Old Bailey Proceedings, 9th July 1800.
Reference Number: 18000709
Reference Number: f18000709-1

THE WHOLE PROCEDDINGS ON THE KING'S Commision of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 9th of July, 1800, and following Days, BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , ESQ. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street; Doctors' Commons. 1800.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir GILES ROOKE, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common-Pleas; Sir SOULDER LAWRENCE, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law, of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Benjamin Lawrence ,

John Bartlett ,

John Briscoe ,

John Pistor ,

Robert-Bagot Skidmore

John Wright ,

William Castle ,

John Goater ,

Thomas Elliot ,

Henry Tyler ,

John Brown ,

Samuel Phillips .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Peat ,

Robert Lawrence ,

Alsop Whinnie ,

Michael Taylor ,

Edward Harris ,

Joseph Kendrick ,

Joseph Weedon ,

William Evans ,

William Lawrence ,

George Leader ,

James Thompson ,

Benjamin Johnson ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Harrow ,

John Barrett ,

James Moore ,

William Knight ,

Samuel Locke ,

Alexander Smith ,

David Dewar ,

Edward Bradshaw ,

James Harris ,

John Curtis ,

Charles Riley ,

Charles Creese .

Reference Number: t18000709-1

477. ANN MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , thirty yards of silk ribbon, value 20s. the property of Edward Cooke .

ARRISA HURRY sworn. - I am the wife of Robert Hurry ; I lodge with Mr. Cooke, who keeps a milliner's and haberdasher's shop : The prisoner came into the shop between nine and ten; she asked the price of some ribbon, and while she was looking at them I saw her take a piece of ribbon out of the drawer, and put it under her cloak; I then desired one of the young ladies to fetch Mr. Jackson, and then she took another piece and concealed it under her cloak; immediately when she heard me send for Mr. Jackson, she then took up her money, and before I could get at her she was out at the door; I followed her and brought her back into the shop; there was a woman walking backwards and forwards before the door; I sent for an officer; when she found the officer was sent for, she said she would pay me any demand that I had upon her; none of the ribbon has been found.

Q. Was the other woman at the door when she went out? - A. I cannot say; I never saw the colour of the ribbon, nor I do not know the quantity.

EDWARD COOKE sworn. - I am a haberdasher: I was not at home; I know nothing of the robbery.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I live next door to Mr. Cooke; I was called in; I advised the woman to give up the ribbons, that she might go about her business; an officer was sent for; she then began to cry, and threw a large red cloak off her shoulders, and said we might search her; and immediately threw the handkerchief off her neck; I told her it was time enough to strip when the officer came; she acknowledged that she took two pieces, and put them in the drawer again; the officer searched her, but nothing was found upon her.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - I am an officer: I searched the prisoner, but found nothing upon her.

Prisoner's defence. I bought a yard of ribbon, and the lady charged me with taking some more; and it was a very wrong thing.

Mrs. Hurry. I did not cut any ribbon for her; she had put down a shilling, and took it up again; I am perfectly sure I saw her take up the ribbon.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-2

478. ANN JONES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Botheroyd , about the hour of five in the afternoon of the 4th of June , Thomas Harrison , Elizabeth Harrison and other persons then being in the same dwelling-house, and stealing five yards of cotton, value 1l. a gown value 12s. a petticoat, value 8s. three petticoats, value 12s. a shawl, value 8s. and two silver tea-spoons, value 4s. the property of Martin Harrison ; and a gown, value 8s. and a shawl, value 4s. the property of Mary-Ann Harrison .

Second Count. Laying it to be the dwelling-house of Martin Harrison .

MARY HARRISON sworn. - I am the wife of Martin Harrison; we lodge in Mr. Botheroyd's house, the corner of beech-street, Golden-lane : I went out to work between five and six in the morning, and came home in the evening; I left nobody in the house that I know of but an old woman that I left my children with, her name is Stanbrook; I left her in her own apartments, I locked mine; the children's names are Thomas Harrison and Elizabeth Harrison.

Q. It is a public stair-case, and your room and her's are distinct from each other? - A. Yes; on Tuesday the 24th of June, I lost the property mentioned in the indictment; one gown and one shawl belonging to Mary- Ann Harrison , the rest were mine; they were all in one drawer; I saw some of them before the Alderman the day after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Does your husband now live with you? - A. I have not seen him lately; he did live with me at the time the robbery was done.

Q.Did you ever see the prisoner before? - A.Never to my knowledge.

Q.Botheroyd and his family lived in the same house? - A. Yes.

Q. It is a general stair-case? - A. Yes, there is only one passage for all the lodgers.

Q. Botheryod's is not a seperate building? - A. No.

Q.Have you never had it intimated to you that the things were given to her by your husband? - A. No.

Q. Have you never said that you believed she had them from him? - A. No; she was a stranger to me.

Q.Did not you think it very odd that he should leave you directly after the robbery? - A. Yes.

Q.One of your gowns was found upon her back; she was publicly wearing it? - A. Yes.

Q. Your husband has the key of the room? - A. No, I have it; I left the key that morning with the old woman.

Q. Are you, in point of fact, married to him? - A. I have been married to him nineteen years.

JANE LYNN sworn. - I saw the prisoner with Mrs. Harrison's gown upon her back the day after the robbery, in Ropemaker's-street, about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Harrison's house; Mrs. Harrison is my sister; I asked her how she came by the property, she told me she bought it at Rag-fair, and gave seven shillings and sixpence for it, and one shilling for the handkerchief she had on; I told her she must go with me, which she did, to my sister's house; we sent for an officer, and he took her into custody, and searched her pockets; she had a gown-piece in her apron.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This was the very day after the robbery? - A. Yes.

Q. And within a quarter of a mile of the prosecutor's house? - A. Yes.

- MILLS sworn. - I am an officer of the parish of Cripplegate: The prosecutor sent for me; I took charge of the prisoner and the property; she said she had bought the gown in Rag-fair, and gave three half-crowns for it; I searched her pockets, and found these dupliccates; (producing them;) I am no very great scholar, and I could not make out the duplicates; there was one that she said was a pair of shoes, and it turned out to be an apron; she dropped a chissel, which I tried with the premises, but there was no mark upon the premises at all.

JOHN BOLTON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Crouch, a pawnbroker: This apron was pledged by the prisoner; I knew her before. (Produces it.)

Q. Look at these duplicates? - A. This is part of the duplicate I gave the prisoner.

JAMES MORRIS sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker; (produces five yards and a half of cotton); I took it in of the prisoner at the bar on the 4th of June; I am sure she is the person; I gave her a duplicate with it.

Q. Look at these duplicates, and see if it is among them? - A. This is it.(The property was deposed to by Mrs. Harrison.)

Q.(To Mrs. Harrison.) Was there and apperance to violence upon the door when you came home? - A. I found the door locked as I left it, but the pannel broke out, and the drawers broke upon.

Q. Was that pannel large enough to let any person in or out of the roon? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I went with another woman to Rag-fair; I had not enough to pay for what I bought, and I borrowed some money of a woman that was with me, and going past Fleet-street, I pledged the gown-patch to pay what I borrowed of her; Mrs. Harrison said, as her husband had been absent some time, she believed he had connections with me, and if I would tell her where he was, she would not prosecute me.

GUILTY (Aged 51.)

Of Stealing goods, value 4s. 10d.

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-3

479. WILLIAM SLADEING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , one pound, two ounces of Spanish juice, value 1s. 10d. the property of George-Allen Aylwin and Thomas Chapman .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of George Robert Thomas .

GEORGE- ROBERT THOMAS sworn. - I am watchman to George- Allen Aylwin and Thomas Chapman: I am answerable for the property under my care: On the 7th of June I had some Spanish juice on the quay belonging to Messrs. Aylwin and Chapman.

Q. Upon what quay? - A. Some upon Ralph's-quay and some upon Young's-quay : they are both belonging to one proprietor, and join each other; I went to Wiggins's-quay, and when I came back the prisoner was stopped, that is all I know of it; I saw it safe about seven o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is the value of it more than three-pence? - A. I believe it is thereabouts.

Q. Did it ever happen to you to give a poor fellow a stick of Spanish liquorice? - A. I cannot say what I ever did; I had no right.

Q. Do you know how many sticks there were? - A. No, I could not count them.

JAMES COPE sworn. - I am inspector of the Excise watch: On the 7th of June last, about seven o'clock in the evening, John Yorke, one of Messrs. Aylwin and Chapman's men, called upon me at my lodgings, and required my preference; I went down to the quays and there were four or five sticks of liquorice brought to me; the prisoner was present; I asked what he had been about, and the prisoner said there was no harm intended; I asked him if he had any about him, and he said, no; and upon searching him I found one stick in his waistcoat pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What is it worth-five pounds? - A. I am not a grocer, and I do not know.

Q.Is it worth five shillings? - A. No, nor five-pence.

Court. Q. Was any thing said about where it was taken from? - A. No.

JOHN YORKE sworn. - I am a labouring man:

I was at work Messrs. Aylwin and Chapman; I saw the prisoner take three sticks of Spanish juice out of one chest that laid on the right hand side between Ralph's-quay and Young's-quay.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know whether the prisoner is a married man? - A. I do not know; he has got three children.

Q. Could you swear to that stick? - A. No, but I can swear that I saw him take three sticks out of the chest.(The constable produced the Spanish liquorice.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character; a great number attended, but the Jury thought it unnecessary to hear them.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-4

480. JOSEPH CARPENTER was indicted for feloniosly stealing, on the 7th of June , two muslin neck-handkerchiefs, value 5s. and a gold hair ring, value 10s. the property of Charlotte Hartley , spinster .

MARTHA HEWITT sworn. - I live at No. 34, Nottingham-place , in the family of Mr. Hartley; I am Miss Hartley's maid: On Saturday the 7th of June, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went into Miss Hartley's bed-room, and found the prisoner there; Miss Hartley had left her room and gone down to breakfast; I asked him what he was doing there, and he told me he was looking for a pair of shoes; he then passed me and came out of the room; the prisoner was footman in the house, he had lived there about three weeks; I saw the handkerchiefs in his jacket-pocket as he went down stairs, they were two muslin handkerchiefs, and I took them out of his pocket; I then opened them, and told him they were the property of Miss Hartley; he turned round, was very much frightened, and begged I would not say any thing; he went down stairs; I told Mr. Hardley and Miss Hartley what had happened, I shewed the things to Miss Hartley, and have had them ever since; I know the handkerchiefs to be her's; and the ring has a motto in French on the inside of it; the constable was sent for immediately, and he was taken up. (Produces the handkerchief).

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn. - I belong to Mariborough-street Office: The prisoner was brought to the Office by a parish constable, who had searched him; I searched him again at the Office, and in pulling off one of his boots this gold ring dropped out; I have had it ever since.

Hewitt. This is Miss Hartley's ring; I had seen in the night before in the dressing-table drawer, which was not locked; Miss Hartley is now in Yorkshire for her health.

Prisoner's defence. The jacket hung up in the hall, where the other servants had access; I did not know I had them. GUILTY, (Aged 29.)

Of stealing the handkerchiefs .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-5

481. WILLIAM PURSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a piece of cloth, value 3l. another piece of cloth, value 50s. another piece of cloth, value 10s. and another piece of cloth, value 20s. the property of William Vaughan , in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM VAUGHAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a tailor , in Pall-Mall: I employ a great number of persons; the prisoner was my foreman , he delivered out the cloths, and had the control of my property to the amount of between two and three thousand pounds; in consequence of a letter I received, I apprehended the prisoner and his wife; I told him there was a very unpleasent business had happened, and I desired two Bow-street officers to search him, which they did, but found nothing upon him.

Court. Q. Where was it? - A. In my parlour; I read an anonymous letter to him, I told I had found that a son of a Mr. Davis had got a blue coat made with my cloth; and likewise a coat and waistcoat for one Griffiths, a butcher, made of my cloth; and a black coat for Mr. Stafford; I told him there was likewise a coat, waistcoat, and small clothes, for the servant girl's father.

Q. Had you made him any promise of forgiveness? - A. No; he said, the cloth that the coat was made at for Mr. Davis's son, he had had by him for twelve years; then he wished to speak to me alone; he asked forgiveness, and confest he had taken silks, and velvets, and trimmings, to a great amount; I told him I could not forgive him, the law must take its course; I then went with him to his lodgings in Market-lane, St. James's, where we found nintey-nine duplicates of coats, waistcoats, and cloths.

Q. Did you know Mr. Davis, or Mr. Griffiths, before? - A. No; I saw the coats at Bow-street; I have no doubt but they were coats made out of cloth taken from my warehouse.

Q.What was the value of the cloth for Davis's coat? - A. A guinea and a half.

Q.What was Griffiths's cloth worth? - A.Thirty-six shillings, and the other worth two guineas.

Q. What would the cloth cost you that Davis's coat was made of? - A. Sixteen shillings a yard: I suppose there was about a yard and a half; the black coat would take two yards, at sixteen shillings

a yard, and the other, two yards, at sixteen shillings a yard; the buttons cost about six shillings; I pat it rather under than over.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. These coats were made for different persons, and, of course, the cloth must have been taken at different times? - A.I should think they were taken at different times.

Court. Q. Do you know any thing about it? - A. No; I missed the cloth very fast, and I missed the ticket; the prisoner said, he dare to say it was unstaid, and he should find it.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you any partner in your business? - A. No.

THOMAS DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. (Produces a blue coat). The prisoner at the bar made it for my son, somewhere about April last; he solicited my son for an order to make some clothes for him; I gave him the order to make a blue coat, it was brought home by Pursey, and I paid him two pounds ten shillings for it.

Mr. Vaughan. (Produces a piece of cloth). I brought this from the same piece of cloth that this coat was made from; I have no doubt but it is the cloth that came out of my warehouse; and here is the same pattern button exactly.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. (Produces a blue coat). I had this coat from the prisoner at the bar the latter end of March, or the begining of April, I cannot say which; I served the prisoner with meat, he owed me some money, and offered to make me a coat and waistcoat; I had a waistcoat of him, which he charged me one pound four shilling for, here it is; then I ordered a coat of him, and he said I must give him a guinea towards buying the cloth, he could not make it without; I gave him a guinea, and he made me the coat.

Vaughan. I can positively swear to the waistcaoat, for it is my own quilting; but that is not in the indictment; I believe this coat to be made of the same cloth; it is the same colour, and the same quality.

Mr. Alley. Q. At the time that he made that confession, did he not tell you he had bills and receipts for cloth from Mr. Hardisty? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Is Lord Berwick a customer of your's? - A. Yes.

RICHARD DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a tailor, I was employed by the prisoner to make this coat for Lord Berwick; I am sure this is the coat; I have worked for Mr. Vaughan these four years.

Q. Do you recollect at what time you made that coat? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. As to Davis's coat, I told Mr. Vaughan I had had the cloth by me for twelve months, not twelve years; it was a remnant of cloth that I had left from a coat that I made for my brother, who belonged to a guineaman; the cloth of Mr. Stafford's coat I purchased of Mr. Hardisty, and likewise I had a guinea from him towards buying it; I never made any collection to Mr. Vaughan at all.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

For the Prisoner.

CHARLES HARDISTY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. Q. Look at that bill? - A. This is the handwriting of one of my clerks; I recollect two or three times that he has bought cloths within six or twelve months, I cannot say particularly to the time; mine is a very extensive trade; I remember seeing him there but I cannot say when.

Court. Q. Look at that blue cloth? - A. It is impossible for any draper to know his own cloth.

Q. Look at that coat, and look at the piece of cloth, and tell us if they are the same cloth? - A. I think it is not the same cloth; I think that which is made up is a stouter cloth; the colour is nearly the same.

Q. Now look at the other coat; are those two coats, do you think, made of the same cloth? - A. I think they are nearly so.

Q. Now look at the piece of cloth, with that coat that you last took up? - A. The colour is not the same; but that may be occasioned by the one having a gloss on, and the other off; and it appears to me to be stouter, but that may be occasioned by the gloss being taken off, damping may have made that difference; it is possible they may be of the same cloth.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRANCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-6

482. RICHARD CHARLTON , SAMUEL WILD , and JOHN HUNT , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Lloyd , about the hour of ten, in the night of the 9th of June , and burglariously stealing a cheese, value 5s. the property of the said Robert.

ELIZABETH LLOYD sworn. - I am the wife of Robert Lloyd , I keep a chandler's shop , No. 9, Paul-street : On the 9th of June, about ten o'clock at night, I lost a cheese, I saw it about two minutes before it was gone; I went into the back-kitchen, and when I returned, the door was open and the cheese gone; I had shut the door but not bolted it.

Q. Then, whether it was latched or not you cannot say? - A. I cannot.

Q. Was there light enough at that time to discover a man's face by the light of the sky? - A.No; I shut the door again, and heard a whistling; I directly opened the door again, and saw a man stand

ing in the middle of the road, but who it was I cannot say; the cheese that I lost was a thin Gloucester cheese, and stood upon a Cheshire cheese.

JOHN BRAYNE sworn. - I am fifteen years of age, I know the three prisoners: On Friday the 9th of June, between nine and ten, I agreed to go with them a thieving, and we went to Mrs. Lloyd's, a chandler's shop, in Paul-street, near Finsbury-square; I opened the door and took a Gloucester cheese that stood on a Cheshire-cheese, facing the door; I gave it to Richard Charlton , he was standing at the door; he went away with the cheese, and I came out of the shop and left the door wide open; we lost Charlton for the space of ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; we whistled several times; we found him at the corner of Finsbury-square; he delivered the cheese to Samuel Wild , and then we all went to William Stevens 's, in Grub-street, and sold the cheese to him for three shillings.

Q.Did he ask you how he came by it? - A. No.

Q. Had you ever sold any thing to him before? - A. No, I never had.

Q. What are you? - A. My father is a shoemaker, and I work with my father in Red-lion-street, Whitechapel.

Q. What is Charlton? - A. I do not know.

Q. How does Wild get his livelihood? - A. He works at weaving; I have not been acquainted with him till lately; Hunt works for a broker, cleans the chairs up; he went with me to Stevens's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have stated that you are a shoe-maker? - A. Yes.

Q. There is some other trade belonging to you besides a shoe-maker, that of thieving - A. Yes.

Q. You came from jail here to give your evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not give any account to the Justice till after you were taken up? - A. No.

Q. You were the first that was taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. And you save yourself by giving evidence here? - A. Yes.

Q. They were neither of them in the shop? - A. No.

WILLIAM STEVENS sworn. - I am a carman, and keep a broker's shop, in Grub-street; I recollect the evidence very well, and I think I know the prisoner Hunt, he was with him, and came to sell a small Gloucester cheese, about the 8th or 9th of June, just about dusk, or a little after, I think I gave them three shillings, or three shillings and sixpence for it.

Q. Did you ask any questions of these boys? - A. No. my wife made the bargain, and they came in to me for the money.

Q. You heard the bargain made? - A. I do not know that I did.

Q. Did your wife ask them no questions? - A. I do not know that she did.

Q. Did you see the cheese? - A. I do not know that I did, I was in the back room.

Q. Which boy did you pay? - A. The evidence; about a month afterwards, the Shadwell officers came to me, and desired me to come to the office; I think I have seen Hunt before.

Q. Did you know Brown before? - A. I have seen him.

Q. Have you had any dealings with him before? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The accomplice was the person that you paid the money to? - A. Yes.

Q. And the other only happened to be with him? - A. Yes.

JOHN COOK sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office, (produces part of a cheese;) I received this from Stevens, he told me he bought it of Brayne; I apprehended Brayne upon suspicion of divers robberies.

Q. Did he make any confession to you? - A. Yes, he said he had been guilty of many robberies, and wished to speak to the Magistrate.

Mrs. Lloyd. It was a cheese of this kind and size, but I cannot say that this is my cheese, I do not think it is the cheese.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I am an officer; Brown, Holebrooke, and I, apprehended all the prisoners at different times; I asked hunt where he had been; I told him we had been after them some time; he said he had been to Rochester, that was on the 3d of July; I asked him what for and he said, to take Brayne in custody, about some cheese that had been taken from some house.

Charlton's defence. I am quite innocent of the charge.

Wild's defence. I am innocent of the crime I am brought here for.

Hunt's defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge.

Charlton called one witness, who said he had borne a tolerable good character; Hunt called five, and Wild five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Charlton, GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Wild, GUILTY. (Aged 15.)

Hunt, GUILTY. (Aged 14.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-7

483. WILLIAM GARDNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , one yard and three quarters of blue cloth, value 20s. one yard and a half of other cloth, value 20s. and two

yards and a half of velveteen, value 8s. the property of James Stark in his dwelling-house .

BARBARA STARK sworn. - I am the wife of James Stark , I keep a house in Well-street : On the 3d of July last, between eight and nine in the morning, as I came up the kitchen stairs, I saw the prisoner coming out of the passage, with something under his arm, which had the appearance of cloth; I collared him, and he got from me, he ran out and shut the street door; I opened the door and called out stop thief; he ran across Well-street, towards Oxford-street, two men followed him, Haynes and Parker; the last that I saw of him, was turning the corner of Wardour-street, from Oxford-street; I afterwards saw him in Titchfield-street, in the custody of Haynes, he had nothing under his arm then.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The person who took your cloth from you, you saw as you came up the kitchen stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. You wre behind him then? - A. Yes.

Q. What opportunity had you of seeing his face? - A. I had an opportunity of seeing his face when he turned half round in the passage, to see if any body were behind him.

Q.You lost sight of him in Wardour-street? - A. Yes.

RICHARD HAYNES sworn. - I am a coachmaker; I was at work on the 3d of July, at a carriage, in Well-street, I was looking down Well-street, and I saw the prisoner upon the step of Mr. Stark's door, with a parcel of cloth under his arm, as soon as he came off the step he began to run, the instant he began to run; Mrs. Stark came out, and cried out, stop thief, I pursued the prisoner as fast as I could; I followed him across Oxford-street, into Wardour-street, and I pursued him till I took him in a house that was under repair, in Little Titchfield-street; I was at work at Mr. Ledder's, which is next but one to Mr. Stark's; I had lost sight of him several times in turning the corners of the streets.

Q. But had you sufficient sight of him before he turned any corner as to be sure of him? - A.Perfectly so.

Q. Did you see him go into that house? - A. I cannot say I did, there were some people before me; I told him he was a thief; he said, do'nt hurt me; I have got nothing about me now; says I, if you have not now, you had when you came out of Well-street; I then brought him back to Stark's house.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn. - I was in Well-street, on the 3d of July, about two doors from Mr. Stark's, in the middle of the road, talking to another person; the prisoner came out of Mr. Stark's house, I pursued him through different streets, till I saw him taken; I do not know the names of the streets.

Q.Did you, in any of the streets through which he ran, find any thing? - A.Yes, just facing the door of the house where the prisoner was taken, in the kennel, I found some cloths, which I brought back to Mr. Stark's.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You lost sight of him several times? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Have you any doubt that he is the man? - A.No, I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; Parker went with me to the office, and delivered the things to me.

Parker. These are the things Jackson delivered to me, and the same that I picked up opposite the empty house.

Mrs. Stark. These cloths are my husband's property; I saw them on the evening of Wednesday, the 2d of July, in the front parlour, my husband brought them in, and on the Thursday morning, I saw them again in the same direction, upon the table.

Q. Are you a judge of the value? - A. They are worth fifty shillings.

Q. How do you know that? - A.By the draper's bill.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY. (Aged 29.)

OF stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-8

484. JOHN MORTON and WILLIAM MORTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , seven pair of cotton hose, value 28s. and two men's hats, value 30s. the property of Thomas Flood , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS FLOOD sworn. - I am a hatter and hosier , in Orchard-street, Portman-square : The prisoner, John Morton , was my shopman , I missed some property on the Friday, and on the Saturday he absconded; I did not see him again till this day fortnight, I met with him, by accident, in Aldersgate-street, I took him to a house in the neighbourhood, and charged him with it, and he seemed very penitent, and gave me the duplicates; I went to the different pawnbrokers, and some of them gave up the property which I received; the prisoner John Morton , said he had given some of the property to his brother to pledge, to support him while he was out of place.

HENRY EWART sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dorbee, pawnbroker, in Oxford-street, (produces three pair of stockings;) I took them in of the

prisoner for seven shillings, I am sure he is the person.

Flood. I know these to be my property, they have my private mark upon them.

Prisoner. It is not Mr. Flood's private mark.

Flood. It is a private mark put upon them by the manufacturer for me.

DAVID GOSS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Aldus, pawnbroker, No. 67, Berwick-street, Soho,(produces a pair of stockings;) I took them in of the prisoner John Morton .

GEORGE HARDWICKE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hewett, pawnbroker, Greek-street, Soho,(produces a pair of stockings;) I took them in for half-a-crown; I cannot swear that either of the two prisoners at the bar pledged them.

Q. Have you a duplicate? - A. Yes; they are pledged in the name of John Morton .

Flood. Here is the counterpart which I received from the prisoner, John, these are my property; the stockings were all of them worth four shillings a pair.

- JONES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lucas, pawnbroker, No. 4, Ryder's-court, Leicester-fields,(produces two hats and pair of stockings;) I received them from the prisoner John.

Flood. I can swear that these are my property; the hats are worth thirty shillings, and the stockings four shillings.

Q. You cannot say when these things were taken, I suppose? - A. No, I cannot; they were taken at different times.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street; I apprehended the prisoner William Morton , at Rumford, in Essex; upon searching him I found this duplicate of a hat upon him, which is a counter-duplicate of a hat produced by the last witness.

- WHITECOMB sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(produces a pair of stockings;) I took them in of the prisoner John.

John Morton 's defence. My brother is entirely innocent; when he was taken, he had my breeches on; I have nothing to say for myself.

John Morton , GUILTY (Aged 17.)

Of stealing to the value of 12s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

William Morton , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-9

485. SAMUEL SOLOMONS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Boddy , about the hour of ten in the night, of the 30th of May , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, a copper tea-kettle, value 4s. the property of the said Peter .

PETER BODDY sworn. - I keep a house, No. 4, Old Gravel-lane , I am a plumber : On Friday night the 30th of May, between nine and ten o'clock, I lost a copper tea-kettle, it came to me to be mended; my daughter went out of the shop about eight o'clock at night, pulled the door after her, and latched it, it was not dark, I missed the kettle the next morning.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer: On the 30th of May, about the hour of ten at night, I, in company with Haynes and Holebrook, and Cook, were coming down Lemon-street, Whitechapel, and as the prisoner passed us, I saw he had something under his coat; I immediately took hold of him, and found it was a tea-kettle; I afterwards went to the prosecutor's house, I think on the Monday following, and he claimed it, (produces the kettle;) Lemon-street is about five or six hundred yards from the prosecutor's house.

Boddy. I am sure this is the same kettle.

Prisoner's defence. I went up the alley to case myself, and I saw the spout sticking out from some straw, I looked and found it was a tea-kettle.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-10

486. PETER WAYLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, a silver watch, value 42s. the property of Charles Bayels , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES BAYLES sworn. - I am a watchmaker , at Hampstead ; I missed a watch on the 19th of last month, between seven and eight in the evening, out of my window, it was a watch I had to repair, it belonged to a man of the name of Price; I was sent for the next day to the public-house, and saw the watch in the prisoner's hand; the prisoner said he bought it of a man, he could not tell who, and gave three guineas for it.

SARAH CURTIS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lawrence: On Thursday evening, the 19th of June, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Bayles's house, I did not see any thing that he had with him but his pipe; I am sure he is the person.

THOMAS ARNES sworn. - I am an officer of Hampstead: On Friday the 20th of June, I was watch from him, I found the key in his pocket, the chain is so broke, that there is only one ring left to it. (Produces it)

Bayles. When the watch was in the window, there was a chain and a metal seal to it: I am sure this is the watch.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the watch, the man was a stranger to me.

GUILTY

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-11

487. GEORGE BORRETT was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon Rebecca D'Agulair , on the 19th of June , did make an assault, putting her in fear, and taking from her person a red leather purse, value 2d. two guineas, 2s. and two Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of the said Rebecca.

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-12

488. MARY-ANN FIELDING was indicted for being found at large before the expiration of the term for which she was ordered to be transported .

THOMAS SIMPSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Kirby, (produces a copy of the record of the conviction of Mary- Ann Fielding , in July 1795;) I had it from Mr. Shelton's office, I saw him sign it, (it is read;) the prisoner at the bar is the same woman that was convicted.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - In consequence of information, I apprehended the prisoner in Shoreditch , on the 21st of June .

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Upon hearing the information of Tipper, I sent for the prisoner to my house, but did not expect she would come in the neighbourhood where she knew I was, but she came and insisted that her time was out; I went to Mr. Kirby before I took her; her mother now lies dead.

Prisoner's defence. I thought my time was out, and the very first day I came on shore, I went directly home to my mother's house, in Kingsland-road, and she is now lying dead.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 25.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-13

489. ELIZABETH SCOLTOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , fourteen pair of stockings, value 14s. seven pair of gloves, value 11s. five caps, value 5s. two shifts, value 10s. forty handkerchiefs, value 40s. eleven petticoats, value 3l. five gowns, value 5l. three night gowns, value 3s. four pair of pockets, value 4s. a fan, value 10s. a shawl, value 5l. two umbrellas, value 21s. a lace handkerchief, value 3. a silk cloak, value 5s. a silk handkerchief, value 5s. a woman's hat, value 10s. a veil, value 10s. a pair of stays, value 10s. fifteen shillings in monies numbered, a five pound Bank-note, and two Bank-notes, each of the value of two pounds, the property of John Elwes , in the dwelling-house of Fredrick Parker .

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am a constable of Somers-Town, in the parish of St. Pancras: On Sunday morning, the 15th of June, about a quarter after three, I met the prisoner at the bar, in the Duke of Bedford's private road, about four hundred yards from her mistress's, lodgings; Mrs. Elwes lodges in the New-road leading to Tottenham-court-road; she had this bundle upon her right arm, and this umbrella in her hand; I said, good morning to you, my dear, where are you going to; she said, she was going to Portsmouth; I asked her where she came from; she said from Islington; I asked her what she had got there; and she said her clothes, she was going to her friends; I untied the bundle, and the first thing I put my hand upon was a pair of stockings, wet, that led me to suspect they were stolen; she said her name was Mary Edwards ; I told her to tell me candidly where she brought them from, for I was sure she was not come from Islington that morning; I looked her hard in the face, and then she said she did not, she had come from next door to where the fire was; I said, what, Mrs. Elwes's; she said, yes, she was a relation to Mrs. Elwes; I took her to the watch-house, and searched her, and in her pocket I found a five pound Bank-note, which Sir William Addington returned to the lady; I have got the number of the note;(produces the bundle); she was afterwards stripped, and these clothes taken from her person; every article of which was claimed by her mistress; a black hat and veil, a shawl, a flannel petticoat; a dimity petticoat, a shift, a cap, a handkerchief, a pair of shoes, a gauze handkerchief, a pair of gloves, a pair of white silk stockings, a pair of stays, and a pair of pockets.

SARAH ELWES sworn. - I am the wife of John Elwes .

Q. Where does Mr. Elwes live? - A. In Upper Seymour-street.

Q. Where did he live at the time of these things being taken? - A. He was in Gloucestershire.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In the New-road; the house is kept by Mrs. Parker, but what her husband's christian name is I cannot say; the prisoner was my servant, and had been, I think, four days; the last witness called me up about four o'clock, in the morning of the 15th, he had brought the prisoner back.

Blackman. Here is an inventory of the things in the bundle, which I made out.

Mrs. Elwes. I have looked over these things before; I value the whole together at thirty-one pounds fourteen shillings.

Q. Where were these things the night before? - A. The greatest part of them in my drawers; the hat and the veil might be hanging up in the room, I cannot say; she put me to bed at night, and stole my pocket, and took the keys out;I missed my pocket in the morning, and found the drawers open, and the keys in them; the things in the drawers were tumbled, and a great number of articles gone from them; I lost from my pocket a five pound Bank-note, two two-pound Bank-notes, half-a-guinea, and some silver.

THOMAS NOBLE sworn. - I am a watchman.

Q. Do you know Mr. Parker? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know his christian name? - A. No. The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY(Aged 16.)

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house of Frederick Parker .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-14

490. GEORGE MARSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a man's coat, value 2s. the property of William Macnamara .

The Prosecutor not having brought the property with him, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-15

49I. AARON AUBREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , twenty-eight pounds weight of lead, value 5s. the property of Thomas Dawson , fixed to a certain building of his .

THOMAS DAWSON Sworn. - I live in Great Marlborough-street: I lost some lead from a coach. house and stables in Portman Mews ; the coach house and stables are my own freehold; I looked at them, and observed that some lead had been taken off; I rent the house; I was sent for to Marlborough-street Office, where I saw the lead, and the prisoner.

TIMOTHY CORBY sworn. - I saw the prisoner at the bar taking the lead off the sky-light, he was at work as a bricklayer in an adjoining yard; I told him not to take it off; he told me to mind my own business; it was between ten and eleven at noon; he took the lead away into the kitchen, and hammered it together, he put it under his smock-frock and went away; I followed him as far as Broad-street, Carnaby-market, and asked him what he was going to do with it; he told me to mind my own business; I told him he was caught in the fact, and he shou'd suffer for it; there was more than a quarter of a hundred of it, for he took it off both skylights.

Prisoner's defence. What Corby has sworn against me I am undeserving of.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-16

492. RALPH WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , ninety-one pounds weight of regulus of antimony, value 4l. the property of Robert Thorne .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner but that of his own confession, which was extorted from him by a promise that it would be better for him, he was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before

Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-17

493. HUGH MCLEOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , two shirts, value 2s eight handkerchiefs, value 4s. a waistcoat, value 5s. and a plated mug, value 1d. the property of Richard Smith .( Richard Smith was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated).

ANN POULTNEY sworn. - I was coming out of Mr. Woodward's field, in Kentish-town , from carrving my husband some bread and cheese; I was picking up a bit of stick behind the chapel, and the prisoner came out of Mr. Smith's garden with a barrow load of rubbish; Mr. Smith has got a house there for his wife and family, he is a linen-draper in town; he asked me if I could tell him of a lodging; while we were talking he emptied his barrow, and I saw a white bundle tumble out, then I saw him make a hole and bury it, and cover it over with rubbish; when he was gone I took it out, and saw a waistcoat that I knew, for I had washed for Mrs. Smith, and I took it out and carried it down to Mrs. Smith, and delivered it to Eleanor Love; there were two shirts, and seven handkerchiefs, in the bundle.

ELEANOR LOVE sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Smith, (produces the property); I received this bundle from our washerwoman; the waistcoat I know to be my master's, and the shirts have got my master's name upon them.

WILLIAM FRAZER sworn. - I am a constable of the parish of St. Pancras; I took charge of the prisoner, and have part of the property to produce, a plated mug, and a handkerchief.

Prisoner's defence. Eleanor Love went out, and asked me to answer the be;; if any body came; she

was gone about a quarter an hour, and came back with three more woman, and some children; her mistress was out, and they were all over the house; one of the women came out and offered me two-pence for a pint of beer to go away from my work; I found the mug in the field with butterflowers in it.

Frazer. He told me so when I found the mug in his pocket.

Love. That is my master's mug, it was for the use of the children, we have seven children.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Midlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-18

494. JOHN WILD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , seven pounds of verdigrease, value 21s. the property of Edward Hanson , John Pearson , Thomas Styles , William Pearson and Daniel Gossett .

WILLIAM PEARSON sworn. - I am a warehouse-keeper , in partnership with Edward Hanson , John Pearson , Thomas Styles, and Daniel Gossett ; the warehouse from which this property was taken is upon Golden-hart-wharf, Upper Thames-street ; the prisoner was at work for us two days before this: On Tuesday, the 3d of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I went to the warehouse and found the door open; the outer door was open for our business; I found the inner door open; there were in that warehouse five casks of verdigrease, they were all there without their heads; at the foot of one of the sacks was some verdigrease tied up in a handkerchief; we had men at work up two stories high; I went up and sat one of them to watch while I went to the accompting-house; when I came there I found Wainewright, the constable of our ward, who had got the prisoner in custody with a sack of verdigrease; I took that sack to the warehouse, and compared it with the one I found tied up; I can tell it by the quality and dryness; we unpacked the casks, and found that we had lost ten sacks; the prisoner had been taken to the Poultry Compter; then Wainewright and I went to the Poultry Compter to examine the prisoner; he acknowledged -

Q. Had not you told him it would be better for him? - A. No, nor threatened him; it was a voluntary confession on his part; we asked him how he came by the verdigrease; he said it was given him by a soldier; I told him it was very hard he could not work for us, without stealing, as we paid them liberally; and he said he had not stole it, a soldier had given it him upon Golden-hart-wharf; he said the man's name that gave it him was Murphy; that Murphy and two soldiers came out with their aprons full of verdigrease; Murphy said he might as well take two as one; he said Murphy called him a green-horn because he would take but one: a crow was found upon the prisoner about two feet long, which he said was given him by one of the soldiers; and that one of them said he had got the keys now, and he could do what he liked; there are the impressions of the crow upon the door now; he had wrenched off the lock.

JOHN WAINEWRIGHT sworn. - I am constable of Dowgate-ward: On the 3d of June, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner at the bar, and two more soldiers; they had all something in their aprons; they were walking pretty quick; I suspected they had been robbing; the prisoner was the first man of the three; I laid hold of him, and asked him what he had got; he hesitated a little, and would not give me a direct answer; the other two passed me, and I called out stop thieves; they got clear away; I secured the prisoner, and saw it was verdigrease; we had a scuffle, and then he said it was given to him by a soldier; I then took him to the Compter; he made a little resistance, but was no way rude; when I got him to the Compter I perceived something under his coat, on the right hand side; I discovered it to be a crow, which I took from him; (produces it;) he said it was given to him by one of his comrades, to carry away; I then went to the Bullporters' warehouse, to enquire; I met with Mr. Pearson, I went with him to the warehouses, and we compared the wood of the door, and it corresponded with the point of the crow; I saw the verdigrease in the warehouse, and it seemed to be of the same sort, and the same quality.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up that verdigrease and the crow with it, in Joiners'-hall-buildings; I went from there into Thames-street, up Collegehill, and there the constable stopped me.

GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-19

495. THOMAS MACKARTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , two shirts, value 10s. a handkerchief, value 1s. a pocket-book, value 5s. and a pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of John Macklin .

JOHN MACKLIN sworn. - I am a stationer in Cheapside ; the prisoner was porter to me; he was accustomed to go into my room to fetch my coat and my shoes: I missed my property, and in consequence of information, I obtained a search-warrant to search the prisoner's boxes; the prisoner left my house last Friday, the 4th of July; he had taken one of his boxes away, and in the box that was left I found a shirt of mine; I had a constable with me; the prisoner had given up the key of the box to the

Alderman, and the Alderman sent an officer with me to search the box; after that I went to his lodgings in Crane-court.

Q.How do you know it was his lodgings? - A.Only from the information of others: I found there a shirt, a handkerchief, and a pocket-book of mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. He left your house on the Friday? - A.He did.

Q. Do you mean that he left your house voluntarily? - A. No, he was taken from the house.

Q. He did not leave your house till he was compelled by law to leave it? - A. No.

Q. Do I understand you right that his boxes were at your house? - A. No; I meant to say, at his lodgings, there was one left behind.

Court. Q.What do you mean by one being left behind? - A.The other was taken away while I was endeavouring to get a search-warrant.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Did you yourself ever see two boxes in that room? - A. No, I only know of one.

Q. Then why do you talk of two - there is something that strikes me a little extraordinary: you now charge him with stealing two shirts, a handkerchief, a pocket-book, and a pair of stockings; he was committed last Friday, was he not? - A. Yes, he was.

Upon your oath, even on last Saturday did you ever charge him with stealing more than one shirt? - A. I did not at that time, because the box was not searched.

Q. Do you mean to say that the box was not searched on Saturday, when Sir John Eamer committed him? - A. I certainly do mean to say that.

Q. When he was before Sir John Eamer you had only found one shirt and a neckcloth? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you before the Alderman charge him with stealing that handkerchief which you had found before he was committed? - A. A handkerchief and shirt were in his lodgings.

Q. Upon your oath did you charge him with stealing a handkerchief? - A. He was charged with stealing a handkerchief and a shirt.

Q. My question to you is this, and you cannot mistake it - did you before the Alderman charge him with stealing a handkerchief which was then found? - A. I certainly charged him with stealing a handkerchief.

Q. Then the Alderman only committed him for stealing a shirt; I will read you the commitment: Mr. Kirby produces the commitment; Mr. Knowlys reads it)? - A. That is one linen shirt.

Q. Then did you or not charge him before the Alderman with stealing a handkerchief? - A. The handkerchief was in his lodgings certainly.

Q. I will have a direct answer to a direct ques--; my question is - as you had found the handkerchief before he was committed, did you or not charge him with stealing that handkerchief? - A.I certainly known the shirt to be mine.

Q. Now I will try you for the fourth time-upon the solemn oath under which you now stand to give evidence, did you before the Alderman charge him with stealing the handkerchief, aye or no? - A. The witness that is with me spoke to the handkerchief; I did not charge the handkerchief because that handkerchief I had not seen.

Q. Now be so good as have recourse back again to your memory; did you not tell me that you had, before the Alderman committed him, found a shirt and a handkerchief? - A. The handkerchief I have a witness to prove was there.

Q. Did you not state, but a little while ago, upon your oath, that you had, before the Alderman committed him, found both a shirt and a handkerchief? - There certainly was only a shirt produced before the Alderman.

Q. Did you not, but a little while ago, tell the gentleman of the Jury that you had found a shirt and a handkerchief, before the Alderman committed him? - A. The prisoner was committed under two witnesses, one that was with me.

Q. Hear the question again - did you not, a little while ago, tell the gentlemen of the Jury that you had found the shirt and the handkerchief before the Alderman committed him? - A. I can only speak to the shirt.

Q. Did you not tell the Jury that you had found a shirt and a handkerchief before he was committed? - A. I did, in consequence of the witness that is with me; the Alderman certainly committed him for a shirt and a handkerchief.

Q. Did you not tell the Jury that before the Alderman committed this man, you had found a shirt and a handkerchief? - A. I certainly found the shirt; the witness can speak to the handkerchief.

Q. If you will not answer me I shall certainly apply for a very serious proceeding against you, and have you committed - I ask you again, did you not say to the Jury -

Court. It does not at all follow that a Magistrate may not make a mistake; I have the deposition in my hand, in which he says exactly as he does now, and that the witness spoke to the handkerchief.

Mr. Knowlys. If your Lordship looks back to your notes, you will find that he has said that he found the handkerchief and shirt before the man was committed.

Q. Did you not swear to that Jury that you had found, before the Alderman committed him, a shirt and a handkerchief? - A. I certainly swore to a shirt.

Q. I will state the question again, and see if you understand it - have you not already sworn here, that before the Alderman committed this man, you

had found a shirt and a handkerchief? - A. I cannot swear to that which is not true.

Q. Is what you said before then not true? - A.I swore to the shirt, and the witness to the handkerchief.

Q. Did you or not say to this Jury, that before the Alderman committed the prisoner, you had found the shirt and the handkerchief; and I will have an answer if I am here till twelve o'clock at night? -

One of the Jury. We heard him say so.

Q.As that is the case, how came you to give my Lord the last answer, that you had not seen it? - There were two handkerchiefs.

Q.How came you to put but one in the indictment? - A. I did not wish to put more in.

Court. Q. You found this shirt in the box that was left behind? - A. No; it was in the lodgings, but not in the box at all.

Q. Where was the handkerchief? - A. The handkerchief was in the lodgings; the shirt, silk stockings, and pocket-book were all found after he was committed.

Q. You have spoke of two boxes - at first every body supposed they were at your house, and then at the lodgings, and then you knew only of one box; did you find any thing in that box that you charge the prisoner with? - A.Nothing.

JOHN CRESS sworn. - I am a constable of Farringdon ward within: Mr. Macklin sent for me on Friday evening last, to his house in Cheapside; I took the prisoner to the Compter, and the next day he was committed; I went with a search-warrant to the prisoner's lodgings.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. How do you know they were his lodgings? - A.The woman of the house told me so, Mrs. Colton; I found there two pair of silk stockings, a shirt, and this pocket-book.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You left the prisoner in gaol, and did not take him to this house to hear what he might say to any thing? - A. No.

Q.(To Macklin.) Who took away the shirt that was produced before the commitment? - A. I did; the constable was with me.

ELIZABETH COLTON sworn. - My husband is a bricklayer; I live in Crane-court, Foster-lane; the prisoner has lodged with me about a month or six weeks; he lodged in the garret with another young man; my husband has worked for Mr. Macklin once or twice; I saw the shirt in the room; with J M upon it, Mr. Macklin's initials; he told me his master had given it him; he was taken up on the Friday evening; in the course of the afternoon he had been at our house; he had two boxes at our house; he came to our house to dine, and brought a knot with him to take away one of his boxes, which he did, loaded; the other remained at our house; Mr. Macklin came in the evening, after he was taken up; the shirt was hanging upon my line, which Mr. Macklin looked at, and there was a cambric pocket handkerchief which I had not hung up; Mr. Macklin came in again, and asked if I had one, and he claimed that; the handkerchief was in my own room; I had been washing, and had not hung it up; I had been washing a shirt also for him; I delivered the shirt to Mr. Macklin, and the handkerchief; but I cannot exactly say when I gave him the handkerchief; I went before Sir John the next day; Mr. Macklin produced a shirt, and a handkerchief was spoke of, but I believe not produced; but I was very much flurried, and cannot say positively.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.You have washed these things for him some considerable time? - A. Yes; and he said his master had made him a present of them.

Q. The young man took one box away? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not make the shirt away, but left it with you to wash? - A. Yes; I had given him notice to quit our lodgings, and he was going away.(The property was deposed to by Mr. Macklin.)

Q.(To Macklin.) Was that handkerchief produced before the Alderman, or not? - A. It was not.

Q. Had you at that time received it from the witness? - A. I cannot say whether I had or not; there were two handkerchiefs, one of them a muslin one, one that was spoke of before the Alderman.

Q.(To Mrs. Calton.) Do you know any thing of two handkerchiefs? - A. Yes; there was a beautiful worked muslin handkerchief which Mr. Macklin said was his.

Q.(To Macklin.) Was the cambric handkerchief your's? - A. No, I had borrowed it of a young lady; the mark has been taken out.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long had this man lived with you? - A.Nearly two years.

Q. In the course of that time it is not uncommon for masters to give servants clothes? - A. I never gave him any in my life.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-20

406. JAMES PATTERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , four window-curtains, value 18s. two valances, value 2s. and two brass door-plates, value 1s. the property of James Mason .

JAMES MASON sworn. - I am a carpenter in Maiden-lane , Covent-garden: I left the property from a house facing mine, on Sunday morning, the 15th of June; I had bought them at a sale; the house was shut up; I might not have seen them for a week before; the prisoner was brought to me on the Sunday morning, about eight o'clock; and in consequence of information I went to the prisoner's lodgings; there is a person here who will prove it was his lodgings, where I found my property; I bought them at a sale, but did not particulary examine them so as to be able to swear to them; I missed such things.

CHRISTOPHER MASON sworn. - I am son of the last witness; I saw a person come out of the house but did not see his face, he had a bundle on his shoulder; I immediately came down stairs, and found the door of the house open, I did not pursue the man at all; I then went over and told my father the house had been robbed; I then went over to the empty house again, and waited, and in about a quarter of an hour I saw the prisoner coming down Maiden-lane, at some distance from the house; and from his dress I conceived it to be the same person that I had seen come out of the house before, he had a blue jacket on: I suffered him to pass the house without speaking to him; I then followed him, and asked him what business he had there; he said he had not been in the house; I took him to the watch-house, and we got an officer, and searched his lodgings, where we found the property.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - I am a Bow-street officer: I went to the prisoner's lodgings on Sunday morning, the 15th of June, at the corner of Vine-street, Chandos-street, Covent-Garden, where I found the property, (produces it); the prisoner told me they were his lodgings; the curtains and valances were in this bag, and the door plates in a bag, with a quantity of lead, by the side of the bed; I have kept them ever since.

JOHN HOWARD sworn. - I am a shoemaker: The prisoner has lodged with me eight or nine months, at the corner of Vine-Street, till he was taken up.(The property was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. William Williams came and knocked at my door, and employed me to carry a bundle for him, and he would give me a shilling; I went with him, and took the bundle from him, just by the door; he desired me, if he did not overtake me, that I would take them to my lodgings; this William Williams, is the son of Williams a broker; I thought he had had a sale, that is true as I shall answer to God at his glorious tribunal at the last day; I thought it was very strange, that because Williams had friends to speak for him he should be discharged, and I, who was only willing to earn a shilling to get a bit of bread for my wife and family, should be brought into this predicament in the sixty-fifth year of my age.

Chirstopher Mason. The prisoner worked for us for a week before; this Williams that he speaks of, is a very suspicious character in the neighbourhood; my father had a sale in the same house, Williams was there, and had an opportunity of seeing what there was in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-21

497. JOHN LECK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a copper, value 218. and one brass cock, value 4d. the property of Edward Magrath .

The prisoner being extremely deaf, and not pleading to his indictment, a fury were sworn to try whether he was of sound mind and understanding or not.

EDWARD MAGRATH sworn. - I never saw the prisoner before last Saturday; he came and asked me for a job, and I told him I could not, another time I would give him a job.

Q. How did he behave when you took him? - A. He said his accomplice took the copper, and sold the copper; I have heard since, that they call him foolish Johnny, and that he has committed a great many robberies in the neighbourhood.

Q. How old is he? - A. I should suppose about twenty.

Q. From his conduct, did you collect whether has was foolish or not? - A. He is certainly none of the wisest; when we were going back from fetching the copper, he said he was dry, and we asked him if he would have a pint of beer; he said, yes; when we came out of the house, he said, I have saved my neck this time; I should suppose he meant by impeaching his-accomplice; after I had detected him, I enquired into his character; I learned that he was a notorious thief; he is generally considered as half foolish.

Q.When you charged him with taking the copper, did he appear to be a man capable of knowing right from wrong? - A. Yes; he told me it was not him that broke open the door, it was Goodyer that broke it open, and sold the copper; I caught him in the yard upon my premises; Goodyer was taken up, and brought before the Magistrate, and there the woman swore it was him that sold the copper himself: and upon that, Goodyer was discharged.

Q.It was after he had been before the Justice that he said I have saved my neck? - A. Yes

Mr. JOHN KIRBY sworn - Q. You are keeper of the prison? - A. I am.

What have you observed of the prisoner's conduct since you have had him in custody? - A. I

asked him where his father was; and he said, he was gone a mowing.

Q. From your own observation, what is your opinion of him? - A. He does not give a proper answer to any thing; I think he is an ideot; he only came in on Monday.

Magrath. His father has absconded last spring, for thieving.

THOMAS SIMPSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Kirby: I was in the lodge when Holebrook, the officer, brought the prisoner in; when he came in, I put an iron on him, and he acted very strangely indeed, I thought he would have broke his leg, he knocked it about so; he only understands from the motion of the mouth, he sometimes gives a contrary answer to what you ask, and sometimes a direct answer; we could not get any thing out of him this morning.

Prisoner. I will never do so any more; I should not have done it now, but another boy did it first.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Magrath brought the prisoner to me at Shadwell: I asked him if he did this himself; he said, no, he held the door while another man took it out; he was with me a long time before I could get that out of him; he said, the other man put it in a bag, took it along Poplar-fields, and cut it in three pieces; if I speak loud, and call to him, he understands every word; he said the other man took it to Mr. Talbot's, a coppersmith, in Back-lane, and sold it, on a Sunday morning; I then took him before the Magistrate, and what he told me he repeated to the Magistrate; the copper was cut in three pieces, exactly as he described it; I went to Talbot's and found the copper, with the two cocks, and the bag that it was in; Mrs. Talbot told me she was a relation of his, but she would tell the truth, he was the man that sold the copper himself, and nobody with him; the other man proved an alibi before the Magistrate, and he was discharged; after we had found the copper, we gave him the bag to carry to the office; he said, on the way, I have saved my neck this time, but he did not mention for what.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, you are here sworn. on the part of the Crown, to inquire whether the prisoner at the bar is of sound mind or not; by which oath, I understand, that you are to pronounce whether you think the prisoner knows right from wrong; the rule laid down in our law books is this, that if a person has the same sort of understanding that a child of fourteen years of age has, he is then answerable to the laws of his country; now, by that rule, I understand, if he is a person that knows right from wrong as well as an ordinary child of fourteen years of age does. This is not a question of sanity or insanity, whether this man is afflicted with a temporary visitation from Providence at times to have his understanding, and at other times not to have it, but simply whether this man, by his natural endowments, has that kind of understanding, as to know when he is doing wrong; if he has that kind of understanding, then he ought to be made answerable for this act; for nothing can be more mischievous than that sort of character which one of the witness represents this half-witted man, going by the name of foolish Johnny, should be suffered to go about, and committing depredations of this sort; and, therefore, however the neighbourhood may be inclined to indulge him, or soften his actions, by calling him foolish Johnny, if he is of that kind of understanding as to know when he is doing wrong, he ought to be amenable to the law; it will be for the Court, if he should be found guilty by-and-by, to say what punishment shall be inflicted upon such a half-witted man; but it is for you to say, whether he has that understanding which enables you to say he knew whether he was doing right or wrong when he committed these depredations upon the property of others; it may be, that a man may be very frantic when they were putting an iron on him; and yet, it does not follow that this lad, when he was going about committing depredations through the village, did not know what he was doing; now, under all the circumstances this case, it will be for you to say, whether you think the man, at the time he is charged to have committed this act, knew that he was doing wrong or not; now, here is a concealment, you see he denies having done it; at first, he lays the charge upon another man, uses a degree of cunning, so as to shew that he knew he had done a wrong thing; he describes all that had been done with the copper, and they find it to answer; and as to the other man that he charged, it appeared that he was innocent, so satisfactorily, that the Justice discharged him; and you hear from Rogers, that if you speak slowly, and loud, he can understand you: Mr. Kirby himself, and these people not knowing how to manage this man, may account for the incoherency of his answers; it is the duty of the parish, where they have idiots, to lock them up; but the Jury and Court have a duty to discharge, without partiality on one side or the other; and the simple question you have to decide is, whether he knew the difference of right and wrong as an ordinary child of fourteen years of age does; if you think he did, you will find that he is of sound memory and understanding; if on the other hand you think he does not know right from wrong, you will find that he is not of sound memory and understanding. In a case of this sort, there cannot be any leaning one way or the other; for the public have a right to be protected from such depredations, as much as an idiot has who is not responsible to the law for his acts; and, therefore, there must be no

leaning one way or the other, it will be for you to say whether you think he is in a fit state to proceed to trial; it is not so much the question how he was at the time he committed the fact as how he is now; and you will now say what you think of him at this moment, whether he ought to be put upon his trial; if you think he ought, you will say he is of sound mind and understanding; and if you think he ought not, you will say he is not of sound mind and understanding.

Foreman of the Jury. We think he is, of sound mind, and ought to be put upon his trial.

Mr. Shelton, after having again read the indictment to the prisoner, put the question - "Are you guilty, or not guilty?" - After some hesitation, and being instructed by Mr. Kirby, he said - "not guilty;" - upon being asked - "How will you be tried?" - with the same hesitation, and instruction from Mr. Kirby, he said, - "by God and my country."

The Jury were then sworn, to try the question of-"Guilty, or Not Guilty."

EDWARD MAGRATH sworn. - Last Sunday morning I went to my premises, about five or six minutes after five, and found the door of the outhouse broke open; I observed a chalk-chopper lying by the door; I thought it had been some of the chalk people; I had not been there five minutes when I saw the prisoner come into the yard; I then hid myself a little while, but not seeing him go, I came out, and asked him what he was doing upon my premises; he said he was doing nothing there, he only went ot buy a pennyworth of milk; there is a piece of ground belonging to the premises let out to a cow-man; I told him I suspected he had broke open that place; I told him to get from the place immediately; he told me it was not him that broke the place open, he told me it was Goodyer; then the officer came up, and we went in search of Goodyer; and found him at home; he is a lad about eighteen or nineteen years of age; we took him, and on Monday morning they were both taken before the Magistrate.

Q.Was what the prisoner said taken down in writing? - A. Yes.

The Court asked if the examinations were returned, Mr. Sherton said they were not; when the Court expressed in very strong terms, their disapprobation of the conduct of Magistrates, in not returning the examinations.

HANNAH TALBOT sworn. - I live in Cable-Street, Whitechapel: On Sunday morning, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner came to my house; I was called up; when I came down, the prisoner was there with a bag, and I asked him what he had got there, he said a little copper that his father had sent him, and would be obliged to me to let him have some money upon it; I let him have sixteen shillings; I did not buy it.

Q. What is his father? - A. He works in a rope-ground; I have known his father many years; he is related to me.

Q. Did any body come with him? - A. No.(The copper produced.)

Q. How came you to let this boy have sixteen shillings upon the copper; he did not deal in copper? - A. No; but I desired him to send his father to me in the morning, and then I should have examined him about it.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner from Mr. Magrath; I asked him to tell me truly who was with him when he took the copper; I did not make him any promise, or use any threat; I asked him repeatedly, and at length he said it was another lad of the name of Goodyer that broke the house; that he flood by while he was breaking it with a chalk-chopper; he said Goodyer brought the copper into Poplar-fields, and there cut it into three pieces; he said he was following him and saw him do it; I then asked him where did they go then; he said they went up by the Cape to Good Hope, and across the fields to Mr. Talbot's, copper-smith, in Back-lane; he said the other went in and fold the copper; that he staid at the door till the other came out, and then went to a public-house with the money; I went to Talbot's with Mr. Magrath, and found this copper lying in the shop, it was not concealed at all; Mrs. Talbot immediately acknowledged she had bought it of the prisoner; I asked her if there was any other boy, and she said, no; that though he was a relation she would tell the truth; there was nobody but him.

Magrath. This is my copper; it was whole when I lost it, full of brass-cocks and plates, as much as two men could lift into a cart; they were all gone.

Prisoner's defence. I did not do it; another boy began at first, and then he ran away; I will never touch any thing again.

Mr. Kirby. Here are two people from Limehouse that were not here when the other witness were examined.

WILLIAM AVERY sworn. - I have known the prisoner about two years; I lived five or six months in the same house.

Q. Have you often conversed with him? - A. No, he never would converse with any body; if he observed the motion of the month he would answer sometimes, and sometimes, he would not; at the times I lived with him I really thought he could not hear any thing.

Q. Have you any reason to know that he knows right from wrong? - A. I cannot say that.

ANN EDNEY sworn. - I live in the same house with the prisoner; he was always foolish.

Q. Do you think he knows right from wrong? - A. That I cannot answer for.

GUILTY (Aged 16.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-22

498. WILLIAM TILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , a child's silver knife and fork, value 8s. and a pocket-book, value 18s. the property of Charles Delahoy .

CHARLES DELAHOY sworn. - I am a surgeon ; the prisoner was my servant : On the 26th of June, I suspected him of having robbed me, I went into his apartments and found a variety of articles, tea, sugar, rhubarb, and other things; upon which I sent for a constable; we found upon his person a child's silver knife and fork, and a pocket-book; the constable has them.

WILLIAM POSTLETHWAYTE sworn. - I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner; upon searching him I found this knife and fork and pocket-book in his pocket. (Produces them.)

Delaboy. The pocket-book I can positively swear to; the knife and fork I believe to be mine, but cannot positively swear to them.

Mr. Alley. Q. This pocket-book was thrown about the house, I understand? - A.No, it was kept in the library.

Prisoner's defence. The pocket-book was thrown about the house, and I picked it up; I had the charge of the plate and table-linen; if I had meant to have made away with any thing I could have taken them.

Court. Q. What is the pocket-book worth? - A. I cannot say; I suppose about sixpence.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-23

499. MARY WHISKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , a quartern loaf, value 1s. 3d. the property of Samuel Dean the elder.(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

JOSHUA DEAN sworn. - My father is a baker , and lives at Bow : In consequence at instructions that I received from my father, I watched the prisoner; there was a hole cut through the wainscot; I saw her take a loaf from a shelf near the bakehouse; she put it in her apron and put a pie upon the top of it; I followed her and found a quartern loaf upon her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This pie she had left to be asked? - A. Yes.

Q. How long has she been a customer of your father's? - A. She never bought any bread; she has come with pies and puddings to bake.

Prisoner's defence. I said to Mrs. Dean, I have a great desire for a new loaf, and I took it; I was with child, and miscarried at Clerkenwell prison; I told her I should take it.

Dean. I was within hearing all the while, and she said no such thing; she was talking to my mother about the expence of a gooseberry pie while she was taking the loaf; my mother was in the bake-house at the time.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-24

500. ROBERT CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a pig, value 20s. four hen fowls, value 8s. and two chickens, value 2s. the property of John Richardby .

JAMES GLOVER sworn. - I am one of the patrols of Hackney: I met the prisoner on the 7th of June, about a quarter past twelve in the night, in Grove-street, Hackney, with two bundles; I asked him what he had got there; he said nothing; upon clapping my hand upon one of the bundles which he had upon this stick, (producing it,) I observed there was poultry in it; I then told him he must go along with me; he endeavoured to draw the stick out, and to make resistance; my partner then coming up, we secured him, and conducted him to the watch-house; one bundle had four fowls in it, and this implement, which fits the door where the locks were wrenched off; and in the other bundle was a pig and this marline-spike; (producing it;) I went to the place where we had had the scuffle, and it being a wet night, I could observe the impression of his shoes and of our's; his particularly; I tracked his footsteps to the back part of Mr. Richardsby's house.

- SCRIVENS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. John Richardby : On Monday, the 7th of June, about six o'clock in the morning I got up, and missed the fowls and the pig; I saw the door of the hen-house broke open, and the door of the pigstye; the bolts and the lock were both broke; I saw the pig safe between four and five on Sunday afternoon, and the fowls at eight; I have just seen the pig at the door, it is the same pig that my master lost. (One of the fowls produced.) This is my master's fowl; the rest would not keep.

JONH RICHARDBY sworn. - The fowls I fed myself every day, I am certain that this is one of them; they were a present from a friend; the pig I cannot speak to, my coachman fed that.

Prisoner's defence. I went out last Sunday to take a walk into Essex; I left Essex at eleven o'clock at night, and came over to Hackney-Wick; I came across a common corn-field; I thought I heard a pig, I looked about and found these bundles upon a stick; I called out, holloa, but nobody answered, and I took it up; I never knew what were the contents till they shewed me when they took me to the watch-house.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-25

501. ISAAC DAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a hempmen sack, value 1s. and half a bushel of malt, value 2s. the property of John Edmunds , Isaac Edmunds , the elder, and Isaac Edmunds , the younger.

The property not being identified, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-26

502. JAMES GILLIGAN and BRYAN FIELD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a silver table-spoon, value 5s. the property of Henry Smeilan .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-27

503. GEORGE HILLYARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , a hammer, value 6d. a chissel, value 4d. a hollow plane value 1s. a chalk line, value 1d. a long plane, value 2s. a jack plane, value 2s. and a smoothing-plane, value 2s. the property of John Scott .(The case was opened by Mr. Beville.)

- WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I am a carpenter, I live in Long-Alley, opposite Primrose-street; I saw the prisoner on the Sunday before Whitsunday; he brought these tools to me to sell, I said, why do you sell your tools; he said, he was going to sea to-morrow, and if he left his tools behind, they would be all lost before he came back again; I have sold some of them, the rest are here. (Produces them.)

THOMAS WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I was present when my father bought these tools.

JOHN SCOTT sworn. - I live at Waltham-cross , I am a journeyman carpenter : On the 8th of May, I missed my tools from a building where I was at work near Waltham-cross-turnpike, at Mr. Kent's house; I left my tools there on the evening of the 7th.

Q.Look at these tools? - A. They are mine.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of it, I never had these tools in my possession.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Publickly whipped and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-28

504. WILLIAM BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , a desk, value 1s. one hunderd and nineteen halfpence, ten pounds weight of beef, value 6s. 8d. twenty-four pounds weight of mutton, value 15s. twenty-four pounds weight of veal, value 15s. and twenty-four pounds weight of lamb, value 18s. and two books, value 3s. the property of Barnard Brookes .

BARNARD BROOKES sworn. - I am a butcher in St. James's-market; I was in bed at the time my property was taken, the prisoner was stopped with them.

RICHARD DORRINGTON sworn. - I am a watchman, at Spring-gardens; I stopped the prisoner on the 4th of June, at two o'clock in the morning, in Spring-gardens.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. I believe he is the man, there was another man with him, they passed me, I followed them directly and overtook the prisoner with this box upon his back, and some meat; I asked him where he was going, he said, he was carrying it for his brother; I told him he could not go that way; and the other man said, Jack, I told you we could not go that way; then the prisoner came behind me, and just as we got to Mr. Drummond's door, he put the box down, and a quarter of lamb and some beef upon it, and away he ran; this box was locked, I then took the property to the watch-house.

Q. Had you such an opportunity of seeing him as, to be able to say the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes, I am positive of it; I took it to the watch-house, and found it belonged to Mr. Brookes, there was some halfpence and books in it; while I was looking over the things, the prisoner was brought in by another watchman, I knew the man again directly.

Q.Did the prisoner say any thing? - He said, he knew nothing of me, nor I of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You say, the man that was with the person, you suppose to be the prisoner, said, he was carrying them for his brother? - A. Yes.

Q.When he ran away, you compleatly lost sight of him? - A. Yes.

Q. How long were you in conversation with him? - A.No great time, it might be a minute.

Q. It was not light, I believe? - A. It was not to say dark, it was a very light morning.

GEORGE MOODY sworn. - At half-past two o'clock in the morning of the 4th of June, I saw the prisoner going along Chandos-street, with a large bundle under his left arm; I asked him what he had got in that bundle; he said, what he had got there, was no business of mine; I told him it was, and insisted upon seeing what he had got; upon that, says he, I will shew you what I have got, he laid his bundle down and broke from me; he got away from me about one hundred and fifty steps, I called out stop thief, he made use of very bad expressions, he would knock my bl - y brains out, and he would not have been taken if I had been by myself; he was stopped directly, and we took him to the watch-house; when we got there, the other watchman knew him directly.

Q. What had he in the bundle? - A. A forequarter of lamb, and the best end of a neck of mutton.

SAMUEL WILSON sworn. - I am a tailor, at No. 16, Clare-court; about half-past two on the 4th of June, I was coming through Chandos-street, I heard the rattles spring; I came up, and saw the watchman had hold of the prisoner, he seemed quite resolute, and would not go to the watch-house; I took him by the collar, and said, you shall go; upon that, the watchman desired me to take up the bundle, which laid upon the pavment, I took it to the watch-house; when we got to the watch-house, he was challenged by Dorrington.

Brookes. I live in the Haymarket, at a distance from my shop; I was called up by Dorrington, I went to the watch-house and saw my property; here are two aprons in the desk, which do not belong to me; I left the desk, the mutton was my own killing; I missed the same quantity of meat from the shop.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it, I had no bundle, I heard the watchmen's rattles spring, I asked what was the matter, the watchman said, he would swear to me.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-29

505. JOHN FENTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a pickaxe, value 2s. 6d. the property of John Clarke and Thomas Thatcher .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am in partnership with Thomas Thatcher we are contractors , both on the canal, and on the West-India docks; the prisoner was employed under us about two months, he was discharged on the 15th of March, we have a great quantity of tools and pick-axes, shovels, and other things to the value of two thousand pounds on the spot; in consequence of information that I received, I went with Rogers to the lodgings of the prisoner, I think on the 9th of June; we found a pick-axe in his apartments, marked with our mark, C. T. on both sides, it is ours; I asked the prisoner how he came by it, he said Mr. Thatcher had given it him to take home.

WILLIAM ELBE sworn. - I am an officer, (produces a pick-axe;) I have had it ever since.

Q.(To Clarke.) In this service, do you allow your workmen to take home their tools? - A. We suffer them to take their own tools home, but not ours, without our leave.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. On the 15th of March, the prisoner was discharged? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you first apprehend him? - A. The 9th of June.

Q. Do you know what became of the prisoner from the 15th of March to the 9th of June? - A.I believe he was employed on the docks, but not on my works.

Q. Did not you see him constantly during that time? - A. I have seen him during the time; I had met him on the road.

Q.Many times? - A. I cannot say, I never saw him walking.

Q.Had you never any dispute with the prisoner at the bar? - A. No.

Q. Nor Mr. Thatcher? - A. I have had none; I cannot say what Mr. Thatcher has done.

Q.Upon your oath, do not you know that he had a dispute with him, and that the consequence was a summons to the Court of Conscience? - A. Not to my knowledge, he never did.

Q. Do not you know that a person of the name of Stint summoned you to the Court of Conscience? - A. He did, for ten shillings, I attended there.

Q.How long ago? - A. I should suppose a month or six weeks back.

Q. How long was it afterwards that you apprehended the prisoner? - A. Not far from that time, but I cannot say exactly, it might be before or after, I cannot say.

Q. In what month was it that you went to the Court of Conscience? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was it in the month of June? - A. I believe it might be.

Q.Try if you can recollect whether it was before or after you were summoned to the Court of

Conscience, that you apprehended the prisoner? - A. I cannot say whether it was before or after, for I do not know.

Q. Was there not an account between you and the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Nor between Mr. Thatcher and the prisoner? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. What work was he engaged in? - A. The excavation.

Q. That excavation would require a pick-axe? - A. Certainly, we supply the men with these kind of implements.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You were summoned by Stint, not by the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Though the prisoner was not apprehended till the 9th of June, did you go as soon as you received the information? - A. Yes, the same day; we missed this and a considerable deal more property about that time; we have lost from time to time, upwards of two hundred pounds.

THOMAS THATCHER sworn. - I am in partnership with Clark; I never in my life gave the prisoner leave to take that pick-axe home, or made him a present of it, it is our property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When you settled with the prisoner, did he not claim more than you paid him? - A. He did not.

Prisoner's defence. I never was guilty of stealing any thing in my life.

The prisoner called twelve witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-30

506. ISAAC HOLLOWAY was, indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , two double sheave-blocks, and five brass sheaves, value 6l. 6s. the property of the Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of William Fowlds .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Watson, and the case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM FOWLDS sworn. - I am a millwright , I am employed under the City, in the new canal works, in the Isle of Dogs ; I saw the double sheave-blocks in use on Saturday the 17th of May, and on the Monday morning I missed them; the ropes that passed through them were cut through in six different parts; I saw them again two or there days afterwards, at the Public-office, Shadwell, I know them to be the same.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How do you know them? - A. This one has my own work to it, I had to chop a part of it away, to make the rope travel easy through it; they were sent there for the use of the City, by Mr. Robinson, a millwright; I have not the least doubt of their being the same.

MARIA JEVANS Sworn. - My husband is a blacksmith, in Three Colt-Street, Limehouse, I Keep a chandler's-shop: On Tuesday the 20th of May, some blocks were offered me for sale, late in the evening.

Q. How far is your husband's shop from your's? - A. He sometimes works backwards; a man came in the afternoon to sell such things, and afterwards in the evening, the same man came again, and the prisoner with him, and brought the blocks, each of them had one block; when I saw them, I said, master, I can't have any thing to do with such things, I do not buy such things.

Q. Are those the same blocks? - A. I cannot say, I only just saw them by candle-light, they were like these.

Q. Did you see where they went? - A. No, I saw them going past the window.

Q. How far does a man of the name of Hill live from you? - A.Twelve or thirteen doors form me, they passed my house in a direction towards Hill's house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did the prisoner say one word to you, or you to him? - A. I spoke to them both.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. On the 21st of May last, I found these blocks in a cart, with the name of John Thurston on it, the blocks were tied up in one bag, and the sheaves in the bag by themselves; I carried them to the office; I afterwards, in consequence of information, went to the house of Hill, and searched the house several times for him, but could not find him; Elbe and I apprehended the prisoner upon the 21st of May; we told him we had taken him upon suspicion of the blocks, and also upon another charge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You found them in a cart belonging to Thurston? - A. Yes.

Q. You took up him and M'Dougal both? - A. No. he came forward.

ROBERT M'DOUGAL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Thurston, Smith and ironmonger: On the 21st of May, I bought one hundred and a quarter and eighteen pounds of iron of sundry kinds, of Hill; among the rest that I bought, there were two things like unto these, but I cannot swear to them; I took them from Hill's in a sack.

Q. Who put the things in the cart? - A. The carman; I have bought many such before, in lots of iron.

Q. How far is Hill's house from Mrs. Jevans? - A. I think it may be twelve or fourteen doors.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. So, honesty, your master is a smith a ironmonger? - A. Yes.

And you go about collecting for him with a cart? - A. Yes.

What did you give for these things? - A. Twenty shillings and ten-pence halfpenny.

You could hardly get a living profit by them at that? - A. I do not think it was too much.

Q. The officers met with you, and then you were frightened? - A. I went to the office.

Q. And then you laid it upon Hill? - A. Yes.

Q. That was to save yourself, you know? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What was Hill? - A. A jobbing smith, or a nailer.

Q. What do you think these things are worth? - A. I cannot say.

Q.(To Fowlds.) What are they worth? - A. Seven guineas.

Q.(To M'Dougal.) Are you so really ignorant as not to know that these things are worth more than twenty shillings and ten-pence halfpenny? - A. They were not put together.

WILLIAM ELBE sworn. - I was in company with Rogers when he apprehended the prisoner; I had no conversation with him.

JAMES MONTAGUE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the surveyors, employed by the City; I have no doubt of their being the same blocks, I know that blocks of that kind were finished by the City of London for these works.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw these blocks, till I saw them at the Public-office.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-31

507. SAMUEL BROWN was indicted feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a silver watch, value 42s. a metal watch-key, value 3d. and a silk ribbon, value 2d. the property of Martin Wall , privily from his person .

MARTIN WALL sworn. - I lodge at the sign of the Two Chairmen, in Warwick-street, Cockspur-Street: On Sunday morning, after I returned from my work, there were two men asked me to have a glass of liquor; I was rather in liquor, I had been after drinking a little gin and milk, and it took rather an effect upon me; the prisoner was one of those two men; when I had drank it, I called for a quartern more, that I should not be under any compliments to them, as they were strangers; I was in the box facing them, waiting for my breakfast; I was going up to Air-street to wait upon a gentleman; the other man said he would give me some more liquor in the Haymarket, and when I had had my breakfast, they took me to a house in the Haymarket, the Cock, where I never was before; they called for liquor, and treated me with it, I drank with them.

Q. At that time you were very drunk, I suppose? - A. Very much so; then I went to James-Street, Golden-Square , the prisoner went with me; I do not know whether the other man went or not.

Q. How do you know that the prisoner was with you? - A. As I have been told; while I was in at the Two Chairmen, I had a silver watch, with a ribbon and key; I did not miss it till next morning, I had been taken home and put to bed; I have never seen it since.

THOMAS DELIGHT sworn. - I am a constable of the parish of St. James's: I met with the prisoner and Mr. Wall, on Sunday last, about twelve o'clock at noon, at the corner of Golden-Square; I had occasion to go into a public-house; they were both intoxicated very much, and wanted more liquor, but the landlord would not draw any more; they both fell together into the middle of the street, the prosecutor was undermost, with his face to the stones, and the prisoner upon him; the prosecutor cut his nose very much; I got a bason and water to wash his face; I asked the prisoner for a pocket-handkerchief to wipe his friend's face, and he pulled out this watch-string, it fell at my feet, which I took hold of; he said it was his, and took it out of my hand, and put it into his pocket; as soon as the prosecutor came to, almost the first words he said were, somebody has robbed me of my watch; I then looked round, and missed the prisoner; I said to the prosecutor, where is your friend gone; he made answer, he had no friend; I then went in pursuit of the prisoner, and overtook him the other side of Golden-Square; says I, are not you the person who was with the young man in liquor just now; he said no, he had been with nobody; says I, how can you tell me such a lie, there is the mud upon your coat now where you have been tumbling in the kennel; he refused to go back with me; however, after some words, I brought him back, and the watch was found in his pocket. (Produces it).

Wall. This is my watch, and this ribbon, and this key, are mine.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I come here defenceless, without Counsel. I was in company with the prosecutor, and we were drinking till near twelve o'clock, till we were very much intoxicated; he could not keep his breeches buttoned, his watch was in great danger several times, and I told him of it; we went to another house, but I cannot tell where, for I was as intoxicated as himself; the

watch fell out of his pocket into the kennel; I was going to get a coach to take him home. I hope your Lordship will have mercy on me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-32

508. JOHN HANSCOM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , a silver watch, value 2l. a silver seal, value 1s. a steel watch-chain, value 2d. and a metal watch-key, value one halfpenny, the property of Roger Turner , in the dwelling-house of John Bennett .

ROGER TURNER sworn. - I lodge in the house of Mr. John Bennett : The prisoner was a stranger to me, he slept in the same room that night; in the morning when I was dressing myself he asked me what it was o'clock, and I told him; then I put my watch upon the bed-clothes, got up, and went out of the room, there was nobody else in the room; when I came out I missed my watch, I had forgot it; I went back again immediately, and found the house-door locked, there was nobody in the house up; I went to my work, which was in the yard adjoining the house, till the house was open, and then I went up stairs to look for my watch, and the prisoner was gone; I made inquiries after him, I went to several places, at last I found him at Whitefriars, my master had sent him there; I asked him if he had seen any thing of my watch; he told me, no; I then got a warrant and in the evening took him, and found the duplicate upon him; I went to the pawnbroker's, Mr. Cotterell's, and found the watch.

THOMAS COTTERELL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Shoe-lane; The Prisoner pledged this watch with me, on the 19th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock; he told me he only wanted six shiillings, which I lent him upon it; the watch is worth two guineas, and the seal and altogether about two pounds five shillings.

Turner. This is my watch, it cost me four guineas this time four years.

GEORGE LONGDEN sworn. - I am an officer: I apprehended the prisoner; on searching him I found this duplicate, wrapped up in the inside of a silk handkerchief that he had round his neck.

Prisoner's defence. I found the watch.

GUILTY of stealing to the value 39s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined ls.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-33

509. JOHN MUSSARETH , alias MUSLIN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , five ewe sheep, value 10l. the property of Robert Cooke .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of John Townsend

It appearing in evidence that four of the sheep were wethers and not ewes and the other being sworn to be a ewe sheep, by a witness whose evidence was materially contradicted, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-34

510. JAMES IRVING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , thirty-three pounds weight of sugar, value 1l. 10s. the property of Sir John Eamer , Knt. Jonah-Smith Wells , and Joseph Hedley .

JOSEPH HEDLEY sworn. - I am a grocer , in partnership with Sir John Eamer , and Jonah-Smith Wells: I was not in town at the time of the loss.

JOSEPH BLANDELL sworn. - I am a soapmaker: On Saturday last, the 5th of July, I saw the prisoner come out of Sir John Eamer 's gate in Wood-street , with a lump of sugar between his hands before him; there was another waiting by him in the street; from their appearance I had a suspicion that they were upon nothing that was good; I immediately stepped into the shop, and gave the alarm, that there was some sugar stolen from them; upon which one of the young men followed me, and we went after the prisoner through a court; upon our running after him he happened to look round, and saw us following him; he then flung the sugar off his shoulder into the kennel, or rather the side of the street; upon the cry of stop thief, from us, some gentlemen that were before attempted to stop him; I saw him stopped, he had not then been out of my sight; after he came through the court, upon his being stopped, Sir John Eamer 's young man went up and collared him, I stood by the sugar; when he brought the man back, I took hold of him and he took the sugar; I conducted the prisoner to Sir John Eamer's warehouses.

Q. Are you sure that the man you saw with the sugar in Milk-Street, is the same that you saw come out of Sir John Eamer's gate? - A. I swear positively that that is the man.

JEREMIAH BUTCHER sworn. - I am servant to Sir John Eamer : I went after the prisoner; I received the sugar from the last witness, and delivered it to the constable; I know it to be our sugar by the mark; upon the alarm being given, I missed it from behind the door; it is marked T B N.

GEORGE WILKINSON sworn. - I live with the prosecutor; the mark upon that lump of sugar is my putting on before it was stolen.

EDWARD HANSON sworn. - I am a constable: The sugar was delivered to me by Butcher, and I have had it ever since; when we took the prisoner

to Guildhall Sir John Eamer was sitting, and he did not think proper to commit the prisoner himself, and I did not receive the sugar till the next day.

Prisoner's defence. Last Saturday, as I was coming down Wood-street, there was a man in a white apron standing, I supposed him to be a person belonging to the warehouses, and he asked me if I would carry a light load; I told him I would; and he took it up and put it into my hands.

Q.(To Blandell.) How was the man dressed that you saw standing near the prisoner? - A. In a loose dress, with a dark great coat on.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Confined three months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-35

511. ELIZABETH PRICE , alias SIMCOE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , two gowns, value 9s. two sheets, value 2s. 6d. three table-cloths, value 5s. two shawls, value 2s. a waistcoat, value 1s 6d. a muslin apron, value 1s. and a pillow-case, value 1s. the property of William Butlin .

WILLIAM BUTLIN sworn. - I keep a coffee-house in Smithfield ; I know nothing of the facts.

SARAH BUTLIN sworn. - I am the wife of William Butlin : The prisoner was my servant , I had dismissed her from my service before I discovered the robbery; after she was gone I missed the property; I inquired after her, and the prisoner's cousin brought me some duplicates, her name is Frances Howe, which led me to discover the property.

FRANCES HOWE sworn. - The prisoner is my cousin: I learned that Mrs. Butlin had missed some property, and I went to the lodgings of the prisoner to make a discovery of it, and she was not at home.

Q. How do you know they were her lodgings? - A.Mrs. Butlin sent her daughter to shew me the house: On Saturday in the Whitsun-week Mrs. Butlin sent a man with me to frighten her, I do not know whether he was a constable or not.

Mrs. Butlin. He was not a constable, nor is he here.

Howe. We opened the door, and there was Elizabeth Price in the parlour, the front room; she was not at home when I found the property; I asked her if she had got any thing belonging to her mistress; she said, no; this man then said, if you have got nothing of your mistress's you must go with me, and he took her to Mrs. Butlin's; the prisoner did not sleep there, the woman and her husband, who did sleep there, made their escape that same night; there was a little box standing upon the shelf, which the woman of the house said was the prisoner's; I took it, and found eighteen duplicates in it; I delivered them to Mrs. Butlin; I did not take the box away.

Q.(To Mrs. Butlin.) Were you ever at the lodgings of the prisoner? - A. Not where she slept, she used to sleep at a public-house; I went to the house where she sat in the day-time; she had left me about a month.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at that house? - A. No.

Mr. Butlin. I have seen her there.

JAMES MINTON sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Pearson, a pawnbroker, in Fleet-market, (produces two gowns, two petticoats, a sheet, a table-cloth, and a half shawl); one black silk gown I took in of the prisoner at the bar on the 15th of April, I did not take in the other things; I knew her before by her being a customer.

JOHN MERRITT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, (produces a sheet, pillow-case, table-cloth, and a shawl); I took in these things of a woman in the name of Elizabeth Pitt ; I do not now whether it was the prisoner or not.

JOSEPH LADBROKE sworn. - I am a publican and a constable: I took charge of the prisoner; I received these duplicates from Mrs. Butlin, and also these letters which the prisoner sent me. (Produces them).

Q.(To Mrs. Butlin.) Do you know her handwriting? - A. Not to be able to swear to it.

Q.(To Howe) Do you know the prisoner's hand-writing so well as to be able to swear to it? - A. No.

HENRY-BOLTON WIGLEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, (produces a waistcoat, a tablecloth, a muslin apron, and a shawl); I took them in on the 22d of February, from a woman, but I cannot say who it was.

Mrs. Butlin. I know this gown to be mine, I had but lately been out of mourning, and it has been altered for me, and has a new lining.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY. (Aged 25.)

Of stealing the gown, value 2s. 6d.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-36

512. EDWARD SHEPHARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , twelve pounds weight of hemp, value 2s. the property of Thomas Wilson .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of a certain person or persons to the Jurors unknown.

There being no evidence to identify the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-37

513. THOMAS CURRELL was indicted for that he, on the 21st of June, in the 30th year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of St. Thomas, in the county of Surry, did take to wife Elizabeth Howes ; and afterwards, on the 11th of November, in the 39th year of his Majesty's reign at the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury , did take to wife Ann Tidman , the said Elizabeth, his former wife, being then living .

MARTHA GRAYSING sworn. - I know the prisoner: I was at his marriage with Elizabeth Howes , about ten years ago; I have got a copy of the register, but I cannot read; Elizabeth Howes is here.

JOHN HARDING sworn. - This paper is not what I wrote; I do not know any thing about it; I was present at the marriage.

Q. What is the name of the church? - A. St. Thomas, in the Borough; there was nobody else present besides the clerk of the parish.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Who subpoenaed you to come here? - A. Mrs. Currell, the first wife.

Q. Not any other person? - A. No.

WILLIAM GRETTAN sworn. - I went to church with the prisoner when he was married about two years ago, I think; I was a little in liquor when I went.

ANN WALKER sworn. - I know the prisoner: I was present when he was married to Ann Tidman twelve months ago last November; they were married at St. George's, Bloomsbury; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner's defence. I was separated from this woman seven years ago, before a Magistrate; I cannot live with her, if I had I should have been hanged long ago; she has encouraged me in thieving; she has carried a knife and a razor to bed, and swore she would do murder; I have a doctor here that will prove she has given me the foul disorder; the doctor examined me and found me to be a clean man, and he examined my wife and found her to be a foul woman.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-38

514. SAMUEL SMEDLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , handkerchief, value 1s. the property of James Polworth .

JAMES POLWORTH sworn. - I am a journeyman carpenter and joiner : On Monday evening, the 16th of June, about half past ten o'clock, I was coming up Snow-hill , and there happened to be a quarrel inside of a house, and a number of people stood round the door; I stopped a little, and went on till I was stopped by a boy, who asked me if I had not had my pocket picked; I put my hand upon my pocket and missed my handkerchief; I went back with him, and he pointed out the prisoner as the man that took it; I laid hold of him by the collar and asked him if he had not picked my pocket; he denied it; I insisted upon his being searched; he turned out his pockets, but there was nothing in them at all; I put my hand down to his inside-pocket and found something lost; I put my hand inside, and pulled out my handkerchief and another one; I know the handkerchief by the border, and likewise it had been torn and sewed up in the middle; the patrol has got it, I delivered it to him in the watch-house; I lost the boy in the crowd.

A WATCHMAN sworn. - I was present when the boy charged the prisoner with picking the prosecutor's pocket; I saw the prisoner searched, and the handkerchief taken out of his pocket; there were two handkerchiefs found upon him; one of them the prosecutor said was his: I did not take much notice of the handkerchief. (The patrol produced the handkerchief, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Q. What is the value of it? - A. About two-pence, I should think.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he picked up the handkerchief upon Snowhill.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly Whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-39

515. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , a silver watch, value 50s. the property of Samuel Baughan , in the dwelling-house of Peter Green.

SAMUEL BAUGHAN sworn. - Last Thursday was a week, on the 3d of July, I went into the Red Lion in Old Gravel-lane , to get some refreshment for my wife and myself, about two o'clock in the afternoon; I had never been in the house before.

Q. What are you? - A. A Serjeant in the 27th regiment : The prisoner Jones and two more men followed me into the house, and placed themselves in the opposite box to me and my wife; I was going that day to join the regiment; my wife asked me what o'clock it was; I gave her my watch to wind up, and she put it on the table; I was told by another man in the house, that the prisoner took the watch and walked away with it; I did not see him take it; I followed the prisoner, and found him on Green-bank, about a quarter of a mile from the house; he was walking very slowly, but on

sight of me he was in a hurry; I went up to him and charged him with the watch.

Q. Have you seen the watch since? - A. Yes; I had it from Elizabeth Barlow; I delivered the watch up to Perry, the officer; I saw the watch at the Thames office; the maker's name is John Curtis No. 1037.

Q.Is your wife here? - A. No, she is ill.

ELIZABETH BARLOW sworn - I live at No. 5, Lower Well-alley, St. George's; I heard a great noise; I ran out to see what was the matter, and there was a bustle; they said a man had stole a watch, and that the watch was upon my stairs; I went up stairs, and there was a broken pan upon the landing-place, and between the pieces of the pan I found the watch; I delivered it to the Serjeant at my own door.

Q.(To Baughan.) Did you take the prisoner in custody near the place where the woman gave you the watch? - A. Yes, within a very few yards.

JAMES YORK sworn. - I am servant to a tallowchandler, on Green-bank, Wapping; I was sitting at my master's door; I saw the prisoner and another man in company with him, pass by the door; I saw the prisoner take a silver watch out of his pocket; the prisoner turned round the corner of Lower Well-alley, and delivered the watch to the man that was in company with him; I saw that it was a silver watch; the man went into a house, No. 5, Lower Well-alley, and went up stairs with the watch in his hand; he came down stairs again, and told the prisoner to make off, or some such words; Mrs. Barlow came out to know what was the matter, I told her there was a watch supposed to be dropped upon her stairs; I fetched the serjeant to receive his watch from the old lady.

Prisoner. In what manner did I give it to the other man? - A. He had a blue coat on, and he took it out of his coat pocket.

RICHARD PERRY sworn - I am an officer belonging to the Marine Police-office, Wapping: On Thursday, the 3d of July, I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner; the serjeant gave me charge of him, for robbing him of his watch; (produces the watch;) I received it from the serjeant.

Baughan. This is my watch.

Prisoner's defence. The serjeant pulled out his watch, and said he had bought it that day or the day before, and he was handing it about to shew what a cheap watch he had bought; but I never had it in my hand at all; he went out backwards, and when he came back he said I had got his watch.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s.

TRANSPORTED for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-40

516. JOSEPH SIMMONS was indicted for being found at large before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

The copy of the record of conviction being defective in point of form, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-41

517. THOMAS QUIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a portable writing-desk, value 51. 5s. the property of Thomas Hanford , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS HANFORD sworn - I am a portable desk maker , No. 94, Strand, nearly opposite Southampton-street ; I know nothing of the loss.

THOMAS HEARNE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Simmons, No. 95, in the Strand, On Saturday last I saw the desk taken from Mr. Hanford's window, about nine o'clock in the evening; I had my hands full of boots; I was just by Mr. Hanford's door; it was an open window, the fash was out for shewing the goods; the prisoner is the man, he took it with both hands, and walked away very gently; two gentlemen stopped him before I could give the alarm; I cannot swear to the desk. (The desk produced.)

Hanford. This desk was in the window; there might be three or four or five upon it; it was marked five guineas.

Q. What is the value of it; what would it cost you making? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Would it cost forty shillings? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the lowest priced desk in that window? - A.Fifteen shillings and sixpence; I never make any with brasses at the corners under two guineas.

Q.(To Hearne.) Do you think it was as large a desk as that? - A. Yes, full.

Hanford. There was only one more desk of this size in the window, and that was marked four guineas and a half.

Q. Did that desk which you marked four guineas and a half stand you in more than forty shillings making? - A. Yes, it must.

Prisoner. The boy said, at the Justice's, that he saw me go into the shop.

Hearne. I did not say so; I said I saw him take it from the window.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 24.)

Of Stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-42

518 RICHARD AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , a pair of

linen sheets, value 20s. , the property of Benjamin Cole .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Charles Bampton .

CHARLES BAMPTON sworn. - I am waiter at the Talbot Inn in the Strand ; my master's name is Benjamin Cole : The prisoner came to sleep at our house, and in the morning I was informed a pair of sheets were missing; the prisoner was gone.

Q. What time did he go? - A. About half past twelve at noon, and they were missed about half an hour after he was gone; I heard of him from Mr. Pearson, a pawnbroker.

THOMAS PEARSON sworn. - I live at No. 33. Norton-salgate: The prisoner brought me a pair of sheets on the 17th of June, about one o'clock: I stopped him; I had seen him once or twice before.(Produces the sheets.)

Bampton. These sheets have the mark of our house upon them, but I cannot swear to the sheets because we have lost other sheets, and Mr. Dyts, the former landlord, left the house about seven weeks ago, and carried some sheets with him.

JANE BAMPTON sworn. - I am a chamber-maid at the Talbot in the Strand: I cannot say that these are the same sheets; I lost the sheets from the bed that the prisoner slept in on the 17th of June.

Q.(To Bampton.) What night was it he came to sleep at your house? - A. On the night of the 17th; he went away on the 18th.

Pearson. I stopped him on the 17th.

Court. Then these cannot be the sheets.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-43

519. THOMAS ARNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a gown, value 5s. three handkerchiefs, value 4s. and a pair of shoes, value 1s. the property of Sarah Welch , Spinster .

SARAH WELCH sworn. - On Saturday last the prisoner came up into my room; he took a bundle off the bed, and went down stairs; I thought he meant it in a bit of fun; some of it was my property, and some belonging to another girl; and he went and pawned them.

Q.Then you suffered him to go down stairs with the bundle, and did not attempt to stop him? - A. I thought it was fun.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, you see the nature of this case. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-44

520. THOMAS BARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , ten yards of canvas, value 15s. the property of George Easterby .

GEORGE EASTERBY sworn. - I am a shipbuilder and ship-owner ; the prisoner was a seaman on board a ship of mine called the Hope, and upon being discharged he cut up a new top-gallant-sail, and took part of it; here is a witness to prove it.

- HENLEY sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Easterby: I was on board the Hope when Barnes was discharged; I saw him cut some canvas off the top-gallant-sail; the top-gallant-sail was in the forecastle; there was about five yards of it.

Q. Was it an old sail? - A. No, I saw him put it in his breast, and he went ashore with it.

Q. How long ago was it? - A. Three or four months.

Prisoner. Q. Did not your master correct you when he found the canvas cut out of the sail? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Your master thought you did it then? - A. No, he did not.

Q. What did he correct you for? - A.Because I did not tell the captain.

Q.(To Easterby.) Did you correct the boy upon the supposition that he had done it? - A. No, I corrected him for not telling the captain.

Prisoner's defence. We were very short of canvas on board in coming from Shields, and the mate cut a piece of an old fad to put round the cable to keep it from chasing; afterwards when I came to London I was discharged and received my wages; and if I had had the canvas in my bosom, then Mr. Easterby must have seen it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-45

521. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , a gown, value 10s. the property of Nathaniel Settle .

ELIZABETH SETTLE sworn. - I am the wife of Nathaniel Settle ; my husband is in the East Middlesex militia ; I knew the prisoner six years ago; I have not seen her these four years, till the 6th of June, she came to find me out, and told me she was out of place; I made her welcome, and left her in the room while I went out; I was gone about five minutes, and when I came back she was gone, and had taken the gown with her; it was about half past four in the afternoon; I had left it upon the back of the chair that I sat on; I found the gown at Mr. Hill's, a pawnbroker, in Turnmill-street.

ROBERT SKAYNE sworn. - I did live with Mr. Hill, in Turnmill-street: The prisoner at the bar pledged this gown with me on the 10th of June,

sometime in the afternoon, I think about five o'clock; I let her have ten shillings upon it; (produces the gown.)

Mrs. Settle. This is my gown.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner; she said she had pawned the gown, but had lost the duplicate.

Prisoner's defence. She lent me the gown.

GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-46

522. JACOB TOWLER was indicted for feniously stealing, on the 27th of June , fifteen pounds weight of lead, value 2s. 8d. the property of William Bailey .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM BAILEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a Smith and ironmonger in Theobald's-road ; the prisoner had been my servant near two years: In consequence of missing some property, I stopped the prisoner on the 27th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening; I sent a boy out to tell him I wanted to speak to him; I told him I had missed a great deal of lead; he said how could he help that; I said it was proper we should find it out; he said he knew nothing about it; says I, I shall search you first; I put my hand to his side, and felt something; I took him to the watch-house, and Mr. Spriggs took from out of his breeches, under his apron, some lead; it came from the Duke of Bedford's; I had fetched it up in the morning; I have no doubt but what it was my lead.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was it in the same state in which it came from Bedford-house? - A. No, it had been cut to pieces in the shop.

Court. Q. What is the weight of it? - A. Sixteen pounds, fourteen ounces.

BENJAMIN SPRIGGS sworn. - The prisoner was brought to our watch-house on the 27th of June: I found these two pieces of lead in the fore part of his breeches; (produces it;) I made my mark upon it; these are the same pieces of lead; the prisoner seemed very much agitated, but I do not recollect that he said any thing.

JOSEPH IZOD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Bailey: This is Mr. Bailey's lead, I have no doubt of it; I know it by having had it in my hand; I saw it cut; I had one piece of it in my hand the day it was lost.

Prisoner's defence. I have a witness here that I bought the lead of; I took this lead to the shop to melt, to do some jobs with; my ladle was in Mr. Bailey's shop, and is now; I saw Izod look very hard at me, and I thought he had a suspicion that I had stolen it, and therefore I did not melt it, but meant to do it at home on Sunday.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-47

523. JAMES THOMAS , SOLOMON HEWSON , and JAMES MAXWELL , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Allan Preston , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 8th of July , and burglariously stealing a table-cloth, value 1s. a glass tumbler, value 6d. part of a quartern loaf, value 1s. and a knuckle of veal, value 2s. the property of the said Allan.

ALLAN PRESTON sworn. - I am a weaver , n Charington's-row, Bethnal-green : Last Tuesday morning, I had the wash-house-door adjoining my house broke open, and a knuckle of veal, a glass tumbler, a table-cloth, and part of a quartern loaf, were taken away; I fastened it up at eleven o'clock, and about four in the morning we discovered it; my wife got up to let the fowls out, they made such a noise we could not sleep; they always do make a noise as soon as it is light in the morning to get out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This was last Tuesday morning? - A. Yes.

Q. You got up at four o'clock the next morning? - A. Yes.

Q. It had been light a great while at that time? - A. Yes.

ANN PRESTON sworn. - I am the wife of Allan Preston : Last Wednesday morning I got up about four o'clock to let the fowls out, and I found the wash-house-door open; I missed out of the cupboard a knuckle of veal, a table-cloth, a glass tumbler, and part of a quartern loaf; I saw them all again at Worship-street.

ROWLAND CHARTER sworn. - I am a patrol: I took the prisoners on Wednesday morning, about three o'clock, at the back of the Hope, in Pollock-row, they were getting up a wall, about two hundred and fifty yards from Mr. Preston's house.

Q.(To Preston.) What morning did you say it was; I said Tuesday morning, but I meant Wednesday morning.

Charter. The prisoner, Maxwell, had a bag, he threw it down, I heard something break, and he said I should pay for it; he said there was nothing in it but provisions for their supper; Thomas then picked it up; I took them to the watch-house, and found in the bag a table-cloth, a part of a quartern loaf, a knuckle of veal and a broken tumbler.

Q.Was it then day-light? - A. Yes.

(To Mrs. Preston.) Are you positive as to the morning? - A. Yes, Wednesday morning.

JOHN RAWSON sworn. - I am a watchman; I assisted in taking the prisoners; one of them called me by my name, he belongs to the Tower Hamlets; I asked him what he had been doing; he said, nothing; we took them to the watch-house, and found the property upon them; after they were gone below, into the hole, we found a chissel, underneath the bench where they had been sitting; the prisoners did not say any thing particular. (The table-cloth was deposed to by Mr. Preston).

Thomas's defence. I had been at the King's-arms in Houndsditch, to a hat-club, I staid there till eleven o'clock, I saw Maxwell and Hewson there; we staid very late, and meant to walk about all night; that is the truth, and nothing but the truth.

Hewson's defence. I can say no more than what Thomas has said.

Maxwell's defence. I went to the club; we bought this meat in Whitechapel-market, as we were too late to get in at home.

The prisoner, Thomas, called four, Maxwell four, and Hewson five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Thomas, GUILTY. (Aged 20.)

Hewson, GUILTY. (Aged 26.)

Maxwell, GUILTY. (Aged 22.)

Of stealing the goods, but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-48

524. ANN JACKSON , and MARY BRINKLEY , were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , two half shawls, value 3s. a linen shawl, value 2s. a linen handkerchief, value 1s. a skirt of a muslin gown, value 14s. an apron, value 1s. a silver tea-spoon, value 2s. and a yard of lawn, value 1s. the property of Catherine Stubbs , widow ; and the other, for receiving part of the same goods knowing them to be stolen .

THOMAS SOWERBY sworn. - On the 5th of June, the prisoner, Jackson, pledged a silk handkerchief with me for two shillings; a tea-spoon for one shilling and sixpence, on the 3d of June; and a remnant of lawn, on the 29th of May, for one shilling; a cap for one shilling, a shawl for sixpence, on the 2d of June; and a coloured shawl, on the 26th of May, for one shilling. (Produces the articles).

CATHERINE STUBBS sworn. - I am a widow; I took the prisoner in because she had not a place to be in, till she could suit herself; On the 5th of June she went away, I missed a silk handkerchief; my little girl happened to see her go into Mr. Sowerby's, I went there, and found the things; the apron I had lent her while she was with me, and she ran away with that upon her.

Q. Is that the apron that you charge Brinkley with receiving? - A. Yes; these things are my property.

Jackson did not say any thing in her defence.

Brinkley was not put upon her defence.

Jackson, GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Brinkley, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-49

525. CHARLES WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for forging, on the 17th of May , a certain Bill of Exchange for payment of money , which said Bill of Exchange is to the tenor following:

"London, May 16, 1800.

"Three days after date pay the bearer the sum"of 24l. 10s. value received, and place the same"to my account. John Smith, and Wilson,"Addressed to York-Buildings, Strand.

"Messrs. Jones and Downes,

"King-Street, Westminster.

"Accepted."

With intent to defraud James Smith .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the same, as true, knowing it to be forged.

There were two other Counts, stating it to be an order for the payment of money, instead of a Bill of Exchange.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I live in Little Alie-street, Goodman's-fields: On the 17th of May, I kept the London-Apprentice, in Whitechapel ; the prisoner came to my house, about three o'clock in the afternoon, took me on one side, and asked me if I was landlord of the house; I told him I was; he wanted to know if he could lodge with me for a week or a fortnight; I said he could not, unless he slept with another man; he said he could make any shift, for he was just discharged from one of his Majesty's ships, and had been in the hospital; he said he would pay me a week beforehand; he asked me what I would charge for boarding him; I told him I was not used to boarding men, but I supposed about fifteen shillings a week; he said I spoke like an honest man, he would give me eighteen shillings; he pulled out his pocket-book and produced a note, which he said he had just received from his agent for prize-money; I shewed the note to a gentleman that was in the parlour, and asked his opinion of it, and he thought it was a good note; the prisoner wanted me to let him have a guinea, or

a guinea and a half, upon the note till the Monday morning; the note became due on the Monday; and through the persuasions of that gentleman, I advanced him a guinea and a half upon it; he said he had to go to the Borough, he had left some things in the hospital, and he would come back to supper; a coach was sent for him, and as he was going away, he said, Mr. Smith, we sailors are run sort of fellows, may-be I may want half-a-guinea more; and I let him have half- a-guinea more; almost as soon as he was gone, I heard that he had defrauded another man; I went after him, but could not find him; I was taking a walk out, accidentally, last Saturday afternoon, at Bethnal-green, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, when I saw the prisoner; I recollected him immediately; he shoved me down, and I had to go almost half a mile for assistance; I went in search of him, I saw him go into a public-house in the road leading to Hackney, and then the officer and I took him, (produces the bill); on the Monday morning I went to King-street, Westminster, but could find no such people as Jones and Downes, I could not learn that any such persons had ever lived there; I learned that there had been fifty such notes inquired about in that neighbourhood.

Q. Did you endeavour to find out Smith and Wilson? - A. Yes, but I could not; I found a name very near it, Williams, or some such name.(The bill read.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. The person that gave you this note, you had never seen before the 17th of May? - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. You asked him to endorse the note, I take it for granted? - A. I did.

Q.But in point of fact he did not endorse it? - A. No, he said he could not write; and he made his mark.

Q. Did he tell you he could not read also? - A. I do not recollect that he did.

Q. You never saw him again as you suppose, till last Saturday? - A. No.

Q. How many minutes might he be with you on the 17th of May? - A. He came about two or three o'clock, and staid till near seven.

Q. Did any thing pass between you, respecting either the drawers or acceptors? - A. No.

JONATHAN ALDUS sworn. - I was at Mr. Smith's, on the 17th of May, I saw the prisoner there, Mr. Smith asked my advice, I told him I should not be afraid of giving him some money upon the note till Monday morning, when it was to be due; I am sure the prisoner is the person.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. Did you ever see the man before? - A. Never, but I am sure the prisoner is the man.

EDWARD EATON sworn. - I am an officer of Bethnal-green; Mr. Smith gave me charge of the prisoner, I know nothing more of it.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it, I hope you will have mercy upon me, I have a wife and family.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 36.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-50

526. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a cotton gown, value 10s. two petticoats, value 10s. two aprons, value 3s. five neck handkerchiefs, value 5s. a pair of women's shoes, value 3s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. two shifts, value 5s. five yards of calico, value 5s. and two caps, value 1s. the property of Mary Marsh , in the dwelling-house of Richard Mimpurse .

MARY MARSH sworn. - I slept one night in the house; I came to town on the 16th of June, from Stratford-upon-Avon, in Warwickshire; I went to Mr. Stafford's, in King-street, St. James's; while I was there, the prisoner Mary Smith came in, I was sitting in the tap-room; she asked me where I came from, and what my name was, and she asked me if I had any where to lie, I told her no; she asked me to go and sleep with her, I did not know her; I went with her, I had a bundle containing a cotton gown, five handkerchiefs, two shifts, two aprons, two caps, a piece of calico, a pair of stockings, and a pair of shoes.

Q. What are they all worth? - A. I do not justly know; I went with her to No. 32, Great Wimpole-street , the house of Richard Mimpurse ; she bid me go to bed, she said, she was going out again; I went to bed about ten o'clock, she had put the bundle in the cupboard; when I first came in, she went out, and about twelve o'clock, she brought a man home, she said it was her husband's brother, and he must lie with her and me, for she had but one bed; they both got into bed for about ten minutes, and then they went away again; I got out of bed and laid on the floor all night; in the morning I went to Mr. Stafford's, and got my place, she promised to bring my bundle there, and she never brought it; on the Sunday following, I went to her, and she was not at home; I went again on Tuesday the 24th, and she said she had sent it down by her servant-maid; the next day she came to our house, and I asked her for it, she d-d me, and called me a liar; I told her she had not sent my clothes; then she said they were at No. 12, in Carnaby-street, I forgot now what the name was, I went, but no such person lived there as she told me.

Q. Were you quite a stranger in London? - A. Yes, I never was in London before.

Q. Are you at Mr. Stafford's now? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you no friend or acquaintance in town? - A. No; before I got to town, a young man gave me a lift in a cart, and he took me to Mr. Stafford's, I did not know any thing of them before.

Q. Why did not you leave your bundle at Stafford's? - A. I was not sure of the place.

JOHN MASCOU sworn. - On the 25th of June, I went with the last witness to the prisoner's lodgings, the prisoner went with us from Mr. Stafford's, and in the way, I asked her where that girl's clothes were, and she said, she had sent them down by her servant-maid; I told her it was a very great falsehood, for she had not; I told her, I would not leave her till she told me the truth; she said then, if I went to No. 12, Carnaby-market, her servant was there, and there the girl would find her clothes.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer, I went to Mimpurse's, where the prisoner did lodge, I found some duplicates of the clothes there.

JOHN- WOOD CAFFALL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Freer, a pawnbroker, (produces a gown, a remnant of calico, and a remnant of cotton;) I took them in on the 17th of June, from the prisoner, and a cotton shift pledged on the 18th of June, but I did not take that in. (The property was deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I was sitting in the bar drinking tea, the girl was sitting among a parcel of drunken men, they could not let her sleep there; I went out to see if I could not get a bed for her at the mangler's, and she could not sleep there; I took her home to my lodgings, she had no money, she gave me some things to take to pledge for her, to get some victuals.

Court. (To Marsh.) Q. Did you give her the things to pawn? - A. No; I gave her one petticoat, and that she never gave me the money for.

Q. How came you to give her that? - A. She said, what did I think was to become of me, with no friends in town, and no money, and advised me to let her pawn something; I gave her a petticoat to pawn, she said she did so herself, when she first came to town.

GUILTY. (Aged 26.)

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-51

527. ANDREW COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , a silver watch, value 20s. and a clasp knife, value 2d. the property of Joseph Dixon .

JOSEPH DIXON sworn. - I am mate of the brig Fortune : On the 12th of June, between six and seven in the morning, I missed my watch, I had put in it my jacket pocket, on the cabin locker.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - (Produces the watch:) I am an officer belonging to the Public office, Shadwell; I took charge of the prisoner on the 12th of June, from Captain Rough , belonging to another brig, about one hundred and fifty yards from that, but that charge turned out nothing; I asked him if he had got any watch, he said, no, he had not; I made him strip, and in the inside of his trowsers, was a little pocket, between the legs, in which I found this watch; I then caused it to be advertised, and Mr. Dixon came forward.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I assisted to search the prisoner, I found that clasp knife in his jacket pocket. (The watch was deposed to by Dixon.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Confined two months in Newgate , and publicly whipped twice .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-52

528. MARY SMITH alias HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , two men's shirt's, value 3l. 12s. three shirts, value 2l. three gowns, value 20s. a woman's dress, value 3s. a yard of muslin, value 5s. three petticoats, value 5s. two aprons, value 3s. nine pair of stockings, value 18s. a silk cloak, value 10s. and a sattin bonnet, value 5s. the property of Ann Williams .

ANN WILLIAMS sworn. - I keep a tripe-shop now, I did follow the laundry business, I took in washing; the prisoner was my chairwoman : On the 18th of October, the property was all taken from the one pair of stairs room, except the gown; some of the things were ironed, and some damped the night before, ready for ironing; there were two men's shirts, three shifts, three petticoats three gowns, one yellow dress, nine pair of stockings, a square of muslin a yard and a half, a new sattin bonnet, a black silk cloak, a table-cloth and handkerchiefs.

Q. What are these things worth? - A. They are worth above ten pounds, without the table-cloth and white handkerchiefs; I left her in the room between nine and ten in the morning; when I came home, I found the door locked, the prisoner was gone out, and had taken the key with her; I did not see her again, till I saw her at her lodgings in Peter-street, Westminster, on the 8th of June; she was taken with the gown upon her, and I swore to my gown upon her back, at Queen-square office, and she had my bonnet upon her head; she would not tell me what she had done with any of the

things, she left her own bed-gown, and her own bonnet in my room; the gown that I lost was down stairs, under the counter.

Q.Were the shirts new? - A. There were two belonging to a gentleman at Kensington, and one of the petticoats was new; those shirts were worth a guinea and a half a shirt, the shirts were new, the woman's dress was bran new, it cost two guineas; the cloak cost me two guineas just before, and was not the worse for wear; the stockings, I cannot say what they were worth, there were two pair cost seven shillings a pair; one of the petticoats was worth fourteen shillings.

Q. Do you keep the house? - A. No, I am a lodger, the house is let in tenements; the landlord does not live in the house, nor any of his family.

JOHN BEVAN sworn. - I have an apartment on the same floor with Mrs. Williams; on the 18th of October, I observed the prisoner go down stairs twice, with clothes drawn carelessly through her arm; the second time she went down, she left the room door wide open; in a few minutes, she came in again, and I followed her into the room, and gave her a caution about leaving the door open, and she thanked me; just after, I heard her go down stairs again, but did not see her, and she locked the door after her.

Q. How was she dressed, when you saw her that second time? - A. In an old bed-gown, and an old black hat; I then went out, I was gone about a quarter of an hour; when I returned, Mrs. Williams was come home, and the door broke open, there did not appear to be so many clothes in the room as there were before.

- JAQUES sworn. - I am a constable; on the 8th of June I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; I found this bonnet upon her, and the gown that Mrs. Williams claimed, the gown was not taken from her; she told me, the bonnet she took, but the gown was given her.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 23.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-53

529. SARAH DONOLLY was indicted for that she, on the 29th of September , in the 23d year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, did take to husband, Andrew Donolly , and afterwards, on the 28th of August, in the 37th year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish of St. Martin, did take to husband one Martin Hindes , her former husband being then alive .

The first marriage not being substantiated the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-54

530. WILLIAM BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , a German-flute, value 5s. two blankets, value 10s. three ladies waist belts, value 6s. five silver belt buckels, value 10s. two other belt buckels, value 2s. and two pawnbroker's duplicates, value one halfpenny , the property of Edward Wright .

EDWARD WRIGHT sworn. - The prisoner was an acquaintance of mine; I lost the several articles from my lodgings that are mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner used to come every day, either to breakfast or dine with me; I found the flute in the possession of John Snow , he had bought it of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Beville. Q. Where did you live? - A. At No. 9, Hemming's-row.

Q. What are you? - A. A belt-market to the army.

Q. The prisoner has been in the habit of visiting you as a friend? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner's father or mother upon the occasion of this transaction? - A. Yes.

Q. Has the prisoner never done any services to you? - A. He has promised me many things, but never performed any of them.

Q. What happened on the day the prisoner was taken to Bow-street? - A. The prisoner's father sent for me, and asked me what his son had been doing, and I told him; he said, if his son was the temper of him, he would blow them all to atoms before him; I saw he was in a passion, and I left him.

Q. Is the prisoner in your debt? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you say any thing about that debt owing from the prisoner to you? - A. He wanted to trap me, and I would not make any charge.

Q. Did you say any thing to the prisoner's father about any debt due from the prisoner to you? - A. I said nothing to him about it.

Q.That you positively swear? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at a public-house in St. Martin's-lane, a few days before the prisoner was taken up? - A.No.

Q. When was the last time before he was taken up, that you were at the public-house with him? - A. I cannot say.

Q.Had you, at any time, your flute at the Coach and Horses, in St. Martin's-lane, when the prisoner was present? - A. I had, one night before Christmas.

Q. Did you carry it home that night? - A. I did, and I never had it there but that night.

Q.When did you see the flute last? - A. I saw it upon the desk three or four days before I missed it; I missed it on or before the 20th of April.

JOHN SNOW sworn. - (Produces a German flute.) I got it out of pledge from Mr. Garton's, in St. Martin's-lane, the prisoner at the bar brought me the duplicate, on or about the 21st of March, I took it out.

Wright. This is my flute.

Q. Did you ever pawn it yourself? - A.Never in my life.

Q. The other things mentioned in the indictment are those to which the duplicates belong? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutor and I have been acquainted for some time, we eat and drank together; at the time he charges me with stealing this flute, we were at the Coach-and-Horses, at a club, and finding our finances growing low, he desired me to go out and pledge the flute; I returned and tendered him the duplicate; I pulled it out of my pocket-book, and he desired me to put it in again; I was to have some money shortly from Mr. Williams, book-maker to the Prince of Wales, who was my master; he gave me the duplicate of these other things, which he said were articles grown out of fashion, and become less valuable; I received five pounds from Mr. Williams, and went into the country; when I returned, I learned that he had been circulating a report that I had stole his flute; hearing that, I went to him, and he told me, if I did not let him have some money, he would fix me; I afterwards met with him accidentally, at the Kings's-head, I think, in Holborn, where we had some conversation; Mr. Jones will prove what passed.

Q.(To Wright.) Did you ever give the prisoner instructions to pledge that flute? - A. No.

THOMAS JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I am a comb-maker, in St. Martin's-lane; I have known the prisoner from a child; I knew the prosecutor about nine months ago, the prisoner brought goods from Mr. Wright for me to sell; Wright repeatedly came with him afterwards; I have often heard Wright say, in conversation, that Bell was indebted to him; some altercation took place now and then between them, but I never heard Wright challenge Bell with robbing him, but that he owed him money, and desired him to pay it; about three months ago, Wright called upon me, and requested me to go and see Bell, who had inlisted for a soldier; I went with him to the King's-arms, in Holborn, and there Wright asked Bell for the money, that as he was become a soldier, he might then pay him out of his bounty-money; he said, he had not received it, yet, as soon as he got it, he would let him have some; I heard little more of it till after the prisoner was in custody; I sent for Wright; Bell's father asked him, respecting this business, how he could attempt to take his son up for robbing him; Wright replied, he should not have done any such thing, but he owed him some money; he asked him how much it was, and he pulled a paper out of his pocket, and said, it was about eight pounds; he told Mr. Bell at the same time, that if he could get the order to receive this money from his commanding officer, he would let this matter drop.

Q. Who was by at this time? - A.Nobody particular; Mrs. Bell was by, and my wife, and Bell the father; I never heard any thing but that he was a very honest young fellow up to the present time.

WILLIAM BELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I am an iron-founder, at Lambeth: I know the prosecutor, Wright; I was present at the conversation on the morning of the day that my son was apprehended; Jones sent for Wright, I said, good God, how could you be so serve, surely he has not robbed you; I should not have done so, says he, if he had paid the money he had agreed to pay me; I asked him how that debt arose; he said, he had frequently lent him money, and he had had his German-flute; surely, says I, he did not steal it; why yes, he said, he had taken it out of his room, and some other things, that he would take care to prove; but upon going a little farther he flew out of the room; I was angry, a little alteration took place, and he ran away.

Q. Was this the day your son was apprehended? - A. It was the day of the last examination, when he was committed; Mrs. Bell was present, and Mrs. Jones.

Q. Was any thing said about the bounty-money? - A. I understand so; I did not hear it.

Q. Did you ever hear Wright say, that he had employed your son to pawn things for him? - A. I cannot speak with any certainty to that.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-55

531. SARAH CHURCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , a pair of half-boots, value 2s. 6d. a linen shift, value 9d. a flannel petticoat, value 3d. a petticoat, value 2s. and a frock, value 2s. the property of Elizabeth Richards , Spinster .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of John-Andrew Richards .

ELIZABETH RICHARDS sworn. - I am the wife of John- Andrew Richards ; I live with my mother, she keeps the house: On Friday the 11th of June, my child was taken from the door, she went to the door about half past five o'clock; I live at St. Andrew's-hill, Blackfriars ; there were three more children playing with her at the door, they came in to go to bed a little after six o'clock, and I inquired

for her, and they said they did not know where she was; I looked about, and saw a woman that is here, she gave me some information, by which we found the child before nine o'clock, this is the child; a young man fetched the child home; the child's frock was gone, and all her clothes, expect the boots and her shirt.

ELIZABETH HUTCHINS sworn. - My husband is a gardener: I was walking to and from upon St. Andrew's-hill on the 11th of June, I saw the prisoner take up the child, and go round the corner with it; this is the child; I saw Mrs. Richards looking about, I asked her if she was looking for a child, and I told her the woman was gone that way with it.

JAMES BRYAN sworn. - The first that I saw of the prisoner was in Earl-street; she came past a stall, where I was standing, with a soldier, about four o'clock, and went down Thames-street; she was gone about half an hour, as near as I can guess; she had no soldier with her when she came back again; she came to this stall, and asked the man if he had done her shoes; he asked her in what name they were; she said, Sarell, then she went away, and came again in about half an hour, with the child in her arms; that is the child; she stood talking with me at the stall for near half an hour, with the baby in her arms; she asked the baby if it would have a cake, and then she turned away, that was about a quarter after six; I am certain the prisoner is the same person.

Q. Did you take any notice of the child's dress? - A. No.

- WINTER sworn. - I am a coal-porter: I saw the prisoner come along with the child in her arms, on the Friday evening at the bottom of Water-lane, Fleet-street; it was about six o'clock, to the best of my knowledge; I cannot swear to the child, but I can swear to the woman; I saw her take it into one Mrs. Baldwin's passage; I went home, and when I came back, I saw the child upon the stairs in its shirt and under petticoat, and the woman along with it; the child was dressed when I saw it first in her arms.

WILLIAM GAY sworn. - I am a shoe-maker: I saw the prisoner go past my shop in Earl-street, with a soldier, about four o'clock; she was gone the best part of an hour, when I saw her go up the hill again, and in about a quarter of an hour after that, she brought this child in her arms; I know the child, and I know the prisoner; she said to the child, I will buy you some cakes, and she went away; I am sure she is the woman.

JOHN WEATHERBY sworn. - I am a parish beadle: The child was brought to my house between six and seven o'clock on the Friday evening, by Mrs. Baldwin, who lives at No. 11, St. Bride's-passage, Salisubry-court; the child was brought to my house stripped; Mrs. Baldwin is too ill to come out; I ordered my wife to dress the child with some of my children's things; I went and cried the child, but could find no owner; about an hour after I heard, by accident, who the child belonged to; this is the child.

Q. Who apprehended the woman? - A. James Bryan .

Bryan. I took the prisoner, about a fortnight after, in Bridge-street, Blackfriars: I am sure it was the same woman; I had no suspicion of her when I saw her with the child; when I took her, I told her she was the person that I saw carry the baby away; she said she was not the person; I took her down to the child's friends, and she was taken before the Magistrate and committed.

Q.(To Mrs. Richards.) Have you seen any of the property since? - A. Yes; here is the frock and skirt; I went before the Alderman, and I walked by the side of her after the examination on Tuesday, as she went to the Compter, and she told me she had pledged them at Mr. Strangeways's, over Blackfriars-bridge.

Q.Did you tell her it would be better for her to confess? - A.No; She asked me to forgive her for taking the child; I told her I could not forgive her; she said she was in liquor at the time; I asked her if she had put them in her own name; she said, no, she had put them in her sister's name; I asked her if she had got the tickets; she said, no, she had lost them; she said her sister's name was Tibbet; when I came there, they were not in that name, they were in the name of Davis; they are my child's clothes; I have a piece of a skirt which the child has on now, there was no particular mark upon it; the frock is the same, I made them both myself.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor; it is the very first time I ever committed an offence of this sort.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

The Court immediately pronounced sentence of

Transportation for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-56

532. JAMES GEARING was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Garton , Sarah the wife of the said John, and other persons, being therein, about the hour of eight, in the evening of the 9th of May , and feloniously stealing four pair of silk stockings, value 2l. 8s. the property of the said John .

JOHN GARTON sworn. - I keep a house, No. 97, Cheapside : I can only speak to the property.

JAMES MARTIN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Garton: On Friday the 9th of May, the window was broke open, about eight o'clock in the evening; I went to put the lamps in the window and missed some silk stockings; the bottom pane of the window

and been broke about a twelvemonth back, it had been completely repaired with putty; the putty was went away, and a piece of glass taken out; the stockings laid as near the window as could be.

Q.Was it light at that time? - A. It was between light and dark.

Q. Was it light enough to see a man's face? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was in the house at this time? - A.Mrs. Garton, myself, another apprentice, and a maid servant.

Q. What are the value of the stockings? - A.Forty-eight shilligs; I saw the stockings afterwards at Shadwell-office, on the 11th of June.

JOHN COOK sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the public-house, Shadwell: On Saturday the 10th of May last, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, in company with Brown, and two other officers, we went to a court in Essex-street, Whitechapel, to the house of a man of the name of Jaques; the prisoner came into the front room up one pair of stairs, and produced four pair of silk stockings; I asked the lad what he came there for; he said he came to sell these stockings to Jaques; I asked him how he came by them; he first told me he had found them, and then he said he had received them of another boy. (Produces the stockings).

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer; I was in company with Cook: I took these four pair of silk stockings from the prisoner; and then I found these two knives, one of them had putty at the point of it, and the other is ground round to make it stiff at the top.

Garton. These stockings are my property, they have my mark upon them.

Q. You sell stockings with your mark upon them? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Martin.) Do you know these stockings? - A. There were such stockings in the window at the time, they have Mr. Garton's mark

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through Whitechapel, I saw a boy and a girl, and the boy asked me to go and sell these stockings for him, he would give me some halfpence, and he would shew me where; he told me to go to Mr. Jaques's.

The prisoner called Thomas Edwards , who deposed that he was a lamp-lighter under his father and bore a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 11.)

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s. but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

Judgment respited till next Sessions .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-57

533. SAMUEL PHIPPARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , a sack, value 2s. 6d. and three bushels of peas, value 5s. the property of George Clarkson .

It appearing in evidence that the property belonged to five other persons, who were equally responsible, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-58

534. THOMAS ROWBOTHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a silk handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Lachlan Mackintosh , privily from his person .

The only material witness being absent, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before. Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-59

535 CHARLES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , a pocket-book value 1s. the property of Diederick Garjen

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

The prosecutor having gone aboard, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-60

536. JOSEPH NORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , three pounds weight of soap, value 2s. the property of William Whitnell , and Sarah Parker , widow .

The prosecutors not being able to identify the property the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-61

537. ELIZABETH EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a silver mug, value 30s. the property of John Meare .

JOHN MEARE sworn. - I am a wholesale warehouseman , No. 68, Friday-street : I can only speak to the property.

RICHARD KENNE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. John Meare : On Wednesday evening last, about half past seven o'clock, I was at the farther end of the room, by the window, I turned my head round and saw the prisoner come into the room by the side-board; I saw her reach her hand over the sideboard; then I walked up to her, and she had got the mug in her hand, she had got it about one inch off the side-board; I asked her what her pleasure was; she said she came to take a glass of water; I immediately walked out of the room, and shut the door to, I called one of the servants, and desired her to call Mr. Meare; he sent for a constable, and she was detained.

Q.What part of the house in this room in? - A. Up one pair of stairs; the side board is within one spot of the door.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.What age are you? - A. Fifteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q.What is the nature of an oath? - A. I shall answer to my conscience.

Q. Do you believe you must answer to God? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you hear it in your memory that you were examined before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Yes, twice.

Q. Did you know the nature of an oath when you were before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q.Whenever you were examined before the Lord-Mayor you were examined upon oath? - A. Yes.

Q.Upon your oath, when you were before the Lord-Mayor the first time, did you not say, that she put her hand upon the mug, and that that was all she did? - I said she hoisted it one inch from the side-board.

Q. Did you not say, the first time that you were before the Lord-Mayor, that she had put her hand upon the top of the mug, and that that was all she did? - A. I said she hoisted it one inch from the side-board.

Q.Recollect, I am speaking of the first time; and I will tell you this, that there was a person by at the time you were examined, and I warn you of that-did you always give the same account before the Lord-Mayor? - A. He asked me but one question the second time, which was, if I was certain she moved the mug, and I said, yes.

Q. Then your account before the Lord-Mayor was always consistant? - A. As far as I know.

Q. Upon your oath, did not the Lord-Mayor reprimand you, and tell you you had been very wicked in giving him different accounts? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. He did not reprimand you at all? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q.You must know; it is now Saturday; was it yesterday, or the day before, that you gave your account before the Lord-Mayor? - A. The day before yesterday, and yesterday.

Q. Then you must have a recollection of what passed? - A. He told me to speak louder; that is the only thing that I remarked.

Q.Then he never reprimanded you for giving different accounts? - A. No, he did not.

Q.Did you never say, that all she did was, to put her hand upon the mug? - A. No, I never said so.

Court. (To Mr. Meare.) Q. Did this witness charge the prisoner in your presence? - A. Yes; he told me that the woman came softly into the room; got between him and the door, and put her hand across the side-board towards the silver mug, and moved it; that is, as near as I can possibly recollect, what passed.

Q. Were you present at the examination before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear the account that he gave there? - A. At the first examination he was asked particularly as to whether the girl had moved the mug; I particularly desired him to recollect himself; and as well as I can recollect, he said, she moved the mug; at the second examination, the Lord-Mayor asked him again, particularly, whether she moved the mug, and he said, she had moved the mug.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. How came you to desire the boy to recollect himself? - A. I desired him to remember to tell the truth, and nothing but the truth; I desired him to recollect the facts as they were.

Q. Do you recollect the Lord-Mayor reprimanding him? - A. No; I was, myself, rather dubious about it, for I did not distinctly hear him; and, at the second examination, I desired him to be particular, and he said, she had moved it, but I did not hear him distinctly say that, at the first examination.

Q.Surely, it was only yesterday, you must recollect whether the Lord-Mayor said any thing particular to the boy? - A. I do not want to keep back any thing, but I do not remember any thing particular.

Q. Will you swear positively, that the Lord-Mayor did not reprimand him? - A. I did not hear it.

Q. Will you swear he did not? - A. I can only swear to what I really heard, I did not hear him reprimand the boy.

Prisoner's defence. As soon as I entered the room the young man locked me in; he told his master I was going to take the mug; at the first examination he said I was going to take it; and at the second, he said he took it out of my hand.

For the Prisoner.

HENRY HIGGINS sworn. - I am a smith and bell-hanger, I live in Houghton-street, Clare-market; I was attending before the Lord-Mayor, when the prisoner was examined, but was not at the first examination.

Q. Were you at the second? - A. Yes, the day before yesterday, Thursday.

Q. What passed? - A. The boy came forward, and said, that the mug that was there, was not moved from off the premises.

Q. Were you there at any other time than Thursday? - A. Yes, Friday.

Court. How came you to be at the second? - A. I attended as her friend; the boy said, the mug was not moved, but her hand was upon it.

Q.Did he say any thing afterwards? - A.Nothing that I took notice of.

Q.On the Friday, did the Lord-Mayor say, any thing to him? - A. On the Friday, he did say, this is two different stories.

Q.What did he say on the Friday? - A. He said it was taken from the side-board.

Q. The Lord-Mayor observed to him this was two different stories? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the prisoner a married woman? - A. Yes; I have known her six or seven years, her husband kept a broker's shop in Stanhope-street, and after that a green-grocer's; I never knew any harm of either of them, in my life; she bears a very good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-62

538. HENRY HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , three pounds of flour, value 16d. and two three-penny loaves, value 6d. the property of John Chipperfield .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN CHIPPERFIELD sworn. - I am a baker in Whitechapel , the prisoner was a servant of mine; in consequence of an information, on the 3d of this month, I set Nowlan, the officer, to watch at a neighbour's house opposite; I saw him searched by Nowlan; he found, in a stocking, in his breeches, three pounds of flour, a three-penny loaf hid in his bat, and a three-penny loaf, half in each of his pockets; the loaves I can swear positively to.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I am an officer, (produces the property;) I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's house; I never lost sight of him till I look him; I took these things from him, this stockings of flour was in his breeches, I searched his lodgings, and found other stockings with flour in them, in the same manner.

Chipperfield. These loaves are my property, the prisoner had been my servant about five months.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-63

539. JOHN WEIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing two hempen sacks, value 5s. two bushels of split pease, value 30s. and half a bushel of oats, value 3s. the property of Richard Holditch and George Hope .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE MATTHEWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a watchman, at Bromley: On Sunday morning, the 22d of June last, I saw the prisoner about half past twelve o'clock at night, rowing about in a boat; I had a suspicion of him, and watched him; I called a man to my assistance, and after some time, the prisoner rowed on shore, on the side where we were; we let him go on a little way a head, and then I followed him and stopped him, he had a sack upon his back, containing peas, and in another sack, inside of that sack, some beans.

Q. Were there a bushel of peas, do you think? - A. I cannot say, the prisoner said it was his own property, that he bought it of a bargeman, and pleaded to let him go; I delivered him, to the officer Shynn, and we went with him to the watch-house; he got out of the watch-house, and was re-taken on the Thursday night following; I left the property in Mr. Shynn's hands.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Was it on the river Thames you first saw him? - A. Yes.

Q.When you went to call assistance, you lost sight of the man in the boat? - A.Certainly.

Q.Then the person that you saw afterwards, you cannot swear was the same that you saw in the boat? - A.No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you certain that he is the same man that came on shore? - A. Yes.

JAMES SHYNN sworn. - I am a headborough,(produces the property;) on Sunday, the 22d of June, the prisoner was delivered to me by the last witness, and two bushels of peas, and about a bushel of beans, and two sacks, he did not say any thing to me; I took him to the watch-house and locked him up, and he was there at near eleven o'clock on Sunday night; when I came to the watch-house, about five the next morning, the lock was broke, and the prisoner gone; on the Thursday night following, Griffiths and I apprehended the prisoner at Seven Oaks, in Kent.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - On Thursday the 26th of June, I apprehended the prisoner at Seven-Oake, in Kent, about a quarter past ten in the evening.

GEORGE HOPE sworn. - I am in partnership with Richard Holditch , miller, at Bow; the prisoner had been a servant of ours, about four months; we discharged him on Saturday evening, the 21st; these are my sacks, I know them by a seal put on by the elders of the Synagogue, it had been brought from the Synagogue, and laid up in a warehouse of ours; they are always laid by for that particular purpose; we contract to furnish the Portuguese Synagogue with flour.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know of your own knowledge, whether there is

not a mark upon the sacks contracted for by the other Synagogues? - A.Each Synagogue has a different mark.

ANANIAH OVELAPHIA sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I know this to be a sack that I did seal myself.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 39.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-64

540. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , a cart harness, value 2s. an iron back belt, value 1s. 6d. a leather wanton, value 3s. two bridles, value 6s. and a sack, value 2s the property of Benjamin Bates .

JOHN DIGBY sworn. - I am a labouring manservant to Mr. Bates, a carman , at Paddington; I saw the prisoner take the property; I unharnessed my horses about an hour before, in the Foundlingfields; I put the harness into one of the vaults, by where we were at work; I saw the prisoner go into the vault, take them out, and put them in a sack, and carry them away; I followed him, and took him in the Duke of Bedford's private road; I asked him what he was going to do with that property, he said it was his own, I collared him, and secured the property; it is Mr. Bates's property, I was at work not five roods from him, behind a clump of bricks, he did not see me. (Produces the property.)

BENJAMIN BATES sworn. - Every article here is my property.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 37.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-65

541. EDWARD PROBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , two linen sheets, value 5s. the property of John Derby .

JOHN DERBY sworn. - I keep the Red-Lion, at Paddington : On the 8th of June, the prisoner came to my house in the afternoon, and enquired for lodgings; I told him, I did not know that I could accommodate him, but he would not take a deniel; I told him I would do the best I could for him; he had some refreshment, and he gave me a bag to put in the bar to take care of for him; he said, he was going to see his brother, his brother might detain him all night, or else he should be back by ten o'clock; he returned about ten o'clock, and brought some steaks to be dressed for his supper, which was done for him; my sister shewed him to his bed; the next morning, between nine and ten, I went up to call him, I knocked at the door, and it was bolted on the inside, and he answered me; I came down stairs, and was out at the back door; while I was there he went away, my sister missed the sheets; I went after him and asked him to come back, and he would not; my ostler came up, and we brought him back, and laid the bag down upon the floor till the constable came, and then a pair of sheets were found in the bag.

ELIZABETH DERBY sworn. - I lit the prisoner to bed, he took his bag up with him; when he came down in the morning, I thought his bag appeared more bulky than it was over-night; I went up stairs and found the sheets gone from out of the chair where I had left them; when he came down stairs, he had the money in his hand to pay for his lodging, and he gave me the money; I went away, my brother went after him, and he was brought back with the bag; I desired him to open the bag and he refused; a constable was sent for, and I saw one sheet taken out, but not the other.

THOMAS WALTON sworn. - I am a constable; I found two sheets in a bag, at Mr. Derby's, one marked 17, J. B. and the other marked 2, J. B. and Mr. Derby said, they were his. (The sheets produced, and deposed to by Mrs. Derby.)

Prisoner's defence. When they came after me, I said, if I had any thing more than my own, it was more than I knew; I believe they were put in out of spite.

GUILTY . (Aged 44.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-66

542. JOHN PETERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , a man's hat, value 2s. the property of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I am a hatter , No. 18, High-street, St. Giles's : On the 11th of June, as I was standing in the shop, I received information, that the prisoner had taken a hat; I pursued him, he had the hat in his hand before him; when I came up to him, he threw it away; I took him to Marlborough-street, the hat was hanging up at the door.

Prisoner's defence. I never meddled with the hat, the hat was lying by me, and a gentleman said I had taken it.

GUILTY (Aged 17.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-67

543. ELIZABETH WILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a frock, value 2s. the property of Catherine Hill , spinster .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of James Hill .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES HILL sworn. - I keep a public-house , the corner of Warwick-street, Golden-square: On the 26th of April, these two children of mine were at play in Golden-square , and left me about two o'clock, on Saturday, and about four I saw them in St. Martin's watch-house; I did not see the prisoner at that time; this child's name is Catherine, her frock was off her; here is a piece of the same that I had at home; I saw the prisoner the same evening, at Bow-street.

MARY JAP sworn. - I live in Taylor's-buildings, St. Martin's -lane; in consequence of four children being stripped in the course of a week, I gave my own children a particular caution, not to let any body take any thing from them; on Saturday the 26th of April, I was sitting at work, about three o'clock, when my own child came and gave me information; in consequence of which, I went to a necessary, opposite to No. 1, Taylor's-buildings; I opened the door, and saw the prisoner with one child at her left knee; I asked her what she was going to do with it; I looked round and saw the other child sitting upon the seat, with her neck bare; I asked her what she was going to do with the child's frock, she had it in her hand; she said, she was going to turn it; I took hold of her, and she dropped the frock; I sent for Mr. Ferguson, who took the prisoner, and I took the frock and the child home with me, and sent to her father; this is the little girl.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am a constable. (Produces the frock.)

Hall. This is my child's frock; I never saw the prisoner till I saw her at Bow-street.

Court. Q. This is a great way from Golden-square? - A. I have no doubt but it is a full mile.

Court. Q. What age is she? - A. About four years of age.

GUILTY (Aged 14.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-68

544. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a gander, value 7s. and twelve geese, value 30s. the property of Thomas Kilby .

ELIZABETH KILBY sworn. - I live at Cherrygreen, Wilsden , my husband is a labourer : On the 15th day of June, in the night, I lost thirteen geese; I locked them up over night, in a house adjoining the dwelling-house; I missed them between three and four in the morning; the prisoner was stopped at Kilburn, and carried to Marlborough-street; I knew my geese again immediately; the two old geese I can swear to, the oldest I have had five years, and the other four, and the young ones were hatched this last March.

JAMES LAWSON sworn. - On Monday morning, the 16th of June, about six in the morning, I saw the prisoner resting upon a stile near Kilburn-Wells, he had a sack; I saw him put it upon his shoulder; I went up to him, and asked him what he had got there, and he said, nuts; I made him put them down, and called a farmer to my assistance; I took out of the bag, thirteen geese and a gander, young and old, all dead; I sent to this woman and sent for a constable.

Mrs. Kilby. I am sure the geese that Lawson shewed me were mine.

Prisoner's defence. I found them under the hedge, just on the other side of the windmill; I saw another man go away from them, and leave them there.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-69

545. JAMES INGRAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , the carcass of a sheep, value 10s. the property of Richard Hoare .

RICHARD HOARE sworn. - I am a butcher in Brooke's-market : On the 4th of July, I saw the prisoner go past the window, with a sheep on his shoulder, I had not killed it above three quarters of an hour, it was quite warm; I pursued him, and he threw it down directly, I am sure it was mine.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-70

546. THOMAS EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of June , a copper pocket-piece, value one halfpenny, a counterfeit halfpenny, value a farthing, seventy-four penny-pieces, one hundred and twenty-seven halfpence, and five farthings , the property of Thomas Richards .

Thomas Richards was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-71

547. PATRICK COLLARIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , two iron pots, value 5s. and thirty pounds of lead, value 3s. the property of Henry Kelly .

JOHN WINSLEY sworn. - On Monday the 16th of June, I went into a shed, where the articles in the indictment were missed from, I saw a hole in the wall which led to a closet that the prisoner had possession of, and I suspected they were gone that way; I got a constable and found them in his bedroom; there was a communication under-ground to the shed.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer, I was sent for to search the prisoner's room; the shed is about as far from his room as I am from that window; I found the property under his bed, I found a communication under his room to the shed.

Prisoner's defence. I am quite innocent of it, I had been out of town, and know nothing at all about it; there are other lodgers in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-72

548. JOSEPH BARTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , a saw, value 2s. two chissels, value 1s. and a jacket, value 6d. the property of John Woolmer .

ROBERT HARDY sworn. - I work for George Clarke , at Stamford-hill : On the 6th of June, I unlocked the shop, I had locked it on the 5th of June, about seven at night; on the 6th in the morning, I found that somebody had taken down a bit of wainscot and got in; my master unlocked the shop and I got in, I missed a great number of tools that were taken upon him, by Gladwell.

- GLADWELL sworn. - I am a patrol at Hackney; I stopped the prisoner on the 6th of June, about three in the morning, by Claptonpond, about a mile from the shop, I was alone then; I followed him till I heard Mr. Curtis's watchman crying three o'clock, and then I stopped him and took him to the constable of the night; I found upon him twelve saws, and other carpenter's tools. (Produces them).

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am constable of Hackney; I had the prisoner in custody, these tools were delivered to me, they were in a basket, and put into a sack. (The tools were deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I found them by the side of the road.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-73

549. JOHN JONES was indicted for that he, on the 6th of June , being a servant to Richard Lancaster , a baker , did receive, and take into his possession, the sum of 1l. 6s. 3d. for and on account of his said master, and having so received the said sum of money fraudulently, and feloniously did embezzle the same against the form of the statute .

Second Count. For the like offence, varying the manner of charging it.

Third Count. For stealing the said 1l. 6s. 3d. the property of the said Richard.

In consequence of the indictment not being laid according to a late Act of Parliament, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-74

550. JOHN WIGNALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , a gown, value 2s. and an apron, value 3d. the property of Robert Wright .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-75

551. MARY QUIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , a seven-shilling piece , the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am a soap-boiler and tallow-chandler , No 10l, Oxford-street : On the 5th of June, the prisoner at the bar came to my house to buy a pound a candles, and wanted change for a guinea; my young man served her; after he had given her the change, he came to me in the parlour, I had a friend in the parlour; I went out, and the prisoner was disputing some seven-shilling pieces that he had given her in change; I changed one that she refused; she then refused that; then I laid down another at the same time; there were these two upon the counter; she concealed one of them in her right-hand, she wrung the other, and asked my neighbour whether he thought it was good; I changed but two, and one of them it was that was lost; I charged her with it, and sent for a constable, but it was never found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.There was a person of the name of Sandford in the shop? - A. Yes, my servant.

Q.What is the name of your friend in the parlour, the butcher? - A.Littlewood.

Q. Did you not say to him, of he would slip round, you would do Mrs. Quin? - A. I said, the woman had been there before, and I had no doubt of it.

Q.What did you say, I told him to go round to

the shop to see whether she would do any thing or I had a suspicion of her.

Q. There was then your servant Sandford and the butcher, all upon the watch in the shop, to catch this woman if you could? - A. Certainly.

Q. And do you mean to say, notwithstanding all your eyes were upon her, that she took a seven-shilling piece? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, did you attempt to send for a constable, till she refused to leave the shop, and insisted upon your giving her a seven-shilling piece, which she said was short in change? - A. No, she never refused to leave the shop.

Q. She was searched while she was in the shop, and a seven-shilling piece found? - A. she was.

Q. Do you remember seeing her before she was taken before the Magistrate.? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not tell her at the watch-house, that if she would give you seven shillings, you would not prosecute her? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you not tell her so, and did she not say, if you must have a seven-shilling piece, you shall have half-a-guinea to take it out of, and then you shall be prosecuted for extorting it from me? - A.No such thing.

WILLIAM SANDFORD sworn. - I am servant to the last witness: On the 5th of June, the prisoner came to our shop for a pound of candles and change for a guinea, upon which I gave her a half-guinea, a seven-shilling piece, six-pence, two shillings and two-pence; she objected to the seven-shilling piece, I changed it, and the did not like that; I changed that, and she did not like that; I then gave her a third, and she said I gave her the same over again; she kept chinking it, and said, I do not think it is a good one, upon that my master threw down the third, and she concealed the second one in her right-hand; my master had a constable sent for, and had her taken to the watch-house.

Q. Did you see her conceal it? - A. Yes; I saw her take it in her right-hand.

Q. How came you not to lay hold of her hand? - A. I was sent for the constable.

Q. Then none of you laid hold of her hand? - A. No; I went for the constable, and I saw no more of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Why did none of you take hold of her hand? - A. Mr. Littlewood did.

Q. And there was no seven-shilling piece there? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, was it not done by you, either by mistake, or design? - A. I saw her conceal it.

Q. Did not you, or your master, or Littlewood, by, you would trap Mary Quin ? - A. No. Q. Upon your oath, did he not say, we will do her? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner was entitled to a seven-shilling-piece, was she not? - A. Yes.

Q. When she was searched, had she even the seven-shilling-piece that she was entitled to upon her? - A. I did not see her searched.

Q. Did She not make a disturbance in the shop, and say, she was cheated out of a seven-shilling-piece; and was it not in consequence of that, that a constable was sent for? - A. She had a seven-shilling-piece besides the one she concealed.

JOHN LITTLEWOOD sworn. - I am a butcher; I was at Mr. Smith's: On the 5th of June, in the evening, the servant came in, and said the woman was there that he suspected; I went out and saw her with a half-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, two shillings, and two pence; she refused a seven-shilling-piece; Smith came out and offered her another, which she refused also; he then put down two, one quickly after the other, and she immediately concealed one of them in her right-hand; she then refused the other directly, saying that was a bad one also; I then saw that she had done what she wanted to do, and I desired Mr. Smith to give her seven shillingsworth of halfpence, to see if she would go out with the seven-shilling-piece in her hand; Mr. Smith then challenged her with having a seven-shilling-piece, for with I blamed him; she denied it; I unbuttoned her sleeve, thinking she might have slipped it up her cuff, but I did not find it.

Q. If you suspected her, why did not you lay hold of her hand? - A. I did, immediately, and it was not there.

Q. Is the constable here? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. The man who searched her, and could have proved that she had no more about her than her right change, you have not brought? - A. I did not know that it was necessary.

The prisoner put in a written defence, declaring, in terms the most solemn, her innocence of the offence with which she was charged.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-76

552. SAMUEL CROSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , a handkerchief, value 1s. and two quarts of currants, value 2d. the property of Thomas Wells .

THOMAS WELLS sworn. - On Thursday the 3d of July, I was coming from the country in a chaise; when I got nearly opposite Bloomsbury-market , a gentleman upon the foot-path called to me, and told me I had lost a bundle, and there were two young men gone after the man, but my wife being very much alarmed, I drove on; but upon reflection that I should not do my duty to society if I did not see after it, I went the next morning up

Holborn to inquire; the gentleman who called to me is not here; I saw the property about ten o'clock that morning.

WILLIAM STAFFORD sworn. - I am a coachmaker: I was standing at the corner of Lion-street, Bloomsbury, on the 3d of July, about half past nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner take a bundle from a single horse chaise, Mr. Wells was the person in the chaise; I saw Mr. Morton, my master, stop the chaise immediately; I pursued the prisoner, I never lost sight of him till he was taken at the corner of Market-Street, Bloomsbury; he was given up to the watchman; he had thrown away the bundle, which I picked up, and delivered to the watchman; a young man that was with me, Gerard Morton , took him; the bundle was in the head of the chaise, he jumped up behind, and took it out.

GERARD MORTON sworn. - I saw the prisoner take the bundle from the chaise, and run away; I called stop thief; I pursued him, and took him; the bundle contained currants tied up in a handkerchief; it was taken to the watch-house along with the prisoner (The watchman produced the handkerchief).

Wells. I believe this to be my handkerchief, it was such a handkerchief; I have the fellow to it.(Produces it).

Prisoner's defence. These two men said, at the watch-house, if they had known what they did then, they would not have come forward; they said, the person that had stole the bundle had got clear.

Q.(To Stafford.) Did you ever say, that the person that took the bundle had got clear? - A. No.

Q.(To Morton.) Did you say so? - A. No.

GUILTY . (Aged 24)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-77

553. JOHN LEONARD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Hood , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 27th of February , and feloniously stealing a shawl, value 5s. three yards of printed cotton, value 4s. a sleeve of a child's frock, value 1d. a child's frock, value 4s. nine yards of calico, value 30s. three yards of cotton, value 5s. and three yards of other cotton, value 5s. the property of the said Elizabeth Hood .

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-78

554. JAMES MAYCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June three trusses of hay value 4s. 6d. and four bushels of horse-feed, containing pollard, beans, and clover value 4s. 6d. the property of Charles Morgan .

CHARLES MORGAN sworn. - I live at St. Paul, Shadwell : I can only prove the property.

RICHARD THOMAS sworn. - I am a watchman at Shadwell: On the Friday before the robbery, at eleven o'clock at night, I saw a cart standing at the bottom of Shadwell-market, which gave me some suspicion; on Sunday morning, about four o'clock, I was locking my box up, and saw the prisoner with a cart, just by Mr. Morgan's place but he stopped at a little distance off; I then called my brother watchman, Strutt, and he came; when we went up to the cart, there were two trusses of hay in it, and the carman bringing the third; the prisoner was in the stables; I then turned my back to him, that he should not see me, then he moved the cart a little farther off; then I saw Mr. Morgan' horse-keeper, the prisoner at the bar; I stood by the corner of the wall, and saw the same carman take a sack of mixture from the stable, and some words passed between them, but I was too far off to hear what it was; my fellow-servant followed him and when I met with them they were coming back again, as he said, to shew where he got it from I observed the carman run away as hard as he could and my partner went after him; after that, I saw the prisoner knock at his own door; after the carman ran away, he came towards the stable, and was catched by the watchman, and we took him to the watch-house; I have got a sample of the mixture and a sample of the hay, (produces it ); the mixture is pollard, split beans, and clover; I suppose that might be between three and four bushels of it.

STRUTT sworn. - I am a watchman, Shadwell: the last witness called me a little after four o'clock on Sunday morning the 1st of June I went away to Mr. Morgan's premises, and the I saw the track of a small cart round the corner out of sight the stables; I went up to the man that belonged to the horse and cart, and asked him where he had got that hay and corn; there we three trusses of hay in the cart, he was going on a direction from the stables; I asked him where he was going, and told him I should not leave him and when he came to the market, he turned down into the market, and the other watchman desired me to mind them while he called an officer; soon as he was gone, the man that belonged to the cart ran away, I ran after him, he ran past Mr. Morgan's stables, and made his escape; the other watchman then took me to the place where gentleman lives, and knocked at the door; the prisoner opened the door, upon which Thomas hold of him, and I likewise, and took him to the watch- house.

Q.Did Thomas tell the prisoner why he took him? - A. No.

Q. Had you any conversation with him? - A. No.

Morgan. I was called up; I saw in the cart three trusses of hay, and this sack of mixture; I can swear to the clover, it is remarkable clover, such as I never saw before nor since; it is singularly green, clover in general is brown.

Q. Had you missed any? - A. I have missed twenty times that quantity; I have missed a great quantity of hay, and the horses have been starved.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty of it; the watchman laid hold of me, and charged me with this, when I was going to buy a pair of shoes; I Know nothing of it.

GUILTY . (Aged 41.)

The Court immediately pronounced sentence of

Transportation for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-79

555. ALEXANDER LOVELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , two pounds of butter, value 2s. the property of Thomas Blunt .

THOMAS BLUNT sworn. - I am a cheesemonger , No. 13, Holborn : On the 12th of June, about nine o'clock at night, I was coming across the way, and heard my wife cry out stop thief; I then saw the prisoner, and another, come out of the shop, one ran one way, and the other the other; I saw that the prisoner had a lump of butter in his hand, and I pursued him; he threw the butter down, and another person picked it up, and gave it me; I stopped the prisoner, and took him back.

MARY BLUNT sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Blunt : On the 12th of June, about nine o'clock at night, the prisoner, and another man, came in, and asked for some cheese; the prisoner took up a lump of butter and ran away; I called out stop thief, and my husband brought him back.

Prisoner's defence. I found it.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-80

556. JAMES MACDONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , a pair of women's shoes, value 3s. the property of Samuel Bumsted .

- BUMSTED sworn. - I am the wife of Samuel Bumsted , a shoe-maker , in Castle-street : On Friday morning, about ten o'clock, or between ten and eleven, I lost a pair of women's shoes from a hook outside the door, up at the top; my daughter brought them to me again, and either my daughter or I gave them to the constable, I am not sure which; I am sure they were the same shoes.

ELEANOR BUMSTED sworn. - I am daughter-in-law of the last witness: I keep a shop, and the prisoner brought me a pair of shoes to sell, last Friday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock; he pulled a pair of women's shoes out of his pocket, and asked me if I would buy a pair of shoes; I told him yes; he said he had bought the duplicate, that they were in pledge; I asked him what he wanted for them; and he said he gave nine-pence for the ticket, and half-a-crown they were in pledge for, that was three shillings and three-pence; when I looked at the shoes, I knew them to be my mother's by the shop-mark; I said half-a-crown was enough for them; I called down one of my lodgers to mind the house; I said I had no silver; I went to my mother's, and she missed them from the nail; my mother then came, and we brought a constable with us, and the prisoner was detained; I think it was me that gave the shoes to the constable; I know the hand-writing upon the shoes well.( Leonard Lommas produced the shoes, which was deposed to by Mrs. Burnfied).

Prisoner's defence. I bought these shoes for my wife, of a Jew; he said he had fetched them out of pawn for half-a-crown.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-81

557. THOMAS BLACK , FRANCIS BARTON , and JOHN CRACKFORD , were indicted, the two first for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May, two hundred pounds weight of sugar, value 61. the property of James Nowland , and John Nowland ; and the other, for feloniously receiving sixty pounds weight of sugar, value 35s. part of the above-mentioned goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were

All Three ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-82

558. WILLIAM HALSTEAD , and JAMES DAVIS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , twenty pounds weight of sugar, value 18s. the property of Charles Smith .

JOHN PLUMER sworn. - On Thursday night last, I was standing at the corner of Carthusian-Street, speaking to a friend; I saw a young man walking backwards and forwards several times, that was the prisoner, Davis; I turned myself round and watched him, as I thought he had a suspicious

appearance; I then saw a person go off the step of Mr. Smith's door, that was Halstead, Davis stood between two and three yards from the door; Davis said to the other, give it to me; I then saw him give him a very large lump of sugar; upon that, I informed Mr. Smith of it; I am sure the prisoners are the two men.

JAMES RAINVOY sworn. - I was coming through Charter-house-square: The prisoner ran past me with a lump of sugar; they turned towards the Charter-house, and threw the sugar against the railing; I lost sight of them after that, but I am sure they are the persons.

JOHN AINSWORTH sworn. - (Produces the sugar). I am a porter: I was coming past at the time, and had charge of the prisoners from Mr. Smith.

CHARLES SMITH sworn. - This is my sugar; it is sugar for refining; I am in the confectionary line; I can swear to it, it is a coarse rough sugar; I had missed it; in about twenty minutes after, they were brought back, with, I dare say, a hundred people; I cannot say which of them it was that brought them back.

The prisoners, in their defence, said they were innocent of the charge.

The prisoner, Davis, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Halstead, GUILTY (Aged 20.)

Davis, GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-83

559. MARY TYRRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d. of June , a carcass of mutton, value 28s. the property of Samuel Lee .

SAMUEL LEE sworn. - I live in George-alley, Fleet market : On the 23d of June, about half past twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the market, and, by some means or other, unhung my sheep, and took it away about forty yards from the place; I went to look at my sheep, and found one wanting; I went to look after it, when a person came to me, and gave me some information of it; I accordingly went about ten yards further, and found the prisoner with it; the fore-quarters she dragged upon the ground; when I found her, she had it up against a door-way, it had slipped out of her arms; it was a sheep that was in my charge, and if it had been taken away I should have been answerable for it.

Q. Was she in liquor? - A. I believe she was, a little.

JAMES SHEEN sworn. - I am a watchman: I came up to assist Lee, and he gave me charge of the prisoner; the sheep was lying down at her feet.

Prisoner's defence. I am an unfortunate girl; I met with a drunken man in the market, and he asked me to lift it upon his shoulder; and because I would not he threw it it at me, and then this man came up and gave charge of me.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-84

560. ELIZABETH GARDINER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , a pewter pint pot, value 10d. the property of Susannah Hale , widow .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-85

561. JAMES STUART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , two pounds weight of raw coffee, value 1s. 3d. the property of Andrew Cornish , John Wildman , and Benjamin Nind .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Andrew Cornish .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas Bull , Welbore-Ellis Agar , Sir Alexander Munro , Knt. Richard Frewin , William Stiles , William Rowe , Francis-Fownes Luttrell , John Buller , and Gloucester Wilson .

Fourth Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JEFFERY BARKER sworn. - I am one of the lockers in the coffee warehouses: I was standing upon the ground-floor, and heard the rattling of coffee in the next floor; I went up, in consequence, and met the prisoner; I had got up about four or five steps, and saw the prisoner coming from that room; I asked him who he wanted; he said Mr. Brown, to borrow a needle, to few up a bag; Mr. Brown is the foreman; after that, he came down stairs; I turned back, and looked at him, and he appeared to me as though he had got something in his pocket; I touched the outside of his jacket, and found he had got coffee loose in his pocket; I found in his pocket about two pounds of raw coffee; there was nothing but raw coffee in that room; he said he had picked it up in Thames-street, from a bag that was broke in a cart; I told him it was a very improper place for him to bring coffee into.

Q. Do you know who is the proprietor of that warehouse? - A. Mr. Andrew Cornish.

ANDREW CORNISH sworn. - I am the proprietor of the warehouse; I have no partner.

- STROUD sworn. - I am a locker in these warehouses: I heard the rattling of coffee; I communicated my suspicious to Barker, and I after

wards saw the prisoner come down, and was present when the coffee was taken from him; there was about two pounds of raw coffee loose in his pocket.(The constable produced the coffee).

Stroud. This is the same sort of coffee that was in these warehouses.

Prisoner's defence. I picked the coffee up in Thames-Street.

Court. Q. Was the coffee dirty? - A. No. quite Clean.

GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Confined one month in Newgate , fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-86

562. ANN SPENCER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Mildred , the said John, and other persons, being therein, about the hour of eleven, in the forenoon of the 10th of July, and feloniously stealing five yards and three quarters of silk, value 26s. part of a muslin gown, value 1l. 11s. 6d. and two cotton gown tails, value 6s. the property of Samuel Salt .

SAMUEL SALT sworn. - I am a watch-pendant maker , No. 75, West-street, West-Smithfield ; I lodge in the house of John Mildred , he lives in the house; he has the same communication to his apartments that I have: On Thursday last, the 10th of July, I left the room, and left the key in the door, for the convenience of attending a bit of meat that I had roasting, and went up stairs into the garret to work; I am sure I locked the door; I was up stairs about a quarter of an hour, and when I came down I found the room-door wide open.

Q. Was Mildred himself at home? - A. Yes, and a lodger up in the garret; just as I entered the room-door, my wife was entering it too; upon inquiring of Mildred, we entertained a suspicion of the prisoner; we went to the pawnbrokers to give information, and then we were going to Rosemary-lane, and in our way there, we met with the prisoner at the bar, in Chiswell-street; my wife accosted her, and asked her if she was going to our apartments, she was then buying fruit at a greengrocer's; she said, yes, in half an hour, will that do; we walked with her to the end of Grub-Street, and when she had turned the corner she ran away; I ran after her, laid hold of her, and brought her to our own apartments; I fetched Cartwright, the constable, who insisted that my wife should search her, I did not see her searched; after the search, my wife brought two duplicates into the room, one of them led to the gown-tail and the silk; she confessed where the muslin gown was.

DOROTHY SALT sworn. - I am the wife of Samuel Salt , I am a mantua-maker: I went out upon business between eleven and twelve o'clock in the forenoon, and I returned about ten minutes or a quarter after twelve; upon missing the things we made inquires, in consequence of which we suspected the prisoner; after that, going down Chiswell-street, we met with the prisoner buying fruit; I asked her if she was coming to have the body of her gown pinned on; she said, yes, in the course of half an hour, if that would do; I told her, yes; then she came out of the house, and when she got to the corner of Grub-street she ran away; my husband pursued her, and took her home to our lodgings; we sent for Cartwright, the officer, and I searched her; I found upon her two duplicates, that was about half past three o'clock; one of the duplicates was for one of the gowns, and the silk.

Q. Whereabouts did you find the duplicates? - A. As she was untying her petticoats they dropped from the side of her; I delivered the duplicates to the officer; I found the property at the pawnbroker's.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I am an officer of the City: I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, the duplicates were delivered to me, (produces them); the prisoner began to lament, and said, the devil possessed her; I then went with her, and found this muslin dress, in Ball-court, Fan-street; there is half a breadth of it missing.

ROBERT EVRINGTON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Burrows, a pawnbroker, in Barbican, (produces a cotton gown-skirt, and five yard and three quarters of silk); I took them in of the prisoner; I had seen her before, I am sure she is the person.

ELIZABETH RIOBY sworn. - I am mantuamaker, in Bell-yard: I met with the prisoner by chance; she brought me this white gown to alter, it was to be done by eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. Is cambric and muslin the same thing? - A. Sometimes it is called cambric, and sometimes muslin; I told her I would do it; she brought it, but with only one sleeve; I asked her where the other was; she said, was not it there; and I said, no; then she said she must have lost it, for she recollected putting into the corner of her handkerchief, as she came along; she was to come again at eight o'clock in the evening to have it fitted on, that was on Thursday last, the 10th of July; she brought it to me about one o'clock at noon.

JOHN MILDRED sworn. - I keep the house in which Mr. Salt lodges: I was standing at my own shop-door when the prisoner came past me in the shop, on Thursday last, between eleven and twelve at noon; she was gone about three minutes; she came down again with something in her lap, and went out very sharp; Mrs. Salt came home soon after, and went up stairs; I heard her scream; I went up to inquire what was the matter; she said, she had been robbed; I described the prisoner to

her; and that is all I know about it. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Salt).

Mrs. Salt. She brought me a gown to make for her on the Wednesday before, and she took the tail of it away with the rest of the things, here is the remainder of it. (Produces it.)

Prisoner's defence. A stranger to me asked me to pledge the tail of the gown and the silk for her, which I did for eight shillings, and Mrs. Salt said, if I would give her the money to take them out, she would not hurt me, and I gave her eight shillings out of my own pocket; the white dress I bought of the same person for seven shillings and sixpence.

GUILTY (Aged) 16.)

Of stealing goods, to the value of 39s. but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-87

563. WILLIAM MAPSOM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , two linen sheets, value 3s. two blankets, value 5s. and a rug, value 4s. the property of John Malone , in a lodging room .

Second Count. Charging it to be a lodging-room, to be used by him and one Richard Wilson.

JOHN MALONE sworn. - I rent a house, NO. 2, Draper's-buildings, London-wall ; my wife let the lodgings to the prisoner.

ESTHER MALONE sworn. - I am the wife of John Malone ; the prisoner took a lodging of me, at one shilling and nine-pence a week, on Thursday the 3d. of June, he slept but one night in the house; I let the articles mentioned in the indictment to him, with the room; when he went away, he put the key under my door, I just saw the glimpse of his coat as he went by, I was at the window, and saw him go by with a large bundle under his arm; I went after him and stopped him, he turned back immediately and came in, he put down the bundle and went up stairs; there were two sheets, two blankets and a rug; I then called out for assistance, and he was secured; I delivered the property to the officer; the prisoner told me he was a carpenter, the officer is very ill of a fever and cannot be removed out of bed, he delivered up the property to day.

Malone. I brought the things here now, I received them at the Poultry-Compter, from the officer.

Mrs. Malone. I saw them carried to the poultry-Compter. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Malone.)

Prisoner's defence. When I came down in the morning, I was desired to put the key under the door; I went away, she called after me, and said, young man, let me see if you have taken any thing with you; I went back, and went up stairs, and she called out for assistance; I never had the things.

Malone. Here is a witness that saw him in the court with the property.

HENRY WIGHTMAN sworn. - I was ust rose from my bed and gone to the window, about a quarter after six in the morning; I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's house, with a large bundle under his left-arm; I saw the prosecutor's wife run out and call after him, that he had robbed his lodgings, he turned about immediately, and came back with the property; she called for assistance, and I ran down immediately; when I came down, he had got into the room, he begged pardon, and said, he was sorry for what he had done.

GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-88

564. THOMAS BUCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , sixteen ounces of cotton, value 16d. the property of a person or persons to the Jurors unknown.

JOHN SIMMONS sworn. - I am a constable, employed by the Lord-Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London, to take care of the merchants' property upon the Quays; I saw the prisoner, on the 12th of June, upon Young's Quay , taking some cotton out of a hairy bag that laid upon the Quays, I do not know whose property it was; he put it into his breeches in small quantities, and filled his breeches so full, that he burst them out behind; my partner came up; I then went up to the prisoner, and asked him what he had got there; he said, he had not got any thing; I took hold of some cotton, and said, what do you call this; then my partner and I took him to the Compter, examined him, and took the property from him.

THOMAS DOGGERELL sworn. - I Am a constable belonging to the Lord-Mayor, (produces the cotton;) Mr. Simmons and I took the prisoner to the Compter; we searched him in the compter, and took this cotton out of his breeches, there are sixteen ounces of it.

Prisoner's defence. I was walking upon the Quays, I saw the cotton in the gang-way, and picked it up, I had no pocket and I put it in my breeches; I thought as I was going to camp, it would be very useful to clean my firelock, I had no other use for it. GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Publicly whipped on Young's Quay and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-89

565. THOMAS CHAMBERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , half a pound of tobacco, value 2d. the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

WILLIAM EDINGTON sworn. - I am constable on the Quays, belonging to the Custom-house: On Monday the 9th of June, I saw the prisoner lying down upon Cox's-Quay ; there were a number of packages for exportation; I saw the prisoner lay hold of a hogshead, and tear this tobacco that I have in my hand out of it; I immediately went up to him, seized him by the collar, took him back, and took this tobacco from his pocket, (produces it;) I cannot say whose property it was, it is worth about four-pence, without duty; there is no duty upon it when it is for exportation.

JOHN CARLISLE sworn. - I am a constable; there was such a great quantity of carts there, that I could not get hold of the prisoner immediately; I saw him take it from a cask, he pulled it from the head.

Prisoner's defence. I saw it fall from the cask, I picked it up and put it in my pocket; I was there half an hour picking it up, it was damaged tobacco, I put a bit in my mouth, and spit it out; I have been in Holland, and was wounded in both legs.

GUILTY .

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-90

566. CHRISTOPHER COOKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a basket, value 3s. a half-peck loaf of bread, value 2s. 11d. twelve quartern loaves of bread, value 17s. 6d. and nine two-penny loaves, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Bath .

JAMES GALE sworn. - I am a journeyman-baker, servant to William Bath; I was serving my master's customers, in Fleet-street , on Wednesday the 17th of June, about ten o'clock in the morning; I set my basket of bread down at a shop, to serve a customer, and went fifty or sixty yards further to serve another customer; when I came back, the basket and bread were gone; I ran down Fleet-market, but saw nothing of him; I went down one side of Fleet-market, and up the other; I stood at the corner of Ludgate-hill, and saw a person carrying the basket up Blackfriar's-bridge, I followed him and came up to the prisoner, on the Surreyside of the bridge; he had the basket upon his shoulder, I walked behind him as far as Fowler's, the Cross-keys; I asked the witness to assist me, and he accordingly did, and I stopped him at the corner; I asked him where he was going with my basket of bread; he threw the basket down, and begged my pardon, he offered me a seven-shilling piece to make it up, and I would not make it up; I took him to Christ-church watch-house, the basket is in Court, the bread is disposed of.

Q. Was it your master's bread? - A. Yes, I know it by the mark; I know the basket by the bottom; it had been new mended.

JACOB SMITH sworn. - I am a plaisterer, I was coming up the other side of Blackfriar's-bridge, and the baker asked me to assist him; I was a stranger to both; I went back with him, and as soon as we came up to the prisoner, he dropped the basket, and begged him to forgive him; he said, he was sorry for what he had done; he offered the baker a seven-shilling piece to make it up; we took him to the watch-house, and from there to Guildball. (The basket produced).

Prisoner's defence. I met with a man who asked me to carry the basket a little way for him over Blackfriar's-bridge; when I got to the foot of the bridge, these two men collared me.

GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-91

567. RALPH WRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , a coat, value 10s. the property of the Parishioners of the Ward of Dowgate .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of George Abrahams .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of a certain person or persons to the Jurors unknown.

JOHN RUFFHEAD sworn. - I am a carman, I was driving Mr. Wherry's cart on the 6th of June, I saw the prisoner take something out of his left-hand pocket, and open the watch-house door; I went to call a constable; I saw him come out with the coat in his arms; the constable stopped him immediately; it was a watchman's coat, and got a mark of the ward and number upon it.

EDWARD EVANS sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the coat); I live almost opposite the watch-house, No. 153, Upper Thames-street: On Friday, the 6th of June, I saw the prisoner with something under his arm, I could not tell what; he turned up Bush-lane, I followed him, tapped him on the shoulder, and asked him how he came by the coat; he said a man gave it to him; then I got a man to assist me, and we secured him, and took him to the Compter; I have had the coat ever since.

- PEACOCK sworn. - I am beadle of Dow-gate Ward: This coat belongs to George Abrahams.

Q. Are the watchmen answerable for these coats if they are lost? - A. No; they are not furnished

by the inhabitants of the Ward; they are paid for out of the watch-rate.

Q.Every man must be a parishioner that contributes to the watch-rate? - A. I think there are house-keepers who contribute towards it who are not parishioners.

GEORGE ABRAHAMS sworn. - I am a watchman in Dowgate Ward: I am trusted with it while I am a watchman.

Q. Are you answerable for it if it is lost? - A. I cannot say.

Prisoner's defence. I had the coat given to me in the street; I shewed the constable the man running up the street.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 28.)

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-92

568. WILLIAM CHETLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , fourteen yards of cotton, value 30s. ten yards of hessing, value 10s. and five yards and half of calico, value 5s. 6d. the property of John Richardby , Richard Francis , John Cleugh , and Nicholas-Cobb Collison .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am one of the constables of the City of London: On Sunday morning; the 29th of June, about four o'clock in the morning, I placed myself in a stable, opposite to the house of a person of the name of Collett, in Two Swan Yard, Bishopsgate-street; I staid from four to six o'clock, and nothing happened; about ten minutes after six, I saw the prisoner at the bar, he brought a bundle, and put it at the step of Collett's door, and sat upon it; he knocked at the door, and said, d-n you, are you going to lay a-bed all day; I came out of the stable, and went up to him; I said, holloo, what have you got here; he said he had got a piece of sheeting, or a piece of hessing, I do not know which; I told him he must go with me; I took him to the stable where I had before concealed myself, I double-locked the door, and locked myself and him in; I asked him how he came by the hessing, -

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Before he gave you an answer had you made him any promise, or used any threats? - A. I had not; he said he got it over the water, and that he was going to sell it to the man of that house, Pearce Collett ; I then asked him how he got his living; he said he worked upon the quays; I then searched him, and found, underneath his waistcoat, a piece of printed cotton; I then secured him, and took him over to Collett's house. (Produces the Property).

JOHN CLEUGH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a wholesale linen-draper, in Gracechurch. street, in partnership with John Richardby, Richard Francis, and Nicholas-Cobb Collison: The Prisoner was a porter of our's; we did not miss the property; the printed cotton I can swear to; after I had been at the Mansion-house, I looked, and missed it; I am certain that it is our property, and was in the warehouse, I have no doubt about it; the cotton is worth about thirty shillings; the prisoner lodged in our house, I saw his box searched the day after he was taken up; there were five yards and a half of calico taken out. which I have no doubt is our property.

Sapwell. I searched the box, and found the calico; I took the keys out of the prisoner's pocket.(Produces the calico).

Mr. Cleugh. - Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. You missed no property before, nor since? - A. No.

Q. This piece of cotton, found under his waistcoat, is the only thing you can swear to? - A. Yes.

Q. How do you know this to be your's? - A. There is the number upon it, which is the private mark of our house.

Q. Did you find any deficiency in your stock? - A. No; I have a pattern of the same. (Producing it).

Q. Patterns are very numerous, which, as you deal wholesale, get abroad in the world? - A. Yes.

Q. Many other shops have the same pattern? - Yes.

Q. Other persons sell in the shop besides youself? - A. There is only myself that is in the habit of selling in the warehouse; my partners have an equal right, but they do not practice it; they may now and then.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-93

569. JAMES RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , half a pound of cotton, value 1s. the property of a person or persons to the Jurors unknown.

DAVID LEADBEATER sworn. - I am a City constable; I saw the prisoner standing by a bag of cotton, I saw him take some cotton out, and put it under his coat; I looked at him, and when he saw me look at him, he ran away; I immediately ran after him and caught him in the gate-way; he then began to pull out the cotton, a bit at a time, and throw it away; I then called another constable to assist me; I left the cotton with Mrs. Wright, while I took hun to the Compter; he was very restive

going along, I was obliged to handcuff him; I applied to the gangsmen to know who the cotton belonged to, but they could not tell till she was cleared out; I received the cotton from Mr. Wright, and have had it ever since. (Produces it.)

CHARLES WRIGHT sworn. - I am a constable under the Lord-Mayor; Mr. Leadbeater called me to his assistance, I saw him throwing the cotton out of his pocket, I picked it up and took care of it, while Mr. Leadbeater took him to the Compter; when he came back, I delivered it to him again.

Prisoner's defence. A cart was going by, and it tore off the corner of the bag, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . (Aged 39.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped on Galley Quay .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-94

570. EDWARD BALDWIN , and PEARCE COLLETT , were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , twelve yards of mode, value 2l. twelve yards of muslin, value 1l. eighteen yards of lace, value 2l. and two pieces of handkerchiefs, each containing seven handkerchiefs, value 3l. the property of John Read , Robert Read , and James Read ; and the other, for receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On the 29th of June, on the Sunday morning, I took the prisoners into custody, about six o'clock; I went to the prisoner Collett's house, No. 7, Two Swan Yard, Bishopsgate-street, and on a copper, close by where the prisoner stood, I found this piece of cambric muslin; I asked him where he bought those things; and he said, d-n me, I would buy any thing; I then took Collett to the Compter; I then returned, and searched the house; in his box I found a piece of black silk mode; I also found a piece of lace, while I was searching the house; I took the key out of Collett's pocket with which I unlocked the box; I then went to a house, No. 17, Old Bethlem-court, where there lived one Elizabeth Day; I took her into custody, and took her to Collett's house; I searched her, and found two pieces of silk handkerchief in her right-hand pocket; I apprehended Baldwin at the prosecutor's house.

Q. Before he had told you any thing, did you make him any promises, or use any threats? - A.I told him I would do what I could, with his master, if he would confess what he knew.

ROBERT READ sworn. Examined by Mr. Knpp. I accused the prisoner, Baldwin, of having robbed us of a piece of mode, a piece of cambric muslin, and eighteen yards, or a piece, of lace; he denied it; I mentioned the articles over again; he said they were at Sapwell's, the constable's house; he said, the cambric muslin is not your's; I then said, what are the other things, you have robbed us of them; he said, yes, and wished he had gone for a sailor before he took them; I asked him what could induce him to do it; he said, that Collett was continually after him, telling him to do it; he said it was his first offence, he never robbed us before, nor since, and he had received no money for the things; I told him if it was so, I Would not prosecute him. This silk mode is our property, it is worth forty shillings, it has not been sold by us; also the eighteen yards of lace, which is worth about forty shillings, that was found in Collett's box; the other things I believe to be our property, but will not swear to them; the handkerchiefs I am certain of, but the marks being picked out I will not swear to them; the cambric muslin, the mark being torn, I will not swear to it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The prisoner did not abscond from your service? - A. No; I sent for him, and he came to me without force.

Q. Do you mean to take upon yourself to say, that that black silk mode had never been sold? - A. If it had, it would have been entered in the book; on the lace there are figures made.

Q. Are the figures always torn off the lace when it is sold? - A. Not always.

Q. You don't know any thing of Collett? - A. No; I never saw him till I saw him before the Lord-Mayor.(The confession of Baldwin was produced, and read).

The Prisoners left their defence to their Counsel, and called six witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Baldwin, GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Transported for seven years .

Collett, GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-95

571. JAMES HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , twelve gilt pans for girandoles, value 7s. the property of John Holmes , and Richard Holmes .

JOHN HOLMES , junior, sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the nephew of John Holmes , his partner's name is William Holmes : On Tuesday last, the 9th of July, I observed the prisoner going towards the gate of the manufactory, I was, at that time, in my father's house; I observed his pockets particularly bulky; I came out of the house into the yard, he then had his hand on the wicket to go out; I called him back into the warehouse in which he

was employed, and I asked him what he had in his pocket; he told me, nothing but his hand, and some paper; then I insisted on his emptying his pockets, and he produced twelve girandole pans, six from each pocket; they were at that time warm, from that I suspected they had lately been taken from the oven; I then sent for an officer, and had him secured; I have no doubt but they were the property of my uncle and father.

THOMAS MASTERS sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the property); I got them from the last witness.

THOMAS QUARMIN sworn. - Q. Look at those pans; - A. I saw them taken from the prisoner's pocket.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-96

572. MARY JOHNSON , and MARY ROBSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , nineteen yards of muslin, value 4l. the property of Peter Wells , William Wells , Benjamin Gilgrest , and William Neville , in the dwelling-house of the said William Wells , and William Neville .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ROBERT PALMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Messrs. Wells and Company; William Wells , and William Neville, live in the house: One the 9th of June, the Prisoners came to our shop, between four and five o'clock; they came into the back shop; I was at that time behind the left-hand counter.

Q. Who else was there in the shop? - A. Jones, Robinson, and, I believe, Alwright, were in the back shop.

Q. Did you serve them immediately? - A. No; I was obliged to go into the front shop for some thread.

At the time you went into the front shop was there any muslin laid on the counter? - A. There was; Mary Johnson bargained, bought, and paid for some thread; the muslin was left in the back shop. on the counter.

GEORGE ALWRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a servant to Messrs. Wells and Company: On the 9th of June, the prisoners at the bar came into our back shop; I saw Palmer, the last witness, serving the prisoners with some thread; he had occasion to go into the front shop; I then saw Mary Johnson cross from the west to the east counter, to look at some artificial flowers which were hanging over the counter, where there were some muslins lying; I saw her take some muslins, and put them under her cloak; but upon looking round, and observing that I was looking that way, she put them down again; she then came across to the left-hand counter, where I was standing, she staid there some time looking at the threads, and then Palmer returned; Mary Robson stood before Mary Johnson between me and the counter; then I saw Mary Johnson cross a second time to the right-hand counter, and take the muslin off the counter, and conceal it under her cloak; she then came over with Mary Johnson to the left-hand counter; I went round the counter and told Mr. Jones of it; I then challenged her with the theft; Mary Robson was close to her when I challenged her with it; she moved about, and I saw the muslin lying close by where she was standing; I sent up to my master; a constable was sent for, and they were taken into custody.

Q. Had you seen the two prisoners conversing together? - A. Yes: they were talking together just before I challenged Marry Johnson; I picked up the muslin, put my mark upon it, and gave it to the constable; there were nineteen yards of it in the whole.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. Four pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Johnson had her back to you the first time she went over? - A. Yes.

Q. There were artificial flowers, you have told us, hanging over the muslins? - A. Yes.

Q. That was an article of great sale at that time? - A. Yes; we have sold a great number.

Q. Though you had seen that which you have represented, when her back was towards you, you did not at that time charge her with any thing? - A. No.

Q. When she went towards the counter the second time, was her back towards you then? - A. Yes; and Robson was standing partly on one side of her.

Q. The artificial flowers hung over? - A. Yes.

Q. Was her back towards you then? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there no muslins upon the west counter? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. I had put them away.

Q. Do you mean to say there had not been muslins there? - A. There had; Mr. Palmer had been serving there.

Q. Did you lay hold of her when you came to the other counter? - A. No.

Q. When you came round, you found the muslin on the ground? - A. No.

Q. And you did not see her drop it? - A. I did not.

Q. Do you sleep in the house? - A. No.

Q. Mr. Wells, and the other gentleman, sleeps in the house? - A. It is the dwelling-house of one of the Mr. Wells's, I cannot say which, and Mr. Neville.

Q.The rent of the house is paid by the partnership? - A. Yes.

Q.Robson staid in the shop, as well as Johnson, after the muslin was picked up? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not Johnson offer any of you to go to her own house with her? - A. Not that I know of.

Court. Q. You say the whole partnership contribute to this house? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am shopman to Messrs. Wells and Company: In consequence of the information of Alwright, I went behind the counter opposite the prisoners, and watched them; I observed the muslin drop from Mary Johnson, the prisoner at the bar; I cannot say I saw it drop from her, but it dropped in an oblique direction, and as it fell, touched her clothes; then Mr. Gilgrest came, and they were secured.

BENJAMIN GILGREST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Whose dwelling-house is it in which you carry on your business? - A. It is the the dwelling-house of William Wells, and William Neville .

Court. Q. Are there no apartments in which the other partners sleep? - A. No; they have no residence there at all.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are not excluded from the right of entry, and doing your business in the shop? - A. No; we are excluded from eating, drinking, and sleeping there.( Alexander Auld , the constable, produced the property, which was deposed to by Mr. Gilgrest).

Mr. Knowlys contended, that Mr. Gilgrest, and Mr. Peter Wells, were proprietors of that part of the house from which the property was taken.

Mr. Gilgrest Mr. Wells, and Mr. Neville, pay for living in the house so much per annum to the trade; they occupy all the parts of the house but the shop.

Johnson's defence. I solemnly declare I never saw the muslin, till they brought it from the front shop to the back shop.

Robson's defence. Mr. Gilgrest said, if I could produce any respectable man in the City, I should go about my business; I offered to take him to my own house, and he should be satisfied that I was a respectable person in every respect.

Mr. Gilgrest, She certainly made that offer.

Johnson, GUILTY (Aged 45.)

Robson, GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-97

573. PATRICK BAILEY was indicted for that he, on the 8th of June , one hundred pounds weight of lead, value 13s. belonging to William Newton , fixed to a building of his, feloniously did rip, cut, and break, with a felonious intent to steal the same .

Second Count. Charging it to belong to Joseph Williams .

THOMAS FOWLER sworn. - I am a watchman, in Aldersgate Ward: As I was going the hour of two, on the 8th of July, coming down Cock-court , I saw the prisoner drop from a penthouse; I said, holloa, my friend, where did you come from; I looked up, and saw the lead hanging down; then I called another watchman, to look after the lead, while I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and then to the Compter; when I returned from the Compter, Halesworth got a ladder, and I went with him to the house, and put the lead down in its place; it was torn from the hooks.

Q. Was the lead broke at all? - A. No; only in tearing it from the hooks; a person of the name of William Newton rents the house.

WILLIAM NEWTON sworn. - I keep the house, No. 7, I heard a great noise, I looked, and saw about two yards of lead hanging down from the penthouse, the prisoner was then in custody; the lead was safe the night before.

Q. Was the lead cut? - A. No, it was ripped; Joseph Williams is my landlord, he is down at Salisbury, he has the lease of the house.

PHILIP HALESWORTH sworn. - I am a constable: About two o'clock last Thursday morning, Fowler brought the prisoner into the watch-house, and told me there was some lead stolen; I went to the court, and saw the lead hanging down; I took the prisoner to the Compter; I went afterwards and got a ladder, and put it together as well as I could, upon the place where it was taken from.

DANIEL WELLS sworn. - I am a watchman in Aldersgate Ward: I assisted Fowler; I took care of the lead.

Prisoner's defence. I had been having a fit of sickness, and I was stopping to ease myself; I know no more about this charge than a child unborn.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-98

574. EDWARD WELSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , two pounds two ounces of bees-wax, value 5s. the property of Thomas Dawson , and James Dixon .

There being no evidence to prove the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000709-99

575. ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , twenty ounces weight of silk, value 4s. the property of Nathaniel Paterson and James Paterson .

The prisoner being so deaf, that it was impossible to make him hear or plead, a Jury was impannelled to try whether he stood mute by the visitation of God, or his own obstinacy.

JOHN KIRBY sworn. - The prisoner has been in my custody ever since the last Session, he appears to me to be extremely deaf as ever man was; we have tried every means to make him hear, but in vain, I think he does not stand mute by obstinacy; I am certain he does not; I do not believe it would be possible for a cannon to make him hear.

(The Jury found that he stood mute by the visitation of God.)

THOMAS TURNER sworn. - I am a porter on Galley Quay , the prisoner has been employed to work on the Quays, I have seen him several times: On the 5th of June, about five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take some silk out of the corner of a bale of silk, in a cart, I saw him take a skain out, and put it into his bosom; I called to Mr. Christopher's man; the bale was cut for examination on the Quays, but whether it had been tied up again or not, I cannot say; I laid hold of the man, and took the silk out of his bosom, and an officer came up and I gave him in charge, he said it hung out of the bale.

Q. Was there any hung out? - A. No; I saw him watching the bale very narrowly, and I saw him pull in out.

- CHRISTOPHER sworn. - I am a Custom-house agent, the silk was under my care, it was in Mr. Barnjum's cart, there were five bales, I clear a great quantity for that house, Messrs. Nathaniel and James Paterson .

Q. Are you sure the silk was their property? - A. I had a commission from them.

Q.Are you sure that this particular silk was their property? - A. It is impossible for me to say.(The constable produced the property.)

GUILTY .

Privately (but really) whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-100

576. GEORGE WILLS was indicted for that he, on the 7th of December, in the thirty-seventh year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of St. Alban's, Wood-street, did take to wife, Martha Elder , spinster , and afterwards on the 14th of January, in the 39th year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish of St. Bartholomew the Less , did take to wife, Violet Bedford , widow , the said Martha, his former wife, being then alive .

JOSEPH LEE sworn. - I am the parish clerk of St. Alban's, Wood-street, (produces the register book containing an entry of the marriage of George William and Martha Elder , spinster;) the witness were James Patmore , he is dead, and Ann Royce; I signed it the 7th of December, in the year 1796.

Q. Is the prisoner the man? - A. Yes, and this is the woman. (Pointing to her.)

GEORGE AVERY sworn - I am a silversmith; on the 14th of January, 1799, I was at the marriage of George Wills to Violet Bedford , at St. Bartholomew the Less.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know who is at the expence of this prosecution? - A. No.

JOHN PETER LAWRENCE sworn. - I am clerk of St. Bartholomew the Less, (produces the marriage book;) the entry is George Wills of this parish, widower, to Violet Bedford of the same parish, widow, married in this church, by banns, the 14th of January, 1799.

ISABELLA PEYTON sworn. - The prisoner lived in my house with one of his wives.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Who is at the expence of this prosecution - who employs the attorney? - A. Mrs. Salter.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

For the Prisoner.

RICHARD WILLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a leather-stainer, brother to the prisoner at the bar; I was present at my brother's wedding, but I was not at church, it is near fourteen years ago, her name Jane May .

Q. Do you know when Jane May died? - A. Yes, two years ago the 12th of last May; I was not present at her death, but I saw her in the evening after she was dead.

Q. Did you know her well? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he support her till the end of her life? - A. He did.

Q. Did you know the reason why they parted? - A. I cannot say.

Q. How many children did she leave him to support? - A. Two.

Q.How many has he had by that wife? - A. I cannot justly say, but I think, six. Q. Do you know who was the clergyman that married them? - A. No, I was not at the church.

Q. How soon did you see them before they went to church? - A.It might be a few weeks.

Q. Did you see them after they were married? - A. Yes; they lived together as man and wife above six years in that place, they were married at Yeovil, in Somersetshire.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. You were not at the church? - A. No.

Q. Who gave her away? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you know of his marrying Martha El

der? - A. I heard of it, my brother and I were at variance.

Q.How many children had he by her? - A. Not one.

Q.Where has your brother lived for the last six or seven years? - A. In the Borough.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Snow's-fields.

Q.Look at that woman, Martha Elder -did you ever see her? - A. Yes, but I never visited her.

Q.To Martha Elder . Q. Do you know this man? - A. I have seen him several times.

SARAH WILLS sworn - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the wife of the last witness; I was present at his wedding at Yeovil, in Somersetshire, but not at the church; I think I saw the certificate of their marriage; they lived very happy and comfortable, till he met with this Martha Elder , she had seven children by him, there are two living, which he supports.

Q. When did she die? - A. Two years ago, the 12th of May last.

Q. Do you know who supported her? - A. The prisoner supported her to the end of her life.

Q. Do you know what was the occasion of their parting? - A. I can give no other account than the meeting with Martha Elder .

Q. Where did the prisoner's first wife live? - A. At Yeovil.

Q. Do you know where her mother lived? - A. I cannot recollect the place.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. How long have you left Yeovil? - A.Eight or nine years.

Q. When were you at Yeovil last? - A. I cannot recollect how long ago it was.

Q. Was it three years? - A. It is better than six years ago.

Q. Not since? - A. No.

Q. Did your husband go down with you? - A. No.

Q.When did he go down? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Has he been down during the last six year? - A. I believe he has.

Q. Are you sure he has? - A. I am not sure of it.

Q. Where did this woman die? - A.At the back of the Bridewell, in the Borough; she came to London with him.

GUILTY (Aged 32.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000709-101

577. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , in the parish of St. Margaret. Westminster , two coach-glasses, value 30s. and two horse cloths, value 1s. the goods of William Bignell .

WILLIAM BIGNELL sworn. - I am a stablekeeper at the Swam with two Necks, in Tothill-street, Westminster; I found the glasses gone from the coach which I had seen the day before; I went to the Hay-market on the 10th of May to buy some hay, and I observed the prisoner coming up the Hay-market with something under his arm, wrapped up in two horse cloths; I stepped up to him, and clapped my hand on these two glasses, and asked him whether he had not got some glasses; he said, yes; I asked him what he was going to do with them, if he was going to sell them; he said, yes; I asked him what he wanted for them, he said, half-a-guinea; I asked him where he got them; he said, they were his sister's; I looked him very hard in the face, and said, your sister's! I don't think your sister has had a glass in her possession some months; and I told him, if he did not tell me where he got them, I should take him to Bow-street; he refused, and I took him to Bow-street; they were with frames when I found them, what I lost had frames; I cannot swear to the property of the glass, but I'll swear to the horse-cloths; there are two letters on them, one was torn in two, to make a pair.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where is the coachman that drove this glass-coach? - A. He is not here.

Q. He returned without the glass and horse, cloths? - A. No, he did not; he returned with them between ten and twelve; the prisoner seemed confused.

JAMES HINTON sworn. - I missed the things about nine o'clock in the morning; I have examined the horse-cloths, and know them to be Mr. Bignell's, by the letters; I know the prisoner by fight, but not his name; I believe he lived near our yard.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the sister of the prisoner? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I was along with a coachman in Brook-street Mews, from eight o'clock in the evening to ten the next day.

Court. (To Prisoner.) Q. How did you come by the glasses? - A. I picked them up, wrapped up in a cloth, in the Hay-market.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am coachman to Mr. Baldwin, of Brook-street, Grosvenor-square; I know the prisoner, who is a coachman; I slept with him on the 9th of May, he came in between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, to the best of my recollection, to Mr. Baldwin's stables and staid there till ten next morning, I am certain of it; I live with Mr. Baldwin now; I have known the prisoner from his infancy, and never heard any thing against him; he drove a coach for his brother-in-law, of the name of Hynes, in

Striatton-ground, Westminster, latterly it has belonged to Mrs. Hynes, his sister; I don't know where they live now; when he was at Mr. Baldwin's stables, he was a helper at Mr. Hudson's stables in Davis's-street, Berkley-square, and I let him sleep with me as he was distressed; he slept with me two nights before the 9th of May; I am certain it was the 9th, because I had a sister in town that slept in the same apartment, it was the last night he slept there; it was the 7th, 8th, and 9th, he slept with me; I recollect it by my sister being in town for four days, she came on the Tuesday night, and slept there, on the Saturday she quitted my place, through his being there, I recollect it; he quitted my place about ten o'clock in the morning, and I saw no more of him till he was in confinement.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

The Court ordered the prisoner to be detained and prosecuted for receiving the goods, knowing them to be stolen.

Reference Number: t18000709-102

578. MARY KEEN and MAURICE KEIMELLY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , in the parish of St. Clement Danes , a gold ring, value 7s. the property of Mary Meed .

There being no evidence against the prisoners, they were ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-103

579. CORNELIUS-FREDERICK HOLT was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 5th of April , a Bank-note for the payment of 10l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For feloniously disposing of, and putting away the like Bank-note, as and for a good and true Bank-note, knowing it to be forged.

Third and Fourth Counts. He was charged with forging and publishing as true, a promissory-note for 10l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

Fifth Count. Charging it to be with intent to defraud James Benson .(The case was opened by Mr. Fielding.)

JAMES BENSON sworn. - I am a cheesemonger, I live at No. 51, Rosomond-street, Clerkenwell: On Wednesday, the 2d of April, I remember selling a cheese, when Mr. Amphlet was in the shop, but do not like to swear to the person; I believe that to be the man, but I won't go the length to swear; the person gave me a ten-pound Bank of England note, it was then candle-light, (the note produced); I know this is the note, because I wrote on the back of it directly after I took it; I wrote"clerk, at Evans's," on it; I knew Mr. Amphlet, who was in the shop, was clerk to a meeting, and Evan's was where he lodged; I cannot tell whether Amphlet and the person were acquainted, only by appearance, as they spoke together; Mr. Amphlet came in first, and the prisoner a few minutes after; the cheese came to two pounds two shillings and nine-pence; I gave him five one-pound notes, (I don't mean to swear to the amount of the change I gave him) two guineas and a half in gold, and I believe four and sixpence in silver, and three penny-pieces; I mark all the notes I take, and if they were among five thousand, I would pick them out, (five one-pound notes shewn the witness;) I can speak to them all, I can swear they were in my possession on the 2d of April, at night, after we lit a candle, when the prisoner came in; I knew Mr. Amphlet, and took him to be a friend of his that made me give change.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner was a stranger to you? - A. Yes; but I knew Mr. Amphlet, who is clerk to a meeting, and, I believe, a tailor by trade, he is here.

Q. You had taken more than one batch of one-pound notes, or you had more than five in the house? - A. I don't know that I had; I gave him all I had, though I will not swear that I had no more.

Q.Neither can you swear, that if you had any more, you did not put your mark on them? - A. I mark all the notes; I had fifty six notes, but no ten-pound notes to the best of my recollection; I gave no five-pound note in change; I did not receive any other ten-pound note that day, I am sure; I have a book in which I put down the notes I take, this note is down; I can recollect the transaction perfectly from memory, but having the book as well, it is stronger.

WILLIAM AMPHLET sworn. - I am a tailor. I live at No. 48. Rosomond's-street, I attend as clerk to a chapel; I have known the prisoner ever since he was an apprentice, I was very well acquainted with him then; I know Mr. Benson also, and once saw the prisoner at Mr. Benson's in April last; he was purchasing a cheese when I went into the shop: he gave a note while I was there, but I went away before he finally paid for it; I cannot say whether it was candle-light or not; I had some conversation with him, and am certain that is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He was apprentice to a japanner, I believe? - A. I believe he was.

Q.He has been employed in japanning glasses and frames? - A. I don't know that; I saw the back of the note, but I cannot say whether it was a Bank-note, or any other note.

Prisoner. Q. How long is it since you have known me? - A.It may be ten years.

Q. I presume you have always heard an excellent character of me? - A. I never heard the least reproach on his character in my life.

GARNETT TERRY sworn. - I am engraver of the Bank-notes; this is a forged note; I believe, it not done from a plate, but a composition, with a brush, either a pen, or a camel-hair brush, or both, occasionally; there is an imitation of the water-mark, it is done with a pen or a camel-hair pencil, with a transparent composition, it is not in the texture of the paper (The note read.)

NATHANIEL LOARING sworn. - I am a clerk in the house of Messrs. Winter and Kay, Solicitors to the Bank; On the 4th of April last in consequence of some information, I went to a house in Bowling-green-lane, Clerkenwell where I understood the prisoner lodged, and forced him in a two pair of stairs room, and a young woman with him; the officers searched them, and their boxes, and found some money and Bank-notes; I then told him my business, that we had a five-pound note, forged, which had been traced to him, and asked him where he had got it; he said he got it at a pawnbroker's-shop, in Fleet-market; he said he wanted a five-pound note to send his father, at Birmingham; and thinking a pawnbroker's a likely place to get a note, they wanting cash, he gave them five pounds in cash for it. I took them with me to the pawnbroker's, and saw the servant who had given the change, and he said he perfectly recollected the prisoner, and his giving him the five-pound note; so that the circumstance related by the prisoner was correct. I asked whether that was the note; he said they never marked the notes, but it might be the note, or it might not. I then took them to Mr. Winter's office, and he there gave an account where he lived, and how he got his living, and got the money in his box, which he said he had got by his business he said he had lived with the young woman for twelve months, that they had lodged at four different lodgings during that time; he mentioned first; a lodging in Portpool-lane, Gray's-Inn-lane; the second, in Bayne's-row; the third I have not got; the fourth was in Bowling-green-lane I asked him where he had lodged beside; I am sure the third was not at Islington; he said, some notes found upon him were received in change for a ten-pound note at the Bank; I asked him where he got the ten-pound note; he said it was, part of the change of a twenty-pound note he took a little while before, at a hosier's shop in Holborn. It was then late, and the account he gave of the note being corroborated by the pawnbroker, induced me to let him go, on his promising to be in the way the next morning, at nine o'clock, at his lodgings in Bowling-green-lane; I called at nine o'clock and he was not at home, he had been gone out about an hour; at that time I knew nothing of Mr. Benson's note. I then made it my business to go to the Bank, to see what notes of this description had been paid there, and I found a great number; I did not see any thing of him till the 28th. Mr. Benson came to Mr. Winter's office, on the 9th of April, with one of the Inspectors of notes, who had traced it to him, and related the manner in which he took it. On the 5th, I went to the house of Mr. Painter, who keeps an oil-shop, in White Lion-street, Islington; I was shewn up to a two pair of stairs back room, there was bed in it; I found a cup with a composition in it, a camel-hair brush, and a table with Indian-ink spread on it as if it had be spread on purpose. On the 28th, in consequence of information, I went and apprehended him in Banner-street, Whitecross-street, at a little cheese monger's shop; I went directly up stairs, without asking any questions, and looked into the front room, but saw nobody there; I then went to the back room door, which was fastened and the key outside; I unlocked it, and went in, and he came out from behind the bed-curtains; the person, in whose house he was concealed, told me they had concealed him there on purpose, as they knew he was in danger, from the information he had given them, of being apprehended for forgery, or something of that sort; when he came from behind the curtains, he said he did not know; I then said you must go with me; he did not deny having a lodging at White Lion-street.

RICHARD GIBBS sworn. - I lodge at a cheesemonger's in Banner-street; I know the prisoner; he applied to me in April, on Good-Friday, to conceal him, as he told me he was accused of forgery, and the officers of Justice were closely pursuing him; I hesitated to admit him into the house, but he assured me he was innocent; he told me he only wished to be concealed for a few days, that he was suspected of forgery, but it was not the case, that he would bring proof of the contrary; I was very uneasy during the time he was at my house; I had not convenience to conceal him, but I did he was with me sixteen or seventeen days; during that time, I heard frequent reports, which I communicated to him, that he was supposed to have made them, and the number he passed off, or made, and the method in which they had been done; when I expressed my uneasiness to him, of his being at my house, he bid me to patient, and he would prove his innocence; he said no more, I recollect perfectly; he did not tell me that he either made them, or passed them off himself; he told me simply this; I am accused; of forgery, or passing off, I will conceal myself for a few days, and will bring indisputable proof of my innocence; when I told him of the reports, he used to turn them off with a smile, or a laugh, and desire I would be patient; he never said any more than that he was innocent; and when I expressed my uneasiness, he told me he would make his innocence clear; he had witness, and proof of it, and would bring it forward at a proper season. (A cup with gum in it produced).

RICHARD MARTIN sworn. - I am a watchman at the House of Correction, where the prisoner was confined; I received a letter from him, which I took to Mr. Valentine, in Aylesbury-street on a Monday morning; he was not at home, I gave it his wife, she read it, and gave it me again; I took it back, and gave it to Mr. Aris, the governor; (a letter shown the witness); this appears to-be the same letter (The letter read).

"To Mr. Valentine, japanner, Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell.

"My Dear Friend, Monday Morning,

"At this time I am in a very strange situation and cannot relieve myself without the assistance of a friend; I write to you, being assured if it is in your power, at this time, that you take pleasure in relieving the distresses of others. - The case is this; if you will be so kind as to lend me eight pounds for a few days, it will be the means of saving my life; I have made an agreement with a person that will give me my liberty for ten-pounds; two guineas I have got by me, and if you will make it up ten pounds, believe me it shall never be forgot as long as I live, consider, Sir, by so doing you will save the life of an unfortunate young fellow; I have no other friend by me at this time, and I believe I shall go to Newgate on Wednesday or Thursday next, and then it will be out of my power. For God's sake do, my dear friend, get it for me if you can, and as soon as I can get it, you shall have it again. Mr. Gibbs, in Banner-street, is indebted to me six pounds, money that my brother sent

out of the country, that you shall have; my sister, she has money enough to let me have it, but my time is so short, and I cannot tell where to write to her; don't be fearful about the payment of it, you shall be sure of it again; don't be fearful of doing it, as my life is in danger When you have got this letter, the person will call soon after for an answer; don't be fearful, all is safe; you may give him a note wherein you may tell your intentions, he will bring it safe to me; and if you can do it, you will spare no time, and come to the House of Correction, and ask for me; and if they will not let me see you, you can tell them you have some money for me, and that you should like to see me yourself; but if you cannot see me, write a note, and give it them, and the money with it, I shall have it safe. I hope you will understand me, for I have no time to write what I wish. You can think of the best method to let me have it. Cornelius Holt ."(The Jury here looked at the note and the letter).

Prisoner's defence, I leave it to my Counsel.

This prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-104

580. CORNELIUS-FREDERICK HOLT was again indicted for feloniously forging, on the 5th of April , a certain Bank-note for the payment of 5l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For feloniously forging a promissory note for the payment of 5l. with the same intent.

Third Count. For feloniously disposing of, and putting away the same note for 5l. well knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

Fourth Count. Charging it to be with intent to defraud John Armstrong .

SANAH MASON sworn. - I live in Austin-street, in the Islington-road; I have known the prisoner about eighteen months; I remember his giving me a Banknote about the 25th or 26th of March last, to the best of my recollection, for five pounds, to get cash for it; I got cash for it from John Armstrong , in the same street, opposite the door where I live, he is in the coal-way; I gave the change to the prisoner; I recollect seeing some other notes in his hand, but cannot tell whether they were Bank-notes.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I live in Austin-street; I remember Mrs. Mason applying to me to change a five-pound Bank-note, on the 25th or 26th of March, which I did, and Mr. Learing came and took it away, it might be ten days after; I had not an opportunity to pay it away before, I wanted to make up more money to pay away; (the note shown him); this is the note I received from Mrs. Mason; I wrote her name upon the back of it at the time.(Mr. Garnett Terry proved it to be a forged note).(The note read).(Mr. Learing deposed, as before, to the taking the prisoner, etc).

ANN PAINTER sworn. - I live at No. 92, White Lion-street, Pentonville, and keep an oil-shop; I know the prisoner, he lodged at my house about eight or nine weeks, the outside; he had not quitted there as I know of, he continued lodging up to the 4th of April; I never saw the woman that lived with him come to the lodging; he did not come home from the 4th to the 28th; he had two rooms up two pair of stairs; he slept there three or four nights, not more; he bought a pencil or two of me, but I thought it belonged to his business; he asked me whether I sold white varnish; I said I had none, but could tell him where to get it; a Mrs. Hindmarsh, who took the apartments for him, came to him twice one Sunday, he was up stairs, but he desired our lad to say he was not at home; there was a young man visited him twice, he did not go up stairs, but spoke to him in the shop; he asked me if Mr. Holt was at home, he came down, and the young man bought a few brushes. Mr. Holt said, I did not know, Mrs. Painter, that you sold brushes, for I use a good many in my business. I remember Mr. Loaring coming to my house, it was the prisoner's apartment he saw, he paid five shillings a week; I shewed Mr. Loaring the apartment, there was a cup in it, and a piece of paper, that gentleman found in the room, and a table with Indian-ink on it. When I taxed Mr. Holt with not being at home regularly at night, he said, Mrs. Painter, you are regular people, don't fet up for me; for any time, I can sleep any where for a shilling. When he came to my lodging, he had an excellent character; I was informed he was a landscape painter, and brushes are used by them.( Richard Gibbs , and Richard Martin , deposed as before; after which the letter was read, as in the last trial).

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-105

581. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of June , a silk purse, value 1s. and three Bank-notes, each of the value of 5l. the property of Robert Colhoun , Esq. (The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ROBERT COLHOUN , Esq. sworn. - On the 22d of June, I made a visit at Sir William Milner 's, the prisoner was a hackney-coachman who drove me there; when I got to Sir William Milner 's, in Portland-place, I gave him half-a-guinea to change; I was going to put the change in my purse, but could not find it; before I quitted the coach, I discovered the purse was gone; I went into the house, and directed search to be made for it, and it was found in the boot of the coach.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.At the time the purse was found in the boot, the prisoner was in the house? - A. He was in the passage; there were fifteen pounds in it, three five-pounds notes, but no money; I did not perceive the prisoner quit me, but am not quite certain.

JAMES BURDON sworn. - I am servant to Sir William Milner : I recollect Mr. Colhoun coming on the 22d of June; I opened the door, and saw him give something to the coachman, and Mr. Colhoun said he had lost his purse; I got a light, and went and searched the coach, the coachman was at the coach-door; I did not find the purse inside the coach, but found it in the boot, among the hay. While I was searching the boot, they took him into the house to search him, that was not till I had searched the inside of the coach, and the pavement, by

the coachman's desire. After I had found the purse in the boot of the coach, I went and informed Mr. Colhoun of it; the coachman said he knew nothing of it, that was all he said; there was no person by when the coachman give change, but there was some other persons by at the time of searching the coach.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was there not a rout that night? - A. Yes; we had some few, eight or ten carriages; the servants were inside the door, and the coachman on their boxes. The prisoner desired to be searched, and he was; I did not hear him say any thing about the boot being to be searched; when Mr. Colhoun desired me to get into the coach, he did not say any thing against it.

JOHN PARRY sworn. - I am butler to Sir William Milner ; I was not present when Mr. Colhoun paid the coachman, I was induced to come up by the noise; James had got a light, and I heard Mr. Colhoun say he had lost his purse; and I assisted in searching, and was with James when he took the purse out of the boot; the prisoner did not say any thing particular.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did not you hear the prisoner desire the coach might be searched by the servants? - A. No; I was up stairs.

GUILTY . (Aged 19)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-106

582. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , in the parish of Wilsden a bay gelding, value 10l. the property of Robert Tubbs , Esq

JOHN GROOM sworn. - I am coachman to Robert Tubbs , Esq; he lives in the Harrow-road, in the parish of Wilsden ; the bay gelding was left in a shed in our yard, on Monday night, the 9th of June, and was missing on Tuesday morning between four and five o'clock; I saw him on Monday night at nine o'clock, and shut the gate myself; James Langley, who observed the horse in the field, got up and missed him; I was there at six o'clock, and the horse was not there; I went from there to Sharpe's-alley, Cow-cross, and there I got intelligence; the horse had been usually used to the carriage, but it now went in a cart; the same horse I found at the Maidenhead, in Dyor-street, St. Giles's, left there by John Brown, who desired them to take care of it; it is a place where they put up carts and waggons; I never saw the prisoner before, but am sure it is the same horse.

WILLIAM LAKE sworn. - I know the prisoner; I live at the Maidenhead-inn, St. Giles's, and am ostler there; he brought a bay horse to me on Tuesday morning the 10th of June, between two and three o'clock; he brought a grey horse to me first of all, on Saturday the 7th, he desired me to put him up in the stable, and take care of him; he did not tell me he should call again, or not, but went away for four or five hours; I know it was the same man that brought the grey horse to me on the Saturday before; when he came back again. I took hold of him; I had orders to stop him from Mr. Marnham a hay-salesman; it was the same horse that a groom locked at.

HENRY MARNHAM sworn. - I am a hay-salesman; I lost a horse about the 4th, and supposed he was gone to the tracker's, at Cow-cross, where they buy horses to slaughter for the dogs; then I went to the Maidenhead, and heard the prisoner had brought a horse there; I know no more of the horse than I saw him in the yard a little after five; I did not know the horse.

ANDREW TAYLOR sworn. - I belong to Bow-street and took the prisoner in custody.

Groom. The horse is about eight or nine years old, and able to work.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along Harrow, between one and two o'clock in the morning, and a man overtook me with this horse, and desired me to take it to the Maidenhead, and leave it, and meet him there about nine or ten o'clock, and he would pay me for my trouble; I went there and was taken.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 42.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000709-107

583. MARY BECKWITH , the wife of JOHN BECKWITH ; and MARY BECKWITH , the younger, were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields, forty-six yards of printed calico, value 5l. the goods of Thomas Ball , privately in his shop .

- HAYNES sworn. - I live with Mr. Ball, a linen-draper , No. 473, in the Strand, near Charing-cross : I remember the two prisoners coming to my master's shop, about half-past nine on Wednesday night, the 10th of June; the eldest asked for some white calico, I shewed her some, and she bought a yard; she afterwards asked to look at some Bandana handkerchiefs; I shewed her some, she bought one, and afterwards asked to look at some dark printed pocket linen handkerchiefs; we had not any at the price she wanted, she paid for what she then bought; during that time, the young one was standing by some printed calicos which lay upon the counter, about a yard and a half from where I was, not further; having paid for the articles bought, she was going out, and I observed young Mary Beckwith went out a very different way from what she came in, which gave me reason to suspect she had got something, upon which I jumped over the counter, and took hold of her to see what she had got; I took from her three quantities of printed calico; containing forty-six yards, which I have here; I took them from under her gown, she had her gown drawn round them; I asked her what she had got, she said, she had got nothing of mine; the woman said, she was very sorry the child had taken any thing, it was not her intention; I being in the shop alone, called for assistance; the elder Mary Beckwith went out, and having assistance come, I left the younger in care and went after the eldest, she had only gone just by, beyond the next house; I asked her to come back, but she objected at first, till I told her I should oblige her; in consequence of which she came back; she said, she was looking after the girl's father, who was waiting in the street; she was questioned respecting her husband, and she said in answer, it was the ault of the father (that the child was not her's,) and the father encouraged her in doing so.

Court. Q. Had you any suspicion of the girl taking

the things, when you saw her looking at them? - A. No, I had not.

Q. Had you any suspicion she was prepared to steal the things, till you saw her going out? - A. No, I had not; I did not see her do any thing; I observed her look at them, as girls in general do.

Q. You had no suspicion she was going to steal them? - A. No.

Q. What is the value? - A. Five pounds; I am convinced they are my master's property; he has no partner.

Mr. Alley. Q. Had you not a suspicion from the conduct of the prisoners, they were able to steal something? - A. No, I had not.

The CONSTABLR sworn. - I took them into custody, and searched them, but found nothing on them.

Mary Beckwith , the elder. I know nothing at all of it.

Mary Beckwith, the younger. I was looking at the calicos, and they sell off the counter, and before I could pick them up again, that young gentleman jumped over the counter, and would not let me lay them down.

Q.(To Haynes.) How far from the place had this girl got, when you took them from her? - A. I don't believe it was more than a yard and a half from where they were taken from.

M. Beckwith, the elder, GUILTY . Death . (Aged 34.)

M. Beckwith the younger, GUILTY . Death . (Aged 14.)

Mary Beckworth, jun. was recommended to mercy, by the Jury, on account of her youth.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t18000709-108

584. CHARLES DERRY and WILLIAM M'ADAMS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Skirme , on the 12th of June , with intent to steal, and stealing six waistcoats, value 18s. one boy's shirt, value 3s. three handkerchiefs, value 6s. three other handkerchiefs, value 3s. four silver tea-spoons, value 12s. a tea-caddy, with silver top, value 1s. and other articles , the goods of the said Edward Skirme .

EDWARD SKIRME sworn. - I keep the Black-lion, in Charles-court, in the Strand ; my house was broke open the 12th of June, about two o'clock, or half-past; my mother and I saw it fastened up; the watchman rung the rattle, and when I came down the door was open, and the bar door too, and two panes of glass cut; it was a double door, and I suppose they had got a wedge and forced it open; six waistcoats and the table-cloath I can swear to; they were in the bar when I went to bed; the till was also gone, and the club box too; I knew Derry, he used the house, but had not been there that night; a few evenings before, he went lookings about the window, and M'Adams's brother, not the prisoner, with him.

Mrs.SKIRME sworn. - I am mother of the last witness, and saw the doors fastened up; I folded the things up, and can swear to them all; Derry and the brother of the other prisoner were in the house a night or two before, and got upon the seat in the top-room, and saw the things in the window, and I said, what do you think of them, and they went away.

MARGARET LAYTON sworn. - I saw three men come out, and run up the court about half-past three o'clock, on the morning of the 12th of the June; one of them had a club-box carrying under his arm, that belonged to some coal-heaver; they run from Mr.Skrime's house to Hungersord; I cannot swear to any one of them, but I think Derry was the person that had the box; as to the other prisoner, I don't know that I ever saw him before.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am constable of St. Martin in the Fields; I went on the 12th of June, and apprehended Derry, in Charles-court; he said he was innocent, and so did the other; I apprehended M'Adams while he was at work, but would not take him away because all three brothers were at work thee, and I did not know which it was till the watchman came, and he said it was him; I did not find a brown coat there; the watchman said he had a brown coat on; there was no implements for house-breaking, or any thing of the sort.

WILLIAM COOKE sworn. - I am a watchman; on Thursday I was in Charles-court, I sprung my rattle, rather better than half-past two in the morning; I preceived the Black-lion shutters broke violently, and as I kept knocking at the door to alarm, they flipped the lock back, and three men bolted out upon me; Charles Derry says, Bill M'Adams, let us go home, he was certainly the man that came out with the box under his arm; I have known him above two years; I made answer, Bill M'Adams, go home, you are three thieves, and three housebreakers; pray Mr. Charles Derry , what have you got under your arm, the till of the landlord's room, or some money, for money rattles; I made up to lay hold of Derry, and Bill M'Adams (as they called him, knocked me down; they went into Hungerford- market, and there I lost them; that is all I have to say; I cannot say who the third man was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know howmany brothers M'Adams has? - A. No.

Do you know his brother Tom? - A. No; I know the man that struck me, and that was Will M'Adams.

Q. Have you never said to Brady that Thos. M'Adams was the person? - A. No;I don't know that I did tell him so; that is the man that struck me, and knocked me down; I can tell you no more if you ask me till this day twelvemonth; I don't know of a reward of forty pounds, I have heard of such a thing, but it never was in my way; I am very sorry this has happened; what I have sworn I will stand to.

Derry's defence. I have got a great many witnesses to prove I was in bed, and fast asleep, when this robbery was committed.

M'Adams's defence. I wish to leave the chief of my defence to my counsel; I only wish to state that this man, Derry, is a total stranger to me; I never saw him till I saw him in Bow-street; and I was locked up in the room with him half an hour before I knew he was taken on the same account I was.

For the Prisoner M'Adams.

- WIVER sworn. - I am a publican; I remember the day M'Adams was taken into custody; I saw him the night before, near eleven o'clock, he came as usual for a pot of beer, which he took home in his hand.

MARY GALE sworn. - M'Adams and I lodge on the same floor in the same house; I remember seeing him the night before he was taken up, between ten and eleven o'clock, he came up stairs with a pot of beer; I was up till about twenty minutes after twelve, with my door open, and it would have been impossible for him to have gone out without my seeing him; and I should have heard, if he went out; he bears an excellent character.

NICHOLAS GALE sworn. - I saw M'Adams, the morning he was taken up, about seven o'clock, coming out of his room.

JAMES HAYES sworn. - I am partner with the landlord of the house; the door was unlocked between four and five in the morning; I unlocked it myself; Mr. Pearson, the landlord, locked it himself near eleven o'clock; and I don't thing it was unlocked from that time till I unlocked it.

SARAH DODD sworn. - I was in the court between two and three o'clock the morning the Black-lion was robbed, and saw three men, but M'Adams was not one; neither of the prisoners were there, they were betwixt their size.

Court. (To Cooke). Q. Do you know whether that is the man? - A. I know the man that came up and knocked me down was pitted with the small-pox, and had high cheek bones.

Q. Was there light enough to see the counter? - A. It was so light that I could see from the water-side up into the Strand, as plain as I see you, my Lord; I am as clear as God is in heaven, that Charles Derry brought the box out of the house.

Q.Was it day light so that you could see them? - A. Yes, my Lord.

Court. Then there is an end of the burglary.

M'Adams called five witnesses, who gave him an excellent charater. DERRY, GUILTY

Of Stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

M'ADAMS, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18000709-109

585. WILLIAM DUGMORE was indicted for unlawfully, knowingly, and designedly, by false pretences, obtaining from John Bill six iron locks, value 18s. and seven iron locks with brass knobs, value 2l. 3s. the property of William Shepherd and John Bill , with intent to defraud them .

JOHN BILL sworn. - I am an ironmonger , in partnership with William Shepherd , in Bread-street: On the 4th of June, the prisoner at the bar came to me, and said he came from Mr. Boyd's; I asked him how Mr. Boyd came not to write the order himself; he told me young Mr. Boyd was just come home from the review as wet as he could be, which was the reason that he was sent for them, which did away the little suspicion that I had, and I let him have the goods. On the Sunday following he was taken up by one Mr. Tomlinson; Mr. James Boyd is a customer of ours, he is a Smith and ironmonger in Welbeck-street; the prisoner had been a servant there, but had left them; he had six six-inch double locks, and seven six-inch knob locks; he brought a written order for them. (Produces it).

Q. What is the value of them? - A. About three guineas.

JAMES BOYD sworn. - Look at that order, is it your hand-writing? - A. No, it is not.

Q. Did you send the prisoner, on the 4th of June, to Mr. Bill's? - A. No, I did not; the prisoner had been servant to me, and left me last November.

JAMES BOYD , jun. sworn. - Look at that order, is it your hand-writing? - A. No.

Q. Did you send the prisoner on the 4th of June to Mr. Bill's? - A. I did not.

JOHN TOMLINSON sworn. - I am a shoe-maker: the prisoner at the bar came to me on the 4th of June, in the morning, to ask me to write a few lines for him; I told him I could not write, but my little boy should do it for him; my son wrote it.

JOHN TOMLINSON, jun. sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A.Turned of fifteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes; it is very wicked to take a false oath; Mr. Dugmore came and asked me to write this for him, which I did.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's defence. I have known Mr. Tomlinson some years, and I met him in Charles-court, and he told me he would give me 1s. to fetch a parcel from that gentleman's warehouse; I have a wife and eight children.

GUILTY . (Aged 56.)

Confined six months in Newgate , publicly whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18000709-110

586. JOHN DAVISON was indicted for receiving, on the 28th of May , from a certain ill disposed person, a bag, value 2d. and fifty pounds weight of pimento, value 1l. the property of William Jackson .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Common serjeant.

Reference Number: t18000709-111

587. BARNETT SOLOMON was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

The Prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the Prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: o18000709-1

Received sentence of Death - 7.

James Benson , (last Session), John Brown, Mary Beckwith, the elder, Mary Beckwith, the younger, Mary-Ann Fielding, Charles-William Price, Mary Smith otherwise Hall.

Reference Number: o18000709-2

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s. - 4.

John Wild, William Chetley, William Marke , George Wills.

Reference Number: s18000709-1

The SESSIONS being ended, the COURT proceeded to GIVE JUDGMENT as follows:

Reference Number: s18000709-1

Received sentence of Death - 7.

James Benson , (last Session), John Brown, Mary Beckwith, the elder, Mary Beckwith, the younger, Mary-Ann Fielding, Charles-William Price, Mary Smith otherwise Hall.

Transported for fourteen years - 1. Pearce Collett .

Transported for seven years - 22.

Thomas Mackarty , Elizabeth Price , Elizabeth Edwards , Ann Spencer , Edward Baldwin, Mary Johnson , Mary Robson, Barnet Quinton, Charles Derry , Joseph Carpenter, Peter Wayland , Elizabeth Scoltock , Robert Carter, John Jones, Thomas Quin, Mary Smith , John Weight , Elizabeth Wills , John Martin, Joseph Barton , William Halstead, James Davis .

Confined two years in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped. - 9.

William Gardiner, John Morton, Aaron Aubrey, John Leck, William Butler , John Hanscom, James Thomas, Solomon Hewson, James Maxwell.

Confined one year in Newgate, and privately whipped. - 1. Ann Jones.

Confined one year in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 2. William Mapsom, Thomas Currell.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped. - 2. Samuel Cross , John Connor.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 5.

Richard Charlton, Samuel Wild, John Hunt, Ann Smith , Ann Jackson.

Confined six months in Newgate, and publicly whipped. - 5.

Samuel Smedley , Patrick Bailey , Christopher Cooke , James Riley , William Dugmore.

Reference Number: s18000709-1

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s. - 4.

John Wild, William Chetley, William Marke , George Wills.

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped. - 1. James Ingram .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 7.

William Brown , John Fenton, Jacob Fowler , Henry Hall, James Smith, Edward Probert, John Peters.

Confined three months in Newgate, and publicly whipped. - 1. James Irving.

Confined two months in Newgate, and publicly whipped twice. - 1. Andrew Collins.

Confined one month in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 1. James Stuart.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 1. Ralph Wray .

Publicly whipped and discharged. - 3. Thomas Buck , George Hillyard, Alexander Lovell .

Whipped in the jail, and discharged. - 1. Robert Taylor .

Judgment respited till next Sessions. - 1. James Gearing.


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