and in the morning she introduced three men into the room to me, and they over-persuaded me to send for gin; I was over-persuaded to drink, till I was so intoxicated as not to be able to know what I was doing, and they treated me as their brutal design led them; two or three days before she charged me with this offence, she introduced one Thomas Jones to me, and he made me intoxicated again; and being deprived of my money and clothes, I was over-persuaded to fetch a broker, and sell the goods, for money to get more liquor; I believe he was in the room, or the adjoining room, when the broker was dealing for the bed; the price was half-a-guinea, and half a pint of gin, Jones, myself, and another woman, drank the half pint of gin; the half-guinea was changed, gin sent for, and the broker's man partook of both; the other woman in the house bought some giblets, and some more liquor, with the money that was received for the bed; then they left me in that miserable and intoxicated state; and when I became a little sensible, and saw my wretched situation, and reflected upon my conduct, in order to replace the bed, I went to a pawnbroker's to pledge some things of my own, when she had me taken up. I solemnly declare, as I believe there is a God above, that I never robbed or defrauded any one; and if I had not been intoxicated with liquor I should not have done as I did. I therefore trust this honourable Court will exercise as much mercy as the circumstances of the case will permit; the prosecutrix has had her bed returned, and her expences paid; she is a married woman, and her husband is abroad.

Court. (To Mrs. Grotage.) Q. Have you a husband? - A. No; my husband has been dead these eight years, he died in Well-Street.

Q. Is there any truth in this story of men being introduced to her? - A. I was not at home from Sunday morning till Monday evening.

Dunbar. Mrs. Grotage's own account was, that she went out on purpose for her to have her sweethearts there, that she might get her some money.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Confined two weeks in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-132

719. JOHN WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , a boot, value 10s. the property of William Dixon , the elder, and William Dixon , the younger.

JOHN MORRIS sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Dixon and Son, both their names are William: On Monday last, in consequence of information, I went out into Foster-lane , and called out stop thief, upon which I saw the prisoner run, and throw the boot down; I pursued him into Horse-shoe-passage, close by where he was taken; I saw the boot picked up by the apprentice of a shoemaker in St. Martin's-le-

grand, and given to another person, by whom it was brought back.

- LOCKLEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dixon: I saw the prisoner drop the boot; Mr. Meadows's apprentice picked it up and delivered it to me; I gave it to Mr. Morris, and it was delivered to the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The poor fellow was a little the worse for liquor, was not he? - A. I cannot say whether he was or not.

(The constable produced the boat, which was deposed to by Morris.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been drinking a little, and was very sick; I turned into the court on that account, and this gentleman came and challenged me with taking the boot.

For the prisoner.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I was executor to the Will of the prisoner's father; I had paid him his legacy that very day, about half past eleven o'clock.

Q. Was he sober? - A. He did not appear to me to be intoxicated; we had three shillingsworth of brandy and water among five of us, and he had had something at the public-house before we met; the prisoner is a shoemaker, and has borne a good character all his life.

The prisoner called six other witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-133

720. CHRISTOPHER MULLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a pound weight of tobacco, value 2s. the property of Thomas Pearson .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas Bull , Welbore-Ellis Agar , Sir Alexander Monro , Knight , Richard Frewin , William Styles , William Rowe , Francis-Fowens Luttrell , John Buller , and Gloucester Wilson .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN JEPPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am locker at the tobacco-warehouses on Towerhill : On the 13th of September the prisoner was employed as a cooper in those warehouses; it is kept in the King's warehouse till the duty is paid; when the prisoner was going away, I suspected him, searched him, and found in his hat this quantity of tobacco; (producing it;) he said he had never done the like before, and hoped I would not take any notice of it; I then sent for a constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know that any tobacco was missing? - A. It is impossible to say.

Q. A great number of people keep tobacco there? - A. Yes.

JOHN MILLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am gate-keeper at the warehouses upon Towerhill: I saw Jeeper stop the prisoner, and take the tobacco from him; he asked forgiveness, and said he had never done so before.

THOMAS PEARSON sworn. - I am keeper of the warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is there not a Mr. Gordon in the warehouse, as well as you? - A. Yes.

Q. He is responsible as well as you, is he not? - A. I should suppose so.

Q. Were you ever called upon to make good any losses singly? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you any knowledge on the subject at all? - A. No.

(Mr. John-Murvin King proved the names of the Commissioners of the Customs to be as stated in the indictment.)

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Whipped 100 yards upon the Tower-hill, near the Tobacco-warehouses .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-134

734. SARAH KELSO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , a bonnet, value 4s. and an apron, value 2s. the property of Ann Sawkins , spinster .

ANN SAWKINS sworn. - I am a single woman: On the 22d of July, I came up from Blackmore, in Essex, to see my sister, who lives at the back of Baker's-row, Whitechapel ; I saw the prisoner there; I asked for a lodging, and she said I might sleep with her; when I waked in the morning, she was gone, and all my clothes, expect my stays and]an old petticoat; she was found the Sunday following, by a young woman, in Whitechapel, and taken to the watch-house; I saw her in the watch-house with my bonnet and apron upon her.

RICHARD OSMAN sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for to the watch-house, the prisoner was there, I took the honest and the apron from her.(Produces them).

(The property was deposed to by Sawkins).

Prisoner's defence. She lent me the bonnet, and the apron; the other things I know nothing about; there were two more women slept with her all night.

Court. (To Sawkins.) Q. How came you not to sleep at youe sisters's? - A. She was gone out of town with her family, for a month.

GUILTY (Aged 29.)

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-135

722. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , a pair of velveret breeches, value 5s. the property of Edward Gore .

EDWARD GORE sworn. - On Friday, the 29th of August, about half past six in the evening, the prisoner came to my house, and said he wanted to buy a pair of breeches; my people were busy, and I came into the warehouse myself; he tried three pair on; he then asked me to shew him a waistcoat; I turned my back to open the drawers to shew him a waistcoat, and heard the breeches move on the counter; I turned round and saw him put these breeches, which I have in my hand, into his breeches; I shewed him a waistcoat; he asked the price, I told him a guinea and a half for the waistcoat and breeches; he bid me twenty-two shillings; I told him I could not take that money, and I let him go down stairs; I was afraid to challenge him in the warehouse, because I was alone; I let him come down, and then collared him; but instead of his resisting, as I expected, he ran back into the shop unbuttoned his breeches, took my breeches out, and threw them down; I then sent for a constable, but the constable not coming, and there being a stand of coaches opposite my door, I called a coach, and a neighbour went with me in the coach with the prisoner to Bow-street.

Prisoner's defence. When I came down stairs Mr. Gore laid hold of me, and called his wife out; he overhauled my breeches, and pulled them down over my knees; he found nothing there; then he said to his wife, they must be somewhere behind the counter, and there they found them; I never had the property at all.

For the Prisoner.

MARY HURLEY sworn. - I drive a barrow in the street: A gentleman bought sixpennyworth of pears of me, and put them in his pocket-handkerchief; he wanted change for a seven-shilling piece, and I went with him down Holborn to get change, till I got to this gentleman's door: he had got the prisoner in hold, and a mob round him; he sent for a constable, and then he unbuttoned his small-clothes just within-side the door; I am sure the prisoner was never in the street at all; he was coming towards the door when the gentleman made a prisoner of him; he pulled down his small-clothes, and found nothing about him; he got no constable; I and then a boy picked up the breeches by the counter.

Q. Be sure you swear that which is true - Are you sure you saw the gentleman unbutton his small-clothes? - A. Yes, and found nothing; I know nothing of the prisoner at all.

Q. How came you here? - A. His wife and three children were coming down past my barrow the next day.

Q. Did you know his wife? - A. No; the children were crying, and I asked her what was the matter, she told me she was going to the gentleman's house that took the prisoner, and I told her that I saw it.

Q.What brought you here? - A. I was summoned.

Q. Have you got your summons with you? - A. No; I never was before a Judge and Jury before.

Q.(To Gore.) Where did he throw the breeches? - A. Just by the door, on the left-hand side, my boy picked them up; I saw the prisoner throw them out of his breeches.

Q. Where was it that you laid hold of him? - A. Outside the door.

Q. It is true that you unbuttoned his small cloaths in the shop, and found nothing upon him? - A. It is not true, he unbuttoned them himself, and threw the breeches out.

GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000917-136

723. ANN PRICE was indicted for feloniously receiving goods, knowing them to be stolen .

There being no evidence offered on the part of the prosecution, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-137

724. THOMAS GILES and THOMAS TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , twenty-six dozen of wine, value 50l. the property of Walter Hattam and Henry Martin .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of George Dawes .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-138

725. FRANCES-ALICE COX and LOUSIA LYNN were indicted the first for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August, a silk purse, value 3s. a silver pencil-case, value 3s. a pair of scissars, value 1s. a theath, value 1d. a candle-shade, value 3s. four sticks of sealing-wax, value 2s. a nutmeggrater, value 4d. a pin-cushion, value 1s. a cloaths-brush, value 8d. a whist-marker, value 4d. a ruler, value 4d. a Tunbridge-ware box, value 1s. and five Tunbridge-ware toys, value 3s. the property of Charles Wigley , and the other for receiving part of the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-139

726. PATRICK MOREING and JAMES ROBINS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , seven geese, value 35s. the property of Thomas Watkins .

THOMAS WATKINS sworn. - I am a butcher , at Mile-end ,: On the 19th of July, I lost seven geese from my premises; they were shut up overnight, and the back gates locked; I saw them at ten o'clock at night; on the 18th, I was called up between four and five, and informed that the geese were gone; in consequence of information that I received, I went to Mr. Knight's, who lives about a furlong from my house; Mr. Knight told me to wait in his garden, which I did with my son and a man; we staid there about ten minutes, when we saw three men walking backwards and forwards, and heard one man say, it won't do yet; my man was then watching through the key-hole, at Mr. Knight's back-door deposited in a pit, about twenty yards from Mr. Knight's back-door; I then went round by White-horse-lane to meet them, and my man and two of Mr. Knight's sons, followed them immediately, and by that time I had got into the field, they were in custody of my man and Mr. Knight's sons; I took one of them, and brought him to the watch-house, the third man made his escape; I lost thirteen geese in the whole.

JOHN KNIGHT sworn. - I am a print-cutter, and pattern-drawer for calicoes; early in the morning, of the 19th, my son called me, and shewed me seven geese, quite warm, in a pit, just killed.

JAMES KNIGHT sworn. - I am the son of the last witness; between four and five in the morning, I went to the pit and saw seven geese, warm; I went back and told my father of it, and my father and I watched them.

Mr. John Knight . Upon hearing the information of my son, I immediately enquired who kept geese on the spot; I found that Mr. Watkins kept geese, and I sent to him, and he and his man came to my garden; after a short time, we saw the two prisoners and another man come down, they passed by, within a yard of me; they went about one hundred yards, and then they all stopped together; I then shut the gate and went in; I told Mr. Watkins to be very quite, for I had no doubt they were the thieves, and then his man watched them through the key-hole; I pursued them and took them.

RICHARD MORGAN sworn. - I took charge of the prisoners and the geese, these are the cloths that they were wrapped up in.

Q.(To Watkins.) Are you certain the prisoners are the man? - A. Yes; and two of the geese I can swear positively to.

JOHN KNIGHT , jun. sworn. - I looked through the key-hole, and went in pursuit of the prisoners; I saw them take the geese out of the pit, and in two minutes we came up to them, and they threw away the geese; Robins had five geese, and the man that got away had two.

Moreing's defence. I was going through the field, at the distance of from here to Newgate-street from the other two men, when I was taken, I was not near the geese.

Robin's defence. I was going to see the new docks, and going through the field, a man asked me if I would have a goose, and he went down into the saw-pit, and chucked me up two; I said, they were stole, he said, he did not think they were, and then these gentlemen came up, and took me.

Mooreing, GUILTY . (Aged 45.)

Robins, GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-140

727. RICHARD PICKUP and FRANCIS his wife , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , a pair of cotton stockings, value 4s. ten yards of lace, value 3s. two yards of black satin, value 10s. a yard of sarcenet, value 6s. a handkerchief, value is a thimble, value 1s. and twelve yards of ribbon, value 3s. the property of Jesse Honeywell .

Mrs. HONEYWELL sworn. - I am the wife of Jesse Honeywell , I am a milliner and haberdasher, No. 63. Upper East-Smithfield ; the woman prisoner was my shopwoman , and her husband boarded and lodged in my house: On the 22nd of August, I had occasion to go down to Chatham, on business, I left them both in charge of my shop and stock; on my return from Chatham the next day, in the evening, I was taken ill, and confined to my room three days; they both insulted me repeatedly after my return, which occasioned me to turn them out of doors; on the 27th, a few days afterwards, I found I had lost two Bandana handkerchiefs, two muslin cap cauls, embroidered, a pair of white cotton stockings, and a piece of black silk; I then got a search-warrant, and searched the prisoners lodgings, No. 4, Crown-court; Nowlan, the officer, upon searching her pockets, found a duplicate for one of my Bandana handkerchiefs, a silver thimble that I had lost, while she was going to bring them home to me; I told her, I wondered she had not brought them home before, as she had been away from me a fortnight; and to my great astonishment, upon searching further, I found a number of things that I knew had been taken from my shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Is your name Honeywell? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of the name of Domain? - A. No.

Q. Nor have any annuities by that name? - A. That has nothing to do with this charge.

Q. Your real name is Domain, is it not? - A. No, it is not.

Q. Have you no other name? - A. My house is taken in the name of Honeywell, and my business is all done in the name of Honeywell.

Court. Q. If it is not real name, you have no right to indict in that name? - A. I cannot take an oath that I am the lawful wife of Mr. Honeywell; I was under sentence of death in France, for conspiring against the French Republic, and was under the necessity of putting myself under the protection of Mr. Honeywell, and I have lived with him as him wife ever since.

Court. Q. Where is Mr. Honeywell? - A.He is a prisoner of war at Chatham.

Q. Are these articles the property of Jesse Honeywell? - A. They are.

Mr. Knapp. Is he an Englishman? - A. No; he is a native of America.(Hare, a pawnbroker, produced a handkerchief, but could not say from whom he received, it.)

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I searched the prisoners apartments, and found the articles mentioned in the indictment, (produces them); the woman prisoner said, they were all Mrs. Honeywell's, except the thimble, and a cambric handkerchief, and hoped she would not prosecute her; I found upon her a duplicate of a handkerchief.

Hare. This is my duplicate.(The property was deposed to by Mrs. Honeywell).

Frances Pickup 's defence. I had been in the habit of making up bonnets before I came there.

The prisoner Frances called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Richard Pickup , NOT GUILTY .

Frances Pickup , GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-141

728. JOHN SHARPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a sheet, value 2s. 6d. a blanket, value 6d. and a bed quilt, value 1s. the property of Timothy Kallihar .

TIMOTHY KALLIHAR sworn. - I can only prove the property.

JOHN WAY sworn. - I am one of the Bow-street patrole: I stopped the prisoner on the 10th of September, between twelve and one, at night, with a bundle; I asked him who it belonged to, he said, it belonged to his father, who lived about twenty yards from where I stopped him; I went with him to his father's door, and there he dropped the bundle, and ran away; his father lived up two pair of stairs, in a back room; I pursued the prisoner, and the watchman picked up the bundle; he ran near a quarter of a mile before he was stopped; I never lost sight of him, but in turning the corners; I am sure he is the same person.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn. - I am a watchman: I picked up the bundle. (Produces it).

May. This is the same bundle.

- SCOTT sworn. - I am a watchman: About half past twelve, on the 10th, I was going round Charles-street, Manchaster-square; I heard the rattles go, and saw the prisoner running; he ran up against me without shoes; he got past me, and I sprang my rattle; he turned back, and said he would throw himself upon my mercy.

MARY CLARKE sworn. - I lodge in Kallihar's house: On the 10th of September, about twelve o'clock at night, I took the prisoner to my lodging; he was not in my room above a minute, and then we both went out together; I left him at the end of the court; I was not gone about six minutes; when I came back, the room-door was open, and the things gone.

MARY KALLIHAR sworn. - These are my husband's property.

Prisoner's defence. Mary Clarke ran after me in Oxford-road, she had some more girls with her; she wanted me to give her something to drink, and, in order to get rid of her, I gave her something to drink; I missed one shilling out of my pocket, and I told her, I must have it; I threatened to charge the watch with her, and she said, if I would go home with her, she would let me have it; I went home with her, and she wanted me to stop with her all night; then she would not let me have it, and, I said, I would take something out of the room for it, and I took these things.

GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-142

729. JAMES STARKIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , a cloth box-coat, value 21s. the property of William,Earl of Desborough .

GEORGE HALFORD sworn. - I am a coachman to Lord Desborough: On the 17th of September, about a quarter past seven in the evening, I had been to take my lord out to dinner; I came back, and backed the carriage under a gateway, and took the horses out; the prisoner went down the gateway, and took a box-coat from the box; when he saw me, he threw it down, and ran away; I took him immediately, (produces the coat); it is Lord Desborough's.

Prisoner's defence. I was making water down the gateway, and this man came up, and said, I had taken the coat, I was not within twenty yards of it. GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Confined three months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-143

730. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a pewter pint pot, value 1s. and a pewter half-pint pot, value 6d. the property of Thomas Stevens .

THOMAS STEVENS sworn. - I am a victualler , in Leather-lane, Holborn : On the 24th of July, the prisoner came in, and called for half a pint of beer; after he had drank his beer, he was going away; I told him, he had not paid for his beer; he said, he had paid me; I said, he had not, and I let him go, because I would not have any more words; as soon as he got outside the door, he ran away; I directly looked, and missed a pint and a half-pint pot; I pursued him, and took them upon him. (Produces them). GUILTY (Aged 39.)

Confined three months in Newgate .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-144

731. THOMAS GROOME was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a sack, value 1s. and three bushels of coals, value 4s. 6d. the property of Benjamin Grainger , and Pressey Grainger .

WILLIAM NOBLE sworn. - I am an officer: On Saturday, the 13th of this month, I was going up White Lion-street, into Leman-street, when I saw the prisoner, Groome, and his waggon, stop; I saw him untie the tail of it, and take a sack of coals upon his back; " Benjamin Grainger and Son" were wrote on the waggon; I followed the nman, with the coals upon his back, into Rosemary-lane; he carried them into Mr. Allen's potato warehouse, he came out again with the sack empty, and put it into his waggon; I then asked him what had had been carrying that sack of coals there for, and desired him to shew me his ticket, which he would not do; I told him it would be better for him to take the coals up again, and he would not, but persisted in going on; I told him, he should not, and I secured him; he then gave me the ticket, (produces it), "Waggon, No. 5, Sept. 13, 1800 - Sir, please to receive 35 sacks of coals, from your humble servant, Benjamin and Pressey Grainger. To M. Ward. Esq." I counted the sacks in the waggon, and there were but thirty-four.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - On the 13th of September, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; he said, it was the first time he had ever stole any, and now it was through distress, for he had a large family.

THOMAS ALLEN sworn. - I keep a potato-warehouse in Rosemary-lane: On the 11th of this month, I went to a man, of the name of Robinson, for seven shillings that he owed me, and he asked me if I wanted a sack of coals; he used to deal in coals; and I agreed that he should send me a sack, and he gave me the difference; and when the prisoner came ro me with the coals, I asked him, who he brought them from, and he said, from Mr. Robinson.(Mr. Pressey Grainger proved the firm, and gave the prisoner an excellent character).

Noble. Robinson has gone out of the way.

GUILTY . (Aged 41.)

Confined one week in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-145

732. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of John Harris .

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I am a ballast-digger ; I lost my watch out of my bed-room, in my father's house, at Finchley : On the 14th of this month, I hung it over my head, and, in the morning, it was gone; the duplicate of the watch was found upon him by Wallace; the prisoner slept in the same room with me.

JOHN WALLACE sworn. - I work in the gardens: I went after the prisoner, and took him at Mill-hill; I asked him what he had done with John Harris 's watch, and he told me, he did not know; I asked him whether he had fold it, or pawned it, and, he said, he had pawned it, and gave me the duplicate.

- JONES sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in the Strand, (produces a watch); I took it in of the prisoner at the bar, on the 15th of September, in the evening.

Harris. This is my watch.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-146

733. WILLIAM M'CARTHY , and SAMUEL SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , a saw, value 3s. 6d. the property of Thomas Moyle .

BENNARD COCK sworn. - I am a carpenter: I was repairing a house, No. 61, Sloane-street ; I left the house about seven 'clock in the evening, this day fortnight; I left the saw in the back room, I missed it the next morning, when I went to wrote.

- MUNDAY sworn. - I am a carpenter: On the 17th of September, I was going up Sloane-Street to work, about five in the morning, and saw M'Carthy leaning against the pales of No. 61, Sloane-Street, and Smith, with a basket hanging upon his shoulder; I passed by them, and watched them; I saw them lift a copper over the fence, and put it upon M'Carthy's head, with a knot; when I got to the top of Sloane-Street, I stopped M'Carthy with the copper; Smith had the saw in his basket.(Produces it).

THOMAS MOYLE sworn. - This is my saw; I have had it twenty-three years.

Cock. I have known this saw five or six years; I am sure it is my master's saw.

M'Carthy's defence. I belong to a stand of porters in Berwick-Street; a man came to the public-house, and desired me to be at the end of Sloane-Street, at five the next morning; when I got there, he gave me a copper, which I took upon my shoulder; he told me to carry it to Berwick-Street, and when I got to the end of Sloane-Street, I was stopped.

Smith's defence. I found the basket, with this saw in it, over the fence.

The prisoner, M'Carthy, called four, and Smith, five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

M'Carthy, GUILTY (Aged 59.)

Smith, GUILTY (Aged 43.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000917-147

734. GEORGE THOMAS was indicted for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, on the 20th of March, in the 39th year of the reign of our Lord the King , a certain false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of three pounds twelve shillings , in the words, letters, and figures following:

Received the 8th May 1794 of John Collinridge the sum of three pounds twelve shillings for Wheelwrights work for the Honble Commissioners of his Majestys Navy.

£3 12 0 WILLIAM CLARKE .

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of one pound five shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 31st Decr. 1793 of John Collinridge the sum of one pound five shillings for digging 5 Sawpitls at five shillings each.

£1 5 Witness The Mark X of

James Bigxby WILLIAM ONAN .

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of thirteen shillings and fourpence, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 5th September 1794 of John Collinridge the sum of thirteen shillings and fourpence for digging Drains and empting the Mud and water out of the sawpitts and banking the Mud and filling the Drains up again 8 days at one shilling and eight pence a day.

£0 13 4 Witness The Mark X of

James Bigxby WILLIAM ONAN .

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of eighteen shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 31st December 1794 of Mr. John Collinridge the sum of Eighteen shillings for filling 9 Sawpitts at two shillings each.

£0 18 0 Witness The Mark X of

James Bigxby WILLIAM ONAN .

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of sixteen shillings and eightpence, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 16th August 1795 of John Collinridge the sum of sixteen shillings and eight pence for digging Drains and empting mud and water out of Sawpitts and banking the mud and filling the Drains up again 10 days at one shilling and eight pence a day.

£0 16 8 Witness Richard Adams The Mark X of

WILLIAM ONAN .

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of eighteen shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 31 December 1796 of Mr. John Collinridge the sum of eighteen shillings for filling nine sawpitts at two shillings each.

£0 18 0 Witness James Bigxby The Mark X of

WILLIAM ONAN .

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of one pound thirteen shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 6th February 1794 of John Collinridge the sum of One Pound thirteen shillings for canting the Navy Timber up and examining afore squared.

£1 13 0 WM. SANDERS.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of eighteen shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 6th Feburary 1794 of John Collinridge the sum of Eighteen shillings for filling nine Sawpitts at two shillings each.

£0 18 0 WM. SANDERS.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of eighteen shillings and fourpence, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 31st December 1795 of John Collinridge the sum of Eighteen shillings and four pence for cleaning and oiling the ropes and screws and putting under Cover 11 Days at one shilling and eight pence a day.

£0 18 4 WM. SANDERS.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of seventeen pounds five shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 6th April 1796 of John Collinridge the sum of seventeen pounds five shillings for sawing 6908 feet of Navy Timber at five shillings a hundred.

£17 5 WM. SANDERS.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of four pounds one shilling and threepence, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 8th August 1796 of John Collinridge the sum of four Pounds two shillings and sixpence for squaring Knees 33 days at two shillings and six pence a day.

£4 2 6 WM. SANDERS.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of one pound five shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 31st December 1796 of Jno. Collinridge the sum of one pound five shillings for digging 5 Sawpitts at 5s od each.

£1 5 0 WM. SANDERS.

And also a certain other, false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of three pounds, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received 31st December 1796 of John Collinridge the sum of three Pounds for myself and 4 men canting examining and opening the defective places in the Navy Timber for abatements when measured 6 days at two shillings a day each.

£3 0 0 WM. SANDERS.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of two pounds nine shillings, in the words, letters, and figures following:

Received the 8th May 1794 of John Collinridge the sum of two Pounds nine shillings for Blacksmiths work for the service of his Majestys Navy.

£2 9 0 SAML. TREADWELL.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of one pound sixteen shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 14th December 1795 of John Collinridge the sum of One pound sixteen shillings, for iron work for the Honble Commissioners of his Majestys Navy.

£1 16 0 SAML. TREADWELL.

And also a certain other false, forged, and a counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of two pounds eighteen shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 16th of April 1793 of John Collinridge the sum of two pounds eighteen shillings for carting stone to the Slows For the Carriages to pass to the Turnpike Roades with Navy Timber.

£2 18 0 WM. RICHARDSON.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of seven pounds twelve shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 11th Sept. 1793 of John Collinridge the sum Seven Pounds twelve shillings for wheelwrights Work for the Honble Commissioners of his Majestys Navy.

£7 12 0 by me WM. HALL.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of four pounds seven shillings and sixpence, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 8th May 1794 of John Collinridge the sum of Four Pounds seven shillings and sixpence for Wheelwrights work done for Honble Commissioners of his Majestys Navy.

£4 7 6 by me WM. HALL.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of six pounds five shillings and sixpence, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 31st December 1794 of Mr. John Collinridge the sum of six Pounds five shillings and sixpence for wheelwrights work for the Honble Commissioners of his Majestys Navy.

£6 5 6 by me

WM. HALL.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of six pounds sixteen shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 31st December 1795 of Mr. John Collinridge the sum of Six Pounds sixteen shillings for Wheelwrights work for the Honble Commissioners of his Majestys Navy.

£6 16 0 by me

WM. HALL.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of four pounds two shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 10th June 1794 of John Collinridge the sum of Four Pounds two shillings for Jinn Poles for the use of his Majesty's Navy in Whittlewood and Salcey Forests for Vincet £4 2 0 Shorthand By me

G: D: ORVILLE.

And also a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of three pounds eighteen shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 31 December 1796 of John Collinridge the sum of three Pounds eighteen shillings for 12 Fir Poles for the Jinns to load and unload the Navy Timber at six shillings and six pence each.

£3 18 0 for Mr. Vincent Shorthand

G. D. ORVILLE.

With intention to defraud our Sovereign Lord the King , he knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited.

Second Count. For feloniously uttering and publishing as true, on the same day, a certain other false, forged, and counterfeited acquittance and receipt, for money, to wit, for the sum of three pounds twelve shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 8th May 1794 of John Collinridge the sum of three Pounds twelve shillings for Wheelwrights work for the Honble Commissioners of his Majestys Navy.

£3 12 0 WILLIAM CLARKE .

With intention to defraud our said Sovereign Lord the King, he knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited.

Third Count. For that he, on the same day, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause, and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and did willingly act and assist in the false making, forging and counterfeiting, a certain acquittance and receipt for money, to wit, for the sum of three pounds twelve shillings, in the words, letters, and figures, following:

Received the 8th May 1794 of John Collinridge the sum of three pounds twelve shillings for wheelwrights work for the Honble Commissioners of his Majestys Navy.

£3 12 0 WM. CLARKE.

With intent to defraud our said Sovereign Lord the King.

Counsel for the Crown.

The Hon. SPEN. PERCIVAL, Mr. FIELDING, Mr. DAMPIER, Mr. KNAPP.

Counsel for the Prisoner.

Mr. GARROW, Mr. SERJ. WILLIAMS, Mr. KNOWLYS, Mr. MANLEY.(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

The Hon. Spencer Percival. May it please your Lordship. Gentlemen of the Jury. In this case, I am of counsel for the prosecution, and you will find that your attention will be directed in the trial of this indictment, to a very interesting and extremely important case; of the importance of it, you must be already apprized by the opening of the indictment, which discloses that it charges the prisoner with a capital offence. Gentlemen, I feel myself fully justified in saying, that in the decision of this case, and in your attention to it, you will feel great anxiety and concern, because, in the part that I have had to discharge, and a very inferior part, in such a duty as this, I have felt very considerable anxiety and concern, for, Gentlemen, I have felt it to be my duty, and an extremely painful duty, I can assure you, to advise this prosecution to be carried to this length against the gentleman who now stands at the bar.

Gentlemen, Mr. Thomas, the prisoner at the bar, is an attorney, in Northamptonshire, a gentleman of very excellent character, excepting in this transaction, in which I say he is implicated in very gross fraud. Gentlemen, he is a man of very considerable fortune, as I understand, independent of his professional pursuits; he is a gentleman for whom I see here, from my personal acquaintance with the country of Northampton, many excellent persons attending to testify to his good character; I have, by a letter from the member for that county, received the most ample testimony to that character, furnished under circumstances which render it impossible for him to attend here, on account of his public duty, in endeavouring to suppress those riots which are disgracing that part of the country as well as others. These peculiar circumstances, in the situation of the county, at this time, though they may not have prevented him from the benefit of many respectable witnesses, yet, as they may possibly exclude him from more than I am acquainted with, leads me to think it a duty which I owe to the prisoner, to state in the outset, that I do really believe you may conscientiously come to a decision upon this case, with your prejudices strongly in favour of the prisoner at the bar; leading you to believe, that from his situation in life, leading you to believe, that from his circumstances and his property, leading you to believe, that from his general character, he is as unlikely a person to have been guilty of this or any other felonious fraud as any that could possibly have been brought before you.

Gentlemen, Having said thus much in justice to the prisoner, I must say a little in justice to the prosecution, and if there is any blame in bringing this gentleman to trial, under these circumstances, it is a blame that I wish to let you and the public know should not fall, and should not rest any where but with those, who having had all the materials laid before them, have thought it their public duty to bring it to this issue.

Gentlemen, The case against Mr. Thomas is a charge for uttering a variety of acquittances and receipts, for the purpose, we say, of defrauding his Majesty. A person of the name of Collinridge, who died in 1798, was a public accomptant, and a person employed under the Navy Board, to convert timber for the purposes of the Navy; he had been in that situation several years, and when he died, in 1798; there was a charge against him of 11, 535l. 16s. 1d. a sum of money entrusted to him for the public service for some years back, of which he had rendered no account; it was therefore thought expedient to issue an extent upon the property, not that it was supposed, perhaps, that the whole of this sum, or any large part of it, would ultimately be found to be the balance against the deceased; but, however, the public, not knowing to what extent that balance might reach, made their claim, and under that extent, the real and personal property of Mr. Collinridge was sold, the personal property was sold for something between four and 500l. and the real estate produced upwards of 100l. a year. At this time, the prisoner, who was an attorney in that neighbourhood, wrote to a gentleman in the Navy Office, that he was employed by the executors of Mr. Collinridge, for the purpose of settling and adjusting this account, between them and the Navy Board; he stated, that he had got all Mr. Collinridge's papers, that he had got the rough draft of the account, but not being well acquainted with the matter, found great difficulty in settling this complicated account, and therefore prayed to have the best assistance that this gentleman, under the Navy Board, could give him. This letter was laid before the Navy Board, and Mr. Thomas, not having an answer so soon as he expected, wrote a second letter, which we have notice to produce, and which unquestionably we shall produce. Upon the face of these letters, there is certainly nothing but what appears perfectly right, fair, and consistent with the character of a person intending to do justice. It does, indeed, appear a slight circumstance, that in these letters, the prisoner represents himself to be employed by the executors, and in a subsequent letter, he says, that he did it for the creditors. These letters were laid before the Navy Board, and were, in the due course of office, sent by them to the Solicitor for the Navy Board, for him to give a proper answer; Mr. Bicknell, Solicitor for the Board, accordingly returned an answer to Mr. Thomas, representing to him, that he apprehended, as he had found a rough draft of the account, it would not be involved in that difficulty, that he imagin ed, because, from that rough draft, if it was supported by vouchers, the balance would be easily ascertained; but Mr. Bicknell did undoubtedly give Mr. Thomas to understand, that it was absolutely necessary that he should produce vouchers for the sums that he insisted should be

set off. In consequence of this, it will appear that the prisoner undertook the transaction; that he procured vouchers; represented that he had found some vouchers already signed, and procured others to be signed that were due, and transmitted them to the Navy Board, and upon that account it appeared, that instead of a balance against Mr. Collinridge, there was a balance of 1200l. in favour of the deceased's estate against the Navy Board. Gentlemen, this was not expected, and it was, perhaps, the first circumstance that rendered it material to look into it; they were therefore put into a course of examination, and the person employed after Mr. Collinridge, in the same situation in the country, was a person that the Navy Board conceived most capable of procuring useful information, and therefore the account and vouchers were sent into the country to Mr. Boddy, for the purpose of examining their accuracy; upon Mr. Boddy's enquiring into the state of these accounts; the result of it, which he discovered in a very short time after he was employed in this way, was, that he found some of the receipts forged for money that had never been paid, and for work that had never been done; the discovery of this fact, though certainly in the first instance, not to a very great extent, made it necessary to take up the business in a very serious light. Gentlemen, you will find that the prisoner came to Mr. Boddy several times, with great anxiety to expedite the settlement of these accounts, for the purpose of releasing the estates; Mr. Boddy told him he found the accounts very wrong; he told him that he had discovered these forgeries; upon this the prisoner, at the bar, appeared, as I understand the witnesses will say, extremely agitated; such an appearance, I am ready to admit, may be consistent with innocence, because, if a man is charged with a serious offence, it is no wonder that he should feel great anxiety; but, however, in consequence of this, he told Mr. Boddy, that if that was the case, he would give up the balance, he would undertake on the part of the executors that the balance should be given up, and if the Commissioners of the Navy would consent to refund what they had received upon the sale of the personal effects, and remove the extent, that they would give up this balance of twelve hundred and odd pounds.

Gentlemen. The person who was employed in the country, feeling the great difficulty in which he was involved, in getting accurate information, thought it not inexpedient that such a proposition should be forwarded to the Commissioners; and, therefore, at the request of Mr. Thomas, he wrote to the Commissioners, adopting a letter dictated by Mr. Thomas, the draft of which we have to produce. Gentlemen, this offer the Commissioners did not think proper to accept, and Mr. Thomas, understanding that they did not think proper to accept it, made a more extensive offer; he offered to give up the whole of the demand, and let the Commissioners of the Navy do what they pleased. Gentlemen, if this was a transaction in which Mr. Thomas was concerned for his own interest, in which Mr. Thomas was claiming this balance of 1200l. for himself, in which Mr. Thomas was concerned for his own interest, in endeavouring to procure the release of this estate from the extent and the return of the four hundred and odd pounds for which the personal estate was sold, it might have been a matter of Mr. Thomas's direction to say, I will give this up, that I may not be harrassed with any further proceedings; but this was not Mr. Thomas's money, but money that he was employed to collect for others, for the purpose of making the estate of this gentleman solvent, and to discharge his debts; it does; therefore, seem rather an extraordinary conduct on the part of Mr. Thomas, that rather than the enquiry should be proceeded in, he should be desirous of giving up the whole demand. However, these repeated offers were not thought proper to be accepted, it therefore seemed expedient to have a warrant issued to take Mr. Thomas into custody, and he was brought to town for examination; this was as long ago as October, 1799. In the course of this examination, Mr. Thomas presented a memorial to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty and Navy. At that time, the case did not seem to me for the purposes of public justice at all, in a state in which either, with regard to the interests of the prisoner, or the public, it was ripe for trial, and therefore I did, and I hope I did nothing wrong in so doing, I am sure nothing harsh towards Mr. Thomas, in consenting on the part of the Navy Board, that Mr. Thomas should be let out upon bail; this was in October, 1799.

Gentlemen, It is now necessary to state to you the contents of this memorial; he states, that after the extent had issued, the executors were so alarmed, and so disinclined to embark in the trouble of enquiring into these accounts, that they determined to have nothing to do with the effects, and relinquished their trusts in consequence of it; and that he was employed by the creditors in endeavouring to liquidate the accounts. He then states, that he had been told by Mr. Bicknell, by letter, that it was necessary for him to procure vouchers, in order to make good his demand against the public, which was to be set off. He says, in consequence of the above letter, your petitioner's clerk examined into the papers for vouchers, many of which were found in a loose state in the box, and some others, for small sums, appeared to have marks to them; and your petitioner then believing, and still believing that those sums had been paid, and were really due; and the said Adams representing to your petitioner, that Mr. Collinridge in his life-time had occasionally procured receipts for monies paid to be attested afterwards; and your petitioner placing such confidence in said Adams's representation, requested him to attest some of them, which he did without the most distant idea of fraud or intention of imposition. He then states the case of his apprehension, and of the forged mark of a man of the name of Onan, who is represented as not having been capable of writing, and whose signature is attested by persons of the name of Adams and Bigxby.

Gentlemen, with a view to that, he says, that he learned from Adams, that Mr. Collinridge was in the habit of obtaining attestations to the marks of persons subsequent to the period of their making that mark, and finding that that was the habit of Mr. Collinridge, he adopted it, but without any intention of fraud on his part; this showed great inaccuracy, great impropriety, and great neglect, in the manner of that gentleman settling his affairs; and it did not appear to me, that if it could be made out, in fact, that this mark of Wm. Onan had been put in Mr. Collinridge's life-time, he, perhaps, having forged it himself; that Mr. Thomas having

procured another person to attest, as if he had seen it done, that that was the mark of the man; however strongly this might lead to fraud, yet, that it would not come up to the charge of uttering an instrument, knowing it to be forged, against Mr. Thomas; and, therefore, the enquiry that I thought important to be made, was to know how far we could, or not, support that part of the assertion contained in the memorial; we made enquiries, and whether it was owing to a great number of persons being creditors, or whether it was from the affection that the people in that neighbourhood have for the character of this respectable gentleman, I know not, but there was considerable difficulty in procuring any intelligence; it then became a question, not being able to prove that these receipts were not so found among Mr. Collinridge's papers, whether it would be proper that this prosecution should be instituted, in the exercise, perhaps, of a very bad direction, I thought it should not, and as soon as I so felt, I thought it proper to give Mr. Thomas the earliest intelligence, that it was not the intention of the Navy Board to prosecute him; I had hardly given this pleasing information to Mr. Thomas, when we procured intelligence of extreme importance, which will be laid before you in evidence, namely, that the receipts, with the mark of William Onan , which are represented in this memorial to be found ready marked among the papers of Mr. Collinridge, were receipts not so found, but receipts drawn up by the amanuensis of Mr. Thomas, subsequent to the period at which they were purported to be drawn. We had, at the same time, procured the means of showing the hand-writing of Mr. Thomas, himself, to a forged receipt, which did away, as appeared to me, the defence that was set up for him; it appeared to me, therefore, to be my duty to give Mr. Thomas the earliest intimation, that the notice, which I had before given, must be considered as countermanded; but as this might lead Mr. Thomas into a situation which might embarrass him very much, the trial was postponed until the present Sessions. Under these circumstances it is now brought before you.

Gentlemen, Having thus stated the general nature of the case, I will very shortly state to you the circumstances that will be laid before you in evidence. The first instrument in the indictment, is an acquittance of a person of the name of William Clarke ; that receipt of William Clarke purports to be a receipt for the sum of, I think, 3l. 12s. for wheelwright's work done on account of his Majesty's service; it will be proved to you, that the body of the receipt is in the hand-writing of Robbins, the amanuensis of Mr. Thomas, who was employed by him to make out this account: the words,"the honble Commissioners of the Navy," will be proved to be in Mr. Thomas's hand-writing, and the signature of William Clarke will be proved to you to be a forgery.

Gentlemen, The only William Clarke that we can find in that neighbourhood, is a wheelwright; and the receipt purports to be for wheelwright's work; we have made all the enquiry possible, and the result is, that no money had ever been paid; that there was none due; nor any work done by him for Mr. Collinridge, at all, subsequent to the year 1788; and that for nineteen years past, the whole amount of work done, by him, for Mr. Collinridge, was no more than 1l. 19s. The forgery of this acquittance will, therefore, be proved; the concern of the prisoner, with the receipt, will be made out, in his own hand-writing, for money which was never paid, and which was, in point of fact, never due. If there is any other person of the name of William Clarke , it will be for the prisoner to show.

With respect to the receipts of William Onan , they are under these circumstances: Onan will tell you, that for four years, from 1794, he did no work for Mr. Collinridge, for he was out of the country; that he had no claim upon Mr. Collinridge for more than 3s. 6d. and these receipts amount to between four and five pounds; he will prove to you, that these receipts, with the mark of William Onan , are not marked by his hand; that he can write his name; that he never made a mark to a receipt in his life; and he is perfectly confident they are a forgery-these receipts are attested by Adams and Bigxby; if they can give any evidence favourable to the prisoner, they will do it; we have thought it proper to bring them here; the prisoner may call them, if he pleases; it is for him to give an explanation of that transaction.

Gentlemen, The next cases are those of Sanders, in which there is this particular and important circumstance: Sanders undoubtedly had been employed by Mr. Collinridge, and had been paid by Mr. Collinridge, and, therefore, there was no impropriety, as far as I conceive, in Mr. Thomas procuring from Sanders, vouchers for money actually due; he applied, therefore, to Sanders, and told him, he found in the accounts of the deceased, some sums of money that had been paid by Mr. Collinridge to him, for which there were no vouchers; Sanders said, he had no demand upon the estate, but if it was so, and others had done the same, he would; he accordingly signed several of these receipts; he found, however, that he had signed one or two receipts of the year 1796, and, upon looking at them, he says to Mr. Thomas, this cannot be right, because I was out of the country in 1796, and, therefore, these receipts I ought not to sign; upon which, Mr. Thomas said, if that was the case, he should sign no more, yet there are, in this account, and charged in this indictment, no less than four receipts of the year 1796, purporting to be signed by this very Sanders, who will tell you, they are not in his hand-writing. If they were receipts that Sanders had signed, Mr. Thomas being afterwards apprized that they could not constitute just items in the account; if Mr. Thomas had not forgot what was due to his own character, and to justice, he would never have presented those receipts; it is for Mr. Thomas to account for that circumstance; if they are signed by Sanders, to be sure, it is no forgery-it is nothing but a gross fraud; but if they are not signed by Sanders, it is both fraud and forgery of the grossest kind.

Gentlemen, There are other receipts of a person of the name of Samuel Treadwell , and, as far as we can find, this name must be a nonentity; we have found out a Mr. John Treadwell , and he will tell you, it is not his handwriting; that if it is meant for him, he has not signed it, and it is a forgery.

Gentlemen, There are other cases, which I do not

know that it will be necessary for me to state to you of charges for money not due, for money that has not been paid, and supported and confirmed by false vouchers.

Now, Gentlemen, under these circumstances, it appears necessary to say a few words, and a very few words more. With regard to the nature of making up these vouchers, I should certainly think, that if Mr. Thomas had got persons, who had been paid, and whose receipts had been lost, to sign vouchers for money actually due, that there could be no possible blame rest upon him for endeavouring to obtain accurate vouchers for payments that had actually been made; but, though Mr. Thomas might believe that these sums were so actually due from the public, no man can doubt that the obtaining a false signature, would amount to the crime of forgery, but if he has obtained vouchers for money not due, and from persons, whose names they do not bear, it is a complication of fraud and forgery together.

Gentlemen, What Mr. Thomas's motive could have been for doing this, is beyond my reach, - an adequate motive for the commission of any crime can never exist; the motives which do influence persons to commit crimes, operate different ways-they may operate upon some minds, and not upon others; but I am afraid, it is too true, that whenever the fraud, intended to be practised, is to operate, either by taking money from the public, or with-holding money from the public, that there is a greater facility in the commission of it, than there is when the fraud is to operate against any of our neighbours. When Mr. Thomas was asked if he had any demand upon the estate, he said, he had none; whether any client of his had mortgages upon the estate which had been extented, I know not; whether from good-nature to the numerous creditors of Mr. Collinridge, he was so far blinded as to think it fit to execute such frauds as these, I am perfectly unable to say, but the fact is done; and if Mr. Thomas has wilfully and knowingly uttered these receipts, upon which there can be no question that they were forged, there can be no doubt that he is guilty of the charge laid in this indictment.

Evidence for the Crown.

SAMUEL HARDING BUTTERFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. Q. Look at that letter; do you know the hand-writing of Mr. Thomas? - A. It appears to me to be like his handwriting.

Q. Do you believe it to be his? - A. I do.(The letter read, addressed Benjamin Slade , Esq. Navy-office, London; dated Brackley, 20th May, 1798).

"Sir,

"An extent having been issued, at the suit of the Crown, against the property of the late Mr. John Collinridge , of Potters-pury, deceased, for 11, 535l. 16s. 1d. being monies advanced by the Navy Board, on account of his employment in Whittlewood and Salcey Forests; and as his accounts are in a very unsettled state, his executors, Messrs. Yates's (who are gentlemen of character and fortune). have desired me to apply to you on the subject, to know what they had best do in the business, not wishing to bring themselves into any difficulties, but, at the same time, desirous of doing ample justice to his creditors, if any thing should be left after the Crown is satisfied. The books and papers of the late Mr. Collinridge are brought to my house, and, on looking over them, I find a rough account in his own hand-writing, made up to May 1797; but, as myself, or the executors, cannot possibly undertake to make out the accounts (not understanding the business), and as they wish to give up every thing they have found, for the information and satisfaction of the Honorable Commissioners of his Majesty's Navy, in order to make out the accounts in the best manner possible, I will either bring the whole up to town to lay them before the Honorable Board, unless they rather choose to send some person down to inspect and settle them. The sooner something is done in this business, the better, as expences will be continually incurring on the extent, and I am to request the favor of your early answer, which will very much oblige the executors, and,

Sir, your most obedient servant,

GEO: THOMAS."

Mr. Fielding. Q. Look at that letter, (Shewing him another)? - A. Mr. Thomas generally writes his name Geo. this is only G.

Q. Look at the body of the letter? - A. It appears a good deal like his character.(A letter read, addressed Benj. Slade , Esq. King-street, Deptsord, signed G. Thomas; dated Brackley, 5th May, the year obliterated by the wafer).

"SIR,

"Some days since, I wrote a letter to you, and directed it for you at the Navy-office, but not having received any answer to it, induces me to write again to you, and direct this letter to Deptsord. The subject on which I address you, is respecting the late Mr. Collinridge, of Potters-pury, who, a little previous to his death, made his will, and appointed two gentlemen, for whom I am concerned, his executors in trust, for the purposes therein-mentioned. I am further to inform you, that immediately after the corpse was interred at Potterspury, an extent, at the suit of the Crown for 11, 500l. and upwards, was entered against all his property, being monies advanced by the Navy-office, on account of his employment in Whittlewood and Salcey Forests, since his last settlement with them in the year 1791. As it is impossible for the executors, or myself, to settle his accounts with the Board, they wish for the favor of your advice and assistance, how they had best act, in order to get the accounts settled, as they wish to shew forth every document in their possession, to enable the Board to make out the accounts in the best manner possible. Mr. Wife. of Potters-pury, advised me to write to you on this subject, as he supposed you must know more of the late Mr. Collinridge's accounts, than any other person. Requesting the favor of your early answer.

I am, Sir, your most obedient servant, G. THOMAS.

I find that an extent is gone into Oxfordshire, as well as this county, against Mr. Collinridge's property. The sooner some settlement with the Board could be effected, the better, as the expence must, of course, be very great."

Q. Look at that, (shewing him another letter)? - A. I believe this to be Mr. Thomas's hand-writing.(A letter read, addressed Chas. Bicknell , Efq. Norfolk-street, London; Signed Geo. Thomas , Brackley, dated 10th June, 1798).

"sir,

I am favored with your letter of the 4th instant, respecting the late Mr. Collinridge's accounts, which I am endevaouring to make out in the best manner, I can, from his books and papers. The following appears in the hand-writing of the late Mr. C. in one of his books of account:

Total amount in account to 31st Decr. 1789 Cr. - 13,811 18 11

Total amount in account to do Dr. 13,313 18 8

Balance to J. C. 498 0 3

Total amount in account from 31st Decr. 1789 to 31st Decr 1791 Dr. £6,306 13 0

Total amount in account from 31st Decr. 1789 to 31st Decr. 1791 Cr. 5,798 19 91/2

Balance 507 13 21/2

I shall be much obliged to you, to inform me, whether the above balance corresponds with the accounts settled with the Commissioners in the year 1789 and 1791, by the late Mr. Collinridge, from which period I do not find any balance made; I will also thank you, to inform me whether I cannot procure from Mr. Slade, what quantites of timber have been delivered from the Forests to Deptford-yard, in order to enable me to make out an account of the carriage of the different years, since the settling, as only a part of appears to be put down in the books. I have found a great many vouchers for monies paid by the late Mr. Collinridge for various sorts of work for the navy business and as a great number more will be wanted to be signed by the several persons who give been employed and paid by the late Mr. Collinridge, who as kept an account thereof in his books, I presume (from your letter) such receipts must be obtained before the accounts can be passed I will endeavor to make out the accounts in the best manner I can, and send them to the Commissioners as soon as posibile, and hope they will make allowance for any error

I may make therein, being a stranger to the business, but by the executors to do the best I can, that some* may be obtained with the Board, in order to enable them to judge what will be coming to his creditors, which are very numerous. The favor of an answer will oblige, Sir, your very obedient servant, GEO THOMAS "

*N B. The above blanks are occasioned by the obliteration of the wafer.

Q. Look at that(shewing him another letter)? - A. This appears to be like Mr. Thomas's handwriting.(A letter read, addressed to Wm. Young Knight , Esq. Great Marlborough-street, London; signed Geo. Thomas; dated Brakely 25th Feb. 1799).

"Sir,

I was favored with your letter of the 21st instant, and, in answer to it, can only say; I advanced young, the sheriff's officer, of Banbury, 51. on account of getting in the grass; the executors do not chuse to interfere in it, I was informed that this crop of grass did not sell for 20l. I hope to be able, in a short time, to bring the late Mr. Collinridge's accounts to London, for the purpose of settling the same with the Commissoners of the Navy-office. I have had an infinite deal of trouble to obtain the necessary vouchers of the many different persons employed by the deceased who were dispersed in various parts of the kingdom, which, Mr. Bicknell informed me. would be absolutely required, before any thing could be settled with the Commissioners. When I come to town, I will do myself the pleasure of waiting upon your for instructions how I am to proceed to get this business settled.

I am, Sir, your very obedient servant,

GEO Thomas.

Q. Look at that, (Shewing him another letter)? - A. It appears like Mr. Thomas's Writing.(A letter read, addressed the Honorable commsinors of his Majesty's Navy, Navy-office,Samerset-house, London; signed G. Themas; dated Brackley, 23d April, 1799).

"Honorable Sirs,

By the direction of the executors of John Collinridge , of Potters-pury, deceased I have with much trouble, from the papers and documents found in his possession made out the account of that deceased, with your Honors, of memories received ai various times of your Honors, and disbursed by him on account of the navy timber converted and conveyed from thence to his Majesty's Dock-yard, at Deptford, and also for expences. &c. at Whittlewood Forest. I have (through Mr. Bicknell, the Solicitor) delivered the accounts and vouchers to Mr. Hartwell, and I do, on behalf of the executors and creditors of the deceased, most humbly request the favour of your Honors to oder the accounts to be examined, as soon as possible, in order that the extent, issued at the instance of your Honors against the effects of the deceased, which are all in mortgage to different persons, may be taken off. The effects of the deceased sold under the extent, according to the accounts I have received from the auctioneers employed therein, were as follows:

At Potters-pury, by the sheriff of North. l. s. d. amptonshire - - - - - - - 176 14 2

At Hooknorton, by the sheriff of Ox. fordshire - - - - - - - - 141 1 0

At Wigginston, by ditto - - - - 31 9 0

And at Adderbury, by ditto - - - 182 4 3

Total - 531 8 5

This sum, your Honors will please to give credit for in the account, and I am sorry to say, the effects sold at a very great loss to the estate of the deceased. As the late Mr. Collinridge has died very much in debt to a great many poor carters, who he hired to carry the timber to Oxford, and they are now in the greatest distress and continuously pressing upon the executors for their monies, or a part thereof, but as the accounts are unsettled, and the extent still remains upon the deceased's estates, the executors cannot proceed to make any sale, a dividend among the creditors, until the accounts with

your Honors are first settled and adjusted. As the excent swept off all the personal property of the deceased, immediately after his funeral, the executors have not even the mean of repaying themselves the money they are obliged to pay to the undertaker on that account. I shall be very glad to receive your Honors instructions and directions what to do for the best for the general creditors of the deceased, for whom I act under the direction of the executors, who are gentlemen of property, and very little known to the deceased, and are very desirous of doing what is just and right.

I am, Honorable Sirs, your most obedient servant, G. THOMAS."

Q. Look at that, (shewing him the memorial)? - A. I believe this to be his hand-writing. (It is read).

To the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty and Navy.

The humble memorial and petition of George Thomas , of Brackley, in the county of Northampton, gentlemen, attorney at law, Sheweth, That, being known to John Collinridge , of Potter's-pury, Northamptonshire, gentleman, your Lordship's agent for Whittlewood and Salcey forests, in Northamptonshire; and having some slight acquaintance with him for several years before his death, he, in the month of April, 1798, being ill, sent for your petitioner, to Potter's-pury, distant about sixteen miles from your petitioner's residence, to make his will, and your petitioner accordingly attended him there, and prepared his will, which he executed in the presence of four witnesses, and the same bears date on the 29th of April, 1798, by which will the testator, after giving several pecuniary and other legacies to divers persons therein-named, devised all his messuages, cottages, closes, lands, tenements, and hereditaments, in Adderbury, in the county of Oxford, Siseham, Silverstone, and Potter's-pury, in the county of Northampton, or elsewbere, with their appurtenances, unto Richard Yates of turveston, gentleman, and John Yates , of Brackley, gentleman, their heirs, executors, administrators, and assigns, according to the nature of such estates, and also bequeathed unto the said Richard Yates , and John Yates , all his household goods of every kind, together with his timber and other, the residue of his estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever in trust, to sell the same; and out of the money arising there-from, in the first place, to pay off and satisfy all his, the testator's just debts of every fort and kind, the several legacies therein bequeathed, the charges and expences of his funeral, and proving his will, and for their trouble, journies, and expences attending the execution of his will; and further he desires that they may retain five guinesas each, as some acknowledgment for the trouble he gives them, and after such payments and deductions aforesaid, the residue of the monies arising from the testator's estate and effects, he gives and bequeaths to the four sons of Richard Adams , in manner therein-mentioned, and appoints the said Richard Yates , and John Yates , executors of his said will, as by the said will now in your petitioner's custody, and ready to be produced will appear.

That on the death of the said John Collinridge , your petitioner was invited to attend his funeral, which he accordingly did, on or about the 12the day of May, 1798, with the said will, at which funeral one of the executors, Richard Adams , and Mr. George Boddy , and several other persons also attended.

That after the funeral was performed, your petitioner returned to the house of the deceased, and the sheriff came soon afterwards, with a warrant on a extent or execution at the suit of the Crown, and seized all the testator's goods, which proceeding so alarmed and intimidated the trustees and executors, that they afterwards wholly declined further acting in the affairs of the testator, or proving his will so as to have carried the trusts thereof into execution, which otherwise your petitioner believes they meant and intended to have done; and being two very worthy and respectable persons, had they been permitted so to have done, would, in your petitioner's judgement and opinion, have been of great advantage to the testator's estate, which, by means of the aforesaid proceedings, is brought into great confusion, and your petitioner understands that the whole, or the greatest part of the testator's estates are mortgaged very considerably.

That your petitioner was no creditor of the testator at the time of his death, save for the trouble of making his said will which he was never paid for, neigher is he any legatee in the will, or otherwise derives any advantage to him in any way or manner whatsoever from the testator of his estate, having never received, directly, or indirectly, one shilling from the testator's estate, but, on the contrary,have been at the expences of his funeral out of thheir own pockets; the sheriff, on behalf of the Crown, having possessed every thing under the aforesaid extents, or executions.

That after the aforesaid executions had been levied, the testator's books and papers were left in his dwelling-house, and not seized, or taken possession of by the Sheriff, and the same were afterwards brought in a large box to your petitioner's house in brackley, by, or by the order of Richard Adams , and left with your petitioner, who received the same, and he ws afterwards desired by the legatees and creditors of the deceased, to inspect and examine the same, and to endeavour to make out the testator's account with the Navy-office, which your petitioner complied with, and after inspecting the same books and papers, which were in a very confused state, the accounts, with your honours were prepared in his office, in the best manner that could be done, under the circumstances of the case.

That on the 4th of June, 1798, pending the accounts, making out, your petitioner received a letter from Mr. Bicknell, your Lordship's solicitor, stating that Mr. Slade had laid your petitioner's letter to him, on the subject of Mr. Collinridge's accounts with the Navy-office, before the Commissioners; they had directed him to take the proper steps to have the account settled; that he supposed your petitioner would not find much difficulty in making up the accounts from the rough draft your petitioner said he had found, in the hand-writing of Mr. Collinridge, and the papers in your petitioner's possession as the Commissioners could allow of no payment

for which there did not appear corresponding vouchers; and if an account of all Mr. Collinridge's payments for government, for which vouchers could be found, was made out and sent to the Commissioners, or Mr. Slade; there would be no difficulty in ascertaining the read balance due from Mr. Collinridge's estate to Government, as the Commissioners had an account of the several sums received from Government, by Mr. Collinridge, since his last settlement in the year 1791.

That, in consequence of the above letter, your petitioner's clerk examined into the papers for vouchers, many of which were found in a lose state in the box, and some others for small sums appeared to have marks to them; and your petitioner when believing, and still believing, that the sums mentioned in such receipts had been paid, and was really due, and said Adams representing to your petitioner, that Mr. Collinridge, in his lifetime had occasionally procured receipts for monies paid to be attested afterwards, and your petitioner placing such confidence in said Adams's representation, requested him to attest some of them, which he did without the most distant idea of fraud or intention of imposition.

That, on the 6th of May, 1799, your petitioner received a letter, signed George Regers , George Marsh , and H. Harmood (three of the Commissioners;) in answer to your petitioner's letter of the 23d ultimo, requesting that Mr. John Collinridge 's accounts might be examined, acquainting your petitioner that they were then in hand, and that your petitioner should, as soon as possible, be informed of the state of them.

That, instant of your petitioner being further informed of the state of the accounts, he has been treated as a criminal, and by virtue of a warrant from the Bow-street Magistrates, was on, or about the 4th of October last, arrested in his bed and forced from his wife and family, and brought before the Magistrates at Bow-street for examination; and Mr. Boddy, Mr. Adams, and one Onan, a labourer, whom your petitioner neither knew, or ever before saw, appeared against your petitioner, and the only charge against your petitioner appeared to be, that the witness Onan brought there, could write, and never made his mark, which might, for any thing your petitioner knows to the countrary, be true; but whether he was the man whose mark appeared to the receipt, or not, your petitioner is wholly ignorant, and knows nothing of the matter, or to what receipts his mark appeared, further than that the testator's books appeared to warrant several small sums for labour paid to William Onan ; and your petitioner verify believes, such sums, as mentioned in the receipts, had actually been paid to a person of the name of William Onan , but such sums are very small and inconsiderable, many of them under twenty shillings, and could be no object in the accounts in question, which consisted principally and near wholly in value, in large items, for land and water carriage of timber paid for by testator, and for which your petitioner believes, regular vouchers were delivered, or at least such as were found amongst testator's papers; and the Magistrate, on a full investigation of the matter, did not find himself warranted in committing your petitioner to prison, but took bail from your petitioner, and two sureties for your petitioner's appearing to answer any charge against him.

That your petitioner, the beginning of the present term, came up to London, and brought with him all the books, papers, and writings of the testator, in his cusdoty, and has offered the same by his agent, Mr. Manley, of the Temple, to Mr. Bicknell, who declined to receive the same, without the direction and authority of your honors; and your petitioner hath been detained in London all his term on his unfortunate business only, to the great discomfiture of himself and family, independent of theloss and injury he sustains in his business, and that his character and fortune might sustain irreparable injury had he not the happiness of standing high in character in his profession, and independent in his fortune and estate, to live without business, as he has no ambition in life further than unblemished integrity and honesty, and which never before was ever brought in question; and as your petitioner is ready and willing to act in this unfortunate business, in any manner your Lordships shall desire or require, having no views or motive of advantage possibly to the derived to himself, nor ever had further than a desire to settle the accounts of the testator fairly and justly. And your petitioner does most humbly hope, that from your Lordship's known liberality of justice, that no other otive will excite your Lordships to injure your petitioner, by further prosecuting him in his business and therefore,

Your petitioner humbly prays your Lordships will be pleased to order all further prosecution of your petitioner to be stayed; or that your Lordships will be pleased to give such directions in this matter, as to your Lordships shall seem meet and just; and that your petitioner may not be detained longer in London on the occasion, being every ready to attend your Lordships commands, and to do any thing in his power at all times, so that justice may be obtained. And your petitioner will ever pay, &c. GEORGE THOMAS .

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. How long was it after the death of Mr. Collinridge, before this letter of the 28th May, 1798 (in which Mr. Thomas states the impossibility of settling the accounts, and his readiness to put the accounts into the hands of the Navy Board) was written? - A. I do not know.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with Mr. Thomas? - A. All my life-time.

Q. You are of the same profession? - A. I am.

Q. And, therefore, have had an opportunity of seeing his conduct as a professional man, and as a private man? - A. Yes; I have transacted business with him several times.

Q. You have, no doubt, had an opportunity of seeing the estimation in which he has been held by others? - A. He bears a universal good character; no man in the profession need with for a better.

Q. From an acquaintance with his character, do you think a large pecuniary sum would induce him to commit a fraud? - A. I think not.

Q. I believe it happens to be within your knowledge, that he has to-day surrendered himself to take his trial upon this capital charge? - A. Yes.

Mr. CHARLES BICKNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. Q. You are solicitor for the Navy-office? - A. I am.

Q. In the early part of 1799, did you see Mr. Thomas at your house in Norfolk-street? - A. I did. Q. Did he ever deliver to you any accounts, as vouchers? - A. He brought a book of accounts, and a parcel tied up, which parcel I did not open.

Q. Did he deliver them to you as the vouchers for that account? - A. He delivered them to me as accounts to be delivered to the Commissioner of the Navy; the next day I carried them to the Navy-office, and delivered them to Mr. Hartwell.

Q. Was Mr. Hartwell the proper officer for their examination? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Thomas express to you the purpose for which he delivered them to you? - A. He expressed a desire that somebody else should be appointed by the board to settle them; I told him that could not be done, he must make out the accounts himself, and if he could, from the papers that he had found; I likewise told him he must produce vouchers for the payments, or else they would not be allowed; he called once or twice upon me afterwards, and I told him the accounts were in a course of investigation.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. When you told him he must make out the accounts himself, had you seen those accounts? - A. Yes.

Q. It contains a great variety of items for small sums, digging a saw-pit here, greasing wheels there, and an infinity of articles, and not kept with any degree of accuracy? - A. The book was tendered to me after the prosecution commenced, but I never looked into it.

Q. In those conversations which you had with Mr. Thomas, long before any prosecution was thought of, did he not represent that the account was almost an impracticable one? - A. Yes.

Q. That there were a great number of vouchers, some signed, and some not, some with marks, and some with names? - A. Yes, to that effect.

Q.And wished the Navy-board would take it into their own hands? - A. Yes. Q.Among those vouchers there are several hundred receipts? - A. I cannot say, there were a great many.

Q. What may be the amount in value of those, upon which this indictment is framed? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Dampicr. About eighty or ninety pounds.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Do you know that Mr. Thomas was neither an executor nor a creditor, under Mr. Collinridge's will? - A. No. Q. Have you any reason to know that he has no pecuniary interest up to the extent of one shilling, or one penny in making up the account of Mr. Collinridge against the Navy-board larger than the truth? - A. I do not know that he has.

Q. Has he any more interest in the subject to your knowledge, than yourself, or any other respectable solicitor? - A. None.

CHARLES HARTWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp I am a clerk in the Comptroller's-office, in the Navy-office, where accounts are delivered in.

Q.You have several under you in that office? - A. Yes.

Q. do you remember Mr. Bicknell bringing any accounts, and a parcel to your office? - A. Yes, about eighteen months ago.

Q.Were those accounts and parcel put in the usual place? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow Q. In order to know, where to place them, you looked into them, and saw that they were accounts and vouchers? - A.I did not open them; I left them upon the desk as Mr. Bicknell brought them to me; Mr. Peyton had them.

GEORGE PEYTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Percival. I found a book of accounts upon my desk, with a parcel.

Q. Look at that book? - A. This is the book.

Q. Did you inspect that book? - A. I did, very particularly.

Q. Be so good as look at those vouchers, and say if they are part of the vouchers contained in that bundle? - A. There are some I can speak to, both with respect to the papers and the book, upon which I have made marks and calculations; I find one here of William Sanders 's, upon which I made a calculation, it is a receipt for seventeen pounds five shillings; when I came to a receipt that required calculation, I made a mark upon it to see that it corresponded with the charge, this is dated the 6th of April, 1796; here is another also of William Sanders 's dated the 8th of August, 1796; three hundred and twenty-five cross cuts in navy timber, at three-pence each, four pounds four shillings.

Q. Have you any recollection so as to be able to speak to the vouchers in your hand? - A. They appear to me to be the same.

Q. Do you know that the amount of the balance appears to be? - A. There was no balance struck when it was delivered to me; Mr. Collinridge in his life-time carried on his balances in a way that I could not understand, and I gave credit for vouchers accompanied by receipts.

Mr. Garrow. Q. So you found upon the loose papers to be made out after his death, that there was no balance struck? - A. Yes.

Q. How many articles are there in this book? - A. They are numbered in the book, 532 articles.

(The receipts read.) See the indictment.

GEORGE BODDY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. I am a surveyor and converter of timber under the Navy Board, in Salsey and Whittlewood Forests.

Q. How long have you been in that situation? - A.Three years last May.

Q. On the 6th of June, 1799, did you receive from the Navy Board this account book? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Where did you reside at that time? - A.At Potter's-pury; after I had received that book, I received the vouchers.

Q.The vouchers that you received, you afterwards gave to Mr. Knight? - A. I sent them to the Board.

Q. Are those the same vouchers? - A. They are.

Q. Did you see the prisoner afterwards? - A. I did; he came to my house, and enquired whether I could give him any information when it would be settled, and I told him I could not.

Q. Did you see him afterwards again? - A. He came to my house several times; I shewed him a copy of the book, and the receipts, and I told him the consequences appeared to me alarming; says I, I have found a man that was not in the country during that time, and that he could write his name; that was Wm. Onan ; I told him, I had shewn him the receipt; he seemed rather alarmed, put his hands together, and said, if I would write to the Board, he would do any thing that they wished; he said, there was twelve hundred and odd pounds, I think, due from the Board, and he would give that up; he sat down in my room, and wrote a copy for me to write to the Board.

Q. Look at that paper? - A. This is the copy that he wrote; I saw him write it; I took out what I thought necessary, and wrote to the Board.(The copy read)." Honorable Sirs,

In consequence of your letters to me, desiring me to make enquiry into the state of the accounts of the late Mr. Collinridge, I have been with several of the persons stated in the accounts, and find many errors therein. Mr. Thomas, of Brackley, attorney for the executors, hearing of my being employed to look into the account, and on my apprising him of there being many errors and mistakes therein, and for the sake of settling the business, made a proposal to give up to your Honors the balance which, by account, appeared due from your Honors to the executors, and to request your Honors to give up to the executors the monies the goods sold for, and release the extent upon the several houses and estates of the deceased, which were mortgaged for very nearly their worth, and some for more than their worth; which proposal, if your Honors chuse to adopt, I think it will be bringing the business to a conclusion in the best way that I can think of, as it will be impossible for me to find out the true state of all the charges that ought to be made upon your Honors."

Q. Did you see him after that conversation again? - A. He came to my house some time after, and asked me whether I had had any letter from the Board, and I told him, I had not.

Q. Did you tell him, or did he know, that you had sent a letter according to that copy? - A. I told him that I had; he then said, I am willing to give up to their Honors the estates and lands to do as they please with.

Q. Did any further conversation pass between you? - A. Not that I recollect.

Q. Can you recollect any thing at any other time? - A. Whenever Mr. Thomas has come to my house, the conversation has been in the same manner, when I thought it would be finished, and whether the Board would accept it.

Q. Did you ever tell him what the result of your enquiries were? - A. I saw that there were things and vouchers there that I thought Government ought not to be charged with.

Q. Did you ever shew the prisoner your mode of keeping accounts? - A. I did; and he said, he thought it was exceedingly well; he said, there was none like unto that in Mr. Collinridge's accounts; he said, it was all in a confused state, as he had received it, to the best of my recollection; he said, he had got some rough accounts, that he had gathered what he could from, and that there was no book.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. There was a box full of loose accounts, some importing to be vouchers, some bills, some receipts; in short, a confused mass? - A. Very much confused.

Q. I believe, before Mr. Collinridge's death, you offered to assist him in his accounts? - A. I did.

Q. Mr. Collinridge had been a shipwright in Deptford-yard? - A. Yes.

Q. How long before his death had you applied to him to offer your assistance to make up his accounts? - A. Five or six months.

Q. From your knowledge of the business, do you not think that it was impossible for any man, but himself, to make out the accounts? - A. I never saw his accounts; he was requested by the Board to give me all the assistance he could, but he never would let me fee any of his writing.

Q. Upon all these occasions he was very anxious to have the accounts settled? - A. Yes; after he had applied to me.

ANN BODDY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Mr. Thomas? - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember his coming to your house at any time, and when? - A. I cannot recollect the time when, nor how long ago.

Q. Do you remember a time that he came when your husband was not at home? - A. Yes; I said Mr. Thomas you must have had a great deal of trouble and patience in making out these accounts, and he signified to me that he and his young man had done it.

HENRY ROBBINS sworn. - Examined Mr. Percival. I am a painter and glazier, and I have been employed to write by Mr. Thomas.

Q. Were you ever employed to write for Mr. Collinridge? - A. No; I was emloyed by Mr. Thomas to make out of the account between Mr.Collinridge's estate and the Navy Board.

Q.Have the goodness to look at these vouchers, and tell me whose hand-writting the body of them are? - A.(Looks at one). The two top lines are in my hand-writting; the bottom line is not.

Q. what is the bottom line? A."For the Honorable the Commissioners of his Majesty's Navy."

Q. Do you know Mr. Thomas's hand-writing? - A. Yes; but that is not Mr. Thomas's writing; I was employed to make out the accounts from loose memorandums; as soon as I found any charge against any body, I posted it in the book.

Mr. Garrow. Q. You made the book from loose and rough papers, and when you did not find the corresponding vouchers, you made a voucher to correspond with the book? - A. Yes.

Mr. Percival. Q. DO you the hand-writting of Wm. Clarke ? - A. I do not.

Q. Now look at the five next receipts; are those your hand-writting? - A. They appear to be my hand-writing.

Court. Q. You must know whether they are or not? - A. Yes, I believe they all are, but the signatures and the attestations.

Q. Is the word "witness" your hand-writing? - A. No.

Q. Are the word, "The mark of Wm. Onan ," your hand-writing? - A. No, they are not.

Q. Now at Sanders receipts; there are eight of them? - A. The body of them all are my hand-writing.

Q.Now look at those two of Treadwell's? - A. The body of them, I believe also to be my handwriting.

Q.Now look at those of Wm. Hall ? - A. The body of them are, likewise, my hand-writing.

Q. Are the words."for the Commissioners of his Majesty's Navy," your hand-writing? - Yes.

Q. There are two of D'Orville's, look at them? - A. Those are my hand-writing, except the words"for the use of his Majesty's navy."

Q. Are the words,

"on account of Mr. Vincent Sharpe ," your hand-writing? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Mr. Thomas is an attorney of great respectability, and doing a great deal of business? - A. Yes.

Q. He had no time to do this himself, and he employed to make out these accounts as well as you could? - A. Yes.

Q. And for that purpose, he put into your possession, as far as you know, all the papers of Mr. Collinridge? - A. I believe, every one of them.

Q. They consist of loose memorandums for work done, some receipts signed, some unsigned, and a variety of other matters? - A. Just so; there were some papers with dates, and some without.

Q. Among the papers handed to you, were there some receipts which imported to be for payment made, which were figured? - A. There were.

Q. Were there others which imported to be receipts for business done for the Navy Board, not yet signed, but ready to be signed? - A. Yes.

Q. And from those documents you made out vouchers; for instance, when you found Wm. Hall for digging a saw-pit, though there was no voucher, you entered that in your book? - A. Yes.

Q. And then you looked for corresponding receipts? - A. Yes; there was a great number of receipts that I found signed.

Q. In many other instance, did you find receipts made out, corresponding with your charge, but not yet signed? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the solemn oath that you have taken, did not Mr. Thomas desire you to make out the account as accurately as you could, but, above all, to make it justify, and to charge nothing that you did not see a voucher for? - A. Mr. Thomas always desired me to make out a just account, to the best of my abilities, between both parties.

Q. Did he give you the smallest intimation to charge a single farthing against Government, for which you did not find charges? - A. He did not.

Q. Did you, making out that account, charge a single farthing against Government, that you did not think conscientiously you had a right to do from the papers of Mr. Collinridge? - A. No, I never did.

Q.Did you, as far as you could collect from the papers of Mr. Colinridge, make just allowances to Government? - A. I did.

Q. Did not Mr. Thomas, upon all occasions, when he talked to you about the account, tell you to charge fairly and justify? - A. He always desired me to do that that was right.

Q. I believe it happens to you to know, that it was Mr. Collinridge's course, instead of taking every Saturday a receipt for eighteen shillings, seven shillings, three shillings, and so on, from the different people, to get them together at different

periods, and take vouchers in the lump? - A. I have understood so from his workmen.

Q. But in point of fact you found many papers that appeared to be prepared for that object? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did you make one single voucher ready for signature, for which you did not find a charge in Mr. Collinridge's papers? - A. No, I never did.

Court Q. Do you mean to say, that every receipt you made, you found a charge for? - A. Every one.

Q. Don't you know, of your own knowledge, that a great number of those memorandums from which you made your vouchers, are actually destroyed? - A. They are, a great of them.

Q. Did you not make out your account in a room appropriated for that purpose, and in which the children of that unfortunate gentleman, and the children of a Mr. Jones were frequently playing? - A. Yes.

Q. Suppose there was a charge of John Stiles for filling up saw-pits, when you had taken that from a loose paper, did you store it up? - A. No, I frequently laid it a side, thinking it was done with.

Q.Don't you know that those children played with them, and made thread papers of them? - A. Yes; I have seen them playing with papers, and have taken them away, and given them other slips that I thought were of no use, they had access to the room as much when I was not there, as when I was.

Q. Then, have you any doubt that a great number of Mr. Collinridge's papers were destroyed in the manner in which you have described? - A. I have not the smallest doubt.

Q. Do you know, that after you had made out your book account, and had got together such unsigned prepared receipts as were found in the papers of Mr. Collinridge, and had made out other to correspond with the demands, that public notice was given to a persons who had done work for Mr. Collinridge to assemble at a public-house to sign voucher? - A. I know there was an appontment made for them to meet there.

Q. And made publickly known to the whole country? - A. Yes.

Q. When was that? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Soon after you had compleated your work? - A. Yes.

Mr. Percival. Q. Did Mr. Thomas know that these papers wre upon to the access of these children to destroy? - A. Yes, he knew they were there, he was in the next room, in his own office.

Q. Was he aware of the careless way in which you kept those papers, which were the only documents for the books that you were making out? - A. He knew that they were in the room, certainly.

Q. Do you mean to say, that he knew they were lying about in that careless way? - A. He must have known it.

Q. Did you ever take occasion to tell Mr. Thomas of the children taking these papers? - A. No.

Q. Do you know, Of your own knowledge, that there was a great many destroyed? - A. I knew that there were a great many gone somewhere.

Q. Did you ever see them destroy a single one? - A. I do not know that I ever did.

Q. Then all you know is, that some of these papers are destroyed and missing? - A. Yes.

Q. Were those papers destroyed immidiately after the account was delivered in, or lately? - A. None lately, none since Mr. Thomas has been prosecuted.

Q. Do you know whether Mr.Thomas has looked for those papers? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you know of Mr. Thomas's bringing those papers to London? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Thomas that there were some of them lost? - A. No.

Q. When was it that you found out that some of them had been destroyed? - A. Since I have been in London.

Q. Since you have been in London upon this trial? - A. No, I had been in London before.

Q. When was is that you looked over the accounts in London? - A. It was the first time that I came to London.

Q. Where was it? - A. At Mr. Thomas's agent's.

Q. Was it after Mr. Thomas had been before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the time when Mr. Thomas presented his memorial to the Lords of the Admiralty? - A. I do not.

Q. The first discovery you made of these papers being absolutely missing, was, when you searched for them in London? - A. I can only say, that there are a great many of them lost, and I dare say, a great many destroyed.

Q. Are there many memoranda still existing? - A.There are a great many papers.

Q. Then you do not know but they may be still existing all the originals from which these vouchers were made? - A. I do not know.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Do you know which of these receipts are in the indictment, and which are not? -

( Charles Jones produces a note which he delivered to Mr. Lowe, the prisoner's Silcitor, informing him upon what receipts the indictment was intended to be framed.)

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Feilding. I am a wheeler, I did live at Whittlebury, near Potter's-pury, but have left it about twenty years.

Q. How far is the place to which you removed from Whittlebury, from Mr. Collinridge's residence? - A. About five miles.

Q. Did you at any time do any work for Mr. Collinridge? - A. Yes, I put two new axles into the timber wheels and other things.

Q.Were you paid for those things? - A. A part of it; there was eight or fourpence of it left unpaid, at one time, that was in 1781.

Q. Have you never done any work for him since? - A. Yes, I did some in 1788.

Q. Were you paid for that? - A. A part of it.

Q. How much, upon the whole, do you think remained due to you from him? - A. I think about seventeen or eighteen shillings in the whole.

Q. How came you not go to him in his lifetime for it? - A. I went several times, and he said, if I would come over to Whittlebury, he would pay it, and I went several times.

Q. Do you know ant other William Clarke , a wheelwright, in that neighbourhood? - A. No; I have a brother, John Clarke .

Q. Can you write your name? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the name William Clarke , to that paper, and say whether it is your writting or not? - A. No, it is not my hand-writting.

Q. Were you at Brackley, in Northamptonshire, in the year 1799? - A. No; I was at Hanscomb, in Buckinghamshire.

Q. Did you see Mr. Thomas at any time in 1799? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Mr. Collinridge was not very punctual in his payments? - A. No, he used to shuffle with every body; we used to get a little at a time, and a promise to rest another day.

Q. And every now and then he took it in his head to get people together to sign receipts? - A. I do not know, I never signed any.

Q. Potter's pury is distant from Brackley, fourteen miles, is it not? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM ONAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. I am a carpenter at Potter's-pury.

Q. Did you ever work for Mr. Collinridge? - A. Yes.

Q. How long is it since you did any work for him upon the forest accounts? - A. I do not know justly; I think about 1791, he owed me about three shillings and sixpence then, but that was on my own account, and not on the forest account; I left Potter's-Pury in 1794, and was four years out.

Q. Can you write? - A. Yes, a little.

Q. Can you write your name? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at those receipts? - A. This is not mine.

Q. There is one of Decemenber, 1794, were you in the country then? - A. No.

Q. Is that your mark? - A. No, they are none of them my marks.

Q. Were you in that country in 1796? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr.Garrow. Q. You left the Forest in 1794? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you to that neighbourghood again? - A. I was out four years.

Q. In what month in 1798 was it that you returned? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was it before Midsummer? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you remember being at Charlton's, the Rein-deer, at Potters-pury, in August 1798? - A. I do not remember that I ever was there at all.

Q. Will you swear you never were? - A. I don't remember that I ever was.

Q. Now have a care upon your oath, were you not, on the 7th of August 1798, at Charlton's house, the Rein-deer, at Potters-Pury? - A. I don't know that I was; if I was, I don't remember it.

Q. Do you know Charlton's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any of his servants? - A. No.

Q.Do you know Sarah Vincent ? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a labourer of the name of Thomas Chatwin , who lives at Ladbroke? - A.No.

Q. What makes you doubtful whether you were at the Rein-deer or not? - A. Because I do not remember it.

Q. You had heard of a difficulty in settling Mr. Collinridge's accounts with the Navy Board? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, were you not present at a meeting of persons who had bad claims upon Mr. Collinridge, on The 7th of August, 1798, at Potters-pury? - A. Nobody sent for me; I never went up.

Q. Will you venture to swear that you were not present at a meeting of persons assembled to sign receipts for monies due to Mr. Collinridge on that day, at the Rein-deer, at Potters-pury? - A. I know nothing about it.

Q. Will you swear that you were not there? - A. I was out four years.

Q. Were you present, on the 7th of August, 1798, at Charlton's, at Potters-pury, when a number of persons were there who signed receipts, in your presence, for monies due to Mr. Collinridge? - A. I believe I was not.

Q. Do you swear that positivly? - A. I cannot remember it no ways in the world; I must be drunk if I was there.

Q. Do you not know that many people, whom you well knew, who had done work for Mr. Collinridge, assembled there at that time? - A. I was not there, and do not remember it.

Q. Then you never heard that nay persons did assembled there for the purpose of signing vouchers? - A. I was never ordered to be there.

Q. Will you swear that you were not there, and did not put not hand to a paper purporting to be a receipt to Mr. Collinridge? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you never frequent that house after you returned to the country? - A. I have not been in it above once or twice, since Charlton has kept it.

Q. Mr. Collinridge was not very punctual in his payments? - A. I got my money of him one way and another.

Q. Did you make out any bills against him? - A. Not for the ship timber; for the building timber I did.

Q. Do you know a person of the name Roper? - A. Yes, very well.

Q. What is he? - A. A gentleman.

Q. Have you known him many years? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. William Jackson ? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you known him many years? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM SANDERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a sawyer at Potters-pury.

Q. Have you been employed by the late Mr. Collinridge? - A. Yes, I have worked for him.

Q. Did he owe you anything at the time of his death? - A. I cannot say, I never had any account against him.

Q.Do you remember Mr. Thomas coming over to you at Potters-pury, in the winter of 1798? - A. I remember his coming over, but I cannot say when it was; it is about a year and a half, or two years ago; he sent for me to the Rein-deer; he asked me whether I had done such and such work, I said, yes; I did do such work, but what it came to, I could not tell; he said he was likely to settle the business of Mr. Collinridge.

Q. Did you sign any receipt? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you sign more than one? - A. I cannot say how many I did sign.

Q. Did you sign six? - A. I dare say I signed more than that, but I cannot recollect how many.

Q. Did you sign all that were offered you to sign? - A. No.

Q. Why did not you? - A. Because I know very well that I was in London at work at the time they were dated; for I signed one of that date before I was aware, that was in the year 1796; and then I refused to sign any more, because as I was in London at the time, I knew it could not be right.

Q. What became all of those receipts? - A. I left them upon the table.

Q. Did you give Mr. Thomas a reason why you would not sign them? - A. Yes, I gave him the same reason that I do now.

Q. Look at those receipts, and tell us if they are of your hand-writting? - A. I have examined them thoroughly, and I believe none of them to be of my hand-writting.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You believe they are not your hand-writting, but you are not sure of it? - A. I don't know how to speak to that.

Q. Are you sure they are not your hand-writting? - A. I believe they are not.

Q. You trusted to Mr. Collinridge as to the accuracy of the sums, I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not make out the bills? - A. No. he made the bills, I suppose.

Q. When you signed the receipts that you did sign, were you alone, or was any body else there? - A. There was one other person signed, one Thomas Robertson ; that was at the Rein-deer; either Mr. Thomas, or Mr. Charlton, sent for me.

Q. There was a public notice given of that meeting? - A. Not that I know of.

JOHN TREADWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Percival. I am a blacksmith, about five miles from Potters pury.

Q. Did you ever do any work for Mr. Collinridge? - A. Yes, in the year 1793. 1794, and 1795.

Q. Did you work for him under his contract for the Navy Board? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any thing due from him to you at the time of his death? - A. No.

Q. Have you done any work for him since 1795? - A. No.

Q. Do you know any person of the name of Samuel Treadwell , a blacksmith, in your neighbourhood? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever sign your name Samuel? - A. No, neve