Old Bailey Proceedings, 28th May 1800.
Reference Number: 18000528
Reference Number: f18000528-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 28th of MAY, 1800, and following Days, BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , ESQ. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1800.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &C.

BEFORE HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; Sir NASH GROSE , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ALAN CHAMBRE , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER, Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law, of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Thomas Bull ,

Ambrose Sainsbury ,

Thomas Collison ,

William Fawcett ,

John Osborn ,

Samuel Hardy ,

William Warren ,

William Bennett ,

William Gardner ,

William Winbolt ,

William Gaimes ,

William Tinkler .

First Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Smith ,

John Allan ,

Thomas Bromfield ,

William Coltman ,

Thomas Francis ,

John Wilson ,

Thomas Wilkinson ,

Peter Vincent ,

Robert Hughes ,

Thomas Elam ,

John Middleton ,

Christopher Robertson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Remett ,

John-Thomas Barber ,

William Ball ,

Richard Screaton ,

John Vickers ,

Daniel Elletson ,

Thomas Ralph ,

Henry Sawyer ,

William Butt ,

Thomas Lonsdale ,

George Griffenhoose ,

John Rogers .

Reference Number: t18000528-1

340. RICHARD BLAKESLEY and ANN HALE were indicted, the first for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jessica Davies , about the hour of five in the night of the 5th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing two beds, value 4l, five pillows, value 10s. two bolsters, value 5s. a carpet, value 2l. two china images, vlaue 6d. and five chimney ornaments, value 1l. the property of the said Jessica ; and Ann Hale for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JESSICA DAVIES sworn. - I am a widow ; I live at Haverstock-hill, in the parish of Pancras , two miles and a half from St. Giles's-Pound: I left my house on the 26th of February to come to London; I left every door locked, and the warehouse perfectly secure; I returned home again on the 9th of March, on a Sunday evening, about a quarter after eight; I had left no person in the house; when I returned I took my keys out of my pocket to open the gate; Margaret Rochfort was with me at the time; I observed the front gate was unbolted and unlocked; I observed the house-door, and found the box that holds the lock thrown into the passage; then I missed the curtains from the parlour, the pictures from the wainscot, and a quantity of wearing apparel from a chest in the parlour, and the drawers turned out; in the first floor I missed the curtains from the windows, the carpet from the floor, and the ornaments from the chimney; they were marble pedestals; a bed, bolster, and two pillows, and a white cotton counterpane; there is a closet in the front room which holds a bed, the bed was gone, three blankets, and a mattrass; I lost in all three beds, three bolsters, and five pillows; I missed two china images from the beaufet in the parlour.

Q. Had you left them all in your house on the 26th of February? - A. Yes; I saw two beds, two bolsters, and five pillows afterwards, before the Justice, and the images and the carpet, but not the chimney ornaments.

Q. Had you left those things in your house when you went to London? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt that they were your property? - A. Not any in the least. (Produces them.)

Q. I believe they were delivered to you in Court here last Sessions, by order of Lord Kenyon? - A. Yes.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer: On Thursday, the 6th of March, I went in company with other officers up one pair of stairs in a house in Gloucester-court, between Golden-lane and Whitecross-street; when I came to the door I looked through the key-hole; I opened the door and went into the room, with Mason and Ray; I found in that room the prisoner Blakesley, Wright the accomplice, Hayes Jones, another prisoner, who is since dead, and the prisoner Hale sitting by the fire-side on a chair.

Q. Do you know whose lodgings these were? - A. The landlady is here; in the window were these two one pound Bank-notes; the prisoners were secured, with the bed, two pillows, and bolsters, that were in that room; we took them all to the office; I left Hayes at the office giving his deposition, and I went with Vickery and Mason, two other officers, to a room in Red-lion-court, Red-lion-market, I believe it is called, in Whitecross-street; I went up two pair of stairs, and broke the room-door open; there I found this carpet, a bed, three pillows, a bolster, two images, and sundry other things, which I put into a coach, and went to Hayes's house in Golden-lane, and brought Mrs. Hayes to the office, who had the key of that room; there was a woman laid in that room, though Mrs. Hayes kept the key; I took her into custody, but she was discharged; I took Mrs. Hayes to the office, her word was taken, and she came when the Magistrates ordered her; her husband was kept; I delivered them to Mrs. Davies in Court last sessions, and put my mark upon them; these are the same things, there is my name upon the bed.

Mrs. Davies. I am very sure they are all mine; they are the things that I left in my house in February, and that I missed when I returned home.

Court. Q. What is the value of them? - A. Each bed two pounds; I gave three guineas for the carpet at Michaelmas last.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Whether these things were all taken at one time or at half a dozen times, you do not know? - A. No.

Q. You prosecuted Davis last sessions? - A. Yes.

Q. You know he had robbed your house four or five times? - A. I cannot say.

PETER MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: I found some crows and dark lanterns at Davis's lodgings, and a quantity of picklock-keys; I went to the house at Hampstead afterwards, and fitted the crows.

Q. You found no crows upon the prisoner? - A. No.

MARY HAYES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the wife of Henry Hayes , who was taken into custody at Hale's house? - A. Yes; I live at No. 6, Golden-lane.

Q. Did you remove any goods? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it after your husband was taken up? - A. Yes; they were removed to Red-lion-market; there was a bed and two small images, a carpet, and two bolsters.

Q. How came you to remove them to Red-lion-market? - A. I had not room in my own house.

Q. And that was the only reason why you removed them? - A. I heard my husband was taken.

Q. Upon your oath was not that the reason that you removed them? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. The bed and the holsters should you know them again if you were to see them? - A. I do not know that I should.

Q. You removed them to the place where the officers took them? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This has not happened frequently to your husband and you to be taken up? - A. It happened once before to me.

Q. You were admitted as a witness then? - A. Yes.

Q. You have once sworn to that Jury that you had no room in your house for those things, is that true or not? - A. I had no room, because they were in the passage; I had no room convenient to put them in; the shop and the kitchen laid open, and I did not think that was proper.

Q. Had you no place above stairs? - A. None but my own sleeping room.

Q. You did not like to put them where they could be seen; that was not convenient to you and your husband's business? - A. No.

Q. How long have you been in this business as a receiver of stolen goods? - A. About a year and a half.

Q. Has it often happened to your husband to be in custody? - A. He was not in custody before he came to see me, and they detained him.

Q. Do you mean to say that your husband never was in custody but that once? - A. He is in custody now.

Q. How came you to swear that your only reason for removing them was that you had not room for them? - A. I should have removed them if my husband had not been taken.

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have been admitted a witness for the crown by the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q. Now remember you are bound to tell the truth, and the whole truth; do you know Mrs. Davies's house at Haverstock-hill? - A. Yes; I went there on the 5th of March, between four and five in the morning, with Richard Blakesley , and Jones, who is dead.

Q. Was it light or dark? - A. It was dark.

Q. Did you take any light with you? - A. We took a dark lantern and a tinder-box; we struck a light in the road.

Q. How did you go there? - A. We went with a horse and cart; we unbolted the garden-gate and went in, and found the door as Davis and I had left it on the Monday before.

Q. How did you leave the door when you left it on Monday? - A. We pulled the house-door to, and left some stones between the door and the doorpost.

Court. You see you cannot make this a burglary.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What did you do then? - A. We pushed the door with our knees, and it went open.

Q. Did it require any degree of force to open it? - A. No; then we went into the house, and I brought out a bed that laid in the passage, and put it in the cart; after which Blakesley brought out another bed that was in the passage; we went up one pair of stairs, and brought the carpet down.

Q. Look at that carpet; do you believe it to be the same? - A. It was like this; there were two china images, three pillows, two bolsters, and some chimney ornaments; they were all put into a cart; we brought them to town, and took them to Jones's apartments, somewhere in Whitecross-street; we took the things up to his room; Blakesley helped to take the things out; then we wanted a purchaser; we shewed them to two or three persons, and they would not buy them; then I went to Henry Hayes, in the afternoon of that same day; he lives in Golden-lane; I told him what articles we had got, and he came along with us to look at them; Blakesley asked eleven guineas for the property, and Hayes refused; he said he would give five guineas and a half; we did not agree to let him have them, and he returned to his home; and then Blakesley went to tell him he should have them; Hayes came back with him, and he was to have them for five guineas and a half; he paid half-a-guinea earnest; Hayes took one bed away with him, and the carpet, and the chimney ornaments; then he returned again for the other bed, and as he was paying the money to Blakesley, while we were there, the officers, Armstrong, Ray, and Mason came in.

Q. We have heard that Hale was in the room at the time? - A. Yes, she was sitting down by the fire.

Q. Had she any thing to do with the sale of the articles? - A. No.

Q. Did you know whose lodgings these were? - A. No, I did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Davis and you and Jones went to the house first? - A. No; only Davis and I.

Q. Davis and you were quite enough to carry away the property; Davis could have done it as well as Blakesley? - A. Yes; but Jones was not there; Davis and I had fell out, I met with Blakesley, and told him of these things, and he agreed with me to go the next morning.

Q. How long have you amnsed yourself in this trade of breaking open houses? - A. About five or six months.

Q. No more than that? - A. No.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with Mr. and Mrs. Hayes? - A. No long time.

Q. This apartment was not Blakesley's? - A. No; it was Jones's.

Q. Do you mean to say that when the officers came in, Hayes was in the act of paying money to Blakesley? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Were the two one-pound Bank-notes that were found, part of that money? - A. Yes.

HENRY HAYES sworn. - Examined by Mr Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner Blakesley? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Hale? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to any lodgings in Whitecross-street? - A. I went to Mrs. Hale's lodgings on the 6th of March, between five and six o'clock; there were Richard Blakesley there, William Wright, Thomas Jones , and Mrs. Hale; Blakesley had come to ask me if I would buy two beds, two bolsters, five pillows, a carpet, and seven chimney ornaments; I followed him to Mrs. Hale's; he desired me to follow him; I followed him up the court; I went up stairs, and saw two beds, two bolsters, five pillows, a carpet, and seven chimney ornaments; I asked how much they wanted for them; Blakesley said, eleven guineas; I bid them five guineas and a half; they told me I should not have them; I returned home, and Blakesley, in about ten minutes, came down to my house, and said I should have them if I would give him five shillings for himself; I told him I would not; then he said would I give him half a crown; I told him, no, I would not; then he said would I give him a pair of left off shoes; I told him I should not stand about a pair of shoes; then he agreed I should have the things for five guineas and a half, and a pair of second-hand shoes; then he returned home; he said he had no money; I let him have five shillings, and then my daughter and I went to Mrs. Hale's room; that was between three and four in the afternoon; I gave my little girl the chimney ornaments in her lap, and she came home.

Q. Who were there when you first went to Hale's lodgings? - A. Richard Blakesley , William Wright Thomas Jones , and Mrs. Hale; when I returned with my little girl, they were there then; I gave her the ornaments, and they took the carpet; this is the carpet, as near as I can judge; I took the carpet home and returned again, and found them all there then; I then packed up the bed, two pillows, and one bolster; then one of the three men, I cannot say which, asked me for half a guinea, to discharge a cart that they had to fetch these things in; I gave them half a guinea, I think it was to Blakesley; I then took home the bed and the two pillows and the bolster; I then went back again, and they were all there then; I took them money with me, and I began to pay for them.

Q. Did you pay them all in cash? - A. No; there were two one-pound notes; one of them was torn a little.

Q. Look at these two? - A. These are the same; Blakesley put the money in his pocket, all but the notes; they were put in the window, and then the officers came in.

Q. Do you recollect Blakesley and you having any conversation about where the goods came from? - A. No, they did not tell me; Blaksley said they came from the country; I think it was him; I had no other conversation with them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you think these goods fairly and honestly come by? - A. No; I did not think about it.

Q. What age is this little girl? - A. Between ten and eleven.

Q. You are training her up early? - A. I never bought any thing in my life before; my wife keeps the shop, and my business is out-door.

Q. Did you know Robertson and Smith that were convicted here? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath did you not open the door to them? - A. I did not know, when they knocked at the door, that it was them.

Q. Do you come from gaol here? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any honest person that ever saw Blakesley at your house? - A. No.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I searched Blakesley; I found upon him a guinea and a half, three seven-shilling pieces, and a sixpence; I saw Mr. Armstrong find the Bank-notes in the window.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Blakesley, GUILTY Death .( Of stealing to the value of 40s.)

Hale, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-2

341. WILLIAM MEAD was indicted for that he, in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, on the 9th of May , upon Mary-Elizabeth Nation did make an assault, putting her in fear, and taking from her person a metal clasp, value 1s. a silk purse, value 6d. a seven-shilling-piece, and two shillings, the property of the said Mary .

(The case was opened by Mr. Newbolt.)

MARY-ELIZABETH NATION sworn. - Examined by Mr. Newbolt. I am governess to Mr. Mill's children: On the 9th of May I was in Kensington-gardens , about a quarter after eleven o'clock in the forenoon, Mr. Mills's children were with me, and the nursery-maid, Sarah Vale ; the prisoner at the bar came up to me, and said, your money.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. The prisoner is the man; I got up from my seat, being very much alarmed; he then said, in a loud tone of voice, you hesitate; upon which I turned round, I was going to run away, and he presented a pistol at me; I said, stop, Sir, and I will give you all I have got; I gave him my purse containing a seven-shilling-piece, some silver, two or three shillings, and there was a little gilt clasp in the purse; he then ran off.

Q. Did you observe the size of the pistol which he presented to you? - A. It was a small pistol; half of his face was covered with a white handkerchief, the lower half; the prisoner was brought to me in about a quarter of an hour afterwards; the children had raised an alarm.

Q. At the time he was brought back, did you, to the best of your belief, think he was the person that had robbed you? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Is the prisoner, who now stands at the bar, the man who was brought back to you? - A. He is.

Examined by the Court. Q. How long had you seen him before he came up to you? - A. I had not seen him till he came up to me.

Q. Was one half of his face covered during the whole time he was with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you under much alarm at the time? - A. I was not at the first.

Q. How is it that you are enabled to say that he is the man, one half of his face being covered? - A. I attended very particularly to the other part of his face; for as I knew I had but very little in my purse, I was afraid what he might do to me.

Q. Had you made any particular observation upon his dress during the time he was with you? - A. Yes; he had on a brown coat.

Q. Did you observe whether he had his own hair, or a wig? - A. I did not observe that; he was without powder.

Q. How are you enabled to judge with certainty - do you speak from his features? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you enabled, from the observation you made, to speak with certainty? - A. I can speak with certainty.

Q. In what part of the garden was it? - A. Near the Bayswater-gate.

Q. When he was brought back to you did you hear him speak? - A. Yes; and I knew his voice immediately.

Q. Where was Sarah Vale at the time? - A. She was sitting opposite to me; one of the children was sitting by me.

Q. What age was that child? - A. About twelve.

SARAH VALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Newbolt. I am nurse to Mr. Mills's children: On the 9th of May I was in Kensington-gardens with Miss Nation, I was sitting on the grass opposite to her.

Q. Were you turned towards Miss Nation, or from her? - A. From her.

Q. Did you at that time observe the prisoner? - A. I cannot swear to him; I only saw the colour of the coat, it was a brown coat, I saw him running; just after that, I saw him take a dirty handkerchief from his face and put it into his hat.

Q. Had the man that was brought back to Miss Nation the same coloured coat on that the man had on that you saw run? - A. I think he had, I cannot swear that.

Court. Q. How far might you be from Miss Nation? - A. About an hundred yards; I then rose my head up and saw him running; he was then about as far from Miss Nation as I am from there,(the bench); I was very much alarmed for the children; I think he was a man about the same size, but I cannot pretend to say.

- FAIRCLOUGH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Newbolt. I am a surgeon, in Queen-street, Portman-square: On the 9th of May I was in Kensington-gardens; I saw Miss Nation about three hundred yards from the Bayswater-gate, or between two and three hundred yards, she was sitting upon the first bench from the gate; I heard the alarm of the children, and immediately saw the prisoner running down the gravel-walk, I immediately pursued him.

Q. How far was he from the bench where Miss Nation was? - A. About an hundred yards.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar the man that you saw running? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any body else running at the same time? - A. No; I pursued him till he came to Grosvenor-gate.

Q. How far is Grosvenor-gate from where Miss Nation was sitting? - A. About a quarter of a mile at least; I saw what direction he took when he got into Hyde-park, and called out, stop thief;

other persons called out, stop thief, also, and he was stopped, I saw him laid hold of; I had him in my eye all the way, except as he passed through Grosvenor-gate; when I cried stop thief, he slackened his pace very much.

Q. Did you see any thing in his hand? - A. No, I did not; I beckoned to the people, when he was laid hold of, to bring him to me, and he was brought to Grosvenor-gate, where I stood; and when they brought the prisoner to me, I desired them to lead him on to Miss Nation; I went with them, and she positively identified his person; I did not see the pistol found, but I heard the prisoner say that he picked up the pistol.

Court. Q. Are you perfectly sure, that the person who was brought to you at Grosvenor-gate, was the person that you had seen running in Kensington-gardens? - A. I am.

Q. You did not see him stop for any thing? - A. No.

Jury. Q. What was the cause of your pursuit? - A. The children gave an alarm, and Miss Nation pointed out to me that that was the man.

Q. Was any handkerchief found in his hat? - A. Yes; there was a white handkerchief, a coarse cambric handkerchief, rather dirty.

Q. Did you see it found? - A. No; the Duchess of Dorset's servant told me it was found in the hat; after he came to Bow-street the handkerchief was found in his pocket.

JAMES DOAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Newbolt. I am servant to the Duchess of Dorset: On the 9th of May I was in Hyde-park, I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner at the bar running; I observed no other person running, I ran towards him, and this gentleman and I laid hold of him; he put his hand to his right hand pocket, I think it was, and pulled out this pistol, and dropped it, (produces it); I afterwards took him to Miss Nation, and she said that was the person.

Q. (To Miss Nation.) Is that pistol like the one that was presented to you by the prisoner? - A. This is like it.

Doan. Some persons came up and examined the pistol, and found it was not loaded; we examined his pockets, and found no other pistol.

ROBERT WATHER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Newbolt. At that time I lived butler with Sir Richard Hearn : I was walking up the Park, and met the prisoner at the bar, he was walking, but seemed to be spent with running; I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw nobody else running, and there fore I stopped him; I did not see him drop the pistol, I saw Doan pick it up; we then took him back to Miss Nation, and she recognized him immediately; I found a dirty white handkerchief in the crown of his hat.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, with regard to the pistol, the evidence that saw me pick the pistol up is now at Bath; it is true I had it in my possession; there was a review in the Park, both of horse and foot, I went into the Park to see it, and kicked this before me; I picked it up, and with a bit of stick I tried it, and found it was not loaded; I looked at the lock, and found there was but one screw in it; as to Miss Nation, I am perfectly innocent; it was a very hot day, and the people were drove about very much, and there were a great many people glad to put handkerchiefs in their hats to keep the sweat from running down their faces; I dare say there were fifty people in the Park with handkerchiefs in their hats; I have lived with Lord Howe, and some of the first families in the kingdom, and am now in the Custom-house; there were several people running in Kensington-gardens; I offered to be searched when I was stopped; but as to Miss Nation, the great Searcher of hearts knows I never saw her purse or money, and we shall be judged by-and-by; I know I had this pistol about me; I thought it would look black against me, and I threw it away.

Wather. He certainly offered to be searched.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , (of the robbery generally, but not guilty of the robbery in a certain field and open place near the King's highway.) Death . (Aged 26.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMERE.

Reference Number: t18000528-3

342. JOHN MARTIN, alias ROBINS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , a promissory note, value 10l. and two other promissory notes, each of the value of 5l. 5s. the property of John Gibson , in the dwelling-house of John Hunter , Esq .

JOHN GIBSON sworn. - I am a solicitor , at Ramsgate: On Wednesday evening, the 2d of April, between eight and nine o'clock, I was at Mr. Hunter's house, who is my brother-in-law, in the parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster ; I went into the drawing-room above stairs, and found that the dressing-room window, even with the drawing-room below stairs, had been thrown up; there was a writing-box belonging to Mrs. Hunter, in which were contained five five-guinea notes of the Ramsgate bank, and one ten pound note of the same bank, belonging to me, I had put them in myself; the first thing I inquired after was that box, and I found it was gone, with the notes; I saw no more of the notes till the constable brought them to me, in consequence of information that I had given at Bow-street on the Thursday morning, and on the Thursday afternoon the notes were brought to me by the constable; the constable has the notes.

SAMUEL PENBERTON sworn. - I live servant with John Hunter , Esq. in Fludyer-street, Westminster: I went into my mistress's dressing-room to shut the window, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, and found it open; the dressing-room window looks into Fludyer-street; I found the window up, the blinds open, and some dirt of a footstep upon the outside of the window; I did not miss any thing.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am a constable of St. John's parish, Westminster: On the 2d of April, I was at the watch-house from between nine and ten o'clock in the evening till the morning; there was a person brought to the watch-house of the name of Gentleman, charged with an assault; and in consequence of information I received from the watchman, Robert Greenhill , I went with him to a place called Corkcutters-alley; as soon as I got into the alley, it is not a thoroughfare, a woman ran up the alley, and said, Jack, shut the door; I made the best of my way to follow her into that house, and I found the prisoner standing in the house with his back towards the fire-place; when he saw me, he stooped to take up something, which he held behind his coat, which put me on my guard; the woman then ran towards him, put her arms round him, and took something away, but what it was I could not discover; he then stooped again, and took something else up, which he held behind his coat in the same way; after a little while that was dropped, and I discovered a poker lying upon the hearth; he asked me what I wanted with him, and it was nonsense, and so on; I then desired the watchman to take him into custody, and I took out my truncheon, and we took him to the watch-house; when he came to the watch-house, I searched him, and in his left-hand waistcoat-pocket I found four Ramsgate bank-notes, which I have now to produce; they were squeezed up separately like waste paper; I did not ask him how he came by them, he was drunk at that time; the next morning I did ask him how he came by them, and he told me he came honestly by them, but did not tell me how. (Produces three five-guinea notes, and a ten pound note.)

Mr. Gibson. I believe them all to be mine; but the ten pound note, which is marked with, the names of Mr. Heritage and J. Perkins upon it, I can swear positively to.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You mean only to speak to the ten pound note? - A. Yes.

Q. And from that single circumstance, of having these names upon it? - A. Yes.

Q. They are all Ramsgate bank-notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Nothing is more common with notes than to have names endorsed upon them? - A. Undoubtedly.

Q. It appears to have been a good while in circulation? - A. Yes.

Q. Cannot you recollect ever having seen the names of Heritage and Perkins upon any other note? - A. Not that I recollect.

Q. Heritage kept a tavern at Ramsgate? - A. Yes.

Q. And it was his practice to put his name upon other bills? - A. That I cannot say.

Q. Did you never see any other notes with his names endorsed upon them? - A. I may; I cannot recollect them.

Q. Supposing there had been a ten pound note that had found its way to York, or any other place, it having the name of Heritage, and having the name of Perkins, should you have been able to distinguish the one from the other? - A. No.

Q. I see the endorsement, Heritage, is dated May 1795? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Observe this is not the endorsement of an endorset, because it is payable on demand, but an endorsement put on for some other purpose? - A. Yes.

Bly. Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The first person you saw at the end of this alley was the woman? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw nothing of the notes in the house? - A. No.

Q. The woman was the person who appeared to be agitated? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you curiosity to search the house before you took the prisoner to the watch-house? - A. No.

Q. Therefore, whether there was any other man in that house you do not know? - A. It is a small house let in tenements.

Q. Did you search the house to see if there was any other man in any other part of that house at that time? - A. I did not.

Court. Q. Did the prisoner make any resistance when you took him? - A. He seemed to menace at first, but he did not make any resistance.

Jury. Q. You say there was a woman whose arms were round the man, what became of her? - A. She was taken into custody a few days afterwards.

Court. Q. Was it impossible that she could have taken any thing from his pocket, or any part about him? - A. I think there was a possibility, but I did not see her take any thing; he back was to me.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Might not the woman have given him something? - A. I did not see her; there is a possibility of it.

Court. Q. Could she have given him these notes that you found squeezed up in his waistcoat pocket? - A. I should suppose she might.

ROBERT GREENHILL sworn. - On the 3d of April, about a quarter past one in the morning, I was going by Cork-cutter's-alley, I heard a very great noise; I went down with my

partner Gilbert, and there was a man there that had been very much beat, and he gave me charge of Gentleman, I took charge of him and two others, I took them all to the watch-house together; I heard the prisoner say to Gentleman in the room of the house where I took charge of them, don't be afraid, I will lend you fifteen or twenty pounds if you want it, in Bank-notes; upon that, I took Gentleman to the watch-house, and locked him up; I called Mr. Bly out of the watch-house, and told him what I had heard the man say, and we went to the house and took him, and as we entered the court, there was a woman called out, Jack, Jack, shut the door; upon that I got my stick between the door and the sill, and with the assistance of Bly, I shoved the door open, and collared the prisoner at the bar, and he made away to the fireplace; he was standing by a table when we went in, he went to the fire-place, where there laid a poker and a hatchet, and a hand-broom upon the hearth, he stooped down and picked up one of these things, but which he had I could not see; he began to skuffle a little at first, till I told him it was of no use, for I would stick him to the wall with a cutlass if he made any resistance; and when he saw me putting my hand toward the cutlass, he let it drop; we took him to the watch-house, and in his waistcoat pocket were four Bank notes, three of five guineas, and a ten pound note.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have told us all that passed about the woman? - A. No; she went to him when he stood by the fire-place, and took something out of his hand, but what it was I do not know, she made use of this expression,"Don't, don't, do nothing;" she put her hands to his hands, and whatever he had in his hands, he dropped; I did not know whether it was the poker, or what it was.

Q. You have told us all that happened that the woman did? - A. I believe so.

Q. Do you remember the woman clasping the man round the body, with her arms? - A. Not to the best of my knowledge.

Q. If that had been done in the room, you must have seen it? - A. Yes, there was a light in the room.

Q. Will you swear that he gave her any thing, or that she gave him any thing? - A. I did not see her either give or take.

Q. Will you venture to swear that she did not give any thing into his hand? - A. No.

THOMAS GILBERT sworn. - I am a patrole: On the 3d of April, I went with the last witness into the prisoner's apartment, he was there along with the woman; I heard the prisoner say to Gentleman, that he would let him have fifteen or twenty pounds, if he wanted it, and not to be afraid.

Q. Was Gentleman and he making a notice and riotous? - A. Yes, and beating the man.

Court. (To Bly.) Q. Was it in consequence of what Greenhill told you, respecting the prisoner having fifteen or twenty pounds, that you proceeded to do what you did? - A. Yes; Gentleman was a man that had returned from transportation, and therefore I suspected the prisoner as they were together.

Court. (To Pemberton.) Q. You say, you observed a footstep when you went up stairs, was it a man's footstep or a woman's? - A. A man's.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through the City, when I got through Temple-bar, by the first church, it was a very wet night, and I picked up a handkerchief, and upon shaking it this paper dropped out; I never was in London till three weeks before this.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-4

343. JOHN KNIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May , a gelding, value 5l. the property of Thomas Cole .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM ISTED . - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. How old are you? - A. I cannot tell; I have been servant to Mr. Cole three years.

Court. Q. Do you know what will become of you if you tell a lie upon your oath? - A. I do not know.

Q. Is it a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. I do not know, I am sure.

JOHN COLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am nephew to Mr. Cole: On the 8th of May, I saw Mr. Cole's horses in the field, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, there were three of them.

Q. Where? - A. At Godstone ; Mr. Cole keeps the White-hart; they were missed the next morning about four o'clock, that was Friday morning; between eight and nine I set off to London; I went to Smithfield market; I got a friend, Mr. Wheeler and a constable, to search the market; Isted was with me, he saw the horse; I went round, and Wheeler and I bargained for it; it was one of those horses that I had seen in the field over-night; we bargained with the prisoner at the bar for it; Wheeler asked the prisoner the price of the horse, he was tied to the rail as a horse for sale, I did not hear what he asked for it; I am sure the prisoner is the person, I had seen him the night before with another person, within a quarter of a mile off the field where the horse was turned out; I knew the prisoner's father, he lived in the parish of Godstone; Mr. Wheeler looked the horse over, and

saw a blemish upon the nose; the horse was not bought, he was only bargained for, and then the constable took the prisoner into custody, he was sent to jail.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person? - A. Yes.

DANIEL WHEELER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a stable-keeper, in Bartholomew-close; I went with Mr. Cole on the Friday, about two in the day, to Smithfield; I saw the prisoner and the horse near the corner of Long-lane, the horse was tied to the rail; I asked him if the horse was his property, he said, it was not, that he was employed to sell the horse for another person, he mentioned the name, but I do not recollect what the name was.

Q. It was not the name of Cole, was it? - A. No, it was not; I asked him the price, and he told me five pounds; I went away a little distance, and Mr. Cole and the constable immediately took the man and the horse.

Q. Was the horse that you saw there, the horse that Mr. Cole claimed as his horse? - A. It was.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the constable under the Lord-Mayor's direction, attending Smithfield-market; I apprehended the prisoner at the bar in Smithfield, and gave the horse to my partner Trimby; I asked him how he came by the horse, he said, I am not the man that took the horse, you have let the man go, but there was no other man near the horse but him at the time; in consequence of which, I took him to the Compter, and there searched him; I found among other things this turnpike ticket, marked Marsh-gate, 54, one penny.

Q. That is Lambeth-marsh, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that in the road from Godstone to London? - A. Yes; it is one of the roads to London.

Q. Was the horse shewn to Mr. Cole? - A. It was shewn to Mr. Wheeler.

Q. (To Cole.) The horse that this witness had delivered to him - was that the horse that had been lost by Mr. Cole? - A. It was.

GEORGE GARDINER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was the toll collector at Lambeth-marshgate, I went on duty at four o'clock in the day of the 8th; I went off again the next day, at four o'clock in the afternoon; I was on twenty-four hours.

Q. Is that the way in which persons would come from Godstone? - A. It is one of the ways.

Q. Look at that ticket - do you know that to be the ticket given by you on that day? - A. It lasts for the 9th; this was given on the Friday morning; we change at twelve o'clock at night always.

THOMAS COLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the White-hart at Godstone ; this horse was my property.

Q. Have you any partner? - A. I had a partner in that horse, but it was made over to me previous to this; I have never seen the horse since, but it was brought back on the Saturday following; my nephew knows the horse.

Cartwright. After we were all bound over, the Lord-Mayor ordered me to deliver the horse up to Mr. Cole, which I did; it was a black horse, pretty near all black, and a sack upon his back for a saddle.

Court. (To Wheeler.) Q. Describe this horse? - A. It was a black horse, a farming like horse, there was an old sack upon his back.

Court. (To Thomas Cole .) Q. Was your's a farming horse, almost black? - A. Yes.

Court. (To John Cole .) Q. Was the horse you saw tied up to the rails, the same horse that Cartwright delivered to you? - A. It was delivered by Cartwright to Chantler.

Cartwright. I delivered it to Chantler.

MOSES CHANTLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am constable of Godstone; the horse was delivered to me by Cartwright and Trimby, and I delivered it to Mr. Cole.

Prisoner's defence. When that gentleman came up to me, I told him it was not my horse, and he asked me if I knew the price, and I told him I believed the price was about five guineas.

GUILTY, Death . (Aged 19.)

The prisoner was recommended by the prosecutor to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his knowledge of the prisoner's father as a man of respectability .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-5

344. JOHN HANSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , a tea-chest, value 20s. the property of William Rann , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM RANN sworn. - I am a cabinetmaker , in Old Compton-street ; I was not at home at the time the tea-chest was lost, I can only prove the property.

JANE RANN sworn. - I am the wife of William Rann ; I was sitting in the parlour, facing the shop; I did not see any body come in, but I saw the tail of a dark coloured coat, going out of the shop; I went into the shop and missed the tea-chest from behind the door; I did not hear any body come in; he left the door open; I gave an alarm, and the prisoner was brought back with the tea-chest under his arm; I know it to be my tea-chest.

AGNES STOUT sworn. - I am servant to the last witness; my mistress gave an alarm that the tea-

chest was gone; I followed the prisoner down Compton street, to the corner of Dean-street, and called stop thief, and he was brought back to my master's house with the tea-chest under his arm; he was never out of my sight at all.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not standing still when you first saw me? - A. He was standing at the door of a house of call, thinking to get in at the door; but he could not, and then he ran off.

JOHN KEMPSON sworn. - I am a butcher, I heard the cry of stop thief; I went up to the prisoner, and asked him, where did you steal this tea-chest from, is it your's or is it not; he said, it was his property; Agnes Stour said, it was her master's property; I immediately took him by the collar, and took him back to the shop; I delivered the property to Agnes Stout , and the prisoner to the constable.

JOHN HARTSHORN sworn. - (Produces the tea-chest;) I received this property from Mrs. Rann,(The tea-chest was deposed to by the Prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the tea-chest at the step of a door in Dean-street; I did not know whose property it was.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-6

345. WILLIAM STRICK was indicted for that he, together with other persons, to the number of three and more, whose names are unknown, being malefactors and disturbers of the peace, on the 5th of May, 1799 , at the parish of St. Keverne, in the Country of Cornwall , being armed with fire-arms, and other offensive weapons, guns, pistols, and swords, unlawfully, riotously, and feloniously did assemble together, in order to be aiding and assisting, and did aid and assist other persons in rescuing and taking away from John Twentyman , being an Officer of the Excise , and Richard Thomas , being an Officer of the Customs , fifty gallons of foreign brandy, and forty gallons of foreign geneva, the same being uncustomed goods, and liable to pay duties which had not been paid or received, after seizure of the said goods, by the said John Twentyman and Richard Thomas , against the form of the statute.

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Jackson.)

Mr. Attorney-General. Gentlemen of the Jury, this is an indictment against the prisoner, William Strick , for a capital offence, so constituted by a special Act of Parliament passed for the purpose in the 39th year of the late King, by which it is made an enquiry before you, notwithstanding the offence itself was committed in the county of Cornwall.

Gentlemen. This is a provision of the law which I think you will find, when the circumstances of this case come to be stated to you, is absolutely necessary; for sorry I am to say, that the evidence that will be offered to you in this case, will shew you what the legislature were sensible of at the time of passing this Act of Parliament, that justice was not to be expected upon the spot, that so many persons were concerned in transactions of this nature, that it could not be hoped upon the spot to find a Jury who would do justice; not perhaps because they might not be disposed to do it, but probably because they would not dare to do it; for, Gentleman, it is a melancholy reflection, that in those counties upon the coast, where transactions of this kind take place, there are so many persons who are in the habit of setting themselves above the law in certain instances, that they are very apt to set themselves above the law in all; and that persons who think sit, as you will find, according to the evidence that will be given to you in this case, to hazard their lives in one instance, are disposed to hazard their lives in others, for the protection of that gain which they are attempting unlawfully to make.

Gentlemen, This Act provides, that if any persons, to the number of three or more, armed with fire-arms or other offensive weapons, shall be assembled for the purpose of assisting in a variety of illegal acts with respect to the smuggling of goods, and particularly with respect to the rescuing or taking away such goods after seizure, from the others of the Customs or Excise, that they shall be adjudged guilty of felony, and shall suffer death as in a cases of felony, without benefit of clergy. Gentlemen, that is the offence with which the prisoner at the bar stands charged, and you are, as indifferent persons, between the prisoner and his country, to determine whether or not he has been guilty of that offence.

Gentlemen, According to the evidence which is stated to me, the case will be proved to you fully, clearly, and in such a manner that I apprehend you can have no doubt upon the subject. It will appear to you, I think, that in the month of May in the last year, some officers of the Customs and Excise had seized a quantity of brandy and geneva, in those small casks which if any of you Gentlemen have been at all conversant with smuggling causes, must know by the common appellation of tubs or ankers, and which ankers(but they are commonly called tubs by the smugglers) were found concealed, being buried in trenches in a ploughed field near a village called Trebuthan, in the parish of St. Keverne, in the county of Cornwall; this village is near another, called Coverack upon the Beach, where goods are landed. Gentlemen, it will be proved to you, that the officers having found these goods buried in these trenches, and having seized them, that some of them went for the purpose of procuring horses or carriages to remove them to Helstone, which was the nearest place to which they could have removed them in safety; that some of them employed themselves in searching for more goods, and a man of the name of Lisle was left in possession of the goods that were seized. It will be in proof to you, that while this man was alone, in the possession of the goods so seized, eight men armed with guns, with pistols, and with hangers or swords, some of them having two of these weapons and others only one, arrived at the place where Lisle stood with the goods; that they used threatening expressions to him, threatening to kill him if he attempted to hinder them, saying that the goods were

their's, that they had already hazarded their lives for them; and then each man took up an anker and carried it away. Gentlemen, this was when Lisle only was present, and a part only of the goods were carried away upon this occasion; when these eight men had carried the goods to the distance I think of about half a mile, they were met by other smugglers, to whom they delivered them, and then they instantly returned, all the officers at that time being collected together. Gentlemen, upon returning again, they presented their firearms; they threatened the officers if they made the least resistance, and then they again carried off seven more of the ankers, leaving a staved one in possession of the officers. The fact, therefore, of the rescue of these goods from the officers, after they had seized them, will be clearly and distinctly proved; the circumstance of these eight men coming thus together, coming thus armed, coming a second time, will also prove to you that this was deliberately done. But, Gentlemen, it will also be shewn to you, that these men came up from the Cove called Coverack, for the very purpose of rescuing these goods; that they made enquiries upon the subject before they came to the spot; they enquired after the goods, and got a person to conduct them to the spot where the seized goods were; it is evident, therefore, that the most deliberate purpose of violating the laws of their country, of setting themselves up above the law, and of preventing the execution of that law by force, was the object of these persons. Gentlemen, the same is obvious also, from the language which they used upon the occasion; when they were told by the officers that the goods had been seized by them, in the character of officers of his Majesty's Customs, the answer they gave was, that they had already hazarded their lives for the goods, that they were their property, and they would have them. Gentlemen, the goods being thus taken away, it will appear to you, that the officers mounting their horses, rode after the men, not for the purpose of taking the goods from them again, because the force was too strong for them; but with a view of going to that place called Coverack, from which these persons had come, to ascertain precisely who they were, or to get some account of them. Gentlemen, they came up with them in a narrow lane leading to Coverack; when they came up with them the smugglers put down their casks and stood before them with their arms presented to the officers, to keep them back; the officers told them they did not mean to fight them, at which time they had an opportunity of minutely examining the persons of the men who were concerned in the transaction; and I understand it will be proved to you most satisfactorily, that the prisoner at the bar was one of those persons. Gentlemen, it will appear to you, how boldly, how openly, and how unfortunately for the peace of the country, these men dared to act, for, upon the officers going to Coverack, the smugglers followed them, and having set down the casks openly in the town at a public-house door, they drank out of them; here there were so many smugglers of different descriptions, crews of vessels employed for that purpose, that it was utterly impossible for the officers to do any thing, and they were obliged to leave these people quietly in possession of the goods. You will easily imagine, Gentlemen, that in a country where such a transaction can be carried on, where all the people of the country sit quiet, and suffer men to conduct themselves in such a lawless manner, that justices is not to be had; the men who are resident upon the spot, whether from their habits of life, whether from their connexions with these people, or whether from the fear they have of them, you will perceive they did not dare to stir to assist the officers against those persons who were thus acting in open defiance of the law.

Gentlemen, If this case is proved to you as it is stated to me, I apprehend you can have no doubt of the guilt of the prisoner; for it will appear to you that there was a rescue of goods seized, as required by the Act of Parliament; that that rescue was with force and violence, by a number of persons armed, to the amount of more than three, namely, eight persons at least were concerned in the transaction. It will be proved to you, that the purpose of these men was deliberate, that their intention was to effect a rescue, that they went for that purpose to the spot, that they returned a second time, having before taken but part of the goods, that they took them away by violence, and declared their resolution to risk their lives in the attempt, if they should be resisted.

Gentlemen, The case therefore, under these circumstances, will, as I conceive, be distinctly proved to you; and if it is proved to you, I conceive you will not hesitate to discharge your duty. You, Gentlemen, must be indifferent upon this subject; you can have no passions or prejudices upon it, nor can you have any fears: to you, therefore, it is, that the law appeals, and your verdict must declare between the prisoner and the public, whether he is guilty or not.

JOHN TWENTYMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a supervisor of Excise, at Penzance.

Q. Tell us what happened on the 5th of May, 1799, in the parish of St. Keverne? - A. I set out in the morning with Mr. Richard Thomas , and William Hodges , Officers of the Customs, Richard Lisle and John Bunney , Officers of the Excise, and Thomas Veal , an Officer of the Customs; we went to Coverack, a smuggling cove, where we expected a vast quantity of smuggled goods had been recently landed; having left our horses at the Cove, we dispersed in different directions to search for smuggled goods; about ten o'clock in the morning of that day, I discovered, in a ploughed field near the village of Trebuthan, sixteen casks, containing brandy and geneva.

Court. Q. What casks were they? - A. Whole ankers.

Q. Is not an anker an unlawful tub? - A. Yes; they hold about seven gallons and a half; they had slings on them.

Q. That is for the purpose of sinking them occasionally? - A. Yes, and for throwing them over the horses' backs; they were buried in three trenches; I then called Mr. William Hodges to my assistance; at the same time Mr. Richard Thomas came up; finding that they could not be

raised without ascade or a shovel, I sent William Hodges to obtain one; when we took them up with a spade we collected them all together; there were sixteen of them; I discovered their contents to be brandy and geneva; after some time the other officers joined us; we consulted together how they were to be removed to Helstone, being the nearest town, and Mr. Thomas and John Punney went off to seek for horses or carriages for that purpose; when they went off, I was in possession of the goods, with Richard Lisle and Mr. Veal and Mr. Hodges; but immediately after they were gone I left Mr. Listle in possession of the goods, charging him to take caro of them till we returned; I went towards Coverack to see if we could find any more in the fields and hedges, being about a quarter of a mile from where we had left Lisle in possession of the goods we had seized; I observed eight men coming up from the village of Coverack; at first fight I took them to be the crew of a King's cutter; when I came nearer I found I was mistaken in that conjecture, seeing them all armed.

Q. How were they armed? - A. They were armed with guns, pistols, swords, and hangers; one man in particular had two pistols; they were every one of them armed with weapons; I stood upon the hedge when they passed quite near me, I could have touched them; on their going up towards the village called Trebuthan, I followed them close behind; on getting near the village, Mr. William Hodges came up also; these eight men went to the first house, and apparently were very anxious to do something; I only heard them enquire for the goods, or something to that purpose, as where is the goods; but it appeared that they did not receive a satisfactory answer; they immediately proceeded to another house, occupied by one Roberts, but I was not near enough to hear what passed; a boy came with them from Roberts's house; and not till then was I certain they were going to rescue the goods; they turned quick round, and went right to the place where I had left Mr. Lisle in possession of the seizure; the boy ran before them; I followed him; they arrived at the place before me.

Q. Do you know who was in the occupation of the field where you had made your seizure? - A. I do not positively know.

Q. These men went up to Lisle then? - A. I saw them go up to Lisle; before I could get up to the spot each of them had got over the first hedge coming towards me again; they were returning with eight ankers; on coming up with them I told them that what they had got were goods that we had seized; I told them they were doing a very illegal act, and cautioned them against persisting in it; they bid me stand off, saying, the goods are our's, we have hazarded our lives for them already, and we will have them; I directed Lisle immediately to go for our horses; I took possession of the other eight ankers.

Q. When you first began to expostulate with them, did you tell them what you were? - A. Yes; I told them we were Revenue-officers, and that we had seized the goods for the use of his Majesty.

Q. Did you, at the time you first spoke to them, know any of them by person? - A. I did not.

Q. At the time when they had got the goods, and had passed you, were they armed in the same manner as they were before? - A. They were all armed; I took possession of the other eight ankers that they had left behind; I observed that the persons that had taken away the eight ankers, were met by another party.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing from whence they came? - A. They came from the neighbourhood of Coverack, but whether from that place or not I cannot say.

Q. Were they armed? - A. I was at the distance of three or four hundred yards; I only perceived that there was a second party; they delivered the ankers that they had taken away to the second party; they then returned to the place where I was in possession of the other eight ankers, at the same time, Mr. Thomas came up to me; the smugglers seeing Mr. Thomas come up, made a stand in the field before they got to the place where the goods were laid; they came on, after stopping a bit, towards me, and bid me stand off; I had some of the casks in my possession; they were all armed as they were before, I do not know whether they had the same arms or not; I had concealed two or three of the ankers in the old trench, where they were found; seeing the slings and ends of the cords hang out, they took them out; I expostulated with them in the same manner as at first, telling them the consequence of such an act, and they answered nearly in the same manner; one person in particular said the most, he was a tall man.

Q. As this was the second time, you had an opportunity of noticing them; did you observe any one of their persons so as to identify them? - A. One I can, he was a short man, and shewed his teeth very much; that was not the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Can you say whether the prisoner at the bar was one of the eight? - A. I cannot say that he was.

Q. And they took away all the remaining tubs? - A. No, only seven; one part of the end was quite out, it contained brandy; they bid me stand off, saying, the goods were their's, and so on; one of the men had no anker to carry, and he took the arms from the others, guns particularly; then they went off towards Coverack; Mr. Lisle and Mr. Hodges then brought horses into the field, and we

followed them; we came up to them, and upon coming up, they appeared to apprehend we intended to attack them; they put down their casks, some on the ground, and some on the hedge, and stood with their arms in their hands; on coming up to them, I told them I hoped they would not fire at us, or injure us, we were not strong enough to cope with them, or to attack them; one of them answered, no, do not meddle with us, we have got the goods, or something to that effect; we immediately went to the village of Coverack; I cannot say that I saw any more of them.

Q. You do not know whether the prisoner was one of them, then, or not? - A. No, I cannot say that I can identify the prisoner; I saw some of them at a distance in the village, but I did not go near them, they seemed to be all together; it was near twelve months after that the prisoner was apprehended; I was not present when he was apprehended.

Q. You it was that chiefly held the conversation with them, while Thomas was by taking notice of them? - A. Yes.

RICHARD THOMAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer of the Customs: I was with Mr. Twentyman, in the parish of St. Keveme, in Cornwall: On the 5th of May, 1799, we seized sixteen casks, ankers; Mr. Twentyman found them in a field near the village of Trebuthan, about three quarters of a mile from the cove of Coverack, I assisted him in taking them out of the trenches; I first tasted one cask, containing geneva; I afterwards tasted one containing brandy, which was staved by Twentyman for that purpose.

Q. What time of the day was it when you first discovered this? - A. About ten in the morning; I went about a mile to get carriages, to convey them to Helstone; I returned in about an hour and a half, more than an hour, I believe; I found Twentyman in the field, with only eight of the ankers; I saw, almost instantly, eight men returning to the field, every one armed, several with two weapons, some had a musket and a pistol, some a musket and a cutlass, some two pistols, and others a pistol and a cutlass, they were every one armed with one, and the major part had two weapons; they came up within about fifteen or twenty yards, and then stopped, they seemed to be consulting together; they hesitated a few minutes, and then came forward; before they came quite up, Mr. Twentyman stove another cask, it was marked brandy, and that I found was brandy; the foremost man of the party that came up, not the prisoner present, said, the goods were their property, that they had ventured their lives for them already, and they would lose their lives before they they would lose the goods, or before we should have them, or words to that effect; they immediately took up seven ankers, and one man that had no cask to carry, took the whole of the muskets of the party; they then went off by the way they came; I was positive that I had seen some of them before; immediately after they were gone with the casks, our horses were brought, by the other three officers, to the side of the field; we purposed going towards Coverack, and mounted our horses immediately; they had not got, I believe, half a quarter of a mile from the village before we overtook them; they had not been out of our sight more than a minute, just while they were turning round the corner of the village; upon seeing us coming, they put down all the casks; and upon our coming up to them, I was the second of our party, I observed one of the eight present a pistol; I called to him not to do any mischief, that we were not going to fight them, for they saw we were not prepared, or something to that effect; they made answer, that it was the best way for us not.

Q. Did you, at that time, observe any of their persons particularly? - A. I looked at them particularly, every one; I knew almost all of them by person, as sailing in smuggling vessels.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. The last man of their party I observed to turn his head away before, who must have been the foremost in going off; we passed them in a narrow lane, and left them all to our right-hand; I observed him to turn his face away, upon which I turned my head round to look at him as he turned his face towards me, and as he recovered his position again he looked me full in the face; I looked in his face, and discovered it to be the prisoner at the bar; I told the other officers that I had seen him before.

Q. Where did you recollect to have seen him before? - A. Four or five years before; he was in the harbour of Helford, belonging to a sloop; I knew him then by frequenting the public-house where I lodged, in company with a brother of his, called Samuel Strick .

Q. You had been acquainted with his countenance? - A. I had seen him for a week, at that time, perhaps twenty times; I never saw him afterwards till this transaction.

Q. Have you any doubt about his person? - A. None.

Court. Q. Then his countenance was familiar to you? - A. Yes; I have seen his brother many times, who resembles him.

Q. Are you sure this is the man you saw with this party, and that it was not his brother? - A. I am certain it was him.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. At the time you saw him with this party, had he any thing about him, or near him? - A. He had an anker as close by his side as he could stand to it; he was one of the eight.

Court. Q. Every one of the eight, at one time, were armed? - A. Yes.

Q. Then he was armed as well as the rest? - A. Yes; he was armed in the field, and he was armed when I passed him; he had a pistol.

Q. Are you sure he was armed with a pistol? - A. Yes; then we went down into Coverack.

Q. When was he apprehended? - A. I apprehended him at Coverack, in March last; I found him at a public-house, in the kitchen, at Coverack.

Q. Before you had any conversation with him, did you tell him it would be better for him to confess, or worse if he did not? - A. I did not; I asked him, is not your name William Strick ? he said, no, it is not William Strick ; my name is William Teague ; I said, no, your name is not Teague, your name is Strick, and you are my prisoner; I took him out of that room into a back parlour, and he immediately asked me what is it that I am taken up for; I told him it was for the business that happened last summer, up at Trebuthan, when you rescued the sixteen ankers from us; he then cried, and said, I cannot say but what I was there; I then brought him to Helstone.

Q. How long was it before that you had seen this man? - A. It might be four or five years.

Q. The time that you had been acquainted with him was about a week? - A. It might be more or less, the vessel laid before the door where I lived and lodged, and he was in the habit of coming in and out with his brother, and slept in the house, I believe; his brother was boatswain of a revenue cutter, lying at Helford, in the Port of Coverack.

Q. Have you the least possible doubt of that man being the same man? - A. Not in the least.

Q. Did you know him again the instant that you saw him at the public-house where you took him up? - A. I saw him three or four days before we took him up; he came in in a sloop to the Pier of Coverack, a smuggling sloop belonging to Coverack; I saw him on board the sloop, and on shore; Mr. Twentyman was in company with me; I passed him two or three times, I was there for two or three hours; I told Mr. Twentyman that that was one of the men.

Q. Why did you not take him at that time? - A. We had no authority; Mr. Twentyman had a warrant at Penzance, twenty-five miles off; I desired him to send it to me, and I would apprehend him, which I did.

Jury. Q. Can you undertake to say, that the prisoner was one of the men that you saw in the field? - A. I was very much agitated in the field, but I was sure the faces of them were familiar to me, and when I saw the prisoner the second time, I was same he was one that I had seen in the field.

WILLIAM HODGES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I was with the other officers, at Trebuthan, on the 5th of May.

Q. Did you hear the evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you agree with them in the story they have told? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner to be one of the men who came up? - A. Yes; I know the prisoner to be one of the men, he had a musket with him or a gun.

Q. Did you see him armed in the field? - A. No, in the village of Trebuthan; the prisoner went to the door of a house to enquire where the smuggled goods were; I heard what was said, I think it was him that spoke, I am sure he was one of the persons that went to the house, I had never seen him before in my life that I know of, I do not recollect to have seen him any more till he was apprehended; I was present when he was apprehended in the village of Coverack, at a public-house; after we had taken him into the back room, he enquired what was the nature of his offence that he was taken for; Mr. Thomas told him it was in consequence of the rescue of some goods the summer before, at Trebuthan; he said, he could not say but he was there; he seemed very much agitated, and burst into tears.

Q. You are very sure it is the same man? - A. I am clear it is the same man; after we had taken him to Helstone, I was mentioning the circumstance to him, and telling him in what situation I saw him; he acknowledged that he had a gun with him, but it had no lock to it, he said he had nothing at all for it.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, any more than this, I trust to the Jury for what punishment they chuse, after what they have spoke it is of no use to say any thing.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 32.)

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of no actual violence having been offered by any of the party .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-7

346. EDWARDS JONES, alias DIGHT , and MARY CAMPBELL, alias DIGHT , were indicted for that they, on the 24th of April , a piece of false and counterfeit money to the likeness of a shilling, falsely, deceitfully, and traiterously did forge, counterfeit and coin .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the Police Officers belonging to Worship-street: On Thursday the 24th of April, in consequence of information, I went to a

house, No. 437 Clement's-lane , about twelve o'clock, or a few minutes before; I went in at the street door, and proceeded up to the two pair of stairs room; Ray, Mason, and Vickery were with me; Ray and I went up first; I went into the room and saw the woman prisoner stooping to a tub, with her hands in the tub, and check apron in that tub, with some suds or other water; this piece of linen was lying by the side of the rub, wet, and stained, as it appears, with a liquid, I think, aqua-fortis.

Q. Are you sufficiently acquainted with the stain of aqua-fortis, to say whether you believe it to be aqua-fortis? - A. I believe it is; Mason then came up, and I delivered the woman prisoner to him; I then went up to the three pair of stairs, which is a garret, Ray being behind me; I found the door locked, by trying the latch; at that instant, I heard the footstep of somebody come across the room inside; the prisoner Dight or Jones opened the door, and I said, ah, master Dight, is it you? then Ray and I were in the room, till we called Mason to come up, and he was to direct Vickery to take care of the woman; Ray and Mason secured him, he made no resistance; I observed the room had got two windows, one looks to the side of the house, and the other to the front; towards the front of that part which comes into Clement's-lane, was a lathe, by the side of the window was an instrument, used for turning the edges of these blanks, and between the windows there was the corner of a room that bulged out into this room, so as to receive the light of both windows, and not be perceived by any body from the window, and in that was this cutting engine, fixed upon a stool, and the stool fixed to the floor; but under the legs of the stool was this soldier's jacket, and this cloth to deaden the found; and close by the cutting engine were these plates and this cecil.

Q. Is the cecil the same metal as the plates? - A. Yes, it appears to be the same; the cutting engine was fresh with the oil running down the screw, and this cutter fixed in the engine, which, if you compare it, corresponds for cutting out the blanks; here is a quantity of sand paper that I found upon the floor, by the side of the cutting engine; the sand paper is used to rub them; these blanks, one hundred and fifty in number, I found in a cupboard, in the same room where the cutting engine was; in a piece of paper, in the same room, by the side of the cutting engine, were these punches, which appear to be used with a hammer; here is another, which will receive the plate, and may be cut out with a hammer, without the force of a cutting engine; a quantity of file dust, which they save; here are the files, with the appearance of that kind of metal now upon some of them; all that I now produce, except this bit of cloth, were found in that garret; this piece of a flat iron was lying upon the floor, and it then bore a heat, which I presume had had the blanks, with the sand paper rubbed upon it, that is the way they are cleaned, his hands were dirty, as a man's hands would be who had been employed in that way; here are shears and pincers, and other articles, which are used, in other business besides this; I asked the prisoner if he lived there, he said, yes, and paid ten pounds a year for that room and the room underneath, and a little back room.

Q. Was the room in which you found the woman, a part of that, for which he said he paid ten pounds a year? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. In the room where the woman prisoner was, you found nothing but a bit of cloth? - A. Not at that moment, till I came down again.

Q. When you went up stairs, had not the prisoner his great coat and his hat on as if he was going out? - A. He had his hat on.

Q. You have described these instruments, I believe, they are all used by brass-workers? - A. I cannot say.

Q. That sack and jacket was for deadening the found? - A. Yes.

Q. Then, if a person was at work there, as a brass-founder, it would prevent disturbing the other lodgers in the house? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Where was the bed? - A. In the little place behind where the woman was.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer belong to Worship-street; I went with Armstrong, on Thursday the 24th of April, to the prisoner's lodgings, Armstrong went up stairs first, and I was immediately after him; he opened the room door up two pair of stairs, and there was the woman prisoner stooping to a tub with some wet clothes in it; we did not stop there, but proceeded immediately to the garret; we found the door locked; we knocked at the door, and the prisoner Dight immediately opened it; we immediately secured him, and behind the door, upon the right, was a lathe fixed; there was some file dust lying fresh about the lathe; on the left-hand, in the corner, was this cutting-engine in the state it is now in, except that it had the cutter in it, it had been fresh at work, for the oil was running down; I saw Armstrong go to a closet and find these blanks.

Q. Look at them, are they of the same colour now that they were then? - A. No; they have got tarnished very much since I searched the room; and over the door, just by the lathe, upon the ledge, were these two pieces of blank copper.

Q. What are they the size of? - A. For sixpences, and these two blanks for shillings.

Q. At the time that you found them, did they appear to have the appearance of being fit for circulation? - A. One of them had, but they are now altered a great deal; there, was one that had been blacked to deaden the whiteness of the metal.

Q. In their present state, you think they would not pass? - A. No; and in a corner I found this bottle, and at that time there was a drop of aquafortis in it, it smelled very strong of the aqua-fortis.

Q. Are you well acquainted with the smell of aqua-fortis? - A. I am.

Q. Have you been in the habit of apprehending many of these kind of people? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any thing else in the room in which you found the man? - A. Not that day; I went again two or three days after, Armstrong having kept the key, he himself locked the door.

Armstrong. I locked the door, and took the key to the office, I gave it to Ray to go and make a second search.

Ray. Upon the second search, upon the moving a board behind the skirting board, I found these three blanks, they are a great deal tarnished since that time.

Q. Were either of them, at that time, such, as in your judgment, would pass in circulation? - A. No, I do not think they would; after the first search, I went down again to the room where we had secured the prisoner, I found nothing there, I saw Armstrong find a rag, which we all smelt, it had the smell of aqua-fortis upon it, it was very much stained, I believe, with aqua-fortis; I did not see any thing else found.

Q. Could this room be overlooked by the opposite house? - A. No; this was a higher house than the opposite side, and no person could see it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Be so good as tell us what the reward is in this case? - A. Forty pounds.

Q. For each of the prisoners to be divided between you and your brother officers? - A. Yes.

Q. These blanks have been kept in the same paper since? - A. Yes.

Q. You said one of them, you think, was in a state fit for circulation, point out which of them it is? - A. This is it.

Q. How long is it since you found them? - A. About a month.

Q. And do you mean to swear that it was a shilling by which you could have been deceived? - A. Yes, it has changed very much.

Q. The paper in which these two shillings have been kept is a softer paper than the other? - A. It may be.

Q. How long was it before you went before the Magistrate to complain of this offence? - A. Immediately.

Q. Did you not then state to the Magistrate that you thought they were not in a state fit for circulation? - A. No.

Q. Did not Mr. Nares state that they were not in a state fit for circulation? - A. With respect to this he did.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I went up to this room, I was left in charge of the woman in that room; I found some cream of tartar upon the table, and wet cloths that appeared to be green and different colours.

Q. Do you knew the use of that cream of tartar? - A. I know that it is used for silvering, for giving metals the appearance of silver.

MARGARET FAWCETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. The prisoner lodged in my house, No. 43. Clement's-lane, and occupied the two pair of stairs and the garret, at four shillings a week; they lived together as man and wife.

Q. Did you understand from him what he was, when he took the lodgings? - A. A brass turner.

Q. Did you make any enquiry of him what branch he was in? - A. Yes, my husband is a printer, and he desired me to ask him, because, perhaps, he might have served him, and he hesitated, and said he worked for two masters, who gave him constant work; he did not tell me at first, at last he be thought himself, in a minute or two, and then said he was in the lamp way.

Q. Did you see any of his work in the lamp way go out of the house? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Upon your oath, did you not ask him the question to get him to contradict himself? - A. No, I never had any reason.

Q. How long had he lived in your house? - A. About three months.

SAMUEL MONSELLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the moniers of the Mint.

Q. (To Ray.) Was that the piece that you say was perfect at the time you found it? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Monsellin.) Is that the coin of the realm? - A. It is a counterfeit.

Mr. Alley. Q. There is no impression? - A. No.

Court. Q. Is that in a state in which it could be circulated? - A. It could not, in this state, the baseness of the metal is too evident in the colour of it.

Mr. Alley. (To Ray.) Q. You searched the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. You found no bad silver upon him? - A. No.

Q. Nor any die upon the premises, by which an impression could have been given? - A. No.

Jones's defence. I am a chaser and button-turner ,

these are things that I have used in my lawsu business.

Campbell's defence. I never took the room at all, I was not present when it was taken, I was not in the place for a month afterwards.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES ROWLAND DYKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a chaser, the prisoner is a chaser, and sometimes works in the brass turning line.

Q. Do you know in the brass turning line, if a lathe is necessary? - A. It cannot be done without.

Q. Look at that engine - is that common? - A. Yes, in button-turning; the master that I work for has got such a one.

Q. Look at that cecil, is not that common? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You use aqua-fortis, do not you? - A. Yes, in working brass where there has been folder, you must heat it with aqua-fortis before it is turned.

Q. Is aqua-fortis used after it is turned? - A. Yes, before it is gilt.

Q. Who did he work for? - A. One Johnson he told me he was going to work for.

Q. Have you known him very lately? - A. Three or four and twenty years; he told my wife, about six months ago, that he was going to work for Mr. Johnson.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-8

347. EDWARD JONES, alias DIGHT , was again indicted, for that he, not being a person employed in or for the Mint or Mints, of our Lord the King, in the Tower of London, or elsewhere; nor authorized by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, or the Lord High Treasurer of England for the time being; and the duty of his allegiance in no wife regarding, on the 24th of April , one cutting engine for cutting round blanks, by force of a screw, out of bars of gold, silver, or other metal, without any lawful authority for that purpose, feloniously and traiterously had in his custody and possession , against the duty of his allegiance, and against the form of the statute.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer of Worship-street: On Thursday the 24th of April, I went to No. 43, Clements-lane , near Clare-market, about twelve o'clock; I went up stairs and knocked at the garret-door, I heard the footstep of a person, the door was opened, and there was the prisoner; I said, again, what is it you, master Dight; he was secured; and in that room was this engine, and this cutter in the engine; the engine was fixed upon a soldier's jacket and a place of sacking; these blanks in the cupboard, this cecil lying by the side of the cutting engine, a quantity of sand-paper, some file-dust, and the necessary apparatus for cutting out these kind of blanks.

Q. In short, may it be used for cutting round blanks out of bars of gold, silver, or other metal? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they appear all of a size? - A. These three appear to be all of the size of a shilling; this one appears less.

Court. Q. Does that belong to the engine? - A. No, it does not.

Q. Did you find any oval cutters to make oval patterns, or any other shapes? - A. No.

Prisoner. Yes; there were a great many others, oval and square too.

Armstrong. If there had been any others I should have brought them.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was with Armstrong: I went up into the garret, and behind the door, upon the right-hand, was a turning lathe, to smoothe the edges, and a great deal of file-dust; upon the right of the lathe, in a corner, was this cutting engine, which was placed upon a sack, and a soldier's jacket, it had the appearance as though it had recently been at work; some of these bars of metal were laying down by the side of the engine; I saw Mr. Armstrong find a paper of blanks in the cupboard in the same room; over the door, I found two blanks of the size of a sixpence, they had not been coloured; and two more blanks of the size of shillings; and then I found a bottle with two of three drops of aqua-fortis in it; and behind a skirting-board I found three more blanks; I observed the prisoner's hands to be all over dirt, as if he had been at work; there were files, and scowering-paper, and all the things that have been produced.

MARGARET FAWCETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. The prisoner lodged in my house at the time he was apprehended, he had the two pair of stairs and garret; he said he was a brass-turner.

Q. Did you ever learn from him, or make any inquiry of him, in what particular branch of that business he was? - A. I asked him what branch of that trade he was in, and he told me in the lamp way.

Q. Did you ever see any work carried out from there? - A. No, I never saw any work go out or come in; the master used to come sometimes, and seemed angry because he was not at home to mind his business, that there was some piece of work in hand that was wanted.

Court. (To Armstrong.) Q. Can you tell me whether that engine is necessary for any thing in the lamp way? - A. No, I should think not in the least; for in coffin furniture, and lamp work, they use a stamp.

Mr. Alley. Q. Is not that engine used in the lamp way? - A. I believe not; I have been all over the factories at Birmingham, and they work with a stamp upon the stump of a tree, without a fly at all.

The prisoner did not make any defence.

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM DYKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a chaser, I chase buttons occasionally; the prisoner is a brass turner .

Q. In the course of his trade, is that sort of implement necessary to be used? - A. Yes, it is; it must be cut before it is turned; the gentleman that I work for has got such a one; no man in the button line can do without.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was he employed in the button line? - A. Yes, for one John Johnson .

Q. Is Johnson here? - A. No.

Q. A button maker makes the shank as well as the button? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where Johnson lives? - A. No.

Q. Have you been to look after him? - A. No.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner since he has been in prison? - A. Yes, several times.

Q. And he never asked you to look for him? - A. No.

Q. Do you know any thing of the brass turning work for lamps? - A. Yes; there are rims of lamps that I have turned for Mr. Lacey in Cursitor-street.

Q. This is nothing like the rim of a lamp? - A. No.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 4, Butcher-row.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 26.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-9

348. JOHN WILLIAMS and JOHN NEWMAN were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Williamson , about the hour of two in the night of the 14th of May , with intent the goods, chattels, and monies, of the said Robert, therein being, feloniously to steal .

ROBERT WILLIAMSON sworn. - I am a publican ; I keep the Glazier's-arms, in Water-lane, Blackfriars : On Wednesday, the 14th of this month, a little before twelve o'clock at night, when I went to bed, I fastened the shutters, and locked and bolted all the doors, and chained them as usual; and between two and three in the morning of Thursday, I was awaked by a very disagreeable surprize, by springing of rattles, and calling out that I was robbed.

Q. Was it light, or dark? - A. It was rather light.

Q. Was it light enough to see a man's face? - A. Yes; I could see a man's face very plain, and likewise the watchman.

Q. Was that by moon-light? - A. I did not observe whether it was moon-light or not; I unlocked the bed-room door and went into the kitchen, which is up one pair of stairs, and looked out at the window; I saw a man lying upon the ground between two watchmen, that was the prisoner, Williams; I immediately went into the bed-room again, put on my small clothes, and came down into the tap-room; I ran against the bar-door, which I found open, I found the outer door upon the spring-lock; I opened that and went out into the street; I had bolted that door with two bolts, I found the bolts undone, but not the spring-lock.

Q. Do you conceive that that door had been opened? - A. I cannot say; I went into the street, and was informed that Williams was one of the thieves; I desired him to be taken to the watch-house, which they did; he said he had lost a shilling, I saw a shilling lay, and some halfpence, and I picked them up and gave them to him myself; I did not go to the watch-house, but went home; there is a door in a gateway under my club-room, I found that door unchained, and unbolted, not even upon the latch, I saw it chined and bolted over night as usual; the door that is at the top of the cellar-stairs had been broke open, the lock was inside.

Q. Then that door you think must have been opened from the inside? - A. Yes; (produces the lock); I found the lock forced off, and lying upon the tap-room floor.

Q. Then some person or other, by breaking open this door, got into your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that door locked over night? - A. Yes, it was; and the key in my till in the bed-room; I did not miss any thing; a neighbour brought a light to me, he is a baker, his name is Freeman; there was an iron crow found in the gateway, a dark lantern, and a little bottle, and matches; they were found close upon the spot where the man laid upon his back.

JOHN SAUCE sworn. - At half past two o'clock on Thursday, the 14th of May, I left the watch-house to go to bed; as I was coming down Water-lane, past Hughes's-court, I saw a man standing at Mr. Williamson's back-door; when I saw him at that hour in the morning, it led me to a suspicion that he had no right to stand there; I rushed in to see what he wanted, and he ran off immediately; I do not know who the man was, he was twenty

panes from me, the first time I saw him; when I came to the back-door of Mr. Williamson's house, I put my hand to the door, and the door went in, by that means I discovered a light at my right-hand, I stood upon the threshold of the door; it was a dark-lantern and had a candle in it; I looked round and saw the two prisoners at the bar, and one more; Newman had his hand upon a drawer in the bar, pulling it out; there were three of them in the bar.

Q. Are you sure the two prisoners are the men? - A. I am; I saw Newman take a paper that was tied up, I do not know what it contained; I was looking at them for four or five minutes before I went in, I did not see what he did with the paper; when I saw that, I shut the door in order to keep them in; I asked them what business they had there; Newman told me he would tell me; after he made that reply, he came out of the bar, and when I had an opportunity I struck at him with a stick, I am sure I struck him; and it was but a very short time before he returned the blow, and I received it upon my arm; after I had got the blow, I went back to the door again, and endeavoured to spring the rattle but I could not, they prevented me; they struck at me; at this time we were in the dark, they forcibly opened the door and rushed out; another watchman was coming round upon his beat, and he was pretty near the door when they rushed out, his name is Harrison, he secured the prisoner, Williams; I heard him sing out, I was inside at that time, that he had one of them, and I saw Williams struggling with Harrison; I struck at him with a stick two or three times, to prevent his getting away; as to Newman, I saw no more of him till I saw him a prisoner in Castle-Baynard watch-house, I believe it was about fifteen or twenty minutes afterwards; I was sent for by the constable to see if I knew him, and when I came to the watch-house, as soon as ever I saw him, I told the officer of the night that he was the very man that struck me in the public-house; at that time he was in a gore of blood; I am sure he is the same man that I saw in the bar.

Williams. He said, at the watch-house, that the man was a big stout man.

Witness. I said no such thing; I said he was a stouter man than Williams.

Q. You had only the light of this lantern in the bar, are you sure there was light enough for you to be able to say these were the same persons? - A. Yes; I stood looking at them for some time, and they moved the lantern about round the bar to see what they could find; I saw them very clearly.

JOHN HARRISON sworn. - I am a watchman of Blackfriar's parish: I was going past Mr. Williamson's back-door.

Q. Was there light enough at that time to see a person's face? - A. Yes, it was quite light; I heard some noise in the house, which made me stop to know what it was, because I knew the family, had been gone to bed some hours; the door was open, and the first man that came out was Williams; we had a long scuffle together, at last I got him down, and there I held him upon his back till I got assistance to take him to the watch-house; in the scuffle he dropped some of his money, which I gave him; I took him to Blackfriars watch-house, and from thence to the Compter.

Q. Are you perfectly sure Williams was one of the men that came out? - A. Yes, he came out at the door under the gateway.

Q. Was it under the gateway that you laid him upon his back? - A. No, that was in the front of the house, in Water-lane; there were two more came out, but who they were I do not know.

JAMES GRAVES sworn. - I am a watchman of Castle-Baynard-ward: Between two and three o'clock in the morning I was upon duty at Puddledock-gate, I heard the rattle spring, and a cry of stop thief; I ran to assist, and passing by a court that leads from Printing-house-yard, I saw the prisoner at the bar come down a court out of the yard, running very fast; it is a court that leads to the end of Bristow-street; he was running in a direction from Williamson's house; I met him and asked him to stop; he refused with great sury; I struggled to stop him; I struck him several times with my stick, but he got away from me; I pursued him to the end of Thames-street; he turned up St. Andrew's-hill, and I followed him through Carter-lane, up Paul's-chain, into St. Paul's-church-yard; there I sprung my rattle, and he was stopped by one of our watchmen; I never lost sight of him the whole time; we took him to Castle-Baynard watch-house; we sent for the watchman of the other ward, Sauce, and he said, that is one of the men that I saw in Williamson's house.

Q. What did Newman say to that? - A. I did not near him say a word all the time he was in the watch-house.

CHARLES DONAHOUGH sworn. - I am a watchman of Castle-Baynard-ward: On the 15th of May, between two and three in the morning, I was at the West end of St. Paul's Church; I heard the alarm; I pursued the found; I saw the prisoner Newman running with one shoe off and the other shoe on; I judged he must be the cause of the springing the rattles; I jumped across the street and took him by the collar; he wanted to get away; I asked him if he was the cause of all the noise; he said, yes; I asked him what he had been doing; he said it was for knocking down a whore; I looked round and saw Graves appear;

he then said, that is the rascal; and one of our housemen came up, and they both assisted; he was taken by force to the watch-house; there were four of us took a limb a-piece.

RICHARD FITZGERALD sworn. - I am houseman and extra-constable of Castle-Baynard: I was out between two and three; I heard the rattles go somewhere about Paul's-chain or Great Carter-lane, I cannot tell which; I made on as fast as I could for Paul's-chain; I saw one of our men, Donahough, lay hold of the prisoner Newman; we were obliged to get him along by a limb a-piece, for he would not go; after he had got some distance, he said if we would let him go, he would walk; I desired the men to let go his legs, and he did.

ANDREW CHRISTIE sworn. - I was officer of the night on the night of the 14th: Williams was brought in on the 15th in the morning, by two watchmen; they told me they caught him coming out of the prosecutor's house; I searched him, and found upon him a small candle and one shilling and four-pence halfpenny, which I returned to him again; (produces the candle;) then Mr. Williamson came and gave charge of him; this instrument(producing a crow) was given to me by a boy, and a dark lanthorn. (Produces it.)

Williamson. I will go and fetch the boy.

EMANUEL PETHERELL sworn. - I am a watchman; I heard the alarm of rattles, and the singing, out of stop thief in Water-lane, Blackfriars, and I came up to aid and assist; I saw a watchman with the prisoner Williams upon the ground on his back; facing the tap-room window I picked up this bottle containing some phosphorus and three bits of matches, about a quarter of an hour afterwards, upon the very spot where I saw Williams lie, as near as I can tell.

RICHARD HATRED sworn. - I am constable of the night: The prisoner Newman was brought to Castle-Baynard watch-house on the 14th, at nearly three o'clock in the morning; he was very bloody all over his left side; we sent for Sauce, and as soon as ever he came up, he says, that is the man that struck me; the prisoner did not say any thing to it; Sauce gave charge of him for striking him, and for house-breaking.

WILLIAM GILES sworn. - I was going past Mr. Williamson's; I picked up a lantern in the kennel, at four o'clock in the morning, as I was going to my work, right opposite Mr. Williamson's back-door; Mrs. Williamson was standing at the door; I gave it to her, she said it was not her's, and I gave it to the watchman, Petherell.

Petherell. I received it from Giles.

Q. (To Christie.) Look at that dark lantern: was the piece of candle that you found of such a size as could be used in that lantern? - A. Yes.

Williams's defence. The man that stands by me is really innocent; it was me and two more men; I never saw this man before till I saw him in prison; one's name was William Jones , and the other John M'Carty ; they both got away.

Newman's defence. I was coming over Blackfriars. Bridge, very much in liquor; I heard a noise upon the bridge, and I went on till I came to Paul's Chain, and there a man knocked me down.

William, GUILTY Death . (Aged 16.)

Newman, GUILTY Death . (Aged 36.)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-10

349. RICHARD PAGETT, alias PRITCHETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a guinea, three half-guineas, one shilling, and two sixpences, the property of John Williams , privately from his person .

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn. - I am an attorney , in Castle-street, Holborn: On Thursday the 1st of May, I went to Drury-lane theatre , when I got there, there was a very large crowd at the pit door; after I had been standing about a quarter of an hour in the passage to the pit door, I found my right-hand breeches-pocket out, and my money gone; I immediately said I had been robbed, or I had had my pocket picked, I am not sure which; some gentlemen behind me, immediately exclaimed, he is gone back, in a brown coat, or there is a person gone back, in a brown coat; I immediately pressed through the crowd, and saw the prisoner about ten yards from me, or not so much, perhaps five or six yards, the crowd were then mostly gone in; he then turned his head round and saw me close behind him; before I came up to him, he threw some money which he had in his hand, into the dirt, and endeavoured to hide it in the dirt under his feet, he was then out in the street where the carriage wheels go; I immediately caught him by the collar; I then saw a Mr. Cooper, an entire stranger to me, he collared the prisoner; I picked up one piece of gold, I am not quite certain whether it was a guinea, or a half-guinea, and gave it to some gentleman that was standing by; the prisoner was then given into the charge of a constable who came up, and the rest of the money was then picked up with some difficulty in the dirt, the prisoner was then taken to Bow-street.

Q. What money had you about you? - A. I had three half-guineas, a guinea and some silver; I believe a half-crown, some shillings and some sixpences; the officer had the money that was picked up given to him; I had not a farthing remaining in my pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How soon before you felt your money go was it that you had seen

it? - A. I did not feel it go, I found the pocket hanging out.

Q. How soon before had you seen your money? - A. I paid three hundred and twenty pounds into my banker's, Child's, not half an hour before I went, and when I got to the theatre, I very incautiously pulled out my money and looked at it at the door, and I apprehend the prisoner saw it.

Q. I take it for granted none of this money had any marks by which you should know it again? - A. No, I believe it to be mine only from the sum, three half-guineas I know I had, and a guinea.

EDWARD COOPER sworn. - I am a manufacturer of Derbyshire spar; I was going into Drury-lane theatre about six o'clock, the entrance to the pit door was extremely crowded; I observed Mr. Williams in company with two ladies, the ladies were a little before Mr. Williams; Mr. Williams was on my left hand, I was close to the wall on the right hand, the prisoner was exactly between us; Mr. Williams, the prisoner, and myself, were endeavouring to keep the crowd behind us from pressing upon the ladies; in the course of a few seconds, Mr. Williams put his hand down to his right-hand breeches-pocket, and exclaimed, my God, I have had my pocket picked, several people heard him besides myself; I told him, I had seen a little gentleman that was between us in a brown coat, go back; in consequence of this, we left the crowd and pursued him, several people, at the same time, crying out, he is there, he is there; upon going from the pit door, I observed the prisoner about the middle of the colonade, Mr. Williams was a few yards before me; the prisoner turned the corner of the colonade, I was then about six yards from the prisoner, he looked round, and at the moment that Mr. Williams was going to seize him, at that instant, I saw him drop out of his hand some money; Mr. Williams immediately seized him, he then took up half-a-guinea and put it into my hand; I searched among the dirt, and took up two half-guineas and some silver; while I was doing this, the prisoner was put into the possession of, I believe, two constables; we took him to a public-house in Bow-street; I had not the money out of my hand till I gave it into the hands of the officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. That money that you had in your hand was a guinea, was it not? - A. The half-guinea that Mr. Williams picked up, two half-guineas that I picked up, and a friend of mine picked up a guinea, and put it into my hand.

Court. Q. Did you take up any silver? - A. I did, but I cannot say what.

Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner was walking at the time you saw him, and he dropped some money? - A. Yes.

Q.Then I take it for granted you will not do more than the prosecuter has done, you will not swear to the money? - A. No, certainly not.

Court. Q. Did you see him do any thing with his feet? - A. No.

JOHN VAUGHAN sworn. - I am a manufacturer of Derbyshire spat; I happened to be going through Russel-street, I saw a crowd collected, I immediately looked into it, and saw the prisoner at the bar in custody of two officers; I rushed in amongst them, and enquired what was the matter, Mr. Cooper was then in the act of picking up money from the mud; I assisted him in that, and I picked up a guinea, what other money he picked up I am not certain, but I believe a sixpence, and a half-guinea; the prisoner was then taken to the public-house, in Bow-street.

ROBERT BERESFORD sworn. - I am an officer, the prisoner was given into my custody, I cannot say by who; I saw two gentlemen looking in the mud, and I saw one gentleman bring out two half-guineas.

- THOMPSON sworn. - On Thursday the 1st of May, about ten minutes before six, I was on duty at Drury-lane theatre; I was standing at the pit door, the people were going in very fast; I saw a man pushing out from the house, towards the street, which I believe was the prisoner at the bar; he turned to the right and went towards Drury-lane; soon after, I saw other persons follow him, Mr. Williams was one of them; he asked if I was an officer, and ordered me to take the prisoner into custody, which I did; I immediately searched him, I found in his pocket a handkerchief, a pair of gloves, and some shillings, which the magistrate ordered me to return him, I then took him to the Brown-bear; Mr. Williams and Mr. Cooper soon after came to the Brown-bear, and Mr. Cooper delivered to me a guinea, three half-guineas, a half-crown piece, one shilling and two sixpences. (Produces them.)

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I was going to Drury-lane theatre, and was violently crushed, in consequence of which I drew back, and standing against the farther end of the colonade, Mr. Williams came up and charged me with picking his pocket, says I, sir, I believe you are mistaken, says he, why, here is my money, catching me by the collar; says I, it cannot be my money, and how it came here I do not know; says he, you are endeavouring to hide it, says he, what are you stirring your foot at; says I, sir, I see something lye there, and I suppose you would stir your foot to see what it was; Mr. Cooper came up at the time, and caught me by the collar, and likewise picked up some money; I was given in charge to Mr. Beresford, the officer, and taken to the Brown-hear; that is all I know about the mat

ter; I positively deny any thing of the charge alledged against me; I am entirely innocent, and in your hands I trust my cause.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 44.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-11

350. GEORGE CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , a great coat, vlaue 14s. and a pair of stockings, value 2s.6d. the property of John M'Ardell .

JAMES ROLLINS sworn. - I am a labouring man, I keep a chandler's-shop in White's-yard, Whitechapel : I went out with some coals about eight o'clock, in the evening of the 6th of January; the prisoner was a lodger of mine, I left him in the kitchen, and when I came back he was not there; I missed a great coat and pair of stockings from the two pair of stairs room, belonging to John M'Ardell ; I had seen them between seven and eight in the evening, and I have never seen them since; the prisoner was taken up on Tuesday the 25th.

JOHN M'ARDELL sworn. - On the 6th of January, I lost a great coat and a pair of stockings from the two pair of stairs room; I had seen them, about twelve o'clock, I missed them about seen them the evening, (produces the stockings); he had them on when he was taken up; I have had them ever since; here is one of them that I mended myself.

Prisoner's defence. It is the first offence I ever was guilty of.

GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-12

351. CORNELIUS MAHONEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , three pounds weight of beef, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Fairbrother .

JOHN HAWLEY sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. William Fairbrother , cheesemonger ; On the 22d of April, about two o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop and talked to the porter, and directly as the porter turned his back, he took a piece of beef from off a butter-slat, and put it under his coat, and walked away with it; I went after him, he went round the horses' heads of a hackney-coach, and dropped the beef; he ran across the way, and I stopped him; the beef was picked up by a boy, and taken to the Magistrates; I am sure the prisoner is the same man.

Prisoner. Q. If you saw me take it, why did not you stop me? - A. Because I could not get round the counter quick enough.

Court. Q. What kind of beef was it? - A. Salt beef; he had been in the shop before in a kind of a drunken way.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing more about it than a child unborn.

GUILTY (Aged 48.)

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-13

352. ANN CLEMENTS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Faveryer , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 21st of February , and burglariously stealing twenty yards of Irish linen, value 30s. a cotton shawl, value 2s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 4s. the property of the said Joseph .

JOSEPH FAVERYER sworn. - I live in Baker's-rents, Hackney-road, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green : I have a ready furnished room, every room is let out in tenements, the owner lives two doors off; my wife and I had a back chamber up one pair of stairs; we went out on the 21st of February, about noon, and came home again the 22d, about the same time; I turned the key myself, and saw that it was locked, before I left it, I returned before my wife; when I came to the door, I found the staple wrenched out, my landlord had put a padlock on it, he let me into the room with the key; I immediately missed a piece of Irish linen cloth, about twenty yards, a pair of white cotton stockings, and a yellow shawl; I left the Irish cloth and the stockings upon the table, the shawl hung upon the chair: the prisoner lived in the same house; I have seen the things since, in the possession of Armstrong the officer.

CHARITY FAVERYER sworn. - I am the wife of Joseph Faveyer: On 21st of February I went out with my husband; I locked the door, and tried the latch; I left the Irish linen lying on the table, and the brown paper under it that it came home in, it was bran new linen; and the stockings upon the table were bran new; I cannot say whether the shawl was upon the table or on the back of the chair; I returned the next day after my husband, he came home first, I missed of him by the way; when I came home I missed the property.

RALPH MASSEY sworn. - I live at No. 3, Kingstand-road, I am a broker: On the 24th of February, the prisoner came to my house, she had been with me before, and sold me some duplicates of her own clothes; she came to me on the 24th of February, with a piece of linen, and a pair of stockings for sale; I had redeemed the clothes, and she had them back from me; there was twenty shillings in all; and besides that, I gave her ten shillings in money, I did not purchase them, not take them as

a pawn, but she said she was in distress; she was to have them back if she paid me the money in a month's time; she said she had been in a very creditable way, and was reduced; that she wanted the clothes to appear in among her friends, and she would redeem them; I kept the cloth till the 14th of April, when Armstrong came with her for it, and I produced it to Armstrong, he took it into his possession.

Q. Are you sure the linen, and the shawl, and stockings, that you shewed to Armstrong, are the same that you had from the prisoner? - A. I am; I had kept them in a drawer.

ANN STONARD sworn. - I have an apartment in the same house with the prisoner; I saw Mrs. Faveryer lock the door, I saw the property there when they went out, my door faces their's; I went out about three o'clock in the afternoon, it was safe then; the door appeared to me to be shut, but I did not try it.

Prisoner. I had the cloth from that woman to sell, and she paid her landlord part of the rent out of the money, and bought herself a pair of shoes with it.

Stonard. I was very much distressed, and my brother-in-law came and gave me half-a-guinea in gold, because I was in such distress; and I paid my landlord three shillings, and bought a pair of shoes for four shillings and sixpence.

Court. Q. What was the name of your brother-in-law? - A. William Bryson .

Prisoner. She was committed to Clerkenwell with me.

Court. (To Stonard.) Q. Were you committed to Clerkenwell prison? - A. I was there with her, on account of what she said, from six o'clock in the evening till ten the next morning, and then the Justice released me.

Q. (To Massey.) Did you give the prisoner half-a-guinea? - A. Yes; and she went out and brought me sixpence in change, she might be out five minutes; she had the whole change in her hand when she came to me.

Q. How far is it from where you live to the prisoner's lodgings? - A. They may be three hundred yards; I do not suppose it is much more.

HENRY BAKER sworn. - I am the owner of this lodging house; I do not live in any part of it myself, I live two doors from it; I went up on the 22d of February to see if Faveryer was at home, it was just dusk then, I was told he was not at home; I went again next morning, and lifted up the latch of the door, and found the staple gone; I then went into the room, I saw Stonard, she lives in the front room opposite; she said they had a piece of new cloth in the room; the staple laid down inside of the room, I went and put a padlock upon the door.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - On Monday the 14th of April, I was applied to by the prosecutor to apprehend the prisoner at the bar, I went to the apartments and took her into custody; when we were up stairs, the prosecutor's wife said, I only want my things; and in going along, she told me she would shew me where the things were, and took me to Mr. Massey's, whom I knew well; I then went with the prisoner to Massey's house, and he produced me the linen, the shawl and the stockings; I took them, and desired Massey to follow me to the Justice; the woman was committed, and through what she said against Stonard, Mason and Ray apprehended her; through my persuasions, Stonard took one of the children to take care of while I took her to the Justice; she did not then say any thing about Stonard, she was not apprehended till next morning. (Produces the property.)

Mrs. Faveryer. I know these to be mine, they are the same things that I lost; the cloth has been out since, it was a whole piece when I lost it; I had only cut off three yards of it; the shawl has been washed since I lost it, I never had it on.

Prisoner's defence. That woman sent for me down stairs, and informed me that her brother had given her some cloth, and asked me to sell it for her.

GUILTY. (Aged 33.)

Of stealing the goods, but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBER.

Reference Number: t18000528-14

353. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a great-coat, value 2l. a pair of buckles, value 12s. and a silver tea-spoon, value 1s. the property of William Purdy , in his dwelling-house .

ISAAC NEAL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. William Purdy , a broker , in Mark-lane ; On the 4th of November last, the property was taken away from the kitchen; I saw the articles there about eight o'clock in the morning; I saw the property, in a few minutes after, in the hands of Richard Cox , a fellow-servant of mine, in Tower-street; the great coat and articles are my property; they were delivered to the constable, who had them in his care till about a fortnight ago; I have had them since that time. (Produces them.)

Q. What is the coat worth? - A. Two pounds.

Q. Would it sell for that? - A. No, it would not; it cost me more.

Q. You must put some value upon it? - A. I will say a pound; I think the buckles would sell for twelve shillings; the constable has got Mr. Purdy's tea-spoon.

RICHARD COX sworn. - I am warehouseman to

Mr. Purdy; On the 4th of November, I was in the warehouse, and saw the prisoner come out of my master's house with a great-coat on; I thought the coat did not belong to him, it was too long for him; I went up to him, followed him, and told him to take the coat from whence he took it; I followed him into Tower-street, and there a silver spoon dropped out of the pocket of the coat; I saw that the spoon was marked with my master's cypher, W. J. P.; he threw the coat off his back in the street, and begged me to let him go, but I brought him back to my master's yard, the buckles were in the coat-pocket; I sent for a constable, and he was taken to the Compter; this spoon has the same cypher upon it; I believe it is the same, the great-coat is the same, and the buckles I believe to be the same.

EDWARD ROBERTS sworn. - I am a constable, I received the property from Mr. Cox, in Mr. Purdy's kitchen; I afterwards delivered them up to Mr. Neale, and marked them.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-15

354. LUCY AHIER was indicted for that she, on the 20th of November, in the 39th year of his Majesty's reign , being then married to Joshua Ahier , did marry James Thomas , a batchelor, the said Joshua being then living .

(The case was opened by Mr. Raine.)

THOMAS THOMAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am the father of James Thomas.

Q. Do you know any thing of the register of the first marriage of this woman at Bristol? - A. I do, (produces it;) I took it off the register-book of the parish of St. Michael, Bristol.

JOSEPH HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do, I was present at her marriage with Joshua Ahier, at the parish church of St. Michael.

Q. He is a cabinet-maker ? - A. He professes that business; I witnessed the marriage, it was in March, 1791; I was the man that gave her away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know any thing of Joshua Ahier ? - A. I saw him yesterday and to-day.

Q. Has he been abroad? - A. I cannot tell whether he has been out of England or not.

Q. Have you never heard that he has been abroad? - A. I never did; I always understood that he was in England, and not out of England.

JOHN FOWLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do; I was present at her marriage, at St. Botolph's, Aldgate , November 20, 1798, to one James Thomas .

Q. Do you know she was described when she was married? - A. As a widow; I gave her away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not know the first husband? - A. I have seen her with a person of the name of Ahier, the latter end of 1791, or the beginning of 1792, I cannot say which.

Q.Do you know what became of him after? - A. I heard that he was gone as a soldier, I did not know that he was abroad.

Prisoner's defence. My first husband left me about eight years and a half ago; and unfortunately young Mr. Thomas happened to be going by my house; there was a lady in my parlour sitting with me; there was a gentleman with Mr. Thomas that knew the lady that was sitting with me; Mr. Thomas came into my parlour, and sat down, and when the gentleman went away, Mr. Thomas stopped; I asked him if he was not going with his friends, he said, he had something to say to me; that he had taken such a liking to me, that he could not be happy without he had me; I told him it was extraordinary what he should have to say to me, being a stranger to me, and I to him; I told him to consider, and to call upon me again the next evening; I told him I was a poor woman, and he was a gentleman, and that his friends might not approve of it; he said, he was not under the jurisdiction of his friends, he could earn a livelihood any where; I told him that I had been married, and that my husband was gone abroad, and I believed he was dead; he paid his addresses to me, several times, and at last he said, if I would not have him, he would not see the light of another day.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Confined three months in Newgate , fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-16

355. WILLIAM STONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , a pewter quart pot, value 1s. a quart of porter, value 4d. and 10s. 2d. the property of Charlotte Johnson , widow .

CHARLOTTE JOHNSON sworn. - I am a widow, I keep the Falcon-tavern in Fetter-lane : On Thursday the 17th of April, the prisoner came to my house about four o'clock in the afternoon, and ordered a pot of beer, and change for half-a-guinea, for Mr. Barr, of Chifford's-inn; I carried the pot

of beer myself, and change for the half-guinea; I gave him ten shillings in silver, and two-pence in copper, and he said, go back again and bring another pot of beer, and then I will give you the half-guinea; I returned with another pot of beer, and went to Mr. Barr's, expecting to find him there, but no such person had been there; upon my returning from Mr. Barr's, I found, under the step of the door, the pot of beer, with about a quarter of a pint drank out of it.

WILLIAM BARR sworn. - I know nothing at all of the prisoner, he is an utter stranger to me; he made use of my name, I did not send him.

Prisoner's defence. The witness swear very false if she says she lost the pot; I never knew any thing about the pot.

GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

Confined one year in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London. Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-17

356. THOMAS RIDLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , a cheese, value 16s. the property of Thomas Winkworth , and John Tilden .

- WHEELER sworn. - I am clerk to Thomas Winkworth, and John Tilden , wharfingers : On Tuesday the 8th of April, we lost a cheese; I live on the wharf; I was up stairs at the time the man was detected; I was called down between twelve and one o'clock, where I saw the prisoner in custody, he said he was employed by a person to take it to Blackfriar's-bridge; after wards, he said, he was very sorry for what he had done.

RICHARD CASLEY sworn. - I am a soldier, labourer to Mr. Winkworth: On Tuesday the 8th of April, I was standing at the gate and saw the prisoner coming across the wharf towards me, and I turned and faced him; I stopped him, he had a cheese concealed under his apron, under his right thigh; he was dressed in soldier s clothes; he belongs to the same regiment that I do.

JOHN PHILIPS sworn. - I am agent to the cheesemongers, to see the cheeses landed: On Tuesday, the 8th of April, we landed a great many cheeses upon Mr. Winkworth's wharf; one parcel of them was one hundred and eighty cheeses, marked H. C. No. 40, they were all right landed upon the wharf; I saw the cheese that was taken from the prisoner, it was marked No. 40, H. C. it was one of that parcel; we piled them up in piles of ten high; when we came to look, there was one pile with only nine; I am positive it was a cheese that was taken from there.

DANIEL MUNRO sworn. - I am constable,(produces the cheese;) I have had it ever since.

Phillips. This is the same cheese, I marked it, besides that mark, H. C. upon it.

Prisoner's defence. I was employed by a man to carry it to Blackfriar's-bridge.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Confined one month in Newgate, and delivered to his serjeant .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-18

357. ABRAHAM BONE , THOMAS STEVENS , and THOMAS RILEY , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Croasdell , about the hour of eight in the night, of the 7th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, five yards of baize, value 12s. the property of the said Henry .

MARY CROASDELL sworn. - I am the wife of Henry Croasdell, I live at No. 3, Mulberry-gardens, Wapping , I keep a chandler's-shop: On the 7th of February, three lads came into the shop, between eight and nine in the evening; the lad in the middle did not come into the shop, he staid outside, his name is Stevens; Bone, and Riley, and another came in; I think they are the same persons, and asked for a halfpennyworth of small-beer; the next day I missed a piece of red baize, I had seen it some hours before in the shop, lying upon the counter; I missed it about three or four o'clock the next day; it was not quite new, I had used it for laying on a carpet for a few weeks; I cannot recollect which came in first; I have never seen the baize since.

JAMES CHESTERMAN sworn. - My self, and Riley, and Stevens, and Bone, went down Nightingale-lane, till we came to the Mulberry-gardens; we went into a chandler's shop, on the Friday before the fire in Thames-street; Bone went in first, and myself and Riley followed him; we saw the gentlewoman in the shop; we lifted up the latch and went in for a halfpenny worth of small-beer.

Q. You went in with no other intention but to get some small-beer? - A. Yes; we saw the baize lying upon the back counter, and we thought it was a red cloak, we had not been in the shop but a few minutes, when Riley drew the baize from the counter; we took it to Rosemary-lane and sold it to Mrs. Levy for three shillings and sixpence, and we shared the money amongst us; myself and Stevens went into Mrs. Levy's, and the other two staid at the door, we asked her five shillings.

Q. Have your known the prisoners long? - A. Yes; I used to go out of nights with them.

SOPHIA LEVY sworn. - I live in Shire-court, Rosemary-lane, my husband keeps a chandler's-shop; the middle one, Stevens, brought me a piece of baize to sell, there were five yards of it;

Chesterman was with him, and asked five shillings for it; I offered three and sixpence; there were two or three more at the door; Chesterman went to the door, and asked them if they would take three shillings and sixpence, and he came back and took it I sold it to a country dealer; I had cut off a small piece for a rubber, which I delivered to the constable.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Public office, Shadwell; I received a piece of baize from Mrs. Levy yesterday. (Produces it.)

Mr. Croasdell I cannot swear to this piece of baize; I cannot swear to it without the whole was together, it is the same kind of baize.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I apprehended the prisoners, in company with Cooke, Holebrook, and Haynes, I known no more of it.

Bone's defence. I am innocent of what I am here for, I know nothing at all about it.

Stevens's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

Riley's defence. I know nothing at all about the baize; I have not been home from sea but nine weeks to-day.

Bone, GUILTY. (Aged 18.)

Stevens, GUILTY. (Aged 17.)

Riley, GUILTY. (Aged 19.)

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before, Mr. Baron CHAMBER.

Reference Number: t18000528-19

358. HONORIA HATTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , two table-cloths, value 2l. 10s. and two silk gowns, value 20s. the property of the Hon. John Stratford , in his dwelling-house.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM GORDON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a pawnbroker, No. 1, Sherrard-street, Golden-square, I know the prisoner perfectly well; on the 1st of March, I took in from the prisoner at the bar, two table-cloths and two silk gowns, for three pounds ten shillings; I am sure she is the person, she had been frequently at our shop before. (Produces the property.)

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was she not frequently in the habit of redeeming things? - A. Yes.

THE HON. ELIZABETH STRATFORD sworn. -The prisoner was my maid and house-keeper.

Q. Your husband is the Hon. John Stratford ? - A. Yes; she had been five months in my service; I missed a great number of things, and at the latter end of April, in consequence of some suspicions that I entertained, the prisoner was apprehended.

Q. Look at these things produced by Mr. Gordon? - A. Here are two silk gowns, they are my property which I have lost; these two table-cloths are mine; they are the same pattern with many that I have lost, but they have no mark upon them; the gowns were made for me, I wore them some time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Upon the tablecloth you have no mark? - A. No.

Q. As she had a controul over your property, she might have taken one gown at one time, and the other at another? - A. She might.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

Mrs. Stratford. I have known the prisoner some years; I have trusted her with large sums of money, and always had a very good opinion of her.

GUILTY.

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-20

359. THOMAS RAINSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , nine ounces of tea, value 1s. 3d. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES NICHOLES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a labourer in the India Company's warehouses; the prisoner is a labourer in the same warehouse in Crutched-friars : On Friday, the 16th of May last, while I was eating my breakfast in one of the alleys in the warehouse, the prisoner came down within three yards of where I was; he unpapered a chest of a tea which had just been papered for nailing up to be weighed; he took out several hands full, and concealed it in his great coat pocket; as soon as he had done he left the place; he could not see me at that time; he then quitted the alley as quick as he possibly could.

Q. The alleys are the spaces between the chests? - A. Yes; I then followed him in to the yard; he took his breakfast from the publican; I then acquainted Mr. Barber, the elder, with what I had seen; the next time I saw the prisoner was in Mr. Coward's accompting-house; I saw some tea in a bag in the officer's hands.

WILLIAM BARBER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am assistant elder: In consequence of information from the last witness, I went in search of the prisoner; I found him sitting upon a congou chest; eating his breakfast; I said to him, Rainsley, I want you below stairs; I took him down into Mr. Coward's accompting-house; he is the chief elder; I acquaited him of it, and I procured a Custom-house officer and had him searched; in his

great-coat pocket was a bag of tea containing nine ounces; I saw it taken out of his pocket by the Custom-house officer; he seemed a good deal confused; I procured a constable and took him over to Mr. Stockwell, the wasrehouse-keeper, and there he went down upon his knees, and begged for mercy.

Q. Had you promised him forgiveness if he would say any thing about it? - A. No, I had not.

Prisoner. I am guilty of this offence; I hope your Lordship will suffer me to go to sea.

SAMUEL VOKINS sworn. - I am an officer of the Customs: I took this tea out of the prisoner's pocket; (produces it;) it is worth one shilling and three-pence.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped 100 yards near the India warehouses in Crutched-friars .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-21

360. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , twenty-four yards of calico, value 4l. 8s. the property of Thomas Cross , privately in his shop .

THOMAS CROSS sworn. - I am a linen-draper in West-Smithfield : On Saturday the 10th of May, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop with another woman of the name of Mary Ridley , otherwise Riley; the other woman purchased half a quarter of a yard of muslin, and then they both went out of the shop together; Smith did not bargain for any thing; in consequence of information, I went after her, and the dropped the calico from under her apron; the other woman was with her then; a person that was standing by picked it up and carried it to my shop; he is not here, but the cotton was never out of my sight till I delivered it to the constable; it cost me four pounds eight shillings about a quarter of an hour before; it laid upon the counter when they came in, about two yards and a half, or three yards from the prisoner, to the best of my knowledge.

Q.Did you not see her hands move at any time to take it? - A. No.

Q. Had you no suspicion that she took it till you were informed of it? - A. No.

RICHARD CROSS sworn. - I am the son of the last witness: I saw both the women come into the shop; I rang the bell for my father to come down to serve them; my back was then turned to them; there were two pieces of calico upon the counter that my father had just brought in; my father came down, and took down some muslins to serve these women; I went a little way from the counter, and left my father behind; when I came, back I missed one of the pieces of print that was lying upon the counter; I looked all round the shop but could not find any thing of it; then they both went out; I told my father I suspected they had got the piece of print; my father immediately went after them and stopped them at the corner of Cloth-fair; I did not go after them, I went out to the door, and saw the print fall from the prisoner; it was brought back and delivered to the constable.

Q. Did you see the prisoner do any thing that led you to suspect she had taken it? - A. Yes; I walked towards the door and she shifted her hands; she was then close to the counter; when I came on this side she lifted this hand up, and when I came on the other side she lifted this hand up.

Q. Was she close to the calico at that time? - A. No; she was two yards from where the calico was.

Q. Has it any mark upon it? - A. There is the name of Salt upon it; he is the wholesale dealer; my father had not put any shop-mark upon it; there were twenty-four yards of it.

( Charles Thompson produced the calico, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I went in with this young woman to buy some muslins for caps; I came away with her, and never saw the calico at all.

JOHN BROUGH sworn. - I am a merchant; I live in sight of Mr. Cross's: On Saturday, the 10th of May, I saw two women go into Mr. Cross's shop; and I saw them come out again, and Mr. Cross follow them; and then I saw one of the women drop a piece of calico, and she was taken back; but I cannot say which of them it was.

GUILTY. (Aged 27.)

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-22

361. WILLIAM JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , an iron pallisade, value 2s. the property of John Taylor , fixed to a certain fence belonging to his dwelling-house .

JOHN TAYLOR sworn. - On Thursday, the 24th of April, I lost an iron pallisade from my house; I had lost eight before; and as I was sitting writing at my desk, I thought I heard a wrench; I then went to the door, and before I could get it open the men were gone; I went back and examined the rail, and found one fresh loosened; I then thought he would return; I placed myself behind the glass-door ready to go out; I then saw the prisoner return; I distinguished him by his leather apron, which was tucked round him; I saw him

take the bar out; it was fixed in a fence belonging to my dwelling-house; I instantly opened the door and ran up the steps, there are three steps up to the door, and followed the prisoner; he had the bar in his hand; I saw him stoop and put it down upon the kirb, and as he rose again I seized him; that was against the next house to my own; I then sent for a constable; I went out and picked the bar up; I never lost sight of him at all; he first attempted to get away form me; he struggled a good deal, and I tore his waistcoat.

JOSEPH FENNELL sworn. - I am a constable:(produces the bar;) I received it form Mr. Taylor, I have kept it ever since.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn; I had no tools to cut it away with, not even a knife; they searched me and I had nothing about me; the gentleman said, you rascal, I have been robbed so many times that I will send you to Botany Bay.

Jury. (To Taylor.) Q. Did you find any tools about him? - A. No, it was done without; the stone work had been fresh chipped away; I saw him take it out.

The prisoner called Robert Binks , who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (of stealing, value 9d.) (Aged 62.)

Publicly whipped 100 yards in London-wall, near the house of Mr. Taylor .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-23

362. NOAH PAGE was indicted for the wilful murder of William Davis .

(The prisoner being called upon to plead guilty or not guilty, he said, guilty, no; you ought to give me one hundred pounds for taking me in this manner, you scoundrels you.)

The Jury was then impannelled to try whether the prisoner was of sound mind and understanding, or not.

JOHN KIRBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine.

Q. How long has the prisoner been in your custody? - A. Five weeks.

Q. What has his demeanor been? - A. The moment he came in, he was exactly as you see him now, and he has appeared in the same deranged state ever since I have had him.

Q. Have you been in the habit of seeing persons in a deranged state? - A. I have seen many.

Q. Has he remained, during the time you have had him, quite insane? - A. That is my opinion.

EDWARD PAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am the brother of the prisoner; my brother has been in his state of mind between eight and nine years.

Q. What has been his general demeanor? - A. He has been afflicted in a kind of stupid, heavy, way, as a lunatick; the first particular thing we observed of him, was, drinking a vast quantity of water; he had a fancy in his head that he was poisoned.

Q. Did you endeavour to convince him he was mistaken? - A. Yes, but it had no effect, he continued so for near a fortnight; he used to drink four or five quarts of water, one after another, he was confined in St. Luke's twelve months, and was sent away as incurable.

(The Jury found a verdict that the prisoner was

INSANE .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-24

363. JANE MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , two cotton gowns, value 10s. a silk cloak, value 10s. a dimity petticoat, value 3s. a stuff petticoat, value 1s. a muslin apron, value 1s. and a check apron, value 1s. the property of Mary Leicester , widow .

MARY LEICESTER sworn. - I am a widow, I live at Chelsea ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them;) I lost them out of my back room; on Thursday the 13th of February, when I came home to dinner at one o'clock, I saw my gowns hanging up, and I left them there when I went out again to work at two; I came home between five and six in the evening from my work, I found the key on the outside, and the door locked; I had left the prisoner in the room; she had lodged with me from the 9th; I opened the door, and immediately missed my gowns, and the other things from my drawers; I never saw her again till I took her myself under the Physic-walls, and delivered her to the constable, his name is Grubb.

ROBERT SIMPSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Brydge's-street, Covent-garden, (produces a black silk clock, and a cotton gown;) I took them in of the prisoner, in the name of Ann Friday ; I am not certain that I had ever seen her before, but I saw her twice that day, they were pledged separately; I produced them at Queen-square Police-office, and there I saw her again, she said they were her own property; I lent her nine shillings on the cloak, and five shillings on the gown. (They were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Priosner's defence. I took the things.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex, Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-25

364. WILLIAM JOHNSON, alias YARMOUTH , and WILLIAM POWELL, alias SOUTH , were indicted for breaking and entering

the dwelling-house of Thomas Hemingway , about the hour of eight, in the night of the 12th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing nineteen pair of men's leather shoes, value 3l. 18s. and one shoe, value 2s. the property of the said Thomas .

THOMAS HEMINGWAY sworn. - I live now in King-street, Seven-dials; I did live in Lower East Smithfield at the time of the robbery; I am a shoemaker , I kept the house on the 12th of December; I missed nineteen pair, and an odd shoe; I went out about eleven o'clock in the morning, and returned about eight in the evening; I found my window broke, and the shoes gone; I had put them in the window myself.

JAMES CHESTERMAN sworn. - Mr. Hemingway did live near the Hermittage-bridge, Wapping, he kept a shoemaker's-shop; I cannot tell, rightly, when it was, it was about six months ago, as near as I can recollect; I went out with Johnson, Powell, and Harper, about eight o'clock; Johnson took a penny-piece and broke the window; then Powell took out several pair of shoes, and put them into Johnson's apron as quick as he could, and brought them to Mrs. Levy.

Q.What is she? - A. I do not know what trade she is, but by buying these sort of goods; we sold them for a guinea and a half; there were eleven pair.

Q. Did you take only eleven pair? - A. No more; I did not go in, I stopped at the door to look out; the other three went in.

Q. Did you see the shoes counted? - A. Yes; eleven pair and an odd one, they told me; they sold them to Mrs. Levy for half-a-crown a pair.

REBECCA LEVY sworn. - Q. Did you ever see the two prisoners? - A. Never before the 12th of December, they came to my house about eight o'clock at night; at that time I dealt in the Change, in clothes, and other things; there were three of them, Johnson had eleven pair of shoes in his lap; I asked him what he had there; he said he had eleven pair of shoes; he asked me a guinea and a half for them, and I gave him a guinea and a half.

Q. Were they worth a guinea and a half? - A. They were boy's shoes.

Q.Were they worth a guinea and a half? - A. Yes.

Q. Not more? - A. I cannot say, rightly; they might be worth three shillings a pair; I kept two pair out for my husband to wear; I sold nine pair, I cannot tell to whom; I sold them in the Change for three shillings a pair.

Q. And no more? - A. No more.

Q. You had never seen the prisoners before? - A. No.

Q. How soon after did you see them? - A. At Shadwell-office.

Q. Did you never see them but that one time? - A. No.

Q.How do you know they are the same boys? - A. I know the little one by the carroty head; I am positive they are the same, (produces one pair); the other pair is quite worn out.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoners, in company with Cook, Brown, and Holebrook, on Thursday the 8th of May; that is all I know of it.

Hemingway. These are my shoes, they were made for a person in Westminster, but they were too small, and I intended to wear them myself; I can swear to them by the cut of them, I cut them myself; and by the binding; if it had been some of the other shoes I could not have sworn to them, because they came out of the country.

Q. Are you not in the habit of cutting other shoes? - A. The shoes that I cut myself are bespoke shoes.

How many had you cut in the course of the preceding week? - A. I might have cut twenty, perhaps; sometimes two or three hundred.

Q. Do you mean to say, that among all the cutters about town, no other man could have cut these shoes? - A. I am positive I cut this pair of shoes.

Q. Can you positively swear that these are shoes that you have not sold to some other customer? - A. I can, I know the cut so well; it is a very remarkable pair; the moment Mrs. Levy shewed me the shoes, I knew them directly.

Q. Do not you usually put the name of your customers in the shoes? - A. I do not at all times.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Johnson, GUILTY.

Powell, GUILTY.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-26

365. CHARLES MOREN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Isabella Smart , about the hour of eight, in the night of the 25th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing two cotton gowns, value 20s. a shirt, value 6s. and a silk-handkerchief, value 1d. the property of the said Isabella .

ISABELLA SMART sworn. - I live in Old Gravel-lane , I keep a fish-shop, and green-grocer's : On Tuesday the 25th of March, about a quarter after seven, or between seven and eight, in the evening, I left my shop, and locked the door, the shop and house is all under one roof; there is no way through the shop, there is a passage to go up stairs;

I had pulled down both the windows, and fastened them with a fork; I was absent about ten minutes at the farthest, I left a candle burning in the parlour; when I returned, I found the door locked, I missed a bundle containing two cotton gowns, and a holland frilled shirt tied up in a silk handkerchief, I had seen it immediately before I went out; I heard of the property again last Tuesday three weeks, I saw them at Shadwell-office.

WILLIAM SINCLAIR sworn. - I live in Mill-lane, Tooley-street, along with my father, he is a millwright: Charles Moren , Abraham Robus , and I, went out a thieving; on Tuesday night, the 25th of March, going down the bottom of Old Gravel-lane, we saw James Chesterman , and Ned Southey , at Mrs. Smart's window; I saw Chesterman lift up the window a little way, Charles Moren came to the window and lifted it quite up, and jumped in; he handed out a bundle to Aby Robus , which Aby Robus gave to me to take home to his lodgings, and told me to stop there till they both came to me; in a short time they both came to me; and we all three went to Solomon Jacobs 's, in Petticoat-lane, and sold the things for a guinea; I went in to Jacobs's with them, and we shared the money between us three.

Q. What time was it? - A. Between seven and eight o'clock; Chesterman and Southey received no part of the money.

Q. How did Chesterman get the window up? - A. He pushed it up with his hand.

Q. Did he find any difficulty at first in getting it up? - A. Not that I saw; the bundle contained two gowns, and one frilled shirt, in a very old crossbar handkerchief; I have known the prisoner twelve months, I have known Chesterman a very short time, and I had known Robus about eight weeks, before I was taken.

Q. Was it dark at that time? - A. Yes.

SOLOMON JACOBS sworn. - I live in Petticoat-lane, I am a dealer in wearing apparel, I have known the prisoner six or seven years: On Tuesday the 25th of March, in the evening, about eight o'clock, the prisoner came to my house with Sinclair, and Abraham Robus , they brought in a bundle, and asked me whether I would buy those articles; there were two gowns, and a shirt, in a silk handkerchief; I did not know Sinclair before, I knew Robus; I gave them a guinea for them.

Q. Did you ask them how they came by them? - A. No, I did not; I lived in the same house with the prisoner's mother some time ago, and he used to attend our fires upon the sabbath-day; I sold the gowns and the shirt to Mr. Clark, a dealer, in Rosemary-lane; the handkerchief was burnt, for it was very old.

Q. How long after? - A. Two or three days.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer(Produces two gowns.)

Jacobs. These are the same two gowns; I remarked them before I brought them; I bought them according to the defects that were in them, and I delivered them to Mr. Brown.

Brown. I apprehended the prisoner on the 28th of April; I received information from Sinclair, after he was apprehended, and he went with me, and pointed out Mrs. Smart's shop; Haynes, Holebrook, and Cook, were with me; he then pointed out Mr. Jacobs's house, as having received the property; we apprehended Jacobs, and brought him to the office; he told me he had sold them, and would do his endeavour to get them back, which he did, and delivered them to me; I have had them in my custody ever since.

Jacobs. I got the gowns back from Mr. Clark, but he could not tell whom he had sold the shirt to.

Mrs. Smart. This is one of my gowns I am sure, but it is now taken to pieces, it was whole when I lost it; the other I am confident is mine.

JAMES CHESTERMAN sworn. - On the 25th of March, me and Ned Southey were going down Old Gravel-lane, I went to push up the window, I found it very hard to push up, and Charles Moren came to the window, and then we shoved it right up; he went in, and handed out a bundle to Aby Robus; then Aby Robus, and Moren, and Sinclair, all went away with the bundle; Ned Southey and I came away from the window; and then, at night, I went to Moren's lodgings, and he said he sold the bundle for a guinea.

Prisoner. I do not know what to say.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 14.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t18000528-27

366. THOMAS STEVENS , and JAMES BENSON , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Monk , about the hour of nine, in the night of the 10th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, two pair of women's leather shoes, value 10s. 6d. the property of the said Samuel .

SAMUEL MONK sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , No. 90, Lemon-street : On the 10th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, a gentleman going by detected a young lad at the door attempting to break the window; I did not miss any thing till about a month after, when the Shadwell officers came to me with a pair of shoes, that I believe to be of my manufacture.

Q. Are you sure? - A. I think I can swear that they are.

WILLIAM SINCLAIR sworn. - On the 10th of April, Stevens, Benson, and I, went out a

thieving at night, it was dark, there were candles lit in the shop; Benson says to me and Stevens, come over the way, and get some shoes; he put his hand to the window, and shoved a piece of the window almost in, that was in Red Lion-street.

Monk. It is very often called Red Lion-street; there is Red Lion-street, Lemon-street, in the middle, and White Lion-street at the bottom.

Sinclair. I then put my hand to the window, and shoved it quite in; then Benson took out one pair, and went over and gave them to Stevens; I took out another pair, and carried them over, and gave them to Stevens; and I was going to take out another pair, when some man came up and laid hold of me; says he, holloa, what are you doing there? says I, nothing, Sir; he took me to the shop-door and called somebody; the gentleman came out, and I told him I knew nothing about it, and he let me go.

Q. Was that Mr. Monk? - A. Yes, I am sure of it; immediately after I was let go, I ran after them, I knew whereabouts they were going; I saw them go into one Timothy Jacques 's house, in Catherinewheel-alley, I did not let them see me; I waited in the passage till they came out, and I heard Jacques say he gave these two lads a crown for these two pair of shoes; immediately as I heard him say that, I came out of the passage, and went up Catherinewheel-alley, I went into Red Lion-street, and waited there till they came; just as they were coming down Red Lion-street, I met them, and pretended I did not know where they had been, and then we parted the money between me, Stevens, and Benson; we parted a crown between us.

Q. How much had you? - A. I had a shilling and some halfpence.

Q. How many halfpence? - A. I cannot recollect; they gave me my fair part; they told me they had been to Jacques's house; then we all went into Back-lane and went to bed.

JOHN COOK sworn. - I am an officer: I, in company with the other officers, Holebrook, Haynes, and Brown, apprehended the prisoners on the 12th of April; and the same morning I went to the house of Timothy Jacques , and there I found this pair of shoes, (produces them); I have had them ever since.

TIMOTHY JACQUES sworn. - I am in the pastry line: On the 10th of April, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, the two prisoners brought me two pair of shoes; they asked me five shillings for them, and I gave them five shillings.

Q. Did you know them before? - A. Yes; they used to buy goods of me in the lane.

Q. Did you ever buy any thing of them before? - A. No.

Q. Did you ask how they came by them? - A. No.

Q. What are they worth? - A. About three shillings and sixpence a pair, I should think.

Monk. These are mine, they have my name in them; they were manufactured in my house.

Q. What is the value of them? - A. The wholesale price is three shillings and nine-pence.

Q. (To Jacques.) Did you know the prisoners before? - A. I had seen them before; when I am in the lane, I buy any thing that I think I can get any thing by.

Stevens's defence. I never saw him before in my life.

Benson's defence. I never committed the robbery at all.

Stevens, GUILTY Death . (Aged 16.)

Benson, GUILTY Death . (Aged 15.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-28

367. ROBERT KEMP , and JOSEPH DAVIS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , a pocket-book, value 2s. the property of George Holland .

GEORGE HOLLAND sworn. - On Friday, the 18th of April, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking through the Strand with Mr. Leake, we were walking arm in arm towards Temple-bar; when I came near Arundel-street, a person came up to me, whom I knew to be an officer, James Bly ; in consequence of what he said, I felt in my pocket, and found I had lost my pocket-book; I had felt it in my pocket in the course of the morning; I cannot speak exactly to the time.

Q. Are you sure you had not taken it out and left it any where? - A. I am certain I had not left it; he desired me to follow him, and he would shew me the parties; I went as far back as Norfolk-street with Bly, and Mr. Lake; Bly looking down the street, saw the two prisoners walking together, about half way down the street, on the right-hand side; we all ran up to them, and just before we got to them, Bly said, come Joe, knowing Davis, upon which they both stopped; I immediately laid hold of Davis, and accused him of picking my pocket; the moment I laid hold of Davis, I perceived my pocket-book at his feet; as I came towards them I kept looking, for I expected it would be dropped, and when he turned round to look me in the face, he dropped it from his left-hand pocket; we took them both to Bow-street; the officer has the pocket-book; they made no resistance.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. (For Kemp). Q. It might have been two or three hours before this time that you felt for your pocket-book? - A. It possibly might, I cannot say.

Q. I believe Kemp was at some distance from Davis, was he not? - A. No; they were walking together; and when I went down Norfolk-street, and called to them, they both stopped.

WILLIAM LEAKE sworn. - I was with Mr. Holland, on the 18th of April; in consequence of information that we received, we followed two men down Norfolk-street, they were walking together; when we got nearly to them, Bly said, come, Joey, I think he added, let us see what you have got; at that instant, I saw the pocket-book drop from Davis's pocket, or the side of his pocket, which Bly immediately picked up, it was a red morocco pocket-book; at the same time. Bly desired I would secure Kemp, which I did; when I found he was an officer, and knew what he was about, I think, Kemp said, he knew nothing at all about it, or something of that kind, and begged I would not collar him; we were rather apprehensive of a rescue, from the gang that were about; we were desired, by Bly, to take care what we were about; we took them to Bow-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Kemp protested his innocence, and gave you no molestation in taking him to the office? - A. None.

RALPH BULMER sworn. - I live in the Strand: On the 18th of April, between one and two o'clock, I observed the two prisoners; I was sitting with the sash up, being a hot day; I saw a number of people walking, I saw Mr. Holland particularly, being very tall, and Mr. Leake; and immediately behind Mr. Holland was a person, whom I knew to be a notorious pickpocket, who is not taken, which led my attention that way immediately; after him followed the two prisoners together.

Q. Did you observe whether the two prisoners held conversation together? - A. They appeared to me to be talking together; I was at too great a distance to hear what passed; at the corner of Norfolk-street, the person, that was immediately behind Mr. Holland, passed him and Mr. Leake, and walked close before them to Arundel-street; when they got to Norfolk-street, the two prisoners walked close up to Mr. Holland and Mr. Leake; they had not gone many yards, before I saw Davis stoop, and put his hand into Mr. Holland's left-hand pocket; he then stood upright, and the other prisoner stood on a parallel line with him on the pavement next the houses; Mr. Holland was likewise next the houses, to the best of my recollection; one of the prisoners then stepped off the pavement, and beckoned back the man that had preceded Mr. Holland, and then he turned back, but what became of him I cannot tell; the two prisoners walked down Norfolk-street, the third man followed them down Norfolk-street also; they had got about halfway down, when I saw Mr. Holland, and his friend, and several other persons running, I went after them, and went to Bow-street; my house is directly opposite Norfolk-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You had never seen the person of Kemp before? - A. Neither.

Court. Q. Are you sure that he is the man? - A. I know him to be the person, he was never out of my sight till he was taken; he had a drab greatcoat on, over a suit of black.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am constable of St. John's, Westminster: About half-past one, on Friday the 18th of April, I was walking from Templebar towards Somerset-house; I saw the prisoner, about half a dozen yards from me, and because they should not see me, I stepped off the pavement, that was between Norfolk-street, and Somerset-house; I know Davis perfectly well, and I knew Kemp some years ago; I turned round and watched Davis, and found him very nimble with his fingers, and pressing very hard upon two gentlemen, in blue coats, whom I afterwards discovered to be Mr. Leake and Mr. Holland; Davis was rather the foremost man, Kemp was next the houses, and Davis towards the kirb-stone; I walked on a few yards, and some people being between us, I could not see what they were doing; I then observed Kemp stop, and I got a view of Davis, but slightly, and as I suspected they had picked these two gentlemen's pockets, I made as fast as I could after those two gentlemen; I touched Mr. Holland on the elbow, with a small stick I had in my hand, and asked him if he had lost any thing, he at first said, no; but putting his hand to his pocket, he said, yes, I have lost my pocket-book; then I went with them after the prisoners; I had lost sight of them then for a bit, but I went on pretty fast, till I came to the corner of Norfolk-street; I looked down Norfolk-street, and saw the two prisoners walking together, I pointed them out to Mr. Holland; I then ran down, and said, come, Joe, I believe, I said, hand over; immediately the pocket-book was dropped on the pavement; I heard something fall, which I believe was the report of the book upon the pavement, it had hardly done moving.

Q. Are you sure it was not on the pavement before? - A. No, it was not. (Produces the pocket-book.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. When you observed them in the Strand, Kemp was rather behind? - A. Davis certainly was a little distance before him, but a very small distance.

Holland. The pocket-book that I lost has my hand-writing in it, it cost me six shillings.

Kemp's defence. Davis is a tailor ; I met with him in the Strand, and spoke to him about a piece of black cloth; he said, if I would go with him to a public-house, he would measure me, and as we were going along, these gentlemen came up.

Davis's defence. I have worked for Kemp a great

many years, he was talking to me about making clothes, he is entirely innocent.

Kemp, NOT GUILTY .

Davis, GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t18000528-29

368. ELIZABETH GOMERSALL , and ELIZABETH STANDEN were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , two curtains, value 25s. a table-cloth, value 2s. and two pair of breeches, value 2s. the property of William James , and the other for receiving the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM JAMES sworn. - The prisoner Gomersall was a servant of mine, and had been nearly two months; I suspected that she was in the daily habit of robbing me: On the 2d of April, I got up earlier than usual; I went up to the second floor front window, facing the street, that was about half-past six o'clock; I saw the other prisoner ringing the bell at my shop door; in consequence of that. I went to Bow-street, I was advised to get a constable, and be upon the watch; on the morning of the 3d, Thursday, about the same time, or rather before, I perceived Standen coming; I saw Treadway, the constable, waiting, he suffered her to get into my house, he waited a few minutes; he was then let in by the servant boy, and detected Standen going down into the kitchen, I had never seen her before; he brought her up stairs, searched her, and found in her possession several duplicates, twenty-two, I believe; he took particular notice of one of the duplicates, of a curtain, which she had pawned for seventeen shillings; he then told her she must go along with him; she told him, if he would walk with her into the adjoining room, he would find something; they went into the adjoining room together, I did not go with them; and when the constable came out, he said she had acknowledged.

Q. Was the prisoner present? - A. Yes; that she had acknowledged, that Elizabeth Gomersall , my servant, had given her that curtain for the purpose of pawning it; there was another duplicate for a table-cloth; I then gave Gomersall in charge to the constables, there were two constables; the constable told Gomersall what Standen had said, Gomersall did not say any thing to that; my curtain was produced by the pawnbroker; we had recently removed from Finsbury-square, into Holborn, and the things were lying in confusion, the curtain had never been put up; there were thirty-eight duplicates of Gomersall's.

MRS. JAMES sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness, the prisoner was my servant; I had seen the curtain on the Monday, in the two pair backroom; she was taken up on the Thursday following; I cannot recollect when I had seen the tablecloth; I missed it the Monday before, and made mention of it to her.

CHARLES TROUTBECK sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, (produces a curtain, a table-cloth, and two pair of breeches;) the curtain I took in of Elizabeth Standen, upon the 1st of April; I did not take in the other things; I lent her seventeen shillings and seven-pence upon that and eight yards of stuff, which the prosecutor does not own.

Q. Did you ask how she came by it? - A. No; I had known her seven years, and she had been most of that time a housekeeper.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - I am a constable: On Thursday, the 3d of April, Mr. Wood, the inspector of the lottery-office, desired me to watch Mr. James's house; about seven o'clock in the morning, I went and watched the door, and a little after seven, I saw the prisoner Standen ring at the bell; I stopped till she went in; I knocked at the door, which was opened to me, I saw her going down the kitchen stairs; I told her I wanted her; I searched her and found a number of papers upon her, lists of numbers, insured for guineas and half-guineas, and a quantity of duplicates; there was a duplicate of a curtain, on the 1st of April; I asked her whose that was, she said it was her property; and another on the 2d of April; I told Mr. James he might as well go with me to the pawnbroker's, and see if they were any of his property; she said if I would go with her into the parlour she wanted to speak to me; she said they were Mr. James's property, the servant had given them her to pawn; the servant was called up, and Mr. James ordered her into custody; I told her what Standen had said, and she made no reply at all; we then went to the pawnbroker's; the things were produced, and Mr. James said they were his.

Standen. I did not say they were Mr. James's, for I did not know it; she told me they were her own.

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn. - I was with Treadway; I can say no more than he has said.(The curtain was deposed to by Mrs. James.)

The prisoner Standen called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-30

369. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , five yards of muslin, value 1l. the property of Joseph Hill .(The person who had the custody of the property not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-31

370. THOMAS BARTON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Freeman , James Freeman , and Rose the wife of Richard Collishaw , being in the same dwelling-house, about the hour of ten in the forenoon of the 14th of April , and stealing three pair of breeches, value 1l. 10s. two gowns, value 18s. three handkerchiefs, value 3s. two aprons, value 4s. a pair of shoes, value 5s. two yards and a half of linen cloth, value 5s. a coat, value 12s. and two waistcoats, value 2s. 6d. the property of the said William Freeman .

ROSE COLLISHAW sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Collishaw ; I lodge in William Freeman 's house.

Q. Who is James Freeman ? - A. A child of three years old. On Easter Monday last Mrs. Freeman went out into Fore-street for half a pint of split pease; Mr. Freeman was out at work; she had not been gone out long before I heard a noise; I did not give it a thought, as it was a very windy day, till I heard it again; I was cleaning myself, without a handkerchief; I threw a petticoat over me, and saw the prisoner run out with his apron full of clothes; it was about half past ten o'clock in the morning; I ran out after him without a handkerchief, and with my petticoat in my hand, and the mob went after him; I did brush him, but I could not hold him; as he went along, running, he threw the things into the kennel.

Q. Where was this? - A. In New-court, Ropemaker's-alley, Cripplegate; the prisoner was brought back; I am sure he was the same man; the things were brought back, I did not see them picked up.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not said that you never saw me till after I was brought back, two hours after the affair happened? - A. It was not an hour.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. I am positive of it.

ANN FREEMAN sworn. - I went out, and locked the outside door; I tried it, and double-locked it; when I came home again I found the things brought back and lying upon the floor; I had left one drawer with the key in it, and every thing was gone out of that drawer; there was another drawer forced open.

Q. How did he get in, do you know? - A. It had been forced open; it was half unlocked, and the rest forced; I lost a pair of shoes, two waistcoats, three pair of breeches, a coat, two gowns, three handkerchiefs, two aprons, a new pair of shoes, and a piece of cloth for a shirt.

Q. What do you suppose they might be all worth? - A. Four pounds.

Q. They were all in wear, I suppose? - A. Yes; the cloth was new, and the shoes were new; the constable has got the property; when I went out I left my little boy, James Freeman , and Mrs. Collishaw in the house.

FRANCES MILLARD sworn. - I heard the cry of stop thief, very loud; I went to my window, and saw Mrs. Collishaw, who was unknown to me at that time, with the prisoner at the bar, snatching hold of his coat; being undrest, I did not know her, I thought it had been a man and his wife quarrelling; I am sure the prisoner is the man; he got away from her; he had the things in a coarse apron before him, and chucked them all out into the kennel in Ropemaker's-alley; when Mrs. Collishaw turned round, I perceived I knew her face; she called out again, stop thief; the mob pursued him, and brought him back; I helped to pick up the things, and the mob threw them into Mrs. Freeman's parlour; there was a blue coat, a pair of bucksk[Text unreadable in original.]n breeches, and a pair of shoes, that I saw the prisoner throw away, that I carried in myself; I am positive he is the man; he had a pig-tail on, tied with a black ribbon and a brush at the end, and a brown coat on.

RICHARD COLLISHAW sworn. - I was sent for from work about eleven o'clock; I went to a house in a court where I had information he was gone to, and I got an officer and went up stairs, and in one of the closets I found the prisoner; I was going to search the place, and he said it was of no use, for he had brought nothing there; then we took him to Mr. Freeman's, and there were the things in the parlour; then we took him to the Compter; when he was brought back to Mr. Freeman's, my wife saw him, and said that was the man.

ALEXANDER STEVENS sworn. - I am an officer: I went with the last witness, and found the prisoner in a closet in a house in Tenter-alley; I searched him and found this key upon him; it is a common key; (produces the property;) I brought them from Mr. Freeman's house; these are the same things.

Millard. This is the coat that I picked up, and these shoes and buckskin breeches.

Mrs. Freeman. These things are all my property, and they were in the room when I went out.

CHARLOTTE WATKINS sworn. - I heard an alarm of stop thief, on Easter Monday, and my house was searched by a neighbour and another person, and they searched but did not mind any body; I went out; I was out I dare say a full hour and a half, and then another man came and wanted to search the house, and I disputed their searching without a proper authority; but I did let them search, and in a closet this man was sitting.

Prisoner's defence. I had been up stairs with a young woman for a quarter of an hour, and then we went and had something to drink together; after

that I went as far as Lombard-street, and she desired me to call as I came back, which I did, and hearing these people come up stairs, I stepped into the closet; I was never near the house.

GUILTY (Aged 31.)

Of stealing to the value of 39s. but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-32

371. ANN PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , two linen sheets, value 4s. the property of Richard Day .

RICHARD PHILLIPS sworn. - On the 26th of April I was sent for to take a woman of the name of Davis into custody, and I found the prisoner in her company with a bundle in her lap; I asked her what she had got there; she said it was nothing to me, they were her property; she then said they were a pair of sheets that she had fetched from Westminster; she said they were the sheets her father died in, and I had nothing to do with them; I took her before a Magistrate, and she was committed for further examination; Mr. Day heard of it by some means, and he applied to me. (Produces them.)

RICHARD DAY sworn. - I live at No. 16, Moor-lane ; I keep a cook's shop : I lost a pair of sheets on the 26th of April, from the garret bed, where two single men lodged; the prisoner used frequently to come to my house with her husband; the sheets were taken at our dinner hour, about half past twelve; I saw the same sheets in the possession of the constable; these are my sheets; there is no mark upon them, but I have got the fellow to one of them here.

Prisoner's defence. I picked them up, tied up in a red pocket handkerchief, the corner of Coleman-street, at four o'clock in the afternoon.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-33

372. CATHERINE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a copper pot, value 4s. a shirt, value 6d. a waistcoat, value 1s. a frock, value 6d. and two pair of stockings, value 6d. the property of John Baskerville .

HANNAH BASKERVILLE sworn. - I am the wife of John Baskerville; I live at No. 58, Grub-street ; my husband is a man-cook : On Saturday, the 26th of April, I lost a copper pot, a waistcoat, an old shirt, an old frock, and two pair of stockings; I lost them from the kitchen; I went into the shop and heard a noise in the passage, it was between twelve and one o'clock; I went out and saw this woman with something in her lap covered ever with a blue apron; I did not know it was mine till she was gone; I sent a little boy after her, and he followed her home, and told me where she lived; I went to her lodgings, and there I found the things that I had lost.

RICHARD PHILLIPS sworn. - I am a constable: I went to the prisoner's lodgings in Cowheel-alley, Whitecross-street; she was not at home; I found the property in the room; she first said the man she lived with brought them in; but afterwards she owned she had taken them from Mrs. Baskerville's.(Produces the property.)

Mrs. Baskerville. They are all my property.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all of it; I never was in the place.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-34

373. JANE QUINNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a silver table-spoon, value 15s. the property of James Inglis .

GEORGE MILBURN sworn. - I am butler to Mr. James Inglis, No. 8, Billiter-square : The prisoner was employed, and had been a considerable time as a chairwoman ; and in December there was a silver table-spoon lost; I mentioned that there was a spoon lost, and the prisoner seemed very much concerned, and offered to pay for part of the spoon; all the servants were to go before a Magistrate to make oath that they did not know any thing about the property, and they all went except her; and she never came again till she was taken up; I put another spoon in the place of it, and did not hear any more of it till she was taken up, and the duplicate found upon her.

ROBERT ROSAMOND sworn. - I am a constable: On the 21st of May I was sent for to the house where the prisoner lodged, to take her into custody upon another charge; I asked her if she had any duplicates about her, she put her hand in her pocket and pulled out about twenty duplicates; in consequence of that I took them out of her hand and took her to the Compter, and the next day had her before the Lord Mayor; (produces a duplicate of a silver spoon, pledged for 13s.) I found it upon the prisoner; I traced it to the gentleman's house.

THOMAS KIMBER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Windsor, pawnbroker, in the Minories: This is our duplicate of a table-spoon pledged 27th of January for 13s. I did not take it in; it is pledged in the name of Mary Higgins , lodger, in John-street; the prisoner used our house, and we always knew her by that description. (Produces the spoon.)

Q. Where is the person that took this spoon in? - A. At Reading, in Berkshire.

Q. Is it the custom of your house to take in spoons in this way, with a crest upon them? - A. No; we have not another spoon in the house with a crest upon it.

Milburn. This is Mr. Inglis's spoon; it has his crest upon it.

Prisoner's defence. The reason of my not going was, that the house-maid came to me the night before, and told me not to go, for it would cause a great deal of confusion, as there were many things missing, and the butler had lent the plate out; or else I should have gone.

GUILTY . (Aged 36.)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t18000528-35

374. MARY THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , six brass weights, value 1s. the property of Charles Francis .

WILLIAM CORBYN sworn. - I live with Charles Francis , surgeon and apothecary , in Fenchurch-street : The prisoner came into my shop to ask for a bottle of Godfrey's Cordial, on the 18th of April, at near nine o'clock in the evening; I got her a bottle, and she said that was not what she wanted; she said that was not the bottle that she wanted, it was longer; I said, this comes to seven-pence halfpenny; she said that was not it, what she wanted came to fifteen-pence; I said perhaps she wanted Dalby's carminative; she said that was the name; but that was eighteen-pence; I shewed her a bottle of Dalby's, and she said that was it; I rather suspected her, from her laying her gown upon the end of the counter, near two sets of weights, with her hand through her pocket-hole; then she said she would go and fetch the three-pence; she went away; I directly looked at the end of the counter, and missed one set of weights, there were six of them; I called after her, and she did not stop; I followed her, and told her she had taken something out of the shop that was not her own; she stooped and said, what is the matter; I said, come back, and I will tell you; and then she dropped the weights, I heard them fall in the street; Mr. Francis sent for a constable, and gave charge of her; I had seen her twice before, which made me suspect her.

Thomas Hope , the constable, produced the weights, which were deposed is by Corbyn.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw any thing of them.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Transported for seven years.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-36

375. JOHN GODSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a pewter pint pot, value 1s. the property of James Litchfield .

THOMAS HILL sworn. - I am a publican: Last Friday morning, in St. Martin's-le-Grand, I saw the prisoner surrounded by a number of boys pelting him; I enquired what was the matter, and was informed he had stole a pot; I went to Mr. Litchfield's directly, he desired me to detain him; I went after him and stopped him; he said he did not steal it, it tumbled into his breeches somehow or other, he did not know how.

GEORGE KERMER sworn. - I got information that the prisoner had a pot in his breeches; I went up to him, and he said he would knock any body down; and a great many people came round, and then he took the pint pot out of his breeches, and held it up, and said, I do not want the pot, I was going to find out who it belonged to, only I could not see to read.

JOHN CLARK sworn. - I am a Marshalman: I was going past, and had the pot delivered to me.

Kermer. This is the same pot.

Litchfield. This is my pot.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up all over dirt.

GUILTY . (Aged 58.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-37

376. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , a wrapper, value 1s. and twelve pieces of linen cloth, each containing twenty-one yards, value 27l. the property of Henry Dibbin , in an out-house belonging to his dwelling-house .

HENRY DIBBIN sworn. - I keep an Inn-yard ; I am agent to a carrier, I live in Basing-lane ; I was robbed on the evening of the 22d of April, the property was taken from the warehouse under the dwelling-house; I was not at home at the time of the loss.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The warehouse is a ground-floor of the dwelling-house. -A. Yes.

Court. Q. It is a part of your dwelling-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Does it extend beyond your house? - A. No.

ROBERT WATSON sworn. - I am book-keeper to Mr. Dibbin: On the 22d of April, I received a truss of linen from Messrs. Scott and Company, in Smithefield; I received it from Reeves, the porter, it was deposited in the warehouse with the other goods, about six o'clock, or between six and seven o'clock; I left the warehouse at seven.

JOHN JACKSON sworn. - I am a box-maker

On the 22d of April, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner with a truss upon his shoulder, and another man by the side of him; from his manner of carrying it, and seeming to be in haste, it gave me a suspicion that it did not belong to him; I followed him to the top of Distaff-lane, the prisoner, and the other man, went into a court called Crown-court, and pitched the load in the court; the prisoner stopped with it, and the other man went away; my father being an officer of that parish, I went and informed him what I had seen; he immediately came and took the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. At nine o'clock at night, I suppose it was about dark? - A. Yes.

Q. How far did you walk? - A. About twenty yards.

Q. On the same side of the way? - A. No.

Q. You did not see the face of the person, you know? - A. No: I could not see his face on account of the truss.

Q. How long were you gone for your father? - A. I suppose, about half a minute; it was only the length of four houses; I never lost sight of the end of the court.

Q. Will you venture to swear, that the person you saw with the truss when you came back with your father, was the same you had left there? - A. I believe it was the same man.

Q. What coat had he on? - A. A brown coat.

Q. That is not very remarkable - what stockings had be on? - A. Blue and white.

Q. That is equally remarkable - what was the colour of the coat that the other man had on? - A. Blue.

Q. Are you sure it was a blue coat? - A. He was on the outside of the prisoner, and being dark, I cannot swear positively it was blue.

Q. The other man was between you and the person you suppose to be the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Consequently you had a much better opportunity of observing him than the person carrying the truss? - A. I took more notice of the man that carried the truss than I did the other.

Q. Did you go into your father's house? - A. No.

Q. Nor turn from the court at all? - A. No.

Q. Did you walk backwards then? - A. My back was to it when I went to call my father.

Court. Q. Have you any doubt, that the person that you saw when you came back with your father, was the same man that you had seen with the truss? - A. Not the least.

EDWARD ALLERTON sworn. - I am a calico-glazer, I work up Crown-court: On the 22d of April, between eight and nine o'clock, an alarm was given, on suspicion that a man had stole a truss; I came down the court, and saw the truss at the distance of three or four yards from the corner of Crown-court, and the prisoner at the corner near the truss; I went to the truss, and asked who it belonged to, if it belonged to him; and the prisoner made answer, yes; I asked him again if it was his property; and he said, yes, it was his property, that there was a gentleman gone for a coach; that was all that passed, except going up to him, and examining him; I looked him in the face.

Q. Look at the prisoner, is that the same man? - A. Yes, it is.

WILLIAM JENNINGS sworn. - I am a calico-glazer: I was coming out of Crown-court, in the Old-change, and saw the prisoner at the bar standing there with a truss; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JOHN READ sworn. - I am porter to Messrs. Scott, Kenworthy, and Scott, in Smithfield: I delivered the truss at Gerrard's-hall, Basing-lane, about six o'clock in the evening; I delivered it at the warehouse, to be forwarded to Bristol.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am a painter: On the 22d of April, about a quarter before nine, I went to Crown-court, and I saw a truss lie three or four yards up the court, and the prisoner at the end of the court; I looked at the truss, and took down the direction of it, and by that I found who it belonged to; I took possession of the truss, and have had it ever since; it weighed one hundred and a quarter.

Watson. This is the truss that I took in on the 22d of April, I know it by the mark S P S, Bristol; it has never been opened.

Q. How do you know the contents of it? - A. By the invoice. (The truss was opened, and found to contain linen cloth.

Q. (To Read.) Did you see this truss packed? - A. I did not; but I can swear to the goods, and I can swear to the marking of it.

Q. Is twenty-seven pounds the value of it? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney contended that the property was proved not to be in an out-house, but a part of the dwelling-house.

Court. I am certainly with you upon that point, for it is only the lower part of the dwelling-house.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Court. (To Dibbin.) Q. How far is Distaff-lane from your house? - A. Between three and four hundred yards; rather less than more.

GUILTY, (Aged 25.)

Of stealing, but not in an out-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-38

377. ANN HAYWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , a silver watch, value 40s. the property of Thomas Hewitt .

THOMAS HEWITT sworn. - On the 13th of April, I had been out with two or three friends, and in coming home, I met with the prisoner in Chandos-street , and I agreed to go home and sleep with her; I pulled off my clothes, and laid my breeches under my head; I went to bed between twelve and one o'clock, I heard my watch tick in my breeches pocket; a short time afterwards the prisoner came to bed, and after having been in bed some time I missed the prisoner out of bed; I directly searched my pockets, and missed my watch, and some small trifle of silver; I directly put on part of my clothes and went down stairs, I met the prisoner returning to her room again; I had been in bed an hour and a half, or two hours, I cannot say whether I had been asleep or not; I passed her and never spoke to her; the reason that I passed her was, I heard some other person lower down upon the stairs, thinking she had given the watch to them, I followed them as quick as possible; I went down into the street, and called the watchman, who searched the house, but could not find the prisoner; I did not see her again till eleven o'clock the next evening, in St. Martin's watch-house, in the hands of the constable.

Q. Was there any body in the bed-room besides the prisoner and you? - A. Nobody; I had given her two shillings.

Q. I suppose you were drunk? - A. I was forward in liquor.

Q. Were you sober enough to be able to swear that you heard your watch tick? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM TUCKER sworn. - I am a watchman; I took the prisoner the next evening after this affair happened, I took her to the watch-house; she denied ever having seen the watch for some time, and then she told a little girl to go up stairs and fetch the watch; the little girl brought the watch down stairs, from another house, in Angel-court; I delivered it to another watchman, and he delivered it to the constable of the night; the prisoner told the girl to go.

ISAAC TENDON sworn. - I was constable of the night, (produces the watch); I received it from the hands of Holt, the watchman.

- HOLT sworn. - I received the watch from the prisoner in Angel-court, in the Strand, and delivered it to the constable of the night.

Hewitt. This is my watch; I know it by the maker's name, and the number; here is the chain that was upon it when I lost it, it has a string to it now; the chain was brought to me with the watch.

Prisoner's defence. When I first met this man he was in company with another woman, and he went home with us both, he was very much intoxicated; he gave me two shillings, but that was not enough to satisfy me; I left him with the other woman in the room, and did not see him any more that night till about two o'clock, I met him on the stairs, and I went out to sleep at a friend's house; I knew the woman that he was with; and when they took me, the constable of the night said I should have my freedom if I would tell where the property was; and I went with them to the house.

Hewitt. I am certain this is the woman that went to bed with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-39

378. JOHN WILSON was indicted for the murder of Louis Bartolomichi .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Matthews, and the case by Mr. Gurney.)

MARIA BARTOLOMICHI sworn. - Examined by Mr. Matthews. I am the widow of the deceased: On Saturday the 15th of March, we lodged at No. 37, Poland-street , in the second-floor, Mills's house; the prisoner came there between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, we were in bed, when a knock came to the bed-room door, my husband asked who was there, and a voice made answer, and said, I came from Mr. Aberer, about some small clothes; Mr. Aberer is a tailor, my husband told him to go into the next room, and he would get up and dress himself; he said, I will get up and see who it is; he got up, and somebody pushed at the door while he was opening of it; when the door was pushed again, he gave it a push against the people on the outside; he said, who was there, what were they doing, I said, what is the matter, come to bed; then he came in, and the man at the bar, a butcher, and Mr. Aberer's foreman came in with them.

Q. Did the butcher come in the first time? - A. The butcher was at the door when I got out of bed; I am not sure that he came in, my husband got out at the foot of the bed, and got into the next room.

Q. Was there any conversation between Wilson and your husband? - A. I heard a voice say, here he is.

Q. Did your husband say any thing to you or Wilson before he went into the room? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Did he say any thing about constables? - A. Yes; when I asked him to come into bed, and asked him what was the matter, he said, oh, Mary, here are constables coming to take me.

Q. Did any thing more pass? - A. I do not know, I am sure, I cannot recollect at present; there was something passed between Wilson and

him, but I cannot recollect what, just as he was getting out at the foot of the bed; he shut this man, the foreman of the tailor, into the front room with him.

Mr. Gurney. The name of the foreman was Ledeka.

Witness. I got out of bed after he went into the front room, and went into the lobby.

Q. How long was it before you were in a situation to go out upon the stairs? - A. I put nothing on but my gown and one petticoat; when I went into the passage, I saw Wilson, and I believe, this butcher, this man in a butcher's dress.

Mr. Gurney. The butcher's name was Lyne.

Q. Where were they standing? - A. Standing at the front room door; I asked one of them what was the matter? he told me, that he had got a warrant, or an order.

Q. Did he state the purpose of his warrant? - A. To arrest Mr. Bartolomichi from the tailor.

Q. Which of them gave that answer to you? - A. Mr. Wilson; I then told my husband to open the door; he told me he would not; he said, they had shewn me no paper, they have not touched me, nor they dare not break the door: Wilson said, he had better open it, he told him to open the door, he did not want to hurt him.

Q. Did he make any proposal to your husband about settling the business about which he came? - A. He told him to open the door and dress himself, and go to Mr. Aberer to settle it, and that he need not go to prison; my husband said, he would not, and told them to go away from the door; he repeated many different things, but I cannot recollect them, about telling Wilson to go away; I told him to go and fetch Mr. Aberer, to settle it; something else passed, but I cannot recollect what, but I told him to go and fetch Mr. Aberer and settle it; then he went down the stairs, and the butcher either went with him or before him; then I knocked at the door, and told him they were gone; I told him to come and get his clothes and dress himself; he opened the door, and I gave him in his clothes.

Q. Was there any body in the room with him? - A. Yes, Ledeka; my husband let him out, and he went away, then he locked the door, and I gave him his clothes; after having dressed himself, he remained in the front room some minutes, this Wilson came up again to the door.

Q. Did your husband not go down stairs at all? - A. Not at that time, it was afterwards.

Q. When Wilson came back, who was with him? - A. At his first coming up to the door, I do not believe there was any one with him; he knocked at the door, and asked it to be opened; when he came up to the door, there were men coming up with him; my husband said, he would not open he door, and if he did not go away, he would make him; Wilson made some answer, but I cannot recollect what it was, so then he frightened Wilson away, or Wilson went away, I do not know.

Court. Q. What did he say or do to frighten Wilson away? - A. He spoke within side of the door, I do not know what he said; then he went down stairs, and my husband opened the door and went down after.

Mr. Matthews. Q. Did you go down stairs with your husband? - A. Yes, I followed him down to the first floor; I then saw Wilson go out at the door, and my husband driving him out with a short sword; Wilson then went away, and returned the same moment; my husband wanted to shut the door, and Wilson and several other men came in, and drove up stairs after my husband; as I was going up stairs, he said to me, oh, Mary, I shall be murdered; my husband went into the second floor front room, and fastened the door; Wilson was coming up after him, with several other men; Wilson and the other men went up to the garret; they broke open the garret door, and when they could not find him there, they returned down to the second-floor, a man looked through the key-hole of the front room door, and said -

Court. Q. Were you in the room? - A. No; I was in the lobby, by the back-room door; a man looked through the key-hole, and said, when he saw the door shut, that there was a key on the inside, and it was locked.

Mr. Matthews. Q. Did they attempt to get in? - A. Yes; a man put a stick against the door, and they broke open the door, the man went into the room.

Q. Did he go in alone? - A. The rest were behind him.

Q. Do you know which man it was? - A. No; he said, here he is, the others followed; my husband made answer, and said, here I am, what do you want with me? they rushed in, and I heard the people say, murder him, murder him, knock him down, shoot him.

Q. Had your husband said nothing to them? - A. He made some answer, but what it was I cannot tell; they all scuffled into the room.

Q. Did he not say any thing like this - though they had broke the door open, they should not take him? - A. Yes; I think he did say so; I stood by the door of the room; I did not see my husband at that minute, I saw him when he was down, before so many of them got in, I saw him stand.

Q. Where was Wilson at that time? - A. Along with them all; they were all together standing in the room.

Q. What was their situation, with respect to your husband - were they near him? - A. Yes, they were over him; they had nothing in their hands but sticks, the men all had sticks.

Q. Had none of them a poker in their hand? - A. That was Wilson that had the poker.

Q. Did the men say any thing at this time? - A. yes, they did; I saw Wilson's arm, I believe it to be Wilson's arm, I cannot swear that it was.

Q. Do you recollect any thing said by any of them, when your husband was on the floor? - A. They said something, but I cannot recollect it; I then saw the poker fall like by the hand that held it up, I saw it go down; then I heard them say, d - n him; drag him up, they then dragged him out of the room.

Q. Are you quite sure, that when you saw the poker go down, your husband was lying upon the floor? - A. Yes; I got out, and I saw them dragging him out; I got out before him at the top of the stairs; my husband asked me for a handkerchief, he was all over blood.

Q. Did you observe where it appeared to come from? - A. Yes, all down his face.

Q. What were the appearance of the men? - A. They appeared to be trades looking men, they were very shabbily dressed.

Q. Did they appear to have any marks about them? - A. Not any marks of cuts, only blood that they had from him.

Q. Did you give your husband the handkerchief? - A. No, they took him away.

Q. Why did you not give him a handkerchief? - A. Because they said, d-n him, and something - and took him away; I cannot recollect what it was; I asked them they did mean to murder my husband, and I lifted up my hands so, (describing it;) and of them gave me a blow, and called me a name.

Q. What was the expression they made use of? - A. I think it was, a b - d whore or a b - d b - h, and said, they would serve me so too, and dragged him down by me as I stood, as I held by the banisters; they wiped their hands against the wall as they went by; they then took him out of the house.

Q. When you saw the poker go down, and your husband lying upon the floor, were you near enough to see whether it hit him? - A. I saw the poker go down, I did not see where it went to.

Q. About what height was your husband? - A. About five foot two, or three, or four inches in heighth; I do not know exactly, he was a little man, all these men were over him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The poker you have mentioned was the poker beionging to that front-room in which your husband lived? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Wilson, at the first time he came, behaved very civily, and told him, he thought he could settle it for him without his going to goal? - A. Yes.

Q. You wished that your husband would have submitted quietly to the arrest, and advised him to do so? - A. Yes.

Q. Before Wilson went away the first time, do you remember your husband calling out to you, Mary, Mary, bring me the dagger? - A. Yes, I think he did.

Q. Then there was no violence attempted to your husband, or any body in the house, till after your husband had driven down the Wilson with a short sword? - A. No.

Q. Did your husband get this dagger himself, or did you fetch it to him? - A. He asked me for it, and I gave it him.

Q. Where did your get it from? - A. From the back room, the bed-room.

Q. Where in the bed-room was it? - A. It used to be by the bed-side, but it was then in a box in the room.

Q. Do you recollect, when they desired admittance at the door, he said, he would not render to twenty men, he would have life for life? - A. No; but I heard him say, he would not submit to twenty soldiers if they came, he was not afraid.

Q. I should suppose, at the time you saw that the part of the scuffle, which you did see, you were exceedingly alarmed and frightened? - A. Certainly I was.

Court. Q. Were any of the people of the house present, upon the stairs, or about at the time? - A. Part of the time, the landlady of the house was there.

Court. Q. That is Mrs. Mills? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. We wish to ask, whether the deceased made any resistance when they entered the room in which he received the hurt? - A. I could not see at that instant, there were a number of men before me.

Court. Q. Had he a dagger then? - A. I believe he had.

Court. Q. Could you see where the dagger was, when he was lying upon the floor? - A. No; but when I went into the room, it was lying by the window.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How far was that window near which you saw the dagger lying, from the place where your husband had been lying upon the floor? - A. He was by the fire-side, as far as from here to there. (About a yard and a half.)

GEORGE KNOWLSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I keep the Crifpin public-house, in Poland-street, next door but one to Mrs. Mills, on the me side of the way; on the 15th of March, I was ting in the tap-room I heard an noise

in the street; I went out past my window to the house where the deceased lodged.

Q. Do you recollect Wilson, the prisoner at the bar? - A. No; I cannot swear to the persons of any of them; five or six persons went into the house, I followed them, and when I came up to the one pair of stairs, the window was standing on the stairs; the man pursued up stairs, and went into the garret; I stood at the foot of the garret stairs, by the door of the two pair, and then came down from the garret, and went towards the first floor; in a moment or two after, they returned again up to the second floor; one of the men which came up stairs first, looked through the key-hole, and said, he saw the key in the door inside, he tried the door and it was fast; he said, if you are in there come out; nobody made any answer, but a man behind him, that followed him up stairs, holloaed out, break the door open; he took a stick, pushed the door, and it flew open the first time; he then took the handle of the lock in his hand, he did not go into the room at first, but looked past the door into the room, as if to see if any body was there, and said, d-n you, I don't mind a pistol.

Q. Had the man any thing in his hand? - A. He had a stick that he broke the door open with, but nothing else; then the other man came up to him, and they all went in together; I heard one of the men say, shoot him.

Q. Did you see any thing to shoot him with? - A. Not any thing.

Q. Did you see any body throughout the whole, that had either a gun or a pistol? - A. Neither; nothing but sticks; somebody called out, knock him down, and other expressions; I believe the word, murder, was made use of, but I cannot say, I heard a great noise in the room after they got in; I thought it was tables and chairs which they were throwing at the deceased.

Q. You did not see? - A. No, I never went into the room; I heard the deceased shriek out, I was then standing at the door; they dragged him out, two men, each had hold of him by the collar; they dragged him out of the room on to the landing-place; the man seemed to hang back, and one of the men said, come along you little b-t; as they were dragging him past me, the deceased, wife was standing by me, two men followed the deceased, one of them, like a butcher, dressed in a frock, with sticks in their hands, said, d-n your eyes, you b-h, we will knock you down too.

Q. To whom was that addressed? - A. To Mrs. Bartolomichi; they then dragged him down stairs; the blood seemed to come very forcibly from his mouth on the stairs; after they had got him out at the door, I saw them take him towards Oxford-road; I saw them turn the corner of Oxford-road, and I saw no more of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You do not know what passed when they were there before? - A. No.

Q. Where you stood, on the landing-place, you could not see into the room? - A. No; I could not see into the room where they were.

Q. Where did Mrs. Bartolomichi stand? - A. Sometimes walking about in the back room, and in and out; she seemed quite distressed, and did not know where she went to, and one time with her hands together.

Q. The person who made use of that offensive expression to Mrs. Bartolomichi was not the prisoner? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How long was it, from the time they broke into the room, till they dragged him out? - A. Not above a minute.

ANN MILLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Matthews. I keep the house in which the deceased lived: On the morning of the 15th of March, I heard a noise; I got out of bed, and wrapped a great coat round me, I slept on the dining-room floor; I came out and inquired what was the matter; they said they were come to arrest Mr. Bartolomichi; I then saw Mr. Wilson come running down stairs frightened, I believe from the second floor; then I went up nearly to the second floor landing-place, and I heard the deceased say that he would not be took, that he would kill or be killed, repeatedly; he said, if twenty soldiers were to come they should not take him; then, by that time, Wilson had gone out to get more assistance; I saw Lyne, the butcher, standing at the bottom of the stairs, he seemed very much afraid; there was a man locked in the front room all the time.

Q. Do you know who that man was? - A. A tailor's foreman; he was, I dare say, half an hour in the room.

Q. He was a person taken there by the prisoner for the purpose of certifying that he was the man? - A. Yes; Mrs. Bartolomichi went to see if there were any more men in the house; she came back, and said there were no more officers; then Bartolomichi opened the door and came down stairs, with a dagger in his hand.

Q. What sort of a dagger was it? - A. About half a yard long, what I saw out of Bartolomichi's hand; then he drove the young man, the butcher, out at the door, with the dagger, pointing it at the street-door; by that time Mr. Wilson was coming back with more assistance; then they went up stairs, Mr. Bartolomichi, and the people after him; I went into my own apartment, and saw no more of it till they brought Mr. Bartolomichi down stairs again; they led him along the passage out at the street-door, and up the street towards Oxford-street; and then I saw no more of them.

Court. Q. The poker was not a poker that any

of the persons brought with them? - A. No; it belonged to the room.

Q. And therefore it might have been taken up suddenly by some person, without intention of doing any mischief with it? - A. Yes, (the poker produced); I believe this is the poker.

Q. Was the dagger as long, or longer, than this poker? - A. Not so long.

Q. Have you the dagger to produce?

Mr. Gurney. No, my Lord; unfortunately Mr. Degville, after the Coroner's Inquest, conceiving there was an end of the inquiry, broke it to pieces.

Court. That was extremely wrong.

Mr. Gurney. He is a foreigner, my Lord.

Jury. Q. Could the deceased have run the butcher through if he had been so inclined? - A. The butcher ran so fast, that I do not think he could.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The butcher was making his way out of the house? - A. Yes.

Q. He was drove out by the deceased with a dagger? - A. Yes.

Q. At that time, was not the deceased pointing his dagger at the butcher? - A. Towards his shoulder as he went down the steps.

Q. In order to force him out of that house? - A. Yes.

Q. You say the foreman was in the room with the deceased? - A. Yes.

Q. After he came out of the room what became of him? - A. He went down the kitchen stairs, I did not see him again.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I keep the White-lion public-house in Oxford-street: On Saturday the 15th of March last. I saw the prisoner come out of Poland-street with other persons; I have known him many years, he is a Sheriff's-officer; there were five or six men leading along a man bleeding very much at the mouth; Wilson left the man to call a coach, there were two coaches on the stand; he called a coachman, but the coachman seeing the bloody man would not turn out of the stand; Wilson went and got into the coach first, the man that was bleeding was laid along the pavement opposite the coach, and Wilson called out to the man, bring the bloody b-r along; the bleeding man was then led up to the step of the coach; he there seemed unable, or unwilling, I cannot say which, to go up into the coach; Wilson said, you bloody b-r, do you want to begin again; do you want any more of your teeth jammed out; the bleeding man cried out, O Lord! O Lord! my arm, you have broke my arm, or you have hurt my arm, I did not hear which he said distinctly; Wilson replied, you bloody thief, I never touched your arm; the man cried, O Lord! and then they shoved him into the coach, the coachman wiped some blood from his mouth first; Wilson said, thank God, I saved you from killing that man; but who it was I did not know; I did not hear the deceased say any thing to that.

WILLIAM HEARNE sworn. - I am pot-boy at the King's-arms, in Poland-street: On the 15th of March, I saw the prisoner, that is the man, with two or three more with him; I saw the deceased run Mr. Lyne up to the door with something in his hand, but what it was I do not know; he turned him out, and then the deceased turned quickly in at the door, and four or five men after him, they had very large sticks in their hands; then I hastened up to the door, and stood opposite the door, on the other side of the way; I saw them bring the deceased out, pulling him by the arms, and the collar; then they led the deceased into Oxford-road, and going along Oxford-road, between Poland street and Berwick-street, he was walking with one man on one arm, and one man on the other; Lyne was walking about two yards behind him; Wilson was one that was leading him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you recollect seeing them put the deceased into the coach? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say it is very well I knocked you down, or you would have killed that man? - A. Wilson said it is very well I knocked you down with the poker, or else you would have killed that man, pointing to Lyne.

Q. Did the deceased say any thing in contradiction to that? - A. He did not; he was crying with the pain in his arm, I believe.

JOHN HUFFNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a Hackney-coachman.

Q. Were you on the stand on the 15th of March last, in Oxford-street? - A. I was.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; he was the man that called me, there were three more with him; I observed a man between two more, bleeding about the mouth, he was put into the coach; first of all two men got in, and then the man that was bleeding; I asked the prisoner at the bar what had been the matter; the prisoner told me that the man that was bleeding drew a dagger out of a stick, and he was very near being run through; and he in his own defence, he said, took up a poker, and rammed down his throat.

Q. Where did you drive them to? - A. Five of them got in, and told me to drive to the Old-Bailey as quick as I could; I stopped at the debtor's-door, at Newgate, and got out there.

Q. In what state did the bleeding man appear then? - A. He appeared very saint; he was taken into Newgate, and I did not see any more of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. When he said this to the deceased, did he contradict him? - A. No.

Court. Unfortunately the deceased knew too much of the law, and too little; he knew that a door could

not be broke open for the purpose of arrest; in that he was correct; but he did not know, which is also law, that if an officer got peaceably into the house, he might break open the inner door; he may break open any inner door having once got within the outer door.

JAMES-HARVEY DEGVILLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am band-master at the Opera-house; the deceased was a dancer at the Opera-house: I visited him at St. Bartholomew's Hospital after he had received the wound, in the evening of the same day.

Q. What did he say to you, as to his apprehensions of his own life? - A. He said that he had been murdered.

Q. Did he use any other expressions, respecting whether he expected to live or not? - A. He said he was a dead man; he said, he was certain that he would die; that he repeatedly said.

Q. After he had said that to you, did you enquire of him in what manner the wound happened? - A. I did: he told me that some men came into his apartments in the morning, that they knocked at the door, and he asked them who they were; they told him to open the door, and he would not; they then forced the door open, and he ran into the other room; that they afterwards came, many of them -

Q. Did he state to you what he did when he came into the other room - did he say any thing respecting a sword? - A. Yes; but that was not till the other people came; he said other people came, and forced into the room, and he then took his sword, and presented it to them to frighten them; they immediately threw chairs and tables at him; in that scuffle one came behind him and pulled him down, while another struck him in the mouth with a poker, and knocked it down his throat, and when he was down, he pulled the poker out with both his hands; that then they dragged him away; he said they had never touched him; I put the question to him, and asked him whether they had presented him a warrant, and he said, no; that is all I know of it.

Q. Did you see him at any other time than the 15th, at which time you first saw him, and the day of his death? - A. I saw him three times: I saw him on the Saturday, on the Tuesday, and on the Friday.

Q. Did he, at each of those times, state that he was in apprehension of approaching death? - A. He did.

Q. Did he relate the circumstances of the case more than once? - A. He did, three times.

Q. Were all those accounts, of the circumstances of the case, consistent with what you have now related? - A. They were.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Did he, in the course of what he told you, mention any thing of the preceding circumstances, of having pursued the man down stairs with a dagger? - A. He did not; he only told me he had taken his sword to frighten them away, but that it never touched any one.

Q. And that he took up this sword upon their coming into the room? - A. He did.

Q. He did not mention to you that he had used such an expression as this: I will either kill or be killed, I will not be taken? - A. He did not.

Q. In the course of your conversation, you asked whether they had shewn him a warrant? - A. I did.

Q. Your impression consequently was, that if they had not so done, they were acting illegally? - A. When he told me they had not touched him, I knew he was wrong.

Q. Your idea was, that the touching was not necessary, but that it was necessary that they should shew a warrant? - A. I imagined so.

Q. His idea was carried to a greater length, he thought it necessary that he must be touched by the officer? - A. Yes.

Q. And upon that opinion, you collected from him that he justified the resistance that he made? - A. I should judge so.

Q. Had you any opportunity of seeing the instrument with which he attempted to frighten them? - A. I saw it the first time at the Coroner's Inquest; and I saw it at Mr. Peters's the next morning.

Q. Mr. Peters belongs to the Hospital? - A. He is the undertaker.

Q. What became of the instrument? - A. I went to Mr. Peters the next morning to speak to him, and to consult how he was to be buried; and in the course of conversation, Mr. Peters took the broken sword, for it was a broken sword, and presented it to me; I looked at it, and said, d-n it, says I, it shall not cause the death of any other man, and broke it into small pieces, and left it in Mrs. Peters's house.

Q. Of what description was it? - A. It was a broken sword, to which a handle had been affixed.

Q. And, therefore, much longer than daggers usually are? - A. Very much.

Q. Nearly the length of that poker? - A. I think it was.

Prisoner. It was twenty-one inches and a half, I have witnesses to prove it.

Mr. Gurney. Q. That was the day after the Coroner's Inquest? - A. Yes; and I imagined all the business was at an end.

Q. I need scarce ask, I suppose, whether you meant to suppress any evidence? - A. Certainly not.

Court. Q. Were you not the prosecutor? - A. I went with the window to Sir William Addington .

Court. You must have supposed that it was necessary to be taken care of, it could have done no harm in the hands of proper people.

Mr. Const. Q. Do not you know that the war

rants were issued before the dagger was broke? - A. I do not; I thought, after the verdict of the Coroner, that the business was at an end; it was certainly an instrument that would have killed any man had it been used.

MOSES RICARDO sworn. - Examined by Mr. Matthews. I am a pupil of St. Bartholomew's Hospital: I attended on Saturday, the 15th of March, at the usual time, between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. Can you say whether he died of that wound? - A. He most assuredly died in consequence of a wound that he had received under his tongue.

Q. Did it cause a fever, or gangrene, or what? - A. A mortification, and divided a material artery, which produced an hemorrhage, and mortification took place.

Q. What was the appearance of the wound? - A. After his death, we found the wound extend five inches on the right side, under his tongue.

Q. What was the appearance of his lip? - A. He had a wound in the upper lip which penetrated entirely through; the red part of his lip was not injured, but above that there was a hole which penetrated quite through, and two or three of his teeth were knocked out.

Q. Are you able to state whether a poker could have proceeded to cause that wound, from the aperture in the upper lip? - A. It is impossible for me to speak with certainly upon that, as it has been doubtful, but I should think it could not; if it had been done by one blow, I should have conceived that the red part must have been injured; I believe it to have been a distinct blow, but I cannot say with any certainty; the blow under the tongue was certainly the cause of his death.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. That is an opinion upon which others have differed? - A. There were very few of us that did examine him; none of them examined him so minutely as I did; some have differed.

Court. Q. Now I will put it to you, Mr. Gurney, whether there is any evidence which brings the blow home to the prisoner, expect the confession?

Mr. Gurney. There is not any, except the declaration of the deceased.

Court. But that declaration does not at all prove who the person was that struck him; there is no evidence of that except the prisoner's own confession, which confession is accompanied by a declaration that he did it by way of self-defence; that confession is his defence, as well as his accusation. Gentlemen, I will now ask you, after what you have heard, whether you think it necessary to proceed any farther.

The Jury declared themselves not satisfied, and expressed a wish to hear the evidence on the part of the Prisoner.

Mr. Gurney. My Lord, as your Lordship has called upon me, I think I am bound, in justice to the prisoner, to say, that if my learned Friends prove he acted under a warrant, it will then become a case of justisiable homicide.

Mr. Justice Grose. Certainly the warrant should be proved.

Mr. Knowlys. I will prove that directly.

Mr. Gurney. The attorney for the prosecution informs me that he has seen the warrant; I will not, therefore, insist upon the proof of the warrant, but will admit it.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I had like to have been murdered twice by the deceased, once with a poker in his right hand and a knife in his left at the same time; that was the time that I made my escape out of the room, and the deceased at that time locked the door, and kept in the foreman belonging to the plaintiff; then I went to fetch Lyne to my assistance; he went with me; I knocked at the fore room door, and asked if Ledeka was there, but I received no answer; Ledeka will tell you that the deceased held a knife to his breast, and would not let him answer me; then I begged of him to come out quietly; I begged of Mrs. Bartolomichi to prevail on him to come out; I told her I would go down with her to Mr. Degville, and take their joint note for the debt, or I would go with them to the plaintiff; he would not comply with either; I then told him if he would come out and behave like a civil man, I would take his own note for six weeks at my own risk; he then told me he would either murder me or I should murder him, for he would not go to prison; I then told him I could not leave him, I must break the door open; but I thought proper to fetch more assistance, I found him so very violent; I then returned in about five minutes with three others; just as we got within about twenty or thirty yards of the deceased's lodgings, I saw the deceased drive out Lyne with a dagger in his right hand; he put his left hand on to the door-post, and extended his right arm, and made a blow which we were very much afraid was in his shoulder; we then all followed him up stairs, but he was so very quick that we lost fight of him; we searched the back-garret, and he was not there; we then returned to the fore-room of the two pair of stairs, one of the persons with me saw the key on the inside of the door, I concluded that the deceased was in that room, and then put a stick just by the lock and shoved it open; it came open very easy, there was no damage done to the lock; I entered the room first, and Crane immediately after me; the deceased then ran to me with the dagger in his right hand, I made my escape out of the room, and cried murder; he then immediately attacked M. Crane, and made a blow at his breast with a dagger, which he avoided; he was making another blow at him in

the breast apparently, I then said hold of the poker, which laid upon the drawers, the same poker which the deceased bad drove me out with, and in that instant I threw it at him, just as the dagger was coming towards Crane's breast; the poker entered just under the nose; at that instant he let the dagger fall which he had in his hand; he pulled out the poker with both his hands, and made a blow at Crane with it, he then immediately ran towards the window, which was open, and certainly would have jumped out if Crane had not caught hold of him and pulled him back; Crane and one or two more laid hold of him, and brought him down stairs instantly, he never fell down at all; and the witnesses will tell you there were no chairs or tables at all moved.

For the Prisoner.

CHARLES LEDEKA sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am foreman to Mr. Aberer, the tailor: My master called me down from the shop to go with the prisoner to arrest Mr. Bartolomichi for debt; my master ordered me to go with him, and I went with him; my master told me that he was a sheriff's officer; I went with him to where Mr. Bartolomichi lodged; the street-door was open; there was a young woman there, and I asked her is Mr. Bartolomichi at home; she said he was; we went up stairs and knocked at the door; he answered, who is there; I told him I came from Mr. Aberer; then he gave me an answer to go to the other room, it was the front room; I went to the front room, I stood just at the door, and the officer, Wilson, stood a little behind me; at the same time Wilson took out his pocket-book and pulled a paper out of the pocket-book; then Mr. Bartolomichi opened the back-door and came out; there is no door from the front-room to the backroom, but they must come out on to the stair-case to go from one room to the other; he came half out upon the stair-case, I told Mr. Wilson, that is your man; Mr. Wilson put his hand upon his shoulder, and said, you are my prisoner; then he returned to his bed-room and he wanted to shut the door, and I put my foot between the door so that he could not shut it; then Wilson went into the bed-room; it was dark; Wilson said, open the shutters; Mr. Bartolomichi jumped into bed again directly, and when Wilson said open the shutters, he jumped out of the bed again and went into the front room; me and Wilson then were after him; he wanted to shut the front-room door, we were so close to him that he could not do it; then he ran up to where stood a table just by the window, and there he took a knife in his hand; he ran to the fire-place and took a poker, and began to swear in a dreadful manner, if he did not leave the room he would murder him; and ran up to Wilson; I said held of him, and said, what are you about; then when I looked round, Wilson was gone out of the room; I let him loose again, and he ran up to the door and locked it, I was locked in; he took the key in his mouth, he had a knife and the poker in his hands; I asked him to let me out, then he took the key out of his mouth, and came up to me with the poker and the knife in his hand, and told me if I was not quiet he would murder me; then I was quiet; then he called out Mary, to his wife, give me my clothes, and give me the dagger; then she came and knocked at the door, and said, there is your clothes; at the same time, when he opened the door to receive the clothes, he put the poker upon a pair of drawers which stands close to the door; he took the clothes and the dagger; he put the dagger upon the table and began to dress himself; when he was dressed, he told me he should jump through the window; I told him he should do no such thing, he would break a leg or an arm; there were curtains in the room and he tied the strings together to let himself down; I told him if he did such things I should make a noise; then there came a knock at the door of the room where we were; that was Wilson; Wilson asked if that man was in there, he meant me.

Prisoner: I did not know his name.

Ledeka. Then Mr. Bartolomichi came up to me and told me if I was not quiet he would murder me, and so I was quiet; then Mr. Bartolomichi and Wilson had some talk together before the door was open, but I cannot recollect what; Wilson told him to give him a note, or something.

Foreman of the jury. It is the with of the Jury not to give the Court any further trouble; they are satisfied.

NOT GUILTY .

The Jury having intimated to the Court that their minds had been biassed and prejudiced against the prisoner, by the reports of the different examinations which had appeared in the public prints, the Court marked, in strong terms, their disapprobation of such reports, and expressed a wish that the printers of such papers should be prosecuted.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-40

379. CHARLES BAXTER was indicted for the wilful murder of William Jackson .

- BAINBRIDGE sworn. - I am beadle of the parish of St. Paul, Covent-garden: I attended the Coroner, and was bound over by the Corner to bring the witness here; I do not know any thing of the fact.

DAVID MACDONALD sworn. - I am a corporal in the third regiment of foot-guards; the prisoner is

a private in the same regiment ; On the 1st of April last, the prisoner and two other men had orders to come to the Savoy prison with arms and accountrements for all of us; I had the command of the party; when we got there we were supplied with six rounds a-piece of powder and ball; we had the charge of two prisoners from the serjeant; we primed and loaded our firelocks before them; we had orders, if they were to resist or run away, or if they got out of our reach, to fire upon them immediately; we were to take them to Chester, or else to give them up to the first troop or company that we should meet with on the road that was not under marching orders.

Q. What were these persons in prison for? - A. For desertion; I delivered them at Coventry to a party of the 13th light dragoons, and received back two prisoners from them to convey to the Savoy; they were deserters.

Q. Having received these two deserters, what did you do? - A. I received the same orders from the adjutant of the 13th light dragoons, to prime and load before them, which we did; the deceased, William Jackson , was one of the deserters.

Q. Did your party come up armed in the same manner all the way? - A. Yes; we got to London on Monday, the 5th of May; we were going down James-street towards the Savoy, when we got facing Hart-street, the deceased slipped his hand from the handcuffs, each of them had a hand in the handcuff.

Q. Was the handcuff too large? - A. Yes; he slipped his hand out, and ran away out of my reach.

Q. What time might this be? - A. About a quarter before seven in the morning; Thomas Cox and John Broadbent marched in front of the deserters; I was in the rear, and so was the prisoner, in file with me; the deceased ran to the right, up Hart-street; I ran after him; by that time Baxter was behind me; I went several yards, I cannot say how many, I was in a slurry at the time, and cannot say how many yards, it might be eight or nine.

Q. How many yards might he be before you? - A. He might be between twenty and thirty yards, he gained ground considerably upon me, for I was loaded at the same time; Baxter was behind me, and I did not know what he was about till I saw the man drop in front of me, before I heard the report of the piece; I turned round to see where the report came from, and likewise to see if the other prisoner was safe.

Q. At what distance was Baxter at that time? - A. A considerable distance; he was with the party at the time; I went up to the deceased and found him quite dead.

Q. What accoutrements had you? - A. We were loaded with our belts and guns, and our knapsacks with necessaries.

Q. Do you think you could have secured him by pursuit? - A. Certainly we could not, we were so fatigued, for we had been up three nights watching over them, because we could not get a prison to put them in, and we were afraid of being punished if we lost them.

Q. Were there any passages that he could have gone up and escaped? - A. Yes, I believe there was one very near where he dropped, I am not sure, I am not much acquainted with that part; at Dunstable they tried to break out of the cage from us, and we were obliged to alarm the town.

Q. You had no particular knowledge of the deceased? - A. I never saw him before in my life that I know of.

Jury. Q. What would have been the punishment upon you if you had let him escape? - A. It depends upon what the gentlemen of the Court-martial please.

Mr. Knapp. I think, by the articles of war, it is death, or such other punishment as the Court-martial may think fit.

Witness. I told them, the men, to prime and load every morning, and the deserters told me they knew that part of the duty very well, for they had been upon such duty themselves.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. He knew, therefore, the consequence of his attempting to run away? - A. Certainly; I received a paper with them, which we call a rout, and delivered it to the provost.

SAMUEL CANE sworn. - I live in James-street, Covent-garden; I am a painter and glazier: On the 5th of May I was near the corner of Hart-street; I saw some soldiers coming down James-street; with deserters, and one of the deserters ran down Hart-street; I then saw one of the soldiers run after him; I heard the piece go off, and saw some soldiers hold of another man by the collar; I went up and observed a man lying dead on the ground, he appeared to me to be dead at least; I turned round, and saw all the soldiers rather in a consternation; I staid about there, walking backwards and forwards, for the course of seven or eight minutes, till the guard came and took the body; I heard a soldier turn round and say he had shot him, but I should not know him again.

Q. At what distance from the corner of Hart-street was it? - A. It might be twenty or twenty-two yards.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing more to say in my defence man my corporal has said.

Capt. THOMAS BASS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I bear the commission of Provost-marshal

to the brigade of Guards; I received from Macdonald a certificate of two deserters to be received.(Produces it, it is read.)

Q. Suppose they had suffered a deserter to escape, what punishment would have been inflicted on them? - A. According to the diseretion of a Courtmartial.

Q. Can they go so far, by the articles of war, as to punish with death? - A. I believe they can.

Q. What punishment do you recollect to have been inflicted for such an offence? - A. I have known four or five hundred lashes.

Court. Q. You have been used to receive these certificates? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it quite regular? - A. Not quite; there is a not a bene in that rout which is not in routs in general; the difference is, that these two men had been tried by a Court-martial, and found guilty, and were to be sent to Chatham to serve abroad.

The prisoner called his serjeant-major, and three other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character for humanity and good nature.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-41

380. GEORGE BIGNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a morocco pocket book, value 2s. the property of John Dick .

Captain Dick being gone abroad, and there being no evidence to prove the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t18000528-42

381. THOMAS RAYNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , a copper, value 25s. the property of Joseph Frowd .

JOSEPH FROWD sworn. - I live in Tottenham-court-road : I was called down stairs, and asked if I had sold a copper; I had seen the copper at the door not half an hour before: I directly ran down Tottenham court-road, and at the end of Great Russel-street I saw the prisoner with the copper, coming out of Bedford-square into Great Russel-street; it was the same copper that I had lost.

Mr. DANCE sworn. - I am an attorney: On the 8th of April I was spending my evening opposite Mr. Frowd's; I had observed the copper at the door some few minutes before; I had asked Frowd the price of it some time before that; I saw the prisoner with the copper, carrying it before him covered with his apron; and from his manner of carrying it, I suspected he had stole it; I looked at Mr. Frowd's and saw that the copper was gone; I went over to Mr. Frowd's, and informed his wife of it; I went after the prisoner, and stopped him going into Russel-street; I asked him where he had that copper from, he said from his master, a Mr. Wilson, I think he said; I said, you have stole that copper; he put down the copper, and at that instant Frowd came up, and the prisoner ran away; I pursued him, and he was brought back.

Prisoner's defence. A copper of mine had fell out of a cart, and I took it by mistake; there were two coppers standing, and I took the wrong one.

GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-43

382. MARY M'GREGOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , two sheets, value 6s. the property of Rose Reilly , Mary-Ann Reilly , Eleanor Reilly , and Lucy Reilly .

MARY-ANN REILLY sworn. - I live in town, and my sister live at Kentish-town ; the sheets are our joint property; their names are Rose, Eleanor, and Lucy; the house is let out in lodgings; the prisoner was our servant ; I challenged her with having taken the sheets on the Thursday night, she was very much in liquor, and she denied it; but in the morning, when she was sober, she told me she had pawned a sheet at Mr. Davis's, in Monmouth-street; I went there, and instead of finding one, I found two.

JOHN TYRRELL sworn. - On the 14th of April the prisoner brought a sheet and pledged for half a crown; and in the afternoon of the same day another sheet for half a crown. (Produces them.)

Miss Reilly. These are our sheets. I have known the prisoner for years; I never heard any thing against her before.

Prisoner's defence. I meant to take them out again.

GUILTY (Aged 19.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-44

383. RICHARD ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , a cheese, value 10s. the property of William Hixon .

WILLIAM HIXON sworn. - The prisoner was brought into my shop: I was informed by the persons that brought him back that he had stolen a Stilton cheese from me; he said he had not stole it, but afterwards acknowledged that he had.

Q. Did you make him any promise? - A. No; it was voluntary.

CHARLES YOUNG sworn. - I am servant to Mr.

Hixon: On the 10th of May two gentlemen brought a Stilton cheese and the prisoner into the shop; this is the cheese; (producing it;) I know it to be my master's property.

- RUSSELL sworn. - I am a constable: On the 10th of May, about seven in the evening, I was going through the Strand , and saw the prisoner standing at Mr. Hixon's door; after I had passed him, I turned round, and saw him take the cheese from Mr. Hixon's door; he came towards me with it, and I stopped him, and took him back to Mr. Hixon's shop, and there he denied it for some time; at last he confessed it.

Prisoner. I am not the man: I was committed by a prosecutor from Westminster.

Q. (To Russell.) Is he the man? - A. He was not in soldier's clothes at that time, and I really cannot say; he was dressed in very shabby clothes.

Hixon. He is very much like the man in the face; but he is so altered, from being very dirty at the time he was taken, that I cannot ascertain; he is very much like the man, but the man that I took was very much knock-knee'd.

Mr. Kirby. This man is very straight.

Hixon. Then he is not the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-45

384. WILLIAM AUSTIN and ANN CURRAN were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , a pound and three ounces of brass, value 1s. 2d. the property of Henry Mist and Richard L'Oste , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the principal, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-46

385. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , thirty yards of lace, value 8l. the property of John Kay , John Wade , and Edward Prodgers .

BENJAMIN PRATT sworn. - I am a porter to Messrs. John Kay, John Wade, and Edward Prodgers, linen drapers , in Hanway-street: Mr. Prodgers was one of the partners at the time: On Monday, the 5th of May, I was passing from Hanway-street, Oxford-street, in my way to the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill ; as I came to Snow-hill, I had a trunk on my head, a parcel under my left arm, and a card of lace in my left-hand pocket; just before I came to the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill, I felt a jerk at my left-hand pocket, and I found a lightness by which I conceived I had lost my property; I turned myself round, and immediately saw a man with a card of lace on the off side of me in his hand; I immediately holloaed out, stop that man, he has got property of mine; I holloaed out several times before any body would assist; after that a gentleman pursued him and took him, by the corner of the Saracen's Head gate; the gentleman's name is Robert Wright ; when he had got hold of him I saw him throw the card of lace away under a stage-coach; he was secured, and taken to the Compter; Robert Wright picked up the lace, and took it to the Compter with the prisoner; the lace was delivered to the constable.

ROBERT WRIGHT sworn. - I am a tailor: On the 5th of May, between three and four in the afternoon, I was going up Snow-hill, I passed a young man with a load; after I had passed him a few yards, I heard him cry out, stop that man; I went on about three yards further, he still continued crying out, stop that man; I saw the prisoner at the bar before me, he had passed me, and as he got to the corner of the gateway of the Saracen's Head, I observed him go up the gateway, and attempt to go round a coach that stood there; I went off the kirb-stone, and went round, and met the prisoner at the other side of the gateway; I laid hold of him by the shoulder; he had a small parcel in his hand, which he threw under the coach; I picked up the parcel and took the prisoner to the Compter; I delivered the parcel to the keeper of the Compter till he sent a constable to take charge of him.

WILLIAM THRALE sworn. - I am an officer of the parish of St. Sepulchre's: I had charge of the prisoner and the lace; (producing it;) I received it on the 6th of this month, from a person that keeps the Compter; he is not here.

Wright. When I picked up the parcel I opened it, and saw that it was black lace; but the pattern I did not examine.

Pratt. I am positive this is the lace I had in my pocket when I left my master's house; I am positive the prisoner is the same man; I looked at him very particularly; and I observed particularly the mark F L upon the lace before I took it from home; there are thirty yards of it.

JOHN WADE sworn.-This property has our mark upon it; I have no doubt it is the property of the firm; it is a pattern that I have seen particularly in our house.

Pratt. I was ordered to take the lace out by one of the work-women, she did not deliver it to me, she told me where it was, and I took it off the counter.

Mr. Wade. I have examined, and missed such a piece of lace.

Prisoner's defence. They stopped me and challenged

me with the card of lace; they searched me and found nothing upon me, and they were going to let me go; and then they picked up a card of lace under the coach, and said I had picked that young man's pocket of the lace, and then they took me to the Compter.

GUILTY (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-47

386. MATTHEW HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , a bag, value 2d. and an hundred and twelve pounds weight of nails, value 1l. 8s. the property of William Hawkes , George Hawkes , William Hawkes , the younger , David Gordon , Adam Gordon , John Biddulph , William Stanley , and William Trail .

(The case was opened by Mr. Beville.)

JAMES CROCKFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I am porter to Messrs. Hawkes: On Saturday last, about half past two o'clock, I saw two soldier s come down the wharf; presently after, I saw one of them, which was the prisoner, return with a bag of nails upon his shoulder; I immediately pursued him, and caught him at Puddle-dock, in Thames-street; I asked him where he was going with that bag of nails; he said he did not know; I then took him back to Mr. Hawkes's wharf, Mr. Hawkes was present.

RICHARD EDWARDS sworn. - I am a constable.(Produces the bag of nails).

Crockford. This is the bag of nails that I took from the prisoner.

GEORGE HAWKES sworn. - (After having proved the firm of the house, as stated in the indictment, proceeds as follows): We are iron manufacturer s: On Saturday last, about half past two o'clock in the afternoon, I was sent for into the yard; I found the prisoner surrounded by two or three men, with the bag of nails by his side; he acknowledged his guilt.

Q. Did you, or any body in your hearing, recommend it to him to confess? - A. Nothing of the kind passed in my hearing; he said, it was his first offence, that he was induced to do it by the persuasions of a man that had taken away a bag before; I asked him where he was going to take it; he said for sale; he would let me know every particular if I would but promise to forgive him; I told him I would promise him nothing but prosecution; I made no other promise; there was a bag of nails missing that day, to my own knowledge.

Prisoner's defence. On Saturday last, a man asked me if I wanted a job; I said, yes; and he took me down this yard, shewed me the job, and told me to carry it over Blackfriars-bridge; upon that, he took the bag of nails and put them upon my back; I had not gone but a very few paces before I was taken into custody; I have served his Majesty five years in the Guards, and was never taken into custody before; I hope your Lordship, and the Gentlemen of the Jury, will shew me lenity now.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Fined 1s. and delivered to his serjeant .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-48

387. JOHN EAGER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of a certain person to the Jurors unknown .

(The case was opened by Mr. Watson.)

- WHITE sworn. - I am a patrol of the parish of St. Sepulchre: On Saturday, the 3d of this month, at eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in a croud in Fleet-market , he followed a gentleman and took a handkerchief out of his pocket; I immediately seized him, took him out of the croud, and took the handkerchief out of his right-hand,(produces it); the gentleman had walked on; I left the prisoner in care of my partner while I went after the gentleman, but could not find him; we brought the prisoner to the watch-house; upon searching him, I found two more handkerchiefs; this is the handkerchief that I saw him take from the gentleman.

Prisoner's defence. I had no handkerchief in my hand; what he has sworn is as false as it is true that there is a God in heaven; one handkerchief was full of holes, and the other I had a clean shirt wrapped up in it.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-49

388. RICHARD BAILEY , WILLIAM JOHNSON, alias YARMOUTH , and CHRISTIAN STIRNBACK , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Emanuel Hutchings , about the hour of ten, in the night of the 1st of March , and burglariously stealing nine gold twist rings, value 9s. the property of the said Emanuel .

EMANUEL HUTCHINGS sworn. - I keep a house, No. 52, in the Minories : My house was broke open on Saturday the 1st of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening; in consequence of information from a neighbour, I looked in the window, and missed a card of nine rings; there was part of a square of glass cut out sufficient to admit a hand in.

JAMES CHESTERMAN sworn. - On the 1st of March, I was coming down the Minories, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening; I saw the three

prisoner standing round the prosecutor's window, and by knowing them I joined their company; soon after, Stirnback took a knife out of his pocket, and cut a piece of glass out; I was to have a part, but not an equal part, with the rest; then Johnson put his hand in and took out a card of rings, Johnson gave it to a man they call Dick the barber, (Bailey); then Stirnback put in his hand, and took out some penknives; then we all went to Mrs. Levy's, in Rosemary-lane, but I did not go in; after they came out, I asked then for my share, and Stirnback gave me a shilling.

Q. What part did you take for that money? - A. The look out; then we parted, and I saw no more of them.

Q. Was it quite dark? - A. Yes; and the candles a-light in the shop.

SOPHIA LEVY sworn. - I live in Rosemary-lane: The three prisoners came to me on Saturday the 1st of March, between nine and ten o'clock at night; they all three came in with a dozen of penknives, and an open one; the prisoner, Bailey, brought them; they asked twelve shillings, I gave them five shillings and sixpence for them; they went away, and in a few minutes after they all returned, with a card with nine rings, but one of the prisoners kept one I bought eight of them, Dick the barber brought them in, I gave him four shillings for them; they were gold twisters.

Q. Are you sure the prisoners are the same three? - A. I am.

Q. Did you ask them how they came by them? - A. No.

Q. Is this the full value of them? - A. I cannot tell; they were very common ones.

JOHN COOKE sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Public-office, Shadwell: I, with Haines, Brown, and Holebrook, apprehended the prisoners; Johnson was apprehended on the 8th of May, Stirnback was apprehended on the 14th of May, and the other on the 18th; I produce two gold twisted rings which I received from Mrs. Levy, on the 22d of this month, before the Magistrate.

Prosecutor. I cannot say that these are mine; they are like what I lost.

Q. In the trade, are they sold as gold twist rings? - A. They are.

Stirnback's defence. I know nothing at all about it; I am very innocent.

Johnson's defence. I know nothing of it.

Boiley's defence. I was never near the person's window.

Q. (To Hutchings.) Was four shillings a fair price for eight rings? - A. No; they are worth eight shillings at least, at the first hand.

Q. Did you miss any penknives near that square of glass? - A. No.

Chesterman. He put his arm in at the window, and reached all round to the left-hand, and took them out.

All Three NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-50

389. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , eight linen sheets, value 3l. the property of Thomas Harris ; and a great coat, value 1l. the property of John Tubb , in the dwelling-house of the said Thomas Harris .

THOMAS HARRIS sworn. - I keep the Castle-and-Falcon Inn, Aldersgate-street : I know nothing of the circumstances; the prisoner is a stranger to me.

ISAAC WARREN sworn. - I was watchman in the Castle-and-Falcon Inn Yard: On the 3d of April last, I saw a woman come down the yard, about nine o'clock in the evening, but it was so dark I could not see who it was; she had a large bundle in her lap; she went out into the street, she walked too sharp for me; I asked her what she had got there, and she set off running directly; I called out stop thief, and she dropped the things; another young man followed her, and brought her back, I stopped along with the things, I do not know whether it was the same woman that I had seen with the bundle.

RICHARD CARPENTER sworn. - I am a butcher; I was standing in my master's shop, opposite the end of Little-Britain, where the prisoner run up with the things; I heard the cry of stop thief, I did not see her come out of the Falcon-yard; I pursued her, when I had got some little way up Little-Britain, a person laid hold of the prisoner, then I laid hold of her; I saw the goods lying upon the pavement, near the church wall, she said, distress had drove her to do it.

Q. Did you tell her it would he better for her to give an account? - A. No; we brought her to the place where the things were, and she went upon her knees, and begged us to let her go; then the watchman came up, and said, the things came out of their yard; a constable came, and they took the prisoner with the goods into the yard, and there I lest them.

THOMAS ALLEN sworn. - I am ostler at the Castle and Falcon-inn: On the 3d of April, about eight o'clock at night, I came down to the gates, the gates were then shut; there was a lady stood at the gates, from whom I learned that the yard had been robbed; I went to see after the property; I came into Little-Britain, by the church, and saw the linen lie upon the stones, near the pavement; this woman was in the custody of two men, she

appeared very much agitated, and said, necessity had drove her to do it.

Q. Had she had any promise made her? - A. Not in my hearing; she said, she had a very bad husband, and three small children, and she would go upon her knees and beg pardon, if we would release her to go home to her dear children; I took up all the linen, and my master's cousin, who was by, sent for a constable; I brought the linen back into the yard, the prisoner was brought; the constable took the property, and tied it up; there were four pair of sheets, a great-coat, and a neckcloth.

CALEB HARDING sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the property;) I saw one of the sheets under her arm, it hung either by a pin, or by the bone of her stays, or something, I did not see the bundle in her lap, the rest of the things were lying upon the pavement; I have had them ever since.

JOHN TUBB sworn. - I am an ostler ; I lost a great-coat from my room, in the inn-yard, up three pair of stairs, at the further end of the yard.

Q. Over the stables? - A. No, over the dwelling-house and warehouse, the sheets were in the same room; this is my great-coat.

Harris. I cannot speak to the property; the watchman has been in the habit of making the beds.

Warren. These are Mr. Harris's sheets; they have Mr. Harris's mark upon them, T. H.

Prisoner's defence. I was going up Little-Britain on a dark night, the carts and coaches were going along, and that made me walk quick, I believe as far from the parcel as the distance of the press-yard; I saw a woman running up the court-yard, it was a dark night, and impossible for them to swear that it was me.

GUILTY (Aged 60.)

Of stealing to the value of 39s .

Confined one year in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-51

390. SARAH MAUNDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a cloak, value 1s. an apron, value 1s. the property of Elizabeth Weston , widow .

ELIZABETH WESTON sworn. - I am a widow; I know nothing of the loss.

JOHN SIMPSON sworn. - I am a breeches-maker, I saw the prisoner come out of Mrs. Weston's house, I lodged in the house; I followed her, and found her with the cloak and apron upon her; I took them from the prisoner, and gave them to Mrs. Weston, she delivered them to the officer.

CHARLES BUTLER sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the property;) I have had them ever since, I received them from Mrs. Weston.

Mrs. Weston. I received this cloak and apron from Simpson, and gave them to the officer; they are my property, I had seen them ten minutes before.

Prisoner's defence. I had come three hundred miles, with three fatherless children, and buried one on the road; I was very sack and fatigued; I went into this house and sat down, and slept about half an hour; I did not know that I had the things till I saw them at my feet, when he stopped me.

GUILTY (Aged 41.)

Of stealing, to the value of 9d .

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-52

391. JAMES SHIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a pocket-book, value 6d. two Bank-notes, value 10l. two other Bank-notes, value 4l. and one other Banknote, value 1l. the property of John Bellew privily from his person .

JOHN BELLEW , Esq . sworn. - I am a private gentleman, I live ten miles from Exeter; I had my pocket picked coming out of the Foundling-chapel ; I buttoned my coat pocket when I came out of the chapel, and within a minute of that time, I discovered my pocket unbuttoned, and my pocket-book taken out; the instant that I put my hand towards my pocket, the prisoner, who was close by my side, hasted forward; I pursued him as fast as I could through the people; I never lost sight of him; I seized him, and accused him of having taken my pocket-book; he declared his innocence, and said he was a tradesman in such a street, such a number; he told me he had not my pocket-book, he was innocent; I told him. I would not let him go, and during the altercation, I saw him take my pocket-book out of his pocket, and throw if into the street, a little boy picked it up, and said, "I have got your pocket-book, sir;" I continued to hold him, and had him carried, I believe, into the vestry, where the governors were; my pocket-book contained five Bank-notes, two of five pounds, two of two pounds, and one of one pound, making together fifteen pounds.

Q. Did you feel any thing at your pocket; I thought I did, which caused me to put my hand down.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I take it for granted there were a great many people collected? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you got compleatly clear from the crowd before you stopped him? - A. Yes.

Q. It was dark, was it not? - A. It was light enough to discover that it was a red body.

Q. Do you mean to say, that by no possible

means you could be mistaken in his being that person who was next to you? - A. I think it impossible.

Jury. Q. Which pocket was your pocket-book in? - A. My lest.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. There was a very considerable press upon you? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM SOUTH sworn. - I picked up the pocket-book and gave it to Mr. Bellew, the prisoner is the man that threw it away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How old are you? - A. Thirteen.

Q. Had you been to the chapel? - A. Yes.

Q. There was too great a crowd for you to see who did this? - A. No, they made room when the prisoner was running. GUILTY

Of stealing, but not privily, from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middilesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-53

392. MARGARET MOODY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 20s. the property of William Smith .

JANE SMITH sworn. - I am the wife of William Smith , I live in Artichoke-lane, St. George's in the East ; I lost a pair of silver buckles from a little drawer under my husband's bed; I saw them on the Sunday in my husband's shoes; I saw them at the pawnbroker's on the Monday following.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - On Monday the 5th of May, I apprehended the prisoner in Long-alley, Moorfields; I searched her, I asked her what she had done with the buckles, she said they were at Mr. Purse's, the pawnbroker, in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel; I went there and found them, and found the duplicate upon her.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; on the 28th of April, the prisoner pledged these buckles with Mr. Purse, I was in the shop at the time, (produces them;) I lent her nine shillings, and on the Monday following she came and asked if I would lend her three shillings more upon them, which I did, I had known her before for some time, I believe she used to work at slop work.

Mrs. Smith. These buckles are my husband's property; the prisoner's farher lodges with me, she came to me on the 26th, she remained there till the 28th.

Prisoner's defence. I went to see my father, and being very much in distress, I took them and pledged them at Mr. Purse's.

The prisoner called one witness who gave her a good character. GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-54

393. ELIZABETH CANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , two sheets, value 4s. and a muslin handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Henry Crawford , Esq .

ELIZABETH CALF sworn. - I live at No. 49, Upper Seymour-street , at Mr. Henry Crawford's: On Friday the 18th of April, I saw the prisoner come in with the coachman's cloak on, I told the coachman that was his cloak; the prisoner lived cook in the family; in consequence of suspicions, her box was searched in her bed-room, and the clock found, then one of the young ladies looked in the box to see if there was any thing of theirs, and they found two sheets, and a muslin handkerchief, they are marked H. C. one sheet was a calico one, and the other a servant's sheet.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer, I saw the sheet and the handkerchief taken out of the prisoner's box, and they were delivered to me.(Produces them.)

Calf. These are my master's sheets.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Neither Mr. nor Mrs. Crawford are here? - A. No; they were ill at the time it happened.

Q. Does Mr. Crawford prosecute this indictment? - A. I do not know.

Q. Yes, you do - does Mr. Crawford prosecute this indictment? - A. He told me to come here.

Q. Upon your oath, are not you the prosecutrix, and have not you paid the expences of the indictment? - A. My fellow-servant has paid it.

Q. Before the boxes were searched, you know there was a quarrel in the kitchen? - A. Yes.

Q. A violent quarrel, and there was a question whether the cloak that she had, was Lancefield's, or her's? - A. Yes.

Q. He said it was his, and she said it was her's? - A. Yes.

Q. How lately had you moved from Gunnersbury? - A. At Christmas.

Q. The boxes were pretty full? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you know that your mistress has said she believes it was put into the box by mistake, in moving? - A. No.

Q. Mrs. Crawford is very well now? - A. Yes.

Q. They could have come if they had chosen? Yes.

Q. They have not been here any one day this session? - A. No.

Jury. (To Kennedy.) Q. Did you find the box locked? - A. Yes; the prisoner had the key.

Court. Q. You were present when the prisoner was searched? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the sheets and handkerchief being found, will you tell me what the prisoner said? - A. I do not remember what she said.

Q. Did she seem surprised when the things were

found? - A. Yes, she did, she refused to go up stairs; she said she was dressing her master's dinner, and she could not go up stairs; I told her we had a warrant to search for a black silk cloak; I told her we could not go without her, because we did not know the box; then we went up stairs with her, she gave Jackson the key before we went up.

Q. Did she give you the key readily or reluctantly? - A. Very reluctantly; Jackson opened the box and found the cloak, two sheets, and a handkerchief; a servant in the house said, they were her master's.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You found her cooking the dinner? - A. Yes.

Q. You found a cloak and came out of the room? - A. Yes.

Q. And came down stairs? A. - Yes.

Q. Did you lock the boxes? - A. I cannot be sure.

Q. And somebody called you back, and then you found the sheets and handkerchief? - A. Yes.

Q. After you had left it four or five minutes? - A. Yes, I dare say it might be four or five minutes.

Court. Q. Did she express any surprize at the things being found in her box? - A. I cannot recollect what she said.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer: On the 18th of April, I had a warrant to search for a black silk cloak; I went to Mr. Crawford's, the prisoner was in the kitchen; I told her I had a warrant to search her box, she refused to go up stairs, but I told her I should not go up without her; I then demanded the key of the box of her; then she wanted me to go up by myself, but I told her she must see what was done; we went up stairs, and she shewed me her box; I opened it, the cloak laid uppermost, and then we returned down stairs, for I had nothing further to search for; she said, she could prove where she bought it, she said she gave six shillings for it; I told her, if she could do that, it would be all very well; upon going down stairs, there was an order from Mrs. Crawford to go back to see if there was any of her property, I went up again.

Q. Can you tell whether, between the time you took the cloak out, and going back again, any thing could have been put into the box? - A. No, the box was locked, and I gave her the key; I had the key from her again, and opened the boxes a second time; the sheets and the cloak were not found in the same box.

Q. Do you recollect whether the sheets laid uppermost? - A. I cannot say, there were a great many little things that had belonged to Mrs. Crawford, which she said her mistress had given her, and the servant acknowledged that they had been given her, and they were thrown on one side.

Q. What did she say with respect to the sheets and the handkerchief? - A. I think she said Mrs. Crawford had given her them.

Q. Was the second box looked? - A. Yes; they were all locked.

Q. Mrs. Crawford never came to the office? - A. I believe she was lying in at the time.

Q. The orders you received were from a servant in the house? - A. The orders came out of the room where Mrs. Crawford was lying-in.

Q. Do you remember which of the servants brought you that order? - A. No, it was not this servant.

Q. Mr. Crawford was in the house? - A. Yes, he was very ill, and is now.

Court. (To Calf.) Q. Relate, as well as you can, what dispute there had been between you and the prisoner? - A. She said she would punish us for saying that she had got the cloak wrongfully; we had told the coachman that it was his cloak, and he asked for it, and she denied having it.

Q. Were you in the room at the time the sheets were taken out of the other box? - A. Yes.

Q. Were the sheets in the same box as the cloak? - A. No, they were not.

Q. Were the sheets at the top of the box? - A. No; there were several things taken out before they came to the sheets; the linen sheet, she said, her mother had given her out of the country, this is the sheet, it is marked H. C. it is a servant's sheet; the sheets had been missed some time, my mistress knew they were missing.

Q. Was the fellow sheet to that missing? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe the prisoner had lived two years and a half with Mr. Crawford? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called one witness, who had known her fourteen years, and gave her an excellent character.

Jury. (To Jackson.) Q. Do you think it impossible that none of the servants could have put in these articles while your back was turned? - A. No, it was impossible.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-55

394. JOHN HIGGINBOTHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , eight volumes of Hessman's Medicina Rationalis, value 4s. four volumes of Medical Essays, value 2s. Mead on Poisons, value 1s. Ball's Practice of Physic, value 6d. Electa ex Ovidis, value 6d. Cooke's Prognostics of Hippocrates, value 6d. Boerhaave's Medical Correspondence, value 6d. two volumes of Bloomfield's surgery, value 1s.

Huxham on Fevers, value 3d. Austin, on Lime, value 3d. an Italian Dictionary, value 3d. an Essay on the Small-pox, value 3d. Duncan's Medical Cases, value 3d. and Pharmacopoeia Porphyrum, value 1d. the property of Henry Witham .

Second Court. Laying them to be the property of Francis Witham , and William Witham .

There being not evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, be was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-56

395. SARAH HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a silver tea-spoon, value 2s. the property of William Parker .

JANE PARKER sworn. - I am the wife of William Parker , a publican : On Saturday the 26th of April, I lost a tea-spoon; the prisoner and another woman came in for a pint of beer; the prisoner came into the bar, and when she was gone, I missed a ten-spoon.

ROBERT ATTENBOROUGH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Clinker, pawnbroker, in Crown-street, Finsbury-square; I took in a tea-spoon from the prisoner, on the 26th of April, in the evening, I lent her two shillings upon it, (produces it.) I am sure the prisoner is the person.

Mrs. Parker. That is my spoon, I know it by the mark, I had used it that evening.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up at the door, and pledged it in my own name.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-57

396. WILLIAM FIELD was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 10th of March , nine ewe sheep, value 9l. the property of Samuel Tingey , whereof Richard Field was, at the last session, convicted of stealing.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Watson, and the case by Mr. Gurney.)

Mr. John Edmunds produced the copy of the record of the conviction of Richard Field , at the last sessions, from Mr. Shelton's office. (It is read.)

SAMUEL TINGEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a salesman , in Smithfield-market: On the 10th of March, I had four hundred sheep there, there were nine pole ewe sheep, separated from the rest, after they were sold to one Mr. Taylorson.

Q. Had they been paid for? - A. No.

Q. Had they been delivered to Taylorson? - A. No, they are always paid for on delivery; I saw them last between one and two o'clock, I after wards saw the skin of one of them.

Q. Was the pen in which they were inclosed, opposite Mr. Hebb's? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You had sold these sheep to Taylorson? - A. Yes.

Q. How much had you received to bind the bargain? - A. Not any thing.

Q. You never received any money on his account? - A. No.

Q. Do you not consider yourself liable to make up to Taylorson the loss of these sheep? - A. No.

JOHN ADKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney, I keep the Goat, at Ponder's-end, eight miles and a half from Shoreditch, the prisoner married a sister of mine.

Q. Did you see him on the 10th of March last? - A. No.

Q. Did you see Richard Field ? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Was any request made to you on that day, respecting sheep, by any body? - A. Yes, to leave some sheep.

EDWARD KINGHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a butcher, at Ponder's-end; on the evening of the 10th of March, I was drawing some sheep out, Richard Field was with them, the brother of the prisoner.

Court. Q. Was he the man that was convicted at the last sessions? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How far were they from the Goat? - A. They were close to the Goat.

Q. Did you hear Richard Field say any thing to Adkins? - A. I heard him call out to Adkins to let him leave some sheep there; I cannot say what time it was, it was about the dusk of the evening; Adkins said, he might if he pleased.

Q. Did Richard Field say who they were to be lest for? - A. Not to my knowledge; Adkins was in the bar at the time.

Q. How near were you to Richard Field? - A. I was as near to him as I am to you.

Q. Were any sheep left there? - A. I cannot positively say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. There was a conversation about sheep, whether they were lest there or not, you cannot say? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that Richard Field was the man that called to Atkins? - A. Yes.

Adkins called again. Examined by Mr. Watson. On the 10th of March, a man applied to me about six o'clock, it was candle-light; I was in the bar, the man was at the door; between the butcher's shop and mine, there is a lane goes up, he asked to leave some sheep for William Field ; I told him he might, and he did leave some.

Q. How many, in point of fact, did he leave?

- A. I never saw them, I have been told there were nine.

Q. You were examined before the Magistrate? - A. Yes, at the Mansion-house, and at Hatton-garden.

Q. What you said upon that occasion was taken down in writing, was it not? - A. I believe so, I saw the clerk writing all the while.

Q. Did you sign any paper upon that occasion? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Was that read over to you? - A. I could not hear it distinctly.

Q. And you swore to it? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, how many sheep were there? - A. I never saw the sheep.

Court. Q. You have sworn to the number before the Lord-Mayor? - A. I never saw them, it is an impossibility for me to swear how many there were.

Q. What became of you the next day? - A. I went out in the morning, and was not home till the evening.

Q. Where were these sheep lodged? - A. In a stable upon my premises.

Q. How came you to know that they were lodged there? - A. Because there was no other place for them.

Q. Were you ever paid for these sheep? - A. Not a farthing.

Q. Are you in the habit of taking in sheep without any money? - A. Yes.

Q. And without spending any money in your house? - A. Frequently; it is customary to come in.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, that they were actually left there? - A. I never saw them.

Q. And therefore, of your own knowledge, you do not know that they were there? - A. No.

Court. (To Kingham) Q. You heard somebody call to the man of the house to leave some sheep - where was the man of the house? - A. In the bar.

Q. Does the bar look into the road where the sheep were? - A. The bar looks into the road, but the sheep were up the lane, he could not see.

- HEBB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. On Monday the 10th of March last, I had some pens opposite Mr. Tingey's; there were sheep in across the loins, with oker; I saw them at eleven o'clock in the day, I saw them several times between eleven and one; I think the last time was between one and two; the butchers frequently asked me the price of them, which led me to look at them to see if they were mine; Richard Field and another person came to the pen, and drove them out of the pen into the alley, and drove them away, for any thing I know, for I saw no more of them; I have seen a skin since in Court here, but I never saw the sheep again.

Q. Was that skin like those that you saw? - A. It is impossible for me to swear with certainty, I cannot tell.

Q. At the time Richard Field drove the sheep away, was Mr. Tingey there? - A. No.

Q. Nor any of his servants? - A. No; there was a servant of his a minute or two before.

Q. What was Richard Field? - A. A butcher's drover.

Q. Suppose they are not sold to a butcher, has the butcher's drover any thing to do with them? - A. No, a salesman's drover.

Q. What was William Field? - A. A butcher's drover also.

JOSEPH HARMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a butcher at Enfield-highway: On Tuesday the 11th of March, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner at my house, at Enfield-highway, he came and asked me to fetch nine sheep from Ponder's-end, from the sign of the Goat, kept by John Adkins; I went there for them; I saw Mrs. Adkins, I asked her where the nine sheep were, she called the ostler, and he shewed me them; they were in a hovel or stable, in the yard, belonging to the dwelling-house; there was nothing to fasten them in.

Q. Were there more than nine sheep? - A. No, they were pole ewes; I brought them to my house, according to my orders, which I had received from William Field; William Field , and Mr. Grover's son, came to my house, and drawed five of them; William Field asked me if I would have the other four; I asked him what the price of them was, he told me he could not tell me, till he saw the salesman on the Friday or the Monday following.

Q. What became of the five that they had

turn home I saw the prisoner at the Bull at Tottenham, I was in a cart, and he asked me to let him get up and ride, I told him he might; in the course of conversation, he asked me if I bought any sheep; I told him, no; and he said he thought I had not, he had not seen my name down; he asked me if I wanted any sheep; I asked him how many he had got; he said I might have half a score if I liked; I told him I would not have more than the half of half a score; I asked where they were; he said they were at home in the drove; he said he would send me some; I told him I did not like to deal without I saw them; he said I could take his word for four or five sheep; I told him I had no objection, knowing the family so many years; so it was agreed on to sell me four or five; I was to kill them, and give him the value of them.

Q. Is that the way you buy sheep often? - A. Not in common; and the next day I sent my son for the five sheep to old Mr. Field's house; my son brought them, they were pole ewe sheep; I killed one that night, and turned the other four into my field; on the 12th, Robinson, the drover, and his son, came and claimed them; on the Wednesday, young Robinson came down again for the skin, I gave it up.

Q. Did you ever pay for the sheep? - A. No; the drover told me I might kill the other four, and sell them, that was at Hatton-garden; I asked what I was to do with them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This young man at the bar drove for his father? - A. Yes; he mostly used to be at his father's; they are in the habit of buying and selling a vast many, both beasts and sheep.

RICHARD GROVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am the son of the last witness: On the 11th of March, I saw William Field at the Blackhorse at Enfield-highway: I went with him to Mr. Harman's for some sheep; I told him my father had sent me for four or five sheep; he took me to Harman's, and delivered me five small pole ewe sheep; I drove them home to my father's house, one was killed that night, and the other four left grazing in the field; George Robinson and his son came down the next day and claimed them; we killed one that night.

Q. What did you do with that skin? - A. - Hung it up in the yard; to the best of my knowledge, it is the sure that was produced here.

Q. Were those five part of the sheep with respect to which you gave evidence? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This conversation passed in the afternoon? - A. Yes.

Q. It was day-light? - A. Yes.

Q. And you put the four sheep into the field publicly? - A. Yes; by the road side.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What did the prisoner say to you when he delivered you the sheep? - A. He told me to take the sheep home to my father's, and tell him, that when he saw the salesman, on the Friday, or the Monday, then my father and him would agree about them.

Q. Did he mention the name of any saleman? - A. No.

GEORGE ROBINSON (the younger) sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. My father and I are drovers to Mr. Tingey: On the 10th of March last, Mr. Tingey lost nine little pole ewe sheep, marked over the loins; my father and I went to Enfield-highway on the Wednesday afterwards, to the prisoner's father's house, and from there I went to Mr. Grover's house.

Q. Now, in your way to Mr. Grover's house, did you see the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. At Mr. Grover's did you find any thing? - A. Yes; the skin of a sheep that was killed, and four alive in the field; I believed them to be the sheep; when I came back to my father's, in my way back I saw the prisoner, he was on horseback, I was in the path, and he was in the road; I asked him whether he knew of any wrong sheep that road; he smiled, and said, no, he did not know of any.

Q. Did you tell him that you had lost any? - A. Yes; I told him we had lost nine, I did not tell him where they were lost from; then he went on, and I came on; then I went back to old Mr. Field's house, which is a public-house, and found the sheep.

Q. Did you see the skin? - A. Yes; Grover gave me a skin some days after.

Grover. The skin that I gave to him was the skin of the sheep that I killed; Mr. Spilling the constable has the skin.

- SPILLING sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the skin); it was delivered to me at Hatton-garden-office by young Robinson; it has been in my possession ever since.

Robinson. I cannot swear that this is the same skin.

Tingey. I believe this to be the skin of one of the sheep that I lost.

Prisoner's defence. I never had any more sheep but what I had honestly paid for; I did not know any thing about the sheep before Tuesday morning; I mentioned to Mr. Grover that I had got some sheep at home, and asked him if he wanted any; I told him he might have a score, or half a score, or fifteen, or any number he pleased; finding these sheep came wrong into my drove, and not knowing where they came from, I sent them to Mr. Grover's to be killed, because they were sinking in flesh; the other four I let Mr. Harman have; I told him they came wrong into my drove, I did not know the price, and when I learned the price I would let them know, for they should pay no more than I

did; Robinson came down on the Wednesday, and I paid him for the nine sheep; he took fifteen guineas from me for them, one pound fifteen shillings a-piece; he told me they were his property; I told young Grover to tell his father I did not know the price of them, when I found out the owner I would let him know.

For the Prisoner.

GEORGE ROBINSON (the elder.) sworn. Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. When these sheep were found out at Grover's did you receive any money for them? - A. Yes, I did; I received three five pound notes, half-a-guinea, and two half-crowns, and I gave him sixpence back, which made fifteen guineas.

Q. Was that the market price of the sheep when they were lost? - A. Yes.

Q. Has that been put to the account of Mr. Tingey? - A. I left it at Mr. Tingey's book.

Q. Was that before the man was taken up? - A. Yes, some days.

Q. Who paid you that money? - A. William Field.

Q. Were you authorized to do that by Mr. Tingey? - A. No.

Q. Does Mr. Tingey know that that stands to his account? - A. Yes; but I took the money on my own account; I was at the loss of the sheep.

The prisoner called fifteen other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY , (Aged 25.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-58

397. SARAH MARCHANT, alias HART , and MATTHEW HART , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , a silver watch, value 21s. a silk handkerchief, value 2s. a cotton handkerchief, value 4d. a leather pocket-book, value 1d. and one guinea, the property of William Sweetman ; and the other for receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM SWEETMAN sworn. - I am a tailor , I live in St. Martin's-street: I went home with Sarah Marchant on Saturday night, in Lewkner's-lane , about twelve o'clock.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I was not intoxicated so much in liquor but what I knew what I was about; I had been out with an acquaintance or two and was going home; we had been at a public-house an hour and a half, or two hours.

Q. What liquor had you had? - A. About the value of two pots of beer to my own share; I met with the prisoner in Hemmings-row, I went home with her; I had a watch, a guinea, a silk handkerchief, a cotton handkerchief, and a pocket-book; I had them when I went into her house; my watch was in my waistcoat-pocket, and the guinea was in the pocket-book, and the handkerchief in my coat-pocket, I had them while I was with her; I went to bed with her, and when I waked in the morning she was gone, and my property; I put them under my head; I found my coat and waistcoat upon the floor; I did not see her again till I saw her in St. Martin's watch-house, upwards of a week after; I inquired in the house directly, and they said they knew nothing of her.

Q. Was the door of the room fastened? - A. Yes; I saw the property afterwards at Bow-street.

Q. Had you been at any other public-house that night? - A. No; I had been at work all day.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - (Produces the property); On the 7th of April, Sweetman applied to me as having been robbed, and on Saturday the 12th she was brought in custody by one of the patrols belonging to the parish; and in consequence of information I received, I went to the prisoner, Matthew Hart , on the 13th, which was the next morning, in Little Wild-street, the Black-horse; I then took the watch out of his sob-pocket; Sweetman had told me the number of his watch, and I found it was the same; I asked him where he got the watch, and he told me he got it from Sarah Marchant; I found this pocket-book in his breeches between his thing and the lining, (produces it); he was taken to St. Martin's watch-house; I sent him down there by Higgs, and I went to the house of call where the prosecutor belonged, and fetched him, and he said immediately that was the man that had robbed him; he had a black silk handkerchief round his neck, which Sweetman claimed; and folded up in the black one was a cotton one; I was obliged to go into the country, and I delivered the property to Higgs; I put a mark upon it that I should know it again; I returned on the Monday, and received it back again.

JOHN HIGSS sworn. - I went with Donaldson to apprehend the prisoner, Hart; I know no more than he has stated.

Sweelman. This is my watch, No. 17558, and there are two bits out of the plate; I know the pocket-book and the handkerchief to be mine.

Q. Are you sure you did not give them to her? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you give her any thing? - A. Yes, two shillings and sixpence.

Marchant's defence. I am an unfortunate woman: This young man asked me to take him home with me, I told him I could not; then he took me to a public-house and gave me two glasses of liquor, and then we went together, I asked him what he was going to make me a present of, and he gave me these things to pledge because he had no money;

then we went to bed, and laid till seven o'clock; I asked him if he was not going to get up, and he said not yet; then I went out on an errand, and when I came back he was gone; I kept the things a considerable time and he never called for them.

Hart's defence. When I first came to London, as a soldier , this woman and I lived together as man and wife, till I went to Ireland, and when I came back I found her upon the town; I did not approve of it, and left her; I did not see any thing of her after that for six months, till she brought these things to me, and told me they were her own property, and desired me to wear them.

Q. The prisoner, Hart, called his serjeant and corporal, who gave him a good character.

Marchant, GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Hart, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-59

398. JOHN ROWE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , two waistcoats, value 5s. and a cotton shawl, value 2s. the property of William Molloy .

WILLIAM MOLLOY sworn. - I am a shoemaker : On the 26th of April I was serving in my shop, between six and seven in the evening, and in consequence of information that somebody had been into our yard, I pursued the prisoner; I called stop thief; he ran down Denmark-court, and a soldier stopped him, and he threw away the waistcoat; when I came up he said he hoped I would forgive him, he had done a bad thing; he was taken to the watch-house and searched, there was a waistcoat of my son's, about fourteen years of age, and a shawl I found upon him my wife.

Q. You provide your son with clothes? - A. Yes.

VALENTINE ROMLEY sworn. - The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and I found the waistcoat and the shawl between his shirt and his skin, quite wet; I asked him how he came by them, and he said he found them. (Produces them.)

Molloy. These are my property.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much distrest, and my shopmates had given me some beer; I had very little, and it affected my head; I do not know what I was in the watch-house for; it is the first crime I ever committed; how I came by the things I do not know; I throw myself at your Lordship's feet for mercy; I have a wife and children.

Romley. He was half drunk.

GUILTY (Aged 40.)

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-60

399. MATTHEW BRODRICK and JOHN MEESON, alias MASON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , four pair of boots, value 42s. the property of George Knowles , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE KNOWLES sworn. - I am a boot and shoe-maker , No. 128, Pall-Mall : The prisoners both worked for me; Brodrick works in the shop as a clicker ; the other prisoner works at home on the seat .

JOHN ACKLEM sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in the Strand: I took in this pair of boots from one of the prisoner; to the best of my belief it was the prisoner Mason, on the 28th of March. (Produces them.)

Q. (To Knowles.) Had you missed such property as that? - A. No.

Q. (To Acklem.) Do you recollect what time of the day it was? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Are you sure Mason is the man? - A. Yes, I had seen him before; I believed him to be a shoemaker from his appearance; I lent him ten shillings upon them.

Knowles. These boots have my own hand-writing; I know them by the cut, I cut them out myself; they have the name of the gentleman that they were made for in them, and my stamp upon the soles; I made for Colonel Hamilton, of the Royal Waggon Train; they were too small for him, and they were returned.

Q. You had not sold them afterwards? - A. No, we never sell any thing in the shop.

Q. Is your shop a part of the dwelling-house? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of that pair of boots? - A. Eleven or twelve shillings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ailey. Q. The prisoners had worked for you some time? - A. The tall one, Brodrick, I have known ever since he was in the petticoats.

Q. Had you sent these boots to his lodgings to be altered? - A. Not these; there are others in Court that I did.

Q. Who delivered your work out in the shop? - A. Myself generally.

Q. Was not Mason employed by you? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you not given directions to Brodrick, your foreman, to send these boots to Mason's house? - A. No such thing; he could not make such a boot if you would give him a million of money.

Q. But did you not send them to him to alter the seam? - A. No.

DAVID BERRYMAN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in St. Martin's-lane: (produces two pair of boots:) On the 29th of March I received this pair in pledge of the prisoner Mason, in the name of Mason; and on the 17th of April he came again,

and offered this pair in mother name; I then suspected him; he told me he had made them for a waiter at a coffee-house; I saw "T. Owen, Esq." written in them; I then sent for an officer.

Q. (To Knowlys.) When did you miss these boots? - A. I did not miss any of them at all.

Mason's defence. Brodrick gave them to me to pledge.

The prisoner Brodrick was not put upon his defence.

Court. (To Knowlys.) Q. Had Mason any access to your house? - A. Only for his work.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-61

400. THOMAS STUDWICK and JOHN CROUCH were indicted for that they, on the 12th of May , one hundred and twenty pieces of false and counterfeit copper money, made to the likeness of a halfpenny, not being melted down or cut in pieces, did take and receive of one Richard Limberick , at a lower rate and value than the same by their denomination imported, that is to say, for two shillings and sixpence, in the monies numbered .

There being no evidence offered on the part of the prosecution, the prisoners were.

Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-62

401. JOHN BRADLEY and JOHN WARE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , a bag, value 1s. and one hundred and sixty-nine pounds weight of cotton, value 12l. the property of Matthew Pickford and Thomas Pickford , upon a wharf adjacent to the river Thames .

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Matthew and Thomas Pickford, carriers ; they do business at the Grand Junction wharf ; it is a public wharf belonging to the Grand Junction Company: On Saturday, the 24th of May, our porter mentioned to me that a quantity of loose cotton had been found upon a dung-heap in the yard, in consequence of which suspicions arose, and we watched all that day and till Sunday morning, imagining that it would be fetched away; but nobody coming near, we removed it to our warehouse again; and on the following morning Alderman Hamerton's son gave us information that two soldier s had been taken up with some cotton in their possession; I enquired who the officer was, and went to him; I saw the cotton in Sermon-lane, St. Paul's, at the officer's house; I saw cotton in two bundles, one of them marked 240, and the other 274, which 1s, I presume, the planter's mark; I presumed they had been originally cut in two, and that the part we found upon the dungheap was the part that was taken out of the middle; I returned home and looked over our notes, and found that the bag had been sent to the wharf originally by the Robert Speare and Company, in Abchurch-lane; here is the note that we received with it. (Produces it.)

Q. Are Messrs. Pickfords liable to pay for this property? - A. Certainly.

JOHN WOOD sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Robert Spear and Company, of Abchurch-lane: I forwarded the cotton myself to Mr. Pickford's wharf, and marked that bag; it was on Friday, the 23d of May, in the afternoon; the bag was marked R S 240; there were nine other bags sent with it in the same cart.

ROBERT PARTRIDGE sworn. - I am a carman: I delivered ten bags from Mr. Speare's, between nine and ten in the morning; I delivered them at Mr. Pickford's wharf, I left them upon the wharf.

Q. Should you know one of the bags if you were to see it? - A. There were so many alike that I cannot say; but the number I know, it was 240.

Wood. I am mistaken in the time; I thought it had been in the afternoon.

- DONOLLY sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Pickford: On Friday, the 23d of May, I received ten bags of cotton, at the Grand Junction wharf, White-stairs; we are responsible, as carriers, for any thing that is lost.

Q. When they are delivered upon that wharf, they are delivered into your charge, I suppose? - A. Yes; they were left upon the wharf, and the numbers all answered; there were ten of them, from 230 to 240; the one that was lost was No. 240; I received them between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; we missed it on the Saturday, it was taken off the wharf; they were never put into the warehouse.

Q. So that whoever stole it must have taken it from the wharf? - A. Certainly.

CHARLES DONOHOUGH sworn. - I am a watchman in Castle-Baynard-Ward: On Saturday, the 24th, I was upon my duty at the West-end of St. Paul's Church-yard; about half after one o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner, Bradley, with a bag upon his head, he walked up to me; I let him pass by where I stood about five or six yards, then I followed and walked up to him; I asked him what he had got there; he told me it was a bale going to the Bell-Savage; I told him he had left the Bell-Savage a great way behind him; then he said he was ordered to take it to some place, and he had forgot the name of the place; as I was going towards the watch-house with him, he told me he found the bale in the Strand; I took him before the officer of the night, and made him take the bale

with him himself into the watch-house; I observed another man at the same time going down the south side of the church-yard; I suspected he was one; when I had got Bradley in the watch-house, I got more assistance, and we went in pursuit; I took two out of the watch-house, and was joined by another in the way; before we got to Watling-street, I heard the springing of a rattle at the south side of St. Paul's; when I got there I found a watchman there with a bale of cotton at his feet; his name is Andrews; the bale is here; we took it to the watch-house.

EBENEZER ANDREWS sworn. - I am a watchman in Castle-Baynard ward: On Saturday, the 24th, between one and two in the morning, I stopped the prisoner Ware at the corner of St. Paul's church-yard, by Warling-street; I asked him what he had got; he told me, a bed; then he put it down from his back on to the kirb-stone, and begged of me to let him pass; I told him I could not; and as I was going to lay hold of him he gave a spring from me, and ran; I immediately sprung my rattle; I lost sight of him; I made enquiry, but could not find him; I then returned to where the bag had been dropped, and took it to Castle-Baynard watch-house; I then returned to my beat; I heard that the man was in the watch-house in Cordwainers'-ward; I went there and saw the prisoner Ware, he is the man that I stopped with the bale; I had seen his face; I held up my lanthorn to his face before he left me, and likewise I know the number of the bale.

RICHARD HATRED sworn. - I am a patrole belonging to Castle-Baynard ward: On the Saturday morning, between one and two o'clock, Donahough came into the watch-house and desired me to come out, for he had got one man with a bale, and there was another; I reached him a cutlass, and got one myself; they said he was gone towards Watling-street; I met my partner by the way, and told him to follow us, for there were thieves about; we pursued past Paul's-chain to King's-head-court, and there I heard the springing of a rattle; I pursued on along Watling-street as hard as I could go; I met another watchman, he told me he had lost the man, and I went in pursuit till I heard that he was lodged in Cordwainers' watch-house, and I went to see him; that was the prisoner Ware; the hales were both carried to Castle-Baynard watch-house; the constable of the night asked him where he got it, and he said he had found it on the other side of St. Paul's Church-yard; he was asked then, why he ran away; and he said he was afriad of being taken to the watch-house; then we took him to Castle-Baynard watch-house.

WILLIAM PARRY sworn. - I am constable of Cordwainers' ward: About a quarter before two on the Saturday morning, I took a walk with our patrole; when we got to Well-court, I heard a noise, I lisened to it, and immediately heard the springing of raules; I then turned out of Well-court into Queen-street; On the left hand side of Queen-street I caught the prisoner Ware; he begged I would let him go, but he first resisted and gave me a blow in the face; I up with my stick and gave him a blow on the head; immediately the patrole that was with me caught hold of him; his name is James Wright; we took him to the watch-house; after that the officer of Castle-Baynard ward came to look at the prisoner; I took the prisoner up to Castle-Baynard watch-house, there I saw the prisoner Bradley sitting; they were both taken to Gilispur-street Compter; the bales were left in the hands of Mr. Bunyard, the constable of Castle-Baynard, that night.

- FITZGERALD sworn. - I joined Parry in the pursuit of the prisoner Ware; I heard the rattle spring, I met Andrews; I asked him if he had lost him, and he said, yes; I turned back to secure the bale, which lay at the corner of Watling-street; I put it upon one of our watchmen's back, and took it to Cordwainers' watch-house; as soon as Andrews came in, he said that was the man; I asked Ware where he found his bale; he said, in St. Paul's church-yard; the other said he had found his in the Strand; I begged of the officer to let us have both at one watch-house, and we took him there.

ROBERT BUNYARD sworn. - I am constable of Castle-Baynard ward: On Saturday, about half past one, Bradley was brought in by Donahough, with a bag of cotton upon his back; in about a quarter of an hour another watchman of the name of Minsey brought in another bale, and a little while after the other prisoner Ware was brought in; I have had the cotton ever since; (produces the parcel which was brought in by the prisoner Bradley;) the number upon it is 274; the other is marked R S 240.

JAMES WRIGHT sworn. - About a quarter before three on Saturday morning I was along with our constable; we met with the prisoner Ware in Queen-street, near the Three Cranes; the constable laid hold of him first, he had no bundle at that time, and he was secured.

Clarke. This was originally one bag; it is one bag cut in two; the number corresponds with the numbers in our notes that we received with the goods.

Wood. This is one of the bags; it is same kind of cotton as the rest that I sent along with it.

- MERRITT sworn. - I am horse-keeper to Mr. Bottomley, upon the same whars: About half past four o'clock on Saturday morning I found a quantity of loose cotton upon the dunghill; I acquainted Mr. Pickford of it; I watched all Satur

day night till Sunday morning, and nobody came to fetch it; and then I put it into a sack, and put it into the warehouse.

Q. (To Clarke.) What is the value of this cotton? - A. The whole would fell for about twelve pounds; this wool that is here is worth about seven pounds.

Q. How far is it from the wharf to the place where the men were found? - A. A quarter of a mile or more, perhaps half a mile.

Prisoner Bradley. Q. Were not your men at work upon the wharf all night? - A. They were at work upon the wharf till near one o'clock.

Bradley defence. My comrade and I were coming along the Strand, by the New Church we saw a bale lay, we thought it had fell out of some cart to waggon, and we took it up.

Ware's defence. I have nothing to say but what Bradley has said.

The prisoner Bradley called his serjeant, and Ware the publican upon whom he was quartered, who gave them both a good character.

Bradley, GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Ware, GUILTY (Aged 27.)

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-63

402. WILLIAM DUDMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , a bell, with spring and carriage, value 3l. one pound weight of copper wire, value 2s. 6d. twelve cranks, value 5s. a pull-out, value 8d. a pair of bell pliers, value 2s. a lock, value 8s. a staple, value 1s. 6d. a key, value 2s. 6d. five screws, value 6d. a latch, value 2s. 6d. a latch key, value 6d. and four iron keys, value 4s. the property of Thomas Budd , in an out-house belonging to his dwelling-house .

THOMAS BUDD sworn. - I am a smith , in Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street : On Friday the 18th of April, the prisoner was at work for me at a gentleman's house in Houndsditch; he went away to dinner at one o'clock, and returned at two; he went out, and took with him the things mentioned in the indictment; I saw them in the shop before he went out; I have not seen them since, nor the prisoner, till he was taken up last Friday was a week; there were two other men in the shop at the time.

RICHARD ROGERS sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Budd: The prisoner went out to a job, he got his materials ready by dinner-time, and he came back with his pliers, which he had no call to have done; he employed himself in a frivolous job concerning his pliers; I had occasion for a tool, and I went to his vice-board, and I saw him spread his apron upon the vice-board, in order to take his tools and materials for the job; he was in the act of putting them in when I left the vice-board; I saw him go out at the back-door near his vice-board, with his apron loaded, to go to his job, as I thought; he was not seen again till Friday the 23d of May, when he was taken up by the officer; he left us on Friday the 18th of April; he came on Wednesday the 16th.

WILLIAM WARDEN sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Budd: I saw the prisoner lay his apron upon the vice-board, and putting the things into his apron; I saw him afterwards go out at the back-door, his apron seemed to be quite full, and he went down the ladder; I saw no more of the prisoner till the officer took him up.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I am an officer of the City: On the 23d of May, a gentleman gave me charge of the of a prisoner, in Ironnonger-lane, for robbing Mr. Budd of a quantity of goods; I searched him, and found a picklock-key, and some scutcheons of a door, upon him.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the things.

Q. (To Budd.) What may be the value of these tools? - A. Twenty-five shillings.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-64

403. JAMES ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , eleven pounds weight of pewter, value 9s. the property of Wakelin Welsh .

There being no evidence to shew the pewter to be the property of Mr. Welsh, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-65

404. SAMUEL WALTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , a time-piece, value 2l. 10s. the property of Thomas Harding .

THOMAS HARDING sworn. - I keep the White-hart public-house, in Foster-lane ; the prisoner at the bar had been at work in my house for three or four weeks, as a journeyman carpenter : On the 17th of April, after he had done work, he sat down in the tap-room, called for a pint of porter, and began smoking his pipe; the time-piece was kept in a window in the back-parlour adjoining the taproom; I went up stairs into the club-room with a friend, I left the prisoner in the tap-room; the next morning I missed the time-piece; it was afterwards found at the pawnbroker's.

JOSEPH PLIMPTON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mrs. Pearson in Fleet-marked, (produces a time-piece); it was pledged by Sarah Walker , on the 13th of April.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer: I went to the prisoner's house, had some conversation with his wife, and saw a duplicate in a glass upon the mantle-piece.

Q. How do you know it was his house? - A. Only from information; he kept a little huckster's shop.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner in the house? - A. No, only the wife and family; I then went to the pawnbroker's, and found the time-piece; the prisoner desired me to go to a friend of his, to look to the children, and to take the property that was in the house. (The time-piece was acposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I was at work on the 17th of April at the prosecutor's: I left off work at six o'clock, I sat down and had a pint of porter, I drank as many as five pints, besides a pipe of tobacco; I went to Mrs. Harding at the bar, and told her I had not money enough to pay her, I would pay her on Saturday night; I went out of doors through the passage into the street, and from there I went to another house, where I knew I could have a pint of beer without money; I had another pint there, and then went home to bed; my little boy was coming from the Sunday-school, the Sunday following, and picked up a bit of paper, and gave it to my wife, and she put it in the glass; it is not in my name, nor my wife's; my wife has been kept in prisoner ever since; I have been obliged to send my children to the work-house.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-66

405. JOHN CLYDE , and ELIZABETH HANIFORD , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , a feather-bed, value 40s. two bolsters, value 8s. two blankets, value 5s. a ring, value 5s. and two curtains, value 5s. the property of Sarah Dawes , widow , in a lodging-room, let by contract to the said Elizabeth .

It appearing in evidence that the prisoners lived together as man and wife, the Court were of opinion that the contract ought to have charged to be made with the husband. Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-67

406. RICHARD FRANKLIN was indicted for that he, on the 13th of March , in and upon Humphrey Owen , Esq . did make an assault in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a watch, value 10l. a ribbon value 1d. a seal, value 5s. four guineas, and seven shillings, in monies numbered, the property of the said Humphrey .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

HUMPHREY OWEN , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you bear the commission of Captain in a corps of Artillery ? - A. In the Royal Artillery: On the 13th of March, I accompanied Mrs. James to see her children, and Miss Clark was with us, she is here, Mrs. James is confined to her bed; we went to Mrs. Balam's house at Enfield-chace , which is a few yards from Enfield-chace gate; we left Mrs. Balam's house between one and two o'clock; when we had got about thirty yards from the gate, the postillion was going on very gently, I desired him to quicken his pace, which I had done before, but he did not; a man then came up on horseback, with a crape over the upper part of his face, and a pistol in his hand; the crape extended to about the tip of the nose, and, as far as I can judge, there were two pieces of lead suspended to the crape to prevent its slapping about; he desired the postillion to stop, upon which he stopped; he then came up to the chaise-door, and presented a pistol, and demanded our purses and our watches; the ladies both delivered their purses, and Miss Clark delivered her watch also; about the same time, I put my hand in my waistcoat-pocket, and took out about four or five guineas in gold, I am not clear as to the precise sum; there was also a toothpick-case, which I withdrew; upon that, the prisoner lifted up his crape, just for the instant, to see what I withdrew; he exclaimed, no pocketing, Sir; I let him see what it was, and put it close to him, and then put it in my pocket; I was then in hopes he might be satisfied with what he had got.

Court. Q. During the time he lifted up his crape had you an opportunity of observing his face? - A. I cannot be positive to any thing more than his chin; he was not content with what he had got, but said, don't hesitate, I shall be troublesome, or I shall shoot, or something to that effect; I saw your watch, give it me; the ribbon hung out, upon which I gave it him, and he rode away.

Q. What coloured horse was it? - A. I am not positive, I was so intent upon the man, I did not observe the colour of the horse.

Q. In the course of your way to town, did you give an alarm at the turnpike-gates? - A. At the desire of the ladies, I desired the postillion to tell every person he met of the robbery, and also at the turnpike-gates.

Q. Did you pass through any turnpike-gates? - A. I did.

Q. How long might this person, whoever it was, be with you during this transaction? - A. The transaction could not be more than two or three minutes at the utmost.

Q. How long was it before you saw the man now at the bar in custody? - A. It was nearly a month, or, I believe, it might be nearly two months, I saw the prisoner at Bow-street; the man who stopped us was a man about the same height as the prisoner, his hair of the same colour, very dark hair, and a very great resemblance of the chin.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. It was two months before you saw the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. You never saw him without a crape? - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect what sort of a pistol that man had who robbed you? - A. He had a small brass mounted pistol.

Q. Can you tell whether the crape was divided into two pieces or one? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you see the crape at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you suppose that crape to have been the same? - A. I should think not.

Q. Mrs. James was examined? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the able to swear to the person of the prisoner? - A. I do not think her evidence was stronger than mine.

Miss ELIZABETH CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was in the post-chaise with Mrs. James and captain Owen.

Q. Had you any opportunity of observing the person of the man, or the horse that he rode? - A. No, I could not; the crape was over his face.

Q. None of your property has been found, I believe? - A. No.

SARAH BALAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live near the gate at Enfield-chase, two of Mr. James's children were at nurse with me: On the 13th of March, Mrs. James came to see her children, with captain Owen and Miss Clark, and left me a little after two by my watch; before they got into the chaise, I saw a gentleman walking his horse; the wheels of the chaise had not got through the gate, when I saw him go up to the post lad, and bid him stop, he said to captain Owen,"Sir, it is of no use your hesitating, but give me your watch immediately, or I will blow your brains out;" then he gave him the watch, and left the chaise and came off towards me; I saw him pull off the crape, and put it into the crown of his hat, and went off by me towards Enfield, and the chaise towards London.

Q. How long do you think you had a view of him from the time he put the crape inside his hat? - A. He walked his horse from the gate, and put up his crape into his hat, and then he went off at a great pace; I then saw all his head and face as you see mine now. (Pulling off her bonnet.)

Q. Look round, and see if you can see the man? - A. Yes; that is the gentleman. (Pointing to the prisoner.)

Q. At this time, had you any body at home with you? - A. None but the two babies.

Q. How long do you think you might have a view of his face without any crape over it? - A. A very few minutes; our house is as close to the gate as it can be, it is not further from the gate than that white wall. (Pointing to the side of the Court.)

Q. After that, did you ever see the same person? - A. Yes, I saw him twice after; I saw him to the best of my knowledge, about three weeks or a months, I was all alone by myself; I saw him after that again, I cannot say how long after, I saw then alone, I saw him both times go through the same gate on horseback; I did not see him again till the day my husband took him.

Q. What was the colour of the horse? - A. The horse that he robbed captain Owen upon, was a little dark chesnut, cropped.

Q. Did you take notice whether, at the other times that you saw him, he was upon the same horse? - A. No, upon a different horse.

Court. Q. Then you knew him again, not by the size or colour, or the circumstance of the horse being cropped, but by his face? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Is that common a convenient common to ride off, after having committed such an offence as this? - A. There are a number of turnings all manner of ways, to Potter's-bar, and different places; I told my husband of what I had seen directly as he came home.

Court. Q. Did your husband take him upon your description? - A. Yes, it was three weeks ago last Friday.

Q. Was your husband with you at the time you saw him? - A. No, he came home; after I had seen him, my husband was in view, and the prisoner was in view at the time; I saw him on the day that my husband took him.

Jury. Q. Had you known the person before the day on which he committed that robbery? - A. No; I said, Balam, there goes the gentleman that robbed captain Owen and my mistress, Mrs. James.

Q. Did you see where your son was at that time? - A. I did not.

Q. Look at him again, and tell me if you have any doubt whether that is the man? - A. That is the man that robbed captain Owen, and took his watch, and put it in his right-hand waistcoat pocket to my certain knowledge.

Q. Which of his hands did he take the watch with? - A. With his right-hand, and the bridle in his left.

Court. Q. Had he any whip? - A. He had a little came tucked into his boot.

Q. Where was his pistol at that time? - A. In his left hand with the bridle.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where you live is very near the turnpike-gate? - A. It is not the turnpike-gate, it is a gate that opens to the common.

Q. You say, you observed the person twice, between the time of the robbery, and the time of the prisoner being apprehended? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you no man in the house at the time? - A. No.

Q. Are there any houses near your's? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it for granted, you alarmed your neighbours, and desired them to pursue him? - A. No, I did not; if I had seen any body on horseback come past, I should have alarmed them.

Q. There are several houses in your neighbourhood? - A. Not close by.

Q. You know it was a chance whether you might ever see him again, and yet you gave no alarm? - A. I told several people, but he had got by so far, they could not have pursued him.

Q. However, you did not go to your neighbours to give the alarm? - A. No, I have not time to gossip.

Q. Upon your oath, did you, the second time, alarm your neighbours? - A. All that I have to say is, he is the man that robbed captain Owen.

Court. Do not put yourself in a passion with the gentleman.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you never heard of a reward of forty pounds? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you expect, or your husband, to get forty pounds if that man is convicted? - A. I do not know any thing about it.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know, that your husband will have forty pounds for apprehending him? - A. I have heard gentlemen say so.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you expect it? - A. To be sure, we shall have something, I dare say.

Q. Do not you expect to have the forty pounds? - A. Yes, I dare say we shall.

Q. Do you mean to say, you have given the same account to day, that you gave at Bow-street, when you were first examined? - A. I dare say I have.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, if you have given the same account now, that you gave that day? - A. He is the man.

Q. Have you given the same account? - A. It will be found I have.

Q. Did you say, at Bow-street, that he walked his horse back wards and forwards at the gate? - A. I did not.

Q. Is your house immediately adjoining the road? - A. Yes.

Q. Is not there a garden before your house, twenty or thirty yards? - A. There is only a little bit of a path.

Q. How long? - A. About as long as this board.

(About a yard and a half.)

Q. You thought it was an extrordinary thing to see a man walking backwards and forwards? - A. No, I did not; I just saw him before they got into the chaise.

Q. And the man you had never seen before? - A. No.

Q. You heard all the conversation? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You have told us, he said, he would blow his brains out, if he did not give him the watch; upon your oath, was that the expression that was made use of? - A. Yes.

Q. Then, if it has been sworn, that the expression was, I will be troublesome to you, it is not correct. -

Court. That is argument rather than question.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were these very young children? - A. One about two years old, and the other a baby of twelve months old to day.

Q. You did not go across the common and leave these two children? - A. No.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not assert, at Bow-street, that the man that robbed captain Owen galloped past you, with a crape over his face, and that the wind blew it on one side? - A. No, I did not.

JOSEPH BALAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am herdsman and common driver to the parish of Edmonton, my business is about the common from morning till night: On the 9th of May, I was coming home from Barnet, and when I got on to the common, my wife held up her finger to me, and beckoned; I touched my horse, and was home in a minute, she clapped her hands together, and said, good God, Joe, here is the highwayman that robbed my mistress, Mrs. James, and Miss Clark, and captain Owen; I said, give me my shoes and my stick, and my bill, and I will pursue him, and take him, please God blesses me; Mr. Franklin was in sight then, and no other man but Mr. Franklin; I pursued him, I in my cart, and Mr. Franklin Jogging along upon his horse; I pursued him nearly a mile, and then I got nigher to him; there was a load of dung coming, and I put with my hat upon my stick, for the men with the dung to stop him, but they did not; I drove down to the gate that parts Enfield-common and Edmonton-common; I then stopped down in my cart, and took up my stick and my bill, and got down out of my cart, and sprung at his horse's bridle, and caught it; I up't with my hand, I told him, he was the man that robbed Mr. James, on the 13th of March, he hesitated a little, and said, it would not do; I told him it should do, it was either him or me, it is either your life or mine; says I, I will take you; he immediately flew from

his horse, he went off on the off-side of the horse.

Court. Q. By the off-side, do you mean the right-hand side or the left? - A. The off-side is the right-hand side, and the near-side is the left-hand; I was standing on the left-hand side of the horse, he got off from the different side to what you would get up on horseback; Mr. Franklin then flew from the hind part of the horse to make for the Chace, and so did I, caught hold of him.

Q. Did he run far? - A. No, we both joined like at the hind part of the horse; I had hold of the shirt of his coat, then we scuffled till we tumbled into a great muddy ditch together, luckily, it was my fortune to be at the top; I squeezed him into the mud; I clapped one hand upon the nape of his neck; and my knee on his loins, and said, where is your pistol, it is in my waistcoat-pocket, he says, I turned him a little on one side, and took the pistol out of his pocket; my son then came up, and I desired him to take hold of one of his hands, and we pulled him out of the ditch together; we then took him into my son's cottage; he said, do not beat me, for I am fairly taken; we got him into the cottage, and he begged some water and a towel to wash himself, he was dirty from being in the ditch; after he had washed himself, and refreshed a little, he made a very great plunge in the house, with a deal of resolution to try to get away to make his escape; then I set at him with a deal of resolution, and down with him in the house, and when he fell down, his hat fell off, and his crape fell over his face.

Q. Had not his hat fell off in the ditch? - A. No, his hat fitted on very tight this black thing; there are two pieces of lead, one at each corner of it; I then tied his hands behind him, and put him into a one horse cart that I had at the door; I took him to Mr. Gundry's just by, and from there I took him to Bow-street; my son went with me to London, Mr. Bond examined the pistol at Bow-street, and it was not loaded.

Q. How soon did you hear from your wife, of Mrs. James having been robbed? - A. They had been gone with the chaise about ten minutes when I came home, and then my wife told me directly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. All that you knew of this man before you took him is what your wife told you? - A. Yes, I had seen him on the Common several times, I opened the gate to him one morning and pulled off my hat, I thought he was a gentleman; I saw him stop a chaise near Mr. Kingston's gate.

Q. There was no robbery committed that day that you took him? - A. No, nor since.

JOSEPH BALAM , Jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the son of the last witness, I live on Ednonton-common; I saw my father get out of the cart, with his bill in his hand, close to the house where I live; I saw my father go up to the prisoner, that is the man, (points to the prisoner;) when my father laid hold of the prisoner's horse.

Court. Q. How far does your father live from you? - A. About a mile and a half; I heard the prisoner say, it will not do; I heard my father say, if he moved his hand, or offered to put his hand to his body, he would chop it off, then the prisoner flew from his horse, and tried to run away, my father was close after him, he had hold of the flap of his coat, and there was a bit of a boggy place, a ditch, or what you may please to call it, and there the prisoner was taken, and my father got across him, and pinned his head down to the ground, and I came up and assisted, he laid hold of one side of him and I the other; he asked the prisoner where his pops were; he told him it was in his waistcoat-pocket, but not loaded; then we got him upon his legs, and took him into the house where I lived; then my father told me to get a string to tie the prisoner's hands; then the prisoner resisted very much and tried to get away, and the force of us all struggling with the prisoner, burst the door-way open, we tied his hands, and put him into the cart; in the struggle his hat came off, and the crape fell down over his face, we did not examine his pockets; this is the crape, it had two pieces of lead to it; we put him into the cart, he wished to be released, for his hands were tied behind him, and he was in very great agony; we stopped at the Cock, at Bowes-farm, and he called for one shilling's worth of brandy and water; he pulled out some money to pay for it, and said, that is all the money I have got, he had eight or nine shillings and a half-guinea; I said, it was a very bad day for him, and he said, it was a very good day to him, for he was tired of his life; then we brought him to Bow-street.

Mr. Knowlys. The post-boy is here, I shall not examine him, but I will call him, if my learned friends chuse to examine him.

SAMUEL HOWLETT sworn. - Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were the post-boy that drove these two ladies, and the gentleman? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were the post-boy that drove the chaise? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been examined at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the man that stands at the bar? - A. did you see that man at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. You said there, you did not think that was the man that robbed the carriage? - A. I could only see one side of the lower part of his face, and I thought he was a fresh coloured man, but I only saw the lower part of the face.

Q. Do you know what sort of a horse the highwayman rode? - A. A dark bay, quite dark.

Q. Chesnut and bay are not the same thing? - A. No, they are different.

Q. Did you see the horse upon which the prisoner was apprehended? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that it? - A. No, it was not.

Q. How was the man dressed? - A. In a brown coat.

Q. He was not dressed the same way that the prisoner was, when he was apprehended? - A. I do not know, his outside coat was a dark brown coat, I did not see what colour his inside coat was.

Q. And from the opportunity you had of observing him, you do not think he was the man? - A. No; I only saw a small part of his face.

Q. Was this pistol the pistol with which he robbed the chaise? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know whether the horse he rode was a cropped horse? - A. I cannot say I know, it was thin of hair at the tail.

Q. It was quite a dark bay, was it? - A. Yes.

Q. This man came up to you, in what pace? - A. He came up quite gently, with a gentle trot.

Q. Did you hear the captain tell you to push-on, and mend your pace? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not captain Owen bid you push on, after he got into the chaise? - A. I did not hear him.

Q. At what pace did this man come up to you? - A. I suppose, about six or seven miles an hour.

Q. After the robbery, did you take the nearest road to London? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. I cannot swear that, captain Owen desired me to stop at a house on the left.

Q. Did you stop at that house? - A. Yes, afterwards, but I went a little way out of the way, because I understood him I was to turn to the left, and I went a little way out of the way.

Q. How far did you go out of the way? - A. About a quarter of a mile.

Q. Did you drive them from London to this lady's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you must have known your way back again? - A. Yes; but when the gentleman told me to stop at the house on the left, I thought I should turn to the left.

Q. Do you mean to say it was only a quarter of a mile out of the road, did you not drive three quarters of a mile out of the road? - A. No, not so far as that.

Q. Did you take the direct turnpike road to London after that? - A. Yes, the same way we came.

Mr. Alley. Q. Who was your guide upon the road? - A. The ladies pointed to me, I did not know the way; I looked back, and when I came to the turning, the ladies pointed.

Court. Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, how often have you seen him in your life? - A. I do not know that I ever saw him in my life.

Q. Will you swear that you never saw him before the day you drove the ladies? - A. I may have seen the man, but never to swear to him.

Q. Will you venture to swear you never saw him before the time that the ladies were robbed? - A. To the best of my knowledge I never did.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I hardly know how to express myself upon this dreadful occasion; I am a very unfortunate man as well in health as pecuniary circumstances, and it is a very improbable thing that a man like me, who has a very bad rupture at this moment, and which I have had for a number of years, should attempt such an offence as this; I have had the honour of serving in the navy, as a midshipman and captain's clerk in the Bellerophon; I left that ship through debilitation; I was in a very debilitated state, I remained ill for eight or nine months; I had no means of subsistence, but dependence on my friends; I was then recommended to be a clerk in the lottery insurance, in Oxford-street; it was actual distress that drove me to that, and nothing else, since which I have been in a very bad way; I never was out of town in my life, till the day I was taken, except to Portsmouth and back again, and if you examine Carpmeal, who is present, he will state in what situation he found my lodgings; I declare before this honourable Court and Almighty God, as I hope and expect to meet my precious Redeemer, that I am as innocent of that robbery as any man in the world ever was, so help me God; it is a serious matter for me to assert such a thing, a very serious matter; I have had a vast number of distresses in my time, but I declare to my Maker, that what I now assert is a truth, and nothing but the truth, as I hope to see him.

For the Prisoner.

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. The prisoner has lodged with me ten weeks, previous to the time of his being taken up; he has been very regular all that time, almost always at home, he never slept out all that time.

Q. In what employ was he? - A. I understood, generally, that he was out of employ, by his being so much at home, he was a man very much at home; I never knew where he was when he was out of doors.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. Do you remember his going out the day on which he was apprehended? - A. No, I was not at home when he went out; I had occasion to be at Guildhall.

Q. You don't know whether he went out on foot, or on horseback? - A. He never went out from my house on horseback, nor ever came home to my house on horseback.

Q. Had he a lodging at your house? - A. Yes, are dy-furnished lodging.

Q. Were you ever in his room? - A. Yes, once and only once.

Q. Did you ever see any pistol or pistols, or any crape? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see him in boots? - A. I don't know that I ever did.

Q. In short, did you ever see him in such a way as induced you to believe that he ever got on horseback? - A. No.

Q. Do you know what he is, or what he has been? - A. Not till since he was taken up.

Q. When he came to your house, then he was a perfect stranger to you? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM WARD sworn. - I am a painter in Mary-le-bonne-lane, where I have lived for ten years; I have known the prisoner four or five years, he has always bore a very good character, as I always understood; he has been in the lottery line principally, and kept very good company.

Court. Q. Did you know him ever in any other capacity than that of the lottery line? - A. No, I did not; he applied to me, and asked me if I could put him into the painting business, as he said he had been in the oil way, and knew some little matter of the materials.

Q. Where did he carry on the lottery business? - A. I do not know; I understood he was a clerk to somebody in that line.

RICHARD BEARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a hair-dresser, in Wigmore-street, Cavendish-square; I have known him fourteen years, when I first knew him, he lived with his mother.

Court. Q. What age is he? - A. I should suppose, about thirty-two, my own age; when I first knew him he lived with his mother, after that, he was in the oil-trade, then I understood he went into the navy, on board the Bellerophon; he left the navy about four or five years ago, and since that he has been in the lottery business, as a clerk, I always understood him an honest character.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I was ordered to search the prisoner's lodgings; I found a quantity of duplicates in the lodgings, but nothing that led to any property claimed; most of them for trifling sums, two or three shillings, every thing in the room was cleared entirely; I knew him at the time he kept an oil-shop, in Bow-street, that was about nine years ago; I have not seen him since he kept the oil-shop.

Court. (To Ward.) Q. Can you tell me in what capacity he was, on board the Bellerophon? - A. I understood, as captain's clerk.

Mr. Const. I will undertake to say as a fact, that he has a certificate of his having been invalided from Haslar Hospital; I have seen it.

The Jury having retired near two hours, returned with a verdict of NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-68

407. RICHARD FRANKLIN was again indicted for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon Emma, the wife of Nathaniel Gundry , Esq . did make an assault, on the 1st of May, putting her in fear, and taking from her person a purse, value 6d. and ten guineas, in monies numbered, the property of the said Nathaniel .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

Mrs. EMMA GUNDRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the wife of Mr. Nathaniel Gundry , at South-Lodge, upon Enfield-Chace: On the 1st of May I was out, in my own carriage, upon Edmonton-Common , near Balam's house; a man on horseback came up to the window of the carriage, and took from me my purse containing ten or eleven guineas, I cannot say whether he was armed or not; I was very much confused at the time, and took no notice of the man.

Q. You gave it to him? - A. Yes; I did not hear the words that he said, but he took it; I was so confused that I could not observe his face at all.

Q. Was the state of your mind such that you could not see whether he was disguised or not? - A. I did not see any crape; I was very much confused, I was alone in the carriage; he asked me some questions, and then rode off; I was very much terrified, I did not take any notice of his person.

GEORGE WHITAKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am coachman to Mr. Gundry, I drove Mrs. Gundry the day she was robbed; we were three or four hundred yards from Balam's house, when a man came up to me; he was trying to put a crape over his face, I did not see his face, he ordered me to stop; he was on a dark brown horse, with a blaze of white in his face, that was all the notice I took of the horse; I have no knowledge of the man, I could not see his face.

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am footman to Mrs. Gundry, I was with the carriage when my mistress was robbed; As we were going from South-Lodge to East-Barnet, about three or four hundred yards from Joseph Balam 's house, a man on horseback rode up to the carriage, and desired the coachman to stop; he said, come madam, deliver madam; as soon as he had said those words he pulled off his hat, and tried to pull a crape over his face, which the wind blew down his back; by that time my mistress had got the purse out at the window; upon that, he put on his

hat again, and took the purse; he then counted the money through the purse, and said, is this all you have got; Mrs. Gundry said, indeed it was; then he asked for my mistress's watch; my mistress said, indeed she had no watch; he asked for it again; she said, upon her life she had no watch; he then said, is this all you have got; Mrs. Gundry said, it was; then he wished her a good morning, and rode off.

Q. Did you observe him all the time he was doing this? - A. I did.

Q. Who is the person that did this? - A. That man that stands there, I am sure of it.

Q. You saw him without any crape? - A. I did, and without his hat; I had a view of his face entirely.

Q. Did you make any remark upon the horse? - A. Yes; the horse's head, and his eyes, the offside to me was half a wall-eye, and a blaze in the horse's face.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - A. The day he was taken, the 9th of May; I do not recollect what day of the week it was; I saw him in the cart in which he was brought to town, about five minutes after he was taken.

Q. Did you say any thing to him, or he to you, at that time? - A. No; I attended at Bow-street, and gave my evidence there.

Q. Look at him again, and tell us if you have the least doubt that he is the man? - A. No; I have not the least doubt whatever.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. He was in custody when you saw him? - A. Yes; Balam had just taken him.

Q. You saw the horse also at Bow-street? - A. Yes; I rode the horse up.

Q. The horse you rode up is the same horse that the man was upon? - A. I am certain it is the same that he did the robbery upon.

Q. When you saw him in the cart, how happened it that you did not tell any body he was the man that robbed your mistress? - A. I did, to Balam and my master, as soon as he was taken; Mr. Gundry said, we have got the highwayman; I went and looked at him, and said it was the man.

Q. This man met you? - A. Yes.

Q. He came up to the coachman first, of course? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say he came past the coachman, and up as far as the carriage, before he put the crape over his face? - A. He did not put the crape on at all.

Q. Did you hear the coachman say he could not see his face for the crape? - A. Yes; he held his hat so, while he came past the coachman, trying to put the crape on.

Q. Then he never had the crape on at all? - A. No, it hung down his back; the wind blew it over his head, and it fell down his back.

Q. All this the coachman must have seen as well as you? - A. Yes.

Q. It is a chariot, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. And that chariot standing still? - A. Yes.

Q. And you are equally positive as to the horse? - A. More so of the man than of the horse.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. He was by the side of the carriage when he was robbing your mistress? - A. Yes; his face was towards her.

Q. Then he was behind the coachman? - A. Yes, with his horse's head straight to the carriage-door.

Jury. Q. Did you see any fire-arms? - A. He did not shew any fire-arms at all.

MARY PIGTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live very near Mr. Balam's house: The day that Mrs. Gundry was robbed, I was driving my cows upon the common, a man on horseback overtook me, and asked me what those two women were, in that field; I told him they were picking up some sticks; there was a man went into the field, and he asked me what he was going to do; I told him I thought he was going to take the sticks from the women; and he said, a son of a b-h, if I was there I would well lick him; he asked me if I had never been there; and I told him I never had; and he said, if I was you, I would fetch all that wood away by night; I said, Sir, you want to get us hang'd, don't you; and he replied, no, d-n hanging, they cannot hang you; and then I called to the two women coming across the field to come to me.

Q. How long might this conversation take up? - A. He stopped with me near a quarter of an hour; he went on with his horse towards Edmonton-Common; I saw him go through the gate near Balam's house.

Q. Whereabouts was Mr. Kingston's house? - A. Very near; close by.

Q. Did he ask you any questions about Mr. Kingston? - A. Yes; he asked me if that family were then here; I told him, no, they were not here now; they were mostly in town, but came down backwards and forwards; then he rode towards Edmonton-Common; I had not got into my house before the news came that Mrs. Gundry was robbed!

Q. When did you see him again? - A. The same man rode by me that very day that he was taken by Balam.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. I really think that is the man; I am almost positive it is the man.

Court. Q. Are you or not positive? - A. I am not quite positive; but I think it really to be the man.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you recollect him again

when you saw him the day that Balam took him? - A. Yes, I did.

Court. Q. Did you say so at the time? - A. I did not see him after he was taken; I saw him that same day.

Mr. Alley. Q. What sort of a horse was the man riding? - A. I did not notice the horse.

WILLIAM WATSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I keep a stable for horses.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he at any time hire a horse of you? - A. Yes, on the 8th of May; he came the next morning for it, and gave me the name of Charlton, (produces a paper); this is his own hand-writing, he wrote it in my presence, (it is read); "Mr. Charlton, at Mr. Castell's, baker, Leather-lane; "(under it was written) "Richard Franklin, May 9, 1800."

Watson. I wrote that myself.

Q. How did you know his name was Franklin? - A. I heard it at Bow-street after he was taken; I sent to Mr. Castell's to inquire after such a person, I was satisfied, and I let him have the horse; the next morning he said he was to go to South-Mims, and return the same evening.

Q. How far is that from London? - A. Between fourteen and fifteen miles.

Q. Had your horse any thing particular about his eye? - A. A little white in his eye.

Q. Is that what they call a wall-eye? - A. Not what we call a wall-eye; not a full wall-eye, but a speck of white in the eye.

Court. Q. Had he a blaze in his face? - A. Yes.

Q. How was he dressed? - A. In a brown loose coat; he had boots on at the same time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const Q. Had he that horse of you on the 1st of May? - A. No, never in his life before; the horse was at Swaffham, in Norfolk, Mr. Champante had him the 13th of April, and returned him the 7th of May.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Had you seen a horse much resembling your's? - A. I saw a horse whose hindquarters very much resembled my horse.

JOSEPH BALAM , senior, sworn. -

Court. This man has given his evidence in the former trial; perhaps the Gentlemen of the Jury will be satisfied if I read it over; and if there is any thing that he wishes to correct he can do so, (reads). You said, you are the driver of Edmonton-Common; that, on the 9th of May, your wife held up her finger, and beckoned to you; that you touched your nose and was home in a minute; she clapped her hands together, and said, good God! Joe, here is the man that robbed my mistress, Mrs. James, and Miss Clark, and Captain Owen; I bid her give me my shoes, my stick and my bill; I said, I will pursue him please God blesses me, and take him; the prisoner was then in sight; I pursued him in my cart and the prisoner jogged on upon his horse, till I came to the other side of Mr. Gundry's, nearly a mile, then I got higher; as I got on, he was never out of my fight, I drove down to the gate that parts Edmonton-Common and Enfield-Common, I took up my stick, and my bill, and got out of my cart; I sprung at the prisoner's bridle, and caught it; I up'd with my bill, and told him he was the man that robbed Mrs. James, on the 13th of March; he hesitated a little, and said, it will not do; I told him it should do, it was either him or me, either your life or mine, I will take you; he flew immediately from his horse, he went off on the off-side of the horse, that is on the right-hand side, a different side from that on which a man would get up; the prisoner flew from the hind quarter of the horse to make for the Chace, and so did I; we both joined like, at the hind part of the horse, I had got hold of the skirt of his coat; then we skuffled till we tumbled into a muddy ditch together; I was quickly at the top, and squeezed him into the mud; I clapped one hand upon the nape of his neck, and my knee upon his loins, and said, where is your pistol; he said, it was in his waistcoat-pocket; I turned him on one side, and took the pistol out of his pocket; then my son came up, and I begged of him to lay hold of one of his hands to keep his hands from his side; we took him out of the ditch, and took him into my son's cottage; he had some water to wash himself, and then he made a very great plunge in the house, with a deal of resolution, to try to get away; then I set at him with resolution, and down'd with him in the house; when he fell down, his hat fell off, and a crape fell over his face; the hat did not fall off in the ditch, for it fitted on very tight; this black thing, that crape, has two pieces of lead, one at each end; I tied his hands behind him, and put him into a one horse cart that I had at the door; I took him to Mr. Gundry's, and then to Bow-street, my son went with me to London; Mr. Bond examined the pistol at Bow-street, and it was not loaded; I heard of Mrs. James being robbed about ten minutes after I came home. In cross examination, he said he heard of no robbery the day he was taken.

Court. (To Witness.) Q. Is what I have read, true? - A. It is all true.

Q. Is there any thing that you would add to it, or take from it? - A. I saw him before he robbed Mrs. James, I thought he had been some gentleman, and I let him through the gate; I knew him again when I saw him.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you see Mr. Gundry, or his footman, after you had taken him? - A. Yes; as I was taking him to town, I saw Mr. Gundry Mrs. Gundry, and the footman; the footman said, in the hearing of the prisoner, that that was the man.

Q. Did he make any answer to that? - A. He said, if we knew who he was, and the circumstances he had been in, we should pity his case; Mr. Gundry made answer, and said, no, not in these matters, these matters are terrifying.

JOSEPH BALAM , junior, sworn. -

Court. I will read to you what you said before, and you will say whether it is correct, (reads). I am the son of Joseph Balam ; I live on Edmonton-Common: I saw my father get out of his cart, with a bill in his hand, and go towards the prisoner; I heard the prisoner say it would not do; I heard my father say, if he moved his hand he would chop it off; then the prisoner flew from his horse, and tried to run away; my father was close after him, he had hold of him at the time, in a boggy place, or ditch; my father got across him, pinned him down, and I came up and assisted; he laid hold of him on one side, and I on the other; he asked the prisoner where his pop was; he said, in his waistcoat-pocket, but not loaded; we took him into the house, and then my father told me to get a string to tie his hands; he resisted very much, and tried to get away, and the force of us all three struggling burst the door way open; we tied his hands, and put him into the cart; in the struggle his hat came off, and the crape fell down over his face; we did not examine his pockets; the crape had leads to it; we put him into the cart; he wished to be released, for his hands were tied behind him, and he was in very great agony; after that we stopped and had some brandy and water; I told him it was a bad day for him; and he said it was a very good day to him, for he was tired of his life.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, the day that I was apprehended by Mr. Balam, and when I hired the horse, I told Mr. Watson I was going to South-Mims, which is but a very little distance from where I was, I have an uncle lives there that I meant to have called upon, that was my reason for going that road; when I was taken, I was very glad it had frustrated my intention in a thing that I never was guilty of; and as to the day that they attribute the robbery to me, I was at Mr. Castell's in the morning, about half past eleven o'clock, and I only went to the other end of the town to see my poor mother, who is bed-ridden; I staid with her about an hour, or an hour and a half, and then I took a walk round and came to Mr. Castell's again; that I declare is the truth, and nothing but the truth.

For the Prisoner.

- CHAMPANTE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You have heard Mr. Watson examined? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the horse? - A. I cannot swear to the horse; I hired a horse of him on the 13th of April; I rode him a circuitous course by Swaffham; on the 27th I was indisposed; I remained at Swaffham till the 4th of May, and then I sent the horse to town by the waggon.

Q. That waggon would arrive in town on the 7th? -

Court. I am satisfied that the horse that he had, when he was taken, was not the horse upon which the man who committed the robbery rode.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 30.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-69

408. JOHN, alias HENRY CRUSOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , two silk handkerchiefs, value 7s. the property of James Elliot .

RACHEL ELLIOT sworn. - I am the wife of James Elliot , baker , Bostock-street, Old Gravel-lane : The first time I ever saw the prisoner was the 27th of April, I saw him come out of the next house; and on the 29th, a little after four o'clock, I saw him come out of my house with his hands in his bosom; I came home immediately, and missed my handkerchiefs; he went off; my husband was in the yard; I had left the handkerchiefs upon the table about a quarter of an hour before; I left nobody in the room when I went out; I saw the prisoner again about half an hour afterwards; I told him he had taken my handkerchiefs; he said he had not; I said he had one of them round his neck, and he took it off and gave it me; (produces it;) he said he had pawned the other, and gave me the duplicate of it; this handkerchief I know to be mine, by a hole I tore by a pin. (Produces the duplicate.)

Prisoner. She said she would send me to jail if I did not give her the handkerchief.

Witness. I did not say any such thing.

WILLIAM MOXON sworn. - I am servant to John Mashiter , a pawnbroker, No. 16, Ratcliff-highway: On the 29th of April I took in this handkerchief from the prisoner for three shillings; this is the duplicate I gave to the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. This is my handkerchief, I know it by the hem; it is my own work; here is some of the silk that I left upon it; I am positive it is my own.

Q. (To Moxon.)How far is it from the prosecutrix's to your house? - A. Five or six minutes walk; not more.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down Ratcliff-highway; I met with a sailor ; he said, shipmate, where are you going; I told him I was going on board my own ship; he said he was going to Portsmouth, and he would give me a pot or two of beer if I would go to the pawnbroker's, and pawn this handkerchief for him; I told him he might go him

self; he said he did not like to go into a pawnbroker's shop, there were always so many women there; and I bought them of him, and pawned one of them; I gave him the money for both of them.

GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t18000528-70

409. JOSEPH NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November, 1799 , ten guineas, a Bank-note, value 2l. and a Banknote, value 1l. the property of Duncan Stewart .

DUNCAN STEWART sworn. - I am a baker : The prisoner came to me on the 5th of November last, about eight o'clock in the evening, be said he was the servant of Mr. Houston, of St. Helen's; Mr. Houston is a hot-presser, I know him perfectly well; he said that not having any cash in the house - they had sent the cash to their banker's - this was Monday evening - a person had called that they owed a small bill to, that was going out of town early in the morning, and if I would have the goodness to lend him thirteen pounds, seven shillings, Mr. Houston would send me over a check for the money as soon as the banking-house was open; I did not much approve of the conduct of the man, and as such I told him I would send it over; accordingly I called one of my lads out of the bake-house, and told him he must keep the person a little bit, and I would send it; he went away, I called up my lad, Thomas Chapman , and gave him ten guineas in gold, a two-pound Bank-note, and a one-pound Bank-note; the lad went out with the money; I told him to give it to the housekeeper at the private door, and not give it to any man whatever; the lad returned back in a very short time, and said he met the gentleman, who was very angry with him for being so long, and he had given the money to him; before I saw the prisoner in custody I thought I should not be able to swear to him, but the moment I saw him it struck me forcibly as if I had been ever so well acquainted with him; I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS-CHRISTOPHER CHAPMAN sworn. -I am servant to Mr. Stewart: On the 5th of November last, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner ask for something for Mr. Houston, I could not hear what; for my master called me up, and said, Tom, you must take this over to Mr. Houston's, there were ten guineas in gold, and a two-pound note and a one-pound note; as I was coming out of the shop the prisoner at the bar met me, as if coming from Mr. Houston's; he began swearing at me for not making haste, he told me the gentleman was waiting for the money; and knowing that he was the man that came into the shop for the money, I held my hand to him and he took it out; I came back, and my master wondered at my coming back so soon, and he sent me to Mr. Houston's to enquire.

Prisoner. Q. You say I swore at you; what words did I make use of? - A. A d-'d puppy, or a d-'d scoundrel, I do not know which.

- HOUSTON sworn. - I am a hot-presser, in St. Helen's; I know Mr. Stewart as a baker living near my residence.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do not know any thing of him at all; I have not the least idea of his countenance.

Q. You did not give him orders then to request ten guineas, and a two-pound and a one-pound note? - A. Nothing of the kind.

Q. (To Stewart.) Do you know when he was apprehended? - A. A fortnight ago last Saturday; he was detained by another baker attempting the same again; I saw him in Bridewell.

Prisoner's defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court, and the decision of the Jury; I have a wife and three children who reside thirty miles in the country, and my friends are all there; I did not expect my trial to come on so soon.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-71

410. LEWIS CHRISTIANA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , four pounds weight of indigo, value 30s. the property of Edward Hanson , John Pearson , Thomas Styles , William Pearson , and Daniel Gossett .

THOMAS GRAVES sworn. - I work in the warehouses in the Steel yard ; the prisoner was at work with me: On the 25th of May as we were going home to dinner, I saw the prisoner go behind the pile of chests and take a smock frock off the chest; I saw something stand out at the side, it looked very big; he put it across his shoulder; he had got, I suppose thirty yards from the warehouse-door when I called him back again; he came back very readily; I asked him what he had got there; he said he had only got a bit of indigo or two, and he thought it no harm; he was going to put them into a chest that was near him; I said, give them to me, that they may be put into the right chest; he pulled off his hat, and there were two or three bits in his hat; and then I sent for my master; the constable was sent for, and I delivered him the indigo.

WILLIAM RICHARDS sworn. - I am servant to Edward Hanson , John Pearson , Thomas Styles , William Pearson , and Daniel Gossett ; I am constable of the ward, and was called to assist: On the

28th of May I received the indigo from Thomas Graves ; (produces it;) Mr. Hanson is not here.

Q. Do you know to whom the property belongs? - A. No.

Q. (To Graves.) Do you know who this property belongs to? - A. No; my masters are the warehouse-keeper s.

Q. Are your masters answerable to the merchants for the property in those warehouses? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I found them coming out of our warehouses.

Q. (To Graves.) Could you tell whether any indigo was missing? - A. No, I could not tell, there is such a great quantity.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-72

411. EDWARD RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a bag, value 1d. and sixty pounds weight of raw coffee, value 3l. the property of Andrew Cornish .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ANDREW CORNISH sworn. - I keep the warehouses called Dowgate warehouses , and have for many years; they contain mostly coffee and cocoa: On the 1st of May I missed a quantity of raw coffee; the prisoner was a labourer in the warehouses, and had been for full a twelvemonth; the prisoner was a servant of mine; he was afterwards apprehended and taken before a Magistrate; I saw a bag of coffee at Guildhall the day before his examination; the prisoner was present.

Q. Was that bag your bag or not? - A. I cannot say whether it is or not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. There are three locks; the Custom-house lock, the Excise lock, and the warehouse lock? - A. Yes.

Q. This was on the 1st of May? - A. Yes.

Q. On going to that warehouse on the 2d of May, did you find your warehouse broke open? - A. Not on that day.

Q. Did you find all your three locks secure and safe? - A. They were.

Q. Do not you believe that they were perfectly secure from the last day of April to the time the prisoner was taken up? - A. I sometimes attend to the securing of them; I have found them open by mistake.

Q. Were they left open on the 1st of May? - A. They were not.

Q. Nor on the last day of April? - A. No; it was part of the duty of that man to go round the warehouses night and morning, and see every thing safe.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable of the city of London: On Thursday, the 1st of May, I saw the prisoner standing at the corner of the Old Change in Cheapside, with a box; I observed the box and I observed him; I saw it very loosely corded, and the prisoner rather in a hurry; I looked and observed no direction upon the box at all; he was looking about him, and during that time a coach get off the box the kirb; before the coachman could get off the box the prisoner opened the door; he put the box in, and the coachman shut the door; he ordered the coachman to drive to Chesterfield-street, Marybone; I then went up to the door, and looked steadfastly at the prisoner; he seemed to be very much confused; the coach drove off into Newgate-street, opposite Bagnio-court; I saw him get off the seat; he told the coachman to draw up; upon that the coachman drew up on the off side; I then ran round the horses' heads, and before I had got to the coach-door he had opened it, and was going to get out; I immediately stopped him, and shoved him back into the coach; I then got into the coach; he asked me what I meant by that; I then told him I had a suspicion that that box was not honestly come by; I asked him if it was his own property; he said, no; I asked him whose it was, he said it belonged to a gentleman's servant at the other end of the town; that he had left it with him, and desired that he would take it to him; and not being satisfied in my own mind, I ordered the coachman to turn round and go to the Compter; the box was in the coach; I took him to the Compter; I there asked him for the key; he said there was no key, it was not locked; I asked him if he had any objection to my opening it; he said he had not; I opened the box, and found a bag containing a quantity of raw coffee; I took him before Alderman Newnham the next morning, and he remanded him till the Wednesday following; the bag was kept in the Alderman's room during that time, in the box; and it was advertised on the Wednesday; I saw the same box again, I sealed it up on the 1st of May; Mr. Cornish attended, and Mr. Brown, his clerk; they saw the bag, and he was fully committed; the bag and box were delivered to me, and I sealed it up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The first time you saw the prisoner was in the Old Change? - A. Yes.

Q. And because the man was in a hurry, going about his business, you took him to be a rogue, and stopped him? - A. So it turned out; I had some suspicions about it; I am a little judge of these things.

Q. The box you spoke of had no directions upon it? - A. No. (Produces the property.)

- BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have been clerk to Mr. Cornish between nine and

ten years; the prisoner was labourer to Mr. Cornish, and had access to all parts of the warehouse.

Q. Did you, on the 1st of May, miss any coffee? - A. The 1st of May was a holiday.

Q. The day before? - A. I cannot say; there had frequently been coffee missing.

Q. Look at that bag? - A. The bag is inside out.

Q. Then you had better empty the coffee out.(The coffee was emptied out.) Do you see any mark there by which you can swear to it? - A. It is one of the bags that has been in the warehouse, and has been lodged there with coffee.

Q. That is one of the bags that has been intrusted to Mr. Cornish's care? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. By what mark do you swear to this bag? - A. By the shipmark, E B, 250.

Q. Is there any other mark? - A. Yes; an original mark of S H.

Q. What do you mean by the original mark? - A. It is a plantation-mark; the other is the ship's name, and the captain's name.

Q. I take it every bag that comes from the plantation has the same mark? - A. I look upon it not; it may.

Q. Do you know whether it is the custom of this plantation to mark with S H, or not? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Now the ship's mark - is not every bag brought by that ship marked with the same mark? - A. It ought.

Q. How many does a ship bring? - A. Sometimes a ship does not bring more than ten, and sometimes five thousand.

Q. If the ship comes over in 1798 or 1799, all the bags will be marked with the same mark? - A. Yes, if the ship's name and the captain's name is the same.

Q. Can you tell whether this bag came over in 1798 or 1799? - A. No.

Q. Will you swear to this bag being in the warehouses any time in April last? - A. Not without looking at the book; that bag might have been out of our warehouse six months ago; but still it has been the property of Mr. Cornish.

Q. The business of Mr. Cornish, as a warehouseman, is this, that when coffee is landed, it is deposited in that warehouse for a certain time? - A. Yes.

Q. At what period does it leave the warehouse, when it is sold to the grocer? - A. Yes; or being delivered for exportation.

Q. Will you swear that that bag was in Mr. Cornish's warehouse at any period of the year 1800? - A. I cannot.

Q. Will you swear it was in Mr. Cornish's warehouse in any part of 1799? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath at what time? - A. I cannot exactly tell.

Q. Did you ever see it in the warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. When did it first come in? - A. About a year and a half ago.

Q. Will you swear that it was not delivered? - A. If it was delivered property it must have been delivered for exportation, for it was prize coffee that was in it.

Q. Will you venture to swear that that bag was not delivered out of Mr. Cornish's warehouse last year? - A. I look upon that bag to be a bag that has been started, and put into casks; I can tell if I refer to my book.

Q. Refer to your book then. (Produces his book.) Is that your day-book or your ledger? - A. It is my weighing-book.

Q. Are these entries made from the weighings themselves? - A. After I weigh them I put them upon pieces of paper, and then copy them into the book.

Q. Where are those pieces of paper? - A. Delivered to the broker.

Q. Those pieces of paper then are the originals? - A. They are.

Q. This book is only a copy from those pieces of paper? - A. It is.

Mr. Gurney. Then it is not evidence.

Court. You can make it evidence if you chuse.

Mr. Gurney. To shew your Lordship I am not afraid of the contents, I will examine to the book:

Q. Now tell me what is that book? - A. The weighing-book.

Q. According to this book, at what time was that bag emptied? - A. I cannot tell from that book.

Q. At what time does it appear by that book that it was weighed off? - A. The 14th or 15th of March, 1799.

Q. Was it at the time it was weighed off, emptied? - A. It was not.

Q. Does that book afford you any further information upon the subject? - A. It does not.

Q. Then can you now tell me if that bag was in Mr. Cornish's possession in December last? - A. I cannot.

Q. In November? - A. No.

Q. In October? - A. I cannot.

Q. How long it has been out of Mr. Cornish's possession you do not know? - A. No.

Q. Give me leave to ask whether bags that have been in Mr. Cornish's possession do not find their way on board ships and on board lighters? - A. Yes, for the purpose of mending other bags; the prisoner himself has taken bags from the warehouse for that purpose, by my order.

Q. Do the bags at any time become your perqui

site? - A. No, unless I purchased any for my own use.

Q. Can you swear positively that you never purchased that identical bag? - A. I am certain I never did.

Q. Are bags never left at the public-house, the Friars, near the warehouse? - A. No.

Q. Are bags of this sort ever sent out of the warehouse after they become Mr. Cornish's property in overtakers? - A. Yes, but they have a private mark put upon them; the mark of those packages which have been started.

Court. Q. Has this bag that mark? - A. No, it has no mark but the original mark.

Q. There is no mark upon that bag which denotes it ever to have been the property of Mr. Cornish? - A. There is not.

Q. What ship did that come by? - A. The Eagle.

Q. Did all the coffee which came by that ship come into the possession of Mr. Cornish? - A. Some of it.

Q. What did the ship contain? - A. To the best of my recollection sixty hogsheads, and about five hundred bags came to our warehouse.

Q. Will you venture to swear there were no other bags that came in that ship that went to some other warehouse with that mark upon it? - A. I am almost sure.

Q. Is it possible that you can know? - A. It is very seldom that it goes to two different persons.

Q. Do you happen to know how many of those five hundred bags you had delivered out of your warehouse before the end of the last year? - A. I do not think there were any remaining at that time; this identical bag I can remember being started by the number; I only know that from my book.

Q. Shew me where it appears in the book? - A. I can shew it by a memorandum from the day-book.

Q. Is the day-book here? - A. No; it was started on the 15th of March, 1799.

Q. And when that bag went out of the warehouse after, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. Did you never know an instance of a bag going out of your warehouse fairly, without a mark upon it? - A. Never.

Q. Are they never given to the Custom-house officers to make aprons? - A. No.

Q. Nor to the Excise officers? - A. No.

Q. Have you never given them yourself for that purpose? - A. I cannot recollect any such thing having been at all.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you, that this bag you know from the circumstance of its being a part of a parcel of eighty that were started? - A. Yes.

Q. If it had gone out of your warehouse then, would it have gone fairly? - A. It could not.

Q. Has it any such private mark as it would have, if it was to get to an overtaker? - A. It has no private mark upon it.

Q. If bags were given, would they be given with raw coffee in it? - A. No.

Q. Is that coffee the same sort that you had in your warehouses in April and May last? - A. I cannot swear to the coffee.

Prisoner's defence. The first was a holiday, on every holiday we leave the doors open; on the 1st of May I went out, and took a pint of porter; I met with a person that had this load; when I have nothing to do, I do any thing for any body that will employ me; I met with a person who asked me to take this box in a coach to Chesterfield-street, Marybone, and having nothing to do, I took it.

For the Prisoner.

JEFFERY BARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a Custom-house Officer; I had the care of Mr. Cornish's warehouse.

Q. Under what locks are the warehouses kept? - A. The Custom-house, the Excise, and Mr. Cornish's locks.

Q. Is it easy to pick those locks? - A. I should think not.

Q. The prisoner was taken on the 1st of May, were you there the day before he was taken up? - A. If the warehouse was open I was.

Q. Have you ever known any bag which had contained coffee to be sold? - A. Mr. Cornish's clerk frequently buys them for his use, or for overtakers.

Q. Have you ever known an instance of a bag being given? - A. As he buys many bags, I have myself asked him for a bag, and he has let me have it.

Q. What is the value of a bag of that sort? - A. I do not know, I suppose about three-pence or four-pence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It is not an easy thing to pick Custom-house locks? - A. No.

Q. But it might be easy, perhaps, for any body to take coffee before they were locked up? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that bag - is that a bag that was ever given to you, by Brown? - A. That I am sure I could not swear.

Q. Has it any mark upon it, that it would have, if it was given for an overtaker? - A. It has the import mark.

Q. Is any private mark put upon it by Mr. Cornish? - A. Not that I know of; it has the mark of the ship, and the lot.

Mr. Gurney. Q. There is no mark belonging to Mr. Cornish? - A. No.

Q. If a bag was given to you, would it have any

more marks upon it, than there is upon that bag? - A. No.

WILLIAM STROUD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a Custom-house Officer; I surveyed these warehouses during the holidays, the warehouses are locked up, and when they are open we are always there.

Q. Is it possible for any thing to be stolen out of the warehouses while you are upon your duty? - A. It may be.

Q. Is it possible for a man to take a large sack of coffee out without your observing it? - A. I should think not.

Q. Do you or not, know whether bags are frequently given away by persons belonging to the warehouse? - A. Certainly they are.

Q. Do you know a public-house called the Friars? - A. Yes, very well.

Q. Do you know if Brown has ever left bags at that public-house? - A. I cannot say; I have had bags given me myself to make aprons of.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Though a diligent officer, you did not observe a man go out with a bag of coffee? - A. No.

Q. But a servant in the house might have done so, without your knowing it? - A. We always rub the men down.

GABRIEL MATTHEWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a Custom-house officer; I survey the warehouses of Mr. Cornish; there is always one officer in the warehouse continually; when we go, we lock it up with three locks.

Q. Should you at all be surprised to hear that a man had escaped with sixty pounds weight of coffee in his breeches-pocket? - A. He could not carry one pound without being discovered.

Q. Was it possible for the prisoner then to have carried out that quantity of coffee without being derected? - A. Impossible.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you at the warehouse the day before the 1st of May? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear that, recollect yourself? - A. Every day the warehouse has been open I have been there.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, were you there upon the 30th of April? - A. I cannot rightly tell.

Q. Upon the 30th of April, if you were not there, any body might have taken out a bag of coffee? - A. But the locks are always locked when we go away.

Q. Will you swear, that on that day the warehouses were locked with locks upon them, and that you saw it? - A. We always six the locks when we go away.

NATHANIEL PLANE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am an Excise-Officer; for the last fourteen months, I have not been absent a day from these warehouses; the prisoner at the bar worked in the warehouses; we always rub down the men.

Q. Is it possible for any man to carry out sixty pounds of coffee without being discovered? - A. I should think not five.

Q. How was the prisoner generally dressed? - A. In a short jacket, with an apron before him.

Q. Have you ever known bags given away? - A. Yes; the clerk was kind enough to make me a present of one, about a twelvemonth ago to make an apron, and since that, I made a request of another, and he let me have it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did he give you any coffee at the same time? - A. No, I did not ask him that question.

Q. You rub down the men, you tell us? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 30th of April, 29th, or 28th, did you rub down, or make any enquiry of the prisoner, with respect to any thing he took out of the warehouse? - A. I did not.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Court. (To Tipper.) Q. Was the bag inside out when you took it from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. So that the mark could not be seen? - A. Yes; it was exactly in the same state in which I produced it here in the box.

The Jury having consulted about two hours, returned a verdict of GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-73

412. JAMES DEAKIN and WILLIAM SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , eight silver table-spoons, value 6l. four desert spoons, value 30s. five dozen of silver tea-spoons, value 3l. three pair of silver sugar tongs, value 20s. five silver watch chains, value 30s. three silver watches, value 6l. a wooden box, value 1s. three pieces of printed cotton, each containing twenty-one yards, value 10l. and another wooden box, value 1s. the property of William Mountain , John Wallis , Joseph Butt , Thomas Ennessey , Eusebius Dandy , and James Edward Miller .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Francis Weldon .

There being no evidence to prove the loss of the property, except that of the accomplice, the prisoners were both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-74

413. RICHARD FLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, of the 22d of May , eight guineas , the property of Robert Penn .

ROBERT PENN sworn. - I am a labouring man , I came up to the Plough, at Kensington Gravelpits , to abide a week or a fortnight, till I could get a place: on Monday morning the 19th of May, about ten o'clock, I went to Esquire Robertson's, to see if I could get a coachman's place; I put on the best clothes I had, I had eight guineas in my breeches pockets in three papers, four in one paper, two in another, and two in another, they were in both pockets; the same evening I took the money out of my breeches pocket, I wrapped it up all in one parcel, in a piece of brown paper, and put it in a box; on the Tuesday evening, the prisoner at the bar came into the Plough, at Kensington Gravel-pits, and I went up stairs and put away my clothes, the box was kept in the room where the prisoner slept; there are three beds in the room, the prisoner and his comrade slept in one bed, and a lad and I slept in another, nobody slept in the other bed; on Wednesday evening, when I went to bed, I tried the hasp and it was fast; on Thursday morning, I went to the box to look for my razor, I went to put the key into the lock, and found it did not go as usual, I undid it by some means or other; I looked after the money the first thing, I could not find it; the things in the box had been moved; I mentioned in the house that I had lost my money; I got a warrant, and took up the two soldier s at Staines, about six o'clock on Thursday evening; we found upon the prisoner four guineas and a half, nine shillings in silver, and three-pennyworth of halfpence; we took him before a Justice, and he was committed.

Q. Was your money all in guineas? - A. It was; there was one guinea, I can swear to it as a guinea that I have had, I dare say, thirteen or fourteen years, the first I ever saved, it was a very nice rough guinea of 1786.

Q. Was it a spade guinea? - A. No.

WILLIAM CORBETT sworn. - I am a constable of the parish of Staines, (produces four guineas and a half;) I had a warrant to apprehend two soldiers on suspicion of felony; I went in search of the prisoner, I found him drinking at the Three Tuns, at Staines; Penn went with me, and said, that is your prisoner, I immediately tapped him on the shoulder, and said, be was my prisoner; he would not go with me at all; I took out a pair of handcuffs, and then he said he would go; I took him to the Red-Lion, where the officer was quartered, and there searched him; the Magistrate ordered me to return him nine shillings and three-pence, and keep the rest which I produce; the other soldier was discharged.

Penn. This guinea I can speak to, and I believe the other three to be mine.

Prisoner's defence. On the 6th of April, I was discharged from the Warwickshire Fencible Cavalry, at Coventry; I received seventy-one days arrears, fourpence halfpenny a day, one pound six and seven-pence halfpenny; then I received fourteen days pay, at one and three-pence a day, seventeen and sixpence, and thirteen shillings for doing a serjeant's horse, and I sold my bridle and saddlebags, and horse-cloth, and a pair of buck-skin breeches, two pair of black gaters, and a pair of trowsers to a serjeant, I got one pound eleven and sixpence for them; I was discharged, and did not know how to carry them home; on the 16th of April, I inlisted in the Royal Waggon Train, and got two guineas bounty, then I went upon a recruiting party for the Plymouth division, and got a recruit, and I had two guineas for him; then I was ordered to Birmingham, and from there to Nottingham; then I was ordered to Hertford, and from there I came to this house; I was billetted there, and was very ill, being wet and tired, and I went to bed, the landlord dried my jacket for me, and brought it up to the bed to me, and then I started for Staines.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN HUGHES sworn. - I am an artificer in the Royal Waggon Train; I come to speak to the prisoner's character, and to the money that I saw him have on Sunday night and Monday night the 18th and 19th of May; Monday night I saw him with five golden guineas, and four half guineas, he pulled them out to pay my wife for his washing, and she changed him one half-guinea.

Q. Were you with him at the time? - A. No, I was at Blackwall; I have known the prisoner between six and seven years; I served five years in the same troop with him, in the Warwick Light Dragoons, he was discharged when the regiment was broke up, and then he entered into the Royal Waggon Train, in the same troop that I serve in now, and he had two guineas bounty; I never heard of any thing amiss in him.

Jury. Q. Did you hear of his having had two guineas for a recruit? - A. Yes, I heard that many times at Ware.

Prisoner. Before the Magistrate, the prosecutor said he could not swear to the money.

Corbet. He said he could not see very well to swear to it, it was dark, it was near ten o'clock at night when the man was committed; he said, his father had sent it him, and that he had sold his watch.

Court. He said, before the Magistrate, he suspected it to be part of the money that he had lost.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-75

414. WILLIAM DICKINSON, alias HALL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , twenty-one silk handkerchiefs, value 5l. and ten cotton handkerchiefs, value 20s. the property of Robert Clarkson , privately in his shop .

THOMAS BARBER sworn. - I live at No. 82, Upper East-Smithfield ; I manage Mr. Clarkson's business, he does not live in the house at all, it is Mr. Clarkson's shop: On Easter Tuesday, the 15th of April, the prisoner came into the shop; he said he wanted to buy a pair of breeches, and I shewed him some; I told him to step behind the counter to try the breeches on; upon that, he went behind the counter and tried several pair on, but none of them fitted; then I sent my son up to the other shop, at Tower-hill; I thought my son was a long time gone, and I went out of the shop to the edge of the pavement to see if he was coming; my son brought some more breeches, and he tried them on; he was behind the counter altogether from fifteen to twenty minutes; he agreed for a pair of velveteen breeches; he told me he kept a lodging-house for sea-saring people, that he lived near the Golden-Anchor, and that he would bring me eight or ten sailors the next day to clothe; he left me one shilling earnest, and said, I will send my old woman for the breeches this afternoon; he said he lived next door to Mrs. Noy's; after he was gone, it might be between two and three hours, I missed four chocolate-coloured spotted handkerchiefs, one crimson one, and, I think, from fourteen to sixteen black; the silk handkerchiefs I look upon to be worth five pounds; on the Thursday se'nnight following, he came into the shop about twelve o'clock at noon, very much intoxicated, he came under the same pretence, to look at breeches, and he made some objections as before, that he wanted leather linings; I then challenged him with having robbed me; he had one of my handkerchiefs round his neck, I have not the least doubt of its being mine; I took him to the Police-office, Lambeth-street, and Mr. Griffiths searched him.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - The prisoner was brought to the office on Friday about one o'clock: I searched him, and from off his neck I took this silk handkerchief; when I took it off his neck he resisted very much, and would not part with it, he said it was his own. (Produces it).

Barber. I cannot swear to it any otherwise than it is the same pattern, and the same size; it appears to be of the same piece.

CATHERINE DONOLLY sworn. - I live in Sun-yard: On Tuesday, about half past eleven o'clock in the forenoon, he came to our house; I was standing at the door when he went past, he was very much intoxicated in liquor; he asked me if I wanted any thing to drink; upon that he came in doors, and he had a bundle in his hand; he said he had been at a sale, and was going down to Liverpool that night, and asked me if I would accept of a silk handkerchief, a black one; I refused the black one, and told him if he would give me one of the coloured ones I would accept of it, and he did; I believe Mr. Nowlan has got it; he had a bundle of handkerchiefs.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - This is the handkerchief I received from the last witness.

Donolly. This is the same handkerchief.

Barber. I believe this to be one of the same, they are all alike.

MARY EDWARDS sworn. - The prisoner asked me if I would have any thing to drink, and I said, yes; and I went into a public-house, and he gave me a quartern of liquor, and made me a present of a handkerchief; Mr. Murray, the pawnbroker, has got it; I sent it to be pledged by one Isaacs, he is not here; it is hemmed on one side with black.

- MURRAY sworn. - On the 18th of April, I received this handkerchief from one Isaacs, for three shillings.

Edwards. This is the handkerchief I received from the prisoner.

Barber. I can say no more to it than I have to the rest.

Prisoner's defence. On Monday, in the beginning of April, I came to London from Portsmouth, and I brought these handkerchiefs with me, and I gave two handkerchiefs to these young women; I went to this gentleman's shop to buy a pair of breeches, and I gave him one shilling earnest; next day I went to Gravesend with some sailors, and when I went for the breeches he challenged me with taking the handkerchief I had round my neck from him.

Q. (To Barber.) Where were those handkerchiefs? - A. The counter is so near the shelves that you cannot go past without touching them with your clothes.

Q. So near, perhaps, that you suspected him? - A. No, I did not. GUILTY.

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-76

415. JOSEPH SHARP , and EDWARD WARREN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , a sack, value 2s. and five pecks of wheaten flour, value 20s. the property of James Surrey , and John Surrey .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

MARY BRYAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. My husband is servant to Daniel Beale , Esq. my house and Mr. Surrey's mill join, I can

go into the mill without leaving my house: On the 18th of April, between eight and nine o'clock, my husband was gone to Edmonton, there was no body on the premises but myself, and Joseph Agar , who has absconded, and Sharp; Agar was at the door of the mill, and Sharp outside, I saw them conversing together; Agar took something, I cannot tell what, upon his left shoulder, which he conveyed away to the stable where Mr. Surrey's horses and teams are; it was in a sack, and looked like some kind of meal; after he had deposited it in the stable, he returned to the mill; he rather stooped as he went past my window, but not so as to conceal his person; he returned to the mill in the course of two or three minutes; in about five or ten minutes after that time, I observed the prisoner, Sharp, go to the stable, he might be there five or ten minutes, I cannot particularly say; he then returned, locked the stable-door, and, I suppose, went home to his lodgings; I immediately acquainted my husband with what I had seen, he went to the stable to see what was in the sack, and immediately went to give information to Messrs. Surrey's; while he was gone, I stood with a candle and lantern at my own door, no one went near the stable till my husband and Mr. Surrey returned.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. The man that you have been talking of has absconded? - A. Yes, that evening.

Q. Sharp did not go into the mill? - A. No.

Q. Agar was the only person that went into the stable at first? - A. No.

Q. Warren was not present, either the first or second time, at the stable? - A. I saw nothing of him.

Q. This was nine o'clock at night? - A. Much thereabout.

Q. It was dark, was it not? - A. It was dusk; but it being a meal sack, and the man being white, I could see very clearly.

JOHN BRYAN sworn. - When I came home on the 18th of April, I received some information from my wife; I had met Sharp about one hundred and fifty yards from the mill; in consequence of my wife's information, I went to the mill, I found nobody there but Agar; then I went to the stable, the door was locked, and I got in at the window; I found a sack with the mark of Surrey upon it, I untied the sack, and found in it the best wheaten flour that we make, it contained about five pecks, or thereabouts; I then went to Mr. James Surrey ; Messrs. Surreys use the mill, Mr. Beale is the proprietor, and pays me my wages, though Mr. Surrey employs the whole of the mill; I take charge of the goods in the mill, Mr. Surrey pays so much a quarter for having it manufactured there; both the Mr. Surreys came immediately with me, they got into the stable, and I followed them, and shewed them the sack, I left the two Mr. Surreys waiting in the stable to detect the person; Mr. Surrey called out to me to assist, and I went, and there were the two prisoners about nine or ten yards from the mill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The mill and the stable adjoin? - A. No. my house and the mill join: it is about four or five steps from the mill to the stable.

Q. Then this property was removed five or six steps from one part of the prosecutor's premises to another? - A. Yes.

Q. The mill belongs to Mr. Beale? - A. Yes.

Q. And he pays you? - A. Yes.

Q. Is not Mr. Beale the proprietor of the goods then? - A. No, Mr. John and Mr. James Surrey ; they pay so much a quarter for having their goods manufactured there.

JAMES SURREY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am in partnership with my brother, John Surrey ; The prisoner, Sharp, was in my employ as carter , he had no business whatever in the mill.

Q. Had you a person of the name of Agar in your service? - A. In Mr. Beale's employ; we agree to employ the mill wholly, let there be little or much water; the whole of the corn is ours, and Mr. Beale pays the men; in consequence of information, I went with Bryan, and my brother, to our stable, we got in at the window; we got up into the hayloft by the direction of Bryan our foreman, he shewed us the sack; I did not take a light with me, it had the appearance of about five pecks of some kind of meal, I did not examine it; we waited in the hay-lost about five minutes; after that, I heard the stable-door unlock very softly, my brother was with me; the two prisoners came into the stable, but I being at the farther end of the stable could not distinguish, at that moment, who they were; I then drew near to the stable-door, I saw Sharp get into the hay-lost, Warren pulled the door after him, and stood inside, and held the door to keep it from flying open; there was nothing but a lock to the door, and that was outside; before they shut the door I could see them perfectly well; I then heard the sack draw along the boards of the hay-lost, and heard Sharp whisper to Warren, but could not hear what he said, he was about five yards from him; Warren immediately let go the door and it few open, he went up towards the rack; Sharp then gave him a sack across his shoulder; Warren took the sack out of the stable, and Sharp followed him, and looked the door after him, my brother stood by the horses all the time; we then jumped out at the window, I ran after Sharp, I caught him about forty yards from the door; Warren was by his son, with a sack across his shoulder; I told Sharp, if he made any

resistance I would shoot him; Warren then threw the sack down at my feet; I then called out for Bryan, the miller; the prisoner, Warren, then ran back towards the mill, I knew my brother must meet him; I hear my brother call out to him to stop, or he would shoot him; I then heard the report of a pistol; I immediately took Sharp back into Bryan's house; I gave Bryan charge of him, and went in pursuit of the other prisoner, leaving my pistol with Bryan; I had not got more than fifteen or twenty yards before I met my brother with the prisoner, Warren, in his custody.

Q. Do you keep your flour in your hay-lost at all? - A. No.

Court. Q. Where is your mill? - A. About a mile from Edmonton; it is called Tanners-end .

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner, Sharp, is not a person employed in the mill? - A. No, he was my carter.

Q. Agar worked in the mill? - A. Yes.

Q. That gentleman has absconded? - A. Yes; I I have not been able to take him; I had advertised him in several papers.

Q. It is not very easy for you to miss five pecks of flour? - A. No, nor forty sacks, or five pecks every day, it is impossible to miss it.

Court. Q. Did the prisoners say any thing at all? - A. No.

JOHN SURREY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am engaged in the mill business with my brother: I went with my brother, in consequence of Bryan's information, to the stable; we had not waited in the stable above ten minutes before I saw the door open, and two men enter, who they were I did not know, being at the furthermost corner of the stable I could not see then, but I heard one of them get into the lost.

Q. How do you know they were two men? - A. I saw them both come into the stable; I had seen the sack in the hay-lost, Bryan shewed it to me; it contained about five pecks of flour.

Q. What is the weight of five pecks of flour? - A. About seventy pounds; I heard them whisper, and then I stooped down behind the horse to conceal myself; about a minute after that, I saw somebody go out at the door, and shut it, but I supposed there was only one, upon which I did not immediately get out of the stable, but made up towards the door; when I got to the door, I whispered to my brother, but he was not there; I then got out at the window, but before I got out, I heard an holloa, which I supposed was my brother, as a signal that they were that way; I then jumped out at the window, and before I had got ten yards, I saw Warren running, he was then about ten yards from me; I called to him as loud as I could and told him, if he did not stop I would shoot him; and, as he did not stop, I fired a pistol, thinking to frighten him; he ran about twenty yards after that, and then I collared him, and brought him to Bryan's house; Sharp was in custody at Bryan's house.

Q. Did he give you any account of himself? - A. I never heard him speak a word; we delivered them both over to Bussey, a constable; we could not find the sack afterwards; Agar absconded.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Agar you have not been able to find? - A. No.

Q. You made no observation upon the sack? - No.

Q. What its contents were you do not know? - A. No.

Q. How are your sacks marked? - A. What we have bought since we began partnership are marked J. and I. Surrey; before the partnership J. Surrey.

Court. Q. Those sacks that were marked only J. Surrey, do you use them in your partnership? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Whether this sack had either J. Surrey, or J. and I. Surrey, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Court. (To Bryan.) Q. How was this sack marked? - A. J. Surrey; it was one of the old sacks used before the partnership.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Is it not very common for millers to lend their sacks to other miller s? - A. It is never customary at all, nor to any body else.

THOMAS BUFFEY sworn. - I am the constable of Edmonton: The two prisoners were delivered into my custody on the 18th of April; I did not hear them say any thing.

Sharp's defence. I have nothing to say because I know nothing; I am innocent of the matter.

Warren's defence. I know nothing at all of it.

The prisoner, Warren, called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Sharp, GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Warren, GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-77

416. JOHN HALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a great coat, value 5s. the property of James Pitcairn , Esq .

- SIMPSON sworn. - Mr. James Pitcairn is on his passage to India, his great coat was left at my house; I know nothing of the loss.

JOHN BAKER sworn. - I live near Mr. Simpson's, in Somerset-street ; my little boy lives opposite Mr. Simpson's: In consequence of his information, I went after the prisoner, I overtook him in Hyde-Park, near Grosvenor-gate, he had the great coat

upon him, (produces it); I told him that great coat did not belong to him, he had better take it back to the parties that it did belong to; he said the great coat was his own, what did I mean by that; I told him the coat did not belong to him, certainly, and he must go back; he said he would not go back, but I forced him to go back; I took him to Mr. Simpson's, and shewed him the great coat.

Mr. Simpson. This is Mr. Pitcairn's great coat; he desired it to be left with me, I had worn it one day, it rained and I slipped it on; I know it to be his coat.

HENRY JOHN BAKER sworn. - On the 23d of May, I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Simpson's, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; he made two attempts before he brought any thing out, and the third time he brought out a coat under his own coat; I did not see what it was, but I supposed it to be a coat; he had not any thing under his coat when he went in; the door had been left half open by the servant.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the coat of a Jew, and gave one shilling and sixpence for it; I am totally innocent of the robbery.

GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-78

417. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , one pound of tea, value 5s. nine pounds of moist sugar, value 5s. and one pound of shag tobacco, value 3s. the property of Henry Thorngate .

HENRY THORNGATE sworn. - I keep the Blackbull, Whitechapel-road : On the 11th of April, I had occasion to go down to Gravesend by the night tide, with two sailor s that had lodged with me, I was bound for them both at the East-India-House; the prisoner at the bar knew one of those sailors very well; the prisoner said he would go with the same ship, The Lady Jane Dundas, East-Indiaman, and he went with us; we went in a coach to the Dundee-arms, and I had a chest, and a bundle containing the articles that that man took from me: there was a pound of tea, a pound of tobacco, and nine pounds of seven-penny sugar; there were other things in the bundle.

Q. Did you buy it for yourself? - A. No; I bought it for one of the men, of the name of Robertson, with my own money, till the ship was paid, and then he would have paid me again; when I got to the Dundee-arms, the boat was not ready, and we had a pot of porter, and some bread and cheese and onions; the bundle was on my left-hand side, and Davis sat on my left; my two sailors went out first, and the prisoner took the bundle off the table; when we came out, instead of his turning to the right, to go towards the boat, he went up the alley, and was off like a shot, I could not overtake him, and I turned back, and went down to Gravesend with the men; I walked it up to town the next day, and as I was coming up the hill from Dartford, who should I meet but Davis; I immediately collared him, and said, you d-d rascal, you robbed me last night, now I will take you into custody; he up'd with his fist, and gave me a shove, and ran away; he broke out of the road into the fields, and I never saw any more of him till Friday the 2d of May, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw him at the Hercules, in Leadenhall-street, and I ran after him; he took down a gate-way, and there I caught him, and he was taken before the Lord-Mayor, and committed.

Prisoner's defence. When I met with that man at Dartford, he said, why did not you ship with the other men; and I said, I should be a d-d fool to let him ship me, for him to get three guineas; if I shipped myself, I should have it myself; he is a crimp.

Q. (To Thorngate.) What is your profit upon shipping men? - A. A guinea a man; if the men take their own crimpage they get two guineas, if not they get three.

Prisoner. I never took his bundle: he wanted to crimp me as he did the other two men.

For the Prisoner.

RACHEL RAYFOLD sworn. - I was had for the prisoner, he has no friends but me, I know but little of him: The prisoner was taken up by Thorngate; I went to him in the Compter, I then went to Thorngate, this day five weeks, and he said, he had got the prisoner, but did not wish to hurt him, any further than being paid for his property; the Lord-Mayor would not have any thing to do with it; I went with Thorngate to the public-house, and he said, if he would give him a guinea and a half he would have him discharged; I went down to Mr. Jacobs, in Ratcliff-highway, and borrowed half-a-guinea of him; Thorngate would not make it up for that; Mr. Jacobs went with me, and he gave him a guinea, he was to let him have another half-guinea the week following; he received the guinea, and has got the guinea still; I went to the prisoner, and told him of it; he said he was going to discharge the prisoner; how it was I do not know, but the prisoner was committed to take his trial; then he wanted me to take the guinea back again.

Q. What is Jacobs? - A. He keeps a stop-shop in Ratcliff-highway; he is not in town at present.

Thorngate. One Jacobs called me into a public-house, and Jacobs, the Jew, said, speak as favourable as you can; and while I was drinking he slipped a guinea into my waistcoat-pocket, and I shewed it to

the Magistrate; I went before the Magistrate, and told the Magistrate about the guinea; and Jacobs said, if I prosecuted the man he would swear I had compounded felony; this woman is a common thief, and the officers know the same.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-79

418. SARAH GORDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of May , a black silk cloak, value 5s. the property of Moses Moses .

ELIZABETH MOSES sworn. - I keep a clothes-shop in Whitechapel : I have lost a great number of things; I know the prisoner, she lives near me; I know nothing of the robbery.

ELIZABETH HANNIFORD sworn. - I live near Mrs. Moses; I have seen the prisoner going backwards and forwards in the neighbourhood: I saw her go into Mrs. Moses's house on the 2d of May, she might stay about a quarter of an hour; she came out with a small bundle under her arm, and a mackerel in her left-hand; the things were hanging at the door, and she stood some minutes as if she was looking at the things; she laid hold of some white petticoats, and then the laid hold of a cloak; she kept fumbling at it a good while, at last she got it down; then I saw her go into a chandler's-shop, where she resided; she did not discern me, I was sitting at my own window opposite, and had got the window up; she might have seen me; I went in, and asked Mrs. Moses if she had sold the cloak; and she said, no, and went in pursuit of her.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer: On Friday the 2d of May, I was sent for to Mrs. Moses's house; I went, and took the prisoner into custody, they had got her in the house; I searched her, and in her pocket I found this cloak. (Producing it).

Mrs. Moses. I know this to be my cloak; I know it by particular marks.

Prisoner's defence. Mrs. Moses had two guineas to make it up; I bought the cloak.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-80

419. JOHN HALSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , a pair of saddlebags, value 2s. six pair boots, value 6s. eight pair of shoes, value 8s. and a pair of pistols, value 20s. the property of Joseph Fuller .

THOMAS SIMS sworn. - I live with captain Fuller, he is at Canterbury at present: On the 7th of May, the prisoner stood at the door of the Prince of Wales's Coffee-house, in Conduit-street ; captain Fuller was gone out to dinner; about eleven-o'clock in the evening, I went in with a pair of saddle bags belonging to captain Fuller, and hung them across the banisters of the stairs; I went up stairs, and when I came down the saddle bags were gone; I began to make enquiry, the chamber-maid saw a man, in a soldier's coat, go out with something, but she could not tell what; there were half a dozen pair of boots in the saddle bags, eight pair of shoes, and a pair of pistols; I put them in myself; I went home to meet two brothers of mine, but they were not there, and then I went out to look for this man, but I did not meet with him; I returned back to the coffee-house a little before twelve; the things were delivered up to me at Marlborough-street, because captain Fuller wanted his things.

Prisoner. Q. You are upon your oath, and I hope you will take care what you swear; you say I was at the coffee-house door, I was not near the coffee-house door - are you certain it was me? - A. I am.

ELIZABETH SIMS sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Sims ; my husband came home, having lost the saddle-bags, he was going to Canterbury the next morning; we were very much alarmed, he expected two brothers of his to take farewell, and they were not come, I went out to Newman-street, where one of them lived, and in going from King-street to St. James's-square, I saw the saddle-bags, and the prisoner sitting by them, they hung over a place where the porters put their loads; I lifted up a bit of leather; I had brought them about a fortnight before from Lewes, for the captain, and they were put into the boot of the coach, and a hole was robbed in them, by that I saw they were the same; the prisoner was dressed in a soldier's coat, my husband said it was a man dressed in a soldier's coat, that made me take notice of them; the watchman came up I said, they were the saddle-bags my husband lost; the watchman said, give me charge, and I said, don't be too hasty, the watchman said, there was boots and shoes in them, and then I gave charge of the prisoner, he was sitting upon the place; I never was out so late in my life before, and was very much frightened; the prisoner had two sticks, the watchman immediately took possession of the bags; the prisoner said, he found them in Oxford-road, and at Marlborough-street, the next morning, he said he found them in Hanover-square.

Q. Did you see the bags opened at any time? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What time was it? - A. About eleven or a quarter after, I cannot say exactly.

EDWARD HUTCHINS sworn. - I am a watchman in Oxford-road: On the 7th of May, a little before twelve, I met the prisoner coming along Oxford-road with the saddle-bags upon a stick, very near Berners-street, Oxford-road; I asked him what he had got there; he said his own property, that he came from Uxbridge, and was very tired; he sat down upon a place where the porters rest themselves, and this lady happened to come by, and saw it; she said the bags that were lost contained boots and shoes, I felt the soles through the leather, and said, ma'am, you are right; I took him to the watch-house with the saddle-bags, and he was taken before a Magistrate the next day; I put a mark on them, and they were delivered up, because the gentleman wanted them to go into the country with; I cut a piece off.(Sims produced the saddle bags).

Hutchins. (Produces a small bit). These are the same bags, the bit matches.

Prisoner. Q. Was there not something round that bag? - A. Yes, a piece of cloth, or handkerchief, and a stick slung through it upon his shoulder.

Sims. These are captain Fuller's bags, I have seen them a hundred times, I bought them for captain Fuller; this pair of pistol's I bought, I know them to be captain Fuller's, here is a pair of boots, and a pair of shoes that I know.

Mr. Sims. These are the same bags; I observed at the time they were taken out of the coach, that they had been rubbed against a box, and I was very much alarmed for fear my husband should get anger of his gentleman.

Prisoner's defence. I found them in the square I saw two men whispering together, and hand something over the iron pallisadoes; I went by that corner, they went away, and I looked and saw a stick sticking to something, and I took it up, I thought they would be advertised or something, and I should get something to help me on the road, I was going down to Scotland, I did belong to the Dunbarton fencibles ; in the midst of judgment, gentlemen, pray remember mercy.

GUILTY . (Aged 74.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-81

420. MARGARET LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , a coat, value 10s. the property of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I am a bricklayer , No. 81. Drury-lane ; the prisoner at the bar used to come backwards and forwards to her sister-in-law, and on the 16th of April, I saw the coat in a drawer, I went out and left it there about an hour, before I missed it the prisoner came to the house between four and five o'clock.

JOHN ACKLAM sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in the Strand: On the 16th of April, between eight and ten in the evening, the prisoner brought a coat and pledged it with me, I am sure the prisoner is the person, (produces it;) I sent her six shillings and sixpence upon it.

Brown. This is my coat, here is a place where it has been fine drawn.

Prisoner's defence. A sister-in-law of mine gave me the coat to pledge, I did not know it was stolen.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-82

421. JOHN HARMAN and WILLIAM SIMMONS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , eight quartern loaves, value 11s. the property of Philip Salter .

PHILIP SALTER sworn. - I am a baker , I live in Cambridge-street ; I stepped down to turn up two or three bakings that were in the oven; just as I had done, one of my men came and told me there was somebody gone out of the shop with bread; I went up and missed the bread from my shop window, I perceived that there were four leaves gone; I went in pursuit of them, I went up as far as Soho-square, and saw no person; I returned home, and found a great mob round the door; I directly ran up, and when I came there, my neighbour had caught one of the men, Harman close at hand in a court with four loaves, I then perceived there were four more gone, and he said nobody else had taken any, and directly after my man brought in the other prisoner.

PETER MARR sworn. - On the 23d of May, I was gone out with a baking; I came down Cambridge-street, and saw the prisoner Harman coming out of the shop with four loaves in his hand; I went down a little way further, and the other followed him with four more; I came home, there was nobody in the shop, the door was open, my master ran out into the middle of the street, in pursuit after them, he went one way and I went another; I overtook James Simmons , with four loaves upon him, but I cannot swear that he was the person; I can swear to the other prisoner.

Q. How do you know it was your master's bread? - A. It was my own manufacturing, my man can swear to his own manufacturing, and I can swear to the quality of the bread; when I laid hold of him, he said he was not the man that took it, he had it from another; I find, I don't care, you are the man that I have found the property with, and I shall take you.

THOMAS EVANS sworn. - I went in pursuit,

and brought back the little one, Harman, with four loaves upon him, and the baker swore they were his.

The prisoners left their defence with the Court, Harman called three, and Simmons five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Harman, GUILTY (Aged 18.)

Simmons, GUILTY (Aged 20.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex, Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-83

422. ANN MYRTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a cotton gown, value 6s. and a silk petticoat, value 10s. the property of John Roberts .

MARY ROBERTS sworn. - I am the wife of John Roberts , I live in Sun-yard, East-Smithfield , the prisoner at the bar was a servant of mine; I went out on a Sunday, about half-past ten; I left the prisoner in care of the house; when I returned, I missed a gown and petticoat, and some other things that are not found; they were locked up in a drawer in the room, and the prisoner was gone; I saw them again in about three weeks after, when I saw the prisoner in Catherine-wheel-alley, Whitechapel.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - On Tuesday the 29th of April, I apprehended the prisoner in Essex-street, Whitechapel, formerly called Catherine-wheel-alley; I brought her to the office, and took this gown off her back; she was rather in liquor that evening, and I was ordered by the Magistrate to put her in the watch-house that night, and the next morning I asked her what she had done with the other things that she had taken from Mrs. Roberts; she said she had not taken so many things as Mrs. Roberts said she had, there was only two gowns and one petticoat more; I asked her if she had pledged or sold them, she said, no; she had left them at the Weaver's-arms, Whitechapel-road, with the landlady of the house, for eighteen shillings; I went to the Weaver's-arms, and the landlady produced them to me; I brought them to the office, and Mrs. Roberts claimed them.

Mrs. BURT sworn. - I am the wife of John Burt , I live at the Weaver's-arms; the woman that goes under the denomination of the prisoner's mother, brought the duplicates of these things to me, she is a tenant of mine, she rents some of the out premises belonging to me; I sent a person with the duplicates, and these things were brought to me for them, they cost me a guinea and nine-pence altogether; she wanted to borrow money of me first. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Roberts.)

Prisoner's defence. This woman keeps a house of ill same; I was in the work-house, and this woman would let me have no rest till I came to her house; she lent me these things for the use of the house, keeping a bad house; and I ran away after she had made away with all my things.

GUILTY , (Aged 24.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-84

423. SUSANNAH BOWEN, alias HICKES , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2s. a linen handkerchief, value 6d. two petticoats, value 4s. and a muslin gown, value 3s. the property of Elias Creed and Ann Preston .

ELIAS CREED sworn. - My wife is a laundress.

Q. Do you know Susannah Bowen ? - A. Yes; and she goes by the name of Hickes; she was in the employment of Mrs. Pressman and my wife; they are in partnership.

ANN PRESSMAN sworn. - I am in partnership with Mrs. Creed, at Bromley : We missed a great number of things out of the wash; among others, the things mentioned in the indictment; but I cannot be positive that I ever saw them, only the ladies saying they were certain they were sent to the wash.

JOHN NOWLAND sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street: On Tuesday, the 27th of May, I apprehended the prisoner; I overtook her in the way to London; she had a bundle; I took her to Mrs. Creed's house, and searched her; upon her neck I found this muslin handkerchief, marked I; she resisted a good deal; she would not let me search her pockets; I found this linen-handkerchief in her pocket; she had this petticoat upon her; this muslin gown was tied up in a bundle; this muslin handkerchief was tied round the bundle, marked M B; there were other things in the bundle belonging to herself; I found a duplicate of a gown pawned in the Borough; I asked her what that duplicate was, she said it was a duplicate of a gown she had stole from Mrs. Creed.

Q. Had he or you made her any promise? - A. No; I told him not, and I was present the whole time; she said she hoped he would not hurt her, it was the first time, and she would tell me where all the property was.

Mrs. Pressman. The same afternoon that she was apprehended I went with her to her lodgings, and the first thing that I claimed was this handkerchief, marked M B; she denied it, and said her sister had given her it; this muslin gown, when it was lost, was in a petticoat; but I cannot say positively as to any of the things, that they were in our house, only the ladies said they were; I have had things

with these marks a great many times, for these ten years; the prisoner owned to this handkerchief, marked M B; and to the muslin spotted gown, and begged for mercy.

Prisoner. My master and mistress both promised that I should not be prosecuted if I would own to the things.

Creed. I did not promise any such thing.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-85

424. ANN HART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a pewter quart pot, value 2s. and two pewter pint pots, value 2s. the property of Thomas Foster .

THOMAS FOSTER sworn. - I keep a public-house in Queen's-row, Pentonville : On Thursday, the 10th of April, my servant went to gather his pots; he brought the prisoner back with him, with the pots upon her; his name is James Harrison ; there was one quart and two pints; she had another pot which did not belong to me; I delivered them to be officer.

JAMES HARRISON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Foster: I was gathering in my pots between nine and eleven o'clock; I took away from one house one quart and two pints; I put them down upon the steps of that house, and ran across the way after the newspaper to carry to another house on the same side of the way, and when I came back again the pots were gone off the step; I saw the prisoner and a little boy with her; I saw him pulling her cloak over the pots; upon that I took hold of her and secured her; she immediately let fall one quart and two pint pots; I took her and the pots across, over to my master; the prisoner and the pots were delivered to the constable.(The constable produced the pots, which were deposed to by Foster.)

Prisoner's defence. My little boy picked them up, and brought them to me; he used to play with a pot-boy; he brought the pots, and he said they are Jem's pots; I immediately said, you little villain, how dare you touch them, and I took them out of his hand at the moment that this man came up.

Q. (To Harrison.) Had she a child with her? - A. Yes; a boy of about seven years of age; he was pulling the cloak over the pots.

Q. Did you see the pots upon the child at all? - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner. My little boy was three weeks in the House of Correction, and when he was had before the Magistrate again, the boy was discharged.

Constable. Mr. Kinnaird sent him there, to see the event of the mother's trial, that he might be sent to the Philanthropic Society.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 43.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-86

425. JOHN BATES, alias SILK , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , one pound of tobacco, value 2s. the property of Thomas Pearson .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas Bone , Welbore-Ellis Agar , Sir Alexander Munro , Knt. Richard Frewin , William Stiles , William Rowe , Francis-Fownes Luttrell , John Buller , and Gloucester Wilson .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES LUCAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am gate-keeper to the Customs tobacco-warehouses in Well-yard, Goodman's-fields : On the 10th of September last, the prisoner was employed by the cooper in the tobacco-warehouses; there was a great quantity of leaf-tobacco in those warehouses; I rubbed down the prisoner a little after three o'clock that day, as he was going out; I found a quantity of leaf-tobacco under his shirt, next his skin; there was about a pound and a half of it; I asked him how he could do such a thing; he told me there was not much of it; and then he walked away; I scolded him for doing so.

Q. Did he say any thing else? - A. He did not; I let him go, and kept the tobacco; I locked it up, I have had it ever since; (produces it;) the prisoner came to his work the next day; as soon as he came to work the next day I sent for an officer to take him into custody; the officer came, and I went with the officer down the warehouse, and found he had made his escape through the files; I saw no more of him till the Wednesday in Easter week, the 16th of April.

Q. He made his escape in September? - A. Yes; my superior officer ordered me to go to Lambeth-street Office, there I saw the prisoner; he was committed for trial; I believe he had been at work previous to that time but two days; it is the same sort of tobacco that is in the warehouses.

THOMAS PEARSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am warehouse-keeper of the warehouses in Well-street, Goodman's-fields: On the 10th of September there was a great quantity of this sort of tobacco in the warehouses.

Q. You have the care and conduct of these warehouses? - A. I have.

JOHN MURVIN KING sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Knapp. I am clerk to Mr. Litchfield, Solicitor for the Customs. (Reads the names of the Commissioners from the indictment.)

Q. Are those the names of the commissioners? - A. They are.

Prisoner's defence. Lucas demanded a shilling of me, and said I should not work there long if I did not give it him; the next day he asked me for a shilling again; some time after that I met him upon London-bridge, and my wife was with me; he asked me where I was going, and I told him I was going to work in the Borough; and he told me I was very foolish not to give him the shilling, for I might have staid there till now.

Mr. Knapp. (To Lucas.) Q. Is there a word of truth in any thing he has said? - A. Not the least; it is as false as there is a God in heaven.

Court. Q. He says he met with you upon London-bridge? - A. I never saw him from the time he made his escape till I saw him before the Magistrate at Whitechapel.

Q. How happened it that you let the man go when you found the property about him? - A. Years back it was a customary thing to take the tobacco from the men, and let them go; Government did not think it worth their while to prosecute, but carrying things on to such a pitch in taking the tobacco, Government began to be more severe, and thought proper to prosecute them; I did not know that till after the man was gone, when one Mr. Kelly, who is warehouse-keeper to the merchants, told me I had done wrong in not detaining him.

Mr. King. With respect to this warehouse, there has been no prosecution for stealing tobacco since Mr. Litchfield has been Solicitor for the Customs.

For the Prisoner.

ELIZABETH MORRIS sworn. - All I have got to say, is, that I nursed the prisoner's wife during the time that this transaction transpired, and while I was there they were very much distrest for money, and he left his work and went to work over London-bridge, at Mr. Mackenzie's; he is a sawyer by trade; and being short of money he took me one morning over London-bridge.

Q. Was this after the transaction of the tobacco? - A. Yes; it was the latter end of September; his wife was delivered on the 2d of September; he was going to take me to his master's for some money; we met a man upon London-bridge, I am not confident who the man was; there were some words between them; the man said, you were very foolish to leave your employ; he said, how came you to be such a fool to leave your business; had you given me a shilling, this would not have happened.

Q. Look at that man; is that the man? - A. I think it is like the man; I won't take my oath of it; I believe you are the man.

Lucas. I never met the woman nor the man to the best of my knowledge, till I saw him before the Magistrate.

Court. (To Morris.) Q. Is that the man? - A. I think it is.

Court. (To Lucas.) Q. You said to the best of your knowledge; it is a fact you must know, whether going over London-bridge, you ever met the prisoner and the woman? - A. I never did.

Q. Did you meet him in the month of September, at any time? - A. I never saw him from the time he went away till I saw him before the Magistrate.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not meet you several times, both morning and evening, as you were going to and from the tobacco-warehouses, and I going into the Borough to work; did not you and I go to the Tumble-down Dick in the Borough, and have a pint of porter, and toss which should pay for it? - A. No, I never did.

Court. (To Lucas.) Q. Where do you live? - A. In Little Suffolk-street, in the Mint, in the Borough.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long have you been an officer employed by the Customs? - A. Twenty-oneyears next Christmas.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-87

426. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , a bed-tick, value 12s. the property of George Thorn .

GEORGE THORN sworn. - I live at No. 13, Bear-yard : On the 13th of April last, I lost a bed-tick; I did not see him take it, but I saw him running away with it.

Q. How far was the prisoner from your house when you saw him? - A. Eighteen yards, for I have measured it since; I immediately stopped him; I suspected it to be my property; when I collared him, he let it fall into my hands.

Q. What are you? - A. An upholsterer by trade, and I sell a few broker's goods; I had but this one tick by me, and I bound it myself; I know it by the blue and white check lace round it; he said, if I would be favourable to him he would inform who was the person that had robbed me before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did he not say somebody had given it to him? - A. No; he said it was his first offence.

CATHERINE THORN sworn. - I saw the prisoner stopped by my husband, with the property upon him.

MARY FEARNS sworn. - I saw the prisoner with the bed-tick, and I saw Mr. Thorn lay hold of him.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and

called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-88

427. WILLIAM HEARNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , a black gelding, value 35s. the property of William Butler .

WILLIAM BUTLER sworn. - I am a farmer , in the parish of Heston ; I lost a black gelding: On Wednesday the 7th of May, I saw the horse about two o'clock in the morning, in my yard; I got up to call the men, and then I went to bed again, they went out about four; when I got up again I missed the horse, and about eleven o'clock in the day I received information, in consequence of which I came off to London, and overtook him in Oxford-street, in the possession of a little boy; I put up my horse at the Boar and Castle, at the bottom of Oxford-street, and the landlord and I spoke to the boy about the horse.

Q. Is that boy here? - A. No; his father is; I took the horse from him, put him into the stable, and took the boy to Bow-street.

Q. How do you know it was your horse? - A. He is a black horse, he has had a kick upon his nether hock behind, and it is challis'd; his off leg behind is greasy, and a star in his forehead.

Q. For what purpose was he used? - A. At cart; he was an overgrown horse, a very poor horse; I was going to send him to the marshes; I have not the least doubt of it being my horse.

Q. What time was it you saw the horse? - A. About two o'clock, or a little after; on the Monday following I saw the prisoner at Bow-street; I took the horse home the following day.

THOMAS PEAKE sworn. - I keep the Black-lion public-house, and livery-stables, at Bayswater: On the 7th of May, the prisoner at the bar brought a black gelding to my door, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, he told me his master sent him with it to be slaughtered; he said his master came from Lambton; I asked him what his master was to have for it; he said, thirty shillings; I said thirty shillings was more than it was worth; I told him I would give him twenty-seven shillings, but that was more than the horse was worth; he tied the horse in the yard, and received the money, and went about his business; I sent for Mr. Barker, and sold it to him the same day for thirty shillings; I delivered him the horse, I believe it might be about eleven o'clock; it was a black gelding, had a black tail, greasy heel, and lame.

Q. Had either of his hocks any blow upon it? - A. I did not see that they had; it was very poor, and the bones coming through the skin; it was a large horse.

BENJAMIN BARKER sworn. - I am in the milk line, and buy now and then-a low-priced horse; I have bought several of Mr. Peake; I bought a black gelding, with a long tail, on Wednesday the 7th of May, greasy behind.

Q. Was there any challis about either of the hocks? - A. I did not observe it, there might be such a thing; it was a large horse, he was as much out of condition as any horse alive; I gave thirty-one shillings for him, the man was to have a shilling that came from Mr. Peake to let me know of the horse; I took him home, and he stood at my own door in North-row, Oxford-street, till my little boy came home from school; I sent my little boy with the horse to carry it to Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross; I went to Aldridge's repository, and I got information there that my little boy was at Bow-street, crying most cruelly, being taken with a stolen horse upon him; I then went to Bow-street; I afterwards took the horse from the Boar and Castle, and left it for Mr. Butler, at the Half-way-house, at Paddington.

Q. What kind of a boy was this? - A. He was dressed in a jacket like mine, and a pair of velveret breeches.

Butler. I saw the boy with his father, at Bow-street; that was the boy that I took the horse from.

RICHARD WEATHERLEY sworn. - I am a gardener: I was standing at Mr. Peake's door when the prisoner came by with the horse; Mr. Peake bought it of the prisoner, I was present at the time; it was a large black horse, with a long tail, in very bad condition; Mr. Peake paid him the money, and then he went away about his business; I apprehended the prisoner the next day, in a brick field, near the New-cut at Brentford; I brought him to Brentford, Mr. Peake was there, and we took him to Bow-street in a horse and cart.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 18.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-89

428. WILLIAM BEARD was indicted for that he, on the 20th of February, in the fifth year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of Badgworth, in the county of Gloucester, did marry Ann Lowe , spinster , and that, afterwards, on the 6th of January, in the 31st year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish of St. George, Hanover-square, in the county of Middlesex , feloniously did marry Mary Drake , spinster, his former wife being then alive .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES BULLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

I live at Badgworth, in Gloucestershire: I was present when the prisoner was married to Ann Lowe .

Q. Is she now living? - A. I have seen her about two years ago.

Q. Are you sure you have seen her within three years? - A. Yes; (produces the register-book, and reads): "William Beard and Ann Lowe , both of this parish, were married the 20th of February, 1765;" my father is clerk of the parish, I was about eleven years of age at the time; the minister of the parish delivered this book to me.

ANN EGGINTON sworn. - I was present when the prisoner was married, on Twelfth-day, about nine years ago, to Mary Drake , at St. George, Hanover-square; I know his person perfectly well.

- MOORE sworn. - I saw Ann Lowe, on the 17th of May last.

Prisoner's defence. My first wife and I agreed to part; Mary Drake is my lawful wife.

GUILTY , (Aged 54.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-90

429. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , seven feet of leaden pipe, value 4s. the property of Samuel Keep .

It appearing in evidence that the pipe was fixed to the house, the Court were of opinion that it ought to have been so laid in the indictment .

NOT GUILTY.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-91

430. ISAAC WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , fourteen bundles of hay, value 40s. the property of James Gaunt .

JAMES GAUNT sworn. - I live in Park-lane; I bought a rick of hay at Kilburn , in September last: On the 20th of May last, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, my hay-binder came to me in London, and said he missed a cut of hay; I immediately went with him to see the rick of hay, I found it cut in a zig-zag way, very bad indeed; my hay-binder had before traced the cart.

JOHN BIDDLE sworn. - I am hay-binder to Mr. Gaunt: On the 20th of May, near about five in the morning, I went to the rick-yard. I found the rick cut and hacked about at a strange rate, I thought I had lost fourteen or fifteen trusses of hay, but there was not so much cut out as if I had cut it myself; I looked at the other rick, I saw but a trifle cut off the other rick, and that was hacked about like mine; I then tracked the loose hay that had been dropped into the lans, the lane was close by, there was not more than room for a carriage to pass between the rick and the hay; I traced it about fifteen yards up the lane, there was a good deal of hay there, where I suppose they loaded the hay; I then tracked the horses' feet, and the wheels, towards London; I then took my horse out of the stable and followed the track down the road, and saw hay scattered at several places; I tracked it up a lane that goes towards Hampstead; I then went on to West-End, and there I was informed of a cart with some hay slung off it, I made the best of my way after it, and when I got near to Hampstead, I saw the track plainer and plainer; there had been rain, and the road was wet; I went down Hampstead till I came to a gate-way, where I could not have gone past it without I did it on purpose, it was so plain; there were two horses in the cart, and the hay in it, under the gate-way; I saw the landlord, and desired him to assist me; I got off my horse, and asked who belonged to that cart, and he, by pointing, made me understand that the person was in doors; I went in, and asked which was the man that belonged to that hay; and the prisoner at the bar told me that he belonged to it; I went to him and took hold of his shoulder, and told him he was my prisoner; he asked me for what; I told him, the hay that was in that cart was stole out of the rick where I bound, that it was my property; he said it was not; I said it was my master's; he told me then that he brought it from Harrow-Weald; upon which I said, I know it did, for it never was there; then I sent for a constable, the constable came, and I searched the cart; I pulled the hay on one side to look for tools, and found a cutting-knife in a sack, upon the top of the cart; I told the constable to take care of him, and I went and rode to Park-lane, to my master, and told him I had had four cuts of hay stole; and he went with me to look at the rick, and then went to Hampstead where the prisoner was in hold.

Q. How long had you been used to cut this hay? - A. I had cut upwards of thirty load of it; I built the rick, and thatched it, for a gentleman that is dead; Mr. Gaunt bought it at the sale.

Q. Then can you tell us, whether the hay in the cart, from the quality of it, was the same hay that had stood in your master's rick-yard? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you say that from knowing the hay, or tracing the wheels, or all together? - A. I know it from both.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How far is it from the rick-yard to where you found the prisoner? - A. About two miles.

Q. What time was it that you went out in search? - A. About five o'clock.

Q. A great many hay-carts were coming to London at that time in the morning? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Was the track so visible that you could

trace it from the place where you first found it to the place where you found the man? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean to say you traced the track without any information? - A. There might be places where the wheels had crossed.

Q. You made an inquiry of a man that you met, you must therefore have lost the track? - A. No; I only asked him to know how long it had been gone.

Q. Was there a ladder in the rick-yard? - A. No.

Q. It could not have been carried without a ladder? - A. No.

Q. And you found no ladder? - A. No.

Jury. Q. In what state was the hay? - A. Made up in bundles for trusses.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you never said, that the knife you found upon the prisoner could not have cut that hay? - A. I do not think I could; it is not cut, hardly, it is rather mauled about; I could not have done it as should be with that knife.

Q. You will not undertake to swear to the hay? - A. No.

Q. You found eighteen bundles of hay in the cart half a load? - A. Nineteen; if it had been properly bound, I think it would have been contained in between fourteen and fifteen trusses.

Court. Q. Do you mean to say, that there was ar in the cart that clearly did not come from your master's rick? - A. No, none.

Q. (To Gaunt.) Did you look at the hay in the ot? - A. I did.

Q. Whose hay was it? - A. It was mine, there no doubt of it; I know it because all the rick of hay that has been cut, has been used by myself; I could, with a vast deal of safety, swear to it; it is a very remarkable load of hay, it is of a very particular colour, it has a great deal of gay flowers in it; though it is dark in its colour, there may be a great dead of hay like mine; but I have no doubt about it.

Mr. Alley. Q. You do not mean to undertake to swear to the hay? - A. I cannot swear positively to it.

Court. Q. Have you any doubt about it? - A. No; I gave one hundred and sixty guineas for the rick.

- READ sworn. - I am a constable, I took the prisoner into custody: I asked him where he got the hay from; and he said, he brought it from Harrow-Weald, from his father-in-law's. (Produces the knife).

Q. (To Gaunt.) I want to know, whether with that knife you could have cut the hay? - A. There is not a doubt of it; it was very fresh when it was found, it is a little rusty now.

Read. I asked him how he came by the knife, and he said it was the last load that he had; it was his own cart and horses.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you leave the prisoner at any time by himself at the public-house, for a considerable length of time? - A. I did; he said, I need not be afraid of his running away; and when I came back I found him there; I really thought, at the time, the man was innocent.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-92

431. JOHN DAVIS, alias SILK , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , two coppers, value 40s. a flew-pot and cover, value 20s. nine flew-pans, value 9s. a fish-kettle, value 10s. four pots, value 10s. two tea-kettles, value 10s. two saucepans, value 5s. a warming-pan, value 10s. and seven pair of candlesticks, value 7s. the property of Thomas Pearce , Esq . in his dwelling-house .

EUSEBIUS SWEET sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Pearce, a brewer in Millbank-street; Mr. Pearce is the owner of the Star and Garter public-house, in Palace-yard ; it is shut up, and we keep a man to sleep there of nights, for the protection of the goods in the house; in the day-time it was uninhabited; it might have been in that state a month or six weeks, I cannot say justly to the time; Mr. Pearce had, before that, let it to a publican; there were sixteen or seventeen beds in the house, and chairs, and tables, and other things; we had made a purchase of them of the last tenant: On the 17th of April, I was there between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and missed one of the large coppers that was a fixture; I was there again at eleven, every thing was safe then except the copper; I double-locked the door, and I went again between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and found the door upon the single lock; I had got the carpenter with me to make the windows fast, that nothing else should go; I put the key in and found the door open, I am sure I had double-locked the door when I left the house; I went into the kitchen and found it stripped, I missed another copper fixed, I missed a stew-pan worth twenty shillings; there were nine small ones worth ten shillings, three copper pots worth ten shillings each, a fish-kettle worth ten shillings, a copper boiler that hung over the fire, which is included in the indictment with the copper pots worth ten shillings; two tea-kettles, two copper saucepans, a warming-pan, which they broke the handle off, and seven pair of metal candlesticks; I found the bar-door broke open but nothing taken from there; I set a man to watch, his name is

George Joynson ; and the next morning he brought the prisoner at the bar to me; I asked the prisoner what his name was, and he said Davis; I asked him what he wanted at that house; he told me he came to look for work, that he was a carpenter, and had worked for a Mr. Charles, at Dock-head, that he had discharged him the day before in the middle of the day, he said he was repairing a house facing the dock, at Dock-head; he had an apron on like a broker's man, which was dirty, and his hands the same, as if he had been handling dirty coppers; I asked him where he laid on the night of the 17th; he told me he slept at the Hit-or-Miss public-house, in Swallow-street; he afterwards said, before the Magistrate, that he did not sleep there; I sent a person to the Hit-or-Miss, and I went myself to Dock-head, but could find no such person as Charles, a carpenter; nor could I find any house repairing near Dock-head.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Mr. Pearce is a man of considerable business? - A. Yes.

Q. He kept a man in the house to take care of the goods, till some other publican should take it? - A. Yes.

Q. He had no idea of its being a residence for himself? - A. No.

JOHN DOWNES sworn. - I live in Palace-yard, Westminster; I was at the Star-and-Garter public-house about half past twelve o'clock: On the 17th of April, I saw a man looking out at the door, but not the prisoner at the bar; the door was about two feet open; upon my return home, about half past two, I saw the prisoner at the bar come out of the Star-and-Garter public-house, I am certain it was the prisoner; one of Mr. Pearce's abroad coopers and I were talking about the house the night before, he told me the furniture was to be taken with the house, which induced me to take notice; I observed the prisoner come out with a prickle basket full of kitchen utensils; I looked at him particularly hard; and he pitched them down at the corner of the House of Commons, the prickle was full; as I was going into Waghorn's coffee-house I saw two other men come out of the Starand-Garter, one of them had a fish-kettle upon his back, and the other was the person that I had seen looking out at the door before, with a dirty apron on, like a broker's man, he had a blue coat on; and the next morning I attended the office by order of Mr. Pearce's clerk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you not think it very strange, that the things should be going? - A. Yes, but I did not know what it meant; they looked like brokers' men.

Q. You did not make any inquiry of them what they were going to do? - A. No.

ANN SWINNEY sworn. - I keep an apple-stall by King Henry the Seventh's Chapel: On the 17th of April, about one or two o'clock, I cannot be certain, I am sure it was past twelve, the prisoner at the bar, to the best of my knowledge, came to me, and told me to mind a parcel of coppers and saucepans in a basket, the bottoms of them were black, and the tops scowered, they were placed at the corner of the House of Commons; he went away and left the basket; I watched it about a quarter of an hour or so, and then he came with another man, and put the basket upon the man to carry it, and he carried it away towards Charing-cross; then the prisoner came and gave me two-pence for minding it, and then he went away.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure he is the person? - A. I believe him to be the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How often were you before the Magistrate? - A. Twice, I believe.

Q. And you always said you believed he was the man, but would not be certain? - A. Yes.

GEORGE JOYNSON sworn. - I was put into the Star-and-Garter to take care of it: On the 11th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, there were three of us went together and staid till about twelve at night, and then two more came and two went away, I was one that went away; I went again at six, and about half past eight the prisoner knocked at the door several times, I went to the door, the door was bolted, and when I went to the door he was doing something at the outside, but was I cannot say; I thought it was my master, and opened the door; he came in, I was behind the door, he was not aware of me at first; I was going to shut the door, and he asked me if there were not some joiners at work there; I answered there were none; he said he had been out of work some time, and had seen a joiner the day before, who told him he was at work there, and if he would come he would give him a job; I told him there were my joiners there; he said, it was very likely he was working over the way; he went across the way, I locked the door and went across the way after him he then went speedily away towards Millbank-street he had hardly run two roods before I was along-side of him, and told him he must go along with me to my master; he was very unwilling to go.

Q. Had he any foot upon his hands? - A. Yes; he was footy all over from what I could see of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. It was the 18th you took him? - A. Yes.

Q. The things were taken on the 17th? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I did not run away, I only wear a foot-pace, I went very volunteerly.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Joynson.) Q. Did you ever sleep in this house where the kettles were taken

from? - A. Yes; my master's own servant slept there.

Q. Where did he sleep at any other time? - A. In my master's house.

Sweet. He had slept there regularly for a month before, ever since he has been in Mr. Pearce's service, unless he has been out of town with Mr. Pearce, and then he has desired me to put in somebody else in his room.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 23.) Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-93

432. ISAAC DOUSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , a grey gelding, value 20s. the property of William Cole .

WILLIAM COLE sworn. - I lost a horse from the side of Lambton-Green, on the side of Hounslow-Heath, in the parish of Heston ; I missed it on the 15th of May, I turned the horse off my own premises at one o'clock in the morning; I am a drover , I came home at twelve o'clock and sed my horse and myself, and then turned the house out upon the Common; I missed it before six o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This horse of your's is very apt to stray? - A. No, it is not.

Q. I am told it is a white horse? - A. No, it is a grey; a grey house on the Common, and a white horse upon the sign.

Court. There is no such thing as a white horse.

THOMAS PEAKE sworn. - I keep the Black-Lion public-house, and stables, at Bayswater: On the 15th of May, the prisoner at the bar brought a grey horse to me, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, he asked me if I would buy a horse of him; I asked him how he came by the horse; he told me he bought it, on the day before, at Chertsey-fair, of a chimney-sweeper; I then told him, neitner the horse should go out of my stable, nor he from my hands; I thought he did not come honestly by him, as I knew the horse; I had seen him a great many times before, I had seen the old gentleman ride him, he has used my house, with cattle, for some years; the prisoner begged to be released, and said he did not come honestly by it; he was a very remarkable horse, he has two spavins on both his hind legs; I took the prisoner to London, put him into a coach, and took him to Bow-street; the Magistrate desired me to keep the horse till I had further orders.

Q. Did you shew Mr. Cole the horse? - A. Yes; I am sure it is Mr. Cole's horse; I shewed it him the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a horse-slaughterer? - A. No; I keep a public-house, and am a livery-stable keeper.

Q. Did you tell the Magistrate that this man confessed he did not come honestly by it? - A. I swore it there; I told Sir William Addington so; what he said was, that this horse was not his.

Q. Will you undertake to swear, that the man ever confessed he came dishonestly by the horse? - A. He said the horse was not his.

Q. Did he say he stole it? - A. He said he did not come honestly by it.

Cole. The horse that I saw at Mr. Peake's was my horse, and had been for a year and a half.

Prisoner's defence. I was on the road, and saw a man who looked like a chimney-sweeper, with a horse; I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said; it was going to be slaughtered, and I bought the horse of him; I gave him a guinea and a pint of beer.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 23.) Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-94

433. ELIZABETH KELSO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a silk cloak, value 1s. a gown, value 4s. four aprons, value 2s. and a shift, value 6s. the property of Solomon Phillips .

CATHERINE PHILLIPS sworn. - I am the wife of Solomon Phillips ; I keep a clothes shop, No. 33. Orchard-street, Westminster : On Tuesday, the 29th of April, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, Levy Hart was in my house, I missed a gown and a cloak from the door; I turned round and missed four muslin aprons and a shift from the shop-window; I called Mr. Hart; I went immediately to Mr. Hart's house in Dean-street, Westminster; he is in the same line; I saw the prisoner there, sitting on a chair, with the cloak round her and one of the aprons in her lap; the gown and shift were lying by the side of her, in a bundle, in a handkerchief; I told her I could swear to the cloak and apron as the property that I lost; she said, your property ! I said, yes; I had never seen the prisoner before; then she said, if it is your property, take it; I sent for a constable, and delivered her and the things to the constable.

LEVY HART sworn. - Mr. Phillips was out, and I went to keep Mrs. Phillips and her father company while he was out; I live at No. 2, Dean-street; after I got home the prisoner came in with two bonnets to sell; she went away and returned again in about a quarter of an hour with a bundle, and wanted to buy a pair of stockings; I saw the corner of a gown sticking out of the bundle; my wife was serving her with the stockings; I went to Mr. Phillips's again, to sit a little longer; I went up stairs, and then Mrs. Phillips went down stairs, and squalled out, I am robbed; I de

sired her to make haste to my house, it might be the person; and she went directly.

MARY HART sworn. - The prisoner came to my shop; she had a bundle; there were four aprons; she wanted to change one of them for a pair of stockings; there was a gown and a shift; my husband came in with Mrs. Phillips, and a constable was sent for.

William Messenger , the officer, produced the property, which was deposed to by Mrs. Phillips.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say any farther than that I was in distress.

GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-95

434. JAMES DRAPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , a bushel of malt, value 4s. the property of Henry Archer .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Sampson Hanbury , John-Truman Villeboy , and Henry Villeboy .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

- ROBJOHN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am miller to Messrs. Hanbury and Company; their names are Sampson Hanbury , John-Truman Villeboy , and Henry Villeboy ; I received the malt from the prisoner; there were thirty-three sacks and a broken one; four bushels in a sack; I measured three sacks that I suspected; it ought to have been contained in thirty-two sacks; they had been apparently untied, one had a hay-band round it; I found a bushel deficient from the three sacks; the other sack was on the ladder, under the tilt.

Q. Was that the place in which it would have been in the regular course of delivery? - A. No; we would not suffer the prisoner to unload the cart, another man did it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You do not know what was put into the sacks? - A. No.

Q. One of them had a hay-band round it? - A. Yes; he said the sack had sell out of the cart and burst; there was a little hole in one corner.

Q. There was a whole bushel found in the sack? - A. Yes.

Q. And that brought to the place where he was to have delivered it? - A. Yes.

THOMAS HINDES Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Mr. Bell, at Stamford-hill: We loaded three hundred and twenty quarters of malt for Messrs. Hanbury; there were sixteen quarters in thirty-two sacks, in the cart that the prisoner drove; the sacks were tied with a bit of rope; we tie them with any thing we can get at times. Q. Was there any one on those sacks tied with a hay-band? - A. No.

Q. Was there any extra sack in the cart? - A. No, unless he had any over his horses.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. They do sometimes slip in the tying, do they not? - A. Very often; it was to go to Messrs. Hanbury's, Brick-lane, Spitalfields, about four miles from Stamford-hill; it is very common for the cords to slip, and a bushel or two to run out into the cart.

Q. Does it ever happen that a man should be so wicked, in that case, as to put it into another sack and place it under the the tilt of the waggon? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. The same sack out of which it came would have held it again? - A. It would if they had taken pains to put it in.

WM. PAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a maltster, at Ware: I was coming to town from Ware; I saw the prisoner standing on the cart, moving the sacks; I did not see him take any malt out of the sacks, but he was moving them; I informed the brewer of it; it appeared to me that he was taking malt out of the sacks; I saw the malt taken from under the tilt; it was lying upon the front ladder, with a little hay over it.

THOMAS AVELING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the clerks in Messrs. Hanbury's brewhouse: On Monday, the 5th of May, Mr. Page came to me and said he suspected the prisoner of stealing malt; I saw the prisoner stop about two or three hundred yards before he got to the brewhouse; he got into his cart, removed a sack, and put it upon the fore-ladder with some hay, and put the tilt over it; then I went to Worship-street for an officer.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you the curiosity to see if any of the sacks were bulged? - A. No. For the Prisoner.

JOSHUA ROWNEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On the 5th of May I saw a sack of malt fall off the prisoner's cart at Stamford-hill; I took a bit of hay and tied the month of the sack; I gathered up the malt as well as I could, and it would not hold it; I then put the remainder into a sack that I lent him, by Mr. Hagan's son's order; he is Mr. Bell's clerk; and it was put upon the top of the cart.

The prisoner called his master, who had known him nine years, and gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-96

435. ROBERT ROBINSON was indicted for that he, on the 5th of April , in the dwelling-house of Charles Stedman , upon Mary, the wife of the said Charles, did make an assault, putting her in

fear, and taking from her person, ten pounds weight of cheese, value 5s. the property of the said Charles .

MARY STEDMAN sworn. - I am the wife of Charles Stedman , No.9, Great Peter-street, Westminster ; I keep a chandiers's-shop and coal-shed : On Saturday night, the 5th of April, between eight and nine o'clock, three soldiers came into the shop; I asked them what they wanted, but before I got an answer, the tallest of the three reached over the counter to a cheshire cheese; he pulled it and I pulled it, but he got it from me; that was not the prisoner; the other two ran away, and I secured the prisoner; I have never seen the cheese since.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask for two-penny worth of bread and cheese? - A. One of you did, but I cannot say which.

Jury. Q. Did they all come in together? - A. They did.

ANN ALLISON sworn. - I was in the back-room with Mrs. Stedman when three men came into the shop; Mrs. Stedman got up and left me in the back-room; all on a sudden she cried out for assistance, and stop thief; I went into the shop, and we secured the prisoner.

JOSEPH FARMER sworn. - I am an officer; I took charge of the prisoner: He said he came to ask for two-pennyworth of bread and cheese, and these men came behind him and took the cheese away.

Prisoner's defence. I went in to buy two-pennyworth of bread and cheese, and two men came in and knocked me down, and ran away with the cheese; I was going to assist the gentlewoman, when she sent for a constable and took me up.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of the larceny only . (Aged 19.)

confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-97

436. ELIZABETH ATHERTON and ELIZABETH BESSALL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , a gown and coat, value 15s. three cloaks, value 15s. a petticoat, value 6s. a table-cloth, value 4s. a pillow-case, value 1s. a muss, value 2s. and a deal box, value 6d. the property of Eleanor Waters , in her dwelling-house .

ELEANOR WATERS sworn. - I am a widow , No. 15, Blue-anchor-yard, York-street, Westminster ; I have a small house at five pounds a year; the prisoner Atherton lodged with me for a fortnight before I lost my property: I went out of an errand, and when I came home I found I was stripped; I went in search of her, and found her; I sent for a constable and detained her; the property was found upon her.

JOHN MARSDEN sworn. - I am an officer: On the 26th of last month, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; and in searching the apartments of the prisoner Bessall, I found this box containing part of the property; (produces it;) and in the other prisoner's pocket I found some duplicates, which led to a discovery of the rest of the things.

- Thompson, James Fuller , and Robert Fisher, pawnbrokers' servants, produced a red cloak, two silk cloaks, and a petticoat, which had been pledged by the two prisoners, and which were all deposed to by the prosecutrix.

Atherton's defence. I am entirely innocent of it; she lent me the cloak and the petticoat; Elizabeth Bessall did not know but what they were my own things.

The prisoner Bessall called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Atherton, GUILTY. (Aged 15.)

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Bessall, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-98

437. SAMUEL ALDRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , a cake of soap, value 1s. 6d. the property of Elizabeth Winterflood .

The prosecutrix not being able to indentify the soap, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-99

438. JOHN PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , a flannel petricoat, value 2s. the property of Frederick Wilson .

HARRIET WILSON sworn. - I am the wife of Frederick Wilson , boot-maker and closer , No. 1, Berwick-street : On the 30th of April, a little after nine in the evening, we heard a noise in the passage; and my husband went out in pursuit of the prisoner; I afterwards saw him at the watch-house, and swore to the property.

FREDERICK WILSON sworn. - On the 30th of April I heard a noise in the passage; I saw the prisoner run swiftly out of the passage across the way; I pursued him and called, stop thief; he then dropped a flannel petticoat; I picked it up, and pursued him; when he had got a little further, he dropped a muslin apron; I picked up the apron, and the prisoner was stopped; we took him to the watch-house.

The constable produced the property, which was deposed to by Mrs. Wilson.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-100

439. FRANCIS-STEELE BOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a Bank-note, value 1000l. another Bank-note, value 500l. another Bank-note, value 500l. another Bank-note, value 200l. another Bank-note, value 100l. another Bank-note, value 100l. another Banknote, value 100l. another Bank-note, value 40l. and another Bank-note, value 20l. the property of William Alstone .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Knapp, and the case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

The Right Hon. the LORD-MAYOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was there a person who answered the description of the wife of the prisoner brought before your Lordship? - A. She was brought before me a few days after Good-Friday, previous to the prisoner being brought before me; Good-Friday was the day when I first signed the warrant; a man of the name of Miller gave me some notes that were taken from Mrs. Bond, a fifty pound note, and two of two pound; I have also got a Bank note of one thousand pound from Mr. Lawrence, the post-master, in the presence of Mrs. Bond, and given to me at her request; I have had them ever since. (Produces them.)

WILLIAM ALSTONE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a butcher , at Rochester; I have known the prisoner some years, I employed him as a stock-broker : On the 7th of April, I was at the Bank, when Mr. Bond came up to me, and asked me if I had a mind to sell out any stock to-day; I told him, no; he asked me several times whether I would sell out, and I refused; Mr. Bond then said I should clear a great deal of money by it; I told him I was thoroughly convinced of that, for I had, had a specimen of it before; Mr. Bond then said, I have bought 4000l. stock for Thursday the 10th of April, 2000l. at 63 7/8, and 2000l. at 64, in the 3 per cent. consols; Mr. Bond then said, if you will give me leave to sell out the 3000l. that you have in the 3 per cents. I can sell it out for 64 1/3, which he said would clear me 28l. clear money, besides his commission or brokerage, I am not sure which he said; I said, Mr. Bond, it is inconvenient for me to stay in town for 28l. says he, sure, it is worth coming twenty-eight miles for; we had some conversation, and I agreed that he should sell out 3000l. in the 3 per cent. consols; Mr. Bond, as he told me, tried so sell out for 64 1/3, but could not, upon which he applied to Mr. Lightfoot in my presence, and it was settled between them, but how and which way I do not know; Mr. Bond told me, that the stock was sold at 64 1/8, I saw Mr. Lightfoot give him one check or two, I cannot say which, upon the Bank, I think it was 1923l. 15s. for the 3000l. he gave me the produce of that stock, which was to clear me 28l. and I went home to Rochester; when we parted, he said, be sure to be in town on Thursday to take up that stock; on Thursday the 10th of April I returned to town, I was to be at the Bank at one o'clock; when I came to the Bank it was a little after one o'clock, I saw Mr. Bond, he said, we will go to the coffee. house and take a glass of wine; I said, with all my heart, for I had been wet coming up; I said to him, you are very warm, Mr.Bond, where have you been, the sweat was dropping from his checks; he said, I have been down to Billingsgate to see if you were come; says I, Mr. Bond, you are very warm indeed, going that little way; we went to the Bank coffee-house, and Mr. Bond called for half a pint of mulled wine; he took, a pen, ink, and paper, and reckoned the, money up, he made it come to 2552l. 10s. I paid him a 1000l note, a 500l. note, a 200l. note, and three of 100l. which made 200l. I then paid him a 500l. note more, a 40l. and a 20l note; I said, I want 7l. 10s. change, upon which he gave me 8l. I gave him half-a-guinea, and he gave me sixpence; I saw that Mr. Bond was hurt upon the business, he was all of a sweat at the time, he was all of a quiver; I said, Mr. Bond, you have got 100l. too much, tell those notes over again; I said that, because seeing him all of a shake and a quiver, I thought he was going to rob me of the money, I immediately thought I had done wrong; I desired him to count the notes over again, in order to snatch them away from him, but as I thought there were several gentlemen in the coffee-room, it might be taking his character away, and I never knew any harm of the man, I always took him to be a very honest good man; I made up my mind that I would not loose fight of him going out, we paid the reckoning and went away to the Bank; I took hold of his arm, I said to him, is the business done, Mr. Bond, meaning, was the stock transferred, he said, yes, it was.

Prisoner. Q. You will not stand there and swear that I said it was transferred? - A. I am stating facts; he said it was transferred, he did before God and man; upon that we went into the Bank together, arm in arm; when we came into the great

hall, I withdrew my arm, or he withdrew his, I cannot say which; I then went to the transfer office of the 3 per cent. consols, where I was to have my receipt, as I expected the stock was transferred to me which he had purchased, as he told me; when I went there to the letter A. I missed Mr. Bond all in a moment; I waited in the office for some time, then I went into the hall where the brokers are, but could not find him, I took all the pains that a man possibly could; I waited in the Bank from a little after one till after three without success; I then went down to Billingsgate to a house that I use, the Three-Tons, where he has dined with me, and enquired there without success; I then returned to the Bank, and went to the book, letter A. and made enquiry there, without success again, and from that time, till the day he was apprehended, the 24th of April, I never saw him, nor heard from him.

Q. Would you have entrusted him with that 2552l. for any other purpose than the transfer of that stock? - A. I would not; the money was going to be placed there to pay for an estate that I had purchased; I went from the Bank to the Borough, there I took my horse, and went over to Mr. Bond's house, on this side of New-Cross Turn pike, on the Deptsered road, near the Five-bells, he was not at home, but I saw Mrs. Bond.

Q. Look at that other letter? - A. That was brought to me, but I cannot say by whom; I have seen Mr. Bond write frequently, and I believe this to be his hand-writing, but I cannot swear that it is, Mrs. Bond was taken into the custody, I saw her before the Lord-Mayor; I gave information the next day, Good-Friday, the 11th, at Bow-street; I got it put in the hue and cry, and in all the papers, with 100l. reward for apprehending him; I was present when he was apprehended at the Bull and Mouth, in Bull and Mouth-street; I saw Carpmeal take some notes out of his pocket, and lay them upon the table, I did not see to what amount.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The notes delivered up to the Lord-Mayor, and the notes taken by Carpmeal, amount to more than the money you paid to Mr. Bond? - A. Yes.

Q.You had employed the prisoner before, as your stock-broker? - A. Yes.

Q.Upon those occasions, have you always paid him a brokerage, or have you and he gone partners in buying and selling stock? - A. I know nothing of partners.

Q.Have you not shared together the profits of buying and selling stock? - A. I have not; I have merely paid him his commission as a broker; he never had any share with me in the purchase or sale of stock.

Q. Lightfoot was the person with whom Mr. Bond told you he had made the contract for the 4000l? - A. Just so.

Q. Did not Mr. Lightfoot give you some information, with respect to a contract made by Mr. Bond with him, for the sale of 4000l. stock? - A. - Yes, he did, that was on the Saturday.

Q. Did you receive any information from Lightfoot, respecting the 4000l. stock to be sold to you? - A. Yes, I did.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Bow street: I apprehended the prisoner at the bar, on the 24th of April, about half past five in the morning, at the coffee-house of the Bull and Mouth, in Bull and Mouth-street: I followed the Carlisle mail-coach, to the Bull and Mouth, with Mr. Alstone, the prosecutor, in a post-chaise; Mr. Alstone and I got out of the post-chaise, I went into the coffee-room, and Mr. Alstone stood at the window, the front of the coffee-room is all window; upon seeing Mr. Alstone, Mr. Bond sat down to the table, and put his head down upon the table, resting his head upon his hands; I then went up to him, and told him, he was my prisoner; Mr. Alstone then came in, Mr. Bond then flew back towards the grate, and appeared to me to be looking for the poker; I then knocked him down, I pulled him up again, but he would not suffer me to search him; Mr. Alstone was so hurt, that he could not help me at all, he cried, and I thought would have fainted away; two waiters then came in and caught hold of one of his hands, then I tied his hands together and searched him, I found these notes in his right-hand breeches-pocket, amounting to 1500l. I delivered them to the Lord-Mayor, and the Lord-Mayor delivered them to me, they are the same notes; there are three of 100l. one of 200l. and two of 500l. Mr. Alstone said, were they his notes, or had he changed any; he said, yes, he had; there was another person with Mr. Bond; I then told him, there is a 1000l. notes recovered from your wife; he said, then there is enough, Mr. Alstone, to satisfy you; the notes and money were then reckoned up, and there was 6l. 12s. more than Mr. Alstone's money; we took him to Bow-street, and from Bow-street, before the Lord-Mayor.

Q. Had you ever seen Mr. Bond before he was taken up at any time? - A. I think I met him as I was coming to town from Litchfield, on the 10th of April; I have no doubt of it, I met him upon Finchley-common, about five o'clock in the evening, in a post-chaise, with a woman.

Q. That is the high north-road, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt that it was Mr. Bond that was in the chaise? - A. I will not swear positively.

Q. What reason had you to believe it was Mr Bond? - A. I had some conversation with him, when I apprehended him; I told him I met him on the Barnet-road, upon Finchley-common, and he said he was there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Balmanna. Q. Did the Carlisle mail-coach stop at the Post-office? - A. I do not know, I suppose it does; I believe they all do.

Q. Had not the prisoner an opportunity, if he had chosen it, to have got away before he came to the Bull and Mouth? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you conceive it to be remarkable, that a man who had travelled a long journey, should rest his head upon his hands? - A. It satisfied me that it was him.

The letter read, dated four o'clock; addressed"Mr. F. S. Bond, Peckham, Surry."

"Dear Nancy,"Inclosed is a Bank-note of one thousand"pounds value, which you will take off, from your"loving husband."

Mr. Gurney. Q. Is there not a space after the words take off?

Mr. Shelton. A. No, there is not.

Another letter read, dated 10th April, 1800.

"Dear Nancy,"Business of the utmost consequence to"me has taken place since I left home, which re-"quires without delay my going into Sussex; I"had not an opportunity of communicating it to"Mr. Alstone, whom I left at the Bank; I make"no doubt but he will call on you; pray inform"him that as soon as the business I am going on is"finished, I shall come home by the way of Ro-"chester, and call at his house. So conclude, with"love to you and the children.

"Your loving husband, F. S. Bond."

Mr. Knowlys. (To Alstone.) Q. Are these notes of the same amount and sum that you paid to Mr. Bond? - A. The 1500l. are in the same sums, every note that I paid to the prisoner; they agree in the numbers and dates, as well as the sums.

Q. Upon the 1000l. note do you now find any mark that you recollect, upon it? - A. I do, which I can safely swear to-1923l. 15s. which he sold me out the 3000l. stock for, in my own handwriting.

Q. Did you put those figures upon it before you delivered it over to the prisoner? - A. Yes, in his presence, on the 7th of April; and upon the 10th, I paid him that very note.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who had known him a great number of years, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 46.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-101

440. GEORGE PHILLIPS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Cockett , about the hour of nine in the night of the 23d of April , and burglariously stealing eleven pair of cotton stockings, value 33s. and three pair of worsted stockings, value 3s. the property of the said William .

WILLIAM COCKETT sworn. - I keep a house in Baker-street, Enfield ; I can only prove the property.

MARY COCKETT sworn. - I am the wife of William Cockett : On the 23d of April I was sitting in a little parlour behind the shop; the prisoner lifted up the latch, opened the shop-door, and came in; he had not regimentals on, he had a light coat; it was between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, it was very dark; he bit himself against a pair of scales, and that alarmed me; I went into the shop and saw the prisoner; I said, you villain, what are you doing there; and he made his escape out of the shop; I went after him and laid hold of him; I said, you villain, you have robbed my shop; and then he got from me; my husband was only two doors off; I went with him, and we found the prisoner at the next public-house; I am sure it was the same man, I saw his face distinctly; there were eleven pair of cotton stockings, and three pair of worsted stockings; the worsted ones he dropped at the door; my husband laid hold of the prisoner, and he wrung himself from him the same as he did from me; he was apprehended the next morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long had you been sitting in that room before you went into the shop? - A. Not so long as an hour.

Q. I take it for granted you were too much alarmed to know whether the light coat was a great coat or not? - A. I cannot be positive, but I am pretty sure it was a little coat.

Q. Did you observe any other part of his dress? - A. No; my husband took him within ten minutes after; he was asking a comrade to lend him a jacket, and he said he had none to lend; I am sure he is the same person, because I had a good view of him in the shop; I am sure to the prisoner, and I am sure to the property.

Prosecutor. I went after the prisoner; I found him at a public-house about an hundred yards off; I heard him asking a comrade to lend him a jacket, and he said he had none but what he had on his

back; my wife said that was the man, and I laid hold of him; the prisoner snatched himself out of my hand, and got away; I took him the next day at his quarters, when he came from the parade.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn; I know nothing at all of it.

The prisoner called the publican upon whom he was quartered, and his paymaster-serjeant, who gave him a good character, and deposed that they had never seen him in a light-coloured coat.

GUILTY of larceny only . (Aged 32.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-102

441. ANN BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , a shift, value 2s. a shirt, value 5s. two handkerchiefs, value 3s. a shawl, value 6s. three pair of stockings, value 6s. a silk handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. a half-handkerchief, value 1s. three waistcoats, value 8s. a pair of breeches, value 2s. a child's frock, value 2s a child's pin-a-fore, value 1d. a child's cap, value 6d. a pair of sheets, value 10s. a pillow-case, value 6d. a coat, value 5s. a gown, value 1s. 6d. a small handkerchief, value 6d. and a flat iron, value 6d. the property of John Clymer , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN CLYMER sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , No. 40, Monmouth-street : My wife has had a bad state of health a long time, and the prisoner has come backwards and forwards to assist in the house; we missed a great number of things, and I suspected the prisoner, my wife went to her lodgings, and sent for me; I went and told her, unless she gave me the duplicates, I would send for an officer; I sent for an officer, and the prisoner delivered to me thirty-four duplicates.

William Locke and Morgan Jones , pawnbrakers' servants, produced the property, which they had taken in pledge from the prisoner, and which were deposed to by the prosecutor.

ELIZABETH CLYMER sworn. - I have been in a bad state of health, and the prisoner assisted in the house during my illness.

Q. Did you ever give her any authority to pledge any of these articles for you or any of the family? - A. Never in my life.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you never taken these things from your husband's house and left them at her house? - A. Never.

Prisoner's defence. The whose of these things I had been entrusted with by Mrs. Clymer; they were going to part, and I was to get her a lodging; she was to have them whenever she called for them.

Mrs. Clymer. I never did any thing of the kind.

Prisoner. (To Clymer.) Q. Have not you and your wife been parted; and did you not advertise her in the papers? - A. We did part, and I advertised not to trust her during her absence; but since that we have been very good friends, and never had any words.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave her an excellent character.

GUILTY of stealing goods, value 39s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and privately whipped.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-103

442. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , three pewter plates, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Clarke .

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - I keep the Nag's-head at Enfield ; the prisoner was quartered in my house; and on Friday night, the 25th of April, between nine and ten o'clock, he went away; I know nothing of the loss.

WILLIAM BLACK sworn. - I am one of the patrol belonging to Bow-street: Between twelve and one o'clock at night on the 25th of April, I was standind at the corner of the Angel at Islington, when a man came past me with a bundle in his right hand, and these three plates upon his left arm; I ran up to him and stopped him; I asked him, what are you doing with those plates; he said, they are my own; I asked him how he came by them, and he said he bought them of a man at Enfield; I asked him who, and he could not tell me.

Clarke. These are my plates; they are marked J A C, and J M C.

Prisoner's defence. I was quartered in Mr. Clarke's house; I belong to the Tower Hamlets militia; I bought these plates of a man that was there; and having heard there was to be no parade the next day, and as I have a family, I came to London to do a day's work, as I always do whenever I can; and I was stopped at Islington.

The prisoner called two serjeants, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-104

443. ANN DICKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , a silver watch, value 21s. the property of William Capel .

WILLIAM CAPEL sworn. - I grind paint for painting the mail-coaches : On the 28th of March, between eight and nine in the evening, I went to take a walk, as I always do before I go to bed, our business being very pernicious; the prisoner came up alongside of me; she walked a little way by the

side of me; I felt her touch me, and then I saw her run away; I put my hand down and missed my watch; I called stop thief, but she got away.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Very sober; I was in no way disguised in liquor.

Q. Upon your oath were you perfectly sober? - A. I was very sober, to know what I said and did.

Q. Now which do you mean to stick by; were you a little in liquor, or were you perfectly sober? - A. I was as sober as I am now.

Q. Have you been drinking this morning? - A. Yes; I have had a pint of beer for my breakfast.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before that night? - A. No; she was with me about five minutes; she was taken to Queen-square Office on the 5th of April; I knew her again in a moment; I am sure she is the person.

JOSEPH PERCIVAL sworn. - I am a constable: On the 29th of March I went into a public-house; the prosecutor was talking about his watch, that he had been robbed the night before; he described the prisoner, and I apprehended her; she told me she had given it to one Taylor, who had sold it to a soldier.

Q. Are you a constable now? - A. No.

Q. How came you to be no longer a constable? - A. I had a disagreement with Mr. Groves, one of the burgesses, and they said I should not be a constable again; the parish was taking my part, and Mr. Groves was against me; I have a parcel of premises in Duck-lane, Westminster, upon lease, and let them out in furnished lodgings.

Q. To women of the town? - A. Yes, or any body; some soldiers and some working people; I am inspector to the commissioners now.

FRANCIS BITTERS sworn. - I bought this watch of Sarah Taylor; she said it was her own, and that her husband was gone to Ireland; I never saw the prisoner till she was apprehended. (The watch produced.)

Capel. This is my watch.

Prisoner's defence. I do not know any thing of it; he was very much in liquor indeed; there was another woman and a man with him.

Q. (To Capel.) Was any other woman with you that night? - A. I do not know that there was.

Q. You must know? - A. There was not.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-105

444. ROBERT SALMON and FRANCES SALMON were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , eighteen morocco leather pocket-books, value 18s. two pieces of morocco leather, value 5s. nine thread-cases, with silver locks, value 18s. and a mourning gold ring, value 10s. the property of William Button , in his dwelling-house ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

There being no evidence of the actual loss of such property, the prisoners were.

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-106

445. ISAAC HOLLOWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , two neck-brasses, value 4l. and two steel rubbers, value 1s. the property of William Kent

WILLIAM KENT sworn. - I live upon the Marsh-wall, Poplar ; I am a miller : On Friday, the 17th of May, between ten in the evening and five the following morning, I lost two mill neck-brasses, and two steel rubbers; the rubbers act a files; they were taken from the granary, which was broke open; and the neck-brasses were taken from the mill; one of the neck-brasses was were out, and useless; the other was put in a block, and useful; on the Wednesday following I found them in the cart of a Mr. John Thurston , at Lime-house. (They are produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleet. Q. Were these articles so placed that a stranger to the mill would have found them out? - A. By moving seven pieces of timber a stranger might have found them.

Q. But they must have been found with considerable difficulty, and after considerable search? - A. Yes.

Q. There was a man worked with you whose name was Wheeler? - A. There was; he has eloped in consequence of this business; I have made all the search I could after him, but have not been able to find him.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I am a police officer: On the 21st of May Mr. Kent came to the office with a cart, and he claimed these brasses to be his property; I took them out of the cart into the office, and in consequence of information apprehended the prisoner; at the first examination he denied knowing any thing of it; at the second examination he confessed he had sold them; he said that he and Wheeler had found these things in a ditch in the mill-yard, and that he took them and sold them to Jevans on the Sunday.

ROBERT M'DOUGAL sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. John Thurston , of St. Catherine's: On the 31st of May I purchased these things of Mrs. Jevans; I took them away, and in less than an hour they were stopped.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleet. Q. Who is Mr. Thurston? - A. A dealer in old iron; Mrs. Jevans keeps a chandler's shop, and deals in old iron and brass.

Q. What did you give for this property? - A. Nine-pence a pound.

MARIA JEVANS sworn. - I live in Three-colt-street, Limehouse: I keep a chandler's shop; my husband is a smith; I purchased these things of the prisoner and another man, William Wheeler , on Sunday evening, May the 18th; I never saw him to my knowledge before; I have known the prisoner twelve years in the neighbourhood; I gave him for the neck-brasses, sixpence a pound; and for the other five farthings; it was very muddy, and I doubted whether it was real brass; the prisoner assured me it was.

Q. Did not you think it a very odd time to come? - A. No; he said he had found it in a ditch.

Q. Do you usually deal of a Sunday night? - A. No.

Q. You do not refuse any thing that is brought to you? - A. Knowing this man; he said they were as safe as though they were my own property; he had found them in a ditch; I sold the rubbers at three halfpence a pound.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleet. Q. Who brought the brass to your house? - A. I did not see the property till it was on the floor when I went to weigh it.

Q. To whom was the money paid? - A. To Wheeler.

Q. Did the prisoner bargain at all for them? - A. He did not; I asked him whether it was real brass or only cast, and I took his word that it was real brass.

Q. I believe you yourself bad the misfortune to be taken up upon this business? - A. No, I had not; Mr. Rogers desired me to come to the Office at six o'clock in the evening, and I did.

Q. Where was your husband at that time? - A. At work.

Q. Where is he now? - A. At work, for any thing I know.

Q. Was he before the Magistrate? - A. No; Mr. Rogers told me he need not come, as it was me that purchased it.

Rogers. When M'Dougal told who he bought the iron from, Mr. Clarke, the Magistrate, desired me to summon Mrs. Jevans; I saw Mr. and Mrs. Jevans, and they told me who they bought it of, and after the examination her husband was sent for, she being a married woman, that he might be bound over, and he was not at home.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all of it.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-107

446. JAMES O'DONNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , a silver watch, value 20s. the property of Michael Ryan .

MICHAEL RYAN sworn. - I have lived foreman to Mr. Grimwood, nurseryman , for fourteen years: On Wednesday the 14th of May, after six o'clock, the men locked up their tools within the gate, I was coming to town, and the prisoner walked with me; he told me he had not had a bit of any thing all day; we went to a public-house in Oxford-street , and I took compassion upon him, and gave him a half-crown to get him a supper; he went out, and did not come back till eleven o'clock; it was late, and I said I should like to have a bed; he said, there was a public-house across the way, that the man had broke, and it was empty, we could go over there and stay till day-light, and we went; there was nobody there but him and me, and the maid, she went up to bed; he then desired me to pull out my watch that we might know what time to go; I laid my head down and went to sleep, he was smoking his pipe, and drinking beer; I waked about three o'clock, and the man was gone, and my watch gone; I staid till Friday, thinking the man would bring the watch, but he did not; then I sent the Bow-street and the Marlborough-street people after him, and he was apprehended; I got information that my watch was sold to a Jew, at Chelsea; I had a warrant for the Jew, and he heard of the warrant, and appeared the day after with my watch; I knew it to be mine.

Q. How long had you known the prisoner? - A. He had worked once or twice in the garden.

Q. What is he? - A. He is a very good clerk; he is a very good writer; but, I believe, he was starving; and, in short, people that know him give him a very good character.

- BENJAMIN sworn. - I am a dealer in clothes: On the 15th of May last, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, I bought this watch of the prisoner at the bar, with a silver seal, and a broken key to it, he told me it was his own property; I gave him a guinea for it; he wished for the seal back, on account of its having been in the family so long, and I returned him the key and the seal.

Ryan. I know this to be my watch.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw Benjamin till I saw him at Marlborough-street; he came and looked at me, and said I was not the man.

GUILTY . (Aged 36.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-108

447. LAWRENCE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , fifty-six

pounds weight of bar iron, value 12s. the property of Ralph Whates .

ROBERT RODMAN sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Bull, a waterman: I saw the prisoner take this iron from King James's Stairs , on Saturday the 17th of May, about four o'clock; he put it on his shoulder, and walked right up Shakespeare's-walk; I sent another boy to see which way he went, while I fetched Mr. Whates; he came with me, and saw it on the prisoner's shoulder; Mr. Whates laid hold of him, and he threw it off his shoulder, and had like to have thrown it on my head.

RALPH WHATES sworn. - I am an anchor-smith : I had the iron landed at King James's Stairs, and employed three men to fetch it home; I received some information, in consequence of which, I immediately pursued the prisoner, he walked up Shakespeare's-walk, in a contrary direction to my house; just before I came up to him, within three or four yards, he threw it off his shoulder, and then I seized him; he made use of very rough language, and struck at me several times; he told me he was going to carry it to his master, and I was not his master; I never saw the man before in my life, to my knowledge.

JAMES ARNOLD sworn . - I was standing at the stairs, and saw the prisoner take the iron upon his shoulder; I followed him, and attacked the man while the other boy went after Mr. Whates; and while we were arguing Mr. Whates came up.

Prisoner's defence. The boy told me to follow the other man with the iron, and I did not know rightly where they were gone to.

GUILTY . (Aged 45.)

Publicly whipped at Shadwell-church, near King James's Stairs , and confined six months in the House of Correction .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-109

448. THOMAS YEULE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a picture, value 5s. the property of John Norborn .

JOHN NORBORN sworn. - I live in Holborn : I deal in pictures, and all kind of curiosities ; I can only prove the property.

JOSEPH NEWMAN sworn. - I keep an oil-shop in High-Holborn, nearly opposite Mr. Norborn's: I saw the prisoner at the bar take a picture from his door, on the 7th of April, about a quarter past two in the afternoon; I immediately followed him, and took it from him; I delivered him up at Mr. Norborn's shop. (Produces the picture).

Norborn. This is my picture.

Prisoner's defence. The picture that I took was not above half the size of that; I have got a wife and two children without a bit of bread for them, and I did not know what to do; I have but one hand. GUILTY .

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-110

449. WILLIAM PURSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , two cloth coats, value 5l. a waistcoat, value 20s. and a yard of blue cloth, value 15s. the property of William Vaughan , in his dwelling-house .

The prisoner being indicted for stealing coats, and it appearing that the property lost was cloth unmade up, he was ACQUITTED; but was ordered to be detained, that a fresh indictment might be preferred against him .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-111

450. JAMES FARO , and EDWARD ARMFIELD , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , nine pair of gold ear-rings, value 2l. 5s. and two odd gold ear-rings, value 5s. the property of Robert Chandler , privately in his shop .

THOMAS HUGHES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Robert Chandler , jeweller , in Leicester-square : On Monday evening, the 19th of May, between six and seven o'clock, I had been out, and when I came back into the shop, I saw the prisoner, Armfield, standing by the ear-ring drawer; in going round by the other counter he went out of the shop; I then saw the prisoner, Faro, apparently purchasing something on the other side of the shop; when Faro was gone, I went up to the place where I had seen Armfield stand, and discovered a great vacancy in the ear-ring drawer; I then went after the prisoners, I watched them into a liquor-shop in Rupert-street; I then came back and informed my master of it, and my master then went with me; when we got into Coventry-street, I saw them again; I laid hold of Armfield, and in bringing him along he made a bit of a rustling, with his hands behind him; upon which I asked him what he was about, and saw a pair of ear-rings in his hand, which he dropped; he then said it was not him that took them, it was the other took them and gave them to him; I brought him back, and my master pursued the other.

ROBERT CHANDLER sworn. - I went in pursuit of the prisoners: I saw them in Coventry-street; I pursued Faro, he ran down the Hay-Market, and about half way down I took him; I brought him as far as Coventry-street, and there I was surrounded by some of his companions, I believe, who rescued him from me; I suppose there were a hundred round me, and he got from me; I am certain the prisoner, Faro, is the same person.

JOHN HALEY sworn. - I am a lace-man in Longacre: I saw Mr. Chandler have hold of the prisoner,

Faro, and a gang round him, there were a great many of them, in Coventry-street; I saw them attempting to rescue him, and I took hold of him by the collar; upon which he made some resistance, and those round him asked me what I had to do with it; when we got to the corner of Rupert-street, or near it, his associates said I was choaking him, and insisted upon my letting him go, and promised he should go quietly to the office; I then quitted my hold, and the gang surrounded us, and he ran away; I pursued, and one of them attempted to strike me with a stick, but it missed me; I told them they had better he quiet, or I would take some more of them; the prisoner ran through a court into Gerrard-street, and there a young man stopped him, but was afraid to take hold of him; I took hold of him, and said he had better be quiet, for he should not get away again; upon which he bit my knuckles; I dragged him over to a mahogany-yard in Princes-street, upon which a fight commenced among the gang, and they knocked down two or three gentlemen; I took the prisoner into the mahogany-yard, and there the officers took him; before they came, he broke a flout man's mouth, or nose, I don't know which, in the yard, and set him in a gore of blood; I don't think I lost sight of him, but I am positive it is the same person that I saw in the custody of Mr. Chandler.

DAVID BOOTH sworn. - I am an upholsterer in Great Portland-street, St. Mary-le-bonne: On Monday, the 19th of May last, a little before seven in the evening, passing along Coventry-street, I saw the witness, Hughes, lay hold of Armfield at the corner of Oxendon-street, and as they were taking him along, I saw him put his hand into his pocket, and upon taking it out, he threw what appeared to me to be bits of paper, into the middle of the street; I immediately ran to the spot and picked them up, and found they contained gold or gilt trinkets of some kind; I followed them to Mr. Chandler's shop, and there produced them; I asked Armfield if he had any more about him, and he told me, yes; he put his hand in his pocket, and produced several pair of ear-rings; at the same time, declaring it was not him that took them, but that the other gave them to him.(George- Timothy Cotterell , a constable, produced the property, which was deposed to by Mr. Chandler).

Armfield's defence. I have nothing to say for myself; Faro is innocent.

Faro's defence. I bought a breast-buckle for half-a-crown, I had change for a seven-shilling-piece, and came away. Faro, GUILTY.

Armfield, GUILTY.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-112

451. JOHN MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , a woman's silk bonnet, value 10s. three men's hats, value 20s. and a hunting cap unfinished, value 6s. the property of Thomas Larkin , and George Dunnage .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS BENNETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was in the employ of Thomas Larkin ; and George Dunnage : On Saturday the 12th of April, I had a woman's silk bonnet sent up to me to be finished; I finished it, and left it in the workshop when I went to dinner, and when I came back it was gone.

THOMAS LARKIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am in partnership with George Dunnage , we keep a silk hat manufactory in the Strand : I missed a bonnet; after some search, I found it under the grate of the copper; I put a mark upon it, T. L. with a pencil, and placed William Butcher to watch; I then got a search-warrant, which was executed on Monday morning the 14th of April, between seven and eight o'clock; we found the prisoner in bed, there were two bedsteads in the room; upon taking down the other bedstead we found three hats, and a cap unfinished; after that, we found the bonnet at Mrs. Sang's, the wife of Mr. Sang, who keeps a music-shop in Oxford-street; I went there by the direction of the prisoner.

WILLIAM BUTCHER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am shopman to Mr. Larkin; I was sent to watch; about six o'clock, when the men leave their work, I saw the prisoner come into the room and take out a white handkerchief, or a cloth, he knelt down upon one knee, and took the bonnet from under the grate of the copper; I was concealed behind some silk, he could not observe me; he then went away with it, and I informed Mr. Duunage.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You don't know who put the bonnet there? - A. No.

ARCHIBALD RUTHVEN sworn. - I am an officer: On Monday the 14th of April, I went with Mr. Larkin to the prisoner's lodgings, No. 1, Garden-court, Standgate; I went into the right-hand room, and there was a woman; Mr. Larkin said, how do you do, Mrs. Miller; I turned to the left, and there was Miller in bed; before he got up I searched his clothes, and in his coat-pocket I found a pocket-book, containing twelve duplicates, all for hats; while I was looking at them he made a snatch, and made towards the fire, but I secured them; I searched the room, and just at the right of his bedstead was another bedstead turned up; his wife said, in his hearing, do not look there, there is nothing but foul linen; I said, I am a married man and I shall look; when I opened it, I saw these three hats, and this cap unfinished; I pulled them out; he begged very hard, and said it was distress made him do

in he cried very much, and I took him to Bow-street.

Mr. Alley. Q. Was there no inducement held out to him, that he should be forgiven if he confessed? - A. None; I went by Mr. Larkin's directions to Mr. Sang's, in Oxford-street, where I found this bonnet; I did not hear the prisoner say any thing about it.( Deborah Sang was called upon her recognizance).(The property was deposed to by Mr. Larkin.)

Prisoner's defence. I don't know any thing of the bonnet.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-113

452. SARAH ROTHERY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , a stuff petticoat, value 2s. the property of Hugh Lewis , and John Herndorn .

JOHN HERNDORN sworn. - I keep a shop in St. Martin's-court , in partnership with Hugh Lewis : On the 13th of May, we were both engaged in the shop, there were goods hanging at the door for shew; in consequence of information, I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and overtook her about fifty yards from the door, with a stuff petticoat upon her,(produces it); it is our property, it has our private mark upon it.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-114

453. RICHARD LLOYD , and RICHARD POOLE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , a silver watch, value 40s. a pad, value 1d. and a silk handkerchief, value 1s. the property of Charles Riley .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-115

454. MARTHA RAYNER , and JAMES HARRIS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , ten silk handkerchiefs, value 30s. the property of Maurice Hasty .

The Prosecutor not being able to identify the prisoners, and no property having been found, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-116

455. PETER STOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of Joseph Parr .

JOSEPH PARR sworn. - I am proprietor of the Equitable-Office for Servants , the corner of Ely-Place : On the 6th of May, within one door of my own house, I felt something at my pocket; I turned round, and the prisoner had got my silk handkerchief from me; I pursued him immediately, I never lost sight of him till I took him in Bartlett's-buildings, with my handkerchief upon him.

Prisoner's defence. I saw the handkerchief drop from the gentleman, I picked it up and gave it him immediately.

GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-117

456. ANDREW COPELAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a silver tea-spoon, value 2s. the property of Nathaniel Middleton , Esq .

WILLIAM MORRIS sworn. - I am butler to Mr. Nathaniel Middleton , No. 47, Portland-place ; I was not at home at the time the spoon was taken.

JOHN CORRALL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Middleton; the prisoner at the bar came with some wine to my master, there were some spoons laid upon the table in the pantry; after he was gone, there was one missing, he was not in soldier s clothes at that time.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD sworn. - On Friday the 23d of May, the prisoner came to his quarters, got drinking, and made a disturbance that somebody had robbed him of a silver spoon; upon searching, they found a silver spoon upon the coal-box, which he swore was his, seeing the crest upon it, I took charge of it, and the next morning, learning that he had been to Mr. Middleton's, I sent it there, and it turned out to be his.

JAMES HARRIS sworn. - I am a constable, I received this spoon from Mr. Shepherd, (produces it;) the prisoner said, d-n my eyes if that is not my spoon now.

Prisoner's defence. I found the spoon, at the corner of Portland-street.

Morris. This is Mr. Middleton's crest; I counted over the spoons and found one short of the number, I have brought the fellow to it. (Produces it.)

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character. GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-118

457. THOMAS JEFFERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a great coat, value 3s. a cloth coat, value 1s. a blanket, value 4s. a pair of stockings, value 6d. a pair of bellows, value 1s. and a towel, value 1s. the property of William Hancock .

WILLIAM HANCOCK sworn. - I am a hairdresser , No. 10, Type-street, Finsbury-square : On Thursday the 1st of May, my business called me out between five and six in the morning; when I returned, I found my shop broke into; I searched, and found the prisoner concealed in the cellar; part of the things were lying down by him, the remainder of the things were found in a washhouse; his friends are very well off, he has been in the capacity of a clerk , he has turned out very wild and has got through it; I have known him some time, (produces the property;) they are all mine, I had seen them that morning.

SARAH GRIFFITHS sworn. - The prisoner got through my parlour into Mr. Jefferson's-shop, the wash-house joins the cellar, he went from the wash-house down to the cellar, I did not see him in the cellar, I was frightened, and shut the door.

ASHTON GRIFFITHS sworn. - Mr. Jefferson came home and missed some things, we found some of them in the wash-house; then we went down into the cellar, Hancock went first, and found the man there, we both secured him, I never knew him before.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime, I know nothing of the things.

GUILTY . (Aged 39.)

Confined one week in Newgate , fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000528-119

458. JAMES MARTIN and SARAH SMITH were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , nineteen deal boards, value 30s. the property of William Mountford .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Sarah Taylor , widow .

Third Count. Laying them to be the property of persons unknown, and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM MOUNTFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a timber-merchant , I land my deals at Mrs. Sarah Taylor's Lime-wharf, St. Catherine's ; she is a widow, I never considered her as responsible for them; they were my property when they were landed; I was landing a single barge of deals on the 22d of April, I sent them into the Dock, on purpose to see if I could discover the person who stole my deals before; they were of a particular quality and mark, they were landed in the same manner as my deals had always been landed, and left on the wharf; there has been but one ship this season, and only one barge for the London side, the others have gone to the Surry side of the water; I lost thirty-seven deals in two nights, they were worth from three and sixpence to three and eight-pence a deal, the wholesale price; they will fell retail, from four and six-pence to four and eight-pence, the wholesale quantity is one hundred; the prisoner Martin has been employed in landing these deals, and has been for a twelvemonth past; he was employed on Monday and Tuesday, and on Wednesday we found the deals, and the next day he was taken up; the deals were found in Mrs. Smith's cellar, in St. Catherine's-lane, under a grocer's shop, about one hundred yards from the Dock; I told her what I had come about, and she said, she had bought some broken pieces of deal from Martin.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleet. Q. Can you tell what quantity of deals were in the barge? - A. I was not present when the deals were landed, or ever am, at least very seldom.

Q. A great many barges have gone on the other side of the water? - A. Yes.

Q. Deals of this description to an amazing amount might have been landed on the other side? - A. Yes, they might.

JOHN YEOMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I was a watchman on Mrs. Taylor's wharf; I saw the prisoner Martin, between five and six in the morning, carry off several deals from Mrs. Taylor's Lime-wharf that had been landed from a barge; I saw no more of him, till I saw him at the Justice's; I was employed by Mrs. Taylor to watch; I spoke to Mr. Pash, the clerk of the wharf, he is employed sometimes at two or three in the morning, according as the side is.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. There were plenty of people to observe him, the thing was done openly, was it not? - A. Yes.

JOHN THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am master of the workhouse of St. Catherine's: On or about the 22d of April, I saw the prisoner Martin about half past four, or three quarters past four, on a Tuesday morning, coming from Mrs. Taylor's wharf with some deals upon his shoulder; I was going the same way that he was, and I saw him put them down into a cellar under the shop window of Mr. Burland, a grocers I am sure he brought them out of Mrs. Taylor's wharf.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleet. Q. The prisoner had them upon his shoulder? - A. Yes.

Q. Then, of course, they concealed his face? - A. Yes; but I have no doubt of the man, I wish I had.

Q. You knew it was his duty to work there? - A. I did not know that.

EDWARD JEFFERIES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live in Glass-house-yard, Minories; about seven hours before I saw Mrs. Smith at the Police-Office, she agreed with me for some old shipping timber, down at Iron-gate, I was to have it for two pence a foot; I saw some deals there, she said she was going to cut them up; I said that was a pity; some had lost one foot, and some two, and some were split down; I gave her two and three-pence a piece, there were seventeen or eighteen of them; I took them up to a saw-yard, in Gower's-walk, I afterwards went with the officer to fetch them back, they were the same deals.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Two shillings and three-pence a piece was a fair price? - A. Yes.

Q. There was no concealment in this transaction? - A. None at all; I took them to Gower's-walk to be cut.

Q. The place where you left them, is a place where a great deal of business is done? - A. Yes.

Q. So much, that a month hence you would not be able to say it was the same? - A. I could not.( Richard Perry , the officer, proved a part of the property.)

ADAM BARLAND sworn. - I am a grocer at St. Catherine's, I have a cellar under my shop, which I let to John Smith , the husband of the prisoner.

ALEXANDER STILES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an officer belonging to the Marine Police office; I was present when the two prisoners were examined. (Produces a book.)

Q. Have you the confession of Martin? - A. I have.

Q. Did you see him sign it? - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the Magistrate sign it? - A. I did, it was entirely a voluntary confession, and the confession of Sarah Smith was also voluntary.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleet. Q. Were you present at the whole of the examination? - A. I was never out of the room.

Q. You are clerk at the office? - A. No, I am an officer.

Mr. Alley. Q. What office is it that sends you to prove examinations? - A. The Marine Police-Office.

Q. Where is the clerk to-day, is he ashamed of his duty? - A. I don't know.

Q. Is it your duty to take down examinations? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, how often was the woman at the office before she was committed for trial? - A. She was there the night before, she was there the second time, on Friday the 25th of April, that was the examination that is taken down; she was examined a third time, but I cannot say what day.

Q. Then you have thought fit to bring her surreptitiously the examination of the middle day, and neither the first nor second? - A. No; Martin's examination was the first day.

Q. There is an examination signed [Text unreadable in original.]y Sarah Smith ? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you read that over to her? - A. I did not, it was read over to her by the Magistrate.

Q. Was it read over to her word for word? - A. She said, that what the Magistrate read to her was the fact.

Martin's confession read.

"I acknowledge that I have sold broken wood to Mrs. Smith before. On Tuesday night last, I took two of those deals now produced, to Mrs. Smith's cellar; a few days before this, I told Mrs. Smith I should soon have some deals to sell, when she told me to carry them into her cellar, and she would pay me for them; on the Wednesday morning, I took the other deals from Mrs. Taylor's wharf, and carried them likewise to her cellar, this was about five o'clock; I did not exactly know the number, but I called at Mrs. Smith's window, as soon as I had done, and told her what I had done, she came down into the cellar, and put them by; Mrs. Smith promised me, the Tuesday before I brought her any deals, that she would give me one and nine-pence for each deal, as the most she could afford, but she had not seen them then; after Mrs. Smith had put the planks by, I asked her for my money, she said, she had none at present; I then asked her to let me have two shillings, which I was to give to the watchman of the wharf that permitted me to take them from the wharf, saying, I must remember him, for his wages were so small, he could not live by them; I gave him one shilling and some purl; I am not the only person concerned in robbing this wharf of deals; there is one William Burford , a labourer on the wharf; a tall man, another labourer, an Irishman, named Splade, and another labourer, that works at the lime, and likewise a soldier, who worked with me at times, and these people I have seen take deals, and broken deals, which they frequently broke on purpose; they mostly took them to Mrs. Smith's, and a man in St. Catherine's-lane, whose name is Witham; no person was concerned with me in this, except the watchman, who permitted me to take them.

(Signed by me,) JAMES MARTIN ."(The deals were deposed to by Mr. Mountford.)

The Court were of opinion, that the contract for the cellar being made by Smith, the husband, the property in that cellar was under his controul, and that therefore the prisoner Smith ought not to be called upon for her defence.

Jury. (To Mountford.) Q. Had you authorized the prisoner Martin to take any deals out that morning? - A. No.

Martin's defence. Mr. Wheeler buys deals of Mr. Mountford, and he, with his own mouth, desired me to take deals to him, such as he should look out at any time.

Mr. Mountford. I never gave him any such directions.

The prisoner Martin called two serjeants, and one other witness, who gave him a good character.

Martin, GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Smith NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-120

459. CHRISTIANA DANDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , two silk petticoats, value 20s. a silver cup, value 17s. a great coat, value 20s. two pair of breeches, value 20s. a pair of stone knee-buckles, value 10s. a pair of stone shoe-buckles, value 10s. two gold lockets, value 20s. a waistcoat, value 10s. three shirts, value 30s. a shirt, value 10s. six knives and forks, value 12s. and a gold ring, value 20s. the property of Thomas Waterman , in the dwelling-house of Edward Tindal .

THOMAS WATERMAN sworn. - I am a dissenting minister , at Ratcliff ; I lodged in the house of Edward Tindal; the prisoner had been a servant in the house about five months: On the 27th of May, I received information, in consequence of which, I applied to an officer of the Police-office, his name is Riley; he went with me to my lodgings, in the way we saw the prisoner, in company with another woman, she was going towards home; I called to her, and ordered her to follow us; upon entering the house, and the officer addressing her, charging her with the robbery, she produced a pocket-book with thirty-two duplicates in it, upon which she was taken before the Magistrate, and upon the second examination committed for trial.

Q. Did these duplicates lead to the discovery of the property? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are not a married man, I suppose? - A. Why do you ask that question?

Q. Are you a married man? - A. I am.

Q. Do you live with your wife now? - A. No.

Q. Does the prisoner live with you or your wife? - A. With me.

Q. Did that prisoner ever live with you, when you and your wife lived together? - A. No.

Q. How long have you ceased to live with your wife? - A. Ever since the 28th of March.

Q. Did you leave your wife, or your wife leave you? - A. She left me.

Q. Did she not leave you in consequence of a complaint that she made, respecting you and the prisoner at the bar? - A. No.

Q. Do you continue to live in the same place? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner continued to live with you? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of the keys of your drawers after your wife left you? - A. The keys of the drawers, that contained the linen, the servant had, or at least knew where they were, they were placed in the drawer of the dressing-glass.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not give them to her, and desire her to take care of your household affairs? - A. I must desire those questions may be separated, because they are distinct.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, did you, or did you not desire the prisoner to take the management of your household affairs upon herself? - A. Yes, of course, as I had no other person in the house; I kept her for that purpose to take care of my house.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not tell her she should be mistress of all you had? - A. No, upon my oath.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. I do.

Q. Is the landlord of the house attending here? - A. No.

Q. Do you know where your wife lives now? - A. No.

Q. Has your wife made any complaint to you, since she left you, with respect to your conduct towards the prisoner? - A. Never.

Q. Neither directly, nor indirectly? - A. Never.

Q. Do you mean to swear, that you did not tell the prisoner, that if she would live with you, and be as a wife to you, that she should have the possession, and be mistress of all you had got? - A. If it were not for the respect I owe this Court, I would not answer so insolent and impertinent a question, but as I owe that respect to the Court, I say, no; it it is a fabricated circumstance worthy of such a pleader as yourself.

Q. Don't be rude, sir, I stand here to do my duty, and I will do it - I ask you, did you not tell the prisoner, that if she would live with you as a wife, she should be mistress of all you had got? - A. No, upon my oath.

Q. Upon your oath, have you not cohabited with her? - A. No.

Q. For what did your wife leave you? - A. I don't know.

Q. And she never told you why? - A. She never did.

Q. And that you mean to swear? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did your wife or not, make it a cause of complaint, that she would leave you,

unless you altered your conduct, with respect to the prisoner at the bar? - A. Never.

Q. Where does your wife live now? - A. I do not know.

Q. Upon your oath? - A. I do not; I have heard where she has been seen, but never heard where she resided.

Q. Does any other servant reside in the house? - A. No; there was one.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not give the prisoner the keys, and the entire dominion of your affairs? - A. No, she only had one key, and that was of the linen.

Q. Did she not dine at table with you? - A. No.

Q. Who desired you to take her into custody? - A. Nobody, it was upon information.

Q. Was it not upon the advice of somebody against your own inclination? - A. No.

Q. Did you take this woman into custody, merely at your suggestion, or that of anybody else? - A. My own suggestion.

GEORGE WINDSOR sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, (produces a great variety of articles;) they were pledged at different times by the prisoner, from the 29th of March, to the 26th of May, in many various names; she has made use of Mrs. Waterman's name, and some in the name of Kelly; I am confident she is the person; there are two articles pledged in the name of Mary Waterman , a table cloth and a silk petticoat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. These things were brought at several times? - A. Yes.

Q. She pledged part of them as Mrs. Waterman? - A. No, there are two names to the duplicates; they were pledged for Mary Waterman, by Mary Dandy, on the 23d of April.

EDWARD PRITCHARD sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. Mashiter, pawnbroker, in Ratcliff-highway; on the 5th of May last, I took in pawn this ring, in the name of Kelly, but I had no recollection at all of the person; I have the counter part of the duplicate. (Produces it.)

ROBERT DICKMAN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, (produces a sheet:) I received it from the prisoner at the bar, I have the counterpart, (produces it;) I know the prisoner very well, her mother lives by my house.

SAMUEL DUDLEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(produces a sheet;) it was pledged on the 12th of April, I cannot say that the prisoner is the person, it was pledged in the name of Elizabeth Watchman .

JOHN RILEY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Shadwell Office; I apprehended the prisoner, in company with the prosecutor; he gave me charge of her, and in her possession I found a number of duplicates, (produces them;) here are sixteen that match with Mr. Windsor's, they were examined and found to correspond, before the Magistrate; here are three that relate to the articles pledged at Mr. Mashiter's and Mr. Dickman's, which correspond exactly; I also found a teaspoon in her pocket, when I searched her in the presence of her master, which is not in the indictment.

Q. What did she say at the time? - A. She said she had certainly made away with them, and gave up the duplicates in the presence of her master, and there was nothing more said.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What conversation had you with her before she made these observations? - A. I made use of no promises or threats, I know better; she said she had done so, she had made away with the property.

Q. Did she say she had done it at the request of her master? - A. She did not.

Q. Did she say any thing like it? - A. She did not.

Jury. Q. Did she say she was either the wife or the kept-mistress of Mr. Waterman? - A. Neither.

Prisoner's defence. He often desired me to buy articles for the house without giving me money, and I could not buy them without money; I was obliged to pledge some things to get money, and he owed me a quarter's wages, and denied paying me, because I wanted to go away.

Mr. Waterman. This silver cup I can swear to, it has my initials upon it; I believe them all to be mine.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 19.)

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-121

460. JAMES CONOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a wicker basket, value 2s. and one hundred and fifteen eggs, value 9s. the property of Charles Cunningham .

CHARLES CUNNINGHAM sworn. - I am a green-grocer and poulterer , No. 37, Greek-street, Soho : On the 29th of May, about a quarter before ten o'clock, I was standing in the shop, I saw the prisoner come up to the basket, I thought he wanted to buy some eggs; I went to the door, and saw the prisoner running down the street with the basket of eggs; it was a wicker basket containing one hundred and fifteen eggs; I never lost sight of him, I called to him not to throw them down, I was just

behind him, and when I came up he immediately threw them down and broke most of them; I knocked him down, and then he threw me down upon the kirb, and hurt me very much.

Prisoner's defence. I was passing by, and this man laid hold of me, and said I was one of the party; he knocked me down, and kicked me till I was not able to stir myself; I lost an entire new hat off my head. GUILTY .

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-122

461. ELIZABETH MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , three half-crowns , the property of Samuel Pearce .

SAMUEL PEARCE sworn. - I am a working-jeweller : On Thursday evening, either the 29th of 30th of May, I stopped in Parliament street , to make water; the prisoner came behind me, and wanted me to go with her; I told her I was a married man, and would have nothing to do with her; she then thrust her hand into my right-hand waistcoat-pocket, and took out three half-crown-pieces; I immediately took hold of her arm, I desired her to give me the property she had taken from me; she said she had nothing of the kind; I said I was confident she had, and I would get a watchman; she seemed not to care for what I said, but endeavoured to get away from me; I got a watchman and gave charge of her; she was searched, and three half-crowns found upon her, but I cannot swear to them; I was perfectly sober, I had not been drinking at all; I had seen my money about two hours before.

JAMES MANSELL sworn. - I was constable of the night, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house; the prosecutor was quite sober; I shook the prisoner's clothes, and three half-crown-pieces fell from her.

Prosecutor. I believe this to be my property.

Prisoner's defence. This gentleman met me at Charing-cross, he was with me up a passage a quarter of an hour, and when he had done, he gave me three-pence; half an hour after that, he came to me and charged me with robbing him; the three half-crowns a gentleman gave me that I had been to see at Temple-bar, I told the constable so.

GUILTY (Aged 23.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-123

462. JOSEPH HUFF , CHARLES MOREN , ABRAHAM BONE , and THOMAS STEVENS , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Moles , spinster , about the hour of ten, in the night of the 27th of February , and burglariously stealing a bed quilt, value 10s. a pair of blankets, value 8s. a pair of sheets, value 6s. a pillow-case, value 1s. a muslin gown, value 10s. a dimity petticoat, value 7s. a cotton petticoat, value 4s. a feather pillow, value 3s. and a muslin apron, value 2s. the property of the said Mary .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoners; except that of the accomplice, the prisoners were

All Four ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-124

463. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a chaise and harness, value 15l. 15s. the property of Arnold White .

There being no evidence to shew that the prisoner did not make use of the chaise for the purpose for which he hired it, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-125

464. JOHN FOSTER , and JAMES BUR-GESS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , two pigs, value 4l. the property of Thomas Butland .

THOMAS BURLAND sworn. - I live in Old-street , I had two little pigs in the yard: On Thursday the 24th of April, I lost them; I saw them about half past eight o'clock in the morning, and I saw them afterwards about nine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleet. Q. These pigs came in and out of the yard just when they pleased? - A. Yes.

Q. Then, in point of fact, you never lost them; they only paraded up one street and down another? - A. I cannot say.

GEORGE BARKER sworn. - I am a bricklayer: On Thursday the 24th of April, I saw the two prisoners driving two pigs, in Leonard-street, they wanted to turn up Tabernacle-walk; I looked at the pigs, and had no suspicion of the prisoners till I saw a little boy turn them back with his hat: I stood at the corner, and heard Foster say, it will not do, that man knows something of the pigs; that gave me some suspicion, and I watched them; they drove them towards the Barking-dogs public-house; I heard one of them say, let us go in here and have a pint, and they went in; Burgess drank first find came out after the pigs; I said, who do these pigs belong to; he said, what was that to me; I said, I would know before he went any further, and I laid hold of him; then Foster came out, and I laid hold of him; a constable was sent for, and I gave them in charge; I then went to look for the pigs, and they had found their way home; I went to Mr.

Burland's and saw the pigs, I am sure they were the same pigs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleet. Q. How far were you from the prisoner at the time of this conversation? - A. The street is thirty feet wide.

Q. Do you mean to say that they heard you distinctly? - A. Yes.

Q. These pigs were left to go wherever they pleased? - A. They were.

Q. Whether the prisoners were driving them to the pound or not you don't know? - A. No; I cannot say.

HARRINGTON BURLAND sworn. - I am a master sawyer, newphew to Thomas Burland : On the 24th of April, I saw the two prisoners driving two pigs into Leonard-street; I saw no more of them till after they were in custody; I saw three ropes, with slip nooses, taken from them, two from Foster, and one from Burgess.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

The prisoner, Foster, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Foster, GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Burgess, GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-126

465. JAMES WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , a pair of sheets, value 2s. and a looking-glass, value 2s. the property of Charles Nicholas , in a lodging-room .

CHARLES NICHOLAS sworn. - I keep a house, No. 14, George-street, Portland-chapel ; my wife let the lodging: On Sunday, the 11th of May, I took the prisoner; my wife was with me; I secured him; he kicked at me, and got from me; my wife cried stop thief, and he was stopped at about seven yards distance; I never lost sight of him.

RACHEL NICHOLAS sworn. - On Friday, the 2d of May, I let the prisoner a lodging; he was to pay three shillings a week; he took possession on Friday night; he left the key with my husband for me to make the bed; and on Saturday, the 3d of May, I gave him the key; I went into the room on the Tuesday following, and missed the looking-glass and sheets; I never saw him after till my husband and I met him on Sunday the 11th; he slept but two nights in the house; I always made the bed myself. I never gave the key to any servant; I went into the room and missed a pair of sheets and a looking-glass; the key was lost, and nobody could get in till we had the lock picked.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the prosecutor till the 11th of last month; I never was in London till the 9th.

Mrs. Nichols. I am perfectly sure the prisoner is the man.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-127

466. PHOEBE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , a shift, value 8d. two petticoats, value 1s. a pair of stockings, value 6d. a gown, value 2d. a pair of stays, value 6d. a pocket, value 3d. and an apron, value 3d. the property of Mary Graystend .

MARY GRAYSTEND sworn. - I live at No. 21, George-yard ; the prisoner lodged in the same room with me two nights; she slept in another bed; I left my property at the side of my bed on a stool; on Friday morning, the 30th of May, between two and three, I awaked and missed them; the prisoner was gone; I got up, put on my cloaths, and my mother and I found the prisoner in the privy of the next house; she had got over a wall fourteen feet high; she had my petticoat and apron on; the rest were tied up in a bundle in her hand; she was delivered to the watchman.

Q. What way of business are you in? - A. A weaveress .

Joseph Sparrow , a shoe-maker, produced the property, and confirmed the evidence of the prosecutrix, who deposed to the property.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , (Aged 25.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-128

467. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon Michael Oliver , on the 9th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a morocco pocket-book, value 5s. and a pair of silver bracelets, value 10s. 6d. the property of the said Michael .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

MICHAEL OLIVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at No. 12, Swan-place, near the Bricklayer's-arms, Kent-road.

Q. Of what prosession are you? - A. I do not prosess any thing at all but that of an honest man, and pay for what I have; I live upon what my ancestors have worked for: On the night of the 9th of May, I came through Covent-garden at twenty minutes after eleven o'clock; I came within

ten yards of the door of the Theatre when I saw the prisoner at the end of the Piazzas, going towards Drury-lane Theatre, standing against one of the pillars; I was wishing to see a friend of mine out of Lancashire come out of the Theatre; I asked the prisoner if the play was nearly over, he said it would not be for half an hour; are you from the country, sir, says the prisoner, because I am; I said I was from the country; he said, so am I too; he said, I am a servant in a family; the prisoner then said, how do you like this London; I said, not at all, I wish I was at home again; but I will wait no longer, and so good night; the prisoner then followed me at the distance of ten or fifteen yards, saying repeatedly that London was a very disagreeable place, and that it was d-'d not; I did not give the prisoner any answer, and having an acquaintance in Craven-buildings , I went up there and was in hopes the prisoner had gone forward; I made an excuse to stop at the door of a Mr. Pratt; I rapped at the door, but it was too late an hour; I went on till I came to the passage that leads from Craven-buildings towards Temple-bar; I stopped to make water within six inches of the corner of the court; I then supposed that the prisoner was not near me, but he turned round, or came back, and seized me, one hand by the collar of my shirt or neckcloth, and the other-I do not know how to express myself.

Q. Was it by your private parts that he seized you? - A. It was; he screwed me most violently round with his hand as he laid hold of me, and said I must have your money, or I will cut your b-d throat; and then he held me, not by the collar, but where I alluded to previous to the word collar, until he put his hand into my right-hand waistcoat pocket, he there took out some halfpence; he felt in my coat-pocket, which is in the inside of my coat, and insisted upon my, that moment, giving him all I had, or he would say - I am ashamed to say what.

Q. You must tell us what? - A. It is a word that you will find written at the beginning of the Bible.

Q. You must tell us the words he made use of? - A. I screamed out watchman, and he said he would call sodomy.

Jury. Q. Was that the word? - A. It was, so help me God; I then begged him not to cut me any more, for he had made several attempts to cut my throat with one hand.

Q. What had he in that hand? - A. Something resembling an instrument commonly called a penknife; my throat and my face were cut in several places; I begged for mercy, and told him he should have all that I had about me; he then put his hand into my coat-pocket, and took out my pocket-book; he asked me whether it contained bills, or what; I told him letters of consequence to me concerning a law business; and of no use to any body but myself; he said, I must have some money, have you no more about you; I replied that I had not, but that I would give him any money he should require for the pocket-book back; that if he lived by robbing, I was willing to redeem my papers back; he said, how much will you give me to have it back again; the prisoner said, if you will give me half a guinea I will let you have it, for I must have half a guinea; I said to him, you may stay here, and I will fetch you half a guinea; he said, will you not hang me, and I declared I could not swear to his face; that if he chose to go along near Temple-bar, I would procure the money; he walked along with me, and when we were opposite St. Clement's Church, he said he must have a guinea, or he would not let me have the pocket-book again; that he was very sorry if he had hurt me, for he lived by that way, and no doubt, he said, I was up to the gossip; I told him I did not know what gossip he meant, without it was cutting throats, and robbing people; he then said that three or four and twenty shillings, I am not sure which, would answer his purpose for the present night; I then asked him to come with me for the money, and he repeated again, will you not hang me; I told him, upon my honour I would not; I went to the Magpye and Stump public-house, where I knew the landlady, Mrs. Young; the prisoner followed me in; my physicians and surgeons, as I live in the country, come there to consult me concerning my health; I went in and asked for a glass of porter, and begged to speak with her alone; I told her to send for a constable; she said it was too late to get a constable, and she sent for a watchman; the prisoner was in a back-room, commonly called a parlour, and I in the tap-room; the watchman came in about two minutes; I was then in the parlour; I gave charge of the prisoner; he said, I have not got Mr. Oliver's pocket-book, but please to look under the table and about the room, and you will find it, I have no doubt; Mrs. Young called me Oliver when I first went in; the pocket-book was found under the table; the prisoner then insulted me with a great deal of bad language, that I was a false man, and should I attempt to swear that that was my pocket-book he would lay such a train against me as should ruin me for ever; the watchman and Mrs. Young were present; then the watchman took him away; (produces the pocket-book and bracelets:) I received it from the person who picked it up; his Christian name is James; I can swear to the pocket-book and its contents.

Court. Q. Here is a letter directed to you at No. 49, Aldermanbury? - A. That is a Mr. Lee's, a

friend of mine, to whom I have letters directed.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me that you were a gentleman's servant? - A. I did, in order to induce him to restore my property.

Prisoner. I wish your Lordship to ask him what he is now, and what he has been? - A. I am a country farmer's son in Northamptonshire; I have had a great deal of friendship from the Earl and Countess of Kinnoul, and the Drummond family, and with what my own friends did for me, and these noble families, I have always been kept independent; I married a lady of most respectable family in Lancashire, a Miss Hart, Counsellor Hart's cousin, and was by that means made independent; she is dead, and I have since married another lady, the daughter of Mr. Samuel Barnes , a respectable citizen of London, who is now living with her son at Newcastle.

Court. Q. How came you to tell him you were a gentleman's servant? - A. To save my life; he said he thought he had got something of value in his clutches.

Q. Is your second wife living? - A. I cannot say, she was nearly twelve months ago, when I came up to London upon some law affairs in Chancery respecting my son by my first wife.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not send your servant to me to try and make it up? - A. I have no servant, nor did I ever send any person; here are some letters that he has sent to me.

Q. Did you not walk arm in arm with me on the 9th of May? - A. I did not.

Court. Q. Where were you going that night? - A. To Temple-bar; I had been at a house in May's Buildings, to speak to a friend from Liverpool.

Q. How many gentlemen were with you? - A. I believe there were about thirty; it was a society of people that meet together called Odd Fellows.

Q. Where were you going? - A. To Lieutenant Marsh's, No. 12, Swan-place, Bricklayer's-arms, where I lodge.

Q. How came you to stop at the play-house? - A. I wanted to see a gentleman of too much decency to mention with such a man as the prisoner, to whom I had lent a pair of silver buckles of a particular pattern.

Q. What is that gentleman's name? - A. They call him Lee, he comes from Liverpool.

Q. What is he? - A. I cannot altogether say.

Q. Is he a gentleman of property? - A. I cannot say any thing about any body's property but my own; he had a country house a little way out of Liverpool, but I have not spoke to him these four years.

Q. Were you intimate with him? - A. So far as taking a cup of tea with him, or drinking a bottle of wine.

Q. How came you to lend him this pair of buckles? - A. They were quite a new fashioned pair from London; I would have sent him ten thousand pounds if I had had it, and he had wanted it.

Prisoner. Mr. Lee lives up two pair of stairs in Milford-lane.

Oliver. The Mr. Lee that I mean is too much of a gentleman to live up two pair of stairs.

Court. Q. How came you to know that Mr. Lee was at the play-house that night? - A. Because I had met a Mr. Jackson near Temple-bar, a cousin to me by marriage, and he told me Mr. Lee was in town; but I have not seen him these four years.

Court. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before that night? - A. To the best of my recollection I had never seen him; but I have every reason to believe he had seen me.

MARY YOUNG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I keep the Magpye and Stump at Temple-bar; I have known Mr. Oliver about six or seven months, he is by profession I believe a dentist; I have heard him say he followed that profession at Liverpool and at York: On the 9th of May, about ten minutes before twelve o'clock at night, he came into my house; the prisoner followed him in through the tap-room into the parlour; Mr. Oliver asked for a pint of porter, and the prisoner asked for a pint of porter; in about two or three minutes Mr. Oliver came, and said he wanted to speak to me; he came to the parlour-door, and said a person in the parlour had picked his pocket of his pocket-book, and begged me to send for a constable, I told him it was too late to send for a constable, I would send for a watchman; I called the watchman, and Mr. Oliver gave charge of the prisoner for picking his pocket; the prisoner told me, if I looked about the table, I should find the pocket-book there; my servant, James Washington , then looked, and found the pocket-book under where the prisoner had sat; Mr. Oliver said it was his pocket-book, and it was given to the watchman; then the prisoner was taken away.

Jury. Q. What was Mr. Oliver's appearance when he came in? - A. His face was cut in four or five places; he was bleeding, and holding his pocket handkerchief up to his face.

Court. Q. What sort of wounds were they? - A. A sort of scratches, as if it had been done by the point of a sharp needle, or an instrument larger than a needle, but not like a knife, or any thing of that sort.

Q. Was Mr. Oliver sober at that time? - A. Perfectly sober.

Q. How long has he lodged with you? - A. He does not lodge with me at all; he lodges with my son, Lieutenant Marsh, No. 12, Swan-place, Kent-

road; Mr. Oliver has been in a bad state of health, and he used frequently to call for a glass of ale; he wanted a country lodging, and I recommended him to my son; and if he was late going home of an evening, he used to sleep at my house by chance.

EDWARD HAMMOND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. - I was at the Magpie and Stump, on the 9th of May, when Mr. Oliver came in, the prisoner followed him; I went into the parlour after them, Mr. Oliver did not stop five minutes in the parlour; I said to Mr. Oliver, sir, you have been fighting, have not you, your face is bloody; the prisoner said, no, it is not hurt at all; Mr. Oliver made me no answer; then Mr. Oliver and the prisoner went into the tap-room; then Mr. Oliver and Mrs. Young came into the parlour, Mrs. Young said she would thank me to go into the taproom, as that gentleman had something to say to her; I went out immediately, the prisoner was there coming towards the parlour to look what was going forward, he clapped his face to the glass, and looked through, he immediately turned back from the parlour door, and placed himself by the side of me; the watchman came in, and Mr. Oliver was called out of the parlour, and he gave charge of the prisoner for having robbed him of his pocket-book, and some halfpence; the prisoner said he had no pocket-book, but if they looked about the table, they would find it; James Washington took the candle and found it under the table, about four feet from where the prisoner sat.

Q. Was Mr. Oliver so near that spot, that it could have come from him? - A. No, it was impossible, Mr. Oliver was very much scratched under the left eye, in three or four places.

Court. Q. When Mr. Oliver first came in, he did not complain of being robbed? - A. No.

Q. If he had, he and you were strong enough to have detained the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Was there any abuse after the pocket-book was found, and after the watchman came in? - A. No.

JAMES WASHINGTON sworn. - I am a bricklayer by trade, and I assist Mrs. Young after my work is done; I was there on the 9th of May, when Mr. Oliver came in, the prisoner came in with him, I cannot say which came in first, I was busy drawing beer; they went into the parlour, I was sent for a watchman; when I came back, I found the prisoner in the tap-room; Mr. Oliver was talking with Mrs. Young at the bar; the watchman came, the prisoner did not say any thing that I heard; I picked up the pocket-book under the tap-room table, about a yard and a half from the prisoner.

Q. Did any abusive language pass? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Have you ever been sent into Newgate to the prisoner, by the prosecutor? - A. No.

Prisoner. Q. Did you never come into Newgate and tell me that Mr. Oliver sent you? - A. No, I said no such thing.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner in Newgate? - A. Yes; I went to see another person and met the prisoner; I told him Mr. Oliver was a very good kind of a man, and I did not think he would hurt him.

Prisoner. He made me write a note to Mr. Oliver, and he carried it? - A. No, I did not.

( John Green , the watchman, deposed that he took charge of the prisoner.)

Court. (To Oliver.) Q. I asked you, in your original examination what you were - what are you? - A. My profession, I before told you, I am the son of a country farmer, I lived till I was, perhaps, twelve or fifteen years under the care of my uncle, an alderman of Leicester; I was afterwards sent by the Drummond family to try if I could learn the cotton business at Stockport, but it did not agree with me; then I went to Edinburgh to study the profession of a surgeon, and I carried it on for some time, but I did not practice for the last four or five years.

Q. Have you drawn teeth within these four or five years? - A. That is a question I can hardly tell, for I believe I drew a stump a few days ago.

Q. Mrs. Young has said, that you are a dentist, are you or not? - A. I was once, but not for the last three years, unless a friends asks it of me.

Q. Why did you not tell the Gentlemen of the Jury so before? - A. I have no profession that I live by.

Q. Have you ever been at Warwick? - A. No, I do not know any thing of such a place.

Q. Have you ever seen me at Warwick? - A. I do not know.

Q. It is impossible that you should not know-upon your oath, were you never there? - A. I have been through it in the night.

Q. Upon your oath, were you never in the daytime in court at Warwick? - A. Never.

Court. There is my clerk, swear him.

Mr. JAMES WINSLOW sworn. -

Court. Q. You are my clerk? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the witness who stands there with a blue coat? - A. I see him.

Q. Have you ever seen him before? - A. I think I have seen him at Warwick, I recollected his face the moment I came into Court, and his speech.

Q. Do you recollect what year it was in? - A. I think about two years ago, for an assault upon two young gentlemen, I believe he is the man.

Oliver. How dare you say so, unless you can prove it; I say, it is a lie, and you are a villain for

saying so; two years ago I was at Bradlington, in Yorkshire.

Court. Q. Do you believe he is the man that you saw at Warwick? - A. I do believe he is the man, and I think it was by the name of Oliver.

Oliver. There was a man of the name of Oliver, who was hung, but I am not that man, he was a surgeon too, and it came to Liverpool in the calendar, I was at Liverpool at the same time.

Prisoner's defence. On the 9th of May, I met with the prosecutor, he came up to me, and asked me what it was o'clock, I told him it was past eleven; he asked me whether the play was over, or whether I had been to the play; I said, I had; I told him I belonged to the Sheer bulk, and I was going into the city; he said he was going that way too; he laid hold of my arm, and we walked together down Drury-lane, till we came to this passage, there he put his hand round me, and squeezed me very hard in the side; I then up't with my fist, and knocked him under the eye, he said, he did not think a young man. would use him so, but he was sorry for what he had done, he knew it was not right: we went on to the Magpie and Stump, and I called the watch close by the door; he then ran into the house, and said, he would get somebody to bail him; as soon as he had got in, he called for a pint of porter, I followed him close, and I called for a pint of porter, I would not drink with him, he winked at Mrs. Young, and sat for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I saw him go out into the tap-room, take something out of his pocket, and put it under the table; as soon as he had done that, Mrs. Young sent for the watchman, and he accused me of robbing him; I then said, I dare say, if they searched, they would find it about the table where I saw Mr. Oliver throw it.

Oliver. I say, that this man robbed me identically, used me cruelly beyond description, and said, he lived by that means, and I swear by the God of heaven and earth (and I am well known throughout the kingdom) that I never did an indelicate action in my life, by God he is the man that robbed me.

GUILTY. (Aged 29.)

Of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000528-129

468. BENJAMIN BROWN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Watkins , no person being therein, about the hour of seven, in the forenoon of the 14th of April , and stealing a canvass bag, value 1d, and two hundred and fifteen halfpence, the property of the said Samuel .

SAMUEL WATKINS sworn. - I live at John's-hill, Ratcliff-highway ; I am a newspaper-distributor ; I keep a small house, I go out very early in a morning upon my business: On the 14th of April, I went out, and fastened up the house, the fore-door and back-door were both fast, there was nobody in the house; the back-door I fastened with a bar and a screw, and the windows were shut down and screwed; I came home about half past eight, and found the bar of the back-door bent very much, and the door-post cut away to make room for the lock to open without unlocking it, and being overstrained, the heads of the nails of the hinge were wrenched off; I missed a bag containing two hundred and fifteen halfpence, three parts of them were current; the prisoner's father's yard comes into my yard, they are both as one; his father is a broker.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know whether your son-in-law had access by a key? - A. No; my daughter had a key.

Q. Had not the prisoner been employed by you to carry out papers? - A. No.

Q. Did you know that your daughter employed him now and then for that purpose? - A. No.

LUCY PORTER sworn. - On the morning of the 14th of April, about half past three, I went to my father's house, with my husband, to lay a watch, as we had been robbed before; we staid till almost six o'clock, inside my father's house; then I doublelocked the door, and came away; I saw the back-door with the bar up, and screwed; I made a mistake, and left a paper at home that I wanted, and I returned about a quarter past seven; I found the street-door locked as I left it, and as I unlocked the door, I saw the prisoner in the house; he fled towards the back-door, and got out side-ways, he stooped to get under the bar; it was quite light enough for me to see who it was; as I advanced towards the yard-door, I saw the bag lie at the threshold of the door, I did not see him drop it; the drawer was left quite open; I locked the door, and went to a neighbour; I told him what I had seen, and he went with me to the boy's father; I said, that is the boy, I knew him perfectly; I used to employ him in a morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. That was without your father's knowledge, I believe? - A. Yes; if I was in a hurry, he would go with a paper or two for me, and I used to give him a halfpenny.

Q. Was your husband entrusted with the key of your father's house? - A. My father does not so particularly give him the key.

Q. Did your father desire you not to deliver it to him? - A. No, he never did; I generally kept it from him.

Q. Did you, or not, intrust him with it? - A. Sometimes I might.

Q. With your father's knowledge? - A. My father never asked me about it.

Q. Would he not have been dissatisfied with your husband having the key? - A. No, I do not think he would.

Q. Where did you find the boy? - A. At his father's house.

Q. Is your husband here? - A. No.

Q. What age is the boy? - A. I believe fourteen, or turned.

WILLIAM HIGGINBOTTOM sworn. - I know the last witness, she came to my house on the 14th of April, I was headborough at that time; I went with her to the prisoner's father's, the boy was standing at the door; he went into a back room, I followed, and told him he must I go with me; he listed up his hands, and said, must I go, father; he said, yes, you rogue, to be sure you must; his father asked what he had done; I told him there was a complaint lodged, that he had got into Mr. Watkins's house; I then took him towards the watch-house; says I, you little rogue, which way did you get into the house; I did not make him any promises or threat; he said he shoved the lock back; Mrs. Porter gave me the bag of halfpence, (produces them); I counted them, there were two hundred and fifteen of them; I asked him to tell me where he got the bag; he looked hard at his father, and said, shall I father; his father said, yes, to be sure; and then he said he got it from the drawer. (Produces the iron bar bent).

Mr. Knowlys. Q. This boy's strength is not sufficient to bend that iron bar? - A. I cannot say.

Prisoner's defence. I don't know any thing about it; I never was in the place.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the father of the prisoner, he is eleven years of age: Mrs. Porter used to employ two or three of my boys, and always desired them to come in the back way, for fear her father should see them; Mr. Porter had the key of the place, and used often to come in through our house, and in at the backdoor.

Q. (To Watkins.) Had you any particular reason for disapproving of your son-in-law having the key? - A. I never disapproved of it; I did not know that he ever had occasion for it.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY. (Aged 11.)

Of stealing the property, but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-130

469. WILLIAM MARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , two loaves of sugar, value 13s. the property of William Jackson .

The prisoner, at the recommendation of his Counsel, pleaded GUILTY.

Judgment respited till next Sessions .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t18000528-131

470. LOUISA JACOBS , and JOHN JOYCE , were indicted, the first, for that she, on the 19th of April , two pieces of false and couterfeit milled money, each made to the likeness of a good shilling, and three pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, each made to the likeness of a good sixpence, not being cut in pieces, did put off to one John Coleman , at a lower rate and value than the same by their denomination imported to be counterfeited for, that is to say, for one shilling and sixpence, in monies numbered; and John Joyce , for that he, before the said felony, did counsel, aid, abet, and procure the said Louisa, the said felony to commit .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN DUMFEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a private in the East London Militia: On the 19th of April, I went with Mr. Wightman, a constable, to the house where the prisoners lived, in Cock-court, Snow-hill ; Wightman did not go in, I went in, and saw Jacobs; I asked her if she had got any silver to sell, and she said, yes; I asked her if she had any seven-shilling-pieces, or half-guineas; she said, she expected Mr. Joyce in in a few minutes with some; in about five minutes Mr. Joyce came in with another man; Jacobs told him I wanted twelve shillingsworth of silver, and seven-shilling-pieces; he asked me how many sevens I wanted; I told him three; I asked him the price of them; and he said half-a-crown-a-piece; I told him I could not purchase three at that time, but if he would wait five minutes, I would bring the remainder of the money to him; I went back to Coleman, and told him; I borrowed the money of him, and when I returned, Jacobs was there, but Joyce was gone; I then introduced Coleman; I told her he was a friend of mine, that he could pass a great deal of bad money; and he bought two shillings flax; he gave her one shilling and sixpence for them: after that I left the house, that was between six and seven o'clock, and at half past eleven Coleman took them into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When Joyce was apprehended, there was a great deal of bad money found upon him? - A. No, it was all good.

Q. Who was present during this transaction? - A. Nobody but me.

Q. Then the whole rests upon you - what are you? - A. A soldier.

Q. Have you ever been a smasher before? - A. No, I can take my sacrament oath I never was.

Q. You being a soldier, you thought it was your duty to protect the public, and therefore you went to buy this bad money? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you no acquaintance with the woman before you saw Coleman? - A. I had not; Mr. Coleman gave me the money to buy it; Tony, a soldier in the same regiment, directed me to the prisoners.

Q. How often has he been prosecuted for smashing? - A. I don't know.

Q. What do you expect for coming here to-day? - A. I do not expect any thing.

Q. Let that be taken down? - A. I don't know whether I shall have any thing or not.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You have been attending here ever since the first day of the Sessions, and expect to have your expences paid? - A. Yes, I hope so.(John Coleman, and John Wightman, confirmed the evidence of the last witness).(Mr. William Parker proved the money to be counterfeit, not having been in circulation).

Jacobs's defence. I know nothing of it any more than being a lodger in the house, and paying one shilling and sixpence a week for the lodging.

Jacobs, GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Joyce, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-132

471. RICHARD MEARS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , nine ounces of jalap, value 2s. the property of Thomas Kibble .

There being no evidence to shew the property to be in any person, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-133

472. RICHARD SMITH was indicted for breaking and entering, on the 11th of April , a certain warehouse belonging to Thomas Bolt , with intent the goods and chattels therein being feloniously to steal .

JOHN WALKER sworn. - I am warehouseman to Mr. Bolt; the warehouses are on Dice-quay : On Good-Friday, I had some suspicion of the prisoner, I watched in the warehouse and saw the prisoner and two more; I and another man had each of us a brace and half of pistols; and in about a quarter of an hour I heard a picklock-key put into the door, and they came in; I was on a floor ten feet and a half over their heads; I opened the door over their heads, put the muzzle of the pistol against the door, and told them, the first man that went out I would blow his brains out; I could have shot them both if I had been disposed; I then called out to two custom-house watchmen, and the prisoner at the bar jumped out and ran up the gateway; I shot at his legs; the other ran out, and the man that was with me fired his pistol, and the flash was so near me that it obscured my sight, and they both escaped; we have not been able to take the other man; we took the prisoner the next morning upon Galley-quay; I am sure he is the man; I saw his face several times; he had on the same dress that he has now; I found two bags in the warehouse.

Thomas Collins corroborated the evidence of the last witness.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I am an officer:(Produces the bags.)

Walker. I believe these to be the same bags.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-134

473. ANN HARRIS was indicted for uttering a counterfeit sixpence, on the 17th of May , to Grace, the wife of Thomas Hall , and afterwards, on the 19th of May . uttering another counterfeit sixpence to the said Grace, knowing it to be counterfeit .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

GRACE HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the wife of Thomas Hall , who keeps the Green Dragon in Bishopsgate-street : On Saturday the 17th of May, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner came in for a pennyworth of gin; I served her and she put down sixpence, and I gave her change; I put the sixpence in my mouth, and she went away; I was reckoning up a score, and when I had done that I discovered it to be a bad one; on the Monday following she came to my house again for a pennyworth of gin; I served her, and she gave me another sixpence; my blood turned at seeing her again; says I, you wicked bussey, I will charge an officer with you, and punish you; me, says she, and ran away directly; I kept the sixpence in my hand till I delivered it to Sapwell; my servant and I ran after her; she got in between some carts, a good way up Houndsditch, before she was stopped; I never lost fight of her.

Jane Liddykin corroborated the evidence of Mrs. Hall, and deposed that she saw the prisoner drop a shilling between the carts, which she picked up and delivered to Sapwell.

Thomas Sapwell , the constable, produced the money, which Mr. Parker proved to be counterfeit.

Prisoner's defence. I never was in the house before that Monday; I had a pain in my belly, which I am subject to, and I went in to get a pennyworth of gin; I did not know it was a bad sixpence.

GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and find sureties for two years more .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-135

474. ELIZABETH CLARK was indicted for uttering a counterfeit sixpence, on the 9th of May , to Robecca Newty , knowing it to be counterfeit; and also for having in her possession at the same time another counterfeit sixpence .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

REBECCA NEWTY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Mr. Kershaw, my brother-in-law, keeps the King's-arms, in Newgate-street : On Friday, the 9th of May, about eight o'clock in the

morning, the prisoner came to the bar for half-a-quartern of gin; I served her, and she gave me a sixpence; I thought it was a bad one, and sent out for change, and the servant brought word it was bad; she said she could not pay for her liquor, she had taken it in Whitechapel-market for a good one; I sent for a constable, and she ran out, and the servant ran after her and stopped her; the prisoner struck her in the mouth, and made it bleed; the constable brought her back, I saw her searched; the constable found upon her one shilling, and three or four bad sixpences.

( Hannah Hawkins corroborated the evidence of Mrs. Nouty.)

JAMES WOODMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner, I searched her, and found three sixpences and one shilling upon her, and I received a sixpence from Mrs. Newty. (Produces them.)

Mr. Parker proved them to be counterfeit.

Prisoner's defence. I did not know that they were bad, I picked them up in a piece of paper, in Fleet-market; I never was in jail in my life before.

GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and find sureties for two years more .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-136

475. JOHN BURLEY, alias BURLAS , was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences , the 15th of April .

JOHN NORRIS sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Jacob Wood , John Wood , Benjamin Wood , and Thomas Wilson , linen-draper s, in St. Paul's church-yard : On the 15th of April, the prisoner at the bar came into the warehouse, he said to me, have you any pink Bengal? I told him, yes; he went with me to that part of the warehouse, where we keep them; I took down two pieces which we had by us, he turned them over to look at, to see the quality of the work; the prisoner at the bar then said, they will do for us; I then took the two pieces to the farther end of the desk to have them entered; I asked the prisoner whether they were bought, or on approbation; he said, they were bought; I asked him who they were for, he said, for Newbury and Roberts; I then called a person down to enter them to Newbury and Roberts, in his presence; when they were entered, and the bill made out, I asked him his name; he said his name was John Williams , and I tied the two pieces up in two sheets of brown paper, they were two pieces of pink Bengal calico, forty-two yards, they were entered at three shillings a yard, that is six pounds six shillings; when I had tied them up, I delivered them to the prisoner, he stopped a little bit before he went out of the warehouse, after they were tied up; Mr. Roberts, the person that he said they were for, came in; as Mr. Roberts advanced to me, the prisoner walked out with the two pieces of print under his arm; I asked Mr. Roberts if the young man that was gone out belonged to him, he said, no; I ran out into the church-yard, and desired him to come back; he returned to the warehouse, with the two pieces of printed calico under his arm; I told Mr. Roberts, in the prisoner's presence, that he had come for this calico in the name of Newbury and Roberts; I then put the door too, and locked it, I put the key in my pocket, went up stairs, and told Mr. Wilson what had happened; I do not know Mr. Newbury's christian name, Mr. Roberts' name is Thomas, they were customers of ours, they were in the habit of sending for goods.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - I have no partner, the firm of the house is Newbury and Roberts, but the business is carried on by Thomas Roberts only, the business formerly belonged to Robert Newbury : On Tuesday afternoon, the 15th of April last, between the hours of four and five, I had occasion to go to Friday-street; when I came to the corner of St. Paul's church-yard, it rained very hard, then I ran as far as Messrs. Wood's in St. Paul's church-yard for shelter; when I came there, I saw no one but Norris, the porter, and the prisoner at the bar; I said to Norris, if you will give me leave, I will wait here till the shower is over, he was then tying up the parcel for this young man; the prisoner then came out of the warehouse with the parcel under his arm; Norris then asked me if he was one of my young men, I said he was not; I immediately went out of the warehouse and called him back; when he came back, Norris said, he has just taken up two pieces of pink Bengal in your name, the prisoner was present then; I then asked the prisoner by what authority he took up these prints in my name; he then said, Thomas and Trye's young man desired him to call for them, and leave them at my house to the best of my knowledge; Thomas and Trye was the name; he then burst into tears, and said, he hoped I would forgive him, and if I would go with him, his friends would pay the money; I asked him where his friends lived, he said, in Bishopsgate-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He said some other person desired him to call for them? - A. Yes, I think it was Thomas and Trye's young man, but I am not certain of the name.

THOMAS WILSON sworn. - I know nothing of the transaction; I apprehend my attendance here is merely for the purpose of identifying the property.

Q. (To Roberts.) Did you give this young man any authority to get these goods from Mr. Wilson?

- A. No, I never saw him before to my knowledge. (The constable produced the property.)

Mr. Wilson. Mr. Roberts was a customer of ours, the firm is Newbury and Roberts, their names are over the door, I believe.

Q. Was there ever a Mr. Newbury in that house? - A. I have every reason to believe there was formerly, I had not the pleasure of knowing him.

Mr. Knapp. Q. He is out of business now? - A. I believe he is.

Norris. These are the pieces I delivered to the prisoner, I received them from the prisoner, and delivered them to Mr. Wilson, who delivered them to the constable.

Mr. Wilson. I believe I delivered them to the constable, I put my mark upon them, immediately upon my coming down from dinner, after the prisoner was brought back.

Mr. Knapp addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant, and called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000528-137

476. CHARLES WILTS was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences , on the 6th of February .

ROBERT GORDON sworn. - I am warehouseman to John and James Stirling , of Bread-street , calico printers : On the 6th of February last, the prisoner came to our warehouse, and said, he wanted to look at a few prints; I asked him who they were for, and he said, for Waithman and Bristow; he looked out four pieces, and said, he would take them with him, as they wanted them immediately; I entered the goods and gave him a bill of them in their names; I asked his name, and he told me it was George Wilkinson ; I let him have the goods, and after he was gone, I missed a fifth piece, which was one piece more than he was to have, there were ninety yards; I then sent to Waithman and Bristow, saying, that their young man had taken a-piece by mistake; I saw no more of him till I was sent for before the Lord-Mayor, a considerable time afterwards, he was taken up for another offence; I knew him again immediately; Messrs. Waithman and Bristow were customers of ours, I am perfectly sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not charged another man with this offence, besides me? - A. No, I have not, nor have I any doubt of his person.

Prisoner. Q. He said, before the Lord-Mayor, that I wrote my name George Wilkinson , in the book? - A. No, I did not.

WILLIAM WAITHMAN sworn. - I know nothing of the prisoner, I never gave him order to go to Messrs. Stirling's for any goods; we do give them orders.

CHARLES BRISTOW sworn. - I never gave any orders to the prisoner to get this linen from Messrs. Stirling's, on our account, I never saw him before.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: s18000528-1

The SESSIONS being ended, the COURT proceeded to GIVE JUDGMENT as follows:

Received sentence of Death - 14.

John Knight ,

John Williams ,

John Newman ,

Richard Blakesley ,

William Mead ,

William Strick ,

Richard Pagett , alias Pritchett,

Charles Moren ,

Thomas Stevens ,

Richard Franklin ,

William Hearne ,

John Davis , alias Silk,

Isaac Douse ,

Edward Jones , alias Dight.

Transported for fourteen years - 1. William Field .

Transported for seven years - 33.

Thomas Smith ,

Mary Smith ,

Thomas Barton ,

Catherine Davis ,

Jane Quinney , alias Morgan,

James Smith ,

Mary Thompson ,

William Jones ,

John Eager ,

John Bradley ,

John Ware ,

Joseph Newman ,

Lewis Christiana ,

John Burlas ,

Charles Wilts ,

Francis-Steele Bond ,

Ann Clements ,

Abraham Bone ,

Thomas Riley ,

Honoria Hatton ,

Joseph Davis ,

James Shield ,

Elizabeth Cane ,

William Jones ,

William Dickinson ,

Joseph Sharp ,

John Davis ,

William Beard ,

George Phillips ,

James Faro ,

Edward Armfield ,

John Miller ,

Andrew Copeland .

Confined two years in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped. - 1. James Martin .

Confined two years in the House of Correction, and privately whipped. - 1. Ann Baker .

Confined two years in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 3.

John Halsey , Henry Williams , Christiana Dandy .

Confined one year in Newgate, and publicly whipped. - 1. William Stone .

Confined one years in Newgate, and privately whipped. - 2. Mary Evans , Edward Riley .

Confined one year in Newgate, and find sureties for two years more. - 2.

Ann Harris , Elizabeth Clarke .

Confined one year in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 2. Louisa Jacobs , Richard Smith .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and whipped in the jail. - 1. Elizabeth Mitchell .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 6.

Sarah Marchant , alias Hart, John, alias Henry Crusor , Ann Myrtle , Phoebe Smith ,

James White , James Mackenzie .

Confined six month in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped. - 3.

George Chapman , John Foster , William Burgess .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped at Shadwell. - 1. Lawrence Smith .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 15.

William Johnson , alias Yarmouth,

William Powell ,

Thomas Raynes ,

Mary M'Gregor ,

Sarah Holmes ,

Edward Warren ,

John Haley ,

Sarah Gordon ,

Ann Hart ,

Elizabeth Kelso ,

Isaac White ,

Robert Robinson ,

John Price ,

James O'Donnell ,

Peter Stokes .

Confined three months in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 1. Lucy Ahier .

Confined one month in Newgate, and publicly whipped. - 1. John Godson .

Confined one month in Newgate, and delivered to his serjeant. - 1. Thomas Ridley .

Confined one month in Newgate, and publicly whipped in Crutched-friars. - 1. Thomas Rainsley .

Confined one week in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 4.

Jane Martin , Elizabeth Atherton , Thomas Yeule , Thomas Jefferson .

Publicly whipped at London-wall. - 1. William Jenkins .

Fined 1s. and delivered to his serjeant. - 1. Matthew Harris .

Fined 1s. and discharged. - 1. Sarah Maunder .

Publicly whipped and discharged. - 3. Cornelius Mahoney , John Rowe , James Conolly .

Privately whipped, and discharged. - 4.

Benjamin Brown , Susannah Bowen , otherwise Hickes, John Harman , William Simmons .

Judgment respited. - 2. James Benson , William Marke .


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